Consolidated (unofficial) AMC&GM to Annex VII - EASA

Consolidated (unofficial) AMC&GM to Annex VII - EASA
Consolidated unofficial AMC/GM to Annex VII (Part-NCO)
European Aviation Safety Agency
Acceptable Means of Compliance (AMC)
and Guidance Material (GM)
to
Annex VII – Part-NCO
Consolidated version including Issue 2, Amendment 21
20 February 2015
1
For the date of entry into force of this amendment, refer to Decision 2015/004/R in the Official
Publication of the Agency.
Page 1
Consolidated unofficial AMC/GM to Annex VII (Part-NCO)
Disclaimer
This consolidated document containing AMC/GM to Annex VII (Part-NCO) to Commission Regulation
(EU) No 965/2012 on air operations includes the initial issue of and all subsequent amendments to
the AMC/GM associated with this Annex.
It is an unofficial courtesy document, intended for the easy use of stakeholders, and is meant purely
as a documentation tool. The Agency does not assume any liability for its contents.
The official documents can be found at http://www.easa.europa.eu/document-library/officialpublication.
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AMC/GM TO ANNEX VII (PART-NCO)
SUMMARY OF AMENDMENTS
Summary of amendments
Chapter
Action
Issue
no.
GM1 NCO.GEN.115
New
AMC1 NCO.GEN.155
Editorial
Issue 2,
Amdt. 2
AMC1 NCO.IDE.A.120(a)(4) &
NCO.IDE.A.125(a)(4)
Editorial
Reg. (EU) 2015/140 (Sterile Flight
Deck procedure);
ED Decision 2015/004/R
AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.120(a)(4) &
NCO.IDE.H.125(a)(4)
Editorial
AMC1 NCO.IDE.S.115(a)(4) &
NCO.IDE.S.120(d)
Editorial
GM1 NCO.GEN.125
Amended
ED Decision 2014/031/R (PED II)
GM2 NCO.GEN.125
Amended
Issue 2,
Amdt. 1
GM3 NCO.GEN.125
Deleted
Issue 2
Reg. (EU) No 379/2014 (SPO, CAT
sailplanes & balloons, CAT A-A);
ED Decision 2014/016/R
AMC1 NCO.GEN.105(c)
New
AMC1 NCO.GEN.155
Amended
AMC2 NCO.GEN.155
Amended
GM1 NCO.GEN.155
Amended
GM2 NCO.GEN.155
New
GM1 NCO.POL.105
Amended
GM1 NCO.IDE.A.100(a)
Amended
GM1 NCO.IDE.A.100(b)
New
GM1 NCO.IDE.A.100(b)&(c)
Amended
AMC2 NCO.IDE.A.140
Amended
AMC2 NCO.IDE.A.170
Amended
AMC3 NCO.IDE.A.170
Amended
GM1 NCO.IDE.A.170
New
AMC1 NCO.IDE.A.175
Amended
AMC1 NCO.IDE.A.180
Amended
GM1 NCO.IDE.A.195 re-numbered as
NCO.IDE.A.190
Renumbered
GM1 NCO.IDE.H.100(a)
Amended
GM1 NCO.IDE.H.100(b)
New
GM1 NCO.IDE.H.100(b)&(c) renumbered as GM1 NCO.IDE.H.100(c)
Renumbered
AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.120(a)(5) – the title
Amended
Amended by Regulation / ED
Decision
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AMC/GM TO ANNEX VII (PART-NCO)
SUMMARY OF AMENDMENTS
AMC2 NCO.IDE.H.140
Amended
AMC2 NCO.IDE.H.170
Amended
AMC3 NCO.IDE.H.170
Amended
GM1 NCO.IDE.H.170
New
AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.175
Amended
AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.185
New
GM1 NCO.IDE.S.100(a)
Amended
GM1 NCO.IDE.S.100(b)
New
GM1 NCO.IDE.S.100(b)&(c) renumbered as GM1 NCO.IDE.S.100(c)
Renumbered
AMC1 NCO.IDE.S.115&NCO.IDE.S.120
Amended
AMC1 NCO.IDE.S.135(b)
Amended
AMC3 NCO.IDE.S.135(b)
Amended
GM1 NCO.IDE.S.135(b)
New
GM2 NCO.IDE.S.140
Amended
GM1 NCO.IDE.B.100(a)
Amended
GM1 NCO.IDE.B.100(b)
New
GM1 NCO.IDE.B.100(b)&(c) renumbered as GM1 NCO.IDE.B.100(c)
Renumbered
AMC1 NCO.IDE.B.110
Amended
GM1 NCO.IDE.B.115(b)(3)
New
AMC1 NCO.IDE.B.125 – the title
Amended
AMC1 NCO.IDE.B.130(b)
Amended
AMC3 NCO.IDE.B.130(b)
Amended
GM1 NCO.IDE.B.130(b)
New
GM1 NCO.IDE.B.135 re-numbered as
GM1 NCO.IDE.B.130(d)
Renumbered
AMC1 NCO.IDE.B.140 (c)(1)
New
Subpart E – Specific requirements
New
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AMC/GM TO ANNEX VII (PART-NCO)
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Table of contents
Subpart A — General requirements .......................................................................................................................... 15
GM1 NCO.GEN.105 Pilot-in-command responsibilities and authority ...................................................................... 15
GENERAL ................................................................................................................................................................ 15
GM1 NCO.GEN.105(a)(8) Pilot-in-command responsibilities and authority ............................................................. 15
RECORDING UTILISATION DATA............................................................................................................................. 15
AMC1 NCO.GEN.105(c) Pilot-in-command responsibilities and authority ................................................................ 15
CHECKLISTS ............................................................................................................................................................ 15
GM1 NCO.GEN.105(d) Pilot-in-command responsibilities and authority .................................................................. 16
REPORTING OF HAZARDOUS FLIGHT CONDITIONS................................................................................................ 16
AMC1 NCO.GEN.105(e) Pilot-in-command responsibilities and authority ................................................................ 16
VIOLATION REPORTING ......................................................................................................................................... 16
GM1 NCO.GEN.106(b) Pilot-in-command responsibilities and authority — balloons............................................... 16
PROTECTIVE CLOTHING ......................................................................................................................................... 16
GM1 NCO.GEN.115 Taxiing of aeroplanes ................................................................................................................. 16
SAFETY-CRITICAL ACTIVITY..................................................................................................................................... 16
GM1 NCO.GEN.115(b)(4) Taxiing of aeroplanes ........................................................................................................ 17
SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE ....................................................................................................................................... 17
GM1 NCO.GEN.120 Rotor engagement ..................................................................................................................... 17
INTENT OF THE RULE ............................................................................................................................................. 17
GM1 NCO.GEN.125 Portable electronic devices ....................................................................................................... 18
DEFINITIONS .......................................................................................................................................................... 18
GM2 NCO.GEN.125 Portable electronic devices ....................................................................................................... 18
GENERAL ................................................................................................................................................................ 18
AMC1 NCO.GEN.130 Information on emergency and survival equipment carried ................................................... 19
CONTENT OF INFORMATION ................................................................................................................................. 19
AMC1 NCO.GEN.135(a)(3) Documents, manuals and information to be carried ...................................................... 19
CERTIFICATE OF AIRWORTHINESS ......................................................................................................................... 19
AMC1 NCO.GEN.135(a)(10) Documents, manuals and information to be carried .................................................... 19
CURRENT AND SUITABLE AERONAUTICAL CHARTS ............................................................................................... 19
GM1 NCO.GEN.135 Documents, manuals and information to be carried................................................................. 20
GENERAL ................................................................................................................................................................ 20
GM1 NCO.GEN.135(a)(1) Documents, manuals and information to be carried ........................................................ 20
AFM OR EQUIVALENT DOCUMENT ........................................................................................................................ 20
AIRCRAFT FLIGHT MANUAL (AFM) — BALLOONS .................................................................................................. 20
GM1 NCO.GEN.135(a)(8) Documents, manuals and information to be carried ........................................................ 20
JOURNEY LOG OR EQUIVALENT ............................................................................................................................. 20
GM1 NCO.GEN.135(a)(11) Documents, manuals and information to be carried ...................................................... 20
PROCEDURES AND VISUAL SIGNALS FOR USE BY INTERCEPTING AND INTERCEPTED AIRCRAFT .......................... 20
GM1 NCO.GEN.135(a)(13) Documents, manuals and information to be carried ...................................................... 21
DOCUMENTS THAT MAY BE PERTINENT TO THE FLIGHT ....................................................................................... 21
STATES CONCERNED WITH THE FLIGHT ................................................................................................................. 21
AMC1 NCO.GEN.140(d) Transport of dangerous goods ............................................................................................ 21
DANGEROUS GOODS ACCIDENT AND INCIDENT REPORTING................................................................................ 21
GM1 NCO.GEN.140(a) Transport of dangerous goods .............................................................................................. 23
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
GENERAL ................................................................................................................................................................ 23
AMC1 NCO.GEN.150 Journey log............................................................................................................................... 24
GENERAL ................................................................................................................................................................ 24
AMC1 NCO.GEN.155 Minimum equipment list ......................................................................................................... 24
CONTENT AND APPROVAL OF THE MEL ................................................................................................................ 24
AMC2 NCO.GEN.155 Minimum equipment list ......................................................................................................... 26
FORMAT OF THE MEL ............................................................................................................................................ 26
AMC3 NCO.GEN.155 Minimum equipment list ......................................................................................................... 26
EXTENT OF THE MEL .............................................................................................................................................. 26
AMC4 NCO.GEN.155 Minimum equipment list ......................................................................................................... 26
OPERATIONAL AND MAINTENANCE PROCEDURES ................................................................................................ 26
AMC5 NCO.GEN.155 Minimum equipment list ......................................................................................................... 26
OPERATIONAL AND MAINTENANCE PROCEDURES — APPLICABLE CHANGES ...................................................... 26
GM1 NCO.GEN.155 Minimum equipment list ........................................................................................................... 27
GENERAL ................................................................................................................................................................ 27
GM2 NCO.GEN.155 Minimum equipment list ........................................................................................................... 27
SCOPE OF THE MEL ................................................................................................................................................ 27
GM3 NCO.GEN.155 Minimum equipment list ........................................................................................................... 27
PURPOSE OF THE MEL ........................................................................................................................................... 27
GM4 NCO.GEN.155 Minimum equipment list ........................................................................................................... 28
OPERATIONAL AND MAINTENANCE PROCEDURES ................................................................................................ 28
Subpart B — Operational procedures ........................................................................................................................... 29
GM1 NCO.OP.100 Use of aerodromes and operating sites ....................................................................................... 29
BALLOONS .............................................................................................................................................................. 29
AMC1 NCO.OP.110 Aerodrome operating minima — aeroplanes and helicopters .................................................. 29
TAKE-OFF OPERATIONS.......................................................................................................................................... 29
AMC2 NCO.OP.110 Aerodrome operating minima — aeroplanes and helicopters .................................................. 29
VISUAL APPROACH................................................................................................................................................. 29
AMC3 NCO.OP.110 Aerodrome operating minima — aeroplanes and helicopters .................................................. 29
EFFECT ON LANDING MINIMA OF TEMPORARILY FAILED OR DOWNGRADED GROUND EQUIPMENT ................. 29
GM1 NCO.OP.110 Aerodrome operating minima — aeroplanes and helicopters .................................................... 30
COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE INFORMATION ......................................................................................................... 30
GM2 NCO.OP.110 Aerodrome operating minima — aeroplanes and helicopters .................................................... 30
VERTICAL PATH CONTROL...................................................................................................................................... 30
GM3 NCO.OP.110 Aerodrome operating minima — aeroplanes and helicopters .................................................... 30
CRITERIA FOR ESTABLISHING RVR/CMV ................................................................................................................ 30
GM4 NCO.OP.110 Aerodrome operating minima — aeroplanes and helicopters .................................................... 31
DETERMINATION OF RVR/CMV/VIS MINIMA FOR NPA, APV, CAT I — AEROPLANES ........................................... 31
DETERMINATION OF RVR/CMV/VIS MINIMA FOR NPA, CAT I — HELICOPTERS.................................................... 35
GM5 NCO.OP.110 Aerodrome operating minima — aeroplanes and helicopters .................................................... 37
CONVERSION OF REPORTED METEOROLOGICAL VISIBILITY TO RVR/CMV ............................................................ 37
GM6 NCO.OP.110 Aerodrome operating minima — aeroplanes and helicopters .................................................... 37
AIRCRAFT CATEGORIES .......................................................................................................................................... 37
GM7 NCO.OP.110 Aerodrome operating minima — aeroplanes and helicopters .................................................... 38
CONTINUOUS DESCENT FINAL APPROACH (CDFA) — AEROPLANES ..................................................................... 38
GM8 NCO.OP.110 Aerodrome operating minima — aeroplanes and helicopters .................................................... 39
ONSHORE AERODROME DEPARTURE PROCEDURES — HELICOPTERS .................................................................. 39
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AMC/GM TO ANNEX VII (PART-NCO)
TABLE OF CONTENTS
AMC1 NCO.OP.111 Aerodrome operating minima — NPA, APV, CAT I operations .................................................. 40
NPA FLOWN WITH THE CDFA TECHNIQUE ............................................................................................................ 40
GM1 NCO.OP.112 Aerodrome operating minima — circling operations with aeroplanes ....................................... 40
SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION ............................................................................................................................ 40
AMC1 NCO.OP.130 Passenger briefing ...................................................................................................................... 43
GENERAL ................................................................................................................................................................ 43
SAILPLANES ............................................................................................................................................................ 43
BALLOONS .............................................................................................................................................................. 43
AMC1 NCO.OP.145 Refuelling with passengers embarking, on board or disembarking ........................................... 44
OPERATIONAL PROCEDURES ................................................................................................................................. 44
AMC1 NCO.OP.150 Carriage of passengers ............................................................................................................... 44
CARRIAGE OF CHILDREN AND PERSONS WITH REDUCED MOBILITY — BALLOONS .............................................. 44
AMC1 NCO.OP.160 Meteorological conditions ......................................................................................................... 44
APPLICATION OF AERODROME FORECASTS (TAF & TREND) — AEROPLANES AND HELICOPTERS ........................ 44
GM1 NCO.OP.160 Meteorological conditions ........................................................................................................... 45
CONTINUATION OF A FLIGHT — AEROPLANES AND HELICOPTERS ....................................................................... 45
GM2 NCO.OP.160 Meteorological conditions ........................................................................................................... 45
EVALUATION OF METEOROLOGICAL CONDITIONS — AEROPLANES AND HELICOPTERS ...................................... 45
GM1 NCO.OP.170(b) Ice and other contaminants — flight procedures ................................................................... 46
KNOWN ICING CONDITIONS .................................................................................................................................. 46
AMC1 NCO.OP.176 Take-off conditions — balloons ................................................................................................. 46
FACILITIES AT THE TAKE-OFF SITE .......................................................................................................................... 46
AMC1 NCO.OP.205 Approach and landing conditions — aeroplanes and helicopters ............................................. 46
LANDING DISTANCE/FATO SUITABILITY ................................................................................................................. 46
AMC1 NCO.OP.210 Commencement and continuation of approach — aeroplanes and helicopters ....................... 46
VISUAL REFERENCES FOR NPA, APV AND CAT I OPERATIONS ............................................................................... 46
GM1 NCO.OP.215 Operational limitations — hot-air balloons ................................................................................. 46
AVOIDANCE OF NIGHT LANDING ........................................................................................................................... 46
Subpart C — Aircraft performance and operating limitations .................................................................................... 48
GM1 NCO.POL.105 Weighing .................................................................................................................................... 48
GENERAL ................................................................................................................................................................ 48
Subpart D — Instruments, data and equipment .................................................................................................... 49
Section 1 — Aeroplanes ............................................................................................................................................ 49
GM1 NCO.IDE.A.100(a) Instruments and equipment — general .............................................................................. 49
APPLICABLE AIRWORTHINESS REQUIREMENTS ..................................................................................................... 49
GM1 NCO.IDE.A.100(b) Instruments and equipment — general .............................................................................. 49
REQUIRED INSTRUMENTS AND EQUIPMENT THAT DO NOT NEED TO BE APPROVED IN ACCORDANCE
WITH THE APPLICABLE AIRWORTHINESS REQUIREMENTS .................................................................................... 49
GM1 NCO.IDE.A.100(c) Instruments and equipment — general............................................................................... 49
NOT REQUIRED INSTRUMENTS AND EQUIPMENT THAT DO NOT NEED TO BE APPROVED IN
ACCORDANCE WITH THE APPLICABLE AIRWORTHINESS REQUIREMENTS, BUT ARE CARRIED ON A FLIGHT ........ 49
GM1 NCO.IDE.A.110 Spare electrical fuses ............................................................................................................... 50
FUSES ..................................................................................................................................................................... 50
AMC1 NCO.IDE.A.120&NCO.IDE.A.125 Operations under VFR & operations under IFR — flight and
navigational instruments and associated equipment ................................................................................................. 50
INTEGRATED INSTRUMENTS .................................................................................................................................. 50
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AMC/GM TO ANNEX VII (PART-NCO)
TABLE OF CONTENTS
AMC2 NCO.IDE.A.120 Operations under VFR — flight and navigational instruments and associated
equipment ................................................................................................................................................................... 50
LOCAL FLIGHTS ....................................................................................................................................................... 50
GM1 NCO.IDE.A.120 Operations under VFR — flight and navigational instruments and associated
equipment ................................................................................................................................................................... 50
SLIP INDICATION .................................................................................................................................................... 50
GM1 NCO.IDE.A.125 Operations under IFR — flight and navigational instruments and associated
equipment ................................................................................................................................................................... 50
ALTERNATE SOURCE OF STATIC PRESSURE ............................................................................................................ 50
AMC1 NCO.IDE.A.120(a)(1)&NCO.IDE.A.125(a)(1) Operations under VFR & operations under IFR —
flight and navigational instruments and associated equipment ................................................................................. 51
MEANS OF MEASURING AND DISPLAYING MAGNETIC HEADING.......................................................................... 51
AMC1 NCO.IDE.A.120(a)(2)&NCO.IDE.A.125(a)(2) Operations under VFR & operations under IFR —
flight and navigational instruments and associated equipment ................................................................................. 51
MEANS OF MEASURING AND DISPLAYING THE TIME ............................................................................................ 51
AMC1 NCO.IDE.A.120(a)(3)&NCO.IDE.A.125(a)(3) Operations under VFR operations & operations
under IFR — flight and navigational instruments and associated equipment ............................................................ 51
CALIBRATION OF THE MEANS OF MEASURING AND DISPLAYING PRESSURE ALTITUDE ....................................... 51
GM1 NCO.IDE.A.125(a)(3) Operations under IFR — flight and navigational instruments and associated
equipment ................................................................................................................................................................... 51
ALTIMETERS ........................................................................................................................................................... 51
AMC1 NCO.IDE.A.120(a)(4)&NCO.IDE.A.125(a)(4) Operations under VFR & operations under IFR —
flight and navigational instruments and associated equipment ................................................................................. 51
CALIBRATION OF THE INSTRUMENT INDICATING AIRSPEED ................................................................................. 51
AMC1 NCO.IDE.A.120(c)&NCO.IDE.A.125(c) Operations under IFR — flight and navigational
instruments and associated equipment ...................................................................................................................... 51
MEANS OF PREVENTING MALFUNCTION DUE TO CONDENSATION OR ICING ...................................................... 51
AMC1 NCO.IDE.A.125(a)(9) Operations under IFR — flight and navigational instruments and
associated equipment ................................................................................................................................................. 52
MEANS OF DISPLAYING OUTSIDE AIR TEMPERATURE ........................................................................................... 52
AMC1 NCO.IDE.A.130 Terrain awareness warning system (TAWS) ........................................................................... 52
EXCESSIVE DOWNWARDS GLIDESLOPE DEVIATION WARNING FOR CLASS A TAWS ............................................. 52
GM1 NCO.IDE.A.130 Terrain awareness warning system (TAWS) ............................................................................ 52
ACCEPTABLE STANDARD FOR TAWS ...................................................................................................................... 52
AMC1 NCO.IDE.A.135 Flight crew interphone system .............................................................................................. 52
GENERAL ................................................................................................................................................................ 52
GM1 NCO.IDE.A.135 Flight crew interphone system ................................................................................................ 52
HEADSET ................................................................................................................................................................ 52
AMC1 NCO.IDE.A.140 Seats, seat safety belts, restraint systems and child restraint devices .................................. 53
CHILD RESTRAINT DEVICES (CRDS)......................................................................................................................... 53
AMC2 NCO.IDE.A.140 Seats, seat safety belts, restraint systems and child restraint devices .................................. 54
UPPER TORSO RESTRAINT SYSTEM ........................................................................................................................ 54
SEAT BELT............................................................................................................................................................... 54
AMC1 NCO.IDE.A.145 First-aid kit ............................................................................................................................. 54
CONTENT OF FIRST-AID KITS .................................................................................................................................. 54
AMC2 NCO.IDE.A.145 First-aid kit ............................................................................................................................. 55
MAINTENANCE OF FIRST-AID KIT ........................................................................................................................... 55
AMC1 NCO.IDE.A.150 Supplemental oxygen — pressurised aeroplanes .................................................................. 55
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AMC/GM TO ANNEX VII (PART-NCO)
TABLE OF CONTENTS
DETERMINATION OF OXYGEN ............................................................................................................................... 55
AMC1 NCO.IDE.A.155 Supplemental oxygen — non-pressurised aeroplanes .......................................................... 55
DETERMINATION OF OXYGEN ............................................................................................................................... 55
AMC1 NCO.IDE.A.165 Marking of break-in points..................................................................................................... 56
MARKINGS — COLOUR AND CORNERS .................................................................................................................. 56
AMC1 NCO.IDE.A.170 Emergency locator transmitter (ELT) ..................................................................................... 56
BATTERIES .............................................................................................................................................................. 56
AMC2 NCO.IDE.A.170 Emergency locator transmitter (ELT) ..................................................................................... 56
TYPES OF ELT AND GENERAL TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS.................................................................................... 56
AMC3 NCO.IDE.A.170 Emergency locator transmitter (ELT) ..................................................................................... 57
PLB TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS ........................................................................................................................... 57
AMC4 NCO.IDE.A.170 Emergency locator transmitter (ELT) ..................................................................................... 57
BRIEFING ON PLB USE ............................................................................................................................................ 57
GM1 NCO.IDE.A.170 Emergency locator transmitter (ELT) ....................................................................................... 57
TERMINOLOGY ....................................................................................................................................................... 57
AMC1 NCO.IDE.A.175 Flight over water .................................................................................................................... 57
ACCESSIBILITY OF LIFE-JACKETS ............................................................................................................................. 57
MEANS OF ILLUMINATION FOR LIFE-JACKETS ....................................................................................................... 58
RISK ASSESSMENT .................................................................................................................................................. 58
GM1 NCO.IDE.A.175 Flight over water ...................................................................................................................... 58
SEAT CUSHIONS ..................................................................................................................................................... 58
AMC1 NCO.IDE.A.180 Survival equipment ................................................................................................................ 58
GENERAL ................................................................................................................................................................ 58
AMC2 NCO.IDE.A.180 Survival equipment ................................................................................................................ 58
ADDITIONAL SURVIVAL EQUIPMENT ..................................................................................................................... 58
GM1 NCO.IDE.A.180 Survival equipment .................................................................................................................. 59
SIGNALLING EQUIPMENT ....................................................................................................................................... 59
GM2 NCO.IDE.A.180 Survival equipment .................................................................................................................. 59
AREAS IN WHICH SEARCH AND RESCUE WOULD BE ESPECIALLY DIFFICULT ......................................................... 59
GM1 NCO.IDE.A.190 Radio communication equipment ........................................................................................... 59
APPLICABLE AIRSPACE REQUIREMENTS ................................................................................................................ 59
AMC1 NCO.IDE.A.195 Navigation equipment ........................................................................................................... 59
NAVIGATION WITH VISUAL REFERENCE TO LANDMARKS ..................................................................................... 59
AMC1 NCO.IDE.A.200 Transponder ........................................................................................................................... 59
GENERAL ................................................................................................................................................................ 59
Section 2 — Helicopters ............................................................................................................................................ 60
GM1 NCO.IDE.H.100(a) Instruments and equipment — general .............................................................................. 60
APPLICABLE AIRWORTHINESS REQUIREMENTS ..................................................................................................... 60
GM1 NCO.IDE.H.100(b) Instruments and equipment — general .............................................................................. 60
REQUIRED INSTRUMENTS AND EQUIPMENT THAT DO NOT NEED TO BE APPROVED IN ACCORDANCE
WITH THE APPLICABLE AIRWORTHINESS REQUIREMENTS .................................................................................... 60
GM1 NCO.IDE.H.100(c) Instruments and equipment — general .............................................................................. 60
NOT REQUIRED INSTRUMENTS AND EQUIPMENT THAT DO NOT NEED TO BE APPROVED IN
ACCORDANCE WITH THE APPLICABLE AIRWORTHINESS REQUIREMENTS, BUT ARE CARRIED ON A FLIGHT ........ 60
AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.115 Operating lights ..................................................................................................................... 60
LANDING LIGHT ...................................................................................................................................................... 60
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AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.120&NCO.IDE.H.125 Operations under VFR & operations under IFR — flight and
navigational instruments and associated equipment ................................................................................................. 61
INTEGRATED INSTRUMENTS .................................................................................................................................. 61
AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.120(a)(1)&NCO.IDE.H.125(a)(1) Operations under VFR & operations under IFR —
flight and navigational instruments and associated equipment ................................................................................. 61
MEANS OF MEASURING AND DISPLAYING MAGNETIC HEADING.......................................................................... 61
AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.120(a)(2)&NCO.IDE.H.125(a)(2) Operations under VFR & operations under IFR —
flight and navigational instruments and associated equipment ................................................................................. 61
MEANS OF MEASURING AND DISPLAYING THE TIME ............................................................................................ 61
AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.120(a)(3)&NCO.IDE.H.125(a)(3) Operations under VFR & operations under IFR —
flight and navigational instruments and associated equipment ................................................................................. 61
CALIBRATION OF THE MEANS OF MEASURING AND DISPLAYING PRESSURE ALTITUDE ....................................... 61
GM1 NCO.IDE.H.125(a)(3) Operations under IFR — flight and navigational instruments and associated
equipment ................................................................................................................................................................... 61
ALTIMETERS ........................................................................................................................................................... 61
AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.120(a)(4)&NCO.IDE.H.125(a)(4) Operations under VFR & operations under IFR —
flight and navigational instruments and associated equipment ................................................................................. 62
CALIBRATION OF THE INSTRUMENT INDICATING AIRSPEED ................................................................................. 62
AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.120(a)(5) Operations under VFR — flight and navigational instruments and
associated equipment ................................................................................................................................................. 62
SLIP......................................................................................................................................................................... 62
AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.120(b)(1)(iii)&NCO.IDE.H.125(a)(8) Operations under VFR & operations under IFR —
flight and navigational instruments and associated equipment ................................................................................. 62
STABILISED HEADING ............................................................................................................................................. 62
AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.120(c)&NCO.IDE.H.125(c) Operations under VFR & Operations under IFR — flight
and navigational instruments and associated equipment .......................................................................................... 62
MEANS OF PREVENTING MALFUNCTION DUE TO CONDENSATION OR ICING ...................................................... 62
AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.125(a)(9) Operations under IFR — flight and navigational instruments and
associated equipment ................................................................................................................................................. 62
MEANS OF DISPLAYING OUTSIDE AIR TEMPERATURE ........................................................................................... 62
AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.135 Flight crew interphone system .............................................................................................. 62
GENERAL ................................................................................................................................................................ 62
GM1 NCO.IDE.H.135 Flight crew interphone system ................................................................................................ 63
HEADSET ................................................................................................................................................................ 63
AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.140 Seats, seat safety belts, restraint systems and child restraint devices .................................. 63
CHILD RESTRAINT DEVICES (CRDS)......................................................................................................................... 63
AMC2 NCO.IDE.H.140 Seats, seat safety belts, restraint systems and child restraint devices .................................. 64
UPPER TORSO RESTRAINT SYSTEM ........................................................................................................................ 64
SEAT BELT............................................................................................................................................................... 65
AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.145 First-aid kit ............................................................................................................................. 65
CONTENT OF FIRST-AID KITS .................................................................................................................................. 65
AMC2 NCO.IDE.H.145 First-aid kit ............................................................................................................................. 65
MAINTENANCE OF FIRST-AID KIT ........................................................................................................................... 65
AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.155 Supplemental oxygen — non-pressurised helicopters .......................................................... 65
DETERMINATION OF OXYGEN ............................................................................................................................... 65
AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.165 Marking of break-in points .................................................................................................... 65
MARKINGS — COLOUR AND CORNERS .................................................................................................................. 65
AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.170 Emergency locator transmitter (ELT) ..................................................................................... 66
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BATTERIES .............................................................................................................................................................. 66
AMC2 NCO.IDE.H.170 Emergency locator transmitter (ELT) ..................................................................................... 66
TYPES OF ELT AND GENERAL TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS.................................................................................... 66
AMC3 NCO.IDE.H.170 Emergency locator transmitter (ELT) ..................................................................................... 67
PLB TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS ........................................................................................................................... 67
AMC4 NCO.IDE.H.170 Emergency locator transmitter (ELT) ..................................................................................... 67
BRIEFING ON PLB USE ............................................................................................................................................ 67
GM1 NCO.IDE.H.170 Emergency locator transmitter (ELT) ....................................................................................... 67
TERMINOLOGY ....................................................................................................................................................... 67
AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.175 Flight over water .................................................................................................................... 67
ACCESSIBILITY OF LIFE-JACKETS ............................................................................................................................. 67
RISK ASSESSMENT .................................................................................................................................................. 67
GM1 NCO.IDE.H.175 Flight over water ...................................................................................................................... 68
SEAT CUSHIONS ..................................................................................................................................................... 68
AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.180 Survival equipment ................................................................................................................ 68
GENERAL ................................................................................................................................................................ 68
AMC2 NCO.IDE.H.180 Survival equipment ................................................................................................................ 68
ADDITIONAL SURVIVAL EQUIPMENT ..................................................................................................................... 68
GM1 NCO.IDE.H.180 Survival equipment .................................................................................................................. 68
SIGNALLING EQUIPMENT ....................................................................................................................................... 68
GM2 NCO.IDE.H.180 Survival equipment .................................................................................................................. 68
AREAS IN WHICH SEARCH AND RESCUE WOULD BE ESPECIALLY DIFFICULT ......................................................... 68
AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.185 All helicopters on flights over water — ditching.................................................................... 69
EMERGENCY FLOTATION EQUIPMENT .................................................................................................................. 69
AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.195 Navigation equipment ........................................................................................................... 69
NAVIGATION WITH VISUAL REFERENCE TO LANDMARKS ..................................................................................... 69
GM1 NCO.IDE.H.195 Navigation equipment ............................................................................................................. 69
APPLICABLE AIRSPACE REQUIREMENTS ................................................................................................................ 69
AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.200 Transponder ........................................................................................................................... 69
GENERAL ................................................................................................................................................................ 69
Section 3 — Sailplanes .............................................................................................................................................. 70
GM1 NCO.IDE.S.100(a) Instruments and equipment — general ............................................................................... 70
APPLICABLE AIRWORTHINESS REQUIREMENTS ..................................................................................................... 70
GM1 NCO.IDE.S.100(b) Instruments and equipment — general............................................................................... 70
REQUIRED INSTRUMENTS AND EQUIPMENT THAT DO NOT NEED TO BE APPROVED IN ACCORDANCE
WITH THE APPLICABLE AIRWORTHINESS REQUIREMENTS .................................................................................... 70
GM1 NCO.IDE.S.100(c) Instruments and equipment — general ............................................................................... 70
NOT REQUIRED INSTRUMENTS AND EQUIPMENT THAT DO NOT NEED TO BE APPROVED IN
ACCORDANCE WITH THE APPLICABLE AIRWORTHINESS REQUIREMENTS, BUT ARE CARRIED ON A FLIGHT ........ 70
AMC1 NCO.IDE.S.115&NCO.IDE.S.120 Operations under VFR & cloud flying — flight and navigational
instruments ................................................................................................................................................................. 70
INTEGRATED INSTRUMENTS .................................................................................................................................. 70
AMC1 NCO.IDE.S.115(a)(1)&NCO.IDE.S.120(a) Operations under VFR & cloud flying — flight and
navigational instruments ............................................................................................................................................. 71
MEANS OF MEASURING AND DISPLAYING MAGNETIC HEADING.......................................................................... 71
AMC1 NCO.IDE.S.115(a)(2)&NCO.IDE.S.120(b) Operations under VFR & cloud flying — flight and
navigational instruments ............................................................................................................................................. 71
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MEANS OF MEASURING AND DISPLAYING THE TIME ............................................................................................ 71
AMC1 NCO.IDE.S.115(a)(3)&NCO.IDE.S.120(c) Operations under VFR & cloud flying — flight and
navigational instruments ............................................................................................................................................. 71
CALIBRATION OF THE MEANS FOR MEASURING AND DISPLAYING PRESSURE ALTITUDE ..................................... 71
AMC1 NCO.IDE.S.115(a)(4)&NCO.IDE.S.120(d) Operations under VFR & cloud flying — flight and
navigational instruments ............................................................................................................................................. 71
CALIBRATION OF THE INSTRUMENT INDICATING AIRSPEED ................................................................................. 71
AMC1 NCO.IDE.S.115(b)(2) Operations under VFR — flight and navigational instruments ...................................... 71
SLIP INDICATION .................................................................................................................................................... 71
GM1 NCO.IDE.S.115(b) Operations under VFR — flight and navigational instruments ............................................ 71
CONDITIONS WHERE THE SAILPLANE CANNOT BE MAINTAINED IN A DESIRED ATTITUDE WITHOUT
REFERENCE TO ONE OR MORE ADDITIONAL INSTRUMENTS ................................................................................. 71
AMC1 NCO.IDE.S.125 Seats and restraint systems .................................................................................................... 72
UPPER TORSO RESTRAINT SYSTEM ........................................................................................................................ 72
AMC1 NCO.IDE.S.135 Flight over water .................................................................................................................... 72
MEANS OF ILLUMINATION FOR LIFE-JACKETS ....................................................................................................... 72
RISK ASSESSMENT .................................................................................................................................................. 72
GM1 NCO.IDE.S.135(a) Flight over water .................................................................................................................. 72
SEAT CUSHIONS ..................................................................................................................................................... 72
AMC1 NCO.IDE.S.135(b) Flight over water ................................................................................................................ 72
BATTERIES .............................................................................................................................................................. 72
AMC2 NCO.IDE.S.135(b) Flight over water ................................................................................................................ 73
TYPES OF ELT AND GENERAL TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS.................................................................................... 73
AMC3 NCO.IDE.S.135(b) Flight over water ................................................................................................................ 73
PLB TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS ........................................................................................................................... 73
AMC4 NCO.IDE.S.135(b) Flight over water ................................................................................................................ 74
BRIEFING ON PLB USE ............................................................................................................................................ 74
GM1 NCO.IDE.S.135(b) Flight over water .................................................................................................................. 74
TERMINOLOGY ....................................................................................................................................................... 74
AMC1 NCO.IDE.S.140 Survival equipment ................................................................................................................. 74
GENERAL ................................................................................................................................................................ 74
AMC2 NCO.IDE.S.140 Survival equipment ................................................................................................................. 74
ADDITIONAL SURVIVAL EQUIPMENT ..................................................................................................................... 74
GM1 NCO.IDE.S.140 Survival equipment................................................................................................................... 75
SIGNALLING EQUIPMENT ....................................................................................................................................... 75
GM2 NCO.IDE.S.140 Survival equipment................................................................................................................... 75
AREAS IN WHICH SEARCH AND RESCUE WOULD BE ESPECIALLY DIFFICULT ......................................................... 75
GM1 NCO.IDE.S.150 Navigation equipment .............................................................................................................. 75
APPLICABLE AIRSPACE REQUIREMENTS ................................................................................................................ 75
AMC1 NCO.IDE.S.155 Transponder ........................................................................................................................... 75
GENERAL ................................................................................................................................................................ 75
Section 4 — Balloons................................................................................................................................................. 76
GM1 NCO.IDE.B.100(a) Instruments and equipment — general .............................................................................. 76
APPLICABLE AIRWORTHINESS REQUIREMENTS ..................................................................................................... 76
GM1 NCO.IDE.B.100(b) Instruments and equipment — general .............................................................................. 76
REQUIRED INSTRUMENTS AND EQUIPMENT THAT DO NOT NEED TO BE APPROVED IN ACCORDANCE
WITH THE APPLICABLE AIRWORTHINESS REQUIREMENTS .................................................................................... 76
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GM1 NCO.IDE.B.100(c) Instruments and equipment — general ............................................................................... 76
NOT REQUIRED INSTRUMENTS AND EQUIPMENT THAT DO NOT NEED TO BE APPROVED IN
ACCORDANCE WITH THE APPLICABLE AIRWORTHINESS REQUIREMENTS, BUT ARE CARRIED ON A FLIGHT ........ 76
AMC1 NCO.IDE.B.110 Operating lights ...................................................................................................................... 76
ANTI-COLLISION LIGHTS ......................................................................................................................................... 76
ILLUMINATION FOR INSTRUMENTS AND EQUIPMENT .......................................................................................... 76
AMC1 NCO.IDE.B.115(a) Operations under VFR — flight and navigational instruments .......................................... 77
MEANS OF DISPLAYING DRIFT DIRECTION ............................................................................................................. 77
AMC1 NCO.IDE.B.115(b)(1) Operations under VFR — flight and navigational instruments ..................................... 77
MEANS OF MEASURING AND DISPLAYING THE TIME ............................................................................................ 77
GM1 NCO.IDE.B.115(b)(2) Operations under VFR — flight and navigational instruments ....................................... 77
MEANS OF MEASURING AND DISPLAYING VERTICAL SPEED ................................................................................. 77
GM1 NCO.IDE.B.115(b)(3) Operations under VFR — flight and navigational instruments and
associated equipment ................................................................................................................................................. 77
MEANS OF MEASURING AND DISPLAYING PRESSURE ALTITUDE .......................................................................... 77
AMC1 NCO.IDE.B.120 First-aid kit ............................................................................................................................. 77
CONTENT OF FIRST-AID KITS .................................................................................................................................. 77
AMC2 NCO.IDE.B.120 First-aid kit ............................................................................................................................. 78
MAINTENANCE OF FIRST-AID KIT ........................................................................................................................... 78
AMC1 NCO.IDE.B.125 Hand fire extinguishers .......................................................................................................... 78
CERTIFICATION SPECIFICATIONS............................................................................................................................ 78
AMC1 NCO.IDE.B.130 Flight over water .................................................................................................................... 78
MEANS OF ILLUMINATION FOR LIFE-JACKETS ....................................................................................................... 78
RISK ASSESSMENT .................................................................................................................................................. 78
AMC1 NCO.IDE.B.130(b) Flight over water ................................................................................................................ 78
BATTERIES .............................................................................................................................................................. 78
AMC2 NCO.IDE.B.130(b) Flight over water ................................................................................................................ 79
TYPES OF ELT AND GENERAL TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS.................................................................................... 79
AMC3 NCO.IDE.B.130(b) Flight over water ................................................................................................................ 79
PLB TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS ........................................................................................................................... 79
AMC4 NCO.IDE.B.130(b) Flight over water ................................................................................................................ 80
BRIEFING ON PLB USE ............................................................................................................................................ 80
GM1 NCO.IDE.B.130(b) Flight over water ................................................................................................................. 80
TERMINOLOGY ....................................................................................................................................................... 80
GM1 NCO.IDE.B.130(d) Survival equipment .............................................................................................................. 80
SIGNALLING EQUIPMENT ....................................................................................................................................... 80
AMC1 NCO.IDE.B.135 Survival equipment ................................................................................................................ 80
GENERAL ................................................................................................................................................................ 80
AMC2 NCO.IDE.B.135 Survival equipment ................................................................................................................ 80
ADDITIONAL SURVIVAL EQUIPMENT ..................................................................................................................... 80
GM1 NCO.IDE.B.135 Survival equipment .................................................................................................................. 81
AREAS IN WHICH SEARCH AND RESCUE WOULD BE ESPECIALLY DIFFICULT ......................................................... 81
AMC1 NCO.IDE.B.140(b)(3) Miscellaneous equipment ............................................................................................. 81
FIRE BLANKET ......................................................................................................................................................... 81
AMC1 NCO.IDE.B.140 (c)(1) Miscellaneous equipment ............................................................................................ 81
KNIFE ...................................................................................................................................................................... 81
GM1 NCO.IDE.B.145 Radio communication equipment ............................................................................................ 81
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APPLICABLE AIRSPACE REQUIREMENTS ................................................................................................................ 81
AMC1 NCO.IDE.B.150 Transponder ........................................................................................................................... 81
GENERAL ................................................................................................................................................................ 81
Subpart E — Specific requirements ....................................................................................................................... 82
Section 1 — General.................................................................................................................................................. 82
AMC1 NCO.SPEC.100 Scope ...................................................................................................................................... 82
CRITERIA................................................................................................................................................................. 82
GM1 NCO.SPEC.100 Scope ........................................................................................................................................ 82
LIST OF SPECIALISED OPERATIONS ........................................................................................................................ 82
GM1 NCO.SPEC.105 Checklist .................................................................................................................................... 83
DEVELOPMENT OF CHECKLISTS ............................................................................................................................. 83
GM2 NCO.SPEC.105 Checklists .................................................................................................................................. 84
TEMPLATE FORMS ................................................................................................................................................. 84
AMC1 NCO.SPEC.125 Safety briefing ......................................................................................................................... 86
TASK SPECIALISTS ................................................................................................................................................... 86
GM1 NCO.SPEC.175(c) Performance and operating criteria — helicopters .............................................................. 87
GENERAL ................................................................................................................................................................ 87
Section 2 — Helicopter external sling load operations (HESLO) ............................................................................... 87
GM1 NCO.SPEC.HESLO.100 Checklist ........................................................................................................................ 87
REFERENCES ........................................................................................................................................................... 87
Section 3 — Human external cargo operations (HEC) .............................................................................................. 88
GM1 NCO.SPEC.HEC.100 Checklist ............................................................................................................................ 88
REFERENCES ........................................................................................................................................................... 88
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Part-NCO — AMC/GM
Subpart A — General requirements
GM1 NCO.GEN.105 Pilot-in-command responsibilities and authority
GENERAL
In accordance with 1.c. of Annex IV to Regulation (EC) No 216/20082 (essential requirements for air
operations), the pilot-in-command is responsible for the operation and safety of the aircraft and for
the safety of all passengers and cargo on board. This includes the following:
(a)
the safety of all passengers and cargo on board, as soon as he/she arrives on board, until
he/she leaves the aircraft at the end of the flight; and
(b)
the operation and safety of the aircraft:
(1)
for aeroplanes, from the moment it is first ready to move for the purpose of flight until
the moment it comes to rest at the end of the flight and the engine(s) used as primary
propulsion unit(s) is/are shut down;
(2)
for helicopters, from the moment the engine(s) are started until the helicopter comes to
rest at the end of the flight with the engine(s) shut down and the rotor blades stopped;
(3)
for sailplanes, from the moment the launch procedure is started until the aircraft comes
to rest at the end of the flight; or
(4)
for balloons, from the moment the inflating of the envelope is started until the envelope
is deflated.
GM1 NCO.GEN.105(a)(8) Pilot-in-command responsibilities and authority
RECORDING UTILISATION DATA
Where an aircraft conducts a series of flights of short duration — such as a helicopter doing a series
of lifts — and the aircraft is operated by the same pilot-in-command, the utilisation data for the
series of flights may be recorded in the aircraft technical log or journey log as a single entry.
AMC1 NCO.GEN.105(c) Pilot-in-command responsibilities and authority
CHECKLISTS
(a)
The pilot-in-command should use the latest checklists provided by the manufacturer.
(b)
If checks conducted prior to take-off are suspended at any point, the pilot-in-command should
re-start them from a safe point prior to the interruption.
2
Regulation (EC) No 216/2008 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 20 February 2008 on common rules in
the field of civil aviation and establishing a European Aviation Safety Agency, and repealing Council Directive
91/670/EEC, Regulation (EC) No 1592/2002 and Directive 2004/36/EC. OJ L 79, 19.3.2008, p. 1, as amended by
Regulation (EC) No 1108/2009 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 October 2009, OJ L 309, 24.11.2009,
p. 51.
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GM1 NCO.GEN.105(d) Pilot-in-command responsibilities and authority
REPORTING OF HAZARDOUS FLIGHT CONDITIONS
(a)
These reports should include any detail which may be pertinent to the safety of other aircraft.
(b)
Such reports should be made whenever any of the following conditions are encountered or
observed:
(c)
(1)
severe turbulence;
(2)
severe icing;
(3)
severe mountain wave;
(4)
thunderstorms, with or without hail, that are obscured, embedded, widespread or in
squall lines;
(5)
heavy dust storm or heavy sandstorm;
(6)
volcanic ash cloud; and
(7)
unusual and/or increasing volcanic activity or a volcanic eruption.
When other meteorological conditions not listed above, e.g. wind shear, are encountered that,
in the opinion of the pilot-in-command, may affect the safety or the efficiency of other aircraft
operations, the pilot-in-command should advise the appropriate air traffic services (ATS) unit
as soon as practicable.
AMC1 NCO.GEN.105(e) Pilot-in-command responsibilities and authority
VIOLATION REPORTING
If required by the State in which the incident occurs, the pilot-in-command should submit a report on
any such violation to the appropriate authority of such State; in that event, the pilot-in-command
should also submit a copy of it to the competent authority. Such reports should be submitted as soon
as possible and normally within 10 days.
GM1 NCO.GEN.106(b) Pilot-in-command responsibilities and authority — balloons
PROTECTIVE CLOTHING
Protective clothing includes:
(a)
long sleeves and trousers preferably made out of natural fibres;
(b)
stout footwear; and
(c)
gloves.
GM1 NCO.GEN.115 Taxiing of aeroplanes
SAFETY-CRITICAL ACTIVITY
(a)
Taxiing should be treated as a safety-critical activity due to the risks related to the movement
of the aeroplane and the potential for a catastrophic event on the ground.
(b)
Taxiing is a high-workload phase of flight that requires the full attention of the pilot-incommand.
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GM1 NCO.GEN.115(b)(4) Taxiing of aeroplanes
SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
The person designated by the operator to taxi an aeroplane should possess the following skills and
knowledge:
(a)
positioning of the aeroplane to ensure safety when starting engine;
(b)
getting ATIS reports and taxi clearance, where applicable;
(c)
interpretation of airfield markings/lights/signals/indicators;
(d)
interpretation of marshalling signals, where applicable;
(e)
identification of suitable parking area;
(f)
maintaining lookout and right-of-way rules and complying with ATC or marshalling instructions
when applicable;
(g)
avoidance of adverse effect of propeller slipstream or jet wash on other aeroplanes,
aerodrome facilities and personnel;
(h)
inspection of taxi path when surface conditions are obscured;
(i)
communication with others when controlling an aeroplane on the ground;
(j)
interpretation of operational instructions;
(k)
reporting of any problem that may occur while taxiing an aeroplane; and
(l)
adapting the taxi speed in accordance with prevailing aerodrome, traffic, surface and weather
conditions.
GM1 NCO.GEN.120 Rotor engagement
INTENT OF THE RULE
(a)
The following two situations where it is allowed to turn the rotor under power should be
distinguished:
(1)
for the purpose of flight, this is described in the implementing rule;
(2)
for maintenance purposes.
(b)
Rotor engagement for the purpose of flight: it should be noted that the pilot should not leave
the control when the rotors are turning. For example, the pilot is not allowed to get out of the
aircraft in order to welcome passengers and adjust their seat belts with the rotors turning.
(c)
Rotor engagement for the purpose of maintenance: the implementing rule, however, should
not prevent ground runs being conducted by qualified personnel other than pilots for
maintenance purposes.
The following conditions should be applied:
(1)
The operator should ensure that the qualification of personnel, other than pilots, who
are authorised to conduct maintenance runs is described in the appropriate manual.
(2)
Ground runs should not include taxiing the helicopter.
(3)
There should be no passengers on board.
(4)
Maintenance runs should not include collective increase or auto pilot engagement (risk
of ground resonance).
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GM1 NCO.GEN.125 Portable electronic devices
DEFINITIONS
(a)
Definition and categories of PEDs
PEDs are any kind of electronic device, typically but not limited to consumer electronics,
brought on board the aircraft by crew members, passengers, or as part of the cargo and that
are not included in the approved aircraft configuration. All equipment that is able to consume
electrical energy falls under this definition. The electrical energy can be provided from internal
sources as batteries (chargeable or non-rechargeable) or the devices may also be connected to
specific aircraft power sources.
PEDs include the following two categories:
(b)
(1)
Non-intentional transmitters can non-intentionally radiate RF transmissions, sometimes
referred to as spurious emissions. This category includes, but is not limited to,
calculators, cameras, radio receivers, audio and video players, electronic games and toys;
when these devices are not equipped with a transmitting function.
(2)
Intentional transmitters radiate RF transmissions on specific frequencies as part of their
intended function. In addition, they may radiate non-intentional transmissions like any
PED. The term ‘transmitting PED’ (T-PED) is used to identify the transmitting capability of
the PED. Intentional transmitters are transmitting devices such as RF-based remote
control equipment, which may include some toys, two-way radios (sometimes referred
to as private mobile radio), mobile phones of any type, satellite phones, computers with
mobile phone data connection, wireless local area network (WLAN) or Bluetooth
capability. After deactivation of the transmitting capability, e.g. by activating the socalled ‘flight mode’ or ‘flight safety mode’, the T-PED remains a PED having nonintentional emissions.
Definition of the switched-off status
Many PEDs are not completely disconnected from the internal power source when switched
off. The switching function may leave some remaining functionality e.g. data storage, timer,
clock, etc. These devices can be considered switched off when in the deactivated status. The
same applies for devices having no transmitting capability and are operated by coin cells
without further deactivation capability, e.g. wrist watches.
GM2 NCO.GEN.125 Portable electronic devices
GENERAL
(a)
PEDs can pose a risk of interference with electronically operated aircraft systems. Those
systems could range from the electronic engine control, instruments, navigation or
communication equipment, autopilots to any other type of avionic equipment on the aircraft.
The interference can result in on-board systems malfunctioning or providing misleading
information and communication disturbance. These can also lead to an increased workload for
the flight crew.
(b)
Interference may be caused by transmitters being part of the PED’s functionality or by
unintentional transmissions from the PED. Due to the likely proximity of the PED to any
electronically operated aircraft system and the generally limited shielding found in small
aircraft, the risk of interference is to be considered higher than that for larger aircraft with
metal airframes.
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(c)
During certification of the aircraft, when qualifying the aircraft functions consideration may
only have been made of short-term exposure to a high radiating field, with an acceptable
mitigating measure being a return to normal function after removal of the threat. This
certification assumption may not be true when operating the transmitting PED on board the
aircraft.
(d)
It has been found that compliance with the electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) Directive
2004/108/EC and related European standards, as indicated by the CE marking, is not sufficient
to exclude the existence of interference. A well-known interference is the demodulation of the
transmitted signal from GSM (global system for mobile communications) mobile phones
leading to audio disturbances in other systems. Similar interferences are difficult to predict
during the PED design and protecting the aircraft’s electronic systems against the full range of
potential interferences is practically impossible. Therefore, not operating PEDs on-board
aircraft is the safest option, especially as effects may not be identified immediately but under
the most inconvenient circumstances.
(e)
Guidance to follow in case of fire caused by PEDs is provided by the International Civil Aviation
Organisation, ‘Emergency response guidance for aircraft incidents involving dangerous goods’,
ICAO Doc 9481-AN/928.
AMC1 NCO.GEN.130 Information on emergency and survival equipment carried
CONTENT OF INFORMATION
The information, compiled in a list, should include, as applicable:
(a)
the number, colour and type of life rafts and pyrotechnics,
(b)
details of emergency medical supplies and water supplies; and
(c)
the type and frequencies of the emergency portable radio equipment.
AMC1 NCO.GEN.135(a)(3) Documents, manuals and information to be carried
CERTIFICATE OF AIRWORTHINESS
The certificate of airworthiness should be a normal certificate of airworthiness, a restricted
certificate of airworthiness or a permit to fly issued in accordance with the applicable airworthiness
requirements.
AMC1 NCO.GEN.135(a)(10) Documents, manuals and information to be carried
CURRENT AND SUITABLE AERONAUTICAL CHARTS
(a)
The aeronautical charts carried should contain data appropriate to the applicable air traffic
regulations, rules of the air, flight altitudes, area/route and nature of the operation. Due
consideration should be given to carriage of textual and graphic representations of:
(1)
aeronautical data, including, as appropriate for the nature of the operation:
(i)
airspace structure;
(ii)
significant points, navigation aids (navaids) and air traffic services (ATS) routes;
(iii)
navigation and communication frequencies;
(iv)
prohibited, restricted and danger areas; and
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SUBPART A — GENERAL REQUIREMENTS
(v)
(2)
sites of other relevant activities that may hazard the flight; and
topographical data, including terrain and obstacle data.
(b)
A combination of different charts and textual data may be used to provide adequate and
current data.
(c)
The aeronautical data should be appropriate for the current aeronautical information
regulation and control (AIRAC) cycle.
(d)
The topographical data should be reasonably recent, having regard to the nature of the
planned operation.
GM1 NCO.GEN.135 Documents, manuals and information to be carried
GENERAL
(a)
In case of loss or theft of documents specified in NCO.GEN.135, the operation may continue
until the flight reaches the base or a place where a replacement document can be provided.
(b)
The documents, manuals and information may be available in a form other than on printed
paper. An electronic storage medium is acceptable if accessibility, usability and reliability can
be assured.
GM1 NCO.GEN.135(a)(1) Documents, manuals and information to be carried
AFM OR EQUIVALENT DOCUMENT
‘Aircraft flight manual (AFM), or equivalent document’ means the flight manual for the aircraft or
other documents containing information required for the operation of the aircraft within the terms
of its certificate of airworthiness.
AIRCRAFT FLIGHT MANUAL (AFM) — BALLOONS
At least the operating limitations, normal and emergency procedures should be available to the pilot
during operation by providing the specific sections of the AFM or by other means (e.g. placards, quick
reference cards) that effectively accomplish the purpose.
GM1 NCO.GEN.135(a)(8) Documents, manuals and information to be carried
JOURNEY LOG OR EQUIVALENT
’Journey log or equivalent’ means that the required information may be recorded in documentation
other than a log book, such as the operational flight plan or the aircraft technical log.
GM1 NCO.GEN.135(a)(11) Documents, manuals and information to be carried
PROCEDURES AND VISUAL SIGNALS FOR USE BY INTERCEPTING AND INTERCEPTED AIRCRAFT
The procedures and the visual signals information for use by intercepting and intercepted aircraft are
those contained in the International Civil Aviation Organisation’s (ICAO) Annex 2.
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GM1 NCO.GEN.135(a)(13) Documents, manuals and information to be carried
DOCUMENTS THAT MAY BE PERTINENT TO THE FLIGHT
Any other documents that may be pertinent to the flight or required by the States concerned with
the flight may include, for example, forms to comply with reporting requirements.
STATES CONCERNED WITH THE FLIGHT
The States concerned are those of origin, transit, overflight and destination of the flight.
AMC1 NCO.GEN.140(d) Transport of dangerous goods
DANGEROUS GOODS ACCIDENT AND INCIDENT REPORTING
(a)
Any type of dangerous goods incident or accident, or the finding of:
(1)
undeclared or misdeclared dangerous goods in cargo;
(2)
forbidden dangerous goods in mail; or
(3)
forbidden dangerous goods in passenger or crew baggage, or on the person of a
passenger or crew member
should be reported. For this purpose, the Technical Instructions consider that reporting of
undeclared and misdeclared dangerous goods found in cargo also applies to items of
operators’ stores that are classified as dangerous goods.
(b)
The first report should be dispatched within 72 hours of the event. It may be sent by any
means, including e-mail, telephone or fax. This report should include the details that are
known at that time, under the headings identified in 3. If necessary, a subsequent report
should be made as soon as possible giving all the details that were not known at the time the
first report was sent. If a report has been made verbally, written confirmation should be sent
as soon as possible.
(c)
The first and any subsequent report should be as precise as possible and contain the following
data, where relevant:
(1)
date of the incident or accident or the finding of undeclared or misdeclared dangerous
goods;
(2)
location and date of flight;
(3)
description of the goods;
(4)
proper shipping name (including the technical name, if appropriate) and United Nations
(UN)/identification (ID) number, when known;
(5)
class or division and any subsidiary risk;
(6)
type of packaging, and the packaging specification marking on it;
(7)
quantity;
(8)
name and address of the passenger, etc.;
(9)
any other relevant details;
(10) suspected cause of the incident or accident;
(11) action taken;
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AMC/GM TO ANNEX VII (PART-NCO)
SUBPART A — GENERAL REQUIREMENTS
(12) any other reporting action taken; and
(13) name, title, address and telephone number of the person making the report.
(d)
Copies of relevant documents and any photographs taken should be attached to the report.
(e)
A dangerous goods accident or incident may also constitute an aircraft accident, serious
incident or incident. The criteria for reporting both types of occurrence should be met.
(f)
The following dangerous goods reporting form should be used, but other forms, including
electronic transfer of data, may be used provided that at least the minimum information of
this AMC is supplied:
DANGEROUS GOODS OCCURRENCE REPORT
1. Operator:
DGOR No:
2. Date of Occurrence:
3. Local time of occurrence:
4. Flight date:
5. Departure aerodrome:
6. Destination aerodrome:
7. Aircraft type:
8. Aircraft registration:
9. Location of occurrence:
10. Origin of the goods:
11. Description of the occurrence, including details of injury, damage, etc.
(if necessary continue on the reverse of this form):
12. Proper shipping name (including the technical name):
13. UN/ID No (when known):
14.Class/Division
(when known):
15. Subsidiary risk(s):
16. Packing
group:
17. Category (Class 7 only):
18. Type of
packaging:
19. Packaging specification
marking:
20. No of
packages:
21. Quantity (or transport
index, if applicable):
22. Name and address of passenger, etc.:
23. Other relevant information (including suspected cause, any action taken):
24. Name and title of person making report:
25. Telephone No:
26. Company:
27. Reporters ref:
28. Address:
29. Signature:
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AMC/GM TO ANNEX VII (PART-NCO)
SUBPART A — GENERAL REQUIREMENTS
30. Date:
Description of the occurrence (continuation)
Notes for completion of the form:
1.
A dangerous goods accident is as defined in Annex I. For this purpose serious injury is as
defined in Regulation (EU) No 996/2010 of the European Parliament and of the Council3.
2.
The initial report should be dispatched unless exceptional circumstances prevent this. This
occurrence report form, duly completed, should be sent as soon as possible, even if all the
information is not available.
3.
Copies of all relevant documents and any photographs should be attached to this report.
4.
Any further information, or any information not included in the initial report, should be sent as
soon as possible to the authorities identified in NCO.GEN.140(d).
5.
Providing it is safe to do so, all dangerous goods, packaging, documents, etc. relating to the
occurrence should be retained until after the initial report has been sent to the authorities
identified in NCO.GEN.140(d), and they have indicated whether or not these should continue
to be retained.
GM1 NCO.GEN.140(a) Transport of dangerous goods
GENERAL
(a)
(b)
3
The requirement to transport dangerous goods by air in accordance with the Technical
Instructions is irrespective of whether:
(1)
the flight is wholly or partly within or wholly outside the territory of a State; or
(2)
an approval to carry dangerous goods in accordance with Annex V (Part-SPA), Subpart G
is held.
The Technical Instructions provide that in certain circumstances dangerous goods, which are
normally forbidden on an aircraft, may be carried. These circumstances include cases of
extreme urgency or when other forms of transport are inappropriate or when full compliance
with the prescribed requirements is contrary to the public interest. In these circumstances all
the States concerned may grant exemptions from the provisions of the Technical Instructions
provided that an overall level of safety that is at least equivalent to that provided by the
Technical Instructions is achieved. Although exemptions are most likely to be granted for the
carriage of dangerous goods that are not permitted in normal circumstances, they may also be
granted in other circumstances, such as when the packaging to be used is not provided for by
the appropriate packing method or the quantity in the packaging is greater than that
permitted. The Technical Instructions also make provision for some dangerous goods to be
OJ L 295, 12.11.2010, p. 35.
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AMC/GM TO ANNEX VII (PART-NCO)
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carried when an approval has been granted only by the State of origin and the competent
authority.
(c)
When an exemption is required, the States concerned are those of origin, transit, overflight
and destination of the consignment and that of the operator. For the State of overflight, if
none of the criteria for granting an exemption are relevant, an exemption may be granted
based solely on whether it is believed that an equivalent level of safety in air transport has
been achieved.
(d)
The Technical Instructions provide that exemptions and approvals are granted by the
‘appropriate national authority’, which is intended to be the authority responsible for the
particular aspect against which the exemption or approval is being sought. The operator
should ensure that all relevant conditions on an exemption or approval are met.
(e)
The exemption or approval referred to in (b) to (d) is in addition to the approval required by
Annex V (Part-SPA), Subpart G.
AMC1 NCO.GEN.150 Journey log
GENERAL
(a)
The aircraft journey log, or equivalent, should include the following items, where applicable:
(1)
aircraft nationality and registration;
(2)
date;
(3)
name of crew member(s);
(4)
duty assignments of crew members, if applicable;
(5)
place of departure;
(6)
place of arrival;
(7)
time of departure;
(8)
time of arrival;
(9)
hours of flight;
(10) nature of flight;
(11) incidents and observations (if any); and
(12) signature of the pilot-in-command.
(b)
The information or parts thereof may be recorded in a form other than on printed paper.
Accessibility, usability and reliability should be assured.
AMC1 NCO.GEN.155 Minimum equipment list
CONTENT AND APPROVAL OF THE MEL
(a)
When an MEL is established, the operator should amend the MEL after any applicable change
to the MMEL within the acceptable timescales. The following are applicable changes to the
MMEL that require amendment of the MEL:
(1)
a reduction of the rectification interval;
(2)
change of an item, only when the change is applicable to the aircraft or type of
operations and is more restrictive;
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AMC/GM TO ANNEX VII (PART-NCO)
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(3)
reduced timescales for the implementation of safety-related amendments may be
required by the Agency and/or the competent authority.
(b)
An acceptable timescale for notifying the amended MEL to the competent authority is 90 days
from the effective date specified in the approved change to the MMEL.
(c)
In addition to the list of items and related dispatch conditions, the MEL should contain:
(1)
(d)
a preamble, including guidance and definitions for flight crew members and
maintenance personnel using the MEL. The MEL preamble should:
(i)
reflect the content of the MMEL preamble as applicable to the MEL scope and
extent;
(ii)
contain terms and definitions used in the MEL;
(iii)
contain any other relevant specific information for the MEL scope and use that is
not originally provided in the MMEL;
(iv)
provide guidance on how to identify the origin of a failure or malfunction to the
extent necessary for appropriate application of the MEL;
(v)
provide guidance on the management of multiple unserviceabilities, based on the
guidance given in the MMEL; and
(vi)
provide guidance on placarding of inoperative items to inform crew members of
equipment condition as appropriate. In particular, when such items are accessible
to the crew during flight, the control(s) and indicator(s) related to inoperative
unit(s) should be clearly placarded.
(2)
the revision status of the MMEL upon which the MEL is based and the revision status of
the MEL;
(3)
the scope, extent and purpose of the MEL;
(4)
operational and maintenance procedures as part of the MEL or by means of reference to
another appropriate document, based on the operational and maintenance procedures
referenced in the MMEL; and
(5)
the dispatch conditions associated with flights conducted in accordance with special
approvals held by the operator in accordance with Part-SPA.
The operator should:
(1)
establish rectification intervals for each inoperative instrument, item of equipment or
function listed in the MEL. The rectification interval in the MEL should not be less
restrictive than the corresponding rectification interval in the MMEL. The definitions and
categories of rectification intervals are provided in CS-MMEL as well as in CS-GENMMEL; and
(2)
establish an effective rectification programme.
(e)
The operator should establish the operational and maintenance procedures referenced in the
MEL, taking into account the operational and maintenance procedures referenced in the
MMEL. These procedures should be part of the operator’s manuals or the MEL.
(f)
The operator should amend the operational and maintenance procedures referenced in the
MEL after any applicable change to the operational and maintenance procedures referenced in
the MMEL.
(g)
Unless otherwise specified in the MEL, the operator should complete:
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AMC/GM TO ANNEX VII (PART-NCO)
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(1)
the operational procedures referenced in the MEL when planning for and/or operating
with the listed item inoperative; and
(2)
the maintenance procedures referenced in the MEL prior to operating with the listed
item inoperative.
AMC2 NCO.GEN.155 Minimum equipment list
FORMAT OF THE MEL
The MEL format, the presentation of MEL items and dispatch conditions should:
(a)
reflect those of the MMEL;
(b)
follow the ATA 100/2200 Specification numbering system for MEL items; and
(c)
when different from (a) and (b), be clear and unambiguous.
AMC3 NCO.GEN.155 Minimum equipment list
EXTENT OF THE MEL
The operator should include guidance in the MEL on how to deal with any failures that occur
between the commencement of the flight and the start of the take-off. If a failure occurs between
the commencement of the flight and the start of the take-off, any decision to continue the flight
should be subject to pilot judgement and good airmanship. The pilot-in-command may refer to the
MEL before any decision to continue the flight is taken.
AMC4 NCO.GEN.155 Minimum equipment list
OPERATIONAL AND MAINTENANCE PROCEDURES
(a)
The operational and maintenance procedures referenced in the MEL should be based on the
operational and maintenance procedures referenced in the MMEL. Modified procedures may,
however, be developed by the operator when they provide the same level of safety as
required by the MMEL. Modified maintenance procedures should be developed in accordance
with the applicable airworthiness requirements.
(b)
Providing appropriate operational and maintenance procedures referenced in the MEL,
regardless of who developed them, is the responsibility of the operator.
(c)
Any item in the MEL requiring an operational or maintenance procedure to ensure an
acceptable level of safety should be so identified in the ‘remarks’ or ‘exceptions’
column/part/section of the MEL. This will normally be ‘(O)’ for an operational procedure, or
‘(M)’ for a maintenance procedure. ‘(O)(M)’ means both operational and maintenance
procedures are required.
(d)
The satisfactory accomplishment of all procedures, regardless of who performs them, is the
responsibility of the operator.
AMC5 NCO.GEN.155 Minimum equipment list
OPERATIONAL AND MAINTENANCE PROCEDURES — APPLICABLE CHANGES
(a)
Changes to the operational and maintenance procedures referenced in the MMEL are
considered applicable and require the amendment of the maintenance and operating
procedures referenced in the MEL when:
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AMC/GM TO ANNEX VII (PART-NCO)
SUBPART A — GENERAL REQUIREMENTS
(b)
(1)
the modified procedure is applicable to the operator’s MEL; and
(2)
the purpose of this change is to improve compliance with the intent of the associated
MMEL dispatch condition.
An acceptable timescale for the amendments of maintenance and operating procedures, as
defined in (a), should be 90 days from the date when the amended procedures referenced in
the MMEL are made available. Reduced timescales for the implementation of safety-related
amendments may be required if the competent authority consider it necessary.
GM1 NCO.GEN.155 Minimum equipment list
GENERAL
(a)
The Minimum Equipment List (MEL) is a document that lists the equipment that may be
temporarily inoperative, subject to certain conditions, at the commencement of flight. This
document is prepared by the operator for their own particular aircraft, taking account of their
aircraft configuration and all those individual variables that cannot be addressed at MMEL
level, such as operating environment, route structure, geographic location, aerodromes where
spare parts and maintenance capabilities are available, etc.
(b)
The MMEL, as defined in the mandatory part of the operational suitability data established in
accordance with Regulation (EU) No 748/2012, is developed in compliance with CS-MMEL or
CS-GEN-MMEL. These Certification Specifications contain, among other, guidance intended to
standardise the level of relief granted in MMELs, in particular for items that are subject to
operational requirements. If an MMEL established as part of the operational suitability data is
not available and items subject to operational requirements are listed in the available MMEL
without specific relief or dispatch conditions but only with a reference to the operational
requirements, the operator may refer to CS-MMEL or CS-GEN-MMEL guidance material, as
applicable, to develop the relevant MEL content for such items.
GM2 NCO.GEN.155 Minimum equipment list
SCOPE OF THE MEL
(a)
(b)
Examples of special approvals in accordance with Part-SPA may be:
(1)
RVSM
(2)
LVO
When an aircraft has installed equipment which is not required for the operations conducted,
the operator may wish to delay rectification of such items for an indefinite period. Such cases
are considered to be out of the scope of the MEL, therefore modification of the aircraft is
appropriate and deactivation, inhibition or removal of the item should be accomplished by an
appropriate approved modification procedure.
GM3 NCO.GEN.155 Minimum equipment list
PURPOSE OF THE MEL
The MEL is an alleviating document having the purpose to identify the minimum equipment and
conditions to operate safely an aircraft having inoperative equipment. Its purpose is not, however, to
encourage the operation of aircraft with inoperative equipment. It is undesirable for aircraft to be
dispatched with inoperative equipment and such operations are permitted only as a result of careful
analysis of each item to ensure that the acceptable level of safety, as intended in the applicable
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AMC/GM TO ANNEX VII (PART-NCO)
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airworthiness and operational requirements, is maintained. The continued operation of an aircraft in
this condition should be minimised.
GM4 NCO.GEN.155 Minimum equipment list
OPERATIONAL AND MAINTENANCE PROCEDURES
(a)
Operational and maintenance procedures are an integral part of the compensating conditions
needed to maintain an acceptable level of safety, enabling the competent authority to approve
the MEL.
(b)
Normally, operational procedures are accomplished by the flight crew; however, other
personnel may be qualified and authorised to perform certain functions.
(c)
Normally, maintenance procedures are accomplished by the maintenance personnel; however,
other personnel may be qualified and authorised to perform certain functions in accordance
with the applicable airworthiness requirements.
(d)
Operational and maintenance procedures, regardless of the document where they are
contained, should be readily available for use when needed for the application of the MEL.
(e)
Unless specifically permitted by a maintenance procedure, an inoperative item may not be
removed from the aircraft.
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SUBPART B — OPERATIONAL PROCEDURES
Subpart B — Operational procedures
GM1 NCO.OP.100 Use of aerodromes and operating sites
BALLOONS
An adequate site is a site that the pilot-in-command considers to be satisfactory, taking account of
the applicable performance requirements and site characteristics.
AMC1 NCO.OP.110 Aerodrome operating minima — aeroplanes and helicopters
TAKE-OFF OPERATIONS
(a)
(b)
General:
(1)
Take-off minima should be expressed as visibility (VIS) or runway visual range (RVR)
limits, taking into account all relevant factors for each aerodrome planned to be used
and aircraft characteristics. Where there is a specific need to see and avoid obstacles on
departure and/or for a forced landing, additional conditions, e.g. ceiling, it should be
specified.
(2)
When the reported meteorological visibility is below that required for take-off and RVR
is not reported, a take-off should only be commenced if the pilot-in-command can
determine that the visibility along the take-off runway/area is equal to or better than
the required minimum.
(3)
When no reported meteorological visibility or RVR is available, a take-off should only be
commenced if the pilot-in-command can determine that the RVR/VIS along the take-off
runway/area is equal to or better than the required minimum.
Visual reference:
(1)
The take-off minima should be selected to ensure sufficient guidance to control the
aircraft in the event of both a rejected take-off in adverse circumstances and a
continued take-off after failure of the critical engine.
(2)
For night operations, ground lights should be available to illuminate the runway/final
approach and take-off area (FATO) and any obstacles.
AMC2 NCO.OP.110 Aerodrome operating minima — aeroplanes and helicopters
VISUAL APPROACH
For a visual approach operation, the RVR should not be less than 800 m.
AMC3 NCO.OP.110 Aerodrome operating minima — aeroplanes and helicopters
EFFECT ON LANDING MINIMA OF TEMPORARILY FAILED OR DOWNGRADED GROUND EQUIPMENT
(a)
Non-precision approaches requiring a final approach fix (FAF) and/or missed approach point
(MAPt) should not be conducted where a method of identifying the appropriate fix is not
available.
(b)
A minimum RVR of 750 m should be used for CAT I approaches in the absence of centreline
lines and/or touchdown zone lights.
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AMC/GM TO ANNEX VII (PART-NCO)
SUBPART B — OPERATIONAL PROCEDURES
(c)
Where approach lighting is partly unavailable, minima should take account of the serviceable
length of approach lighting.
GM1 NCO.OP.110 Aerodrome operating minima — aeroplanes and helicopters
COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE INFORMATION
An acceptable method of selecting aerodrome operating minima is through the use of commercially
available information.
GM2 NCO.OP.110 Aerodrome operating minima — aeroplanes and helicopters
VERTICAL PATH CONTROL
Due consideration should be given to the selection of an appropriate technique for vertical path
control on non-precision approaches (NPAs). Where appropriate instrumentation and/or facilities are
available, a continuous descent final approach technique (CDFA) usually offers increased safety and a
lower workload compared to a step-down approach.
GM3 NCO.OP.110 Aerodrome operating minima — aeroplanes and helicopters
CRITERIA FOR ESTABLISHING RVR/CMV
(a)
In order to qualify for the lowest allowable values of RVR/CMV specified in Table 3.A, the
instrument approach should meet at least the following facility requirements and associated
conditions:
(1)
Instrument approaches with designated vertical profile up to and including 4.5° for
Category A and B aeroplanes, or 3.77° for Category C and D aeroplanes, where the
facilities are:
(i)
instrument landing system (ILS)/microwave landing system (MLS)/GBAS landing
system (GLS)/precision approach radar (PAR); or
(ii)
approach procedure with vertical guidance (APV); and
where the final approach track is offset by not more than 15° for Category A and B
aeroplanes or by not more than 5° for Category C and D aeroplanes.
(2)
Instrument approach operations flown using the CDFA technique with a nominal
vertical profile, up to and including 4.5° for Category A and B aeroplanes, or 3.77° for
Category C and D aeroplanes, where the facilities are non-directional beacon (NDB),
NDB/distance measuring equipment (DME), VHF omnidirectional radio range (VOR),
VOR/DME, localiser (LOC), LOC/DME, VHF direction finder (VDF), surveillance radar
approach (SRA) or global navigation satellite system (GNSS)/lateral navigation (LNAV),
with a final approach segment of at least 3 NM, which also fulfil the following criteria:
(i)
the final approach track is offset by not more than 15° for Category A and B
aeroplanes or by not more than 5° for Category C and D aeroplanes;
(ii)
the final approach fix (FAF) or another appropriate fix where descent is initiated
is available, or distance to threshold (THR) is available by flight management
system (FMS)/area navigation (NDB/DME) or DME; and
(iii)
the missed approach point (MAPt) is determined by timing, the distance from
FAF to THR is ≤ 8 NM.
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AMC/GM TO ANNEX VII (PART-NCO)
SUBPART B — OPERATIONAL PROCEDURES
(3)
(b)
Instrument approaches where the facilities are NDB, NDB/DME, VOR, VOR/DME, LOC,
LOC/DME, VDF, SRA or GNSS/LNAV, not fulfilling the criteria in (a)(2), or with an
minimum descent height (MDH) ≥ 1 200 ft.
The missed approach operation, after an approach operation has been flown using the CDFA
technique, should be executed when reaching the decision height/altitude (DH/A) or the
MAPt, whichever occurs first. The lateral part of the missed approach procedure should be
flown via the MAPt unless otherwise stated on the approach chart.
GM4 NCO.OP.110 Aerodrome operating minima — aeroplanes and helicopters
DETERMINATION OF RVR/CMV/VIS MINIMA FOR NPA, APV, CAT I — AEROPLANES
(a)
The minimum RVR/CMV/VIS should be the highest of the values specified in Table 2 and
Table 3.A but not greater than the maximum values specified in Table 3.A, where applicable.
(b)
The values in Table 2 should be derived from the formula below:
required RVR/VIS (m) = [(DH/MDH (ft) x 0.3048) / tanα] – length of approach lights (m);
where α is the calculation angle, being a default value of 3.00° increasing in steps of
0.10° for each line in Table 2 up to 3.77° and then remaining constant.
(c)
If the approach is flown with a level flight segment at or above MDA/H, 200 m should be added
for Category A and B aeroplanes and 400 m for Category C and D aeroplanes to the minimum
RVR/CMV/VIS value resulting from the application of Table 2 and Table 3.A.
(d)
An RVR of less than 750 m, as indicated in Table 2, may be used:
(1)
for CAT I operations to runways with full approach lighting system (FALS), runway
touchdown zone lights (RTZL) and runway centreline lights (RCLL);
(2)
for CAT I operations to runways without RTZL and RCLL when using an approved headup guidance landing system (HUDLS), or equivalent approved system, or when
conducting a coupled approach or flight-director-flown approach to a DH. The
instrument landing system (ILS) should not be published as a restricted facility; and
(3)
for approach procedure with vertical guidance (APV) operations to runways with FALS,
RTZL and RCLL when using an approved head-up display (HUD).
(e)
Lower values than those specified in Table 2 may be used for HUDLS and auto-land operations
if approved in accordance with SPA.LVO.
(f)
The visual aids should comprise standard runway day markings and approach and runway
lights as specified in Table 1. The competent authority may approve that RVR values relevant
to a basic approach lighting system (BALS) are used on runways where the approach lights are
restricted in length below 210 m due to terrain or water, but where at least one cross-bar is
available.
(g)
For night operations or for any operation where credit for runway and approach lights is
required, the lights should be on and serviceable, except as provided for in Table 1.
(h)
For single-pilot operations, the minimum RVR/VIS should be calculated in accordance with the
following additional criteria:
(1)
an RVR of less than 800 m, as indicated in Table 2, may be used for CAT I approaches
provided any of the following is used at least down to the applicable DH:
(i)
a suitable autopilot, coupled to an ILS, microwave landing system (MLS) or GBAS
landing system (GLS) that is not published as restricted; or
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AMC/GM TO ANNEX VII (PART-NCO)
SUBPART B — OPERATIONAL PROCEDURES
(ii)
an approved HUDLS, including, where appropriate, enhanced vision system (EVS),
or equivalent approved system;
(2)
where RTZL and/or RCLL are not available, the minimum RVR/CMV should not be less
than 600 m; and
(3)
an RVR of less than 800 m, as indicated in Table 2, may be used for APV operations to
runways with FALS, RTZL and RCLL when using an approved HUDLS, or equivalent
approved system, or when conducting a coupled approach to a DH equal to or greater
than 250 ft.
Table 1: Approach lighting systems
Class of lighting facility
Length, configuration and intensity of approach lights
FALS
CAT I lighting system (HIALS ≥ 720 m) distance coded centreline,
Barrette centreline
IALS
Simple approach lighting system (HIALS 420 – 719 m) single
source, Barrette
BALS
Any other approach lighting system (HIALS, MIALS or ALS 210 –
419 m)
NALS
Any other approach lighting system (HIALS, MIALS or ALS < 210
m) or no approach lights
Note: HIALS: high intensity approach lighting system;
MIALS: medium intensity approach lighting system;
ALS: approach lighting system.
Table 2: RVR/CMV vs. DH/MDH
DH or MDH
Class of lighting facility
FALS
IALS
BALS
NALS
See (d), (e), (h). above for RVR < 750/800 m
ft
RVR/CMV (m)
200
-
210
550
750
1 000
1 200
211
-
220
550
800
1 000
1 200
221
-
230
550
800
1 000
1 200
231
-
240
550
800
1 000
1 200
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DH or MDH
Class of lighting facility
FALS
IALS
BALS
NALS
See (d), (e), (h). above for RVR < 750/800 m
ft
RVR/CMV (m)
241
-
250
550
800
1 000
1 300
251
-
260
600
800
1 100
1 300
261
-
280
600
900
1 100
1 300
281
-
300
650
900
1 200
1 400
301
-
320
700
1 000
1 200
1 400
321
-
340
800
1 100
1 300
1 500
341
-
360
900
1 200
1 400
1 600
361
-
380
1 000
1 300
1 500
1 700
381
-
400
1 100
1 400
1 600
1 800
401
-
420
1 200
1 500
1 700
1 900
421
-
440
1 300
1 600
1 800
2 000
441
-
460
1 400
1 700
1 900
2 100
461
-
480
1 500
1 800
2 000
2 200
500
1 500
1 800
2 100
2 300
481
501
-
520
1 600
1 900
2 100
2 400
521
-
540
1 700
2 000
2 200
2 400
541
-
560
1 800
2 100
2 300
2 500
561
-
580
1 900
2 200
2 400
2 600
581
-
600
2 000
2 300
2 500
2 700
601
-
620
2 100
2 400
2 600
2 800
621
-
640
2 200
2 500
2 700
2 900
641
-
660
2 300
2 600
2 800
3 000
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AMC/GM TO ANNEX VII (PART-NCO)
SUBPART B — OPERATIONAL PROCEDURES
DH or MDH
Class of lighting facility
FALS
IALS
BALS
NALS
See (d), (e), (h). above for RVR < 750/800 m
ft
RVR/CMV (m)
661
-
680
2 400
2 700
2 900
3 100
681
-
700
2 500
2 800
3 000
3 200
701
-
720
2 600
2 900
3 100
3 300
721
-
740
2 700
3 000
3 200
3 400
741
-
760
2 700
3 000
3 300
3 500
761
-
800
2 900
3 200
3 400
3 600
801
-
850
3 100
3 400
3 600
3 800
851
-
900
3 300
3 600
3 800
4 000
901
-
950
3 600
3 900
4 100
4 300
951
-
1 000
3 800
4 100
4 300
4 500
1 001
-
1 100
4 100
4 400
4 600
4 900
1 101
-
1 200
4 600
4 900
5 000
5 000
5 000
5 000
5 000
5 000
1 201 and above
Table 3.A: CAT I, APV, NPA — aeroplanes
Minimum and maximum applicable RVR/CMV (lower and upper cut-off limits)
Facility/conditions
RVR/CMV
(m)
Aeroplane category
A
ILS, MLS, GLS, PAR,
GNSS/SBAS, GNSS/VNAV
NDB, NDB/DME, VOR,
B
C
D
Min
According to Table 2
Max
1 500
1 500
2 400
2 400
Min
750
750
750
750
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Facility/conditions
RVR/CMV
(m)
VOR/DME, LOC, LOC/DME,
VDF, SRA, GNSS/LNAV with a
procedure that fulfils the
criteria in GM3 NCO.OP.110
(a)(2)
For NDB, NDB/DME, VOR,
VOR/DME, LOC, LOC/DME,
VDF, SRA, GNSS/LNAV:
—
not
fulfilling
the
criteria
in
GM3
NCO.OP.110 (a)(2), or
—
with a DH or MDH
≥ 1 200 ft
Aeroplane category
A
B
C
D
Max
1 500
1 500
2 400
2 400
Min
1 000
1 000
1 200
1 200
Max
According to Table 2 if flown using the CDFA
technique, otherwise an add-on of 200/400 m
applies to the values in Table 2 but not to
result in a value exceeding 5 000 m.
DETERMINATION OF RVR/CMV/VIS MINIMA FOR NPA, CAT I — HELICOPTERS
(a)
(b)
For non-precision approach (NPA) operations, the minima specified in Table 4.1.H should
apply:
(1)
where the missed approach point is within ½ NM of the landing threshold, the approach
minima specified for FALS may be used regardless of the length of approach lights
available. However, FATO/runway edge lights, threshold lights, end lights and
FATO/runway markings are still required;
(2)
for night operations, ground lights should be available to illuminate the FATO/runway
and any obstacles; and
(3)
for single-pilot operations, the minimum RVR is 800 m or the minima in Table 2,
whichever is higher.
For CAT I operations, the minima specified in Table 4.2.H should apply:
(1)
for night operations, ground light should be available to illuminate the FATO/runway
and any obstacles;
(2)
for single-pilot operations, the minimum RVR/VIS should be calculated in accordance
with the following additional criteria:
(i)
an RVR of less than 800 m should not be used except when using a suitable
autopilot coupled to an ILS, MLS or GLS, in which case normal minima apply; and
(ii)
the DH applied should not be less than 1.25 times the minimum use height for the
autopilot.
Table 4.1.H: Onshore NPA minima
MDH (ft) *
Facilities vs. RVR/CMV (m) **, ***
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FALS
IALS
BALS
NALS
250 – 299
600
800
1 000
1 000
300 – 449
800
1 000
1 000
1 000
450 and above
1 000
1 000
1 000
1 000
*:
The MDH refers to the initial calculation of MDH. When selecting the associated RVR,
there is no need to take account of a rounding up to the nearest 10 ft, which may be
done for operational purposes, e.g. conversion to MDA.
**:
The tables are only applicable to conventional approaches with a nominal descent
slope of not greater than 4°. Greater descent slopes will usually require that visual
glide slope guidance (e.g. precision path approach indicator (PAPI)) is also visible at the
MDH.
***: FALS comprise FATO/runway markings, 720 m or more of high intensity/medium
intensity (HI/MI) approach lights, FATO/runway edge lights, threshold lights and
FATO/runway end lights. Lights to be on.
IALS comprise FATO/runway markings, 420 – 719 m of HI/MI approach lights,
FATO/runway edge lights, threshold lights and FATO/runway end lights. Lights to be
on.
BALS comprise FATO/runway markings, < 420 m of HI/MI approach lights, any length of
low intensity (LI) approach lights, FATO/runway edge lights, threshold lights and
FATO/runway end lights. Lights to be on.
NALs comprise FATO/runway markings, FATO/runway edge lights, threshold lights,
FATO/runway end lights or no lights at all.
Table 4.2.H: Onshore CAT I minima
DH (ft) *
Facilities vs. RVR/CMV (m) **, ***
FALS
IALS
BALS
NALS
200
500
600
700
1 000
201 – 250
550
650
750
1 000
251 – 300
600
700
800
1 000
301 and above
750
800
900
1 000
*:
The DH refers to the initial calculation of DH. When selecting the associated RVR, there
is no need to take account of a rounding up to the nearest 10 ft, which may be done
for operational purposes, e.g. conversion to DA.
**:
The table is applicable to conventional approaches with a glide slope up to and
including 4°.
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***: FALS comprise FATO/runway markings, 720 m or more of HI/MI approach lights,
FATO/runway edge lights, threshold lights and FATO/runway end lights. Lights to be
on.
IALS comprise FATO/runway markings, 420 – 719 m of HI/MI approach lights,
FATO/runway edge lights, threshold lights and FATO/runway end lights. Lights to be
on.
BALS comprise FATO/runway markings, < 420 m of HI/MI approach lights, any length of
LI approach lights, FATO/runway edge lights, threshold lights and FATO/runway end
lights. Lights to be on.
NALS comprise FATO/runway markings, FATO/runway edge lights, threshold lights,
FATO/runway end lights or no lights at all.
GM5 NCO.OP.110 Aerodrome operating minima — aeroplanes and helicopters
CONVERSION OF REPORTED METEOROLOGICAL VISIBILITY TO RVR/CMV
(a)
A conversion from meteorological visibility to RVR/CMV should not be used:
(1)
when reported RVR is available;
(2)
for calculating take-off minima; and
(3)
for other RVR minima less than 800 m.
(b)
If the RVR is reported as being above the maximum value assessed by the aerodrome
operator, e.g. ‘RVR more than 1 500 m’, it should not be considered as a reported value.
(c)
For all other circumstances, Table 5 should be used.
Table 5: Conversion of reported meteorological visibility to RVR/CMV
Lighting elements in operation
RVR/CMV = reported
meteorological visibility x
Day
Night
High intensity (HI) approach and runway lights
1.5
2.0
Any type of light installation other than above
1.0
1.5
No lights
1.0
not applicable
GM6 NCO.OP.110 Aerodrome operating minima — aeroplanes and helicopters
AIRCRAFT CATEGORIES
(a)
Aircraft categories should be based on the indicated airspeed at threshold (VAT), which is equal
to the stalling speed (VSO) multiplied by 1.3 or where published 1-g (gravity) stall speed (VS1g)
multiplied by 1.23 in the landing configuration at the maximum certified landing mass. If both
VSO and VS1g are available, the higher resulting VAT should be used.
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(b)
The aircraft categories specified in the Table 6 should be used.
Table 6: Aircraft categories corresponding to VAT values
Aircraft
category
VAT
A
Less than 91 kt
B
from 91 to 120 kt
C
from 121 to 140 kt
D
from 141 to 165 kt
E
from 166 to 210 kt
GM7 NCO.OP.110 Aerodrome operating minima — aeroplanes and helicopters
CONTINUOUS DESCENT FINAL APPROACH (CDFA) — AEROPLANES
(a)
(b)
Introduction
(1)
Controlled flight into terrain (CFIT) is a major hazard in aviation. Most CFIT accidents
occur in the final approach segment of non-precision approaches; the use of stabilisedapproach criteria on a continuous descent with a constant, predetermined vertical path
is seen as a major improvement in safety during the conduct of such approaches. The
following techniques are adopted as widely as possible, for all approaches.
(2)
The elimination of level flight segments at MDA close to the ground during approaches,
and the avoidance of major changes in attitude and power/thrust close to the runway
that can destabilise approaches, are seen as ways to reduce operational risks
significantly.
(3)
The term CDFA has been selected to cover a flight technique for any type of NPA
operation.
(4)
The advantages of CDFA are as follows:
(i)
the technique enhances safe approach operations by the utilisation of standard
operating practices;
(ii)
the technique is similar to that used when flying an ILS approach, including when
executing the missed approach and the associated missed approach procedure
manoeuvre;
(iii)
the aeroplane attitude may enable better acquisition of visual cues;
(iv)
the technique may reduce pilot workload;
(v)
the approach profile is fuel efficient;
(vi)
the approach profile affords reduced noise levels; and
(vii)
the technique affords procedural integration with APV operations.
CDFA
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(1)
Continuous descent final approach is defined in Annex I to the Regulation on Air
operations.
(2)
An approach is only suitable for application of a CDFA technique when it is flown along a
nominal vertical profile; a nominal vertical profile is not forming part of the approach
procedure design, but can be flown as a continuous descent. The nominal vertical profile
information may be published or displayed on the approach chart to the pilot by
depicting the nominal slope or range/distance vs. height. Approaches with a nominal
vertical profile are considered to be:
(3)
(i)
NDB, NDB/DME (non-directional beacon/distance measuring equipment);
(ii)
VOR (VHF omnidirectional radio range), VOR/DME;
(iii)
LOC (localiser), LOC/DME;
(iv)
VDF (VHF direction finder), SRA (surveillance radar approach); and
(v)
GNSS/LNAV (global navigation satellite system/lateral navigation).
Stabilised approach (SAp) is defined in Annex I to the Regulation on Air operations.
(i)
The control of the descent path is not the only consideration when using the CDFA
technique. Control of the aeroplane’s configuration and energy is also vital to the
safe conduct of an approach.
(ii)
The control of the flight path, described above as one of the requirements for
conducting an SAp, should not be confused with the path requirements for using
the CDFA technique.
(iii)
The predetermined approach slope requirements for applying the CDFA technique
are established by the following:
(A)
the published ‘nominal’ slope information when the approach has a
nominal vertical profile; and
(B)
the designated final-approach segment minimum of 3 NM, and maximum,
when using timing techniques, of 8 NM.
(iv)
An SAp will never have any level segment of flight at DA/H or MDA/H, as
applicable. This enhances safety by mandating a prompt missed approach
procedure manoeuvre at DA/H or MDA/H.
(v)
An approach using the CDFA technique will always be flown as an SAp, since this is
a requirement for applying CDFA. However, an SAp does not have to be flown
using the CDFA technique, for example a visual approach.
GM8 NCO.OP.110 Aerodrome operating minima — aeroplanes and helicopters
ONSHORE AERODROME DEPARTURE PROCEDURES — HELICOPTERS
The cloud base and visibility should be such as to allow the helicopter to be clear of cloud at the takeoff decision point (TDP), and for the pilot flying to remain in sight of the surface until reaching the
minimum speed for flight in instrument meteorological conditions, as given in the AFM.
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AMC1 NCO.OP.111 Aerodrome operating minima — NPA, APV, CAT I operations
NPA FLOWN WITH THE CDFA TECHNIQUE
When flying a non-precision approach operation using the CDFA technique, the pilot-in-command
should ensure that when executing a missed approach, the initiation of the go-around is done at or
above the DA/H to avoid flying below the MDA/H.
GM1 NCO.OP.112 Aerodrome operating minima — circling operations with aeroplanes
SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION
(a)
The purpose of this Guidance Material is to provide pilots with supplemental information
regarding the application of aerodrome operating minima in relation to circling approaches.
(b)
Conduct of flight — general:
(c)
(1)
the MDH and obstacle clearance height (OCH) included in the procedure are referenced
to aerodrome elevation;
(2)
the MDA is referenced to mean sea level; and
(3)
for these procedures, the applicable visibility is the meteorological visibility.
Instrument approach followed by visual manoeuvring (circling) without prescribed tracks:
(1)
When the aeroplane is on the initial instrument approach, before visual reference is
stabilised, but not below MDA/H — the aeroplane should follow the corresponding
instrument approach procedure until the appropriate instrument MAPt is reached.
(2)
At the beginning of the level flight phase at or above the MDA/H, the instrument
approach track determined by radio navigation aids, RNAV, RNP or ILS, microwave
landing system (MLS) or GBAS landing system (GLS) should be maintained until the pilot:
(i)
estimates that, in all probability, visual contact with the runway of intended
landing or the runway environment will be maintained during the entire circling
procedure;
(ii)
estimates that the aeroplane is within the circling area before commencing
circling; and
(iii)
is able to determine the aeroplane’s position in relation to the runway of intended
landing with the aid of the appropriate external references.
(3)
When reaching the published instrument MAPt and the conditions stipulated in (c)(2)
are unable to be established by the pilot, a missed approach should be carried out in
accordance with that instrument approach procedure.
(4)
After the aeroplane has left the track of the initial instrument approach, the flight phase
outbound from the runway should be limited to an appropriate distance, which is
required to align the aeroplane onto the final approach. Such manoeuvres should be
conducted to enable the aeroplane:
(5)
(i)
to attain a controlled and stable descent path to the intended landing runway;
and
(ii)
to remain within the circling area and in such a way that visual contact with the
runway of intended landing or runway environment is maintained at all times.
Flight manoeuvres should be carried out at an altitude/height that is not less than the
circling MDA/H.
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(6)
(d)
Instrument approach followed by a visual manoeuvring (circling) with prescribed track:
(1)
(e)
Descent below MDA/H should not be initiated until the threshold of the runway to be
used has been appropriately identified. The aeroplane should be in a position to
continue with a normal rate of descent and land within the touchdown zone.
The aeroplane should remain on the initial instrument approach procedure until one of
the following is reached:
(i)
the prescribed divergence point to commence circling on the prescribed track; or
(ii)
the MAPt.
(2)
The aeroplane should be established on the instrument approach track determined by
the radio navigation aids, RNAV, RNP, or ILS, MLS or GLS in level flight at or above the
MDA/H at or by the circling manoeuvre divergence point.
(3)
If the divergence point is reached before the required visual reference is acquired, a
missed approach should be initiated not later than the MAPt and completed in
accordance with the initial instrument approach procedure.
(4)
When commencing the prescribed circling manoeuvre at the published divergence
point, the subsequent manoeuvres should be conducted to comply with the published
routing and published heights/altitudes.
(5)
Unless otherwise specified, once the aeroplane is established on the prescribed track(s),
the published visual reference does not need to be maintained unless:
(i)
required by the State of the aerodrome; or
(ii)
the circling MAPt (if published) is reached.
(6)
If the prescribed circling manoeuvre has a published MAPt and the required visual
reference has not been obtained by that point, a missed approach should be executed in
accordance with (e)(2) and (e)(3).
(7)
Subsequent further descent below MDA/H should only commence when the required
visual reference has been obtained.
(8)
Unless otherwise specified in the procedure, final descent should not be commenced
from MDA/H until the threshold of the intended landing runway has been identified and
the aeroplane is in a position to continue with a normal rate of descent to land within
the touchdown zone.
Missed approach:
(1)
(2)
Missed approach during the instrument procedure prior to circling:
(i)
if the missed approach is required to be flown when the aeroplane is positioned
on the instrument approach track defined by radio navigation aids, RNAV, RNP or
ILS, MLS or GLS and before commencing the circling manoeuvre, the published
missed approach for the instrument approach should be followed; or
(ii)
if the instrument approach procedure is carried out with the aid of an ILS, MLS or
a stabilised approach (SAp), the MAPt associated with an ILS or MLS procedure
without glide path (GP-out procedure) or the SAp, where applicable, should be
used.
If a prescribed missed approach is published for the circling manoeuvre, this overrides
the manoeuvres prescribed below.
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(3)
If visual reference is lost while circling to land after the aeroplane has departed from the
initial instrument approach track, the missed approach specified for that particular
instrument approach should be followed. It is expected that the pilot will make an initial
climbing turn toward the intended landing runway to a position overhead of the
aerodrome where the pilot will establish the aeroplane in a climb on the instrument
missed approach segment.
(4)
The aeroplane should not leave the visual manoeuvring (circling) area, which is obstacle
protected, unless:
(5)
(i)
established on the appropriate missed approach procedure; or
(ii)
at minimum sector altitude (MSA).
All turns should be made in the same direction and the aeroplane should remain within
the circling protected area while climbing either:
(i)
to the altitude assigned to any published circling missed approach manoeuvre if
applicable;
(ii)
to the altitude assigned to the missed approach of the initial instrument
approach;
(iii)
to the MSA;
(iv)
to the minimum holding altitude (MHA) applicable for transition to a holding
facility or fix, or continue to climb to an MSA; or
(v)
as directed by ATS.
When the missed approach procedure is commenced on the ‘downwind’ leg of the
circling manoeuvre, an ‘S’ turn may be undertaken to align the aeroplane on the initial
instrument approach missed approach path, provided the aeroplane remains within the
protected circling area.
The pilot-in-command should be responsible for ensuring adequate terrain clearance
during the above-stipulated manoeuvres, particularly during the execution of a missed
approach initiated by ATS.
(6)
Because the circling manoeuvre may be accomplished in more than one direction,
different patterns will be required to establish the aeroplane on the prescribed missed
approach course, depending on its position at the time visual reference is lost. In
particular, all turns are to be in the prescribed direction if this is restricted, e.g. to the
west/east (left or right hand) to remain within the protected circling area.
(7)
If a missed approach procedure is published for a particular runway onto which the
aeroplane is conducting a circling approach and the aeroplane has commenced a
manoeuvre to align with the runway, the missed approach for this direction may be
accomplished. The ATS unit should be informed of the intention to fly the published
missed approach procedure for that particular runway.
(8)
The pilot-in-command should advise ATS when any missed approach procedure has
been commenced, the height/altitude the aeroplane is climbing to and the position the
aeroplane is proceeding towards and/or heading the aeroplane is established on.
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AMC1 NCO.OP.130 Passenger briefing
GENERAL
(a)
(b)
Except for sailplanes and balloons, the briefing should include the locations and use of seat
belts and if applicable:
(1)
emergency exits;
(2)
passenger emergency briefing cards;
(3)
life-jackets;
(4)
oxygen dispensing equipment;
(5)
life rafts; and
(6)
other emergency equipment provided for individual passenger use.
The briefing should also include the location and general manner of use of the principal
emergency equipment carried for collective use.
SAILPLANES
(c)
The briefing should include the locations and use of seat belts and if applicable:
(1)
emergency canopy opening;
(2)
use of the parachute;
(3)
oxygen dispensing equipment;
(4)
passenger emergency briefing cards; and
(5)
other emergency equipment provided for individual passenger use.
BALLOONS
(d)
Passengers should be given a verbal briefing and demonstration about safety matters in such a
way that the information is easily retained and reproduced during the landing and in the case
of an emergency situation.
(e)
The briefing/demonstration should contain the following items:
(1)
use of landing hand-holds;
(2)
use of oxygen dispensing equipment;
(3)
other emergency equipment provided for individual passenger use, if applicable;
(4)
wearing of suitable clothing;
(5)
smoking regulations and the use of portable electronic devices;
(6)
stowage of baggage;
(7)
importance to remain inside the basket at all times, particularly after landing;
(8)
landing positions to be assumed to minimise the effect of the impact upon an
emergency landing; and
(9)
safe transport of the balloon on the ground after landing.
(f)
Part or all of the verbal briefing may be provided additionally by a safety briefing card on which
pictorial instructions indicate the correct landing position.
(g)
Before take-off the correct landing position should be demonstrated.
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(h)
Before commencing the landing phase, passengers should be required to practice the correct
landing position.
AMC1 NCO.OP.145 Refuelling with passengers embarking, on board or disembarking
OPERATIONAL PROCEDURES
If passengers are on board when refuelling with other than aviation gasoline (AVGAS), wide-cut type
fuel or a mixture of these types of fuel, the following precautions should be taken:
(a)
the pilot-in-command should remain at a location during fuelling operations with passengers
on board which allows him to handle emergency procedures concerning fire protection and
fire-fighting and initiate and direct an evacuation;
(b)
personnel and passengers should be warned that refuelling will take place;
(c)
passengers should be instructed to unfasten their seat belts and refrain from smoking; and
(d)
if the presence of fuel vapour is detected inside the aircraft, or any other hazard arises during
refuelling, fuelling should be stopped immediately.
AMC1 NCO.OP.150 Carriage of passengers
CARRIAGE OF CHILDREN AND PERSONS WITH REDUCED MOBILITY — BALLOONS
The pilot-in-command may exclude children and/or persons with reduced mobility (PRM)s from
transportation in a balloon, when:
(a)
their presence may impede:
(1)
the crew in their duties;
(2)
access to emergency equipment; or
(3)
the emergency evacuation of the balloon;
and/or
(b)
those persons are:
(1)
unable to take a proper brace position; or
(2)
smaller than the inner height of the basket wall.
AMC1 NCO.OP.160 Meteorological conditions
APPLICATION OF AERODROME FORECASTS (TAF & TREND) — AEROPLANES AND HELICOPTERS
Where a terminal area forecast (TAF) or meteorological aerodrome or aeronautical report (METAR)
with landing forecast (TREND) is used as forecast, the following criteria should be used:
(a)
From the start of a TAF validity period up to the time of applicability of the first subsequent
'FM...' or 'BECMG' or, if no 'FM' or ‘BECMG' is given, up to the end of the validity period of the
TAF, the prevailing weather conditions forecast in the initial part of the TAF should be applied.
(b)
From the time of observation of a METAR up to the time of applicability of the first subsequent
'FM...' or 'BECMG' or, if no 'FM' or ‘BECMG' is given, up to the end of the validity period of the
TREND, the prevailing weather conditions forecast in the METAR should be applied.
(c)
Following FM (alone) or BECMG AT, any specified change should be applied from the time of
the change.
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(d)
(e)
(f)
Following BECMG (alone), BECMG FM, BECMG TL, BECMG FM TL:
(1)
in the case of deterioration, any specified change should be applied from the start of the
change; and
(2)
in the case of improvement, any specified change should be applied from the end of the
change.
In a period indicated by TEMPO (alone), TEMPO FM, TEMPO TL, TEMPO FM TL, PROB30/40
(alone):
(1)
deteriorations associated with persistent conditions in connection with e.g. haze, mist,
fog, dust/sandstorm, continuous precipitation should be applied;
(2)
deteriorations associated with transient/showery conditions in connection with shortlived weather phenomena, e.g. thunderstorms, showers may be ignored; and
(3)
improvements should in all cases be disregarded.
In a period indicated by PROB30/40 TEMPO:
(1)
deteriorations may be disregarded; and
(2)
improvements should be disregarded.
Note: Abbreviations used in the context of this AMC are as follows:
FM: from
BECMG: becoming
AT: at
TL: till
TEMPO: temporarily
PROB: probability
GM1 NCO.OP.160 Meteorological conditions
CONTINUATION OF A FLIGHT — AEROPLANES AND HELICOPTERS
In the case of in-flight re-planning, continuation of a flight refers to the point from which a revised
flight plan applies.
GM2 NCO.OP.160 Meteorological conditions
EVALUATION OF METEOROLOGICAL CONDITIONS — AEROPLANES AND HELICOPTERS
It is recommended that the pilot-in-command carefully evaluates the available meteorological
information relevant to the proposed flight, such as applicable surface observations, winds,
temperatures aloft, terminal and area forecasts, air meteorological information reports (AIRMETs),
significant meteorological information (SIGMET) and pilot reports. The ultimate decision whether,
when, and where to make the flight rests with the pilot-in-command. The pilot-in-command also
should continue to re-evaluate changing weather conditions.
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GM1 NCO.OP.170(b) Ice and other contaminants — flight procedures
KNOWN ICING CONDITIONS
Known icing conditions are conditions where actual ice is observed visually to be on the aircraft by
the pilot or identified by on-board sensors.
AMC1 NCO.OP.176 Take-off conditions — balloons
FACILITIES AT THE TAKE-OFF SITE
At the balloon take-off site a means of assessing the wind direction and wind speed should be
available to the pilot-in-command.
AMC1 NCO.OP.205 Approach and landing conditions — aeroplanes and helicopters
LANDING DISTANCE/FATO SUITABILITY
The in-flight determination of the landing distance/FATO suitability should be based on the latest
available meteorological report.
AMC1 NCO.OP.210 Commencement and continuation of approach — aeroplanes and helicopters
VISUAL REFERENCES FOR NPA, APV AND CAT I OPERATIONS
(a)
At DH or MDH, at least one of the visual references specified below should be distinctly visible
and identifiable to the pilot:
(1)
elements of the approach lighting system;
(2)
the threshold;
(3)
the threshold markings;
(4)
the threshold lights;
(5)
the threshold identification lights;
(6)
the visual glide slope indicator;
(7)
the touchdown zone or touchdown zone markings;
(8)
the touchdown zone lights;
(9)
FATO/runway edge lights; or
(10) other visual references specified in the operations manual.
GM1 NCO.OP.215 Operational limitations — hot-air balloons
AVOIDANCE OF NIGHT LANDING
The intent of rule is to ensure that when the balloon takes off during night, sufficient fuel is on board
for landing under VFR by day.
The risk of collision with overhead lines is considerable and cannot be overstated. The risk is
considerably increased during night flights in conditions of failing light and visibility when there is
increasing pressure to land. A number of incidents have occurred in the late evening in just such
conditions, and may have been avoided had an earlier landing been planned. Night landings should
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SUBPART B — OPERATIONAL PROCEDURES
therefore be avoided by taking appropriate measures, including a larger quantity of fuel and/or
additional safety equipment.
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SUBPART C — AIRCRAFT PERFORMANCE AND OPERATING LIMITATIONS
Subpart C — Aircraft performance and operating limitations
GM1 NCO.POL.105 Weighing
GENERAL
(a)
New aircraft that have been weighed at the factory may be placed into operation without
reweighing if the mass records and, except for balloons, balance records have been adjusted
for alterations or modifications to the aircraft. Aircraft transferred from one EU operator to
another EU operator do not have to be weighed prior to use by the receiving operator, unless
the mass and balance cannot be accurately established by calculation.
(b)
For aircraft other than balloons, the mass and centre of gravity (CG) position should be revised
whenever the cumulative changes to the dry operating mass exceed ± 0.5 % of the maximum
landing mass or, for aeroplanes, the cumulative change in CG position exceeds 0.5 % of the
mean aerodynamic chord. This may be done by weighing the aircraft or by calculation. If the
AFM requires to record changes to mass and CG position below these thresholds, or to record
changes in any case, and make them known to the pilot-in-command, mass and CG position
should be revised accordingly and made known to the pilot-in-command.
(c)
The initial empty mass for a balloon is the balloon empty mass determined by a weighing
performed by the manufacturer of the balloon before the initial entry into service.
(d)
The mass of a balloon should be revised whenever the cumulative changes to the balloon
empty mass due to modifications or repairs exceed ± 10 % of the initial empty mass. This may
be done by weighing the balloon or by calculation.
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SUBPART D — INSTRUMENTS, DATA AND EQUIPMENT
Subpart D — Instruments, data and equipment
Section 1 — Aeroplanes
GM1 NCO.IDE.A.100(a) Instruments and equipment — general
APPLICABLE AIRWORTHINESS REQUIREMENTS
The applicable airworthiness requirements for approval of instruments and equipment required by
this Part are the following:
(a)
Regulation (EU) No 748/20124 for aeroplanes registered in the EU; and
(b)
Airworthiness requirements of the State of registry for aeroplanes registered outside the EU.
GM1 NCO.IDE.A.100(b) Instruments and equipment — general
REQUIRED INSTRUMENTS AND EQUIPMENT THAT DO NOT NEED TO BE APPROVED IN ACCORDANCE
WITH THE APPLICABLE AIRWORTHINESS REQUIREMENTS
The functionality of non-installed instruments and equipment required by this Subpart and that do
not need an equipment approval, as listed in NCO.IDE.A.100(b), should be checked against
recognised industry standards appropriate to the intended purpose. The operator is responsible for
ensuring the maintenance of these instruments and equipment.
GM1 NCO.IDE.A.100(c) Instruments and equipment — general
NOT REQUIRED INSTRUMENTS AND EQUIPMENT THAT DO NOT NEED TO BE APPROVED IN
ACCORDANCE WITH THE APPLICABLE AIRWORTHINESS REQUIREMENTS, BUT ARE CARRIED ON A
FLIGHT
(a)
The provision of this paragraph does not exempt any installed instrument or item of
equipment from complying with the applicable airworthiness requirements. In this case, the
installation should be approved as required in the applicable airworthiness requirements and
should comply with the applicable Certification Specifications.
(b)
The failure of additional non-installed instruments or equipment not required by this Part or by
the applicable airworthiness requirements or any applicable airspace requirements should not
adversely affect the airworthiness and/or the safe operation of the aeroplane. Examples may
be the following:
4
(1)
portable electronic flight bag (EFB);
(2)
portable electronic devices carried by crew members; and
(3)
non-installed passenger entertainment equipment.
Commission Regulation (EU) No 748/2012 of 3 August 2012 laying down implementing rules for the airworthiness and
environmental certification of aircraft and related products, parts and appliances, as well as for the certification of
design and production organisations, OJ L 224, 21.8.2012, p. 1.
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GM1 NCO.IDE.A.110 Spare electrical fuses
FUSES
A spare electrical fuse means a replaceable fuse in the flight crew compartment, not an automatic
circuit breaker or circuit breakers in the electric compartments.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.A.120&NCO.IDE.A.125 Operations under VFR & operations under IFR — flight and
navigational instruments and associated equipment
INTEGRATED INSTRUMENTS
(a)
Individual equipment requirements may be met by combinations of instruments, by integrated
flight systems or by a combination of parameters on electronic displays. The information so
available to each required pilot should not be less than that required in the applicable
operational requirements, and the equivalent safety of the installation should be approved
during type certification of the aeroplane for the intended type of operation.
(b)
The means of measuring and indicating turn and slip, aeroplane attitude and stabilised
aeroplane heading may be met by combinations of instruments or by integrated flight director
systems, provided that the safeguards against total failure, inherent in the three separate
instruments, are retained.
AMC2 NCO.IDE.A.120 Operations under VFR — flight and navigational instruments and associated
equipment
LOCAL FLIGHTS
For flights that do not exceed 60 minutes duration, that take off and land at the same aerodrome,
and that remain within 50 NM of that aerodrome, an equivalent means of complying with
NCO.IDE.A.120 (b)(1)(i), (b)(1)(ii) may be:
(a)
a turn and slip indicator;
(b)
a turn co-ordinator; or
(c)
both an attitude indicator and a slip indicator.
GM1 NCO.IDE.A.120 Operations under VFR — flight and navigational instruments and associated
equipment
SLIP INDICATION
Aeroplanes should be equipped with a means of measuring and displaying slip.
GM1 NCO.IDE.A.125 Operations under IFR — flight and navigational instruments and associated
equipment
ALTERNATE SOURCE OF STATIC PRESSURE
Aeroplanes should be equipped with an alternate source of static pressure.
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AMC1 NCO.IDE.A.120(a)(1)&NCO.IDE.A.125(a)(1) Operations under VFR & operations under IFR —
flight and navigational instruments and associated equipment
MEANS OF MEASURING AND DISPLAYING MAGNETIC HEADING
The means of measuring and displaying magnetic direction should be a magnetic compass or
equivalent.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.A.120(a)(2)&NCO.IDE.A.125(a)(2) Operations under VFR & operations under IFR —
flight and navigational instruments and associated equipment
MEANS OF MEASURING AND DISPLAYING THE TIME
A means of measuring and displaying the time in hours, minutes and seconds may be a wrist watch
capable of the same functions.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.A.120(a)(3)&NCO.IDE.A.125(a)(3) Operations under VFR operations & operations
under IFR — flight and navigational instruments and associated equipment
CALIBRATION OF THE MEANS OF MEASURING AND DISPLAYING PRESSURE ALTITUDE
The instrument measuring and displaying pressure altitude should be of a sensitive type calibrated in
feet (ft), with a sub-scale setting, calibrated in hectopascals/millibars, adjustable for any barometric
pressure likely to be set during flight.
GM1 NCO.IDE.A.125(a)(3) Operations under IFR — flight and navigational instruments and
associated equipment
ALTIMETERS
Altimeters with counter drum-pointer or equivalent presentation are considered to be less
susceptible to misinterpretation for aeroplanes operating above 10 000 ft.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.A.120(a)(4)&NCO.IDE.A.125(a)(4) Operations under VFR & operations under IFR —
flight and navigational instruments and associated equipment
CALIBRATION OF THE INSTRUMENT INDICATING AIRSPEED
(a)
The instrument indicating airspeed should be calibrated in knots (kt).
(b)
In the case of aeroplanes with a maximum certified take-off mass (MCTOM) below 2 000 kg,
calibration in kilometres per hour (kph) or in miles per hour (mph) is acceptable when such
units are used in the AFM.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.A.120(c)&NCO.IDE.A.125(c) Operations under IFR — flight and navigational
instruments and associated equipment
MEANS OF PREVENTING MALFUNCTION DUE TO CONDENSATION OR ICING
The means of preventing malfunction due to either condensation or icing of the airspeed indicating
system should be a heated pitot tube or equivalent.
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AMC1 NCO.IDE.A.125(a)(9) Operations under IFR — flight and navigational instruments and
associated equipment
MEANS OF DISPLAYING OUTSIDE AIR TEMPERATURE
(a)
The means of displaying outside air temperature should be calibrated in degrees Celsius.
(b)
In the case of aeroplanes with a maximum certified take-off mass (MCTOM) below 2 000 kg,
calibration in degrees Fahrenheit is acceptable, when such unit is used in the AFM.
(c)
The means of displaying outside air temperature may be an air temperature indicator that
provides indications that are convertible to outside air temperature.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.A.130 Terrain awareness warning system (TAWS)
EXCESSIVE DOWNWARDS GLIDESLOPE DEVIATION WARNING FOR CLASS A TAWS
The requirement for a Class A TAWS to provide a warning to the flight crew for excessive downwards
glideslope deviation should apply to all final approach glideslopes with angular vertical navigation
(VNAV) guidance, whether provided by the instrument landing system (ILS), microwave landing
system (MLS), satellite-based augmentation system approach procedure with vertical guidance (SBAS
APV (localiser performance with vertical guidance approach LPV)), ground-based augmentation
system (GBAS (GPS landing system, GLS)) or any other systems providing similar guidance. The same
requirement should not apply to systems providing vertical guidance based on barometric VNAV.
GM1 NCO.IDE.A.130 Terrain awareness warning system (TAWS)
ACCEPTABLE STANDARD FOR TAWS
An acceptable standard for Class A and Class B TAWS may be the applicable European Technical
Standards Order (ETSO) issued by the Agency or equivalent.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.A.135 Flight crew interphone system
GENERAL
(a)
The flight crew interphone system should not be of a handheld type.
(b)
A headset consists of a communication device that includes two earphones to receive and a
microphone to transmit audio signals to the aeroplane’s communication system. To comply
with the minimum performance requirements, the earphones and microphone should match
the communication system’s characteristics and the flight crew compartment environment.
The headset should be adequately adjustable in order to fit the pilot’s head. Headset boom
microphones should be of the noise cancelling type.
(c)
If the intention is to utilise noise cancelling earphones, the pilot-in-command should ensure
that the earphones do not attenuate any aural warnings or sounds necessary for alerting the
flight crew on matters related to the safe operation of the aeroplane.
GM1 NCO.IDE.A.135 Flight crew interphone system
HEADSET
The term ‘headset’ includes any aviation helmet incorporating headphones and microphone worn by
a flight crew member.
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AMC1 NCO.IDE.A.140 Seats, seat safety belts, restraint systems and child restraint devices
CHILD RESTRAINT DEVICES (CRDS)
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
A CRD is considered to be acceptable if:
(1)
it is a supplementary loop belt manufactured with the same techniques and the same
materials as the approved safety belts; or
(2)
it complies with (b).
Provided the CRD can be installed properly on the respective aircraft seat, the following CRDs
are considered acceptable:
(1)
CRDs approved for use in aircraft by a competent authority on the basis of a technical
standard and marked accordingly.
(2)
CRDs approved for use in motor vehicles according to the UN standard ECE R 44, -03 or
later series of amendments.
(3)
CRDs approved for use in motor vehicles and aircraft according to Canadian CMVSS
213/213.1.
(4)
CRDs approved for use in motor vehicles and aircraft according to US FMVSS No 213
and manufactured to these standards on or after February 26, 1985. US approved
CRDs manufactured after this date should bear the following labels in red letters:
(i)
‘THIS CHILD RESTRAINT SYSTEM CONFORMS TO ALL APPLICABLE FEDERAL
MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY STANDARDS’; and
(ii)
‘THIS RESTRAINT IS CERTIFIED FOR USE IN MOTOR VEHICLES AND AIRCRAFT’;
(5)
CRDs qualified for use in aircraft according to the German ‘Qualification Procedure for
Child Restraint Systems for Use in Aircraft’ (TÜV Doc.: TÜV/958-01/2001); and
(6)
Devices approved for use in cars, manufactured and tested to standards equivalent to
those listed above. The device should be marked with an associated qualification sign,
which shows the name of the qualification organisation and a specific identification
number, related to the associated qualification project. The qualifying organisation
should be a competent and independent organisation that is acceptable to the
competent authority.
Location
(1)
Forward facing CRDs may be installed on both forward and rearward facing passenger
seats but only when fitted in the same direction as the passenger seat on which they
are positioned. Rearward facing CRDs should only be installed on forward facing
passenger seats. A CRD may not be installed within the radius of action of an airbag,
unless it is obvious that the airbag is de-activated or it can be demonstrated that there
is no negative impact from the airbag.
(2)
An infant in a CRD should be located as near to a floor level exit as feasible.
(3)
An infant in a CRD should not hinder evacuation for any passenger.
Installation
(1)
CRDs should only be installed on a suitable aircraft seat with the type of connecting
device they are approved or qualified for. E.g., CRDs to be connected by a three point
harness only (most rearward facing baby CRDs currently available) should not be
attached to an aeroplane seat with a lap belt only; a CRD designed to be attached to a
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vehicle seat by means of rigid bar lower anchorages (ISO-FIX or US equivalent) only,
should only be used on aeroplane seats that are equipped with such connecting
devices and should not be attached by the aeroplane seat lap belt. The method of
connecting should be the one shown in the manufacturer’s instructions provided with
each CRD.
(e)
(2)
All safety and installation instructions should be followed carefully by the responsible
adult accompanying the infant.
(3)
If a forward facing CRD with a rigid backrest is to be fastened by a lap belt, the
restraint device should be fastened when the backrest of the passenger seat on which
it rests is in a reclined position. Thereafter, the backrest is to be positioned upright.
This procedure ensures better tightening of the CRD on the aircraft seat if the aircraft
seat is reclinable.
(4)
The buckle of the adult safety belt should be easily accessible for both opening and
closing, and should be in line with the seat belt halves (not canted) after tightening.
(5)
Forward facing restraint devices with an integral harness must not be installed such
that the adult safety belt is secured over the infant.
Operation
(1)
Each CRD should remain secured to a passenger seat during all phases of flight, unless it
is properly stowed when not in use.
(2)
Where a CRD is adjustable in recline, it should be in an upright position for all occasions
when passenger restraint devices are required.
AMC2 NCO.IDE.A.140 Seats, seat safety belts, restraint systems and child restraint devices
UPPER TORSO RESTRAINT SYSTEM
The following systems are deemed to be compliant with the requirement for an upper torso restraint
system:
(a)
A seat belt with a diagonal shoulder strap;
(b)
A restraint system having a seat belt and two shoulder straps that may be used independently;
(c)
A restraint system having a seat belt, two shoulder straps and additional straps that may be
used independently.
SEAT BELT
A seat belt with diagonal shoulder strap (three anchorage points) is deemed to be compliant with the
requirement for a seat belt (two anchorage points).
AMC1 NCO.IDE.A.145 First-aid kit
CONTENT OF FIRST-AID KITS
(a)
First-aid kits should be equipped with appropriate and sufficient medications and
instrumentation. However, these kits should be amended by the operator according to the
characteristics of the operation (scope of operation, flight duration, number and demographics
of passengers, etc.).
(b)
The following should be included in the FAKs:
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(1)
bandages (assorted sizes),
(2)
burns dressings (large and small),
(3)
wound dressings (large and small),
(4)
adhesive dressings (assorted sizes),
(5)
antiseptic wound cleaner,
(6)
safety scissors,
(7)
disposable gloves.
AMC2 NCO.IDE.A.145 First-aid kit
MAINTENANCE OF FIRST-AID KIT
To be kept up-to-date, the first-aid kit should be:
(a)
inspected periodically to confirm, to the extent possible, that contents are maintained in the
condition necessary for their intended use;
(b)
replenished at regular intervals, in accordance with instructions contained on their labels, or as
circumstances warrant; and
(c)
replenished after use in-flight at the first opportunity where replacement items are available.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.A.150 Supplemental oxygen — pressurised aeroplanes
DETERMINATION OF OXYGEN
(a)
In the determination of the amount of oxygen for the routes to be flown, it is assumed that the
aeroplane will descend in accordance with the emergency procedures specified in the AFM,
without exceeding its operating limitations, to a flight altitude that will allow the flight to be
completed safely (i.e. flight altitudes ensuring adequate terrain clearance, navigational
accuracy, hazardous weather avoidance, etc.).
(b)
The amount of oxygen should be determined on the basis of cabin pressure altitude, flight
duration, and on the assumption that a cabin pressurisation failure will occur at the pressure
altitude or point of flight that is most critical from the standpoint of oxygen need.
(c)
Following a cabin pressurisation failure, the cabin pressure altitude should be considered to be
the same as the aeroplane pressure altitude, unless it can be demonstrated to the competent
authority that no probable failure of the cabin or pressurisation system will result in a cabin
pressure altitude equal to the aeroplane pressure altitude. Under these circumstances, the
demonstrated maximum cabin pressure altitude may be used as a basis for determination of
oxygen supply.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.A.155 Supplemental oxygen — non-pressurised aeroplanes
DETERMINATION OF OXYGEN
(a)
In the determination of the amount of oxygen for the routes to be flown, it is assumed that the
aeroplane will operate at a flight altitude that will allow the flight to be completed safely (i.e.
flight altitudes ensuring adequate terrain clearance, navigational accuracy, hazardous weather
avoidance, etc.).
(b)
The amount of oxygen should be determined on the basis of cabin pressure altitude and flight
duration.
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AMC1 NCO.IDE.A.165 Marking of break-in points
MARKINGS — COLOUR AND CORNERS
(a)
The colour of the markings should be red or yellow and, if necessary, should be outlined in
white to contrast with the background.
(b)
If the corner markings are more than 2 m apart, intermediate lines 9 cm x 3 cm should be
inserted so that there is no more than 2 m between adjacent markings.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.A.170 Emergency locator transmitter (ELT)
BATTERIES
(a)
(b)
All batteries used in ELTs or PLBs should be replaced (or recharged, if the battery is
rechargeable) when the equipment has been in use for more than 1 cumulative hour or in the
following cases:
(1)
Batteries specifically designed for use in ELTs and having an airworthiness release
certificate (EASA Form 1 or equivalent) should be replaced (or recharged, if the battery
is rechargeable) before the end of their useful life in accordance with the maintenance
instructions applicable to the ELT.
(2)
Standard batteries manufactured in accordance with an industry standard and not
having an airworthiness release certificate (EASA Form 1 or equivalent), when used in
ELTs should be replaced (or recharged, if the battery is rechargeable) when 50 % of
their useful life (or for rechargeable, 50 % of their useful life of charge), as established
by the battery manufacturer, has expired.
(3)
All batteries used in PLBs should be replaced (or recharged, if the battery is
rechargeable) when 50 % of their useful life (or for rechargeable, 50 % of their useful
life of charge), as established by the battery manufacturer, has expired.
(4)
The battery useful life (or useful life of charge) criteria in (1),(2) and (3) do not apply to
batteries (such as water-activated batteries) that are essentially unaffected during
probable storage intervals.
The new expiry date for a replaced (or recharged) battery should be legibly marked on the
outside of the equipment.
AMC2 NCO.IDE.A.170 Emergency locator transmitter (ELT)
TYPES OF ELT AND GENERAL TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
(a)
The ELT required by this provision should be one of the following:
(1)
Automatic fixed (ELT(AF)). An automatically activated ELT that is permanently attached
to an aircraft and is designed to aid search and rescue (SAR) teams in locating the crash
site.
(2)
Automatic portable (ELT(AP)). An automatically activated ELT that is rigidly attached to
an aircraft before a crash, but is readily removable from the aircraft after a crash. It
functions as an ELT during the crash sequence. If the ELT does not employ an integral
antenna, the aircraft-mounted antenna may be disconnected and an auxiliary antenna
(stored on the ELT case) attached to the ELT. The ELT can be tethered to a survivor or a
life-raft. This type of ELT is intended to aid SAR teams in locating the crash site or
survivor(s).
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(3)
Automatic deployable (ELT(AD)). An ELT that is rigidly attached to the aircraft before the
crash and that is automatically ejected, deployed and activated by an impact, and, in
some cases, also by hydrostatic sensors. Manual deployment is also provided. This type
of ELT should float in water and is intended to aid SAR teams in locating the crash site.
(4)
Survival ELT (ELT(S)). An ELT that is removable from an aircraft, stowed so as to facilitate
its ready use in an emergency and manually activated by a survivor. An ELT(S) may be
activated manually or automatically (e.g. by water activation). It should be designed
either to be tethered to a life-raft or a survivor.
(b)
To minimise the possibility of damage in the event of crash impact, the automatic ELT should
be rigidly fixed to the aircraft structure, as far aft as is practicable, with its antenna and
connections arranged so as to maximise the probability of the signal being transmitted after a
crash.
(c)
Any ELT carried should operate in accordance with the relevant provisions of ICAO Annex 10,
Volume III, and should be registered with the national agency responsible for initiating search
and rescue or other nominated agency.
AMC3 NCO.IDE.A.170 Emergency locator transmitter (ELT)
PLB TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
(a)
A personal locator beacon (PLB) should have a built-in GNSS receiver with a cosmicheskaya
sistyema poiska avariynich sudov — search and rescue satellite-aided tracking (COSPASSARSAT) type approval number. However, devices with a COSPAS-SARSAT number belonging
to series 700 are excluded as this series of numbers identifies the special-use beacons not
meeting all the technical requirements and all the tests specified by COSPAS-SARSAT.
(b)
Any PLB carried should be registered with the national agency responsible for initiating search
and rescue or other nominated agency.
AMC4 NCO.IDE.A.170 Emergency locator transmitter (ELT)
BRIEFING ON PLB USE
When a PLB is carried by a passenger, he/she should be briefed on its characteristics and use by the
pilot-in-command before the flight.
GM1 NCO.IDE.A.170 Emergency locator transmitter (ELT)
TERMINOLOGY
(a)
An ELT is a generic term describing equipment that broadcasts distinctive signals on designated
frequencies and, depending on application, may be activated by impact or may be manually
activated.
(b)
A PLB is an emergency beacon other than an ELT that broadcasts distinctive signals on
designated frequencies, is standalone, portable and is manually activated by the survivors.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.A.175 Flight over water
ACCESSIBILITY OF LIFE-JACKETS
The life-jacket, if not worn, should be accessible from the seat or berth of the person for whose use it
is provided, with a safety belt or a restraint system fastened.
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MEANS OF ILLUMINATION FOR LIFE-JACKETS
Each life-jacket or equivalent individual flotation device should be equipped with a means of electric
illumination for the purpose of facilitating the location of persons.
RISK ASSESSMENT
(a)
When conducting the risk assessment, the pilot-in-command should base his/her decision, as
far as is practicable, on the Implementing Rules and AMCs applicable to the operation of the
aeroplane.
(b)
The pilot-in-command should, for determining the risk, take the following operating
environment and conditions into account:
(1)
sea state;
(2)
sea and air temperatures;
(3)
the distance from land suitable for making an emergency landing; and
(4)
the availability of search and rescue facilities.
GM1 NCO.IDE.A.175 Flight over water
SEAT CUSHIONS
Seat cushions are not considered to be flotation devices.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.A.180 Survival equipment
GENERAL
(a)
(b)
Aeroplanes operated across land areas in which search and rescue would be especially difficult
should be equipped with the following:
(1)
signalling equipment to make the distress signals;
(2)
at least one ELT(S) or a PLB, carried by the pilot-in-command or a passenger; and
(3)
additional survival equipment for the route to be flown, taking account of the number of
persons on board.
The additional survival equipment specified in (a)(3) does not need to be carried when the
aeroplane remains within a distance from an area where search and rescue is not especially
difficult, that corresponds to:
(1)
120 minutes at one-engine-inoperative (OEI) cruising speed for aeroplanes capable of
continuing the flight to an aerodrome with the critical engine(s) becoming inoperative at
any point along the route or planned diversion routes; or
(2)
30 minutes at cruising speed for all other aeroplanes.
AMC2 NCO.IDE.A.180 Survival equipment
ADDITIONAL SURVIVAL EQUIPMENT
(a)
The following additional survival equipment should be carried when required:
(1)
500 ml of water for each four, or fraction of four, persons on board;
(2)
one knife;
(3)
first-aid equipment; and
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(4)
(b)
one set of air/ground codes.
If any item of equipment contained in the above list is already carried on board the aeroplane
in accordance with another requirement, there is no need for this to be duplicated.
GM1 NCO.IDE.A.180 Survival equipment
SIGNALLING EQUIPMENT
The signalling equipment for making distress signals is described in ICAO Annex 2, Rules of the Air.
GM2 NCO.IDE.A.180 Survival equipment
AREAS IN WHICH SEARCH AND RESCUE WOULD BE ESPECIALLY DIFFICULT
The expression ‘areas in which search and rescue would be especially difficult’ should be interpreted,
in this context, as meaning:
(a)
areas so designated by the competent authority responsible for managing search and rescue;
or
(b)
areas that are largely uninhabited and where:
(1)
the authority referred to in (a) has not published any information to confirm whether
search and rescue would be or would not be especially difficult; and
(2)
the authority referred to in (a) does not, as a matter of policy, designate areas as being
especially difficult for search and rescue.
GM1 NCO.IDE.A.190 Radio communication equipment
APPLICABLE AIRSPACE REQUIREMENTS
For aeroplanes being operated under European air traffic control, the applicable airspace
requirements include the Single European Sky legislation.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.A.195 Navigation equipment
NAVIGATION WITH VISUAL REFERENCE TO LANDMARKS
Where aeroplanes, with the surface in sight, can proceed according to the ATS flight plan by
navigation with visual reference to landmarks, no additional equipment is needed to comply with
NCO.IDE.A.195 (a)(1).
AMC1 NCO.IDE.A.200 Transponder
GENERAL
(a)
The secondary surveillance radar (SSR) transponders of aeroplanes being operated under
European air traffic control should comply with any applicable Single European Sky legislation.
(b)
If the Single European Sky legislation is not applicable, the SSR transponders should operate in
accordance with the relevant provisions of Volume IV of ICAO Annex 10.
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Section 2 — Helicopters
GM1 NCO.IDE.H.100(a) Instruments and equipment — general
APPLICABLE AIRWORTHINESS REQUIREMENTS
The applicable airworthiness requirements for approval of instruments and equipment required by
this Part are the following:
(a)
Regulation (EU) No 748/2012 for helicopters registered in the EU; and
(b)
Airworthiness requirements of the State of registry for helicopters registered outside the EU.
GM1 NCO.IDE.H.100(b) Instruments and equipment — general
REQUIRED INSTRUMENTS AND EQUIPMENT THAT DO NOT NEED TO BE APPROVED IN ACCORDANCE
WITH THE APPLICABLE AIRWORTHINESS REQUIREMENTS
The functionality of non-installed instruments and equipment required by this Subpart and that do
not need an equipment approval, as listed in NCO.IDE.H.100(b), should be checked against
recognised industry standards appropriate to the intended purpose. The operator is responsible for
ensuring the maintenance of these instruments and equipment.
GM1 NCO.IDE.H.100(c) Instruments and equipment — general
NOT REQUIRED INSTRUMENTS AND EQUIPMENT THAT DO NOT NEED TO BE APPROVED IN
ACCORDANCE WITH THE APPLICABLE AIRWORTHINESS REQUIREMENTS, BUT ARE CARRIED ON A
FLIGHT
(a)
The provision of this paragraph does not exempt any installed instrument or item of
equipment from complying with the applicable airworthiness requirements. In this case, the
installation should be approved as required in the applicable airworthiness requirements and
should comply with the applicable Certification Specifications.
(b)
The failure of additional non-installed instruments or equipment not required by this Part or by
the applicable airworthiness requirements or any applicable airspace requirements should not
adversely affect the airworthiness and/or the safe operation of the helicopter. Examples may
be the following:
(1)
portable electronic flight bag (EFB);
(2)
portable electronic devices carried by crew members; and
(3)
non-installed passenger entertainment equipment.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.115 Operating lights
LANDING LIGHT
The landing light should be trainable, at least in the vertical plane, or optionally be an additional fixed
light or lights positioned to give a wide spread of illumination.
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AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.120&NCO.IDE.H.125 Operations under VFR & operations under IFR — flight and
navigational instruments and associated equipment
INTEGRATED INSTRUMENTS
(a)
Individual equipment requirements may be met by combinations of instruments, by integrated
flight systems or by a combination of parameters on electronic displays. The information so
available to each required pilot should not be less than that required in the applicable
operational requirements, and the equivalent safety of the installation should be approved
during type certification of the helicopter for the intended type of operation.
(b)
The means of measuring and indicating turn and slip, helicopter attitude and stabilised
helicopter heading may be met by combinations of instruments or by integrated flight director
systems, provided that the safeguards against total failure, inherent in the three separate
instruments, are retained.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.120(a)(1)&NCO.IDE.H.125(a)(1) Operations under VFR & operations under IFR —
flight and navigational instruments and associated equipment
MEANS OF MEASURING AND DISPLAYING MAGNETIC HEADING
The means of measuring and displaying magnetic direction should be a magnetic compass or
equivalent.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.120(a)(2)&NCO.IDE.H.125(a)(2) Operations under VFR & operations under IFR —
flight and navigational instruments and associated equipment
MEANS OF MEASURING AND DISPLAYING THE TIME
A means of measuring and displaying the time in hours, minutes and seconds may be a wrist watch
capable of the same functions.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.120(a)(3)&NCO.IDE.H.125(a)(3) Operations under VFR & operations under IFR —
flight and navigational instruments and associated equipment
CALIBRATION OF THE MEANS OF MEASURING AND DISPLAYING PRESSURE ALTITUDE
The instrument measuring and displaying pressure altitude should be of a sensitive type calibrated in
feet (ft), with a sub-scale setting, calibrated in hectopascals/millibars, adjustable for any barometric
pressure likely to be set during flight.
GM1 NCO.IDE.H.125(a)(3) Operations under IFR — flight and navigational instruments and
associated equipment
ALTIMETERS
Altimeters with counter drum-pointer or equivalent presentation are considered to be less
susceptible to misinterpretation for helicopters operating above 10 000 ft.
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AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.120(a)(4)&NCO.IDE.H.125(a)(4) Operations under VFR & operations under IFR —
flight and navigational instruments and associated equipment
CALIBRATION OF THE INSTRUMENT INDICATING AIRSPEED
(a)
The instrument indicating airspeed should be calibrated in knots (kt).
(b)
In the case of helicopters with an MCTOM below 2 000 kg, calibration in kilometres per hour
(kph) or in miles per hour (mph) is acceptable when such units are used in the AFM.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.120(a)(5) Operations under VFR — flight and navigational instruments and
associated equipment
SLIP
The means of measuring and displaying slip may be a slip string for operations under VFR.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.120(b)(1)(iii)&NCO.IDE.H.125(a)(8) Operations under VFR & operations under
IFR — flight and navigational instruments and associated equipment
STABILISED HEADING
Stabilised direction should be achieved for VFR flights by a gyroscopic direction indicator, whereas
for IFR flights, this should be achieved through a magnetic gyroscopic direction indicator.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.120(c)&NCO.IDE.H.125(c) Operations under VFR & Operations under IFR —
flight and navigational instruments and associated equipment
MEANS OF PREVENTING MALFUNCTION DUE TO CONDENSATION OR ICING
The means of preventing malfunction due to either condensation or icing of the airspeed indicating
system should be a heated pitot tube or equivalent.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.125(a)(9) Operations under IFR — flight and navigational instruments and
associated equipment
MEANS OF DISPLAYING OUTSIDE AIR TEMPERATURE
(a)
The means of displaying outside air temperature should be calibrated in degrees Celsius.
(b)
In the case of helicopters with a maximum certified take-off mass (MCTOM) below 2 000 kg,
calibration in degrees Fahrenheit is acceptable, when such unit is used in the AFM.
(c)
The means of displaying outside air temperature may be an air temperature indicator that
provides indications that are convertible to outside air temperature.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.135 Flight crew interphone system
GENERAL
(a)
The flight crew interphone system should not be of a handheld type.
(b)
A headset consists of a communication device which includes two earphones to receive and a
microphone to transmit audio signals to the helicopter’s communication system. To comply
with the minimum performance requirements, the earphones and microphone should match
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the communication system’s characteristics and the flight crew compartment environment.
The headset should be adequately adjustable in order to fit the pilot’s head. Headset boom
microphones should be of the noise cancelling type.
(c)
If the intention is to utilise noise cancelling earphones, the pilot-in-command should ensure
that the earphones do not attenuate any aural warnings or sounds necessary for alerting the
flight crew on matters related to the safe operation of the helicopter.
GM1 NCO.IDE.H.135 Flight crew interphone system
HEADSET
The term ‘headset’ includes any aviation helmet incorporating headphones and microphone worn by
a flight crew member.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.140 Seats, seat safety belts, restraint systems and child restraint devices
CHILD RESTRAINT DEVICES (CRDS)
(a)
(b)
(c)
A CRD is considered to be acceptable if:
(1)
it is a supplementary loop belt manufactured with the same techniques and the same
materials of the approved safety belts; or
(2)
it complies with (b).
Provided the CRD can be installed properly on the respective helicopter seat, the following
CRDs are considered acceptable:
(1)
CRDs approved for use in aircraft by a competent authority on the basis of a technical
standard and marked accordingly.
(2)
CRDs approved for use in motor vehicles according to the UN standard ECE R 44, -03 or
later series of amendments.
(3)
CRDs approved for use in motor vehicles and aircraft according to Canadian CMVSS
213/213.1.
(4)
CRDs approved for use in motor vehicles and aircraft according to US FMVSS No 213 and
manufactured to these standards on or after February 26, 1985. US approved CRDs
manufactured after this date should bear the following labels in red letters:
(i)
‘THIS CHILD RESTRAINT SYSTEM CONFORMS TO ALL APPLICABLE FEDERAL MOTOR
VEHICLE SAFETY STANDARDS’; and
(ii)
‘THIS RESTRAINT IS CERTIFIED FOR USE IN MOTOR VEHICLES AND AIRCRAFT’;
(5)
CRDs qualified for use in aircraft according to the German ‘Qualification Procedure for
Child Restraint Systems for Use in Aircraft’ (TÜV Doc.: TÜV/958-01/2001); and
(6)
Devices approved for use in cars, manufactured and tested to standards equivalent to
those listed above. The device should be marked with an associated qualification sign,
which shows the name of the qualification organisation and a specific identification
number, related to the associated qualification project. The qualifying organisation
should be a competent and independent organisation that is acceptable to the
competent authority.
Location
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(d)
(e)
(1)
Forward facing CRDs may be installed on both forward and rearward facing passenger
seats but only when fitted in the same direction as the passenger seat on which they are
positioned. Rearward facing CRDs should only be installed on forward facing passenger
seats. A CRD may not be installed within the radius of action of an airbag, unless it is
obvious that the airbag is de-activated or it can be demonstrated that there is no
negative impact from the airbag.
(2)
An infant in a CRD should be located as near to a floor level exit as feasible.
(3)
An infant in a CRD should not hinder evacuation for any passenger.
Installation
(1)
CRDs should only be installed on a suitable helicopter seat with the type of connecting
device they are approved or qualified for. E.g., CRDs to be connected by a three point
harness only (most rearward facing baby CRDs currently available) should not be
attached to a helicopter seat with a lap belt only; a CRD designed to be attached to a
vehicle seat by means of rigid bar lower anchorages (ISO-FIX or US equivalent) only,
should only be used on helicopter seats that are equipped with such connecting devices
and should not be attached by the helicopter seat lap belt. The method of connecting
should be the one shown in the manufacturer’s instructions provided with each CRD.
(2)
All safety and installation instructions should be followed carefully by the responsible
person accompanying the infant.
(3)
If a forward facing CRD with a rigid backrest is to be fastened by a lap belt, the restraint
device should be fastened when the backrest of the passenger seat on which it rests is in
a reclined position. Thereafter, the backrest is to be positioned upright. This procedure
ensures better tightening of the CRD on the aircraft seat if the aircraft seat is reclinable.
(4)
The buckle of the adult safety belt should be easily accessible for both opening and
closing, and should be in line with the seat belt halves (not canted) after tightening.
(5)
Forward facing restraint devices with an integral harness must not be installed such that
the adult safety belt is secured over the infant.
Operation
(1)
Each CRD should remain secured to a passenger seat during all phases of flight, unless it
is properly stowed when not in use.
(2)
Where a CRD is adjustable in recline, it should be in an upright position for all occasions
when passenger restraint devices are required.
AMC2 NCO.IDE.H.140 Seats, seat safety belts, restraint systems and child restraint devices
UPPER TORSO RESTRAINT SYSTEM
The following systems are deemed to be compliant with the requirement for an upper torso restraint
system:
(a)
a seat belt with a diagonal shoulder strap;
(b)
a restraint system having a seat belt and two shoulder straps that may be used independently;
(c)
a restraint system having a seat belt, two shoulder straps and additional straps that may be
used independently.
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SEAT BELT
A seat belt with diagonal shoulder strap (three anchorage points) is deemed to be compliant with the
requirement for a seat belt (two anchorage points).
AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.145 First-aid kit
CONTENT OF FIRST-AID KITS
(a)
First-aid kits should be equipped with appropriate and sufficient medications and
instrumentation. However, these kits should be amended by the operator according to the
characteristics of the operation (scope of operation, flight duration, number and demographics
of passengers, etc.).
(b)
The following should be included in the FAKs:
(1)
bandages (assorted sizes),
(2)
burns dressings (large and small),
(3)
wound dressings (large and small),
(4)
adhesive dressings (assorted sizes),
(5)
antiseptic wound cleaner,
(6)
safety scissors,
(7)
disposable gloves.
AMC2 NCO.IDE.H.145 First-aid kit
MAINTENANCE OF FIRST-AID KIT
To be kept up-to-date, the first-aid kit should be:
(a)
inspected periodically to confirm, to the extent possible, that contents are maintained in the
condition necessary for their intended use;
(b)
replenished at regular intervals, in accordance with instructions contained on their labels, or as
circumstances warrant; and
(c)
replenished after use in-flight at the first opportunity where replacement items are available.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.155 Supplemental oxygen — non-pressurised helicopters
DETERMINATION OF OXYGEN
The amount of oxygen should be determined on the basis of cabin pressure altitude and flight
duration, consistent with the operating procedures, including emergency procedures, established for
each operation and the routes to be flown as specified in the AFM.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.165 Marking of break-in points
MARKINGS — COLOUR AND CORNERS
(a)
The colour of the markings should be red or yellow and, if necessary, should be outlined in
white to contrast with the background.
(b)
If the corner markings are more than 2 m apart, intermediate lines 9 cm x 3 cm should be
inserted so that there is no more than 2 m between adjacent markings.
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AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.170 Emergency locator transmitter (ELT)
BATTERIES
(a)
(b)
All batteries used in ELTs or PLBs should be replaced (or recharged, if the battery is
rechargeable) when the equipment has been in use for more than 1 cumulative hour or in the
following cases:
(1)
Batteries specifically designed for use in ELTs and having an airworthiness release
certificate (EASA Form 1 or equivalent) should be replaced (or recharged, if the battery
is rechargeable) before the end of their useful life in accordance with the maintenance
instructions applicable to the ELT.
(2)
Standard batteries manufactured in accordance with an industry standard and not
having an airworthiness release certificate (EASA Form 1 or equivalent), when used in
ELTs should be replaced (or recharged, if the battery is rechargeable) when 50 % of
their useful life (or for rechargeable, 50 % of their useful life of charge), as established
by the battery manufacturer, has expired.
(3)
All batteries used in PLBs should be replaced (or recharged, if the battery is
rechargeable) when 50 % of their useful life (or for rechargeable, 50 % of their useful
life of charge), as established by the battery manufacturer, has expired.
(4)
The battery useful life (or useful life of charge) criteria in (1),(2) and (3) do not apply to
batteries (such as water-activated batteries) that are essentially unaffected during
probable storage intervals.
The new expiry date for a replaced (or recharged) battery should be legibly marked on the
outside of the equipment.
AMC2 NCO.IDE.H.170 Emergency locator transmitter (ELT)
TYPES OF ELT AND GENERAL TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
(a)
The ELT required by this provision should be one of the following:
(1)
Automatic fixed (ELT(AF)). An automatically activated ELT that is permanently attached
to an aircraft and is designed to aid SAR teams in locating the crash site.
(2)
Automatic portable (ELT(AP)). An automatically activated ELT that is rigidly attached to
an aircraft before a crash, but is readily removable from the aircraft after a crash. It
functions as an ELT during the crash sequence. If the ELT does not employ an integral
antenna, the aircraft-mounted antenna may be disconnected and an auxiliary antenna
(stored on the ELT case) attached to the ELT. The ELT can be tethered to a survivor or a
life-raft. This type of ELT is intended to aid SAR teams in locating the crash site or
survivor(s).
(3)
Automatic deployable (ELT(AD)). An ELT that is rigidly attached to the aircraft before the
crash and that is automatically ejected, deployed and activated by an impact, and, in
some cases, also by hydrostatic sensors. Manual deployment is also provided. This type
of ELT should float in water and is intended to aid SAR teams in locating the crash site.
(4)
Survival ELT (ELT(S)). An ELT that is removable from an aircraft, stowed so as to facilitate
its ready use in an emergency, and manually activated by a survivor. An ELT(S) may be
activated manually or automatically (e.g. by water activation). It should be designed
either to be tethered to a life-raft or a survivor.
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(b)
To minimise the possibility of damage in the event of crash impact, the automatic ELT should
be rigidly fixed to the aircraft structure, as far aft as is practicable, with its antenna and
connections arranged so as to maximise the probability of the signal being transmitted after a
crash.
(c)
Any ELT carried should operate in accordance with the relevant provisions of ICAO Annex 10,
Volume III, and should be registered with the national agency responsible for initiating search
and rescue or other nominated agency.
AMC3 NCO.IDE.H.170 Emergency locator transmitter (ELT)
PLB TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
(a)
A personal locator beacon (PLB) should have a built-in GNSS receiver with a cosmicheskaya
sistyema poiska avariynich sudov — search and rescue satellite-aided tracking (COSPASSARSAT) type approval number. However, devices with a COSPAS-SARSAT number belonging
to series 700 are excluded as this series of numbers identifies the special-use beacons not
meeting all the technical requirements and all the tests specified by COSPAS-SARSAT.
(b)
Any PLB carried should be registered with the national agency responsible for initiating search
and rescue or other nominated agency.
AMC4 NCO.IDE.H.170 Emergency locator transmitter (ELT)
BRIEFING ON PLB USE
When a PLB is carried by a passenger, he/she should be briefed on its characteristics and use by the
pilot-in-command before the flight.
GM1 NCO.IDE.H.170 Emergency locator transmitter (ELT)
TERMINOLOGY
(a)
An ELT is a generic term describing equipment that broadcasts distinctive signals on designated
frequencies and, depending on application, may be activated by impact or may be manually
activated.
(b)
A PLB is an emergency beacon other than an ELT that broadcasts distinctive signals on
designated frequencies, is standalone, portable and is manually activated by the survivors.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.175 Flight over water
ACCESSIBILITY OF LIFE-JACKETS
The life-jacket, if not worn, should be accessible from the seat or berth of the person for whose use it
is provided, with a safety belt or a restraint system fastened.
RISK ASSESSMENT
(a)
When conducting the risk assessment, the pilot-in-command should base his/her decision, as
far as is practicable, on the Implementing Rules and AMCs applicable to the operation of the
helicopter.
(b)
The pilot-in-command should, for determining the risk, take the following operating
environment and conditions into account:
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(1)
sea state;
(2)
sea and air temperatures;
(3)
the distance from land suitable for making an emergency landing; and
(4)
the availability of search and rescue facilities.
GM1 NCO.IDE.H.175 Flight over water
SEAT CUSHIONS
Seat cushions are not considered to be flotation devices.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.180 Survival equipment
GENERAL
Helicopters operated across areas in which search and rescue would be especially difficult should be
equipped with the following:
(a)
signalling equipment to make the distress signals;
(b)
at least one ELT(S) or a PLB, carried by the pilot-in-command or a passenger; and
(c)
additional survival equipment for the route to be flown taking account of the number of
persons on board.
AMC2 NCO.IDE.H.180 Survival equipment
ADDITIONAL SURVIVAL EQUIPMENT
(a)
(b)
The following additional survival equipment should be carried when required:
(1)
500 ml of water for each four, or fraction of four, persons on board;
(2)
one knife;
(3)
first-aid equipment; and
(4)
one set of air/ground codes.
If any item of equipment contained in the above list is already carried on board the helicopter
in accordance with another requirement, there is no need for this to be duplicated.
GM1 NCO.IDE.H.180 Survival equipment
SIGNALLING EQUIPMENT
The signalling equipment for making distress signals is described in ICAO Annex 2, Rules of the Air.
GM2 NCO.IDE.H.180 Survival equipment
AREAS IN WHICH SEARCH AND RESCUE WOULD BE ESPECIALLY DIFFICULT
The expression ‘areas in which search and rescue would be especially difficult’ should be interpreted,
in this context, as meaning:
(a)
areas so designated by the competent authority responsible for managing search and rescue;
or
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(b)
areas that are largely uninhabited and where:
(1)
the authority referred to in (a) has not published any information to confirm whether
search and rescue would be or would not be especially difficult; and
(2)
the authority referred to in (a) does not, as a matter of policy, designate areas as being
especially difficult for search and rescue.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.185 All helicopters on flights over water — ditching
EMERGENCY FLOTATION EQUIPMENT
The same considerations of AMC1 NCC.IDE.H.231 should apply in respect of emergency flotation
equipment.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.195 Navigation equipment
NAVIGATION WITH VISUAL REFERENCE TO LANDMARKS
Where helicopters, with the surface in sight, can proceed according to the ATS flight plan by
navigation with visual reference to landmarks, no additional equipment is needed to comply
NCO.IDE.H.195(a)(1).
GM1 NCO.IDE.H.195 Navigation equipment
APPLICABLE AIRSPACE REQUIREMENTS
For helicopters being operated under European air traffic control, the applicable airspace
requirements include the Single European Sky legislation.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.H.200 Transponder
GENERAL
(a)
The secondary surveillance radar (SSR) transponders of helicopters being operated under
European air traffic control should comply with any applicable Single European Sky legislation.
(b)
If the Single European Sky legislation is not applicable, the SSR transponders should operate in
accordance with the relevant provisions of Volume IV of ICAO Annex 10.
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Section 3 — Sailplanes
GM1 NCO.IDE.S.100(a) Instruments and equipment — general
APPLICABLE AIRWORTHINESS REQUIREMENTS
The applicable airworthiness requirements for approval of instruments and equipment required by
this Part are the following:
(a)
Regulation (EU) No 748/2012 for sailplanes registered in the EU; and
(b)
Airworthiness requirements of the State of registry for sailplanes registered outside the EU.
GM1 NCO.IDE.S.100(b) Instruments and equipment — general
REQUIRED INSTRUMENTS AND EQUIPMENT THAT DO NOT NEED TO BE APPROVED IN ACCORDANCE
WITH THE APPLICABLE AIRWORTHINESS REQUIREMENTS
The functionality of non-installed instruments and equipment required by this Subpart and that do
not need an equipment approval, as listed in NCO.IDE.S.100(b), should be checked against
recognised industry standards appropriate to the intended purpose. The operator is responsible for
ensuring the maintenance of these instruments and equipment.
GM1 NCO.IDE.S.100(c) Instruments and equipment — general
NOT REQUIRED INSTRUMENTS AND EQUIPMENT THAT DO NOT NEED TO BE APPROVED IN
ACCORDANCE WITH THE APPLICABLE AIRWORTHINESS REQUIREMENTS, BUT ARE CARRIED ON A
FLIGHT
(a)
The provision of this paragraph does not exempt any installed instrument or item of
equipment from complying with the applicable airworthiness requirements. In this case, the
installation should be approved as required in the applicable airworthiness requirements and
should comply with the applicable Certification Specifications.
(b)
The failure of additional non-installed instruments or equipment not required by this Part or by
the applicable airworthiness requirements or any applicable airspace requirements should not
adversely affect the airworthiness and/or the safe operation of the sailplane. Examples may be
portable electronic devices carried by crew members or passengers.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.S.115&NCO.IDE.S.120 Operations under VFR & cloud flying — flight and
navigational instruments
INTEGRATED INSTRUMENTS
(a)
Individual equipment requirements may be met by combinations of instruments or by
integrated flight systems or by a combination of parameters on electronic displays. The
information so available to each required pilot should not be less than that required in the
applicable operational requirements, and the equivalent safety of the installation should be
approved during type certification of the sailplane for the intended type of operation.
(b)
The means of measuring and indicating turn and slip and sailplane attitude may be met by
combinations of instruments, provided that the safeguards against total failure, inherent in the
three separate instruments, are retained.
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AMC1 NCO.IDE.S.115(a)(1)&NCO.IDE.S.120(a) Operations under VFR & cloud flying — flight and
navigational instruments
MEANS OF MEASURING AND DISPLAYING MAGNETIC HEADING
The means of measuring and displaying magnetic direction should be a magnetic compass or
equivalent.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.S.115(a)(2)&NCO.IDE.S.120(b) Operations under VFR & cloud flying — flight and
navigational instruments
MEANS OF MEASURING AND DISPLAYING THE TIME
A means of measuring and displaying the time in hours, minutes and seconds may be a wrist watch
capable of the same functions.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.S.115(a)(3)&NCO.IDE.S.120(c) Operations under VFR & cloud flying — flight and
navigational instruments
CALIBRATION OF THE MEANS FOR MEASURING AND DISPLAYING PRESSURE ALTITUDE
(a)
The instrument measuring and displaying pressure altitude should be of a sensitive type
calibrated in feet (ft), with a sub-scale setting, calibrated in hectopascals/millibars, adjustable
for any barometric pressure likely to be set during flight.
(b)
Calibration in metres (m) is also acceptable.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.S.115(a)(4)&NCO.IDE.S.120(d) Operations under VFR & cloud flying — flight and
navigational instruments
CALIBRATION OF THE INSTRUMENT INDICATING AIRSPEED
(a)
The instrument indicating airspeed should be calibrated in knots (kt).
(b)
Calibration in kilometres per hour (kph) or in miles per hour (mph) is also acceptable.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.S.115(b)(2) Operations under VFR — flight and navigational instruments
SLIP INDICATION
The means of measuring and displaying slip may be a yaw string for operations under VFR.
GM1 NCO.IDE.S.115(b) Operations under VFR — flight and navigational instruments
CONDITIONS WHERE THE SAILPLANE CANNOT BE MAINTAINED IN A DESIRED ATTITUDE WITHOUT
REFERENCE TO ONE OR MORE ADDITIONAL INSTRUMENTS
Sailplanes operating in conditions where the sailplane cannot be maintained in a desired attitude
without reference to one or more additional instruments means a condition that is still under VFR
(under VMC) though where there is no external reference such as the natural horizon or a coastline,
that would allow the attitude to be maintained. Such conditions may occur over water, a desert or
snow-covered areas where the colour of the surface cannot be distinguished from the colour of the
sky and therefore no external reference is available. Cloud flying is not considered to be one of these
conditions.
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AMC1 NCO.IDE.S.125 Seats and restraint systems
UPPER TORSO RESTRAINT SYSTEM
(a)
A seat belt with upper torso restraint system should have four anchorage points and should
include shoulder straps (two anchorage points) and a seat belt (two anchorage points), which
may be used independently.
(b)
A restraint system having five anchorage points is deemed to be compliant to the requirement
for seat belt with upper torso restraint system with four anchorage points.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.S.135 Flight over water
MEANS OF ILLUMINATION FOR LIFE-JACKETS
Each life-jacket or equivalent individual flotation device should be equipped with a means of electric
illumination for the purpose of facilitating the location of persons.
RISK ASSESSMENT
(a)
When conducting the risk assessment, the pilot-in-command should base his/her decision, as
far as is practicable, on the Implementing Rules and AMCs applicable to the operation of the
sailplane.
(b)
The pilot-in-command should, for determining the risk, take the following operating
environment and conditions into account:
(1)
sea state;
(2)
sea and air temperatures;
(3)
the distance from land suitable for making an emergency landing; and
(4)
the availability of search and rescue facilities.
GM1 NCO.IDE.S.135(a) Flight over water
SEAT CUSHIONS
Seat cushions are not considered to be flotation devices.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.S.135(b) Flight over water
BATTERIES
(a)
All batteries used in ELTs or PLBs should be replaced (or recharged, if the battery is
rechargeable) when the equipment has been in use for more than 1 cumulative hour or in the
following cases:
(1)
Batteries specifically designed for use in ELTs and having an airworthiness release
certificate (EASA Form 1 or equivalent) should be replaced (or recharged, if the battery
is rechargeable) before the end of their useful life in accordance with the maintenance
instructions applicable to the ELT.
(2)
Standard batteries manufactured in accordance with an industry standard and not
having an airworthiness release certificate (EASA Form 1 or equivalent), when used in
ELTs should be replaced (or recharged, if the battery is rechargeable) when 50 % of
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their useful life (or for rechargeable, 50 % of their useful life of charge), as established
by the battery manufacturer, has expired.
(b)
(3)
All batteries used in PLBs should be replaced (or recharged, if the battery is
rechargeable) when 50 % of their useful life (or for rechargeable, 50 % of their useful
life of charge), as established by the battery manufacturer, has expired.
(4)
The battery useful life (or useful life of charge) criteria in (1),(2) and (3) do not apply to
batteries (such as water-activated batteries) that are essentially unaffected during
probable storage intervals.
The new expiry date for a replaced (or recharged) battery should be legibly marked on the
outside of the equipment.
AMC2 NCO.IDE.S.135(b) Flight over water
TYPES OF ELT AND GENERAL TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
(a)
The ELT required by this provision should be one of the following:
(1)
Automatic fixed (ELT(AF)). An automatically activated ELT that is permanently attached
to an aircraft and is designed to aid SAR teams in locating the crash site.
(2)
Automatic portable (ELT(AP)). An automatically activated ELT that is rigidly attached to
an aircraft before a crash, but is readily removable from the aircraft after a crash. It
functions as an ELT during the crash sequence. If the ELT does not employ an integral
antenna, the aircraft-mounted antenna may be disconnected and an auxiliary antenna
(stored on the ELT case) attached to the ELT. The ELT can be tethered to a survivor or a
life-raft. This type of ELT is intended to aid SAR teams in locating the crash site or
survivor(s).
(3)
Automatic Deployable (ELT(AD)). An ELT that is rigidly attached to the aircraft before the
crash and that is automatically ejected, deployed and activated by an impact, and, in
some cases, also by hydrostatic sensors. Manual deployment is also provided. This type
of ELT should float in water and is intended to aid SAR teams in locating the crash site.
(4)
Survival ELT (ELT(S)). An ELT that is removable from an aircraft, stowed so as to facilitate
its ready use in an emergency and manually activated by a survivor. An ELT(S) may be
activated manually or automatically (e.g. by water activation). It should be designed
either to be tethered to a life-raft or a survivor.
(b)
To minimise the possibility of damage in the event of crash impact, the automatic ELT should
be rigidly fixed to the aircraft structure, as far aft as is practicable, with its antenna and
connections arranged so as to maximise the probability of the signal being transmitted after a
crash.
(c)
Any ELT carried should operate in accordance with the relevant provisions of ICAO Annex 10,
Volume III, and should be registered with the national agency responsible for initiating search
and rescue or other nominated agency.
AMC3 NCO.IDE.S.135(b) Flight over water
PLB TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
(a)
A personal locator beacon (PLB) should have a built-in GNSS receiver with a cosmicheskaya
sistyema poiska avariynich sudov — search and rescue satellite-aided tracking (COSPASSARSAT) type approval number. However, devices with a COSPAS-SARSAT number belonging
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to series 700 are excluded as this series of numbers identifies the special-use beacons not
meeting all the technical requirements and all the tests specified by COSPAS-SARSAT.
(b)
Any PLB carried should be registered with the national agency responsible for initiating search
and rescue or other nominated agency.
AMC4 NCO.IDE.S.135(b) Flight over water
BRIEFING ON PLB USE
When a PLB is carried by a passenger, he/she should be briefed on its characteristics and use by the
pilot-in-command before the flight.
GM1 NCO.IDE.S.135(b) Flight over water
TERMINOLOGY
(a)
An ELT is a generic term describing equipment that broadcasts distinctive signals on designated
frequencies and, depending on application, may be activated by impact or may be manually
activated.
(b)
A PLB is an emergency beacon other than an ELT that broadcasts distinctive signals on
designated frequencies, is standalone, portable and is manually activated by the survivors.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.S.140 Survival equipment
GENERAL
Sailplanes operated across land areas in which search and rescue would be especially difficult should
be equipped with the following:
(a)
signalling equipment to make the distress signals;
(b)
at least one ELT(S) or a PLB; and
(c)
additional survival equipment for the route to be flown taking account of the number of
persons on board.
AMC2 NCO.IDE.S.140 Survival equipment
ADDITIONAL SURVIVAL EQUIPMENT
(a)
(b)
The following additional survival equipment should be carried when required:
(1)
500 ml of water;
(2)
one knife;
(3)
first-aid equipment; and
(4)
one set of air/ground codes.
If any item of equipment contained in the above list is already carried on board the sailplane in
accordance with another requirement, there is no need for this to be duplicated.
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GM1 NCO.IDE.S.140 Survival equipment
SIGNALLING EQUIPMENT
The signalling equipment for making distress signals is described in ICAO Annex 2, Rules of the Air.
GM2 NCO.IDE.S.140 Survival equipment
AREAS IN WHICH SEARCH AND RESCUE WOULD BE ESPECIALLY DIFFICULT
The expression ‘areas in which search and rescue would be especially difficult’ should be interpreted,
in this context, as meaning:
(a)
areas so designated by the authority responsible for managing search and rescue; or
(b)
areas that are largely uninhabited and where:
(1)
the authority referred to in (a) has not published any information to confirm whether
search and rescue would be or would not be especially difficult; and
(2)
the authority referred to in (a) does not, as a matter of policy, designate areas as being
especially difficult for search and rescue.
GM1 NCO.IDE.S.150 Navigation equipment
APPLICABLE AIRSPACE REQUIREMENTS
For sailplanes being operated under European air traffic control, the applicable airspace
requirements include the Single European Sky legislation.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.S.155 Transponder
GENERAL
(a)
The secondary surveillance radar (SSR) transponders of sailplanes being operated under
European air traffic control should comply with any applicable Single European Sky legislation.
(b)
If the Single European Sky legislation is not applicable, the SSR transponders should operate in
accordance with the relevant provisions of Volume IV of ICAO Annex 10.
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Section 4 — Balloons
GM1 NCO.IDE.B.100(a) Instruments and equipment — general
APPLICABLE AIRWORTHINESS REQUIREMENTS
The applicable airworthiness requirements for approval of instruments and equipment required by
this Part are the following:
(a)
Regulation (EU) No 748/2012 for balloons registered in the EU; and
(b)
Airworthiness requirements of the state of registry for balloons registered outside the EU.
GM1 NCO.IDE.B.100(b) Instruments and equipment — general
REQUIRED INSTRUMENTS AND EQUIPMENT THAT DO NOT NEED TO BE APPROVED IN ACCORDANCE
WITH THE APPLICABLE AIRWORTHINESS REQUIREMENTS
The functionality of non-installed instruments and equipment required by this Subpart and that do
not need an equipment approval, as listed in NCO.IDE.B.100(b), should be checked against
recognised industry standards appropriate to the intended purpose. The operator is responsible for
ensuring the maintenance of these instruments and equipment.
GM1 NCO.IDE.B.100(c) Instruments and equipment — general
NOT REQUIRED INSTRUMENTS AND EQUIPMENT THAT DO NOT NEED TO BE APPROVED IN
ACCORDANCE WITH THE APPLICABLE AIRWORTHINESS REQUIREMENTS, BUT ARE CARRIED ON A
FLIGHT
(a)
The provision of this paragraph does not exempt any installed instrument or item of
equipment from complying with the applicable airworthiness requirements. In this case, the
installation should be approved as required in the applicable airworthiness requirements and
should comply with the applicable Certification Specifications.
(b)
The failure of additional non-installed instruments or equipment not required by this Part or by
the applicable airworthiness requirements or any applicable airspace requirements should not
adversely affect the airworthiness and/or the safe operation of the balloon. Examples may be
portable electronic devices carried by crew members or passengers.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.B.110 Operating lights
ANTI-COLLISION LIGHTS
An acceptable means of compliance is the anti-collision light required for free manned balloons
certified for VFR at night in accordance with CS 31HB/GB.
ILLUMINATION FOR INSTRUMENTS AND EQUIPMENT
A means of providing adequate illumination to instruments and equipment essential to the safe
operation of the balloon may be an independent portable light.
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AMC1 NCO.IDE.B.115(a) Operations under VFR — flight and navigational instruments
MEANS OF DISPLAYING DRIFT DIRECTION
The drift direction may be determined by using a map and reference to visual landmarks.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.B.115(b)(1) Operations under VFR — flight and navigational instruments
MEANS OF MEASURING AND DISPLAYING THE TIME
A means of measuring and displaying the time in hours, minutes and seconds may be a wrist watch
capable of the same functions.
GM1 NCO.IDE.B.115(b)(2) Operations under VFR — flight and navigational instruments
MEANS OF MEASURING AND DISPLAYING VERTICAL SPEED
The necessity of a vertical speed indicator depends on the balloon design. Some envelope shapes
have a high drag and will therefore not develop a high ascent/descent speed. Such balloons usually
do not require a vertical speed indicator. More slender envelope shapes such as special shape
balloons may have a significantly lower drag. Their ascent/descent speed is usually limited to a
certain value so that controllability of the balloon is maintained. To be able to stay within this
limitation of the AFM, a vertical speed indicator is required for such balloons.
GM1 NCO.IDE.B.115(b)(3) Operations under VFR — flight and navigational instruments and
associated equipment
MEANS OF MEASURING AND DISPLAYING PRESSURE ALTITUDE
A means of measuring and displaying pressure altitude is needed when required by ATC, or by
Regulation (EU) 923/2012, or when altitude needs to be checked for flights where oxygen is used, or
the limitations in the AFM require to limit altitude and/or rate of climb/descent.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.B.120 First-aid kit
CONTENT OF FIRST-AID KITS
(a)
First-aid kits should be equipped with appropriate and sufficient medications and
instrumentation. However, these kits should be amended by the operator according to the
characteristics of the operation (scope of operation, flight duration, number and demographics
of passengers, etc.).
(b)
The following should be included in the FAKs:
(1)
bandages (assorted sizes),
(2)
burns dressings (large and small),
(3)
wound dressings (large and small),
(4)
adhesive dressings (assorted sizes),
(5)
antiseptic wound cleaner,
(6)
safety scissors,
(7)
disposable gloves.
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AMC2 NCO.IDE.B.120 First-aid kit
MAINTENANCE OF FIRST-AID KIT
To be kept up-to-date, first-aid kits should be:
(a)
inspected periodically to confirm, to the extent possible, that contents are maintained in the
condition necessary for their intended use;
(b)
replenished at regular intervals, in accordance with instructions contained on their labels, or as
circumstances warrant; and
(c)
replenished after use in-flight at the first opportunity where replacement items are available.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.B.125 Hand fire extinguishers
CERTIFICATION SPECIFICATIONS
The applicable Certification Specification for hot-air balloons should be CS-31HB or equivalent.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.B.130 Flight over water
MEANS OF ILLUMINATION FOR LIFE-JACKETS
Each life-jacket or equivalent individual flotation device should be equipped with a means of electric
illumination for the purpose of facilitating the location of persons.
RISK ASSESSMENT
(a)
When conducting the risk assessment, the pilot-in-command should base his/her decision, as
far as is practicable, on the Implementing Rules and AMCs applicable to the operation of the
balloon.
(b)
The pilot-in-command should, for determining the risk, take the following operating
environment and conditions into account:
(1)
sea state;
(2)
sea and air temperatures;
(3)
the distance from land suitable for making an emergency landing; and
(4)
the availability of search and rescue facilities.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.B.130(b) Flight over water
BATTERIES
(a)
All batteries used in ELTs or PLBs should be replaced (or recharged, if the battery is
rechargeable) when the equipment has been in use for more than 1 cumulative hour or in the
following cases:
(1)
Batteries specifically designed for use in ELTs and having an airworthiness release
certificate (EASA Form 1 or equivalent) should be replaced (or recharged, if the battery
is rechargeable) before the end of their useful life in accordance with the maintenance
instructions applicable to the ELT.
(2)
Standard batteries manufactured in accordance with an industry standard and not
having an airworthiness release certificate (EASA Form 1 or equivalent), when used in
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ELTs should be replaced (or recharged, if the battery is rechargeable) when 50 % of
their useful life (or for rechargeable, 50 % of their useful life of charge), as established
by the battery manufacturer, has expired.
(b)
(3)
All batteries used in PLBs should be replaced (or recharged, if the battery is
rechargeable) when 50 % of their useful life (or for rechargeable, 50 % of their useful
life of charge), as established by the battery manufacturer, has expired.
(4)
The battery useful life (or useful life of charge) criteria in (1),(2) and (3) do not apply to
batteries (such as water-activated batteries) that are essentially unaffected during
probable storage intervals.
The new expiry date for a replaced (or recharged) battery should be legibly marked on the
outside of the equipment.
AMC2 NCO.IDE.B.130(b) Flight over water
TYPES OF ELT AND GENERAL TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
(a)
The ELT required by this provision should be one of the following:
(1)
Automatic fixed (ELT(AF)). An automatically activated ELT that is permanently attached
to an aircraft and is designed to aid SAR teams in locating the crash site.
(2)
Automatic portable (ELT(AP)). An automatically activated ELT that is rigidly attached to
an aircraft before a crash, but is readily removable from the aircraft after a crash. It
functions as an ELT during the crash sequence. If the ELT does not employ an integral
antenna, the aircraft-mounted antenna may be disconnected and an auxiliary antenna
(stored on the ELT case) attached to the ELT. The ELT can be tethered to a survivor or a
life-raft. This type of ELT is intended to aid SAR teams in locating the crash site or
survivor(s).
(3)
Automatic deployable (ELT(AD)). An ELT that is rigidly attached to the aircraft before the
crash and which is automatically ejected, deployed and activated by an impact, and, in
some cases, also by hydrostatic sensors. Manual deployment is also provided. This type
of ELT should float in water and is intended to aid SAR teams in locating the crash site.
(4)
Survival ELT (ELT(S)). An ELT that is removable from an aircraft, stowed so as to facilitate
its ready use in an emergency and manually activated by a survivor. An ELT(S) may be
activated manually or automatically (e.g. by water activation). It should be designed
either to be tethered to a life-raft or a survivor.
(b)
To minimise the possibility of damage in the event of crash impact, the automatic ELT should
be rigidly fixed to the aircraft structure, as far aft as is practicable, with its antenna and
connections arranged so as to maximise the probability of the signal being transmitted after a
crash.
(c)
Any ELT carried should operate in accordance with the relevant provisions of ICAO Annex 10,
Volume III, and should be registered with the national agency responsible for initiating search
and rescue or other nominated agency.
AMC3 NCO.IDE.B.130(b) Flight over water
PLB TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
(a)
A personal locator beacon (PLB) should have a built-in GNSS receiver with a cosmicheskaya
sistyema poiska avariynich sudov — search and rescue satellite-aided tracking (COSPASPage 79
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SARSAT) type approval number. However, devices with a COSPAS-SARSAT number belonging
to series 700 are excluded as this series of numbers identifies the special-use beacons not
meeting all the technical requirements and all the tests specified by COSPAS-SARSAT.
(b)
Any PLB carried should be registered with the national agency responsible for initiating search
and rescue or other nominated agency.
AMC4 NCO.IDE.B.130(b) Flight over water
BRIEFING ON PLB USE
When a PLB is carried by a passenger, he/she should be briefed on its characteristics and use by the
pilot-in-command before the flight.
GM1 NCO.IDE.B.130(b) Flight over water
TERMINOLOGY
(a)
An ELT is a generic term describing equipment that broadcasts distinctive signals on designated
frequencies and, depending on application, may be activated by impact or may be manually
activated.
(b)
A PLB is an emergency beacon other than an ELT that broadcasts distinctive signals on
designated frequencies, is standalone, portable and is manually activated by the survivors.
GM1 NCO.IDE.B.130(d) Survival equipment
SIGNALLING EQUIPMENT
The signalling equipment for making distress signals is described in ICAO Annex 2, Rules of the Air.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.B.135 Survival equipment
GENERAL
Balloons operated across land areas in which search and rescue would be especially difficult should
be equipped with the following:
(a)
signalling equipment to make the distress signals;
(b)
at least one ELT(S) or a PLB; and
(c)
additional survival equipment for the route to be flown taking account of the number of
persons on board.
AMC2 NCO.IDE.B.135 Survival equipment
ADDITIONAL SURVIVAL EQUIPMENT
(a)
The following additional survival equipment should be carried when required:
(1)
500 ml of water for each four, or fraction of four, persons on board;
(2)
one knife;
(3)
first-aid equipment; and
(4)
one set of air/ground codes.
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(b)
If any item of equipment contained in the above list is already carried on board the balloon in
accordance with another requirement, there is no need for this to be duplicated.
GM1 NCO.IDE.B.135 Survival equipment
AREAS IN WHICH SEARCH AND RESCUE WOULD BE ESPECIALLY DIFFICULT
The expression ‘areas in which search and rescue would be especially difficult’ should be interpreted,
in this context, as meaning:
(a)
areas so designated by the authority responsible for managing search and rescue; or
(b)
areas that are largely uninhabited and where:
(1)
the authority referred to in (a) has not published any information to confirm whether
search and rescue would be or would not be especially difficult; and
(2)
the authority referred to in (a) does not, as a matter of policy, designate areas as being
especially difficult for search and rescue.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.B.140(b)(3) Miscellaneous equipment
FIRE BLANKET
A fire blanket should comply with EN 1869 or equivalent. The size should be at least 1.5 m x 2 m.
Smaller sizes are not recommended as they cannot sufficiently cover the source of developing
propane fire.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.B.140 (c)(1) Miscellaneous equipment
KNIFE
The knife, hook knife or equivalent, should be capable of cutting any control line or handling rope
that is accessible to the pilot-in-command or a crew member from the basket.
GM1 NCO.IDE.B.145 Radio communication equipment
APPLICABLE AIRSPACE REQUIREMENTS
For balloons being operated under European air traffic control, the applicable airspace requirements
include the Single European Sky legislation.
AMC1 NCO.IDE.B.150 Transponder
GENERAL
(a)
The secondary surveillance radar (SSR) transponders of balloons being operated under
European air traffic control should comply with any applicable Single European Sky legislation.
(b)
If the Single European Sky legislation is not applicable, the SSR transponders should operate in
accordance with the relevant provisions of Volume IV of ICAO Annex 10.
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Subpart E — Specific requirements
Section 1 — General
AMC1 NCO.SPEC.100 Scope
CRITERIA
The pilot-in-command should consider the following criteria to determine whether an activity falls
within the scope of specialised operations:
(a)
the aircraft is flown close to the surface to fulfil the mission;
(b)
abnormal manoeuvres are performed;
(c)
special equipment is necessary to fulfil the mission and which affects the manoeuvrability of
the aircraft;
(d)
substances are released from the aircraft during the flight where these substances are either
harmful or affect the manoeuvrability of the aircraft;
(e)
external loads or goods are lifted or towed; or
(f)
persons enter or leave the aircraft during flight.
GM1 NCO.SPEC.100 Scope
LIST OF SPECIALISED OPERATIONS
(a)
Specialised operations include the following activities:
(1)
helicopter external loads operations;
(2)
helicopter survey operations;
(3)
human external cargo operations;
(4)
parachute operations and skydiving;
(5)
agricultural flights;
(6)
aerial photography flights;
(7)
glider towing;
(8)
aerial advertising flights;
(9)
calibration flights;
(10)
construction work flights, including stringing power line operations, clearing saw
operations;
(11)
oil spill work;
(12)
avalanche mining operations;
(13)
survey operations, including aerial mapping operations, pollution control activity;
(14)
news media flights, television and movie flights;
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(b)
(15)
special events flights, including such as flying display, competition flights;
(16)
aerobatic flights;
(17)
animal herding and rescue flights and veterinary dropping flights;
(18)
maritime funeral operations;
(19)
scientific research flights (other than those under Annex II of Regulation 216/2008);
and
(20)
cloud seeding.
For other operations, the pilot-in-command can apply the criteria specified in AMC1
NCO.SPEC.100 to determine whether an activity falls within the scope of specialised
operations.
GM1 NCO.SPEC.105 Checklist
DEVELOPMENT OF CHECKLISTS
For developing the checklist, the pilot-in-command should duly take into account at least the
following items:
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
nature and complexity of the activity:
(1)
the nature of the flight and the risk exposure, e.g. low height;
(2)
the complexity of the activity taking into account the necessary pilot skills and level of
experience, ground support, safety and individual protective equipment;
(3)
the operational environment and geographical area, e.g., congested hostile
environment, mountainous areas, sea areas, or desert areas;
(4)
the result of the risk assessment and evaluation;
aircraft and equipment:
(1)
the category of aircraft to be used for the activity should be indicated, e.g.
helicopter/aeroplane, single/multi-engined;
(2)
all equipment required for the activity should be listed;
crew members:
(1)
crew composition;
(2)
minimum crew experience and training provisions; and
(3)
recency provisions;
task specialists:
(1)
description of the task specialists’ function(s)
(2)
minimum crew experience and training provisions; and
(3)
recency provisions;
(4)
briefing;
aircraft performance:
this chapter should detail the specific performance requirements to be applied, in order to
ensure an adequate power margin;
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(f)
(g)
normal procedures and emergency procedures:
(1)
operating procedures for the flight crew, including the coordination with task
specialists;
(2)
ground procedures for the task specialists;
ground equipment:
this chapter should detail the nature, number and location of ground equipment required for
the activity;
(h)
records:
it should be determined which records specific to these flight(s) are to be kept, such as task
details, aircraft registration, pilot-in-command, flight times, weather and any remarks,
including a record of occurrences affecting flight safety or the safety of persons or property on
the ground.
GM2 NCO.SPEC.105 Checklists
TEMPLATE FORMS
The following templates are examples, which could be used for developing checklist.
(a)
Template Form A — Risk assessment (RA)
Date: RA of
Responsible:
Purpose:
Type of operation and brief description:
Participants, working group:
Preconditions, assumptions and simplifications:
Data used:
Description of the analysis method:
External context:
•
Regulatory requirements
•
Approvals
•
Environmental conditions (visibility, wind, turbulence, contrast, light, elevation, etc.;
unless evident from the checklists)
•
Stakeholders and their potential interest
Internal context:
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•
Type(s) of aircraft
•
Personnel and qualifications
•
Combination/similarity with other operations/SOPs
•
Other RA used/considered/plugged in
Existing barriers and emergency preparedness:
Monitoring and follow up:
Description of the risk:
Risk evaluation:
Conclusions:
(b)
Template Form B — Hazard identification (HI)
Date:
HI of
Phase of
operation
Responsible:
Haz ref
Hazard /
accidental
event
Cause /
threat
Current
Treatment
Measures
(TM)
Further
treatment
required
TM
Comment
ref
Haz ref: A unique number for hazards, e.g., for use in a database
TM ref: A unique number for the treatment method
(c)
Template Form C — Mitigating measures
Date:……………..
Phase
operation
RA of
of Haz
ref
Responsible:………………………
Hazard/a
ccidental
event
Current
Treatment
Measures
(TM)/controls
TM
ref
L
C
Further treatment
required
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Haz ref: A unique number for hazards, e.g., for use in a database
TM ref: A unique number for the treatment method
(d)
L:
Likelihood (probability)
C:
Consequence
Template register A — Risk register
Ref
Operation /
Procedure
Ref
Generic
hazard
L:
Likelihood (probability)
C:
Consequence
Ref
Accidental
event
Treatment
/ control
L
C
Monitoring
AMC1 NCO.SPEC.125 Safety briefing
TASK SPECIALISTS
(a)
Safety briefings should ensure that task specialists are familiar with all aspects of the
operation, including their responsibilities.
(b)
Such briefings should include, as appropriate:
(1)
behaviour on the ground and in-flight, including emergency procedures;
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AMC/GM TO ANNEX VII (PART-NCO)
SUBPART E — SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS
(c)
(2)
procedures for boarding and disembarking;
(3)
procedures for loading and unloading the aircraft;
(4)
use of doors in normal and emergency operations;
(5)
use of communication equipment and hand signals;
(6)
precautions in case of a landing on sloping ground; and
(7)
in addition to the items listed from (b)(1) to (b)(6) before take-off:
(i)
location of emergency exits;
(ii)
restrictions regarding smoking;
(iii)
restrictions regarding the use of portable electronic equipment; and
(iv)
stowage of tools and hand baggage.
Briefings may be given as a verbal presentation or by issuing the appropriate procedures and
instructions in written form. Before commencement of the flight, their understanding should
be confirmed.
GM1 NCO.SPEC.175(c) Performance and operating criteria — helicopters
GENERAL
(a)
Even when the surface allows a hover in ground effect (HIGE), the likelihood of, for example,
dust or blowing snow may necessitate hover out of ground effect (HOGE) performance.
(b)
Wind conditions on some sites, particularly downdraft in mountainous areas, may require a
reduction in the helicopter mass in order to ensure that an out of ground effect hover can be
achieved at the operational site in the conditions prevailing.
Section 2 — Helicopter external sling load operations (HESLO)
GM1 NCO.SPEC.HESLO.100 Checklist
REFERENCES
The following references to the AMC and GM of Annex VIII (Part-SPO) provide further guidance for
the development of checklists.
(a)
AMC1 SPO.SPEC.HESLO.100 provides a generic framework for the development of standard
operating procedures (SOP) for HESLO operations. This AMC can be regarded as a good
practice example for developing the checklist for HESLO operations.
(b)
GM1 SPO.SPEC.HESLO.100 provides guidance for initial pilot training for HESLO types 1, 2, 3, 4
and 5.
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AMC/GM TO ANNEX VII (PART-NCO)
SUBPART E — SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS
Section 3 — Human external cargo operations (HEC)
GM1 NCO.SPEC.HEC.100 Checklist
REFERENCES
AMC1 SPO.SPEC.HEC.100 of Annex VIII (Part-SPO) provides a generic framework for the development
of SOP for HEC operations. This AMC can be regarded as a good practice example for developing the
checklist for HEC operations.
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