Student Catalog - Career Training Solutions

Student Catalog - Career Training Solutions
CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
Winter Catalog - 2014
And Student Handbook
TABLE OF CONTENTS
PART I – GENERAL INFORMATION ..................................................................................................... 1
HISTORY OF CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS ........................................................................................ 1
APPROVALS, MEMBERSHIPS AND PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS .................................................. 2
PART II – STUDENT CATALOG AND HANDBOOK ................................................................... 4
ADMISSIONS POLICY, REQUIREMENTS, AND PROCEDURES ............................................................. 4
ACADEMIC POLICIES ................................................................................................................................... 6
Withdrawal .................................................................................................................................................. 6
Exemption Credit ......................................................................................................................................... 7
Transfer of Credits....................................................................................................................................... 7
Credit by Standard Exam............................................................................................................................. 7
Clock Hour/Credit Hour Conversion Formula ............................................................................................ 8
Grading System............................................................................................................................................ 8
Grade Point Average ................................................................................................................................... 8
Graduation Requirements ............................................................................................................................ 8
Short-Term Course Offerings ...................................................................................................................... 8
STUDENT HEALTH, SAFETY, AND SECURITY ........................................................................................ 9
STUDENT SERVICE INFORMATION ........................................................................................................ 12
Counseling Services ................................................................................................................................... 12
Class Schedule ........................................................................................................................................... 12
Facilities – Main Campus .......................................................................................................................... 12
Career Placement ...................................................................................................................................... 12
Substance Abuse Policy ............................................................................................................................. 13
Standards of Conduct ................................................................................................................................ 17
Disciplinary Sanctions ............................................................................................................................... 17
Weather Information, Cancellations, and Delays ...................................................................................... 17
Grievance Procedures ............................................................................................................................... 17
Notice to all Students ................................................................................................................................. 18
Student Records ......................................................................................................................................... 18
FINANCIAL AID INFORMATION............................................................................................................... 19
Financial Aid Application Process ............................................................................................................ 19
Financial Aid Eligibility Requirements ..................................................................................................... 20
FEDERAL FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS .................................................................................................. 20
Pell Grant .................................................................................................................................................. 20
Direct Loans .............................................................................................................................................. 21
OTHER FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS ..................................................................................... 21
TUITION AND FEES ..................................................................................................................................... 22
INSTITUTIONAL REFUND POLICY .......................................................................................................... 22
RETURN OF TITLE IV FUNDS POLICY .................................................................................................... 23
REFUND POLICY FOR CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS ................................................................................ 24
LEAVE OF ABSENCE ................................................................................................................................... 24
STANDARDS OF SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS (SAP) ...................................................... 25
READMISSION .............................................................................................................................................. 26
PART IIIA – DEGREE GRANTING PROGRAMS CURRICULA ................................................. 27
ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE NURSING ....................................................................... 27
ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE NURSING - LPN TRANSITION OPTION.................... 28
GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES ........................................................................................................... 29
ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ASSISTANT ................ 29
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CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
PART IIIB – DIPLOMA AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS CURRICULA .............................. 32
NURSING DEPARTMENT............................................................................................................................... 32
PRACTICAL NURSE EDUCATION PROGRAM ........................................................................................ 32
NURSE AIDE PROGRAM ............................................................................................................................. 33
ALLIED HEALTH DEPARTMENT ................................................................................................................ 34
MEDICAL ASSISTANT PROGRAM ............................................................................................................ 34
PHARMACY TECHNICIAN PROGRAM .................................................................................................. 345
SPA DEPARTMENT ......................................................................................................................................... 36
ESTHETICS PROGRAM ............................................................................................................................... 36
MASTER ESTHETICS PROGRAM .............................................................................................................. 37
MEDICAL MASSAGE THERAPY PROGRAM ........................................................................................... 38
MAKEUP ARTISTRY PROGRAM ............................................................................................................... 39
NAIL TECHNICIAN PROGRAM ................................................................................................................. 40
WAX TECHNICIAN PROGRAM ................................................................................................................. 41
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES DEPARTMENT .................................................................................. 42
CISCO NETWORKING ACADEMY PROGRAM ....................................................................................... 42
PART IV-A – DEGREE GRANTING PROGRAMS COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ...................... 43
Associate of Applied Science Degree Nursing Program ........................................................................... 43
Associate of Applied Science Degree Nursing Program - LPN Transition Option ................................... 45
Associate of Applied Science Degree Occupational Therapy Assistant Program ..................................... 46
PART IV-B – DIPLOMA AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS COURSE DESCRIPTIONS .. 49
NURSING DEPARTMENT ........................................................................................................................... 49
Practical Nurse Education Program ......................................................................................................... 49
Nurse Aide Program .................................................................................................................................. 51
ALLIED HEALTH DEPARTMENT .............................................................................................................. 52
Medical Assistant Program ....................................................................................................................... 52
Pharmacy Technician Program ............................................................................................................... 523
SPA DEPARTMENT ...................................................................................................................................... 55
Esthetics Program ..................................................................................................................................... 55
Master Esthetics Program ......................................................................................................................... 55
Medical Massage Therapy Program ......................................................................................................... 56
Makeup Artistry Program .......................................................................................................................... 57
Nail Technician Program .......................................................................................................................... 58
Wax Technician Program .......................................................................................................................... 58
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES DEPARTMENT .................................................................................. 60
Cisco Networking Academy Program ........................................................................................................ 60
GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES ........................................................................................................... 62
General Education Courses ....................................................................................................................... 62
PART V – ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF AND FACULTY .................................................................. 64
Administrative Staff ................................................................................................................................... 64
Faculty and Staff by Program .................................................................................................................... 65
The Spa at CTS .......................................................................................................................................... 67
Ownership and Board of Directors ........................................................................................................... 67
PART VI – GENERAL HOLIDAYS .......................................................................................................... 68
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CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
PART I – GENERAL INFORMATION
HISTORY OF CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
Career Training Solutions (CTS) was established on April 27, 1998, as the Health and Beauty
Academy, Inc., in Fredericksburg, Virginia. Health and Beauty Academy offered programs in
European Skin Care, Body Spa Wellness, Esthetics, Electrolysis, and Professional Massage
Therapy. In October 2000, ownership of the Health and Beauty Academy changed, and the
school was renamed Career Training Solutions.
The new management of Career Training Solutions implemented stronger curricula to the
programs already offered. In addition, Medical Assistant, Electronic Health Information
Technician, Phlebotomy, and Practical Nurse programs were implemented. CTS attained
national accreditation with the Commission of the Council on Occupational Education (COE) in
February 2002. In 2008 CTS offered its first degree granting program, the A.A.S. Degree Nurse
Education program. Then added Nail Technician to the Spa programs in 2011 and introduced a
Cisco Networking Academy program in 2012. Currently, CTS is in the process of gaining national
accreditation for its second degree granting program, Occupational Therapy Assistant.
Today Career Training Solutions remains committed to providing quality education to its students
and to enhancing the prosperity of the communities we serve.
LOCATION
MAIN CAMPUS
10304 Spotsylvania Avenue, Suite 400, Fredericksburg, Virginia 22408
(540) 373-2200 Fax: (540) 373-4465
www.careertrainingsolutions.edu
Email: [email protected]
Web:
Important notice: CTS reserves the right to revise class schedules, programs of study, course
curricula, class hours, faculty and administrative staff, tuition and fees, and any other material
listed in this catalog when such revisions are necessary. Catalog addenda will be published and
distributed to all students electronically, in paper form, or both, when significant changes are
made. Please contact the Admissions Office with any questions.
Career Training Solutions 2014 Winter Catalog and Student Handbook
Published – November, 2014, Volume 14
2014-2016 Career Training SolutionsВ© All Rights Reserved.
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CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
INSTITUTIONAL PHILOSOPHY
CTS understands that advancements in education and training are made each day. It is our goal
to prepare our students for the changes in industry by providing quality education and training
that is focused on hands-on experiences using the most current technology available.
Our mission is:
п‚·
To provide quality career education and training in the nursing, allied
health, information technology, and health and beauty industries;
п‚· To provide quality instructors, equipment, curricula and facilities;
п‚· To educate our students to achieve competency levels which qualify them
for employment placement and/or advancement in existing or potential
occupations.
OBJECTIVES
Specific objectives for each program offered at CTS are stated in the Program Curricula section
of the catalog. All programs are designed to provide very specific training within a well-defined
workforce job classification. Instructors at CTS are professionals who are well-trained and
concerned with providing a quality education. The overall objectives of CTS are:
п‚·
п‚·
To prepare students to become outstanding in their careers;
To offer complete academic curricula, incorporating all of the basics
necessary for success in each graduate’s chosen career;
п‚· To graduate professional men and women who will make a significant
contribution to their communities.
APPROVALS, MEMBERSHIPS AND PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS
2
п‚·
Accredited by the Commission of the Council on Occupational Education (COE) –
www.council.org
п‚·
Authorized by the Commonwealth of Virginia Department of Health Regulatory Board’s
State Board of Nursing to conduct registered nurse education, practical nurse education,
and nurse aide programs – www.dhp.state.va.gov/nursing
п‚·
Candidacy Status granted by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy
Education (ACOTE), accrediting body for occupational therapy education.*
http://www.aota.org/Education-Careers/Accreditation.aspx
п‚·
Certificate to Operate issued by the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia
(SCHEV) – www.schev.edu
п‚·
National Certification Board for Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork approved provider
(450811-08) - www.ncbtmb.org
п‚·
Commonwealth of Virginia Department of Professional and Occupational Regulation –
Virginia Board for Barbers and Cosmetology - www.dpor.virginia.gov/dporweb
п‚·
Authorized by the U.S. Department of Education (USDOE) to participate in Title IV
programs – www.ed.gov
п‚·
Eligible institution for NCMIS – Marine Corps Tuition Assistance Program (4036A) www.quantico.usmc-mccs.org
п‚·
Eligible institution for the training of eligible veterans by the Committee on Veteran’s
Education, Department of Education, Commonwealth of Virginia - www.dvs.virginia.gov
п‚·
Eligible institution for Vocational Rehabilitation training by the Virginia Department of
Rehabilitative Services – www.vadrs.org
п‚·
Authorized under Federal Law to enroll non-immigrant alien students by the Immigration
and Naturalization Service of the U.S. Department of Justice - www.uscis.gov
п‚·
Cisco Networking Academy - cisco.com/web/learning/netacad
CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
п‚·
Linux Professional Institute – https://www.lpi.org
п‚·
American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA) - www.amtamassage.org
п‚·
Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP) - www.abmp.com
п‚·
Exam site for National Healthcareers Certification Testing - www.nhanow.com
п‚·
Pearson VueВ® Authorized Testing Center for Cisco and CompTIA - www.pearsonvue.com
п‚·
Pearson VueВ® Approved Nurse Aide Testing Center - www.vue.com
п‚·
Authorized Prometric Testing Center for Microsoft - www.prometric.com
п‚·
Official College Level Examination Program (CLEPВ®) Test Center - clep.collegeboard.org
п‚·
Member of the Fredericksburg, VA, Chamber of Commerce www.fredericksburgchamber.org
*CTS adheres to and abides by all rules and regulations required by ACOTE in matters of
accreditation, including, but not limited to, program sponsorship; institutional name change;
adverse accreditation actions; significant program changes prior to admission of students into
new or changed program; notification of resignation or appointment of new or interim program
director within 30 days of change; submission of completed self-study and other required reports
within timeframes specified by ACOTE; site visits for accreditation purposes as specified by
ACOTE; and demonstrate honesty and integrity in all matters regarding ACOTE.
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CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
PART II – STUDENT CATALOG AND HANDBOOK
ADMISSIONS POLICY, REQUIREMENTS, AND PROCEDURES
Admissions Policy
CTS appreciates each student’s desire to learn and to advance in the workplace. Therefore, CTS
seeks only those students who have a genuine desire to become nursing, allied health,
information technology, and health and beauty professionals. Interest and motivation are
important factors in determining a student’s degree of success.
CTS admits students without regard to race, color, creed, sex, age, disability, or national and
ethnic origin. Each student is entitled to all rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally
accorded or made available to students at the school.
General Admissions Procedures and Requirements
An interview with an authorized school official will be scheduled. An applicant under the age of
18 must bring a parent or guardian to the personal interview. Spouses are also encouraged to
visit CTS with prospective students, tour the facility, and discuss career opportunities with staff
personnel.
To qualify for acceptance, each applicant must meet the following requirements:
1. Complete and submit an application for admission;
2. Successfully complete an entrance examination;
3. Complete and submit a request for official transcripts from all previous post-secondary
schools attended;
4. Pay a non-refundable application fee;
5. Complete and sign an enrollment agreement (must be co-signed by a parent or guardian
if the applicant is under 18 years of age);
6. Complete and submit all pertinent forms and supporting documentation to determine
eligibility if financial assistance is desired;
7. Set up a payment plan with the business office;
8. Complete authorization for Criminal Background Check (program specific).
ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREES
Registered Nurse Education Admissions Procedures and Requirements
General Education Prerequisites:
Degree Requirements
Credits
SDV ............................. Student Development.................................................................................. 1
Natural Science ........... Anatomy and Physiology ............................................................................ 8
English ......................... College English ........................................................................................... 6
Humanities ................... Any course from ART, HUM, MUS, PHI, REL, or Foreign Language ......... 3
Behavioral Science ...... Psychology or Sociology ............................................................................. 3
Mathematics ................ College Level .............................................................................................. 3
Additional Admissions Requirements
1. Applicant must have completed high school or college chemistry or biology, or equivalent
with a “C” or better;
2. Submit official transcripts from all secondary and post-secondary schools attended;
General education courses to be transferred must be taken at an institution accredited by
a national or regional agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education, and that
faculty members teaching the general education course must hold a minimum of a
Bachelor’s degree with 18 post graduate credits in discipline being taught;
3. Standardized pre-admission testing is required. Scores in the upper 50th percentile of the
national average will receive priority consideration in the application process;
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CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
4. Applicants will be expected to have earned a “C” or better in general education courses
for the Associate of Applied Science Degree;
5. Interview with Admissions Board;
6. Meet prerequisites for admission to the Associate of Applied Science Degree Nursing
Program;
7. Applicants must attend a nursing orientation.
Admission into the LPN to RN Transition Program
Applicants must also meet the following criteria:
1. Provide proof of a current, active unencumbered LPN license;
2. GPA of 2.5 or better on a 4.0 scale from LPN studies;
3. Non-Career Training Solutions LPN graduates must provide official transcripts that
document all previous post-secondary work;
4. LPN applicants graduating from a program other than Career Training Solutions may be
required to validate comparable LPN program requirements. Faculty may validate using
nationally normed tests and clinical competency requirements;
5. Non-Career Training Solutions LPN graduates must submit two letters of
recommendation from practicing RNs or former instructors;
6. Current certification of cardiopulmonary resuscitation for health care professionals.
SPECIAL NOTICE FOR NURSING APPLICANTS
Nursing students will receive a Nursing Student Handbook at orientation. This handbook
contains additional information specific to the nursing programs that is not listed in the Career
Training Solutions Student Catalog and Handbook.
VIRGINIA BOARD OF NURSING CERTIFICATION NOTICE
The Virginia Board of Nursing, along with other state boards, may refuse licensure for certain
causes including the conviction of any felony or any misdemeanor involving moral turpitude. This
potentially affects the AAS Degree Nursing, Practical Nurse, Nurse Aide, Pharmacy Technician,
and the Massage Therapy education programs.
Occupational Therapy Assistant Admissions Procedures and Requirements
General Education Requirements:
Degree Requirements
Credits
Natural Science ........... Anatomy and Physiology ............................................................................ 8
English ......................... College English ........................................................................................... 3
Humanities ................... Any course from ART, HUM, MUS, PHI, REL, or Foreign Language ......... 3
Behavioral Science ...... Psychology only .......................................................................................... 3
Mathematics ................ College Level .............................................................................................. 3
Additional Admissions Requirements
1. Submit official transcripts from all secondary and post-secondary schools attended;
General education courses to be transferred must be taken at an institution accredited by
a national or regional agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education;
2. Standardized pre-admission testing is required. Scores in the upper 50th percentile of
the national average will receive priority consideration in the application process;
3. Applicants will be expected to have earned a grade of C or better in general education
courses for the Associate of Applied Science Degree;
4. Interview with OTA admissions panel member(s);
5. Entrance examination.
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CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
ACCEPTANCE NOTIFICATION
After all general admissions requirements and any program specific requirements have been met,
the appropriate administrator will review the complete application and acceptance will be
determined. Applicants will then be notified by their admissions representative if they have been
accepted. Applicants who have been accepted will receive a letter of congratulations and an
orientation notice in the mail.
ACADEMIC POLICIES
Appearance and Dress Code
It is expected that a student’s attire, hairstyle, and personal grooming will reflect a professional
manner, self-respect, respect for classmates, and respect for the CTS community. Most
programs require a uniform; students will be informed of the specific requirements regarding
uniforms before the start of class.
Unprofessional attire is not permitted including, but not limited to, short-shorts, bare feet,
strapless or halter-tops, or lack of a shirt.
Attendance
Students are expected to attend all classes including lectures, laboratories, and other
instructional activities in which they are enrolled. Late arrival, early departure, or other absences
from scheduled class time are disruptive to the instructor and to other students and must be
avoided.
Students are required to provide a reason for any absence; individual instructors are responsible
for determining, on a case-by-case basis, the validity of the explanation and whether the student
must provide documentation to verify the absence. A daily attendance record is maintained and
becomes a part of the student’s permanent record. This data may be used for verification
purposes and upon request by governmental agencies and educational accreditation
organizations. Students are responsible for completing all assignments assigned in their
absence.
Any student absent in excess of 10 percent of the scheduled instructional time for each semester
within his or her program of study may be terminated. Students absent for more than seven
consecutive instruction days may be withdrawn from the program. Termination may affect current
and/or future financial aid eligibility.
Tardiness
Students are required to arrive on time for each class in order to minimize class interruptions and
to develop a professional work attitude. In keeping with our attendance policy, any student
arriving late or departing early will have this time recorded as time out of class and, therefore,
deducted from the total attended instructional time.
Withdrawal
Students who are scheduled for an academic course may withdraw from that course during the
first week of class and receive a grade of “W”.
After the first week of class, no academic course may be dropped without penalty. A grade of "F"
will be assigned to those who stop attending class after the first week. All final course grades of
"F" will be used in calculating the final grade point average. Withdrawal may affect current and/or
future financial aid eligibility.
Withdrawal grades will be posted to the student's official transcript and will be used for calculation
of the final grade point average as credits attempted.
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CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
Make-Up Policy
Class assignments are due on the date designated by the instructor. If the student contacts the
instructor directly, the instructor at his or her option may receive overdue daily assignments. In
addition, if a student has an excused absence on exam day, he or she may make up an alternate
test version once. The make-up test must be given within three school days of the original test.
Incomplete Policy
If, due to unusual circumstances, a student has not completed the required course work by the
end of the grading period, a grade of “I” (Incomplete) may be issued with approval from the
Program Manager. The course work must be completed within a two week period or the
Incomplete (I) will become a failing grade (F).
Exemption Credit
Any student interested in exempting a class may do so upon requesting permission from the
Program Manager, paying an exemption fee of $50, and successfully completing an exemption
test with a score of 85 or above. Credits will be awarded but no grade will be given and the
course will not be computed into the grade point average (GPA). Students cannot exempt
individual courses from the Waxing, Makeup, Nail, or Nurse Aide programs.
Transfer of Credits
Any student entering CTS may transfer credits from other accredited schools to CTS upon receipt
of an official transcript from the other institution and approval of those courses from the Program
Manager. An evaluation of a prior transcript of grades from another institution will be made on an
individual basis. Although CTS reserves the right not to accept undergraduate credits that are
more than five years old, a comparison of the course descriptions and number of credits with
satisfactory grades of at least a “C” and an honorable dismissal or withdrawal from the institution
from which transfer is made are required before approval can be granted. Approved transfer
credits will be shown as “TC” on the student transcript. In all cases, transfer of credits may meet
a maximum of 30 percent of graduation requirements. These guidelines do not apply to credits
associated with a completed undergraduate degree.
For all programs, including the Associate of Applied Science Degree program, which is
considered a terminal degree, it is at the sole discretion of the receiving institution to accept the
credits granted at CTS. CTS makes no claims that credits earned will transfer to any other
institution.
Credit by Standard Exam
CLEPВ® exams are standardized tests developed by The College Board. CTS accepts CLEPВ®
results for credit granting purposes for the Associate of Applied Science Degree Nursing
Program. CLEPВ® exams are given at Career Training Solutions on the first and third Fridays of
every month. Students wishing to participate must register at least two weeks prior to the testing
date.
A CLEPВ® exam may not be taken for any course that has previously been taken for which a poor
or failing grade was received. A maximum of two prerequisite courses may be fulfilled by exam.
Please see the CLEPВ® page of the CTS website (careertrainingsolutions.edu), or contact the
Admissions Office for more information.
Transfer of Students within Programs
CTS allows students to transfer to other programs. The grades received in the first program of
study will remain part of the complete student transcript. Students need to consult with their
Program Manager who will advise them on the necessary procedures to transfer to another
program. A student may be enrolled in only one program of study at a time.
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CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
Clock Hour/Credit Hour Conversion Formula
CTS measures its semester programs in clock hours/credit hours. The school uses the following
clock hour/credit hour definitions and conversion formulas.
A clock hour is a period of sixty (60) minutes with a minimum of fifty (50) minutes of instruction.
A credit hour is one semester credit that is awarded for each fifteen (15) clock hours of lecture,
thirty (30) clock hours of laboratory, and forty-five (45) clock hours of externship/clinical.
Grading System
Letter grades used at CTS for all academic courses are based on the following scale:
A
B
C
F
I
TC
EX
W
(Excellent)
90-100%
(Good)
80 - 89%
(Average)
70- 79%
(Failing)
Below 70%
(Incomplete)
(Transfer Credit)
(Exemption)
(Withdrawal)
4.0
3.0
2.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
A student who receives a grade below "C" is required to repeat that course. It is expected that
students will aspire to a minimum grade of "B" in all courses. Specific programs may have
different requirements.
Grade Point Average
A student's cumulative grade point average is computed by dividing the total number of points
earned by the total number of credit hours attempted. Grades of “I”, “TC", “EX” are not
included in any calculation of GPA. Grades of "W” are included in the calculation of GPA
as credits attempted.
Graduation Requirements
Students must take a minimum of seventy (70) percent of their course work at CTS to qualify for
graduation. To meet graduation requirements, students must be making satisfactory progress
and be in compliance with academic standards by maintaining a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or
greater; pass each subject; meet program attendance requirements; earn required hours; achieve
all applicable skill proficiencies; be in compliance with financial terms of enrollment; and have no
outstanding obligations including both account balance and library materials.
NOTE: A student who completes a program but exceeds 1.5 times the number of
clock hours required to complete that program is not eligible to receive a
diploma, but he/she may receive a certificate of completion.
Graduation Ceremony
CTS conducts a formal graduation ceremony once a year. Graduates who have met all
graduation requirements must complete an application for graduation and attend a graduation
meeting to participate in the ceremony. There is a $25 fee for the purchase of the cap and gown.
Short-Term Course Offerings
CTS provides some short-term program offerings based on the clock hour system. A
certificate of completion is awarded upon successful completion of these programs.
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CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
STUDENT HEALTH, SAFETY, AND SECURITY
Health, safety, and security at CTS is undertaken in accordance with relevant institutional
and governmental regulations and policies in order to promote a safe, secure, and
healthful learning and work environment.
Health and Safety
Student Responsibility, Health and Safety: It is the student’s responsibility to adhere
to institutional policies and procedures relating to student conduct and campus health,
safety, and security. Students are responsible for the personal safety and the safety of
others in their classroom, laboratory, or common areas and for immediately reporting any
health or safety concerns to an instructor or staff member.
All health and safety incidents will be recorded in an Occurrence Report, which allows
CTS to document the incident, evaluate the response, and determine if further action is
required.
Emergencies: Emergencies may be reported at any time to the Spotsylvania County
Sheriff’s Office by calling 911.
Emergency notification: In cases of emergencies that pose an immediate threat to the
health and safety of the campus community, students will be notified via the telephone
intercom system, by email, and in person if possible and necessary.
Evacuation: Evacuation routes are posted in every classroom, laboratory, office, and
common area. Evacuate the building following the route shown on the evacuation maps
posted in each room. DO NOT USE THE ELEVATORS. Once evacuated, assemble on
the far side of the west parking lot (nearest to Golden Corral restaurant). Instructors are
responsible for the evacuation of their students, and should conduct a head-count at the
assembly point.
Fire: In case of fire, immediately inform an instructor or staff member and activate the
fire alarm when possible. When you hear the fire alarm, evacuate the building following
the route shown on the evacuation maps posted in each room. DO NOT USE THE
ELEVATORS. Call 911. Fire extinguishers are stationed in each hallway. Day and night
managers should secure the building if possible.
Fire drills are held twice a year. Follow evacuation procedures.
Medical and Health Emergencies: Report medical or health emergencies to an
instructor or staff member. Make the ill or injured person comfortable. Seek a qualified
healthcare professional in the school, if possible. This person will assess the situation
and take appropriate measures. If no qualified healthcare professional is available,
call 911.
If an accident or illness occurs that requires a student, employee, or guest to be sent to a
doctor or hospital, the immediate family will be notified. If unable to notify the family,
emergency vehicles will be summoned at the student’s, employee’s, or guest’s expense.
Safety Resources: Safety resources such as sharps disposal, eye wash equipment,
and Emergency Kits are located in laboratory classrooms as appropriate. First aid kits
are located in every laboratory and at the front desk in the school lobby.
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CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
Earthquake: Take cover under a sturdy desk, table, or in a doorway. If that is not
possible, stand as close to a wall in a hallway as possible. Stay away from windows.
Remember to wait for TWO MINUTES after tremors stop then evacuate as per
evacuation instructions. Remember, DUCK, COVER, HOLD, and DON’T PANIC.
Tornado: Immediately move away from windows and glass and move into the hallway.
Crouch down facing the wall, with your hands locked over your head. Wait until high
winds die down then evacuate the building as per evacuation instructions. Remember,
STAY AWAY FROM GLASS, PROTECT YOUR HEAD, and DON’T PANIC.
Biohazard (Blood): If blood has been spilled onto the floor or other surfaces,
immediately alert an instructor or staff member. Do not attempt to clean up the blood and
do not allow another student to do so. For skin or open wound exposure to another
person’s blood, wash area thoroughly with soap and water. For blood splashed into
eyes, nose, or mouth, rinse repeatedly with tap water. Instructors should refer to the
Exposure Control Plan.
Environmental Hazard: Hazardous materials or substances can be in the form of
chemical spills, gas leaks, or other materials. If you see or smell a substance that you
believe may be hazardous, stay away from the substance and alert an instructor or staff
member immediately. Direct others away from the immediate area. Do not touch or
attempt to clean up an unidentified substance. If evacuation is necessary, an instructor
or member of the staff will activate the fire alarm. Evacuate the building as per
evacuation instructions.
Security
Student Responsibility in Criminal Matters: A significant part of every campus
security program is prevention, including cooperative and precautionary steps by
students themselves.
Students are encouraged to report all criminal acts or suspicious activities promptly. You
have the right to report these matters confidentially. Victims or witnesses to a crime are
encouraged to file an Occurrence Report of the incident with a Campus Security Authority
as soon as possible.
CTS Campus Security Authorities:
Gary Fee, Cisco Networking Academy Director
Helen Flores-Ford, Esthetics Program Manager
Kathy Marshall, Director of Nursing Programs
Cassandra Messam, Medical Office Education Program Manager
Brian Terrill, Medical Massage Therapy Program Manager
A report of criminal activity should contain sufficient information to provide reasonable
grounds for CTS to investigate or refer the matter to local authorities for investigation and
prosecution. CTS will investigate reports of criminal activity and will refer for prosecution
or investigation by local police authorities, reports of the crimes of murder, sexual assault,
robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, motor vehicle theft, and arson, among other
crimes, as required by law.
CTS is required to complete an annual security report of crimes and attempted crimes
which is made available to students, prospective students, CTS staff members, and
members of the public. Names of victims or witnesses are not disclosed in the security
report.
Timely Warning: In the event that a crime or alleged crime occurs, either on or off
campus, that, in the judgment of CTS Administration, constitutes a serious criminal event
or an ongoing or continuing threat, a campus-wide “Timely Warning” will be issued. The
warning will be provided via bulletins posted throughout campus.
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CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
Behavioral Disturbance or Assault: A behavioral disturbance can be verbal or physical
(assault). When a behavioral disturbance or suspicious behavior is observed, alert the
nearest instructor or staff member, who will alert CTS Administration. If no staff member
can be found and you believe the threat to be dangerous, call 911.
Internal Threat: If you observe someone threatening with a weapon or other dangerous
device, or hear a possible gunshot, inform CTS Administration immediately. CTS
Administration will confirm the threat and alert the local authorities. CTS will, without
delay and taking into account the safety of the campus community, issue an emergency
alert unless such an alert would, in the judgment of responsible authorities, compromise
the efforts to assist victims, or to contain, respond to, or otherwise mitigate the
emergency.
An evacuation may be ordered, depending on the nature of the emergency. If you cannot
get out, move to a room where you can hide. Lock the door if possible. Make sure lights
are turned off and stay clear of doors and windows. Silence, but do not turn off, all cell
phones. Remain inside the room until you receive instructions from CTS staff or first
responders.
When the police arrive, follow all instructions and keep your hands visible. When
evacuating the building, take all necessary items including keys. The building may be
sealed as a crime scene and no one will be allowed in for several hours.
Sexual Assault: Sexual assault includes any physical sexual act directed against
another person forcibly, against the victim’s will, when the victim is incapable of giving
consent (such as intoxication), or when the act constitutes statutory rape. Sexual assault
is unacceptable regardless of the prior or current relationship of the perpetrator or victim.
Students are strongly encouraged to report any alleged sexual assault to a Campus
Security Authority, instructor, or staff member. This report should be made as soon as
possible after the incident for medical reasons and to preserve evidence of the assault.
Even if you do not wish to prosecute, it is important that you have a physical examination
after the attack to assess injuries and to be screened for sexually transmitted disease.
Perpetrators of sexual assault will be subject to CTS disciplinary action up to and
including suspension or dismissal, and referral to authorities for prosecution.
Rape crisis centers are specifically equipped to treat sexual assault survivors. If you are
a victim of sexual assault, the Rappahannock Council Against Sexual Assault can help.
They can be reached at the telephone number and website below:
Rappahannock Council Against Sexual Assault: 540-371-1666 or http://rcasa.org/
CTS is required to advise the campus community where to find information regarding sex
offenders registered in the Commonwealth of Virginia. A more detailed explanation and
access to the registry can be found at the website below:
Sex Offender and Crimes Against Minors Registry
http://sex-offender.vsp.virginia.gov/sor
Campus Crime Statistics: CTS complies with the requirements of the Federal Student
Right to Know and Campus Security Act (also known as the Clery Act), which requires all
schools participating in Federal Student Aid Programs to disclose information about crime
on and near the campus. CTS annually publishes a Campus Security Report with these
statistics. Copies of this report may be obtained from the Business Office.
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CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
STUDENT SERVICE INFORMATION
Counseling Services
Members of the staff and faculty take individual interest in each student and are very willing to be
of assistance. Students are urged to consult their instructor for additional help with assignments
if needed. Students who are in need of individual counseling are encouraged to talk with the
program manager who may refer them to the appropriate community resources. If you or
someone you know is considering harming themselves, please call:
National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-TALK (8255)
Faculty Accessibility
Faculty are always available to students. Program managers and directors keep office
hours daily and maintain an open door policy to all program students. Most classes are
held Monday through Thursday. Qualified instructors are present during class,
laboratory, and clinical hours in addition to maintaining their own office hours. In addition,
faculty and Program Managers are available on Fridays for advising, tutoring, or
counseling. Study groups are also encouraged.
Class Schedule
CTS operates on the semester system, with a semester averaging 15 weeks. Students
attend classes throughout the year. Individual program beginning and end dates can
vary, depending on the nature of the coursework. Please inquire about the specific dates
for each program.
Day and evening classes are scheduled Monday through Saturday between 8:00 a.m.
and 10:00 p.m. CTS offers weekend workshops and the facilities are open for student
use on Friday and Saturday during the day.
Facilities – Main Campus
The campus is located in a modern office building and has ample, well-lighted parking at no
charge to the students. The school is fully climate controlled. All equipment is modern, attractive,
and specifically designed for the comfort and progress of the student. Class sizes average
between ten (10) and twenty (20) students.
In an effort to provide a healthy learning environment for all students, CTS maintains a nonsmoking policy throughout its facilities.
CTS does not provide housing or transportation for students.
Career Placement
Career counseling is available to all students at CTS. The Career Placement Coordinator
maintains an “Open Door” policy for the purposes of advising and assisting students in career
planning, resume and cover letter writing, interviewing skills, and professional development. A
current and up to date job board is prominently displayed in the student lounge, for students to
review at all times.
The Career Placement Coordinator also assists graduates in finding job openings in the region.
Every effort is made to help each graduate secure a position suitable to that graduate’s interests
and abilities in his or her chosen field, however CTS cannot promise or guarantee
employment to anyone.
CTS maintains a list of employers who have previously hired our graduates, and we will continue
to seek individuals and businesses that may be potential employers. In order to be eligible for
career placement assistance, a graduate must meet all stated graduation requirements and
complete all placement assistance forms.
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CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
Substance Abuse Policy
CTS has adopted policies in compliance with the Federal Drug-Free Schools and Communities
Act and the Federal Drug-Free Workplace Act. Students are prohibited from the unlawful
manufacture, distribution, possession, sale or use of illicit or illegal drugs or alcohol while on
campus, in the parking lots, or in common areas in and around the building. CTS prohibits
underage drinking. This prohibition applies while on the property of the school or when
participating in any institutional activity. Students will not report or return to class under the
influence of drugs or alcohol. Students who violate these policies or Federal and State laws
regarding drugs or underage drinking will be subject to disciplinary action up to, and including,
expulsion from school and may be subject to criminal prosecution. Students are required to
provide written notification of drug or alcohol related convictions to the President of CTS no later
than five calendar days after the conviction.
As a recipient of federal aid, CTS must certify under the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 and
the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act of 1989 that it will take certain steps to provide a
drug-free campus.
The attached statement, which is part of CTS’ program adopted to comply with these Acts, is
being distributed to you as required by law. If you have any questions regarding this statement or
wish to receive further information on the CTS Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act and
Drug-Free Workplace Act program, you are encouraged to contact President Christine Carroll or
Vice President Maureen LaGreca.
CTS does not offer formal substance abuse treatment programs. We do, however, strongly
encourage all students and employees to seek counseling, treatment, or rehabilitation if
substance abuse is suspected or known to be a problem. If you believe that you, a fellow
student, or a colleague, has a substance abuse problem, please call the national hotline number,
below, or visit the following website:
www.samhsa.gov/treatment/index.aspx
24 hour national hotline: 1-800-662-HELP (4357)
Locally, the Rappahannock Area Community Services Board has offices in the city of
Fredericksburg and the counties of Caroline, King George, Spotsylvania, and Stafford. They offer
help and support in dealing with alcohol and drug abuse, including outpatient and case
management services, inpatient and emergency services, and residential services. They provide
emergency therapy services 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.
In Fredericksburg, Stafford, Spotsylvania call:
In Caroline County call:
In King George County call:
540-373-6876
804-633-4148
540-775-5064
Local or Statewide Support Groups
In addition, there are local and statewide support groups available to anyone at any time:
Alcoholics Anonymous: HOTLINE (540) 752-2228
Al-Anon and Alateen: District Rep. (540) 842-9072
Narcotic Anonymous: HOTLINE (800) 777-1515
http://www.aavirginia.org/hp/
http://al-anonfredericksburg.org/
http://www.rappahannockareaofna.com/
The Dangers of Substance Abuse
Abuse of alcohol and use of drugs is harmful to physical, mental and social wellbeing. Accidents
and injuries are more likely to occur if alcohol and drugs are used. Alcohol and drug users can
lose resistance to disease and destroy their health. Tolerance and psychological dependence
can develop after sustained use of drugs.
Alcoholism is the number one drug problem in the United States. Alcoholism takes a toll on
personal finances, health, social relationships and families. It can have significant legal
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consequences. Abuse of alcohol or use of drugs may cause an individual driving a motor vehicle
to injure others and may subject the abuser to criminal prosecution. Drunk drivers are
responsible for more than half of all traffic fatalities.
Drug abuse in general causes a lowered resistance to disease. I.V. drug abuse can lead to
exposure to the AIDS virus and other diseases. Stimulants can cause individuals to go beyond
their physical limits. Heart disease, infections, malnutrition, and death are also attributable to their
abuse. Withdrawal from stimulants can be accompanied by severe depressions and suicidal
thoughts. Depressant abuse can result in respiratory arrest, convulsions coma and death.
Withdrawal from depressants can be very dangerous is not done under a physician's care.
CTS takes a strong stand on substance abuse and will vigorously enforce school rules regarding
alcohol and drugs. We also support and will cooperate with authorities of the Federal
government, the Commonwealth of Virginia, and the County of Spotsylvania in the enforcement
of public laws and regulations regarding alcohol and drugs.
Health Risks
It is important for all students and employees to be aware of health risks related to drug and
alcohol abuse.
Alcohol: Alcohol consumption, even in low amounts, causes a number of changes in behavior
and physiology. The physical effects related to alcohol abuse include increased heart rate, loss of
muscle control, slurred speech, poor coordination and hangover miseries. The mental effects of
alcohol use are impaired judgment, impaired thinking and reasoning processes, poor
concentration and loss of inhibitions. Statistics show that alcohol use is involved in a majority of
violent behaviors on college campuses, including acquaintance rape, vandalism, fights, and
incidents of drinking and driving. Continued abuse may lead to dependency, toxic psychosis, and
permanent neurological and organ damage. Mothers who drink alcohol during pregnancy may
give birth to infants with fetal alcohol syndrome.
Cannabis (Marijuana, Hashish): The use of marijuana may impair or reduce short term memory
and comprehension, alter sense of time, and reduce coordination and energy level. Users often
have a lowered immune system and an increased risk of lung cancer. The active ingredient in
marijuana, THC, is stored in the fatty tissues of the brain and reproductive system for a minimum
of 28 to 30 days.
Hallucinogens: Lysergic acid (LSD), mescaline, and psilocybin cause illusions and
hallucinations. The user may experience panic, confusion, suspicion, anxiety, and loss of control.
Delayed effects, or flashbacks, can occur even when use has ceased. Phencyclidine (PCP)
affects the section of the brain that controls the intellect and keeps instincts in check. Because
the drug blocks pain receptors, violent PCP episodes may result in self-inflicted injuries.
Cocaine/Crack: Cocaine users often have a stuffy, runny nose and may have a perforated nasal
septum. The immediate effects of cocaine use include dilated pupils and elevated blood pressure,
heart rate, respiratory rate, and body temperature, followed by depression. Crack, or freebase
rock cocaine, is extremely addictive and can cause delirium, hallucinations, blurred vision, severe
chest pain, muscle spasms, convulsions, and even death.
Amphetamines: Amphetamines can cause a rapid or irregular heartbeat, tremors, loss of
coordination, collapse, and death. Heavy users are prone to irrational acts.
Heroin: Heroin is an opiate drug that causes the body to have diminished pain reactions. The use
of heroin can result in coma or death due to a reduction in heart rate.
Standards of Conduct
Employees are prohibited from working while under the influence of alcohol or non-prescribed
controlled substances. Employees are prohibited from the unlawful possession, use,
consumption, sale, dispensing, distribution, or manufacture of alcohol or controlled substances
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while on campus, in the parking lots, or in common areas in and around the building. CTS
prohibits underage drinking. This prohibition applies while on the property of the school or when
participating in any institutional activity. Further, employees must report any drug-related or
alcohol-related misdemeanor or felony conviction to the President of CTS.
Employees who are age 21 or older may consume alcohol on campus during well-defined
campus events when alcohol is supplied and served by the school. Employees may not
otherwise provide or consume alcohol on campus. Employees will not report or return to work
under the influence of drugs or alcohol.
Employees who violate these policies or Federal and State laws regarding drugs or underage
drinking will be subject to disciplinary action up to, and including, termination of employment and
may be subject to criminal prosecution.
Legal Sanctions, Alcohol
Students and employees of CTS should be aware of legal penalties applied for conviction in
cases of drug or alcohol abuse. An offense is classified in the Code of Virginia as a misdemeanor
or a felony, depending upon the type and the amount of the substance(s) involved.
Virginia's Alcohol Beverage Control Act contains provisions governing the possession, use, and
consumption of alcoholic beverages. The Act applies to all students and employees of CTS. As
required by the Federal Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989, the
pertinent laws, and sanctions for violations, are summarized below:
1. It is unlawful for any person under age 21 to purchase or possess any alcoholic beverage.
Violation of the law exposes the violator to a misdemeanor conviction for which the punishment is
confinement in jail for up to twelve months and a fine up to $2,500, either or both. Additionally,
such person's Virginia driver's license may be suspended for a period of not more than one year.
2. It is unlawful for any person to sell alcoholic beverages to persons under the age of 21 years
of age. Violation of the law exposes the violator to a misdemeanor conviction for which the
punishment is confinement in jail for up to twelve months and a fine up to $2,500, either or both.
3. It is unlawful for any person to purchase alcoholic beverages for another when, at the time of
the purchase, he knows or has reason to know that the person for whom the alcohol is purchased
is under the legal drinking age. The criminal sanction for violation of the law is the same as #2
above.
4. It is unlawful for any person to consume alcoholic beverages in unlicensed public places.
Violating the law, upon conviction, exposes the violator to a misdemeanor conviction for which the
punishment is a fine up to $250.
Legal Sanctions, Controlled Substances and Illicit Drugs
The unlawful possession, distribution, and use of controlled substances and illicit drugs, as
defined by the Virginia Drug Control Act, are prohibited in Virginia. Controlled substances are
classified under the Act into "schedules," ranging from Schedule I through Schedule VI, as
defined in sections 54.1-3446 through 54.1-3456 of the Code of Virginia (1950), as amended.
As required by the Federal Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989, the
pertinent laws, including sanctions for their violation, are summarized below.
1. Possession of a controlled substance classified in Schedules I or II of the Drug Control Act,
upon conviction, exposes the violator to a felony conviction for which the punishment is a term of
imprisonment of ranging from one to ten years, or in the discretion of the jury of the court trying
the case without a jury, confinement in jail for up to twelve months and a fine up to $2,500, either
or both.
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2. Possession of a controlled substance classified in Schedule III of the Drug Control Act, upon
conviction, exposes the violator to a misdemeanor conviction for which the punishment is
confinement in jail for up to twelve months and a fine up to $2,500, either or both.
3. Possession of a controlled substance classified in Schedule IV of the Drug Control Act, upon
conviction, exposes the violator to a misdemeanor conviction for which the punishment is
confinement in jail for up to six months and a fine up to $1,000, either or both.
4. Possession of a controlled substance classified in Schedule V of the Drug Control Act, upon
conviction, exposes the violator to a misdemeanor conviction for which the punishment is a fine
up to $500.
5. Possession of a controlled substance classified in Schedule VI of the Drug Control Act, upon
conviction, exposes the violator to a misdemeanor conviction for which the punishment is a fine
up to $250.
6. Possession of a controlled substance classified in Schedule I or II of the Drug Control Act with
the intent to sell or otherwise distribute, upon conviction, exposes the violator to a felony
conviction for which the punishment is imprisonment from five to forty years and a fine up to
$500,000. Upon a second conviction, the violator must be imprisoned for not less than five years
but may suffer life imprisonment, and fined up to $500,000.
7. Possession of a controlled substance classified in Schedules III, IV, or V of the Drug Control
Act with the intent to sell or otherwise distribute, upon conviction, exposes the violator to a
misdemeanor conviction for which the punishment is confinement in jail for up to one year and a
fine up to $2,500, either or both.
8. Possession of marijuana, upon conviction, exposes the violator to a misdemeanor conviction
for which the punishment is confinement in jail for up to thirty days and a fine up to $500, either or
both. Upon a second conviction, punishment is confinement in jail for up to one year and a fine up
to $2,500, either or both.
9. Possession of less than one-half ounce of marijuana with intent to sell or otherwise distribute,
upon conviction, exposes the violator to a misdemeanor conviction for which the punishment is
confinement in jail for up to one year and a fine up to $2,500, either or both. If the amount of
marijuana involved is more than one-half ounce to five pounds, the crime is a felony with a
sanction of imprisonment from one to ten years, or in the discretion of the jury or the court trying
the case without a jury, confinement in jail for up to one year and a fine up to $2,500, either or
both. If the amount of marijuana involved is more than five pounds, the crime is a felony with a
sanction of imprisonment from five to thirty years.
Students who need help with substance or alcohol problems are encouraged to call the
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) hotline or visit their
website.
24 hour hotline: 1-800-662-HELP (4357) or www.samhsa.gov/treatment/index.aspx
Weapons
No weapons or ammunition shall be worn, displayed, used or possessed on campus, in
the parking lots, or in common areas of the building, except by authorized members of
law enforcement. Any member of the CTS community who violates this policy shall be
subject to appropriate disciplinary action up to and including suspension or dismissal.
Any person not a member of the CTS community who enters the campus and violates
this policy shall be subject to all appropriate procedures and penalties including, but not
limited to, the application of the criminal trespass provisions of the law of the
Commonwealth of Virginia.
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Standards of Conduct
Conduct which is disruptive to classes or academic processes, including wrongly taking credit for
work or possessing unauthorized materials during tests or examinations; discourteous or
disrespectful behavior toward staff or faculty; willfully damaging school property or equipment;
possession of weapons; and other behavior detrimental to the facility, staff, faculty, or student
body is cause for immediate termination. Students may not re-enroll at any time after termination
for unacceptable conduct.
The Honor Code at CTS is based on individual integrity. This system assumes that every student
accepts his or her role in the academic community with self-respect and duty. Each student
attending CTS is requested to sign the honor code pledge. It follows, therefore, that all work
submitted by a student is his or her work. Suspected violations of the honor code should be
reported to the appropriate Program Manager.
Disciplinary Sanctions
CTS will impose disciplinary sanctions on employees and students consistent with local, state,
and federal laws, up to and including expulsion and referral for prosecution, for violation of the
Standards of Conduct.
Weather Information, Cancellations, and Delays
Classes will be cancelled when the administration of CTS believes conditions are such that travel
may be hazardous. Announcements will be made through the following:
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CTS website at www.careertrainingsolutions.edu
CTS Facebook page at www.facebook.com/cts.edu
Free Lance Star, at www.fredericksburg.com
Radio station WBQB, 101.5 FM, also at www.b1015.com
Radio station WFLS, 93.3 FM
TV station channel 4 NBCWashington, also at www.nbcwashington.com
Holidays and Vacation Breaks
Observed holidays and school breaks are listed in the back of this catalog. Students should
consult their program schedule for more specific and detailed information.
Mobile Phones and Pagers
Mobile phones and pagers are allowed on the premises but must be muted or turned off in the
hallways and during class time. Mobile phone use is allowed only in the Student Lounge and in
the designated areas outside the building.
Property Responsibility
CTS is not responsible for the loss of personal property. The front desk maintains a Lost and
Found. Any property turned in will be kept for a maximum of thirty (30) days.
Learning Resource Center
CTS maintains up-to-date periodicals, books, DVDs, and other educational materials. The
materials may be checked out at the front desk. In addition to the LRC, the school subscribes to
an on-line reference library known as ProQuest. Instructions for student login and passwords are
provided in the LRC. Students are strongly encouraged to use these resources.
Grievance Procedures
CTS encourages students to resolve grievances informally when possible. Students should
report grievances to their program manager or director, who will work informally with the student
to resolve the complaint. If the complaint cannot be resolved informally the student may file a
formal complaint, which must be submitted in written form to the Program Manager and copied to
the President at the address below. Any necessary documentation must accompany the written
complaint.
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In the event that a satisfactory resolution cannot be found with the program manager or director,
all pertinent materials must then be forwarded to the President of CTS at the address below. The
President shall endeavor to reach a resolution acceptable to both the student and the school’s
administration.
Students will not be subject to unfair action or treatment as the result of the initiation of a
complaint.
Career Training Solutions
10304 Spotsylvania Avenue, Suite 400
Fredericksburg, VA 22408
(540) 373-2200 Fax: (540) 373-4465
In the event that no satisfactory resolution can be found between the parties, then all materials
may be sent to:
Executive Director
Council on Occupational Education
Building 300, Suite 325
7840 Roswell Road,
Atlanta, GA 30350
(800) 917-2081 Toll Free
(770) 396-3898 Fax: (770) 396-3790
State Council of Higher Education for Virginia
Private and Out-of-State Postsecondary
Education Unit
101 N. 14th Street, 9th Floor
James Monroe Building
Richmond, VA 23219
(804) 225-2600 Fax: (804) 225-2604
Grievance procedures regarding the Occupational Therapy Assistant program should follow all of
the steps outlined above. In the event that no satisfactory resolution can be found between the
parties, then all materials may be submitted in writing to:
ACOTE Chairperson
c/o the AOTA Accreditation Department
4720 Montgomery Lane, Suite 200
Bethesda, MD 20814-3425
(301) 652-6611 Fax: (301)652-7711
Notice to all Students
CTS reserves the right to revise class schedules, programs of study, course curricula, class
hours, faculty and administrative staff, tuition and fees, and any other material listed in this
catalog when such revisions are deemed necessary. Catalog addenda will be published and
distributed to all students when significant changes occur.
Student Records
CTS is responsible for maintaining academic records on each student according to the provisions
of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA), Public Law 93380 as
amended. The law provides that the institution will maintain the confidentiality of each student’s
educational records. Written consent is required before education records may be disclosed to
third parties, with the exception of accrediting commissions or governmental agencies authorized
by law.
Record Retention
All student records, including academic transcripts, are stored electronically and in locked
fireproof file cabinets. Access to student records is restricted to management and instructors on
a “need-to-know” basis. The electronic records are maintained indefinitely and physical student
records are maintained for five years.
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FINANCIAL AID INFORMATION
CTS offers a federal financial aid program to provide assistance to students in our degree and our
diploma programs who would not be able to attend school without such aid.
Financial need is one of the most important requirements for the student who seeks federal
student aid. Need is defined as the difference between a student’s cost of education and the
amount the student and student’s family can reasonably afford to pay (expected family
contribution). The expected family contribution (EFC) is a standard formula established by
Congress and is determined by evaluating the information the applicant provides on the Free
Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Factors such as income, assets, family size, and
number of family members in college are taken into consideration.
Career Training Solutions supports, and is in full compliance with, U.S. Department of Education
regulations published in the Federal Register on October 29, 2010 requiring institutions to report
certain information about students who enrolled in Title IV eligible educational programs that lead
to gainful employment in a recognized occupation (GE programs). Those regulations also
provide that institutions must disclose to prospective students certain information about the
institution’s GE Programs. This information, along with a Net Price Calculator, is available from
the Financial Aid page of the school’s website (careertrainingsolutions.edu).
Prospective students are encouraged to contact the Financial Aid Department for detailed
information about available student financial aid programs. CTS awards federal student aid to
those students who meet all federal eligibility requirements, and follows all policies and
regulations to manage Title IV (financial aid) funding. CTS Certificate programs are not eligible
for Federal Student Aid.
Note: CTS may limit financial aid to tuition, books, supplies, and student fee expenses.
Financial Aid Application Process
Students are encouraged to apply for financial assistance early because some types of aid have
limited funding. Providing copies of the documents listed below will ensure proper completion of
the application process:
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The student’s and/or spouse’s and/or parents’ federal income tax transcript;
W2s and other records of money earned by student and/or spouse and/or parents;
The student’s and/or spouse’s and/or parent’s untaxed income records;
Student’s Social Security card;
Student’s driver’s license or state picture ID;
U.S Passport or Card;
Certificate of Citizenship;
Certificate of Naturalization;
Permanent Resident Card;
Other documents as requested.
Students are responsible for payment of their tuition and fees even if an application for financial
aid has been made. Any CTS refund of tuition and fees due will be refunded to the financial aid
program from which it came according to the CTS refund policy and applicable federal financial
aid regulations.
Any financial aid commitment involving the use of federal funds is tentative, determined by federal
guidelines and conditioned upon subsequent Congressional appropriation, actual receipt of the
funds by CTS, and completion of the necessary forms by the student as requested by the
financial aid department.
The financial aid office reserves the right to review, rearrange, cancel, and/or revise the award at
any time due to changes in the student’s financial or academic status.
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Funding from federal aid programs is not automatically continued from one year to the next;
therefore students must reapply for each award year and must provide the financial aid
department a copy of the previous year’s federal income tax return and any other appropriate
paperwork as requested.
Financial Aid Eligibility Requirements
In order for CTS to award any federal student aid program, an individual must:
1.
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6.
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8.
9.
10.
11.
Be a U.S. citizen, national or permanent resident of the United States, or eligible non-citizen;
Be enrolled as a full-time and, in some cases, as a part-time student;
Be enrolled in an eligible program of study;
Not be in default on any loan under the Federal Perkins Loan Program (including NDSL), the
Federal Stafford Loan Program, the Federal SLS Loan Program, Federal PLUS Program, ICL
or Federal Consolidation Loan, or have made satisfactory arrangements to repay any
defaulted loan;
Certify that he or she does not owe a repayment on a Federal Pell Grant or the Federal
Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant or a State Student Incentive Grant for attendance
at any school;
Sign a statement of educational purpose;
Determine his or her eligibility for the Federal Pell Grant;
Be registered with Selective Service, if required;
Demonstrate financial need, except for some loan programs;
Be eligible to enroll in postsecondary education by providing a high school diploma or a
General Education Development (GED) Certificate (the school registrar will provide more
information about other types of acceptable documents);
Maintain satisfactory academic progress.
Students who have attended ANY postsecondary school within the past 60 days MUST have a
FINANCIAL AID TRANSCRIPT (FAT) sent to CTS from each institution attended. This is a
requirement even if you have not received financial aid. Students must provide any
documentation, verification, corrections, and/or new information requested by the financial aid
office or the agency to which the application was submitted.
FEDERAL FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS
CTS will award financial aid to eligible students. The eligibility will depend not only on the EFC
but also on the cost of attendance, whether the student is a full-time or part-time student, and
whether the student attends school for a full academic year or less.
Pell Grant
This program provides grants to students based upon a federal analysis of family financial status.
A grant does not have to be repaid. To be eligible for the grants, a student must be enrolled in a
Pell eligible program and show financial need by means of the Free Application for Federal
Student Aid (FAFSA). The student may not have previously received a bachelor’s graduate
degree from another institution. The student can receive only one Pell grant per academic year
and for no more than one school at a time. The amount of Pell Grant funds you may receive over
your lifetime is limited to the equivalent of six years of Pell Grant funding. Since the maximum
amount of Pell Grant funding you can receive each year is equal to 100%, the six-year equivalent
is 600%.
Go to “FAFSA4caster”- (fafsa.ed.gov/FAFSA), which will provide you with an EFC (Expected
Family Contribution). This is the index that colleges use to determine what type of aid you may
receive. Use your EFC “FAFSA4caster” to determine what types of federal grants & loans you
may qualify for, and to give you an estimated award amount for each.
20
CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
Direct Loans
The William D. Ford Federal Direct Loans (Direct Loans) are a low-interest education loan which
offers a grace period for repayment after graduation (or last day of attendance) plus offers
deferment, forbearance, and several types of repayment plans. The funds for these loans are
provided by the Federal government and must be repaid to the federal government. The student
and/or parent can apply for the following types of Direct Loans:
п‚· Direct Subsidized Stafford Loans are awarded on basis of financial need. The
student will not be charged interest while in school. The federal government
subsidizes the interest during this time. The student will be responsible for interest
that accrues while the loan is in the grace period, during repayment and authorized
deferment periods.
п‚· Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loans are not awarded on the basis of need. The
student will be charged interest from the time the loan is disbursed until the loan is
paid in full.
 Direct PLUS loans are loans that the student’s parents or adoptive parents can
obtain to pay for education expenses if the student is a dependent undergraduate
student enrolled at least half time. The student’s parents must have an acceptable
credit history.
Note:
For more information about Federal Student Aid, please contact the
Financial Aid Office.
OTHER FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS
Veterans Benefits
Programs of study are approved for eligible veterans seeking Veterans Educational Benefits.
CTS will make every effort to assist our veterans and their dependents. Students can pick up
application forms at the school or by accessing the Veterans Affairs web site at
www.gibill.va.gov.
Military Tuition Assistance
Programs of study are approved for active duty military personnel. Tuition assistance varies
depending on the branch of service. Funding eligibility and requirements vary; students should
contact their education office for more information. We participate in MYCAA - Military One
Source.
Vocational Rehabilitation
State agencies provide this service to eligible individuals who wish to prepare for and/or return to
the workforce. For further information, please contact the local office of the State Vocational
Rehabilitation Services.
Other Tuition Assistance
A student whose tuition, book, and/or other fees are paid by another institution or sponsor must
present a letter to CTS indicating that the funds will be paid directly to the school regardless of
whether the student completes the course and regardless of grade obtained. A student is
responsible for all tuition, books, and fees if the institution or sponsor does not pay for any
reason.
Payment Plans
Career Training Solutions has tuition plans available for students who may opt to pay cash for
their program. A plan tailored to meet individual needs can be arranged with the Bursar’s Office.
The Financial Aid office determines cash payments with CTS In-House Financing Agreement.
Defaulting on Payment Plans
Failure to repay outstanding loans or other financial obligations according to the terms of the
promissory note or other financial agreement will result in the account being in default. Defaulting
on your financial agreement has a major negative impact on future credit ratings. In the event
that an account reaches default status, Career Training Solutions will contract with a third party
collection firm to make every attempt to collect these funds. All fees accrued for the process of
collection will be the responsibility of the account holder in default.
21
CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
TUITION AND FEES
Application Fee
A non-refundable application fee must accompany all applications for admission. The application
fee for Title IV (financial aid) funding eligible programs is $100. The application fee for CTS
Certificate programs is $50.
Criminal Background Check Fee
There is a non-refundable $35 Criminal Background Check fee required for all programs at CTS.
This fee must be paid with the Application Fee.
Exemption Fee
A fee of $50 is charged for taking an exemption test in an attempt to be exempt from a class.
This fee is charged to the student whether or not he or she is successful in passing the test.
Transcript Fee
Students receive an unofficial transcript when all course objectives have been met and all
financial obligations have been satisfied. Additional transcripts must be requested in writing and
forwarded with a $5 transcript processing fee to the Registrar, Career Training Solutions, 10304
Spotsylvania Avenue, Suite 400, Fredericksburg, VA 22408.
Tuition
Individual program tuition costs are listed in Part III of this catalog. This information may also be
found in the Gainful Employment Disclosures on the web site. Students who interrupt training
(other than for an approved leave of absence) and re-enter at a later date will pay tuition based
on the current rate at the time of re-entry.
Graduation Fee
Students who have fulfilled all requirements for graduation and wish to participate in the formal
graduation ceremony are charged $25 for the purchase of their cap and gown.
Returned Check Fee
Checks that are presented to CTS and are returned for insufficient funds will result in the student
being charged a $100 reprocessing fee.
Books and Supplies
Required books and materials are supplied at the campus. Student costs may vary each
semester depending on courses scheduled and suppliers' prices in effect on the date of
purchase. Current estimated costs for books and supplies are provided each semester.
INSTITUTIONAL REFUND POLICY
CTS plans expenses, engages faculty, selects student, and bases its budget upon collection of
tuition from all accepted students. Refunds or adjustments for withdrawals, dismissals, or
academic failure are made according to the Institutional Refund Policy.
All students will be charged a non-refundable application fee, plus the cost of textbooks,
materials, and supplies received, in addition to tuition charges as specified below.
A student may cancel enrollment without financial obligation within three business days
(weekends and holidays excluded) of the beginning of enrollment, other than the non-refundable
application fee. Textbook fees will be refunded if returned to CTS undamaged. Cancellation
must be made in writing and sent to the Admissions Office, Career Training Solutions, 10304
Spotsylvania Ave., Suite 400, Fredericksburg, VA 22408.
When students begin but do not complete their term or program (depending on the program of
study), the portion of the term or program completed will be determined by the number of weeks
22
CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
attended. Any portion of a week’s attendance will be considered a full week’s attendance for the
purpose of the refund calculation. Retention of tuition and fees collected in advance for a student
who does not commence class does not exceed $100.
Refunds, when due, will be made without requiring a request from the student. When a student
provides a written statement of withdrawal, refunds will be made within 45 days of the last day of
attendance. When a student is terminated for reasons of non-attendance, refunds will be made
within 45 days of the student’s last week of attendance.
Institutional refunds will be calculated as follows for those Title IV programs:
п‚· After the first day of class and during the first 10% of the period of financial obligation,
90% of the tuition will be refunded.
п‚· After the first 10% of the period of financial obligation and until the first 25% of the period
of financial obligation, at least 50% of the tuition will be refunded.
п‚· After the first 25% of the period of financial obligation and until the first 50% of the period
of obligation, at least 25% of the tuition will be refunded.
п‚· After the first 50% of the period of financial obligation, no refunds will be made.
RETURN OF TITLE IV FUNDS POLICY
This policy is separate and independent from the Institutional Refund Policy, above.
If you are considering dropping or withdrawing from enrollment, please contact the Financial Aid
Office immediately regarding possible adjustments to your financial aid.
The Financial Aid Office is required by the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended in 1998, to
determine the amount of financial aid that a student "earned" for the period the student attended
class. When the "earned" aid is less than the disbursed aid, the institution and student are
responsible for returning the "unearned" disbursed funds to the appropriate agency.
A statutory refund schedule established by the Higher Education Act is used to determine the
amount of Title IV funds a student has “earned” as of the last date of attendance. The amount of
Title IV finds “earned” is based on the amount of time the student spent in academic attendance;
it has no relationship to the student’s incurred institutional charges.
Students who complete over 60% of the semester are considered to have “earned” 100% of their
financial aid. No funds can be returned.
Up through 60% in each payment period or period of enrollment, the following refund schedule is
used:
The percentage of Title IV aid to be returned is equal to the number of calendar days remaining in
the student’s period of enrollment within the term (including weekends) divided by the number of
total calendar days in the term. Scheduled breaks of five or more consecutive days are excluded.
This determines the percentage of the term that the student is considered to have attended
school.
This percentage is multiplied by total amount of Title IV funds for which the student is eligible; the
resulting figure will be the amount of funds “earned.”
From this amount, the school multiplies the total institutional charges by the percentage of
“unearned” funds to determine the amount that must be returned. It makes no difference which
type of resource actually paid the school bill; the law assumes that Title IV funds go first to pay
institutional charges.
23
CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
The school must return the “unearned” funds, up to the maximum received, to each of the Title IV
programs, in the following order.
1. Unsubsidized Direct Stafford Loans
2. Subsidized Direct Stafford Loans
3. Federal PLUS Loans
4. Direct PLUS Loans
5. Federal Pell Grants for which a return of funds is required
6. Other assistance under Title IV funds for which a return of funds is required
7. Other Federal, State, private, or institutional aid
The school then calculates the amount for which the student is responsible by subtracting the
funds returned by the school from the total amount of “unearned” funds. The remaining amount is
the student’s responsibility, which must be returned according to the same order of assistance
types listed above.
Once the school determines dollar amounts and which assistance programs must be repaid, the
student will be notified of any amounts he or she will owe.
Unpaid balances due Career Training Solutions that result from funds returned to Title IV
programs and other sources of financial aid will be charged back to the student.
If you have any questions regarding financial aid, please visit or contact the Financial Aid Office,
which will be glad to help you.
REFUND POLICY FOR CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
The refund policy for Certificate programs requiring pre-payment will be calculated as follows:
п‚· A student who enters the school, but withdraws or is terminated during the first quartile
(25%) of the program shall be entitled to a minimum refund amounting to 75% of the cost of
the program.
п‚· A student who withdraws or is terminated during the second quartile (more than 25% but
less than 50%) of the program shall be entitled to a minimum refund amounting to 50% of
the cost of the program.
п‚· A student who withdraws or is terminated during the third quartile (more than 50% but less
than 75%) of the program shall be entitled to a minimum refund amounting to 25% of the
cost of the program.
п‚· A student who withdraws after completing more than three quartiles (75%) of the program
shall not be entitled to a refund.
LEAVE OF ABSENCE
In cases of prolonged illness or accident or other special circumstances that may make
attendance impossible or impractical, a leave of absence may be granted to a student.
The request for a leave of absence must be made in writing and must be approved by the
program manager. The maximum amount of time permitted for a leave of absence is 180 days in
a twelve-month period. Students on approved leaves of absence remain enrolled in their
program of study. No absences are accrued and no additional charges are incurred.
Upon returning from an approved leave of absence, a student returns to classes with the same
status of academic progress as when the leave began. There shall be no restart of the period for
demonstrating satisfactory academic progress. When the approved leave expires, a student
must return to classes. A student who does not return from an approved leave of absence will be
withdrawn from enrollment as of his or her last date of attendance.
24
CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
STANDARDS OF SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS (SAP)
Note:
Standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress Apply to All Students
The maximum time frame allowed to complete an educational program is a period of time during
which a student attempts 1.5 times the number of clock hours required to complete the program.
For purposes of this standard, semester credit hours attempted shall mean any such hours for
which a student has incurred a financial obligation.
Progress will be calculated at the end of the semester for all students on all credit hours
attempted. A determination shall be made at the twenty-five (25) percent point whether a student
has successfully completed at least fifty-five (55) percent of the credit hours attempted toward the
educational objective with a minimum GPA of 1.25. If unsuccessful, the student will be placed on
probation. An evaluation will be conducted again at the fifty (50) percent point to determine
whether the student has successfully completed sixty (60) percent of the credit hours attempted
with a minimum GPA of 1.5. If unsuccessful, the student will be placed on suspension.
Successful completion of a program requires a final GPA of 2.0 or better.
There is a process by which students will be kept informed of their satisfactory academic
progress. Exceptions due to mitigating circumstances may be made by appeal to and after
review by the program manager. The process is as follows:
FINANCIAL AID WARNING -- Students who do not meet the above academic improvement
standards are placed on financial aid warning but are eligible to receive financial aid during that
time. At the end of the financial aid warning period one of the following actions will occur:
п‚·
A student is removed from FA warning if the student is now meeting all SAP standards,
or
п‚·
A student is placed on FA suspension if, after the warning period, the student has not met
the required academic improvement standards.
FINANCIAL AID SUSPENSION -- If the SAP standards are not met after the warning period, a
student is placed on financial aid suspension and is no longer eligible to receive any form of
financial aid, including loans. Financial aid eligibility can be reinstated if a student either:
п‚·
Enrolls and pays for courses raising his or her GPA and/or completion rate to meet the
SAP standards,
п‚·
Appeals the suspension of financial aid due to circumstances such as documented
illness, military service, or family emergency, or
п‚·
Reestablishes satisfactory progress by following the procedures outlined below:
1. Students must have an interview with the program manager to determine the causes
for their lack of progress and to ensure those causes have been eliminated and/or
resolved during the interim period;
2. Students must successfully retake courses previously failed or upgrade the skills
applicable to the student’s educational objective;
FINANCIAL AID PROBATION – Students who are able to re-establish satisfactory academic
progress through successful appeal and remediation will be placed on probationary status for one
semester of day school or two semesters of night school. During that time they must successfully
complete the requirements for satisfactory progress. Financial aid may be re-established for
students placed on Financial Aid Probation.
Grades of “I”, “EX” and “TC” are not included in any calculation of GPA.
A grade of “W” is included in the calculation of GPA as credits attempted.
Leave of Absence will have an effect on satisfactory academic progress only if a grade of “W” has
been assigned for any course begun but not completed during a semester grading period.
25
CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
READMISSION
Students will be considered for readmission on an individual basis. The returning student
reapplies in writing to the specific program director or manager. The following factors may be
considered in readmission and placement:
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
26
Courses the student completed;
Amount of time that has passed since the applicant completed these courses;
Curriculum or course changes during the applicant’s absence;
Courses that the applicant may have taken at another institution while not enrolled at
Career Training Solutions;
Current physical and /or mental status verified by a physician’s statement;
Space availability;
Professional attitude and behavior;
Review of performance in the program during first admission.
CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
PART IIIA – DEGREE GRANTING PROGRAMS CURRICULA
ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE NURSING
(Associate of Applied Science Degree)
Objective
The program objective is to prepare the student to enter the profession of nursing as a
contributing member of the discipline to promote, maintain, and restore the health of clients in a
variety of settings. This is a 15-month program designed for students who choose nursing as a
career. The program’s curriculum provides high quality theoretical, laboratory and clinical
experiences ensuring the student opportunities to develop as a professional nurse and as an
individual.
COURSE
NUMBER
Gen. Ed.
Gen. Ed.
Gen. Ed.
Gen. Ed.
Gen. Ed.
Gen. Ed.
(Pre-req)
NSG100
NSG110
NSG120
NSG130
NSG140
NSG150
NSG160
NSG170
NSG180
NSG190
NSG200
NSG210
NSG220
NSG230
NSG240
COURSE
TITLE
College English I*
College English II*
Humanities*
Behavioral Science*
College Mathematics*
Anatomy & Physiology I & II*
SDV (Must be fulfilled at CTS)
Introduction To Nursing
Principles Of Nutrition
Communication Skills
Fundamentals Of Nursing
Fundamentals Of Nursing Clinical
Pharmacology
Adult Nursing I
Adult Nursing II
Adult Nursing Clinical
Specialized Populations
Specialized Populations Clinical
Psychiatric Nursing
Organizational Management
Psychiatric/Organizational Clinical
NCLEX Preparation
Total Credit Hours:
Program Length:
CREDIT
HOURS
3
3
3
3
3
8
1
3
3
3
7
2
8
11
9
5
9
1
3
4
1
3
96
Day School: 15 Months
Evening/Weekend School: 22 Months
Tuition:
$30,875
Application Fee:
100
†35
Criminal Background Check:
Book Fee:
1,500
Student Fees:
1,475
Total Program Cost:
$33,985
Uniforms, immunizations, a watch with a second hand, and other additional supplies are
the student’s responsibility. †Criminal Background check fee must be paid with
application fee.
*General Education Courses Required. Required general education courses including
College English, Anatomy and Physiology, Humanities, Behavioral Science, and College
Mathematics may be taken as the first semester of this program. For more information,
see General Education course listings in this catalog.
Entrance Test Required
27
CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE NURSING - LPN TRANSITION OPTION
ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE NURSING
(Associate of Applied Science Degree)
Objective
The program objective is to prepare the student to enter the profession of nursing as a
contributing member of the discipline to promote, maintain, and restore the health of clients in a
variety of settings. This program is designed for students who choose nursing as a career. The
program’s curriculum provides high quality theoretical, laboratory and clinical experiences
ensuring the student opportunities to develop as a professional nurse and as an individual.
COURSE
NUMBER
Gen. Ed.
Gen. Ed.
Gen. Ed.
Gen. Ed.
Gen. Ed.
Gen. Ed.
(Pre-req)
NSG145
NSG150
NSG160
NSG170
NSG180
NSG190
NSG200
NSG210
NSG220
NSG230
NSG240
COURSE
TITLE
College English I*
College English II*
Humanities
Behavioral Science
College Mathematics
Anatomy & Physiology I & II
SDV (Must be fulfilled at CTS)
Transitional Nursing
Pharmacology
Adult Nursing I
Adult Nursing II
Adult Nursing Clinical
Specialized Populations
Specialized Populations Clinical
Psychiatric Nursing
Organizational Management
Psychiatric/Organizational Clinical
NCLEX Preparation
Total Credit Hours:
Program Length:
CREDIT
HOURS
3
3
3
3
3
8
1
3
8
11
9
5
9
1
3
4
1
3
81
Day School: 12 Months
Evening/Weekend School: 18 Months
Tuition:
Application Fee:
†Criminal Background Check:
Book Fee:
Student Fees:
Total Program Cost:
$26,000
100
35
1,500
1,475
$29,110
Uniforms, immunizations, a watch with a second hand, and other additional supplies are
the student’s responsibility. †Criminal Background Check fee must be paid with
application fee.
*General Education Courses Required. Required general education courses including
College English, Anatomy and Physiology, Humanities, Behavioral Science, and College
Mathematics may be taken as the first semester of this program. For more information,
see General Education course listings in this catalog.
Entrance Test Required
28
CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES
REQUIRED FOR ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAMS
The following courses are required for the Occupational Therapy Assistant and Registered
Nurse Education programs, as detailed below. Students who have previously taken these
classes or their equivalents may be allowed to transfer the credits into their respective
programs. The acceptance of credits from other schools is decided on a case-by-case
basis; Career Training Solutions cannot guarantee that credits earned elsewhere will be
accepted.
ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ASSISTANT
(General Education Semester)
COURSE
NUMBER
BHS151
ENG111
HUM150
MTH120
BIO141
BIO142
COURSE
TITLE
Behavioral Science
College English I
Humanities
College Mathematics
Anatomy and Physiology I
Anatomy and Physiology II
Total Credit Hours:
CREDIT
HOURS
3
3
3
3
4
4
20
Tuition:
Book Fee:
Total Semester Cost:
$3,000
925
$3,925
Semester Length:
15 Weeks
ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE NURSING
(General Education Semester)
COURSE
NUMBER
BHS151
ENG111
ENG112
HUM150
MTH120
BIO141
BIO142
COURSE
TITLE
Behavioral Science
College English I
College English II
Humanities
College Mathematics
Anatomy and Physiology I
Anatomy and Physiology II
Total Credit Hours:
CREDIT
HOURS
3
3
3
3
3
4
4
23
Tuition:
Book Fee:
Total Semester Cost:
$3450
950
$4400
Semester Length:
15 Weeks
For information about felony background checks, immunizations, fees, and other specific
requirements for the AAS Nursing and AAS OTA programs, please refer to those pages in
this catalog.
29
CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ASSISTANT
(Associate of Applied Science Degree)
Objective
The program objective is to prepare the student to enter practice as an entry-level occupational
therapy assistant working under the supervision of an occupational therapist. This 15 month
program, inclusive of Level II Fieldwork, begins after the student has satisfied the program’s
general education requirements. The curriculum is occupation and evidenced-based to ensure
the student has the knowledge and skills needed to meet the occupational needs of individuals,
groups and organizations as well as contribute to the OT process and emerge as a life-long
learner.
COURSE COURSE
CREDIT
NUMBER TITLE
HOURS
(Gen Ed) College English I*
3
(Gen Ed) Humanities*
3
(Gen Ed) Behavioral Science*
3
(Gen Ed) College Mathematics*
3
(Gen Ed) Anatomy and Physiology I & II*
8
OTA100
Professional Seminar I
2
OTA101
Level I Fieldwork A
1
OTA102
Introduction to Occupational Therapy
3
OTA104
Analysis of Occupational Performance
2
OTA106
Activity and Occupation Lab
1
OTA108
Concepts, Techniques & Interventions in
3
Aging
OTA110
Concepts in Mental Health
4
OTA116
Techniques and Interventions I
3
OTA200
Professional Seminar II
1
OTA201
Level I Fieldwork B
1
OTA224
Concepts in Children & Youth
4
OTA226
Techniques & Interventions II
3
OTA234
Concepts in Adult Rehabilitation:
4
General/Orthopaedic Conditions
OTA236
Techniques & Interventions III
3
OTA244
Concepts in Adult Rehabilitation:
4
Neurological Conditions
OTA246
Techniques & Interventions IV
3
OTA301
Level II Fieldwork A
7
OTA302
Level II Fieldwork B
7
Total Credit Hours:
76
Program Length:
Day School: 12 Months
Tuition:
Application Fee:
†Criminal Background Check:
Book Fee:
Student Fees:
Total Program Cost:
$24,970
100
35
1,500
1,855
$27,790
Uniforms, immunizations, a watch with a second hand, and other additional supplies are
the student’s responsibility. †Criminal Background Check fee must be paid with
application fee.
*General Education Courses Required. Required general education courses including
College English, Anatomy and Physiology, Humanities, Behavioral Science, and College
Mathematics may be taken as the first semester of this program. For more information,
see General Education course listings in this catalog.
Entrance Test Required
30
CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
The occupational therapy assistant program has applied for accreditation and has been granted
Candidacy Status by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of
the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), located at 4720 Montgomery Lane,
Suite 200, Bethesda, MD 20814-3449. ACOTE’s telephone number c/o AOTA is (301) 652-AOTA
and its Web address is www.acoteonline.org. Once accreditation of the program has been
obtained, its graduates will be eligible to sit for the national certification examination for the
occupational therapy assistant administered by the National Board for Certification in
Occupational Therapy (NBCOT). After successful completion of this exam, the individual will be a
Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant (COTA). In addition, most states require licensure in
order to practice; however, state licenses are usually based on the results of the NBCOT
Certification Examination. When you apply to sit for the certification exam you will be asked to
answer questions related to the topic of felonies. Note that a felony conviction may affect a
graduate’s ability to sit for the NBCOT certification examination or attain state licensure.
For further information contact NBCOT at www.nbcot.org
or
National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy, Inc.
12 South Summit Ave., Suite 100
Gaithersburg, MD 20877
(301) 990-7979
31
CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
PART IIIB – DIPLOMA AND CERTIFICATE
PROGRAMS CURRICULA
NURSING DEPARTMENT
PRACTICAL NURSE EDUCATION PROGRAM
(Diploma Program)
Objective
This professional education program is designed to provide quality nursing to meet the needs of
the region and the state. The high quality of theoretical and clinical education ensures the
Practical Nurse student opportunities to develop as a nurse and as an individual while practicing
in various settings and ensures the student possesses the ability to meet and exceed employer
expectations in the job market.
COURSE
NUMBER
PN100
PN110
PN120
PN130
PN140
PN150
PN160
PN170
PN180
PN190
PN200
PN210
PN220
PN230
PN240
PN250
PN260
PN270
PN280
PN290
COURSE
TITLE
Trends in Nursing
Journey Across the Life Span
Anatomy and Physiology
Nutrition
Nursing Skills Theory
Nursing Skills Clinical
Pharmacology
Medical Surgical Nursing I
Medical Surgical Nursing I Clinical
Medical Surgical Nursing II
Medical Surgical Nursing II Clinical
Pediatric Nursing
Pediatric Nursing Clinical
Maternity Nursing
Maternity Nursing Clinical
Psychiatric Nursing
Psychiatric Nursing Clinical
Geriatric/Leadership Nursing
Geriatric/Leadership Nursing Clinical
NCLEX Reviews
Total Credit Hours:
CREDIT
HOURS
3
1
8
3
6
1
7
11
2
10
2
3
0
3
0
3
0
3
0
6
72
Program Length:
Day School: 14 Months
Night School: 17.5 Months
(Night School Clinicals are held on weekends.)
Tuition:
Application Fee:
†Criminal Background Check:
Book Fee:
Student Fees:
Total Program Cost:
$24,500
100
35
1,675
1,100
$27,410
Uniforms, immunizations, a watch with a second hand, and other additional supplies are
the student’s responsibility.
†Criminal Background Check fee must be paid with application fee.
Entrance Test Required
32
CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
NURSE AIDE PROGRAM
(Certificate Program)
Objective
This program prepares the graduate for entry level employment as a nurse aide. Students will
acquire knowledge and skills in relation to clients’ rights and independence, safety and
emergency procedures, infection control, and communication/interpersonal skills. Basic patient
care issues are addressed as well as special care concerns.
COURSE
NUMBER
NA100
NA101
NA102
NA103
NA104
COURSE
TITLE
Introduction to Nurse Aide Program
Patient Care and Safety
Mental Health and Palliative Care
Emergency Procedures and Certification Review
Externship
Total Clock Hours:
Program Length:
CLOCK
HOURS
12
36
12
16
56
132
Day School: 4 Weeks
Night School: 8 Weeks
Tuition:
Application Fee:
†Criminal Background Check:
Book Fee:
Certification Exam Fee:
Total Program Cost:
$1,100
50
35
200
125
$1,510
Uniforms, immunizations, a watch with a second hand and other additional supplies are
the student’s responsibility.
†Criminal Background Check fee must be paid with application fee.
This program is not eligible for student financial aid, and requires a 10% deposit to hold
your place in the program.
Entrance Test Required
33
CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
ALLIED HEALTH DEPARTMENT
MEDICAL ASSISTANT PROGRAM
(Diploma Program)
Objective
This program prepares the graduate for an entry-level position as a medical assistant able to
work in a variety of medical facilities and private practices. Students receive intensive training to
develop both clinical and administrative skills. A graduate of this program will have met the
training requirements to test for national certification.
COURSE
NUMBER
AT101
CM300
AT102
AD101
AT103
CP200
CP201
CP102
CP103
PD101
CX100
CX200
COURSE
TITLE
Anatomy/Terminology I
Microsoft Office
Anatomy/Terminology II
Medical Office Administration
Anatomy/Terminology III
Basic Pharmacology I
Basic Pharmacology II
Clinical Office Procedures I
Clinical Office Procedures II
Professional Development
Medical Assistant Externship Preparation
Medical Assistant Externship
Total Credit Hours:
Program Length:
CREDIT
HOURS
6
2
6
4
4
1
1
4
4
1
1
2
36
Day School: 7.5 Months
Night School: 7.5 Months
Tuition:
Application Fee:
†Criminal Background Check:
Book Fee:
Student Fees:
Total Program Cost:
$12,600
100
35
750
550
$14,035
Uniforms, immunizations, a watch with a second hand, a minimum 2 GB flash drive, and
other additional supplies are the student’s responsibility.
†Criminal Background Check fee must be paid with application fee.
Entrance Test Required
34
CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
Pharmacy Technician Program
(Diploma Program)
Objective
This program combines classroom instruction, laboratory, and clinical experience to prepare
students for employment in hospitals, health care agencies, and retail outlets, as well as
insurance and other third party providers. Students will learn Federal and States laws pertaining
to pharmacy technicians, as well as pharmacology through an overview of drugs and how they
affect the human body, drug classifications, common side effects, drug use and abuse.
Pharmacy math and dosage calculation familiarizes students with methods of drug preparation,
packaging, and distribution, as well as the functions and services provided by hospital and retail
pharmacies. In addition, a comprehensive certification review will be threaded throughout the
course of the program. Completion of the program includes a practical learning experience in a
community setting.
COURSE
NUMBER
PT 120
PT 121
APT120
PT122
PT123
PT124
PD121
PT125
PT126
COURSE
TITLE
Pharmacy Law & Ethics
Pharmacy Principles & Practice
Anatomy, Physiology & Terminology
Pharmacy Computer Applications
Pharmacy Calculation
Pharmacy Compounding
Professional Development
Pharmacy Technician Certification Exam (PTCE) Review
Pharmacy Technician Externship
Total Credit Hours:
Program Length:
CREDIT
HOURS
2
5
3
3
4
4
3
1
3
28
Day Classes: 7.5 months
Night Classes: 7.5 months
Tuition:
Application Fee:
Background Check:
Books Fee:
Supplies:
Total Program Cost:
$10,000.00
100.00
35.00
540.00
60.00
$10,735.00
Uniforms and other additional supplies are the student’s responsibility.
Background check fee must be paid with application fee.
Entrance Test Required
35
CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
SPA DEPARTMENT
ESTHETICS PROGRAM
(Diploma Program)
Objective
This program is designed to prepare the graduate for an entry-level position as an Esthetician.
Students will receive intensive classroom and lab training in the techniques of skin care therapy
and waxing. Graduates of the Esthetics program will be prepared to test for state board
licensure.
COURSE
NUMBER
EST201
EST202
EST210
EST211
EST214
EST215
EST216
EST217
COURSE
TITLE
General Sciences and Basic Anatomy
State Laws & Regulations
Basic Skin Care I
Basic Skin Care II
Basic to Advanced Infection Control
Basic Procedures & Theory of Advanced Topics
Basic Anatomy & Physiology
Business Skills, Licensure Preparation & Review
Total Hours:
Length of Program:
CREDIT
HOURS
3
0
6
5
3
5
4
3
29
Credit
CLOCK
HOURS
45
10
145
105
45
95
65
90
600
Clock
Day School: 7.5 Months
Night School: 9 Months*
Tuition:
Application Fee:
†Criminal Background Check:
Book Fee:
††Student Fees:
Exam & Licensure Fees:
Total Program Cost:
$10,000
100
35
500
1,355
295
$12,285
(* Some Saturdays may be required)
Uniforms and other additional supplies are the student’s responsibility.
†Criminal Background Check fee must be paid with application fee.
††Student fees include general supplies, esthetic class kit, esthetic state board exam kit,
make up kit, and new current clinic equipment that each student owns when they receive
their final transcript.
Entrance Test Required
36
CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
MASTER ESTHETICS PROGRAM
(Diploma Program)
Objective
This program is designed for the student who holds a license as an Esthetician. Students will be
introduced to advanced treatments in the field of Esthetics to include microdermabrasion, chemical
exfoliation, and lymphatic drainage. Upon completion of this program, the graduate will be eligible
to apply for Master Esthetician licensure.
COURSE
NUMBER
ME101
ME102
ME103
ME104
ME105
COURSE
TITLE
Advanced Business and Infection Control
Advanced Anatomy and Physiology
Advanced Skin Care & Modalities and Intro to Advanced
Procedures
Advanced Procedures and Chemical Exfoliation
Lymphatic Drainage
Total Hours:
Length of Program:
CREDIT
HOURS
3
4
9
CLOCK
HOURS
55
65
180
8
5
29
Credit
180
120
600
Clock
Day School: 7.5 Months
Night School: 9 Months*
Tuition:
Application Fee:
†Criminal Background Check:
Book Fee:
††Student Fees:
Exam & Licensure Fees:
Total Program Cost:
$10,000
100
35
750
1,320
295
$12,500
(* Some Saturdays may be required)
Uniforms and other additional supplies are the student’s responsibility.
†Criminal Background Check fee must be paid with application fee.
††Student fees include general supplies, master esthetic class kit, master esthetic state
board exam kit, PCA peels certification, and new master clinic equipment that each
student owns when they receive their final transcript.
Entrance Test Required
37
CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
MEDICAL MASSAGE THERAPY PROGRAM
(Diploma Program)
Objective
This program is designed to provide education, guidance, and an environment for the systematic
study of the art and science of Massage Therapy with an emphasis on medical rehabilitative
modalities. A graduate of this program will have met the training requirements to test for
licensing.
COURSE
NUMBER
MT100
MT110
MT120
MT130
MT140
MT150
MT160
MT230
MT251
MT260
MT280
MT300
MT310
COURSE
TITLE
Professional Foundations/Ethics
Business Practices
Musculoskeletal/Kinesiology I
Musculoskeletal/Kinesiology II
Anatomy/Physiology I
Anatomy/Physiology II
Massage Therapy I
Eastern Thought & Practice
Medical Massage I
Massage Therapy II
Medical Massage II
Certification Review
Student Clinic
Total Hours:
Program Length:
CREDIT
HOURS
1
1
2
2
5
5
5
3
2
3
2
2
2
35
Credit
CLOCK
HOURS
15
15
45
45
75
75
120
60
50
75
60
30
60
725
Clock
Day School: 7.5 Months
Night School: 9 Months*
Tuition:
Application Fee:
†Criminal Background Check:
Insurance:
Book Fee:
††Student Fees:
Licensure Exam Fees:
Total Program Cost:
$10,000
100
35
50
650
875
375
$12,085
(* Some Saturdays may be required)
Uniforms and other additional supplies are the student’s responsibility.
†Criminal Background Check fee must be paid with application fee.
††Student fees include general supplies and a massage table, massage chair, and current
equipment package provided to each student during the first semester.
Entrance Test Required
38
CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
MAKEUP ARTISTRY PROGRAM
(Certificate Program)
Objective
The Makeup Artistry program is for the student with no prior experience in the beauty field or who
may already hold a license in the field of esthetics or cosmetology. This program is designed to
not only cover the basics of makeup application, but to also teach the student more advanced
techniques and specialties that encompass all areas of makeup artistry. The skills learned in this
program can give the student a new career path or enhance the career of a licensed professional.
COURSE
NUMBER
MK101
MK102
MK103
MK104
COURSE
TITLE
Makeup History and Fundamentals
Makeup Foundation
Specialty Makeup
Advanced Makeup
Total Clock Hours:
Length of Program:
CLOCK
HOURS
22
23
25
45
115
Day Classes: 7 Weeks
Evening Classes: 11 Weeks
Tuition:
Application Fee:
Book Fee:
Student Fees:
Total Program Cost:
$1,200
50
100
500
$1,885
Student fees include general supplies, student cosmetic kit, student kit, and tools.
Uniforms and other additional supplies are the student’s responsibility.
This program is not eligible for student financial aid, and requires a 10% deposit to hold
your place in the program. Criminal Background Check fee must be paid with application
fee.
Entrance Test Required
39
CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
NAIL TECHNICIAN PROGRAM
(Certificate Program)
Objective
The primary objective of this course is to train the student in the basic manipulative skills and
safety judgments necessary to obtain a license and competency in this beauty industry.
COURSE
NUMBER
NT100
NT110
NT120
NT130
COURSE
TITLE
Orientation to Nail Technology
Science of Nail Technology
Practices and Procedures
Business Skills
Total Clock Hours:
Length of Program:
CLOCK
HOURS
10
75
55
10
150
Day School: 8 Weeks
Night School: 11 Weeks
Tuition:
Application Fee:
Criminal Background Check:
Book Fee:
Supplies:
Total Program Cost:
$1,500
50
35
125
100
$1,810
Uniforms and additional supplies are the responsibility of the student.
This program is not eligible for student financial aid, and requires a 10% deposit to hold
your place in the program. Criminal Background Check fee must be paid with application
fee.
Entrance Test Required
40
CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
WAX TECHNICIAN PROGRAM
(Certificate Program)
Objective
The Wax Technician program is for the student who wishes to pursue a rewarding career in the
waxing industry. Student of the program will become familiar with the skin and hair, and learn the
basics of waxing and application techniques. Types of wax, proper technique, and instruction in
waxing different areas of the body will give students the confidence and skills to excel in this core
field of esthetics.
COURSE
NUMBER
WAX101
WAX102
WAX103
WAX104
WAX105
WAX106
COURSE
TITLE
Orientation, State Laws & Regulations
Anatomy & Physiology of the Skin and Hair
Infection Control
Client Consultations and Skin Analysis
Waxing Procedures & Treatments
Salon Management
Total Clock Hours:
Length of Program:
CLOCK
HOURS
10
25
25
15
30
10
115
Day School: 7 Weeks
Night School: 11 Weeks
Tuition:
Application Fee:
Criminal Background Check:
Book Fee:
Student Fees:
Total Program Cost:
$1,200
50
35
90
135
$1,510
Uniforms and additional supplies are the responsibility of the student.
This program is not eligible for student financial aid, and requires a 10% deposit to hold
your place in the program. Criminal Background Check fee must be paid with application
fee.
Entrance Test Required
41
CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES DEPARTMENT
CISCO NETWORKING ACADEMY PROGRAM
(Diploma Program)
Objective
This program helps prepare students for a career within the Information and Communication
Technology industry. The Cisco Networking Academy program provides comprehensive projectbased training in computer network design, set-up, maintenance, troubleshooting, and
administration. Students participate in hands-on projects that provide experiential learning, while
preparing for the Cisco certification exam. This exam, given at the completion of two semesters,
determines if the student is fully qualified to work as a Cisco Certified Networking Associate.
While focused on the CCNA certification, students are also being prepared to pursue other major
industry networking certifications including CompTIA A+, Network+, Security+, Microsoft Certified
Server and Workstation Support, and Linux Professional Institute’s (LPI) Linux Essentials
Professional Development Certificate. The academy program is well rounded, and encompasses
those technical domains being sought by today’s employers.
COURSE
NUMBER
BIT121
BIT122
MIS121
MIS122
BIT224
BIT225
BIT226
BIT327
PD121
PD122
COURSE
TITLE
IT Essentials
Introduction to Networks
Linux Essentials
Microsoft Server Support
Routing and Switching Essentials
Scaling Networks
Connecting Networks
Network Security
Professional Development I
Professional Development II
Total Credit Hours:
Length of Program:
CREDIT
HOURS
5
4
4
4
4
4
4
5
1
1
36
Day School: 7.5 Months*
Night School: 12 Months
Tuition:
Application Fee:
†Criminal Background Check:
Book Fee:
Student Fees:
Total Program Cost:
$14,500
100
35
500
650
$15,785
(* Some Fridays may be required)
Certification testing fees are not included in the cost of tuition. Uniforms and other
additional supplies, including a minimum 4 GB flash drive, are the student’s responsibility.
†Criminal Background Check fee must be paid with application fee.
Entrance Test Required
42
CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
PART IV-A – DEGREE GRANTING PROGRAMS
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Associate of Applied Science Degree Nursing Program
Health, fire, and safety measures are emphasized in each course of the program.
SDV100 Student Development
1 Credit Hour
This course introduces students to the skills which are necessary to achieve their academic goals.
Strategies are explored to assist students with improving their study skills, test taking, learning
techniques, and time management and those topical areas which are applicable to their particular
discipline. In addition, the principles and practical application of effective communication are
studied. The discipline of Health Informatics is introduced and the concepts relevant in today’s
health care delivery are explored.
NSG100 Introduction To Nursing
3 Credit Hours
Introduction to Nursing focuses on the student as learner and on the transition into the beginning
registered nurse role. The importance of organization, time management, effective study skills,
test-taking strategies, cultural diversity, and communication skills are emphasized. Maslow’s
hierarchy of human needs and the systematic problem-solving approach are introduced as the
organizational framework to identify, prioritize, and integrate human needs into the delivery of
nursing care. Attention is given to the historical development, current trends, cultural and spiritual
aspects of nursing care, and legal aspects of nursing. These principles will show how nursing
can serve the client and his family, as well as the community. In addition, introduction to
computer skills and math will be integrated to prepare the student for future objectives. The
licensure requirements will be addressed.
NSG110 Principles Of Nutrition
3 Credit Hours
Principles of Nutrition emphasizes the basic foundations of nutrition and the interrelationship with
optimal health. Nutrients, their sources, functions, basic requirements, and an overview of clinical
diets are included in relationship with certain pathophysiology problems encountered in nursing.
This knowledge will serve as a basis for the application of diet therapy to the nursing needs of the
patient.
NSG120 Communication Skills
3 Credit Hours
Communication Skills is designed to help students develop these skills in the nurse-client
relationship. It reviews therapeutic communication strategies as well as barriers in the
communication process. It explores intercultural communication as well as communications with
different groups, genders and clients with special needs. It also emphasizes the communication
process with other professionals, life’s losses, and documentation in the electronic age.
NSG130 Fundamentals Of Nursing
7 Credit Hours
Fundamentals of Nursing focuses on identifying, prioritizing, and integrating the hierarchy of basic
human needs throughout the lifespan. Transcultural nursing concepts are introduced. Systemic
problem-solving approach provides the organizational framework for a holistic approach to
nursing care. Through theory and lab, this course introduces the principles and cognitive and
motor skills essential to nursing practice. This includes: communication, the systematic problemsolving approach, vital signs, health assessment, body mechanics, aseptic techniques, client
safety, nutritional needs, and care for adults of varying cultural and developmental stages.
NSG140 Fundamentals Of Nursing Clinical
2 Credit Hours
This course provides a supervised clinical experience to apply the knowledge from the
theoretical/ lab base of previous courses. Prerequisite NSG 130
43
CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
NSG150 Pharmacology
8 Credit Hours
Pharmacology is designed to give the student an understanding of principles of pharmacology
and specific drug groups using the prototypical approach and emphasizing physiological
classifications and generic nomenclature. Discussion of specific physiological drug groups will be
organized according to their use in treating alteration in activity-exercise, sleep-rest, elimination,
cognitive-perceptual, nutritional-metabolic, and self-perception-self concept dimensions. The
nursing process is applied to the administration of medication, and emphasizes identifying the
altered health pattern for which the medication is administered, promoting and monitoring
therapeutic effect, observing for and minimizing adverse effects, and evaluating the effectiveness
of drug therapy. Drug dosage calculation will be emphasized. Lab will enhance the student’s
ability to apply these principles through hands-on experience with enteral, parenteral, and
cutaneous routes.
NSG160 Adult Nursing I
11 Credit Hours
Adult Nursing I is designed to develop the student’s knowledge of etiology, symptoms, prescribed
treatment, and use of the nursing process in selected disorders. Disorders to be included are:
stress adaptation and pain, death and dying, fluid and electrolytes, and shock, as well as the
diseases of the respiratory, renal, cardiac, and the gastrointestinal systems. Geriatric
considerations are integrated throughout the course. Lab will have various applications of the
skills necessary to perform nursing tasks in these medical surgical areas.
NSG170 Adult Nursing II
9 Credit Hours
Adult Nursing II is designed to develop the student’s knowledge of etiology, symptoms,
prescribed treatment, and use of the nursing process for selected disorders of the integumentary,
hematological/peripheral vascular diseases, lymphatic, neurological, sensory, musculoskeletal,
endocrine and reproductive systems. The geriatric considerations are integrated throughout the
course. Lab will have various applications of the skills necessary to perform nursing tasks in
these medical surgical areas.
NSG180 Adult Nursing Clinical
5 Credit Hours
Adult Nursing Clinical provides a supervised clinical experience that focuses on nursing care of
individuals and families requiring the integration of concepts related to nursing care of complex
medical/surgical disorders. Content includes math computational skills, computer instruction
related to the delivery of nursing care, and the application of the nursing process to the following
disorders: sensory, neurological, integumentary, respiratory, lymphatic, musculoskeletal, renal,
cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, endocrine and reproductive. Use of all concepts of the nursing
process with increasing degrees of skill will be emphasized. Prerequisite NSG 160
NSG190 Specialized Populations
9 Credit Hours
Specialized populations is designed to provide the students with the knowledge, understanding
and nursing skills related to phases of childbearing including the welfare and care of the neonate
and other family members. Care of well and sick children and other family members’ needs
related to those specific conditions are addressed. Principles of prenatal, perinatal, postnatal,
and neonatal care as well as care given during labor, delivery, and puerperium are examined.
Newborn care and assessment are explored. Abnormal conditions of pregnancy, infants and
children and disorders of the newborn are discussed and experiences provided via simulation and
lab. This unit builds upon previous concepts of developmental theory and provides the basis for
the clinical experience. The concept of child abuse will be given particular attention as well as the
legal aspect of recognizing and reporting abuse and coordinating with community resources.
Math calculations for the specialized populations are emphasized.
NSG200 Specialized Populations Clinical
1 Credit Hour
Specialized Populations Clinical provides supervised clinical experiences to build upon the
theoretical/lab knowledge base of Specialized Populations. Opportunities are provided to the
student to be able to provide care to the mother in the hospital during labor, delivery, and
puerperium along with newborn care. Abnormal conditions of pregnancy and disorders of the
newborn are presented and experiences completed. Opportunities are provided to observe and
44
CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
participate in the care given to well and sick children. Experiences of abnormal conditions of
infants and children of all ages are incorporated through hands on application.
Prerequisite NSG 190
NSG210 Psychiatric Nursing
3 Credit Hours
Psychiatric Nursing via theory/lab focuses on the principles and concepts of mental health,
psychopathology, and treatment modalities related to the nursing care of clients and their
families. Alterations in the functional health pattern of cognition-perception, and the nurse’s role
in promoting mental health and coordinating community services are emphasized. Common
alterations in the cognition-perceptual pattern including chemical dependency, violence, abuse,
anxiety, psychosis, and organic conditions affecting cognition are studied.
NSG220 Organizational Management
4 Credit Hours
Organizational Management provides the managerial and leadership roles and skills to prepare
the registered nurse student to provide safe and effective care for a group of clients in both acute
and long-term settings. In addition, it provides information in community health practice.
Principles of delegation and supervisory skills are emphasized. In addition, this course teaches
the importance of communication skills, time management and prioritization fulfilling the duties of
being a nurse manager/leader. The course also emphasizes the role of the registered nurse as a
member of the profession. The importance of the individual nurse as well as the profession at
large in proactively responding to the transformation of the local, state, national and global health
care delivery systems are emphasized. Opportunities for personal growth and career
development are explored.
NSG230 Psychiatric/Organizational Clinical
1 Credit Hour
Psychiatric/Organizational Clinical provides clinical experiences to build upon the theoretical/lab
experience knowledge base from Psychiatric Nursing and Organizational Management. Cultural
diversity, life span issues, socioeconomic concerns, use of human and material resources as well
as community-based resources are integrated into the activities as preparation for the role as an
RN. Clinical will be divided equally between each specialty area. Prerequisites NSG210 and
NSG220
NSG240 NCLEX Preparation
3 Credit Hours
NCLEX Preparation offers a comprehensive review of the major principles of the previous
courses and prepares the student for the National Council Licensure Examination-RN. The major
areas of Nutrition, Fundamentals, Pharmacology, Adult Nursing, Specialized Populations,
Psychiatric Nursing, and Organizational Management are emphasized. Test-taking preparation
strategies and rationale are utilized with numerous opportunities to apply them in a lab setting
before the final examination.
Associate of Applied Science Degree Nursing Program - LPN Transition Option
NSG145 Transitional Nursing
3 Credit Hours
Transitional Nursing introduces the role of the registered nurse through concepts and skill
development. This course serves as a bridge course for licensed practical nurses to review the
critical core areas needed for transitioning into the practice of a registered nurse. Math
computational skills and basic computer instruction related to the delivery of nursing care are
included. Fundamentals and Nutritional therapy will be reviewed. Communication strategies and
differences of roles of the LPN and RN will be emphasized.
45
CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
Associate of Applied Science Degree Occupational Therapy Assistant Program
Health, fire, and safety measures are emphasized in each course of the program.
OTA100 Professional Seminar I
2 Credit Hours
Professional Seminar I (online) is the OTA student portal for exploring health professional
behaviors, OT practitioner role delineation, supervision, interprofessional collaboration, concepts
of therapeutic use of self and medical terminology in the context of an online forum. Students will
learn how to search for evidence-based occupational therapy intervention through AOTA.org,
WHO.org, Healthy People 2020, OT seeker, PEDRO, and CTS ProQuest online library, be
introduced to health information technology, the electronic medical record, use medical
terminology and critically problem solve abbreviations and symbols found in client case studies.
OTA101 Level I Fieldwork A
1 Credit Hour
Level I Fieldwork A introduces the student to the psychological and social factors that influence
engagement in occupation (Standard C.1.7). It is intended "to introduce students to the fieldwork
experience, and develop a basic comfort level with an understanding of the needs of clients [as
well as] engage in experiences designed to enrich didactic coursework through directed
observation and participation in selected aspects of the occupational therapy process." (AOTA,
COE, 1999).
Students will be placed in community or hospital-based settings that support learning in OTA 108
& 110.
OTA102 Introduction to Occupational Therapy
3 Credit Hours
Introduction to Occupational Therapy provides the starting point for continued competence as an
occupational therapy practitioner/ occupational therapy assistant. Topics explored include OT
history, the philosophical base, core tenets, delivery of OT services and key definitions.
Emphasis will be placed on the OT code of ethics, technical standards, OT process, scope of OT
practice, current AOTA documents and Occupational Therapy Practice Framework: Domain and
Process.
OTA104 Analysis of Occupational Performance
2 Credit Hours
Analysis of Occupational Performance specifically focuses on the process of analyzing
occupations and purposeful activity for effective therapy outcomes. It incorporates knowledge of
anatomy, kinesiology, occupational science and application of the Ecology for Human
Performance Framework as the basis for the process of “doing.” The Occupational Therapy
Practice Framework: Domain & Process, (AOTA, 2014) (3rd ed.) and World Health Organization
International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (WHO, 2001) will be referenced
and applied in OTA 106.
OTA106 Activity and Occupation Lab
1 Credit Hour
Purposeful activities and Occupation Lab provides the student with hands on experiences to
apply concepts of kinesiology, anatomy and neuroscience to systematically observe and
evaluate/analyze human “doing.” Concepts of occupational science and the Ecology for Human
Performance Model will set the stage to understand how to conceptualize activities and
occupations to meet the needs and wants of clients, organizations or populations. Occupational
therapy “tools” will be explored and applied in activities and occupations.
OTA108 Concepts, Techniques & Interventions in Aging
3 Credit Hours
Concepts in Aging examines the occupational therapy process in individual, organizational and
population aging. Topics include common diagnoses of aging, six broad areas of practice defined
by AOTA Centennial Vision, trends and concepts of aging, health and well-being, health equity
and determinants of health that interfere with participation in daily occupations and therapeutic
technologies. Use of theory, evaluation and data collection, documentation, evidence and
occupation-based interventions will be presented and applied.
46
CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
OTA 110Concepts in Mental Health
4 Credit Hours
Concepts in Mental Health examines the occupational therapy process in individual,
organizational and population mental health recovery. Topics include common diagnoses,
historical events in psychosocial and mental health care, introduction of Diagnostic and Statistical
Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM V), co- morbidities with severe and persistent mental illness,
introduction to psychotropic drugs and issues that impact mental health well being. Use of theory,
evaluation and data collection, documentation, evidence and occupation-based interventions will
be presented and applied in Techniques & Interventions I.
OTA116 Techniques and Interventions I
3 Credit Hours
Techniques & Interventions I provides the student with hands-on laboratory experience to apply
concepts presented in OTA 110: Concepts in Mental Health. Topics are inclusive of specific
diagnostic categories of DSM V and therapeutic technologies. Students will practice and
demonstrate competency in techniques and interventions related to AOTA practice guidelines.
Group process and community-based interventions will be highlighted.
OTA200 Professional Seminar II
1 Credit Hour
Professional Seminar II is a continuation of Professional Seminar I. In-class and online
discussions prepare the OTA student for Level II Fieldwork and the NBCOT exam. Professional
advocacy, management of occupational therapy services, professional ethics, values and
responsibilities, reimbursement for OT services, scholarship and professional development will be
highlighted.
OTA201 Level I Fieldwork B
1 Credit Hour
Level I Fieldwork B introduces the student to the adult rehabilitation and/or pediatric setting of
occupational therapy practice. It is intended "to introduce students to the fieldwork experience,
and develop a basic comfort level with an understanding of the needs of clients [as well as]
engage in experiences designed to enrich didactic coursework through directed observation and
participation in selected aspects of the occupational therapy process." (AOTA, COE, 1999).
Students will be placed in practice settings that support learning in OTA 224, 234, & 244.
OTA224 Concepts in Children & Youth
4 Credit Hours
Concepts in Children & Youth examines the occupational therapy process in pediatrics.
Topics are inclusive of selected diagnostic categories (autism, cerebral palsy, intellectual
disabilities, learning disabilities, developmental and developmental trauma disorders), therapeutic
technologies, Individual with Disabilities Act (IDEA), normal and abnormal development, autism,
sensory integration, youth transportation, and play. Use of theory, evaluation and data collection,
documentation, evidence and occupation-based interventions will be presented and applied in
Techniques & Interventions II.
OTA226 Techniques & Interventions II
3 Credit Hours
Technique & Interventions II provides the student with hands-on laboratory experience to apply
concepts presented in OTA 224: Concepts in Children & Youth. Students will practice and
demonstrate competency in techniques and interventions related to AOTA practice guidelines.
OTA234 Concepts in Adult Rehabilitation: General/ Orthopaedic Conditions 4 Credit Hours
Concepts in Rehabilitation examines the occupational therapy process for adults with physical
disabilities. Topics are inclusive of selected diagnostic categories (cardio-pulmonary diseases,
diabetes, orthopedic conditions, chronic pain, hand impairments, spinal cord injury, rheumatoid
arthritis, osteoarthritis, fibromyalgia, burn injuries, amputations, and cancer) and therapeutic
technologies. Use of theory, evaluation and data collection, documentation, evidence and
occupation-based interventions will be presented and applied in Techniques & Interventions III.
OTA236 Techniques & Interventions III
3 Credit Hours
Technique & Interventions Lab III provides the student with hands-on laboratory experience to
apply concepts presented in OTA 106: Activity & Occupations Lab & 234: Concepts in Adult
Rehabilitation: General/ Orthopaedic Conditions. Students will practice and demonstrate
competency in techniques and interventions related to AOTA practice guidelines.
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CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
OTA244 Concepts in Adult Rehabilitation: Neurological Conditions
4 Credit Hours
Concepts in Adult Rehabilitation: Neurological Conditions examines the occupational therapy
process for adults with physical disabilities. Topics are inclusive of selected diagnostic categories
(Stroke, Acquired Brain Injury, Neurodegenerative Diseases, Dysphagia, Human
Immunodeficiency Virus); motor learning and therapeutic technologies. Use of theory, evaluation
and data collection, documentation, evidence and occupation-based interventions will be
presented and applied in Techniques & Interventions IV.
OTA246 Techniques & Interventions IV
3 Credit Hours
Technique & Interventions Lab IV provides the student with hands-on laboratory experience to
apply concepts presented in OTA 244: Concepts in Adult Rehabilitation: Neurological Conditions.
Students will practice and demonstrate competency in techniques and interventions related to
AOTA practice guidelines.
OTA301 Level II Fieldwork A
7 Credit Hours
The Level II Fieldwork A experience provides the student with the opportunity to connect
classroom learning and Level I Fieldwork to “real-time” experiences with clients in traditional an
OT practice setting. Students will engage in 8 weeks of full-time, in depth learning experiences
under the direct supervision of a licensed OT or OTA when delivering occupation and evidenced
based services to clients or groups.
OTA302 Level II Fieldwork B
7 Credit Hours
The Level II Fieldwork B experience provides the student with the opportunity to connect
classroom learning and Level I Fieldwork to “real-time” experiences with clients in another
traditional OT practice setting. Students will engage in 8 weeks of full-time, in depth learning
experiences under the direct supervision of a licensed OT or OTA when delivering occupation
and evidenced based services to clients or groups.
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CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
PART IV-B – DIPLOMA AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
NURSING DEPARTMENT
Practical Nurse Education Program
Health, fire, and safety measures are emphasized in each course of the program.
PN100 Trends in Nursing
3 Credit Hours
This course offers a general overview of practical nursing and introduces the student to basic
concepts of the profession, including the history, philosophy of practical nursing, and the nursing
process. Students are also introduced to theories of practical nursing, professional practice roles,
the expectations and relationships encountered in nursing, and legal, ethical, and licensure
issues.
PN110 Journey Across the Life Span
1 Credit Hour
This course is designed to bring into awareness the importance of verbal and written
communication in the health care field. Therapeutic communication will be discussed involving
multicultural, lifespan responses, and specialized population concerns. Life-altering issues and
responses to death and dying will be addressed.
PN120 Anatomy and Physiology
8 Credit Hours
This course focuses on the basic structure and function of the human body for students preparing
for professions in the healthcare field. Topics include anatomical terminology, basic biochemistry,
cells and tissues and anatomy of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous and endocrine
systems. The student will also study special senses, cardiovascular and lymphatic/immune,
respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. The student is introduced to common
human disease processes. Medical terminology will include the terms used for practical
application within the medical field.
PN130 Nutrition
3 Credit Hours
This course is designed to build on the anatomy course with an emphasis on the basic principles
of good nutrition and their interrelationship with good health. Nutrients, their sources, functions,
basic requirements, and an overview of clinical diets are included. This knowledge will serve as a
basis for the application of diet therapy to the nursing needs of the patient.
PN140 Nursing Skills Theory
6 Credit Hours
This course is designed to provide knowledge of the principles and performance of the
procedures that are essential to the nursing care of patients at a basic level through classroom
instruction and laboratory practice.
PN150 Nursing Skills Clinical
1 Credit Hour
This course provides a supervised clinical experience to build upon the theoretical knowledge
base from previous courses. Prerequisite PN140
PN160 Pharmacology
7 Credit Hours
This course includes a review of basic mathematics, weights and measures used in relationship
to the administration of medication. This course also provides basic information relevant to the
safe preparation and administration of medications prescribed by the physician. Practice
administration under the direct supervision of an instructor will be included in this course. The
student will be introduced to the pharmacological actions and the individual’s response to
medication utilizing the nursing process. An additional focus is on the integration of patient/family
education in the plan of treatment.
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CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
PN170 Medical Surgical Nursing I
11 Credit Hours
This course is designed to teach the student the basic knowledge of etiology, symptoms,
prescribed treatment, and experience in the nursing care of selected disorders including fluid and
electrolytes, respiratory, urinary, cardiac, hematological, and peripheral vascular disease. The
nursing process implementation will be taught and reinforced in the clinical setting. The stress
response including pain and issues of death and dying will be addressed. Psychosocial and
cultural issues pertaining to patient care will be explored. This course builds on the knowledge
and concepts taught in the previous courses.
PN180 Medical Surgical Nursing I Clinical
2 Credit Hours
This course provides a supervised clinical experience to build upon the theoretical knowledge
base from Medical Surgical Nursing I. Prerequisite: PN170
PN190 Medical Surgical Nursing II
10 Credit Hours
This course is designed to teach the student the basic knowledge of selected disorders included
in the lymphatic, gastrointestinal, integumentary, neurological, sensory, musculoskeletal,
endocrine, and reproductive systems. The nursing process implementation will be taught and
reinforced for application in the clinical setting. This course builds on the knowledge and
concepts taught in previous courses. Prerequisite: PN180
PN200 Medical Surgical Nursing II Clinical
2 Credit Hours
This course provides a supervised clinical experience to build upon the theoretical knowledge
base from Medical Surgical Nursing II. Prerequisite: PN190
PN210 Pediatric Nursing
3 Credit Hours
This course is designed to assist the student in gaining knowledge and understanding, and in
developing nursing skills related to the needs and care of well and sick children and other family
members. Planned clinical experiences are correlated with theory. Opportunities are provided to
observe and participate in the care given to well and sick children. Abnormal conditions of infants
and children of all ages are discussed and experiences are provided as available. Principles from
the life span will be integrated as well as structure and function, nutrition and drug therapy.
PN220 Pediatric Nursing Clinical
0 Credit Hours
This course provides a supervised clinical experience to build upon the theoretical knowledge
base from Pediatric Nursing. Prerequisite: PN210
PN230 Maternity Nursing
3 Credit Hours
This course is designed to provide the student with knowledge, understanding, and nursing skills
related to phases of childbearing including the welfare and care of the neonate and other family
members. Principles of prenatal, perinatal, postnatal, and neonatal care remain constant, and
pregnancy and birth are presented as part of the normal life cycle. Clinical experiences are
correlated with theory. The care given the mother in the hospital during labor, delivery, the
puerperium, and the care of the newborn is provided. Abnormal conditions of pregnancy and
disorders of the newborn are presented and experiences provided opportunistically. This unit
builds theory taught in structure and function of the reproductive system and is correlated with
nutrition, drug therapy, and nursing skills.
PN240 Maternity Nursing Clinical
0 Credit Hours
This course provides a supervised clinical experience to build upon the theoretical knowledge
base from Maternity Nursing. Prerequisite: PN230
PN250 Psychiatric Nursing
3 Credit Hours
This course is designed to provide the student with skills that will aid in recognizing the emotional
needs of patients. Emphasis is placed on the study of personality formation, communication
skills, adaptive and maladaptive behavior, and problem solving using the nursing process. A
basic foundation of the definitions, therapies, and nursing interventions of specific
psychopathologies is integrated in this subject. The course content is built upon and incorporated
into theory taught in all other areas of the practical nursing curriculum.
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CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
PN260 Psychiatric Nursing Clinical
0 Credit Hours
This course provides a supervised clinical experience to build upon the theoretical knowledge
base from Psychiatric Nursing. Prerequisite: PN250
PN270 Geriatric/Leadership Nursing
3 Credit Hours
This course is designed to provide knowledge and understanding of the normal process of aging.
In order to develop a positive attitude toward the older person in our society, students will be
provided experiences in the areas in which they can relate to the senior citizen who functions
independently in the community, as well as those in health care facilities. Emphasis in this
course is given to the leadership-management roles of the practical nurse and the knowledge and
skills needed to assume this responsibility.
PN280 Geriatric/Leadership Clinical
0 Credit Hours
This course provides clinical experience to build upon the theoretical knowledge base from
Geriatric/Leadership Nursing. Prerequisite: PN270
PN290 NCLEX Reviews
6 Credit Hours
This course offers a comprehensive review of the major principles of anatomy and physiology,
nutrition, pharmacology, medical surgical nursing, maternity nursing pediatric nursing, psychiatric
nursing, and geriatric nursing. The primary focus is to prepare students to take the National
Council Licensure Examination-PN.
Nurse Aide Program
Health, fire, and safety measures are emphasized in each course of the program.
NA100 Introduction to Nurse Aide
12 Clock Hours
This course offers a general introduction to the basic concepts of working in long term care.
Roles and responsibilities of health care workers are discussed. Promoting residents’ rights and
independence as well as communication and interpersonal skills will be included.
NA101 Patient Care and Safety
36 Clock Hours
This course is designed to provide knowledge of the principles and performance of the
procedures that are essential to the care of patients at a basic level through classroom instruction
and laboratory practice. Safety related to the performance of duties is emphasized.
NA102 Mental Health and Palliative Care
12 Clock Hours
This course provides the student with a basic understanding of caring for a resident with mental
health needs as well as the cognitively impaired. Basic restorative care to include physical,
psychological and social aspects will be discussed. An additional focus on the dying patient will
be included.
NA103 Emergency Procedures and Certification Review
16 Clock Hours
This course provides the basic understanding of life support and the necessary interventions
required. Students will review all of the material covered in the classes taken during this program
to prepare the student for the state certification examination.
NA104 Externship
56 Clock Hours
This course provides a supervised clinical experience to build upon the theoretical knowledge
base from previous courses.
51
CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
ALLIED HEALTH DEPARTMENT
Medical Assistant Program
Health, fire, and safety measures are emphasized in each course of the program.
AT101 Anatomy/Terminology I
6 Credit Hours
AT102 Anatomy/Terminology II
6 Credit Hours
AT103 Anatomy/Terminology III
4 Credit Hours
Students will study the structure and function of various body systems. Radiology, nuclear
medicine, oncology, psychiatry, pharmacology, and the blood and immune systems will be
introduced. Medical terminology related to anatomy, physiology, pathological conditions, clinical
procedures and laboratory tests of these body systems and medical specialties will be
emphasized, along with their proper pronunciation and spelling.
AD101 Medical Office Administration
4 Credit Hours
Administrative medical office techniques will be taught, including those related to telephone,
appointments, insurance referrals, patient account management, collections, medical records,
correspondence, payroll, and travel arrangements. Professional ethics and legal issues will be
discussed. Students will be introduced to medical transcription and health insurance claims
processing.
CM300 Microsoft Office
1 Credit Hour
In these courses students will learn the basics of Microsoft Word and Excel. Word topics will
include document preparation, editing, formatting and design, and printing and publishing. Excel
will cover integrating worksheets, graphics and data management for mathematical, financial and
organizational tasks.
CP200 Basic Pharmacology I
1 Credit Hour
This course is a concentration of the mathematical process of medication distribution and
administration. Emphasis is placed on accuracy in mathematics and dosage calculation skills
necessary for safe preparation and administration of medication to the adult and pediatric patient.
CP201 Basic Pharmacology II
1 Credit Hour
This course presents a detailed explanation of drugs, drug classification and identification, routes
of administration, drug actions and adverse reactions. Emphasis is placed on legislation relating
to drugs, drug references, basic principles for the administration of medication and universal and
standard precautions.
CP102 Clinical Office Procedures I
4 Credit Hours
This course is an introduction and study of the basic aseptic and infection control practices,
sterilization procedures, OSHA guidelines, and hazard control. Vital signs, assisting with physical
exams, and taking medical histories are studied and practiced. Blood specimen collection
procedures are studied with the practice of capillary collection and venipuncture collection
methods. Basic hematology is studied and analyzed with practice in hematology skills, including
erythrocyte sedimentation rate, hematocrit, white blood cell count, and peripheral blood smear.
Blood chemistries are discussed and blood glucose is performed and practiced. Other laboratory
procedures for the medical office are studied, including microbiology with culture specimen
collection and urinalysis.
CP103 Clinical Office Procedures II
4 Credit Hours
This course is a study and practice of electrocardiography, the administration of medication,
injection techniques, assisting with minor surgical procedures, and the identification of surgical
instruments. First aid procedures are studied and practiced, and a course for CPR is presented.
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CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
CX100 Medical Assistant Externship Preparation
1 Credit Hour
This course will prepare the student for entry into the medical community. Students will utilize
administrative and clinical medical office skills previously taught in the Medical Assisting program.
Emphasis will be placed on customer service, professional dress and an overall review of the
basic skills needed to perform satisfactorily at the externship site. The primary focus is to prepare
the students for certification examination.
CX200 Medical Assistant Externship
2 Credit Hours
This course is a practical application of general administrative and clinical skills in an ambulatory
care setting. The clinical portion of the course is designed to provide the student with a wellrounded practical experience in an actual workplace setting.
PD101 Professional Development
1 Credit Hour
This course will introduce the student to resume writing, job search techniques and interviewing
skills. All students will participate in this course prior to graduation.
Pharmacy Technician Program
Health, fire, and safety measures are emphasized in each course of the program.
APT 120 Anatomy, Physiology & Terminology
3 Credit Hours
This course introduces the basics of medical terminology: root words, suffixes, and prefixes.
Students will study the structure and function of various body systems and learn associated
medical terms and abbreviations, with proper pronunciation and spelling emphasized. Related
pathological conditions, clinical procedures, and laboratory tests will be discussed.
PT 120 Pharmacy Law & Ethics
2 Credit Hours
This course will provide the student with an understanding of both Federal and State laws as they
pertain to the Pharmacy Technician occupation. Drug distribution, regulations that govern
controlled substances, and storage and dispensing of controlled substances will be examined. An
introduction to the history of pharmacy law and the application of laws governing duties delegated
to pharmacy technicians will be studied. The ethics content of this course will address the
principles of ethical thought as applied within the area of pharmacy practice.
PT 121 Pharmacy Principles & Practice
5 Credit Hours
This course covers theory and skills as determined by national certifying bodies for Pharmacy
Technicians. Students will gain knowledge of the pharmacy environment and the roles and
responsibilities of a technician. The basic sciences and core of pharmacy practices will be
examined, including the latest information on the top 200 prescription drugs, drug usages,
regulations, guidelines, and safety procedures.
PT 122 Pharmacy Computer Applications
3 Credit Hours
This course is designed to provide hands-on training using a step-by-step approach through all
operations of pharmacy clerical and data management. Students will learn how to enter patient
demographics, insurance information, prescription information and inventory data into a
pharmacy computer system. Students will master the technical and administrative skills
necessary to be successful in a pharmacy setting.
PT 123 Pharmacy Calculation
4 Credit Hours
This course helps Pharmacy Technician students master the mathematical calculations
necessary for patient safety when delivering medications. Traditional methods of calculating
medicinal dosages and doses such as ratio/proportion, dimensional analysis, and the formula
methods are taught. This course provides students with the knowledge to perform calculations
for dispensing and administering medications in both ambulatory care and inpatient areas.
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CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
PT 124 Pharmacy Compounding
4 Credit Hours
This comprehensive laboratory course is designed to give students practical lab exercises
representative of a variety of pharmacy settings such as retail, inpatient/hospital, home health
care, long-term care, and mail order, with full feature illustrations of prescription orders.
PT 125 Pharmacy Technician Certification Exam (PTCE) Review
1 Credit Hours
This course offers a comprehensive review of the major principles of pharmacology, dosage
forms, DEA scheduling, anatomy and physiology, interpreting prescriptions, pharmacological
calculations, pharmacy law, community pharmacy, institutional pharmacy and career preparation.
The primary focus is to prepare students to take the Pharmacy Technician Certification Exam
(PTCE).
PT 126 Pharmacy Technician Externship
3 Credit Hours
This course provides supervised clinical and practical experience to build upon the theoretical
knowledge base obtained in previous courses. Students are placed in a clinical pharmacy setting
in which they develop confidence through well-rounded practical experience, allowing them to
perform skills and procedures learned throughout the program.
PD 121 Professional Development
3 Credit Hours
Students will learn how to compose an effective cover letter, rГ©sumГ©, and thank you letter as well
as properly complete an employment application, pursue and research job leads, and prepare for
interviews.
54
CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
SPA DEPARTMENT
Esthetics Program
Health, fire, and safety measures are emphasized in each course of the program.
EST201 General Sciences and Basic Anatomy
3 Credit Hours
Orientation of Esthetics, life skills, professional image, and communication for success are
explored in this course.
EST202 State Laws & Regulations
0 Credit Hours
Students are introduced to the Virginia State laws and the rules from the Department of
Professional and Occupational Regulation for the Esthetics profession.
EST210 Basic Skin Care I
6 Credit Hours
The basics of skin care encompass many areas. This course focuses on facial massage
techniques as well as basic facial techniques. Hair removal is studied and students learn the
correct treatment room set up for various client services.
EST211 Basic Skin Care II
5 Credit Hours
This course teaches skin care and various skin conditions as well as skin analysis. Products and
their ingredients are studied to understand their effects on the skin. Nutrition and the role it plays
in healthy skin is also a focus of this course.
EST214 Basic to Advanced Infection Control
3 Credit Hours
Microbiology and infection control including sanitation, disinfection, and sterilization with an
emphasis on disorders and diseases of the skin are covered in this course. Additionally, HIPAA
rules concerning client records, documentation, and privacy are covered. The student is
introduced to OSHA, FDA, MSDS regulations, and personal protective equipment.
EST215 Basic Procedures & Theory of Advanced Topics
5 Credit Hours
In this course a thorough introduction to advanced topics including light treatments, chemical
exfoliation, microdermabrasion, microcurrent, lasers, lymphatic drainage, body treatments, and
makeup are given to the student.
EST216 Basic Anatomy & Physiology
4 Credit Hours
Students will learn skin structures and function, nutrition, cells, organs, tissues, and the 11 body
systems. Students will also learn to relate muscle groups to massage techniques.
EST217 Business Skills, Licensure Preparation & Review
3 Credit Hours
This course covers business practices, including insurance, liability, and business skills. It also
includes an introduction to career planning, the skin care business, and the marketing of products
and services typical of the spa industry. This course prepares the student for application, testing
and procedures for licensure.
Master Esthetics Program
Health, fire, and safety measures are emphasized in each course of the program.
ME101 Advanced Business and Infection Control
3 Credit Hours
This course provides in depth business skills information including state laws, OSHA, FDA, and
MSDS esthetics regulations, and insurance and liability issues. Additionally, advanced infection
control, disinfection and sterilization methods and protective equipment are covered.
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CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
ME102 Advanced Anatomy and Physiology
4 Credit Hours
Advanced anatomy and physiology and advanced skin structure and functions are covered along
with advanced nutrition and stress management.
ME103 Advanced Skin Care & Modalities
and Intro to Advanced Procedures
9 Credit Hours
Advanced disease and disorders are covered with advanced skin typing and conditions,
advanced cosmetic ingredients and pharmacology, advanced home care, advanced facial
techniques, advanced skin care massage, medical terminology, and pre and post medical
treatments.
ME104 Advanced Procedures and Chemical Exfoliation
8 Credit Hours
Advanced facial devices, hair removal, home care, advanced makeup, spa/body treatments,
alternative therapies, Ayurveda theory and treatments, and medical intervention are covered.
ME105 Lymphatic Drainage
5 Credit Hours
This course is an Introduction to lymphatic drainage and covers tissues and organs of the
lymphatic system and functions of the lymphatic system, immunity, etiology of edema, indications
and contraindications for lymphatic drainage. Also included are manipulations and movements
for lymphatic drainage, face and neck treatment sequence, lymphatic drainage of the trunk and
upper extremities and the trunk and lower extremities, cellulite, use of lymphatic drainage with
other treatments, and machine aided lymphatic drainage.
Medical Massage Therapy Program
Health, fire, and safety measures are emphasized in each course of the program.
MT100 Professional Foundations/Ethics
1 Credit Hour
Professional foundations and ethics provide the background for understanding key concepts,
issues, legal and ethical considerations in the field of massage therapy today. Topics include
boundaries, the therapeutic relationship, ethical touch, ethical business practice, communication
skills, and confidentiality.
MT110 Business Practices
1 Credit Hour
The success of a massage therapy practice rests on an understanding of sound business
principles. This course covers basic business planning skills, massage practice start-up
requirements, and legal insurance considerations. The options of working as sole proprietor,
independent contractor, or as an employee are discussed.
MT120 Musculoskeletal/Kinesiology I
2 Credit Hours
This course presents thorough extensive study of origins, insertions, and actions of the shoulder,
and spine/thorax muscles to include head, face and neck; covers a deeper understanding of the
function of muscles and how they relate to movement.
MT130 Musculoskeletal/Kinesiology II
2 Credit Hours
This course presents thorough extensive study of origins, insertions, and actions of the lower
body muscles as well as muscles of the forearm & hand; continues to cover the function of
muscles, types of contractions, muscle energy source and the function of muscle fibers.
MT140 Anatomy & Physiology I
5 Credit Hours
This course will give the student an overview of the integral workings of the human body and the
mechanisms of health and disease. The regions, organs and cavities will be covered. Medical
terminology relating to the body’s systems will be introduced. Anatomical position, terms and
meanings will be covered. The integumentary system, the body as a whole, the skeletal system
including the joints and the anatomy of the muscular system will be explored.
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CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
MT150 Anatomy & Physiology II
5 Credit Hours
This course will give the student an overview of the integral workings of the human body. The
student will continue the study of anatomical Systems. Biomechanics basics will be introduced.
The cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary, nervous, endocrine and
reproductive systems and their pathological conditions will be covered.
MT160 Massage Therapy I
5 Credit Hours
This course presents the history, requirements for practice of massage; the effects, benefits,
indications and contraindications of massage, equipment and products, sanitary and safety
practices, classification of massage movements, application of massage techniques, and
procedure for a complete body massage. Attention is given to the technical aspects of massage,
including the use of proper body mechanics and equipment. Proper preparation for massage,
including presenting a professional environment, will be established and practiced in lab.
Massage manipulations and techniques will be introduced, developed and practiced in lab.
MT230 Eastern Thought & Practice
3 Credit Hour
This course will give the student an overview on the basics of Chinese Medicine and Eastern
Thought as related to the massage field. Concepts and basics of modalities with Eastern
Thought origins will be introduced, including Acupuncture, Acupressure, Jin Shin Do and Watsu.
Ayurveda will be introduced as well as systems that relate to Chakras.
MT251 Medical Massage I
2 Credit Hours
This course will give the student a foundation in clinical massage approaches and techniques
integrating anatomy and treatment. A review of massage basics, tools and techniques are
provided. Assessment approaches and procedures will be covered as well as clinical note taking.
i.e. S.O.A.P. notes.
MT260 Massage Therapy II
3 Credit Hours
This course continues to present complimentary therapeutic approaches. The techniques will be
practices and refined in the lab. Students will be exposed to different modalities of treatment and
how to incorporate them into an overall treatment plan. Attention is paid to dealing with special
populations like pregnant clients, athletes and the elderly.
MT280 Medical Massage II
2 Credit Hours
This course will teach the basic concepts of thermotherapy and cryotherapy as it relates to the
therapeutic environment. Concepts of clinical massage will continue to be developed. This
course includes forty hours of externship performed at a local medical/rehabilitation facility.
MT300 Certification Review
2 Credit Hours
This course will prepare the students for successful completion of the national certification
examination. CPR and First Aid will be offered during this course.
MT310 Student Clinic
2 Credit Hours
This clinic will provide the students with practical application of everything they have learned.
The students will participate in all aspects of a massage business. They will set and follow up
appointments, work on advertising and provide massage therapy for outside clients. The
students will be supervised by an instructor.
Makeup Artistry Program
Health, fire, and safety measures are emphasized in each course of the program.
MK101 Makeup History and Fundamentals
22 Clock Hours
This course will introduce the student to the evolution and history of makeup artistry. Students
will also learn the principles and practices of proper infection control. Anatomy and physiology of
the face and skin will be covered as well as the importance of professional image, the tools of the
trade, color theory and how to conduct a proper client consultation.
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CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
MK102 Makeup Foundation
23 Clock Hours
This course will give the student a solid foundation on how to create the ideal canvas on any
client while minimizing and accentuating defining features to provide a basic makeup application.
MK103 Specialty Makeup
25 Clock Hours
This course will introduce the student to special event makeup to include bridal and photography
applications, high fashion and high-definition makeup, makeup for men and teens, and makeup
applications for aging skin.
MK104 Advanced Makeup
45 Clock Hours
This course will introduce the student to advanced makeup techniques to include camouflage
makeup, airbrush makeup, lash application, lash perming and tinting, and lash extensions.
Students will also be introduced to Avant-garde makeup, Fantasy makeup, mortuary makeup,
special effects makeup, permanent makeup, and business practices.
Nail Technician Program
Health, fire, and safety measures are emphasized in each course of the program.
NT100 Orientation to Nail Technology
10 Clock Hours
This course is designed to introduce the student to the history of cosmetology and the career
paths for a nail technician. Life skills will be discussed along with ethics and professional image.
In addition, communication strategies and human relations will be explored.
NT110 Science of Nail Technology
75 Clock Hours
This course provides the student with the basic principles and practices related to infection
control in the salon setting. The student is then introduced to anatomy and physiology, skin
structure and growth, along with nail structure and growth. Abnormal conditions and diseases of
the nails are discussed. The basics of chemistry and its relationship to product are explored. An
additional focus is on the basics of electricity.
NT120 Practices and Procedures
55 Clock Hours
This course is designed to introduce the student to the practical aspects of nail technology. The
technique of manicuring and pedicuring will be practiced along with tips, wraps, and gels. In
addition, nail enhancements and nail art will be introduced and practiced in the lab.
NT130 Business Skills
10 Clock Hours
This course will introduce the student to the basic business practices necessary for developing
and implementing a successful career in nail technology.
Wax Technician Program
Health, fire, and safety measures are emphasized in each course of the program.
WAX101 Orientation, State Laws and Regulations
10 Clock Hours
This course covers an introduction and orientation to waxing and its basic fundamentals. Subjects
covered include life skills, professional ethics, state laws and regulations pertaining to waxing.
WAX102 Anatomies and Physiology of the Skin and Hair
25 Clock Hours
This course covers the structures of the skin and hair, the stages of hair growth, the functions of
the skin, the glands and their functions and all components of the endocrine system as they
pertain to waxing.
WAX103 Infection Control
25 Clock Hours
This course covers disorders and diseases of the skin to include allergies, autoimmune skin
diseases, skin cancer, hormone induced disorders, and chemical causing disorders. Also
covered are hair disorders and syndromes, bacteriology, sanitation, and sterilization.
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CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
WAX104 Client Consultations and Skin Analysis
15 Clock Hours
This course covers wax types, client consultations and expectations, health records and release
forms, client preparation and treatment setup.
WAX105 Waxing Procedures
30 Clock Hours
This course covers hard and strip wax basics and application techniques. Students will learn how
to appropriately wax the different areas of the body.
WAX106 Salon Management
10 Clock Hours
This course covers the basics of owning and operating a business to include location and facility,
insurance, equipment maintenance, business plans, accounting and finance and business ethics.
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CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES DEPARTMENT
Cisco Networking Academy Program
Health, fire, and safety measures are emphasized in each course of the program.
BIT121 IT Essentials
5 Credit Hours
The IT Essentials: PC Hardware and Software curriculum provides an introduction to the
computer hardware and software skills needed to help meet the growing demand for entry-level
information and communication technology (ICT) professionals. The curriculum covers the
fundamentals of PC technology, networking, and security, and also provides an introduction to
advanced concepts.
Students who complete this course will be able to describe the internal components of a
computer, assemble a computer system, install an operating system, and troubleshoot using
system tools and diagnostic software. Hands-on labs and Virtual Laptop and Virtual Desktop
learning tools help students develop critical thinking and complex problem-solving skills. Cisco
Packet Tracer simulation-based learning activities promote the exploration of network and
networking security concepts and allow students to experiment with network behavior.
IT Essentials: PC Hardware and Software is a hands-on, career-oriented e-learning solution with
an emphasis on practical experience to help students develop fundamental computer skills, along
with essential career skills.
This curriculum helps students prepare for entry-level ICT career opportunities and the CompTIA
A+ certification, which helps students differentiate themselves in the marketplace to advance their
careers.
BIT122 Introduction to Networks
4 Credit Hours
This course introduces the architecture, structure, functions, components, and models of the
Internet and computer networks. The principles of IP addressing and fundamentals of Ethernet
concepts, media, and operations are introduced to provide a foundation for the curriculum. By
the end of the course, students will be able to build simple LANs, perform basic configurations for
routers and switches, and implement IP addressing schemes.
This course aligns with the CompTIA Network+ Certificate. Prerequisite: BIT121.
BIT224 Routing and Switching Essentials
4 Credit Hours
This course describes the architecture, components, and operations of routers and switches in a
small network. Students learn how to configure a router and a switch for basic functionality. By
the end of this course, students will be able to configure and troubleshoot routers and switches
and resolve common issues with RIPv1, RIPv2, single-area and multi-area OSPF, virtual LANs,
and inter-VLAN routing in both IPv4 and IPv6 networks. Prerequisites: BIT121 & BIT122.
BIT225 Scaling Networks
4 Credit Hours
This course describes the architecture, components, and operations of routers and switches in a
large and complex network. Students learn how to configure routers and switches for advanced
functionality. By the end of this course, students will be able to configure and troubleshoot
routers and switches and resolve common issues with OSPF, EIGRP, STP, and VTP in both IPv4
and IPv6 networks. Students will also develop the knowledge and skills needed to implement
DHCP and DNS operations in a network. Prerequisite: BIT224.
BIT226 Connecting Networks
4 Credit Hours
This course Discusses the WAN technologies and network services required by converged
applications in a complex network. The course enables students to understand the selection
criteria of network devices and WAN technologies to meet network requirements. Students learn
how to configure and troubleshoot network devices and resolve common issues with data link
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CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
protocols. Students also develop the knowledge and skills needed to implement IPSec and
virtual private network (VPN) operations in a complex network. Prerequisite: BIT225
BIT327 Network Security
5 Credit Hours
The curriculum provides an introduction to the core security concepts and skills needed for the
installation, troubleshooting, and monitoring of network devices to maintain the integrity,
confidentiality, and availability of data and devices. Network Security includes the following
features: Students develop an in-depth, theoretical understanding of network security principles
as well as the tools and configurations available. The course emphasizes the practical
application of skills needed to design, implement, and support network security. The curriculum
helps prepare students for entry-level security career opportunities Implementing Cisco IOS.
This course aligns with the CompTIA Security+ Certificate. Prerequisites: BIT121, BIT122,
MIS122.
MIS121 Linux Essentials
4 Credit Hours
The Linux Essentials course covers the fundamentals of the Linux operating system and
command line. It teaches students about the Linux operating system, basic open source
concepts, how Linux is used, and the basics of the Linux command line. It uses a "learn by doing"
approach and gives each learner hands-on access to a Linux virtual machine to practice, explore,
and test Linux command line concepts. Students who complete this course should understand
Linux as an operating system, basic open source concepts, how Linux is used, and the basics of
the Linux command line.
This course aligns with the CompTIA Linux+ Certificate and the Linux Professional Institute (LPI)
Linux Essentials Professional Development Certificate.
MIS122 Server Support
4 Credit Hours
Microsoft Server Support teaches students how to build and maintain physical and virtual servers
using Windows Server 2008-R2 and Windows Server 2012. Course covers the full range of
enterprise client and server deployments, unified communications, security features, performance
optimization, virtualization, troubleshooting, and disaster recovery. It also includes security
policies, tools, and techniques to help protect Active Directory systems from viruses, spam, and
phishing. This is a comprehensive course for anyone who must deploy and operate effective,
reliable, and security-enhanced network file services.
PD121 Professional Development I
1 Credit Hours
This course will introduce the student to rГ©sumГ© writing, job search techniques, and interviewing
skills. All students will participate in this course prior to graduation.
PD122 Professional Development II
1 Credit Hours
This course will introduce the student to the peculiarities of the ICT workplace culture, and career
paths. All students will participate in this course prior to graduation.
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CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES
General Education Courses
Health, fire, and safety measures are emphasized in each course of the program.
BHS 151: BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE
3 Credit Hours
This course surveys the basic concepts of psychology, including physiology, learning, perception,
motivation, human development, personality, adjustment, and abnormal behavior. Attention is
focused on the mastery of basic concepts and theories, along with the supporting research and
application. In addition, this course examines individuals in social contexts, social roles and group
behavior.
ENG 111: COLLEGE ENGLISH I
3 Credit Hours
Through a lens of cultural identities and diversity, students will explore the modes of discourse by
reading and analyzing contemporary critical discourse. English 111 will guide students through
invention, research, writing, and revision methods in order to develop rhetorical skills including
description, narration, explanation, research, and documentation. Students completing this
course should be able to compose descriptive, researched, and documented essays (of at least
1,000 words) demonstrating the conventions of standard written English and manuscript
presentation.
ENG 112: COLLEGE ENGLISH II (AAS Degree Nursing program only)
3 Credit Hours
Through a lens of cultural identities and diversity, students will continue to explore the modes of
discourse by reading and analyzing contemporary critical discourse and relevant culturallythemed fiction. English 112 will focus on the rhetorical styles of exposition and argumentation and
further develop students’ methods of invention, research, writing, documentation, and revision.
Students completing this course should be able to compose persuasive, researched, and
documented essays (of at least 1,500 words) demonstrating the conventions of standard written
English and manuscript presentation.
HUM 150: HUMANITIES
3 Credit Hours
The Humanities examines the human cultural experience, including art, philosophy, and
religion. This course presents a variety of theories and factors impacting cultural competence
and familiarizes the student in cultural diversity and Heritage consistency. Students explore
health variants and evaluate the ways in which they may influence assessment and health care of
diverse populations. Modern healthcare delivery and illness in selected populations are
examined. The course will examine spirituality, community, personal and family relationships, and
education through the lenses of cross-cultural holistic health and healing practices. Students will
advance personal cultural competence skills and address their own assumptions and beliefs
associated with cultural diversity.
MATH 120: COLLEGE MATH
3 Credit Hours
This course reviews and develops computational skills involving operations and applications of
whole numbers, integers, and rational numbers. An introduction to the areas of algebra,
geometry, statistics, and graphical interpretation are included. The course is designed to satisfy
the requirement of college level math indicated for medical programs.
BIO 141: Anatomy & Physiology I
4 Credit Hours
This is a lecture and lab course that focuses on the basic structure and function of the human
body for students preparing for professions in the healthcare field. This is the first of in a
sequence of two courses in anatomy and physiology. This course will prepare students for
continued study of human physiology and disease processes’ in subsequent courses. The
content includes detailed consideration of basic cellular processes, integumentary, skeletal,
muscular, endocrine and nervous system anatomy and physiology. The laboratory component
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CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
closely follows lecture and is designed to support the lecture with a laboratory experience that will
require full participation by the student.
BIO 142: Anatomy & Physiology II
4 Credit Hours
This is the second sequence of two courses in anatomy and physiology for students preparing for
professions in the healthcare field. This course provides a study of the basic structure and
function of the human body with an emphasis on system and current theories of physiology. This
course will prepare students for continued study of human physiology and disease process in
subsequent courses. The course focuses on cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, immune,
reproductive and urinary systems. The laboratory component follows the lecture and is designed
to support the lecture with a laboratory experience that will require full participation by the
student.
SDV 100: STUDENT DEVELOPMENT (AAS Degree Nursing program only)
1 Credit Hour
This course introduces students to the skills which are necessary to achieve their academic
goals. Strategies are explored to assist students with improving their study skills, test taking,
learning techniques, and time management and those topical areas which are applicable to their
particular discipline. In addition, the principles and practical application of effective
communication are studied. This discipline of Health Informatics is introduced and the concepts
relevant in today's health care delivery are explored.
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CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
Part V – ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF AND FACULTY
Administrative Staff
A. Christine Carroll.............................................................................................................. President
B.S., State University of New York, NY
Maureen LaGreca, R.N., M.A. .................................................................................... Vice President
M.A., Norfolk State University, VA
Dorie Milford ..........................Counselor/Executive Director of Spa Programs and The Spa at CTS
B.A., Westminster College, PA
Janene Cabatic ............................................................................................... Chief Financial Officer
B.S., Strayer University, VA
Deborah Blankenbaker ............................................................................Financial Aid Administrator
Annemarie Bartholomew. ........................................................................................................ Bursar
B.A., Radford University, VA
Heather Burnham. ............................................................................. Registrar / Compliance Officer
B.L.S., Mary Washington College
Cynthia Rothell ..............................................................................................Placement Coordinator
B.A., University of South Carolina, SC
Kathleen Carr.......................................................................................... Admissions Representative
Jessica Griner ......................................................................................... Admissions Representative
Dana Cornett, MCSE ............................................................................ Network / Facilities Manager
B.S., Strayer University, VA
Amanda Morton .......................................................................................Nursing Program Assistant
L.P.N., Fredericksburg School of Nursing, VA
Janet Hicks ......................................................................... Business Office Manager / Receptionist
Notary
Lauren Smith ................................................................................................... Admissions Assistant
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CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
Faculty and Staff by Program
Cisco Networking Academy Program
Gary Fee, M.C.T., C.N.I. ...................................................................... Academy Director / Instructor
College of St. Thomas, St. Paul, MN
Augustine Arthur, M.S., CCNA ............................................................................................Instructor
American University, Washington, D.C.
Esthetics Program
Helen Flores-Ford, L.E.I ..................................................................... Program Manager / Instructor
Aveda Institutes, Conroe, TX; University of California, Irvine, CA
Medical Massage Therapy Program
Brian Terrill, B.S., CMT ....................................................................... Program Manager / Instructor
Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA
Randall C. Arnold, B.A., CMT ..............................................................................................Instructor
Thomas Edison State College, Trenton, NJ
Medical Office Professional Programs
Cassandra A. Messam, C.H.I. ............................................................ Program Manager / Instructor
National Health Career Association, NJ
Sharon Deveney, B.A. .........................................................................................................Instructor
George Mason University, Fairfax, VA
Melanie A. Sheaff, C.M.A. ........................................ Medical Office Clinical Coordinator / Instructor
Mount Aloysius College, Cresson, PA
Cynthia Weatherington, L.P.N. ............................................................................................Instructor
Prince William School of Practical Nursing, Manassas, VA
Judith Whitfield, L.P.N. ........................................................................................................Instructor
L.P.N., Kapiolani Community College, Honolulu, HI
Nursing Education Programs (Registered Nurse, Practical Nurse, Nurse Aide)
Kathleen H. Marshall, R.N., M.N. ........................................................ Director of Nursing Programs
Louisiana State University Medical Center, New Orleans, LA
Lori H. Allen, R.N. ................................................................................................................Instructor
Rappahannock Community College, Glenns, VA
Mary A. Byrum, R.N. ............................................................................................................Instructor
Rappahannock Community College, Glenns, VA
Belinda C. Cameron, R.N., B.S.N........................................................................................Instructor
Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, VA
Debra Z. Clark, R.N., M.S.N., A.E.-C. ............................ Nursing Education Coordinator / Instructor
Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI
Mary Ellen K. Cole, R.N., B.S.N. .........................................................................................Instructor
University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA
Noreen C. Collins, R.N., B.S.N. ...........................................................................................Instructor
George Mason University, Fairfax, VA
Rebecca J. Currie, R.N. ...................................................................................................... Instructor
Methodist Hospital School of Nursing, Memphis, TN
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CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
Gail M. DeWitt, R.N., B.S.N. ................................................................................................Instructor
Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA
Candie Dyer, R.N.................................................................................................................Instructor
Charles County Community College, LaPlata, MD
Stephanie W. Erdley, R.N., B.S.N. ......................................................................................Instructor
University of Texas, Austin, TX
Laura K. Gares, R.N., M.A., M.S.N......................................................................................Instructor
University of Pheonix, Pheonix, AZ
Collette H. Hokana, R.N., B.S.N. .........................................................................................Instructor
Molloy College, Rockville Centre, NY
Jane W. Ivey, R.N., M.S.N. ..................................................................................................Instructor
George Mason University, Fairfax, VA
Tamara Dawn Jeffries, R.N., M.S.N. ...................................................................................Instructor
Walden University, Minneapolis, MN
Gerald A. Lowe, R.N., B.S., M.S.N ......................................................................................Instructor
Walden University, Minneapolis, MN
Brach A. McCurry, A.A.S., R.N., C.C.R.N., C.E.N., T.N.C.C., E.N.P.C. .............................Instructor
Career Training Solutions, Fredericksburg, VA
Amanda H. Morton, L.P.N. ..................................................................................................Instructor
Fredericksburg Area School of Practical Nursing, Fredericksburg, VA
Christi Nevel, R.N.C.-O.B., W.H.N.P.-B.C. ..........................................................................Instructor
Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA
Lynnette Jo W. Ojeda, R.N., B.S.N., M.A. ...........................................................................Instructor
University of Maryland, Asian Division, Okinawa, Japan
Mayron Z. Platt-Shumpert, R.N., M.S.N. .............................................................................Instructor
George Mason University, Fairfax, VA
Linda D. Purks, R.N. ............................................................................................................Instructor
Germanna Community College, Locust Grove, VA
Kathleen L. Schroeder, R.N., B.S.N, M.P.A. .......................................................................Instructor
Troy University, Troy, AL
Karly Silkensen, R.N., B.S.N., C.M.S.R.N. ..........................................................................Instructor
Virginia Commonwealth University, VA
Tanya Y. Singleton, R.N.C., B.S.N., M.A., M.P.H., L.C.C.E. ...............................................Instructor
University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL
Esther M. Walden, R.N., B.S.N. ..........................................................................................Instructor
Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA
Ann Marie C. Weed, M.S.N., C.N.S., R.N.C.-OB, L.N.C. ....................................................Instructor
California State University, Bakersfield, CA
Kylie Wright, R.N., B.S.N. ....................................................................................................Instructor
Indiana Wesleyan University, Marion, IN
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CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
Occupational Therapy Assistant Program
Jan Kress, M.Ed., OT/L ........................................................................ Program Director / Instructor
LeHigh University, Bethlehem, PA
Jessica Welsh, M.S.O.T., OTR/L................................. Academic Fieldwork Coordinator / Instructor
Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA
Wax Technician Program
Annette Lundmark, W.T...................................................................... Program Manager / Instructor
Career Training Solutions, VA
General Education Courses
Randall C. Arnold, B.A. ........................................................................................................Instructor
Thomas A. Edison State College, Trenton, NJ
Nathan Frey, B.S., M.Ed ......................................................................................................Instructor
University of Mary Washington, Fredericksburg, VA
Amanda Marsico, M.A. ........................................................................................................Instructor
Southern New Hampshire University, Manchester, NH
The Spa at CTS
Brian Thaler, M.A. ......................................................................................................... Spa Manager
University of Mary Washington, Fredericksburg, VA
Ownership and Board of Directors
Career Training Solutions is owned and operated by TEMACC, LLC, a Virginia State Corporation.
Board of Directors:
A. Christine Carroll, President and CEO
B.S., State University of New York, NY
Maureen LaGreca, Vice President
M.A., Norfolk State University, VA
Dorie E. Milford, Treasurer
B.A., Westminster College, PA
Robert LaGreca, Secretary
A.D., Tidewater Community College, VA
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CAREER TRAINING SOLUTIONS
PART VI – GENERAL HOLIDAYS
CTS will be closed on the following general holidays. These holidays may not apply to all
programs. Please refer to your specific program calendar for holidays and breaks that apply to
you.
2015
New Year’s Day ................................................................................................Thursday, January 1
Memorial Day........................................................................................................... Monday, May 25
Independence Day ...................................................................................................... Friday, July 3
Labor Day ...................................................................................................... Monday, September 7
Thanksgiving.................................................... Wednesday, November 25 – Friday, November 27
Christmas............................................................. Thursday, December 24 – Friday, December 25
2016
New Year’s Day ..................................................................................................... Friday, January 1
Memorial Day........................................................................................................... Monday, May 30
Independence Day ................................................................................................... Monday, July 4
Labor Day ...................................................................................................... Monday, September 5
Thanksgiving.................................................... Wednesday, November 23 – Friday, November 25
Christmas...................................................................................................... Monday, December 26
2017
New Year’s Day .................................................................................................. Monday, January 2
Memorial Day........................................................................................................... Monday, May 29
Independence Day .................................................................................................. Tuesday, July 4
Labor Day ...................................................................................................... Monday, September 4
Thanksgiving.................................................... Wednesday, November 22 – Friday, November 24
Christmas...................................................................................................... Monday, December 25
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