Course Catalog - University of La Verne

Course Catalog - University of La Verne
2014 – 2015
Central Campus: 1950 3rd Street, La Verne, California 91750
Telephone: (909) 593-3511
Fax: (909) 392-2703 (Registrar)
Home Page: laverne.edu
Telephone, email, and office directory: laverne.edu/phonebook/
Locations, contacts, and maps: laverne.edu/locations/
2014-15 Catalog – Provisions Subject to Change
The information provided in the catalog reflects current policies, procedures and fees in place at the time of
publication. However, the University reserves the right to make necessary changes in policies, requirements,
tuition, fees and calendars contained herein at any time without prior notification.
2014-15 Catalog Effective Dates – August 25, 2014 through August 30, 2015
University of La Verne catalogs become effective on the first day of the Academic Year (Fall Semester /Term)
and remain in effect until the first day of the following academic year (Fall Semester/Term).
2014-15 Catalog – Student Responsibility
It is the responsibility of the student to be familiar with the information presented in this catalog and to know
and observe all policies and procedures related to the academic program he/she is pursuing. Requirements
and regulations will not be waived, nor exceptions granted because a student pleads ignorance of policies and
procedures. While academic advisors will assist students in every way possible, the responsibility for following
all policies and meeting all requirements and deadlines rests with the student. Students are expected to satisfy
the requirements of the catalog in effect at the time they are admitted to, and begin coursework in, a degree
program. However, a student may elect to graduate under the catalog in effect at the time of his or her
graduation provided the student complies with ALL requirements of that catalog. New catalogs take effect on
the first day of the Academic Year (Fall Semester/Term) it was published. The official Course Catalog is
online at MyLaVerne and is updated continuously.
University of La Verne • 2014-2015
photo by Tom Zasadzinski
A Message from President Devorah Lieberman
Welcome to the University of La Verne. I am delighted that you
are reviewing our catalog. This publication contains essential
information about our university and its outstanding academic
offerings, as well as countless rewarding activities and
opportunities outside of the classroom. It is important that every
student at La Verne receives a well-rounded La Verne
Experience.
Since its founding in 1891, La Verne has provided a responsive,
values-based education to every student. You are valued member
of our university community, whether you are a recent high
school graduate, a transfer student, someone seeking an
advanced or graduate degree, or an adult learner. Every faculty
and staff member is committed to providing outstanding academic instruction, and aiding with
scholastic and personal growth.
At the University of La Verne, we promote achievement and engagement. Just as learning is
accomplished by asking questions and seeking solutions, genuine understanding comes through
interaction, experience, and reflection. La Verne graduates take with them the La Verne
Advantage; the ability to reason, the confidence to succeed, and the aspiration to lead.
There are more than 50,000 successful La Verne alumni across the country and around the
world, each instilled with a sense of responsibility and a desire to contribute to the advancement
of their chosen profession and of society.
I invite you to learn more about La Verne by exploring our web site, www.laverne.edu, and by
personally visiting our campus. If you have any other questions, please contact us at 909-5933511. Once you learn about the University of La Verne and experience all it has to offer, I am
confident you will want to become part of this growing and vibrant learning community.
Devorah Lieberman, Ph.D.
President
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 1
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Academic Calendars.............................................................................................3
The University of La Verne - General Information ................................................6
Student Services and Athletics............................................................................10
Admissions Information.....................................................................................14
Financial Information ........................................................................................25
Academic Information .......................................................................................40
Rights and Responsibilities ................................................................................54
Graduation Requirements ..................................................................................65
Programs - Complete List of Undergraduate and Graduate Programs ................72
College of Arts and Sciences..........................................................................74
College of Business and Public Management ..............................................111
College of Education and Organizational Leadership ..................................129
College of Law ............................................................................................145
Board of Trustees, Administration, and Faculty................................................151
Catalog Information Online .............................................................................152
Index ...............................................................................................................153
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 2
ACADEMIC CALENDARS 2014-2015
(for detailed calendar information see laverne.edu/registrar)
Central Campus Semester Calendar *(16 weeks)
Fall Semester 2014: August 25 - December 14, 2014
August 25, Monday
Classes begin at 7:00 a.m.
December 14, Sunday
Fall Semester ends
September 1, Monday
Labor Day – academic holiday
November 27-30, Thursday-Friday
Thanksgiving Recess - academic holiday
January Interterm 2015: January 5-30, 2015
January 5, Monday
Classes begin at 7:00 a.m.
January 31, Saturday
Winter Commencement
January 19, Monday
Martin Luther King, Jr. - academic holiday
January 30, Friday
January Interterm ends
Spring Semester 2015: February 2-May 31, 2015
February 2, Monday
Classes begin at 7:00 a.m.
April 3, Friday
Good Friday - academic holiday
February 16, Monday
President’s Day - academic holiday
March 16-22, Monday-Sunday
Spring Break - academic holiday
May 25, Monday
Memorial Day - academic holiday
May 30, Saturday
Spring Commencement
May 31, Sunday
Spring Semester ends
Summer Terms 2015: June 8 - August 16
July 3-4, Friday - Saturday
Independence Day - academic holiday
*This calendar is also used at the Ecumenical Center for Black Church Studies.
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 3
CAPA SEMESTER Calendar
Fall 2014: August 25-December 14, 2014
Cycle I
Cycle II
August 29-30
October 24-25
September 5-6, 19-20
November 7-8, 21-22
October 3-4, 17-18
December 5-6, 12-13
Accelerated Evening
September 29 - December 14, 2014
Accelerated Sunday
October 26
November 2, 9, 16, 23
December 7, 14
Online
August 25 – November 2, 2014
Spring 2015: February 2- May 31, 2015
Cycle I
Cycle II
February 6-7, 13-14, 27-28
March 27-28
March 13-14, 20-21
April 10-11, 24-25
May 8-9, 15-16
Accelerated Evening
March 23 - May 31, 2015
Accelerated Sunday
March 29
April 12, 19, 26
May 3, 10, 17
Online
March 23 - May 31, 2015
Summer 2015: June 8 – August 16, 2015
Cycle I
Accelerated Sunday
June 12-13, 26-27,
June 14, 21, 28
July 10-11, 24-25
July 12,19, 26
August 7-8
August 2
Online
June 8 - August 16, 2015
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 4
Accelerated Evening
June 8 -August 16
COLLEGE OF LAW*
LAW SEMESTERS calendar
August 18 – December 14, 2014
August 11 – August 17
August 18
September 1
November 27-30
December 1-12
January 5 – May 10
January 5
January 19
February 16
March 2-8
April 3
April 27-May 8
June 1 – July 26
Classes begin
July 3
July 23-24
Fall Semester 2014
Orientation for Fall 2014 Entrants
Classes begin
Labor Day – holiday
Thanksgiving Recess – holiday
Exam Period
Spring Semester 2015
Classes begin
Martin Luther King, Jr. Day – holiday
Presidents Day – holiday
Spring Break
Good Friday – holiday
Exam Period
Summer Term 2014
June 1
Independence Day (observed) – holiday
Exam Period
*This calendar is also used at the American Baptist Theological Center.
TERMS CALENDAR (10 weeks)
Central Campus Programs:
D. P. A., Doctor of Public Administration
M.B.A., Master of Business Administration
M.Ed., Reading
M.H.A., Master of Health Administration
Central Coast Campus
High Desert /Victorville Campus
Off-campus Education Master’s degrees
Off-campus Education credentials
Off-campus Teacher Education
Inland Empire Campus
Kern County Campus
La Verne Online
Orange County Campus
Point Mugu Campus
San Fernando Valley Campus
Vandenberg Campus
Ventura County Campus
August 25 - November 2, 2014
November 3 - December 14, 2014
November 24-30, 2014
January 5 - March 15, 2015
March 16-22, 2015
March 23 - May 31, 2015
June 8 - August 16, 2015
July 3 - 4
M.P.A., Master of Public Administration
M. S., Accounting
M.S., Gerontology
M.S., Leadership and Management
Fall Term 2014
Mini Fall Term 2014 (6 weeks)
Thanksgiving - holiday
Winter Term 2015
Spring Break - academic holiday
Spring Term 2015
Summer Term 2015
Independence Day - holiday
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 5
UNIVERSITY OF LA VERNE
History
The University of La Verne was founded in 1891 as
Lordsburg College by members of the Church of the
Brethren who had moved west. Both the College and
the agricultural community were renamed La Verne
in 1917, and the 1920’s and 1930’s found three-quarters of the student body in teacher education. The
next three decades saw campus facilities multiply
fourfold, the Board of Trustees become independent
of church control, and the student body increase and
become more cosmopolitan without the College losing its commitment to service and to sound, valuesoriented education. In the 1960’s the college awarded its first master’s degree, and in 1979, it conferred
its first doctorate.
In 1969 La Verne, began offering degree programs
off campus, and the following year it opened its
College of Law. Reflecting these profound changes,
the College reorganized in 1977 as the University of
La Verne. The University founded its Orange County
campus in 1981 and its San Fernando Valley campus
in 1983. A decade later it created campuses in
Ventura and San Bernardino/Riverside Counties, and
in 2000 established a separate campus for the
College of Law in Ontario, California. Continuing the
trend of improving services to students, La Verne
developed the Central Coast, Kern County, High
Desert campuses. More information on La Verne’s
regional
campuses
may
be
found
at
http://laverne.edu/location/regional-campus-locations/.
The University of La Verne is a Hispanic Serving
Institution (HSI).
Academic Organization
The University of La Verne is a Carnegie
Doctoral/Research University in Southern California
enrolling over 8,000 students in four colleges: the
College of Arts and Sciences, the College of
Business and Public Management, the College of
Education and Organizational Leadership, and the
College of Law. The University has nine regional
campuses in central and southern California admin-
istered through the office of Regional and Online
Campuses.
College of Arts & Sciences
Felicia Beardsley, Interim Dean
Kathleen Weaver, Assistant Dean
The college continues the traditions, programs, and
general education of the historical liberal arts college founded in 1891.
Full description:
laverne.edu/academics/arts-sciences/
College of Business & Public Management
Abe Helou, Dean
Rita Thakur, Associate Dean
Keeok Park, Associate Dean
The college provides a demanding, relevant, and
practically oriented curriculum to meet the diverse
and changing needs of business, government, and
the non-profit sector.
Full description:
laverne.edu/academics/business-management/
College of Education & Organizational
Leadership
Barbara Poling, Interim Dean
The college prepares professional educators with
credential and graduate programs in Reading,
Special Education, Educational Counseling, and
Teacher Credentials and offers graduate programs in
Child Life, Child Development, Educational
Management, and School Psychology. The Ed.D. in
Organizational Leadership is one of the most
respected programs of its kind in the nation.
Full description:
laverne.edu/academics/education/
College of Law
Gilbert Holmes, Dean
Randall Rubin, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
Susan Exon, Associate Dean for Faculty Development
August Farnsworth, Assistant Dean for Students and
Professional Development
The college offers systematic and thorough instruction in the law to prepare students to enter the legal
profession.
Full description: law.laverne.edu/
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 6
Regional and Online Campuses (ROC)
Stephen Lesniak, Dean
Carrie Lewis Hasse, Assistant Dean, Advising and
Retention Services
Pamela Bergovoy, Assistant Dean and Director of
Centers for Educators
Regional Campuses provide an opportunity for people to take La Verne programs at geographic locations convenient to their homes or work places as
well as through the internet. The Regional Campuses
are listed below; the degrees offered through them,
on page 8. Degree requirements are the same at the
central campus and all other locations.
Full description:
laverne.edu/locations
Telephone: (909) 448-4949
Regional Campuses:
Central Coast Campus
4119 Broad Street, Suite 200
San Luis Obispo, CA 93401
Tel.: (805) 788-6200
High Desert Campus-Victorville
15447 Anacapa Road, Suite 100
Victorville, CA 92392
Tel.: (760) 955-6440
Inland Empire Campus
3237 Guasti Road, Suite 300
Ontario, CA 91761
Tel.: (909) 937-6985
Kern County Campus
1201 24th Street, Suite D-200
Bakersfield, CA 93301
Tel.: (661) 861-6800
Orange County Campus
2855 Michelle Drive, Suite 250
Irvine, CA 92606
Tel.: (714) 505-6936
San Fernando Valley Campus
4001 W. Alameda, Suite 300
Burbank, California 91505
Tel.: (818) 295-6500
Vandenberg AFB Campus
P.O. Box 5578
Vandenberg AFB, CA 93437
Tel.: (805) 734-6200
Ventura County Campus
500 E. Esplanade, Suite 1000
Oxnard, CA 93036
Tel.: (805) 981-6020
Other ROC Programs:
Campus Accelerated Program for Adults (CAPA),
a La Verne campus program designed for working
adult students, offers classes in the evenings and on
weekends.
(909) 448-4151.
La Verne Online- This program offers courses online
leading to selected La Verne degrees. (800) 6954858 ext. 4961
Centers for Educators- A statewide program that
offers courses leading to graduate degrees and credentials in education at selected locations throughout
California.
ROC Continuing Education
Extended Learning- Non-degree and non-credit
continuing education opportunities offered to individuals interested in expanding their horizons.
http://laverne.edu/extendedlearning/
Professional Development Courses- Graduate
level, non-degree credit courses offered to educators
for salary advancement or re-certification.
http://www.pdccourses.net
Point Mugu Campus
Naval Base Ventura County
162 N. Mugu Road
Point Mugu, CA 93042
Tel.: (805) 986-6900
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 7
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Accreditation
The University of La Verne is accredited by the
Accrediting Commission for Senior Colleges and
Universities of the Western Association of Schools
and Colleges.* The College of Education and
Organizational Leadership is accredited by the
National Council on Accreditation of Teacher
Education (NCATE) and is approved by the California
Commission on Teacher Credentialing for offering
credentials in several areas. The College of Law is
accredited by the State Bar of California and provisionally approved by the American Bar Association.
The Doctor of Psychology Program is accredited by
the American Psychological Association. The Master
of Public Administration degree is accredited by the
National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and
*985 Atlantic Ave., Suite 100, Alameda, CA 94501 • (510) 748-9001
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Business Administration
Child Development
Criminology
Health Administration
Liberal Studies
Organizational Management
Psychology
Public Administration
For Experienced Professionals
Educational Leadership
Special Emphasis
Health Administration
Child Development
Leadership and Management
Educational Counseling
Special Education
Educational Specialist – Mild/Mod.
Multiple and Single Subject
Pupil Personnel Services Credential
Preliminary Administrative Services
High Desert
Major/Program
La Verne Online
B.A.
B. S.
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B. S.
B.A.
B. S.
B.S.
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M.B.A.
M.ED.
M.ED
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M.S.
M.S.
M.S.
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Degree
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DEGREE/CREDENTIAL PROGRAMS OFFERED AT REGIONAL AND ONLINE CAMPUSES
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Administration (NASPAA). The Athletic Training
Education Program is accredited by the Commission
on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education
(CAATE). The Legal Studies Program is approved by
the American Bar Association.
Student Consumer Complaint Process
A student who has a complaint concerning academic
program quality and/or accrediting standards (including complaints that the University has violated state
consumer protection laws) is invited to contact the
Office of the Provost at 909-448-4748 or
[email protected] The University encourages
students to work through internal University processes for resolution of complaints. If after doing so a stu-
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 8
dent believes that his or her complaint warrants further attention, he or she may contact the Western
Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC) at
http://www.wascsenior.org/comments. WASC is the
academic accrediting body of the University of La
Verne. If the student believes the complaint warrants
still further consideration after review by WASC, a
complaint can be submitted to the Attorney General
of the State of California (Attorney General at
http://oag.ca.gov or 916-322-3360 or 800-952-5225).
Prospective students may contact WASC or the
Attorney General with complaints as well.
Memberships
The University of La Verne maintains memberships
in many organizations. Among them are the
American Association of Colleges and Universities,
the American Council on Education, the Association
to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business, the
Association of Independent California Colleges and
Universities, the College Board, the Hispanic
Association of Colleges and Universities, the
National Association of Independent Colleges and
Universities, the National Association of Schools of
Public Affairs and Administration, the National
Collegiate Athletic Association, the National
Collegiate Honors Council, and the Council of
Colleges of Arts and Sciences.
Nondiscrimination Policy
The University of La Verne is a coeducational university organized as a nonprofit corporation under the
laws of the State of California. Its purpose is to provide education and training to prepare its students to
meet the responsibilities and duties of life effectively.
The University of La Verne is committed to a policy of
equal opportunity for all persons and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, ethnic origin, ancestry, citizenship, sex
(including pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical
conditions), sexual orientation, gender (including
gender identity and expression), marital status, age,
physical or mental disability, medical condition,
genetic characteristics, military and veteran status, or
any other characteristic or status protected by applicable law as to the enrollment of any student, or its
educational programs and activities, and in the
employment of any member of the faculty or staff, or
to the election of any officer or trustee of the
University.
Inquiries concerning the University’s equal opportunity policies, compliance with applicable laws, statutes
and regulations (such as Title VI of the 1964 Civil
Rights Act, Title IX of the Educational Amendments of
1972 and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of
1973), and complaint procedures may be directed to
the Dean of Student Affairs, Loretta H. Rahmani,
Ed.D, Abraham Campus Center 137, 1950 Third
Street, La Verne, CA 91750, (909) 448-4053, [email protected] To the extent such inquiries and
complaints pertain to employment-related matters,
they should be directed to the Chief Human
Resources Officer, Jody L. Bomba, 1950 Third
Street, La Verne, CA 91750, (909) 593-3511, ext
4075, [email protected] The Dean of
Student Affairs is designated as HMC’s Section 504
and Title IX Coordinator. The Chief Human
Resources Officer is the University’s Equal
Employment Opportunity Officer and Deputy Section
504 and Deputy Title IX Coordinator with respect to
employment matters.
MISSION STATEMENT
University Mission
The University of La Verne offers a distinctive and
relevant educational experience to a diverse population of traditional-age, adult, and graduate learners
preparing them for successful careers and a commitment to a life-long learning across the liberal arts and
professional programs.
Core Values of the University of
La Verne
Ethical Reasoning
The University affirms a value system that actively
supports peace with justice, respect of individuals,
and humanity and the health of the planet and its
people. Students are reflective about personal, professional, and societal values that support professional and social responsibility.
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 9
Diversity and Inclusivity
The University supports a diverse and inclusive
environment where students recognize and benefit
from the life experiences and viewpoints of other
students, faculty and staff.
STUDENT
SERVICES
The University promotes intellectual curiosity and the
importance of lifelong learning. It teaches students
how to learn, to think critically, to be capable of original research, and to access and integrate information to prepare them for continued personal and professional growth.
Note: Full descriptions of all services and activities are provided at the website indicated.
Lifelong Learning
Community and Civic Engagement
The University asserts a commitment to improving
and enhancing local, regional and global communities.
Division of Student Affairs
Loretta Rahmani, Ed.D. Dean of Student Affairs and
Title IX Coordinator
Ruby Montaño-Cordova, Associate Dean of Student
Affairs
Juan Regalado, Associate Dean of Student Affairs
Mindy Baggish, J.D., Assistant Dean of Student
Career Support and Employer Relations
http://sites.laverne.edu/student-affairs/
Associated Students of the University of La
Verne (ASULV)
ASULV is the governing body representing and advocating for the traditional-age undergraduate student
body on the main campus.
http://sites.laverne.edu/student-life/asulv/
Campus Activities Board (CAB)
CAB, the Campus Activities Board coordinates a
variety of social activities throughout the academic
year. Activities include concerts, intramural events,
movie nights, multicultural events, and other major
social events on campus for both residential and
commuter students.
http://sites.laverne.edu/student-life/campus-activities-board/
Career Services & Employer Relations
Career counseling, resume/cover letter review,
job/internship search assistance, mock interviews,
workshops, and career/major exploration assessments are available in the Career Services Center for
all La Verne Campus and Regional Campus students. The office is located in the Abraham Campus
Center.
http://sites.laverne.edu/careers/
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 10
Clubs and Organizations
The Office of Student Life recognizes a range of academic, religious, cultural, and special interest clubs
and organizations that are active at the La Verne
Campus.
http://sites.laverne.edu/student-life/clubs/
Commencement Services
The Office of Commencement Services provides
information on the Winter and Spring ceremonies.
http://sites.laverne.edu/commencement/
Counseling and Psychological Center Services
(CAPS)
Counseling and psychological services are available
from September through May for free to all Central
Campus, full-time undergraduates and for a nominal
fee to graduate, CAPA, Regional Campus students
and College of Law students.
http://sites.laverne.edu/caps/
Dining Services
Davenport Dining Hall is located on the La Verne
Campus for residence students and all faculty, staff,
and commuter students. Barbara’s Place is located in
the Abraham Campus Center.
http://laverne.cafebonappetit.com/
Disabled Students Services
Services for students with learning, physical and/or
psychological disabilities are coordinated by the
Director of Disabled Student Services
http://laverne.edu/students-with-disabilities/
Emergency Student Loans
Emergency Student Loans are available to eligible
students in the Financial Aid Office.
http://laverne.edu/financial-aid/
First Generation Student Success Program
(FGSSP)
The First Generation Student Success Program
(FGSSP) provides educational opportunities for first
generation college students to learn, connect and
engage successfully in a university setting. Through
the FGSSP, students receive substantial support
through mentorship, parental involvement and selfreflective processes, as well as academic, personal
and professional development programs and workshops.
http://sites.laverne.edu/multicultural/first-generationprogram/
Greek Life
The University has national and local fraternities and
sororities. Although distinct and unique organizations, the fraternities and sororities are centered
around the core principles of sisterhood and brotherhood, leadership, philanthropy and community service, scholarship, and social activities and events.
http://sites.laverne.edu/student-life/greek-life/
Health Services
The Student Health Center provides medical services and consultation for eligible students. Prior to
entrance, a Physical Examination Form and
Immunization Record is required. These forms can
be found on the following website:
http://sites.laverne.edu/health-services/
International Student Services (OISS)
The OISS supports international students by providing semester and term orientations, immigration
advising, OPT workshops and social-cultural activities.
http://sites.laverne.edu/office-of-international-student-services/
Leadership Education and Development (LEAD)
The LEAD program offers support, theory, and practical skills training through workshops and retreats
aimed at traditional-age students interested in leadership.
http://sites.laverne.edu/students/leadership-opportunities/
New Student Orientation and Parent Orientation
Orientation includes a variety of programs geared to
help students and their families make a successful
transition to college life at La Verne and it generally
takes place the weekend before classes begin.
http://sites.laverne.edu/student-life/orientation/
Office of Multicultural Services (OMS)
OMS creates opportunities for learning, exploring,
deconstructing and celebrating diversity and inclusion
as it impacts students and the global community. The
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 11
OMS supports the First Generation Student Success
Program, cultural graduation celebrations, cultural
clubs and organizations, student diversity related training and initiatives, and a host of other diversity initiatives on campus.
http://sites.laverne.edu/students/multicultural/
Student Housing and Residential Education
On-campus housing is available for all students at
the main campus (undergraduate, graduate, CAPA)
in four residence halls. The Mission of the Student
Housing and Residential Education (SHARE) Office
is to support, enhance, and empower all students living in University residential facilities. The office does
this through its five core outcomes: a) to provide a
home-like environment where residents feel like they
“belong”; b) to value, respect and promote awareness of diversity; c) to foster the academic success of
all residents; d) to provide a safe and healthy living
environment and e) to facilitate leadership development and campus engagement.
http://sites.laverne.edu/housing/
Title IX: Sex Discrimination, Harassment, and
Assault
Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 is a
federal law that prohibits sex discrimination in education. Sex discrimination includes sexual harassment,
sexual assault and sexual exploitation. The
University of La Verne has designated Loretta H.
Rahmani, Ed.D., the Dean of Student Affairs [(909)
448-4053, [email protected]] and Jody L.
Bomba, Chief Human Resources [(909) 448-4075,
[email protected]] to serve as its Title IX
Coordinator and Deputy Coordinator. The Title IX
Coordinator and Deputy Coordinator is available to
receive reports of sex discrimination at the University
of La Verne, including sexual harassment, sexual
assault, and sexual exploitation, to discuss questions
or concerns relating to the investigation of complaints
received, reporting and complaint procedures, and
education and training opportunities across campus.
For further information concerning the University’s
Title IX policy, resources, complaint procedures and
complete list of Title IX Deputy Coordinators please
see the website.
http://sites.laverne.edu/stunt-affairs/title-ix-resourceguide/
Veteran Student Success
The Office of Veteran Student Success serves as an
advocate-liason that connects all veteran students
with services, resources, programs and events
designed to assist in their efforts-academically, financially, emotionally, socially, and physically- to achieve
their educational goals. The Office of Veteran
Students Success is located on the 2nd Floor of the
Abraham Campus Center.
http://sites.laverne.edu/veteran-affairs/
Other Services and Activities
Bookstore
The University Bookstore offers books, supplies, gift
items, and other merchandise to the campus and
community.
http://laverne.edu/bookstore/
Campus Safety and Transportation
The University maintains its own security department
to patrol the campus 24 hours a day, seven days a
week. It is the central repository for all lost and found
property.
http://sites.laverne.edu/safety-parking/safety/
Child Development Center
The Child Development Center is located two miles
south of the Central Campus.
http://laverne.edu/education/partnership-and-outreach/fairplex-child-development-center/
Office of Religious and Spiritual Life
This office provides religious and spiritual programming for the campus community. The University
Chaplain coordinates a variety of activities, including
faith-specific programs, as well as interfaith and
multi-religious opportunities. This office is dedicated
to religious diversity with a commitment to acceptance, mutual respect, awareness and dialog. http://sites.laverne.edu/chaplain/
Sports Science and Athletics Pavilion
The Sports Science and Athletic Pavilion hosts
indoor intercollegiate athletics, intramurals, and
recreational sporting events and other Universitywide events.
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 12
Study Abroad Office
The Study Abroad Office provides information on and
coordinates semester-long study abroad programs
for La Verne Students. It also provides information
about short term study tours offered by La Verne faculty.
http://sites.laverne.edu/study-abroad/
Summer Service
This program provides an opportunity for Central
Campus undergraduate students to learn through
service during summer.
http://sites.laverne.edu/chaplain/interfaith-engagement/summer-service/
ATHLETICS
Julie Kline, Athletic Director
Julie Smith, Assistant Athletic Director/Senior
Women’s Administrator
Contact: 909-448-4530
GO LEOS!!!
The University of La Verne, a NCAA Division III
Member Institution, thrives on providing an engaging
diverse Athletics’ community focusing on progressive
growth while creating a challenging competitive environment with equitable opportunities. Seeking to cultivate sound mind and body, intercollegiate athletics
at the University of La Verne provides an engaging
educational experience that transforms a student’s
life.
The women have intercollegiate squads in basketball, cross country, golf, soccer, softball, swimming
and diving, tennis, track, volleyball, and water polo.
The men enter into intercollegiate programs in baseball, basketball, cross country, football, golf, soccer,
swimming and diving, track, and water polo. In addition to fine facilities and equipment, the athletic
department is staffed with qualified and enthusiastic
coaches and certified athletic trainers.
Other colleges in the Southern California
Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (SCIAC) are
California Institute of Technology, California Lutheran
University, Chapman University, Claremont- MuddScripps, Occidental College, Pomona- Pitzer,
University of Redlands, and Whittier College. In addition, La Verne competes against other independent
colleges in Southern California as well as a number
of colleges and universities outside the west region.
The total program is designed to meet student interests.
Student Athletic Eligibility: To maintain full compliance with NCAA Division III and Southern California
Intercollegiate Athletic Conference standards, only
full-time regular students (to be defined as traditional
undergraduates, admitted through the Office of
Admissions) shall be eligible for participation in intercollegiate athletics at the University of La Verne. For
continued participation, a student must be enrolled in
a full-time academic program and be making satisfactory progress toward a degree. Freshmen student-athletes shall be eligible during their first full
academic year of attendance at the University of La
Verne. Thereafter, a minimum of 24 semester hours
must be completed during the previous two full time
semesters prior to participation. A transfer studentathlete, in order to participate and maintain satisfactory progress in the second semester of attendance,
must have successfully completed a minimum of
twelve units in the first semester at the University of
La Verne. January interterm units completed may be
counted towards the minimum 24 semester hours
total in the determination of satisfactory progress. In
the event a student-athlete has eligibility remaining
following completion of his/her undergraduate
degree at the University of La Verne, he/she may
participate as a graduate student in intercollegiate
athletics if he/she meets all requirements for participation as defined by the institution and NCAA guidelines.
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 13
ADMISSIONS
INFORMATION
Chris Krzak, Dean of Admissions
Ana Liza V. Zell, Associate Dean
Matriculation Policy
In order to be governed by this catalog, students who
apply for admission must enroll in courses within
twelve months of their acceptance date.
Non-matriculated Students
Undergraduates who wish to enroll as part-time students may enroll in a combined total of no more than
11 semester hours in any semester and related
Interterm or 8 semester hours in any term without
making a formal application for admission. Students
who wish to become degree candidates must submit
a formal application and complete the admissions
process prior to completion of 12 semester hours at
the University. The University cannot be held responsible for the degree applicability of courses which are
selected by students who have not been officially
admitted and assigned academic advisors.
Graduate students who possess a bachelor’s degree
and who wish to enroll in graduate courses may
enroll in no more than six semester hours without filing a formal application. These courses would count
toward professional growth and in service education.
However, if students wish to enter a graduate degree
program or seek institutional recommendation for a
credential from the University, they must submit a formal application and complete the admission process.
The University cannot be held responsible for the
degree applicability of courses which may be selected by a student who has not been officially admitted
and assigned a program counselor. A student is eligible to enroll in no more than 12 semester hours prior
to being admitted to a program. Several programs
restrict this limit to 6 semester hours. Assessment
fees up to $50 for each unit accepted beyond the program minimum requirement may be charged for violations of this policy.
Terms of Admission Offers
All offers of admission are conditional, pending
receipt of final transcripts showing work comparable
in quality to that upon which the offer was based. All
information submitted during the admission process,
including the application, the personal essay, any
supplements, and any other supporting materials will
become property of the University of La Verne and
will not be returned to applicants or forwarded to third
parties. The university reserves the right to select its
students and deny admission at its sole discretion
based on applicant’s suitability and the best interest
of the university. Any applicant who is found to submit altered, forged, or falsified documentation to the
University will be denied admission or have any offer
of admission already made revoked, and no further
applications will be considered. Additionally, inappropriate behavior by applicants, including those that
pose a threat or present a danger to the college community or other behaviors where it is considered to
be in the best interest of the college to refuse admission, may be used as a basis to deny the student
admission or revoke any offer of admission. Such
behaviors and/or findings of falsified admission information may also be used to justify disqualification or
termination of enrollment for a current student,
including revocation of course credit, grades, and
degree.
UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSION
Main Campus Admission
The goal of the University of La Verne is to provide
maximum opportunities for educational and personal
growth; therefore, a student’s goals and objectives
are considered in the evaluation process.
Consideration is given to previous formal and informal educational experience as well as to the potential to succeed in a challenging academic program.
La Verne seeks students who are creative, motivated, self-disciplined, and committed to learning.
Freshman Admission/ Advanced Freshman
Admission
In keeping with the above philosophy, an admission
decision emphasizes the academic course of study,
marks in coursework during grades 10, 11 and the
first semester of grade 12, SAT I or ACT scores, the
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 14
applicant’s personal statement (essay), and a letter
of recommendation. In addition, consideration is
given to the applicant’s involvement in school and
community activities, leadership abilities, special talents, and character. Students classified as Advanced
Freshmen are high school graduates with less than
28 transferable college credits.
Application Procedures and Requirements:
Students may apply for admission after completion of
their junior year of high school. In some cases a decision may be delayed until grades from the first
semester of the senior year of high school are submitted. Freshman candidates are encouraged to
apply by February 1 for the Fall Semester and by
December 1 for the Spring Semester. Applicants for
admission will be considered after these dates on a
space-available basis. La Verne subscribes to the
National Candidate’s Reply Date of May 1 (for Fall
semester), and does not require advance payment or
confirmation of intent to enroll prior to this date. To
apply for admission to the University, the following
documents must be submitted to the Office of
Admission. All application materials become the
property of the University upon receipt.
1. Formal Application for Admission: Applicants
must sign and submit the completed application
form, personal statement, and the non-refundable $50 application fee.
2. High School Transcripts: Applicants must
request that their high school transcripts be sent
directly to the Office of Admission. A transcript is
not considered official if sent or delivered by the
student. A final high school transcript with the
graduation date will be required.
3. SAT I or ACT Scores: The applicant must have
an official SAT I or ACT score report sent from the
appropriate testing agency or a score reported on
the official transcript.
4. One letter of recommendation from school officials where the applicant is currently enrolled or
has most recently attended. Upon admission to
the University, recommendation forms are
destroyed and are not a part of the student’s permanent record.
Honors at Entrance: Students who have earned a
cumulative high school academic GPA of 3.5 or
above in college preparatory classes with SAT I
scores of at least 1170 (or ACT scores of at least 26)
may be accepted with Honors at Entrance. Such students are considered for Honors scholarships and
are invited to apply for the La Verne Honors Program,
described in the Honors Program section of this catalog.
First-Year Resource Program: The Admission
Committee may choose to grant admission through
the First-Year Resource Program (FYRP). The FirstYear Resource Program is described in the “Student
Acceptance through the First-Year Resource
Program (FYRP)” section of this catalog.
Transfer /Advanced Freshman Admission
Students who wish to transfer from an accredited
two- or four-year institution are invited to apply for
admission. Students who have completed 28 or more
semester hours of completed college level coursework will be considered transfer applicants. Students
classified as Advanced Freshmen are high school
graduates with less than 28 completed semester
hours. The priority application deadline for students
applying for Fall semester is April 1. Students applying for Spring semester should submit their applications by December 1.
Application Procedures and Requirements: To
apply for admission, transfer applicants must submit
the following documents to the Office of
Undergraduate Admission. All application materials
become the property of the University upon receipt.
Students who have completed 28 or more semester
hours of completed college-level coursework will be
evaluated based on their college work, letter of recommendation, special talents, character, and school
and community involvement. Applicants must
demonstrate minimum proficiency by completing a
college level English course. Additionally, a minimum
2.7 GPA is required and completion of college-level
Math is strongly recommended.
Students with fewer than 28 semester hours of transferable college-level coursework will be considered
advanced standing freshman. These students will be
evaluated based on their college work, high school
transcripts, letters of recommendation, and SAT I or
ACT scores. Special talents, character, and school
and community involvement will also be considered.
1. Application for Admission: Upon receipt of the
completed and signed application form, personal
statement, and the non-refundable $50 applica-
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 15
tion fee, the Office of Admission will notify the
applicant of any missing documents necessary to
complete the application process.
2. Official transcripts: Applicants must have official transcripts sent to the Office of Admission
from each college or university previously attended. Applicants with fewer than 28 semester hours
of acceptable transfer credit must also submit
official high school transcripts. All previous college work must be evaluated for transfer.
3. One letter of recommendation addressing the
applicant’s record from a school official where the
applicant is currently enrolled or has most recently attended. Upon admission to the University,
recommendation forms are destroyed and are
not a part of the student’s permanent record.
4. SAT I or ACT scores: Only students who have
completed less than 28 transferable semester
hours of college-level coursework must submit
official scores from one of these tests. In other
cases, SAT I or ACT scores may be requested as
supporting evidence.
Honors at Entrance: Students who have completed
28 or more semester hours of transferable academic
credit with a GPA of 3.3 or above may be granted
Honors at Entrance.
International Admission
The University of La Verne welcomes applications
from students living in countries throughout the
world. Sufficient evidence must be provided to
insure that a student is able to depend upon his/her
own financial resources. International students must
not plan on earnings from employment in the United
States, financial assistance, or scholarship grants.
The estimated yearly cost for an international student
to attend La Verne is approximately $52,104. This
includes tuition, fees, room/ board, books, and personal expenses (summer school tuition and transportation are NOT included). The University is
authorized to issue the I-20 when international applicants have been accepted and have submitted the
$200 advance deposit. In order to allow time for
obtaining visas, it is important for international applicants to provide all required documents a minimum
of two months before the beginning of the semester.
Students holding F-1 and J-1 visas may attend only
the Main Campus and are not eligible for the CAPA
program. To be considered for admission, international students must provide the following documents
to the Office of Admission. All application materials
become the property of the University upon receipt.
1. Application for Admission: Upon receipt of the
completed and signed application form, personal
statement, and the non-refundable $50 application fee, the Office of Admission will notify the
applicant of any missing documents necessary to
complete the application process.
2. Official transcripts and certificates (with notarized translations into English where appropriate)
from all secondary schools, colleges, and universities attended. Students who have completed
studies at a foreign university must send their
transcripts for a detailed credential review to be
evaluated for transfer credit. There is a fee for
this service. A brochure is available upon request.
Students attending a foreign university that is
accredited by a U.S. accrediting agency are
exempt from the detailed credential review.
3. Proof of English Proficiency: Applicants must
establish minimum proficiency in English by submitting one of the following:
(a) A minimum score of 80 iBT/550pb on the
Test of English as a Foreign Language
(TOEFL)
(b) A minimum score of 420 on the critical reading section of the Scholastic Aptitude Test
(SAT)
(c) A minimum score of 6.5 on the International
English Language Testing System (IELTS)
(d) A minimum of 58 on the Cambridge English
(CAE)
(e) A minimum of 53 on the Pearson Test of
English Academic (PTE)
(f) Completion of the equivalent of WRT 110
(English composition) and 32 transferable
semester units with a grade of C or better
(g) Successful completion of ELS Language
Centers level 112
4. One letter of recommendation from school officials where the applicant is currently enrolled or
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 16
has most recently attended. Upon admission to
the University, recommendation forms are
destroyed and are not a part of the student’s permanent record.
Additional Admission Information
Information Sessions and Tours: Prospective students and parents are invited to visit the University of
La Verne. Information sessions and tours are held on
campus by appointment at 10:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m.
weekdays. The Office of Admission is open from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on weekdays. Please call the Office
of Admission at (800) 876-4858 for more information
or to schedule a visit.
Candidates Reply Date: Freshman and transfer
candidates are considered for admission upon
receipt of the application for admission, all official
transcripts, appropriate test scores, the personal
statement (essay), and letters of recommendation.
Once accepted, candidates with the intent to enroll
are expected to submit a $200 nonrefundable tuition
deposit by May 1 (postmark deadline). Students
admitted after this date will be expected to submit the
tuition deposit within two weeks after the date of
acceptance. The deposit is applied to the student’s
account and is deducted from the first semester’s
expenses.
Financial Aid: New students seeking financial assistance should contact the Office of Financial Aid for
information and forms. For complete information, see
the Financial Aid section of this catalog.
Residence Hall Reservations: Admitted students
can access Residence Hall Application and License
Agreement at sites.laverne.edu/housing/. Students
must return the application and license agreement,
along with a $250 housing reservation/security
deposit and a $50 activity fee to the Office of
Residential Life. Rooms will be reserved for students
on a space available basis.
Student Acceptance through the First-Year
Resource Program (FYRP): This program is
designed to assist selected students who have
demonstrated potential for success in college
through grades and/ or college entrance examinations, but fall short in academic preparedness in one
or more subject areas at the time of admission.
Students in FYRP are provided additional support as
they begin their academic careers at the University of
La Verne. They are limited to 14 semester hours during their first academic year as they acclimate to rigorous college-level course work. All students will
work closely with an academic advisor in their major
to develop schedules that maximize academic success. Additionally, students must enroll in a one unitlearning Enhancement Seminar and register for an
appropriate writing and math class each semester
until the requirements are met. Students who make
normal satisfactory academic progress at the end of
their first academic year will be allowed to register for
up to 18 semester hours of full-time enrollment in
subsequent semesters.
Returning Student Readmission: Main campus
undergraduates who have attended La Verne as
matriculated students but who have not been in
attendance for two consecutive semesters must
reapply by filing a Readmission Application for
Admission. Readmission will be based on the current
admission policies, and the student will be required
to meet current graduation requirements. Official
transcripts for all academic work taken during the
period of absence must be provided.
Reinstatement of Academically Disqualified
Students: The readmission of a previously disqualified student is by special approval. La Verne will consider an application for reinstatement only after the
student has remained absent for a minimum of one
year following disqualification and has fulfilled all
conditions of re-enrollment. In every instance, reinstatement action is based on evidence, including
transcripts of courses completed elsewhere after disqualification, that warrants such action. If reinstated,
the student may be placed on academic probation.
Regional and Online Campuses (ROC)
Undergraduate Programs Admission
Nine regional campuses, CAPA and La Verne Online
provide educational opportunities for mature adults
with varied educational backgrounds. Applicants will
be considered for admission based on several factors: applicant’s age (CAPA and other programs may
require applicants to be 25 years of age or older),
number of college-level semester hours completed,
cumulative college GPA, work experience, and the
degree program being pursued. Specific majors or
programs may require additional admission requirements beyond those described in the preceding sentence and the next paragraph. These additional
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 17
requirements may be found in the Regional and
Online Campuses program brochures and on the La
Verne website. Consideration is given to previous
formal educational experience as well as to the
potential to succeed in a challenging academic program. La Verne seeks students who are motivated,
self-disciplined, and committed to learning.
Applicants academically disqualified from another
college may be considered for admission by appeal
only if the disqualification occurred more than 12
months prior to application.
In addition to admission to the University, applicants
must meet degree program requirements as follows:
•
•
•
Applicants for undergraduate degree programs
offered through La Verne Online must have completed at least 28 semester hours of transferable
college credit from a regionally accredited college
or university, including WRT 110 (or the equivalent), with an overall minimum GPA of 2.0.
Applicants for a B.A. in Liberal Studies must have
completed at least 28 semester hours of transferable college credit from a regionally accredited
college or university, including WRT 110 and
WRT 111 (or their equivalents), with an overall
minimum GPA of 2.0. They also must sign a
College of Education and Organizational
Leadership Disposition Agreement Form.
Applicants for a B.S. in Child Development must
have completed at least 28 semester hours of
transferable college credit from a regionally
accredited college or university, including WRT
110 and WRT 111 (or their equivalents), with an
overall minimum GPA of 2.5. They also must
complete an interview with the faculty, submit a
successful writing sample, and sign a College of
Education and Organizational Leadership
Disposition Agreement Form.
Students are eligible to enroll in a cumulative total of
no more than 8 semester hours in a term-based system or 12 semester hours in a semester-based system prior to official admission. For additional degree
program requirements and enrollment policies,
please refer to ROC program brochures.
Application Procedures: To apply for admission to
the University of La Verne through ROC, students
should submit the necessary admission documents
to the Regional Campus where they plan to study.
Transcripts and other official records necessary to
evaluate a student’s prior work become University
property upon submission and will not be returned to
the applicant, copied or forwarded to another institution. The following documents must be submitted:
1. Application for Admission: The application
form may be obtained from the regional campus where the student plans to study. Upon
receipt of the completed and signed application form and the non-refundable application
fee, the regional campus will notify the applicant of the required documents necessary to
complete the application process.
2. Official Transcripts and Certificates of
Prior Work: Official transcripts from all colleges and universities previously attended
must be submitted. If applicable, military documents, college level test scores
(CLEP/DANTES), and documentation for
Educational Credit for Training or non-collegiate sponsored programs must be submitted
for evaluation of potential transfer credit. All
previous college work must be evaluated for
transfer. Any transcripts of coursework completed prior to admission that are not submitted will not be considered for transfer credit
after admission has been granted. In addition,
failure to list this coursework could result in
academic dismissal.
Applicants with fewer than 28 semester hours
of college-level coursework must submit official verification of graduation from high school
or its equivalent. Official transcripts from
schools in the US must be sent directly by the
issuing institution to the ROC office where the
student plans to study. Transcripts from
schools outside the US must also be submitted. Applicants wishing to have work completed outside the US considered for transfer
credit must have their transcripts evaluated
by an approved foreign credential evaluation
service. There is a fee for this service.
The University of La Verne will evaluate military training for credit. Veterans must submit
a DD214, and in service military applicants
must submit a DD295, a SMART transcript, or
a CCAF transcript for evaluation.
3. International Students: International students on F or J visas may apply to and attend
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 18
only La Verne’s Main Campus and La Verne
College of Law. They are not eligible for the
CAPA program.
4. Additional Information: La Verne reserves
the right to request additional information in
order to make an informed decision.
Evaluations: ROC academic advisors can unofficially evaluate transcripts of prior course work. This provides the academic advisor with the necessary information to help the student structure a program leading to graduation. Upon admission, the Office of the
Registrar will provide a complete audit of all acceptable transfer credits that are applicable toward a
University of La Verne degree.
Degree Time Limits and Readmission: The
University recognizes that ROC students may not be
able to attend full time every term. For this reason,
ROC students need not reapply after a break in
enrollment unless the break was due to academic
disqualification, or unless specified in one of the conditions that follow:
Students who do not enroll in courses within one year
from the date of admission must reapply for admission and follow the degree requirements in effect at
the time of their readmission.
Students who do not complete their degrees within
seven years of the date of their admission letter must
reapply for admission and fulfill the graduation
requirements in effect at the time of their readmission. Students who leave due to academic disqualification may reapply for admission after one calendar
year.
Students who complete their degrees within seven
years of the date of admission may elect to fulfill
either the graduation requirements in effect at the
time of their admission or any catalog prior to graduation after matriculation.
Matriculated students who have not been enrolled at
La Verne for more than one year will be classified as
Inactive and will not be eligible to register via the
web. Inactive students who wish to register should
contact their academic advisor to change their student status.
Transfer Credit for
Undergraduate Students
The process of course credit evaluation is to consistently apply university policy in determining the transferability of coursework to the University of La Verne,
and the applicability of that coursework to General
Education and Major requirements for all undergraduate students. The policies that have been established for the evaluations process are specified in the
University Catalog and in the University Transfer
Manual. Exceptions to these policies are rare and
approved only at the discretion of the University
Registrar and the Undergraduate Appeals
Committee. The ultimate responsibility for establishing policies and regulations for transcript evaluation
rests with the Faculty and the Provost. The Provost
is responsible for assuring that the faculty’s directives
are developed and implemented, as well as for maintaining academic quality and fairness.
The evaluation of transcripts should be clearly separated from the function of advising students. No one
should be responsible for both the official evaluation
of transcripts and for advising the students whose
transcripts are being evaluated. Advisors may perform unofficial preliminary evaluations and unofficially advise students towards their degree requirements. The official evaluation must be finalized
through the Office of the Registrar.
General Transfer of Courses: Students may transfer a maximum of 88 semester hours for credit
towards the Bachelor’s degree. Courses eligible for
transfer credit include any courses designated as
baccalaureate level by the credit granting institution.
Any coursework completed with grades below C- will
not be considered for transfer credit to the University
of La Verne. Transfer credit will be awarded up to this
88 semester hour limit in the following order:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Satisfaction of general education requirements;
Satisfaction of major requirements;
Satisfaction of upper division requirements;
GPA benefit;
Overall elective unit completion
Any transfer work completed after matriculation and
beyond the 88 semester hour limit will be considered
for subject area fulfillment, but will not transfer with
unit value (the particular course will be fulfilled by a
0-unit course marker). Regardless of the number of
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 19
units transferred, all students must meet the
University of La Verne’s residency, upper division,
general education, and major requirements, as well
as the minimum 128 semester hours required for the
degree.
The process for reviewing individual coursework to
determine course comparability rests with the faculty
and will be facilitated through the Office of the
Registrar. All coursework will be evaluated on a
course-by-course basis following the guidelines listed below. Courses designated as baccalaureate
level by Junior or Community Colleges will transfer to
La Verne as lower-division credit. Traditional fouryear college courses transfer at the same level, lower
or upper-division, as they were designated by the
sending institution. Courses transferred from other
institutions (i.e., public in-state and out-of-state, private in-state and out-of-state) are not to be construed
as “equivalent” but rather as comparable, or acceptable in lieu of a course and/or requirement by the
University of La Verne.
Community College Transfer Policy:
The
University of La Verne establishes formal partnerships with institutions that are part of the California
Community College system. These partnerships support the principle that transfer students should not be
required to repeat competencies already achieved,
with the purpose of enabling students who have completed transfer course work at a Community College
to carry with them the credit they have already
earned towards fulfilling all relevant University
degree requirements. Transfer Agreements outline
California Community College courses that have
been approved to meet specific General Education
Area requirements at La Verne. Transfer Plans are
available online on the Registrar’s Articulation website: laverne.edu/registrar/articulationinformation/.
Statute of limitations of courses: To maintain the
currency and integrity of the University of La Verne
degree, each department may establish limits on the
age of previously completed coursework in regards
to the applicability of that coursework to the major
requirements for the undergraduate degree. These
limits are stated in the descriptions of individual program and major requirements in the Programs section of this catalog. These limits do not impact the
transferability of coursework to general education or
non-major elective requirements.
General Education Transfer Policy—Breadth
Requirements: At the time of matriculation, students who have completed one of the two certifications listed below will be credited with fulfilling all of
La
Verne’s
General
Education
Breadth
Requirements with the exception of the Foreign
Language requirement, depending on the student’s
declared major. They will need to fulfill the appropriate University Values (UV) requirements. 1. The
California State University General Education
Breadth
Certification
(CSU-GE).
2.
The
Intersegmental General Education Transfer
Curriculum (IGETC).
Other General Education Transfer Options for
Breadth Requirements: At the time of matriculation,
students who have completed a minimum of 28
semester hours of transferable baccalaureate level
coursework will be evaluated for fulfillment of La
Verne’s General Education Breadth Requirements
according to the following guidelines:
1. Students certified as having met all area requirements in the California State University General
Education (CSU-GE) Breadth Certification or in
the Intersegmental General Education Transfer
Curriculum (IGETC) with a C- or better in all
applicable courses will be credited with fulfilling
all of La Verne’s General Education Breadth
requirements with the exception of the Foreign
Language requirement depending on the student’s declared major, and the appropriate
University Values requirements. Students must
provide proof of certification when the final transcript is sent to La Verne.
2. Courses completed with a grade C- or better at a
regionally accredited community college prior to
matriculation at La Verne that partially fulfill
selected CSU-GE or IGETC general education
options completed at a college prior to admission
at La Verne will be credited toward partial fulfillment of the like General Education Breadth
requirements at La Verne. CSU-GE and IGETC
applicability of each course must be documented
in the relevant college catalog, or through the
Assist website, which is the official repository of
articulation information for the State of California.
Students may still be required to fulfill a Foreign
Language requirement depending on their
declared major.
3. Courses completed at regionally accredited community colleges outside the state of California
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 20
which meet bachelor’s level general education
requirements within a statewide college system
and are documented in the college catalog, will
be articulated to fulfill like general education
requirements at La Verne. Students may still be
required to fulfill a Foreign Language requirement
depending on their declared major. All other
coursework will be evaluated on a course-bycourse basis. No transfer course will be considered for general education fulfillment unless a Cor better was received, and the course has been
designated as baccalaureate level by the credit
granting institution.
General Education Transfer Policy— Values
Requirements: Students who transfer 0-27.99
semester hours at the time of matriculation are
required to complete two designations each in Values
Orientation/Ethical Reasoning (UVVO), Community
and Diversity/Diversity & Inclusivity (UVCD), and
Lifelong Learning (UVLL), and one designation in
Community Service/Community & Civic Engagement
(UVCS), while students who transfer 28-59.99 must
complete one designation in each of the four areas.
Students who transfer 60-87.99 semester hours must
complete three designations in three different areas.
Students who transfer the maximum of 88 semester
hours must complete two designations in two different areas.
Transfer Credit for Exams and Testing
International Baccalaureate (IB) Transfer Credit:
The Office of the Registrar will accept the IB diploma
for students who have earned 30 points or more, and
grant 32 semester hours of transfer credit (sophomore standing). Students who do not successfully
achieve the IB diploma will have the subjects individually evaluated as listed on their certificate. La Verne
will award 4 semester hours for each subject in which
a score of 4 or greater was earned for a maximum of
24 semester hours.
Advanced Placement Exam (AP) Transfer Credit:
The Office of the Registrar articulates up to 44
semester hours of credit in subject area examinations offered by the College Board’s Advanced
Placement Program. Exams are articulated during
the evaluation of the student’s file upon matriculation.
Credit can only be reviewed at the time the Office of
the Registrar receives an official score report provided by the College Board and or scores that are indicated on a student’s official high school transcript.
CLEP and DSST Exams: Transfer credit for the
College Level Examination Program (CLEP) and
DSST exams are awarded based on the articulation
of each individual exam and are reviewed for major
or general education requirements by university faculty. Based on these reviews, articulation guides
have been created and are available on the
Registrar’s Articulation website. Furthermore, a combined maximum of 44 semester hours of credit by
exam may be applied toward the bachelor’s degree
(AP and IB credits do not contribute to this total).
Exams are normally articulated as lower division
credit, and duplication policies are followed as
described below.
Exam Duplication Policy: A student is not eligible to
earn credit by exam if that exam covers the same
subject material that was covered in previously completed college level coursework. Furthermore, a student is not eligible to earn credit by exam if that exam
covers material that is the same general subject area
as more advanced coursework that he or she previously completed. For example if a student completes
Calculus 1, he or she is not eligible to earn credit for
a Pre-Calculus exam.
Additional Transfer Credit Options
High School Diploma and Transfer Credit: All traditional undergraduate students entering La Verne
may receive up to 32 semester hours of credit for college courses taken before graduation from high
school. These courses must appear on an official college transcript and the name of the accredited college must be disclosed on the University of La Verne
Admissions Application.
Vocational/Technical Transfer Credit Policy: A
total of 44 semester hours of vocational/technical
courses may be transferred and applied toward a
bachelor’s degree at the University of La Verne.
Applicability of these units toward specific degree
requirements is finalized by the Office of the
Registrar.
Military Transfer Credit: Courses taken through the
military may be transferred under the guidelines
established by the American Council on Education
(ACE) Guide to the Evaluation of Educational
Experiences in the Armed Services and according to
La Verne policy. Acceptance of credit is limited by the
Vocational/ Technical Transfer Credit policy.
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 21
Service members Opportunity Colleges (SOC):
The University of La Verne is a member of the SOC
Consortium and will honor all transfer agreements
negotiated by the SOC administration.
Foreign Colleges and Universities Transfer Credit
Eligibility: In order for the university’s Articulation
Office to facilitate faculty review of foreign coursework for general education applicability, students
must submit notarized translations of course descriptions from the foreign transfer institution. In cases
where course descriptions are not available, students
are encouraged to take available placement examinations to qualify for general education credit, or to
work with an academic advisor to determine alternative modes of assessment (such as CLEP and DSST
exams).
Transfer Credit for ESL and English Composition
Courses: La Verne will grant transfer credit for
courses articulated to fulfill the Written
Communication, a sub-area stated within the GE
Breadth Requirements. The course must be completed prior to acceptance into La Verne. The Office of
the Registrar will not grant credit for similar courses
completed after a student has been accepted to La
Verne until all prerequisite ESL courses required by
placement criteria have been completed. ESL and
Writing courses which the placement test indicates
are needed must be taken at La Verne, but the
University may grant elective credit for transferable
ESL courses and English composition courses not
equivalent to WRT 110 that was completed elsewhere prior to acceptance.
GRADUATE ADMISSION
Main Campus & Regional and Online Campuses
(ROC)
Admissions Policy: In order to pursue a graduate
degree, a specialized credential, or a graduate certificate program at the University of La Verne, students
must be formally admitted by the appropriate graduate department. Candidates are evaluated on the
strength of their GPA, Statement of Purpose, and letters of recommendation, as well as standardized test
scores and résumés where required. Additional
admission requirements beyond those described
below are listed with the individual programs in the
Programs section of this catalog. Each academic
department balances all these measures in considering admission eligibility. The general eligibility guidelines for full admission to all graduate programs are
as follows:
1. A bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited
college or university. (Doctoral programs may
also require a master’s degree.) Students who
earned degrees or completed coursework at non
U.S. universities should review the International
Transcript
Guidelines
page
at
www.laverne.edu/admission/graduate to ensure
that proper transcript documentation is submitted
to the university. Students who earned degrees
from institutions using a marks-grading or testingonly system should obtain a course-by-course
credential evaluation by an approved NACES
institution (www.naces.org; fees will apply for
these services). All other students who have
completed their studies outside of the United
States may be required to have their degrees
evaluated by a La Verne approved evaluation
service to determine bachelor’s degree equivalency. Applicants will be notified if their degrees
need to be evaluated.
2. A preferred GPA of 2.5 or above for the last 60
semester hours or the last 90 quarter hours of the
baccalaureate degree, and a GPA of 3.0 for any
graduate work.
3. Letters of recommendation attesting to academic/professional competency.
4. Demonstrated ability to write at an acceptable
level for graduate study.
Some programs prefer a higher GPA, the submission of standardized test scores, and other documentation to be eligible for admission. Additional
details about graduate admission can be found at
laverne.edu/admission/graduate/faqs/.
Application Materials: All application materials are
processed by the Graduate Admission Office or
ROC, as appropriate, and forwarded to departments.
All materials submitted become the property of the
University and will not be returned to the applicant,
copied for another use outside of admission, or forwarded to another institution. Applications are valid
for one year from the semester/term to which the
applicant applies, after which they are destroyed.
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 22
Applicants requiring additional time must reapply.
Before departments take any action regarding possible admission to a graduate program, the student
must submit the following:
1. Completed application with non-refundable application fee. Fees may be submitted via check or
money order made payable to the University of
La Verne (the applicant’s full name must appear
on the payment), or may be submitted online at
the time of the application via the application portal found at laverne.edu/admission/applyapply2/.
2. Statement of Purpose. Unless otherwise noted,
the statement of purpose should outline goals for
graduate study and be roughly 200 words in
length. Information reinforcing the strengths of
the applicant for admission should be included as
well as any professional experience and qualifications that may be related to the intended field
of study. Some departments have additional
requirements, or require essays in addition to or
in place of the statement of purpose, so it is best
to refer to the program’s specific requirements as
listed in this Catalog.
3. Official transcripts showing academic degrees
and all coursework completed for the baccalaureate degree, and all graduate coursework. All transcripts must be issued directly by the degree
granting institution and remain in their original,
sealed institutional envelopes to be considered
official. Applicants to La Verne Campus programs
should have the transcripts sent “Attention:
Graduate Admission Office.’’ Applicants to ROC
programs will be provided with forms which indicate the proper return address. For additional
guidance on obtaining and submitting proper
transcripts visit
laverne.edu/admission/graduate/faqs/.
4. The appropriate number of letters of recommendation, as specified by the department. Upon
admission to the University, all letters of recommendation will be destroyed and are not a part of
the student’s permanent record.
5. Applicants who have not completed their bachelor’s degree level education at a school in the
USA, Australia, Canada (English-language
provinces), United Kingdom, or New Zealand,
and South Africa must provide proof of English
proficiency in one of the following ways:
a. A minimum score on the Test of English as a
Foreign Language (TOEFL) of 79 (iBT), 213
(CBT), or 550 (PBT) or above. Some programs require a higher score.
b. A minimum score on the International English
Language Testing System (IELTS) of 6.5.
c. Completion of English 112 at the ELS
Language Center.
Note: These scores are minimum admission
requirements only. Some programs require higher scores.
6. Other documents as required. Please refer to the
program’s specific admissions requirements as
listed in this Catalog.
International Students: La Verne is authorized to
issue an I-20 only after international applicants have
been accepted for admission and have submitted the
$200 non-refundable tuition deposit. International
students with F-1 or J-1 visas may apply to and
attend only the Central Campus. The following documentation is not required at the time of the application, but must be submitted after an offer of admission has been made in order to have immigration
documents to the University of La Verne issued:
1. Copy of valid passport
2. A signed, current Financial Statement found at
laverne.edu/admission/graduate/forms/
3. Financial documentation, no more than one
month old, verifying the statements made on the
Financial Statement
Possible Departmental Action: Each applicant’s
documents are carefully reviewed by the appropriate
department. Admission decisions are made within
the guidelines of the graduate admissions policy
based upon the applicant’s qualifications and potential for success in a graduate program. Departments
may take any of the actions listed below.
1. Grant admission to students who satisfy all
requirements.
2. Grant admission to students who demonstrate
academic and professional promise. These stu-
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 23
dents must meet the stipulations required by the
department, including prerequisites. Students
who do not meet these stipulations may be withdrawn from the University.
3. Hold the admissions decision pending specified
additional requirements needed to strengthen the
application file (e.g., a GRE or GMAT score).
Applicants will be notified of any additional
requirements placing the admission decision on
hold.
4. Deny admission because documents appear to
indicate applicant would be unsuccessful in this
graduate program.
Admission Time Limits and Readmission Policy:
Admissions decisions are valid for one year from the
semester/term to which the applicant has been
admitted, after which the admission is withdrawn and
the application materials destroyed. Applicants
requiring additional time must reapply or petition the
Office of Graduate Admission for additional time.
Graduate students who began studies but whom
have not been enrolled for two consecutive years or
more must apply for readmission by submitting the
following:
1. An Appeal for Readmission.
2. A new application form and application fee.
3. A statement which addresses the absence from
the program and reasons for returning.
4. Transcripts for course work completed since
leaving La Verne and other documents as
required by the department, if applicable.
Readmission will be based on the current admissions
policies, and the student will be required to meet current program requirements. Any coursework previously completed at La Verne that is more than four
years old at the time of readmission will need to be
reviewed for acceptance by the department and the
Graduate Appeals Committee.
Students who have been dismissed from La Verne
for ethical or behavioral reasons will not be readmitted.
Transfer Credit: All students must request transfer
credit for courses previously completed at another
college or university at the time of application or during the semester/term of their admission. Students
receiving Veterans Administration (VA) funding are
eligible to receive transfer credit for previously completed courses only if they make their request during
the semester/term of their admission. The following
conditions must exist for transfer credit to be
approved:
1. The course must have been taken within the last
five years at an accredited university or college
and after the student had received a bachelor’s
degree.
2. The course must be acceptable into an appropriate graduate degree program at the institution
where it was taken.
3. A grade of B or better must have been earned in
the course. (A grade of B- is not acceptable.)
4. The course must be sufficiently related to the student’s degree program at La Verne as determined by the Program Chairperson.
5. There is a limit of six semester hours which may
be transferred into 30-35 semester hour degree
programs. A total of 12 semester hours may be
transferred into a program requiring 36 or more
semester hours. (A quarter hour counts as twothirds of a semester hour.)
6. Courses taken through the military may be transferred into a University of La Verne graduate program, consistent with the guidelines above. The
number of graduate transfer credits allowed is
subject to the guidelines established by the
American Council on Education (ACE) Guide to
the Evaluation of Educational Experiences in the
Armed Services.
7. Only courses which are accepted for transfer into
a degree program are added to the student’s La
Verne transcript.
8. The University of La Verne reserves the right to
refuse transfer credit or limit the credits accepted
toward any of its degree programs from accredited institutions, including those accredited by
regional accreditation associations, if these credits are attributed to courses that do not meet the
University of La Verne’s academic standards.
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 24
Graduate students matriculated into a certificate
program may transfer up to six semester hours of
elective credit toward completion of the certificate. Requests to have transfer credit applied to
the certificate must be submitted to the
Department/Program Chair through the student’s
advisor. The Department/Program Chair will evaluate the transfer credit using the same criteria for
accepting transfer credits into a degree program
and notify the Graduate Office or ROC Office to
post the approved transfer credit to the student’s
transcript.
Second La Verne Master’s Degree: Students who
have completed a master’s degree at La Verne and
wish to earn a second master’s degree at the
University must apply for the second degree by submitting an application with a statement of purpose
and all supporting documents required for admission
by the second degree program. For courses to count
toward both degrees, they must be common to both
approved programs. A maximum of 21 semester
hours approved by the Program Chairperson may be
used from the first degree to meet requirements for
the second degree. A new “culminating activity” must
be a part of a second degree program.
Adding a Concentration After a Master’s Degree
Has Been Granted: A concentration may be added
after a La Verne master’s degree has been granted,
subject to the program chairperson’s approval. If
approved, the concentration will be added to the transcript only; a new diploma will not be issued. The
concentration that is to be added must be listed in the
current La Verne catalog as being an approved concentration for the degree previously granted to the
student.
A formal Application for the Addition of a
Concentration to a Completed La Verne Master’s
Degree must be submitted to add a concentration
after a degree has been granted. La Verne course
work completed within five years preceding the date
of application may be applied to the concentration. A
student has three years from the date of application
to complete all concentration requirements. A grade
of B or better is required for each course applied to
the concentration with a minimum cumulative concentration GPA of 3.0. Financial aid funds are not
available to students pursuing a concentration after a
degree has been posted.
FINANCIAL
INFORMATION
Financial Arrangements
Students must complete their financial arrangements
no later than one to two weeks prior to the start of the
term/semester. Students who do not make financial
arrangements two weeks prior to the start of the
term/semester will be assessed a fee of $100.
Students who have not made financial arrangements
after 30 days from one to two weeks prior to the
term/semester will be assessed an additional $200.
New students living on campus must complete their
financial arrangements no later than 30 days prior to
the start of the term/semester. Continuing students
living on campus must complete their financial
arrangements no later than June 25. Students living
on campus who fail to make arrangements prior to
the deadlines listed above will lose their confirmed
space and moved to a “pending” list. Financial
arrangements include payment in full or enrollment in
a payment plan. No student is allowed to register for
a semester/term if there is an overdue debt from a
previous semester or term. Students who register
after the due date are required to pay at the time of
registration. The University offers the payment
options listed below.
1. Payment in Full: Tuition, room, board, and any
other fees are payable at the time of registration.
2. Deferred Payment Plans: Payment plans are
available for courses lasting eight weeks or more.
Short-term courses of up to five weeks in length
must be paid in full one to two weeks prior to the
term. All deferred payment plans require the completion of an agreement. If the student is under
18 years of age, a cosigner is required on the
agreement.
All deferred payment plans require the payment of a
fee at the time of registration or at the initiation of the
monthly payment contract. The fee is based on the
program in which the student is enrolled, as follows:
Semester Based Programs...........................$75
Term Based Programs ..................................$50
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 25
All students electing a deferred payment plan who do
not meet their payment dates will also be assessed a
monthly late payment fee of $30. The University
reserves the right to impose finance charges on all
unpaid balances.
3. Payment Methods: The University of La Verne
accepts payments by cash, check, credit card,
money order, traveler’s check, wire transfer, or by
electronic check through the web at MyLaVerne.
Accepted forms of credit card payment include:
VISA, MasterCard, and Discover. No payments
are accepted at the Regional Campuses.
The tuition charged a student will be the rate which is
current for the program in which the student is
enrolled, regardless of the course in which the student enrolls. The University reserves the right to
make changes to all published rates of tuition and
fees at any time without prior written notice.
Central Campus Undergraduate
Programs
Tuition and Fees
Full-time students (12-18 semester hours and 1-5
semester hours in the January Interterm), per
semester...............................................$18,372*
Part-time students, approved academic overloads,
Directed Study, and Independent Study, per
semester hour ...........................................$1040
Summer Sessions, per semester hour .............$595
Paralegal Certificate, per semester hour ..........$380
Religion Program (off-campus), per course......$565
*The full-time student rate includes tuition, student medical insurance, health center, technology, library and an ASULV fee.
Fees
Academic Services (not charged to full-time, traditional-age students), per course ..................$30
Appeals ...............................................................$50
Application ..........................................................$50
Auditing, per semester hour .............................$520
CEOL Assessment Fee, per course .....................$9
Community Service Assessment ........................$50
Course Challenge, per course
...............................one semester hour of tuition
Graduation ........................................................$140
Journalism, Radio, and TV Lab Fee(s).............$100
Laboratory Fee, per course ..............................$150
Late Financial Arrangement.......................$100-300
Legal Studies Certificate.....................................$35
Legal Studies Association (one time charge) .....$25
Legal Studies, online research, per course ........$20
Lost ID card ..........................................................$5
Lost Parking Permit, semester/year .........$65; $125
Make-up Examination .........................................$40
Missed Payment Fee ..........................................$30
Music Lessons, per semester hour...................$250
Parking, per semester; per year ...............$65; $125
Photography Laboratory ...................................$175
Replacement of Diploma ....................................$60
Returned Check/Rejected Credit Card ...............$25
Senior Citizens Audit Program (Per Course)......$50
Student Orientation Fall ......................................$75
Student Orientation Spring .................................$35
Student Tuition Deposit.....................................$200
Teacher Performance Assessment..............$50-100
Transcript, per copy ..............................................$6
Transcript (24-hour turnaround), per copy..........$15
Written Composition (will be applied toward
challenge if passed)......................................$50
Residence Hall Charges
Room Rates
Main Campus - Students, Per Semester
Room, Brandt/Studebaker/Hanawalt Halls,
triple occupancy .......................................$2,265
Room, Brandt/Studebaker/Hanawalt Halls,
double occupancy ....................................$2,680
Room, Brandt/Studebaker/Hanawalt Halls,
single........................................................$3,360
Room, Oaks Hall, triple occupancy ...............$2,600
Room, Oaks Hall, double occupancy ............$3,195
Room, Oaks Hall, single ................................$3,590
Room, Vista La Verne, double occupancy ....$3,675
Room, Vista La Verne, single occupancy ......$4,060
Room, Sheraton Fairplex,
double occupancy ....................................$4,400
Main Campus - Students, Per Term
Room, Oaks Hall, double occupancy ............$2,130
Room, Oaks Hall, single occupancy..............$2,395
Room, Brandt/Studebaker/Hanawalt Halls,
double occupancy ....................................$1,785
Room, Vista La Verne, double occupancy ....$2,445
Room, Vista La Verne, single occupancy ......$2,710
College of Law - Students, Per Semester
Room, Oaks Hall, double occupancy ............$3,525
Room, Oaks Hall, single occupancy..............$3,960
Room, Vista La Verne, double occupancy ....$4,050
Room, Vista La Verne, single occupancy ......$4,475
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 26
Board Rates
Residential Undergraduate Students, Per Semester
10 meals per week ........................................$2,440
12 meals per week ........................................$2,555
14 meals per week ........................................$2,655
19 meals per week ........................................$2,905
Residential Graduate Term Students
75 meals, per term/semester............................$775
125 meals, per term/semester.......................$1,290
150 meals, per term/semester.......................$1,545
175 meals, per term/semester.......................$1,805
New
Student
Resident
Application
and Activity Fee ..........................................$300
Returning
Student
Resident
Application
and Activity fee............................................$150
Study Abroad Programs: The costs listed below
include tuition, room, and board. These must be paid
before departure. Travel costs are the responsibility
of the student.
per semester ..........................................$24,775
per year..................................................$49,555
Washington D.C. Internship………………$23,872
Insurance Requirement for International
Students in All Programs: All full-time students with
F-1 or J-1 visas secured with documentation provided by La Verne are required to pay La Verne Health
Center and Medical Services fees. Coverage thus
secured meets the requirements specified by U.S.
Federal Regulations. The costs of these fees are
included in full-time, traditional-age undergraduate
tuition, but graduate students must pay the separate
Health Center and Medical Services fees as listed.
Students with J-2, H- 1, or H-4 visas are not required
to purchase La Verne insurance, but J-2 visa holders
must show that they have coverage that meets U.S.
Federal Regulations.
Graduate Programs
Graduate Tuition
All master’s degrees in College of Business & Public
Management, per semester hour .....................$720
M.Ed., Educational Leadership, Preliminary A d m i n .
Services Credential, Professional Administrative
Services Credential, per semester hour .....$620
All other master’s degree and credential programs
in College of Education & Organizational
Leadership, per semester hour ..................$660
Master’s degrees in College of Arts & Sciences,
per semester hour.......................................$720
Psy.D., D.P.A., Ed.D.. per semester hour .........$960
Graduate Fees
Academic Services, per course ..........................$30
APA fee (doctoral students)……………………...$100
Apostille/Certification Fee ..........................$80-$110
Appeals ...............................................................$50
Application, doctoral ...........................................$75
Application, master’s and credential...................$50
Auditing, per semester hour ..one-half normal tuition
Cap and Gown Fee (doctoral students)….…….$55
CEOL Assessment Fee, per course .....................$9
Competency Exam (CBPM)..............................$100
Continuous Registration (Psy.D., Ed.D.)
1-2 semester hours of tuition..........$960-$1,920
Continuous Registration (D.P.A.),
per term ..........................................$630-$1,260
Course Challenge ........one semester hour of tuition
Dissertation completion ....................................$450
Graduation, doctoral .........................................$300
Graduation, master’s ........................................$160
Health Center (mandatory for all international graduate students and all other graduate students who
qualify and purchase the Student Insurance Plan
separately)
per semester....................$75
per term ...........................$60
Student Medical Insurance (mandatory for all international graduate students),
per semester……………$444
per term .........................$264
International Student Tuition Deposit................$200
Late Financial Arrangement.......................$100-300
Lost ID card ..........................................................$5
Lost Parking Permit, semester/year .........$65; $125
Make-Up Examinations.......................................$40
Missed Payment Fee ..........................................$30
Parking, per semester; per year ...............$65; $125
Placement, Ed.D...............................................$150
Returned Check/Rejected Credit Card ...............$25
Teacher Performance Assessment..............$50-100
Transcript, per copy ..............................................$6
Transcript (24-hour turnaround), per copy..........$15
College of Law
Full-time La Verne Law students are required to pay
six semesters of full-time tuition; part-time students
are required to pay eight semesters of part-time
tuition. These fiscal responsibilities may be lessened
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 27
if students reduce their final semester unit load
because they have taken summer course work, or
have taken semester unit overloads.
Tuition
Full time 12-16 semester hours ...................$12,500
Part time 1-11 semester hours .....................$9,800
Approved academic overload and Summer per
credit hour ................................................$1,000
Fees
Application ..........................................................$50
Bar Readiness, per semester..................$387-$516
Graduation ........................................................$300
Late Financial Arrangement.......................$100-300
Late Registration Fee .......................................$100
Library, per semester ........................................$120
Licensing Exam ..................................................$45
Lost ID card ..........................................................$5
Lost Parking Permit, semester/year .........$65; $125
Missed Payment Fee ..........................................$30
Multipurpose, per semester ..............................$246
Parking, per semester; per year ...............$65; $125
Returned Check/Rejected Credit Card ...............$25
Student Bar Association, per semester ..............$50
Transcript, per copy ..............................................$6
Transcript (24-hour turnaround), per copy..........$15
Regional Campuses, La Verne Online,
and CAPA
Tuition (per semester hour)*
Program
Undergraduate
Regional Campuses
$565
Corporate rate
$465-515
Education Program
$490-590
Military base Regional Campuses $250
Graduate
$720
$620-670
$330
*The University of La Verne reserves the right to
establish a varying tuition rate for new programs
established at new sites when there are unusual
operating conditions.
Fees
Academic Services, per course ..........................$30
Appeals ...............................................................$50
Application ..........................................................$50
Auditing, per semester hour..one-half normal tuition
CEOL Assessment Fee, per course .....................$9
Course Challenge ........one semester hour of tuition
Community Service Assessment ........................$50
Graduation Fee, undergraduate .......................$140
Graduation Fee, master’s .................................$160
Late Financial Arrangement.......................$100-300
Missed Payment Fee ..........................................$30
Professional Development Courses (700-level, nondegree credit), per semester hour...............$110
Returned Check/Rejected Credit Card ...............$25
School Counseling Field Work Doc. .................$150
Teacher Performance Assessment..............$50-100
Transcript, per copy ..............................................$6
Transcript (24-hour turnaround), per copy..........$15
CAPA Professional Development Center
Tuition, per semester hour................................$595
Academic Services Fee, per course...................$30
Appeals Fee........................................................$50
Application Fee ...................................................$50
Auditing, per semester hour .............................$297
CEOL Assessment Fee, per course .....................$9
Course Challenge Fee, per course...................$595
Community Service Assessment ........................$50
Graduation Fee.................................................$140
Health Center Fee (mandatory for all who purchase
accident and health insurance),
per semester .................................................$75
Insurance Medical Services (optional) Fee,
per semester ...............................................$444
Late Financial Arrangement Fee ...............$100-300
Lost ID card ..........................................................$5
Lost Parking Permit, semester/year .........$65; $125
Missed Payment Fee ..........................................$30
Parking, per semester; per year ...............$65; $125
Returned Check Fee...........................................$25
Transcript Fee, per copy.......................................$6
Transcript Fee (24-hour turnaround), per copy ..$15
REFUND/TUITION CREDIT
POLICIES
It is the student’s responsibility to officially notify the
Registrar, or the regional campus where the student
is enrolled, if he or she withdraws from classes at any
point during the semester or term. Failure to attend
class or informing the instructor does not constitute
official withdrawal from a course. Students who have
received (or whose accounts have been credited
with) financial aid funds will have these funds
returned to the appropriate financial aid programs
before any refunds will be issued to the student.
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 28
Policies and procedures on withdrawal are covered
in the “Tuition Credits/Refunds” section below as well
as in the sections entitled “Withdrawal from La Verne
by Financial Aid Recipients” and “Withdrawal from
the University.”
Room and Board Refunds: Refunds for the residence halls will be made according to the terms and
conditions outlined on the Residence Hall License
Agreement. The amount of refund will be determined
by the Housing Office. Board refunds during the Fall,
Winter and Spring terms/ semesters will be calculated on a prorated basis. There will be no refunds for
January Interterm.
Tuition Credits/Refunds: To be eligible for a tuition
credit(s), a student must complete a Program
Change Form, drop or withdraw online before the
tuition credit deadline for the semester or term. The
date of withdrawal for purposes of tuition credit shall
be the date on which the Office of the Registrar (or
the office of the student’s regional campus) receives
the official Program Change Form or withdraws
online. Tuition credits will only be granted for students who officially drop or withdraw in writing or
online before the deadline. If eligible, a refund will be
generated within 14 days of the date your student
account reflects a credit status. Checks are mailed to
your mailing address.
Tuition Refund/Credit Policy: Students who drop
their class(es) through the end of the add/drop period are eligible for 100% refund of tuition and fees.
Students who withdraw from their class(es) 7 business days from the end of the add/drop period are
eligible for 75% refund of tuition charged. Students
who withdraw from their class(es) 7 business days
from the end of the 75% refund period are eligible for
50% refund of tuition charged. Courses that are less
than seven weeks are not eligible for a 50% refund.
The tuition refund policies for dismissal and suspension are the same as for voluntary withdrawal.
Students who receive federal financial aid are subject to a pro-rata return of federal funds through the
60% period of each term or semester, as described
in the Withdrawal from La Verne by Financial Aid
Recipients section of this catalog. The 60% period is
calculated by dividing the number of days enrolled in
the term by the total number of days within the term.
The amount of funds that must be returned is determined by dividing the number of days in the term or
semester that the student was not enrolled by the
total number of days in the term or semester. The
Financial Aid Office will calculate the amount of the
refund to the financial aid programs.
If a student drops classes after the tuition credit period, but before the 60% period of a term, the student
will be charged for the entire amount of tuition, but a
prorated portion of the financial aid will be returned to
the Title IV Program.
Petitions to the stated policy, for medical reasons or
reasons beyond the control of the students, should
be in writing and addressed to the Director of Student
Accounts. Any exceptions to the policy must also be
approved by the Associate Vice President of
Finance.
Student Refunds: A student who is eligible for a
refund due to excess financial aid and who used a
credit card to pay any and all of his or her tuition and
fees will have a refund processed to his or her credit
card up to the amount of the payment. This policy
applies to all credit card transactions, regardless of
the order of payment. Any credit over the amount
paid by credit card will be processed through direct
deposit or paper check.
Delinquent Payment of Tuition
La Verne reserves the right to refuse a diploma or a
transcript to any student or former student who is
delinquent in the payment of any promissory note
given in payment of any tuition, costs, or fees.
Financial holds are placed on the transcripts of students with delinquent accounts, and no transcripts or
diplomas will be issued for such students until the
holds have been removed. Students who have not
met their financial obligations at the beginning or
completion of a semester of enrollment may be withdrawn automatically from all courses in that semester/term. The University reserves the right to request
prepayment before allowing registration for future
terms.
Unpaid balances at the end of each semester may
become interest bearing at the rate of 10% per
annum. Interest on the outstanding balance may be
computed and added monthly to the amount due.
However, if the balance is outstanding for more than
180 days, the interest rate may escalate to 15% per
annum.
If it becomes necessary for the University to seek col-
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 29
lection help and/or initiate legal proceedings to collect unpaid accounts. The student may be responsible for all legal fees incurred.
FINANCIAL AID
Diane Anchundia, Director of Financial Aid
Fernando Ramos, Associate Director of Financial Aid
All students admitted to a degree or certificate program may apply for financial assistance. All student
financial aid (institutional, federal, and state aid) will
be administered by and coordinated through the
Office of Financial Aid located in Woody Hall.
Toll Free Number: 800-649-0160
Email address: [email protected]
Website: laverne.edu/financial-aid/
School Code: 001216
Financial Assistance Eligibility
To be eligible for federal, state, and need-based institutional aid, the student
must:
• Be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident.
• Complete the FAFSA by the priority deadline:
www.fafsa.gov.
• Be accepted for admission to the University as a
regular, degree-seeking student. Non-degree students are ineligible for financial assistance.
• Demonstrate financial need.
• Be enrolled in good standing with at least half-time
status (for federal aid, full-time for institutional aid).
• Maintain satisfactory academic progress.
• Be registered for the draft with the Selective
Service if the student is male, at least 18 years old,
was born after December 31, 1959, and is not a
current member of the active armed service. Males
who are age 26 and older are not required to register with the Selective Service.
• Not be in default on any Title IV loans or owe a
repayment on any Title IV grant.
NOTE: Non-citizens and/or International
Students may qualify for private, University
and/or merit-based aid.
A student who has a drug record may not be eligible
to receive federal student aid. To find out status, call
1-800-433-3243.
University of La Verne Financial Assistance
Policy
La Verne students are limited to a maximum of eight
semesters of institutional financial assistance or until
the requirements of their first degree are completed,
whichever occurs first. Some students may require
less than eight semesters to complete their first
degree. Once students complete their degree
requirements they will no longer be eligible to receive
University-funded financial aid. If students choose to
pursue another degree they may be able to receive
state or federal grants, outside scholarships, or
loans. Students who wish to request an exception to
this policy due to extenuating circumstances may
submit an appeal with supporting documentation to
the Office of Financial Aid.
Types of Assistance: Financial aid is money awarded to assist a student to attend college who would
otherwise not have the opportunity. There are two
types of assistance a student may be awarded: gift
financial aid and self-help financial aid. Gift financial
aid is money the recipient does not have to pay back,
such as University grants and scholarships, outside
scholarships and federal and state grants. Self-help
financial aid includes Federal and private loans,
which must be repaid, and the Federal Work-Study
program, which requires the student to work.
Determination of Financial Aid Awards: Eligibility
for need based financial aid is the difference between
the Cost of Attendance (minimum costs include
tuition, fees, and, if applicable, on-campus housing)
and the Expected Family Contribution (what the federal government says a family can contribute).
Subtract the Expected Family Contribution from the
Cost of Attendance to Determine the financial need
(COA – EFC = FN), or the financial aid eligibility for
need-based financial aid.
The Cost of Attendance is the average cost for a student to attend the University of La Verne for the academic year. The Cost of Attendance includes
allowances for tuition and fees, room and board,
transportation, books/supplies, and personal expenses. However, only the cost of tuition and fees (or on
campus housing, if applicable) must be paid directly
to the University. The total financial aid awarded cannot exceed the total Cost of Attendance.
The Expected Family Contribution is calculated from
the income and asset information a student and
his/her family have provided on the FAFSA. The
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 30
Expected Family Contribution is the dollar amount
the Federal government has determined that a student and his/her family are expected to contribute
toward educational costs for the academic year.
The Office of Financial Aid will determine financial aid
eligibility and award the student institutional, federal,
and state financial aid. Once a student’s financial aid
for the academic year is determined, the Office of
Financial Aid will send the student a Financial Aid
Award Letter along with other important information
and instructions.
The University of La Verne awards institutional financial assistance on the basis of financial need and
merit and does not discriminate on the basis of race,
color, national or ethnic origin, religion, age, sex, disability, or prior military service.
Priority Deadlines: Many financial aid sources are
limited. Failure to meet priority deadlines may result
in the loss of financial aid funds a student may otherwise be eligible to receive.
FAFSA: March 2: If the FAFSA is submitted after
March 2, a student may still be eligible to receive a
Federal Pell Grant and Federal student loans.
Grade Point Average Verification: March 2: The
California Student Aid Commission (CSAC) will not
accept GPA Verification after the March 2 deadline.
To prevent delay in the processing of the FAFSA or
GPA Verification, a student should read and follow
the instructions carefully.
How To Apply for Financial Aid
The 2014-2015 Award Year FAFSA must be used to
apply for financial aid in the 2014-2015 academic
year. La Verne’s academic year begins July 1st and
ends June 30th of the following year.
1. Complete the Online Free Application for
Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), starting January 1:
The fastest and most efficient way to complete the
FAFSA is online at www.fafsa.ed.gov.
Online FAFSA and Online Renewal FAFSA: A new or
renewal FAFSA must be completed on the web. If a
student does not have a Personal Identification
Number (PIN) issued by the federal student aid programs, he/she may request a PIN online at
www.fafsa.ed.gov.
Financial Aid Renewal for Returning Students: All
students must reapply for financial aid annually.
Renewable financial aid is conditionally based on a
student’s ability to maintain academic standards and
financial aid eligibility. Students who filed an electronic FAFSA the previous year and have a PIN will, starting January 1, find their Renewal FAFSA at
www.fafsa.ed.gov.
FAFSA Results: After the Federal processor has
processed a student’s FAFSA, the student will
receive a Student Aid Report (SAR). This summarizes the information on the student’s FAFSA and
indicates the family’s Expected Family Contribution
(EFC), the amount the family is expected to contribute towards the student’s educational expenses
for the academic year. The Office of Financial Aid will
receive the FAFSA results as long as the student has
listed the University of La Verne on the FAFSA or
SAR and the student has been officially admitted into
a degree or certificate program at the University of La
Verne. The school code is 001216.
2. Submit the Grade Point Average Verification
Form: (Non-California residents may skip this step.)
The University of La Verne strongly encourages all
California residents to apply for a Cal Grant. To apply,
a student must submit a GPA Verification to the
California Student Aid Commission by March 2.
“California resident” is defined at www.calgrants.org.
The following high school grades are included in the
GPA calculations for Cal Grants:
High School Seniors: All grades from sophomore and
junior years, including summer school grades earned
following sophomore and junior years, as of the time
of GPA certification, with a few exceptions listed at
www.calgrants.org.
High School Graduates: All grades from sophomore,
junior and senior years of high school, including summer sessions. PE, ROTC, and remedial courses are
excluded.
Transfer Students: For a student who is not enrolled
in high school and who has completed fewer than 24
college semester units, 36 quarter units, or the equivalent, all grades from sophomore, junior and senior
years of high school, except for PE, ROTC, and
remedial courses are included in the grade point
average calculation. If such a student has taken at
least 16 semester units the California Community
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 31
College GPA will be used, but only for the Cal Grant
B Competitive award. For transfer students who are
not enrolled in high school and who have completed
at least 24 college semester units, 36 quarter units or
the equivalent, all college grades received by the
date the college certifies the student’s GPA will be
used.
Continuing La Verne Students: The Registrar automatically submits GPA information to the California
Student Aid Commission for students continually
enrolled at the University of La Verne. Specific
requirements for the Registrar to follow in submitting
GPA information are posted on La Verne Financial
Aid web page at the beginning of January.
It is the student’s responsibility to ensure that the
GPA verification information is submitted to the
California Student Aid Commission by March 2.
3. Submit All Documents Requested to La Verne’s
Office of Financial Aid: Failure to turn all requested
documents into the Office of Financial Aid by the
deadline specified in the request may result in the
loss of financial aid for which the student may otherwise have been eligible.
A student may be selected for “verification.” This
means the student has been selected by the federal
government to provide specific documents verifying
income information, family size, or other supporting
documents.
When this occurs, the student will be notified on the
Student Aid Report (SAR), and the Office of Financial
Aid will send the student a written request or email
notification to submit a completed Verification
Worksheet (downloadable at www.laverne.edu/financial-aid a tax transcript copy or tax transcript from the
IRS, W-2’s, and other necessary documents.
Additional documentation (such as Selective Service
or citizenship documents) may be requested to complete a student’s file. The student’s file is not complete until all required documents, properly filled out,
have been received by the Office of Financial Aid.
Financial aid cannot be awarded until a student’s
financial aid file is complete.
4. Obtain Official Admission to La Verne: A
prospective student may complete the FAFSA and
GPA Verification before he/she is officially admitted to
La Verne. However, financial aid will not be awarded
until the student is officially admitted.
Additional Information
Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy: The federal government requires universities to develop and
enforce an internal system to monitor the academic
progress of financial aid recipients. A student must
maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) in
order to be awarded and remain eligible for financial
aid. The SAP policy includes procedures through
which a student may appeal a determination that satisfactory academic progress is not being met. The full
SAP policy is available at www.laverne.edu/financialaid/ and at the La Verne Office of Financial Aid.
Requirements
The federal government requires that colleges and
universities develop and enforce an internal system
to monitor the academic progress of financial aid
recipients and mandates that financial aid recipients
be making satisfactory academic progress in order to
maintain financial aid eligibility. These standards may
be different than the academic standards required to
remain in the program, to advance to candidacy, or to
earn a degree or certificate. Where differences exist,
the standards set forth in this policy shall be used to
determine eligibility for participation in student financial aid programs at the University of La Verne (La
Verne).
Criteria
Academic progress criteria apply to applicants and
recipients of financial aid programs created under
Title IV regulations of the Higher Education Act of
1965, as amended, as well as to recipients of other
programs used by the Office of Financial Aid at La
Verne to provide students with financial assistance to
achieve their primary educational objective.
Specific programs include the following:
• Federal ACG Grant Federal Perkins Grant
• Cal Grant A Federal SMART Loan
• Cal Grant B Federal Stafford Loan
• Cal
Child
Development
Grant
Federal
Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant
• Federal Graduate PLUS Loan Federal TEACH
Grant
• Federal Pell Grant Federal Work-Study
These standards of satisfactory academic progress
also apply to students receiving agency-sponsored
assistance; and participation in all scholarship, grant,
loan or employment programs provided through La
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 32
Verne funds. La Verne has developed the standards
described in this policy.
Standards
At the end of each academic year, the academic
progress of financial aid applicants is measured by
the criteria listed below. Students must meet all of the
following standards:
• Maintain a minimum grade point average, and
• Complete a minimum number of units each academic year, and
• Complete no more than 150% of units required to
complete primary educational objective, and
• Complete the primary educational objective within a
maximum time frame.
Students who do not meet the satisfactory academic
progress standards and or who fail to maintain satisfactory academic progress will be disqualified from
receiving future financial aid.
Initial Review
The academic progress of financial aid applicants
and recipients are reviewed at least once annually,
primarily at the end of the academic year. There are
two categories within the standards of satisfactory
academic progress that students must meet: qualitative and quantitative. Students who meet or exceed
these standards are said to be making satisfactory
academic progress. Students who do not meet one
or more of the standards should refer to the sections
identified below that are related to Financial Aid,
Ineligibility, and the Appeal Process.
Qualitative Standards (the degree of excellence)
At the time of review, a student’s official cumulative
grade point average is evaluated to determine
whether qualitative standards are being met. To
maintain satisfactory academic progress, students
must meet the minimum grade point average requirements for continued enrollment at La Verne, as stated in the La Verne catalog under academic information: Academic Progress and Probation. Grade point
averages are based on the official cumulative record
of the student at the time of review. Official grade
point averages may include work earned at prior
schools.
1. Minimum Grade Point Average (GPA)
GPA Program
2.00 Students pursuing an undergraduate certificate, degree, teacher credential, or JD
degree must maintain this minimum “cumula-
3.00
tive” GPA.
Students pursuing a doctoral degree, a graduate degree or graduate certificate must
maintain this minimum “cumulative” GPA.
Quantative Standards (the amounts or proportions)
At the time of review, a student’s ratio of the number
of semester hours earned is compared to the semester hours attempted to determine whether quantitative standards are being met. To maintain satisfactory academic progress, students must complete at
least 67 % of the units attempted each academic
year. Paralegal certificate students by definition are
considered undergraduate students based upon the
program length, regardless of the number of units
earned. Teacher credential students are considered
post baccalaureate degree students and not graduates. Courses taken as incompletes, withdrawals,
repetitions and all transfer credits accepted by the
university from other institutions will be calculated as
units attempted. This includes repeat courses and
courses taken with a grade options: WF, CRD, NCR,
WNC, INC, IP, NG and W will be counted as units
attempted.
2. Minimum percentage completed per academic
year
%
Program
67% Students pursuing an undergraduate degree
must complete this minimum percentage of
units.
67% Students pursuing a graduate degree must
complete this minimum percentage of units.
67% Students pursuing a doctoral degree or J.D.
degree must complete this minimum percentage of units.
Unit Cap
The academic progress standards for students
receiving financial aid are more restrictive than for
the general student population. The standards are
based upon a reasonable expectation of academic
progress toward an educational objective. Students
who exceed 150% of the maximum number of units
required to complete their degrees are not considered to be making satisfactory academic progress
toward their certificate or degree.
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 33
1. Maximum number of units attempted
Units Program
192
Students pursuing an undergraduate degree
must not exceed this maximum number of
units attempted.
45-92 Students pursuing a graduate degree must
not exceed this maximum number of units
attempted.
81-180 Students pursuing a doctoral degree must not
exceed this maximum number of units
attempted.
126
Candidates for the J.D. degree must not
exceed this maximum number of units
attempted.
Maximum Time Frame
Students not completing their degrees within the
maximum time frame are not considered to be making satisfactory academic progress toward their certificate or degree. All terms of enrollment will count
toward the maximum time frame as well as any transfer credits. Enrollment in terms/semesters in which
no financial aid is received will be included in the
maximum time limit. Enrollment in summer
sessions/terms will count toward the maximum time
frame, grade point average, and unit requirements.
Undergraduate
Students
Terms Years Status Conditions
18
6 Full-time Students pursuing
Graduate
Students
JD Students
an undergraduate
degree will be
allowed this maximum time frame to
complete a degree.
Terms Years Status Conditions
9
3 Full-time Students pursuing
a graduate degree
will be allowed this
maximum
time
frame to complete
a degree.
Terms Years Status Conditions
12
6 Full-Time Students pursuing
a JD degree will be
allowed this maximum time frame to
complete a degree.
Certificate Program Students
Students pursuing approved certificate programs will
be monitored on the basis of each certificate program
requirements.
Failure to Maintain Standards
At the end of each academic year, the Office of
Financial Aid notifies students who do not meet satisfactory academic progress requirements, in writing.
Students who fail to meet the satisfactory academic
progress standards are disqualified from receiving
future financial aid.
The Appeal Process
Students may be given the opportunity to appeal the
determination that they are not meeting the satisfactory academic progress standards. Appeals for
reestablishing eligibility are based on extenuating circumstances. Examples of extenuating circumstances include, but are not limited to: injury; extended illness; one-time extenuating circumstances that
have since been resolved; and enrollment limitations
due to academic advisement.
The student must obtain, complete, and submit,
along with any supporting documentation, a
University of La Verne Academic Satisfactory
Academic Progress Appeal Request Form to the
Office of Financial Aid. The appeal will be evaluated
and the student will be notified of the decision within
21 days of the submitted request.
Regaining Financial Aid Eligibility
Students who have lost eligibility for financial aid due
to lack of academic progress can be reinstated by
successfully completing sufficient units to meet the
desired standards. The student must notify the
Financial Aid Office once the units have been completed. If extenuating circumstances apply, the student must submit a Satisfactory Academic Progress
Appeal Form along with supporting documentation to
the Financial Aid Office. If a student’s SAP appeal is
granted and approved, he/she will be placed on
financial aid probation during the time outlined in
their Probation letter. If at the end of the student’s
financial aid probation period he/she fails to maintain
the minimum standards of financial aid the student
will be ineligible to receive future financial aid.
Financial Aid Disqualification
Students who fail to meet the minimum standards of
the Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress
Policy are no longer eligible to receive financial aid at
the University of La Verne.
Academic Disqualification
Students who are academically disqualified are no
longer eligible to receive financial aid at the
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 34
University of La Verne.
Financial Aid Disbursements
Financial aid funds are disbursed through the Office
of Student Accounts. The total amount of financial aid
for the academic year is divided among semesters or
terms for which the student is enrolled, as reflected
on the financial aid award letter. Students must meet
eligibility requirements before financial aid is disbursed. Eligibility requirements include, but may not
be limited to the following: being officially admitted
into an eligible program, enrolling in the correct number of units in classes leading toward the student’s
degree, maintaining satisfactory academic progress,
and completing necessary documentation. The disbursement schedule is listed on the Student
Accounts website at
sites.laverne.edu/student-accounts/disbursements/
Disbursement for La Verne Students Borrowing a
Federal Direct Loan for the First Time: As well as
meeting the above criteria, a new borrower must
complete a Federal Direct Loan Program Master
Promissory Note (MPN) with the Direct Loan program at https://studentloans.gov/, and complete an
entrance counseling session online at https://studentloans.gov/, before receiving student loan funds.
Each semester or term, Federal Direct Loan and
Federal Direct PLUS Loan funds are forwarded to La
Verne. The funds are disbursed after the add/drop
period. The net loan amount (gross loan amount
minus the loan origination fee) is forwarded to
Student Accounts each semester/term after the student’s enrollment and satisfactory academic
progress have been verified. If a student is not
enrolled at least half time, or is not making satisfactory academic progress, student loan funds will not
be disbursed. The student is responsible for repaying
only the amount of student loan funds disbursed.
Notice of Disbursement and Right to Cancel
Federal Loans: Students and borrowers have the
right to cancel the entire loan or any portion (a specific disbursement) of any federal Direct, Perkins or
PLUS loan. Requests to cancel a specific loan disbursement may be submitted prior to the date of
crediting to the student’s account or within 14 days
from the date the student receives official notification
from the Student Accounts Office that loan funds
have credited to the student’s account. To request
cancellation of a loan disbursement, the student can
complete a Request to Cancel and Return Loans
Form located on the Student Accounts section of the
University of La Verne website. Interest will not be
charged and loan fees will be returned to the loan
holder. Cancelling a loan disbursement could cause
a balance to be due which the student will be responsible for paying. This is especially true if the student
received a bookstore voucher or a refund due to
excess funds (credit balance) on the account.
Repayment After the Designated Time Period:
Students cannot cancel the loan disbursement if the
designated time period described above has already
passed. Instead, students can repay the loan disbursement directly by contacting the loan holder
(Direct Loan Servicer for Federal Direct Loans or the
Student Loan Specialist at the University of La Verne
for Perkins Loan). The borrower (the student for student loans; the parent borrower for parent loans) will
be responsible for any interest that may have
accrued and/or any loan fees.
Cal Grant B Access Authorization: The Office of
Financial Aid mails to all Cal Grant B Access recipients an authorization form. The Cal Grant B recipient’s “access” portion of the Cal Grant award cannot
be applied to his or her student account unless the
student completes and submits a Cal Grant B Access
Form to the Office of Student Accounts, which is the
office that disburses financial aid.
Repayment of Federal Loans: Repayment of the
Federal Direct Loans begins six months after the student graduates, drops below half-time enrollment
status, or withdraws from school. A variety of repayment options and loan assumption programs are
available to borrowers, and the information about
these options may be obtained from the Federal
Direct Loan program. Repayment information is also
available in the financial aid award packet and at the
La Verne Office of Financial Aid. Repayment of the
Federal Direct Parent PLUS Loan can begin 60 days
after the last disbursement if the parent chooses.
However, parents are now eligible to defer their
Direct Parent PLUS Loan payments until after their
dependent graduates. The Federal Direct Loan program at https://studentloans.gov, can provide specific information regarding this new benefit.
Withdrawal from La Verne by Financial Aid
Recipients: A student receiving Federal Pell Grants,
Federal Perkins Loans, Federal Direct Loans,
Federal Direct PLUS Loans, and/or Federal
Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants
(SEOG) who withdraws from La Verne is subject to
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 35
the Return of Federal Funds provision included in the
regulations governing the administration of Federal
Student Aid Funds. Any amount established by the
Return to Federal Funds provision will be returned to
the Federal programs in the following order:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Federal Unsubsidized Direct Loan
Federal Subsidized Direct Loan
Federal Perkins Loan
Federal Direct Parent PLUS Loan
Federal Direct Grad PLUS Loan
Federal Pell Grant
Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity
Grant
• Other Title IV grant funds
Federal Student Aid Programs
The University of La Verne participates in the Federal
Campus-Based financial aid programs. Federal
grants received and Work-Study funds earned do not
have to be repaid; however, loans must be repaid.
Graduate students are not eligible to receive federal
grants. The Federal Perkins Loan and Federal WorkStudy programs are available to graduate students.
Federal Pell Grants are awarded to undergraduate
students on the basis of financial need. Students
enrolled in the fifth-year Teacher Credential program
are not eligible to receive Federal Pell Grants. During
the 2014-2015 academic year, Federal Pell Grant
awards will range from $587 to $5,730. A student
cannot receive Federal Pell Grant funds from more
than one institution for the same period of enrollment.
If more than one institution submits a request for payment to the Federal Pell Grant Program for the same
period of enrollment, one of the schools will be
required to withdraw the Federal Pell Grant award
from the student’s financial aid. The student will ultimately be responsible for any balance resulting from
the duplicate enrollment.
Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity
Grants (FSEOG) are awarded to undergraduate students with exceptional financial need. Students
enrolled in the fifth-year Teacher Credential program
are not eligible to receive Federal SEOG Grants.
During the 2014-2015 academic year, FSEOG Grant
awards will range from $500 to $3,000. Students
must be enrolled at least half-time to receive FSEOG
Grants.
Federal Perkins Loans, are student loans awarded
to students with exceptional financial need. During
the 2013-2014 academic year, Federal Perkins Loan
awards will range from $375 to $4,500. Students
must be enrolled at least half-time to receive Federal
Perkins Loans.
Federal Work-Study (FWS) funds are awarded to
students with the greatest financial need. Federal
Work Study is a paid work opportunity to eligible
applicants, allowing students to earn money to pay
for educational expenses. Employment may not
exceed 20 hours per week during periods when
school is in session in the fall and spring semesters.
Every effort is made to place students in work related to their studies, career plans, or community service.
Federal Direct Loans are available to eligible students. There are two types of Direct Loans:
Subsidized, for which the government pays the interest while students are in school, and during the grace
period and deferment periods; and Unsubsidized, for
which students pay all the interest on the loan.
Students may defer the interest while enrolled at
least half-time; however, the interest continues to
accrue. Students may receive both types of loans at
the same time, if eligible. For loans originated
between July 1, 2013 and June 30, 2014, the interest
rate is 3.68%.
Federal Direct Loan Limits: Dependent undergraduates and fifth-year Teacher Credential students may
be eligible to borrow up to $31,000 of which no more
than $23,000 may be in subsidized loans.
Independent undergraduate Students: $57,500 of
which no more than $23,000 may be in subsidized
loans. Graduate, professional program and College
of Law students may be eligible to borrow up to
$138,500 of which no more than $65,500 may be in
subsidized loans. Clinical Psychology (Psy.D.) students may be eligible to borrow up to $224,000 of
which no more than $65,500 may be in subsidized
loans.
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 36
Year In School
Subsidized &
Additional
Additional
Unsubsidized Unsubsidized Unsubsidized
Dependent
Independent
Freshman
$3,500
Sophomore
$4,500
Junior
$5,500
Senior
$5,500
5th Year
$5,500
5th Year Teaching
Credential
$5,500
Graduate-Law
Clinical Psychology
$2,000
$2,000
$2,000
$2,000
$2,000
$6,000
$6,000
$7,000
$7,000
$7,000
$7,000
$20,500
$33,712
Federal Direct Parent PLUS Loans are offered to
the Parent or Stepparent of dependent undergraduate students. “Dependent student” is defined under
“Announcements” on “The Student Guide and
Funding your Education” at www.studentaid.ed.gov.
Parent borrowers in this program may borrow up to
the total cost of attendance minus other financial aid
offered. Federal Direct Parent PLUS Loan origination
fees are 4.204% (for loans first disbursed on or after
July 1, 2013 and before November 30, 2013) and
4.288% (for loans first disbursed on or after
December 1, 2013 and before September 30, 2014.)
and the interest rate on the funds borrowed will not
exceed 6.41%. A parent borrower’s credit record will
be checked prior to the loan approval, and creditworthy applicants will be required to complete a
Federal Direct Parent PLUS Loan application and
promissory note. A dependent applicant whose parents are denied the Federal Direct Parent PLUS
Loan will automatically be considered for an
Unsubsidized Direct Loan. Interested students
should contact the Office of Financial Aid for further
details.
Federal Direct PLUS Loans for Graduate or
Professional Students (Grad PLUS): Students
enrolled in graduate (master’s and doctoral programs) or professional programs (law school) are eligible to borrow under the Federal Direct Grad PLUS
Loan Program up to their cost of attendance minus
other financial assistance. These requirements
include a determination that the applicant does not
have an adverse credit history, repayment beginning
on the date of the last disbursement of the loan, and
a fixed interest rate of 8.5 percent in the Direct Loan
Program. Applicants for these loans are required to
complete the Free Application for Federal Student
Aid (FAFSA) and must have applied for their annual
loan maximum eligibility under the Federal
Subsidized and Unsubsidized Direct Loan Program
before being considered for a Federal Direct Grad
PLUS Loan.
California Grant Programs
For detailed information on specific state programs,
see the California Student Aid Commission’s website
at www.calgrants.org
Cal Grants A and B, the largest scholarship source
awarded to undergraduate students that is funded by
the state of California, and are administered by the
California Student Aid Commission. Cal Grants A and
B do not need to be repaid and may be received for
up to four years. California residents who are La
Verne undergraduates or applicants for undergraduate admission should apply for these grants. The tentative maximum award for new Cal Grant recipients
for the 2014-2015 academic year is $8,056. The tentative maximum award for new Cal Grant B recipients is $1,472. The awards are contingent upon the
2014-2015 California State Budget approval.
Cal Grants A and B extended benefits provide an
additional year of assistance for recipients who are
enrolled in a teaching credential program. To extend
benefits a student must complete a G-44 form,
Request for Cal Grant Teaching Credential Program
Benefits, available in the “Participants Forms and
Applications” section under “Publications” at
www.csac.ca.gov.
California Specialized Programs
Assumption Program of Loans for Education
(APLE) assumes up to $19,000 in education loans in
exchange for teaching service at a designated school
or in a designated subject. APLE participants must
commit to teach at least four consecutive years at a
California public school, either in a designated subject or a designated school. To qualify, students must
have completed at least 60 units, be enrolled each
term at least half-time in coursework required for a
bachelor’s degree or an initial teaching credential,
and have received, or be approved to receive, a
Federal Direct Student Loan, Perkins, or any private
loan associated with obtaining a bachelor’s degree or
an initial teaching credential. To view the entire eligibility criteria go to www.laverne.edu/financial-aid/ and
click on the APLE Program link. The Office of
Financial Aid announces application deadlines.
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 37
Child Development Grants are for outstanding students who are pursuing a child development permit
as a teacher, master teacher, site supervisor, or program director to work at a licensed children’s center.
Selected students attending a four-year university
may receive $2,000 each year, for up to two years.
The maximum amount awarded is $6,000. Grant
recipients must work full time at an eligible California
children’s center for one year for each year they
receive grants. To qualify, students must be enrolled
at least half-time in coursework leading to their permit during the 2013-2014 academic year. Contact the
Office of Financial Aid for more information. This program is subject to the availability of California state
funds.
California Chafee Grants offer up to $5,000 a year
for college or vocational training. To qualify, a student
must be a current or former foster youth and hot have
reached 22 years of age as of July 1 of the award
year. A student must attend school at least half time,
and be enrolled in a program of study of at least one
year in length. Youth who have “aged out” of another
state’s foster care program and who now live in
California are eligible to apply. Applicants must file
the FAFSA and submit a California Chafee Grant
Application, available at www.chafee.csac.ca.gov
University of La Verne Programs
La Verne Grants: To be eligible for consideration for
La Verne grants, a student must be admitted through
the Office of Undergraduate Admission at the central
campus and be enrolled as a full-time undergraduate
student. La Verne Grants are awarded based on
financial need as determined by the Free Application
for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and the student’s
high school grade point average and SAT/ACT
scores.
La Verne Academic Scholarships: To be eligible for
consideration for a La Verne academic scholarship, a
student must be admitted through the Office of
Undergraduate Admission at the central campus and
be enrolled as a full-time undergraduate student.
Academic (merit) scholarships are not need based
and are annually renewable based on full-time enrollment and satisfactory academic progress. La Verne
academic scholarships are awarded to first-time college students based on high school grades in college
preparatory coursework only and SAT/ACT scores at
the time of admission. La Verne academic scholarships are awarded to transfer students based on the
college GPA at the time of admission. Information on
scholarship requirements is available through the
Office of Undergraduate Admission.
La Verne Performance Scholarships: Twelve
Performance Scholarships will be awarded to incoming freshmen and transfer students with outstanding
potential. Two each will be awarded in the six areas
of fine arts:
Art (Painting or Sculpture)
Communications (Video Production)
Music (Voice or Instrument)
Photography
Speech (Debate)
Theatre (Performance or Design)
Each Performance Scholarship recipient receives a
$20,000 yearly award for four years. Scholarships
are renewable annually for up to four years of undergraduate study based on the student’s academic
progress and participation in the program. Although
students are encouraged to major, they must at least
minor in the area of study to be applicable for the
scholarship.
To receive consideration for a La Verne Performance
Scholarship, a student must be admitted through the
Office of Undergraduate Admission at the central
campus and be enrolled as a full-time student. The
deadline to apply for the Performance Scholarship is
February 1st annually. Audition or some other work is
required as determined by the academic department.
International Student Scholastic Awards: To be
eligible for consideration for an International Student
Scholarship Award, a student must be admitted
through the Office of Undergraduate Admission at the
central campus and be enrolled as a full-time student. La Verne International Student Scholastic
Awards are awarded to first-time college students or
to transfer students at the point of admission to La
Verne. Award requirements are available through the
Office of Undergraduate Admission.
University of La Verne Loans: This is a student
loan. To be eligible for consideration of a La Verne
Loan, a student must be admitted through the Office
of Undergraduate Admission at the central campus
and be enrolled as a full-time student. La Verne
Loans are interest free during the student’s enrollment. Recipients must have a minimum 2.5 GPA,
and have graduated from a California high school.
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 38
Repayment begins after graduation or withdrawal
from La Verne.
Graduate Scholarships and Assistantships:
Based on merit, these awards are made to graduate
students who have been nominated by their departments and approved by the Dean. These scholarships cannot exceed 25% of any semester’s tuition.
Application must be made each semester through
the department.
Honors Program Scholarships: To be eligible for
consideration for an Honors Program Scholarship, a
student must be admitted through the Office of
Undergraduate Admission at the central campus and
be enrolled as a full-time student. These scholarships
are offered for the Spring Semester after completing
Honors 101 and 102 with the Galapagos trip. The
recipients are awarded $2,000 in addition to other La
Verne institutional scholarships.
Private Alternative Loans: Students enrolled less
than half time, are eligible to apply for a loan through
a private bank, credit union or other lending agency.
The lender determines eligibility. The requirements
include determination that the applicant does not
have any adverse credit history and is credit-worthy.
Each lender has different criteria, interest rates and
repayment provisions. Students who obtain private
alternative loans based upon less than half-time
enrollment do not meet the requirements for a federal deferment.
The Office of Financial Aid requires the student to
submit a FAFSA to determine eligibility for the lowercost federal loans before certifying any private alternative loans. Where students qualify for the federal
loans, they will not be permitted to decline those
loans in favor of a larger alternative loan. If students
meet requirements, they will be required to first
accept the federal loans before receiving private
alternative loans. The private alternative loan cannot
exceed the cost of attendance less any financial aid
awarded. A private alternative loan may be used to
replace the expected family contribution (EFC).
Holds on Records: Students who receive Federal
Perkins Loans and or University of La Verne Loans
and fail to fulfill the requirements outlined in the
promissory note will have a hold placed on their transcripts, diploma, grades, and future registrations until
the student has satisfied the requirements.
BENEFITS OTHER THAN FINANCIAL
AID
Veterans Administration Benefits: Students who
meet the definition of a “veteran” may be eligible for
Veterans Administration (VA) benefits. Prior to
enrolling, veterans should contact the La Verne campus they wish to attend to determine if the site is VA
approved for educational benefits. Students wishing
to receive VA benefits at an approved site should
contact the Registrar or the local La Verne campus
director at or before the time of registration in order
to complete the necessary paperwork.
The Veterans Administration requires all entering veterans to be formally admitted to the University before
becoming eligible to receive VA benefits. All prior
transcripts and military documents must be received
and evaluated by the Office of the Registrar prior to
the second semester of attendance. Once veterans
have been admitted and evaluated, they must notify
the certifying official of their program each term or
semester of enrollment.
To maintain eligibility, veterans must successfully
complete all units enrolled. Veterans who fail to maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress for two semesters (or three terms) will be disqualified and will have
their benefits terminated. For an explanation of grading policy, see the Grades section of this catalog or
contact the Registrar’s Office. For additional information or questions regarding military and veteran
benefits, please contact the Office of Veteran Student
Success at 909-448-4416.
Yellow Ribbon Program: The University of La
Verne is pleased to participate in the Yellow Ribbon
Program. The Yellow Ribbon Program is a partnership between the University of La Verne and the
Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). The program is
a provision of the Post 9/11 Veterans Educational
Assistance Act of 2008 and is designed to help students supplement their Post 9/11 GI Bill Tuition
Benefits. For additional information or questions
regarding military and veteran benefits, please contact the Office of Veteran Student Success at 909448-4416.
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 39
ACADEMIC
INFORMATION
Academic Communication
The University student portal is called MyLaVerne.
MyLaVerne provides student access to the
University’s official Course Catalog, course schedules for every term, and student information.
MyLaVerne can be accessed from the University’s
homepage at laverne.edu or the La Verne portal at
myportal.laverne.edu. Registration, grade reporting,
online request for transcripts, and course evaluation
are all accomplished through MyLaVerne. Students
can also access and accept their financial aid award
information, check account balance and make payments to their account through MyLaVerne. For information on MyLaVerne see
laverne.edu/registrar/mylaverne-info/.
All enrolled students are provided a University of La
Verne email address and network username. This
provides students access to their MyLaVerne
secured account and campus portal. Students
should not share their La Verne network, MyLaVerne,
or email information/password with anyone at any
time.
All official communication between the University and
students is conducted electronically and sent to the
students’ La Verne e-mail address (@laverne.edu).
Students are expected to open and check their campus email on a regular basis. We expect students to
read, respond and archive all official correspondence
from the University. Students are responsible for all
information communicated via their @laverne.edu email address. Students using other e-mail addresses
should have mail forwarded from the La Verne e-mail
address so that official messages are not missed.
Students should also use their La Verne email
address to communicate with university officials.
Communication with University employees and faculty in regards to any academic or financial information
will not normally be replied to if the student does not
use their La Verne email address. This is to protect
the privacy of student information.
Academic Advising
The University of La Verne values academic advising
as an important part of the unique La Verne experience. The Office of Academic Advising facilitates
individualized advising for traditional undergraduate
students. The office assigns faculty advisors in each
student’s field of study, advises undeclared majors,
and provides advising support to traditional-age students and their advisors. Students are invited to seek
guidance or request a change in advisor by visiting or
calling the office in Woody Hall, ext. 4510.
Central campus graduate students are advised by
the faculty program chairperson for their respective
programs. Graduate students seeking academic
advising should contact the appropriate academic
department or the Graduate Office.
Academic advising for ROC students begins on the
student’s first visit to the regional campus. Students
work closely with academic advisors in selecting a
major and choosing courses each term which best
suit their degree and career plans. A professional
academic advisor is available for every ROC student.
By signing the registration form, or by gaining a pin
number from the student’s primary major advisor in
web registration, the student signifies that he or she
takes responsibility for classes selected. The academic advisor’s signature on the registration form, or
the issuing of a pin number to traditional age undergraduates and Central Campus graduate students,
indicates that the advisor has reviewed the student’s
class choices and has offered appropriate advice.
Placement Examination Requirements for
Traditional Undergraduates: Placement examinations in writing and math are administered to determine a student’s level of proficiency at the time of
testing in order to establish the appropriate placement level. The test results are used for advising and
placement into the appropriate courses prior to registration. No credit hours are granted for these exams.
There is no charge for taking these exams.
Placement tests are administered by the Learning
Enhancement Center in math, writing, and foreign
languages. Examinations are administered on
scheduled dates throughout the academic year. A La
Verne ID is required in order to take a placement
exam.
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 40
Writing Examinations: All new freshmen students
are expected to take a writing placement exam for
appropriate placement into Written Communication A
or B. Transfer students who have a passing score of
3, 4, or 5 on the Advanced Placement English
Language or English Literature exam, or have transferred the appropriate college level writing course(s)
from another institution that satisfy the Written
Communication A and/or B General Education
requirements. Students are expected to enroll in writing courses each semester until they satisfy both the
Written Communication A and B requirements.
Questions concerning writing placement should be
directed to the Director of the Writing Program,
Department of Modern Languages.
Mathematics Examinations: All new freshmen and
transfer students are expected to take a mathematics
placement exam unless they have earned a passing
score of 3, 4, or 5 on the Advanced Placement
Calculus AB or BC exam or transferred the appropriate college level math course that meets the
Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Transfer students may be required to repeat, without additional
credit, one or more semesters of instruction in mathematics if their skills are judged insufficient at the
time of testing. Students are expected to enroll in
math courses each semester until they satisfy the
requirement. Individual departments may have different timelines for completing this requirement.
Students should check with their advisors to develop
a plan to complete the Quantitative Reasoning
requirement. General questions concerning math
placement should be directed to the Chair of the
Mathematics, Physics, and Computer Sciences
Department.
Foreign Language Examinations: Students are not
required to take a foreign language examination, but
they are strongly encouraged to take a placement
exam prior to first enrollment. Selected majors
require a foreign language as stated in the General
Education Requirements section of this catalog. The
second semester of a foreign language fulfills one
course in the Humanities area of general education.
International Students: Upon arrival at the
University of La Verne, international students are
expected to take the mathematics placement exam
and the Writing Placement Exam for Multilingual
Writers. Questions concerning the Proficiency Test
should be directed to the Modern Languages
Department.
Registration/Adds/Drops/
Withdrawls
Registration
Registration is the process by which a student
selects a course or courses for academic credit for a
term or semester. The registration process is the
responsibility of the student which includes (1)
selecting courses, (2) reserving space in the courses
by making financial arrangements, and (3) paying for
the courses. The awarding of academic credit,
including the issuance of final grades, can only be
done after all three steps are completed for the specified term or semester. Students are not allowed to
attend classes for which they have not officially registered. Students who do not attend the first class
session or log in as described above may be administratively dropped (see the Class Attendance section
of this catalog). Students are obligated to make
financial arrangements for courses they have
enrolled in. Financial arrangement must be made
prior to the first day of the semester/term.
A student adding a course to his or her initial schedule needs to follow all three steps listed above.
Students are expected to complete their registration/add by the first day of classes. To assure their
seats, students must attend all of their classes during
the first week of each term or semester.
Registration for the traditional 16-week Fall Semester
begins in the spring and continues through the first 7
workdays of the semester. Registration for the Spring
Semester begins in the fall and continues through the
first 7 workdays of the semester.
Registration for 10 - 11week terms begins approximately three weeks prior to the first day of the enrollment term. Registration continues through the first 7
workdays of the term without a late fee.
Registration for 5 or 6 week terms begins approximately three weeks prior to the first day of the enrollment term. Registration continues through the first 5
workdays of the term without a late fee.
Registration for the January Interterm begins in the
fall and continues through the fourth day of classes.
Full-time traditional undergraduate students who
were full-time during the fall may take up to five units
during January Interterm at no additional charge
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 41
regardless of whether or not the course is required
for the degree. Registration for 4-week summer
terms begins in the spring and continues through the
fourth day of classes for each term. Registration for
classes that meet 1-6 days only must be completed
prior to the first class meeting.
Students enrolling in CAPA cycle classes must be
enrolled prior to the first class meeting on the Friday
of the first full weekend.
Registration dates are available at laverne.edu/registrar for Main Campus semesters. Registration dates
for Main Campus terms can be obtained from the
appropriate academic department. Registration
dates for Regional Campuses can be obtained from
the appropriate Regional Campus. Contact numbers
are included in the catalog and online.
The Change of Program period begins when registration opens and continues through the first 7 workdays of the term/semester. A late fee will be
assessed beginning the 8th workday of the
term/semester.
Registration for special courses such as independent
studies and directed studies are permitted for CAPA
and graduate students through 60% of the term or
semester. A late fee will be assessed beginning the
8th day of a term or semester. All special courses
need to be processed in person.
All La Verne students register and make program
changes through their MyLaVerne account. The La
Verne Course Catalog and all schedules of courses
are available on MyLaVerne. All students can verify
the courses they have enrolled in for a specified term
and the amount they will be obligated to make payment arrangements on their MyLaVerne Account. A
student who registers and decides not to attend the
course(s) must follow the Drops and Withdrawals
policy printed in this section. Complete registration
information and procedures are available at laverne.edu/registrar.
Late Registration/Adds: Students must have permission of the instructor of the class to appeal for late
entry into a class. Students cannot assume an
instructor will allow entry to a class if they do not
attend the first class meeting. Students must obtain
and complete the appropriate appeal form and submit to the Undergraduate or Graduate Academic
Appeals Committee. Further information can be
obtained in the Appeals section in the catalog.
Late Registration/Adds by appeals with fee begins as
indicated below:
1. Enrolling the 8th workday of a semester or term
or thereafter.
2. Enrolling in a January Interterm course on the 5th
workday of class or thereafter.
3. Enrolling in a 5-6 week term course on the 6th
workday of class or thereafter.
4. Enrolling in a weekend cycle class on the
Saturday of the first full weekend or later. Appeal
is not required on the Saturday of the first full
weekend, but payment of the late fee is.
Waitlist: A student can make a request to be on a
waiting list for closed classes. This will list the student name on the class roster to notify the instructor
they wish to enroll in a specified class. Not all classes will allow a wait list. If a course has the wait list
option this will be designated on the schedule of
courses. A student can view how many wait list
spaces are available for a specified course. If there
is still a seat available the student can request that
space on MyLaVerne. The registration system will
automatically notify a student when a space is available. Upon receipt of notification that a space is
available a student must immediately enroll officially
into the class.
Dropping a Class: Dropping a class is the process
through which students officially notify the Registrar
or Regional Campus of their intention to not attend a
class or classes. Classes that are officially dropped
are not posted on the student’s official transcript.
Failure to drop a class will result in a failing grade.
Drops can be processed via the students MyLaVerne
account. Students should view the academic calendar for their semester/term to determine the last day
to drop. The time period to drop a class is indicated
below:
1. To drop a class from a term or semester that is 10
weeks or greater a student can initiate the Drop
beginning the first day of open enrollment
through the first seven work days (Monday
through Sunday) of the term or semester, excluding university holidays. CAPA Weekend Cycles
and Accelerated term students must also drop
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 42
classes within the first seven work days of the
term.
2. To drop a class for January Interterm or a term 4
weeks or less in length a student can initiate a
Drop beginning the first day of open enrollment
through the 4th workday of the term.
3. To drop a class from a term that is 5 – 6 weeks in
length a student can initiate a Drop beginning the
first day of open enrollment through the 5th workday of the term.
Withdrawal from Class: Withdrawal is the process
through which a student officially notifies the
Registrar or regional campus of their intent to not
attend a class or classes after the drop period is over.
Withdrawals are recorded on the student’s official
transcript as a W.
Withdrawals can be processed via the students
MyLaVerne account. The withdrawal period for terms
and semesters is indicated below:
1. The withdrawal period for a term or semester
class that is 10 weeks in length or greater begins
the 8th workday (Monday through Sunday) of the
term or semester, excluding university holidays
and continues through 60% of the term or semester. CAPA Weekend Cycles and Accelerated term
students may also withdraw from classes beginning the 8th day of the term dates through 60% of
the term.
2. The withdrawal period for January Interterm or 4
weeks in length or less begins the 5th workday of
the term and continues through 60% of the term.
3. The withdrawal period for a term 5-6 week in
length, begins the 6th day of the terms through
60% of the term.
4. Students enrolled in a class that meets 2-6 consecutive days must withdraw before the second
class meeting commences.
5. Students enrolled in a class that meets for one
day only cannot withdraw.
Students can submit their request to withdraw in person, by phone, e-mail, letter, or fax to the Registrar or
regional campus center. Students should view the
academic calendar for their semester/term to determine the last day to withdraw. A student who fails to
withdraw officially from a registered course will
receive a failing grade (NCR, F, WF, WNC) Faculty
are required to submit a student’s last date of attendance for all students who stop attending classes
prior to the last day to withdraw.
The University assumes that the student who drops
or withdraws during a term or semester will return the
following term or semester. A student not intending to
return to La Verne in the following term or semester
needs to follow the Withdrawal process from the
University or Leave of Absence procedures outlined
in the appropriate section below.
Complete Drop and Withdrawal procedures can be
found at laverne.edu/registrar/, including applicable
deadlines.
Leave of Absence: A student who finds it necessary
to interrupt his or her studies at the University of La
Verne and desires to return may apply to the
Registrar for a leave of absence prior to leaving the
University. The Leave Of Absence form requires signatures from Student Accounts, Financial Aid, and
the Office of Academic Advising. With a Leave Of
Absence, an undergraduate student may be absent
from La Verne for no more than two semesters and a
graduate student may be absent from La Verne for
up to four semesters without reapplying for admission. Among the acceptable reasons for granting a
Leave Of Absence are financial or medical problems
and military duties. Students are required to keep the
University informed about plans for return; otherwise,
they will be considered withdrawn.
Withdrawal from the University: A student who
wishes to withdraw in good standing must obtain a
“Notice of Withdrawal’’ application from the
Registrar’s Office and have it signed by his/her
Academic Advisor, Student Accounts, Financial Aid,
and the Office of Academic Advising. Students who
are transferring to another institution must fill out a
Notice of Withdrawal form. If the student is also withdrawing from courses, a “Program Request and
Change Form” signed by the student’s advisor is also
required. Students who fail to officially withdraw from
classes will receive failing grades. The effective date
of withdrawal is the date the student officially withdraws from all courses or the final day of the term.
Students withdrawing from the University must also
withdraw from University housing if they live in the
residence halls.
Cross-Enrollment Policy: Undergraduate and master’s degree students are admitted into programs
either with semester (16 weeks) schedules or with
term (5-10 week) schedules. They may not crossenroll in both term and semester courses. Doctoral
students may cross enroll in term and semester
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 43
courses as long as they maintain full-time enrollment
as designated for their primary degree program.
College of Law students may only cross enroll during
the summer or with special approval of the College of
Law Dean.
Academic Progress
Policy on Credit Hours: A credit hour at the
University of La Verne is an amount of work represented in intended learning outcomes and verified by
evidence of student achievement that is an institutionally established equivalency that reasonably
approximates not less than:
1. One hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction (at La Verne this equates to a contact hour of
50 minutes) and a minimum of two hours of outof-class student work each week for approximately fifteen weeks for one semester or the
equivalent amount of work over a different
amount of time; or
2. At least an equivalent amount of work as required
in paragraph (1) of this definition for other academic activities as established by the institution,
including laboratory work, internships, practicum,
studio work, and other academic work leading to
the award of credit hours.
Course Load: Undergraduate- A bachelor’s degree
candidate must complete an average of 32 semester
hours per year in order to earn his/her degree within
four years. A student at the Central Campus normally accomplishes this by taking 12-18 semester hours
each semester and 1-5 semester hours in January
Interterm. A term Bachelor student normally accomplishes this by taking 8 semester hours for each term
offered in an academic year.
Below is a chart indicating the minimum semester
hours needed for the semester based and term
based undergraduate students for each reported
time status. CAPA students who attend Weekend
cycle courses, CAPA Accelerated Evening, CAPA
Accelerated Sunday and/or CAPA Distant Learning
terms are all considered to be semester students.
Students need to be aware what the minimum time
status is required to maintain eligibility for financial
aid, athletics, student activities, insurance, housing,
I-20 to name a few.
Undergraduate
Semester
Based Programs
Traditional
Undergraduates
(BA/BS)
CAPA, REL, LVPL
FT (Full Time) TH (3/4 Time) HT (Half Time)
12
12
9
9
6
6
Undergraduate Term
Based Programs FT (Full Time) TH (3/4 Time) HT (Half Time)
Undergraduates
(BA/BS)
8
6
4
Course Load: Graduate- To be considered full time,
a graduate student in the 16-week semester plan
must enroll in a minimum of nine semester hours
each semester. To be considered half time, a student
must enroll in a minimum of five semester hours each
semester. A student wishing to enroll in more than 15
semester hours in any semester or more than one
semester hour per week during January Interterm
must have prior approval from the appropriate Dean.
For graduate students enrolled in accelerated 10week terms, six semester hours constitute full-time
status; three semester hours constitute half-time status.
To be considered a full time student when enrolled in
less than the required number of semester hours, a
student must be “currently enrolled” in all courses
necessary to complete his/her degree, and be making normal academic progress. However, this may
not qualify the student for financial aid eligibility or
loan deferments.
Graduate Semester
Based Programs
FT (Full Time)
Master’s Degree Programs 9
Teacher Credential
12
Psy.D and Ed.D.
9
Law School Programs
9
TH (3/4 Time) HT (Half Time)
7
5
9
6
7
5
7
5
Graduate Term
Based Programs
FT (Full Time) TH (3/4 Time) HT (Half Time)
Master’s Degree Programs 6
4
3
Teacher Credential
8
6
4
DPA
6
4
3
Course Overloads: The maximum number of
semester hours a Central Campus Undergraduate is
able to enroll in a single semester is 18. A Central
Campus undergraduate who is enrolled at the
University of La Verne and concurrently enrolls at
another institution, cannot enroll in more than 18
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 44
semester hours total for both institutions for the Fall
or Spring Semester. A Central Campus undergraduate who is enrolled at the University of La Verne and
concurrently enrolls at another institution, cannot
enroll in more than 12 semester hours total for both
institutions for the Summer. Students who desire to
take more than the maximum semester hours must
petition to the Undergraduate Academic Appeals
Committee for approval. This process must be completed prior to enrollment. Overloads are not permitted for the January Interterm.
Regional campus and CAPA students requesting to
enroll in more than the number of semester hours
specified for full-time enrollment must have approval
by the Director of their Regional Campus two weeks
prior to registration week. Approvals are based on
extenuating circumstances. Students wishing to
enroll in courses at other institutions should obtain
the approval of their academic advisor before
enrolling.
Graduate Students requesting to enroll in more than
the number of semester hours specified for full-time
enrollment must have approval by the Director of
their Regional Campus or Program Chair two weeks
prior to registration week. Approvals are based on
extenuating circumstances.
Enrollment of Undergraduate Students in
Graduate Courses: Undergraduate students who
wish to take courses for graduate credit must be within eight semester hours and enrolled in their final
courses for degree completion of the baccalaureate
degree. The approval form must be completed prior
to the beginning of the semester with appropriate signatures (undergraduate program advisor, instructor,
Registrar, and appropriate Dean for the graduate
courses). All 400-level courses taken without such
approval will be considered to have been taken for
undergraduate credit. Undergraduates may not enroll
in 500 or 600 level courses without prior approval.
500 and 600 level course are not applicable toward
an undergraduate degree.
Normal Academic Progress: Undergraduate: A
full-time undergraduate student will be considered
making normal academic progress when completing
24 semester hours per year while maintaining a 2.0
cumulative GPA; a part-time student, when completing 12 semester hours per year while maintaining a
2.0 cumulative GPA. Student class level is determined by the number of semester hours completed
as follows:
Freshman
Sophomore
Juniors
Seniors
0-27 semester hours successfully
completed
28-59 semester hours successfully
completed
60-91semester hours successfully
completed
92 semester hours successfully completed and above
To maintain financial aid eligibility, students must also
meet financial aid satisfactory academic progress
standards as described under Satisfactory Academic
Progress Policy in the Financial Aid section of this
catalog. Students receiving veterans benefits who fail
to maintain the 2.0 cumulative GPA required for graduation in three consecutive semesters will have their
benefits interrupted, and the VA office will be notified.
Normal Academic Progress: Graduate- Graduate
students are considered to be making normal academic progress when a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or
higher is maintained. Full-time and part-time graduate students making normal academic progress must
complete their degrees within the limits specified
under Time Limitation in the Graduation
Requirements—Graduate Programs section of this
catalog. To maintain financial aid eligibility, students
may have to meet additional requirements as
described in the Financial Aid section of this catalog.
Students receiving veterans benefits who fail to
maintain the 3.0 cumulative GPA required for graduation in three consecutive semesters will have their
benefits interrupted, and the VA office will be notified.
Academic Warning: An academic warning is given
to an undergraduate student in good standing who
fails to earn a 2.0 GPA in a given term. An academic
warning is posted on the transcript and grade report
for that term.
Academic Probation: Academic probation is a serious warning to the student that his/her scholastic
record is unsatisfactory. Continued failure to improve
this record will result in academic disqualification.
Students on probation may also have restrictions
imposed by the Deans regarding their programs of
study. The following students will be placed on academic probation, with an appropriate notation made
on the transcript:
1. An undergraduate student whose cumulative La
Verne GPA falls below 2.0.
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 45
2. A graduate student whose cumulative GPA falls
below 3.0.
Academic standing is determined after every term for
students enrolled in both 5-week and 10-week terms.
For all other students’ academic standing is calculated after fall, spring, and summer semesters.
Academic standing is reported at the end of the
terms as listed above. Grades submitted at a later
date will not result in an updated academic standing.
Academic standing is an end-of-term process and
will not be updated with subsequent grade submission.
Undergraduate students on academic probation
must obtain a La Verne GPA of 2.0 or above for each
term until their cumulative La Verne GPA reaches 2.0
or greater. Undergraduate students will remain on
academic probation until their cumulative La Verne
GPA rises to 2.0 or better and will not be eligible for
enrollment in the culminating activity or for commencement until academic probation is removed.
Graduate students on academic probation must
obtain a GPA of 3.0 or above for each term until their
cumulative GPA reaches 3.0. Graduate students will
remain on academic probation until their cumulative
GPA rises to 3.0 or better. Graduate students will not
be eligible for Advanced Standing or enrollment in
the culminating activity until academic probation is
removed. After reaching the cumulative 3.0 GPA,
graduate students must maintain that average as a
minimum until they complete their degree program.
Academic probation is distinct from financial aid probation, which is covered in the Financial Aid
Programs section of this catalog.
Academic Disqualification: Undergraduate students who fail to earn a 2.0 La Verne GPA in any term
after being placed on academic probation will be academically disqualified. Graduate students on academic probation who fail to earn a 3.0 La Verne GPA
in any term will be academically disqualified.
Disqualified students are not allowed to return as an
enrolled student.
Central
Campus
Undergraduate
Academic
Disqualified students must appeal to the Associate
Vice President for reinstatement to the university.
ROC undergraduate students must appeal to the
Dean of the Regional and Online Programs for reinstatement to the University. Central Campus and
ROC graduate students must appeal to their
Academic Dean. Extenuating circumstances will be
reviewed on a case by case basis.
Academic disqualification will be recorded on the students’ academic transcript. If a Dean reinstates a student, the date of reinstatement will also be recorded.
Should a reinstated student not meet the conditions
specified at the time of reinstatement, academic disqualification will result. The Veterans Administration
(in cases where students receive VA funds) or other
appropriate governmental agencies will be notified
when a student is academically disqualified.
Academic Disqualification is distinct from Financial
Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress. Students who
appeal for academic reinstatement must also appeal
to the Office of Financial Aid.
Academic Renewal for Undergraduate Students:
Under special circumstances a student may petition
for academic renewal. Academic renewal is provided
for currently enrolled undergraduate students whose
previous academic record was below the acceptable
standard (a cumulative La Verne GPA of less than
2.0) and is not reflective of their current demonstrated ability to succeed. A student may request
Academic renewal if the following conditions are met:
1. He/she is currently matriculated at La Verne.
2. At least five years have elapsed since the end of
the term in which the work requested for removal
was taken.
3. He/she has completed 18 semester hours with a
minimum GPA of 3.0, 24 semester hours with a
minimum GPA of 2.5, or 30 semester hours with
a minimum GPA of 2.0 at La Verne since the work
to be removed was completed.
4. He/she was matriculated and enrolled full time
when the substandard work was completed.
Having met these conditions, a student may petition
for removal of La Verne degree work from the institution degree GPA by submitting a request to the
appropriate Academic Dean. A student may request
the maximum of one academic year (four terms, or
two semesters, interterm, and a summer session,
consecutively taken) to be removed from the degree
calculation. The request for Academic Renewal will
be considered with supporting statements providing
evidence of the following:
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 46
a. Conditions 1-4 above have been met, and
b. The work requested to be removed from the
degree calculation is substandard and not
representative of the student’s current academic ability.
If the Academic Dean approves the request,
“Academic Renewal” will be printed on the student’s
transcript and show that no work taken during the
terms removed, even if satisfactory, will be applied to
the Bachelor’s Degree. All work will remain on the
transcript to ensure a true and complete academic
history, and all work, including the academic renewal
terms will be included in the computation for departmental and school honors.
Academic Renewal only applies to course work completed at La Verne. Students who have unsatisfactory grades at other colleges or universities must consult those institutions to see if they are eligible for
academic renewal according to the policies of those
institutions. Academic renewal from another institution will not be considered by La Verne after matriculation at the University.
Alternative Instructional Modes
Directed Study: A directed study is an approved catalog course taught independently to one student.
Courses may be taken by directed study only if the
course is not scheduled during the term and only with
the instructor’s and the department chair or program
director’s prior approval. Directed study courses may
only be taken by matriculated students in good
standing. Seminars, activity courses, introductory
courses in some disciplines, and courses with heavy
emphasis on process rather than content may not be
taken by directed study. Directed Study Forms are
available
from
the
Registrar
and
www.laverne.edu/registrar/. The forms must be
signed by the instructor and the department chairperson before they are submitted with the registration
form to the Registrar. Traditional undergraduates
may register for directed studies only during the normal registration period. CAPA, ROC and graduate
students may register until the last day to withdraw
from a course.
Independent Study: An independent study course is
a course initiated and written by a student that deals
with material not covered in any approved catalog
course. The student works independently under the
guidance of an instructor who must approve the student’s comprehensive written plan and time line
before the student can begin. An independent study
form, available from the Registrar and
www.laverne.edu/registrar/, must be signed by the
department chairperson prior to commencement of
the study. Independent studies are available only to
matriculated students in good standing at La Verne.
Traditional undergraduates must register for independent studies only during the normal registration
period. CAPA, ROC and graduate students may register until the last day to withdraw from a course.
Independent studies can be approved as 199, 299,
399, 599, or 699 courses for a maximum of four
semester hours each.
Course Challenge: Matriculated students, who
believe they can successfully demonstrate the competencies of a course without attendance, may
request to challenge the course. Most La Verne
courses may be challenged for credit. Students can
view the MyLaVerne Course catalog to determine if a
course is challengeable.
The student may see a list of course goals and objectives prior to challenging the course. A complete list
of steps to challenge a course can be found on the
Office of the Registrar website. If the student demonstrates the competencies required for successful
completion of the course, the number and title of the
course will be placed on the transcript with a CRD
grade. If the student does not demonstrate the competencies, nothing is recorded on the transcript. A
student may only challenge a course once. If a student fails a course challenge, he or she may receive
credit for the course only by enrolling in the course
for credit. A maximum of eight semester hours of
course challenge may be counted toward fulfilling the
undergraduate residency requirement.
A student may not challenge any course in which
he/she has received tutoring from a La Verne instructor, was formerly enrolled, or has audited formally or
informally. Any student who has received secondary
or higher education in a country where the native language of instruction is not English may not challenge
beginning or intermediate courses in this language.
Any student who has received credit for high school
courses in foreign languages may not challenge
those courses at La Verne. In this context, two years
of high school foreign language will be considered
equivalent to one year of college instruction. First-
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 47
year language courses may not be challenged. With
respect to these limitations placed on the challenging
of language courses, CLEP examinations will be
regarded as challenges.
College Writing A and College Writing B
Challenge Exam: Students who believe they can
successfully demonstrate the competencies for WRT
110 College Writing A or College Writing B can pay
the $50 nonrefundable fee to initiate this process.
Traditional Students who desire to take the writing
challenge exam will need to contact the Writing
Department. Regional and Online students need to
consult with their Academic Advisor.
Students who do not pass the College Writing A or
the College Writing B exam must enroll immediately
in the class to earn credit for the course. Students
who pass the exam can also request to obtain course
credit for WRT 110 or WRT 111 by paying the additional fee. Students must contact the Office of the
Registrar and the Office of Student Accounts to complete this process.
Community Service Assessment: Students who
have already completed 20 hours of unpaid community service in one community organization within the
past two years from the date of application for alternative assessment may be able to meet the requirement for Community Service through an assessment
of prior learning. Alternative Assessment assumes
that you have already attained mastery of the learning outcomes as stated on the Community Service
Web site:
http://laverne.edu/generaleducation/requirements/co
mmunity-service
There is a $50 non-refundable fee for this assessment. The Request for Community Service
Assessment form can be found on the Community
Service website along with instructions.
Certification Options: Students have the option of
fulfilling certain General Education requirements by
showing competency through prior learning or experience. The following general education areas can be
fulfilled through certification: Written Communication,
Quantitative Reasoning, Foreign Language, Creative
and Artistic Expression, Community Service, and
Lifelong Fitness. If a student successfully demonstrates competency in a particular area, the general
education area will be fulfilled, but no course credit
will be given. For Written Communication and
Community Service, students are required to pay a
fee in order to enter the certification process (see
“Tuition and Fees”). Students certified in Written
Communication or Community Service have the
additional option of paying the Course Challenge Fee
and receiving course credit. Payment for course
credit must be completed within one semester or
term after completing the certification or no course
credit will be given. Students who wish to meet a
requirement through certification should contact the
appropriate department for information.
Auditing: Most courses may be audited with the permission of the instructor as long as seats are available. Students pay one-half the regular tuition.
Students do not receive semester hours nor meet
any University requirements. Audited courses will
appear on a student’s transcript with a grade of Audit.
The normal registration deadlines apply, and
changes from audit to grade status (or grade to audit
status) must be made before the end of the tenth day
of classes in any semester; the end of the third day
of classes during January Interterm.
General Information on Courses
Course Catalog: La Verne courses are presented
with course descriptions and full details on MyLaVerne
online accessible from laverne.edu/. A complete
course catalog is available at laverne.edu/catalog/.
Course Numbering System:
Alpha Code Precollege- not applicable to bachelor’s degree program
001-099
Activity and survey courses — lower
division applicable to bachelor’s
degree programs
100-199 Elementary and survey courses —
lower division applicable to bachelor’s
degree programs
200-299 Intermediate courses and courses
introductory to a discipline applicable
to bachelor’s degree programs
300-399 Advanced level, upper-division courses applicable to bachelor’s degree
programs
400-499 Advanced level, upper-division courses applicable to bachelor’s degree
programs or introductory graduate
level courses applicable to advanced
degree programs and credential programs
500-699 Graduate level courses applicable to
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 48
advanced degree programs and credential programs
700-799 Graduate level, non-degree, professional development courses, not to be
used for degree credit
University of La Verne courses can be designated by
three digits or by three digits and a letter. The
common letters used in course designations are A, B,
C, D with sequences, F with field work, G with
selected graduate courses, L with laboratories, P with
practicums, S with seminars, and W with workshops.
Other letters have been used as needed to provide
course numbers and do not have significance in
defining the courses.
Course Value: All La Verne courses are offered on a
semester hour basis. The semester hour value of
each course is listed in parenthesis after the course
title in the Programs section of this catalog. The
standard value for undergraduate courses is 4
semester hours; for graduate courses, 3 semester
hours.
Course Location: Most courses are available on
more than one campus. Where a course is offered
only at one location, the location is listed followed by
“only.”
Course Frequency: Some courses are offered every
semester; most are offered less frequently. Course
schedules for all locations are available on MyLaVerne
online accessible from www.laverne.edu.
Course Challenges: Non-challengeable courses are
marked NCh in the Course Catalog on MyLaVerne.
Grade Options: Most courses can be taken either for
a letter grade or for Credit/No Credit at the student’s
discretion. If the grade option is limited, the course
description specifies “May be taken Credit/No Credit
only” or “May be taken for a letter grade only.”
Final Examinations
The University Registrar publishes final exam schedules each semester. Students have a right to sit for
no more than two final exams in one day. In cases
where a student has more than two final exams
scheduled on the same day, faculty will accommodate students.
a. Students are individually responsible to work
directly with their instructor(s) to request alter-
native exam arrangements as soon as possible. Unreasonable requests for accommodations such as, but not limited to, last minute
requests except in illness or emergencies,
may be denied by the instructor(s).
b. When three final exams are scheduled backto-back on a single day, or students experience documented and verified illness or
emergency, students may wish to speak with
their instructors. Instructors may collaborate
with individual students to reschedule final
exams on date that is mutually agreeable.
The rescheduled exam must be made with
enough time to allow the instructor to meet
the deadline for grade submission.
c. Students and/or instructors who are unable to
reach agreement for reasonable requests for
accommodations may appeal to the department chair or academic dean of the school or
college as soon as possible. Appeals will be
handled on a case-by-case basis.
d. The instructor must make arrangements with
the Learning Enhancement Center (LEC) and
notify the student if proctored testing is necessary. Students are expected to follow-up
with the LEC to make arrangements for testing and to inquire about specific policies or
procedures associated with proctored exams.
e. Final exams for “term” students are given on
the last class session.
Grades
Grading Policy—Undergraduate.
A .....................4.0 quality points per semester hour.
A-....................3.7 quality points per semester hour.
Clearly stands out as excellent performance. Has
unusually sharp insight into material; initiates
thoughtful questions. Sees many sides of an
issue. Articulates well and writes logically and
clearly. Integrates ideas previously learned from
this and other disciplines; anticipates next steps
in progression of ideas.
B+ ...................3.3 quality points per semester hour.
B .....................3.0 quality points per semester hour.
B-....................2.7 quality points per semester hour.
Grasps subject matter at a level considered to be
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 49
good to very good. Is an active listener and participant in class discussion. Speaks and writes
well. Accomplishes more than the minimum
requirements. Work in and out of class is of high
quality though rarely outstanding.
C+...................2.3 quality points per semester hour.
C.....................2.0 quality points per semester hour.
C-....................1.7 quality points per semester hour.
Demonstrates a satisfactory comprehension of
the subject matter. Accomplishes the minimum
requirements, and communicates orally and in
writing at an acceptable level for a college student. Has a general understanding of all basic
concepts.
D+...................1.3 quality points per semester hour.
D.....................1.0 quality points per semester hour.
Quality and quantity of work in and out of class is
below average and barely acceptable.
F ........................0 quality points per semester hour.
Quality and quantity of work in and out of class
are unacceptable.
WF.....................0 quality points per semester hour.
Designates an unofficial withdrawal from a
course. Last date of attendance is required.
CRD ......................Excluded from GPA (see below),
................................Equivalent to C- work or better.
NCR ......................Excluded from GPA (see below).
..............................Equivalent to D+ work or poorer.
WNC .....................Excluded from GPA (see below).
Designates an unofficial withdrawal from a
course registered as a CRD/NCR grade option.
INC........................Excluded from GPA (see below).
IP ..........................Excluded from GPA (see below).
NG ........................Excluded from GPA (see below).
W ..........................Excluded from GPA (see below).
Good grades are usually correlated with regular
attendance and with assignments completed and on
time. On the other hand, poor grades are often correlated with frequent absences and incomplete and/or
missing assignments.
Grading Policy—Graduate. The grading policy for
graduate students is based on the assumption that
the grade for acceptable and satisfactory performance in graduate study is B (3.0). This implies that
graduate students must perform at an above-average level, compared to undergraduate standards, in
order to progress satisfactorily in graduate programs.
It also implies that the C- and D grades are unacceptable in graduate work; therefore, there are no C- or D
grades for graduate students.
A .....................4.0 quality points per semester hour.
A-....................3.7 quality points per semester hour.
Demonstrates insightful mastery of the subject
matter and exceptional quality in written and oral
communication.
B+ ...................3.3 quality points per semester hour.
B .....................3.0 quality points per semester hour.
B-....................2.7 quality points per semester hour.
Exhibits professional competence in the subject
matter and in all written and oral communication.
C+...................2.3 quality points per semester hour.
C.....................2.0 quality points per semester hour.
Completes course assignments and requirements with minimally acceptable proficiency in
written and oral communication.
F ........................0 quality points per semester hour.
Quality and quantity of work in and out of class
are unacceptable.
WF.....................0 quality points per semester hour.
Designates an unofficial withdrawal from a
course. Last date of attendance is required.
CRD ......................Excluded from GPA (see below).
Equivalent to B (3.0) work or better.
NCR ......................Excluded from GPA (see below).
Equivalent to B- work or poorer.
WNC .....................Excluded from GPA (see below).
Designates an unofficial withdrawal from a
course registered as a CRD/NCR grade option.
The policy for NCR, IP, INC, NG, and W grades is the
same for graduates as for undergraduates.
Credit/No Credit (CRD/NCR) Grade Option:
Courses taken for CRD/NCR do not affect a student’s
GPA. Certain courses, designated “CRD/NCR only”
in the Courses section of this catalog, may only be
taken CRD/NCR. Undergraduate students are
encouraged to use this grade option to explore
courses outside their majors. However, no undergraduate may take more than one class of CRD/NCR
per semester, elect the CRD/NCR option in a course
required for a major, or apply more than 32 semester
hours of La Verne CRD grades toward a degree.
Exceptions to these limitations are courses listed as
“CRD/NCR only.” Selection of the grade option is
done at the time of registration. Students can change
their grade options in the Office of the Registrar up to
60% of the semester. Changes after the 60% time
period can only be approved by the appropriate
appeals committee.
Graduate students must take challenge exams and
competency exams CRD/NCR, but they must register for a letter grade in every other course if they are
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 50
in a credential or degree program unless the course
is offered “CRD/NCR only.”
Incomplete Grades (INC): Incompletes are authorized only when a) it is impossible for the student to
complete the course because of illness or other justifiable extenuating cause and b) the student has successfully completed all coursework up to the last day
to withdraw in the semester or term.
Students must initiate a request for an incomplete,
and if able complete the Incomplete Contract available on MyLaVerne. The contract can be found on
the Student Record Menu. The contract must be
submitted prior to the last day of the term. The contract will be reviewed by the instructor at the time of
grade submission. The instructor can amend the contract, list outstanding course requirements and
approve or deny the request for an Incomplete.
By requesting an INC, the student agrees to complete the coursework specified on the contract. It is
the student’s responsibility to check his or her
MyLaVerne account to view the status of the incomplete contract.
Students who receive an INC must submit all final
coursework by the dates as specified below. (Note
faculty can designate an earlier date to require all
coursework to be submitted. This date is specified
on the Incomplete Contract)
Term students (Terms are defined as 5 to 11 weeks
in length) must submit all final coursework as follows:
If the grade of incomplete (INC) was issued
for the following terms:
Fall Term
Mini Fall Term
Winter Term
Spring Term
Summer Term
Deadline to submit
coursework to remove
“INC” grade is:
The last day of the following winter term
The last day of the following winter term
The last day of the following spring term
The last day of the following fall term
The last day of the following fall term
Semester students (Semesters are defined as 16
weeks and the 4 week January Interterm) must submit all final coursework/assignments as follows:
If the grade of
Incomplete (INC) was
issued for the following
semester:
Fall Semester
January Inter-term
Spring Semester
Summer Term
Deadline to submit
coursework to remove
“INC” grade is:
The last day of the following spring semester
The last day of the following spring semester
The last day of the following fall semester
The last day of the following fall semester
No Grade (NG): This is a temporary grade issued by
the Registrar pending receipt of the official grade
from the instructor. If an instructor does not submit a
final grade, the NG grades, will be automatically converted to a failing grade of NCR or F. NG are automatically converted to a failing grades using the
same calendar guidelines as stated above for “INC”
grades. Students who received an NG are encouraged to contact their instructor to obtain their correct
final grade.
In Progress Grades (IP): In Progress grades are
reserved for directed studies, independent studies,
field work courses, senior projects , and graduate
culminating activities wherein the contract at the time
of registration specifies a date of completion that is
beyond the end of the term of registration. The intent
of the IP policy is to provide for individualized study
which, in its inception, requires more than the normal
term or semester to complete. Students who receive
IP grades are considered to be maintaining satisfactory academic progress for financial aid purposes. An
IP grade will automatically be converted to a failing
grade of NCR or F, if not cleared within one year following the term of registration. A grade of IP is not
considered as enrollment.
Students who receive a grade of (IP) must submit all
final coursework/assignments by the dates as specified below. (Note faculty can designate an earlier
date to require all coursework to be submitted.
This date is specified on the Directed Study
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 51
Contract or Independent Study Contract.)
Term students (Terms are defined as 5 to 11 weeks
in length) must submit all final coursework/assignments as follows:
If the grade of In
Progress (IP) was
issued for the following
terms:
Deadline to submit
coursework to remove
“IP” grade is:
Mini Fall Term
The last day of the following mini-fall term
Fall Term
Winter Term
Spring Term
Summer Term
The last day of the following fall term
The last day of the following winter term
The last day of the following spring term
The last day of the following summer term
Semester students (Semesters are defined as 16
weeks or greater and the 4 week inter-term) must
submit all final coursework/assignments as follows:
If the grade of In
Progress (IP) was
issued for the following
semester:
Deadline to submit
coursework to remove
“IP” grade is:
January Inter-term
The last day of the following January Interterm
Fall Semester
Spring Semester
Summer Term
The last day of the following fall semester
The last day of the following spring semester
The last day of the following Summer Term
Final Grades: Grades submitted to the Registrar by
the instructor of record are final and official. By policy a final grade is based on the instructor’s evaluation of course work completed as of the contractual
end of the course. Final grades may not be changed
as the result of the submission of additional work or
the repeating of examinations after the contractual
conclusion of the course for the purpose of improving
the final grade. The Registrar is authorized to accept
an adjusted grade only when all of the following conditions are met:
1. The student applies to the instructor for a reevaluation within four weeks after the student grade is
available through MyLaVerne;
2. The instructor concludes by re-evaluation that the
original grade issued was in error based on the
work completed at the time that the original grade
was issued; and
3. The revised grade is officially reported by the
instructor to the Registrar as a result of reevaluation within a reasonable time after the grade
report was made available on MyLaVerne.
A student may elect to repeat a La Verne course for
the purpose of improving a grade if repeated at La
Verne. The student must enroll in the same La Verne
course and is expected to repeat it in its entirety.
When a course is repeated, the original course,
grade, and semester hours remain on the transcript,
but are appropriately marked and are no longer part
of the student’s GPA or applicable toward credit for
graduation. Only the grade and semester hours of
the repeated course are counted.
Notification of final grades for each course is made
through each student’s MyLaVerne account. A student who has a hold on his or her account must clear
the hold to view final grades.
Appeals of Final Grades. A student who feels that
an incorrect grade has been given must consult with
the instructor first and must make this appeal within
four weeks after grades are issued. A student dissatisfied with the instructor’s response may appeal to
the program chair and department chair.
Subsequently, an appeal may be made to the appropriate college Dean and finally to the Provost.
Questions of subject matter will usually be handled
by the department. Charges of injustice due to prejudice or capricious action may require the attention of
the Dean.
Official Cumulative Record/Transcript: The
Registrar maintains each student’s official record
which includes a complete academic history. All
courses attempted at La Verne are listed on the official transcript. In addition to the official transcript, offi-
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 52
cial records are maintained which establish the last
day of attendance for courses in which a withdrawal
occurred. The official transcript will only be released
upon the written consent of the student in compliance
with federal and state policies.
Graduation and Honors
Dean’s List: The Dean’s List is issued at the end of
each full term to honor undergraduate students who
excelled in their courses during that term. To receive
this honor, a student must be full time and have a
minimum GPA of 3.75. In addition, a student must
have letter grades in the minimum number of units
required to be full time. Students must complete all
semester hours within the semester enrolled.
Students who complete IP’s and INC’s at a later date
may petition to be placed on the Dean’s List retroactively.
National Honor Societies: La Verne has chapters of
several national honor societies including Alpha Chi
(all fields), Alpha Kappa Delta (Sociology), Alpha
Lambda Delta (all fields), Alpha Psi Omega (Theatre
Arts), Lambda Alpha (Anthropology), Lambda
Epsilon Chi (Legal Studies), Pi Gamma Mu (Social
Science), Psi Chi (Psychology), Sigma Delta Pi
(Spanish), and Sigma Tau Delta (English).
Application for Graduation: All students must submit an application for graduation along with the published fee. Undergraduate students should file an
Application for Graduation with the Office of the
Registrar two semesters or three terms prior to their
anticipated completion date. Any student with a
major in Liberal Arts, Social Science, or one not listed in the catalog must also submit a major contract.
Any student with a minor not printed in the catalog
must submit a minor contract. Graduate students
should file their Application for Graduation when they
apply for Advanced Standing. This application provides the Registrar with the information needed to
prepare the diploma and to include the student’s
name in the list of graduates.
A graduation fee is required of all students. This fee
covers the costs associated with the completion of a
degree program. Upon submission of the Application
for Graduation and associated fees, the Office of the
Registrar or Graduate Services will complete an official degree audit to assess the student’s progress
toward degree completion. Students who have not
submitted an application for graduation are not eligi-
ble for degree posting and will not be reviewed for
degree completion.
Commencement Ceremony: La Verne holds commencement ceremonies at the Central Campus each
year in Winter and in Spring. A candidate qualifies to
participate in the Winter ceremony (usually in
January) upon successful completion of all degree
and program requirements during the preceding
Summer, Fall terms, Accelerated Fall, or when he or
she has enrolled in all final courses during the current
January Interterm. A candidate qualifies to participate
in the Spring ceremony (in May) upon successful
completion of all degree and program requirements
during the preceding Winter Term, or when he or she
has enrolled in all final courses during the current
Spring term.
Diplomas: The actual completion date of a student’s
degree will be noted on the official transcript. The
diploma, however, will carry one of the following
dates, whichever comes first after degree completion—May 31, August 31, or January 31. For graduate students, the specific title of the degree with the
concentration will appear on the diploma; for undergraduate students, the degree, the major, undergraduate honors, and the concentration (if any) will
appear on the diploma.
Undergraduate Honors: Honors at graduation are
based on GPA according to the guidelines below. A
bachelor’s degree student must have taken at least
84 semester hours for letter grades to be considered
for honors.
Cum Laude. The student who completes 44 semester hours or more at La Verne, and who earns a
minimum GPA of 3.6 in courses taken at the
University and a minimum GPA of 3.6 in all work
applicable toward the bachelor’s degree, will be
considered for the honor of Cum Laude upon graduation.
Magna Cum Laude. The student who completes 44
semester hours or more at La Verne, and who
earns a minimum GPA of 3.75 in courses taken at
the University and a minimum GPA of 3.75 in all
work applicable toward the bachelor’s degree, will
be considered for the honor of Magna Cum Laude
upon graduation.
Summa Cum Laude. The student who completes 60
semester hours or more at La Verne, and who
earns a minimum GPA of 3.85 in courses taken at
the University and a minimum GPA of 3.85 in all
work applicable toward the bachelor’s degree, will
be considered for the honor of Summa Cum Laude
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 53
upon graduation.
Honors:
UndergraduateDepartmental
Departmental honors are granted to undergraduate
students who demonstrate a high level of achievement in their majors. Students are encouraged to
work toward departmental honors and should apply
to the department chairperson or academic advisor.
Departmental honors will be awarded on the basis of
a high-quality senior thesis/project and a minimum
GPA of 3.6 in the major and 3.0 overall. All major
courses, with the exception of challenges, must be
taken for letter grades. These are the minimum
requirements for honors; departments may add other
requirements. Departmental honors are printed on
the official transcript but not on the diploma.
Academic Resources
The Elvin and Betty Wilson Library:
The
University’s central library, owns more than 250,000
physical volumes, 53,000 journals, 14,000 electronic
books and access to an online catalog, LEOpac.
Research assistance is available to all La Verne students in person and via telephone, online chat or
email.
For
more
information
visit
http://laverne.edu/library/
The Law Library: The University of La Verne Law
Library occupies 27,000 square feet and holds more
than 300,000 volumes and microform volume equivalents. This modern facility offers wireless Internet
access, a computer lab with enhanced audio-visual
capabilities, 12 study/conference rooms, and a seating capacity that accommodates 300 library users.
For more information visit http://laverne.edu/library/
Learning Enhancement Center: The Learning
Enhancement Center (LEC) provides academic support for ULV undergraduates, including CAPA and La
Verne Online students, through one-on-one, online,
and group tutoring, Supplemental Instruction, and
academic skills workshops. The LEC can be
reached at 909-448-4342 or [email protected]
Graduate Success Center: The Graduate Success
Center provides comprehensive academic support
services to all graduate students at the University of
La Verne; on campus and online. For more information visit http://sites.laverne.edu/graduate-successcenter/
RIGHTS AND
RESPONSIBILITIES
Rights
Freedom of Access: The University of La Verne is
open to all applicants qualified according to its published admissions policies and standards. Upon
matriculation, each student has access to all La
Verne services and facilities for which he or she is
qualified. Access may be denied to persons who are
not University students.
Classroom Rights and Privileges: Instructors are
expected to encourage open discussion and inquiry.
Students may take reasoned exception to information offered in any course and should make judgment
on matters of informed opinion.
Protection Against Improper Disclosure:
Students’ views, political associations, and beliefs
which are confided to instructors, advisors, and
counselors during the performance of their duties are
confidential.
University Governance: As members of the
University community, students are free individually
and collectively to express their interests. As vehicles
for this purpose, provisions are made for student selfgovernment as well as for student representation on
the Board of Trustees; University, college, and
departmental committees; and other decision-making bodies.
Policy Against Discrimination and Harassment:
The University of La Verne is committed to maintaining a learning, working, and living environment for
students, faculty and staff that is free from discrimination and harassment based on a person’s race, color,
religion, national origin, ethnic origin, ancestry, citizenship, sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions), sexual orientation, gender
(including gender identity and expression), marital
status, age, physical or mental disability, medical
condition, genetic characteristics, military and veteran status, or any other characteristic or status protected by applicable law. University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 54
The University also prohibits discrimination and
harassment based on the perception that anyone
has any of these characteristics, or that anyone is
associated with a person who has, or is perceived as
having, any of these characteristics.
Consistent with state and federal law, reasonable
accommodation will be provided to persons with disabilities, to women who are pregnant, and/or to
accommodate religious beliefs and practices.
Sexual misconduct including, but not limited to, sexual assault, sexual exploitation, domestic and intimate partner violence and stalking is a form of sexual harassment and is also a violation of University
policy.
Any person who believes s/he has been subjected to
discrimination or harassment or the victim of sexual
misconduct may utilize the University’s complaint
procedures. All such complaints will be promptly and
thoroughly investigated through an impartial investigative process. It is against University policy and
applicable law to retaliate against anyone who files a
complaint or cooperates in the investigation of a
complaint. Complaints may be submitted to the
Office of Student Affairs and/or Office of Human
Resources.
Information concerning the Policy Against
Discrimination and Harassment and Policy Against
Sexual Misconduct, compliance with applicable laws,
statutes and regulations (such as Title VI of the 1964
Civil Rights Act, Title IX of the Educational
Amendments of 1972, and Section 504 of the
Rehabilitation Act of 1973), and complaint procedures is available from the Office of Student Affairs,
Office of Human Resources, or online at
http://laverne.edu/students/student-affairs/
or
http://laverne.edu/hr/.
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act: La
Verne abides by the Family Educational Rights and
Privacy Act of 1974 as amended. Students have the
right to inspect and review information contained in
their education records, to challenge the contents of
their education records, to have a hearing if they consider the outcome of the challenge to be unsatisfactory, and to submit explanatory statements for inclusion in their files if they feel the decisions of the hearing panels are unacceptable. The University’s
Registrar coordinates the inspection and review procedures for student education records, which include
admissions, personal, academic, and financial files,
and academic, cooperative education, and placement records. The Dean of Student Affairs oversees
the review of records pertaining to social judicial matters. Students wishing to review their education
records must make written requests to La Verne’s
Registrar listing the item(s) of interest. Records covered by the Act will be made available within 45 days
of the request. Students may have copies of their
records, at their own expense, with certain exceptions (e.g., a copy of a transcript upon which a “financial hold” has been placed or copies of transcripts
from other schools). Educational records do not
include records of instructional, administrative, and
educational personnel which are the sole possession
of the maker and are not accessible or revealed to
any individual (except temporary substitutes); La
Verne security records; student health records;
employment records; or alumni records. Health
records may be reviewed by physicians of the students’ choosing. In addition, students may not see
financial information submitted by their parents, any
confidential letters or recommendations to which they
have waived their rights of inspection and review, or
education records containing information about more
than one student. In the latter case a student will be
permitted access only to that part of the record which
pertains to him or her.
Students who believe that their education records
contain information that is inaccurate, misleading, or
otherwise in violation of their privacy or other rights
may discuss their problems informally with the
Registrar, either in person or in writing. If the
Registrar agrees with a student’s requests, the
appropriate records will be amended. If not, the student will be informed and may request a formal hearing. This request must be made in writing to the
Registrar who will inform the student of the date,
place, and time of the hearing before a panel selected by La Verne. The student may present evidence
relevant to the issues raised and may be assisted or
represented at the hearings by one or more persons
of the student’s choice, including attorneys, at the
student’s expense. Decisions of the hearing panel
are final and based solely on the evidence presented
at the hearing. The panel’s written judgment will be
delivered to all parties concerned. If the decision is in
favor of the student, the education records will be
corrected. If the decision is not satisfactory to the student, he or she may place with the education records
statements commenting on the information in the
records or statements setting forth any reasons for
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 55
disagreeing with the decisions of the hearing panel.
These statements will be placed in the student’s education records, maintained as part of them, and
released whenever the records in question are disclosed. A student who believes that the decisions of
this adjudication process were unfair or not in keeping with the Act may make a written request for assistance to La Verne’s President. Students who still
believe that their rights have been abridged may file
complaints with the US Department of Education,
Washington, DC.
No one outside La Verne may have access to, nor
will the University disclose, any information from a
student’s education record without the written consent of the student. Exceptions are La Verne personnel, officials of other institutions in which the student
seeks to enroll, persons or organizations providing
the student’s financial aid, accrediting agencies carrying out their accreditation functions, persons in
compliance with a judicial order, and persons in an
emergency in order to protect the health or safety of
the student or other persons. Within the La Verne
community, only members acting in the students’
educational interest, individually or collectively, are
allowed access to student education records. These
members include personnel from the Offices of the
Provost, Registrar, Financial Aid, Admissions, and
Academic Advising, as well as academic personnel
within the limitations of their need to know.
At the discretion of University officials, the following
directory information will be provided: student’s
name, enrollment status (full time or part time and
class level), major field of study, dates of attendance,
degrees and awards received, email address, permanent address, current phone number, participation
in officially recognized activities, photographs, and,
for student athletes, weight and height. A student
wishing to withhold this directory information must
complete the Privacy Request Form in La Verne’s
Registrar’s Office or at their center of registration.
The privacy request will be valid until the student
directs the Registrar’s Office or campus of registration to remove the request.
Americans With Disabilities Act: University policies and procedures concerning students with disabilities are available through the Director of
Disabled Student Services on the La Verne campus.
Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act
Report: The University of La Verne is compliant with
the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security
Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (The Clery
Act) as amended in 1998, which requires all postsecondary institutions to publish and distribute certain information regarding campus crimes, including
reports of campus sexual assault, sexual assault
policies, and security programming to all current students, employees, and to any applicant who so
requests. A copy of the University of La Verne annual security report can be obtained by contacting the
University of La Verne Campus Safety Department at
909-208-4903 or by accessing the website
www.ulv.edu/security/.
Teach-out Policy: Occasionally, the University of La
Verne discontinues a degree program at a particular
location or for a specific delivery modality. In such
cases a formal announcement is made to all enrolled
students affected by the decision describing a teachout plan with a timeline of course offerings that allows
a reasonable time to completion. The University is
obliged to offer all of the courses and support necessary to complete the program for each student who
started the program and maintained continuous
enrollment in good standing. In addition, all students
who have registered in a course in the program during the preceding 24 months and who have successfully completed at least 50% of the semester hours
required in the program will be offered all necessary
courses to complete the degree at or near the location where they have been attending. Students who
have not registered in a course within the preceding
24 months or who have not been continuously registered and completed less than 50% of the program
will be advised of alternative options to the discontinued degree program. When teach-outs involve programs governed by a contractual agreement, all such
agreements will be honored. The schedule for discontinuance and teach-out plan will be developed by
the program chair (in consultation with the ROC dean
and director, as appropriate) and approved by the
college dean and the Provost. The Provost will monitor implementation.
Confidentiality and Institutional Research: La
Verne is committed to maintaining confidentiality.
Data published contains no personally identifiable
information and adheres to guidelines outlined in
FERPA regarding the disclosure of education records
and directory information.
Protection of Human Participants in Research:
The University’s Policies and Procedures for the
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 56
Protection of Human Subjects in research have been
developed to comply with federal requirements and
are specified in the University’s Federal Assurance
filed with the Office for Human Research Protections
(OHRP) of the U.S. Department of Health and
Human Services (HHS). The University’s Institutional
Review Board (IRB) has the responsibility to determine risk with regard to human subject research and
to approve or not approve such research conducted
at the University or under the sponsorship of the
University. This approval must be obtained prior to
the initiation of the research. Further information is
available on the web site for the Institutional Review
Board.
Protection of Animal Subjects: The University’s
Policies and Procedures for the Protection of Animal
Subjects in research have been developed to comply
with federal requirements and are specified in the
University’s Federal Assurance filed the Office of
Laboratory Animal Welfare (OLAW). Guidelines were
developed in accordance with the Guide for the Care
and Use of Laboratory Animals 8th Edition (Guide-8),
Public Health Service, OLAW, US Department of
Agriculture Animal Welfare Regulations, and, as
applicable, the Code of Federal Regulations – Title 9:
Animals and Animal Products. The Institutional
Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) conducts
semiannual reviews of IACUC membership and function, IACUC records, and reporting, veterinary care,
personnel qualifications and training, and occupational health and safety of personnel. The IACUC
has the responsibility to determine compliance with
federal guidelines regarding research with live animals, and to approve or not approve such research
conducted at the University or under the sponsorship
of the University. This approval must be obtained
prior to the initiation of the research.
Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act: La
Verne complies with the mandates of the Drug-Free
Schools and Communities Act (34 CRF Part 86) of
federal regulations. The University of La Verne certifies that it has adopted and implemented a program
to prevent the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by students and
employees.
For
further
information
visit
laverne.edu/students/student-affairs/substanceabuse
Responsibilities
Class Attendance: The University of La Verne faculty requires regular and prompt attendance in all
University courses. Students who do not attend the
first class session without prior consent of the faculty
member will not be guaranteed a space in the course.
A faculty member can give a student’s space away to
another student if the student 1) does not attend the
first class session of the term/semester for a course
or 2) does not electronically log into his or her online
course during the first week of the term/semester.
Students who do not attend the first class session or
log in as described above may be administratively
dropped, unless they make arrangements with the
instructor prior to the first day of the course. Note: students should not assume that non-attendance will
automatically result in an administrative drop.
Students have the responsibility to drop the course
from their schedule. This needs to be done before the
end of the first week of the term/semester to avoid a
failing grade, financial obligations, or late fees.
Students should refer to the course syllabus of each
course registered for the attendance policy of their
instructor. The instructor may assign extra work,
require special examinations, or refuse to grant credit for a course based on the number of class sessions
missed.
Only students registered in the course, University
staff, and guests invited by the instructor may attend
class sessions. All others, including children of registered students, will be asked to leave. If a minor child
is present, both the parent and the child will be asked
to leave.
Classroom Conduct: Instructors are responsible for
presenting appropriate material in courses, and students are responsible for learning this material.
Although it is a student’s academic performance that
is evaluated in determining grades, student conduct
is important in the academic setting. Enrollment in a
class may be terminated due to unsatisfactory conduct in the class; disrespect toward an instructor, faculty member, administrator, or staff member; academic dishonesty; judicial misconduct; or sanctions.
Each student is responsible for maintaining standards of academic performance established for each
course in which he or she is enrolled.
Academic Honesty: Each student is responsible for
performing academic tasks in such a way that hon-
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 57
esty is not in question. Unless an exception is specifically defined by an instructor, students are expected
to maintain the following standards of integrity:
a. All tests, term papers, oral and written
assignments, recitations, and all other academic efforts are to be the work of the student presenting the material.
b. Any use of wording, ideas, or findings of
other persons, writers, or researchers
requires the explicit citation of the source;
use of the exact wording requires a “quotation” format.
c. Deliberately supplying material to a student
for purposes of plagiarism is also culpable.
When academic honesty is in question, the following
may occur:
1. A faculty member who has clear evidence that
academic honesty has been violated may take
appropriate disciplinary action. Appropriate disciplinary action may include, but is not limited to,
requiring the student to rewrite a paper or retake
a test, giving the student an F on the assignment
and/or in the course, and/or recommending
expulsion. If the action includes giving a course
grade of NCR or F and/or a recommendation for
expulsion because of academic dishonesty, the
faculty member must report the action to the
Department Chair and/or Academic Dean (or to
the Campus/Program Director for off-campus situations). The course grade will be given immediately to the University Registrar to record on the
student’s academic transcript. Students may not
drop or withdraw from the course after they have
been sanctioned for academic dishonesty.
2. If a faculty member has reason to suspect academic dishonesty (even after having seen
requested additional or revised work when appropriate) and the student denies the allegation, the
faculty member may refer the matter to the
Provost
or
designee
(through
the
Campus/Program Director for off-campus situations). Following due process an Academic
Judicial Board may be formed to investigate the
matter and make a recommendation to the
Provost about whether academic honesty has
been violated. The Provost will then take appropriate action which may include, but is not limited
to, academic probation, suspension, or expulsion. In this process students may be asked to
produce earlier drafts of their work and/or original
notes and resources, other samples of writing, or
documents deemed appropriate or necessary by
the Board.
3. Grades of F or NCR received in courses due to
academic dishonesty will be filed with appropriate
documentation for future reference in the Office
of the Provost by the Department Chair,
Academic Dean, or Campus/Program Director.
Students receiving an F or NCR as a result of
academic dishonesty will be sent a letter from the
Provost noting that a second offense will result in
expulsion.
4. Expulsion for academic dishonesty will be noted
on the student’s transcript by the words “Expelled
for Academic Dishonesty.”
College of Law students are covered by the academic dishonesty policies contained in the College of Law
Manual of Academic Policies and Procedures.
Appeals Procedures on Academic Matters:
Students may appeal final grades, academic honesty
decisions, and most policy decisions, and they may
submit academic grievances. All must be made in a
timely manner, generally within four weeks of the
action or decision in question. Administrative fees
may be assessed. Please contact Academic Support
and Retention Services for more information.
Final Grades: Procedures for appealing final grades
are contained in the Final Grades section of this
catalog. Appeals begin with the instructor of the
course and then goes successively to the program chair and department chair,* the college
Dean, and the Provost. The decision of the
Provost is final.
Academic Honesty: Procedures for appealing academic honesty violations are contained in the
Academic Honesty section of this catalog. Appeal
begins with the instructor and then may be taken
successively to the program chair and department chair,* college Dean, and Provost. The
decision of the Provost is final.
Academic
Disqualification
(Undergraduate):
Students who have been disqualified may not
register for subsequent terms. A disqualified student may appeal for reinstatement to the Dean of
Academic Support and Retention. An ROC student may appeal for re-instatement to the Dean
of ROC. A plan to improve academic perform-
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 58
ance must be submitted and a contract signed.
Appeals must be made immediately upon notification of disqualification.
Academic Disqualification (Graduate): Students who
have been disqualified from a graduate program
may not register for subsequent terms. A disqualified graduate student may appeal for reinstatement to the Academic Dean of his or her college.
Should the dean reinstate the student and the
student not meet the conditions specified at the
time of reinstatement, academic disqualification
will result.
Academic Policy Exceptions: Appeals for exceptions
to academic policy must be submitted to the
Undergraduate Appeals Committee or the
Graduate Appeals Committee. Appeals must be
made in writing, on the appropriate appeals form,
with the signatures of the academic or program
advisor and appropriate course instructors.
Students can obtain this form from the Office of
the Registrar. Graduate students may obtain this
form from Graduate Academic Services or the
Regional Campus Office. Appeals Committee
decisions may be challenged with an appeal to
the Provost. The decision of the Provost is final.
Academic Grievances: In rare instances, a student
may have a grievance that cannot be addressed
by any of the established appeals structures
described above. In such cases, no matter where
the student studies, the grievance must be submitted to the Dean of Academic Support and
Retention who will appoint an appeals panel,
consisting of representatives from appropriate
academic and/or administrative units, to review
the grievance. The panel will review all documented information, including any written statement and/or phone statements that the student
wishes to provide. Upon completion of the review,
the appeals panel will submit its findings and recommendations to the Provost. The decision of
the Provost is final.
Appeals by Students with Disabilities: La Verne
has established a set of procedures that address policy implementation for students with disabilities.
Should any student desire to initiate action related to
a diagnosed disability or to initiate testing for a disability, he/she should refer to the Information and
Accommodations Packet which can be accessed
through the university website under Disabled
Student Services.
Demonstration Policy: The University of La Verne
is absolute in the belief of the right of free speech,
and the intellectual development and self-definition of
students, faculty, and staff. Demonstrations are often
a part of the expression of ideas and beliefs.
Experience leads us to believe that campus activities
function better when there are policies to assure that
demonstrations and the educational environment can
exist side by side. La Verne’s Demonstration Policy is
as follows:
1. Access to Building and Offices: Participants may
enter campus buildings for the purpose of conducting orderly and peaceful demonstrations.
Exterior doorways and interior doorways that
open into the office of administrative officials, faculty, or staff or into any other essential facility or
building may not be blocked. Participants may
stand or sit in the hallways but may not block the
hallways or stairs. Participants may not enter or
occupy any room or office without the permission
of the faculty or staff member or administrative
official in charge of that office.
2. Noise Level: Noise in the building shall not be so
loud as to prevent office workers from carrying on
their normal business or so loud as to interfere
with classes that meet in the building.
3. Placards: Placards used by demonstrators inside
or outside the building may be made of poster
board or other similar material, but not out of
material of a hard substance. Placards may be
carried or worn on the person, but not tacked, or
nailed to trees or lampposts or to the walls and
windows of the building. Placards may be affixed
by tape or string and remain in place for the duration of the demonstration so long as they do not
damage the structures to which they are affixed.
4. General Conduct: Students shall abide by the
Behavior Standards of the University.
Participants who are not affiliated with the
University shall conduct themselves as guests
and will be asked to leave the campus if their
conduct is, in the judgment of University officials,
disruptive or otherwise contrary to the mission of
the University.
5. Hours: Participants in the demonstration may be
present in building(s) only during the normal
hours of operations (i.e., when the buildings are
open for business).
6. Amplifying Equipment: No loudspeaker or other
amplifying equipment is permitted inside or outside the building. Participants may use hand held
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 59
megaphones outside the building, but these may
not be connected to any type of electrical amplifying device. Electrical amplifying devices are
subject to confiscation. Exceptions are not
allowed.
7. Care of University Property: Reasonable care
must be taken to reduce as much as possible any
damage to University buildings and lawn and turf
areas. Trash must be collected and placed into
trash containers. Participants who damage
University property will be subject to financial
restitution.
8. Reservations: Student, faculty, or staff groups
wishing to reserve the Quad, the Mall, or rooms
for a demonstration may do so using the appropriate reservation procedures for these areas.
9. Sanctions: Violations of this policy will be subject
to University Judicial Procedures.
CODE OF STUDENT CONDUCT
The University of La Verne community is committed
to fostering a campus environment that is conducive
to academic inquiry, a productive campus life and
thoughtful study and discourse. The student conduct
program within the Office of the Dean of Student
Affairs is committed to an educational and developmental process that balances the interests of individual students with the interests of the University of La
Verne community. The student conduct process is
not intended to punish students; rather, it exists to
protect the interests of the community and to challenge those whose behavior is not in accordance
with our policies. Sanctions are intended to challenge
students’ moral and ethical decision-making and to
help them bring their behavior into accord with our
community expectations. When a student is unable
to conform their behavior to community expectations,
the student conduct process may determine that the
student should no longer share in the privilege of participating in this community.
The student conduct process is different from criminal and civil court proceedings. Procedures and
rights in student conduct procedures are conducted
with “fundamental fairness” in mind. However they
do not include the same protections of due process
afforded by the courts. Due process, as defined within these procedures, assures written notice and an
administrative review meeting before an objective
decision-maker. No student will be found in violation
of University of La Verne policy without information
showing that it is more likely than not (i.e. preponderance of evidence) that a policy violation occurred and
any sanctions will be proportionate to the severity of
the violation and to the cumulative conduct history of
the student.
Code of Student Conduct: Jurisdiction
Students at the University of La Verne are provided a
copy of the Code of Student Conduct annually in the
form of a link on the University of La Verne website
(http://sites.laverne.edu/student-affairs/the-disciplinary-process-for-student-social-misconduct/).
Students are responsible for having read and abiding
by the provisions of the Code of Student Conduct.
The Code of Student Conduct applies to behaviors
that take place on the campus, at University of La
Verne sponsored events and may also apply off-campus when the Dean of Student Affairs or designee
determines that the off-campus conduct affects a
substantial University of La Verne interest. A substantial University of La Verne interest is defined to
include: a) Any situation where it appears that the
student’s conduct may present a danger or threat to
the health or safety of him/herself or others; and/or b)
Any situation that significantly impinges upon the
rights, property or achievements of self or others or
significantly breaches the peace and/or causes
social disorder; and/or c) Any situation that is detrimental to the educational mission and/or interests of
the University of La Verne; d) Any situation has implications or ramifications that affect members of the
on-campus community or the campus community at
large.
The Code of Student Conduct may be applied to
behavior conducted online, via email or other electronic medium. Students should be aware that online
postings such as blogs, web postings, chats and
social networking sites are in the public sphere and
are not private. These postings can subject a student
to allegations of conduct violations if evidence of policy violations is posted online. The University of La
Verne does not regularly monitor for this information
but may take action if and when such information is
brought to the attention of University of La Verne officials.
The Code of Student Conduct applies to guests of
community members whose hosts may be held
accountable for the misconduct of their guests.
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 60
There is no time limit on reporting violations of the
Code of Student Conduct; however, the longer someone waits to report an offense, the harder it becomes
for University of La Verne officials to obtain information and witness statements and to make determinations regarding alleged violations. Essentially,
delayed reporting may limit the University’s ability to
take action.
Though anonymous complaints are permitted, doing
so may limit the University of La Verne’s ability to
investigate and respond to a complaint. Those who
are aware of misconduct are encouraged to report it
as quickly as possible to the Office of the Dean of
Students Affairs, Student Housing and Residential
Education, or Campus Safety.
Code of Student Conduct - Policies: The University
of La Verne considers the behavior described at
http://sites.laverne.edu/student-affairs/policies/ as
inappropriate for the University of La Verne community and in opposition to its core values. These
expectations and policies apply to all students,
whether undergraduate, graduate, doctoral, or professional. The University of La Verne encourages
community members to report to University of La
Verne officials all incidents that involve the following
actions. Any student found to have committed or to
have attempted to commit misconduct as outlined in
http://sites.laverne.edu/student-affairs/policies/ is
subject to University sanctions.
Non-Traditional-Age and Graduate Programs:
The College of Law, College of Business and Public
Management, College of Arts and Sciences, College
of Educational and Organizational Leadership,
Regional Campus (ROC), Campus Accelerate
Program for Adults (CAPA), and on-line programs for
non-traditional and graduate students may have their
own judicial processes, including administrative
reviews.
Interim Action:
Immediate Interim Suspension: Under the Code of
Student Conduct, the Dean of Student Affairs or
designee may impose restrictions and/or separate a
student from the community pending the scheduling
of an administrative meeting or review on alleged violation(s) of the Code of Student Conduct when a student represents a threat of serious harm to others, is
facing allegations of serious criminal activity, to preserve the integrity of an investigation, to preserve
University of La Verne property and/or to prevent disruption of, or interference with, the normal operations
of the University of La Verne. Interim actions can
include separation from the institution or restrictions
on participation in the community pending the scheduling of an administrative meeting or review on
alleged violation(s) of the Code of Student Conduct.
During an interim suspension, a student may be
denied access to University of La Verne housing
and/or
the
University
of
La
Verne
campus/facilities/events. As determined appropriate
by the Dean of Student Affairs, this restriction may
include classes and/or all other University of La
Verne activities or privileges for which the student
might otherwise be eligible.
The University of La Verne reserves the right to exercise its authority of interim suspension upon notification that a student is facing criminal investigation
and/or complaint. Interim suspensions are imposed
until an administrative meeting or review can be held,
typically within two weeks. The interim suspension
may be continued if a danger to the community is
posed and the University of La Verne may be
delayed or prevented from conducting its own investigation and resolving the allegation by the pendency
of the criminal process.
No Contact Order: The University may impose a nocontact order on two or more students where it is
determined that a) is in the best interest of the students identified to minimize contact with each other;
b) there is a health and safety concern; or c) contact
may result in the escalation of incident. No contact
orders will remain in place until the University has
been able to conclude an administrative review. No
contact orders may remain in place after administrative review and without the need to have found student responsible as long as the no contact is intend-
University of La Verne email (@laverne.edu) is the
University of La Verne’s primary means of communication with students. Students are responsible for all
communication delivered to their University of La
Verne email address.
Code of Student Conduct - Violations of the Law:
Alleged violations of federal, state and local laws
may be investigated and addressed under the Code
of Student Conduct. When an offense occurs over
which the University of La Verne has jurisdiction, the
University of La Verne conduct process will usually
go forward notwithstanding any criminal complaint
that may arise from the same incident.
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 61
ed to a) minimize health and safety concerns or b)
reduce the escalation of incidents.
Code of Student Conduct - Overview of Process:
This overview gives a general idea of how the
University of La Verne’s campus conduct proceedings work, but it should be noted that not all situations
are of the same severity or complexity. Thus, these
procedures are flexible, and are not exactly the same
in every situation, though consistency in similar situations is a priority. The campus conduct process and
all applicable timelines commence with notice to an
administrator of a potential violation of University of
La Verne rules.
Once notice is received from any source (victim,
campus safety, RA, 3rd party, online, etc.), the
University of La Verne may proceed with an administrative review with the student alleged to have violated policy (responding student). An administrative
review officer will be assigned to oversee administrative review process including sending notices to
meet; meeting with respondent, victims and witnesses; investigating the incident(s); making a decision;
and sending notice of decision.
STEP 1: Notice of Administrative Review: Students
identified as allegedly having violated a policy
(respondents) of the Code of Student Conduct
receive formal notice for an administrative review
meeting. Notice is sent via a formal communication
through e-mail communication to the respondent’s
University of La Verne email account and/or hardmail. The notice will: a) Provide notice of alleged violation and the time/date that it occurred (to the extent
that is possible); b) Provide notice of specific policies
respondents is alleged to have violated; c) Inform
respondent of their right to schedule an administrative review meeting within a specified date (usually
3–5 days from date of notice); d) Inform the respondents of the right to have an administrative review
meeting within a specific date (usually 7–10 dates
from date of notice); e) Inform the respondents of
their right to not attend or participate an administrative review meeting; f) Provide the respondents an
opportunity to submit a written statement with their
version of the events/incident; g) Provide the respondents information regarding the student code of conduct and process. Individuals identified as victims or
witnesses may also receive a notice requesting to
meet with administrative officer to discuss incident(s)
in question as part of the administrative review investigation.
STEP 2 – Administrative Review Meeting(s) and
Investigation: The University will conduct an administrative review meeting into the nature of the incident,
complaint or notice, the evidence available, and the
parties involved. During the administrative review
meeting, respondents will: a) Have an opportunity to
share their perspective on the incident, present related evidence or identify possible witnesses; b) Have
an opportunity to review the notice (statements)
received by the University indicating a violation of
student code of conduct; c) Be informed of the followup being done by the administrative review officer as
part of their investigation. This may include additional administrative review meetings with respondent;
intermediate action; or request for additional information; d) Be informed of expected date by which university official expects to notify respondent of outcome of administrative review process/investigation
(usually 7 – 14 days from date of initial meeting).
Should a responding student not attend/participate or
schedule an administrative review meeting within the
specific dates, the administrative review officer will
proceed with their investigations and make decisions
based on the information available to them.
The administrative review officer may take the following steps as part of their investigation of an incident:
a) Initiate any necessary remedial actions on behalf of
the victim (if any); b) Determine the identity and contact information of the party bringing the complaint,
whether that person is the initiator of the complaint,
the alleged victim, or a University of La Verne proxy or
representative; c) Conduct an immediate preliminary
investigation to identify an initial list of all policies that
may have been violated, to review the history of the
parties, the context of the incident(s), any potential
patterns and the nature of the complaint; d) Conduct
a comprehensive investigation to determine if there is
reasonable cause to believe that the responding student violated University policy, and to determine what
specific policy violations should serve as the basis for
the complaint; e) Meet with the party bringing the
complaint; f) Interview all relevant witnesses; g)
Obtain all documentary evidence and information that
is available; h) Obtain all physical evidence that is
available; i) Complete the investigation promptly by
analyzing all available evidence; j) Make a finding,
based on a preponderance of the evidence; k) If there
is insufficient evidence through the investigation to
support reasonable cause, the allegations will be
closed with no further action; l) Share the findings and
update the party bringing the complaint on the status
of the investigation and the outcome.
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 62
Findings: A student will be found “not responsible” where: a) The responding student was not
involved in the alleged policy violation; b) The
incident or behavior in question does not constitute a violation of the University of Code of
Student Conduct; c) Where there is inconclusive
information to meet preponderance of evidence.
In such instances where the student is found not
responsible, the investigation will be closed and
duly noted on the student file. The investigation
may be re-opened if new /relevant information is
made available that it would significantly impact
the finding. The party bringing the complaint, if
any, may request that the Title IX Coordinator
and/or Dean of Student Affairs (where applicable), review the investigation file to possibly reopen the investigation. The decision to re-open
an investigation rests solely in the discretion of
the Title IX Coordinator or the Dean of Student
Affairs in these cases, and is granted only on the
basis of extraordinary cause.
A student will be found responsible where the
administrative review officer determines that
there is a preponderance of evidence that a code
of student conduct policy was violated. In such
incidents the investigator will assign a sanction,
notify the student respondent and duly note it on
the student file.
Conduct Sanctions: One or more of following sanctions may be imposed upon any student for any single violation of the Code of Student Conduct:
University
Warning;
Restitution;
Fines;
Community/University of La Verne Service
Requirements; No Contact Order; Loss of Privileges;
Confiscation of Prohibited Property; Behavioral
Requirement; Educational Program; Restriction of
Visitation Privileges; Persona Non Grata; University
of La Verne Housing Probation; University of La
Verne Housing Reassignment; University of La
Verne Housing Removal; University of La Verne
Probation; Social Probation/Eligibility Restriction;
University of La Verne Suspension; University of La
Verne Expulsion; Other Sanctions: Additional or
alternate sanctions may be created and designed as
deemed appropriate to the offense with the approval
of the Dean of Student Affairs or designee.
The following sanctions may be imposed upon
groups or organizations found to have violated the
Code of Student Conduct: One or more of the sanctions listed above; and/or deactivation; de-recogni-
tion; loss of all privileges (including status as a
University of La Verne registered group/organization); for a specified period of time.
Parental Notification: The University of La Verne
reserves the right to notify the parents/guardians of
dependent students regarding any conduct situation,
particularly alcohol and other drug violations. The
University of La Verne may also notify
parents/guardians of non-dependent students who
are under the age of 21 of alcohol and/or other drug
violations. Parental notification may also be utilized
discretionarily by administrators when permitted by
FERPA or consent of the student.
Notification of Outcomes: The outcome of an
administrative review is part of the education record
of the responding student and is protected from
release under the Federal Education Rights and
Privacy Act (FERPA), except under certain conditions. As allowed by FERPA, when a student is
accused of a policy violation that would constitute a
“crime of violence” or forcible or non-forcible sex
offense, the University of La Verne will inform the
alleged victim/party bringing the complaint in writing
of the final results of a hearing regardless of whether
the University of La Verne concludes that a violation
was committed. Such release of information may
only include the alleged student’s/responding student’s name, the violation committed, and the sanctions assigned (if applicable). In cases of sexual misconduct and other offenses covered by Title IX, only,
the rationale for the outcome will also be shared with
all parties to the complaint in addition to the finding
and sanction(s).
In cases where the University of La Verne determines through the student conduct process that a
student violated a policy that would constitute a
“crime of violence” or non-forcible sex offense, the
University of La Verne may also release the above
information publicly and/or to any third party. FERPA
defines “crimes of violence” to include: arson; assault
offenses (includes stalking); burglary; criminal homicide—manslaughter by negligence; criminal homicide—murder and non-negligent manslaughter;
destruction/damage/vandalism of property; kidnapping/abduction; robbery; forcible sex offences; nonforcible sex offences.
Failure to Complete Conduct Sanctions: All students, as members of the University of La Verne
community, are expected to comply with conduct
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 63
sanctions within the timeframe specified by the Dean
of Student Affairs or designee. Failure to follow
through on conduct sanctions by the date specified,
whether by refusal, neglect or any other reason, may
result in additional sanctions and/or suspension from
the University of La Verne and may be noted on, or
with, the student’s official transcript at the end of the
semester.
Social Misconduct Appeal Review Procedures:
Any party directly involved in an incident (either as a
victim or respondent) may request an appeal of the
decision from an administrative review by filing a written appeal, subject to the procedures outlined below.
All sanctions imposed remain in effect, and all parties
should be timely informed of the status of requests
for appeal, the status of the appeal consideration,
and the results of the appeal decision.
Grounds for Appeal Request: Appeals requests
are limited to the following grounds:
1. A substantive error occurred that significantly
impacted the outcome of the administrative
review (e.g. substantiated bias, material deviation from established procedures, etc.);
2. To consider new evidence, unavailable during the
original administrative review or investigation,
that could substantially impact the original finding
or sanction. A summary of this new evidence and
its potential impact must be included;
3. The sanctions imposed are substantially disproportionate to the severity of the violation.
Appeals must be filed in writing with the Office of
the Dean of Student Affairs or designee within
three (3) business days of the notice of the outcome to the hearing, barring exigent circumstances. Any exceptions are made at the discretion of the Dean of Student Affairs and, when
appropriate, the Title IX Coordinator.
The Dean of Student Affairs or designee will
share the appeal by one party with the other party
(parties) when appropriate under procedure or
law (e.g., if the responding student appeals, the
appeal is shared with the complainant, who may
also wish to file a response, request an appeal on
the same grounds or different grounds). The
Dean of Student Affairs will refer the request(s) to
the University’s designated Appeal Review
Officer for that case. The Appeal Review Officer
will draft a response memorandum to the appeal
request(s), based on the determination that the
request(s) will be granted or denied, and why.
The Appeal Review Officer will conduct an initial
review to determine if the appeal request meets
the limited grounds and is timely. They may consult with the Dean of Student Affairs and/or Title
IX Coordinator on any procedural or substantive
questions that arise.
If the appeal is not timely or substantively eligible,
the original finding and sanction will stand and
the decision is final. If the appeal has standing or
merit, the Appeal Review Officer will consider the
appeal or remand it to the original decisionmaker(s), typically within 3-5 business days.
Efforts should be made to remand to the original
decision maker whenever possible, with clear
instructions for reconsideration only in light of the
granted appeal grounds. Where the original decision-maker may be unduly biased by a procedural or substantive error, the Appeal Review Officer
will consider the appeal. Full administrative rereviews are not permitted. In reviews, the original finding and sanction are presumed to have
been decided reasonably and appropriately, thus
the burden is on the appealing party(ies) to show
clear error.
On consideration, the Appeals Review Officer or
original decision maker may affirm or change the
findings and/or sanctions of the original hearing
officer according to the permissible grounds.
Substantive errors should be corrected, new evidence should be considered, and sanctions
should be proportionate to the severity of the violation and the student’s cumulative conduct
record.
All decisions made in appeals are to be made
within five (5) days of submission and are final,
as are any decisions made by the original administrative review officer, Dean of Student Affairs or
Title IX Coordinator as the result of reconsideration consistent with instructions from the Appeal
Review Officer.
The University of La Verne Code of Student
Conduct is adapted from the NCHERM Group
Model Developmental Code of Student Conduct
and is used here with permission.
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 64
GRADUATION
REQUIREMENTS
LA VERNE EXPERIENCE
The La Verne Experience is a holistic approach that
incorporates La Verne’s traditions and values, integrates curricular, co-curricular, and community
engagement activities that promotes best practices in
higher education. Requirements for traditional
undergraduates span their four years at La Verne.
In the Freshman Year all students participate in a
FLEX Learning Community with three linked GE (1
major) classes including a writing class.
Sophomore Year students participate in a SoLVE
class. Core 200 – Sophomore Seminar, guides students in an exploration of the La Verne values and
co-curricular opportunities in the community and
builds the e-portfolio. It may not be taken as a directed study. During the Junior Year students participate in a
Learning Community with two or three linked major
classes, which include integrated curriculum with
reflective learning.
In the Senior Year students take the Capstone class
in the major plus a 1 or 2 unit class completing the
ePortfolio and reflecting on the total La Verne
Experience, La Verne Values, curricular and co-curricular experiences.
ROC and CAPA students take LVE 300 which
explores the role of the educated individual in modern society from the global, organizational, and personal contexts using the reflective lenses of diversity
and inclusivity, ethical reasoning, communication,
community and civic engagement, lifelong learning,
and the ePortfolio. The LVE 300 class guides adult
learners to become practice-ready professionals and
influential community leaders. (Effective Fall of 2015)
BACCALAUREATE GOALS
The University of La Verne is dedicated to the intellectual, personal, and professional development of its
students through a focus on the whole individual. Its
faculty nurtures a love of learning and innovation,
and encourages each student to make an informed
and conscientious commitment, to engage in an
ever-changing world.
Every student from the University will graduate
with:
• Broad knowledge and appreciation of the liberal
arts integrated with a depth of knowledge in a specialized discipline;
• Ability to think critically and creatively and apply
those skills toward resolution of local, national and
global problems;
• Excellence in written, oral and creative expression
through a variety of traditional and contemporary
media;
• Effective leadership and teamwork skills with cultural competence;
• Commitment to ethical, environmental and social
responsibility accompanied by civic and community engagement.
Baccalaureate Programs
General Requirements: To obtain a bachelor’s
degree from the University of La Verne, a student
must complete the residency requirement, the minimum GPA requirement in the major, and overall,
General Education requirements, all major requirements, upper-division requirement, minimum course
grade requirement, and the minimum number of
semester hours required. Below you will find the
specifics for each requirement. It is the responsibility of the student to familiarize himself or herself with
these requirements. Faculty and professional advisors are assigned to assist students with their degree
objectives.
Residency Requirement: Students must enroll and
successfully complete 44 semester hours of course
work at the University of La Verne. At least 16
semester hours of the residency hours must be at the
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 65
upper-division level in the major, and five semester
hours in general education must be taken at the
University of La Verne. All traditional age, undergraduate students on the main campus must take 16
of their last 32 units prior to graduation at the
University of La Verne.
For all degrees for active-duty service members and
their adult family members (spouse and college-age
children) who enroll and petition for graduation at the
University of La Verne under the SOC agreements,
the University of La Verne will limit academic
residency to twenty-five percent or less of the degree
requirements There is no “final year” or “final
semester” residency requirements for these students
under this agreement. Academic residency can be
completed at any time while active-duty service
members and their family members (spouse and
college-age children) are enrolled at the University of
La Verne. Reservists and National Guardsmen who
enroll at the University of La Verne under the SOC
agreements and who are on active-duty are also
covered in the same manner.
GPA Requirements: To qualify for graduation, the
student must have a minimum La Verne GPA and a
cumulative GPA of 2.0 or better, both in the major and
overall. The Programs section of this catalog lists
any additional departmental GPA requirements.
Refer to Academic Information to find information in
regards to graduating with honors.
Course Grade Requirements: For the purpose of
fulfilling elective requirements and general education
requirements other than Written English, a course in
which a D or D+ was received will be counted only if
the course was taken at the University of La Verne.
A grade of C- or better is required to fulfill the Written
English general education requirement, to count
toward an academic major or minor, or to advance to
the next course in the ESL program. The grade of Cis also the minimum acceptable grade for prerequisites for undergraduate courses as well as for undergraduate supportive courses in the major. All major
courses must be taken for a letter grade.
Senior Seminar/Culminating Activity Requirement:
All undergraduate students of the University of La
Verne must register and complete their major/concentration senior seminar or culminating activity at
the University of La Verne.
Minimum Number of Semester Hours: The mini-
mum number of semester hours required for degree
completion is 128 successfully passed semester
hours. Repeated courses, unless designated in the
catalog as being repeatable, will be counted one time
only. The minimum number of semester hours for a
course to meet a GE requirement is 2 semester
hours unless otherwise designated.
Degree Completion Date: The degree is not considered completed until all of the above requirements
have been fulfilled, all relevant transfer work and
grades have been received, and all applicable graduation or appeal fees have been paid. The degree
date will be determined by the final event that completes the degree; this may be the final day of the
term or semester, the date coursework is completed
for an IP or INC grade, or the payment of required
graduation and/or appeal fees. Degrees completed
via transfer work will be assigned a degree date
based on the nearest La Verne term or semester
ending date, with certain exceptions determined by
the Office of the Registrar.
General Education Requirements —
Bachelor’s Degree Programs
Philosophy: General Education at the University of
La Verne has two primary objectives: 1) to communicate the central values of the University as
expressed in its Mission Statement, and 2) to expose
students to the traditional liberal arts fields of study.
It provides students with the knowledge, skills, and
attitudes crucial to student success in the 21st century world and workplace.
The goal of the general education program is
expressed in the following learning outcomes:
University Values Learning Outcomes: A graduate
with a baccalaureate degree should have an understanding and appreciation of the following core
areas:
Values Orientation (UVVO)
1. Describe and analyze diverse value systems and
the historical, social, and psychological backgrounds from which they emerge.
2. Situate and critique one’s own values within a
conscious value system and social context.
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 66
Community and Diversity (UVCD)
1. Identify and analyze the significance human
beings attach to their differences.
2. Describe and analyze the effects of prejudice,
exclusion, subordination and ideologies of racial
superiority on affected groups and individuals.
3. Demonstrate an understanding that diversity is a
key factor for the flourishing of communities
(social, environmental, and/or economic) and
that a lack of diversity can compromise future
generations.
Lifelong Learning (UVLL)
1. Demonstrate proficiency in skills that sustain lifelong learning, particularly the abilities to think
both critically and responsibly and to access,
evaluate, and integrate information.
2. Demonstrate the ability to determine and use the
appropriate technology to support information
search and discovery methods.
Community Service (UVCS)
1. Reflect on service as a component of active citizenship, community engagement and social
responsibility.
2. Demonstrate reciprocity and responsiveness in
service work with a community organization.
3. Describe and analyze the social issues relevant
to community organization.
*Courses must include a minimum of 20 hours of
unpaid, active participation assisting an off-campus community organization in the achievement
of its goals, not simply observing the work of the
organization.
Interdisciplinary Thinking Learning Outcomes
(INTD): A graduate with a baccalaureate degree
should be able to:
1. Identify the different frameworks, tools, perspectives, methods, fundamental underlying questions and contributions of different academic disciplines.
2. Demonstrate how the synthesis of disciplines can
establish a new level of discourse and integration
of knowledge to provide a broader analysis of
complex issues.
Definition of Interdisciplinary Courses: Courses
approved for the interdisciplinary designation
must be an upper division course that incorporates two or three distinct disciplines. For the purpose of this designation, each of the Breadth
Areas in the G.E. program constitute a distinct
discipline: Written Communication, Oral
Communication, Quantitative Reasoning, The
Natural World, Humanities, Behavioral and Social
Sciences, Creative and Artistic Expression, and
Lifelong Fitness
Critical Skills Learning Outcomes: A graduate with
a baccalaureate degree should have competency in
the following skill areas and be able to:
Written Communication A: Writing Process (CSWA)
1. Communicate effectively and with purpose in
multiple creative and academic writing genres by
applying Standard American English.
2. Understand and apply the stages of the writing
process to academic communications: composition, organization, revision and editing of
Standard American English mechanics.
Written Communication B: Research and Reading
Comprehension (CSWB)
1. Critically analyze modes of writing and writing
components in popular and academic texts.
2. Understand and apply a variety of documentation
styles to cite research in written compositions for
specific purposes and designated audiences.
Oral Communication (CSOC)
1. Analyze how communication theory, including the
study of nonverbal behavior, helps guide the
organization, interpretation, and presentation of
messages and their effects.
2. Understand and practice public speeches in various formats and contexts, including self-written
and self-portrayed speeches.
Quantitative Reasoning (CSQR)
1. Represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically, and verbally, and interpret and draw inferences from mathematical
models such as formulas, graphs, tables and
schematics.
2. Apply arithmetical, algebraic, geometric and statistical methods with appropriate technological
tools to solve problems.
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 67
3. Think critically and apply common sense in estimating and checking answers to mathematical
problems in order to determine reasonableness,
identify alternatives and select optimal results.
Areas of Knowledge Learning Outcomes: A graduate with a baccalaureate degree should have
acquired the knowledge of the following breadth
areas and should be able to:
Social and Behavioral Sciences (ASBH, ASEC,
ASPS, ASIA)
1. Understand and describe the use of elementary
methods of social science inquiry.
2. Articulate the impact of societal institutions on the
experiences and needs of individuals, groups,
and/or organizations.
Humanities (AHFA, AHFL, AHHT, AHLT, AHMM,
AHPR, AHIA)
1. Analyze, interpret, evaluate and appreciate
human intellectual and imaginative creations and
the context of their production.
2. Recognize how various works of cultural production illuminate enduring human concerns and
changes in the human condition.
The Natural World (ANSL, ANSP, ALAB)
1. Demonstrate an understanding of the basic principles, concepts, discovery process, power and
limitations of the life and/or physical sciences.
2. Apply the principles, concepts and methods of
the life and/or physical sciences to everyday life.
3. Demonstrate an understanding of the roles of science and technology in society and their impact
on the sustainability of the planet.
Creative and Artistic Expression (ACAE)
1. Produce works of art through written, visual, digital and/or performance expression that communicate to diverse audiences through demonstrated understanding and fluency of expressive
forms.
Lifelong Fitness (AFFL)
1. Demonstrate the ability to physically meet the
demands of everyday life.
2. Demonstrate an understanding of the benefits of
physical activity and its effect on intellectual,
emotional, and physical well-being.
General Education Requirements
For each General Education requirement, acceptable
courses are marked with a GE code in the La Verne
Course Catalog, on MyLaVerne, and shown below in
parenthesis. One “course” is defined as a minimum
of two semester hours, and no course can be used to
meet more than one Breadth Requirement. All
courses (general education, major, minor, or electives) can be used to fulfill multiple requirements in
the University Values Requirement and/or
Interdisciplinary Requirement. Students may take a
maximum of one course in their major to fulfill their
Breadth Requirement, and they must complete a
minimum of 5 upper division semester hours in at
least two different areas of the University Values
requirement.
University Values Requirement: University Values
are integrated in courses across the curriculum.
Students meet the University Values requirement by
taking courses in which one or more University
Values are explicitly embedded. The University
Values requirement can be met in general education,
major, minor, or elective courses. For University
Values, one “course” is defined as 1-4 semester
hours. One course may satisfy more than one
University Value. Students satisfy this requirement
by taking two courses designated as Values
Orientation (UVVO), two courses designated as
Community and Diversity (UVCD), two courses designated as Lifelong Learning (UVLL), and one course
designated as Community Service (UVCS).
Interdisciplinary Requirement: Students must take at
least one upper division interdisciplinary course
(INTD).
Breadth Requirement:
1. Critical Skills
a. Written Communication A (CSWA)
b. Written Communication B (CSWB)
c. Oral Communication (CSOC)
d. Quantitative Reasoning (CSQR)
2. Areas of Knowledge
a. The Natural World
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 68
1
1
1
1
course
course
course
course
b.
c.
d.
e.
Life Science (ANSL)
1 course
Physical Science (ANSP)
1 course
Lab (ALAB)
1 lab
Social and Behavioral Sciences
2 courses from two different sub-areas:
Behavioral Science (ASBH)
Political Science (ASPS)
Economics (ASEC)
Inter-Area Social Sciences (ASIA)
Humanities
3 courses from three different sub-areas:
Literature (AHLT)
Philosophy and Religion (AHPR)
Foreign Language (AHFL)
Mass Media (AHMM)
History (AHHT)
History of Fine Arts (AHFA)
Inter-Area Humanities (AHIA)
Creative & Artistic expression (ACAE) 1 course
Fitness for Life (AFFL)
1 course
Some majors require foreign language as part of the
Humanities requirement. Students meet this requirement by completing, transferring in, or testing out of
second semester college-level foreign language as
one of their three Humanities requirements. The following
majors
require
foreign
language:
Anthropology, Art, Art History, Behavioral Science,
Broadcasting, Child Development, Communications,
Comparative
Literature,
Creative
Writing,
Criminology, French, German, History, International
Business and Language, International Studies,
Journalism, Liberal Arts, Mathematics, Music,
Philosophy, Political Science, Religion, Religion and
Philosophy, Physics, Social Science, Sociology,
Spanish, Speech Communication, Theatre. Students
whose first language is not English and who successfully pass (C- or better) WRT 109 Intro to
Expository Writing, WRT 110 College Writing A, or
WRT 111 College Writing B will have their Foreign
Language requirement waived.
The following general education areas can be fulfilled
through certification: Written Communication,
Quantitative Reasoning, Foreign Language, Creative
and Artistic Expression, Community Service, and
Lifelong Fitness. Certifications do not carry course
credit. However, students certified in Written
Communication or Community Service have the
option of paying the course challenge fee and receiving course credit. Students who wish to meet a
requirement through certification should contact the
appropriate department for information.
WRT Requirement for Undergraduate International
Students: An International student who has been
accepted into an undergraduate program by demonstrating English competency as described in the
Admissions section of this catalog, but who has not
passed a transferable course in written composition
equivalent to WRT 110, Written Communication A,
must have scores on file in the Admissions Office
from one of the following proficiency tests before registration for his or her first semester at La Verne: the
iBT (TOEFL), the SAT, the IELTS or ELS Language
Centers level 112. This includes students who are
transferring from other institutions in the United
States. If the test scores indicate that the student is
below WRT 110 level, they will be placed into WRT
109 his or her first semester at La Verne and continue instruction in WRT 110 and WRT 111 in the following semesters.
The Bachelor’s Degree Major: Students may
choose an established departmental or interdepartmental major, or they may design a major of their
own with faculty advisement and approval. A major
consists of not less than 40 semester hours of which
at least 24 must be upper division. No more than 16
semester hours may be required beyond this as prerequisites. Regional campus students must select a
structured major and can only choose from those
offered at a particular site. A concentration in a major
is available in selected departments. A concentration
requires a student to complete between 12 and 20
upper division semester hours, none of which may be
used to fulfill requirements in other concentrations or
majors. Available concentrations are listed in the
Programs section of this catalog. Concentrations are
noted on the transcript. Students are strongly
encouraged to declare a major at point of entry, but
must declare a major prior to enrollment in their junior year.
No course, whether a prerequisite, core requirement,
elective or culminating requirement can be applied
toward a major unless a grade of C- or better was
received. A course in which CRD was received cannot be applied to the major, except in limited
instances approved by the department chair and the
Registrar. Most seniors are required to pass a set of
comprehensive examinations in their major(s) and/or
complete a senior project/seminar.
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 69
Bachelor’s Degree Double Majors: La Verne permits students to pursue a double major. Students
who desire to double major should make this decision early and meet with the advisors of both majors.
The minimum requirements for graduation with two
bachelor’s degree majors are as follows:
1. Completion of all the requirements in both
majors.
2. In cases where there is no duplication of major
requirements, completion of a minimum of 80
semester hours in the two fields (40 semester
hours in each major), of which 48 semester hours
(24 semester hours in each) must be at the
upper-division level.
3. In cases where there are overlapping upper-division major requirements (not including supportive
requirements), completion of additional upperdivision electives in the fields equal to the number
of overlapped courses.
Note: students who declare double majors that are
designated B.A. or B.S. must choose one of the designations. Students obtain a single degree, B.A. or
B.S.
Second Bachelor’s Degree: A student already holding a bachelor’s degree may earn an additional bachelor’s degree by satisfying the requirements of that
degree in residence, general education, and upperdivision course work. To satisfy the residency
requirement for the second bachelor’s degree, a student must complete a minimum of 44 additional
semester hours at La Verne of which 16 must be
upper division. The major, general education, and
upper-division requirements in effect at the time of
matriculation for the second bachelor’s degree must
also be completed, but courses taken for the first
degree may be applied to the second.
Bachelor’s Degree Minors: Students may declare a
minor in a second field upon the approval of the
minor field department if the student has completed
20 semester hours of upper-division work in the
minor field, or 24 semester hours in the minor field of
which 16 are upper division, or 30 semester hours in
the minor field of which 12 are upper division.
Individual departments may require specific courses
and/or additional work for the minor as specified in
the Undergraduate Programs section of this catalog.
Courses declared as part of the major (not including
supportive requirements) cannot be applied toward
the minor. No course can be applied toward a minor
unless a grade of C- or better was received. A course
in which CRD was received cannot be applied to a
minor.
Adding an additional Major/Minor/Concentration
after degree posting: Students can add a major,
minor, or concentration after their degree has been
officially posted to their transcript. Students must
contact the appropriate Program Chair/Advisor to
declare their intent to add the additional
major/minor/concentration. Once the student has the
approval of the Program Chair/Advisor he/she must
also complete an Application for Graduation in the
Office of the Registrar. This will allow the Office of
the Registrar to monitor completion of the added
major/minor/concentration, and update the student
record to allow registration. A fee will not be charged
for this application. Upon completion, the Program
Chair/Advisor must notify the Registrar’s Office, at
which time the added major/minor/concentration will
be noted on the student’s official transcript along with
the completion date. The additional program will be
indicated as an event separate from the original
degree. The diploma will not be revised.
Students who request the added major/minor/concentration after degree posting are no longer considered admitted to a degree program and therefore will
not be eligible to apply for financial aid for the
required additional courses. However all other
polices and requirements listed in the catalog under
the major, minor, or concentration areas will apply.
Associate Degree Programs
An Associate Degree is offered at the Point Mugu
Regional Campus only. To earn an Associate Degree
in General Studies, a student must complete the following:
1. A minimum of 60 semester hours, at least 30 of
which must be at the lower division level.
2. A minimum of 20 semester hours earned at the
University of La Verne as a residency requirement.
3. A minimum of 18 semester hours in the major.
4. A minimum of 12 semester hours in the major
from the University of La Verne.
5. A minimum of 18 semester hours in General
Education, including one course in Fine Arts, one
in Humanities, one in Natural Science, one in
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 70
Social Science and two in Written English (designated CSWA and CSWB).
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
Specific requirements for each graduate degree and
credential program offered by the University of La
Verne are contained in the Graduate Programs section of this catalog; policies for second master’s
degrees are described in the Graduate Admissions
section. To qualify for a degree or credential, a student must have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or above for
all La Verne course work required for the degree or
credential. All transfer credit from other colleges or
universities must be 3.0 or above.
English Proficiency Requirement for Graduate
International Students:
Applicants who have not completed their bachelor’s
degree level education at a school in the USA,
Australia, Canada (English-language provinces),
United Kingdom, or New Zealand, and South Africa
must provide proof of English proficiency in one of
the following ways:
a. A minimum score on the Test of English as a
Foreign Language (TOEFL) of 79 (iBT), 213
(CBT), or 550 (PBT) or above. Some programs require a higher score.
b. A minimum score on the International English
Language Testing System (IELTS) of 6.5.
c. Completion of English 112 at the ELS
Language Center.
Note: These scores are minimum admission
requirements only. Some programs require higher scores.
Advanced Standing - Master’s Degree Programs:
Master’s degree candidates must have received
Advanced Standing prior to the beginning of the
term/semester for which they plan on registering for
their culminating activity. To obtain Advanced
Standing, candidates must have completed a minimum of 21 semester hours, or have completed 18
semester hours and currently be enrolled in 6 semester hours (30 semester hours in a 39-50 semesterhour program; 43 semester hours in a 61 semesterhour program), as well as all prerequisites. In addi-
tion, they must have satisfied any provisions or conditions imposed at the time of admission to the program, fulfilled any special conditions or procedures
specified by their academic departments, and
attained a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 for all
courses applicable to the degree program. To apply
for Advanced Standing, students must submit an
Application for Advanced Standing with the approval
of their academic advisor along with an Application
for Graduation (with the graduation fee) to the
Graduate Office or regional campus. Verification of
Advanced Standing is sent to the student by the
Graduate Office or the ROC Student Services Office.
Time Limitation: All requirements for the master’s
degree are to be completed within five years from the
time of first course registration for the graduate program at La Verne; all requirements for the doctorate,
within eight years. Appeals for extensions of time
limitations must be made in writing to the Graduate
Appeals Committee.
Continuous Registration for Culminating
Activity/Field Work: Students who receive an IP for
592 or 594 (Thesis), or 596 (Graduate Seminar); or
for EDLD 574A, 574B, or 574C; PPS 583A, 583B, or
597; RDG 598 or SPSY 598; or SPED 596; and have
not cleared it within one year following the end of the
term or semester of registration, can extend their registration for six months with a one-semester-hour
extension fee and approval of their sponsor/instructor. A maximum of four six-month extensions will be
permitted within the five-year time limit for the completion of the degree.
Degree Completion Date: The degree is not considered completed until all of the above requirements
have been fulfilled, all grades have been received,
and all applicable advanced standing or appeal fees
have been paid. The degree date will be determined
by the final event that completes the degree; this may
be the final day of the term or semester, the date
coursework is completed for an IP, INC, or CE grade,
or the payment of required advanced standing and/or
appeal fees.
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 71
ACADEMIC
PROGRAMS
On the pages that follow, the degree, certificate, and
credential programs offered by the University of La
Verne are listed with the college and department
that offers them. Topical lists follow, one undergraduate and one graduate, with the page numbers indicating location in this catalog.
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
In addition to the following established programs,
undergraduate students at the central campus may
design their own majors in one or more departments
to meet their personal interests and needs. For further information on individualized majors, please
consult the appropriate department(s) or the Registrar.
Bachelor’s Degree Majors:
• Accounting — B.S., B.A.
112, 114
• Anthropology — B.S.
107
• Art History — B.A.
75
• Athletic Training — B.S.
86
• Behavioral Sciences — B.S.
107
• Biology — B.A./B.S.
75
• Broadcasting — B.A.
78
• Business Administration — B.S., B.A.
112, 114
• Business Management — B.S.
114
• Chemistry — B.A./B.S.
77
• Child Development — B.S.
129
• Communications — B.A.
78
• Community Health — B.S.
95
• Comparative Literature — B.A.
80
• Computer Science/Engineering — B.S.
90
• Creative Writing — B.A.
94
• Criminology — B.S.
108
• E-Commerce — B.S.
91, 113
• Economics — B.S.
113
• English — B.A.
79
• French — B.A
92
• Health Administration — B.S.
120
• History — B.A.
81
• International Business & Lang. — B.S.
83, 113
• International Studies — B.A.
84
• Journalism — B.A.
79
• Kinesiology — B.S.
85
• Legal Studies – B.S.
• Liberal Arts — B.A.
• Liberal Studies — B.A.
• Mathematics — B.A./B.S.
• Music — B.A.
• Natural History — B.A.
• Organizational Management — B.S.
• Philosophy — B.A.
• Photography — B.A.
• Physics — B.A./B.S.
• Political Science — B.A.
• Psychology — B.S.
• Public Administration — B.S.
• Religion — B.A.
• Religion and Philosophy — B.A.
• Social Science — B.A.
• Sociology — B.S.
• Spanish — B.A.
• Speech Communication — B.A.
• Studio Art — B.A.
• Theatre — B.A
Bachelor’s Degree Minors:
• American Law
• Anthropology
• Art History
• Behavioral Sciences
• Biology
• Business Administration
• Business Management
• Child Development
• Creative Writing
• Criminology
• Economics
• English
• Ethnic Studies
• French
• Gender Studies
• History
• Information Science
• International Studies
• Internet Programming
• Japanese
• Kinesiology
• Latin American Studies
• Liberal Studies
• Marketing
• Music
• Peace Studies
• Philosophy
• Photography
• Physics
• Political Science
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 72
87
84
133
89
95
77
123
105
96
89
81
98
126
105
106
81
108
93
109
74
110
88
107
75
108
77
115
115
130
94
108
115
80
108
92
82
81
91
85
91
92
87
84
133
115
95
84
106
96
90
81
• Psychology
• Religion
• Sociology
• Software
• Spanish
• Speech Communication
• Studio Art
• Theatre Arts
98
106
109
91
93
109
74
110
Associate Degree:
• General Studies (Point Mugu only)
83
Undergraduate Programs:
• Honors
• Prehealth Science
• Prelaw
• Teacher Education
• Writing
Undergraduate Certificates:
• Analytical Instrumentation
• Environmental Chemistry
• Paralegal Studies
• Solar Photochemistry & Technology
• Systems Engineering
• Website & Internet Application Development
• Writing Certificate
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
82
97
97
131
93
78
78
88
78
91
91
94
Graduate admission requirements are listed in the
Admissions Information section of this catalog. Additional admission requirements specific to individual
programs, if any, are noted with the program descriptions.
Master’s Degree Programs:
• Accounting, M.S.
116
• Business Administration,
Master of (M.B.A.)
117, 118, 119
• Child Development, M.S.
133
• Child Life, M.S.
134
• Education (Special Emphasis), M.Ed.
130
• Education: Advanced Teaching Skills, M.Ed. 130
• Educational Counseling, M.S.
135
• Educational Leadership, M.Ed.
138, 139
• Gerontology, M.S.
122
• Health Administration, Master of (M.H.A.)
121
• Leadership and Management, M.S.
124
• Marriage & Family Therapy, M.S. (MFT)
99
• Public Administration, Master of (M.P.A.)
126
• Reading, M.Ed.
140
• School Psychology, M.S.
• Special Education Studies, M.S.
141
143
Doctoral and First Professional Degree
Programs:
• Juris Doctor (J.D.)
see College of Law catalog
• J.D./M.P.A. Dual Degree
(Juris Doctor/Master of Public Administration) 145
• Education, Doctor of (Ed.D.)
144
• Psychology, Doctor of (Psy.D.)
101
• Public Administration, Doctor of (D.P.A.)
128
Credential Programs:
• Bilingual Authorization
• Clear Induction Administrative
Services Credential
• Mild/Moderate Education Specialist Prelim.
• Multiple Subject (Elementary)
• Preliminary Administrative Services
• Pupil Personnel Services
• Reading and Language Arts Specialist
• Single Subject (Secondary)
Certificate Programs:
• California Teachers of English Learners
• Child Life Specialist
• Geriatric Care Management
• Gerontology
• Health Services Financial Management
• Health Services Marketing and Business
Development
• Health Services Management
• Human Resource Management
• Nonprofit Management
• Organizational Leadership
• Reading
• Spanish Bilingual Bicultural Counseling
• Teacher Leadership
• Teaching with Technology
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 73
132
139
142
131
138
137
141
131
133
135
123
123
122
122
121
125
125
125
140
137
139
131
Electives:
A minimum of 8 units of additional 200 level studio
courses from the following:
ART 221 Introduction to Stage Design & Craft(4)
ART 250 Sculpture
(4)
ART 260 Painting
(4)
ART 270 Installation and Mixed Media
(4)
ART 280 Digital Art Practices
(4)
PHOT 210 Elementary Photography
(4)
PHOT 230 Documentary Photography
(4)
COLLEGE of
ARTS and SCIENCES
Dean: Felicia Beardsley
Assistant Dean: Kathleen Weaver
ART AND ART HISTORY
DEPARTMENT
Chairperson: Keith Lord
Regular Faculty: Jon Leaver, Keith Lord, Ruth
Trotter
Adjunct Faculty: Dion Johnson, Gerald Slattum1
Regional Campus faculty
1
The Department of Art and Art History is committed to
providing a rich environment of interdisciplinary learning and exploration in which the student will develop
a sound foundation of knowledge and a wealth of experience in the visual arts. The art studio courses, art
history lectures and seminars, and the University
gallery programs provide the context for the curricula
in two majors, Studio Art and Art History.
Studio Art — B.A.
The major in studio art gives the student a background
in the fundamentals of the formal, technical, and theoretical concerns of the artist from both historical and
contemporary perspectives. Students can prepare for
a career as a professional artist or designer, for graduate study in art or design, for gallery and museum
administration, art conservation, or for careers in professional education in the arts.
Core Requirements:
ART 120 Foundations of Design
ART 140 Drawing Techniques and Materials
ART 200 Introduction to Visual Culture
ART 212 Materials, Tools, and Techniques
for the Visual Arts
ART 392 Junior Seminar
ART 499 Senior Project Seminar
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(2)
(4)
A minimum of 8 units of additional art history
courses from the following:
ART 210 Art History Foundation: Ancient
through Early Renaissance
(4)
ART 211 Art History Foundation: Renaissance
through Contemporary
(4)
300-400 level art history electives
(4)
A minimum of 10 units of additional 300-400 level
studio courses from the following:
ART 340 Life Drawing I
(4)
ART 350 Sculpture II
(4)
ART 370 Painting II
(4)
ART 380 Advanced Digital Art Practice
(4)
PHOT 300 Composition in Photoshop
(4)
PHOT 315 Alternative Processes
(4)
PHOT 351 Landscape Photography
(4)
Internship in art
(variable)
Study Abroad
(variable)
Studio Art Minor
The minor in Studio Art is an opportunity to pursue visual art as an enhancement to a major in another discipline. It is an excellent interdisciplinary option for
students with majors in areas such as business, education, philosophy, and science.
Core Requirements:
ART 120 Foundations of Design
(4)
ART 140 Drawing Techniques and Materials (4)
ART 200 Introduction to Visual Culture
(4)
ART 212 Materials, Tools, and Techniques
for the Visual Arts
(4)
Three 300-400 level studio ART courses
(4,4,4)
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 74
Art History — B.A.
The art history major provides a broad background in
the histories of art, photography, and architecture. Instruction focuses on the visual skills necessary for art
analysis as well as the writing and speaking skills
through which this analysis is articulated. Students
pursuing an art history major prepare themselves for
careers in professional education in the arts, gallery
and museum curatorship, law, urban planning, historic
preservation, and other professions demanding good
writing skills and critical thinking. Students who intend
to pursue graduate study in art history should be proficient in a foreign language and should include these
courses in their study. Students who intend to pursue
graduate study and/or a career in museums and arts
administration should take MGMT 300. Students may
do both the internship and study abroad, but only one
is required.
Core Requirements:
ART 200 Introduction to Visual Culture
(4)
ART 210 Art History Foundation: Ancient
through Early Renaissance
(4)
ART 211 Art History Foundation: Renaissance
through Contemporary
(4)
Five 300-400 level art history courses (4, 4, 4, 4, 4)
Internship in art or study abroad
(2-10)
ART 499 Senior Project Seminar
(4)
Art History Minor
The minor in Art History is an opportunity for a student
to pursue art history as an enhancement to a major in
another discipline. It is an excellent interdisciplinary
option for students with majors in areas such as business, education, philosophy, and science.
Core Requirements:
ART 200 Introduction to Visual Culture
(4)
ART 210 Art History Foundation: Ancient
through Early Renaissance
(4)
ART 211 Art History Foundation: Renaissance
through Contemporary
(4)
Four 300-400 level art history courses (4, 4, 4, 4)
BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT
Chairperson: Jerome Garcia
Regular Faculty: Christine Broussard, Jeffery
Burkhart, Heidi Contreras, Stacey Darling-Novak,
Jerome Garcia, Jay Jones, Todd Lorenz, Kathleen
Weaver
Adjunct Faculty: Fredda Fox, Harvey Good
The Biology Department offers a major with concentrations to prepare students for the health professions, cellular and molecular biology, general
biology, environmental biology, and teaching. B.A.
and B.S. majors are developed with the advice of
the student’s advisor. A senior comprehensive exam
is required for all majors.
Biology — B.A./B.S.
Prerequisite: Junior Candidacy Examination
Core Requirements: 16-18 semester hours
BIOL 311 Genetics
(4)
BIOL 312 Environmental Biology
(4)
BIOL 378 Evolution and Biosystematics
(2)
BIOL 379 Research Methods
(2)
BIOL 380 Biostatistics
(2)
BIOL 499A, 499B Senior Project/Seminar
(2-4)
Pre-Med/Health Science Concentration (B.S.)
Total requirements: 78-81 semester hours
Program Chairpersons: Jerome Garcia, Robert
Neher
Additional Biology Requirements: 20-21 semester hours
BIOL 302 Microbiology
(4)
BIOL 310 Cell Biology
(4)
BIOL 313 Developmental Biology
(4)
BIOL 314 Biochemistry or
BIOL 316 Molecular Biology
(4-5)
BIOL 344 Human Physiology
(4)
Supportive Courses: 42 semester hours
BIOL 204 Plant Biology
BIOL 205 Animal Biology
CHEM 201, 202
General Chemistry I, II
CHEM 311, 312
Organic Chemistry I, II
MATH 201 Calculus I
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 75
(4)
(4)
(5, 5)
(5, 5)
(4)
PHYS 201, 202
General Physics I, II
(5, 5)
Cellular and Molecular Biology Concentration
(B.S.)
Total requirements: 79-81 semester hours
Program Chairperson: Christine Broussard
Additional Biology Requirements: 21 semester
hours
BIOL 302 Microbiology
(4)
BIOL 310 Cell Biology
(4)
BIOL 313 Developmental Biology
(4)
BIOL 314 Biochemistry
(5)
BIOL 316 Molecular Biology
(4)
Supportive Courses: 42 semester hours
BIOL 204 Plant Biology
BIOL 205 Animal Biology
CHEM 201, 202
General Chemistry I, II
CHEM 311, 312
Organic Chemistry I, II
MATH 201 Calculus I
PHYS 201, 202
General Physics I, II
(4)
(4)
(5, 5)
(5, 5)
(4)
(5, 5)
General Biology Concentration (B.A.)
Total requirements: 75-84 semester hours
Program Chairpersons: Jay Jones, Stacey Darling-Novak
Additional Biology Requirements: 22-29 semester hours
BIOL 310 Cell Biology
(4)
BIOL 314 Biochemistry or
BIOL 316 Molecular Biology
(4-5)
4 upper-division BIOL courses
(12-16)
BIOL field course
(2-4)
Supportive Courses: 37 semester hours
BIOL 204 Plant Biology
BIOL 205 Animal Biology
CHEM 201, 202
General Chemistry I, II
CHEM 311 Organic Chemistry I
MATH 201 Calculus I
PHYS 201, 202
General Physics I, II
(4)
(4)
(5, 5)
(5)
(4)
(5, 5)
Environmental Biology Concentration (B.A.)
Total requirements: 69-73 semester hours
Program Chairpersons: Robert Neher , Kathleen
Weaver
Additional Biology Requirements: 18-20 semester hours
BIOL 302 Microbiology
(4)
BIOL 322 Marine and Freshwater Biology
(4)
BIOL 305 Vertebrate Zoology, or
BIOL 336 Invertebrate Zoology, or
BIOL 361 Plant Physiology
(4)
BIOL 325 Field Biology, or
BIOL 327 Mountain and Desert Biology, or
BIOL 390 Tropical Biology
(2-4)
Additional approved courses
(4)
Supportive Courses: 35 semester hours
BIOL 204 Plant Biology
BIOL 205 Animal Biology
CHEM 201, 202
General Chemistry I, II
CHEM 311 Organic Chemistry I
MATH 105 Precalculus
NASC 201 General Geology
PHYS 105 Introduction to Physics
(4)
(4)
(5, 5)
(5)
(4)
(4)
(4)
Teaching Concentration (B.A.)
Total requirements: 80-85 semester hours
Program Chairpersons: Kathleen Weaver, Stacey
Darling-Novak
Additional Biology Requirements: 18-21 semester hours
BIOL 302 Microbiology
(4)
BIOL 310 Cell Biology, or
BIOL 314 Biochemistry, or
BIOL 316 Molecular Biology
(4-5)
BIOL 322 Marine and Freshwater Biology
(4)
BIOL 333 Animal Physiology or
BIOL 344 Human Physiology
(4)
BIOL 325 Field Biology, or
BIOL 327 Mountain and Desert Biology, or
BIOL 390 Tropical Biology
(2-4)
Supportive Courses: 46 semester hours
BIOL 204 Plant Biology
(4)
BIOL 205 Animal Biology
(4)
CHEM 201, 202
General Chemistry I, II
(5, 5)
INTD 308 Ethics, Religion, & Environment or
INTD 309 Sunshine & Water: An
Environmental History of California (4)
MATH 105 Precalculus
(4)
NASC 201 General Geology
(4)
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 76
NASC 350 Field Experience
PHYS 201, 202
General Physics I, II
PHYS 230 Astronomy
(2)
(5, 5)
(4)
Biology Minor
Coordinator: Jerome Garcia
Core Requirements: Two of the following three
choices. (If either 204/204L or 205/205L are taken,
an approved 300- or 400-level BIOL course may
substitute as the second choice.)
BIOL 101 Life Science: Human Environment
(4)
BIOL 204 Plant Biology
(5)
BIOL 205 Animal Biology
(5)
Electives: A minimum of 16 semester hours of 300or 400-level BIOL courses. (A 300- or 400-level
CHEM
Natural History — B.A.
The Natural History Major is similar to the Biology
Major, but is less technical and more descriptive. Interested students should contact the program chairperson.
CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT
Chairperson: Iraj Parchamazad
Regular Faculty: Jay Jones, Ricardo Morales,
Mark Nelson, Iraj Parchamazad,
Andrew Rice
Adjunct Faculty: Ernie Baughman, Melvin Miles
The Chemistry Department provides a solid theoretical and experimental based bachelor’s program in
Chemistry in preparation for graduate study in chemistry, the medical professions, and employment in
chemistry-related professions. The Department
strongly encourages hands-on laboratory experience
with instrumentation. Ample opportunity exists for participation in research and other professional activities.
Chemistry — B.A./B.S.
Core Requirements:
CHEM 201 General Chemistry I
CHEM 202 General Chemistry II
CHEM 230 Analytical Chemistry I
CHEM 430 Analytical Chemistry II
CHEM 311 Organic Chemistry I
CHEM 312 Organic Chemistry II
CHEM 411 Physical Chemistry I
CHEM 412 Physical Chemistry II
NASC 370 Science Seminar (4 sem.)
(5)
(5)
(4)
(4)
(5)
(5)
(4)
(4)
(1, 1, 1, 1)
Electives: All of the following for the B.S.; one for
the B.A.:
CHEM 314 Biochemistry
(5)
CHEM 440 Inorganic Chemistry
(4)
CHEM 450 Advanced Organic Chemistry
(4)
Supportive Requirements: Students must show
competency in Mathematics (MATH 201 and 202),
Physics (PHYS 201/202 or PHYS 203/204), and Biology (BIOL 204 and 205).
Culminating Requirements:
CHEM 499 Senior Project
Senior Comprehensive Examination
Certificate Programs in Chemistry
(1-4)
(0)
In addition to the traditional B.S. program, the department offers three certificates which link pure theoretical chemistry with chemical engineering: Solar
Photochemistry and Technology, Environmental
Chemistry, and Analytical Instrumentation. The following are the courses in the programs:
CHEM 400 Fundamentals of Electronics,
Optics, and Computers
CHEM 401 Introduction to Scientific Principles
of Chemical Engineering
CHEM 402 Environmental Chemistry and
Technology
CHEM 403 Solar Photochemical
and Thermal Process
CHEM 404 Instrumental Analysis I
CHEM 405 Instrumental Analysis II
CHEM 406 Selected Topics in
Energy Technology
CHEM 407 Selected Topics in
Environmental Technology
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 77
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
Program requirements are as follows:
Analytical Instrumentation
Requirements: CHEM 400, 401, 404, 405
Electives: One of the remaining four courses.
Environmental Chemistry
Requirements: CHEM 401, 402, 404, 407
Electives: One of the remaining four courses.
Solar Photochemistry and Technology
Requirements: CHEM 400, 401, 403, 405
Electives: One of the remaining four courses.
COMMUNICATIONS
DEPARTMENT
Chairperson: George Keeler
Regular Faculty: Gary Colby, Valerie Cummings,
George Keeler, Maia Kinsinger, Michael Laponis,
Don Pollock, Elizabeth Zwerling
Adjunct Faculty: Jake Huberman, Randy Miller
Broadcasting — B.A.
The broadcasting major gives students a solid introduction to the entire field of broadcasting, allowing
them to select concentrations and internships in either
television or radio. It requires the core requirements
and one emphasis.
Core Requirements:
JOUR 100
News Reporting
RDIO 112
Radio and TV Audio Controls
and Techniques
RDIO/TV 166 Introduction to Mass Media
RDIO 230
Radio Production I
TV 225
Fundamentals of Video Prod.
RDIO/TV 305 Radio and TV Newswriting
and Editing
RDIO/TV 400 Designing the Media Message
RDIO/TV 460 Law and the Mass Media
RDIO/TV 467 Ethics of Mass Media—
Printed and Electronic
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
Radio Concentration:
RDIO 240 Radio Production II
(4)
RDIO 426 Radio Station Operation (2 sem.) (2, 2)
RDIO 497 Internship
(1-4)
RDIO 499 Senior Seminar
(4)
Television Concentration:
Intermediate Video Production
TV 235
TV 320
Advanced Video Production
TV 325
Multi-Camera TV Production
TV 330
Television Editing
TV 497
Internship
TV 499
Senior Seminar
Communications — B.A.
(4)
(2)
(2)
(4)
(1-4)
(4)
The Communications Major allows the student to design a program in the mass media to fulfill individual
needs. For the major students complete the core requirements and the concentration of their choice. Not
all classes are offered every semester.
Core Requirements:
JOUR 100 News Reporting
JOUR 166 Introduction to Mass Media
JOUR 460 Law and the Mass Media
JOUR 467 Ethics of Mass Media—
Printed and Electronic
JOUR 499 Senior Seminar
RDIO 230 Radio Production I
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
Broadcast Journalism Concentration:
JOUR 315 Syntax and Grammar for the
Professional Writer
(4)
RDIO 306 Radio News Production
(2)
TV 225
Fundamentals of Video Production (4)
TV 235
Intermediate Video Production
(4)
TV 305
Radio/TV Newswriting and Editing (4)
TV 307
TV News Production
(2)
JOUR 220 Newspaper Production I, or
TV 307
TV News Production (2nd sem.) or
TV 330
Television Editing
(2-4)
TV 320
Advanced Video Production I
(2)
TV 497
Internship
(1-4)
Multimedia Concentration:
JOUR 317 Graphic Production Processes and
Design for Publications
(4)
JOUR 318 Survey of Multi-Media
(4)
JOUR 319 Designing Multi-Media Web Pages (4)
JOUR 497 Internship
(1-4)
TV 225
Fundamentals of Video Production (4)
TV 340
Television Graphics
(4)
PHOT 210 and PHOT 310, or PHOT 230:
PHOT 210 Elementary Photography
(4)
PHOT 310 Photoshop
(4)
PHOT 230 Documentary Photography
(4)
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 78
Public Affairs/Information Concentration:
(2)
JOUR 220 Newspaper Production
JOUR 317 Graphic Production Processes and
Design for Publications
(4)
JOUR 318 Survey of Multi-Media
(4)
JOUR 319 Designing Multi-Media Web Pages (4)
JOUR 325A Magazine Production I
(2)
JOUR 328 Media Sales
(4)
JOUR 330 Theory and Principles of Public
Relations
(4)
JOUR 430 Public Relations Practices
(4)
JOUR 497 Internship
(1-4)
PHOT 210 and PHOT 310, or PHOT 230:
PHOT 210 Elementary Photography
(4)
PHOT 310 Photoshop
(4)
PHOT 230 Documentary Photography
(4)
Journalism Emphasis:
Program Chairperson: George Keeler
JOUR 220 Newspaper Production (2 sem.) (2, 2)
JOUR 300 Advanced News Reporting
(4)
JOUR 313 Feature Writing
(2)
JOUR 325 Magazine Production (2 sem.)
(2, 2)
JOUR 497 Internship
(1-4)
PHOT 327 Staff Photography
(2)
(4)
(2)
One of the following three:
BUS 360 Principles of Marketing
BUS 368 Integrated Marketing
Communication
MGMT 354 Oral Communication in
Organization
(4)
(4)
Journalism — B.A.
The Journalism program prepares students for careers in the news media. By following the Journalism emphasis or the photojournalism concentration,
students prepare for positions on newspapers and
magazines as reporters, photographers, columnists,
and editorial writers, or for positions in public relations. The major includes the core requirements
and one concentration.
Core Requirements:
JOUR 100 News Reporting
JOUR 115 News Editing
JOUR 315 Syntax and Grammar for the
Professional Writer
JOUR 317 Graphic Production Processes
and Design for Publications
JOUR 460 Law and the Mass Media
JOUR 467 Ethics of Mass Media—
Printed and Electronic
JOUR 499 Senior Seminar
PHOT 210 and PHOT 310, or PHOT 230:
PHOT 210 Elementary Photography
PHOT 310 Photoshop
PHOT 230 Documentary Photography
(4)
(2)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
Photojournalism Concentration:
Program Chairperson: Gary Colby
PHOT 327 Staff Photography
(2)
PHOT 350 Color Photography
(4)
PHOT 356 Digital Portfolio
(4)
PHOT 450 Special Projects in Photography
(4)
PHOT 497 Internship
(1-4)
Supportive Electives:
PHOT 327 Staff Photography
ENGLISH DEPARTMENT
Chairperson: David Werner
Regular Faculty: Bill Cook, Jeffrey Kahan, Alden
Reimonenq, Kenneth Scambray, David Werner,
Dorena Wright
English — B.A.
Program Chairperson: David Werner
English studies help students sharpen their understanding, enhance their enjoyment, and heighten their
awareness of themselves and their changing multicultural world. Designed for a variety of students, including those who are seeking personal enrichment,
English studies are appropriate as preparation for careers in education, law, business, or human relations,
and for graduate study in literature. The approach is
through a close study of language and literature as a
discourse upon and communication of human concerns and values, with emphasis as well on the distinctive imaginative and aesthetic qualities of literary
texts.
To complete an English major a student must demonstrate the ability to read and analyze critically the
major genres, to write clearly and coherently, to understand and use basic linguistic concepts, to employ
intelligently the vocabulary of literary study, and to be
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 79
able to relate major events in literary history to the
world at large.
The English major requires 58 units. Single Subject
Certification (for high school teaching) has somewhat
different requirements and electives. See the Department Chairperson for details.
Core Requirements:
ENG 270 The Foundations of Linguistics
ENG 275 Advanced Writing for the
English Major
ENG 350A English Literature I:
Beginning to 1790
ENG 350B English Literature II: 1790-1914
ENG 353 American Literature I:
Developing a Voice
ENG 354 American Literature II:
Emerging Voices
ENG 383 Myth in Literature
ENG 434A The American Novel 1700-1900, or
ENG 434B The American Novel 1900-2000
ENG 460 Shakespeare
ENG 499 Senior Examination
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
Program Chairpersons: Gerard Lavatori, Dorena
Wright
Core Requirements:
One upper-division literature course in French,
German, or Spanish
CMPL 390 Critical Theory: Approaches
to Literature
CMPL 498 Senior Seminar—Comparative
Literature
ENG 385 Special Studies in American
Literature
One survey of English Literature
One survey of American Literature
One course in Shakespeare
One genre course
Electives: A minimum of 16 semester hours of
upper-division ENG, FREN, GERM, or SPAN
courses involving comparative literature.
(4)
(4)
(2)
Additional Core for Single Subject Certification:
ENG 320 Language Arts for the
High School Teacher
(4)
Electives: A minimum of 20 semester hours of
upper-division ENG courses. Courses from other departments, such as WRT or JOUR, may serve as
electives upon approval of the Department of English.
English Minor
Core Requirements:
One survey of American Literature
One survey of English Literature
One course in Shakespeare
One additional 400-level ENG course
Two ENG electives
Comparative Literature — B.A.
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(8)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
FINE ARTS DEPARTMENTS
Faculty Representative: David Flaten
The University of La Verne’s Fine Arts Program consists of the Departments of Art, Music, Photography,
and Theatre Arts. For a complete listing of faculty and
offerings, see the separate departmental and program
listings in this catalog.
HISTORY AND POLITICAL
SCIENCE DEPARTMENT
Chairperson: Jason Neidleman
Regular Faculty: Gitty Amini, Richard Gelm, Kenneth Marcus, Julio Minoves-Triquell, Jason Neidleman, Stephen Sayles,
Adjunct Faculty: Phillip Castruita,1 Thomas Caughron, Gregory Cumming, Blake Harrison, Ray Johnson,1 Tom Long,1 Angelo Montante,1 Stephen
Slakey, Harold Sweet, Gloria Walker
Regional Campus faculty
1
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 80
The department’s programs prepare students for careers in a number of fields, such as law, business,
government, politics, journalism and broadcasting, administration, or research.
History — B.A.
A variety of courses are offered to allow students to
develop their own interests and attain their professional objectives.
Core Requirements:
HIST 311 Development of American
Democracy I
(4)
HIST 312 Development of American
Democracy II
(4)
HIST 333 Early Modern Europe
(4)
HIST 337 Nineteenth Century Europe, or
HIST 439 Modern Europe, 1900 to Present (4)
HIST 464 Modern China and Japan, or
PLSC 301 American Government and Politics, or
PLSC 378 American Political Thought
(4)
HIST 389 Approaches to History
(4)
HIST 499 Senior Seminar
(4)
Electives: A minimum of 16 semester hours in the
upper-division courses in the student’s area(s) of emphasis.
History Minor
Core Requirements:
HIST 311 Development of American
Democracy I
HIST 312 Development of American
Democracy II
HIST 337 Nineteenth Century Europe, or
HIST 439 Modern Europe, 1900 to Present
(4)
(4)
(4)
Electives: A minimum of 12 semester hours in
upper-division History courses.
Political Science — B.A.
A variety of courses are offered to allow students to
develop their own interests and attain their professional objectives.
Core Requirements:
PLSC 301 American Government and Politics (4)
PLSC 351 International Relations
(4)
PLSC 371 Classical Political Philosophies, or
PLSC 373 Modern Political Theory
(4)
PLSC 389 Study of Politics
(4)
PLSC 452 Comparative Government & Politics(4)
PLSC 499 Senior Seminar
(4)
Electives: A minimum of 20 semester hours in
upper-division Political Science courses.
Political Science Minor
Core Requirements:
PLSC 301 American Government and Politics (4)
PLSC 351 International Relations, or
PLSC 452 Comparative Government & Politics (4)
PLSC 371 Classical Political Philosophies, or
PLSC 373 Modern Political Theory
(4)
Electives: A minimum of 12 semester hours in
upper-division Political Science courses.
Social Science — B.A.
Program Chairperson: Stephen Sayles
Lower-Division Requirements: A minimum of 12
semester hours of courses selected from at least
three of the following fields:
Anthropology
Political Science
Economics
Geography
History
Psychology
Sociology
Upper-Division Requirements: 42-44 semester
hours from the above fields approved by the departments and distributed as follows:
16 semester hours in one of the fields
(16)
12 semester hours in a second field
(12)
8 semester hours in a third field
(8)
4 additional semester hours in
one of the three fields
(4)
Senior Project in HIST/PLSC
(4)
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 81
HONR 302:
HONORS PROGRAM
Program Chairperson: Sean Bernard
The Honors Program offers a challenging intellectual
experience that complements any major at the University. Open to students with proven academic success, the rigorous curriculum is taught by passionate
and knowledgeable professors, and it allows students
an opportunity to concurrently complete many general
education requirements.
The Honors Center, available to Honors Program students, offers a study lounge, computer laboratory, and
a seminar room.
All Honors classes reinforce the essential skills acquired during college education: to write effectively,
communicate clearly, and think critically. The program
also provides opportunities for creative expression
through innovative pedagogical contexts in small
classes, study-travel experiences, interdisciplinary
group projects, and career preparation.
Students who complete the program curriculum with a
3.0 or better overall GPA at ULV receive the designation “Honors Program Graduate” on their diplomas
and transcripts.
Eligibility Requirements: For entering first-year students, a high school GPA of 3.5 or above and a combined SAT Mathematics and Critical Reading score of
1170 are required. For currently enrolled and transfer
students, a 3.3 GPA or above and the recommendation of two instructors are required. All applications will
be considered on an individual basis, and final acceptance will be determined by the Honors Committee.
Core Requirements (4 units): HONR 499:
Senior Project – The World is Our
Neighborhood (2 units)
HONR 370: Honors Colloquium (1 unit, taken
twice) (2 units total)
Elective Units (24 units from below; only 370 and
371 are repeatable): HONR 101: Global Ideas I (4; required for freshmen)
HONR 102: Global Ideas II (4)
HONR 103: Global Ideas III (4; required for freshmen)
HONR 301: Literature Interdisciplinary Seminar
(4)
HONR 303:
HONR 304:
HONR 305:
HONR 306:
HONR 311:
HONR 312:
HONR 313:
HONR 314:
HONR 321:
HONR 322:
HONR 331:
HONR 341:
HONR 351:
HONR 361:
HONR 370:
HONR 371:
Philosophy and Religion Interdisciplinary Seminar (4)
Mass Media Interdisciplinary Seminar
(4)
History Interdisciplinary Seminar (4)
History of Fine Arts Interdisciplinary
Seminar (4)
Inter-area Humanities Interdisciplinary Seminar (4)
Behavioral Science Interdisciplinary
Seminar (4)
Political Science Interdisciplinary
Seminar (4) Economics Interdisciplinary Seminar
(4)
Inter-area Social & Behavioral Science Interdisciplinary Seminar (4) Life Science Interdisciplinary Seminar
(4)
Physical Science Interdisciplinary
Seminar (4)
Oral Communication Interdisciplinary
Seminar (4)
Quantitative Reasoning Interdisciplinary Seminar (4)
Creative and Artistic Expression Interdisciplinary Seminar (4)
Lifelong Fitness Interdisciplinary
Seminar (4)
Honors Colloquium (1 unit, may be
taken a third time) (1)
College Connection (1 unit; may be
taken four times) (1)
INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAMS
Gender Studies Minor
This minor offers students the opportunity to think critically about gender and sexuality within the weave of
cultural, historical, political, and social forces, recognizing that gender and sexuality are shaped by context, location, and other significant identities, such as
race, class, and nationality. Students may complete a
minor of 20, 24, or 30 semester hours, the two core requirements and at least 16 semester hours of upperdivision electives.
Core Requirements:
ANTH 314 Sexuality and Gender Issues
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 82
(4)
One of the following:
ANTH 333 Women Across Cultures, or
ANTH 334 Women’s Experience in America
(4)
Humanities and Fine Arts Electives: A minimum of
eight semester hours in upper-division courses from
the following courses or others approved by the
Gender Studies Advisor.
PHIL 317
REL 390
SPAN 386
SPCM 210
SPCM 490
THAR 370
Power and Oppression
Special Topics: Women and
Religion
Chicano Literature
Interpersonal Communication
Special Topics (Queer Theory)
Theatre and the Community
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
Social Science Electives: A minimum of 4 semester hours from the following courses or others approved by the Gender Studies Advisor.
ANTH/SOC 315, Race and Ethnicity
(4)
ANTH 333 Women Across Cultures
(4)
ANTH 334 Women’s Experience in America
(4)
PSY 409 Multicultural Psychology
(4)
PSY 450 Selected Topics: Gender and
Sexuality
(4)
General Studies - Associate Degree
(Available only at Point Mugu Regional Campus)
Core Requirements: A minimum of six semester
hours in each of the following areas (courses used for
general education requirements may also be used in
the major):
Written and Spoken English
Fine Arts
Humanities (Literature, Philosophy, Religion, Foreign
Language)
Natural Science
Social Science
International Business and
Language — B.S.
Program Chairperson: Ann Hills
The goals of this program are to develop the ability to
communicate and interact in a business context with
people of other nationalities and/or economies, to provide language students with career opportunities in international business, and to prepare graduates to
function more efficiently in cross-cultural environments.
French or Spanish may be chosen as the language.
Prerequisites:
FREN 101 Elementary French II, or
SPAN 101 Elementary Spanish II
(4)
FREN 210, 211 Intermediate French I, II, or
SPAN 210, 211 Intermediate Spanish I, II
(4, 4)
ACCT 203 Financial and Managerial Acct.
(4)
BUS 228 Economic Theories and Issues
(4)
Core Requirements:
FREN 420 Commercial French, or
SPAN 420 Commercial Spanish
A 300- or 400-level FREN or SPAN course
ANTH 320 Cultural Anthropology
BUS 360 Principles of Marketing
BUS 466 International Marketing
ECON 324 Comparative Economic Systems
ECON 325 International Economics
MGMT 300 Principles of Management
MGMT451 International Management
PLSC 351 International Relations
PLSC 452 Comparative Government and
Politics
BUS 496 Business Seminar, or
FREN or SPAN 499 Senior Project
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
Electives: Three 3 or 4 semester hour, 300- or 400level courses in BUS, ECON, FREN, MGMT, PLSC,
or SPAN chosen with the approval of a program
chairperson. Students who wish to take BUS 496:
Business Seminar as their culminating activity MUST
take MGMT 388: Statistics and BUS 330: Business
Finance as two of their three electives.
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 83
Latin American Studies Minor
Students must have at least three areas represented
in their concentration, and must include at least 12
units of upper division course work.
Program Chairperson: Ann Hills
Core Requirements:
HIST 351 History of Latin America
LIT 362
Contemporary Latin American
Literature in Translation
(4)
(4)
Electives: A minimum of 12 semester hours if all
upper division, 16 if not, selected from the following
or others with permission of the chairperson:
ART 317 Latin American Art
(4)
PLSC 363 Politics of Developing Nations
(4)
REL 370 History of Christianity
(4)
SOC 336 Latino Experience
(4)
SPAN 321 Hispanic Civilizations and Culture II (4)
Liberal Arts — B.A.
Program Coordinator: Gerard Lavatori
This major gives students the opportunity to design
an individualized, interdisciplinary major centered
around a focus, theme, or issue area of the student’s
choosing. It is ideal for students planning to pursue
graduate work in disciplines that require a broadbased bachelor’s degree.
Core Requirements:
LA 200
Foundations of Interdisciplinary
Studies
LA 390
Research Seminar
LA 499
Senior Seminar/Project
(4)
(1)
(2-4)
Electives:
A minimum of 22 semester hours selected from a list
of approved upper division courses available from
the program coordinator. At least one course in each
of the following four areas, and no more than two
courses in any one area:
Fine Arts
Humanities
Natural Sciences
Social Sciences
Concentration: The concentration consists of a minimum of 20 semester hours, focusing on the student’s
theme or issue area, chosen by the student in consultation with an academic advisor. A concentration is defined as a social/political/cultural issue or theme that
can be studied from an interdisciplinary perspective.
Peace Studies Minor
The Peace Studies interdisciplinary minor examines
the process of engagement between the individual
and the human and natural environments in a context
that affirms mutual welfare and cooperative security.
Core Requirements:
HUM 110 Introduction to Peace Studies
HUM 302 Conflict Resolution and
Non-Violence
HUM 310 Peace Studies Colloquium
HUM 410 Peace Studies Seminar
(4)
(4)
(1, 1)
(4)
Electives: A minimum of 12 semester hours approved by a Peace Studies advisor, at least two of
which are taken concurrently with Peace Studies
Colloquium.
INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
International Studies — B.A.
Program Chairperson: Kenneth Marcus
The International Studies major combines an area of
study with an academic core program that provides
an interdisciplinary approach to learning about the international community, culture, legal systems, trade,
and relations between states.
Prerequisite: Two years of a foreign language
Core Requirements:
ECON 325 International Economics
HIST 101 World Civilizations I, or
HIST 102 World Civilizations II
PLSC 351 International Relations
PLSC 389 Study of Politics, or
HIST 389 Approaches to History
PLSC 452 Comparative Government and
Politics
HIST 499 Senior Seminar, or
PLSC 499 Senior Seminar
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 84
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
Electives: A minimum of 20 semester hours in
upper-division courses in the student’s area(s) of emphasis approved by the advisor.
International Studies Minor
Core Requirements:
ECON 325 International Economics
HIST 101 World Civilizations I, or
HIST 102 World Civilizations II
PLSC 351 International Relations, or
PLSC 452 Comparative Government and
Politics
(4)
(4)
(4)
Electives: A minimum of 12 semester hours in
upper-division courses in the student’s area(s) of emphasis approved by the advisor.
KINESIOLOGY DEPARTMENT
Chairperson: Brian Clocksin
Regular Faculty: Paul Alvarez, Brian Clocksin,
Sarah Dunn, Megan Granquist, Marilyn Oliver, Jim
Paschal, Pat Widolff, Wendy Zwissler
The Kinesiology Department offers three programs of
study within two majors. The Physical Education
Teacher Education (PETE) program (68 semester
hours) prepares students to teach Physical Education
in the State of California public school system. The
Health and Human Performance program (51 semester hours) prepares students for careers and graduate education in health and sport science professions.
The Athletic Training Education Program (63 semester hours) prepares students to become Certified Athletic Trainers by addressing the educational and
clinical competencies required to pass the Board of
Certification (BOC) examination.
Kinesiology — B.S.
Core Requirements:
KINE 151 Health and Physical Fitness
Strategies
(4)
KINE 230 Fieldwork and Foundations of
Physical Education and Athletics, or
KINE 233 Introduction to Kinesiology, or
KINE 235 Fieldwork and Foundations of
KINE 323
KINE 345
KINE 355
KINE 456
KINE 456L
KINE 499A
KINE 499B
Athletic Training
Biomechanics
Research Methods and Statistics
Anatomical Kinesiology
Physiology of Exercise
Physiology of Exercise Lab
Senior Seminar A
Senior Seminar B
Supportive Requirement:
BIOL 343 Human Anatomy
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(0)
(2)
(2)
(4)
Physical Education Teacher Education Concentration:
KINE 210 Skill Themes and Movement
Concepts
(2)
KINE 211 Using Sport & Physical Activity to
Teach Personal & Social
Responsibility
(2)
KINE 212 Teaching Games to Enhance
Physical Literacy
(2)
KINE 213 Enhancing Physical Literacy through
Sport Education
(2)
KINE 214 Promoting Lifelong Fitness
(2)
KINE 215 Methods and Practice of Teaching
Gymnastics and Dance
(2)
KINE 250 Introduction to Adapted Physical
Education
(4)
KINE 330 Elementary Physical Education
(4)
KINE 333 Curriculum and Organization in
Physical Education
(4)
KINE 380 Motor Development
(4)
KINE 381 Motor Learning
(4)
KINE 460 Philosophy of Physical Education
and Athletics
(2)
A minimum of 6 semester hours of
advisor-approved electives
(6)
Health and Human Performance Concentration:
KINE 380 Motor Development, or
KINE 381 Motor Learning
(4)
A minimum of 3 semester hours of
Instructional Activity Courses (KINE 002-049) (3)
A minimum of 8 semester hours of
KINE electives
(8)
A minimum of 8 semester hours of
advisor-approved related coursework
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 85
Athletic Training — B.S.
Director: Paul Alvarez
The Athletic Training Program (ATP), offers a Bachelor of Science Degree in Athletic Training, and is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of
Athletic Training Education (CAATE). CAATE accreditation allows the student who graduates with a major
(B.S.) in Athletic Training to sit for the Board of Certification (BOC) exam. The Athletic Training Major prepares students for this exam by addressing the
required educational competencies and clinical proficiencies through a challenging curriculum that integrates classroom studies with clinical application.
The La Verne ATP is a five-semester program that begins in the spring of each year. Due to the specific sequence of courses that allows basic knowledge and
skills to progress to advanced clinical levels, it is vital
that all students interested in pursuing the Athletic
Training Major be advised, at entrance, by a faculty
advisor within the ATP. Students must communicate
with that advisor on a regular basis.
The ATP is a rigorous and intense program. The
Technical Standards establish the essential qualities
considered necessary for students admitted to the
ATP to achieve the knowledge, skills, and competencies of an entry-level athletic trainer and meet the expectations of CAATE. All students must meet the
Technical Standards to be admitted to and continue
in the ATP. In the event a student is unable to fulfill
the Technical Standards, with or without reasonable
accommodation, he or she will not be admitted to or
retained in the ATP.
Admission Requirements: Admission into the Athletic Training Major is competitive and highly selective. Applicants meeting the minimum requirements
listed below are not guaranteed admission into the
major. Applications for admission to the ATP are available in the fall of each year. Final confirmation of acceptance into the program will be made after final Fall
grades are posted. Transfer students must meet all
prerequisites for the ATP, be accepted to La Verne,
and meet with the Program Director prior to applying
to the ATP. Acceptance into La Verne does not guarantee acceptance into the ATP. The GPA requirement
for program retention and graduation with a B.S. in
Athletic Training is 2.5 overall. The following are the
minimum requirements for admission.
1. Completion of 32 semester hours with a minimum overall GPA of 2.5 which is higher than the
institutional standard.
2. College Transcripts showing completion of KINE
151, 235, and 237, and BIOL 343 with a combined minimum GPA of 3.0.
3. 50 athletic training observation hours and a performance evaluation by a supervising Certified
Athletic Trainer.
4. A physical examination by an M.D. or D.O. with
verification of ability to perform ergonomic tasks
and compliance with the program’s Technical
Standards (listed in La Verne’s “ATP Policies
and Procedures Manual”).
5. Verification of current immunizations, including
Hepatitis B, MMR, tetanus, polio, and a negative TB test.
6. Three letters of recommendation, at least one of
which by a Certified Athletic Trainer.
7. Current First Aid/CPR certification.
8. A completed ATP Application Form.
9. Application cover letter containing statement of
professional interest, previous athletic training
experiences, and career goals.
10. Professional résumé
11. An interview with ATP faculty and staff.
Prerequisites for KINE 355 and 456:
BIOL 343 Human Anatomy
BIOL 344 Human Physiology
Kinesiology Core Requirements:
KINE 151 Health and Physical Fitness
Strategies
KINE 235 Fieldwork and Foundations of
Athletic Training
KINE 323 Biomechanics
KINE 345 Research Methods and Statistics
KINE 355 Anatomical Kinesiology
KINE 456 Physiology of Exercise
KINE 456L Physiology of Exercise Lab
KINE 499A Senior Project A
KINE 499B Senior Project B
Supportive Requirements:
BIOL 343 Human Anatomy
BIOL 344 Human Physiology
PSY 101 Principles of Psychology
Athletic Training Core Requirements:
KINE 237 Techniques and Observation in
Athletic Training
KINE 324 Evaluation & Assessment of
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 86
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(0)
(2)
(2)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(2)
KINE 325
KINE 326
KINE 327
KINE 328
KINE 351
KINE 400
KINE 410
KINE 411
KINE 412
KINE 413
KINE 415
KINE 454
Athletic Injuries Lower Extremities (4)
Athletic Training Practicum I
Introduction
(1)
Evaluation & Assessment of
Athletic Injuries Upper Extremities (4)
Athletic Training Practicum II
Lower Extremity
(1)
Evaluation and Assessment of Head
and Spinal Injuries
(4)
Psychology of Sport Injury &
Rehabilitation
(2)
General Medical Conditions in
Athletic Training
(2)
Exercise and Rehabilitation
(4)
Athletic Training Practicum III
Upper Extremity
(1)
Therapeutic Modalities
(4)
Athletic Training Practicum IV
Rehabilitation
(1)
Management and Administration in
Athletic Training
(4)
Athletic Training Practicum V
Team Management
(1)
Kinesiology Minor
Prerequisite for KINE 355 and 456:
BIOL 343 Human Anatomy
Core Requirements:
KINE 151 Health and Physical Fitness
Strategies
KINE 230 Fieldwork and Foundations of
Physical Education and Athletics
KINE 323 Biomechanics
KINE 333 Curriculum and Organization in
Physical Education
KINE 355 Anatomical Kinesiology
KINE 456 Physiology of Exercise
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
Electives: A minimum of 8 upper-division semester
hours from KINE courses selected in consultation
with the KINE department chair. Additional Minor options can be developed with the Department Chair.
LEGAL STUDIES DEPARTMENT
Program Chairperson: Patricia Adongo
Regular Faculty: Patricia Adongo, Carolyn Bekhor
The American Bar Association has approved this program for the education of paralegals. It prepares individuals for careers as paralegals or for positions
where organizational and analytical skills as well as
knowledge of the law and legal procedures are necessary. Paralegals work under the supervision of an attorney or perform work for which an attorney is
responsible. Paralegals do not practice law nor give
legal advice. The goal of the department is to educate students of diverse backgrounds to become effective, ethical, and professional paralegals who are
employable in a variety of legal settings. The five cornerstones to achieving this goal are knowledge of law,
practical application, analytical ability, effective communication, and technology literacy. The minor in
American Law is not approved by the American Bar
Association and does not prepare a student for a career as a paralegal. LS 301 and LS 304 are prerequisites to all other courses, and a grade of C or better in
each is required for the student to continue.
Legal Studies — B.S.
Transfer courses are accepted into this program, but
majors must take a minimum of 24 semester hours of
upper-division LS courses from La Verne. Students
should complete WRT 110 and six additional semester hours of general education prior to taking LS
courses. At least 18 semester hours of general education must meet the Legal Studies Program’s approval. The major requires 46 semester hours.
Core Requirements:
LS 301
American Legal Studies
LS 304
Legal Research and Writing
LS 311
Law Office Computer Applications
LS 355
Advanced On-line Research
LS 365
Litigation I
LS 368
Litigation II
LS 380
Torts
LS 390
Contracts
LS 490
Paralegal Internship & Ethics
LS 499
Senior Project
(4)
(4)
(2)
(2)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
Electives: 10-12 semester hours from the following:
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 87
LS 321
LS 328
LS 329
LS 330
LS 331
LS 338
LS 340
LS 345
LS 350
LS 357
LS 358
LS 370
LS 410
Family Law
Property/Real Estate Transactions
Property/Bankruptcy
Business Organizations
Bankruptcy
Intellectual Property
Selected Topics
Immigration Law and Procedure
Wills, Trusts, and Probate
E Discovery
Trial Technology
Criminal Law and Procedures
Law in Film and Literature
Certificate in Paralegal Studies
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(2)
(2)
(4)
(4)
Students in any major may earn a paralegal certificate. See the department for more details. Admission requirements for all others are bachelor’s degree
or 60 semester hours (including a minimum of 18 in
general education) from a regionally accredited college. The general education must include at least
three semester hours in college-level English composition and 15 hours from at least three of the following
academic areas: social and behavioral science; English composition and literature; foreign language;
mathematics; humanities; natural science; appreciation or history of the arts.
Requirements:
Same as the Core Requirements for the B.S., Legal
Studies, except that LS 499 is not required. An elective in an area of interest is encouraged.
American Law Minor
The minor in American Law is not approved by the
American Bar Association and does not prepare a student for a career as a paralegal. The goal of the minor
is to educate students in the basics of American law
so that they can be better consumers, determine their
interest in law, or prepare for law school.
Core Requirements:
LS 301
American Legal Studies
LS 304
Legal Research and Writing
LS 380
Torts
LS 390
Contracts
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
Electives: A minimum of eight semester hours in LS
courses approved by the advisor. A related course in
another department may be substituted for one elective if approved by the advisor.
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 88
Electives for B.S.: A minimum of 12 semester
hours in upper-division mathematics courses.
MATHEMATICS, PHYSICS,
AND COMPUTER SCIENCE
DEPARTMENT
Culminating Requirement:
MATH 499 Senior Project
Comprehensive examination
Chairperson: Michael Frantz
Mathematics — B.A./B.S.
Program Chairperson: Michael Frantz
Regular Faculty: Yousef Daneshbod, Michael
Frantz, Frank Ives, Xiaoyan Liu, Rick Simon, Gail
Tang
Adjunct Faculty: Joan Marge, Ron Morrow, Scott
Phelps, Gary Westfahl1
Regional Campus faculty
1
The mathematics program offers students preparation
for graduate study, careers in teaching, scientific computing, and technology-related industry. While offering a basic grounding in the classical areas of
mathematics, the curriculum also emphasizes applied
mathematics and its constantly evolving role in analyzing and solving problems in fields ranging from economics to aerodynamics to the environment.
Core Requirements:
MATH 201 Calculus I
MATH 202 Calculus II
MATH 311 Calculus III
MATH 305 Transition to Adv. Mathematics
MATH 320 Linear Algebra
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
Supporting Requirements:
CMPS 367 Object Oriented Programming
using C++
(4)
PHYS 203 Physics I: Mechanics
(5)
PHYS 204 Physics II: Electricity & Magnetism (5)
Additional Core Requirements for B.A.:
MATH 319 Vector Calculus, or
MATH 328 Abstract Algebra
MATH 325 Number Theory, or
MATH 351 Probability
(4)
Additional Core Requirements for B.S.:
MATH 315 Differential Equations
MATH 328 Abstract Algebra
(4)
(4)
Electives for B.A.: A minimum of 8 semester
hours in upper-division mathematics courses.
(4)
Physics — B.A./B.S.
(1-4)
(0)
Program Chairperson: David Chappell
Regular Faculty: David Chappell, Vanessa Preisler
Adjunct Faculty: Chris Morgan, Scott Phelps,
Amtul Chaudry
This program offers rigorous and personalized training
in physics for students wishing to pursue careers in
teaching, industry, and research. The courses cover
the fundamentals of Classical Mechanics, Electricity
and Magnetism, Modern Physics, and Quantum Mechanics. Upper-division electives provide students
the opportunity to study Astrophysics, Solid State
Physics, Optics, Electronics and Statistical Mechanics.
Core Requirements:
PHYS 203 Physics I: Mechanics
(5)
PHYS 204 Physics II: Electricity & Magnetism (5)
PHYS 322 Electricity and Magnetism
(4)
PHYS 342 Analytical Mechanics
(4)
PHYS 360 Modern Physics
(5)
PHYS 368 Quantum Mechanics
(4)
PHYS 390 Physics Seminar (2 sem.)
(1, 1)
Electives: A minimum of 8 semester hours selected in consultation with the program counselor
for the B.A.; a minimum of 12 for the B.S.
Supportive Requirements:
CHEM 201 General Chemistry I
MATH 201 Calculus I
MATH 202 Calculus II
MATH 311 Calculus III
MATH 315 Differential Equations
Culminating Requirement:
PHYS 499 Senior Seminar/Project
Comprehensive examination
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 89
(5)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(1-4)
(0)
Physics Minor
Core Requirements:
MATH 201 Calculus I
(4)
MATH 202 Calculus II
(4)
Either PHYS 201/PHYS 202 or PHYS 203/PHYS 204:
PHYS 201 General Physics I
(5)
PHYS 202 General Physics II
(5)
PHYS 203 Physics I: Mechanics
(5)
PHYS 204 Physics II: Electricity & Magnetism (5)
3 approved upper-division PHYS courses, at least
one of which must be from the following:
PHYS 322 Electricity and Magnetism
(4)
PHYS 342 Analytical Mechanics
(4)
PHYS 360 Modern Physics
(5)
PHYS 368 Quantum Mechanics
(4)
Computer Science and Computer
Engineering — B.S.
Program Chairperson: Ray Ahmadnia
Regular Faculty: Ray Ahmadnia, Jozef Goetz,
Seta Whitby
Adjunct Faculty: Mohammad Muqri, Samuel Son
This major requires a minimum of 48 semester hours
of computer engineering, information science, internet programming, and software courses. Students are
required to complete the core requirements, one concentration, and a minimum of two elective courses, as
well as satisfying the supportive requirements.
Core Requirements:
CMPN 280 Computer Organization
CMPS 367 Object Oriented Language C++
CMPS 368 Principles of Computer Networks
CMPS 370 Seminar
CMPS 385 Data Structures
CMPS 471 Internship
CMPS 499 Senior Project
Comprehensive Exam
Engineering Concentration:
CMPN 150 Principles of Electronics and
Computer Engineering
CMPN 202 Electronic Devices and Circuits
CMPN 220 Digital Logic Systems
CMPN 330 Microprocessor Systems
CMPN 480 Advanced Computer Architecture
Information Science Concentration:
(4)
(4)
(4)
(1)
(4)
(1)
(4)
(0)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
CMPN 220
CMPS 375
CMPS 392
CMPS 410
CMPS 490
Digital Logic Systems
Systems Analysis and Design
Project Management
Management Information Systems
Database Management Systems
Internet Programming Concentration:
CMPS 218 Publishing on the Web I
CMPS 319 Publishing on the Web II
CMPS 320 Internet Apps Development
CMPS 378 C# Programming
CMPS 480 Distributed Internet Computing
Software Concentration:
CMPN 220 Digital Logic Systems
CMPS 371 Assembly Language
CMPS 455 Compiler Design
CMPS 460 Operating Systems
CMPS 490 Database Management Systems
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
Electives: A minimum of two courses from the following or from a concentration outside the chosen
one:
CMPN 303
CMPS 362
CMPS 369
CMPS 377
CMPS 379
CMPS 388
CMPS 390
CMPS 392
CMPS 400
CMPS 451
CMPS 463
CMPS 475
CMPS 481
CMPS 491
CMPS 495
Integrated Electronics
Numerical Algorithms
Local Area Networks
Visual Basic.NET
JAVA
Software Engineering
Special Topics in
Computer Science
Project Management
Analysis of Algorithms
Artificial Intelligence
Computer Graphics
Systems Design Process
Mobil Applications
Systems Architecture
Information Systems Project
Supportive Requirements:
CMPS 301 Programming Concepts
MATH 201 Calculus I
MATH 327 Discrete Mathematics
Additional for Engineering Concentration:
CHEM 201 General Chemistry, or
CHEM 103 Intro to Chemistry
MATH 202 Calculus II
PHYS 201, 202 General Physics I, II, or
PHYS 203, 204 Physics I: Mechanics, and
Physics II: Electricity and Magnetism
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 90
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(1-4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4-5)
(4)
(5, 5)
Additional for Information Science Concentration:
ACCT 201 Fundamentals of Accounting I, or
ACCT 203 Financial & Managerial Accounting (4)
ECON 221 Economic Analysis II, or
ECON 228 Economic Theories and Issues
(4)
MGMT 300 Principles of Management
(4)
PHYS 201 General Physics I, or
PHYS 203 Physics I: Mechanics
(5)
Additional for Software and Internet Programming
Concentrations:
MATH 202 Calculus II
(4)
PHYS 201, 202 General Physics I, II, or
PHYS 203, 204 Physics I: Mechanics, and
Physics II: Electricity and Magnetism
(5, 5)
Information Science Minor
CMPS 368
CMPS 375
CMPS 410
CMPS 490
CMPS
Principles of Networks
Systems Analysis & Design
Management Information Systems
Database Management Systems
Elective
Internet Programming Minor
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
CMPS 218
CMPS 319
CMPS 320
CMPS 378
CMPS 480
Publishing on the Web I
Publishing on the Web II
Internet Apps Development
C# Programming
Distributed Internet Computing
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
CMPS 362
CMPS 367
CMPS 377
CMPS 378
CMPS 385
CMPS 460
CMPS
Numerical Algorithms
Object Oriented Language C++
Visual Basic .NET, or
C# Programming
Data Structures
Operating Systems
Elective
(4)
(4)
Software Minor
Systems Engineering Certificate
CMPS 370 Seminar: Introduction to Systems
Engineering
CMPS 375 Systems Analysis and Design
CMPS 392 Project Management
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(1)
(4)
(4)
CMPS 410 Management Information Systems (4)
(4)
CMPS 492 Systems Architecture
Website and Internet Applications
Development Certificate
CMPS 218
CMPS 319
CMPS 320
CMPS 378
CMPS 480
CMPS 481
Publishing on the Web I
Publishing on the Web II
Internet Apps Development
C# Programming
Distributed Internet Computing
Mobile Applications Development
E-Commerce — B.S.
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
Program Chair: Ray Ahmadnia
This interdisciplinary program is jointly offered by the
Department of Mathematics, Physics, and Computer
Science and by the College of Business and Public
Management to prepare students for careers in electronic commerce.
Prerequisites:
ACCT 203 Financial & Managerial Accounting
CMPS 200 Informational Technology
CMPS 378 C# Programming
ECON 228 Economic Theories and Issues
Core Requirements:
BUS 270 Business Statistics
BUS 360 Principles of Marketing
BUS 416 Electronic Commerce
CMPS 218 Publishing on the Web I
CMPS 368 Principles of Computer Networks
CMPS 375 Systems Analysis and Design
CMPS 392 Project Management
CMPS 410 Management Information Systems
CMPS 490 Database Management Systems
MGMT 300 Principles of Management
CMPS 499 Senior Project
Electives: One of the following:
CMPS 301 Programming Concepts
CMPS 319 Publishing on the Web II
CMPS 320 Internet Apps Development
CMPS 369 Local Area Networks
CMPS 379 JAVA
CMPS 480 Distributed Internet Computing
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 91
(4)
(2)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
to complete 40 semester hours in French. Many of
these may be taken abroad.
MODERN LANGUAGES
DEPARTMENT
Chairperson: Catherine Irwin
Foreign Language Chair: Ann Hills
Regular Faculty: Clarie Angelici, Sean Bernard,
Gabriela Capraroiu, Gabe Gomez, Ann Hills, Judy
Holiday, Catherine Irwin, Gerard Lavatori, Jolivette
Mecenas, José Pérez-González
Adjunct Faculty: Diane Ayers,1 William Csellak,1
Dennis Dirks, Gloria Montebruno, Ghada Mouawad,
Patricia Wangler
Regional Campus faculty
1
La Verne’s world language programs with majors in
French and Spanish, a minor in Japanese, and
courses in German aim to familiarize students with the
cultural richness and diversity of the world through the
intensive study of the linguistic, literary, and cultural
expressions of other global communities. Since cultural values are best understood experientially, study
abroad is a central component of the Spanish and
French majors.
Students who complete La Verne’s foreign language
major should demonstrate the linguistic competence
and cultural sensitivity necessary to function effectively as informed world citizens in a growing number
of professional fields, including international affairs,
business, teaching, and communications. The La
Verne foreign language major also prepares students
for graduate studies.
French — B.A.
Program Chairperson: Gerard Lavatori
Core Requirements:
ANTH 340 Language and Culture, or
ENG 270 The Foundations of Linguistics
(4)
FREN 210 Intermediate French I
(4)
FREN 211 Intermediate French II
(4)
FREN 320 French Civilization and Culture I
(4)
FREN 321 French Civilization and Culture II
(4)
FREN 330 Second Language Teaching
(4)
FREN 430 French Literature I
(4)
FREN 431 French Literature II
(4)
FREN 499 Senior Project
(1-4)
Electives: Additional upper-division French courses
Study Abroad Requirement: French Majors must
complete a semester of study in France or a Frenchspeaking country and select a curriculum which includes at least one course in French Phonetics,
Linguistics, or Advanced Syntax.
Comprehensive Examination: The senior comprehensive examination tests language proficiency and
reading skills.
French Minor
Core Requirements: A minimum of 20 semester
hours from the following list or a total of 24 semester
hours in French of which at least 16 are upper division:
ANTH 340 Language and Culture
(4)
FREN 320 French Civilization and Culture I
(4)
FREN 321 French Civilization and Culture II
(4)
FREN 330 Second Language Teaching
(4)
FREN 365 French Literature in Translation
(4)
FREN 420 Commercial French
(4)
FREN 430 French Literature I
(4)
FREN 431 French Literature II
(4)
Study abroad courses taught in French
(1-8)
Japanese Minor
Core Requirements: Students must take one of
the following:
JAPN 320 Advanced Japanese Grammar
and Conversation I, or
JAPN 321 Advanced Japanese Grammar
and Conversation II
(4)
(4)
An additional four upper-division courses, or an additional five courses, three of which must be upper
division, from among the following:
ANTH 340 Language and Culture, or
(4)
ENG 270 The Foundation of Linguistics
(4)
JAPN 210 Intermediate Japanese I
(4)
JAPN 211 Intermediate Japanese II
(4)
JAPN 330 Second Language Teaching
(4)
LIT 375
Modern Asian Literature
in Translation
(4)
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 92
JAPN 399
REL 305
HIST 464
PLSC 464
Independent Study
World Religions: East
Modern China and Japan, or
Modern China and Japan
(1-4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
Students must receive a C- or better for a course to
be applied to the minor. No more than 8 semesters
hours of approved coursework may be applied toward the minor. Study abroad through a La Verneapproved program can also count toward the minor.
lower division units.
Spanish — B.A.
Program Chairperson: Ann Hills
Core Requirements:
ANTH 340 Language and Culture, or
ENG 270 The Foundations of Linguistics
SPAN 210 Intermediate Spanish I
SPAN 211 Intermediate Spanish II
SPAN 314 Advanced Spanish Composition
and Grammar
SPAN 320 Hispanic Civilization & Culture I, or
SPAN 321 Hispanic Civilization & Culture II
SPAN 330 Second Language Teaching
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
Two of the following four:
SPAN 430, 431, 432, 433 Hispanic Readings (4, 4)
SPAN 499 Senior Project
(1-4)
Electives:
Additional upper-division Spanish
courses to complete 40 semester hours, many of
which may be taken abroad. Literature in translation
courses do not apply toward the major.
Study Abroad Requirement: Spanish Majors must
supplement their La Verne language course with
study in an approved program in a Spanish-speaking country.
Spanish Minor
Core Requirements: A minimum of 20 semester
hours of upper division courses is required for students beginning at the 300 level, or a minimum of 24
semester hours for students beginning at the 200
level, 16 of which must be upper division courses. Literature in translation courses do not apply toward the
minor.
SPAN 314 Spanish Composition, or
SPAN 420 Commercial Spanish
SPAN 320 Hispanic Civilization and Culture I
SPAN 321 Hispanic Civilization and Culture II
SPAN 300- and 400-level electives
Writing Program
(4)
(4)
(4)
(8)
Director: Catherine Irwin
Regular Faculty: Claire Angelici, Sean Bernard,
Judy Holiday, Catherine Irwin, Jolivette Mecenas,
José Pérez-González
Adjunct Faculty: Lourdes Villarreal, Gary Westfahl
The Writing Program views the liberal arts tradition
of studying language, rhetoric, and poetics as foundational to ethical and reflective written communication in the disciplines, professions, and civic life.
Writing courses in the General Education Written
Communication Area requirement (CSWA and
CSWB) are designed to introduce writing-to-learn
practices and audience-based communication as
fundamental to lifelong learning. First-year students
and transfer students are placed into a writing course
based on their exam scores from the combined Written and Critical Reading SAT score or from the program’s Writing Placement Examination. Additionally,
transfer students with courses from other institutions
that articulate with CSWA may place directly into
WRT 111. Students who place into WRT 109 will also
be placed into WRT 109S, Writing Studio. Students
must complete WRT 109 with a grade of C- or higher
and the co-requisite WRT 109S with a grade of
Credit in order to enroll in WRT 110. Students who
place into WRT 110S, Writing Studio, must complete
this co-requisite with a grade of Credit while concurrently enrolled in WRT 110 in order to satisfy CSWA.
Students wishing to major in creative writing must
fulfill core requirements and electives. Students
wishing to minor in creative writing must fulfill core
requirements. See Creative Writing B.A./Minor.
Prerequisite to CSWA:
WRT 109
WRT 109S
Co-requisite to CSWA:
WRT 110S Writing Studio
(4)
(1)
(1)
General Education CSWA and CSWB (Written
Communication Area) Requirements:
WRT 110 College Writing A
(4)
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 93
WRT 111
College Writing B
(4)
General Education UVLL (Lifelong Learning);
BA Liberal Studies Elective:
WRT 306 Writing Theory and Practice
(4)
Creative Writing – B.A.
Program Chairperson: Sean Bernard
Core Requirements:
WRT 201 Introduction to Creative Writing
WRT 303 Poetry Writing WRT 304 Fiction Writing WRT 305 Literary Magazine Staff
WRT 390 Great Writer Immersion
WRT 499 Senior Project (4)
(4)
(4)
(2, 2)
(2)
(2)
Elective Core (8 semester hours from the following):
WRT 303 Poetry Writing
(4)
(repeatable once as elective core)
WRT 304 Fiction Writing (4)
(repeatable once as elective core)
WRT 305 Literary Magazine Staff
(2, 2)
WRT 307 Special Topics in Writing & Literature (4)
WRT 324 Literary Non-Fiction Writing
(4) Electives: 16 semester hours of courses chosen
from a list provided by the program chairperson. Creative Writing Minor
Core Requirements:
WRT 201 Introduction to Creative Writing
WRT 303 Poetry WRT 304 Fiction (4)
(4)
(4)
WRT 305 Literary Magazine Staff
(2, 2)
(2)
WRT 390 Great Writer Immersion
WRT 499 Senior Project (2)
And one of the following for a minimum total of
24 semester hours in the minor:
WRT 303 Poetry (4)
(repeatable once)
WRT 304 Fiction (4)
(repeatable once)
WRT 307 Special Topics Writing & Literature (4)
WRT 324 Creative Non-Fiction
(4)
Writing Certificate
A minimum of 16 semester hours in a single emphasis is required, in addition to the completion of the
General Education Written Communication Requirement with a C- or better.
Creative Writing Emphasis:
THAR 360 Playwriting and Screenwriting I
THAR 460 Playwriting and Screenwriting II
WRT 301 Introduction to Creative Writing
WRT 302 Experimental Writing Genres
WRT 303 Poetry Writing
WRT 304 Fiction Writing
Professional Writing Emphasis:
THAR 365 Desktop Publishing for Theatre
WRT 300 Writing for the Visual Arts
WRT 311 Composing in Digital Environments
WRT 314 Language Structures
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(2)
(4)
(4)
(4)
Electives Common to Both Emphases:
WRT 305 Prism Review Staff
(2-4)
WRT 306 Writing Theory and Practice
(4)
WRT 307 Special Topics in Writing/Literature (4)
WRT 309 Writing Workshop
(4)
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 94
MUSIC DEPARTMENT
Chairperson: Reed Gratz
Regular Faculty: James Calhoun, Reed Gratz,
Kathleen Lamkin, Grace Xia Zhao
Artist in Residence: Grace Xia Zhao
Adjunct Faculty: Pebber Brown, Roberto Catalano, Moh Wei Chen-Hribar, Danielle Cummins,
Robert Dominguez, Anita Hanawalt,1 Michael Ryan,
Carol Stephenson
Regional Campus faculty
1
The mission of the Music Department is to provide
students opportunities to experience a broad spectrum of music from the Western fine art tradition, the
many genres of American music, and the music of
other cultures. Through the courses and performances offered by the department, students will develop an understanding of artistic expression as an
essential part of life and learn skills essential to musicians today. Students may choose a major or
minor with a concentration in performance, history,
or theory/composition.
The department has a unique relationship with the
total educational experience in that students majoring in other areas are invited and encouraged to participate in all classes, ensembles, and applied
lessons. Students are given the opportunity to initiate and/or continue development of their musical interests and talents.
Music — B.A.
Core Requirements:
MUS 230 Theory I
(4)
MUS 232 Theory II
(4)
MUS 330 Theory III
(4)
MUS 332 Theory IV
(4)
MUS 351 Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque
Music
(4)
MUS 352 Classic, Romantic Music
(4)
MUS 353 Music Since 1900
(4)
Theory, History, or Conducting (300-400 level) (8)
Applied music
(8)
Ensemble
(6)
Piano proficiency
(0)
Concert attendance
(0)
MUS 499 Senior Project/Recital
(1-4)
Music Minor
Core Requirements:
MUS 230 Theory I
(4)
MUS 232 Theory II
(4)
MUS 352, 353 History & Literature of Music (4, 4)
Theory, History, or Conducting (330-400 level) (4)
Applied music
(4)
Ensemble
(6)
Concert attendance
(0)
Other MUS courses may be substituted for some
core requirements with department chair approval.
NATURAL SCIENCE DIVISION
Chairperson: Christine Broussard
The University of La Verne’s Natural Science Division
consists of the Departments of Biology, Chemistry,
Mathematics/Physics/Computer Science, and the
Prehealth Science Programs. For a complete listing
of faculty and offerings, see the separate departmental and program listings in this catalog.
Community Health – B.S.
Effective Fall 2015
Chairperson: Jerome Garcia
Associate Chairperson: Kent Badger
Core Requirements:
CH 380
Internship in Community Health
(4)
CH 400
Theoretical Foundations in
Health Promotion & Education
(4)
CH 401
Biostatistics for Community Health (4)
CH 402
Epidemiology
(4)
CH 403
Health Services in the U.S.
and Abroad
(4)
CH 404
Research Methods in
Community Health
(4)
CH 405
Advocating for Social Change
(4)
CH 406
Foundations of Program Design
and Evaluation
(4)
HSM 401 Organizational Management Theory
in Health Services Organizations (4)
HSM 496 Senior Project:
Culminating Program Summary
(4)
Electives: A minimum of 8 semester hours from the
following:
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 95
ANTH 320
BIOL 310
BIOL 314
BIOL 316
BIOL 344
CHEM 311
CHEM 312
MGMT 458
PSY 303
PSY 308
PSY 327
PSY 375
PSY 405
PSY 408
PSY 422
SOC 324
SOC 370
SPCM 240
Cultural Anthropology
Cell Biology
Biochemistry
Molecular Biology
Human Physiology
Organic Chemistry I
Organic Chemistry II
Stress Management
Learning and Behavior Change
Social Psychology
Health Psychology
Community Psychology
Brain and Behavior
Adolescent Psychology
Substance Abuse
Social Problems
Social Change
Persuasion and Social Influence
Supportive Requirements:
BIOL 302 Microbiology
BIOL 343 Human Anatomy
CHEM 201 General Chemistry I, or
CHEM 202 General Chemistry II
KINE 151 Health and Physical Fitness
Strategies
MATH 201 Calculus I, or
MATH 202 Calculus II
PSY 101 Principles of Psychology
(4)
(4)
(5)
(4)
(4)
(5)
(5)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(5)
(4)
(4)
(4)
PHOTOGRAPHY DEPARTMENT
Chairperson: Gary Colby
Photography is a primary means for personal expression and technical revelation within all facets of human
experience. In practical applications of the craft, students and teachers work together to create, process,
publish pictures and assess the effects of the images
that make the stories of our adventures. This work enables an examination of the social consequences of
photography and offers a stream of opportunities to
recognize graduate and career paths afforded by the
dynamic and disruptive technology that is photography in our culture.
Photography — B.A.
48 semester hours are required, with at least 24
upper division.
Core Requirements:
ART 120 Foundations of Design
ART 390 Art History: Selected Topics:
History of Photography, or
PHOT 305 Magic Box Revolutions
PHOT 210 Elementary Photography
PHOT 230 Documentary Photography
PHOT 310 Image Processing
PHOT 327 Staff Photography
PHOT 356 Digital Portfolio
PHOT 360 Studio Lighting
PHOT 499 Senior Project
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
Electives. Select a minimum of 14 semester hours
from at least 4 different courses (PHOT 321 and
PHOT 322 together count as one course):
PHOT 299 Independent Study
(1-4)
PHOT 300 Composition in Photoshop
(4)
PHOT 315 Alternative Photographic Processes (4)
PHOT 321 Portrait Photography and
PHOT 322 Digital Retouching
(2, 2)
PHOT 327 Staff Photography
(2)
PHOT 351 Landscape Photography
(4)
PHOT 399 Independent Study
(1-4)
PHOT 450 Special Projects in Photography
(4)
PHOT 497 Internship
(1-4)
Photography Minor
26 semester hours are required with at least 16
upper division.
Core Requirements:
ART 120 Foundations of Design, or
PHOT 100 How Do I Look Better?
PHOT 230 Documentary Photography
PHOT 310 Photoshop
ART 390 Art History: Selected Topics:
History of Photography, or
PHOT 305 Magic Box Revolutions
PHOT 327 Staff Photography
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(2)
Electives: A minimum of 8 semester hours from at
least two different courses. (PHOT 321 and PHOT
322 together count as one course).
PHOT 210 Elementary Photography
(4)
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 96
PHOT 321
PHOT 322
PHOT 315
PHOT 351
PHOT 356
PHOT 360
PHOT 450
Portrait Photography and
Digital Retouching
(2, 2)
Alternative Photographic Processes (4)
Landscape Photography
(4)
Digital Portfolio
(4)
Studio Lighting
(4)
Special Projects in Photography
(4)
PREHEALTH SCIENCE
PROGRAMS
Program Chairperson: Jerome Garcia
Prehealth Science Committee: Jeffery Burkhart,
Jerome Garcia, Iraj Parchamazad
The Prehealth Science Committee works directly with
students interested in pursuing vocations in the healing arts. Committee members advise prehealth science students and will write letters of recommendation
for students applying to graduate programs. A student
interested in a prehealth science field should contact
the program chair during the first week at La Verne so
that an academic advisor on the Prehealth Science
Committee appropriate to the student’s field of interest
can be assigned.
La Verne’s prehealth science programs are designed
to meet the requirements for admission to all accredited health science programs in medical, dental, pharmacy, optometry, veterinary, and nursing schools.
The high school program should include biology,
chemistry, physics, trigonometry, and a foreign language, such as Spanish or German.
The health science student is entering a difficult and
demanding program, and there are many steps to be
taken in preparation for graduate study. First, a broad,
well-balanced, general education background is essential. Second, although a health science student
may select any college major, the prescribed courses
in biology, chemistry, mathematics, physics, and English must be completed. These courses are required
by most graduate health science schools, and they
are essential preparation for the highly competitive entrance examinations (e.g., MCAT, DAT, PCAT, etc).
Competition for admission to graduate schools is increasingly keen, with the average GPA of those accepted at about 3.8. Other important factors in
determining admission include interviews, admission
exam results, letters of recommendation, grade
trends, extracurricular activities, intensity of the academic programs, and work experience.
Suggested Prehealth Science Program for Students Majoring in Biology:
Freshman year:
BIOL 204 Plant Biology
(5)
BIOL 205 Animal Biology
(5)
CHEM 201, 202 General Chemistry I, II
(5, 5)
English and Speech
(4, 4, 2)
Three electives (general education requirements)
Sophomore year:
BIOL 310 Cell Biology
(4)
BIOL 311 Genetics
(4)
BIOL 312 Environmental Biology
(4)
CHEM 311, 312 Organic Chemistry I, II
(5, 5)
MATH 201, 202 Calculus I, II
(4, 4)
Two electives (including general education requirements)
Junior year:
BIOL 313 Developmental Biology
(4)
BIOL 314 Biochemistry
(5)
PHYS 201, 202 General Physics I, II
(5, 5)
Four electives (including general education requirements)
Senior year:
Fall: Appropriate screening exam—MCAT, DAT,
PCAT, etc.
Completion of major requirements, including senior
project.
Completion of general education requirements.
Comprehensive examination in Biology.
If majoring in Chemistry, Physics, or other field: The
above schedule for Biology majors illustrates one
pathway that can be followed, but if majoring in Chemistry or another demanding major, it is especially important to receive proper advising.
PRELAW PROGRAM
Prelaw Advisor: Jason Neidleman
A broad academic, cultural, and intellectual background in the various disciplines of the liberal arts is
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 97
highly beneficial to students who are considering the
legal profession. While leading law schools prescribe
no one set of courses for students preparing to enter
law school, all encourage prelaw students to develop
skills in analytic research, communication (both written and oral), and reading comprehension. Prelaw
students may select any undergraduate major offered
at the University of La Verne.
The prelaw advisor has been designated to give
prelaw students assistance in designing their courses
of study at La Verne to best prepare them for law
school. Through careful counseling the advisor will
identify the student’s strengths and weaknesses for
future legal study. This individualized counseling program and the help given to students in locating suitable law schools has been successful in placing
prelaw students in the La Verne College of Law as
well as other law schools in California and other parts
of the United States. Students are urged to contact
the prelaw advisor as soon as they decide to pursue
a legal career.
PSYCHOLOGY DEPARTMENT
Chairperson: Glenn Gamst
Regular Faculty: Leticia Arellano-Morales, Aaron
Baker, Ngoc Bui, Amy Demyan, Aghop Der-Karabetian, Glenn Gamst, Arthur Gonchar, Jerry Kernes,
Jeanie Li, Luci Martin, Nadine Nakamura, Christopher Perez, Cecilia Poon, Kristina Post, Richard
Rogers, Rocio Rosales Meza
Adjunct Faculty: Wayne Henkelmann, Joleen Lara,
Dorie Richards
The Psychology Department offers bachelor’s and
master’s programs, and an APA-accredited doctoral
program in Clinical Psychology. Psychology students
have the opportunity to join Psi Chi, the national honor
society in Psychology.
Psychology — B.S.
Program Chairperson: Arthur Gonchar
This major prepares students for graduate study and
careers in psychology and related fields.
PSY 101
PSY 305
PSY 395
Principles of Psychology
Statistics
Computer Data Analysis
Core Requirements:
PSY 390 Research Methods
PSY 400 History of Psychology
PSY 497 Internship
PSY 499 Senior Thesis
Area of Emphasis:
PSY 312 Abnormal Psychology
PSY 405 Brain and Behavior
PSY 407 Life-Span Development
PSY 409 Multicultural Psychology
Two of the following laboratory courses:
PSY 303 Learning and Behavior Change
PSY 304 Experimental Psychology
PSY 306 Cognitive Psychology
PSY 308 Social Psychology
Electives:
A minimum of two of the following:
PSY 215 Personality Theory and Research
PSY 315 Psychological Testing
PSY 327 Health Psychology
PSY 375 Community Psychology
PSY 408 Adolescent Psychology
PSY 422 Substance Abuse
PSY 429 Counseling and Interviewing Skills
PSY 439 Industrial-Organizational Psychology
PSY 450 Selected Topics
Psychology Minor
Prerequisite:
PSY 101 Principles of Psychology
Core Requirements:
PSY 312 Abnormal Psychology
PSY 400 History of Psychology
PSY 407 Life-Span Development
One 300- or 400-level PSY elective
Two of the following:
PSY 303 Learning and Behavior Change
PSY 306 Cognitive Psychology
PSY 308 Social Psychology
Courses for declaration of major:
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 98
(4)
(4)
(2)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
Marriage and Family Therapy — M.S.
Program Chairperson: Amy Demyan
The MFT program trains students to become therapists to meet the psychological needs of families, couples, and children in a changing society. It combines
theoretical training with practical experiences to prepare students for professional counseling careers emphasizing the best practices Recovery Model.
General systems theory provides the theoretical foundation for the MFT program, and students are exposed to a range of theoretical orientations that reflect
a systems perspective. In California, completion of
this program fulfills all of the academic requirements
of the Board of Behavioral Science for licensure in
California as a Marriage and Family Therapist, as well
as the academic requirements for California community college counseling and instructor positions. The
program also meets statutory requirements for the
LPCC (Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor) license. Those planning to apply for the LPCC, in addition to the degree plan of classes, must complete
PSY 514 Career Counseling.
Admission requirements:
1. A bachelor’s degree with the following six
courses: general psychology, developmental
psychology, abnormal psychology, psychological research methods/experimental psychology,
statistics, and one other psychology theory
class.
2. The undergraduate course work will be evaluated on an individual basis for its recency and
appropriateness to the graduate program.
3. An overall undergraduate GPA of 3.0. Applicants with a GPA below 3.0 may be considered
with additional requirements.
4. The La Verne Graduate Studies Admission
Form returned with nonrefundable $50 application fee.
5. Completion of a 5-7-page statement of purpose
and autobiography.
6. A copy of a current résumé.
7. Three letters of recommendation from professors and colleagues who are familiar with the
applicant’s academic and professional abilities,
potential, and appropriateness for the counseling profession. At least one letter should be
from a professor.
8. Applicants are strongly encouraged to have at
least one year of volunteer or paid experience
working with families, children, couples, or indi-
viduals.
9. An interview with at least two psychology faculty
members.
10. Completion of a test of written language.
A student is eligible to enroll in no more than six semester hours prior to being admitted into the MFT program.
Classroom Conduct, Behavior Standards, and
Ethics. Professionals in the field of counseling are
governed by a number of ethical principles. Students
in the MFT program are expected to follow such principles. Students should be aware that annual evaluations will consider personal suitability for the field and
professional development. Classroom conduct, behavioral standards, and ethical behavior will be considered in this evaluation.
Failure to display
appropriate behaviors in each of these areas may result in dismissal from the program.
Academic Progress. The program adheres to the
grading policies stated in the current ULV catalog. It
should be noted that grades of B- or better are required for “successful completion” in the MFT program. Students earning grades lower than B- will be
required to retake these classes if they are required
for their degree. In addition, students must maintain
a cumulative GPA of 3.0 in order to maintain normal
academic progress and good standing in the program.
Program Candidacy. All counseling students are admitted into the program under a pre-candidacy status.
After the completion of 12 semester hours, all students become eligible for candidacy status and are
evaluated by the following criteria: GPA of 3.0 or
above, a passing score on the Competency Examination (PSY 595), and demonstrated personal suitability
for the counseling profession. Occasionally, students
may receive a provisional candidacy status in which
certain conditions must be completed before they can
receive candidacy status. In some instances, students may be denied candidacy and be discontinued
from the program. All students must receive candidacy status in order to complete the program.
During their coursework in the program, students continue to be evaluated for demonstrated suitability to
the program and the counseling profession. Occasionally, discontinuation of a student from the program
may occur, even after the conferring of candidacy status, if the student’s personal or professional behavior
does not continue to meet minimum professional
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 99
and/or academic standards.
Personal Psychotherapy. The department believes
that students entering the marriage and family therapy profession benefit professionally, personally, and
academically from experiencing personal psychotherapy, and believes that psychotherapy is a necessary
training experience for counseling professionals.
Therefore, all students enrolled in the MFT program
are required to complete a minimum of 10 hours of
personal psychotherapy during their year of fieldwork
placement (PSY 580, 581). Students should design a
treatment plan for departmental approval, with their
fieldwork instructor. Students must complete 5 (five)
hours of personal therapy by the end of PSY 580 to
earn academic credit for that class and must complete
all 10 (ten) required hours by the end of PSY 581 in
order to receive credit for that course. The therapy
may include individual, couple, family, or group therapy, depending on the individual student’s issues and
preferences. Students enrolled in the MFT program
may apply their psychotherapy hours towards the optional hours of experience category for California MFT
licensure. Any exceptions to this policy must be approved by the department.
Competency Exam. The Competency Exam is a
program requirement that must be completed in order
to be eligible to begin the fieldwork experience. For
MFT students, the exam is based upon, and occurs
after successful completion of PSY 512, 516, 517, and
527. The exam is scheduled in June each year. All
conditions of admission must be completed, and the
student must be making satisfactory progress in the
program, in order to sit for the exam. Students should
complete the competency exam after all graduate
level prerequisites are completed but prior to the start
of the 30th semester hour. Exceptions to this must be
approved by the program chair in writing.
Advanced Standing. Students must receive advanced standing in order to enroll in Graduate Seminar (PSY 596), the culminating activity for the MS
Program. MFT students are eligible to apply for Advanced Standing when they have completed 35 semester hours. Students must have completed all
provisions or conditions of admission, have passed
the competency exam, be in academic good standing, and have attained a minimum GPA of 3.0 for all
work applicable in the degree programs in order to
apply for advanced standing.
participate in coursework each semester until degree
completion. A student who finds it necessary to interrupt his or her studies and desires to return should
contact the Program Chair to request a leave of absence. With a leave of absence, a student may be
absent from ULV for no more than two semesters
without reapplying for admission. Students absent
during a Fall or Spring semester without an approved
leave of absence will be considered withdrawn.
Total Program: 60 semester hours
Core Courses: 15 semester hours
PSY 502 Research Methods in Counseling
PSY 507 Human Development
PSY 522 Group Counseling
PSY 523 Multicultural Counseling
PSY 527 Professionalism, Ethics, and
Law in Counseling
PSY 595 Competency Exam
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(0)
MFT Specialization: 42 semester hours
PSY 506 Human Sexuality
(1)
PSY 509 Psychological Testing
(3)
PSY 512 Clinical Psychopathology
(3)
PSY 516 Counseling Theories & Skills I
(3)
PSY 517 Counseling Theories & Skills II
(3)
PSY 518 Family Therapy
(3)
PSY 519 Couples Therapy
(3)
PSY 521 Child Therapy
(2)
PSY 528 Substance Abuse Counseling
(3)
PSY 530 Violence & Abuse in Family Systems (2)
PSY 534 Psychopharmacology
(2)
PSY 536 Counseling Older Adults
(1)
PSY 542 Working with Clients’ Anger Issues (1)
PSY 543 Grief and Loss Counseling
(1)
PSY 544 Trauma Focused Treatment
(1)
PSY 545 Working With Anxiety Disorders
(1)
PSY 550 Community Mental Health Counseling (3)
PSY 580 Supervised Fieldwork in Marriage,
Family, and Child Therapy I
(3)
PSY 581 Supervised Fieldwork in Marriage,
Family, and Child Therapy II
(3)
Culminating Activity: 3 semester hours
PSY 596 Graduate Seminar
Leave of Absence. MFT students are expected to
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 100
(3)
Doctor of Psychology — Psy.D. Clinical
Psychology
Program Chair/Director of Clinical Training: Jerry
L. Kernes
Accreditation:
Accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of
the American Psychological Association.
Questions related to the program’s accredited status
should be directed to the following:
Office of Program Consultation and Accreditation
American Psychological Association
750 1st Street, NE
Washington, DC 20002
Phone: (202) 336-5979
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.apa.org/ed/accreditation
Program Policies
All students admitted into the Psy.D. Program at the
University of La Verne are governed by, expected to
be familiar with, and abide by the Program’s policies
as described in the Psy.D. Program Policies and Procedures Handbook located at:
http://sites.laverne.edu/psychology/psydprogram/program-policies/
This Program Policies and Procedures Handbook is
designed to orient and guide students admitted to the
Psy.D. Program in Clinical Psychology through their
educational journey at the University of La Verne. It
contains information regarding the policies and procedures that govern both administrative and academic
matters. Where appropriate, students may be referred
to additional documents for further information on program policies and procedures. The Program Policies
and Procedures Handbook applies to all students active in the program (i.e. to all students whose Psy.D.
degree has not posted). Clarification of matters contained in this handbook may be obtained from the Program Chair/Director of Clinical Training (PC/DCT).
Psy.D. students should note that the policies outlined
in the Program Policies and Procedures Handbook
may be more stringent than the policies contained in
the university catalog. Psy.D. students are expected to
abide by the policies outlined in this Program Policies
and Procedures Handbook and will be held accountable to them.
Training Philosophy
The program follows the scholar-practitioner model of
professional training and prepares clinical psychologists to promote mental health for the welfare of individuals, families, groups, institutions, and society as
a whole. The program follows the NCSPP professional psychology educational model as well as the
APA Guidelines and Principles for Accreditation of
Programs in Professional Psychology. The curriculum
also meets the California Board of Psychology educational requirements for licensure as a psychologist.
The core mission of the program is to train scholarpractitioners who think critically, apply their knowledge
diligently, and practice ethically and compassionately.
The program strives to prepare doctoral students to
become multi-culturally competent professionals. The
program’s philosophy is that clinical practice is based
on the scientific foundations of psychology and that
the science of psychology is informed by good clinical
practice. Consistent with this view, our program includes systematic training in both research and practice and our students are expected to develop
competencies in clinical and research skills. Our curriculum is designed to prepare clinicians to be able to
critically evaluate empirical research pertinent to the
practice of clinical psychology and incorporate this information into practice.
The Psy.D. Program is a secular doctoral program
and embraces diversity of all kinds. The program welcomes students, faculty, and staff from many ethnic,
cultural, religious, sexual orientation, age, and ability
backgrounds. The program is committed to creating
and maintaining a positive training climate that (a) allows for open inquiry, free expression, and effective
conflict resolution, and (b) promotes the understanding and affirmation of all aspects of human diversity.
Program goals, objectives, and competencies
The program is guided by an overarching set of principles designed to: (a) integrate theory, research, and
practice; (b) infuse multicultural issues throughout; (c)
provide a sequential, cumulative, and graded in complexity experience that enhances coherency and
depth; (d) encourage active collaboration among students and foster cooperative classroom and program
environments; and (e) meet NCSPP core professional
competencies. The Psy.D. program has established
the following goals, objectives, and competencies for
students in the program. A detailed listing of these
goals, objectives, and competencies is presented in
the Program Policies and Procedures Handbook
available on the program’s website at: http://sites.lav-
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 101
erne.edu/psychology/psyd-program/program-policies/
Admissions requirements and procedures
Applicants to the Psy.D. program must submit the following materials postmarked by December 31st (for
admissions the following fall semester) to the office of
Graduate Admissions:
1. Application for Admission form and a non-refundable application fee.
2. Official undergraduate transcripts from a regionally-accredited institution. An undergraduate
major in psychology is required. Coursework in
the major must include: introductory/general
psychology, statistics, experimental psychology/research methods, and abnormal psychology; and two of the following courses: history
and systems of psychology, social psychology,
theories of personality, human development/developmental psychology, clinical psychology,
physiological psychology/biopsychology, multicultural psychology, psychological testing/psychometrics,
cognitive
psychology,
learning/memory, or sensation and perception.
A minimum overall undergraduate GPA of 3.30
is required. A Master’s degree is not required for
admission and a Master’s GPA may not be substituted for a deficient undergraduate GPA.
3. International students must submit proof of proficiency in the English language via a satisfactory total TOEFL score. The minimum required
TOEFL total score for the 3 versions of the
TOEFL are: 600 (paper-based version), 250
(computer-based version), and 100 (internetbased version). International students must also
provide proof of financial sponsorship and financial statements.
4. Official test scores for the GRE General test
(Verbal, Quantitative, and Analytical Writing).
The minimum required GRE scores are 300
(Verbal and Quantitative combined) and 3.5 (Analytical Writing). The GRE Psychology Subject
test is recommended but not required. Scores
must be recent (no older than 5 years).
5. Three letters of recommendation from individuals familiar with the applicant’s academic preparation, fieldwork, employment, or volunteer
experience. All three letters must be from indi-
viduals who are qualified to objectively assess
the applicant’s ability to succeed in doctorallevel study and potential to function competently
as a professional clinical psychologist.
6. A current curriculum vita.
7. A statement of professional goals and aspirations explaining why the applicant wants to pursue doctoral study in clinical psychology and
outlining what the individual anticipates for his
or her future as a result of earning the Psy.D.
Following receipt of all application materials, only applicants being considered for admission are interviewed. The program admits only full-time students
and part-time applicants are not accepted. Interviews
are held in February and include: individual interviews
with core doctoral faculty members, a group experiential activity, a writing assignment, a campus tour,
and meeting current students. The program strongly
favors interviews to be held in person, but telephone
interviews may be arranged for applicants from distant locations. Students are notified of their admission
status by the middle of March, and are given until April
15th to respond. To be officially admitted to the program, students must provide documentation of having completed an undergraduate degree in
psychology prior to enrolling in the fall. Only admitted
students may take courses in the program.
Students with disabilities.
Students with disabilities, who need reasonable modifications, special assistance, or accommodations in
the program, should direct their request to the
PC/DCT at the time of the program orientation. Students must register with the Services for Students with
Disabilities office and provide documentation of their
disability to receive services. If a student with a disability feels that modifications, special assistance, or
accommodations offered by the program are insufficient, that student should seek the assistance of the
Services for Students with Disabilities office.
Student self-disclosure while in program. The
American Psychological Association (APA) Code of
Ethics states:
7.04 Student Disclosure of Personal Information
Psychologists do not require students or supervisees to disclose personal information in courseor program-related activities, either orally or in
writing, regarding sexual history, history of abuse
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 102
and neglect, psychological treatment, and relationships with parents, peers, and spouses or significant others except if (1) the program or training
facility has clearly identified this requirement in its
admissions and program materials or (2) the information is necessary to evaluate or obtain assistance for students whose personal problems
could reasonably be judged to be preventing
them from performing their training- or professionally-related activities in a competent manner
or posing a threat to the students or others.
complete the program. Practicum, internship, statistics, research methods, and dissertation units are nontransferable and are not accepted for transfer credit.
Students requesting transfer credit for previous graduate work must submit official transcripts and copies
of relevant syllabi to the PC/DCT for formal review by
November 1st of their first semester in the program.
Requests for transfer credit past that date will not be
honored. The PC/DCT, in consultation with relevant
course instructors, decides whether or not to award
transfer credit.
Program requirements and progression through
program
Students are continuously evaluated on their professional, ethical, and legal conduct while in the program.
Several activities measure students’ competency
while in the program including: course grades,
practicum performance, completion of peer supervision requirement, completion of the personal psychotherapy requirement, performance on the clinical
competency exam, progression and performance on
the dissertation, and performance during the pre-doctoral internship. In addition, students are evaluated on
their professional development including participation
in extracurricular activities, and on their ability to engage in self-reflection and evaluation.
Masters of Psychology
Students may apply for an M.S. in Psychology at the
completion of their second year of the Psy.D. program.
This degree is intended only as an en route degree
toward completion of the Psy.D. and is not a terminal
master’s degree. Students must be in good academic
standing at time of application and have successfully
completed their first two years of required coursework.
Completion of Psy 660: Clinical Competency Exam is
not required for advancement to the Master’s degree.
Those students awarded the degree may participate
in the January commencement during their third year
Several courses in the program (such as but not
limited to: practicum courses, the multicultural
competency sequence, group therapy, and supervision) require students to explore their world
view as it affects their work with clients. Because
of the effect that students’ personal experiences
and perspectives might have on their work with
clients, these courses often include experiential
activities such as self-disclosure, group process,
role plays, and exploration of personal issues as
they affect the therapeutic relationship.
Transfer credit for previous graduate work
Students who have completed previous graduate
work at another university may request transfer credit
for this work. Request for transfer for academic credit
and coursework will be reviewed by the PC/DCT on a
case by case basis for recency and academic applicability. Only courses completed within 5 years from date
of admission into the Psy.D. program, at a regionally
accredited university, with a grade of B (3.0) or better
may be considered for transfer. The maximum number of transfer credits is 12 semester hours. Transfer
credit may reduce course load during various semesters of the program but does not shorten residency requirements or the number of years required to
Grading policies
The Psy.D. program uses the following grades in evaluation of students’ performance (A, A-, B+, B, B-, and
F) or (Credit, No Credit). The minimal passing grade
for all letter grade courses is B-. The minimal passing
grade for all Credit/No Credit courses is “credit.” A final
grade lower than a B- in a letter grade course or “no
credit” in a CR/NCR course is evaluated as failing the
course and the course must be re-taken for course
credit to be obtained. Psy.D. students may re-take a
course for course credit only once. Any student failing
any course in the program twice will be dismissed
from the program.
Advancement to Doctoral Candidacy
Students are admitted into the Psy.D. program as precandidates. To be advanced for doctoral candidacy,
pre-candidates must at a minimum (a) complete their
first 3 years of coursework, (b) complete a minimum of
1,500 clinical practicum hours, (c) pass PSY 660: Clinical Competency Exam, and (d) complete PSY 662:
Dissertation Proposal Defense. Evaluation for doctoral
candidacy occurs after completion of both PSY 660
and PSY 662. All students must earn candidacy status in order to complete the program. Students must
be advanced to candidacy before they can apply for
internship. Once candidacy is granted, students are
permitted to use the title “Doctoral Candidate” or
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 103
“Psy.D. Candidate.” Students are prohibited from
using these titles before then and should instead refer
to themselves as a “Doctoral Student,” or “Psy.D. Student.” Dismissal of a student may occur even after the
conferring of candidacy and passing the Clinical Competency Exam if the student does not meet the dissertation competency and/or internship competency,
or if the student’s personal or professional behavior
does not continue to meet required standards for the
profession.
Continuous enrollment
Students must be continuously enrolled in the program until their degree is completed. Details concerning continuous enrollment are presented in the
Program Policies and Procedures Handbook.
Degree completion time limit
While students are expected to complete their Psy.D.
requirements and graduate in five years from the date
of matriculation, all requirements for the doctoral degree must be completed within 8 years from the start
of the student’s first course in the Psy.D. program
Dismissal from program
Students may be dismissed from the program under
several circumstances including, but not limited to: academic dishonesty, academic disqualification, failure
to maintain minimum academic standards, failure of
program activities measuring student competencies,
failure to maintain satisfactory academic progress, unethical or unprofessional conduct, circumstances interfering with training or well-being of others, felony
conviction. Students dismissed from the program may
not apply for readmission.
Licensure
Courses in the Psy.D. curriculum are consistent with
educational requirements for licensure in California.
Because licensure requirements vary among states,
students interested in practicing outside of California
are encouraged to consult the licensing boards in the
states where they intend to practice.
Total Program: 120 units
I. Breadth of Scientific Psychology
Biological Aspects of Behavior:
PSY 604 Biological Bases of Behavior
Cognitive and Affective Aspects:
PSY 638 Cognitive & Affective Bases of
Behavior
Social Aspects:
(3)
(3)
PSY 639 Advanced Social Psychology
(3)
History and Systems:
PSY 637 Advanced History & Systems
(3)
Psychological Measurement:
PSY 603 Psychological Measurement
(3)
Research Methodology:
PSY 640 Quantitative Research Methods
(3)
PSY 641 Qualitative Research Methods
(3)
PSY 661-664 Dissertation I-IV
(3, 3, 3, 3)
Techniques of Data Analysis:
PSY 605 Advanced Statistics I
(3)
PSY 605L SPSS Lab (Univariate)
(1)
PSY 606 Advanced Statistics II
(3)
PSY 606L SPSS Lab (Multivariate)
(1)
II. Foundations of Practice
Individual Differences in Behavior:
PSY 609 Personality Theory & Individual
Differences
Human Development:
PSY 633 Advanced Human Development
Dysfunctional Behavior/Psychopathology:
PSY 612 Advanced Psychopathology
Professional Standards and Ethics:
PSY 610 Professional Development Seminar
PSY 617 Professional Issues & Ethics
(3)
(3)
(3)
(0)
(3)
III. Diagnosis, Assessment, and Intervention
Strategies
Theories and Methods of Assessment & Diagnosis:
PSY 608 Cognitive & Intellectual Assessment (3)
PSY 628 Personality Assessment I
(3)
PSY 629 Personality Assessment II
(3)
PSY 649 Full Battery Assessment
(3)
Interventions:
PSY 614 Clinical Skills & Interviewing
Techniques
(3)
PSY 635, 636 Clinical Practicum I, II
(2,2)
PSY 655, 656 Clinical Practicum III-IV
(2, 2)
PSY 643 Medical Psychology
(3)
PSY 647 Advanced Group Psychotherapy
(3)
PSY 680A, 680B Full-time Internship I,II , or (5, 5)
PSY 681A, 681B Half-time Internship I,II
(5, 5)
One of the following:
PSY 645 Cognitive-Behavioral Psychotherapy (3)
PSY 646 Psychodynamic Psychotherapy
(3)
Consultation and Supervision:
PSY 635L, 636L Supervision Lab I & II
PSY 670, 671 Adv. Supervision Skills I,II
PSY 670L, 671L Supervision Lab I, II
PSY 672, 673 Adv. Consultation Skills I, II
Evaluating the Efficacy of Interventions:
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 104
(1, 1)
(1, 1)
(1, 1)
(1, 1)
PSY 615 Psychotherapy Efficacy and Outcome (3)
IV. Cultural and Individual Diversity
PSY 623 Advanced Multicultural Competency I (3)
PSY 624 Advanced Multicultural Competency II (3)
V. Electives:
A minimum of 10 semester hours from the following:
PSY 644 Counseling Older Adults
(1)
PSY 651 Substance Abuse: Detection and
Treatment
(1)
PSY 652 Child Abuse: Detection & Treatment (1)
PSY 653 Human Sexuality
(1)
PSY 654 Domestic Violence
(1)
PSY 657A, Practicum V
(1)
PSY 657B Practicum VI
(1)
PSY 690 Selected Topics
(1-3)
PSY 699 Independent Study
(1-3)
VI. Qualifying Examination:
PSY 660 Clinical Competency Exam
(0)
RELIGION & PHILOSOPHY
DEPARTMENT
Chairperson: Dan Campana
Regular Faculty: Dan Campana, Richard Rose
Adjunct Faculty: Marshall Osman, Jonathan Reed,
Zandra Wagoner
Consistent with La Verne’s history and values orientation, the Religion/Philosophy Department offers bachelor of arts degrees in Religion, Philosophy, and
Religion/Philosophy. A minor is also available in Religion or Philosophy. Religion courses offer the opportunity to explore religion and religious values in a
critical, academic context. Philosophy courses challenge students to look seriously at the philosophical
traditions which have helped to shape our world
views. In all courses emphasis is upon critical thinking and evaluation of a broad range of views with the
goal of refining one’s own perspectives.
Off-campus religion programs are also offered to enable students in African American and Latino communities of Los Angeles to pursue degrees in Religion
and Philosophy. In order to best serve the needs of
this diverse group of adult learners, both the admis-
sion requirement of proof of high school completion
and the departmental foreign language requirement
are waived. Courses are offered in Pasadena and
central Los Angeles in the evenings and on Saturdays.
Religion — B.A.
Core Requirements:
PHIL 351 Philosophy of Religion
REL 100 Introduction to Religion
REL 220 Bible 2, or
REL 230 Bible 1
REL 490 Senior Seminar
REL 499 Senior Project
Scripture:
REL 220
REL 230
REL 331
REL 335
REL 390
Theology:
REL 349
(4)
(4)
(4)
(0-1)
(4)
one course with SC designation
(4)
Bible 2, or
Bible 1
(4)
Jesus and His Teachings
The First Christians
Topics in Religion with SC designation
one course with TH designation
(4)
Contemporary Themes in
Christian Thought
REL 390 Topics in Religion with TH designation
Religion & Society: one course with RS mark (4)
REL 390 Topics in Religion with RS designation
REL 398 Topics in Urban Studies
Non-Western Religion: one course with NW
(4)
REL 305 World Religions: East
REL 390 Topics in Religion with NW designation
Electives: (12) Three upper-division courses with either the REL or PHIL designation. (Interdisciplinary
courses that include Religion or Philosophy as a discipline can be applied here.)
Philosophy — B.A.
Core Requirements:
HUM 305 Values and Critical Thinking
PHIL 110 Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 330 Introduction to Ethics
PHIL 399 Independent Study on a
selected major philosopher
PHIL 490 Senior Seminar
PHIL 499 Senior Project
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 105
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(1 or 0)
(4)
Ancient or Medieval Philosophy: one course with
AM designation
(4)
PHIL 321 History of Ancient and
Medieval Philosophy
PHIL 350 Topics in Philosophy with AM mark
PHIL 371 Classical Political Philosophies
Modern or Contemporary Philosophy: one course
with MC designation
(4)
PHIL 322 History of Modern and Contemporary
Philosophy
PHIL 350 Topics in Philosophy with PS mark
PHIL 373 Modern Political Theory
PHIL 375 Contemporary Political Theory
Philosophy & Society: one course with PS
PHIL 317 Power and Oppression
PHIL 350 Topics in Religion with PS mark
PHIL 351 Philosophy of Religion
PHIL 370 Contemporary Issues in the
Philosophy of Love and Sex
(4)
Non-Western Religion: one course with NW
(4)
REL 305 World Religions: East
REL 390 Topics in Religion with NW designation
Electives:
(8)
Two upper-division courses with either the REL or
PHIL designation. (Interdisciplinary courses that include Religion or Philosophy as a discipline can be
applied here.)
Religion/Philosophy — B.A.
Core Requirements:
PHIL 110 Introduction to Philosophy, or
REL 100 Introduction to Religion
(4)
PHIL 351 Philosophy of Religion
(4)
REL 100 Introduction to Religion
(4)
PHIL 490 or REL 490 Senior Seminar
(0-1)
PHIL 499 or REL 499 Senior Project
(4)
Ancient or Medieval Philosophy: one course
with AM designation
(4)
PHIL 321 History of Ancient and
Medieval Philosophy
(4)
PHIL 350 Topics in Religion with AM mark
PHIL 371 Classical Political Philosophies
Modern or Contemporary Philosophy: one course
with MC designation
(4)
PHIL 322 History of Modern and Contemporary
PHIL 350
PHIL 373
PHIL 375
Philosophy
Topics in Philosophy with MC mark
Modern Political Theory
Contemporary Political Theory
Scripture: one course with SC designation
(4)
REL 220 Bible 2, or
REL 230 Bible 1
(4)
REL 331 Jesus and His Teachings
REL 335 The First Christians
REL 390 Topics in Religion with SC designation
Theology: one course with TH designation
(4)
REL 349 Contemporary Themes in
Christian Thought
REL 390 Topics in Religion with TH designation
Religion & Society: one course with RS mark (4)
REL 388 American Baptist Missions Today
REL 390 Topics in Religion with RS designation
REL 398 Topics in Urban Studies
REL 497 Internship
Non-Western Religion: one course with NW
(4)
REL 305 World Religions: East
REL 390 Topics in Religion with NW designation
Electives:
(8)
Two upper-division courses with either the REL or
PHIL designation. (Interdisciplinary courses that include Religion or Philosophy as a discipline can be
applied here.)
Philosophy Minor
Core Requirements:
PHIL 110 Introduction to Philosophy
(4)
HUM 305 Values and Critical Thinking
(4)
Upper-division PHIL electives
(16)
(REL 305 and interdisciplinary courses that include
Religion or Philosophy as a discipline can be applied
here.)
Religion Minor
Core Requirements:
REL 100 Introduction to Religion
One course in scripture (with SC designation)
REL 220 Bible 2, or
REL 230 Bible 1
REL 331 Jesus and His Teachings
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 106
(4)
(4)
(4)
REL 335 The First Christians
REL 390 Topics in Religion with SC designation
Upper-division REL electives (16)
(PHIL 351 and interdisciplinary courses that include
Religion or Philosophy as a discipline can be applied
here.)
Chairperson: Hector Delgado
Regular Faculty: Felicia Beardsley, Sharon K.
Davis, Hector Delgado, Karen Donahue, Kanya
Goode, Roy Kwon, Kimberly Martin, Ernie Thomson
Adjunct Faculty: Monica Argondona, Glenn Goodwin, Dan Kennan, Gerlaine Kiamco, Robert Lewis,
Joanna Norton, John Norvell
Anthropology — B.S.
This major provides a balanced education in the four
fields of anthropology: culture, archaeology, linguistics, and biology. It offers a foundation in theory,
methodology, and applications of anthropological
knowledge. The curriculum emphasizes the comparative study of human beings and their cultures in all
times and all places. It prepares students for graduate study and/or careers in such fields as teaching,
research, human services, international business, heritage preservation, forensics, and criminalistics. The
Anthropology major requires 52 semester hours including supportive requirements. A maximum of two
courses may be accepted in transfer to be applied toward the Breadth Requirements.
Breadth Requirements:
One course from each of the following:
ANTH 320 (Cultural Anthropology) series
ANTH 340 (Linguistic Anthropology) series
ANTH 350 (Physical Anthropology) series
ANTH 360 (Archaeology) series
Two ANTH lab courses
Supportive Requirement:
ANTH 305 Quantitative Analysis
Anthropology Minor
SOCIOLOGY/ANTHROPOLOGY
DEPARTMENT
Core Requirements:
ANTH 390 Research Methods
ANTH 400 Anthropological Theory
ANTH 497 Internship
ANTH 499 Senior Thesis
Electives:
12 semester hours approved by advisor
(12)
Maximum of two transfer courses may be accepted
toward the breadth requirement within the major.
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(2, 2)
Core Requirements:
ANTH 320 Cultural Anthropology
ANTH 340 Language and Culture
ANTH 350 Physical Anthropology
One course from the archaeology sequence,
ANTH 360-366
One ANTH lab courses
One approved elective
Behavioral Sciences — B.S.
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(2)
(4)
This major provides an opportunity to study human
behavior from the perspectives of anthropology, psychology, and sociology. Two emphasis areas are
available to students majoring in Behavioral Science: General and Ethnic Studies.
Core Requirements:
ANTH 250 Issues in Anthropology or
ANTH 320 Cultural Anthropology
(4)
PSY 101 Principles of Psychology
(4)
SOC 250 Introduction to Sociology
(4)
ANTH/SOC 305 Quantitative Analysis
(4)
ANTH/SOC 390 Research Methods
(4)
ANTH/SOC 497 Internship
(4)
ANTH/SOC 499 Senior Thesis
(4)
General Concentration: This concentration allows
students to experience a broad range of behavioral
science perspectives on human behavior.
Two of the following:
ANTH 400 Anthropological Theory
(4)
PSY 400 History of Psychology
(4)
SOC 400 Sociological Theory
(4)
Electives: 8 upper-division semester hours from
PSY, SOC, and/or ANTH approved by the advisor.
Ethnic Studies Concentration: This concentration
permits students to study the contemporary multi-ethnic society in the United States:
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 107
ANTH/SOC 315 Race and Ethnicity
SOC 330 Social Class and Inequality
(4)
(4)
Three of the following:
ANTH/SOC 335 Black Experience in the U.S. (4)
ANTH/SOC 336 Latino Experience
(4)
ANTH/SOC 337 Asian American Experience (4)
ANTH/SOC 328 Native American Experience (4)
Electives: A minimum of four semester hours of
upper-division units in any course approved by the
advisor.
Behavioral Sciences Minor
Core Requirements:
ANTH 250 Issues in Anthropology, or
PSY 101 Principles of Psychology, or
SOC 250 Introduction to Sociology
PSY 309 Personality Theory and Research
SOC 324 Social Problems
ANTH 320 Cultural Anthropology
PSY 400 History of Psychology, or
SOC 400 Sociological Theory, or
ANTH 400 Anthropological Theory
ANTH, PSY, or SOC 300-400-level Elective
Ethnic Studies Minor
Core Requirements:
ANTH/SOC 315 Race and Ethnicity
SOC 330 Social Class and Inequality
Three of the following:
ANTH/SOC 335 Black Experience in the U.S.
ANTH/SOC 336 Latino Experience
ANTH/SOC 337 Asian American Experience
ANTH/SOC 338 Native American Experience
Criminology — B.S.
Area of Emphasis:
SOC 321 Juvenile Delinquency
SOC 322 Introduction to Criminology
SOC 326 Criminal Justice System
SOC 350 Law and Society
Two of the following:
SOC 329 Correctional Systems
SOC 360 The Death Penalty
SOC 362 Forensic Investigations
Criminology Minor
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
This major is designed for students planning careers
in law or criminal justice, or working with troubled
youth.
Core Requirements:
One ANTH course
SOC 250 Introduction to Sociology
SOC 305 Quantitative Analysis
SOC 390 Research Methods
SOC 497 Internship
SOC 499 Senior Thesis, or
SOC 499A-B Senior Thesis
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
Prerequisites:
SOC 250 Introduction to Sociology
Core Requirements:
SOC 320 Sociology of Deviance, or
SOC 350 Law and Society
SOC 321 Juvenile Delinquency
SOC 322 Introduction to Criminology
SOC 326 Criminal Justice System
One approved 300-400-level elective
Sociology — B.S.
(4)
(4 or 2, 2)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
This major is designed for students planning careers
working with people and groups, their social creations and issues.
Core Requirements:
One ANTH course
SOC 250 Introduction to Sociology
SOC 305 Quantitative Analysis
SOC 390 Research Methods
SOC 400 Sociological Theory
SOC 497 Internship
SOC 499 Senior Thesis, or
SOC 499A-B Senior Thesis
Area of Emphasis:
SOC 270 Social Problems
SOC 320 Sociology of Deviance
SOC 330 Social Class and Inequality
SOC 370 Social Change
Elective: One course approved by the
academic advisor
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 108
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4 or 2, 2)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
Sociology Minor
Prerequisites:
SOC 250 Introduction to Sociology
Core Requirements:
SOC 320 Sociology of Deviance
SOC 324 Social Problems
SOC 330 Social Class and Inequality
SOC 400 Sociological Theory
One approved 300-400-level elective
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
SPEECH COMMUNICATION
DEPARTMENT
Chairperson: Ian Lising
Regular Faculty: Ian Lising, Rob Ruiz
Adjunct Faculty: Thomas Allison, Michaeline Anderson, Rachel Friend
The mission of the Speech Communication Department is to help students explore how and why people
communicate, and the effects of communication on individuals, groups, organizations, and societies. The
departmental curriculum examines communication
theory, encourages practice and improvement of communication skills in a variety of contexts, and explores
communication from a multicultural perspective. The
department sponsors the La Verne Slam Poetry Team
that competes nationally as well as the La Verne Debate Team, which competes nationally and internationally. Both teams are open to students of all majors
and colleges.
Speech Communication — B.A.
The Speech Communication major prepares students
for careers that demand good communication skills
and theoretical understanding, such as social and
human services, business, and law. It emphasizes
basic communication theory and basic research methods as well as context-specific training. Supportive
electives outside the department allow students to explore areas closely related to the field, such as public
relations and business communication.
Core Requirements:
SPCM 100 Fundamentals of Public Speaking (2)
SPCM 110 Introduction to Speech Communication
Theory and Practice
(2)
SPCM 360*Leadership Communication
(4)
SPCM 452 Rhetorical Criticism
(4)
SPCM 499 Senior Project
(2-4)
*SPCM 360 must be taken in the same semester
with at least one additional SPCM upper division
class.
A minimum of three of the following four:
SPCM 210 Interpersonal Communication
SPCM 220 Intercultural Communication
SPCM 240 Persuasion and Social Influence
SPCM 250 Public Controversy and Criticism
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
Electives:
16 unduplicated semester hours from the following:
SPCM 332 Interviewing Principles & Practices (4)
SPCM 350 Argumentation & Debate
(4 or 8)
SPCM 400 Voices of Revolution
(4)
SPCM 490 Special Topics in Speech
Communication
(4, 8 or 12)
Speech Communication Minor
Core Requirements:
SPCM 100 Fundamentals of Public Speaking (2)
SPCM 110 Introduction to Speech Communication
Theory and Practice
(2)
A minimum of one of the following four:
SPCM 210 Interpersonal Communication
(4)
SPCM 220 Intercultural Communication
(4)
SPCM 240 Persuasion and Social Influence
(4)
SPCM 250 Public Controversy and Criticism (4)
Electives: 16 upper division hours from the list of
B.A., Speech Communication Electives.
THEATRE ARTS DEPARTMENT
Chairperson: David Flaten
Regular Faculty: Sean Dillon, David Flaten
Adjunct Faculty: Skip Clague, Gabriel Gomez,
Georgij Paro, Alan Tollefson
Director of Theatre: Steven Kent
Technical Director: Alan Tollefson
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 109
The Theatre Arts Department views theatre as an integrative discipline that embraces many fields of endeavor. Its goal is to create a learning community that
empowers students to become highly skilled, self-motivated, socially aware theatre artists and engaged citizens. Theatre Arts is a rigorous academic program
that provides a strong foundation in world theatre history, dramatic literature, theory, and criticism, as well
as an active production program of plays for public
presentation that includes theatre arts majors and minors as well as non-major participants. The program
encourages students to develop an emphasis in a
special area of theatre study, such as performance,
directing, design, or playwriting through electives approved by advisor
Prerequisites for the Major and Minor:
THAR 100 Introduction to Theatre
THAR 113 Theatre, Acting, and Performance
THAR 120 Introduction to Stagecraft
Theatre — B.A.
(2)
(2)
(2)
Core Requirements: a minimum of 42 semester
hours:
THAR 110 Acting for Anyone, or
THAR 210 Acting Studio, or
THAR 212 Acting for the Camera I
(4)
THAR 233 Introduction to Design for
(4)
Stage and Studio
THAR 251 Introduction to Theatrical Directing or
THAR 351 Directing Studio I
(4)
THAR 255 Theatre and Stage Management
(2)
THAR 270 Theatre Seminar (3 semesters) (1,1,1)
THAR 300 Drama on Page and Stage, or
THAR 440 American Stage-Mirror of Society, or
THAR 443 Twentieth-Century Drama, or
THAR 449 Shakespeare
(4)
THAR 321 Production Experience (3 sems.)(1,1,1)
THAR 370 Theatre and Community
(4)
THAR 445 Masters of the Drama
(4)
THAR 480 Cultural History of World Theatre I (4)
THAR 481 Cultural History of World Theatre II (4)
THAR 499 Senior Project
(1-4)
Electives as approved by advisor
Theatre Arts Minor
Core Requirements: One of the following three options approved by advisor:
1. 20 semester hours of upper-division courses, or
2. 24 semester hours with 16 upper-division, or
3. 30 semester hours with 12 upper-division
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 110
COLLEGE of BUSINESS and
PUBLIC MANAGEMENT
Dean: Abe Helou
Associate Deans: Rita Thakur and Keeok Park
APPLIED BUSINESS SCIENCES &
ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT
Chairperson: Adham Chehab
Regular Faculty: Paul Abbondante, Mehdi Beheshtian-Ardakani, Adham Chehab, Yingxia Cao,
William J Hippler III, Yan Hu, Alicia Iriberri, Ahmed
Ispahani, David Kung, Dennis Kyte, Renee Miller,
Daehyun Moon, Yehia Mortagy, Claudio Muñoz,
Gonyung Park, Yibo Xiao, Julius Walecki
MANAGEMENT & LEADERSHIP
DEPARTMENT
Chairperson: Janat Yousof
Regular Faculty: Yeri Cho, Douglas Chun, Kathleen Duncan, Loren Dyck, Omid Furutan, Issam
Ghazzawi, Si Hyun Kim, Giancomo Laffranchini,
Byungku Lee, Susan MacDonald, Deborah Olson,
Carol Sawyer, Richard Simpson, Virgil Smith,
Yvonne Smith, Janat Yousof
MARKETING & LAW
DEPARTMENT
Chairperson: Robert Barrett
Regular Faculty: Gordon Badovick, Robert Barrett,
Susan Caple, Caroline Chizever, Janis Dietz, Greg
Fast, Christine Jagannathan, Jeanny Liu, Constance Rossum
PUBLIC & HEALTH
ADMINISTRATION DEPARTMENT
Chairperson: Keith Schildt
Regular Faculty: Kent Badger, Suzanne Beaumaster, Joan Branin, Marcia Godwin, Soomi Lee, Jack
Meek, Keith Schildt, Adrian Vazquez, Matt Witt, Kelly
Niles Yokum
College Mission. The College provides its students
with a broad-based management education that emphasizes the application of theory to management
practice and builds conceptual skills and core values
needed to become effective leaders and managers in
today’s rapidly changing global environment. In support of this, the College provides relevant curriculum
that capitalizes on the University’s liberal arts traditions, focuses on effective decision making, and emphasizes the knowledge, skills, and values needed in
a culturally diverse workplace. In addition, the College is committed to continuous quality improvement,
applied scholarly pursuits, and sharing resources with
the business, governmental, professional, and academic communities.
College Programs. The College offers undergraduate majors in Accounting, Business Administration
(with concentrations in Management, Information
Technology, International Business, and Marketing),
Economics, Health Administration, Organizational
Management, and Public Administration. In addition,
the College offers two interdepartmental majors in ECommerce and International Business & Language.
Minors in Business Administration, Economics,
Human Resources Management, and Marketing are
available for non-business majors.
Traditional-aged business students are advised to
participate in co-curricular activities related to business or other student governance and leadership
groups. Students may choose to augment on-campus education through job experience in work-study
and internship programs. Students are also strongly
encouraged to study abroad to broaden their horizons
while earning degree credit. All students are expected
to be proficient in word processing, spreadsheets,
electronic communications, and information retrieval
on the Internet.
At the graduate level, the College offers the Master of
Science in Accounting, Master of Business Administration (with concentrations in Accounting, Finance,
Health Services Management, Information Technology, International Business, Management and Leadership, Marketing, and Supply Chain Management),
Master of Health Administration (with concentrations
in Financial Management, Management and Leadership, and Marketing and Business Development),
Master of Public Administration (with concentrations
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 111
in Urban Management and Affairs, Policy, and NonProfit), Master of Science in Gerontology (with concentrations in Geriatric Care Management
Gerontology Administration, and Health Service Management), Master of Science in Leadership and Management (with concentrations in Human Resource
Management, Nonprofit Management, and Organizational Development), and Doctor of Public Administration. Graduate academic certificates are available in
the areas of concentration.
Core Accounting Requirements:
ACCT 301 Intermediate Accounting I
ACCT 302 Intermediate Accounting II
ACCT 307 Cost Accounting
ACCT 308 Federal Taxation I
ACCT 401 Auditing
ACCT 402 Advanced Accounting
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
Concentrations: Accounting students may pursue
a concentration listed under the B.S., Business Administration by satisfying all the requirements of the
B.S., Accounting and of the concentration.
Business Administration — B.S.
CENTRAL CAMPUS
UNDERGRADUATE
BUSINESS PROGRAMS
Accounting — B.S.
The Accounting Program develops an understanding
of the enterprise’s primary information system. It
builds on the conceptual, analytical and communication skills necessary to succeed in the business
world. It prepares students for careers in all areas
of accounting. All students are encouraged to take
BUS 101: Connect for Success (1 unit).
Prerequisites: All students are expected to be proficient in word processing, spreadsheets, electronic
communications, and information retrieval on the Internet. The following must be completed before enrolling in 300- or 400-level ACCT, BUS, ECON, or
MGMT courses:
ACCT 201 Fundamentals of Accounting I
(4)
ACCT 202 Fundamentals of Accounting II
(4)
BUS 200 Information Technology
(2)
BUS 242 Achieving Professional Success
(4)
BUS 270 Business Statistics
(4)
ECON 220 Economic Analysis I
(4)
ECON 221 Economic Analysis II
(4)
BUS 272 Intro. to Operations Management (4)
Core Business Requirements:
BUS 330 Business Finance
BUS 347 Legal Environment of Business
BUS 360 Principles of Marketing
BUS 456 Operations Management
BUS 496 Business Seminar
MGMT 300 Principles of Management
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
This program enhances the knowledge and effectiveness of students by linking theory with practice for a
successful career in business. The themes of critical
thinking, ethics, interpersonal skills, the impact of cultural differences on business practices, working in
group settings, and lifelong learning are woven
throughout the curriculum.
Prerequisites: Same as for Accounting — B.S.
Core Requirements:
BUS 330 Business Finance
(4)
BUS 343 Foundations of Business Ethics
(4)
BUS 347 The Legal Environment of Business (4)
BUS 360 Principles of Marketing
(4)
BUS 410 Management Information Systems (4)
BUS 456 Operations Management
(4)
BUS 496 Business Seminar
(4)
MGMT 300 Principles of Management
(4)
MGMT 459 Organizational Behavior: Theory
and Application
(4)
Starting with the fall of 2014, all entering students will
have to take BUS 330, BUS 360, BUS 390, and
MGMT 300 as a block in their junior year.
Electives or Concentration:
Three 300-400-level ACCT, BUS, ECON, and/or
approved MGMT courses
(4, 4, 4)
or one of the following concentrations:
Management Concentration: This concentration
studies theoretical foundations for understanding
how an organization is affected by its environment,
how employees are motivated to accomplish organizational goals, practical skills necessary for attracting, encouraging, and retaining human resources,
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 112
and successful interpersonal skills.
MGMT 356 Intro. to Organizational Theory
MGMT 455 Managing Human Resources
One of the following:
BUS 440 Entrepreneurship
MGMT 358 Culture and Gender Issues in
Management
MGMT 451 International Management
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
Information Technology Concentration: This concentration prepares students for successful careers
in Information Systems/Information Technology. It
also provides an overview and trend analysis for decision making.
CMPS 475 Systems Design Process
(4)
CMPS 490 Database Management Systems (4)
CMPS 368 Principles of Computer Networks, or
CMPS 369 Local Area Networks
(4)
BUS 416 Electronic Commerce
(4)
(programming recommended)
International Business Concentration: This concentration studies how international business practices and customs differ from those in the US.
BUS 466 International Marketing
(4)
ECON 325 International Economics
(4)
MGMT 451 International Management
(4)
Marketing Concentration: This concentration examines the tools and techniques used to determine
the needs of individuals or segments of society to
provide the most effective means of informing customers of the availability of goods and services, and
to deliver such goods and services.
BUS 368 Integrated Marketing
Communication, or
BUS 461 Marketing Management
(4)
BUS 464 Marketing Research
(4)
BUS 466 International Marketing
(4)
Economics — B.S.
Economics examines the difficult choices that society,
business enterprises, the public sector, and individuals must make to distribute resources. It also deals
with explaining and forecasting how an economy will
perform, and it provides analytical tools for determining the attractiveness of industries, markets and behaviors that will maximize profits.
Core Requirements:
BUS 330 Business Finance
(4)
BUS 410 Management Information Systems (4)
ECON 320 Intermediate Macroeconomics
(4)
ECON 321 Intermediate Microeconomics
(4)
ECON 323 Money and Banking
(4)
ECON 325 International Economics
(4)
ECON 327 Public Finance and Fiscal Policy
(4)
ECON 371 Econometrics
(4)
ECON 499 Senior Project
(4)
12 additional semester hours in 300-400 level
BUS, ECON, or approved MGMT courses (4, 4, 4)
E-Commerce — B.S.
This interdisciplinary program is jointly offered with the
Department of Mathematics, Physics, and Computer
Science, where the program description may be found
in this catalog.
International Business and
Language — B.S.
This interdisciplinary program is jointly offered with
the Department of Modern Languages. The program
is described in the Interdisciplinary Programs section of this catalog.
REGIONAL CAMPUSES
(INCLUDING CAPA)
UNDERGRADUATE BUSINESS
PROGRAMS
Undergraduate students enrolled in one of the Regional Campuses should inquire about program offerings at their location. Some programs offered at
specific locations are described below. All students
are expected to be proficient in word processing,
spreadsheets, electronic communications, and information retrieval on the Internet.
Prerequisites: Same as for Accounting — B.S.
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 113
Accounting — B.A.
(Available only at selected regional campuses.)
Prerequisites:
ACCT 201 Fundamentals of Accounting I
(4)
ACCT 202 Fundamentals of Accounting II
(4)
BUS 270 Business Statistics
(4)
BUS 274 Applied Quantitative Analysis
(4)
ECON 228 Economic Theories and Issues
(4)
Core Business Requirements:
BUS 330 Business Finance
(4)
BUS 347 The Legal Environment of Business (4)
BUS 360 Principles of Marketing
(4)
BUS 496 Business Seminar
(4)
MGMT 300 Principles of Management
(4)
Core Accounting Requirements:
ACCT 301 Intermediate Accounting I
ACCT 302 Intermediate Accounting II
ACCT 307 Cost Accounting
ACCT 308 Federal Taxation I
ACCT 401 Auditing
ACCT 402 Advanced Accounting
ACCT 414 Accounting Information Systems
Business Administration — B.A.
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(Available only at selected regional campuses.)
This program is designed to enhance the knowledge
and effectiveness of students by linking theory with
student’s work experience and industry practices for
a successful career in business. The themes of critical thinking skills, ethics, interpersonal skills, the impact of cultural differences on business practices,
learning to work in group settings and lifelong learning skills are woven throughout the program.
Prerequisites:
BUS 270 Business Statistics
BUS 274 Applied Quantitative Analysis
ECON 228 Economic Theories and Issues
(4)
(4)
(4)
Core Requirements:
ACCT 203 Financial & Managerial Accounting (4)
BUS 330 Business Finance
(4)
BUS 347 The Legal Environment of Business (4)
BUS 360 Principles of Marketing
(4)
BUS 410 Management Information Systems (4)
BUS 496 Business Seminar
(4)
MGMT 300 Principles of Management
(4)
MGMT 355 Leadership in Organizations
(4)
Electives: Two or more additional 300-400 level
ACCT, BUS, ECON, and/or approved MGMT
courses.
Concentrations: All concentrations listed under
the B.S., Business Administration at the central
campus are available through CAPA. At other campuses consult with the director about the availability
of concentrations.
Business Management — B.S.
(Available only at selected sites.)
This program focuses on the human capital as the
critical success factor to build a competitive edge for
business organizations. To enhance student’s personal and professional growth, the program is designed to provide in-depth understanding of all the
business disciplines. When appropriate, case study
approach is utilized to effectively communicate application of theories in real world situations. Students will enhance conceptual, interpersonal, and
analytical competencies required to succeed in managing today’s ever changing and diverse organizations.
Prerequisites:
BUS 270 Business Statistics
BUS 274 Applied Quantitative Analysis
ECON 228 Economic Theories and Issues
Core Requirements:
ACCT 203 Financial & Managerial Accounting
BUS 330 Business Finance
BUS 360 Principles of Marketing
MGMT 300 Principles of Management
BUS 347 Legal Environment of Business
MGMT 355 Leadership in Organizations
MGMT 454 Technology Based Operations
Management
MGMT 497 Strategic Management
Two of the following:
BUS 343 Foundations of Business Ethics
BUS 346 Written Business Communication
MGMT 354 Oral Communication in
Organization
MGMT 356 Intro. to Organizational Theory
MGMT 358 Culture and Gender Issues in
Management
MGMT 359 Management of Change and
Conflict
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 114
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
MGMT 451 International Management
MGMT455 Human Resources Management
MGMT 459 Organizational Behavior
Business Minor
(4)
(4)
(4)
The Business Minor is suitable for students planning
careers in any field where knowledge of business
would enhance their career opportunities, such as
journalism, behavioral science, law, and government.
Business Minors are not available to students majoring in undergraduate business programs.
Business Administration Minor
This minor is designed to give the student a broad
based introduction to all the major functions of a business enterprise (i.e., accounting, economics, finance,
management, and marketing).
Prerequisites: Proficiency in computer spreadsheets
before ACCT 203 and proficiency in descriptive statistics before BUS 330.
Core Requirements:
ACCT 203 Financial & Managerial Accounting
ECON 228 Economic Theories and Issues
BUS 330 Business Finance
MGMT 300 Principles of Management
BUS 360 Principles of Marketing
300-400-level elective in
Business Administration
Business Management Minor
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
This minor provides an overall view of the role and
function of human resources management and its importance to the success of business enterprise. It is
offered only to students whose majors are outside the
College of Business and Public Management.
Core Requirements:
MGMT 300 Principles of Management
MGMT 455 Managing Human Resources
MGMT 459 Organizational Behavior
Two of the following:
BUS 341 International Business
BUS 440 Entrepreneurship
(4)
(4)
(4)
MGMT 354 Oral Communication in
Organization
MGMT 356 Introduction to Organizational
Theory
MGMT 358 Culture and Gender Issues in
Management
MGMT 451 International Management
Economics Minor
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
The Economics minor is designed to provide students
with a broad-based introduction to the methods and
techniques of economic analysis. It is offered only to
students whose majors are outside the College of
Business and Public Management.
Core Requirements:
ECON 220 Economic Analysis I
ECON 221 Economic Analysis II
Five of the following:
ECON 320 Intermediate Macroeconomics
ECON 321 Intermediate Microeconomics
ECON 322 Current Economic Problems
and Opportunities
ECON 323 Money and Banking
ECON 324 Comparative Economic Systems
ECON 325 International Economics
ECON 327 Public Finance and Fiscal Policy
BUS 341 International Business
Marketing Minor
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
This minor provides a broad-based introduction to the
role and function of marketing in business. It is offered only to students whose majors are outside the
College of Business and Public Management.
Core Requirements:
BUS 360 Principles of Marketing
16 semester hours of upper-division
marketing courses
(4)
(4)
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 115
(4)
(4, 4, 4, 4)
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
IN BUSINESS
Graduate business programs at La Verne are designed for individuals with proven academic background and work experience along with high
probability of success in graduate study and in subsequent teaching, research, or professional careers.
All applications are reviewed carefully, based on the
following criteria:
1. A bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited
college or university.
2. A preferred GPA of 3.0 in the last 60 semester
hours of undergraduate work, including no lower
than a C grade in all prerequisite courses. Applicants with lower GPA’s may be required to
submit GMAT scores. The GRE may be substituted for the GMAT.
3. Two positive letters of recommendation, especially from business instructors or employers.
4. A current résumé and personal statement of purpose.
Students without a degree from an English-speaking
institution, where English is the primary language of
instruction and of the geographic area, must establish
minimal proficiency in English by accomplishing one
of the following: a TOEFL score of 550 or more, completion of ESL 112, a GRE verbal score of 400, satisfactory completion of La Verne’s English proficiency
test, or satisfactory completion of prerequisite courses
at La Verne as indicated by a placement examination.
All students are expected to be proficient in word processing, spreadsheets, electronic communications,
and information retrieval on the Internet.
Master of Science in Accounting
Program Director: Renee Miller
Mission:
The mission of the Master of Science in Accounting
(MACC) is to help students meet some of the requirements for the Certified Public Accountant licensure.
Also, the MACC aims to develop ethical and culturally
competent professionals in the accounting field.
Learning Goals
Upon the completion of the program, the student will
be able to:
1. Apply accounting standards, rules and regulations.
2. Utilize critical-thinking in solving accounting and
business problems.
3. Effectively communicate in diverse cultural and
organizational settings.
4. Research accounting and business problems
and generate new knowledge.
5. Demonstrate ethical and professional judgment.
Foundation Courses: 0-30 semester hours
The foundation courses a student must fulfill are determined by a review of the student’s undergraduate
coursework and professional experience. If foundation courses are needed, they should be among the
first courses taken. Undergraduate accounting
courses can be used to satisfy the following accounting foundation courses.
BUS 501 Corporate Accounting and Reporting I (3)
BUS 502 Corporate Accounting and Reporting II(3)
BUS 506 Auditing Standards and Practices
(3)
BUS 508 Federal Taxation Concepts and PracticesIndividual
(3)
BUS 508I Federal Taxation Concepts and PracticesIndividual
(3)
Students might be also be required to take the MBA
foundation courses, undergraduate business courses
can be used to satisfy these foundation courses:
BUS 500A
BUS 500B
BUS 500C
BUS 500D
BUS 500E
BUS 500F
Accounting Fundamentals
(3)
Economics for Decision Making
(3)
Quantitative and Statistical Analysis (3)
Business Finance
(3)
Business Management
(3)
Business Marketing
(3)
Total Program: 30 semester hours
ACCT 501 Financial Accounting Issues
ACCT 504 Corporate Taxation
ACCT 505 International Financial Reporting
Standards
ACCT 506 Forensic Accounting OR
BUS 509 Cost Accounting
ACCT 507 Accounting Decision Models
ACCT 508 Governmental and Not for Profit
Accounting OR
BUS 505 Accounting for Specialized
Accounting Entities
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 116
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
ACCT 543 Accounting Ethics and Professional
(3)
Responsibilities
ACCT 510 Advanced Auditing
(3)
ACCT 595 Accounting Research and
Communication
(3)
ACCT 596 Accounting Graduate Seminar
(3)
M.B.A. Preparatory Program
Program Director: Richard Simpson
This program provides coursework tailored to the
needs of international students who do not meet the
English proficiency entrance requirements for full
admission to the M.B.A. program. For further information contact the program director.
Master of Business Administration
Program Director: Richard Simpson
The M.B.A. provides a strong foundation in the traditional areas of business administration, the interrelationships among the various functional business
disciplines, and a broad exposure to the contemporary skills of management. Emphasis is on the development of skills necessary to manage in a critical,
rational, and effective manner within the complex
global environment. The program does not require
work experience or an undergraduate degree in business administration.
Students with professional experience and/or an undergraduate degree in business are also eligible.
Foundation Courses: 0-18 semester hours
The foundation courses a student must fulfill is determined by the chairperson’s review of the student’s undergraduate coursework and professional experience.
If foundation courses are needed, they should be
among the first courses taken.
BUS 500A Accounting Fundamentals
(3)
BUS 500B Economics for Decision Making
(3)
BUS 500C Quantitative and Statistical Analysis (3)
BUS 500D Business Finance
(3)
BUS 500E Business Management
(3)
BUS 500F Business Marketing
(3)
Total Program: 36 semester hours
Core Courses: 24 semester hours
BUS 503 Accounting Information for
Decision-Making
BUS 510 Management of Information
Technology
BUS 525 Economics of the Firm
BUS 530 Financial Management
BUS 551 Seminar in Organization Theory
and Behavior
BUS 560 Seminar in Marketing Management
BUS 575 Analysis of Business Operations
BUS 581 Managing in a Global Economy
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
Concentrations/Electives: 9 semester hours
Students may complete one of the concentrations
listed after the M.B.A., Experienced Professionals, or
the M.S., Leadership and Management, or they may
select 9 semester hours of electives from 500-level
BUS courses other than foundation courses.
Culminating Activity: 3 semester hours
BUS 596 Graduate Business Seminar
Master of Business Administration
for Experienced Professionals
(3)
Program Director: Richard Simpson
The Master of Business Administration for Experienced Professionals is designed to develop effective
future business leaders. The program is designed primarily for adult professionals with a minimum of three
years of full time professional experience with or without undergraduate business degrees. The curriculum
integrates management theory with real-world applications.
Prerequisite: A minimum of three years full-time professional experience. Students without a degree from
an English-speaking institution, where English is the
primary language of instruction and of the geographic
area, must establish minimal proficiency in English by
providing a TOEFL score of 560 or more.
Program Expectations: Entering students are expected to be able to utilize word processing, spreadsheets, electronic communications, and information
retrieval on the Internet; to have access to a personal
computer; to be able to apply mathematical skills for
solving basic economic and business problems; and,
to possess good oral and written communication
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 117
skills. The University offers courses to assist students
in obtaining these necessary competencies.
Foundation Courses: 0-15 semester hours
The foundation courses a student must fulfill is determined by the chairperson’s review of the student’s undergraduate coursework and professional experience.
If foundation courses are needed, they should be
among the first courses taken.
BUS 500A Accounting Fundamentals
(3)
BUS 500B Economics for Decision-Making
(3)
BUS 500C Quantitative and Statistical Analysis (3)
BUS 500D Business Finance
(3)
BUS 500F Business Marketing
(3)
Foundation courses can be waived, if the following
equivalent undergraduate courses were completed
at a regionally accredited college or university with a
grade of C or higher within the past seven years: Financial Accounting and Managerial Accounting for
BUS 500A; Microeconomics and Macroeconomics
for BUS 500B; Business Statistics for BUS 500C;
Principles of Finance for BUS 500D, and Principles
of Marketing for BUS 500F.
Total Program: 33 semester hours
Core Courses: 18 semester hours
BUS 615 Managing Technology
BUS 635 Managing Financial Resources
BUS 655 Designing Effective Organizations
BUS 665 Strategic Marketing Management
BUS 675 Management of Business Operations
BUS 685 Global Business Management
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
Electives and Concentrations:
12 semester hours
Each student can select a set of courses that addresses his or her career needs. Specific concentrations can be pursued or courses can be selected from
any 500-level BUS courses (other than foundation
courses). Concentrations require a minimum of four
courses (12 semester hours) that may include required core courses in the same discipline.
Culminating Activity: 3 semester hours
BUS 695 Strategic Management
(3)
Concentrations for the M.B.A. and M.B.A., Experienced Professionals: In addition to the concentrations listed below, students may pursue any of the
concentrations listed under the M.S., Management
and Leadership.
Accounting Concentration:
BUS 501 Corporate Accounting
and Reporting I
BUS 502 Corporate Accounting
and Reporting II
A minimum of two of the following:
BUS 503 Accounting Information for
Decision-Making
BUS 505 Accounting for Specialized
Accounting Entities
BUS 506 Auditing Standards and Practices
BUS 507 Government and Nonprofit
Accounting
BUS 508 Federal Taxation Concepts
and Practices
Finance Concentration:
BUS 530 Financial Management, or
BUS 635 Managing Financial Resources
A minimum of three of the following:
BUS 531 Investment and Portfolio Analysis
BUS 532 Management of Financial
Institutions
BUS 533 Investment Banking
BUS 534 Entrepreneurial Finance
BUS 536 International Financial
Management
BUS 538 Financial Strategy and Policy
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
Health Services Management Concentration
HSM 501 Current Trends and Issues in
Health Services
(3)
Three of the following:
HSM 520 Strategic Planning and Management
in HSOs
(3)
HSM 533 Mergers and Acquisitions
(3)
HSM 540 Legal Issues in Health
Services Organizations
(3)
HSM 555 Ethical Issues in Health Services (3)
HSM 571 Management of Clinical
and Financial Information
(3)
HSM 583 Marketing & Business Development (3)
HSM 598 Field Work/Internship
(3)
Information Technology Concentration:
BUS 510 Management of Information
Technology, or
BUS 615 Managing Technology
A minimum of three of the following:
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 118
(3)
BUS 511
BUS 512
BUS 513
BUS 515
BUS 516
BUS 517
Management Support Systems
Integrated Data Management
Information Networks
Systems Planning and
Implementation
E-Business
Cyber Law
International Business Concentration:
BUS 581 Managing in a Global Economy, or
BUS 685 Global Business Management
A minimum of three of the following:
BUS 516 E-Business
BUS 528 Contemporary Issues in
International Trade
BUS 536 International Financial Management
BUS 566 International Marketing
Management
Management and Leadership Concentration:
BUS 586 Leadership for the Future
BUS 551 Seminar in Organization Theory
and Behavior, or
BUS 655 Designing Effective Organizations
BUS 581 Managing in a Global Economy, or
BUS 685 Global Business Management
MGMT 522 Human Resource Management
Marketing Concentration:
BUS 560 Seminar in Marketing
Management, or
BUS 665 Strategic Marketing Management
A minimum of three of the following:
BUS 561 Seminar in Consumer Behavior
BUS 562 New Product Development
BUS 563 Marketing Channels/Distribution
BUS 564 Marketing Intelligence
BUS 566 International Marketing
Management
BUS 567 The Management and Marketing of
Services
BUS 568 Marketing Communications
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
Supply Chain Management Concentration:
BUS 575 Analysis of Business Operations, or
BUS 675 Management of Business Operations (3)
BUS 576 Supply Chain Management
and Strategy
(3)
BUS 577 Compliance Issues in Supply Chains (3)
A minimum of one of the following:
BUS 516
BUS 558
BUS 563
E-Business
Project Management
Marketing Channels/Distribution
Full-Time Master of Business
Administration
(3)
(3)
(3)
Program Director: Richard Simpson
The full-time M.B.A. program is designed to utilize a
dynamic, holistic, solution-based management learning to educate and facilitate the development of effective, ethical, and culturally competent business
leaders and managers.
La Verne achieves this mission by providing students
with ample opportunities to bridge the gap between
theory and practice and to help them develop professionally and personally. Students are placed in an internship for the duration of the program and have
opportunities to interact with local businesses for consulting opportunities. In their third and fourth terms,
students are required to apply their knowledge of various business disciplines to a real complex business
problem.
This immersive and integrative program is designed
primarily for young professionals who completed each
foundation course with a minimum of a C and who
maintained a GPA of 3.0 or better in the last sixty semester hours of their undergraduate studies. Students without a degree from an English-speaking
institution, where English is the primary language of
instruction and of the geographic area, must establish
minimal proficiency in English by providing an IBT
TOEFL score of 85 or its equivalent.
Foundation courses: 0-15 semester hours
All students are expected to have completed the
following foundation courses prior to the start of the
program in the fall term:
BUS 500A Accounting Fundamentals
(3)
BUS 500B Economics for Decision-Making
(3)
BUS 500C Quantitative and Statistical Analysis (3)
BUS 500D Business Finance
(3)
BUS 500E Business Management
(3)
BUS 500F Business Marketing
(3)
Foundation courses can be waived, if the following
equivalent undergraduate courses were completed
within the past seven years at a regionally accredited
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 119
college or university with a grade of C or higher: Financial Accounting and Managerial Accounting
(500A), Microeconomics and Macroeconomics
(500B), Business Statistics (500C), Principles of Finance (500D), Principles of Management (500E),
Principles of Marketing (500F).
Total Program: 45 semester hours
Fall Term
MBA 509
MBA 510
MBA 520
MBA 541
Managerial Accounting
Information Systems
Managerial Economics
Critical Thinking and
Communication
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
Fall II Term
MBA 580 Introduction to Hispanic Cultures
(3)
MBA 581 International Management
(3)
During this term, students travel with faculty to a foreign country to meet with business executives and
tour their facilities. During the first two terms, students will complete five modules in ethics, leadership, business law, innovation and cultural
competency.
Winter Term
The following courses delivered as an integrated
block:
MBA 530: Financial Management
(3)
MBA 560 Marketing Management
(3)
MBA 570: Operations Management
(3)
During this term, students consult with a local company to solve a complex business problem.
Spring Term
MBA 540 Ethical Leadership
MBA 561 Hispanic Consumer Behavior
MBA 562: Communication and Marketing
to Hispanic Consumers
(3)
(3)
(3)
Summer Term
The following courses delivered as an integrated
block:
MBA 550 Organizational Behavior and
Design
(3)
MBA 558 Project Management
(3)
MBA 590 Graduate Business Seminar
Concentration: The Hispanic Marketing Concentration is included in the above schedule.
HEALTH SERVICES
MANAGEMENT AND
GERONTOLOGY PROGRAMS
The curriculum in health services management is designed to prepare healthcare professionals for positions of increased responsibility in health and
health-related organizations. In the programs offered,
students will learn to (1) analyze problems with a
greater critical awareness, (2) apply sound methods of
statistical and financial control, and (3) utilize management techniques and manage contracts.
Health Administration — B.S.
(Available only at selected regional campuses.)
The B.S. in Health Administration is designed to prepare health industry personnel with the necessary
knowledge and skills to assume supervisory and midmanagement positions in health organizations.
Prerequisites:
HSM 201 Statistics
HSM 203 Accounting in Health Service
Organizations
(4)
(4)
Core Requirements:
HSM 401 Leadership and Management in
Health Services
(4)
HSM 405 Ethical and Legal Issues in
Health Services Management
(4)
HSM 407 Human Resources Management
in HSOs
(4)
HSM 409 Communications in Health Services
Organizations
(4)
HSM 411 Information Management in HSOs (4)
HSM 413 Quantitative and Qualitative
Decision-Making in Health Services
Organizations
(4)
HSM 415 Budgeting & Financial Management
in Health Services Organizations (4)
HSM 417 Economic, Social, and Political
Issues in Healthcare
(4)
HSM 496 Senior Seminar: Culminating
Program Summary
(4)
Electives: One course from the following:
HSM 301 Strategic Planning & Management
of Health Services Organizations (4)
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 120
HSM 303
HSM 305
HSM 309
HSM 381
Management of Change and
Conflict in HSOs
Management of Diversity in HSOs
Introduction to Gerontology
Introduction to Managed Care
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
Master of Health Administration — M.H.A.
Interim Program Director: Kathy Duncan
The Masters in Health Administration (MHA) is designed to provide the key competencies and specialized knowledge required of health services
professionals to manage effectively. Key competencies are developed in the core courses; specialized
knowledge and understanding are developed in the
concentrations.
Prerequisites: A bachelor’s degree in business, science, or liberal arts. Experience in the health services industry preferred. Healthcare internship
required if no health services industry experience.
HSM 593 Accounting for Healthcare
Decision-Making
(3)
Total program: 36 semester hours
Core Requirements:
18 semester hours from the following:
HSM 500 Management and Organizational
Theory and Practice
HSM 501 Current Trends and Issues
in Health Services
HSM 502 Financial and Cost Analysis
HSM 503 Healthcare Economics
HSM 504 Organizational Communications
HSM 555 Ethical Issues in Health Care
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
Research and Culminating Courses:
9 semester hours:
HSM 595 Organizational Research Methods (3)
HSM 596 Graduate Seminar, or
HSM 592 Thesis
(3)
Students who wish to write a thesis must take HSM
591, Organizational Research II, as one of their
electives.
Financial Management Concentration:
12 semester hours from the following:
HSM 502 Financial and Cost Analysis
A minimum of three of the following:
HSM 532
HSM 533
HSM 534
HSM 571
Budgeting and Cost Control
Mergers and Acquisitions
Program Evaluation
Management of Clinical and
Financial Information
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
Management and Leadership Concentration:
HSM 500 Management and Organizational
Theory and Practice
(3)
A minimum of three from the following:
HSM 520 Strategic Planning and
Management in HSOs
(3)
HSM 524 Personal Professional
Development
(3)
HSM 533 Mergers and Acquisitions
(3)
HSM 562 Human Resource Management
in HSOs
(3)
Marketing and Business Development
Concentration:
HSM 501 Current Trends and Issues in
Health Services
A minimum of three from the following:
HSM 520 Strategic Planning and
Management in HSOs
HSM 523 Management of Organizational
Innovation
HSM 540 Legal Issues in HSOs
HSM 583 Marketing and Business
Development
Certificate in Health Services
Management
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
Requirements: 18 semester hours
HSM 500 Management and Organizational
Theory and Practice
(3)
HSM 501 Current Trends and Issues in
Health Services
(3)
HSM 502 Financial and Cost Analysis
(3)
HSM 520 Strategic Planning and
Management in HSOs
(3)
HSM 533 Mergers and Acquisitions
HSM 590 Selected Topics
(1-3)
HSM 598 Fieldwork/Internship, or any other
HSM course
(3)
(3)
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 121
Certificate in Health Services Marketing
and Business Development
Requirements: 18 semester hours
HSM 501 Current Trends and Issues
in Health Services
HSM 520 Strategic Planning and
Management in HSOs
HSM 523 Management of Organizational
Innovation
HSM 532 Budgeting and Cost Control
HSM 583 Marketing and Business
Development
HSM 590 Selected Topics (1-3)
HSM 598 Fieldwork/Internship, or
any other HSM course
Certificate in Health Services
Financial Management
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
Requirements: 18 semester hours
HSM 520 Strategic Planning and Management
in HSOs
(3)
HSM 532 Budgeting and Cost Control
(3)
HSM 533 Mergers and Acquisitions
(3)
HSM 534 Program Evaluation in
Health Services
(3)
HSM 571 Management of Clinical and
Financial Information
(3)
HSM 590 Selected Topics
(1-3)
HSM 598 Fieldwork/Internship, or
any other HSM course
(3)
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
IN GERONTOLOGY
Interim Program Director: Kathy Duncan
The graduate program in Gerontology is multidisciplinary and views the training of gerontology professionals
from an integrative and developmental perspective.
The master’s degree program requires 36 semester
hours, with 12 semester hours in one of the following
concentrations: Geriatric Care Management, Gerontology Administration, or Health Services Management. The certificate program requires 18 semester
hours: 12 are core courses in gerontology, and the re-
maining 6 are selected from any of the five concentrations.
Gerontology — M.S.
Admission Requirements:
1. A bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited College or University
2. A preferred GPA of 2.75 in the last 60 semester hours of undergraduate course work.
Some applicants with lower GPA’s may be
admitted conditionally.
3. Two positive letters of recommendation.
4. A current resume and a personal statement.
Students without a degree from an English speaking
institution, where English is the primary language of
instruction and of the geographic area, must establish
minimal proficiency in English by accomplishing one
of the following: a TOEFL score of 550 or more, completion of ESL 112, a GRE verbal score of 400, satisfactory completion of La Verne’s English proficiency
test, or satisfactory completion of prerequisite courses
at La Verne as indicated by a placement examination.
All students are expected to be proficient in word processing, spreadsheets, electronic communications,
and information research and retrieval on the Internet.
Total Program: 36 semester hours
Core Courses: 15 semester hours
GERO 501 Professional Issues in Gerontology (3)
GERO 511 Social Policy, Health, and Aging
(3)
GERO 513 Legal, Ethical, and Financial Issues
in Aging
(3)
GERO 520 Physiological and Psychosocial
Aspects of Aging
(3)
GERO 571 Cognitive Aspects of Aging
(3)
Internship: 3 semester hours
GERO 592 Practicum in Geriatric Care
Management, or
GERO 598 Internship/Fieldwork
(3)
Electives: 12 semester hours or completion of any
of the concentrations listed below. Students who
wish to take GERO 594, Thesis, must take GERO
591, Organizational Research II as one of their
electives.
Research and Culminating Activity:
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 122
6 semester hours
GERO 595 Research Methods in Gerontology (3)
GERO 594 Thesis, or
GERO 596 Graduate Seminar
(3)
Concentrations:
Gerontology Administration
GERO 507 Organization of Older Adult
Services
(3)
Three of the following:
GERO 510 Marketing Services for Older Adults (3)
GERO 512 Managing Senior Services
(3)
HSM 502 Financial and Cost Analysis
(3)
HSM 562 Human Resource Management
in HSOs
(3)
Health Service Management
HSM 500 Management and Organizational
Theory and Practice
Three of the following:
HSM 501 Current Trends and Issues in
Health Services
HSM 502 Financial and Cost Analysis
HSM 503 Healthcare Economics
HSM 583 Marketing and Business
Development
Geriatric Care Management
GERO 509 Geriatric Case Management
Three of the following:
GERO 505 Fitness and Nutrition in Later Life
GERO 506 Housing Alternatives for Older
Adults
GERO 514 Geriatric Assessment
GERO 573 Legal and End-of-Life Issues
in Aging
Certificate in Gerontology
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
This multidisciplinary, graduate-level certificate is designed for professionals who want to specialize or
broaden their knowledge in gerontology. The admission requirements are the same as for M.S., Gerontology. The certificate program requires 18 semester
hours: 12 are core courses in Gerontology, and the
remaining 6 are selected from any of the five M.S.,
Gerontology concentrations. Courses completed in
the certificate with a grade of B or higher may be
transferred to the M.S., Gerontology program with the
approval of the program chair.
Certificate in Geriatric Care
Management
This graduate certificate prepares geriatric care managers to maximize the function and independence of
older adults residing in the community and facilitate
the delivery of health care and other services in the
most appropriate setting.
Requirements: 18 semester hours
Core Courses:
GERO 592 Practicum in Geriatric Care
Management
Five of the following:
GERO 505 Fitness and Nutrition in Later Life
GERO 506 Housing Alternatives for
Older Adults
GERO 509 Geriatric Care Management
GERO 513 Legal, Ethical and Financial Issues
In Aging
GERO 514 Geriatric Assessment
GERO 520 Physiological and Psychosocial
Aspects of Aging
GERO 571 Cognitive Aspects of Aging
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT
PROGRAMS
Organizational Management — B.S.
The mission of the BSOM program is to improve management, organizational, and interpersonal skills while
earning a bachelor’s degree. The program is constructed in two parts: The core requirements stress
general management, organizational, and interpersonal skills critical in a constantly changing environment, with a focus on immediate application in the
work setting, and include an opportunity for student
research. The second part of the program is a wide
range of electives from a variety of disciplines which
allows the student great flexibility to choose those
courses which best suit his or her career path.
Core Requirements:
BUS 343 Foundations of Business Ethics
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 123
(4)
MGMT 300 Principles of Management
MGMT 355 Leadership in Organizations
MGMT 358 Culture and Gender Issues in
Management
MGMT 360 Financial Management and
Budgeting
MGMT 388 Statistics
MGMT 459 Organizational Behavior: Theory
and Application
MGMT 496 Seminar in Management
Electives: Two from the following:
BUS 346 Written Business Communication
BUS 347 Legal Environment of Business
BUS 410 Management Information Systems
MGMT 354 Oral Communication in
Organizations
MGMT 356 Introduction to Organizational
Theory
MGMT 359 Management of Change and
Conflict
MGMT 390 Research Methods
MGMT 451 International Management
MGMT 455 Managing Human Resources
MGMT 458 Stress Management
Human Resources Concentration:
MGMT 455 Managing Human Resources
Two of the following:
BUS 347 Legal Environment of Business
MGMT 359 Management of Change and
Conflict
MGMT 457 Mediation
MGMT 458 Stress Management
SPCM 332 Interviewing Principles and
Practices
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
Leadership and Management — M.S.
Program Director: Kathy Duncan
This program emphasizes the human dimensions of
management. It is applicable where skills in change
management, leadership, and group dynamics are
demanded for professional effectiveness. The core
classes develop an essential managerial knowledge
base; students then customize the balance of the
coursework with either electives from one focused
concentration or a more generalized program of study,
selecting electives from any of the three concentrations. The capstone course, built upon two or three
required research courses, results in the research,
writing, and presentation of either a thesis or an applied research project. The MSLM program is a networked and mutually supportive community of
learners. Applications are reviewed on the following
criteria:
1. A bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited
college or university.
2. A preferred GPA of 2.75 in the last 60 semester
hours of undergraduate work. Some applicants
with lower GPA’s may be admitted conditionally.
3. Two positive letters of recommendation.
4. A current résumé and personal statement of purpose.
Students without a degree from an English speaking
institution, where English is the primary language of
instruction and of the geographic area, must establish
minimal proficiency in English by accomplishing one
of the following: a TOEFL score of 550 or more, completion of ESL 112, a GRE verbal score of 400, satisfactory completion of La Verne’s English proficiency
test, or satisfactory completion of prerequisite courses
at La Verne as indicated by a placement examination.
All students are expected to be proficient in word proc e s s i n g , s p r e a d s h e e t s , e l e c t r o n i c communications, and information research and retrieval on the
Internet.
Foundation Course: 0-3
Prerequisite knowledge of management is required.
Assessment of need is based on a review of undergraduate coursework.
The foundation course (MGMT 500) provides prerequisite knowledge and tools needed for those with insufficient background. If needed, MGMT 500 should
be among the first courses completed. Students who
earned an undergraduate degree in a management
field within the past seven years could be exempt from
taking MGMT 500.
MGMT 500 Management: Theory and Practice (3)
Total Program: 33 semester hours
Core Courses: 15 semester hours
MGMT 520 Leadership: Theory and Practice
MGMT 521 Ethics and Decision-Making
MGMT 522 Human Resource Management
MGMT 523 Organizational Theory and Design
MGMT 569 Conflict Management and
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 124
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
Organizational Change
(3)
Electives or Concentrations: 12 semester hours
Each student can select a set of courses that addresses his or her career needs. Courses can be selected from any 500-level MGMT courses (other than
foundation courses), or specific concentrations can be
pursued. Concentrations require a minimum of four
courses (12 semester units), that may include required core courses in the same discipline.
Human Resource Management Concentration:
MGMT 522 Human Resource Management
(3)
A minimum of three of the following:
MGMT 525 Management of Diversity
MGMT 526 Training and Development
MGMT 529 Seminar in Human Resource
Management
MGMT 554 Negotiations and Collective
Bargaining
Nonprofit Management Concentration:
MGMT 520 Leadership: Theory and Practice
A minimum of three of the following:
MGMT 530 Managing Nonprofits
MGMT 531 Marketing for Nonprofit
MGMT 532 Effective Fundraising
MGMT 533 Accounting and Compliance for
Nonprofits
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
Organizational Development Concentration:
MGMT 523 Organizational Theory & Design
(3)
A minimum of three of the following:
MGMT 525 Management of Diversity
MGMT 556 Building Partnerships; Creating
Coalitions
MGMT 559 Seminar in Organizational
Development
MGMT 582 Managing Groups and Teams
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
Research and Culminating Activity: 6 semester
hours
MGMT 586 Organizational Research I
(3)
MGMT 594 Thesis, or
MGMT 596 Graduate Seminar
(3)
Students who wish to write a thesis must take
MGMT 588, Organizational Research II, as one of
their electives.
Certificate in Organizational
Leadership
All courses in this program can apply to the M.S.
program, if desired. The admissions requirements
for the certificate are identical to those for the M.S.
program.
Requirements: 18 semester hours
MGMT 520 Leadership: Theory and Practice
MGMT 521 Ethics and Decision-Making
MGMT 523 Organizational Theory & Design
MGMT 569 Conflict Management and
Organizational Change
Two of the following:
MGMT 525 Management of Diversity
MGMT 556 Building Partnerships; Creating
Coalitions
MGMT 582 Managing Groups and Teams
MGMT 590 Selected Topics in Leadership
and Management
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
Certificate in Nonprofit Management
This program emphasizes the human dimensions
associated with leading and managing nonprofit organizations. All courses in this program can apply to
the M.S. program, if desired. The admissions requirements for the certificate are identical to those
for the M.S. program.
Requirements: 18 semester hours
MGMT 520 Leadership: Theory and Practice
MGMT 530 Managing Nonprofits
MGMT 531 Marketing for Nonprofits
MGMT 532 Effective Fundraising
MGMT 533 Accounting and Compliance
for Nonprofits
One MGMT course from M.S. Core Courses
Human Resource Management
Certificate
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
All courses in this certificate can apply to the M.S.
program, if desired. The admissions requirements
for the certificate are identical to those for the M.S.
program.
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 125
Requirements: 18 semester units:
MGMT 522 Human Resource Management (3)
MGMT 525 Management of Diversity
(3)
MGMT 526 Training and Development
(3)
MGMT 529 Seminar in Human
Resource Management
(3)
MGMT 554 Negotiations and
Collective Bargaining
(3)
One MGMT course from
M.S. Core Courses
(3)
PLSC 321 Political Parties and Interest
Groups
PADM 436 Policy-Making Process
PLSC 304 Contemporary Legal Issues
PLSC 311 Development of American
Democracy I
PLSC 312 Development of American
Democracy II
PLSC 375 Contemporary Political Theory
PLSC 378 American Political Thought
PLSC 407 Constitutional Law
PLSC 410 Congress and the Presidency
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION
PROGRAMS
Public Administration — B.S.
(Available only at selected regional campuses.)
The bachelor’s degree in Public Administration is an
academic and professional degree program offering
basic coursework in the theory, applications, and practice of public sector management. Experience in applying these skills will be gained through class
participation, special projects, and research reports.
Core Requirements:
PADM 313 Urban Environments
PADM 332 Public Administration
BUS 343 Foundations of Business Ethics
MGMT 388 Statistics
PADM 469 Management of Change and
Conflict
PADM 470 Administrative Processes
PADM 499 Senior Seminar
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
Electives: Students may take any combination of
three additional courses from either of the elective
areas below to meet their 40 semester hours in the
major.
Area 1: The Policy and Institutional Context of
Public Administration:
PADM 314 Local Public Administration
and Government, or
PLSC 416 State and Local Government and
Politics
(4)
PADM 320 Federalism and the Administrative
State, or
PLSC 301 American Government and
Politics, or
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
Area 2: The Organizational and Management
Context of Public Sector Administration:
BUS 346 Written Business Communication (4)
BUS 410 Management Information Systems (4)
MGMT 354 Oral Communication in Organization(4)
MGMT 459 Organizational Behavior:
Theory and Application
(4)
PADM 330 Labor/Management Negotiation
in the Public Sector
(4)
Master of Public Administration — M.P.A.
Program Director: Jack Meek
The mission of the Master of Public Administration
program is to offer an innovative and practical curriculum that stresses intellectual and theoretical foundations to professionals preparing to take on socially
responsible roles in public leadership and service.
The mission is achieved through a curriculum that emphasizes:
• The effective use of public resources
• The changing context (contextual nature) of public
administration
• Analytic and decision-making capacity
• The practice of public administration in diverse public organizations
• The ethical dimensions of public service
In adherence to our national accrediting body, the
M.P.A. program is additionally focused on the following competencies:
• To lead and manage in public governance;
• To participate in and contribute to the public policy
process;
• To analyze, synthesize, think critically, solve problems, and make decisions;
• To articulate and apply a public service perspective;
and
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 126
• To communicate and interact productively with a diverse and changing workforce and citizenry.
Admission: Evaluation of the applicant’s qualifications to pursue graduate studies is based on the applicant’s statement of purpose, professional
experience, college transcripts, and academic and
professional references. Applicants are evaluated by
a Faculty Admissions Committee that considers all
these measures, including commitment to public
and/or nonprofit service.
Admission Requirements:
• Official transcript from every undergraduate and
graduate institution attended
• A bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited
college or university
• A preferred GPA of 3.0 or above for the last 60
semester units of undergraduate study (minimum required GPA of 2.8) and a GPA of 3.0 for
any graduate study
• A 1-2 page statement of purpose that demonstrates:
1) the ability to write at an acceptable level
for graduate study,
2) experience and interest in public and/or
non-profit administration, and
3) how the La Verne MPA program compliments the student’s interests and professional goals in public service
• Two positive letters of recommendation discussing academic and/or professional qualifications from work supervisors, college professors,
and/or public service and professionals.
• A current résumé
Additional Requirements: Additional requirements,
if needed, may include but not limited to Graduate
Record Examination (GRE) and a personal interview
with the Director.
PADM 501 is to be completed the first term of study.
If not offered the first term, then it must be taken before the end of the second term of course work.
Total Program: 39 units
Core Courses: 27 units
PADM 501 Public Administration and Society
PADM 510 Public Management and
Leadership
PADM 531 Organizational Theory and
Development
(3)
(3)
(3)
PADM 533 Policy Formation
PADM 534 Budgeting and Fiscal Management
PADM 555 Ethics in Administration
PADM 561 Legal Environment of
Public Administration
PADM 582 Quantitative Methods for
Public Management
PADM 596 Graduate Seminar
Internship: 3 units
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
PADM 598, Public Service Internship (For students
without previous public, nonprofit, or service sector
experience). This requirement is in addition to the 39
units needed for the M.P.A.
Concentrations: Concentrations require a minimum
of 12 units. MGMT courses are not interchangeable
with PADM courses.
Urban Management and Affairs Concentration:
This concentration focuses on developing skills in
managing in urban metropolitan environment.
Required Course:
PADM 570: Urban and Community Politics
(3)
And three of the following:
PADM 538 Collaborative Public Management (3)
PADM 572 Managing Complex Systems
(3)
PADM 586 Economics of the Public Sector
(3)
PADM 587 Managing Sustainable Communities (3)
Policy Concentration:
This Concentration focuses on developing analytic
skills necessary to communicate meaningful interpretation and processes that address or impact social
problems.
Required Course
PADM 536 Policy Analysis
And three of the Following:
PADM 528 Program Evaluation
PADM 539 Special Topics in Public Policy
PADM 586 Economics of the Public Sector
PADM 580 Applied Policy Research
Non-Profit Concentration:
MGMT 531 Marketing for Non-Profit
MGMT 537 Managing Non-Profit
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 127
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
MGMT 532 Effective Fundraising
MGMT 533 Accounting and Compliance
for Non-Profits
JD/MPA Dual Degree Program:
(3)
(3)
Required Courses: 9 MPA core Courses (27 units)
MPA electives/Law classes: 4 classes (12 units)
Law classes are reviewed for acceptance; students
may request to transfer up to 12 law units toward the
JD/MPA dual degree.
Doctor of Public Administration — D.P.A.
Program Director: Suzanne Beaumaster
The Doctor of Public Administration is designed to develop scholarly practitioners as leaders. Students
learn to consciously integrate and apply current theoretical, moral, and institutional perspectives that contribute to the disciplined analysis and resolution of
organizational and community issues.
Prerequisites: Applicants should possess a master’s
degree, ideally in Public Administration or a closely related field. Applicants must also have a minimum of
five years of work experience.
Admission: Applicants are evaluated in a two stage
process: First stage applicants are initially screened
based on undergraduate GPA, graduate GPA, Statement of Purpose and letters of recommendation. Applicants advancing to the second stage will be
required to schedule a personal interview. A standardized test score (eg. GMAT or GRE) may be required,
if recommended by the Faculty Admissions Committee. The department considers all of these measures
in making a decision on admission. Students accepted into the D.P.A. Program will begin their coursework in the Fall Term.
PADM 609
PADM 611
PADM 612
PADM 610
PADM 613
PADM 677
Nature of Inquiry
Scope of PA
Qualitative Analysis
Constitutional Foundations
Quantitative Analysis
Ethics and Decision Making
Second Year (Two Courses per Term)
PADM 665 Economic Perspectives in
Administrative and Policy Analysis
PADM 651 Policy
PADM 667 Urban Theory and Governance
PADM 674 Program Evaluation and
Performance Measurement
PADM 664 Public Sector Collaboration
PADM 620 Organizational Development
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
The DPA comprehensive exam will be taken after successfully completing the second year coursework.
Third Year (Two Courses per Term)
PADM 670 Dissertation Seminar
PADM 668 Civic Engagement I
PADM 686 Research Specialization I
PADM 669 Civic Engagement II
PADM 687 Research Specialization II
PADM 688 Research Specialization III
Dissertation Units: 1-22 units
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
Students must be continuously enrolled in either Dissertation 1 or 2 coursework until they have successfully completed their dissertation and it has been
posted.
Post Coursework Terms 10-12
PADM 697C Dissertation I
Post Coursework Terms 13 - 24
PADM 697D Dissertation II
Total Program: 55 units minimum
The program requires a minimum time commitment of
three years of coursework which includes six units
each term. After successfully completing coursework
students are required to produce and defend a dissertation of publishable quality.
Program Coursework: 54 units
First Year (Two Courses per Term)
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 128
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(2)
COLLEGE of EDUCATION
AND ORGANIZATIONAL
LEADERSHIP
Interim Dean: Barbara Poling
EDUCATION AND TEACHER
DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT
Chairperson: Lynn Stanton-Riggs
Endowed Chair: Margaret Redman
Regular Faculty: Darren Avrit,1 Cindy Giaimo-Ballard, Valerie Beltran, Ingrid Carruth, Cindy Cary, Jessica Decker, Julie Elvin,1 Anita Flemington,
Cleveland Hayes, Lisa Hill,1 Denise Kennedy, Judy
Krause, Marga Madhuri, Mark Matzaganian, Lanney
Mayer,1 Cindy Olivas, David Perry, Donna Redman,
Justin Saldaña, Joy Springer,1 Gary Stiler,1 Robert
Wakeling, Nancy Walker, Susan Walsh,1 Naomi
Watkins, Michael Woessner
Adjunct Faculty: Carolyn Angus,1 Cynthia
Bogan,1Linda Caputo, Nancy Dunn,1 Jessica Lingenfelter,1 Karen Miller,1 Sallie Phillips,1 Ann Raymond
Regional Campus faculty
1
CHILD DEVELOPMENT
PROGRAM
Child Development — B.S.
Program Chairperson: Lynn Stanton-Riggs
Full-time Faculty: Cindy Cary, Cindy Giaimo-Ballard, Denise Kennedy, Judy Krause, Cindy Olivas,
Lynn Stanton-Riggs, Susan Walsh
The Child Development Major is designed for students planning careers in early childhood education
in public or private schools, and/or social service
agencies. It focuses on studies of the growth and development of children in relation to the family, school,
and community. The Child Development Major is designed as a complete four-year program at La Verne,
but it also complements community college programs
in Early Childhood Education. The degree requires a
minimum of 52 semester hours in the major of which
at least 24 must be at the upper-division level. Progression through the program requires assessment;
advisors review assessment requirements with students when they enter the program.
Prerequisites:
WRT 110 College Writing A
WRT 111 College Writing B
EDUC 251 Curriculum Development for
Early Childhood Education
EDUC 253 Child, Family, and Community
Admission Requirements:
• A GPA of 2.5 or more in college coursework
• Clear fingerprints
• Interview with Child Development faculty
• Assessment of writing ability
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
Graduation Requirements:
1. Application for graduation
2. Developmental Knowledge Exam and Supervisor Evaluation Form
3. Completion of specific assessments and
Taskstream submissions required by the College
4. Graduation Clearance from Registrar’s office
Core Requirements:
EDUC 350 Child Psychology & Development
EDUC 352 Writing for Child Development
EDUC 354A Child Observation/Practicum
EDUC 354B Assessment in Early Childhood
EDUC 445 Adult Supervision and
Communication Skills
EDUC 448 Math for Young Children
EDUC 449 Early Childhood Literacy
EDUC 451 Infant/Toddler Development,
Group Care and Curriculum
EDUC 452 Parenting Theory in
Cultural Contexts
EDUC 453A Supervision and Administration
of Programs for Young Children
EDUC 453B Advanced Supervision and
Administration of Programs for
Young Children
EDUC 454P Early Childhood Teaching
EDUC 499 Senior Project
SPED 455 Introduction to Early Childhood
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 129
(4)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
Special Education: Policies and
Practices
(4)
Recommended Courses:
EDUC 252 Childhood Environments:
Culture, Education and Media
(4)
EDUC 402 Experiencing an International
Culture: Discovering the History,
Educational Philosophies and Ethics(4)
EDUC 444 Adolescent Development and
Education
(1)
EDUC 470 Theories and Methods of Education
for Linguistically Diverse Students (4)
Child Development Minor
Core Requirements:
EDUC 251 Curriculum Development for
Early Childhood Education
EDUC 253 Child, Family, and Community
EDUC 350 Child Psychology & Development
EDUC 354A Child Observation/Practicum
EDUC 354B Assessment in Early Childhood
EDUC 445 Adult Supervision and
Communication Skills
EDUC 454P Early Childhood Teaching
One of the following:
EDUC 451 Infant/Toddler Development,
Group Care and Curriculum
EDUC 452 Parenting Theory in
Cultural Contexts
EDUC 453A Supervision and Administration
of Programs for Young Children
(4)
(4)
(4)
(2)
(2)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
MASTER OF EDUCATION
PROGRAM
Program Chairperson: Valerie Beltran
Education (Special Emphasis) — M.Ed.
This program is designed for students wishing to develop their own programs to meet special needs. It
is practical in nature and culminates in a project or
paper structured to help teachers improve their instructional and leadership abilities.
Admission Requirements: In addition to the requirements and application materials listed in the
Graduate Admission section of this catalog, three
positive references, passing a writing assessment,
and internet access are required.
Core Courses: 9 semester hours
EDUC 501 Educational Assessment
EDUC 504 Methods of Research
EDUC 590 Issues in Teaching
(3)
(3)
(3)
Culminating Activity: 3 semester hours
EDUC 594 Thesis, or
EDUC 596 Graduate Seminar
(3)
Area of Concentration: 21 semester hours selected from established courses and independent
studies.
Teaching Credential/Master of Education Program.
The Multiple Subject or Single Subject Teaching
Credential may be earned as part of the M.Ed., Education (Special Emphasis). See the M.Ed., Education (Special Emphasis) chairperson for
information.
Education: Advanced Teaching Skills
— M.Ed.
This program is designed to provide classroom teachers the opportunity to develop greater understanding
of student needs and characteristics, curriculum and
instructional decision-making, and collaborative peer
interaction.
Total Program: 33 semester hours
Core Courses: 9 semester hours
ASCD 503 Educational Psychology
EDUC 501 Educational Assessment
EDUC 504 Methods of Research
Area of Concentration: 21 semester hours
ASCD 558 Cognition and Brain Development
EDLD 578 School Law
EDUC 575 Teaching Strategies for Diverse
Student Populations
EDUC 576 Teacher Leadership
EDUC 588 Curriculum Development and
Instructional Technology
EDUC 590 Issues in Teaching
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 130
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
SPED 505 Advanced Positive Behavior Support:
(3)
Theory and Practice
Culminating Activity: 3 semester hours
EDUC 594 Thesis, or
EDUC 596 Graduate Seminar
(3)
Teaching with Technology Certificate
Prerequisite:
EDUC 407 Learning Technology for Educators (4)
Requirements: 12 semester hours
EDTC 510 New Learning Technologies
EDTC 511 Online Instructional Design
EDTC 512 Learning Management Systems
EDTC 513 Online Teaching Practicum
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM
Program Chairperson: Anita Flemington
Earning a multiple or single subject credential takes
several steps. Following entry into La Verne’s teacher
education program, students must successfully complete teaching methodology courses and fieldwork.
Candidates then must be accepted for student teaching, which includes courses as well as 15 weeks of inclassroom training, completed in two segments.
The multiple and single subject credential teacher
preparation programs address teaching strategies for
all students in California schools. Integrated throughout the programs are methodologies to deliver comprehensive instruction to English learners and to work
with special populations in the general education
classroom. This replaces the program formerly known
as the CLAD credential.
Admission Requirements:
• Application and personal interview
• Writing competency sample
• Statement of Purpose
• TB clearance
• Verification of taking CBEST by submitting score
report
• Application for Certificate of Clearance or copy
of Substitute Teaching Permit
• Transcript(s) indicating 90 semester hours or
more toward B.A./B.S. at time of application
• GPA of 2.75 overall and 3.0 in the major
• Internet access
• Verification of CSET registration or Subject Matter Competency Program Waiver
Core Requirements:
EDUC 460 Diversity, Interaction, and the
Learning Process
(3)
EDUC 468 Introductory Supervised Teaching (3)
EDUC 470 Theories and Methods of Education
for Linguistically Diverse Students (4)
EDUC 472 Teaching Strategies
(3)
EDUC 478 Advanced Supervised Teaching
(6)
SPED 457 Introduction to Exceptional
Individuals and Their Families
(3)
Multiple Subject Candidates only:
EDUC 462 Literacy Methods for
Multiple Subject Candidates - I
EDUC 464 Literacy Methods for
Multiple Subject Candidates - II
EDUC 474 Teaching in the Content Areas—
Multiple Subject
(3)
(3)
(4)
Single Subject Candidates only:
EDUC 475 Foundations and Introduction to
Teaching Single Subject
(3)
EDUC 476 Teaching in the Content Area for
Single Subject Candidates
(4)
*Must enroll in your content area
(EDUC 476A: Math; EDUC 476B: English; EDUC
476C:Science; EDUC 476D:History; EDUC
476E:Physical Education; EDUC 476F: Music;
EDUC 476G: Spanish; EDUC 476H:Art)
Student Teaching Program Prerequisites:
Student teaching candidates must complete an application and be accepted into the program with the
following:
For Introductory Supervised Teaching, EDUC 468:
• Certificate of Clearance or equivalent fingerprint
clearance
• Demonstration of personal characteristics necessary for teaching (as outlined by La Verne’s Education Department)
• Passing score on the CBEST
• Verification of Subject Matter
Competence as defined by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing:
*Candidates with low undergraduate GPA’s who have completed
subject matter competence programs may appeal to waive the
state mandated examination(s) if they maintain a 3.5 GPA in ULV’s
Teacher Preparation Program.
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 131
1.
•
•
•
•
•
CSET (California Subject Examinations for
Teachers) for Multiple Subject Candidates
2. CSET or completion of a state approved
program with a minimum GPA of 3.0 in the
major* and 2.75 overall for Single Subject
Candidates
Passing score of 3 or higher on the writing competency assessment (ADD)
Acceptance by the Teacher Education faculty
GPA of 3.0 or better in pre-student teaching
courses
A grade of B or better in each pre-student teaching course
Passing score on TPA #1
For Advanced Supervised Teaching, EDUC 478:
• All prerequisites required for EDUC 468
• Passing the Reading Instruction Competency
Assessment (RICA). (Multiple Subject only)
• Verification of Subject Matter Competence as
defined by the California Commission on
Teacher Credentialing:
1. CSET (California Subject Examinations for
Teachers) for Multiple Subject Candidates
• US Constitution course or passing test score
• Speech course or verification
• EDUC 407 Learning Technology for Educators
• Health Education/Nutrition/Drug Prevention/
Sexually Transmitted Diseases Course
• Completion of all core courses except for SPED
457, which may be taken concurrently with
EDUC 478
• CPR for adults, infants and children
• Passing Score on TPA #1 and #2
Enhanced Intern Credential. If a student has successfully completed the constitution requirement,
EDUC 460 and EDUC 470, and subject matter competence, and also has a contract in a public school,
he/she will be eligible for an enhanced intern credential.
Teacher Performance Assessments. The California
Teacher Assessment Program (TPA) provides teacher
candidates with the opportunity to demonstrate
achievement of the teaching performance expectations. Each of the four required TPAs is embedded in
coursework as follows:
• EDUC 460/470 TPA: Subject Specific Pedagogy
• EDUC 472 TPA: Designing Instruction
• EDUC 474/476 TPA: Assessing Learning
• EDUC 478 TPA: Culminating Teaching Experience
Preliminary Credential Application Requirements. To apply for a Preliminary or Level I Credential, candidates must have:
• Maintained a GPA of 3.0 or better in EDUC
classes
• Received a B or better in EDUC 468 and EDUC
478
• Completed a bachelor’s degree from a regionally
accredited college or university
• Completed field work or teaching experience
with students from at least age two and ability
levels during the program
• Completed an “Application for Credential” packet
• Completed CPR Certification for Adults, Infants,
and Children
• Passed all required TPAs
• Passed the RICA (Multiple Subject only)
Clear Credential Application Requirements:
To apply for a Professional Clear or Level II Credential, candidates must have completed the following
within five years of the issuance date of their Preliminary Credential:
• a two-year induction program in a school district
• a Level II computer class
Bilingual Authorization
Program Chairperson: Justin Saldaña
The requirements of the single or multiple subject
BCLAD Emphasis teaching credential are the same
as for the CLAD Emphasis teaching credential except
that, in the BCLAD, Spanish language proficiency
equivalent to or higher than test six for BCLAD, and
EDUC 413 must be completed prior to student teaching.
EDUC 413 Methodology for Primary Language
Instruction in a Bilingual Environment
(Spanish)
(4)
Teaching Credential/Master of Education Program. The Multiple Subject or Single Subject Teaching Credential may be earned as part of the M.Ed.,
Education (Special Emphasis). See the Education
Department Chairperson for information.
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 132
California Teachers of English
Learners (CTEL) Certificate
Program Chairperson: Justin Saldaña
This program is designed for credentialed teachers
who wish to acquire the Cross-Cultural, Language,
and Academic Development (CLAD) certificate. Applicants must possess a valid California Teaching Credential.
Required courses: 12 semester hours
EDUC 470 Theories and Methods of Education
for Linguistically Diverse Students (4)
EDUC 519 Language and Literacy
Development for English
Language Learners
(4)
EDUC 561 Cultural Diversity
(4)
Liberal Studies — B.A.
Program Chairperson: Donna Redman
This major provides students with subject matter
preparation for the Multiple Subject Teaching Credential and California Subject Examination for Teachers
(CSET). It also prepares students with content knowledge for the K-6 classroom. Fieldwork and/or observation may be required in any of the courses and will
vary in required number of hours.
Core Requirements: 44 Semester Hours
EDUC 306 Writing for Educators
EDUC 310 Foundations in Education
EDUC 325 The Integration of Literature and
Writing in the Classroom
EDUC 330 Instructional Approaches to
Physical Education
EDUC 349 Visual and Performing Arts for the
Elementary Teacher
EDUC 350 Child Psychology and
Development
EDUC 385 Teaching K-8 Social Studies
EDUC 389 Instructional Approaches to
Mathematics
EDUC 390 Science for the Elementary
Teachers
EDUC 407 Learning Technology for Educators
EDUC 499 Senior Seminar
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
Concentration (optional): 12 upper division semes-
ter hours.
Completion of an approved concentration in one of the
following areas: English, Fine Arts, Human Development, Languages and Literature, Mathematics, Modern Languages, Movement and Sports Science,
Natural and Social Sciences.
Liberal Studies Minor
Fieldwork and/or observation may be required in any
of the courses and will vary in required number of
hours.
Core Requirements:
EDUC 306 Writing for Educators
(4)
EDUC 310 Foundations of Education
(4)
EDUC 407 Learning Technology for Educators (4)
EDUC elective approved by advisor
(4)
EDUC 499D Senior Seminar
(4)
ADVANCED STUDIES IN
EDUCATION AND HUMAN
DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT
Chairperson: Laurie Schroeder
Regular Faculty: Jackie Allen, Kathy Elderson, Patricia Ensey, John Gruenewald, Robert Hansen,
Thierry Kolpin, Lisa Looney, Bettye Messick, Rita
Marinoble, Adonay Montes, Barbara Nicoll, Carol
Oberg, Janice Pilgreen, Veronica Runnels, Janet
Trotter, Patricia Taylor, Dawn Witt, Leslie Ann Young
Adjunct Faculty: Sam Bouman, Janeane Dimple,
Barbara Fraley, Michelle Parker, Patricia Whitman,
Madeline Patane, Lori Kezos, Kathie Spaun, Devon
Monson, Robyn Ferguson
Child Development — M.S.
Program Chairperson: Barbara Nicoll
Regular Faculty: Barbara Nicoll, Lisa Looney
This program is intended for those professionals and
supervisors in the field of child development who wish
to increase their understanding of the physical, intellectual, social and emotional development of children.
It emphasizes the study of children and the theories
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 133
and issues concerned with growth and development
in early childhood. This degree will enable a student
to qualify to teach in a California community college.
Each course in the program is offered both on campus
in face-to-face format and online. Courses in both delivery modes are identical in content and rigor and are
offered on the semester schedule. Students enrolled
in the program have the option of taking face-to-face
courses, online courses, or a combination of the two.
Prerequisites: A bachelor’s degree from a regionally
accredited institution of higher learning that includes
the following courses: Child Psychology and Development, Early Childhood Curriculum, Practicum or
Field Work, and Early Childhood Program Management. Experience working in early childhood settings
is also desirable.
Admission Requirements: La Verne’s graduate
admission requirements and the following:
1. An undergraduate GPA of 2.75 or above with a
GPA of 3.0 or above in the last 60 semester hours
and in Early Childhood or Childhood Development
courses.
2. A statement of purpose that includes a description
of work experience related to young children, a
clear statement of short term and long term professional goals, a description of why this particular
M.S. is wanted, and a statement about what the
student expects to do professionally after receiving the degree.
3. An interview with the program chair.
4. A writing assessment with the program chair
Total Program: 33 semester hours
Advancement to Candidacy requires the completion
of 21 semester hours, an application for graduation,
and the completion of specific assessments required
by the College’s assessment system
Core Courses: 9 semester hours
ASCD 503 Educational Psychology
ASCD 504 Methods of Research
ASCD 550 Human Development
Area of Concentration: 18 semester hours
ASCD 518 Language, Reading, and
Concept Development
ASCD 551 Studies in Attachment
ASCD 556 Assessment in Early Childhood
ASCD 557 Teaching Adults
ASCD 558 Cognition and Brain Development
ASCD 559 Developmental Curriculum
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
Electives: 3 semester hours of courses selected
on the advice of the program chairperson.
Culminating Activity: 3 semester hours
ASCD 596 Graduate Seminar
Child Life — M.S.
(3)
Program Chairperson: Leslie Anne Young
Adjunct Faculty: Michelle Parker
This program prepares individuals for careers working with children from birth through adolescence, who
are medically fragile, hospitalized, or placed in community healthcare facilities because of illness, injury,
or specialty needs. While working with other healthcare professionals providing medical care, the child
life specialist helps child and adolescent minimize
anxiety, maintain relationships with their families, and
retain their independence and self-esteem. The child
life specialist is a clinical educator who provides developmental interventions to help patients and families
understand and cope with traumatic experiences always respecting diversity and the family system. All
M.S., Child Life Courses are taught by a Certified
Child Life Specialist and are designed, implemented
and evaluated according to the specific clinical and
academic standards set forth by the national Child Life
Council.
Admission Requirements for Child Life Masters
and Child Life Certificate:
1. A personal interview (in-person interview for
local students; by telephone for non-local students; by email interview for international students. This interview must be successfully
completed before any other application materials will be accepted.
2. In addition to the requirements and application
materials listed in the Graduate Admission section of this catalog, the following are required:
a. An overall GPA of 2.75 or above with a required GPA of 3.0 or above for the last 60
semester units of undergraduate study. A
GPA of 3.0 for any graduate study.
b. 3 letters of reference, one personal, one
educational, and one professional
c. A professional résumé
d. A written letter of intent/purpose that includes a clear statement of short-term and
long-term professional goals and explains
the applicant’s motivation in seeking ad-
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 134
e.
mission to the program.
English and writing assessment
Prerequisites for admission to the M.S., Child Life
Program and to complete a Child Life Certificate:
1. 15 semester hours or 5 courses in Child Development or related fields approved by the M.S.,
Child Life Chairperson.
2. 1 to 2 years of professional work experience in
educational institutions or related institutions approved by the M.S., Child Life Chairperson.
3. In-hospital visitation by the prospective candidate.
4. Completion of the pre-admission questions.
Total Program: 36 semester hours for M.S.
30 semester hours for Child Life Certificate
Core Courses:
ASCL 504
Research Methods
(3)
ASCL 530
Child Life Administration and
Program Development
(3)
ASCL 530A Multi-Cultural Family
Centered Care
(3)
ASCL 530C Outreach and Technology for the
Child Life Educators
(3)
ASCL 530H Effects of Disease and Injury on
the Hospitalized Child-Part A
(3)
ASCL 530I
Child Life Assessment,
Preparation and Medical
Terminology
(3)
ASCL 530M Helping Children Cope in the
Health Care and Medical Setting (3)
ASCL 530S Developmental Issues of Grieving (3)
ASCL 530T Pediatric Educational and
Therapeutic Interventions
(3)
ASCL 553F Child Life Internship I
(3)
ASCL 553P Child Life Internship II
(3)
Culminating Activity: 3 semester hours
ASCL 596 Graduate Seminar
Child Life Specialist — Certificate
(3)
This program prepares individuals for careers working with medically fragile and hospitalized children
from birth through adolescence. The child life specialist helps children minimize anxiety while undergoing
medical treatment through varied educational, coping,
and therapeutic interventions. Candidates who complete the 30 semester hours of Core Courses for the
M.S., Child Life Program are eligible for the certificate.
Completion of the M.S., Child Life is not required to
earn the certificate.
EDUCATIONAL COUNSELING
PROGRAM
Educational Counseling — M.S.
Program Chairperson: Laurie Schroeder/ Adonay
Montes
Regular Faculty: Kathy Elderson, John
Gruenewald, Robert Hansen, Thierry Kolpin, Rita
Marinoble, Adonay Montes, Laurie Schroeder, Janet
Trotter
Students
successfully
completing
program
requirements can obtain an M. S. in Educational
Counseling. Students have four options:
Educational Counseling — M.S., a 46 unit master’s
degree, preparing qualified candidates to serve in
community based organizations or colleges.
Educational Counseling — M.S. with Pupil Personnel
Services Credential (PPS), a 48 unit master’s degree
and credential, which has been approved by the
California Commission on Teacher Credentialing and
prepares qualified candidates to become professional
school counselors in grades K-12.
Educational Counseling — M.S. with Pupil Personnel
Services Credential (PPS) with a concentration in
School and Family Based Counseling (SFBC), a 60
unit master’s degree and credential which satisfies the
educational requirements of the Board of Behavioral
Sciences toward the Licensed Professional Clinical
Counselor (LPCC) and prepares qualified candidates
for the PPS credential.
Educational Counseling — M.S. with Pupil Personnel
Services Credential (PPS) with a concentration in
Spanish Bilingual Bicultural Counseling (SBBC), a 57
unit master’s degree and credential which uniquely
prepares qualified candidates for working with
Latina/o students in California schools.
Admission Requirements for the degree and
credentials: In addition to the requirements and
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 135
application materials listed in the Graduate Admission
section of this catalog, the following are required:
1. A 2.75 or above for the last 60 semester hours or
the last 90 quarter hours of the undergraduate
GPA and a 3.0 cumulative GPA for any graduate
work. Those who demonstrate academic and
professional promise but do not meet the
preferred GPA may be admitted with stipulations
required
by
the
department,
including
prerequisites.
2. Possession of ONE of the following:
a. A bachelor’s degree in a behavioral science
b. A valid teaching credential with a minimum of
one year of full-time classroom teaching
experience
c. Successful coursework or experience
demonstrating basic knowledge of general
psychology, human learning and development,
and human behavior.
3. A completed Statement of Purpose that includes
an autobiography and explains the applicant’s
motivation in seeking admission to the program.
Applicants without prior teaching experience are
strongly encouraged to have at least one year of
volunteer or paid experience working with children
or adolescents. The experience should be detailed
in the Statement of Purpose and demonstrate an
ability to write at an acceptable level for graduate
study.
4. Three letters of reference addressing the
candidate’s potential in the field of educational
counseling. One must be from the candidate’s
immediate supervisor.
5. A personal interview with the program chair or
designated faculty member.
6. A passing score on the CBEST, the CCTCapproved Basic Skills Examination, is an
admissions requirement for candidates pursuing
the PPS Credential. Candidates pursuing the
master’s degree only are not required to pass the
CBEST.
7. Evidence of a Certificate of Clearance or a valid
teaching credential issued by the California
Commission on Teaching Credentialing must be
on file with the University before entrance into
the program.
8. TB clearance
Additional Requirement:
By the completion of PPS 572 and prior to entering
PPS 583A, candidates must demonstrate
dispositional competence for the school counseling
program.
NOTE: Maximum course load is 8 units per
semester or term; all exceptions must be approved
by the program chair.
Educational Counseling candidates are advised to
be mindful that each required course will be offered
at least once a year, but candidates need to plan the
sequence with their advisor to ensure it matches the
availability of courses.
Educational Counseling — M.S
Core Courses: 46 semester hours
ASCD 503
ASCD 550
EDUC 501
PPS 504
PPS 543*
PPS 546
PPS 549
PPS 565
PPS 567
PPS 571
PPS 572
PPS 573
PPS 574
PPS 576
PPS 583A
PPS 583B
Educational Psychology
(3)
Human Development
(3)
Educational Assessment
(3)
Methods of Research
(3)
School Guidance Seminar (3)
Introduction to School
Counseling
(3)
School Counseling Theories (3)
Career Development (3)
School Safety & Crisis
Prevention
(2)
Individual Counseling Skills (3)
Group Counseling Skills
(3)
Counseling Diverse
Populations
(3)
Facilitation, Consultation and
Collaboration Skills
(3)
Organizational Mgmt. and
School/Community
Collaboration
(2)
Supervised Field Work
Level I
(2)
Supervised Field Work
Level II
(2)
Culminating Activity:
(2)
PPS 597
Graduate Seminar in School
Counseling
*SFBC students will take PPS 544 in lieu of PPS
543
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 136
MS with PPS Credential:
Core courses- 46 semester hours plus 2 Semester
Hours
PPS 583C Supervised Field Work – Level III
(2)
MS/ PPS Credential with a Concentration in School and Family Based
Counseling:
Core courses- 46 semester hours plus 14 Semester
Hours*
NOTE: Upon completion of PPS 546, PPS 549, PPS
571, and PPS 572, candidates may apply for the
SFBC concentration.
SFBC candidates are advised to be mindful that each
SFBC course will be offered at least once a year, but
candidates need to plan the sequence with their
advisor to ensure it matches the availability of
courses.
PPS 544* Law & Ethics in Counseling
(3)
PPS 551 Diagnosis & Treatment of
Psychopathology
(3)
PPS 554 Advanced Theories in Counseling (3)
PPS 558 Psychopharmacology for School and
Family Based Counseling
(3)
PPS 559 Substance Abuse Counseling
(3)
PPS 584 Clinical Practicum
(2)
*SFBC students will take PPS 544 in lieu of PPS
543
MS/ PPS Credential with a
Concentration in Spanish Bilingual
Bicultural Counseling:
Core course- 48 semester hours MS/PPS plus 12
Semester Hours**
Director: Adonay Montes
NOTE: Upon completion of PPS 546, PPS 549, PPS
571, and PPS 572, candidates may apply for the
SBBC concentration.
SBBC candidates are advised to be mindful that each
required course will be offered at least once a year,
but candidates need to plan the sequence with their
advisor to ensure it matches the availability of
courses.
PPS 532
PPS 533
The World of Immigrant Youth
Counseling Latino Immigrant
Youth and Families
PPS 534 Bilingual Educational Theories
PPS 573** Counseling Diverse Populations
**Included in core requirements for MS/PPS
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
Spanish Bilingual Bicultural
Counseling Certificate:
12 Semester Hours
The Spanish Bilingual Bicultural Counseling certificate
requires twelve semester hours. Professional
practitioners and graduate candidates not enrolled in
the Educational Counseling program may apply for
entry into the SBBC courses. Candidates must
complete the admission requirements for the
Educational Counseling program and satisfy a
Spanish language assessment. Contact the Director
for information.
PPS 532
PPS 533
PPS 534
PPS 573
The World of Immigrant Youth
Counseling Latino Immigrant
Youth and Families
Bilingual Educational Theories
Counseling Diverse Populations
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP
PROGRAM
Educational Leadership — M.Ed.;
Program Chairperson: Patricia Ensey
Regular Faculty: Robert Hansen, Patricia Ensey
Senior Adjunct Faculty: Janeane Dimpel, Patricia
Whitman
The program emphasizes the human dimensions of
educational leadership in schools. It is applicable
where skills in change management, leadership, and
group dynamics are demanded for professional effec-
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 137
tiveness. Students who successfully complete the program requirements can obtain the M.Ed., Educational
Leadership and/or the Preliminary Administrative
Services Credential. The California Commission on
Teacher Credentialing has approved this program for
granting administrative credentials.
Students have four options:
1. To obtain both the M.Ed. and the Preliminary Administrative Services Credential (33 semester
hours total), or
2. To obtain the Preliminary Administrative Services Credential only (24 semester hours total),
or
3. To obtain the M.Ed. only (33 semester hours),
or
4. To obtain one of the above while serving in an
internship.
Prerequisites:
1. A bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited
institution with a preferred GPA of 2.75 or above
in undergraduate work and a cumulative GPA of
3.0 or above in any graduate work.
2. Demonstrated writing competency in response
to required prompt;
3. Current résumé
4. Three positive letters of reference, two of which
must be from active school district administrators; and
5. An interview with the program chair.
Additional admission requirements for the Preliminary Administrative Credential:
1. Possession of a valid California Credential in
teaching, pupil personnel services, health, or library services;
2. A minimum of three years of full-time experience
in one of the areas listed above. (Five years fulltime experience is needed to apply for the credential)
3. Verification of having passed the CBEST.
Educational Leadership with a
concentration in Administrative
Leadership — M.Ed; Preliminary
Administrative Services Credential
Total Program: 33 semester hours
Foundation Requirements: 9 semester hours
EDLD 570 Curriculum, Instruction, and
Assessment*
EDLD 572 Foundations of Educational
Leadership*
EDLD 573 Contemporary Issues in
Schools*
(3)
(3)
(3)
Administrative Leadership Concentration: 15
semester hours
EDLD 571 Human Resource Administration* (3)
EDLD 574A
Orientation to Field Experience* and
EDLD 574 B-C
Field Experience B-C,* or
EDLD 581 Education-A World View
(1, 1, 1)
(Master’s degree only)
(3)
EDLD 576 Organizational Management and
School/Community
Collaboration*
(3)
EDLD 577 Fiscal Resources Management and
Policy Development*
(3)
EDLD 578 School Law*
(3)
Research and Culminating Courses: 9 semester
hours
ASCD 504 Methods of Research
(3)
ASCD 596 Graduate Seminar
(3)
EDUC 501 Educational Assessment
(3)
*Required for the California State Preliminary Administrative Services Credential
Internship: An Administrative Internship credential is
available with permission of the program chair. The
candidate must be fully matriculated in the Preliminary
Administrative Services Credential program and meet
University and CTC Administrative Internship Credential requirements prior to being recommended for the
Internship Credential.
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 138
Educational Leadership with a
concentration in Instructional
Leadership — M.Ed; Certificate in
Teacher Leadership
Certificate in Teacher Leadership
Additional admission requirement for the Instructional Leadership concentration:
Three years of successful preschool, K-12, or adult
teaching experience in either a public or private
school. Additional observational time in an educational
setting may be required if applicant has no educational experience.
Total Program: 33 semester hours
Foundation Requirements: 9 semester hours
EDLD 570 Curriculum, Instruction, and
Assessment*†
EDLD 572 Foundations of Educational
Leadership*†
EDLD 573 Contemporary Issues in
Schools†
(3)
(3)
(3)
Instructional Leadership Concentration: 15 semester hours
EDLD 574A
Orientation to Field Experience and
EDLD 574 B-C
Field Experience B-C (1,1,1)
EDLD 575 Advanced Curriculum Studies*
(3)
EDLD 579 Professional Development
Strategies*
(3)
EDTC 511 Online Instructional Design
(3)
EDTC 512 Learning Management Systems
in Education
(3)
Research and Culminating Courses: 9 semester
hours
ASCD 504 Methods of Research
(3)
ASCD 596 Graduate Seminar
(3)
EDUC 501 Educational Assessment
(3)
*Applies toward La Verne Teacher Leadership Certificate.
†Applies toward Preliminary Administrative Services Credential
This program is designed for experienced and successful teachers who wish to develop the expertise to
teach, coach, and collaborate with their colleagues to
implement research supported practices that enhance
student success. Some may aspire to become principals. Others may desire to remain in the classroom,
performing leadership roles.
Requirements:
EDLD 570 Curriculum, Instruction, and
Assessment*†
EDLD 572 Foundations of Educational
Leadership*†
EDLD 575 Advanced Curriculum Studies*
EDLD 579 Professional Development
Strategies*
Culminating Project: Capstone Portfolio
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
* Applies toward M.Ed. with concentration in Instructional Leadership
†Applies toward Preliminary Administrative Services
Credential
Clear Induction Administrative
Services Credential
Program Chairperson: Patricia Ensey
Senior Adjunct Faculty: Janeane Dimpel,1 Patricia
Whitman
The Clear Administrative Services Credential is the
second level of the two-tiered credential requirements
enacted into law in 1982. This credential may be
taken in conjunction with the Ed.D. program in Organizational Leadership, or it may be pursued as a separate program. The courses in the credential program
relate directly to the five thematic principles established by the Credentialing Commission: organizational and cultural environment; dynamics of strategic
issues management; ethical and reflective leadership;
evaluation, analysis, and development of public policy; and management of information systems and
human and fiscal resources. The California Commission on Teacher Credentialing has approved this program for granting the administrative credential.
Admission Requirements: In addition to the Univer-
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 139
sity requirements, the following are required:
1. A valid Preliminary Administrative Services
Credential (Tier 1).
2. Employment in a full-time public or private
school administrative position.
3. Verification of having passed the CBEST.
4. Statement of Purpose Essay
5.
Total Program: 30 semester hours
Total Program: 8 semester hours
Year 1: Direct Instruction Courses: 6 semester
hours
EDLD 659
EDLD 661
EDLD 663
EDLD 664
Professional Development
Curriculum Leadership
Leading Program Transformation
Planning Program Transformation
Year 2: Coaching 2 semester hours
Statement of purpose with autobiographical
information
(1)
(3)
(3)
(1)
EDLD 665 A, B Professional Coaching (1, 1)
Doctoral Option: This credential may be taken in
conjunction with the Ed.D. program in Organizational
Leadership. For information contact the Program
Chair, Patricia Ensey.
READING PROGRAM
Program Chairperson: Janice Pilgreen
Regular Faculty: Janice Pilgreen
Reading — M.Ed.
This program is designed for professional educators
who wish to increase their effectiveness in areas of literacy as classroom teachers, reading specialists, or
administrators. The program may be taken concurrently with the California Commission-approved program leading to the Reading and Language Arts
Specialist Credential.
Prerequisites:
1. Completion of a California state-approved
Teaching of Reading course
2. Passing score on the CBEST
3. Satisfactory interview with the Reading Program Chairperson
4. Minimum GPA of 3.0
Core Courses: 27 semester hours
RDG 510 Foundations of Emergent Literacy
Instruction
RDG 514 Literacy Assessment and
Interpretation
RDG 516 Processes of Comprehending and
Composing
RDG 518 Language Acquisition and Schema
Development
RDG 520 Principles of Adolescent Literacy
Development
RDG 521 Literature for Children and
Young Adults
RDG 524 Research Design and Statistical
Procedures
RDG 525 Literacy Research, Theory,
and Applications
RDG 530 Reading Specialist Leadership
Roles
Culminating Activity: 3 semester hours
RDG 598 Development of Reading
Intervention Programs
Reading Certificate
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
This program may be taken separately or concurrently
with a Reading and Language Arts Specialist Credential and/or M.Ed.
Prerequisites:
In addition to the 5 prerequisites listed for the
M.Ed.RDG, the following is also required:
6. Possession of a preliminary or clear teaching
credential (multiple or single subject) issued by
the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing. (An Emergency Permit does not fulfill the
requirement.)
Program Requirements (to be met by the end of the
program):
1. For the Credential, a passing score on the
Reading and Language Arts Specialist Exam
2. Minimum of three years of successful full-time
teaching, K-12 level
Total Program: 12 semester hours
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 140
RDG 510
RDG 514
RDG 516
RDG 518
Foundations of Emergent
Literacy Instruction
Literacy Assessment and
Interpretation
Processes of Comprehending
and Composing
Language Acquisition and
Schema Development
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
Reading and Language Arts Specialist
Credential
This program may be taken separately or concurrently
with an M.Ed.
Prerequisites:
The same as those listed for the Reading Certificate.
Program Requirements: (to be met by the end of the
program): The same as those listed for the Reading
Certificate.
Total Program: 27 semester hours
RDG 510 Foundations of Emergent
Literacy Instruction
RDG 514 Literacy Assessment and
Interpretation
RDG 516 Processes of Comprehending
and Composing
RDG 518 Language Acquisition and
Schema Development
RDG 520 Principles of Adolescent
Literacy Development
RDG 521 Literature for Children and
Young Adults
RDG 524 Research Design and Statistical
Procedures
RDG 525 Literacy Research, Theory, and
Applications
RDG 530 Reading Specialist Leadership
Roles
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY
PROGRAM
Program Chairperson: Jackie Allen
Regular Faculty: Jackie Allen, Veronica Runnels
Adjunct Faculty: Sam Bouman, Barbara Fraley
School Psychology — M.S.; Pupil
Personnel Services Credential
This program offers training in counseling and psychology to prepare school psychologists to work with
age groups from infancy through adolescence. It has
been approved by the California Commission on
Teacher Credentialing to recommend qualified candidates for the Pupil Personnel Services Credential in
School Psychology, including the Intern Credential.
Admission Requirements:
1. A bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited
institution of higher learning with a GPA of 2.75
or above (3.0 is preferred) in undergraduate
work and a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or above for
any graduate work.
2. (a) An undergraduate major in psychology or another behavioral science, or (b) a valid teaching
credential with a minimum of one year of fulltime classroom teaching experience, or (c) successful
coursework
or
experience
demonstrating basic knowledge of general psychology, human learning and development, and
human behavior or (d) a pupil personnel services credential in school counseling.
3. Internet access and a course or the equivalent
to demonstrate competence in word processing,
database management, computer presentation,
and Internet skills. This prerequisite must be satisfied before enrolling in SPSY 548.
4. A statement of purpose outlining reasons for
seeking admission to the School Psychology
Program, together with an autobiography.
5. Applicants without prior teaching or counseling
experience are strongly encouraged to have at
least one year of volunteer or paid experience
working with children or adolescents. This experience should be described in the statement of
purpose and autobiography.
6. Three letters of reference addressing the candidate’s potential as a school psychologist. One
of these references must be from the candidate’s immediate supervisor.
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 141
7. A personal interview with the program chairperson or designated faculty member.
8. An application for Certificate of Clearance or a
valid California Teaching Credential.
9. A writing competency sample.
SPSY 587A
SPSY 587B
SPSY 589A
Additional Requirements:
1. Candidates seeking the Pupil Personnel Services Credential must show evidence of having
passed the CBEST prior to registering for SPSY
586B.
2. Demonstrated suitability for the profession of
school psychology by completing SPSY 578,
prior to entering SPSY 589A.
3. A Certificate of Clearance or a valid California
Teaching Credential before registering for SPSY
586A.
4. A signed CEOL Dispositions Agreement Form.
Total Program: 63 semester hours for M.S. and credential. Minimum 31 semester hours with PPS/M.S.
in School Counseling (CCTC 2001 standards) or
equivalent.
Core Courses: 60 semester hours
ASCD 503 Educational Psychology
ASCD 550 Human Development
SPSY 502 Learning Disabilities & Neurology
SPSY 535 Child Psychopathology
SPSY 547 Introduction to School Psychology
SPSY 548 Program Planning & Evaluation
SPSY 549 Counseling and Psychological
Theories
SPSY 560 Behavioral Interventions
for Academic Success
SPSY 564 Instruction and Intervention
SPSY 567 Crisis Prevention and Intervention
SPSY 571 Individual Counseling in Schools
SPSY 572 Group Counseling in Schools
SPSY 573 Psychology of Multiculturalism in
Schools
SPSY 574 Consultation Skills for School
Psychologists
SPSY 577 Individual Assessment
SPSY 578 Advanced Assessment
SPSY 579 Alternative Assessment &
Behavior Intervention
Elective from recommended CEOL classes
SPSY 586A
Practicum I in School Psychology
SPSY 586B
Practicum II in School Psychology
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(2)
(2)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(1)
(1)
SPSY 589B
Practicum III in School Psychology (1)
Practicum IV in School Psychology (1)
Supervised Field Work in
School Psychology Level I*
(2)
Supervised Field Work in School
Psychology Level II*
(2)
SPSY 599 Independent Study in School
Psychology
(1-4)
Culminating Activity: 3 semester hours
SPSY 598 Graduate Seminar in School
Psychology
(3)
Passing National School Psychology Praxis Exam
for eligibility for PPS Credential in School Psychology.
SPECIAL EDUCATION PROGRAM
Program Chairperson: Patricia Taylor
Regular Faculty: Bettye Stachowiak,1 Carol Oberg,
Patricia Taylor, Dawn Witt
Student Teaching and Intern Coordinator: Carol
Oberg
Regional Campus faculty
1
Mild/Moderate Education Specialist
Preliminary Credential
This program is designed for individuals interested in
teaching learners with mild/moderate special education needs, in particular but not exclusive to students
with learning disabilities, emotional/behavioral disorders, mild intellectual disabilities, traumatic brain injury, other health impaired or Autism Spectrum
disorders. Completion of the program authorizes candidates to work with students who have autism spectrum disorders.
Credential candidates receive a complete range of instruction and support in instructing learners with
mild/moderate disabilities within a continuum of service delivery options. The Reading Instruction Competence Assessment and any course-related Teacher
Performance Assessments (TPA’s) are required.
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 142
Upon completion of the Education Specialist Preliminary Credential, candidates have five years to complete the Clear Education Specialist Credential.
Prior to enrolling in student teaching (SPED 409), candidates are required to successfully contribute to the
field through documented advocacy and service.
Admissions Requirements:
1. A GPA of 2.8 or higher in a completed B.A. or
B.S.
2. A passing score on admissions interview.
3. CBEST Passage
4. CSET Passage
5. TB Clearance
6. Fingerprint Clearance
7. Health Education/Drug Prevention/Sexually
Transmitted Disease course
8. Internet access capability
9. Computer for Educators approved course
Core Requirements: 13 Semester Hours and
CBEST Passage
EDUC 470A Theories and Methods of Education
for Linguistically Diverse Students
(Special Education)
(4)
SPED 401 Assessment: Education
Specialist Professionalism
(3)
SPED 457 Introduction to Exceptional
Individuals and Their Families
(3)
SPED 510 Typical and Atypical
Development and Practicum
(3)
Area of Concentration: 27 semester hours
RDG 510A Foundations of Emergent Literacy
Instruction for Special Education (3)
RDG 514A Literacy Assessment and
Interpretation for Special Education (3)
SPED 405 Diversity and Professional
Communication and Practicum
(3)
SPED 406 Assessment Practices and IEP
Development and Practicum
(3)
SPED 407 Mild-Moderate Caseload
Management and Practicum
(3)
SPED 408 Curriculum and Instruction and
Practicum
(3)
SPED 409 Directed Teaching
(6)
SPED 505 Advanced Positive Behavior
Support: Theory and Practice and
Practicum
(3)
Additional Requirements: Prior to applying to the
Commission, proof of a valid CPR card, proof of US
Constitution competency and Speech/Public Speaking is required.
Internship Program
The Education Specialist Internship Program offers an
intern credential for those qualified to become the
teacher of record in a mild/moderate special education class. Candidates who are interns take all the
core courses for the Mild-Moderate Education Specialist Preliminary Credential, as well as SPED 459,
a 1 semester hour course, for each semester and
term they are teaching. Interns may complete SPED
409 in their intern classroom. The internship credential is a two-year program that is district specific.
Admissions Requirements:
1. Acceptance into the Education Specialist Preliminary Credential Program with all admissions requirements completed and current
2. Completion of SPED 401
3. Completion of SPED 457 with a B or better
4. Completion of EDUC 470A with a B or better
5. Completion of SPED 510 with a B or better
6. District letter indicating 120 hours or more of
successful classroom experience with learners
with special needs
7. District “intent to hire” letter or contract specifically stating a special education classroom
8. Interview with Student Teaching and Intern Coordinator
Intern Course:
SPED 459 Intern Seminar
(1, 1, 1)
Special Education Studies — M.S.
This program is designed for those interested in
teaching, advocating, and working with individuals
with mild/moderate disabilities. Persons applying to
this Master’s degree need not possess a teaching credential. Within the Master’s degree are specializations that will result in added authorizations for
persons possessing Education Specialist Teaching
Credentials or certifications for those who do not possess the required California credential.
Admissions Requirements:
1. Bachelor’s degree from an accredited university
2. GPA of 3.0 or higher in credential or last year of
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 143
undergraduate degree
3. Passing score on admissions interview
ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP
DEPARTMENT
Total Program: 39 semester hours
Core Courses: 12 semester hours
ASCD 504 Methods of Research
SPED 401 Assessment: Education
Specialist Professionalism
SPED 504 Current Issues Policies and
SPED
SPED 510 Typical and Atypical
Development and Practicum
Area of Concentration: 15 semester hours
SPED 502 Disabilities/Bio-Neurology
SPED 505 Advanced Positive Behavior
Support: Theory and Practice
SPED 506 Advanced Assessment of Students
with Special Needs
SPED 507 Advanced Curriculum
SPED 508 Life Cycle and Transitions
(3)
(4)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
Specializations: 9 semester hours
Specializations are available in Autism, Early Childhood Special Education Authorization, teaching in
higher education, At-Risk and incarcerated youth,
Co-teaching and cooperative learning and Special
Education leadership and advanced professional
roles in special education and other areas of interest.
Culminating Activity: 3 semester hours
SPED 596 Graduate Seminar
(3)
Doctor of Education — Ed.D.
Organizational Leadership
Chairperson: Laura Hyatt
Regular Faculty: Doug DeVore, Mark Goor, MD
Haque, Thomas Harvey, Laura Hyatt, Sunny Liu,
Carol Roberts
The doctor of education in organizational leadership
program is designed for the professional who wishes
to pursue a doctoral degree while continuing his or her
career. The program mission is to develop scholarly
practitioners as leaders and architects of change who
make significant contributions to the organizations
and communities they serve. The focus of the program is to apply leadership theory to practice through
relevant and experiential learning.
Admission: Applicants will be evaluated by the department admissions committee using the following
measures:
• An earned bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited university
• An earned master’s degree from a regionally accredited university with a minimum of a 3.0 GPA in
all work leading to the degree
• Academic capability to complete program requirements
• Leadership potential
• Opportunity to apply theory to leadership practice
in an organization
• A completed application with application fee
• Official transcripts from degree-granting institutions for the bachelor’s and master’s degrees and
all other coursework
• An official copy of the GRE score or a Miller Analogies Test score. Scores are considered as part of
the applicant’s overall academic and professional
background.
• 2 letters of recommendation
• A curriculum vitae or résumé
• Writing sample.
Total Program: 54 semester hours
The program requires a time commitment of three
years with 6 semester hours per semester (2 courses)
of organizational leadership and 3 semester hours per
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 144
semester (1 course) of research. The program is
blended with a combination of face-to-face and virtual
work. Students attend on-campus Practicum Sessions and Research Seminars during the semester as
well as virtual activities such as webinars. In addition,
students participate in a learning group in their geographical area.
The organizational leadership sequence includes 36
units delivered in 12 courses over three years that
may be taken for credit or for a grade. Each course integrates leadership theory, skill development, and
practice in the field. Examples of content include
leadership theory, communication, conflict, change,
systems thinking, diversity, visioning, and teamwork.
The research sequence is 18 units. Four courses (12
semester hours) provide students with a foundation in
quantitative and qualitative research. Typically, students complete these four research courses during
the first two years. The remaining 6 units of research
are completed during the dissertation process in the
third year.
Year 1
Fall Semester
ORGL 675
Executive Leadership
ORGL 677
Decision Making
ORGL 684
Research Methods
Spring Semester
ORGL 678
Resource Development
ORGL 694
Resource Management
ORGL 687
Introduction to Dissertation
Research I
Year 2
Fall Semester
ORGL 681
Communication Theory
ORGL 682
Conflict Management
ORGL 688
Introduction to Dissertation
Research II
Spring Semester
ORGL 695
Innovation and Technology
ORGL 696
Evaluation
ORGL 686
Quantitative and Qualitative
Research
Year 3
Fall Semester
ORGL 674
Change
ORGL 679
Planning and Futures
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
ORGL 698A
Dissertation in Organizational
Leadership I
Spring Semester
ORGL 680
Organizational Theory
ORGL 683
Organizational Development
ORGL 698B Dissertation in Organizational
Leadership II
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
If the student does not finish his/her dissertation
within the three years of coursework, he/she must
continuously enroll in the Dissertation in Organizational Leadership course each semester up to the
eight-year time limit for the completion of the degree.
JURIS DOCTORATE (JD) DEGREE
COLLEGE OF LAW
Administration
Gilbert A. Holmes, Dean
H. Randall Rubin, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs & Professor of Law
Susan Nauss Exon, Associate Dean for Faculty Development & Professor of Law
August Farnsworth, Assistant Dean of Student Affairs & Career Services
Jendayi Saada, Assistant Dean, Center for Academic & Bar Readiness
Our Vision: La Verne Law is an incubator for innovation in legal education, thought, and advocacy for individuals passionate about serving their communities
and promoting access and justice.
Our Mission: The mission of La Verne Law is to guide
our students in the discovery of law and self as they
prepare for the practice of law or other professional
careers. Our faculty of scholars and teachers is committed to creating an innovative, collaborative learning environment designed to develop the knowledge
and skills relevant to achieving individual and professional success.
Our mission includes educating, and enhancing the
professional lives of the members of the local, regional, national, and international communities we en-
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 145
counter students, faculty, staff, administrators, alumni,
members of the bench and bar, and others who pursue social justice.
Our mission is grounded in the core values of the University of La Verne life-long learning, ethical reasoning
and decision-making, diversity and inclusivity, and
community and civic engagement.
Difference-making is our legacy.
Program Policies. All students admitted to the Juris
Doctorate program at the University of La Verne, College of Law are expected to be familiar with and abide
by the law school’s Manuel of Academic Policies &
Procedures (MAPP), located at:
www.law.laverne.edu/academics/mapp/.
Admissions. La Verne College of Law reviews applications on a continual basis and continues accepting applications until the class is full. To be
admitted, a student must submit a completed law
school application, a personal statement, have a
competitive LSAT score and a strong undergraduate academic record in addition to describing on
their application (mainly in their personal statement)
evidence of work or life experiences, leadership,
maturity, motivation, passion or other characteristics
that show that they are capable of succeeding in law
school. Admitted students should have a Bachelor’s
degree from a regionally accredited college or university, a CAS registration and a minimum of two letters of recommendation, an LSAT score report, and
official undergraduate transcripts. All foreign credentials must be evaluated by the Law School Admissions Council (LSAC).
Students are not required to make appointments to
meet with Financial Aid Staff. However, it is advisable for students to make an appointment with the
Financial Aid Office using the online appointment
system located on the main page of the financial aid
section of the College of Law, or by phone at (909)
460-2001.
Transfer Credit. Transfer applicants must have completed one year at an ABA-approved or state accredited law school and be in good academic standing.
The decision on a transfer application will be based
on a review of the transfer applicant’s entire file, including the LSDAS report, grades earned in law
school, letters of recommendation, and reasons for
transferring. A decision to admit a transfer applicant is
conditional, pending receipt of an official transcript and
a letter of good standing from the applicant’s current
law school. An admitted transfer applicant must agree
to all terms and conditions of admission (including
those pertaining to which credits will transfer). See
more information on transfer policies at: www.law.laverne.edu/prospective-students/admissions/admission-requirements/transfer-students/
New Student Orientation. La Verne Law holds an
annual Orientation for new and first-year law students during the first week of classes. Members
of the Center for Academic & Bar Readiness
(CABR) conduct several workshops targeted at introducing students to basic skills that are fundamental to academic achievement. These
workshops, which address topics like case briefing, case reading, time management, note taking,
and course organization, are designed to give
students an overview of the types of skills that
they need to practice and develop during their law
school career.
Dual Degree Programs: JD/MBA & JD/MPA
The University of La Verne College of Law and College of Business and Public Management have joined
to offer combined Juris Doctor/Master of Business Administration (JD/MBA) and Juris Doctor/Master of
Public Administration (JD/MPA) degree programs. Applicants must meet the admission standards of each
degree program and should check with each College
for specific entrance requirements. Up to six law elective units that count towards the JD may be earned in
courses at the College of Business and Public Management. Similarly, an equivalent of six units may be
transferred from La Verne Law toward the MBA or
MPA degree. Please consult the La Verne Law Manual of Academic Policies and Procedures (MAPP) for
academic policies governing these dual degree programs.
La Verne Law currently has two campus-based
clinics: the Disability Rights Legal Center and
the Justice and Immigration Clinic.
Clinical Programs. The Disability Rights Legal
Center addresses some of the most extreme problems for people with disabilities in the Inland Empire.
The DRLC-Inland Empire provides legal services
through its Education Advocacy Project (EAP), the
Civil Rights Litigation Project, and the Community Advocacy Program (CAP). These services are provided
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 146
free of charge for low-income families. focuses on disability civil rights litigation and special education issues for low-income and minority families.
To learn more about the Disability Rights Legal Center
Clinic, you may contact Professor Elizabeth Eubanks
at (909) 460-2034 or at [email protected]
You may also visit the DRLC website at:
www.disabilityrightslegalcenter.org.
The Justice and Immigration Clinic represents asylum
applicants who cannot return to their home country
because of persecution. While the practice area of the
clinic is immigration, this clinic is especially appropriate for those who wish to become litigators. JIC provides pro bono representation to immigrants seeking
asylum or alternative forms of humanitarian relief in
the United States due to political, religious, and other
human rights persecution. Asylum can lead to permanent residency and U.S. citizenship. JIC has represented refugees from a variety of countries.
JIC provide students with many opportunities to build
lawyering skills by giving personal feedback, as well
as having students engage in peer review and selfevaluation. Self-reflection and self-evaluation are necessary practices and skills to support lifelong learning.
For more information about the Justice and Immigration Clinic, please contact Professor Diane Uchimiya
at (909) 460-2031 or [email protected] You
may also visit:
www.law.laverne.edu/academics/clinical/.
Center for Academic & Bar Readiness
La Verne Law’s Center for Academic and Bar Readiness provides general counseling for students who
want to maximize their educational experience and
learning outcomes for law school and the bar exam.
The Center’s staff maintains flexible weekly office
hours and will schedule appointments upon request
outside of office hours. The Center has an open door
policy and students are encouraged to take advantage of the resources available to them as early and
as often as possible.
Externship Program. The La Verne Law externship
program places students into various public and nonprofit agencies in which students gain practical experience under the supervision of a practicing attorney.
The goals of the La Verne Law externship program
are to enhance the student’s understanding of the
practice of law, inspire dedication to the needs of individual clients, and to value the promotion of justice
carried out with integrity and civility. Student experiences may include research, conducting factual investigations and discovery, research, interviewing clients,
counseling clients, drafting pleadings, assisting clients
in preparing their pleadings, mediating a dispute,
preparing an order or a memo of law for the judge or
negotiating a resolution to a dispute. For more information, go to:
www.law.laverne.edu/academics/clinical/
Licensing and Bar Preparation
Bar Registration. Statutory requirements for Admission to the Practice of Law in the State of California
are set forth in California Business and Professions
Code Section 6060. The Committee of Bar Examiners of the State Bar of California examines all applicants for admission to the practice of law in this state
and administers the requirements for admission to
practice. The Committee certifies to the California
Supreme Court admission to practice only those persons who fulfill the requirements for admission set
forth in the Business and Professions Code and the
Rules published by the Committee.
Those persons who, upon graduation from law
school, seek admission to practice in California
must register with the Committee of Bar Examiners
within three months after beginning their law studies. Registration forms are available at:
www.calbarxap.com/applications/calbar/California_Bar_Registration/.
The fee is $108.00. Each individual student is responsible to for insuring that these forms are properly completed and filed in a timely manner.
Students who wish to practice in states other than California are cautioned to make their own investigations
into the rules for admission to practice in those states.
Registration at the commencement of law school
studies often is required.
Multistate Professional Responsibility Exam
(“MPRE”) Preparation Course
The National Conference of Bar Examiners conducts
the Multistate Professional Responsibility Exam
(“MPRE”) annually in March, August and November.
The CABR administers a free MPRE preparation program that begins approximately three weeks before
each MPRE exam to help students prepare for the
exam.
Bar Exam Review. In order to be licensed to practice
law, each student must pass a state bar exam. The
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 147
Bar Exam Strategic Training (BEST) Program is a
complimentary program for COL graduates that provides comprehensive and targeted assistance after
graduation, during the bar exam review period. This
customized program is not a standalone bar review
course, but works in tandem with BARBRI to provide
our graduates with the best opportunity to perform
well on the California Bar Exam. For more information, go to:
www.law.laverne.edu/academics/academic-support/
COURSE OF STUDY
Full-Time Division (Beginning Fall 2013)
The course of study in the full-time division requires
three academic years of study in residence. If you enroll in the full-time program, you should expect to devote most of your time to the study of law. The
curriculum usually includes five days of class time per
week, 14-16 units per semester for a total of 88 units.
A typical three-year course of study would be as follows:
1L - Foundational Year
The Foundational (First) Year curriculum will consist
of single-semester length courses. Academic success
skills will be incorporated into one course each semester (Contracts during first semester, Property second semester), as will legal writing (Torts first
semester, Criminal Law second semester). Additionally, in the spring semester, students participate in a
Court Observation Week in a small group with a faculty adviser. During that week, all first year students
will observe a 3-5 day trial from start to finish. At the
conclusion of the trial, the students will have an opportunity to interview the attorneys and the judge and
will write a reflective essay on the experience.
2L - Experiential Learning Year
During the Experiential Learning Year, students will
take courses in a pair of experiential tracks – Transaction Practical Track and Litigation Practical Track –
taught by full time and adjunct faculty members
through a cooperative endeavor. The Second Year
class will be split in half; one half will take one Track
during fall term and the remaining Track during spring
term, with the other half reversing the order. Each semester-long Track will consist of multiple courses with
designated hours for credit and graded independently.
Many aspects of the two collective courses will be
taught by adjunct professors who are judges and
practicing attorneys. They will also review the students’ participation in mock trial and mock negotiation
sessions. Additionally, the Experiential Learning Year
curriculum will also incorporate academic success
skills and legal writing throughout.
3L - Enhancement Year
The Enhancement Year will allow students to enhance
their learning and expand their horizons by taking
courses covering areas of personal interest as well as
gaining valuable experience from clinics, externships
and other possibilities. It also incorporates a rigorous
writing, academic success, and bar preparation curriculum. Collectively, the Enhancement Year serves to
transition students from academic readiness to bar
readiness, allowing them to build on what they have
learned, become ready to pass the bar exam and
enter the legal profession.
Part-Time Division (Fall 2014)
To accommodate the needs of working adults or others who cannot devote themselves to the full-time
study of law, La Verne Law offers a part-time program.
The part-time program requires four academic years
of study. In this program, students will complete 8-11
units per semester, enroll in summer courses, and attend class three to four times per week. Students
should expect a four-evening schedule in some semesters.
Total Program: 88 semester hours.
Required Courses
Full-Time Division (Fall 2012 Entrants ONLY)
3L Fall Semester Courses
Units
3L Spring Semester Courses
Units
1L Fall Semester Courses
Units
1L Spring Semester Courses
Units
Lawyering Skills Practicum
Multistate Bar Strategies
3
3
Full-Time Division (Beginning Fall 2013 Entrants)
Torts – ILS
Contracts - DVS
Civil Procedure
Criminal Law – ILS
Constitutional Law
Property – DVS
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 148
6
5/6
4/5
5
4
6
2L Litigation Track
Units
Evidence
Criminal Procedure
Trial Advocacy
* Professional Responsibility
4
3
2
2
2L Transactional Track
Business Organizations
Sales
Negotiation
** Multistate Bar Strategies (MBS)
Professional Skills (Clinic, Externship,
or Practicum)
Wills & Trusts
rd
3
3
3
Units
3L Spring Semester Courses
Units
3L Summer Semester Courses
Units
4L Fall Semester Courses
Units
4L Spring Semester Courses
Units
Electives
Lawyering Skills Practicum
Wills & Trusts
Multistate Bar Strategies
4
4
3
3
3
3
Part-Time Division (Beginning Fall 2014 Entrants)
1L Fall Semester Courses
Torts – ILS
Contracts - DVS
Total
1L Spring Semester Courses
Criminal Law – ILS
Property – DVS
2L Spring Semester
Units
2L Summer Semester
Units
3L Fall Semester Litigation Track
Units
3L Spring Sem. Transactional Track
Units
3L Summer Semester
Units
Fourth Year Fall Semester
Units
Fourth Year Spring Semester
Units
Units
3L Fall Semester Courses
Criminal Procedure: Investigation
Units
Professional Responsibility
Electives
Strategic Legal Methods II
Part-Time Division (Fall 2011/Fall 2012 Entrants
ONLY)
Business Organizations
Evidence
2L Fall Semester
Electives
Units
* May be taken during the 2 or 3 years of study.
**May be taken in either semester of the final year of study.
nd
Units
Civil Procedure/DVS
Constitutional Law
Electives/Strategic Legal Methods I
4
2
3
Third Year Enhancement
1L Summer Semester Courses
Units
5
6
11
Units
5
6
Electives
Evidence
Criminal Procedure: Investigation
Trial Advocacy
Electives
Business Organizations
Sales
Negotiation
Electives
Electives
Externships
Criminal Procedure: Trial
Externships/Clinics/Practicums
Wills & Trusts
Electives
Multistate Bar Strategies**
Externships/Clinics/Practicums
Electives
Electives
0-4
5
4
0-2
2
6-9
0-1
0-4
4
3
2
0-2
4
2/3
2/3
0-2
0-4
0-4
0-2
0-6
3
0-5
3
0-6
0-5
Administrative Law (LAW 650 – 2 units)
Advanced Appellate Advocacy (LAW 587 – 2 units)
Advanced Legal Research (LAW 562B – 1 unit; Prerequisite: LAW 562A)
Alternative Dispute Resolution (LAW 548 – 2 or 3 units)
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 149
Alternative Dispute Resolution Competition Team
(LAW 589 – 1 or 2 units)
Antitrust And Trade Regulation (LAW 629 – 2 units)
Arbitration (LAW 543 – 2 units)
Bankruptcy (LAW 615 – 2 units)
California Civil Procedure (LAW 549 – 2 units)
California Performance Test Strategies (LAW 567 –
2 units)
Capital Punishment Seminar (LAW 508 – 3 units)
Civil Rights Law (LAW 594– 2-3 units)
Clinical Externships (LAW 690 – 1 or 2 units)
Community Property (LAW 522 – 2 units)
Construction Law & Ethics (LAW 647 – 2 units)
Copyright Law (LAW 622 – 2 units)
Corporate Taxation (LAW 634 – 3 units; Prerequisite/Co-requisite: Income Taxation)
Criminal Procedure: Pre-Trial, Trial, And Sentencing
(LAW 504 – 2 units)
Disability Rights Legal Center Clinic (LAW 691 – 3,
4, 5, or 6 units; Requires Instructor’s approval)
Discovery Techniques and Practices (LAW 636 – 3
units)
Employment Law Seminar (LAW 653 – 3 units)
Employment Relations (LAW 656 – 2 units)
Entertainment Law (LAW 611 – 2 units)
Estate Planning (LAW 524 – 2 units;
Prerequisite/Co-requisite: Wills and Trusts)
Family Law (LAW 523 – 2 units)
Federal Income Taxation (LAW 624 – 3 units)
Health Care Law and Policy (LAW 626 – 3 units)
Immigration Law (LAW 655 – 2 or 3 units)
Independent Research (LAW 699 – 1-3 units)
Insurance Law (LAW 614 – 2 units)
Intellectual Property Overview (LAW 610 – 2 or 3
units)
International Law (LAW 538 – 2 or 3 units)
Issues in Constitutional Law Seminar (LAW 595 – 3
units)
Justice & Immigration Clinic (LAW 692 – 6 units;
Prerequisite: Immigration Law and Instructor’s approval)
Juvenile Law (LAW 679 – 2 units)
Law and Terrorism Seminar (LAW 651 – 3 units)
Law Practice Management (LAW 648 – 2 units: Prerequisites – Business Organizations and Professional Responsibility)
Law Review (LAW 695 and 697 – 1 or 2 units; by in-
vitation only)
Math And Physics for Lawyers (LAW 529 – 2 units)
Mediation (LAW 546 – 2 or 3 units)
Mediation Ethics Seminar (LAW 556 – 3 units)
Mediation Practicum (LAW 555 – 3 units)
National Moot Court Competition Team (LAW 588 –
1 or 2 units; Prerequisites: LAW 580 and LAW 587;
by invitation only)
Negotiation (LAW 550 – 3 units) (Elective for Fall
2011/12 Entrants Only – Required for Fall
2013/2014 Entrants)
Non-Profit Business Organizations (LAW 638 – 2
units; Co-requisite: Business Organizations)
Remedies (LAW 514 – 3 units)
Sales (LAW 603 – 2 units) (Required for Fall
2013/2014 Entrants)
Special Education Law (LAW 596 – 2 units)
Sports Law (LAW 619 – 2 units)
Strategic Legal Methods (LAW 566A and B – 1 unit
each semester; Mandatory for students with a GPA
of 2.7 or lower. May be taken as an elective for all
other students.)
Trademark Law (LAW 621 – 2 units)
Trial Advocacy (LAW 643 – 3 units) Fall 2011/2012
Only. Required for Fall 2013/2014 Entrants)
Trial Team (LAW TBA – 1 or 2 units)
Video Game Law Seminar (LAW 631 – 2 or 3 units)
White Collar Crime (LAW 502 – 2 units; Prerequisites: Criminal Procedure I or II, Business Organizations recommended)
Workers’ Compensation (LAW 658 – 2 units)
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 150
BOARD OF TRUSTEES
Officers of the Board of Trustees
Chairman
Luis Faura*
President, C & F Foods, Inc.
Kenneth D. Little
Partner, Brandes Investment Partners
Secretary
Susan M. Searing*
Retired Educator
James W. Long*
Partner, Magnesium Alloy
Other Members
Mary Ann Melleby
Director, San Gorgonio Pass Water Agency
Michael Abraham
Chief Executive Officer
MKA Capital Group, Inc.
Michael J. Bidart, Esq.
Managing Partner
Shernoff, Bidart, Echeverria, Bentley LLP
Kim J. Burchiel, M.D., F.A.C.S.
Chairman/Professor
Department of Neurological Surgery
OHSU Brain Institute
Joseph V. Fengler
Director, Defense Logistics Policy
Honeywell International
Benjamin C. Harris
Retired business owner
William Hawkins
Managing Director, Overton Partners
Ivan R. Misner, Ph.D.
Founder & Chairman, BNI
Cecilia Martinez Morris
Owner & Agent
State Farm Insurance Agency
Paul Moseley*
Owner, Ruby Springs Lodge
Leslie Porras*
Public Relations Director, Wellpoint, Inc.
Peter Eckel
Vice President
Government/Leadership Programs
Association of Governing Boards (AGB)
Alex Espinoza
President, California Capital
Wendy Lau, Esq.
Senior Counsel
Wood, Smith, Henning & Berman, LLP
Richard A. Lewis
President and Co-owner
Lewis Operating Corporation
Vice Chair
Mark Hicks*
President, NHC Medical Supply
Ann Quay Davis, C.P.A.*
Partner
Vincenti, Lloyd, and Stutzman, LLP
Anthony LaFetra
President & CEO
Rainbird Corporation
Steven N. Reenders
President, The Reenders Company
Valerie C. Romero
Executive Vice President
Oremor Management and Investment
Margaret Sedenquist
Owner, Sedenquist Fraser Enterprises
David D. Shively, D.D.S.
Dental Practice
Owen “Ray” Skelton
Retired business executive
Emmett L. Terrell
Retired educator
*Member of the Executive Committee
Note: Personnel information is correct as of June 30, 2014.
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 151
Emeriti of the Board of Trustees:
Marvin Belcher
Retired school administrator
FACULTY AND ADMINISTRATION
Compete information on La Verne faculty and
administrators can be found at laverne.edu/profiles/.
Basic directory information on all University
employees is available in the Phonebook at
laverne.edu/phonebook/.
Kenneth L. Calkins
Retired educator
Jerry A. Davis
Retired farmer
Catalog Information Online
Richard G. Landis
Retired CEO & Chairman
Del Monte Corporation
Jay Rodriguez
Retired foundation executive
Donald G. Wilson
Retired business owner
OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY
President
Devorah A. Lieberman
Interim Provost
Jonathan L. Reed
Chief Financial Officer
Avedis “Avo” Kechichian
Vice President, Strategic Enrollment and Communications
Homa Shabahang
Vice President, University Advancement
Myra Garcia
Printed and Electronic Catalogs: This catalog can
be found online at laverne.edu/catalog/ and conforms
to the Catalog Effective Dates and policy printed in the
inside front cover. Its contents do not change during
the time that the catalog is effective except as
provided for in “Changes in Policy, Tuition, and Fees,”
listed in the inside front cover. In contrast, the
University’s academic organization, courses,
personnel, and student affairs offerings are briefly
mentioned in this catalog but detailed in full online,
because these four sections are dynamic and benefit
from regular updates. Course, schedule, and financial
aid application information is found in MyLaVerne at
laverne.edu/, while details on academic organization,
personnel, and student affairs as well as expanded
academic calendars are available through the Site
Directory there. The current printed catalog and
selected past catalogs as well as catalogs of courses
can be downloaded in full or in part at
laverne.edu/catalog/.
MyLaVerne: MyLaVerne can be accessed from the
green menu bar at the top of the University of La
Verne’s home page, www.laverne.edu. In addition to
complete information on La Verne courses,
MyLaVerne provides full schedule information and
financial aid notes.
Registered students use
MyLaVerne to register for courses, submit financial aid
forms, complete course evaluations, view their
grades, and more.
Maps and Directions: Maps and directions to the
Main Campus and to regional campuses as well as a
map of the Main Campus itself can be found at
laverne.edu/about/maps-directions/.
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 152
INDEX
Academic Advising ...................................................................................40
Academic Appeal Procedures ..................................................................58
Academic Honesty ..............................................................................57, 58
Academic Organization ...............................................................................6
Academic Progress..............................................................................44-49
Academic Renewal ...................................................................................46
Academic Standing .............................................................................45, 46
Accreditation and Memberships..............................................................8, 9
Accounting — B.S., B.A, M.S.,. ...............................................112, 114, 116
Admissions .........................................................................................14-25
Advanced Placement Credit ....................................................................21
Advanced Standing (Graduate) .............................................................. 71
American Baptist Theological Center............................................5, 26, 105
American Law Minor .................................................................................88
Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).......................................................56
Anthropology — B.S. ..............................................................................107
Art History — B.A., Minor ..........................................................................75
Arts and Sciences, College of ...............................................................6, 74
Associated Students of the University of La Verne ...................................10
Associate Degree ...............……………………………………………...70, 83
Athletics ....................................................................................................13
Athletic Training — B.S. ............................................................................86
Auditing .....................................................................................................26
Baccalaureate Goals.................................................................................65
Bachelor’s Degree Programs...............................................................72-73
Behavioral Sciences — B.S., Minor .................................................107,108
Bilingual Authorization.......................................................................73, 132
Biology — B.A./B.S., Minor .................................................................75, 77
Broadcasting — B.A..................................................................................78
Business Administration—B.S./B.A., Minor .............................112, 114, 115
Business & Public Management, College of....................................... 6, 111
Business Management—B.S., Minor...............................................114, 115
Calendars ................................................................................................3-5
Campus Activities Board ...........................................................................10
CAPA...........................................................................................4, 7, 17, 28
Career Services ........................................................................................10
Catalog Information/Disclaimers ................................inside front cover, 152
Centers for Educators .......................................................5, 7, 8, 17, 22, 28
Central Coast Campus......................................................5, 7, 8, 17, 22, 28
Certificate Programs .................................................................................73
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 153
Challenge, Course ....................................................................................47
Chemistry — B.A./B.S., Certificates....................................................77, 78
Child Development — B.S./M.S., Minor ..............................8, 129, 130, 133
Child Development Center ........................................................................12
Child Life—M.S., Certificate.............................................................134-135
Class Attendance/Classroom Conduct .....................................................57
Classroom Rights and Privileges ..............................................................54
Clear Induction Administrative Services Credential ................................139
CLEP and DSST Credit ............................................................................21
Clubs and Organizations ...........................................................................11
Code of Student Conduct ....................................................................60-64
Commencement Ceremony/Services..................................................11, 53
Communications — B.A. ...........................................................................78
Community Health — B.S. ........................................................................95
Comparative Literature .............................................................................80
Computer Science & Computer Engineering—B.S., Certificates........90, 91
Confidentiality and Institutional Research .................................................56
Continuous Registration for Culminating Activity ......................................71
Counseling and Psychological Center.......................................................11
Course Catalog ........................................................................................48
Course Load .......................................................................................44-45
Course Numbering and Value ..................................................................48
Course Overloads .....................................................................................44
Creative Writing – B.S., Minor...................................................................94
Credential Programs .................................................................................73
Credit Hour Policy .....................................................................................44
Credit/No Credit (CRD/NCR) Grade Option .............................................50
Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act.............................................56
Criminology — B.S., Minor......................................................................108
Cross-Enrollment Policy............................................................................43
CTEL (California Teachers of English Learners) .....................................133
Dean’s List ...............................................................................................53
Degree Completion Date ..........................................................................66
Delinquent Payment of Tuition .................................................................29
Demonstration Policy ...............................................................................59
Departmental Honors ...............................................................................54
Dining Services ...................................................................................11, 27
Diplomas ...................................................................................................53
Directed Study ...................................................................................47, 51
Disabilities, Students with....................................................................11, 56
Double Majors ..........................................................................................70
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) ....................................................................144
Doctor of Psychology (Psy.D.) ................................................................101
Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act .................................................57
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 154
E-Commerce — B.S., .......................................................................91, 113
Economics — B.S., Minor................................................................113, 115
Ecumenical Center, Black Church Studies ...................................3, 26, 105
Education and Organizational Leadership, College of........................6, 129
Education: Advanced Teaching Skills — M.Ed........................................130
Education (Special Emphasis) — M.Ed. .................................................130
Educational Counseling — M.S. .............................................................135
Education Credentials...................8, 73, 131, 132, 137, 138, 139, 141, 142
Educational Leadership — M.Ed.. ..................................................138, 139
Emergency Student Loans ........................................................................11
Employment, Student................................................................................36
English — B.A., Minor .........................................................................78, 80
Ethnic Studies Minor ...............................................................................108
Faculty ....................................................................................................152
FAFSA.......................................................................................................30
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)................................55
Final Grades Policy ...................................................................................52
Financial Aid .......................................................................................30-39
Financial Arrangements .......................................................................25-30
First-Year Resource Program (FYRP) ......................................................15
Freedom of Access ...................................................................................54
French — B.A., Minor ...............................................................................92
Gender Studies Minor .............................................................................. 82
General Education Requirements ............................................................66
Gerontology — M.S., Certificates ...................................................122, 123
GPA Requirements, Baccalaureate Programs ..........................................66
Grading Policy .....................................................................................49-53
Graduate Studies ..........................................................8, 22, 27, 44, 50, 73
Graduate Success Center.........................................................................54
Graduation, Application for........................................................................53
Graduation Requirements .........................................................................65
Greek Life..................................................................................................11
Grievances, Academic ..............................................................................59
Health Administration — M.H.A., Certificates .................................121, 122
Health Administration —B.S., Certificate ................................................120
Health Services ........................................................................................11
High Desert-Victorville Campus ........................................5, 7, 8, 17, 22, 28
History — B.A., Minor ...............................................................................81
History of the University of La Verne...........................................................6
Honor Societies.........................................................................................53
Honors at Entrance ............................................................................15, 16
Honors at Graduation .........................................................................53, 54
Honors Program........................................................................................82
Incomplete (INC) Grade ...........................................................................51
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 155
Independent Study ....................................................................................47
Inland Empire Campus ....................................................5, 7, 8, 17, 22, 28
In Progress (IP) Grade .............................................................................51
Institutional Review Board (IRB) ..............................................................57
International Student Services ..................................................................11
International Business and Language — B.S....................................83, 112
International Studies — B.A., Minor ....................................................84, 85
International Students .................................................11, 18, 23, 38, 69, 71
Interterm......................................................................................................3
Japanese Minor ........................................................................................92
Journalism — B.A. ....................................................................................79
Juris Doctor (J.D.) ...................................................................................145
Kern County Campus (Bakersfield) ..................................5, 7, 8, 17, 22, 28
Kinesiology —B.S., Minor ...................................................................85, 87
Late Registration/Adds..............................................................................42
Latin American Studies Minor ...................................................................84
La Verne Experience.................................................................................65
La Verne Online ..........................................................5, 7, 8, 17, 18, 22, 28
Law, College of ...................................................................5, 6, 26, 27, 145
Leadership and Management — M.S., Certificates ................................124
Leadership Education & Development Program (LEAD) ..........................11
Learning Enhancement Center .................................................................54
Leave of Absence .....................................................................................43
Legal Studies — B.S. ............................................................................... 87
Liberal Arts — B.A.....................................................................................84
Liberal Studies – B.A., Minor ..................................................................133
Libraries ...................................................................................................54
Major (Bachelor’s Degree) .......................................................................69
Maps, Area and Campus ........................................................................152
Marriage and Family Therapy, M.S. ..........................................................99
Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) .....................................117-119
Mathematics — B.A./B.S. .........................................................................89
Matriculation Policy ...................................................................................14
Military Transfer Credit .............................................................................21
Minors (Bachelor’s Degree) ......................................................................70
Mission Statement and Core Values .....................................................9, 10
Multicultural Services ................................................................................11
Multiple-Subject Credentials ..................................................................131
Music — B.A., Minor. ................................................................................95
MyLaVerne ........................................................................................40, 152
Natural History — B.A. ..............................................................................77
Natural Science Division ...........................................................................95
NCAA Eligibility ........................................................................................13
No Grade (NG) .........................................................................................51
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 156
Nondiscrimination Policy ............................................................................9
Nonmatriculated Students.........................................................................14
Normal Academic Progress .....................................................................45
Officers of the University .........................................................................152
Orange County Campus ...................................................5, 7, 8, 17, 22, 28
Organizational Management — B.S… ....................................................123
Orientation, Student and Parent ...............................................................11
Peace Studies Minor .................................................................................84
Philosophy — B.A., Minor ...............................................................105, 106
Photography— B.A., Minor .......................................................................96
Physics — B.A./B.S., Minor ................................................................89, 90
Placement Examinations (traditional undergraduate) .........................40, 41
Point Mugu Campus .............................................5, 7, 8, 17, 22, 28, 70, 83
Policy Against Discrimination and Harassment.........................................54
Political Science — B.A., Minor.................................................................81
Prehealth Science (Premed, etc.) Programs ............................................97
Prelaw Program ........................................................................................97
Preliminary Administrative Services Credential ......................................138
Protection Against Improper Disclosure ....................................................54
Protection of Animal Subjects ...................................................................57
Protection of Human Participants in Research .........................................56
Psychology — B.S., Psy.D., Minor ............................................................98
Public Administration — B.S., M.P.A., D.P.A....................................126-128
Pupil Personnel Services Credential.......................................................137
Racial Harassment..............................................................................12, 54
Readmission .................................................................................17, 19, 24
Reading — M.Ed., Specialist Credential .................................................140
Refunds.....................................................................................................28
Registration Procedures (add/drops) ..................................................41-43
Regional and Online Campuses (ROC) ................................7, 8, 17, 22, 28
Reinstatement of Academically Disqualified Students ..............................17
Religion — B.A., Minor....................................................................105, 106
Religion and Philosophy — B.A. .............................................................106
Religious and Spiritual Life, Office of ........................................................12
Residence Halls/Campus Housing ...............................................12, 17, 27
Residency Requirement, Baccalaureate Programs ..................................65
Safety and Transportation, Campus .........................................................12
San Fernando Valley Campus ..........................................5, 7, 8, 17, 22, 28
Satisfactory Progress ...................................................................32, 45, 46
School Psychology — M.S......................................................................141
Second Bachelor’s Degree ......................................................................70
Second Master’s Degree .........................................................................25
Senior Seminar/Culminating Activity Requirement ...................................66
Single-Subject Credentials .....................................................................131
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 157
Social Science — B.A. ..............................................................................81
Sociology — B.S., Minor .................................................................105, 109
Spanish — B.A., Minor..............................................................................93
Spanish Bilingual Bicultural Counseling Certificate ................................137
Special Education, M.S., Credential .......................................................143
Speech Communication — B.A., Minor...................................................109
Sports Science and Athletics Pavilion .......................................................12
Statute of Limitations of Courses ..............................................................20
Student Activities, Center, and Services ...................................................10
Student Affairs, Division of ........................................................................10
Student Consumer Complaint Process .......................................................8
Studio Art — B.A., Minor ...........................................................................74
Study Abroad Programs ............................................................................13
Summer Service Program ........................................................................11
Summer Sessions .........................................................................3, 4, 5, 26
Teacher Education Program ...................................................................131
Teaching with Technology Certificate ......................................................131
Teach-out Policy........................................................................................56
Theatre — B.A, Minor..............................................................................110
Time Limitations (for completion of degrees) ............................................71
Title IX: Sex Discrimination, Harassment and Assault ..............................12
Transcripts ................................................................................................52
Transfer Credit .....................................................................................19-22
Transfer Students .....................................................................................15
Trustees of the University .......................................................................151
Tuition and Fees ......................................................................................26
Undergraduate Students in Graduate Courses.........................................45
University Governance..............................................................................54
Vandenberg Campus ........................................................5, 7, 8, 17, 22, 28
Ventura County Campus ...................................................5, 7, 8, 17, 22, 28
Veterans Services ..............................................................................12, 39
Writing Program ....................................................................................... 93
University of La Verne • 2014-2015 • Page 158
2014 – 2015 Catal og
Hoover Building
1950 Third Street
La Verne, CA 91750
877-GO-TO-ULV
laverne.edu
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