Workbook - Settlement.Org

Workbook - Settlement.Org
Industrial Trades
WORKBOOK
Contents
Orientation 7
Overview 9
Occupations 19
Workplace 33
Workplace Law in Ontario 45
Training and Experience 57
Terminology 65
Health and Safety 67
Equipment and Tools 77
Workplace Tasks 89
Communication 99
Personal Plan 107
Glossary 113
Acknowledgements
The Steps to Employment project was made possible with funding from Citizenship and Immigration
Canada-Ontario–Administration of Settlement and Integration Services (CIC—OASIS).
LCRT Consulting researched each sector, designed the curricula, conducted consultations on
content, coordinated reviews by users and sector representatives and developed the materials.
Many individuals and organizations were involved throughout the project. Thanks to all who provided
input and support. A special thanks to focus group participants who shared their experience as new
job seekers in Ontario.
March 2001
Katherine Babiuk
Program Consultant
Citizenship and Immigration Canada
Ontario Administration of Settlement and Integration
Services (OASIS)
AlphaPlus
Web Site Host
Alvin Ng
Editor
Intellisearch, Toronto Public Library
Media and Literature Research
Bruce Russell
Curriculum Design/Senior Consultant
Principal Researcher/Writer
LCRT Consulting
Andrea Strachan
Curriculum Design/Senior Consultant
LCRT Consulting
Peggie Shek
Project Manager
LCRT Consulting
Kaoli Hanawa
Illustrator
Monika Etzler
Toronto District Schol Board, LINC Program
Outreach and Recruitment Consultant
Kathleen Doe
Web Site Designer and Webmaster
Antonella Valeo
ESL Reviewer
Kevin Cheng
Supercat Illustrations
Graphic Designer
Cheryl Henry
Focus Group Facilitator
Louise Thomas
Internet Research
Learning Enrichment Foundation
Focus Group Location
Trudy Kennell
Editorial Consulant
The information in the Steps to Employment series was researched, collected and written in 19992001 by LCRT Consulting under contract with Citizenship and Immigration Canada. Some of the
information may change in time. Please consult the contacts listed for the most current information.
The Steps to Employment workshop manuals are strictly for use in non-commercial, not-for-profit
educational environments.
Steps to Employment in Ontario
Where do you begin?
You just arrived in Ontario and want to work
in an industrial trade. These first steps will
help you get started.
Know your sector – employers, working
conditions, and entry-level qualifications.
Know your job-related traits – be able to
describe your skills, knowledge and
interests.
Know sector-specific terminology – be able
to discuss your occupation with others.
Know what credentials are required and
how to translate and evaluate your
documents.
Know where to get training, upgrading and
help finding a job.
In this workshop
you will learn about…
;
labour market trends in the industrial sector
;
employers in industrial trades, how they hire, and what they are looking for in their
workers
;
working conditions in the industrial sector, including wages, duties and responsibilities
;
laws that protect workers in Ontario
;
basic health and safety issues in the industrial trades
;
vocabulary for industrial trades
;
industry standards
You will also practise…
;
basic dialogues for conversations with other industrial trades members
;
describing your skills and knowledge
;
getting information from various sources
;
pronunciation of key words for industrial trades
… and prepare…
;
a personal plan for your next step to employment in Ontario
Icons used in the workbook
Exercises in the workbook are headed by the following icons. These icons indicate the type
of activity intended by the exercise.
Reading
Vocabulary
Writing
Pair Discussion
Group Discussion
Research
Pronunciation
Orientation
Overview
Occupations
Workplace
Workplace Law in Ontario
Training and Experience
Steps
to
Employment
7
Workshop introduction INTERVIEW
Steps to Employment
Interview your partner
Ask your partner the following questions. Write down the answers in complete sentences.
Once you have finished, prepare to introduce yourself to the group using the answers on
your partner’s sheet.
1. What is your name?
2. Where are you from?
3. How long have you been in Canada?
4. Do you have any children?
5. What job did you do before coming to Canada?
6. Have you ever worked in Canada before?
7. Why are you taking this workshop?
8. What are your hopes for this workshop?
Steps
to
Employment
8
1
OVERVIEW
In this unit you will learn about
skilled workers
the Ontario manufacturing industry
Ontario regions
the Ontario construction industry
Skilled workers
Many of the people who work in industrial trades are employed in the manufacturing or
construction industries. The automotive industry is a big employer in the manufacturing
industry in Ontario. In the construction industry, by far the most new construction is done in
the Toronto area. Across Ontario, it is predicted that there will be a shortage of skilled
tradespeople in the near future, which means that there will be jobs for skilled tradespeople.
The following reading gives some predictions in these areas.
Automotive parts
The Automotive Parts Manufacturers Association predicts that 15,000 skilled tradespeople
will be needed in the auto parts industry over the next five to six years.
Tooling and machining
The Canadian Tooling and Machining Association predicts it will need 50,000 skilled metal
tradespeople in the next five years.
Construction
The Greater Toronto Home Builders Association predicts that 5,000 – 7,000 workers will
retire between 2000 and 2005 while at the same time there will be a 22 per cent increase in
the demand for skilled workers on residential construction sites.
Statistics source: Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities
Activity 1: Pronunciation
Listen to the instructor. Mark the syllable stress in these words, then practise saying each
one.
industrial
manufacturing
automotive
construction
predictions
residential
association
industry
skilled worker
tradesperson
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9
Industrial
Trades
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Activity 2: Fill in the blanks
Fill in the blanks in the paragraph below using the following words and with information from
the reading.
1. The Automotive Parts Manufacturers Association predicts that ___________ skilled
tradespeople will be needed in the auto parts industry over the next five to six years.
2. The Canadian Tooling and Machining Association predicts it will need ___________
skilled metal tradespeople in the next five years.
3. The Greater Toronto Home Builders Association predicts that there will be a
___________ to replace retiring skilled workers.
Activity 3: Discussion
1. Why do you think so many auto parts are built in Ontario? Who are they sold to?
2. Why do you think residential construction is going up?
3. Do you think this is a good time to work as a tradesperson in Ontario? Why?
The Ontario manufacturing industry
Manufacturing industries produce a variety of consumer and industrial products.
Manufacturing industries account for one fourth of all economic activity in Ontario, and
about 70% of these products are exported to other provinces and countries. In 1999,
manufacturing employed over one million people in the province.
The transportation equipment industry is Ontario’s largest manufacturing industry,
employing 20% of, or one in five, manufacturing workers. In recent years, employment in
this industry has grown as Ontario’s companies have increased production of automobiles
and auto parts to meet the demands of the U.S. market. The second largest industry is the
chemical, plastics and rubber products industry, employing 13% of manufacturing workers.
The computer and electronics industry is the sixth largest with a 7% share of manufacturing
employment.
Manufacturing is often concentrated in certain regions of the province. It is useful to know
industry locations in order to identify the potential for job opportunities. For example, Sarnia
and the surrounding area is home to much of the chemical, plastics and rubber industry. The
computer and electronics industry is largely based in the Ottawa and Greater Toronto Area,
while the auto industry is largely located around Toronto and in southwestern Ontario. Steel
and other primary metal production is heavily concentrated in Hamilton, Sault Ste. Marie and
Sudbury. Food, beverage, textile and clothing manufacturers are located in many different
communities in southern Ontario.
Source: Ontario Job Futures 2000
10
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Employment
Overview
Activity 4: Pronunciation
Listen to the instructor. Mark the syllable stress in these words, then practise saying each
one.
manufacturing
industrial
consumer
economic
transportation
equipment
production
electronics
identify
opportunities
Sarnia
Sault Ste. Marie
Sudbury
Hamilton
Activity 5: True or false
Read the following sentences and circle T for true statements and F for false statements.
T
F
1. Manufacturing industries account for one fourth of all economic activity in
Ontario.
T
F
2. In 1999, manufacturing employed over ten million people in the province.
T
F
3. The transportation equipment industry is Ontario’s smallest manufacturing
industry.
T
F
4. Much of the chemical, plastics and rubber industry is in Sarnia and the
surrounding area.
T
F
5. The chemical, plastics and rubber products industry is the second largest
industry.
T
F
6. The computer and electronics industry is the fifth largest.
T
F
7. Food, beverage, textile and clothing manufacturers are located in many different
communities in southern Ontario.
T
F
8. The auto industry is largely located around Toronto and in southwestern Ontario.
T
F
9. The computer and electronics industry is largely based in the Ottawa and
Hamilton area.
T
F
10. Steel and other primary metal production is heavily concentrated in Hamilton,
Sault Ste. Marie and Toronto.
Activity 6: Discussion
1. Locate Hamilton, Sarnia and the Greater Toronto Area on a map. What country are they
all close to?
2. Why do you think a lot of manufacturing in Ontario is near the U.S. border?
3. Which manufacturing industry employs the most workers?
4. Are Ontario’s manufactured goods produced for export or for the Canadian market?
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Industrial
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Workbook
5. From what you have seen and heard in Canada so far, how does the manufacturing
industry in Ontario compare to the manufacturing industry in other countries? (Is it
growing? What are the big products? What goods are exported?)
Ontario regions
12
Steps
to
Employment
Overview
Activity 7: Pronunciation
Listen to the instructor. Mark the syllable stress in these words, then practise saying each
one.
Ottawa
Kingston-Pembroke
Hamilton-Niagara Peninsula
Toronto
Stratford-Bruce Peninsula
Northeast
Muskoka-Kawarthas
Kitchener-Waterloo-Barrie
London
Windsor-Sarnia
Northwest
Activity 8: Ontario regions
1. Locate your region on the map of Ontario.
2. Locate all the other areas.
3. Test your classmate: “Where is Ottawa?”
The Ontario construction industry
Houses, apartments, factories, offices, schools, roads, and bridges are some of the products of
the construction industry. This industry’s activities include work on new buildings as well as
additions, alterations, and repairs.
The Ontario construction industry is a world leader. It has built high quality projects such as
the CN Tower, Air Canada Centre, and Imax cinemas. The industry makes its mark in other
ways as well: home builders alone employed 200,000 people in Ontario in 1998 and
contributed $18.2 billion to the province’s economy.
The construction industry is divided into three major parts: general building contractors,
heavy construction contractors, and special trade contractors. General building contractors
build residential, industrial, commercial, and other buildings. Heavy construction contractors
build sewers, roads, highways, bridges, tunnels, and other projects. Special trade contractors
do specialized activities such as carpentry, painting, plumbing, and electrical work.
Construction is usually done or coordinated by general contractors, who specialize in one
type of construction such as residential or commercial building. They take full responsibility
for the complete job, except for some parts of the work that may be left out from the general
contract. General contractors usually subcontract most of the work to heavy construction or
special trade contractors.
Source: Ontario Job Futures and the U.S. Department of Labor, 2000
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Industrial
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Workbook
Activity 9: Pronunciation
Listen to the instructor. Mark the syllable stress in these words, then practise saying each
one.
Imax
contributed
commercial
sewers
plumbing
coordinated
responsibility
contractors
Activity 10: Vocabulary matching
Using the reading The Ontario construction industry, write the correct term under the
appropriate type of contractor.
residential
industrial
plumbing
sewers
roads
commercial
electrical work
tunnels
painting
bridges
highways
carpentry
General building
contractors
Heavy construction
contractors
Special trade
contractors
Activity 11: Discussion
1. In other countries, what were some of the big construction projects?
2. Did you ever work on a construction project? What was it?
3. In your experience, is the construction industry in other countries divided into three parts
like it is in Ontario?
4. In your experience, do general contractors subcontract work in construction projects?
5. From what you have seen and heard in Canada so far, how does the construction
industry compare to your experience?
14
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Employment
Overview
Activity 12: Reading
1. How many manufacturing industries
are shown in the chart?
2. What industry had the most jobs?
3. What do you think the product was?
4. Do you have experience working in
any of these industries? Which ones?
Source: Ontario Job Futures 2000
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Industrial
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Source: Ontario Job Futures 2000
1. How many industries are shown in the chart?
2. What industry is going to grow the most in the next five years?
3. What industry is going to grow the second most?
4. What industry is going to grow the fourth most?
5. What industry is going to grow the least?
6. Do you have experience working in any of these industries? Which ones?
16
Steps
to
Employment
Overview
For more information on…
labour market information
visit the Ontario Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities Web site
www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/general/postsec/superbuild/skills_e.html
to get descriptions of trade jobs and training, see
www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/training/apprenticeship/manufac.html
trends
in Ontario Job Futures you can get information on job trends to 2005 and
today’s jobs by industry or sector, see:
www.on.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/english/lmi/eaid/ojf/overview_e.html
industries in Ontario
Canadian Industry Statistics are broken down by industry at this federal
government Web site: strategis.ic.gc.ca/sc_ecnmy/sio/homepage.html
industry profiles are given at this federal government Web site. The
information is Canada-wide and not specific to Ontario:
www.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/hrib/hrp-prh/ssddes/english/industryprofiles/prsearch2.shtml
Steps
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Employment
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2
OCCUPATIONS
In this unit you will learn about
job titles by industry
specific job titles
employment trends and wages
Job titles by industry
Motor Vehicle and Equipment Manufacturing
Hand workers, including assemblers and fabricators
Machine setters, operators, and tenders
Mechanics, installers, steamfitters and repairers
Millwrights
Metal workers, precision
Electricians
Tool and die makers
Industrial electricians
Steel Manufacturing
Machine tool cutting and forming setters, operators,
and tenders, metal and plastic
Metal fabricating machine operators
Industrial truck and tractor operators
Welders and cutters
Crane and tower operators
Furnace operators and tenders
Construction
Heating, air conditioning, and refrigeration mechanics
and installers
Cement masons, concrete finishers, and terrazzo
workers
Structural and reinforcing metal workers
Machinery mechanics, installers, and repairers
Heating, air conditioning, and refrigeration mechanics
and installers
Carpenters
Electricians
Sheet metal workers and duct
installers
Drywall installers and finishers
Plumbers, pipefitters, and
steamfitters
Electronic Equipment Manufacturing
Electrical and electronic equipment assemblers,
precision
Inspectors, testers, and graders, precision
Electrical and electronic equipment assemblers,
precision
Industrial machinery mechanics
Metal workers, precision
Mechanics, installers, and repairers
Steps
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Employment
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Industrial
Trades
Workbook
Activity 1: Pronunciation
Mark the syllable stress in these words and phrases, then practise saying each one. If you
are unsure of the meanings of some words, check a dictionary or visit the Ontario
government Web site, Ontario Job Futures 2000. Enter the job title in the search box and
you will get a description of the job.
www.on.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/english/lmi/eaid/ojf/ojf_home_e.html
repairers
assemblers
fabricators
installers
welders
furnace
carpenters
electricians
operators
plumbers
refrigeration
duct
drywall
structural
precision
terrazzo
equipment
electronic
equipment
mechanics
Activity 2: Interview
Ask your classmates the following questions.
1. What industry did you work in?
2. Where did you work?
3. How many years did you work in that industry?
4. What jobs have you done?
5. How many years did you work in those jobs?
Activity 3: Writing
Write a short report about three of your classmates. Write about:
1. The industry the person worked in
2. Where the person worked (country, city)
3. How long the person worked in that industry
4. The kind of job the person had (job title)
5. How long the person worked in that job
20
Steps
to
Employment
Occupations
Specific job titles
Activity 4: Pronunciation
Listen to the instructor. Mark the syllable stress in these job titles, then practise saying each
one.
Construction Millwrights and Industrial Mechanics
construction millwright
millwright apprentice
industrial mechanic
plant equipment mechanic
maintenance millwright
treatment plant mechanic
millwright
Tool and Die Makers
metal patternmaker
die finisher
mould maker - plastics processing
die maker
tool and die maker
jig maker
tool maker
metal mould maker
Industrial Electricians
industrial electrician
mine electrician
plant electrician
marine electrician
plant maintenance electrician
mill electrician
Steamfitters, Pipefitters and Sprinkler System Installers
fire sprinkler fitter
sprinkler system fitter
marine pipefitter
sprinkler system installer
pipefitter
steamfitter
Machinists and Machining and Tooling Inspectors
automotive machinist
tooling inspector
general machinist
machinist
machine parts inspector
maintenance machinist
machine shop inspector
tooling inspector
machine tool set-up operator
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Employment
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Industrial
Trades
Workbook
Activity 5: What job title did you have?
Interview your classmates and complete the chart. Write your classmates’ names in the left
column and write their job title(s) in the right column. If you don’t know the specific job title,
write the general title (e.g. electrician).
Name
22
Steps
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Employment
Job Title
Occupations
Activity 6: Matching
Match the words to their definitions.
1. __ lay out
a) machine for shaping wood or metal
2. __ assemble
b) put out in the correct place and order
3. __ fabricate
c) fix
4. __ maintain
d) find out what the problem is
5. __ troubleshoot
e) instrument that measures temperature or pressure
6. __ repair
f)
7. __ lubricate
g) to put together
8. __ jigs
h) to make or construct or manufacture
9. __ lathe
i)
to keep in good working order
10. __ gauge
j)
appliance that holds something so you can work on it
11. __ install
k) put in position for use
to oil or grease a machine
Activity 7: Matching
Match the job title in the left column with the description in the right column.
1. ___
construction
millwrights
and
industrial
mechanics
2. ___
steamfitters,
pipefitters
and
sprinkler
system
installers
3. ___
4. ___
5. ___
tool and die
makers
machinists
and
machining
and tooling
inspectors
industrial
electricians
a) lay out, assemble, fabricate, maintain and repair piping
systems carrying water, steam, chemicals and fuel in heating,
cooling, lubricating and other process piping systems.
Fabricate, install, test, maintain and repair water, foam,
carbon dioxide and dry chemical sprinkler systems in buildings
for fire protection purposes.
b) make, repair and modify custom-made, prototype or special
tools, dies, jigs, fixtures and gauges which require precise
dimensions. This group includes pattern and metal mould
makers. The work involves the operation of lathes, grinders
and milling and boring machines, and computerized numeric
control (CNC) machines.
c) set up and operate a variety of machine tools to cut or grind
metal and similar materials into parts or products with precise
dimensions. Inspect machined parts and tooling in order to
maintain quality control standards.
d) install, maintain, test, troubleshoot and repair industrial
electrical equipment and associated electrical and electronic
controls on hydraulic and pneumatic equipment.
e) install, maintain and repair stationary industrial machinery and
mechanical equipment. Install industrial plant machinery and
equipment; also do post-installation maintenance and repair of
machinery and equipment.
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Industrial
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Workbook
Activity 8: Fill in the blank
Using the vocabulary at the top, complete the sentences below.
lay out
install
lathes
tool and die makers
install
operate
maintenance
industrial electricians
1. ________________ repair jigs which require precise dimensions.
2. Sprinkler system installers ___________ sprinkler systems in buildings for fire protection
purposes.
3. Pipefitters ____________ piping systems that carry water in heating systems.
4. ____________________ repair industrial electrical equipment.
5. Construction millwrights ______________ industrial machinery and mechanical
equipment.
6. Machinists ___________ a variety of machine tools to cut metal.
7. Tool and die makers operate ____________ .
8. Millwrights also do post-installation ______________ on machinery and equipment.
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Employment
Occupations
Employment trends and wages
Millwrights
Employment is expected to grow the same for millwrights as for all occupations through the
year 2005. While job growth will create new positions, many job openings will come from
replacement needs as experienced millwrights retire. Many employers report difficulties in
finding qualified workers to fill vacant positions. Many employers have been recruiting
outside Canada for workers.
The average annual income in 1995 was $48,806 and the average hourly wage was $20.58.
Millwrights and industrial mechanics are employed in a variety of industries where they
maintain and repair existing machinery, dismantle old machinery, and install new equipment.
New technologies like hydraulic torque wrenches, ultrasonic measuring tools, and laser shaft
alignment will affect the work of millwrights, and they must acquire the skills to use these
devices.
Source: Ontario Job Futures 2000
Main industries of employment by per cent
Per cent employment by region
Transportation equipment
16%
Ottawa
4%
Primary metal
8%
Kingston-Pembroke
3%
Food products
8%
Muskoka-Kawarthas
4%
Paper products
7%
Kitchener-Waterloo-Barrie
11%
Fabricated metal products
7%
Hamilton-Niagara Peninsula
17%
Toronto
30%
London
5%
Windsor-Sarnia
8%
Stratford-Bruce Peninsula
4%
Northeast
9%
Northwest
4%
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Industrial
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Activity 9: True or false?
Read the following sentences and circle T for true statements and F for false statements.
T
F
1. Employment is expected to grow about the same as the average for all
occupations through the year 2005.
T
F
2. The main industry of employment for millwrights is the transportation industry.
T
F
3. Most millwrights are employed in the Kitchener-Waterloo-Barrie area.
T
F
4. Many job openings will come from replacement needs as experienced
millwrights retire.
T
F
5. Many employers don’t have difficulties in finding qualified workers to fill vacant
positions.
T
F
6. Many employers have been recruiting outside Canada for workers.
T
F
7. The average annual income in 1995 was $84,806.
T
F
8. The average hourly wage was $20.58.
T
F
9. New technologies will not affect the work of millwrights.
T
F
10. Millwrights maintain and repair existing machinery, dismantle old machinery, and
install new equipment.
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Employment
Occupations
Steamfitters, Pipefitters and Sprinkler System Installers
Employment is expected to grow the same as all occupations through the year 2005. Many
job openings will become available each year from the need to replace experienced workers
who retire. The average annual income for 1995
Per cent employment by region
was $50,655 and the common hourly wage was
$23.26. The main industries of employment are
Ottawa
7%
construction and manufacturing.
Kingston-Pembroke
3%
Employment in the piping trades is determined by
the amount of new construction requiring piping
installation and by the existing stock of piping that
must be maintained. There is growing demand for
fitting sprinkler systems to meet changes in fire
code regulations. In this area, computer literacy is
becoming essential, as more sprinklers are
electronically controlled. As building codes change,
sprinkler fitters will need a better knowledge of
products, applications and fire protection
requirements. Integration of sprinkler systems with
thermal storage systems is expected to be an
increasing element in the work of sprinkler fitters.
Muskoka-Kawarthas
3%
Kitchener-Waterloo-Barrie
7%
Hamilton-Niagara Peninsula
20%
Toronto
25%
London
4%
Windsor-Sarnia
16%
Stratford-Bruce Peninsula
2%
Northeast
8%
Northwest
5%
Source: Ontario Job Futures 2000
Activity 10: True or false?
Read the following sentences and circle T for true statements and F for false statements.
T
F
1. Many job openings will become available each year from the need to replace
experienced workers who retire.
T
T
T
T
T
T
F
F
F
F
F
F
2. The average annual income for 1995 was $70,655.
T
F
8. Computer literacy is not becoming essential, as fewer sprinklers are
electronically controlled.
T
F
9. Sprinkler fitters will need a better knowledge of products, applications and fire
protection requirements as building codes change.
T
F
10. Employment in the piping trades is determined by the amount of new
construction requiring piping installation and by the existing stock of piping that
must be maintained.
3. The common hourly wage was $22.26.
4. The main industries of employment are manufacturing and construction.
5. Hamilton-Niagara Peninsula employs 20%.
6. Hamilton-Niagara Peninsula and Toronto employ about the same amount.
7. There is growing demand for fitting sprinkler systems to meet changes in fire
code regulations.
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Industrial
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Tool and Die Makers
Employment is expected to increase much faster than the average for all occupations through
the year 2005. Job seekers with the appropriate skills and qualifications should have excellent
opportunities for finding employment, as employers across Ontario report difficulties in
finding qualified workers to fill vacant positions. Due to the large size of this occupational
group, many new jobs will be created each year by tool and die makers who retire. The
average annual income in 1995 was $46,894 and the common hourly wage was $20.97. The
main industries of employment are fabricated metal products, transportation equipment and
machinery.
Over 95% of tool and die makers are
employed in the manufacturing sector.
Employment of these workers will be affected
by advancements in automation, including
CNC machine tools and computer-aided
design (CAD). CNC machine tools have made
tool and die makers more productive, while
CAD and computer-aided manufacturing
(CAM) have allowed some functions
previously performed by these workers to be
carried out by a computer and tool
programmer.
The skills of this trade are portable and can be
transferred to the general machinist trades.
Source: Ontario Job Futures 2000
Per cent employment by region
Ottawa
1%
Kingston-Pembroke
1%
Muskoka-Kawarthas
2%
Kitchener-Waterloo-Barrie
14%
Hamilton-Niagara Peninsula
12%
Toronto
38%
London
6%
Windsor-Sarnia
23%
Stratford-Bruce Peninsula
2%
Northeast
0%
Northwest
0%
Activity 11: True or false?
Read the following sentences and circle T for true statements and F for false statements.
T
F
1. Employment is not expected to increase much for tool and die workers.
T
F
2. Employers across Ontario report difficulties in finding qualified workers to fill
vacant positions.
T
F
3. Many new jobs will be created each year by tool and die makers who retire.
T
F
4. The average annual income in 1995 was $66,894.
T
F
5. The common hourly wage was $4.97.
T
F
6. The main industries of employment are fabricated metal products, transportation
equipment and computers.
T
F
7. Most tool and die makers are employed in the manufacturing sector.
T
F
8. Employment will not be affected by advancements in automation, including CNC
machine tools and computer-aided design (CAD).
T
F
9. Windsor-Sarnia is the second most popular area for tool and die workers.
T
F
10. Computer and tool programmers have replaced some of the work that tool and
die workers used to do.
28
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Employment
Occupations
Machinists and Machining and Tooling Inspectors
Employment is expected to grow the same as for
Per cent employment by region
all occupations through the year 2005. Job
seekers with the appropriate skills and
Ottawa
4%
qualifications can expect good job chances, as
Kingston-Pembroke
3%
employers across Ontario report difficulties in
finding qualified workers to fill vacant positions.
Muskoka-Kawarthas
3%
Many employers have been recruiting outside of
Kitchener-Waterloo-Barrie
15%
Canada. Most machinists are employed in the
Hamilton-Niagara Peninsula
20%
manufacturing industries. The main industries
that these workers are employed in are fabricated
Toronto
33%
metal, transportation equipment and machinery.
London
6%
The average annual income for 1995 was $39,253
Windsor-Sarnia
9%
and the common hourly wage was $17.90.
Stratford-Bruce Peninsula
The work of machinists is being changed by the
use of sophisticated numerical control systems.
Northeast
New apprentices entering this field are expected
Northwest
to have a higher level of math and reading skills
than what was traditionally expected before these new technologies were developed.
3%
4%
1%
Source: Ontario Job Futures 2000
Activity 12: True or false?
Read the following sentences and circle T for true statements and F for false statements.
T
F
1. Employment is not expected to grow as fast as the average for all occupations
through the year 2005.
T
F
2. Employers across Ontario report difficulties in finding qualified workers to fill
vacant positions.
T
T
T
F
F
F
3. Employers have not been recruiting outside of Canada.
T
T
T
F
F
F
6. The average annual income for 1995 was $39,253.
T
F
9. The work of machinists is being changed by the use of sophisticated numerical
control systems.
T
F
10. The Kitchener-Waterloo-Barrie area is the second strongest area for
machinists.
4. Most machinists are employed in the manufacturing industries.
5. The main industries that these workers are employed in are fabricated metal,
farm equipment and machinery.
7. The common hourly wage was $17.09.
8. New apprentices entering this field are expected to have a higher level of math
and reading skills.
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to
Employment
29
Industrial
Trades
Workbook
Industrial Electricians
Employment is expected to grow the same as
for all occupations through the year 2005. The
main industries of employment are trade
contracting, primary metal, transportation and
mining. The average annual income in 1995
was $52,338 and the common hourly wage
was $20.00.
Production technologies involving robotics and
automated transfer machinery have created
new areas of work for industrial electricians.
As robots and other computerized control
equipment become the norm in many of the
manufacturing industries, the electricians who
install and repair it are an increasingly
important part of the manufacturing team.
Per cent employment by region
Ottawa
3%
Kingston-Pembroke
3%
Muskoka-Kawarthas
3%
Kitchener-Waterloo-Barrie
8%
Hamilton-Niagara Peninsula
17%
Toronto
31%
London
5%
Windsor-Sarnia
10%
Stratford-Bruce Peninsula
2%
Northeast
14%
Northwest
4%
Source: Ontario Job Futures 2000
Activity 13: True or false?
Read the following sentences and circle T for true statements and F for false statements.
T
F 1. The Windsor-Sarnia region is the second strongest region for jobs.
T
F 2. The main industries of employment are trade contracting, primary metal,
transportation and mining.
T
T
T
F 3. The average annual income in 1995 was $52,338.
F 4. The common hourly wage was $12.00.
F 5. Production technologies involving robotics and automated transfer machinery
have reduced jobs for industrial electricians.
T
F 6. Robots and other computerized control equipment are becoming an important
part of an electrician’s job.
T
F 7. Toronto followed by the Hamilton-Niagara Peninsula is strongest region for
employment.
30
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Employment
Occupations
Activity 14: Comparing wages
Look at the chart of job titles and wage information. With your classmates, discuss how this
compares with your employment experience. Are the wages higher or lower than what you
made before? Do you think these are fair wages for these jobs?
Job
Annual salary (1995)
Hourly wage (1995)
Millwrights
$48,806
$20.58
Steamfitters, Pipefitters and
Sprinkler System Installers
$50,655
$23.26
Tool and Die Makers
$46,894
$20.97
Machinists and Machining and
Tooling Inspectors
$39,253
$17.90
Industrial Electricians
$52,338
$20.00
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to
Employment
31
Industrial
Trades
Workbook
Ontario labour market information
For more information on…
for extensive information about duties, working conditions, employment,
training, related jobs, wages, regional statistics and association links, see
Ontario Job Futures: www.on.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/english/lmi/eaid/ojf/
32
Steps
for career and labour market information, visit the Human Resources
Development Canada (federal government) Web site: www.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/english/work/cpadm.html#calmi
for comparative U.S. Labour market information, see the US Department
of Labour, Bureau of Labour Statistics. This Web site gives labour market
information much like Ontario Job Futures 2000 but gives national rather
than regional information: stats.bls.gov/oco/cg/cg1002.htm
job duties
for information on what millwrights, electricians and sprinkler fitters do,
visit the Ontario Construction Secretariat Web site:
www.madewiththetrades.com/
overview
for an overview of the Ontario construction industry, visit the Ontario
Construction Secretariat Web site:
207.61.93.206/ocs/Industry%20Overview%202000/index.htm
to
Employment
3
WORKPLACE
In this unit you will learn about
major employers
employers in this sector (company profile)
unions
how employers hire
Major employers
Major employers for skilled industrial trades include:
•
aircraft and parts manufacturers
•
construction firms
•
electric power companies
•
electrical construction firms
•
hardware, tool and cutlery manufacturers
•
machine shop firms
•
machinery and equipment manufacturers
•
mechanical construction firms
•
metal fabricating companies
•
mining companies
•
motor vehicle manufacturers
•
motor vehicle parts manufacturers
•
plumbing, heating and air conditioning
•
primary steel producers
•
pulp and paper companies
•
residential building developers
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Employment
33
Industrial
Trades
Workbook
Activity 1: Pronunciation
Write the name of the employers under the occupation names. Then, listen to the instructor.
Mark the syllable stress in these words and phrases, then practice saying each one.
Construction Millwrights and Industrial Mechanics
Tool and Die Makers
Industrial Electricians
Steamfitters, Pipefitters and Sprinkler System Installers
Machinists and Machining and Tooling Inspectors
Activity 2: Interview
Ask a classmate if they have worked in any of the kinds of companies in Activity 1. After you
do the interview, change your partner and retell the information that you got to your new
partner. Remember to use the past tense.
1. What kind of company did you work for?
2. How long did you work there?
3. Do you want to find a job in the same kind of company in Ontario?
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Employment
Workplace
Activity 3: Research
Using the Yellow Pages, identify four companies from the list in Activity 1.
Name
Name
Address
Address
Phone
Phone
Name
Name
Address
Address
Phone
Phone
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Employment
35
Industrial
Trades
Workbook
Company profile
Blow Mould Engineering
Design and manufacturing of moulds for the plastics container industry
291-13 Edgeley Blvd.
Concord, Ontario, Canada L4K 3Z4
Tel: (905) 660-3306
Fax: (905) 660-3308
email: [email protected]
www.blowmouldeng.com/
Established: 1985
Corporation Status: Privately held
Employment: 30 Employees
Production: Conceptual design, engineering, prototype, manufacturing, service and
reconditioning of custom and proprietary moulds for the plastic container industry.
All design, engineering and manufacturing of moulds and tooling is executed on technologically
advanced, state-of-the-art computer and machining centres, using only licensed engineers, CNC
operators and mould makers. BME is manufacturing on two daily shifts, five days a week, eight
hours per day and is capable of increasing to include a third shift to our schedule.
Markets
Beverage
Other foods
Motor oil
Car care products
Medical
Pharmaceutical
Automotive parts
Furniture
Household chemicals
Personal care
Toys
Drums
Industrial chemicals
Lawn and garden
Trash cans
Agricultural chemicals
Commercial packaging
Manufacturing Inventory
CNC Machining Centres
Matsura RAIV (pallet change)
Matsura MC510 (pallet change)
Nakamura Tome CNC lathe
Grinding
Chevalier 12x24 hydraulic surface grinder
Harig 6x18 automatic hydraulic grinder
Kelenberger cylindrical grinder
Engineering
5 CAD- CADKey workstations
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Employment
CAD/CAM
Renishaw CYCLONE scanner & touch probe
surface digitization (2D&3D)
5 MasterCam (6.1) workstations
Weber Cam workstation
Standard Machine Tools
Milling machines
Radial drills
Lathes etc.
Workplace
Activity 4: Reading for information
Complete the chart with information from the company profile.
Company name
Type of business
Address
Phone
Email address
Number of employees
How many markets is this company in?
Does this company use computerassisted design (CAD)?
Does a mould maker need to be
licensed to work at this company?
What is the work schedule?
Which machining tools are used?
Activity 5: Talk about your experience
Discuss with your classmates the following questions:
1. What kind of company did you work for before?
2. What kinds of products did it produce?
3. How many people worked in the company?
4. What were your working hours?
5. Did you have any benefits (vacation, dental, medical)?
6. What kind of tools and equipment did you use?
7. When you were working, how was technology changing the type of job that you did?
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Employment
37
Industrial
Trades
Workbook
Unions
Industrial trades jobs are heavily unionized. One of the most important services a union
provides is employment. Much hiring is done through union halls, especially in the
construction industry. A member may leave his or her name with the union and as employers
call to recruit workers, the union will match up available members with employers. Unions
have collective agreements with many employers. These agreements contain important
information regarding working hours, duties, wages, dental, health and pension benefits.
Unions also give their members protection from abuse and harassment on the job, the ability
to improve health and safety conditions and prevent violations of labour laws. When there is
a problem with your job, you get the union to help you fight back through a grievance
procedure. The union can also give you access to training and upgrading, which makes you
more employable in your trade. Members pay dues to be in the union. These dues will
usually be deducted from your paycheque.
How a newcomer can join a union:
1. Look at your skills and interests.
2. Call unionized labour organizations (in the GTA, the Building Trades Council).
3. Take whatever documentation you have to the union local. You many have to fill out an
application. This will determine if you have to have more training or if you can work
right away.
4. Be persistent.
Activity 6: Group discussion
1. What are the advantages of belonging to a union?
2. How are dues usually paid?
3. Did you belong to a union before?
4. What were the benefits of belonging to the union?
5. Were you ever in a training program offered by a union? What was it?
6. Why do some people not belong to unions?
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Workplace
Union profile
Local 853 Sprinkler Fitters
Membership Services
UA Local 853 represents sprinkler fitters throughout the province of Ontario. The local,
on behalf of its membership, negotiates the National Road Sprinkler Fitter Collective
Agreement as well as the National Sprinkler Fabrication Agreement. These two collective
agreements operate in all provinces except B.C. and Quebec.
The local has also helped develop a National Pension Plan for Sprinkler Fitters and a
Provincial Health and Welfare Plan. These plans ensure that its members and their
families are provided with 1st class pension and health and welfare benefits.
Local 853 is recognized by the Ontario Ministry of Education and Training as the only
training delivery body for the sprinkler fitter trade in Ontario. The local works with its
contractors to provide the most up-to-date training for its members. This ensures that both
the membership and the contractors who employ them have the skills and knowledge to
keep ahead of the ever-changing technological advances.
Adapted from the UA Local 853 Sprinkler Fitters Web page www.ualocal853sprinkler.org/
Activity 7: Union profile
1. What is the name of this union?
2. Does this union represent sprinkler fitters for one city?
3. The union negotiates collective agreements (like contracts) for all provinces except
which two?
4. What two benefit plans has the union helped to negotiate?
5. What does the Ontario Ministry of Education and Training recognize the union for?
6. Who does the union work with to provide training?
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Employment
39
Industrial
Trades
Workbook
How employers hire
Employers hire through unions for a specific project (common in the construction industry),
by word-of-mouth (referrals from contacts or other workers) and either print (newspaper) or
electronic (Internet) advertising or through recruiting agencies.
Activity 8: Newspaper ads
Answer the questions after each ad with the appropriate information.
Soft skills: related to communication and behaviour
Hard skills: what you have been trained to do
?
Maintenance Millwrights
Electrical Technicians
For: Plastics, Pharmaceutical,
Packaging & Food industry
1. What are the job titles for this ad?
•
•
3. How much experience is required?
1-5 years related experience
Electrical & Industrial
millwright licence
• Knowledge of Pneumatics &
Hydraulics
• Troubleshooting, Programming
PLC/PM
Human Resource Fax 416-xxx-xxxx
Email: [email protected]
@
40
Industrial Mechanic
Minimum five years experience
Certification in industrial
mechanics. Hands-on experience
in the repair of grinders,
mixers and compressors.
Knowledge of electrical motors,
controls and instrumentation.
Ability to read and follow
complex instruction manuals,
schematic and circuitry
diagrams. Background in plastic
or powder coating manufacturing
is an asset. Salary is
dependent on experience
MAIL resumes to 350 Shepherd
Ave., North York, M84 3R5
Or fax resumes to 416-xxx-xxxx:
or email [email protected]
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Employment
2. What industries does this company
produce for?
4. Is a licence required?
5. What special knowledge is
required?
6. What are the duties?
7. What are the two sources of
contact?
1. What is the job title?
2. What certification is necessary?
3. What practical experience is
required?
4. What knowledge is required?
5. What reading skills are required?
6. What is the salary dependent on?
7. How must you send your resume?
8. What’s the address of the
company?
Workplace
A
Maintenance Millwright
We are a leader in quality food
ingredients manufacturing,
requiring a licensed
millwright. Selected applicants
will participate in a team
environment to maintain and
improve equipment and
manufacturing processes.
Qualified applicants should
possess some or all of the
following skills:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Machine trouble
shooting/repairs/overhauls
Skilled in welding, cutting,
fabricating
Machine shop, lathe, mill
etc.
Basic electrics
Experience with scales
Gas fitting
Innovation & creativity
Leadership
Strong interpersonal skills
Good communication skills
Licensed millwright
1. What is the job title?
2. Is a licence required?
3. Does this job require you to work
alone?
4. What hard skills should you have?
5. What soft skills should you have?
6. What is the name of the company?
7. What is the address?
8. Which department should you send
your resume to?
9. How should you send it?
Milton Laboratories Ltd.
575 Denison Avenue
Scarborough, Ontario
M8L 4F5
Attention: Human Resources
Department
Fax: xxx-xxx-xxxx
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Employment
41
Industrial
Trades
Workbook
Activity 9: Interview
Ask your classmates these questions.
1. How have you found work in your trade before?
2. Was the job search process the same here in Canada as it is in other countries?
3. Have you ever answered a job ad in a newspaper?
4. Have you ever looked for a job on the Internet?
5. How do people in industrial trades find jobs in other countries?
6. How do you think you should start looking for a job in Ontario?
Activity 10: Matching
Match the job terms with the definitions in the left column.
1. __ full-time
a) refers to the permanence of a job.
2. __ part-time
b) a fixed, regular payment to employees. This could be
a monthly, weekly or biweekly payment.
3. __ casual part-time
4. __ contract work
5. __ shift work
c) insurance paid for by employers to pay for things like
sick pay, dental plan and parental leave.
d) means 40 hours a week and a regular schedule. For
example, Monday to Friday, 9AM to 5PM.
6. __ salary
7. __ wage
8. __ benefits
9. __ job security
e) means working only a few hours a week. For
example, less that 25 hours a week, maybe Monday,
Tuesday and Wednesday, 10 to 3.
f)
means that work is not steady. Sometimes it may be
10 hours a week, and sometimes 20. It depends on
how much work there is.
g) means that you are hired to do a job or a project.
When the job or project is finished, so is your
employment.
h) regular payments received for work or services,
usually given as an hourly amount.
i)
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Employment
is a set number of hours in a day. For example, the
day shift is usually from 8AM to 4PM; the afternoon shift
is from 4PM to midnight; and the night shift, also called
the “graveyard” shift, is from midnight to 8AM
Workplace
For more information on…
employers
Check the Scott’s Directory in your local library, or get a copy.
Southam Information Products (1-800-408-9431)
www.scottsinfo.com/main/index.php
see the Bluebook of Canadian Business is online, but for subscribers
only. www.bluebook.ca/
use search engines on the Internet (e.g. Mamma and type in “Canadian
Tool and Die”)
try the federal government Job Bank. Choose the area you are interested
in: jb-ge.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/job-html/title_e.html
visit the Industry Canada Web site at strategis.gc.ca. There is labour
market information there as well as names of companies and the number of
employees. Choose a company, copy the name and paste it into your
browser to see if it has a Web site: strategis.ic.gc.ca/SSG/io29198e.html
unions and associations
the Association of Industrial Mechanics has addresses of millwright
locals. www.millwright.org/Unions.html
the Construction Trades Council has links for many trade unions and
associations including millwrights, electricians and sprinkler
fitters.www.constructiontrades.org/2testhref.html
the Provincial Building and Construction Trades Council of Ontario
has a large list of unions, click on their links.
www.pbctco.org/
the Ontario Construction Secretariat has excellent information about
various trade unions and their management partners (employers). Visit this
Web site and click on “Who we are” and then on “Partnerships”
www.iciconstruction.com/Q300/frameset.html
the Canadian Skilled Trade Council has many links.
www.skilledtrades.org/emain.htm
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43
4
WORKPLACE LAW IN ONTARIO
In this unit you will learn about
the laws that protect workers in Ontario
employment standards
human rights
health and safety
workers’ compensation
Real stories…
Did you know? While the typical vacation for North American workers is two weeks,
many European governments mandate longer vacations. French employers are required to
provide 25 vacation days per year. German workers are entitled to 24 days. In Spain,
workers have 22 days. Employers in Belgium, Ireland and the Netherlands provide 20
days, and in the U.K., vacation requirements are from 15 to 20 days.
Source: Society for Human Resource Management, 2000
Activity 1: Discussion
Discuss each of the following situations.
1. John had a 15-minute coffee break in the morning, and another in the afternoon for the
past year. Recently his employer reduced the breaks to ten minutes each. Can the
employer do this?
2. Anne was asked to pay for the lab coat that she is required to wear at work. Can the
employer do this?
3. Munir refuses to test some hazardous material delivered to the lab this week. Can he do
this?
Laws that protect workers in Ontario
The Ontario Ministry of Labour is responsible for labour laws in Ontario. These laws
describe the rights and responsibilities of employers and workers in this province.
Ontario’s Employment Standards Act does not apply to industries regulated by the
government of Canada, such as the railways, airlines, post offices, and shipping companies
that cross provincial and state borders. These employees are covered under the Canada
Labour Code.
As a new worker, you need to learn about these laws so that you know your rights and
responsibilities in the workplace.
Steps
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Employment
45
Industrial
Trades
Workbook
Employment standards
The Employment Standards Act is the law that contains Ontario’s basic rules about the
minimum standards for salary, overtime, vacations, maternity benefits, termination, and
more. This provincial law covers most workers in Ontario.
These laws set the standards for:
Minimum wage: Employers must pay both full-time and part-time workers at least the
minimum wage. Any changes are announced in newspaper ads at least a month before the
change happens.
Hours of work: This is the number of hours for each normal working day. The Act says that
the limit for most employees is eight hours a day and 48 hours a week. Employers must pay
employees overtime if they work more than the legislated hours of work.
Overtime pay: Overtime pay is the wage that employers must give workers who work
overtime. Overtime pay is the regular wage x 1.5, or time and a half.
Meal breaks: Workers must have a meal break each working day. The length of this meal
break is determined either by the law, by the employer, or by union contracts. The Act does
not set coffee and rest breaks, but some employers allow coffee and rest breaks throughout
the day.
Public holidays: Under the law, Ontario has eight paid public holidays. Workers who
qualify for paid public holidays don’t have to work on these days, but are still paid their
regular wages for the day.
Vacation pay: Workers are entitled to a minimum number of days of paid holidays each
year. The law determines how long workers must work before they are eligible for paid
holidays and vacation pay.
Pregnancy and parental leave and benefits: This is the time off for a new parent. While
on pregnancy leave employees can receive employment insurance maternity benefits. While
on parental leave, employees can receive employment insurance parental benefits. To qualify
for these benefits the employee must have paid EI over a period of time prior to the arrival of
the baby.
Deductions: These are payments that employers can legally deduct from an employee’s
paycheque. This includes Employment Insurance and Canada Pension Plan payments.
Termination of employment: The law determines how employees or employers end their
contracts and how much termination pay must be paid.
Activity 2: Pronunciation
Listen to the instructor. Mark the syllable stress in these words, then practise saying each
one.
vacation
overtime
deduction
minimum
compensation
standards
termination
benefits
46
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Employment
Workplace
Law
in
Ontario
Activity 3: Vocabulary matching
Test your understanding of employment standards terminology by matching the terms on
the left with their definitions on the right.
1. ___ minimum wage
2. ___ hours of work
3. ___ overtime pay
4. ___ meal breaks
5. ___ public holidays
a) payments that employers deduct from an
employee’s paycheque
b) the wage that employers must give workers
who work more than the normal hours of work
in a workweek
6. ___ vacation pay
c) employers must pay at least this much to parttime and full-time employees
7. ___ deductions
d) firing or giving notice
8. ___ termination of employment
e) time off or the equivalent pay
f)
a normal working day
g) time available for breakfast, lunch or dinner,
depending on your work schedule
h) days of rest, recreation or festivity
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Employment
47
Industrial
Trades
Workbook
Activity 4: Interview
Work with your partner to fill in the chart with information about Ontario’s employment
standards, then ask your partner about workplace law in another country.
Question
In Ontario
1. What is the minimum wage?
2. How many weeks’ vacation do most
workers get each year?
3. How many public holidays are there?
4. What are the normal working hours
each week?
5. What are the normal working hours
each day?
6. Are employers required to pay
overtime?
7. What are some deductions from
paycheques?
8. Is there maternity and parental leave?
How long is it?
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Employment
In ________________
Workplace
Law
in
Ontario
Activity 5: Reading and completing a pay stub
Here is a pay stub for two weeks. Fill in the pay stub with this information:
This person worked for 75 hours.
The regularly scheduled hours were 72.5.
The total pay before deductions was $915.00.
Canada Pension Plan contributions were $27.45.
Employment Insurance (EI) deductions were $18.30.
Union dues were $12.00.
Income Tax deducted was $228.75.
O Detach Cheque Here O
EARNINGS
DEDUCTIONS
Time
Income
Tax
Overtime Gross
pay
EI
CPP
Union
dues
NET PAY
What was the net pay?
Human rights in the workplace
Ontario Human Rights Code
The Ontario Human Rights Code is the law that says all citizens in Ontario must receive
equal and just treatment. The Code protects workers in Ontario from discrimination and
harassment by their employers or co-workers. It also reminds all workers to treat each other
with respect.
The Ontario Human Rights Code forbids discrimination against a person because of race,
colour, religion or sex. Employers and workers must act according to the principles described
in this law. For example, it is illegal to sexual harass people, or to make jokes about people
of different races.
Discrimination
Discrimination is being treated differently from other people. There are situations in which
the employer is allowed to be selective on the basis of citizenship, age or disability. But
generally it is against the law to discriminate against people because of race, ancestry, place
of origin, colour, ethnic origin, citizenship, creed, age, record of offences, marital status,
same-sex partnership status, family status or handicap. This is why it is illegal for employers
in Ontario to ask questions about an applicant’s marital status, number of children, age, etc.
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Industrial
Trades
Workbook
Harassment
Harassment is a situation in which someone threatens or insults you. Racial harassment
includes racial jokes and derogatory comments. Sexual harassment includes unwanted
touching, sexual comments, sexual jokes and suggestions. Discrimination and harassment
can occur in job advertisements, questions about Canadian experience, job applications, job
interviews and in the way workers treat each other and how the employer treats the workers.
Ontario Human Rights Commission
The Ontario Human Rights Commission is the office that enforces the Ontario Human Rights
Code. Anyone who has been discriminated against or harassed in the workplace should try to
solve the problem with the colleagues and employer, but if this fails, the commission can
help.
Activity 6: Vocabulary matching
Match the terms on the left with their definitions on the right.
1. ___ ancestry
a) being in a parent and child relationship
2. ___ creed
b) derogatory comments and unwelcome advances
3. ___ family status
c) physical or mental disability
4. ___ handicap
5. ___ harassment
d) the person you are married or to whom you live as a
couple
6. ___ marital status
e) single, married, divorced, common law
7. ___ place of origin
f)
8. ___ sexual orientation
g) where you were born
9. ___ spouse
h) heterosexual (straight), homosexual (gay)
10. ___ discrimination
i)
being treated differently from others
j)
your beliefs, especially religious
relatives from many generations back
Activity 7: Discussion
Brainstorm questions that an employer might ask or statements that you might see in a job
ad that would be against the Human Rights Code.
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Workplace
Law
in
Ontario
Activity 8: Matching
Match each situation with one of the following types of discrimination or harassment:
P – place of origin
R – race
G – gender
C – creed
A – age
D – disability
__
1. Andy answered an advertisement for a Girl Friday. The duties of the job involved
typing, filing and sorting. When he asked for an interview, he was told that the job
was for “girls” only.
__
2. Ameena applied for a job as a receptionist. Ameena is from India. She speaks
English very well, but she has an accent. At the job interview the employer told her
that she was not right for the job. He said that the company needed someone who
spoke English with no accent.
__
3. Andrea speaks with a stutter. One of her co-workers makes fun of her when she
stutters. He knows that this makes it harder for her to speak, but he does it anyway.
__
4. Nathan works in a machine shop. He is black. Most of his co-workers are white.
Last week his co-workers were telling “black jokes.” Nathan asked them to stop, but
they just laughed at him and went on with the jokes.
__
5. Ute has been looking for a job for almost two years. She can’t understand why it is
so difficult. Her friends say that it will be impossible for her to get a job because she
is 52 years old.
__
6. Ahmed is a Muslim. He has a special prayer time every Friday. Every Friday one of
his co-workers teases him: “There goes Ahmed to the mosque again!”
Adapted from: Discrimination and Harassment at Work, CLEO. August, 1993
Activity 9: Discussion
Discuss the following situations and decide if the actions described are lawfull (L) or
unlawful (U) according to the laws described in this unit:
L U 1. Jonathan could not apply for a job as an environmental technician because he
uses a wheelchair to get around, and field work would require him to go into
areas that are not wheelchair accessible.
L U 2. Jose applied for a job and did well during the interview, but he did not get the job
because a requirement for the job is Canadian citizenship.
L U 3. A job ad in the newspaper said: only single males need apply.
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Health and safety
Occupational Health and Safety Act
The Occupational Health and Safety Act helps to protect the health and safety of workers in
the workplace. This Act is based on the idea that employers and employees must work
together to create a safe and healthy workplace.
Employers must do everything possible to protect workers’ health and safety and workers
must work with employers to identify and solve safety problems in the workplace. The Act
gives workers four basic rights:
•
•
•
•
the right to participate in keeping their workplace safe and healthy
the right to know about health and safety hazards through the Workplace Hazardous
Materials Information System (WHMIS)
the right to refuse work that they think is unsafe
the right to stop work.
Occupational health and safety applies to all workplaces, however some workplaces will
have more health and safety hazards than others. Inform yourself by contacting the Health
and Safety Association for your occupation or sector.
Activity 10: Pronunciation
Listen to the instructor. Mark the syllable stress in these words, then practise saying each
one.
hazard
protect
safe
W HMIS
hazardous
protection
unsafe
occupational
Activity 11: Whose responsibility is it?
Circle E for employer and W for worker in front of each sentence, according to whose
responsibility it is. Remember that some responsibilities are shared.
1. give information, training and supervision
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
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Steps
2. not work or operate equipment in a way that could be dangerous
3. make sure safe work procedures are followed and equipment is used properly
4. report any broken equipment or safety devices
5. keep safety equipment in good condition
6. use the safety equipment available in the workplace
7. report any health or safety violations
8. provide training on how to handle dangerous materials
to
Employment
Workplace
Law
in
Ontario
WHMIS
The Occupational Health and Safety Act requires that labels be placed on all hazardous
chemicals that are used in the workplace. This labelling system is called Workplace
Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS). Under WHMIS all potentially
hazardous materials are labelled, and have a materials safety data sheets (MDHS), which
describe how to handle the materials safely. This prevents the incidence of occupational
illness and injuries resulting from the use of hazardous chemicals in the workplace.
Activity 12: Reading comprehension
1. What does WHMIS mean?
2. What is the WHMIS system about?
3. Where are the labels put?
4. What do the WHMIS labels show?
Activity 13: Matching
Match the picture to the symbols that correspond.
a) Reactive Material
1. __
5. __
b) Biohazardous Infectious Material
c) Compressed Gas
2. __
6. __
d) Oxidizing Material
e) Other Toxic Effects
f)
3. __
7. __
Corrosive Material
g) Poisonous and Infectious Material
h) Flammable and Combustible Material
4. __
8. __
Activity 14: Pronunciation
Listen to the instructor. Mark the syllable stress in these words and phrases, then practise
saying each one.
flammable
toxic
compressed
combustible
oxidizing
poisonous
infectious
biohazardous
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Activity 15: Reading
The eight symbols are identified according to six classes, ranging from “Class A” (the least
dangerous substance or situation) to “Class F” (the most dangerous substance or situation)
With your partner, decide which symbols represent which class. Use the pictures from
Activity 8 and write the corresponding numbers in the boxes.
1. Class A: Chemicals such as oxygen or acetylene used under pressure in a
container.
2. Class B: Chemicals that are easily ignited.
3. Class C: If mixed with oxygen, these materials can contribute to the combustion
of other materials.
4. Class D: Three types of poisonous and infectious materials:
a) Acute health effects b) Chronic health effects c) Biohazardous material
5. Class E: Materials which can attack metal and skin.
6. Class F: Under certain conditions, these materials may react violently. This
sudden release of energy can produce gases or an explosion. Some chemicals
when mixed can produce the same effect.
Source: WHMIS Education Program
Workers’ compensation
Workers’ Compensation Act
The Workplace Safety and Insurance Act says that workers who are injured at work or get
sick from their work can receive compensation and assistance in getting back to work.
The Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (WSIB) is the office responsible for
administering workers’ compensation. The WSIB also enforces the provincial occupational
health and safety system.
No injury is too small to report!
All employees must be registered with the WSIB. Employers must register any new
employees with the WSIB within ten days of hiring, or they can be fined. Employers must
also report any injuries that occur on at the workplace to the WSIB within three days of the
injury.
Workers must report any injury to their employer immediately. If a worker misses work
because of an injury or illness, the employer must report it to the WSIB within three days
after the accident. Workers must also make a claim with the WSIB within six months of their
injury.
Although both the employer and the employee report any injury related to their job,
employees must apply for workers’ compensation and the WSIB decides if the law covers a
worker or not.
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Employment
Workplace
Law
in
Ontario
Real stories…
WSIB Violations
An Ontario company operating as Ontario
1234567 has been charged with one count
of failing to notify the WSIB within three
days after learning of an accident to an
employee.
The company has also been charged with
one count of failing to register with the
WSIB within ten days of becoming an
employer.
These are violations under sections 152(3)
and 151(1) respectively of the Workplace
Safety and Insurance Act.
The company and the company owner are
scheduled to appear in a provincial
courtroom.
Source: Adapted from media and government sources.
Activity 16: Discussion
1. What law is this company breaking?
2. What were the responsibilities of the employer in this case?
3. What could the workers have done to prevent this?
4. What will happen next?
5. What do you think the judge will decide?
Activity 17: Research
If you need more details on Ontario’s employment standards, use brochures or the Internet
to find information about employment standards in Ontario. Use the For more information…
page as a guide.
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employment standards
For more information on…
contact the Ministry of Labour at 416-326-7000 or toll-free at
1-800-531-5551
56
Steps
visit the Ministry of Labour Web site at www.gov.on.ca/LAB
WISB
contact the WISB at 416-344-1013 or toll-free at 1-800-387-8638.
visit the WISB Web page at www.wisb.on.ca.
health and safety regulations
contact the Ministry of Labour at 416-326-7000 or toll-free at
1-800-531-5551.
WHMIS
WHMIS: what you need to know, www.utoronto.ca/safety/whmis9.htm
WHMIS Training Course on-line, www.prohnet.com/
to
Employment
5
TRAINING AND EXPERIENCE
In this unit you will learn about
Canadian training
trade certification
ongoing training
describing your experience
Canadian training
In Ontario, people who work in the skilled trades enter the trade through an apprenticeship
program. The apprenticeship program is administered by the Ontario government through the
Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities. The government partners with colleges and
trade organizations to run the apprenticeship program.
An apprenticeship program is a contract and agreement between the individual and the
employer or its agent. The employer may also be one of the various trade unions. The
apprentice learns the chosen skilled trade with hands-on experience and classroom theory
training at a college. The period of time for the apprenticeship varies but normally is about
four years. Requirements may vary for different trades but normally the candidate should
have completed high school. Apprentices earn a percentage of journeyperson’s rates, which
usually increases as time in the program increases, and the apprentice proves to the employer
that he or she is proficient in the work and class work.
Source: Ontario Job Futures, 2000
Activity 1: Pronunciation
Listen to the instructor. Mark the syllable stress in these words, then practise saying each
one.
apprenticeship
organizations
individual
requirements
journeyperson
proficient
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Activity 2: Reading comprehension
1. How do people enter the skilled trades in Ontario?
2. Who administers the apprenticeship program?
3. Who does the government partner with?
4. What is an apprenticeship program?
5. Can a trade union act like an employer?
6. How long does the apprenticeship program normally last?
7. What is the apprentice paid?
8. Where does the apprentice learn trade theory?
9. Does the apprentice get hands-on experience?
Activity 3:Your training experience
Ask your classmates the following questions about their training experiences.
1. Do you know of apprenticeship systems in other countries?
2. Did you train as an apprentice for your trade? (If you weren’t an apprentice, how did you
learn how to do your trade?)
3. How long were you an apprentice? (or, how long did you train?)
4. Did you have classroom training?
5. Did you have to write an exam?
6. Do you have to be certified to work in your trade in other countries?
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Training
and
Experience
Activity 4: Who had what training?
Ask your classmates if their trade is included in the apprenticeship training program. If the
trade is not on this list, contact the apprenticeship office nearest you (See the For More
Information.. section of this unit).
Write the name of your classmates beside the appropriate trade in the chart and write yes or
no if the person had apprenticeship training. If their trade is not in the list, write it in the blank
space in the chart.
Questions: “What trade were you in?” and “Were you an apprentice?” and “How long was
your training?”
Apprenticeship trade
Name
Apprenticeship training
Brick and stone mason
Electrician
Construction millwright
Glazier and metal mechanic
Ironworker
Lathe operator
Lineworker
Plumber
Refrigeration and air-conditioning
mechanic
Sheet metal worker
Sprinkler and fire protection installer
Steamfitter
General machinist
Industrial electrician
Industrial mechanic millwright
Industrial woodworker
Mould maker
Pattern maker
Tool and die maker
Fuel and electrical systems
technician
Heavy duty equipment mechanic
Truck-trailer service technician
Transmission technician
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Trade certification
Some trades in Ontario do not require certification but many employers ask for it. To find out
if your trade requires certification, contact your nearest apprenticeship office or visit the
Ontario Job Futures 2000 Web site (see for More information on… section of this unit).
If you are foreign-trained, you will have to write the licensing examination to become
certified. In order to write the exam, you must have written proof of 8,000 hours (some trades
may vary) of work in your trade. The exam contains between 100 – 150 multiple choice
questions and is three hours long; however, you can take six hours if you need to. The fee for
taking the exam is about $100.00
Examples of proof include completion of an apprenticeship contract, documentation showing
that training time meets at least minimum industry standards, or proof of sufficient relevant
experience as a skilled worker.
If English is not your first language, you are permitted to bring someone with you who can
translate the exam for you. The person you bring, however, must not be a tradesperson in the
trade of the exam you are taking. To pass the exam, you must get 70% or higher (60% until
2001).
Activity 5: Reading comprehension
1. Does every trade require certification?
2. Why is it a good idea to get certified?
3. If you are foreign-trained, do you have to take an exam to get certified?
4. To take the exam, what do you have to prove first?
5. If English is not your first language, what can you do to take the exam?
6. How well do you have to do to pass the exam?
7. How much does it cost to take an exam?
8. What kind of exam is it?
9. How many hours is the exam?
Activity 6: Is your occupation regulated?
Call your local apprenticeship office or the Training Hotline and find out if you need to be
certified to work in Ontario in your trade. Here are some useful questions that you can use:
I would like some information on millwrights. Do millwrights have to be certified to work in
Ontario?
I am a foreign-trained sprinkler fitter. Do I have to get certified to work in Ontario?
I am a foreign-trained industrial electrician. What do I need to do to take the licensing exam?
What kind of written proof do I need to show that I have worked 8,000 hours?
Is there a fee for the licensing exam?
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Training
and
Experience
Ongoing training
Getting certified is important, but because new technology is changing how work is done, it
is important to upgrade yourself too. Many different kinds of training are offered in Ontario.
You can take health and safety training or training related to how you do your job. Unions
and associations generally offer these types of training.
The following is a sample of a computer course offered by the Canadian Steel Trade and
Employment Congress.
Real stories…
Computer Basics
The aim of the Computer Basics course
is to give learners a chance to better
understand what computers are all about,
how they work and the many purposes
for which they can be used. Participants
will learn basic computer-related
terminology, and will become familiar
with the microcomputer environment and
a few applications; namely, the Windows
environment, a word processing program
and a spreadsheet.
The course takes three days, 21 hours plus
personal and practice work. There are three
modules. Introduction to microcomputers is
seven hours. Introduction to word processing
is nine hours. Introduction to spreadsheets is
five hours.
General learning outcome
Learners will be able to operate a
microcomputer in a Windows environment
in order to produce simple documents using
a word processing program and an electronic
spreadsheet.
Activity 7: True or false?
Read the following sentences and circle T for true statements and F for false statements.
T
F
1. The course is called Computer Basics.
T
T
T
T
T
F
F
F
F
F
2. The students will learn advanced computer terminology.
T
T
T
F
F
F
7. The course is three hours a day for 21 days.
3. The students will learn how to use Windows.
4. The students will not learn how to use a word processing program.
5. The students will learn how to use a spreadsheet.
6. The students will use a word processing program and an electronic
spreadsheet to produce simple documents.
8. There are seven modules.
9. Each module is one day.
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Activity 8: Matching
Match the phrases on the left with the phrases on the right. The sentences describe what
you would be able to do after taking the first module of the course in Activity 7.
1. ___
2. ___
3. ___
4. ___
5. ___
a) learner will demonstrate that he/she has
to explain the role and
mastered the most commonly used commands.
importance of computers in
our society;
b) learner will present his/her view on the role of
computers in our society.
to describe the main
components of a
c) learner will demonstrate that he/she has
computer;
mastered the functions of the most commonly
to find the different keys on
the keyboard;
d)
to navigate with ease
through the Windows
environment
e)
to describe the main
categories of application
software
used keys.
based on specified needs, the learner will
choose the appropriate hardware and software,
and describe the related applications.
learner will briefly describe the main
components of a computer.
Activity 9: Interview
Ask your classmates about their training experiences.
1. Did you ever take a training course in your trade before?
2. What was it?
3. How long was it?
4. Did you have to take this course as part of your job?
5. Who offered the course? (your employer? union? government?)
6. Did you have to pay for the course?
7. Did the course help you?
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Training
and
Experience
Describing your experience
When you apply for a job in Canada,
employers want to know about your work
experience.
You have to talk about:
•
where you worked
•
how long you worked there
•
your position (job title, occupation)
•
your duties and responsibilities
Here is an example:
“In Russia, I worked in a steel company for five
years. I started as a millwright. After three years,
I was promoted to supervisor. I supervised staff
and scheduled maintenance.”
Activity 10: Write your experience statement
Practise it and use it to tell people about your training, experience and knowledge. The more
people know about you, the more they are able to tell others! Word-of-mouth is one of the
best ways to get a job.
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apprenticeship
For more information on…
for a list of links to useful educational and training Web sites, visit the
Ontario Job Futures 2000 Web site. www.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/english/lmi/eaid/ojf/ojf_links_e.html
64
Steps
visit the Toronto Central Region Training and Apprenticeship (trade
certification exams are written here: 625 Church St.; 416-326-5800
employment
job ads and volunteer opportunities from the newspaper, Internet, job
boards
HRDC information (Essential Skills Profile, Job Futures, etc.)
the Skills for Change Web site has links for employment and training
related organizations www.skillsforchange.org/
licensing
Job Grow and Training Hotline at 1-888-JOB-GROW or (416) 326-5656.
There’s also information on the Internet at www.youthjobs
Occupational Licensing and Educational Accreditation in Ontario
www.on.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/english/lmi/eaid/occ.info/occlicont_e.html
training
list of training centres by trade at the Construction Trades Council
www.constructiontrades.org/training.html
Ministry of Education and Training, Training Hotline 1-800-386-5656
Canadian Steel Trade and Employment Congress
Tel 416-480-1797
Fax 416-480-2086
www.cstec.ca/
Access to Professions and Trades has links to training and other
employment related information
www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/training/training.html
to
Employment
Terminology
Health and Safety
Equipment and Tools
Workplace Tasks
Workplace Communication
Personal Plan
Steps
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Industrial
66
Steps
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Employment
6
HEALTH AND SAFETY
In this unit you will learn about
common safety concerns
health and safety responsibilities
accident benefits
reporting a hazard
industry standards – ISO 9000 and QS 9000
Common safety concerns
Safety is an important issue in the workplace and much training is available for workers.
Every trade has its particularly dangerous jobs but in general there are safe practices that
everyone should follow.
Activity 1: pronunciation
The following are some common terms related to health and safety. Listen to the instructor.
Mark the syllable stress in these words and phrases, then practise saying each one.
compressed gas
beards
corrosive
W HMIS
disposable
extinguisher
flammable
moustaches
safety harness
radiation
helmet
protective
decibel level
respirator
hazardous
face shield
hearing protection
goggles
labels
vibration
ultraviolet light
safety belt
vapour
protective
electrical shock
scaffolding
toxic
poisonous
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Activity 2: Matching
Match the words from the column on the left with the words in the column on the right.
1. __ disposable
a) protective hard hat
2. __ poisonous
b) hair on the face
3. __ flammable
c) device that puts out fires (spray)
4. __ extinguisher
d) use once and then throw out
5. __ respirator
e) protective glasses (plastic)
6. __ decibel level
f)
7. __ safety harness
g) can burn
8. __ beard
h) chemical that can hurt you
9. __ goggles
i)
level of sound (loudness)
10. __ helmet
j)
device that helps you breathe
special belt to stop you from falling
Activity 3: Interview
Ask your classmates about the risks and dangers in their jobs.
1. What kind of job did you do?
2. Did you wear any special equipment (goggles, hard hat, gloves, etc.)? Did you have to
wear it?
3. What were the risks and dangers in your job?
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Health
and
Safety
Activity 4: Identify the problem
With a partner, read the information and decide what the safety risks and dangers are in
these jobs. Write the key words in the risks and dangers box.
Job
Description
Risks and dangers
Millwrights
While some activities occur in industrial
and commercial construction, work is
usually indoors at industrial plants or in
commercial or institutional buildings,
where noise, vibrations and other
hazards are common on the job.
Steamfitters,
pipefitters and
sprinkler system
installers
The work is both indoors and outdoors.
Safety has a high priority. Steamfitters
have to be aware of the dangers of
working on rigging and scaffolding and
in and around trenches. They must
inspect job sites, noting such hazards
as power lines, flammable materials
and unsecured loads.
Tool and die
makers
The work is indoors and involves some
exposure to noise and hazards
requiring the use of safety equipment.
Physical activities may include lifting
and carrying heavy objects and periods
of standing and handling machinery
and material.
Machinists and
machining and
tooling
inspectors
A machinist works indoors, usually in
industrial settings that are noisy and
potentially hazardous. Frequent lifting
and carrying of objects is required, as
are prolonged (long) periods of
standing.
Industrial
electricians
Much of electrical work is done in a
standing position, often in confined
(small) spaces. Risks involved include
falling from a height or receiving an
electrical shock.
Activity 5: Interview
1. Were you ever in an accident in your job? What happened? Did you report the accident?
2. Did you ever see an accident? What happened?
3. What happens if there is an on-the-job accident in other countries?
4. If you are injured on the job in other countries, do you still get paid?
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Health and safety responsibilities
Health and Safety Responsibilities
Duties of the
worker
Use and wear the right safety equipment
Report damaged or missing personal safety equipment
Report any dangerous job to the supervisor
Don’t do a job if you think it’s too dangerous
Help other workers to work safely
Report all hazards
Duties of the
supervisor
Make sure all workers wear and correctly use all equipment
Tell workers the dangers of the job
Explain why they must wear and use safety equipment
Duties of the
company
Make sure all safety equipment is in good condition
Train workers and supervisors in the safe storage and handling rules
Use the MSDS (Materials Safety Data Sheet)
Follow all housekeeping responsibilities for storage, handling and disposal of
toxic materials
Activity 6: Whose responsibility is it?
Write Supervisor, Worker or Company on the line. Look in the chart above to find the
answers.
1. The __________ must make sure all workers wear and correctly use all equipment.
2. The __________ must report any dangerous job to the supervisor.
3. The __________ must make sure all safety equipment is in good condition.
4. The __________ must explain why workers must wear and use safety equipment.
5. The __________ uses and wears the right safety equipment.
6. The __________ must train workers and supervisors in safe storage and handling.
7. The __________ must tell workers of the dangers of the job.
8. The __________ must report missing or damaged personal safety equipment.
9. The __________ must report all hazards.
10. The __________ helps others to work safely.
11. The __________ uses the MSDS (Materials Safety Data Sheet).
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Health
and
Safety
Accident benefits
The Workers Safety Insurance Board (WSIB) is an Ontario government agency that helps
workers who get injured or hurt on the job.
Reporting an accident
How and when do I file a claim for benefits with the WSIB?
You should file a claim with the WSIB if you suffer (have) a work-related illness or injury that
causes you to:
Lose time from work
Lose earnings
Get health care; not just first aid.
How do I file a claim for benefits?
To file a claim for benefits you must:
1. Consent to release of your functional abilities information to your employer.
Your functional abilities information is non-medical information from the doctor treating you.
It tells you and your employer what kinds of work activities your illness or injury permits.
Without this consent, you cannot claim benefits.
You give consent by signing one of the following forms:
The Employer’s Report of Injury/Disease (Form 7)
The Worker’s Report of Injury/Disease (Form 6)
Consent Form 1492
2. Report your illness or injury to the WSIB.
If you sign a Form 7 or Consent Form 1492, your claim will be initiated when your employer
submits the Form 7 to the WSIB. If you choose to complete a Form 6, you must submit this
form to the WSIB to claim all benefits you are entitled to.
When should I file a claim for benefits?
You must file a claim for benefits as soon as possible after being injured or after you become
aware of an illness. You have up to six months to file a claim.
Source: Worker's’ Safety Insurance Board
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Activity 7: True or False?
Read the following sentences and circle T for true statements and F for false statements.
T
F 1. If you have an illness that makes you miss work, you can claim benefits.
T
F 2. If you get health care, you cannot file a claim with the WSIB.
T
F 3. There are four conditions to claim benefits.
T
F 4. You must submit three forms to make a claim.
T
F 5. You must submit Form 6 to the WSIB by yourself.
T
F 6. You have up to one year to make your claim.
T
F 7. You must consent to release of your functional abilities information to your
employer.
Reporting a hazard
Real stories…
Canadian auto workers at Johnson Controls
Four workers, who produce foam cores for car seats, had refused to work because of
recurring sore throats, runny noses, eye irritation and nausea. The symptoms always
occurred shortly after the appearance of “sticky foam”. The symptoms cleared when the
workers were no longer exposed to the foam.
Cathy Walker, the CAW Director of Health and Safety said, “We convinced the inspector
that when the foam was in a certain condition, workers experienced consistent, physical
problems. Any reasonable person would have to refuse, even though they couldn’t say
exactly what the root cause of the problem was."
A gut reaction, an honest belief that one’s health or safety is in danger, is all that is
needed.
The ruling said that symptoms have more weight than measurement criteria. For instance,
if the air samples say that air levels are fine, but the symptoms of the worker still persist,
the MOL should err on the side of caution.
Since the ruling, Johnson Controls re-designed the process involving the application of
the foam. “The high-pressure head (nozzle and hose) that dispenses the foam no longer
leaks, therefore, the workers are no longer exposed,” confirms Walker.
Adapted from Manufacturing Sector Review — Winter 1996.
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Activity 8: Reading comprehension
Answer the questions about the story.
1. What do the workers produce?
2. What were their symptoms?
3. What happened to the symptoms after they were no longer exposed?
4. Who did Cathy Walker talk to?
5. What is all that is needed to refuse to work?
6. What did the ruling say?
7. What did the company do as a result of this ruling?
Activity 9: Group discussion
1. Have you ever had symptoms of bad health in your workplace?
2. What were they?
3. Did you do anything about it?
4. In your work experience, what happened when workers got sick because of their job?
5. In this story, do you think the company would have done anything if nobody had
complained about it? Why or why not?
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Activity 10: Reporting an emergency
In the workplace you might have to report a co-worker’s accident to a supervisor or get help
from someone.
Practise these dialogues in pairs.
Dialogue
Mike:
You won’t believe what happened!
George:
What happened?
Mike:
Tom cut himself and he’s bleeding very badly
George:
Tell him to press on the cut! I’ll get the first aid kit.
Try these…
Tim burned himself with the blow-torch!
Tell him to put cold water on the burn and I’ll get the first aid kit.
Mario hurt himself on the rip saw!
Turn off the power! I’ll call 911.
I poked myself in the eye!
Don’t touch your eye! I’ll take you to emergency.
Bob spilled gasoline over himself!
Tell him to keep calm. I’ll be right there.
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Health
and
Safety
Industry Standards – ISO 9000 and QS 9000
What is ISO 9000?
ISO 9000 is a set of five universal standards for a quality assurance system that is
accepted around the world. It is concerned with “quality management”. It focuses on the
features of a service or product that are required by the customer. It refers to what the
organization does to ensure that a product or service conforms to the customer”s
requirements. In other words, every product is made the same way every time.
The ISO 9000 Series
ISO 9001
It is used by manufacturers that design their own products and build them.
Key words: design, develop, produce, install, service
ISO 9002
It is used by organizations that provide goods or services consistent with designs or
specifications given by the customer.
ISO 9003
This refers to final inspection and test procedures only and is the least detailed of the
series.
What is QS 9000? Is it the same as ISO 9000?
QS 9000 is the automotive industry standard and includes all of ISO 9001 and ISO 9002
plus industry and customer-specific requirements. It was developed by GM, Ford,
Chrysler and heavy truck manufacturers. Companies that supply car makers with parts
also have to be QS9000 certified.
Source: Canada Works, with permission
Activity 11: Discussion
Discuss these questions about ISO with your classmates.
1. Once you know about ISO 9000, you begin to see signs everywhere. When you are
driving or riding the bus, what kinds of companies do you see with ISO 9000 signs?
What kind of products do they make? What kinds of services do they offer?
2. Look at the things in your house. Is anything in your house ISO 9000 certified? If you
have a camera, look at your film. Film has an ISO standard. Credit cards and phone
cards can be used anywhere because ISO says that all of these cards must be no
thicker than .75mm.
3. Do you think ISO 9000 and QS 9000 are good things for organizations? Are they good
for the consumer?
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health and safety information
or more information on…
Workers Safety Insurance Board (WSIB) has industry links for Safe
Workplace Associations, Occupational Health Clinics, and the Workers
Health and Safety Centre. There are also injury report forms that can be
printed and used.
www.wsib.on.ca/wsib/wsibsite.nsf/public/PreventionHSSI
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The Ontario Ministry of Labour has occupational health and safety
information www.gov.on.ca/LAB/main.htm
The Industrial Accident Prevention Association (IAPA) is an excellent
resource for industrial health and safety issues. There are good health and
safety links and a list of their training programs. www.iapa.on.ca/
The Workers Health and Safety Centre is a not-for-profit organization
established by the Ontario Federation of Labour. There is information on
training programs. www.whsc.on.ca/
publications
The Workers Health & Safety Centre produces nine Sector Reviews
with industry health and safety reports and cases. They can be viewed online (click on “publications”).www.whsc.on.ca/
Canada Works, author Judith Bond, has more information on ISO 9000
and information on workplace culture
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Employment
7
EQUIPMENT AND TOOLS
In this unit you will learn about
common equipment and tools
power tools
oxygen and fuel cylinders
Common equipment and tools
Real stories...
Robertson Screwdriver
Sometime around the turn of the century, Peter Lymburner Robertson was setting up a street
booth from which he planned to sell tools, when the slot-headed screwdriver he was using
slipped out of the screw head and slashed open his hand. “There must be a better way,” he
mumbled to himself. He then went on to create the ultimate screwdriver.
P. L. Robertson patented his square-headed driver and screw system in 1908. And not long
after, the Fisher Body Company (famous for constructing the Ford Model T) decided to use
his invention in its production line.
Robertson’s colour-coded screwdrivers—green, red and black from smallest to largest—and
square-headed screws dominate the Canadian fastening market: 85% of the screws sold in
Canada use the Robertson head. After 90 years of production, Americans are finally
accepting the fact that Robertson indeed created a better screwdriver. About 10% of the
screws sold in the U.S. are Robertson.
Activity 1: Discussion
1. Do you own and use a Robertson screwdriver?
2. Is the Robertson screwdriver used in other countries?
3. Can you name three other types of screwdrivers?
4. Can you name, in English, three different types of screwdrivers used by electrical
tradespeople?
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Activity 2: Pronunciation
Listen to the instructor. Mark the syllable stress in these words and phrases, then practise
saying each one. Discuss the meanings with your instructor and classmates.
The following list contains some examples of equipment that might be used by an industrial
tradesperson.
hard hat
rope
pile driver
dolly
safety glasses
cradle
coveralls
roller
safety boots
forklift
gear pullers
dozer
protective clothing
gantry
scaffolding
jack
small crane
grinder
cutting torches
heater
safety belt
lever
pry bars
rollers
jackhammer
laser
welding torches
ladder
sledge hammer
drill
lathe
backhoe
chains & wire sling
scraper
rivet gun
punch
extension cord
nuts
bolts
Activity 3: Repeat the term
This activity is a practice to remember and pronounce equipment names. One person starts
“I’ve used a hard hat”. The next person repeats and adds a new term, “I’ve used a hard hat
and a scraper.” The next person repeats the first two and adds a third.
Activity 4: Group discussion
Discuss these questions with your classmates.
1. What equipment have you used a lot?
2. What equipment have you used a little?
3. What equipment have you never used?
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Equipment
and
Tools
Activity 5: Pronunciation
The following contains some examples of equipment that might be used by an industrial
tradesperson. Listen to the instructor. Mark the syllable stress in these words, then practise
saying each one. Discuss the meanings with your instructor and classmates.
adjustable wrench
pliers
clamp
sockets
combination square
wrench
tool box
scriber
tape measure
chalk
pencil
level
metal markers
hack saw
plumb bob
file
hex wrench
gauge
micrometer
calipers
vise-grip
chisel
pipe wrench
imperial
sliding square
Robertson
bevel gauge
philips
screwdriver
metric
skillsaw
crowbar
drill bits
nail
hammer
slot
Activity 6: Repeat the term
In this activity, practise remembering and pronouncing tool names. One person starts “I’ve
used a chisel”. The next person repeats and adds a new term, “I’ve used a chisel and a
drill.” The next person repeats the first two and adds a third.
Activity 7: Group discussion
Discuss these questions with your classmates.
1. What tools have you used a lot?
2. What tools have you used a little?
3. What tools have you never used?
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Power tools
The following activities contain some practice identifying the parts of power drills and saws.
Activity 8: Light duty drill
Light duty drills are used for drilling, disc sanding, sawing holes, driving screws and grinding.
jaw
chuck
trigger switch
reverse switch
air vents
switch
1. ___________________
2. ___________________
3. ___________________
4. ___________________
5. ___________________
6. ___________________
Activity 9: Sabre saw
Sabre saws are used for cutting internal or external contours.
switch
air vents
slot for edge guide
chuck
shoe or base
auxiliary handle
1. ___________________
2. ___________________
3. ___________________
4. ___________________
5. ___________________
6. ___________________
7. ___________________
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Tools
Activity 10: Quick-cut saws
Hand-held portable quick-cut saws are used for cutting concrete, masonry products, sheet
metal products (steel and aluminium) and light steel sections.
cutting disc
disc guard
starter
knob for guard
fuel tank
adjustment screws
carburettor
choke
handle pre-fitter
stop switch
starter handle
1. _________________________
2. _________________________
3. _________________________
4. _________________________
5. _________________________
6. _________________________
7. _________________________
8. _________________________
9. _________________________
10. ________________________
11. ________________________
SAFETY
These saws create clouds of dust when dry-cutting masonry and showers of
hot sparks when cutting metal products.
Dangers are cuts, kickbacks, carbon monoxide fumes and exposure to dust.
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Activity 11: Survey your classmates
Ask your classmates if they have ever used the tools for these jobs. Write their names in the
boxes if they have. Who has the most experience with these tools and jobs in the class?
tool
job
light duty drill
drilling
sanding
sawing holes
driving screws
grinding
sabre saw
cutting
quick-cut saws
concrete
masonry
sheet metal
light steel
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names
Equipment
and
Tools
Oxygen and fuel cylinders
Industrial work areas have different kinds of cylinders. Common types of cylinders are
oxygen and fuel cylinders.
Activity 12: Matching
The objective of the exercise is to mach the terms to the picture. With your classmates and
instructor, identify the terms.
WHMIS label
outlet pressure gauge
cylinder valve
SAFETY
Store and secure cylinders upright at all times.
pressure adjusting screw
Never strike, roll or expose cylinders to extreme heat
(this can cause fire and explosion.)
cylinder contents gauge
Never drag the torch by the hose.
fire extinguisher
reverse flow check valve
Do not use vise-grips or pipe wrenches to make
connections.
1. __________________________
2. __________________________
3. __________________________
4. __________________________
5. __________________________
6. __________________________
7. __________________________
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Activity 13: Pronunciation
Listen to the instructor. Mark the syllable stress in these words and phrases, then practise
saying each one.
pressure
oxygen
valve
extinguisher
cylinder
fuel
outlet
adjusting
Activity 14: Interview
1. Have you ever used cylinders before? What kind?
2. What kind of job were you working on?
3. What are the dangers of using cylinders?
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Equipment
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Tools
More tools
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Activity 15: Pronunciation
Listen to the instructor. Mark the syllable stress of the tools in the pictures, then practise
saying each one. Discuss the meanings with your instructor and classmates.
diagonal-cutting pliers
adjustable hacksaw
ballpeen hammer
lineman’s pliers
pocket knife
combination square
voltage tester
long-nose pliers
half-round file
centre punch
steel tape
channellock
cold chisel
tool pouch
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Equipment
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Tools
equipment and tools
For more information on…
visit your local library for reference books
visit a bookstore at a college that offers apprenticeship programs
for simple tools and equipment, use Canadian Tire or Home Depot
catalogues
the Construction Safety Association of Ontario publishes a Health and
Safety Manual which lists equipment and tools
The Construction Safety Association of Ontario
74 Victoria St.,
Toronto
M5C 2A5
Phone: 416-674-2726
Fax: 416-674-8866
the Industrial Accident Prevention Association also publishes a
catalogues that offers products related to health and safety, but also other
industry-related things,
www.iapa.on.ca/products/00catalog/pdf/00catalog.pdf
to find out exactly what your trade uses, visit the federal government
Essential Skills Web site: www15.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/english
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8
WORKPLACE TASKS
In this unit you will learn about
daily tasks
describing what you can do
Daily tasks
It is important to know what English terms to use to describe what you do in a job. The
following activities focus on terms related to actions (verbs) and equipment and/or materials
(nouns) that you would use to describe the job that you do. Different tradespeople do
different work, but some work is similar.
Millwrights
Activity 1: Pronunciation
Listen to the instructor. Mark the syllable stress in these words and phrases, then practise
saying each one. Discuss the meanings with your classmates and instructor.
Actions (verbs)
Equipment and machines (nouns)
examine
diagrams
Install (set up)
drawings
operate
malfunction
inspect
mechanical equipment
repair
Power tools
adjust
lifting devices
investigate
machinery
replace
stationary industrial machinery
clean
handtools
lubricate
foundations
construct
defective parts
assemble
welding equipment
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Activity 2: Matching
Match the actions (verbs) on the left with the words (nouns) on the right. In some cases
some verbs will match with more than one word. Discuss this with your classmates.
1. __ read
a) hand tools
2. __ examine
b) welding equipment
3. __ clean
c) foundations
4. __ investigate
d) defective parts
5. __ install
e) malfunction
6. __ adjust
f)
7. __ lubricate
g) lifting devices
8. __ operate
h) power tools
9. __ repair
i)
diagrams
10. __ construct
j)
drawings
11. __ inspect
k) stationary industrial machinery
12. __ replace
l)
machinery
mechanical equipment
Activity 3: Describe yourself
Write sentences about yourself. For example, “I can replace mechanical equipment.”
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
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Workplace
Tasks
Steamfitters, pipefitters and sprinkler system installers
Activity 4: Pronunciation
Listen to the instructor. Mark the syllable stress in these words and phrases, then practise
saying each one. Discuss the meanings with your classmates and instructor.
Actions (verbs)
Equipment and machines (nouns)
read
drawings
interpret
specifications
cut
openings for pipe
select
pipe
measure
joints
remove and replace
system for leaks
thread
pipe units
bend
worn components
weld
cost estimates
cement
fittings
solder
prepare
clean
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Activity 5: Matching
Match the actions (verbs) on the left with the words (nouns) on the right. In some cases
some verbs will match with more than one word. Discuss this with your classmates.
1. __ read
a) drawings
2. __ interpret
b) pipe
3. __ clean
c) size of pipe required
4. __ cut
d) pipe to required shape
5. __ select
e) joints to join pipes
6. __ measure
f)
7. __ remove and replace
g) pipe units
8. __ bend
h) worn components
9. __ weld
i)
for leaks
cost estimates
10. __ cement
11. __ solder
12. __ thread
13. __ prepare
Activity 6: Describe yourself
Write sentences about yourself. For example, “I can solder joints to join pipes.”
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
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Tasks
Tool and die makers
Activity 7: Pronunciation
Listen to the instructor. Mark the syllable stress in these words and phrases, then practise
saying each one. Discuss the meanings with your classmates and instructor.
Actions (verbs)
Equipment and machines (nouns)
read
drawings
compute
dimensions
measure
metal stock or castings
position
a variety of machine tools
operate
work piece
grind
machined parts
assemble
casting
fit
metal moulds
machine
completed tools, dies, jigs
inspect
test
Activity 8: Matching
Match the actions (verbs) on the left with the words (nouns) on the right. In some cases
some verbs will match with more than one word. Discuss this with your classmates.
1. __ operate
a) completed tools, dies, jigs
2. __ read
b) casting
3. __ machine
c) metal moulds
4. __ compute
d) work piece
5. __ grind
e) machined parts
6. __ inspect
f)
7. __ measure
g) metal stock or castings
8. __ assemble
h) dimensions
9. __ test
i)
a variety of machine tools
drawings
10. __ fit
11. __ position
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Activity 9: Describe yourself
Write sentences about yourself. For example, “I can test completed tools.”
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Machinists and machining and tooling inspectors
Activity 10: Pronunciation
Listen to the instructor. Mark the syllable stress in these words and phrases, then practise
saying each one. Discuss the meanings with your classmates and instructor.
Actions (verbs)
Equipment and machines (nouns)
perform
blueprints
compute
dimensions
measure
work pieces
set up
a variety of machine tools
fit
precision machining operations
verify
machined metal parts
adjust
dimensions of products
operate
machine tools
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Workplace
Tasks
Activity 11: Matching
Match the actions (verbs) on the left with the words (nouns) on the right. In some cases
some verbs will match with more than one word. Discuss this with your classmates.
1. __ read
a) blueprints
2. __ compute
b) dimensions
3. __ measure
c) work pieces
4. __ set up
d) a variety of machine tools
5. __ fit
e) precision machining operations
6. __ verify
f)
7. __ adjust
g) dimensions of products
8. __ perform
h) machine tools
machined metal parts
9. __ operate
Activity 12: Describe yourself
Write sentences about yourself. For example, “I can compute dimensions.”
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
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Industrial electricians
Activity 13: Pronunciation
Listen to the instructor. Mark the syllable stress in these words and phrases, then practise
saying each one. Discuss the meanings with your classmates and instructor.
Actions (verbs)
Equipment and machines (nouns)
read
drawings
install
electrical code specifications
replace
electrical wiring
test
receptacles
maintain
switch boxes
troubleshoot
lighting fixtures
conduct
electronic equipment
transformers
electrical motors
electronic control systems
preventive maintenance programs
Activity 14: Matching
Match the actions (verbs) on the left with the words (nouns) on the right. In some cases
some verbs will match with more than one word. Discuss this with your classmates.
1. __ read
a) preventive maintenance programs
2. __ install
b) electrical code specifications
3. __ replace
c) electrical wiring
4. __ test
d) receptacles
5. __ maintain
e) switch boxes
6. __ troubleshoot
f)
7. __ conduct
g) electronic equipment
lighting fixtures
h) transformers
i)
electrical motors
j)
electronic control systems
k) preventive maintenance programs
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Workplace
Tasks
Activity 15: Describe yourself
Write sentences about yourself. For example, “I can troubleshoot electronic control
systems.”
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Describing what you can do
Activity 16: Report
Write a report about one of your classmates. Choose a partner and have him or her tell you
about a project that he or she worked on before. Use as much vocabulary as you can.
Ask about these things:
1. What the project was
2. Where the project was
3. When the project was
4. What your partner’s job was
5. What jobs did he/she have to do
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job duties
For more information on…
Ontario Job Futures 2000 has an excellent description of duties. Visit
www.on.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/english/lmi and follow the links to Job Futures
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The federal government department of Human Resources Development
Canada (HRDC) has an excellent description of different skill
requirements for jobs at its Essential Skills Web site: www15.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/english/
The National Occupational Classification gives much information
related to job duties: www.worklogic.com:81/noc/overview/overview.html
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Employment
9
COMMUNICATION
In this unit you will learn about
communication situations for your workplace
talking with co-workers
language for borrowing
offering to help
apologizing
networking
Important communication situations
In the workplace, industrial trades workers….
• give information to supervisors or co-workers, usually in person and sometimes using a
walkie-talkie
• take direction from supervisors or more experienced workers in regard to safety hazards,
problems, work progress and how to complete jobs
• talk with co-workers to discuss procedures, to ask or answer questions, to plan tasks, to
borrow tools and to ensure supplies are provided and jobs are done safely
• talk with workers from other trades, to exchange ideas, plan work or resolve
disagreements. For example, the surveyor helper/instrument person talks with heavy
equipment operators about how much earth to remove
• talk with suppliers, when purchasing or receiving supplies and tools, to determine prices
or to ask how to repair equipment
• may participate in group discussions at staff meetings and at training courses, to discuss
safety, goals, procedures, job time-frames and projects
• may read labels on products and chemicals, listing information on product ingredients,
instructions for use, warnings and emergency procedures
• may read procedure and regulation manuals and refer to Workplace Hazardous Materials
Information System (WHMIS) manuals when using new products
• may fill out reports or maintenance sheets, after installing or servicing products for
customers.
Source: Ontario Job Futures, 2000
Every trade has its own special situations and vocabulary but many situations are common to
most trades workers. The following is a list of important workplace communication
situations for trades workers in Ontario. Do these situations match your own experience?
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Activity 1: Discussion
After discussing these situations with your class and teacher, talk with a partner about the
communication situations you have taken part in your previous job.
For example, “In China, I had to read labels on products and chemicals.”
Activity 2: Talking with co-workers
Look at the example dialogue, then practise with a partner.
Example
A. Did Mark install the engine yet?
B. Yes, he did. He already installed it.
A. Great. When did he do it?
A. He installed it this morning.
1. George
install the engine
this morning
6. Frank
lubricate the motor
cut the opening for the pipe in the wall
a little while ago
this morning
2. Lee
7. Mario
fix the welding equipment
test the pipes for leaks
a few minutes ago
yesterday afternoon
3. Roger
8. Alberto
measure the steel plates
remove the broken glass
an hour ago
At lunchtime
4. Dimitri
9. John and Wong
fix the generator
set up the scaffolding
yesterday
a little while ago
5. you
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Mark
10. Paul
find the blueprints
measure the brackets
just found them
two hours ago
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Communication
Activity 3: Borrowing and lending
Practise these dialogues with a partner. Use the tools and equipment vocabulary in the box
or any others you can think of.
Grammar point: Can I borrow a hammer = Can you lend me a hammer
Example 1
A. Can I borrow the saw?
B. Sure, here you are.
A. Thanks.
later
B. Are you finished with the saw yet?
A. Sure. Thanks. Here you go.
Example 2
A. Can you lend me the hammer?
B. Sorry. Can you wait just a few minutes?
A. Ok. No problem.
later
B. Are you finished with the hammer yet?
helmet
drill
measuring tape
wrench
instruction manual
goggles
oil
toolbox
ladder
jack
dolly
pliers
A. Just a sec. I’ll bring it right over.
Activity 4: Offering to help and making a request
Practise these dialogues with a partner.
Offering to help
Mike: Do you want me to help you set up the ladder?
Wong: Sure. If you don’t mind.
take down the scaffold?
Mike: Not at all. I’m not that busy right now.
install the switchboards?
Wong: Thanks. That’d be great.
put away the extension cords?
test the lighting fixtures?
hang up the ladders?
measure the work pieces?
lift those boards?
set up the machine tools?
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Making a request
Mike: Could you please give this tool belt to
Carlos?
help Van with the frames?
Wong: Sure. I’ll give it to him right away.
get the sabre saw from the tool shed?
Mike: Thanks. That’s great.
call John about that order?
Wong: Sure. No problem.
plug this extension cord in over there?
check the blueprints again?
see if the delivery came yet?
tighten the bolts a little tighter?
take notes at the meeting for me?
Activity 5: Apologizing
Practise these dialogues with a partner.
Dialogue 1
Worker A:
I’m sorry that I couldn’t work overtime yesterday.
Worker B:
That’s all right.
Worker A:
The reason is that I had to take my daughter to the doctor.
Worker B:
I understand. Don’t worry about it.
Try these….
come in early today
go to the dentist
clean up on Saturday
take my wife to the airport
finish taking down the machine
go the WHMIS meeting
unload that truck last night
go to a meeting at my daughter’s school
come to the meeting this morning
take my son to day-care
Dialogue 2
Worker A:
I’m really sorry, but I won’t be able to work this weekend.
Worker B:
Oh? Why not?
Worker A:
I have to move to a new apartment on Saturday.
Worker B:
No problem. It’s okay.
Try these…
unload the truck
finish taking down the scaffolding
leave work early today
finish cleaning up
finish moving the steel
go to the whmis meeting
work next Saturday
i have to go to a wedding out of town
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Employment
Communication
Networking
Your network includes everyone in your life. Your network is probably much bigger than
you think! People in your network can help you and you can help them. You should learn
what you can about each individual. Acknowledge their skills, experiences, talents and
needs. The people you know are “warm” leads. It’s much easier to build on that warmth by
expanding your knowledge of these people, than it is to pursue “cold” leads.
Family
Members of your family are individual with skills and
backgrounds. You can tap into their knowledge and their networks.
Friends
Your friends have skills you may not be aware of and they have
their own networks. Ask to be introduced.
Neighbours
Because you live close by, you have the chance to develop close
relationships. Find out who your neighbours are. You know you
already have one thing in common—your choice of residence.
Professionals in
your field
People who share the same career choice can advise and support
each other on common issues.
Suppliers
Because you do business with them anyway it is easier to find out
more about them and find out if they might need your services.
Clients
You serve them and you have built up a relationship of trust. Ask
them to serve you in various ways, as suppliers, supporters and
referrals.
Co-workers
Find out about their skills and knowledge. You may be able to help
each other.
Clubs or
association
members
If you are involved with any community or professional
associations or activities, you have a ready-made network. Most
people join these groups to meet others. The door is already open.
Volunteer
groups
One of the reasons people volunteer is to meet others. Get to know
your fellow volunteers better.
Acquaintances
These are people who you meet in work and social settings. Don’t
waste the opportunity to begin friendships and networks this way.
Ask each person you meet to tell you more about him or herself.
Activity 6: Discussion
1.
Everyone you know is part of your network. Name three people in your life and say how
they can help you make connections.
2.
What is a “warm lead”?
3.
What would be an example of a “cold” lead?
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Activity 7: Find someone who…
For each of the lines below, find someone in your group who has the knowledge or
experience that is described. Use this activity to practise networking with the people in this
workshop.
1.
... taking/took a workplace training course.
2.
... belonged to a union.
3.
... has worked in Ontario before.
4.
... knows how to do computer assisted design (CAD).
5.
.... installed big machinery.
6.
... has hired workers before.
7
... had a job interview in Ontario.
8.
... knows how to install a sprinkler system.
9.
... knows how to read blueprints.
1
0.
... has ordered materials at work before.
1
1.
... has taught a safety course before.
1
2.
... has reported an accident before.
1
3.
... has seen an accident before.
1
4.
... has been an apprentice.
1
5.
... has worked as a supervisor.
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For more information on…
job duties
Essential Skills Profiles is a federal government collection of information
on workplace tasks www15.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/english/
for occupation definitions, check the National Occupational Classification
www.worklogic.com:81/noc/overview/overview.html
for job duties by trade, see Ontario Job Futures 2000 www.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/english/lmi/ and follow the links or try
www.ontariojobfutures.net
English as a second language
check your local library for resources
AlphaPlus Centre has links for finding ESL programs, click on find others
www.alphaplus.ca/mainframe.htm
also at AlphaPlus, click on Library Services and then on the AlphaPlus
Index to Web Resources. Type English as a second language in the
search box for a list of on-line ESL study sites
for other on-line resources, visit Dave’s ESL Café
www.pacificnet.net/~sperling/
Canada Works, author Judith Bond, has information on workplace culture
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10
PERSONAL PLAN
In this unit you will
assess your skills and knowledge
make a personal plan for the near future
discover community resources to help newcomers
You will also
make a personal plan for the next steps to take
Self-assessment
This self-assessment will help you think about your previous education, training, and
experience, your skills and knowledge, your interests, and help you make a plan of action.
The steps for this self-assessment are to:
1. consider your personal characteristics;
2. list your training, experience, and industry skills;
3. know what you want in terms of employment;
4. make a list of the first steps.
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Activity 1: Assess your personal characteristics
Answer the questions with a yes or no. These personal characteristics are seen as
important for success in your workplace. If you feel that you don’t have these characteristics,
think about strategies that you can use instead.
Questions
Yes
Personal characteristics and work
ethics
Do you have patience do deal with repetitive
tasks and complicated jobs?
Are you willing to learn about new materials
and procedures?
Are you willing to learn how to use more
sophisticated computer-controlled machines?
Are you team-oriented and able to take
direction from others?
Do you get things done on time?
Do you adapt easily to changing conditions?
Communication and social skills
Can you communicate clearly and effectively
in English both orally and in writing?
Can you interact with co-workers to discuss
procedures (borrowing tools, jobs are done
safely)?
Can you relay information to supervisors or
co-workers?
Can you take direction from supervisors or
more experienced workers in regard to safety
hazards, problems, work progress and how to
complete jobs?
Are you knowledgeable about labour laws?
Can you participate in formal meetings about
work processes or product improvement?
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No
Strategies…
Personal
Plan
Activity 2: Make an inventory of your skills and training
These questions focus on your skills and training. First, go through all the questions and
answer yes or no. Then, go back and look at all the questions for which you answered no.
Try to think about what you can do to gain this knowledge or these skills. Are there courses
that you can take to help? Are there people who can help you? Are there ideas that you
need to reconsider?
Questions
Yes
No
What can I do next?
Technology
Can you use a computer?
Are you able to use the Internet to do
research?
Education and training
Do you have the training that you need for
working in your trade?
Is certification or registration required in
Ontario for your occupation?
Do you have the certificate, diploma or degree
required to work in your occupation?
Training and upgrading
Do you think you need upgrading or extra
training before you look for a job?
Do you know where you can get training in
your field?
If you were trained overseas, do you need to
upgrade your certification?
If so, have you collected information about
certification in Canada?
If not, do you know where to get this
information?
Do you know what English skills you need to
work on?
Do you need to find a special ESL class?
Are you prepared to lose your savings?
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Activity 3: A personal plan
Take all the NOs and make a short term plan. Choose five steps that you feel you can
accomplish this year and list them here:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
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Personal
Plan
Activity 4: Research
To help you achieve your personal plan, use training and upgrading pamphlets, flyers and
calendars to find information for training and upgrading opportunities in your field.
Type of training
Training providers
Cost
English as a
second language
(ESL)
ESL / computers
English
upgrading
Job search
programs
Workshops on
how to upgrade
Co-op programs
Workplace
communications
Volunteering
opportunities
Other
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Employment
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volunteering
For more information on…
visit Charity Village’s Web site at www.charityvillage.com for a listing of
volunteer jobs in the non-profit sector
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Steps
visit www.voe-reb.org/welcome.html for a matching service for volunteers
and agencies across Canada
look in the Yellow Pages for volunteer centres in your city
community programs
look for pamphlets advertising community workshops
look for any ESL/small business classes, seminars or workshops in your
community
check your local community college
training and upgrading
for private colleges and vocational schools, look in the Yellow Pages under
computer training
for a list of Ontario Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology, visit the
Ministry of Education and Training Web site: www.edu.gov.on.ca
visit the HRDC Interactive Training Inventory Service for Ontario at
www.trainingiti.com
connect to the Ontario Ministry of Education and Training’s Training
Hotline at 1-800-387-5656
language training/ESL
free ESL and word processing courses are available through the catalogues
for boards of education and the bulletin boards at your local library
to
Employment
11
GLOSSARY
adjust
arrange, put in order, regulate
administer
to manage or provide a service
apprenticeship
a contract between an employer and someone who is learning a trade
assemble
to put together from different parts
automated
works by itself (automatically)
beard
facial hair
benefits
dental, medical, vacation plans that your employer provides
blueprint
photographic engineering plan of something that will be built
carpenter
craftsman in woodwork
certification
having a certificate of license to work in a trade
collective agreement
an agreement between the employer and the union regarding work duties and pay
combustible
can burn
commercial builder
a builder who does not build houses
compensation
money you get for being injured at work
corrosive
able to wear away or decay something
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decibel
sound level (measurement)
deduct
to take away (tax from your paycheque)
defective
not working properly – something is wrong
documentation
proof of what you say you are or have (passport, licence, etc.)
dolly
device on wheels that is pushed by hand to transport things
drywall
wall material without mortar
electrician
person who is licensed to install/maintain electrical systems
fabricate
to make or manufacture
flammable
can burn (easy to burn: oil, gas)
gauge
instrument for measuring (heat, pressure)
goggles
glasses that protect your eyes when working (plastic)
hard skills
things you have learned to do (e.g. install an electrical system)
hazardous
dangerous
install
to put in, set up something new
jack
a device used to raise something
jig
a device to hold a workpiece so you can work on it
lathe
machine for shaping wood or metal
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Glossary
lay out
to put out or arrange before assembling or installing
lubricate
to oil or grease (machine)
maintain
to keep in good working order
malfunction
something that causes a machine to break down
mill
a factory (paper mill or steel mill)
millwright
a person who can install industrial machinery
mine
the process or place where minerals are taken from the ground
mould
pattern, template or hollow form for making things
network
people who you know or can use to get information
overhaul
to redo or repair a machine or system that is old or not working
overtime
working longer than the time you are required to do
pipefitter
a person who can fit, install and repair pipe systems
plumber
a person who works with water systems
poisonous
can poison (substance that can injure of kill)
precision
degree of accurate measurement
qualified
a person who has the proper licence or certificate or experience to do a job
receptacle
an electrical outlet
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refrigeration
the process of keeping things cool
residential builder
a builder that builds houses, condominiums, etc.
respirator
an apparatus put over the nose and mouth that is a filter (e.g. so you do not breathe gas)
salary
your earnings from your job (usually referring to yearly or monthly income)
scaffolding
a temporary structure made of tubes or poles providing workmen with platforms to stand on
while working
soft skills
able to work with people, communicate effectively
sprinkler system
a water system in a building that activates when there is a fire
terminology
words that associated with a particular subject or group (e.g. trade terminology)
toxic
poisonous (can harm you)
troubleshoot
to guess what the problem is (e.g. figure out why the machine is not working)
wage
money you get for doing work (usually refers to hourly rate)
welder
a person whose trade it is to join pieces of metal by heating
WSIB
Workers Safety Insurance Board (Government of Ontario)
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