2014-2015 Academic Catalog

2014-2015 Academic Catalog
2106 South 9th Street
Salina, KS 67401
785.825.5422
1.800.365.0433
www.brownmackie.edu/Salina
9705 Lenexa Drive
Lenexa, KS 66215
913.768.1900
1.800.635.9101
www.brownmackie.edu/KansasCity
7101 Northwest Expressway
Suite 800
Oklahoma City, OK 73132
405.621.8000
1.888.229.3280
www.brownmackie.edu/OklahomaCity
В©2011 Brown Mackie College
2614
01/12
2014-2015 Academic Catalog
Academic Catalog
2014-2015
Brown Mackie College — Salina
2106 South 9th Street
Salina, KS 67401
785.825.5422
1.800.365.0433
Fax: 785.827.7623
Brown Mackie College — Kansas City
9705 Lenexa Drive
Lenexa, KS 66215
913.768.1900
1.800.635.9101
Fax: 913.495.9555
Brown Mackie College — Oklahoma City
7101 NW Expressway, Suite 800
Oklahoma City, OK 73132
405.621.8000
1.888.229.3280
Fax: 405.621.8055
www.brownmackie.edu
In order to continually provide current information, this catalog may be amended by an insert identified as Bulletin
to the 2013-2014 Academic Catalog. Such a bulletin is intended as, and is to be regarded as, an integral part of this
catalog. This catalog is not complete without the bulletin.
Published: February 2014
Effective: February 2014
Volume 1
TABLE OF CONTENTS
CONSUMER INFORMATION ...................................................................................................................................... 5
MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT ........................................................................................................................... 6
ABOUT BROWN MACKIE COLLEGE — SALINA
BROWN MACKIE COLLEGE — KANSAS CITY and
BROWN MACKIE COLLEGE — OKLAHOMA CITY ....................................................................................... 7
COLLEGE MISSION, PHILOSOPHY, AND VALUES ............................................................................................... 8
Mission Statement ................................................................................................................................................... 8
Philosophy ............................................................................................................................................................... 8
General Education Philosophy ................................................................................................................................. 8
Value Statements ..................................................................................................................................................... 8
OWNERSHIP ................................................................................................................................................................. 9
ADMINISTRATION
Brown Mackie College — Salina Administration ................................................................................................. 10
Brown Mackie College — Kansas City Administration ........................................................................................ 10
Brown Mackie College — Oklahoma City Administration ................................................................................... 10
Board of Trustees ................................................................................................................................................... 10
ACCREDITATION AND AFFILIATIONS
Institutional Accreditation ..................................................................................................................................... 11
State Licensure....................................................................................................................................................... 11
Programmatic Accreditation .................................................................................................................................. 11
Veterans Administration ........................................................................................................................................ 12
Affiliations ............................................................................................................................................................. 12
U.S. Department of Education ............................................................................................................................... 12
ADMISSION
General Admission Requirements ......................................................................................................................... 13
Orientation ............................................................................................................................................................. 13
Disability Services ................................................................................................................................................. 13
Transcripts ............................................................................................................................................................. 13
Transfer Credits ..................................................................................................................................................... 14
Advance Placement Policy .................................................................................................................................... 15
Other Sources of Credit ......................................................................................................................................... 15
Credits Earned at the College ................................................................................................................................ 15
Residency Requirement ......................................................................................................................................... 15
University Credit for Military Experience and Training ........................................................................................ 15
Transferability of College Credits ......................................................................................................................... 15
Transitional Course Studies ................................................................................................................................... 16
International Admissions Policy ............................................................................................................................ 16
English Language Proficiency Policy .................................................................................................................... 17
ACADEMIC INFORMATION
Certification and Licensure .................................................................................................................................... 18
ACADEMIC RESOURCES, POLICIES, AND PROCEDURES
Initial Academic Assessment ................................................................................................................................. 21
Initial Academic Assessment: Surgical Technology .............................................................................................. 21
Initial Academic Assessment: Occupational Therapy Assistant ............................................................................ 21
Attendance ............................................................................................................................................................. 21
Leave of Absence Policy ....................................................................................................................................... 23
Last Date of Attendance ........................................................................................................................................ 23
Course Availability ................................................................................................................................................ 23
Course Delivery ..................................................................................................................................................... 23
Course Schedule Changes ...................................................................................................................................... 24
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Reenrollment Policy .............................................................................................................................................. 24
Academic Integrity ................................................................................................................................................ 24
Higher Education Opportunity Act ........................................................................................................................ 25
Intellectual Property Policy ................................................................................................................................... 25
Learning Resources Center .................................................................................................................................... 30
Admission to Classes ............................................................................................................................................. 30
Incompletes ............................................................................................................................................................ 30
Makeup Time Policy.............................................................................................................................................. 30
Independent Study ................................................................................................................................................. 30
Repeated Courses................................................................................................................................................... 30
Program Changes ................................................................................................................................................... 31
Definition of a Quarter Credit Hour ....................................................................................................................... 31
Definition of an Academic Year ............................................................................................................................ 31
Credit Hour Determination and Outside Work Expectations . .................................................................................31
Grade Challenges ................................................................................................................................................... 32
Grade Point Average .............................................................................................................................................. 32
Graduation and Commencement Ceremony .......................................................................................................... 32
STANDARDS OF SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS
Undergraduate Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) Policy and Procedures ..................................................... 34
Criteria for Honors Designation............................................................................................................................. 34
Milestones and Evaluation Points for Satisfactory Academic Progress ................................................................. 35
Procedure for Appealing Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal ............................................................................... 37
Explanations of Related Issues .............................................................................................................................. 38
Grading System ..................................................................................................................................................... 39
Grading System for Occupational Therapy Assistant ............................................................................................ 40
Student Withdrawal .............................................................................................................................................. 41
FACULTY
Brown Mackie College — Salina Faculty ............................................................................................................. 42
Brown Mackie College — Kansas City Faculty .................................................................................................... 43
Brown Mackie College — Oklahoma City Faculty ............................................................................................... 44
STUDENT SERVICES AND REGULATIONS
Tutoring ................................................................................................................................................................. 45
Advising................................................................................................................................................................. 45
Career Services ..................................................................................................................................................... 45
Professional Appearance........................................................................................................................................ 45
College Store ......................................................................................................................................................... 45
Transcripts and Diplomas ...................................................................................................................................... 46
Student Right-to-Know Statement ......................................................................................................................... 46
Security of Student Information: Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act ...................................................... 46
Firearm Policy ....................................................................................................................................................... 49
Drug and Alcohol Prevention Program and Drug-Free Workplace and Campus Program .................................... 49
STUDENT CONDUCT
I. Guiding Principles .............................................................................................................................................. 58
II. Scope ................................................................................................................................................................. 58
III. Reach ............................................................................................................................................................... 58
IV. Responsibilities of Dual Membership .............................................................................................................. 58
V. Disciplinary Offenses........................................................................................................................................ 58
VI. Sanctions ......................................................................................................................................................... 60
VII. Disciplinary Procedures ................................................................................................................................. 61
VIII. Appeal Procedure .......................................................................................................................................... 63
Anti-Hazing Policy ................................................................................................................................................ 63
No Harassment Policy ........................................................................................................................................... 64
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Definition of Sexual Harassment ........................................................................................................................... 64
Complaint and Resolution Process ........................................................................................................................ 65
Non-discrimination Policy ..................................................................................................................................... 66
Student Grievance Procedure for Internal Complaints of Discrimination and Harassment ................................... 66
Sexual Violence Policy .......................................................................................................................................... 67
Arbitration ............................................................................................................................................................. 68
Campus Security .................................................................................................................................................... 69
TUITION, FEES, AND REFUND POLICY
Tuition and Fees .................................................................................................................................................... 70
Refund Policy ........................................................................................................................................................ 70
Cancellation of Enrollment .................................................................................................................................... 71
FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS
Federal Pell Grant .................................................................................................................................................. 72
Federal Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant ............................................................................................. 72
Federal Direct Loan Program................................................................................................................................. 72
Federal Plus Loan Program .................................................................................................................................... 72
Federal Work-Study Program ................................................................................................................................ 72
Vocational Rehabilitation ...................................................................................................................................... 73
Veterans’ Benefits ................................................................................................................................................. 73
Institutional Scholarships ....................................................................................................................................... 73
President’s Scholarship .......................................................................................................................................... 73
Merit Scholarship................................................................................................................................................... 73
Athletic Scholarship............................................................................................................................................... 73
The Education Foundation Scholarships ................................................................................................................ 74
PROGRAM INFORMATION
Program Offering ................................................................................................................................................... 75
Externship Requirement ........................................................................................................................................ 75
Bachelor’s Degree Programs
Business Administration ................................................................................................................................ 76
Health Care Management .............................................................................................................................. 78
Associate’s Degree Programs
Accounting Technology ................................................................................................................................ 80
Architectural Design & Drafting Technology ................................................................................................ 81
Biomedical Equipment Technology ............................................................................................................... 82
Business Management .................................................................................................................................... 83
Computer Aided Design & Drafting Technology .......................................................................................... 84
Computer Networking & Applications........................................................................................................... 85
Construction Trades-Welding…..…………………………………………………………………………....86
Criminal Justice .............................................................................................................................................. 87
Health & Fitness Training .............................................................................................................................. 88
Health Care Administration............................................................................................................................ 89
Medical Assisting ........................................................................................................................................... 90
Nursing (Salina & Kansas City) ..................................................................................................................... 91
Nursing (Oklahoma City)……… ………………………………………………………………………….93
Occupational Therapy Assistant ..................................................................................................................... 95
Operations Management – Associate of General Studies ............................................................................... 97
Paralegal ......................................................................................................................................................... 98
Surgical Technology ...................................................................................................................................... 99
Veterinary Technology ................................................................................................................................. 101
Diploma Programs
Architectural Drafting Specialist .................................................................................................................. 103
Bookkeeping Specialist ................................................................................................................................ 104
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Computer Aided Designer/Drafter ............................................................................................................... 105
Criminal Justice Specialist ........................................................................................................................... 106
Fitness Trainer .............................................................................................................................................. 107
General Business .......................................................................................................................................... 108
Medical Assistant ......................................................................................................................................... 109
Medical Insurance Specialist ........................................................................................................................ 110
Networking Specialist ................................................................................................................................. 111
Certificate Programs
Networking Engineer Specialist ................................................................................................................... 112
Practical Nursing .......................................................................................................................................... 113
Certificate Programs (not for college credit)
Nurse Aid ..................................................................................................................................................... 114
IV Therapy for Practical Nurses) ................................................................................................................. 114
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ........................................................................................................................................ 115
4
CONSUMER INFORMATION
This catalog is published in order to inform students and others of the Brown Mackie College — Salina, Brown Mackie
College — Kansas City and Brown Mackie College — Oklahoma City’s academic programs, policies, calendar, tuition,
fees, administration, and faculty. The information provided is current and accurate as of the date of publication. Brown
Mackie College — Salina, Brown Mackie College — Kansas City and Brown Mackie College — Oklahoma City
(collectively, “the College”) cannot assure that changes will not occur which will affect this information. The College
reserves the right to make changes within the term of this catalog which may affect any of the information published, and
to make such changes, if necessary, without prior notice to individual students. As such changes may occur, these will be
published in the Bulletin to the 2013–2014 Academic Catalog, which is intended as, and is to be regarded as, an integral
part of this catalog. The College expects its students to read and understand the information published in this catalog and
in the Bulletin identified as belonging to this catalog. Failure to read and understand this catalog will not excuse any
student from the application of any requirement or regulation published herein. Further, it is the responsibility of each
student to remain apprised of current graduation requirements of his or her program.
The College affirms a policy of equal employment opportunity, equal educational opportunity, and non-discrimination in
the provision of educational services to the public. The College makes all decisions regarding recruitment, hiring,
promotion, and all other terms and conditions of employment without discrimination on grounds of race, color, national
origin, sex, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, disability, age, religion, veteran’s status, genetic
marker, or any other characteristic which lawfully cannot be the basis for an employment decision by state, local, or
federal law. Brown Mackie College — Salina, Brown Mackie College — Kansas City, and Brown Mackie College —
Oklahoma City will not retaliate against persons bringing forward allegations of harassment or discrimination.
The College affirms its policy of administering all educational programs and related supporting services and benefits in a
manner which does not discriminate because of a student’s race, color, national origin, sex, gender, sexual orientation,
gender identity or expression, disability, age, religion, veteran’s status, genetic marker, or any other characteristic which
lawfully cannot be the basis for the provision of such services by state, local, or federal law. Brown Mackie College —
Salina, Brown Mackie College — Kansas City, and Brown Mackie College — Oklahoma City will not retaliate against
persons bringing forward allegations of harassment or discrimination.
Gainful Employment: See bmcprograms.info for program duration, tuition, fees and other costs, median debt,
federal salary data, alumni success, programmatic accreditation and other important info.
The College is obligated by and adheres to the provisions of:
• Section 493A, Title IV, Higher Education Act of 1965 as amended
• Title 38, United States Code, Veterans’ Benefits
• Title IX, Education Amendments of 1972
• Section 504, Rehabilitation Act of 1973
• Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 as amended
• Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989
Inquiries concerning the application of these laws and their implementing regulations may be referred to the President at
the Brown Mackie College location you attend.
5
MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT
Welcome to Brown Mackie College — Salina, Brown Mackie College — Kansas City and Brown Mackie
College — Oklahoma City!
We commend you for selecting a school which will prepare you to seek an entry-level career and are
pleased to welcome you as a vital part of our student body.
By enrolling in the College, you have already demonstrated your desire to achieve and a commitment to
invest the time and effort necessary to succeed. The difference between those who are successful and those
who are not is usually not a matter of intelligence. More often than not, it is a positive attitude and the
ability to persevere when the going gets tough that separates the winners from the rest.
We attempt not only to give you assistance academically, but also to offer other services to help solve
any problems that might stand in the way of your educational and career potential. We believe that career
training should be a pleasant and invigorating experience.
We are interested in your efforts and want to help in any way we can while you are a student of ours.
Again, congratulations on your educational career decision and welcome to the College.
Judy Holmes, EdD
Institutional President and
Campus President, Brown Mackie College — Salina,
Jamie Carpenter
Campus President, Brown Mackie College — Kansas City
John Parker
Campus President, Brown Mackie College-Oklahoma City
6
ABOUT BROWN MACKIE COLLEGE — SALINA,
BROWN MACKIE COLLEGE — KANSAS CITY and BROWN
MACKIE COLLEGE — OKLAHOMA CITY
Brown Mackie College was founded and approved by the Board of Trustees of Kansas Wesleyan College in Salina,
Kansas on July 30, 1892. The trustees contracted with Professor T.W. Roach to organize the Commercial Department,
which was then known as The Kansas Wesleyan School of Business. The Kansas Wesleyan School of Business began
operation on September 12, 1892.
In 1938, The Kansas Wesleyan School of Business was incorporated as The Brown Mackie School of Business under the
ownership of Mr. Perry E. Brown and Mr. A.B. Mackie, former instructors at Kansas Wesleyan University in Salina,
Kansas. By January 1975, with improvements in curricula and higher degree-granting status, The Brown Mackie School of
Business became Brown Mackie College. In 2003, Brown Mackie College was acquired by Education Management
Corporation and the name of the school was changed to Brown Mackie College — Salina.
Brown Mackie College — Salina, Brown Mackie College — Kansas City, a branch campus of Brown Mackie College —
Salina, opened in 1984, and Brown Mackie College — Oklahoma City, also a branch of Brown Mackie College — Salina,
opened in 2011, are three of more than 27 school locations of the Brown Mackie College family of schools, which is
dedicated to providing educational programs that prepare students for entry-level positions in a competitive, rapidlychanging workplace. Brown Mackie College schools provide students with physical spaces and resources that are designed
to facilitate teaching and learning. These include attractive, accessible physical locations; comfortable classrooms and
support services areas; ample space for studying and socializing; and appealing outdoor areas. Strategic planning
initiatives at Brown Mackie College schools reflect the institutions’ commitments to continuous improvements to physical
learning spaces and academic resources.
Brown Mackie College — Salina resides in a facility on South Ninth Street, completed in 2000. The location is situated in
an energetic area of the city and is easily accessible through a main thoroughfare. The campus includes eight classrooms,
computer laboratories, two Nursing laboratories, and one laboratory each for Allied Health programs, Computer Aided
Design and Drafting (CADD), and Computer Networking. All classrooms and labs, except the Nursing labs, are fitted
with multimedia equipment. The main facility occupies 20,800 square feet, and the annex nearby adds 2500 square feet of
office space. Brown Mackie College — Salina operates a course location site located at 2525 S. Ohio, Salina, KS. The
Course location site, which comprises of approximately 9,500 square feet, houses the Occupational Therapy laboratory,
Criminal Justice lab, three additional classrooms, and a Veterinary Technology suite.
In 2002, Brown Mackie College — Kansas City moved into its current facility in Lenexa, Kansas. The highly visible and
centrally located Lenexa campus is easily accessible through a major highway. The Kansas City campus is situated on
more than five acres of land, with eight classrooms equipped with multimedia and computer technology; one CADD
laboratory; one industry-current Allied Health laboratory; one Bio Science laboratory; and two Nursing laboratories in an
18,800-square-foot facility. Most classrooms and labs are spacious enough to accommodate up to thirty students. Brown
Mackie College — Kansas City operates a course location site located at 450 N. Rogers Rd., Olathe, KS. The course
location site, which comprises of approximately 16,300 square feet, houses the Occupational Therapy laboratory, nine
classrooms and computer labs, and a Veterinary Technology suite.
Brown Mackie College — Oklahoma City opened in 2011, with a total of 31,493 square feet. There are nine classrooms
equipped with multimedia and computer technology laboratories, an Allied Health laboratory, two nursing laboratories,
and an Occupational Therapy classroom and laboratory. The school provides a contemporary professional environment
for learning. Instructional equipment is comparable to that used in business and industry. The facility provides media
presentation rooms for special instructional needs, a resource center that provides instructional resources and academic
support for both faculty and students, and qualified, experienced faculty who are committed to the academic and technical
preparation of their students.
The modern, well-maintained campuses present a contemporary appearance and provide easy accessibility for all students.
All facilities are fully handicapped accessible. Faculty at all three locations use work areas designed to facilitate their
advisory and curricular planning tasks. Computer access is available for all personnel. Each campus features a break room
with vending machines and microwaves; a bookstore with displays for educational items and collegiate clothing and
memorabilia; and highly visible libraries.
7
COLLEGE MISSION, PHILOSOPHY, AND VALUES
Mission Statement
The mission of an institution of higher learning is to provide excellent quality, student-centered education and career
training including broad-based general education leading to a high degree of employment and transfer integrity. The
College strives to provide traditional and non-traditional students from throughout the United States with the opportunity
to interact in a caring and harmonious environment which will enhance their educational, personal, and professional
growth.
Philosophy
In accordance with this mission, the College believes that higher learning is a valuable asset and that a concentration in
career areas, strengthened by compatible business principles and a core of comprehensive general education, is an
important alternative to other types of higher education. Further, the College believes in the importance of a constant
awareness of the needs of an ever-changing business world and in making an appropriate and professional response to
those needs in order for its graduates to compete ethically and successfully in their chosen careers.
General Education Philosophy
General Education at the College encourages students to realize the significance of learning for their personal and
professional success. The curriculum’s design is derived from the principle that a broad base of knowledge combined with
the development of critical thinking skills foster a learner’s lifelong intellectual capacity. Emphasis is also placed upon an
exposure to fundamental truths and values, and the cultivation of an appreciation for humankind’s achievements. Taken as
a whole, the general education program serves as a catalyst to help students effectively interact and communicate in a
diverse and rapidly changing world.
General Education Outcomes
Brown Mackie College’s Mission and Values are embodied in its General Education program. This program of study is
required of all degree seeking students and ensures that all students fulfill basic institutional expectations. The General
Education curriculum increases the skills, knowledge, and critical thinking students need for professional and personal
success. It broadens and deepens students’ understanding of people, cultures, and ethics, the sciences and human
discoveries, and enables students to draw upon this knowledge. Students graduating from one of the College's degree
programs will be able to demonstrate the following General Education Outcomes:
п‚· Communicate effectively with persons of diverse backgrounds, in both educational and professional settings, by
utilizing various forms of communication that include spoken, written, computer-mediated, and symbolic
language.
п‚· Apply systematic methods of inquiry, effective reasoning, and analytical thinking skills to identify, investigate,
and solve problems in educational and professional contexts.
п‚· Engage in self-initiated learning and discovery, thereby integrating the educational process into everyday life.
п‚· Apply ethical concepts to the resolution of problems and dilemmas encountered in the workplace.
п‚· Solve problems related to self, family, work and community.
Value Statements
The following values reinforce the College’s mission and goals, serving as ethical guideposts for faculty and staff to use in
all interactions at the College:
• Integrity, requiring consistency, honor, and fidelity in all actions and decisions made by the College.
• Genuine concern for the student, as reflected in all communication, instruction, and demeanor of faculty and staff.
• Fairness, as exemplified by equitability in educational and disciplinary decisions.
• Honesty in all things related to the institution, its programs, and its constituents.
• Employee teamwork, functioning effectively to coordinate and deliver all academic and support services.
• Ethics indicative of the moral foundation of the College and as the critical element in all College activities and
decisions.
• Dedication of the faculty and academic administration to the performance of all endeavors and activities in a worthy and
admirable manner.
• Diversity in offering appropriate, timely, and practical information to a unique and divergent community of learners.
8
OWNERSHIP
Brown Mackie College — Salina is owned by Brown Mackie College — Salina LLC, which is owned by Brown Mackie
Education Corporation. Brown Mackie College—Salina has the following branches: Brown Mackie College — Kansas
City and Brown Mackie College — Oklahoma City. Brown Mackie College — Salina also operates a learning site at 2525
S. Ohio Street, Salina, KS 67401.
Brown Mackie College — Kansas City is owned by Brown Mackie College — Kansas City LLC, which is owned by
Brown Mackie College — Salina LLC. Brown Mackie College — Kansas City also operates a learning site at 450 N.
Rogers Rd, Suite 175 Olathe, KS 66062. Brown Mackie College — Kansas City is a branch of Brown Mackie College —
Salina.
Brown Mackie College — Oklahoma City is owned by Brown Mackie College — Oklahoma City LLC, which is owned
by Brown Mackie College — Salina LLC. Brown Mackie College — Oklahoma City is a branch of Brown Mackie
College — Salina.
Brown Mackie Education Corporation, through two intermediary companies, is a subsidiary of Education Management
Corporation. Education Management Corporation is located at 210 Sixth Avenue, 33rd Floor, Pittsburgh, PA 15222.
Education Management Corporation can be contacted toll-free at 800-275-2440 and at www.edmc.edu.
Board of Directors of Education Management Corporation
Samuel C. Cowley
General Counsel & Vice President of Business Development of Prestige Brands Inc.
Adrian M. Jones
Managing Director in the Principal Investment/Merchant Banking Division of Goldman Sachs & Co.
Jeffery T. Leeds
President and co-founder of Leeds Equity Partners, LLC
John R. McKernan, Jr.
Former Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Education Management Corporation
Leo F. Mullin
Former Chief Executive Officer of Delta Airlines
Brian A. Napack
Senior Advisor of Providence Equity Partners LLC.
Paul J. Salem
Senior Managing Director and a founder of Providence Equity Partners
Edward H. West
Chief Executive Officer and President of Education Management Corporation
Peter O. Wilde
Managing Director, Providence Equity Partners
Principal Officers of Education Management Corporation
Edward H. West
Chief Executive Officer and President, Education Management Corporation
J. Devitt Kramer
Senior Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary, Education Management Corporation
9
ADMINISTRATION
Brown Mackie College — Salina Administration
Institutional & Campus President
Judy Holmes, Ed.D., Argosy University - Sarasota
Chief Academic Officer
Debra Smith, Ed.D., The University of Kansas
Dean of Academic Affairs
Vanessa Davis-Warner, Ed.D., Nova Southeastern University
Director of Admissions
Diann Heath
Associate Director of Financial Aid
Betty Charles
Registrar
Jessica Liphart
Director of Career Services
Robin Nash
Librarian
Lynda Linder
Brown Mackie College — Kansas City Administration
Campus President
Dean of Academic Affairs
Director of Admissions
Jamie Carpenter, M. ED, Argosy University
Heath Hulsey, M.A., Webster University
Keith Elliott
Associate Director of Financial Aid
Cheryl Hanerhoff
Registrar
Cari Ann Kreienhop
Director of Career Services
Kathy Vollenweider
Librarian
Tara Bradshaw
Brown Mackie College — Oklahoma City Administration
Campus President
John Parker, DBA, Argosy University
Dean of Academic Affairs
Patricia Aronoff, MS, Adult Education, Florida State University
Director of Admissions
Jessica Thompson
Registrar
Ramah Nation
Director of Career Services
Michael Rainey
Librarian
Michael Lowder
Board of Trustees
Brown Mackie College is governed by a Board of Trustees. The board members represent the public good, and the names
of all Board of Trustees members are given below.
R. John Reynolds, PhD, Board Chairman
Tri-State University, Angola, IN and Chancellor, Salem International University, Salem, WV
John Hanrahan, Vice Chair
President, North American Financial Resources, Overland Park, KS
Elsie Faciane, JD, MHA
VP/Chief Legal Officer, HCA Midwest, Kansas City, MO
Joseph Emmons, PhD
President, Garden City Community College
Lyman Ott, PhD
Member of the Industrial Research Institute, the Drug Information Association and the Biometric Society
Ron Reck, MS
Vice Chair and Chair of the Audit Committee: Board of Directors of the Concordia University System
Interim CFO, Georgian Court University
Barbara Sack
Executive Director, Midwest Orthopedics
Judy Holmes, EdD
President of the College, Salina, KS, Kansas City, KS, and Oklahoma City, OK
Danny Finuf
EVP, Education System Operations , Education Management Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA
10
ACCREDITATION AND AFFILIATIONS
Institutional Accreditation
Brown Mackie College — Salina
Brown Mackie College — Salina is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and is a member of the North Central
Association (NCA) (230 South LaSalle Street, Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604, 1-800-621-7440, www.ncahlc.org).
This school is authorized under Federal law to enroll nonimmigrant alien students.
Brown Mackie College — Kansas City
Brown Mackie College — Kansas City is a branch of Brown Mackie College — Salina which is accredited by the Higher
Learning Commission and is a member of the North Central Association (NCA) (230 South LaSalle Street, Suite 7-500,
Chicago, IL 60604, 1-800-621-7440, www.ncahlc.org).
This school is authorized under Federal law to enroll nonimmigrant alien students.
Brown Mackie College — Oklahoma City
Brown Mackie College — Oklahoma City is a branch of Brown Mackie College — Salina which is accredited by the
Higher Learning Commission and is a member of the North Central Association (230 South LaSalle Street, Suite 7-500,
Chicago, IL 60604, 1-800-621-7440, www.ncahlc.org).
This school is not currently authorized under Federal law to enroll nonimmigrant alien students.
State Licensure
Brown Mackie College — Salina is approved and authorized to grant the Bachelor of Science (BS), Associate of Applied
Science (AAS) and Associate of General Studies (AGS) degree by the Kansas Board of Regents, 1000 SW Jackson Street,
Suite 520, Topeka, KS 66612-1368.
Brown Mackie College — Kansas City is approved and authorized to grant the Bachelor of Science (BS) and Associate of
Applied Science (AAS) degree by the Kansas Board of Regents, 1000 SW Jackson Street, Suite 520, Topeka, KS 666121368.
Brown Mackie College — Oklahoma City has been granted authority to operate in Oklahoma by the Oklahoma State
Regents for Higher Education (OSRHE), 655 Research Parkway, Suite 200, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73101. Telephone:
405-225-9100.
Programmatic Accreditation
The Occupational Therapy Assistant program at Brown Mackie College — Salina is accredited by the Accreditation
Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy Association
(AOTA), located at 4720 Montgomery Lane, Suite 200, Bethesda, MD 20814-3449. ACOTE’s telephone number
c/o AOTA is (301) 652-AOTA and its Web address is www.acoteonline.org. Graduates of the program will be
eligible to sit for the national certification examination for the occupational therapy assistant administered by the
National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT). After successful completion of this exam, the
individual will be a Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant (COTA). In addition, most states require licensure in
order to practice; however, state licenses are usually based on the results of the NBCOT Certification Examination.
Note that a felony conviction may affect a graduate’s ability to sit for the NBCOT certification examination or attain
state licensure.
The Occupational Therapy Assistant program at Brown Mackie College — Kansas City is accredited by the
Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy
Association (AOTA), located at 4720 Montgomery Lane, Suite 200, Bethesda, MD 20814-3449. ACOTE’s
telephone number c/o AOTA is (301) 652-AOTA and its Web address is www.acoteonline.org. Graduates of the
program will be eligible to sit for the national certification examination for the occupational therapy assistant
administered by the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT). After successful
completion of this exam, the individual will be a Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant (COTA). In addition,
most states require licensure in order to practice; however, state licenses are usually based on the results of the
NBCOT Certification Examination. Note that a felony conviction may affect a graduate’s ability to sit for the
NBCOT certification examination or attain state licensure.
The Occupational Therapy Assistant program at Brown Mackie College — Oklahoma City is accredited by the
Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy
Association (AOTA), located at 4720 Montgomery Lane, Suite 200, Bethesda, MD 20814-3449. ACOTE’s
11
telephone number c/o AOTA is (301) 652-AOTA and its Web address is www.acoteonline.org. Graduates of the
program will be eligible to sit for the national certification examination for the occupational therapy assistant
administered by the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT). After successful
completion of this exam, the individual will be a Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant (COTA). In addition,
most states require licensure in order to practice; however, state licenses are usually based on the results of the
NBCOT Certification Examination. Note that a felony conviction may affect a graduate’s ability to sit for the
NBCOT certification examination or attain state licensure.
The Associate of Applied Science Nursing program and the Practical Nursing program at Brown Mackie College —
Salina and Brown Mackie College — Kansas City are approved by the Kansas State Board of Nursing, London State
Office Building, 900 SW Jackson Street Suite 1051, Topeka, KS 66612; 785-296-4929.
The Veterinary Technology programs at Brown Mackie College — Salina and Brown Mackie College — Kansas City
have provisional programmatic accreditation granted by the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) through
the Committee on Veterinary Technician Education and Activities (CVTEA), 1931 N. Meacham Rd., Suite 100,
Schaumberg, IL 60173. AVMA’s telephone number is 800-248-2862. The web address is www.avma.org.
Veterans Administration
The degree programs described in this catalog are approved for veterans’ training by the state of Kansas, the state of
Missouri, and the state of Oklahoma Approving Agencies for Veterans Training.
Affiliations
•
•
Brown Mackie College — Kansas City and Brown Mackie College — Salina are approved by Kansas
Department of Social and Rehabilitation Services, Division of Vocational Rehabilitation
Brown Mackie College — Kansas City and Brown Mackie College — Salina are approved by Kansas Veterans
Commission Brown Mackie College — Oklahoma City is approved for Veteran’s training by Oklahoma State
Accrediting Agency
Brown Mackie College — Oklahoma City is approved by the Central Oklahoma Workforce Investment Board
•
Brown Mackie College — Oklahoma is approved by Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitation Services.
•
Brown Mackie College — Salina is approved by Microsoft Corporation as an IT Academy Program
•
Brown Mackie College — Kansas City is approved by State of Missouri, Division of Vocational Rehabilitation
•
Brown Mackie College — Kansas City and Brown Mackie College — Salina hold membership in the Better
Business Bureau
•
Brown Mackie College — Kansas City and Brown Mackie College — Salina hold membership in the Kansas
Library Association
•
Brown Mackie College — Salina holds membership in the National Junior College Athletic Association
•
Brown Mackie College — Salina and its branch campuses in Kansas City and Oklahoma City hold membership
in the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs.
•
The College also benefits from Community Advisory Councils comprising area professionals who serve in a continual
advisory capacity. These advisors meet on a formal and informal basis with College administration and faculty, and assist
in matters of course design, curriculum development, and employment needs and expectations.
U.S. Department of Education
The College is eligible for, and participates in, certain Title IV financial aid programs and vocational education contracts
with private vocational institutions. The College is authorized to enroll students as Vocational Rehabilitation program
participants and as Social Security beneficiaries. The College does not participate in the Department of Education’s Leave
of Absence Program.
12
ADMISSION
General Admission Requirements
Each applicant for admission is assigned an Assistant Director of Admissions who directs the applicant through the steps
of the admissions process, providing information on curriculum, policies, procedures, and services, and assisting the
applicant in setting necessary appointments and interviews. To be considered for admission to the College a candidate
must be a high school graduate or hold a General Education Development (GED) Certificate.
As part of the admissions process, applicants must sign a document attesting to graduation or completion and containing
the information to obtain verification of such. Official high school transcripts or official documentation of high school
graduation equivalency must be obtained within the first financial aid payment period or the student will be withdrawn
from the institution following established guidelines for withdrawn students noted in the catalog. Title IV aid will not be
dispersed until verification of graduation or completion has been received by the College.
Students seeking entry into the College with a high school diploma completed in a foreign country must provide an
original U.S. – equivalency evaluation from an evaluating agency which is a member of the National Association of
Credential Evaluation Services (NACES) (http://www.naces.org/) or the Association of International Credential
Evaluators, Inc. (AICES) (http://www.aice-eval.org/). The cost of evaluating the foreign transcript is borne by the
applicant.
All transcripts or other documentation related to graduation or completion becomes the property of the College. Admission
to the College is based upon the applicant’s meeting the above requirements, a review of the applicant’s previous
educational records, and a review of the applicant’s career interests. If previous academic records indicate that the
College’s education and training would not benefit the applicant, the College reserves the right to advise the applicant not
to enroll. It is the responsibility of the applicant to ensure that the College receives all required documentation, and
all records provided become the property of the College. No action upon an application for admission will proceed
without the required documentation.
Orientation
New students are required to attend an orientation program to familiarize them with the College’s policies, personnel, and
resources. Orientation is scheduled in the week prior to the start of each month’s classes (see “Academic Calendar”).
Enrolling students are notified of the dates and times of orientation.
Disability Services
The College provides accommodations to qualified students with disabilities. The Disability Services office assists
qualified students with disabilities in acquiring reasonable and appropriate accommodations and in supporting equal
access to services, programs and activities at the College. Students who seek reasonable accommodations should notify the
Disability Services office, at their specific location-Brown Mackie College-Salina (1-888-365-0433); Brown Mackie
College-Kansas City (1-800-635-9101); Brown Mackie College-Oklahoma City (1-888-229-3280) and, if known,
their specific requested accommodations. Students will be asked to supply medical documentation of the need for
accommodation. Classroom accommodations are not retroactive, but are effective only upon the student sharing approved
accommodations with the instructor. Therefore, students are encouraged to request accommodations as early as feasible
with the Disability Services office to allow for time to gather necessary documentation. If you have a concern or
complaint in this regard, please contact the Dean of Academic Affairs. Complaints will be handled in accordance with the
school’s Internal Grievance Procedure for Complaints of Discrimination and Harassment.
Transcripts
Official evaluation of a collegiate transcript is conducted only upon receipt of an official transcript received directly from
the institution at which the courses under consideration have been earned. Faxed transcripts are acceptable forms of
official transcripts as long as they are faxed directly from the sending institution. The fax must include both the front and
the back of the transcript so that the legend and school address are available. Only graded courses taken for collegiate
credit are eligible for transfer; ineligible courses include pass/fail courses, audited courses, continuing education courses,
remedial and developmental courses, and courses in English as a second language. Transferred credits are applied to the
student’s program, but carry no grade and are not computed in determining the student’s grade point average. It is the
responsibility of the student to ensure that the College receives all official transcripts, and the transcripts provided become
the property of the College.
13
Transfer Credits
The College evaluates credits for transfer from accredited colleges and universities, including technical and business
colleges. The following criteria are applied in examining credits for transfer:
•
The accreditation of the institution at which the credits have been earned.
•
The age of the credits earned, as an indication of the persistence of the skills or knowledge. Credits more than ten
years old are generally not accepted.
•
The compatibility of the course description and objectives with those of appropriate courses in the student’s
program at the College.
•
The grade earned in the course, which must be at least a C (or 2.00 on a 4.00 scale).
•
The convertibility of the credit hours earned, 1 semester credit hour converting as 1.5 quarter credit hours.
•
Some previously completed courses crucial to programmatic outcomes, otherwise eligible for consideration of
transfer, may not transfer. The dean of academic affairs will make the final determination on acceptance of the
credits, with input from the faculty.
•
Clinical courses previously earned in a health sciences program must have been completed no more than one
year prior to enrollment into an allied health program at the College.
•
To be eligible to transfer, clinical courses previously earned in the associate or diploma Nursing programs must
have been completed no more than one year prior to enrollment into the College’s associate or diploma Nursing
programs.
To transfer composition, literature or math courses previously earned, a student must obtain the following minimum scores
on the COMPASS student academic readiness assessment:
o
o
o
Writing - 60
Reading – 61 (OTA student threshold is 75. See Admissions Policy for further details.)
Mathematics – 51 (pre-algebra)
If a student does not achieve these scores, he/she will be enrolled in the appropriate transitional studies courses.
Composition, literature and math courses previously earned will be ineligible for transfer.
Official transcripts for use in determining transferability of credit must be received by the school by the end of the
student’s first month or the credits will not be considered for transfer. Students may also be asked to provide additional
documentation such as a course syllabus to determine transferability.
Appeals to decisions regarding transfer of credit must be submitted in writing to the dean of academic affairs within seven
days of receipt of the decision. The Dean of Academic Affairs will make the final determination on acceptance of the
credits, with input from the faculty. The decision of the dean is final.
The College does not imply, promise, or guarantee that credits earned in the College will transfer to other institutions,
since such determinations are made according to the policies of the receiving institution. See “Transferability of College
Credits” for the full policy concerning credit transfer.
Advanced Placement Policy
Some baccalaureate degree programs provide an opportunity for persons who already have an associate degree in a related
technical area to complete a bachelor’s degree focused in the same area. The degrees are academic and have been
constructed with at least 24 quarter credit hours in general education or their equivalent, including college-level writing
and mathematics courses. There also shall be 46 quarter hours or their equivalent within the area of concentration.
Twenty-two (22) quarter credit hours or their equivalent can be integrated into either general education, technical, or core
for a maximum of 92 credits eligible to be transferred in. Degree completion programs may have additional requirements
for admission as well as different credit hour disciplinary requirements. Please see the specific degree completion program
for details.
General education courses will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis to determine course equivalencies. Deficiencies
in general education requirements may require that additional credits be taken before graduation.
Other Sources of Credit
Students may be permitted to have credit applied to their graduation requirements from such sources as the College Level
Examination ProgramВ® (CLEP) В® and education programs sponsored by the military, as well as other methods of proficiency
14
testing. Questions regarding such options should be addressed to the Academic Affairs Office. Students seeking credit for life
experience may do so based only on work experience, military experience or a combination of the two as validated through
CLEP® testing. Crediting of any course through such options is indicated in the student’s transcript by a grade of Proficiency
(PR), which is not computed in determining the student’s grade point average. No more than 30% of the student’s program’s
credits may be awarded through this CLEPВ®-validated life experience option.
Credits Earned at the College
Credits earned at any Brown Mackie College school are acceptable at the College, with the following provisions:
• Credits earned under previous catalogs must be compatible with program requirements of the current catalog.
• Older credits are subject to the age restrictions indicated under “Transfer Credits.”
• Credits approved are applied, with the grade earned, to the student’s current program, and are subject to application of
the College’s standards of satisfactory progress.
Credits earned at the College may not transfer to another educational institution. Credits earned at another educational
institution may not be accepted by the College. You should obtain confirmation that the College will accept any credits
you have earned at another educational institutional before you execute an enrollment contract or agreement. You should
also contact any educational institutions that you may want to transfer credits earned at the College to determine if such
institutions will accept credits earned at the College prior to executing an enrollment contract or agreement. You should
never assume that credits will transfer to or from any educational institutional. It is highly recommended and you are
advised to make certain that you know the transfer of credit policy of the College and of any other educational institutions
you may in the future want to transfer the credits earned at the College before you execute an enrollment contract or
agreement.
Residency Requirement
Though credits may be applied to a student’s degree program through transfer from institutions other than another Brown
Mackie College and through other means, the total number of these credits cannot exceed 75 percent of the credits in the
student’s degree program. In addition, the student must complete the final 25 percent of a degree program's credits or 50
percent of a degree program’s technical concentration credits in-residence at any Brown Mackie College, whichever is the
greater benefit to the student.
The residency requirement for a non-degree (diploma or certificate) program is that the student must complete the final 50
percent of the program's credit in-residence at any Brown Mackie College, and this may be subject to program accreditor’s
restrictions. Questions regarding the specifics of accredited program's limitations on residency should be referred to the
program administrator or department chairperson.
University Credit for Military Experience and Training
Brown Mackie College is proud to be a Military Friendly college and may exempt those attending on Veteran's
Administration's benefits from the above requirements, granting appropriate credit on a case by case basis.
Students who wish to have their military experience and training evaluated for credit should submit copies of appropriate
forms to the appropriate campus Registrar. Veterans should submit DD Form 214, and active duty military personnel
should submit DD Form 295. Active duty Army personnel and soldiers discharged since October 1, 1986, should also
provide the appropriate campus Registrar with copies of their Army/American Council on Education Registry Transcripts.
The University may also accept as transfer credit completion of formal military courses as recommended by the American
Council on Education (ACE) when verified through official transcripts (Army/ACE registry Transcript System,
Community College of the Air Force, Sailor/Marine/ACE Registry Transcript, Registry of Credit Recommendations, or
National Registry for Training Programs).
Additionally, credit may also be awarded through review of a student’s certified Department of Defense (DD) Form 214
(Armed forces of the United States Report of Transfer or Discharge) in conjunction with the ACE Handbook, Evaluation
of Educational Experiences in the Armed Forces. Credit will be applied to a degree program upon the approval of the
Department Chair from which the degree is to be awarded.
Transferability of College Credits
Brown Mackie College — Salina is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and is a member of the North Central
Association (NCA) (230 South LaSalle Street, Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604, 1-800-621-7440, www.ncahlc.org).
15
Brown Mackie College — Kansas City is a branch campus of Brown Mackie College — Salina which is accredited by the
Higher Learning Commission and is a member of the North Central Association (NCA) (230 South LaSalle Street, Suite
7-500, Chicago, IL 60604, 1-800-621-7440, www.ncahlc.org).
Brown Mackie College — Oklahoma City is a branch location of Brown Mackie College — Salina which is accredited by
the Higher Learning Commission and is a member of the North Central Association (NCA) (230 South LaSalle Street,
Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604, 1-800-621-7440, www.ncahlc.org).
The Higher Learning Commission is an accrediting agency recognized by the United States Department of Education.
Brown Mackie College — Salina is approved and authorized to grant the Bachelor of Science (BS), the Associate of
Applied Science (AAS) and the Associate of General Studies (AGS) degree by the Kansas Board of Regents, 1000 SW
Jackson Street, Suite 520, Topeka, KS 66612-1368.
Brown Mackie College — Kansas City is approved and authorized to grant the Bachelor of Science (BS) and the
Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degrees by the Kansas Board of Regents, 1000 SW Jackson Street, Suite 520,
Topeka, KS 66612-1368.
Brown Mackie College — Oklahoma City is authorized to grant the Bachelors of Science (BS) and the Associate of
Applied Science (AAS) degree by the Oklahoma Board of Regents, 655 Research Parkway, Suite 200, Oklahoma City,
OK 73104-3603.
However, the fact that a school is licensed and accredited is not necessarily an indication that credits earned at that school
will be accepted by another school. In the U.S. higher education system, transferability of credit is determined by the
receiving institution taking into account such factors as course content, grades, accreditation, and licensing.
Programs offered by one school within the Brown Mackie College system of schools may be similar to but not identical to
programs offered at another school within the system. This is due to differences imposed by state law, use of different
instructional models, and local employer needs. Therefore, if you decide to transfer to another school within the Brown
Mackie College system of schools, not all of the credits you earn at the College may be transferable into that school’s
program. Credits earned at the College may not transfer to another educational institution. Credits earned at another
educational institution may not be accepted by the College. You should obtain confirmation that the College will accept
any credits you have earned at another educational institutional before you execute an enrollment contract or agreement.
You should also contact any educational institutions that you may want to transfer credits earned at the College to
determine if such institutions will accept credits earned the College prior to executing an enrollment contract or agreement.
The ability to transfer credits from the College to another educational institution may be very limited. Your credits may
not transfer and you may have to repeat courses previously taken at the College if you enroll in another educational
institution. You should never assume that credits will transfer to or from any educational institutional. It is highly
recommended and you are advised to make certain that you know the transfer of credit policy of the College and of any
other educational institutions you may in the future want to transfer the credits earned at the College before you executive
an enrollment contract or agreement.
Brown Mackie College — Salina, Brown Mackie College — Kansas City, and Brown Mackie College — Oklahoma
City does not imply, promise, or guarantee transferability of its credits to any other institution.
Transitional Studies Courses
Based on the results of the academic placement test, students may be required to take transitional studies courses. Students
must successfully complete such courses in order to progress in the program. Transitional studies course credits do not
count towards the total number of credits for graduation, nor do they count in the cumulative grade point average (CGPA);
however, they do count in determining the maximum timeframe and the incremental completion rate.
Each individual transitional studies course may be attempted no more than three times, except for students enrolled in the
Occupational Therapy program who may attempt no more than two times. Failure to pass the courses within three attempts
will result in termination from the College.
International Student Admissions Policy
Brown Mackie College- Salina and Brown Mackie College-Kansas City- All non-U.S. citizen or lawful permanent
resident (LPR) Students must meet the same admissions standards as all other students when seeking to enroll in Brown
Mackie Colleges. Please refer to Admissions Requirements. Those international students applying to SEVP-certified
schools and requiring the school’s sponsorship for international student visa status (Form I-20) must meet the additional
16
requirements listed below. Brown Mackie College requires nonimmigrant students present in Visa Waiver, B-1, B-2, F-2,
and M-2 status to change visa to F-1 or other qualifying status prior to enrolling in programs of study (other than a
vocational or recreational courses). Please note that some programs may not be eligible for international students requiring
Form I-20 sponsorship. Please ask to speak with Brown Mackie College’s International Admissions Representative for
more detail.
Brown Mackie College- Oklahoma City- is not currently authorized to sponsor international student (F-1) visas. Other
qualifying nonimmigrant (temporary) visa status may enroll.
English Language Proficiency Policy
As the lectures, seminars, materials, and discourse which comprise programs of study at Brown Mackie College are
presented in English, Brown Mackie College requires that all students possess and demonstrate a minimum level of
English language proficiency required to substantially benefit from the programs offered.
A student is deemed proficient in the English language if he or she:





Holds a U.S. high school diploma or U.S. General Equivalency Diploma (GED) or international high
school diploma, e.g., U.S. military base, business/diplomat expat community, etc., in which instruction
is delivered primarily in English
Holds the equivalent (evidenced by credential evaluation) of a U.S. high school diploma from overseas
institution in which instruction is delivered primarily in English
Completes (with passing grades in all courses) a minimum of two (2) academic terms at a regionally or
nationally accredited U.S. post-secondary institution in which instruction is delivered primarily in
English
Completes (with passing grades in all courses) English 101 and 102 at a regionally or nationally
accredited U.S. post-secondary institution in which instruction is delivered primarily in English
Presents acceptable English Language Proficiency test scores meeting the minimum required levels set
forth below.
Minimum Acceptable Proof of English Language Proficiency Standards
ELP TEST
TOEFL PAPER
TOEFL i-BT
IELTS
American College Testing (ACT)
English
EF International Language Schools
ELS Language Schools
iTEP
Pearson
Michigan English Language Assessment
Battery (MELAB or “Michigan Test”)
Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT)-English
Section
Prueba Aptitud Academica (Puerto
Rico)- English Secion
TOEIC (Academic Test)
DIPLOMA
480
54-55
Level 5.5
17
ASSOCIATE/BACHELOR
500
61
Level 6.0
19
GRADUATE
550
79-80
Level 6.5
21
C1
108
4.0
42
73
C1
109
4.5
44
80
C2
112
5.0
53
85
420
526
572
453
526
572
600
650
700
Please contact an International Student Admissions Representative for questions about acceptable
alternative measures of English Language Proficiency.
17
ACADEMIC INFORMATION
Certification and Licensure
Criminal Background
Individuals who have been found guilty of a felony or pleaded guilty to a felony may not be eligible to take professional
licensure or certification examinations. Professional licensure and certification examinations may require students to
receive a waiver to allow them to sit for an examination. State and professional association rules vary by location and
profession. It is the student’s responsibility to carefully research the license or certification requirements in the state(s)
where the student intends to seek licensure or certification. These eligibility requirements, responsibilities, and possible
restrictions apply to all of the program certification and licensure information that follows.
Occupational Therapy Assistant
In order to practice as occupational therapy assistants, graduates must pass the certification examination for the certified
occupational therapy assistant. Application for such examination is arranged through the National Board for Certification
in Occupational Therapy, Inc. (NBCOT). Graduates may request application materials and the Candidate Handbook from
NBCOT or apply online. For further information, graduates should contact NBCOT at:
National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy, Inc.
12 South Summit Avenue
Suite 100
Gaithersburg, MD 20877
Telephone: 301-990-7979
Fax: 301-869-8492
www.nbcot.org
To practice as an occupational therapy assistant in Kansas a graduate must be certified by the State. Graduates may apply
for a temporary permit to work between graduation and successful completion of certification examination. For
information on application procedures for either a temporary permit or permanent state endorsement, graduates should
contact:
Kansas State Board of Healing Arts
800 SW Jackson, Lower Level
Suite A
Topeka, KS 66612
(785) 296-7413
Toll Free: 1-888-886-7205
Fax: (785) 296-0852
http://www.ksbha.org/licensure.html
For information on application procedures in the State of Oklahoma for either a temporary permit or a permanent state
endorsement, graduates should contact:
Oklahoma State Board of Medical Licensure and Supervision (OSBMLS)
PO Box 18256
Oklahoma City, OK 73154-0265
(405) 962-1400
Fax: (405) 962-1440
www.okmedicalboard.org/occupational_therapists
18
Nursing and Practical Nursing
Graduates from the nursing program are eligible to have their name submitted to respective boards of nursing to apply for
the ability to sit for the National Council for Licensure Examination (NCLEX-PN or NCLEX-RN). Applications for
licensure by examination must be completed by each candidate and submitted with the appropriate fees to the respective
board of nursing.
Registration with NCLEX must be completed according to the instructions in the NCLEX Candidate Bulletin. Both the
board of nursing licensure application and the NCLEX registration process must be completed and fees paid before
eligibility to take the examination can be granted by the respective board.
Graduates may obtain further information by contacting:
Kansas State Board of Nursing
Landon State Office Building
900 SW Jackson Street, Suite 1051
Topeka, Kansas 66612-1230
Main: 785-296-4929
www.ksbn.org
Or, the respective state board of their choice.
Brown Mackie College – Oklahoma City is approved by the Oklahoma Board of Nursing. Graduates of this
state-approved program are eligible to apply to take the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX) for
(registered or practical) nurses. Applicants for Oklahoma licensure must meet all state and federal requirements to
hold an Oklahoma license to practice nursing. In addition to completing a state-approved nursing education
program that meets educational requirements and successfully passing the licensure examination, requirements
include submission of an application for licensure, a criminal history records search, and evidence of citizenship or
qualified alien status. Applicants for practical nurse licensure must also hold a high school diploma or a graduate
equivalency degree (G.E.D.) [59 O.S. В§567.5 & 567.6]. To be granted a license, an applicant must have the
legal right to be in the United States (United States Code Chapter 8, Section 1621). In addition, Oklahoma law
only allows a license to be issued to U.S. citizens, U.S. nationals, and legal permanent resident aliens. Other
qualified aliens may be issued a temporary license that is valid until the expiration of their visa status, or if there is
no expiration date, for one year. Applicants who are qualified aliens must present to the Board office, in person,
valid documentary evidence of:
1. A valid, unexpired immigrant or nonimmigrant visa status for admission into the United States;
2. A pending or approved application for asylum in the United States;
3. Admission into the United States in refugee status;
4. A pending or approved application for temporary protected status in the United States;
5. Approved deferred action status; or
6. A pending application for adjustment of status to legal permanent resident status or conditional resident status.
The Board has the right to deny a license to an individual with a history of criminal background,
disciplinary action on another health-related license or certification, or judicial declaration of mental incompetence
[59 O.S. В§567.8]. These cases are considered on an individual basis at the time application for licensure is made,
with the exception of felony convictions. An individual with a felony conviction cannot apply for licensure
for at least five years after completion of all sentencing terms, including probation and suspended sentences,
unless a presidential or gubernatorial pardon is received [59 O.S. В§567.5 & 567.6].
19
Veterinary Technology
The Kansas Board of Veterinary Examiners requires all Veterinary Technicians to be registered. An applicant for
registration as a Veterinary Technician must be a graduate of an accredited program of Veterinary Technology approved
by the board and have met all the requirements of the board. An applicant for registration as a Veterinary Technician shall
possess an associate degree related to veterinary sciences or its equivalent, approved by the board, and has met all the
requirements of the board. The successful examinee shall obtain a total test converted scale score of seventy percent
(70%) or above on each of the national tests, and a score of ninety percent (90%) or above on the state jurisprudence
examination. For more information on this, see www.accesskansas.org/veterinary.
The Kansas Board of Veterinary Examiners is responsible for administering the Veterinary Technician National
Examination. This examination is given three times each year, please check with AAVSB or your state agency for
specific dates and times. It is the responsibility of each candidate to obtain, complete and submit the necessary application
materials from the Kansas Board of Veterinary Examiners. For more information on the application process, please see
www.accesskansas.org/veterinary. For information on the VTNE, please visit the website for the American Association of
Veterinary State Boards. www.aavsb.org.
Medical Assisting Degree Program and Medical Assistant (60 credit hour diploma) (Optional Certification)
The American Medical Technologists (AMT) accepts the accreditation of the College. Therefore students will qualify to
take the Registered Medical Assisting (RMA) certification examination upon graduating from the Medical Assisting
associate program and/or the Medical Assistant 60 credit hour diploma program.
Information on application procedures can be found at:
http://americanmedtech.org/SchoolsStudents/CertificationProcess.aspx
20
ACADEMIC RESOURCES, POLICIES, AND PROCEDURES
Initial Academic Assessment
Students are given an assessment of academic skills, commonly referred to as the academic readiness evaluation, no later
than the end of the student's first quarter. Though the results of this assessment do not determine eligibility for admission,
they provide the College with a means of determining the need for academic support through transitional studies courses
and academic advisement, as well as a means by which the College can evaluate the effectiveness of its educational
programs. Because of the purposes of this assessment, students are advised to perform to the best of their ability to
accurately reflect the need or not for additional academic support.
Upon enrollment in the admissions process, students are advised of the date and time of the assessment of academic
readiness; it is required for all students to be available for the assessment, since the evaluation will be scheduled in
reserved computer classrooms with trained proctors, so that the evaluation can be conducted in compliance with the
instrument’s design. This assessment will be conducted outside of the described course meeting time and is in addition to
the course contact hours.
As soon as practicable after the completion of the assessment, students will meet with academic advisement staff and
review their performance and the plan for additional academic support toward success.
Initial Academic Assessment – Surgical Technology Program
Applicants enrolling in the Surgical Technology associate’s degree program must complete an academic readiness
assessment and obtain minimum scores in reading, writing, and mathematics that demonstrate the ability to be successful
in the program.
In the event that applicants do not demonstrate proficiency in any of these areas, they will be enrolled in transitional
studies courses. The applicant then must demonstrate academic readiness by the successful completion of these courses as
well as obtaining the minimum scores on the academic readiness assessment. The determination will be made to see if the
program is an appropriate choice for the student. If a student does not achieve the minimum scores in reading, writing, and
mathematics after attempting the transitional course twice, the student will not be allowed to continue with the Surgical
Technology program, but can be considered for another program of study at Brown Mackie College.
Initial Academic Assessment – Occupational Therapy Assistant program
Applicants enrolling in the Occupational Therapy Assistant associate’s degree program must complete an academic
readiness assessment and obtain minimum scores in reading, writing, and mathematics that demonstrate the ability to be
successful in the program.
In the event that applicants do not demonstrate proficiency in any of these areas, they will be enrolled in transitional
studies courses. The applicant then must demonstrate academic readiness by the successful completion of these courses as
well as obtaining the minimum scores on the academic readiness assessment. The determination will be made to see if the
program is an appropriate choice for the student. If a student does not achieve the minimum scores in reading, writing, and
mathematics after attempting the transitional course twice, the student will not be allowed to continue with the
Occupational Therapy Assistant program, but can be considered for another program of study at Brown Mackie College.
Attendance
Considerable time and effort have been spent designing each of the College’s academic programs in order to provide
students with a coherent and effective preparation for their careers. Regular class attendance is essential to academic
progress and is expected. Satisfactory attendance is considered to be a vital part of each student's performance and students
are required to engage in weekly academic activity by attending residential classes and/or participating in the blended
learning mode portion of a course.
Student success is dependent on the frequency and quality of participation in class in either the residential or blended
learning mode environment, consistent with the requirements of the particular course, and as outlined in the course
syllabus. A student must complete an academically related activity in order to support the attendance requirements of the
college. The completion of such an activity documents positive attendance and is retained by the college.
Academic activity may include any or all of the following:
21
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Participating in a residential class or laboratory session.
Engaging in on-line tutorials, lectures, and research, and then posting a meaningful response per faculty assigned
discussion. A meaningful post is a response that stimulates thought such as responding to the discussion question
or being involved in a series of responses to a question. It can also be a contribution of a new thought that must
relevant to course content, theory or personal experience as opposed to a personal opinion.
Taking an examination or quiz.
Participating in asynchronous learning activities where content is viewed through assigned recorded videos
and/or through assigned Brown Mackie College iTunes classes in the on-line classroom. In-class sessions are
focused on practice and application of theory.
Participating in experiential course work such as externships, clinical experiences, practicum, and field trips.
A student must meet all scheduled activities that are part of the class regardless of the number of course sessions missed.
All assignments must be completed and submitted by the assigned due dates in order to be considered for evaluation.
New students and re-entering students must register and maintain attendance in one of the above outlined academically
related activities within the first six (6) consecutive calendar days of the course. This includes weekends. New and reentering students who have not registered attendance in this fashion will be withdrawn and their enrollment cancelled.
Active and continuing students who do not have any academic-related activity as described in one of the above guidelines
within the first six (6) consecutive calendar days of the course, including weekends, but excluding college-scheduled
recesses, will be administratively withdrawn from the course and may be administratively withdrawn from the College. A
student’s last date of attendance is determined by the last date of participation in an academically related activity for the
course.
Students who do not have any academic related activity as described in the above guidelines for seven (7) consecutive
calendar days of the course, including weekends, after the first week will be administratively withdrawn from the course
and may be administratively withdrawn from the College. Weekly attendance periods begin the scheduled start date of the
course. An example of weekly attendance would be Monday through Sunday at midnight except for the last week of the
class which begins on Monday and ends on Saturday at midnight. Certain laboratory courses may have more restrictive
attendance requirements, which are outlined in the course syllabus. Students who do not post attendance during the fourth
week of the term, regardless of attendance in the prior weeks of the term, will be considered as not having completed the
course. In that case, the student will be administratively withdrawn from school.
A student will be given an unearned F (UF - failure) grade for the course if the student does not take a final assessment
measure. A student will be given an earned F (F - failure) grade for the course if the student takes a final assessment
measure, but does not pass the course. In both cases, the credits will be considered unearned and will negatively impact
your eligibility for veteran, financial aid and other benefits. In both situations, however, the credits are considered to be
attempted and will negatively impact Standards of Academic/Financial Aid Progress.
A student withdrawn from a course will receive a grade of Withdrawn, without penalty (W) or Withdrawn, with penalty
(WF) for that course (see “Grading System”) and will be charged with an unsuccessful attempt of the course. Students are
advised that withdrawals from courses will affect their course completion rate (see “Standards of Satisfactory Academic
Progress”).
If it appears that you will not be able to attend a module in the quarter you might be eligible to apply in advance for Active
Non-Attending status. Please see the dean of academic affairs for guidelines. Applying for this status is not considered an
academic activity and therefore is not considered attendance.
The following activities do not constitute academically-related activities:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Participation in an academic counseling or advisement
A student’s self-certification of an academically related activity.
Posting a completed assignment.
Asking the instructor or classmates questions about an assignment.
Sending an email to the instructor or classmates.
Posting a simple, “I agree” comment.
Connect time to course.
22
The College’s make-up policy is as follows: make-up work is at the sole discretion of the instructor. It is likewise solely
the student's responsibility to maintain contact with the instructor to request the opportunity to engage in make-up work.
Students will not be penalized for pregnancy or related conditions, including recovery from childbirth. Students who are
absent due to pregnancy or related conditions may receive an exception to the attendance policy and/or be permitted to
make up missed work for as long as the student’s absence is medically necessary. To avoid being administratively
withdrawn, students must contact their academic advisor or department chair about the need for a pregnancy-related
exception. As with other students seeking exceptions for medical-related reasons, students seeking a pregnancy-related
exception to the attendance policy must provide a doctor’s note indicating that the absences were medically necessary.
Failure to provide evidence of medical necessity for any absence may result in the student being administratively
withdrawn from school, and the student may not be allowed to make up any missed assignments.
Leave of Absence Policy
There is no Leave of Absence. If a student cannot complete the course, they must withdraw.
Last Date of Attendance
When a student withdraws, or is withdrawn or dismissed from the College, his or her official date of separation from the
College is determined to be the last date of attendance (LDA), that is, the last date on which he or she participated in an
academically related activity for the course. The LDA is used in calculating applicable refunds, and may determine the
extent of the student’s financial obligation to the College.
Course Availability
In its scheduling of courses, the College’s primary responsibility is to those students who remain continuously enrolled in
pursuit of their first credential. Persons who wish to enroll in single courses, students who are returning from withdrawals
or dismissals, and graduates who wish to return for an additional credential are advised that the courses required may not be
immediately and continuously available. Courses will not be offered specifically to meet such exceptional circumstances.
Course Delivery
The College offers courses using three delivery modes. A student may be enrolled and admitted to a class using a
residential or fully on-ground learning mode, a blended learning mode where at least fifty percent (50%) of the course is
on campus and the remaining fifty percent (50%) is delivered online, or 100% online learning.
The delivery method of the online learning content for this course supports the educational learning objectives or
outcomes for the program objectives and the credential awarded. The outcomes and objectives for the online component
mirror the classroom delivered content.
Grading will be done on a point system. Points are assigned for each criterion previously established for the purpose of
evaluating each assignment. Each graded assignment, project, quiz, exam, and discussion question criterion is assigned a
point value, which is reflective of the quality of the contribution. In most instances there will be at least two, and usually
more, distinct criteria specified for evaluation and grading of the student's work. Students will receive a weekly progress
and grade report.
Successful learning requires active participation by the students while in the class. In the online learning environment this
is achieved through students posting notes and responding to the notes of others that may relate to the lecture and assigned
readings; answering and responding to others' answers of assigned discussion questions; case studies; specific
assignments; and critiques. A "response" may be a question about another's work; an agreement with or challenge to the
point of view expressed, supported by a reference to the text or lecture or personal experience (not mere opinion); citation
of a reference relevant to the topic; a critique of someone's work, etc.
Students are required to read all the notes of the instructor and fellow students, for this is what constitutes the course of
study. The quantity and quality of the student's participation will be graded. Students are strongly encouraged to
participate throughout the week, including weekends.
Everyone's comments are important. The diversity of experience among members of the class will enhance learning. All
students will be treated equitably within the classroom. The classroom shall be a place of expression and discussion.
All communications must be respectful. Inappropriate language will not be tolerated. The instructor will determine what is
inappropriate. Students not treating instructor and peers with respect are subject to discipline or dismissal from the online
learning platform for this course.
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TECHNOLOGY REQUIREMENTS
PC:
Hardware: 1 GHz Intel x86 or x64 series processor, 2 GB RAM, Windows 7 or higher.
Software: Microsoft Office 2007 or higher (including Word, Excel, PowerPoint), Anti-Virus software, Adobe Acrobat
Reader.
Browser: Internet Explorer 8 or higher, Safari 3 or higher, or Firefox. Adobe Flash Player 10 plug-in and Oracle Java 7
plug-in or higher.
Mac:
Hardware: Intel-based Mac, 2GB RAM, Mac OS X 10.6 or higher.
Software: Microsoft Office 2008 for Mac or higher (including Word, Excel, PowerPoint), Adobe Acrobat Reader.
Browser: Safari 3 or higher, or Firefox. Adobe Flash Player 10 plug-in and Oracle Java 7 plug-in or higher.
Tablet:
Hardware: Apple iPad Mini or iPad 2 with 16GB of memory or greater, iOS 6 or higher.
Course Schedule Changes
Changes to the course schedule must be made prior to the completion of the second class session, and must be approved
by both the student’s department chairperson and the Dean of Academic Affairs.
Reenrollment Policy
A student who withdraws from the College may reenroll only once in any nine-month period. If, after the first
reenrollment, the student withdraws a second time, he or she must wait nine months from the last date of attendance to
resume enrollment in the College. This policy applies to both voluntary and administrative withdrawals.
Additionally, capped programs may not have sufficient space availability for students to re-enter. Students may be
required to wait until there is sufficient room for the student to re-enter.
Academic Integrity
Students are required to conduct themselves in conformity with normal expectations of collegiate academic integrity in the
completion of assignments and examinations. Academic dishonesty includes, but is not restricted to, the following:
• Theft or abuse of another’s work
• Alteration of any grade or other evaluation of one’s own or another student’s work in order to misrepresent its quality
• Unauthorized collaboration in completing work, including completing work for another and submitting another’s work
as one’s own
• Use of resources prohibited by the instructor
• Representation of another’s work as one’s own (plagiarism)
• Unapproved submission of the same work in more than one course
The following are the College’s policies and procedures in cases of academic dishonesty:
First Offense
A grade of zero (without recovery) on the assignment or examination. The student will receive a written
notification of the offense and penalty, signed, dated, and filed by the Academic Affairs Office. The
notification will advise the student of the consequences of a second offense.
Second Offense Failure in the course involved and ineligibility for academic honors upon graduation. The student will
receive a written notification of the offense and penalty, signed, dated, and filed by the Academic
Affairs Office. This notification will explain the action taken and advise the student of the
consequences of a third offense.
Third Offense
Failure in the course involved and permanent disciplinary dismissal from the College, with the action
recorded in the student’s transcript. The student will receive a written notification of the offense and
penalty, signed, dated, and filed by the Academic Affairs Office.
In the case of a second or third offense, academic dishonesty will remove the student’s option to withdraw from the course
involved.
24
Violation of academic integrity includes “willful obstruction of learning.” In such cases the College, in determining the
appropriate action, must take into account the extent of the disruption resulting from the obstruction. Obstruction of
learning may be physical (as theft or abuse of instructional materials or equipment) or behavioral (as disruption or
prevention of learning). The College will, as its general policy, provide a written notification of penalties more serious
than an oral warning, but in instances of intolerable or persistent obstruction the only appropriate action may be immediate
and permanent disciplinary dismissal from the College.
Any appeal of an action taken in response to a violation of academic integrity must be submitted in writing for review by
the Administrative Review Committee. The appeal process is described under “Student Conduct.”
Higher Education Opportunity Act
The unauthorized distribution of copyrighted material, including unauthorized peer-to-peer file sharing, may subject
students and individuals to civil and criminal liabilities. Almost all of the music, movies, television shows, software,
games and images found on the Internet are protected by federal copyright law. The owner of the copyright in these works
has the right to control their distribution, modification, reproduction, public display and public performance. It is therefore
generally illegal to use file sharing networks to download and share copyrighted works without the copyright owner’s
permission unless “fair use” or another exemption under copyright law applies.
Fair use under the federal Copyright Act allows the use without permission of copyrighted material for the purpose of
criticism, comment, news reporting or teaching under certain limited circumstances. There is no blanket exception from
liability for students or employees of educational institutions, however, and whether the use of copyrighted material
without permission falls within “fair use” or one of the other exceptions in the Act depends on a very detailed, case-bycase analysis of various factors. Students should be aware that sharing music, videos, software and other copyrighted
materials is very likely not to be considered a �fair use” and therefore may be a violation of the law.
A violation of the institution’s policy for use of its information technology system can result in termination of network
access for the student and/or other disciplinary action including removal of the student from the institution. Moreover,
there are severe civil and criminal penalties for copyright infringement under federal law. A copyright owner is entitled to
recover actual damages and profits resulting from an infringement, but also may recover statutory damages ranging from
$750 to $30,000 per work for a non-willful infringement and up to $150,000 for a willful infringement, even if there is no
proof of actual damages, in addition to court costs and reasonable attorneys’ fees. The government also can file criminal
charges that can result in fines and imprisonment.
The College’s policies in regard to copyright infringement via the Internet prohibit the illegal downloading or
unauthorized distribution of copyrighted materials using the institution’s information technology system. The College’s
policies prohibit use of the College’s computer network to engage in illegal copying or distribution of copyrighted works
such as by unauthorized peer-to-peer file sharing (i.e., the sharing of copyrighted works, typically in digital or electronic
files) without permission.
Brown Mackie College Intellectual Property Policy
I.
Purpose or Scope
The unauthorized distribution of copyrighted material, including unauthorized peer-to-peer file sharing, may subject
students and individuals to civil and criminal liabilities. Almost all of the music, movies, television shows, software,
games and images found on the Internet are protected by federal copyright law. The owner of the copyright in these works
has the right to control their distribution, modification, reproduction, public display and public performance. It is therefore
generally illegal to use file sharing networks to download and share copyrighted works without the copyright owner’s
permission unless “fair use” or another exemption under copyright law applies.
Fair use under the federal Copyright Act allows the use without permission of copyrighted material for the purpose of
criticism, comment, news reporting or teaching under certain limited circumstances. There is no blanket exception from
liability for students or employees of educational university, however, and whether the use of copyrighted material without
permission falls with “fair use” or one of the other exceptions in the Act depends on a very detailed, case-by-case analysis
of various factors. Students should be aware that sharing music, videos, software and other copyrighted materials is very
likely not to be considered a “fair use” and therefore may be a violation of the law. A violation of the Brown Mackie
Colleges policy for use of its information technology system can result in termination of network access for the student
and/or other disciplinary action including removal of the student from the Brown Mackie College.
25
Summary of Civil and Criminal Penalties for Violation of Federal Copyright Laws
Copyright infringement is the act of exercising, without permission or legal authority, one or more of the exclusive rights
granted to the copyright owner under section 106 of the Copyright Act (Title 17 of the United States Code). These rights
include the right to reproduce or distribute a copyrighted work. In the file-sharing context, downloading or uploading
substantial parts of a copyrighted work without authority constitutes an infringement. Penalties for copyright infringement
include civil and criminal penalties. In general, anyone found liable for civil copyright infringement may be ordered to pay
either actual damages or “statutory” damages affixed at not less than $750 and not more than $30,000 per work infringed.
For “willful” infringement, a court may award up to $150,000 per work infringed. A court can, in its discretion, also assess
costs and attorneys’ fees. For details, see Title 17, United States Code, Sections 504, 505. Willful copyright infringement
can also result in criminal penalties, including imprisonment of up to five years and fines of up to $250,000 per offense.
For more information, please see the website of the U.S. Copyright Office at www.copyright.gov.
Brown Mackie College’s policies in regard to copyright infringement via the Internet prohibit the illegal downloading or
unauthorized distribution of copyrighted materials using the Brown Mackie College’s information technology system.
Brown Mackie College’s policies prohibit use of the Brown Mackie College’s computer network to engage in illegal
copying or distribution of copyrighted works such as by unauthorized peer-to-peer file sharing (i.e., the sharing of
copyrighted works, typically in digital or electronic files) without permission.
As a creative community of teachers, artists and scholars, Brown Mackie College is committed to encouraging the creation
of new works, new ideas, and new forms of creative and scholarly expression. This Policy on Intellectual Property is
provided to protect the interests of those who create as well as the interests of Brown Mackie College itself, which
supports this creative and scholarly work.
This document expresses Brown Mackie College’s policy regarding ownership and usage rights with respect to Intellectual
Property (as hereinafter defined). It covers all those who are a part of Brown Mackie College – faculty, staff, students,
visiting artists, visiting scholars, or other participants enrolled, employed or affiliated with Brown Mackie College, and
this Policy governs in all circumstances, unless Brown Mackie College has modified it through a written agreement
connected to a sponsored or commissioned work or as part of work under a grant or contract. Should there be any conflict
between the provisions of this Policy and the terms of a separate written agreement between Brown Mackie College and
any party, the terms of that separate written agreement will govern. This Policy is not intended to limit “fair use” as
defined by U.S. laws.
II.
Definitions
The following terms are used throughout the Policy and are defined as follows:
A. Copyright - Copyright is the intangible property right granted for a limited period of time by federal statute
(Title 17 of the U.S. Code) for an original work of authorship fixed in any tangible form of expression.
Copyright provides the owner with five exclusive rights, including the exclusive right to reproduce the work,
to prepare derivative works based on the work, to distribute copies of the work to the public by sale or other
transfer of ownership (or by rental, lease, license or lending), to display the work publicly and to perform the
work publicly (if relevant).
B. Commissioned Work - A Commissioned Work is defined as a Work (as defined in paragraph K) that is
produced or created pursuant to a written agreement with the Institution and for Institution purposes by (a)
individuals not under the employ of the Institution or (b) Institutional Employees (as defined in paragraph
D) acting outside the scope of their regular Institution employment, as determined by their existing
Institution employment arrangement or contract.
C. Independent Academic Effort or Creative Activity - Independent Academic Effort or Creative Activity is
defined as the inquiry, investigation, research, or creative activity that is carried out by faculty, staff and
Students of the Institution working on their own, that advances knowledge or the development of the arts,
sciences, humanities, or technology where the specific direction, methodology, and content of the pursuit is
determined by the faculty, staff member(s), or Student(s) without the direct assignment, supervision, or
involvement of the Institution.
D. Institutional Employee - An Institutional Employee is a full-time or part-time faculty member, visiting
faculty, adjunct faculty, artist, scholar, or fellow (as defined in the Faculty Handbook), or a full-time or parttime staff member (as defined in the Staff Handbook), or Student, who is employed by the Institution or who
is working under an Institution contract, either expressed or implied.
26
E.
F.
Intellectual Property - Means: (i) trademarks, service marks, brand names, trade dress, assumed names,
trade names, slogans, URLs, domain names, logos and other indications of source, sponsorship or affiliation,
together with all associated goodwill (whether the foregoing are registered, unregistered or the subject of a
pending application for registration); (ii) inventions, developments, improvements, discoveries, know how,
concepts and ideas, whether patentable or not, in any jurisdiction; (iii) patents, patent applications and patent
disclosures; (iv) trade secrets and proprietary or confidential information; (v) writings and other works of
authorship, whether subject to copyright protection or not, in any jurisdiction, including but not limited to
literary works (such as books, scholarly articles, journal articles and other articles, theses, research, course
syllabi, curricula, exams, instructional and evaluation materials for classes, courses, labs or seminars, study
guides, student rosters and attendance forms, grade reports, assessment of student work and projects, course
or program proposals, software, data and databases, lecture and presentation materials); musical works
(including any accompanying words); dramatic works (including any accompanying music); pantomimes
and choreographic works; pictorial, graphic, and sculpture works (including graphic designs; illustrations,
photographs, paintings, sculptures and other works of art); motion pictures and other audiovisual works
(including films, audio and video recordings and multimedia projects); sound recordings; architectural
works; and compilations; and (vi) copyrights, copyright registrations and applications for registration of
copyrights in any jurisdiction.
Patent - A United States patent is a grant which gives the owner of the patent the right to exclude all others
from making, using, or selling the claimed invention in the United States for a set period of time. Similar
rights are granted in other countries, but the discussion of Patents in this Policy will focus specifically on
United States patent rights.
G. Sponsored Work - Sponsored Work is a Work (as defined in paragraph K) that is produced or created under
an agreement between the Institution and a sponsor which provides the Institution with ownership and/or
usage rights to the Work and Intellectual Property produced under the agreement. Sponsored works do not
include works created through independent academic effort or creative activity, even when based on the
findings of the sponsored project, so long as an agreement does not state otherwise.
H. Student - A Student is a regularly registered, full- or part-time, undergraduate or graduate at the Institution,
including students attending the Institution as “special status students”: e.g., as participants in Professional
Institute for Educators (PIE), Continuing Education (CE), the Pre-College or Saturday programs, or in
exchange programs or through special grants or fellowships.
I. Substantial Institutional Resources - Any substantial use of Institution equipment, facilities, time, personnel,
or funds, and use of Institution resources that are not “commonly provided”, is considered a use of
“Substantial Institutional Resources.” This use does not include resources commonly provided to Institution
faculty and staff, such as offices, library facilities, basic artistic facilities, and everyday telephone, computer,
and computer network support. However, substantial time spent in the use of these latter resources may
constitute the use of “Substantial Institutional Resources.” Resources not considered “commonly provided”
include specially procured equipment or space, additional staffing or personnel, utilization beyond normal
work hours of Institution personnel, and monetary expenditures that require a budget. Faculty may use the
basic artistic facilities unless use infringes on student use of those facilities for coursework.
J. Trademark and Service Mark - A trademark or service mark is any word, phrase, name, symbol, logo,
slogan, device, or any combination thereof that is used in trade to identify and distinguish one party’s goods
or services from those of others.
K. Work - The term “Work” as used in this Policy shall be defined to include all of the items identified in
Sections (i), (ii), (iv) and (v) of the definition of Intellectual Property in paragraph E.
L. Work Made for Hire - A “Work Made for Hire” is defined as a Work (as defined in paragraph K) prepared
by an employee within the scope of his or her employment.
Consistent with the Copyright Act of 1976, as amended, a Work Made for Hire under this Policy also
includes a work specially ordered or commissioned for use as a contribution to a collective work, as a part of
a motion picture or other audiovisual work, as a translation, as a supplementary work, as a compilation, as
an instructional text, as a test, as answer material for a test, or as an atlas, if the parties expressly agree in a
written instrument signed by them that the work shall be considered a work made for hire.
Examples of works made for hire include software programs created within the scope of an employee’s
duties by a staff programmer, a newspaper article written by a staff journalist for the newspaper that
employs him/her, and a musical arrangement or ditty written for a music company by a salaried arranger on
27
its staff.
III.
The Rights of the Creator of Intellectual Property
A. Faculty, Staff and Student Works
1.
General Rule.
Subject to the exceptions noted in this Policy, as a general rule, the College does not claim
ownership of Intellectual Property developed through Independent Academic Effort or Creative
Activity and that is intended to disseminate the results of academic research and scholarship,
and/or to exhibit forms of artistic expression on the part of faculty, staff, and students.
2.
Exceptions to the General Rule.
Exceptions to the general rule set forth in III.A.1 above include Intellectual Property developed by
faculty, staff, Students and Institutional Employees under any of the following circumstances:
(a)
The Intellectual Property is developed as a Sponsored Work.
(b) The Intellectual Property is developed as a Commissioned Work.
(c)
The Intellectual Property is developed using Substantial Institutional Resources.
(d) The Intellectual Property is developed by the creator within the scope of his or her
employment with the College and constitutes a Work Made for Hire.
(e) The Intellectual Property is developed by a creator who is assigned, directed or funded by the
College to create the Intellectual Property.
(f) The Intellectual Property is developed under a grant, program or agreement which provides
the College with ownership rights, in whole or in part, to the Intellectual Property.
Under the circumstances described in Section III.A.2 (a) through (f) above, the Intellectual Property shall be owned by the
College and any other party as specified in any written grant, program or agreement).
The creator of any Intellectual Property that is or might be owned by the College under this Policy is required to make
reasonable prompt written disclosure of the Work to an officer designated by the College’s Campus President, and to
execute any document deemed necessary by the College to perfect legal rights in the College and enable the College to file
applications for registration when desired.
3.
Ownership Rights in Specific Types of Works.
For purposes of clarification and without limiting the general rule and exceptions set forth in
Sections III.A.1 and 2 above, ownership rights in the following types of Works are allocated as set
forth below:
(a) Curricular materials including course outlines, curricula, lesson plans, course handouts,
PowerPoint and other presentation materials (in all forms and media), course content and syllabi
are deemed to be Works Made for Hire and therefore all Intellectual Property associated therewith
is owned by the College. Likewise, student rosters, attendance forms, interim grade reports, and
assessments of student projects, including all Intellectual Property associated therewith, belong
solely to the College.
(b) Unless developed under the circumstances set forth in Section III.A.2 (a) through (f), or a
written agreement provides otherwise, scholarly articles and papers written for publication in
journals, presentations and scholarly papers prepared for seminars and conferences, and personal
lecture or teaching notes are typically not considered to be owned by the College as Works Made
for Hire or otherwise.
(c) If any Intellectual Property to be owned by the College under Section III.A.2 (a) through (f)
above is developed jointly with a non-Institution party, the parties respective ownership and usage
rights in the resulting Intellectual Property shall be set forth in a written agreement.
(d) Where Intellectual Property is to be developed using Substantial Institutional Resources,
authorized representatives of the College will develop a written agreement with the user of those
resources, which must be executed by the parties prior to use of the resources, to identify the
nature and terms of the use, including possible reimbursements or other systems of compensation
back to the College.
(e) Unless a Work is developed under the circumstances set forth in Section III.A.2 (a) through (f),
or a written agreement provides otherwise, all Intellectual Property created by faculty during
28
sabbatical are owned by the faculty.
(f) Unless the Work is developed under the circumstances set forth in Section III.A.2 (a) through
(h), or a written agreement provides otherwise, Intellectual Property created by a Student working
on his or her own, or developed in the context of a course, is owned by the Student and the College
will not use the Student’s Work without the Student’s permission to do so.
(g) Students working on a project governed by an existing written agreement to which the College
is a party are bound by all terms of that agreement.
(h) Students hired to carry out specific tasks that contribute to Intellectual Property of the College
retain no rights of ownership in whole or in part to that Intellectual Property or to the Student’s
contribution to that work.
(i) Students who wish to work collaboratively with Institutional Employees on projects which
involve the creation of Works and Intellectual Property are required to sign and deliver an
acceptable written agreement to the College outlining their rights before commencing work on
such projects. Either party has the right to initiate such agreement.
(j) The rights of the College to a perpetual, worldwide license (exclusive or non-exclusive, as the
College deems necessary), to use and reproduce copyrighted materials for educational, research,
and promotional purposes must be included in any agreement with a non- Institution sponsor.
B. Independent Contractor Works.
As a general rule, the College will own Intellectual Property created by an independent contractor if a written
agreement signed by the parties so provides, or the College has specially ordered or commissioned the work and
such work is designated as a Work Made for Hire in a signed written agreement between the parties. If the
College does not own the Intellectual Property created by an independent contractor, it shall have a right or
license to use any Work produced by the independent contractor in the course of performance of the contract, in
accordance with the parties’ agreement.
IV.
Institution’s Usage Rights
To the extent that faculty, staff or Institutional Employees retain ownership of Work and Intellectual Property
according to this Policy, the College shall have a permanent, non-exclusive, worldwide, royalty free right and
license to make educational use of such Work and Intellectual Property, including the right to use, reproduce,
distribute, display, perform and modify (i.e. create derivative works) such Work and Intellectual Property in all
forms and media now known or hereafter existing in connection with its curriculum, courses of instruction and
educational programs, and any related accreditation or promotion of the College. Where practicable, the College
will use best efforts to cite the creator of the Work if the College exercises such usage rights.
V.
Institution’s Marks
Intellectual Property comprised of or associated with the College’s Trademarks and Service Marks, including but
not limited to its name, logos, slogans, insignia, and other symbols of identity (collectively the “Marks”) belongs
exclusively to the College and/or its affiliates. This Policy is designed to protect the reputation of the College and
its affiliates, and to prevent the illegal or unapproved use of the College’s Marks.
No Institution Mark may be used without the prior, written authorization of the appropriate authorities of the
College. However, faculty, staff, and Students may identify their status or professional affiliation with the
College as appropriate, but any use of the College’s Marks in this regard must avoid any confusing, misleading
or false impression of affiliation with, or sponsorship or endorsement by, the College. No products or services
may be marked, offered, sold, promoted or distributed with or under the College’s Marks without the College’s
prior written permission and compliance with the licensing policies of the College. All requests for use of
Institution Marks must be submitted in writing to an officer designated by the President. The designated
Institution officer retains information concerning what marks, names, logos, symbols, insignias, and related
words, phrases, and images currently comprise the Brown Mackie College’s Marks.
VI.
Substantial Use of Institution Resources
Although “Substantial Institutional Resources” is defined (see Section II. Terminology), it is acknowledged that
such resources and their use may change over time, with changes in technology, physical infrastructure of Brown
the College, modes of employment, etc. Therefore, this Policy allows the Academic Policy Advisory Committee
to review the definition of “substantial use” from time to time and implement any changes or clarification to the
definitions which the College deems necessary in order to establish an appropriate standard.
29
VII.
Review Scheme
Questions concerning this Intellectual Property Policy should be addressed to the Dean of Academic Affairs.
VIII.
Reservation of Rights
The College reserves the right at any time in its sole discretion to modify and/or make changes to the Policy as
advisable or appropriate. The College agrees, however, that it will endeavor to notify the entire Institution
community through both print and electronic means of its intention to make modifications and/or changes to the
Policy at least 30 working days prior to their enactment.
IX.
Effective Date
This Policy supersedes any preexisting Intellectual Property policy of the College and will remain in effect until
modified or revoked by the College. This Policy will be binding on all parties who create Intellectual Property
after the effective date and this Policy and other agreements that represent modifications to this Policy shall
remain binding on such creators even after their relationship with the College changes or terminates.
X.
Governing Law
This Policy shall be governed by and interpreted under applicable federal laws pertaining to intellectual property
laws of the State of Kansas and Oklahoma, without regard to choice of law provisions.
Learning Resources Center
The College maintains a library of curriculum-related resources. Technical and general education materials, academic and
professional periodicals, and audio-visual resources are available to both students and faculty. The library offers a
computerized journal index and access by way of modem to the online library catalogs of other area colleges and
universities. Students have borrowing privileges at several local libraries. Internet access is available for research.
Students are oriented to the library early in their curricula, and the College has a full-time, professional librarian to assist
students in using the library’s resources to best support their learning. Faculty makes regular assignments which require
use of the library, and students are encouraged to become familiar with the available resources as early as possible. The
library also provides students with a quiet and pleasant environment for study and recreational reading.
Admission to Classes
Students are admitted to classes only with official written authorization (i.e., schedules, class change notifications, and
attendance change notifications). Visitors are permitted in class only with the prior approval of the instructor and the
Academic Affairs Office.
Incompletes
A grade of Incomplete (I) may be assigned for a course when circumstances beyond the control of the student prevent his
or her completion of required coursework. An Incomplete will be considered upon the student’s request. If the instructor
approves the request, he or she will provide the student an Agreement for Incomplete (filed also in the student’s academic
file) which specifies the work to be submitted in order to resolve the Incomplete. Resolution of an Incomplete must occur
within 14 calendar days after the final class meeting of the course for which the Incomplete is requested, unless an
extension of up to 14 days is requested and approved in writing. If the Incomplete has not been resolved within the period
approved, a grade of zero will be given for all work not submitted, and the course grade will be determined in accordance
with the criteria published in the course syllabus. An Agreement for Incomplete is automatically cancelled if the student
subsequently withdraws, or is withdrawn, from the course.
Makeup Time Policy
The College's make-up policy is as follows: make-up of any missed assignment is at the discretion of the instructor. It is
the student's responsibility to maintain contact with the instructor when absences occur. The instructor reserves the right to
require documentation for absences.
Independent Study
From time to time it may be necessary to offer a course on an Independent Study basis. Independent Study is defined as a
course that meets all criteria of accreditation standards. However, it may be offered at times which do not conform to the
standard academic class schedule for the term. Courses will only be offered in this manner at the sole discretion of the
College administration.
Repeated Courses
A student must repeat and pass all courses failed or dropped. A course must be successfully completed as the program
defines Course Passed within three attempts, or the student is subject to dismissal from the College. For grade point
30
average calculation purposes, when a student repeats a course, the repeat grade will count in the grade point average
calculation for the quarter and will replace the original grade in the cumulative grade point average calculation. It is
important to note that while students are allowed to repeat a course under certain circumstances, if the repeat grade is
lower than the original grade, the repeat grade is still the grade counted in the quarter grade point average calculation and
in the cumulative grade point calculation. Repeated courses will be calculated when determining the program’s maximum
timeframe and the incremental completion rate. If students desire the repeat of the course to be calculated as the
replacement of the original grade, then the student must repeat the failed course at the Brown Mackie College location
where the course was originally taken.
A student enrolled in an allied health program (Medical Assisting, Nursing, , Occupational Therapy Assistant, , Surgical
Technology, or Veterinary Technology) will be dismissed from that program if he or she requires more than two attempts
to successfully complete a course in Allied Health (ALH), Biology (BI), Health Sciences (HSC), Medical Education (ME),
Nursing (NU, NUR, PN), Pharmacy (PH, PHR), Occupational Therapy (OT, OTA), Surgical Technology (MD), or
Veterinary Technology (ANH, VT). In the Nursing program, a student will be dismissed if they attempt any three
different concentration courses and do not successfully pass. An unsuccessful attempt of a course is indicated by a
grade of F, NPG, W, or WF.
Program Changes
Request for a change of program must be made through the Office of the Registrar, and the request must be approved by
the Academic Affairs Office. Approval is based upon an evaluation of the student’s career objectives, attendance, and
previous academic achievement. Students are advised that a change of program may involve a reevaluation of courses
already completed, including courses transferred from other institutions, in order to determine the applicability of these
courses to the new program. A change of program does not necessarily exclude courses already attempted from the
application of Standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress, and may extend the student’s date of graduation.
A student who wishes to change programs must be advised by the dean of academic affairs (or designated faculty) of the
new program before submitting an application for program change to the Office of the Registrar. No more than one
program change will be approved for a student.
Definition of a Quarter Credit Hour
Course crediting is based upon the number of lecture, laboratory, and/or externship hours provided in the contact hours of
each course. A contact hour is defined as 50 minutes of instruction in a 60-minute period. 1 quarter credit hour is awarded
for each:
• At least 10 contact hours of lecture (instruction in theory and principles)
• 20 contact hours of laboratory (supervised application of knowledge and skills learned)
• 30 or 40 contact hours of externship (supervised field experience), depending on the requirements
of the student’s program
Each quarter is 12 weeks in length.
Definition of an Academic Year
An Academic Year is defined as three (3) quarters in which courses are attempted in each quarter.
Credit Hour Determination and Outside Work Expectations
Students can expect at least 10 hours of instructional engagement for every 1 quarter credit hour of a course. Instructional
engagement activities include lectures, presentations, discussions, group-work, directed laboratory work under the
supervision of faculty, and other activities that would normally occur during class time with the faculty. Instructional
engagement activities may occur in a face-to-face meeting on campus, or in the eClassroom.
In addition to instructional engagement, students can expect to complete 20 hours of outside work for every 1 quarter
credit hour of a course. Outside work includes, but is not limited to, preparing for and completing readings and
assignments; all research associated with completing assignments; working with others to complete a group project;
participating in tutorials, simulations and other electronic activities that are not a part of the classroom; attending
internships; attending externships; attending practica; attending fieldwork; attending clinical experiences; attending other
experiential opportunities, such as employer visits and field trips; and any other activities related to preparation for
instructional engagement.
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At least an equivalent amount of work as required in the paragraphs above shall be applied for other instructional
engagement activities as may be established by the institution in the future.
Grade Challenges
If a student wishes to challenge a course grade, he or she must do so within 28 calendar days after the final class meeting
of the course involved. A student may challenge a course grade which he or she believes to be inaccurate or improperly
assigned. In challenging a grade, the student must first appeal to the instructor who assigned the grade. If the instructor has
erred in computing the grade, or if the instructor’s grade is accurate but other than that reported to the student, the
instructor will inform the Office of the Registrar and the grade will be corrected. If the grade has been accurately
computed and recorded, and the student wishes to pursue the challenge, he or she must submit a written appeal,
accompanied by appropriate and relevant coursework and other documentation, to the Appeals Committee, which will
pursue the challenge with the appropriate faculty and issue a decision to the student and instructor involved. Students are
advised that collegiate faculty are permitted considerable latitude in determining their grading policies, provided that their
criteria for evaluating student work are compatible with course objectives, made clear to students, and applied equitably.
Grade Point Average
The grade point average represents the student’s quarterly or cumulative (overall) academic performance. The College
employs a conventional system of awarding quality points (from zero to four), based upon the course grades received by
the student.
A
AB+
B
B-
=
=
=
=
=
4
3.7
3.3
3
2.7
C+
C
D+
D
F
=
=
=
=
=
2.3
2
1.7
1
0
The student’s grade point average is computed as follows:
1. Each course grade is converted to the appropriate quality points.
2. The quality points for each grade are multiplied by the number of credit hours awarded by the course.
3. The products of the course quality points are added.
4. The number of quality points is divided by the number of computed credit hours attempted.
The illustration below provides an example of how a grade point average is determined:
Course
Grade
Credit
Hours
Quality
Points
Product
Principles of Accounting I
B+
4
x
3.3
=
13.2
Effective Public Speaking
A
4
x
4
=
16
Principles of Psychology
W
4
College Mathematics
D+
4
Computed Credit Hours Attempted
(not computed)
x
12
1.7
=
6.8
Quality Points 36.0
Grade point average = 36.0 (sum of quality points earned) divided by 12 (sum of computed credit hours attempted)
= 3.0 GPA
Graduation and Commencement Ceremony
A formal commencement ceremony is conducted at least once each year. Participants include all graduates in the time
period preceding the ceremony since the prior ceremony. Under certain circumstances, degree-candidates within 16
quarter credit hours or one (1) quarter of graduation may be eligible to participate in the Commencement Ceremony, and
should consult with campus personnel on their eligibility. Candidates seeking less than a degree are not eligible for this
consideration. No certificate representing the degree or diploma is ever issued before all requirements for graduation from
the program have been met. The College cannot ensure that a student will graduate on his or her anticipated date of
graduation. Actions and circumstances beyond the control of either the student or the College may result in obstacles
which are beyond the College’s power to resolve.
Graduation Requirements
32
To be eligible to graduate with a credential from the College the candidate for graduation must:
• Have successfully completed all courses required for the credential sought.
• Have satisfied the College’s residency requirement.
• Have earned all credits required by his or her program within the maximum program length (1.5 times the number of
credit hours in the program).
• Have a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.00.
The graduate’s official graduation date is the date that all of the above graduation requirements are met, and as posted in
the college’s student information system.
33
STANDARDS OF SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS
Undergraduate Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) Policy and Procedures
The Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy ensures that all students enrolled in certificate, diploma, and undergraduate degree
programs are maintaining satisfactory academic progress towards a successful completion of their academic programs. The
criteria and standards contained in this policy are set to recognize exemplary academic achievements or to detect problems for
which actions of early intervention and/or remediation can be taken. The Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy complies with
requirements of accrediting commission(s) along with federal regulatory guidelines.
A student must demonstrate satisfactory academic progress by successfully completing courses attempted. Completing courses
with C or better grades indicates academic progress. Receiving D or lower grades and/or withdrawing from classes may put
students at risk. Poor academic performance may lead to Academic/Financial Aid Warning and/or dismissal. It is very
important that students attend all registered courses and complete them successfully. Should a compelling reason arise that
requires a student to cease attendance, it is the student’s responsibility to immediately contact the Dean of Academic Affairs.
The following criteria are used to determine whether or not a student is making academic progress. A student must be able to:
• Maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average (CGPA);
• Achieve the minimum incremental completion rate (ICR); and
• Complete the program within a maximum allowable timeframe (MTF).
Students who fail to meet the minimum standards of any of the above criteria will be notified by letter by the Dean of
Academic Affairs within four (4) business days.
Administrative actions will be taken when a student fails to meet the minimum standards of any of the above criteria. If the
resulting action results in Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal, a student may appeal the Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal. If
the appeal is denied, the student will remain dismissed and can no longer attend or receive Title IV aid at Brown Mackie
College.
The Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy contains the following information:
• Criteria for Honors Designations
• Milestones and Evaluation Points for Satisfactory Academic Progress
• Procedure for Appealing Academic Financial Aid Dismissal
• Procedure to Apply for Re-Entry after Academic Financial Aid Dismissal
• Explanations of Related Issues
Failure to complete courses successfully for any reason may negatively affect satisfactory academic progress. Failing courses
or withdrawing from courses could result in the loss of financial aid and dismissal. In order for a student to graduate, the
minimum requirements are a CGPA of 2.0, 66.6% ICR, and completion of the program without attempting more than 150% of
the credits in the program. In order for a nursing student to graduate, the minimum requirements are a CGPA of 2.5, 66.6%
ICR, and completion of the program without attempting more than 150% of the credits in the program.
The entire period of a quarter is included in determining a student's Satisfactory Academic Progress. If a student does not
attend any part of an entire quarter (all three months), that entire quarter is not included in determining a student's
Satisfactory Academic Progress. While the terms Academic/Financial Aid Warning and Academic/Financial Aid
Dismissal are used, the status applies to all students whether receiving aid or not.
The College has the right to modify the Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy at any time.
Criteria for Honors Designations
To promote academic excellence and to recognize exemplary academic achievement, the following system is recommended for
honor designations on a quarter basis and upon graduation.
Quarter Honors Designations (at the completion of a quarter)
Any student who enrolls for and completes 12 credits or more is eligible for the following designations:
Quarter GPA
Honors Designation
4.0
President’s List
3.60-3.99
Dean’s List
34
3.25-3.59
Honors
Honors Designation at Graduation
Students who achieve a CGPA of 3.5 or better are designated as Honor Graduates.
Transitional studies classes are not considered when evaluating honors designations.
Milestones and Evaluation Points for Satisfactory Academic Progress
Compliance with Standards of Academic Progress is reviewed every quarter for all Certificate, Diploma, and Degree programs.
Certificate and Diploma Programs:
1. At the end of the first quarter, students must attain a minimum CGPA of 1.0 and an ICR of 33.3%. Anything below these
milestones will result in Academic/Financial Aid Warning for one quarter. Students who are only participating in transitional
study courses are considered to be maintaining SAP.
Nursing students must achieve a minimum CGPA of 1.50 and have an ICR of 33.3%.
2. At the end of the second quarter, students must attain a minimum CGPA of 1.5 and an ICR of 66.6%. Anything below these
milestones will result in Academic/Financial Aid Warning for one quarter unless the student was on Academic/Financial Aid
Warning in his or her previous term. If the student was on Academic/Financial Aid Warning in the previous term, the student will
will result in Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal. Students who are only participating in transitional study courses are considered
to be maintaining SAP.
Nursing students must achieve a minimum CGPA of 1.75 and an ICR of 66.6%.
3. At the end of the third quarter, and every quarter thereafter, students must attain a minimum CGPA of 2.0 and an ICR of
66.6%. Anything below these milestones will result in Academic/Financial Aid Warning for one quarter unless the student was on
Academic/Financial Aid Warning in his or her previous term. If the student was on Academic/Financial Aid Warning in the
previous term, the result will be Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal.
Nursing students must achieve a minimum CGPA of 2.0 and an ICR of 66.6%.
4. Students may not attempt more than 150% of the credits in their programs; anything in excess of 150% of the credits will
result in Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal. Students are not allowed to appeal dismissals for violating the 150% Maximum
Time Frame.
5. Students should note that if they are on Academic/Financial Aid Warning, it will be very difficult to meet the minimum
requirements of the next evaluation point. Please consult with your academic advisor concerning your exact requirements.
6. Transitional Studies courses are based on the result of the academic assessment tool. Like any course, students must
successfully complete such courses in order to progress in the program. Transitional Studies course credits do not count towards
the total number of credits for graduation nor do they count in the CGPA. Additionally, the courses do not count in determining
the maximum time frame allowable to earn the degree and the incremental completion rate as attempted credits and, if successful,
earned credits.
7. Transitional Studies courses do have credit hours assigned to them for enrollment and tuition charging purposes. While
Transitional studies courses are not included in the CGPA, a student who attempts but does not pass or withdraws from the same
Transitional studies course three times, or in the case of an Occupational Therapy Assistant student, two times, is dismissed and
there is no right to appeal the termination.
8. Students on Academic/Financial Aid Warning are considered to be making progress toward meeting Satisfactory Academic
Progress and, if otherwise eligible may receive financial aid.
9. The grades, grade point average, cumulative data for all courses a student attempted at the Institution, as well as courses
successfully transferred in from prior postsecondary education, are available on the student portal for review. There is also an
indication if a student is on Academic/Financial Aid Warning, Academic/Financial Aid Probation, or on Academic/Financial
Aid Dismissal.
Unless otherwise noted, Academic/Financial Aid Dismissals can be appealed. Please see the Appeal Process below.
35
Unless otherwise noted, dismissals can be appealed. Please see the Appeal Process below.
Degree Programs:
Degree programs are evaluated after a student has attempted three quarters (including portions of a quarter). While grades,
GPAs and Incremental Completion Rates are made available at the end of a student’s quarter, they are informational only
except at evaluation points. Please note students may be alerted of their progress at any time and may be required to take
specific action.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
At the end of the first academic year (an academic year is three (3) quarters in which courses are attempted in each
quarter); students must achieve a minimum CGPA of 1.25 and an ICR of 50%. Anything below these milestones
will result in Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal.
Nursing students must achieve a minimum CGPA of 2.0 and an ICR of 66.6%.
At the end of the second academic year, students must attain a minimum CGPA of 2.0 and an ICR of 66.6%.
Anything below these milestones will result in Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal.
Nursing students must achieve a minimum CGPA of 2.5 and an ICR of 66.6%.
Starting the quarter after the sixth attempted quarter, and every quarter thereafter, students must attain a minimum
CGPA of 2.0 and an ICR of 66.6%.
Nursing students must achieve a minimum CGPA of 2.5 and an ICR of 66.6%.
Anything below these milestones will result in Academic/Financial Aid Warning for one quarter unless the student
was on Academic/Financial Aid Warning in his or her previous quarter. If the student was on Academic/Financial
Aid Warning in the previous quarter, the student will result in Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal.
Students may not attempt more than 150% of the credits in their programs; anything in excess of 150% of the
credits will result in Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal. Students are not allowed to appeal dismissals for violating
the 150% Maximum Time Frame.
Transitional studies courses are based on the result of the academic assessment tool. Like any course, students must
successfully complete such courses in order to progress in the program. Transitional studies course credits do not
count towards the total number of credits for graduation nor do they count in the CGPA. Additionally, the courses
do not count in determining the maximum time frame allowable to earn the degree and the incremental completion
rate as attempted credits and, if successful, earned credits.
Transitional studies courses do have credit hours assigned to them for enrollment and tuition charging purposes.
While Transitional studies courses are not included in the CGPA, a student who attempts but does not pass or
withdraws from the same Transitional studies course three times, or in the case of an Occupational Therapy
Assistant student two times, is dismissed and there is no right to appeal the dismissal.
The grades, grade point average, cumulative data for all courses a student attempted at the Institution, as well as
courses successfully transferred in from prior postsecondary education, are available on the student portal for
review. There is also an indication if a student is on Academic/Financial Aid Warning or Academic/Financial Aid
Probation or is on Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal.
Unless otherwise noted, Academic/Financial Aid Dismissals can be appealed. Please see the Appeal Process below.
A student enrolled in Transitional studies courses must be able to pass the same Transitional studies course after three
attempts, or in the case of an Occupational Therapy Assistant student two attempts, or that student will be academically
dismissed.
If the review of a student’s Satisfactory Academic Progress performed at any time indicates that it is mathematically
impossible to meet the minimum requirements of the Standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress policy at the next
mandatory check point, the student will result in Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal from the College.
A student will be dismissed if they attempt any course three times without passing it and there is not a right to appeal the
dismissal. In the Nursing program, a student will be dismissed if they attempt any three different concentration courses
and do not successfully pass and there is not a right to appeal the dismissal. An unsuccessful attempt of a course is
indicated by a grade of F, NPG, W, or WF.
In some programs, (Dental Assistant, Medical Assisting, Nursing, Pharmacy, Occupational Therapy Assistant, Physical
Therapist Assistant, Surgical Technology, or Veterinary Technology), a student will be dismissed from that program if he
or she requires more than two attempts to successfully complete a course in Allied Health (ALH), Biology (BI), Health
Sciences (HSC), Medical Education (ME), Nursing (NU, NUR, PN), Pharmacy (PH, PHR), Occupational Therapy (OT,
36
OTA), Physical Therapy (PT, PTA), Surgical Technology (MD), or Veterinary Technology (ANH, VT). An unsuccessful
attempt of a course is indicated by a grade of F, NPG, W, or WF.
To be removed from Academic/Financial Aid Warning or Academic/Financial Aid Probation, a student must meet the
Satisfactory Progress requirement at the applicable measuring point.
Procedure for Appealing Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal
A student who is dismissed for violating Satisfactory Academic Progress must appeal in writing to the Dean of Academic
Affairs for re-entry before the start of the quarter in which he/she wishes to return. The written appeal must state the
mitigating circumstances that contributed to the dismissal. The written appeal must be supported with appropriate
documentation of the mitigating circumstances with an explanation on how the circumstances have been remedied or
changed to ensure that he or she will be able to meet satisfactory academic progress if re-admitted.
The Dean of Academic Affairs or an Appeals Committee will review the student’s appeal and will determine within 14
business days of the date of the receipt of the appeal whether the circumstances and academic status warrant consideration
for re-admission. The student may be asked to appear in person during the review process when deemed necessary by the
Dean of Academic Affairs or the Appeals Committee. Upon the Appeals Committee decision, the student will be notified
by the Dean of Academic Affairs both verbally and in writing. The Appeals Committee decision will be final.
Following is a comprehensive list of events that indicate there may be a mitigating circumstance which has negatively
impacted academic progress:
п‚· Death of an immediate family member
п‚· Student illness requiring hospitalization (this includes mental health issues)
п‚· Illness of an immediate family member where the student is the primary caretaker
п‚· Illness of an immediate family member where the family member is the primary financial support
п‚· Abusive relationships
п‚· Divorce proceedings
п‚· Previously undocumented disability
п‚· Work-related transfer during the period
п‚· Change in work schedule during the period
п‚· Natural disaster
п‚· Family emergency
п‚· Financial hardship such as foreclosure or eviction
п‚· Loss of transportation where there are no alternative means of transportation
п‚· Documentation from a Professional Counselor
п‚· A doctor documented illness of the student for a significant period of time
п‚· Military deployment
A student who is granted an appeal is able to apply for re-entry and if otherwise eligible, receive financial aid; however,
the student will be placed on Academic/Financial Aid Probation at the start of the academic quarter. A student on
Academic/Financial Aid Probation may receive financial aid (if otherwise eligible).
The Dean of Academic Affairs is responsible for determining the appropriateness of the mitigating circumstance in regards
to severity, timing and duration of the mitigating circumstance, and the student’s ability to avoid the circumstance. Any
consideration of the conditions outside of the list provided should be discussed with the Brown Mackie College Vice
President of Academic Operations. Student life issues and making the transition to college are not considered mitigating
circumstances under this policy since students have at least two quarters to adjust to college life.
Documentation from a professional counselor should not breach the student/counselor relationship and should remain
confidential. A memorandum or letter on school or organizational letterhead indicating a counselor’s opinion that the
student issues may be accommodated to ensure that the student will be able to meet Satisfactory Academic Progress will
suffice as proof of mitigating circumstances as well as documentation that the student’s circumstances have been remedied
or changed to ensure that the student will be able to meet Satisfactory Academic Progress with the accommodations from
the institution.
Academic Advisors, Registrars, and/or Academic Department Chairs/Program Directors must document and maintain as
part of the appeals process a concrete plan for how a student will complete his remaining coursework by the next
measurement point as well as how the student’s progression will be monitored. The Academic Plan must detail specific
time frames and student success measures and for Degree Programs can be for up to two quarters. This plan must be
reviewed at least on a monthly basis with the student to ensure that designated academic plan is being met and the student
is on track to meeting the approved extended timeframe. Failure to meet the established goals approved in the appeal will
37
result in dismissal.
A student denied an appeal must sit out one year before being eligible to apply for re-entry. Also, any student who ceased
attendance and whose grades in the last quarter of attendance caused him or her to not meet the minimum standards of the
academic/financial aid progress must go through the same appeal process. The appeal procedure described in the
preceding section applies. The student must demonstrate resolution to any mitigating circumstances and demonstrate that
he or she will be able to meet satisfactory academic progress if re-admitted.
If the appeal is granted, the re-entering student will be placed on Academic/Financial Aid Probation at the start of their
quarter of return. The student must meet the standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress by the end of his or her first
quarter if in a diploma program and second quarter if in a degree program (but only if there is a documented Academic
Plan) to continue in the program. The student may be asked to retake courses previously failed in order to raise both the
CPGA and ICR. If a student was initially denied a re-entry appeal and sit out one year, before attempting to re-enter the
student must submit a second appeal for consideration for re-entry. If the second re-entry appeal is denied, no additional
appeals may be allowed and the student is permanently academically dismissed.
Upon the Appeals Committee decision, the student is notified by the Dean of Academic Affairs both verbally and in
writing. The Appeals Committee decision will be final.
Academic/Financial Aid Dismissal Appeals not Allowed
Students are not allowed to appeal dismissals for violating the 150% Maximum Time Frame.
A student who attempts but does not pass the same Transitional studies course three times, or in the case of an
Occupational Therapy Assistant student two times, is dismissed and there is not a right to appeal the dismissal.
A student will be dismissed if they attempt any course three times without passing it and there is not a right to appeal the
dismissal.
In the Nursing program, a student will be dismissed if they attempt any three different concentration courses and do not
successfully pass and there is not a right to appeal the dismissal.
Explanations of Related Issues
Calculation of CGPA
A student’s cumulative grade point average is calculated by a) Multiplying credits for each course by grade points
associated with the grade earned; b) Totaling the grade points earned for all the courses, and c) Dividing total grade points
earned by the total number of quality credits. Most Brown Mackie College schools use a 4.0 scale in assigning grade
points.
Transitional Studies Courses
Many Brown Mackie College schools require academic assessments. Depending on assessment scores, students may be
required to take Transitional studies courses. Students must successfully complete such courses in order to progress in the
program. Transitional studies course credits do not count towards the total number of credits for graduation nor do they
count in the CGPA. Additionally, they do not count in determining the maximum timeframe and the incremental
completion rate.
While Transitional studies course(s) are not included in the CGPA, each individual Transitional Studies course may be
attempted no more than three times, or in the case of an Occupational Therapy student two times. Failure to pass the
courses within the attempts permitted will result in dismissal from the College and there is no right to appeal the dismissal.
Repeated Courses and Grades
As courses are retaken, only the most recent attempt will count in the GPA/CGPA. All attempts are included in the credit
hours attempted for the purposes of calculating the Incremental Completion Rate (ICR). Withdrawn and failing grades are
included in the maximum allowable timeframe and incremental completion rate as credit hours attempted but not earned.
The grade Incomplete (I) and is calculated as if it is an F for CGPA and ICR purposes until it is changed to another grade
and the course will be included as credits attempted but not credits earned.
A student will be dismissed if they attempt any course three times without passing it and there is not a right to appeal the
dismissal. In the Nursing program, a student will be dismissed if they attempt any three different concentration courses
and do not successfully pass and there is not a right to appeal the dismissal. An unsuccessful attempt of a course is
indicated by a grade of F, NPG, W, or WF.
In some programs, (Dental Assistant, Medical Assisting, Nursing, Pharmacy, Occupational Therapy Assistant, Physical
Therapist Assistant, Surgical Technology, or Veterinary Technology), a student will be dismissed from that program if he
or she requires more than two attempts to successfully complete a course in Allied Health (ALH), Biology (BI), Health
38
Sciences (HSC), Medical Education (ME), Nursing (NU, NUR, PN), Pharmacy (PH, PHR), Occupational Therapy (OT,
OTA), Physical Therapy (PT, PTA), Surgical Technology (MD), or Veterinary Technology (ANH, VT). An unsuccessful
attempt of a course is indicated by a grade of F, NPG, W, or WF.
Remediation of Academic Deficiencies
It is strongly recommended that any student with withdrawn or failing grades register for the same course(s) in the
subsequent quarter to improve academic performance.
Transfer Credits
Credits from transfer courses are calculated in the maximum allowable credits and Incremental Completion Rate
requirements as credits attempted and credits earned.
Grades for credits transferred from any postsecondary institution will be recorded as Transfer Credit (TR) and will not be
calculated in the student’s CGPA. Grades from courses taken in a program within the Brown Mackie Colleges, if
applicable to a transfer program, will be recorded as earned credit and will be calculated in the student’s CGPA.
In cases in which a student has graduated from one program then subsequently begins work in a different program, grades
earned in the first program, if applicable to the new program, will be recorded as earned and will affect the student’s new
program CGPA calculation but will be included in the Incremental Completion Rate as credits attempted and credits
earned.
Change of Program
Students will be allowed one change of program. Changing from a day program to an evening program of the same major
is not considered a change of major. Changing from an associate’s program to a bachelor’s program in the same major is
not considered a change of major. Courses that apply to the second major will be recorded as earned credit and will affect
the student’ CGPA and will be included as attempted and completed hours. Students who change programs must sign a
new program enrollment agreement which must be filed in the student’s academic file. Note: If a student is at the point of
dismissal for Satisfactory Academic Progress in the first major, that student must be put on Academic/Financial Aid
Dismissal, appeal the dismissal, have the appeal granted based on mitigating circumstances before transferring to the new
major. Under no circumstances can a request to change majors circumvent a dismissal of Satisfactory Academic Progress.
When a student has graduated from Brown Mackie College in one program, then subsequently begins work in another
program, grades used in the CGPA of the previous program, if applicable to the new program, will be recorded as grades
earned and will be applied to the student’s new program CGPA calculation and Incremental Completion Rate.
Transfers
A student must be maintaining Satisfactory Academic Progress in order to be allowed the opportunity of transferring from
one program to another or from one school or campus to another. A student who has is on Academic/Financial Aid
Dismissal and wishes to transfer to another Brown Mackie College school must appeal his/her Academic/Financial Aid
Dismissal at the originating school and receive reinstatement prior to the transfer.
Grading System
At the conclusion of each course in the program, the student receives a report of his or her grade(s) for the course(s) just
completed. These grades are entered also in the student’s academic transcript, which is updated each quarter. The criteria
for determining a student’s grade shall be as follows (on a percentage of total point basis):
Percentage
Quality Points
Grade
Description
Breakdown
per Credit Hr
A
Superior achievement
95-100
4.0
A90-94
3.7
B+
Commendable achievement
87-89
3.3
B
83-86
3.0
B80-82
2.7
C+
Satisfactory achievement
76-79
2.3
C
70-75
2.0
D+
Passing but less than
satisfactory achievement
65-69
1.7
D
60-64
1.0
F
Unacceptable achievement
59 or below
0
39
I
W
WF
TR
PR
AU
PG
NPG
CR
TO
Incomplete coursework
Computed as F in GPA
Withdrawn, without penalty
Not computed
Withdrawn, with penalty
0
Credit granted through transfer
Not computed
Credit granted through other sources (proficiency)Not computed
Course audited—no credit awarded
Not computed
Progress (Transitional studies courses only)
Not computed
No Progress (Transitional studies courses only)
Not computed
Credit granted through test out
Not computed
Test Out (Transitional studies courses only)
Not computed
In allied health programs, courses that have the following designation ALH, ANH, BI, HSC, MD, ME, PH, PHR, and VT
the grade of C is the lowest passing grade and the grades of D+ and D are not awarded. In courses that have the
designation of NU, NUR, or PN the grade of B- is the lowest passing grade and the grades of C+, C, D+ and D are not
awarded.
Students enrolled in nursing programs must successfully complete the didactic, laboratory and clinical components of the
course to pass (NU, NUR, PN prefix). Nursing students must pass each nursing course in their program with a minimum
grade of 80%. Laboratory and clinical components will be graded as satisfactory (pass) or unsatisfactory (fail). Students
must complete the laboratory/clinical component of the course with a satisfactory (pass) grade. Failure to obtain a passing
score in one or more components (didactic, laboratory and/or clinical) requires that the student repeat the entire course and
not just the failed component.
A student enrolled in an allied health program (Dental Assistant, Medical Assisting, Nursing, Pharmacy, Occupational
Therapy Assistant, Physical Therapist Assistant, Surgical Technology, or Veterinary Technology) will be dismissed from
that program if he or she requires more than two attempts to successfully complete a course in Allied Health (ALH),
Biology (BI), Health Sciences (HSC), Medical Education (ME), Nursing (NU, NUR, PN), Pharmacy (PH, PHR),
Occupational Therapy (OT, OTA) Physical Therapy (PT, PTA), Surgical Technology (MD), or Veterinary Technology
(ANH, VT). In the Nursing program, a student will be dismissed if they attempt any three different concentration courses
and do not successfully pass. An unsuccessful attempt of a course is indicated by a grade of F, NPG, W, or WF.
In those courses restricted to the Occupational Therapy Assistant (OT, OTA prefix) and Physical Therapy Assistant (PT,
PTA prefix) programs the grading system is as follows:
Grading System for Occupational Therapy Assistant and Physical Therapy Assistant Programs
Percentage
Quality Points
Grade
Description
Breakdown
per Credit Hour
A
Superior achievement
93–100
4.0
B
Commendable achievement
85–92
3.0
C
Satisfactory achievement
77–84
2.0
F
Unacceptable achievement
below 77
0.0
I
Incomplete course work
Computed as F in GPA
IP
In progress
Not Computed
P
Pass
Not Computed
NP
No Pass
Not Computed
The grades of Pass (P) and No Pass (NP) are included in the maximum allowable timeframe and incremental completion rate.
The grade of In Progress (IP) is not included in the maximum allowable timeframe and incremental completion rate.
40
Student Withdrawal
The student may officially withdraw from school by notifying the Office of the Registrar in writing or in person. The
termination date will be the student’s last date of attendance. The refund policies outlined above shall apply in the event
that a student withdraws, is suspended or is terminated from school.
After the student has finished his or her FIRST quarter of enrollment, he or she may qualify for Voluntary Intent to
Continue status. Students who are in the first or second course of their quarter and are administratively dropped from their
current course(s) but intend to return in the same quarter must have a Voluntary Intent to Continue form on file or will be
considered withdrawn from Brown Mackie College. Students will have four business days from their date of determination
to file the Voluntary Intent to Continue form that states he/she will return within the same quarter. Students who do not
have a Voluntary Intent to Continue form on file after the fourth business day are dropped from all their courses and will
be administratively withdrawn from the college. Students who do not intend to return in the same quarter are not eligible
for Voluntary Intent to Continue and will be administratively withdrawn from Brown Mackie College. To indicate
Voluntary Intent to Continue, a student must contact the Office of the Registrar to complete the required Voluntary Intent
to Continue form and receive approval.
A student who withdraws from a course within the first two weeks of that course receives a Withdrawn, without penalty
(W) grade for the course. After the first two weeks, withdrawal incurs a W or a Withdrawn, with penalty (WF) grade,
depending upon the instructor’s evaluation of the student’s achievement to the point of the student’s last date of
attendance. Withdrawal from a fundamental course incurs a grade of W regardless of the student’s last date of attendance.
To withdraw from a program, a student must notify the Office of the Registrar. Every course for which a student receives
an “F” or a “W” grade/code must be repeated and completed with a passing grade in order to graduate. The original
grade/code and the subsequent passing grade(s) will remain on the record for reference purposes. However, when a course
is successfully repeated, only the passing grade will be computed in the grade point average. Tuition is charged for
repeated courses.
When a final course grade has been established and recorded in the student record, the grade may not be changed
without approval by the Academic Director or Chair and the Dean of Academic Affairs. Withdrawals and failed
courses can affect the student’s Incremental Completion Rate and ability to succeed.
41
FACULTY Brown Mackie College — Salina
Vanessa Davis-Warner
Ed.D, MS, BS
Nova Southeastern University
Dean of Academic Affairs
Lynda Linder MLS
Emporia State University
Librarian
General Education
Ann Knowles, BS, MS
Kansas State University
Chair, General Education & General
Studies
Peggy DeBey, MS
Fort Hays State University
Linda Diehl, BA, MBA
Kansas Wesleyan University
Jerold Gaines, BS
Kansas State University
David Goodwin, MS
Fort Hays State University
Evelyn Hyde, BS, MS
Kansa State University
Kerry Parks, BS
Northrup University
Rebecca Patrick, MA
Fort Hays State University
Gene Petersen Beard
MS Ed, MS
University of South Carolina
Steve Pope, BS, RN
Fort Hays State University
Basil Price, MS
Kansas State University
Olga Silverman, MS
University of Latvia
Monty Parker, BS, MBA
Fort Hays State University
Webster University
Southern Illinois University
Technology
Monti Frank, MCP, MCSA, MCSE,
MCT, Network +, and CTT
Brown Mackie College
Chair, Technology
Frank Nelson, BS, MS
Argosy University
Allied Health
Lesa Dunn, BS, MS Ed.
Baylor University
Chair, Allied Health
Gary Husted, BS, MS
San Diego State University
Patricia Frazier, BA
Wichita State University
Bill Govreau, BS
Stephens College
Jeanne Heki, RN
University of Nevada, Las Vegas
BlasГ© Sibilla, DPM
California College of Podiatric Medicine
Susan Sweeney, BSN, BLS, ACLS,
PALS, BSN
Marymount College
Nursing
Linda Henningsen, MSN, MS, RN
South University Online
Nurse Administrator
Paula Berg, RN, BSN
Pittsburg State University
Pauline Howell, MSN, RN
South University Online
West Texas State University
Andrea Picklesimer, MSN, RN
South University
Janeane Houchin, MSN, RN
South University
Keri Bell, MSN, APRN, NP-C, RN
Fort Hays State University
Christina Rudacille BSN, RN
University of Phoenix
Sara Rasco RN, AAS
Brown Mackie College
Legal Studies
David Forristal, BS, PhD
Kansas State University
Chair, Legal Studies
M. Joseph Kuhn, BS, MS, JD
Washburn University
Occupational Therapy
Joan Soltis, MBA, BS, RT
Walden University
College of St. Catherine
Gloria Custer, AAS, COTA
Barton County College
Gwen Fox, MA, BS, COTA
Ashford University
University of Phoenix
Veterinary Technology
Jan Grace, MS, RVT
Baker University
Chair, Veterinary Technology
Callie Rost, DVM
Kansas State University
Jessica Braun, BS, DVM
Iowa State University
Alicia Smith, BS, DVM
Kansas State University
Curtis Stevens, PhD
Wichita State University
Charity Miller, RN
Kansas Wesleyan University
Christa Johnson, RVT, AAS
Brown Mackie College
Business
Phyllis Ross, BS, MBA
Kansas Wesleyan University
Chair, Business
Kathy Sweeney, RN, BSN
Kansas Wesleyan University
Welding
Kevin Knitter, BS
Pittsburg State University
Janelle Thiel, RN, BSN
University of Kansas
42
FACULTY Brown Mackie College — Kansas City
Cass Butler, PhD
Saint Louis University
Dean of Academic Affairs
Tara Bradshaw, BA, MISLT
University of Missouri
Library Director
General Education
Janet Conner, BA, MA
University of Missouri – Kansas City
Chair, General Education
Kevin Michael, BS, MA
University of Kansas
Donald Cripps BS, MA
University of Central Missouri
Allied Health
David Noll, BS, MD
University of Kansas
Steven Benz, III, BS
University of Kansas
Virginia Walker, BS, DC
Cleveland Chiropractic College
Tim Doerr, BA
Ashford University
Julie Smith, BA, MA, PhD
University of Kansas
Harvenia Gates, CCS
Concorde Career College
Pamela Smits, MA
Truman University
Melissa Halsted, BS, MA, PhD
Capella University
Mark Knapp, BSEd, MSEd, EdS, EdD
Northern Illinois University
Darlene Kocher, RMA
Ross Medical Center
John Comstock BS, MS
Emporia State University
Robin Coombs, BS
Brigham Young University
David Brackey BS, MS
University of Kansas
Nursing
Mary Ann Eickhoff, RN, BSN, MSN
University of Phoenix
Director of Nursing
Mark Antkowicz BS, MS
Texas A&M University
Melinda DiGirolamo BS, MS
University of Missouri at Kansas City
Amanda Kulp BA, MA
Columbia College
Rebecca Matthews, BA, MA
Mercy College
Janet Summers, BS
Central Missouri State University
Nicole Wick, BA, MFA
National University
Business
Patricia Lee, BS, MBA
Friends University
Thomas Moore, BS, MS
Brigham Young University
Linda Richards, EMT, AA, BSN
Kansas City, Kansas Community
College
Rosetta Bard, RN, BSN
Avila College
Megan Broom RN, MSN, CEN
University of Mary
Megan Randle-Robinson, RN, BSN
University of Phoenix
Chrissy Palomba, MBA, MSN
University of Mary
Jeannette Whalen, RN, MSN
University of Kansas
Deb Rodman, RN, BSN, MA
University of Missouri at Kansas City
Scott Keller-Turbeville BSE
Vanderbilt University
Legal Studies
Jonni Allen, BS, MS, JD
Washburn University
Joe Moore BA, MS
Emporia State University
Linda Gollub, JD
University of Missouri
43
Charles Boyd, BA, JD
Mississippi College School of Law
Richard Gooch, BS, MS
University of Central Missouri
Occupational Therapy
Alyson Denton, BA, MS, OTR
Rockhurst University
Chair, Occupational Therapy
Heather Knoeferl, BS, OTR
Pacific University
Allora Nutter, BS, MOT
University of Kansas
Veterinary Technology
Kerry Coombs, AA, BS, DVM
Colorado State University
Chair, Veterinary Technology
Gregory Harvey, RVT, AA
Maple Woods Community College
Natalie McDonald, RVT, AAS, BS
Kansas State University
Amber Andrews, BS, DVM
Kansas State University
Rana Barber BS, DVM
University of Missouri
Lindsey Crawford, BS, DVM
Kansas State University
Surgical Technology
Andrea Winslow, BS, CST
Georgia State University
Chair, Surgical Technology
FACULTY Brown Mackie College — Oklahoma City
Michael Lowder, MLIS
University of Oklahoma
Librarian
Business
Eddie Schmitz, BA, BS, MBA, CPA
Eastern University
General Education
Rebekah Davis, M. Ed, BA
Oklahoma City University
Todd Wheeler, BS
Excelsior College
Maggie Green, MSW
Wichita State University
Hsiu-Ling (Renny) Huang, BS, MBA
Oklahoma City University
Schlunda Leslie, MA
Webster University
Cheryl Lovett, BS, MS,PhD
University of Oklahoma
Amy Post-McCorkle BA, MA, PhD
University of Oklahoma
Asal Salmation, MS
Oklahoma City University
James Smash, BA, MS, PhD
University of Kentucky
Nancy Tool, BS, MS
University of Oklahoma
Shari Zimmerman, BA, M.Ed, PhD
Oklahoma State University
Stephanie Zeigler, MA
Mid-America Christen University
Jerryme Mitchell, BA, MSA
University of Phoenix
Kenneth Sullivan,BS, MS
Oklahoma State University
Angela Perry, BS, MS
Southern Nazarene University
Lynda Bennick, MBA
Keller Graduate School of Management
Allied Health
Wendi Jakubiak MSN, RN, CNE
Regis University
Program Administrator- RN Program
Consultant
Malena Keeth, BS, DoC
Cleveland Chiropractic College
Legal Studies
Joelle Fehlauer Moaning
BA, JD
University of Oklahoma
Garland Floyd, BA
Fisk University
Mitzy Fryer, BS, JD
Oklahoma City University
Michael McMahan, BA, JD
University of Oklahoma
Occupational Therapy
Tiffany Traxler-Simmons, COTA, BS
Mid American Christian University
Colby Livingstone, BS, MA
Western Michigan University
44
STUDENT SERVICES AND REGULATIONS
Tutoring
The College has designed its class scheduling to leave Wednesdays and Fridays available for tutoring by faculty at no
additional charge. Participation in Friday tutoring sessions may be required of students as part of their course assignments.
Student tutors are also available for many courses. However, students should not expect tutoring to be available for every
course or for every term. It is the student’s responsibility to complete the program independently with tutoring limited to
an appropriate level of ancillary support. A designated faculty member coordinates all tutoring resources at each Brown
Mackie College location that offers this service. Students interested in tutoring should contact the Academic Affairs Office
for further information.
Advising
Student advisors and/or faculty are available to assist students with academic, personal, and employment issues which may
be distracting them from successful pursuit of their courses. The student advisor and/or faculty member works closely with
faculty, staff, and administration to assist students in finding solutions to such issues, and can also direct students to
appropriate community resources. The student advisor and/or faculty member also assist in organizing College-approved
events for both students and employees.
Career Services
The Office of Career Services assists graduates in seeking entry into careers in their fields of education and training. The
Career Services staff works with students prior to graduation to determine areas of employment interest and to explore
employment options. Students are notified of appropriate opportunities as these occur. Although the College does not
guarantee employment to any graduate, the Office of Career Services works to provide employment leads and to help
graduates seek interviews for appropriate employment. Students seeking part-time employment are also assisted by the
office, which interviews and screens students in advance, and arranges interviews between employers and students when
employment opportunities occur. Students are then expected to take the initiative in pursuing the employment process.
Career Services assistance is most effective when there is cooperation between the graduating student and the Office of
Career Services. To this end, it is the student’s responsibility to do the following:
• Understand that the College cannot and does not guarantee the employment of any graduate, and that obtaining
employment is ultimately the graduate’s responsibility. While the Office of Career Services will assist all graduates in
good standing, graduates should independently pursue entry-level employment opportunities and not rely solely on the
efforts of the office.
• Complete all paperwork required by the office and keep the office apprised of any changes in personal or employment
information.
• Attend workshops and training sessions as these become available. Attendance at these sessions will assist students in
preparing rГ©sumГ©s, cover letters, and applications, and will provide information concerning interviewing techniques.
• Attend career conferences as requested by the Office of Career Services. These meetings enable the staff to better assess
the career goals and needs of each student.
• Begin addressing practical concerns immediately. These include such issues as child care, transportation, and wardrobe.
Professional Appearance
Appearance is an important indication of professionalism. Some educational programs have specific dress requirements.
The College reserves the right to advise any student that his or her appearance is immodest, offensive, or otherwise
distracting in the educational environment, and to require the student to take immediate steps to comply with reasonable
expectations. Refusal to observe reasonable decorum in appearance may be cause for disciplinary action.
College Store
Each Brown Mackie College location has a college store that stocks iPads, courseware, and other educational supplies
required for courses at the College. Students will also find a variety of personal, recreational, and gift items, including
apparel, supplies, and general merchandise incorporating the College logo. Hours are posted at the College store entrance.
45
Transcripts and Diplomas
The academic transcript provides a record of every course which the student has attempted and indicates any credential
earned at the College. A sealed, dated, and signed copy of this record constitutes an official transcript, which may be
ordered for a $5.00 fee. Official transcripts will not be issued to, or on behalf of, students who have not satisfied their
financial obligations to the College. The student’s written authorization is required for the College to release an official
transcript.
Student Right-to-Know Statement
According to regulations published by the Department of Education based on the Student Right-to-Know Act, the
graduation/completion rates for first-time, full-time students who entered school and graduated/completed within 150% of
the normal time to complete the program, as published in the catalog must be made available to current and prospective
students. You may obtain this information in the Admissions Office.
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, as amended (“FERPA”) sets out requirements designed to afford
students certain rights with respect to their education records. In addition, it puts limits on what information the College
may disclose to third parties without receiving prior written consent from the student.
I.
Procedure to Inspect Education Records
Students have the right under FERPA to inspect and review their education records. A student who wishes to inspect and
review his/her records should submit a written request to the College president. The request should identify as precisely as
possible the records the student wishes to inspect. If the requested records are subject to inspection and review by the
student, arrangements for access will be made within a reasonable period of time but in no case more than 45 days after
the request was made, and the student will be notified of the time and place where the records may be inspected. The
College may require the presence of a College official during the inspection and review of a student’s records.
Certain limitations exist on a student’s right to inspect and review their own education records. Those limitations include,
for example, the following: (i) financial information submitted by parents; (ii) confidential letters and recommendations
placed in their files prior to January 1, 1975; (iii) confidential letters and recommendations placed in their files after
January 1, 1975 to which the student has waived his or her right to inspect and review and that are related to the student’s
admission, application for employment or job placement, or receipt of honors. In addition, the term “education record”
does not include certain types of records such as, by way of example, records of instructional, supervisory, administrative,
and certain educational personnel that are in the sole possession of the maker thereof, and are not accessible or revealed to
any other individual except a substitute.
When a record contains personally identifiable information about more than one student, the student may inspect and
review only the information that relates to him/her personally.
II. Disclosure of Education Records
The College generally will not permit disclosure of personally identifiable information from the records of a student
without prior written consent of the student. Personally identifiable information is disclosed (some items are mandatory,
some discretionary) from the records of a student without that student’s prior written consent to the following individuals
or institutions or in the following circumstances:
1. To College officials who have been determined by the school to have legitimate educational interests in the records. A
school official is:
a. person employed by the school or its corporate parent in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or
support staff position. This includes, but is not limited to human resources and accounting staff for purposes of the
tuition reimbursement plan; or
b. a person employed by or under contract to the school to perform specific tasks, such as an auditor, consultant, or
attorney, a person on the Board of Trustees, or a student serving on an official committee or assisting another school
official.
c. any school official who needs information about a student in the course of performing instructional, supervisory,
advisory, or administrative duties for the College has a legitimate educational interest.
46
2.
To certain officials of the United States Department of Education, the Comptroller General of the United States, the
Attorney General of the United States, and state and local educational authorities in connection with state or federally
supported educational programs.
3.
In connection with the student’s request for, or receipt of, financial aid necessary to determine the eligibility, amounts
or conditions of financial aid, or to enforce the terms and conditions of the aid.
4.
To organizations conducting certain studies for or on behalf of the school.
5.
To accrediting commissions or state licensing or regulatory bodies to carry out their functions.
6.
To parents of a dependent student, as defined in Section 152 of the Internal Revenue Code.
7.
To comply with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena.
8.
To appropriate parties in health or safety emergencies.
9.
To officials of another College or the Brown Mackie College system of schools, upon request, in which a student
seeks or intends to enroll.
10. To an alleged victim of a crime of violence or a nonforcible sexual offense, the final results of the disciplinary
proceedings conducted by the school against the alleged perpetrator of that crime or offense with respect to that crime
or offense.
11. To persons in addition to the victim of a crime of violence or nonforcible sexual offense, the final results of the
disciplinary proceedings described in paragraph 10 above but only if the school has determined that a student is the
perpetrator of a crime of violence or non-forcible sexual offense, and with respect to the allegation made against him
or her, the student has committed a violation of the institution’s rules or policies. [The school, in such instances, may
only disclose the name of the perpetrator — not the name of any other student, including a victim or witness —
without the prior written consent of the other student(s).]
12. To a parent regarding the student’s violation of any federal, state, or local law or of any rules or policy of the school
governing the use or possession of alcohol or a controlled substance if the school determines that the student has
committed a disciplinary violation with respect to that use or possession, and the student is under 21 at the time of the
disclosure to the parent.
13. Directory information (see Section IV below).
14. Student Recruiting Information as requested by the U.S. Military. Student recruiting information includes ONLY:
name, address, telephone listing, age or date of birth, class level, academic major, place of birth, degrees received and
most recent educational institution attended. It does not include and the College will not provide: social security
numbers, race, ethnicity, nationality, GPA, grades, low performing student lists, religious affiliation, students with
loans in default, veteran’s status, students no longer enrolled. Students who opt out of the directory also opt out of
student recruiting information.
III. Record of Requests for Disclosure
Except with respect to those requests made by the student themselves, those disclosures made with the written consent of
the student, or to requests by or disclosures to College officials with legitimate educational interests and disclosures of
directory information (or other exceptions described in the applicable regulations), the College will maintain a record
indicating the parties who have requested or obtained personally identifiable information from a student's education
records and the legitimate interests those parties had in requesting or obtaining the information. This record may be
inspected by the student.
IV. Directory Information
The College designates the following information as directory information. (Directory information is personally
identifiable information which may be disclosed without the student’s consent):
1. Student’s name
2.
Address: Local, email, and Web site
3.
Telephone number (local)
4.
Date and place of birth
5.
Program of study
6.
Participation in officially recognized activities
7.
Dates of attendance
47
8.
Degrees and certificates awarded
9.
Most recent previously attended school
10. Photograph of the student, if available
11. Enrollment status (i.e., enrolled, continuing, future enrolled student, re-entry, etc.)
12. Student honors and awards received.
13. The height and weight of athletic team members
Notice of these categories and of the right of an individual in attendance at the College to request that his/her directory
information be kept confidential will be given to the student annually. Students may request nondisclosure of student
directory information by specifying nondisclosure, in writing, to the Office of the Registrar, Brown Mackie College —
Salina, Brown Mackie College — Kansas City, or Brown Mackie College — Oklahoma City. Failure to request
nondisclosure of directory information will result in routine disclosure of one or more of the above-designated categories
of personally identifiable directory information.
V. Correction of Education Records
Students have the right under FERPA to ask to have records corrected which they believe are inaccurate, misleading, or in
violation of their privacy rights. The following are the procedures for the correction of records:
1.
A student must ask the Registrar to amend a record. As part of the request, the student should identify the part of the
record they want to have changed and specify why they believe it to be inaccurate, misleading, or in violation of
his/her privacy rights.
2.
The College may either amend the record or decide not to amend the record. If it decides not to amend the record, it
will notify the student of its decision and advise the student of the right to a hearing to challenge the information
believed to be inaccurate, misleading, or in violation of the student’s privacy rights.
3.
Upon request, the College will arrange for a hearing and notify the student reasonably in advance of the date, place,
and time of the hearing. The hearing will be conducted by an individual who does not have a direct interest in the
outcome of the hearing. That individual may be an official of the College. The student shall be afforded a forum for
the opportunity to present evidence relevant to the issues raised in the original request to amend the student’s
education records. The student may be assisted by other people, including an attorney.
4.
The College will prepare a written decision based solely on the evidence presented at the hearing. The decision will
include a summary of the evidence, and the reasons for the decision.
5.
If, as a result of the hearing, the College decides that the information is inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in
violation of the privacy rights of the student, it will (a) amend the record accordingly; and (b) inform the student of
the amendment in writing.
6.
If, as a result of the hearing, the College decides that the information in the education record is not inaccurate,
misleading, or otherwise in violation of the privacy rights of the student, it shall inform the student of the right to
place a statement in the record commenting on the contested information in the record or stating why he or she
disagrees with the decision of the school.
7.
If a statement is placed in the education records of a student under paragraph six above, the College will:
a.
maintain the statement with the contested part of the record for as long as the record is maintained and
b.
disclose the statement whenever it discloses the portion of the record to which the statement relates.
VI Student Right to File Complaint
A student has the right to file a complaint with the United States Department of Education concerning alleged failures by
the College to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the governmental office that administers
FERPA is:
Family Policy Compliance Office
United States Department of Education
400 Maryland Avenue, S.W.
Washington, DC 20202-4605
48
Firearm Policy
Brown Mackie College — Salina, Brown Mackie College — Kansas City, and Brown Mackie College — Oklahoma City
are committed to maintaining workplaces and educational environments that are free of violence. This obligation includes
eliminating recognized hazards that contribute to violence or serious harm. This Policy applies to anyone on Brown
Mackie College — Salina, Brown Mackie College — Kansas City, and Brown Mackie College — Oklahoma City
premises, unless otherwise prohibited by law.
Firearms, including concealed weapons, are not permitted on College premises and/or at College events, except that
sworn members of a law enforcement agency acting in performance of their duties and/or employees of a licensed
armored car service providing contracted services to the College or to the College’s vendors and contractors
(where approved by the College) may carry weapons.
Firearms are not permitted in any vehicle while the vehicle is parked on College property, whether said property is owned
or leased by the College or provided to the College for its use, except where otherwise required by law.
Any employee or student who becomes aware of a violation of this policy should immediately notify Human Resources,
the President or a member of management or a member of school staff.
Violation of this policy is considered a serious offense that endangers the safety of anyone on College premises. Any
person violating this policy may be required to leave the College premises. Employees violating this policy are subject to
discipline, up to and including termination. Students violating this policy are subject to suspension or dismissal from
school.
Drug and Alcohol Prevention Program and the Drug-Free Workplace and Campus Program
Standards of Conduct
The use of illegal drugs and the abuse of alcohol on the campus of Brown Mackie College — Salina, Brown
Mackie College — Kansas City and Brown Mackie College — Oklahoma City or in facilities controlled by Brown
Mackie College — Salina, Brown Mackie College — Kansas City, and Brown Mackie College — Oklahoma City
are prohibited by college regulations and are incompatible with the Brown Mackie College — Salina, Brown
Mackie College — Kansas City, and Brown Mackie College — Oklahoma City goal of providing a healthy
educational environment for students, faculty, staff and guests. The following information is provided in
compliance with the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989.
49
Effects of Drugs and Alcohol
Although individuals often use drugs and alcohol to achieve a variety of effects on mind and body that are found to
be temporarily useful or pleasurable, drugs can be highly addictive and injurious. A person can pay a price in terms
of his or her physical, emotional, and social health.
This price can be paid in a number of ways. The risk of contracting sexually transmitted diseases, including AIDS,
is increased through unwanted or unprotected sex when one is under the influence of drugs or alcohol. Drugs can
be the trigger for violent crime. Economic and legal problems usually follow directly when one tries to support a
drug habit by resorting to crime. The dependence, illness, loss of job, and loss of family or friends that can result
from drug or alcohol use and abuse can be tragic.
In keeping with the mission of the College and the requirements of state and federal law, the College has adopted
this program to ensure a drug-free campus and workplace and to prevent the use of controlled substances and the
abuse of alcohol.
Health Risks Associated with the Use of Alcohol
Short Term Risks:
1. Increased risks of accidents and injuries
2. Alcohol-related traffic accidents (the leading cause of death for teens)
3. Alcohol slows reaction time, decreases muscle coordination, and impairs vision
4. Fatal overdose
5. Unconsciousness or blackout
6. Death by aspiration of vomit
7. Nausea
8. Gastritis
Long-Term Risks:
1. Increased blood pressure
2. Increased risk of heart attack
3. Brain damage resulting in permanent psychosis
4. Cancer of the mouth, esophagus or stomach
5. Liver damage (cirrhosis, alcohol hepatitis, cancer)
6. Ulcers and Gastritis
7. Pancreatitis
8. Birth defects
9. In males-testicular atrophy and breast enlargement
10. In females--increased risk of breast cancer
11. Prolonged, excessive drinking can shorten life span by ten to twelve years.
Health Risks Associated with the Use of Drugs Amphetamines (Speed, Uppers):
1. Malnutrition
2. Hallucinations
3. Dependence, psychological and sometimes physical
Deliriants (Aerosols, Lighter Fluid, Paint Thinner):
1. Permanent damage to lungs, brain, liver, bone marrow
2. Loss of coordination, confusion, hallucinations
3. Overdose causing convulsions, death
Depressants (Barbiturates, Tranquilizers, Methaqualone):
1. Confusion, depression, loss of coordination
2. Dependence, physical and psychological
3. Coma, death (caused by overdose)
4. Can be lethal when combined with alcohol
Hallucinogens (LSD, PCP, DMT, STP, Mescaline):
1. Hallucinations, panic, irrational behaviors (which can lead to increased risk of accidents, injuries)
2. Tolerance overdose leading to convulsions, coma, death
3. Possible birth defects in children of LSD users
50
Intravenous Drug Use:
1. Places one at risk for HIV infection (the virus causing AIDS) when needles are shared
Marijuana and Hashish:
1. Chronic bronchitis
2. Decreased vital capacity
3. Increased risk of lung cancer
4. In men lower levels of testosterone and increase in abnormal sperm count
Stimulants (Cocaine):
1. Painful nosebleeds and nasal erosion
2. Intense "downs" that result in physical and/or emotional discomfort
3. Tolerance and physical dependence can develop
Narcotics (Heroin, Morphine, Codeine, Opium):
1. Malnutrition
2. Hepatitis
3. Loss of judgment and self-control leading to increased risk of accidents, injuries
4. Dependence
5. Overdose leading to convulsions, coma, death
Sanctions
College Sanctions
The College, in all of its actions, seeks to uphold local, state and federal laws. Insofar as permitted by these laws, the
College will apply sanctions that could lead to a student being fined, suspended, or expelled or an employee being
disciplined, suspended, or dismissed for violation of the College standards of conduct. Students and employees may also
be referred for prosecution. Disciplinary sanctions may include the completion of an appropriate rehabilitation program, at
the student’s or employee’s expense, if necessary.
The use of illegal drugs and the abuse of alcohol at the College or in facilities controlled by the College are prohibited by
college regulations and are incompatible with the College goal of providing a healthy educational environment for
students, faculty, staff, and guests. The following information is provided in compliance with the Safe and Drug-Free
Schools and Communities Act.
State of Kansas Sanctions
Kansas Law — Use and Misuse of Forms of Identification
Possession, use, sale, or manufacture of altered or false driver’s licenses or identification cards are prohibited by criminal
laws. Criminal conviction may jeopardize employment status in professions requiring licensing, certification, or security
clearances.
In Kansas, it is also illegal to lend a driver’s license or identification card to another person under 21 years of age in order
to obtain cereal malt beverage and/or alcoholic liquor.
• Possession or display of any fictitious or fraudulently altered driver’s license or identification card is a Class B
non-person misdemeanor.
Maximum Penalty: 6 months in jail; $1,000 fine
• Lending their driver’s license or identification card to a person under 21 years of age for use in obtaining cereal malt
beverage and/or alcoholic liquor is a Class B non-person misdemeanor (first conviction).
Maximum Penalty: at least 100 hours public service; $500 fine, 6 months in jail; (severity level and penalties increase
with subsequent convictions).
• Other crimes relating to false identifications can be more severe. Dealing in false identification documents is a severity
level 9 non-person felony. Penalties will vary based upon factors considered in sentencing guidelines.
Maximum Penalty: 12 months in prison; $100,000 fine
Kansas Law — Consumption of Alcohol
• It is illegal for anyone of any age to consume alcoholic liquor on state (university) property, except where specific
exemptions are provided by law.
Maximum Penalty: 6 months in jail; $200 fine
51
• It is illegal for anyone under 21 years of age to possess, purchase, attempt to purchase, or consume cereal malt beverage
or alcoholic liquor anywhere within the state.
Maximum Penalty: 1 month in jail; $200 minimum fine (18–21 years of age); $500 fine (under 18 years of age);
perform 40 hours of public service and attend an alcohol education program and 30 day suspension of driving privileges
• It is illegal for anyone to furnish cereal malt beverage or alcoholic liquor to another person under 21 years of age.
Maximum Penalty: 6 months in jail; $1,000 fine
Kansas Law — Driving Under the Influence
In Kansas, it is illegal to operate a vehicle under the influence of alcohol, drugs, or both alcohol and drugs with a breath or
blood alcohol content of .08 or more. For anyone under 21, it is illegal to do so with a breath or blood alcohol content of
.02 or greater. If convicted, you are subject to the following penalties:
• First Conviction — Misdemeanor
Maximum Penalty: 6 months in jail (48 hours mandatory) or 100 hours of public service; $1,000 fine; required
completion of an alcohol education program; suspended driver’s license for 30 days (then restricted for 330 days);
impoundment of vehicle for up to one year, with costs
• Second Conviction — Misdemeanor
Maximum Penalty: 1 year in jail (5 days mandatory); $1,500 fine; completion of an alcohol education program;
suspended driver’s license for 1 year; then use of ignition interlock devise for 1 year; impoundment of vehicle for up to
one year, with costs
• Third Conviction — Felony
Maximum Penalty: 1 year in prison (90 days mandatory); $2,500 fine; required completion of an alcohol education
program; suspended driver’s license for 1 year; then use of ignition interlock devise for 1 year; impoundment of vehicle
for up to one year, with costs
• Fourth and Subsequent Convictions — Felony
Maximum Penalty: 1 year in prison (90 days mandatory); $2,500 fine; participation in alcohol abuse program; 1 year
post-release supervision; suspended driver’s license for 1 year; then use of ignition interlock devise for 1 year;
revocation for one year of the license plate or temporary registration certificate of the motor vehicle driven during the
violation; impoundment of vehicle for up to one year, with costs; (on fifth conviction driver’s license is permanently
revoked)
• Refusal to submit to alcohol or drug testing
Penalty: First time — suspended driver’s license for 1 year
Second time — suspended driver’s license for 2 years
Third time — suspended driver’s license for 3 years
Fourth time — suspended driver’s license for 10 years
Fifth time — license is permanently revoked
Kansas Law — Drugs
The illegal possession or illegal use of drugs may subject individuals to criminal prosecution. The College will refer
violations or proscribed conduct to appropriate authorities for prosecution.
• Kansas law provides that any person who violates the criminal statutes on controlled substances by manufacturing a
controlled substance will be guilty of a drug severity level 1 felony.
Maximum penalty: 17 years imprisonment; $500,000 fine
• Illegal possession of opiates, amphetamines, and narcotics is a drug severity level 4 felony.
Maximum penalty: 3 1/2 years imprisonment; $100,000 fine
• Unlawful possession of a depressant,* paraphernalia, stimulant, or hallucinogenic drug is punishable as a Class A
non-person misdemeanor.
Maximum penalty: 1 year and 2 months imprisonment; $2,500 fine
• The sale or distribution of these drugs is a drug severity level 3 felony.
Maximum penalty: 4 years and 3 months imprisonment; $300,000 fine
*Depressants include barbiturates and barbital. Hallucinogens include LSD, marijuana, and psilocybin.
Oklahoma State Law - Alcohol
1. Public Intoxication – 37 Okla. State § 8
52
A person who is drunk or intoxicated and disturbs the peace of any person is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by
a fine of not less than $10.00 nor more than $100.00, or imprisonment of not less than five (5) not more than thirty
(30) days, or both.
2. Possession of Alcohol by a Minor in Public – 21 Okla. Stat. § 1215
It is unlawful for any person under twenty-one (21) years of age to possess any intoxicating beverage containing
more than 3.2% alcohol by weight and more than ВЅ of 1% of alcohol by volume while upon any public street, road,
highway or in any public building or place. Violators are subject to a fine not to exceed $100,000, or imprisonment
not to exceed thirty (30) days, or both.
3. Consumption or Possession of Alcohol by a Minor – 37 Okla. Stat. § 246
A minor who consumes or possesses with the intent to consume alcohol is guilty of a misdemeanor and, for a first
offense, is subject to a fine not to exceed $300.00, or the performance of community service not to exceed thirty (30)
hours, or both, in addition to suspension of one’s driver’s license. The punishments for subsequent offenses increase
with each other.
4. Driving Under the Influence of Alcohol – 47 Okla. Stat. § 11-902
It is a misdemeanor to drive, operate or be in physical control of a motor vehicle where the alcohol concentration in
such person’s blood or breath is 0.08% or more. Penalties for a first offense include: imprisonment for a period not
less than ten (10) days or more than one (1) year and a fine of not more than $1,000.00.
Laws Governing the Use of Drugs
Note: This listing is not intended to be a comprehensive listing and is not intended for legal purposes.
Oklahoma State Law – Controlled Substances
The State of Oklahoma also imposes penalties for the possession, sale or delivery of controlled substances.
Oklahoma classifies controlled substances according to Schedule I through V consistent with federal law. Unlike
federal law, which classifies penalties according to the type and quantity of controlled substance involved, penalties
under Oklahoma law vary according to the type of activity involved.
An extensive comprehensive list of the drugs and their classifications under Oklahoma law can be found in Chapter
2 of Title 63 of the Oklahoma Statutes, commonly known as the Oklahoma Uniform Controlled Dangers Substances
Act, which is available at http://www/lsb.state.ok.us.
1. One who distributes, dispenses, transports with the intent to distribute or dispense, or possesses with the intent
to manufacture, distribute or dispense a controlled substance is subject to the following penalties:
a. Schedule I and II narcotic drugs, and LSD – a felony punishable by a prison term not exceeding five (5)
years and/or a fine of up to $100,000.00;
b. Any other Schedule I, II, III or IV drugs – a felony punishable by a prison term not exceeding two (2) years
and/or a fine of up to $20,000.00;
c. Schedule V drugs – a felony punishable by a prison term not exceeding one (1) year and/or a fine of up to
$1,000.00 (a second conviction regarding Schedule V drugs carries with it a prison term of five (5) years
and/or a fine of up to $5,000.00).
2. One who knowingly or intentionally possesses or purchases a controlled substance is subject to the following
penalties:
a. Schedule I and II drugs, other than marijuana – a felony punishable by a term of imprisonment of not less
than two (2) years nor more than ten (10) years and a fine of $100.00 (second and subsequent convictions
carry prison terms of four (4) to twenty (20) years);
b. Schedule III, IV and V drugs, along with marijuana – a felony punishable by term of imprisonment of not
more than one (1) year and fine of $100.00 (second and subsequent convictions carry prison terms of
between two (2) and ten (10) years); and
c. For any such offense occurring within 1,000 feet of school property (including colleges and universities),
the penalties are automatically doubled (second and subsequent convictions occurring within 1,000 feet of
school property result in tripled penalties).
3. One who sells, delivers, possesses or manufactures drug paraphernalia for the ingestion of a controlled
substance is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a jail term not to exceed one (1) year and/or a fine of up to
$1,000.00 for a first offense, with second and third convictions carrying fines of up to $5,000.00 and $10,000.00
53
respectively, in addition to the jail terms noted above (an adult who sells or delivers paraphernalia to a minor,
however, is guilty of a felony).
Financial Aid
A student may be ineligible to receive financial aid if the student has been convicted of an offense involving the
possession or sale of illegal drugs.
Federal Sanctions
Federal penalties and sanctions for illegal possession of a controlled substance include the following: First conviction: up
to 1 year in prison, fine of $1,000 to $100,000, or both Second conviction: at least 15 days and up to 2 years
imprisonment, $5,000 to $250,000 fine, or both After two drug convictions: at least 90 days and up to 3 years in prison,
$5,000 to $250,000 fine, or both. Special federal sentencing provisions for possession of crack cocaine include a
mandatory prison term of at least 5 years and up to 20 years, fine of up to $250,000, or both, for a first conviction if the
amount of crack exceeds 5 grams, for a second conviction if amount exceeds 3 grams, and for a third or subsequent
conviction if the amount exceeds 1 gram.
Additional federal sanctions may also apply including forfeiture of vehicles used to transport controlled substances,
denial of federal benefits including student loans, grants, and contracts and denial or revocation of certain federal
licenses and benefits (exhibit A).
54
Exhibit A:
Federal Trafficking Penalties
U.S. Department of Justice
Drug Enforcement Administration
Drug
Schedule
Quantity
Methamphetamine
Schedule II
5-49 gms pure
or 50-499 gms
mixture
Heroin
Schedule I
100-999 gms
mixture
Cocaine
Schedule II
500-4,999 gms
mixture
Cocaine Base
Schedule II
5-49 gms
mixture
PCP
Schedule II
10-99 gms
pure or 100999 gms
mixture
100 gms or
more pure or
1 kg or more
mixture
LSD
Schedule I
1-9 gms
mixture
10 gms or
more mixture
3rd Offense
or More
Fentanyl
Schedule II
40-399 gms
mixture
400 gms or
more mixture
Life Imprisonment
Fentanyl Analogue
Schedule I
10-99 gms
mixture
100 gms or
more mixture
Others
Schedules I & II
Any
(Includes 1 gm or more flunitrazepam
and gamma hydroxybutric acid)
1st
Offense
Not less than 5
yrs and not
more than 40
yrs. If death or
serious injury,
not less than
20 or more
than life. Fine
of not more
than $2
million if an
individual, $5
million if other
than an
individual.
Not more than
20 yrs. If death
or serious
injury, not less
than 20 yrs,
not more than
life. Fine of $1
million if an
individual, $5
million if other
than an
individual.
2nd
Offense
Not less than
10 yrs and not
more than life.
If death or
serious injury,
not less than
life or more
than life. Fine
of not more
than $4
million if an
individual, $10
million if other
than an
individual.
5 kgs or more
mixture
50 gms or
more mixture
Not less than
10 yrs and not
more than life.
If death or
serious injury,
not less than
20 or more
than life. Fine
of not more
than $4 million
if an individual,
$10 million if
other than an
individual.
Not less than 20 yrs
and not more than
life. If death or serious
injury, not less than
life. Fine of not more
than $8 million if an
individual, $20 million
if other than an
individual.
2nd Offense
Any
Not more than 10 yrs. Fine not more than $500,000 if an
individual, $2 million if other than an individual.
Any
Not more than 3yrs. Fine not
more than $250,000 if an
individual, $1 million if other
than an individual
Not more than 6 yrs. Fine not more than $500,000 if an
individual, $2 million if other than an individual.
Any
Not more than 1yr. Fine not
more than $100,000 if an
individual, $250,000 if other than
an individual.
Not more than 2 yrs. Fine not more than $200,000 if an
individual, $500,000 if other than an individual.
(Includes less than 30 mgs
flunitrazepam)
All
Schedules V
1 kg or more
mixture
2nd
Offense
Not more than 5 yrs. Fine not
more than $250,000 if an
individual, $1 million if other
than an individual.
(Includes 30 mgs – 999 mgs
flunitrazepam)
Others*
Schedules IV
50 gms or
more pure or
500 gms or
more mixture
1st
Offense
Not more than
30 yrs. If death
or serious
injury, life.
Fine of $2
million if an
individual, $10
million if other
than an
individual.
1st Offense
Others
Schedules III
Quantity
*Although flunitrazepam is a Schedule IV controlled substance, quantities of 30 or more milligrams of flunitrazepam are subject to greater statutory mazimum
penalties than the above-referenced penalties for Schedule IV controlled substances. See 21 U.S.C. В§
55
Federal Trafficking Penalties – Marijuana*
U.S. Department of Justice
Drug Enforcement Administration
Quantity
1st Offense
2nd Offense
3rd Offense
Marijuana
1,000 kgs or
more mixture;
or 1,000 or
more plants
Not less than 10 years, not
more than life.
Not less than 20 years, not
more than life.
If death or serious injury, not
less than 20 years, not more
than life.
If death or serious injury, then
life.
Fine not more than $4 million
individual, $10 million other
than individual.
Life imprisonment without
release.
Fine not more than $8 million
individual, 20 million other
than individual.
Marijuana
100 kgs to 999
kgs mixture; or
100-999 plants
Not less than 5 years, not more
than 40 years.
Not less than 10 years, not
more than life.
If death or serious injury, not
less than 20 years, not more
than life.
If death or serious injury, then
life.
Fine not more than $2 million
individual, $5 million other
than individual.
Fine not more than $4 million
individual, $10 million other
than individual.
1st Offense
Marijuana
50 to 99 kgs
mixture
Not more than 20 years.
50 to 99 plants
Hashish
More than 10
kgs
Hashish Oil
More than 1
kg
Marijuana
Less than 50
kgs mixture
Hashish
Hashish Oil
2nd Offense
1 to 49 plants
10 kgs or less
If death or serious injury, not less than 20 years,
not more than life.
Fine $1 million individual, $5 million other than
individual.
Not more than 30 years.
If death or serious injury, then life.
Fine $2 million individual, $10 million other than
individual.
Not more than 5 years.
Not more than 10 years.
Fine not more than $250,000, $1 million other
than individual.
Fine $500,000 individual, $2 million other than
individual.
1 kg or less
Convictions for Drug-Related Offenses
Any student convicted of any drug-related criminal statute must notify the Dean of Academic Affairs, in writing, no later
than five (5) days after such conviction regardless of where the offense occurred. This is because under federal and state
laws, any student convicted of a drug-related felony offense must be denied all federal and state assistance, including Pell
Grants, Frank O’Bannon grant and 21st Century Scholars program. However, a criminal conviction shall not be necessary
to find that a student has violated these standards of conduct, and the Brown Mackie College — Salina, Brown Mackie
College — Kansas City, and Brown Mackie College — Oklahoma City need not, and ordinarily will not, defer its own
actions and sanctions pending the outcome of any criminal proceeding.
Danger Signals Indicating a Drug or Alcohol Problem
Following is a listing of classic danger signals that may indicate the presence of a drug or alcohol problem:
п‚· abrupt changes in mood or attitude
п‚· decreased efficiency at work or at school
п‚· frequent absences, tardiness, and/or early departures
п‚· relationship problems with family, friends, and co-workers
56
п‚·
п‚·
unusual outbursts of anger and hostility
social withdrawal
Advising
If you observe any of these changes in yourself or another student, you are encouraged to talk with an Advisor in the
Student Affairs Office.
Abuse of alcohol or drugs can lead to dependency and addiction, with serious consequences for personal health and
overall quality of life. There are drug and alcohol counseling, treatment, and rehabilitation facilities available in our area
where students and employees may seek advice and treatment. The College Counselor can refer you to one that meets
your needs.
Area Resources
These organizations may be contacted for help.
Salina Area Resources
Central Kansas Foundation for Alcohol and Chemical Dependency
1805 South Ohio
Salina, KS 67401
785-825-6224
Johnson County Adult Detox Center
8000 W 127th Street
Overland Park, KS 66213
913-897-6101
Central Kansas Mental Health Center
809 Elmhurst Boulevard
Salina, KS 67401
785-823-6322
Johnson County Mental Health/Substance Abuse Center
6000 Lamar, Suite 130
Shawnee, KS 66202
913-831-2550
St. Francis Center at Salina
1646-B North 9th Street
Salina, KS 67401
785-823-0001
Oklahoma City Area Resources
Narcotics Anonymous
Oklahoma City, OK 73102
(405) 524-7068
Kansas City Area Resources
Heart of America Family Services
10500 Berkley, Suite 210
Overland Park, KS 66212
Alcoholics Anonymous
Oklahoma City Intergroup Service Office
2701 N. Portland, Suite E,
Oklahoma City, OK 73107
Hotline (405) 524-1100
SACEK — Social Abuse Center of Eastern Kansas
3424 Rainbow
Kansas City, KS 66103
913-362-913-642-4300
Oklahoma Prevention Resource Center
Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services
2401 NW 23rd, Suite 82
Oklahoma City, OK 73107
(405) 522-3810; (405) 522-3650
Email: [email protected]
National Sexual Assault Hotline
(800) 656-HOPE
National Resources
The National Institute on Drug Abuse Hotline 800.662.4357 is available from 8 a.m. to 2 a.m., Monday through Friday
and from 11 a.m. to 2 a.m. on weekends.
A list of emergency and sliding-fee scale resources is available from the counselor.
57
STUDENT CONDUCT
STUDENT CONDUCT POLICY
SECTION I. GUIDING PRINCIPLES
The College recognizes its students as responsible and dedicated men and women who are preparing for career
employment. An integral part of their career and professional development is the expectation that they conduct themselves
during the education process in the same manner as will be expected in all employment situations.
As members of the College community, students have responsibilities and duties commensurate with their rights and
privileges. In this policy, the College provides guidance to students regarding those standards of student conduct and
behavior that it considers essential to its educational mission. This policy also provides guidance regarding the types of
conduct that infringe upon the fulfillment of the College’s mission.
SECTION II. SCOPE
This Student Conduct Policy applies to all students and student organizations at the College.
SECTION III. REACH
The Student Conduct Policy shall apply to student conduct that occurs on College premises including online platforms, at
College-sponsored activities, student organization sponsored events, or in College housing. At the discretion of the dean of
academic affairs, the Policy also shall apply to off-campus student conduct when the conduct, as alleged, adversely affects
a substantial college interest and potentially violates a campus policy.
SECTION IV. RESPONSIBILITIES OF DUAL MEMBERSHIP
Students are both members of the College community and citizens of the state. As citizens, students are responsible to the
community of which they are a part, and, as students, they are responsible to the academic community of the College and
to other individuals who make up the community. By enforcing its Student Conduct Policy, the College neither substitutes
for nor interferes with other civil or criminal legal processes. When a student is charged in both jurisdictions, the College
will decide on the basis of its interests, the interests of affected students, and the interests of the community whether to
proceed with its disciplinary process or to defer action.
SECTION V. DISCIPLINARY OFFENSES
The offenses listed below are given as examples only. The College may sanction other conduct not specifically
included on this list.
1.
Scholastic Dishonesty
a) Plagiarism
b) Cheating on assignments or examinations
c) Engaging in unauthorized collaboration on academic work
d) Taking, acquiring or using test materials without faculty permission
e) Submitting false or incomplete records of academic achievement;
f) Altering, forging or misusing a College academic record;
g) Fabricating or falsifying data, research procedures, or data analysis;
h) Deceiving the College and/or its officials.
2. Illegal or Unauthorized Possession or Use of Weapons
a) Possession or use of firearms, explosives, dangerous chemicals, or other weapons, likenesses of weapons, on
college property, school sponsored housing or at college sponsored functions, except where possession is
required by law.
3. Sexual Assault or Nonconsensual Contact
a) Any form of unwanted sexual attention or unwanted sexual contact
4. Threatening, Violent or Aggressive Conduct
a) Assault, battery, or any other form of physical abuse of a student or college employee
b) Fighting or physical altercation
c) Conveyance of threats by any means of communication including, but not limited to, threats of physical abuse
and threats to damage or destroy college property or the property of other students or college employees
d) Any conduct that threatens the health or safety of another individual one’s own self or another individual.
Threats to commit self-harm and/ or actual incidents of self-harm by any student
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5. Theft, Property Damage and Vandalism
a.) Theft, attempted theft, vandalism/damage, or defacing of college property, college controlled property or the
property of another student, faculty, staff member or guests.
b.) Extortion
c.) Setting fires, tampering with fire safety and/or firefighting equipment
6. Disruptive or Disorderly Conduct
Disruptive Behavior, such as, Interference with the normal operations of the college (i.e., disruption of teaching and
administrative functions, disciplinary procedures, pedestrian or vehicular traffic, or other college activities)
a) Disruptive Classroom Conduct, such as,
i. Engaging in behavior that substantially or repeatedly interrupts either the instructor’s ability to
teach or student learning. The classroom extends to any setting where a student is engaged in
work toward academic credit or satisfaction of program-based requirements or related activities,
or
ii. Use of cell phones and pagers during scheduled classroom times
b) Disorderly Conduct, such as,
i. Disorderly, lewd, indecent, or obscene conduct. This would include but is not limited to any
type of clothing, gang colors, gang symbols or materials worn or brought onto the premises by
any student or guest deemed to be lewd, indecent or obscene as determined by college
officials
ii. Breach of peace on college property or at any college-sponsored or supervised program
iii. Any in-school or off-campus act considered inappropriate or as an example of misconduct that
adversely affects the interests of the College and/or its reputation
7. Illegal or Unauthorized Possession or Use of Drugs or Alcohol
a. Use, sale, possession or distribution of illegal or controlled substances, drug or drug paraphernalia on
college property or at any function sponsored or supervised by the college.
b. Being under the influence of illegal or controlled substances on college property, or at any college
function
c. Use, sale, possession or distribution of alcoholic beverages on college property or at any function
sponsored or supervised by the college.
d. Being under the influence of alcohol on college property or at any college function is also prohibited
8. Verbal Assault, Defamation and Harassment
a. Verbal abuse of a student or college employee
b. Harassment by any means of any individual, including coercion and personal abuse. Harassment
includes but is not limited to, written or verbal acts or uses of technology, which have the effect of
harassing or intimidating a person
c. Harassment based on sex, race, color, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, age, disability or any
other criteria protected by state, federal or local law.
9. Hazing
a.
Any form of "hazing" and any act that endangers the safety of a student, or that destroys or removes
public or private property, for the purpose of initiation, admission into, affiliation with, or as a
condition for continued membership in a group or organization. "Hazing" includes any method of
initiation or pre-initiation into a student club or any pastime or amusement engaged in with respect to
such a club that causes, or is likely to cause, bodily danger, physical harm, or personal degradation or
disgrace resulting in physical or mental harm, to any student or other person attending the college.
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10. Falsification
Willfully providing college officials with false, misleading or incomplete information
Forgery, falsification, alteration or misuse of college documents, records or identification with the intent to
injure, defraud, or misinform.
11. Abuse of the College disciplinary system, including but not limited to:
a) Failure to obey the summons of a disciplinary body or college official
b) Falsification, distortion, or misrepresentation of information before a disciplinary body or college official
c) Disruption or interference with the orderly conduct of a disciplinary proceeding
d) Attempting to influence the impartiality of a member of a disciplinary body prior to and/or during the course
of the disciplinary proceeding
e) Verbal or physical harassment and/or intimidation of a member of a disciplinary body prior to, during,
and/or after the disciplinary proceeding
f) Failure to comply with the sanction(s) imposed under the student conduct policy
g) Influencing or attempting to influence another person to commit an abuse of the disciplinary system
12. Unauthorized Use or Misuse of College Facilities
a) Unauthorized entry into, unauthorized use of, or misuse of college property, including computers and data
and voice communication networks.
13. Violation of Federal or State Laws
a) Violation of federal, state or local laws and college rules and regulations on college property or at collegesanctioned or college-sponsored functions
14. Insubordination
a) Persistent or gross acts of willful disobedience or defiance toward college personnel
b) Failure to comply with direction of college officials, faculty, staff or security officers who are acting in the
performance of their duties
c) Failure to exit during fire drill,
d) Failure to identify oneself when on college property or at a college- sponsored or supervised functions, upon
request of college official acting in the performance of his/her duties
15. Violations of College Rules
a) Violations by guest of a student on college property. Students are responsible for the actions of their guests
b) Violation of school safety regulations, including but not limited to setting fires, tampering with fire safety and/or
firefighting equipment, failure to exit during fire drill, turning in false fire alarms and bomb threats
c) Smoking in classrooms or other college buildings or areas unless designated as a smoking area
d) Any violation of the student housing license agreement, rules and regulations and/or the college-sponsored
housing student handbook
e) Any violation of the institutions policies on the responsible use of technology including but not limited to
I. The theft or abuse of computer, email, Internet or Intranet resources
II. Unauthorized entry into a file, to use, read, or change the contents, of for any other purpose
III. Unauthorized transfer of a file
IV. Unauthorized downloading of copyrighted materials in violation of law
V. Unauthorized use of another individual's identification and/or password
VI. Use of computing facilities to interfere with the work of another student, faculty member, or school
official
VII. Use of computing facilities to send obscene or abusive messages
VIII. Use of computing facilities to interfere with normal operation of the school's computing system
f) Failure to satisfy school financial obligations
The above list is illustrative only, and the College may sanction other conduct not specifically included on this list.
SECTION VI. SANCTIONS.
The College may impose sanctions for violations of the student conduct policy. The type of sanction imposed may vary
depending upon the seriousness of the violation(s). The College reserves the right to immediately impose the most severe
sanction if circumstances merit.
Although not exhaustive, the following list represents the types of sanctions that may be imposed upon any student or
student organization found to have violated the student conduct policy:
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1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Warning: A notice in writing that a student has failed to meet some aspect of the school's standards and
expectations
Probation: Probation is used for repeated violations or a specific violation of a serious nature as a first course of
action. The dean of academic affairs or his/her delegate defines the terms of probation.
Discretionary Sanctions: The student will be required to complete an educational service, attend counseling, or
have restricted privileges.
Removal from Sponsored Housing: The student will be immediately dismissed from school-sponsored housing.
The student will be required to vacate the premises according to the terms of the sanction.
Suspension: Separation of the student from the school for a pre-determined period of time. The student may be
able to return to school once specified conditions for readmission are met. The student may not attend classes,
visit college-sponsored housing, use school facilities, participate in or attend college activities, or be employed
by the school during his/her suspension.
Expulsion: The student will be expelled from the College immediately. The student will not be permitted to
continue his or her studies at the college and may not return to the college or to college-sponsored housing or
activities at any time or for any reason.
Restitution: Compensation for loss or damage to property leased, owned or controlled by the school. This may
take the form of monetary or material replacement.
The above list is only a general guideline. Some sanctions may be omitted, and other sanctions not listed above may be
used.
SECTION VII. DISCIPLINARY PROCEDURES.
Complaint
Any member of the College community may file a complaint against any student for misconduct or for otherwise being in
violation of the College policies.
1. The complaint shall be prepared in writing or in an incident report and directed to the dean of academic
affairs Officer or his/her delegate.
2. The written complaint or incident report should include the nature of the offense, date, approximate time
and location of incident. The name of the victim, offender and any witness/s may be included.
3. Complaints or incident reports should be submitted within 48 hours after the alleged violation occurred
unless there are extenuating circumstances requiring a longer timeframe.
The dean of academic affairs or a delegate may review and investigate the complaint to determine if the allegations have
factual merit, to identify violations of the student conduct policy, and to impose sanctions for such violations.
Generally, the accused should be given the opportunity to tell his or her account of the situation and to provide this
information, in writing, unless the College determines that the circumstances do not warrant disclosure of some or all of
the facts.
Search of Student's Property
Students have no expectation of privacy in their personal property while on campus. The College reserves the right to
search the contents of students' personal property or belongings at any time and for any reason, including when there is
reasonable suspicion on the part of the College staff that a risk to the health, safety or welfare of students, and/or the
school community exists and including searches pursuant to an investigation of potential wrong doing. This includes but is
not limited to vehicles brought onto property leased, owned or controlled by the school, backpacks, portfolios and
clothing. This policy also applies to student property in school-sponsored housing, student e-mail and/or computers.
Notification and Determination of violations that warrant Disciplinary Meeting
1. The dean of academic affairs or a delegate may choose to conduct a disciplinary meeting. Potential attendees
include a student or students, the Chief Conduct Officer or his/her delegate and others who may have relevant
information. The Student should receive advance notice of the allegations and the reason for the meeting. After
the meeting,
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2.
The Dean of Academic Affairs or his/her delegate will determine whether it is more likely than not that a
violation occurred, may a render and communicate the decision to the STUDENT in writing, which shall
describe the violation and the sanctions imposed, if any, and the student’s right to appeal. If the Dean of
Academic Affairs determines that there was no violation, that decision may be documented in writing to the
student as well.
a. If a STUDENT fails to appear for the meeting, the dean of academic affairs or his/her delegate may
make a determination of violations of the College policies on the basis of the information available, and
impose sanctions for such violations.
NOTIFICATION AND DETERMINATION OF VIOLATIONS THAT WARRANT DISCIPLINARY HEARING
In some cases, involving serious violations, the dean of academic affairs or delegate, hereby referred to as “Hearing
Officer”, in his or her sole discretion, may choose to assemble a disciplinary panel to adjudicate the process.
1. The Hearing Officer may immediately (before a hearing takes place) remove the student from the campus
community pursuant to an Interim Suspension until the Disciplinary Panel is convened. (see interim suspension)
2. The Student should receive advance notice of the allegations and the reason for the meeting. A student may
forgo attendance at the hearing and a determination of the sanction will be made by the Disciplinary Panel
3. Hearings normally shall be conducted in private. The Disciplinary Hearing is an academic hearing, not a legal
hearing. Therefore, legal counsel is not allowed at the hearing.
4. The student may be accompanied by one person (family member, friend, etc) to provide support. The committee
may prohibit from attending or remove any person who disrupts the proceedings of the committee
5. In Hearings involving more than one STUDENT, the Hearing Officer, in his or her discretion, may permit the
hearing concerning each student to be conducted separately.
6. The Disciplinary Panel may hear from any person who may have relevant information and the Panel may review
any documents presented to them.
a. Pertinent records, documents and written statements may be considered by the Hearing Officer at
his/her discretion
b. The Disciplinary Panel may ask questions and may seek information not provided to it.
7. The Disciplinary Panel may determine whether it is more likely than not that a violation occurred The Panel
should communicate to the Hearing Officer its decision and its recommended sanction, if any.
8. After the Hearing, the Hearing Officer will issue a written decision to the accused student which identifies the
accusations and the panel’s conclusions, any sanctions, and the student's right of appeal.
9. In general, the accused should have access to the documentation reviewed by the panel, however identifying
names and information may be removed from the documentation when necessary to protect other student’s
privacy rights.
Disciplinary Panel
A Disciplinary Panel may consist of members of the college Executive Committee, Campus Staff, Faculty or Student
Body. When students are permitted on the panel, the accused student should sign a form granting permission to release
his/her educational records to a student serving on the panel. Failure to sign the permission constitutes an agreement to
have no student on the panel.
Administrative Interim Suspension
Students may be administratively suspended on an interim basis when:
(1) serious allegations are being investigated
(2) serious allegations are pending before a disciplinary panel
(3) in advance of a disciplinary panel hearing; or
(4) when a student potentially poses a threat of harm to himself, to others, or to property of the Institute or a
member of the Institute community
During the interim suspension, students are denied access to college-sponsored housing and/or to the school (including
classes, labs, and library) and/or all other school activities or privileges for which the student might otherwise be eligible,
as the dean of academic affairs or designee may determine to be appropriate. This interim suspension period should last
no longer than three business days, and the dean of academic affairs or delegate may make reasonable provisions to
provide for accommodations of a student in school sponsored housing.
The interim suspension is not to be considered disciplinary, but it is a tool to separate potential adversaries until a reasoned
decision can be made.
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SECTION VIII. APPEAL PROCEDURES.
Students have a right to appeal disciplinary actions when they believe they have extenuating circumstances or believe to
have been treated in an arbitrary or biased fashion or without adherence to the College policies and procedures.
п‚· During an appeal, the student should continue to obey the terms of the decision, i.e., a student who has been
suspended from school may not be on school property, a student dismissed from school-sponsored housing must leave
in accordance with the directions indicated in the decision
 The student must write a letter of appeal in the student’s own words, addressed to the President of the College or
his/her delegate. This letter must clearly state the extenuating circumstances or the grounds for believing the decision
was arbitrary or biased or that it was without adherence to [school name] policies and procedures, and provide any
supporting documentation. It must be delivered to the President or his/her delegate within seven calendar days
following the student’s receipt of the decision.
п‚· Students should provide documentation to support the allegations of the appeal.
п‚· The President or his/her delegate may appoint an ad hoc committee to review appeals and make a recommendation
regarding disposition of the appeal within 30 days of the date of receipt of the appeal. This committee will be
comprised of faculty or staff members not involved in making the initial disciplinary decision.
п‚· The President and/or the committee may decide to convene an appeal hearing. The student will be informed notified
in writing of the date and time of the appeal. The student is expected to attend the meeting, and failure to do so, for
other than documented emergencies, may be considered forfeiture of the right to present further information regarding
the appeal.
п‚· The student making the appeal may be provided an opportunity to address the committee in person. The student may
be accompanied by one person (family member, friend, etc) as an observer. The committee may prohibit from
attending or remove any person who disrupts the proceedings of the committee.
п‚· The Appeal Committee is an academic hearing, not a legal hearing. Therefore, legal counsel is not allowed at the
meeting.
п‚· Audio recording of the academic hearing is not permitted. Minutes of the meeting are confidential.
п‚· Following appropriate review and deliberation, the committee will report back to the President or his/her delegate
with its recommendation following its review of the appeal. The President or his/her delegate will render a written
decision on the appeal within thirty calendar days from receipt of the appeal. The decision will be final.
Anti-Hazing Policy
Hazing involving College students or student groups is strictly prohibited. Hazing is defined as any action or situation that
recklessly or intentionally endangers the mental or physical health or safety of a student for the purpose of initiation or
admission into or affiliation with any club or organization operating under the sanction of an institution of higher
education.
For purposes of this definition, any activity as described in this definition that the initiation or admission into or affiliation
with a club or organization is directly or indirectly conditioned shall be presumed to be “forced” activity, the willingness
of an individual to participate in such activity notwithstanding. This policy is applicable to all students and members of a
student club or organization at the College. Every student and member of a student club or organization is responsible for
complying with this policy.
Individuals and/or student clubs that force, require, and/or endorse violations will be held directly responsible through the
College’s student conduct process and if appropriate, through local authorities, which may pursue criminal action.
Students who wish to make a complaint under this policy the Dean of Student Affairs. The negligence or consent of a
student or any assumption of risk by the student is not a defense to an action brought pursuant to this policy. Student club
activities or programs must not interfere with the rights and activities of others and should always reflect the best interests
of the members of the organization it represents and the College community as a whole. In all cases of alleged violations
of this policy, faculty and staff advisors and the national/international headquarters, if applicable, of any organization will
be notified.
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No Harassment Policy
The College is committed to providing workplaces and learning environments that are free from harassment on the basis
of any protected classification including, but not limited to race, sex, gender, color, religion, sexual orientation, gender
identity or expression, age, national origin, disability, medical condition, marital status, veteran status, genetic marker or
on any other basis protected by law. Such conduct is unprofessional, unproductive, illegal, and generally considered bad
for business. Consequently, all conduct of this nature is expressly prohibited, regardless of whether it violates any law.
Definition of Sexual Harassment
Sexual harassment consists of unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, sexual violence or other verbal or
physical conduct of a sexual nature where:
a. Submission to such conduct is an explicit or implicit term or condition of a person’s status in a course,
program or activity or in admission, or in an academic decision;
b. Submission to or rejection of such conduct is used as a basis for an academic decision; or
c. Such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual's work or academic
performance or creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work or educational environment.
Sexual violence is considered to be a form of sexual harassment and is defined as physical sexual acts perpetrated against a
person’s will or where a person is incapable of giving consent due to the victim’s use of drugs or alcohol.
Other examples of sexual harassment include, but are not limited to: unwanted sexual advances; demands for sexual favors
in exchange for favorable treatment; verbal abuse of a sexual nature; graphic commentary about an individual’s body,
sexual prowess, or sexual deficiencies; leering; whistling; touching; pinching; assault; coerced sexual acts; suggestive,
insulting or obscene comments or gestures; stalking; and displaying sexually suggestible objects or pictures. The College
prohibits all conduct of this nature whether or not such conduct violates any applicable laws.
Other Forms of Harassment
Verbal abuse, insulting comments and gestures, and other harassing conduct are also forbidden under this policy when
directed at an individual because of his or her race, color, sex, sexual orientation, familial status, age, religion, ethnic
origin, genetic marker or disability. It is the responsibility of each employee and each student to conduct himself or
herself in a professional manner at all times and to refrain from such harassment.
Complaint Procedure
Students who feel they have been harassed should follow the Student Grievance Procedure for Internal Complaints of
Harassment and Discrimination (the “Student Grievance Procedure”). Students who have been subjected to sexual
violence should also review the Policy Concerning Sexual Violence and Programs and Procedures Regarding Sexual
Assault (available in the Student Affairs Office). Regardless if a complaint is filed under the Student Grievance
Procedure, promptly after learning of such alleged conduct, the College will conduct an investigation for the purpose of
determining whether prohibited harassment has occurred. Efforts will be made to ensure confidentiality to the extent
consistent with the goal of conducting an appropriate investigation. Students who initiate or participate in such
investigations in good faith will be protected against subsequent harassment and school-related retaliation. If an
investigation confirms the allegations, the College will take prompt corrective action, which may include discipline, up to
and including immediate dismissal.
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Complaint and Resolution Process
In order to provide an effective and equitable means of resolving student complaints, a process is available to any student
who believes that the College decision, action, or policy has unfairly and adversely affected his or her status, rights, or
privileges as a student. In most cases, a complaint can be resolved at the school level. Faculty and staff are available to
guide students in completing their programs, and students must be aware of those resources to whom issues and concerns
should be addressed. These are as follows:
Faculty
Resolution of academic concerns pertaining to individual courses (as grades,
assignments, attendance, etc.)
Department Chair or
Program Director
Unresolved academic issues pertaining to the student’s program (as program
objectives, curriculum, graduation requirements, licensure examinations, faculty,
etc.)
Unresolved issues pertaining to faculty, curriculum, grades, attendance, change of
program, transfer of credit, graduation requirements, withdrawal, and personal
issues which may impact the student’s education
Academic Affairs Office
Office of the Registrar
Resolution of issues involving course scheduling and obtaining transcripts
Student Financial Services Office
Resolution of issues involving loans, grants, deferments, verification, federal
funding, and consequences of withdrawal
Business Office
Resolution of issues involving the status of the student’s account and issues of
billing (as monthly payments, book returns, financial arrangements, fees, etc.)
Office of Career Services
Full-time and part-time employment assistance, employment correspondence, and
related employment services
Campus President
Resolution of an issue in any area above which remains unresolved by the
employee to whom the issue has been properly addressed
Institutional President
Resolution of issues unresolved through the campus’s complaint and resolution
process.
However, a student who believes that his or her complaint remains unsatisfactorily resolved by the College may refer the
complaint to the appropriate office as follows:
Kansas Board of Regents
1000 SW Jackson, Suite 520
Topeka, KS 66612
Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education
655 Research Parkway, Suite 200
Oklahoma City, OK 73104
Higher Learning Commission
230 S. LaSalle St., Suite 7-500
Chicago, IL 60604
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Non-Discrimination Policy
Brown Mackie College — Salina, Brown Mackie College — Kansas City and Brown Mackie College — Oklahoma City
does not discriminate or harass on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity
or expression, disability, age, religion, genetic marker, veteran’s status or any other characteristic protected by state, local
or federal law, in our programs and activities. Brown Mackie College — Salina, Brown Mackie College — Kansas City
and Brown Mackie College — Oklahoma City will not retaliate against persons bringing forward allegations of
harassment or discrimination. The Campus President at Brown Mackie College – Salina (1-888-365-0433), Brown
Mackie College - Kansas City (1-800-635-9101), or Brown Mackie College - Oklahoma City (1-888-229-3280) has been
designated to handle inquiries and coordinate the institution’s compliance efforts regarding the non-discrimination policy.
Student Grievance Procedure for Internal Complaints of Discrimination and Harassment
Students who believe they have been subjected to discrimination or harassment in violation of the Non-Discrimination
Policy should follow the procedure outlined below.
This complaint procedure is intended to provide a fair, prompt, impartial and reliable determination about whether the
College’s Non-Discrimination Policy has been violated.
1. Complainants are encouraged to file a complaint as soon as possible after an alleged incident of discrimination has
occurred. Any student who chooses to file a discrimination complaint should do so with the dean of academic affairs. The
complaint should be presented in writing and it should describe the alleged incident(s) and any corrective action sought.
The complaint should be signed by the complainant.
2. The College will investigate the allegations. Both the complainant and the accused will have an opportunity to meet
and discuss the allegations with the investigator and may offer any witnesses and other evidence in support of their
position to the investigator during the course of the investigation. A student may be accompanied during investigation
meetings and discussions by one person (family member, friend, etc.) who can act as an observer, provide emotional
support, and/or assist the student in understanding and cooperating in the investigation. The observer may not be an
attorney, unless otherwise required by local law. The investigator may prohibit from attending or remove any person who
disrupts the investigation in the investigator’s sole discretion.
3. The student who made the complaint and the accused shall be informed promptly in writing when the investigation is
completed, no later than 45 calendar days from the date the complaint was filed. The student who made the complaint shall
be informed if there were findings made that the policy was or was not violated and of actions taken to resolve the
complaint, if any, that are directly related to him/her, such as an order that the accused not contact the student who made
the complaint. In accordance with school policies protecting individuals’ privacy, the student who made the complaint
may generally be notified that the matter has been referred for disciplinary action, but shall not be informed of the details
of the recommended disciplinary action without the consent of the accused.
4. The decision of the Investigator may be appealed by either the complainant or the accused by petitioning the President's
Office of the College. The written appeal must be made within 20 calendar days of receipt of the determination letter.
The President, or his/her designee, will render a written decision on the appeal within 30 calendar days from receipt of the
appeal. The President's decision shall be final.
5. The College will not retaliate against persons bringing forward allegations of harassment or discrimination.
6. Matters involving general student complaints will be addressed according to the Student Complaint Procedures, a copy
of which can be found in the College’s Academic Catalog.
7. For more information about your rights under the federal laws prohibiting discrimination, please contact the Office for
Civil Rights at the U.S. Department of Education or visit the website at http://www.ed.gov/ocr.
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SEXUAL VIOLENCE POLICY
Sexual violence refers to physical sexual acts perpetrated against a person’s will or where a person is incapable of giving
consent due to the victim’s use of drugs or alcohol. Sexual violence includes rape, sexual assault, sexual battery and sexual
coercion. Sexual violence is considered a form of sexual harassment, and is therefore a form of sex discrimination. Acts
involving sexual violence, sexual harassment or sex discrimination are not tolerated by the College. Complaints of sexual
violence should be made to the Dean of Academic Affairs at each specific campus location.
Upon learning of possible sexual violence involving a student, the College will take immediate action to investigate or
otherwise determine what happened. Such action may include, but is not limited to, speaking with the alleged victim, the
alleged perpetrator and other potential witness as appropriate and reviewing other evidence such as calendars, videos,
phone records, etc.
If the College determines that sexual violence may have occurred, the College will take steps proactively designed to
promptly and effectively end the sexual violence or the threat of sexual violence, prevent its recurrence, and address its
effects regardless of whether the alleged actions are subject to criminal investigation.
The College will use good faith efforts to protect the alleged victim from any hostile environment at the school and any
subsequent harassment or retaliation. Such efforts may occur prior to the outcome of the investigation and may include:
1.
Reporting any subsequent harassment or retaliation to the Campus President
2.
Providing an escort to ensure the alleged victim can move safely between classes and activities
3.
Ensuring that the alleged victim and the alleged perpetrator do not attend the same classes
4.
Providing referral to counseling services or providers
5.
Providing academic support services, such as tutoring
6.
Arranging for the victim to re-take a course or withdraw from a class without penalty.
Disciplinary Actions and Sanctions
On-campus disciplinary procedures against students will be in accordance with the College’s published Student Code of
Conduct and the Student Grievance Procedure for Internal Complaints of Discrimination and Harassment. Both the
accuser and the accused are entitled to have others present during a disciplinary proceeding. Both will be informed of the
outcome of any campus disciplinary proceeding. For this purpose, the outcome of a disciplinary proceeding means only
the College’s final determination with respect to the alleged sexual offense and any sanction that is imposed against the
accused. Sanctions, which may be imposed following a final determination of a disciplinary proceeding regarding rape,
acquaintance rape, or other forcible or non-forcible sex offenses, may include warning, probation, suspension or dismissal.
Students who have been subjected to sexual violence are encouraged to review the No Harassment Policy, the NonDiscrimination Policy, the Student Grievance Procedure for Internal Complaints of Discrimination and
Harassment and the Programs and Procedures Regarding Sexual Assault (available in the Student Affairs Office).
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ARBITRATION
Every student and Brown Mackie College — Salina, Brown Mackie College — Kansas City, and Brown Mackie College
— Oklahoma City agrees that any dispute or claim between the student and Brown Mackie College (or any company
affiliated with Brown Mackie College, or any of its officers, directors, trustees, employees, or agents) arising out of or
relating to a student’s enrollment or attendance at Brown Mackie College, whether such dispute arises before, during, or
after the student’s attendance and whether the dispute is based on contract, tort, statute, or otherwise, shall be, at the
student’s or Brown Mackie College — Salina, Brown Mackie College — Kansas City, and Brown Mackie College —
Oklahoma City election, submitted to and resolved by individual binding arbitration pursuant to the terms described
herein. This policy, however, is not intended to modify a student’s right, if any, to file a grievance with any state
educational licensing agency.
Either party may elect to pursue arbitration upon written notice to the other party. Such notice must describe the nature of
the controversy and the remedy sought. If a party elects to pursue arbitration, it should initiate such proceedings with
JAMS, which will serve as the arbitration administrator pursuant to its rules of procedure. JAMS can be contacted as
follows: JAMS, 45 Broadway, 28th Floor, New York, NY, 10006, www.jamsadr.com, 800-352-5267. This provision
does not preclude the parties from mutually agreeing to an alternate arbitration forum or administrator in a particular
circumstance. If either party wishes to propose such an alternate forum or administrator, it should do so within twenty
(20) days of its receipt of the other party’s intent to arbitrate.
Brown Mackie College — Salina, Brown Mackie College — Kansas City, and Brown Mackie College — Oklahoma City
agrees that it will not elect to arbitrate any undividable claim of less than the relevant jurisdictional threshold that a student
may bring in small claims court (or in a similar court of limited jurisdiction subject to expedited procedures). If that claim
is transferred or appealed to a different court, however, or if a student’s claim exceeds the relevant jurisdictional threshold,
Brown Mackie College — Salina, Brown Mackie College — Kansas City, and Brown Mackie College — Oklahoma City
reserves the right to elect arbitration and, if it does so, each student agrees that the matter will be resolved by binding
arbitration pursuant to the terms of this Section.
If either a student or Brown Mackie College — Salina, Brown Mackie College — Kansas City, and Brown Mackie
College — Oklahoma City chooses arbitration, neither party will have the right to a jury trial, to engage in
discovery, except as provided in the applicable arbitration rules, or otherwise to litigate the dispute or claim in any
court (other than in small claims or similar court, as set forth in the preceding paragraph, or in an action to enforce
the arbitrator’s award). further, a student will not have the right to participate as a representative or member of
any class of claimants pertaining to any claim subject to arbitration. The arbitrator’s decision will be final and
binding. other rights that a student or Brown Mackie College — Salina, Brown Mackie College — Kansas City,
and Brown Mackie College — Oklahoma City would have in court also may not be available in arbitration.
The arbitration shall have no authority to arbitrate claims on a class action basis, and claims brought by or against a
student may not be joined or consolidated with claims brought by or against any other person. Any arbitration hearing
shall take place in the federal judicial district in which the student resides. Upon a student’s written request, Brown
Mackie College — Salina, Brown Mackie College — Kansas City, and Brown Mackie College — Oklahoma City will pay
the filing fees charged by the arbitration administrator, up to a maximum of $3,500 per claim. Each party will bear the
expense of its own attorneys, experts and witnesses, regardless of which party prevails, unless applicable law gives a right
to recover any of those fees from the other party. If the arbitrator determines that any claim or defense is frivolous or
wrongfully intended to oppress the other party, the arbitrator may award sanctions in the form of fees and expenses
reasonably incurred by the other party (including arbitration administration fees, arbitrators’ fees, and attorney, expert, and
witness fees), to the extent such fees and expenses could be imposed under Rule 11 of the Federal Rules of Civil
Procedure.
The Federal Arbitration Act (“FAA”), 9 U.S.C.§§ 1, et seq., shall govern this arbitration provision. This arbitration
provision shall survive the termination of a student’s relationship with Brown Mackie College — Salina, Brown Mackie
College — Kansas City, and Brown Mackie College — Oklahoma City.
68
Campus Security
The College publishes an annual security report that contains information concerning policies and programs relating to
campus security, crimes and emergencies, the prevention of crimes and sexual offenses, drug and alcohol use, campus law
enforcement and access to campus facilities. The annual security report also includes statistics concerning the occurrence
of specified types of crimes on campus, at certain off-campus locations, and on the public property surrounding the
campus. The annual security report is published each year by October 1 and contains statistics for the three most recent
calendar years. The annual security report is provided to all current students and employees. A copy of the most recent
annual security report may be obtained from the Admissions office during regular business hours. Copies of the Crime
Report are available on the Brown Mackie College — Salina, Brown Mackie College — Kansas City, and Brown Mackie
College — Oklahoma City website in the Student Consumer Information section.
The College will report to the campus community concerning the occurrence of any crime includable in the annual
security report that is reported to campus security or local police and that is considered to be a threat to students or
employees.
The College reminds all students that they are ultimately responsible for their own actions regarding their safety and
welfare.
69
TUITION, FEES, AND REFUND POLICY
Because of the many changes that may occur in both business and education, it is impossible to guarantee long-standing
tuition and fee charges. The College, therefore, reserves the right to modify tuition and other charges upon sufficient
notice to students and appropriate agencies. It is the responsibility of the student to remain apprised of the status of
his or her account.
Tuition and Fees
A listing of the College’s tuition and fees is published in the Bulletin identified as a part of this catalog.
Refund Policy
As allowed under Federal, state, and accreditation agency rules, the refund policy may be changed. Students will be
notified approximately sixty (60) calendar days in advance of any changes.
Return of Federal Title IV Aid
In compliance with Federal regulations, the school will determine how much Federal student financial assistance the
student has earned or not earned when a student who is a Title IV recipient withdraws from school.
The school will calculate the percentage and amount of awarded Federal student financial assistance that the student has
earned if the student withdraws up through the 60 percent point of the term. If the student has completed more than 60
percent of the term, the student earns 100 percent of the Federal student financial assistance.
The amount earned will be based on the percentage of the term that was completed in days up to and including the last
date of attendance. To calculate the amount earned, the school will determine the percentage by dividing the number of
calendar days completed in the term up to and including the last date of attendance by the total number of calendar days in
the term. If there is a scheduled break of five or more days, it will reduce the term length and if the scheduled break is
before the student’s last day of attendance, it will reduce the calendar days completed.
If the student received more than the amount of Federal student financial assistance earned, the difference will be returned
to the Federal student financial assistance programs from which funds were received in the following order: Federal
Unsubsidized Direct Loans, Federal Subsidized Direct Loans, Federal PLUS Loans, Federal Pell Grant, FSEOG. Funds
will be returned to the aid source within forty-five (45) calendar days of the date that the school determines that the student
has withdrawn.
If more Federal student financial assistance has been earned than has been received, the student may be eligible for a postwithdrawal disbursement loan funds. The school will notify the student of any post-withdrawal disbursement loan funds
for which the student may be eligible and what steps need to be taken for the Federal financial assistance funds to be
received. The student or parent, in the case of the Federal PLUS Loans, needs to provide permission before any loan
funds may be disbursed on the student’s account or disbursed to the student or parent. However, the school may
automatically use all or a portion of the post-withdrawal disbursement of grant funds for tuition, fees, and room and board
charges (as contracted with the school), and, with the student’s authorization, the school may automatically use the grant
funds for other educationally-related charges. Any balance of grant funds that may be available will be offered the
student.
If Federal student financial assistance funds need to be returned, the institution must return a portion or all of the unearned
funds equal to the lesser of:
п‚· The institutional charges multiplied by the percentage of the unearned Federal student financial assistance funds;
or
п‚· The entire amount of unearned funds.
If there are remaining unearned Federal financial aid funds to be returned, the student must return any loan funds that
remain to be returned in accordance with the terms and conditions of the promissory note. If the remaining amount of
funds to be returned includes grant funds, the student must return any amount of the overpayment that is more than half of
the grant funds received. The school will notify the student as to the amount owed and how and where it should be
returned.
70
Adjustment of Charges
If the student is not accepted, all monies paid in advance shall be refunded. If the student is accepted and then cancels
before classes begin, all monies paid in advance shall be refunded. If the student is accepted and subsequently starts,
he/she is subject to the Cancellation of Enrollment policy below.
The student’s last date of attendance is used to determine the refund due. Refund provisions apply only to complete
withdrawal from the College. Students who withdraw from the College should contact the Student Financial Service
department for advising and information concerning loan repayment.
In accordance with Brown Mackie College – Kansas City, Brown Mackie College – Salina and Brown Mackie College –
Oklahoma City policy, if a student withdraws from the College, Brown Mackie College – Kansas City, Brown Mackie
College – Salina and Brown Mackie College – Oklahoma City will refund tuition and fees as follows, based on the week
in which the student withdraws:
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
During the first 5% of the quarter, a refund of 95% of the quarter’s tuition, and fees;
More than 5% of the quarter up to 10% of the quarter, a refund of 90% of the quarter’s tuition, and fees;
More than 10% of the quarter up to 20% of the quarter, a refund of 80% of the quarter’s tuition, and fees;
More than 20% of the quarter up to 25% of the quarter, a refund of 75% of the quarter’s tuition, and fees;
More than 25% of the quarter up to 30% of the quarter, a refund of 70% of the quarter’s tuition, and fees;
More than 30% of the quarter up to 40% of the quarter, a refund of 60% of the quarter’s tuition, and fees;
More than 40% of the quarter up to 50% of the quarter, a refund of 50% of the quarter’s tuition, and fees;
More than 50% of the quarter up to 60% of the quarter, a refund of 40% of the quarter’s tuition, and fees;
More than 60% of the quarter or thereafter, 100% tuition obligation, no refund available with all fees retained.
Refunds after Matriculation
The College will first calculate how much needs to be returned under the Return of Federal Title IV Aid policy. The
College will then calculate how much of the charges can be retained based on the College refund policy. If there is
additional money to be refunded from Federal Title IV funds, the refund will be made to the student, or with the student’s
written authorization, to Federal Loans from which funds were received, in this order: Federal Unsubsidized Direct Loans,
Federal Subsidized Direct Loans, Federal PLUS Loans. If there is an additional credit balance remaining after the Federal
refund is made, under College policy, refunds will be made in this order, to programs from which funds were received:
Federal Unsubsidized Direct Loans, Federal Subsidized Direct Loans, Federal PLUS Loans, other loans, other aid (if
required), student.
If kits, components of the kit, books, or supplies are returned to the College store in re-saleable condition within twentyone (21) calendar days of withdrawal, a credit will be given.
All refunds and return of funds will be made within thirty (30) calendar days of the date the student notifies the College of
the withdrawal or of the institution terminating enrollment of the student, whichever is earlier.
Examples of the calculations for these policies are available in the Student Financial Service department.
Cancellation of Enrollment
A full refund will be made to any student who cancels the enrollment contract by submitting notice in writing within six
(6) business days (until midnight of the sixth day excluding Saturdays, Sundays and legal holidays) after the enrollment
contract is signed. When enrollment is cancelled, all monies paid to the College will be refunded to the applicant within
thirty (30) calendar days.
71
FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS
The College maintains a full-time staff of financial aid professionals to assist qualified students in obtaining the financial
assistance they require to meet their education expenses. Available resources include federal and state aid, student loans
from private lenders, and federal work-study opportunities, both on and off College premises. Federal assistance programs
are administered through the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Student Financial Assistance. Any U.S. citizen,
national, or person in the United States for other than temporary reasons who is enrolled or accepted for enrollment may
apply for these programs. Most forms of financial assistance are available for each July 1 – June 30 award period. Every
student considering application for financial aid should request a copy of the current Student Guide, published by the U.S.
Department of Education. The College will assist persons in understanding eligibility requirements, the application
process, deadlines, and the various forms of grants and loans available.
Federal Pell Grant
The Federal Pell Grant is an important source of aid for students. The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)
may be filed online at www.fafsa.ed.gov and is available through high school counselors or the Student Financial Services
Office. The amount of the award depends upon the determination of the student’s eligibility, his/her enrollment status, cost
of attendance, and a payment schedule issued by the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Student Financial
Assistance.
Federal Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant
Each year the College makes a limited number of awards to students through the Federal Supplemental Education
Opportunity (FSEOG) program. These funds are targeted for students who qualify based upon exceptional financial need
as determined by the results of the FAFSA. The financial aid officer determines who will receive a FSEOG and the
amount awarded, based on need, not to exceed the program maximum.
Federal Direct Loan Program
These loans are either subsidized or unsubsidized. A subsidized loan is awarded on the basis of financial need as
determined by the results of the FAFSA. The federal government pays interest on the subsidized loan while the student is
enrolled at least half time and during authorized periods of deferment. An unsubsidized loan is not awarded on the basis of
need. The borrower is charged interest from the time the loan is disbursed until it is paid in full. The borrower can either
allow the interest to accumulate, that is, the interest will be added to the principal amount of the loan and will increase the
amount the borrower must repay, or the borrower can pay the interest as it becomes due.
Federal PLUS Loan Program
Federal PLUS loans are for parents with good credit histories who want to borrow to help pay for their children’s
education. PLUS loans have a fixed interest rate and are made available to the parents of a dependent student by the
federal government. For additional information, students should contact the College Student Financial Services Office.
Federal Perkins Loan Program
A student who demonstrates financial need as determined by the results of the FAFSA may be eligible to borrow through
the Federal Perkins Loan Program to help meet his/her educational expenses. Recipients of Federal Perkins Loan funds are
selected by the Student Financial Services Office on the basis of financial need and the availability of funds. These funds
are extremely limited.
Federal Work-Study Program
The Federal Work-Study Program (FWSP) provides employment for students who demonstrate financial need as
determined by the results of the FAFSA and who desire to earn a part of their educational expenses. The program
encourages community service work and work related to a student’s program of study. FWSP employment is arranged
with public or private non-profit agencies off College premises, and the work performed must be in the public interest.
FWSP employment may also be arranged at the College under certain conditions. Eligibility for participation in the
Federal Work-Study Program is determined by the Student Financial Services Office, based on the student’s financial need
and academic progress. Questions regarding the Federal Work-Study Program should be directed to the College Student
Financial Services Office.
72
Vocational Rehabilitation
A student who has a physical or mental disability that is a handicap to employment may be eligible for training services
through the state government Agency for Vocational Rehabilitation. For further information, students should contact the
Business Office.
Veterans’ Benefits
The Department of Veterans Affairs administers a variety of education benefit programs. Many Veterans and active duty
personnel can qualify for more than one education benefits program, including but not limited to:
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
The Post-9/11 GI Bill
Montgomery GI Bill - Active Duty (MGIB-AD)
Montgomery GI Bill - Selected Reserve (MGIB-SR)
Reserve Educational Assistance Program (REAP)
Veterans Educational Assistance Program (VEAP)
Educational Assistance Test Program (Section 901)
Survivors’ and Dependents' Educational Assistance Program (DEA)
National Call to Service Program
Veterans Retraining Assistance Program
Free education and vocational counseling services are available to service members and veterans
More information is available at www.gibill.va.gov
Generally, survivors of deceased veterans, spouses of living veterans, and sons/daughters of veterans who died while on
active duty or who are permanently and totally disabled due to their military service may be eligible for educational
assistance. Prospective students who may qualify for educational assistance under these provisions should contact the
veterans’ coordinator at the College for further information regarding available programs and eligibility requirements.
Institutional Scholarships
Scholarship applications are reviewed by the campus president who is solely responsible for award decisions. All
Scholarship Awards are disbursed to recipients in quarterly increments over the academic year for which the scholarship
has been awarded. All scholarship recipients must maintain full-time status and a minimum cumulative grade point
average or will forfeit their awards. The total value of all college scholarships awarded to any one student shall not exceed
the cost of one academic year (48 credit hours) of tuition.
President’s Scholarship
Each year, the College makes available scholarships of $1000 each to qualifying seniors from area high schools. In order
to qualify, a senior must be graduating from a participating high school, must be maintaining a cumulative grade point
average of at least 2.0, and must submit a brief essay. The student’s extracurricular activities and community service are
also considered. The President’s Scholarship is available only to students enrolling in one of the College’s degree
programs. Students awarded the scholarship must begin classes at the College no later than October 15th. Applications for
these scholarships can be obtained from the guidance departments of participating high schools. These applications must
be completed and returned to the College by March 31. Those awarded scholarships will be notified by April 30. A list of
participating high schools may be obtained from the campus Admissions Office.
Merit Scholarship
This College-sponsored scholarship may be awarded to first year students who demonstrate exceptional academic ability.
To qualify for a Merit Scholarship, an applicant or student must have scored 21 or higher on the ACT, or 900 or higher on
the SAT. The maximum amount awarded by this scholarship to any student is $500.
Athletic Scholarship (Salina location only)
Athletic scholarships may be awarded to students who participate in athletic programs sponsored by the College. Current
sports are men’s baseball, men’s and women’s basketball, and women’s fast-pitch softball. Maximum award(s) for any
applicant or student are determined by the campus president. Further information is available from the Athletic Office.
Recipients of athletic scholarships must achieve a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.00 by their graduation.
Recipients who fail to maintain full-time status or the required grade point average will forfeit their awards.
73
The Education Foundation Scholarship
The Education Foundation was established in 2000 to offer scholarship support to students interested in continuing their
education in one of the post-secondary, career-focused schools in the Education Management Corporation system. The
number and amount of the awards can vary depending on the funds available. Scholarship applications may be offered as
often as once per Winter, Spring, Summer, and Fall quarters. At the College, applicants must be currently enrolled in an
associate’s or bachelor’s degree program and in their fourth quarter or higher (but no further than their second-to-last
quarter) at the time of application. Awards are made based on academic performance and potential, as well as financial
need. Applications can be obtained from the Student Financial Services department at Brown Mackie College – Brown
Mackie College — Salina, Brown Mackie College — Kansas City, and Brown Mackie College — Oklahoma City. The
applications must be completed and returned 30 days prior to the beginning of the quarter in which the Education
Foundation Scholarship is offered. Please see Student Financial Services department for specific deadlines. Those
awarded scholarships will be notified by the beginning of the quarter for which the scholarship is being awarded.
For detailed and complete information on all financial aid awards, processes, requirements, and deadlines, please refer to
the school's current Financial Aid Guide, the Student Consumer Information on the school’s website, or contact the
Student Financial Services Office directly.
74
PROGRAM OFFERING
Not all programs are offered at all locations.
Bachelor of Science degree is awarded in:
Business Administration
Health Care Management
The Associate of Applied Science degree is awarded in:
Accounting Technology
Architectural Design & Drafting Technology
Biomedical Equipment Technology
Business Management
Computer Aided Design & Drafting Technology
Computer Networking & Applications
Construction Trades-Welding
Criminal Justice
Health & Fitness Training
Health Care Administration
Medical Assisting
Nursing
Occupational Therapy Assistant
Operational Management - Associates of General Studies
Paralegal
Surgical Technology
Veterinary Technology
Diplomas are awarded in:
Architectural Drafting Specialist
Bookkeeping Specialist
Computer Aided Design & Drafting Technician
Criminal Justice Specialist
Fitness Trainer
General Business
Medical Assistant
Medical Insurance Specialist
Networking Specialist
Certificates are awarded in:
IV Therapy for Practical Nurses (not for college credit)
Network Engineer Specialist
Nurse Aid (not for college credit)
Practical Nursing
The College reserves the right to add or delete programs of study. Further, the College reserves the right to add or delete
courses within published programs of study. Continuing students enrolled in published programs will be notified in
advance of adjustments in their programs and will be protected from undue hardship which might otherwise result from
such adjustments.
Externship Requirement
Students should be aware that a criminal background and drug screening check may be required in order for them to
complete the externship requirements of the program.
75
Bachelor of Science:
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
The bachelor’s degree program in Business Administration is built on a foundation of general studies in mathematics, social
sciences, humanities, science, language arts and key business competencies. The program is designed to prepare graduates to seek a
variety of fields within the business arena or add to an existing set of skills.
Graduates of the program will be able to:
в–Є
в–Є
в–Є
в–Є
Apply principles and theories to workplace applications, employing the vocabulary, generally accepted business
principles, current technology, and procedures associated with the profession.
Evaluate business systems and practices to address the needs of an ever-changing business environment.
Analyze businesses and business models in a multivariate economy.
Perform as ethical professionals in the field of study, able to exhibit sound reasoning and effective communication in
an increasingly diverse world.
The following links provide program duration, tuition, fees, other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and other
important info on programs offered at Brown Mackie College – Kansas City, Brown Mackie College – Oklahoma City, and Brown
Mackie College – Salina.
Location
Brown Mackie College – Kansas City
Degree
Bachelor of Science in Business
Administration
Gainful Employment Link
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/4018
Brown Mackie College – Oklahoma
City
Brown Mackie College – Salina
Bachelor of Science in Business
Administration
Bachelor of Science in Business
Administration
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/4139
Concentration
ACC1011
ACC1012
ACC2010
BUS1100
BUS1120
BUS1130
BUS1300
BUS1400
BUS2120
BUS2250
BUS2600
BUS3000
BUS3240
BUS3300
BUS3381
BUS3382
BUS3400
BUS3500
BUS4360
BUS4370
BUS4500
BUS4620
BUS4640
BUS4650
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/4021
Quarter Credit Hours
4
Principles of Accounting I .....................................................................................................................
4
Principles of Accounting II ...................................................................................................................
4
Payroll Management .............................................................................................................................
4
Introduction to Business ........................................................................................................................
4
Business Law I ......................................................................................................................................
4
Advanced Spreadsheets .........................................................................................................................
4
Small Business Management .................................................................................................................
4
Human Resources..................................................................................................................................
4
Business Law II .....................................................................................................................................
4
Principles of Finance .............................................................................................................................
4
Marketing and Advertising ....................................................................................................................
4
Management Information Systems ........................................................................................................
4
Corporate Finance .................................................................................................................................
4
Management ..........................................................................................................................................
4
Introduction to Leadership ....................................................................................................................
4
Applied Leadership ...............................................................................................................................
4
Performance Management Systems.......................................................................................................
4
Organizational Behavior .......................................................................................................................
4
Operations Management .......................................................................................................................
4
Global Business Management ...............................................................................................................
4
Case Study Project ................................................................................................................................
4
Consumer Behavior and Market Research ............................................................................................
4
Marketing, Sales and Channel Management .........................................................................................
4
Retail Marketing ...................................................................................................................................
96
76
Bachelor of Science:
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (Continued)
Core Curriculum
Quarter Credit Hours
COM1101
Composition I* .....................................................................................................................................
COM1102
Composition II* ....................................................................................................................................
COM1200
Effective Public Speaking* ...................................................................................................................
HUM2000
Introduction to Literature* ....................................................................................................................
HUM3000
World Literature* .................................................................................................................................
HUM3010
History of Art Through the Middle Ages* ............................................................................................
HUM3020
History of Art Through the Modern Times* .........................................................................................
HUM3100
Introduction to Philosophy* ..................................................................................................................
MTH1800
College Algebra* ..................................................................................................................................
MTH3800
Statistics*..............................................................................................................................................
PSS1100
Professional Development ....................................................................................................................
PSS1200
Business Communications ....................................................................................................................
PSS1800
Applied Ethics ......................................................................................................................................
PSS4500
Senior Project .......................................................................................................................................
SCI1800
Introduction to Biology* .......................................................................................................................
SCI1850
Environmental Science* .......................................................................................................................
SSC1100
Principles of Psychology* ....................................................................................................................
SSC1450
Constitution and Society* .....................................................................................................................
SSC2220
Principles of Microeconomics* ............................................................................................................
SSC2230
Principles of Macroeconomics* ............................................................................................................
SSC3100
Principles of Sociology* .......................................................................................................................
Total quarter credit hours required
* Indicates a general education course
77
84
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
180
Bachelor of Science:
HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT
The bachelor’s degree program in Health Care Management is designed to accommodate the needs and interests of students from a
variety of backgrounds. Courses are intended to provide a solid foundation to seek varied entry-level health care careers.
Graduates of the program will be able to:
в–Є
в–Є
Apply learning to the functional role of the manager in a health care setting.
Analyze trends in health care and internal systems to assure they are adequately matched and working together.
в–Є
Evaluate the effectiveness of health care administrative systems and procedures for strategic revision and modification.
в–Є
Perform as ethical professionals in the field of study, able to exhibit sound reasoning and effective communication in an
increasingly diverse world.
The following links provide program duration, tuition, fees, other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and other
important info on programs offered at Brown Mackie College – Kansas City, Brown Mackie College – Oklahoma City, and Brown
Mackie College – Salina.
Location
Brown Mackie College –
Kansas City
Brown Mackie College –
Oklahoma City
Brown Mackie College –
Salina
Degree
Bachelor of Science in Health Care
Management
Bachelor of Science in Health Care
Management
Bachelor of Science in Health Care
Management
Gainful Employment Link
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/4019
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/4140
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/4020
Concentration
ACC1011
Quarter Credit Hours
Principles of Accounting I .....................................................................................................................
104
4
ACC1012
Principles of Accounting II ...................................................................................................................
4
BUS1100
Introduction to Business ........................................................................................................................
4
BUS1130
Advanced Spreadsheets .........................................................................................................................
4
BUS1400
Human Resources..................................................................................................................................
4
BUS3500
Organizational Behavior .......................................................................................................................
4
HCA1100
Professionalism and Communication in Health Care Setting ................................................................
4
HCA1110
Introduction to Health Care Services.....................................................................................................
4
HCA1700
Managing Health Care Information .......................................................................................................
4
HCA1750
Medical Administrative Practices..........................................................................................................
4
HCA1800
Diagnostic Coding .................................................................................................................................
4
HCA1850
Procedural Coding .................................................................................................................................
4
HCA1870
Medical Insurance Processes .................................................................................................................
4
HCA2200
Health Care Delivery Systems ..............................................................................................................
4
HCA2500
Medical Ethics.......................................................................................................................................
4
HCA3130
Health Care Marketing and Strategy .....................................................................................................
4
HCA3150
Health Care Finance ..............................................................................................................................
4
HCA3300
Health Services Organization and Delivery ..........................................................................................
4
HCA3330
Health Information Management Systems ............................................................................................
4
HCA3500
Economics of Health Care.....................................................................................................................
4
HCA3550
Ethics and Law for Administrators........................................................................................................
4
HCA4100
Leadership in HealthCare Organizations ...............................................................................................
4
HCA4120
Strategic Management in Health Care Organizations ............................................................................
4
HCA4140
Risk Management in Health Care Settings ............................................................................................
4
HCA4160
Case Studies in Health Administration ..................................................................................................
4
HSC1100
Medical Terminology ............................................................................................................................
4
78
Core Curriculum
Quarter Credit Hours
COM1101
Composition I* .....................................................................................................................................
76
4
COM1102
Composition II* ....................................................................................................................................
4
COM1200
Effective Public Speaking* ...................................................................................................................
4
HUM2000
Introduction to Literature* ....................................................................................................................
4
HUM3000
World Literature*..................................................................................................................................
4
HUM3010
History of Art Through the Middle Ages* ............................................................................................
4
HUM3020
History of Art Through the Modern Times* .........................................................................................
4
HUM3100
Introduction to Philosophy* ..................................................................................................................
4
MTH1800
College Algebra* ..................................................................................................................................
4
MTH3800
Statistics* ..............................................................................................................................................
4
PSS1100
Professional Development ....................................................................................................................
4
PSS1200
Business Communications ....................................................................................................................
4
PSS4500
Senior Project........................................................................................................................................
4
SCI1360
Anatomy and Physiology* ....................................................................................................................
4
SCI1850
Environmental Science* .......................................................................................................................
4
SSC1100
Principles of Psychology* .....................................................................................................................
4
SSC1450
Constitution and Society* .....................................................................................................................
4
SSC2230
Principles of Macroeconomics * ...........................................................................................................
4
SSC3100
Principles of Sociology* .......................................................................................................................
4
Total quarter credit hours required
180
* Indicates a general education course
79
Associate of Applied Science:
ACCOUNTING TECHNOLOGY
The associate’s degree program in Accounting Technology is designed to prepare graduates to seek entry-level employment and
advancement in accounting positions in various types of business organizations. The program is designed to meet its objectives
through instruction in appropriate accounting, business, and general education courses.
Graduates of the program will be able to:
в–Є
в–Є
в–Є
в–Є
Apply the fundamental principles of accounting to workplace problems, using generally accepted principles and
procedures.
Operate computerized accounting systems to address accounting and business applications.
Prepare, maintain, interpret, and analyze basic financial statements, and apply the relationship of these statements to the
accounting equation.
Perform as ethical professionals in the field of study, exhibiting sound reasoning and effective communication in an
increasingly diverse world.
The following links provide program duration, tuition, fees, other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and other
important info on programs offered at Brown Mackie College – Kansas City, Brown Mackie College – Oklahoma City, and Brown
Mackie College – Salina.
Location
Brown Mackie College –
Kansas City*
Brown Mackie College –
Oklahoma City
Brown Mackie College –
Salina*
Degree
Associate of Applied Science in Accounting
Technology
Associate of Applied Science in Accounting
Technology
Associate of Applied Science in Accounting
Technology
Gainful Employment Link
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/11
52
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/28
01
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/12
04
*This program is no longer enrolling new students
Concentration
Quarter Credit Hours
ACC1011
Principles of Accounting I ............................................................................................................................
ACC1012
Principles of Accounting II ...........................................................................................................................
ACC1013
Principles of Accounting III ..........................................................................................................................
ACC2010
Payroll Management .....................................................................................................................................
ACC2020
Computerized Accounting Systems ..............................................................................................................
ACC2040
Tax Accounting.............................................................................................................................................
ACC2900
Accounting Externship ..................................................................................................................................
BUS1100
Introduction to Business................................................................................................................................
BUS1120
Business Law I ..............................................................................................................................................
BUS1130
Advanced Spreadsheets.................................................................................................................................
BUS2250
Principles of Finance.....................................................................................................................................
SSC2230
Principles of Macroeconomics ......................................................................................................................
Core Curriculum
Quarter Credit Hours
COM1101
Composition I* .............................................................................................................................................
COM1102
Composition II* ............................................................................................................................................
COM1200
Effective Public Speaking* ...........................................................................................................................
HUM2000
Introduction to Literature* ............................................................................................................................
MTH1800
College Algebra* ..........................................................................................................................................
PSS1100
Professional Development ............................................................................................................................
PSS1200
Business Communications ............................................................................................................................
PSS1800
Applied Ethics...............................................................................................................................................
SCI1850
Environmental Science* ...............................................................................................................................
SSC1100
Principles of Psychology* .............................................................................................................................
SSC1450
Constitution and Society* .............................................................................................................................
Total quarter credit hours required
* Indicates a general education course
80
46
4
4
4
4
4
4
2
4
4
4
4
4
44
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
90
Associate of Applied Science:
ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN AND DRAFTING TECHNOLOGY
Program not offered at Brown Mackie College - Oklahoma City
The associate’s degree program in Architectural Design and Drafting Technology prepares the graduate with the necessary
technical knowledge and skills to seek entry-level positions in computer aided design and drafting operations as they support
the engineering aspects of residential and commercial building design. The program provides the student with a combination
of computer aided drafting and design skills using current software applications and the general education courses needed to
meet the technical and professional demands for these applications in the architectural, construction, and engineering
industries.
Graduates of the program will be able to:
в–Є Exhibit proficiency in using basic drafting technology, distinguishing between the component of mechanical and
computer-aided drafting.
в–Є Demonstrate basic computer-aided design project skills.
в–Є
в–Є
Apply engineering/design theory, industry-accepted standards, and practices to solve design problems in the workplace
setting.
Perform as ethical professionals in the field of study, exhibiting sound reasoning and effective communication in an
increasingly diverse world.
The following links provide program duration, tuition, fees, other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and
other important info on programs offered at Brown Mackie College – Kansas City, Brown Mackie College – Oklahoma City,
and Brown Mackie College – Salina.
Location
Degree
Gainful Employment Link
Brown Mackie College –
Associate of Applied Science in
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/2370
Kansas City
Architectural Design and Drafting
Technology
Brown Mackie College –
Associate of Applied Science in
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/2371
Salina*
Architectural Design and Drafting
Technology
*This program is no longer enrolling new students.
Concentration
Quarter Credit Hours 46
CDE1100
Fundamentals of Drafting .............................................................................................................................
CDE1200
Multiview Drawing ......................................................................................................................................
CDE1500
3-Dimensional Graphics ...............................................................................................................................
CDE1850
Computerized Design for Structural Engineering .........................................................................................
CDE1860
Computerized Design for Mechanical Engineering ......................................................................................
CDE1870
Computerized Design for Civil Engineering.................................................................................................
CDE2011
Building Information Modeling I .................................................................................................................
CDE2012
Building Information Modeling II ................................................................................................................
CDE2230
3-Dimensional Visualization I ......................................................................................................................
CDE2240
3-Dimensional Visualization II .....................................................................................................................
CDE2900
Design and Drafting Externship ...................................................................................................................
SCI1100
Physics..........................................................................................................................................................
Core Curriculum
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
2
4
Quarter Credit Hours 44
BUS1130
Advanced Spreadsheets ................................................................................................................................
COM1101
Composition I* .............................................................................................................................................
COM1102
Composition II* ............................................................................................................................................
COM1200
Effective Public Speaking*...........................................................................................................................
HUM2000
Introduction to Literature* ............................................................................................................................
MTH1800
College Algebra* ..........................................................................................................................................
PSS1100
Professional Development ............................................................................................................................
PSS1200
Business Communications ............................................................................................................................
PSS1800
Applied Ethics ..............................................................................................................................................
SCI1850
Environmental Science* ...............................................................................................................................
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
SSC1100
Principles of Psychology* ............................................................................................................................
Total quarter credit hours required
90
* Indicates a general education course
81
Associate of Applied Science: BIOMEDICAL EQUIPMENT TECHNOLOGY
The associate’s degree program in Biomedical Equipment Technology is designed to prepare the student to seek a variety of entry-level
positions in the field. Biomedical Equipment Technologists apply basic engineering principles and technical skills necessary to properly
maintain diagnostic, treatment and life support equipment in the health and medical fields. Students undergo training in electronics and
computer technology, with a special emphasis on medical applications, operations and procedures. This program includes instruction in
instrument calibration, design and installation testing; and safety, maintenance, and installation procedures. The general education
component of the program prepares students to think critically in preparation for taking on leadership positions in the field.
Graduates of the program will be able to:
в–Є
в–Є
в–Є
в–Є
Demonstrate familiarity with basic human anatomy, standard medical practices, routine medical procedures, and basic
safety procedures.
Utilize wiring diagrams and schematic drawings to perform repair and maintenance on biomedical equipment and
computers.
Demonstrate the ability to troubleshoot, perform preventative maintenance, calibrate and repair biomedical equipment
and computers.
Perform as ethical professionals in the field of study, exhibiting sound reasoning and effective communication in an
increasingly diverse world.
The following links provide program duration, tuition, fees, other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and other
important info on programs offered at Brown Mackie College – Kansas City, Brown Mackie College – Oklahoma City, and Brown
Mackie College – Salina.
Location
Degree
Gainful Employment Link
Brown Mackie College –
Associate of Applied Science in Biomedical
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/4331
Kansas City
Equipment Technology
Brown Mackie College –
Associate of Applied Science in Biomedical
Oklahoma City
Equipment Technology
Brown Mackie College –
Associate of Applied Science in Biomedical
Salina*
Equipment Technology
*This program is no longer enrolling new students.
Concentration
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/4334
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/4175
Quarter Credit Hours
46
ELE1101
Fundamentals of Electronics I ................................................................................................................................... 4
ELE1102
Fundamentals of Electronics II .................................................................................................................................... 4
ELE1301
Solid State Electronics I .............................................................................................................................................. 4
ELE1302
Solid State Electronics II ............................................................................................................................................. 4
ELE2201
Computer Repair: Systems and Software .................................................................................................................... 4
ELE2202
Computer Repair: Hardware Applications................................................................................................................... 4
ELE2500
Introduction to Biomedical Equipment Technology .................................................................................................... 4
ELE2501
Biomedical Equipment and Instrumentation I ............................................................................................................. 4
ELE2502
Biomedical Equipment and Instrumentation II ............................................................................................................ 4
ELE2950
Biomedical Equipment Technology Externship .......................................................................................................... 2
MTH1800
College Algebra........................................................................................................................................................... 4
SCI1100
Physics ........................................................................................................................................................................ 4
Core Curriculum
Quarter Credit Hours
44
COM1101
Composition I* ............................................................................................................................................................ 4
COM1102
Composition II*........................................................................................................................................................... 4
COM1200
Effective Public Speaking* ......................................................................................................................................... 4
HCA1100
Professionalism & Communication in a Health Care Setting ...................................................................................... 4
HCA2500
Medical Ethics ............................................................................................................................................................. 4
HSC1100
Medical Terminology .................................................................................................................................................. 4
HUM2000
Introduction to Literature* .......................................................................................................................................... 4
PSS1100
Professional Development ........................................................................................................................................... 4
SCI1360
Anatomy and Physiology* .......................................................................................................................................... 4
SCI1850
Environmental Science* .............................................................................................................................................. 4
SSC1100
Principles of Psychology* ........................................................................................................................................... 4
Total quarter credit hours required
90
* Indicates a general education course
82
Associate of Applied Science:
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
The associate’s degree program in Business Management is designed to equip graduates with the knowledge and skills necessary to
seek entry into the contemporary world of business management. The curriculum reaches this objective through coursework in
management principles, technical business procedures, computer operations, and general education. The program is designed to
prepare the graduate to seek any of a variety of entry-level management positions.
Graduates of the program will be able to:
в–Є
в–Є
в–Є
в–Є
Employ the vocabulary, rules, and procedures associated with the business culture, applying business law and the
elements of ethics and social responsibility of business.
Utilize appropriate information technologies to address the business needs of planning, accounting, and process control.
Apply business principles and theories to workplace problems, using the sound management of finance, human
resources, marketing techniques, and operational processes.
Perform as ethical professionals in the field of study, exhibiting sound reasoning and effective communication in an
increasingly diverse world.
The following links provide program duration, tuition, fees, other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and other
important info on programs offered at Brown Mackie College – Kansas City, Brown Mackie College – Oklahoma City, and Brown
Mackie College – Salina.
Location
Degree
Gainful Employment Link
Brown Mackie College – Kansas
Associate of Applied Science in
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/1155
City
Business Management
Brown Mackie College – Oklahoma Associate of Applied Science in
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/2845
City
Business Management
Brown Mackie College – Salina
Associate of Applied Science in
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/1207
Business Management
Concentration
Quarter Credit Hours
46
ACC1011
Principles of Accounting I .............................................................................................................................
4
ACC1012
Principles of Accounting II ...........................................................................................................................
4
ACC2010
Payroll Management .....................................................................................................................................
4
BUS1100
Introduction to Business ................................................................................................................................
4
BUS1120
Business Law I ..............................................................................................................................................
4
BUS1130
Advanced Spreadsheets .................................................................................................................................
4
BUS1300
Small Business Management .........................................................................................................................
4
BUS1400
Human Resources ..........................................................................................................................................
4
BUS2250
Principles of Finance .....................................................................................................................................
4
BUS2600
Marketing and Advertising ............................................................................................................................
4
BUS2900
Business Externship ......................................................................................................................................
2
SSC2230
Principles of Macroeconomics ......................................................................................................................
4
Core Curriculum
Quarter Credit Hours
44
COM1101
Composition I* ..............................................................................................................................................
4
COM1102
Composition II* ............................................................................................................................................
4
COM1200
Effective Public Speaking* ...........................................................................................................................
4
HUM2000
Introduction to Literature* ............................................................................................................................
4
MTH1800
College Algebra* ..........................................................................................................................................
4
PSS1100
Professional Development .............................................................................................................................
4
PSS1200
Business Communications ............................................................................................................................
4
PSS1800
Applied Ethics ...............................................................................................................................................
4
SCI1850
Environmental Science* ................................................................................................................................
4
SSC1100
Principles of Psychology* .............................................................................................................................
4
SSC1450
Constitution and Society* .............................................................................................................................
Total quarter credit hours required
4
90
* Indicates a general education course
83
Associate of Applied Science:
COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN AND DRAFTING TECHNOLOGY
Program not offered at Oklahoma City
The associate’s degree program in Computer Aided Design and Drafting Technology is designed to prepare the graduate with the
necessary technical knowledge and skills to seek entry-level positions in computer aided design and drafting (CADD) operations. The
program is designed to provide students with a combination of mechanical and computer aided drafting and design skills, as well as
general education, to meet the expanding demand for these applications in a variety of industries.
Graduates of the program will be able to:
в–Є
в–Є
в–Є
в–Є
Exhibit proficiency in using basic drafting technology.
Demonstrate basic computer-aided design project skills.
Apply engineering/design theory, industry accepted standards, and practices.
Perform as ethical professionals in the field of study, exhibiting sound reasoning and effective communication in an
increasingly diverse world.
The following links provide program duration, tuition, fees, other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and other
important info on programs offered at Brown Mackie College – Kansas City, Brown Mackie College – Oklahoma City, and Brown
Mackie College – Salina.
Location
Degree
Gainful Employment Link
Brown Mackie College –
Associate of Applied Science in Computer ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/1157
Kansas City*
Aided Design and Drafting Technology
Brown Mackie College –
Associate of Applied Science in Computer
Salina*
Aided Design and Drafting Technology
*This program is no longer enrolling new students
Concentration
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/1209
Quarter Credit Hours
46
CDE1100
Fundamentals of Drafting..............................................................................................................................
4
CDE1110
Dimensioning and Tolerancing .....................................................................................................................
4
CDE1200
Multiview Drawing .......................................................................................................................................
4
CDE1210
Technical Drawing ........................................................................................................................................
4
CDE1500
3-Dimensional Graphics ................................................................................................................................
4
CDE1510
Descriptive Geometry ...................................................................................................................................
4
CDE2210
Detail Drawing ..............................................................................................................................................
4
CDE2235
AutoCAD Customization ..............................................................................................................................
4
CDE2550
Solid Modeling ..............................................................................................................................................
4
CDE2610
Fastening Devices .........................................................................................................................................
4
CDE2900
Design and Drafting Externship ....................................................................................................................
2
SCI1100
Physics ..........................................................................................................................................................
4
Core Curriculum
Quarter Credit Hours
44
BUS1130
Advanced Spreadsheets .................................................................................................................................
4
COM1101
Composition I* ..............................................................................................................................................
4
COM1102
Composition II* ............................................................................................................................................
4
COM1200
Effective Public Speaking* ...........................................................................................................................
4
HUM2000
Introduction to Literature* ............................................................................................................................
4
MTH1800
College Algebra* ..........................................................................................................................................
4
PSS1100
Professional Development .............................................................................................................................
4
PSS1200
Business Communications ............................................................................................................................
4
PSS1800
Applied Ethics ...............................................................................................................................................
4
SCI1850
Environmental Science* ................................................................................................................................
4
SSC1100
Principles of Psychology* .............................................................................................................................
Total quarter credit hours required
4
90
* Indicates a general education course
84
Associate of Applied Science:
COMPUTER NETWORKING AND APPLICATIONS
Program not currently offered at Oklahoma City
The associate’s degree program in Computer Networking and Applications is designed to provide the student with a foundation to
seek employment in entry-level networking. Technical courses are intended to provide hands-on experience in building,
troubleshooting, designing, and implementing networks. Beyond the technical curriculum, the program meets its educational
objectives through appropriate business and general education courses.
Graduates of the program will be able to:
в–Є
в–Є
в–Є
в–Є
Exhibit the knowledge of computer network installation, configuration, and administration.
Demonstrate the ability to design and manage security for a computer network.
Detect, troubleshoot, and repair problems in computer software, hardware, and network systems.
Perform as ethical professionals in the field of study, exhibiting sound reasoning and effective communication in an
increasingly diverse world.
The following links provide program duration, tuition, fees, other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and other
important info on programs offered at Brown Mackie College – Kansas City, Brown Mackie College – Oklahoma City, and Brown
Mackie College – Salina.
Location
Brown Mackie College – Kansas
City*
Degree
Associate of Applied Science in
Computer Networking and Applications
Gainful Employment Link
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/1159
Associate of Applied Science in
Computer Networking and Applications
*This program is no longer enrolling new students
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/1211
Brown Mackie College – Salina*
Concentration
BUS3000
Quarter Credit Hours
Management Information Systems ................................................................................................................
46
4
CIT1120
Principles of Logic and Problem Solving ......................................................................................................
4
CIT2120
Fundamentals of Web-based Systems ...........................................................................................................
4
CIT2990
Networking Externship .................................................................................................................................
2
CIT3213
Windows Professional ...................................................................................................................................
4
CIT3223
Windows Server ............................................................................................................................................
4
CIT3233
Directory Services Infrastructure ..................................................................................................................
4
CIT3243
Network Infrastructure Implementation and Administration .........................................................................
4
CIT3253
Network Infrastructure Design and Security Design .....................................................................................
4
CIT3263
Exchange Server ...........................................................................................................................................
4
ELE2201
Computer Repair: Systems and Software ......................................................................................................
4
ELE2202
Computer Repair: Hardware Applications ....................................................................................................
4
Core Curriculum
Quarter Credit Hours
BUS1100
Introduction to Business ................................................................................................................................
44
4
COM1101
Composition I* ..............................................................................................................................................
4
COM1102
Composition II* ............................................................................................................................................
4
COM1200
Effective Public Speaking* ...........................................................................................................................
4
HUM2000
Introduction to Literature* ............................................................................................................................
4
MTH1800
College Algebra* ..........................................................................................................................................
4
PSS1100
Professional Development .............................................................................................................................
4
PSS1200
Business Communications ............................................................................................................................
4
PSS1800
Applied Ethics ...............................................................................................................................................
4
SCI1850
Environmental Science* ................................................................................................................................
4
SSC1100
Principles of Psychology* .............................................................................................................................
Total quarter credit hours required
4
90
* Indicates a general education course
85
Associate of Applied Science: CONSTRUCTION TRADES – WELDING
Program not currently offered at Brown Mackie College - Oklahoma City or Brown Mackie College-Kansas City
This associate degree program is designed to provide the student with a foundation in the construction trades by presenting
common methods and tools, including the proper safety procedures. The concentration courses in welding provide the skills
necessary to seek entry-level welding positions in manufacturing and construction. In addition to an overview of the
construction industry, this program addresses a wide range of skills in welding, brazing, cutting, and fabrication operations
using shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), gas metal arc welding, (GMAW), and flux-cored arc welding (FCAW)
techniques. Through a combination of classroom training and hands-on skills practice, students are exposed to the tools,
methods, materials, and proper safety procedures necessary to weld successfully.
Upon successful completion of the program, graduates should be able to:
в–Є
в–Є
в–Є
в–Є
в–Є
Identify and employ the terminology, equipment, and materials commonly encountered in various construction trades, with
an emphasis on welding.
Demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and abilities developed in the program through applications involving various
materials, methods, and situations, while demonstrating sound quality and safety principles in both welding and across
different aspects of the construction trade.
Demonstrate sound scaffolding and rigging techniques using the proper equipment and safety features relevant to each
task.
Assess and critique welding plans and projects to propose effective solutions to construction design problems.
Perform as ethical professionals in the field of study, able to exhibit sound reasoning and effective communication in an
increasingly diverse world.
The following links provide program duration, tuition, fees, other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and other
important info on programs offered at Brown Mackie College – Kansas City, Brown Mackie College – Oklahoma City, and Brown
Mackie College – Salina.
Location
Degree
Gainful Employment Link
Brown Mackie College –
Associate of Applied Science in Construction Trades ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/4403
Salina
Welding
Concentration
Quarter Credit Hours
46
WLD1501
Level I Welding A ........................................................................................................................................
4
WLD1502
Level I Welding B ........................................................................................................................................
4
WLD1503
Level I Welding C ........................................................................................................................................
4
WLD1601
Level II Welding A .......................................................................................................................................
5
WLD1602
Level II Welding B .......................................................................................................................................
4
WLD1701
Level III Welding A .....................................................................................................................................
5
WLD1702
Level III Welding B ......................................................................................................................................
4
WLD1703
Level III Welding C ......................................................................................................................................
4
WLD1704
Level III Welding D .....................................................................................................................................
4
WLD1801
Level IV Welding A .....................................................................................................................................
4
WLD1802
Level IV Welding B .....................................................................................................................................
4
Core Curriculum
Quarter Credit Hours
45
CON1101
Introduction to Construction Trades .............................................................................................................
5
CON1102
Scaffolding ...................................................................................................................................................
4
CON1106
Rigging .........................................................................................................................................................
4
CON1107
Field Safety...................................................................................................................................................
4
PSS1100
Professional Development ............................................................................................................................
4
COM1101
Composition I* .............................................................................................................................................
4
COM1102
Composition II* ............................................................................................................................................
4
HUM2000
Introduction to Literature* ............................................................................................................................
4
SSC1100
Principles of Psychology* ............................................................................................................................
4
MTH1800
College Algebra* ..........................................................................................................................................
4
SCI1850
Environmental Science .................................................................................................................................
4
Total quarter credit hours required
91
*indicates general education courses
86
Associate of Applied Science: CRIMINAL JUSTICE
Program not offered at Brown Mackie College Oklahoma City
The associate’s degree program in Criminal Justice is designed to prepare graduates to seek entry-level job opportunities in law
enforcement, corrections, investigations, juvenile law, and security. An associate’s degree in Criminal Justice offers students a solid
foundation in human service-related fields.**
Graduates of the program will be able to:
в–Є
в–Є
в–Є
в–Є
Understand the basics of the principle components of the criminal justice and correctional systems, including describing
principles and practices of criminal justice and distinguishing system components.
Use the tools and systems commonly encountered in the criminal justice environment, particularly those related to criminal
investigation and police procedures.
Demonstrate criminal justice, security, and corrections practices and procedures, including those for the juvenile justice
system.
Perform as ethical professionals in the field of study, exhibiting sound reasoning and effective communication in an
increasingly diverse world.
The following links provide program duration, tuition, fees, other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and other
important info on programs offered at Brown Mackie College – Kansas City, Brown Mackie College – Oklahoma City, and Brown
Mackie College – Salina.
Location
Degree
Gainful Employment Link
Brown Mackie College –
Associate of Applied Science in Criminal Justice
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/1163
Kansas City
Brown Mackie College –
Associate of Applied Science in Criminal Justice
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/1190
Salina
Concentration
Quarter Credit Hours
46
JUS1100
Introduction to Criminal Justice ....................................................................................................................
4
JUS1111
Report Writing ..............................................................................................................................................
4
JUS1300
Correctional Systems and Practices...............................................................................................................
4
JUS1550
Criminal Investigation and Police Procedure ................................................................................................
4
JUS1700
Introduction to Criminology..........................................................................................................................
4
JUS2111
Research Methods .........................................................................................................................................
4
JUS2500
Criminal Procedure .......................................................................................................................................
4
JUS2530
Homeland Security ........................................................................................................................................
4
JUS2700
Juvenile Justice .............................................................................................................................................
4
JUS2900
Criminal Justice Externship ..........................................................................................................................
2
LEG1350
Criminal Law ................................................................................................................................................
4
SSC1460
The American Judicial System ......................................................................................................................
4
Core Curriculum
Quarter Credit Hours
44
COM1101
Composition I*..............................................................................................................................................
4
COM1102
Composition II* ............................................................................................................................................
4
COM1200
Effective Public Speaking* ...........................................................................................................................
4
HUM2000
Introduction to Literature* ............................................................................................................................
4
MTH1800
College Algebra* ..........................................................................................................................................
4
PSS1100
Professional Development ............................................................................................................................
4
PSS1200
Business Communications ............................................................................................................................
4
PSS1800
Applied Ethics...............................................................................................................................................
4
SCI1360
Anatomy and Physiology* ............................................................................................................................
4
SSC1100
Principles of Psychology* .............................................................................................................................
4
SSC1450
Constitution and Society* .............................................................................................................................
Total quarter credit hours required
4
90
* Indicates a general education course
** This program is not intended for advancement into law school.
87
Associate of Applied Science: HEALTH & FITNESS TRAINING
Program not offered at Brown Mackie College - Oklahoma City
The associate’s degree program is designed to provide students with skills and knowledge to seek entry-level positions in the health,
fitness, wellness, or the recreation industry. Graduates will have the opportunity to seek employment positions that require skills to
assess health and fitness levels, design, implement, and promote safe effective exercise programs for various populations, screen clients
for contraindications to exercise and sit for national certification exams.**
Graduates of the program will be able to:
в–Є
в–Є
в–Є
в–Є
Understand the natural sciences informing the study of an allied health program.
Demonstrate an ability to teach appropriate modifications in specific exercises for most populations.
Employ relevant regulatory, organizational and professional rules and standards associated with a health and fitness
business environment.
Perform as ethical professionals in the field of study, exhibiting sound reasoning and effective communication in an
increasingly diverse world.
The following links provide program duration, tuition, fees, other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and other
important info on programs offered at Brown Mackie College – Kansas City, Brown Mackie College – Oklahoma City, and Brown
Mackie College – Salina.
Location
Degree
Gainful Employment Link
Brown Mackie College – Kansas
Associate of Applied Science in Health &
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/2368
City*
Fitness Training
Brown Mackie College – Salina*
Associate of Applied Science in Health &
Fitness Training
*This program is no longer enrolling new students
Concentration
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/2366
Quarter Credit Hours
ALH1250
Introduction to Health and Fitness ................................................................................................................
ALH1483
Kinesiology...................................................................................................................................................
ALH1650
Introduction to Nutrition ...............................................................................................................................
ALH2251
Exercise Psychology .....................................................................................................................................
ALH2253
Exercise Physiology......................................................................................................................................
ALH2255
Fitness Assessment and Exercise Prescription – Health ...............................................................................
ALH2257
Fitness Assessment and Exercise Prescription – Sports ................................................................................
ALH2925
Health and Fitness Externship ......................................................................................................................
BUS1100
Introduction to Business ...............................................................................................................................
BUS1300
Small Business Management ........................................................................................................................
HCA1100
Professionalism and Communication in Healthcare Setting .........................................................................
HSC1100
Medical Terminology ...................................................................................................................................
Core Curriculum
Quarter Credit Hours
COM1101
Composition I* .............................................................................................................................................
COM1102
Composition II* ............................................................................................................................................
COM1200
Effective Public Speaking* ...........................................................................................................................
HUM2000
Introduction to Literature* ............................................................................................................................
MTH1800
College Algebra* ..........................................................................................................................................
PSS1100
Professional Development ............................................................................................................................
PSS1800
Applied Ethics ..............................................................................................................................................
SCI1351
Anatomy and Physiology I ...........................................................................................................................
SCI1352
Anatomy and Physiology II ..........................................................................................................................
SCI1850
Environmental Science* ...............................................................................................................................
SSC1100
Principles of Psychology* ............................................................................................................................
Total quarter credit hours required
* Indicates a general education course
**Brown Mackie College — Salina, Brown Mackie College-Kansas City a does not guarantee third-party certification/licensure. Outside agencies control
the requirements for taking and passing certification/licensing exams and are subject to change without notice to Brown Mackie College — Salina, Brown
Mackie College, Kansas City
88
48
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
44
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
92
Associate of Applied Science: HEALTH CARE ADMINISTRATION
The associate’s degree program in Healthcare Administration is designed to prepare the student to understand all the components that
are essential to providing management and organizational support in the healthcare industry. A student will have the opportunity to be
exposed to various healthcare systems and will have the opportunity to learn multiple aspects of healthcare administration while
simultaneously being trained in the clinical aspects of providing healthcare to the general population. A graduate will have the
opportunity to seek entry-level administrative positions in hospitals, clinics, healthcare insurance offices, home healthcare agencies,
public health settings, and any other healthcare or healthcare related organization.
Graduates of the program will be able to:
в–Є
в–Є
в–Є
в–Є
Possess an operational understanding of the health/disease continuum.
Apply software solutions to healthcare management problems.
Demonstrate the ability to manage health care finances and information.
Perform as ethical professionals in the field of study, exhibiting sound reasoning and effective communication in an
increasingly diverse world.
The following links provide program duration, tuition, fees, other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and other
important info on programs offered at Brown Mackie College – Kansas City, Brown Mackie College – Oklahoma City, and Brown
Mackie College – Salina.
Location
Degree
Gainful Employment Link
Brown Mackie College –
Associate of Applied Science in Health Care
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/2113
Kansas City
Administration
Brown Mackie College –
Associate of Applied Science in Health Care
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/2849
Oklahoma City
Administration
Brown Mackie College –
Associate of Applied Science in Health Care
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/2110
Salina
Administration
Concentration
Quarter Credit Hours
ACC1012
Principles of Accounting II ...........................................................................................................................
BUS1130
Advanced Spreadsheets .................................................................................................................................
HCA1100
Professionalism and Communication in Health Care Setting ........................................................................
HCA1110
Introduction to Healthcare Services ..............................................................................................................
HCA1700
Managing Healthcare Information ................................................................................................................
HCA1750
Medical Administrative Practices..................................................................................................................
HCA1800
Diagnostic Coding .........................................................................................................................................
HCA1850
Procedural Coding .........................................................................................................................................
HCA1870
Medical Insurance Processes .........................................................................................................................
HCA2500
Medical Ethics...............................................................................................................................................
HCA2900
Healthcare Externship ...................................................................................................................................
HSC1100
Medical Terminology ....................................................................................................................................
Core Curriculum
Quarter Credit Hours
ACC1011
Principles of Accounting I .............................................................................................................................
BUS1100
Introduction to Business ................................................................................................................................
COM1101
Composition I* ..............................................................................................................................................
COM1102
Composition II* ............................................................................................................................................
COM1200
Effective Public Speaking* ...........................................................................................................................
HUM2000
Introduction to Literature* ............................................................................................................................
MTH1800
College Algebra* ..........................................................................................................................................
PSS1100
Professional Development .............................................................................................................................
PSS1200
Business Communications ............................................................................................................................
SCI1850
Environmental Science * ...............................................................................................................................
SSC1100
Principles of Psychology* .............................................................................................................................
Total quarter credit hours required
* Indicates a general education course
89
46
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
2
4
44
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
90
Associate of Applied Science:
MEDICAL ASSISTING
The associate’s degree program in Medical Assisting is designed to prepare students to seek work with, and under the direction of,
physicians in the office or in other medical settings. To achieve this goal, the Medical Assisting curriculum provides study in clinical
and laboratory procedures, anatomy and physiology, medical terminology, and medical office administration. Coursework in general
education and business also can help graduates to grow professionally and develop the ability to assume leadership roles.
Graduates of the program will be able to:
в–Є
в–Є
в–Є
в–Є
Understand the natural science informing the study of an allied health program.
Perform appropriate clinical, laboratory and office skills and procedures toward applying these to an understanding of
diagnosis and treatment, and toward resolving medical office problems.
Demonstrate entry-level competencies for the Medical Assistant as outlined by nationally recognized and accredited
medical assisting bodies.
Perform as ethical professionals in the field of study, exhibiting sound reasoning and effective communication in an
increasingly diverse world.
The following links provide program duration, tuition, fees, other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and other
important info on programs offered at Brown Mackie College – Kansas City, Brown Mackie College – Oklahoma City, and Brown
Mackie College – Salina.
Location
Degree
Gainful Employment Link
Brown Mackie College –
Associate of Applied Science in Medical Assisting ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/1167
Kansas City*
Brown Mackie College –
Associate of Applied Science in Medical Assisting ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/2847
Oklahoma City
Brown Mackie College –
Associate of Applied Science in Medical Assisting ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/1194
Salina
*This program is no longer enrolling new students
Concentration
Quarter Credit Hours
48
ALH1601
Pharmacy I ....................................................................................................................................................
4
ALH1610
Dosage Calculation .......................................................................................................................................
4
ALH2935
Medical Assisting Externship ........................................................................................................................
4
HCA1750
Medical Administrative Practices ..................................................................................................................
4
HCA2500
Medical Ethics...............................................................................................................................................
4
HSC1100
Medical Terminology ....................................................................................................................................
4
HSC1851
Clinical Procedures I .....................................................................................................................................
4
HSC1852
Clinical Procedures II ....................................................................................................................................
4
HSC2830
Phlebotomy and Hematology Procedures ......................................................................................................
4
HSC2840
Urinalysis and Microbiology Procedures ......................................................................................................
4
SCI1351
Anatomy and Physiology I ............................................................................................................................
4
SCI1352
Anatomy and Physiology II ...........................................................................................................................
Core Curriculum
Quarter Credit Hours
4
44
BUS1140
Advanced Word Processing ..........................................................................................................................
4
COM1101
Composition I* ..............................................................................................................................................
4
COM1102
Composition II* ............................................................................................................................................
4
COM1200
Effective Public Speaking* ...........................................................................................................................
4
HCA1100
Professionalism and Communication in Healthcare Setting ..........................................................................
4
HUM2000
Introduction to Literature* ............................................................................................................................
4
MTH1800
College Algebra* ..........................................................................................................................................
4
PSS1100
Professional Development .............................................................................................................................
4
PSS1200
Business Communications ............................................................................................................................
4
SSC1100
Principles of Psychology* .............................................................................................................................
4
SSC1450
Constitution and Society* .............................................................................................................................
4
Total quarter credit hours required
92
* Indicates a general education course
90
Associate of Applied Science:
NURSINGK
Not offered at Brown Mackie College - Oklahoma City
The associate’s degree program in Nursing provides students with principles and knowledge from general education and the biological
and behavioral sciences, as well as the science of nursing. This knowledge forms the basis for utilizing the nursing process in a
professional practice. Concurrent integration of theory into clinical practice is an important aspect of professional nursing education. The
program prepares students for the testing required by the Kansas State Board of Nursing for the licensure to practice as a Registered
Nurse. ** A Registered Nurse can work in hospitals, long-term care facilities, home health, and a variety of other health care areas.
Graduates of the program will be able to:
в–Є
в–Є
в–Є
в–Є
в–Є
в–Є
Synthesize concepts from the humanities, social sciences, natural sciences and nursing into the framework of professional nursing
practice and the stewardship of life-long learning.
Demonstrate effective therapeutic communication to manage patient, family and community needs in collaboration with members
of the interdisciplinary health team to optimize patient outcomes.
Utilize evidence-based practice, critical thinking and effective clinical judgment to implement the nursing process to promote and
maintain health in the individual, family, and community at any point on the health-illness continuum.
Integrate caring behaviors in practicing the art and science of professional nursing while adapting to diverse populations across the
lifespan.
Engage in effective leadership that promotes professional values and behaviors within the legal, ethical, and regulatory framework
of professional nursing standards.
Integrate the use of patient-care technologies, resources, and information systems to meet the healthcare needs of the patient,
family and community.
The following links provide program duration, tuition, fees, other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and other
important info on programs offered at Brown Mackie College – Kansas City, Brown Mackie College – Oklahoma City, and Brown
Mackie College – Salina.
Location
Degree
Gainful Employment Link
Brown Mackie College – Kansas City Associate of Applied Science in Nursing
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/1170
Brown Mackie College – Salina
Associate of Applied Science in Nursing
Concentration
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/1197
Quarter Credit Hours
62
NUR1000
Health Assessment ........................................................................................................................................
4
NUR1012
Pharmacology ...............................................................................................................................................
4
NUR1050
Introduction to Nursing Practice ...................................................................................................................
4
NUR1931
Foundations of Nursing ................................................................................................................................
4
NUR1951
Nutrition .......................................................................................................................................................
1
NUR1971
Care of the Childbearing Family and Children I ...........................................................................................
6
NUR1972
Care of Older Adults.....................................................................................................................................
6
NUR1973
Care of Adults I ............................................................................................................................................
6
NUR2200
LPN Bridge...................................................................................................................................................
1
NUR2221
Care of Adults II ...........................................................................................................................................
6
NUR2222
Care of the Childbearing Family and Children II..........................................................................................
6
NUR2223
Advanced Care of Adults..............................................................................................................................
6
NUR2240
Issues in Nursing Practice .............................................................................................................................
4
NUR2310
Pathophysiology ...........................................................................................................................................
4
91
Associate of Applied Science: NURSING
Not offered at Brown Mackie College - Oklahoma City
Core Curriculum
Quarter Credit Hours
48
COM1101
Composition I* .............................................................................................................................................
4
COM1102
Composition II* ............................................................................................................................................
4
COM1200
Effective Public Speaking*...........................................................................................................................
4
HSC1100
Medical Terminology ...................................................................................................................................
4
HUM2000
Introduction to Literature* ............................................................................................................................
4
MTH1800
College Algebra* ..........................................................................................................................................
4
PSS1210
Essentials of Student Success .......................................................................................................................
4
SCI1351
Anatomy and Physiology I ...........................................................................................................................
4
SCI1352
Anatomy and Physiology II ..........................................................................................................................
4
SCI2100
Elements of Microbiology* ..........................................................................................................................
4
SSC1100
Principles of Psychology* ............................................................................................................................
4
SSC1120
Human Growth and Development* ..............................................................................................................
Total quarter credit hours required
4
110
* Indicates a general education course
**Brown Mackie College — Salina and Brown Mackie College — Kansas City do not guarantee third-party certification/licensure.
Outside agencies control the requirements for taking and passing certification/licensing exams and are subject to change without notice to
Brown Mackie College — Salina or Brown Mackie College — Kansas City.
92
Associate of Applied Science:
Offered at Oklahoma City only
NURSING
The Associate of Applied Science in Nursing Program is designed to prepare the student who is seeking to become an effective nurse
clinician capable of sound clinical judgment in a variety of healthcare settings and in the community. The curriculum enables students to
acquire principles and knowledge from natural and behavioral sciences and blends this coursework with the science of nursing. The
integration of theory and clinical practice is designed to assist the student in the development of critical thinking and problem solving skills.
The program is designed to prepare the student for the opportunity to sit for the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX) for
registered nurses.**
Graduates of the program will be able to do:
в–Є
в–Є
в–Є
в–Є
в–Є
в–Є
Synthesize concepts from the humanities, social sciences, natural sciences and nursing into the framework of professional nursing
practice and the stewardship of life-long learning.
Demonstrate effective therapeutic communication to manage patient, family and community needs in collaboration with members
of the interdisciplinary health team to optimize patient outcomes.
Utilize evidence-based practice, critical thinking and effective clinical judgment to implement the nursing process to promote and
maintain health in the individual, family, and community at any point on the health-illness continuum.
Integrate caring behaviors in practicing the art and science of professional nursing while adapting to diverse populations across the
lifespan.
Engage in effective leadership that promotes professional values and behaviors within the legal, ethical, and regulatory framework
of professional nursing standards.
Integrate the use of patient-care technologies, resources, and information systems to meet the healthcare needs of the patient,
family and community.
The following links provide program duration, tuition, fees, other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and other
important info on programs offered at Brown Mackie College – Kansas City, Brown Mackie College – Oklahoma City, and Brown
Mackie College – Salina.
Location
Degree
Gainful Employment Link
Brown Mackie College – Oklahoma
Associate of Applied Science in Nursing
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/4439
City
Concentration
Quarter Credit Hours
72
NUR1000
Health Assessment ........................................................................................................................................
4
NUR1010
Pharmacology................................................................................................................................................
5
NUR1201
Foundations of Nursing I ...............................................................................................................................
4
NUR1202
Foundations of Nursing II .............................................................................................................................
5
NUR1203
Foundations of Nursing III *** .....................................................................................................................
5
NUR1701
Care of Older Adults I ...................................................................................................................................
5
NUR1702
Care of Older Adults II ..................................................................................................................................
5
NUR2201
Care of Adults I .............................................................................................................................................
4
NUR2202
Care of Adults II............................................................................................................................................
4
NUR2203
Care of Adults III ..........................................................................................................................................
4
NUR2400
Care of Clients with Mental Health Needs ....................................................................................................
4
NUR2500
Care of Women and Childbearing Families ..................................................................................................
4
NUR2800
Care of Children and Adolescents .................................................................................................................
4
NUR2851
Care of Clients with Complex Health Care Needs I ......................................................................................
5
NUR2852
Care of Clients with Complex Health Care Needs II .....................................................................................
5
NUR2890
Leadership and Transition to Nursing Practice ..............................................................................................
5
93
Associate of Applied Science:
Offered at Oklahoma City only
NURSING
Core Curriculum
Quarter Credit Hours
36
COM1101
Composition I* ..............................................................................................................................................
4
COM1102
Composition II* ............................................................................................................................................
4
HUM2000
Introduction to Literature* ............................................................................................................................
4
MTH1800
College Algebra* ..........................................................................................................................................
4
PSS1100
Professional Development .............................................................................................................................
4
SCI1351
Anatomy and Physiology I ............................................................................................................................
4
SCI1352
Anatomy and Physiology II ...........................................................................................................................
4
SCI2100
Elements of Microbiology* ...........................................................................................................................
4
SSC1100
Principles of Psychology* .............................................................................................................................
Total quarter credit hours required
* Indicates a general education course
** Brown Mackie College – Oklahoma City does not guarantee third-party certification/licensure. Outside agencies control the
requirements for taking and passing certification/licensing exams and are subject to change without notice to Brown Mackie CollegeOklahoma City
*** Applicants holding an unencumbered Practical Nursing License will have a course substitution for NUR1203 with SSE0090
Exploration of Professional Nursing Practice.
94
4
108
Associate of Applied Science:
OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ASSISTANT
The Occupational Therapy Assistant associate’s degree program provides the student with the knowledge, skills, practice, and
professionalism necessary to seek an entry-level position as an occupational therapy assistant. The objective of the program is to train the
student to administer occupational therapy treatments, under the direction of an occupational therapist, to individuals who have lost
functional abilities due to illness, injury, or disease. This program will prepare the graduate for the National Board for Certification in
Occupational Therapy (NBCOT) Certification Examination for Occupational Therapy Assistants. The basic sequencing of occupational
therapy courses, which combine classroom lecture, laboratory and clinical experiences, is supplemented with general education to
enhance the student’s versatility and effectiveness in the occupational therapy profession.**
Graduates of the program will be able to:
в–Є
в–Є
в–Є
в–Є
Possess working knowledge in the natural sciences and technical methods informing the study of an allied health program.
Demonstrate an ability to apply appropriate therapeutic accommodations within the scope of an assistant in occupational therapy.
Employ relevant regulatory, organizational and professional rules and standards associated with the occupational therapy
environment.
Perform as ethical professionals in the field of study, exhibiting sound reasoning and effective communication in an increasingly
diverse world.
The following links provide program duration, tuition, fees, other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and other
important info on programs offered at Brown Mackie College – Kansas City, Brown Mackie College – Oklahoma City, and Brown
Mackie College – Salina.
Location
Degree
Gainful Employment Link
Brown Mackie College Associate of Applied Science in Occupational Therapy
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/2112
– Kansas City
Assistant
Brown Mackie College
– Oklahoma City
Brown Mackie College
– Salina
Associate of Applied Science in Occupational Therapy
Assistant
Associate of Applied Science in Occupational Therapy
Assistant
Concentration
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/2855
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/2111
Quarter Credit Hours
60
ALH1400
Introduction to Occupational Therapy ...........................................................................................................
4
ALH1460
Therapeutic Media.........................................................................................................................................
4
ALH1481
Functional Anatomy I ....................................................................................................................................
4
ALH1482
Functional Anatomy II ..................................................................................................................................
4
ALH2480
Intervention in Mental Health........................................................................................................................
3
ALH2400
Level I Fieldwork ..........................................................................................................................................
1
ALH2482
Intervention in Pediatrics and Adolescents ....................................................................................................
4
ALH2484
Intervention in Physical Rehabilitation ..........................................................................................................
4
ALH2486
Intervention in Neurological Rehabilitation ..................................................................................................
4
ALH2488
Intervention in Geriatric Rehabilitation .........................................................................................................
4
ALH2490
Management, Scholarship, and Professional Responsibilities .......................................................................
4
ALH2940A
Level II Fieldwork .........................................................................................................................................
5
ALH2940B
Level II Fieldwork .........................................................................................................................................
5
ALH2941A
Level II Fieldwork .........................................................................................................................................
5
ALH2941B
Level II Fieldwork .........................................................................................................................................
5
95
Associate of Applied Science:
OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ASSISTANT
Core Curriculum
Quarter Credit Hours
36
COM1101
Composition I* ..............................................................................................................................................
4
COM1102
Composition II*.............................................................................................................................................
4
COM1200
Effective Public Speaking* ...........................................................................................................................
4
HUM2000
Introduction to Literature*.............................................................................................................................
4
MTH1800
College Algebra*...........................................................................................................................................
4
HSC1100
Medical Terminology ....................................................................................................................................
4
PSS1100
Professional Development .............................................................................................................................
4
SCI1360
Anatomy and Physiology ..............................................................................................................................
4
SSC1100
Principles of Psychology* .............................................................................................................................
4
Total quarter credit hours required
* Indicates a general education course
96
**Brown Mackie College — Salina, Brown Mackie College — Kansas City, Brown Mackie College-Oklahoma City does not
guarantee third-party certification/licensure. Outside agencies control the requirements for taking and passing
certification/licensing exams and are subject to change without notice to Brown Mackie College — Salina, Brown Mackie
College — Kansas City, or Brown Mackie College-Oklahoma City.
96
Associate of General Studies Degree: Operational Management
Not offered at Brown Mackie College – Kansas City or Brown Mackie College - Oklahoma City
The associate’s degree program in General Studies is designed to provide students a broad range of knowledge through an introduction
to a variety of career paths. The degree offers a greater level of flexibility for students who may be unsure of their career choice, want a
more generalized education, or who want to transfer to a baccalaureate program.
Graduates of the program will be able to:
в–Є
в–Є
в–Є
в–Є
Apply business principles, theories, procedures, and technologies to workplace problems in order to propose effective
solutions applicable to a wide range of business contexts.
Demonstrate critical thinking, analytical, and communication skills through the specified general education courses.
Use the foundational knowledge and skills to advance professionally as a leader, manager, or supervisor in a contemporary
business operation.
Perform as ethical professionals in the field of study, exhibiting sound reasoning and effective communication in an
increasingly diverse world.
The following links provide program duration, tuition, fees, other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and other
important info on programs offered at Brown Mackie College – Kansas City, Brown Mackie College – Oklahoma City, and Brown
Mackie College – Salina.
Location
Brown Mackie College –
Salina
Degree
Associate of General Studies in Operational
Management
Concentration
Gainful Employment Link
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/4477
Quarter Credit Hours
48
ACC1011
Principles of Accounting I ............................................................................................................................
4
BUS1100
Introduction to Business................................................................................................................................
4
BUS1120
Business Law I ..............................................................................................................................................
4
BUS1140
Advanced Word Processing ..........................................................................................................................
4
BUS1300
Small Business Management ........................................................................................................................
4
BUS1400
Human Resources .........................................................................................................................................
4
BUS2600
Marketing and Advertising ...........................................................................................................................
4
MTH1800
College Algebra ............................................................................................................................................
4
PSS1200
Business Communications ............................................................................................................................
4
SSC1120
Human Growth and Development .................................................................................................................
4
SSC2220
Principles of Microeconomics .......................................................................................................................
4
SSC2230
Principles of Macroeconomics ......................................................................................................................
4
Core Curriculum
Quarter Credit Hours
48
COM1101
Composition I* .............................................................................................................................................
4
COM1102
Composition II* ............................................................................................................................................
4
COM1200
Effective Public Speaking* ...........................................................................................................................
4
HUM2000
Introduction to Literature* ............................................................................................................................
4
HUM3010
History of Art Through the Middle Ages* ....................................................................................................
4
HUM3100
Introduction to Philosophy ............................................................................................................................
4
PSS1100
Professional Development ............................................................................................................................
4
PSS1800
Applied Ethics...............................................................................................................................................
4
SCI1850
Environmental Science* ...............................................................................................................................
4
SSC1100
Principles of Psychology* .............................................................................................................................
4
SSC1450
Constitution and Society ...............................................................................................................................
4
SSC3100
Principles of Sociology* ...............................................................................................................................
Total quarter credit hours required
* Indicates a general education course
4
96
97
Associate of Applied Science: PARALEGAL
The associate’s degree program in Paralegal is designed to prepare the student seeking to work directly under the supervision of an
attorney and perform general work for a law firm. The objective of the program is to train students in the many phases of paralegal
responsibilities. Legal courses are supplemented with business, computer applications, and general education courses that ensure the
student’s versatility and productivity in the business environment.**
Graduates of the program will be able to:
в–Є
в–Є
в–Є
в–Є
Demonstrate an understanding of the American legal system and the role of the paralegal.
Create and carry out a legal research plan using both print and electronic sources of law, including employing legal terms
correctly, preparing legal documents appropriately, and conducting research in case law effectively.
Analyze and categorize key facts in a given situation to yield a logical conclusion, relative to the principles of contract,
tort, family, business, property, and criminal law as applied to a case situation.
Perform as ethical professionals in the field of study, exhibiting sound reasoning and effective communication in an
increasingly diverse world.
The following links provide program duration, tuition, fees, other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and other
important info on programs offered at Brown Mackie College – Kansas City, Brown Mackie College – Oklahoma City, and Brown
Mackie College – Salina.
Location
Degree
Gainful Employment Link
Brown Mackie College – Kansas
Associate of Applied Science in Paralegal
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/1172
City*
Brown Mackie College –
Oklahoma City
Brown Mackie College – Salina*
Associate of Applied Science in Paralegal
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/2848
Associate of Applied Science in Paralegal
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/1199
*This program is no longer enrolling new students
Concentration
Quarter Credit Hours
46
BUS1120
Business Law I ..............................................................................................................................................
4
BUS1140
Advanced Word Processing ..........................................................................................................................
4
JUS2500
Criminal Procedure .......................................................................................................................................
4
LEG1121
Legal Research ..............................................................................................................................................
4
LEG1122
Legal Writing ................................................................................................................................................
4
LEG1350
Criminal Law ................................................................................................................................................
4
LEG2400
Family Law ...................................................................................................................................................
4
LEG2500
Property Law .................................................................................................................................................
4
LEG2700
Contract Law .................................................................................................................................................
4
LEG2750
Litigation .......................................................................................................................................................
4
LEG2900
Paralegal Externship......................................................................................................................................
2
SSC1460
The American Judicial System ......................................................................................................................
4
Core Curriculum
Quarter Credit Hours
44
COM1101
Composition I* ..............................................................................................................................................
4
COM1102
Composition II* ............................................................................................................................................
4
COM1200
Effective Public Speaking* ...........................................................................................................................
4
HUM2000
Introduction to Literature* ............................................................................................................................
4
MTH1800
College Algebra* ..........................................................................................................................................
4
PSS1100
Professional Development .............................................................................................................................
4
PSS1200
Business Communications ............................................................................................................................
4
PSS1800
Applied Ethics ...............................................................................................................................................
4
SCI1850
Environmental Science* ................................................................................................................................
4
SSC1100
Principles of Psychology* .............................................................................................................................
4
SSC1450
Constitution and Society* .............................................................................................................................
4
Total quarter credit hours required
* Indicates a general education course
** This program is not intended for advancement into law school.
98
90
Associate of Applied Science:
SURGICAL TECHNOLOGY
Not offered at Brown Mackie College – Salina or Brown Mackie College - Oklahoma City
The associate’s degree in Surgical Technology program is designed to provide the knowledge base and technical skills required to seek
entry level employment in the discipline. Surgical technologists in the field work under the supervision of physicians and surgical nurses
and are responsible for monitoring, maintaining and enforcing the sterile field through adherence to aseptic techniques by all preoperative, surgical, and post-operative personnel. With this end in mind, this program provides study in instrument and equipment
sterilization and handling during both general and specific procedures, patient and team scrubbing, management of surgical supplies,
wound exposure and closure, maintenance of hemostasis, and surgical computer and robotics operation and monitoring. Additional
course work in general education invites critical thinking, leadership, and oral and written communication skills that will help students to
develop as professionals.
**Upon successful completion of this program, graduates should be able to:
в–Є Consistently demonstrate the necessary training to assume responsibilities in the operating room, including aseptic technique,
instrument setup, assisting the surgeon, anticipating the surgeon’s needs, and assisting with post-operative care.
в–Є Apply knowledge, skills, and demonstrate ability to perform as a surgical technologist in the cognitive, psychomotor, and affective
learning domains.
в–Є Provide to the community professional, competent, and knowledgeable individuals who can provide surgeons and the surgical
team quality assistance as a Surgical Technologist
в–Є Display professionalism, be prepared to be a lifelong learner, and value the professional attributes of the Surgical Technologist.
в–Є Possess the necessary didactic and clinical skills needed to pass the certification exam and enter into the job arena as a competent
entry-level Surgical Technologist.
The following links provide program duration, tuition, fees, other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and other
important info on programs offered at Brown Mackie College – Kansas City, Brown Mackie College – Oklahoma City, and Brown
Mackie College – Salina.
Location
Degree
Gainful Employment Link
Brown Mackie College –
Associate of Applied Science in Surgical
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/4320
Kansas City
Technology
Concentration
Quarter Credit Hours
52
ALH1561
Principles of Surgical Technology ................................................................................................................
4
ALH1570
Introduction to Surgical Technology .............................................................................................................
4
ALH1571
Advanced Practice in Surgical Technology ...................................................................................................
4
ALH1572
Operating Room Skills and Case Management .............................................................................................
4
ALH1573
Advanced Practice in OR Skills and Case Management ...............................................................................
4
ALH2561
Surgical Procedures and Techniques I ...........................................................................................................
4
ALH2562
Surgical Procedures and Techniques II .........................................................................................................
4
ALH2563
Surgical Procedures and Techniques III ........................................................................................................
4
ALH2569
Professional Transition for Surgical Technologists .......................................................................................
4
ALH2951A
Surgical Technology Externship A................................................................................................................
4
ALH2951B
Surgical Technology Externship B ................................................................................................................
4
ALH2951C
Surgical Technology Externship C ................................................................................................................
4
ALH2951D
Surgical Technology Externship D................................................................................................................
4
99
Associate of Applied Science:
SURGICAL TECHNOLOGY
Core Curriculum
Quarter Credit Hours
40
COM1101
Composition I* ..............................................................................................................................................
4
COM1102
Composition II* ............................................................................................................................................
4
COM1200
Effective Public Speaking* ...........................................................................................................................
4
HSC1100
Medical Terminology ....................................................................................................................................
4
HUM2000
Introduction to Literature* ............................................................................................................................
4
MTH1800
College Algebra* ..........................................................................................................................................
4
PSS1100
Professional Development .............................................................................................................................
4
SCI1351
Anatomy and Physiology I ............................................................................................................................
4
SCI1352
Anatomy and Physiology II ...........................................................................................................................
4
SSC1100
Principles of Psychology* .............................................................................................................................
4
Total quarter credit hours required
* Indicates a general education course
**Brown Mackie College — Kansas City does not guarantee third-party certification/licensure. Outside agencies control the
requirements for taking and passing certification/licensing exams and are subject to change without notice to Brown Mackie
College — Kansas City.
100
92
Associate of Applied Science:
VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY
Not offered at Brown Mackie College - Oklahoma City
The associate’s degree program in Veterinary Technology is designed to provide students the knowledge and skills needed to seek
entry-level employment as a veterinary technician within private veterinary clinics, animal hospitals, and veterinary testing laboratories.
Veterinary technicians may perform a variety of tasks, including observing the behavior and condition of animals, performing
laboratory tests, communicating an animal’s condition or prescription instructions to owners, maintaining patient records, and advanced
duties under the supervision of a licensed veterinarian. While veterinary technicians often care for domestic animals, such as cats and
dogs, they may also care for a variety of animals, including equine, mice, rats, sheep, pigs, cattle, and birds. The curriculum includes a
combination of didactic instruction and clinical experience. Upon completion, students will have the opportunity to sit for the American
Association of Veterinary State Boards (AAVSB) Veterinary Technician National Exam (VTNE)**.
Graduates of the program will be able to:
в–Є
Assess the patient’s clinical symptoms by observing behavior and condition; monitoring clinical symptoms; and collecting and
recording case history information.
в–Є
Observe the behavior and condition of animals and monitor their clinical symptoms.
Administer anesthesia to animals, under the direction of a veterinarian, and monitor animals' responses to anesthetics so that
dosages can be adjusted.
в–Є
в–Є
в–Є
в–Є
в–Є
Care for and monitor the condition of animals recovering from surgery.
Collect, prepare, and label samples for laboratory testing, culture, or microscopic examination and perform laboratory tests on
blood, urine, or feces, such as urinalyses or blood counts, to assist in the diagnosis and treatment of animal health problems.
Administer emergency first aid, such as performing emergency resuscitation or other life saving procedures.
Prepare and administer medications, vaccines, serums, or treatments, as prescribed by veterinarians, as well as fill prescriptions
and maintain controlled drug inventory and related log books.
Take and develop diagnostic radiographs, using x-ray equipment.
в–Є
The following links provide program duration, tuition, fees, other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and other
important info on programs offered at Brown Mackie College – Kansas City, Brown Mackie College – Oklahoma City, and Brown
Mackie College – Salina.
Location
Degree
Gainful Employment Link
Brown Mackie College – Kansas City
Associate of Science in Veterinary
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/2115
Technology
Brown Mackie College – Salina
Associate of Science in Veterinary
Technology
Concentration
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/2114
Quarter Credit Hours
52
ANH1100
Introduction to Veterinary Technology ........................................................................................................
4
ANH1120
Small Animal Medicine I .............................................................................................................................
4
ANH1201
Veterinary Lab Procedures I .........................................................................................................................
4
ANH1202
Veterinary Lab Procedures II........................................................................................................................
4
ANH1400
Pharmacology ...............................................................................................................................................
4
ANH2120
Small Animal Medicine II ............................................................................................................................
4
ANH2140
Large Animal Medicine ................................................................................................................................
4
ANH2200
Laboratory and Exotic Animals ....................................................................................................................
4
ANH2240
Veterinary Imaging .......................................................................................................................................
4
ANH2400
Anesthesia and Surgical Assistance ..............................................................................................................
4
ANH2900A
Veterinary Technology Externship A ...........................................................................................................
4
ANH2900B
Veterinary Technology Externship B ...........................................................................................................
4
ANH2900C
Veterinary Technology Externship C ...........................................................................................................
4
101
Associate of Applied Science:
VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY (Continued)
Core Curriculum
Quarter Credit Hours
44
ANH1101
Veterinary Anatomy and Physiology I ..........................................................................................................
4
ANH1102
Veterinary Anatomy and Physiology II .........................................................................................................
4
COM1101
Composition I* ..............................................................................................................................................
4
COM1102
Composition II* ............................................................................................................................................
4
COM1200
Effective Public Speaking* ...........................................................................................................................
4
HSC1110
Veterinary Medical Terminology ..................................................................................................................
4
HUM2000
Introduction to Literature* ............................................................................................................................
4
MTH1800
College Algebra* ..........................................................................................................................................
4
PSS1100
Professional Development .............................................................................................................................
4
PSS1800
Applied Ethics ...............................................................................................................................................
4
SSC1100
Principles of Psychology* .............................................................................................................................
4
Total quarter credit hours required
* Indicates a general education course
**Brown Mackie College — Salina and Brown Mackie College — Kansas City do not guarantee third-party
certification/licensure. Outside agencies control the requirements for taking and passing certification/licensing exams and are
subject to change without notice to Brown Mackie College — Salina or Brown Mackie College — Kansas City.
102
96
Diploma: ARCHITECTURAL DRAFTING SPECIALIST
Not offered at Brown Mackie College – Salina or Brown Mackie College - Oklahoma City
The diploma program in Architectural Drafting Specialist is designed to prepare the student to seek entry-level positions in
computer-aided design and drafting operations to support the engineering aspects of residential and commercial building design.
Students combine computer-aided drafting and design skills using current software applications to meet the technical and
professional demands for these applications in the architectural, construction, and engineering industries.
Graduates of the program will be able to:
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
Exhibit proficiency in using basic drafting technology, distinguishing between the components of mechanical and
computer-aided drafting.
Demonstrate basic computer-aided design project skills.
Apply drafting and design skills and industry accepted standards and practices to projects.
The following links provide program duration, tuition, fees, other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and
other important info on programs offered at Brown Mackie College – Kansas City, Brown Mackie College – Oklahoma City, and
Brown Mackie College – Salina.
Location
Brown Mackie College
– Kansas City
Degree
Diploma in Architectural Drafting Specialist
Concentration
Gainful Employment Link
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/4160
Quarter Credit Hours
50
CDE1100
Fundamentals of Drafting......................................................................................................................
4
CDE1200
Multiview Drawing ...............................................................................................................................
4
CDE1500
3-Dimensional Graphics ........................................................................................................................
4
CDE1850
Computerized Design for Structural Engineering..................................................................................
4
CDE2011
Building Information Modeling I ..........................................................................................................
4
CDE2012
Building Information Modeling II .........................................................................................................
4
CDE2230
3-Dimensional Visualization I...............................................................................................................
4
CDE2240
3-Dimensional Visualization II .............................................................................................................
4
CDE2900
Design and Drafting Externship ............................................................................................................
2
MTH1800
College Algebra* ..................................................................................................................................
4
PSS1100
Professional Development .....................................................................................................................
4
PSS1800
Applied Ethics .......................................................................................................................................
4
SCI1100
Physics ..................................................................................................................................................
Total quarter credit hours required
* Indicates a general education course
4
50
103
Diploma: BOOKKEEPING SPECIALIST
Not offered at Brown Mackie College – Kansas City or Brown Mackie College - Oklahoma City
The diploma program in Bookkeeping Specialist prepares students to seek entry-level employment in accounting positions in a
variety of business organizations. This program combines accounting, business, and technical knowledge with sound business
procedures to prepare graduates to contribute effectively to a variety of business organizations.
Graduates of the program will be able to:
п‚·
п‚·
Apply the fundamental principles of accounting to workplace problems, using generally accepted principles and
procedures.
Operate computerized accounting systems to address accounting and business applications.
The following links provide program duration, tuition, fees, other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and
other important info on programs offered at Brown Mackie College – Kansas City, Brown Mackie College – Oklahoma City, and
Brown Mackie College – Salina.
Location
Brown Mackie College –
Salina*
Degree
Diploma in Bookkeeping Specialist
Gainful Employment Link
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/4259
*This program is no longer enrolling new students
Concentration
Quarter Credit Hours
50
ACC1011
Principles of Accounting I .....................................................................................................................
4
ACC1012
Principles of Accounting II ...................................................................................................................
4
ACC1013
Principles of Accounting III ..................................................................................................................
4
ACC2010
Payroll Management .............................................................................................................................
4
ACC2020
Computerized Accounting Systems.......................................................................................................
4
ACC2040
Tax Accounting .....................................................................................................................................
4
ACC2900
Accounting Externship ..........................................................................................................................
2
BUS1100
Introduction to Business ........................................................................................................................
4
BUS1120
Business Law I ......................................................................................................................................
4
BUS1130
Advanced Spreadsheets .........................................................................................................................
4
BUS2250
Principles of Finance .............................................................................................................................
4
PSS1100
Professional Development .....................................................................................................................
4
PSS1800
Applied Ethics .......................................................................................................................................
Total quarter credit hours required
4
50
104
Diploma:
COMPUTER AIDED DESIGNER/DRAFTER
The diploma program in Computer Aided Designer/Drafter is designed to prepare students with the necessary technical
knowledge and skills to seek entry-level positions in computer-aided design and drafting operations as they support the
engineering aspects of mechanical design. The students combine computer-aided drafting and design skills using current
software applications as needed to meet the technical and professional demands of the mechanical and engineering industries.
Graduates of the program will be able to:
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
Identify key principles of design and demonstrate the ability to use current drafting technology.
Apply the appropriate computer-aided design skills to a variety of projects.
Apply engineering and design theory, integrated with industry-accepted standards and practices, to create effective
design solutions for various design projects and challenges.
Identify and demonstrate the characteristics and behaviors of a successful professional in the industry.
The following links provide program duration, tuition, fees, other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and
other important info on programs offered at Brown Mackie College – Kansas City, Brown Mackie College – Oklahoma City, and
Brown Mackie College – Salina.
Location
Brown Mackie College – Salina*
Degree
Diploma in Computer Aided
Designer/Drafter
*This program is no longer enrolling new students
Concentration
Gainful Employment Link
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/1208
Quarter Credit Hours
50
CDE1100
Fundamentals of Drafting......................................................................................................................
4
CDE1110
Dimensioning and Tolerancing .............................................................................................................
4
CDE1200
Multiview Drawing ...............................................................................................................................
4
CDE1210
Technical Drawing ................................................................................................................................
4
CDE1500
3-Dimensional Graphics ........................................................................................................................
4
CDE1510
Descriptive Geometry ...........................................................................................................................
4
CDE2210
Detail Drawing ......................................................................................................................................
4
CDE2235
AutoCAD Customization ......................................................................................................................
4
CDE2550
Solid Modeling ......................................................................................................................................
4
CDE2610
Fastening Devices .................................................................................................................................
4
CDE2900
Design and Drafting Externship ............................................................................................................
2
PSS1100
Professional Development .....................................................................................................................
4
PSS1800
Applied Ethics .......................................................................................................................................
Total quarter credit hours required
4
50
105
Diploma: CRIMINAL JUSTICE SPECIALIST
Not offered at Brown Mackie College - Oklahoma City
The diploma program in Criminal Justice Specialist is designed to prepare students to seek a variety of entry-level support
positions related to law enforcement, corrections, investigations, or juvenile justice detention administration.**
Graduates of the program will be able to:
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
Understand the basics of the principle components of the criminal justice and correctional systems.
Use the tools and systems commonly encountered in the criminal justice environment.
Demonstrate criminal justice, security, and corrections practices and procedures.
The following links provide program duration, tuition, fees, other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and
other important info on programs offered at Brown Mackie College – Kansas City, Brown Mackie College – Oklahoma City, and
Brown Mackie College – Salina.
Location
Brown Mackie College – Kansas
City
Degree
Diploma in Criminal Justice Specialist
Gainful Employment Link
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/1164
Brown Mackie College – Salina*
Diploma in Criminal Justice Specialist
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/1191
*This program is no longer accepting students
Concentration
COM1101
Quarter Credit Hours
Composition I* ......................................................................................................................................
50
4
JUS1100
Introduction to Criminal Justice ............................................................................................................
4
JUS1111
Report Writing ......................................................................................................................................
4
JUS1300
Correctional Systems and Practices .......................................................................................................
4
JUS1550
Criminal Investigation and Police Procedure ........................................................................................
4
JUS1700
Introduction to Criminology ..................................................................................................................
4
JUS2111
Research Methods .................................................................................................................................
4
JUS2500
Criminal Procedure ...............................................................................................................................
4
JUS2700
Juvenile Justice .....................................................................................................................................
4
JUS2900
Criminal Justice Externship...................................................................................................................
2
LEG1350
Criminal Law ........................................................................................................................................
4
PSS1100
Professional Development .....................................................................................................................
4
SSC1450
Constitution and Society* .....................................................................................................................
4
Total quarter credit hours required
50
** This program is not intended for advancement into law school.
106
Diploma: FITNESS TRAINER
Not offered Brown Mackie College - Oklahoma City
The diploma program in Fitness Trainer is designed to provide students with skills necessary to seek entry-level positions in the
fitness and recreation industries. Graduates will be trained to assess fitness levels in order to effectively design, implement, and
promote safe and effective exercise programs for various populations. Graduates will also be able to screen clients for
contraindications to exercise, and to sit for national certification exams.**
Graduates of the program will be able to:
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
Understand the natural sciences informing the study of an allied health program.
Demonstrate an ability to teach appropriate modifications in specific exercises for most populations.
Employ relevant regulatory, organizational and professional rules and standards associated with a health and fitness
business environment.
The following links provide program duration, tuition, fees, other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and
other important info on programs offered at Brown Mackie College – Kansas City, Brown Mackie College – Oklahoma City, and
Brown Mackie College – Salina.
Location
Degree
Gainful Employment Link
Brown Mackie College – Kansas City*
Diploma in Fitness Trainer
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/2369
Brown Mackie College – Salina*
Diploma in Fitness Trainer
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/2365
*This program is no longer accepting students
Concentration
Quarter Credit Hours
48
ALH1250
Introduction to Health and Fitness ........................................................................................................
4
ALH1483
Kinesiology ...........................................................................................................................................
4
ALH1650
Introduction to Nutrition .......................................................................................................................
4
ALH2251
Exercise Psychology .............................................................................................................................
4
ALH2253
Exercise Physiology ..............................................................................................................................
4
ALH2255
Fitness Assessment and Exercise Prescription – Health ........................................................................
4
ALH2257
Fitness Assessment and Exercise Prescription – Sports ........................................................................
4
ALH2925
Health and Fitness Externship ...............................................................................................................
4
BUS1300
Small Business Management .................................................................................................................
4
PSS1100
Professional Development .....................................................................................................................
4
SCI1351
Anatomy and Physiology I ....................................................................................................................
4
SCI1352
Anatomy and Physiology II ...................................................................................................................
Total quarter credit hours required
4
48
**Brown Mackie College- Salina, Brown Mackie College-Kansas City does not guarantee third-party
certification/licensure. Outside agencies control the requirements for taking and passing certification/licensing exams
and are subject to change without notice to Brown Mackie Colleges.
107
Diploma: GENERAL BUSINESS
Not offered at Brown Mackie College - Oklahoma City
The diploma program in General Business is designed to prepare graduates with the skills necessary to seek entry into the
contemporary world of business. Students encounter the business practices and principles, technical business procedures, and
appropriate microcomputer applications necessary for effective business operations. Graduates have the opportunity to seek
entry-level roles in a variety of business positions.
Graduates of the program will be able to:
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
Employ the vocabulary, rules, and procedures associated with the business culture.
Utilize appropriate technologies to address business needs as directed by others.
Apply business principles and theories to workplace problems as directed by others as part of the business support
team.
The following links provide program duration, tuition, fees, other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and
other important info on programs offered at Brown Mackie College – Kansas City, Brown Mackie College – Oklahoma City, and
Brown Mackie College – Salina.
Location
Degree
Gainful Employment Link
Brown Mackie College –
Diploma in General Business
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/1154
Kansas City
Brown Mackie College –
Salina
Diploma in General Business
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/1206
Concentration
Quarter Credit Hours
ACC1011
Principles of Accounting I ....................................................................................................................
ACC1012
Principles of Accounting II ...................................................................................................................
ACC2010
Payroll Management .............................................................................................................................
BUS1100
Introduction to Business........................................................................................................................
BUS1120
Business Law I ......................................................................................................................................
BUS1130
Advanced Spreadsheets.........................................................................................................................
BUS1300
Small Business Management ................................................................................................................
BUS1400
Human Resources .................................................................................................................................
BUS2600
Marketing and Advertising ...................................................................................................................
BUS2900
Business Externship ..............................................................................................................................
PSS1100
Professional Development ....................................................................................................................
PSS1200
Business Communications ....................................................................................................................
PSS1800
Applied Ethics.......................................................................................................................................
Total quarter credit hours required
108
50
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
2
4
4
4
50
Diploma: MEDICAL ASSISTANT
Not offered at Brown Mackie College - Oklahoma City
The diploma program in Medical Assistant is designed to prepare students to seek entry-level work with, and under the direction of,
physicians in a medical office or in other medical settings. To achieve this goal, the medical assistant curriculum provides study in
clinical and laboratory procedures, anatomy and physiology, medical terminology, and medical office administration.
Graduates of the program will be able to:
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
Understand the natural science informing the study of an allied health program.
Perform appropriate skills in clinical and laboratory theory and procedures.
Demonstrate entry-level competencies for the Medical Assistant as outlined by nationally recognized and accredited
medical assisting bodies.
The following links provide program duration, tuition, fees, other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and other
important info on programs offered at Brown Mackie College – Kansas City, Brown Mackie College – Oklahoma City, and Brown
Mackie College – Salina.
Location
Degree
Gainful Employment Link
Brown Mackie College – Kansas
Diploma in Medical Assistant
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/1166
City
Brown Mackie College – Salina
Diploma in Medical Assistant
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/1193
Concentration
ALH1601
Quarter Credit Hours
Pharmacy I ............................................................................................................................................
60
4
ALH1610
Dosage Calculation ...............................................................................................................................
4
ALH2935
Medical Assisting Externship ................................................................................................................
4
HCA1100
Professionalism and Communication in Health Care Setting ................................................................
4
HCA1750
Medical Administrative Practices ..........................................................................................................
4
HCA2500
Medical Ethics.......................................................................................................................................
4
HSC1100
Medical Terminology ............................................................................................................................
4
HSC1851
Clinical Procedures I .............................................................................................................................
4
HSC1852
Clinical Procedures II ............................................................................................................................
4
HSC2830
Phlebotomy and Hematology Procedures ..............................................................................................
4
HSC2840
Urinalysis and Microbiology Procedures ..............................................................................................
4
PSS1100
Professional Development .....................................................................................................................
4
SCI1351
Anatomy and Physiology I ....................................................................................................................
4
SCI1352
Anatomy and Physiology II ...................................................................................................................
4
SSC1100
Principles of Psychology* .....................................................................................................................
Total quarter credit hours required
109
4
60
Diploma:
MEDICAL INSURANCE SPECIALIST
Not offered at Brown Mackie College - Oklahoma City
The diploma program in Medical Insurance Specialist is designed to prepare the student to seek entry-level administrative positions
in a variety of healthcare related environments that may include hospitals, clinics, healthcare insurance offices, home healthcare
agencies, or public health settings.
Graduates of the program will be able to:
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
Possess an operational understanding of the health/disease continuum.
Apply software solutions to healthcare management problems.
Demonstrate the ability to manage health care finances and information.
The following links provide program duration, tuition, fees, other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and other
important info on programs offered at Brown Mackie College – Kansas City, Brown Mackie College – Oklahoma City, and Brown
Mackie College – Salina.
Location
Degree
Gainful Employment Link
Brown Mackie College –
Diploma in Medical Insurance Specialist
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/1193
Kansas City*
Brown Mackie College –
Diploma in Medical Insurance Specialist
Salina*
*This program is no longer accepting students
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/3621
Concentration
ACC1011
Quarter Credit Hours
Principles of Accounting I .....................................................................................................................
50
4
BUS1130
Advanced Spreadsheets .........................................................................................................................
4
HCA1100
Professionalism and Communication in Healthcare Setting ..................................................................
4
HCA1110
Introduction to Healthcare Services ......................................................................................................
4
HCA1700
Managing Healthcare Information.........................................................................................................
4
HCA1750
Medical Administrative Practices ..........................................................................................................
4
HCA1800
Diagnostic Coding .................................................................................................................................
4
HCA1850
Procedural Coding .................................................................................................................................
4
HCA1870
Medical Insurance Processes .................................................................................................................
4
HCA2500
Medical Ethics.......................................................................................................................................
4
HCA2900
Healthcare Externship ...........................................................................................................................
2
HSC1100
Medical Terminology ............................................................................................................................
4
PSS1100
Professional Development .....................................................................................................................
4
Total quarter credit hours required
50
110
Diploma:
NETWORKING SPECIALIST
Not offered at Brown Mackie College – Kansas City or Brown Mackie College - Oklahoma City
The diploma program in Networking Specialist is designed to provide the student with a foundation to seek employment in
entry-level networking positions. Technical courses provide hands-on experience in building, troubleshooting, designing, and
implementing networks.
Graduates of the program will be able to:
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
Exhibit the knowledge of computer networking installation, configuration, and administration.
Demonstrate the ability to design and manage security for a computer network.
Detect, troubleshoot, and repair problems in computer software, hardware, and network systems.
The following links provide program duration, tuition, fees, other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and
other important info on programs offered at Brown Mackie College – Kansas City, Brown Mackie College – Oklahoma City, and
Brown Mackie College – Salina.
Location
Degree
Gainful Employment Link
Brown Mackie College – Salina*
Diploma in Networking Specialist
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/3623
*This program is no longer enrolling new students
50
Concentration
CIT1120
Quarter Credit Hours
Principles of Logic and Problem Solving ..............................................................................................
CIT2990
Networking Externship .........................................................................................................................
4
50
2
CIT3213
Windows Professional ...........................................................................................................................
4
CIT3223
Windows Server ....................................................................................................................................
4
CIT3233
Directory Services Infrastructure ..........................................................................................................
4
CIT3243
Network Infrastructure Implementation and Administration .................................................................
4
CIT3253
Network Infrastructure Design and Security Design .............................................................................
4
CIT3263
Exchange Server ...................................................................................................................................
4
ELE2201
Computer Repair: Systems and Software ..............................................................................................
4
ELE2202
Computer Repair: Hardware Applications ............................................................................................
4
MTH1800
College Algebra ....................................................................................................................................
4
PSS1100
Professional Development .....................................................................................................................
4
PSS1800
Applied Ethics .......................................................................................................................................
4
Total quarter credit hours required
50
111
Certificate: NETWORK ENGINEER SPECIALIST
Not offered at Brown Mackie College – Kansas City or Brown Mackie College - Oklahoma City
The certificate program in Network Engineer Specialist provides the student with skills necessary to seek employment in entrylevel networking positions. Technical courses are intended to provide hands-on experience in building, troubleshooting,
designing, and implementing networks.
Graduates of the program will be able to:
п‚·
п‚·
п‚·
Exhibit the knowledge of computer networking installation, configuration, and administration.
Demonstrate the ability to design and manage security for a computer network.
Detect, troubleshoot, and repair problems in computer software, hardware, and network systems.
The following links provide program duration, tuition, fees, other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and
other important info on programs offered at Brown Mackie College – Kansas City, Brown Mackie College – Oklahoma City, and
Brown Mackie College – Salina.
Location
Degree
Brown Mackie College –
Certificate in Network Engineer Specialist
Salina*
*This program is no longer enrolling new students
Gainful Employment Link
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/4063
Concentration
CIT3213
Windows Professional
Quarter Credit Hours
24
4
CIT3223
Windows Server
4
CIT3233
Directory Services Infrastructure
4
CIT3243
Network Infrastructure Implementation and Administration
4
CIT3253
Network Infrastructure Design and Security Design
4
CIT3263
Exchange Server
Total quarter credit hours required
4
24
112
Certificate:
PRACTICAL NURSING
Not offered at Brown Mackie College - Oklahoma City
The Certificate in Practical Nursing is designed to provide students with principles and knowledge from the biological and
behavioral sciences as well as the science of nursing. This knowledge forms the basis for utilizing the nursing process in a
professional practice. Concurrent integration of theory into clinical practice is an important aspect of practical nursing education.
The program is designed to prepare the student for the testing required by the Kansas State Board of Nursing for the licensure to
practice as a Licensed Practical Nurse.** A Licensed Practical Nurse can pursue entry-level employment in hospitals, long-term
care facilities, home health, and a variety of other health care areas. **
A current Certified Nurse Aide (CNA) license is required for enrollment in the Practical Nursing program.
Graduates of the program will be able to:
в–Є
в–Є
в–Є
в–Є
в–Є
в–Є
Apply knowledge and skills from natural, behavioral, and social and nursing sciences in the delivery of nursing care
to healthy, chronic and acute populations.
Utilize the nursing process in providing nursing care which will assist patients and families to attain, maintain or
regain optimal health along the health/illness continuum.
Demonstrate critical thinking, caring behaviors and problem solving skills to provide safe, competent and
knowledgeable care within the scope of practice for the practical nurse.
Utilize appropriate communication skills in teaching the patient and family members about health care needs and in
collaborating with other health team members within the scope of practice for the practical nurse.
Display professional behavior based on ethical principles and the legal scope of the practical nurse.
Utilize information technology to support the planning and provision of patient care.
The following links provide program duration, tuition, fees, other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and
other important info on programs offered at Brown Mackie College – Kansas City, Brown Mackie College – Oklahoma City, and
Brown Mackie College – Salina.
Location
Brown Mackie College – Kansas City
Degree
Certificate in Practical Nursing
Gainful Employment Link
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/1174
Brown Mackie College – Salina
Certificate in Practical Nursing
ge.brownmackie.edu/programoffering/1201
Concentration
HSC1100
Quarter Credit Hours
Medical Terminology ............................................................................................................................
55
4
NUR1012
Pharmacology ........................................................................................................................................
4
NUR1050
Introduction to Nursing Practice ............................................................................................................
4
NUR1931
Foundations of Nursing .........................................................................................................................
4
NUR1951
Nutrition ................................................................................................................................................
1
NUR1971
Care of the Childbearing Family and Children I ....................................................................................
6
NUR1972
Care of Older Adults .............................................................................................................................
6
NUR1973
Care of Adults I .....................................................................................................................................
6
PSS1210
Essentials of Student Success ................................................................................................................
4
SCI1351
Anatomy and Physiology I ....................................................................................................................
4
SCI1352
Anatomy and Physiology II ...................................................................................................................
4
SSC1100
Principles of Psychology .......................................................................................................................
4
SSC1120
Human Growth and Development .........................................................................................................
Total quarter credit hours required
4
55
**Brown Mackie College — Salina and Brown Mackie College — Kansas City do not guarantee third-party
certification/licensure. Outside agencies control the requirements for taking and passing certification/licensing exams
and are subject to change without notice to Brown Mackie College — Salina or Brown Mackie College — Kansas City.
113
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS - NOT FOR COLLEGE CREDIT
Certificate: IV Therapy for Practical Nurses Not offered at Brown Mackie College - Oklahoma City
This course meets the Kansas Board of Nursing’s requirements for LPN’s seeking certification in IV
Therapy.
NUR199CE
IV Therapy for Practical Nurses – Kansas: (0 credit hours)
This course provides review of basic physiology of the circulatory system and instruction in principles of site selection for veins
appropriate for intravenous (IV) fluid therapy. The course also provides instruction in the introduction of needles into veins, the
selection of the type of needle used based on the therapy and the client diagnosis and circumstances, fluids and drugs commonly
encountered, adverse reactions to IV therapies, and care responses to same. Classroom instruction, labs and clinical experiences
are included in the training. The course will provide for maintaining competency in IV therapy for those already licensed and
certified in IV therapy.
Prerequisites:
п‚·
Compass test reading score of 61 or above, ACT reading score of 13 or above, or a Grade of C or better in
COM1101 Composition I
п‚·
Current Kansas Nursing license; Maintenance of current CPR certification for the duration of the course;
Evidence of negative TB test or chest X-ray within the past year.
Certificate: Nurses Aide
Not offered at Brown Mackie College - Oklahoma City
ALH100C
Nurse Aid Certificate Program (0 quarter credit hours) Not available at Oklahoma City
The Certified Nurse Aide (CNA) program is a short-term course consisting of both classroom and clinical instruction. This
course meets all requirements for the Kansas Department of Health and Environments Certified Nurse Aide (CNA) program.
CNAs provide direct care to residents of hospitals, physician offices, assisted living centers and long term care facilities, under
the supervision of a physician or nurse. Students are given an introduction to the anatomy and physiology of each body system,
along with age related changes and common abnormalities. Students will learn procedures for taking vital signs, assisting with
feeding, assisting with basic activities of daily living, changing bed linens, lifting and positioning, admitting, transferring and
dismissing residents and care of the critically ill.
Prerequisites: Compass test reading score of 61 or above, ACT reading score of 13 or above, or a Grade of C or better
in COM1101 Composition I
114
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
1000-level courses are recommended for students in the first year of their programs. Such courses are designed to prepare
students for more advanced work in the same (or a related) subject area. 2000-level courses are recommended for students
in the second year of their programs. Such courses often have a stated prerequisite to indicate the preparation required for
successful completion of these courses.
Each course number is preceded by a three letter prefix indicating the academic concentration or general area to which the
course belongs: Accounting (ACC), Allied Health (ALH), Biology (BI), Business (BUS), Computer Aided Design
(CDE), Career Foundations (CF), Computer and Information Technology (CIT), Communications (CM, COM),
Electronics (ELE), English (EN), Healthcare Administration (HCA), Health Science (HSC), Humanities (HUM), Justice
Studies (JUS), Legal Studies (LEG), Microcomputer Applications (MC), Medical Education (ME), Mathematics (MT,
MTH), Nursing (NUR), Occupational Therapy (OT), Psychology (PS), Professional Success Skills (PSS), Natural Science
(SCI), Social and Behavioral Sciences (SSC), Sociology (SO), Veterinary Technology (VT).
Course descriptions describe the learning opportunities that are provided through the classroom and coursework.
It is each student’s responsibility to participate in the activities that will lead to successfully meeting the learning
outcomes.
The use of an asterisk (*) is used throughout the following course descriptions to note those courses classified as general
education courses.
ACC1011
Principles of Accounting I (4 quarter credit hours)
Basic accounting concepts, procedures, and principles are presented. Topics include journalizing and posting entries;
preparing adjustments, a worksheet, and financial statement; completing the closing process using subsidiary ledgers
and special journals, journals; and a study of accounting systems.
Prerequisites:PSS1100
ACC1012
Principles of Accounting II (4 quarter credit hours)
A continuation of ACC1011. Topics include accounting procedures for business, accounting for cash, receivables,
temporary investments, inventories, plant assets, intangible assets, and accounting procedures for partnerships and
corporations.
Prerequisites: ACC1011
ACC1013
Principles of Accounting III (4 quarter credit hours)
A continuation of ACC1012. Topics include accounting procedures for partnership formation, income division, and
liquidation. Additionally, the organization and equity rights of corporations are discussed.
Prerequisites: ACC1012
ACC2010
Payroll Management (4 quarter credit hours)
Course covers basic concepts and procedures of payroll management. Topics include the procedures for maintaining
payroll records and the preparation of the required federal, state, and local payroll tax reports.
Prerequisites: ACC1011
ACC2020
Computerized Accounting Systems (4 quarter credit hours)
Use of the computer in solving accounting problems. The course provides the student with self-confidence in the
use and understanding of an automated accounting system.
Prerequisites: ACC1011
ACC2040
Tax Accounting (4 quarter credit hours)
An introduction to federal income taxes for individuals, with a brief overview of partnerships and corporations.
Topics include gross income, exclusions, deductions, business expenses, credits and special taxes, and capital gains
and losses.
Prerequisites: ACC1011
115
ACC2900
Accounting Externship (2 quarter credit hours)
Students are assigned to work in a professional environment appropriate for the application of skills learned in the
curriculum, thus gaining practical experience in the skills acquired. The externship requires 60 hours.
Prerequisites: Completion of all course requirements or departmental approval
ALH1250
Introduction to Health and Fitness (4 quarter credit hours)
This course will introduce students to the main concepts underlying health and fitness. Students will develop an
understanding of the fitness industry, the skills to explain exercise, and its importance to human health. It will cover
fitness testing, exercise programming and prescription, as well as nutrition, weight management, stress management,
and guidelines for prescribing an overall healthy lifestyle.
Prerequisites: PSS1100
ALH1400
Introduction to Occupational Therapy (4 quarter credit hours)
This course provides the student with an introduction to the profession of occupational therapy and the role of the
occupational therapy assistant. Topics include the history, development, philosophy, scope of practice, and
standards of practice of the profession. Occupational therapy within the health care system is explored with
emphasis to trends and current practice settings. Principles of ethics, role delineation, and professionalism are
discussed. The Practice Framework: Domain & Process, research, clinical reasoning skills, and documentation are
introduced.
Prerequisite: Completion of all general education courses.
ALH1460
Therapeutic Media (4 quarter credit hours)
This course examines the therapeutic use of purposeful and meaningful occupations in the occupational therapy
process. Students will have the opportunity to explore their own occupational history. Human occupation and its
application to intervention choice will be addressed based on occupational therapy systems models and frames of
reference. Practical applications in determining treatment activities based on these theories for clients through
therapeutic groups and individual interventions will be applied. Activity analysis will be studied assisting with the
development of therapeutic media. Teamwork and group leadership, media selection throughout the lifespan, and
establishment of therapeutic relationships are introduced. Students will learn how to design, select, and complete
goal-directed activities for diverse client populations within a group or individual session.
Prerequisite: ALH1400
ALH1481
Functional Anatomy I (4 quarter credit hours)
Functional Anatomy I is designed to study the biomechanics of human motion. The students develop knowledge
and understanding of the musculoskeletal system including the skeletal, articular, muscular and nervous systems.
Muscle physiology and neurophysiology are presented early in the course in preparation for the laboratory
experience. Structure is stressed in the laboratory portion of this course as students apply lecture information by
identifying bony structures and muscle location ultimately applying to functional activities.
Prerequisite: ALH1460
ALH1482
Functional Anatomy II (4 quarter credit hours)
The second of the Functional Anatomy classes is designed to provide the student with the foundation necessary for
developing specific skills such as manual muscle strength, range of motion, and others to use with individual clients
in order to determine current functional levels and develop functional goals. Implications of impaired muscle tone
and sensory deficits will be explored. This course examines the study of kinetics and kinematics with an emphasis
on the assessment procedures that an occupational therapy assistant must carry out to monitor a patient’s progress.
Each area of the body is examined to determine relevant functional activities. The lab portion of this course will
provide direct clinical application of functional activity into exercise progression.
Prerequisite: ALH1481
116
ALH1483
Kinesiology (4 quarter credit hours)
This course examines the study of kinetics and kinematics with an emphasis on the assessment procedures that are
necessary to monitor a patient’s progress. Each area of the body is examined to determine relevant functional
activities. The lab portion of this course will provide direct clinical application of functional activity into exercise
progression.
Prerequisites: SCI1352
ALH1561
Principles of Surgical Technology (4 quarter credit hours)
Surgical technologists are expected to have a wide range of foundational knowledge in science and technology, This
course addresses the science concepts and skills in microbiology, pathophysiology, pharmacology, and technology
related to surgical technology. Students are also exposed to the principles of anesthesia administration and the
biopsychosocial needs of the patient in order to be of greater assistance to the operating room team and the patient
throughout the perioperative process.
Prerequisite:
Completion of all non-ALH coursework
ALH1570
Introduction to Surgical Technology (4 quarter credit hours)
This course will expose students to the general requirements of the field of surgical technology, as well as the basic
surgical techniques required in the operating room. Instruction will emphasize the role of the surgical technologist,
the needs of the patient, including safety and sterile techniques, as well as ethical and legal considerations. Students
will also be exposed to instrumentation for specific surgical procedures. This course is taught both through didactic
and laboratory experiences.
Prerequisite: ALH1561
ALH1571
Advanced Practice in Surgical Technology (4 quarter credit hours)
This advanced practice course provides the opportunity to extend the skills learned in prior didactic coursework and
apply them to some of the most common tasks performed by surgical technologists in perioperative care. This
course focuses on equipment sterilization and maintenance and pre-operative preparations and activities of the
surgical technologist. This course is taught both through didactic and laboratory experiences.
Prerequisite: ALH1570
ALH1572
Operating Room Skills and Case Management (4 quarter credit hours)
This advanced practice course provides the opportunity to extend the skills learned in prior didactic coursework and
apply them to some of the most common tasks performed by surgical technologists in perioperative care. This
course focuses on the sequence of the surgical technologist’s activities and responsibilities for intra-operative and
post-operative procedures. This course is taught both through didactic and laboratory experiences.
Prerequisite: ALH1570
ALH1573
Advanced Practice in OR Skills and Case Management (4 quarter credit hours)
This course addresses intraoperative and post-operative processes and techniques. Students will be exposed to the
general requirements for proper use and care of the operating room environment, This course also cover the proper
use of surgical equipment and post-operative concepts, including patient discomfort and complications. This course
is taught both through didactic and laboratory experiences.
Prerequisite: ALH1572
ALH1601
Pharmacy I (4 quarter credit hours)
This course will provide the fundamentals of pharmacology including drug classification, brand, and generic drug
nomenclature, common drug therapy associated with various disease states, drug indications, side effects, and
parameters for safe drug usage. Also topics will include but are not limited to medication dosage forms, routes of
administration, abbreviations, interpreting medication orders and drug information resources.
Prerequisites: PSS1100
117
ALH1610
Dosage Calculation (4 quarter credit hours)
This course will use basic algebra to calculate dosage and dosage rates used to compound prescriptions, prepare
intravenous solutions, pediatric doses or special prescriptions. Basic pharmacokinetic principles will also be
introduced so that the student has a better understanding of the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of
medications.
Prerequisites: SSE0071, or placement through initial academic assessment
ALH1650
Introduction to Nutrition (4 quarter credit hours)
This course centers on an explanation of the basic principles of nutrition and their relationship to health. The
structure, functions and source of nutrients including proteins, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins, minerals, and water are
discussed. Current issues in nutrition are reviewed, including dietary guidelines, energy balance, vitamin
supplements, and food fads.
Prerequisites: PSS1100
ALH2251
Exercise Psychology (4 quarter credit hours)
This course is designed to introduce students to the basic principles, theories and applications related to the
psychological aspects of physical activity and wellness. It introduces the field of sport and exercise psychology by
providing a broad overview of the major topics in the area including moral development, team dynamics, anxiety
and arousal, goal-setting, imagery, and motivation. Discussions will focus on understanding how best to motivate
and communicate with athletes; group processes associated with the team environment; and enhancing exercise
performance, as well as health and well-being. The topics will increase understanding of the psychological makeup
of athletes, how psychological factors influence involvement and performance in sport, and how to apply them to the
exercise-working environment.
Prerequisites: ALH1250
ALH2253
Exercise Physiology (4 quarter credit hours)
This course will provide a broad introduction to the field of exercise physiology. A strong emphasis will be placed
on the changes that occur to the body’s physiological processes as a result of exercise. Areas such as body
movement, energy and energy systems for movement and cardiovascular and respiratory functions will be discussed
in depth. Other topics covered will include muscle physiology, training, nutrition, body composition, and exercise
testing. Human performance in special population groups will also be studied including: high altitude populations,
populations working in hot, humid, or cold environments, populations working under nutritional stress, aging
populations, and exercise for children and adolescents.
Prerequisites: ALH1483
ALH2255
Fitness Assessment and Exercise Prescription - Health (4 quarter credit hours)
This course develops the knowledge and skills needed to assess the levels of fitness and prescribe proper exercise
for healthy living. This course examines in detail the correct methods of designing, administering and interpreting
fitness assessments as well as studies cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength, endurance, flexibility, nutrition, and
body composition in both individual and group assessments.
Prerequisites: ALH2253
ALH2257
Fitness Assessment and Exercise Prescription - Sports (4 quarter credit hours)
This course develops the knowledge and techniques of strength training to prescribe exercise programs for sportspecific optimization. This course examines in detail the correct methods of using weightlifting with ply metrics,
speed and agility training and sport psychology to improve athletic performance in sports.
Prerequisites: ALH2255
118
ALH2400
Level I Fieldwork (1 quarter credit hour)
This course is the student’s first formal exposure to the clinic. Students are assigned to a local occupational therapy
service or clinic to observe for 30 hours. The student is expected to observe and record information on treatment
sessions with patients. The student is encouraged to ask questions and should converse frequently with the clinical
instructor regarding treatment. This fieldwork must be completed during the day from approximately 8:00 a.m. to
5:00 p.m. during one week, or as required by the cooperating facility.
Prerequisite: ALH2480
ALH2480
Intervention in Mental Health (3 quarter credit hours)
This course is designed to introduce the student to the etiology, symptoms, prognosis, and treatment of psychosocial
disorders and their impact on occupational performance areas and components. Frames of reference, intervention
theories, and techniques are discussed. Laboratory sessions emphasize the application of theory to treatment
techniques for specific conditions. The course covers the affective and personality disorders, as seen by the
occupational therapy practitioner. Students are expected to identify and describe the course and progression of
psychiatric conditions throughout the lifespan. Laboratory assignments require the student to demonstrate concepts
and techniques used in interventions. Students will demonstrate role appropriate collaboration with the occupational
therapist in providing services from assessment to discharge.
Prerequisite: ALH1482
ALH2482
Intervention in Pediatrics and Adolescents (4 quarter credit hours)
This course is designed to introduce the student to the etiology, symptoms, prognosis, and treatment of pediatric and
adolescent disorders and their impact on occupational performance areas and components. Frames of reference,
intervention theories, and techniques are discussed. Laboratory sessions emphasize the application of theory to
treatment techniques for specific conditions. Disabilities commonly associated with childhood and techniques used
for remediation are the focus. The course will focus on the disabilities that impair function in this population and
introduce the student to occupational therapy as practiced with children and adolescents.
Prerequisite: ALH2400
ALH2484
Intervention in Physical Rehabilitation (4 quarter credit hours)
This course is designed to introduce the student to the etiology, symptoms, prognosis, and treatment of conditions
commonly treated in physical rehabilitation and their impact on occupational performance areas and components.
Frames of reference, intervention theories, and techniques are discussed. Laboratory sessions emphasize the
application of theory to treatment techniques for specific conditions. The course is designed to provide the clinical
knowledge of skills required to provide intervention to a variety of physical dysfunctions for diseases and disorders
of the physical body systems. The principles of promoting health and independence throughout the lifespan by way
of adaptation and emphasize the basic skills in the management of the physical needs of the individual are also
included. Students will determine adaptations in the areas of basic activities of daily living, instrumental activities of
daily living, adaptive equipment, and splinting for hand injuries, in collaboration with the occupational therapist.
Fine and gross motor assessment procedures will be discussed. Students are also required to provide documentation
for the provision of service under simulated conditions. The lab sessions provide the student with an opportunity to
practice increasingly complex treatment strategies in simulated conditions.
Prerequisite: ALH2482
ALH2486
Intervention in Neurological Rehabilitation (4 quarter credit hours)
This course is designed to introduce the student to the etiology, symptoms, prognosis, and treatment of neurological
disorders and their impact on occupational performance areas and components. Frames of reference, intervention
theories, and techniques are discussed. Laboratory sessions emphasize the application of theory to treatment
techniques for specific conditions in simulated experiences.
Prerequisite: ALH2482
119
ALH 2488
Intervention in Geriatric Rehabilitation (4 quarter credit hours)
This course is designed to introduce the student to the etiology, symptoms, prognosis, and treatment of common
geriatric disorders and their impact on occupational performance areas and components. Frames of reference,
intervention theories, and techniques are discussed. Laboratory sessions emphasize the application of theory to
treatment techniques for specific conditions. This course provides the student with a greater depth of understanding
of the disabilities that affect the older adult and geriatric population, with emphasis upon assessment, treatment and
remediation of those disabilities and the effects of aging. The role of the occupational therapy assistant in treatment
with focus on the techniques used to modify daily functional activities through environmental assessments and
modification, transfer training and the use of assistive technology are included.
Prerequisites: ALH2484 and ALH2486
ALH 2490
Management, Scholarship, and Professional Responsibilities (4 quarter credit hours)
This is an intermediate course to continue development of the student's knowledge in management, scholarship and
professional responsibilities. This course will expose the student to application of principles of management and
systems in the provision of occupational therapy services to individuals and organizations. The scholarship
component will increase student's understanding in interpretation and applying knowledge of scholarly activities.
The professional responsibilities component will increase understanding, appreciation, and application of ethics and
values to the profession of occupational therapy.
Prerequisite: ALH2488
ALH2561
Surgical Procedures and Techniques I (4 quarter credit hours)
This course will expose the student to the relevant surgical anatomy and physiology, factors unique to surgical
procedure, supplies, equipment, and instrumentation needed for various surgical procedures, including general,
obstetric and gynecologic, and genitourinary. This course also covers the correct steps taken during these
procedures, post-operative care and wound classification specific to each procedure. This course is taught both
through didactic and laboratory experiences.
Prerequisite: ALH1572
ALH2562
Surgical Procedures and Techniques II (4 quarter credit hours)
This course will expose the student to the relevant surgical anatomy and physiology, factors unique to surgical
procedure, supplies, equipment, and instrumentation needed for various surgical procedures, including orthopedic,
cardiothoracic, peripheral vascular, and neurosurgery. This course also covers the correct steps taken during these
procedures, post-operative care and wound classification specific to each procedure. This course is taught both
through didactic and laboratory experiences.
Prerequisite: ALH2561
ALH2563
Surgical Procedures and Techniques III (4 quarter credit hours)
This course will expose the student to the relevant surgical anatomy and physiology, factors unique to surgical
procedure, supplies, equipment, and instrumentation needed for a variety of procedures, including
otorhinolaryngology, oral and maxillofacial, plastic and reconstructive, and opthalmic. This course also covers the
correct steps taken during these procedures, post-operative care and wound classification specific to each procedure.
This course is taught both through didactic and laboratory experiences.
Prerequisite: ALH2562
ALH2569
Professional Transition for Surgical Technologists (4 quarter credit hours)
This course introduces the students to the professional practice of surgical technology, with an emphasis on
professional behavior, organizations and credentialing, and employability skills such as effective communication
and teamwork. Students will also be exposed to ethical, moral, legal, and risk management issues, as well as the
organization of and relationships within the healthcare facility.
Prerequisite: ALH2563
120
ALH2925
Health and Fitness Externship (4 quarter credit hours)
Students are assigned to work in a professional environment appropriate for the application of skills learned in the
curriculum, thus gaining practical experience in the skills acquired. The externship requires 160 hours.
Prerequisites: Completion of all course requirements or departmental approval
ALH2935
Medical Assisting Externship (4 quarter credit hours)
Students are assigned to work in a professional environment appropriate for the application of skills learned in the
curriculum, thus gaining practical experience in the skills acquired. The externship requires 160 hours.
Prerequisites: Completion of all course requirements or departmental approval
ALH2940A
Level II Fieldwork (5 quarter credit hours)
This course represents 4 of 16 weeks of Level II Fieldwork experience. The student will average 37.5 hours
minimum a week at a fieldwork site. By the end of the course, the student must complete a minimum of 150 hours
per course. The clinical instructor arranges for the student to begin direct treatment of psychosocial and physical
dysfunction. Students carry out clinical techniques learned in the lecture and laboratory portion of the curriculum.
The clinical instructor teaches and directly supervises any techniques. This fieldwork must be completed during the
day from approximately 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. or as required by the cooperating facility. ALH2940A and
ALH2940B will run consecutively to attain the minimum hours required at a fieldwork site. A student will be
assessed at the end of ALH2940A with a midterm grade of IP or NP as defined by the Fieldwork Performance
Evaluation (FPE). A student may receive an IP even though the score on the FPE is below 54 points. To receive an
IP with a score below 54 points, the Clinical Instructor, Academic Fieldwork Coordinator, and student must have a
documented remediation plan for the final four (4) weeks of ALH2940B. If the student receives a score of NP as
defined by the Fieldwork Performance Evaluation and the Clinical Instructor and Academic Fieldwork Coordinator's
assessment is that the student is not competent in the fieldwork setting, the student may not advance to ALH2940B.
The student must repeat ALH2940A upon completion of academic remediation.
Prerequisite: Completion of all program coursework except Level II Fieldwork
ALH2940B
Level II Fieldwork (5 quarter credit hours)
ALH2940B is a continuation of ALH2940A. This course represents 4 of 16 weeks of Level II Fieldwork experience.
The student will average 37.5 hours minimum a week at a fieldwork site. By the end of the course, the student must
complete a minimum of 150 hours per course. The clinical instructor arranges for the student to continue direct
treatment of psychosocial and physical dysfunction. Students carry out clinical techniques learned in the lecture and
laboratory portion of the curriculum. The clinical instructor teaches and directly supervises any techniques. This
fieldwork must be completed during the day from approximately 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. or as required by the
cooperating facility. A student will be assessed at the end of ALH2940B with a final grade of P or NP as defined by
the Fieldwork Performance Evaluation (FPE). If the student receives a grade of NP at the end of ALH2940B, as
defined by the FPE, the student will be required to repeat both ALH2940A and ALH2940B.
Prerequisite: Completion of ALH2940A.
ALH2941A
Level II Fieldwork (5 quarter credit hours)
This course represents 4 of 16 weeks of Level II Fieldwork experience. The student will average 37.5 hours
minimum a week at a fieldwork site. By the end of the course, the student must complete a minimum of 150 hours
per course. The clinical instructor arranges for the student to begin direct treatment of psychosocial and physical
dysfunction. Students carry out clinical techniques learned in the lecture and laboratory portion of the curriculum.
The clinical instructor teaches and directly supervises any techniques. This fieldwork must be completed during the
day from approximately 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. or as required by the cooperating facility. ALH2941A and
ALH2941B will run consecutively to attain the minimum hours required at a fieldwork site. A student will be
assessed at the end of ALH2941A with a midterm grade of IP or NP as defined by the Fieldwork Performance
Evaluation (FPE). If the student receives a score of NP as defined by the Fieldwork Performance Evaluation, the
student may advance to ALH2941B with an advisement that the student is not making progress to mastering the
competencies for the course at mid-point and advisement on how to meet course expectations.
Prerequisite: ALH2940A and ALH2940B.
121
ALH2941B
Level II Fieldwork (5 quarter credit hours)
ALH2941B is a continuation of ALH2941A. This course represents 4 of 16 weeks of Level II Fieldwork experience.
The student will average 37.5 hours minimum a week at a fieldwork site. By the end of the course, the student must
complete a minimum of 150 hours per course. The clinical instructor arranges for the student to continue direct
treatment of psychosocial and physical dysfunction. Students carry out clinical techniques learned in the lecture and
laboratory portion of the curriculum. The clinical instructor teaches and directly supervises any techniques. This
fieldwork must be completed during the day from approximately 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. or as required by the
cooperating facility. A student will be assessed at the end of ALH2941B with a final grade of P or NP as defined by
the Fieldwork Performance Evaluation (FPE). If the student receives a grade of NP at the end of ALH2941B, as
defined by the FPE, the student will be required to repeat both ALH2941A and ALH2941B
Prerequisite: ALH2941A
ALH2951A
Surgical Technology Externship A (4 quarter credit hours)
This externship is a four-course series designed to engage the students in increasingly more complex skills
applications in surgical technology. Under the direct supervision of a staff surgical technologist and a registered
nurse, the extern will assist the surgical team members with the daily pre-operative and post-operative duties of a
student surgical technologist. Students will progress through the increasingly more complex First and Second
Scrubbing surgical procedures as the extern moves toward entry-level graduate abilities.
Prerequisites: Completion of all course requirements or departmental approval
ALH2951B
Surgical Technology Externship B (4 quarter credit hours)
This externship is a four-course series designed to engage the students in increasingly more complex skills
applications in surgical technology. Under the direct supervision of a staff surgical technologist and a registered
nurse, the extern will assist the surgical team members with the daily pre-operative and post-operative duties of a
student surgical technologist. Students will progress through the increasingly more complex First and Second
Scrubbing surgical procedures as the extern moves toward entry-level graduate abilities.
Prerequisites: ALH2951A
ALH2951C
Surgical Technology Externship C (4 quarter credit hours)
This externship is a four-course series designed to engage the students in increasingly more complex skills
applications in surgical technology. Under the direct supervision of a staff surgical technologist and a registered
nurse, the extern will assist the surgical team members with the daily pre-operative and post-operative duties of a
student surgical technologist. Students will progress through the increasingly more complex First and Second
Scrubbing surgical procedures as the extern moves toward entry-level graduate abilities.
Prerequisites: ALH2951B
ALH2951D
Surgical Technology Externship D (4 quarter credit hours)
This externship is a four-course series designed to engage the students in increasingly more complex skills
applications in surgical technology. Under the direct supervision of a staff surgical technologist and a registered
nurse, the extern will assist the surgical team members with the daily pre-operative and post-operative duties of a
student surgical technologist. Students will progress through the increasingly more complex First and Second
Scrubbing surgical procedures as the extern moves toward entry-level graduate abilities.
Prerequisites: ALH2951C
ANH1100
Introduction to Veterinary Technology (4 quarter credit hours)
This course provides an introduction to the roles and responsibilities of the veterinary technician, including the
administrative and clinical competencies necessary to perform front office procedures, basic animal nursing skills,
veterinary ethics and law, animal safety, client relations, animal behavior, human-animal bond, physical
examinations, grooming care, and medication administration.
Prerequisite: ANH1102, MTH1800
122
ANH1101
Veterinary Anatomy and Physiology I (4 quarter credit hours)
This course provides students a fundamental comparative overview of the anatomy and physiology of domestic
animals, including canine, feline, bovine, equine, and ruminant species. The unique anatomy and physiology of
avian, amphibian, and repitle species will also be discussed. Instruction will focus on the identification, structure,
and function of body systems. Students will demonstrate an understanding of course concepts through applied lab
activities involving the disection and study of animal cadavers and tissue specimems.
Prerequisites: HSC1110
ANH1102
Veterinary Anatomy and Physiology II (4 quarter credit hours)
This course is a continuation of ANH1101 and provides students a fundamental comparative overview of the
anatomy and physiology of domestic animals, including canine, feline, bovine, equine, and ruminant species. The
unique anatomy and physiology of avian, amphibian, and reptile species will also be discussed. Instruction will
focus on the identification, structure, and function of body systems. Students will demonstrate an understanding of
course concepts through applied lab activities involving the disection and study of animal cadavers and tissue
specimems.
Prerequisites: ANH1101
ANH1120
Small Animal Medicine I (4 quarter credit hours)
This course is designed to provide students the knowledge of common small animal diseases, including an overview
of the etiology, symptoms, transmission, basic treatment and control through preventative care. Instruction will
include an introduction to kennel sanitation, nutrition, immunology, vaccinations, and advanced nursing skills.
Prerequisites: ANH1100
ANH1201
Veterinary Lab Procedures I (4 quarter credit hours)
This course provides an introduction to laboratory concepts and procedures commonly experienced in the veterinary
clinical setting, as well as to provide the knowledge and skills necessary to perform urinalysis and hematological
laboratory procedures on a variety of species, including dogs, cats, laboratory animals, large animals, birds and
reptiles. Instruction includes laboratory safety, quality control, specimen collection and handling, basic clinical
chemistry, serology, cytology, a study of the components of blood components, their characteristics and function,
normal values, normal and abnormal variations and laboratory testing of these components in relation to a variety of
species.
Prerequisites: ANH1120 or ANH1400
ANH1202
Veterinary Lab Procedures II (4 quarter credit hours)
This course is designed to provide the knowledge and skills necessary to perform parasitic and microbiological
laboratory procedures on small and large animals. Instruction includes an overview of the identification, life cycle,
symptoms, diagnostic methods, treatment and control of internal and external parasites. An introduction to the
characteristics, classification, pathology and culturing of bacteria and fungi is also provided.
Prerequisites: ANH1201
ANH1400
Pharmacology (4 quarter credit hours)
This course is designed to provide the knowledge and skills to follow prescribed orders for preparing, dispensing
and administering drugs, providing appropriate client education, and monitoring therapeutic responses in a
veterinary setting. Instruction will also include a discussion of drug classification, toxicology and alternative
therapeutic methods.
Prerequisites: ANH1120
ANH2120
Small Animal Medicine II (4 quarter credit hours)
This course is designed to provide students the knowledge and advanced nursing skills needed to understand and
assist in canine and feline reproduction, small animal dentistry, emergency care and fluid therapy. An overview of
animal handling and restraint, critical patient care, first aid, administration and maintenance of fluid therapy, dental
prophylaxis and procedures related to small animal reproduction will be studied.
Prerequisites: ANH1202, ANH1400
123
ANH2140
Large Animal Medicine (4 quarter credit hours)
This course provides an overview of management, diseases, veterinary care and nursing skills associated with
production animals and horses. Instruction includes breed identification, nutrition, diseases, herd health
management, reproduction, production practices, restraint, nursing skills, and lab work associated with each breed.
Prerequisites: ANH2120, ANH2240
ANH2200
Laboratory and Exotic Animals (4 quarter credit hours)
This course provides the knowledge and skills necessary to provide basic care to laboratory animals, birds, and
reptiles. Topics include breed recognition, restraint, basic husbandry, reproduction, diseases, and veterinary
procedures associated with these animals. Students will also learn aspects of animal research, as well as general
veterinary medicine.
Prerequisites: ANH2120
ANH2240
Veterinary Imaging (4 quarter credit hours)
This course provides instruction needed to produce quality radiographs for diagnostic purposes in a veterinary
setting, including the use of proper safety measures. Topics will include radiographic theory, x-ray equipment,
positioning patients, exposing and processing film, radiographic evaluation and troubleshooting, safety regulations
and an introduction to ultrasonography.
Prerequisites: ANH1120
ANH2400
Anesthesia and Surgical Assistance (4 quarter credit hours)
This course provides the knowledge and skills necessary to administer and monitor the effects of various preanesthetic and anesthetic agents commonly used in a small and large animal clinical setting to assist in routine
surgical procedures. Instruction includes basic properties and actions of various types of anesthetic agents and
protocols, drug administration techniques, recognition of anesthetic emergencies, surgical prep and assistance for
routine surgeries using aseptic technique, pre and postoperative care, and maintenance of the operating room and
surgical supplies.
Prerequisites: ANH2120
ANH2900A
Veterinary Technology Externship A (4 quarter credit hours)
This is the first in a series of externship courses that will provide students the opportunity to apply skills and
techniques learned within the classroom to the veterinary clinic or lab environment. ANH2900A will focus on
animal care and nursing and dentistry. Each externship course requires the completion of 120 practicum hours.
Prerequisites: Completion of all prior coursework
ANH2900B
Veterinary Technology Externship B (4 quarter credit hours)
This course provides students the opportunity to apply skills and techniques learned within the classroom to the
veterinary clinic or lab environment. ANH2900B will focus on laboratory procedures and diagnostic imaging. Each
externship course requires the completion of 120 practicum hours.
Prerequisites: ANH2900A
ANH2900C
Veterinary Technology Externship C (4 quarter credit hours)
This course provides students the opportunity to apply skills and techniques learned within the classroom to the
veterinary clinic or lab environment. ANH2900C will focus on surgical preparation and assisting and anesthesia and
analgesia. Each externship course requires the completion of 120 practicum hours.
Prerequisites: ANH2900B
BUS1100
Introduction to Business (4 quarter credit hours)
This course gives the student an overview of all phases of business: ownership, marketing, personnel, finance,
managerial controls, and the relationship of business with the social and economic environment in which the
business operates.
Prerequisites: PSS1100
124
BUS1120
Business Law I (4 quarter credit hours)
An introduction to contracts, termination and breach of contracts, and the application of legal principles to such
areas as corporations, agencies, partnerships, and bailments.
Prerequisites: PSS1100
BUS1130
Advanced Spreadsheets (4 quarter credit hours)
Students will explore a variety of topics such as using formulas, macros, filters, queries and other data analysis
techniques. Students will use spreadsheets to automate some business processes.
Prerequisites: PSS1100
BUS1140
Advanced Word Processing (4 quarter credit hours)
Students will learn how to work with multiple page documents, create and modify tables, import and edit graphic
designs, desktop publishing and mail merge. Students will also become familiar with automating a variety of
documents and templates used in business.
Prerequisites: PSS1100
BUS1300
Small Business Management (4 quarter credit hours)
An introduction to the intricacies of decision-making in organizing and developing a small business. Discussion
focuses on the various responsibilities a small business must meet and the challenges generated by the marketplace.
Prerequisites: PSS1100
BUS1400
Human Resources (4 quarter credit hours)
A study of the planning, recruiting, selecting, hiring, training, appraising and compensating of human resources.
Case studies are employed in order for students to gain practical experience.
Prerequisites: PSS1100
BUS2120
Business Law II (4 quarter credit hours)
This course covers the law of basic business associations, including agencies, partnerships, and corporations. This
course will include a discussion of franchise and relevant real property concepts, and a study of negotiable
instruments using the Uniform Commercial Code.
Prerequisites: BUS1120
BUS2250
Principles of Finance (4 quarter credit hours)
An examination of the analytical tools necessary for investigating corporate financial structure as well as evaluating
and ranking various types of investments. Capital budgeting, return on investment, required rate of return, present
value, and other investment techniques are studied.
Prerequisites: ACC1011
BUS2600
Marketing and Advertising (4 quarter credit hours)
An introduction to the principles of marketing, advertising, and sales promotion, with an emphasis on target
marketing and ethics.
Prerequisites: PSS1100
BUS2900
Business Externship (2 quarter credit hours)
Students are assigned to work in a professional environment appropriate for the application of skills learned in the
curriculum, thus gaining practical experience in the skills acquired. The externship requires 60 hours.
Prerequisites: Completion of all course requirements or departmental approval
BUS3000
Management Information Systems (4 quarter credit hours)
This course provides an introduction to business applications of information systems and emphasizes how business
objectives shape the application of new information systems and technologies and demonstrates the relevance of
information systems.
Prerequisites: BUS1100, (BA 1000)
125
BUS3240
Corporate Finance (4 quarter credit hours)
An introductory course in the financial management of non-financial corporations, this course focuses on the role of
interest rates and capital markets in the economy. A variety of topics are addressed, including the structure and
analysis of financial statements, time value of money circulations, and the valuation of income-producing physical
assets.
Prerequisites: ACC1012, BUS2250
BUS3300
Management (4 quarter credit hours)
The latest major approaches and techniques of management are studied, including planning, systems management,
new organizational concepts, computer influence, controlling, and quantitative measurement.
Prerequisites: BUS1100, BUS1300, BUS1400, BUS2250
BUS3381
Introduction to Leadership (4 quarter credit hours)
This course focuses on the theories of leadership and their application to leaders of the past and present. This course
sets the foundation for individuals to assume increasingly responsible leadership roles in their professional
environment. Topics include: leadership theory, the influence of patterns of thinking values, attitudes and
personality on leadership and application of moral and ethical principles to leadership.
Prerequisites:BUS1100, or Junior Standing = 72 credit hours earned
BUS3382
Applied Leadership (4 quarter credit hours)
This course focuses on the application of leadership theory and practical skills in organizations. There is an
emphasis on becoming a productive leader. Topics include: change management, team building, motivation,
communication, conflict resolution, and diversity.
Prerequisites: BUS3381
BUS3400
Performance Management Systems (4 quarter credit hours)
An introduction to management with an emphasis on employee performance including, job analysis and job
descriptions as a basis for establishing performance criteria. Provide a review of the applicable legal aspects and
managing work, using employees and independent contractors.
Prerequisites: BUS1400
BUS3500
Organizational Behavior (4 quarter credit hours)
This course advances the concepts learned in the foundational business courses. In addition, behavioral concepts are
applied to motivation, leadership, work groups, and communication.
Prerequisites: BUS1100, SSC1100
BUS4360
Operations Management (4 quarter credit hours)
This course focuses on the production and operations component of business. Topics include forecasting of
demand, capacity and location planning, inventory management, scheduling of jobs and projects, and quality
assurance and control.
Prerequisites: BUS3300
BUS4370
Global Business Management (4 quarter credit hours)
Students study characteristics of international management and the bases for business among countries. Different
perspectives on organizational behavior, human resource management, management styles and the practical aspects
of international management are discussed. Business in the international environment is interpreted from a strategic
management and marketing perspective that yields practical guidance concerning the management of firms and
social responsibility.
Prerequisites: BUS3300, SSC2220, SSC2230
126
BUS4500
Case Study Project (4 quarter credit hours)
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the knowledge acquired in their business degree program to
advanced, real-world situations in a case-study simulation. Students will focus on research, critical analysis, and
assessment, specifically the analysis of the challenges involved in the initiation, evolution, development, and control
of business organizations. An emphasis is placed on proposed solution and outcomes.
Prerequisites: Completion of all course requirements or departmental approval
BUS4620
Consumer Behavior and Market Research (4 quarter credit hours)
Examines the psychological and sociological factors that influence consumption and decision-making. Studies the
practical implications of consumer attitudes and behavior for such marketing activities as merchandising, market
research, distribution, product development, pricing, branding, and e-commerce. Students are also exposed to
applications of traditional and electronic media procedures and theories involved in solving marketing problems
related to customer and competitive intelligence and marketing information systems.
Prerequisites: BUS2600, MTH1800 or MT 1800, and SSC1100 or PS 1200
BUS4640
Marketing, Sales and Channel Management (4 quarter credit hours)
Develops an understanding of the marketing, sales, and channel management functions in organizations. An
awareness of the interrelated nature of these functions is developed. Students are given an opportunity to examine
the nature of this interdependency through online discussion, simulations, case studies, and experiments. Through
these activities, students will explore the strategic and operational aspects of the marketing, sales, and channel
functions. Students will also explore methods of maintaining relationships between firms and their channel partners
including, strategic channel design, channel evaluation, and the management of marketing, sales, and channels for
competitive advantage.
Prerequisites: BUS2600
BUS4650
Retail Marketing (4 quarter credit hours)
This course is designed to present and integrate basic principles in decision areas such as location, layout,
organization, personnel, merchandise control, pricing, sales promotion, traditional and e-commerce marketing
strategies and channel development considerations. Focus on strategic management and marketing perspective of
retail merchandising.
Prerequisites: BUS2600
CDE1100
Fundamentals of Drafting (4 quarter credit hours)
An introductory course in computer-aided drafting (CAD) using standard architectural conventions emphasizing the
production of scaled drawings for use in architecture, including orthographic views, correct sheet design, different
line weights, architectural lettering, dimensions, symbols, and notation.
Prerequisites: PSS1100
CDE1110
Dimensioning and Tolerancing (4 quarter credit hours)
An introduction to dimensioning. Basic dimensioning using manual and CAD techniques is presented. Geometric
tolerancing, feature control frames, editing dimensions, and creating dimension styles with AutoCAD software are
introduced.
Prerequisites:CDE1100
CDE1200
Multiview Drawing (4 quarter credit hours)
An introductory course in multiview drawing from an architectural perspective, emphasizing the three orthographic
views: plane, elevation and section, where students describe design intent through production documents drawn at
different scales.
Prerequisites: CDE1100
CDE1210
Technical Drawing (4 quarter credit hours)
An introduction to pictorial and sectional drawing. Isometric and sectional drawings are presented using both
manual and computer-aided techniques.
Prerequisites:CDE1100
127
CDE1500
3-Dimensional Graphics (4 quarter credit hours)
This introductory course in digital 3D graphics introduces a widely-adopted computer-aided drafting program, in
which students create finished 3D scenes, including 3D geometry, simulated surface textures and colors, theatrical
lighting and rendered camera views.
Prerequisites: CDE1200
CDE1510
Descriptive Geometry (4 quarter credit hours)
The study of spatial relationships of points, lines, and planes. Parallelism, perpendicularity, intersections, and
developments are covered in detail.
Prerequisites:CDE1100
CDE1850
Computerized Design for Structural Engineering (4 quarter credit hours)
A course in computer-aided drafting (CAD) emphasizing the production of scaled drawings for use in structural
engineering, including different foundation types, framing technologies and related details. Students will combine
standard architectural drafting conventions with the symbols, notation and numeracy of structural engineering to
produce professional-level technical documents.
Prerequisites: CDE1500, SCI1100
CDE1860
Computerized Design for Mechanical Engineering (4 quarter credit hours)
An introductory course in computer-aided drafting (CAD) using standard engineering conventions emphasizing the
production of scaled drawings for use in mechanical engineering, including orthographic views, sheet design, line
weights, technical lettering, notation, dimensions, symbols and schematic diagrams.
Prerequisites: CDE1500, SCI1100
CDE1870
Computerized Design for Civil Engineering (4 quarter credit hours)
A course in computer-aided drafting (CAD) using standard architectural drafting conventions emphasizing the
production of scaled drawings for use in civil engineering, including property description, landform, utilities,
infrastructure, and related details.
Prerequisites: CDE1500, SCI1100
CDE2011
Building Information Modeling I (4 quarter credit hours)
An introductory course in digital architectural visualization using a widely-adopted Building Information Modeling
(BIM) software program, where students create 2D and 3D digital geometry, simulated surface textures and colors,
theatrical lighting and rendered camera views.
Prerequisites: CDE1850
CDE2012
Building Information Modeling II (4 quarter credit hours)
An intermediate course in digital architectural visualization using a widely-adopted Building Information Modeling
(BIM) software program, where students create 2D and 3D digital geometry, simulated surface textures and colors,
theatrical lighting and rendered camera views.
Prerequisites: CDE2011
CDE2210
Detail Drawing (4 quarter credit hours)
Students learn to create detail and assembly drawings using CAD and manual drawing procedures. A discussion of
industrial manufacturing processes is presented.
Prerequisites:CDE1100
CDE2230
3-Dimensional Visualization I (4 quarter credit hours)
This is a course in digital 3D visualization using a widely-adopted computer software program, in which students
create finished 3D scenes, including 3D geometry, simulated surface textures and colors, theatrical lighting and
rendered camera views.
Prerequisites: CDE2012
128
CDE2235
Auto CAD Customization (4 quarter credit hours)
An introduction to the internal structure of AutoCAD menus. Students will learn to create and modify a variety of
button, screen, pull-down, and icon menus. Creating custom linetypes and hatch patterns is introduced.
Prerequisites:CDE1100
CDE2240
3-Dimensional Visualization II (4 quarter credit hours)
This course is a continuation of CDE2230. This is a course in digital 3D visualization using a widely-adopted
computer software program, in which students create finished 3D scenes, including 3D geometry, simulated surface
textures and colors, theatrical lighting and rendered camera views.
Prerequisites:CDE2230
CDE2550
Solid Modeling (4 quarter credit hours)
An introduction to computer-generated solid modeling. Students learn to construct solid models using primitives,
extruded objects, and Boolean operations. The generation of mass property reports and sectional profiles is
presented. The application of various lighting, color, and surface texture options to 3-D drawings to create realistic
views for demonstration and client presentation is introduced.
Prerequisites:CDE1500
CDE2610
Fastening Devices (4 quarter credit hours)
An introduction to threads, fastening devices, and welding symbols using computer-aided and manual methods.
Creating blocks and attributes with AutoCAD software.
Prerequisites:CDE1100
CDE2900
Design and Drafting Externship (2 quarter credit hours)
Students are assigned to work in a professional environment appropriate for the application of skills learned in the
curriculum, thus gaining practical experience in the skills acquired. The externship requires 60 hours.
Prerequisites: Completion of all course requirements or departmental approval
CIT1120
Principles of Logic and Problem Solving (4 quarter credit hours)
This course is an introduction to the basics of logical problem solving using a computer programming language.
This course introduces data structures, programming structures, object-orientation, algorithms and event-driven
programming as solutions to common business problems.
Prerequisites: PSS1100
CIT2120
Fundamentals of Web-based Systems (4 quarter credit hours)
This course is an introduction to Internet technologies and systems, searching the Internet, communications, Internet
security, creating a Web site (including an introduction to HTML), e-business, and site administration.
Prerequisites: PSS1100
CIT2990
Networking Externship (2 quarter credit hours)
Students are assigned to work in a professional environment appropriate for the application of skills learned in the
curriculum, thus gaining practical experience in the skills acquired. The externship requires 60 hours.
Prerequisites: Completion of all course requirements or departmental approval
CIT3213
Windows Professional (4 quarter credit hours)
This course is designed to give the student the ability to implement, administer, and troubleshoot information
systems that incorporate Microsoft Windows Professional, with emphasis upon installing, configuring, and
administering Microsoft Windows.
Prerequisites: PSS1100
CIT3223
Windows Server (4 quarter credit hours)
Instruction and practice of how to manage and maintain a Microsoft Windows Server environment, with emphasis
upon managing and maintaining a Microsoft Windows Server.
Prerequisites: CIT3213
129
CIT3233
Directory Services Infrastructure (4 quarter credit hours)
Preparation in planning, implementing and managing Microsoft Windows Service Active Directory Infrastructure,
with emphasis on planning, implementing, and maintaining a Microsoft Windows Service Active Directory
Infrastructure.
Prerequisites: CIT3223
CIT3243
Network Infrastructure Implementation and Administration (4 quarter credit hours)
Instruction and practice in implementing and administering a Microsoft Windows Server Network Infrastructure,
with emphasis upon implementing, managing, and maintaining a Microsoft Windows Server Network Infrastructure.
Prerequisites: CIT3223
CIT3253
Network Infrastructure Design and Security Design (4 quarter credit hours)
Instruction and practice on how to plan, maintain, gather, secure, and analyze business requirements for a secure
Microsoft Windows Server Network Infrastructure, with emphasis upon planning and maintaining a Microsoft
Windows Server Network Infrastructure.
Prerequisites: CIT3233, CIT3243
CIT3263
Exchange Server (4 quarter credit hours)
Instruction and practice on how to implement, manage, and troubleshoot a Microsoft Exchange Server organization,
with emphasis upon implementing and managing a Microsoft Exchange Server.
Prerequisites:
CIT3233, CIT3243
COM1101
Composition I* (4 quarter credit hours)
This is the first course in a two course sequence designed to improve student writing skills. The course emphasizes
the construction of clear, coherent, expository essays employing various strategies of pre-writing, thesis
development, support, organization, and revision.
Prerequisites: SSE0051 or placement through initial academic assessment
COM1102
Composition II* (4 quarter credit hours)
Composition II has been designed to develop the students' proficiencies in both academic and professional writing.
It promotes an awareness of the need to provide responsible support of ideas and conclusions. Students will employ
logical reasoning (both inductive and deductive), analyze using critical reasoning, and accept the burden of proof in
composing arguments.
Prerequisites: COM1101
COM1200
Effective Public Speaking* (4 quarter credit hours)
An introduction to the principles and practices of topic selection, research, audience analysis, organization, style,
and delivery of oral presentations. A variety of informative, persuasive, and group presentations are required.
Prerequisites: PSS1100 or PSS1210
CON1101
Introduction to Construction Trades (5 quarter credit hours)
This course introduces the learner to the knowledge and skills essential to successful and safe practice in
construction. The learner covers common tools, equipment, and materials used in construction, along with the
applicable safety principles. Students also perform necessary mathematical calculations, study the symbols
necessary to read construction drawing, and undergo OSHA10 and First Aid/CPR training. Additionally, this course
addresses effective workplace communications and the characteristics of successful employees.
Prerequisites: PSS1100
CON1102
Scaffolding (4 quarter credit hours)
This course introduces the types and terms of scaffolding, as well as the duties of the scaffolder. This course
provides a comprehensive overview of the safety regulations and guidelines pertinent to this industry. Students
encounter the equipment and procedures used for stationary, mobile, and suspension scaffolds.
Prerequisites: CON1101
130
CON1106
Rigging (4 quarter credit hours)
This course exposes students to the basic rigging principles and techniques, including the equipment, hardware, and
essential safety techniques. The intermediate portion of this course addresses lift plans, crane loads, sling selection,
and the proper use of jacks, hoists, and rollers. Students also cover wire rope installation and inspection, and boom
assembly/disassembly.
Prerequisites: CON1101
CON1107
Field Safety (4 quarter credit hours)
This course offers a review of OSHA practices, personal protective equipment, hand and power tool safety, and
hazard communication. This course also extends this foundational knowledge in safety to hazards in additional areas
including work zone safety, electrical and high-voltage hazards, fire protection and prevention, fall protection,
walking and working surfaces, confined spaces, forklift safety, horizontal directional drilling hazards, and ladders
and scaffolding.
Prerequisites: CON 1101
ELE1101
Fundamentals of Electronics I (4 quarter credit hours)
This course is designed to give the student an introduction to basic electronic theory and concepts, including atomic
theory and magnetism, resistors and resistance, multimeters and their use, voltage, current, and power relationships,
AC and DC circuits, and circuit analysis using Ohm’s and Watt’s laws.
Prerequisites: PSS1100 or CF 1100
ELE1102
Fundamentals of Electronics II (4 quarter credit hours)
During this course the student obtains an understanding of alternating current theory, aspects of resistors, capacitors,
and inductors.
Prerequisites: ELE1101
ELE1301
Solid State Electronics I (4 quarter credit hours)
A study of atomic structure, with an introduction to the functions of diodes, bipolar junction transistors, and power
supplies.
Prerequisites: ELE1101
ELE1302
Solid State Electronics II (4 quarter credit hours)
A study of the functions of field effect transistors, thyristors, operational amplifiers, oscillators and ilters.
Prerequisites: ELE1301
ELE2201
Computer Repair: Systems and Software (4 quarter credit hours)
This course develops an understanding of operating systems, system requirements, installation, configuration, basic
networking, communications, and troubleshooting.
Prerequisites: PSS1100
ELE2202
Computer Repair: Hardware Applications (4 quarter credit hours)
This course examines basic computer hardware, including power supplies, form factors, CPU's and computer
memory. Students will become competent in the use of the command line interface, storage devices, printers, system
resources, monitors, video cards, and safety procedures.
Prerequisites: PSS1100
ELE2500
Introduction to Biomedical Equipment Technology (4 quarter credit hours)
This course provides an introduction to the clinical environment of health-related facilities which includes hospitals,
extended care facilities and medical offices. Topics include an overview of the structure of various health-care
environments, roles and responsibilities of staff; national, state, and local safety standards, electrical safety, gas
safety; reporting and compliance, conducting safety inspections, mastering aseptic techniques, and the identification
and purpose of basic biomedical equipment.
Prerequisites: SCI1100
131
ELE2501
Biomedical Equipment and Instrumentation I (4 quarter credit hours)
This course will provide an overview of the principles of instruments used in medicine for diagnosis, treatment and
life support. It includes a focus on acquiring and monitoring biological signals, processing signal data, the
management of electronic information in medical applications, and the calibration of instruments.
Prerequisites: ELE2500, SCI1100
ELE2502
Biomedical Equipment and Instrumentation II (4 quarter credit hours)
This course provides advanced study of the instrumentation used in medicine for diagnosis, treatment and life
support. It includes advanced operation, repair, troubleshooting, and preventive care maintenance.
Prerequisites: ELE2501
ELE2950
Biomedical Equipment Technology Externship (2 quarter credit hours)
Students are assigned to work in a professional environment appropriate for the application of skills learned in the
curriculum, thus gaining practical experience in the skills acquired. The externship requires 60 hours.
Prerequisites: Completion of all course requirements or departmental approval
HCA1100
Professionalism and Communication in Health Care Setting (4 quarter credit hours)
This course is designed to assist the student in understanding the importance of professionalism and proper
communication in a health care setting. The student will learn how to appropriately interact with co-workers,
visitors and guests, as well as learn the soft skills needed to project a professional image. The student will also learn
how to therapeutically interact with clients, learning how to adjust their approach depending upon the age and/or
presenting illness of the client.
Prerequisites:PSS1100
HCA1110
Introduction to Health Care Services (4 quarter credit hours)
This course explains how the nation’s health care system is structured and how it functions. The student will gain a
broad perspective of the increasing role and impact of health care in our nation’s society and economy. Emphasis is
placed on describing and explaining the components of the health care system.
Prerequisites:PSS1100
HCA1700
Managing Health Care Information (4 quarter credit hours)
A study of the recordkeeping practices in a health care setting. Emphasis is placed on hospital and medical staff
organization, patient record content, procedures in filing, numbering and retention of patient records, quantitative
analysis, release of patient information, forms control and design, indexes and registers, reimbursement, regulatory
and accrediting agencies, and alternative health care delivery systems.
Prerequisites: HSC1100
HCA1750
Medical Administrative Practices (4 quarter credit hours)
This course introduces automated scheduling and billing procedures as well as fundamental accounting, office
management and correspondence. In addition, students will be introduced to medico legal issues as they relate to
health professions and the medical office. The course provides a fundamental overview of national health coding
systems and insurance forms and requires the proper use of medical terminology, and abbreviations, and practice in
medical transcription.
Prerequisites: HSC1100
HCA1800
Diagnostic Coding (4 quarter credit hours)
The focus of this class is learning the coding rules for the ICD-9-CM, and Level II (HCPCS) coding systems and
then applying the rules to code patient diagnoses. In addition, a variety of payment systems are presented—DRG,
APC, RUGSIII. The topics of Medicare fraud/abuse, HMOs, and PROs are also reviewed as related to diagnostic
coding.
Prerequisites: HCA1750
132
HCA1850
Procedural Coding (4 quarter credit hours)
The focus of this class is learning the coding rules for the CPT and Level II (HCPCS) coding systems and then
applying the rules to code patient procedures.
Prerequisites: HCA1750
HCA1870
Medical Insurance Processes (4 quarter credit hours)
Students will be introduced to basic concepts related to health insurance and reimbursement. The student will
become familiar with the medical health insurance industry, billing practices, processing procedures, and regulatory
issues. The differences in reimbursement methodologies will be examined. The student will gain knowledge of
insurance processing in the private and governmental sectors. The student will learn principles of medical billing as
related to claim form preparation, submission and payment reimbursement.
Prerequisites: HCA1800, HCA1850
HCA2200
Healthcare Delivery Systems (4 quarter credit hours)
This course is an introduction to the healthcare delivery system. It provides an overview of the various
forces and elements that shape the way healthcare is delivered and received in the United States.
Prerequisites: HCA1110
HCA2500
Medical Ethics (4 quarter credit hours)
This course will explore the ethical issues in health care. A structured approach for identifying, analyzing, and
resolving ethical issues in clinical medicine will be discussed. Case studies will be utilized to demonstrate the
process of identifying, analyzing and resolving ethical issues.
Prerequisites:PSS1100
HCA2900
Healthcare Externship (2 quarter credit hours)
Students are assigned to work in a professional environment appropriate for the application of skills learned in the
curriculum, thus gaining practical experience in the skills acquired. The externship requires 60 hours.
Prerequisites: Completion of all course requirements or departmental approval
HCA3130
Healthcare Marketing and Strategy (4 quarter credit hours)
This course will examine the role and function of marketing and strategy development in healthcare
organizations. Marketing concepts including market research, segmentation, branding and advertising are
reviewed. Strategy development is examined, including the roles of vision and mission, internal and
external assessment, developing strategic initiatives, tactical planning and strategic execution.
Prerequisites:HCA2200
HCA3150
Healthcare Finance (4 quarter credit hours)
This course covers the unique structure and process of financial management in healthcare organizations.
Students learn to examine and understand statements of profit and loss, balance sheets and cash flow
statements in order to make administrative decisions regarding operations and resource allocation. The
unique healthcare reimbursement system is given special attention.
Prerequisites: HCA3500
HCA3300
Health Services Organization and Delivery (4 quarter credit hours)
This course covers structure and function of the health organizations, professions, and delivery systems
across the continuum of care including community and teaching hospitals, long-term care facilities,
rehabilitation hospitals, ambulatory care facilities, public health clinics and private medical practice.
Prerequisites:HCA2200
HCA3330
Health Information Management Systems (4 quarter credit hours)
This course examines the design, operation, application and future of health information management
systems.
Prerequisites:HCA1700
133
HCA3500
Economics of Healthcare (4 quarter credit hours)
This course examines the application of both micro and macroeconomic principles to the healthcare
industry.
Prerequisites:HCA1110, SSC2230
HCA3550
Ethics and Law for Administrators (4 quarter credit hours)
This course examines legal and ethical dimensions of health care administration. Students learn to integrate
ethical and legal aspects into administrative decision-making.
Prerequisites:HCA1110, HCA2500
HCA4100
Leadership in Healthcare Organizations (4 quarter credit hours)
This course presents students with leadership fundamentals in healthcare organizations. Interpersonal skills,
leadership, ongoing professional development, and strategic management are examined.
Prerequisites: None
HCA4120
Strategic Management in Healthcare Organizations (4 quarter credit hours)
Students will integrate the knowledge and skills learned in leadership, marketing strategy, managerial
communication, research methods, and strategic management.
Prerequisites:HCA3130, HCA4100, MTH3800
HCA4140
Risk Management in Healthcare Settings (4 quarter credit hours)
This course examines various risk factors and methods of managing risk in healthcare organizations.
Strategies for prevention, intervention and remediation of risk will be explored.
Prerequisites: HCA3550, HCA3150
HCA4160
Case Studies in Health Administration (4 quarter credit hours)
This course uses case studies to provide students with the opportunity to integrate the skills and knowledge
learned in the core foundation with learned conceptual and technical competencies.
Prerequisites:HCA3150, HCA3330, HCA4120
HSC1100
Medical Terminology (4 quarter credit hours)
A study of the basic structure of medical terms through examination of prefixes, suffixes, word roots, and combining
forms. The course includes pronunciation, spelling, definitions of medical terms, and an introduction to medical
abbreviations.
Prerequisites: PSS1100 or PSS1210
HSC1110
Veterinary Medical Terminology (4 quarter credit hours)
A study of the basic structure of veterinary medical terminology through examination of prefixes, suffixes, word
roots, and combining forms. The course includes pronunciation, spelling, and definitions of medical terms related to
the practice of veterinary medicine, and an introduction to common medical abbreviations.
Prerequisites: PSS1100 or CF 1100
HSC1851
Clinical Procedures I (4 quarter credit hours)
The course provides study and practice in routine procedures for a physical examination, which include taking vital
signs (temperature, pulse, respiration and blood pressure), draping patients, using instruments, mastering aseptic
techniques, taking measurements, and recording medical histories.
Prerequisites:SCI1352
HSC1852
Clinical Procedures II (4 quarter credit hours)
An overview of diagnostic procedures and equipment used in the physician's office, preparing the student to assist in
a medical specialty office. The student learns about and practices acquiring and mounting diagnostically correct
electrocardiograms. The principles of first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) are presented.
Prerequisites:HSC1851
134
HSC2830
Phlebotomy and Hematology Procedures (4 quarter credit hours)
An introduction to phlebotomy and other collection techniques to obtain samples on which various hematological
tests and blood chemistries are performed.
Prerequisites:SCI1352
HSC2840
Urinalysis and Microbiology Procedures (4 quarter credit hours)
Microbiological specimens are collected, processed and stained for examination. The physical, chemical and
microscopic components of a complete urinalysis are studied and practiced. The course includes instruction in the
care and use of the microscope.
Prerequisites:SCI1352
HUM2000
Introduction to Literature* (4 quarter credit hours)
An examination of various works of fiction, poetry, and drama, with emphasis on the analysis of character, plot, and
language as means of discovering the writer’s purpose. The course requires written analyses of works and assumes
competence in expository writing.
Prerequisites:COM1101
HUM3000
World Literature* (4 quarter credit hours)
Organized thematically, this course explores multi-cultural viewpoints expressed in at least one novel
supported by plays, short fiction, and poetry from around the world.
Prerequisites:HUM2000
HUM3010
History of Art Through the Middle Ages* (4 quarter credit hours)
This course is a history of art from the prehistoric/tribal period through the Middle Ages. Students will analyze the
design and artistic concepts common to all artwork, and will also cover the external themes and influences that
shaped art at various points in history and across cultures.
Prerequisites:COM1102
HUM3020
History of Art Through the Modern Times* (4 quarter credit hours)
This course is a history of art from the Renaissance to the Modern period. The concepts, historical themes and
social/cultural influences on the art and architecture of the periods will be studied. Students will analyze the design
and artistic concepts common to all artwork, and will also cover the external themes and influences that shaped art at
various points in history and across cultures and provide us with a window onto those cultures.
Prerequisites:COM1102 (EN 11012)
HUM3100
Introduction to Philosophy* (4 quarter credit hours)
This course introduces students to philosophical thinking. Students will confront fundamental questions of self and
identity, of freedom and determinism, of belief and truth, and of ethics and morality. Critical thinking activities will
challenge students to incorporate philosophy into their daily lives by applying the questions of philosophy to
themselves and their world.
Prerequisites:PSS1800 or ALH2100
JUS1100
Introduction to Criminal Justice (4 quarter credit hours)
This course provides students with a thorough understanding of the relationships and functions of the various police
agencies and their respective jurisdictions, defense and prosecution, judges and juries, and personnel affiliated with
correctional institutions.
Prerequisites:PSS1100
JUS1111
Report Writing (4 quarter credit hours)
Students will be introduced to the methods and styles of report writing and professional communication in the
criminal justice system. The course also examines interviewing and note taking techniques that are related to the
filing of reports in criminal justice.
Prerequisites:COM1101 or placement through assessment
135
JUS1300
Correctional Systems and Practices (4 quarter credit hours)
An examination of the correctional system and practices in criminal justice. Topics include the theoretical basis for
the correctional system, organizational structures, management and operation of correctional facilities,
rehabilitation, treatments, and alternatives.
Prerequisites:JUS1100
JUS1550
Criminal Investigation and Police Procedure (4 quarter credit hours)
A comprehensive examination of the investigative procedures and techniques in the field of criminal investigation.
This will include the recording of witness statements, interviewing, and the writing of reports. The course will also
include an overview of standard police procedures and technological innovations.
Prerequisites:JUS1100
JUS1700
Introduction to Criminology (4 quarter credit hours)
This course provides an introduction to the field of criminology by reviewing the historical aspects of the study of
crime and criminals. The theoretical causes of crime and criminality and society’s response to crime are examined.
Learners are introduced to the sociological, biological, and psychological schools of criminological thought. Topics
include crime statistics and the social and legal mechanisms utilized to address criminal activity and the individual
criminal.
Prerequisites:PSS1100
JUS2111
Research Methods (4 quarter credit hours)
This course introduces the student to research methodology utilized in the criminal justice system. Critical analysis
of those methods most often used in the study of police, court, and corrections policies and programs will be
emphasized. Students will acquire knowledge and skills necessary to critically analyze research studies. Topics
include the roles of theory and ethics, hypothesis testing, and basic research design.
Prerequisite:JUS1100
JUS2500
Criminal Procedure (4 quarter credit hours)
Emphasis is placed upon practical guidelines for law enforcement officers with respect to the legal aspects of their
daily duties and the rights of defendants. The goal of the course is to make students knowledgeable in the
procedures applied, from criminal investigations to post-conviction remedies.
Prerequisites:PSS1100
JUS2530
Homeland Security (4 quarter credit hours)
The course provides students with knowledge related to the mission and organization of homeland security in the
United States. Issues such as intelligence analysis, emergency preparedness, emergency response, infrastructure
protection, counter-terrorism, border security, and transportation security are examined. The balance between
domestic and/or international threats and constitutional safeguards are studied.
Prerequisites:SSC1460
JUS2700
Juvenile Justice (4 quarter credit hours)
This course provides a study of juvenile delinquency by describing and analyzing its nature and extent, its suspected
causes, and the environmental influences upon youthful misbehavior.
Prerequisites:PSS1100
JUS2900
Criminal Justice Externship (2 quarter credit hours)
Students are assigned to work in a professional environment appropriate for the application of skills learned in the
curriculum, thus gaining practical experience in the skills acquired. The externship requires 60 hours.
Prerequisites: Completion of all course requirements or departmental approval
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LEG1121
Legal Research (4 quarter credit hours)
This course provides the student with an introduction to the basic concepts of legal research by using both hands-on
manual research techniques and newer, computerized technology. Topics include understanding, locating, and
analyzing primary and secondary legal authorities as well as verifying the accuracy of sources for legal writing
projects. Students will also learn the various sources of law and how they are used to provide a basis for legal
writing and the appropriate method of crediting legal sources by using proper citation formats.
Prerequisites:PSS1100
LEG1122
Legal Writing (4 quarter credit hours)
This course will provide students with experience in legal writing. Topics include formulating research strategies,
analyzing primary and secondary legal authorities, and preparing and drafting legal memorandums as well as other
law office correspondence. The course will culminate in a legal research and writing project which will require the
student to integrate knowledge gained from legal writing and this course.
Prerequisites:LEG1121
LEG1350
Criminal Law (4 quarter credit hours)
A study of the fundamental principles of criminal law, which pertains to any act or omission in violation of a public
law forbidding or commanding it. The course is designed to provide students with an understanding of substantive
criminal law and defenses to prosecution.
Prerequisites:PSS1100
LEG2400
Family Law (4 quarter credit hours)
A study of the domestic issues of law, including divorce, custody, alimony, child support, adoption, third-party
parental rights, marital torts, mediation, paternity, juvenile law, and genetic engineering.
Prerequisites:PSS1100
LEG2500
Property Law (4 quarter credit hours)
A study of the principles of law concerning the nature of property, including estates, licensing, marital and
concurrent interests, and landlord/tenant relationships.
Prerequisites:LEG1122
LEG2700
Contract Law (4 quarter credit hours)
A study of the basic principles of contract law, including the process of contract formation, contract enforcement,
and remedies for breach of contract.
Prerequisites:LEG1122
LEG2750
Litigation (4 quarter credit hours)
This course will introduce the student to the process of litigating a civil case from its initiation through the use of
discovery techniques and the actual order and presentation of the trial. Students will learn how to analyze
jurisdictional issues as well as the preparation of pleadings and other critical litigation documents required in the
processing of a case through the legal system.
Prerequisites:LEG1122
LEG2900
Paralegal Externship (2 quarter credit hours)
Students are assigned to work in a professional environment appropriate for the application of skills learned in the
curriculum, thus gaining practical experience in the skills acquired. The externship requires 60 hours.
Prerequisites: Completion of all course requirements or departmental approval
MTH1800
College Algebra* (4 quarter credit hours)
A study of algebraic functions and their properties. Topics include identities, graphs, equations, complex numbers,
and applications.
Prerequisites: SSE0071 or placement through initial academic assessment
137
MTH3800
Statistics* (4 quarter credit hours)
This course introduces the student to fundamental laws of probability, levels of measurement, measures of central
tendency and variance, random variables, hypothesis testing, correlation, regression, small sample techniques and
non-parametric methods.
Prerequisites:MTH1800
NUR1000
Health Assessment (4 quarter credit hours)
This course builds on the core curriculum courses to develop the essential assessment skills necessary for nursing
students. The course focuses on a holistic approach to health assessment as the basis for nursing intervention and
practice. The student will learn to develop multiple skills for client interviewing with the use of therapeutic
communication, assessing health history, and performing physical examinations for clients across the lifespan, to
include special populations while considering cultural needs. Teaching and learning will take place in the classroom
and in the laboratory setting.
Prerequisites:SCI1352
NUR1010
Pharmacology (Oklahoma City) (5 quarter credit hours)
This course outlines the basic concepts of pharmaceutics, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and
pharmacotherapeutics. The process of clinical calculations is introduced, as well as the major drug classifications.
Students will utilize critical thinking in the nursing process as it relates to providing safe, effective nursing care in
drug administration.
Prerequisite: MTH1800 or MT1800
NUR1012
Pharmacology (Kansas City) (4 quarter credit hours)
This course examines the major drug classifications along with pharmacologic principles of drug administration,
actions, interactions, contraindications and therapeutic effects of selected medications. Dosage calculation and
utilization of the nursing process in provision with safe, effective nursing patient care related to each of the major
drug classifications is discussed.
Prerequisites:HSC1100
NUR1050
Introduction to Nursing Practice (4 quarter credit hours)
This course introduces the role of the nurse as part of the health care team. Emphasis is placed on the cultural,
ethical and legal aspects of nursing care, confidentiality, communication and critical thinking. The nursing process,
nursing theory and principles of patient teaching and learning are discussed.
Prerequisites:SSE0072, SSE0052, or placement through initial academic assessment, admission to Practical
Nursing program, current CNA certificate
NUR1201
Foundations of Nursing I (4 quarter credit hours)
This course provides an introduction to the role of the nurse as an integral part of the healthcare team describing the
concepts of critical thinking, nursing process and evidence-based practice. There is a review of health assessment as
it relates to being a core concept of the nursing process. The students will learn infection control practices and client
safety as it relates to National Patient Safety Goals utilizing theory and laboratory instructional methodology.
Prerequisite: SCI2100
NUR1202
Foundations of Nursing II (5 quarter credit hours)
This course builds on nursing skills and knowledge developed in Foundations of Nursing I by emphasizing concepts
of therapeutic communication, biological needs, developmental theories and cultural influences. Principles of
teaching and learning are also discussed relevant to client care needs. Laboratory and clinical skills are focused on
assisting clients with biological needs, medication administration and pain management.
Prerequisite: NUR1201
NUR1203
Foundations of Nursing III (5 quarter credit hours)
This course builds on the nursing skills and knowledge developed in Foundations of Nursing I and II by developing
new knowledge of client oxygenation, fluid/electrolyte, self-concept, sexuality, and spiritual needs. Emphasis is also
placed on the legal/ethical issues involved in the profession of nursing, community nursing and management of care.
Content relating to nursing care for clients receiving complimentary/alternative therapies, care of clients with
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cancer, clients undergoing surgical interventions, and experiencing death/loss/grief is also discussed.
Prerequisite: NUR1202
NUR1701
Care of Older Adults I (5 quarter credit hours)
This course provides the foundations of healthy aging and the basic biologic, safety and security needs of the older
adult client. There is an overview of nursing concepts with regard to physiological, cognitive, biological needs as
they relate to providing therapeutic nursing interventions within this population of clients. In addition, there is a
focus on building strong assessment and communication skills to evaluate the health status of the older adult and
utilizing the nursing process, plan and implement care in a clinical setting.
Prerequisite: NUR1203
NUR1702
Care of Older Adults II (5 quarter credit hours)
This course expands upon the concepts from NUR1701 – Care of Older Adults I. There is an overview of chronic
diseases that affect the older adult, as well as key concepts related to self-esteem and self-identity development.
Additionally, there is discussion related to the concepts and theories of loss, death and dying, and the nurse’s role in
the process. The course has a clinical component allowing the student to utilize the nursing process to plan and
implement care to meet the needs of the older adult.
Prerequisite: NUR1701
NUR1931
Foundations of Nursing (4 quarter credit hours)
This course focuses on the theoretical basis for selected nursing skills and the development of the student’s
psychomotor ability in performing those skills. The student applies basic knowledge of medical safety (asepsis) and
the infection chain in meeting the needs of the individual patient. Various learning methods are employed, including
texts, video materials, cooperative learning and demonstration and practice time in the skills laboratory and clinical
site.
Prerequisites: Admission to Nursing Program, SSE0051, SSE0071, or placement through initial assessment
NUR1951
Nutrition (1 quarter credit hours)
This course includes instruction in basic human nutritional needs. The course explores dietary approaches designed
to promote the health and well-being of the patient. Macronutrients, micronutrients, ethnic meal preparation, and
therapeutic diets are addressed for patients with a wide variety of chronic or acute medical conditions.
Prerequisites: Admission to nursing preparation program
NUR1971
Care of the Childbearing Family and Children I (6 quarter credit hours)
This course includes instruction in meeting the physiological and psychological needs of the pediatric patient and
the patient experiencing reproductive health problems, including the need of the pregnant woman and the newborn.
Organizational skills of the practical nurse, including managing small groups of patients along with current issues
affecting the delivery of nursing care are presented.
Prerequisites:NUR1931
NUR1972
Care of Older Adults (6 quarter credit hours)
This course builds on knowledge and skills acquired in Nursing I. Clinical learning assignments are designed to
provide student opportunity to expand the use of the nursing process as a basis for care of adult home bound and
geriatric patients.
Prerequisites:NUR1971
NUR1973
Care of Adults I (6 quarter credit hours)
This course focuses on the theoretical basis for selected nursing skills and the nursing process. Instruction focuses
on assessment of nursing needs and nursing care of individuals with commonly occuring medical/surgical health
problems. Clinical learning assignments are designed to provide student opportunity to use the nursing process as a
basis for care of adult patients.
Prerequisites:NUR1972
139
NUR2200
LPN Bridge (1 quarter credit hours)
This course focuses on the role transition from Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) to Registered Nurse (RN). It
includes the review and/or validation of major content/concepts and skills from NUR1971, NUR1972, and
NUR1973. Emphasis is placed on application of the nursing process, physical assessment, communication and
critical thinking skills.
Prerequisites: Current LPN License in Good Standing, Admission to Nursing Program
NUR2201
Care of Adults I (4 quarter credit hours)
This course integrates the use of therapeutic communication, therapeutic interventions, evidence-based practice and
teaching/learning concepts for the care of adult clients. Dimensions of the course will focus on expanding the
application of concepts from previous nursing and natural/behavioral science courses. An emphasis will be placed
on content related to care and needs of clients in the perioperative period and experiencing problems of protection.
Prerequisite: NUR1702
NUR2202
Care of Adults II (4 quarter credit hours)
This course integrates the use of therapeutic communication, therapeutic interventions, evidence-based practice and
teaching/learning concepts for the care of adult clients. Dimensions of the course will focus on expanding the
application of concepts from previous nursing and natural/behavioral science courses. An emphasis will be placed
on content related to care and needs of clients experiencing problems of mobility, sensation and cognition.
Prerequisite: NUR2201
NUR2203
Care of Adults III (4 quarter credit hours)
This course integrates the use of therapeutic communication, therapeutic interventions, evidence-based practice and
teaching/learning concepts for the care of adult clients. Dimensions of the course will focus on expanding the
application of concepts from previous nursing and natural/behavioral science courses. An emphasis will be placed
on content related to care and needs of clients experiencing problems of digestion, nutrition, elimination and
protection.
Prerequisite: NUR2202
NUR2221
Care of Adults II (6 quarter credit hours)
This course focuses on nursing care of the adult patient in an acute care setting and mental health. The nursing
process is used as a method to promote the adaptive capabilities of patients experiencing physiological disruptions
requiring medical or surgical interventions. Mental health nursing concepts and an introduction to therapies used in
providing holistic nursing care for the mentally ill are included. The course emphasizes interrelatedness of
pathophysiology, pharmacology and nutrition as it occurs in specific conditions. Development of competency in
initiating and managing intravenous therapy is included.
Prerequisites:NUR2200
NUR2222
Care of the Childbearing Family and Children II (6 quarter credit hours)
This course focuses on 1) care of the childbearing and child rearing family and 2) community health nursing.
The nursing process is utilized to promote the patient’s and families adaptation in situations of health and illness.
Critical Thinking differentiates patient needs based on age, health status, acuity of condition and prognosis.
The patient’s role within the family, his/her occupation and society is examined.
Prerequisites:NUR2221
NUR2223
Advanced Care of Adults (6 quarter credit hours)
This course focuses on complex conditions in areas such as critical care, post-anesthesia, cardiac cath lab and
emergency room. Emphasis is placed on application of the nursing process, physical assessment, medications and
IV administration in critical care areas. Ethical, psychological and legal issues are explored as they relate to nursing
practice.
Prerequisites:NUR2222
140
NUR2240
Issues in Nursing Practice (4 quarter credit hours)
This course explores patient management of larger groups of patients. Major trends and issues affecting the roles of
the nurse: organizational, political, social, economic, legal, educational, ethical and professional aspects, are
discussed.
Prerequisites:NUR2223 or Departmental Approval
NUR2310
Pathophysiology (4 quarter credit hours)
This introduction to the physiology of disease covers common disorders of the body from the cellular to the
systemic level and the nursing implications of caring for individuals with these diseases. Topics include causes,
symptoms, diagnostic tests and nursing interventions. The nursing process and development of a nursing plan of
care, incorporating evidence based practice, for selected disease processes are discussed.
Prerequisite: SCI2100 and completion of PN level clinical courses
NUR2400
Care of Clients with Mental Health Needs (4 quarter credit hours)
This course provides an introduction to mental health and psychiatric nursing using the nursing process to promote
psychosocial integrity within the context of a health-illness continuum across the lifespan. Emphasis is placed on
therapeutic communication, bio-psychosocial rehabilitation, and the therapeutic use of self. Clinical experiences
provide students with opportunities to participate in therapeutic activities in a variety of health settings.
Prerequisites: SSC1100 or PS1200 and NUR2203
NUR2500
Care of Women and Childbearing Families (4 quarter credit hours)
Theory and clinical course focusing on the nursing care of normal childbearing families and at-risk families during
the preconception, prenatal, intrapartum, neonatal and postpartum periods emphasizing critical thinking and
professional values within a legal/ethical framework. Related women’s health issues will also be explored.
Prerequisite: NUR2203
NUR2800
Care of Children and Adolescents (4 quarter credit hours)
This course provides a general overview of the healthcare needs of children and adolescents with a focus on growth
and developmental patterns, health promotion, risk reduction, and disease prevention. The theory content is
enhanced through observational opportunities and supervised clinical experiences that allow the student to utilize the
nursing process, and therapeutic communication.
Prerequisites: NUR2203
NUR2851
Care of Clients with Complex Health Care Needs I (5 quarter credit hours)
This course integrates the use of therapeutic communication, therapeutic interventions, evidence-based practice and
teaching/learning concepts for the care of clients with complex health care needs. Dimensions of this course will
focus on expanding the application of concepts from previous nursing and natural/behavioral science courses. An
emphasis will be placed on content related to care and needs of clients experiencing problems of fluid/electrolyte,
acid/base imbalances, oxygenation, cardiac output and tissue perfusion.
Prerequisites: NUR2203
NUR2852
Care of Clients with Complex Health Care Needs II (5 quarter credit hours)
This course integrates the use of therapeutic communication, therapeutic interventions, evidence-based practice and
teaching/learning concepts for the care of clients with complex health care needs. Dimensions of this course will
focus on expanding the application of concepts from previous nursing and natural/behavioral science courses. An
emphasis will be placed on content related to care and needs of clients experiencing problems of Tissue Perfusion,
Regulation and Metabolism, Excretion, Reproduction, and Concepts of Emergency Care and Disaster Preparedness.
Prerequisite: NUR2851
NUR2890
Leadership and Transition to Nursing Practice (5 quarter credit hours)
This course is designed to expand the scope of nursing practice for final quarter nursing students to develop in the
role of leader and manager of nursing resources. The course provides a comprehensive introduction to the study of
nursing leadership and management concepts, and provides the opportunity to utilize these concepts in a clinical
setting. The principles and theories of leadership and management will be integrated into the role of the nurse as a
collaborator of care for clients across the life span.
Prerequisites: Completion of all other course work
141
PSS1100
Professional Development (4 quarter credit hours)
Development of skills for collegiate success, including techniques for effective use of texts, productive studying and
note taking, and success in tests and other assignments. The course also emphasizes professional expectations,
communication skills, academic policies and issues, time management, problem solving, and effective and ethical
use of resources.
Prerequisites: None
PSS1200
Business Communications (4 quarter credit hours)
This course provides for practice in various methods of business communication as these are appropriate for job
search and career enhancement. The course requires the composition of rГ©sumГ©s, cover letters, thank you letters, and
acceptance letters, as well as the application of oral communication skills required for effective employment
interviews and other aspects of job search and career enhancement. The student will assemble a portfolio for job
search purposes, will research target companies for employment, will engage in program assessment activities, as
well as will prepare for licensure and certification examinations in the field.
Prerequisites:PSS1100
PSS1210
Essentials of Student Success (4 quarter credit hours)
This course is designed to introduce the skills necessary for success in the nursing program. Students are assisted in
understanding the academic rigors of the nursing programs of study and are encouraged to develop self-discipline.
Students will participate in activities to gain a practical understanding of their role in the nursing profession and will
be provided with tools to develop basic computer and study skills in order to become a successful student.
Prerequisites: None
PSS1800
Applied Ethics (4 quarter credit hours)
This course introduces the student to moral principles and helps them to identify and become sensitized to
controversial issues and ethical problems likely to develop in the workplace. The course examines a professional’s
ethical and legal responsibilities.
Prerequisites:PSS1100
PSS4500
Senior Project (4 quarter credit hours)
This course provides students the opportunity to apply the knowledge acquired in their bachelor degree program to
advanced, real-world situations in a case-study simulation, a problem identification and resolution format, a
capstone project, or other comparable assignments which will result in a product which will reflect the scope of
learning in the program, the depth of the student’s ability to analyze and synthesize toward a resolution, and/or to
examine in detail a problem in the content area environment as a unique and original piece of research. Projects will
focus on research, critical analysis, assessment, and touching on all aspects of the degree coursework. An emphasis
is placed on issues or problems and proposed solutions and/or outcomes.
Prerequisites: Completion of all technical (content area-related) courses in program and permission of the
Department Chairperson.
SCI1100
Physics (4 quarter credit hours)
This course explores the basic principles of mechanical function, thermal physics and the concepts of physical
sound.
Prerequisites:MTH1800
SCI1351
Anatomy and Physiology I (4 quarter credit hours)
This course focuses on the normal structure and function of the human body as a living organism and the
relationship of its parts. Disease processes will also be discussed. The course begins with basic cellular structure
and function, then progresses through these selected body systems: integumentary, skeletal, nervous, muscular and
senses. A structured lab experience is included. Correct medical terminology is emphasized.
Prerequisites:PSS1100 or PSS1210
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SCI1352
Anatomy and Physiology II (4 quarter credit hours)
This course is a continuation of Anatomy and Physiology I and focuses on the normal structure and function of the
human body as a living organism and the relationship of its parts. Disease processes are discussed. The course
progresses through these selected body systems: endocrine, blood, circulatory, lymph, immune, respiratory,
digestive, urinary and reproductive. Correct medical terminology is emphasized. A structured laboratory
experience is included.
Prerequisites:SCI1351
SCI1360
Anatomy and Physiology* (4 quarter credit hours)
A study of the human body as a whole, including structure of the body, cells, tissues, organ systems, the mechanism
of disease, and the senses.
Prerequisites:PSS1100
SCI1800
Introduction to Biology* (4 quarter credit hours)
This course introduces biology, scientific methods, biological chemistry, and energy for life. This course also
exposes students to the organization of humans and plants, basic genetics, and evolutionary concepts. In addition,
the student will complete writing assignments that serve to introduce scientific literature.
Prerequisites:PSS1100
SCI1850
Environmental Science* (4 quarter credit hours)
This course is an introduction to the study of the physical environment and some of the major related issues and
problems. Areas of concern include nature of the environment, climatic factors, natural resources, solid and
hazardous waste, pollution, global environmental hazards, and energy production. These topics are studied in
relation to population, land use, environmental ethics, decision-making, and environmental management.
Prerequisites:PSS1100
SCI2100
Elements of Microbiology* (4 quarter credit hours)
Survey of microorganisms in terms of physiology, biochemistry, genetics, and diversity with emphasis placed on
prokaryotes and eukaryotes causing human diseases. Methods of their control including physical, mechanical,
chemical, chemotherapeutic, and role of the immune system are discussed.
Prerequisites:MTH1800
SSC1100
Principles of Psychology* (4 quarter credit hours)
A study of the scientific basis of human behaviors, and the factors which influence human development. The course
provides an overview of the history and major issues of psychology, including learning and perception, personality
theories, abnormal behavior, motivation and emotion, human development, and social psychology.
Prerequisites:PSS1100 or PSS1210
SSC1120
Human Growth and Development (4 quarter credit hours)
This course is a study of human growth and development across the life span with emphasis on normal growth and
milestones achieved in the physical, cognitive, social and emotional systems.
Prerequisites:SSC1100
SSC1450
Constitution and Society* (4 quarter credit hours)
This course introduces students to the United States Constitution in theory and practice; the constitutional division
of government, the role of the United States Supreme Court, the Bill of Rights, and subsequent amendments.
Prerequisites:PSS1100
143
SSC1460
The American Judicial System (4 quarter credit hours)
This course is an introduction to the nature of the judiciary and the court system and the major functions of
substantive and procedural law in modern society. Students will learn the general structure of the U.S. court system
at the federal, state, and local levels. Also studied are the roles of the various officials involved in the court system
and the functions and procedures related to trial courts and appellate courts.
Prerequisites:PSS1100
SSC2220
Principles of Microeconomics* (4 quarter credit hours)
Microeconomics is the study of the internal forces in the market place. Students will develop an understanding of
the forces that control the economy, and the effect of changes in those forces. Specific topics include the free
enterprise system, capitalism, wage and price theory, law of supply and demand, and government regulation of
business.
Prerequisites:MTH1800
SSC2230
Principles of Macroeconomics* (4 quarter credit hours)
The study of macroeconomics includes the basic aspects of economic analysis of the business world. Students will
develop an understanding of the monetary system, recession, inflation, and the main cycles of business activity.
Prerequisites:MTH1800
SSC 3100
Principles of Sociology* (4 quarter credit hours)
An introduction to the basic concepts of sociology, including organizational behavior systems development, cultural
diversity and human social institutions.
Prerequisites:SSC1100
SSE0051
Writing Strategies (4 quarter credit hours)
This course is designed to develop the confidence and competence of reluctant writers. Emphasis is placed upon
development of sentence-level skills which will be applied to paragraph development.
Prerequisites: Placement through initial assessment.
SSE0052
Introduction to Writing (4 quarter credit hours)
This course provides an introduction to composition. Students begin with a review of sentence skills and move to
paragraph writing, with an emphasis upon topic selection, organization, development, and editing. The course
concludes with an essay which demonstrates the writer’s grasp of the skills learned.
Prerequisites: SSE0051 or placement through initial assessment.
SSE0071
Pre-Algebra (4 quarter credit hours)
This course is designed to help students obtain the necessary skills to be successful in algebra. It provides a
foundation of instruction in key areas of algebra while reinforcing previously learned mathematical skills. This
course will help bridge the gap between arithmetic and algebra.
Prerequisites: Placement through initial assessment.
SSE0072
Introduction to Algebra (4 quarter credit hours)
This course covers fundamental algebraic operations, rational expressions, first- and second-degree equations,
graphs, exponents, and radicals.
Prerequisites: SSE0071 or placement through initial assessment.
144
SSE0090
Exploration of Professional Nursing Practice (4 quarter credit hours)
This course is designed to facilitate successful entry of licensed practical nurses into the role of the professional
nurse. Throughout the course the nursing process is used to enhance knowledge, skills, attitudes and judgments that
are required of a professional nurse. Concepts related to foundations of nursing and populations across the lifespan
are reviewed through the lens of the professional nurse in a classroom and laboratory environment. At the
completion of this course, the licensed practical nurse will be eligible for further participation in the professional
nursing program.
Prerequisites: Admission to the Associate of Applied Science in Nursing Program
WLD1501
Level I Welding A (4 quarter credit hours)
This course emphasizes safety and quality in forming the initial foundation of the student’s knowledge in welding.
Students are exposed to a variety of cutting techniques, as well as base metal preparation, and shielded metal arc
welding (SMAW) equipment, electrodes and preparation.
Prerequisites: CON1101 Introduction to Construction Trades
WLD1502
Level I Welding B (4 quarter credit hours)
This course provides an introduction on how to prepare and setup arc welding equipment, as well as how to strike an
arc. Students practice making welds including stringers, overlapping beads and fillets.
Prerequisites: WLD1501
WLD1503
Level I Welding C (4 quarter credit hours)
This course introduces the learner to job code specifications, as well as how to check fit-up alignment using gauges
and measuring devices. This course also covers additional SMAW welds including groove welds with backing and
open V-groove welds. The learner is exposed to the proper procedures for making flat, horizontal, vertical and
overhead welds.
Prerequisites: WLD1502
WLD1504
Level I Welding Practicum (4 quarter credit hours)
This course gives the students the opportunity to apply further the knowledge and skills acquired in the Level I
Welding sequence.
Prerequisites: WLD1503
WLD1601
Level II Welding A (5 quarter credit hours)
This course introduces the learner to reading welding symbols, drawings, specifications, and welding procedure
specifications (WPS). Students study the physical characteristics and mechanical properties of metals, pre- and postheating procedures. Students will practice setting up and using gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and flux-cored arc
welding (FCAW) equipment to weld carbon steel plate.
Prerequisites: WLD1504
WLD1602
Level II Welding B (4 quarter credit hours)
This course provides an overview of gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and related safety techniques while using
filler metals and shielding gases. Students are exposed to how to set up the GTAW equipment and how to build pad
on carbon steel using carbon steel filler plate. Students continue multiple-pass GTAW fillet welds and V-groove
welds using a variety of pipe positions.
Prerequisites: WLD1601
WLD1701
Level III Welding A (5 quarter credit hours)
This course addresses how to prepare SMAW equipment for open-root V-groove welds and to make these welds on
carbon steel pipe in the 1G/ROTATED, 2G, 5G, and 6G positions.
Prerequisites: WLD1602
145
WLD1702
Level III Welding B (4 quarter credit hours)
This course covers how to prepare both GMAW and FCAW equipment for open-root V-groove pipe welds, some on
carbon steel pipe. Students will practice these welds using various pipe positions.
Prerequisites: WLD1701
WLD1703
Level III Welding C (4 quarter credit hours)
This course covers how to prepare GTAW equipment to make open-root V-groove welds carbon steel pipe
concentrating on the 2G, 5G, 6G pipe positions.
Prerequisites: WLD1702
WLD1704
Level III Welding D (4 quarter credit hours)
This course covers how to make open-root V-groove GTAW welds on low alloy or stainless steel pipe in the 2G,
5G, 6G positions. Students also gain practice making open-root V-groove SMAW welds on stainless steel in the
1G/1G-ROTATED, 2G, 3G, 4G, 5G, and 6G positions.
Prerequisites: WLD1703
WLD1705
Level III Welding Practicum (4 quarter credit hours)
This course gives the students the opportunity to apply further the knowledge and skills acquired in the Level III
Welding sequence.
Prerequisites: WLD1704
WLD1801
Level IV Welding A (4 quarter credit hours)
This course represents and advanced topic in welding and covers aluminum metallurgy and the characteristics of
aluminum welding. Students encounter the GTAW techniques used in aluminum welding on both pipe and plate.
Prerequisites: WLD1703
WLD1802
Level IV Welding B (4 quarter credit hours)
This course continues to address the advanced topic of aluminum welding conducted on both pipe and plate using
GMAW techniques.
Prerequisites: WLD1801
146
2106 South 9th Street
Salina, KS 67401
785.825.5422
1.800.365.0433
www.brownmackie.edu/Salina
9705 Lenexa Drive
Lenexa, KS 66215
913.768.1900
1.800.635.9101
www.brownmackie.edu/KansasCity
7101 Northwest Expressway
Suite 800
Oklahoma City, OK 73132
405.621.8000
1.888.229.3280
www.brownmackie.edu/OklahomaCity
В©2014 Brown Mackie College
2614
03/14
2011-2012 Academic Catalog
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