BVCTC Cat-201412200160640.pdf

BVCTC Cat-201412200160640.pdf
www.bridgevalley.edu
2014-15
Course
Catalog
Workforce and Economic Development Divison
General Information
General Information
General Information
BridgeValley CTC
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General Information
BridgeValley CTC
General Information
ACCREDITATION
BridgeValley Community and Technical College is accredited by the Higher Learning
Commission. Information regarding affiliation status may be directed to
Higher Learning Commission,
30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400,
Chicago, Illinois 60602-2504
(Phone: 800-621-7440)
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General Information
Information regarding specialized program accreditation may be directed to the following
accrediting agencies:
DENTAL HYGIENE:
Commission on Dental Accreditation
American Dental Association
211 East Chicago Avenue
Chicago, Illinois 60611-2678
(Telephone: 800-621-8099, ext. 4653).
NURSING:
Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing, Inc.
Dr. Sharon Tanner, RN, Chief Executive Officer
3343 Peachtree Road NEW, Suite 850
Atlanta, Georgia 30326
[email protected]
West Virginia Board of Examiners for Registered Professional Nurses
101 Dee Drive, Suite 102
Charleston, WV 25311-1620
[email protected]
NUCLEAR MEDICINE TECHNOLOGY:
Joint Review Committee on Educational Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology
Of the American Medical Association
RESPIRATORY THERAPY:
Committee on Accreditation for Respiratory Care
1248 Harwood
Road, Bedford, Texas 76021-4244
(Telephone: 817-283-2835).
ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGYABET Engineering Technology Accreditation Commission,
415 North Charles Street
Baltimore, MD 21201
(Telephone: 410-347-7700).
VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY:
American Veterinary Medical Association
1931 North Meacham Road
Suite 100, Schaumburg, IL 60173-4360
(Telephone: 800-248-2862)
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General Information
PROGRAM ACCREDITATION
General Information
BridgeValley CTC
COMPLIANCE STATEMENT
It is the policy of BridgeValley Community and Technical College to provide equal
opportunities to all prospective and current members of the student body, faculty and
staff based on individual qualifications and merit without regard to race, color, religion,
sex, marital status, disability, veteran status, sexual orientation, national origin or age. This
policy complies with the requirements of Titles VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964,
Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the
Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and all other applicable federal, state and local
statutes, ordinances and regulations.
Information on the implementation of the policy may be obtained by contacting:
AA/EEO/ADA/ Justice Officer
Michelle Bissell
2001 Union Carbide Drive
South Charleston, WV 25303
(304) 205-6606
INSTITUTIONAL CONTACT INFORMATION
BridgeValley Community and Technical College
2001 Union Carbide Drive
South Charleston, WV 25303
(304) 205-6600
www.BridgeValley.edu
DISCLAIMER
The BridgeValley Community and Technical College catalog is used as a source of
information for curriculum, course offerings, admission, graduation requirements, and
other rules and regulations pertaining to the college. While every effort has been made to
provide a correct catalog, the institution reserves the right to delete, change, or amend
this information as necessary.
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General Information
On November 8, 1990, the Student Right-to-Know and Campus Security Act was signed
into federal law. This Act (Public Law 101-542) requires institutions to produce and make
available annually the completion or graduation rate of first-time, full-time,
certificate/degree seeking undergraduates.
Graduation rates for all West Virginia public higher education institutions are published in
the West Virginia Higher Education Report Card, which is available at any of the public
colleges and universities and at the main public libraries throughout the state.
For information pertaining to graduation rates at BridgeValley Community and Technical
College, contact the Office of the Registrar and Records at (304) 205-6708.
AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT
Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 prohibits discrimination based on disability in
programs or activities receiving federal financial assistance, including going to public or
private college or university. It ensures to the maximum extent possible that people with
disabilities have the opportunity to be fully integrated into mainstream life. It applies to
all qualified people with disabilities, regardless of where special education services are
required in public elementary, secondary or postsecondary settings.
BridgeValley Community and Technical College is committed to excellence in education
through an accessible, inclusive learning environment that provides leading edge
technology and dynamic service to a diverse student body on campus, in our communities,
and at a distance. Students who are protected by ADA and would benefit from reasonable
accommodations should meet with the Disabilities Services counselor in the Office of
Student Services.
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General Information
STUDENT RIGHT TO KNOW AND CAMPUS SECURITY ACT
General Information
BridgeValley CTC
COMMITMENT TO SOCIAL JUSTICE
The pursuit of truth underlying the mission of BridgeValley Community and Technical
College focuses attention on issues of diversity, power, and perspective, so that students,
faculty, and staff may study and work in a climate of academic freedom and responsibility,
developing the skills, knowledge, and self-esteem necessary for participation as world
citizens. Equal opportunity is a fundamental goal in a democratic society, and BridgeValley
Community and Technical College shares the responsibility for achieving that equity. The
institution is committed, therefore, to ensuring that all persons, including women; people
of color; people with disabilities; gays, lesbians, and bisexuals; veterans; and people of
different religions, ages, and international, ethnic, and economic backgrounds benefit
from the many opportunities the institution provides. In keeping with this responsibility,
the members of the academic community are expected to demonstrate mutual respect,
understanding, and appreciation for all persons; to express that perspective in every
dimension of the institution’s life and mission; and to work cooperatively, representing not
only the interests of their own groups, but also those of the wider community. The
importance of the social justice program goes beyond the benefits that accrue to any one
person or group, to the strengthening of the institution and the enhancing of the ability to
accomplish the mission with which they have been entrusted by the people and the state
of West Virginia.
MEDIATION
Conflict is a part of everyday life and is not necessarily good or bad. The mediation of
conflicts that arise among us is an important tool in helping members of our community
successfully live and work well together. The Social Justice Office administers the
Mediation program at BridgeValley Community and Technical College. Common causes of
conflict are breakdowns in communication, contradictory beliefs and values, changes,
cultural differences, and misinformation. Conflict makes many people uncomfortable,
disrupts work, may cause illness, and is often times difficult to define and deal with.
Examples include, but are not limited to: supervisor/employee relationships; co-worker
behavior; work expectations; schedules; annoying habits; credit for work done; and many
more. Mediation is a structured process of communication that creates a special context
for people to discuss and resolve issues of mutual concern. Mediators lead the process to
clarify issues, identify options, and create an agreed-upon course of action. Mediation is a
valuable alternative in resolving differences. Participation is always voluntary on the part
of all parties and mediation occurs during official work time.
If assistance is needed to arrange for mediation, please contact the Dean of Student
Services at 304-205-6710. There is no charge for this service.
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General Information
BridgeValley Community and Technical College will be the college of opportunity for a
diverse learner population, offering leading-edge technology, innovative ideas, and
dynamic service to our students and our communities.
MISSION
BridgeValley Community and Technical College promotes student success, prepares a
skilled workforce, and builds tomorrow’s leaders by providing access to quality education.
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General Information
VISION
General Information
BridgeValley CTC
INSTITUTIONAL VALUES
Faculty, staff, and administrators share a common set of values that guides the College in
fulfilling its mission. These values influence our actions, guide our decision, mold our
policies, and determine our strategic planning.
Excellence in Education. We are dedicated to excellence in education by providing a highly
competent, innovative, and supportive faculty and staff; facilities equipped with current
technology; quality academic and occupational programs; and integrity and high standards
in teaching, learning, and service.
Accessibility and Achievement. We are committed to access and affordability of higher
education for all students and the delivery of education and support services that will
enable students to achieve their individual educational goals in course, skill set, or
program completion.
Respect for Diversity. We value intellectual and cultural diversity. We believe that all
individuals should have an opportunity to learn and succeed in the classroom, in the
workplace, and in the community and encourage a diverse student body through open
admission and delivery of educational services that support student success.
Accountability. We are committed to efficient and effective management of human and
financial resources that will maintain public trust and ensure a fiscally responsible,
sustainable environment for the institution.
Quality of Work Environment. We value each member of our community; promote free,
open and responsible exchange of ideas; foster respect, trust, and support among faculty,
staff, and students through shared governance; encourage ethical risk-taking and
innovation; recognize exceptional performance and contributions made to our dynamic
learning environment.
Contribution to Community and Economic Development. We are committed to serving
the academic, occupational, and enrichment needs of our communities; enhancing quality
of life; and supporting economic development through effective business and industry
partnerships and collaborations.
Commitment to the Future. We are dedicated to continuous evaluation of the institution
in order to address the needs of the present and the challenges of the future.
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GOALS
Objectives:
п‚·
Prepare students to become successful and independent contributors to society
by providing transfer skills for future technical innovations
п‚·
Maintain a sound assessment program for student learning outcome
measurement
п‚·
Ensure a student-centered learning environment and support services
п‚·
Increase retention rates
п‚·
Increase the number of graduates in certificate and associate degree programs
Goal Two: Institutional Success and Sustainability
Objectives:
п‚·
Promote faculty and staff excellence
п‚·
Increase headcount and FTE enrollment annually
п‚·
Pursue new revenue opportunities to support present and future programs and
services
п‚·
Assess institutional effectiveness and continuous improvement through strategic
planning
п‚·
Leverage the strengths and efficiencies of a multi-campus college
п‚·
Promote the college to community and industry through effective marketing,
branding, and public relations opportunities
п‚·
Provide access to education, training, and enrichment opportunities on multiple
campuses, off-site, or on line
п‚·
Promote sustainability principles throughout college operations
п‚·
Maintain a safe, secure, modern, and positive learning/working environment
Goal Three: Community and Industry Success
Objectives:
п‚·
Exhibit responsiveness and flexibility in course and program offerings to meet
changing workforce needs of business and industry
п‚·
Build synergistic relationships with community, schools, and alumni
п‚·
Integrate community service and civic engagement opportunities into
programming
п‚·
Forge strategic partnerships that advance community, workforce and economic
development
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General Information
Goal One: Student Success
General Information
BridgeValley CTC
HISTORY
BridgeValley Community and Technical College, formed in 2014 with the merger of
Bridgemont and Kanawha Valley Community and Technical Colleges, is accredited by the
Higher Learning Commission. The service region for the multi-campus consolidated
institution includes Fayette, Kanawha, Clay, Putnam, Nicholas, and Raleigh counties.
The new community college evolved in response to the educational and economic
development needs for the State of West Virginia. Associate degree program offerings in
the region began in the late 1940s and early 1950s at West Virginia State College and West
Virginia Institute of Technology. In the 1960s, each of these colleges created “community
college components” on the respective campuses. In 1999, the state legislature created a
separate community and technical college system. Community college components
hosted by baccalaureate institutions began the process of becoming independent colleges.
In 2004, independent accreditation was achieved. The Community and Technical College
at West Virginia University Institute of Technology and West Virginia State Community and
Technical College were formed.
The new community colleges were asked to change names in 2009 to emphasize their
mission and create distinction from the baccalaureate colleges. The Community and
Technical College at WVU Tech became Bridgemont Community and Technical College;
West Virginia State Community and Technical College became Kanawha Valley Community
and Technical College. The two colleges worked collaboratively to avoid duplication of
programs in their overlapping service regions.
During the 2013 legislative session, Senate Bill 438 was passed to consolidate Bridgemont
and Kanawha Valley to form a stronger, more comprehensive multi-campus institution for
the six-county region. A Board of Governors was appointed to oversee the consolidation;
the name BridgeValley was selected to represent the fusion of the institutions.
The official founding date of BridgeValley, March 20, 2014, signifies the completion of all
accreditation requirements for the college and the beginning of a new era in community
and technical college education for the region.
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General Information
BridgeValley Community and Technical College is a multi-campus institution with locations
in South Charleston and Montgomery, WV. The two campuses are 34 miles apart, both
situated near the Kanawha River in the rugged Allegheny Mountains. This diverse service
area includes the New River Gorge National Park reserve near Fayetteville, the state
Capitol complex in Charleston, and the chemical, energy and manufacturing center for the
southern part of the state.
The South Charleston facilities are located on the campus of the West Virginia Regional
Technology Park, a mixed-use research and industry property. The college buildings
include Main, Annex, and the Advanced Technology Center for South Central West
Virginia.
Davis Hall, the main building for the Montgomery campus and adjoining Westmoreland
Hall, are located on the campus of West Virginia University Institute of Technology (WVU
Tech); the Publishing Innovation Center and Diesel Technology Center resides in the leased
facilities on Third Avenue. Access to both campuses in provided through Interstate Routes
64, 77, and 79, U.S. Route 60, Charleston Yeager Airport, and the Beckley/Raleigh County
Airport. Bus service is available through Charleston and Beckley, as well as more distant
points. The Kanawha Rapid Transit (KRT), with convenient schedules between
Montgomery, Charleston, and other towns in the Kanawha Valley. Amtrak service is
available in Montgomery to Chicago.
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General Information
LOCATION
Admissions
Admissions
Admissions
BridgeValley CTC
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Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
Admissions
BridgeValley Community and Technical College adheres to an open admissions policy. It is
the intent of this policy that area residents shall have access to higher education
opportunities commensurate with their interest and abilities. BridgeValley abides by the
Community and Technical College System on residency classification for determining
tuition and fees. For the full text, visit www.wvctcs.org/rules and policies.
Applications for admission may be completed on-line at www.BridgeValley.edu,contacting
the Division of Enrollment Management at the South Charleston campus at 2001 Union
Carbide Drive, South Charleston, WV 25303 or the Montgomery campus at 619 2nd
Avenue, Montgomery, WV 25136, or requesting an application be mailed by telephoning
304.205.6700 South Charleston campus or 304.734.6604 Montgomery campus.
GENERAL ADMISSIONS INFORMATION
Regular (degree-seeking) admission is available for all persons who have obtained a high
school diploma or a General Education Development (GED/TSAC) diploma. Applicants who
have neither a high school diploma nor a General Education Development (GED/TSAC)
diploma may be admitted on a conditional basis, but will be evaluated at the end of each
semester for academic progress. Students admitted on a conditional basis are not eligible
for financial aid. (See section “Conditional admission”) Individuals may also enroll as a
non-degree seeking student to take courses for personal or professional enrichment.
Students who are enrolled with a “non-degree” status are not eligible for financial aid.
Admission to BridgeValley Community and Technical College does not guarantee
acceptance into “selective admission” associate or certificate programs. Selective
admission programs have additional admission requirements. (See section “Programs with
Specific Admission Requirements” for additional information.)
Scores from standardized tests such as the American College Test (ACT), Scholastic
Aptitude Test (SAT), ACCUPLACER or COMPASS are not required for admission. However,
scores from one of these tests are required for placement and counseling purposes, and
must be taken prior to registering for classes.
PLEASE NOTE: West Virginia residents are highly encouraged to take the ACT or SAT test
as scores from these tests are required for certain West Virginia scholarships and grant
programs including the Promise Scholarship, as well as campus-based scholarships from
the institution.
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DEGREE-SEEKING ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS
Persons interested in applying for Certificate (one-year) or Associate (two-year) Degree
programs must submit the following documents to the Division of Student Affairs:
2.
3.
4.
A completed BridgeValley Community and Technical College Application for
Admission.
An official high school transcript or GED/TSAC scores report.
An official transcript from each previous college or university attended.
Note: Official transcripts must be mailed directly to BridgeValley Community and
Technical College from the issuing institution.
ACT/SAT or other placement test (ACCUPLACER, ASSET, or COMPASS) scores.
(Required for placement in math and English courses.)
Admissions
1.
Provisional admission may be granted to degree-seeking students whose admission,
readmission, or transfer admission documentation is incomplete at the time classes begin.
(NOTE: Financial aid will not be processed until all records are received.)
If student records indicate a student does not meet regular degree-seeking admissions
requirements, either the registration will be voided or the student will be conditionally
admitted.
If records are not received by the Division of Students Affairs by the designated time, the
student’s registration will be voided. If the registration is voided, there will be no refund
of tuition and fees.
CONDITIONAL ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Conditional admission maybe granted to students that have neither a high school diploma
nor a GED/TSAC. Where institutional officials have determined the student has the
potential to successfully complete college work. Conditionally admitted students must
meet the following requirements:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Must be 18 years of age or older.
Will be evaluated at the end of each semester of enrollment for academic progress.
Must successfully complete all developmental courses.
Must pass the GED/TSAC and be in good standing before being admitted as a regular
degree-seeking student.
Conditionally admitted students may be allowed to complete a maximum of 12 credit
hours per semester.
Conditionally admitted students are not eligible for financial aid.
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Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
NON-DEGREE SEEKING ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Individuals that wish to enroll at BridgeValley Community and Technical College to take
credit classes for personal enrichment, job improvement, or for reasons other than
seeking a degree may enroll as a non-degree student. Non-degree applicants must submit
the following documents to the Division of Student Affairs.
1.
A completed BridgeValley Community and Technical College application for
admission.
Non-Degree seeking students are not eligible for financial aid.
Non-Degree students who wish to change to the degree-seeking status must complete the
necessary forms in the Division of Student Affairs and also submit the following
documents.
1.
2.
3.
An official high school transcript or GED/TSAC scores report.
An official transcript from each previous college or university attended. (Note:
Official transcripts must be mailed directly to BridgeValley Community and Technical
from the issuing institution.)
ACT/SAT or other placement test (ACCUPLACER, ASSET, or COMPASS) scores.
(Required for placement in math and English courses.)
TRANSFER STUDENT REQUIREMENTS
Individuals may transfer to BridgeValley Community and Technical College from other
accredited postsecondary institutions. Transfer students must meet BridgeValley’s
admission requirements. The transferring applicant must submit the following documents
to the Division of Students Affairs:
1.
2.
3.
4.
A completed BridgeValley Community and Technical College Application for
Admission.
An official transcript from each previous college or university attended. (Note:
Official transcripts must be mailed directly to BridgeValley Community and
Technical from the issuing institution.)
An official high school transcript or GED/TSAC score report for transfer applicants
with less than 15 credit hours of college work.
ACT, SAT scores, or other state-approved placement test scores are required for
transfer applicants with less than 15 semester hours of college credit and for those
who have not successfully completed the first level of college math and English
course’s in their program.
BridgeValley Community and Technical College reserves the right to suspend or expel any
student who does not reveal previous college records and/or who misrepresents the truth
on any admission document.
The institution abides by the West Virginia Council for Community and Technical College
Education Series 17: Rules and Policies for Transferability of Credits and Grades at West
Virginia Pubic Colleges and Universities.
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Admissions
Credits and grades for college-level courses completed at previous accredited institutions
will be evaluated by the Registrar’s Office and recorded on the BridgeValley Community
and Technical College transcript with equivalents noted when applicable.
READMISSION DUE TO NON-ATTENDANCE
Individuals seeking readmission because of discontinued studies by not enrolling for one
or more academic semesters must complete a readmission application in the Division of
Student Affairs. Students with a cumulative GPA below 2.00 will be required to meet with
the Vice President of Academic Affairs prior to registering for any courses offered by
BridgeValley Community and Technical College. Students who have attended another
institution(s) during their absence from BridgeValley Community and Technical College will
be considered transfer students. Please follow the instructions listed under “Transfer
Students”. Readmitted students may be required to meet academic standards which have
changed during their absence.
READMISSION DUE TO ACADEMIC REASONS
Persons who were required to discontinue their studies due to academic reasons and are
now seeking readmission must submit a readmission application to the Academic Affairs
Office with complete academic records and a narrative as indicated on the application. The
student must schedule a meeting with the Vice President for Academic Affairs after
submitting this information where a decision on readmission will be made and the
conditions of readmission will be applied, if appropriate.
TRANSIENT STUDENTS REQUIREMENTS
Students enrolled at another postsecondary institution wishing to enroll in courses at
BridgeValley may be admitted as transient students. The transient student must submit
the following:
1.
2.
A completed BridgeValley Community and Technical College Application.
A completed Transient Approval Form from their home institution.
BridgeValley Community and Technical College students who wish to enroll at another
institution as a transient student must complete a BridgeValley Transient Approval Form
with appropriate signature approvals.
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Admissions
READMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
EARLY ENTRANCE HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS REQUIREMENTS
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
The student must complete a consent form signed by his/her parent and the high
school principal or counselor.
The student must submit a completed BridgeValley Community and Technical College
application for admission.
The student must have a 2.5 average or be recommended by a counselor or a
principal.
Early entry students must meet prerequisites for courses, which may include ACT/SAT
scores, or other state-approved placement test scores.
Early entry students are not eligible for financial aid .
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT REQUIREMENTS
International students must have their completed application on file at least four (4)
months prior to their intended date of enrollment. International students must complete
the equivalent of a secondary education with higher than average grades. The Test of
English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) is required of all students with a native language
other than English. International students must submit the following documentation to
the Division of Students Affairs.
1.
2.
3.
4.
An international student application at least four (4) months prior to their intended
date of enrollment.
Official records equivalent of a secondary education with higher than average grades.
Official transcripts (from all institutions) of previous college work completed. All
documents must be translated to the English language.
The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) with a score of 500 on the paperbased test, or 173 on the computer-based version, or 61 or above on the internetbased version, or a score of 6.5 or above on the International English Language
Testing Service (IELTS). Only official score reports for the TOEFL are acceptable.
Under no circumstances will photocopies serve as an official score report.
A certification of “Financial Support Statement” from a financial institution.
Additional standardized tests are required for placement and counseling purposes, and
must be taken prior to registration. Acceptable placement tests include ACT, SAT,
Accuplacer or COMPASS.
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Admissions
ADMISSION TO SPECIFIC ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
Admissions
SELECTIVE ADMISSION PROGRAMS
BLASTING TECHNOLOGY, ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
Blasting Technology is a limited enrollment program, which admits one class of students
each fall semester (exceptions may be considered by the blasting program coordinator).
All admission materials must be received by the Admission’s Office at least one calendar
month before scheduled classes begin.
Students will be registered as Civil Engineering Technology majors and transferred to the
Blasting Technician A.A.S. program when complete documentation is obtained.
Each applicant will be required to pass a background check based upon Federal Bureau
of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives criteria.
Persons prohibited from the Blasting Technician program include those:
1. Under indictment or information in any court for a crime punishable by imprisonment
for a term exceeding one year;
2. Convicted of a crime punishable by imprisonment for a term exceeding one year;
3. Who is a fugitive from justice;
4. Who is an unlawful user of or addicted to any controlled substance;
5. Who have been adjudicated as a mental defective or has been committed to any
mental institution;
6. Who is an illegal alien.
7. Who has been discharged from the military under dishonorable conditions;
8. Who has renounced his or her United States citizenship.
Students must agree to refrain from any action that :
1. Constitutes a threat to another student or employee’s health or safety.
2. Violates state or federal laws or standards.
3. Violates policy and procedure of either the school or the field camp site. In addition
students may be required to submit to random drug tests while at the field camp
sites.
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Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
DENTAL HYGIENE, ASSOCIATE OF SCIENE
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
The Dental Hygiene program is a limited enrollment program which admits one
class each fall semester. An admissions committee selects candidates. To be
considered for admission, applicants must first meet one of the following
minimum requirement options:
MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS
(Choose one option)
Option 1:
1.
2.
3.
4.
ACT composite score of 20. (SAT equivalent composite score 950)
High school grade point average of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale. (GED equivalent average 500;
sub scores 410)
ACT math score of 19.
Two high school science courses completed at a “B” or higher level, including
Chemistry.
Option 2:
1.
2.
3.
4.
High School Graduation/GED/TASC completion
12 hours college credit with a minimum grade of “C” in each course at an accredited
institution of higher learning within the past five years. These courses must have
included 8 credit hours of General Chemistry and a Biology both with laboratory
components. (Developmental or remedial courses will not be considered).
ACT math score of 19. If the applicant’s ACT math score is less than 19, then the
individual must complete appropriate developmental math course/courses
equivalent to BridgeValley MATH 111.
Cumulative college grade point average of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale.
In addition to meeting minimum requirements, all applicants must submit:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
A one page, handwritten essay detailing reason for application to the program.
Two letters of recommendation for admission into the program.
20 hours of shadowing experience in a dental office verified by a letter from the
supervising dentist.
Official copy of high school transcripts.
Official copy of previous college transcripts.
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Admissions
BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS/RADIATION SAFETY/HIPAA/ETHICS POLICIES:
Department policies related to bloodborne pathogens, radiation safety, HIPAA and Ethics
are available for review at www.bridgevalley.edu
All transcripts, essays, recommendations, shadowing documentation and related
materials are due in the admissions office by January 31st for consideration of fall
admission.
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Admissions
Current students enrolled in BridgeValley Community & Technical College who meet the
above guidelines will be given first consideration for admission when having the same
qualifications as an off-campus student.
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES TECHNOLOGY (PARAMEDIC), ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED
SCIENCE
ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS
The Emergency Medical Services Technology program is a selective admission program.
Candidates must meet the admission requirements listed below.
All persons seeking admission to the A.A.S. Degree Program in Emergency Medical
Services Technology:
1. Must be fully admitted to BridgeValley Community and Technical College. This
includes the submission of ACT or SAT I scores, official high school transcripts or GED
score reports, and official transcripts from all previous colleges attended to the
Admissions Office.
2. Must also submit a EMST Program application to the EMST Program by October 1
preceding the Spring admission. These applications are available on the website,
www.bridgevalley.edu. Official copies of transcripts must accompany application to
the EMST Program; however, an official BVCTC transcript listing all previous college
credit is acceptable.
3. Must have a current, valid West Virginia EMT certification.
High School Applicants (or those with less than 12 college credit hours):
1. Must have a minimum of a 3.0 High School grade point average (GPA) or GED with 45
on all sub-scores.
2. Must have a minimum ACT composite score of 21 with a minimum score of 19 in all
sub-scores or 1000 SAT I with 490 verbal and 480 math sub-scores.
College Applicants (with 12 or more credit hours):
1. Must have a minimum of a 2.50 cumulative GPA on all previous college credits.
2. Must be eligible for English 101 and Math 113.
Students should be aware that clinical agencies require students to pass a criminal
background check and drug screen in order to have learning experiences in their facilities.
This will require a criminal and traffic violation check. Other additional admission
requirements, such as a screening interview, may be required. All students admitted must
meet and be able to perform the Technical Standards of the Program.
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BridgeValley CTC
Admissions
MEDICAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY, ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
Admissions
ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS
The Medical Laboratory Technology is a selective admission program. Candidates must
meet the admission requirements listed below.
All persons seeking admission to the A.A.S. Degree Program in Medical Laboratory
Technology:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Must be fully admitted to BridgeValley Community and Technical College. This
includes the submission of ACT or SAT 1 scores, official high school transcripts or
GED/TSAC scores reports and official transcripts from all previous colleges attended.
Must also submit a MLT Program application to the MLT Program during the
application period of January through March preceding the summer admission.
These applications are available on the website, www.bridgevalley.edu. Official
copies of transcripts must accompany application to the MLT Program; however, an
official BridgeValley Community and Technical College transcript listing all previous
college credit is acceptable.
Must have completed all the prerequisite courses or have them in progress by the
application period.
Must have a minimum of a 2.75 cumulative GPA on all previous college credits.
Must have a grade of “C” or better in all science classes.
Students should be aware that clinical agencies require students to pass a criminal
background check and drug screen in order to have learning experiences in their facilities.
This will require a criminal background check. Other additional admission requirements,
such as screening interviews or health screenings, may be required. All students admitted
must meet and be able to perform the Technical Standards of the Program.
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
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Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
NURSING, ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS
The Nursing program is a selected admission program. Candidates must submit all
documentation listed below:
All persons seeking admission to the A.A.S. Degree Program in Nursing:
1. Must be fully admitted to BridgeValley Community and Technical College. This
includes the submission of ACT or SAT 1 scores, official high school transcripts or
GED/TASC score reports and official transcripts from all previous colleges attended to
the Admissions Office.
2. Must also submit a Nursing Program application to the Nursing Program by February
1 preceding the fall admission. These applications are available on the website,
www.bridgevalley.edu. Official copies of transcripts must accompany application to
the Nursing Program; however, an official BridgeValley Community and Technical
College transcript listing all previous college credit is acceptable.
3. Must take the TEAS-V Nursing Admissions Test and score a minimum score of 60.5.
High School Applicants (or those with less than 12 college credit hours):
1. Must have a minimum of a 3.0 High School grade point average (GPA) or GED with 45
on all sub-scores.
2. Must have a minimum ACT composite score of 21 with a minimum score of 19 in all
sub-scores or 1000 SAT I with 490 verbal and 480 math sub-scores.
College Applicants (with 12 or more credit hours):
1. Must have a minimum of a 2.50 cumulative GPA on all previous college credits.
2. Must be eligible for English 101 and Math 113.
LPN-RN Applicants
1. Must be fully admitted to BridgeValley Community and Technical College. This
includes the submission of ACT or SAT 1 scores and official high school or vocational
and college transcripts/GED/TASC scores to the Admissions Office.
2. Must also submit a LPN-RN Nursing Program application to the Nursing Program by
March 3 preceeding the fall admission. Official copies of transcripts must accompany
application to the nursing program; however an official BridgeValley Community and
Technical College transcript listing all previous college credit is acceptable.
3. Must take the TEAS-V Nursing Admissions Test and score a minimum score of 60.5.
4. Must have a minimum of a 2.50 GPA on all previous vocational or college credits.
Students should be aware that clinical agencies require students to pass a criminal
background check and drug screen in order to have learning experiences in their facilities.
Additionally, the West Virginia State Board of Examiners for Registered Professional
Nurses requires graduates to be “of good moral character,” according to Chapter 30 of the
West Virginia Code, in order to take the NCLEX licensing exam. This will require a criminal
and traffic violation check. Other additional admission requirements, such as a screening
interview, may be required. All students admitted must meet and be able to perform the
Technical Standards of the Program.
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BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Admissions
NUCLEAR MEDICINE PROGRAM, ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
The Nuclear Medicine Program is a selected admission program. Candidates must meet
the admissions requirements listed below.
1.
2.
3.
All candidates for the Associate in Applied Science degree in Nuclear Medicine
Technology must be selected by the Nuclear Medicine Technology Screening
Committee before entering the Nuclear Medicine Training Program. Application to
the program can be made between November 1st and March 30th; after the student
has achieved a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.51 and have
completed all the general education requirements as listed on our current academic
year curriculum checklist.
Screening evaluations normally take place in May for incoming students. Accepted
students will enroll and begin work in Nuclear Medicine Technology classes the
following August.
The following items shall be considered in the screening evaluation. The items are
ranked and weighted in order of consideration.
п‚·
Overall Nuclear Medicine (year one) General Educational Requirements-GPA
п‚·
Personal Interview by Screening Committee
п‚·
HOBET entrance examination
п‚·
Observation/Shadowing
п‚·
Overall College Grade Point Average
Questions concerning the screening process or criteria should be brought to the Program
Director and/or the Clinical Coordinator.
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Admissions
ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
RESPIRATORY THERAPY, ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS
The associate of science degree program in Respiratory Therapy is a cooperative program
offered by Carver Career & Technical Education Center in Malden, WV and BridgeValley
Community and Technical College. This is a limited enrollment program which admits one
class of students each fall semester.
Admission Requirements include the following:
MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS:
Option 1:
1. ACT scores of: English 18, Math 19, Reading 17 OR SAT scores of: English 450; Math
460, Reading 420 OR
2. Accuplacer scores of: English 88, Arithmetic Math 85, Reading 79.
(Students who do not meet the above scores must pass developmental Math 050 or
its equivalent with a grade of “C ”or higher, as well as developmental English and/or
reading.
3. High school GPA of 2.0 OR GED scores of 410 on each sub-test with an average of 450.
4. One high school chemistry course and one other high school science course, both
with a grade of C or higher.
Option 2:
1. Twelve hours of college work at an accredited institution of higher learning within the
past five years with a minimum grade of C in each course.
Courses cannot include developmental courses and must include chemistry at either
the high school or collegiate level (with a grade of C or better).
In addition, both Options 1 and 2 require the following:
1. A one-page, handwritten essay detailing reason for application to the program.
2. Two letters of recommendation for admission into the program.
Students Who Meet The Above Qualifications Are Required To:
1. Complete and submit application forms for both Carver and BridgeValley CTC.
2. Submit either official ACT/SAT/Accuplacer (may be on HS transcript) or Accuplacer
scores.
3. Official copies of all high school transcripts OR GED/TASC Diploma.
4. Official copies of all college transcripts.
5. Submit Carver and BridgeValley application forms (must have both),
ACT/SAT/Accuplacer scores, official transcripts and the completed Respiratory
Therapy Data Sheet to
Carver Career and Technical Center,
4799 Midland Drive,
Charleston, WV 25306
by February 28.
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BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Admissions
VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY, ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
The associate of science degree program in Veterinary Technology is a cooperative
program offered by Carver Career & Technical Education Center in Malden, WV and
BridgeValley Community and Technical College. This is a limited enrollment program which
admits one class of students each fall semester. Admission Requirements include the
following:
MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS
Option 1:
1. ACT scores of: English 18, Math 19, Reading 17 OR SAT scores of: English 450; Math
460, Reading 420 OR Accuplacer scores of: English 88, Arithmetic Math 85, Reading
79.
2. (Students who do not meet the above scores must pass developmental Math 050 or
its equivalent with a grade of C or higher, as well as developmental English and/or
reading.
3. High school GPA of 2.0 OR GED scores of 410 on each sub-test with an average of 450.
4. One high school chemistry course and one other high school science course, both
with a grade of “C” or higher.
Option 2:
1. Twelve hours of college work at an accredited institution of higher learning within the
past five years with a minimum grade of C in each course. Courses cannot include
developmental courses and must include chemistry at either the high school or
collegiate level (with a grade of C or better).
In addition, both Options 1 and 2 require the following:
1. A minimum of 20 hours of paid or volunteer experience working directly with animals
(clinic, hospital, zoo, etc.), verified by a supervisor.
2. A one-page, typed essay entitled “Why I want to be a Veterinary Technician.”
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
29
Admissions
ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
Students Who Meet The Above Qualifications Are Required To:
1. Complete and submit application forms for both Carver and BridgeValley.
2. Submit either official ACT/SAT/Accuplacer (may be on HS transcript) or Accuplacer
scores.
3. Official copies of all high school transcripts OR GED Diploma.
4. Official copies of all college transcripts.
5. Submit Carver and BridgeValley application forms (must have both),
ACT/SAT/Accuplacer scores, official transcripts and the completed Veterinary
Technology Data Sheet to:
Carver Career and Technical Center,
4799 Midland Drive,
Charleston, WV 25306
By February 28th.
Selection for the Veterinary Technology program is based on ACT/SAT/Accuplacer scores,
high school/college coursework, GPAs and animal related experience.
Department policies related to blood-borne pathogens, radiation safety, HIPAA and ethics
are available for review at www.bridgevalley.edu.
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Financial Information
BridgeValley CTC
32
Financial Information
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Financial Information
EXPENSES /REFUNDS
PAYMENT OF FEES
Students should be prepared to pay all tuition and fees through direct payment, financial
aid, or other resources to complete registration or pre-registration. Direct payment may
be made by cash, certified/cashier’s check, money order, or credit card. BridgeValley
offers two forms of payment plans to students; the sixty-forty plan, in which 60% of tuition
is due at time of registration and 40% is due before the end of six weeks with 1.5% interest
added per month, and a monthly plan through Tuition Management Services, in which
students pay a small set-up fee, and then pay four or five monthly payments. For more
information about our payment plans, please contact the Cashier’s Office located in Room
012 on the South Charleston Campus and in Room 218 on the Montgomery Campus.
Certified/cashier’s checks or money orders should be made payable to BridgeValley
Community and Technical College. All payments sent by mail should include the student’s
name and B number.
Payments for books and supplies must be made separately from tuition and fees. Each
student should be prepared to purchase textbooks and necessary supplies at the
beginning of each semester. The average cost of books for a full-time student ranges from
less than $100 to more than $200 per class, depending upon the course of study. The
college cannot advance or lend money to students for textbook purchases.
All students are advised that the first payments received by BridgeValley will be applied to
their accounts. Refunds will be processed only after obligations to BridgeValley have been
satisfied.
TUITION AND FEES
Tuition and fees are established annually by the BridgeValley Community and Technical
College Board of Governors with secondary approval required by the West Virginia Council
for Community and Technical College Education for tuition increases above 5%.
Considerable effort is made to keep increases at a minimum.
A current “Schedule of Fees” is available at www.bridgevalley.edu. This document will
include the current tuition, mandatory fees, and any special instructional fees. Books,
supplies, and other examination expenses are paid separately from BridgeValley charges.
Students should consult their academic department for an estimate of these costs.
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Financial Information
FINANCIAL AID INFORMATION
BridgeValley CTC
Financial Information
REFUNDS
BridgeValley Community and Technical College refunds are processed through the
Financial Affairs Office and are mailed or direct deposited through United Bank. All
payments must be reflected on a student’s account before a refund can be processed.
Refund requests should be addressed to the BridgeValley Financial Affairs Office.
Students are responsible for notifying BridgeValley of a change of address. This may be
done in the Registrar’s Office on the Montgomery Campus and in Student Services on the
South Charleston Campus.
REFUND POLICY FOR STUDENTS WHO WITHDRAW
A student who officially withdraws from college (i.e., drops all classes) through the
Registrar’s Office or is administratively withdrawn from college prior to completing 60% of
a semester, is entitled to a partial refund of that semester’s tuition/fees. Refund amounts
are calculated to the day based on the number of calendar days which have elapsed from
the first day of class to the date of withdrawal. The date of withdrawal is the actual date
the student notifies the Registrar’s Office of withdrawal. Any student who withdraws at
any point during the semester is advised to consult with the Cashiers Office to determine
whether there is a balance owing or a refund due.
For a student receiving federal and/or state financial aid who withdraws before
completion of 60% of the semester, the amount of federal and/or state financial aid
earned will be calculated to the day according to the same formula. Unearned financial
aid must be returned. When aid is returned, the student may owe a balance to the
College, to the US Department of Education, or to both. Any student receiving financial
aid should contact the Financial Aid Office before withdrawing from college or reducing
the number of hours enrolled to determine the impact of these actions on his or her
financial aid status.
SPECIAL NOTICE
Should conditions warrant, the administration reserves the right to adjust fees and charges
without advance notice.
FINANCIAL SERVICES
Students may submit payment to the BridgeValley Cashiers Office, located in Room 012 on
the South Charleston Campus and in Room 218 on the Montgomery Campus.
DELINQUENT ACCOUNTS
BridgeValley Community and Technical College will not issue a degree, transcript, or a
grade report to any student who has a delinquent account. A delinquent student will not
be readmitted to the college until all balances due are paid.
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Financial Information
The purpose of BridgeValley Community and Technical College’s financial assistance
program is to provide assistance to qualified students who, without such aid, would be
unable to attend college. Assistance is awarded on the basis of need as determined
through the Federal Needs Analysis System. All students seeking financial aid are required
to complete an online Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) each year to be
processed by the U.S. Department of Education. The FAFSA is an application for the
following Title IV federal aid programs: Pell Grant, Federal Supplemental Education
Opportunity Grant, Federal Work Study, Federal Direct Subsidized Student Loan, Federal
Direct Unsubsidized Student Loan and Parent PLUS Loan.
FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS
Students interested in applying for financial aid must complete the FAFSA. The application
is submitted online at: www.fafsa.gov.
The BridgeValley school code is 040386.
If financial assistance is needed for more than one year, new applications must be
submitted annually. (General instructions for completing the FAFSA follow this section.)
The financial aid awarded to students is based on individual financial need and eligibility,
and may include a combination of various types of aid. Financial Aid packages are intended
to provide assistance in paying tuition, fees, books, supplies, room, board, transportation,
and personal expenses. Financial Aid is available to both full and part-time students.
Financial Aid primarily comes in four basic types:
п‚·
Scholarships: Gift aid, based on academic performance or talent in a specific
category, with many programs also having need requirements.
п‚·
Grant Programs: Gift aid, money which is not repaid, usually requires need.
п‚·
Employment: Money earned through employment during college.
п‚·
Low-Interest Loans: Money which must be repaid.
SCHOLARSHIPS
A variety of scholarships are available to students. Scholarship awards are based on high
academic performance in high school and/or college, financial need, or a combination of
need and academic performance. Each scholarship is awarded on the basis of the specific
criteria established. All scholarship applicants, who minimally meet the requirements, will
be considered for the award: all relevant factors are taken into consideration, and awards
do not automatically go to the applicants with the highest cumulative GPA. For more
information on available scholarships, visit www.bridgevalley.edu.
INSTITUTIONAL TUITION WAIVERS
Student tuition waivers are used in the case of extenuating circumstances. Criteria and
amount of awards are based on the situation and award type. Tuition waivers will only be
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35
Financial Information
FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FOR STUDENTS
BridgeValley CTC
Financial Information
considered for students who are not currently receiving a Promise Scholarship or a West
Virginia Higher Education Adult Part-Time Student (HEAPS) grant. In addition, students
must be in good academic standing (usually GPA of 2.25 or higher) and meeting the
Satisfactory Academic Progress guidelines established by the Financial Aid Office. A tuition
waiver must be used for certificate or associate degree coursework and is limited to up to
12 (twelve) hours per semester (base tuition) at the in-state rate. In general, tuition waiver
awards will not be used to cover books, lab fees, extra fees or other expenses. Enrollment
must be maintained in consecutive semesters; should a student withdraw from
BridgeValley while receiving the award, the award is nullified and no longer available for
subsequent semesters.
GRANTS
Federal Pell Grants
This program provides annual grants to students. Only undergraduate students are eligible
for consideration. Students may apply directly to the Federal Government by using the
Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The maximum amount one can receive
from this grant is determined by Congress each year. Financial need is the major
determinant of eligibility in this program.
Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG)
This program provides annual grants to undergraduate students with financial need.
FSEOG award is based on enrollment status.
Higher Education Adult Part-Time Student Grant Program (HEAPS)
This program is available to part-time undergraduates who have financial need with a
minimum GPA of 2.00 and are a West Virginia resident. This grant is tuition-based and
cannot be used for the purchase of books, supplies or any other additional costs.
West Virginia Higher Education Grant Program
This program is administered by the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission
and is available to those West Virginia students who demonstrate financial need, academic
ability and complete the FAFSA by the respective deadline.
Other State Programs
For additional state aid programs please visit www.cfwv.com.
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BridgeValley CTC
Financial Information
Federal Work-Study Program (FWS)
Federal Work-Study is federally-funded financial aid which provides paid work experience
as part of the financial aid package. Students must complete the FAFSA, a Federal WorkStudy Application and submit a current resume to the Financial Aid Office to apply for this
program. FWS is designed to stimulate and promote part-time employment to help defray
college expenses. All government guidelines must be met to participate in this program.
Like other aid programs, Federal Work-Study is based on financial need. To participate in
this program, students must be enrolled for 6 hours or more credit hours per semester
and have a cumulative GPA of 2.00. Students may be employed up to 20 hours weekly
while enrolled in classes. The current rate of pay is determined by the Financial Aid Office.
All funds are based on availability.
LOANS
A word of caution about loans:
A loan is money borrowed and MUST be repaid under the terms specified in the Master
Promissory Note (MPN), which is signed by the student prior to receiving the first loan
disbursement. Before signing the MPN, students should fully understand all rights and
responsibilities relative to any loan borrowed.
Federal Direct Student Loan
Students who do not qualify for other Financial Aid programs or if additional funds are
needed, students may apply for a Federal Direct Student Loan. Students must complete
the Free Application for Federal Student Aid prior to applying for a Federal Direct Student
Loan.
The maximum loan amount that can be borrowed is set by the federal government for an
undergraduate student; however, the amount in any year may not exceed educational
costs as certified by the Financial Aid Office, less other financial aid received. When
students decide to apply for a Federal Direct Student Loan, the Financial Aid Office can
advise on how to complete the application. Students must be enrolled at least half-time to
qualify for a Federal Direct Student Loan.
Federal PLUS Loans
The Federal PLUS Loan program enables parents, with good credit histories, to borrow the
educational expenses of each child who is a dependent, undergraduate student, enrolled
at least half-time. Repayment of the principal amount of the loan begins within 60 days
after the final loan disbursement.
Repaying a Loan
Loan repayment begins six months after graduation, or cease of half-time enrollment.
Repayment must be completed within ten years under the standard repayment plan. The
Financial Aid Office will provide information concerning other repayment and deferment
options.
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Financial Information
ON-CAMPUS EMPLOYMENT
BridgeValley CTC
Financial Information
In general, the details of repayment are included in the loan description. The terms of the
loan will be explained when signing the Master Promissory Note. In addition, before
leaving school, for whatever reason, an exit interview will be required. Contact the
Financial Aid Office or visit www.studentaid.ed.gov/repay-loans for more information.
OTHER FORMS OF FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE
VETERANS ASSISTANCE
Financial assistance is available to veterans who qualify through the Veteran’s
Administration. Visit www.gibill.va.gov or our website for additional details and
information.
To start the process to apply for benefits, students need to complete the application for
VA Education Benefits at: vabenefits.vba.va.gov/vonapp/main.asp. Once approved, the
Veterans Administration will send a “Certificate of Eligibility” to the student which will
need to be submitted to BridgeValley’s VA Certifying Official.
Description of Benefits
п‚·
Post 9/11 GI Bill/Chapter 33: The Post-9/11 GI Bill is for individuals with at least 90
days of aggregate service after September 11, 2001, or individuals discharged with a
service-connected disability after 30 days. Students must have received an honorable
discharge to be eligible for the Post-9/11 GI Bill. The Post-9/11 GI Bill will become
effective for training on or after August 1, 2009.
п‚·
Montgomery GI Bill/Chapter 30: Chapter 30 is for individuals, active duty or nonactive duty, who have served in the United States Armed Forces for a minimum
period of two to four years and have been HONORABLY discharged prior to returning
to school.
п‚·
Montgomery GI Bill/Chapter 1606: Chapter 1606 is for individuals in selected reserve
who have completed Basic Training and AIT and are now assigned to a Reserve and/or
West Virginia National Guard Unit. Students must submit a DD214 and NOBE (Notice
of Basic Eligibility). The NOBE is available from the assigned unit.
п‚·
Montgomery GI Bill Chapter 1607: Chapter 1607 is known as the Reserve Educational
Assistance Program (REAP) and is for individuals called or ordered to active duty in
response to war or national emergency (Contingency Operation) as declared by the
President or Congress. This program makes certain reservists, who are activated for at
least 90 days after September 11, 2001, either eligible for education benefits or
eligible for increased benefits.
п‚·
VA Vocational Rehabilitation/Chapter 31: Chapter 31 is for disabled Veterans and
individuals must submit an application with a VA case worker and disabilities must be
rated. Veterans Certifying Official will receive Authorization and Certification of
Entrance or Re-Entrance into Rehabilitation and Certification of Status.
п‚·
Survivors’ and Dependents’ Educational Assistance Program/Chapter 35: Chapter 35
is for dependents and spouses of 100 % disabled or deceased Veterans. Individuals
must complete Form 22-5490 and submit all information to the Department of
Veterans Affairs. Once a claim is established, a Certificate of Eligibility will be issued
to the dependent/spouse.
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BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
п‚·
Financial Information
Yellow Ribbon: Those receiving the maximum benefit from the Post 9/11 GI Bill can
receive additional funding to cover the difference between in-state and out-of-state
tuition and fees. BridgeValley Community and Technical College has agreed to waive
50% of this difference, and the Veterans Administration will pay the remaining
balance. This means that those students eligible for the maximum Post 9/11 GI Bill
should not have to pay any tuition and fees out-of-pocket.
Work-Study Program: All students eligible for Chapter 30, 31, 35 and 1606 benefits are
eligible to apply for VA Work Study. Required forms can be found at: www.vba.gov/VBA.
Reserve or National Guard Tuition Assistance
Apply for the WV National Guard assistance at www.guardtuition.com.
Apply for the Army Reserves at www.goarmy.com
VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION
Students with a disability may be eligible for vocational rehabilitation benefits through the
West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services. Contact a local vocational rehabilitation
office for more information and an application.
WIA
BridgeValley Community and Technical College participates in the Workforce Investment
Act Program which provides significant financial and counseling support for youth and
adults having the desire to pursue an associate degree. Candidates must meet eligibility
requirements under WIA and satisfy admission requirements.
APPLY FOR FINANCIAL AID
FILING THE FREE APPLICATION FOR FEDERAL STUDENT AID (FAFSA) ONLINE
Documentation needed to file the FAFSA online can be found at: www.fafsa.gov. From
this site, students may apply for a PIN, download a FAFSA worksheet, file the FAFSA on the
Web, and receive follow-up information.
Federal PINs may be retrieved at, www.pin.ed.gov, by requesting a duplicate PIN and
clicking “submit now”.
To insure the timely processing of Financial Aid, it is imperative that students:
п‚·
file early
п‚·
be accurate
п‚·
meet deadlines
п‚·
check myBRIDGE and BridgeValley campus e-mail accounts for important notices
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
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Financial Information
BridgeValley CTC
BridgeValley CTC
Financial Information
NEED DETERMINATION
BridgeValley awards financial aid to eligible students after applications and all
documentation has been processed. For most programs, determining eligibility also
means determining who has financial need.
A uniform, national needs analysis system is used by BridgeValley to determine eligibility
and probable amounts of need, based on information which the student (and parents or
spouse, if applicable) provides on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid. The
family’s income, number of dependents, etc., are taken into consideration, and the
potential family contribution is determined. Income levels do not automatically exclude
students from all aid consideration.
DEADLINES
As application deadlines vary by program, students are encouraged to complete the FAFSA
as soon as possible after January 1, to allow time for processing prior to deadlines.
The following deadline dates are established for Federal Aid programs:
Fall Awards
June 30
Spring Awards
November 21
Summer Awards
April 30
Please refer to the financial aid section of www.bridgevalley.edu for any changes to these
deadlines.
Students must have the FAFSA and all required documentation submitted to the Financial
Aid Office prior to the above deadlines. Students, who fail to do so, should be prepared to
cover all college expenses from their own resources, until such time as their application is
complete and financial aid has been awarded.
Applications will be accepted at any time throughout the year.
RECEIVING YOUR AWARD
Awards are determined by the Financial Aid Office. All awards are available on a secure
web site, myBRIDGE. The Award from the Financial Aid Office specifies the program(s), the
amount of the award, and the periods during which assistance will be provided.
RETURN TO TITLE IV FUNDING
Financial Aid recipients who withdraw from BridgeValley before 60% of the semester has
been completed, may be required to repay a portion of the federal and state aid received.
Repayments are based on the number of days a student has been enrolled in classes.
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BridgeValley CTC
Financial Information
SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS
To receive financial aid administered by BridgeValley Community and Technical College,
Students must be making satisfactory academic progress (SAP) toward completion of an
eligible degree. For this reason, students’ SAP for financial aid is calculated each semester
to verify they have met all standards. Federal regulations require academic progress be
evaluated both quantitatively and qualitatively. Students receiving assistance from any of
the following aid programs must meet ALL the standards of Satisfactory Academic
Progress:
п‚·
Pell Grants
п‚·
Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (SEOG)
п‚·
Federal Work-Study Programs (FWS)
п‚·
William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (DL) Program including:
o Subsidized Loans
o Unsubsidized Loans
o Parents’ Loan for Undergraduate Students (PLUS) Programs
п‚·
West Virginia and other State Grant and/or Scholarship Programs
EVALUATION INCREMENTS
Students may be allowed to receive financial aid for an academic year; however,
Satisfactory Academic Progress is evaluated at the end of each semester.
COMPONENTS
Standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress include Cumulative GPA, Completion Ratio,
and Maximum Hours.
Hours Attempted
0-29
30-44
45+
Associates Degree
Cumulative GPA
1.50
1.75
2.00
Completion Ratio
50%
58%
67%
Hours Attempted
0-15
16+
Certificate Degree
Cumulative GPA
1.50
1.75
Completion Ratio
60%
67%
Note: The Financial Aid Office will use the GPA as reported in the Banner Student System.
The GPA used in calculating Satisfactory Academic Progress must include credits that may
not be calculated in an academic GPA, examples including but not limited to,
developmental courses, academic forgiveness, transfer credits etc.
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Financial Information
STANDARDS OF SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS FOR STUDENTS RECEIVING
FINANCIAL AID
BridgeValley CTC
Financial Information
MAXIMUM HOURS
Federal regulations require a maximum time frame for completion of a degree or
certificate. A student will not be eligible for Title IV federal aid if the degree is not
completed within 150% of the normal credit hours required to complete the degree or
certificate program. Financial Aid will be suspended for students who have attempted 90
or more credit hours for a two year degree or 45 credits for a certificate. The number of
attempted credits in determining maximum timeframe will include transfer, remedial,
failed and withdrawn credits.
If a student changes their course of study, the hours attempted under all courses of study
are included in the calculation of the maximum time frame. The Financial Aid Office will
review a student’s eligibility at the end of each semester and will notify students if he/she
will no longer be eligible for federal aid programs (grants and loans) for any future
semester.
If a student has previously completed an associate degree, or a bachelor degree, all
financial aid will be suspended and the student has the right to submit an appeal and must
submit an academic evaluation to the Financial Aid Office.
If a student has met all requirements to receive a degree in his or her stated major, the
student must apply for graduation. Change of major is not an option. Refusal to graduate
in the intended major will result in financial aid suspension.
Students who have exceeded maximum hours are limited to 2 major changes. Students are
permitted to change majors at any time; however, this may result in financial aid
suspension.
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42
IMPORTANT NOTE
Withdrawal, academic forgiveness, incomplete, repeated and non-credit remedial
hours are counted for the calculation of hours attempted and GPA. In cases of
repeated courses, a student may continue to repeat a failed course and receive
Financial Aid until it is passed.
A student, who has exceeded the maximum hours for his or her major, may not
receive Financial Aid to repeat courses on the academic evaluation that are failed
or withdrawn.
Students may only attempt 30 semester hours of developmental (remedial)
courses. Once a student has reached the 30 semester hour limit, Financial Aid may
not be used to pay for further developmental (remedial coursework), new or
repeated.
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Financial Information
A student is eligible to receive Financial Aid for one repeat when repeating a previously
passed course to obtain a higher grade.
1. Allowable: Repeated coursework may be included when determining enrollment
status in a term-based program if a student needs to meet an academic standard for
a particular previously passed course, such as a minimum grade.
2. Not permissible: A student enrolls in four classes in the fall semester and passes only
three of them; the institution requires the student to retake the failed class and also
the other three classes because of failing the one class. When the student repeats all
four classes in the spring semester, the failed class would be included in the student's
enrollment status, but the three classes passed would not be.
TRANSFER AND READMISSION
Students who transfer into BridgeValley Community and Technical College in the fall or
spring term with one or more semesters of classes and who do not meet the satisfactory
academic progress requirements will be automatically placed on financial aid suspension
and must appeal the suspension. Students seeking readmission to BridgeValley
Community and Technical College in the fall or spring term and who do not meet the
satisfactory academic progress requirements will be automatically placed on financial aid
suspension and must appeal the suspension.
Transfer and readmission students who have completed one semester of classes prior to
entering or re-entering BridgeValley Community and Technical College will be required to
submit a financial aid appeal if they:
1. Are on academic suspension with the Vice President of Academic Affairs’ Office
2. Have exceeded the maximum hours
TRANSIENT
Transient students should seek financial assistance from their home school.
FIRST TIME FRESHMAN STUDENTS
First time freshman students will be awarded financial aid, providing they are in good
academic standing and meet all eligibility requirements to receive federal and state funds.
PROVISIONAL ADMISSIONS
Students who have a provisional admissions status will not be granted Financial Aid until
fully admitted to the college.
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STUDENTS WHO DO NOT MEET ACADEMIC PROGRESS STATUS OF NON-COMPLIANCE
1.
2.
3.
4.
Suspension Status - Students are placed on financial aid suspension status after one
semester. Students on suspension cannot receive Financial Aid. Students will be
removed from Financial Aid suspension and/or probation when in compliance with
the GPA and Hours Passed rules. Students cannot exceed the maximum hours
allowed.
Probation Status - Probation status is granted to students who have successfully
appealed. Students can receive aid during their probationary period after signing and
submitting a financial aid appeal Contract to the Financial Aid Office.
Warning Status - Warning status may be granted to students with extenuating
circumstances (i.e.: A student who was forced to withdraw due to an accident or
illness. Appropriate documentation must be provided.).
Maximum Hours Evaluation Status - Maximum Hours Evaluation status is granted to
students who have successfully appealed. Students can receive aid during this period
after signing and submitting a financial aid appeal contract to the Financial Aid Office.
APPEAL PROCESS
Students may submit documented reasons to the Financial Aid Office for failure to
maintain satisfactory academic progress. The academic progress requirements may be
waived based on written procedures below. Any appeals granted must be well
documented as they would otherwise be violations of federal standards.
REQUEST TO APPEAL SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS SUSPENSION
Waivers or appeals may be decided by the Director of Financial Aid or their designated
representative in Financial Aid. The following documentation must be submitted to the
Financial Aid Office:
п‚·
Appeal Form and Academic Plan for Improvement
п‚·
Letter of Extenuating Circumstances
п‚·
Supporting Documentation
DEADLINES FOR APPEALS
Students planning to appeal should appeal as soon as they are notified of their financial
aid suspension. Tuition and fees are due by the specified date set by the Financial Affairs
Office each term. In order to avoid difficulties involved in late payment of tuition and fees,
students should submit the appeal promptly and observe the deadline dates.
For an appeal to have meaning, the appeal must be granted in time to allow the student’s
award to be processed before grades are released for that semester. In addition, student
loans cannot be processed after October 25th for the fall semester and March 25th for the
spring semester. Federal regulations require that once the standing of a student is known,
then the award must reflect that information. Thus, a student granted an appeal before
the end of the semester and awarded after the end of the semester may become ineligible
for the award by the time the award is granted. Financial aid appeals cannot be
retroactive.
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The student must submit a Financial Aid Suspension Appeal Form to the Financial Aid
Office, using the official college Appeal Form, and include documentation to support the
reason for granting an appeal.
Appeals cannot be processed if the student is placed on Academic Suspension with the
Vice President of Academic Affairs’ Office.
The Satisfactory Academic Progress standing can be appealed when one of the following
conditions exists:
п‚·
Illness or injury of the student
п‚·
Illness, injury, or death of a family member
п‚·
Natural Disasters i.e.: floods, fires, tornadoes, hurricanes, or earthquakes
п‚·
Criminal acts inflicted on the student or student’s family. For example: terrorism,
kidnapping, or theft.
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Military involvement i.e.: draft or US service duty
п‚·
Emotional problems supported by documentation from a counseling agency,
counselor or psychiatrist.
п‚·
Documented errors of an official designated representative of the Vice President
of Academic Affairs resulting in unacceptable academic progress.
п‚·
Legal entanglements i.e.: divorce, child custody, extended jury duty or
bankruptcy
Students will be informed within fifteen (15) business days of the appeal decision once
all documents are received.
PROOF OF ATTENDANCE
ATTENDANCE REPORTING
Schools are required to verify that a student began attendance in all classes before
financial aid awards can be paid to a student account or directly to a student. If the
student begins attending some but, not all, classes a school must recalculate federal
financial aid to reflect the actual enrollment.
Students who do not begin attendance are not eligible to receive federal financial aid.
CLASS ROSTERS
Class rosters are automatically updated in Banner as students add and drop. It is
imperative that faculty use the most current roster to report attendance issues. The most
current roster is accessible via Banner Self Service.
FIRST WEEK REPORTING
It is imperative that all faculty report non-attending (or “no-show”) students prior to any
funds being released to students but, no later than, close of business prior to the first
disbursement of each term. “No-show” students should be reported using a grade of NGR
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Financial Information
APPEAL PROCEDURES
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Financial Information
in Banner Faculty Self Service. Disbursement to student accounts will occur the Monday
following the first week of class. The deadline date for attendance reporting will be
published so that all faculty and staff are aware of the reporting deadline date. Using the
NGR grade in Banner provides the flexibility to immediately update student accounts to
prevent disbursement and allows faculty time to do the reporting.
30-DAY REPORTING
”No-show” and “stop-out” students must be reported prior to releasing loan funds to any
student on a 30-day disbursement delay. Using the same method described above, “noshows” and “stop-outs” must be reported no later than the close of business day prior to
the thirty day point in each term. The actual date will be published so that all faculty and
staff are aware of the deadline date for the thirty day delay reporting. “No-show” students
should be reported with a grade of NGR. Students who began attendance, but, who have
stopped attending, should be reported with the actual last date of attendance.
MIDTERM REPORTING
Faculty members will report student attendance again when submitting mid-term grades.
Faculty will enter grades, and input last date of attendance at midterm. Any students who
began attendance, but have stopped attending, should be reported with the actual last
date of attendance.
FINAL GRADES
When entering final grades, faculty will report the last date of attendance for all students
receiving an F or FI. If a student began attendance but, has stopped attending, use the
actual last date of attendance. If the student earned an F, use the last date of the term.
PART OF TERM COURSES
It is imperative that all faculty report non-attending (or “no-show”) students for Part of
Term courses.
п‚·
Faculty should report “no-show” students to the Financial Aid Office via email
immediately following the completion of the second day of the course.
п‚·
Faculty members will report student attendance again when submitting mid-term
grades. Faculty will enter grades and input last date of attendance at midterm. Any
students who began attendance, but have stopped attending, should be reported
with the actual last date of attendance. All reports of “no-show” or stopped
attendance of students should be directly made via email to the Financial Aid Office.
п‚·
When entering final grades, faculty will report the last date of attendance for all
students receiving an F or FI. If a student began attendance but, has stopped
attending, use the actual last date of attendance. If the student earned the grade of F,
use the last date of the term.
PROOF OF ATTENDANCE
Once the data is collected and a student is identified as not attending, then a Proof of
Attendance (or POA) requirement will be established in Banner and a “bad” academic
progress code will be posted to their student record until such time as a student can verify
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attendance. POA forms will require students to obtain signatures of all faculty members
for all classes in which they are registered. Students taking online classes may route an
electronic form for faculty signature. The student must attend one full week’s worth of
classes before faculty sign the POA form. Once the student provides the signed POA form
to the Financial Aid Office, the POA requirement will be satisfied (in Banner), the academic
progress code changed to the previous code and the student’s aid disbursed. Students
who have not satisfied POA will be dropped for non-payment and removed from class
rosters. Students not on class rosters will not be permitted to attend class, nor will they be
permitted to reinstate their classes.
RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF AID RECIPIENTS
WHAT ARE STUDENT RIGHTS AND OBLIGATIONS?
As consumers of a commodity (financial aid for higher education), students have certain
rights to which they are entitled, and certain obligations for which they are responsible.
Students have the right to know:
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п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
What financial assistance is available, including information on federal, state, and
institutional financial aid programs.
The deadlines for submitting applications for the financial aid programs available.
The cost of attending BridgeValley and BridgeValley’s refund policy.
The criteria used by BridgeValley to select financial aid recipients.
How BridgeValley determines your financial need.
What resources (such as parental contribution, other financial aid, your assets, etc.)
are considered in the calculation of financial need.
How much financial need, as determined by BridgeValley, has been met.
The policy governing inclusion or exclusion of programs comprising a financial aid
package. If students believe they have been treated unfairly, they may request
reconsideration of their award.
What portion of the financial aid received is loan aid and what portion is grant aid. If
the aid is a loan, students have the right to know what the interest rate is, the total
amount that must be repaid, the repayment procedures, the length of time given to
repay the loan, and when repayment is to begin.
How BridgeValley determines whether students are making satisfactory progress and
what happens if they are not.
CONSUMER RESPONSIBILITIES OF AID RECIPIENTS
It is the student’s responsibility to:
[1] Review and consider all information about BridgeValley before enrolling.
[2] Pay special attention to and accurately complete the Free Application for Federal
Student Aid. Errors can result in long delays in receiving financial aid. Intentional
misrepresenting of information on application forms for Federal financial aid is a
violation of law and is considered a criminal offense, subject to penalties under the
U.S. Criminal Code.
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Financial Information
[3] Complete and return all additional documentation, verification, corrections, and/or
new information requested by the Financial Aid Office
[4] Read all forms prior to signing and keep copies of them.
[5] Accept responsibility for all agreements signed.
[6] Notify Financial Aid Office of changes in name, address, or enrollment status. (This
also applies to loan recipients after leaving BridgeValley.)
[7] Perform the work that is agreed upon in accepting a Federal Work-Study award.
[8] Know and comply with the deadlines for application or reapplication for aid.
[9] Know and comply with BridgeValley refund procedures.
[10] Notify the Financial Aid Office in advance when enrollment is less than 6 hours.
Failure to do so will cause a delay in the receipt of funds.
[11] Notify the Financial Aid Office if receiving other financial assistance. Failure to do so
can result in the termination of financial assistance.
[12] Maintain satisfactory academic progress. Withdrawal from BridgeValley or never
attending classes will result in termination of financial aid and may result in partial or
full repayment of aid disbursed for the semester involved.
FAMILY EDUCATIONAL RIGHTS AND PRIVACY ACT (FERPA)
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 is a Federal law which states that:
п‚·
A written institutional policy must be established; and
п‚·
A statement of adopted procedures covering the privacy rights of students be made
available. The law provides that the institution will maintain confidentiality of
student education records.
A student may give permission to another party or individual to act as a representative in
matters concerning Federal Title IV Financial Assistance. A copy of the form may be
obtained in the Registrar’s Office on the Montgomery Campus and Student Services on the
South Charleston Campus. No information pertaining to a student’s educational record,
including financial aid, will be released to a third party without the completion of this
form.
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Student Services
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Student Services
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Student Services
Student Services
ADULT BASIC EDUCATION LEARNING CENTERS
BridgeValley provides an Adult Education Learning Center (AELC) in collaboration with the
West Virginia Department of Education, Office of Adult Education & Workforce
Development at each campus location. The AELC on the South Charleston campus is
located in room 029 Main Hall, and the AELC on the Montgomery campus is located in
room 401 Davis Hall. The AELC provides assistance with skill-building in the areas of math,
reading, and language arts. The staff administers assessments to help students gauge
their own strengths and weaknesses. In the AELC, students gain proficiency in critical
reading, thinking, writing and computation for college-level coursework and tests such as
the TASC (high school equivalency exam), ACCUPLACER, ACT, ASVAB, TEAS V Nursing
Entrance Test, and PPST. The AELC also helps students to deal with test anxiety, develop
better study habits, manage time more effectively, set short-term goals in order to achieve
long-term objectives, and become independent learners. Students can also find help with
career exploration and career pathway building.
BOOKSTORE
BridgeValley partners with Follett to provide bookstore services for its students. This
online company sells new, used, and rental textbooks as well as various campus supplies.
For more information, visit the BridgeValley website or stop by the Division of Student
Affairs in Main Hall on the South Charleston campus or in Davis Hall in Montgomery.
CAMPUS POLICE
Safety of our students, faculty, staff, and visitors is a top priority at BridgeValley
Community and Technical College. Campus Police works diligently to ensure a safe work
and academic environment for the BridgeValley community. Administration and the
Campus Safety Committee have implemented several services that will allow everyone to
play a vital role in security on campus. In addition, there are campus police officers to
assist students in the parking areas and in other helpful ways around campus.
For all emergencies, including medical, you should first call 911. Remember when calling
from a campus phone you will need to dial the number 9 for an outside line.
All other non-emergencies, contact the campus police department.
SEE SOMETHING SAY SOMETHING!
CAREER SERVICES
Career Services offers many services to students including on-line career search and
employment opportunities; announcements of available full-time, part-time, internship,
and seasonal positions; and on-campus career fairs and workshops.
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Student Services
CLUBS AND ORGANIZATIONS
BridgeValley Community & Technical College recognizes a variety of student clubs and
organizations. These organizations cover a broad range of interests that include
leadership, professional, religious, academic honorary, social and special interest.
Students may also petition to the Student Government Association to organize a club or
organization. For a full list of recognized student club and organizations, please contact
the Student Government Association or the Division of Student Affairs.
COUNSELING SERVICES
The College counselor serves as a student advocate and as a resource for students in crisis.
Students who have on-going, long-term, or therapeutic needs are referred to community
agencies for assistance. The counselor maintains a list of available community providers
for professional testing, counseling, and alternative support services.
DISABILITY SERVICES
Consistent with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with
Disabilities Act (ADA), BridgeValley ensures that individuals with disabilities are afforded
an equal opportunity to participate in its academic programs, student activities, and all
other events sponsored by the College.
Students shall be provided reasonable accommodations based on the recommendations
made by a licensed health care professional who is qualified to diagnose the impairment.
A student with a physical, learning, emotional, or temporary disability must provide
documentation verifying a disabling condition which impacts the function of a major life
activity. No accommodations will be provided without proper documentation that is
outlined in the Disability Services Student Handbook, which can be found on the
BridgeValley website.
LIBRARY SERVICES
BridgeValley has an online library that is designed to support the information, curriculum,
and research needs of all students, faculty, and staff. BridgeValley provides access to
multiple web-based periodical and eBook databases with access to full text articles and
reference books. These materials can be accessed on campus or from home with an
individual's B number. Questions about finding materials or need research help? The
librarian and library staff can get you started with a research project, narrowing a search,
evaluating sources, and creating citations. The librarian also provides a variety of
information literacy services including, but not limited to, Orientation/Instruction on how
to use the online resources. (The Ask a Librarian chat service, where a live librarian is
available to answer your questions, is available to all during staffed library hours. The
library webpage provides links to databases & web resources and hours are posted at the
beginning of each semester.
STUDENT ACTIVITIES
Campus involvement, whether it is participating in a research project, attending an offcampus event or engaging in welcome back week, is an important part of the college
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experience. Involvement assists in the intellectual, personal and social development of a
student. BridgeValley strives to connect students, student organizations, faculty and staff
to their campus community.
The Division of Student Affairs serves student organizations and their members by
enhancing their experiences both in and out of the classroom. BridgeValley strives to have
an active and engaged community that promotes leadership development, encourages
community involvement, and life-long learning.
STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT
BridgeValley expects that every member of its community share its commitment to
honesty, integrity, and the search for the truth. In addition, BridgeValley Community and
Technical College is concerned with the social and learning environment of all its students.
It is expected that each person will grow to have greater respect for self, others, and
property. For a complete explanation of student rights and responsibilities, students
should consult the Student Code of Conduct which can be found on the BridgeValley
website or in the Division of Student Affairs.
STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
The Student Government Association (SGA) of BridgeValley serves as an intermediary
between the administration and the student body in matters of general welfare, promotes
a spirit of cooperation in the activities of the College, and encourages student initiative.
The SGA is governed by an established constitution with officers elected by the student
body. For more information, visit the BridgeValley website or stop by the Division of
Student Affairs
STUDENT SUCCESS CENTER
BridgeValley provides a Student Success Center (SSC) at each campus location. The SSC on
the South Charleston campus is located in room 031 Main Hall, and the SSC on the
Montgomery campus is located in room 401 Davis Hall.
Services provided:
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Peer Tutors
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Faculty Tutors
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Group and One-on-One Tutoring
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Tutoring by Appointment
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Computer Services
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Accuplacer Testing
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CLEP Testing
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TEAS V Testing
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Corporate Testing
Walk-ins are welcome & encouraged!
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VETERANS AFFAIRS
BridgeValley is approved by the WV Higher Education Policy Commission’s State Approving
Agency for enrollment of veterans and dependents of deceased or 100% disabled veterans
eligible for education benefits under current regulations. Those serving in the Army or Air
National Guard or those on Active Duty or service in a Reserve Unit may also qualify for
educational assistance. The Division of Student Affairs serves as the official institutional
contract point for military and veterans’ programs and services.
For more information, students should contact the Division of Student Affairs.
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Academic Policy
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Academic Policy
GENERAL EDUCATION POLICY
The BridgeValley General Education Student Learning Outcomes are designed to provide a
foundation for future study and to expand the educational experience. The goal of the
GEC is to provide opportunities and support needed to develop the skills, behaviors and
attitudes that will enable the student to be successful as they matriculate through their
higher education to graduate with the credentials needed to be employed in their chosen
field. The GEC affords all students a common learning experience, provides opportunities
through classes, labs and field experiences to advance student learning. In addition to
being addressed by the GEC, each BVCTC program and discipline integrates these general
education student learning outcomes into the major courses. It should also be noted that
involvement in co-curricular activities and work experiences can contribute to the
development of these skills, attitudes and behaviors.
Upon graduation students will be able to:
1. Communicate effectively by listening, speaking, and writing using appropriate
technology.
2. Use quantitative and scientific knowledge effectively to solve problems, manipulate
and interpret data, and communicate findings.
3. Demonstrate interpersonal skills and ethical behavior appropriate for living and
working in a diverse society.
4. Apply critical thinking skills to analyze problems and make informed decisions.
GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Each degree or certificate program specifies courses students must take to satisfy the
requirements for general education as well as the courses specified within the major. The
same course may appear in more than one GEC category, but shall count only once
towards graduations requirements. The requirements of each category must be satisfied.
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Academic Policy
Students pursuing a two year associate of science, associate of arts, associate of applied
science, or certificate program will complete a minimum sequence of courses known as
the General Education Curriculum (GEC). The GEC is guided by a common set of student
learning outcomes.
BridgeValley CTC
Academic Policy
The GEC includes courses in four areas of study as shown in the following table:
GEC Area
Associate
of
Arts
Associate
of
Science
Associate
of
Applied
Science
Certificate
Programs
1. Communication
2. Quantitative and Scientific Inquiry
3. Ethical Behavior, Diversity
4. Critical Thinking
Total GEC credit hours
9
6-9
3
3-6
24
6
6-9
3
6-9
24
3
3-6
3
3-6
15
3
3
0
0
6
Each program must include English 101. A 100 level math course is required for all
programs unless otherwise specified by State or accreditation requirements.
In addition to the above GEC requirements, all associate degree graduates must complete
and document 15 hours of approved citizenship/volunteerism/service learning activities.
Associate degree graduates are also required to complete a portfolio demonstrating
proficiency of the general education core curriculum, and technical assessments
demonstrating proficiency within the field of study.
BVCTC continues to collaborate with other state institutions of higher education to
facilitate a smooth transfer of general education courses, taken for associate programs, to
be accepted as general education courses for baccalaureate programs. Students should
inform their program advisor of their possible intent to continue with a bachelor degree
program after completion of their associate degree program. This will assist the student
and advisor to select the GEC options that provide the smoothest transfer from associate
programs to bachelor degree.
BVCTC DOCUMENTATION OF GENERAL EDUCATION STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
BVCTC uses a portfolio process to document attainment of the general education learning
outcomes. The primary goal of the portfolio process is to document an enhance student
learning at BVCTC. Students will select artifacts that demonstrate they have met the
expected student learning outcome for general education. The portfolio is where students
will collect completed assignments and other products from co-curricular, work, or
community experiences. Students will organize the evidence along with written reflection
papers detailing how this evidence connects with the expected learning outcomes and
future benefits.
BVCTC students are informed of the general student learning outcomes during their first
semester at the college and are also introduced to the required portfolio process to
document the outcomes at the same time. Students may seek the assistance of advisors
for production and maintain a portfolio throughout their academic program. The
submission of the portfolio is a requirement for each major capstone course. Prior to the
student’s graduation, the completed portfolio will be submitted by the student to his/her
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capstone course instructor or advisor, who will forward the portfolio for review at the
institutional level.
A panel of BVCTC faculty, staff, and administrators, along with external reviewers from the
community will be convened to review the portfolios. Data collected during these reviews
of student portfolios will be analyzed and the findings reported. Each student will receive
feedback on his/her portfolio submitted, and each program will receive an aggregate
report of their program. This analysis is intended to provide information to the college as
to what areas of the GEC might need improvement. Then, as appropriate, the institution
will formulate recommendations to improve the attainment of the general education
learning outcomes at BVCTC.
GENERAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM CORE REQUIREMENTS
The GEC policy focuses on four educational areas as outlined below. Upon completion of
the General Education Curriculum, students are expected to:
Requirements: Successful completion of ENGL 101 and ENGL 102, 104,201 and
COMM 100.
[GEC-2] Use quantitative and scientific knowledge effectively to solve problems,
manipulate and interpret data, and communicate findings.
Requirements: Successful completion of defined courses in mathematics,
science, or computational computer applications. Applicable courses include:
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
ATEC 115
BIOL 101, 102, 210, 215, 220, 221, 230,231
BUSN 112
CHEM 100, 101, 102/103, 110, 111/112,
MTGY 100
PHYS 101, 102
PHSC 100, 101
MATH (100 level or above)
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[GEC-1] Communicate effectively by listening, speaking, and writing using appropriate
technology.
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[GEC-3] [GEC-3] Demonstrate interpersonal skills and ethical behavior appropriate for
living and working in a diverse society.
Requirements: Successful completion of defined courses in:
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
i.
j.
k.
l.
m.
n.
o.
ARTS 110, 120
BUSN 230
CRJU 208, 213
DENT 258
EDUC 110, 260
ENGL 230
GNET 112
GERO 209
HGMT 205
HIST 101, 102, 111, 205
HUMN 101, 130, 205
HWAY 106
NURS 245
PSYC 101, 201
SOCA 101, 110, 120, 130
[GEC-4] [GEC-4] Apply critical thinking skills to analyze problems and make informed
decisions.
Requirements: Successful completion of defined course(s) in:
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
i.
j.
k.
l.
m.
n.
o.
60
BUSN 296
CIET 114, 245
CRJU 262, 280
CSCI 103
DDPC 242
DENT 262
DRET 286
ECON 201, 202
GNET 108
HSRS 140
INFT 290
MGMT 170
NURS 244
PRLS 103
PRLS 221
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Academic Policy
ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE PROGRAMS
Associate in Science Programs
Civil Engineering Technology
Dental Hygiene
Drafting and Design Engineering Technology
Electrical Engineering Technology
General Studies
Graphic Design & Print Communication
Information Technology
Mechanical Engineering Technology
Medical Assisting
Respiratory Therapy
Major Code
5701
5301
5703
5704
5101
5702
5706
5705
5302
5102
ASSOCIATE IN ARTS
Major Code
7101
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE PROGRAMS
Associate in Applied Science Programs
Accounting
Accounting-Transfer
Administrative Professional Technology: Executive Conc.
Administrative Professional Technology: Legal Conc.
Administrative Professional Technology: Medical Conc.
Advanced Manufacturing
Applied Process Technology
Blasting Technology
Board of Governors
Bridge Inspection Concentration -DOH
Building Design & Construction
Computer Management Information Systems
Computer Science Technology
Criminal Justice
Cyber Security
Diagnostic Medical Sonography
Diesel Technology
Early Childhood Education
Early Childhood Education-Transfer
Emergency Medical Services- Paramedic
Finance
Finance: Banking Concentration
Finance-Transfer
Gerontology
Health Sciences
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Major Code
3501
3502
3503
3504
3505
3701
3702
3703
3101
3704
3716
3705
3706
3506
3707
3319
3708
3102
3103
3306
3507
3508
3509
3307
3308
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Basic Skill Sets
General Studies
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Academic Policy
Associate in Applied Science Programs
Healthcare Management
Highways Engineering Technology
Highways Engineering Technology- Department of Highways
Human Services and Rehabilitation Studies - Peer Support Specialists
Concentration
Human Services and Rehabilitation Studies -Addictions Concentration
Human Services and Rehabilitation Studies -Autism Concentration
Human Services and Rehabilitation Studies -Youth Concentration
Human Services and Rehabilitation Studies
Industrial Piping Design Technology
Machine Tool Technology
Management
Management: Entrepreneurship Concentration
Management: Occupational Specialty Concentration
Management-Transfer
Marketing
Marketing-Transfer
Medical Laboratory Technology
Nuclear Medicine Technology
Nursing
Occupational Dev: Child Development Specialist
Paralegal Studies
Technical Studies
Veterinary Technology
Web Design & Development Technology
Welding Technology
Major Code
3510
3709
3710
3301
3302
3303
3304
3305
3717
3712
3511
3512
3513
3514
3515
3516
3309
3310
3311
3104
3517
3713
3105
3714
3715
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
Certificate Programs
Accounting
Advertising
Banking & Finance
Blasting Technology
Chemical Operations
Computer Maintenance and Networking
Criminal Justice
Diesel Technology
Early Childhood Education
Emergency Medical Services- Emergency Medical Technician
Entrepreneurship
General Studies
Gerontology
Health Sciences
Human Services and Rehabilitation Studies - Peer Support Specialists
Human Services and Rehabilitation Studies -Addictions
Human Services and Rehabilitation Studies -Autism
Human Services and Rehabilitation Studies -Youth
Human Services and Rehabilitation Studies
Machine Tool Technology
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Major Code
1501
1502
1503
1701
1702
1703
1507
1704
1101
1306
1504
1102
1307
1308
1301
1302
1303
1304
1305
1706
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Major Code
1505
1103
1707
1506
1709
1711
1712
1710
Academic Policy
Certificate Programs
Medical Coding
Paraprofessional Education
Pre Engineering
Sales
Simulation, Gaming & Apps Development
Sustainable Building & Technology
Technical Studies
Telecommunications Technology
Academic Policy
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ACADEMIC INFORMATION
CREDIT HOURS
Academic advancement by the student is measured in terms of semester hours. To earn
one semester hour, usually the student must attend a lecture of 50 minutes (one clock
hour) each week in a semester. For laboratory credit of one semester hour, the student
attends two or three clock hours per week.
Course descriptions in the catalog show the number of semester hours for the course and
the number of hours of lecture and/or laboratory per week. Some courses may be offered
in a compressed or extended timeframe and/or in a web or blended format.
DELIVERY METHOD
The delivery method of the course does not affect the number of contact hours or the
amount of work required to complete the course. The amount of work, the amount of
contact hours, and the amount of credit hours granted remain the same regardless of the
delivery method or timeframe.
Courses are delivered in one of three formats:
Type of
Course
Web
Face-toFace Time
None
Blended
Up to 50%
Traditional*
51-100%
Online Time
100%
(asynchronously)
51-99%
(either synchronously or
synchronously)
0-50%
(either asynchronously
or synchronously)
How can I tell the format of
the class before I register?
Courses will have a “W”
before the section number
Courses will have a “B”
before the section number
Courses will have an alphanumeric section number.
*Traditional face-to-face classes may be enhanced with a web-delivered portion (less than
50% of the material delivered via the Internet, either synchronously or
asynchronously). Most traditional classes at BridgeValley have a web enhanced portion.
EXPIRATION OF CREDIT
Certain programs may require currency in specific courses. If you have any questions or
concerns regarding specific program requirements, please contact your academic advisor.
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NONTRADITIONAL CREDIT
BridgeValley Community and Technical College (College) provides students opportunities
to earn credit through non-traditional avenues. Students have the option to earn credit by
the College Level Examination Program (CLEP), Experiential Portfolio, and In-House Exams.
The College shall accept CLEP credits in accordance with Series 16 as provided by the West
Virginia Council for Community and Technical Education. Successful completion of
examinations will result in the acceptance of CLEP credits. Experiential Portfolio and InHouse Examinations options will adhere to the guidelines stipulated by the college.
ACADEMIC CREDIT FOR MILITARY TRAINING
Academic credit may be granted to veterans, National Guard, or Reserve members for
successful completion of formal service school training programs on the basis of
evaluations made by the Commission on Accreditation of Service Experiences and listed in
the “Guide to the Evaluation of Educational Experiences in the Armed Services.”
Credit for college-level USAFI courses will be granted in accordance with
recommendations of the Commission on Accreditation of Service Experiences. In addition,
veterans who served in regular military service for more than one year will be granted one
semester hour of physical education and two semester hours of health upon presentation
of a DD-214. Contact the BridgeValley Community and Technical College’s Veterans’ Affairs
Office for additional information and assistance.
PROJECT AHEAD (ARMY HELP FOR EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT)
BridgeValley Community and Technical College cooperates with the United States Army in
a Project AHEAD program to assist service personnel in keeping an accurate record of the
academic work they complete while on active duty.
After qualifying for Army service, participants in the program apply for admission to
college. The college will maintain a scholastic file and provide guidance for long term
educational planning. In turn, the Army provides on-post guidance counselors to insure
that courses leading to a degree are taken by the soldier-student. Records of college
credits earned on active duty should be sent to the Office of the Registrar, which maintains
an updated account of the student’s work.
In addition, the Army offers financial educational support to the Project AHEAD student
both during and after the tour of duty.
Upon release from active duty, the Project AHEAD student should report to campus and
register for classes. The Office of Admissions and Records has complete information on the
program.
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Students who apply for credit are required to submit official records, such as a DD-214, a
DD-295, transcripts of in-service training, certificates, or diplomas to the Office of the
Registrar.
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Academic Policy
ADVANCED PLACEMENT
Students who have earned Advanced Placement credit and would like to have it evaluated
for consideration should request an official Advanced Placement transcript from
CollegeBoard to be sent to the Office of the Registrar. Not all Advanced Placement credit is
eligible for articulation. If you have any questions or concerns regarding which Advanced
Placement credits and/or scores will apply to your program, please contact your academic
advisor.
Information concerning Advanced Placement credit is available at
www.collegeboard.org/ap.
COLLEGE LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAM (CLEP)
Students who opt for CLEP testing will register for the exam through Educational Testing
Services (ETS). Guidelines, procedures, and a score matrix for CLEP examinations are
available on the College website.
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Students who participate in the College Level Examination Program and wish to
receive college credits for such examinations must be enrolled at the College in order
to receive credit from the institution. Students that have taken CLEP prior to
enrollment must submit an official CLEP transcript to the Office of the Registrar.
Credit shall not be awarded for equivalent courses in which students have already
earned such credit through course work, institutional challenge examinations, life
experience, or other mechanisms.
The College shall equate the CLEP credit earned with existing course offerings. If no
equivalent course is offered at the College, the credit earned by CLEP examination
shall be considered elective credit.
Programs reserve the right to limit the number of CLEP credits a student can earn
toward his/her degree. Credits earned in this manner cannot exceed 12 hours and
does not count toward residency requirements. There are exceptions to the Board of
Governors AAS degree. Programs also reserve the right to require a higher score than
recommended by the Commission of Educational Credits and Credentials of the
American Council on Education for CLEP Exams. Credit shall be awarded in an amount
not exceeding the number of semester hours for which the examination was
designed.
Information concerning CLEP examinations is available at
www.collegeboard.org/clep.
Upon successful completion of a CLEP Exam, the Office of the Registrar will transcript
the official course titles to the student’s official transcript as a “CR” grade. The
academic record shall indicate credit was earned by CLEP and the credit will not be
included in the computation of the student’s grade point average.
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CREDIT BY EXAMINATION
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Student will be required to obtain permission to test for a certain course from the
Dean of the Division where the course is housed.
Application forms for “Credit-by-Examination” must be completed with the Division
Dean’s approval and required fees paid prior to the exam being given.
Once student obtains permission to test and payment made, he/she would make
arrangements with the Exam Administrator/Assigned Instructor of the course to take
the exam. The Student will be required to present the application for In-House exams
with the stamped receipt of payment to the Exam Administrator/Assigned Instructor
at the time of the exam.
Upon successful completion of the exam and meeting the specified passing score, a
Credit Equivalency form will be completed by the Exam Administrator/Assigned
Instructor and signed by the Division Dean and Vice President of Academic Affairs.
The form will be forwarded to the Registrar for posting to the student’s transcript and
recorded with a grade of “CR” to indicate test out.
A student may attempt to take an in-house examination in any individual course only
once.
Students may not attempt credit-by-examination in courses for which they are
enrolled and have begun. Additionally, students may not attempt credit-byexamination in courses which they have completed and for which they have grades
on their transcripts.
PORTFOLIO CREDIT
Academic credit may be granted through portfolio review for work or life experiences that
are equivalent to course work which meets the requirements for the degree program in
which the student is enrolled. (For students enrolled in programs outside the Board of
Governors AAS Program)
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Students interested in submitting an experiential portfolio can initiate the request for
a portfolio review only after they have successfully completed 12 credit hours of
college level work at the College and/or a regionally accredited institution of higher
education. Students should consult the program director for the program in which
the course is offered to obtain direction and guidance with the portfolio process.
For students enrolled in programs outside of the Board of Governor AAS, submission
of a portfolio for credit earned in the manner cannot exceed 12 credit hours and does
not count toward residency requirements.
Prior to the portfolio process and in the initial consultation with the program director,
the student will obtain and complete a “Request for Academic Credit for Experiential
Learning Preliminary Application”. The program director will review the application
and either approve or deny courses for the experiential portfolio. The application is
returned to the student for payment of the portfolio process.
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Students interested in pursuing the in-house examination option will secure permission
from the Dean of the Division where the course is housed. Once permission has been
granted, arrangements for testing will be made and testing will occur.
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Academic Policy
A non-refundable portfolio assessment fee, per fee schedule, is due upon completion
and approval of the Experiential Learning Preliminary Application.
Once payment has been made for the portfolio assessment, the student can begin
the portfolio process following the Portfolio Preparation Guidelines provided by the
program director.
Completed portfolios are submitted to the program director of the program in which
the course is housed. If the portfolio is approved for credit, the student will be
required to pay a posting fee, as reflected on the fee schedule, to post credits to their
transcript.
The program director will complete a Credit Equivalency form to indicate credit
earned, and once proper fees have been paid by the student, the form will be
submitted to the Office of the Registrar where credits will be posted to the student’s
transcript with a special designation for portfolio credits.
TRANSFER CREDIT
Students may transfer to BridgeValley from other regionally accredited institutions of
higher education. Official transcripts must be submitted to the college. Transfer credit
evaluation will be conducted by the Office of the Registrar in collaboration with Academic
Affairs. If you have any questions or concerns regarding specific program requirements,
please contact your academic advisor.
CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS BY CLASS RANK
Class rank is based on the total number of semester hours of college-level credit on file in
the Registrar’s Office at the beginning of each term. Minimum requirements are:
Class Rank
Freshman
Sophomore
Semester Hours
Earned
0 – 29
≥ 30
CLASSIFICATION OF RESIDENCY FOR FEE PURPOSES
Students who have been classified as non-residents may appeal to the Residency Appeals
Committee by submitting the Application to Establish Residency, along with supporting
documentation, to the Office of the Registrar.
CREDIT-HOUR LOAD
Students may register for up to 19 credit hours during a regular semester. However, a
student may be approved for a maximum load of up to 23 hours upon recommendation of
the academic advisor and by approval of the department dean.
Students may register for up to 12 credit hours during a summer term.
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CLASS ATTENDANCE
Students are expected to attend class regularly. Instructors set attendance regulations for
their classes. They will specify early in the semester what the regulations are and the
policy regarding makeup tests and class assignments. Students are responsible for all work
missed as a result of absence. Institutional excuses for college-sponsored activities are
granted by the administrator of the school and honored by each instructor. There are
consequences for non-attendance; including the possibility of failing grades and/or loss of
financial aid.
GRADING SYSTEM
Grades awarded are:
Excellent
Good
Average
Below Average
Failure
Failure Irregular Attendance
Incomplete
No Credit
Credit, but no grade
Audit
Passing
Withdrawal within time limit
In Progress
4 quality points per credit hour
3 quality points per credit hour
2 quality points per credit hour
1 quality point per credit hour
0 quality points per credit hour
0 quality points per credit hour
Not calculated in GPA
Unsuccessful completion
Successful completion
Not calculated in GPA
Successful completion
Not calculated in GPA
IP or “In Progress” will appear on a transcript
while courses are in progress.
Academic Policy
A
B
C
D
F
FI
I
NC
CR
AU
P
W
IP
Any course below the 100-level will be excluded from the GPA calculation and will not
count toward fulfilling graduation requirements.
GRADE POINT AVERAGE CALCULATION
The grade point average is calculated by dividing the total number of quality points earned
by the total number of GPA hours.
INCOMPLETE GRADES
Students requesting an incomplete grade due to unavoidable circumstances should
contact the instructor of the course. Eligible students will have an opportunity to complete
the course within an established amount of time as published in the academic calendar.
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Academic Policy
REPEATING CLASSES
Students must make satisfactory academic progress toward degree completions. In
maintaining satisfactory academic progress, no student may take a class more than two
times without permission from the Chief Academic Officer or designee.
If a student earns a grade of “D” or “F”, including failures due to regular or irregular
withdrawal, on any course taken no later than the semester or summer term during which
the student attempts the sixtieth semester hour, and if that student repeats this course
prior to the receipt of a baccalaureate degree, the original grade shall be disregarded and
the grade earned when the course is repeated shall be used in determining the student’s
cumulative grade point average. The original grade shall not be excluded from the
student’s record.
ACADEMIC FORGIVENESS
Students are eligible for academic forgiveness if the following conditions are met:
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The student must not have been enrolled in any college on a full-time basis
during any semester or term in the last four consecutive years.
Only grades for courses taken at least four years prior to the request for
academic forgiveness may be disregarded for grade point average computation.
In cases where grades may be disregarded for grade-point average computation,
these grades shall not be excluded from the student’s permanent record.
In instances where students request and gain academic forgiveness from one
college and then transfer to another institution, the receiving institution is not
bound by the prior institution’s decision to disregard grades for grade-point
computation.
All institutional degree requirements must be met.
Only enrolled students are eligible.
The Board of Governor’s Degree Completion Program is governed by a different
forgiveness policy.
This pertains only to graduation requirements and may not fulfill requirements
for application to selective admission to programs.
GRADE REPORTING PERIODS
Mid-semester and final grades are reported to the Office of the Registrar each semester.
Mid-semester grades are progress reports only and students may obtain a copy through
MyBridge (the student self-service account). Final grades are available at the end of each
semester through MyBridge. A student having an error in a grade received or a grade
omitted should contact the instructor. An instructor who makes an error in reporting a
grade may request a grade change by completing a form provided by the Office of the
Registrar. All corrections in grades must be approved by the department dean and vice
president.
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GRADE APPEALS
The Student Grade Appeal Process provides a fair, orderly and unbiased process for
students who wish to pursue a formal appeal of their final course grade. In taking such
action, students shall assume the burden of proof concerning any perceived error in the
grade assigned. Further, they shall follow the sequence of steps outlined in this policy
with the presumption that, as a matter of rule, instructors do not assign arbitrary,
capricious, prejudicial, or discriminatory grades. The grade appeal process must be
started within 15 working days of the posting of the final grade, within 2 working days
for part-of-term courses.
If the faculty member finds in the student’s favor, a grade change is submitted with
signatures and the appeal process is resolved.
If a student and instructor fail to resolve the grade dispute through informal means the
student may request a formal grade appeal process by initiating a formal student grade
appeal.
PROCESS
Step 1: The student must notify the course faculty member in writing immediately (within
2 working days for part-of-term courses, no later than 15 working days for full-term
courses) of the posting of the final grade stating that s/he wishes to discuss his/her final
grade. If the course faculty member does not respond to the student’s email within the
specified time or if there is no resolution and the student intends to pursue a grade
appeal, the student must obtain a Student Grade Appeal Form from the BridgeValley
website, his or her counselor, or any division office. The Student Grade Appeal Form must
include all facts and supporting documentation from the student prior to presenting the
form to the course faculty. The Student Grade Appeal containing the decision and the
rationale must be completed, dated and signed by the course faculty member.
Step 2: If the issue is not resolved to the student’s or the instructor’s satisfaction at Step 1,
the decision may be appealed to the department chairperson* within 10 working days of
the student submission of the Student Grade Appeal Form to the faculty to arrange a
meeting. The faculty member may be invited to this meeting if the department
chairperson deems it appropriate. The student must attend the scheduled meeting and
discuss the issue of the grade appeal with the department chairperson. Should a student
fail to attend any scheduled meeting, the appeal will be nullified and no further action will
be considered. The Student Grade Appeal Form, containing the decision and the rationale,
must be completed, dated and signed by the department chairperson.
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Before starting a formal grade appeal process, the student must discuss the final course
grade, including grading practices and assignments, with the instructor who gave the final
grade. The instructor and the student should make every effort to eliminate any
misunderstandings over the assignment of the grade as it relates to the course syllabus. It
is expected that most grade issues will be resolved at this level. This discussion must occur
before the student may file a formal appeal.
BridgeValley CTC
Academic Policy
*If the faculty member is also the department chair, proceed to the next step.
Step 3: If the issue is not resolved to the student’s or the instructor’s satisfaction at Step 2,
the student must contact the Academic Division Dean* within 10 working days to schedule
a meeting. The student must attend the scheduled meeting and discuss the issue of the
grade appeal. Should a student fail to attend any scheduled meeting, the appeal will be
nullified and no further action will be considered. The Academic Division Dean will conduct
an investigation of the situation. The Student Grade Appeal Form, containing the decision
and the rationale must be completed, dated and signed by the Academic Division Dean.
*If the faculty member is also the Academic Division Dean, proceed to the next step.
Step 4: If the issue is not resolved to the student’s or the instructor’s satisfaction at Step 3,
the student must send a copy of the Student Grade Appeal Form to the Office of the
Registrar (Registrar) within 10 working days to schedule a meeting. After meeting with the
student and discussion with faculty, the Registrar will review the appeal to determine if
the student has appropriate grounds for appeal based on the statements in the syllabus
and other instructor documents. If warranted, the Registrar will convene the Grade
Appeals Committee, which is a recommending body and a subcommittee of the Academic
Board, to convene a hearing. If not, the Vice President of Academic Affairs (VPAA) makes
the determination that the grade stands. The student will be notified in writing of the
VPAA’s decision.
Grade Appeals Committee: The Grade Appeals Committee is convened by the Registrar
after Step 4 when the grade is still in dispute and the Registrar determines that the
student has grounds for an appeal. The Grade Appeal Committee will be made up of five
(5) faculty members, one (1) student, and the Registrar (or designee), who will be a nonvoting member, except in the event of a tie. Both the faculty member and student
involved in the appeal will have an opportunity to be heard before the Grade Appeals
Committee, and any employee involved in Steps 1-3 may be asked to comment before the
Committee. The participants will be informed, in writing, of the Committee’s
recommendation within two (2) working days after the hearing.
The faculty member must abide by the recommendation of the Committee and will submit
any grade change deemed necessary to the Office of the Registrar.
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ACADEMIC DISHONESTY
Honesty among the members of any group is required for the smooth functioning of the
group. In college, new experiences, awareness, and the academic life with its freedoms,
frequently put individual honesty to the test. Without honesty, both individual and
institutional goals would be compromised. Therefore, academic dishonesty will not be
tolerated. It is presumed that the student has gained a basic understanding of the meaning
of the term dishonesty prior to entering college. Academic dishonesty includes any
deceitful act committed to affect any student’s scholastic standing. All parties knowingly
associated with the act are guilty of dishonesty whether or not they directly benefit from
the act.
While this policy will apply for all courses in the institution, each faculty member may
establish a policy statement, within the framework of this policy, on cheating and resulting
penalties for their courses, to be included in the course syllabus. It is a faculty and student
responsibility to prevent academic dishonesty.
When academic dishonesty is suspected, the faculty member should discuss the matter
with the student involved as soon as practical, but should assess a penalty only when the
evidence justifies such action or where the student provides a written admission of guilt.
Possible penalties the faculty member may utilize range from failure on the item in
question to dismissal from the course with a failing grade. In the event of dismissal from
the course for reasons of academic dishonesty, a student may not withdraw to avoid a
failing grade. When a penalty is levied, the student may accept the penalty and sign a
written admission of guilt, accept the penalty without admission of guilt, or may, within
one week, appeal the faculty member’s decision to the department/division chair of the
department involved. If appeal is requested, the chair will meet with the student and
faculty member involved as soon as possible to review the evidence related to the case.
The student still has the option to remain in the course and continue the work until the
appeal process is completed in the case of appeal of dismissal from a course. It should,
however, be clearly understood that, if the decision for dismissal is upheld, the student
will receive an “F” grade for the course regardless of overall performance in the course
work. If the student chooses not to remain in the course, the committee shall decide
whether to award a “W” or “F” grade based on the outcome of the appeal.
Should the chair uphold the faculty member’s decision, the student may appeal to the Vice
President of Academic and Student Affairs or accept the decision. If the chair does not
uphold the faculty member’s action, the instructor may accept that decision or appeal the
question to the Vice President. The appeal must be in writing, describing the basis for
appeal, and be submitted within one week after the chair’s decision.
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Academic Policy
Examples of academic dishonesty include, but are not limited to: (1) plagiarism of an item
submitted for a grade such as a question answer or an exam, quiz, or laboratory report, a
submitted paper, experimental data, a computer program, or homework; (2) falsifying
experimental data; (3) using work accomplished by another person; (4) assisting another
person to cheat; (5) falsifying records; and (6) improperly accessing computer stored
information.
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Academic Policy
Either the student or faculty member may appeal the decision of the Vice President by a
written request for a hearing, addressed to the Chair of Academic Appeals Committee,
within one week of the decision. When such an appeal request is made, the committee
chair will schedule a hearing within two weeks and notify, in writing, all concerned parties
of the time and location of the hearing and also the hearing procedure to be followed.
Additional penalties for academic dishonesty include suspension or permanent dismissal
from the institution. Only the Academic Appeals Committee can determine these
sanctions after a formal hearing before the Committee. In accordance with BOG Policy, a
recommendation for the imposition of sanctions by the Academic Appeals Committee in a
case of academic dishonesty is final. A hearing toward imposition of the sanctions of
suspension or dismissal can be initiated at the request of the instructor, the
department/division chair, or the Vice President.
In the event that a student receives an “F” grade in a course as a result of academic
dishonesty, a report of this action will be filed with the appropriate administrative office.
Should the student receive a second such “F” grade, the student shall be subject to
suspension or dismissal from the institution, the appropriate action to be determined by
the Academic Appeals Committee. When a student graduates, any such report concerning
that student will be removed from the file and destroyed.
OFFICIAL TRANSCRIPTS
Students may request an official transcript of their academic progress from the Office of
the Registrar. Please allow up to two weeks for the processing of transcripts. The first
official transcript will be issued at no charge. Additional official transcripts require a fee of
seven dollars. The fee must be paid to the Cashier’s Office. Each request for an official
transcript must be submitted on a separate form. Any and all obligations to the college
must be satisfied before the transcript will be released.
COURSE REGISTRATION
Students may request a change in schedule by completing a course registration form and
having it signed by their academic advisor. Completed forms may be submitted to the
Division of Student Affairs.
Students choosing to withdraw from a specific course must complete and submit a course
registration form to the Division of Student Affairs by the applicable date published in the
academic calendar.
A student enrolled under a Veterans Administration program must report to the Office of
Special Populations before withdrawing from a course.
CHANGE IN MAJOR
A student indicates a major at the time of application for admission and remains in that
major until graduation or until receiving approval to change to another major. Such
approval is granted when the student completes a change in major form, available in the
Office of the Registrar or the Information Desk. Change in major requests will only be
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processed prior to the start of the semester. All other requests will be processed the
following semester.
ADMINISTRATIVE DROP
At the discretion of the Chief Academic Officer, students may be administratively dropped
from courses for reasons including, but not limited to, cases of emergency, attendance
related issues, non-payment, failure to complete financial aid processing, failure to meet
academic requirements, etc.
ADMINISTRATIVE WITHDRAWAL
At the discretion of the Chief Academic Officer, students may be administratively
withdrawn from courses for reasons including, but not limited to, attendance related
issues, calls to serve in the military, etc.
For more information regarding calls to serve in the military, please refer to the “Students
Called to Serve in the Military” section of the catalog.
Students requesting to withdraw from college must complete and submit a Withdraw
from College form to the Office of the Registrar by the deadline in the academic calendar.
Refund of tuition and fees, when applicable, is based on the earliest dated signature by a
college official.
Any grade earned for a part-of-term class that has concluded prior to the request to
withdraw from college will be unaffected by the request to withdraw from college.
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Academic Policy
STUDENT INITIATED WITHDRAWAL FROM COLLEGE
BridgeValley CTC
Academic Policy
ATTENDANCE REPORTING
Instructors are required to report attendance. Non-attendance may affect a student’s
financial aid eligibility, veteran’s benefits, final grades, etc. Students should notify their
instructor(s) immediately if they are unable to attend class(es) for any reason.
STUDENTS CALLED TO SERVE IN THE MILITARY
Students called to serve in the military during a period of enrollment should notify the
college immediately. Several options, as outlined below, are available to these students.
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п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
In the event of an unexpected call to duty, the military member student shall be
afforded a choice of options for completion of enrolled coursework.
If the military member student has completed 75 percent or more of the term or the
required coursework, s/he may choose to:
Receive full credit for the course, with assignment of the grade earned up to the time
of the call to duty, or
Withdraw from the course without academic penalty and receive no credit for the
course pursued.
If the military member student has completed less than 75 percent of the term or the
required coursework, s/he may choose to:
Receive an “incomplete” grade for the course and, with written verification of
concurrence of the instructor or department chair, complete the course within one
year of release from military duty. Institutional timelines for completing the
coursework and removing the “incomplete” grade shall be published, or
Withdraw from the course without academic penalty and receive no credit for the
course pursued but receive a proportional refund of tuition and fees and room and
board for the term, as permitted within adherence to financial aid regulations.
Military members seeking relief under this rule must provide proof, in the form of a
dated copy of official orders, that the call up or reassignment could not reasonably
have been foreseen prior to the beginning of term in which registered.
This rule shall not be applicable in the case of planned military training during an
enrolled term if the planned military training was scheduled and the military member
notified of it prior to the beginning of the term.
APPROVED ACADEMIC LEAVE OF ABSENCE FOR SERVICE MEMBERS
Service members in good academic standing who have been continuously enrolled and
completed 50% or more of the course work in a program of study are eligible for academic
leave of absence due to military service obligations. Degree requirements in effect at the
time of each Service member’s enrollment will remain in effect for a period of one year
beyond the program’s standard length, providing continuance of the program. If a student
attends any institutions of higher education while on leave of absence, an overall grade
point average of 2.0 on all work attempted while on leave combined with the BridgeValley
grade point average is required. Students requesting academic leave must meeting with
the college Veterans Coordinator and also receive approval from the major Academic
Dean.
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Academic Policy
PROBATION AND SUSPENSION
An institutional grade point average of a 2.0 is required to maintain “good standing.”
Additional requirements regarding the successful completion of attempted credit hours
and stated degree objectives are required for consideration in awarding Federal Financial
Aid.
PROBATION
If a student’s institutional GPA falls below a 2.0, the student shall be placed on academic
probation for the following semester and be notified by letter. Copies of the notification
will be forwarded to the Office of the Registrar to be placed in the student’s permanent
file, and to the students’ department chair.
A student receiving financial aid or veteran benefits, having failed to maintain satisfactory
academic progress, will be referred to the respective office responsible for administering
these student service programs. Satisfactory academic progress as related to financial aid
policies may differ from the academic standing policy. Students receiving financial aid may
be required to submit additional documentation in order to maintain their financial aid
status (see Standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress in Student Services Handbook).
Students on probation must report to the Director of Retention no later than one week
after classes begin the next semester.
Students are removed from probation once their overall institutional GPA is at least 2.0. If
during any subsequent semester the overall institutional GPA is below 2.0, the student will
return to academic probation.
SUSPENSION
A student on academic probation who fails to achieve a semester GPA of at least 2.0 for
the current semester will be suspended for one semester. A student who has been
suspended once may be readmitted by remaining out of school for one semester (summer
does not satisfy this provision) and by applying for readmission. A student may petition the
Chief Academic Officer to waive the one semester waiting period. Approval is granted on a
case-by-case basis and requires a signed contract of agreement. All petitions must be
made prior to the beginning of the semester. A student who is readmitted after academic
suspension will be placed on academic probation and will be required to follow all
requirements associated with academic probation. A suspended student is not eligible to
attend the College during the period of suspension nor will credits earned at other schools
during this period be accepted in transfer.
A student who is placed on second Academic Suspension will remain on suspension for a
period of one academic year and then may request readmission to the College. The
student must request readmission through the Chief Academic Officer. Students
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Academic Policy
No student on probation may carry more than 14 semester hours without the approval of
the academic advisor and the Chief Academic Officer; including participation in non-credit
courses.
BridgeValley CTC
Academic Policy
readmitted after any suspension may not be eligible for federal financial aid and must
report to the Director of Retention no later than one week after classes begin.
RECOGNITION OF SCHOLARSHIP
The college publicly recognizes students who have achieved a high degree of scholarship in
their academic work at BridgeValley Community and Technical College through formal
induction ceremonies into Honor Societies, publication of the Dean’s List each semester,
publication of the President’s List each semester, and the awarding of degrees with honors
at commencement.
DEAN’S LIST
To recognize academic excellence of students enrolled for 12 semester hours or more, the
Dean’s List is published at the end of each regular semester. This list contains names of all
full-time students whose grade point averages are 3.25-3.99. Each student whose grade
point average in a particular semester is 3.25-3.99 receives a certificate.
PRESIDENT’S LIST
To recognize academic excellence of students enrolled for 12 semester hours or more, the
President’s List is published at the end of each regular semester. This list contains names
of all full-time students whose grade point averages are 4.0. Each student whose grade
point average in a particular semester is 4.0 receives a certificate.
GRADUATION WITH HONORS
Special recognition is given at commencement to students who have achieved special
distinction in their studies. Spring graduates’ ceremonial honors are based on their
previous semester averages. Final honors will be recorded on the diploma and transcript.
To graduate Summa Cum Laude, a student must attain a 3.75 or higher grade point
average. Magna Cum Laude requires a 3.50-3.74 grade point average. Cum Laude requires
a 3.25-3.49 grade point average.
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Academic Policy
PROGRAM DESIGNATIONS
GRADUATION
APPLICATION FOR GRADUATION
A formal application for graduation must be filed in the Office of the Registrar by the date
published in the academic calendar.
REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION
Candidates for graduation from a specific major will be evaluated based on the catalog
which was in effect at the time they declared the major unless one of the following is true:
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п‚·
п‚·
A student interrupts his/her study for two consecutive semesters excluding the
summer term (readmitted students will be placed in the effective catalog at a the
time of readmission)
A student elected to move to newer catalog at the time it was in effect
A student meets the requirements of the catalog in effect at the time of graduation
Degree requirements vary from program to program. The minimum semester hour
requirement for an Associate degree is 60. The student is responsible for completing all
program requirements. If a substitution or waiver is recommended by the academic
advisor and is approved by the Chief Academic Officer, a signed form must be on file in the
Office of the Registrar before the substitution or waiver is in effect. Candidates for
graduation taking courses under transient student status must ensure that a transcript is
received in the Office of the Registrar no later than ten (10) calendar days after the
Commencement date. Transfer students must meet the residency requirements of the
program. If you have any questions or concerns regarding specific program requirements,
please contact your academic advisor.
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Academic Policy
Degree Program: an area of study approved as such by the institution and the WV
Community and Technical College System and listed on the official inventory of degree
programs. The degree is represented by the official degree designation (e.g., A.S. Associate
in Science, A.A.S. Associate in Applied Science and CP- Certificate Degree.)
Major/Program of Study: a field of study within an approved degree program, having its
own prescribed curriculum. A degree program may have more than one major.
Concentration: A thematic focus of study that enable the student to spend the time and
effort to acquire depth in a particular discipline, in addition to meeting the normal breadth
of requirements for the associate’s degree (typically 12-18 credit hours).
Certificate Degree Programs: allows for successful entry into employment in a specific
career usually as the foundation of the Associate in Applied Science. A minimum of 30
credit hours constitute a certificate program at the associate level.
Advanced Skill Sets: defined series of courses that prepare individuals for a specific skill
(13-29 credit hours).
Basic Skill Sets: defined series of courses that prepare individuals for a specific skill (up to
11 credit hours)
BridgeValley CTC
Academic Policy
Graduation requirements for associate degrees from BridgeValley Community and
Technical College includes the following:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Fifteen (15) credit hours be taken in residence at BridgeValley Community and
Technical College.
An overall 2.0 GPA
An overall 2.0 GPA from BridgeValley Community and Technical College
An overall 2.0 GPA in the student’s major field as specified by each program.
A minimum grade of “C” in each course of the student’s major field as specified by
each program.
Completion of required assessments.
A. General education Portfolio
B. Program specific assessment(s)
Document completion of 15 hours of citizenship/volunteerism/service learning
activities. These activities are to be approved by the program advisor prior to the
activity, and signed off by the advisor at the completion of the activity.
ASSESSMENT PROGRAM
To assess student academic achievement, BridgeValley Community and Technical College
has established an institutional assessment program. Components of the assessment
programs include the following:
•
•
•
•
Assessment of the general education core curriculum: Portfolio
Programmatic assessment: Instruments designated by each academic department,
administered in accordance with the departmental assessment program.
Student satisfaction: Survey completed to gather data on student engagement.
Graduate and employer follow-up: Surveys mailed to graduates and employers to
determine relevance of education in the workplace.
DEPARTMENTAL PRACTICUMS/INTERNSHIPS/EXTERNSHIPS
A number of programs require supervised Practicum/Internships/Externship. The
Practicum/ Internship/Externship is designed to combine theory and practice in a field
integrated with the academic program.
OFF-CAMPUS COURSES
The college provides a variety of credit courses and programs for adult and nontraditional
students. Off-campus, evening, weekend and special session offerings at the associate
levels are arranged by academic departments. Programming is supplemented through the
use of electronic videoconferencing, Internet, e-mail, satellite and television featuring a
wide variety of educational topics. Courses are offered in locations that best meet the
needs of students, business and industry.
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BridgeValley CTC
Academic Policy
Students enrolled in off-campus courses may be admitted under several different
categories:
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Special Students, who are (1) high school juniors or seniors, preferably with a 2.5
scholastic average and with approval of their principal; (2) high school graduates not
pursuing degrees; or (3) adults without a diploma but who have passed the GED test.
Special students take fewer than 12 hours of course credit.
Auditors take no examinations and receive no grades or credits for courses audited
and cannot later receive credit by examination for courses audited.
High School Graduates who are taking courses that lead to a college degree.
Additional information may be obtained by contacting the Admissions Office.
PROCTORED EXAMS
It is the policy of BridgeValley Community and Technical College that exams will be
proctored (supervised) including those administered in web-based courses.
Service learning is an important component, and expectation of the educational
experience at BridgeValley. Students are required to complete and document a minimum
of 15 hours of citizenship/volunteerism/service learning experiences prior to earning an
associate degree. Opportunities for service learning occur through participation in
academic clubs or specific departmental courses or through activities with civic or
professional groups. Examples include stream monitoring, CANstruction, food and
clothing drives, assistance with “The Bridge” newspaper, and dental hygiene clinics for
elementary school children.
WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT AND CONTINUING EDUCATION
Education is a lifelong process. BridgeValley Community and Technical College promotes
this concept through its mission by offering a wide variety of courses, activities, programs,
and workshops to meet the needs of a diversified clientele. Included are workforce
development training and retraining, general interest and community service offerings,
workshops and short courses for professionals in business and industry, and special
classes, seminars and workshops for women, business personnel, local government
officials, and health professionals.
Offerings vary in length from one hour to several weeks and are distributed throughout
the year. Classes are taught by qualified instructors, and professional workshops are
conducted by recognized specialists. Participants who successfully complete approved
continuing education offerings may receive a corresponding unit of credit, the Continuing
Education Unit (CEU). One CEU is awarded for each 10 contact hours of successful
participation in an organized continuing education experience under responsible
sponsorship and instruction. The CEU is used for the measurement, recording,
accumulation, transfer, and recognition of participation, but not for academic credit.
Examples of training include National Electric Code, programmable logic controllers,
computer applications, networking, project management, supervision, safety, rigging and
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Academic Policy
SERVICE LEARNING
BridgeValley CTC
Academic Policy
sustainability. Faculty from the technical business and health programs provide expertise
in development of up-to-date training programs.
Students participating in the above noncredit activities do not have to meet the
admissions requirements of the institution.
For information regarding customized training through Workforce Development, call:
304.205.6691.
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Programs of Study
Programs of Study
Programs of Study
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Programs of Study
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BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
CERTIFICATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
ACCOUNTING
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
The Accounting Program prepares students for entry level positions in the field of accounting as well
as enhancing the skills of individuals currently employed in the accounting field. The program
provides specialized knowledge in accounting theory and practice as well as an understanding of
Business operations in the American economy.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
Upon completion of the program, graduates will:
п‚·
Demonstrate an understanding and proficiency with accounting terminology, Generally
Accepted Accounting Principles, financial statement preparation and the accounting cycle.
п‚·
Prepare and analyze financial statements in accordance with Generally Accepted
Accounting Principles and IFRS.
п‚·
Demonstrate proficiency in the use of accounting software.
п‚·
Demonstrate an understanding of the taxation of individual income.
п‚·
Apply cost accounting principles and procedures to evaluate and project business
performance.
п‚·
Possess the necessary knowledge and skills to move into a baccalaureate program.
Program outcomes are assessed by capstone courses, exit interview, employer surveys and program
specific exit exams. General education outcomes are assessed by a general education portfolio.
CAREERS
The Accounting program prepares graduates for employment as:
*Bookkeeping, Accounting, and Auditing Clerks
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Accounting Clerk
Accounting Assistant
Accounts Payables
Clerk
Bookkeeper
Account Clerk
*ACCOUNTANTS AND AUDITORS
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Public Accountant
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Cost Accountant
п‚·
Auditor
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Tax Preparer
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Controller
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Treasurer
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Business Analyst
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Accounts Payable
Clerk
Accounts Receivable
Clerk
Account Receivable
Clerk
п‚·
Accounting Officer
Accounting
Supervisor
Staff Accountant
Internal Auditor
Assurance Manager
Financial Auditor
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п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
Accounts Payable
Specialist
Accounting
Associate
Audit Manager
Forensic Accountant
FBI Investigator
*www.onetonline.org
BCTC 2012–2013 Catalog
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Programs of Study
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT INFORMATION
The Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook Handbook reports that the annual median salary
(May 2012) for Bookkeeping, Accounting, and Auditing clerks is $35,170 and a 11% job outlook growth
rate (average rate), 2012-20. Experience, education and certification all increase earning potential. If
students go on to further their education, Accountants and Auditors have a reported median salary of
$63,550 as of May 2012 and a 13% growth rate, 2012-2020.
SALARY INFORMATION
http://www.bls.gov/ooh/business-and-financial/home.htm
Tuition and Fees*: $4520 In-State Resident
$11420 Non-Resident
Books*: $1300
CB Certification Exam: $395
Graduation Rate: N/A
Job Placement Rate: 72% (college average)
Median Loan Debt: N/A
*Actual costs may vary.
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BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
ACCOUNTING
CERTIFICATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
ENGL 101
ECON 202
ATEC 115
BUSN 112
ACCT 185
ACCT 215
ACCT 216
ACCT 235
ACCT 285
ACCT 290
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
30
Denotes courses only offered on the South Charleston, WV campus.
Accounting
$
Curriculum/Suggested
Sequence
English Composition I
Principles of Macroeconomics
Fundamentals of Business
Computer Technologies
Business Mathematics
Survey of Accounting
Financial Accounting
Managerial Accounting
Integrated Computer Accounting
Intermediate Accounting$
Individual Income Tax$
Semester Total
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Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
Associate in Applied Science
ACCOUNTING
with 2+2 Transfer track
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
The Accounting Program prepares students for entry level positions in the field of accounting as well
as enhancing the skills of individuals currently employed in the accounting field. The program
provides specialized knowledge in accounting theory and practice as well as an understanding of
Business operations in the American economy.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
Upon completion of the program, graduates will:
п‚·
Demonstrate an understanding and proficiency with accounting terminology, Generally
Accepted Accounting Principles, financial statement preparation and the accounting cycle.
п‚·
Prepare and analyze financial statements in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting
Principles and IFRS.
п‚·
Demonstrate proficiency in the use of accounting software.
п‚·
Demonstrate an understanding of the taxation of individual income.
п‚·
Apply cost accounting principles and procedures to evaluate and project business performance.
п‚·
Possess the necessary knowledge and skills to move into a baccalaureate program.
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
Program outcomes are assessed by capstone courses, exit interview, employer surveys and program
specific exit exams, which may include ETS Associate Business Exam or The National Certified
Bookkeeper Exam. The Accounting 2+2 option is assessed according to the above in addition to the
successful transition/completion of a Baccalaureate degree. General education outcomes are
assessed by a general education portfolio.
TRANSFER BACCALAUREATE OPTIONS
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
Marshall University
West Virginia State University
University Of Charleston
CAREERS
The Accounting program prepares graduates for employment as:
*Bookkeeping, Accounting, and Auditing Clerks
п‚·
Accounting Clerk
п‚·
Accounts Payable
Clerk
п‚·
Accounting Assistant
п‚·
Accounts Receivable
п‚·
Accounts Payable
Clerk
Clerk
п‚·
Account Receivable
п‚·
Bookkeeper
Clerk
п‚·
Account Clerk
If students go on to further their education:
*ACCOUNTANTS AND AUDITORS
п‚·
Public Accountant
п‚·
Controller
п‚·
Staff Accountant
п‚·
Business Analyst
п‚·
Auditor
п‚·
Accounting Officer
п‚·
Tax Preparer
90
п‚·
Accounts Payable
Specialist
Accounting Associate
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
Accounting
Supervisor
Internal Auditor
Assurance Manager
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
п‚·
Audit Manager
Programs of Study
п‚·
Forensic Accountant
*www.onetonline.org
SALARY INFORMATION
The Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook Handbook reports that the annual median salary
(May 2012) for Bookkeeping, Accounting, and Auditing clerks is $35,170 and a 11% job outlook
growth rate (average rate), 2012-20. Experience, education and certification all increase earning
potential. If students go on to further their education, Accountants and Auditors have a reported
median salary of $63,550 as of May 2012 and a 13% growth rate, 2012-2020.
http://www.bls.gov/ooh/business-and-financial/home.htm
Tuition and Fees*: $4520 In-State Resident
$11420 Non-Resident
Books*: $1300
CB Certification Exam: $395
Graduation Rate: N/A
Job Placement Rate: 72% (college average)
Median Loan Debt: N/A
*Actual costs may vary
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Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
ACCOUNTING
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
First Semester
ENGL 101
BUSN 106
ATEC 115
ACCT 185
BIOL 101
BIOL 102
MATH 130
BUSN 112
English Composition I
Introduction to Business
Fundamentals of Business
Computer Technologies
Survey of Accounting OR
Principles of Biology*
Principles of Biology Lab*
College Algebra* OR
Business Mathematics
Semester Total
Second Semester
3
3
3
3
1*
ACCT 215
BUSN 201
ECON 202
ENGL 102
MGMT 202
Financial Accounting
Business Law
Principles of Macroeconomics
English Composition II
Principles of Management
Semester Total
3
3
3
3
3
15
3
15-16*
Third Semester
ECON 201
FINC 290
MRKT 205
ACCT 216
BUSN 230
ACCT 235
Principles of Microeconomics* OR
Financial Management
Fundamentals of Marketing
Managerial Accounting
Business Communications and
Ethics
Integrated Computer Accounting
Semester Total
Fourth Semester
3
3
3
3
3
15
ACCT 290
ACCT 285
ACCT 286
Elective
ACCT 291
Individual Income Tax$
Intermediate Accounting$
Cost Accounting *$AND
Restricted Elective* OR
Cert Bookkeeper & Acctg.
Review$
BUSN 266 Business Internship OR
BUSN 296 Business Statistics*
*BUSN 298 Business Studies Seminar
Semester Total
3
3
4*-6
2-3*
1
14*-15
* Denotes courses students will take if they are completing 2+2 transfer
requirements.
$
Denotes courses that will be offered on the South Charleston, WV campus
only.
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Programs of Study – BTEC
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Associate in Applied Science
ADMINISTRATIVE PROFESSIONAL TECHNOLOGY
EXECUTIVE, LEGAL, AND MEDICAL CONCENTRATIONS
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
This two-year program is designed to prepare students for a professional career as an administrative
support specialist and reflects the evolving responsibilities of this occupation. Office professionals are
increasingly self-directed and technically proficient. This program emphasizes project management;
Internet communications and research; document retrieval; customer service and public relations; the
ability to take initiative, think logically, demonstrate problem-solving techniques and successfully
interact with a variety of personalities.
The program includes theoretical and laboratory instruction by providing students with up-to-date
training for today's high-tech office as well as a strong background in office-related skills and
knowledge. Additionally, an internship at an area business setting provides the foundation needed
for the following certification exams: Computing Core Certification (IC3), Microsoft Office Specialist
(MOS), and Office Proficiency Assessment Certification (OPAC). Students pursuing the medical
concentration will also develop their expertise in ICD-10-CM, ICD-10-PCS, and CPT/HCPCS medical
coding and medical office billing procedures. The program will be applying for AHIMA acreditation and
will prepare the student to sit for the AHIMA Certified Coding Specialist (CCSВ®) Certification.
Secretaries and administrative professionals perform a variety of clerical and managerial duties that
are necessary to run an organization efficiently. Instruction includes business communications,
principles of business law, scheduling and travel management, accounting, filing systems and records
management, conference and meeting recording, report preparation, office equipment and
procedures, office management skills, and professional standards. Specific job duties vary by
experience, job title, and specialty.
Executive secretaries and executive administrative assistants provide high-level administrative
support for an office and for top executives of an organization. They often handle more complex
responsibilities, such as reviewing incoming documents, conducting research, and preparing reports.
Some also supervise clerical staff.
Legal secretaries perform work that requires knowledge of legal terminology and procedures. They
prepare legal papers such as summonses, complaints, motions, and subpoenas under the supervision
of an attorney or a paralegal. They also review legal journals and help with legal research—for
example, by verifying quotes and citations in legal briefs.
Medical secretaries transcribe dictation and prepare reports or articles for physicians or medical
scientists. They take simple medical histories of patients, arrange for patients to be hospitalized, or
process insurance payments. Medical secretaries need to be familiar with medical terminology,
medical records, and hospital or laboratory procedures.
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Programs of Study
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES – EXECUTIVE CONCENTRATION
In addition to the learning outcomes set forth in the general education core curriculum for the
associate of applied science degree, specific outcomes for this concentration have been established.
Upon completion of the program graduates will:
п‚·
Operate office equipment, use office procedures, perform machine transcription, manage
records and prepare documents with proficiency
п‚·
Utilize office technology such as word processing, electronic file management, electronic
presentations and various desktop publishing software packages with proficiency
п‚·
Pass the Microsoft Office Certification Exams – Word, Excel and PowerPoint and the OPAC Exam
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES – LEGAL CONCENTRATION
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES – MEDICAL CONCENTRATION
In addition to the learning outcomes set forth in the general education core curriculum for the
associate of applied science degree, specific outcomes for this concentration have been established.
Upon completion of the program graduates will:
п‚·
Operate office equipment, use medical office procedures, perform machine transcription,
manage records and prepare documents with proficiency
п‚·
Utilize office technology such as word processing, electronic file management, electronic
presentations and various desktop publishing software packages with proficiency
п‚·
Pass the Microsoft Office Certification – Word, Excel and Access and the OPAC Exam
п‚·
Apply ICD-10-CM, ICD-10-PCS, and CPT/HCPCS principles and guidelines
п‚·
Use medical office billing guidelines and procedures
п‚·
Utilize medical terminology as well as knowledge of human anatomy, basic pharmacology, and
pathophysiology of the human body to assign medical codes
п‚·
Interpret medical records for completeness, accuracy, and compliance with regulations
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT ALL CONCENTRATIONS
Course outcomes are assessed by exit exams in each course. Program outcomes are assessed in
capstone courses and internship. Learner outcomes are assessed by national certification
examinations. General education outcomes are assessed by ACT WorkKeys and a portfolio.
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
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Administrative Professional Technology
In addition to the learning outcomes set forth in the general education core curriculum for the
associate of applied science degree, specific outcomes for this concentration have been established.
Upon completion of the program graduates will:
п‚·
Operate office equipment, use legal office procedures, perform machine transcription, manage
records and prepare documents with proficiency
п‚·
Utilize office technology such as word processing, electronic file management, electronic
presentations and various desktop publishing software packages with proficiency
п‚·
Pass the Microsoft Office Certification – Word, Excel and Access and the OPAC Exam
п‚·
Examine the legal system and processes as well as employ legal reasoning
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
CAREERS
According to the Occupational Outlook Handbook, overall employment of secretaries and
administrative assistants is projected to grow 12 percent from 2012 to 2022, about as fast as the
average for all occupations. Employment growth, however, will vary by occupational specialty.
Employment of paralegals and legal assistants is projected to grow 17 percent from 2012 to 2022,
faster than the average for all occupations. This occupation attracts many applicants, and
competition for jobs will be strong.
Employment of medical secretaries is projected to grow 36 percent from 2012 to 2022, much faster
than the average for all occupations. Federal health legislation will expand the number of patients
who have access to health insurance, increasing patient access to medical care. In addition, the aging
population will have increased demand for medical services. As a result, medical secretaries will be
needed to handle administrative tasks related to billing and insurance processing.
GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT INFORMATION
The Administrative Professional Technology program prepares graduates for employment as:
43-6011.00* - Executive Secretaries and Executive Administrative Assistants - Administrative
Assistant, Executive Assistant, Executive Secretary, Administrative Secretary, Office Manager,
Administrative Coordinator, Administrative Aide, Administrative Associate, Executive Administrative
Assistant, Secretary
43-6012.00* - Legal Secretaries - Legal Secretary, Legal Assistant, Magistrate Assistant, Confidential
Secretary, Judicial Administrative Assistant, Legal Administrative Secretary, Litigation Assistant,
Secretary
43-6013.00* - Medical Secretaries - Admissions Coordinator, Billing Coordinator, Health Unit
Coordinator, Medical Office Specialist, Medical Secretary, Patient Coordinator, Physician Office
Specialist, Unit Secretary, Unit Support Representative, Ward Clerk
*www.onetonline.org
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BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
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Programs of Study
ADMINISTRATIVE PROFESSIONAL TECHNOLOGY
EXECUTIVE CONCENTRATION
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
ATEC 120
BUSN 106
BUSN 112
ENGL 101
First Semester
Fund of Business Computer
Applications
Beginning Document Processing
Introduction to Business ACBSP
Business Mathematics
English Composition
Semester Total
Second Semester
3
3
3
3
3
15
ACCT
185
ATEC
125
BUSN
120
BUSN
121
BUSN
122
CHEM
100
BIOL
101
MGMT
151
Survey of Accounting
3
Advanced Document
Processing
3
IPR: Interviewing Strategies
1
IPR: Professional
Etiquette OR
IPR: Customer Service
1
Consumer Chemistry
OR
Principles of Biology
3
Supervisory
Management
3
Semester Total 14
ATEC 200
ATEC 210
ATEC 220
BUSN 201
FINC 201
Third Semester
Desktop Publishing
Machine Transcription
Records & Database Management
Business Law I
Personal Finance
Semester Total
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
3
3
3
3
3
15
ATEC 230
ATEC 250
ATEC 255
ATEC 260
ATEC 265
BUSN 230
BUSN 266
BUSN 298
MGMT 253
Fourth Semester
Office Procedures
MOS Access Certification
MOS Excel Certification
MOS PowerPoint Certification
MOS Word Certification
Business Comm. & Ethics
Business Internship
Business Studies Seminar
Human Resource Management
Semester Total
97
3
1
1
1
1
3
2
1
3
16
Administrative Professional Technology
ATEC 115
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
ADMINISTRATIVE PROFESSIONAL TECHNOLOGY
LEGAL CONCENTRATION
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
ATEC 120
BUSN 112
ENGL 101
PRLS 100
PRLS 101
ATEC 210
ATEC 220
BUSN 201
BUSN 230
PRLS 201
First Semester
Beginning Document Processing
Business Math
English Composition
Intro to the Paralegal Profession*
Civil Litigation I*
Semester Total
Third Semester
Machine Transcription
Records & Database Management
Business Law I
Business Comm. & Ethics
Evidence and Litigation*
Semester Total
3
3
3
2
3
14
3
3
3
3
3
15
Second Semester
Fund of Business Computer
Applications
ACCT 185 Survey of Accounting
ATEC 125 Advanced Document Processing
BUSN 120 IPR: Interviewing Strategies
BUSN 121 IPR: Professional Etiquette
BUSN 122 IPR: Customer Service
CHEM 100 Consumer Chemistry OR
BIOL 101
Principles of Biology
MGMT 151 Supervisory Management
Semester Total
3
18
Fourth Semester
Office Procedures
MOS: Access Certification
MOS: Excel Certification
MOS: PowerPoint Certification
MOS: Word Certification
Business Internship
Business Studies Seminar
Civil Litigation II*
Semester Total
3
1
1
1
1
2
1
3
13
ATEC 115
ATEC 230
ATEC 250
ATEC 255
ATEC 260
ATEC 265
BUSN 266
BUSN 298
PRLS 204
3
3
3
1
1
1
3
*Denotes courses only offered at the South Charleston, WV campus.
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Programs of Study
ADMINISTRATIVE PROFESSIONAL TECHNOLOGY
MEDICAL CONCENTRATION
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
ATEC 210
ATEC 220
BIOL 210
MEDC 201
MEDC 215
First Semester
Beginning Document Processing
Introduction to Business
Business Mathematics
English Composition
Medical Terminology
Medical Insurance & Billing
Practices
Semester Total
Third Semester
Machine Transcription
Records & Database Mgmt.
Human Anatomy & Physiology
ICD-10-CM Diagnostic Medical
Coding
Human Pathophysiology
Semester Total
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
3
3
3
3
1
3
16
3
3
4
3
2
15
Second Semester
Survey of Accounting
Basic Pharmacology
Fund of Business Computer
Applications
BUSN 120 IPR: Interviewing Strategies
MEDC 110 Medical Law & Ethics
MGMT 151 Supervisory Management
Semester Total
ACCT 185
ALHL 120
ATEC 115
ATEC 230
BUSN 230
BUSN 266
BUSN 298
MEDC 203
MEDC 205
Fourth Semester
Office Procedures
Business Comm. & Ethics
Business Internship
Business Studies Seminar
ICD-10-PCS Procedural Medical
Coding
CPT/HCPCS Medical Coding
Semester Total
3
3
3
1
1
3
14
3
3
2
1
3
3
15
99
Administrative Professional Technology
ATEC 120
BUSN 106
BUSN 112
ENGL 101
MEDC 101
MEDC 150
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
Associate In Applied Science
ADVANCED MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
The Advanced Manufacturing Technology (AAS-AMFT) degree program provides a highly interactive
hands-on course of study that prepares graduates for careers in the modern manufacturing
environment. Advanced manufacturing technology graduates repair, troubleshoot and maintain
manufacturing equipment including automated control systems, process control systems, hydraulic
and pneumatic systems, conveyors, robots, and application specific machinery. Graduates have a
broad multi-disciplinary background in electrical, mechanical, fluid power, automation,
instrumentation and process control systems, as well as basic fabrication skills in order to facilitate
working with modern electro-mechanical machinery.
The AMFT program uses an innovative block-scheduled cohort model to deliver classes, so students
have the opportunity to participate in long-term in-depth internships with participating industrial
partners. Program courses are offered two days a week in approximately 8-hour blocks for five
semesters. Qualifying students may intern with industry partners on non-class days to obtain a
valuable background of real world applications throughout the program. Graduates who have
participated in the internship program enter the work force with not just a degree, but also the
equivalent of a year of professional industrial experience.
The core program provides a general framework that students can customize to meet their specific
educational and career goals. Due to the flexibility of the program, graduates have career
opportunities in a wide range of manufacturing industries including chemical processing, automotive
manufacturing, equipment fabrication and the mining industry.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
Upon completion of the program, the student will be able to:
1.
Work competently, effectively and safely to install, analyze, repair and maintain
electromechanical, electrical and electronic systems and subsystems with minimal supervision.
2.
Install, maintain, repair and operate:
п‚·
industrial control systems,
п‚·
test, measurement and instrumentation equipment,
п‚·
electromechanical systems and devices,
п‚·
machine tools and fabrication equipment.
3.
Communicate effectively in written, oral and graphical forms.
4.
Work effectively in teams with other technicians, engineers, scientists, and production
personnel.
5.
Apply industry-based safety standards in the work environment.
6.
Understand professional and ethical responsibility to their field and to society.
7.
Appreciate cultural and ethnic diversity in the workplace.
8.
Understand the need to maintain their technical skills and develop new ones through personal
development and continued learning.
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BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
Program outcomes are assessed by a variety of means, including quizzes, unit tests, oral
presentations, written reports, and final examinations. Outcomes based on technical expertise are
assessed by the Society of Manufacturing Engineers EET Outcomes Assessment exit exam, which
assesses student knowledge in a variety of areas of the electrical engineering technology field.
General education outcomes are assessed by the ACT WorkKeys exit examination.
ADVANCED PLACEMENT CREDIT FOR HIGH SCHOOL/VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL
CENTER/COLLEGE PROGRAMS
High school level electronic, electrical or computer-oriented coursework is not necessary for entrance
into the Advanced Manufacturing Technology program. Introductory subjects are incorporated as
part of the program. Students, who have completed vocational or EDGE courses, may receive credit
for advanced placement. Articulation/EDGE agreements are in place with various vocation-technical
centers. Advanced placement is also available for students with prior college experience. Please
contact the department chair.
CAREERS IN ADVANCED MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY
Advanced Manufacturing Technology
The Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook Handbook predicts that AMFT graduates will
have bright prospects for employment over the next decade, with the number of positions in the field
expected to grow by 19% from 2010 to 2020. According to the O*NET database, this corresponds to
more than 117,000 new positions nationally by 2020.
Typical graduate positions include chemical process technician, industrial maintenance mechanic,
automation programmer and electromechanical equipment assembler/tester/installer.
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
101
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
ADVANCED MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
Program Core with Program Specialization Electives Shown
AMTE 111
AMTE 121
GNST 102
GNET 122
MATH 115
AMTM 247
First Semester
DC Circuits: Fundamentals
AC Circuits: Fundamentals
First Year Experience
Industrial Safety Fundamentals
Applied Technical Math (GEC-2)
Fundamentals of Fluid Power
Semester Total
WLDT 101
WLDT 102
ENGL 102
GNET 108
MEET 121
MEET 225
3
3
1
3
3
3
16
Second Semester
AC Circuits:
AC Power & 3-Phase Systems
AMTE 131 Industrial Electronics:
Transformers
AMTE 132 Industrial Electronics:
Motors & Motor Control
AMTE 141 PLC Fundamentals (GEC-4)
AMTE 142 PLC Interfacing and HMIs (GEC-4)
AMTE 143 PLC Applications (GEC-4)
AMTE 151 CST: Sensors and Actuators
AMTE 152 CST: Process Control
AMTM 248 Applications of Fluid Power
ENGL 101 English Composition I (GEC-1)
GEC-3 Elective
Semester Total
AMTE 127
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
3
16
Third Semester
Introduction to Welding Processes 3
Part I
Introduction to Welding Processes 3
Part II
Semester Total 6
Fourth Semester
English Composition II (GEC-1)
Computer Applications for
Technicians (GEC-4)
Manufacturing Processes I
Mechanical Design I
Program Elective
Semester Total
3
3
AMTM 280
3
3
3
15
Fifth Semester
Mechanical Maintenance
Principles
Program Elective
Program Elective
Program Elective
Semester Total
3
3
3
3
12
Program Electives must be approved by your academic advisor.
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BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
ADVANCED MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
Automotive Maintenance Technician Concentration
First Semester
DC Circuits: Fundamentals
AC Circuits: Fundamentals
First Year Experience
Industrial Safety Fundamentals
Applied Technical Math (GEC-2)
Fundamentals of Fluid Power
Semester Total
WLDT 101
WLDT 102
ENGL 102
GNET 108
MEET 121
MEET 225
MATH 126
Second Semester
AC Circuits:
AC Power & 3-Phase Systems
AMTE 131 Industrial Electronics:
Transformers
AMTE 132 Industrial Electronics:
Motors & Motor Control
AMTE 141 PLC Fundamentals (GEC-4)
AMTE 142 PLC Interfacing and HMIs (GEC-4)
AMTE 143 PLC Applications (GEC-4)
AMTE 151 CST: Sensors and Actuators
AMTE 152 CST: Process Control
AMTM 248 Applications of Fluid Power
ENGL 101 English Composition I (GEC-1)
GEC-3 Elective
Semester Total
AMTE 127
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
3
16
Third Semester
Introduction to Welding Processes 3
Part I
Introduction to Welding Processes 3
Part II
Semester Total 6
Fourth Semester
English Composition II (GEC-1)
Computer Applications for
Technicians (GEC-4)
Manufacturing Processes I
Mechanical Design I
College Algebra
Semester Total
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
3
3
1
3
3
3
16
3
3
3
3
3
15
AMTE 261
AMTE 281
AMTE 290
AMTM 280
MEET 122
Fifth Semester
Industrial Robotics
Industrial Troubleshooting
Practicum
Mechanical Maintenance
Principles
Manufacturing Processes II
Semester Total
3
2
1
3
3
12
103
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Technology
AMTE 111
AMTE 121
GNST 102
GNET 122
MATH 115
AMTM 247
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
ADVANCED MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
Instrumentation and Processes Technician Concentration
AMTE 111
AMTE 121
GNST 102
GNET 122
MATH 115
AMTM 247
First Semester
DC Circuits: Fundamentals
AC Circuits: Fundamentals
First Year Experience
Industrial Safety Fundamentals
Applied Technical Math (GEC-2)
Fundamentals of Fluid Power
Semester Total
WLDT 101
WLDT 102
GNET 108
MEET 225
PTEC 101
PTEC 103
WLDT 102
104
3
3
1
3
3
3
16
Second Semester
AC Circuits:
AC Power & 3-Phase Systems
AMTE 131 Industrial Electronics:
Transformers
AMTE 132 Industrial Electronics:
Motors & Motor Control
AMTE 141 PLC Fundamentals (GEC-4)
AMTE 142 PLC Interfacing and HMIs (GEC-4)
AMTE 143 PLC Applications (GEC-4)
AMTE 151 CST: Sensors and Actuators
AMTE 152 CST: Process Control
AMTM 248 Applications of Fluid Power
ENGL 101 English Composition I (GEC-1)
GEC-3 Elective
Semester Total
AMTE 127
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
3
16
Third Semester
Introduction to Welding Processes 3
Part I
Introduction to Welding Processes 3
Part II
Semester Total 6
Fourth Semester
Basic Computer App. (GEC-4)
Mechanical Design I
Introduction to Process
Technology
Process Technology I: Equipment
Introduction to Welding Processes
Part II
Semester Total
3
3
3
3
3
PTEC 203
PTEC 205
ENGL 102
MEET 280
Fifth Semester
Process Technology II - Systems
Process Technology III Operations
English Composition II (GEC-1)
Mechanical Maintenance
Principles
Semester Total
3
4
3
3
13
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BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
Certificate in Applied Science
ADVERTISING
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
The Certificate in Applied Science in Advertising is designed for students and employees interested in
developing advertisements. Although all advertising media is addressed, the student will learn basic
graphic design and general desktop publishing software. This certificate will offer more specialized
skills to a student majoring in marketing, communications or any other business field.
The 30 credit hours for the degree were selected to improve the understanding of advertising and its
use with respect to public relations, marketing, business and non-profit organizations. There are nine
credit hours dealing with computer graphics, graphic design and desktop publishing.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
Demonstrate an understanding and proficiency with the Marketing Mix (the Four Ps) and its
importance to the organization
Make a sales presentation using the ten step sales process.
Be able to develop an integrated advertising campaign using sound advertising principles.
Developed a social media strategy for a brand or company that was appropriately integrated
with overall marketing strategy (i.e. segmentation, targeting, positioning, marketing mix)
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
Program outcomes are assessed by capstone courses, exit interview, employer surveys and program
specific exit exams. General education outcomes are assessed by a general education portfolio.
The Advertising Certifcate program prepares graduates for employment as an advertising sales
agent* or advertising/promotion manager* with typical job titles such as: advertising agent, retail
sales manager, account executive, advertising representative, sales director, ad buyer, promotions
manager or advertising director.
*www.onetonline.org
GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT INFORMATION
The Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook Handbook reports that the annual median salary
(May 2012) for Advertising Sales Agents is $46,290 and a -1% job outlook growth rate, 2012-20.
Experience, education and certification all increase earning potential. If students go on to further
their education, Advertising, Promotions and Marketing Managers have a reported median salary of
$115,750 as of May 2012 and a 12% growth rate, 2012-2020.
For additional salary information see:
п‚·
http://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/advertising-promotions-and-marketing-managers.htm
п‚·
http://www.bls.gov/ooh/sales/advertising-sales-agents.htm
Tuition and Fees*: $4520 In-State Resident
$11420 Non-Resident
Books*: $1300
CB Certification Exam: $395
Graduation Rate: N/A
Job Placement Rate: 72% (college average)
Median Loan Debt: N/A
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
105
Advertising
CAREERS
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
*Actual costs may vary.
ADVERTISING
CERTIFICATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
ENGL 101
MRKT 173
MKRT 175
CSCT 120
MRKT 205
$ Denotes
106
First Semester
English Composition I
Professional Selling
Advertising
Computer Graphics - Illustrator
Fundamentals of Marketing
Semester Total
3
3
3
3
3
15
ATEC 115
BUSN 112
ATEC 200
CSCT 124
MRKT 220
Second Semester
Fundamentals of Business
Computer Applications
Business Mathematics
Desktop Publishing
Computer Graphics - Photoshop
Social Media Marketing
Semester Total
3
3
3
3
3
15
courses only offered on the South Charleston, WV campus
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
Certificate in Applied Science
Associate in Applied Science
BLASTING TECHNOLOGY
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
Blasting technicians apply scientific and mathematical principles to safely dislodge coal overburden,
ore, rock or aggregate, or for demolishing structures. They are employed by mining, quarrying,
construction and drilling and blasting companies, as well as regulating agencies and suppliers of
explosives and blasting equipment. This program places particular concentration on safe blasting
operations and adherence to the laws and regulations that control these operations. Topics studied
include explosives and initiation types, blasting theory, blast calculations and design, drill and blast
records, geology, blast hole drilling, safety, accident prevention, and environmental issues.
Blasting Technology is a limited enrollment program, which admits one class of students each fall
semester (exceptions may be considered by the blasting program coordinator). Please refer to the
Admission section of the catalog for specific program admission requirements. All admission
materials must be received by the Admission’s Office at least one calendar month before scheduled
classes begin.
Program graduates will:
1.
Demonstrate an appropriate mastery of topics encountered by the blasting technician including
materials handling, blasting equipment, blast-hole layout, record keeping, and
legislation/regulations controlling blasting operations.
2.
Perform routine calculations encountered in the blasting industry.
3.
Demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively by written and oral means.
4.
Demonstrate an awareness of safety issues related to the blasting environment and to use this
knowledge to establish and maintain a safe working environment.
5.
Exhibit appropriate workplace behavior and display a commitment to quality and dependability.
6.
Know, apply and adhere to laws and regulations applicable to the blasting industry.
Also, see the learning outcomes for the associate of applied science programs outlined in the general
education core curriculum.
ADVANCED PLACEMENT CREDIT FOR HIGH SCHOOL/VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL
CENTER/COLLEGE PROGRAMS
Degree specific high school coursework is not necessary for entrance into the Blasting Technology
program. Introductory subjects are incorporated as part of the program. Students, who have
completed vocational or EDGE courses, may receive credit for advanced placement.
Articulation/EDGE agreements are in place with various vocation-technical centers. Advanced
placement is also available for students with prior college experience or certifications. Please contact
the department chair.
CAREERS IN BLASTING TECHNOLOGY
Blasting jobs are available in the construction Industry, the mining Industry (surface and
underground),as well as quarrying operations. Typical job titles include construction, surface
mine,open-pit / quarrying blasting technician, blasting inspector, seismograph technician, and blasting
consultant.
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
107
Blasting Technology
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
BLASTING TECHNOLOGY
CERTIFICATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
BLST 100
BLST 102
ENGL 101
GNET 125
GNST 102
MATH 115
First Semester
Basic Blasting +*~
Blasting Materials-Storage
Handling, and Transportation
English Composition I (GEC-1)
40-Hour Surface Apprentice
Class*
First Year Experience
Applied Technical Math (GEC-2)
HU/SS Elective (GEC-3)
Semester Total
2
3
3
2
1
3
3
17
BLST 103
BLST 105
BLST 106
BUSN 120
ENGL 202
PHSC 100
PHSC 101
Second Semester
Blasting Field Camp I
Blasting Calculations
Blasting Communication and
Records
IR: Interviewing Strategies
Business & Professional Writing
(GEC-1)
2
3
3
1
3
Physical Science (GEC-4)
3
Physical Science Lab(GEC-4)
1
Semester Total 16
Continued Studies for an
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE (A.A.S.)
Third Semester
Blast Design and Layout
Above Ground Drilling
Blasting Safety Issues & Laws
Computer Applications for
Technicians
HWAY 120 Geology for Technicians (GEC-4)
Technical Electives
Semester Total
BLST 210
BLST 211
BLST 212
GNET 108
3
2
3
3
2
2
15
BLST 213
BLST 225
BLST 226
BLST 228
GNET 112
Fourth Semester
Blasting Field Camp II
Blasting in Construction and
Quarries
Environmental Issues in Blasting
Initiation Systems
Ethics & Professional Behavior
Semester Total
2
3
3
3
1
12
+ BLST-100 & GNET-122 constitute the Basic Blasting and Industrial Safety Skill Set.
* BLST-100 & GNET-125 constitute the Blasting and Apprentice Miner Skill Set.
~ BLST-100 & BLST-211 constitute the Basic Drill and Blast Skill Set.
Recommended Electives:
GNET-122 Industrial Safety Fundamentals +
GNET-126 80 Hour Underground Apprentice Class
WLDT-101 Introduction to Welding Processes I
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BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
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Programs of Study
Associate In Science
Associate In Applied Science
BOARD OF GOVERNORS
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
Is A non-traditional degree completion opportunity at the associate degree level.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
It is specifically designed for adult learners to meet occupational goals, employment requirements,
establish professional credentials, or achieve personal goals. The degree program provides the
opportunity for adult learners to utilize credit for prior learning experiences via licenses, certificates,
military credits and other non-collegiate sources while assuring maximum credit transferability.
PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
Board of Governors
Upon completion of this program, graduates will be able to:
•
Apply effective written and oral communication skills
•
Work collaboratively in groups
•
Think critically and solve problems
•
Demonstrate practical application of quantitative and scientific reasoning skills
•
Demonstrate analysis and evaluation of skill competencies derived from multiple sources
including work, volunteer activities, hobbies, etc.
•
Demonstrate understanding of principles of good citizenship
•
Develop long-range vocational or transfer goals
•
Demonstrate basic computer literacy and use of computerized communication technology
•
Examine issues from a global perspective
•
Demonstrate mastery of interdisciplinary competencies as defined in educational plan
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
General Education– 21 credit hours
Communications – 6 credits hours
(3 credits of ENGL 101 or equivalent is required)
Mathematics/Sciences – 6 credit hours
(3 credits hours of MATH – 100 level or higher is required)
Social Sciences/Humanities – 6 credit hours
Computer Literacy – 3 credit hours
Credit hour requirements may be met through a variety of means such as:
•
Traditional coursework
•
Standardized exams
•
Institutional Challenge exams
•
Military Training
•
Work and Life experiences (see note)
•
Evaluation of non-collegiate sponsored instruction
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
109
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
Note:
п‚·
Students submitting a portfolio for assessment of credits for prior learning will be required to
take GNST 130 – Introduction to Governors Portfolio and GNST 201 – Writing Governors
Portfolio
п‚·
A $300 evaluation fee plus a $10 per credit hour posting fee is charged for portfolio
evaluation/assessment. Evaluation fee is charged at time of submittal and posting fee is charged
after the evaluation.
PROGRAM ASSESMENT
Students must take a General Education Proficiency Profile (ETS) exam prior to graduation.
TRANSFER BACCALAUREATE OPTIONS
Regents B.A.
OTHER INFORMATION
(LINKS TO ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS, SPECIFIED VACCINATIONS, SAFETY REQUIREMENTS, ETC.)
Residency Requirements
Twelve credit hours from a regionally accredited higher
education institution are required. A minimum of three credit hours from BVCTC are required.
Admission Requirements
Students are eligible for admission to the program two
years after graduation from high school. In the case of those
passing a high school equivalency exam, admission must be
two years after their high school class has graduated.
Areas of Emphasis
Students enrolled in the Board of Governors AAS can be eligible for an area of emphasis. In order to
receive an area of emphasis, a student must meet one of the following criteria:
1.
Completion of 15 credit hours of transcribed coursework from an accredited institution of higher
learning in an occupational concentration with a minimum grade of C in each course, in program
areas of study appropriate to the associate degrees offered at BVCTC.
2.
Completion of 15 credit hours obtained through extra-institutional credits in an occupational
concentration appropriate to the associate degrees offered at BVCTC. Extra-institutional credits
can be earned through programs such as those offered at vocational and technical centers as
well as military occupational training programs.
3.
Completion of a minimum of 15 credit hours obtained through a combination of graded
coursework from an accredited institution, in an occupation concentration with a minimum
grade of C in each course (as described in #1) and extra-institutional credits in program areas of
study appropriate for the associate-level degrees (as described in #2).
All credits either earned traditionally or through extra-institutional means must be transcribed to the
student’s BVCTC records before areas of emphasis can be determined. The Program Director is
responsible for validating the completion of a defined area of concentration and will recommend the
area of emphasis designation to the VPAA. The VPAA will give the final approval for the area of
emphasis.
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BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
BOARD OF GOVERNORS
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
Communications
Mathematics/Science
Social
Sciences/Humanities
Computer Literacy
Social Science/Humanities/ 6
Credit Hours/ Suggested
Electives
PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology
PSYC 201 Life Span Development
SOCI 101 Introduction to Sociology
SOCI 110 Social Problems
SOCI 120 Families and Society
GERO 209 Psychosocial Aspects of Aging
GERO 206 Death and Dying
HUMN 101 Introduction to Humanities
HIST
Any 100/200 History Course
6
6
6
3
21
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Communication/ 6 Credit Hours/
Suggested Electives
ENGL 101 English Composition 1
ENGL 102 English Composition 2
ENGL104 Technical Writing
ENGL 201 Business & Professional Writing
ATEC 240 Business Communications &
Ethics
COMM 100 Oral Communications
GNST 130 Introduction to Governors Portfolio
GNST 201 Writing Governors Portfolio
BIOL 101
CHEM 100
MTGY 100
PHSC 100
MATH
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
2
21
Mathematics/Science*/ 6 Credit
Hours/ Suggested Electives
General Biology
3-4
Consumer Chemistry
3
Weather and Climate
3
Physical Science
3-4
Any 100 level Math Course*
3
3 credit hours must be in Math
15
-17
27
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
111
Board of Governors
General Education 21
Credit Hours
Programs of Study
ATEC 115
ATEC 120
CSCI 100
Computer Literacy/ 3
Credit Hours/ Suggested
Electives
Fundamentals of Business 3
Computer Applications
Beginning Document
3
Processing
Introduction to Computer 3
& Office Applications
9
BridgeValley CTC
•
•
•
•
•
•
General Electives
39 Credit Hours
Traditional coursework
Standardized exams
Institutional challenge exams
Military training
Work and life experiences
Evaluation of non-collegiate
sponsored instruction
*Most BA/BS degrees require College Algebra
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BCTC 2012–2013 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
Associate in Applied Science
BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
The Associate in Applied Science in Building Design and Construction is a two-year program focused
on sustainability and building design and construction. The program concentrates on new
construction at both residential and commercial levels. It also examines building construction
methods and site analysis. Advanced building science, building systems integration, building codes,
construction management, construction documents and building information modeling are
emphasized during year two.
PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES:
Upon completion of this program, graduates will be able to:
п‚·
Understand sustainability and how it applies to the design and construction industry.
п‚·
Design and construct assemblies in new construction.
п‚·
Understand building codes.
п‚·
Understand building system integration.
п‚·
Understand construction documents and contracts.
п‚·
Prepare simple construction management plans.
п‚·
Apply estimating techniques.
п‚·
Construct a virtual building model from concept to construction using building information
modeling software.
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Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION
ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE
First Semester
BDAC 101 Fundamentals of Building
Design
BDAC 103 Principles of Building Construction
I
DRFT 120 Drafting I
GNST 120 First Year Experience
MATH 110 Applied Technical Math
SBLT 101 Introduction to Sustainable Design
and Construction
Semester Total
BDAC 201
COMM 100
SBLT 210
SBLT 207
114
Third Semester
Building Codes and Standards
Speech Communications
Building Information Modeling
Building Science for Commercial
Enclosure
GNEC-3 Elective
Semester Total
3
BDAC 105
3
BDAC 107
CSCT 104
2
1
3
3
ENGL 101
SBLT 103
Second Semester
Principles of Building Construction
II
Site Analysis and Development
Technical Application for
Spreadsheets and Databases
English Composition I
Building Science for Wood
Framed Enclosures
Semester Total
3
3
3
3
3
15
15
3
3
3
3
3
15
BDAC 207
BDAC 215
SBLT 203
SBLT 211
PHYS 100
Fourth Semester
Construction Management and
Estimating (Capstone)
Construction Documents and
Contracts
Building Systems Integration
Building Information Modeling II
Introductory Physics
Semester Total
3
3
3
3
3
15
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
Associate In Applied Science
CIVIL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
The Associate in Science degree Civil Engineering Technology (ASCET) is a two-year
program that prepares graduates for employment in construction, water resources, public
works, structural detailing and design, environmental studies, mining development and
related fields. The program stresses materials, surveying, structures, water resources, soil
mechanics, construction and highways. The graduate is prepared to support engineers
various areas of civil engineering.
Typical assignments include preparing plans, field/lab testing of construction materials,
layout and inspection of construction projects and mining development. The graduate
might also work under the supervision of an engineer performing basic design calculations
in highways, structures, hydraulics/hydrology and soils. Completion of this program also
qualifies the graduate to enter directly into the plus-two Bachelor of Science program
Engineering Technology-Civil emphasis at West Virginia University Institute of Technology.
The A.S. Civil Engineering Technology program is accredited by the Technology Engineering
Technology Accreditation Commission (ETAC) of ABET, Inc.
PROGRAM OBJECTIVES
Recent graduates of the ASCET program will be able to achieve the following career and
professional accomplishments:
1. Demonstrate an appropriate mastery of aspects of civil engineering technology such
as construction materials, surveying, structures, soil mechanics, highways, and water
resources.
2. Demonstrate the ability to utilize accumulated knowledge supplemented with
practical experience and continuing education to adapt to changing technology within
their chosen area of specialization.
3. Demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively by oral and written means and
display the interpersonal and leadership skills needed to work and participate
effectively in a team environment.
4. Exhibit appropriate behavior when dealing with professional, ethical and social issues
and display evidence of a commitment to quality and dependability.
5. Demonstrate the ability to successfully pursue and complete studies at the
baccalaureate level if they so choose.
Course outcomes are assessed by exit examinations in each course. Program outcomes are
assessed in designated courses. General education outcomes are assessed by ACT
WorkKeys exam.
CAREERS IN CIVIL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
Typical job titles include: Lead Engineering Technician, Assistant Project Engineer, and
Design Technician, Surveying Coordinator, Inspector, Lab Manager, Surveying/Party Chief,
Survey Technician, Estimator, Traffic/Highway Technician, Environmental Technician.
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
113
Civil Engineering
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
TRANSFER BACCALAUREATE OPTIONS
Graduates of the program may transfer to Bachelor of Sciences program in Engineering
Technology-Civil. Advanced Placement Credit for High School/Career-Technical
Center/College Programs High school level drafting, surveying, or construction subjects are
not necessary for entrance into the Civil Engineering Technology program. Beginning
subjects are part of the program. The student who has completed such vocational
courses, however, may receive advanced placement. Articulation Edge agreements are in
place with various vocational-technical centers. Advanced placement is also available to
the student with prior college experience. Please check with the department chair for
more information.
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BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
CIVIL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
DRET 120
ENGL 101
GNST 102
GNET 108
MATH 130
MATH 140
CIET 131
First Semester
Drafting I
English Composition (GEC 1)
First Year Experience
Basic Computer App. (GEC 4)
College Algebra (GEC 2)
Trigonometry (GEC 4)
Construction Materials
Semester Total
2
3
1
3
3
3
3
18
CIET 114
DRET 121
CIET 141
ENGL 102
PHYS 101
SOCI 130
CIET 115
CIET 145
CIET 215
CIET 230
MATH 155
Third Semester
Strength of Materials
Surveying II
Structural Steel Design
Hydraulics & Drainage
Technical Calculus (GEC 5)
Semester Total
3
3
3
3
3
15
CIET 216
CIET 222
CIET 245
PHYS 102
GNET 112
Second Semester
Statics
Drafting II
Surveying I
English Composition II (GEC 1)
Introductory Physics (GEC 2)
3
2
3
3
4
Diversity in the Workplace (GEC 3)
1
Semester Total 16
Fourth Semester
Structural Concrete Design
Soils and Foundations
Highways1
General Physics II (GEC 2)
Ethics & Professional Behavior
Technical Elective2
Semester Total
3
3
3
4
1
2
16
NOTE: GEC refers to BridgeValley CTC General Education Curriculum requirements.
1.
2.
Capstone course
Must be approved by the advisor.
As a requirement for graduation students must perform and document 15 hours of
approved community service activities.
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
113
Civil Engineering
ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
Certificate in Applied Science
COMPUTER MAINTENANCE & NETWORKING
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
The Computer Maintenance and Networking Certificate provide a fast one-year program that allows
students to quickly gain the skills necessary to enter the information technology job market. The
program provides entry-level coverage of computer hardware, operating systems, networking,
programming, web page development, standard computer applications and customer service skills.
Completion of the program prepares students to sit for the Comp TIA A+ and the Cisco Certified Entry
Network Technician (CCENT) certification exams.
Graduates are prepared for entry level information technology and help desk positions.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
1.
2.
3.
Maintain, repair, and support computer hardware and personal PC and network operating
systems in an effective and efficient manner.
Design, install, maintain and operate small office and branch level network infrastructure.
Install or update and configure computer application software, network security software, and
document computer systems and networks.
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
Program outcomes are assessed by a variety of means, including quizzes, unit tests, oral
presentations, written reports, and final examinations. Outcomes based on technical expertise are
assessed by the CCENT (Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician) certification exam, which
assesses student knowledge in a variety of areas of the networking technology field. General
education outcomes are assessed by the ACT WorkKeys exit examination.
ADVANCED PLACEMENT CREDIT FOR HIGH SCHOOL/VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL
CENTER/COLLEGE PROGRAMS
High school computer and networking coursework is not necessary for entrance into the Computer
Maintenance & Networking program. Introductory subjects are incorporated as part of the program.
Students, who have completed vocational or EDGE courses, may receive credit for advanced
placement. Articulation/EDGE agreements are in place with various vocation-technical centers.
Advanced placement is also available for students with prior college experience or certifications.
Please contact the department chair.
CAREERS IN COMPUTER MAINTENANCE & NETWORKING TECHNOLOGY
Graduates of this certificate program develop skills for entry level positions involving
troubleshooting, repairing, and maintenaning personal computers and small business networks.
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BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
COMPUTER MAINTENANCE AND NETWORKING
CERTIFICATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
CSCT 218
ISST 250
INFT 110
3
3
4
3
3
16
INFT 121
INFT 131
INFT 132
INFT 290
Second Semester
Network Operating Systems
Networking I
Networking II
Project Management
Semester Total
3
4
4
3
14
Computer Maintenance & Networking
ENGL 101
MATH 130
First Semester
Scripting (Powershell)
Security Fundamentals
Computer Architecture &
Troubleshooting
English composition I (GED1)
College Algebra (GEC 2)
Semester Total
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
119
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
Associate in Applied Science
COMPUTER SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY
MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS CONCENTRATION
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
If you are planning a career as a computer professional, opportunities are endless! Almost every
company, no matterhow big or small, employs computer specialists and most of these companies are
always looking for qualified people.The number of programmers, system analysts &
hardware,software, networking & security specialists needed to fillavailable positions will continue to
grow.In addition to computer specialists, trained personnel areneeded in all fields. Whether one is
seeking employmentas a teacher, accountant, writer, fashion designer, lawyer ora number of other
jobs, one question is frequently asked:What do you know about computers? Interacting with
acomputer is part of the daily routine for millions of white-and blue-collar workers. No matter the
career choice, in all likelihood one will be a frequent user of computers.
The MIS Concentration prepares students for entry levelemployment in any type of business
functional area. Students will be able to design small business systems, write programs in current
programming languages, design, implement and use databases and support most of the technical
needs of these areas.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
Upon completion of the program, the student will:
п‚·
Have fundamental knowledge of the information technology field and most business functions.
п‚·
Have skills in at least one current programming language.
п‚·
Be able to design, create, maintain, use and support databases.
п‚·
Have knowledge of operating systems and basic networking technologies.
п‚·
Have skills in project management.
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
Program outcomes are assessed by a variety of means, including quizzes, unit tests, oral
presentations, written reports, and final examinations. The student will also be required to submit a
portfolio to fulfill general education requirements.
TRANSFER BACCALAUREATE OPTIONS
Graduates of this program can seamlessly continue their studies in a +2 MIS program at Marshall
University or West Virginia State University.
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BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
COMPUTER SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY
MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS CONCENTRATION
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
BUSN 230
CSCT 244
CSCT 260
CSCT 280
ECON 201
First Semester
Principles of Biology
Principles of Biology Lab
First Year Experience
Introduction to Humanities
College Algebra
Free Elective
Semester Total
Third Semester
Business Communication and
Ethics
Data Communication and
Networking
Visual Basic .NET I
Database Management Systems
Principles of Management
Semester Total
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
3
1
1
3
3
2
13
ACCT 215
ATEC 115
3
BUSN 201
BUSN 296
CSCT 210
3
3
3
3
15
CSCT 101
ECON 201
ENGL 102
CSCT 282
INFT 290
Second Semester
Financial Accounting
Fundamentals of Business
Computer Applications
Introduction to Programming
Principles of Macroeconomics
English Composition II
Semester Total
Fourth Semester
Business Law I
Business Statistics
Fundamentals of Operating
Systems
System Analysis & Design
Project Management
Semester Total
3
3
3
3
3
15
3
3
3
3
3
15
121
Computer Science Technology - MIS
BIOL 101
BIOL 102
GNST 102
HUMN 101
MATH 130
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
Associate in Applied Science
COMPUTER SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY
SOFTWARE DEVELOPER CONCENTRATION
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
If you are planning a career as a computer professional, opportunities are endless! Almost every
company, no matter how big or small, employs computer specialists and most of these companies are
always looking for qualified people. The number of programmers, system analysts and hardware,
software, networking and security specialists needed to fill available positions will continue to grow.
In addition to computer specialists, trained personnel are needed in all fields. Whether one is seeking
employment as a teacher, accountant, writer, fashion designer, lawyer or a number of other jobs, one
question is frequently asked: What do you know about computers? Interacting with a computer is
part of the daily routine for millions of white-and blue-collar workers. No matter the career choice, in
all likelihood one will be a frequent user of computers.
The curriculum is intended to prepare entry-level computer programmers to create or maintain
programs and systems for business, industry, health care, education and government service. The
curriculum is designed to train both first-time job seekers as well as those currently employed in the
field who want to upgrade their knowledge and skills. Graduates should be able to transfer their
knowledge of computer systems and languages to different systems as technological changes occur.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
Upon completion of the program, the student will:
•
Have a thorough understanding of computer hardware and software principles and functions.
•
Have a detailed understanding of the fundamentals of computer programming and knowledge
of multiple current programming languages.
•
Have knowledge of the client-server model for program design and implementation.
•
Have knowledge of object-oriented programming techniques.
•
Be knowledgeable of all phases of the systems development life cycle (SDLC).
•
Be able to design, create, implement, use and support databases.
•
Be familiar with current networking models and network operating systems.
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
Program outcomes are assessed by a variety of means, including quizzes, unit tests, oral
presentations, written reports, and final examinations. The student will also be required to submit a
portfolio to fulfill general education requirements. A final project will be used to assess the students’
ability to perform in the workplace after graduation.
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BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
COMPUTER SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY
SOFTWARE DEVELOPER CONCENTRATION
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
CSCI 210
CSCI 280
CSCI 212
Elective
Elective
CSCI 120
CSCI 122
CSCI 124
CSCI 130
CSCI 131
CSCI 244
First Semester
First Year Experience
Classroom Success Strategies
Professional Development
College Algebra
English Composition I
Critical & Creative Thinking
Social Science Elective
Semester Total
Third Semester
Fundamentals of Operating
Systems
Database Management Systems
Algorithms
Restricted Elective
Programming Language Elective
Semester Total
Restricted Electives
Computer Graphics - Illustrator
Computer Graphics - InDesign
Computer Graphics - Photoshop
Introduction to Web Design
Content Management Systems
Data Communications and
Networking
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
1
1
1
3
3
3
3
15
3
3
3
3
3
15
CSCI 101
CSCI 260
COMM 100
Elective
CSCI 104
Second Semester
Introduction to Programming
Visual Basic .NET I
Oral Communication
Natural Science Elective
Technical Applications For
Microsoft Office
3
3
3
3
3
Semester Total 15
INFT 290
CSCI 282
CSCI 290
Elective
Elective
CSCI 232
CSCI 234
CSCI 236
CSCI 238
CSCI 264
CSCI 266
CSCI 262
CSCI 268
CSCI 270
Fourth Semester
Project Management
System Analysis & Design
Final Project
Restricted Elective
Restricted Elective
Semester Total
3
3
3
3
3
15
Programming Electives
Mobile Application Development
JavaScript I
PHP Programming I
ASP.NET I
Python I
C++ Programming I
C# Programming I
Java I
Visual Basic .NET II
123
Computer Science Technology – SW Dev
GNST 102
GNST 103
GNST 104
MATH 130
ENGL 101
CSCI 103
Elective
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
Associate in Applied Science
COMPUTER SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY
WEB DESIGN CONCENTRATION
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
If you are planning a career as a computer professional, opportunities are endless! Almost every
company, no matter how big or small, employs computer specialists and most of these companies are
always looking for qualified people. The number of programmers, system analysts & hardware,
software, networking & security specialists needed to fill available positions will continue to grow. In
addition to computer specialists, trained personnel are needed in all fields. Whether one is seeking
employment as a teacher, accountant, writer, fashion designer, lawyer or a number of other jobs, one
question is frequently asked: What do you know about computers? Interacting with a computer is
part of the daily routine for millions of white-and blue-collar workers. No matter the career choice, in
all likelihood one will be a frequent user of computers.
The Web Design Concentration prepares students for employment in all areas of web design.
Individuals can work for a company or independently as an entrepreneur. Students get hands-on
experience using the latest in web design software, database software and networking technologies.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
Upon completion of the program, the student will:
•
Have fundamental knowledge of the information technology field.
•
Have an understanding of computer program design and development using one or more
programming languages.
•
Have skills in developing and implementing relational databases.
•
Understand basic networking technologies.
•
Have skills in graphic design.
•
Have skills in project management.
•
Have skills in designing and developing database-driven Web sites with graphical and
multimedia content.
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
Program outcomes are assessed by a variety of means, including quizzes, unit tests, oral
presentations, written reports, and final examinations. The student will also be required to submit a
portfolio to fulfill general education requirements. A final project will be used to assess the students’
ability to perform in the workplace after graduation.
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BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
COMPUTER SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY
WEB DESIGN CONCENTRATION
CSCT 103
CSCT 120
ENGL 101
GNST 102
GNST 103
GNST 104
CSCT 210
CSCT 234
CSCT 260
CSCT 104
CSCT 122
CSCT 212
CSCT 232
CSCT 238
First Semester
Critical & Creative Thinking
Computer Graphics - Illustrator
English Composition I
First Year Experience
Classroom Success Strategies
Professional Development
Natural Science Elective
Semester Total
Third Semester
Fundamentals of Operating
Systems
JavaScript I
Visual Basic .NET I
Technical Elective
Technical Elective
Semester Total
Technical Electives
Technical Applications For
Spreadsheets and Databases
Computer Graphics - InDesign
Algorithms
Mobile Application Development
ASP.NET I
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
3
3
3
1
1
1
3
15
COMM 100
CSCT 101
CSCT 124
CSCT 130
CSCT 131
MATH 130
3
CSCT 282
CSCT 280
CSCT 247
CSCT 290
3
3
3
3
15
3
CSCT 244
3
3
3
3
CSCT 262
CSCT 264
CSCT 266
CSCT 282
INFT 290
Second Semester
Oral Communication
Introduction to Programming
Computer Graphics - Photoshop
Introduction to Web Design
Content Management Systems
College Algebra
Semester Total
3
3
3
2
1
3
15
Fourth Semester
System Analysis & Design
Database Management Systems
PHP Programming I
Final Project
GEC-3 Elective
Semester Total
3
3
3
3
3
15
Technical Electives
Data Communications and
Networking
C# Programming I
Python I
C++ Programming I
Systems Analysis & Design
Project Management
3
3
3
3
3
3
125
Computer Science Technology – Web Dev
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
Associate of Applied Science
CRIMINAL JUSTICE
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
The field of criminal justice involves the three components of the criminal justice system: police,
courts and corrections. The academic discipline also includes study of the juvenile justice system and
the extent and causes of crime among adults and juveniles. Criminal Justice is an exciting and
interesting discipline that can lead to attractive and worthwhile careers.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
Students will have a fundamental knowledge of the criminal justice system.
The student will know and understand the basic philosophies behind policing, corrections,
juvenile justice, probation, parole and the court system.
The student will have current information on trends in criminal justice.
The student will understand the need for lifelong learning, as a result of the changing
trends and laws in the U.S.
The student will be exposed to a wide variety of situations in the criminal justice field and
be able to use the knowledge to better understand the situation and develop the correct
response of the criminal justice professional.
TRANSFER BACCALAUREATE OPTIONS
BVCTC has an articulation agreement that, upon completion of the Associate’s degree from BVCTC,
college credits earned will transfer to West Virginia State University for students pursuing a
Baccalaureate degree.
CAREERS
Criminal justice continues to provide employment opportunities and is predicted to do so in the
future. Employment is available at the local, state and federal levels of the criminal justice, and the
juvenile justice system. An associate degree in criminal justice will provide students with a
competitive advantage.
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BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
CRIMINAL JUSTICE
ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE
First Semester
First Year Experience
English Composition I
Introduction to Criminal Justice
Juvenile Justice*
General Psychology OR
Introduction to Sociology
Semester Total
CRJU 200
MATH 113
COMM 100
CRJU 213
CRJU 211
CRJU 207
3
3
3
3
ATEC 115
ENGL 102
BUSN 230
CRJU 230
CRJU 223
3
15
Second Semester
Fund. Of Bus Comp Tech
English Comp II
Business Comm. & Ethics
Criminology*
Police and Society*
Semester Total
3
3
3
3
3
15
Summer Semester
Criminal Justice Internship* OR 3
Approved Elective
Semester Total 3
Third Semester
Mathematical Reasoning
3
Oral Communications
3
Race and Gender in CJ*
3
Drugs and Society*
3
Criminal Law
3
Semester Total 15
HUMN 101
Nat Science
CRJU 226
CRJU 262
Fourth Semester
Introduction to Humanities
Natural Science Elective
Court Systems in the US*
Contemporary Issues in CJ*
(CJ Capstone Course)
Semester Total
3
3
3
3
12
*Denotes courses offered only at the South Charleston, WV campus.
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
127
Criminal Justice
COLL 101
ENGL 101
CRJU 101
CRJU 204
PSYC 101
SOCI 101
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
Certificate in Applied Science
CRIMINAL JUSTICE
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
This certificate program is designed for those individuals seeking training/education opportunities to
enhance their skills and knowledge in the criminal justice field. It provides a basic knowledge of the
police, court and correctional systems and theories of criminal behavior.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
128
Students will have a fundamental knowledge of the criminal justice system
The student will know and understand the basic philosophies behind policing, corrections,
juvenile justice, probation, parole and the court system.
the student will understand the need for lifelong learning, as a result of the changing
trends and laws in the U.S.
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
CRIMINAL JUSTICE
CERTIFICATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
CRJU 101
CRJU 204
HUMN 101
ENGL 101
ATEC 115
First Semester
Introduction to Criminal Justice
Juvenile Justice*
Humanities 101
English 101
Fundamentals of Computer Tech.
Semester Total
3
3
3
3
3
15
CRJU 226
CRJU 230
CRJU 223
MATH 113
COMM 100
Second Semester
Punishment and Corrections*
Criminology*
Police and Society*
Mathematical Reasoning
Oral Communication
Semester Total
3
3
3
3
3
15
Sales, CAS
$ Denotes courses offered only at the South Charleston, WV campus.
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Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
Associate Science
Associate in Applied Science
CYBER SECURITY
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
The Associate of Applied Science degree in Information System Security Technology (AAS-ISST) is a
two-year program that prepares graduates to enter the field of cyber security, (information
technology with an concentration on information system security and data integrity).
The program provides a general background in computer repair; computer networking;
internetworking; enterprise computing practices; implementing and maintaining security on
computers and networking equipment; and assessing security risks. The breadth of coverage produces
a multi-skilled entry-level information technology “jack of all trades” with a high degree of career
flexibility in large business organizations and the ability to independently handle the information
technology needs of small and medium size businesses.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
In addition to the learning outcomes set forth in the general education policy for BridgeValley
Community and Technical College for Associate of Science degrees, the learning outcomes of the
Associate of Applied Science in Computer and Information Technology program prepare students to:
1.
Install, configure, maintain, repair, and support computer hardware and software on
workstation and server platforms in an effective and efficient manner.
2.
Design, install, maintain and operate small office and branch level network infrastructure.
3.
Install, update and configure computer application software, network security software, and
document computer systems and networks.
4.
Design, implement and maintain computer system and network security.
5.
Assess and alleviate potential security threats.
6.
Maintain information integrity and evaluate the results of security breaches. 7. Function
effectively in multidisciplinary teams
7.
Demonstrate an ability to communicate effectively in written, oral, and graphical formats
appropriate for the information technology discipline.
8.
Appreciate the need for life-long learning and continue to maintain and develop their technical
skills.
9.
Exhibit a broad education and knowledge of contemporary issues, such as diversity and
sustainability, in a global and societal context.
10. Demonstrate a general knowledge of professional behavior and ethical responsibility toward
employers, customers, and society.
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
Program outcomes are assessed by a variety of means, including quizzes, unit tests, oral
presentations, written reports, and final examinations. Outcomes based on technical expertise are
assessed by the CCENT, CCNA and Cisco CCNA Security national certification exams. General
education outcomes are assessed by the ACT WorkKeys exit examination.
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Programs of Study
ADVANCED PLACEMENT CREDIT FOR HIGH SCHOOL/VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL
CENTER/COLLEGE PROGRAMS
High school level computer science, computer repair (A+), or computer networking (Cisco) subjects
are not necessary for entrance into the Computer & Information Technology program. Beginning
subjects are part of the program. The student who has completed such vocational courses, however,
may receive advanced placement. Articulation, vocational or EDGE, and dual credit agreements are in
place with various high schools and vocational-technical centers. Advanced placement is also available
to the student with prior college experience. Please contact the department chair for any specific
questions
CAREERS
Cyber Security
Graduates of the program typically have strengths in building, testing, operating, maintaining and
securing computer networks and computer systems. Typical graduates obtain entry level positions in
information technology departments and computer/networking consulting firms.
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Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
CYBER SECURITY
ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE
ENGL 101
GNST 102
INFT 110
INFT 131
MATH 130
ECET 260
INFT 231
INFT 260
INFT 280
ISST 250
First Semester
English Composition I (GEC 1)
First Year Experience
Computer Architecture &
Troubleshooting
Networking I (GEC 4)
College Algebra (GEC 2)
Semester Total
4
3
15
Third Semester
Telecommunications
Networking III
Disaster Recovery
Intro to Database Systems (GEC 4)
Security Fundamentals
Semester Total
4
4
3
3
3
17
3
1
4
ENGL 102
INFT 121
INFT 132
INFT 232
INFT 290
INFT 295
ISST 252
ISST 262
Second Semester
English Composition II (GEC 1)
Network Operating Systems
Networking II
GEC 3 Elective
Technical Elective
Semester Total
3
3
4
3
3
16
Fourth Semester
Networking IV
Project Management
Seminar
Network Security
Computer Forensics
Semester Total
4
3
1
4
4
16
REMARKS
1.
2.
3.
Humanities / social science electives must meet the general education requirements for
graduation. Consult your academic advisor.
Those planning to enter a baccalaureate program are advised to take an eight-hour laboratory
science sequence. Additional laboratory science electives can be taken as technical electives.
Technical electives should be selected with program advisor approval.
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Programs of Study
Associate in Science
DENTAL HYGIENE
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
A dental hygienist is a preventive oral health professional licensed to provide educational, clinical, and
therapeutic services to the public. The Dental Hygiene program at BridgeValley is designed to prepare
students for a career in dental hygiene with concentration on educating students for clinical dental
hygiene practice. Faculty and students are committed to a culture of excellence in education, service
and patient care while maintaining the highest levels of professionalism and teamwork. The program,
fully accredited by the American Dental Association Commission on Dental Accreditation , is normally
two full academic years with 72 hours of credit course work and many hours of clinical practice.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
Mission Statement
The program is designed to prepare students for a career in dental hygiene with emphasis on
educating students for clinical dental hygiene practice and preparation for future baccalaureate
studies. Faculty and students are committed to a culture of excellence in education, service and
patient care while maintaining the highest levels of professionalism and teamwork.
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
Provide a quality educational program meeting the standards of the Commission on Dental
Accreditation and reflecting relevant and current dental hygiene practice to ensure competent
individuals for licensure and clinical practice of dental hygiene
Provide opportunities for quality patient care experiences in the dental hygiene clinic and off
campus enrichment sites for diverse populations
Encourage participation in community service and health promotion initiatives
Provide an academic experience which allows students to pursue advanced degrees
Promote an environment committed to professionalism, career development and lifelong
learning
Program Competency Statements
The BridgeValley Community and Technical College Dental Hygiene Program Competencies identify
knowledge, skills and behaviors graduates must possess as entry level practitioners. The statements
are utilized by faculty to assess, develop and modify curriculum and educational methodologies to
ensure the graduate is prepared to assume their role as a competent member of the dental health
care team. Competency statements are identified in 4 domains: Professionalism, Health Promotion
and Disease Prevention, Community Involvement and Patient Care.
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Dental Hygiene
Program Goals
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
The Dental Hygiene program is committed to assessment of faculty effectiveness and student
performance in support of our emphasis on excellence in dental hygiene education. Program
outcomes are assessed systematically and comprehensively by didactic course reviews, clinical
performance evaluations, externally administered board examinations, advisory committee/employer
feedback, patient surveys, student/graduate surveys and faculty evaluation. General outcomes are
assessed via portfolio
TRANSFER BACCALAUREATE OPTION
•
•
•
•
WVU Tech – Health Services Administration
WVU Morgantown – BA Pathway
WVU School of Dentistry – Dental Hygiene Degree Completion
Other online BS/BA options in dental hygiene, health care or related majors
OTHER INFORMATION
Admissions
The Dental Hygiene program is a limited enrollment program which admits one class each fall
semester. All transcripts, essays, recommendations, shadowing documentation and related materials
are due in the admissions office by January 31st for consideration for fall admission.
Admission criteria may be found in the Admissions section for specific criteria
Bloodborne Pathogens/Radiation Safety/HIPAA/Ethics Policies:
Department policies related to bloodborne pathogens, radiation safety, HIPAA and Ethics are available
for review at www.bridgevalley.edu
CAREERS
Dental hygienists may assume the roles of clinician, educator, researcher , administrator/manager and
advocate. Dental hygienists are employed clinically in private dental practice, hospitals, clinics,
institutions, public and private schools, and the armed forces. Dental hygienists are also employed as
health educators in various public health settings.
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Programs of Study
DENTAL HYGIENE
ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE
First Semester
Anatomy & Physiology*
Fundamentals of Chemistry*
Fundamentals of Chemistry Lab
Dental Radiography
Dental Hygiene I
Preventive Concepts
Embryology, Histology & Anatomy
Semester Total
4
3
1
2
5
1
3
19
BIOL 230
BIOL 231
ENGL 101
DENT 126
DENT 144
DENT 151
DENT 156
DENT 153
DENT 134
ENGL 202
PSYC 101
DENT 256
DENT 251
DENT 235
DENT 225
DENT 246
DENT 260
DENT 237
Second Semester
Principles of Microbiology*
Principles of Microbiology Lab*
English Composition I*
Head & Neck Anatomy
Periodontics I
Nutrition
Pharmacology
Advanced Dental Hygiene
Procedures
Dental Hygiene II Clinic
Semester Total
3
1
3
2
1
2
2
1
3
18
Summer
Business & Professional Writing*
3
Psychology*
3
Semester Total 6
Third Semester
Dental Hygiene Care Planning
Local Anesthesia/Pain Control
Periodontics II
Pathology
Dental Materials
Dental Health Education
Dental Hygiene III Clinic
Semester Total
2
2
1
2
2
2
4
15
SOCI 101
DENT 258
DENT 240
DENT 262
DENT 239
Fourth Semester
Sociology*
Ethics & Practice Management
Applied Concepts in Clinical
Dental Hygiene
Community Health
Dental Hygiene IV Clinic
Semester Total
3
2
1
3
5
14
*Students are STRONGLY encouraged to complete these requirements before admission to the
program
**If the student so chooses, summer courses may be scheduled during regular semesters when
available.
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Dental Hygiene
BIOL 210
CHEM 110
CHEM 111
DENT 141
DENT 132
DENT 152
DENT 125
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
Associate In Applied Science
Certificate in Appllied Science
DIESEL TECHNOLOGY
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
This program is designed to prepare graduates for positions as diesel technicians for both on and off
highway equipment. The program has been developed in response to industry demand in conjunction
with various consortium members. This program offers individuals the opportunity to complete the
full outline of courses listed below on site at BridgeValley Community and Technical College or
transfer diesel technology credit from various Career Technical Centers which offer similar programs.
Credit may also be transferred from individuals completing industry training from Caterpillar,
Komatsu, Cummins or Detroit. Individuals completing industry based training must confer with the
program advisor for credit equivalency. Students may also be interested in the Entrepreneurship skill
sets offered by the Business & Health Management department.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
In addition to the learning outcomes set forth in the general education core curriculum for the
associate degree, specific outcomes for this program have been established.
Upon completion of this program, the student should be able to:
1.
Apply industry-based safety standards in the work environment.
2.
Understand two-and four-stroke engine operation, electrical and hydraulic system principles and
mechanical operations.
3.
Apply principles of suspension and steering, brakes, drive train, and computer analysis.
4.
Perform general maintenance and troubleshooting.
5.
Practice approved safety procedures in various work situations.
6.
Read and interpret vehicle and component service manuals and write clear, accurate, and
complete service reports.
7.
Diagnose and repair mechanical and electronic fuel injection malfunctions.
8.
Demonstrate the correct use of basic hand tools, special tools, and testing equipment.
9.
Perform vehicle safety inspections as required by state and federal laws.
10. Overhaul and tune diesel engines.
11. Test, adjust, and align truck suspension systems.
12. Diagnose and repair common malfunctions to brakes, air conditioning, and refrigeration
systems.
13. Interpret schematics and wiring diagrams, test starting, charging, lighting, and accessory
systems.
14. Understand the potential health and safety hazards in the work place and how to properly
document and perform corrective action.
15. Apply basic electronic principles to engine control and data storage.
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
Program outcomes are assessed by a variety of means, including quizzes, unit tests, oral
presentations, written reports, and final examinations. Outcomes based on technical expertise are
assessed by the WorkKeys Applied Technology exit exam, which measures the skills people use when
they solve problems with machines and equipment found in the workplace. The primary areas of
assessment are electricity, mechanics, fluid dynamics, and thermodynamics. General education
outcomes are assessed by the ACT WorkKeys exit examination.
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BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
ADVANCED PLACEMENT CREDIT FOR HIGH SCHOOL/VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL
CENTER/COLLEGE PROGRAMS
High school level diesel technology coursework is not necessary for entrance into the program.
Introductory subjects are incorporated as part of the program. Students, who have completed
vocational or EDGE courses, may receive credit for advanced placement. Articulation/EDGE
agreements are in place with various vocation-technical centers. Advanced placement is also
available for students with prior college experience. Please contact the department chair.
CAREERS IN ADVANCED MACHINE TOOL TECHNOLOGY
Diesel service technicians and mechanics have opportunities in a wide range of industries such as
Truck transportation, government, repair and maintenance, mining, timber, construction, railroad,
marine, and manufacturing. Typical job titles include: bus mechanic, diesel mechanic, diesel
technician, fleet mechanic, general repair mechanic, mechanic, service technician, trailer mechanic,
transit mechanic, truck mechanic, shop foreman, and service manager.
The median national wage for Diesel service tecniciansis $42,320 per year or $20.35 per hour as
reported by the U.S. Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statstics (BLS) May 2012.
DIESEL TECHNOLOGY
DESL 112
DESL 114
DESL 121
DESL 122
DESL 123
DESL 231
DESL 232
DESL 233
DESL 240
MATH 115
First Semester
Diesel Engine Theory & Operation
Diesel Engine Valvetrain &
Operation
Fundamentals of Electricity
Electrical Production, Storage &
Usage
Chassis Electrical Systems
Manual Transmissions
Automatic Transmissions
Differentials of Drive Axles
Air Brakes
Applied Math for Technicians
(GEC-2)
Semester Total
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
DESL 113
DESL 115
DESL 120
DESL 130
ENGL 101
BUSN 120
Second Semester
Diesel Engine Inspection &
Reassembly
Diesel Engine Accessories
Suspension & Steering
Hydraulics (GEC-4)
English Composition I (GEC-1)
IPR: Interviewing Strategies
Semester Total
2
2
3
4
3
1
15
15
137
Diesel Technology
CERTIFICATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
DIESEL TECHNOLOGY
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
DESL 112
DESL 114
DESL 121
DESL 122
DESL 123
GNST 102
MATH 115
WLDT 101
DESL 231
DESL 232
DESL 233
DESL 240
DESL 241
ENGL 202
PHSC 100
PHSC 101
ECET
INFT
MEET
WLDT
CHEM 110
GREN 101
MGMT-151
138
First Semester
Diesel Engine Theory & Operation
Diesel Engine Valvetrain &
Operation
Fundamentals of Electricity
Electrical Production, Storage &
Usage
Chassis Electrical Systems
First Year Experience
Applied Technical Math
(GEC-2)
Introduction to Welding Processes
Part I
Semester Total
Third Semester
Manual Transmissions
Automatic Transmissions
Differentials of Drive Axles
Air Brakes
Hydraulic Brakes
Business and Professional Writing
(GEC-1)
Physical Science (GEC-2)
Physical Science Lab (GEC-2)
Technical Elective**
Semester Total
Technical Electives
Any ECET course
Any INFT course
Any MEET course
Any WLDT course
Fundamentals of Chemistry
Introduction to Sustainability
Supervisory Management
2
2
1
1
1
1
3
DESL 113
DESL 115
DESL 120
ENGL 101
GNET 107
GNET 122
Second Semester
Diesel Engine Inspection &
Reassembly
Diesel Engine Accessories
Suspension & Steering
English Composition I (GEC-1)
Introduction to Computer
Applications for Technicians
Industrial Safety / OSHA 30
Semester Total
2
2
3
3
3
3
16
3
14
1
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
3
17
BUSN 120
DESL 130
DESL 250
DESL 260
DESL 270
DESL 280
DESL 298
Fourth Semester
IPR: Interviewing Strategies
Hydraulics (GEC-4)
System Preventative Maintenance
Mobile Air Conditioning Systems
Advanced Electronic Engine
Controls
Internship
Senior Seminar
GEC-3 Elective
Semester Total
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
3
13
3
3
3
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
Programs of Study
Programs of Study – BTEC
BridgeValley CTC
BCTC 2012–2013 Catalog
139
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
Associate in Science
DRAFTING & DESIGN ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
The Associate in Science degree in Drafting and Design Engineering Technology (ASDDET) is a twoyear program that combines computer-aided drafting (CAD) with technical knowledge that allows the
graduate to be employed in nearly any drafting and/or design position. Because of the diverse nature
of the program, graduates have opportunities to work in mechanical, civil, construction, architectural,
mining, and electrical related industries. This program also makes it possible for graduates to more
easily advance into a supervisory position in the drafting and design field. The program is accredited
by the Engineering Technology Accreditation Commission of ABET, Inc.
Job titles of recent graduates have included: CAD Operator, Designer, Drafting Technician,
Estimator/Detailer.
PROGRAM OUTCOMES
Graduates of the ASCDDET program will be able to achieve the following career and professional
accomplishments:
1.
Use computers, peripherals, and software applications commonly found in the drafting and
design field to successfully complete tasks within their chosen fields of employment.
2.
Apply appropriate theory, knowledge, and design standards of conventional practice to the
preparation of documentation drawings.
3.
Work independently or as a member of a design team to develop design solutions to problems;
refine those solutions; analyze those design solutions; and, be able to communicate the
appropriate implementation of the final solution.
4.
To be an employee who manifests qualities of ethical, professional, and social responsibility;
who will also exhibit a desire for life-long learning and service to the community.
5.
To be prepared to pursue and complete studies at the baccalaureate level if they so choose.
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
Program outcomes are assessed by a variety of means, including quizzes, unit tests, oral
presentations, written reports, and final examinations. Outcomes based on technical expertise are
assessed by the WorkKeys Applied Technology exit exam, which measures the skills people use when
they solve problems with machines and equipment found in the workplace. The primary areas of
assessment are electricity, mechanics, fluid dynamics, and thermodynamics. General education
outcomes are assessed by the ACT WorkKeys exit examination.
ADVANCED PLACEMENT FOR HIGH SCHOOL/VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL
CENTER/COLLEGE PROGRAMS
High school level drafting or design coursework is not necessary for entrance into the ASCDDET
program. Introductory subjects are incorporated as part of the program. Students, who have
completed vocational or EDGE courses, may receive credit for advanced placement.
Articulation/EDGE agreements are in place with various vocation-technical centers. Advanced
placement is also available for students with prior college experience. Please contact the department
chair.
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BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
DRAFTING & DESIGN ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
DRFT 120
ENGL 101
GNET 108
GNST 102
MATH 130
MEET 121
DRFT 202
CIET 115
MEET 225
DRFT 286
DRFT 201
DRFT 212
DRFT 284
DRFT 285
DRFT 287
DRFT 288
DRFT 290
DRFT 289
First Semester
Drafting I
English Composition I (GEC-1)
Basic Computer App. (GEC-4)
First Year Experience
College Algebra (GEC-2)
Manufacturing Processes I
GEC-3 Elective
Semester Total
2
3
3
1
3
3
1
16
CIET 114
DRFT 121
DRFT 214
ENGL 102
MATH 140
PHYS 101
Third Semester
Architectural Drafting
Strength of Materials
Mechanical Design I
Parametric Modeling
Technical CAD Elective
Semester Total
3
3
3
3
3
15
DRFT 204
DRFT 216
PHYS 102
Technical CAD Electives
Electrical & Electronic Drafting
Piping and Sheet Metal Drafting
Microstations
Land & Topographic Design
Illustrations for Presentation
SurvCAD
Internship in CAD
GPS/GIS Systems
3
3
3
3
3
3
1-3
3
CIET
ELET
GREN
INFT
MEET
WLDT
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
MATH 117
Second Semester
Statics
Drafting II
Computer Graphics
English Composition II (GEC-1)
Trigonometry (GEC-2)
General Physics I (GEC-2)
Semester Total
3
2
3
3
3
4
18
Fourth Semester
Structural Drafting
Engineering Design Graphics
Introductory Physics II
Technical Elective**
Technical Calculus
Semester Total
3
3
4
3
3
16
Technical Electives**
Any CIET course not listed above
Any ELET course
Any GREN course
Any INFT course
Any MEET course not listed above
Any WELD course
141
Drafting and Design Technology
ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
Associate In Applied Science
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
The A.A.S. in Early Childhood Education degree is a four-semester program designed to prepare
students for employment as teachers or aides in early childhood programs, preschools, and Head
Start Programs. Students will gain background in child development as well as planning and
administering early childhood Educational programs. The courses will combine lecture with
observation and participation in early childhood settings.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
The degree will allow students to enter the workforce or further their Education as early childhood
professionals.
PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
Upon successful completion of all program requirements, graduates will be able to:
п‚·
Identify a variety of current and historical theoretical approaches to Early Childhood Education.
п‚·
Identify and assess the elements that determine quality in early childhood settings.
п‚·
Articulate the beginnings of a personal philosophy of Early Childhood Education.
п‚·
Identify and evaluate ethical issues that may be encountered in the field of Early Childhood
Education.
п‚·
Plan, implement and evaluate age-appropriate and individually appropriate activities. Also, plan
curriculum that is based on child development knowledge, observations and assessments of
typical and atypical children from culturally diverse backgrounds.
п‚·
Create and evaluate a learning environment that supports children’s physical, social, emotional,
creative, language and cognitive development.
п‚·
Identify and apply positive approaches to discipline that encourage children to develop selfcontrol and self-esteem.
п‚·
Create strategies that will support and maintain positive, collaborative relationships with
families.
п‚·
Recognize current issues and policies that affect young children and their families.
п‚·
Identify and communicate effectively with other professionals concerned with supporting
children’s development and well-being.
п‚·
Identify sources and participate in opportunities available for professional growth.
п‚·
Demonstrate competence in integrating theory and practice in early childhood programs serving
diverse populations of children and their families.
п‚·
Reflect, analyze and evaluate their teaching practices in order to strengthen their work with
young children.
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Programs of Study
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
First Semester
Second Semester
3
3
1
3
ENGL
102
SCI
COMM
100
EDUC
101
English Composition II 3
EDUC 225
ASLI 102
PHED 104
Early Childhood Development
Finger Spelling II
First Aid
Semester Total
Any lab science
4
Oral Communications 3
Healthy Environments 3
for Young Children
3
1
1
18
3
Early Childhood Education
ENGL English Composition I
101
MATH College Algebra OR
130
Mathematical
MATH Reasoning
113
GNST First Year Experience
102
PSYC
Life Span
201
Development
EDUC Foundations of Early
120
Childhood
ASLI 101 Finger Spelling I
ATEC
Fundamentals of
115
Business Computer
Applications
1
3
Semester Total 17
Third Semester
EDUC
110
EDUC
115
EDUC
220
EDUC 291
Family Relationships
3
Infant and Toddler
Development
Integrating
Technology in the
Classroom
3
3
EDUC 260
EDUC 290
EDUC 292
EDUC 295
Fourth Semester
Special Needs in Early Childhood
Language and Literacy
Assessing Young Children
Early Childhood Education
Capstone
Semester Total
3
3
3
4
13
Pre-K Curriculum and Methods
3
Semester Total 12
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Programs of Study
144
BridgeValley CTC
BCTC 2012–2013 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
Associate in Science
ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING
TECHNOLOGY
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
The Associate of Science in Electrical Engineering Technology (AS-EET) degree is a two-year program
that provides engineering technicians skilled in electronics, power generation and distribution,
communications, instrumentation, and other fields to meet the demands of local industry. The
program provides a broad background in electricity, electronics, communications, industrial control
and electrical machinery. Technical electives, certificate, and skill set programs enable students to
tailor their education program for careers in specific industries. The program is accredited by the
Technology Accreditation Commission (TAC) of ABET, Inc.
In addition to the learning outcomes outlined in the BCTC general education policy graduates of the
program will be able to:
1.
Apply principles of mathematics and science to perform calculations and solve problems
typically encountered in the electrical engineering technology field.
(TAC/ ABET: Criterion 3 Outcomes a, b, e; Program Criteria Outcome a, b)
2.
Demonstrate the ability to identify, formulate, and present creative solutions to technical
problems in the electrical engineering technology field.
(TAC/ABET: Criterion 3 Outcome a, b, e; Program Criteria Outcome a, b)
3.
Function competently in a laboratory or field setting by taking measurements, operating
technical equipment, critically examining experimental results, and documenting them in a
suitable manner.
(TAC/ABET: Criterion 3 Outcomes a, b, c, f; Program Criteria Outcome a, b)
4.
Use modern computational tools to solve problems, including scientific calculators, general
purpose computer programs, and discipline specific software applications.
(TAC/ABET: Criterion 3 Outcomes a, b, e; Program Criteria Outcome a, b)
5.
Function effectively in multidisciplinary teams and demonstrate an ability to communicate
effectively in written, oral, and graphical formats.
(TAC/ABET: Criterion 3 Outcomes d, f)
6.
Appreciate the need for life-long learning to maintain and develop their technical skills.
(TAC/ABET: Criterion 3 Outcome g)
7.
Exhibit a broad education and knowledge of contemporary issues in a global and societal context
and demonstrate a general knowledge of professional behavior and ethical responsibility toward
employers, customers, and society.
(TAC/ABET: Criterion 3 Outcomes h, i)
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
145
Electrical & Computer Eng Tech
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
Program outcomes are assessed by a variety of means, including quizzes, unit tests, oral
presentations, written reports, and final examinations. Outcomes based on technical expertise are
assessed by the Society of Manufacturing Engineers EET Outcomes Assessment exit exam, which
assesses student knowledge in a variety of areas of the electrical engineering technology field.
General education outcomes are assessed by the ACT WorkKeys exit examination.
TRANSFER BACCALAUREATE OPTION
Graduates of this program can seamlessly continue their studies in +2 Bachelor of Science programs at
various other institutions in Electronic or Electrical Engineering Technology, Engineering Technology,
Industrial Technology or Technology Management.
ADVANCED PLACEMENT CREDIT FOR HIGH SCHOOL/VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL
CENTER/COLLEGE PROGRAMS
High school level electronic, electrical or computer-oriented coursework is not necessary for entrance
into the Electrical Engineering Technology program. Introductory subjects are incorporated as part of
the program. Students that have completed vocational or EDGE courses, may receive credit for
advanced placement. Articulation/EDGE agreements are in place with various vocational-technical
centers. Advanced placement is also available for students with prior college experience. Please
contact the department chair.
CAREERS IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
The program prepares graduates with the technical skills necessary to enter careers in the design,
application, installation, manufacture, testing, operation and maintenance of electrical and electronic
systems. Job titles of recent graduates have included: Electronic Technician, Management Associate,
Electrical Technician, Engineering Technician, and Engineering Test Technician.
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Programs of Study
ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE
ECET 220
ECET 230
ECET 260
ECET 280
First Semester
DC Circuit Analysis
First Year Experience
Public Speaking for Technology
Drafting I
English Composition I (GEC 1)
College Algebra (GEC 2)
Trigonometry (GEC 4)
Semester Total
4
1
1
2
3
3
3
17
ECET 115
ECET 120
ENGL 102
MATH 155
PHYS 101
Third Semester
Analog Devices II
Digital Devices
Telecommunications
Programmable Logic Controllers
GEC 3 Elective
Semester Total
4
4
4
3
3
18
ECET 235
ECET 270
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
ECET 290
PHYS 102
Second Semester
AC Circuit Analysis
Analog Devices I
English Composition II (GEC 1)
Technical Calculus (GEC 2)
General Physics I (GEC 2)
Semester Total
Fourth Semester
Microcontrollers
Power Systems & Industrial
Devices
Seminar
General Physics II (GEC-2)
Technical Elective(s)
Semester Total
4
4
3
3
4
18
3
4
1
4
2
14
147
Electrical & Computer Eng Tech
ECET 110
GNST 102
GNET 111
DRFT 120
ENGL 101
MATH 130
MATH 140
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
Associate in Science
EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES TECHNOLOGY
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
A graduate of this program will be able to function in the world of pre-hospital medicine as an entry
level paramedic. The subjects in this course range from report writing to advanced emergency vehicle
operations and all points in between. Students are taught all aspects of pre-hospital care including:
advanced airway adjuncts and management, emergency cardiology, traumatic life support, new born
and pediatric advanced life support, and many other skills.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Recognize, assess, reassess, modify, and safely manage the scene of a medical emergency
incident as a certified paramedic team leader.
Provide clinically competent pre-hospital care to the ill or injured to patients across the lifespan
by utilizing critical thinking and problem-solving abilities according to seatblished regional or
state guidelines.
master skills and concepts essential to the operation of EMS systems and other agencies.
document and communicate effectively the appropriate relevant information to the receiving
facility.
demonstrate empathy for values and perspectives of diverse cultures and the desire to serve as a
patient advocate.
demonstrate personal behavior consistent with professional and employer expectations for the
EMS Technician.
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
Program evaluation demonstrates that students and graduates have achieved the student learning
outcomes, program outcomes, and role-specific competencies. To ensure accreditation standards are
met, the program has a Plan of Program Evaluation in place that is shared with communities of
interest. Specifically, the PPE evaluates performance on the exam, program completion, graduate
program satisfaction, employer program satisfaction, and job placement rates.
OTHER INFORMATION:
A separate application is required for admission to the EMST program. Information regarding the
application process can be found on www.bridgevalley.edu/programs-study. Students must meet
eligibility requirments including drugscreening, background check, and technical standards.
The science course (BIOL 210) must be taken within five years of admission. Once admitted into the
EMST program, students have three academic years for completion. A valid WV E.M.T. must be
possessed prior to entry testing.
CAREERS:
Paramedics are best defined as medical professionals who provide medical care at an advanced life
support level in the pre-hospital environment, usually in an emergency, at the point of illness or injury.
This includes an initial assessment, a diagnosis and a treatment plan to manage the patient's particular
health crisis. Treatment can also be continued en route to a hospital if more definitive care for the
patient is required. Paramedics provide advanced levels of care for medical emergencies and trauma.
The majority of paramedics are based in the field in ambulances, emergency response vehicles, or in
specialist mobile units such as cycle response. Paramedics provide out-of-hospital treatment and some
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Programs of Study
Emergency Medical Services Technology
diagnostic services, although some may undertake hospital-based roles, such as in the treatment of
injuries.
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Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES TECHNOLOGY
ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE
EMST 111
EMST 112
EMST 113
EMST 111
First Semester
Intro to Paramedic 1
Intro to Paramedic 2
Advanced Airway Management
Intro to Paramedic 1
Semester Total
3
3
6
3
15
EMST 221
EMST 222
EMST 223
Second Semester
Medical Emergencies 1
Medical Emergencies 2
Special Considerations in Patients
Semester Total
EMST 231
EMST 232
EMST 233
Third Semester
Paramedic Operations
Clinical Practicum 1
Clinical Practicum 2
Semester Total
4
4
4
12
ENGl 101
PSYC 101
MATH 111
MATH 113
COMM 100
GNST 104
GERO 206
Fourth Semester
English Composition 1
General Psychology
Math for Healthcare OR
Mathematical Reasoning
Oral Communication
Professional Development
Death and Dying
Semester Total
4
4
8
16
3
2
3
1
3
12
Certificate in Applied Science
ENTREPRENEURSHIP
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
Entrepreneurship is the process of identifying a need in the marketplace and starting a business to
fulfill that need. Today, entrepreneurship is seen as a vital way to grow the economy. This certificate
transitions fully into the A.A.S. Degree in Management Entrepreneurship Concentration.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
Upon completion of the program, graduates will:
п‚·
Have an appropriate mastery of general business terminology, principles, practices and skills.
п‚·
Understand the roles of manager, management theory, organizational structure and culture,
and develop key managerial skills to be used at any level of management.
п‚·
Demonstrate an understanding of leadership fundamentals, effective team building, motivation
theories and the strategic decision making process.
п‚·
Demonstrate an understanding of the terminology and concepts associated with managing a
small business.
п‚·
Demonstrate an understanding of the business plan and gain experience in preparing one.
п‚·
Understand the entrepreneurship process from innovation to implementation.
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Programs of Study
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
Program outcomes are assessed by capstone courses, exit interview, employer surveys and program
specific exit exams. General education outcomes are assessed by a general education portfolio.
CAREERS
The Entrepreneurship program prepares graduates for employment as:
* General and Operations Manager
*www.onetonline.org
GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT INFORMATION
The Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook Handbook reports that the annual median salary
(May 2012) for General/Administrative Services Manager is $46,810 per year and only a 1% job
outlook growth rate (average rate), 2012-20. Experience, education and certification all increase
earning potential.
Entrepreneurship
Tuition and Fees*: $4520 In-State Resident
$11420 Non-Resident
Books*: $1300
CB Certification Exam: $395
Graduation Rate: N/A
Job Placement Rate: 72% (college average)
Median Loan Debt: N/A
*Actual costs may vary.
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Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
ENTREPRENEURSHIP
CERTIFICATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
Curriculum
MGMT
130
MGMT
110
BUSN
112
MGMT
151
BUSN
106
ENTR
155
Opportunities Analysis 2
ACCT 215
MRKT 205
ENGL 101
Funding Your Venture 1
Business Math
3
Supervisory
Management
Introduction to
Business
Intro to
Entrepreneurship
3
Financial Accounting
Fundamentals of Marketing
3
3
3
3
3
English Composition I
MGMT Principles of
3
202
Management
MGMT 255 Small Business
3
Management
Total 30
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Programs of Study
Associate Applied Science
FINANCE – BANKING CONCENTRATION
The Finance program prepares students for entry-level positions in the field of corporate money
management as well as enhancing the skills of individuals currently employed in corporate finance,
banking, lending, and investment. The program provides specialized knowledge in the various
financial markets, financial decision making, and financial operations as they are practiced in
American business.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
Upon completion of the program graduates will:
•
Demonstrate an understanding and proficiency with accounting terminology, Generally
Accepted Accounting Principles, financial statement preparation and the accounting cycle.
•
Prepare and analyze financial statements in accordance with Generally Accepted
Accounting Principles.
•
Apply the concepts of time value of money.
•
Apply principles of budgeting.
•
Demonstrate the ability to perform financial analysis.
•
Understand the importance of personal and corporate financial management.
•
Demonstrate an understanding of interest, consumer loans, banking and the Federal
Reserve System.
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
Program outcomes are assessed by capstone courses, exit interview, employer surveys and program
specific exit exams, which may include ETS Associate Business Exam. The Finance 2+2 option is
assessed according to the above in addition to the successful transition and/or completion of a
Baccalaureate degree. General education outcomes are assessed by a general education portfolio.
CAREERS
The Finance program prepares graduates for employment as:
*FINANCIAL CLERKS
•
•
•
•
•
Loan Officer
Relationship Manager
Branch Manager
Portfolio Manager
Commercial Banker
•
•
•
Business Banking
Officer
Personal Banker
New Accounts
Representative
•
•
•
•
Loan Processor
Customer Service
Representative
Teller Coordinator
Finance Clerk
If Students go on to further their education:
*FINANCIAL ANALYSTS, FINANCIAL MANAGERS, AND FINANCIAL ADVISORS
•
Financial Analyst
•
Portfolio Advisor
•
•
Risk Analyst
•
Finance Supervisor
•
•
Equity Research
•
Branch Manager
•
Analyst
•
Securities Analyst
•
•
Financial Advisor
•
Finance Manager
•
Investment Analyst
FBI Investigator
Budget Analyst
Financial Examiners
Purchasing Officer
*www.onetonline.org
SALARY INFORMATION
http://www.bls.gov/ooh/business-and-financial/home.htm
BCTC 2012–2013 Catalog
153
Programs of Study – BTEC
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
FINANCE
BANKING CONCENTRATION
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
BIOL 101
ENGL 101
BUSN 106
FINC 223
BUSN 112
ACCT 216
BUSN 201
FINC 241
ECON 201
BUSN 110
FINC 201
First Semester
Principles of Biology
English Composition I
Introduction to Business
Principles of Banking*
Business Mathematics
Semester Total
Third Semester
Managerial Accounting
Business Law I
Consumer Lending*
Principles of Microeconomics
Interpersonal Relations:
Interviewing Strategies
Personal Finance
Semester Total
3
3
3
3
3
15
ACCT 215
ATEC 115
ECON 202
ENGL 102
MRKT 175
3
3
3
3
1
FINC 290
BUSN 266
Elective
FINC 296
FINC 295
3
16
BUSN 298
Second Semester
Financial Accounting
Fund of Business Comp Tech
Principles of Macroeconomics
English Composition II
Professional Selling
Semester Total
Fourth Semester
Financial Management
Business Internship
Restricted Elective
Analyzing Financial Statements*
Money, Banking & Financial
Markets*
Business Senior Seminar
Semester Total
3
3
3
3
3
15
3
2
2
3
3
1
14
*Denotes a course that will be taken online through a partnership with the
American Institute of Banking
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Programs of Study
AAS in Finance
BridgeValley CTC
Associate in Applied Science
FINANCE
With 2+2 Transfer track
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
The Finance program prepares students for entry-level positions in the field of corporate money
management as well as enhancing the skills of individuals currently employed in corporate finance,
banking, lending, and investment. The program provides specialized knowledge in the various
financial markets, financial decision making, and financial operations as they are practiced in
American business.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
Upon completion of the program the graduate will:
•
Demonstrate an understanding and proficiency with accounting/law terminology,
Generally Accepted Accounting Principles, financial statement preparation, maintaining
financial data and the accounting cycle.
•
Prepare and analyze financial statements in accordance with Generally Accepted
Accounting Principles.
•
Apply the concepts of time value of money.
•
Apply principles of budgeting.
•
Demonstrate the ability to perform financial analysis.
•
Understand and demonstrate an understanding of the importance of personal and
corporate financial management.
•
Possess the necessary knowledge and skills to move into a baccalaureate degree program
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
155
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
Program outcomes are assessed by capstone courses, exit interview, employer surveys and program
specific exit exams, which may include ETS Associate Business Exam. General education outcomes are
assessed by a general education portfolio.
TRANSFER BACCALAUREATE OPTIONS
•
•
•
Marshall University
West Virginia State University
University of Charleston
CAREERS
The Finance program prepares graduates for employment as:
*FINANCIAL CLERKS
•
Loan Officer
•
Relationship Manager
•
Branch Manager
•
Portfolio Manager
•
Commercial Banker
•
•
•
Business Banking
Officer
Personal Banker
New Accounts
Representative
•
•
•
•
Loan Processor
Customer Service
Representative
Teller Coordinator
Finance Clerk
If Students go on to further their education:
*FINANCIAL ANALYSTS, FINANCIAL MANAGERS, AND FINANCIAL ADVISORS
п‚·
Financial Analyst
п‚·
Finance Supervisor
п‚·
п‚·
Risk Analyst
п‚·
Branch Manager
п‚·
п‚·
Equity Research
п‚·
Securities Analyst
п‚·
Analyst
п‚·
Finance Manager
п‚·
п‚·
Financial Advisor
п‚·
Investment Analyst
п‚·
Portfolio Advisor
FBI Investigator
Budget Analyst
Financial Examiners
Purchasing Officer
*www.onetonline.org
SALARY INFORMATION
http://www.bls.gov/ooh/business-and-financial/home.htm
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BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
FINANCE
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
First Semester
English Composition I 3
Personal Finance
3
Introduction to
Business
Survey of Accounting
3
College Algebra
3
3
Semester Total 15
ACCT
215
HUMN
101
ATEC
115
ECON
202
ENGL
102
Second Semester
Financial Accounting
Introduction to
Humanities
Fund of Bus. Comp.
Technology
Principles of
Macroeconomics
English Composition II
3
3
3
3
3
Semester Total 15
Third Semester
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
157
Respiratory Therapy
ENGL
101
FINC
201
BUSN
106
ACCT
185
MATH
130
Programs of Study
ACCT
216
ECON
201
MGMT
202
FINC
290
MRKT
205
Managerial
3
Accounting
Principles of
3
Microeconomics
Principles of
3
Management
Financial
3
Management
Fundamentals of
3
Marketing
Semester Total 15
BridgeValley CTC
FINC
296
BUSN
296
BIOL
101
BIOL
102
Elective
BUSN
298
BUSN
201
Fourth Semester
Analyzing Financial
Statements*
Business Statistics
3
3
Principles of Biology
3
Principles of Biology
Lab
Restricted Elective
Business Studies
Seminar
Business Law I
1
1
1
3
Semester Total 15
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Programs of Study
Certificate in Applied Science
BANKING & FINANCE
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
Upon completion of the program, graduates will:
•
Demonstrate an understanding and proficiency with accounting terminology, Generally
Accepted Accounting Principles, financial statement preparation and the accounting cycle.
•
Prepare and analyze financial statements in accordance with Generally Accepted
Accounting Principles.
•
Apply the concepts of time value of money.
•
Apply principles of budgeting.
•
Demonstrate the ability to perform financial analysis.
•
Understand the importance of personal and corporate financial management.
•
Demonstrate an understanding of interest, consumer loans, banking and the Federal
Reserve System.
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
Program outcomes are assessed by capstone courses, exit interview, employer surveys and program
specific exit exams, which may include ETS Associate Business Exam. General education outcomes are
assessed by a general education portfolio.
CAREERS
The Finance program prepares graduates for employment as:
*FINANCIAL CLERKS
Loan Officer
Relationship Manager
Branch Manager
Portfolio Manager
Commercial Banker
Business Banking Officer
Personal Banker
New Accounts Representative
Loan Processor
Customer Service Representative
Teller Coordinator
Finance Clerk
If Students go on to further their education:
*FINANCIAL ANALYSTS, FINANCIAL MANAGERS, AND FINANCIAL ADVISORS
Financial Analyst
Finance Supervisor
FBI Investigator
Risk Analyst
Branch Manager
Budget Analyst
Equity Research Analyst
Securities Analyst
Financial Examiners
Financial Advisor
Finance Manager
Purchasing Officer
Portfolio Advisor
Investment Analyst
*www.onetonline.org
BCTC 2012–2013 Catalog
159
CAS in Banking and Finance
The Banking and Finance Certificate is designed for the individual who desires to acquire skills and
receive credentials in the banking field.
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT INFORMATION
www.onetonline.org states Financial Clerks making a median salary of $36,850 (2012). The Bureau of
Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook Handbook reports that the annual median salary (May 2012) for
Financial Analysts is $76,950 and a 16% job outlook growth rate (average rate), 2012-20 Experience,
education and certification all increase earning potential. If students go on to further their education,
Financial Managers have a reported median salary of $109,740 as of May 2012 and a 9% growth rate,
2012-2020. Additional salary information can be found at http://www.bls.gov/ooh/business-
and-financial/home.htm .
Tuition and Fees*: $4520 In-State Resident
$11420 Non-Resident
Books*: $1300
CB Certification Exam: $395
Graduation Rate: N/A
Job Placement Rate: 72% (college average)
Median Loan Debt: N/A
*Actual costs may vary.
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Programs of Study
BANKING & FINANCE
CERTIFICATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
Semester Total 30
English Composition
3
Business Math
3
Fund of Business
Comp Tech
Financial Accounting
3
Managerial
Accounting
Principles of
Macroeconomics
Consumer Lending*
3
*Denotes courses taken online through the
American Institute of Banking.
CAS in Banking and Finance
ENGL
101
BUSN
112
ATEC
115
ACCT
215
ACCT
216
ECON
202
FINC
121
FINC
180
FINC
290
FINC
295
3
3
Principles of Banking* 3
Financial
Management*
Money, Banking &
Financial Markets*
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
3
3
161
Programs of Study
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BridgeValley CTC
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
Associate in Arts
GENERAL EDUCATION
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
The Associate of Arts degree is a program that serves a dual purpose:
п‚·
It provides the first two years of general study to students who plan to transfer to a
baccalaureate program and work toward a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science.
п‚·
It provides two years of general studies to individuals who desire a structured, non-technical
degree program to gain employment or to secure a promotion in employment.
GENERAL EDUCATION
ASSOCIATE IN ARTS
Second Semester
3
ENGL
102
HUMN
101
PSYC
101
3
English Composition II 3
Introduction to
Humanities
General Psychology
3
3
History Elective
3
Natural Science Elective
4
Semester Total 13
3
3
3
Semester Total 15
Third Semester
SOCI 101 Introduction to Sociology
POSCI 101 American Federal Government
OR
History Elective
Fine Arts Elective
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
3
3
Foreign Language Elective
3
Literature Elective
3
Semester Total 15
3
163
General Education
First Semester
ENGL 101 English
Composition I
MATH
College Algebra
130
OR
MATH
Mathematical
113
Reasoning
GNST 110 Personal
Leadership
COMM Oral
100
Communications
ATEC 115 Fundamentals of
Business
Computer
Applications
Programs of Study
Fourth Semester
Health Elective
Natural Science Elective
BridgeValley CTC
2
3
Social Science Elective
3
Free Electives
6
Semester Total 17
*Most BA/BS degrees require College Algebra
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Programs of Study
Associate in Science
GENERAL EDUCATION
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
The Associate in Science degree is a program that serves a dual purpose:
п‚·
It provides the first two years of general study to students who plan to transfer to a
baccalaureate program and work toward a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science.
п‚·
It provides two years of general studies to individuals who desire a structured, non-technical
degree program to gain employment or to secure a promotion in employment.
GENERAL EDUCATION
ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE
Second Semester
3
ENGL OR
COMM
College Level Math
PSYC
General Psychology
101
3
3
Fine Arts
NATSCI
3
ATEC 115 Fundamentals of 3
Business
Computer
Applications
3
3
3
3
4
Semester Total 16
Semester Total 15
Third Semester
NATSCI
English OR
COMM
PHED
RES.SOC.SCI*
Free Electice
3-4
3
3
3
3
Semester Total 1516
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
Fourth Semester
SOC SCI
NAT SCI
REST. Elective
Free Electives
Semester Total
3
4
3
3
14
165
General Education
First Semester
ENGL 101 English
Composition I
MATH
130
GNST 101
PHED
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
GENERAL EDUCATION
CERTIFICATE IN SCIENCE
First Semester
ENGL 101 English
Composition I
MATH
112,113,125 or
130
GNST
110,102,104
HUMN
101,102,104
Second Semester
3
3
3
3
ATEC 115 Fundamentals of 3
Business
Computer
Applications
ENGL OR
COMM
SOC SCI SOCI,PSYC,ECON or
HIST
NAT SCI BIOL, CHEM, PHYS,
PHSC, MTGY
PHED
3
6
34
Any PHED courses
2-3
Semester Total 15
Semester Total 15
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Programs of Study
Associate in Applied Science
Certificate in Applied Science
GERONTOLOGY
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
Gerontology, the study of aging, is a relatively new discipline that has emerged during the last 20-30
years. It is a multi-disciplinary field that integrates adult education, sociology, health, biology,
psychology and social work. The program includes both theoretical and practical components. It is
designed for students wishing to pursue a career serving the aging population as well as those already
in the field wishing to increase their knowledge and skills.
Employment opportunities for individuals in the field of gerontology include the following job titles:
adult protective services representative, community organizer, lobbyist, agency administrator,
assisted living director, consultant on consumer needs for older adults, adult day-care provider,
environmental designer, health/wellness educator, elderhostel coordinator, bereavement counselor,
elder abuse investigator, senior citizens center director, home health care manager, hospice provider,
home-bound outreach coordinator, policy planner, volunteer coordinator, senior transportation
coordinator, and many more.
Upon completion of the program, graduates will have:
п‚·
A well-defined inclusive understanding of the field of gerontology, including demographics, tasks
facing gerontologists and entrepreneurship.
п‚·
Knowledge of the health and biological aspects of aging, theories of aging, wellness strategies
and chronic illnesses common to the elderly.
п‚·
Knowledge regarding mental health as related to aging, later life transitions and mental illness
and treatment.
п‚·
Knowledge regarding death and dying, bereavement and advance directives.
п‚·
Knowledge regarding long-term care settings, licensure and accreditation.
п‚·
Knowledge of basic organizational and managerial theories and principles applicable to social
service agencies.
п‚·
Basic knowledge of grant writing.
п‚·
Knowledge and skills for appropriate interpersonal skills and intervention techniques to work
with people.
п‚·
Completed a 240-hour practicum in an approved agency that provides services to the elderly.
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Gerontology
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
GERONTOLOGY
ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE
GNST 102
HUMN 101
ENGL 101
ALHL 101
GERO 103
GERO 206
First Semester
First Year Experience
Intro to Humanities
English Composition I
Intro to Health Care
Intro to Gerontology
Death and Dying
Semester Total
BIOL 245
MGMT 151
HMGT 105
MATH 112
GERO 205
GERO 209
Third Semester
Nutrition and Diet Therapy
Supervisory Management OR
Foundations to Health Care Mgmt
Business Math
Human Relationship Skills
Psychosocial Aspects of Aging
Semester Total
1
3
3
3
3
3
16
PSYC 201
PSYC 101
BUSN 106
ATEC 115
GERO 102
GERO 208
3
3
BIOL 210
GERO 298
MGMT 155
HMGT 215
3
3
3
15
GERO 204
GERO 202
Second Semester
Life Span Psychology OR
General Psychology
Intro to Business
Fund of Business Computer Tech
Health Aspects of Aging
Long Term Care
Semester Total
Fourth Semester
Human Anatomy & Physiology
Business Seminar (capstone)
Entrepreneurship OR
Management of Health Care
Systems
Administration and Program
Planning in Gerontology
3
3
3
3
3
15
4
1
3
3
Practicum in Gerontology
3
Semester Total 14
GERONTOLOGY
CERTIFICATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
GERO 209
First Semester
ENGL 101 English Comp I
GERO 102 Health Aspects of Aging
GERO 103 Intro to Gerontology
GERO 206 Death and Dying
168
Psychosocial Aspects of Aging
3
Semester Total 15
3
3
3
3
BCTC 2012–2013 Catalog
MATH 112
GEOR 202
GERO 204
Second Semester
Business Math
Practicum in Gerontology
Administration and Program
Planning in Gerontology
Programs of Study
GERO 205
GERO 208
3
3
3
Human Relationship Skills
3
Long Term Care
3
Semester Total 15
Gerontology
BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
Associate in Science
GRAPHIC DESIGN AND PRINT
COMMUNICATIONS
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
The associate of science degree in Digital Design and Print Communications is designed to provide
quality technical education to prepare technicians for the rapidly changing graphic arts and digital
design industries. The student will receive training in all of the basic skills required of these industries,
and upon completion of the two-year program, should be qualified to enter the industry in a junior
supervisory capacity directly responsible to the plant manager or supervisor. For the student wishing
to pursue the plus-two baccalaureate Printing Management degree or the plus-two baccalaureate
Graphic Design degree programs offered by WVU Tech, the associate program offers a well-rounded
basis for advanced study.
PROGRAM OBJECTIVES
In addition to the learning outcomes set forth in the general education core curriculum for the
associate degree, specific outcomes for this program have been established. Upon completion of the
Associate of Science degree in Graphic Design and Print Communications, the student will be able to:
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Design and prepare electronic text, images, and/or documents for publication
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Utilize desktop publishing software common to the graphic arts industry
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Apply appropriate color theory to design and copy
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Produce or publish materials for print and digital distribution
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Have experience in the operation of printing presses
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Appropriately bind and finish a printed document
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Apply appropriate management skills for technical workers
Program outcomes are assessed by exit course examinations, performance on laboratory projects,
and a capstone course. General education objectives are assessed with the WorkKeys examination.
TYPICAL JOB TITLES
Graphic Design and Print Communication graduates have opportunities for employment in publishing,
design services, advertising, public relations and related industries. Typical job titles include: Graphic
Designer, Graphic Arts Computer/Software Specialist, Digital Pre-Press Operator, Desktop Publisher,
Sheetfed Press Operator, Webfed Press Operator, Screen Press Operator, Flexographic Press
Operator, Bindery and finishing operator, First line supervisor, and Customer service representative.
Median annual salaries for typical occupations in the field range from $34,000 to $44,000 per year
according to the data from the U.S. Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statstics (BLS) May 2012
TRANSFER BACCALAUREATE OPTIONS
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170
Management, BS
Printing Management, BS
Graphic Design, BA
Journalism, BS
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
GRAPHIC DESIGN AND PRINT COMMUNICATIONS
DSGN 111
DSGN 112
DSGN 113
DSGN 114
DSGN 118
ENGL 101
GNST 102
DSGN 218
DSGN 235
ENGL102
First Semester
Introduction to Graphic
Communications
Ink and Substrates
Introduction to Graphic Design
Text and Type
Adobe Photoshop
English Composition I (GEC-1)
Freshman Seminar
Semester Total
3
1
1
3
3
1
15
Third Semester
Adobe Creative Suite Projects
Flexography II
English Composition II (GEC-1)
Lab Science Elective (GEC-2)
GEC-3 Elective
Semester Total
3
3
3
4
3
16
3
Second Semester
Applied Technical Math (GEC-2)
Flexography 1
Adobe Illustrator
Adobe InDesign
Digital Photography
Adobe Dreamweaver
Semester Total
3
3
3
3
1
1
14
Fourth Semester
DSGN 232 Packaging Design
MGMT 202 Principles of Management
Restricted Electives*
GEC-4 Elective
Semester Total
3
3
6
3
15
MATH 110
DSGN 135
DSGN 134
DSGN 120
DSGN 125
DSGN 128
*Restricted electives can be DSGN 299, any GAME or any CSCT or program coordinator approved
course(s)
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
171
Graphic Design and Print Communications
ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
Associate in Applied Science
HEALTH SCIENCES
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
The Health Science curriculum is designed to initially prepare students for application and admission
into the nursing, medical laboratory technician, or nuclear medicine programs at BVCTC. All
prerequisites for these programs are outlined in the first year. If, at that time, a student does not
enter into either of these programs, that student may opt to continue in the AAS in Health Sciences
curriculum, choosing one of four areas of emphasis (Gerontology, Human Services and Rehabilitation
Studies, Medical Coding, HealthCare Management), each also leading to a certificate in that area.
Students who are not directly admitted into dental hygiene, respiratory therapy, or veterinary
technology may also pursue this degree option while earning credits toward a health care degree.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
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Complete all prerequisite course requirements, in the first two semesters, for
application/admission into various programs in the medical field: Nursing, Medical Lab
Technician, Nuclear Medicine, Dental Hygiene, Respiratory Therapy, and Veterinary Technology.
Complete AAS in Health Sciences with a track of emphasis leading to a certificate: Gerontology;
Human Services and Rehabilitation Studies; Medical Coding; HealthCare Management.
Demonstrate an understanding of health care and medical terminology, as well as the biological
and physiological basis of health care.
Gerontology Track: Demonstrate an understanding of the biological, cognitive, social and
emotional aspects of the aging process; apply all ethical practices in direct care delivery to aging
individuals in a variety of health care settings.
Human Services and Rehabilitation Studies Track: Demonstrate an understanding of psychiatric
development and substance abuse disorders; demonstrate person-centered principles, values
and attitudes needed to facilitate the recovery/rehabilitation of peopl e with disabilities. (This
track leads to an AAS in HSRS which prepares students to sit for CPRP examination.)
Medical Coding Track: Develop expertise in ICD-10-CM, ICD-10-CS, and CPT/HCPCS medical
coding and medical office billing procedures. (AHIMA approved; may sit for AHIMA Certified
Coding Specialist Certification.)
HealthCare Management Track: Demonstrate knowledge of principles, terminology, structure
and products of health care management; apply business practices to the health care setting.
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
Program outcomes are assessed by capstone courses, exit interviews, employer surveys and program
specific exit exams. General education outcomes are assessed by a general education portfolio.
he Dental Hygiene program is committed to assessment of faculty effectiveness and student
performance in support of our emphasis on excellence in dental hygiene education. Program
outcomes are assessed systematically and comprehensively by didactic course reviews, clinical
performance evaluations, externally administered board examinations, advisory committee/employer
feedback, patient surveys, student/graduate surveys and faculty evaluation. General education
outcomes are assessed via WorkKeys examination.
172
BCTC 2012–2013 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
CAREERS AND SALARY INFORMATION
HUMAN SERVICES AND REHABILITATION STUDIES:
http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/21-1094.00
HEALTHCARE MANAGEMENT:
http://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/medical-and-health-services-managers.htm
GERONTOLOGY:
http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/39-9021.00
MEDICAL CODING:
http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/29-2071.00
HEALTH SCIENCES
ENGL 101
GNST 102
BIOL 220
BIOL 210
CHEM 101
CHEM 110
CHEM 102
CHEM 111
MATH 113
MATH 111
MATH 130
First Semester
English Composition I
3
First Year Experience
1
Human Anatomy 1,2,3 OR
4
Human Anatomy/Physiology 4
General Chemistry 2,3 OR
3
Fundamentals of Chemistry 4
General Chemistry Lab 2,3 OR
1
Fundamentals of Chemistry Lab 4
Mathematical Reasoning 2,1 OR
3
Math for Health Care 1,4 OR
College Algebra 2,3
Semester Total 15
BIOL 221
ALHL 101
PSYC 101
PSYC 201
ATEC 115
ENGL 102
ENGL 202
BIOL 230
BIOL 231
BIOL 245
PHYS 100
SOCA 101
Second Semester
Human Physiology 1,2,3
4
Introduction to Allied Health
3
Intro to Psychology 1,4 OR
3
Lifespan Development 2,3,4
Intro. to Business Computers 2
OR
English Composition II 3,1 OR
3
Business and Prof Writing4
Principles of Microbiology 2,4
3
AND
1
Principles Microbiology Lab 2,4
OR
3
Nutrition and Diet Therapy 1 OR 42
Introductory Physics 3
Intro to Sociology4
3
Semester Total 15-16
1– Pre-Nursing, 2 – Pre-MLT, 3 – Pre-Nuclear Medicine, 4 – Pre-Dental Hygiene, Pre-Respiratory, Pre-Vet Tech
Once the student completes the first two semesters of coursework they will then choose one of the four areas of
emphasis below.
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
173
Health Sciences
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
Programs of Study
HSRS 120
HSRS 123
HSRS 125
HSRS 221
HSRS 222
HSRS 230
HSRS 231
HSRS 232
HSRS 272
Elective
Human Services and
Rehabilitation Studies
Introduction to CBHT
Psychiatric Rehabilitation I
Observation, Crisis and Document
Psychiatric Rehabilitation II
Psychiatric Rehabilitation III
Developmental Disabilities
Psychiatric Disabilities
Substance Abuse
Trauma Informed Support
HSRS Elective
Semester Total
BridgeValley CTC
Gerontology
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
28
GERO 103
GERO 206
GERO 102
GERO 208
GERO 205
GERO 209
GERO 204
Introduction to Gerontology
Death and Dying
Health Aspects of Aging
Long Term Care
Human Relationship Skills
Psychosocial Aspects of Aging
Admin & Program Plan in
Gerontology
GERO 202 Practicum
HMGT 105 Foundations of HC MGMT OR
MGMT 151 Supervisory Management
GERO 298 Gerontology Studies Seminar
HMGT 120 Computer Applications in
Healthcare Organizations OR
HMGT 120 Computer Apps in Healthcare orgs
1
Semester Total
HealthCare Management
MGMT 151
MGMT 202
HMGT 105
HMGT 205
HMGT 120
HMGT 210
HMGT 215
ACCT 215
MRKT 205
BUSN 201
BUSN 298
174
Supervisory Management
Principles of Management
Foundations of Healthcare Mgmt.
Ethical/Legal Aspects of HC Mgmt
Computer Apps in Healthcare
Organizations
Quality & Patient Safety in HC
Mgmt. of Healthcare Delivery
Systems
Financial Accounting
Fundamentals of Marketing
Business Law
Business Studies Seminar
Semester Total
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
1
29
Medical Coding
3
3
3
3
1
3
3
3
3
3
1
29
MEDC 201
MEDC 150
MEDC 203
MEDC 205
ALHL 120
MEDC 250
MEDC 260
MEDC 110
MEDC 215
MEDC 240
HMGT 105
ATEC 220
ICD 10 – CM Diagnostic
3
Medical Insurance & Billing
3
CD 10 – CM
3
CPT/HCPCS Medical Coding
3
Basic Pharmacology
3
Directed Practicum
1
Preparation for CCS Exam
1
Medical Law and Ethics
1
Human Pathophysiology
2
Advanced Coding Concepts
3
Foundations in Healthcare Mgmt. 3
Records & Database Mgmt
3
Semester Total 29
BCTC 2012–2013 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
Associate in Applied Science
HEALTHCARE MANAGEMENT
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
The Healthcare Management curriculum prepares students for management roles in a health care
environment that is rapidly changing from one focused on episodes of treatment for acute disease to
lifelong health maintenance and wellness promotion. The program is intended for health care workers
who need new knowledge and skills to compete in the changing health care marketplace. It will also
be useful for those individuals with no previous health care experience who seek non-clinical entrylevel positions in health care, or who plan to continue their education in the field of health care
administration.
Medical and health services managers also called healthcare executives or healthcare administrators,
plan, direct, and coordinate medical and health services. They might manage an entire facility or
specialize in managing a specific clinical area or department, or manage a medical practice for a group
of physicians. Medical and health services managers must be able to adapt to changes in healthcare
laws, regulations, and technology.
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Demonstrate knowledge of principles, terminology, structure and products of health care
management.
Define emerging health care delivery systems and their impact on delivery, financing, practice
patterns and the utilization of personnel and services.
Function within an ethical and legal framework appropriate for a managed care environment.
Demonstrate proficiency in computer applications used in a health care environment.
Apply business practices to the health care setting.
Demonstrate an understanding of the issues and practices applicable to health information.
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
Program outcomes are assessed by capstone courses, exit interview, employer surveys and program
specific exit exams, which may include ETS Associate Business Exam. General education outcomes are
assessed by a general education portfolio.
TRANSFER BACCALAUREATE OPTIONS
Currently under development.
CAREERS
The Healthcare Management program prepares graduates for employment as *General And
Operations Manager Or Healthcare Services Managers with typical job titles such as:
office manager, nursing home administrator, medical/health manager, assisted living administrator,
nursing home administrator, administrative services manager, and medical office manager. Students
who further their education can become *Medical And Health Services Managers/Administrators
with typical job titles such as: health and social service manager, program manager, clinical director,
practice administrator, office manager, director of healthcare facility, and health facility manager.
*www.onetonline.org
SALARY INFORMATION
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
175
Healthcarre Management
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
http://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/medical-and-health-services-managers.htm
HEALTHCARE MANAGEMENT
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
ENGL 101
BUSN 106
ALHL 101
MGMT 151
HMGT 105
MATH 130
MRKT 205
ACCT 215
HMGT 210
BIOL 270
MGMT202
176
First Semester
English Composition I
Introduction to Business OR
Intro to Allied Health
Supervisory Management
Foundations of Health Care
Management
College Algebra
Semester Total
Third Semester
Fundamentals of Marketing
Financial Accounting
Quality & Patient Safety in
Healthcare
Human Biology
Principles of Management
Semester Total
3
3
3
3
3
15
3
3
3
4
3
16
PSYC 101
ATEC 115
ENGL 102
ECON 202
HMGT 205
HMGT 120
MGMT 255
ACCT 216
BUSN 201
HMGT215
BUSN 298
Second Semester
General Psychology
Intro. to Business Computers
English Composition II
Principles of Macroeconomics
Ethical/Legal Aspects of Health
Care Management
Computer Applications in
Healthcare Organizations
Semester Total
Fourth Semester
Small Business Management
Managerial Accounting
Business Law
Management of HealthCare
Delivery Systems
Business Studies Seminar
Semester Total
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
3
3
3
3
1
13
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
Associate in Applied Science
TECHNICAL STUDIES - HIGHWAY ENGINEERING
TECHNOLOGY
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
This is a collaborative effort between the West Virginia Department of Highways (WVDOH) and
BridgeValley Community and Technical College. The aim of the program is to develop skilled
technicians and technologists to service the highway engineering and construction industries. It
provides a career path for people employed by WVDOH with professional development opportunities
and a formal education that is measured and evaluated through the certification process. Technicians
in this program may advance through a series of five levels based on their years of work experience
and technical competency in the various technical aspects of the highways field.
In addition to the learning outcomes set forth in the general education core curriculum for the
associate of applied science degree, specific outcomes for this program have been established. Upon
completion of this program, the graduate should be able to:
п‚·
Demonstrate an appropriate mastery of topics encountered by the highway technician including
surveying, construction inspection and field and lab testing.
п‚·
Perform routine calculations common to highway technician work.
п‚·
Demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively by written and oral means.
п‚·
Demonstrate an awareness of safety issues related to highway construction and to use this
knowledge to maintain a safe working environment.
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Exhibit appropriate workplace behavior and display a commitment to quality and dependability.
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Understand and use standard documents encountered in highway construction.
TYPES OF JOBS AVAILABLE:
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West Virginia Division of Highways
Construction Industry
Construction Materials Manufacturing Industry
JOB TITLES:
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Bridge Construction Inspector
Highway Construction Inspector
Materials Inspector
Laboratory Technician
Assistant Project Manager
Field Technician
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
177
Highway Engineering Technology
PROGRAM OBJECTIVES
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
HIGHWAY ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
HWAY 101
HWAY 103
HWAY 104
MATH 115
ENGL 101
First Semester
Technical Orientation4
1
Construction Inspection I
3
Plans and Specifications
3
Applied Technical Math
3
English Composition I
3
Program Specific Elective (GEC 2) 2
Semester Total 15
Third Semester
HWAY 102 Heavy Construction Methods I
3
HWAY 107 Erosion and Sediment Control
3
HWAY 121 Highway Surveying
3
Technical Elective3
2
Technical Elective3
3
GEC-3 Elective
1
Semester Total 15
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Second Semester
HWAY 106 Ethics and Professionalism
3
DOH 101
Aggregate Inspector/Aggregate 3
Lab2
HWAY 105 Work Zone Traffic Control
3
HWAY 203 Construction Inspection II
3
Program Specific Elective (GEC 2) 3
Semester Total 15
ENGL 202
DOH 102
Fourth Semester
Business & Professional Writing7 3
Compaction Inspection/Com.Lab2 3
Technical Elective3
3
Technical Elective3
3
Technical Elective3
3
Semester Total 15
GEC-4: Computer Application course required and other technical courses – science related may
qualify, may be approved by advisor. GNET 107, HWAY 120, and CIET 132. May substitute GNET
108, or BAHM 260, BAHM 261, BAHM 267 (3 – 1 hr credits),
WVDOH / Industry administered courses held at Cedar Lakes Conference Center, Spring only.
Compulsory courses, substitutions are not allowed.
Technical Elective, must be approved by advisor. Specializations available, courses
recommended include HWAY 201, HWAY 202, HWAY 204, HWAY 205, DOH 201, DOH 202, DOH
203, DOH 204. Additional technical electives from accredited institutions may be substituted
pending approval of advisor.
GNET 101, Technology Orientation, may be substituted for this course
GEC-2 - May substitute MATH 113, Elementary Algebra, and MATH 041, Intro to Trigonometry,
for this course to meet the requirements for a future A.S. or B.S. program. 100 level math
course is a minimum requirement for this GEC-2
GEC-4 HU/SS elective must meet the Cultural Diversity requirement as part of Core Curriculum
Requirements. Consult your academic advisor.
ENGL 102, English Composition II, can substitute for this course.
178
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
HIGHWAY ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE (A.A.S.)
Component I – General Education Core
ENGL 101
(GEC 1)
English Composition I
ENGL 202
(GEC 1)
Business & Professional Writing
MATH 110
(GEC 2)
Applied Math for Technicians
(GEC 3)
HU/SS Elective (Diversity)
(GEC 4)
Program Specific Electives
15 Credit Hours
3
3
3
1
5
Component II - Technical Core
HWAY101
HWAY 102
HWAY 103
HWAY 104
HWAY105
HWAY106
HWAY107
HWAY 203
HWAY121
DOH 101 *
DOH 102 *
31 Credit Hours
1
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Technician Orientation
Heavy Construction Methods I
Construction Inspection I
Plans & Specifications
Work Zone Traffic Controls
Ethics & Professionalism
Erosion & Sediment Control
Construction Inspection II
Highway Surveying
Aggregate Inspector, Aggregate Lab
Compaction Inspector, Compaction Lab
*Note: DOH Certification in required as documentation for all DOH-coded.
Component III - Technical Electives Construction Specialization
HWAY 201
Scheduling Analysis
HWAY 202
Heavy Construction Methods II
HWAY 204
Project Finals
HWAY 205
Project Recording Systems
DOH 201*
Asphalt Plant Technician
DOH 202*
PCC Technician
DOH 203*
PCC Inspector, PCC Lab
DOH 204*
Asphalt Field Technician
14 credit hours
3
3
3
3
3
2
2
1
**Other subjects may be approved by the academic advisor as Technical Electives.
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
60
179
Highway Engineering Technology
WVDOH Certification Track
Associate in Applied Science
HUMAN SERVICES AND REHABILITATION STUDIES
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
Human service and rehabilitation practitioners are helping agents that assist individuals, groups,
families, and communities in developing skills and supports that increase satisfaction and success in
living, learning, working, social and/or spiritual environments of choice. To help others better cope
with stress, change, and crisis, the HSRS program prepares students to blend together an array of
community resources and natural supports, and to offer specialized assistance promoting well-being
and self-determination. Coursework and field experiences ready students with interdisciplinary
knowledge, skills, attitudes, and values for direct and indirect service to at-risk populations, including
those with disabilities. Accessibility, accountability, and coordination of services and supports systemwide is emphasized, including prevention, remediation, rehabilitation, and recovery. The HSRS
program is aligned with competencies found in human services and rehabilitation studies, such as
participant empowerment, community networking, and advocacy. Students have opportunity to
specialize in various program concentrations: Human Services and Rehabilitation; Peer Support
Specialist; Psychiatric Rehabilitation; Addictions; Autism Intervention and Education; and/or Youth
Development. Relevant professional disciplines include psychiatry, psychology, nursing, social work,
counseling, rehabilitation, human resource development, and adult education.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
Upon completion of this program, students will:
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Gain knowledge in psychiatric, developmental, and substance abuse disorders.
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Acquire person-centered principles, values, attitudes to facilitate recovery and rehabilitation of
people with disabilities
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Use skills to promote choice, change, resource access, and optimal community living
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Be skilled in crisis prevention and intervention (CPI)
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Be prepared, after work requirement to sit for CPRP exam
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Participate in multi-disciplinary networks, professional and community organizations
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Complete career plan and prepare for baccalaureate program and lifelong learning
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Be aware of WV human service systems and allied health roles and functions
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Have mastery in the General Education Core Learning outcomes
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
Students are assessed on their knowledge, understanding, and ability to apply their skills and
techniques through: tests, presentations, person-centered supportive counseling demonstrations,
portfolio, practicum and evaluations from site supervisors.
TRANSFER BACCALAUREATE OPTIONS:
Articulation agreement with WVSU
OTHER INFORMATION:
The HSRS program prepares the student to sit for the Certified Psychiatric Rehabilitation Practitioner
(CPRP) exam administered by the Psychiatric Rehabilitation Association (PRA).
CAREERS:
Psychiatric Rehabilitation Practioner
Wellness Coach
Residential Supervisor
Service Worker
Job Coach
Rehabilitation Counselor
Transitional Residence Manager
Counselor
Recovery Educator
Program Director
Programs of Study
Human
Addiction
Highway Engineering Technology
BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
Associate In Science
Certificate in Applied Science
HUMAN SERVICES AND REHABILITATION STUDIES
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
This program meets the expanding need for communty-based human
service generalist practitioners to respond to the issues of psychiatric
disabilities, addiction, and developmental disabilities. Advances in
behavioral and social sciences have lead to the emergence of a body
of scientific research and its applications in technology for today’s
services. Human service technology affords practitioners the capacity
for significant contributions to the effective deliverty of behavioral
health care in communities. Human Services and Rehabilitation
comprises many professional disciplines, including psychiatry,
psychology, nursing, social work, counseing, adult education and
rehablitation.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
Upon completion of this program, students will:
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182
Gain knowledge in psychiatric, developmental, and substance
abuse disorders.
Acquire person-centered principles, values, attitudes to
facilitate recovery and rehabilitation of people with
disabilities
Use skills to promote choice, change, resource access, and
optimal community living
Be skilled in crisis prevention and intervention (CPI)
Be prepared, after work requirement to sit for CPRP exam
Participate in multi-disciplinary networks, professional and
community organizations
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
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Programs of Study
Complete career plan and prepare for baccalaureate program
and lifelong learning
Be aware of WV human service systems and allied health
roles and functions
Have mastery in the General Education Core Learning
outcomes
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
Students are assessed on their knowledge, understanding, and ability to
apply their skills and techniques through: tests, presentations, personcentered supportive counseling demonstrations, portfolio, practicum and
evaluations from site supervisors.
.
TRANSFER OPTIONS
HSRS
•
This Certificate of Applied Science degree leads to an
Associate in Applied Science Degree in Human Services and
Rehabilitation Studies
OTHER INFORMATION
The HSRS program prepares the student to sit for the Certified
Psychiatric Rehabilitation Practitioner (CPRP) exam administered by
the Psychiatric Rehabilitation Association (PRA).
CAREERS
Psychiatric Rehabilitation
Practiioner
Day Treatment Coordinator
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
Residental Supervisor
Job Coach
Vocational Aide
183
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
Transitional Residence Manager
Recovery Educator
Wellness Coach
Human Service Worker
Developmental Disabilities Case
Worker
Substance Abuse Program
Assistant
Rehabilitation Counselor
Addiction Counselor
Program Director
Mental Health Aide
Group Facilitator
184
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
Associate in Applied Science
Certificate in Applied Science
HUMAN SERVICES AND REHABILITATION STUDIES
CONCENTRATION: ADDICTION
Addiction is the number one public health issue in the United States today. According to the U.S.
Department of Health and Human Services Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services
Administration (SAMHSA), approximately 22.1 million people aged 12 or older needed treatment for a
substance use disorder in 2010. This program is designed to prepare students for careers in addiction
counseling and to enhance the knowledge and skills of those already working in the field. Skills include
individual, family and group counseling techniques, as well as assessment, treatment planning,
prevention and other topics related to addiction. This program was designed to prepare students to
become an Alcohol and Drug Counselor (ADC) and to prepare students to sit for West Virginia’s
Alcohol and Drug Counselor’s (ADC) Certification examination.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
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Prepare data, utilize assessments and create treatment plans
Demonstrate person-centered teaching/counseling/support strategies
Recognize stages of change and implement intervention strategies
Apply motivational interviewing skills in the counseling relationship
Demonstrate 12 Core Functions of a chemical dependency counselor
Apply various assessment tools in regard to identifying chemical dependency
Complete a career plan and be academically prepared for lifelong learning and professional
growth.
Practice Addictions Recovery by promoting choice, societal change, access to resources and
optimal community-based living
Acquire proficiency in non-violent crisis intervention and prevention
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
Program outcomes are assessed systematically and comprehensively by didactic course reviews,
clinical performance evaluations, externally assessed by pracitcum clinical supervisor evaluations,
employer feedback, student/graduate surveys and faculty evaluation.
General education outcomes are assessed via of General Education Portfolio
HSRS
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
TRANSFER BACCALAUREATE OPTIONS
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WVSU – AH and Rehab Leadership
Program serves as minor at WVSU
WVU – BA Pathway
OTHER INFORMATION
www.bridgevalley.edu
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Programs of Study
CAREERS
The U.S. Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that Employment of substance
abuse and behavioral disorder counselors is projected to grow 31 percent from 2012 to 2022, much
faster than the average for all occupations. Growth is expected as addiction and mental health
counseling services are increasingly covered by insurance policies. Demand is particularly strong for
rehabilitation, substance abuse and behavioral disorder counselors because drug offenders are
increasingly being sent to treatment programs rather than to jail. Graduates can expect to find
employment in:
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Private and Non-profit Treatment Facilities
Correctional Institutions
Hospitals
Local and State governments
Outpatient care centers
Family services organizations
Residential faciilties
SALARY
HSRS : Addiction
$25,410 - $60,000
Median annual wage: $38, 520
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Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
HUMAN SERVICES AND REHABILITATION STUDIES
CONCENTRATION: ADDICTION
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
HSRS 120
HSRS 232
ENGL 101
ATEC 105
ATEC 110
ATEC 115
HSRS 125
HSRS 221
HUMN 101
HSRS 292
HSRS 294
HSRS 296
188
First Semester
Introduction to Human Services
and Rehabilitation Studies
Substance Abuse Disorders
English Composition
Computer Literacy OR
Office Keyboarding OR
Fundamentals of Business
Computer Applications
Observation, Crisis, and
Documentation
Semester Total
Third Semester
Psychiatric Rehabilitation II
Introduction to Humanities
Rehabilitation Case Management
Treatments and Supports in
Addictions
Addiction in Co-occurring
Disorders
Semester Total
3
3
3
3
3
HSRS 123
HSRS 290
HSRS 293
MATH
PSYC
Restricted
Elective
3
15
3
3
3
3
3
1
Semester Total 16
15
3
3
3
3
Second Semester
Psychiatric Rehabilitation I
Intake, Assessment and Diagnosis
in Addiction
Family and Addiction
Any college level Math
General Psychology OR Lifespan
Psychology
Any HSRS course outside major
HSRS 222
HSRS 297
BIOL
HSRS 298
BUSN 298
Fourth Semester
Psychiatric Rehabilitation III
Motivational Interviewing in
Addictions
Any College Level Biology
Clinical Practice in Addiction
Business Studies Seminar
Semester Total
3
3
3
4
1
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BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
HUMAN SERVICES AND REHABILITATION STUDIES
CONCENTRATION: ADDICTION
HSRS 120
HSRS 232
ENGL 101
HSRS 123
MATH
First Semester
Introduction to Human Services
and Rehabilitation Studies
Substance Abuse Disorders
English Composition
Psychiatric Rehabilitation I
ANY College Level MATH
Semester Total
HSRS 290
3
3
3
3
3
15
HSRS 296
HSRS 294
HSRS 297
Elective
Second Semester
Intake, Assessment and Diagnosis
in Addiction
Addictions with Co-occurring
Disorders
Treatment and Support in
Addiction
Motivational Interviewing in
Addiction
Restricted Elective (Program
Director approved clinical)
Semester Total
3
3
3
3
3
15
Programs of Study – BTEC
CERTIFICATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
Associate In Science
Associate in Applied Science
Certificate in Applied Science
HUMAN SERVICES AND REHABILITATION STUDIES
CONCENTRATION: AUTISM INTERVENTION AND
EDUCATION
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
The Autism Intervention and Education concentration is designed as a first step to meet the training
and educational requirements for the role of Applied Behavioral Analyst/interventionist. The ABA
therapist works with children and families of children with autism in the home and school
environments improving the person’s quality of life and social, behavioral, and academic skills to
support a level of independence.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
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The program will address the disabling effects of this mysterious developmental disorder
including, but not limited to:
Gain knowledge of Autism symptomology, signs, and potential causes
Acquire understanding of the antecedents, behaviors, and consequences of Autism
Be skilled in intervention and treatment techniques
Gain knowledge of the legal aspects of autism and education
Be skilled in research-based applied behavioral analysis and discrete trail teaching
interventions
Demonstrate proficiency in applying approaches of B.F. Skinner and Ivar Lovaas
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
Students will be assessed on their knowledge, understanding, and ability to apply their skills and
techniques through: testing, research projects, oral presentations, practicum experience portfolios,
and evaluations from site supervisors
TRANSFER BACCALAUREATE OPTIONS
п‚·
Articulation Agreement with
WVSU
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п‚·
Program serves as a minor at
WVSU
WVU Pathway Program
OTHER INFORMATION
www.bridgevalley.edu
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Programs of Study
CAREERS
This specialization provides coursework and experience aimed at providing students with the
knowledge, skills and attitudes needed to work and interact with people who have an ASD diagnosis.
Graduates of this degree may expect to find employment in areas such as school systems, Waiver
programs, Developmental Disabilities Agencies (both private and State/Federal level) in positions such
as theraputic consultants, early intervention specialist, autism mentors, and adult services specialists.
According to the US Dept of Labor Occupational Outlook Hanbook Statistics.
SALARY
HSRS : Autism
$25,410 - $60,000
Median annual wage: $38, 520
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191
HUMAN SERVICES AND REHABILITATION STUDIES
CONCENTRATION: AUTISM INTERVENTION AND EDUCATION
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
Second Semester
First Semester
ENGL
101
HUMN
101
ATEC
105
HSRS
120
HSRS
130
English Composition I 3
Introduction to
Humanities
Computer Literacy OR
ATEC 110 Office
Keyboarding OR ATEC
115 Fundamentals of
Business Computer
Applications
Introduction to
Human Services and
Rehabilitation Studies
Introduction to
Autism
3
3
COMM
100
HSRS
123
MATH
HSRS
140
HSRS
210
3
HSRS
271
Oral Communication
3
Psychiatric
Rehabilitation I
Any College Level
Math
Introduction to ASD
Research
Introduction to
Applied Behavioral
Analysis
Childhood Psychiatric
Disorders
3
3
3
3
3
Semester Total 18
3
Semester Total 15
Third Semester
BIOL
HSRS
283
HSRS
Any college level
Biology Course
Practicum I: HomeBased
(120 hours)
Restricted Elective in
HSRS
3
3
2
HSRS
233
HSRS
220
Assessments in ASD
3
Legal Aspects of
Autism Intervention
and Education
3
Semester Total 14
BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
Fourth Semester
HSRS
Business Studies
Seminar
Practicum II:
School-Based (120
hours)
Restricted Elective
in HSRS
1
3
HSRS
234
General Psychology
OR PSYC 201
Lifespan
Development
Treatments in ASD
Semester Total
3
3
13
3
Programs of Study – BTEC
BUSN
298
HSRS
285
PSYC
101
HUMAN SERVICES AND REHABILITATION STUDIES
CONCENTRATION: AUTISM INTERVENTION AND EDUCATION
CERTIFICATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
First Semester
ENGL
101
MATH
HSRS
120
English Composition I 3
Any College Level
3
Math
Introduction to
3
Human Services and
Rehabilitation Studies
BCTC 2012–2013 Catalog
HSRS
130
HSRS
140
Introduction to
Autism
Introduction to ASD
Research
3
3
Semester Total 15
193
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
Second Semester
HSRS
123
HSRS
233
HSRS
210
194
Psychiatric
Rehabilitation I
Assessments in ASD
3
Introduction to
Applied Behavioral
Analysis
3
3
HSRS
220
HSRS
234
Legal Aspects of
Autism Intervention
Education & Services
Treatments in ASD
3
3
Semester Total 15
BCTC 2012–2013 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
Associate In Science
Associate in Applied Science
Certificate in Applied Science
HUMAN SERVICES AND REHABILITATION STUDIES
CONCENTRATION: PEER SUPPORT SPECIALIST
This concentration is for students who wish to further develop
knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to mutually support and
educate peers in the recovery process, including those with mental
health, trauma experiences, and/or substance abuse challenges. Students
learn to inspire hope, share relevant narratives, and promote
rehabilitation and recovery through role-modeling self-help values, selfcare, and person-centered strategies. This program is designed to meet
certification training and educational requirements for the growing role of
peers-as-providers. Students serve as role models and change-agents for
persons who are in recovery by encouraging health and wellness,
empowerment, and development of natural supports.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
Upon completion, students are expected to:
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Demonstrate understanding of peer support roles and
responsibilities
Differentiate between recovery goals and treatment goals
Facilitate creation of wellness and recovery plans
Utilize self-advocacy and systems advocacy
Identify stages of change and person centered recovery paths
Role-model peer support values and ethics
Discern applicable use of recovery narratives
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195
HSRS: Peer Support Specialist
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
Programs of Study
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
BridgeValley CTC
Demonstrate culturally appropriate connecting skills
Exhibit awareness of family and group dynamics
Display interpersonal skills and coaching techniques
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
Students are assessed on their knowledge, understanding, and ability to
apply their skills and techniques through: tests, presentations, peer
counseling demonstrations, field experiences,, practicum and evaluations
from site supervisors.
TRANSFER BACCALAUREATE OPTIONS
п‚·
Articulation agreement with WVSU
OTHER INFORMATION
Students successfully completing this training are eligible to:
п‚·
п‚·
apply for WV State Certification and testing as a Peer Support
Specialist
become a Certified WRAP Facilitator
CAREERS
Veteran Peer Support Specialist
Certified Peer Specialist
Veteran Peer Support
Apprentice
Advocate, Human Service
Worker
Recovery Coach, Wellness Coach
Peer-Run Program Director
Peer Recovery Support Liaison
Self-Help Group Facilitator
Mental Health Recovery
Educator
Peer Mentor, Counselor,
Navigator
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Programs of Study
HUMAN SERVICES AND REHABILITATION STUDIES
CONCENTRATION: PEER SUPPORT SPECIALIST
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
ENGL
101
PHED
101
MATH
HSRS
106
HSRS
120
Second Semester
English Composition
3
Health and Wellness 2
Any College Level
3
Math
Peer Support
4
Specialist I
Introduction to
3
Human Services and
Rehabilitation Studies
Semester Total 15
COMM Oral Communication
100
CSCT
Introduction to
100
Computers and Office
Application OR ATEC
105 Computer
Literacy OR ATEC 115
Fundamentals of
Business Computers
OR ATEC 120
Beginning Document
Processing
HSRS
Peer Support
107
Specialist II
HSRS
WRAP Seminar I
121
HSRS
Psychiatric
221
Rehabilitation II
3
3
4
1
3
Semester Total 15
HSRS 291
Summer
WRAP Seminar II
3
Semester Total 3
HSRS 200
Third Semester
BIOL
Any College Level
Biology
3
Community
Reconnection &
Navigating
3
HSRS : Autism
First Semester
Programs of Study
HSRS
201
HSRS
217
BridgeValley CTC
Advocacy Skills for
Peer Support
Peer Support
Specialist III
3
4
Semester Total 13
Fourth Semester
SOC SCI
HUMN 101/SOCI 101/ PSYC 101
Elective
HSRS 272 Trauma-Informed Support and
Compassion Fatigue
HSRS 222 Psychiatric Rehabilitation III
HSRS 280 Practicum: Peer Recovery
Support Services
HSRS 293 Family and Addictions
Semester Total
3
3
3
3
3
15
HUMAN SERVICES AND REHABILITATION STUDIES
CONCENTRATION: PEER SUPPORT SPECIALIST
CERTIFICATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
First Semester
CSCT
100
198
Introduction to
3
Computers and Office
Application OR ATEC
105 Computer
Literacy OR ATEC 115
Fundamentals of
Business Computers
OR ATEC 120
ENGL
101
HSRS
106
HSRS
107
Beginning Document
Processing
English Composition I
Peer Support
Specialist I
Peer Support
Specialist II
4
4
BCTC 2012–2013 Catalog
HSRS
120
HSRS
121
Programs of Study
Introduction to
3
Human Services and
Rehabilitation Studies
WRAP Seminar I
1
Semester Total 15
Second Semester
COMM Oral Communication
100
MATH ANY 100 LEVEL
COLLEGE MATH
PHED Health and Wellness
101
HSRS
Psychiatric
221
Rehabilitation II
HSRS
Peer Support
217
Specialist III
3
2
3
4
Semester Total 15
HSRS: Peer Support Specialist
BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
Associate in Applied Science
Certificate in Applied Science
HUMAN SERVICES AND REHABILITATION STUDIES
CONCENTRATION: YOUTH DEVELOPMENT
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
The Youth Development concentration offers students the opportunity to further their knowledge
and skills in modern techniques geared toward the prevention, recovery and rehabilitation of at-risk
and incarcerated youth. The program prepares students to implement person-centered life skill plans,
plan and monitor daily activities, provide support ser¬vices to youth based on their individual service
needs and provide crisis intervention/prevention when needed.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
Upon completion of this program, students will:
•
Gain knowledge and skills in child and adolescent services and disorders/behaviors. Students will
acquire the person-centered principles, values and attitudes.
•
Acquire proficiency in non-violent crisis prevention and intervention in accordance with the
national standard.
•
Complete a career plan and be academically prepared to enter a baccalaureate program to
enhance lifelong learning and professional growth.
•
Be conversant with and skilled in youth development specific ethical practice and West Virginia
Law for incarcerated youth and be accountable to the consumers and programs they serve.
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
Students will be assessed on their knowledge, understanding, and ability to apply their skills and
techniques through: testing, research projects, oral presentations, Practicum experience portfolios,
and evaluations from site supervisors.
TRANSFER BACCALAUREATE OPTIONS
•
•
•
Articulation Agreement with WVSU
Program serves as a minor at WVSU
WVU Pathway Program
OTHER INFORMATION
www.bridgevalley.edu
CAREERS
Graduates of this degree program may expect to find employment in juvenile detention centers,
residential child and adolescent programs, child and adolescent programs affiliated with the judicial
system, special education programs including after school programs and adolescent behavioral health
care centers.
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Programs of Study
HUMAN SERVICES AND REHABILITATION STUDIES
CONCENTRATION: YOUTH DEVELOPMENT
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
HSRS
120
HSRS
125
Second Semester
English Composition I 3
Introduction to
Humanities
Computer Literacy OR
ATEC 110 Office
Keyboarding OR ATEC
115 Fundamentals of
Business Computer
Applications
Introduction to
Human Services and
Rehabilitation Studies
Observation, Crisis &
Documentation
3
3
3
COMM
100
HSRS
127
MATH
HSRS
123
HSRS
230
HSRS
232
Oral Communication
3
Youth Development
Wellness
Any College Level
Math
Psychiatric
Rehabilitation I
Developmental
Disabilities
Substance Abuse
Disorders
3
3
3
3
3
Semester Total 18
3
Semester Total 15
Third Semester
PSYC
101
HSRS
HSRS
221
HSRS
271
General Psychology
OR PSYC 201 Lifespan
Development
Restrictive Elective in
HSRS
Psychiatric
Rehabilitation II
Childhood Psychiatric
Disorders
3
3
3
3
HSRS
270
Adjudicated Youth
3
Semester Total 15
HSRS : Autism
First Semester
ENGL
101
HUMN
101
ATEC
105
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
Fourth Semester
BUSN
298
HSRS
222
Business Studies
Seminar
Psychiatric
Rehabilitation III
1
3
HSRS
225
BIOL
ELEC
Psychiatric
Rehabilitation IV:
Practicum
Any College Level
Biology
Free Elective
3
3
2
Semester Total 12
HUMAN SERVICES AND REHABILITATION STUDIES
CONCENTRATION: YOUTH DEVELOPMENT
CERTIFICATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
First Semester
ENGL 101 English Comp I
3
MATH
Any College Level Math
3
HSRS 120 Introduction to Human Services 3
and Rehabilitation Studies
HSRS 123 Psychiatric Rehabilitation I
3
HSRS 125 Observation, Crisis, and
3
Documentation
Semester Total 15
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BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
HSRS 270
Adjudicated Youth
3
Semester Total 15
3
3
3
3
HSRS: Youth Development
HSRS 221
HSRS 271
HSRS 222
HSRS 232
Second Semester
Psychiatric Rehabilitation II
Childhood Psychiatric Disorders
Psychiatric Rehabilitation III
Substance Abuse Disorders
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
Associate In Applied Science
Certificate in Applied Science
INDUSTRIAL PIPING DESIGN TECHNOLOGY
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
A piping system transports various gases and liquids from one place to another. Piping systems are
used in buildings to move air throughout the premises and in petroleum distillation, chemical
processes and paper pulping among other industrial areas. A piping designer creates the drawings for
the operation, construction and layout of the system of pipes.
For those wishing to become a piping designer, it is necessary to learn computer-aided drafting (CAD)
at a 2-year postsecondary school. To prepare for entry into one of these schools, high school courses
in mathematics, science, computer technology, design, computer graphics and, if possible, drafting
should be taken.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
The Candidate will demonstrate by test or by degree or certificate awarded the following skills:
1.
Use generally accepted practices to route, support and assure pipe stays within an existing
layout of process equipment arrangement.
2.
Identify basic process equipment, pipe, valves, and fittings from either photographs, drawings or
generally accepted 2D and 3D symbols and identifies their nozzles and other points of
connection and attachment.
3.
Trace out, sketch and correctly identify process lines on the Process Engineer’s P&ID and on a
corresponding 2D or 3D representation (Piping Isometrics, Plans, Sections, Renderings) and
verify their correctness.
4.
Identify and list the proper materials for a given piping specification.
5.
Identify situations requiring the application of publicly available piping design standards,
including ASME B31.3, B31.1 and API 1104.
6.
Deisgn piping systems appropriately to commonly available fabrication and erection methods.
7.
Design pipe systems to accommodate reasonably foreseeable inspection and maintenance
practices.
8.
Use a Computer Aided Design (CAD) system to correctly represent a schematic and dimensioned
piping drawings and backup electronic client appropriately.
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
Program outcomes are assessed by a variety of means, including quizzes, unit tests, oral
presentations, written reports, and final examinations. Outcomes based on technical expertise are
assessed by the Society of Piping Engineeris and Deisgners. General education outcomes are assessed
by the ACT WorkKeys exit examination.
TRANSFER BACCALAUREATE OPTION
The Industrial Piping Design Technology is an Associate in Applied Science program designed to
provide skills for immediate entry to the workforce. Students wishing to continue their studies with a
Bachalorate program discuss program options with their academic advisor.
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BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
ADVANCED PLACEMENT CREDIT FOR HIGH SCHOOL/VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL
CENTER/COLLEGE PROGRAMS
High school level design and drafting coursework is not necessary for entrance into Industrial Piping
Design Technology program. Introductory subjects are incorporated as part of the program.
Students, who have completed vocational or EDGE courses, may receive credit for advanced
placement. Articulation/EDGE agreements are in place with various vocation-technical centers.
Advanced placement is also available for students with prior college experience or certifications.
Please contact the department chair.
CAREERS IN INDUSTRIAL PIPING DESIGN TECHNOLOGY
Career information.
Industrial Piping Design Technology
All wage information is based on the data from the U.S. Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statstics
(BLS) May 2013. All apprenticship information is from U.S. Department of Labor Office of
Apprenticeship.
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
205
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
INDUSTRIAL PIPING DESIGN TECHNOLOGY
CERTIFICATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
AMTM 120
DRFT 120
ENGL 101
GNST 102
MATH 130
First Semester
Introduction to Piping
2
Drafting I
2
English I
3
First Year Experience
1
College Algebra
3
GEC-3 Elective
3
Semester Total 14
AMTM 121
CIET 114
DRFT 121
DRFT 187
GNET 107
MATH 140
Second Semester
Advanced Piping – Process Plant
Layout & Design
Statics
Drafting II
PDMS
Introduction to Computer
Applications for Technicians
Trigonometry
Semester Total
2
3
2
3
3
3
16
Continued Studies for an
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
DRFT 290
CIET 115
CIET 131
DRFT 288
MEET 241
MEET 242
MEET 245
206
Summer Semester
Internship in CAD
Semester Total
Third Semester
Strengths of Materials
Surveying I
Advanced PDMS
Principles of Fluid Power
Components of Fluid Power
Fluid Power Lab
Technical Elective
Semester Total
3
3
3
1
1
1
3
15
BUSN 122
GNET 111
GNET 212
PHYS 101
3
3
Fifth Semester
Interpersonal Relations:
Customer
Public Speaking for Technology
Project Management
General Physics I
Technical Elective
Semester Total
1
1
3
4
3
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BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
Associate Science
Associate in Science
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
The Technical Studies in Information Technology program is offered as part of a statewide
Information Technology (IT) certification program. This program offers students a solid background in
computer technology complemented by a full array of vendor certification training choices. The
program is available in a web delivery format by community colleges throughout the state. Students
may take courses at the local institution, where provided, and take those offered by other colleges via
the web, if not available at the local institution (coded below with the prefix “IT”).
Students must complete a series of courses in four components:
п‚·
Component 1: General Studies;
п‚·
Component 2: Technical Core;
п‚·
Component 3: Certifications; and
п‚·
Component 4; On-the job Training.
Component 3: Offers the student a choice from a variety of vendor certifications.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
4.
Maintain, repair, and support computer hardware and personal PC and network operating
systems in an effective and efficient manner.
5.
Design, install, maintain and operate small office and branch level network infrastructure.
6.
Install or update and configure computer application software, network security software, and
document computer systems and networks.
7.
Applying skills in basic computer programming and web-based application to operate networks
and host basic web-sites.
8.
Function effectively in multidisciplinary teams and demonstrate an ability to communicate
effectively in written and oral formats.
9.
Appreciate the need for life-long learning and continue to maintain and develop their technical
skills.
10. Exhibit a broad education and knowledge of contemporary issues in a global, societal contest,
and demonstrate a general knowledge of professional behavior and ethical responsibility toward
employers, customers, and society.
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
Course outcomes are assessed by exit examinations in each course. Program outcomes are assessed
in a designated “capstone” course. General education outcomes are assessed by ACT WorkKeys.
Graduating students are eligible to sit for the CompTIA A+, CompTIA NET+, Cisco Certified Entry
Networking Technician (CCENT) and Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) Certification Exams.
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
207
Respiratory Therapy
In addition to the learning outcomes set forth in the general of education policy of the BridgeValley
Community and Technical College for the Associate in Science degree, the learning outcomes of the
Associate in Science in Computer and Information Technology program prepare students to:
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
TRANSFER BACCALAUREATE OPTIONS
OTHER INFORMATION
(LINKS TO ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS, SPECIFIED VACCINATIONS, SAFETY
REQUIREMENTS, ETC.)
CAREERS
Graduates of the program typically have strengths in the building, testing, operation, and
maintenance of existing hardware and software systems.
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BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
INFT 110
INFT 131
ENGL 101
GNST 102
MATH 130
INFT 231
ISST 250
INFT 260
INFT 280
CSCT 218
First Semester
Computer Architecture &
Troubleshooting
Networking I (GEC 4)
English Composition I (GEC 1)
First Year Experience
College Algebra (GEC 2)
Elective (GEC 3)
Semester Total
4
3
1
3
3
18
Third Semester
Networking III
Security Fundamentals
Disaster Recovery
Intro to Database Systems (GEC 4)
Scripting (PowerShell)
Semester Total
4
3
3
3
3
16
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
4
INFT 121
INFT 132
ENGL 102
INFT 290
INFT 232
INFT 295
INFT 228
Second Semester
Network Operating Systems
Networking II
English Composition II (GEC 1)
Lab Science Elective (GEC 2)
Semester Total
3
4
3
4
14
Fourth Semester
Project Management
Network IV
Technical Elective
Seminar
Web Server Administration
Semester Total
3
4
4
1
3
15
209
Respiratory Therapy
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
Associate In Applied Science
Certificate in Appllied Science
MACHINE TOOL TECHNOLOGY
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
Machinists set up and operate a variety of computer-controlled and mechanically-controlled machine
tools to produce precision metal parts, instruments, and tools. Machinists use machine tools, such as
lathes, milling machines, and machining centers, to produce precision metal parts. Production
machinists may produce large quantities of a specific part, but machinists frequently produce small
batches or one-of-a-kind items. Machinists use their knowledge of the working properties of metals
and their skill with machine tools to plan and carry out the operations needed to make machined
products that meet precise specifications.
The Machine Tool Technology (AAS-MTT, CAS-MTT) degree programs provides a highly interactive
hands-on course of study that prepares graduates for careers in modern industry. The first year of the
program (CAS) focuses on manual machine tools and processes. The second year of the program
(AAS) focuses on Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) equipment, processes and programming.
The MMT program uses an innovative block-scheduled cohort model to deliver classes, so students
have the opportunity to participate in long-term in-depth internships with participating industrial
partners. Program courses are offered two days a week in approximately 8-hour blocks for five
semesters. Qualifying students may intern with industry partners on non-class days to obtain a
valuable background of real world applications throughout the program. Graduates who have
participated in the internship program enter the work force with not just a degree, but also the
equivalent of a year of professional industrial experience.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
Upon completion of the program, the student will be able to:
1.
Effectively and safely operate manual machine equipment, such as hand tools, lathes, mills,
grinders, and drills (AAS).
2.
Configure and operate CNC equipment. (AAS)
3.
Read and interpret blueprints per industry standards. (CAS, AAS)
4.
Plan and execute part fabrication from initial specifications. (CAS, AAS)
5.
Communicate effectively in written, oral and graphical forms. (CAS, AAS)
6.
Work effectively in teams with other machinists, engineers, technicians, and production
personnel. (CAS, AAS)
7.
Apply industry-based safety standards in the work environment. (CAS, AAS)
8.
Understand professional and ethical responsibility to their field and to society. (AAS)
9.
Appreciate cultural and ethnic diversity in the workplace. (AAS)
10. Understand the need to maintain their technical skills and develop new ones through personal
development and continued learning. (AAS)
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BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
Program outcomes are assessed by a variety of means, including quizzes, unit tests, oral
presentations, written reports, and final examinations. Outcomes based on technical expertise are
assessed by the Society of Manufacturing Engineers EET Outcomes Assessment exit exam, which
assesses student knowledge in a variety of areas of the electrical engineering technology field.
General education outcomes are assessed by the ACT WorkKeys exit examination.
TRANSFER BACCALAUREATE OPTION
The Machine Tool Technology is an Associate in Applied Science program designed to provide skills for
immediate entry to the workforce. Students wishing to continue their studies with a Bachalorate
program discuss program options with their academic advisor.
ADVANCED PLACEMENT CREDIT FOR HIGH SCHOOL/VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL
CENTER/COLLEGE PROGRAMS
High school level machining and drafting coursework is not necessary for entrance into Machine Tool
Technology program. Introductory subjects are incorporated as part of the program. Students, who
have completed vocational or EDGE courses, may receive credit for advanced placement.
Articulation/EDGE agreements are in place with various vocation-technical centers. Advanced
placement is also available for students with prior college experience or certifications. Please contact
the department chair.
Machinists work in environments from large industries to small shops. Typical positions include: Gear
Machinist, Journeyman Machinist, Machine Operator, Machine Repair Person, Machinist,
Maintenance Machinist, Maintenance Specialist, Production Machinist, Set-Up Machinist, Tool Room
Machinist.
Based on data from the Bureau of Labor Statstics the national median wage for machinists was $18.99
per hour or $39,500 annually. A comon career path to is enter an apprenticeship for specialization.
There are currently 11 recognized apprencible specialities: fixture maker; instrument maker;
instrument-maker and repairer; machinist, automotive; machinist, experimental; machinist;
machinist; machinist, outside (ship-boat manufacturing); maintenance machinist; rocket-motor
mechanic; test technician.
Many machinist continue their training, primarily through apprenticeships, to become tool and die
makers. Based on data from the Bureau of Labor Statstics the national median wage wage for tool
and die makers had a national median of $22.60 per hour or $58,500 annually. There are currenlty 20
recognized apprenticeable specialities in the field of tool and die making: die finisher; die maker; mold
maker, die-casting and plastic molding; die maker, stamping; die maker, trim; die making; die sinker;
plastic tool maker; saw maker; tap-and-die-maker technician; tool maker; tool making; tool maker,
bench; tool-and-die maker; hardener - tool & die; tool & die making (inspector set up & layout); die
maker; die maker, bench, stamping; plastic-fixture builder; die maker, wire drawing
All wage information is based on the data from the U.S. Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statstics
(BLS) May 2012. All apprenticship information is from U.S. Department of Labor Office of
Apprenticeship.
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
211
Machine Tool Technology
CAREERS IN ADVANCED MACHINE TOOL TECHNOLOGY
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
MACHINE TOOL TECHNOLOGY
CERTIFICATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
GNST 102
GNET 107
GNET 121
MATH 115
MACH 121
MACH 123
MACH 131
First Semester
First Year Experience
Basic Computer Applications for
Technicians
Fundamentals of Industrial Safety/
OSHA 10
Applied Technical Math (GEC-2)
Blueprint Reading
Precision Measurement and
Quality Assurance
Introduction to Machining
Semester Total
1
3
1
ENGL 101
MACH 125
MACH 141
MACH 151
3
2
2
MACH 153
MACH 155
MACH 191
4
16
Second Semester
English Composition I (GEC-1)
Advanced Measurement
Metallurgy and Machining Theory
Manual Machine Tool - Grinding
and Polishing
Manual Machine Tool - Milling
Manual Machine Tool – Turning
NIMS Credentialing – Manual
Machine Tools
Semester Total
3
1
2
2
2
2
3
15
Continued Studies for an
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
WLDT 101
WLDT 102
MACH 271
MACH 261
MACH 263
212
Third Semester
Introduction to Welding Processes 3
Part I
Introduction to Welding Processes 3
Part II
Semester Total 6
Fourth Semester
Introduction to CAD and 3D
Modeling
CNC Machine Tool – Intro to
Programming
CNC Machine Tool – Setup and
Operation
Semester Total
4
MACH 275
MACH 281
4
MACH 292
4
12
Fifth Semester
Computer Aided Manufacturing
Theory, Maintenance and
Troubleshooting
NIMS Credentialing – CNC
Machine Tool
Program Elective
Semester Total
3
3
3
3
12
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
CERTIFICATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
ENTREPRENEURSHIP
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
Entrepreneurship is the process of identifying a need in the marketplace and starting a business to
fulfill that need. Today, entrepreneurship is seen as a vital way to grow the economy. This certificate
transitions fully into the A.A.S. Degree in Management Entrepreneurship Concentration.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
Upon completion of the program, graduates will:
п‚·
Have an appropriate mastery of general business terminology, principles, practices and
skills.
п‚·
Understand the roles of manager, management theory, organizational structure and
culture, and develop key managerial skills to be used at any level of management.
п‚·
Demonstrate an understanding of leadership fundamentals, effective team building,
motivation theories and the strategic decision making process.
п‚·
Demonstrate an understanding of the terminology and concepts associated with managing
a small business.
п‚·
Demonstrate an understanding of the business plan and gain experience in preparing one.
п‚·
Understand the entrepreneurship process from innovation to implementation.
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
Program outcomes are assessed by capstone courses, exit interview, employer surveys and program
specific exit exams. General education outcomes are assessed by a general education portfolio.
CAS in Accounting
CAREERS
The Entrepreneurship program prepares graduates for employment as:
* General and Operations Manager
*www.onetonline.org
GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT INFORMATION
The Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook Handbook reports that the annual median salary
(May 2012) for General/Administrative Services Manager is $46,810 per year and only a 1% job
outlook growth rate (average rate), 2012-20. Experience, education and certification all increase
earning potential.
Tuition and Fees*: $4520 In-State Resident
$11420 Non-Resident
Books*: $1300
CB Certification Exam: $395
Graduation Rate: N/A
Job Placement Rate: 72% (college average)
Median Loan Debt: N/A
*Actual costs may vary.
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
213
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
ENTREPRENEURSHIP
CERTIFICATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
MGMT
MGMT
BUSN
MGMT
BUSN
ENTR
ACCT
MRKT
ENGL
MGMT
MGMT
160
170
112
151
106
155
215
205
101
202
255
214
Curriculum/Suggested
Sequence
Opportunities Analysis
Funding Your Venture
Business Mathematics
Supervisory Management
Introduction to Business
Intro to Entrepreneurship
Financial Accounting
Fundamentals of Marketing
English Composition I
Principles of Management
Small Business Management
2
1
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Total 30
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
Associate in Applied Science
MANAGEMENT
ENTREPRENEURSHIP CONCENTRATION
Entrepreneurship is the process of identifying a need in the marketplace and starting a business to
fulfill that need. Today, entrepreneurship is seen as a vital way to grow the economy. While the
emphasis of the program is the transformation of an idea into a new business venture, this program
can also serve the needs of those who want to work within an existing business Entrepreneurial
abilities are needed within corporations today to assist with new product development, product
innovation, new market opportunities and other needs of a growing business.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
Upon completion of this program, graduates will:
п‚·
Have an appropriate mastery of general business terminology, principles, practices and
skills.
п‚·
Understand the roles of manager, management theory, organizational structure and
culture, and develop key managerial skills to be used at any level of management.
п‚·
Demonstrate an understanding of leadership fundamentals, effective team building,
motivation theories and the strategic decision making process.
п‚·
Demonstrate an understanding of the terminology and concepts associated with managing
a small business.
п‚·
Demonstrate an understanding of the business plan and gain experience in preparing one.
п‚·
Understand the entrepreneurship process from innovation to implementation
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
Program outcomes are assessed by capstone courses, exit interview, employer surveys and program
specific exit exams, which may include ETS Associate Business Exam. General education outcomes are
assessed by a general education portfolio.
CAREERS
The Management program prepares graduates for employment as:
*FIRST-LINE SUPERVISORS OR *GENERAL AND OPERATIONS MANAGERS
п‚·
Team Leader
п‚·
Business Owner
п‚·
Office Supervisor
п‚·
General Manager
п‚·
Director
п‚·
Store Manager
п‚·
Coordinator
п‚·
Plant Manager
п‚·
Service Manager
п‚·
Manager Trainee
п‚·
Business
п‚·
Department Manager
Administrator
п‚·
Account Executive
п‚·
Business Manager
п‚·
Project Manager
п‚·
Services Manager
п‚·
Foreman
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
Business Owner
First-Line Supervisor
Property Manager
Office Manager
*www.onetonline.org
SALARY INFORMATION
http://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/home.htm
BCTC 2012–2013 Catalog
215
Management
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
MANAGEMENT
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
ENTREPRENUERSHIP CONCENTRATION
ENGL
ATEC
BUSN
BUSN
ACCT
MGMT
MGMT
BUSN
MRKT
MGMT
Elective
First Semester
101 English Composition I
115 Fundamentals of Bus. Comp
Tech
106 Introduction to Business
112 Business Math
185 Survey of Accounting
Semester Total
170
202
201
205
160
3
3
3
3
3
15
Third Semester
Opportunities Analysis
2
Principles of Management
3
Business Law I
3
Fundamentals of Marketing
3
Funding Your Venture
1
Restricted Elective*
2
Semester Total 15
ACCT 215
MGMT 155
BUSN 230
MGMT 151
MRKT 173
MGMT 266
MGMT 255
MGMT 238
ACCT 235
ECON 202
ECON 201
BUSN 298
Second Semester
Financial Accounting I
3
Fund of Entrepreneurship
3
Business Comm. & Ethics
3
Supervisory Management
3
Professional Selling
3
Semester Total 15
Fourth Semester
Entrepreneurship Mentorship
3
Small Business Management
3
Retail Management
3
Integrated Computer Accounting
3
Principles of Macroeconomics OR
3
Principles of Microeconomics
Business Studies Seminar
1
Semester Total 15
*Restricted Elective BUSN 201, MKRT 175 or permission of Program Director.
216
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BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
Associate in Applied Science
MANAGEMENT
OCCUPATIONAL SPECIALTY CONCENTRATION
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
Students who select the Occupational Specialty Concentration are those who have a particular field of
interest and want an associate degree in management to prepare them for a management role in that
field. The student would meet with the management advisor to determine the occupational specialty
courses needed.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
Program outcomes are assessed by Capstone courses, exit interview, employer surveys and program
specific exit exams. General education outcomes are assessed by general education portfolio.
CAREERS
The Management program prepares graduates for employment as:
*FIRST-LINE SUPERVISORS OR *GENERAL AND OPERATIONS MANAGERS
п‚·
Office Manager
п‚·
Business
Administrator
п‚·
Team Leader
п‚·
Business
п‚·
Office
Manager
Supervisor
п‚·
Services
п‚·
Director
Manager
п‚·
Coordinator
п‚·
Business
п‚·
Service
Owner
Manager
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
General
Manager
Store Manager
Plant Manager
*www.onetonline.org
SALARY INFORMATION
http://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/home.htm
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
217
AAS in Management – Occupational
Specialty
Upon completion of this program, graduates will:
п‚·
Have an appropriate mastery of general business terminology, principles, practices and
skills.
п‚·
Understand the roles of manager, management theory, organizational structure and
culture, and develop key managerial skills to be used at any level of management.
п‚·
Demonstrate an understanding of leadership fundamentals, effective team building,
motivation theories and the strategic decision making process.
п‚·
Understand the roles and principles of the occupational specialty.
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
MANAGEMENT
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
OCCUPATIONAL SPECIALTY CONCENTRATION
ENGL
MGMT
BUSN
BUSN
101
151
106
112
First Semester
English Composition I
Supervisory Management
Introduction to Business
Business Math
3
3
3
3
ACCT
ATEC
BUSN
BUSN
215
115
230
201
Occupational Specialty Course 3
Semester Total 15
MRKT
MGMT
ECON
ECON
ACCT
218
205
202
202
201
216
Third Semester
Fundamentals of Marketing
Principles of Management
Prin. of Macroeconomics OR
Prin. of Microeconomics
Managerial Accounting
Occupational Specialty
Semester Total
3
3
3
3
3
15
Elective
MGMT 255
MGMT 238
BUSN 298
MGMT 253
Second Semester
Financial Accounting
3
Fund. of Bus. Computer Tech.
3
Business Comm. & Ethics
3
Business Law
3
Occupational Specialty Course
3
Semester Total 15
Fourth Semester
Occupational Specialty OR
Restricted Elective
2
Small Business Management
3
Retail Management
3
Business Studies Seminar
1
Occupational Specialty
3
Human Resource Management 3
Semester Total 15
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
Associate in Applied Science
MANAGEMENT
WITH 2+2 TRANSFER TRACK
The Management Associate in Applied Science degree program offers students a two-year general
management degree with optional concentrations in Entrepreneurship or Occupational Specialty. The
2+2 transfer track in Management provides the student with an associate in applied science degree
and enables the graduate to continue in the management field to earn a baccalaureate degree.
Supervisors and managers at all levels are a vital component of all organizations-public, private, profit
or not-for-profit. Management is the most fundamental function of business. Modern firms need
competent managers who can address emerging issues in a global economy while dealing with global
competition, ethical issues, and diverse work groups.
The types of businesses that employ graduates include state government, restaurants, supermarkets,
warehouses, utility companies, insurance companies and many more.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
Upon completion of this program, graduates will:
•
Have an appropriate mastery of general business terminology, principles, practices and skills.
•
Understand the roles of manager, management theory, organizational structure and culture,
and develop key managerial skills to be used at any level of management.
•
Demonstrate an understanding of leadership fundamentals, effective team building, motivation
theories and the strategic decision making process.
•
Demonstrate an understanding of the terminology and concepts associated with managing a
small business.
•
Demonstrate an understanding of the business plan and gain experience in preparing one.
•
Have the necessary skills and competencies to continue with their education on the
baccalaureate level.
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
Program outcomes are assessed by Capstone courses, exit interview, employer surveys and program
specific exit exams. The 2+2 Management outcomes are assessed according to the above in addition
to the successful completion of a Baccalaureate degree. General education outcomes are assessed by
general education portfolio.
TRANSFER BACCALAUREATE OPTIONS
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
Marshall University 2+2
West Virginia State University
University of Charleston
CAREERS
The Management program prepares graduates for employment as:
*FIRST-LINE SUPERVISORS OR *GENERAL AND OPERATIONS MANAGERS
п‚·
Team Leader
п‚·
Services Manager
п‚·
Office Supervisor
п‚·
Business Owner
п‚·
Director
п‚·
General Manager
п‚·
Coordinator
п‚·
Manager Trainee
п‚·
Service Manager
п‚·
Department Manager
п‚·
Business Manager
п‚·
Project Manager
BCTC 2012–2013 Catalog
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
Foreman
Business Owner
First-Line Supervisor
Office Manager
219
Programs of Study – BTEC
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
*www.onetonline.org
SALARY INFORMATION
http://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/home.htm
220
BCTC 2012–2013 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
MANAGEMENT
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
Second Semester
First Semester
ENGL 101
BUSN 106
MGMT 151
BIOL 101
BIOL 102
MATH 130
BUSN 112
English Composition I
Introduction to Business
Supervisory Management
Principles of Biology
Principles of Biology Lab*
College Algebra* OR
Business Mathematics
3
3
3
3
1*
3
ACCT 185
HUMN 101
ATEC 115
ENGL 102
BUSN 296
MGMT 155
MGMT 202
Survey of Accounting OR
Introduction to Humanities*
Fund of Bus Comp Tech
English Composition II
Business Statistics* OR
Fund. of Entrepreneurship
Principles of Management
3
3
3
3
3
Semester Total 15
1516*
Third Semester
BUSN 201
MRKT 205
ACCT 215
BUSN 230
ECON 202
Business Law
Fundamentals of Marketing
Financial Accounting
Business Comm. and Ethics
Principles of Macroeconomics
Fourth Semester
3
3
3
3
3
Semester Total 15
* Students will take designated
course to complete 2+2 transfer
requirements.
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
ACCT 216
MGMT 255
MGMT 253
FINC 290
FINC 201
BUSN 266
Elective
BUSN 298
Managerial Accounting
Small Bus Management
Human Resource Mgmt.
Financial Management* OR
Personal Finance
Business Internship OR
Restricted Elective*
Business Studies Seminar
3
3
3
3
1*-2
1
Semester Total 14*15
221
Management
Semester Total
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
Associate In Science
Associate in Applied Science
MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
If you are planning a career as a computer professional, opportunities are endless! Almost every
company, no matterhow big or small, employs computer specialists and most of these companies are
always looking for qualified people.The number of programmers, system analysts &
hardware,software, networking & security specialists needed to fillavailable positions will continue to
grow.In addition to computer specialists, trained personnel areneeded in all fields. Whether one is
seeking employmentas a teacher, accountant, writer, fashion designer, lawyer ora number of other
jobs, one question is frequently asked:What do you know about computers? Interacting with
acomputer is part of the daily routine for millions of white-and blue-collar workers. No matter the
career choice, in all likelihood one will be a frequent user of computers.
The MIS Concentration prepares students for entry levelemployment in any type of business
functional area. Students will be able to design small business systems, write programs in current
programming languages, design, implement and use databases and support most of the technical
needs of these areas.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
Upon completion of the program, the student will:
п‚·
Have fundamental knowledge of the information technology field and most business functions.
п‚·
Have skills in at least one current programming language.
п‚·
Be able to design, create, maintain, use and support databases.
п‚·
Have knowledge of operating systems and basic networking technologies.
п‚·
Have skills in project management.
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
Program outcomes are assessed by a variety of means, including quizzes, unit tests, oral
presentations, written reports, and final examinations. The student will also be required to submit a
portfolio to fulfill general education requirements.
TRANSFER BACCALAUREATE OPTIONS
Graduates of this program can seamlessly continue their studies in a +2 MIS program at Marshall
University or West Virginia State University.
222
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BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
BUSN 230
CSCT 244
CSCT 260
CSCT 280
ECON 201
First Semester
Principles of Biology
Principles of Biology Lab
Introduction to Humanities
College Algebra
English Composition I
First Year Freshman
Semester Total
Third Semester
Business Communication and
Ethics
Data Communication and
Networking
Visual Basic .NET I
Database Management Systems
Principles of Management
Semester Total
3
1
3
3
3
3
16
ACCT 215
CSCT 101
CSCT 104
3
BUSN 201
BUSN 296
CSCT 210
3
3
3
3
15
ECON 201
ENGL 102
CSCT 282
INFT 290
Second Semester
Financial Accounting
Introduction to Programming
Technical Applications for
Microsoft Office
Principles of Macroeconomics
English Composition II
Semester Total
Fourth Semester
Business Law I
Business Statistics
Fundamentals of Operating
Systems
System Analysis & Design
Project Management
Semester Total
3
3
3
3
3
15
3
3
3
3
3
15
Associate
Associate in Applied Science
MARKETING
WITH 2+2 TRANSFER TRACK
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
Marketing has become an important component of business. As part of marketing, advertising and
sales perform valuable functions for both society and the individual firm. Individuals who choose a
career in this field must possess knowledge, motivation, dedication and integrity. Employment
opportunities exist in industrial, wholesale and retail areas. Marketing applies to almost every facet of
the business industry.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
223
Management Information Systems
BIOL 101
BIOL 102
HUMN 101
MATH 130
ENGL 101
GNST 102
Programs of Study
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
BridgeValley CTC
Demonstrate an understanding and proficiency with the marketing mix (four Ps) and its
importance to the organization.
Make a sales presentation using the ten-step sales process.
Develop an integrated advertising campaign using sound advertising principles.
Develop a social media strategy for a brand or company that is integrated with overall
marketing strategy (i.e. segmentation, targeting, positioning, marketing mix).
Demonstrate an understanding and ability to create a complete integrated marketing
campaign.
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
Program outcomes are assessed by capstone courses, exit interview, employer surveys and program
specific exit exams, which may include ETS Associate Business Exam or The National Certified
Bookkeeper Exam. The Accounting 2+2 option is assessed according to the above in addition to the
successful transition/completion of a Baccalaureate degree. General education outcomes are
assessed by a general education portfolio.
TRANSFER BACCALAUREATE OPTIONS
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
Marshall University
West Virginia State University
University of Charleston
CAREERS
The Marketing program prepares graduates for employment as:
*Advertising Sales agent and *Advertising/promotion manager
Advertising Agent
Account Executive
Marketing Director
Advertising Representative
Retail Sales Manager
Sales Director
Ad Buyer
Promotions Manager
Advertising Director
Students who go on to further their education:
*advertising, promotions, and marketing managers or market research analysts
Marketing Manager
Sales Manager
Business Development
Advertising Manager
VP of Sales/Marketing
Specialist
Marketing Executive
Market Analyst
Promotions Manager
Marketing Analyst
Research Analyst
Advertising Director
*www.onetonline.org
SALARY INFORMATION
http://www.bls.gov/ooh/business-and-financial/market-research-analysts.htm
http://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/advertising-promotions-and-marketing-managers.htm
224
BCTC 2012–2013 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
MARKETING
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
First Semester
English Composition I
3
Professional Selling
3
Advertising$
3
Introduction to Business
3
College Algebra * OR
Business Mathematics
3
Semester Total 15
ECON 202
MRKT 220
BUSN 230
ACCT 216
ATEC 200
MGMT 23
BUSN 296
Third Semester
Principles of Macroeconomics
3
Social Media Marketing$
3
Business Comm. & Ethics*
3
Managerial Accounting * OR
Desktop Publishing
3
Retail Management OR
Business Statistics *
3
Semester Total 15
Second Semester
English Composition II
3
Fundamentals of Business
3
Computer Applications
MRKT 205 Fundamentals of Marketing
3
ACCT 215 Financial Accounting I * OR
3
ACCT 185 Survey of Accounting
MGMT 202 Principles of Management
3
Semester Total 15
ENGL 102
ATEC 115
ECON 201
BUSN 266
Elective
MRKT 250
BUSN 201
BIOL 101
BIOL 102
BUSN 298
Elective
Fourth Semester
Prin. of Microeconomics * OR
Business Internship AND
Restricted Elective
3
Marketing Management$
3
Business Law
3
General Biology
3
General Biology Lab
1
Business Studies Seminar
1
Restricted Elective
1
Semester Total 15
* Students will take designated course to complete 2+2 transfer
requirements.
$
Denotes courses that are only offered on the South Charleston, WV
campus.
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225
Respiratory Therapy
ENGL 101
MRKT 173
MRKT 175
BUSN 106
MATH 130
BUSN 112
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
Associate In Science
Associate in Science
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
The associate in science degree Mechanical Engineering Technology (ASMET) is a two year program
that applies established scientific and engineering knowledge and methods to the field of machines
and manufacturing. This program is ideally suited to the person who is capable of understanding
theoretical principles, but prefers to get involved with mechanical systems and processes.
The program prepares graduates with knowledge, problem solving ability, and hands-on skills to enter
careers in the design, installation, manufacturing, testing, evaluation, technical sales, and/or
maintenance of mechanical systems. A graduate mechanical engineering technician can select
employment from many areas, such as manufacturing, maintenance, modification of design, power
generation, technical laboratory operation, technical sales, testing and analysis, and field engineering
services.
The AS Mechanical Engineering Technology program is accredited by the Engineering Technology
Accreditation Commission (ETAC) of ABET, Inc.
PROGRAM OBJECTIVES
In addition to the learning outcomes set forth in the general education core curriculum for the
associate degree, specific outcomes for this program have been established.
Graduates of the A.S. Mechanical Engineering Technology program will, in their first several years of
employment, have the ability to:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Work competently in technical and professional careers related to their field.
Communicate effectively and work in teams.
Continue growth in professional knowledge and competencies.
Achieve compensation consistent with their degree.
Course outcomes are assessed by exit examinations in each course. Program outcomes are assessed
in designated courses.
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
Program outcomes are assessed by a variety of means, including quizzes, unit tests, oral
presentations, written reports, and final examinations. Outcomes based on technical expertise are
assessed by the Society of Manufacturing Engineers EET Outcomes Assessment exit exam, which
assesses student knowledge in a variety of areas of the electrical engineering technology field.
General education outcomes are assessed by the ACT WorkKeys exit examination.
TRANSFER BACCALAUREATE TRANSFER OPTIONS
High school level mechanical, manufacturing, fluid power, welding, industrial maintenance, CAD, or
drafting subjects are not necessary for entrance into the Mechanical Engineering Technology
program. Beginning subjects are part of the program. The student who has completed vocational or
EDGE courses, however, may receive advanced placement. Articulation Edge agreements are in place
with various career-technical centers. Advanced placement is also available to the student with prior
college experience. Please check with the department head or the Dean of Engineering Technology
for more information.
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Programs of Study
ADVANCED PLACEMENT CREDIT FOR HIGH SCHOOL/VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL
CENTER/COLLEGE PROGRAMS:
High school level mechanical, manufacturing, fluid power, welding, industrial maintenance, CAD, or
drafting subjects are not necessary for entrance into the Mechanical Engineering Technology
program. Beginning subjects are part of the program. The student who has completed vocational or
EDGE courses, however, may receive advanced placement. Articulation Edge agreements are in place
with various career-technical centers. Advanced placement is also available to the student with prior
college experience. Please check with the department head or dean for more information.
CAREERS IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
Mechanical Engineering Technology
Graduates of associate degree programs typically have strengths in specifying, installing, fabricating,
testing, documenting, operating, selling, and/or maintaining basic mechanical systems. Job titles of
recent graduates have included: Engineering Draftsman, Engineering Technician, and Technical
Supervisor.
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
227
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE
DRFT 120
ENGL 101
GNET 108
GNST 102
MATH 130
MEET 121
CIET 115
ECET 110
GNET 111
MEET 225
MEET 241
MEET 242
MEET 243
MEET 245
First Semester
Drafting I
English Composition I (GEC-1)
Computer Applications for
Technicians
First Year Experience
College Algebra (GEC-2)
Manufacturing Processes I
GEC-3 Elective
Semester Total
1
3
3
3
18
Third Semester
Strength of Materials
DC Circuit Analysis
Public Speaking for Tech (GEC-3)
Mechanical Design I
Principles of Fluid Power
Components of Fluid Power
Hydraulic Circuit Design
Fluid Power Laboratory
Semester Total
3
4
1
3
1
1
1
1
15
2
3
3
CIET 114
DRFT 121
ENGL 102
MATH 140
MEET 122
PHYS 101
MATH 155
MEET 226
MEET 250
PHYS 102
Second Semester
Statics
Drafting II
English Composition II (GEC-1)
Trigonometry (GEC-4)
Manufacturing Processes II
General Physics I (GEC-2)
Semester Total
3
2
3
3
3
4
18
Fourth Semester
Technical Calculus (GEC-4)
Mechanical Design II
Climate Control
General Physics II (GEC-4)
Technical Elective
Semester Total
3
3
4
4
1
17
Program Electives must be approved by your academic advisor.
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Programs of Study
Associate Incience
Associate in Applied Science
MEDICAL ASSISTANT
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
This two-year program is designed for the individual who is interested in the following administrative
and clinical duties:
•
Receiving patients and their family members and managing public relations
•
Acting as an informational and educational resource for the patient
•
Handling telephone, written communications, and appointment scheduling
•
Managing patient records
•
Bookkeeping and insurance processing
•
Management and maintenance of the office and treatment areas
•
Preparing the patient for treatment
•
Preparing and sterilizing instruments and obtaining specimens for diagnostic evaluation
•
Performing EKGs and administering medications under the direction of the physician
The program includes an internship at an area health care setting and provides the foundation
needed for certification examinations.
Upon completion of the program, graduates will:
•
Demonstrate effective workplace communications;
•
Identify and maintain legal standards appropriate for the field
•
Function as a health care advocate and patient educator as appropriate
•
Perform appropriate operational functions of medical assisting
•
Perform clinical skills and follow diagnostic procedures effectively
•
Perform appropriate administrative and finance tasks effectively
•
Possess the knowledge and skill to pass programmatic exit assessments and in-field nationally
normed professional certifications
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
Course outcomes are assessed by exit exams in each course. Program outcomes are assessed in
capstone courses (Clinical Skills II and Administrative Medical Assistant). Learner outcomes are
assessed by the national certification exaministion for medical assisting. General education outcomes
are assessed by ACT WorkKeys.
TRANSFER BACCALAUREATE OPTIONS
•
•
•
Health Services Administration at WVU Tech
Business Management at WVU Tech
BA Pathway at WVU
OTHER INFORMATION
(LINKS TO ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS, SPECIFIED VACCINATIONS, SAFETY REQUIREMENTS, ETC.)
•
Link to vaccinations
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
229
Medical Assistant
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
Programs of Study
•
•
•
•
BridgeValley CTC
Link to safety disclaimer/blood-borne pathogen policy
Link to drug testing and background check
Link to felony statement
Link to Physical Demands
CAREERS
This program is designed for the individual who desires to provide allied health services in ambulatory
out-patient facilities, including medical offices, clinics and hospitals. This program is designed to
prepare comptenent individuals to participate in Diagnostic, Clinical and Administrative functions.
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Programs of Study
MEDICAL ASSISTANT
ASSOCIATE APPLIED IN SCIENCE
ALHL 205
ALHL 200
ATEC 210
ATEC 220
BIOL 210
First Semester
First Year Experience
Medical Terminology
First-Year Clinic
Fund of Business Computer Apps
Beginning Document Processing
English Composition I
Medical Insurance & Billing Prac.
Semester Total
Third Semester
Clinical Skills Lab I
Medical Coding
Machine Transcription (Med)
Records & Database Mgmt
Human Anatomy &
Physiology/Lab
Semester Total
1
2
1
3
3
3
3
16
2
3
3
3
4
15
ALHL 110
ALHL 120
ALHL 101
BUSN 122
MATH 111
MEDC 110
MEDC 215
Second Semester
Pharmacology
OSHA for Allied Health
Phlebotomy & Lab
Customer Service
Math for Health Care
Medical Law and Ethics
Human Pathophysiology
Semester Total
Fourth Semester
ALHL 210 Clinical Skills Lab II
ATEC 230 Office Procedures
ALHL 203 EKG/ECG Technician
ALHL 215 Seminar II
ALHL 225 Internship (160 hours)
3
1
3
1
3
1
2
14
1
3
3
3
3
BUSN 120 Interviewing
PSYC 201 Life-Span Development
Semester Total
15
Medical Assistant
GNST 102
ALHL 105
ALHL 115
ATEC 115
ATEC 120
ENGL 101
MEDC 150
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
Associate in Science
Certificate in Applied Science
MEDICAL CODING
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
Two-semester certificate program is designed to prepare students for employment as medical
insurance specialists and/or medical coders in physician offices, hospital billing offices, outpatient
departments, and insurance companies. This program will enable the student to develop expertise in
ICD-9-CM and CPT/HCPCS medical coding and medical office billing procedures. The program will be
applying for AHIMA accreditation and will prepare the student to sit for the AHIMA Certified Coding
Specialist(CCSВ®) Certification.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
Upon completion of the program, graduates will:
п‚·
Apply ICD-9-CM and CPT/HCPCS principles and guidelines
п‚·
Use medical office billing guidelines and procedures
п‚·
Utilize medical terminology as well as knowledge of human anatomy and physiology, basic
pharmacology, and pathophysiology of the human body to assign medical codes
п‚·
Interpret medical records for completeness, accuracy, and compliance with regulations
п‚·
Earn AHIMA CCSВ® certification
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
The success of the Medical Coding program will be measured by the following criteria:
Course outcomes are assessed by exit exams in each course. Program outcomes are assessed in the
directed practicum. Learner outcomes are assessed by the national certification examination.
General education outcomes are assessed by ACT WorkKeys and a porfolio.
OTHER INFORMATION
п‚·
п‚·
Link to Background Check and Immunizations
Link to Tuition and Fees Statement
CAREERS
Medical coding specialists are in demand. The US Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates a shortage of
more than 50,000 qualified HIM and HIT workers by 2015. According to the US Department of Labor,
job growth for medical records and health information technicians is expected to increase by 21%
between 2010 and 2020, which is considered faster than average for all occupations. This increase is
partly due to the aging of our population—Americans will be using more and more healthcare services
in coming decades. New regulations that demand more accountability from healthcare providers are
also creating jobs for qualified medical coding specialists.
GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT INFORMATION
The Medical Coding program prepares graduates for employment as:
29-2071.00* - Medical Records and Health Information Technicians, Coder, Health Information
Specialist, Health Information Technician, Medical Records Analyst, Medical Records Clerk, Medical
Records Coordinator, Medical Records Director, Medical Records Technician, Registered Health
Information Technician
11-9111.00* - Medical and Health Services Managers, Office Manager, Medical Records Manager,
Practice Administrator
232
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
Medical Coding
*www.onetonline.org
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
233
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
MEDICAL CODING, CAS
CERTIFICATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
First Semester
Human Anatomy
English Composition
Medical Terminology
Medical Insurance & Billing
Practices
MEDC 201 ICD-10-CM Diagnostic Medical
Coding
MEDC 215 Human Pathophysiology
Semester Total
BIOL 220
ENGL 101
MEDC 101
MEDC 150
4
3
1
3
3
2
16
ALHL 110
BUSN 112
MEDC 205
MEDC 240
MEDC 250
MEDC 260
Second Semester
Pharmacology
Business Mathematics
CPT/HCPCS Medical Coding
Advanced Coding Concepts
Directed Practicum (160 hrs)
Preparation for CCSВ® Exam
Semester Total
3
3
3
3
1
1
14
*Denotes courses that are offered on the South Charleston, WV campus only.
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BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES TECHNOLOGY
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
Upon successful completion of this program, graduates will demonstrate competency in performing
test methodologies and clinical laboratory tasks expected of an entry level MLT/CLT. Students will
complete a 16-week rotation in all areas of the laboratory in a hospital setting, applying cognitive
learning to hands-on situations.
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
This mlt program prepares the student to sit for a national certification exam, and upon successful
completion of this exam, enables the mlt graduates to be licensed in the state of wv.
TRANSFER BACCALAUREATE OPTIONS:
MLT’s can go on to baccalaureate institutions
to earn their bachelor’s degree in medical technology and continue on to work as a medical
technologist, usually as a laboratory supervisor.
OTHER INFORMATION:
See program admission requirements in front of catalog add link to admissions page.
CAREERS:
Employment opportunities would include (but are not limited to) the following: hospitals, clinics,
reference laboratories, public health laboratories, infection control, pharmaceutical companies,
industry, businesses (particularly lab equipment companies).
Programs of Study – BTEC
Medical laboratory Technicians (MLT’s) perform a variety of complex biological and chemical analyses
on patient specimens both manually and with sophisticated laboratory equipment. These analyses
assist the physician in the prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of disease.
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
MEDICAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
BIOL 220
ENGL 101
MATH 130
CHEM 101
CHEM 102
MLAB 100
MLAB 204
First Semester
Human Anatomy
English Composition I
College Algebra
General Chemistry
General Chemistry Lab
Semester Total
4
3
3
3
1
14
Summer Semester
Introduction to Laboratory Science
and Phlebotomy (GEC4)
Clinical Urinalysis and Body Fluids
with Lab
Elective
ATEC 115
BIOL 221
BIOL 230
BIOL 231
Second Semester
Social Science Elective (GEC3)
Fundamentals of Business
Computer Applications
Human Physiology
Microbiology
Microbiology Lab
Semester Total
3
3
4
3
1
14
2
1
Semester Total 3
MLAB 200
MLAB 201
MLAB 202
MLAB 203
Third Semester
Clinical Hematology (GEC4)
Clinical Biochemistry (GEC4)
Clinical Immunohematology
(GEC4)
Clinical Microbiology (GEC4)
Semester Total
4
4
4
MLAB 205
MLAB 206
Fourth Semester
MLT Seminar
1
MLT Clinical Practicum(GEC4)
12
Semester Total 13
4
16
NUCLEAR MEDICINE TECHNOLOGY
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
The Nuclear Medicine Technology Program prepares the students for an entry-level position as a
Nuclear Medicine Technologist as well as understanding the daily operations of a hospital, clinic, and
Nuclear Pharmacy. This program is designed to provide specialized clinical and didactic training in
Nuclear Medicine theory and practice with emphasis on Radiobiology and Radiation Protection,
Nuclear Medicine Instrumentation, Radiation Physics for Medical Imaging,
Radiopharmacy/Radiochemistry, and Nuclear Medicine Procedures.
BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
Upon completion of the program, graduates will:
•
Be prepared to obtain appropriate entry level employment in the field of Nuclear Medicine
Technology.
•
Have the necessary skills and knowledge for successful passage of the Nuclear Medicine
Technology Certification Board Exam or the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists,
Nuclear Medicine Exam.
•
Be prepared to perform patient-care tasks, prepare and administer radiopharmaceuticals,
conduct quality control procedures, perform imaging and non-imaging procedures, apply
radiation physics and safety regulations to limit radiation exposure and be familiar with PET and
PET/CT imaging.
•
Effectively use human relationship skills to work in a diverse society.
•
Effectively use their skills and knowledge learned in the clinical and didactic portion of the
program to positively impact the patient, employer, and community.
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
CAREERS
The Nuclear Medicine Program prepares graduates for employment in a wide range of clinical
settings, such as community hospitals, university hospitals, outpatient diagnostic imaging centers, and
research centers as an entry-level Nuclear Medicine Technologist working in a:
п‚·
PET/CT Department
п‚·
Radiopharmacy
CAREER PATHS
•
Staff Technologists
•
Departmental Supervisors
•
Sales representatives
•
Technical/Development Specialists
•
Program Educators.
The Nuclear Medicine Technology program is a limited enrollment, selective admission program.
Students must complete the first two semesters of general education requirements to be considered
for acceptance into the program. Criteria for acceptance and admission information may be found in
the Admission section of the catalog
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
237
AccountingCAS in Accounting
Program outcomes are assessed by capstone courses, employee surveys, employer surveys and
program specific exit exams, which may include the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certified Board
(NMTCB) and/or The American Registry of Radiologic Technologists in Nuclear Medicine (ARRT-N).
The general education outcomes are assessed by a general education portfolio.
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
NUCLEAR MEDICINE TECHNOLOGY
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
ENGL 101
MATH 130
BIOL 220
PHYS 100
HUMN 101
First Semester
English Composition I
College Algebra
Human Anatomy and Lab
Introductory Physics
Intro to Humanities
Semester Total
Third Semester
NUCM 202 Nuclear Medicine Practicum
NUCM 203 Nuclear Medicine Procedures I
NUCM 204 Radiation Physics for Medical
Imaging
NUCM 205 Radiobiology/Radiation Protection
Semester Total
3
3
4
3
3
16
6
3
3
2
14
ENGL 202
CHEM 101
CHEM 102
BIOL 221
PSYC 201
NUCM 200
Second Semester
Business and Professional Writing
General Chemistry
Chemistry Lab
Human Physiology and Lab
Life Span Development
Intro to Nuclear Medicine
Semester Total
Fourth Semester
NUCM 206 Nuclear Medicine Practicum
NUCM 207 Nuclear Medicine Procedures II
NUCM 208 Nuclear Medicine
Instrumentation
NUCM 209 Radiopharmacy/Radiochemistry
Semester Total
3
3
1
4
3
3
17
6
3
3
2
14
Fifth Semester
NUCM 201 Nuclear Medicine Practicum
3
Semester Total 3
Contact Information:
Alicia Tucker, RBA, CNMT
Program Director
[email protected]
Office 131D, (304)205-6681
238
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
Associate In Science
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
NURSING
ACCREDITED BY THE WEST VIRGINIA BOARD OF EXAMINERS FOR REGISTERED PROFESSIONAL NURSES
AND THE ACCREDITATION COMMISSION FOR EDUCATION IN NURSING, INC.
The Associate Degree Nursing program is a two-year program whose graduates meet the academic
requirement to apply to take the NCLEX-RN licensing examination upon
graduation. Other requirements for licensure are specified by the West Virginia Board of Examiners for
Registered Professional Nurses. A combination of general education,
related cognates and courses from the professional major provide students with the opportunity to
acquire the knowledge and skills needed to practice in a variety of direct client care settings as well as
providing the educational foundation for further study in nursing.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Collaborate with the patient or designee to plan and provide nursing care that respects the
patient’s individual needs and values.
Generate safe and effective patient-centered care using the nursing process.
Incorporate effective communication strategies to reduce risk and injuries in the healthcare
environment.
Create caring relationships with patients and support systems consistent with the ANA Standards
of Nursing Practice and Code of Ethics.
Evaluate the utilization of healthcare system resources to efficiently and effectively manage care.
Integrate current best practices to plan and implement safe and effective patient care.
PROGRAM ASSESMENT
Program evaluation demonstrates that students and graduates have achieved the student learning
outcomes, program outcomes, and role-specific competencies. To ensure accreditation standards are
met, the program has a Systematic Plan of Program Evaluation in place that is shared with
communities of interest. Specifically, the SPPE evaluates performance on the licensure (NCLEX) exam,
program completion, graduate program satisfaction, employer program satisfaction, and job
placement rates.
TRANSFER BACCALAUREATE OPTIONS
п‚·
п‚·
Marshall University RN-BSN
Fairmont State University RN-BSN
OTHER INFORMATION
(links to admission requirements, specified vaccinations, safety requirements, etc.)
A separate application is required for admission to the program. Information regarding
the application process can be found on bvctc’s website at ------. Students must meet
eligibility requirments including drugscreening, background check, and technical standards.
All science courses (BIOL 220, BIOL 221, BIOL 230 or BIOL 240) must be taken within five
years of admission. Once admitted into the nursing program, students have three
academic years for completion.
Programs of Study – BTEC
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
CAREERS
Demand for Registered Nurses continues to dramatically increase both locally and nationally. Nurses
are one of the most important components of the American health care system, playing an essential
role in health care delivery in diverse settings in hospitals, out-patient and long-term care facilities,
homes and workplaces, pharmaceutical and insurance companies.
BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
NURSING
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
NURS 134
ENGL 101
NURS 234
BIOL 230
BIOL 245
First Semester
Introduction to Psychology
Anatomy
Drug and Dosage Calculations I
Health Assessment and
Diagnostics I
Introduction to Nursing Concepts I
Semester Total
Third Semester
Composition I
Nursing Concepts of Health and
Illness II
Microbiology OR
Nutrition & Diet Therapy
Semester Total
3
4
1
2
BIOL 221
NURS 142
NURS 143
NURS 144
8
18
3
9
3
3
15
CONTACT INFORMATION:
Mr. B. Kent Wilson, MSN, RN, CLNC,
Program Chair
[email protected] –Office
110H- 304.205.6689
Second Semester
Physiology
Drug and Dosage Calculations II
Health Assessment and
Diagnostics II
Nursing Concepts of Health and
Illness I
Semester Total
4
1
1
9
15
Fourth Semester
NURS 244 Synthesis of Nursing Concepts
9
NURS 245 Professional Nursing and
3
Health Systems Concepts
Semester Total 12
Programs of Study – BTEC
PSYC 101
BIOL 220
NURS 132
NURS 133
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
Associate In Science
Associate in Applied Science
NURSING (LPN-RN BRIDGE)
ACCREDITED BY THE WEST VIRGINIA BOARD OF EXAMINERS FOR REGISTERED PROFESSIONAL NURSES
AND THE ACCREDITATION COMMISSION FOR EDUCATION IN NURSING, INC.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
The LPN to RN Program is a three semester program whose graduates meet the academic requirement
to apply to take the NCLEX-RN licensing examination upon graduation.
Other requirements for licensure are specified by the West Virginia Board of Examiners for Registered
Professional Nurses. A combination of general education, related cognates and courses from the
professional major provide students with the opportunity to acquire the knowledge and skills needed
to practice in a variety of direct client care settings as well as providing the educational foundation for
further study in nursing.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Synthesize knowledge from nursing and the physical, biological and behavioral sciences to
provide therapeutic nursing interventions for a client at any stage of the life span.
Effectively communicate, in collaboration with health care team members, to coordinate,
manage and promote client care in a variety of acute care and community settings.
Employ appropriate clinical decision making, based on critical thinking and reflection, in
implementing sound evidence-based clinical nursing judgments.
Practice professional and personal accountability and responsibility in the competent and
compassionate practice of nursing.
Maintain the legal, ethical and professional standards of nursing practice in providing
individualized, culturally-competent client care.
Implement teaching and learning processes, in collaboration with the client, significant support
persons and other members of the health care team, to maintain health, reduce risks and
promote self-care.
Manage care through the efficient and effective use of human, physical, financial and technical
resources to meet client needs and support organizational outcomes.
Demonstrate professionalism through identification of self-learning needs and participation in
ongoing professional development.
PROGRAM ASSESMENT
Program evaluation demonstrates that students and graduates have achieved the student learning
outcomes, program outcomes, and role-specific competencies. To ensure accreditation standards are
met, the program has a Systematic Plan of Program Evaluation in place that is shared with
communities of interest. Specifically, the SPPE evaluates performance on the licensure (NCLEX) exam,
program completion, graduate program satisfaction, employer program satisfaction, and job
placement rates.
TRANSFER BACCALAUREATE OPTIONS
п‚·
п‚·
Marshall University RN-BSN
Fairmont State University RN-BSN
OTHER INFORMATION
(Links to admission requirements, specified vaccinations, safety requirements, etc.)
A separate application is required for admission to the program. Information regarding the
application process can be found on bvctc’s website at ------. Students must meet eligibility
requirments including having an unencumbered nursing license, drugscreening, background check,
and technical standards.
BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
All science courses (BIOL 220, BIOL 221, BIOL 230, BIOL 240 and CHEM 105) must be taken within five
years of admission. Once admitted into the nursing program, students have 5 semesters for
completion.
Demand for Registered Nurses continues to dramatically increase both locally and nationally. Nurses
are one of the most important components of the American health care system, playing an essential
role in health care delivery in diverse settings in hospitals, out-patient and long-term care facilities,
homes and workplaces, pharmaceutical and insurance companies.
Programs of Study – BTEC
CAREERS
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
NURSING LPN BRIDGE
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
First Semester
ENGL 101 English Composition I
3
BIOL 220 Anatomy
4
MATH 113 Mathematical Reasoning
3
CSCT 106 Intro to Computers & Office Apps 3
BIOL 220
Semester Total 13
PSYC 201
BIOL 230
BIOL 245
NURS 217
NURS 218
NURS 219
Third Semester
LifeSpan Development
Microbiology
Nutrition & Diet
Maternity Nursing Care
Pediatric Nursing Care 3
Nursing Care in Health & Illness III
3
Semester Total
Second Semester
NURS 108 Role Transition to Professional Nurse 1
NURS 109 Advanced Health Assessment
2
NURS 114 Nursing Care in Health & Illness I
3
NURS 115 Nursing Care in Health & Illness II
3
NURS 116 Nursing Care in Mental Health 3
NURS 125 Pharmacology for Nursing
3
BIOL 221 Physiology
4
CHEM 105 Intro to Chemistry for AH
1
Semester Total 20
3
3
3
3
ENGL 102
NURS 221
NURS 222
NURS 223
NURS 224
Fourth Semester
English Composition II
3
Nursing Care in Adult IV
5
Management of Nursing Care 3
Preceptorship in Nursing Care 4
Professional Nursing Seminar 1
Semester Total 16
18
*Clinical courses meet sequentially for five-week sessions
CONTACT INFORMATION:
Mr. B Kent Wilson, MSN, RN, CLNC, Program Director
[email protected] –Office 110H- 304.205.6689
BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
Associate in Applied Science
PARALEGAL STUDIES
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
The expanding role of the paralegal in the delivery of legal services has created increased
opportunities with private law firms, corporate legal departments, insurance companies, real estate
and title firms, banks, and government agencies. Graduates are prepared for careers in business,
industry or non-profit corporations that interface with the legal system.
Paralegals organize and manage work flow in law office settings, draft legal documents, research and
draft legal memoranda, and file documents with the appropriate court. They conduct background
checks, interview clients, and pursue factual investigations for employers. Paralegals may prepare
witnesses for depositions, develop materials for trial, organize client files, and assist with title
searches. Paralegals may serve as employer liaisons to business, the police, other attor neys,
government officials and the courts. Paralegals cannot accept a case, set fees, give legal advice or
represent a client in court.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
Students take the Paralegal Core Competency Exam (PCCE) prior to graduating. The PCCE serves as
one assessment tool for the Paralegal Studies program and also allows students, upon successful
passage, to become Registered Paralegals through the National Federation of Paralegal Associations.
Other methods of assessment include exams, homework assignments, surveys, class presentations,
and various assigned projects.
TRANSFER BACCALAUREATE OPTIONS
Once a student completes all of the requirements for a Paralegal Studies degree, she may transfer
into the University of Charleston’s Bachelor’s Degree in Political Science program through a 2+2
agreement that the Paralegal Studies program has with the University of Charleston’s Political Science
department.
OTHER INFORMATION
(LINKS TO ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS, SPECIFIED VACCINATIONS, SAFETY
REQUIREMENTS, ETC.)
The Paralegal Studies program
•
has a challenging curriculum
•
requires that students possess or develop excellent written and oral communication skills,
analytical ability, and a high level of motivation
•
utilizes Westlaw
•
utilizes PACER
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
245
Paralegal Studies
Through participating in this program, students will learn:
1.
How to conduct legal research
2.
How to prepare legal documents
3.
How to apply critical thinking skills to legal issues
4.
How to communicate clearly and effectively
5.
Information about various substantive areas of the law
Programs of Study
•
•
•
•
BridgeValley CTC
incorporates the expectations of employers into a curriculum that teaches practical jobrelated paralegal skills in conjunction with underlying theory
provides an internship opportunity
allows students to become Registered Paralegals upon their successful completion of the
PCCE Exam
features faculty that consists of legal professionals
The program does not have admission requirements that differ from BridgeValley’s admission
requirements.
CAREERS
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
246
Paralegal for Private Sector Attorneys
Paralegal for Public Sector Attorneys
Paralegal for a Court system
Arbitrator
Bar Association Administrative Assistant
Billing Professional
Conflicts Analyst or Specialist
Contracts Administrator
Court Clerk
Court Interpreter (with additional training in the applicable language)
Designer Designer / Developer of Trial Visual Aids
Editor for a legal or business publisher
Equal Employment Opportunity Specialist
Evidence technician
Grant Writer
Insurance Claims Adjuster and Investigator
Investigator
Judicial Assistant
Jury Consultant
Law Librarian
Legal analyst
Legal Compliance and Enforcement Inspector
Legal computer software representative
Legislative Analyst
Loan Closing Coordinator
Loan Interviewer and Clerk
Mediator
Mortgage Processor
Municipal Clerk
Occupational Health and Safety Specialist and Technician
Parole Officer
Patent Database Administrator
Probation Officer
Property Manager
Technical Writer
Title Examiner, abstractor, and researcher
Title Insurance Administrative Assistant
Trial Court coordinator
Victim or Witness Advocate for Domestic Violence office, County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office, or US
Attorney’s Office
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
PARALEGAL STUDIES
BUSN 201
PRLS 100
PRLS 101
ATEC 115
ENGL 101
GNST 102
PRLS 204
PRLS 205
MATH 113
COMM 100
BIOL 101
MTGY 100
CHEM 100
*
First Semester (Fall)
Business Law 1
Introduction to the Paralegal
Profession
Civil Litigation 1
Fundamentals of Business
Computer Technologies
English Composition 1
First Year Experience
Semester Total
Third Semester (Fall)
Civil Litigation 2
Legal Research and Writing 1
Mathematical Reasoning
Oral Communications
General Biology
3
2
3
3
PRLS 200
PRLS 201
PRLS 202
PRLS 203
ENGL 102
Second Semester (Spring)
Civil Law 1
Evidence and Litigation
Property Law
Criminal Litigation
English Composition II
Semester Total
3
3
3
4
3
16
PRLS 206
PRLS 296
PRLS 297
PRLS 298
ACCT 185
ECON 202
ENGL 107
Fourth Semester (Spring)
Legal Research and Writing 2
PCCE Review Course
Paralegal Studies Internship
Paralegal Studies Seminar
Survey of Accounting
Principles of Macroeconomics
English Grammar Review
Semester Total
3
1
2
1
3
3
1
14
3
1
15
3
3
3
3
3
OR
Weather and Climate
3
OR
Consumer Chemistry
3
Semester Total 15
Denotes courses only offered on the South Charleston, WV campus.
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
247
Paralegal Studies
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
CERTIFICATE in Applied science
PRE-ENGINEERING
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
The Pre-Engineering Certificate program will prepare graduates to be successful in applying to an
engineering degree program at another institution. Program is designed for students who are
interested in pursuing a four-year degree in engineering but are not academically prepared to directly
enter the program or would like to complete general education course needed for engineering
disciplines.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
The Pre-Engineering Certificate program has an educational objective to prepare students to meet
admission requirements and to successfully complete an engineering degree program at an institution
of their choice.
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
Upon completion of this certificate program graduates will:
п‚·
be able to communicate articulately in speech, writing, and visual presentation
п‚·
be able to use standard methods of mathematical analysis including algebra and trigonometry in
solving problems
п‚·
be able to use general concepts, theories, and principles of sciences in practical applications
п‚·
be able to use computer technology to organize, access, and communicate information
п‚·
be able to use mathematical, problem-solving, and college success skills in future engineering
courses
п‚·
be prepared to continue a baccalaureate degree in engineering or a related technical program
TRANSFER BACCALAUREATE OPTIONS
Upon completing Pre-Engineering Certificate program at BVCTC students will be able to transfer to
baccalaureate programs in several engineering fields, including chemical, civil, computer, electrical,
industrial, and mechanical.
OTHER INFORMATION
(LINKS TO ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS, SPECIFIED VACCINATIONS, SAFETY
REQUIREMENTS, ETC.)
CAREERS
This program will also prepare a student who chooses not to enroll in an engineering or technical
program to enter the workforce in an engineering or architecture company, a company providing
technical services or a manufacturing operations company in an entry level trainee position. The
certificate will provide the basic skills needed by employers. The Pre-Engineering Certificate
curriculum includes technical elective courses such as computer science, programming, computer
aided drafting and design, microcontrollers, programmable logic controllers, global positioning
system, and geographic information system. Technical elective courses together with the general
education core courses prepare students for employment in various technical fields as well as for
continuation of their education in engineering.
248
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
PRE-ENGINEERING
CERTIFICATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
GNST 102
ENGL 101
MATH 130
DRFT 120
CSCT 104
First Semester
First Year Experience
English Composition I
College Algebra
Drafting I
Technical Applications of
Spreadsheets and Databases
Social Science Elective
Semester Total
1
3
3
2
3
ENGL 102
ENGL 104
MATH 140
CSCT
Second Semester
English Composition II OR
Technical Writing
Plane Trigonometry
Critical and Creative Thinking
Natural Science Electives
Semester Total
3
3
3
6
15
3
15
ELECTIVES-Natural Science (select two courses) PHYS-100, PHYS-101, MTGY-100, CHEM-101, CHEM102, CSCT-101, CSCT-266, CSCT-219 OR GNET-161, GNET-162, DRFT-289, CIET-114, CIET-115, DRFT121, DRFT-201, DRFT-202, ECET-110, ECET-115
Respiratory Therapy
ELECTIVES-Social Science (select one courses) HUMN-101 (or ARTS 110, ARTS 120), COMM-100, HIST101, HIST-102, ECON-201, ECON-202, PSYC-101, SOCI-101
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
249
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
Associate I Science
Certificate
PROCESS TECHNOLOGY
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
This certificate prepares students to be employed as operators in the process industry where an AAS
degree is not required by the employer.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
Upon completion of this program, graduates will be able to:
п‚·
Prepare, measure and feed raw material and processing agents into plant equipment.
п‚·
Draw samples of products for lab analysis.
п‚·
Use standard test equipment, materials and procedures to perform chemical tests.
п‚·
Monitor gauges, signals and recording instruments.
п‚·
Turn valves and move controls to regulate temperatures, pressures, levels and flows
through a process system to affect prescribed response within critical limits
п‚·
Demonstrate knowledge of equipment and process operations.
п‚·
Maintain log of gauge readings and shift production information.
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
An exam is given in each course
TRANSFER BACCALAUREATE OPTIONS
None
OTHER INFORMATION
(LINKS TO ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS, SPECIFIED VACCINATIONS, SAFETY
REQUIREMENTS, ETC.)
A chemical process operator works in the safe production, refining and transfer of various chemicals
in three states of matter - solid, liquid and gas. Production is carried out in reactors and converters.
Refining is done in distillation columns, filter presses, separators and other types of equipment.
Chemicals are transferred through pipelines to shipping containers or storage tanks. In operating
equipment, the operator must observe, interpret and record data from gauges, instruments,
computer displays, log books and laboratory analysis data. The operator will need to make changes in
pressure, flow, temperature, level and other parameters by operating control devices including
valves, switches and levers. Operators may also be required to operate moving equipment such as
aerial work platforms, forklifts and track mobiles. Minor maintenance activities requiring the use of
hand tools is done frequently by operators. The operators must be able to solve simple math
problems and be able to run lab tests to assure quality products are being made. An operator must
have good written and verbal communication skills. Being able to recognize unusual conditions and
troubleshoot problems are essential traits for a chemical process operator.
CAREERS
Graduates may find employment as Chemical Equipment Operators and Tenders:
250
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
Process Technology CAS
51-9011 Chemical Equipment Operators and Tenders, www.onetonline.org/link/summary/51-9011.00
Tuition and Fees*: $4050 In-State Resident, $10950 Non-Resident, Books: $1000.00
Graduation Rate: n/a
Job Placement Rate: 72% (college average)
Median Loan Debt: $0
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
251
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
PROCESS TECHNOLOGY
CERTIFICATE
PTEC 101
PTEC 202
PTEC 103
ENGL 101
252
First Semester
Intro to Process Technology
Safety, Health & Environment
Process Technology I (Equipment)
English Composition I
Semester Total
4
3
4
3
14
Second Semester
Quality
Process Technology II (Systems)
Process Technology III
(Operations)
PWPT 202 Instrumentation and Control
MATH 115 Applied Technical Math
Semester Total
PTEC 206
PTEC 203
PTEC 205
3
3
4
3
3
16
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
Associate In Science
Associate in Applied Science
PROCESS TECHNOLOGY
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
Process Technology prepares students to be employed as operators
In the process industry.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
Upon completion of this program, graduates will be able to:
п‚·
Prepare, measure and feed raw material and processing agents into plant equipment.
п‚·
Draw samples of products for lab analysis.
п‚·
Use standard test equipment, materials and procedures to perform chemical tests.
п‚·
Monitor gauges, signals and recording instruments;
п‚·
Turn valves and move controls to regulate temperatures, pressures, levels and flows
through a process system to affect prescribed response within critical limits
п‚·
Demonstrate knowledge of equipment and process operations.
п‚·
Maintain log of gauge readings and shift production information.
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
A comprehensive exam is given in the PTEC Capstone course
None
OTHER INFORMATION
(LINKS TO ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS, SPECIFIED VACCINATIONS, SAFETY
REQUIREMENTS, ETC.)
A chemical process operator works in the safe production, refining and transfer of various chemicals
in three states of matter - solid, liquid and gas. Production is carried out in reactors and converters.
Refining is done in distillation columns, filter presses, separators and other types of equipment.
Chemicals are transferred through pipelines to shipping containers or storage tanks. In operating
equipment, the operator must observe, interpret and record data from gauges, instruments,
computer displays, log books and laboratory analysis data. The operator will need to make changes in
pressure, flow, temperature, level and other parameters by operating control devices including
valves, switches and levers. Operators may also be required to operate moving equipment such as
aerial work platforms, forklifts and track mobiles. Minor maintenance activities requiring the use of
hand tools is done frequently by operators. The operators must be able to solve simple math
problems and be able to run lab tests to assure quality products are being made. An operator must
have good written and verbal communication skills. Being able to recognize unusual conditions and
troubleshoot problems are essential traits for a chemical process operator.
CAREERS
Most graduates enter the chemical processing industry. However, many industries will accept a twoyear Technology degree as the minimum qualifications.
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
253
Respiratory Therapy
TRANSFER BACCALAUREATE OPTIONS
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
PROCESS TECHNOLOGY
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
PTEC 101
PTEC 202
PTEC 103
GNST 102
GNST 103
GNST 104
AMTM 113
CHEM 101
ENGL 101
COMM 100
HUMN 101
CSCT 104
254
First Semester
Intro to Process Technology
Safety, Health, and Environment
Process Technology I (Equipment)
First Year Experience AND
Classroom Success Strategies
AND
Professional Development
Semester Total
Third Semester
Industrial Mechanics
General Chemistry
English Composition I
Oral Communications OR
Introduction to Humanities
Technical Applications of
Microsoft Office
Semester Total
4
3
4
1
1
1
14
3
3
3
3
3
15
Second Semester
PTEC 206 Quality
3
PWPT 202 Instrumentation & Control
3
MATH 115 Applied Technical Math
3
PTEC 203 Process Technology II (Systems)
3
PTEC 205 Process Technology III
(Operations) OR
PTEC 207 Internship
4
Semester Total 16
Fourth Semester
Technical Writing OR
Business Communication and
Ethics
PHYS 100 Introductory Physics
Elective
Social Science Elective
PTEC 201 Water and Wastewater Treatment
PTEC 250 PTEC Capstone
Semester Total
ENGL 120
ATEC 240
3
3
3
3
3
15
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
Associate In Science
Associate In Applied Science
RESPIRATORY THERAPY
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
The respiratory therapy program is a cooperative program between BridgeValley Community and
Technical College and Carver Career and Technical Education Center in Malden, West Virginia.
Respiratory therapy is a selective admission, limited enrollment program which admits one class per
year. Sucessful candidates are selected by an admissions committee. Students wishing to enter this
program must complete an application packet available in the Admissions Office by February 28 of
each year. The admissions committee will consider applications during two selection periods. The
application deadline for priority selections is February 28 of each year. If seats are still available in the
program following priority application reviews, secondary applications will be considered. The
application deadline to be considered for the secondary selection period will be April 30 of each year.
Financial aid for this program is awarded through Carver Career and Technical Center only.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
Completion of the program leads to an associate of science degree in Respiratory Therapy and
eligibility for the Certified Respiratory Therapist (CRT) and Registered Respiratory Therapist (RRT)
examinations.
PROGRAM ASSESMENT
The program is nationally acredited by the Committee on Accreditation for Respiratory Care (CoARC).
TRANSFER BACCALAUREATE OPTIONS
Health Services administration BS
Regents BA
BA Pathways
OTHER INFORMATION
Admission requirements include the following:
•
Graduation with a high school diploma with a 2.0 GPA OR GED scores of 500 on each subtest.
•
ACT composite score of 20 (or SAT composite of 950) or better. ACT scores: English 18,
math 19, reading 17 OR SAT scores: English 450, math 460, reading 420 OR Accuplacer
scores of: English 88, arithmetic math 85, reading 79
•
One high school or college chemistry course with a “C” or better. The chemistry course
does not require a laboratory component. If the student has high school courses only
another high school science laboratory course with a “C” or better is required for
admission.
•
A one-page, handwritten essay detailing reason for wanting to be a Respiratory Therapist
•
Two letters of reference
Or
Programs of Study
п‚·
•
•
•
•
•
•
BridgeValley CTC
Students whose ACT/SAT scores do not meet the above outlined criteria may be considered
for admission to the Respiratory Therapy program by successfully completing:
Graduation with a high school diploma with a 2.0 GPA OR GED scores of 500 on each subtest.
Twelve hours of college work at an accredited institution of higher learning within the past
five years with a minimum overall GPA of 2.0. (Collegiate courses cannot include
developmental courses.)
If math or English scores are below acceptable levels, students must pass the appropriate
math course with a grade of C or higher, as well as developmental English and/or reading.
One high school or college chemistry course with a “C” or better. The chemistry course
does not require a laboratory component. If the student has high school courses only
another high school science laboratory course with a “C” or better is required for
admission.
A one-page, handwritten essay detailing reason for wanting to be a Respiratory Therapist
Two letters of reference
CAREERS
Respiratory Therapist in hospitals, asthma and allergy clinics, sleep disorders centers, skilled nursing
facilities, asthma education, doctors’ offices, various clinics and research settings.
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
RESPRIATORY THERAPY
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
First Semester
BIOL 210
ENGL 101
MATH 111
RESP 101
RESP 107
RESP 111
Human Anatomy & Physiology
4
English Composition I
3
Math for Health Care
3
Clinical Rotation I
0
CP Pharmacology
3
Respiratory Skills I
4
Semester Total 17
Second Semester
ATEC 115
BIOL 230
BIOL 231
ENGL 202
RESP 102
RESP 112
RESP 115
Fund Business Comp Appl
3
Microbiology
3
Microbiology Lab (wet)
1
Business & Professional Writing 3
Clinical Rotation II
0
Respiratory Skills II
3
Pathology
3
Semester Total 16
Summer Semester
RESP 105
Summer Semester
RESP 103
RESP 220
Patient Assessment
4
Semester Total 4
Clinical Rotation III
0
Mechanical Ventilation
3
Semester Total 3
Third Semester
PSYC 201
RESP 201
RESP 205
RESP 210
RESP 221
Life Span Development
3
Clinical Rotation IV
0
Neonates/Pediatrics
3
Cardiopulmonary Diagnostics I
3
Mechanical Ventilation II
4
Semester Total 13
Program Total – 66
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
SOCI 130
Diversity in the Workplace
1
Semester Total 13
Fourth Semester
BUSN 120
RESP 202
RESP 207
RESP 209
RESP 211
RESP 215
RESP 217
258
IPR: Interviewing Strategies
Clinical Rotation V
Alternate Health Care
Clinical Simulations
Cardiopulmonary Diagnostics II
Review Seminar
Professional Issues
1
0
2
2
3
2
2
BCTC 2012–2013 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
Associate I
Certificate in Applied Science
SALES
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
The Certificate in Applied Science in Sales can be used in a number of ways. A salesperson with no
formal training could complete the certificate and expect sales skills and income to increase. Any
major who wants to help people (meet needs) and be well paid should consider the Certificate in
Applied Science in Sales.
The 30 credit hours for the degree were selected to improve the understanding of sales with respect
to public relations, advertising and integrated marketing communications. Specific approaches, closes,
trail closes and presentation methods are explained with the opportunity to apply them during the
sales role-plays.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
Demonstrate an understanding and proficiency with the Marketing Mix (the Four Ps) and its
importance to the organization
Make a sales presentation using the ten step sales process.
Be able to develop an integrated advertising campaign using sound advertising principles.
Developed a social media strategy for a brand or company that was appropriately integrated with
overall marketing strategy (i.e. segmentation, targeting, positioning, marketing mix)
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
Program outcomes are assessed by capstone courses, exit interview, employer surveys and program
specific exit exams. General education outcomes are assessed by a general education portfolio.
Sales CAS
CAREERS
The Sales Certifcate program prepares graduates for employment as:
*Sales representatives
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
Sales
Sales Consultant
Sales Agent
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
Outside Sales
Account Executive
Sales Representative
п‚·
Sales Director
*www.onetonline.org
GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT INFORMATION
The Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook Handbook reports that the annual median salary
(May 2012) for Advertising Sales Agents is $46,290 and a -1% job outlook growth rate, 2012-20.
Experience, education and certification all increase earning potential. If students go on to further
their education, Sales Engineers have a reported median salary of $91,830 as of May 2012 and a 9%
growth rate, 2012-2020.
SALARY INFORMATION
http://www.bls.gov/ooh/sales/home.htm
Tuition and Fees*: $4520 In-State Resident-$11420 Non-Resident-Books*: $1300-CB Certification
Exam: $395-Graduation Rate: N/A-Job Placement Rate: 72% (college average)-Median Loan Debt: N/A
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
259
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
*Actual costs may vary.
260
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
SALES
CERTIFICATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
First Semester
English Composition I
Professional Selling
Fundamentals of Business
Computer Applications
MGMT 151 Supervisory Management
MRKT 205 Fundamentals of Marketing
Semester Total
ENGL 101
MRKT 173
ATEC 115
3
3
15
MRKT 175
BUSN 112
BUSN 230
MGMT 238
MRKT 220
Second Semester
Advertising$
3
Business Mathematics
3
Business Communication & Ethics 3
Retail Management
3
Social Media Marketing$
3
Semester Total
15
Denotes courses offered only at the South Charleston, WV campus.
Sales, CAS
$
3
3
3
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
261
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
Associate In Science
Certificate in Applied Science
TECHNICAL STUDIES
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
The Certificate of Applied Science in Technical Studies addresses the identified educational and
training needs of business, industry, labor and governmental agencies through the delivery of
customized programs in a timely and efficient manner.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
The program is designed to allow BVCTC to package courses in a manner that will address short-term
educational and training needs of employers.
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
No specific assessment is made; however, technical courses may required to successfully complete
industry certifications.
TRANSFER BACCALAUREATE OPTIONS
Possible transfer to Board of Regents or Batchelor of Technology.
CAREERS
Individuals currently employed in business and industry are the primary focus of this program. By
providing a program of study designed to enhance and maintain employee knowledge and skills, it is
expected that such individuals will enjoy greater job security and flexibility. For those preparing to
enter the job market, the program of study will include the education and training needed to assure
basic entry-level skills for the specific occupational/technical field. Such programs will typically be
offered only if the need for new employees or the need for expanded education and training of
current employees is demonstrated by the local businesses and industries BVCTC serves.
GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT INFORMATION
Graduates may find employment as:
49-9052 Telecommunications Line Installers and Repairers
www.onetonline.org/link/summary/49-9052.00
15-1041 Computer Support Specialists
www.onetonline.org/link/summary/15-1041.00
49-9042 Maintenance and Repair Workers, General
www.onetonline.org/link/summary/49-9042.00
51-9011 Chemical Equipment Operators and Tenders
www.onetonline.org/link/summary/51-9011.00
51-2022 Electrical and Electronic Equipment Assemblers
www.onetonline.org/link/summary/51-2022.00
Tuition and Fees: $4050 In-State Resident, $10950 Non-Resident
Books: $1100
Graduation Rate: n/a
Job Placement Rate: 72% (college average)
Median Loan Debt: $0
262
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
TECHNICAL STUDIES
CERTIFICATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
Component I-General Education
Communication Skills Appropriate to the Occupational Area
Quantitative Skills
Optional Additional General Education or Technical Courses which directly support the
Technical Knowledge/Skills Taught in the Program
3
3
0-5
Component II – Technical / Occupational Specialty
This component consists of technical specialty courses specific to an occupational area.
Technical courses developed by the college, approved courses included in a business, industry,
labor or agency-based education/ training program, or combinations of credit courses and/or
non-credit training modules evaluated for credit equivalency by an identified college body can be
included in this component. Externally based education and training programs which are
equivalent to college level classroom/lab courses are to be converted to college credit hours at
no less ratio than 15:1 contact to credit hours for lecture, and at a rate consistent the lab contact
hour/credit hour ratio of KVCTC for laboratory credit. Credit equivalencies for noncredit training
modules will be converted at no less ratio than 30:1 contact to credit hours. Credit for externally
based education and training will be awarded upon completion of the college work required in
Component I.
Component III – Supervised Worksite Based Learning or OJT Training
Credit for worksite-based training is optional in the certificate in technical studies program. When
incorporated, such training consists of an internship, practicum, or OJT experience performed in
an occupational setting related to the certificate. The credit value of internships will be
determined by the process and contact to credit hour ratio used in traditional programs. On-thejob training experience will be converted at a ratio of 160:1 contact hour per credit hour, with a
maximum of 960 contact hours allowable. This credit may be recorded immediately prior to
graduation from college.
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
3
3
263
Technical Studies CAS
6 to 11
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
TECHNICAL STUDIES
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
Component I-General Education
Communication Skills Appropriate to the Occupational Area
Quantitative Skills
Optional Additional General Education or Technical Courses which directly support the
Technical Knowledge/Skills Taught in the Program
3
3
0-5
6 to 11
Component II – Technical / Occupational Specialty
This component consists of technical specialty courses specific to an occupational area.
Technical courses developed by the college, approved courses included in a business, industry,
labor or agency-based education/ training program, or combinations of credit courses and/or
non-credit training modules evaluated for credit equivalency by an identified college body can be
included in this component. Externally based education and training programs which are
equivalent to college level classroom/lab courses are to be converted to college credit hours at
no less ratio than 15:1 contact to credit hours for lecture, and at a rate consistent the lab contact
hour/credit hour ratio of KVCTC for laboratory credit. Credit equivalencies for noncredit training
modules will be converted at no less ratio than 30:1 contact to credit hours. Credit for externally
based education and training will be awarded upon completion of the college work required in
Component I.
Component III – Supervised Worksite Based Learning or OJT Training
Credit for worksite-based training is optional in the certificate in technical studies program. When
incorporated, such training consists of an internship, practicum, or OJT experience performed in
an occupational setting related to the certificate. The credit value of internships will be
determined by the process and contact to credit hour ratio used in traditional programs. On-thejob training experience will be converted at a ratio of 160:1 contact hour per credit hour, with a
maximum of 960 contact hours allowable. This credit may be recorded immediately prior to
graduation from college.
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Programs of Study
Associate In Science
Associate in Applied Science
PROCESS TECHNOLOGY
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
Process Technology prepares students to be employed as operators
In the process industry.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
Upon completion of this program, graduates will be able to:
п‚·
Prepare, measure and feed raw material and processing agents into plant equipment.
п‚·
Draw samples of products for lab analysis.
п‚·
Use standard test equipment, materials and procedures to perform chemical tests.
п‚·
Monitor gauges, signals and recording instruments;
п‚·
Turn valves and move controls to regulate temperatures, pressures, levels and flows
through a process system to affect prescribed response within critical limits
п‚·
Demonstrate knowledge of equipment and process operations.
п‚·
Maintain log of gauge readings and shift production information.
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
Respiratory Therapy
A comprehensive exam is given in the PTEC Capstone course
TRANSFER BACCALAUREATE OPTIONS
None
OTHER INFORMATION
(LINKS TO ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS, SPECIFIED VACCINATIONS, SAFETY
REQUIREMENTS, ETC.)
A chemical process operator works in the safe production, refining and transfer of various chemicals
in three states of matter - solid, liquid and gas. Production is carried out in reactors and converters.
Refining is done in distillation columns, filter presses, separators and other types of equipment.
Chemicals are transferred through pipelines to shipping containers or storage tanks. In operating
equipment, the operator must observe, interpret and record data from gauges, instruments,
computer displays, log books and laboratory analysis data. The operator will need to make changes in
pressure, flow, temperature, level and other parameters by operating control devices including
valves, switches and levers. Operators may also be required to operate moving equipment such as
aerial work platforms, forklifts and track mobiles. Minor maintenance activities requiring the use of
hand tools is done frequently by operators. The operators must be able to solve simple math
problems and be able to run lab tests to assure quality products are being made. An operator must
have good written and verbal communication skills. Being able to recognize unusual conditions and
troubleshoot problems are essential traits for a chemical process operator.
CAREERS
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Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
Most graduates enter the chemical processing industry. However, many industries will accept a twoyear Technology degree as the minimum qualifications.
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Programs of Study
PROCESS TECHNOLOGY
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
GNST 104
AMTM 113
CHEM 101
ENGL 101
COMM 100
HUMN 101
CSCT 104
First Semester
Intro to Process Technology
Safety, Health, and Environment
Process Technology I (Equipment)
First Year Experience AND
Classroom Success Strategies
AND
Professional Development
Semester Total
Third Semester
Industrial Mechanics
General Chemistry
English Composition I
Oral Communications OR
Introduction to Humanities
Technical Applications of
Microsoft Office
Semester Total
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
4
3
4
1
1
1
14
3
3
3
3
3
15
Second Semester
PTEC 206 Quality
3
PWPT 202 Instrumentation & Control
3
MATH 115 Applied Technical Math
3
PTEC 203 Process Technology II (Systems)
3
PTEC 205 Process Technology III
(Operations) OR
PTEC 207 Internship
4
Semester Total 16
Fourth Semester
Technical Writing OR
Business Communication and
Ethics
PHYS 100 Introductory Physics
Elective
Social Science Elective
PTEC 201 Water and Wastewater Treatment
PTEC 250 PTEC Capstone
Semester Total
ENGL 120
ATEC 240
3
3
3
3
3
15
267
Respiratory Therapy
PTEC 101
PTEC 202
PTEC 103
GNST 102
GNST 103
Programs of Study
BRidgeValley CTC
Associate In Science
Associate in Applied Science
TECHNICAL STUDIES
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
A program of study developed under this degree designation leads to an A.A.S. Degree in Technical
Studies. This program of study will include general education, general technical education, and
specific occupational training. On-the-job training is an optional component that may be included.
Portions of this type of education and training are currently offered on a no-college credit basis via
quality industry-based educational and training programs.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
This degree program is designed to provide a vehicle to assist the community and technical colleges in
responding to the needs of employers in a timely manner. Those educational needs that are one time
or short term are the primary focus for this program.
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
No specific assessment is made; however, technical courses may required to successfully complete
industry certifications.
TRANSFER BACCALAUREATE OPTIONS
Possible transfer to Board of Regents or Batchelor of Technology.
CAREERS
Business, industry, labor, and government organizations interested in furthering the education and
training of their employees/members constitute the target audience of this degree program. By
providing a program of study designed to enhance and maintain employee knowledge and skills, it is
expected that such individuals will maintain employee knowledge and skills. it is expected that such
individuals will enjoy greater job security and job flexibility while providing employers with a more
highly skilled and educated workforce. For those just entering the job market, the program of study
will include the education and training needed to assure basic entry level skills for the specific
technical/occupational filed. Such programs will typically be offered only if the need for new
employees or the need for expanded education and of current employees is needed by the employers
served by the sponsoring community and technical college.
GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT INFORMATION
Graduates may find employment as:
49-9052 Telecommunications Line Installers and Repairers
www.onetonline.org/link/summary/49-9052.00
15-1041 Computer Support Specialists
www.onetonline.org/link/summary/15-1041.00
49-9042 Maintenance and Repair Workers, General
www.onetonline.org/link/summary/49-9042.00
51-9011 Chemical Equipment Operators and Tenders
www.onetonline.org/link/summary/51-9011.00
51-2022 Electrical and Electronic Equipment Assemblers
www.onetonline.org/link/summary/51-2022.00
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Programs of Study
TECHNICAL STUDIES
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
Component I
General Education
Communication Skills
(At least one business or technical writing course)
Quantitative Skills/Laboratory Science/Experience
(At least one mathematics course)
General Education Elective
6
Credit Hours
3
15
Component II
Technical Core
Each program of study must include a general technical core that meets the goal of developing
skills that may be applied to a variety of occupations or that may be specific to an occupation.
Technical courses such as the examples listed below are to be a part of every program of study
under this degree designation.
Labor Management Relations, Laboratory Science, Safety and Industrial Hygiene, Fluid Power,
Principles of Management, Graphics, Principles of Supervision, Electrical Systems, Methods of
Inquiry, Human Relations, Computer Applications, Industrial Psychology, Draft/CAD/Blueprint
Reading, Nutrition, Accounting Principles, Information Processing, Advanced Mathematics,
Industrial Relations, Human Resource Management, TQM Principles, Qualitative Business
Analysis, Statistics, Quality Control Principles, Medical Terminology
Maximum Credit Hours
39
Component III
Supervised Worksite Based Learning or OJT Training
The component consists of technical specialty courses specific to an occupational area. Technical
courses developed and delivered by the college, apprenticeship courses, or approved courses
included in a business or industry training program can be included in this component.
Apprenticeship and industry based education and training program courses are to be converted to
college credit hours at the usual ratio of 15:1 for lecture and at a rate consistent with BVCTC’s lab
hour/credit hour ratio for lab credit.
Maximum Credit Hours
39
Component IV
On-the-Job Training in the Occupation or Supervised Work Based Learning
Credit for worksite-based training is optional in the certificate in technical studies program. When
incorporated, such training consists of an internship, practicum, or OJT experience performed in
an occupational setting related to the certificate. The credit value of internships will be determined
by the process and contact to credit hour ratio used in traditional programs. On-the-job training
experience will be converted at a ratio of 160:1 contact hour per credit hour, with a maximum of
960 contact hours allowable. This credit may be recorded immediately prior to graduation from
college.
Maximum Credit Hours
12
Total Degree Credit Hours
60
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Technical Studies AAS
6
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
Associate In Science
Certificate in Applied Science
TELECOMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
The Associate of Science in Electrical Engineering Technology (AS-EET) degree is a two-year program
that provides engineering technicians skilled in electronics, power generation and distribution,
communications, instrumentation, and other fields to meet the demands of local industry. The
program provides a broad background in electricity, electronics, communications, industrial control
and electrical machinery. Technical electives, certificate, and skill set programs enable students to
tailor their education program for careers in specific industries. The program is accredited by the
Technology Accreditation Commission (TAC) of ABET, Inc.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
Program outcomes are assessed by a variety of means, including quizzes, unit tests, oral
presentations, written reports, and final examinations. Outcomes based on technical expertise are
assessed by the Society of Manufacturing Engineers EET Outcomes Assessment exit exam, which
assesses student knowledge in a variety of areas of the electrical engineering technology field.
General education outcomes are assessed by the ACT WorkKeys exit examination.
TRANSFER BACCALAUREATE OPTION
ADVANCED PLACEMENT CREDIT FOR HIGH SCHOOL/VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL
CENTER/COLLEGE PROGRAMS
High school level electronic, electrical or computer-oriented coursework is not necessary for entrance
into the Electrical Engineering Technology program. Introductory subjects are incorporated as part of
the program. Students that have completed vocational or EDGE courses, may receive credit for
advanced placement. Articulation/EDGE agreements are in place with various vocational-technical
centers. Advanced placement is also available for students with prior college experience. Please
contact the department chair.
CAREERS
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Programs of Study
TELECOMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY
CERTIFICATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
First Semester
Networking I
English Composition I (GEC 1)
Applied Technical Math (GEC 2)
DC/AC Circuit Analysis
Telecommunications I
Semester Total
4
3
3
3
4
17
ECET 120
ECET 230
ECET 262
ELET 265
Second Semester
Analog Devices I
4
Digital Devices
4
Advanced Telecommunications 4
Fiber Optics
3
Semester Total 15
Telecommunications Technology
INFT 131
ENGL 101
MATH 115
ECET 105
ECET 260
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
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Programs of Study
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BCTC 2012–2013 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Programs of Study
Associate In Applied Science
VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
The Veterinary Technology program is a cooperative program between BridgeValley Community and
Technical College and Carver Career and Technical Education Center in Malden, West Virginia. The
program is nationall credited by the American Veterinary Medical Association. Completion of this
program leads to an associate of applied science in Veterinary Technology from BridgeValley CTC.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
Graduates of this program that have successfully passed both the national and state exams earn their
license and become Registered Veterinary Technicians within the state of WV.
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
Graduates of this program are eligible to take the Veterinary Technicians National Exams and the WV
state exam for veterinary technicians.
TRANSFER BACCALAUREATE OPTIONS
•
•
BA – Regents BA
BS – Veterinary Technology (out of state)
The Veterinary Technology program is a selective admission, limited enrollment program which
admits one class per year. Successful candidates are selected by an admissions committee. Students
wishing to enter this program must complete an application packet available in the admissions office.
The admissions committee will consider applications during two selection periods. The application
deadline for priority selections is February 28th of each year. If seats are still available in the program
following priority application reviews, secondary applications will be considered. The application
deadline to be considered for the secondary selection period will be April 30th of each year.
Financial aid for the Veterinary Technology program is awarded through Carver Career and Technical
Center only.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Admission requirements include the following:
(1) Graduation with a high school diploma with a 2.0 GPA OR GED scores of 500 on each sub-test.
(2) ACT composite score of 20 (or SAT composite of 950) or better. ACT scores: English 18, math 19,
reading 17 OR SAT scores: English 450, math 460, reading 420 OR Accuplacer scores of: English
88, arithmetic math 85, reading 79
(3) One high school or college chemistry course with a “C” or better. The chemistry course does not
require a laboratory component. If the student has high school courses only another high school
science laboratory course with a “C” or better is required for admission.
(4) A minimum of 20 hours of paid or volunteer veterinary experience verified by a supervisor.
(5) A one-page, typed essay entitled “Why I want to be a Veterinary Technician.”
OR
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
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Veterinary Technology
OTHER INFORMATION
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
Students whose ACT/SAT scores do not meet the above outlined criteria may be considered for
admission to the Veterinary Technology program by successfully completing:
(1) Graduation with a high school diploma with a 2.0 GPA OR GED scores of 500 on each sub-test.
(2) Twelve hours of college work at an accredited institution of higher learning within the past five
years with a minimum overall GPA of 2.0. (Collegiate courses cannot include developmental
courses.)
(3) Must be eligible for MATH 111 and English 101.
(4) One high school or college chemistry course with a “C” or better. The chemistry course does not
require a laboratory component. If the student has high school courses only another high school
science laboratory course with a “C” or better is required for admission.
(5) A minimum of 20 hours of paid or volunteer veterinary experience verified by a supervisor.
(6) A one-page, typed essay entitled “Why I want to be a Veterinary Technician.”
Submission of a completed physical examination form is required prior to the start of laboratory
classes. Students will also submit a background check and a random drug screen after they are
enrolled in the program.
Applications are to be sent to:
Veterinary Technology Program
c/o Carver Career and Technical Center
4799 Midland Trail
Charleston, WV 25306
CAREERS
Employment of veterinary technologists and technicians is projected to grow 30 percent from 2012 to
2022, much faster than the average for all occupations. Employment will grow as more veterinarians
utilize technicians and technologists to do general care and lab work, and as they continue to replace
lower skilled veterinary assistants.
Median pay is $30,290 per year or $14.56 per hour.
Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor,
Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2014-15 Edition,
Veterinary Technologists and Technicians,
http://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/veterinary-technologists-and-technicians.htm
Veterinary Technician find employment in veterinarian offices, zoos, animal research, biomedical
research, food inspection, wildlife management, pharmaceutical sales, government agencies, US
Army, humane societies, and many additional areas. Typical job titles include Certified Veterinary
Technician (CVT), Emergency Veterinary Technician, Internal Medicine Veterinary Technician, Licensed
Veterinary Technician (LVT), Registered Veterinary Technician (RVT), Veterinary Assistant, Veterinary
Laboratory Technician (Veterinary Lab Tech), Veterinary Nurse, Veterinary Technician (Vet Tech)
http://www.onetonline.org/
Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) 29-2056.00 - Veterinary Technologists and Technicians
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Programs of Study
VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
First Semester
Animal Anatomy & Physiology
Math for Health Care
Intro to Veterinary Technology
Parasitology
Animal Science
Veterinary Medical Terminology
Semester Total
VETT 219
VETT 221
ENGL 202
VETT 201
VETT 202
VETT 203
VETT 212
VETT 213
BIOL 230
BIOL 231
ENGL 101
VETT 111
VETT 112
VETT 113
Second Semester
Microbiology
3
Micro biology Lab (wet)
1
English Composition I
3
Surgical Techniques & Nursing
5
Veterinary Pharmacology I
2
Companion Animal Diseases I
2
Semester Total 16
Summer Semester
Seminar I
1
Preceptorship
1
Semester Total 2
Third Semester
Business & Professional Writing
Veterinary Pathology
Large Animal Health & Diseases
Laboratory Animal & Avian
Medicine
Veterinary Pharmacology Ii
Companion Animal Diseases II
Semester Total
BVCTC 2014-2015 Catalog
4
3
3
3
3
2
18
3
4
3
3
2
2
17
ATEC 115
SOCI 101
VETT 222
VETT 223
Fourth Semester
Computer Applications
Introduction to Sociology
Preceptorship II
Veterinary Capstone
Semester Total
3
3
2
4
12
275
Veterinary Technology
BIOL 215
MATH 111
VETT 101
VETT 102
VETT 103
VETT 105
Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
Associate in Applied Science
WELDING TECHNOLOGY
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
The associate of applied science degree in Welding Technology is a two year program that prepares
graduates to enter the field of welding. A graduate with this degree should have a strong foundation
in welding and be able to advance to the upper pay level grades at a much higher pace than those
untrained.
The program prepares the graduate in the selection of the right equipment; selection of filler metals;
pre, intermediate and post heat treatment of welded metals; and proper weld techniques. The
program stresses industry-wide safety procedures and trains the student to read weld symbols and
detail drawings. The student is presented with a general knowledge of many fields in welding thus
allowing them to choose an area(s) to specialize in if they desire to do so.
Lastly, the Welding Technology program provides the student with a solid foundation which will
enable them to enter into areas of the construction, engineering, manufacturing, heavy equipment
repair, and plant maintenance and/or weld engineering if they should decide to continue their
education.
PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
Program outcomes are assessed by a variety of means, including quizzes, unit tests, oral
presentations, written reports, and final examinations. Outcomes based on technical expertise are
assessed by the Society of Manufacturing Engineers EET Outcomes Assessment exit exam, which
assesses student knowledge in a variety of areas of the electrical engineering technology field.
General education outcomes are assessed by the ACT WorkKeys exit examination.
TRANSFER BACCALAUREATE OPTION
ADVANCED PLACEMENT CREDIT FOR HIGH SCHOOL/VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL
CENTER/COLLEGE PROGRAMS
High school level welding coursework is not necessary for entrance into the Welding Technology
program. Introductory subjects are incorporated as part of the program. Students, who have
completed vocational or EDGE courses, may receive credit for advanced placement.
Articulation/EDGE agreements are in place with various vocation-technical centers. Advanced
placement is also available for students with prior college experience or credentials. Please contact
the department chair.
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Programs of Study
CAREERS IN ADVANCED WELDING TECHNOLOGY
Welders may work in a variety of industries, including construction and manufacturing. Because the
bond is so strong, welding is used in many industrial applications from airframes to bridges.
Welding Technology
In May 2012, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reported that welders received an average annual
salary of $38,410. Those employed in the electric power generation, distribution and transmission
industry earned the highest salaries, receiving $62,850 annually on average. The top 10% of welders
took home at least $56,000 per year in 2012. Additional opportunities exist in the weld inspection
industry for properly qualified individuals.
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Programs of Study
BridgeValley CTC
WELDING TECHNOLOGY
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE
ENGL 101
GNST 102
MATH 115
MEET 121
WLTD 111
WLDT 121
ENGL 202
WLDT 151
WLDT 161
WELD 223
WLDT 265
First Semester
English Composition I (GEC-1)
First Year Experience
Applied Technical Math (GEC-2)
Manufacturing Processes I
Basic Oxyfuel, Plasma And
Carbon Arc Cutting And Gouging
Basic SMAW
Semester Total
3
1
3
3
3
ALHL 100
DRFT 120
GNET 108
3
16
WLDT 122
WLDT 131
Third Semester
Bus & Professional Writing (GEC-1)
Basic FCAW
Weld Symbols & Detail Drawings
Advanced SMAW
Metallurgy
Semester Total
3
3
3
3
3
15
BAHM 251
WLDT 141
WLDT 225
WLDT 227
WLDT 235
GNET 125
Second Semester
CPR/AED/First Aid
0.5
Drafting I
2
Computer Applications for
3
Technicians
40-Hour Surface Mining
2
Apprentice Class
Intermediate SMAW
3
Basic GMAW
3
Semester Total 13.5
Fourth Semester
IPR: Interviewing
Basic GTAW
CODE SMAW
ST: CODE API 1104 Pipe
CODE GMAW
Technical Elective
Semester Total
1
3
3
3
3
3
16
Program Electives must be approved by your academic advisor and can be shosen from the list below.
DESL
DRFT
ECET
MEET
WLDT
WLDT 293
278
Technical Electives
Any DESL course
Any DRFT course
Any ECET course
Any MEET Course
Any WLDT Course
Internship
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
Course Descriptions
Course Descriptions
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BridgeValley CTC
Course Descriptions
Course Descriptions
COURSE DESCRIPTION LEGEND
Subject code
indicates the general subject
area of the listed course. In the
example the subject code is AST
for Astronomy.
Course Number
is the numeric ID of a specific
class within a subject area. In
the sample listing the course
number is 552.
Course Title
is the name of the listed
course. In the example shown
the course title is General
Plasma Physics II.
Prerequisites
are courses that
must be
successfully
completed to
qualify for
enrollment in the
listed class.
AST 552- GENERAL PLASMA PHYSICS II
Course Description
outlines the course
topics and
coverage.
Ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium,
MHD energy principle, ideal and resistive MHD
stability, drift-kinetic equation, collisions,
classical and neoclassical transport, drift waves
and low-frequency instabilities, high-frequency
microinstabilities, and quasilinear theory.
Pre-requisite(s): AST 551
Co-requisite(s): AST 513
Co-requisites
are courses that must
be successfully
completed or
simultaneously
enrolled in to qualify
for enrollment in the
listed class.
Credit hours:
Indicates the hours of academic
credit for the course. In general
credit is related to the hours of
lab and lecture time required for
a class.
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Course Descriptions
The figure below illustrates how to interpret the catalog descriptions provided in the following
section.
Course Descriptions
ACCT
Accounting
ACCT-185 SURVEY OF ACCOUNTING
Pre-requisites: Eligible for BUSN 112 or MATH 110
A one semester accounting course to provide an
overview of the basic topics in financial
accounting. Topics include: the mechanics of
accounting, accounts receivable and payable,
inventories, depreciation, fixed and intangible
assets, accrual and cash basis of accounting.
This course is designed for students without
prior accounting knowledge.
Credit Hours: 3
ACCT-199 SPECIAL TOPICS
Special topics course relating to Accounting.
Credit Hours: 1-3
ACCT-215 FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING
Pre-requisites: Grade C or better in MATH 130 or
BUSN 112
The course provides students with an
understanding of the nature and purpose of
accounting and its function in business. The
principles and concepts underlying the
accounting cycle, transaction analysis and
recording; financial statement preparation,
disclosures and analysis; and ethical issues are
addressed. The course includes units on
inventories, internal control, cash, receivables,
fixed and intangible assets, current and longterm liabilities, and stockholders’ equity,
preparation of financial statements, income tax
and investments.
Credit Hours: 3
ACCT-216 MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING
Pre-requisites: Grade C or better in ACCT 215
(Financial Accounting)
The analysis of internal accounting practices
with emphasis on use of data for performance
evaluation, control, cost
analysis, capital budgeting, cash flows, and the
contribution approach to decision making.
Credit Hours: 3
ACCT-235 INTEGRATED COMPUTER
ACCOUNTING
Pre-requisites: Grade C or better in ACCT 215
(Financial Accounting)
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This course is the study of the processing of
accounting data through the use of integrated
accounting systems. This course of study will
involve the operation of the General Ledger,
Accounts Receivable, Accounts Payable,
Invoicing, Financial Statement Analysis and
Payroll Accounting Systems, which are the
major systems commonly found in
computerized accounting environments.
Credit Hours: 3
ACCT-285 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I
Pre-requisites: Grade of C or better in ACCT 216
(Managerial Accounting)
This course is a continued study of the
accounting process and the reporting process in
conjunction with the development of
accounting theory. The course includes the
conceptual framework for generally accepted
accounting; the accounting cycle; financial
statement preparation and limitations’ present
value of money applications; current assets
including cash, receivables, and inventories;
plant assets, depreciation, impairments and
depletion.
Credit Hours: 3
ACCT-286 COST ACCOUNTING
Pre-requisites: Grade of C or better in ACCT 216
(Managerial Accounting)
This course is the study of cost and managerial
procedures and concepts designed to develop
students who have a functional knowledge of
the basic managerial accounting principles. The
course introduces the basics of cost accounting
which apply to service, merchandising, and
manufacturing firms. Concepts covered include
job order costing, cos-volume-profit analysis,
activity-based costing, variable costing,
budgeting, standard costing systems and
variance analysis, decision-making using
managerial accounting information, and related
topics in addition to analytical and
communication skills.
Credit Hours: 3
ACCT-287 GOVERNMENTAL ACCOUNTING
Pre-requisites: Grade of C or better in ACCT 216
(Managerial Accounting)
Accounting practices used in governmental
units and not-for profits organizations. Includes
basis characteristics of fund accounting,
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Credit Hours: 3
ACCT-290 INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX
Pre-requisites: Grade of C or better in ACCT 216
(Managerial Accounting)
This course emphasizes the income taxation of
individuals as prescribed in the internal revenue
code, related regulations, rulings and case law.
topics include sources of tax law, basic tax
principles, introduction to U.S. federal, state
and local tax systems, income and expense
definitions, property transactions, developing
research skills, ethical considerations,
calculations of taxable income, and tax
planning.
Credit Hours: 0.5
ALHL-101 PHLEBOTOMY AND LAB
Pre-requisites: ALHL 105, ENGL 101 eligible
A combination of lecture, lab, and hands-on
practical experience. Coursework includes
selecting and preparing the skin puncture site,
tube selection, collecting specimens (order of
the draw), adhering to proper health and safety
guidelines, patient-technician relationship, and
clerical duties associated with proper record
keeping. Under direction of a preceptor,
students master venipuncture (100 sticks),
capillary sticks (25), and other procedures while
on clinical rotation at an approved facility (120
hours) Emphasis will be placed on the
successful completion of the national
certification exam after the course.
Credit Hours: 3
Credit Hours: 3
ACCT-291 CERTIFIED BOOKKEEPER
PREPARATION AND ACCOUNTING REVIEW
Pre-requisites: Grade of C or better in ACCT 216
(Managerial Accounting)
This course offers students a review of
accounting knowledge, bookkeeping subject
matter, and prepare to sit for the Certified
Bookkeepers (CB) designation with the
American Institute of Professional Bookkeepers
(AIPB). This capstone course focuses on the
seven primary subject areas: Accounting
Review, Adjusting Entries, Correction of
Accounting Errors, Payroll, Depreciation,
Inventory and Internal Controls.
Credit Hours: 6
ACCT-299 SPECIAL TOPICS
Special topics course relating to Accounting.
Credit Hours: 1-3
ALHL
Allied Health
ALHL-100 CPR/AED/FIRST AID
This course is designed to prepare the student
for CPR/AED and First Aid certifications.
Curriculum will consist of instruction on how
and when to use an automated external
defibrillator for victims of cardiac arrest, proper
techniques of administering CPR to adults, and
the appropriate response to sudden illnesses
and injuries.
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
ALHL-102 INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH CARE
This interdisciplinary course introduces
students to the medical care system with
emphasis on medical specialties, allied health
fields, and medical terminology. Major units of
the course include the history and evolution of
medicine, clinical experiences, the patient’s
concerns, medical trends, economics, and the
legal and professional aspects of medical care.
The course will utilize a programmed text for
medical terminology. The course is designed
specifically for students enrolled in an allied
health discipline but may be taken by others
interested in the health professions.
Credit Hours: 3
ALHL-105 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY
This course is intended for allied health
students. An introduction to essential
components of building a medical vocabulary.
Anatomic roots for words denoting body
structure, disease process, prefixes, suffixes;
Greek and Latin verbal and adjectival
derivatives.
Credit Hours: 2
ALHL-110 PHARMACOLOGY
Pre-requisites: ALHL 105
A non-laboratory course intended for allied
health majors. Concentration is placed on types
and classification of drugs, their modes of
action at the cellular, systemic, and organismal
level, their contraindications and possible long-
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Course Descriptions
functions of governmental accounting,
budgetary process, basic fund accounting
system, financial reporting objectives, and
government-wide financial statements.
Course Descriptions
Course Descriptions
term effects; covers the science of drugs
including their origin, nature, properties,
composition, uses, and effects. Legal and
ethical issues, proper documentation,
indications, and side effects are discussed;
administration of medication as allowed by law.
Credit Hours: 3
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Independent study of topic(s) pertinent to the
profession of medical assisting or the allied
health field.
Credit Hours: 1-3
ALHL-199/299 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ALLIED
HEALTH
Pre-requisites: Consent of Instructor
ALHL-115 FIRST-YEAR CLINIC
This course is intended for medical assisting
students. Students will work in an area health
care facility under the supervision of preceptor.
Emphasis on work ethic.
Credit Hours: 1
ALHL-120 OSHA FOR ALLIED HEALTH
This course is intended for allied health majors.
Concentration is placed on the principles of
OSHA, hazard identification, evaluation of
personal habits and changing them to meet
safety guidelines. Coursework includes HazCom
Standard, Bloodborne Pathogen Standard,
biohazardous waste management, general
safety, and guidelines for preventing violence in
the workplace.
Credit Hours: 1
ALHL-130 LEGAL CONCEPTS IN HEALTH CARE
This course is intended for allied health
students. An introduction to legal guidelines
and requirements for allied health
professionals; topics include health care laws,
scope of practice, risk management, informed
consent, documentation, and malpractice.
Credit Hours: 2
ALHL-140 SEMINAR I
Pre-requisites: ALHL 110
This course is intended for students who are
graduating with a one-year certificate in
phlebotomy. Covers the selection of clinical
rotation placements and weekly reports. Topics
include programmatic and college exit
assessments and career preparation; business
meeting format, agendas, and meeting minutes.
Presentations and portfolio are required.
Credit Hours: 1
ALHL-199/299 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ALLIED
HEALTH
Pre-requisites: Consent of Instructor
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Independent study of topic(s) pertinent to the
profession of medical assisting or the allied
health field.
Credit Hours: 1-3
ALHL-200 MEDICAL CODING
Pre-requisites: ALHL 105
This course is intended for medical assisting
students and will cover the study of diagnostic
and procedure codes used by healthcare
providers; use of ICD-(9 and 10)-CM and CPT
codes for ambulatory care coding will be
discussed.
Credit Hours: 3
ALHL-203 EKG/ECG TECHNICIAN
Course prepares students as credentialed
Eletrocardiograph (EKG/ECG) Technicians.
Through lecture and practical labs, course
materials labs, course includes anatomy and
physiology of the heart, medical disease
processes, medical terminology, medical ethics,
legal aspects of patient contact, the Holter
monitor, electrocardiography, and
echocardiography.
Credit Hours: 4
ALHL-205 CLINICAL SKILLS I
Pre-requisites: ALHL 105
This course is intended for medical assisting
students and will discuss basic sterilization
techniques and asepsis control; preparing and
maintaining treatment areas, instruments, and
equipment; taking vital signs and patient
histories; maintaining patient records; and
patient education and instruction.
Credit Hours: 2
ALHL-210 CLINICAL SKILLS II
Pre-requisites: ALHL 205
This course is intended for medical assisting
students and will discuss specimen collection
and processing; diagnostic testing;
venipuncture and capillary puncture; preparing
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patients and assisting with exams and
procedures; relaying screening and follow-up
testing to patients. Students are required to
complete CPR and first aid training prior to the
start of the course.
Credit Hours: 2
ALHL-215 SEMINAR II
Course Descriptions
A brief introduction to sinusoidal steady-state
analysis of electrical circuits. Topics includes:
sinusoidal waveforms; RMS and average values;
complex arithmetic; phasors; impedance;
equivalent circuit analysis techniques;
introduction to AC power; AC test equipment;
and AC measurement techniques.
Credit Hours: 3
Co-requisites: ALHL 210, ALHL 220
AMTE-127 AC CIRCUITS: AC POWER & 3 PHASE
SYSTEMS
Pre-requisites: AMTE 121
ALHL-225 INTERNSHIP
An introduction to complex power and threephase systems. Topics include complex power;
apparent power; real power; reactive power; an
introduction to three phase systems; three
phase analysis techniques; power in three
phase systems; power factor and power factor
correction; power measurement equipment
and power measurement techniques.
Co-requisites: ALHL 210, ALHL 220
Credit Hours: 1
This course is intended for students who are
graduating with a two-year degree in medical
assisting. This is supervised on-the-job training
totaling 150 clock hours in an area health care
facility under the direction of a preceptor.
Background checks, drug testing, current
CPR/First Aid certification, TB testing, and
additional training on site-specific policies may
be required. The student is responsible for
his/her on transportation to/from the location.
AMTE-131 INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS:
TRANSFORMERS
Credit Hours: 1
Credit Hours: 1
Credit Hours: 1
AMTE
Advanced Manufacturing Technology
(Electrical)
AMTE-111 DC CIRCUITS: FUNDAMENTALS
Co-requisites: MATH 115 or MATH 130
A brief introduction to steady-state dc circuit
analysis. Topics include: electrical
fundamentals; resistors; capacitors; inductors,
Ohm’s Law, Kirchoff ’s laws; equivalent circuit
analysis techniques; maximum power transfer;
test equipment; and measurement techniques.
Credit Hours: 3
AMTE-121 AC CIRCUITS: FUNDAMENTALS
Pre-requisites: AMTE 131 or ECET 110.
Pre-requisites: AMTE 127 or ECET 115
A course covering the use of transformers in
electrical systems with a focus on industrial
power distribution. Topics include: ideal
transformers; non-ideal transformers;
transformer testing; transformer types and
ratings; and three-phase transformers.
AMTE-132 INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS: MOTORS
& MOTOR CONTROL
Pre-requisites: AMTE 127 or ECET 115
An introduction to electric motors and the
design, development and trouble shooting of
motor control circuits. Topics include DC
motors, single and 3-phase induction motors,
motor circuit protection, motor control
components, VFDs, and motor control circuits.
Credit Hours: 1
AMTE-141 PLC: FUNDAMENTALS
An introduction to the fundamentals of PLC
hardware and software. Topics include: relay
logic; PLC architectures; addressing; data types;
ladder logic programming; seals; latches;
counters; and timers. Concentration on
industrial applications and standard
Co-requisites: MATH 115, or MATH 130 and MATH 140
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
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Course Descriptions
This course is intended for students who are
graduating with a two-year degree in medical
assisting. Covers the selection of internship site
placements and weekly reports. Topics include
programmatic and college exit assessments and
career preparation; business meeting format,
agendas, and meeting minutes. Presentations
and portfolio are required.
Course Descriptions
BridgeValley CTC
programming practices.
industrial control systems.
Credit Hours: 1
Credit Hours: 1
AMTE-142 AC PLC: INTERFACING AND HMIS
Pre-requisites: AMTE 141
AMTE-261 INDUSTRIAL ROBOTICS
Pre-requisites: Instructor permission
An introduction to hardware interfacing, HMI
design and HMI programming. Topics include:
digital I/O; analog I/O; PLC system design and
documentation; HMI design practices; HMI
programming fundamentals; and fault
reporting.
Credit Hours: 1
AMTE-143 PLC: APPLICATIONS
Pre-requisites: AMTE 142
Advanced topics in industrial automation.
Topics include: state machine design,
implementation, and troubleshooting;
distributed I/O systems; and automation system
design and troubleshooting.
Credit Hours: 1
AMTE-151 CONTROL SYSTEM TECHNOLOGY:
SENSORS AND ACTUATORS
Co-requisites: AMTE 141
An introduction to the standard sensors and
actuators used in industrial automation
systems. Topics include: limit switches; photoeyes; inductive and capacitive proximity
sensors; encoders; RTDs; thermistors;
thermocouples; process sensors; load cells;
pressure sensors; solenoids; pneumatic and
hydraulic controls; current loop devices; sensor
interfacing, and industrial networks.
Credit Hours: 1
An introduction to the fundamental concepts of
industrial robotics. Topics include: robot safety;
coordinate systems; robot geometry and
configuration; manipulator control; sensor
systems; path control; multi-axis dynamics;
program development and debugging; and
robotic work cell design and implementation.
Credit Hours: 3
AMTE-281 INDUSTRIAL TROUBLESHOOTING
Pre-requisites: Instructor permission
A course in system-level troubleshooting as
applied to industrial manufacturing systems.
Topics measuring and evaluating problems,
development of a systematic troubleshooting
method, root cause analysis, corrective action,
and evaluating the effects of corrective actions.
Credit Hours: 2 Lecture and lab
AMTE-290 PRACTICUM
Pre-requisites: Instructor permission
Special assignment in the manufacturing
technology field. Students must make a final
presentation and submit a reflective writing
assignment based on the field experience. A
designated field supervisor and a faculty
coordinator will oversee the field experience.
Credit Hours: Variable
AMTE-152 CONTROL SYSTEM TECHNOLOGY:
PROCESS CONTROL
Pre-requisites: AMTE 141
AMTE-299 SPECIAL TOPICS
Pre-requisites: Instructor permission
An introduction to industrial control systems
with a focus on process dynamics and PID
controllers. Topics include: obtaining and
analyzing system response; the PID control
algorithms; loop tuning; and applications.
Credit Hours: 1
AMTE-153 CONTROL SYSTEM TECHNOLOGY:
APPLICATIONS
Pre-requisites: AMTE 172
A project based course focusing on the design,
implementation and troubleshooting of
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Selected studies in Advanced Manufacturing
Technology.
Credit Hours: Variable
AMTM
Advanced Manufacturing Technology
(Mechanical)
AMTM-113 INDUSTRIAL MECHANICS
Introduction to concepts of industrial
mechanical systems, principles and equipment.
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Credit Hours: 3 Contact: 3
AMTM-120 INTRODUCTION TO PIPING
Includes equipment and fittings necessary for
routing pipe from nozzle to rack to
nozzle. Topics include: intro to process plant
design, pipe manufacturing and fabrication,
pipe assembly, valve types and applications,
pump selection, and pressure vessels. The
topics covered are chosen to prepare for the
SPED PPD Level I Certification Exam.
Credit Hours: 2
AMTM-121 ADVANCED PIPING: PROCESS
PLANT LAYOUT & DESIGN
Pre-requisite: AMTM 120
Includes terminology and concepts needed for
equipment layout within the process plant. This
includes equipment placement, spacing and
orientation. It also includes pipe routing to key
equipment nozzles considering operations and
maintenance. Topics include: design phases,
instrumentation, heat exchangers, furnaces,
and pipe racks. The topics covered are chosen
to prepare for the SPED Professional Piping
Designer Level III Certification Exam.
AMTM-280 MECHANICAL MAINTENANCE
PRINCIPLES
Pre-requisites: MATH 110 or MATH 113; MEET 121 or
MEET 270, MEET 271, MEET 272
This course covers a wide range of mechanical
maintenance topics. The assortment of
concepts includes topics such as: NDT (vibration
analysis, oil analysis, thermography), alignment,
rigging, lifting, lifting devices, maintenance
management and troubleshooting.
Credit Hours: 3
AMTM-299 SPECIAL TOPICS
Pre-requisites: Instructor permission
Selected studies in Advanced Manufacturing
Technology.
Credit Hours: Variable
ARTS
Art
ARTS-110 MUSIC APPRECIATION
(GEC 3)
Music appreciation is a basic course that
focuses on listening to, appreciating and
analyzing music of Western and American
heritage. It is designed to enhance the student’s
understanding and enjoyment of music.
Credit Hours: 3
Credit Hours: 2
AMTM-247 FUNDAMENTALS OF FLUID POWER
Co-requisites: MATH 110
An introduction to fluid power concentrating on
industrial pneumatics and hydraulics. Physical
properties of hydraulic fluid, concepts of fluid
flow and power transformations, hydraulic and
pneumatic symbols, unit conversions and circuit
reading.
Credit Hours: 3
ARTS-120 ART APPRECIATION
(GEC 3)
This course is intended to be a first level
introductory art course for the beginning art
student, as well as the student seeking
humanities elective in the visual arts. The
student’s appreciation of art will be developed
through aesthetics, disciplines, critical
evaluations, projects, history and attendance at
a real or virtual art show.
Credit Hours: 3
AMTM-248 APPLICATIONS OF FLUID POWER
This course covers a wide range of mechanical
maintenance topics. The assortment of
concepts includes topics such as: NDT (vibration
analysis, oil analysis, thermography), alignment,
rigging, lifting, lifting devices, maintenance
management and troubleshooting.
Credit Hours: 2
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
ASLI
American Sign Language
ASLI-101 FINGER SPELLING I
This course teaches rules and techniques for
finger spelling, along with lexical items.
Students will become fluent in the manual
alphabet.
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Course Descriptions
All aspects of the systems, principles and
equipment, including rigging, lifting, ladders &
scaffolds, hydraulics pneumatics, lubrication,
bearings, belts and pulleys, mechanical drives,
vibration, alignment and electricity are
investigated.
Course Descriptions
Course Descriptions
Credit Hours: 1
ASLI-102 FINGER SPELLING II
Pre-requisites: ASLI 101
This course expands upon the rules and
techniques for finger spelling begun in ASLI 101.
Students will increase fluency in the manual
alphabet, lexical items and ASLI poetry.
Credit Hours: 1
ASLI-103 FINGERSPELLING III
Pre-requisites: ASLI 101 and 102 or EIPA performance
score of 3.5 or higher
Dactylology uses the manual alphabet to
provide a visual representation of English
words. Fingerspelling is generally limited to
proper names of people, places, acronyms,
brand names, vocabulary, numbers, spelling
words and titles. Fingerspelled loan or lexical
signs are a combination of English letters and
ASLII movements.
Credit Hours: 1
ASLI-104 EDUCATIONAL FINGERSPELLING I
Dactylology uses the manual alphabet to
provide a visual representation of English
words. Fingerspelling is generally limited to
proper names of people, places, acronyms,
brand names, vocabulary, numbers, spelling
words and titles. Fingerspelled loan or lexical
signs are a combination of English letters and
ASLI movements. At times key information may
need to be fingerspelled, especially if a student
must recognize a term while reading or taking a
test. This class will also focus on the students’
ability to produce manual numbers with a
fluent rate.
Credit Hours: 1
ASLI-111 AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE I
BridgeValley CTC
development of expressive sign skills.
Application of rudimentary, syntactical and
grammatical structures stressed with continued
development of sign vocabulary.
Credit Hours: 3
ASLI-113 AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE III
Pre-requisites: ASLI 111 and 112 or EIPA performance
score of 3.5 or higher
Continuation of ASLI 112. This course is
grounded in contemporary language theories
that balance grammar instruction and
conversational skills while developing language
proficiency. This course focuses on prosodic
language development via expressive
narratives, utilizing exercises that reach
multiple learning styles, along with scope and
sequence topics mimic natural conversation.
This course focuses on highlighting the
differences between ASLI and English and
making cultural and linguistic uniqueness of the
deaf world accessible.
Credit Hours: 3
ASLI-114 AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE IV
Pre-requisites: ASLI 113 or EIPA performance score of
3.5 or higher.
This course is a continuation of ASLI 113.
Grounded in contemporary language theories
that balance grammar instruction and
conversational skills while developing language
proficiency. This course focuses on prosodic
language development via expressive
narratives, utilizing exercises that reach
multiple learning styles, along with scope and
sequence topics mimic natural conversation.
This course focuses on ASLI entirely and no
voicing/speaking will occur during class.
Credit Hours: 3
Co-requisites: ASLI 101
This courses focuses on the development of
knowledge and language skills needed for
communicating with deaf people who sign.
Focus on numbers, fingerspelling, and culture of
the deaf.
Credit Hours: 3
ASLI-112 AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE II
Continued development of knowledge and
language skills for communicating for deaf
people who sign. Includes numbers,
fingerspelling and culture. Emphasis on
enhancement of receptive skills and continued
288
ASLI-121 EDUCATIONAL INTERPRETING AS A
CAREER
Interpreting as a Career will prepare students
for interpreting business practices according to
state guidelines and school policies. This class
will enhance students’ knowledge of
educational interpreting principles while
following the Educational Interpreter
Guidelines. This class focuses on the
interpreting model theories, invoices,
portfolios, invoice keeping and professional
business practices for those interpreters on
contract in school systems and at the same time
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
prepares students for professional business
practices while adhering to interpreting
guidelines, school policies and procedures.
Credit Hours: 1
Course Descriptions
ASLI-199 SPECIAL TOPICS
Special topics course relating to American Sign
Language.
Credit Hours: 1-3
Credit Hours: 3
ASLI-200 VOICING I
Pre-requisites: ASLI 111
This course engages students in the
development of consecutive interpreting skills,
focusing on further development of processing
skills associated with interpreting.
Credit Hours: 3
ASLI-201 VOICING II
ASLI-123 COCHLEAR IMPLANTS
This course focuses on different implant
technologies and prepares students to correctly
adjust the educational environment for
accessibility for those with implants. This course
will prepare students in the contents of early
identification, intervention techniques, oral
deaf education, amplification programs, audio
logical testing, interpreting audiograms and
alternative placement. The students will discuss
Cochlear Implants and the ramifications the
implants have on the education setting,
student, hearing peers and the deaf
community.
Pre-requisites: Prerequisite: Qualified students should
see Kim Lovinski to enroll
Credit Hours: 1
Pre-requisites: ASLI 200 or 201 or EIPA performance
score of 3.5 or higher
ASLI-124 EDUCATIONAL INTERPRETING
PRINCIPLES
This course will prepare students for the EIPA
written portion exam. This class will enhance
students’ knowledge of educational interpreting
guidelines and code of ethics while working in
the educational setting. The EIPA written test is
based on a set of knowledge standards that was
developed by a group of experts, including deaf
consumers, interpreters, interpreter trainers,
deaf educators and ASLI linguistics. The test is
not a factual memory test. In other words,
memorization of the knowledge standards only
may not enable you to receive a passing score.
Application of knowledge to situations is
necessary in order to pass this examination. The
test is also based on the EIPA Code of
Professional Conduct of Educational
Interpreters. The Rid Code of Ethics is not the
basis for professional conduct in the EIPA
written test.
Development and cognitive processing skills in
English focuses on those trilingual skills
necessary to develop before working between
two languages: understanding the relationship
between visual form and meaning, lexical
substitution, paraphrasing, at the proposition
and discourse levels, identifying the main idea,
summarizing, comprehension, memory,
repetition, pattern, inference and multitasking.
Credit Hours: 3
ASLI-202 VOICING III
This course engages students in the
development of simultaneous interpreting
skills, focusing on further development of the
dual tasking skills associated with interpreting.
This class focuses on the interpreter’s ability to
listen to the message and predict where the
speaker is going. In simultaneous interpretation
(SI), the interpreter renders the message in the
target-language as quickly as he or she can
formulate it from the source language, while
the source-language speaker continuously
speaks. Students will show the ability to use
process decal age, the ability to watch a signed
message, use process time, analyzing,
construction form and then creating a spoken
equivalent without changing the meaning.
Credit Hours: 3
ASLI-221 ENGLISH INTERPRETING
Credit Hours: 3
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
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Course Descriptions
ASLI-122 DEAF CULTURE AND HISTORY
This course teaches the history of American
Sign Language which is based in French Sign
Language and the development of Martha’s
Vineyard, historically deaf community. In
addition, the stories of notable figures in deaf
history that the pertinent to understand and
appreciation ASLI and interpreting will be
studied.
Course Descriptions
Pre-requisites: Prerequisite: ASLI 112 or EIPA
performance score of 3.5 or higher
This course examines the different
methodologies incorporated when interpreting
in an English course. When interpreting in an
English course, students learn to follow the
rules of grammar to communicate information
and ideas effectively in a written form.
Interpreters must know the phoneme
sequencing program for reading, spelling and
speech in order to interpret effectively and
accurately. This course examines the
components of language and theories of
language acquisition of phonology, morphology,
syntax, semantics and pragmatics.
Credit Hours: 3
ASLI-299 SPECIAL TOPICS
Special topics course relating to American Sign
Language.
Credit Hours: 1-3
ATEC
Administrative Professional Technology
ATEC-100 KEYBOARDING
This is a one-credit hour test out exam. The test
consists of a timed-writing at 40 wpm for 5
minutes with 95% accuracy.
Credit Hours: 1
ATEC-105 COMPUTER LITERACY
Introductory class for incoming students who
have had little or no computer training.
Provides coverage on computer basics,
including computer hardware/components,
operating systems, computer communications
and application software. Intended to help
students become computer literate as they
learn to use Windows, Microsoft Office Suite
and navigate the internet. It is also helpful to
those who want to understand how to use the
computer effectively for class and personal use.
Credit Hours: 3
ATEC-110 OFFICE KEYBOARDING
Emphasis is placed on technique, keyboard
mastery, and skill building. Minimum speed
attainment of 40 wpm with 95% accuracy.
Credit Hours: 2
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BridgeValley CTC
ATEC-115 FUNDAMENTALS OF BUSINESS
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
(GEC 2)
This course is an overview that will give
students an opportunity to investigate business
computer applications. The student will get a
“hands-on” familiarity (non-programmer) of the
Microsoft Office Suite and will become
proficient in Word, Excel, Access, and
PowerPoint. The student will integrate
documents from one application to another.
Credit Hours: 3
ATEC-120 BEGINNING DOCUMENT
PROCESSING
Pre-requisites: ATEC 110 or equivalent skill level
Emphasis is placed on learning the keyboard
and developing proper formatting techniques
using the latest in computer technology. English
grammar, proofreading skills, and composition
are strengthened through learning activities.
Upon completion of this course, it is expected
that the student will be able to key at a
minimum rate of 50 wpm for 5 minutes with
95% accuracy.
Credit Hours: 3
ATEC-125 ADVANCED DOCUMENT
PROCESSING
Pre-requisites: ATEC 120
Emphasis is placed on maintaining proper
formatting techniques, enhancing English
grammar, proofreading and composition skills
while increasing speed and accuracy. Upon
completion of this course, it is expected that
the student will be able to key at a minimum of
60 wpm for 5 minutes with 95% accuracy. The
student will master advanced skills in the
formation of business documents and will be
able to integrate documents, spreadsheets,
presentations, and databases.
Credit Hours: 3
ATEC-200 DESKTOP PUBLISHING
Pre-requisites: ATEC 125
Hands-on application of desktop publishing
software used to prepare/create, revise and
produce print and multimedia materials using
various desktop publishing software packages.
Upon completion of the course, the student will
be knowledgeable in selecting page layouts,
formatting text, positioning graphics, and
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
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Credit Hours: 3
ATEC-210 MACHINE TRANSCRIPTION
Pre-requisites: ATEC 120, ATEC 115
The student will select the appropriate learning
resources based upon the concentration
chosen: Executive, Legal, or Medical. Emphasis
is placed on the mastery of English skills as well
as the specific vocabulary germane to the area
of specialization. Upon completion of the
course, the student will be able to transcribe
dictation from electronic media. Achievement
of exit transcription speed required with 80
percent accuracy.
Credit Hours: 3
ATEC-220 RECORDS AND DATABASE
MANAGEMENT
Pre-requisites: ATEC 115
This course is designed to provide the student
with the basic terminology of records
management, alphabetic and numeric filing
theory and practice. Record storage and
retrieval systems, and purging files according to
government rules for records retention will be
covered. Managing files manually and
electronically (using specialized software) will
also be covered.
Credit Hours: 3
ATEC-230 OFFICE PROCEDURES
Pre-requisites: ATEC 200, ATEC 120
This capstone course examines the procedures
and terminology related to specialized office
environments (Executive, Legal, or Medical).
Utilization specialized software application
programs and/or office simulations. Involves
creating portfolios for a business, event
planning, presentations, and travel
arrangements are implemented.
Credit Hours: 3
ATEC-250 MICROSOFT CERTIFICATION:
ACCESS
Pre-requisites: ATEC 115; permission of the
Director/Chairperson
This course provides an effective, systematic
way to review and master Microsoft Access.
Step-by-step, on screen instructions,
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
performance-based activities, practice
assessments, and registration information are
provided. Upon completion of this course, the
student will have the requisite skills to become
MOS certified in Access. (If Credit hours
equivalency or test-out is desired student must
pay test-out fee plus certification fee.)
Credit Hours: 1
ATEC-255 MICROSOFT CERTIFICATION: EXCEL
Pre-requisites: ATEC 115; permission of the
Director/Chairperson
This course provides an effective, systematic
way to review and master Microsoft Excel.
Step-by-step, on screen instructions,
performance-based activities, practice
assessments, and registration information are
provided. Upon completion of this course, the
student will have the requisite skills to become
MOS certified in Excel. (If Credit hours
equivalency or test-out is desired student must
pay test-out fee plus certification fee.)
Credit Hours: 1
ATEC-260 MICROSOFT CERTIFICATION:
POWERPOINT
Pre-requisites: ATEC 115; permission of the
Director/Chairperson
This course provides an effective, systematic
way to review and master Microsoft
PowerPoint. Step-by-step, on screen
instructions, performance-based activities,
practice assessments, and registration
information are provided. Upon completion of
this course, the student will have the requisite
skills to become MOS certified in PowerPoint. (If
Credit hours equivalency or test-out is desired
student must pay test-out fee plus certification
fee.)
Credit Hours: 1
ATEC-265 MICROSOFT CERTIFICATION: WORD
Pre-requisites: ATEC 115; permission of the
Director/Chairperson
This course provides an effective, systematic
way to review and master Microsoft Word.
Step-by-step, on screen instructions,
performance-based activities, practice
assessments, and registration information are
provided. Upon completion of this course, the
student will have the requisite skills to become
MOS certified in Word. (If Credit hours
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Course Descriptions
applying appropriate typographic design
enhancements.
Course Descriptions
Course Descriptions
equivalency or test-out is desired student must
pay test-out fee plus certification fee.)
Credit Hours: 1
ATEC-199/299 SPECIAL TOPICS IN
ADMINISTRATIVE PROFESSIONAL
TECHNOLOGY
Pre-requisites: Consent of Instructor
Independent study of topic(s) pertinent to the
profession of administrative professional
technology.
Credit Hours: 1-3
BDAC
Building Design and Construction
BDAC-101 FUNDAMENTALS OF BUILDING
DESIGN
The course presents an introduction to form,
space and the principles that guide their
ordering in the built environment. Topics
covered include but are not limited to the
primary elements, form, space, organization,
circulation, proportion and scale. Based on the
premise that drawing is central to the design
process, an emphasis on drawing as a medium
for visualizing and communicating design ideas
will also be given.
Credit Hours: 3
BDAC-103 PRINCIPLES OF BUILDING
CONSTRUCTION I
An introduction to the principles of building
construction, this course provides a
comprehensive overview of the materials and
methods used in today’s construction industry.
Topics include but are not limited to the
building site, foundation systems, the building’s
structure and envelope, finished, and building
systems. Upon completion of this course,
students will be equipped with knowledge
needed for approaching new material and
techniques encountered in today’s construction
industry.
Credit Hours: 3
BDAC-105 PRINCIPLES OF BUILDING
CONSTRUCTION II
BridgeValley CTC
This course examines the materials and
methods of building construction. Topics
include concrete construction, rood systems,
windows and doors, exterior walls, cladding,
ceilings and floors, interior walls and use of
glass.
Credit Hours: 3
BDAC-107 SITE ANALYSIS AND DEVELOPMENT
Pre-requisites: Eligible MATH-130 Spring 2014, Math110 Fall 2014
Co-requisites: SBT Spring 2014, SBLT/BDAC Fall 2014
An introduction to the principles and
techniques of basic site engineering for grading,
drainage, earthwork and road alignment.
Topics include interpreting landform and
contour lines, designing horizontal and vertical
road alignments, sequencing construction and
designing and sizing storm water management
system.
Credit Hours: 3
BDAC-201 BUILDING CODES AND STANDARDS
Pre-requisites: BDAC 103
Co-requisites: SBLT/BDAC
This course examines the international building
codes. Topics related to codes include
occupancy, construction types, fire resistant
methods, egress and accessibility, interior
spaces, roof assemblies, exterior walls, soils,
and foundations, structure provisions, test and
inspections, and building materials.
Credit Hours: 3
BDAC-215 CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS AND
CONTRACTS
Pre-requisites: BDAC 15
Co-requisites: SBLT/BDAC
This course examines the construction process.
Topics include the stake holders and
participants, facility life cycle, codes, regulations
and standards, project design, project planning,
project delivery, design documents and facility
management.
Credit Hours: 3
Pre-requisites: BDAC Spring 2014, BDAC 103 Fall 2014
Co-requisites: SBT Spring 2014, SBLT/BDAC Fall 2014
292
BIOL
Biology
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
(GEC 2)
A biology course for non-science majors. The
focus will be on examining the building blocks
of plants and animals, how energy and life
interact, discovering genetics, studying
evolution and diversity of life, learning about
ecology and ecosystems, and investigating
human and plant anatomy and physiology.
Credit Hours: 3
BIOL-102 GENERAL BIOLOGY LAB
digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems.
Human physiologic function will be reviewed as
it applies to cells, tissues, organs, and body
systems. The concepts of heredity and human
anatomical and physiologic development will be
studied. Correct terminology utilization will be
expected throughout the course. As part of a
required laboratory component, a mammalian
dissection is required.
Credit hours: 4
BIOL-215 ANIMAL ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY
(GEC 2)
Co-requisites: BIOL 101
Lab for BIOL 101. Laboratory activities will be
demonstrated by faculty and experiments will
be conducted by students to reinforce concepts
introduced during lecture.
(GEC 2)
Pre-requisites: Admission to the Veterinary Technology
Program
BIOL-112 INTRODUCTION TO BIOTECHNOLOGY
A study in techniques and concepts including
Bioinformatics, Proteomics, and Genomics, as
well as detailed information on agricultural,
medical, forensic, and regulatory issues that
affect the biotechnology industry.
This course will introduce students to the
anatomy and physiology of domestic animals
including a survey of cells, tissues and major
body systems for the cat, dog, and horse, with
lesser emphasis on birds, reptiles, and
amphibians. This course is intended for
students entering veterinary technology,
veterinary assisting or other animal related
fields. As part of a required laboratory
component, a mammalian dissection is
required.
Credit Hours: 3
Credit Hours: 4
BIOL-113 INTRODUCTION TO BIOTECHNOLOGY
LAB
A study of lab methods and exercises to assist
students in establishing a coherent, integrated
understanding of laboratory work in
biotechnology.
BIOL-220 HUMAN ANATOMY
Credit Hours: 1
Credit Hours: 1
BIOL-199 SPECIAL TOPICS
Special topics relating to biology.
BIOL-210 HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY
(GEC 2)
Pre-requisites: Eligible for 100 level MATH and ENGL
101
This course will cover the basic principles of
human anatomy and physiology beginning with
the cell and progressing to tissues and body
systems. Anatomical exploration of the human
body will include the integumentary, skeletal,
muscular, nervous, sensory, endocrine,
circulatory, lymphatic, immune, respiratory,
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
(GEC 2)
Pre-requisites: Eligible for ENGL 101 and 100 level
Math
This course will provide an anatomical
exploration of the principles of human
anatomy, beginning with the cell and
progressing to tissues and all body systems.
Human anatomical development from
conception to across the life span will be
synthesized. On-Campus laboratory experiences
will include both on-site experimentation and
virtual interactive simulations. A lab component
is required with this course.
Credit Hours: 4
BIOL-221 HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY
(GEC 2)
Pre-requisites: BIOL 220 with a C or better
This course is a continuation of BIOL 220 and
will explore the principles of human physiology.
Cause and effect mechanisms of the human
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Course Descriptions
BIOL-101 GENERAL BIOLOGY
Course Descriptions
Course Descriptions
BridgeValley CTC
body will be examined as they apply to cells,
tissues, organs, and body systems in the healthy
state. On-Campus laboratory experiences will
include both on-site experimentation and
virtual interactive simulations. A lab component
is required with this course.
Credit Hours: 4
BIOL-230 PRINCIPLES OF MICROBIOLOGY
(GEC
2)
Pre-requisites: Eligible for ENGL 101 and 100 level
Math
This course is a comprehensive introduction to
the biology of microorganisms and viruses.
Special attention will be given to microorganism
and viruses of medical importance. Course
topics will include cellular structures and
functions, biochemical processes, replication,
genetics, disease prevention and control, and
immunology.
Credit Hours: 3
BIOL-231 PRINCIPLES OF MICROBIOLOGY LAB
(GEC 2)
Co-requisites: BIOL 230
Lab for BIOL 230. Students will perform
laboratory exercises to reinforce lecture
concepts. Laboratory exercises will include
principles of asepsis, identification of common
microbes, study of bacterial physiology, cellular
staining techniques, microscopic observation of
morphological characteristics, and culturing of
bacteria.
Credit Hours: 1
BIOL-245 NUTRITION AND DIET THERAPY
Pre-requisites: Eligible for 100 level MATH and ENGL101
This course will review the principles of basic
nutrition and diet therapy. The requirements of
a healthy diet will be discussed as it occurs
across the human life span. Selected dietary
alterations associated with nutritional health
will be reviewed including sports nutrition,
eating disorders, diabetes, CVD, obesity, bone
health, and cancer.
Credit Hours: 3
BIOL-299 SPECIAL TOPICS
Special topics course relating to biology.
294
BLST
Blasting Technology
BLST-100 BASIC BLASTING
This course introduces students to the basics of
drilling and blasting. Introductory components
include explosive terms, types and properties of
explosives, initiation systems, blast
mathematics and design, drilling and geology,
environmental and regulatory issues and blast
equipment.
Credit Hours: 2
BLST-102 BLASTING MATERIALS-STORAGE,
HANDLING & TRANSPORTATION
Co-requisites: BLST 100
This course covers the identification of various
explosive materials by type, marking and
applications. It will also introduce students to
the safety procedures & legislation relating to
the safe storage, handling and transportation of
dangerous goods and hazardous materials. The
Safety Library Publications (SLP) designed by
the institute of Makers of Explosives (IME) form
the basis of this course.
Credit Hours: 3
BLST-103 BLASTING FIELD CAMP I
Pre-requisites: BLST 101, BLST 102
This field camp gives students the opportunity
for practical hands-on experience with blasting
in a highly supervised environment. Students
will work on basic blasting applications and
problems utilizing their skills and knowledge
from BLST 100 and BLST 102. Students will
assist drillers and certified blasters in various
aspects of drill and blast cycles and associated
paperwork. Regulatory personnel will mentor
students in blast inspection, blast complaints,
and damage claim processes. Students will
shadow seismic company employees to gain
practical field experience in proper seismograph
installation and record analysis.
Credit Hours: 2
BLST-105 BLASTING CALCULATIONS
Co-requisites: Math 115 or permission from Blasting
Program Coordinator
This course will enable students to apply
specific mathematical concepts and acquire
foundation skills important in blasting. It is
designed to complement and reinforce learning
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Credit Hours: 3
BLST-106 BLASTING COMMUNICATIONS AND
RECORDS
Co-requisites: BLST 105
This course focuses on the development of
fundamental reading, writing, speaking,
observational and research skills within the
context of the blasting field. Students will
prepare and respond to a variety of technical
documents, some with links to their program
courses, and in the process learn to apply rules
of usage in keeping with professional and
program record keeping standards. Blast plans,
drill logs, seismic records, blast log, inventory,
public perception, complaints, damage claims,
judicial testimony will be covered. Lab will focus
on hands-on use of various seismograph
manufacturers, firmware settings and field
setup. The proper use of GPS and 2D laser
profilers in blast documentation will be
extensively examined as well as the proper use
of field density kits.
Credit Hours: 3
BLST-199 SPECIAL TOPICS
Special topics course reserved for freshman
status.
well as, 2D laser profiles used in angled borehole scenarios.
Credit Hours: 3
BLST-211 ABOVE GROUND DRILLING
This course introduces students to various
drilling applications, operating theories, and
working principles of rock drills and air
compressors. Other course components include
Safety and Health, Drill Maintenance, Drilling
Patterns and Layout. Course includes classroom
and hands-on segments and taught through WV
Laborers’ Training Center instructors. Last 5
week summer course.
Credit Hours: 2
BLST-212 BLASTING SAFETY ISSUES AND
LAWS
Pre-requisites: BLST 102
This course emphasizes safety regulations and
accompanying legislation for the correct
handling, storage and procedures with blasting
equipment, explosives and their components,
and tools. Proper equipment selection is
stressed. Students will also develop a thorough
understanding of the consequences of their
actions on blast sites including responsibility
and liability. Blasting regulations and
recommendations from MSHA, OSM, BATF,
DOT, OSHA, NFPA, IME, WV Miners Health
Safety and Training, WV Office of Explosives and
Blasting as well as relevant KY, OH, VA, PA, and
MD blasting regulations will be reviewed.
Credit Hours: 3
BLST-213 BLASTING FIELD CAMP II
Credit Hours: 1-4
Pre-requisites: Completion of 3rd semester or
permission of instructor
BLST-210 BLAST DESIGN AND LAYOUT
This second field camp gives student more
opportunity for practical hands-on experience
with blasting in a highly supervised
environment. Students will work on more
advanced blasting applications and problems
utilizing their skills and knowledge from the first
three semesters of the program. Students will
assist driller(s) and certified blaster(s) in various
drill and blast activities and associated
paperwork. Students will continue field training
with various blasting regulatory inspectors and
explosive manufacturing sites.
Pre-requisites: BLST105, BLST 106
Co-requisites: MATH 115
Students will learn to review and interpret blast
plans in order to determine initial blast
parameters and constraints. Konya, Ash,
Bergmann and Chiapetta formulas are studied
to determine proper production and pre-split
hole diameters, powder factors, decking
requirements, stem heights, spacing and
burden calculations, and subdrill requirements.
Spatial relationships related to protected and
other structures and ground vibration
prediction techniques are broadly studied, as
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
Credit Hours: 2
BLST-225 BLASTING IN CONSTRUCTION AND
QUARRIES
295
Course Descriptions
within other first semester courses and includes
applied operations and concentration on the
mathematics and calculations used in the field
of blasting. Calculations will include
volumetrics, explosive charge weights, scaled
distances, firing times, pounds per delay,
powder factors, spacing and burden, ground
vibration predictions, spatial relationships, and
Ohm’s Law.
Course Descriptions
Course Descriptions
Pre-requisites: BLST 105 or permission of instructor
This course covers blasting operations in
surface/underground rock quarries and on
construction sites. Trench, highway, foundation
and secondary blasting scenarios are explored.
Methods to reduce blasting flyrock potential is
continually studied. Rock fragmentation
analysis methods and case studies are
reviewed.
BridgeValley CTC
production, marketing, law, economics, fiscal
and monetary policy, ethics, and technology.
Other current business topics may be discussed.
Credit Hours: 3
BUSN-112 BUSINESS MATHEMATICS
(GEC 2)
Pre-requisites: ACT Math 19 or Accuplacer Arithmetic
85.
Credit Hours: 3
BLST-226 ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES IN
BLASTING
Pre-requisites: BLST 210, BLST 212, HWY 120
This course concentrates on the environmental
impact of blasting. Students will learn about the
negative impacts of uncontrolled blasting and
possible environmental effects. Students will
learn how to control and minimize unwanted
environmental factors associated with blasting.
Concentration will be placed on close proximity
blasting to structures, including the creation,
detection, migration, and dissipation of noxious
gases. Case studies are widely studied.
Weather, open face direction, over and under
confinement, fly rock, gases, air blast, vibration
regression analysis, structure response, and
topography will be examined.
Co-requisites: MATH 012 if required by placement
This course will use fractions, decimals, and
percentages to solve problems involving
equations. Simple and compound interest,
future and present value, annuities, sinking
funds, banking, inventory valuation,
depreciation methods, retail pricing and
business discounts, payroll taxes, overhead
allocations, home ownership with amortization
schedules, financial statements and ratios are
other topics that are taught. Other possible
topics include financial statements and ratios,
investments, and simple statistics. (also listed as
MATH 112)
Credit Hours: 3
Credit Hours: 3
BUSN-120 INTERPERSONAL RELATIONS:
INTERVIEWING STRATEGIES
BLST-228 INITIATION SYSTEMS
Pre-requisites: Must have completed at least 40 Credit
Hours towards degree requirements
Pre-requisites: BLST 210
An advanced study of initiation systems
involved in explosives detonation. Scheduled
are electric, non-electric, and electronic
systems. In-depth aspects of circuits, hook-up
techniques, shot timing, blast performance,
safety, and blast equipment requirements are
covered.
Credit Hours: 3
BLST-299 SPECIAL TOPICS
Special topics course reserved for sophomore
status.
Credit Hours: 1-4
This course will prepare a student for the job
search by composing resumes and letters of
application. SWOT analysis, salary research,
statement of worth, includes building a
professional portfolio and participating in a
mock interview.
Credit Hours: 1
BUSN-121 INTERPERSONAL RELATIONS:
PROFESSIONAL ETIQUETTE
Course emphasizes essential professional
courtesies, introductions, gift giving, meeting
arrangements, and dining tips. Concentration
on both American and international cultures.
Credit Hours: 1
BUSN
Business
BUSN-106 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS
This course is a survey of business practices and
procedures. It explains basic business principles
such as management, accounting, finance,
296
BUSN-122 INTERPERSONAL RELATIONS:
CUSTOMER SERVICE
Pre-requisites: Eligible for ENGL 101
Professional interpersonal communication
skills. Includes both verbal and non-verbal
signals. Meeting organization goals, attracting
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
and retaining customers, diffusing angry clients
dealing with difficult situations, and working
with diverse populations.
Course Descriptions
Prerequisites: Eligible for ENG 101 and
keyboarding skills.
Credit Hours: 3
Credit Hours: 1
BUSN-266 BUSINESS INTERSHIP
Credit Hours: 1-3
BUSN-201 BUSINESS LAW I (B)
Pre-requisites: Eligible for ENGL 101
This course is intended to serve as a basis for
understanding of the legal system and legal
processes as well as legal reasoning. This
course will explore various aspects of the law
including substantive and procedural law as
well as topics such as contracts, property,
crimes, torts, business organizations and other
aspects of the law related to business. These
students will acquire an overview of the law but
will not be able to practice law or deal with
complicated legal issues.
Credit Hours: 3
BUSN-214 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS
Pre-requisites: BUSN 106
This course reviews how to compete ethically in
the external environment (cultural, legal,
political and social) of international business. It
examines international practices in accounting,
communication, finance, management and
marketing. It discusses theories of international
trade and international economic development.
Credit Hours: 3
BUSN-230 BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS AND
ETHICS (B)
Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 Grade of “C” or better
This course is designed to help students
develop writing skills needed to succeed in
today’s technologically enhanced workplace
through the use of a comprehensive
grammar/mechanics review. Upon completion
of this course the student will possess the skills
needed to compose business correspondence
(letters, memos, reports, etc.) at the computer.
The student will have enhanced listening,
speaking, critical thinking, and nonverbal skills
enhanced through the use of workshop
activities. The student will be able to take a
conscious stand on social issues such as ethics,
etiquette, and multicultural concerns.
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
Pre-requisites: ENG 101, completion of a minimum of
45 hours and/or permission of supervising instructor
and Program Coordinator
Associate degree business students work in
businesses and industries in the community at
least 160 hours for the purpose of gaining onthe-job experience. Students attend a weekly
seminar. Students are responsible for securing
employment. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis.
Credit Hours: 2
BUSN-296 BUSINESS STATISTICS (B)
(GEC 4)
Pre-requisites: “C” or better in MATH 130
Business statistics is an introduction to
descriptive statistics and some inferential
statistics. It explains measures of central
tendency, measures of dispersion, probability
concepts, hypothesis testing and other
statistical techniques. It explains both discrete
and continuous probability distributions. It
shows how to use these distributions to
describe and make inferences so better
decisions can be made in the fields of business
and economics. These uses are transferable to
other fields such as engineering, medicine, and
other fields. The use of technology and/or a
statistical calculator will be required in certain
applications. Prerequisite: MAT 120 with a C or
better.
Credit Hours: 3
BUSN-298 BUSINESS STUDIES SEMINAR
Pre-requisites: All graduation requirements except for
the courses in which the student is currently enrolled
must be completed.
This capstone course must be taken the
semester the community college student plans
to graduate. Program specific and general
knowledge exit examinations, oral
presentations, writing assignments, and case
analyses will be used to measure student
competencies. Seminars will be presented on
such topics as resume writing, interviewing
skills, time management, business etiquette,
and customer service.
Credit Hours: 1
BUSN-299 SPECIAL TOPICS
297
Course Descriptions
BUSN-199 SPECIAL TOPICS
Special topics course relating to Business.
Course Descriptions
BridgeValley CTC
Special topics course relating to Business.
CHEM-111 FUNDAMENTALS OF CHEMISTRY
LAB
Credit Hours: 1-3
Pre-requisites: ACT English score 18 or higher or ENG
101 or ENGL 095 with a C or better, ACT Math
admission level scores
CHEM
Chemistry
CHEM-100 CONSUMER CHEMISTRY
This course is the study of the fundamental
concepts of chemistry for non-science majors.
The focus is on the role that chemistry plays in
the daily lives of individuals and the effect of
chemistry on society.
Credit hours: 3
CHEM-101 GENERAL CHEMISTRY
(GEC 2)
Co-requisites: ENGL 101, CHEM 110
Corresponding lab course for CHEM 110.
Credit Hours: 1
CIET
Civil Engineering Technology
CIET-114 STATICS (GEC 4)
Co-requisites: MATH 113 and MATH 114
Pre-requisites: MATH 060 or MATH 113, 100 level
English or equivalent ACT scores
A general chemistry course that provides an
introduction to elements, atoms, the periodic
table, covers the nature of ionic and molecular
compounds, and discusses chemical reactions
including stoichiometry energies, rates, and
equilibria.
Credit Hours: 3
CHEM-102 GENERAL CHEMISTRY LAB
Pre-requisites: 100 level Math, 100 level English or
equivalent ACT scores
A virtual lab course for CHEM 101 General
Chemistry. Explores the five different chemistry
areas: inorganic qualitative analysis, simulation
of foundational experiments of quantum
mechanics, behavior of ideal, real and van der
Waals gases, precise quantitative titration
experiments, and calorimetry experiments.
Credit Hours: 1
CHEM-110 FUNDAMENTALS OF CHEMISTRY
(GEC 2)
Pre-requisites: ACT English score 18 or higher or ENG
101 or ENGL 095 with a C or better, ACT Math
admission level scores
Co-requisites: ENG 101
Fundamentals of inorganic, organic, and
biological chemistry. Oriented toward the
needs of associate degree level health,
profession programs. A laboratory component
is required (CHEM-111).
Study of the fundamental principles of
mechanics of rigid bodies and the application of
these principles to engineering problems.
Credit Hours: 3
CIET-115 STRENGTH OF MATERIALS
Co-requisites: CIET 114
This course includes fundamental stress and
strain relationships, torsion, shear and bending
moments, stress and deflections in beams and
columns, and combined stresses. Laboratory
experience relates classroom theory through
experiments involving tension, compression,
shear.
Credit Hours: 3
CIET-131 CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS
A study of the properties of a wide range of
construction materials including aggregates,
concrete, bituminous materials, steel,
nonferrous metals, wood and masonry. Simple
material estimates are also included. Standard
lab tests are conducted with concentration on
aggregates and concrete. The course is
supplemented with field trips to batch plants,
quarries and/or other relevant sites.
Credit Hours: 3
CIET-132 HIGHWAY MATERIALS
A study of the properties of a wide range of
materials used in highway construction and
additional construction materials. Topics
include aggregates, concreted bituminous
materials, steel, nonferrous metals, wood and
Credit Hours: 3
298
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Credit Hours: 2
CIET-133 HIGHWAY MATERIALS LAB COrequisites: CIET 1325
Laboratory testing to support material
properties presented in CIET 132; tests are
conducted with a concentration on aggregates
and concrete; lab and site visits also
supplement course
CIET-215 STRUCTURAL STEEL DESIGN
Co-requisites: CIET 115
A practical study of the analysis and design of
steel structural members used in the
construction of highways, buildings, and
industrial facilities including simple beams,
columns, and connections.
Credit Hours: 3
CIET-216 STRUCTURAL CONCRETE DESIGN
Credit Hours: 1
Co-requisites: CIET 115
CIET-141 SURVEYING I
Practical study of the analysis and design of
elementary reinforced concrete structural
members, including beams, floor systems,
columns, footings, and retaining walls
Co-requisites: MATH 113, MATH 114, DRFT 120 or
instructor permission
Fundamental concepts of surveying and the
acquisition of the data necessary for civil
engineering projects. Topics include note
keeping, measurement of distances, angles, and
elevations; azimuth and bearing calculations;
field traversing and traverse calculations and
methods of topographic mapping. Use of
appropriate equipment is emphasized in field
labs. Use of current computer software is
employed where appropriate.
Credit Hours: 3
CIET-222 SOILS AND FOUNDATIONS
Co-requisites: CIET 115
Origin, composition, classification of soils;
fundamental soil properties and stresses in
soils. Subsurface exploration. Introduction to
foundation design and construction of earth
structures. Field and laboratory testing.
Credit Hours: 3
Credit Hours: 3
CIET-145 SURVEYING II
CIET-230 HYDRAULICS AND DRAINAGE
Pre-requisites: CIET 141
Course Descriptions
masonry. Simple material estimates are also
included
Course Descriptions
Pre-requisites: PHYS 101 or permission of instructor.
The application of surveying principles in the
construction of engineering works. Topics
include profiles and cross-sections; construction
surveys and earthwork computations;
calculations involving circular and parabolic
curves; geodetic and state plane coordinates;
total station surveys and introduction to GPS. In
the field labs, appropriate equipment and
techniques are employed in the performance of
control and location surveys. This subject makes
extensive use of current surveying computer
packages and integration with other relevant
software.
Principles of hydrostatics; fundamental
concepts of fluid flow in pipes and open
channels; methods of estimating storm water
runoff; sizing of culverts, storm and sanitary
sewers, and open channels. Laboratory
experience relates classroom theory through
experiments and/or hydraulic computer
software.
Credit Hours: 3
Co-requisites: CIET 222 or permission of instructor
CIET-199 FRESHMAN PROJECTS
Highway planning and design including the
study of surveys and plans. Topics include
design characteristics and standards, surveying
and mapping, geometric design, pavements,
earthwork, drainage, safety and environmental
considerations.
Pre-requisites: Consent of the advisor
To provide for supervised independent study or
projects in Civil Engineering Technology for
students in the freshman year.
Credit Hours: 1-3
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
Credit Hours: 3
CIET-245 HIGHWAYS
Pre-requisites: CIET 145, CIET 230 or permission of
instructor
Credit Hours: 3
299
Course Descriptions
CIET-299 SOPHMORE PROJECTS
Pre-requisites: Consent of advisor
To provide for supervised independent study or
projects in Civil Engineering Technology for
students in the sophomore year.
Credit Hours: 1-3
COMM
Communications
COMM-100 ORAL COMMUNICATION (GEC 1)
This course is designed to develop the student’s
skill in the organization of ideas for oral
expression and presentation. Topics covered
include interpersonal communication,
intrapersonal communication, small group
communication and effective public speaking.
Particular emphasis will be placed on selfawareness, professional presentations, team
building, effective listening skills, and
finding/crediting source material.
Credit Hours: 3
CRJU
Criminal Justice
CRJU-101 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL
JUSTICE
A course designed to introduce the student to
the study of crime, society, reaction to crime,
the organization and function of various
components of the criminal justice system; law
enforcement, the courts and corrections.
Credit Hours: 3
CRJU-141 INTRODUCTION TO HOMELAND
SECURITY
Pre-requisites: TSA Employees Only
This course will introduce students to the
vocabulary and important components of
homeland security. Topics to be covered
include the importance of associated agencies
and their interrelated duties and relationships;
events impacting homeland security, state,
national, and international laws, and the most
critical threats confronting homeland security.
Credit Hours: 3
CRJU-142 INTELLIGENCE ANALYSIS AND
SECURITY MANAGEMENT
BridgeValley CTC
This course examines intelligence analysis and
its indispensable relationship to the security
management of terrorist attacks, man-made
disasters and natural disasters. It also explores
vulnerabilities of our national defense and
private sectors. Students will discuss
substantive issues regarding intelligence
support of homeland security measures
implemented by the US and explore how the
intelligence community operates.
Credit Hours: 3
CRJU-143 TRANSPORTATION AND BORDER
SECURITY
Pre-requisites: TSA Employees Only
This course provides an in-depth view of
modern border and transportation security.
Specific topics of study will include security for
ships and seaports; aircraft and airports; trains;
ground transportation and their related
terminals; commercial trucking; pipelines and
power transmission; bridges and tunnels; and
major border crossing control points. Existing
and emergent technologies needed to detect
terrorists, their weapons and inherent
vulnerabilities in infrastructure will be a special
emphasis in the course, along with discussion of
the legal, economic, political and cultural
aspects of transportation safety and border
security.
Credit Hours: 3
CRJU-200 CRIMINAL JUSTICE INTERNSHIP
OPTIONAL ELECTIVE
Pre-requisites: Permission of Program Coordinator
This course is designed to provide practical
practicum experience to students in a criminal
justice agency. 120 clock hours of experience is
required. Optional elective.
Credit Hours: 3
CRJU-201 INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC
SCIENCE
Pre-requisites: Permission of Program Coordinator
This course covers the scientific aspects of
criminal investigation. It focuses on physical
evidence, fingerprints, the application of
forensic science, the collection, examination
and preservation of evidence. The student will
learn the capabilities of the advanced police
science laboratory in the study of firearms, hair,
Pre-requisites: TSA Employees Only
300
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fibers, blood, paint, tools, poisons and other
material
Credit Hours: 3
Course Descriptions
are dealt with in the correctional system (both
institution and community) and police
departments.
Credit Hours: 3
CRJU-212 COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS
Pre-requisites: CRJU 101
CRJU-207 CRIMINAL LAW
This course provides the student with an
understanding of the evolution of the US
correctional system. It gives a survey of the
historical development of alternative
approaches to incarceration from early
correctional procedure through modern
approaches. Specific emphasis is on the
antecedents of modern correctional
procedures, administration, and alternatives to
incarceration in the state of WV. This course
introduces the student to sentencing systems,
diversionary programs, and the roles of those
who monitor offenders who in communitybased programs.
Pre-requisites: CRJU 101
Credit Hours: 3
This course examines criminal, correctional,
constitutional and procedural law. The basic
constitutional rights applicable to those
involved in the criminal justice system from
arrest to incarceration are discussed. The
development of public policy and the
administration of criminal justice and the legal
principles for determining criminal and civil
liability are studied.
CRJU-213 RACE AND GENDER IN CRIMINAL
JUSTICE (GEC 3)
This course introduces race and gender issues
from the perspectives of offenders, victims and
professionals who work in the criminal justice
system. Theoretical perspectives, as they apply
to gender and racial issues, are explored.
Credit Hours: 3
Credit Hours: 3
Credit Hours: 3
CRJU-223 POLICE AND SOCIETY
Pre-requisites: CRJU 101
CRJU-208 ETHICS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (GEC 3)
Pre-requisites: CRJU 101
This course provides a survey of the various
ethical systems, and focuses on the ethical
issues, problem and dilemmas encountered by
professionals in the field of criminal justice, the
recognition of moral issues and the
development of moral imagination. Corruption,
brutality and morality are discussed.
Credit Hours: 3
This course is a study of law enforcement from
an operational perspective. Law enforcement
functions such as patrol, communications,
investigations, traffic, special operations and
other line staff functions are reviewed. Officer
safety and duty-related stressors are also
examined.
Credit Hours: 3
CRJU-224 PUNISHMENT AND CORRECTIONS
Pre-requisites: CRJU 101
CRJU-211 DRUGS AND SOCIETY
This course is designed to deal with the use and
abuse of drugs and alcohol, both legal and
illegal. The etiology, social phenomena,
psychological and physiological effects, and the
current modes of treatment within the criminal
justice setting will be examined. Particular
attention will be paid to how the above issues
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
This course is a survey of criminal offenders and
their environment. Material is presented
describing the types and amount of crime in the
US. Characteristics such as age, race, gender
and class of offender types are discussed. The
interaction between society, the criminal justice
system and the offender is examined. The
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Course Descriptions
CRJU-204 JUVENILE JUSTICE AND
DELINQUENCY
A study of delinquent and criminal behavior
issues among the lower, middle and upper
social classes of youths and adolescents giving
consideration to history, crime causation,
treatment and prevention and court related
programs. The course covers the proper
handling and referral of juveniles. Juvenile
court organization, issues related to operation
of juvenile courts, procedures, detention, filing
and enforcement of juvenile code. Juvenile
drug addition, mental illness, neglect,
dependency cases and habitual offenders are
discussed.
Course Descriptions
current correctional practices that focus on the
goals, organization, functions and operations of
state, county and local correctional systems are
examined. Theories on causation are analyzed.
Credit Hours: 3
BridgeValley CTC
and interview skills and serve as the CRJU
capstone course with an end of program exam.
Credit Hours: 3
CRJU-280 CRIMINAL PROCEDURE
Pre-requisites: CRJU 101
CRJU-225 VICTIMOLOGY
This course is an examination of the history and
philosophy of treatment, the structure of the
correctional system and the legal basis for
treatment. Consideration is given to the history
of corrections and how that history has shaped
treatment approaches. This course focuses on
treatment modalities presently being used in
working with offenders, issues of public safety,
security and raises questions of whether
treatment methods are effective.
Credit Hours: 3
CRJU-226 COURT SYSTEMS IN THE US
This course will provide students with a working
knowledge of the major structures and basic
legal concepts that underlie the court system in
the US. The structure of the courts, the nature
of the criminal law they apply, and the
procedures followed by them will be examined,
in addition to the history and development of
our court systems and the goals they seek to
achieve will be examined. Local, state and
federal court systems will be discussed.
Credit Hours: 3
CRJU-230 CRIMINOLOGY
Pre-requisites: CRJU 101
This course involves the basic study of the
nature and peculiarities of human behavior and
its direct relationship to crime and delinquency.
Credit Hours: 3
CRJU-262 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN
CRIMINAL JUSTICE
Pre-requisites: CRJU 101 and permission of Program
Coordinator
This course provides the student with an
understanding of the organization and
administration of criminal justice system
agencies. Topics covered include the primary
components of criminal justice and their
responsibilities, functions and activities,
planning and research, public relations,
personnel training inspection and control, and
policy formulation in criminal justice system
agencies. This course will include job seeking
302
This is a study of the scope, purpose and
principles of criminal law, analysis of crime and
offenses and the mechanics of criminal justice
procedures in the US and WV, as they apply to
search and seizure and investigations. Also
considered is the evaluation of evidence and
proof with regards to kind, degree,
admissibility, competence and weight. This
course emphasizes rules of evidence at the
operational level of law enforcement.
Credit Hours: 3
CSCT
Information Technology
CSCT-101 INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING
Pre-requisites: MATH 110
This course introduces the student to the basic
control structures, data types, and algorithms in
programming.
Credit Hours: 3
CSCT-103 CREATIVE AND CRITICAL THINKING
(GEC 4)
This course is designed to guide the student
through a variety of thought and hands-on
exercises that will challenge the student and
introduce them to new knowledge, tools, and
experiences useful in problem solving and idea
generation.
Credit Hours: 3
CSCT-104 TECHNICAL APPLICATIONS FOR
SPREADSHEETS AND DATABASES
This course is designed to teach students how
to use Microsoft Office applications to solve
problems, interpret data, and present that data
in ways that will be best suited for those in
technical fields of study.
Credit Hours: 3
CSCT-120 COMPUTER GRAPHICS ILLUSTRATOR
The course covers the use of Adobe Illustrator
to create and use vector graphics. Students
learn to create and draw shapes, lines text;
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BridgeValley CTC
Credit Hours: 3
CSCT-122 COMPUTER GRAPHICS - INDESIGN
This graphics course focuses on desktop
publishing using Adobe InDesign. This course
teaches students to create print
layouts, multimedia content, interactive PDF
documents, posters, fliers, brochures,
magazines and books. Students will also learn
to work with text and set up a document, work
with frames, colors, place and link graphics,
create graphics, work with transparency, work
with tools and tables, prepare, package and
export documents.
Credit Hours: 3
CSCT-124 COMPUTER GRAPHICS - PHOTOSHOP
This graphics design course focuses on digital
photo and image editing using Adobe
Photoshop. Students will learn to work with
photos, downloaded icons or scanned artwork
and edit these images by modifying size and
scale, changing image compression and putting
one image within another. Students will also
learn to create icons, buttons, lines and text art.
Credit Hours: 3
CSCT-130 INTRODUCTION TO WEB DESIGN
This course will take an in depth look at web
design concepts and techniques. It will examine
theoretical concepts that make the world of
Web design unique. Also, this course will adopt
a practical hands-on approach when examining
Web development techniques. Along with
examining different coding strategies, this
course will explore the advancement of Web
site implementation, as well as, timeless
problem solving strategies.
Credit Hours: 2
CSCT-131 CONTENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS
This course will show students how to use
server space, FTP programs, and Content
Management Systems (CMS) to put together
web sites. It is designed to complement CSCT
130 but it is also suited for Digital Design
students. Other students with experience in
Web Design or Digital Design may also take the
course for more experience using CMS.
This course is an overview of gaming
throughout history. Topics will start with games
in ancient history and end with gaming in the
modern computer age.
Credit Hours: 1
CSCT-152 GAME DESIGN I
Co-requisites: CSCT 101 & 130
This course is intended to teach students how
to create games using Game Maker Studio.
Game Maker Studio allows you to create games
using HTML5 and export to a variety of
platforms including mobile devices.
Credit Hours: 3
CSCT-210 FUNDAMENTALS OF OPERATING
SYSTEMS
This course is an introduction to the
organization, implementation, and
administration of computer operating systems.
Credit Hours: 3
CSCT-212 ALGORITHMS
Pre-requisites: CSCT 101
Basic paradigms for the design and analysis of
efficient algorithms: recursive algorithms,
sorting and searching, divide-and-conquer,
hashing, reductions, and the use of
randomness.
Credit Hours: 3
CSCT-218 SCRIPTING (POWERSHELL)
This course introduces the student to the power
of the PowerShell scripting programming
language. Students will learn how to interact
with the Windows PowerShell command line to
provide secure administration of Windows
operating Systems.
Credit Hours: 3
CSCT-219 PROJECT MANAGEMENT
Pre-requisites: Programming Language Elective
This course covers the topics necessary to
achieve quality project management. Topics
include project integration, scope, time, cost,
quality and HR management along with risk and
procurement. This course is the capstone
course for Information Technology majors
Credit Hours: 3
Credit Hours: 1
CSCT-230 INTERMEDIATE WEB DESIGN
CSCT-150 SURVEY OF GAMING
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
Pre-requisites: CSCT 130
303
Course Descriptions
import graphics and pictures; and to use these
features to create web pages.
Course Descriptions
Course Descriptions
This course builds upon the skills learned in
Intro to Web Design by asking students to use
them in a group environment for a long term
project. Topics of user needs and requirements
will be discussed while exploring content
management systems.
Credit Hours: 3
BridgeValley CTC
This course is and introduction to the theories,
terminology, equipment, and distribution media
associated with data communications and
networking.
Credit Hours: 3
CSCT-260 VISUAL BASIC .NET I
Pre-requisites: CSCT 101
CSCT-232 MOBILE APPLICATION
DEVELOPMENT I
Pre-requisites: CSCT 101, CSCT 130
This course is an introduction to programming
for iOS, Android, and mobile web development.
Credit Hours: 3
Co-requisites: CSCT 101
This course introduces students to the standard
visual basic forms, controls, and event
procedures. Students will be heavily exposed to
the object-oriented programming paradigm.
Credit Hours: 3
CSCT-234 JAVASCRIPT I
Pre-requisites: CSCT 101, CSCT 130
CSCT-262 C# PROGRAMMING I
Pre-requisites: CSCT 101
This course uses JavaScript, an interpreted web
programming language with object-oriented
capabilities. The student will learn how to
program in JavaScript and how to efficiently use
it in web development. By the end of the
course, the student will be able to design and
code feature-rich dynamic web pages using
JavaScript.
Credit Hours: 3
CSCT-237 PHP PROGRAMMING I
Pre-requisites: CSCT 101, CSCT 130, Enrollment in or
previous completion of CIT 230 recommended.
This course will teach the student the basics of
PHP programming. Students will learn to build
web pages containing dynamic content through
use of PHP scripting and database querying.
Also covered in this course is basic HTML and
SQL.
Credit Hours: 3
CSCT-238 ASP .NET I
Pre-requisites: CSCT 101, CSCT 130, Enrollment in or
previous completion of CIT 230 recommended.
This course will explore Web Programming
using ASP .NET and how to create and maintain
interactive and dynamic Web applications using
object-oriented programming.
The course introduces students to the standard
C# forms, controls, and event procedures.
Sequential and random access file handling,
database access, web forms, and general
language structure and syntax will be explored.
Credit Hours: 3
CSCT-264 PYTHON I
Pre-requisites: CSCT 101
This course introduces the student to the
Python programming language. Students will
learn how to implement all the basic
programming constructs as well as perform
rudimentary graphics manipulation. The
student will conceive, design
and implement a project by the end of the class.
Credit Hours: 3
CSCT-266 C++ PROGRAMMING I
Pre-requisites: CSCT 101
This course presents a comprehensive
introduction to the C++ programming language.
Students will write programs using most of the
standard language constructs.
Credit Hours: 3
CSCT-268 JAVA I
Credit Hours: 3
Pre-requisites: CSCT 101
CSCT-244 DATA COMMUNICATIONS AND
NETWORKING
This course introduces students to the JAVA
programming language. This object-oriented
language is popular for developing secure,
platform independent applications and is often
the language of choice for internet applications.
Pre-requisites: CSCT 101
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BridgeValley CTC
CSCT-270 VISUAL BASIC .NET II
Pre-requisites: CSCT 260
This course covers advanced topics in Visual
Basic .NET.
Credit Hours: 3
CSCT-280 DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS
Pre-requisites: Programming Language Elective
This course covers database management
theory, the logical and physical structures of
several current models, and deals in a practical,
experiential way with the design of databases
and the management systems that control
them.
Credit Hours: 3
CSCT-282 SYSTEMS ANALYSIS & DESIGN
Pre-requisites: CSCT 280 and a Programming
Language course
This course covers all phases of the systems
development life cycle (SLDC): feasibility,
analysis, design and implementation. Students
will learn to use project management and
economic analysis tools as part of the
development process. A case study approach
will be used throughout the course. This course
will serve as the capstone course for Computer
Science majors and should be taken in the
student’s final semester.
Introduction to the clinical, developmental and
microscopic structures of the face and oral
cavity; detailed study of primary and
permanent dentitions including crown and root
morphology, numbering systems and eruption
patterns.
Credit Hours: 3
DENT-126 HEAD & NECK ANATOMY
Pre-requisites: DENT-125, 132, 141, 152; BIOL 210;
CHEM 110, 111
Co-requisites: DENT-134, 144, 151, 153, 156; BIOL 230,
231
A detailed study of the intraoral and extraoral
structures of the head and neck region. Systems
include skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular,
nervous, glandular, lymphatics and anatomy of
local anesthesia.
Credit Hours: 2
DENT-132 DENTAL HYGIENE I
Co-requisites: DENT-125, 141, 152; BIOL-210; CHEM110,111
Introduction to the role and responsibilities of
the dental hygienist in preventive dentistry and
clinical practice; didactic laboratory and clinical
hours are devoted to development of basic
skills of assessment, treatment and evaluation.
Prevention of disease transmission and medical
emergency prevention and management is
included. Meets freshman seminar objectives.
Credit Hours: 3
Credit Hours: 5
CSCT-290 COMPUTER SCIENCE CAPSTONE
This course is the capstone course for all CSCT
majors. The student will design a final project
that will demonstrate what they have learned in
their time here. The student will meet with the
professor on a weekly basis to discuss the
progress of their project and will present their
project to a small panel of instructors at the end
of the class.
DENT-134 DENTAL HYGIENE CLINIC II
Credit Hours: 3
DENT
Dental Hygiene
DENT-125 DENTAL EMBRYOLOGY, HISTOLOGY
& ANATOMY
Co-requisites: DENT 132, 141, 152; BIOL 210; CHEM
110, 111
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
Pre-requisites: DENT-125, 132, 141, 152; BIOL 210;
CHEM 110,111
Co-requisites: DENT-126, 144, 151, 153, 156; BIOL 230,
231
Nine hours of clinical practice per week with
concentration on developing basic patient
treatment and assessment skills.
Credit Hours: 3
DENT-141 RADIOLOGY
Co-requisites: DENT-125, 132, 152; BIOL-210; CHEM
110,111
A study of the history, basic principles,
biological effects, landmarks and interpretation
and the role of radiographs in dental hygiene
and dental care. Laboratory component will
305
Course Descriptions
Credit Hours: 3
Course Descriptions
Course Descriptions
include instruction on intraoral and extra oral
projections using digital radiographic processes.
BridgeValley CTC
Pre-requisites: DENT-125, 132, 141, 152; BIOL 210;
CHEM-110,111
Credit Hours: 2
Co-requisites: DENT-126, 134, BIOL-230, 231
DENT-144 PERIODONTICS I
Pre-requisites: DENT-125,132,141,152; BIOL-210;
CHEM 110, 111
Co-requisites: DENT-126, 134, 151, 153, 156, BIOL230, 231
A study of periodontal disease and associated
anatomy, etiology, and treatment modalities.
Dental hygiene care planning for the
periodontal patient is included.
A study of the drugs used in and concerned with
the practice of dentistry, their classification,
usage, methods of administration, and
toxicology.
Credit Hours: 2
DENT-225 PATHOLOGY
Pre-requisites: DENT-126, 134, 144, 151, 153, 156;
BIOL-230, 231
Credit Hours: 1
Co-requisites: DENT-246,256,235,237,251,260
DENT-151 NUTRITION
Pre-requisites: DENT-125,132,141,152; BIOL 210;
CHEM 110, 111
A study of general and oral pathology as related
to oral disease conditions and abnormalities of
the head, neck and periodontium.
Co-requisites: DENT-126,134,144,153,156; BIOL-230,
231
Credit Hours: 2
DENT-235 PERIODONTICS II
A detailed study of nutrition as applied to
general and oral health. Nutritional counseling
and dietary evaluation will be included.
Pre-requisites: DENT-126, 134, 144, 151, 153, 156;
BIOL-230, 231
Credit Hours: 2
Co-requisites: DENT-246,256,225, 237, 251,260
DENT-152 PREVENTIVE CONCEPTS
An advanced study of periodontal disease
eitology and pharmacological and surgical
treatment modalities. The interaction of
periodontal disease and systemic health will be
emphasized.
Co-requisites: DENT-125, 132, 141; BIOL-210; CHEM
110, 111
A study of the etiologic factors and role of
preventive strategies in periodontal and dental
diseases.
Credit Hours: 1
DENT-153 ADVANCED DENTAL HYGIENE
PROCEDURES
Pre-requisites: DENT-125,132,141,152; BIOL-210;
CHEM 110,111
Co-requisites: DENT-126,134,144,151,156; BIOL-230,
231
Continued study of dental hygiene clinical
procedures utilized in the delivery of dental
hygiene care. Topics include but are not limited
to; air polishing, topical anesthesia/pain
control, ultrasonic scaling advanced
instrumentation, appliance care, implant
maintenance, instrument sharpening and
dental photography.
Credit Hours: 1
Credit Hours: 1
DENT-237 DENTAL HYGIENE CLINIC III
Pre-requisites: DENT-126, 134, 144, 151, 153, 156;
BIOL-230, 231
Co-requisites: DENT-246,256,225,235,251,260
Twelve hours of clinical practice per week with
concentration on strengthening clinical skills,
with particular concentration on treatment of
patients demonstrating moderate to advanced
periodontal disease. Extramural clinical
rotations at various area clinics/health care
facilities are included.
Credit Hours: 4
DENT-239 DENTAL HYGIENE CLINIC IV
Pre-requisites: DENT-246,256,225,235,237,251
Co-requisites: DENT-239,258,262
DENT-156 PHARMACOLOGY
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BridgeValley CTC
A study of the dental hygiene process of care
and care planning for the management of
patients with special needs.
Credit Hours: 2
DENT-258 ETHICS & PRACTICE MANAGEMENT
(GEC 3)
Credit Hours: 5
Pre-requisites: DENT-246,256,225,235,237,251
DENT-240 APPLIED CONCEPTS IN CLINICAL
DENTAL HYGIENE
Co-requisites: DENT-239,240,262
Pre-requisites: DENT-246,256,225,235,237,251
Co-requisites: DENT-239,258, 240, 262
A study of the expanded duties and topics
expected of dental hygienist in today’s dental
practices.
Credit Hours: 1
A study of the ethics and legal principles
involved in dental hygiene practice and
preparation for employment through resume’
writing and interviewing. The course also
provides a review of the role of the dental
hygienist in practice management.
Credit Hours: 2
DENT-260 DENTAL HEALTH EDUCATION
Pre-requisites: DENT-126,134,144,151,153,156; BIOL230,231
DENT-246 DENTAL MATERIALS
Pre-requisites: DENT-126, 134, 144, 151,153,156;
BIOL-230, 231
Co-requisites: DENT-256,225,235,237,251,260
A study of the general composition, properties
and manipulation of dental materials as they
apply to current dental and dental hygiene
practice. Laboratory devoted to skill
development in services delivered by dental
hygienists.
Credit Hours: 2
DENT-251 ANESTHESIA/PAIN CONTROL
Pre-requisites: DENT-126, 134, 144, 151,153,156;
BIOL-230, 231
Co-requisites: DENT-246,256,225,235,237,260
Co-requisites: DENT-246,256,225,235,237,251
A study of the planning and implementation of
dental health education with concentration on
educational principles, methodologies and
programs for specific populations.
Credit Hours: 2
DENT-262 COMMUNITY HEALTH (GEC 4)
Pre-requisites: DENT-246,256,225,235,237,251
Co-requisites: DENT 239,240,258
A continuation of Dental Health Education
emphasizing program planning, statistical
analysis and application in community health
settings. Programs are conducted in local
schools and other area facilities.
Credit Hours: 3
A study of local anesthesia administration for
the dental hygienist. Includes neurophysiology,
pharmacology, armamentarium, complications,
legal considerations and techniques for delivery
of local anesthesia.
Credit Hours: 2
DENT-256 DENTAL HYGIENE CARE PLANNING
Pre-requisites: DENT-126, 134, 144, 151,153,156;
BIOL-230, 231
DENT-299 SPECIAL TOPICS IN-DENTAL
HYGIENE
Independent study of topic(s) pertinent to the
profession of dental hygiene or to dental
hygiene practice.
DESL
Diesel Technology
Co-requisites: DENT-246, 225, 235, 237, 251,260
DESL-112 THEORY & OPERATION
Co-requisites: ENGL 095
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
307
Course Descriptions
Fifteen hours of clinical practice per week with
concentration on refining clinical skills, with
particular concentration on total patient care
and treatment of patients demonstrating
moderate to advanced periodontal disease.
Extramural clinical rotations at various area
clinics/health care facilities.
Course Descriptions
Course Descriptions
Fundamentals of operation and construction of
two and four stroke diesel engines. All the
engine components and support systems will be
included.
BridgeValley CTC
Fundamentals of battery construction and
usage; covers alternators, starters and
capacitors.
Credit Hours: 1
Credit Hours: 2
DESL-123 CHASSIS ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS
DESL-113 DISASSEMBLY, INSPECTION, AND
REASSEMBLY
Pre-requisites: Need to pass DESL 112 with a “C” or
better.
Complete engine overhaul; lab work includes
disassembly, cleaning, inspection, measuring
and determining reusable parts. Use of OEM
service procedures, specifications and torque
values will be stressed.
Credit Hours: 2
DESL-114 VALVETRAIN COMPONENTS &
OPERATION
Pre-requisites: DESL 112
Includes theory and operation of all valve train
components and disassembly, inspection and
reassembly of the cylinder head; lab includes
operation of a valve grinding machine.
Credit Hours: 2
DESL-115 DIESEL ENGINE ACCESSORIES
Pre-requisites: DESL 113
Includes theory and operation of turbochargers,
superchargers, hydro mechanical and electronic
diesel fuel injection system operation plus
troubleshooting, timing of injection pumps and
tune-up procedures.
Credit Hours: 2
DESL-120 SUSPENSION & STEERING
Includes theory and operation of all valve train
components and disassembly, inspection and
reassembly of the cylinder head; lab includes
operation of a valve grinding machine.
Credit Hours: 3
DESL-121 FUNDAMENTALS OF ELECTRICITY
Focuses on basic electrical theory, including
Ohm’s law, simple circuits, instrument reading,
AC and DC current. There will be some basic
math calculations.
Credit Hours: 1
DESL-122 ELECTRICAL PRODUCTION,
STORAGE AND USAGE
Pre-requisites: Need to pass DESL 121 with a “C” or
better.
308
Pre-requisites: Need to pass DESL 122 with a “C” or
better.
Use of electrical diagnostic service tools,
troubleshooting, testing and repairing of chassis
electrical systems. Use of electrical tools; wiring
techniques.
Credit Hours: 1
DESL-130 INTRODUCTION TO HYDRAULICS
Fundamental hydraulic principles through
lecture/lab experiences by applying the laws of
hydraulics, calculating force, pressure, and area
and describing the function of pumps, valves,
actuators, and motors, hydraulic conductors,
and couplers. Students will learn the properties
of hydraulic fluids, identity graphic symbols, and
perform maintenance procedures on truck
hydraulic systems.
Credit Hours: 4
DESL-231 MANUAL TRANSMISSIONS
Basic operation of clutches; repair and
maintenance of heavy duty manual
transmissions.
Credit Hours: 1
DESL-232 AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS
Operation of automatic transmissions, torque
converters and transfer cases.
Credit Hours: 1
DESL-233 DIFFERENTIAL AND DRIVE AXLES
Students will disassemble, measure, and
reassembly drive lines axles to factory
specifications.
Credit Hours: 1
DESL-240 AIR BRAKES
Operation and construction of medium duty
truck air brake systems. Air brake components
plus repair and maintenance procedures.
Credit Hours: 2
DESL-241 HYDRAULIC BRAKES
Operation and construction of medium duty
truck hydraulic brake systems. Hydraulic brake
components plus repair and maintenance
procedures.
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Course Descriptions
Credit Hours: 2
Credit Hours: 2
DESL-250 SYSTEM PREVENTATIVE
MAINTENANCE
Service and preventive maintenance practices
commonly found in the trucking industry as well
as heavy equipment. Students will understand
the benefits of a well-planned preventive
maintenance program including pre-trip
inspection, criteria for out-of-service tagging a
vehicle and record keeping.
DRFT-121 DRAFTING II
DESL-260 MOBILE AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEMS
Principles of air conditioning including purging,
charging, leak testing, and performance testing.
Credit Hours: 1
DESL-270 ADVANCED ELECTRONIC ENGINE
CONTROLS
Electronic sensors and engine control units.
Topics include how to use a laptop and
handheld scanner to troubleshoot and diagnose
electronic engine controls using the
manufacturer’s software.
Continuation of Drafting I to include auxiliary
views, working drawings, and tolerancing; basic
descriptive geometry; and mapping. Also covers
computer graphics, at a more advanced level
than the basics covered in Drafting I.
Credit Hours: 2
DRFT-201 ELECTRICAL & ELECTRONIC
DRAFTING
Pre-requisites: DRFT-120
Introduction to the methods used to produce
technical drawings required by industry. Topics
include block diagrams, control drawings, logic
diagrams, schematic diagrams, printed circuit
board drawings, integrated circuit drawings,
ladder diagrams, and interconnecting diagrams.
Interaction and coordination of projects with
ECET courses is encouraged with permission of
instructor.
Credit Hours: 1
Credit Hours: 2
DESL-280 INTERNSHIP
DRFT 202 ARCHITECTURAL DRAFTING
Pre-requisites: Permission of Department Chair
Pre-requisites: DRFT-121 or permission of instructor
Special assignment in industry to correlate with
the diesel technology program. Students must
have a designated industrial supervisor and
faculty coordinator. Final approval will be
granted by the student’s department head.
Functional planning and design of residences
and allied structures; experiences in designing,
drawing, calculation costs, and preparing
specifications and presentation drawings.
Concentration on construction drawings and
details using current methods and software.
Credit Hours: 1-3
Credit Hours: 3
DESL-299 DIESEL TECHNOLOGY PROJECTS
Pre-requisites: Permission of Department Chair
DRFT-204 STRUCTURAL DRAFTING
Pre-requisites: DRFT-121 or permission of instructor
Selected studies in Diesel Technology.
Credit Hours: 1-3
DRFT
Drafting and Design Engineering
Technology
DRFT-120 DRAFTING I
Fundamentals of drafting through the use of
sketching and computer graphics as applied to
orthographic views, sectional views, isometric
views, and threads and fasteners. Student must
possess skills using a computer and basic file
management.
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
Co-requisites: CIET 115
Techniques in preparing design and working
drawings for various structures in wood,
concrete, and steel. Drawings will be produced
using AutoCAD. Neatness and ability to make
systematic computations emphasized.
Interaction and coordination of projects with
CIET courses is encouraged with permission of
instructor.
Credit Hours: 3
DRFT 212 PIPING & SHEET METAL DRAFTING
Pre-requisites: DRFT-121
309
Course Descriptions
Credit Hours: 1
Pre-requisites: DRFT-120
Course Descriptions
Design, layout and graphical treatment of piping
systems. Concentration on standard symbols
and nomenclature and schematic, pictorial,
multiview representation. Design and layout of
patterns for fabrication from sheet materials.
Concentration on theory or developments,
sheet materials, forming processes, and use of
standard forming tables.
Credit Hours: 3
DRFT 214 COMPUTER GRAPHICS
Pre-requisites: DRFT-120
BridgeValley CTC
DRFT-284 MICROSTATIONS
Pre-requisites: DRFT-214 or permission of instructor
Introduces the student to the basic operation of
Microstation CAD software. Some comparisons
to AutoCAD will be made. Included in this
course are loading existing design files; new
design file creation and setup; construction and
modification within design files; cell library
concepts; dimensioning; and plotting.
Credit Hours: 3
DRFT-285 LAND & TOPOGRAPHIC DESIGN
Co-requisites: DRFT 121 or permission of instructor
Pre-requisites: DRFT-214 or permission of instructor
Teaches use of the two and three dimensional
graphics capability of capability of the
microcomputer, using industrial CAD software.
An in-depth review of CAD software including
AutoCAD by Autodesk.
Introduces various topographic-related
drawings and design principles utilizing
specialized design software intended for this
purpose. Concentration is placed on
conventions and practices that are used by CAD
professionals working in the civil, surveying, and
mapping fields.
Credit Hours: 3
DRFT-215 ADVANCED COMPUTER-AIDED
DRAFTING
Pre-requisites: DRFT-214
Credit Hours: 3
DRFT 286 PARAMETRIC MODELING (GEC 4)
Pre-requisites: DRFT-214 or permission of instructor
Co-requisites: DRFT-286 or permission of instructor
Continues the development of skills in the use
of computer graphics. It utilizes all skills learned
in DRFT 214 and further develops them by
exposing students to more powerful software
and equipment. Concentrates on Autodesk’s 3D
and solid modeling applications to include wire
frame modeling, surface modeling, region
modeling, as well as cloud computing.
Credit Hours: 3
DRFT 216 ENGINEERING DESIGN GRAPHICS
The creation of three-dimensional parametric
models is used in the design process to develop
solutions to design problems. Specialized design
software is used to create designs and perform
various analytical functions on them. Creation
of engineering drawings from parametric
models; assembly of components to make
adaptive assemblies; and generation of
presentation files for technical illustrations are
studied.
Credit Hours: 3
Pre-requisites: DRFT-121, MEET-121, MATH-113, DRFT
202, PHYS 101
DRFT-287 PDMS
Co-requisites: PHYS 102 or consent of department
chair
This course is designed to familiarize students
with 3-D plant design software modeling using
Piping/Process Instrumentation Diagrams and
converting them into a graphical database
environment using an advanced design and
management software, PDMS by AVENA.
A multi-stage design process is used to find
graphic solutions to various technical problems;
includes sections, dimensioning, tolerancing,
screw nomenclature, gears, cams and skills
leading to the implementation of functional
design solutions. This capstone course includes
activities involving communications skills,
preparing for the job market, and assessment of
program outcome attainment.
Credit Hours: 3
310
Pre-requisites: DRFT 214, DRFT 121
Credit Hours: 3
DRFT 288 SURVCAD
Pre-requisites: DRFT-214 or permission of instructor
This course will introduce the student to the
operation of Carlson’s SurvCAD software.
Included in this course are drawing problems
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Credit Hours: 3
DRFT-289 GPS/GIS SYSTEMS
Pre-requisites: DRFT-214 or permission of instructor
This course will cover the basics of GPS types
and uses, and the basics of a GIS system. The
student will learn to differentiate the
differences and benefits of each of the systems
and how to merge their use into a more
powerful and modern-day tool for information
tracking and analysis. A project will be done in a
group setting to utilize the introductory topics
covered for hands-on relation to their
surroundings.
Credit Hours: 3
DRFT-290 INTERNSHIP IN CAD
Pre-requisites: Permission of Department Chair
Industry CAD work supervised by an industry
representative. Work must be closely
monitored by a department faculty and of a
relevant nature to reflect the kind of work an
entry level CAD operation would experience.
Toward the end of the internship, the work will
be evaluated by multiple tools, including a
report completed by the student and another
by the industry representative.
Credit Hours: 1-3 depending on hours worked
DRFT-299 DRAFTING & DESIGN PROJECTS
Pre-requisites: Permission of Department Chair
Select studies in Computerized
Drafting and Design Engineering
Technology.
Credit Hours: 1-3 depending on hours worked
DSGN
Graphic Design and Print
Communications
DSGN-111 INTRODUCTION TO GRAPHIC
COMMUNICATIONS
Pre-requisite(s): ACT English score of 18 or higher or
ENGL-101 or ENGL 095 with a C or better
The study of the history of printing, current
aspects of the industry, and career
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
opportunities. Comparison of lithographic,
flexographic, gravure, screen printing, ink-jet,
toner-based, on-demand printing, variable data
printing, and electronic image reproduction
processes. Lab projects and demonstrations
including basic typography, layout and design,
page makeup, image creation, plate making,
printing and finishing operations, and image
and document conversion for electronic media.
Credit Hours: 3
DSGN-112 INK AND SUBTRATES
Investigating paper manufacturing, properties
and terminology, as well as paper cutting
practices, paper finishes and pricing; a study of
ink manufacturing, components and
characteristics; Lab devoted to testing methods
for papers and inks.
Credit Hours: 3
DSGN-113 INTRO. TO GRAPHIC DESIGN
An introduction to graphic design principles and
practices. Emphasizes design principles and the
skills and techniques applied to page layout,
computer graphics, and digital imaging, leading
to careers in graphic design, advertising design,
computer art, or web design.
Credit Hours: 1
DSGN-114 TEXT AND TYPE
A five week course on an introduction to
typography, including classification and design
of fonts, and type utilities used with personal
computers. Techniques used in word processing
and page layout applications. Text formatting
including indents, tabs, and use of style menus,
and basics of design with type.
Credit Hours: 1
DSGN-118 ADOBE PHOTOSHOP
The use of tools and pull down menus of Adobe
Photoshop. Also, image re-sizing, tone
manipulation, unsharp masking, use of layers
and channels to optimize color images. Special
effects using filters. Creating images
appropriate for print, web and monitor usage.
Credit Hours: 3
DSGN-120 ADOBE INDESIGN
Use of page creation software for print and
interactive publications Topics will include
document creation, importing of text and
graphics, introduction to graphic design, and
digital output, creation of interactive PDF’s.
311
Course Descriptions
related to topographic, civil and mining
applications. Fundamental of operating a CAD
system are needed prior to taking this course.
Course Descriptions
Course Descriptions
Also covered preflighting of files for production,
digital workflow, and PostScript output issues.
Credit Hours: 1
DSGN-125 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY
The course introduces students to the basics of
producing digital images through hands-on
activities and experiences operating a digital
camera and basic imaging software to improve
photos. During the class the student will define
and use digital imaging terminology including
file formats, identify features of different types
of digital cameras, manipulate and organize
images transferred from digital cameras,
transfer images to computer software, and
produce a variety of different digital
photographs such as landscapes, portraits,
action shots and product pictures.
Credit Hours: 1
DSGN-128 ADOBE DREAMWEAVER
This course is an overview of website structure
and publication. Course participants will learn
the basic navigation and functionality of Adobe
Dreamweaver and have an opportunity to
produce beginner work for a portfolio. Topics
include navigation, basic website design, file
formats and saving, tools, linking elements on
the page and website flow.
Credit Hours: 1
DSGN-132 SOCIAL MEDIA BASICS
This course will be divided in three parts. (1) a
brief overview of Social Media options ( Such as
Facebook, Twitter, UTube, etc.) (2) the ethics of
Social Media that will focus on the action, the
consequence and principles to guide the
decision making process (3) Social Media
Marketing that will explore ways to connect
with multi-media technology in business.
Credit Hours: 1
DSGN-135 FLEXOGRAPHY I
Pre-requisite(s): DSGN 131
An introduction to all aspects of Flexographic
printing that will include design, image
preperation, plate making, presswork and
finishing.
Credit Hours: 3
DSGN-140 ADOBE ILLUSTRATOR
Pre-requisite(s): DSGN 131
312
BridgeValley CTC
An introduction to all aspects of Flexographic
printing that will include design, image
preperation, plate making, presswork and
finishing.
Credit Hours: 3
DSGN-218 ADOBE CREATIVE SUITE PROJECTS
Pre-requisite(s): 118, 120, 125, 134
Integration of separate Adobe Creative Suite
software applications from previous courses to
create projects that may be published
electronically such as on the internet, or printed
on a traditional substrate such as paper or
fabric.
Credit Hours: 3
DSGN-232 PACKAGING DESIGN
Pre-requisite(s): DSGN-113, 115, 116, 134, 135, 142
Packaging is the fastest growing segment of the
print communications industry. This course
examines the different types of packaging such
as paper and board, flexible and rigid plastics,
bio-based materials, metal, and glass used for
food, drugs, other consumer goods, and
industrial products. Other topics include the
psychology and design of packaging, corporate
identity and branding issues, legal
requirements, sustainable materials, and
printing and production processes.
Credit Hours: 3
DSGN-235 FLEXOGRAPHY II
Pre-requisite(s): DSGN-135
Advanced topics in flexographic printing.
Emphasis in process color printing. Topics
include image registration, quality control and
production workflows.
Credit Hours: 3
DSGN-245 SCREEN PRINTING
Pre-requisite(s): 3rd Semester majors
Concentrated use of the equipment in the area
of screen reproduction; special projects and lab
work to obtain higher degree of proficiency in
screen printing. Two formal labs and one
lecture.
Credit Hours: 3
DSGN-299 SPECIAL TOPICS (1, 2, OR 3)
Pre-requisite(s): Consent of faculty and chair
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
ECON
Economics
ECON-201 PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS
(GEC 4)
Pre-requisites: BUSN 112 or MATH 112 or MATH 130
with a grade of “C” or better and ENGL 101 with a C or
better
This course explores the micro economy.
Microeconomics emphasizes how individuals,
households, firms and governments within
society make decisions to allocate limited
resources to satisfy unlimited wants. Students
will be introduced to economic terminology,
theory, models and application. This course will
cover topics including, but not limited to:
elasticity, efficiency and exchange, explore the
application of economic models, government
regulations on the market system and the
different types of economic competition that
may be found in the individual markets of our
economy.
Credit Hours: 3
ECON-202 PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS
(GEC 4)
Pre-requisites: BUSN 112 or MATH 112 or MATH 130
with a grade of “C” or better and ENGL 101 with a C or
better
This course explores the macro economy.
Macroeconomics emphasizes how society as a
whole and various groups within society
manage scarce resources. It considers wide
phenomena such as unemployment and
inflation while focusing on aggregate economic
outcomes. To better understand aggregate
economic activity, students will be introduced
to economic terminology, theory, models, and
application. This course will cover topics
including but not limited to: supply and
demand, real and nominal magnitudes, trade,
money, economic growth, inflation,
international macroeconomics, aggregate
demand and aggregate supply.
Credit Hours: 3
ECON-295 MONEY, BANKING AND FINANCIAL
MARKETS
Pre-requisites: ECON 201
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
A survey of the historical development of the
American monetary and banking institutions;
the rationale behind financial tools; the concept
of a global financial system; and the economic
theory that is basis of our understanding of the
role of financial markets.
Credit Hours: 3
EDUC
Education
EDUC-101 HEALTHY ENVIRONMENTS FOR
YOUNG CHILDREN
This course is an introduction to the basic
requirements and regulations for health and
safety in early childhood programs serving
young children. This course is intended to
prepare students to follow the practices
required of all individuals who participate in
early childhood programs.
Credit Hours: 3
EDUC-110 FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS
This course describes current and ongoing
research related to the important benefits of
family involvement to children’s achievement,
as well as practical ideas and specific activities
for pre-service and in-service teachers to assist
them in getting families involved in their
children’s education.
Credit Hours: 3
EDUC-115 INFANT AND TODDLER
DEVELOPMENT
Pre-requisite: PSYC 201
This course will include an in-depth study of the
physical, social, emotional, cognitive and
language development of children from
conception to age three. Students will develop
an understanding of the importance of
responsive quality care & use of
developmentally appropriate practices when
caring for infants and toddlers in a group setting
as well as one on one.
Credit Hours: 3
EDUC-120 FOUNDATIONS OF EARLY
CHILDHOOD
Pre-requisites: Eligible for ENGL 101
This is an introductory course of the history,
philosophy, and theoretical foundations of early
childhood programs with specific attention to
current programs serving children prior to
school entry. Concepts for providing
313
Course Descriptions
Independent study of topic(s) pertinent to
Digital Design and Communications
Course Descriptions
Course Descriptions
developmentally appropriate practices are
introduced. Observation hours in an early
childhood classroom will be required.
Credit Hours: 3
EDUC-199 SPECIAL TOPICS
Special topics course relating to early childhood
education.
Credit Hours: 1-3
EDUC 215 INFANT & TODDLER EXPERIENCES
Pre-requisites: ENGL 102, EDUC 115 & EDUC 225
This course covers the unique needs and rapid
changes that occur in the first three years of life
and the inter-related factors that influence
development. Emphasis is placed on
recognizing and supporting developmental
milestones through purposeful strategies,
responsive care routines and identifying
elements of quality, inclusive early care and
education. Upon completion, students should
be able to demonstrate respectful relationships
that provide a foundation for healthy
infants/toddler/twos development, plan/select
activities/materials, and partnering with diverse
families.
Credit Hours: 3
EDUC-220 INTEGRATING TECHNOLOGY IN THE
CLASSROOM
Pre-requisites: PSYC 201
Introduces future educators to technology and
digital media. Students will learn about the
latest trends in technology and how to
integrate these concepts into their classroom
using a variety of practical applications to
successfully teach the current generation of
digital students.
Credit Hours: 3
EDUC-225 EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT
Pre-requisites: PSYC 201
This course examines the physical, emotional,
cognitive and intellectual development of
young children. Students will examine
relationships with parents and peers and
growth in self-direction with a primary focus on
young children birth through five years of age.
Observation and participation in an early
childhood classroom required.
Credit Hours: 3
EDUC-226 FIELD EXPERIENCE IN CLASSROOM
MANAGEMENT
BridgeValley CTC
This course is designed for those in the
paraprofessional role in the school setting and
will give them experience in applying current
management strategies in public school
classrooms. Both group and individual
management strategies will be implemented
and a functional behavioral assessment will be
required. This is the Capstone course for the
Associate in Science in Education.
Credit Hours: 3
EDUC 230 EARLY CHILDHOOD CLASSROOM
MANAGEMENT
Pre-requisites: ENGL 102 & EDUC 225
Students study theories of early childhood
education with emphasis on classroom
management, teaching methods, assessment
and behavior guidance. Students demonstrate
their knowledge and understanding of theories
and best practices by planning, designing, and
assessing programs for young children with
emphasis on management skills.
Credit Hours: 3
EDUC 250 ADMINISTRATOR OF AN EARLY
CHILDHOOD PROGRAM
Pre-requisites: ENGL 102, EDUC 225 & BUSN 106
This course allows students to study early
childhood programs from the perspective of the
person serving in the role of leader and
administrator. Studies include the planning and
development of a program or center, budgeting
issues, environmental planning and
preparation, state licensing regulations, health
and safety guidelines, staffing and personnel
issues and parent-school relationships.
Credit Hours: 3
EDUC-260 SPECIAL NEEDS IN EARLY
CHILDHOOD
Pre-requisites: ENGL 102 and EDUC 225
This course introduces students to children who
differ from the average child in mental, physical
and emotional characteristics. The purpose of
this course is to provide educators with an
overview of children with exceptional needs,
focusing on historical, legal, and multi-cultural
issues, high incidence disabilities and
giftedness, including characteristics and
adaptation of educational procedures.
Credit Hours: 3
EDUC-290 LANGUAGE AND LITERACY FOR
YOUNG CHILDREN
Pre-requisites: ENGL 102 and EDUC 225
314
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Credit Hours: 3
EDUC-291 EARLY CHILDHOOD CURRICULUM
&METHODS
Pre-requisites: ENGL 102 and EDUC 225
In this course students will plan, prepare,
implement and evaluate learning experiences
for young children. Topics include philosophy,
curriculum models, indoor and outdoor
environments, scheduling, authentic
assessment, and planning developmentally
appropriate experiences. Upon completion,
students should be able to evaluate and critique
curriculum models, plan for individual and
group needs, and assess and create quality
hands-on learning environments.
Credit Hours: 3
required as the student gains actual teaching
experience. Includes 90 to 120 hours of
observation in an approved setting.
Credit Hours: 4
EDUC 296 EARLY CHILDHOOD EXPERIENCE
PRACTICUM
Pre-requisites: ENGL 102 & EDCU 225
Prearranged experiential learning program to
be planned, supervised, and evaluated by
faculty. May involve temporary placement with
public or private enterprise for professional
competence development.
Credit Hours: 1-4
EDUC-299 SPECIAL TOPICS
Special topics courses related to Education
Credit Hours: 1-3
ECET
Electrical Engineering Technology
ECET-105 DC/AC CIRCUIT ANALYSIS
Pre-requisites: Math-115
Basic concepts of electricity, voltage, current,
resistance, and power in DC and AC circuits are
introduced. Topics include Ohm’s law, Kirchoff’s
laws, analysis of series and parallel circuits,
principles of electromagnetism, characteristics
of alternating currents, capacitive and inductive
circuit analysis techniques, operation of basic
transformers, equipment protection, and use of
test equipment.
Credit Hours: 3
EDUC- 292 ASSESSMENT OF YOUNG CHILDREN
ECET-110 DC CIRCUIT ANALYSIS
Pre-requisites: ENGL 102 and EDUC 225
Co-requisites: MATH-130
An introduction to assessing young children
from infancy through age eight. It provides the
full range of types of assessment and how,
when, and why to use them. Students will study
examples, and models of various assessment
tools and learn how to apply the principles of
quality, authentic assessments.
An introductory course in steady-state DC
circuit analysis including electrical
fundamentals, RLC circuits, test equipment and
measurement techniques.
Credit Hours: 3
EDUC-295 EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
CAPSTONE
Pre-requisites: EDUC 291 and EDUC 292
Students will utilize the knowledge of early
childhood education theory, assessment and
curriculum development as they participate in a
professional manner during a practicum
placement. Observations and assessments of
children will be used for learning activities
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
Credit Hours: 4
ECET-115 AC CIRCUIT ANALYSIS
Pre-requisites: ECET-110, MATH-130, MATH-140
An introduction to the sinusoidal steady-state
analysis of electrical circuits including
waveforms, RLC circuits, impedance, power,
frequency response, resonance, filters, test
equipment and measurement techniques.
Credit Hours: 4
ECET-120 ANALOG DEVICES I
Pre-requisites: ECET-110, MATH-130, MATH-140
315
Course Descriptions
This course is designed to teach Early Childhood
educators how to recognize and implement
appropriate environmental strategies that
support early literacy development and
appropriate early experiences with books,
puppets, flannel board stories and writing.
Emphasis is placed on listening and speaking,
foundational skills for reading, literatures, and
writing. Content will cover current theory,
expectations of young children, teaching
strategies, and the creation of literacy-rich
environments. Upon completion of the course,
students will be able to select, plan, implement,
observe and evaluate appropriate early literacy
experiences.
Course Descriptions
Course Descriptions
An introduction to basic electronic device
theory including semiconductor theory, diodes,
BJTs, DC biasing, AC response, circuit
applications and measurement techniques.
Credit Hours: 4
ECET-150 FUNDAMENTALS OF RADIO
COMMUNICATIONS
Pre-requisites: ACT Math Score greater than 14.
An introductory course in radio
communications including basic electrical
principles, radio wave fundamentals, FCC
regulations and electrical safety. Students will
be prepared to take the FCC amateur radio
licensing exam.
Credit Hours: 3
BridgeValley CTC
frequency allocation, antennas, propagation
and RF measurement equipment.
Credit Hours: 4
ECET-260 TELECOMMUNICATIONS
An introduction to data communications and
modern telecommunication systems including
multiplexing, analog and digital transmission,
premise wiring, fiber optics and test equipment.
Credit Hours: 4
ECET-262 ADVANCED TELECOMMUNICATIONS
Pre-requisites: ECET-260
A continuation of ECET-260 including DS3 and
optical circuits, switching concepts, VOIP, FTTH,
Ethernet, and cellular circuits.
Credit Hours: 4
ECET-170 ALTERNATE ENERGY SYSTEMS
Pre-requisites: ECET-110
An introduction to alternative energy systems
including photovoltaic systems, hydroelectric
systems and wind energy systems.
Credit Hours: 3
ECET-220 ANALOG DEVICES II
Pre-requisites: ECET-115 and ECET-120
A continuation of ECET-120 including multistage
amps, op-amps, active filters, MOSFET
switching and an introduction to
instrumentation.
Credit Hours: 4
ECET-230 DIGITAL DEVICES
Study of basic logic elements including gates,
flip-flops, counters, registers, Boolean algebra,
logic reduction methods, and digital logic
applications.
Credit Hours: 4
ECET-235 MICROCONTROLLERS
Pre-requisites: ECET-230 or instructor permission
Introduction to microprocessors and computer
architecture focusing on microcontrollers.
Topics include: computer architectures;
addressing modes; memory interfacing; I/O
interfacing; high level language programming,
assembly language programming; system
development and troubleshooting.
ECET-265 FIBER OPTICS
A study of fiber optic (FO) technology including
theory, components, standards, installation
considerations, cable handling, terminations,
splicing and test equipment. Credit Hours: 3
ECET-270 POWER SYSTEMS AND INDUSTRIAL
DEVICES
Pre-requisites: ECET-115
A study of electrical machinery and power
distribution systems for commercial and
industrial applications including AC power, 3phase systems, transformers, motors, control
circuits, standards and safety.
Credit Hours: 4
ECET-275 SUBSTATION MAINTENANCE I
Pre-requisites: ECET-115
A course in substation configuration,
equipment, testing and maintenance
procedures. including substation types and
configurations; safety procedures; mediumvoltage circuit breaker fundamentals; insulation
resistance, contact resistance, over potential,
vacuum and vacuum medium-voltage circuit
breakers; medium voltage circuit break
maintenance; switchgear properties and
maintenance; battery types and maintenance;
and basic over-current/I
Credit Hours: 3
Credit hours: 3
ECET-250 RF AND ANTENNA FUNDAMENTALS
Pre-requisites: ECET-115 and ECET-120
An introduction to RF communication including
modulation; receiver and transmitter
architectures, filters, system loss and gain,
316
ECET-276 SUBSTATION MAINTENANCE II
Pre-requisites: ECET-275
A course in substation configuration,
equipment, testing and maintenance
procedures including disconnect switch
fundamentals, maintenance and testing
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
methods; grounding fundamentals, ground
resistance testing and maintenance;
transformer fundamentals; transformer testing;
and the interpretation of test results.
Credit Hours: 3
ECET-277 ELECTRICAL SAFETY
Pre-requisites: ECET-270 or ECET-275
A course in electrical safety hazards and
procedures focusing on electrical power
distribution and industrial environments
including electrical hazards and safety
procedures for working on or around
transmission, generation and distribution
systems.
Credit Hours: 3
ECET-280 PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC
CONTROLLERS
An introduction to the programmable logic
controller (PLC) and its industrial applications
including relay logic, architectures, addressing,
data types, ladder logic, programming
structures and HMIs.
Credit Hours: 3
ECET-285 INDUSTRIAL ROBOTICS
An introduction to the fundamental concepts of
industrial robotics including safety; coordinate
systems; robot geometry and configuration;
manipulator control; sensor systems; path
control; multi-axis dynamics; and program
development and debugging.
Course Descriptions
This course is the required course for any
person seeking to become a West Virginia
Emergency Medical Technician (EMT). This is a
150 hour class based off of the U.S. D.O.T.
guidelines for EMT Basic curriculum. The
student will have lectures as well as practical
(hands on) instruction. When the student
successfully completes the course, he/she may
choose to take the National Registry of EMT’s
Exam. The course can be broken down into 7
modules. They are as follows: Preparatory,
Airway Management, Patient assessment,
Medical Emergencies, Trauma Emergencies,
Infants and Children, Operations.
Credit Hours: 10
EMST-111 INTRODUCTION TO PARAMEDIC
TECHNOLOGY I
Pre-requisites: Must have BIOL 210 or BIOL 220 and
BIOL 221, and a valid WV EMT card.
Co-requisites: EMST 112 and EMST 1132.
This course is an introduction to advanced prehospital care with an emphasis on roles and
responsibilities of the Paramedic, his/her wellbeing, illness and injury prevention,
medical/ethics/legal aspects of pre-hospital
care in the field. The laboratory component of
this course will provide the student the
opportunity to work with simulated real life
situations that require the knowledge learned
in this course.
Credit Hours: 3
Credit Hours: 3
EMST-112 INTRODUCTION TO PARAMEDIC
TECHNOLOGY II
ECET-290 SEMINAR
Seminar course for graduating students. Topics
include review for assessments, exit
assessments and career preparation.
Pre-requisites: Must have BIOL 210 or BIOL 220 and
BIOL 221, and a valid WV EMT card.
Co-requisites: EMST 111 and EMST 113.
Credit Hours: 1
ECET-299 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ELECTRICAL
ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
Selected studies in Electrical Engineering
Technology.
Credit Hours: Varies
EMST
Emergency Medical Services
Technology
EMST-101 EMT BASIC
Pre-requisites: Must have a high school diploma or
G.E.D.
Co-requisites: BIOL 210 OR BIOL 220 and BIOL 221
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
This course is designed to teach techniques of
patient history taking, physical examinations,
patient assessment, clinical decision making,
communication, and documentation. This
course will also review principles of
pathophysiology. Extensive lab time will be
spent on learning and practicing these skills.
Co-requisites: EMST 111, EMST 113, and
admission into the Paramedic program with a
“C” or better in all classes.
Credit Hours: 3
EMST-113 ADVANCED AIRWAY MANAGEMENT
Pre-requisites: Must have BIOL 210 or BIOL 220 and
BIOL 221, and a valid WV EMT card.
Co-requisites: EMST 111 and EMST 112.
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Course Descriptions
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Course Descriptions
This course is designed for students to further
develop their knowledge in assessment and
treatment of the patient with a compromised
airway. Skills in advanced airway management,
intravenous therapy, and pharmacology will be
taught. Extensive lab time will be spent on
learning and practicing these skills.
BridgeValley CTC
special challenges and acute interventions for
home health patients. Extensive time will be
spent in the skills lab learning assessment
techniques for all categories of special needs
patients.
Credit Hours: 8
Credit Hours: 6
EMST-231 PARAMEDIC OPERATIONS
EMST-221 MEDICAL EMERGENCIES I
Pre-requisites: EMST 221, EMST 222, and EMST with a
grade of “C” or better; and a current valid WV EMT
card
Co-requisites: EMST 232 EMST 233
Pre-requisites: EMST 111, EMST 112, and EMST 113
with a grade of “C” or better; and a current valid WV
EMT card
Co-requisites: EMST 222 and EMST 233
This course is designed for paramedic students
who are currently in good standing in the
program to review the pathophysiology,
assessment, and management of medical
patients with pulmonary and cardiovascular
emergencies. In addition to instructional
sessions, this course will include lab hours.
Credit Hours: 4
EMST-222 MEDICAL EMERGENCIES II
Pre-requisites: EMST 111, EMST 112, and EMST 113
with a grade of “C” or better; and a current valid WV
EMT card
Co-requisites: EMST 221 and EMST 223
This course is designed for paramedic students
who are currently in good standing in the
program to further enhance their ability to
recognize, understand the pathophysiology of,
and treat the following medical emergencies:
neurological, endocrinological, allergic and
anaphylaxis, gastroenterological, urological,
toxicological, hematological, environmental
conditions, infectious and communicable
diseases, behavioral and psychiatric disorders,
gynecological and obstetric. In addition to
instructional sessions, this course will include
lab hours.
This course is designed for the paramedic
students who are in good standing in the
paramedic program to further enhance their
ability to recognize and manage various types of
ambulance operational situations. Areas of
concentration include ambulance operations,
rescuer awareness and operations, hazardous
material incidents, abuse and assault patients,
and crime scene awareness. In addition to
instructional sessions, this course has a lab
component.
Credit Hours: 4
EMST-232 CLINICAL PRACTICUM 1
Pre-requisites: EMST 221, EMST 222, and EMST with a
grade of “C” or better; and a current valid WV EMT
card
Co-requisites: EMST 231 EMST 233
The clinical practicum is designed for the
paramedic students only. The student rotates
throughout various affiliated sites. The clinical
contact hours are to provide the student with
direct experience in working with patients and
aid the student in developing proficiencies in
performing paramedic procedures. The course
requires a minimum of 300 contact hours as
well as a minimum number of clinical
competencies that must be completed.
Credit Hours: 4
Credit Hours: 4
EMST-233 CLINICAL PRACTICUM II
EMST-223 SPECIAL CONSIDERATION PATIENTS
Pre-requisites: EMST 111, EMST 112, and EMST 113
with a grade of “C” or better; and a current valid WV
EMT card
Co-requisites: EMST 221 and EMST 222
This course is designed for paramedic students
who are currently in good standing in the
program to further enhance their ability to
recognize and treat the patients that have
special needs and to deal with medical incident
command. These special consideration patients
include those with trauma injuries, as well as
neonatology, pediatrics, geriatrics, patients with
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Pre-requisites: EMST 221, EMST 222, and EMST with a
grade of “C” or better; and a current valid WV EMT
card
Co-requisites: EMST 231 EMST 232
The clinical practicum is designed for the
paramedic student only and is the capstone
course. The student rotates throughout various
affiliated sites completing their direct
experience with patients while developing
proficiencies in performing paramedic
procedures and assessment based patient
management. The course requires a minimum
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
of 300contact hours as well as completing a
minimum number of clinical competencies.
Credit Hours: 4
Course Descriptions
An introductory course, with emphasis on the
process of preparing various technical
documents as well as methods of research.
Credit Hours: 3
ENGL-095 ACCELERATED INTEGRATED
READING AND WRITING
Pre-requisites: ACT English 11-15 OR Accuplacer
Sentence Skills 45-65. In addition, ACT Reading score
12-14 OR Accuplacer Reading score 35-59.
Co-requisites: ENGL 101
This course focuses on developing reading
comprehension, composition, and critical
thinking skills necessary for academic success in
college.
Credit Hours: 3
ENGL-202 BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL
WRITING (GEC 1)
Pre-requisites: ENGL-101 with a C or better
This course emphasizes reading and writing in
professional/business situations. The focus will
be on creating emails, memos, short reports,
job proposals, collaborative projects, reports,
and oral presentations.
Credit Hours: 3
ENGL-203 AMERICAN LITERATURE TO 1865
Pre-requisites: ENGL-101 with a C or better
This course surveys the major writers and
literary periods to 1865.
Credit Hours: 3
ENGL-204 AMERICAN LITERATURE SINCE 1865
Pre-requisites: ENGL-101 with a C or better
ENGL-096 ACCELERATED WRITING SKILLS
Pre-requisites: ACT English 16-17 OR Accuplacer
Sentence Skills 66-87. In addition, ACT Reading 15-16
OR Accuplacer Reading score 60-78.
Co-requisites: ENGL 101
Course topics include the writing process;
sentence, paragraph, and essay development;
and basic grammar, mechanics, and usage.
This course surveys the major writers and
literary periods since 1865.
Credit Hours: 3
ENGL-215 INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE
Pre-requisites: ENGL-101 with a C or better
This is a survey course which examines selected
poetry, drama and fiction along with principles
of literary criticism.
Credit Hours: 1
Credit Hours: 3
ENGL-101 ENGLISH COMPOSITION 1 (GEC 1)
ENGL-218 INTRODUCTION TO THE SHORT
STORY
Pre-requisites: ACT English 18 or Accuplacer Sentence
Skills 88.
Pre-requisites: ENGL 095 or ENGL 096 if required by
placement.
The course emphasizes expository writing and
reading with a focus on the process of writing.
Credit Hours: 3
ENGL-102 ENGLISH COMPOSITION II (GEC 1)
Pre-requisites: ENGL-101 with a grade of C or better
This course primarily focuses on the research
writing process. It covers basic research
inquiry, MLA documentation, and the use of the
library. Particular attention is given to
argumentation and critical thinking skills.
Credit Hours: 3
ENGL-103 TECHNICAL WRITING (GEC 1)
Pre-requisites: ENGL-101 with a C or better
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
Pre-requisites: ENGL-101 with a C or better
This course is an introduction to literature
through short stories. It focuses on careful
reading and interpretation of the short story as
a distinct genre. It examines formal and
thematic elements of the short story as well as
a wide range of styles, themes, and contexts.
Credit Hours: 3
FINC
Business and Legal Studies DivisionAccounting & Finance
FINC-120 PRINCIPLES OF BANKING
Considers many bank functions such as
language and documents of banking, check
processing, teller functions, deposit functions,
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Course Descriptions
ENGL
English
Course Descriptions
trust services, investments, and the bank’s role
in the community.
Credit Hours: 3
FINC-121 CONSUMER LENDING
A complete study of the consumer lending
function with special emphasis placed on credit
evaluation process. Other topics include types
of loans, collection procedures, and marketing
techniques.
Credit Hours: 3
FINC-201 PERSONAL FINANCE
Pre-requisites: Introduction to Computer-Aided
Drafting and Design
This course examines the financial problems
encountered by the individual in the
management of his/her own affairs. Areas
covered include budgeting, consumer
borrowing, real estate, investments, insurance,
taxes, and estate and retirement planning.
Credit Hours: 3
FINC-199 SPECIAL TOPICS
Special topics course relating to Finance.
Credit Hours: 1-3
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cash flow statements. Finally, the course
discusses personal financial statements and tax
returns, as well as combining business and
personal cash flows into a global analysis.
Credit Hours: 3
FINC-299 SPECIAL TOPICS
Special topics course relating to Finance.
Credit Hours: 1-3
GAME
Simulation, Gaming and Apps
Development
GAME-111 INTRODUCTION TO SIMULATION,
GAMING AND APPS DEVELOPMENT
This course introduces a brief history of video
gaming and evolution, simulation, and general
game development. Topics include: key
development techniques, story-telling
mechanics, game genres, game play, and
simulation structure. Upon course completion,
students should be able to demonstrate
knowledge of the major aspects of simulation,
game design, and development.
Credit Hours: 3
FINC-280 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
Pre-requisites: Grade of C or better in ACCT 215
Basic understanding of the functions of a
financial manager. A descriptive approach is
used to cover such topics as time value of
money, ratio analysis, leverage, capital
budgeting and stocks and bonds.
Credit Hours: 3
FINC-295 MONEY, BANKING AND FINANCIAL
MARKETS
Pre-requisites: ECON 201 or 202
A survey of the historical development of the
American monetary and banking institutions;
the rationale behind financial tools; the concept
of a global financial system; and the economic
theory that is basis of our understanding of the
role of financial markets.
Credit Hours: 3
FINC-296 ANALYZING FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Course explores understanding business
industries and types, plus why they borrow
money. It also introduces basic concepts of
business financial accounting and entity
structures and explains the analysis of business
financial statements and tax returns, including
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GAME-113 INTRODUCTION TO ADOBE FLASH
This course introduces the Flash programming
environment for use in simulation and game
development. Topics include: general design
tools, timeline usage, button creation,
motiontweening, sprite-swapping, and Action
Script. Before taking this course, you should
have a good working knowledge of standard
operating systems, should know how to use the
mouse, keyboard, standard menus, and
commands, and also know how to open, save,
and close files. Upon course completion,
students should be able to create a simple Flash
game.
Credit Hours: 3
GAME-116 INTRODUCTION TO AUDIO & VIDEO
PRODUCTION
This course introduces audio and video
production and their application in simulations,
gaming, and apps building. Topics include
techniques for recording, editing, and
producing audio and video files for use in
multiple digital media.
Credit Hours: 3
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
which human beings may maximize “life
satisfaction” over the life cycle, through health
promotion behavior.
Credit Hours: 3
GERO-103 INTRODUCTION TO GERONTOLOGY
This course provides students with an overview
of the field of gerontology and the aging
process; current empirical research on adult
development and aging; an orientation to tasks
facing future gerontologists; demographics of
aging; and the opportunity to think critically
about gerontological issues and myths about
adult development and aging.
Credit Hours: 3
Credit Hours: 1
GAME-123 ADVANCED ADOBE FLASH
Pre-requisite(s): GAME 113
An advanced course using the Flash
programming environment for use in simulation
and game development. Concentration is
placed on learning advanced Flash techniques
for use in SGD. Upon completion, students
should be able to create industry quality
simulations, games, and apps using Adobe
Flash.
Credit Hours: 3
GAME-126 ADVANCED AUDIO & VIDEO
PRODUCTION
Pre-requisite(s): GAME 116
An advanced course in audio and video
production application in simulations, gaming,
and apps building. Topics include advanced
techniques used in producing audio and video
files for use in multiple digital media.
Credit Hours: 3
GERO-199 SPECIAL TOPICS
Pre-requisites: Permission/Collaboration with Program
Coordinator.
Special Topics course relating to the field of
Gerontology.
Credit Hours: 1-3
GERO-202 GERONTOLOGY PRACTICUM
Pre-requisites: Completion of 6 Credit Hours of
Gerontology Core Courses with a grade of “C” or
better; Permission of Program Coordinator.
This course requires that a student spend 240
Contact hours in an approved agency that
provides services to the elderly population.
Practicum are geared toward the student’s
career interests and objectives. Practicum sites
will provide professional work experiences in
administration, education, and direct services.
Practicum is a capstone course utilizing all of
the student’s skills and knowledge regarding
gerontology.
Credit Hours: 3
GERO
Gerontology
GERO-102 HEALTH ASPECTS OF AGING
This course provides an overview of the health
and biological aspects of aging, biological
theories of aging and longevity, and chronic
illnesses that are common in the elderly. The
course orients students to the philosophy that
aging is a manageable process. This course
recognizes the exciting aspects of the aging
process and the creative and resilient ways in
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
GERO-204 ADMINISTRATION AND PROGRAM
PLANNING IN GERONTOLOGY
This course presents the basic organizational
structure applicable to social service agencies;
the objectives of the older Americans Act and
the implications of the act on the current local,
state, and national aging networks; various
services provided by community programs and
residential institutions; grant writing and the
processes of planning and evaluating new
programs and services; policy-making at the
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GAME-120 BUILDING A GAMING COMPUTER
This course is designed for anyone interested in
building a computer specifically designed for
today’s resource intensive video games. Topics
will include: pricing parts, popular builds,
setting a motherboard and power supply,
building the machine, installing the operating
system, updating drivers, and finally
benchmarking/optimization. Before taking this
course, you should have a good working
knowledge of standard operating systems and
should know how to use the mouse, keyboard,
standard menus, and commands, and also how
to open, save, and close files. Upon course
completion, students should have the
confidence and know-how to build their own
gaming rig.
Course Descriptions
Course Descriptions
state and national levels; an in-depth review of
the resources relevant to the elderly; and
entitlement programs, retirement, and older
worker programs.
Credit Hours: 3
GERO-205 HUMAN RELATIONSHIP SKILLS
This course provides the student with an
introduction to interpersonal skills and
intervention techniques to develop effective
active listening, assertion skills, problem solving
skills, and conflict resolution skills to work with
people, including the confused, difficult, quiet,
and angry.
Credit Hours: 3
GERO-206 DEATH AND DYING
This course will provide students with an
overview of the stages of dying and
bereavement, an understanding of how to care
for and communicate with dying clients, an
overview of advance directives, and assistance
in confronting students’ own attitudes toward
death and dying.
Credit Hours: 3
GERO-208 LONG TERM CARE
This course provides students with an overview
of the long-term care continuum and the
different types of long-term care settings.
Students will survey the state of long-term care
and forecasts for the future, explore how the
various segments of long-term care fit together
to form an overall system, and be oriented to
licensure, accreditation, reimbursement,
governance, management, and
marketing/public relations in long-term care.
Credit Hours: 3
GERO-209 PSYCHOSOCIAL ASPECTS OF AGING
(GEC 3)
This course provides an overview of the
concepts and issues regarding the social and
mental health of aging and the aged. It orients
students to the psychological transitions that
take place later in life, to the illness and
functional disorders experienced by the aged,
and to the various treatments and services for
mental disorders. This course also explores
various perspectives and sociological
developments in aging, cultural diversity,
adaptations in later life, social problems facing
the elderly, sociological myths that surround
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the aged, and the social services available to the
elderly.
Credit Hours: 3
GERO-298 GERONTOLOGY STUDIES SEMINAR
Pre-requisites: All graduation requirements except for
courses in which the student in currently enrolled must
be completed.
Cross listing with BUSN 298 – Business Studies
Seminar. This capstone course must be taken
the semester the community college student
plans to graduate. Program specific and general
knowledge exit examinations, oral
presentations, writing assignments, and case
analyses will be used to measure student
competencies. Seminars will be presented on
such topics as resume writing, interviewing
skills, time management, business etiquette,
and customer service.
Credit Hours: 1
GERO-299 SPECIAL TOPICS
Pre-requisites: Permission/collaboration with Program
Coordinator.
Special Topics course relating to the field of
Gerontology.
Credit Hours: 1-3
GNET
General Engineering Technology
GNET-107 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER
APPLICATIONS FOR TECHNICIANS
Prepares students with a basic working
knowledge of computers and apply software
applications to situations associated with their
technical studies and working environment.
Students will have a basic introduction to the
computer, internet basics, file and folder
creation, and Windows feature usage. They will
use basic office productivity software to
perform fundamental technical document
preparation and delivery in worksheets, charts
and presentations.
Credit Hours: 3
GNET-108 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS FOR
TECHNICIANS (GEC 4)
Co-requisites: Math 060, Math 096 or Math ACT score
of 19 or higher (BAHM-265 or BAHM-101 helpful for
students that have limited computer experience.)
Prepares students to apply software
applications to the solution, reporting, and
presentation of findings associated with their
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
technical studies. Students will use software to
perform technical document and presentation
preparation and delivery, charting, sorting and
filtering, import and export of data, unit
conversion, data analysis, curve fitting, and the
solution of single equations. Applications from
all fields of technology will be used as a basis
for problem solutions.
Credit Hours: 3
GNET-111 PUBLIC SPEAKING FOR
TECHNOLOGY
Co-requisites: ENGL 101
An introduction to public speaking in a technical
context with a concentration on using
presentation software as a foundation for
effective speeches and presentations.
Presentations will focus on technical talks and
issues of concern in the modern workplace
environment. Topics will focus on preparing the
student to understand and appreciate diversity
among people as well as working professionally
in an ethical manner.
Credit Hours: 1
GNET-112 ETHICS AND PROFESSIONAL
BEHAVIOR
Pre-requisite(s): Final Year Standing
The course provides the student with an
overview of ethical and professional behavior
while working in the field of engineering
technology. A typical code of ethics and rules of
professional conduct are covered and
concentration is placed on the employee’s
obligations to the employer and the client.
Students are required to participate in
profession activities and to document this
involvement.
Credit hours: 1
GNET-121 INDUSTRIAL SAFETY
FUNDAMENTALS / OSHA 10
Introduction to safety and hazard recognition
for general industry intended for entry level
workers. Topics include introduction to OSHA,
electrical safety, egress and fire protection,
walking and working surfaces, flammable and
combustible liquids, personal protective
equipment, machine guarding, hazard
communication, blood-borne pathogens as well
as safety and health programs. OSHA 10-hour
general industry safety and health course
completion cards will be issued based on course
attendance.
Course Descriptions
GNET-122 INDUSTRIAL SAFETY / OSHA 30
Introduction to safety and hazard recognition
for general industry intended for workers with
safety responsibilities. Topics include: manual
handling and material storage; mechanical
injuries; industrial environmental hazardssolvents, particulate, noise, radiation,
toxicology, and ergonomics, etc.; monitoring
instruments; protective devices; industrial
hygiene programs and safety practice in the use
of basic hand and machine tools, with reference
to OSHA, and other regulatory safety
regulations. OSHA 30 hour general industry
safety and health course completion cards will
be issued based on course attendance.
Credit Hours: 3
GNET-125 40-HOUR SURFACE APPRENTICE
CLASS
Curriculum will consist of instruction in
Equipment and Job Safety, Federal and State
Mining Laws, First Aid, Blasting, Welding, Prep
Plant and Tipple Safety, Fire Prevention and
Controls, Hazardous Chemicals, Personal
Protective Equipment, Conveyor-Belt Safety,
Substance Abuse, Lock- Out/Tag-Out
Procedures, Mine Emergency Plan, Mining
Terms and Definitions. At the completion of the
class a test will be given by a State Mine
Inspector.
Credit hours: 2
GNET-126 80-HOUR UNDERGROUND
APPRENTICE CLASS
Curriculum will consist of instruction in
Equipment and Job Safety, Federal and State
Mining Laws, Roof and Rib Control, Pinch-Point
Safety, Mine Gas Detection, Self- Rescuer
Training, First Aid, Blasting, Welding, Prep Plant
and Tipple Safety, Fire Prevention and Controls,
Hazardous Chemical, Personal Protective
Equipment, Conveyor-Belt Safety, Substance
Abuse, Lock-Out/Tag-Out Procedures, Mine
Emergency Plan, Mine Fires and Explosions,
Ventilation and Controls, and Mining Terms and
Definitions. At the completion of the class a test
will be given by a State Mine Inspector.
Credit hours: 4
GNET-145 LEAN SIX-SIGMA YELLOW BELT
Pre-requisites: Permission of Instructor
Introduction to the concepts of Lean Six Sigma
in preparation for Lean Yellow Belt certification.
Credit hours: 1
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
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Course Descriptions
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Course Descriptions
Includes introduction to Six-Sigma principles,
control charts, Pareto analysis, return on
investment, basic statistics and statistical
diagrams. Also includes identification of wastes
and 5S.
Credit Hours: 2
GNET-146 LEAN SIX -SIGMA GREEN BELT
Pre-requisites: Permission of Instructor
Introduction to concepts of Lean Six Sigma in
preparation for Lean Green Belt certification.
Builds on the foundation of Six-Sigma Yellow
Belt. Includes a study of process capability
assessments, process mapping, FMEA, and
measures of central tendency and dispersion.
Also includes lean topics of value stream
mapping, Kaizen events, total productive
maintenance and flow pull systems. Students
are required to complete one project selected
by the instructor.
Credit Hours: 5
GNET-147 LEAN SIX-SIGMA BLACK BELT
Pre-requisites: Lean Six Sigma Green Belt & Permission
of Instructor
Introduction to concepts of Lean Six Sigma in
preparation for Lean Black Belt certification.
Includes a review of Lean Six-Sigma Green Belt
topics plus an in-depth study of statistics used
in six sigma projects. Students will review all
material at the end of the course in preparation
for certification testing. Students are required
to complete two projects selected by the
instructor.
Credit Hours: 7
GNET-161 NANOSCIENCE
Pre-requisites: Eligible for English Composition I
Introductory level class for nanoscience for
students of all knowledge levels. This course is
designed to provide an overview of nanoscience
including perspectives, nanotools, and
emphasis on properties, phenomena, synthesis
and modifications.
Credit Hours: 3
GNET-162 NANOFABRICATION
Introductory level class for nanotechnology for
students of all knowledge levels. This course is
designed to provide an overview of
nanotechnology with an exploration of practical
applications by examining materials, chemistry,
coatings pharmaceuticals, components,
mechanisms, devices and systems. Focus is on
science and developing nanotechnology.
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Credit Hours: 3
GNET-210 ESTIMATING
Pre-requisites: BAHM-260 or GNET 108, GREN 221 or
permission of instructor
Provides students the skills to estimate the
costs of the various activities of a construction
project. Issues to be considered include
contract documents, the bid award process,
types of estimates, breakdown of a project,
elements of the estimate, quantity take-off
techniques, estimating labor, material and
equipment costs, use of “experience” tables
and databases, adjustments for overhead, profit
and contingencies, and assembling the
estimate.
Credit Hours: 3
GNET-212 PROJECT MANAGEMENT
Co-requisites: ENGL 101, MATH 130
Analysis and management techniques used to
implement a successful project. Topics include:
project planning, project scheduling and
staffing, and project control; project
administration, economic analysis, and
reporting procedures; and material and labor
cost estimating. Project management software
will be introduced, a project will be analyzed,
and an in-depth project report will be
generated and presented.
Credit Hours: 3
GNST
General Studies
GNST-101 COLLEGE TRANSITION
Pre-requisites: Students selected by participating high
school; signed participation agreement
College transition is a college success and
orientation course designed to develop
confidence and improve chances of student
success and retention. This course will provide
students with active participation in the
assessment and development of abilities in line
with college expectations including an
orientation to college services and activities,
learning and test taking skills, using traditional
and electronic resources, problem solving,
people skills, self-management skills, and
career/life planning strategies.
Credit Hours: 1-3
GNST-102 FIRST YEAR EXPERIENCE
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Credit Hours: 1
GNST-103 CLASSROOM SUCCESS STRATEGIES
Classroom Success Strategies is a course
designed to develop confidence and improve
the chances of academic success for incoming
freshman, students enrolled in developmental
education courses and students who have been
away from a learning environment for a number
of years. This course will provide students with
the opportunity to: assess and develop current
and alternative learning styles for college
success, apply college-level learning approaches
for improved concentration and memory and
adapt active listening and note taking skills.
College 103 also covers reading strategies for
improved comprehension, strategies for
college-level test preparation along with
examining the tools used in the critical thinking
process.
Credit Hours: 1
GNST-104 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
This course is designed to develop confidence
and improve the chances of success for
students as they enter their professional field.
This course will provide students with the
opportunity to investigate career opportunities
within various fields of study and assess the
skills necessary to succeed in the professional
world. Students will be exposed to job
acquisition skills such as resume and cover
letter writing, interviewing skills, networking
and online job search skills, leadership,
diversity, ethical reasoning, strategic thinking,
and creative problem-solving.
Credit Hours: 1
GNST-105 MILITARY TO COLLEGE LIFE
This course is designed to introduce new
recruits to military service and the completion
of a college degree as they enter the Future
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
Solider program. The course covers basic
military concepts, military history, financial
readiness, utilization of the GI Bill, tuition
assistance, and connection to the community
college for degree completion. Enrollment is
limited to recruits in the Future Soldier
program. Pass/Fail grading.
Credit Hours: 3
GNST-110 PERSONAL LEADERSHIP
This course is designed to develop confidence
and improve the chances of academic success
for first year college students. It will provide
students with the opportunity to assess and
develop abilities in line with college
expectations including utilization of college
services, program planning, study and time
management skills, library skills, interpersonal
relationship skills, personal leadership
development, self-management skills, and
career/life planning strategies. This course is
recommended for students taking more than
one developmental education course and is also
beneficial for students who have been away
from a learning environment for a number of
years.
This course is equivalent to GNST 102, 103, and
104 (combined).
Credit Hours: 3
GNST-130 INTRODUCTION TO GOVERNORS
PORTFOLIO
Pre-requisites: Eligible for ENGL 101 or permission of
instructor, basic computer skills, and BOG AAS majors
only
The portfolio development course is designed
to introduce Board of Governors AAS majors
with the development of a comprehensive
documenting of knowledge acquired through
life/work experiences and other formal and
informal learning experiences. Students will be
introduced to the various components of an
experiential learning portfolio.
Credit Hours: 1
GNST-199 SPECIAL TOPICS
Pre-requisites: As stated for each offering
Courses or seminars on timely subjects related
to the topic.
Credit Hours: 1-3
GNST-299 SPECIAL TOPICS
Pre-requisites: As stated for each offering
Courses or seminars on timely subjects related
to the topic.
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Course Descriptions
The first year experience course is designed to
develop confidence and improve the chances of
success for the incoming freshman. This course
will provide students with the opportunity to
assess and develop abilities in line with college
expectations including utilization of college
services, program planning, library skills, time
and self-management skills, personal finance –
including credit card debt, critical thinking and
problem solving. It will also introduce incoming
students to the BridgeValley General Education
Portfolio process.
Course Descriptions
Course Descriptions
BridgeValley CTC
Credit Hours: 1-3
History
GNST-201 WRITING GOVERNORS PORTFOLIO
HIST-101 UNITED STATES HISTORY TO 1865
(GEC 3)
Pre-requisites: GNST 130
The portfolio development course is designed
to assist Board of Governors AAS students with
the development of an experiential learning
portfolio. Each student is responsible for the
development of a written portfolio, which
provides the analysis and documentation of
learning experiences appropriate for his/her
own educational program of study.
Credit Hours: 2
GREN
Sustainable Technology
GREN-101 INTRODUCTION TO SUSTAINABILITY
A survey course which introduces the
participant to the many topics of the Triple
Bottom Line of Sustainability. The economic,
societal, and environmental impacts of the
human species on the planet are discussed and
the Nine Opportunities for Sustainability are
presented as a potential solution to those
impacts.
Credit Hours: 3
GREN-221 GREEN CONSTRUCTION
TECHNOLOGY I
Topics include various construction techniques
and materials associated with sustainable
construction methods. Use of passive and active
solar energy, sustainably harvested wood
products, geothermal heating and cooling, and
recycling and reuse of “grey water” are topics
included.
Credit Hours: 3
GREN-222 GREEN CONSTRUCTION
TECHNOLOGY II
Pre-requisites: GREN-221
Continuation of GREN 221, with concentration
on methods employed by Green Advantage and
Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design
(LEED). While not necessary to be in the process
of certification from either body, completion of
this course will inform and familiarize student
of the benefits of both.
Pre-requisites: Eligible for ENGL 101
An introduction to the political, economic,
social, and cultural history of the United States
from exploration to the Civil War.
Credit Hours: 3
HIST-102 UNITED STATES HISTORY FROM 1865
TO CONTEMPORARY TIMES (GEC 3)
Pre-requisites: Eligible for ENGL 101
An introduction to the political, economic,
social and cultural history of the United States
from Reconstruction to the contemporary era.
Credit Hours: 3
HIST-111 WORLD HISTORY TO 1500 (GEC 3)
Pre-requisites: Eligible for ENGL 101
Comparative history of Africa, Asia, and Europe
from earliest times until 1500. Political,
economic, social and religious developments
with concentration on patterns of authority, the
individual, nature, and society.
Credit Hours: 3
HIST-112 WORLD HISTORY SINCE 1500 (GEC 3)
Pre-requisites: Eligible for ENGL 101
Comparative history of Africa, Asia, and Europe
1500 to the present. Political, economic, and
social developments with concentration on
pattern of authority, the individual, nature,
society, and the impact of the West.
Credit Hours: 3
HIST-205 APPALACHIAN CULTURE AND
HISTORY (GEC 3)
Pre-requisites: ENGL 101
This course emphasizes the study of Appalachia
and its culture and history. It will be an
overview that will include the history of the
region and its cultures and customs.
Credit Hours: 3
HMGT
Healthcare Management
HIST
HMGT-105 FOUNDATIONS OF HEALTH CARE
MANAGEMENT
An interdisciplinary course that focuses on
issues and techniques in healthcare delivery for
a variety of healthcare majors. Topics include
the healthcare delivery system; medical
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BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
Credit Hours: 3
BridgeValley CTC
Credit Hours: 3
HMGT-120 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN
HEALTHCARE ORGANIZATIONS
Pre-requisites: ATEC 115, HMGT 105
The delivery of health services has become an
information intensive process, and is at the core
of most health services professionals' activities.
Computers are being used to document patient
care, assist in the diagnosis and management of
a variety of health conditions, measure clinical
outcomes to improve quality of care, and in
administrative and financial management
decisions. This course provides students with
knowledge to assist them in understanding the
design, evaluation, selection, and utilization of
computer applications in health care to support
high quality patient care and management
decisions. The need to understand the ethical
and legal responsibilities of managers as health
information is collected, stored, retrieved and
analyzed in this rapidly increasing integration of
computer application in health care will also be
included.
Credit Hours: 1
HMGT-199/299 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HEALTH
CARE MANAGEMENT
Pre-requisites: Consent of Instructor
Independent study of topic(s) pertinent to the
profession of health care management.
Credit Hours: 1-3
HMGT-205 ETHICAL/LEGAL ASPECTS OF
HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT (GEC 3)
Pre-requisites: HGMT 105
Co-requisites: HGMT 105
Rapid advances in medical technology challenge
legal and ethical standards, and lend to
situations requiring moral decisions. This
course provides the student with an
introduction to law, ethics and bioethics as they
apple to decision making in the health care
setting. Emphasis is on use of appropriate
language, application of ethical principles, and
use of critical thinking skills to articulate a point
of view on current issues in health care.
Credit Hours: 3
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
HMGT-210 QUALITY & PATIENT SAFETY IN
HEALTHCARE
Pre-requisites: HGMT 105, HMGT 205
This course is designed for students who seek
an understanding of the administration and
organization of quality and patient safety
definitions, practices, processes within the
health care system of the United States. This
course focuses on quality and patient safety
management in the US health care system using
continuous quality improvement and team
building techniques. Topics to be examined
include the history of quality, leaders and
trends in health care quality and patient safety,
measure and measurement development,
analysis of variation and quality practices in
different health care environments,
administrative responsibilities and structures
with respect to production and service quality,
including the function and roles of professional
and non-professional staff.
Credit Hours: 3
HMGT-215 MANAGEMENT OF HEALTHCARE
DELIVERY SYSTEMS
Pre-requisites: HGMT 105, HMGT 205
As the reshaped American healthcare system
shifts to preventive medicine and embraces
managed care concepts, there is an on-going
struggle to create a cost effective system
without eroding the high standard of quality
care that has been set. In this foundation
course, students study the organization and
structure of our healthcare system and options
that pave the way for the emerging one.
Merging theoretical constructs and practical
application, students develop an understanding
of the healthcare workplace and their place in
it.
Credit Hours: 3
HSRS
Human Services and Rehabilitation
Studies
HSRS-106 PEER SUPPORT SPECIALIST I
Co-requisites: HSRS 120
This course begins the skill-focused series of
courses providing academic background in
recovery-oriented peer support and personcentered psychiatric rehabilitation. Emphasis is
on use of self to inspire hope and promote
recovery. Students are introduced to recovery
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Course Descriptions
terminology; interpersonal communications;
medical-legal issues; patient assessment; and
critical thinking as it relates to patient care,
infection control, and Occupational Safety and
Health Administration standards.
Course Descriptions
Course Descriptions
concepts; wellness tools; people-first language;
personal narratives; and self-determination.
They learn about mental health and addiction
concerns; negative self-talk; triggers; intense
situations; and time management. The self-help
movement, recovery environment
characteristics, partnerships, and cultural
awareness topics are explored.
Credit Hours: 4
HSRS-107 PEER SUPPORT SPECIALIST II
Pre-requisites: HSRS 106
Second in the skill-focused curriculum, this
course builds on academic knowledge in
recovery-oriented peer support and psychiatric
rehabilitation. Students learn about identifying
strengths to help others; developing peer
groups and programs; and honing advocacy
skills. Principles, practices, and concerns
surrounding peers as providers are discussed.
Students interactively use self-assessment,
discovery, goal-setting, and planning.
Familiarity is developed with recovery models
and methodologies, effective interpersonal
skills, sharing stories of recovery, and
exploration of life domains.
Credit Hours: 4
HSRS-120 INTRO TO COMMUNITY BEHAVIORAL
HEALTH
An overview of the modern delivery of
behavioral health care services in the
community. A knowledge base is provided for
sensitivity to the human dimensions of service
delivery, as well as the need for cooperative
functioning in multi-disciplinary working
environments.
Credit Hours: 3
HSRS-121 WRAPВ® SEMINAR I
WRAPВ® Seminar I is a two-day training for up to
16 students. This course is for anyone wanting
to learn about Wellness Recovery Action
Planning and begin to incorporate it into their
life to improve personal wellness and achieve
improved quality of life. It is designed to be
highly interactive and encourage participation
and sharing from students. This course lays a
foundation for building a peer workforce. WRAP
Seminar I fulfills prerequisites to be trained as a
WRAPВ® Facilitator as required by Copeland
Center for Wellness and Recovery
Credit Hours: 1
HSRS-123 PSYCHIATRIC REHABILITATION I
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BridgeValley CTC
Pre-requisites: HSRS 120
The Psychiatric Rehabilitation sequence of
courses is a skill-focused curriculum designed to
provide students with experience in the skills of
person-centered psychiatric rehabilitation
practice. Ongoing development of effective
interpersonal skills is emphasized. A two hour
weekly skill session is included where students
are provided further supervised practice,
alternating roles of practitioner and participant
along with other students. This “hands-on”
approach, from two perspectives, provides
opportunity for students’ personal
development as they learn skills of facilitating
development of others. Students receive
introductory counseling skills training, including
responding to content, feeling, and meaning.
Credit Hours: 3
HSRS-125 OBSERVATION, CRISIS,
DOCUMENTATION
This course is designed to develop awareness
and skill in the monitoring of, intervention in
and recording of critical events. The primary
focus of this course is to provide students with
the basic skills and techniques of Nonviolent
Crisis Intervention: The safe management of
disruptive and assaultive behavior.
Credit Hours: 3
HSRS-126 IMPAIRMENTS, DISABILITIES, AND
HANDICAPS
Pre-requisites: HSRS 120, Eligible for ENGL 101
The problems of persons with mental disorders
vary in nature. An objective of this course is to
provide students a familiarity with the
symptoms and treatment for various disorders,
while also providing a knowledge base for the
understanding of non-medical needs and issues.
The primary focus of this course is to teach
students to use the Diagnostic and Statistical
Manual of Mental Disorders 5 as an
investigative path for on-going understanding of
mental disorders. NOTE: Observation/practicum
experiences with written and oral reports are
required as out-of-class assignments of this
course.
Credit Hours: 3
HSRS-127 YOUTH DEVELOPMENT WELLNESS
This course provides students with a
comprehensive understanding of the
nutritional, health and physical activity
requirements for young children and
adolescents. Students will gain an
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Credit Hours: 3
HSRS-130 INTRODUCTION TO AUTISM
This course is an introductory course for the
three courses, ten-credit hour skill set
certificate in Autism Intervention and Education
I. In this course, students will be introduced to
autism, its history, epidemiology, symptoms
and behaviors, diagnostic protocols and
therapeutic, biomedical and educational
intervention options.
Credit Hours: 3
HSRS-140 INTRODUCTION TO ASD RESEARCH
(GEC 4)
Pre-requisites: HSRS 130 Eligible for College Level
Math
Co-requisites: ENGL 101
This course is designed to provide the beginning
researcher with the basic information needed
for research in ABA methods of single-subject
research designs. Specific focus will be spent on
designing, implementing, and evaluating
behaviors of people who have been diagnosed
with an Autism Spectrum Disorder. Students
will gain a basic foundation of withdrawal
designs, multiple base line designs, alternating
treatment designs and changing criteria
designs.
Credit Hours: 3
HSRS-199 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMAN
SERVICES AND REHABILITATION STUDIES
Special topics course relating to the field of
Human Services and Rehabilitation.
Credit Hours: 1- 3
HSRS-200 COMMUNITY RECONNECTION AND
NAVIGATING
Pre-requisites: HSRS 107; HSRS 120
When people are away from community,
family, and support systems – then re-enter at a
later time – issues are encountered. Navigating
systems, connecting with community, is
discussed for those with disabilities,
deployment, trauma, homelessness,
incarceration, commitment, long-term
hospitalization experiences. Barriers involving
poverty, education, transportation, care
systems are identified. Peer supporters, as
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
navigators, explore solutions: finance and
benefits sources; forms and laws; and talking
with providers. Students apply self-help, social
services knowledge, and communication skills.
Credit Hours: 3
HSRS-201 ADVOCACY SKILLS FOR PEER
SUPPORT SPECIALISTS
Pre-requisites: HSRS 107; HSRS 221
Individual and collective advocacy skills are
integral to “helping professions” as they work
to improve lives, communities, systems. This
course supplements peer support core courses
by lectures, readings, research, and applied
knowledge and skills through an experiential
practicum. Students identify issues and learn
benefits of group advocacy campaigns. Skill is
developed in needs analysis; communication
methods; person-centered communication;
research; writing effective concern statements;
identifying and targeting key decision makers to
receive concern statements; negotiation and
mediation.
Credit Hours: 3
HSRS-210 INTRODUCTION TO ABA: THE
LOVAAS METHOD
Pre-requisites: HSRS 130
This course is the second in a series of three
courses required for the ten credit-hour skill set
certificate in Autism Intervention and Education
I. This course is an introduction to the landmark
research of child psychologist Ivor Lovaas,
based on the behavioral principles of B.F.
Skinner, in the effective treatment and
education of children with autism. Students will
learn the techniques of discrete trial teaching as
a fundamental component of applied
behavioral analysis.
Credit Hours: 3
HSRS-217 PEER SUPPORT SPECIALIST III
Pre-requisites: HSRS 106; HSRS 107
This course completes the basic peer support
skill-set series by providing opportunity to
integrate peer recovery supports and
psychiatric rehabilitation values. Students
apply key recovery concepts; identify treatment
model characteristics; become familiar with
behavioral health care roles; and conduct an
informational interview. Fidelity to common
ingredients of consumer operated services and
accountability are examined. Students
participate in a supervised weekly peer support
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Course Descriptions
understanding of how the environment, diet,
and prenatal factors plan an important role on
body composition, fat distribution and physical
structure as well as cognitive, emotional,
psychological and social development.
Course Descriptions
Course Descriptions
skills lab; have a field observation experience,
and prepare a project of excellence.
Credit Hours: 4
HSRS-220 LEGAL ASPECTS OF AUTISM
INTERVENTION, EDUCATION AND SERVICES
Pre-requisites: HSRS 130
Co-requisites: ENGL 101
In this course the students will be introduced to
the legal aspects associated with a child’s
diagnosis of autism. Accessing services and
funding through state Early Intervention and
federal Title XIX MR/DD Community-Based
Waiver programming, public school services
required by the Individuals with Disability
Education Act (2004 reauthorization), and
vaccine injury causes of action will be
addressed. Students will learn skills necessary
to apply for and secure funding, and to
prosecute causes of action regarding a FAPE.
Disclaimer: this course is not intended to give
legal advice, but simply to provide information
about accessing services.
BridgeValley CTC
personal development as they learn the skills of
facilitating the development of others. The ongoing development of effective interpersonal
skills is emphasized.
Credit Hours: 3
HSRS-223 SYSTEMS AND ACCOUNTABILITY IN
BEHAVIORAL HEALTH
Pre-requisites: HSRS 120, ENGL 101
This course is an overview of the vision, values,
principles, and tasks essential for effective
leadership in behavioral health services.
Students will be introduced to leadership
principles and regulations essential to assuring
behavioral health systems that are driven by
recovery, hope and choice. This course will
introduce students to regulations and outcome
measurement tools and how they may be used
to assess leadership success.
Credit Hours: 3
HSRS-225 PSYCHIATRIC REHABILITATION IV PRACTICUM
Credit Hours: 3
Pre-requisites: Permission of Program Coordinator and
ENGL 101 and Any College Level MATH
HSRS-221 PSYCHIATRIC REHABILITATION II
Fieldwork experience affording theory-practice
and geared towards students’ career interests
and objectives. Utilization of skills will be
performed in local Community Behavioral
Health Centers and Social Service agencies. The
extended presence of students at these sites
will aid the students’ understanding of the
individual recovery and rehabilitation process of
persons with psychiatric and developmental
disabilities. (240 hours required on site.)
Attendance is required at two 3-hour practicum
seminars to address portfolio development.
NOTE: The Psychiatric Rehabilitation courses
must be taken in sequence.
Pre-requisites: HSRS 120, HSRS 123
Second in the Psychiatric Rehabilitation
curriculum sequence, this course offers
students training in Psychiatric Rehabilitation
Readiness Assessment. Through supervised
practice, students alternate in roles of
practitioner and participant with other
students. Psychiatric rehabilitation skills, such
as inferring need and validating commitment to
change, are demonstrated. This “hands-on”
approach, from two perspectives, strengthens
students’ personal development as they learn
the skills of facilitating the development of
others. Ongoing development of effective
interpersonal skills is emphasized.
Credit Hours: 3
Credit Hours: 3
HSRS-230 DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES
Co-requisites: HSRS 120
HSRS-222 PSYCHIATRIC REHABILITATION III
Pre-requisites: HSRS 221, Eligible for College Level
Math
Third in the Psychiatric Rehabilitation
curriculum sequence, this course offers
students training in Psychiatric Rehabilitation
Goal Setting and Functional Assessment.
Students use connecting skills to help to identify
personal criteria and describe alternative
environments necessary for choosing a
personalized goal. This “hands-on” approach,
from two perspectives, strengthens students’
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This course focuses on the basic knowledge,
skills, and attitudes necessary for effectiveness
as a practitioner in the field of developmental
disabilities. NOTE: Observations/ practicum
experiences with written and oral reports are
required as out-of-class assignments in this
course.
Credit Hours: 3
HSRS-231 PSYCHIATRIC DISABILITIES
Pre-requisites: HSRS 120, HSRS 126, ENGL 101
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Credit Hours: 3
HSRS-232 SUBSTANCE ABUSE DISORDERS
Pre-requisites: HSRS 120
The focus of this course is to provide an indepth understanding of the nature of addiction
to various psychoactive substances and its
treatment. NOTE: Observation/ practicum
experiences with written and oral reports are
required as out-of-class assignments in this
course.
Credit Hours: 3
HSRS-233 ASSESSMENTS IN ASD
Pre-requisites: HSRS 130, HSRS 140, HSRS 210, Eligible
for College Level Math
Co-requisites: ENGL 101
This course is designed to teach how Functional
Behavior Analysis Therapy is effective in
problem-behaviors such as aggression, selfinjury, stereotypical behavior, tantrums, and
non-compliance. This course will focus on target
behaviors in special and general education
settings, institutions, residential facilities and
homes. Students will gain the knowledge of
how FBA is implemented in determining proper
diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)
and preparing appropriate behavior plans to
introduce, change or eliminate behaviors.
Credit Hours: 3
HSRS-234 TREATMENTS IN ASD
Pre-requisites: HSRS 233
Co-requisites: ENGL 101
This course is designed to provide students with
information that is beneficial for families,
schools and professionals on selecting and
applying effective treatments/interventions to
children and youth who have been diagnosed
with Autism Spectrum Disorders. Students will
gain a basic knowledge of the following:
interpersonal relationships, skill-based
interventions, cognitive interventions and
biological and neurological treatments.
sub-groups in this population. The course
focuses on the skills of assessments, treatment
and counseling unique to the Juvenile System as
well as the rights of the juvenile offender while
in the correctional facility. This course is
recommended for those students wishing to
become a Correctional Counselor or who wish
to work with children in agencies affiliated with
the judicial system.
Credit Hours: 3
HSRS-271 CHILDHOOD PSYCHIATRIC
DISORDERS
Co-requisites: HSRS 120, ENGL 101
Childhood Psychiatric Disorders vary in nature.
An objective of this course is to provide
students a familiarity with the symptoms and
treatments for various disorders, while also
providing a knowledge base for the
understanding of non-medical needs and issues.
The focus of this course is for students to be
able to use the Diagnostic and Statistical
Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM 5) as an
investigative path for on-going understanding of
disorders first diagnosed in childhood and
adolescence.
Credit Hours: 3
HSRS-272 TRAUMA INFORMED SUPPORT AND
COMPASSION FATIGUE
Pre-requisites: HSRS 107 or HSRS 221
This course presents trauma-informed
principles of assessment, consumer-run
services, and creating safe environments.
Students discuss compassion fatigue as it
relates to Peer Support Specialists and other
professionals serving vulnerable populations
often experiencing crisis. Students recognize
trauma and compassion fatigue signs and
advocate for symptom relief through coping
and self-nurturing skills. Unrecognized
compassion fatigue, secondary trauma, affects
resilience, motivation, attitude and
performance of supporters. Awareness is
raised about self-care while caring for others in
need.
Credit Hours: 3
Credit Hours: 3
HSRS-280 PRACTICUM: PEER RECOVERY
SUPPORT SERVICES
HSRS-270 ADJUDICATED YOUTH
Co-requisites: HSRS 120
Pre-requisites: HSRS 217; HSRS 121; HSRS 201; HSRS
123; HSRS 293; ENGL 101 and Any College Level MATH;
permission of Program Coordinator.
This course is an introduction to understanding
the youthful offender and recognizing specific
Through this course, students have opportunity
to utilize peer support theory and practice
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
331
Course Descriptions
This course provides an in-depth overview of
the field of services to persons with psychiatric
disabilities and its specialized technical skills.
NOTE: Students are expected to participate in
project learning and CPRP test preparation.
Course Descriptions
Course Descriptions
geared toward their individual career interests
and objectives through a community-based 250
hour practicum. Students apply strengthsbased, culturally aware, knowledge and skills
from prior academic coursework while drawing
on life experience insights. They role-model
commitment to inspiring hope and promoting
recovery. Attendance is required at three, twohour, practicum seminars: Ethics & Values;
State Certification (Specialist, Coach, Advocate);
and Portfolio Development.
Credit Hours: 3
HSRS-283 PRACTICUM I: HOME-BASED
PROGRAMMING
Pre-requisites: HSRS 130, HSRS 210, Permission of
Program Coordinator AND ENGL 101 and Any College
Math
Students are afforded a practicum experience,
under the guidance of an ABA therapist, in the
home (or non-school) environment of a child
with a diagnosis of an autism spectrum
disorder. Students are expected to utilize the
knowledge and skills acquired in AHC 133 and
AHC 134 in providing supervised, direct, one-toone ABA and discrete trial teaching. Students
will log approximately 100 hours of clinical
time, under a preceptor, in 2-2.5 hour
increments (a maximum of 5 hours per week)
during the course of the semester.
Credit Hours: 3
HSRS-285 PRACTICUM II: SCHOOL-BASED
PROGRAMMING
Pre-requisites: HSRS 130, HSRS 210, HSRS 220, HSRS
280, Permission of Program Coordinator AND ENGL
101 and Any College Math
This course is an advanced-level course for the
two course, seven-credit hour Skill Set
Certificate in Autism and Intervention and
Education II. Students are afforded a practicum
experience, under the guidance of an ABA
therapist, in the school (public or private)
environment of a child with a diagnosis of an
autism spectrum disorder. Students are
expected to utilize the knowledge and skills
acquired in BHT 133, BHT 134 and BHT 135 in
providing direct, supervised, one-to-one ABA
and discrete trial teaching. Students will log 150
hours of clinical time, under a preceptor, in 2.5
hour increments (a minimum of ten hours per
week) during the course of the semester.
Credit Hours: 3
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BridgeValley CTC
HSRS-290 INTAKE, ASSESSMENT AND
DIAGNOSIS IN ADDICTIONS
Co-requisites: HSRS 232, ENGL 101
This course teaches the rationale, process, and
procedures for completion of a professional
biopsychosocial assessment, a diagnosis, and a
treatment plan for adolescents and adults with
addiction disorders. Implications of chemical
dependency on the family are addressed.
Credit Hours: 3
HSRS-291 WRAPВ® SEMINAR II: FACILITATORS
TRAINING
Pre-requisites: HSRS 121; HSRS 107 or permission of
Program Coordinator
WRAPВ® Seminar II applies Copeland Center
standards to equip students with skills; values
and ethics; resources. An experiential learning
environment, based on mutuality and selfdetermination, participants interactively
demonstrate experience with WRAPВ®. Seminar
II is for Peer Support Specialists and others
wanting to lead Mental Health Recovery and
WRAPВ® groups; work with others to develop a
WRAPВ®; and present on recovery issues to
groups, organizations. Students are expected to
have working WRAPВ® knowledge, demonstrate
four practice elements, share experiential
knowledge of how WRAPВ® works. Limited to 16.
Credit Hours: 3
HSRS-292 REHABILITATION CASE
MANAGEMENT
Pre-requisites: HSRS 120, HSRS 123, HSRS 221, ENGL
101
Co-requisites: HSRS 222
This case management model has a recovery
and rehabilitation focus. This course teaches
students the purpose, process, objectives, and
core case management activities needed to
access resources and services, within a planned
framework, for people with psychiatric and
addictive disorders.
Credit Hours: 3
HSRS-293 FAMILY AND ADDICTION
Pre-requisites: HSRS 120
This is an introduction course presenting the
family as a dynamic system focusing on the
effects of addiction on family roles, rules, and
behavior patterns. The addition effects of
mood-altering substances, behaviors, and
therapeutic alternatives as they relate to the
family from a multicultural and transgenerational perspectives.
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
HSRS-294 TREATMENT AND SUPPORTS FOR
ADDICTION
Pre-requisites: HSRS 120, HSRS 232
This course will explore the scope of
professional and self-help services available for
persons with addiction disorders. Prevailing and
controversial models, along with their scientific
and philosophical underpinnings, will be
examined, compared, and contrasted.
Credit Hours: 3
HSRS-296 ADDICTIONS WITH CO-OCCURRING
DISORDERS
Pre-requisites: HSRS 120, HSRS 232, Eligible for ENGL
101
Students examine the special characteristics
and service needs of persons experiencing
addiction related disorders and other mental
disorders simultaneously. A particular focus is
given to the need for integrated treatment to
address the person as a whole, avoiding the
pitfalls of service ”siloing”.
Credit Hours: 3
HSRS-297 MOTIVATIONAL INTERVIEWING FOR
ADDICTIONS
Pre-requisites: HSRS 120, HSRS 222, HSRS 232, Eligible
for ENGL 101
This course is an introduction to the spirit,
principles, and techniques of Motivational
Interviewing, a counseling technique for
exploring and resolving ambivalence regarding
health behavior change.
Credit Hours: 3
drug screening and background check prior to
placement.
Credit Hours: 4
HSRS-299 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMAN
SERVICES AND REHABILITATION STUDIES
Special topics course relating to Human Services
and Rehabilitation Studies.
Credit Hours: 1-3
HWAY
Highway Engineering Technology
HWAY-101 TECHNICIAN ORIENTATION
This course is comprised of a one-day workshop
held on campus and an 8-week online course.
The purpose of this course is to introduce the
new student to the college and to familiarize
them with the processes needed to be
successful and productive online students.
Credit Hours: 1
HWAY-102 HEAVY CONSTRUCTION METHODS
Pre-requisites: HWAY 104
Co-requisites: HWAY 103 or permission of Program
Coordinator
This course will deal with the earthwork
involved in the construction of the highway
subgrade. The focus will be on earthwork
operations and equipment. Topics include soil
characteristics, lab and field controls,
determination of highway earthwork quantities,
and estimating equipment production rates.
Web-based course.
Credit Hours: 3
HSRS-298 CLINICAL PRACTICE ADDICTIONS
Pre-requisites: Permission of Program Coordinator,
ENGL 101, Any College Level Math
Students engage in a three hundred (300) hour
clinical experience at a chemical dependency
facility. Students will be afforded the
opportunity to complete clinical practice and
increase their competency in the addictions
counseling domains while fulfilling the
practicum experience requirements mandated
by the state certification board. Ongoing
supervision will be given by a qualified staff
member on site and a faculty member off site.
Students will be interviewed by the Program
Coordinator and the Clinical Coordinator to
determine eligibility and suitability of
placement. Students are required to submit to a
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
HWAY-103 CONSTRUCTION INSPECTION I
Co-requisites: HWAY 101 or permission of Program
Coordinator
This course will provide the construction
inspector with an overview of the fundamentals
in bridge and highway inspection. It deals with
the role of the inspector and introduces aspects
of record keeping and required reports,
material quantity calculations and payment,
and other related topics. The current edition of
the WVDOH Construction Manual will be used
as a primary resource. Web-based course.
Credit Hours: 3
HWAY-104 PLANS AND SPECIFICATIONS
Co-requisites: HWAY 101 or permission of Program
Coordinator
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Course Descriptions
Credit Hours: 3
Course Descriptions
Course Descriptions
This course is intended to enable the technician
to interpret and understand plans and
specifications used in highway construction. It
will involve a comprehensive coverage of the
most current edition of the Standard
Specifications for Roads and Bridges with
Supplementals, and the WVDOH Standard
Details books. Web-based course.
Credit Hours: 3
BridgeValley CTC
emphasizes the dynamic processes that shape
the earth, and the results of those processes.
Topics include rocks and minerals, weathering,
the hydrologic cycle, erosion, deposition,
mountain building, metamorphism, volcanism,
and earthquakes. Web-based course.
Credit Hours: 2
HWAY-140 HIGHWAY BRIDGE CALCULATIONS
Pre-requisite(s): MATH-115, HWAY-115
HWAY-105 WORK ZONE TRAFFIC CONTROL
Co-requisites: HWAY 101 or permission of Program
Coordinator
The purpose of this course is to familiarize the
student with National and State requirements
for highway safety and efficiency by providing
for the orderly movement of all road users on
streets and highways throughout the Nation
and State. Web-based course.
This course provides the construction or bridge
inspector working in the field with an overview
of the fundamentals in bridge and highway
calculations. It deals with locating data and
performing calculations needed for material
quantities, structural loadings, section loss and
other related topics. Record keeping and data
collection are included.
Credit hours: 3
Credit Hours: 3
HWAY-106 ETHICS AND PROFESSIONALISM
(GEC 3)
Co-requisites: HWAY 101 or permission of Program
Coordinator
This course will provide the technician an
overview of the topics of Ethics,
Professionalism, and Risk Management.
Investigation into ethical issues and decision
making within the technical field. Procedures
for professionalism while working in the
transportation industry will be included.
History, theory, and current situations will bring
awareness to the student of just how Ethics,
Professionalism, and Risk Management fit into
the work/life commitment. Web-based course.
Credit Hours: 3
HWAY-115 BRIDGE INSPECTION I
This course will provide the bridge inspector
with an overview of the fundamentals in bridge
and highway inspection. It deals with the role of
the inspector and introduces aspects of record
keeping and required reports, material, damage
and repair quantity calculations. The current
editions of the WVDOH Bridge Inspection
Manual and the FHWA Bridge Inspector’s
Reference Manual will be used as primary
resources.
Credit Hours: 3
HWAY-120 GEOLOGY FOR TECHNICIANS
A basic geology course that deals with the
structure of Earth and the nature and
classification of earth materials. The course
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HWAY-202 HEAVY CONSTRUCTION METHODS II
Pre-requisites: HWAY 102, MATH 110
This course is a continuation of HWAY 102. The
focus will be on pavement construction
methods and placement of materials and
assembly of components used in highway
structures and drainage systems. Construction
safety and aspects of construction management
will be included. Web-based course.
Credit Hours: 3
HWAY-203 CONSTRUCTION INSPECTION II
Pre-requisites: HWAY 103
This course is a continuation of HWAY-103.
Emphasis will be placed on proper
documentation of records and reports, material
quantity calculations and payment, and other
related topics in accordance with WVDOH
requirements. The current WVDOH
Construction Manual will be used as a primary
resource. Web-based course.
Credit Hours: 3
HWAY-207 EROSION AND SEDIMENT CONTROL
Pre-requisites: HWAY 102, HWAY 103 or permission of
instructor
This course introduces the student to the basic
concepts and fundamental theories of
temporary erosion and sediment control
features. Design, construction, and
maintenance of the sediment control plan and
NPDES permitting requirements will be
included. Emphasis will be on local, state, and
federal regulations for erosion and sediment
control. Web-based course.
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Course Descriptions
Credit Hours: 3
HWAY-255 BRIDGE INSPECTION CERTIFICATION
/ REVIEW
HWAY-215 BRIDGE INSPECTION II
Pre-requisites: HWAY 215, HWAY 250 or permission of
instructor
This course is a continuation of HWAY-115.
Emphasis will be placed on proper
documentation of records and reports,
material, damage, and repair quantity
calculations, and other related topics in
accordance with the National Bridge Inspection
Standards (NBIS) and WVDOH requirements.
The current editions of the WVDOH Bridge
Inspection Manual and the FHWA Bridge
Inspector’s Reference Manual will be used as
primary resources.
Credit Hours: 3
HWAY-221 HIGHWAY SURVEYING
Pre-requisites: MATH 110 or higher or permission of
instructor
This course deals with the surveying operations
associated with highway construction. This
course will cover basic surveying equipment,
the techniques employed to obtain acceptable
elevations and linear and angular
measurements and the use of proper format for
recording of field notes and related
calculations. Lecture portions of the course will
be web-based. Lab portion of the course will
consist of hands-on use of surveying
equipment.
Credit Hours: 3
Credit hours awarded for successful passage of
the Safety Inspection of In-Service Bridges
course by the National Highway Institute, and
any introductory or review sessions included.
Capstone course.
Credit Hours: 3
HWAY-299 SPECIAL TOPICS: HET (COURSE
HOURS VARY)
Pre-requisites: HWAY 215, HWAY 250 or permission of
instructor
This course is used to transfer credit hours from
other institutions or training programs within a
specialized field of study that is applicable to
the Highway Engineering Technician Degree.
This course may be substituted into the
curriculum when certain learning outcomes
have been obtained and documented. This
course may be substituted as an elective course
based on application to the degree.
Credit Hours: 3
HUMN
Humanities
HUMN-101 INTRODUCTION TO HUMANITIES
(GEC 3)
Pre-requisites: Eligible for ENGL-101
HWAY-250 STRUCTURES II
Pre-requisites: HWAY 150
A continuation of HWAY 150. Study of
equilibrium of simple trusses and basic analysis
of stresses and strains on structural
components. Centroids and moments of inertia,
shear bending moments, and displacements.
Web-based course.
Credit Hours: 3
HWAY-252 STRUCTURES III
Pre-requisites: HWAY 250
The fundamentals of analysis and design of
structural members in steel and concrete and
their relationship to bridge design and
construction. Bridge loading and load rating,
reference to appropriate codes and
specifications, selection of structural members,
connections, concrete reinforcement.
Credit Hours: 3
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
This course focuses on basic human
achievements as expressed in art, philosophy,
music, religion, and literature throughout
history.
Credit Hours: 3
HUMN-103 PERFORMANCE ARTS AS CULTURE
(GEC 3)
The purpose of this course is to enhance one’s
understanding of diverse countries and peoples
nationwide and globally by exploring the
connections between cultures in the
development of music, dance, theater, and
other performance arts.
Credit Hours: 3
HUMN-205 APPALACHIAN CULTURE AND
HISTORY (GEC 3)
Pre-requisites: ENGL-101 with a C or better
This course emphasizes the study of Appalachia
and its culture and history. It will be an
overview that will include the history of the
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Course Descriptions
Pre-requisites: HWAY 115
Course Descriptions
region and its cultures and customs. Dual-listed
as HIST 205.
Credit Hours: 3
INFT
Information Technology
INFT-110 COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE AND
TROUBLESHOOTING
An introduction to current information
technology hardware, operating systems and
system troubleshooting. This course is designed
to prepare students for Comp TIA A+
certification examinations.
Credit Hours: 4
INFT-121 NETWORK OPERATING SYSTEMS
Pre-requisites: INFT 111 or A+ Certification or
Instructor's Permission
An introductory course covering the
implementation; configuration and
administration of network servers and
operating system designed to prepare students
for the CompTIA Server+ certification exam.
Credit Hours: 3
INFT-131 NETWORKING I
Pre-requisites: ENGL-091
An introduction to networking fundamentals;
hardware and operating systems; terminology;
topologies and protocols; local area networks
(LANs); and wide area networks (WANs).
Credit Hours: 4
INFT-132 NETWORKING II
Pre-requisites: INFT 131
A continuation of networking fundamentals
focusing on medium size business and ISP
related topics in network design, configuration,
Network Address Translation, IPv4/6,
subnetting, and troubleshooting to prepare
student for the CISCO CCENT certification.
Credit Hours: 4
INFT-228 WEB SERVER ADMINISTRATION
Pre-requisites: INFT 121 or Instructor permission
An introductory course with an in-depth study
of the methods, applications, scripting, SQL,
HTML standards, security, and e-commerce
issues related to Web server setup,
administration, and maintenance using various
operating system platforms.
Credit Hours: 4
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INFT-231 NETWORKING III
Pre-requisites: INFT 132
A study of designing hierarchical networks that
is scalable using Cisco IOS with appropriate
switch and routing hardware features and
configurations to support small to mediumsized business networks. This course is the
third in a series of Cisco courses leading to the
Cisco CCNA certification.
Credit Hours: 4
INFT-232 NETWORKING IV
Pre-requisites: INFT 231
A study of engineering principles for designing
hierarchical networks with current networking
and configuration standards conducive to
connecting large scale networks to the WAN,
Point-to-point, and site-to-site using broadband
solutions. This course is the forth in a series of
Cisco courses leading to the Cisco CCNA
certification.
Credit Hours: 4
INFT-241 NETWORKING V
Pre-requisites: INFT 231, CCNA certification or
Instructor permission
A course in implementing, monitoring, and
maintaining routing services in an enterprise
network. This is the first course in a three
course sequence to prepare students for the
CCNP certification.
Credit Hours: 4
INFT-242 NETWORKING VI
Pre-requisites: INFT 241 or Instructor permission
A course in implementing, monitoring, and
maintaining switching in converged enterprise
campus networks. This is the second course in a
three course sequence to prepare students for
the CCNP certification.
Credit Hours: 4
INFT-243 NETWORKING VII
Pre-requisites: INFT 2420 or Instructor permission
A course in monitoring and maintaining
complex enterprise routed and switched IP
networks. This is the third course in a three
course sequence to prepare students for the
CCNP certification
Credit Hours: 4
INFT-260 DISASTER RECOVERY
Pre-requisites: ISST 250 or Instructor permission
This course presents methods to identity risk
and vulnerabilities, to develop plans, policies,
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Credit Hours: 3
INFT-280 INTRODUCTION TO DATABASE
SYSTEMS
This course is the official academic training
course from IBM that teaches you relational
database concepts and provides you with
critical hands-on skills using IBMВ® DB2, the
industry leading database server from IBM; and
IBM Data Studio, an Eclipse-based tool for
database development and administration.
After completing this course and passing Test
302A – DB2 9 Database and Application
Fundamentals test, you will become an IBM
Certified Academic Associate.
Credit Hours: 3
INFT-299 SPECIAL TOPICS IN INFORMATION
TECHNOLOGY
Pre-requisites: Department chair permission
Selected studies in Information Technology.
Credit Hours: 1-4
ISST
Cyber Security Technology
ISST-250 SECURITY FUNDAMENTALS
Pre-requisites: INFT 1100, INFT 131 or Instructor
permission
An introduction to network security designed to
prepare students for the CompTIA Security+
certification exam. This course covers current
methods in securing computers and networks
using stand access control methods including
encrypted data transfer, protocols, and
organizational security practices.
Credit Hours: 3
INFT-290 PROJECT MANAGEMENT (GEC-4)
Pre-requisites: INFT 1310 or Instructor Permission
Co-requisites: ENGL 101
This course focuses on the theory, concepts,
tools, and techniques used to implement and
manage successful information technology
projects using Project Management Body of
Knowledge standards for managing projects.
Topics include: planning, scheduling and
staffing, and control, administration, analysis,
and reporting procedures. Project
management software will be introduced.
Credit Hours: 3
INFT-295 SEMINAR
Pre-requisites: Department chair permission
Seminar course for graduating students. Topics
include review for certification assessments,
exit assessments and career preparation.
Credit Hours: 1
INFT-298 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
PRACTICUM
ISST-252 NETWORK SECURITY
Pre-requisites: INFT 231 and ISST 250, CCNA
certification or Instructor permission
An introduction to network security principles,
tools and configurations. This course prepares
students for the Cisco CCNA Security
certification exam.
Credit Hours: 4
ISST-262 COMPUTER FORENSICS
Pre-requisites: INFT 110, 250, or Instructor permission
This course is a study of the collection,
preservation and analysis of digital data for
recovery, system evaluation and evidentiary
purposes. Topics include: data recovery in a
variety of OS environments; intrusion detection,
damage assessment, metadata; computer
investigations; crime scene processing;
evidence acquisition; evidence management
and expert witnessing.
Credit Hours: 4
Pre-requisites: Department chair permission
Special assignment in the Information
Technology field. Students must make a final
presentation and submit a reflective writing
assignment based on the field experience. A
designated field supervisor and a faculty
coordinator will oversee the field experience. A
designated field supervisor and a faculty
coordinator will oversee the field experience.
Credit Hours: 1-3
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
MACH
Machine Tool Technology
MACH-121 BLUEPRINT READING
An introduction to mechanical blueprint reading
for machining. Topics include: projections, line
types, auxiliary views, sectional views,
dimensioning, geometric dimensioning and
tolerancing, casting details, welding details,
sketching and applications to layout.
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Course Descriptions
and procedures which implement an
appropriate countermeasure to prevent or
mitigate incidents that affect business recovery
and continuity.
Course Descriptions
Course Descriptions
Credit Hours: 2
MACH-123 PRECISION MEASUREMENT AND
QUALITY ASSURANCE
An introduction to precision measurement
devices and techniques as well as basic
machining quality assessments. Topics include:
systems of measurement; rules; vernier, dial
and digital direct measurement instruments;
micrometers; indirect measurements; gage
blocks; angular measurement devices;
tolerances; fits; geometric dimensions and
statistical process control (SPC).
Credit Hours: 2
MACH-125 ADVANCED MEASUREMENT
An introduction to industry standard hardware
and software used for 3-dimensional
measurement of components and parts.
Students learn how to use a coordinate
measuring machine to enhance inspection
speed, confidence and accuracy.
Credit Hours: 1
MACH-131 INTRODUCTION TO MACHINING
Co-requisites: MACH 121, MACH 123
This course provides an introduction to a
variety of machining processes common to the
machining industry. Topics include safety,
process-specific machining equipment,
measurement devices, set-up and layout
instruments, and common shop practices. Upon
completion, students should be able to safely
demonstrate basic machining operations,
accurately measure components, and
effectively use layout instruments.
Credit Hours: 4
MACH-141 METALLURGY AND MACHINING
THEORY
A survey of materials, their physical properties
and the theoretical and practical aspects of
machining processes on materials. Topics
include ferrous and non-ferrous materials,
mechanical and physical properties, material
selection, material identification, hardening,
tempering, annealing, stress relief,
machinability, effects of machining, chip
formation, abrasives, cutting fluids, grinding
fluids, tooling, and tooling materials.
Credit Hours: 2
MACH-151 MANUAL MACHINE TOOL - GRINDING
AND POLISHING
BridgeValley CTC
An introduction to grinding processes with
laboratory applications. Topics include
selection and identification of grinding wheels,
truing, dressing, balancing, grinding fluids,
spindle grinders, surface grinders, grinding
processes, lapping, polishing and safe operating
practices.
Credit Hours: 2
MACH-153 MANUAL MACHINE TOOL - MILLING
Co-requisites: MACH 141
An introduction to milling processes with
applications. Topics include: milling processes;
work-holding methods; cutter identification,
selection and use; speeds and feeds; adapters;
tool holders; safe operating practices and
applications.
Credit Hours: 2
MACH-155 MANUAL MACHINE TOOL - TURNING
Co-requisites: MACH 141
Introduction to turning processes with
applications. Topics include lathe elements and
setup; work-holding methods; tooling selection;
tool holders; speeds and feeds; facing, drilling,
boring, knurling and threading; part inspection;
safe operating practices and applications.
Credit Hours: 2
MACH-191 NIMS CREDENTIALING – MANUAL
MACHINE TOOL
Pre-requisites: Instructor permission
A project based class focused on National
Institute of Metalworking Skills (NIMS)
credentialing. Topics include an introduction to
the NIMS credentialing system and preparation
for Level I Machining certifications for manual
machine processes. Emphasis on NIMS
credentialing projects.
Credit Hours: 3
MACH-261 CNC MACHINE TOOL –
INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING
Pre-requisites: Instructor permission
An introduction to CNC machining focusing on
programming. Topics include introduction to
CNC operation, equipment setup, coordinate
systems and G-code programming with a focus
on simulation.
Credit Hours: 4
MACH-263 CNC MACHINE TOOL – SETUP AND
OPERATION
Pre-requisites: MACH 261
Co-requisites: MACH 141
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BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Credit Hours: 4
MACH-271 INTRODUCTION TO CAD AND 3D
MODELING
Pre-requisites: MACH 121 or instructor permission
An introduction to 2D and 3D computer-aided
drafting and modeling. Topics include drawing
standards, multi-view, sections, and auzilliary
views; dimensioning, geometric and
tolerancing, use of 2D CAD software,
introduction to 3D solid modeling and the use
of 3D CAD software.
Credit Hours: 4
MACH-275 COMPUTER-AIDED MANUFACTURING
Pre-requisites: MACH 271 or instructor permission
An introduction to CNC programming via the
CAD/CAM tool chain. Topics include: 3D model
creation and geometry specification; use of
CAM software packages; tool selection; tool
path verification and post-processing with an
emphasis on lab exercises and projects.
Credit Hours: 4
MACH-281 THEORY, MAINTENANCE AND
TROUBLESHOOTING
Pre-requisites: MATH 110
An introduction to the theory and maintenance
of mechanical and electromechanical systems.
Topics include basic fundamentals of
mechanical drive systems, principles of
hydraulics and pneumatics; fasteners, bushings
bearings, lubrication; basic electrical theory,
electrical and mechanical measurements;
preventive maintenance; analysis of results and
the troubleshooting process.
Credit Hours: 3
MACH-292 NIMS CREDENTIALING – CNC
MACHINE TOOL
Pre-requisites: MACH 275 or instructor permission
A project based class focused on National
Institute of Metalworking Skills (NIMS)
credentialing. Students must pass the NIMS
Machining Level I CNC performance and theory
certification exams. Emphasis on NIMS CNC
credentialing projects.
Credit Hours: 3
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
MACH-299 SPECIAL TOPICS: MACHINING
Pre-requisites: Instructor permission
Special topics in machining.
Credit Hours: Variable
MATH
Mathematics
MATH-010 APPLIED TECHNICAL MATH SEMINAR
Pre-requisites: ACT Math 14-18 or Accuplacer
Arithmetic 40-84 . Students with ACT scores of 12-13
and Accuplacer Arithmetic scores of 35-39 may be
eligible for the course.
Co-requisites: Students must co-enroll in MATH 110
This course provides support and enhancement
for MATH 110.
Credit Hours: 1
MATH-011 APPLIED MATH FOR HEALTHCARE
SEMINAR
Pre-requisites: ACT Math 14-18 or Accuplacer
Arithmetic 40-84. Students with ACT scores of 12-13
and Accuplacer scores of 35-39 may be eligible for
the course.
Co-requisites: Students must co-enroll in MATH 111.
This course provides support and enhancement
for MATH 111.
Credit Hours: 1
MATH-012 APPLIED MATH FOR BUSINESS
SEMINAR
Pre-requisites: ACT Math 14-18 or Accuplacer
Arithmetic 40-84. Students with ACT scores of 12-13
and Accuplacer scores of 35-39 may be eligible for the
course.
Co-requisites: Students must co-enroll in MATH 112.
This course provides support and enhancement
for MATH 112.
Credit Hours: 1
MATH-013 APPLIED MATH REASONING
SEMINAR
Pre-requisites: ACT Math 14-18 or Accuplacer
Arithmetic 40-84. Students with ACT scores of 12-13
and Accuplacer scores of 35-39 may be eligible for the
course.
Co-requisites: Students must co-enroll in MATH 113.
This course provides support and enhancement
for MATH 113.
Credit Hours: 1
MATH-060 BRIDGE TO ALGEBRA
Pre-requisites: ACT Math 15-18 or Accuplacer
Elementary Algebra 43-83. Students with ACT Math
scores of 13-14 or Accuplacer scores of 28-42 may be
eligible for the course.
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Course Descriptions
A hands-on introduction to CNC mill and lathe
operations. Topics include machine setup;
coordinate systems; tooling selection.; tool
offsets; setting zero; part set up; program
setup, editing and execution; tool wear
compensations and applications.
Course Descriptions
Course Descriptions
This course provides students with a review of
basic algebra in preparation for college-level
algebra courses. Topics include solving linear
equations and inequalities, formulas and
application problems, graphing, equations of
lines, slopes, functions, polynomials
(simplifying, performing operations, and
factoring), scientific notation, and complex
number systems.
Credit Hours: 3
MATH-111 MATH FOR HEALTH CARE (GEC-2)
Pre-requisites: ACT Math 19 or Accuplacer Arithmetic
85.
Co-requisites: MATH 011 if required by placement
Engages students in quantitative mathematics
related to health fields. Students will apply
skills necessary for real-world situations while
demonstrating competencies in measurement
and conversion, dosages and intravenous fluid
administration, solving equations, and limited
statistical applications.
Credit Hours: 3
MATH-112 MATH FOR BUSINESS (GEC-2)
Pre-requisites: ACT Math 19 or Accuplacer Arithmetic
85.
Co-requisites: MATH 012 if required by placement
Utilization of mathematical operations to solve
practical business application problems. The
core topics include percentages with
applications, banking (check writing, statement
reconciliation) cash and trade discounts,
markup and markdowns, payroll, interest,
notes, present value. Additional topics may
include installment buying, mortgages, taxes,
insurance, stocks, bonds, analysis of financial
statements, treatment of depreciation, and
inventory costs.
Credit Hours: 3
MATH-113 MATHEMATICAL REASONING (GEC-2)
Pre-requisites: ACT Math 19 or Accuplacer Arithmetic
85.
Co-requisites: ACT MATH 013 if required by placement
This course provides students with a survey of
basic mathematics, algebra, geometry, and
probability and statistics as they apply to
solving problems in today’s world. Emphasis will
be placed on logical thinking, quantitative
reasoning, and number sense, in addition to
computational skills.
Credit Hours: 3
MATH-115 APPLIED TECHNICAL MATH (GEC-2)
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BridgeValley CTC
Pre-requisites: Math ACT 19 or Accuplacer Arithmetic
of 85 or higher or grade of C or better in Math 020
Co-requisites: MATH 010 if required by placement
This course is designed to engage students in
technical applications of ratios and proportions,
unit conversions, measurement, algebra,
geometry and trigonometry.
Credit Hours: 3
MATH-125 COLLEGE ALGEBRA EXPANDED (GEC2)
Pre-requisites: ACT Math 19 or Accuplacer Elem
Algebra of 76 or grade of C or better in MATH 060
(recommended for students who passed MAT 085
Introduction to Algebra but have not taken an
intermediate algebra course)
This course will explore the use of algebra to
model real world situations. Topics emphasized
will be the study of equations (linear,
polynomial, rational, exponential, and
logarithmic), functions, inequalities, systems,
matrices and conic sections. Supporting topics
include factoring techniques, the quadratic
formula, rational and radical expressions, and
function notation. This course is designed to
give additional support and review to students
who lack a strong background in introductory
algebra.
Credit Hours: 4
MATH-130 COLLEGE ALGEBRA (GEC-2)
Pre-requisites: ACT Math 21 or Accuplacer Elem
Algebra 84 (Recommended for students who have
passed an intermediate algebra course with a grade of
C or better). Students with ACT Math 19-20 or
Accuplacer Elem Algebra 76-83 may be given
consideration for this course through advising.
This course explores the use of algebra to
model real world situations and solve problems.
Topics emphasized include functions
(polynomial, rational, exponential, and
logarithmic), equations and inequalities,
systems of equations, matrices and conic
sections.
Credit Hours: 3
MATH-140 TRIGONOMETRY (GEC-2)
Pre-requisites: ACT Math 21 or Accuplacer Elem
Algebra 84 (Recommended for students who have
passed an intermediate algebra course with a grade of
C or better). Students with ACT Math 19-20 or
Accuplacer Elem Algebra 76-83 may be given
consideration for this course through advising.
This course will cover analytical trigonometry;
right and oblique triangles; vectors; radians;
formulas; identities; trigonometric equations;
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Course Descriptions
graph of trigonometric functions and complex
numbers.
Charge entry, payment posting, report design,
and generation are covered.
Credit Hours: 3
Credit Hours: 3
MATH-155 TECHNICAL CALCULUS (GEC-2)
MEDC-199 SPECIAL TOPICS IN MEDICAL
CODING
Special topics course relating to medical coding.
This course provides students with a foundation
in calculus topics relating to topics in
engineering technology fields, including linear
functions, conic sections, differentiation and
integration of basic forms, and applications of
derivatives.
Credit Hours: 3
MEDC
Medical Coding
MEDC-101 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY
Basic medical terminology course which focuses
on the many components of a medical term and
how to break down a medical term by simply
knowing the meaning of the prefix or suffix. It
will also emphasize word roots and their
combining forms by review of each body system
and specialty area, we well as, word
construction, spelling, usage, comprehension,
pronunciation and common medical
abbreviations.
Credit Hours: 1
MEDC-110 MEDICAL LAW AND ETHICS
This course is an introduction to the concepts of
medical law and ethics which focuses on legal
relationships of physicians and patients,
contractual agreements, professional liability,
malpractice, medical practice acts, informed,
consent, and bioethical issues. Emphasis is
placed on legal terms, professional attitudes,
and the principles and basic concepts of ethics
and laws involved in providing medical services.
Upon completion, students should be able to
meet the legal and ethical responsibilities of a
multi-skilled health professional.
Credit Hours: 1
MEDC-150 MEDICAL INSURANCE & BILLING
PRACTICES
Co-requisites: MEDC 101
Basic insurance claims processing, data entry,
insurance forms, EOBs, incorporate I-9/I-10 &
CPT coding systems for reimbursement of
claims; utilizing billing software applications.
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
Credit Hours: 1 -3
MEDC-201 ICD-10-CM DIAGNOSTIC MEDICAL
CODING
Co-requisites: MEDC 101, MEDC 215, BIO 220
This course is designed to introduce the student
to ICD-10-CM diagnostic coding with an indepth study of ICD-10-CM coding conventions
and guidelines. Students develop their coding
skills using the ICD-10-CM diagnostic coding
manual to accurately apply ICD-10-CM codes to
exercises and case studies applicable to any
clinical setting.
Credit Hours: 3
MEDC-203 ICD-10-PCS PROCEDURAL MEDICAL
CODING
Pre-requisites: MEDC 201
This course is designed to introduce the student
to ICD-10-CM procedural coding with an indepth study of ICD-10-CM coding conventions
and guidelines. Students develop their coding
skills using the ICD-10-CM procedural coding
manual to accurately apply ICD-10-CM codes to
exercises and case studies applicable to any
clinical setting. This course is designed to
introduce the student to ICD-10-CM diagnostic
coding with an in-depth study of ICD-10-CM
coding conventions and guidelines. Students
develop their coding skills using the ICD-10-CM
diagnostic coding manual to accurately apply
ICD-10-CM codes to exercises and case studies
applicable to any clinical setting.
Credit Hours: 3
MEDC-205 CPT/HCPCS MEDICAL CODING
Pre-requisites: BIO 220, MEDC 101, MEDC 215
This course is designed to introduce the student
to CPT/HCPCS procedural coding with an indepth study of CPT/HCPCS coding conventions
and guidelines. Students develop their coding
skills using the American Medical Association
CPT procedural coding manual to accurately
apply CPT/HCPCS codes to exercises and case
studies applicable to any clinical setting.
Credit Hours: 3
MEDC-215 HUMAN PATHIOPHYSIOLOGY
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Course Descriptions
Pre-requisites: MATH 130 (125) and MATH 140 with a
C or better; or ACT Math 28 or higher.
Course Descriptions
Co-requisites: BIO 220
Course focus is on description of conditions and
diseases of the body systems including etiology,
physical signs and symptoms, prognosis,
complications of commonly occurring diseases
and their management. Expected student
outcomes include ability to recognize physical
signs and symptoms in identifying disease
entities and ability to describe appropriate
diagnostic and treatment modalities.
Credit Hours: 2
MEDC-240 ADVANCED CONCEPTS
This course is advanced coding that uses ICD10-CM, ICD-10-PCS, and CPT/HCPCS
classification systems to apply code set
conventions, guidelines, and principles in
various combinations, settings, and scenarios.
Practice case studies take the student from
beginning concepts and selection of codes,
through intermediate applications using short
code assignment scenarios, to advance case
studies that on based on excerpts from health
records that require complex clinical analysis
skills and multiple code assignments.
Credit Hours: 3
MEDC-250 MEDICAL CODING DIRECTED
PRACTICUM
BridgeValley CTC
MEET
Mechanical Engineering Technology
MEET-121 MANUFACTURING PROCESSES I
Co-requisite(s): DRFT-120; or MATH-040/041 or ACT
math score 18
An introductory course combining the machine
tool field with the welding and casting fields. A
basic working knowledge of the terminology
and processes used in both machine tools and
welding fields. Laboratory experience on lathes,
grinders, milling machines, shapers, and drills in
the machine tool area; and welding and casting.
Special projects are produced in both lab and
class.
Credit Hours: 3
MEET-122 MANUFACTURING PROCESSES II
Pre-requisite(s): MEET-121
Co-requisite(s): MATH-113
An advanced course in the production and
manufacturing systems, process capability,
quality control; Computer Numerical Control
machines, casting processes, milling machines,
ferrous and non-ferrous metallurgy, heat and
surface treatment of metals, inspection, and
safety are also covered. Special class and lab
projects incorporate production operations.
Pre-requisites: MEDC 201(ICD-10-CM)
Co-requisites: MEDC 203, MEDC 205
Credit Hours: 3
This practicum places the student in a health
care facility providing the opportunity for the
practical application of classroom knowledge
and skills. It is designed to provide students
with an opportunity to obtain technical
experience under the supervision of competent
practitioners in a professional environment.
MEET-225 MECHANICAL DESIGN I
Credit Hours: 1
MEDC-260 PREPARATION FOR CERTIFIED
CODING SPECIALIST (CCS) CERTIFICATION
TEST
Pre-requisites: MEDC 201
Co-requisites: MEDC 203, MEDC 205
This course prepares students to take the
Certification test for Certified Coding Associate
(CCS) through AHIMA. It is designed to provide
the ICD-10-CM, ICD-10-PCS, and CPT/HCPCS
practice, a student needs to successfully pass
CCS certification exam. The practice exams and
exercises simulate the exam experience.
Credit Hours: 1
Pre-requisite(s): DRFT 120, MATH 113, MATH 114,
MEET 121 or permission of instructor
Co-requisite(s): CIET-115
A course in mechanical component
terminology, specification, and integration. The
following will be covered; couplings, clearance
and interference fits, V-Belts, HTD drives, keys
and keyways, sprocket drive systems, gears, and
bearings.
Credit Hours: 3
MEET-226 MECHANICAL DESIGN II
Pre-requisite(s): MEET 225, DRFT 121, CIET 115, MEET
240
The primary focus of this course is system
integration. Design projects will be assigned
throughout and oral presentations will be
required. This course also covers the following:
centrifugal pumps, eccentric loading, bolts and
fasteners, welded connections, sleeve bearings,
mechanical seals, alignment, economic analysis,
maintainability, and other related topics.
Credit Hours: 3
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Pre-requisite(s): MATH 114, Meet 121
An applied hydraulics course with special
concentration on factory or industrial hydraulic
systems. Introduction to fluid mechanics, and
mobile equipment and mining machinery.
Subject matter includes types of hydraulic
pumps and motors, cylinders, directional valves,
sequence and counterbalance valves, volume
controls, pressure-reducing valves,
specifications for piping and filtration, etc.
Selected computer application software is
introduced.
Credit Hours: 4
MEET-241 PRINCIPLES OF FLUID POWER
Pre-requisite(s): MATH 113 or MATH 110
An introduction to fluid power with
concentration industrial hydraulics. Physical
properties of hydraulic fluid, concepts of fluid
flow and power transformations are
introduced. Hydraulic symbols, unit conversions
and circuit reading will be covered.
Credit Hours: 4
MEET-242 COMPONENTS OF FLUID POWER
Pre-requisite(s): MEET 241
A course introducing industrial hydraulic
components and fluid transport devices. The
course further investigates fluid flow and
power. Introduces volumetric and mechanical
efficiencies as well as friction with in a system.
Credit Hours: 1
MEET-243 HYDRAULIC CIRCUIT DESIGN
Pre-requisite(s): MEET 242
A course in practical hydraulics. This course will
explore concepts involved in maintaining
hydraulic circuits. Common hydraulic problems
will discussed along with troubleshooting
techniques.
Credit Hours: 1
MEET-245 FLUID POWER LABORATORY
Co-requisite(s): MEET 241
A laboratory experience designed to
complement a study in hydraulics. Various
theoretical and practical labs will be conducted.
Written reports and skills tests will be used to
evaluate lab performance.
Credit Hours: 1
MEET-250 CLIMATE CONTROL
Pre-requisite(s): MATH-113, PHYS-201
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
This course begins with an overview of
fundamental concepts of thermodynamics
including energy equations, gas laws energy
cycles, and vapor cycles. The course then moves
to heating, cooling, and ventilation
fundamentals including the design of heating
and cooling installations. Humidity calculations
using psychometric charts, electrical control
systems, solar heating, and design
fundamentals are also covered. Selected
computer application software is introduced.
Credit Hours: 4
Course Descriptions
MEET-240 FLUID POWER
Course Descriptions
MGMT
Management
MGMT-151 SUPERVISORY MANAGEMENT
Pre-requisite(s): Eligible for ENGL 101
A management course for those interested in
acquiring the knowledge and exploring the skills
and techniques required for effective
management at the supervisory to midmanagement levels. Content is presented
within the context of four management
functions (Planning, Organizing, Leading, and
Controlling). Supporting skills development
topics and general human resources
management topics are also addressed. Primary
focus is on the human relations side of
management.
Credit Hours: 3
MGMT-155 FUNDAMENTALS OF
ENTREPRENEURSHIP
This course addresses the unique
entrepreneurial experience of conceiving,
evaluating, creating, managing and potentially
selling a business. The goal is to provide a solid
background with practical application of
important concepts applicable to the
entrepreneurial environment. In addition to
creative aspects, key business areas of finance,
accounting, marketing, and management will be
addressed from an entrepreneurial perspective.
Credit Hours: 3
MGMT-160 FUNDING YOUR VENTURE
Pre-requisite(s): MGMT 155
Methods of funding small business including
loans, grants, angel and venture capital. Topics
include loan packaging; grants: fact or fiction;
Small Business Administration guaranteed
loans, traditional bank loans, and micro-lending;
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Course Descriptions
credit, capital and collateral; and the
advantages and disadvantages of each.
Credit Hours: 1
MGMT-170 OPPORTUNITIES ANALYSIS (GEC 4)
Pre-requisite(s): MGMT 155 and MGMT 160
Critically and realistically analyze business ideas
for successful implementation. Topics include
business research, business planning and
financial planning, market demand, cost benefit
analysis, knowledge and experience vs. business
ideas.
Credit Hours: 2
MGMT-175 PRESENTING YOUR VENTURE
Techniques and methods for presenting a
business venture to a lender, partners, potential
funders, and customers. Marketing ideas to all
possible resource partners including branding
your business image.
Credit Hours: 2
MGMT-199 SPECIAL TOPICS
Special topics course relating to Management.
Credit Hours: 1-3
MGMT-202 PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT (B)
Pre-requisite(s): BUSN 106
This course familiarizes the student with the
management concepts of planning, organizing,
directing, and controlling. Assists the student in
developing an integrated concept of issues
affecting contemporary business environments.
In addition to introducing the student to the
technical knowledge and skills of management,
the application of these concepts in the
workplace will be considered.
Credit Hours: 3
MGMT-238 RETAIL MANAGEMENT
Pre-requisite(s): MGMT 202
This course covers product and service retailing.
Emphasis is placed on store management,
human resource management, customer buying
behavior, customer service, and financial
strategy.
Credit Hours: 3
MGMT-251 HUMAN RESOURCE CERTIFICATION
PREPARATION
This course provides an in-depth study of the six
key areas of the human resource body of
knowledge including: strategic management,
workforce planning and employment, human
resource development, total rewards
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(compensation and benefits), employee and
labor relations, and risk management (health,
safety and security). Students will be prepared
to sit for the Professional in Human Resources
(PHR) or Senior Professional in Human
Resources (SPHR) certification exams.
Credit Hours: 3
MGMT-253 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
Pre-requisite(s): BUSN 106 and MGMT 151
This course provides a comprehensive overview
of human resource/personnel management
concepts, practices, and procedures. Emphasis
is placed on the practical application of human
resource management principles in small
business.
Credit Hours: 3
MGMT-255 SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
Pre-requisite(s): BUSN 112, BUSN 106, MGMT 151,
MGMT 202, MKTG 205 and ACCT 180 (or permission of
the Program Coordinator.
Major management problems characteristic of
small business entrepreneurs are analyzed and
discussed. Requirements for starting a small
business are emphasized including selling
marketing, legal issues, management, and
financial controls. In this capstone course
students develop and write a business plan for
a small business.
Credit Hours: 3
MGMT-266 ENTREPRENUERSHIP MENTORSHIP
Pre-requisite(s): ENGL 101, completion of a minimum
of 45 hours and permission of supervising instructor
and Program Coordinator
Working one-on-one with a cooperating
professional in an entrepreneurial-based setting
for the purpose of developing specific
competencies, insight, self-awareness, wisdom
and skills of an entrepreneur. Students will
focus on developing skills and competencies
and how to overcome obstacles of entry into an
entrepreneurial opportunity. Students must
complete at least 250 hours of on-the-job
experiences with their mentor as well as
classroom supplemental
assignments/assessments.
Credit Hours: 3
MGMT-299 SPECIAL TOPICS
Special topics course relating to Management.
Credit Hours: 1-3
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
MLAB-100 INTRODUCTION TO LABORATORY
SCIENCE AND PHLEBOTOMY
Pre-requisites: Students must have completed all
required courses to apply to and be chosen to
participate in the MLT program.
This course will provide an introduction to
clinical laboratory science, including
phlebotomy.
Credit Hours: 2
MLAB-199 SPECIAL TOPICS
Pre-requisites: Students must have completed all
required courses to apply to and be chosen to
participate in the MLT program.
Special topics course relating to medical
laboratory technology.
Credit Hours: 1-3
MLAB-200 CLINICAL HEMATOLOGY WITH LAB
Pre-requisites: Students must have completed all
required courses from the first and second semester
courses and be chosen to participate in the MLT
program.
This course will provide an introduction to
clinical hematology (the study of blood and its
related disorders) and the fundamentals of
hemostasis (coagulation).
Credit Hours: 4
MLAB-201 CLINICAL BIOCHEMISTRY WITH LAB
Pre-requisites: Students must have completed all
required courses from the first and second semester
courses and be chosen to participate in the MLT
program.
This course will provide an introduction to
clinical chemistry with an emphasis on
fundamental principles and techniques used in
a clinical chemistry laboratory and the analytes
to be measured.
Credit Hours: 4
MLAB-202 CLINICAL IMMUNOHEMATOLOGY
WITH LAB
Pre-requisites: Students must have completed all
required courses from the first and second semester
courses and be chosen to participate in the MLT
program.
This course will provide an introduction to
Blood Banking and Transfusion Practices for the
MLT student. Topics will include (but are not
limited to) basic immunology, blood groups and
serologic testing and transfusion practices.
MLAB-203 CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY WITH LAB
Pre-requisites: Students must have completed all
required courses from the first and second semester
courses and be chosen to participate in the MLT
program.
This course will provide the MLT student with
an introduction to diagnostic microbiology,
including topics such as routine and special
specimen processing, clinically significant
isolates and analysis of body systems for
infectious disease.
Credit Hours: 4
MLAB-204 CLINICAL URINALYSIS AND BODY
FLUIDS WITH LAB
Pre-requisites: Students must have completed all
required courses from the first and second semester
courses and be chosen to participate in the MLT
program.
This course will provide the MLT student with
an introduction to the analysis of non-blood
body fluids using physical, chemical and
microscopic methods.
Credit Hours: 1
MLAB-205 MLT SEMINAR
Pre-requisites: Students must have completed all
required courses from the first and second semester
courses and be chosen to participate in the MLT
program.
This course will provide the MLT students with
an opportunity to review for their certification
exam, explore career options and present
personal research on a laboratory topic.
Credit Hours: 1
MLAB-206 MLT CLINICAL PRACTICUM
Pre-requisites: Students must have completed all
required courses to apply and be chosen to participate
in the MLT program. The first semester major didactic
courses must be completed before the clinical
practicum is offered.
This course will provide the MLT students with
an opportunity to get hands-on training in
actual hospital laboratories, using automated
and manual procedures and computer
information systems.
Credit Hours: 12
MLAB-299 SPECIAL TOPICS (ADVANCED)
Pre-requisites: Students must be actively participating
in the MLT program.
Special topics course relating to medical
laboratory technology
Credit Hours: 1-3
Credit Hours: 4
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
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Course Descriptions
MLAB
Medical Laboratory Technology
Course Descriptions
Course Descriptions
MRKT
Marketing
MRKT-173 PROFESSIONAL SELLING
A study of the basic principles of selling
including product knowledge, presentation of
the product or service, demonstrations,
objectives and sales resistance, and closing the
sale. Includes discussion of customer behavior.
Credit Hours: 3
MRKT-175 MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS
A comprehensive study of the field of
advertising and its many career opportunities.
Emphasis on marketing and media strategies
with special focus on print and electronic
media.
Credit Hours: 3
MRKT-199 SPECIAL TOPICS
Special topics course relating to Marketing.
Credit Hours: 1-3
MRKT-205 FUNDAMENTALS OF MARKETING
This course explores the marketing concept,
examines the marketing environment, and
discusses marketing ethics, social responsibility
and consumer and organizational buying
behavior. It introduces students to the role that
marketing research plays in developing
products and segmenting markets and explains
elements of the marketing mix. Course topics
help students understand how marketing plans
are developed.
Credit Hours: 3
MRKT-220 SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING
Pre-requisites: MRKT 205
This course will focus on understanding social
media, how to build social media marketing
strategies, and how to track their effectiveness.
This course covers advertising, marketing and
communications strategies in the new media
landscape where traditional media (e.g.
television, printing) and the online social media
(i.e. Web 2.0; e.g. online social networks, user
generated content, blogs, forums) coexist. We
will look at the current media landscape and
the strategic opportunities and challenges that
it affords marketers, managers and consultants
who are concerned with how to efficiently and
effectively advertise/promote brands and
products.
Credit Hours: 3
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BridgeValley CTC
MRKT-250 MARKETING MANAGEMENT
Pre-requisites: MRKT 205
This is the capstone course for the marketing
program will encompass skills learned in all
previous Marketing courses. The course will
give the student the opportunity to
demonstrate their knowledge by creating a
complete integrated marketing campaign.
Credit Hours: 3
MRKT-299 SPECIAL TOPICS
Special topics course relating to Marketing.
Credit Hours: 1-3
MTGY
Meteorology
MTGY-100 WEATHER AND CLIMATE (GEC 2)
Examination of weather, atmosphere and
climate change using the American
Meteorology Society’s Weather Studies
Education Program. Includes laboratory work.
Credit Hours: 3
NUCM
Nuclear Medicine
NUCM-200 INTRODUCTION TO NUCLEAR
MEDICINE
Designed for the student who will be applying
and screening for the Nuclear Medicine
Technology program. This course will orient
each student to the policies/procedures of each
of the clinical affiliates. In addition, infection
control, HIPAA, JCAHO, NRC, NMT Codes of
Ethics, IV techniques, routine procedures,
radiation safety, patient assessment, and body
mechanics will be presented.
Credit Hours: 3
NUCM-201 NUCLEAR MEDICINE PRACTICUM III
Co-requisites: Admissions into the Nuclear Medicine
Program
Directed practice in an affiliated hospital. This
training will prepare the student to perform
routine, diagnostic, and therapeutic nuclear
medicine procedures. Summer session, 40
hours per week.
Credit Hours: 3
NUCM-202 NUCLEAR MEDICINE PRACTICUM I
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Directed practice in an affiliated hospital. This
training will prepare the student to perform
routine, diagnostic, and therapeutic nuclear
medicine procedures. Fall Semester, 32 hours
per week.
Credit Hours: 6
NUCM-203 NUCLEAR MEDICINE PROCEDURES I
Co-requisites: Admissions into the Nuclear Medicine
Program
This course covers imaging and non-imaging
procedures in nuclear medicine including
anatomy & physiology, radiopharmaceuticals,
instrumentation, and basic interpretation. It
also covers patient care, dose administration,
ethics, legal issues, department organization,
and radiation safety issues.
NUCM-208 NUCLEAR MEDICINE PROCEDURES II
Pre-requisites: NUCM 203-Nuclear Medicine
Procedures I
Co-requisites: Admissions into the Nuclear Medicine
Program
Continuation of issues and procedures
discussed in NUCM 203.
(Covering imaging and non-imaging procedures
in nuclear medicine including anatomy &
physiology, radiopharmaceuticals,
instrumentation, and basic interpretation. It
also covers patient care, dose administration,
ethics, legal issues, department organization,
and radiation safety issues). Also, reviews for
nuclear medicine registry and certification
exams.
Credit Hours: 3
Credit Hours: 3
NUCM-209 RADIOPHARMACY AND
RADIOCHEMISTRY
NUCM-204 RADIATION PHYSICS
Pre-requisites: Admissions into the Nuclear Medicine
Program
Pre-requisites: Physics 109
A study of electronic structures, corpuscular
and wave nature of electromagnetic radiation,
spectra, electromagnetic interaction with
matter, relativity, radioactivity, neutron
activation, cyclotron nuclear reactors,
production and properties of x-rays, and
fundamentals of nuclear physics.
Basic principles of radiopharmacy as practiced
in the nuclear medicine department will be
discussed. Radiopharmaceutical production,
methods of localization, chemical reaction,
radiation safety, government regulations,
quality control and the principles of
radiochemical techniques.
Credit Hours: 2
Credit Hours: 3
NUCM-205 RADIOBIOLOGY AND RADIATION
PROTECTION SEMINAR
Pre-requisites: Admissions into the Nuclear Medicine
Program
This course encompasses the concepts of
maximum permissible radiation dose and
maximum permissible concentrations of
radionuclide in the environment. Biological
effects to ionizing radiation in man are
considered, with emphasis on the variables
which affect the response to radiation
exposure.
Credit Hours: 2
NUCM-206 NUCLEAR MEDICINE PRACTICUM II
Co-requisites: Admissions into the Nuclear Medicine
Program
Directed practice in an affiliated hospital. This
training will prepare the student to perform
routine, diagnostic, and therapeutic nuclear
medicine procedures. Spring Semester, 32
hours per week.
Credit Hours: 6
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
NURS
Nursing
NURS-101 HEALTH ASSESSMENT AND
NURSING CARE I
This course introduces the technical nursing
student to the history, characteristics, and
legalities of the profession of nursing, the use of
therapeutic communication, the fundamental
principles of health assessment, the nursing
techniques that focus on infection control, basic
client safety, and select functional health
patterns of Gordon’s nursing framework,
including the value-belief, health perceptionhealth maintenance, and activity-exercise
patterns.
Credit Hours: 2
NURS-102 HEALTH ASSESSMENT AND
NURSING CARE II
This course is the second module that
introduces the technical nursing students to the
principles of health assessment and nursing
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Course Descriptions
Co-requisites: Admissions into the Nuclear Medicine
Program
Course Descriptions
Course Descriptions
fundamentals. Students will perform health
assessments on the heart, lungs, thorax,
abdomen, lower GI and vascular systems.
Students will also explore the topics of nursing
process, concept mapping, client management,
pain management, diagnostic testing, and
select functional patterns of Gordon’s nursing
framework including value-belief, activityexercise, nutritional-metabolic, and elimination
patterns.
Credit Hours: 2
NURS-103 HEALTH ASSESSMENT AND
NURSING CARE III
This is the third module that introduces the
technical nursing student to the principles of
health assessment and nursing fundamentals.
Students will perform health assessments on
the breast and reproductive and neurological
systems. Students explore the topics of
developmental theories, health concerns and
risks across the life span, stress, complementary
and alternative therapies, preoperative client
management, a variety of diagnostic testing,
nursing theories and research, and select
functional health patterns of Gordon’s nursing
framework including the perception-selfconcept, sexuality-reproductive, nutritionalmetabolic, coping-stress tolerance, cognitiveperceptual, and sleep-rest patterns.
Credit Hours: 2
NURS-108 TRANSITION TO PROFESSIONAL
NURSE
Pre-requisites: Admission into the LPN-RN Bridge;
ENGL 101, CSCT 106 or ATEC 115, MATH 113 with a
grade of “C” or better, BIOL 220
Co-requisites: NURS 114, NURS 115, NURS 116, NURS
125, BIOL 221 and CHEM 105
This is the third module that introduces the
technical nursing student to the principles of
health assessment and nursing fundamentals.
Students will perform health assessments on
the breast and reproductive and neurological
systems. Students explore the topics of
developmental theories, health concerns and
risks across the life span, stress, complementary
and alternative therapies, preoperative client
management, a variety of diagnostic testing,
nursing theories and research, and select
functional health patterns of Gordon’s nursing
framework including the perception selfconcept, sexuality-reproductive, nutritionalmetabolic, coping-stress tolerance, cognitiveperceptual, and sleep-rest patterns.
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Credit Hours: 1
NURS-109 SYSTEM REVIEW
Pre-requisites: Admission into the LPN-RN Bridge;
ENGL 101, CSCT 106 or ATEC 115, MATH 113 with a
grade of “C” or better, BIOL 220
Co-requisites: NURS 115, NURS 116, NURS 125
In this course students will study how to
perform and interpret advanced assessment
skills. Students will review selected body
systems and apply appropriate assessmentbased nursing interventions.
Credit Hours: 2
NURS-114 NURSING CARE IN ADULT HEALTH
AND ILLNESS I
Pre-requisites: Completion of BIOL 220 with a grade of
“C” or better and NURS 103 with a grade of “B” or
better
Co-requisites: NURS 115, NURS 116, NURS 125, BIOL
221 and CHEM 105
This course will cover the principles of medicalsurgical nursing in the ambulatory and acute
care setting. Students will review concepts of
surgical nursing, and care of the client with
basic integumentary, musculoskeletal,
digestive, urinary, reproductive and infectious
disorders. Health promotion and maintenance,
risk reduction, and acute disease interventions
will be studied.
Credit Hours: 3
NURS-115 NURSING CARE IN ADULT HEALTH
AND ILLNESS I
Pre-requisites: Completion of BIOL 220 with a grade of
“C” or better and NURS 103 with a grade of “B” or
better
Co-requisites: NURS 114, NURS 116, NURS 125, BIOL
221 and CHEM 105
The principles of chronic health disorders and
nursing in the acute care, rehabilitation, and
palliative settings will be explored. Students will
study concepts of chronic illness, immobility,
chronic pain management, death and dying,
and nursing care of the client with chronic
musculoskeletal, ingestive, renal, elimination,
hematologic and oncology disorders. Health
promotion and maintenance, risk reduction and
chronic disease intervention strategies will be
reviewed.
Credit Hours: 3
NURS-116 NURSING CARE IN MENTAL HEALTH
AND ILLNESS
Pre-requisites: Completion of BIOL 220 with a grade of
“C” or better and NURS 103 with a grade of “B” or
better
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
In this course students will be introduced to the
concepts of mental health. Students will explore
the topics of psychobiology, mental health
disorders, crisis and suicide interventions,
treatment modalities, psychopharmacology,
nursing process in mental illness, principles of
therapeutic communication, and select
functional patterns of Gordon’s nursing
framework including the self-perception/selfconcept and coping-stress tolerance patterns. A
variety of community health care resources will
be used for clinical practice.
Credit Hours: 3
NURS-125 PHARMACOLOGY FOR NURSING
Pre-requisites: NURS 103 with a grade of “B” or better
Co-requisites: NURS 114, NURS 115, NURS 116
This course covers the basic principles of
pharmacology for nursing students. Consumer
safety, methods of identifying drug names, and
references will be identified in addition to
emergency preparedness and bioterrorism
review. Principles of drug processing,
absorption, distribution, metabolism, and
excretion will be discussed along with
responsibilities for principles of study for the
health care worker. Administration of drugs by
various routes of administration will be
explored including oral, gastrointestinal, and
parenteral routes.
Credit Hours: 3
NURS-132 DRUG AND DOSAGE CALCULATIONS
I
Pre-requisites: Admission into the Nursing Program;
Eligible for College-level MATH 100 or greater, Eligible
for ENGL 101
Co-requisites: NURS 133, NURS 134, PSYC 101, BIOL
220, ENGL 101
This course is designed to enhance the nursing
student’s ability to read, interpret, and solve
dosage calculation problems. Critical thinking
skills are applied to medication situations to
emphasize the importance of accuracy and the
avoidance of medication errors.
Credit Hours: 1
NURS-133 HEALTH ASSESSMENT AND
DIAGNOSTICS I
Pre-requisites: Admission into the Nursing Program;
Eligible for ENGL 101
Co-requisites: NURS 132, NURS 134, PSYC 101, BIOL
220, ENGL 101
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
This course is designed to introduce the nursing
student to the knowledge and skills required to
perform a health assessment across the lifespan
and to document appropriate findings. The
nursing student will be introduced to normal
lab values and basic diagnostic procedures.
Credit Hours: 2
NURS-134 INTRODUCTION TO NURSING
CONCEPTS
Pre-requisites: Admission into the Nursing Program;
Eligible for ENGL 101
Co-requisites: NURS 132, NURS 133, PSYC 101, BIOL
220, ENGL 101
This foundational course is designed to
introduce concepts to the beginning nursing
student that will focus on maintaining health
and promoting wellness throughout the
lifespan. Concepts and core values basic to the
foundation of nursing practice are presented.
Classroom and laboratory experiences provide
opportunity for understanding of the nursing
process, clinical judgment and decision making.
Credit Hours: 8
NURS-142 DRUG AND DOSAGE CALCULATIONS
II
Pre-requisites: Completion of NURS 132, NURS 133,
and NURS 134 with a grade of “C” ADD or better”
Co-requisites: NURS 143, NURS 144, BIOL 221
This course expands the nursing student’s
ability to read, interpret, and solve increasingly
complex dosage calculation problems. Critical
thinking skills are applied to age and acuity
specific variations in select populations.
Credit Hours: 1
NURS-143 HEALTH ASSESSMENT AND
DIAGNOSTICS II
Pre-requisites: Completion of NURS 132, NURS 133,
and NURS 134 with a grade of “C” or better
Co-requisites: NURS 142, NURS 144, BIOL 221
This course is designed to focus on abnormal
assessment and diagnostic findings.
Modifications of assessment for select
populations will be addressed.
Credit Hours: 1
NURS-144 NURSING CONCEPTS OF HEALTH
AND ILLNESS I
Pre-requisites: Completion of NURS 132, NURS 133,
and NURS 134 with a grade of “C” or better
Co-requisites: NURS 142, NURS 143, BIOL 221
This course builds upon foundational concepts
across the lifespan while introducing the
concepts of the wellness-illness continuum and
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Course Descriptions
Co-requisites: NURS 114, NURS 115, NURS 125, BIOL
221 and CHEM 105
Course Descriptions
Course Descriptions
the individual and family response. Classroom
and laboratory experiences provide opportunity
for application of the nursing process and
development of clinical judgment and decision
making.
Credit Hours: 9
NURS-199 SPECIAL TOPICS
Special topics course related to nursing.
Credit Hours: 1-3
NURS-217 MATERNITY NURSING CARE IN
HEALTH AND ILLNESS
Pre-requisites: Completion of NURS 114, NURS 115,
NURS 116, and NURS 125 with a grade of “B” or better
Co-requisites: NURS 218, NURS 219; PSYC 201, BIOL
230 and BIOL 245
In this course, the student applies the principles
of maternity nursing to the obstetrical client in
the antepartum, intrapartum and postpartum
health states. Additional course topics will
include the care of the newborn infant,
maternal and newborn health complications,
concepts of women’s health, health promotion
and maintenance, and selected functional
health patterns in Gordon’s nursing framework.
Credit Hours: 3
NURS-218 PEDIATRIC NURSING CARE IN
HEALTH AND ILLNESS
Pre-requisites: Completion of NURS 114, NURS 115,
NURS 116, and NURS 125 with a grade of “B” or better
Co-requisites: NURS 217, NURS 219 PSYC 201, BIOL
230 and BIOL 245
The principles of pediatric nursing will be
explored in this course. Content will include
principles of growth and development, health
assessment from infancy to adolescence, health
promotion and maintenance, parenting, the
special needs child, end-of-life care for the
pediatric client, common childhood illnesses
and select functional health patterns of
Gordon’s nursing framework including the
health promotion-health maintenance,
nutritional-metabolic, elimination, activityexercise, cognitive-perceptual, role relationship,
and value-belief patterns. Acute care and
community health care settings will be used for
clinical experiences.
Credit Hours: 3
NURS-219 NURSING CARE IN ADULT HEALTH
AND ILLNESS III
Pre-requisites: Completion of NURS 114, NURS 115,
NURS 116, and NURS 125 with a grade of “B” or better
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BridgeValley CTC
Co-requisites: NURS 217, NURS 218, PSYC 201, BIOL
230, BIOL 245
Principles of medical-surgical nursing in acute
care, home health, and long-term care settings
will be reviewed in this course. Students will
focus on the concepts of adult and geriatric
nursing, and the care of clients with sensory,
neurologic, endocrine, pancreatic, biliary,
hepatic, vascular and immune disorders. This
course will incorporate health promotion and
maintenance, risk reduction, and disease
intervention strategies for the client requiring
increasing complexity in nursing care.
Credit Hours: 3
NURS-221 NURSING CARE IN ADULT HEALTH
AND ILLNESS IV
Pre-requisites: Completion of NURS 217, NURS 218,
and NURS 219 with a grade of “B” or better
Co-requisites: NURS 222, NURS 223, NURS 224, ENGL
102
This course will cover the nursing principles of
the high acuity client in acute care, critical care
and emergency settings. Students will review
the concepts of critical care and emergency
nursing, shock, trauma, transplantation and
organ donation, disaster management, and the
care of clients with advanced disorders
involving the respiratory, cardiac,
integumentary, renal, hematologic, and
systems. Health promotion and maintenance,
risk reduction and disease intervention
strategies will be incorporated.
Credit Hours: 5
NURS-222 MANAGEMENT OF NURSING CARE
Pre-requisites: Completion of NURS 217, NURS 218,
and NURS 219 with a grade of “B” or better
Co-requisites: NURS 221, NURS 223, NURS 224, ENGL
102
This course will explore the principles of nursing
management and leadership. Students will
review the topics of effective communication,
conflict management, delegation and
supervision, nursing care delivery models,
Quality Improvement research, health care
economic issues and fiscal responsibility, legal
and ethical issues, client and workplace
advocacy, emergency preparedness,
informational computer-based technology, and
the use of nursing research to guide practice.
Evidence-based clinical nursing practice will
allow for the application of these principles in a
variety of acute and community health care
settings during the course.
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Course Descriptions
Credit Hours: 3
NURS-244 SYNTHESIS OF NURSING CONCEPTS
(GEC 4)
NURS-223 PRECEPTORSHIP IN NURSING CARE
Pre-requisites: Completion of NURS 234 with a grade
of “C” or better
Co-requisites: NURS 245
Students will be provided the opportunity to
perform in the role of the registered nurse
under the supervision of a RN preceptor and
nursing faculty. Students will be able to
synthesize scientific concepts to enhance client
care, apply critical thinking to form competent
clinical judgments, perform and manage
evidence-based nursing care, effectively
communicate and collaborate with health care
team members, utilize discipline-specific
technology, demonstrate professional
accountability, and participate in professional
development activities.
Credit Hours: 4
NURS-224 PROFESSIONAL NURSING SEMINAR
Pre-requisites: Completion of NURS 217, NURS 218,
and NURS 219 with a grade of “B” or better
Co-requisites: NURS 221, NURS 222, NURS 223, ENGL
102
This capstone course in the nursing program
will focus on current issues in health care and
the nursing profession and is designed to
facilitate the transition from student to
professional nurse. Topics of discussion will
include economic issues and health care
financing, health care policy and politics, ethical
and bioethical issue, career development and
preparation for the NCLEX-RN examination.
Students will submit a general education
portfolio for evaluation. Students must achieve
a designated score on the RN Assessment by ERI
in order to graduate.
Credit Hours: 1
NURS-234 NURSING CONCEPTS OF HEALTH
AND ILLNESS II
Pre-requisites: Completion of NURS 142, NURS 143,
and NURS 144 with a grade of “C” or better
Co-requisites: ENGL 101, BIOL 230 or BIOL 240
This course expands the concepts of the
wellness-illness continuum, with emphasis on
the expanding family and tertiary care within
the community. Classroom and laboratory
experiences provide opportunity for analysis
within the nursing process and application of
clinical judgment and decision making.
Credit Hours: 9
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
This course together with the capstone course
focuses on the integration of interrelated
concepts across the wellness-illness continuum.
Classroom and laboratory experiences provide
opportunity for synthesis of the nursing process
and integration of clinical judgment and
decision making.
Credit Hours: 9
NURS-245 PROFESSIONAL NURSING AND
HEALTH SYSTEMS CONCEPTS (GEC 3)
Pre-requisites: Completion of NURS 234
Co-requisites: NURS 244, BIOL 245
This capstone course will focus on current
issues in health care and the nursing profession
and is designed to facilitate the transition from
student to professional registered nurse. Topics
of discussion will include national health policy
and politics, ethical and bioethical issues, career
development, application for state licensure
and preparation for the NCLEX-RN examination.
Credit Hours: 3
NURS-299 SPECIAL TOPICS
Pre-requisites: Completion of NURS 234
Co-requisites: NURS 244
Special topics course related to nursing.
Credit Hours: 1-3
PHED
Physical Education
PHED-101 HEALTH AND WELLNESS
This course is designed to provide the student
with knowledge of current health issues and
problems, including physical fitness, nutrition,
and major diseases and to encourage
application of this knowledge for healthful
living.
Credit Hours: 2
PHED-102 INTRODUCTION TO YOGA
Introduction to Yoga is an activity course that
develops the following areas of health-related
fitness: muscular endurance, flexibility and
body awareness. This course also enhances the
student’s overall wellness and stress
management through a combination of
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Course Descriptions
Pre-requisites: Completion of NURS 217, NURS 218,
and NURS 219 with a grade of “B” or better
Co-requisites: NURS 221, NURS 222, NURS 224, ENGL
102
Course Descriptions
BridgeValley CTC
stretching, breathing exercises, and deep
relaxation.
in class are used in lieu of a separate lab
section.
Credit Hours: 1
Credit Hours: 3
PHED-104 FIRST AID
This course teaches students critical skills to
respond to and manage an emergency in the
first few minutes until emergency medical
service personnel arrive. Students learn skills
such as how to treat bleeding, sprains, broken
bones, shock and other first aid emergencies.
PHYS-101 GENERAL PHYSICS I (GEC 2)
Pre-requisites: Algebra (MATH 130)
Co-requisites: Trig (MATH 140)
Mechanics; properties of solids, liquids and
gases; properties of heat; wave motion,
including sound and applications. Laboratory
activities are integrated into the course.
Credit Hours: 1
Credit Hours: 4
PHED-199 SPECIAL TOPICS
Special topics course relating to physical
education.
PHYS-102 GENERAL PHYSICS II (GEC 2)
Credit Hours: 1-3
PHED-299 SPECIAL TOPICS
Special topics course relating to physical
education.
Pre-requisites: Algebra (MATH 130)
Co-requisites: Trig (MATH 140)
Continuation of PHYS 101. Electricity and
magnetism; basic electronics; properties of
light; lenses and mirrors; optical phenomena;
introduction to modern physics. Laboratory
activities are integrated into the course.
Credit Hours: 1-3
Credit Hours: 4
PHSC
Physical Science
POLI
Political Science
PHSC-100 PHYSICAL SCIENCE (GEC 2)
POLI-101 AMERICAN FEDERAL GOVERNMENT
Co-requisites: 100 level English or equivalent ACT score
Pre-requisites: Eligible for ENGL-101
Current theories and concepts of physical
science focusing on fundamental laws and
concepts of physics, chemistry, astronomy, and
geology.
U.S. government under the Constitution; power
and duties of the executive, legislative, and
judicial branches; relationships between
federal, state and local governments; expansion
of federal power; federal agencies; foreign
affairs. A study of the theory, organization,
functions, politics, and issues of the United
States political system. Primary emphasis is on
the federal level of government. The course
focuses on how the system is supposed to work,
how it does work, its achievements and
shortcomings. Topics include the legislative,
executive branches of government, political
parties, campaigns and elections, and
formulation of public policy.
Credit Hours: 3
PHSC-101 PHYSICAL SCIENCE LAB
Co-requisites: 100 level English or equivalent ACT score
Corresponding lab for PHSC 101.
Credit Hours: 1
PHYS
Physics
PHYS-100 INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS (GEC 2)
Credit Hours: 3
Pre-requisites: MATH 115 or MATH-125 or Co-requisite
MATH 130
This course is an introduction to basic process
physics, including vectors, forces and motion,
work and energy, gases and flowing liquids,
fluid systems, heat transfer, simples machines
and mechanical advantage, and other physical
science principles. Laboratory demonstrations
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PRLS
Paralegal Studies
PRLS-100 INTRODUCTION TO THE PARALEGAL
PROFESSION
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
The role of paralegals/legal assistants in the
legal system and the skills needed to work as a
paralegal/legal assistant are the main foci of
this course. Students will also be introduced to
legal ethics, the regulation of legal
assistants/paralegals, legal interviewing, law
office administration and employment
information.
Credit Hours: 2
Course Descriptions
Pre-requisites: Eligible to take ENG 101
The course covers the following substantive
areas of law: property, leases, deeds, real
estate finance, and distribution of assets
through testamentary and non-testamentary
means. Students are also required to draft
various testamentary and non-testamentary
documents and are required to perform title
searches as part of this course.
Pre-requisites: Eligible for ENGL-101
PRLS-203 CRIMINAL LITIGATION
This course provides students with an overview
of the initial stages of the civil litigation process.
The course focuses on the role of the paralegal
in the preparation of court documents,
investigation, client and witness contact and
discovery. Students are asked to draft
complaints, certificates of service, and other
documents as part of this course.
Pre-requisites: Eligible to take ENG 101
Credit Hours: 3
This course studies criminal law and procedure.
Topics to be covered include searches and
seizures, arraignment, trial, and sentencing, the
habeas corpus petition process, and
information concerning various types of
misdemeanors and felonies. Students will be
taught to think critically about these topics and
may be asked to draft different documents
needed in the criminal litigation process.
PRLS-199 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PARALEGAL
STUDIES
Credit Hours: 4
Pre-requisites: PRLS 199
PRLS-204 CIVIL LITIGATION 2
Courses or seminars on timely subjects related
to the interests and needs of paralegals.
Pre-requisites: PRLS 101 Civil Litigation 1; PRLS 201
Evidence and Litigation
Credit Hours: 1-4
PRLS-200 CIVIL LAW 1
Pre-requisites: BUSN 203 Business Law 1
This course builds upon BUSN 203. Specifically,
this course covers a number of substantive
areas of law including business organizations,
consumer protection, employment,
environmental, and family law. In covering
these areas, students are encouraged to think
critically regarding how these areas of law are
applied to real life scenarios. Students may be
asked to draft documents as part of this course.
Credit Hours: 3
PRLS-201 EVIDENCE AND LITIGATION PREREQUISITES: PRLS 101 CIVIL LITIGATION 1
This course will build upon what students have
learned in PRLS 101 about the civil litigation and
appellate process. It will also study areas of
evidentiary law, including the rules of evidence,
and it will require students to perform various
writing assignments that will assist them in
learning how to draft documents needed in a
litigation practice.
Credit Hours: 3
PRLS-202 PROPERTY LAW
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
This course studies debt, debt collection
through both judicial and non-judicial means,
and bankruptcy. The course also seeks to
expose students to practical applications of
litigation theory by allowing the students to
have an opportunity to visit various court
hearings. Certain writing assignments may be
required of students enrolled in this class.
Credit Hours: 3
PRLS-220 LEGAL RESEARCH AND WRITING 1
Pre-requisites: BUSN 203; PRLS 101; PRLS 200; PRLS
201
This course covers basic legal research and
writing techniques. The student will utilize
manual research techniques and/or computerbased research techniques. Some writing
assignments may be assigned.
Credit Hours: 3
PRLS-221 LEGAL RESEARCH AND WRITING 2
(GEC 4)
Pre-requisites: PRLS 220
This course covers more advanced legal
research and writing techniques. It also covers
the use of legal reasoning in legal writing.
Writing assignments will be assigned and
students are expected to utilize critical thinking
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Course Descriptions
Credit Hours: 3
PRLS-101 CIVIL LITIGATION 1
Course Descriptions
skills that have previously been acquired in
other PRLS classes.
Credit Hours: 3
BridgeValley CTC
PRLS-299 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PARALEGAL
STUDIES
Pre-requisites: PRLS 299
PRLS-296 PCCE REVIEW COURSE
Pre-requisites: All graduation requirements except for
the courses in which the student is currently enrolled
must be completed; Permission of supervising
instructor and Program Coordinator must be obtained
to enroll in this course.
Co-requisites: PRLS 298
This review course will help prepare Paralegal
Students to take the Paralegal Core
Competency Examination. This course must be
taken in the semester that the student is
graduating from the Paralegal Studies program.
Credit Hours: 1
PRLS-297 PARALEGAL STUDIES INTERNSHIP
Pre-requisites: All graduation requirements except for
the courses in which the student is currently enrolled
must be completed; Permission of supervising
instructor and program coordinator must be obtained
to enroll in this course.
The associate degree paralegal studies
candidate will work at least 220 hours for the
purpose of gaining on-the-job experience in
legal and legal related fields. Students attend a
weekly class that accompanies their work
requirement. Students are responsible for
securing employment with an internship
provider. Graded on a pass/fail basis.
Credit Hours: 2
PRLS-298 PARALEGAL STUDIES SEMINAR
Pre-requisites: All graduation requirements except for
the courses in which the student is currently enrolled
must be completed; Permission of supervising
instructor and Program Coordinator must be obtained
to enroll in this course.
Co-requisites: PRLS 250 Paralegal Studies Internship
This capstone course must be taken the
semester the student plans to graduate.
Program specific and general knowledge exit
examinations, oral presentations, writing
assignments and case analyses will be used to
measure student competencies. Seminars will
be presented on such topics as resume writing,
interviewing skills, time management, business
etiquette and customer service. Prerequisites:
All graduation requirements except for the
courses in which the student is currently
enrolled must be completed; Permission of
supervising instructor and Program Coordinator
must be obtained to enroll in this course.
Credit Hours: 1
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Courses or seminars on timely subjects related
to the interests and needs of paralegals.
Credit Hours: 1-4
PSYC
Psychology
PSYC-101 GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY (GEC 3)
Pre-requisites: Eligible for ENGL 101
This course involves a general survey of the
discipline and concepts of psychology, (origins,
growth and development of behavior, language,
conditioning, and learning) utilizing landmark
and recent research to examine relevance
(application) outside of the classroom.
Emphasis in this course is on real-world
application (personally and professionally) of
psychological concepts, within the context of a
diverse and ever-changing society
Credit Hours: 3
PSYC-201 LIFE SPAN DEVELOPMENT (GEC 3)
Pre-requisites: Eligible for ENGL 101
This course examines the major theoretical
perspectives in developmental psychology.
Based on psychological theory and research, it
includes practical application. Emphasis will be
on the interconnectedness through change and
development across each stage of the life cycle.
Effects of individual variable differences of
development (social, emotional, physical,
cognitive) are examined.
Credit Hours: 3
PTEC
Process Technology
PTEC-101 INTRODUCTION TO PROCESS
TECHNOLOGY
Pre-requisites: MATH 020, or placement into the next
higher MATH course
Introduction to process technology, including
the history, shift work, operations, equipment,
basic electric circuits, utilities, auxiliaries,
maintenance and trouble identification,
instrumentation and control systems basics.
The physics and chemistry of processing,
including calculation of volumes, flows, forces,
pressure, temperature, and gas law equations.
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
Course Descriptions
Credit Hours: 4
PTEC-205 PROCESS TECHNOLOGY III:
OPERATIONS
PTEC-103 PROCESS TECHNOLOGY I:
EQUIPMENT
Pre-requisites: PTEC 203
Pre-requisites: PTEC 101
Introduction to process technology equipment.
Industry-related equipment concepts, including
purpose, components, operation and the
operator’s role for operating and
troubleshooting the equipment.
Credit Hours: 4
PTEC-199 SPECIAL TOPICS
Pre-requisites: Permission of Program Coordinator
Special topics course relating to Process
Technology.
Credit Hours: 1- 3
PTEC-201 WATER AND WASTEWATER
TREATMENT
Pre-requisites: PTEC 101
Introduction to basic principles of water
treatment, including water treatment
chemistry, types and operation of equipment,
controls and instruments, accessory equipment,
water treatment and wastewater treatment
operations.
Credit Hours: 3
PTEC-202 SAFETY, HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENT
Pre-requisites: ENGL 020, or placement into the next
higher ENGL course
Introduction to safety basics including hazard
communication, hazardous waste operations
and emergency response (HAZWOPER),
personal protective equipment, respiratory
protection, industrial hygiene topics, permit
systems and environmental protection.
Credit Hours: 3
PTEC-203 PROCESS TECHNOLOGY II: SYSTEMS
Pre-requisites: PTEC 101
Introduction to basic operating fundamentals
including typical plant facilities layout, and the
interrelation of process equipment and
systems. Students will arrange process
equipment into basic systems, describe the
purpose and function of specific systems, and
explain how operating parameters are
maintained and controlled while recognizing
factors that may affect process systems.
Students will also study the concepts of system
and plant economics.
Credit Hours: 3
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
Students apply existing knowledge of
equipment, systems, and instrumentation to
the operation of an entire unit in a
manufacturing plant in the process technology
industry. Concepts relating to commissioning,
normal start-up, normal operations, normal
shutdown, turnarounds, and abnormal
situations, as well as the operator’s role in
performing the tasks associated with these
concepts are also studied.
Credit Hours: 4
PTEC-206 PROCESS QUALITY
Pre-requisites: MATH020, or placement into the next
higher MATH course
Introduction to modern quality control,
including the definition of quality, statistical
distributions, capability measures with respect
to customer expectations, Lean manufacturing,
Six Sigma, Quality Reliability Planning, Quality
costs. Students gain knowledge in customer
expectations in a manufacturing system and
continuous improvement methodology.
Demonstrates procedures and policies to insure
operating consistency, reduce variability in the
process, reduce waste and prevent safety
incidents. Students use quality tools and team
problem-solving techniques.
Credit Hours: 3
PTEC-207 CHEMICAL PLANT INTERNSHIP
Pre-requisites: Permission of Program Coordinator and
of the host company
Students are chosen by local companies to
intern for periods up to 16 weeks, and must
meet performance, safety and work habit
criteria of the host. Students will be evaluated
jointly by employees of the chemical plant and
an instructor from the Process Technology
Program. Students must register for the four
semester hour course to receive credit hours.
The Chemical Plant Internship can be taken in
lieu of PTEC 205, Process Technology IIIOperations.
Credit Hours: 4
PTEC-250 CAPSTONE COURSE
Pre-requisites: Permission of Program Coordinator
Capstone course. Prior Process Technology
course information is reviewed in preparation
for certifications. Course includes preparations
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Course Descriptions
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Course Descriptions
for employment, Work Keys testing and review
of General Education Portfolio.
Credit Hours: 3
BridgeValley CTC
care. Modalities to be covered include: Airway
Management; Infection Control and
Microbiology; Lung Inflation Therapy.
Credit hours: 3
RESP
Respiratory Therapy
RESP-101, 102, 103, 201, 202, CLINICAL
ROTATIONS
Clinical rotations provide opportunities for
students to apply theory and skills in the work
environment. Clinical rotations must be
completed in sequence.
Credit hours: 0
RESP-105 PATIENT ASSESSMENT
A modular course designed to begin learning
the terminology, diagnostics, and techniques
used by the respiratory therapist. Preparatory
information is covered to begin assessment and
treatment of the acute or chronically impaired
patient.
Credit hours: 4
RESP-107 CP PHARMACOLOGY
Pre-requisite(s): RESP-105
Course designed to instruct the student in the
physiology of pharmaceuticals used by the
advanced level respiratory therapist. The
pharmaceutical, pharmacokinetic, and
pharmacodynamics phases of therapy are
studied in depth along with the autonomic
nervous system. Drug classifications are studied
as they pertain to the respiratory patient.
Calculation of intravenous medications and
gram/solution strength will be covered.
Credit hours: 3
RESP-111 RESPIRATORY SKILLS I
Pre-requisite(s): RESP-105
The theory and application of respiratory
therapy equipment and techniques being used
in the health care setting today. Modalities to
be covered include: Basic Life Support (CPR);
Respiratory Math and Physics; Gas
Administration Devices and Therapy; Aerosol
and Humidity Therapy.
RESP-115 PATHOLOGY
Pre-requisite(s): RESP-105, 111
The course covers etiology and symptoms of
various diseases encountered by the respiratory
therapist. Concentration is on assessment and
critical thinking skills during the treatment of
both acute and chronic illness.
Credit hours: 3
RESP-205 NEONATES/PEDIATRICS
Pre-requisite(s): RESP-220
Special topics that relate to the treatment of
the pediatric and neonatal infant. Assessment,
therapy, and ventilatory differences will be
stressed.
Credit hours: 2
RESP-207 ALTERNATE HEALTH CARE
Pre-requisite(s): RESP-220, 210
Attention is given to the continuum of health
care outside the acute hospital setting. Areas
include DME companies, home care, skilled
nursing units, and rehabilitation programs.
Medicare and Medicaid regulations concerning
reimbursement will be introduced to increase
awareness of the legal and ethical
considerations involved for the licensed
respiratory therapist.
Credit hours: 3
RESP-209 CLINICAL SIMULATIONS
Pre-requisite(s): RESP-221, 210
Information gathering and decision making
training to prepare the student for the national
board exams. The course is a compilation of the
therapist’s training acquired from all previous
work.
Credit hours: 2
RESP-210 CARDIOPULMONARY DIAGNOSTICS I
Pre-requisite(s): RESP-220
An in-depth study of laboratory results and
hemodynamics as they relate to the assessment
and treatment of the cardiopulmonary patient.
Credit hours: 4
Credit hours: 3
RESP-112 RESPIRATORY SKILLS II
RESP-211 CARDIOPULMONARY DIAGNOSTICS II
Pre-requisite(s): RESP-111
Pre-requisite(s): RESP-210
A continuation of RT Skills I in studying the
theory and application of respiratory therapy
equipment and techniques being used in health
A continuation of Cardiopulmonary Diagnostics
I as an in-depth study of chest x-rays, EKG, and
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BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Credit hours: 3
RESP-215 REVIEW SEMINAR
Pre-requisite(s): RESP-205, 211, 209
The capstone course in respiratory care
presented by Kettering National Seminars. The
review covers respiratory care from beginning
to end to prepare the student for the national
board exam.
SBLT-101 INTRODUCTION TO SUSTAINABLE
DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION
Pre-requisites: English Composition I
An introduction to the theory and practice of
sustainable design and construction. This
course will explore the meaning of sustainability
and how it is applied to architectural design and
building construction in the context of ecology,
economy, and social equity. This course will
cover a range of sustainable precedents from
indigenous cultures to modern-day design and
construction.
Credit Hours: 3
Credit hours: 2
RESP-217 PROFESSIONAL ISSUES
Pre-requisite(s): RESP-221, 210
Legal and ethical issues involved in respiratory
care. Course will also cover professional
behavior and characteristics and job seeking
skills.
Credit hours: 2
RESP-220 MECHANICAL VENTILATION I
Pre-requisite(s): RESP-112, 115
Current modes of ventilation, types of
ventilators, and mathematical calculations
involved in their physiologic use. Application
based on laboratory results and assessment
techniques will be emphasized.
Credit hours: 3
RESP-221 MECHANICAL VENTILATION II
Pre-requisite(s): RESP-220
Advanced techniques of ventilator support.
Concentration on assessment and care of the
ventilator patient throughout the continuum of
care.
Credit hours: 4
SBLT
Sustainable Building Technology
SBLT-100 INTRODUCTION TO GREEN
TECHNOLOGY
This course will introduce students to green
technologies currently being practiced. Topics
covered include a description of green
technologies, the seven green wastes, LEED,
case studies in sustainable activities,
sustainable energy systems and green
employment opportunities.
Credit Hours: 3
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
SBLT-102 BPI INSTALLER
This course is designed to prepare students to
perform air-sealing and insulating jobs to the
Building Performance Institute’s (BPI) standard.
Course content includes: health and safety on
the job, the house as a system, introductory
building science, air-sealing and insulating, fire
protection, and combustion safety awareness.
Upon successful completion of the BPI
requirements, students will have the
opportunity to earn BPI’s Residential Building
Envelope-While House Air Leakage Control
Installer (RBE-WHALCI) certification.
Credit Hours: 3
SBLT-104 BPI BUILDING ANALYST
Pre-requisites: Eligible for Tech Math I
This course is designed to prepare students to
perform home energy audits to the Building
Performance Institute’s (BPI) standard. Course
content includes: building science, building
envelope diagnosis and performance, air
infiltration testing, pressure diagnostics, indoor
air quality, and combustion appliance safety
testing. Upon successful completion of the BPI
requirements, students will have the
opportunity to earn BPI’s Building Analyst (BA)
certification.
Credit Hours: 3
SBLT-112 BPI ENVELOPE PROFESSIONAL
Pre-requisites: BPI Building Analyst
This course is designed to advance student
competence in home energy auditing to the
Building Performance Institute’s (BPI) standard.
Course content includes: building science,
building envelope diagnosis and performance,
air-infiltration testing, pressure diagnostics and
testing, indoor air quality, duct pressure testing,
and combustion appliance safety testing. Upon
successful completion of the BPI requirements,
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Course Descriptions
pulmonary function testing is highlighted. Also
how they relate to the overall assessment and
treatment of the cardiopulmonary patient.
Critical thinking skills are emphasized.
Course Descriptions
Course Descriptions
BridgeValley CTC
students will have the opportunity to earn BPI’s
Envelope certification.
design, indoor air quality, and heating
ventilating and air conditioning systems (HVAC).
Credit Hours: 2
Credit Hours: 3
SBLT-113 HOME ENERGY MODELING
SBLT-207 ADVANCED TOPICS IN BUILDING
SCIENCE
Pre-requisites: BPI Building Analyst & Introduction to
Computers and Office Applications
This course is designed to prepare students to
build an energy model of single-family
residence using computer software. Students
will learn how to calculate current energy
consumption and accurately estimate energy
savings based upon various improvement
options. Life-cycling costing and savings to
investment ratio (SIR) will also be addressed.
Credit Hours: 1
SBLT-120 BPI INTRODUCTION TO BUILDING
ASSESSMENT
An introduction to green building rating
systems. Strategies and concepts covered
include: sustainable sites, water efficiency,
energy and atmosphere, materials and
resources, and indoor environmental quality.
This course will prepare students to sit for the
LEED Green Associate credential exam,
demonstrating green building expertise in nontechnical fields of practice.
Pre-requisites: BPI Envelope Professional & Building
Systems Integration
Capstone course. This course will review and
build upon the principles of heat, air, and vapor
flow through the building envelope. Types of
materials (their properties and assembly) will
be analyzed for various building assemblies
including the roof, walls, and foundation.
Analysis results will depend upon climate,
orientation, components, and assemblies.
Building envelope recommendations will be
made based on the results of each analysis.
Credit Hours: 3
SBLT-210 BUILDING INFORMATION MODELING
Pre-requisites: Introduction to Computers and Office
Applications
SBLT-140 RESIDENTIAL BUILDING
ASSESSMENT
This course will teach students how to quickly
and efficiently model design concepts for
visualization using building information
modeling software. The software will be used as
a management tool throughout the design and
construction process. Building information
modeling improves coordination, supports
sustainable design, reduces conflicts and errors,
and ensures project success.
Pre-requisites: Introduction to Building Assessment
Credit Hours: 3
Credit Hours: 1
This course explores green building rating
systems from a low-rise residential perspective.
Topics covered include: location and linkages,
sustainable sites, water efficiency, energy and
atmosphere, materials and resources, indoor
environmental quality, and awareness and
education. This course will prepare students to
sit for the LEED AP Homes credential exam
which provides a standard for the design and
construction of high-performance green homes.
Credit Hours: 2
SBLT-203 BUILDING SYSTEMS INTEGRATION
Pre-requisites: Tech Math I & eligible for English
Composition I
This course will explore the design of
environmental control systems in buildings. An
emphasis will be given to sustainability in
architecture and how these systems can be
integrated. Topics covered include energy
conservation, heat flow, heating and cooling
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SOCI
Sociology
SOCI-101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY (GEC
3)
Pre-requisites: Eligible for ENGL-101
The course focuses on sociological principles
and human society; comparison of cultures; the
family, groups, classes, castes, races, and
nations; human ecology; the community;
education and religion; conflict and
cooperation; change.
Credit Hours: 3
SOCI-110 SOCIAL PROBLEMS (GEC 3)
Pre-requisites: Eligible for ENGL-101
Causes of disorganization in modern Society
life. Concentration on research findings derived
from studies of contemporary American
Society.
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Course Descriptions
Credit Hours: 3
Credit hours: 3
SOCI-120 FAMILIES AND SOCIETY (GEC 3)
VETT-102 VETERINARY PARASITOLOGY
An introduction to common internal and
external parasites, life cycles, treatment, and
prevention. Laboratory will discuss
identification techniques.
Historical comparative approach to changing
structures and functions of the family. Effect of
economic, demographic, and cultural changes
on relationships, gender, roles, marriage,
childcare, variations by socioeconomic status,
race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation.
Credit Hours: 3
SOCI-130 DIVERSITY IN THE WORKPLACE (GEC
3)
Credit hours: 3
VETT-103 ANIMAL SCIENCE
This course will familiarize students with
common breeds of dogs, cats, horses, and
cattle. Also, breeding behaviors.
Credit hours: 3
Pre-requisites: Eligible for ENGL-101
Designed to prepare the student to understand
and appreciate differences among people.
Linking this knowledge to the workplace will
make this course both informative and
practical.
Credit Hours: 1
SPAN
SPANISH
VETT-105 VETERINARY MEDICAL
TERMINOLOGY
This course introduces the vocabulary,
abbreviations, and symbols used in the
language of veterinary medicine. Concentration
is placed on building medical terms using
prefixes, suffixes, or word roots. Upon
completion students should be able to
pronounce, spell, and define accepted
veterinary medical terms.
Credit hours: 2
SPAN-101 SPANISH 1 (GEC 3)
Pre-requisites: Eligible for ENGL-101
This course teaches the fundamentals of
Spanish communication. Instruction includes
listening comprehension, speaking, writing and
reading.
Credit Hours: 3
VETT-111 SURGICAL TECHNIQUES & NURSING
In this course students will learn the basic
principles of radiology, anesthesia, dental
prophylactics, and surgical techniques.
Emergency care, nursing care, wound
management, bandaging, and instrumentation
will also be covered.
SPAN-102 SPANISH 2 (GEC 3)
Credit hours: 5
Pre-requisites: Spanish 101 with a C or better or 2
years of high school Spanish with instructor’s approval
VETT-112 VETERINARY PHARMACOLOGY I
This course continues the activities of Spanish
101 with special attention to developing oral
proficiencies.
Credit Hours: 3
VETT
Veterinary Technology
VETT-101 INTRO TO VETERINARY
TECHNOLOGY
Pre-requisite(s): Accepted into program
This is an introductory course with focus on
history, laws and ethics, business and hospital
management, and client relations and
education. The lab will focus on husbandry,
restraint, handling, drug administration, and
phlebotomy.
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
Pre-requisite(s): VETT-101, 102, 103
This course is an introduction into
pharmacology. It will include drug laws,
calculations, classifications, drug uses, and drug
administration. Common drugs for diseases
covered in VETT-113 will also be discussed.
Credit hours: 2
VETT-113 COMPANION ANIMAL DISEASES I
Pre-requisite(s): VETT-101, 102, 103
Study of the most commonly encountered
diseases in veterinary medicine. Etiology,
pathogenesis, zoonosis, history and clinical
signs, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention will
be discussed.
Credit hours: 2
VETT-201 VETERINARY PATHOLOGY
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Course Descriptions
Pre-requisites: Eligible for ENGL-101
Course Descriptions
BridgeValley CTC
Pre-requisite(s): VETT-219 & 221
This course is designed to acquaint students
with equipment and techniques used in
veterinary laboratories. The different areas that
will be discussed include hematology, lab
safety, urinalysis, blood chemistries, cytology
and serology.
Credit hours: 4
VETT-222 PRECEPTORSHIP II
This is an extensive external practicum where
the student will function as a member of the
veterinary team.
Credit hours: 2
VETT-223 VETERINARY CAPSTONE
Co-requisite: VETT 222
VETT-202 LARGE ANIMAL HEALTH & DISEASES
Pre-requisite(s): VETT 219 & 221
The students will learn restraint and drug
administration of common farm animals. They
will also cover care, handling, and common
diseases. This class will travel to local farms for
practical experience.
Credit hours: 3
VETT-203 LABORATORY ANIMAL & AVIAN
MEDICINE
Pre-requisite(s): VETT 219 & 221
This course provides basic instruction in the
concepts of laboratory animal and avian health
management. This course will cover the proper
methods of restraint, daily care, nursing
techniques, and housing needs for the common
species of laboratory animals and avian
patients, specific procedures that are used in
laboratory animal medicine, and the issues of
animal welfare as they apply to research.
Credit hours: 3
VETT-212 VETERINARY PHARMACOLOGY II
This course is a continuation of VETT-112.
Common drugs for the diseases discussed in
VETT-213 will be covered.
Discussion of case situations that encourage
development of decision making skills at the
veterinary technologist level. Independent
study time is allocated for review and
completion of national examination practice
exams. Case studies will be presented in a
format to illustrate problem analysis at the
technologist level. This course will also prepare
the student to join the workforce by covering
resume writing and interview techniques.
Credit Hours: 4
WLDT
Welding
WLDT-101 INTRODUCTION TO WELDING
PROCESSES – PART I
A basic welding course for the non-welding
student. Introductory topics include: basic
construction safety requirements, common
hand tool usage, common power tool usage,
basic oxyfuel, plasma & carbon arc cutting,
gouging procedures, a focus on basic
SMAW/stick usage and an introduction to
GMAW/MIG.
Credit hours: 2
Credit Hours: 3
VETT-213 COMPANION ANIMAL DISEASES II
WLDT-102 INTRODUCTION TO WELDING
PROCESSES – PART II
Pre-requisite(s): VETT-113
This course is a continuation of VETT-113.
Credit hours: 2
VETT-219 SEMINAR I
Pre-requisite(s): VETT-111, 112, 113, 114
This course is taken in conjunction with VETT221. Students will keep a weekly journal and
will present one case study from their
preceptor.
Credit hours: 2
VETT-221 PRECEPTORSHIPS I (OJT)
Pre-requisite(s): VETT-111, 112, 113, 114
The student will get on the job training at a
local veterinary facility.
Pre-requisite(s): WLDT-101 or instructor permission
A continuation of WLDT-101. Topics include
enhanced coverage of the SMAW/stick and
GMAW/MIG processes with an introduction to
the GTAW/TIG process.
Credit Hours: 3
WLDT-111 BASIC OXYFUEL, PLASMA AND
CARBON ARC CUTTING AND GOUGING
Co-requisite(s): ENGL-091 and WLDT-121
Basic construction safety requirements, how to
safely inspect and operate common hand and
power tools, and basic oxyfuel, plasma, and
carbon arc cutting and gouging procedures.
Credit Hours: 3
Credit hours: 1
360
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
WLDT-121 BASIC SMAW
Co-requisite(s): WLDT-111
Nomenclature and set up procedures for the
SMAW welding process. Hands on welding
experience using E6010 and E7018 electrodes
welding on pads in each of the four welding
positions. They will then transition to the five
joints in each of the four positions.
Credit Hours: 3
WLDT-122 INTERMEDIATE SMAW
Course Descriptions
prints, weld procedures and determine their bill
of material.
Credit Hours: 3
WLDT-223 ADVANCED SMAW
Pre-requisite(s): WLDT 122
Shielded metal arc welding various metals and
shapes in various positions including plate in
the 6G position. Continued to progress toward
the Code SMAW Unlimited AWS qualification.
Credit Hours: 3
This is a continuation of WLDT 110. Welding
each joint in the four positions with transition
into bevel plate in all positions.
Credit Hours: 3
WLDT-131 BASIC GMAW
Pre-requisite(s): WLDT 121 or permission of instructor
Students will learn safety, nomenclature and set
up procedures for GMAW equipment. They will
get hands on welding primarily utilizing E70
solid wire, with gas, welding on pads and in
each of the four welding positions. They will
then transition to the five joints in each
position.
Credit Hours: 3
WLDT-141 BASIC GTAW
Pre-requisite(s): WLDT 121 or permission of instructor
Safety, nomenclature and set up procedures for
gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) equipment
with GTAW welding in each of the five types of
joints in the four welding positions utilizing 12gauge metal. Preparation for the ASME 6G weld
qualification on 2-inch schedule-80 pipe with a
GTAW root with 3/32” E7018 filler; uphill
welding.
Credit Hours: 3
WLDT-225 CODE SMAW
Pre-requisite(s): WLDT 223
Students will prepare for American Welding
Society (AWS) certification by welding 1 inch
plate in all positions with concentration on
vertical and overhead. Certification will be
vertical and overhead, 1-inch plate with backing
strip.
Credit Hours: 3
WLDT-227 CODE API 1104 PIPE
Students will prepare for the API 1104 6G
downhill weld qualification on 6 inch pipe.
Welding will be practiced in the three positions,
flat horizontal and 6G with emphasis on 6G.
Welding will be with a E6010 root and E8010
filler.
Credit hours: 3
WLDT-235 CODE GMAW
Pre-requisite(s): WLDT 133
Students will prepare for American Welding
Society (AWS) certification by welding of 3/8
inch plate in all positions with concentration on
vertical and overhead. Certification will be 3/8”
plate with backing strip in vertical and overhead
positions.
Credit Hours: 3
WLDT-151 BASIC FCAW
Pre-requisite(s): WLDT 121 or permission of instructor
Students will learn safety, nomenclature and set
up procedures for FCAW equipment. Students
will weld primarily utilizing E70 solid wire and
gas on pads and in each of the four welding
positions. They will then transitions to the five
joints in each position.
Credit Hours: 3
WLDT-161 WELD SYMBOLS AND DETAIL
DRAWINGS
Welding symbols, metal shapes, their
abbreviations, and weld detail prints. Students
will learn to draw various detail drawings, read
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
WLDT-265 METALLURGY
The study of ferrous and non-ferrous metals,
their properties, composition, manufacture,
weld preparation, weld-ability, heat treatment
(before and after welding), and proper storage.
Credit Hours: 3
WLDT-267 INTRODUCTION TO WELD THEORY
Students will learn to use the basics of welding
theory in various area(s) of welding and will
communicate in writing, using the technical
terminology commonly used in the welding
industry for inspection.
Credit Hours: 3
361
Course Descriptions
Pre-requisite(s): WLDT-121
Course Descriptions
WLDT-281 WELD INSPECTION PROCEDURES,
PART 1
Reading and interpretation of the American
Welding Society, the American Society of
Mechanical Engineers and the American
Petroleum Institute codes for welding. The
writing of welding procedures and the basic
methods of destructive and non-destructive
testing applied to welding.
Credit Hours: 3
WLDT-282 WELD INSPECTION PROCEDURES,
PART 2
Detailed understanding of the American
Welding Society, the American Society of
Mechanical Engineers section IX. Conduct
methods of destructive and non-destructive
tests and interpretation of results. Determining
the proper welding procedures and
qualifications per ASME and AWS and API 1104.
BridgeValley CTC
This course provides an overview of the
fundamental principles, physical properties, and
testing procedures of aggregates as a
construction material, and consists of a weeklong course, a written exam, a period of
practical test practice, and a practical exam.
Credit hours for this course will be awarded
upon successful passage of both the written
and practical exams within the time frame
designated by the WVDOH Materials Section
Material Procedures.
Credit Hours: 3
WVDH-111 AGGREGATE INSPECTOR COURSE
Pre-requisites: CIET-132, or permission of instructor
This course is the lecture portion of the WVDH
110 Aggregate Inspector Certification. This
credit applies to the completion of the course
and passage of the written exam according to
the WVDOH Materials Section.
Credit Hours: 2
Credit Hours: 3
WVDH-112 AGGREGATE INSPECTOR LAB
WLDT-291 FAB SHOP
Pre-requisites: WVDH 111
Pre-requisite(s): Welding students in their final
semester or instructor permission.
This course is the practical portion of the WVDH
110 Aggregate Inspector Certification .This
credit applied to the passage of the practical
exam associated with this certification
according to the WVDOH Materials Section.
This course is designed to introduce the student
into a work environment depicting the actual
day-to-day operations of a fabrication shop. The
student will incorporate the skills and
knowledge acquired to gain experience that is
required to enter the workforce successfully.
Credit Hours: 3
Credit Hours: 1
WVDH-120 COMPACTION INSPECTOR
CERTIFICATION
Pre-requisites: CIET-132, or permission of instructor
WLDT-293 INTERNSHIP
Pre-requisite(s): Instructor permission
Special assignment in industry to correlate with
the Welding Technology program. Students
must have a designated industrial supervisor
and faculty coordinator. Final approval will be
granted by the student’s department head.
Credit Hours: 2-6.
WLDT-299 SPECIAL TOPICS
Pre-requisite(s): Instructor permission
Special topics related to welding.
Credit Hours: Variable
This course will provide an overview of the
principles and physical properties of soils as a
construction material, and proper practices for
using compaction testing equipment in the
field. This course consists of a week-long
course, a written exam, practical test practice,
and a practical exam. Credit hours for this
course will be awarded upon successful passage
of both the written and practical exams within
the time frame designated by the WVDOH
Materials Section Material Procedures.
Credit Hours: 3
WVDH-121 COMPACTION INSPECTOR COURSE
WVDH
Highway Engineering Technology
Pre-requisites: CIET-132, or permission of instructor
WVDH-110 AGGREGATE INSPECTOR
CERTIFICATION
This course is the lecture portion of the WVDH
120 Compaction Inspector Certification. This
credit applies to the completion of the course
and passage of the written exam according to
the WVDOH Materials Section.
Pre-requisites: CIET-132, or permission of instructor
Credit Hours: 2
362
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
BridgeValley CTC
Course Descriptions
WVDH-122 COMPACTION INSPECTOR LAB
the time frame designated by the WVDOH
Materials Section Material Procedures.
Pre-requisites: WVDH 121
Credit Hours: 2
Credit Hours: 1
WVDH-210 ASPHALT PLANT TECHNICIAN
CERTIFICATION
Pre-requisites: CIET-132 and MATH 110, or permission
of instructor
This course will provide an overview of the
fundamental principles, properties, and testing
procedures for asphalt materials; includes
asphalt mix design and plant operations. This
course consists of classroom lecture, a written
exam, a period of practical test practice, and a
practical exam. Credit hours for this course will
be awarded upon successful passage of both
the written and practical exams within the time
frame designated by the WVDOH Materials
Section Material Procedures.
Credit Hours: 3
WVDH-211 ASPHALT PLANT TECHNICIAN
COURSE
WVDH-230 PCC INSPECTOR CERTIFICATION
Pre-requisites: CIET 132 and MATH 110, or permission
of instructor
This course will provide an overview of the
fundamental principles and properties of
concrete. This course consists of a partial weeklong course, a written exam, a period of
practical test practice, and a practical exam.
Credit hours for this course will be awarded
upon successful passage of both the written
and practical exams within the time frame
designated by the WVDOH Materials Section
Material Procedures.
Credit Hours: 2
WVDH-231 PCC INSPECTOR COURSE
Pre-requisites: CIET 132 and MATH 110, or permission
of instructor
This course is the lecture portion of the WVDH
230 PCC Inspector Certification. This credit
applies to the completion of the course and
passage of the written exam according to the
WVDOH Materials Section.
Credit Hours: 1
Pre-requisites: CIET-132 and MATH 110, or permission
of instructor
WVDH-232 PCC INSPECTOR LAB
This course is the lecture portion of the WVDH
210 Asphalt Plant Technician Certification. This
credit applies to the completion of the course
and passage of the written exam according to
the WVDOH Materials Section.
This course is the practical portion of the WVDH
230 PCC Inspector Certification. This credit
applied to the passage of the practical exam
associated with this certification according to
the WVDOH Materials Section.
Credit Hours: 2
Credit Hours: 1
WVDH-212 ASPHALT PLANT TECHNICIAN LAB
WVDH-240 ASPHALT FIELD TECHNICIAN
CERTIFICATION
Pre-requisites: WVDH 211
This course is the practical portion of the WVDH
210 Asphalt Plant Technician Certification. This
credit applied to the passage of the practical
exam associated with this certification
according to the WVDOH Materials Section.
Credit Hours: 1
WVDH-220 PCC TECHNICIAN CERTIFICATION
Pre-requisites: CIET 132 and MATH 110, or permission
of instructor
This course will provide an overview of the
fundamental principles and properties of
concrete mix design. This course consists of a
week-long course, and a written exam. Credit
hours for this course will be awarded upon
successful passage of the written exam within
BVCTC 2014–2015 Catalog
Pre-requisites: WVDH 231
Pre-requisites: CIET 132 and MATH 110, or permission
of instructor
This course will provide the Asphalt Field
Technician with an overview of the delivery,
placement, and compaction measures required
for asphalt as a construction material. The
course consists of classroom lecture and a
written exam. Credit hours for this course will
be awarded upon successful passage of the
written exam given at the conclusion of the
course.
Credit Hours: 1
363
Course Descriptions
This course is the practical portion of the WVDH
120 Compaction Inspector Certification .This
credit applied to the passage of the practical
exam associated with this certification
according to the WVDOH Materials Section.
Programs of Study
364
BridgeValley CTC
BCTC 2012–2013 Catalog
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