Using Designer - Adobe Support

Using Designer - Adobe Support
Using Designer
AEM 6.2 Forms
Legal notices
For legal notices, see http://help.adobe.com/en_US/legalnotices/index.html.
Last updated 5/27/16
Contents
Welcome to Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
About Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Using Designer in the SAP environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Using Designer in different spaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
New features in Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Render XFA forms as HTML5 forms 2
Support for Turkish Lira locale 2
Support for Japanese Postal barcode 3
Accessibility Checker 3
Add document title to the PDF title bar 3
Support for Hindi language 3
New features in Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Preview your XDP forms in HTML in Designer 3
Preview your XDP forms in HTML in forms manager 4
Accessibility Checker 4
Add document title to the PDF title bar 4
Where to find documentation, samples, and tutorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Get started with samples and tutorials 5
Add calculations to forms 5
Enhance forms by using scripts 5
Getting Started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
About forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Interactive forms 7
Non-interactive forms 8
Print and fill forms 8
About form designs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Form design layouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
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Fixed layout 9
Flowable layout 9
Parts of a form design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Master pages 10
Pages 11
Content areas 11
Subforms 11
Tables 12
Field objects 12
Boilerplate or static objects 13
Installing and configuring Designer . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring JVM settings 13
Looking at the workspace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About editors 14
Layout Editor 15
Script Editor 16
About palettes 17
Hierarchy palette 17
Data View palette 17
Tab Order palette 18
PDF Structure palette 19
Object Library palette 19
Fragment Library palette 20
Style Catalog palette 20
Layout palette 20
Border palette 21
Object palette 21
Accessibility palette 21
Font palette 21
Paragraph palette 22
Drawing Aids palette 22
Info palette 22
Report palette 23
How To palette 23
Customizing the workspace 23
To customize the Layout Editor 23
To customize the Script Editor 24
To customize the palettes 24
To use the drawing aids 25
To customize the toolbars 26
To customize the tool tips for objects 27
Managing library palettes 28
Object Library palette 28
Fragment Library palette 32
Fragment Library palette 33
Steps to creating a form design . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Basic steps to creating a form design 33
Plan the form design 34
Create the form design 35
Start with a sample form 35
Considerations when creating form designs 35
Save the form design 36
Preview and test the form design 36
Publish the form 36
Distribute the form 37
Create Form Designs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Create, open, and save . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Creating forms 38
Creating forms with the stand-alone version of Designer 38
Creating forms from Workbench 39
Creating forms based on a template, sample, or existing form 39
Using forms as a model for Guides 40
Creating forms by importing a PDF 40
Considerations for creating forms for use with Acrobat and Adobe Reader 40
Adding details about the form 41
To add information about a form 41
To add custom properties 42
To remove custom properties 42
To add document title to the PDF title bar 42
To set user permissions on a PDF form 43
Saving forms 43
To save a form design 44
To check in a form in Workbench 44
To save a copy of a form design 45
Opening forms 45
Selecting the Acrobat and Adobe Reader target version 46
Saving forms for Acrobat and Adobe Reader 47
Distributing forms 47
To distribute a form using Designer 48
Publishing forms 48
Publishing to the AEM forms repository 48
To publish a form to a repository 48
To publish a form to the repository 49
To set save options prior to publishing a form: 49
Publishing a form to a repository 49
Creating and managing templates 50
Creating and managing templates 51
Creating a template 51
Managing templates 52
Importing a template 55
Creating and customizing a form based on a template 56
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Page layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Setting up pages 56
To show or hide a page 57
To add a page 57
To delete a page 57
To move between multiple pages 57
To reorder pages 57
To rename a page 58
Using master pages 58
To use master pages with repeating subforms 59
When to add a master page 59
To show or hide a master page 59
To add a master page 59
To delete a master page 60
To move between multiple master pages 60
To reorder master pages 60
To rename a master page 60
To add page numbering 61
To specify the size of a master page 61
To specify the orientation of a master page 61
Specifying white space around the edges of a form 62
Headers, footers, and other background items 63
Assigning additional master pages to complex form designs 63
To assign a master page to a specific page 64
Applying master pages to forms whose number of pages vary 65
To use the first master page one time only 66
To use the first master page one time only by specifying minimum and maximum
page-occurrence values 67
To use the first master page one time only by specifying the master page’s placement
in the page set 67
Controlling the order and visibility of pages 67
To move between multiple page sets 68
To add or delete a page set 68
To reorder page sets 68
To rename a page set 68
To manage page sets by controlling the number of occurrences of each page 68
Setting page break controls 68
To control widow and orphan lines for new forms 69
To control widow and orphan lines for a form 69
To remove widow and orphan control from a form 70
Styles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
To sort the style sheets in the Style Catalog 71
To select a default style sheet for new forms 71
To add a style sheet to a form 72
To create a new style sheet 72
To embed a style sheet 72
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To extract styles to a new style sheet 73
To remove a style sheet 73
To replace a style sheet 73
To edit a style sheet file 74
Create a new style from an object 74
Creating a new style for an object type 74
To create a new style in the internal style sheet 75
To create a new style in an external style sheet file 75
Creating a common style 75
To create a common style in the internal style sheet 76
To create a common style in an external style sheet file 76
To apply a style to an object 76
To remove a style from an object 77
Editing a style 77
To edit a style in the internal style sheet 77
To edit a style in an external style sheet file 77
Deleting a style form a style sheet 78
To delete a style from the internal style sheet 78
To delete a style from an external style sheet 78
To set a default style for new objects 78
To apply default styles to new objects 79
To edit default styles for new objects 79
Printing forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Setting up forms for printing 79
Specifying page placement and printing options in existing form designs 80
To specify page placement and printing options in existing form designs 81
To specify double-sided printing for an existing form design 81
To prepare a form design to use with preprinted paper 82
To use master pages in a form intended for double-sided printing 84
To specify the master page placement in a page set 84
Inserting a blank page after the first page in a form intended for double-sided printing 86
To insert a blank page after the first page in a form intended for double-sided printing 88
Using page sets to control single-sided and double-sided printing in a form 88
To print the contents of the Design View or Master Pages tab 90
To print a form with sample data 90
To create sample data to print with your form 91
To automatically generate sample data to print with your form 91
To specify settings for printing a PDF form 92
To automatically print a PDF form when it is opened 93
Tabbing order . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
How the default tabbing order works 94
Viewing the default tabbing order 95
To hide the tabbing order and return to normal form-editing mode 96
Using the Tab Order palette 96
Changing the tabbing order 97
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To change the tabbing order for a single object using the mouse 98
To change the order using drag-and-drop 99
To change the order using the arrow buttons 99
To change the order using the menu 99
To change the order by editing the number 99
To change the order using copy and paste 99
To change the tabbing order for a single object using keyboard shortcuts 99
To change the order using the menu 100
To change the order by editing the number 100
To change the order using copy and paste 100
Changing the tabbing order for a group of objects 100
To select a sequential group of objects using the mouse 100
To select a sequential group of objects using the keyboard 101
To change a group of individually selected objects to a sequential group 101
To change the order to geographic (left-to-right) 101
To change the geographic order to right-to-left 101
Changing the tabbing order on master pages 101
To change the tabbing order in fragments 102
To return to the default tabbing order 102
Excluding text and image objects from the tabbing order 102
To exclude text and image objects 103
To view the tabbing order using visual aids 103
Building actions in forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Combining conditions 105
Build an action 106
Rename an action 107
Revert to the default name 107
Edit an action 107
Remove an action 107
Build a custom result 108
Setting the zoom level in a PDF form 108
Spell checking in forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
To select the default locale 109
To check spelling while you type 110
To set up Designer to identify spelling errors as you type 110
To check the spelling in a form 111
To add a word to all languages in the custom dictionary 112
To add a word to selected languages in the custom dictionary 112
To edit the custom dictionary 113
To open the Edit Dictionary dialog box 113
Adding a word to the list of ignored words 113
To add a word to the list of ignored words while typing 114
To add a word to the list of ignored words while spell checking a form 114
To add a dictionary 114
To remove a dictionary 115
Hyphenate text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
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Considerations for setting hyphenation 116
Hyphenate option in the Paragraph palette 117
Currently Editing palette menu 117
Expand to Fit options 117
Allow Multiple Lines option 118
Setting and removing hyphenation in forms 118
To set hyphenation for a new form 119
To set hyphenation for an individual form 119
To remove hyphenation from a form 120
Hyperlinks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
To insert a hyperlink 121
To remove hyperlink 121
To edit a hyperlink 121
To test a hyperlink 121
Prepare for translation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
To create translation identifiers 122
Extracting the translation identifiers and translatable text 122
extractstrings.xslt optional parameters 123
Creating the form design with the translated text 124
Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
To set up macros for use in Designer 125
About macro.xml configuration files 125
Organizing the macros subfolder 126
Localizing macros 127
Macro Logging 127
Using tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Types of tables 129
Ways to create tables 129
To create a simple table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To create a table using the Table Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To create a table from existing objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To create a table within a table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To import a table from Microsoft Word . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To create a table using subforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To create a table containing variable-width cells 136
To create a nested table using subforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To create a table that grows by using the Subform Instance Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To create a table that grows by using the Subform Instance Controls 141
To add the Subform Instance Control buttons 141
To create a table that grows using the Button object . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To create a table that grows using the Button object 143
To add the buttons 143
Selecting, copying, moving, and navigating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To select a table, row, column, cell, or section 145
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To select the entire table 145
To select the cells in a row 146
To select a row 146
To select the cells in a column 146
To select a cell 147
To select multiple rows, columns, cells, or sections 147
To select a section 148
To copy a table, row, column, cell, or section 148
To move a table 148
To go to a specific row 148
Inserting and deleting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To insert a row, column, or section 149
To delete a table, row, column, or section 149
To delete a table 149
To delete a row, column, or section 149
Formatting a table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To add a table title 150
Adding space 150
To add space around a table 150
To add space around cells 150
To add space around rows 150
Applying borders and shading to a table 151
To apply and remove borders and shading 151
To remove the border from around the entire table 152
To distribute rows and columns evenly 152
To format the corners of a table or cells 152
To show captions in rows 156
To create a table style for the custom library . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To create a calendar using a table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Aligning, resizing, and arranging tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To align a table with other objects 159
To align the contents of a cell 159
To make another object the same size as a table 159
To resize an entire table 160
To resize rows and columns 160
To center a table 160
To arrange a table with other objects 160
Working with data in tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To create a table from a data source 161
To set the rows in a table to adjust to accommodate data 163
To create a table that groups data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To create the main table 166
To create the first nested table 167
To create the last nested table inside the first nested table 167
To show data in the cells 168
To make a table optional . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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To perform calculations in a table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170
To use the TableCalcs custom object . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172
Working with pagination in tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
To set up a table to span multiple pages 173
To set up a master page that includes the Table continued tag 174
To set the pagination for the table 175
To connect to a data source 176
To select a data file 176
To repeat a header or footer row on subsequent pages 177
Working with header and footer rows in tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
To change a row to a header, body, or footer row 177
To control table, header row, body row, footer row, and section breaks using conditional
statements 177
Working with cells and cell contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
To clear a cell 179
To merge and split cells 179
To merge cells into one cell 180
To split a merged cell 181
To orient text vertically in cells 181
To change a cell to another object type 181
To change a cell to another object type by using the Type list in the Cell tab of the
Object palette 182
To change a cell to another object type by dragging an object from the Object Library palette 183
To change a cell to another object type by dragging an object from the form design
183
Working with table sections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
To insert a table section 184
To group rows into a section 184
To ungroup a section into rows 184
To make a table section optional 184
Creating choice sections in tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185
To create a choice section from an existing section 185
To create a choice section from a row 186
To add a header, body, or footer row to a choice section 186
To remove a header, body, or footer row from a choice section 186
Creating data bindings and conditional statements for choice table sections . . . . . . . . . 187
To create data bindings and conditional statements for choice table sections 187
Using subforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About subforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Subforms that position content . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Subforms that flow content . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating and configuring subforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To add a subform 193
To add a subform from the menu 193
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To add a subform from the Library palette 193
To name a subform 194
To name or rename a subform using the Hierarchy palette 194
To name or rename a subform using the Binding tab of the Object palette 194
To make a subform visible, invisible, or hidden 194
To specify a locale (language and country or region) for a subform 194
To wrap and unwrap objects in a subform 195
To add objects to an existing subform 195
To unwrap the objects in a subform 195
To specify how a subform manages content . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195
To specify how a subform positions content 196
To specify a flow direction for the objects in a subform that flows content 196
To change a subform that positions content into a subform that flows content 196
To position subforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
To specify where to position a subform 197
To keep the subform within the same content area or page as the previous or next subform
197
To specify how to merge data between subforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
To define custom data-binding properties for a subform . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198
Using subform sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
To insert a subform set 199
Creating repeating and multipage subforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
To create a repeating subform 201
To specify a subform to span multiple pages 201
To enable a subform to span multiple pages 202
About overflow leaders and trailers 202
To create and assign overflow leaders and trailers 203
To create an overflow leader or overflow trailer subform 203
To apply an overflow leader or overflow trailer to a subform 204
To control subform and subform set breaks by using conditional statements . . . . . . . . 204
Using choice subform sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206
To create choice subform sets 206
To create a choice subform set from an existing subform set 206
To create a choice subform set from a subform object 206
To add and remove subforms in choice subform sets 206
To add a subform to a choice subform set 207
To remove a subform from a choice subform set 207
Working with forms that have a flowable layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207
Differences at design time and run time 208
Controlling the placement of objects in forms that have a flowable layout 208
Content areas in a flowable layout 208
Subforms in a flowable layout 209
Creating form designs that have a flowable layout 210
Start with a fixed layout 210
Tips for starting with a fixed layout 211
Creating interactive forms that have a flowable layout 212
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Position the header and footer on the master page 213
Wrap form objects in subforms and setting occurrence values 213
Modify margins to accommodate subforms 214
Use overflow leader and overflow trailer subforms 214
Create subforms with flowable elements 215
Create a button to add and remove a section 216
Create add and delete buttons 217
Add and remove subform instances using scripting 218
To add a subform instance to a form 219
Add and remove tables and table rows by using scripting 220
To add a table or table row instance to a form 220
FormCalc 220
To remove a table or table row instance from your form 221
FormCalc 221
Creating non-interactive forms that have a flowable layout 221
How non-interactive forms that have a flowable layout work 222
Design tips for forms that have flowable layout 223
General 223
Subforms 224
Accessibility 225
Scripting 225
Data binding 225
Common mistakes 226
Using fragments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About fragments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fragments and subforms 227
Script fragments 228
When to use fragments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Content reuse 228
Global updates 228
Shared form creation 229
Security 229
Naming and organizing and fragments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fragment references . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fragment references in the Layout Editor 230
Fragment references in the Hierarchy palette 231
How fragment references are resolved . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Binding fragments to a data source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating and inserting fragments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Create a fragment 234
Inserting fragment references 234
To insert a fragment from the Fragment Library palette 234
To insert a fragment from the Insert menu 235
Editing and embedding fragments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To edit a fragment from the Fragment Library palette 236
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To edit a fragment from a fragment reference 236
To view fragment information 236
To convert a fragment reference to an embedded object 236
Viewing and embedding fragments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237
To view fragment information 237
To convert a fragment reference to an embedded object 237
Fixing overrides and broken fragment references . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 238
To remove fragment reference overrides 238
To resolve broken fragment references 238
Fragments tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239
Working with Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241
About Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241
Categories of objects 241
To change an object type 244
To change an object type using the Type list in the Object palette tabs 244
To change an object type using the Type list in the Object Editor 245
To name and rename objects 245
To name or rename an object by using the Hierarchy palette 245
To name or rename an object by using the Binding tab of the Object palette 245
To name or rename an object by using the Object Editor 246
To set the border style 246
To specify a locale (language and country or region) for an object 246
Objects that support scripting and calculations 246
Using objects in interactive forms 247
Using objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248
Using barcodes 248
Barcode formats 248
Barcode position and appearance 249
Barcode properties 249
To define barcode field properties 249
To set the default value for the barcode 250
To control how a barcode obtains data 250
To define custom data-binding properties for a barcode 251
Encoding non-printing characters in barcode data 251
Using buttons 252
Email submit buttons 253
HTTP submit buttons 254
Print buttons 255
Reset buttons 255
To insert a standard button that runs a calculation or script 256
Processing options for a button 256
To execute a web service operation or database query using a button 256
To attach a database script to a button 258
Using a button to populate fields from a database 259
Submitting data using a button 260
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To add a button that submits an XML Data Package (XDP) to a URL 261
To add a button that submits an embedded PDF to a URL 262
To add an email submit button that submits an embedded PDF to an email address
263
To add a button that submits XML data to a URL 263
To add an email submit button that submits XML data to an email address 264
To add a button that submits XML data to an e-mail address 265
To add a button that submits a text stream using the POST method 265
To add an email submit button that submits encrypted form content to an e-email
266
To add a button that submits encrypted and encoded form content to an e-mail address 267
To add an HTTP button that submits encrypted form content to a URL 267
Using check boxes 268
To specify the size for the check box 268
To specify the check style 269
To specify the states for the check box 269
To define the behavior of the check box 269
To specify the default state of the check box 270
To change the values assigned to check box states 270
To define custom data-binding properties for a check box 270
Using circles, lines, and rectangles 271
To change the line style 272
To change the thickness of the line 272
To select a line color 272
To specify the shape of the circle 272
To specify the start and end points of an arc 272
To fill the circle or rectangle with color or a pattern 272
To change the slope of the line 273
To change the corners of the rectangle 273
Using content areas 273
Data flow between content areas 274
Copying, moving, and resizing content areas 275
Adding content areas 276
Using date/time fields 277
To add current date fields 278
To define the behavior of date/time fields 278
To define custom data-binding properties for date/time fields 279
To specify the data to display in date/time fields 279
To define the pattern for displaying date/time fields 279
To specify the comb format for date/time fields 280
To limit the numbers in date/time fields 280
Using decimal and numeric fields 280
About numeric fields 281
To define a radix (decimal point) alignment for numeric values 282
To define the behavior of decimal or numeric fields 282
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To define custom data-binding properties for decimal or numeric fields 283
To specify the data format for numeric fields 283
To limit the numbers entered in decimal and numeric fields 284
To perform a calculation with decimal fields by using JavaScript 284
To specify the comb format for decimal and numeric fields 284
Using drop-down lists and list boxes 285
To specify the list of options for a drop-down list or list box 286
To add items from Excel or text editor 287
To add items individually 287
To define the behavior of a drop-down list or list box 288
To display a default selection in the drop-down list or list box 288
To define custom data-binding properties for a drop-down list or list box 289
To specify list item values for a drop-down list or list box 289
Using flash fields 289
To specify the URL of a SWF file 290
To embed flash data in the form 290
To specify the location of a poster image 290
To embed a poster image 291
To display rich media content in a floating window 291
To add an additional asset 291
To unembed or delete an additional asset 291
To define custom data-binding properties for a flash field 292
Using image fields 292
To specify an initial (default) image to link 294
To embed image data in the form when the form is created 294
To size an image 294
To define custom data-binding properties for an image field 295
Using images 295
To specify the image to link 296
To embed an image into a form 296
To size the image 296
About paper forms barcodes 297
How the paper forms barcode works 298
Using paper forms barcodes 299
To specify a unique caption for the paper forms barcode 299
To generate a caption for the paper forms barcode 299
To specify the symbology for the paper forms barcode 299
To specify the paper forms barcode scanning method 299
To specify custom decoding settings for a paper forms barcode 300
To control how a paper forms barcode encodes data 300
To create a custom script for encoding data for a paper forms barcode 301
To use legacy encoding format 302
To specify a delimiter 302
To specify character encoding 303
Design tips for using a paper forms barcode 303
Using password fields 305
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To specify the password display character 306
To define the behavior of the field 307
To define custom data-binding properties for a password field 307
To limit the characters entered in password fields 307
Using radio buttons 307
To set the size for a radio button 309
To specify the radio button style 309
To assign On values to radio buttons 309
To define custom data-binding properties for radio buttons 310
To create a new exclusion group 310
To move a radio button to a different exclusion group 310
To move an exclusion group 310
To merge exclusion groups 311
To define the behavior of the exclusion group 311
To specify the default selection for the exclusion group 311
Using signature fields 312
Using text 313
To type characters into a text object 313
To insert a floating text field into a text object 313
To insert the value of a run-time property into a text object 314
To merge text objects 314
To create a caption by merging a text object and a field object 315
To insert language-specific numbers in text or captions 316
To allow page breaks within a text object 317
To keep a text object with the next object in the form 318
Using text fields 318
To allow multiple lines of text in text fields 320
To limit the number of characters in text fields 320
To specify the number of characters in text fields 320
To limit the number of characters to the width of text fields 320
Allowing page breaks within a text field 320
To allow page breaks within a text field 321
To keep a text field with the next object in the form 321
To enable the field to be filled with rich-formatted text 321
To define the behavior of the field 321
To define custom data-binding properties for text fields 322
To specify the data format for text fields 322
To specify the comb format for text fields 322
Using form object collections 322
To create a form object collection 323
To create a form object collection 324
To copy a form object collection 324
To copy a form object collection 324
To rename a form object collection 325
To rename a form object collection 325
To modify a form object collection 325
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To modify a form object collection 326
To delete a form object collection 326
To delete a form object collection 326
Using custom objects 326
About custom objects for the SAP environment 329
To create a custom object 332
Adding, copying, and deleting objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 332
To add objects to a form design 332
To add an object using the Insert menu 332
To add an object from the Object Library palette 333
To add several objects of the same type 333
To cut, copy, and paste objects 333
To cut or copy and paste an object 333
To copy a group of objects 334
To make multiple copies of one or more objects 334
To duplicate objects 334
To duplicate an object by dragging it 334
To delete objects 335
Selecting, grouping, and moving objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 335
To select objects 335
To select objects using the Hierarchy palette 335
To group and ungroup objects 336
To group interactive fields and set their properties 336
To move objects 337
To move or duplicate objects by pasting 338
To move an object by dragging it 338
To move an object by using the arrow keys 338
To move objects by using x and y coordinates in the Layout palette 338
To stack objects 338
To lock objects 339
To manipulate objects in a form design by selecting them in the Hierarchy palette 340
Aligning and sizing objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 340
To align objects to each other 340
To align the edges of objects 340
To align the vertical centers of objects 341
To align the horizontal centers of objects 341
To align objects in subforms that flow content 341
To align objects to a grid 341
To center objects on the page 341
To rotate objects 342
To distribute objects 342
To resize objects 344
To make objects the same size 344
To make objects expand to fit 345
To position objects 345
Using Snap to Grid 345
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Using to Snap to Guideline 346
Using Snap to Object 346
Using Snap to the Center of the Page 347
Formatting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 347
Formatting text 348
To apply a different font 348
To change the font size 349
To apply bold, italic, underline, or strikethrough formatting 349
To change the color of text 349
To change the baseline shift of text 350
To change the letter spacing of text 350
To change the vertical or horizontal scale of text 351
To auto kern text 352
Formatting paragraphs 352
To align paragraphs 353
To create a bulleted list 353
To create a numbered list 353
To add compound tags to a numbered list 354
To change the indentation of paragraphs 354
To change the spacing of paragraphs 355
Hyphenation in selected paragraphs 355
To hyphenate the text in a selected paragraph 356
To remove hyphenation from a selected paragraph 356
Formatting objects 356
To add space around an object 357
To add a border around an object 357
To add a border around the fillable area 357
To change the default formatting for new objects 358
Using leaders in text 358
To add a leader 359
To edit a leader 359
To delete a leader 360
To enable a visual clue for No Leader 360
To delete tab stops 360
Creating an insertion point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 361
Insert an insertion point object into a form 362
Insertion point into an existing subform 362
Define a subform as an insertion point 362
Add an insertion point placeholder (to a subform that is defined as an insertion point) 362
Formatting captions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 363
To set a default font for captions in new forms 363
To set a default font for captions in an existing form 364
To rename a caption 364
To position a caption 364
To specify the amount of space for a caption 364
To set the caption area to auto-fit 365
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To hide a caption 365
Making objects visible, invisible, or hidden . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To make an object visible, invisible, or hidden 367
Formatting field values and using patterns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
When to use patterns 368
Capturing and displaying user input 368
Retrieving and displaying bound data 370
Defaults for value formatting 370
To specify a default value 370
To specify a display pattern 371
To prompt users to enter data 371
Recommending that users enter data 371
Requiring that users enter data 372
To specify an edit pattern 372
To validate user input 373
To define a validation pattern and custom message 374
To display a message when an attached script detects unacceptable input 374
To specify a data pattern 374
Simple patterns 375
Locales 375
Epoch 380
Date formats 381
Time formats 381
Date and time patterns 382
Reserved symbols 385
Complex field patterns 386
Locale-specific patterns 386
Variable patterns 386
To set a default font for values in new forms 386
To set a default font for values in an existing form 387
Setting up an object for other languages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To set up an object for Arabic and Hebrew 387
To set up an object for Thai and Vietnamese 389
To set up a date field for other languages 390
Using special objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To define a global field 391
To insert a floating field 393
To insert run-time properties 393
To add a run-time property to a text object 394
To add a run-time property to a text field or numeric field object 394
To add variables to a form 394
Adding repeating fields in a form design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About repeating text fields 395
To add repeating fields 396
Adding URL links to a PDF form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About URL links 397
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365
368
387
391
395
396
Button 397
Hidden text field 397
To hard-code a URL link 397
To pass a URL from data 398
To bind the hidden field explicitly 398
To bind the hidden field implicitly 398
Setting a PDF form action upon submission of data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 398
About setting a PDF form action 399
To set a PDF form to close after data submission 399
To set PDF form fields to read-only 400
Object Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Layout properties in the Layout palette . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Border properties in the Border palette . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Font properties in the Font palette . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Paragraph properties in the Paragraph palette . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Accessibility properties in the Accessibility palette . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Master page properties in the Master Page tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Presence 409
Master page properties in the Pagination tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Page set properties in the Page Set tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Presence 412
401
401
402
403
404
406
409
410
412
Properties in the Object palette . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 414
Barcode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 414
Barcode properties in the Field tab 414
Location 414
Property/Value 414
Presence 414
Barcode properties in the Value tab 415
Type 415
Default 416
Empty Message 416
Validation Pattern 416
Validation Pattern Message and Error 417
Validation Script Message and Error 417
Form Level Validation Settings 417
Override Message 417
Barcode properties in the Binding tab 418
Name 418
Data Binding 418
Import/Export Bindings 418
Supported barcode formats 419
Valid barcode text characters 422
Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 424
xix
Button properties in the Field tab 424
Type 424
Caption 424
Appearance 425
Highlighting 425
Rollover Caption 425
Down Caption 426
Control Type 426
Presence 426
Locale 427
Print button properties in the Field tab 427
Type 427
Caption 427
Appearance 428
Highlighting 428
Rollover Caption 428
Down Caption 429
Presence 429
Reset button properties in the Field tab 430
Caption 430
Appearance 430
Highlighting 431
Rollover Caption 431
Down Caption 431
Presence 431
Locale 432
Button properties in the Submit tab 432
Submit to URL 432
Submit As 433
Include 434
Data Encoding 434
Button properties in the Execute tab 435
Connection 435
Connection Info 435
Run At 435
Re-merge Form Data 435
Check box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 436
Check box properties in the Field tab 436
Caption 436
Appearance 436
States 437
Size 437
Check Style 437
Presence 438
Locale 438
Check box properties in the Value tab 439
xx
Type 439
Default 439
Validation Script Message and Error 440
Form Level Validation Settings 440
Override Message 440
Check box properties in the Binding tab 440
Name 440
Data Binding 441
On Value 441
Off Value 441
Neutral Value 441
Import/Export Bindings 441
Circle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 442
Circle properties in the Draw tab 442
Appearance 442
Start 442
Sweep 442
Line Style 442
Color Picker 442
Fill 443
Color Picker 443
Presence 443
Content area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 444
Content area properties in the Content Area tab 444
Name 444
Flow Direction 444
Presence 444
Date/time field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 445
Date/time field properties in the Field tab 445
Caption 445
Appearance 445
Limit Length to Visible Area 446
Use Cells and Cells 446
Patterns 446
Presence 446
Locale 447
Date/time field properties in the Value tab 448
Type 448
Default 449
Empty Message 449
Validation Pattern 449
Validation Pattern Message and Error 449
Validation Script Message and Error 449
Form Level Validation Settings 450
Calculation Script 450
Runtime Property 450
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Override Message 450
Date/time field properties in the Binding tab 450
Name 450
Data Binding 451
Data Format 451
Import/Export Bindings 451
Examples of date/time patterns 452
Predefined patterns 452
Custom patterns 452
Decimal field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 453
Decimal Field properties in the Field tab 453
Type 453
Caption 453
Appearance 453
Limit Length to Visible Area 454
Comb of <x> characters 454
Patterns 454
Limit Leading Digits and Max 454
Limit Trailing Digits and Max 455
Presence 455
Locale 456
Drop-down list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 456
Drop-down list properties in the Field tab 456
Type 456
Caption 456
Appearance 457
List Items 457
Allow Custom Text Entry 457
Commit On 457
Presence 458
Locale 458
Drop-down list properties in the Value tab 459
Type 459
Default 460
Empty Message 460
Validation Pattern 460
Validation Pattern Message and Error 460
Validation Script Message and Error 461
Form Level Validation Settings 461
Override Message 461
Drop-down list properties in the Binding tab 461
Name 461
Data Binding 462
Specify Item Values 462
Up, Down, Sort Ascending, Sort Descending 462
Import/Export Bindings 462
xxii
Email submit button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Email submit button properties in the Field tab 463
Type 463
Caption 463
Appearance 463
Highlighting 464
Rollover Caption 464
Down Caption 464
Email Address 464
Email Subject 464
Submit As 464
Presence 465
Locale 466
(Deprecated) Flash field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
(Deprecated)Flash field properties in the Field tab 467
Property/Value 467
Property/Value 468
Presence 469
Locale 470
Flash field properties in the Binding tab 470
Name 470
Data Binding 471
HTTP submit button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
HTTP submit button properties in the Field tab 471
Type 472
Caption 472
Appearance 472
Highlighting 472
Rollover Caption 473
Down Caption 473
URL 473
Presence 473
Locale 474
Image field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Image field properties in the Field tab 475
Type 475
Caption 475
URL 475
Embed Image Data 475
Presence 476
Locale 477
Image field properties in the Binding tab 477
Name 477
Data Binding 477
Import/Export Bindings 478
Image . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 463
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 467
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 471
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 475
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 478
xxiii
Image properties in the Draw tab 478
Type 478
URL 478
Embed Image Data 478
Sizing 479
Presence 479
Line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 480
Line properties in the Draw tab 480
Type 480
Appearance 480
Line Style 480
Color Picker 480
Presence 480
List box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 481
List box properties in the Field tab 481
Type 482
Caption 482
Appearance 482
List Items 482
Allow Multiple Selection 483
Commit On 483
Presence 483
Locale 484
List box properties in the Value tab 484
Type 484
Default 485
Empty Message 485
Validation Pattern 485
Validation Pattern Message and Error 486
Validation Script Message and Error 486
Form Level Validation Settings 486
Override Message 486
List box properties in the Binding tab 486
Name 487
Data Binding 487
Specify Item Values 487
Up, Down, Sort Ascending, Sort Descending 487
Import/Export Bindings 488
Numeric field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 488
Numeric field properties in the Field tab 488
Type 488
Caption 488
Appearance 488
Limit Length to Visible Area 489
Comb of <x> characters 489
Patterns 489
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Presence 489
Locale 490
Numeric field properties in the Value tab 490
Type 491
Default 491
Empty Message 492
Validation Pattern 492
Validation Pattern Message and Error 492
Validation Script Message and Error 492
Form Level Validation Settings 493
Calculation Script 493
Runtime Property 493
Override Message 493
Numeric field properties in the Binding tab 494
Name 494
Data Binding 494
Data Format 494
Import/Export Bindings 495
Numeric patterns 495
Reserved symbols 497
Examples of numeric patterns 497
Paper Forms Barcode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 499
Paper forms barcode properties in the Field tab 499
Type 499
Label 499
Generate Label Automatically 499
Symbology 499
Scanning Method 500
Property/Value 501
Presence 502
Paper forms barcode properties in the Value tab 502
Compress Data Before Encoding 503
Automatic Scripting 503
Format 503
Include Field Names 503
Include Label 503
Use Legacy Format 504
Delimiter 504
Character Encoding 504
Apply To 505
Collection 505
Modify 506
Password field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 506
Password field properties in the Field tab 506
Type 506
Caption 506
xxv
Appearance 507
Password Display Character 507
Limit Length to Visible Area 507
Patterns 507
Presence 507
Locale 508
Password field properties in the Value tab 509
Type 509
Empty Message 509
Validation Pattern 509
Validation Pattern Message and Error 510
Validation Script Message and Error 510
Form Level Validation Settings 510
Password field properties in the Binding tab 510
Name 510
Data Binding 510
Import/Export Bindings 511
Password patterns 511
Reserved symbols 512
Examples of password patterns 512
Radio button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 513
Radio button properties in the Field tab 513
Type 513
Appearance 513
Size 514
Check Style 514
Item 514
Presence 515
Locale 515
Radio button properties in the Value tab 516
Type 516
Default 517
Empty Message 517
Validation Script Message and Error 517
Form Level Validation Settings 517
Override Message 517
Radio button properties in the Binding tab 518
Name 518
Data Binding 518
Specify Item Values 518
Import/Export Bindings 519
Rectangle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 519
Rectangle properties in the Draw tab 519
Type 519
Line Style 519
Color Picker 519
xxvi
Corners 519
Radius 519
Fill 520
Color Picker 520
Presence 520
Signature field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 521
Signature field properties in the Field tab 521
Type 521
Caption 521
Appearance 521
Presence 522
Locale 522
Signature field properties in the Signature tab 523
Lock Fields After Signing 523
All Fields in Collection 523
All Fields not in Collection 523
Subform . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 524
Subform properties in the Subform tab 524
Source File 524
Fragment Name 524
Content 524
Flow Direction 525
Allow Page Breaks Within Content 525
This Subform Is An Insertion Point 525
Name 525
Presence 525
Locale 526
Subform properties in the Pagination tab 526
Place 527
Keep With Previous 528
Keep With Next 528
After 528
Conditional Breaks 528
Overflow 528
Overflow Leader 529
Overflow Trailer 529
Subform properties in the Binding tab 530
Name 530
Data Binding 530
Import/Export Bindings (Execute WSDL) 530
Initial Count 530
Subform set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 531
Subform set properties in the Subform Set tab 531
Type 531
Presence 531
Subform set properties in the Pagination tab 532
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Place 532
After 533
Conditional Breaks 533
Overflow 534
Overflow Leader 534
Overflow Trailer 534
Subform set properties in the Binding tab 535
Name 535
Repeat Subform For Each Data Item 535
Min Count 535
Max 535
Import/Export Bindings (Execute WSDL) 535
Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 535
Table properties in the Table tab 535
Source File 536
Fragment Name 536
Body Rows 536
Header Rows 536
Columns 536
Footer Rows 536
Allow Page Breaks Within Content 536
Presence 536
Locale 537
Table properties in the Row Shading tab 538
Apply Alternating Row Shading 538
Color Picker 538
Next 538
Color Picker 538
Table properties in the Pagination tab 539
Place 539
Keep With Previous 540
Keep With Next 540
After 540
Conditional Breaks 540
Overflow 541
Table properties in the Binding tab 541
Name 541
Data Binding 541
Import/Export Bindings 542
Repeat Table For Each Data Item 542
Min Count 542
Max 542
Initial Count 542
Header row properties in the Row tab 543
Source File 543
Fragment Name 543
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Type 543
Layout 543
Allow Page Breaks Within Content 544
Presence 544
Locale 544
Footer row properties in the Row tab 545
Source File 545
Fragment Name 545
Type 545
Layout 546
Allow Page Breaks Within Content 546
Presence 546
Locale 547
Header and footer row properties in the Pagination tab 547
Place 547
Keep With Previous 548
Keep With Next 548
After 549
Conditional Breaks 549
Include Header Row At Beginning Of Table 549
Include Header Row In Subsequent Pages 549
Include Footer Row In Subsequent Pages 549
Include Footer Row At End Of Table 550
Header row properties in the Binding tab 550
Name 550
Data Binding 550
Import/Export Bindings 551
Repeat Row For Each Data Item, Min Count, Max, and Initial Count 551
Footer row properties in the Binding tab 551
Name 551
Data Binding 551
Import/Export Bindings 552
Repeat Row For Each Data Item, Min Count, Max, and Initial Count 552
Body row properties in the Row tab 552
Source File 552
Fragment Name 552
Type 553
Layout 553
Allow Page Breaks Within Content 553
Presence 553
Locale 554
Body row properties in the Pagination tab 554
Place 555
Keep With Previous 556
Keep With Next 556
After 556
xxix
Conditional Breaks 556
Body row properties in the Binding tab 557
Name 557
Data Binding 557
Import/Export Bindings 557
Repeat Row For Each Data Item, Min Count, Max, and Initial Count 557
Section properties in the Section tab 558
Type 558
Section properties in the Row Shading tab 558
Apply Alternating Row Shading 558
First 559
Color Picker 559
Next 559
Color Picker 559
Section properties in the Pagination tab 559
Place 559
After 560
Conditional Breaks 561
Overflow 561
Section properties in the Binding tab 562
Name 562
Repeat Section For Each Data Item, Min Count, Max, and Initial Count 562
Cell properties in the Cell tab 562
Presence 563
Cell properties in the Value tab 563
Cell properties in the Binding tab 564
Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 564
Text properties in the Draw tab 564
Type 564
Allow Page Breaks Within Content 565
Keep With Next 565
Presence 565
Locale 566
Text field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 566
Text field properties in the Field tab 566
Type 566
Caption 566
Appearance 567
Allow Multiple Lines 567
Limit Length and Max Chars 567
Limit Length to Visible Area 567
Allow Page Breaks Within Content 567
Keep With Next 567
Comb Of Characters 568
Field Format 568
Patterns 568
xxx
Presence 568
Locale 569
Text field properties in the Value tab 569
Type 569
Default 570
Empty Message 570
Validation Pattern 571
Validation Pattern Message and Error 571
Validation Script Message and Error 571
Form Level Validation Settings 571
Calculation Script 571
Runtime Property 572
Override Message 572
Text field properties in the Binding tab 572
Name 573
Data Binding 573
Import/Export Bindings 573
Text field patterns 573
Reserved symbols 574
Examples of text patterns 575
Predefined patterns 575
Custom patterns 575
Working with Data Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 577
About data connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578
Updating data connections and the Data View palette . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 579
Updating the Data View palette for non-embedded XML schema data connections 579
To work with the Data View palette . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 580
Schema filtering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 580
To apply a filter to the Data View palette 580
To remove a filter from the Data View palette 581
Connecting to a data source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 581
Create a data connection to an XML schema 581
Create a data connection to an XML data file 582
Create a data connection to a model 583
Create a data connection to an OLE database 584
About creating a data connection using a WSDL file 585
Create a data connection using a WSDL file 587
Execute the connection to the web service 588
To execute the connection to the web service using a button 588
To execute the connection to the web service from another event 588
To view a button's connection information 588
Modifying and deleting a data connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 589
Delete a data connection 589
Modify a data connection 589
Binding fields to a data source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 589
xxxi
Binding to data not defined by the default data connection 590
Saving or exporting undefined data in a separate namespace 590
Identifying nodes not bound by the default data connection 590
To allow binding to data that is not defined by the default data connection 591
Ways to create bound fields or subforms 591
To create a bound field or subform 592
To bind referenced data nodes to fields or subforms 592
To bind a node to an existing field 593
To generate bound fields in a subform 594
Create data bindings and conditional statements for choice subform sets 594
Ways to show the same data in multiple places 596
Bind multiple fields to one node 599
Use a script to show the data that is entered into one field in another field 600
Set field generation options 601
Remove a binding 601
Refresh data connections 602
View a list of bound fields 602
Field types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 602
Simple types 603
Built-in simple types 603
Restricted simple types 605
List and union types 606
Complex types 606
How a subform is generated from element content in a data source 607
Simple content 607
Mixed content 607
Empty content 607
Occurrence 607
Content models 607
Rich text objects 608
Images 609
Default/fixed values 609
Annotation information 609
Namespaces 609
Validation 610
Numeric type scripts 610
Inclusion/exclusion scripts 611
length, minLength, and maxLength scripts 611
totalDigits/fractionDigits scripts 611
Dynamically populating form object properties from a data source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 612
Set up dynamic properties 614
To turn active labels on and off 614
To set the default color for active labels 614
Dynamically populate a drop-down list or list box 615
Dynamically populate a drop-down list or list box from an OLEDB data connection 618
Dynamically populate a drop-down list in the Web DynPro environment 619
xxxii
To customize the default value in the drop-down list 619
Dynamically populate a caption 620
Dynamically populate a validation pattern message 622
Dynamically populate a validation script message 624
Dynamically populate a tool tip 626
Dynamically populate screen reader text 627
Dynamically populate a second field after populating the first 629
To set up the first field 630
To set up the script that dynamically populates a second field after populating the
first 631
To set up the second field 632
Dynamically populate form object properties using the drag and drop method 633
Edit the dynamic data binding 633
Remove the dynamic data binding 634
Creating Accessible Forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
About accessible forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reading order versus tabbing order in accessible forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reading order restrictions 636
Reading order and subforms 636
Static text objects and tabbing order 636
Designing accessible forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tips for designing accessible forms 637
Forms for users with vision impairment or disabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Forms for users with reduced mobility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Color in accessible forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Support for screen readers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Design tips for authoring forms for screen readers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Create a PDF form with accessibility tags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Create a PDF form with accessibility tags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating accessible PDF forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Design tips for creating accessible PDF forms 642
Techniques for testing form accessibility 644
Making objects accessible . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Specify custom screen reader text for an object 645
Specify a custom tool tip for an object 645
Specify a different search order for screen reader text 646
Turn off screen reader text for an object 646
Make radio buttons accessible 646
To make radio buttons accessible using the button captions 647
To make radio buttons accessible using a specified item value 647
Make lists accessible 647
Make images accessible 648
Make scripts accessible 648
Making tables accessible . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Make simple tables accessible 649
635
635
635
636
638
639
639
640
641
641
642
642
645
649
xxxiii
Navigate tables in accessible forms 650
Make complex tables accessible 650
Add structural navigation in forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 651
Checking the accessibility of a form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 651
To run the Accessibility checker 651
Accessibility checker rules 652
Setting Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Importing digital IDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To import a digital ID into the Windows Certificate Store 655
To import a digital ID into the Digital ID Files store 656
Using XML encryption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To apply XML encryption to form content using a button 657
To apply XML encryption to form content using an email submit button 658
To apply XML encryption to form content using an HTTP submit button object 659
Using digital signatures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Document signatures 660
Data signatures 660
To add a signature field 660
Considerations for adding multiple signature fields 662
To test a signature field 662
To add a data signature to a submit button 662
To use digital signatures in dynamic PDF forms 663
Using password fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To add a password field in an interactive form 664
To change the password display character 665
To specify an input format and validation message 665
Using PDF security options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To set a password to open a PDF form 666
To restrict printing in a PDF form 666
To restrict editing in a PDF form 667
To enable text access for screen readers in secure forms 667
654
654
Digital Signatures in PDF Workflows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Design considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Application design considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How PDF documents are signed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How document signature fields are added . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How digitally signed PDF documents are submitted for validation . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Performing multiple operations on a PDF document . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using scripts in forms that have digital signatures 671
Obtaining digital certificates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Signing PDF documents 672
Signing PDF documents in Adobe document services 672
Signing PDF documents in Acrobat 672
669
669
669
670
670
670
671
xxxiv
656
659
664
665
671
Signing PDF documents in Adobe Reader 672
Validating a signature in Adobe document services 672
Comparing document versions 673
Single digital signature workflows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Multiple digital signature workflows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Locking fields 674
Signature workflow in Adobe document services . . . . . . . . . . .
Certified documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Legal warnings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
GeoTrust certificates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adobe Root Certificate Authority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chain of trust 676
Creating and printing RFID labels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Before you start 677
Create and print RFID labels 678
Step 1 Add the RFID object to the form design 678
Step 2 Set the data length of the object 678
RFID Tag types 678
Step 3 Bind the object to the XML data 679
Step 4 Configure the XDC file 679
Step 5 Map the XDC file to an SAP output device 680
Step 6 Verify the printed RFID label 680
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 673
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 674
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674
675
675
676
676
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 677
Creating Forms for Optimal Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
General design considerations for performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Optimizing performance for objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Optimizing performance for images 683
Optimizing performance for discrete option choices 684
Optimizing performance for subforms 684
Optimizing performance for text fields 684
Performance of objects on master pages versus pages 685
Tips for reducing the number of objects 685
Tips for reducing the complexity of objects 685
Structuring data for performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data binding options for performance 686
Evaluating data structure for performance 687
Choosing fonts for performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Design considerations for printing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Performance considerations for importing forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Performance considerations for accessible forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Performance considerations for scripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Performance considerations for XML Form Object Model expressions . . . . . . . . . . . .
Resolving log messages for optimal performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
681
681
682
685
687
688
689
690
690
691
692
Considerations for Creating Forms for Server Processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 694
xxxv
Creating forms for AEM forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How Forms processes captured data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How Forms renders forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How Forms prepopulates forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Designing forms for Forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Considerations for creating form designs for Forms 696
Additional requirements for submitting form designs to Forms 698
Specifying the format for submitting data 698
Form transformations 699
Copying form designs to the local network 699
Saving a form design: XDP or PDF 699
Optimizing and improving performance for Forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Form caching 700
To specify form caching for a form that has a fixed layout 701
Rendering a form design that has a flowable layout on the client 701
Prepopulating form fields with data 702
Verifying your XML data source for data merging 702
Creating HTML forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using subforms to create HTML pages 703
Layout considerations for HTML forms 705
Image guidelines for creating HTML forms 706
Working around web browser limitations 707
Previewing an HTML form 707
Where calculations and scripts are run 708
Client- and server-side processing 708
Client-side processing 709
Server-side processing 709
Events that you can reference in a script or calculation 709
Server-side scripts 709
Client-side scripts 710
Summary of supported properties, methods, and events 711
Expressions supported by HTML clients 716
How to write a script to handle HTML pages 717
Creating forms for Adobe document services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The role of Adobe document services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How Adobe document services processes captured data . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How Adobe document services renders forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How Adobe document services prepopulates forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Designing forms for Adobe document services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Considerations for creating form designs for Adobe document services 722
Specifying the format for submitting data 723
Form transformations 723
Saving a form design: XDP or PDF 723
Optimizing and improving performance for Adobe document services . . . . . .
Form caching 724
To specify form caching for a form that has a fixed layout 725
xxxvi
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694
694
695
695
696
. . . . . . 700
. . . . . . 703
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719
720
720
721
721
722
. . . . . . 724
Rendering a form design that has a flowable layout on the client 725
Creating scripts for use with Adobe document services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 726
Where calculations and scripts are run 726
Client- and server-side processing 726
Client-side processing 726
Server-side processing 727
Events that you can reference in a script or calculation 727
Summary of supported properties, methods, and events 728
Creating Forms for forms workflow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Preparing a form for use in Workspace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Form Bridge object with form designs that contain Artwork 736
To submit form designs that contain Artwork to Workspace: 736
How Workspace handles buttons in PDF forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fields in the Process Fields object . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
734
734
Working with the Keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Default keyboard shortcuts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Keys for common actions 739
Keys for undoing and redoing an action 740
Keys for deleting text 740
Keys for selecting text 740
Keys for copying and moving text 741
Keys for applying character formats to selected text 742
Keys for special characters 742
Keys for setting line spacing 742
Keys for aligning paragraphs 742
Keys for controlling windows 743
Keys for controlling palettes 744
Keys for navigating a form design 744
Keys for controlling menus 745
Keys for the Script Editor or XML Source Tab 746
Keys for manipulating objects 746
Keys for changing the tabbing order 748
Keys for selecting and navigating within a table 748
Keys for navigating the Designer Help 749
Controlling the palettes with a keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To size the Data View Info area 750
To size the Object Library Preview area 751
To size the Fragment Library Preview area 751
Customizing keyboard shortcuts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To create a customized keyboard shortcut set 751
To assign a keyboard shortcut to a command 752
To remove a keyboard shortcut from a command 753
To verify the current keyboard shortcuts for a command 754
739
739
736
737
750
751
xxxvii
Menu, Command, Toolbar, and Dialog Box Reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 755
Menus and Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 755
To open a menu using the keyboard 755
To display a context menu 755
Menu bar commands 755
File menu 755
Edit menu 757
View menu 760
Insert menu 761
Table menu 763
Layout menu 765
Tools menu 767
Window menu 768
Palettes menu 771
Help menu 772
Palette menus 773
Hierarchy palette menu 773
Data View palette menu 774
Tab Order palette menu 775
PDF Structure palette menu 776
Style Catalog palette menu 777
Layout palette menu 778
Border palette menu 778
Object palette menu 779
Accessibility palette menu 779
Font palette menu 780
Paragraph palette menu 780
Drawing Aids palette menu 781
Info palette menu 781
Report palette menu 782
How To palette menu 783
Object and Fragment Library palette menus 783
Object Library palette menu 784
Standard menu 784
Custom menu 785
Barcode menu 786
Fragment Library palette menu 787
Fragment Library panel menu 787
Template Manager menu 788
Toolbars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 789
About toolbars 789
Standard toolbar 789
Text Formatting toolbar 791
Layout toolbar 792
Styles toolbar 793
Table toolbar 794
xxxviii
Tools toolbar 795
Dialog Box Reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 795
Action Builder dialog box 796
Additional Assets dialog box 796
Binding Properties dialog box 797
Check Spelling dialog box 799
Collection Editor dialog box 800
Collection List dialog box 801
Connection Properties dialog box 801
Create Fragment dialog box 802
Customize Toolbars dialog box 803
Toolbars (Customize Toolbars dialog box) 803
Commands (Customize Toolbars dialog box) 803
Data View Options dialog box 804
Delete Tab Stops dialog box 805
Digital IDs dialog box 805
Windows Certificate Store tab (Digital IDs dialog box) 805
Digital IDs Files tab (Digital IDs dialog box) 806
Dynamic Properties dialog box 806
Edit Conditional Breaks dialog box 808
Edit Data Nominated Subforms dialog box 811
Edit Dictionary dialog box 813
Edit Fragment Identifier dialog box 814
Edit Hyperlink dialog box 814
Encrypt Data and Submit Settings dialog box 815
Encrypt Data (Encrypt Data and Submit Settings dialog box) 815
Encryption Algorithm (Encrypt Data and Submit Settings dialog box) 815
Encryption Certificates (Encrypt Data and Submit Settings dialog box) 816
Issuers and Policies (Encrypt Data and Submit Settings dialog box) 817
Key Usage (Encrypt Data and Submit Settings dialog box) 819
Extract Style Sheet dialog box 819
File Import Options 820
Adobe Output Designer form (File Import Options dialog box) 820
Microsoft InfoPath (File Import Options dialog box) 820
Microsoft Word (File Import Options dialog box) 821
XForms Model (File Import Options dialog box) 822
Form Properties dialog box 823
Info (Form Properties dialog box) 823
Defaults (Form Properties dialog box) 824
Run-time (Form Properties dialog box) 825
Formatting (Form Properties dialog box) 826
Default Fonts (Form Properties dialog box) 828
Form Validation (Form Properties dialog box) 828
Server (Form Properties dialog box) 830
Variables (Form Properties dialog box) 830
PDF Security (Form Properties dialog box) 831
xxxix
PDF Print Options (Form Properties dialog box) 832
Compatibility (Form Properties dialog box) 833
Preview (Form Properties dialog box) 834
Save Options (Form Properties dialog box) 835
Data Binding (Form Properties dialog box) 836
Fragment Information dialog box 836
Import Options dialog box 837
Insert Fragment dialog box 839
Insert Hyperlink dialog box 840
Insert Table dialog box 840
Keyboard Shortcuts dialog box 841
Missing Fonts dialog box 842
Change Font Substitutions dialog box 843
Network Connection Not Found dialog box 843
New Data Connection dialog box 843
Authentication (New Data Connection dialog box) 843
ADO Properties (New Data Connection dialog box) 844
OLEDB Connection (New Data Connection/Connection Properties dialog box)
845
New Connection (New Data Connection dialog box) 846
Sample XML Data (New Data Connection/Connection Properties dialog box) 846
Operation (New Data Connection dialog box) 847
WSDL File (New Data Connection dialog box) 847
Adobe Data Model (New Data Connection dialog box) 848
XML Schema (New Data Connection/Connection Properties dialog box) 848
New dialog box 849
Open dialog box 850
Options dialog box 850
Document Handling (Options dialog box) 850
Workspace (Options dialog box) 852
Spelling (Options dialog box) 853
Formatting (Options dialog box) 854
Default Fonts (Options dialog box) 855
Wizards and Tips (Options dialog box) 856
Bidirectional Text (Options dialog box) 858
Data Binding (Options dialog box) 859
International (Options dialog box) 860
Tab Order (Options dialog box) 860
Security (Options dialog box) 861
Patterns dialog box 861
Display (Patterns dialog box) 861
Edit (Patterns dialog box) 862
Validation (Patterns dialog box) 863
Data (Patterns dialog box) 863
Print dialog box 864
Publish To Repository dialog box 864
xl
Remove Style dialog box 865
Report Warnings Options dialog box 866
Save As dialog box 867
Select Digital IDs dialog box 868
Signature Settings dialog box 868
Signature Handler (Signature Settings/Sign Data and Submit Settings dialog box)
868
Signing Certificates (Signature Settings/Sign Data and Submit Settings dialog box)
872
Issuers and Policies (Signature Settings/Sign Data and Submit Settings dialog box)
875
Signing Reasons (Signature Settings/Sign Data and Submit Settings dialog box) 877
Key Usage (Signature Settings/Sign Data and Submit Settings dialog box) 878
Signature Info (Signature Settings/Sign Data and Submit Settings dialog box) 879
Sign Data and Submit Settings dialog box 880
About the Sign Data and Submit Settings dialog box 880
Sign Data (Sign Data and Submit Settings dialog box) 880
Specify Substitute Font dialog box 881
Spreadsheet Paste Options dialog box 881
Style Editor dialog box 882
General (Style Editor dialog box) 882
Caption Text Formatting (Style Editor dialog box) 883
Value Text Formatting (Style Editor dialog box) 885
Border (Style Editor dialog box) 885
Layout (Style Editor dialog box) 886
Syntax Formatting dialog box 887
Table Assistant dialog box 888
Body Layout (Table Assistant dialog box) 888
Footer Row (Table Assistant dialog box) 888
Header Row (Table Assistant dialog box) 889
Row Shading (Table Assistant dialog box) 889
Sections (Table Assistant dialog box) 890
Template Manager dialog box 891
Template Options dialog box 891
Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
accessible forms 893
Acrobat form 893
Adobe certified document 893
application 893
B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
binding data 894
boilerplate 894
boilerplate object 894
C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
893
893
894
894
xli
F .
I. .
P .
R .
S .
T .
U .
X .
xlii
canonical format 894
certificate 895
client 895
credential 895
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
fixed layout 896
flowable layout 896
form 896
form authors 896
FormCalc 896
form design 896
form developers 896
form object 897
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
interactive form 897
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PDF form 897
permissions 897
prepopulated form 897
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
render 898
restricted document 898
rights-enabled document 898
run time 898
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
script fragment 898
security handler 898
static form 899
subform 899
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
tagged PDF form 899
trusted identity 899
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
usage rights 899
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
XML Forms Architecture 900
XML form 900
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 896
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 897
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 897
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 898
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 898
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 899
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 899
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 900
Welcome to Designer
1.
Welcome to Designer
Welcome to Designer.
1.1.
About Designer
Effective March 10, 2012, Adobe is deprecating the Guides capabilities of Adobe® LiveCycle® ES.
The Guides functionality is available for upgrade purposes only and will be removed from the product
after two major releases.
NOTE:
Designer is a point-and-click graphical form design tool that simplifies the creation of forms. Form
recipients can fill a form online, submit the data, and print it, or print and fill the form by hand. You
can design a form, define its logic, and modify it to match paper counterparts or to meet strict legislative requirements. Form developers can use Designer to create applications that generate dynamic,
data-driven documents and produce customized business documents for print, web, or archival.
Using form designs, form developers can create, interactive data capture applications by leading
users through a series of visually appealing and streamlined panels, improving usability and
reducing data entry errors.
You can also build and maintain data capture solutions that read from, validate against, and add to
corporate data sources. With Designer, you can integrate PDF documents into existing workflows
by binding forms to XML schemas, XML sample files, databases, and web services.
Forms and documents that are created in Designer can be merged with business data and rendered
as a number of file types, including Adobe PDF, HTML, SWF, and printing for PCL, Adobe PostScript® and Zebra (ZPL) printers.
1.2.
Using Designer in the SAP environment
Form authors using Designer in the ABAP™ Workbench or in the SAP® NetWeaver™ Developer
Studio should be aware that a number of topics in this documentation provide additional information that is not necessary in these environments.
For developing a Java Web Dynpro form user interface, form authors can use special Web Dynpro
form user interface elements such as a check field or a submit button. When using these elements,
three different Value help types are available to provide efficient end-user support. These elements
are highly integrated into Designer. The documentation for these elements is available in the UI
Reference Guide in the SAP NetWeaver Online Help.
1
Welcome to Designer
1
For developing a form using the ABAP environment, special date objects are also provided in the
Designer Library palette. The documentation for these elements is included in the PDF-Based Forms
documentation in the SAP NetWeaver Online Help.
1.3.
Using Designer in different spaces
Designer is available in two ways: bundled with Adobe® Acrobat® Professional and as part of the AEM
forms software platform.
As part of the AEM forms platform, you use Designer with Workbench , where you create, manage,
and automate business processes and forms. You design the form and add objects in Designer, which
operates outside Workbench. When you create or open a form design, it opens in Designer and a
corresponding tab is displayed in Workbench.
Designer works with the files in your local file system. In Workbench, you synchronize the files that
you need from an application and check in any forms created in Designer. You must also check in
any referenced files, such as images or fragments.
Using Designer with Acrobat Professional users can create, manage, and automate business
processes and forms. User can also consolidate the data they receive from the people who are filling
the form using Adobe® Reader®.
1.4.
New features in Designer
1.4.1.
Render XFA forms as HTML5 forms
Mobile Forms is a new capability available in SAP IFbA that renders XFA form templates in HTML5
format. This capability enables the rendering of forms on mobile devices and desktop browsers on
which XFA-based PDF is not supported. Mobile Forms not only supports the existing capabilities of
XFA form templates but also adds new capabilities, such as scribble signature, for mobile devices.
1.4.2.
Support for Turkish Lira locale
Designer now supports for the Lira currency symbol. In the list of locales you can now select ‘Turkish
(Turkey Lira)’ to display the symbol for the currency. For more details, see Locales.
2
Welcome to Designer
1.4.3.
Support for Japanese Postal barcode
The Japanese Postal barcode format is now supported by Designer. For more details, see Supportedbarcode formats and Validbarcodetext characters.
1.4.4.
Accessibility Checker
An accessible form is one that a wide range of people can use, including those with disabilities that
affect how they are able to interact with the form on a computer screen. You can now use the Accessibility Checker to test the accessibility of your Designer forms against a set of accessibility rules. For
more details, see Checkingthe accessibility of a form.
1.4.5.
Add document title to the PDF title bar
You can now add the document title to the PDF title bar. If a user opens the PDF, the document title
will display on the title bar of the window. For more details, see Toadd document title to the PDF
title bar.
1.4.6.
Support for Hindi language
Interactive Forms by Adobe (IFbA) now supports Hindi locale. It is supported Adobe Reader 12
onwards. For more details, see Locales.
1.5.
New features in Designer
1.5.1.
Preview your XDP forms in HTML in Designer
Besides previewing the PDF rendition of forms, now you can also preview the forms in HTML rendition. While designing the form in Designer, click on the new Preview HTML tab, to preview the form
as it would appear in a browser.
See HTML Preview.
3
Welcome to Designer
1.5.2.
1
Preview your XDP forms in HTML in forms manager
You can now use forms manager to preview and manage your AEM forms. You can launch forms
manager from within Designer. To configure forms manager to launch from the Designer, see
Launch forms managerfrom Designer.
1.5.3.
Accessibility Checker
An accessible form is one that a wide range of people can use, including those with disabilities that
affect how they are able to interact with the form on a computer screen. You can now use the Accessibility Checker to test the accessibility of your Designer forms against a set of accessibility rules. For
more details, see Checkingthe accessibility of a form.
1.5.4.
Add document title to the PDF title bar
You can now add the document title to the PDF title bar. If a user opens the PDF, the document title
will display on the title bar of the window. For more details, see Toadd document title to the PDF
title bar.
1.6.
Where to find documentation, samples, and tutorials
The following resources can help you start building forms and applications.
Learn about AEM forms
Learn about AEM forms and get important information about Designer that was not available
when the product documentation was written.
Documentation
4
Description and location
Overview
Provides an overview of AEM forms.
See Overview.
Workbench Help
Available from the Help menu when you install Workbench.
Creating Dynamic Forms with
Designer by J.P. Terry
Shows you how to use Designer to create interactive and dynamic
forms.
Available at Adobe Press.
Welcome to Designer
1.6.1.
Get started with samples and tutorials
These tutorials take you through the process of creating forms for applications. Form samples help
you learn about form design techniques and provide a starting point to creating a form design.
Scripting samples demonstrate quick and simple form solutions.
Documentation
1.6.2.
Description and location
Quick Start tutorials
Designed to get you started on creating forms using Designer. See any of
the following tutorials in Designer Quick Start Tutorials
Creating a purchase order form, Creating apurchase order form that has
a flowable layout, and Creatingandusing fragments in form designs.
Designer form fragment tutorial
Walks you through the steps of working with form fragments.
See Designer form fragment tutorial.
Form samples
Designer includes a selection of complete samples, each one
accompanied by a form design, sample data, and/or schema, and the
final version of the form. The samples are installed with Designer in the
default location installation directory under \...\EN\Samples.
Add calculations to forms
Use FormCalc to build calculations into Designer forms.
Documentation
FormCalc Reference
1.6.3.
Description and location
See Introducing FormCalc.
Enhance forms by using scripts
Use scripts to build intelligence into forms.
Documentation
Description and location
Scripting Basics
Provides an overview of how you can use scripting to develop and
enhance forms that are created in Designer.
See Scripting Basics
Scripting samples
You can experiment with the sample forms and apply the techniques to
your own work.
Go to the Adobe Developer Connection to get the latest sample forms.
5
Welcome to Designer
Documentation
Scripting Reference
6
1
Description and location
Describes the objects, properties, and methods that are available for
scripting in the Designer environment.
See Scripting Reference.
Getting Started
2.
Getting Started
2.1.
About forms
A form is the document that a user views or interacts with. It is derived from a form design that you
create using Designer.
Forms typically collect or present structured data and are the front end to a business process.
Designer creates forms and documents that can be merged with business data and rendered in a
number of file types, including PDF documents, HTML, Flash (SWF file), and printing for PostScript and Zebra (ZPL) printers.
Forms can capture or present information in three different ways.
2.1.1.
Interactive forms
Forms can be designed to capture data directly from end users. Users fill the form and select options
online, and return the form data according to some prescribed process. These forms are known as
interactive forms. You can author interactive forms that the user fills using Acrobat Professional or
Adobe Reader, or you can author forms for Forms Generator that the user fills in a web browser.
Interactive forms have many benefits over paper-based forms:
•
Although interactive forms may look like traditional paper-based forms, they eliminate
cumbersome and time-consuming effort required to process paper forms. Using interactive
forms to provide business solutions makes sense in the worlds of the Internet and enterprise-wide computing.
•
You can deliver interactive forms through Internet, intranet, or email. You can automate the
document exchange process, store forms in reliable formats, and protect document content
and integrity.
•
Interactive forms allow you to streamline your data collection process. An interactive form can
collect and integrate data into your existing core data collection systems, thereby extending
their value. The form might integrate data directly to your data collection system or use a
program on the server, such as a CGI script,an ASP page, Java Server Pages (JSP), or servlet.
•
Using interactive forms, you can also establish online forms-based workflow processes using
built-in logic to route the form electronically from one user to the next. Interactive forms can
also support assistive technologies, such as screen readers, so that you can extend the form to
users with disabilities.
7
Getting Started
2
In the simplest scenario, end users only require Adobe Reader to electronically fill the form and send
the form data to the originator of the form or print the form and send the paper copy of form and
data to the originator. If you have purchased Forms, the interactive form can be in PDF or HTML.
In this case, users open and fill the form using a web browser.
Interactive forms typically include data entry features such as selection lists, drop-down lists, check
boxes, automatically generated calculations, validation messages, digital signatures, and Submit and
Execute buttons. Form authors can use built-in FormCalc functions and custom scripting by using
JavaScript™ to extend the functionality of interactive fields. Interactive forms can include command
buttons so that users can save the data to a file or database or to send the data by email to a specified
address. In addition, validations can be added to ensure the accuracy of user-entered data. The form
can provide feedback such as messages to prompt for specific types of data.
2.1.2.
Non-interactive forms
Forms can be designed to present information to end users. The data can come from a variety of data
sources, such as databases, web services, or enterprise content management systems. The end user
views the form already prepopulated with data. The end user cannot modify the data in the form or
add new data to the form. These types of forms are known as non-interactive forms. A typical
scenario for these types of forms involves Forms as part of the solution. Forms merges the form
design with data and renders the form, prepopulated with data, to the end user. A classic example of
a non-interactive form is a credit card statement or telephone bill.
In yet another scenario, a form might be designed to initially present information to the end user,
and then provide the capability for the end user to supply additional information and send it to the
initiator or server for further processing.
2.1.3.
Print and fill forms
Another type of form is the print-and-fill form. The form author creates a form design in Designer
and typically saves it as a PDF. The end user opens the form in Acrobat or Adobe Reader, prints the
form, and fills the form manually. The form is then returned to its originator by fax or land mail.
2.2.
About form designs
Form design is the term that describes the form during its creation or design process. The form
design specifies the layout, data capture, and final presentation rules for the form. The presentation
rules are applied when the form is filled with data. How the form is filled with data depends on the
purpose of the form, which in turn influences the type of form you create.
In Designer, you add functionality to your form by adding objects, such as a place to enter text, or a
button for sending the form by email. Static objects are available that present fixed text or graphic
information. These objects include circles, lines, rectangles, images, and text
8
Getting Started
2.3.
Form design layouts
2.3.1.
Fixed layout
The most common type of forms have a fixed layout; that is, they have a predetermined layout,
always with a fixed number of pages regardless of the amount of data available to fill it. For example,
a course registration form that an end user can either print and fill by hand, or fill in Acrobat or
Adobe Reader. When filled, the form retains its original layout and number of pages. Fields that are
not filled remain empty. Conversely, if the amount of data is more that the form can hold, the form
cannot expand to accommodate excess data. For example, if a course registration form has 5 rows
where end users list their course selections, and enough data is available to fill 10 rows, only 5 rows
can be filled. Similarly, if an end user lists only 2 course selections, you will still see 5 rows, 2 that are
filled and 3 that are empty.
This form can be interactive, where an end user fills the form typically in Acrobat or Adobe Reader,
or it can be non-interactive, where a server process merges the form with data from a data source.
Similarly, Forms typically renders non-interactive forms that have a fixed layout to present information from a data source.
2.3.2.
Flowable layout
In addition to forms that have a fixed layout, you can define sections of the form that will expand
and shrink in response to the amount of data that is merged when the form is rendered. You do this
by wrapping various sections (groups of subforms) in subforms that are set to flow content. Then, at
run time, only the subforms that are necessary for displaying the exact amount of data are instantiated.
This type of form has a flowable layout with a varying number of pages. The subforms adjust
depending on the amount of data merged with the form when it is rendered, or the subforms expand
when end users need to add more data. For example, you may decide to let end users add to the form
the number of rows they need to list their selections, remove rows from the form, and then return
the form data electronically. Depending on how many rows they add, the form may extend over two
or more pages.
Interactive forms that have a flowable layout are sometimes referred to as client-side forms. Acrobat
and Adobe Reader 7.0 and later support this type of interactive forms.
You can also create forms that have a flowable layout for use with Forms. In this scenario, Forms
merges the form design with data. For example, such forms as a telephone bill or credit card statement are typically non-interactive forms and designed to present users with information from a data
source. Users then print these forms or store them electronically. These forms are sometimes
referred to as server-side forms because the merging of the form design and data occurs at the server.
9
Getting Started
2.4.
2
Parts of a form design
You create a form design by dragging objects from the Library palette onto one or more pages in the
Layout Editor and working in the Object palette to modify the properties specific to the object you
select. The object that you select determines which tabs are available in the Object palette. Many
other palettes are available that contain specific properties that you may want to change. For
example, you can use the Font palette to change the font family, size, and style of text in a selected
object.
You place the objects you want in the form design on pages. If you want an object to appear on each
page of the form design, you place it on a master page. For example, you can include a logo, watermark, or introductory information that always appears in the same location on each page of the form
design.
The following key components make up a form design:
•
Master pages
•
Pages
•
Content areas
•
Subforms
•
Fields
•
Boilerplate objects
Form design elements are displayed in the Hierarchy palette.
Designer automatically generates XML source code for each object as you build the form design.
Because Designer automatically generates the XML source code for you, you can create form designs
without having any knowledge about XML.
2.4.1.
Master pages
Every form design contains at least one master page that Designer creates automatically. Master
pages are designated to format pages, and they help to facilitate design consistency because they can
provide a background and layout format for more than one page in a form design.
You can use the supplied master page to format pages, edit the master page’s settings, or add additional master pages if needed. If you are creating a simple interactive form, you would probably use
the supplied master page without changing its settings.
At the very least, master pages define the orientation and dimensions of pages. You can use master
pages to define these aspects of a form design:
10
•
Page size and orientation
•
Headers and footers
Getting Started
•
Watermarks and company logos
Each master page is created with a default content area that covers the whole page. You can add text,
images, and other boilerplate objects to a master page. These objects are displayed on all of the pages
that the master page formats. (See Using master pages.)
Text fields, numeric fields, and date/time fields on master pages will not be interactive on
Acrobat 6-compatible forms. Users cannot modify the associated data in these fields.
NOTE:
You manipulate master pages in the Master Pages tab.
2.4.2.
Pages
Pages represent the pages of a form. Each page derives its size and orientation from a master page
and, by default, each page is associated with the default master page that Designer creates. Each page
is created with a default subform that covers the whole page. (See Setting up pages.)
If your form design contains more than one master page, you can choose which master page to
assign to a page. (See Usingmaster pages.)
You work with pages in the Design View tab.
2.4.3.
Content areas
Content areasdefine where objects can be placed on pages. When you design a form, you cannot
place an object on a page unless it is inside the area bounded by a content area.You can add content
areas to master pages only.
Whenever you create a new master page, Designer creates a default content area on the master page.
A form design that has a fixed layout will typically contain one content area. A form design that
contains sections that adjust to accommodate data can have one or more content areas. You can
specify whether the objects in each content area should be positioned from top to bottom, or from
left to right and top to bottom. (See Usingcontent areas.)
2.4.4.
Subforms
Subforms are container objects that you can use to group form design objects, including fields, boilerplate objects, and other subforms. When they are grouped, you can control whether the subform
and the grouped objects appear on your form based on data bindings that you configure for your
form. You can also configure subform objects to be repeatable, which lets you have multiple
instances of a single subform and its grouped objects appear on your form. This allows you to create
more flexible and adaptable form designs.
Subforms are essential when creating forms that contain sections that expand to accommodate data
because they provide the dynamic capabilities to be visible, to remain hidden, and to grow, all in
response to data and user interaction at run time. (See Subform.)
11
Getting Started
2.4.5.
2
Tables
Tables are essentially structured container objects that you can use to organize your form design
content in meaningful, logical ways. Each cell of a table is a separate container capable of storing
form design objects. (See Usingtables.)
Tables are very similar to subforms in terms of functionality and behavior. Like subforms, tables can
be dynamic, which means they can repeat and grow in response to data and user interaction at run
time. (See Subform.)
2.4.6.
Field objects
Designer provides a number of field objects that are capable of capturing, merging, and displaying
data. A field object provides a data-entry region, and users can interact with field objects by entering
or selecting an associated data value. (See AboutObjects.)
The following objects are field objects:
12
•
Button
•
Check box
•
Date/time field
•
Decimal field
•
Signature Field
•
Drop-down list
•
Email Submit button
•
HTTP Submit button
•
Image field
•
List box
•
Numeric field
•
Paper Forms Barcode
•
Password field
•
Print button
•
Radio button
•
Text field
Getting Started
2.4.7.
Boilerplate or static objects
Boilerplate or static objects are read-only objects that improve the aesthetic appeal of a form and may
provide context or assistance for users. They can be added to pages or master pages. (See AboutObjects.)
The following objects are boilerplate objects:
•
Circle
•
Image
•
Line
•
Rectangle
•
Text
2.5.
Installing and configuring Designer
Designer is available as a standalone installer and is also bundled with workbench. To know more
about installing Designer as part of Workbench, see Installing and running Workbench in this document. If you are using a standalone installer for Designer, follow these steps:
1)
Launch the Designer installer by double-clicking setup.exe.
2)
Proceed and provide your details and the serial number on the Personalization screen.
3)
If you accept the license agreement, click Next to proceed.
4)
(Optional) change the default installation path, if you want to install Designer ES4 at a location
of your choice. Click Next.
5)
(Optional) If you have a previous version of LC Designer installed, the installer provides an
option to migrate, delete, or ignore the user settings of the previous installation. Click Next.
6)
Click Back to change any preferences. To install Designer, click Install.
7)
Click Finish when the installation completes.
2.5.1.
Configuring JVM settings
By default, a Java Virtual Machine (JVM) is initialized when Designer is launched. NOTE: To initialized the JVM, install JDK 1.5 or later.You can modify the JVM configuration and the default behavior
using the supplied INI file. The file name is JVMSettings.ini and it is available at [Designer
Install Directory]\cfg\ location. The various configurable parameters are:
13
Getting Started
2
JVMOnDemand
specifies if the JVM is initialized with Designer (value 0) or is initialized only when required
(value 1). By default, the value is 0.
JVMHeapSizeCustomization
specifies if the heap size for JVM is determined by the JVM itself (value 0) or by Designer
(value 1). By default, the value is 0.
JVMInitialHeapSize
specifies the initial heap size in KB. This setting is relevant if
JVMHeapSizeCustomization = 1. If the value is <1025, it is set at 1025 (default value).
JVMMaxHeapSize
specifies the maximum heap size in KB that JVM can grow to. This setting is relevant if
JVMHeapSizeCustomization = 1. If the value is <2048, it is set as 4096 (default value).
2.6.
Looking at the workspace
2.6.1.
About editors
By default, the Designer workspace consists of an area called the Layout Editor where you create and
lay out your form design and a Script Editor where you can write scripts to extend the capabilities of
the form design.
As you become comfortable working with form designs, you can customize the workspace to suit
your requirements.
A.
Script Editor
14
Getting Started
B.
Palettes
C.
Layout Editor
Layout Editor
The Layout Editor is the main area where you create and maintain the form design. It contains four
tabs:
Design View tab
Displays the pages that make up the form design. The pages in Design View contain a form
design’s content. The first time you start Designer or create a new form design, the Design
View tab displays a page ready for objects to be added. Objects in the master page appear in the
page but cannot be selected.
Master Pages tab
Displays the master pages that can be applied to pages in Design View. Master pages specify
the layout and the background for the form design. You add objects that will occur in the same
position throughout the form design on a master page. The Master Pages tab is hidden by
default. Objects in the Design View page do not appear in the master page.
XML Source tab
Displays the XML source code that describes the structure of the form design and its objects.
It is recommended that you do not edit the XML source code directly.
Preview PDF tab
Displays a PDF form based on the current form design. As you work, if you have Acrobat or
Adobe Reader installed, you can preview the form in the Preview PDF tab. Use the Preview
PDF tab to view and test the operation of a form or template as if it were a PDF file. You can
set options for previewing interactive forms or printable forms in PDF by using the Form
Properties dialog box (Preview tab).
To preview a form in the Preview PDF tab, in Acrobat, ensure that the Edit > Preferences
> Internet > Display PDF In Browser option is selected.
NOTE:
By default, not all the tabs are displayed. The Design View tab is displayed; however, the Master
Pages tab and the XML Source tab are not displayed. The Preview PDF tab is displayed only
when Acrobat or Adobe Reader is installed.
Tabbed palettes are arranged around the Layout Editor to provide easy access to the tools
without cluttering your workspace.
For more information see Tocustomize the Layout Editor.
15
Getting Started
2
Script Editor
The Script Editor is where you create, modify, and view the calculations and scripts of a particular
form. For example, you can use the Script Editor to write a simple calculation that adds two numeric
fields or complex scripts that alter the appearance of the form based on end-user actions. Designer
supports scripting either in its own scripting language called FormCalc or in JavaScript.
By default, the Script Editor appears at the top of the Designer workspace, but you can dock it
anywhere. It has both a single-line view and a multiline view that you can switch between, depending
on your needs. Single-line view is designed to maximize the amount of space dedicated to the Layout
Editor and other palettes. Multiline view is designed to maximize the amount of space for writing
script.
Show
Lists all form design events that support user-defined scripting. Any events that do not apply
to a particular object appear dimmed. Events that contain a calculation or script display an
asterisk (*) beside the name of the event.
Show Events for Child Objects
Displays the event you have currently selected in the Show list for the current object and all
of its child objects. If you select the uppermost object in the Hierarchy palette, this option
displays the event you have currently selected in the Show list for all objects on your form.
Functions
Displays a list of available built-in FormCalc or JavaScript functions, depending on the
scripting language you currently have selected in the Language list.
To place a function onto your script editing field, select a function from the list and press Enter.
Check Script Syntax
Checks all of the scripts in a form for correct syntax and reports any errors on the Warnings
tab in the Report palette.
Language
Specifies the scripting language you want to use for the current calculation or script. Two
options are available:
•
FormCalc FormCalc is a native Adobe calculation language typically used for shorter
scripts, such as simple calculations.
•
JavaScript JavaScript is the default scripting language for new forms.
The scripting language that is displayed in the Language list matches the scripting
language option you select as the default for new forms in the Workspace panel in the
Options dialog box. However, if you change the scripting language setting for the current
form on the Defaults tab in the Form Properties dialog box, the scripting language that is
displayed in the Language list changes similarly for any new scripts on new events.
16
Getting Started
Changing the scripting language option in the Form Properties dialog box does not
change the scripting language for existing scripts. If an event already contains script and
that script is deleted, the Script Editor continues to use that same scripting language for
the duration of your Designer working session.
Run At
Specifies where the calculation or script will execute. Three options are available:
•
Client Calculations and scripts execute while the client application (for example,
Acrobat, Adobe Reader, or a web browser) processes the form.
•
Server Calculations and scripts execute while the server application (for example, Forms)
processes the form.
•
Client and server Calculations and scripts execute while the server application (for
example, Forms) processes the form, except in cases where the HTML client application
supports client-side scripting. For example, a script that accesses a database to prefill data
on a form.
For more information, see ScriptingUsing Designer.
2.6.2.
About palettes
The palettes provide easy access to the tools without cluttering your workspace. Palettes can include
one or more tabs, each containing common properties. For example, the Object palette can include
one or more tabs.
You can arrange the palettes in the workspace to suit your work style. For example, you can hide the
rarely used palettes and move the frequently used ones into one palette window.
As you work in the Layout Editor, the information that appears in certain palettes changes to reflect
the selected object. For example, if you select an object, the information in the Layout palette changes
to display information about the object’s size and position.
Hierarchy palette
The Hierarchy palette is a graphical representation of the contents in the Design View and Master
Pages tabs.
Whatever you select in the Hierarchy palette is also selected in the body or master page that it is associated with. See Hierarchypalette menu.
Data View palette
If a data connection exists, the Data View palette displays the hierarchy derived from the data
connection. The top nodes in the hierarchy represent each data connection and display the name of
the data connection. A data connection provides a link between the form and the data source.
17
Getting Started
2
When you design a form based on a data connection, Designer builds a data structure for your form
based on that data source. You can filter the nodes to work with and quickly create a form using some
or all of the data source. You then use binding to link a node from a data source to an object on the
form. See Connectingto a data source.
Tab Order palette
The Tab Order palette displays a numbered list of all the objects on the form, where each number
represents the position of the object within the tabbing order.
The Tab Order palette may show the following visual markers in the list:
18
•
A gray bar marks each page of the form. The tabbing order on each page starts with the number
1.
•
The letter M inside a green circle indicates master page objects (visible only when viewing the
form on the Design View tab).
•
A range of numbers indicates objects within a fragment reference.
•
A yellow background indicates the currently selected object.
Getting Started
•
A lock icon beside the first object on the page indicates that the object cannot be moved within
the order (visible only when viewing the form on the Master Pages tab).
For more information see Usingthe Tab Order palette.
PDF Structure palette
The PDF Structure palette displays a view of the hierarchical structure of tagged PDF documents,
which provide accessibility and a defined tabbing and reading order for assistive technologies, such
as keyboard access and screen readers. See the PDFStructure palette menu.
For information about PDF documents as artwork, see ImportingPDF documents as artwork.
Object Library palette
The Object Library palette contains all the objects that you can add to a form design. Objects are
organized into categories:
19
Getting Started
2
Standard
Contains the most commonly used form objects, such as check boxes and text fields.
Barcodes
Contains a list of barcode objects.
Custom
Contains preformatted objects, such as address blocks and phone number fields.
For information about using the library palettes, see Managinglibrary palettes.
Fragment Library palette
The Fragment Library palette contains the fragment libraries that are currently open. A fragment
library corresponds to a folder in your file system that contains the fragment source XDP files.
Each fragment library has an expandable panel in the library that lists the available fragments.
My Fragments
A location for the fragments that you create. You can insert them in a form design or use them
to create new fragments.
Style Catalog palette
Use the Style Catalog palette to manage styles sheets, and to edit and apply styles to objects in a form
design. The Style Catalog palette lists the various style sheets available with a form and the styles
included with each style sheet. The Style Catalog includes a different panel for each style sheet. Each
panel lists the styles included with that style sheet. The first panel is the Internal Style Sheet panel.
Below the internal style sheet panel are panels for each Designer Style Sheet file (XFS) file that you
add to the Style Catalog. See Styles .
Layout palette
Use the Layout palette to set the following properties for the selected object::
20
•
Size and position of the object.
•
Whether the object should ignore the defined height and width, and expand to reveal all of its
content.
•
Position of the anchor (insertion) point. You can rotate an object around its anchor point in a
90°, 180°, or 270° increment.
•
Align selected objects in subforms that flow content.
•
Margins around the object.
Getting Started
•
Caption position and width. You can also hide the caption.
For more information, see Formattingobjects.
When you select an object, the Layout palette automatically displays the selected object’s settings.
You can edit most of an object’s layout settings directly in the Layout Editor. For example, to change
an object’s position, you can drag it to the new location on the page.
Border palette
Use the Border palette to edit the border properties for objects in the form design. You can edit the
borders individually (left, right, top, and bottom) or together. You can also specify the type of border
corner and background color.
For more informaiton, see Borderproperties in the Border palette.
Object palette
Use the Object palette to modify properties that are specific to the selected object. The object that is
selected in the Layout Editor determines which tabs are available in this palette.
Accessibility palette
Use the Accessibility palette to specify custom text for an object that a Microsoft® Active Accessibility
(MSAA)- compliant screen reader reads as it passes through the form. (See Makingobjects accessible.) If custom screen reader text is available for the object, the screen reader will read the custom
text and not the tool tip.
You can also change the default order in which the screen reader searches for text to read on an
object-by-object basis, and you can turn off screen reader text for any object.
For more informaiton, see Accessibilityproperties in the Accessibility palette.
Font palette
Use the Font palette to change the font family, size, style, and scale, as well as the baseline shift, letter
spacing, and kerning of the text in one or more selected objects. You can change the font properties
of text in text objects, in the caption area of objects such as text fields, decimal fields, and numeric
fields, and in the value area of text field objects.
For more information, see Formattingtext.
21
Getting Started
2
Paragraph palette
Use the Paragraph palette to change the alignment, indentation, line spacing, and hyphenation of the
selected text. You can also set the radix alignment for a Numeric Field object. The options that
appear in the Paragraph palette depend on what is selected.
For more information, see Formattingparagraphs.
Use the Paragraph palette to create lists and to change the alignment, indentation, line spacing, and
hyphenation of the selected text. You can also set the radix alignment for a Numeric Field object. The
options that appear in the Paragraph palette depend on what is selected.
Drawing Aids palette
Use the Drawing Aids palette to specify the grid and ruler settings and drawing units. You can also
show or hide object boundaries and specify boundary border style. The settings for snapping objects
to other elements on the page and guideline definitions are also included on the Drawing Aids
palette.
The horizontal and vertical rulers, the grid, and the long cross hairs help you position objects
precisely across the width or length of a page. When visible, rulers appear along the top and left side
of the active body or master page. Markers in the ruler display the pointer’s position when you move
it. Changing the ruler origin (the (0, 0) mark on the top and left rulers) lets you measure from a
specific point on the form design.
You can also show or hide object boundaries on the form design. Showing boundaries is useful for
displaying objects that do not have borders on the form. You can also specify border style for fields,
subforms, content areas, groups, and other objects.
When you move objects, the snapping options enable you to automatically position them in relation
to other elements on the page. Objects can snap to the grid, a guideline, another object, or the center
of the page.
You can use guidelines as a visual cue or as elements for object snapping. Use the guideline definitions lists to add or remove horizontal or vertical guidelines.
For more information, see Touse the drawing aids.
Info palette
The Info palette displays the metadata associated with the selected objects. This metadata is stored
in the XML source as named children of a <desc> element. You can edit some metadata for the
form design by using the Form Properties dialog box (Info tab).
22
Getting Started
Report palette
The Report palette provides information about the form design. The Warnings tab lists errors that
are reported as you work in the form design, the Binding tab lists fields based on how you defined
their binding data, and the Log tab shows a log of actions reported by Designer.
To clear the Warnings tab, you must address the errors listed. To clear the Log tab, click the palette
menu and select Clear Warnings. See Addressingwarning messages in the Report palette.
How To palette
The How To palette contains a list of help topics about common procedures in Designer. You can
scroll the list to locate a topic of interest and click More Info to see the steps.
2.6.3.
Customizing the workspace
To customize the Layout Editor
You can customize the Layout Editor to show or hide tabs, resize pages, and zoom in and out.
To show or hide tabs
•
To show or hide the Design View tab, select View > Design View.
•
To show or hide the Master Pages tab, select View > Master Pages.
•
To show or hide the XML Source tab, select View > XML Source.
•
To show or hide the Preview PDF tab, select View > Preview PDF.
To zoom in and out
•
To size the page to 100%, select View > Actual Size.
•
To size the page to fit in the Layout Editor, select View > Fit Page.
•
To size the page to fit the width of the Layout Editor, select View > Fit Width.
•
To zoom in or out of the Layout Editor, select View > Zoom, enter a value from 25% to 500%
in the Zoom To box, and then click OK. You can also use the Zoom To box in the toolbar.
•
To magnify an area, select View > Zoom Area. The pointer changes to a magnifying glass.
Using the magnifying glass, click and drag the area that you want to magnify.
•
To display a specific page, zoom out so that you can see the entire page and scroll down to the
page that you want to display.
23
Getting Started
2
To customize the Script Editor
You can show or hide the Script Editor and change the view from single-line to multiline.
•
To show or hide the Script Editor, select Window > Script Editor.
•
To change from single-line to multiline view, drag the Expand button on the Script Editor
palette border until the palette is the required size.
For more information, see ScriptingUsing Designer.
To customize the palettes
You can customize the palettes to show or hide palettes, dock or move palettes, or size or reset
palettes.
To show or hide palettes
•
To show a palette, select Window > [name of palette].
•
To hide a palette, select palette menu > Hide Palette.
•
To show or hide all palettes on one side of the Layout Editor, click Expand
border. Click it again to collapse the palettes.
•
To show or hide all the palettes that are in the selected location, select Window > Workspace,
and then select one of the commands.
on the palette
To dock or move palettes
•
To dock a palette on the side of the window, drag the palette bar to the side of the Designer
window.
•
To dock palettes together, drag the palette bar to the bottom of another palette. This procedure
applies only to palettes that are docked to the Designer window; it does not apply to floating
palettes.
•
To move and dock a palette, drag the palette bar.
•
To move a palette without docking it, Ctrl+drag the palette bar.
•
To move a palette into another palette window, drag the palette tab to the target palette. You
cannot move a sub-tab.
To size or reset palettes
24
•
To change the size of a palette, drag any side of the palette.
•
To reset palette locations, select Window > Reset Palette Locations.
Getting Started
To use the drawing aids
You can use the Drawing Aids palette to show or hide rulers and object boundaries, set the grid, and
set other preferences.
To show or hide the drawing aids
•
To quickly show the Drawing Aids palette, double-click the rulers.
•
To show or hide the object boundaries, select Show Object Boundaries.
•
To show or hide guidelines, or the grid, select Show Guidelines and Show Grid.
•
To show or hide rulers, select Horizontal Ruler and Vertical Ruler.
•
To show or hide cross hairs, select Long Crosshairs.
To use the grid
•
To enable snap to grid, select Snap To Grid.
•
To set the grid’s origin, type new coordinates for the origin in the X and Y Origin boxes.
•
To set the grid’s interval, type new values in the X and Y Interval boxes. For example, if the grid
is in 1-inch units and you specify an interval of 10, 10 grid points are displayed per inch.
To set snapping options
•
To automatically place objects at locations on the grid, select Snap To Grid.
•
To automatically place objects on guidelines you define, select Snap To Guideline.
•
To automatically position the edge of an object using another object, select Snap To Object.
•
To automatically place the center of an object at the vertical or horizontal center of the page,
select Snap To Guideline.
To use guidelines
•
To automatically place objects on guidelines, select Snap To Guideline.
•
To add a guideline, starting from the upper-left corner of the Layout Editor, drag the pointer
onto the page. To remove a guideline, select its triangle in the ruler and drag it off the page.
•
Alternatively, under Guideline Definitions, to add a horizontal or vertical guideline, click
and enter a numeric location. To remove a guideline, select it and click .
•
Use the Drawing Aids palette menu to select preset guidelines (for example, to add guidelines
for a standard US Letter or Legal-sized page).
To set other drawing aids
•
To set the rulers’ unit of measurement, select a unit from the Units list.
25
Getting Started
2
•
To set the color of object boundary borders, click Styles, click the Color box, select More
Colors, and either choose a predefined color from a palette or create a custom color by clicking
Define Custom Color.
•
To set the object boundary border style, click Styles and select the border style for the required
object.
•
To set the color of grids or guidelines, click the Color box, select More Colors, and either
choose a predefined color from a palette or create a custom color by clicking Define Custom
Color.
To customize the toolbars
You can customize the toolbars to show, hide, dock, or move toolbars, create new toolbars, remove
toolbars that are no longer needed, add frequently-used commands or remove unused commands
from a toolbar, or reset to the default toolbars.
To show, hide, dock, or move a toolbar
•
To show or hide a toolbar, right-click a toolbar and select or deselect the toolbar that you want
to show or hide.
•
To dock a toolbar, drag the toolbar to the top of the Designer window.
•
To move a toolbar, drag the toolbar to the new location.
To create a toolbar
1)
Select Tools > Customize.
2)
In the Toolbars tab, click New.
3)
Type a name for the toolbar and click OK.
4)
Add commands to the toolbar as required.
To delete a toolbar
1)
Select Tools > Customize.
2)
In the Toolbars tab, select the toolbar that you want to delete and click Delete.
NOTE:
You can only delete user-created toolbars.
To rename a toolbar
26
1)
Select Tools > Customize.
2)
In the Toolbars tab, select the toolbar that you want to rename and click Rename.
3)
Rename the toolbar and click OK.
Getting Started
NOTE:
You can only rename user-created toolbars.
To show or hide tool tips
1)
Select Tools > Customize.
2)
Show or hide toolbar tool tips:
•
To show tool tips , select the Show Tool Tips check box.
•
To hide tool tips, clear the Show Tool Tips checkbox.
To add or remove a command on a toolbar
1)
Select Tools > Customize.
2)
In the Commands tab, select the toolbar that you want to edit in the Edit Toolbar list.
Add or remove a button:
3)
•
To add a command to a toolbar, select the command that you want to add and then click
Add Tool to Toolbar. Use Move Tool Up and Move Tool Down to position the command
in the toolbar.
•
To add a separator after a command in the toolbar, select the command in the toolbar,
and then click Add Separator to Toolbar. Use Move Tool Up and Move Tool Down to
position the separator in the toolbar.
•
To remove a command or separator from a toolbar, select the command or separator and
then click Remove Tool from Toolbar.
Click Close.
To reset toolbar commands to the default
1)
Select Tools > Customize.
2)
In the Commands tab, select the toolbar that you want to reset in the Edit Toolbar list.
3)
Click Reset Toolbar to Default.
NOTE:
You cannot reset user-created toolbars.
To customize the tool tips for objects
You can display tool tips that show the position, the size, and the name of the object as you work on
a form design.
•
To show or hide the position of tool tips, select Tools > Options > Workspace, select or deselect
Display Position And Size Tool Tips While Editing, and then click OK.
•
To show or hide the object tool tips, select Tools > Options > Workspace, select or deselect
Display Object Name Tool Tips While Pointing, and then click OK.
27
Getting Started
2.6.4.
2
Managing library palettes
Object Library palette
You can add categories to this palette, rename existing categories, move objects between categories,
and remove categories from this palette. You can also create and add your own objects to the categories. Each category corresponds to a folder in the file system.
To add a category to the Object Library palette
1)
In the Object Library palette menu, select Add Group.
2)
Type a name for the category and click OK. Adding a category to the Object Library palette
creates a folder in the file system.
To view the location of the new folder, click the category in the Object Library palette and,
in the Object Library palette menu, select Group Properties. Notice the folder location in the
Location box.
TIP:
To delete a category from the Object Library palette
1)
In the category menu, select Remove Group.
2)
Do one of the following tasks:
3)
•
To delete a category, select Remove Group and All Its Objects.
•
To delete a category and move the objects to another category, select Remove Group and
Move Objects to [category name].
Click OK.
To move an object to a different category in the Object Library palette
1)
In the Object Library palette, right-click the object that you want to move and select Move
Object To > [category name].
Only categories that allow objects to be added to it or removed from it are listed.
To customize the view in the Object Library palette
1)
28
Do one or both of these tasks:
•
To change the size of the icons, in the category menu, select View > [icon size].
•
To sort the icons, in the category menu, select View > Sorted List.
Getting Started
To set permissions for an Object Library palette category
1)
In the category menu, select Group Properties.
2)
Do one of the following tasks:
•
To allow objects to be added to a category, ensure that Allow Objects To Be Added is
selected.
•
To allow objects to be removed from a category, ensure that Allow Objects To Be
Removed is selected.
•
To allow objects to be modified in a category, ensure that Allow Objects To Be Modified
is selected.
To add an object to the Object Library palette
1)
In the Object Library palette, select the category where you want to store the object.
2)
Drag the object into the Object Library palette.
3)
In the Add Library Object dialog box, type the name of the object.
4)
(Optional) Type a description for the object.
5)
Click OK.
If another object of the same name exists in that category, Designer prompts you to confirm
whether you want to replace the existing object.
From the Group Properties dialog box, some categories may have been set up to prevent
objects from being added, removed, or modified. If a category prevents new objects from being
added, the objects are added to the first category that accepts them.
To delete an object from the Object Library palette
1)
In the Object Library palette, select the category where the object is stored.
2)
Right-click the object and select Remove Object From Library.
Using the Group Properties dialog box, some categories may have been set up to prevent
objects from being added, removed, or modified. You cannot delete an object if the category
prevents it.
3)
When you are prompted to delete the object, click Yes. The object is removed from the file
system.
29
Getting Started
2
To rename an object in the Object Library palette
1)
In the Object Library palette, select the category where the object is stored.
2)
Right-click the object and select Object Info.
Using the Group Properties dialog box, some categories may have been set up to prevent
objects from being added, removed, or modified. You cannot delete an object if the category
prevents it.
3)
In the Name box, type a new name.
4)
(Optional) In the Description box, type a description.
5)
Click OK.
If another object of the same name exists in that category, Designer prompts you to confirm whether
you want to replace the existing object.
To restore default objects in the Object Library palette
You can restore the default objects in the My Favorites, Standard, Barcodes, and Custom categories
in Designer.
When you restore objects, all the objects provided with Designer are restored. Designer
replaces any missing objects and overwrites all objects that have the same names as the originals.
IMPORTANT:
1)
Do one or both of these tasks:
•
To restore default objects in all categories at once, in the Object Library palette menu,
select Restore Default Objects For All Groups.
•
To restore default objects in a single category, select one of the categories: My Favorites,
Standard, Custom. or Barcodes. Then in the category menu, select Restore Default [category name] Objects.
To share an Object Library palette category with other form authors or form developers
You can place the Object Library palette objects in a shared folder or web folder where other form
authors or form developers can access them.
30
1)
Create a shared folder or web folder that other form authors or form developers can access.
2)
Create subfolders for each of the categories in the Object Library palette you want to share.
3)
Copy the objects from their existing location to the new location.
4)
In Designer, select the category that you want to share in the Object Library palette.
5)
In the Object Library palette menu, select Group Properties.
6)
In the Location box, type or browse to the location of the new category subfolder that you
created in step 2.
Getting Started
7)
Click OK.
8)
Repeat steps 4 to 7 for each of the categories.
To share an Object Library with other form authors or form developers
You can place your Object Library of categories and objects into a shared folder or web folder where
other form authors or developers can access them.
To create a shared library by using an existing library
1)
Add and remove categories and objects from your existing library until you create the structure
you want to achieve for the shared library.
2)
For each category, in the Object Library palette menu, select Group Properties and set the
appropriate user permissions.
3)
Locate the Objects folder in the directory where Designer is installed, and copy the Objects
folder and all of its subfolders to a shared folder or web folder that form authors or developers
can access.
4)
Rename the LocalLibrary.xml file located in the Object folder to avoid confusion. For example,
rename the file as SharedLibrary.xml.
5)
Add the shared library to Designer by following the procedure Toadd a shared library.
To create a shared library without using an existing library
1)
Create a shared folder or web folder that form authors or developers can access.
2)
Create subfolders within the shared folder for each of the categories in the Library that you
want to share.
3)
Copy the Library objects from their existing location to the new shared location.
To view the current location of objects or categories in the Library, click the category in the
Object Library palette and select Group Properties from the category menu. Notice the folder
location in the Location box.
TIP:
4)
Using the form, create a new object library file, where Category_name is the name to appear as
a category title in the Object Library palette, and folder is the location or relative path to the
folder that contains the objects for the category.
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<objectLibraryTabSet>
<tab name="Category_name" directory="folder" permission="adm"/>
<tab name="Category_name" directory="folder" permission="adm"/>
.
.
.
</objectLibraryTabSet>
31
Getting Started
2
5)
Save the new object library file to the root of your shared folder with an .xml file name extension.
6)
Add the shared library to Designer by following the procedure Toadd a shared library.
To add a shared library
1)
In the Object Library palette menu, select Shared Library Location.
2)
In the Location box, type the name of or browse to the shared folder that contains the object
library file for the shared library you want to add.
3)
Click OK.
Fragment Library palette
You can view the fragments in a fragment library as a list of fragment names or as a detailed view
that includes the file names. You can also view a preview of the selected fragment. A preview of the
selected fragment appears at the bottom of the Fragment Library palette.
Fragment libraries are folders in your file system. To create or delete a fragment library, you simply
create or delete a folder. After you create a fragment library, you can open it in Designer.
To open a fragment library
1)
In the Fragment Library palette menu, select Open Fragment Library.
2)
Select the fragment library.
3)
•
If you are using the stand-alone version of Designer, select the folder that corresponds to
the fragment library.
•
If you are using Designer with Workbench, select the AEM forms application folder that
corresponds to the fragment library.
Click OK.
To set the view in the Fragment Library palette
1)
32
Set the view in the Fragment Library palette menu:
•
To view the fragments as a list, select View > List.
•
To view the fragments as a detailed list, select View > Details.
Getting Started
To preview the selected fragment
1)
In the Fragment Library palette menu, select Show Preview Pane.
Fragment Library palette
You can view the fragments in a fragment library as a list of fragment names or as a detailed view
that includes the file names. You can also view a preview of the selected fragment. A preview of the
selected fragment appears at the bottom of the Fragment Library palette.
Fragment libraries are folders in your file system. To create or delete a fragment library, you simply
create or delete a folder. After you create a fragment library, you can open it in Designer.
To open a fragment library
1)
In the Fragment Library palette menu, select Open Fragment Library.
2)
Select the folder that corresponds to the fragment library.
3)
Click OK.
To set the view in the Fragment Library palette
1)
Set the view in the Fragment Library palette menu:
•
To view the fragments as a list, select View > List.
•
To view the fragments as a detailed list, select View > Details.
To preview the selected fragment
1)
In the Fragment Library palette menu, select Show Preview Pane.
2.7.
Steps to creating a form design
2.7.1.
Basic steps to creating a form design
Here are the basic steps to creating a form design using Designer:
•
Plan the form design
•
Create the form design
•
Save the form design
33
Getting Started
2
•
Preview and test the form design
•
Publish the form design
•
Distribute the form
2.7.2.
Plan the form design
Keep these considerations in mind when planning a form design:
Data capture requirements
Consider the data you hope to gather or distribute and how you will capture and process it.
Will users manually enter all data, or can any data be prepopulated in the form?
Calculations or scripts to associate with the data and where they will be run (client, server, or
client and server)
Script will only run on a server if you are deploying forms through Forms and/or Output.
Security requirements.
Will users require a password for such things as opening, printing, copying text or applying
signatures? See SettingSecurity, Usingpassword fields, and Usingsignature fields.
Determining user needs
Your primary design objective should be to satisfy the needs of the people who use your forms.
The clearer your goals, the better the form design.
Create a library of fragments
Consider creating fragments for logos, headers, address blocks, and footers that can be shared
among form designs.
•
Decide whether you will use the FormCalc or JavaScript language.
•
Examine which security options you will apply to the form.
•
Set accessibility standards, if needed.
Considering form usability
When planning a form, remember to build usability into the design. Here are a few points to
consider:
•
34
A form should be easy to use. A simple layout with clear, meaningful captions will make
the form easier to understand. Forms can validate user input and supply prompts to assist
users who enter data. If Forms is available, some of the information can be filled in ahead
of time through merged data. If you are adept at scripting, you can also develop scripts to
process or route data and forms automatically from the click of a button.
Getting Started
•
A form should be accessible to users with disabilities.
See Aboutaccessible forms and Tabbingorder.
2.7.3.
Create the form design
There are several ways you can create a form design. You can start with a blank form, template, or
PDF document. If you are creating your first form design using Designer, try one of the tutorials or
look at one of the sample forms installed with Designer.
Start with a sample form
If you prefer not to try one of the tutorials, you can start by looking at one of the sample forms
installed with Designer. The sample forms illustrate form design techniques, from simple to
complex. Designer includes a selection of complete samples, each one accompanied by a form
design, sample data and/or schema, as well as the final version of the form. If one of the sample forms
suits your requirements, use it as a starting point. For more information about sample forms, see
“Sample Forms” in Sample Form Snippets and Forms.
You can start a form design based on a template and modify the design to suit your requirements.
The Template Manager contains a variety of templates from which to choose.
Considerations when creating form designs
You will need to consider form-specific details when creating form designs. The following table lists
items that you may want to keep a record of as you work on a form design.
Item
Specifications
Page size and orientation (for
master page)
Page size (for example, Letter)
Orientation (for example, Portrait)
Logos and graphics
Required file format (for example, TIF)
Form properties
Store title of form with form properties (Yes or No)
Locale setting (for example, Viewer’s system locale)
Default scripting language (for example, JavaScript)
Accessibility
Tool tips required for objects (specify the objects requiring tool tips)
Screen reader precedence (for example, Tool Tip)
Tabbing order
Setting (for example, Western)
Common font and drawing
properties
Line thickness (for example, same thickness for all lines)
All captions (same typeface and size)
All data values (same typeface and size)
35
Getting Started
2
Item
2.7.4.
Specifications
Object properties
Field borders and background color (Yes or No)
Background color of fillable areas (for example, an RGB value)
Field names (for example, see supplied “Field Name” list)
Form intelligence
Fields that must be filled (identify the fields)
Prompts to specify for required fields (specify the required prompts)
Save the form design
Save your form design as you work.
If you are using Designer with Workbench, the form designs are saved in a AEM forms application
to ensure that they are available to others who are logged in to the same server. If you are using the
stand-alone version of Designer, form designs are saved using the current name and location.
2.7.5.
Preview and test the form design
Previewing and testing your form designs ensures that they look and behave the way you intended.
Preview your form design as you work by using the Preview PDF tab. When you preview a form
design, Designer renders your form as a PDF file. See Topreview and test forms in the Preview PDF
tab.
You can test a form using sample data. Testing the form with sample data ensures that data and fields
map and that repeating subforms appear as expected. You can automatically generate sample data
to preview and test your form instead of creating a sample data file. If your form contains repeating
subforms or subform sets, you can specify the number of times the data will be repeated when you
preview the form. See Topreview a form using sample data.
You can also preview how your form will print by generating sample data to print with the form. If
the form contains repeating subforms or subform sets, you can specify the number of times the data
will be repeated when you print the form. See Toprint a form with sample data.
2.7.6.
Publish the form
This feature is available only in the stand-alone version of Designer.
Publishing a form to a shared folder or web folder allows users or applications access to it. If the form
design contains links to fragments, images, or other resources, the links are modified to reflect the
new location of the file. Keep in mind that all the files in the form will be copied into a single folder.
If you are working outside of Workbench and want to publish to the repository, you can set up a web
folder on your file system and map it to the location in the AEM forms repository.
36
Getting Started
2.7.7.
Distribute the form
This feature is available only in the stand-alone version of Designer.
If you have Acrobat 8 or later, you can send PDF forms to multiple recipients by using the Acrobat
Distribute wizard. The wizard is available from the File menu in Designer.
37
Create Form Designs
3.
Create Form Designs
3.1.
Create, open, and save
3.1.1.
Creating forms
3
You create a form design by dragging objects from the Object Library onto the Layout Editor. Alternatively, you can drag objects defined in an XML schema onto the Layout Editor.
The process for creating forms in Designer is different in the stand-alone and Workbench versions
of Designer.
Creating forms with the stand-alone version of Designer
When you start Designer, you are prompted to create a new form, create a new form from a template,
or open an existing form. You can also explore the sample forms. When you select the New Form or
New From Template option, the New Form Assistant appears.
The New Form Assistant guides you through a series of steps where you choose the type of form
design or template to create, how people will fill it, and how you will get the information back.
If you prefer, you have the option of making the New Form Assistant unavailable.
If you have Acrobat 8 or later, you can send PDF forms to multiple recipients by using the Acrobat
Distribute wizard.The wizard is available from the File menu in Designer. Sending the form by using
the wizard certifies the form originator's identity to form recipients and encrypts the data that the
recipients submit when they return a filled form. It also adds usage rights to the form so that form
fillers can save the form in Adobe Reader.
To create a form design using the New Form Assistant
38
1)
Select File > New. The New Form Assistant appears.
2)
In the Getting Started panel, select a method for creating the new form, and then click Next.
3)
Follow the on-screen instructions to create a form.
4)
Name and save the form.
Create Form Designs
To create a form design without the New Form Assistant
1)
Select File > New. The New Form Assistant appears.
2)
Click the Do Not Use Assistant link. The Assistant Options dialog box appears.
3)
Set the options for using the New Form Assistant and click OK. The New dialog box appears.
4)
In the Standard tab, click an icon to select a page size, and then click OK. An untitled form
design is created.
To view the whole page, the actual size of the page, or an area equivalent to the width of the
page, click Actual Size ,Fit Page , or Fit Width on the toolbar. The current zoom setting is also
displayed in the toolbar.
TIP:
To start with a blank form
1)
Click the New button
on the toolbar.
Creating forms from Workbench
In Workbench, use the Form Design perspective to create and manage XDP and PDF forms for a
AEM forms application. When you create a form, it opens in Designer, where you can lay out the
form design and add objects. Workbench displays a tab with an image of the first page of the form
design, but all form editing is done in Designer.
When you create a form design, you can specify a data model, a data submission method, the
Acrobat or Adobe Reader version, and the form type. You can also select Adobe Reader features for
the form, such as commenting, digital signatures, and encryption.
1)
2)
Create a form design from either Designer or Workbench:
•
In Designer, click File > New.
•
In Workbench, select File > New > Form.
Follow the onscreen instructions and then click Finish.
Creating forms based on a template, sample, or existing form
You can create forms based on a template, sample, or existing form in both the stand-alone version
of Designer and Designer with Workbench.
1)
Open the template, sample, or existing form on which you want to base the form design.
2)
Select File > Save As.
3)
Browse to the location in which to save the form design.
4)
In the File Name box, type a file name for the form design.
39
Create Form Designs
3
If you create a form using a template that was created in a previous version of Designer,
you can use the Compatibility tab (Form Properties dialog box) to update it to version 7.
NOTE:
Using forms as a model for Guides
Guides is deprecated.You can use Designer PDF or XDP form designs as the model for
creating Guides in Workbench. If you have an existing form guide from an earlier release of AEM
forms, you can open it in Guide Builder and your existing Guide definition is imported into Guide
Builder. For more information, see Guides based on XDP or PDF forms section in Workbench Help.
NOTE:
NOTE:
You cannot create a Guide based on a form design created by importing a PDF file as artwork.
Creating forms by importing a PDF
You can import a PDF document to use as the basis for creating a new form design. For more information, see Importing PDF files.
You can create forms by importing a PDF document in both the stand-alone version of Designer and
Designer with Workbench.
If you have PDF forms that were created in Acrobat or another application, you can import them as
background artwork. After you import the PDF forms, you can add objects to make them interactive.
If you are creating a PDF form design, you can select the Acrobat or Adobe Reader target version.
With the target version chosen, you can see when an object is not appropriate for that version.
s
3.1.2.
Considerations for creating forms for use with Acrobat and Adobe Reader
Keep these considerations in mind when creating forms to be opened and filled in Acrobat or Adobe
Reader:
•
Consider which version of Acrobat and Adobe Reader people are using when filling the form.
Setting the target version of Adobe Reader and Acrobat in Designer can help you create a form
design that is compatible. See Selecting the Acrobat and Adobe Readertarget version.
•
Acrobat supports full interactive functionality, including form filling, local saving, digital
signatures, review and markup, database and web service calls, and printing.
•
Adobe Reader supports a smaller set of functionalities and provides users with the ability to fill
and print forms, and in some situations, submit them. To extend the functionality of Adobe
Reader to match that of Acrobat, you must set usage rights for the form using extensions. For
more information, see Using PDF security options.
•
40
Create Form Designs
•
Acrobat and Adobe Reader support client-side data exchange processing for interactive PDF
forms.
•
•
Server-side data processing, such as dynamic rendering and redisplay of forms at run time, is
available through Forms. For more information see Designing forms for Forms.
RELATED LINKS:
Guidelinesfor PDF forms
Distributing forms
3.1.3.
Adding details about the form
You can add descriptive information about a form design or template (for example, file description
and author’s name) in the form design or template. If you want to save the information as metadata
with the PDF form, select Enable Plaintext Metadata in Form Properties > PDF Security tab. When
the metadata is saved, it is available to other Adobe applications, such as Acrobat and search utilities.
In Acrobat, the metadata appears on the Description tab of the Document Properties dialog box.
You can also add custom properties, such as copyright URLs, to a form.
In Acrobat, the metadata appears in the Custom tab of the Document Properties dialog box.
Keep in mind that certain case-sensitive keywords are reserved for property names:
•
Title
•
CreationDate
•
Creator
•
Producer
•
Subject
•
Keywords
•
ModDate
•
Trapped
•
Author
To add information about a form
1)
Select File > Form Properties.
2)
Enter the information on the Info tab. For a complete list and description of the items on this
tab, see Info tab (Form Properties dialog box).
3)
Embed the information for other applications to use:
41
Create Form Designs
3
•
Click the PDF Security tab.
•
In the Permissions area, select Use A Password To Restrict Printing And Editing Of The
Document And Its Security Settings, and then select the required security settings.
To add custom properties
1)
Select File > Form Properties.
2)
In the Custom Property box on the Info tab, click the Add button.
3)
Type the name of the property and press Enter.
4)
Type the value of the property and press Enter.
5)
Repeat steps 4 and 5 for each property you want to add.
6)
For a complete list and description of the items in this tab, see Info tab (Form Properties dialog
box).
7)
Embed the information for other applications to use:
•
Click the PDF Security tab.
•
In the Permissions area, select Use A Password To Restrict Printing And Editing Of The
Document And Its Security Settings, and then select the required security settings.
To remove custom properties
1)
Select File > Form Properties.
2)
In the Custom Property box on the Info tab, select the property, and click the Remove button.
To add document title to the PDF title bar
By default, the PDF output of a document displays the file name in the Adobe Reader or Adobe
Acrobat title window. You can add the document title of static XFA forms to the PDF title bar. If a
user opens the PDF, the document title will display on the title bar of the window.
1)
To open the Xml source for a document, click View -> XML Source.
Verify if the following tag is available in the Xml:
<?originalXFAVersion http://www.xfa.org/schema/xfa-template/3.3/ ?>
2)
If the tag exists, append DisplayDocTitle:1? to the tag. The resultant tag should be:
<?originalXFAVersion http://www.xfa.org/schema/xfa-template/3.3/
DisplayDocTitle:1?>
If the tag does not exist, add the tag with the DisplayDocTitle:1? append.
42
Create Form Designs
<?originalXFAVersion http://www.xfa.org/schema/xfa-template/3.3/
DisplayDocTitle:1?>
You need to add this tag along with the other processing instructions. in the following
parent node:
NOTE:
<template xmlns="http://www.xfa.org/schema/xfa-template/3.6/">
3)
3.1.4.
Save the document.
To set user permissions on a PDF form
You can set user permissions for accessing, printing, and editing PDF forms output through
Designer.
1)
Select File > Form Properties.
2)
In the PDF Security tab, select Use A Password To Restrict Printing And Editing Of The Document And Its Security Settings, and then select the required security settings.
RELATED LINKS:
UsingPDF security options
3.1.5.
Saving forms
When you save a form, the file format must be compatible with the way the form will be used in the
user community. You can save a form as a PDF file or an XDP file. Each file type has different uses:
Adobe Static PDF Form (*.pdf)
Saves forms as static PDF, based on the Acrobat and Adobe Reader target version specified.
Static PDF forms render once and are displayed on the client in the Acrobat or Adobe Reader
target version. They are not rerendered in response to user interaction. The PDF form may
have been designed with a flowable layout; however, when the static PDF form is created, its
layout is fixed and the resulting PDF form will not rerender on the client. Static PDF forms can
be interactive or non-interactive.
Adobe Dynamic XML Form (*.pdf)
Saves forms as dynamic PDF, based on the Acrobat and Adobe Reader target version. The form
design can contain dynamic elements. Dynamic PDF forms render on the client in Adobe
Reader and, depending on the end-user interactions, can rerender on the client several times.
Changes to the appearance of an object are possible in Adobe Reader because Adobe Reader
has enough information to rerender the final output. For example, objects can change color,
pagination can change, and objects can appear or disappear. If the end user clicks a button that
adds a new row to a table, the form is rerendered in Adobe Reader.
43
Create Form Designs
3
Adobe XML Form File (*.xdp)
Sets the default file type for new forms to the native XML-based file format created by
Designer. Use this option if you will be using Forms.
Designer Template (*.tds)
Saves the basic structure for a form as a template. It can contain components and settings, such
as fonts, page layout, formatting, and scripts. Use it as a starting point for a new form.
When Designer is integrated with Workbench, files are saved in the Workbench folder on your
local system:
•
If you are using Windows® XP, the Workbench folder is located in \Documents and
Settings\<user name>.
•
If you are using Windows Vista®, the Workbench folder is located in \Desktop\<user
name>.
After you save a form, check in the form and any referenced files in Workbench.
To save a form design
You can save form designs by using their current name and location, or save a copy by using a
different name or location.
When Designer is integrated with Workbench, form designs are saved in an application in Workbench. Saving form designs in an application ensures that they are available to others who are logged
on to the same server. When you save a form design in Designer the corresponding image of the
form in Workbench is updated. After you save a form, check in the form and any referenced files,
such as fragments or images, in Workbench.
You can save a form design in several formats. PDF forms saved in Designer should only be edited
in Designer.
1)
To save a form design, do one of the following actions:
•
Select File > Save.
•
In the toolbar, click Save
.
If you are using Designer with Workbench, check in the form and any referenced files in
Workbench.
NOTE:
To check in a form in Workbench
44
1)
In Designer, in the toolbar, click the Switch To Workbench button.
2)
In Workbench, open the Applications view.
3)
Navigate to the form you saved, right-click the form and select Check-in.
Create Form Designs
To save a copy of a form design
1)
Select File > Form Properties.
2)
Click the Save Options tab and set the save options:
•
To embed accessibility information within a PDF form file, select Generate Accessibility
Information (Tags) For Acrobat.
•
To create a log file of the saved PDF form file, select Generate Log File When Saving. The
log file is placed in the same directory as the saved form.
•
To embed the form fonts in the saved PDF form file, select Embed Fonts.
3)
Click OK.
4)
Select File > Save As.
5)
To make a copy of the form design under a different name, browse to the location in which to
save the form design. In the File Name box, type a different filename.
6)
To change the file type, from the Save As Type list, select one of the options.
Notice the message above the Save Options area that indicates the Acrobat and
AdobeReader target version for the form. You can change the target version by selecting File >
Form Properties > Defaults > Target Version > Choose Version To Run Form In.
NOTE:
7)
Click Save.
Sample form designs and templates are provided. To use them, see the associated readme
files. The sample form designs are installed in the EN\Samples folder of the Designer installation
folder. The sample templates are installed in the Templates folder of the Designer installation
folder. Templates can be viewed and managed through the Template Manager.
NOTE:
RELATED LINKS:
Importdocuments
Addingdetails about the form
Selectingthe Acrobat and Adobe Reader target version
3.1.6.
Opening forms
In addition to opening form designs (XDP), templates (TDS), or PDF forms created and modified
using only Designer, you can open other files of different formats. These formats are described in
detail in Import documents.
NOTE:
PDF forms created in a program other than Designer must be imported.
When you open a file, either a form design, template, or a file of another format, Designer attempts
to match fonts in the file with fonts that are available on your computer. If the file contains an
unavailable font, Designer displays a dialog box showing the missing font and a suggested replace-
45
Create Form Designs
3
ment. You can accept the replacement font or change it. Later, when you save the file, you can indicate whether you want the replacement fonts saved with the file.
If you open a form that was created in a previous version of Designer, you can use the Compatibility
tab (Form Properties dialog box) to update it to the current version.
You can open forms in Designer or in Workbench. To open a form in Workbench, in the Applications view, double-click the form. When you open a form from Workbench, the form opens in
Designer. In Workbench, a corresponding tab is displayed with an image of the first page of the
form.
If you are using Workbench, you might need to synchronize files, such as images or fragments, from
Workbench to your local system. In Workbench, forms and fragments are managed in the Applications view, and images are managed in the Resources view. To synchronize a file, right-click the file,
and select Synchronize.
1)
Select File > Open.
2)
Browse to the location or Workbench application where the form design is stored, select the
file, and click Open. If the file contains fonts that are not available on your computer, the
Missing Fonts dialog box appears.
3)
If necessary, select a font substitution method:
•
To accept the suggested replacement fonts, click OK.
•
To change the replacement font, click Change Substitute Font. Select a font and font style
and then click OK. In the Missing Fonts dialog box, click OK.
This font substitution is not permanent. Designer must map the unavailable fonts every
time the form opens. To make the font substitution permanent, before saving the file, select File
> Form Properties > Save Options and then selecting Embed Fonts.
NOTE:
3.1.7.
Selecting the Acrobat and Adobe Reader target version
You can design a form to run on a specific target version of Acrobat and Adobe Reader. Designer
displays warning messages when you try to use a feature that the selected target version does not
support.
When you specify a target version of Acrobat and Adobe Reader, you must ensure that you have the
correct version of Acrobat installed that matches the target version saved; otherwise, you may get an
error or warning message when you click the Preview PDF tab. The target version you select is also
displayed at the bottom of the Save As dialog box when you save a form.
46
Create Form Designs
The preview will use the same format as the saved form. You can right-click the Preview PDF tab to
see which format is currently selected. To indicate the format of an unsaved form, you must change
the Tools > Options > Document Handling > Default File Type For New setting.
1)
Select File > Form Properties.
2)
Click the Defaults tab and, in the Choose Version To Run Form In list, select the target version
of Acrobat and Adobe Reader.
3)
Click OK.
RELATED LINKS:
Defaults(Form Properties dialog box)
3.1.8.
Saving forms for Acrobat and Adobe Reader
When you create forms for Acrobat and Adobe Reader, you must save them as PDF files. PDF files
saved from Designer should only be edited using Designer.
You can select the target version of Adobe Reader or Acrobat that you plan to run the form on.
Selecting the target version allows you to see features that are not supported. See Selecting the
Acrobat and Adobe Readertarget version.
1)
Select File > Save As.
2)
In the File Name box, type the name for the file.
3)
In the Save As Type, select the required type.
4)
Click OK.
Ensure that you have the version of Acrobat installed that matches the target version saved;
otherwise, you may get an error or warning message when you click the Preview PDF tab.
NOTE:
RELATED LINKS:
Saving forms
Addressingwarning messages in the Report palette
Targetversion warning messages
3.1.9.
Distributing forms
This feature is available only in the stand-alone version of Designer.
If you have Acrobat 8 or later, you can send PDF forms to multiple recipients by using the Acrobat
Distribute wizard. The wizard is available from the File menu in Designer.
The Acrobat Distribute wizard is designed for form authors who want to distribute forms and collect
the form data locally on their computers. When you select File > Distribute Form, the Distribute
Forms wizard opens and walks you trough a few step-by-step panes to prepare a form for distribu-
47
Create Form Designs
3
tion. Sending the form by using the wizard certifies the form originator's identity to form recipients
and encrypts the data that the recipients submit when they return a filled form. It also adds usage
rights to the form so that form fillers can save the form in Adobe Reader. When you close a form
design in Designer, you can choose to distribute the form (if you started the form design process in
Acrobat).
To distribute a form using Designer
1)
Save the form as a PDF file.
2)
To distribute the form, select File> Distribute Form.
3.1.10. Publishing forms
This feature is available only in the stand-alone version of Designer.
You can publish your form designs to a shared or web folder where many users or other applications
can access them. If a form design contains links to external files, the links are modified to reflect the
new location of the file. You need write access to the folders to which you publish. Your network
administrator can set up the permissions you require.
RELATED LINKS:
Saving forms
Publishing to the AEM forms repository
If you are using the stand-alone version of Designer and want to use resources, such as images and
fragments, that reside in the AEM forms repository, you can set up a web folder on your file system
and map it to the repository. When you publish the form, links to the resources are maintained. You
use the Publish to Repository command to copy the files into the AEM forms repository.
Alternatively, you can create the form design on your file system. When you complete the form
design, you can drag and drop the folder and any sub-folders into the appropriate folder in the
Workbench Resources view.
You need access to AEM forms to read and write files in the AEM forms repository.Your network
administrator can set up the permissions your require.
To publish a form to a repository
You can put a copy of a form and its linked files in a shared or web folder where it can be accessed
by many users or other applications. When you publish a form to a repository, changes to file names,
file types, and references to external files (images) occur only in the published copy. If the form
contains a link to an external file, when the form and files are published, the list in the form is modified to reflect the new location of the file.
48
Create Form Designs
You can publish the form in PDF or in XDP format.
•
When you publish the form in PDF, information such as images and schemas is embedded in
the form, and no external files are copied to the publish folder.
•
When you publish the form in XDP format, the links to externally referenced files are modified
to be a relative path. The relative path lets you have one location for images that multiple forms
can reference without having to have multiple copies of the images.
If the externally linked files are not contained in a folder below the shared or web folder, the files are
copied to the publish folder and the links in the XDP file are adjusted to reflect the new absolute path
location of the files.
When publishing a form to the AEM forms repository, all external files are copied to the web folder.
To publish a form to the repository
1)
Select File > Publish to Repository.
2)
(Optional) To change the file type, select a new file type in the Save As Type list.
3)
Click Save.
Before you publish a form to a repository, you can optionally specify additional save options.
To set save options prior to publishing a form:
1)
2)
Select File > Form Properties > Save Options and do one or more of the following:
•
To embed accessibility information in a PDF form file, select Generate Accessibility
Information (Tags) For Acrobat.
•
To create a log file of the saved PDF form file, select Generate Log File When Saving. The
log file is placed in the same directory as the saved form.
•
To embed the form fonts in the saved PDF form file, select Embed Fonts.
Click OK.
Publishing a form to a repository
You can put a copy of a form and its linked files in a shared or web folder where it can be accessed
by many users or other applications. When you publish a form to a repository, changes to file names,
file types, and references to external files (images) occur only in the published copy. If the form
contains a link to an external file, when the form and files are published, the list in the form is modified to reflect the new location of the file.
You can publish the form in PDF or in XDP format.
49
Create Form Designs
3
•
When you publish the form in PDF, information such as images and schemas is embedded in
the form, and no external files are copied to the publish folder.
•
When you publish the form in XDP format, the links to externally referenced files are modified
to be a relative path. The relative path lets you have one location for images that multiple forms
can reference without having to have multiple copies of the images.
If the externally linked files are not contained in a folder below the shared or web folder, the files are
copied to the publish folder and the links in the XDP file are adjusted to reflect the new absolute path
location of the files.
If you are using Designer in ABAP Workbench or SAP NetWeaver Developer Studio, the environment publishes the forms for you.
NOTE:
3.1.11. Creating and managing templates
A template provides the basic structure for the form design and contains predefined file-creation
information that Designer applies to the form design. Templates contain definitions of objects used
in a form design as well as the form design’s page layout. A template can store any properties that
you would use in more than one form design, including these:
•
Master page layouts, which influence the format of pages
•
Boilerplate objects, including formatted headers and footers
•
Embedded images or objects that link to frequently used graphics, such as logos or watermarks
•
Any text variables or floating fields that you use as placeholders for data
•
Predefined formula equations and script fragments
•
File properties and file creation information
•
Other properties that facilitate or automate your work
Creating a template is very much like creating a form design. However, in a template, you design the
layout and select the file settings and preferences that you would typically need in more than one
form design. You can optionally include and define any objects that could be applied to more than
one form design. Including layouts and properties that are common to many form designs saves you
time because less work is needed to prepare form designs that are based on the template.
The Template Manager contains a variety of sample templates that are provided with Designer. It
can also contain any templates you create and use with Designer.
Use the Template Manager to do these tasks:
50
•
Preview templates
•
Select a default template for creating form designs
•
Add, delete, and rename templates, as well as add and remove groups
Create Form Designs
In the Template Manager, you can also add or delete tabs, move templates between tabs, and determine where in the file system Designer stores templates. Each tab corresponds to a folder in the file
system. By default, template files are stored in the Designer Templates folder.
RELATED LINKS:
Aboutforms
3.1.12. Creating and managing templates
A template provides the basic structure for the form design and contains predefined file-creation
information that Designer applies to the form design. Templates contain definitions of objects used
in a form design as well as the form design’s page layout. A template can store any properties that
you would use in more than one form design, including these:
•
Master page layouts, which influence the format of pages
•
Boilerplate objects, including formatted headers and footers
•
Embedded images or objects that link to frequently used graphics, such as logos or watermarks
•
Any text variables or floating fields that you use as placeholders for data
•
Predefined formula equations and script fragments
•
File properties and file creation information
•
Other properties that facilitate or automate your work
RELATED LINKS:
Aboutforms
Creating forms based on atemplate, sample, or existingform
Creating a template
Creating a template is very much like creating a form design. However, in a template, you design the
layout and select the file settings and preferences that you would typically need in more than one
form design. You can optionally include and define any objects that could be applied to more than
one form design. Including layouts and properties that are common to many form designs saves you
time because less work is needed to prepare form designs that are based on the template.
One of the easiest way to create a template (TDS) file is by using the New Form Assistant. The New
Form Assistant guides you through the steps involved in creating a template, such as previewing and
selecting the template you want to use, entering business contact information, and adding email
submit and print buttons. However, if you prefer not to use the New Form Assistant, you can select
Tools > Template Manager to open the Template Manager dialog box where you can directly select
the template you want.
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Create Form Designs
3
To create a template in the stand-alone version of Designer
1)
Open the New Form Assistant by using one of these methods:
•
Select File > New.
•
In the toolbar, click the Down Arrow next to the New button and select New.
2)
In the New Form Assistant, select Based on a Template and click Next.
3)
Follow the onscreen instructions to customize the template to suit your needs.
4)
Select File > Save As.
5)
In the Save As Type list, select Adobe Designer Template (*.tds).
6)
Click Save.
To create a template with Designer and Workbench
1)
In Designer, select File > New.
2)
Follow the onscreen instructions until the New Form Assistant opens in Designer, and then
select Based on a Template.
3)
Follow the onscreen instructions to customize the template to suit your needs.
4)
Select File > Save As.
5)
In the Save As Type list, select Adobe Designer Template (*.tds).
6)
Click Save.
Managing templates
The Template Manager contains a variety of sample templates that are provided with Designer. It
can also contain any templates you create and use with Designer.
Use the Template Manager to do these tasks:
•
Preview templates
•
Select a default template for creating form designs
•
Add, delete, and rename templates, as well as add and remove groups
In the Template Manager, you can also add or delete tabs, move templates between tabs, and determine where in the file system Designer stores templates. Each tab corresponds to a folder in the file
system. By default, template files are stored in the Designer Templates folder.
By default, templates are stored in the Designer Templates folder (\EN\Templates).
Each time you open Designer, the application copies the template files in the Templates folder to the
user profile for each language. This could be an issue in certain multiuser environments where disk
52
Create Form Designs
quotas are restricted. To save disk space, set up a common directory for templates. For further information about setting up a common directory for templates, see the technical note at
http://kb2.adobe.com/cps/524/cpsid_52464.html.
To add a template to the Template Manager
1)
Select Tools > Template Manager.
2)
Click the tab in which to add the template.
3)
In the palette menu, select Add Template.
4)
Browse to the appropriate folder, select the template file (TDS) you want to add, and click
Open. A copy of the template file is added to the Template Manager.
To delete a template from the Template Manager
1)
Select Tools > Template Manager.
2)
Click the tab where the template is stored.
3)
Right-click the template and select Delete Template.
4)
When you are prompted to delete the template, click Yes. The file is removed from your
computer’s file system.
To rename a template in the Template Manager
1)
Select Tools > Template Manager.
2)
Click the tab where the template is stored.
3)
Right-click the template and select Rename Template.
4)
Type a different name for the template, and press Enter.
To specify a default template in the Template Manager
1)
Select Tools > Template Manager.
2)
Click the tab where the template is stored.
3)
Select the template.
4)
Click Set Selected as Default.
To restore the default templates in the Template Manager
You can restore the default templates that are available in the Blank tab and the Common Forms tab
in the Template Manager dialog box.
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Create Form Designs
3
When you restore templates, all of the templates that were provided with Designer in the
Blank tab and the Forms tab are restored. Designer replaces any missing templates and overwrites all
templates with the same names as the originals.
IMPORTANT:
1)
Select Tools > Template Manager.
2)
Click either the Blank tab or the Forms tab.
3)
In the palette menu, select Restore Default Templates.
To add a tab to the Template Manager
When you add a tab to the Template Manager, a subfolder with the same name is created in the
Designer Templates folder.
1)
Select Tools > Template Manager.
2)
In the palette menu, select Add Category.
3)
Type a name for the tab and click OK.
To delete a tab from the Template Manager
When you delete a tab from the Template Manager the corresponding folder is removed from the
Designer Templates folder.
1)
Select Tools > Template Manager.
2)
Click the tab you want to delete.
3)
In the palette menu, select Remove Category.
4)
When you are prompted to remove the tab, do one of these actions:
5)
•
To delete the selected tab and its associated category folder and templates, select Remove
The Category And Delete All Contained Templates.
•
To move the templates to a different tab before deleting the selected tab and its associated
category folder, select Remove The Category And Move The Contained Templates To
The Following Category: [tab name], and then click the tab where you want to move the
templates.
Click OK.
To move a template to a different tab in the Template Manager
54
1)
Select Tools > Template Manager.
2)
Click the tab you want, right-click the template that you want to move, and select Move
Template To > [tab name].
Create Form Designs
To determine where the template files are stored
1)
Select Tools > Template Manager.
2)
Click the tab you want.
3)
In the palette menu, select Category Properties. The Template Category Properties box
displays the location of the templates that are currently listed in the selected tab.
To customize the view in the Template Manager
1)
Select Tools > Template Manager.
2)
Click the tab you want.
3)
In the palette menu, select View and perform one of these actions:
•
To display the template names as icons, select Large Icons.
•
To display the template names in a list, select List.
Importing a template
You can import any template file (TDS) into Designer and copy the template into the Template
Manager, create a new form based on the template, or edit the template.
When you import a template, a copy is automatically added either to the templates folder that is indicated in the form’s XML source code or to the folder named Other, if no location is specified. The
imported template appears in the Template Manager, listed in the corresponding tab. If a template
with the same name already exists in the tab, Designer displays a message prompting you to replace
the existing file.
1)
2)
3)
Open the template file you want to import by using one of these methods:
•
Select File > Open, browse to the folder you want, select the template file (TDS), and click
Open.
•
In Windows Explorer, double-click the template file (TDS).
•
Drag the template file (TDS) from Windows Explorer into the Designer workspace.
In the Template Options dialog box, select one of these options:
•
To add the template to the Template Manager, select Copy This Template Into The
Template Manager.
•
To create a PDF form based on the template, select Create A New Form Based On This
Template.
•
To open the template in Designer for editing, select Edit This Template.
Click OK.
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Create Form Designs
3
Creating and customizing a form based on a template
Template files (TDS) sometimes contain customizable text or images within field captions, text
objects, and static images. When you create a form based on a template that contains fields with
customizable text or images, the New Form Assistant opens enabling you to change the information
displayed in each field to suit your own needs. For example, the sample templates available in the
Template Manager contain customizable text and images, which you can replace with your
company’s name, address, telephone number, and logo.
The information that you enter for each field is saved and reused to repopulate the same fields in the
New Form Assistant the next time you open the template.
To create a form based on a template in the stand-alone version of Designer
1)
Open the New Form Assistant by using one of these methods:
•
Select File > New.
•
In the toolbar, click the down arrow next to the New button and select New.
2)
In the New Form Assistant, select Based on a Template and click Next.
3)
Follow the onscreen instructions to customize the new form to suit your needs.
4)
Name and save the file.
To create a form based on a template with Designer and Workbench
1)
In Designer, select File > New.
2)
Follow the onscreen instructions until the New Form Assistant opens in Designer, and then
select Based on a Template and click Next.
3)
Follow the onscreen instructions to customize the new form to suit your needs.
4)
Name and save the file.
3.2.
Page layout
3.2.1.
Setting up pages
Pages represent the canvas on which you build your form design. To lay out a form design, you drag
objects, such as Text Fields, from the Object Library palette onto the page. Use the Design View tab
to view, add, delete, and edit pages.
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Create Form Designs
To show or hide a page
You can show or hide pages in a form design by using different methods:
•
To show the Design View tab if another tab is active, in the Layout Editor, click the Design
View tab.
•
To show or hide the Design View tab, select View > Design View.
To add a page
You can add a page by using the Insert menu or Hierarchy palette.
TIP:
If the Hierarchy palette is not visible, select Window > Hierarchy.
•
To add a page, click the Design View tab and select Insert > New Page.
•
To add a page in the Hierarchy palette, right-click the required page-level subform and select
New Page.
To delete a page
You can delete a page by using the Insert menu or Hierarchy palette.
TIP:
if the Hierarchy palette is not visible, select Window > Hierarchy.
•
To delete a page, click anywhere on the page and select Edit > Delete Page.
•
To delete a page in the Hierarchy palette, right-click the page-level subform that corresponds
to the page and select Delete.
To move between multiple pages
If your form design has multiple pages, you can easily move from one to another by using the Layout
Editor or Hierarchy palette.
TIP:
If the Hierarchy palette is not visible, select Window > Hierarchy.
•
In the Design View tab, scroll up or down to the required page.
•
In the Hierarchy palette, click the required page.
To reorder pages
If you need to change the order of the pages, you can use the Hierarchy palette.
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Create Form Designs
TIP:
3
If the Hierarchy palette is not visible, select Window > Hierarchy.
1)
In the Hierarchy palette, select the subform that corresponds to the page you want to move.
2)
Drag the subform to a new position below the “form1” node.
3)
Repeat steps 1 and 2 until all the pages are in the order you prefer.
To rename a page
You can change the name of a page by using the Hierarchy palette or the Binding tab of the Object
palette. The default name of a page node in the Hierarchy palette is “(untitled Subform) (page 1)”,
“(untitled Subform) (page 2)”, and so on.
TIP:
If the Hierarchy palette is not visible, select Window > Hierarchy.
•
In the Hierarchy palette, right-click the page node and select Rename Object. Type a new name
for the page.
•
With the Design View tab selected, click anywhere on the page, click the Object palette and, in
the Binding tab, type a new name for the page.
3.2.2.
Using master pages
Master pages allow you add objects that will appear in the same position throughout the form design.
They are useful when you want to adjust the size and position of content areas, add page numbering,
and create single- or double-sided features (such as headers and footers).
A typical form design that has two pages with different dimensions contains at least two master
pages, one for each page. If a form design has multiple pages that have the same dimensions and
orientation, the form design needs only a single master page.
You can start designing pages immediately with the default master page. If your design is more
complex (for example, you need to create design components such as page headers and footers), it
is best to work with those components directly on the master page.
You can place objects anywhere on a master page. Each master page can have a unique design, which
you can apply to one or more pages. Master pages save you the effort of creating the same layout
directly on individual pages, one page at a time. If several pages that have the same layout also need
the same set of objects (for example, a standard footer), placing and maintaining one set of those
objects on a master page is more efficient than duplicating the objects on every page. When the
objects are placed on a master page, all associated pages display those objects in the background.
Changing the master page after automatically updates all associated pages.
Use the Pagination tab to indicate whether the master page is used in odd (front), even (back), or
blank pages and its placement in the page set. You can also choose whether pages that are rendered
according to the selected master page should contribute to the total page count.
RELATED LINKS:
58
Create Form Designs
Headers,footers, and other background items
Applyingmaster pages to forms whose number of pages vary
Masterpage properties in the Master Page tab
Masterpage properties in the Pagination tab
To use master pages with repeating subforms
You can assign a different master page for any pages that occur after the first page in a form if you
have a repeating subform that does not fit on one page but requires subsequent pages. For example,
the subform may begin in the middle of the first page in the form. To have the subform begin at the
top of the pages that occur after the first page, you create a different master page.
When to add a master page
Normally, you add additional master pages when your require two or more different page sizes, a
different page orientation, or different print mode settings. Form filling is not supported on Master
page fields. It is recommended to use master page to show only static and read-only content. Use
normal pages for data capture fields.
If a form has a fixed layout, the number of pages in the form is also fixed. If the form contains
subforms that adjust to accommodate the amount of data being merged, Forms adds additional
pages automatically if the amount of data to be merged cannot completely fit on a single page.
When you create a form design for a form that has a fixed layout that accepts merged data, you
must ensure that filled objects do not expand to the point that they overrun the content area. Otherwise, unwanted pages may get added to the form automatically when the form is rendered.
NOTE:
A form design may contain more than one content area. For example, a master page may have two
content areas to provide a two-column layout, and two master pages of this type (one odd and one
even) may be needed to support double-sided pages.
To show or hide a master page
You can show or hide a master page by using different methods.
•
To show the Master Pages tab if another tab is active, in the Layout Editor, click the Master
Pages tab.
•
To show or hide the Master Pages tab, select View > Master Pages.
To add a master page
You can add a master page by using the Insert menu or Hierarchy palette.
TIP:
If the Hierarchy palette is not visible, select Window > Hierarchy.
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Create Form Designs
•
To add a master page, click the Master Pages tab and select Insert > New Master Page.
•
To add a master page in the Hierarchy palette, right-click the Master Pages node and select
New Master Page.
3
To delete a master page
You can delete a master page by using the Edit menu or Hierarchy palette.
TIP:
If the Hierarchy palette is not visible, select Window > Hierarchy.
•
To delete a master page, click the Master Pages tab, select the content area that corresponds to
that master page and select Edit > Delete Master Page.
•
To delete a master page in the Hierarchy palette, right-click the master page and select Delete.
To move between multiple master pages
If your form design has multiple master pages, you can easily move from one to another by using the
Layout Editor or Hierarchy palette.
TIP:
If the Hierarchy palette is not visible, select Window > Hierarchy.
•
In the Master Pages tab, scroll up or down to the required page.
•
In the Hierarchy palette, click the required master page.
To reorder master pages
If you need to change the order of the master pages in a form design, you can use the Hierarchy
palette.
TIP:
If the Hierarchy palette is not visible, select Window > Hierarchy.
1)
In the Hierarchy palette, drag the master page to a new position below the Master Pages node.
2)
Repeat step 1 until all of the master pages are in the order you prefer.
To rename a master page
You can change the name of a master page by using the Hierarchy palette or the Master Page tab of
the Object palette.
TIP:
•
60
If the Hierarchy palette is not visible, select Window > Hierarchy.
In the Hierarchy palette, right-click the master page, select Rename Object, and type a new
name for the master page.
Create Form Designs
•
With the Master Pages tab selected, click anywhere on the master page, select the Object palette
and, in the Master Page tab, type a new name for the master page.
To add page numbering
In the Master Pages tab, you can add an object that displays the current page and total page count of
the form, for example, Page 1 of 30.
1)
In the Object Library palette, click the Custom tab category.
2)
Click the Page n of m object, and then drag it onto the form design.
To specify the size of a master page
In the Master Pages tab, you can view changes to a form’s basic page layout, including the page size.
When you select a master page in the Hierarchy palette, you can change its basic page layout properties in the Master Page tab of the Object palette.
Content areas define the region in which objects can be placed on the pages of a form. If you are
creating a form that contains subforms set to flow content, it is best to define the size and position of
all content areas before you add other objects to the master page.
TIP:
1)
In the Hierarchy palette, under the Master Pages node, select the master page you want to
resize.
2)
In the Object palette, select a page size from the Paper Type list.
3)
If you selected the Custom type, type the page dimensions in the Height and Width boxes.
To specify the orientation of a master page
In the Master Pages tab, you can view changes to a form’s basic page layout, including the orientation. When you select a master page in the Hierarchy palette, you can change its basic page layout
properties in the Master Page tab of the Object palette.
1)
In the Hierarchy palette, under the Master Pages node, select the master page you want to
orient.
2)
In the Object palette, select Portrait or Landscape.
Set the page orientation explicitly as portrait or landscape for the Custom Paper Type. If
the form width is greater than the form height, the orientation does not change to landscape automatically in when Custom Paper Type is selected.
NOTE:
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Create Form Designs
3.2.3.
3
Specifying white space around the edges of a form
In a traditional printed document, margin refers to an area around the outside edges of the page
where no printing occurs. In interactive forms, the term margin refers only to the buffer of white
space around the inside edges of an object’s border.
To increase the amount of white space around the outside edges of a form, you must reduce the size
of the content area on the master page. By default, the border of the content area is 0.25 inches from
the edges of the form. To create extra white space in which to place a header or footer or to make
adjustments to support printer limitations, you must make the default content area smaller.
The area bounded by the content area determines where objects can be placed on the pages of a form.
The default subform on a page is the same size as the default content area on a master page, and the
margin settings of the default subform are set to 0 inches. Changing the margin settings of the default
subform on a page also influences where objects are positioned. Increasing the subform’s margin
settings decreases the area where the subform’s objects may be rendered.
A.
Objects can be placed on pages inside the area bounded by a content area. The border
represents the edge of the content area.
B.
This area external to the content area represents white space on the page.
All of the objects that you place on a master page are displayed on each associated page, regardless
of whether you place those objects inside or outside the content area. If you are setting up a watermark, you place the objects that make up the watermark inside the content area.
If you are designing a form that contains subforms that flow content, and you do not want the objects
on the master page to interfere with objects that are placed on pages, you must position the master
page objects outside the content area; that is, somewhere on the white space that you create on the
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Create Form Designs
master page. If you place objects inside the content area, other objects may be placed on top of the
master page objects when the form is rendered.
RELATED LINKS:
Usingcontent areas
Aboutsubforms
Copying,moving, and resizing content areas
3.2.4.
Headers, footers, and other background items
If most of the pages in your form design require a certain amount of standardized, fixed content, you
can place that content on master pages to provide a consistent background and make editing easier.
For example, you can arrange text, images, and geometric shapes on a master page to have them
appear in the same location on multiple pages.
If you create headers and footers and arrange other background items on the master page, follow
these general guidelines:
•
If you are creating a form that contains subforms set to flow content, it is best to define the size
and position of all content areas before you add additional objects to the master page.
•
Objects can be placed anywhere on a master page, inside or outside the content area. As a
general rule, do not place objects inside the content area unless you intend to have other objects
placed on top of the master page objects when the form is rendered. If you are setting up a
watermark, place it inside the content area.
•
You will need text objects to hold read-only text, image or image field objects to position
images (such as a logo), and you may consider adding geometric objects such as circles, lines,
or rectangles to improve the appearance of the form design.
•
All of the objects on a master page are displayed as background objects on pages when the form
is rendered.
RELATED LINKS:
Copying,moving, and resizing content areas
3.2.5.
Assigning additional master pages to complex form designs
Master pages provide the underlying format and background for pages. All new form designs are
created with a default master page, which is applied to the first page. Additional pages are formatted
according to the layout of the default master page unless you create a different master page to use.
A form design can contain any number of master pages, each having a unique layout. If some of the
pages need different layouts or boilerplate objects, you can create a master page for each unique
layout.
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Create Form Designs
3
To assign a master page to a specific page
1)
2)
Select the subform by using one of these methods:
•
In the Design View tab, select the default subform on the page.
•
In the Hierarchy palette, select the subform that corresponds to the page.
In the Object palette, click the Pagination tab and, in the Place list, select On Page > [page],
where [page] is the name of the master page you want use.
Example of assigning a second master page to a form design
The following example provides steps for assigning a second master page to a page in an interactive
form design or a form design that has a fixed layout.
This form design contains two pages and two master pages. The first master page has a portrait
orientation and the second master page has a landscape orientation.
A.
Page 1
B.
Page 2
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Create Form Designs
A.
Master page 1:Portrait
B.
Master page 2:Landscape
1)
Click the Design View tab.
2)
Select the subform on page 2.
3)
In the Object palette, click the Pagination tab and, in the Place list, select On Page > [page],
where [page] is the name of master page 2.
Page 2 inherits the layout of master page 2 and now has a landscape layout.
3.2.6.
Applying master pages to forms whose number of pages vary
Forms containing subforms that are set to flow content have a varying number of pages. When the
form is rendered, objects are placed inside content areas and, if the data fills the content area, a page
break is automatically inserted. By default, all of the pages inherit the format of the default master
page.
When more than one master page is available, each one can influence how pages are formatted. In
this case, the layout of a master page is applied when the subform that it is associated with is
rendered. That is, if the subform is rendered on page 2 of the form, the format of the assigned master
page is applied to page 2.
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Create Form Designs
3
Two options are available for applying master pages to forms whose number of pages vary. The
nature of the type of form should dictate which of these options are used.
First, you can limit the number of times a master page is used in a form by setting minimum and
maximum page-occurrence settings. For example, the first master page needs a minimum and
maximum page-occurrence setting of one to indicate that it always occurs only once. For master
pages, the default minimum count is 0 and the maximum count is -1. For the second master page,
the layout can be rendered on a page an infinite number of times.
Alternatively, you can define the placement of the master pages in the page set, such as in the first
printed page, the last printed page, or the printed pages that occur in between. For example, a pay
statement has company and employee-specific information on the first page. Subsequent pages show
very little company or employee information and a significant amount of time card information.
You can define two master pages. The first master page will have the company logo and contact
information first, outside the content area. A small content area will follow to receive
employee-specific information. The second master page will have a larger content area, possibly
covering the whole page, to receive time card information.
By default, all form designs are created with the option of applying master pages by setting minimum
and maximum occurrence values. Although different, the result of the rendered page using either
option is the same. However, if the form is intended for double-sided printing, use the placement
options.
Keep in mind that if you define the placement of the master pages in a form design and then you
switch to setting page-occurrence values, you may need to make some changes to the form before it
will behave as expected. Also, defining the placement of master pages is recommended only for form
designs saved as Acrobat 8 (Static) PDF forms or for form designs intended for printing, including
PCL and Postscript.
3.2.7.
To use the first master page one time only
You can set minimum and maximum page-occurrence values to use the first master page one time
only, or you can specify the master page’s placement as the first page in the page set.
By default, all form designs are created with the option of applying master pages by setting minimum
and maximum occurrence values. Although different, the result of the rendered page using either
option is the same. However, if the form is intended for double-sided printing, use the placement
options.
Keep in mind that if you define the placement of the master pages in a form design and then you
switch to setting page-occurrence values, you may have to make some changes to the form before it
will behave as expected. Also, defining the placement of master pages is recommended only for form
designs saved as Acrobat 8 (Static) PDF forms or for form designs intended for printing, including
PCL and Postscript.
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To use the first master page one time only by specifying minimum and maximum page-occurrence values
1)
In the Hierarchy tab, click the first master page, Page1.
2)
Click the Object palette and do the following tasks:
3)
•
Select Restrict Page Occurrence.
•
Select Max and then type 1 in the corresponding box.
Save the form design.
To use the first master page one time only by specifying the master page’s placement in the
page set
1)
In the Hierarchy tab, click the first master page, Page1.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Pagination tab
3)
Select First Page (in Page Set) in the Placement list.
4)
Save the form design.
3.2.8.
Controlling the order and visibility of pages
Page sets allow you to control the order and visibility of pages in the form design. Form designs
contain at least one page set.
RELATED LINKS:
Makingobjects visible, invisible, or hidden
Settingup pages
Pageset properties in the Page Set tab
Usingpage sets to control single-sided and double-sidedprinting in a form
Specifyingpage placement and printing options in existingform designs
Tospecify the master page placement in a page set
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Create Form Designs
3
To move between multiple page sets
1)
In the Hierarchy palette, click the page set.
TIP:
If the Hierarchy palette is not visible, select Window > Hierarchy.
To add or delete a page set
•
To add a page set, in the Hierarchy palette, right-click the Master Pages node and select Insert
Page Set.
•
To delete a page set, in the Hierarchy palette, right-click the page set and select Delete.
To reorder page sets
1)
In the Hierarchy palette, drag the page set to a new position below the Master Pages node.
2)
Repeat step 1 until all of the page sets are in the order you want.
To rename a page set
1)
In the Hierarchy palette, right-click the page set and select Rename Object.
2)
Type a new name for the page set.
NOTE:
You can also rename the selected page set in the Page Set tab of the Object palette.
To manage page sets by controlling the number of occurrences of each page
1)
In the Hierarchy palette, select the page set.
2)
In the Object palette, select Page Occurrence from the Printing list. Designer notifies you that
if you previously selected Print on Front Side Only or Print on Both Sides and are now
switching back to the Page Occurrence option, you may need to make changes to the form
before it will behave as expected. Click Yes to continue.
3.2.9.
Setting page break controls
Designer provides ways to control the page breaks that are inserted when a form that has a flowable
layout expands beyond the bottom edge of a rendered page:
Widow and Orphan Control
Lets you prevent a single line of text from being separated from the rest of a paragraph when a
page break is introduced. A widow is the last line of a paragraph that appears by itself at the top
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Create Form Designs
of the next page. An orphan is the first line of a paragraph that appears by itself at the bottom
of a page.
Keep With Next
Lets you keep a text object or text field object with the next object in the document when a page
break is introduced.
Allow Page Breaks Within Content
Allows page breaks within the content of a text object or text field object.
When both the Keep with Next and Allow Page Breaks Within Content options are selected,
the Allow Page Breaks Within Content option is considered first followed by the Keep with
Next option.
The Widow and Orphan, Keep With Next, and Allow Page Breaks Within Content options are
not available for objects on a master page or in artwork.
You can set the default page break options for new forms, page break options for an individual
form, and page break options for selected objects by using the various options in the Form
Properties dialog box, Options dialog box, and Object palette.
To control widow and orphan lines for new forms
Use the Formatting page in the Options dialog box to control widow and orphan lines for new forms.
The widow and orphan functionality can prevent a single line of text in all text and text field objects
in the form from being separated from the rest of a paragraph when page breaks are introduced. The
widow and orphan control ensures that a minimum of two lines from the paragraph are kept
together.
To control widow and orphan lines for new forms:
1)
Select Tools > Options.
2)
Click Formatting and select Widow and Orphan Control.
3)
Click OK.
To control widow and orphan lines for a form
Use the Formatting tab in the Form Properties dialog box to control window and orphan lines in all
text and text field objects for individual forms.
The default setting that initially appears in the Form Properties dialog box is inherited from the
Options dialog box on the Formatting page. The default setting automatically applies to all new
forms. If you change the default setting in the Form Properties dialog box, the new setting overrides
the setting in the Options dialog box for the current form. The Widow and Orphan Control option
in the Options dialog box does not change.
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Create Form Designs
3
NOTE: To modify widow and orphan lines for new forms, use the Options dialog box. (See Tocontrol
widow and orphan lines for new forms.)
To control widow and orphan lines for an individual form:
1)
Select File > Form Properties.
2)
Click the Formatting tab and select Widow and Orphan Control.
3)
Click OK.
To remove widow and orphan control from a form
You can remove widow and orphan control from the text and text field objects.
To remove widow and orphan control from a form:
1)
Select File > Form Properties.
2)
Click the Formatting tab and deselect Widow and Orphan Control.
3)
Click OK.
RELATED LINKS:
Toallow page breaks within a text object
Tokeep a text object with the next object in the form
Allowingpage breaks within a text field
Tokeep a text field with the next object in the form
Formatting(Options dialog box)
Formattingtab (Form Properties dialog box)
3.3.
Styles
You can create and manage style sheets and styles to provide consistent formatting within a single
form or across multiple forms. For example, you can control the look of caption and field value text,
the appearance of object borders and background colors, as well as the size and style of radio buttons
and check box objects.
You use the Style Catalog to manage styles sheets, and to edit and apply styles to objects in a form
design. The Style Catalog lists the various style sheets available with a form and the styles included
with each style sheet. The Style Catalog organizes the style sheets into different panels, one for each
style sheet. The first panel is for the internal style sheet, which is embedded within the form. Below
the internal style sheet panel are panels for each external style sheet (Designer Style Sheet.xfs) that
you add to the Style Catalog. Each panel bar shows the name of the style sheet. If you hover the
mouse over the panel bar, the location of the style sheet is displayed in a tooltip. Menus are also avail70
Create Form Designs
able on each panel bar and a context menu is available with each listed style. Additional commands
are available on the Style Catalog menu.
An internal style sheet is automatically associated with each new form you create. The internal style
sheet is useful when you are creating a single form and you want the style sheet and styles embedded
in the form for easy editing. However, if you are creating more than one form design, you can create
multiple external style sheets in Designer, and add them to any number of form designs.
You can extract the styles from the internal style sheet to a new external style sheet for use in other
forms. Alternatively, you can add the styles in various external style sheets to the internal style sheet
by embedding the external style sheets within the form design.
Also, using options in the Form Properties and Options dialog boxes, you can specify default fonts
for captions and values in new or existing forms to quickly change the fonts for all form objects.
3.3.1.
To sort the style sheets in the Style Catalog
The Style Catalog organizes style sheets into different panels, one for each style sheet. The first panel
is for the internal style sheet. Below the internal style sheet panel are panels for each Designer Style
Sheet file (XFS) file that you add to the Style Catalog.
By default, Designer arranges the style sheets in the order they are added to the Style Catalog. You
can resort the external style sheet files list in the Style Catalog by name or by type of style sheet.
1)
3.3.2.
On the Style Catalog palette menu, point to Sort, and then perform one of the following
actions:
•
To sort the list of style sheets by name, click Name.
•
To sort the list of style sheets by type, click Type.
•
To unsort the list of style sheets, click Unsort.
To select a default style sheet for new forms
You can select an Designer Style Sheet (XFS) file for ne w forms. When you create a new form, the
selected XFS file appears in the Style Catalog ready for use.
1)
Click Tools > Options.
2)
Select the Formatting panel.
3)
Select Use Style Sheet.
4)
Click the browse button, and select the Designer Style Sheet (XFS) file to use.
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Create Form Designs
3.3.3.
3
To add a style sheet to a form
You can add one or more Designer Style Sheet (XFS) files to a form. After you add a new style sheet,
the Style Catalog displays a new panel listing the styles that are available for use in the form.
You can add the styles in the XFS files listed in the Styles catalog to the internal style sheet, by embedding the styles in the form. See Toembed a style sheet.
You can hover the mouse over the panel toggle bar, to display the location of the style sheet.
1)
Select Windows > Style Catalog.
2)
On the Style Catalog palette menu, click Add style sheet.
3)
In the Open dialog box, navigate to and select the Designer Style Sheet (XFS) file to use.
4)
Click Open.
3.3.4.
To create a new style sheet
When you create a new style sheet, Designer opens a blank Designer Style Sheet (XFS) file in which
to create new styles. Designer displays style sheets using a different background color than forms to
distinguish them. In the Hierarchy palette, the top-level subform is named Style sheet.
1)
Click the Style Catalog menu, and select New Style Sheet.
2)
Name and save the style sheet file.
3.3.5.
To embed a style sheet
You can embed the styles from any number of Designer Style Sheet file (XFS) files within a form
design, for ease of editing.
When you select the Embed Style Sheets command, Designer adds the styles from all of the external
style sheet panels in the Style Catalog to the internal style sheet panel. Any references from form
objects or default styles are reset to the new internal styles and the references to the external style
sheets are removed from the form.
The Embed Style Sheets command is available when the Style Catalog contains one or more external
style sheets.
72
1)
Click the Style Catalog menu.
2)
Select Embed Style Sheets.
Create Form Designs
3.3.6.
To extract styles to a new style sheet
You can extract the styles from the internal style sheet to a new Designer Style Sheet file (XFS). You
can also replace the internal style sheet with a reference to the new external style sheet, when needed.
1)
Click the menu on the Internal style sheet panel.
2)
Select Extract Styles To A New Style Sheet.
3)
In the File Name box, enter a name for the new style sheet file.
4)
(Optional) Select Replace Internal Style Sheet With Reference To The New External Style
Sheet.
5)
Click Save.
3.3.7.
To remove a style sheet
You can remove an external Designer Style Sheet file (XFS) from the Style Catalog at any time.
The Style Catalog organizes the style sheets that are available with a form into different panels. The
first panel is for the internal style sheet. You cannot remove the internal style sheet. Below the
internal style sheet panel are panels for each Designer Style Sheet file (XFS) referenced by the form.
1)
Click the menu on the panel of the external style sheet you want to remove.
2)
Click Remove Style Sheet.
3.3.8.
To replace a style sheet
You can replace any Designer Style Sheet file (XFS) in the Style Catalog at any time. The Style Catalog
organizes the style sheets that are available with a form into different panels. The first panel is for the
internal style sheet. You cannot replace the internal style sheet. Below the internal style sheet panel
are panels for each Designer Style Sheet file (XFS) referenced by the form.
If the style names are the same in two different style sheets, when you replace the one style sheet
with the other, the objects in the form are automatically updated with the style properties from the
replacement style sheet.
NOTE:
1)
Click the menu on the panel of the external style sheet you want to replace.
2)
Click Replace Style Sheet.
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Create Form Designs
3.3.9.
3
To edit a style sheet file
You can edit the styles in an external Designer Style Sheet file (XFS). You do not need to add a style
sheet file to the Style Catalog to edit it.
1)
To open a style sheet for editing, do one of the following actions:
•
If the style sheet file is in the Style Catalog, click the menu on the style sheet panel you
want to edit, and then click Edit Style Sheet. Designer opens the style sheet file.
•
If the style sheet is not in the Style Catalog, click File > Open to select and open the file in
Designer. Designer adds the styles to the Internal Style Sheet panel.
2)
In the Style Catalog, right-click the style to edit, and select Edit Style.
3)
In the Style Editor, change formatting options as needed.
4)
Save a close the style sheet file.
3.3.10. Create a new style from an object
You can create a new style from an object in an external Designer Style Sheet file (XFS).
1)
Click the menu on the external style sheet panel you want to use to create the new style.
2)
Select Edit Style Sheet.
3)
On the Design View tab, right-click the object to use to create the new style, point to Styles, and
then click Create New Style From Object.
4)
In the Style Editor, name the style and select formatting options as needed.
5)
Click OK.
6)
Save changes and close style sheet file.
3.3.11. Creating a new style for an object type
You can create new styles in the internal style sheet of a form design, or in an external Designer Style
Sheet file (XFS) file.
When creating a style for an object with caption, value, or border formatting, you can select an
existing style of the same object type or of the Common Style type from which the new style can
inherit the properties specified in the style sheet.
After you create the new style, it appears in the Style Catalog.
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Create Form Designs
To create a new style in the internal style sheet
You create a new style for the internal style sheet within the current form design.
1)
Click the menu on the internal style sheet panel.
2)
Select Create New Style. The Style Editor dialog box is displayed.
3)
Select the General panel.
4)
In the Style Name box, type a name for the style.
5)
In the Type list, select the object type you want to create a style for.
6)
Select formatting options as needed, and then click OK.
7)
Save changes and close the style sheet file.
To create a new style in an external style sheet file
To create a new style in an external Designer Style Sheet file (XFS), open the style sheet file in
Designer and create styles in that file.
1)
Click the menu on the external style sheet panel to which you want to add a style.
2)
Select Edit Style Sheet.
3)
In the Style Catalog, right-click the style to edit, and select Create New Style. The Style Editor
dialog box is displayed.
4)
Select the General panel.
5)
In the Style Name box, type a name for the style.
6)
In the Type list, select the object type you want to create a style for.
7)
Select formatting options as needed, and then click OK.
8)
Save changes and close the style sheet file.
3.3.12. Creating a common style
A common style is a generic style type, which can be referenced by any object type. As a result, you
can define a single common style with properties, which can be inherited by all other object types.
By default, a common style defines caption text formatting, value text formatting, and border properties. You can choose to define only text formatting properties or only border properties.
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Create Form Designs
3
To create a common style in the internal style sheet
You create a common style for the internal style sheet within the current form design.
1)
Click the menu on the internal style sheet panel.
2)
Select Create New Style. The Style Editor dialog box is displayed.
3)
Select the General panel.
4)
In the Style Name box, type a name for the style.
5)
In the Type list, select Common Style.
6)
Select formatting options as needed, and then click OK.
7)
Save changes and close style sheet file.
To create a common style in an external style sheet file
To create a common style in an external Designer Style Sheet file (XFS), open the style sheet file in
Designer and create the common style in that file.
1)
Click the menu on the external style sheet panel in which you want to create a common style.
2)
Select Edit Style Sheet.
3)
Click the menu on the internal style sheet panel.
4)
Select Create New Style. The Style Editor dialog box is displayed.
5)
Select the General panel.
6)
In the Style Name box, type a name for the style.
7)
In the Type list, select Common Style.
8)
Select formatting options as needed, and then click OK.
9)
Save changes and close the style sheet file.
3.3.13. To apply a style to an object
The Style Catalog lists the styles that are available with each style sheet. Each style in a style sheet is
associated with a particular object type. You can apply a style to the same object type. For example,
you can apply a Text Field style to a Text Field object. If the style you want to apply is not compatible
with the selected object, the Apply Style command is unavailable.
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Create Form Designs
You can also create common styles with properties that you can apply to all object types. See
Tocreate a common style.
1)
On the Design View tab, select the object type you want to apply a style to.
2)
In the Style Catalog, right click the style you want to apply.
3)
Click Apply Style.
3.3.14. To remove a style from an object
You can remove a style directly from an object on the Design View tab.
1)
On the Design View tab, select the object you want to remove a style from.
2)
Right-click, and select Styles > Remove Style.
3.3.15. Editing a style
You can edit styles in the internal style sheet of a form design, or in an external style sheet that references an Designer Style Sheet file (XFS). You edit the styles in an internal style sheet in the current
form design. You edit the styles in an external style sheet, by opening the XFS style sheet in Designer.
When you edit a style sheet file in Designer, the page background (in the Design view) is colored to
differentiate it from the white background used for form designs.
With the internal style sheet, changes are immediately applied to all objects that use that style. With
external style sheet files, the chances are applies when you save the form.
To edit a style in the internal style sheet
1)
In the Style Catalog, expand the internal style sheet panel.
2)
Right click the style you want to edit, and select Edit Style.
3)
In the Style Editor, select options as needed, and click OK.
4)
Saves the changes.
To edit a style in an external style sheet file
1)
To open the style sheet file for editing, do one of the following actions:
•
If the style sheet file is in the Style Catalog, click the menu on the external style sheet panel
to edit, and then click Edit Style Sheet. Designer opens the style sheet file.
•
If the style sheet is not in the Style Catalog, click File > Open to select and open the style
sheet file in Designer.
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Create Form Designs
2)
In the Internal Style Sheet panel, right click the style you want to edit, and click Edit Style.
3)
In the Style Editor, select formatting options as needed, and click OK.
4)
Save the changes.
3
3.3.16. Deleting a style form a style sheet
You can delete a style from the internal style sheet of a form design, or from an external style sheet
that references an Designer Style Sheet file (XFS). You delete styles directly from the internal style
sheet of a form design. You delete the styles from an external style sheet, by opening the XFS style
sheet in Designer.
To delete a style from the internal style sheet
1)
In the Style Catalog, expand the internal style sheet panel.
2)
Right click the style you want to delete, and select Delete Style.
3)
Click Yes to confirm that you want to delete the style.
To delete a style from an external style sheet
1)
In the Style Catalog, click the menu on the external style sheet panel.
2)
Select Edit Style Sheet. Designer opens the style sheet file, temporarily removes the associated
panel from the Style Catalog, and adds the styles to the internal style sheet panel.
3)
In the internal style panel, right click the style you want to delete., and click Delete Style.
4)
Save the changes and close the style sheet file. Designer moves the remaining styles from the
internal style sheet panel back to the external style sheet panel.
3.3.17. To set a default style for new objects
You can select default styles for new objects from any style sheet in the Style Catalog. You can select
a default style for most objects in the Object Library. The default styles you select for an object type
are shown in the Style Catalog in bold italic text.
When the Apply Default Styles To New Forms option is selected and you add a new object to a form,
Designer automatically applies the default styles for that object type to the new object.
78
1)
In the Style Catalog, right click the object style you want to set as a default.
2)
Click Set As Default Style.
Create Form Designs
3.3.18. To apply default styles to new objects
Before you can apply default styles to new objects, select a default style for each object type you add
to your form design.
1)
Click the Style Catalog menu.
2)
Select Apply Default Styles To New Objects.
3.3.19. To edit default styles for new objects
You can change or clear the default styles for new objects.
1)
Click the Style Catalog menu.
2)
Select Edit Default Styles Settings.
3)
Click the list next to the objects you want and do one of the following actions:
•
To clear the default style, select None.
•
To change the default style, select a substitute style.
RELATED LINKS:
DefaultFonts (Form Properties dialog box)
DefaultFonts (Options dialog box)
Toset a default font for captions in new forms
Toset a default font for captions in an existing form
Toset a default font for values in new forms
Toset a default font for values in an existing form
3.4.
Printing forms
3.4.1.
Setting up forms for printing
For forms intended for printing, you can select single-sided or double-sided printing for each page
set in the form design. For forms intended for double-sided printing, you can specify which side of
the paper the master page is used: odd (front), even (back), no odd/even restrictions, or blank.
Keep in mind that specifying single-sided or double-sided printing is recommended only for form
designs saved as Acrobat 8 (Static) PDF forms or for form designs intended for printing, including
PCL and Postscript.
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Create Form Designs
3
When setting up forms for printing, it is recommended that you review the input data and consider
preparing sample data files or have Designer automatically generate a sample data file to determine
whether the layout, formatting, content, and behavior of a form responds as expected when it is
printed. For example, when setting up forms for double-sided printing, you need to have sample data
files for testing how a rendered form looks when the printed page ends on an odd page or an even
page, and when the rendered form fits on one printed page.
You can also specify print settings for PDF forms. For example, for Acrobat 8 (Static) PDF forms and
Acrobat 8 (Dynamic) XML forms, you can select the number of copies to print and whether to print
single-sided or double-sided. When a user chooses to print the form, these options are automatically
applied. For all PDF forms, you can specify that the form be printed immediately when it is opened.
In this case, the Print dialog box appears when the user opens the form, and you can choose to print
the form on the user’s default printer or on a printer that you specify.
RELATED LINKS:
Specifyingpage placement and printing options in existingform designs
Touse master pages in a form intended for double-sidedprinting
Tospecify the master page placement in a page set
Insertinga blank page after the first page in a formintended for double-sided printing
Usingpage sets to control single-sided and double-sidedprinting in a form
Toautomatically print a PDF form when it is opened
3.4.2.
Specifying page placement and printing options in existing form designs
In form designs created using a version earlier than Designer 8, you control repetitive rendering of
pages by specifying the Restrict Page Occurrence, Min, Count, and Max options in the Object palette
for the selected page set or master page.
You can update an older form design to use page placement and printing options, which also take
occurrence into account. Using the page placement and printing options, you can specify the pages
on which a master page is used as well as the settings for single-sided and double-sided printing.
The result of specifying single-sided printing in a form design closely matches the result of setting
minimum and maximum page set and master page-occurrence values. Therefore, it is recommended
that you begin by updating the form design for single-sided printing. Then, when you are satisfied
that the form renders properly, you can update the form design for double-sided printing, if necessary. When you select double-sided printing, you can control whether the master page and other
objects, including subforms, subform sets, and tables, occur on the odd (front) or even (back) pages.
Notice that when you select the page placement and printing options in the form design, Designer
disables the occurrence settings because management of the page set occurrences is now controlled
by the placement and printing options that you select. Therefore, it is recommended that you back
up the form design before you begin.
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To specify page placement and printing options in existing form designs
1)
In the Hierarchy palette, select the page set.
2)
In the Object palette, select Print on Front Side Only from the Printing list. Designer notifies
you that the Restrict Page Occurrence option will be disabled. Click Yes to continue.
3)
Select the first master page in the page set and click the Master Page tab in the Object palette.
Notice that the Restrict Page Occurrence option is now disabled. Before this option was
disabled, this master page had a minimum and maximum page-occurrence setting of one, indicating that it always occurs only once.
4)
Click the Pagination tab and notice that the Odd/Even and Placement lists are now enabled
and that there are no placement restrictions for this master page.
5)
To specify that the master page occurs once, select First Page (in Page Set) from the Placement
list.
6)
Preview the form in the Preview PDF tab to confirm that the master page is used once.
7)
Select the next master page in the page set.
8)
For master pages in the page set where the minimum page-occurrence setting was 0 and the
maximum setting was 1, select one of these options from the Placement list in the Pagination
tab in the Object palette:
9)
•
To specify that the master page is used for pages between but not including the first and
last pages, select Rest of Pages.
•
To specify that the master page is used for all pages but not including the first page, select
No Placement Restrictions.
For master pages in the page set where the minimum and maximum page-occurrence settings
were one, select Last Page (in Page Set) from the Placement list to specify that the master page
is used for the last page.
10) Preview the form in the Preview PDF tab.
To specify double-sided printing for an existing form design
1)
Follow the previous procedure for specifying page placement and single-sided printing options
in existing form designs.
2)
Select File > Form Properties.
3)
Click the Defaults tab and, in the Choose Version To Run Form In list, select Acrobat and
Adobe Reader 9.0 or later.
4)
Click the Preview tab and, in the Preview Type list, select Print Form (Two-sided).
5)
(Optional) To test the form that you are previewing by using a data source that you created,
use the Browse button to navigate to the file. You can also enter the full path to your test data
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3
file in the Data File box. You should plan to have several data source files available for testing
forms that are intended for double-sided printing. For example, you should have a data source
file that fills only one page, a data source file where the rendered form ends on an even page,
and a data source file where the rendered form ends on an odd page.
6)
(Optional) To test the form you are previewing by using an automatically generated data
source, click Generate Preview Data. If the form contains repeating subforms or subform sets,
indicate the number of times each subform or subform set will repeat in the data file. You can
use the Browse button to navigate to the location where you want the file saved. Type a name
for the file and then click Generate.
7)
In the Preview Adobe XML Form As list, select Static PDF Form, and then click OK.
8)
In the Hierarchy palette, select the page set.
9)
In the Object palette, select Print on Both Sides from the Printing list.
10) Preview the form in the Preview PDF tab. It is recommended that you preview the form as you
work. If you encounter unexpected behavior in the previewed form, review the settings for the
Place and After option in the Pagination tab for the subforms, subform sets, and tables in the
form design. For example, a subform that is set to be placed at the top of the next even page
may cause an unexpected empty odd page in the middle of the form.
11) Here is a list of ways that you can set up the form for double-sided printing:
3.4.3.
•
To use master pages in a form intendedfor double-sided printing
•
To specify the master page placementin a page set
•
Inserting a blank page after the firstpage in a form intended for double-sidedprinting
•
Using page sets to control single-sidedand double-sided printing in aform
To prepare a form design to use with preprinted paper
You can create a form design that generates a preprint form, which is a form printed on paper that
already has lines, graphics, or text printed on it. For example, you can generate a preprint form for
printing information on an income tax statement.
Notice that the following description lets you create a form that prints on preprinted paper and also
generates a PDF for archiving. However, the resulting PDF will not be accessible to users with vision
impairment.
After the form design is ready, a batch process gets the data from the SAP system and prints the
information on preprinted paper. The form design can also generate a PDF form that contains both
the lines, graphics, or text and the information. This PDF form is useful for previewing or archiving.
You must set the appropriate options in your application for the process to work with preprinted
paper.
To prepare the preprint form, create two sets of master pages:
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Create Form Designs
Master pages for printing the form
This set of master pages contains the fields that will print on the preprinted page. They do not
contain any of the lines, graphics, or text on the preprinted paper. Their purpose is to print data
on the preprinted paper.
Master pages for previewing the form
This set of master pages contains the lines, graphics, and text that are on the preprinted paper.
The SAP system does not print these master pages. These master pages are used for generating
the PDF form for archiving or previewing.
When creating the preprint form design, place the fields that you want printed on the master
pages for printing, and place the objects that are on the preprinted paper on the master pages
for previewing. After you create the preview and print master pages, add a FormCalc script to
generate the preprint form. When the PDF form is rendered, you have a preview of how the
form will look when the information prints on the preprinted paper, and you can archive it.
Here is an example of how you can create a preprint form design that produces a PDF form for
previewing and archiving.
a)
Create the Preview First Page, Preview Next Page, Print First Page, and Print Next Page
master pages.
b)
Select one of the first master pages and then click the Object palette.
c)
To use the selected master page one time only by specifying minimum and maximum
page-occurrence values, click the Master Page tab, click Restrict Page Occurrence, and
then do the following tasks:
•
Select Min and type 0 in the corresponding box.
•
Select Max and type 1 in the corresponding box.
d)
Repeat step 3 for the other first master page.
e)
To use the selected master page one time only by specifying the master page’s placement
in the page set, click the Pagination tab, select First Page (in Page Set) in the Placement
drop-down list.
f)
Repeat step 5 for the other first master page.
g)
Place the objects that you want on the preview and print master pages.
h)
Write the following FormCalc script in the form:ready event of the topmost subform.
if ( $xfa.config.present.destination ne "pdf" ) then
$.break.before = "pageArea"
$.break.beforeTarget = "#PrintFirstPage"
endif
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Create Form Designs
i)
3
Modify the $.break.beforeTarget value to match the name of the print master
page. For example, use PrintFirstPage.
When the form renders, the form displays as it will look when output on preprinted
paper.
RELATED LINKS:
Specifyingpage placement and printing options in existingform designs
Touse master pages in a form intended for double-sidedprinting
Tospecify the master page placement in a page set
Insertinga blank page after the first page in a formintended for double-sided printing
Usingpage sets to control single-sided and double-sidedprinting in a form
3.4.4.
To use master pages in a form intended for double-sided printing
For forms intended for double-sided printing, you can specify which side of the paper the master
page is applied to: odd (front), even (back), no odd/even restrictions, or blank.
You can use master pages for the odd (front) and even (back) sides of a form intended for
double-sided printing. For example, you may want the page numbers of a double-sided printed form
to appear at the lower-right corner of the odd (front) printed pages and the lower-left corner of an
even (back) printed pages.
Select the Blank Pages option when you need a blank page inserted between two odd (front)
double-sided printed pages.
The options in the Odd/Even list are not relevant for form designs that are based on setting
minimum and maximum page-occurrence values.
NOTE:
1)
In the Hierarchy palette, under the Master Pages node, select the master page.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Pagination tab.
3)
In the Odd/Even list, select the printed page where the master page is applied.
RELATED LINKS:
Specifyingpage placement and printing options in existingform designs
Tospecify the master page placement in a page set
Insertinga blank page after the first page in a formintended for double-sided printing
Usingpage sets to control single-sided and double-sidedprinting in a form
3.4.5.
To specify the master page placement in a page set
Form designs contain at least one page set. For forms intended for printing, you need to specify
where in the page set the master page is used; for example, in the first printed page, the last printed
page, or the printed pages in between.
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Create Form Designs
NOTE:
The first page in the root page set cannot be blank; it must contain a content area.
In addition, for form designs that contain more than one page set, you must specify a break in a
subform for printing to transition from one page set to the next.
Specifying master page placement is not relevant for form designs that are based on setting
minimum and maximum page-occurrence values.
NOTE:
The Only Page (in Page Set) option is useful when the rendered form can be printed on one side of
a printed page. For example, although the data fits on one printed page in the form below, two pages
are printed because there is a master page for the first printed page and a master page for the last
printed page in the page set. In the example, the header information appears on the first_page master
page and the footer information on the last_page master page.
To prevent two pages from being printed when everything can fit on one page, create a master page
and select the Only Page (in Page Set) option. Whenever the data of the rendered form fits on one
side of a printed page, this master page is used.
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Create Form Designs
1)
In the Hierarchy palette, under the Master Pages node, select the master page you want to
place.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Pagination tab.
3)
In the Placement list, select the placement of the master page.
3
RELATED LINKS:
Specifyingpage placement and printing options in existingform designs
Touse master pages in a form intended for double-sidedprinting
Insertinga blank page after the first page in a formintended for double-sided printing
Usingpage sets to control single-sided and double-sidedprinting in a form
3.4.6. Inserting a blank page after the first page in a form intended for
double-sided printing
To insert a blank page after the first page in a form that is intended for double-sided printing, the
page set must include master pages for the first, odd, and even printed pages. For example, you may
want a blank page to print on the back side of the cover letter. By specifying that the area that follows
the cover letter subform begin on an odd page, a blank page will be inserted as the first even page
when the form is printed.
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Create Form Designs
A.
This page uses the front_page master page
B.
The blank page is inserted as the first even page by using the blank_page master page
C.
This page uses the odd_page master page
D.
This page uses the even_page master page
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Create Form Designs
3
E.
The area after this subform is set to Go To Next Odd Page
To insert a blank page after the first page in a form intended for double-sided printing
1)
Add a new master page to the page set.
2)
Click anywhere in the master page.
3)
Click the Pagination tab and select Blank Pages from the Odd/Even list.
4)
Select the subform or subform set that occurs before the blank page.
5)
Click the Pagination tab and select Go To Next Odd Page from the After list.
6)
Preview the form in the Preview PDF tab.
RELATED LINKS:
Settingup forms for printing
Specifyingpage placement and printing options in existingform designs
Touse master pages in a form intended for double-sidedprinting
3.4.7.
form
Using page sets to control single-sided and double-sided printing in a
For forms intended for printing, you can specify single-sided or double-sided printing for each page
set in the form design.
NOTE: Specifying single-sided or double-sided printing is recommended for form designs intended for
printing, including PCL and Postscript.
For example, you may want to create a form design to be used to generate a preprint and plain copy
form. A preprint form is a form that is printed on paper that already has items printed on it. A plain
copy form is a form that is printed on blank paper.
For this example, you create five master pages that are combined into page sets. You can specify
which page sets print single-sided and which ones print double-sided.
MasterPage1
Contains the title page information and is used in the first page in the page set and prints single
sided. MasterPage1 includes a page break in a subform that allows printing to transition to the
PrePrint page set.
MasterPage2
The paper that the preprint form is printed on contains the company logo and contact information. This master page leaves room for that information outside the content area. A small
content area follows next to receive employee-specific information. It occurs once for the
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Create Form Designs
preprint form and therefore is assigned as the first page in the second page set. The second page
set requires double-sided printing.
MasterPage3
Has a larger content area, possibly covering the whole page, to receive more information. It is
used for the second and subsequent pages of the preprint form. It is assigned the Rest of Pages
placement option in the second page set. MasterPage3 includes a page break in a subform that
allows printing to transition to the PlainCopy page set.
MasterPage4
Has the company logo and contact information first, outside the content area. A small content
area follows next to receive employee-specific information. It occurs once for the plain copy
form and therefore is assigned as the first page in the third page set. The third page set also
requires double-sided printing.
MasterPage5
Has a larger content area, possibly covering the whole page, to receive more information. It is
used for the second and subsequent pages of the plain copy form. It occurs 0 to infinite times.
It is assigned the Rest of Pages placement option in the second page set.
The master pages are grouped into page sets:
•
The Main page set is set to print single-sided.
•
The PrePrint page set is set to print double-sided.
•
The PlainCopy page set is set to print double sided.
The form is rendered according to the order of the page set in the hierarchy:
•
The first subform is always placed on MasterPage1.
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Create Form Designs
•
3
The next subform is placed on MasterPage2 and then MasterPage3 if the form is a
preprint form, or on MasterPage4 and then MasterPage5 if the form is a plain copy form.
RELATED LINKS:
Controllingthe order and visibility of pages
Specifyingpage placement and printing options in existingform designs
Touse master pages in a form intended for double-sidedprinting
Tospecify the master page placement in a page set
Insertinga blank page after the first page in a formintended for double-sided printing
3.4.8.
To print the contents of the Design View or Master Pages tab
1)
In the Layout Editor, click the Design View tab or Master Pages tab.
2)
Select File > Print.
3)
Set the required options and then click OK.
The options that display in the Printer and Print range sections of the dialog box depend
on the printer that your computer is connected to. For more information about your printer’s
options, see the printer documentation.
NOTE:
RELATED LINKS:
Toprint a form with sample data
3.4.9.
To print a form with sample data
Designer lets you print a final version of the current form design with sample data. When you print
the form, the data values from the sample XML file will appear in the respective objects.
By testing your form with sample data, you can see the final product and verify your design.
1)
Select File > Print.
2)
Select Print Form With Data.
3)
(Optional) To print the form with a data source, use the Browse button to navigate to the file.
You can also enter the full path to your test data file in the Data File box.
4)
(Optional) To print the form with an automatically generated data source, click Generate Data
File. If the form contains repeating subforms or subform sets, indicate the number of times
each subform or subform set will repeat in the data file. You can use the Browse button to navigate to the location where you want the file saved. Type a name for the file and then click
Generate.
5)
Click OK.
RELATED LINKS:
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Create Form Designs
Tocreate a data connection to an XML schema
3.4.10. To create sample data to print with your form
You can print a final version of the current form design using sample data to ensure that the form
prints correctly. If you do not have sample data, you can create it using Acrobat.
After you create the sample data file, you can specify which data file to use when printing the form.
The next time you print the form in Designer, the sample data will appear in the respective objects.
1)
In Designer, save the form design as a PDF file.
2)
Open the PDF file in Acrobat and enter values in the fields you want to test.
3)
In Acrobat, do these tasks:
4)
•
Select Advanced > Forms > Export Form Data.
•
In the Export Form Data As dialog box, name the file and save it as XML Data Package
(*.xdp).
In Designer, do these tasks:
•
Select File > Print.
•
Select Print Form With Data.
•
To print the form with a data source, use the Browse button to navigate to the test data
XML file. You can also enter the full path to your test data XML file in the Data File box.
•
Click OK.
RELATED LINKS:
Toprint a form with sample data
3.4.11. To automatically generate sample data to print with your form
You can generate sample data to print with your form instead of creating a sample data file using
Acrobat. Also, if your form contains repeating subforms or subform sets, you can specify the number
of times the data will be repeated when you print the form.
Designer generates sample data that is valid for the corresponding objects in the form, with a few
exceptions:
•
Sample data is not generated according to any validation scripts that may be specified for an
object.
•
The minimum and maximum count for a subform will restrict the number of repeating
subforms that you specify for the generated sample data file.
•
The default value you select for a 2D barcode is retained in the generated sample data file.
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Create Form Designs
3
After you generate the sample data file, you can edit the file, if required.
Specify which data file to use when printing the form. The next time you print the form in Designer,
the sample data will appear in the respective objects.
1)
Select File > Print.
2)
Select Print Form With Data.
3)
Click Generate Data File.
4)
In the Data File box, use the Browse button to navigate to the location of the test data file. You
can also type the full path, including a file name, for the test data file.
5)
In the Repeating Elements list, select the number to the right of a subform and type the number
of times it will repeat in the data file.
6)
Click Generate.
RELATED LINKS:
Toprint a form with sample data
3.4.12. To specify settings for printing a PDF form
To print a PDF form, you can specify the settings in the form design, instead of placing the effort on
the user to properly configure the print job. For example, you can select the number of copies to print
and single-sided or double-sided printing or select page scaling options. These settings are automatically applied when the user prints the form.
Specifying settings for printing is recommended only for form designs saved as Acrobat 8 (Static)
PDF forms or Acrobat 8 (Dynamic) XML forms.
NOTE:
1)
Select File > Form Properties.
2)
Click the PDF Print Options tab and select Use These Print Settings for Printing This PDF
Form.
3)
Select the number of copies to print.
4)
Select one of the following options for duplex printing. To print double-sided, the selected
printer must support duplex printing.
5)
92
•
To print on one side of the paper, select Simplex.
•
To print on both sides of the paper where the paper flips along the long edge, select
Duplex Flip Long Edge.
•
To print on both sides of the paper where the paper flips along the short edge, select
Duplex Flip Short Edge.
Select one of the following options for page scaling:
Create Form Designs
6)
•
To use the page scaling options selected in the Adobe Acrobat/Reader Print dialog box,
select Use Adobe Acrobat/Reader Setting.
•
To set Page Scaling to None in the Adobe Acrobat/Reader Print dialog box, select No
Page Scaling. The Adobe Acrobat/Reader user can change the Page Scaling setting. Select
Prevent User From Changing to prevent Adobe Acrobat/Reader users from disabling
page scaling.
•
To automatically select the paper source based on the page size, select Paper Source By
Page Size.
Click OK.
RELATED LINKS:
Toautomatically print a PDF form when it is opened
3.4.13. To automatically print a PDF form when it is opened
You can specify that the Print dialog box appears when the PDF form opens, allowing the user to
print the form immediately.
1)
Select File > Form Properties.
2)
Click the PDF Print Options tab and select Automatically Print the Form When it is Opened.
3)
(Optional) To print the PDF form by using the default printer on the user’s computer, select
Print to the User’s Default Printer.
4)
(Optional) To print the PDF form using a specified printer, select Print To and select the
printer from the list. You can also type the printer name. This is useful when you want to
specify a printer that is not available to you. The printer name must match exactly the name of
the printer as installed on the user's computer.
5)
Click OK.
3.5.
Tabbing order
Many users use the Tab key to move between fields and buttons in a form instead of using the mouse.
Designer lets you set the tabbing order between objects in a form.
Tabbing order is important for interactive forms and forms that have a fixed layout. For interactive
forms, the tabbing order affects the end user’s experience when filling the form.
For both interactive and non-interactive forms, tabbing order is critical if your forms need to be
accessible to users with vision or mobility impairments. These users typically do not use a mouse to
navigate through the form, so they depend on the keyboard keys and a good tabbing order sequence
to ensure that they have full access to all the fields on the form.
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Create Form Designs
3
Accessible forms require a tabbing order, whether the form is interactive or designed for print. Additionally, a screen reader will read the form in geographic order, which in Designer is set when you
use the default tabbing order.
Designer automatically sets a default tabbing order for each form. This tabbing order can be easily
changed to better reflect the logical flow of the form and to accommodate particular user requirements.
3.5.1.
How the default tabbing order works
The default tabbing order for objects in a form is from left to right, top to bottom, starting from the
upper-left corner. Tabbing order respects the existence of subforms, radio buttons, and content
areas. For example, if two subforms exist side-by-side, and each subform contains a number of field
objects, the tabbing sequence will go through the fields in the first subform before moving on to the
next.
NOTE:
Designer does not include circle, line, or rectangle objects in the tabbing order.
Tabbing order is also determined by the vertical position of objects on a page and its master page.
The tabbing order starts from the object with the smallest vertical coordinate and ends with the
object with the largest vertical coordinate, regardless of whether the object is on the body or master
page.
For objects that contain objects, such as content areas, all child objects are tabbed through before
tabbing to the next higher-level object.
The following list provides an example of the tabbing order for objects on body and master pages:
•
Image object on the master page with a vertical coordinate of 1.
•
Content area object on the page with a vertical coordinate of 4. All objects in the content area
are tabbed through before tabbing to the subform object on the master page.
•
Subform object on the master page with a vertical coordinate of 10. All objects in the content
area are tabbed through before tabbing to the text object on the master page.
•
Text object on the master page with a vertical coordinate of 12.
Because the tabbing order is important, ensure that you position objects precisely on the form, relative to each other. For example, you can position and size an object using its coordinates and you can
snap objects to points on a grid.
You can change the default tabbing order if you require a different sequence in your form. For
example, you may want to change the tabbing order to move through objects in a column, from top
to bottom, and then left to right.
In Acrobat 6.0.2, tabbing to a group of radio buttons makes the upper-left radio button active.
Use the Tab key to move through the radio buttons. In Acrobat 7.0.5 and later, the selected radio
button becomes active. Use the arrow keys to move between the radio buttons in a group and the Tab
key to move out of the group.
NOTE:
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Create Form Designs
RELATED LINKS:
Toposition objects
Viewingthe default tabbing order
Changingthe tabbing order
3.5.2.
Viewing the default tabbing order
One of the final tasks to do when creating a form is to set the tabbing order. Before you do this task,
make sure you have finished laying out the form design so that all the objects are in their correct position on the form. First, you should examine the default tabbing order, which is created automatically
by Designer.
When you design or open a form in Designer, the tabbing order is not visible. To see the tabbing
order for the form, select View > Show Tab Order or click Show Order on the Tab Order palette.
NOTE:
If the Tab Order palette is not visible, select Window > Tab Order.
The tabbing order is displayed on the form as a series of consecutive numbers inside colored shapes:
•
Numbers inside a gray circle indicates the default tabbing order for the objects in the content
area.
•
•
Numbers inside a green circle indicate the tabbing order for master page objects.
Numbers inside a lavender square indicate the tabbing order for the objects inside a fragment.
Examine the default tabbing order carefully to determine whether it suits your particular requirements or whether you need to change it. Even if you modify the tabbing order, you can quickly
return to the default tabbing order by selecting the Automatic option in the Tab Order palette.
NOTE:
While viewing the tabbing order, you cannot edit any parts of the form.
95
Create Form Designs
3
To hide the tabbing order and return to normal form-editing mode
Perform one of the following actions:
•
Select View > Hide Tab Order
•
Click Hide Order in the Tab Order palette
•
Open a different palette, such as the Hierarchy palette.
RELATED LINKS:
Howthe default tabbing order works
Changingthe tabbing order
3.5.3.
Using the Tab Order palette
The Tab Order palette provides an alternative view of the tabbing order on the form. It shows all the
objects on the form as a numbered list, where each number represents the position of the object in
the tabbing flow. The palette is also where you modify the tab order, if required.
To open the Tab Order palette, select Window > Tab Order.
The Tab Order palette may show the following visual markers in the list:
•
A gray bar marks each page of the form. The tabbing order on each page starts with the number
1.
•
The letter M inside a green circle indicates master page objects (visible only when viewing the
form on the Design View tab).
•
A range of numbers indicates objects within a fragment.
•
A yellow background indicates the currently selected item.
•
A lock icon beside the first object on the page indicates that the object cannot be moved within
the tabbing order (visible only when viewing the form on the Master Pages tab).
The list shows exactly the same tabbing order numbers as the numbers displayed on the form itself.
The difference is that the numbers displayed on the form are for information purpose only, whereas
the numbers on the list can be changed to modify the tabbing order.
In the Tab Order palette, you can also show or hide the tabbing order on the form and switch
between the default and custom tabbing order.
RELATED LINKS:
Changingthe tabbing order
Viewingthe default tabbing order
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Create Form Designs
3.5.4.
Changing the tabbing order
After examining the default tabbing order, you may decide that you need a different sequence for
some of the objects on the form. For example, if you have two groups of address fields situated
side-by-side, you may want to tab through the fields in the first group before moving to the second
group.
You change the position of an object in the tabbing order by moving the object up or down in the
Tab Order palette list. You can move a single object or a group of objects. When you move the object
to a new place in the order, Designer reassigns the numbers to accommodate the object in its new
place.
For example, you have four objects on the page, which are arranged in the following layout.
Therefore, their default tabbing order will be as shown in this illustration.
You may want to change this tabbing order to a more logical one, such as First Name, Last Name,
Telephone, Email. All you have to do is move the LastName object one position up in the list. The
tabbing order numbers are reassigned to reflect this move.
Although the tabbing order for the objects on the master page and the objects inside a fragment are
displayed on the form, you cannot change the order for these objects on the Design View tab. For
the master page objects, click the Master Pages tab and customize the tabbing order. (See Changingthe tabbing order on master pages). For the fragments, open the required fragment and change
the order inside the fragment. (See Tochange the tabbing order in fragments).
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Create Form Designs
3
If your form has more than one page, the tabbing order for each page starts at the number 1, and you
can change the order only inside each page.
Before you change the tabbing order, you should prepare your working area in the following way:
1)
Select Window > Tab Order. The Tab Order palette appears on the left side of the working area.
2)
Click Show Order and then select Custom.
The tabbing order numbers displayed on the form are now inside blue squares . This square
visually indicates that you are now in custom tabbing mode and can change the position of one
or more objects in the tabbing sequence.
RELATED LINKS:
Usingthe Tab Order palette
Tochange the tabbing order for a single object usingthe mouse
Changingthe tabbing order for a group of objects
Toview the tabbing order using visual aids
3.5.5.
To change the tabbing order for a single object using the mouse
You change the tabbing order by selecting the objects and changing their positions in the Tab Order
palette list.
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Create Form Designs
To change the order using drag-and-drop
1)
Drag the selected object up or down the list and place it at the required location. A black handle
marks your current position within the list before you place the object.
To change the order using the arrow buttons
1)
In the Tab Order palette, click the up or down arrow buttons until the selected object is placed
in the correct position.
To change the order using the menu
1)
In the Tab Order palette menu, select Move First, Move Up, Move Down, or Move Last.
To change the order by editing the number
1)
In the Tab Order palette list, click the selected object to make the number listed beside the
object name editable. Then, type the new number indicating the new position of the object in
the tabbing order and press Enter.
To change the order using copy and paste
1)
Select Copy from the Tab Order palette menu and, in the list, select the object above which to
place the object you are moving, and then select Paste or Paste After from the menu.
RELATED LINKS:
Changingthe tabbing order
Tochange the tabbing order for a single object usingkeyboard shortcuts
Changingthe tabbing order for a group of objects
Toview the tabbing order using visual aids
3.5.6.
To change the tabbing order for a single object using keyboard shortcuts
You must use the mouse pointer in conjunction with the keyboard to change the tabbing order
by using keyboard shortcuts.
NOTE:
You change the tabbing order by selecting the objects and changing their positions in the Tab Order
palette list.
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Create Form Designs
3
To change the order using the menu
1)
Press Ctrl+Up Arrow or Ctrl+Down Arrow to move the object one position up or down in the
list.
To change the order by editing the number
1)
Press F2 to make the number listed beside the object name editable. Then type the new number
that indicates the new position of the object in the tabbing order and press Enter.
To change the order using copy and paste
1)
Press Ctrl+C to copy the selected object to the clipboard. Then press the Up Arrow or Down
Arrow repeatedly until you highlight the object above which you want to place the object, and
press Ctrl+V to paste the object from the clipboard.
RELATED LINKS:
Changingthe tabbing order
Tochange the tabbing order for a single object usingthe mouse
Changingthe tabbing order for a group of objects
Toview the tabbing order using visual aids
3.5.7.
Changing the tabbing order for a group of objects
Instead of moving individual objects to their new location within the tabbing order, you can move a
group of objects all at once. This method works only for the objects that are positioned in sequence
in the list of objects.
If you have a selection of objects that are scattered throughout the list, you must make them sequential first and then move the group.
After you select a group of sequentially ordered objects, you move the group to a new location in the
tabbing order by using the same methods you used for moving a single object.
To select a sequential group of objects using the mouse
100
1)
In the Tab Order palette list, click the first object in the sequence.
2)
Press Shift and click the last object in the sequence.
Create Form Designs
To select a sequential group of objects using the keyboard
1)
In the Tab Order palette list, click the first object in the sequence.
2)
Press Shift+Down Arrow or Shift+Up Arrow until all objects in the sequence are selected.
To change a group of individually selected objects to a sequential group
1)
In the Tab Order palette list, click the first object and then press Ctrl and click each object that
you want to select.
2)
In the palette menu, select Make Sequential. The selected objects are moved together into a
sequentially ordered group.
To change the order to geographic (left-to-right)
1)
In the Tab Order palette list, select the objects in the sequence.
2)
In the Tab Order palette menu, select, Make Geographic.
To change the geographic order to right-to-left
1)
In the Tab Order palette list, select the objects in the sequence.
2)
In the Tab Order palette menu, select, Make Geographic Right-To-Left.
RELATED LINKS:
Changingthe tabbing order
Tochange the tabbing order for a single object usingthe mouse
Tochange the tabbing order for a single object usingkeyboard shortcuts
Toview the tabbing order using visual aids
3.5.8.
Changing the tabbing order on master pages
Although the tabbing order for the objects that are located on a master page is displayed on the
Design View tab, you can change the order for these objects only on the Master Pages tab.
The objects on the master page are placed in two areas, one above the content area and one below
the content area. The tabbing order is set for objects within each of these two areas. Consequently,
you can only change the tabbing order within each area.
The upper-left object on each master page is locked in the first tabbing position and cannot be
moved.
NOTE:
When you change the tabbing order on a master page, any pages in your form that are using this
master page are affected by the change.
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3
RELATED LINKS:
Changingthe tabbing order
Tochange the tabbing order for a single object usingthe mouse
Tochange the tabbing order for a single object usingkeyboard shortcuts
Changingthe tabbing order for a group of objects
3.5.9.
To change the tabbing order in fragments
If you use fragment references in your form, the tabbing order inside a fragment is visible when
viewing the order for the form. To change the tabbing order inside a fragment, you must open the
fragment source file for editing, make the change, and save the file. Any forms that use this fragment
are affected by this change.
1)
Select View > Hide Tab Order.
2)
Select the fragment reference.
3)
Select Edit > Fragments > Edit Fragment.
4)
Select View > Show Tab Order.
5)
Change the tabbing order as required.
6)
Save and close the fragment source file.
RELATED LINKS:
Changingthe tabbing order
3.5.10. To return to the default tabbing order
If you decide that you do not want the customized tabbing order on your form, you can quickly
return to the automatic (default) tabbing order. You will lose any changes made to the tabbing order.
1)
On the Tab Order palette, select Automatic.
2)
In the message box, click Yes to acknowledge that the custom tab order will be removed.
3.5.11. Excluding text and image objects from the tabbing order
You can exclude text and image objects from the tabbing order to improve usability and flow of the
tabbing on the form.
For example, on the form below, the user will need to tab through the title of the form (Purchase
Order) before reaching the P.O. Date field.
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If the text and image objects are excluded from the tabbing order, the tabbing flow on this form will
change to include only the fields that require user input or action.
Excluding text and image objects from the tabbing order is not recommended if one or more of the
following is true for your form:
•
Your form will be used with a screen reader.
•
Your form contains hyperlinks inside the text objects.
You can exclude the text and image objects for both the default and the custom tabbing order.
To exclude text and image objects
1)
Do one of the following actions:
•
Select Tools > Options > Tab Order and, in the Tab Order panel, select Only Show Tab
Order For Fields.
•
In the Tab Order palette menu, select Show Fields Only.
RELATED LINKS:
Viewingthe default tabbing order
Changingthe tabbing order
3.5.12. To view the tabbing order using visual aids
On a complex and busy form, it may be difficult to see how the tabbing flows from one object to the
next. You can use visual aids to help you see the tabbing flow on the form.
With the visual aids turned on, when you hover the pointer over the object, blue arrows show the
tabbing flow for the two preceding and two following objects in the tabbing order.
1)
Do one of the following actions:
•
Select Tools > Options > Tab Order and, in the Tab Order panel, select Display Additional Visual Aids For Tab Order.
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•
3
In the Tab Order palette menu, select Show Visual Aids.
RELATED LINKS:
Viewingthe default tabbing order
Changingthe tabbing order
3.6.
Building actions in forms
Use the Action Builder dialog box on the Tools menu to build common interactive capabilities in
forms, without writing scripts. Using actions, you can control how you present form objects and data
and how the objects and data respond to form filler interaction.
Here are examples of what you can do with actions:
•
Add buttons that a form filler can click to add or remove sections in the form or rows in a table.
•
Set the value of a field, such as prepopulating a date/time field object with the current date or
a numeric field object with a specific value.
•
Set the background color of fields.
•
Hide or show objects or set the focus to a specific field.
•
Create custom actions by using scripting objects and the function within the scripts.
•
Build actions within fragments.
To display the actions within a fragment file in the Action Builder dialog box, you must embed
the fragments file within the Adobe XML Form (XDP) document or edit the fragment in Designer. The
Action Builder dialog box does not display actions within a fragment that you create in a fragment
library.
NOTE:
NOTE:
Actions may not work with HTML forms and Guides.
You can add actions to most form fields and objects.
When you click the object link in the Action Builder dialog box, the Select an Object dialog box
appears, displaying the objects in the form that you can select to create a condition or result.
You build actions by adding one or more conditions that must be met, and one or more results that
occur when the conditions are fulfilled. You can build simple actions with just one condition, where
the results begin when that condition is met. Alternatively, you can combine multiple conditions to
build more complex actions, where the results can begin at different times depending on the conditions you add.
Designer generates a script for each action and monitors the scripts for changes. If Designer detects
that the script has been modified, it performs the following actions:
•
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Stops monitoring the script, giving the form author ownership of the script.
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•
Displays a message on the Log tab in the Report palette, indicating that the script is no longer
managed and can be edited.
Designer does not modify unmanaged script in any way.
Designer inserts the script that it generates for an action at the beginning of the script in the Script
Editor, before any unmanaged scripts.
The Report palette lists warning messages about broken actions. Broken actions occur when an
object that was used to create a condition or result is deleted from the form. Broken actions are indicated in the Action list. A missing object link also appears next to the relevant condition or result.
Double-click the warning message in the Report palette to open the Action Builder dialog box and
highlight the broken action.
Designer does not monitor changes that you make to radio buttons and choice lists. If you
change the items in the list, reorder items, change the display text or save value, or delete a radio button,
the action can break without generating a broken action warning.
NOTE:
3.6.1.
Combining conditions
If you combine a trigger condition with other conditions, the trigger condition must be met last.
Only the trigger condition can start the action results, after all other conditions are met first. As a
result, you can add only one trigger condition to an action. For example, you cannot build an action
with two trigger conditions, where the form filler is required to click a button and click a check box
at the same time. The Action Builder dialog box displays an error message if you add more than one
trigger condition to an action. However, keep in mind that an action does not require a trigger condition. You can build an action without adding a trigger condition. If you do not add a trigger condition to an action, the conditions can be met in any order. Any one of the conditions in the action can
display the results, after all other conditions are met.
When you add multiple conditions to an action, the Action Builder dialog box sorts the list of conditions, as shown below. The trigger condition (if you have added one) appears at the top of the list.
All other conditions are grouped under the trigger condition. The and/or link appears next to the
grouped conditions. The and/or link is not available with the trigger condition. When you select and,
all conditions in the group must be met before the actions results occur. When you select or, at least
one of the conditions in the group must be met before the action results occur.
A. Trigger condition B. And/or toggle link
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3.6.2.
3
Build an action
When you build an action, you add one or more conditions and one or more results. The results
occur when the conditions are fulfilled. You can add as many conditions and results as you need.
However, you can add only one trigger condition to an action, because the trigger condition must be
met last. For example, you cannot build an action where the form filler must click a button and a
check box at the same time, to initiate the results. The Action Builder dialog box displays an error
message if you add more than one trigger condition to an action.
If you build an action using the ‘is changed’ option for a condition, when the form is viewed in
Acrobat or Adobe Reader, the results may not be applied until the field is exited.
NOTE:
For each condition you add, click the object link to open the Select an Object dialog box and choose
an object. The Select An Object dialog box only shows the objects in the form that you can use for a
condition or result. For each result you add, you select an option in the Select a Result list, and then
choose various other options depending on the object. The options available for each result vary
depending on the object you select.
If you build an action that adds or removes instances of subforms, be sure to name each subform
object. If the action references any unnamed subforms, the action could fail.
NOTE:
Keep in mind that the following results are not compatible with HTML forms or guides.
•
Attach a File to the Form
•
Close the Form
•
Go to a Specific Page
•
Reset All the Fields in the Form
•
Save the Form
•
Set the Zoom Level
Designer generates a default name for each action, which consists of the object name followed by the
scripting event that the condition is generated within (<name of object>.<name of
scripting event>).
For information on events, see Events in Designer ScriptingBasics.
If you create an action in the Enter event and run the form in Acrobat 7.1.3, the background or
foreground color of the field does not change until the user exits the field.
NOTE:
106
1)
Select Tools > Action Builder.
2)
Click the Add A New Action
3)
In the Condition area, click the Add A Condition
4)
Click the object link.
button.
button.
Create Form Designs
5)
Select the object for the condition. Repeat steps 3 and 4 as needed. If you add three or more
conditions, the and/or link appears next to the conditions. Click the link to change the relationship between the conditions as needed.
6)
In the Result area, click the Add A Result
7)
In the Select a Result list, select a result and then choose options as needed. Repeat steps 6 and
7 as needed.
3.6.3.
1)
3.6.4.
1)
3.6.5.
button.
Rename an action
Click the action name and type a new name. You can give two or more actions the same name.
Revert to the default name
Delete the new name.
Edit an action
Use the Actions dialog box to view and edit the actions in a form. Actions are listed on the left side
of the dialog box, and the conditions and results for the selected action appear on the right. Add,
delete, and modify condition and results as needed.
For existing conditions, the Select an Object dialog box only shows the object associated with that
condition and other objects of the same type. To change the object type for an existing condition,
delete the condition and then create another condition.
For existing results, the Select an Object dialog box shows all objects in the form that you can select
for a result. To change the object for an existing result, select a different object.
1)
Select Tools > Action Builder.
2)
Under Actions, select an action, and select options as needed.
3.6.6.
Remove an action
You can remove an action from a form at any time.
1)
Select Tools > Action Builder.
2)
Under Actions, select the action to remove.
3)
Click the Remove An Existing Action
button.
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3.6.7.
3
Build a custom result
You can create a custom result for an action by using a script object that contains a function. A script
object is an object you can use to store JavaScript functions and values separately from any particular
form object.
Designer does not validate parameters and return values. Ensure that the parameters you type
are correct and the return value is valid.
NOTE:
1)
Select Tools > Action Builder.
2)
Click the Add A New Action
3)
In the Condition area, click the Add A Condition
4)
Click the object link.
5)
Select an object for the condition. Repeat steps 3 and 4 as needed. If you add three or more
conditions, the and/or link appears next to the conditions. Click the link to change the relationship between the conditions as needed.
6)
In the Result area, click the Add A Result
7)
In the Select a Result list, select Call A Script Object Function.
8)
Click the Call Script Object link and, under Variables, select the script object.
9)
Select a function from the list.
button.
button.
button.
10) Type the parameters in the box. Example: Call script *(script object)* function (function name)
with parameters *(funcParam1, funcParam2)*and "(No Return Result)".
11) (Optional) Select Assign Return Result To, click the object link, and select an object for the
return result.
For more information, see Creating and Reusing JavaScript Functions in Designer ScriptingBasics.
3.6.8.
Setting the zoom level in a PDF form
When a user opens a PDF form in Acrobat or Adobe Reader, they see the initial view of the document. You can build an action to set the initial viewing area of a PDF to a specific zoom level or page
magnification. For example, you can set the zoom level to a specific percentage of the page size or to
automatically fit the width or height of the page.
108
1)
Select Tools > Action Builder.
2)
Click the Add A New Action
3)
In the Condition area, click the object link.
4)
In the Select An Object dialog box, select the name of the form at the top of the form hierarchy.
The default name is form1.
button.
Create Form Designs
5)
Click OK.
6)
In the Condition area, select When Form <form name> Has Finished Loading.
7)
In the Select a Result list, select Set The Zoom Level.
8)
In the Set Zoom To list, select the option you want.
9)
Click OK.
3.7.
Spell checking in forms
3.7.1.
To select the default locale
Before you check the spelling in a form, you should verify that the correct default form locale is
selected. The locale option that is selected in the Default Form Locale list in the Form Properties
dialog box specifies the default language that Designer uses to check spelling. For quick reference,
the current spell-check language is indicated in the upper-right corner of the Check Spelling dialog
box, just below the title bar.
If you apply different locale options to individual objects in the form by using the Locale list in the
Object palette, those locale settings override the default form locale setting. That is, when the locale
setting for an object is different from the locale setting for the form, Designer identifies the words
(text) associated with these objects as being misspelled.
When applying different locale options to individual objects, keep in mind that the objects that are
within tables and subforms automatically receive the same locale setting as the table and subform
object.
If you select a locale option (language) that the spell-check feature does not support, a message
appears indicating that objects with that particular locale setting will not be spell checked.
NOTE:
1)
Select File > Form Properties.
2)
Click the Defaults tab and, in the Form Locale list, select the language you want the spell-check
feature to use.
3)
Click OK.
RELATED LINKS:
Tocheck spelling while you type
Tocheck the spelling in a form
FormProperties dialog box
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3.7.2.
3
To check spelling while you type
You can set up Designer to identify spelling errors as you type by selecting the Check Spelling While
Typing option in the Spelling panel of the Options dialog box.
When the Check Spelling While Typing option is selected, a wavy red line appears under misspelled
words in text objects, caption fields, or the various fields in the Object and Accessibility palettes,
regardless of the options selected. You can use the options in the Spell Check list to specify the type
of text to spell check when you use the Check Spelling dialog box.
When checking the spelling in a form, Designer always refers to the internal dictionary and your
custom dictionary (My Custom Dictionary). You can also add other custom dictionary files (*.clam)
to expand the list of correctly spelled words to which Designer refers. For more information, see
Adding a word to the list of ignoredwords.
To see a list of the dictionaries you currently have available, select Tools > Options, and click
Spelling. The Spelling panel displays a list of the installed dictionaries. Notice that My Custom Dictionary is selected at all times and cannot be removed.
TIP:
Keep in the mind these other points when you check spelling as you type:
•
When the Check Spelling While Typing option is selected, a wavy red line appears under
misspelled words in text objects and caption fields only when the insertion point (vertical,
flashing bar used for entering text) is placed in or directly next to text.
•
You can change the color of the wavy underline by selecting Tools > Options > Spelling > Wavy
Underline Color.
•
You can quickly correct spelling errors by right-clicking a misspelled word and selecting one
of the suggested words from the context menu. Designer displays a maximum of four alternate
spelling suggestions on the context menu for each misspelled word. To see more than four
suggestions, use the Check Spelling dialog box.
To set up Designer to identify spelling errors as you type
110
1)
Select Tools > Options and, in the Spelling panel, select Check Spelling While Typing.
2)
To correct a spelling error while typing, place the insertion point in or directly next to the
underlined word, and right-click and perform one of these actions:
•
To correct the misspelled word, select one of suggested words in the context menu. If no
spelling suggestions are available for the misspelled word, the text no spelling suggestions
appears instead.
•
To add the word to My Custom Dictionary, select Add to Dictionary. This selection adds
the underlined word to all languages in the dictionary. Designer no longer identifies the
word as being misspelled.
•
To disregard all occurrences of the misspelled word, select Ignore All. This selection adds
the word to the list of ignored words, and Designer temporarily does not identify the
Create Form Designs
word as being misspelled. All spell checks disregard the word until you restart Designer.
The list of ignored words is cleared each time Designer is started.
RELATED LINKS:
Toselect the default locale
Tocheck the spelling in a form
Toedit the custom dictionary
Optionsdialog box
3.7.3.
To check the spelling in a form
You can check the text for spelling errors in selected objects or in an entire form by using the Check
Spelling dialog box.
By default, Designer checks the spelling in all of the text associated with the various objects in a form,
such as text, captions, tool tips, custom screen reader text, and list box entries. However, you can
control the type of text that Designer checks by selecting options in the Spell Check list available in
the Spelling panel of the Options dialog box. When you select the Static Text and Captions options,
you can also select specific text or captions in the form to spell check. If the Static Text and Captions
options are not selected, Designer will not check the spelling in any selected text objects or caption
fields.
When checking the spelling in a form, Designer always refers to the internal dictionary and your
custom dictionary (My Custom Dictionary). You can also add other custom dictionary files (*.clam)
to expand the list of correctly spelled words to which Designer refers. For more information, see
Adding a word to the list of ignoredwords.
To see a list of the dictionaries you currently have available, select Tools > Options, and click
Spelling. The Spelling panel displays a list of the installed dictionaries. Notice that My Custom Dictionary is selected at all times and cannot be removed.
TIP:
1)
(Optional) If you want to check the spelling in specific text objects or caption fields, press Ctrl
and select the necessary objects.
2)
Select Tools > Check Spelling. The Check Spelling dialog box appears with the first misspelled
word highlighted in red under Not in Dictionary.
3)
To remove spelling errors, perform one of these actions:
•
To correct the misspelled word, select one of the words in the Suggestions list, and then
either click Change to replace this occurrence of the misspelled word or click Change All
to replace all occurrences of the misspelled word. If the word you want is not in the list
of suggested words, you can type the correct spelling directly in the Check Spelling dialog
box, and then click Change or Change All as needed. If you clicked Change or Change
All and want to revert the changes, click Undo.
•
To disregard this one occurrence of the misspelled word, click Ignore Once.
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3
•
To disregard all occurrences of the misspelled word, click Ignore All. This selection adds
the word to the list of ignored words, and Designer temporarily does not identify the
word as being misspelled. All spell checks disregard the word until you restart Designer.
The list of ignored words is cleared each time Designer is started.
•
To add the word to My Custom Dictionary, click Add to Dictionary. This selection adds
the highlighted word to all languages in the My Custom Dictionary and Designer no
longer identifies the word as being misspelled.
After you correct a spelling error, the Check Spelling dialog box automatically advances to the
next misspelled word. A message is displayed when Designer completes the spell check.
RELATED LINKS:
Toedit the custom dictionary
CheckSpelling dialog box
Optionsdialog box
3.7.4.
To add a word to all languages in the custom dictionary
When you spell check a form, Designer may identify a word as being misspelled when the word is
actually spelled correctly. For example, Designer generally will not recognize company or
industry-specific product terminology and acronyms. As a result, Designer provides each user with
a custom dictionary (My Custom Dictionary) where you can create a customized list of properly
spelled words. My Custom Dictionary is listed under Installed Dictionaries in the Spelling panel in
the Options dialog box and is always selected by default. Designer refers to My Custom Dictionary
whenever you spell check a form; therefore, you cannot delete My Custom Dictionary.
The words that you add to the custom dictionary are automatically added to all languages (locales).
Designer considers the word to be spelled correctly regardless of the locale that is currently applied
to the form or to a selected object. However, if the word you want to add to the Custom Dictionary
does not belong to all languages, you can use the Edit Dictionary dialog box to add the word to
selected languages. After you add a word to the Custom Dictionary, Designer recognizes the spelling
of the word as correct and removes the wavy red line from under the word.
1)
3.7.5.
Right-click the misspelled word and select Add to Dictionary.
To add a word to selected languages in the custom dictionary
If the word you want to add to your custom dictionary (My Custom Dictionary) does not belong to
all languages, you can use the Edit Dictionary dialog box to add the word to selected languages. After
you add a word to My Custom Dictionary, Designer recognizes the spelling of the word as correct
for the selected language and removes the wavy red line under the word.
112
1)
Select Tools > Edit Dictionary.
2)
In the Language list, select the language you want.
Create Form Designs
3)
In the Word box, type the correct spelling of the word you want to add.
4)
Click Add.
5)
Repeat steps to add the word to another language.
RELATED LINKS:
Toadd a word to all languages in the custom dictionary
Toedit the custom dictionary
EditDictionary dialog box
3.7.6.
To edit the custom dictionary
From time to time, you may want to edit your custom dictionary (My Custom Dictionary) or review
the contents. In the Edit Dictionary dialog box, you can select options from the Language list to view
the words that are associated with all languages or individual languages. You can also change the
spelling of any listed word, add words to all or selected languages, and delete words from all or
selected languages.
To open the Edit Dictionary dialog box
1)
Select Tools > Edit Dictionary.
RELATED LINKS:
Toadd a word to all languages in the custom dictionary
Toadd a word to selected languages in the custom dictionary
Optionsdialog box
EditDictionary dialog box
3.7.7.
Adding a word to the list of ignored words
Sometimes Designer may identify a word as being misspelled when it is actually spelled correctly.
However, in such cases you may not always want to add the word to your custom dictionary. As an
alternative, you can create a list of words that Designer ignores temporarily when spell checking a
document. Designer recognizes the spelling of ignored words as being neither correct nor incorrect,
and disregards them when performing a spell check.
You cannot view or edit the list of ignored words. Therefore, it is a good idea to remember the words
you add. The list of ignored words remains in place until you close Designer; each time Designer is
started, the list is cleared.
You can quickly add a word to the list of ignored words while typing in one of the fields in a form or
in the Object or Hierarchy palettes by using the commands on the context menu (right-click). Using
the buttons in the Check Spelling dialog box, you can also add a word to the list of ignored words
while spell checking in a form.
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3
To add a word to the list of ignored words while typing
1)
Right-click a misspelled word in any field in a form or in the Object or Hierarchy palette and
select Ignore All. Designer temporarily disregards all instances of the word as being misspelled
until Designer is restarted.
To add a word to the list of ignored words while spell checking a form
1)
Select Tools > Check Spelling. The Check Spelling dialog box appears with the first misspelled
word highlighted in red under Not in Dictionary.
2)
Perform one of the these actions:
•
To disregard only this occurrence of the misspelled word, click Ignore Once. Designer
ignores the word and advances to the next misspelled word.
•
To disregard all occurrences of the misspelled word, click Ignore All. Designer ignores all
instances of the misspelled word and advances to the next misspelled word. All spell
checks disregard all occurrences of the misspelled word until you restart Designer. The
list of ignored words is cleared each time Designer is started.
RELATED LINKS:
Toadd a word to selected languages in the custom dictionary
Toedit the custom dictionary
CheckSpelling dialog box
EditDictionary dialog box
3.7.8.
To add a dictionary
You can add additional dictionary files to Designer to suit your needs. That is, if you want to expand
the list of correctly spelled words that Designer refers to when spell checking a form, you can add
one or more custom dictionary files (*.clam) for a specific language or for all supported languages.
For example, you can add a custom dictionary of unique terms for specialized industries such as
medicine, law, engineering, insurance, or finance. Keep in mind that if you want to add the words in
a custom dictionary file to a particular language instead of all languages, you must include the correct
language extension in the custom dictionary file name. Let’s say you want to add a custom dictionary
file to French Canadian only, you must add fr_CA to the file name like this, [file name]-fr_CA.clam.
If you do not include a language extension in the file name, the words in the file will be considered
correct for all languages.
NOTE: You can also add more standard dictionary files (*.lex) for languages that Designer does not
already support, by manually adding the files to the folder located at \Program Files\Common
Files\Adobe\Linguistics\Providers\Proximity.
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You can use the options in the Spelling panel of the Options dialog box to add dictionaries and select
which dictionaries are used when performing spell-check operations.
1)
Select Tools > Options.
2)
Select Spelling from the list on the left and then click Add a Dictionary. The Custom Dictionary
File dialog box appears.
3)
Browse to the dictionary file you want to add to Designer and click Open. The dictionary is
added to the list of installed dictionaries.
RELATED LINKS:
Toremove a dictionary
Toedit the custom dictionary
Optionsdialog box
EditDictionary dialog box
3.7.9.
To remove a dictionary
The Installed Dictionary list in the Spelling panel of the Options dialog box shows the dictionaries
currently available for spell checking a form. You can delete one or more of the custom dictionaries
you no longer need. When you delete a custom dictionary, it is removed from the list of installed
dictionaries. The actual dictionary file (*.clam) is not removed from your computer’s file system.
You cannot remove My Custom Dictionary because Designer always refers to this dictionary
whenever you spell check a form.
NOTE:
1)
Select Tools > Options.
2)
In the Spelling panel, select the dictionary you want to delete from the Installed Dictionaries
list.
3)
Click Remove a Dictionary.
RELATED LINKS:
Addinga word to the list of ignored words
Toedit the custom dictionary
Optionsdialog box
3.8.
Hyphenate text
Use hyphenation to improve text alignment in a given area by reducing the amount of white (empty)
space between the last word on a line and the right margin. If a word is too long to fit entirely on a
single line, the word is hyphenated at the proper hyphenation point, which forces a line break as
close to the right margin as possible. Hyphenation makes each line of text approximately the same
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3
length to give the text a more uniform layout. Designer uses a hyphenation dictionary, metrics such
as line spacing and font size, as well as other linguistic information to determine where various
words can be legally and optimally hyphenated.
You can hyphenate the text in text objects, in the caption area of objects such as text fields, decimal
fields, and numeric fields, and in the value area of text field objects (default text and text the form
filler enters). For example, you can indicate the number of letters to allow in a word before it can be
hyphenated; hyphenate capitalized words, such as the first word of a sentence; hyphenate words that
are all capital letters, such as acronyms; and add or remove all hyphenation from the form.
You can set default hyphenation options for all new forms or customize hyphenation settings for
individuals forms.
Set hyphenation options in these areas:
Options dialog box (Formatting panel)
Use the options in this dialog box to specify default hyphenation settings for all new forms.
Changing theses options does not affect the currently opened form.
Forms Properties dialog box (Formatting tab)
Use the options in this dialog box to specify hyphenation settings for the currently opened
form only.
Paragraph palette (Hyphenation option)
Use this option to enable or disable hyphenation in individual objects.
When you create a form, the Form Properties dialog box automatically inherits the default
hyphenation settings for new forms from the Tools Options dialog box. To create a form that has
different hyphenation settings or to change the default settings in an existing form, use the Form
Properties dialog box. The settings in the Form Properties dialog box override the settings in the
Options dialog box for the current form. When you change the hyphenation settings in the Forms
Properties dialog box for the current form, the settings in the Options dialog box (for new forms)
do not change.
NOTE:
RELATED LINKS:
Hyphenationin selected paragraphs
Paragraphproperties in the Paragraph palette
Formatting(Options dialog box)
Formattingtab (Form Properties dialog box)
3.8.1.
Considerations for setting hyphenation
Keep the following points in mind regarding the various options you must select for objects that
contain hyphenated text:
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Hyphenate option in the Paragraph palette
Although the hyphenation you select in the Form Properties and Options dialog boxes apply to the
entire form, you can use the Hyphenate option in the Paragraph palette to add or remove hyphenation in individual objects. Using the Hyphenate option, you can manually adjust text layout on an
object-by-object basis.
The Hyphenate option is available in the Paragraph palette only when you select the Using the Allow
Hyphenation in Text and Field Captions option or the Allow Hyphenation in Text Field Values
option, or both on the Form Properties (Formatting tab) or the Options (Formatting panel) dialog
boxes. The Hyphenate option displays a colored square when these two options are in a mixed state,
where either Allow Hyphenation in Text and Field Captions or Allow Hyphenation in Text Field
Values is deselected. That is, when you select the Hyphenate option for an object when these two
options are in a mixed state, the check box displays a colored arrow, which changes to a colored
square to remind you that one of the options is deselected.
When Hyphenate New Items is selected in the Options dialog box on the Formatting panel, the
Hyphenate option is automatically selected with new objects added to a form.
TIP:
Currently Editing palette menu
The commands in the Currently Editing palette menu (Edit Caption or Value, Edit Caption, or Edit
Value) determine when the Hyphenate option is available in the Paragraph palette (does not apply
to text objects). That is, the Allow Hyphenation in Text and Field Captions option and the Allow
Hyphenation in Text Field Values option are applied according to the command you select. For
example, if you select the Allow Hyphenation in Text and Field Captions option, you must also select
either the Edit Caption or Value command or the Edit Caption command to make the Hyphenate
option available.
Use these commands to select the area (caption, value, or both) to hyphenate in each object that
contains hyphenated text. For example, to hyphenate the text in text objects and the captions in text
field objects, select the Allow Hyphenation in Text and Field Captions option and either the Edit
Caption and Value menu command or the Edit Caption command. Alternatively, to hyphenate the
default or user input text in the value area of text objects, select the Allow Hyphenation in Text Field
Values option and the Edit Value menu command. The default command for text fields, decimal
fields, numeric fields, and signature fields is Edit Caption or Value.
Expand to Fit options
It is recommended that you select the Expand to Fit (Height) option for each object that contains
hyphenated text. When a word is too long to fit entirely on a line, hyphenation forces a line break
and divides the word over two lines. As a result, the object that contains the text needs to expand in
height to accommodate additional lines when needed. However, you can also manually enlarge
objects to the correct size where hyphenation can occur. Text objects expand in width (as needed)
when you enter text, even if you do not select the Expand To Fit (Width) option.
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3
Allow Multiple Lines option
(Applies to the value area of text objects only) Select this option on the Field tab of the Object palette
for each text object to hyphenate the text in, in the value area of text field objects. This option enables
the text to break onto more than one line where the height of the field permits.
RELATED LINKS:
Hyphenationin selected paragraphs
Paragraphproperties in the Paragraph palette
Formatting(Options dialog box)
Formattingtab (Form Properties dialog box)
3.8.2.
Setting and removing hyphenation in forms
You can hyphenate the text in, and remove hyphenation from, text objects, the caption area of
objects such as text fields, decimal fields, numeric fields, and signature fields, and the value area of
text field objects (default text and text the form filler enters).
To set hyphenation for new forms
Use the Formatting panel in the Options dialog box. The numbers you enter and the options
you select on the Formatting panel are used as default settings in the Form Properties dialog
box on the Formatting tab.
To set hyphenation for individual forms
Use the Formatting tab in the Form Properties dialog box. The numbers you enter and the
hyphenation options you select on the Formatting tab apply to the current form only. You can
change the hyphenation settings for the current form to suit your needs. The default settings
that initially appear in the Form Properties dialog box are inherited from the Formatting panel
in the Options dialog box, which automatically apply to all new forms. If you change the default
settings in the Form Properties dialog box, the new settings override the settings in the Options
dialog box for the current form. The hyphenation options in the Options dialog box do not
change.
NOTE: Before you set hyphenation for forms, it is recommended that you become familiar with
the different options you need to select for objects that contain hyphenated text. (See Hyphenatetext)
To remove hyphenation from forms
Use the You can remove hyphenation from the text in text objects, in the caption area of objects
such as text fields, decimal fields, numeric fields, and signature fields, and in the value area of
text field objects.
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To set hyphenation for a new form
1)
Select Tools > Options.
2)
Click Formatting, enter the values, and select the options to apply to new forms:
•
In the Words With At Least <x> Letters box, enter the minimum number of letters that
a word must contain to be hyphenated.
•
In the After First <x> Letters box, enter the minimum number of letters in a word that
must appear on a line before the hyphen.
•
In the Before Last <x> Letters box, enter the minimum number of letters in a word that
must appear on the next line, after the hyphen.
•
To hyphenate words that begin with a capital (uppercase) letter, such as the first word of
a sentence, select Hyphenate Capitalized Words.
•
To hyphenate words that are all capital letters, such as acronyms, select Hyphenate
Words in ALL CAPS.
•
To hyphenate the text in text objects, and in the caption area of objects such as text fields,
decimal fields, numeric fields, and signature fields, select Allow Hyphenation in Text and
Field Captions.
•
To hyphenate the text in the value area of text field objects (default text and text entered
by the person filling the form), select Allow Hyphenation in Text Field Values.
•
Select Hyphenate New Items to hyphenate the text in new objects added to the form.
For descriptions and example usage of the above options, see Formatting (Optionsdialog box).
3)
Click OK.
To set hyphenation for an individual form
1)
Select File > Form Properties.
2)
Click the Formatting tab, and enter the values and select the options to apply to the current
form:
•
In the Words With At Least <x> Letters box, enter the minimum number of letters that
a word must contain to be hyphenated.
•
In the After First <x> Letters box, enter the minimum number of letters in a word that
must appear on a line before the hyphenation point.
•
In the Before Last <x> Letters box, enter the minimum number of letters in a word that
must appear on the next line after the hyphenation point.
•
To hyphenate words that begin with a capital (uppercase) letter, such as the first word of
a sentence, select Hyphenate Capitalized Words.
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3
•
To hyphenate words that are all capital letters, such as acronyms, select Hyphenate
Words in ALL CAPS.
•
To hyphenate the text in text objects, and in the caption area of objects such as text fields,
decimal fields, numeric fields, and signature fields, select Allow Hyphenation in Text and
Field Captions.
•
To hyphenate the text in the value area of text field objects (default text and text entered
by the person filling the form), select Allow Hyphenation in Text Field Values.
For descriptions and example usage of the above options, see Formattingtab (Form Properties
dialog box).
3)
Click Hyphenate All Text.
TIP:
Click Edit > Undo Hyphenate All text to immediately undo hyphenation.
To remove hyphenation from a form
1)
Select File > Form Properties.
2)
Click the Formatting tab and do one of the following actions:
3)
•
To remove hyphenation from the text in text objects and in the caption area of objects,
deselect Allow Hyphenation in Text and Field Captions.
•
To remove hyphenation from the text in the value area of text field objects, deselect Allow
Hyphenation in Text Field Values.
•
To remove all hyphenation, click Remove All Hyphenation.
Click OK.
TIP:
3.9.
To immediately restore all hyphenation, click Edit > Undo Remove All Hyphenation.”
Hyperlinks
Use hyperlinks to provide links to external websites, email addresses, and PDF and HTML files. You
can insert URL and email hyperlinks within static text objects (including floating fields) or within
the caption area of objects such as text field, image field, and drop-down list objects.
When using hyperlinks with Dynamic XML forms, you must select target version as Acrobat and
Adobe Reader 9 or later.
Designer can not anticipate the content of run-time data. If you intend to populate a form with
rich text that contains hypertext links, you must set the target version to Acrobat and Adobe Reader
9.0 or later.
NOTE:
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To render an XDP form design to HTML when the hyperlinks point to resources in a AEM forms
application, use the correct notation and check the file in to the forms server. For the hyperlinks, use
the http://<AEM forms server name>:<port number>/repository/Applications/<application
name>/<version>/<folder>/<filename> notation. In Workbench, check in the form design to the
same forms server and location.
The hyperlink menu commands are not available with button objects such as Print and Reset,
and with read-only text.
NOTE:
3.9.1.
To insert a hyperlink
1)
Select the text where you want to insert a hyperlink.
2)
Click Insert > Hyperlink.
3)
Do one of the following tasks:
4)
3.9.2.
1)
•
Select URL, and either type or select a valid website address, or click the browse button
to select a file located on your computer. When you select a file, the relative path for the
document appears in the URL box.
•
Select Email and type one or more valid email addresses and, optionally, a subject line.
Click OK.You can also use the Undo Hyperlink and Redo Hyperlink commands in the Edit
menu to quickly revert text or a hyperlink to its former state.
To remove hyperlink
Place the insertion point within the hyperlink, right-click, and select Remove Hyperlink.
You can also use the Undo Hyperlink and Redo Hyperlink commands in the Edit menu to
quickly revert text or a hyperlink to its former state.
TIP:
3.9.3.
To edit a hyperlink
1)
Place the insertion point within the hyperlink, right-click, and select Edit Hyperlink.
2)
Make the necessary changes, and click OK.
3.9.4.
To test a hyperlink
After you insert a hyperlink, it is recommended that you test it to make sure it opens correctly.
You can test links on either the Design View tab or the PDF Preview tab. On the Design View tab,
when you move the pointer over a hyperlink, the name of the associated object and the link are
displayed in a tool tip. On the PDF Preview tab, when you move the pointer over a hyperlink, only
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3
the associated link is displayed in a tool tip. Each link opens the appropriate program, such as a web
browser or an email program.
1)
Place the insertion point within the hyperlink, right-click, and select Open Hyperlink.
TIP:
As a shortcut, you can use Ctrl+click to quickly open links.
3.10. Prepare for translation
To prepare a form design for translation, generate XLIFF identifiers for the translatable text. In
Designer, the identifiers are generated when you select the Create Translation identifiers When
Saving option. When selected, the option generates a unique XLIFF ID for each text string the first
time you save the form design. The XLIFF identifiers are visible in the XML source when you save a
form design in the Adobe XML Form (.xdp) format.
When you modify and save the form design, Designer compares the identifier, and string combinations to determine whether any changes were made since the last time the form design was saved.
Changes can include changed text, field deletion, or field insertion. If the text changed since it last
saved, Designer updates the text when you copy an object that already has an identifier so that a
duplicate identifier is not created.
Designer includes two examples of Extensible Stylesheet Language Transformations (XSLT) files.
The extractstrings.xslt file extracts the XLIFF IDs and the mergestrings.xslt file creates a new version
of the form design in the new language. The examples are installed with Designer in the installation
directory under \...\FormTranslation.
RELATED LINKS:
Translating Forms using XLIFF
3.10.1. To create translation identifiers
1)
Select Tools > Document Handling.
2)
In the File Options area, select Create Translation Identifiers When Saving.
3)
Create and save the form design.
3.10.2. Extracting the translation identifiers and translatable text
You can use the example extractstrings.xslt file as a starting point to extract the XLIFF identifiers and
text that must be translated from the form design.
Pass the form design as the input to the extractstrings.xslt style sheet by using an XSLT processor,
such as a free or commercial version of the Saxon XSLT processor. Optional and required arguments
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are available. The required arguments describe how to execute a given XSLT. The optional arguments contain metadata.
For example, to extract the XLIFF identifiers and text from the MyForm.xdp file, enter the
following required arguments at the command prompt to generate the MyForm.s2x file:
java -jar saxon8.jar MyForm.xdp extractstrings.xslt > MyForm.s2x
MyForm.xdp is the name of the form design that you extract the XLIFF identifiers and text from,
and MyForm.s2x is the file that you send to be translated.
Make sure that you keep a backup of the XLIFF file. Then, if you must edit the form design, you can
easily determine which strings must be translated by comparing the XLIFF backup file with the
XLIFF file for the changed form design.
NOTE: The saxon8.jar file can have a different name, depending on the version of Saxon being
used. An example is saxon9.jar.
extractstrings.xslt optional parameters
You can specify the following optional parameters that are included in the S2X metadata.
Parameter
Description
locale
Locale of the form design
xdpFilename
Name of the form design that you extract the XLIFF identifiers and text from
develContact
Email address of the contact for the form design
collection
Name of the package
domain
Domain name
Each parameter has a default:
<xslt:param
<xslt:param
<xslt:param
<xslt:param
<xslt:param
name="locale" select="'en'" />
name="xdpFilename" select="'mytemplate.xdp'" />
name="develContact" select="'[email protected]'" />
name="collection" select="'package'" />
name="domain" select="'BC'" />
Here is an example:
java -jar saxon8.jar input.xdp extractstrings.xslt
xdpFilename=MyForm.xdp locale=en_CA > MyForm.s2x
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3
3.10.3. Creating the form design with the translated text
After you receive the translated XLIFF file, enter the following string at the command prompt to
create the translated form design:
java -jar saxon8.jar MyForm.s2x mergestrings.xslt
xdpFile=MyForm.xdp > MyFormTranslated.xdp
MyForm.s2x is the translated XLIFF file, MyForm.xdp is the name of original form design, and
MyFormTranslated.xdp is the translated form design.
The result is a master form design (MyForm.xdp) and a translated form design
(MyFormTranslated.xdp) that you can make available to users.
If you must change the form design, edit the master form design and then repeat the steps above to
produce a new XLIFF file.
We provide the example mergestrings.xslt style sheet, which creates a new version of the
form design in the new language.
RELATED LINKS:
Preparefor translation
3.11. Macros
Macros provide an external plug-in interface, to extend the functionality of Designer. For example,
you can run a macro to rename a field and update all associated script references, or to find scripts
that consist entirely of comments.
NOTE:
You should only run a macro if you trust the author of the script.
A macro is a JavaScript file (JS). You create JavaScript files in a JavaScript editor and run the scripts
in Designer. The JavaScript in the macro has full access to the template model. In addition to the
template DOM, there is an object in the root namespace called designer. The designer object
provides methods that you can use to communicate directly with Designer. For example, one
method allows you to launch a SWF dialog box and exchange strings with it, which allows you to
build a custom user interface.
For more information about available scripting methods, see the Scripting Reference.
To set up macros for use in Designer, you create a subfolder structure for JavaScript files in the
Designer installation folder, and run the JavaScript files from the Macros menu (Tools > Macros).
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3.11.1. To set up macros for use in Designer
1)
Do one of the following actions:
•
For common macros (all languages), in the Designer installation folder, create a
subfolder called macros. For example, <DesignerInstallationFolder>\macros.
•
For language specific macros, in the Designer installation folder, create a subfolder for
each language (locale), and then create a macros folder in each locale folder. For example,
<DesignerInstallationFolder>\EN\macros.
2)
In each macros folder, create one or more subfolders for JavaScript (JS) and macro.xml files.
3)
Save JavaScript and macro.xml files to the appropriate subfolders. Place any SWF files used by
the macro JavaScript files in the same subfolder.
4)
In Designer, click Tools > Macros. The macros (common and language specific) are listed on
the Macros menu.
3.11.2. About macro.xml configuration files
You create an macro.xml configuration file to rename the command that appears on the Macros
menu for each JavaScript file in a subfolder. You add one macro.xml file to each subfolder containing
one or more JavaScript files.
Notice the label and script tags in the following example macro.xml file. The label tag encloses the
name of the command (Merge) that appears on the Macros menu. The script tag encloses the name
of the associated JavaScript file (mergenodes.js).
Example macro.xml file:
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<designerMacros>
<!-- one or more macros that are in the same directory can be specified in the
same macro.xml config file -->
<macro>
<!-- used as menu command text -->
<label>Merge</label>
<!-- A macro key can refer to only one script file -->
<script>mergenodes.js</script>
</macro>
</designerMacros>
Using macro.xml configuration files is optional. When Designer refreshes the list of macros, it
searches the macros subfolders for macro.xml files. If Designer does not locate a macro.xml file in a
subfolder, the names of the JavaScript files appear on the Macros menu.
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3
3.11.3. Organizing the macros subfolder
Create a least one subfolder under the macros folder to contain your JavaScript files. If you save
JavaScript files directly in the macros folder, they do not appear on the Macros menu in Designer.
You can organize macros subfolders different ways. The method you choose, depends on your
needs. Consider the number of JavaScript files you have, the number of macro.xml files to create, and
the order of commands on the Macros menu.
One way to organize the macros subfolders is to save all JavaScript files in one subfolder. This way,
you use one macro.xml file to specify the names of all JavaScript files in the folder, and names of the
associated Macros menu commands. The order of the commands on the Macros menu, is the same
as the order of macros listed in the macro.xml file.
Example macro.xml file containing multiple macros:
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<designerMacros>
<macro>
<label>Get Designer Locale</label>
<!-- Description - Get Designer locale -->
<script>getLocale.js</script>
</macro>
<macro>
<label>Hello World</label>
<!-- Description - Display Hello World -->
<script>helloWorld.js</script>
</macro>
<macro>
<label>Highlight Text</label>
<!-- Description - Highlight text areas -->
<script>HighlightFields.js</script>
</macro>
<macro>
<label>Refactor</label>
<!-- Description - Refactor -->
<script>refactor.js</script>
</macro>
<macro>
<label>Show Flex Sample</label>
<!-- Description - Show Flex Sample -->
<script>showFlexSample.js</script>
</macro>
</designerMacros>
Another way to organize the macros subfolders is to save JavaScript files in separate subfolders. You
use a macro.xml file in each subfolder to specify the name of the JavaScript files, and name the related
Macros menu commands. The order of the commands on the Macros menu, is the same as the order
of subfolders and the macros listed in each macro.xml file.
Keep in mind that all the subfolders you create for JavaScript files must be a child of the macros
parent folder (macros\MyMacros). Designer does not scan subfolders below the level of the first
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subfolder.After you add a JavaScript file to a macros subfolder, the name of the file appears under
the Macros command on the Tools menu. If you want to display a name other than the JavaScript
filename, you can create an XML configuration file named macro.xml to change the name.
3.11.4. Localizing macros
You create a subfolder structure in the Designer installation folder for the JavaScript files associated
with macros. The subfolders structure you create depends on whether you plan to localize macros or
not.
If you do not need to localize macros, because they are common to all languages, you create a
subfolder named macros in the Designer installation folder. For example, c:\program
files\Adobe\Designer\macros\. You then create one or more subfolders in the macros subfolder for
the JavaScript files you want to run. You can create one subfolder for all JavaScript files or create a
separate subfolder for each JavaScript file. Designer loads the JavaScript files in these subfolders,
regardless of the locale option selected in the Form Locale list (Form Properties dialog box > Defaults
panel).
If you need to localize macros, because they are locale (language) specific, you create a subfolder in
the Designer installation folder for each locale. You then create a macros subfolder in each locale
subfolder, and create one or more subfolders in the locale subfolder for the Javascript files. For
example: c:\program files\Adobe\Designer\EN\macros\. Designer loads the JavaScript files in these
folders based on Designer's application language.
3.11.5. Macro Logging
If you are unsure which macros Designer is loading, you can check the macros log file.
Designer creates a log file called MacrosLog.log in the Designer application data folder located here:
C:\Documents and Settings\<username>\Application Data\Adobe\Designer\<Designer version
number>.
The MacrosLog.log file lists the macros loaded in Designer.
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Using tables
4.
Using tables
4.1.
About tables
4
A table is made up of rows and columns of cells that you can fill with form fields or merge with data.
This example shows what the various parts of a table are called.
A.
Header Row
B.
Row
C.
Footer Row
D.
Column
E.
Cell
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Using tables
F.
Section
4.1.1.
Types of tables
You can create two types of tables in Designer form designs:
•
Tables that have a fixed number of rows and columns. For example, this table is a simple
four-column, four-row table with a header and footer row.
•
Tables in which the number of columns are fixed, but the number of rows will change
depending on how much information is in the data source.
A. This is how the table looks in the Layout Editor B.This is how the table looks in the Preview PDF tab when
merged with data from a data source
Or, interactive tables can grow or shrink when a user clicks a button to add or delete a row.
A. Buttons that add a row or delete a row B.When the user clicks the Add Row button twice, Designer adds two rows.
4.1.2.
Ways to create tables
Here are some of the common methods for creating tables.
•
Create an empty table that has a fixed number of rows and columns. See To createa simple
table.
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Using tables
4
•
Create an empty table that has a fixed number of rows and columns. See To createa simple
table.
•
Create a table whose number of rows changes to accommodate the amount of data that
displays. See Tocreate a table from a data source.
•
Create an empty table in which the number of rows changes to accommodate the amount of
data. See Tocreate a table using the Table Assistant.
•
Create a table from existing objects. See Tocreate a table from existing objects.
•
Create a table nested within a table. See Tocreate a table within a table.
•
Import a table from another application. See Toimport a table from Microsoft Word.
4.2.
To create a simple table
You can create a simple table with a range of columns and rows with or without header or footer
rows. For example, here is a four-column, four-row table with a header and footer row.
1)
In the Object Library palette, click the Standard category and select the Table object
2)
Click where you want the table to appear.
.
If you selected Don’t Show This Again in the Insert Table dialog box, when you select the
Table object in the Object Library palette, Designer automatically inserts a table with the same
number of columns and rows that you inserted the last time you used the Insert Table dialog box.
NOTE:
3)
In the Insert Table dialog box, enter the number of columns and rows.
You can enter a maximum of 20 columns and 50 rows. You can add more columns and rows
after the table is created by using the Insert commands in the Table menu.
4)
(Optional) To add a header row, select Include Header Row In Table.
5)
(Optional) To add a footer row, select Include Footer Row In Table.
6)
Click OK.
RELATED LINKS:
To repeat a header or footer row on subsequent pages
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Using tables
4.3.
To create a table using the Table Assistant
The Table Assistant simplifies and streamlines the process of creating a table by letting you easily
define some of the basic elements in a table before you place the table on a form. For example, the
Table Assistant dialog box provides options for adding body rows and columns, adding header and
footer rows, adding sections, and applying shading to rows.
You can use the Table Assistant to create tables that have a fixed number of rows and columns, or
tables that have a fixed number of columns but the number of rows changes depending on how
much information is in the data source.
As you select options, you can see how the table will look in the Preview area of the Table Assistant.
After you create a table using the Table Assistant, you can modify it using the commands on the
Table menu and the various options in the Layout, Border, Object, and Accessibility palettes.
By default, the Insert Table dialog box appears when you select Insert > Standard > Table or when
you drag the Table object onto the Layout Editor. However, if you previously selected the Don’t Show
This Again option in the Insert Table dialog box, you can restore the default behavior by selecting Tools
> Options > Wizards and Tips and selecting the Show When Creating Tables option.
TIP:
1)
Select Table > Insert Table, and select Create Table Using Assistant.
2)
In the Table Assistant, specify the body layout, and then click Next:
3)
4)
5)
•
To add a specific number of rows and columns, select Body Has Fixed Dimensions, and
then select values in the Number of Columns and Number of Rows lists.
•
For a table in which the number of body rows in the table matches the number of rows
in the data, select Body Rows Vary Depending on Data, and then select a value from the
Number of Columns list.
Specify whether you want to include a header row, and then click Next:
•
To have no header row, select No Header Row.
•
To add a header row, select Has Header Row, and then select Repeat Header Row on
Each Page, if needed. The Repeat Header Row on Each Page option is available only when
you select the Body Rows Vary Depending on Data option in the Body Layout page.
Specify whether you want to include a footer row, and then click Next:
•
To have no footer row, select No Footer Row.
•
To add a footer row, select Has Footer Row, and then select Repeat Footer Row on Each
Page, if needed. The Repeat Footer Row on Each Page option is available only when you
select the Body Rows Vary Depending on Data option in the Body Layout page.
Specify the sections to include, and then click Next:
•
To include body rows with no sections, select Has Body Rows and No Sections.
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Using tables
6)
4
•
To include body rows grouped into sections, select Has Sections of Body Rows and do the
following tasks:
•
Use the Add, Delete, Up, and Down buttons above the Sections list to add, remove, and
order sections as needed.
•
To rename a section shown in the Sections list, double-click the section and rename it in
the Table Section dialog box.
•
To apply options to a section listed in the Sections list, select the section and, under
Section Options, select options as needed. Note that when you select Section Is Optional,
the minimum occurrence for the section is set to 0. This means that if no data exists for
the section, the section will not be shown.
Specify the row shading and then click Finish:
•
Select Alternating Row Colors.
•
In the First list, select the number of initial rows to shade, and then select a color.
•
In the Next list, select the number of subsequent rows to shade, and then select a color.
RELATED LINKS:
To repeat a header or footer row on subsequent pages
4.4.
To create a table from existing objects
If you have an existing form that includes field objects formatted as a table, you can easily convert
them to a table. For example, the Bill of Lading template that comes with Designer includes fields
formatted like a table.
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1)
Open a form that contains fields formatted like a table.
For example, start a new form based on the Bill of Lading template. Select File > New and select
Based On A Template. Click Next and then select the Bill of Lading template. Click Next and
finish filling in the New Form Assistant.
2)
Drag the objects that you want to convert to a table.
For example, select the header row and body rows but stop above the Terms of Delivery and
Insurance section.
3)
Select Table > Convert to Table.
You can convert any group of fields to a table. For example, in this same template, you
can convert the fields under Shipped To and Shipper to a table.
NOTE:
4.5.
To create a table within a table
You can create a table within a table that is independent from the main table. For example, the nested
table can have a different number of columns and rows than the main table. There is no limit to the
number of levels that you can nest tables.
If you want a table to automatically flow to the next page, you must ensure the following conditions:
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4
•
The table must be in a subform that is set to Flowed in the Subform tab of the Object palette.
•
The Allow Page Breaks Within Content option is selected in the Table tab.
•
The table is not in a group.
Table within a table
1)
Create a table. See Tocreate a simple table.
2)
In the Object Library palette, click the Standard category and drag the Table object into a cell
in the main table.
If you selected Don’t Show This Again in the Insert Table dialog box, when you select the
Table object from the Object Library palette, Designer automatically inserts a table with the same
number of columns and rows that you inserted the last time you used the Insert Table dialog box.
NOTE:
3)
In the Insert Table dialog box, enter the number of columns and rows.
You can enter a maximum of 20 columns and 50 rows. You can add more columns and rows
after the table is created by using the Insert commands on the Table menu.
4)
(Optional) To add a header row, select Include Header Row In Table.
5)
(Optional) To add a footer row, select the Include Footer Row In Table.
6)
Click OK.
If you have an existing table, you can select the table and drag it to the cell where you want
it to appear.
NOTE:
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4.6.
To import a table from Microsoft Word
You can import a table from Microsoft Word into Designer.
1)
In Designer, select File > Open.
2)
In the Files of Type list, select Microsoft Word Document.
3)
Select the Microsoft Word document that contains the table and click Open.
Designer displays the New Form Assistant and Import A Microsoft Word Document is already
selected.
4)
Click Next and finish answering the questions when prompted in the New Form Assistant.
5)
In the File Import Options dialog box, provide the required information and click OK.
Designer imports the contents of the document, including the table.
RELATED LINKS:
To change a cell to another object type
4.7.
To create a table using subforms
You can create a table using subforms. Subforms can contain a variety of objects including buttons,
text fields, and other subforms. The flow direction of the subform indicates how the contained
objects will be arranged. Typically, you will create tables by using the Table object in the Object
Library palette. If you need to create a complicated table where the columns do not line up, you can
use subforms.
1)
2)
Start the table:
•
In the Object Library palette, click the Standard category and drag a Subform object onto
the form.
•
Resize the subform to match the required width of the table.
•
Expand the height of the subform so that you can add one or more child subforms.
•
Type a name for the subform in the Name box in the Binding tab of the Object palette.
For example, type TableParent.
•
In the Accessibility palette, select Table from the Subform Role list.
Create a table header:
•
Drag another Subform object into the TableParent subform.
•
Set the width of the header subform to match the width of its parent subform and set the
height of the subform to match the required height of the header row.
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3)
4)
•
Type a name for the subform in the Name box in the Binding tab of the Object palette.
For example, type TableHeader.
•
In the Accessibility palette, select Header from the Subform Role list.
Add text for the column headers:
•
Drag a Text object into the TableHeader subform.
•
Double-click the text in the Text object and type a name for the column.
•
Repeat as many times as required to add additional headers to the table.
Create a body row that will act as the repeating row in the table:
•
Drag another Subform object into the TableParent subform.
•
Set the width of the body row subform to match the width of its parent subform and set
the height of the body row subform to match the required height of the body row.
•
Type a name for the subform in the Name box in the Binding tab of the Object palette.
For example, type TableBodyRow.
•
Add the same number of fields to go under the headers that you added in step 3 to display
the data values in the table. Set the size of the fields.
•
In the Layout palette, select None from the Caption list.
•
In the Accessibility palette, select Body Row from the Subform Role list.
5)
Select the TableParent subform, click the Subform tab of the Object palette, and select Flowed
from the Type list.
6)
In the Object palette, click the Binding tab and select Repeat Subform For Each Data Item.
7)
(Optional) Consider enhancing the table as follows:
4.7.1.
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4
•
Add borders and shading for table elements by using the Border palette.
•
Specify overflow leaders and trailers for the rows of the table.
To create a table containing variable-width cells
1)
Create two or more tables. Each table should have one body row. The first table should have a
header row, and the other tables should have only body rows.
2)
Arrange the tables one below the other.
3)
Wrap all these tables in a parent subform.
4)
Adjust the width of each cell as required.
5)
Set the parent subform to Flowed.
Using tables
RELATED LINKS:
About subforms
About overflow leaders and trailers
Making complex tables accessible
Border properties in the Border palette
Accessibility properties in the Accessibility palette
4.8.
To create a nested table using subforms
After you create a table using subforms, you can insert a table into a table cell. For example, you can
show two independent tables side by side (in separate cells) or nest tabular material.
Before you insert a table in to a cell, you must wrap the cell in a subform.
1)
2)
Start the nested table:
•
Select the cell (in the table that was created using subforms) where the nested subform
will go.
•
Select Insert > Wrap In Subform.
•
Type a name for the subform in the Name box in the Binding tab of the Object palette.
For example, type Wrapper.
Create the nested table.
•
Right-click the cell again and select Wrap In Subform, or drag the Subform object from
the Object Library palette to the cell.
•
Type a name for the subform in the Name box in the Binding tab of the Object palette.
For example, type NestedTable.
•
In the Accessibility palette, select Table from the Subform Role list.
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4
3)
Right-click the cell (TextField1 in the example) and select Delete.
4)
Create a header row for the nested table:
•
Drag another Subform object into the NestedTable subform.
•
Set the width and height of the header row.
•
Type a name for the subform in the Name box in the Binding tab of the Object palette.
For example, type NestedRow1.
•
In the Accessibility palette, select Table Header from the Subform Role list.
A subform that is inserted into a parent subform that is set to Flowed may not appear in
the correct position in the Hierarchy palette.
NOTE:
5)
6)
Add text for the column headers:
•
In the Object Library palette, click the Standard category and drag two Text objects into
NestedRow1.
•
Select one of the text objects and type a name for the text object. For example, type
Description.
•
Select the second text object and type a name for the text object. For example, type Cost.
•
Select the two Text objects in NestedRow1 and select Layout > Group.
Create a body row for the nested table:
•
138
Drag another Subform object into the NestedTable subform.
Using tables
7)
•
Set the width and height of the body row.
•
Type a name for the subform in the Name box in the Binding tab of the Object palette.
For example, type NestedRow2.
•
In the Accessibility palette, select Body Row from the Subform Role list.
•
In the Object Library palette, click the Standard category and drag three field objects into
NestedRow2 (such as Text Fields).
Set the parts of the table to Flowed:
•
Select the NestedTable subform and, click the Subform tab of the Object palette, and
select Flowed from the Type list.
•
Select the subform that contains the NestedTable subform called (untitled Subform)
(page 1), click the Subform tab of the Object palette, and select Flowed from the Type list.
The Hierarchy palette could look like this illustration.
The form could look like this in the Preview PDF tab.
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4
RELATED LINKS:
About subforms
About overflow leaders and trailers
Border properties in the Border palette
Accessibility properties in the Accessibility palette
4.9. To create a table that grows by using the Subform
Instance Controls
You can create a table that grows when users click a button by using the Subform Instance Controls.
These controls let users add and remove rows and move rows up and down in a table.
A.
Adds and removes rows
B.
Moves rows up and down
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You must create the table before you insert the controls. You also must already have the predefined
set of custom objects in the SAP environment.
4.9.1.
To create a table that grows by using the Subform Instance Controls
1)
Select Table > Insert Table.
2)
In the Insert Table dialog box, select Create Table Using Assistant and click OK.
3)
In the Body Layout panel of the Table Assistant, select Body Rows Vary Depending On Data.
This creates a table that is dynamic so that it grows based on the data sent to it.
4)
Enter the number of columns and click Next.
5)
(Optional) Select Has Header Row and click Next.
6)
(Optional) Select Has Footer Row and click Next.
7)
(Optional) Select Has Body Rows And No Sections and click Next.
8)
(Optional) Select Alternate Row Colors and click Finish.
9)
Select Edit > Form Properties and click the Preview tab.
10) In the Preview Adobe XML Form As list, select Dynamic XML Form and then click OK.
Now you must add the controls that will add and delete rows dynamically.
4.9.2.
1)
To add the Subform Instance Control buttons
Select the first cell of the body row and, in the Object palette, click the Cell tab and select
Subform from the Type list.
This cell needs to be a subform so that it can contain the buttons.
TIP:
2)
You can also drag the Subform object from the Object Library palette into a cell in the table.
In the Object Library palette, click the category that contains the custom objects for the SAP
environment.
You must have already set up a category that contains these custom objects.
3)
Drag the Subform Instance Controls: Insert Remove Move object into a cell in the body row.
For example, place them in the first cell of the body row.
4)
Select the first row.
5)
In the Binding tab of the Object palette, ensure that Repeat Row For Each Data Item is selected.
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Using tables
6)
4
View the form in the Preview PDF tab.
For example, this is what you would see if you formatted the table.
Here is what it would look like after a user adds rows and data.
RELATED LINKS:
About custom objects for the SAP environment
4.10. To create a table that grows using the Button object
You can create a table that adds a row when a user clicks an Add Row button. You can also include
a Delete Row button. You must create the table, add the buttons, and then set the properties that will
make the table grow.
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A.
Buttons that add a row or delete a row
B.
When the user clicks the Add Row button twice, Designer adds two rows.
4.10.1. To create a table that grows using the Button object
1)
Select Table > Insert Table.
2)
In the Insert Table dialog box, select Create Table Using Assistant and click OK.
3)
In the Body Layout panel of the Table Assistant, select Body Rows Vary Depending On Data.
This creates a table that adds or removes rows, depending on the data sent to it.
4)
Enter the number of columns and click Next.
5)
(Optional) Select Has Header Row and click Next.
6)
(Optional) Select Has Footer Row and click Next.
7)
(Optional) Select Has Body Rows And No Sections and click Next.
8)
(Optional) Select Alternate Row Colors and click Finish.
9)
Save the form as an Adobe Dynamic XML Form (*pdf).
Now, you must add the buttons that will be used to add and delete rows.
4.10.2. To add the buttons
1)
Select the first cell of the body row and, in the Object palette, click the Cell tab and select
Subform from the Type list.
This cell needs to be a subform so that it can contain two buttons.
TIP:
2)
You can also drag the Subform object from the Object Library palette into a cell in the table.
In the Object Library palette, click the Standard category and drag the Button object into a cell
in the body row. For example, place it in the first cell of the body row.
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Using tables
3)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab and type Add Row in the Caption box.
4)
Repeat steps 2 and 3 to create a Delete Row button.
5)
Select the Add Row button and, in the Script Editor, select Click from the Show list.
6)
In the Script Editor, select JavaScript from the Language list.
7)
Type the following script:
4
Table.Row1.instanceManager.addInstance(1);
To modify the script for your own form, you must understand how the script relates to the
hierarchy. For example, in the hierarchy for the current form, both buttons are inside the same
subform; therefore, you do not need to specify any objects beyond the Table level.
8)
Select the Delete Row button and, in the Script Editor, select Click from the Show list.
9)
In the Script Editor, select JavaScript from the Language list.
10) Type the following script:
Table.Row1.instanceManager.removeInstance(1);
To reuse these buttons in another form, you can add them to the Custom category (or your
own category) of the Object Library palette. Note that you may have to edit the script for the
button if you use it in a different form.
TIP:
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Using tables
11) View the form in the Preview PDF tab.
For example, this is what you would see if you modified the Part table from the Purchase Order
template.
4.11. Selecting, copying, moving, and navigating
4.11.1. To select a table, row, column, cell, or section
You can select rows, columns, cells, sections, or the entire table in different ways:
•
Click in the table and use the Select commands in the Table menu.
•
Drag the mouse pointer to select different parts of the table.
•
Select objects in the Hierarchy palette.
You can also use one of the following methods.
To select the entire table
1)
Click in the area on the upper left of the table, or click and drag to select the entire table.
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Using tables
To select the cells in a row
1)
Click in the area to the left of the row until you see the following arrow.
To select a row
1)
Click in the area to the left of the row until you see the following arrow.
To select the cells in a column
1)
146
Click above the column.
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Using tables
To select a cell
1)
Click the lower-right edge of the cell.
NOTE: After a cell is selected, you can select more cells in the table by using the arrow keys to move
within the table. Press Shift and then press the arrow key to select adjacent cells.
To select multiple rows, columns, cells, or sections
1)
Drag the mouse pointer across the rows, columns, cells, or sections.
To select multiple items that are not adjacent, click the first row, column, cell, or section you
want, press Ctrl, and then click the next rows, columns, cells, or sections you want.
To select adjacent cells, click the first cell you want, press Shift, and then use the arrow keys to
select more cells in the table.
The rows, columns, cells, or sections must be in the same table. A nested table is considered
a separate table.
NOTE:
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4
To select a section
1)
Click the right bracket that indicates a section.
4.11.2. To copy a table, row, column, cell, or section
1)
Select the table, row, column, cell, or section you want to copy.
2)
Do one of the following actions:
•
Press Ctrl and drag the copy to a new location.
•
Select Edit > Copy, click the where to place the object, and then select Edit > Paste.
•
Select Edit > Duplicate. This command does not work for single cells or cells in rows.
To make multiple copies that are positioned and aligned, use the Copy Multiple command
in the Edit menu. This command does not work for single cells or cells in rows.
TIP:
4.11.3. To move a table
1)
Select the table.
2)
Click in the upper part or left side of the table to find the move cursor
location.
and drag it to the new
4.11.4. To go to a specific row
If the table is long, you can go to a specific row in a table, including a header, body, or footer row.
1)
Select part of the table and select Table > Go to Row.
2)
Select Header Row, Body Row, or Footer Row.
You can also go to a specific header or footer row within sections.
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Using tables
3)
Type the row number to go to and click OK.
4.12. Inserting and deleting
4.12.1. To insert a row, column, or section
1)
Select part of the table.
2)
Select Table > Insert and select an option.
NOTE:
When you insert a section, Designer adds a header row for the section by default.
4.12.2. To delete a table, row, column, or section
To delete a table
1)
Select the table. See Toselect a table, row, column, cell, or section.
2)
Select Table > Delete and click Table.
TIP:
If the table is not a nested table, you can select Table > Delete to delete the table.
To delete a row, column, or section
1)
Select the rows, columns, or sections. See Toselect a table, row, column, cell, or section.
2)
Select Table > Delete and click Row, Column, or Section.
4.13. Formatting a table
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4
4.13.1. To add a table title
1)
In the Object Library palette, click the Standard category and drag the Text object
table.
2)
Double-click the default text and type the title.
3)
Set the font properties.
TIP:
above the
You can also merge the cells in the first row of the table and type the title in the combined cell.
4.13.2. Adding space
To add space around a table
You can add blank space around the edges of a table by using margins.
1)
Select the table. See Toselect a table, row, column, cell, or section.
2)
In the Layout palette, set the margins for Left, Right, Top, and Bottom.
To add space around cells
You can add space around cells by using margins.
1)
Select the cell. See Toselect a table, row, column, cell, or section.
2)
In the Layout palette, set the margins for Left, Right, Top, and Bottom.
To add space around rows
You can add space around rows by using margins. For example, in the following table, margins are
set to 0.25 inch around the row.
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Using tables
1)
Select the row. See Toselect a table, row, column, cell, or section.
2)
In the Layout palette, set the margins for Left, Right, Top, and Bottom.
4.13.3. Applying borders and shading to a table
Borders and shading can add interest and emphasis to a table. You can add borders to a table or an
individual row, column, or cell. You can use shading to fill in the background of a table.
You can add a striped or alternating shading pattern to the rows. You can select the number of rows
or columns to include in a stripe pattern and apply your color choices to the pattern.
To apply and remove borders and shading
1)
Select the table. See Toselect a table, row, column, cell, or section.
2)
To apply a border and shading, do one of the following actions:
•
To place borders only on particular sides, in the Border palette, select Edit Individually
from the Edges list. Now you can set the border for each side.
•
To place the same border on all sides, select Edit Together from the Edges list.
3)
Select an option from the list of line types and select a color from the color picker.
4)
To apply shading, select a style from the Style list and select a color from the color picker.
5)
To remove a border or shading do the following action:
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Using tables
6)
4
•
In the Border palette, select Edit Together from the Edges list.
•
Select None from the list of line types.
To apply a striped or alternating shading to rows
•
In the Object palette, click the Row Shading tab and select Apply Alternating Row
Shading.
•
Select the shading color for the first row or first set of rows.
•
Select the shading color for the next row or next set of rows.
If you use the Border palette to set shading for a cell, it overrides the row shading set for
the table.
NOTE:
7)
To remove the striped or alternating shading from rows
•
In the Object palette, click the Row Shading tab and deselect Apply Alternating Row
Shading.
To remove the border from around the entire table
1)
Select the table and, in the Border palette, select None from the list of line types.
4.13.4. To distribute rows and columns evenly
You can make multiple rows or columns the same size. All rows adjust to the height of the tallest
selected row. All columns adjust to equal distances based on the width of the table. The table does
not grow.
1)
Select the rows or columns you want to make the same size. See Toselect a table, row, column,
cell, or section.
2)
Select Table > Distribute Rows Evenly or Distribute Columns Evenly.
NOTE: If you used the Merge Cells command, the original columns still exist but are hidden (so
that you can split the cells again if you want). To make the columns the same size after you have
merged cells, delete the hidden columns first by using the Table > Delete > Column command.
4.13.5. To format the corners of a table or cells
You can format a table or specific cells in a table to have rounded or notched corners.
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154
4
Using tables
1)
Select the table or the cells. See Toselect a table, row, column, cell, or section.
2)
In the Border palette, select one of the options for Corners.
3)
In the Radius box, type a number. For example, the previous example uses .1 inch.
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4
4.13.6. To show captions in rows
By default, captions for fields are not shown when a field is in a cell. For example, the following
objects have captions, but they are hidden when the field is in a cell.
•
Check Box
•
Date/Time Field
•
Decimal Field
•
Signature Field
•
Drop-down List
•
Image Field
•
List Box
•
Numeric Field
•
Password Field
•
Text Field
You may want to show the caption in some tables. For example, in the following form, a table is used
to present the information. Each row below the header row is one cell.
156
1)
Select the cell. See Toselect a table, row, column, cell, or section.
2)
In the Layout palette, select a position for the caption from the Position list.
Using tables
4.14. To create a table style for the custom library
You can create your own table style to provide a consistent look to borders, shading, alignment, and
fonts in tables. For example, you can format a table that looks like this one and save it in the custom
library so that you can reuse it in another form.
1)
Create a table.
2)
Set the borders, shading, cell types, cell alignments, and fonts.
3)
Ensure that the Custom category of the Object Library palette is open.
4)
Select the table and drag it into the Custom category of the Object Library palette.
5)
In the Add Library Object dialog box, type the name of the table style and click OK.
You can type a description and select which tab group in the library that you want the object
to appear in.
4.15. To create a calendar using a table
You can create a calendar by using a table.
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Using tables
1)
Select View > Master Pages.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Master Page tab and select Landscape.
3)
Click the Design View tab.
4)
In the Object Library palette, select Table > Insert Table.
5)
In the Insert Table dialog box, type 7 for columns and 6 for rows.
6)
Select Include Header Row In Table and click OK.
7)
Move the table to the top of the page.
8)
Resize the columns so that the table fits the width of the page.
9)
Select Table > Distribute Columns Evenly.
4
10) Select the last row of the table. See Toselect a table, row, column, cell, or section.
11) In the Layout palette, type 1.1in in the Height box.
12) Select the table. See Toselect a table, row, column, cell, or section.
13) Select Table > Distribute Rows Evenly.
14) Select the first row of the table. See Toselect a table, row, column, cell, or section.
15) Select Table > Merge Cells.
16) Type the month and set the font properties.
17) In the second row, type the days of the week and set the font properties.
18) In the remaining cells, type the numbers for the days of the week and set the font properties.
4.16. Aligning, resizing, and arranging tables
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Using tables
4.16.1. To align a table with other objects
1)
Select the table. See Toselect a table, row, column, cell, or section.
2)
Ctrl+click to select the other object that you want to align.
3)
Select one of the following options.
•
To align the left edges of the objects, select Layout > Align > Left.
•
To align the right edges of the objects, select Layout > Align > Right.
•
To align the top edges of the objects, select Layout > Align > Top.
•
To align the bottom edges of the objects, select Layout > Align > Bottom.
•
To align the vertical centers of the objects, select Layout > Align > Vertical Center.
•
To align the horizontal centers of the objects, select Layout > Align > Horizontal Center.
4.16.2. To align the contents of a cell
You can change the horizontal and vertical alignment of the contents of a cell.
1)
Select the cell. See Toselect a table, row, column, cell, or section.
2)
In the Paragraph palette, select one of the following alignment options.
•
To left-align the contents of the cell, select Align Left.
•
To center-align the contents of the cell, select Align Center.
•
To right-align the contents of the cell, select Align Right.
•
To justify the contents of the cell, select Justify.
Full justification is applied to all of the lines except the last line in a multiple-line cell
(single line paragraphs cannot be justified).
NOTE:
•
To align to the top of the cell, select Align Top.
•
To align to the middle of the cell, select Align Middle.
•
To align to the bottom of the cell, select Align Bottom.
4.16.3. To make another object the same size as a table
You can make the size of an object the same size as a table in your form. For example, you can make
a rectangle the same width as a table so that you can insert a dividing element or a border around a
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4
section of the form. Other objects can become the same size as the table, but a table cannot become
the same size as other objects.
1)
Select the object you want to make the same size as the table.
2)
Ctrl+click or Shift+click to select the table. You must select the table last.
3)
Select Layout > Make Same Size and select Width, Height, or Both.
The object that you selected last is used to set the size of both objects.
4.16.4. To resize an entire table
You can resize an entire table. You can only resize on the bottom or right edge of the table. To resize
the table outside of the content area, select the last column or last row and change its width or height
in the Layout palette.
1)
Select the table. See Toselect a table, row, column, cell, or section.
2)
Place the pointer on the edge of the table until a double-headed arrow appears.
3)
Drag the table boundary until the table is the size you want.
4.16.5. To resize rows and columns
You can resize rows and columns. You can only resize on the bottom, left, or right edge of the rows
and columns. To resize the last column outside of content area, change the width in the Layout
palette.
1)
Place the pointer on the row or column borders until a double-headed arrow appears.
2)
Drag the boundary until the row or column is the size you want.
4.16.6. To center a table
1)
Select the table. See Toselect a table, row, column, cell, or section.
2)
Select Layout > Center in Page and select either Horizontally or Vertically.
4.16.7. To arrange a table with other objects
You can control how objects overlap by putting them in front of or in back of other objects. For
example, you can put a watermark image behind a table.
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1)
Select the table. See Toselect a table, row, column, cell, or section.
2)
Choose one of these options:
•
To bring the table forward, select Layout > Bring Forward.
•
To bring the table to the front, select Layout > Bring To Front.
•
To send the table backward, select Layout > Send Backward.
•
To send the table to the back, select Layout > Send To Back.
4.17. Working with data in tables
4.17.1. To create a table from a data source
Some data from a data source could be shown in a table. When you connect to a data source, the Data
View palette identifies any items that could be tables. Designer also shows which items will become
rows in the table if it finds a repeating data group.
After you connect to a data source, you can drag items from the Data View palette onto the form
design to quickly create fields that are bound to the data source. If you drag a table item from the
Data View palette onto the form design, Designer creates a table and, when you select a data file, you
see a table like this one at run time. The repeating data group in the data file has four records.
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1)
4
Ensure you are connected to a data source. See Connectingto a data source.
For example, if you or your administrator installed the samples that come with Designer, locate
and open the following schema: Purchase Order.xsd in the Data Connections dialog box.
2)
In the Data View palette, locate a node that could be a table. For example, locate the following
item node.
Item node represents the table
3)
162
Select the node and drag it onto your form design. For example, this is what you should see
after dragging the item node onto your form.
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The Data View palette shows that the node is bound to an object.
4)
To select a data file, select File > Form Properties and click the Preview tab.
For example, if you or your administrator installed the samples that come with , locate and
open the Purchase Order.xml data file.
5)
View the form in the Preview PDF tab.
Designer automatically creates a table that dynamically grows, depending on the amount of
data in the data source.
4.17.2. To set the rows in a table to adjust to accommodate data
If you have already created a table that has a fixed number of columns and rows, you can convert it
to one that dynamically grows based on the amount of data from a data source. Converting the table
involves setting the subform that contains the table to Flowed and setting the body row or rows to
repeat.
1)
Create a table. See Tocreate a simple table.
2)
Select the rows below the first row.
In a table whose number of columns are fixed, but its number of rows will change depending
on how much information is in the data source, only one row is needed. Therefore, you must
delete all the rows except the first row in the table. You can keep the footer row.
3)
Select Table > Delete > Row.
4)
Save the form as Adobe Dynamic XML Form (*.pdf).
5)
In the Hierarchy palette, select the subform that contains the table.
6)
In the Object palette, click the Subform tab and select Flowed from the Content list.
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7)
In the Hierarchy palette, select the body row (for example, Row1).
8)
In the Object palette, click the Binding tab and select the Repeat Row For Each Data Item
option.
9)
Connect to a data source. See Connectingto a data source.
You must connect to a data source, such as an XML schema, to show data in the table.
10) Select a data file. See Topreview a form using sample data.
You must select a data file to view and test the form with the data.
11) View the form in the Preview PDF tab.
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4
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4.18. To create a table that groups data
You can display data in a grouped fashion inside a table. Grouping organizes and arranges data into
relationships, such as Country or Region. You can nest groups to easily identify relationships and see
trends. It also helps present summaries, such as totals and counts.
For example, if you supply products, such as monitors, desk lamps, and telephones, you may want
to see which country and region is selling the most product. You can create this table, which contains
a nested table inside a nested table inside the main table:
•
Country is the table header for the main table.
•
Region is the table header for the first nested table.
•
Product and Profit makes up the table header for the nested table inside the first nested table.
For example, the sample XML file you connect to could have the following syntax:
<form1>
<Sales>
<SalesData>
<country>United States</country>
<CountryData>
<RegionRow>
<region>Western</region>
<RegionData>
<Item>
<product>Monitor</product>
<profit>10</profit>
</Item>
<Item>
<product>Desk Lamp</product>
<profit>20</profit>
</Item>
</RegionData>
</RegionRow>
<RegionRow>
<region>Central</region>
<RegionData>
<Item>
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4
<product>Monitor</product>
<profit>30</profit>
</Item>
<Item>
<product>Desk Lamp</product>
<profit>25</profit>
</Item>
<Item>
<product>Telephone</product>
<profit>28</profit>
</Item>
</RegionData>
</RegionRow>
<RegionRow>
<region>Atlantic</region>
<RegionData>
<Item>
<product>Monitor</product>
<profit>31</profit>
</Item>
<Item>
<product>Desk Lamp</product>
<profit>17</profit>
</Item>
<Item>
<product>Telephone</product>
<profit>22</profit>
</Item>
</RegionData>
</RegionRow>
</CountryData>
</SalesData>
</Sales>
</form1>
Before you perform this task, you must ensure that the following settings are in effect:
•
Ensure that you are connected to a data source. See Connectingto a data source.
•
To test the form with sample data, ensure that you are pointing to a data file. See Topreview a
form using sample data.
4.18.1. To create the main table
166
1)
Select File > Save As, type a name for the file, and select Adobe Dynamic XML Form (*.pdf).
Click OK.
2)
Select Table > Insert Table.
Using tables
3)
In the Insert Table dialog box, enter the number of columns and rows. For example, enter 2 for
the number of columns, 1 for the number of rows.
You can enter a maximum of 20 columns and 50 rows. You can add more columns and rows
after the table is created by using the Insert commands in the Table menu.
4)
(Optional) To include a header row, select Include Header Row In Table.
5)
(Optional) To include a footer row, select Include Footer Row In Table.
6)
Click OK.
7)
Rename the header row. For example, name the first header Country and delete the header
text for the second column.
8)
Resize the table.
4.18.2. To create the first nested table
1)
Drag the Table object from the Object Library palette to a cell in the table.
2)
Rename the header row text. For example, name the first header Region and delete the
header text for the second column.
4.18.3. To create the last nested table inside the first nested table
1)
Drag the Table object from the Object Library palette to a cell in the table to create another
nested table. For example, drag it to the second cell of the body row in the first nested table.
2)
In the Insert Table dialog box, enter the number of columns and rows.
3)
(Optional) To include a header row, select Include Header Row In Table.
4)
(Optional) To include a footer row, select Include Footer Row In Table.
5)
Click OK.
6)
Rename the header row. For example, change the first header to Product and the second
header to Profit.
The form should now look like one.
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4
4.18.4. To show data in the cells
1)
In the Data View palette, drag a node to the cell under the first heading. For example, drag the
country node to the cell under the Country heading.
2)
Repeat for the remaining cells.
For example, drag the region node to the cell under the Region heading. Drag the product node
to the cell under the Product heading. Drag the profit node to the cell under the Profit heading.
3)
In the Hierarchy palette, select each Row1 and, in the Binding tab of the Object palette, select
Repeat Row For Each Data Item.
4)
Match the table, row, and field names to those in the sample XML file.
For example, select Table1 in the Hierarchy palette. Then, in the Object palette, click the
Binding tab and type $record.Sales in the Data Binding (Open, Save, Submit) box.
For example, set the default binding as indicated in this table.
Select in the Hierarchy palette
168
Set Data Binding to the corresponding string
Row1
SalesData
country
country
Table2
CountryData
Row1
RegionRow[*]
region
region
Table3
RegionData
Row1
Item[*]
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Select in the Hierarchy palette
Set Data Binding to the corresponding string
product
product
profit
profit
5)
Select the subform that the main table is in and, in the Subform tab of the Object palette, select
Flowed from the Content list.
6)
Format the table. For example, add borders and shading.
7)
View the form in the Preview PDF tab.
4.19. To make a table optional
Making a table optional is useful when you do not want to display information contained in a table
or when no data is available to display in the table.
1)
Connect to a data source. See Connectingto a data source.
You must connect to a data source, such as an XML schema, to be able to show data in the table.
2)
Select a data file. See Topreview a form using sample data.
You must select a data file to view and test the form with the data.
3)
Ensure that the table is in a subform that is set to Flowed.
4)
Select the table in which the number of rows change depending on how much information is
in the data source. See Toselect a table, row, column, cell, or section.
If you select a table that has a fixed number of rows and columns and make it optional, the
header row is repeated for each data item. To change this table to one in which the number of
rows will change according to the data, deselect Repeat Row For Each Data Item for the header
row but select Repeat Row For Each Data Item for the body row.
5)
In the Object palette, click the Binding tab and select Repeat Table For Each Data Item.
6)
Deselect Min Count.
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7)
4
View the form in the Preview PDF tab.
If you have not connected to a data source, the table should not appear. If you have bound the
cells in a table to a data source and there is data for the bound cells, the table should appear.
4.20. To perform calculations in a table
You can use the sum function in FormCalc to total the values in a column. You must add the calculation to the footer row of the table.
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1)
Select the cell in the footer row where you want the calculation. For example, select the cell that
corresponds to the total for Q1.
2)
In the Script Editor, select Calculate from the Show list.
3)
In the Language list, select FormCalc.
4)
In the Run At list, select Client.
5)
In the Script Source field, insert your FormCalc calculation. For example, to calculate the total
for the Q1 data, type the following expression:
sum (Table.Row[*].Q1[*])
6)
Repeat for the totals for Q2 and Q3.
7)
To calculate the totals for the country, type the following expression:
sum(Q1 + Q2 + Q3)
8)
Repeat for the remaining row totals.
9)
For the grand total, type the following expression:
sum(TotalQ1 + TotalQ2 + TotalQ3)
To show the data as 10K, in the Object palette, click the Cell tab, click Patterns, and type
z9'K' in the Pattern box. In the Value tab, select Calculated - Read Only from the Type list.
TIP:
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4
4.21. To use the TableCalcs custom object
Use the TableCalcs custom object to include calculations in fields on one or more pages in a form.
Here are the calculations that you can set on a form:
Count
Calculates the number of non-null fields that match the specified field name.
Sum
Calculates the sum of non-null fields that match the specified field name.
Average
Calculates the average of non-null fields that match the specified field name.
Unless you provide a range of pages for the TableCalcs object, the calculation is applied across
the entire form.
Here is the list of function calls to set the calculations.
NUMBER
NUMBER
NUMBER
NUMBER
Count(STRING
Count(STRING
Count(STRING
Count(STRING
sFieldName,
sFieldName,
sFieldName,
sFieldName,
NUMBER
NUMBER
NUMBER
NUMBER
Sum(STRING
Sum(STRING
Sum(STRING
Sum(STRING
NUMBER
NUMBER
NUMBER
NUMBER
Average(STRING
Average(STRING
Average(STRING
Average(STRING
sFieldName,
sFieldName,
sFieldName,
sFieldName,
[NUMBER
[OBJECT
[NUMBER
[OBJECT
[NUMBER
[OBJECT
[NUMBER
[OBJECT
sFieldName,
sFieldName,
sFieldName,
sFieldName,
pageNum])
xfaObject])
startPage], [NUMBER endPage])
xfaObject], [OBJECT xfaObject])
pageNum])
xfaObject])
startPage], [NUMBER endPage])
xfaObject], [OBJECT xfaObject])
[NUMBER
[OBJECT
[NUMBER
[OBJECT
pageNum])
xfaObject])
startPage], [NUMBER endPage])
xfaObject], [OBJECT xfaObject])
The first argument, sFieldName, is the field name, which indicates which fields are calculated. The second and third object optional arguments (startPage, endPage) are page
numbers. The page numbers can be a number or a reference to another field object on the
form. When you provide a field object reference, the page number is the page where the object
reference is located.
a)
Add the TableCalcs object to your existing form design.
b)
In the Hierarchy view, move the TableCalcs object under the root subform.
c)
Write a script that will invoke the function of the script object.
This example returns the Sum of all fields called NumericField1 on the entire form.
this.rawValue = tableCalcs.Sum(“NumericField1”);
This example returns the number of non-null fields called NumericField1 on page 3 only.
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Using tables
this.rawValue = tableCalcs.Count(“NumericField1”, 2);
NOTE:
d)
Numeric page references are 0-based.
Save, preview, and test the form in the Preview PDF tab.
You may want to enable the JavaScript Debugger to catch any errors while testing the
form.
For more information about scripting, including the JavaScript Debugger in Acrobat Professional,
see Scripting Basics .
RELATED LINKS:
About subforms
To add objects to a form design
Objects that support scripting and calculations
4.22. Working with pagination in tables
4.22.1. To set up a table to span multiple pages
To enable tables to automatically flow to the next page, you must ensure the following conditions:
•
The table must be in a subform that is set to Flowed in the Subform tab of the Object palette.
•
The Allow Page Breaks Within Content option is selected in the Table tab.
•
The table is not in a group.
Now you can make adjustments to the table to ensure that the information is displayed the way you
want when the table spans multiple pages. You can include a Table continued tag at the top of the
next page if the table spans more than one page.
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4
If you want the header row to repeat on the next page, see Torepeat a header or footer row on subsequent pages.
To set up a master page that includes the Table continued tag
174
1)
Create a table that grows based on the amount of data from a data source. See Toset the rows
in a table to adjust to accommodate data.
2)
Select the header row.
3)
In the Object palette, click the Pagination tab and select Include Header Row In Subsequent
Pages.
4)
Select View > Master Pages to display the Master Pages tab if it is not already displayed.
5)
Click the Master Pages tab and select Insert > New Master Page.
6)
Resize the content area so that it is smaller on the new master page.
7)
In the Object Library palette, click the Standard category and drag the Text object
content area.
8)
Double-click the default text and type Table continued ...
9)
Select the text and, in the Font palette, set the text to Bold and Italic.
above the
Using tables
10) In the Hierarchy palette, rename the (untitled Content Area) on Page 2 to Page2ContentArea.
To set the pagination for the table
1)
In the Design View tab of the Layout Editor, select the table. See Toselect a table, row, column,
cell, or section.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Table tab, and ensure that Allow Page Breaks Within Content is
selected.
Although the Allow Page Breaks Within Content option is selected by default for tables, it
is deselected for table rows. You must select this option for the table rows to allow page breaks
within the table.
NOTE:
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Using tables
3)
4
In the Object palette, click the Pagination tab and, next to the Overflow list, click the arrow and
select Go To Content Area > Page2ContentArea.
To connect to a data source
1)
Ensure that you are connected to a data source. See Connectingto a data source.
For example, if you or your administrator installed the samples that come with Designer, locate
and open the following schema: Purchase Order.xsd in the Data Connections dialog box.
2)
In the Data View palette, locate the partNum node.
3)
Drag the node into the first cell under the Part No header.
4)
Repeat steps 2 and 3 for description, quantity, and unitPrice.
To select a data file
1)
Select File > Form Properties and click the Preview tab. Browse to the location of the data file
you want to use.
You will need to select a data file that contains enough data to fill a table that spans more
than one page.
NOTE:
2)
176
View the form in the Preview PDF tab.
Using tables
4.22.2. To repeat a header or footer row on subsequent pages
1)
Click and drag to select the table header or footer.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Pagination tab, and do one of the following actions:
•
Select Include Header Row In Subsequent Pages.
•
Select Include Footer Row In Subsequent Pages.
NOTE:
The table must be inserted into a subform that is already set to Flowed.
RELATED LINKS:
Edit Conditional Breaks dialog box
Table properties in the Pagination tab
Section properties in the Pagination tab
4.23. Working with header and footer rows in tables
4.23.1. To change a row to a header, body, or footer row
After you insert a table, you can change a row to another type. For example, you can change a body
row to a header row to set up a table inside a table. Also, you can change a body row to a footer row
to show summaries in the last row that you want to appear on each page in the form.
1)
Select a row. See Toselect a table, row, column, cell, or section.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Row tab and select an item from the Type list.
4.23.2. To control table, header row, body row, footer row, and section breaks
using conditional statements
Designer provides the capability to create customized conditional breaks for table objects as well as
for header rows, body rows, footer rows, and sections. Instead of paginating these objects in response
to data overflow, conditional breaks allow you to manually control how these objects break on a form
based on a series of checks called conditional statements.
Through conditional statements, you can verify data for a field within a table, header row, body row,
footer row, or section against previous instances of that field. The table, header row, body row, footer
row, or section can then be broken in response to a change in the data supplied to the field.
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4
For example, on a telephone bill, you could break a table object in response to changes in the field
that stores the date of each billing entry. The telephone bill could then be visually broken down by
date, making it easier for a user to read.
In addition to specifying a breaking condition, you can also specify leader and trailer subforms, and
indicate where to place the next instance of the repeating subform on the form.
Before you perform this task, you must ensure that the table is in a subform that is set to Flowed.
1)
Select a table, header row, body row, footer row, or section. See Toselect a table, row, column,
cell, or section.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Pagination tab.
3)
Click the Edit button and then click the Add button
item.
4)
Select a scripting language from the Language list. The conditional break condition statement
is created by using the scripting language you select.
5)
In the Run At list, select where you want the conditional break to execute.
6)
Click Insert Sample Expression and select the form design object within the table, header
row, body row, footer row, or section to use as the comparison field for the conditional break.
Alternatively, you can enter your own conditional statement in the field. To correctly evaluate
as a conditional break, however, any user-defined conditional statements must evaluate to
either true or false.
7)
Select when you would like the table, header row, body row, footer row, or section to break by
selecting either Before or After. Selecting Before inserts a break immediately before the current
instance of the table, header row, body row, footer row, or section is inserted into the form, and
selecting After inserts the break immediately after.
8)
In the To field, select where you want to place the remaining occurrences of the table, header
row, body row, footer row, or section.
9)
In the Trailer and Leader lists, select trailer and leader subforms to use for the current conditional break, if any.
to insert a new conditional break list
10) Repeat steps 2 to 9 for each conditional break you want to include for the selected object, and
click OK when you have finished adding entries to the list.
After you create all of your conditional break entries, you should review the order in which
they appear in the Edit Conditional Breaks dialog box. Designer processes the conditional
breaks specified in this dialog box in sequential order from top to bottom. Each conditional
break for which the conditional statement evaluates to true is executed.
Use the Up and Down
order you want.
buttons to move individual conditional break list entries into the
RELATED LINKS:
Header and footer row properties in the Pagination tab
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Using tables
Body row properties in the Binding tab
4.24. Working with cells and cell contents
4.24.1. To clear a cell
You cannot delete a cell. However, you can clear the contents of the cell. This action changes the cell
type to a Text object that is empty.
1)
Select the cell. See Toselect a table, row, column, cell, or section.
2)
Select Edit > Clear Contents.
4.24.2. To merge and split cells
You can combine two or more adjacent cells in the same row into a single cell. For example, you can
merge several cells horizontally to create a table heading that spans several columns. You can only
merge cells that are in the same row.
You cannot merge the data from two cells into one cell. You can only merge text. For example, if the
header row is merged, the text is merged because these two cells are Text objects. However, if the
body row is merged, and the cells are bound to items in the data source, only the left most cell is
retained.
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4
A.
Before merging cells
B.
After merging cells, the header row text is merged, but the data for the body row only retains
data from the left-most cell
It is a good idea to merge cells at the end of the process of designing a table because adding new
columns or removing columns does not work the same if there is a merged cell in the table.
TIP:
To merge cells into one cell
1)
Select the cells you want to merge. See Toselect a table, row, column, cell, or section.
2)
Select Table > Merge Cells.
If the cells contain Text objects, Designer combines the text. If the cells contain other objects,
the objects are deleted.
To make the columns the same size by using the Distribute Columns Evenly command after
you have merged cells, delete the hidden columns first by using the Table > Delete > Column
command.
TIP:
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Using tables
To split a merged cell
1)
Select a merged cell. See Toselect a table, row, column, cell, or section.
2)
Select Table > Split Cell Horizontally.
The split cells will be converted to an empty Text object or, if the original cells were subforms,
they will be converted to empty subforms. For example, if the merged cell was a numeric field,
all the split cells will be numeric fields.
You can use these two buttons in the Cell tab of the Object palette: Merge Cells
Cells Horizontally .
NOTE:
, Split
4.24.3. To orient text vertically in cells
You can change the orientation in table cells so that the information is displayed vertically instead
of horizontally.
Only cells can be rotated (not rows, columns, sections, or entire tables).
1)
Select the cell. See Toselect a table, row, column, cell, or section.
2)
In the Layout palette, select one of the rotation buttons.
3)
Click the orientation you want. For example, the vertical text in the previous example is rotated
90°.
4)
In the Paragraph palette, select the align option that works best for the cell. For example, the
vertical text in the previous example is aligned right and aligned to the top.
NOTE:
If you rotate a field that users fill in, users will have to enter their data at the angle of rota-
tion.
4.24.4. To change a cell to another object type
By default, all cells are set to text objects. Text objects present read-only text that users cannot edit.
You can use text objects to do these tasks:
•
Label an area in the form, such as headers in the table
•
Provide instructions for filling the form
•
Enhance the form
You can change the cell to any other type of object, such as a numeric field or text field. In this way,
you could use a table to lay out an entire form.
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4
A cell can also be a button that submits data, executes a web service operation or database query, or
emails data to someone.
A cell can even be a subform. A subform acts as a container for other objects, including fields, boilerplate objects, and other subforms. Subforms also help to position objects relative to each other and
provide structure. If a cell is a subform, the cell can hold more than one object. For example, it can
have two buttons.
When a cell becomes an object other than a Text object, it behaves differently in a cell than if it were
in the form design on its own. For example, a Text Field object in a cell has the caption set to None.
Here are ways to change a cell to another object type; however, the results are different, depending
on what is already in the cell and what you change it to:
•
Use the Type list in the Cell tab of the Object palette.
•
Drag an object from the Object Library palette into a cell.
Depending on what you select from the Type list or Object Library palette and what is in the cell, the
new object replaces the existing object. If you change a cell to a subform, objects that existed in the
cell already are wrapped in the subform. For example, if a text field already existed in the cell and you
choose Subform from the Type list, the Text Field is wrapped in the subform. If a text field already
existed in the cell and you choose Numeric Field from the Type list, the Numeric Field replaces the
Text Field.
•
Drag an existing object in the form design that is outside of the table into a cell. This method
preserves the look of the object. For example, if you drag a formatted phone number field into
a cell, the caption is retained along with the size of the field.
If you click and drag a Subform object that is outside of the table into a cell, it replaces the
contents of the cell.
If you change a cell to a text field, you can select the Allow Multiple Lines option in the
Cell tab of the Object palette to show more than one line of text.
NOTE:
To change a cell to another object type by using the Type list in the Cell tab of the Object palette
182
1)
Select the cell. See Toselect a table, row, column, cell, or section.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Cell tab and select another object type from the Type list.
Using tables
To change a cell to another object type by dragging an object from the Object Library palette
1)
Drag the object from the Object Library palette into the cell where you want it to appear.
To change a cell to another object type by dragging an object from the form design
1)
In the form design, drag the existing object that is outside of the table into the cell where you
want it to appear.
4.25. Working with table sections
A table section is a grouping of rows that remains a unit. Using sections lets you organize your table.
A section can have its own header and footer so that you can show detailed information grouped by
common values. Each section appears in a predictable order in the form. By default, Designer inserts
a header row for each section.
After you create a table, you can group the rows into sections. You can also apply row shading to
each section so that each section has different colors. For example, here is a table that is grouped into
four sections.
You can also make a table section optional when you do not want to display information contained
in a section. For example, here is a table where section 1 and 3 are hidden.
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Using tables
4.25.1. To insert a table section
1)
Select a cell or a row. See Toselect a table, row, column, cell, or section.
2)
Select Table > Insert and then select Section Above or Section Below.
Designer inserts one header row and one body row for the section.
4.25.2. To group rows into a section
1)
Select the rows that you want to group. See Toselect a table, row, column, cell, or section.
2)
Select Table > Group as Section.
Designer shows a bracket on the right side of the table to indicate a section.
4.25.3. To ungroup a section into rows
1)
Select the section and select Table > Ungroup Section.
4.25.4. To make a table section optional
184
1)
Select the section. See Toselect a table, row, column, cell, or section.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Binding tab and deselect Repeat Section For Each Data Item.
4
Using tables
To show a table section that has been hidden, select the section, select Repeat Section For
Each Data Item, select Min Count, and type 1in the box.
TIP:
4.26. Creating choice sections in tables
A choice section is a section within a table that can be configured to customize the display of specific
rows from within the section.
This customization is applied to individual rows within the section by using conditional statements.
For example, you can configure a choice section to display instances of a specific row using different
text colors, depending on the value of a specific field within that row.
You can also add header, body, and footer rows to a choice section, and remove header, body, and
footer rows from a choice subform set by choosing one of these options:
•
Using the Edit Data Nominated Subforms dialog box
•
Manually editing the contents by dragging subform objects into or out of the choice section by
using the Hierarchy palette
4.26.1. To create a choice section from an existing section
1)
Select a table section and in the Object palette.
2)
Click the Section tab and select One Subform from Alternatives from the Type list.
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4
4.26.2. To create a choice section from a row
1)
Select a row within the table and select Table > Group as Choice Section.
4.26.3. To add a header, body, or footer row to a choice section
1)
Select a choice section.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Section tab and ensure that Select One Subform from Alternatives is selected from the Type list.
3)
Click the Edit Alternatives button.
4)
Click the Add button to insert a new Alternative Subforms list item. You can also drag rows
into the choice subform set by using the Hierarchy palette.
Adding a new row adds a duplicate of the currently selected row. If no row is selected, a new
unnamed row is added to the choice section.
5)
Use the Up and Down buttons to move the new row entry to the location you want.
Ordering entries in the Alternative Subforms list is important because entries are processed
sequentially at run time, and the first entry with an expression that evaluates to true appears
on the form.
This procedure outlines the process for adding new rows to an existing choice
section. When you add rows in this way, Designer first creates a new row object and then adds
the row to the table and the choice section. If you want to add existing table rows to a choice
section, drag row objects into the choice section from the Hierarchy palette.
IMPORTANT:
4.26.4. To remove a header, body, or footer row from a choice section
1)
Select a choice section.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Section tab and click Edit Alternatives.
3)
Select an entry from the Alternative Subforms list and click Delete
.
Removing a row by using the Edit Data Nominated Subforms dialog box completely
removes the row object from your form design. If you want to preserve the row but remove it from
the choice section, you must manually drag the row out of the choice section by using the Hierarchy palette.
IMPORTANT:
RELATED LINKS:
Edit Data Nominated Subforms dialog box
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Using tables
4.27. Creating data bindings and conditional statements for
choice table sections
After you create a choice section, you can create data bindings with or without conditional statements for the various rows within the section. Using conditional statements provides greater control
over when rows within the choice section are displayed on your form than specifying only a data
binding.
For each row listed in the Alternative Subforms list in the Edit Data Nominate Subforms dialog box,
you can specify a data node from the data connection. If you specify a conditional statement, you can
enter an expression that will evaluate to either true or false at run time. Only the first entry in the
Alternative Subforms list with a conditional statement that evaluates to true will appear on your
form.
4.27.1. To create data bindings and conditional statements for choice table
sections
1)
Select a subform set object.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Section tab and ensure that Select One Subform from Alternatives is selected from the Type list.
3)
Click Edit Alternatives.
4)
Choose how you want to specify a row data binding from within the choice section by
performing one of the following actions:
•
Click Choose Subform Whose Name Matches Data Element or Attribute to bind data
nodes to rows by name. In this case, the names of the associated data nodes must match
the names of the rows on your form design.
•
Click Choose Subform Using Expression to bind rows from your form design to data
nodes from the data connection by manually specifying a binding.
5)
In the Data Connection list, select the data source you want to bind data from.
6)
Click Add to insert a new row into your table, or select an existing list item. Adding a new
row adds a duplicate of the currently selected row. If no row is selected, a new unnamed row is
added to the choice section.
7)
Insert a new subform into the choice subform set, or select an existing list item. Adding a new
subform adds a duplicate of the currently selected subform. If no subform is selected, a new
unnamed subform is added to the choice subform set.
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Using tables
8)
4
In the Name field, enter a name for a new row object, if necessary. If you are binding the row
by data element or attribute name, ensure that the name in the field matches exactly with the
name of the associated data node.
If you selected the Choose Subform Whose Name Matches Data Element or Attribute in step
4, you can go directly to step 12. Otherwise, continue with step 9.
9)
Click the arrow to the right of the Binding field and select a data node from the pop-up menu.
Designer automatically populates the Binding field with a scripting reference to the data node
you select. Alternatively, you can manually type a reference into the field.
10) Select a scripting language from the Language list.
11) In the Expression field, enter your scripting to perform the actions or processing you want for
the specified row and data node.
12) Repeat steps 6 to 10 for any additional rows within the choice section, and then click OK.
RELATED LINKS:
Edit Data Nominated Subforms dialog box
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Using subforms
5.
Using subforms
5.1.
About subforms
A subform is a section in the form design that provides anchoring, layout, and geometry management for objects. The objects in a subform can be arranged in rows, columns, or some other kind of
balanced arrangement.
More than one subform can be used in a form design. Subforms can be placed inside other subforms.
This relationship is displayed in the Hierarchy palette.
Subforms are used to organize a form into different sections. They can also be used to create a form
that contains sections that automatically expand and shrink to accommodate the data. If you set a
subform to grow, the layout of the form changes in response to the amount of data that is merged
when the form is rendered. When the data is merged, subforms ensure that objects and their data are
positioned consistently relative to each other. Subforms can be used to match the data hierarchy in
XML data.
If you are designing a form that has a fixed layout, it is unlikely that you will need to work with more
than one subform because the default subform positions the objects automatically.
You can manipulate the properties of a subform in the Subform and Binding tabs of the Object
palette. You can define these properties:
•
Give a meaningful name to the subform (recommended)
•
Enable the subform to span page breaks or force it to be rendered on the next page when the
data is merged
•
Specify whether to place the subform after the previous subform, in the specified content area,
or on a page that is formatted according to the specified master page
•
Specify whether to place the subform in the same content area as the previous or next subform
•
Specify the flow order of merged data after the subform is placed.
•
Define the subform as visible, invisible, or hidden
•
Specify a locale for the subform
•
Specify whether the subform will repeat its objects each time a unique data item is provided for
one of its objects
•
If required, create an overflow leader or trailer for a subform that is capable of repeating the
rendering of its objects
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Using subforms
•
5
Specify a binding method for controlling how the subform’s objects are mapped to data
All forms contain a root (parent) subform. In the Hierarchy palette, the root subform (form1) is
displayed as the top-level node with the default page subform (untitled Subform) appearing as a
child node below the root subform.
Designer automatically adds to every page a default subform that covers the whole page, and corresponds in size and position to the default content area on the master page. Any subforms that you
subsequently add to the pages are nested in and appear below the default page subform in the Hierarchy palette.
A.
Root (parent) subform
B.
Default subform
C.
New subform
In the Hierarchy palette, each subform is represented by a node, and the objects wrapped in a
subform are displayed under the subform node. The children of the subform do not inherit changes
made on the subform level; the properties of each object must be defined individually.
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Using subforms
A.
Renamed subform
B.
Objects in the subform
If you look at the Purchase Order sample, the root subform, form1, is shown as the top-level node
with the default page subform, purchaseOrder, appearing below as a child of the root subform. The
other subforms used to wrap objects on the page (header, detailHeader, detail, and total) are nested
under the page subform. In the Hierarchy palette, each subform is represented by a node, and the
objects wrapped in a subform are displayed under each node.
RELATED LINKS:
Using subforms
To add a subform
To wrap and unwrap objects in a subform
Subform properties in the Subform tab
Subform properties in the Pagination tab
Subform properties in the Binding tab
5.2.
Subforms that position content
Objects in the subform are positioned according to their individual X and Y coordinates. When the
form is rendered, the subforms are placed in an order determined by their positions in the Hierarchy
palette.
All subforms except the root subform (form1) are set to position content by default. When a subform
is set to position content, the subform can still expand to fit any amount of merged data, but none
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Using subforms
5
of the objects within the subform can move from their anchor points. As a result, if a subform is
configured to position content, you must frequently test your form design to make sure that any
objects within the subform that you expect to expand in response to data merging do not interfere
with other objects in the form design. Remember that any objects you configure to expand, such as
text field objects, can possibly overlap other objects when the form is rendered. To avoid this design
concern, you can set the subform to flow and expand to fit the content. (See Subformsthat flow
content.)
Designer automatically sets the default page subform to position content to make it easier to create
forms that have a fixed layout and are interactive forms. For more information, see Aboutsubforms.
However, when designing a form whose layout will adjust to accommodate data, you will need to
reset the default page subform to flow content after you complete the form design. It is a good idea
to do this last so that the subform remains visible and the objects you place within the subform
remain in the intended position on the page.
You use the Position Content option in the Type list in the Subform tab to position content in a
subform. When you select the Position Content option, the X and Y coordinates of each object
within the subform are maintained. The objects are placed at their X and Y coordinates relative to
the position of the subform.
When designing nested subforms to emulate tables, the header subform has to be "positioned"
content. Otherwise, the field elements are not positioned properly on subsequent pages.
5.3.
Subforms that flow content
Objects in the subform are positioned during the data-merging process so that no objects are
rendered on top of each other. Subforms that flow content are placed in ascending order. You can
use subforms that flow content when you need the form to automatically expand to fit the contents.
The root subform (form1) is set to flow content by default. The root subform always flows content
according to the flow direction option that you apply to the associated default content area. Because
the root subform is set to flow content, all subforms nested under the root subform automatically
flow, as needed, from one form page (content area) to the next when data is merged. When the form
is rendered, the subforms under the root subform are placed in descending order according to their
position in the object hierarchy.
You can set any other subform to flow content as well. Each subform that is set to flow content can
hold varying amounts of data, whereas the objects within the subform move together during the
data-merging process so that none of the objects interfere with each other.
You use the Flow Content option in the Type list in the Subform tab to flow content in a subform.
When you select the Flow Content option, the objects are positioned based on the Flow Direction
option you select. Notice that the Flow Direction list and the Allow Page Break option are enabled
after you select Flow Content in the Type list.
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Using subforms
NOTE: When you resize a subform that flows content, the subform is automatically converted to a
subform that has a fixed layout, which prevents page breaks.
RELATED LINKS:
Using subforms
5.4.
Creating and configuring subforms
RELATED LINKS:
To specify a subform to span multiple pages
Subform properties in the Binding tab
To define custom data-binding properties for a subform
Making objects visible, invisible, or hidden
Subform properties in the Subform tab
Layout properties in the Layout palette
Border properties in the Border palette
5.4.1.
To add a subform
You can add a subform from the menu or the Library palette.
To add a subform from the menu
1)
With the page of the form displayed, select Insert > Standard > Subform.
To add a subform from the Library palette
1)
Do one of the following actions:
•
In the Library palette, click the Standard tab, and then select the Subform object and draw
the object on the page of the form.
•
In the Standard tab of the Library palette, drag a Subform object onto the page of the
form.
•
In the Library palette, click the Standard tab, and then double-click the Subform object.
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Using subforms
5.4.2.
5
To name a subform
To name or rename a subform, you must first select the subform.
To name or rename a subform using the Hierarchy palette
1)
In the Hierarchy palette, right-click the subform and select Rename Object.
2)
Type the new name and press Enter.
To name or rename a subform using the Binding tab of the Object palette
1)
Select the subform.
2)
In the Binding tab, type a new name for the subform in the Name box and press Enter.
Designer maintains the occurrence number automatically.
5.4.3.
1)
Select the subform.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Subform tab.
3)
In the Presence list, select the option that suits your needs:
5.4.4.
194
To make a subform visible, invisible, or hidden
•
To make the object visible on-screen, visible in the printed form, and occupy space in the
form layout, select Visible.
•
To make the object visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and occupy space
in the form layout, select Visible (Screen Only).
•
To make the object not visible on-screen, visible in the printed form, and occupy space
in the form layout, select Visible (Print Only).
•
To make the object not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and occupy
space in the form layout, select Invisible.
•
To make the object not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and not occupy
any space in the form layout, select Hidden (Exclude From Layout). The Hidden
(Exclude from Layout) option works as described only when you apply this option to a
subform that is placed within a parent subform that is set to Flowed.
To specify a locale (language and country or region) for a subform
1)
Select the subform.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab.
Using subforms
3)
In the Locale list, select one of these options or one of the provided alternatives for the
subform’s localization setting:
•
To use the default locale specified in the Defaults tab of the Form Properties dialog box,
select Default Locale.
•
To use the system locale of the user’s computer, select Viewer’s System Locale.
At design time and run time, formatted values in the field are displayed in the locale-sensitive format.
NOTE:
5.4.5.
To wrap and unwrap objects in a subform
Objects are wrapped in a subform when they are contained by the subform.
To add objects to an existing subform
1)
Select the objects to include in the subform, and then select Insert > Wrap in Subform.
To unwrap the objects in a subform
1)
5.5.
Select the subform that contains the objects to unwrap, and then select Insert > Unwrap
Subform.
To specify how a subform manages content
By default, all subforms except the root subform are defined to position content. The root subform
always flows content according to the Flow Direction setting of its associated content area. Because
the root subform flows content, all subforms nested under the root subform can flow from one form
page or content area into the next automatically if required when data is merged.
In contrast, when a subform positions content, the area bounded by the subform may expand to
accommodate any amount of merged data, but none of the objects in the subform can move from
their anchor points. Therefore, if a subform contains objects that merge with variable sizes of data,
you must verify that those objects do not expand to the extent that they overrun the area occupied
by another object. Any objects that expand in response to data merging, such as a text field, have the
potential to be rendered on top of other objects.
To avoid this design problem, you can make the subform flow content. A subform that flows content
places objects correctly during the data-merging process so that none of its objects are rendered on
top of each other.
The default subform for the page positions content to support the creation of interactive forms and
forms that have a fixed layout. If you are authoring a form that contains subforms that adjust to
195
Using subforms
5
accommodate data, you need to work with subforms that position content as well as those that flow
content. Different techniques are available for working with subforms in this type of form design.
The approach you take depends on your experience with creating form designs whose layout adjusts
to accommodate data. For more information, see Creating interactiveforms that have a flowable
layout.
5.5.1.
1)
5.5.2.
1)
To specify how a subform positions content
In the Object palette, click the Subform tab and, in the Content list, select one of these options:
•
Positioned
•
Flowed
To specify a flow direction for the objects in a subform that flows content
In the Object palette, click the Subform tab and, in the Flow Direction list, select one of these
options (objects are always placed starting at the top of the subform):
•
Top to Bottom
•
Western Text
•
Right to Left
NOTE:
The Flow Direction option is only available when Flowed is selected in the Content list.
5.5.3. To change a subform that positions content into a subform that flows
content
1)
Select the subform in which you want content to flow.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Subform tab and, in the Content list, select Flowed.
3)
In the Flow Direction list, select one of these options (objects are always placed starting at the
top of the subform):
•
Top to Bottom
•
Western Text
•
Right to Left
RELATED LINKS:
Subform properties in the Subform tab
To position subforms
To specify how to merge data between subforms
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Using subforms
5.6.
To position subforms
5.6.1.
To specify where to position a subform
1)
In the Object palette, click the Pagination tab, and then click the arrow to the right of the Place
box and select one of these presentation options:
•
Following Previous
•
In Content Area > [name_of _content_area]
•
Top of Next Content Area
•
Top of Content Area > [name_of _content_area]
•
On Page > [name_of _page]
•
Top of Next Page
•
Top of Page > [name_of _page]
•
On Odd Page
•
Top of Next Odd Page
•
On Even Page
•
Top of Next Even Page
5.6.2. To keep the subform within the same content area or page as the
previous or next subform
1)
In the Object palette, click the Pagination tab, and then select Keep W/ Previous or Keep W/
Next.
RELATED LINKS:
Subform properties in the Subform tab
To specify how a subform manages content
To specify how to merge data between subforms
5.7.
1)
To specify how to merge data between subforms
In the Object palette, click the Pagination tab, and then click the arrow to the right of the After
box and select one of these options:
•
Continue Filling Parent
197
Using subforms
•
Go to Next Content Area
•
Go To Content Area > [name _of_content_area]
•
Go To Next Page
•
Go To Page > [name_of_page]
•
Go to Next Odd Page
•
Go to Next Even Page
5
RELATED LINKS:
Subform properties in the Subform tab
To specify how a subform manages content
To position subforms
5.8.
To define custom data-binding properties for a subform
Using the Binding options, you can build a form that captures data for enterprise infrastructures or
use an external data source to populate a form at run time. Set data-binding properties in the Binding
tab of the Object palette.
Subforms themselves do not capture or display data, but the objects in a subform can. The binding
settings of a subform have a direct influence on how nested objects are mapped to data.
A subform can be bound to a data group, and the subform’s objects can be bound to data values
within that data group. By default, the bindings of the objects in a subform are relative to the
subform’s binding.
1)
Select the subform.
2)
Enable the form to connect to the data source when the form is opened.
3)
Bind the subform and its objects to their corresponding data nodes. For information about
how to bind objects to a data source, see Bindingfields to a data source.
RELATED LINKS:
Using subforms
Subform properties in the Binding tab
To name a subform
To create a repeating subform
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Using subforms
5.9.
Using subform sets
A subform set is a grouping of two or more repeating or multipage subforms.
Use a subform set to control the order in which the subforms are rendered within the set, based on
the order that the subforms appear within the set.
For example, in the sample Purchase Order form, you can see how the detailHeader and detail
subforms are grouped into a subform set. The subform set keeps the two subforms together so that
both subforms for each data item are rendered, or neither subform is rendered if no data exists for
the detail subform.
By grouping subforms into a subform set, you ensure that subforms will not rendered within the set
unless data exists to render the subform.
You can control the order in which subforms are rendered within a set by selecting one of these
options from the Type list of the Subform Set tab in the Object palette:
•
Use All Subforms in Order
All of the subforms in the subform set will appear in the final document and in the order they
appear in the Hierarchy palette.
•
Select One Subform From Alternatives
One subform from the set appears in the final document. For more information, see Usingchoice subform sets.
When choosing how to render subforms, consider the following facts:
•
If you set a subform to a minimum count of zero, the subform is not rendered if no data exists
for that subform.
•
If you set a subform to a minimum count value less than the number of actual occurrences in
the data, the remaining data values will not be displayed. Conversely, if you set a subform to a
maximum count value greater than the number of actual occurrences in the data, the specified
number of subforms are rendered, which means that some objects in the subform will render
without data and appear blank.
•
You can, if you want, nest subform sets within other subform sets to any number of levels.
However, you cannot place individual objects such as lines, circles, or text field objects inside
a subform set.
5.9.1.
To insert a subform set
A subform set is a grouping of two or more subforms that you want to keep together. You can use
subform sets to combine subforms and control the order in which they are rendered.
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5
Before you create a subform set, it is a good practice to consider the order in which you want the
form to be rendered so that you can select the correct option from the Type list in the Subform tab.
1)
Right-click in the Hierarchy palette and select Insert Subform Set. An untitled subform set is
added to the Hierarchy palette.
2)
In the Hierarchy palette, drag the subforms you want into the subform set.
3)
With the subform set selected in the Hierarchy palette, in the Object palette, click the Subform
Set tab and, in the Type list select the option you want.
4)
Click the Binding tab. Optionally, you can type a name for the subform set in the Name box.
5)
If you want the subform set to repeat according to the data provided, select Repeat Subform
For Each Data Item, and then specify a minimum and maximum count, if necessary.
6)
Preview the form design to test the subform set.
RELATED LINKS:
Subform set properties in the Subform Set tab
Subform set properties in the Pagination tab
Subform set properties in the Binding tab
5.10. Creating repeating and multipage subforms
You can place a subform anywhere on a page; however, when a large amount of data is merged with
the form, the subform may expand beyond the bottom edge of the rendered page. To deal with this
issue, you can either select the Allow Page Breaks Within Content option to cause the server to break
the subform in the middle or deselect this option to force the entire subform to the top of the next
rendered page. Forcing a subform to the next page ensures that any nested subforms are displayed
together on the same page. If you do not select the Allow Page Breaks Within Content option, you
will probably want to create an overflow leader and overflow trailer subform. (See Aboutoverflow
leaders and trailers.)
When data is merged, the server positions the content of a subform within the confines of content
areas only. In cases where a large amount of data needs to be merged with any of the objects in a
subform, a subform may span multiple form pages. When a form page is filled, the server automatically renders another identical page and continues to place the subform on the new page unless you
explicitly direct the flow to a different content area or master page. When more than one content
area or master page exists in the same form, you can specify whether a subform will be placed in a
particular content area or positioned according to the specified master page.
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5.10.1. To create a repeating subform
1)
In the Hierarchy palette, select the parent subform of the subform you want to repeat. (See
Aboutsubforms.)
2)
In the Object palette, click the Subform tab, and in the Content list, select Flowed.
3)
Select the subform to repeat.
4)
In the Object palette, click the Subform tab and, in the Content list, select either Positioned or
Flowed.
5)
Click the Binding tab and select Repeat Subform For Each Data Item.
6)
To specify the minimum number of repetitions, select Min Count and type a number in the
associated box. If this option is set to 0 and no data is provided for the objects in the subform
at data-merge time, the subform is not placed when the form is rendered.
7)
To specify the maximum number of subform repetitions, select Max and type a number in the
associated box. If you do not specify a value in the Max box, the number of subform repetitions
will be unlimited.
8)
To specify a set number of subform repetitions, regardless of the quantity of data, select Initial
Count and type a number in the associated box. If you select this option and either no data is
available or fewer data entries exist than the specified Initial Count value, empty instances of
the subform are still placed on the form.
The value in the Initial Count box must be between the Min Count and Max values. If the
Min Count value is not specified or is 0, the Initial Count value defaults to 0.
NOTE:
5.10.2. To specify a subform to span multiple pages
Subforms can be placed anywhere in a form design. However, when a large amount of data is
merged, the subform may expand beyond the bottom edge of the rendered page.
To deal with this issue, you can either enable a page break in the middle of the subform or force the
entire subform to be rendered starting at the top of the next rendered page. Forcing a subform to the
next page ensures that any nested subforms are displayed together on the same page.
When data is merged, the content of a subform is placed within the confines of content areas only.
In cases where a relatively large amount of data needs to be merged with any of the objects in a
subform, a subform may span multiple form pages.
When a form page is filled, an additional identical page is rendered automatically. The subform
continues to be placed on the new page unless you explicitly direct the flow to a different content
area or master page. When more than one content area or master page exists in the same form, you
can specify whether a subform will be placed in a particular content area or positioned according to
the specified master page.
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5
To enable a subform to span multiple pages
1)
In the Object palette, click the Subform tab and select Allow Page Breaks Within Content.
When this option is deselected, the objects in the subform are kept together on the same page.
5.10.3. About overflow leaders and trailers
Because the length of a form that has a flexible layout varies depending on the amount of data
merged with the form, forms that have a flexible layout are often longer than one page. Using overflow leader and overflow trailer subforms is an effective way to start and finish subforms that repeat
over multiple pages. You can use any subform that is configured to position content as an overflow
leader or trailer. For example, in the Purchase Order sample form, the detail subform is configured
to position content and repeat for every data item. When the form is merged with data, if the first
page has insufficient space to display all occurrences of the detail subform, a new page is added and
the data continues to flow into the next content area.
When data flows this way across multiple pages, you may want to carry forward onto each new page
certain text such as “Continued from previous page” or specific formatting elements such as a
column header row that includes the descriptive labels for each column of data. Using column
header rows on each subsequent page makes the resulting form much easier for users to follow. To
do this, you can create an overflow leader subform that will act as the column header row for each
additional page. In the Purchase Order sample form, for example, the detailHeader subform is
selected as the overflow leader. As a result, a copy of the detailHeader subform is rendered at the top
of every new page before the first occurrence of the detail subform.
Similarly, you may want to include information following the last occurrence of the repeating
subform, at the bottom of all pages except the last page. For example, you may want to include text
such as “Continued on next page” at the bottom of these intervening pages. To do this, you can create
an overflow trailer subform for the repeating subform in the same way that you created an overflow
leader subform.
When a subform overflows to the new page, the server performs these operations:
•
Places the overflow trailer on the current page
•
Places the overflow leader on the next page
•
Flows the expanding subform and the remainder of its repeating objects onto the new page
An overflow leader is a special type of positioned subform that appears at the top of the next page
whenever a page overflow occurs.
Overflow leaders are similar to the heading row in a standard table. The heading row appears at the
top of the table and contains a descriptive label for each of the columns in the table. You can format
the table so that when it expands beyond one page, the heading row is repeated at the top of the new
page. This makes the information in the table easier to understand as the reader moves from page to
page.
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An overflow leader subform behaves in a similar way. When you specify that a specific subform will
be the overflow leader for a subform that repeats, the overflow leader subform will appear once
before the repeating subform at the top of the current page and each subsequent page thereafter.
The repeating subform is added as many times as necessary when merged with data. When there is
no more room on the first page, a new page is added and the data continues to flow into the next
page until all the data is consumed. The overflow leader subform will appear once at the top of each
page.
You can see an example of how an overflow leader subform is used in the sample form design whose
layout adjusts to accommodate data that is included with Designer. The sample, Purchase
Order.xdp, is in the Samples folder where Designer is installed on your system. In that example, the
subform named detailHeader acts as the overflow leader for the repeating subform named detail.
Bookend leaders are subforms that appear before a repeating subform. If you define a subform
sibling just above a repeating subform and then specify it as an overflow leader, you have defined it
as a bookend leader and as an overflow leader.
An overflow trailer appears at the bottom of the next page whenever a page overflow occurs. Use an
overflow trailer to include information that appears only once, after all the data is positioned.
Bookend trailers are subforms that appear just below a repeating subform. If you define a subform
just below a repeating subform and then specify it as an overflow trailer, you have defined it as a
bookend trailer and as an overflow trailer.
5.10.4. To create and assign overflow leaders and trailers
An overflow leader or overflow trailer is a positioned subform that can be assigned to any repeating
subform. Typically, you create the subform that will become overflow leader or trailer first. Then you
assign them to a repeating subform and give them overflow properties.
If the overflow leader is also treated as a bookend leader, it is placed in the Hierarchy palette just
above the subform. Also, if the overflow trailer is also treated as a bookend trailer, it is placed in the
Hierarchy palette just below the subform.
To create an overflow leader or overflow trailer subform
1)
Create a form design with all the necessary subforms.
2)
On your form design, locate the subform that you want to use as an overflow leader or an overflow trailer, select the subform, and do these tasks:
•
Look at the Subform tab in the Object palette. Ensure that the Content list displays Positioned. In the Object palette, click the Subform tab and make sure that Positioned is
selected in the Content list.
•
Look at the Binding Tab in the Object palette. In the Object palette, click Binding tab and
select Repeat Subform For Each Data Item to have the leaders and trailers appear for
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5
more than one overflow. Bookend leader and trailers are not counted against this
number.
To apply an overflow leader or overflow trailer to a subform
1)
Select the subform or subforms that you want to repeat.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Binding tab and select Repeat Subform For Each Data Item to
set the subform to repeat.
3)
In the Object palette, click the Pagination tab and, in the Overflow box, specify either a content
area or page where the form should place the overflow subforms.”]
4)
If you want to specify an overflow leader, in the Overflow Leader list, select the subform that
you want to use as the overflow leader subform for the current repeating subform. Alternatively, select New from the Overflow Leader list to create and assign a new overflow leader
subform.
5)
If you want to specify an overflow trailer, in the Overflow Trailer list, select the subform that
you want to use as the overflow trailer subform for the current repeating subform. Alternatively, select New from the Overflow Trailer list to create and assign a new overflow trailer
subform.
NOTE: You do not need to have both an overflow leader and an overflow trailer. Whether you
have one, both, or none is determined entirely by the requirements of your form.
RELATED LINKS:
Working with forms that have a flowable layout
Use overflow leader and overflow trailer subforms
Using subforms
Subform properties in the Subform tab
Subform properties in the Pagination tab
Subform properties in the Binding tab
5.11. To control subform and subform set breaks by using
conditional statements
Designer provides the capability to create customized conditional breaks for repeating subform
objects. As opposed to paginating in response to data overflow, conditional breaks allow you to
manually control how a subform breaks in a form based on a series of checks called conditional statements.
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Through the conditional statements, you can verify data for a field within a repeating subform
against previous instances of that field. The repeating subform can then be broken in response to a
change in the data supplied to the field.
For example, on a telephone bill, you could break a repeating subform in response to changes in the
field that stores the date of each billing entry. The telephone bill could then be visually broken down
by date, making it easier for a user to read.
In addition to specifying a breaking condition, you can also specify a leading or trailing subform and
indicate where to place the next instance of the repeating subform in the form.
1)
Select a subform or subform set.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Pagination tab.
3)
Click Edit and then click Add
4)
Select a scripting language from the Language list. The conditional break condition statement
is created using the scripting language you select.
5)
In the Run At list, select where you want the conditional break to execute.
6)
Click Insert Sample Expression and select the form design object within the subform to use
as the comparison field for the conditional break. Alternatively, you can enter your own conditional statement in the field. To correctly evaluate as a conditional break, however, any
user-defined conditional statements must evaluate to either true or false. Conditional
statements that evaluate to true are executed.
7)
Use one of these options to specify when you want the subform object to break:
to insert a new conditional break list item.
•
Select Before to insert a break immediately before the current instance of the subform is
inserted into the form.
•
Select After to insert a break immediately after the current instance of the subform is
inserted into the form.
8)
In the To field, select where you want to place the remaining occurrences of the broken
subform.
9)
In the Trailer and Leader lists, select trailer and leader subforms to use for the current conditional break, if any.
10) Repeat steps 2 to 8 for each conditional break that you want to include for the selected subform.
11) Click OK when you have finished adding entries to the list.
After you create all of your conditional break entries, you should review the order in which
they appear in the Edit Conditional Breaks dialog box. Designer processes the conditional
breaks specified in the Edit Conditional Breaks dialog box in sequential order from top to
bottom. Each conditional break for which the conditional statement evaluates to true is
executed.
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Using subforms
Use the Up and Down
preferred order.
5
buttons to move individual conditional break list entries into the
RELATED LINKS:
Edit Conditional Breaks dialog box
Subform properties in the Pagination tab
5.12. Using choice subform sets
A choice subform set is a variation of the subform set object that allows you to customize the display
of specific subforms from within the set through the use of conditional statements. As with subforms
sets, choice subform sets are bound to data from a data connection. However, using choice subform
sets provides a greater level of control over which subforms within the set are displayed at run time.
For example, you can configure a choice subform set to display instances of a repeating subform by
using different text colors, depending on the value of a specific field within that repeating subform.
5.12.1. To create choice subform sets
You can create a choice subform set from either an existing subform set or from an existing subform
object.
To create a choice subform set from an existing subform set
1)
Select a subform set object.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Subform Set tab and select the Select One Subform from Alternatives option from the Type list.
To create a choice subform set from a subform object
1)
Select a subform object and select Insert > Wrap in Choice Subform Set.
5.12.2. To add and remove subforms in choice subform sets
You can add subform objects to a choice subform set or remove subform objects from a choice
subform set in using either of these methods:
206
•
Using the Edit Data Nominated Subforms dialog box
•
Manually editing the contents by dragging subform objects into or out of the choice subform
set by using the Hierarchy palette.
Using subforms
IMPORTANT: Removing a subform from the Alternative Subforms list by using the Edit Data
Nominated Subforms dialog box completely removes the subform object from your form design.
If you want to preserve the subform object but remove it from the choice subform set, you must
manually drag the subform object out of the choice subform set by using the Hierarchy palette.
To add a subform to a choice subform set
1)
Select a subform set object.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Subform Set tab and click Edit Alternatives.
3)
Click the Add button to insert a new Alternative Subforms list item. You can also drag and
drop subform objects into the choice subform set by using the Hierarchy palette.
Adding a new subform adds a duplicate of the currently selected subform. If no subform is
selected, a new unnamed subform is added to the choice subform set.
4)
Use the Up and Down buttons to move the new subform entry to the preferred location.
Ordering entries in the Alternative Subforms list is important because entries are processed
sequentially at run time, and the first entry with an expression that evaluates to true appears
in the form.
To remove a subform from a choice subform set
1)
Select a subform set object.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Subform Set tab and click Edit Alternatives.
3)
Select an entry from the Alternative Subforms list and click the Delete button
.
RELATED LINKS:
Using subform sets
5.13. Working with forms that have a flowable layout
A form that has a flowable layout contains subforms and other elements that adjust to accommodate
the amount of data available to fill the form. The form can be interactive, which means that users can
fill the form, or non-interactive, where a server-based process merges data into the form. (See Formdesign layouts.)
Master pages, content areas, and subforms are the elements that control how Designer places objects
in the form and adjusts to display varying amounts of data.
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5
5.13.1. Differences at design time and run time
In a flowable layout, keep in mind that what you see at design time is not what users see when the
form is rendered. For example, a form design may contain one item row to enter data in. However,
when the form is rendered on the client, the form may contain several item rows and users may be
able to insert additional item rows. The number of rows that appear at design time depends on
whether you wrapped the objects in the item row in a subform that uses the Min Count or Max
options. Setting up the subform Min Count or Max options controls the number of rows that are
initially available for users to fill and the number of additional rows that users can later add.
Because a form that has a flowable layout adjusts automatically to accommodate data, you do not
have to set the size of objects or the number of item lines that the form requires. For example, by
selecting options such as Allow Multiple Lines, Allow Page Breaks Within Content, and Expand To
Fit, you can design flowable interactive forms that adjust to an undetermined amount of data.
For an example of the differences between the design and run-time views of non-interactive forms,
see Hownon-interactive forms that have a flowable layout work.
RELATED LINKS:
Building actions in forms
Controlling the placement of objects in forms that havea flowable layout
Creating form designs that have a flowable layout
Creating non-interactive forms that have a flowable layout
Design tips for forms that have flowable layout
Guidelines for PDF forms
5.13.2. Controlling the placement of objects in forms that have a flowable layout
You can use either of two ways to control how Designer places objects in a form:
Content areas
On the master pages, content areas control the areas and flow direction in which Designer
places objects on the pages. Every master page has a default content area.
Subforms
Subforms control how Designer places objects in the form. By wrapping objects into subforms,
you can use the options in the Subform and Binding tabs in the Object palette to regulate how
many times objects are rendered and their placement on the page.
Content areas in a flowable layout
All master pages contain a default content area, which is displayed on the associated pages. The
content area outlines the area in which you can place objects on the pages, much like the margins in
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a text document. You cannot place objects on the pages outside the area represented by the content
area.
TIP:
Every form must have at least one content area.
The content area does not delineate or limit the area in which you can position objects on the master
pages. In fact, you can place boilerplate objects anywhere on the master pages, inside or outside the
content area. If you place objects outside the content area to contain header and footer text, the date
and time, or page numbering, test the form to ensure that the objects appear as intended. You want
to make sure that objects on the pages do not overlap and hide the objects on the master pages when
the form is rendered.
With forms that have sections that adjust to accommodate data, remember that the layout of the
form is ultimately data-driven. If the form is being rendered through Forms or Output, the pages are
added until all the available data is merged. As new pages are added, data flows from page to page
within the area defined by the content area on the master pages.
If you want the same layout for each page in your form, the default content area is all you need.
However, if the layout is more involved, you can add additional content areas to the default master
page. Keep in mind that if you want different flow direction, page orientations, or two-sided pages,
you can insert additional master pages and configure the other master pages and content areas to
suit your design.
TIP:
Remember that you cannot work with content areas on the pages.
Subforms in a flowable layout
Planning subforms is an important part of creating a form with a flowable layout. In a form that
contains flowable sections, subforms contain the objects within each section of the form. They maintain the form layout as it adjusts in length according to the amount of data merged into it. Subforms
also ensure that the objects move as a unit and are placed consistently relative to each other. When
you wrap objects in subforms, you ensure that regardless of the amount of data merged with the
form, the format of each section remains consistent, and the layout of the entire form is predictable
from one rendering to the next.
You can nest subforms to any depth. By nesting them, you can make the form design match the XML
data file that is merged with it. For example, if the XML data file includes two levels, you can create
the subform hierarchy by matching the subform names with the tag names in the XML data file so
that Designer can map the data without transforming the data file.
A form that has a flowable layout, such as the Purchase Order sample, typically includes various
subforms nested together, with one or more objects in each subform. For example, you can see how
the various objects in the Purchase Order sample are wrapped in the subforms named header, detailHeader, detail, and total. Notice how you can align text and text field objects into rows and columns
and wrap them in a subform. Using subforms to wrap groups of objects such as the various text field
objects in the detail subform not only lets you maintain the layout of the objects, but also lets you
control how often the subform is repeated.
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5
You can configure each subform so that when the form is rendered, only the subforms that contain
the objects that are necessary for representing the data content are placed. For example, you may
want to produce different purchase orders for each customer. In one purchase order form, the detail
subform is placed 12 times to indicate the items purchased. In another purchase order form, the
same subform is placed 50 times, spanning multiple pages.
The sample Purchase Order form illustrates how you can use subforms to achieve this configuration.
Open the form in Designer and look at the Hierarchy palette to examine the structure of the
subform. Look at the Object palette to see how the subforms are configured. Pay particular attention
to the purchaseOrder, detailHeader, and detail subforms and how they are configured. Keep in mind
that the parent subform, which is purchaseOrder, controls the flow of content in the form and
expands to fit the available data. The detailHeader subform is configured with a minimum count of
1, which means that when the form is rendered, this subform appears only once. However, the detail
subform is configured to repeat with each data item and therefore, when the form is rendered,
appears as many times as there are occurrences of the data.
You can also use a subform to draw a border around a group of subforms. For example, you can
create one or more dynamic subforms, nest those subforms within a wrapper subform, and then
specify a border for the wrapper subform. When the form is rendered, a border is drawn around all
the internal subforms.
5.13.3. Creating form designs that have a flowable layout
There are two basic approaches to creating a form design containing subforms that adjust to accommodate data:
•
Starting the form design with a fixed layout
•
Creating the form design in a flowable layout
Both methods produce the same results. However, you may find that one suits your design style
more than the other. As you become more familiar with creating form designs that have a flowable
layout, you can adopt a style that works best for you.
Start with a fixed layout
If you are familiar with creating forms that have a fixed layout, you may find that starting your design
with a fixed layout is most comfortable and familiar. You can plan the layout of the form, including
the necessary objects and information that you want users to see. Using a fixed layout, build the form
design by using as many master pages and design pages as are required. When the object layout and
formatting are completed, set the appropriate properties to those areas of the form design that flow
content.
In addition, this approach provides the easiest and most straightforward way of converting an
existing form that has a fixed layout to a form design that has a flexible layout.
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Using subforms
The following steps provide a general idea of the design process for creating a form design starting
with a fixed layout, assuming that the planning stage is completed.
1)
Create the required master pages.
2)
On the page, create the form content. If you are converting a form that has a fixed layout,
simply begin by wrapping the objects on the form into subforms. If you are starting with a
blank form, do the following tasks:
3)
4)
•
Add objects to the form and enclose them in the appropriate subforms.
•
Apply the necessary formatting to the objects.
•
Finalize the layout of the objects within their subforms, and subforms on the page.
•
Add scripting if necessary.
Implement the dynamic concepts:
•
Unwrap the default subforms on each of the pages. The subforms become children of the
root subform, form1, which has flowed content. From this point on, you are designing in
a flowable layout. Notice that the subforms are positioned one below the other because
the flow direction is top to bottom.
•
Apply the necessary formatting to the subforms, such as subform binding type and
borders.
•
Define the flow. Set the occurrence values, page breaks, leader and trailer subforms,
define which subforms to keep together, associate subforms to master pages, and set
margins.
Test the form by using sample data.
The sample forms included with Designer follow this procedure. For usability reasons, the
subforms that contain the actual content are wrapped inside a subform that has its binding type
set to none. By configuring the subforms in this way, you can quickly understand the overall
structure of a form when you see it in Hierarchy View for the first time.
NOTE:
Tips for starting with a fixed layout
When you are creating form designs by starting with a fixed layout, keep in mind the following
points:
•
Set the form’ content to flowed only when you are satisfied with the layout. When the form
content is set to flowed, you can revert to a positioned content, but you may experience problems with the form layout. For example, if you choose to wrap the subforms inside a single
positioned container, the subforms are positioned exactly where they were on their pages and
may overlap. To avoid the overlapping, wrap the subforms by using page grouping.
•
The default minimum and maximum count for subforms is 1. Adjust these values for forms
with a flowable layout.
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Using subforms
•
5
Wrapping objects inside a subform discards any extra space defined beyond the objects. Add
left and right margins to realign the subform horizontally. You can resize the subform, but
doing so repositions the objects because they are positioned relatively to the parent.
RELATED LINKS:
Controlling the placement of objects in forms that havea flowable layout
Using content areas
Guidelines for PDF forms
Using subforms
Subform properties in the Subform tab
5.13.4. Creating interactive forms that have a flowable layout
Using Designer, you can create interactive PDF or HTML forms for data capture that have a flowable
layout. This type of form combines both flowable elements and interactive form functionality so that
users can enter data directly into expandable fields, add or remove sections, and return the form data
electronically. For example, you can create an interactive form where users can add or remove item
rows and can choose to add their comments to the form. (See Form designlayouts.)
To fill interactive PDF forms that have a flowable layout, end users need Acrobat 7.0.5 or Adobe
Reader 7.0.5 or later.
To fill interactive HTML forms that have a flowable layout, end users require a client application
such as a web browser. (See Creating HTMLforms.)
Users cannot use Acrobat commenting features when filling interactive forms that have a flowable layout.
NOTE:
Keep in mind that you can also use the Action Builder dialog box on the Tools menu to build
common interactive capabilities in forms that have a flowable layout, without writing scripts. (See
Buildan action.)
When creating interactive forms that have a flowable layout, many form authors prefer to start with
an interactive form design that has a fixed layout. By starting in this manner, you can see the form
in its final state. The form design provides the final layout including all the elements that users need.
After completing the form design in fixed layout, you can then begin to divide it into its essential
parts, identify the subforms, and specify how they will flow the data being entered into the form.
Adding dynamic capabilities to an interactive form typically involves the following techniques:
212
•
Positionthe header and footer on the master page
•
Wrapform objects in subforms and setting occurrence values
•
Modifymargins to accommodate subforms
•
Useoverflow leader and overflow trailer subforms
•
Createsubforms with flowable elements
Using subforms
•
Createa button to add and remove a section
•
Createadd and delete buttons
In addition, you must understand how to add and remove subforms so that the form can respond to
the amount of data a user enters. (See Addand remove subform instances using scripting and
Addand remove tables and table rows by using scripting.)
RELATED LINKS:
Guidelines for PDF forms
Working with forms that have a flowable layout
About forms
Creating HTML forms
5.13.5. Position the header and footer on the master page
In an interactive form that has a fixed layout, header and footer text is positioned on the page. When
you add subforms that are set to flow content in the form, you typically want header and footer text
on the master page.
Because the length of an interactive form containing subforms that are set to flow content can
expand depending on the amount of data the form contains, additional pages may be added to the
form as the end user enters more data. By placing the header and footer on the master page, you
ensure that they appear on each page instead of only on the first page.
RELATED LINKS:
Plan the form design
5.13.6. Wrap form objects in subforms and setting occurrence values
When designing an interactive form that has a fixed layout, must provide a sufficient number of item
lines for users to fill. However, if you wrap the item lines in subforms that are set to flow content,
users can add item lines as they need them.
Because of the dynamic capabilities of subforms, you can include one or two item lines in the form
along with Add and Delete buttons. By wrapping the objects in a subform, you can determine when,
where, and how many times particular subforms are repeated by using the options on the Subform
and Binding tabs of the Object palette.
Wrapping groups of form objects in subforms is an important part of creating a form with dynamic
functionality.
Subforms contain and control the objects arranged within sections of the form to maintain the
form’s layout as it adjusts in length according to the amount of incoming data. Subforms preserve
the x and y coordinates of each object to ensure that the objects move as a unit and are placed
together.
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5
When you wrap groups of objects in subforms, you ensure that, regardless of the amount of data
contained in the form, the format of each section and the layout of the entire form remains consistent and predictable.
Remember that end users must see at least one item row to enter data when they open the form. That
means that you must set the Min Count option for the subform to at least 1. Depending on the form,
initially displaying two or more rows in the PDF form can give the form a more balanced appearance,
as well as result in a more intuitive and functional end-user experience.
Subforms also provide the dynamic capabilities that let users add or remove rows and sections in the
form. For example, you can include various buttons that users can use to add and remove item rows
or to submit comments.
Plan how you want to wrap objects in subforms to create sections in your form design. Then test the
form design to ensure that the subforms move and repeat as you intended and do not break across
pages in ways not intended.
RELATED LINKS:
Using subforms
Guidelines for PDF forms
Creating and configuring subforms
Create a button to add and remove a section
5.13.7. Modify margins to accommodate subforms
When applying dynamic functionality to an interactive form that has a fixed layout, a certain
amount of reformatting is typically needed. Using the options in the Layout palette, you can set the
size and position, margins, and captions of objects. For example, you may need to set margins
around subform objects to regulate the alignment of and the spacing (white space) between the
sections in the form.
RELATED LINKS:
Layout properties in the Layout palette
5.13.8. Use overflow leader and overflow trailer subforms
Because the length of an interactive form containing subforms that are set to flow content can vary
depending on the amount of data displayed in the form, the form often has more than one page. As
a result, you may want certain subforms (sections) in the form to continue on subsequent pages.
Using overflow leader and overflow trailer subforms, you can designate different subforms to
precede and follow repeating or expanding subforms that are likely to carry over to additional pages.
Overflow leaders and trailers are special types of subforms that you can use in form designs that have
a flowable layout. After you specify a subform as an overflow leader subform in the Binding tab of
the Object palette, the subform appears at the top of each new page.
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For example, you can use the heading row at the top of a table as an overflow leader subform. Placing
the heading row at the top of a table ensures that it is repeated at the top of each new page, making
the information in the table rows easier to read and follow from page to page.
Similarly, you can assign an overflow trailer subform to follow the last occurrence on a page of a
repeating or expanding subform that could possibly span multiple pages.
RELATED LINKS:
Using subforms
Creating and configuring subforms
5.13.9. Create subforms with flowable elements
Depending on the purpose of your form design, you may want to add an adjustable section to the
form where users can type information such as special requests or comments. With Designer, you
can apply different options to text fields and subforms that enable the size of sections in the form to
adjust to the amount of data that the user enters.
For example, your interactive form may contain a Comments section that users can display or hide
by clicking a button. You would create the section by using a text field placed inside a subform with
these options selected to enable dynamic data entry:
Text field
Allow Multiple Lines and Plain Text Only (Field tab), User Entered - Optional (Value tab),
Height - Expand to fit (Layout palette)
Enables users to enter as much text as they want in the Comments section and ensures that the
text field automatically expands in height to display the data available.
Subform
Allow Page Breaks Within Content (Subform tab), Max (count) with a value of 1 (Binding tab),
Auto-fit (Layout palette)
Allows the comments subform to carry over to succeeding pages when necessary and to appear
only once in the form and ensures that the subform automatically enlarges to display the data
available.
RELATED LINKS:
Using subforms
Creating and configuring subforms
Create a button to add and remove a section
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5
5.13.10. Create a button to add and remove a section
In interactive form designs, it is common practice to have one or more sections in the form that are
not displayed until the user selects the option to include it. With Designer, you can add a button
along with a script that dynamically adds or removes a particular section (subform) from the form
when the user clicks a button.
For example, in the sample interactive Purchase Order, the user can click the Add Comments button
to display the Comments section (comments subform). The button has one of two alternating
captions, Add Comments or Clear Comments, depending on the current state of the subform. Each
time the user clicks the button, the script checks whether the comments subform is displayed and
then updates the button caption accordingly.
The button triggers a script that uses instanceManager, the XML Form Object Model object
that manages the instance creation, removal, and movement of form objects. When the end user
deletes the Comment subform, the instanceManager object removes the subform from both the
Form data document object model (DOM) and the Data DOM.
Note that instanceManager uses four methods: addInstance, removeInstance,
moveInstance, and setInstances. The naming convention of an instanceManager is
the subform name prefixed with an underscore (_subformname). The syntax for
instanceManager is_subformname.methodname().
In the sample interactive Purchase Order form, the form author typed the following JavaScript script
in the Script Editor by using the setInstances method to add and remove the comments
subform and change the button’s caption. Notice that the comments.count == 0
propertyreturns the number of subform instances instantiated.
// Invoke the Instance Manager to add and remove the comments subform.
if (_comments.count == 0) {// The count property specifies the current number
// of instances instantiated.
_comments.setInstances(1);// Add the comments subform.
this.resolveNode("caption.value.#text").value = "Clear Comments";// Change the
button's caption.
}
else {
_comments.setInstances(0);// Remove the comments subform.
this.resolveNode("caption.value.#text").value = "Add Comments";// Change the
button's caption.
}
You can also use the ActionBuilder dialog box on the Tools menu to build common interactive
capabilities in forms that have a flowable layout, without writing scripts.
TIP:
RELATED LINKS:
Building actions in forms
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Using subforms
Create add and delete buttons
Adding buttons to an interactive form provides end users with a way to initiate an action, such as
adding and deleting instances of subforms that define sections such as item lines in an order form.
You can also add a tool tip to the delete button to display the words “Delete Item” when the user
positions the pointer over the button. Using separate delete buttons is a good way to allow users to
remove specific rows from the form.
For example, the sample interactive Purchase Order has an Add Item button and a delete button
labeled “X” for each detail subform. When the user clicks the Add Item button, a script adds an item
line. Alternatively, when the user clicks one of the delete buttons, a script deletes the associated item
line.
You can also use the Action Builder dialog box on the Tools menu to build common interactive
capabilities in forms that have a flowable layout, without writing scripts. See Buildingactions in forms.
TIP:
Add Item button
The following JavaScript script in the click event of the Add Item button lets users add an item
line to the sample interactive Purchase Order form. The script also recalculates the form so that the
Total field includes the new line in the calculation.
Because users only add item lines by using the Add Item button, the script does not need to verify
the minimum count (occurrence) value.
// Invoke the Instance Manager to add one instance of the detail subform.
_detail.addInstance(1);
//Invoke the recalculate method to include the field values from the added subform
in calculations.
xfa.form.recalculate(1);
Delete button
The following JavaScript script in the click event of the Delete button lets users use the Delete
button to delete an instance of the detail subform from the sample interactive Purchase Order form.
The script also recalculates the form so that the Total field no longer includes the deleted line in the
calculation.
// Invoke the Instance Manager to remove the current instance of the detail
subform.
_detail.removeInstance(this.parent.index);
// Invoke the recalculate method to update the form calculations.
xfa.form.recalculate(1);
Because the initial minimum occurrence value for the detail subform is 2, the script needs to reduce
the minimum occurrence value to allow the person filling the form to delete the two item lines that
appear automatically when the form is rendered. This script is added to the initialize event of
the detail subform.
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// Reset the minimum occurrence value of the detail subform.
this.occur.min = "0";
Because the form allows users to delete all instances of the detail subform, the script for the
calculate event of the Total field (numTotal) must verify that at least one instance of the
numAmount field in the detail subform exists. Otherwise, an error appears because the calculation
cannot find any occurrences of the numAmount field. This script is added to the Calculate event
of the numTotal field.
// Verify at least one instance of the numAmount field exists.
if (exists(detail[0].numAmount) == 1) then
Sum(detail[*].numAmount)
endif
5.13.11. Add and remove subform instances using scripting
You can add or remove subform instances by adding calculations or scripts to objects on your form.
It is important to name the subforms when adding and removing subforms instances though
scripting. Scripting against existing subforms is error prone when the subforms are accessed through
a relative position instead of unique names.
Before you begin, perform the following tasks:
•
If it is not already visible, display the Script Editor by selecting Windows > Script Editor.
Expand the Script Editor so that it is displayed in multiline view.
•
Ensure that the subform that you want to add instances to is contained within a flowed
subform.
You can also use the Action Builder dialog box on the Tools menu to build common interactive capabilities in forms that have a flowable layout, without writing scripts. See Buildingactions in forms.
TIP:
RELATED LINKS:
Building actions in forms
Add and remove tables and table rows by using scripting
Subform properties in the Binding tab
Using the methods of the instancemanager to control subforms
s
addInstance
removeInstance
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Using subforms
To add a subform instance to a form
1)
Select the object on your form design that you want to add the script to and select an event from
the Show list in the Script Editor. For example, choose the click event of a button or other
interactive form object.
2)
Type one of the following scripts in the Script Editor, where Subform1 is the name of the
subform to add instances to, and the value true indicates that the new subform instance
should be merged with the form data:
FormCalc
Subform1.instanceManager.addInstance(true) // Default instance manager syntax
xfa.form.recalculate(true) // Invoke the recalculate method to include the field
values from the added subform in the form calculations.
or
_Subform1.addInstance(true) // Short form of the instance manager syntax
xfa.form.recalculate(true) // Invoke the recalculate method to include the field
values from the added subform in the form calculations.
JavaScript
Subform1.instanceManager.addInstance(true); // Default instance manager syntax
xfa.form.recalculate(true) // Invoke the recalculate method to include the field
values from the added subform in the form calculations.
or
_Subform1.addInstance(true); // Short form of the instance manager syntax
xfa.form.recalculate(true) // Invoke the recalculate method to include the field
values from the added subform in the form calculations.
To remove a subform instance from a form
1)
Select the object on your form design to add the script to, and select an event from the Show
list in the Script Editor.
2)
Type one of the following scripts in the Script Editor, where Subform1 is the name of the
subform to remove an instance from and integer is the zero-based index number of the
instance to remove:
FormCalc
Subform1.instanceManager.removeInstance(integer) // Default instance manager
syntax
or
_Subform1.removeInstance(integer) // Short form of the instance manager syntax
JavaScript
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5
Subform1.instanceManager.removeInstance(integer); // Default instance manager
syntax
or
_Subform1.removeInstance(integer); // Short form of the instance manager syntax
5.13.12. Add and remove tables and table rows by using scripting
You can add or remove tables, body rows, header rows, and footer rows by adding instance manager
scripting expressions to objects on your form by using the Script Editor.
Before you begin, make sure that you perform the following tasks:
•
If it is not already visible, display the Script Editor by selecting Windows > Script Editor.
Expand the Script Editor so that it is displayed in multiline view.
•
Ensure that the table to add instances to is contained within a flowed subform so that you can
add new instances of either the table or the rows within the table.
To add a table or table row instance to a form
1)
Select the object on your form design to add the script to, and select an event from the Show
list in the Script Editor.
2)
Type one of the following scripts in the Script Editor, where Table1 and Row1 are the names
of the table and table row to add instances to:
FormCalc
Table1.instanceManager.addInstance(true) // Default instance manager syntax
Table1.Row1.instanceManager.addInstance(true) // Default instance manager syntax
xfa.form.recalculate(true) // Invoke the recalculate method to include the field
values from the added table or row in the form calculations.
or
Table1.addInstance(true) // Short form of the instance manager syntax
Table1._Row1.addInstance(true) // Short form of the instance manager syntax
xfa.form.recalculate(true) // Invoke the recalculate method to include the field
values from the added table or row in the form calculations.
JavaScript
Table1.instanceManager.addInstance(true); // Default instance manager syntax
Table1.Row1.instanceManager.addInstance(true); // Default instance manager
syntax
xfa.form.recalculate(true); // Invoke the recalculate method to include the field
values from the added table or row in the form calculations.
or
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Using subforms
Table1.addInstance(true); // Short form of the instance manager syntax
Table1._Row1.addInstance(true); // Short form of the instance manager syntax
xfa.form.recalculate(true); // Invoke the recalculate method to include the field
values from the added table or row in the form calculations.
To remove a table or table row instance from your form
1)
Select the object on your form design to add the script to, and select an event from the Show
list in the Script Editor.
2)
Type one of the following scripts in the Script Editor, where Table1 and Row1 are the names
of the table and table row to remove instances from and integer is the zero-based index
number of the instance to remove:
FormCalc
Table1.instanceManager.removeInstance(true) // Default instance manager syntax
Table1.Row1.instanceManager.removeInstance(true) // Default instance manager
syntax
or
Table1.removeInstance(true) // Short form of the instance manager syntax
Table1._Row1.removeInstance(true) // Short form of the instance manager syntax
JavaScript
Table1.instanceManager.removeInstance(true); // Default instance manager syntax
Table1.Row1.instanceManager.removeInstance(true); // Default instance manager
syntax
or
Table1.removeInstance(true); // Short form of the instance manager syntax
Table1._Row1.removeInstance(true); // Short form of the instance manager syntax
RELATED LINKS:
Table properties in the Binding tab
Body row properties in the Binding tab
Header row properties in the Binding tab
addInstance
removeInstance
Add and remove subform instances using scripting
5.13.13. Creating non-interactive forms that have a flowable layout
When you need a form to present varying amounts of data, typically from a data source, non-interactive forms that are designed to flow content are useful. Just as with interactive forms that are
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Using subforms
5
designed to capture varying amounts of user-supplied data, the layout of this type of form adjusts
automatically to the amount of data being merged with the form design by a server-based process.
You do not need to predetermine the number of sections or pages for the form as you must do with
a form that has a fixed layout.
Typically, non-interactive forms are printed and/or stored electronically. For example, you can
create a non-interactive form design that has a flowable layout for use with Output. Output can then
merge the form design with XML form data and output the form to a network printer, a disk file, and
an email recipient as a file attachment. You can output these forms as PDF (including PDF/A documents), PostScript, Printer Control Language (PCL), and Zebra Programming Language (ZPL)
formats.
RELATED LINKS:
Using subforms
Design tips for forms that have flowable layout
How non-interactive forms that have a flowable layout work
In a form design that has a fixed layout, you typically use only one subform (the default subform on
the page), which Designer sets to position content by default. When Designer positions the content
in a subform, none of the objects within the subform move from their anchored positions, regardless
of the characteristics and quantity of data.
However, if you want sections of the form to expand to accommodate data, you generally use
multiple subforms: the default subform on the page, which you set to flow content, along with additional subforms that you can set to repeat for each data item, expand to fit, or both. When you reset
a subform to flow content, the objects within the subform, including other subforms, move to
accommodate the data merged into the repeating and expanding subforms.
With Designer, you can bind the objects in the form to the data elements in a data file, and you can
configure the text field and subform objects in the form to appear, repeat, or expand, depending on
the characteristics and quantity of data merged with the object. Because the objects in the form are
bound to the source data, the layout of the form is data-driven.
When authoring a form design that contains sections that expand and shrink to accommodate data,
it is important to understand which subforms appear once in the form, such as an address block, and
the subforms that repeat according to the amount of data, such as a detail line. For those subforms
that repeat, include only one instance of the subform and its components in the form design. Consequently, what you see at design time is not what users see when the form is rendered.
For example, the following illustrations of the non-interactive Purchase Order sample show the form
design before it is merged with data and the resulting form that is presented to a user after the form
design is merged with data. Notice how the detail line (detail subform) repeats four times to accommodate the list of parts (available data).
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Using subforms
Form that has a flowable layout without merged data
Form that has a flowable layout with merged data
5.13.14. Design tips for forms that have flowable layout
The complexity of a form significantly influences the amount of time it takes Adobe Reader to render
or reender the document. You can measure the complexity in several ways, but a main factor is the
number of visible form objects. Even a complex form design with many objects, subforms, and pages
can perform well if a limited part of its complexity is visible at once. It can perform well because the
objects that have a presence set to hidden are ignored, and no time is spent to position and render
them.
Keep in mind the following points when creating forms with a flowable layout:
General
•
Reduce the overall complexity the form design:
–
Use field captions instead of static text objects.
–
Remove captions form a field when not required.
–
Specify borders instead of drawing lines.
–
Specify a subform margin instead of using objects to add spacing between subforms.
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Using subforms
–
•
5
Remove duplicate objects, scripts, or constructs that you can replace with fragments,
script objects, and global fields.
Use either explicit or implicit breaks:
–
With implicit pagination, the master pages are instantiated in the order they are listed in
the hierarchy, based on their minimum and maximum occurrences.
–
Explicit breaks are allowed and often required for complex forms, but are not necessary
to create complex forms.
•
Start with the layout, ant then add the dynamic behaviors and scripting.
•
Use fixed layout when possible; for example, when a container such as a subform has one child.
•
Use fixed size objects when possible.
•
Resize the content area to leave enough space on the page for other objects that you do not want
overlaid (for example, a page number, title, logo, and so on). Watermarks are meant to be overlapped content.
•
For a column layout, consider using multiple content areas or tables. To flow content from one
column to the other, use content areas. To align the content of each column side by side, use a
table. Create the table without a header and footer row.
Subforms
224
•
Avoid placing flowed subforms inside a positioned subform. Doing so causes problems with
page breaks, overlapping objects, and repeating subforms.
•
If a subform contains objects that merge with data of varying sizes, verify that the objects do
not expand and overrun the area that another object occupies. Expandable objects, such as text
fields, may render on top of other objects. Set the subform to flow and expand to fit the content.
•
When you create a subform, resize it so that its width is the same as the width of the content
area. Resize the subform before you place objects in it. This way, you avoid having to reposition
the subform's children after you resize the subform.
•
Always set up overflow leader and trailer subforms to Positioned content and deselect the
Allow Page Breaks option. Otherwise, the rendered form may contain errors such as duplicate
headers or overlapping fields.
•
Specify an overflow leader and trailer subform for subforms that break between pages.
•
To quickly resize a subform to fit around its children, select the Autofit option in the Layout
palette and then disable it.
•
It is good practice to rename nameless subforms with unique names. Naming subforms makes
scripting easier and helps you locate objects in the Hierarchical view. A nameless subform does
not participate in the data merge. To achieve the same result with a named subform, set its
binding type to None.
Using subforms
If you create a large interactive PDF form with no structure, end users may experience
slow performance when tabbing between fields. This problem is averted if you save the form
without tagging. However, if you need your form to be accessible. However, to make your form
accessible, save it as tagged PDF. To work around this situation, wrap sections of the form in
unnamed subforms. This task adds the required structure to the form.
NOTE:
•
You can have several content areas on a master page. The content areas are filled with content
in the order they are listed in the Hierarchy view regardless of their position on the page.
•
If you are creating a compliant form, use Acrobat to compare the documents. Select Compare
Documents from the Acrobat Advanced menu.
•
Setting the margins of a subform may generate unexpected results. Most subforms have positioned content and therefore a fixed height. Adding margins offsets the subform content and
can cause the objects below it to overlap.
•
To wrap the content of a subform exactly, without using the Expand To Fit option, resize the
subform by using the properties in the Layout palette. The sample forms that are included with
Designer use both methods.
Accessibility
•
Accessibility tags are generated from left to right and then from top to bottom. Accessibility
problems can occur in subforms that position content when the objects are not positioned
precisely.
Scripting
•
When scripting, avoid placing code in the initialize event of objects on the master page. In
earlier versions of Adobe Reader, the initialize events for objects on master pages are executed
more often than necessary. This extra script execution affects the performance of the form. If
possible, use a different event, such as the calculate event.
Data binding
•
If you have a data connection, bind objects to the data connection or set the binding type to
None. Also, use relative binding referencess. Do not have reoccurring data that is not bound to
reoccurring subforms. It is best to bind fields to a data element and bind subforms to a data
group. Data groups and subforms can repeat.
•
By default, the subform binding type is set to Use Name. When working with a schema, it is
preferable that you set the default binding type to No Data Binding. You can set the default data
binding in Tools > Options > Data Binding.
•
Set the data binding to No Data Binding for objects you do not want exported in the data. Set
the binding type of subforms that contain no fields to No Data Binding. For example, an overflow leader or trailer subform usually has no fields. Setting the binding type to No Data Binding
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5
prevents it from participating in the merge. Excluding the overflow leader or trailer from the
merge can improve performance.
RELATED LINKS:
Creating form designs that have a flowable layout
5.13.15. Common mistakes
226
•
Not specifying preview data.
•
Forgetting that the data entered in the Preview PDF tab is not the form data. When you save
the form as a PDF form and open it in Acrobat or Adobe Reader, the data is not displayed.
•
Previewing the form as a static Static PDF Form instead of a Dynamic XML Form.
•
Forgetting to allow content to break between pages.
•
Placing a flowed subform inside a positioned subform.
•
Do not know how to set a subform to repeat. The repeat option is disabled when the parent
container uses positioned layout.
•
Resizing or moving the contents of containers with flowed contents.
•
Unnecessary nesting of subforms, especially subforms that have one child container.
•
Removing subform instances from Document Object Model (DOM) instead of hiding the
subform.
•
Not using the Report palette or the JavaScript Debugger in Acrobat (Ctrl+J) to view scripting
errors.
Using fragments
6.
Using fragments
6.1.
About fragments
A fragment is a reusable part of a form. For example, a fragment can include an address block or legal
text.
A fragment is managed in the Fragment Library and is stored as a separate XDP file that can be
inserted into multiple form designs. In the stand-alone version of Designer, fragments are stored in
the file system and in the Fragment Library. In Designer with Workbench, fragments are stored in
the Fragment Library and in the AEM forms repository.
Using fragments simplifies and speeds up the creation and maintenance of large numbers of forms.
When creating a form, you insert a reference to the required fragment and the fragment appears in
the form. The fragment reference contains a subform that points to the physical XDP file.
All fragments share common characteristics:
•
You create all fragments the same way.
•
You can create a fragment in the current file or in a separate file, and you can create multiple
fragments in the same file.
When you create a fragment in a separate file, a file is generated to store the fragment in the file
system or in the AEM forms repository.
•
Other form authors can use the fragments in their form designs.
•
You edit the fragment source files in Designer.
6.1.1.
Fragments and subforms
To create a fragment, you can either select an existing subform or select one or more objects.
Subforms also include tables, table rows, header rows, and footer rows. If you select objects that are
not in a subform, the objects are wrapped in a subform when the fragment is created.
You can also use a choice subform set that contains multiple fragment references. A choice subform
set is a variation of the subform set object that allows you to customize the display of specific
subforms from within the set by using conditional statements. You use conditional statements to
determine which subform from within the set appears in the delivered form.
For example, each subform in a set can include information for a particular state, and the subform
that is displayed can be determined based on the state where the form is filed.
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Using fragments
6.1.2.
6
Script fragments
A script fragment contains reusable JavaScript functions or values that are stored separately from a
particular object, such as a date parser or a web service invocation. These fragments include a single
script object that appears as a child of variables in the Hierarchy palette. Fragments cannot be created
from scripts that are properties of other objects, such as event scripts like validate, calculate, or
initialize.
For more information, see UsingScript Fragments.
RELATED LINKS:
Fragment Library palette menu
Binding fragments to a data source
Using choice subform sets
6.2.
When to use fragments
Create fragments when you identify form content or a script that you intend to use in multiple forms.
Fragments allow you to quickly create or change common elements that you want to share with
multiple form authors. A company logo is a good example of content that you use in multiple forms.
Changes to the logo are simplified because you make a single change in one place, which is the fragment file.
A script fragment is also useful where a function defines a standard way of formatting or doing some
type of calculation.
6.2.1.
Content reuse
You can use fragments to reuse content in multiple form designs. When you must use some of the
same content in multiple forms, using a fragment is faster and simpler than copying or re-creating
the content. Using fragments also ensures that the frequently used parts of a form design have
consistent content and appearance in all the referencing forms.
6.2.2.
Global updates
You can use fragments to make global changes to multiple forms only once, in one file. You can
change the content, script objects, data bindings, layout, or styles in a fragment, and all XDP forms
that reference the fragment reflect the changes. To update a fragment in a PDF form, resave the form
in Designer.
For example, a common element across many forms can be an address block that includes a
drop-down list object for the country. If you update the values for the drop-down list object, you
228
Using fragments
must open many forms to make the changes. If you include the address block in a fragment, you
open only one fragment file to make the changes.
6.2.3.
Shared form creation
You can use fragments to share the creation of forms among several resources. Form developers with
expertise in scripting or other advanced features of Designer can develop and share fragments that
take advantage of scripting and dynamic properties. Form designers can use those fragments to lay
out form designs and to ensure that all parts of a form have a consistent appearance and functionality
across multiple forms designed by multiple people.
6.2.4.
Security
If you have Designer and Workbench, you can use the AEM forms repository to limit access to a
fragment and to store and share fragments.
RELATED LINKS:
Inserting fragment references
Editing and embedding fragments
6.3.
Naming and organizing and fragments
An easy way to organize fragments is to create folders that represent categories of forms and store
the fragments in a common folder under each category. The common folders under each category
of forms hold fragments common to those forms. It is also good practice to create a common folder
outside the categories of forms to hold fragments that are common across all forms (for example,
fragments such as a company logo or address in the common folder).
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Using fragments
6
Example of folder structure that includes fragments
Make sure that you use a unique name for each fragment and that you add information about the
purpose of the fragment in the Description box.
When stored in the AEM forms repository, the only way to view the fragment information is to open
the fragment and view the information. Properly naming the fragment can make it easier for form
authors to find the fragment they want to use.
You can maximize content reuse across teams by creating a fragments catalog and distributing it to
form authors. For example, create a form design that displays all the fragments that are available in
the fragment library in logical order. The fragments catalog provides a central location to view all
fragments and obtain information about them.
6.4.
Fragment references
Designer provides visual cues that identify fragment references in the Layout Editor and the Hierarchy palette. These visual cues provide information about how fragments behave.
6.4.1.
Fragment references in the Layout Editor
Object boundaries appear around fragments and fragment references. You can set the color of the
object boundary borders in the Drawing Aids palette.
A fragment icon appears in the upper-left corner of a fragment reference and uses the color of the
object boundary borders. The objects within a fragment reference have gray borders to indicate that
you cannot edit them from the fragment reference.
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Using fragments
Clicking anywhere within a fragment reference selects it, and dragging anywhere on a fragment
reference moves it.
You cannot select any of the objects in a fragment reference. For example, if the fragment reference
contains a table, you cannot select a row or column. To select objects in a fragment reference, open
the fragment source file for editing.
6.4.2.
Fragment references in the Hierarchy palette
The objects in a fragment reference are dimmed in the Hierarchy palette because you cannot select
or edit them from the fragment reference.
A.
Fragment reference icon on a subform
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Using fragments
6
B.
The objects in a fragment are dimmed
You can move a fragment reference and its contents as a single entity within the Hierarchy palette
in the same way that you move other form objects. However, you cannot drag objects into a fragment
reference.
RELATED LINKS:
Drawing Aids palette
To use the drawing aids
Layout Editor
Hierarchy palette
Editing and embedding fragments
6.5.
How fragment references are resolved
Fragment references are resolved when you open a form design in Designer, preview it, or save it as
a PDF file. With Workbench, you can also save a form design as a PDF file in Forms or Output.
When you update a fragment, all form designs that reference the fragment are refreshed with the
changes when you open the form design in Designer. All form designs that are open in Designer are
also updated.
Fragment references in PDF forms are resolved when you open or save the form design in Designer.
If you update a referenced fragment after you save the PDF form, the old fragment is still visible
when you view the PDF form in Acrobat. To update the PDF form with the changed fragment, resave
the PDF form in Designer.
RELATED LINKS:
Creating and inserting fragments
Inserting fragment references
6.6.
Binding fragments to a data source
When you create a form design that includes fragment references, you cannot bind individual
objects in the fragment. Instead, either bind the fragment reference to the data or create bindings in
the fragment source file. When you create bindings in the fragment source file, set the binding of the
fragment in the host form to No Data Binding so that it does not interfere in the data binding set in
the fragment source file.
RELATED LINKS:
About fragments
232
Using fragments
Binding fields to a data source
6.7.
Creating and inserting fragments
You can create a fragment in a separate XDP file or in the current form design. When you create the
fragment in a separate file, you can replace the selected objects with a reference to the fragment file.
If you do not replace the selection with a fragment reference, the fragment is created, but the selection remains unchanged and is not connected to the new fragment. Leaving the selection unchanged
saves steps when you need to create multiple, similar fragments.
Creating the fragment in the current file is useful when you want to define multiple fragments in one
file. Creating multiple fragments in one file can make it easier to update multiple fragments, particularly when the fragments are similar.
You cannot create a fragment in a form created by importing a PDF file as artwork. For more
information, see ImportingPDF documents as artwork.
NOTE:
Fragments are identified by the fragment name. When you create the fragment in a separate file, you
can also specify the location and the file name. The fragment name does not have to match the file
name.
The fragment name appears in the Fragment Library when you click OK in the Create Fragment
dialog box. When you create a fragment in the current form design and save it as an XDP file, the
fragment name appears in the Fragment Library when you save the file.
When you create a fragment, you can either select an existing subform or select one or more objects.
If you select objects that are not in a subform, the objects are wrapped in a subform when the fragment is created.
NOTE: After you create a fragment by selecting existing objects, update script references in the fragment
to reflect that the objects are wrapped in a new subform.
You can use the menu to create a fragment, or you can drag the selected objects into the Fragment
Library. When you create a fragment by dragging the selection into the Fragment Library, the option
for creating the fragment in the current file is unavailable.
Save fragment source files as XDP files. If you save a fragment source file as a PDF file, the fragments
cannot be referenced in other forms.
When you create a fragment in a AEM forms application and check it in, it is saved in the repository
and appears in the Applications view in Workbench.
Create script fragments from script objects instead of subforms, and create them from the Hierarchy
palette.
For more information about creating and inserting script fragments, see UsingScript Fragments.
233
Using fragments
6.7.1.
Create a fragment
1)
Select the objects to include in the fragment. You can select a fragment or multiple objects.
2)
Select Edit > Fragments > Create Fragment.
3)
(Optional) In the Description box, type a description of the fragment.
4)
Select a method for creating the fragment:
6.7.2.
6
•
To define the fragment in a separate XDP file that is stored in the Fragment Library, select
Create Fragment In Fragment Library.
–
In the stand-alone version of Designer, select the Fragment Library where you want to
save the fragment file.
–
In Designer with Workbench, from the Fragment Libary list, select a AEM forms application folder where you want to save the fragment file. You cannot select the root application folder.
–
(Optional) To use a different file name, in the File Name box, type the file name for the
fragment.
–
To reference the new fragment in the current form design, select Replace Selection With
Reference To New Form Fragment, and then click OK.
Inserting fragment references
You can use fragments to reuse content in multiple forms. When creating a form design, insert a
reference to an existing fragment and the fragment appears in the form design.
After you insert a fragment reference, you can reposition it in the form design.
If you are using Designer with Workbench, you can insert a reference to a fragment that is outside
the root application folder or is not in a Workbench application. However, you must copy the fragment and the files it references into the current application. The files are copied into the same folder
as the current form, and the references to the files are updated.
You cannot insert a fragment in a form that was created by importing a PDF file as artwork.
(See ImportingPDF documents as artwork.)
NOTE:
To preview the fragments in the Fragment Library palette, select Show Preview Pane from the
palette menu.
TIP:
To insert a fragment from the Fragment Library palette
1)
Do one of the following actions:
•
234
Drag the fragment onto the form design.
Using fragments
You cannot drag a fragment from the Fragment Library palette onto a subform that
is a child of a SubformSet. The cursor changes and Designer displays a warning icon (a
circle with a diagonal line) to indicate that this operation is illegal.
NOTE:
•
Double-click the fragment.
To insert a fragment from the Insert menu
1)
Select Insert > Fragment.
2)
Navigate to the file that contains the fragment.
3)
Select the file.
4)
If the file contains more than one fragment, select the fragment.
5)
Click OK. The fragment appears in the center of the visible page.
RELATED LINKS:
Fragment Library palette menu
To select objects
Create Fragment dialog box
Insert Fragment dialog box
6.8.
Editing and embedding fragments
You can edit a fragment by selecting the fragment in the Fragment Library palette or by selecting the
fragment reference in any form.
When you select the edit option, the fragment source file opens in Designer and the fragment is
selected.
NOTE:
You can also open and edit a fragment source file the same way you edit any other XDP file.
You can rename the fragment or modify the form objects in the fragment. When you save the fragment source file, your changes are immediately reflected in all open forms that reference the fragment. You do not need to reload the forms to see the changes.
Renaming the fragment subform in the Hierarchy palette in the referenced XDP file breaks all
references to that fragment. You can change the fragment metadata name in the Fragment Information dialog box or in the Object palette.
NOTE:
When you edit a fragment, all forms that reference the fragment reflect the changes when you save
the form in Designer. If you update a referenced fragment after you save a PDF form, the old fragment is still visible when you view the PDF form in Acrobat. To update the fragment that is visible
in the PDF form, resave the PDF form in Designer
235
Using fragments
6.8.1.
To edit a fragment from the Fragment Library palette
1)
Open the fragment library and select the fragment.
2)
In the fragment library panel menu, select Edit Fragment. The fragment source file opens.
3)
Edit the file as required.
4)
Save the fragment source file.
6.8.2.
1)
6
To edit a fragment from a fragment reference
Do one of the following actions:
•
Double-click the fragment reference.
•
Select Edit > Fragments > Edit Fragment.
The fragment source file opens.
2)
Edit the file as required.
3)
Save the fragment source file.
6.8.3.
To view fragment information
You can view the fragment information that was added when the fragment was created. The fragment information includes the fragment name, a description, and the location of the fragment
source file.
The same information is displayed for fragments and fragment references. When you select a fragment, you can view or edit the information, but when you select a fragment reference, you can only
view the information.
1)
2)
6.8.4.
View the fragment information:
•
To view the fragment information for a fragment reference, select the fragment reference.
•
To view the fragment information for a fragment, open the fragment for editing.
Select Edit > Fragments > Fragment Info.
To convert a fragment reference to an embedded object
When you convert a fragment reference, it becomes an embedded copy of the fragment, and the fragment metadata is removed. The embedded object does not retain any relationship to the fragment
source file. The fragment source file is unchanged and you can still reference it in your forms.
236
Using fragments
Converting a fragment reference is useful when you no longer need to reference the fragment but do
not want to remove the objects from a form design. For example, you can convert a fragment reference if you want to create a new fragment based on an existing fragment.
If the referenced fragment contains one or more fragment references, you can either embed only the
selected fragment reference or embed the selected fragment and the nested fragment references.
1)
Select the fragment reference to embed.
2)
Select Edit > Fragments > Convert To Embedded Object.
RELATED LINKS:
About fragments
Fragment references
6.9.
Viewing and embedding fragments
6.9.1.
To view fragment information
You can view the fragment information that was added when the fragment was created. The fragment information includes the fragment name, a description, and the location of the fragment
source file.
1)
2)
6.9.2.
View the fragment information:
•
To view the fragment information for a fragment reference, select the fragment reference.
•
To view the fragment information for a fragment, open the fragment.
Select Edit > Fragments > Fragment Info.
To convert a fragment reference to an embedded object
When you convert a fragment reference, it becomes an embedded copy of the fragment, and the fragment metadata is removed. The embedded object does not retain any relationship to the fragment
source file. The fragment source file is unchanged and you can still reference it in your forms.
Converting a fragment reference is useful when you no longer need to reference the fragment but do
not want to remove the objects from a form design. For example, you can convert a fragment reference if you want to create a new fragment based on an existing fragment.
237
Using fragments
6
If the referenced fragment contains one or more fragment references, you can either embed only the
selected fragment reference or embed the selected fragment and the nested fragment references.
1)
Select the fragment reference to embed.
2)
Select Edit > Fragments > Convert To Embedded Object.
RELATED LINKS:
About fragments
Fragment references
6.10. Fixing overrides and broken fragment references
You create overrides on a fragment reference when you edit its properties in the referencing form
design. These changes affect only the fragment reference in the current form and do not affect the
fragment source file or any other references.
You can create fragment reference overrides on properties in the Object, Layout, Border, and Accessibility palettes of the fragment subform. In the Script Editor, you can create overrides for scripts that
are defined in the fragment reference subform. The properties you can edit include the tab order,
binding, scripts, X and Y positions, and subform properties such as presence and locale.
You cannot create overrides on the properties of any objects in the fragment reference, including
nested objects such as subform sets or tables. For example, if a fragment reference includes a table,
you cannot edit the row shading because row shading is a property of the cells in a table.
6.10.1. To remove fragment reference overrides
You can remove the overrides from fragment reference properties by using the Clear Fragment
Property Overrides option in the Object, Border, Layout, and Accessibility palette menus. This
option removes all overrides, on all the palettes, from the selected fragment reference, except overrides on the X and Y properties when the fragment is in a subform that positions content.
When overrides exist, an information marker appears on the fragment reference and an entry
appears in the Warnings tab in the Report palette.
1)
Select the fragment reference that has overrides.
2)
In the palette menu of the Object, Border, Layout, or Accessibility palette, select Clear Fragment Property Overrides.
6.10.2. To resolve broken fragment references
A fragment reference can be broken when Designer cannot find either the fragment or the fragment
source file because it was renamed, deleted, or moved.
238
Using fragments
When you open a form that has a broken fragment reference, the fragment reference is replaced with
this broken fragment icon.
The broken fragment icon also appears on broken fragment references in the Hierarchy palette.
1)
In the Object palette, click Open Fragment Source File.
2)
Select the file that contains the fragment and click Open.
3)
In the Fragment Name box, select the name of the fragment.
RELATED LINKS:
About fragments
Fragment references
About palettes
Properties in the Object palette
6.11. Fragments tips
When working with fragments, keep in mind the following points:
•
Because fragments are used for content reuse, keep them generic enough so that they do not
quickly become unusable in some forms when changes are made to it.
•
When changing a fragment, verify whether you must also change the following items:
–
Digital signatures that sign a collection that includes the fragment file.
–
Update the schema for the fragment or host form to accommodate the changes.
–
The form design layout of the host form to ensure that the changes did not cause errors.
More work may be required to complete the change to the host forms. If you are not
using the AEM forms server to generate the PDF files on demand, manually open each
form design and resave it as a PDF file in order for the fragment changes to appear. If the
PDF files are generated by using the AEM forms server, the fragment references in the
host form design are resolved before the form is rendered so that no additional effort is
required.
•
When placing fragments on a master page, leave consistent space between the page border and
the fragments to maintain consistent margins.
•
When creating the fragments, such as the body of a letter, consider the spacing you want
between each paragraph. Then make the spacing part of the static text object that contains the
paragraph or part of the fragment subform itself (where the fragment subform has a greater
height than the static object it contains). When the paragraph fragments are flowed into the
239
Using fragments
6
body pages, they are consistently spaced. The easiest way to add spacing is to use the Paragraph
palette and define the spacing on the static text object.
•
240
When creating paragraph fragments that contain floating fields, always ensure that they are
wide enough to allow for arbitrary data width. For example, make the salutation of a letter as
wide as the page so that it can accommodate long names.
Working with Objects
7.
Working with Objects
7.1.
About Objects
Objects are the building blocks of every form. Each object provides some piece of functionality to
your form, such as a place to enter text or a button to use to email the form. As you create your form,
you select objects and add them to the body or master page of the form design. You will find all the
available objects in the Object Library palette.
The objects in the Object Library palette are grouped into category. The Standard and Barcode categories contain the core objects. In addition, a number of predefined custom objects are available in
the Custom category.
7.1.1.
Categories of objects
The majority of the objects fall into two categories:
Boilerplate or static objects
Static objects do not capture or display data. Instead, they present fixed text or graphic information. These objects include circles, lines, rectangles, images, and text. Static objects can be
used in all types of forms.
Field objects
Field objects both capture and display data. These objects include barcodes, buttons, check
boxes, date/time fields, drop-down lists, image fields, list boxes, password and signature fields,
radio buttons, and text fields. Some field objects, such as text fields, can be used in all types of
forms, whether the form is interactive, to be filled by a user, or to be filled by merging with a
data source. Others, such as drop-down lists, are intended specifically for interactive forms.
The following objects are available in the Standard and Barcodes categories of the Object
Library palette.
Object
Barcode
Description
A barcode identification
symbol.
Category
Static
Use
Designed for any
type of form.
For more
information
Usingbarcodes
241
Working with Objects
Object
242
7
Description
Category
Use
For more
information
Button
A button for issuing commands
or client requests.
Field
Designed for
interactive forms.
Usingbuttons
Check Box
An object that has an enabled
(on) or disabled (off) state.
Field
Designed for any
type of form.
Usingcheck boxes
Circle
A circle, ellipse, or arc.
Static
Designed for any
type of form.
Usingcircles, lines, and
rectangles
Content
Area
A container that serves as the
top-level object in an object
hierarchy and defines the area
in a form in which objects may
be placed.
Static
Every master page
defines at least one
content area.
Usingcontent areas
Date/Time
Field
A field that accepts and displays
date/time data and supports
pattern recognition.
Field
Designed for any
type of form.
Usingdate/time fields
Decimal
Field
A field that accepts and displays
decimal data and supports
pattern recognition.
Field
Designed for any
type of form.
Usingdecimal and
numeric fields
Signature
Field
A control that users can use to
attach an electronic signature to
the form.
Field
Designed for any
type of form.
Usingsignature fields
Drop-dow
n List
A list of multiple options from
which one option can be
selected. Only one option
appears at a time.
Field
Designed for
interactive forms.
Usingdrop-down lists
and list boxes
Email
Submit
Button
A button that form users can
use to return form data to a
specified email address.
Field
Designed for
interactive forms.
Emailsubmit buttons
Flash Field
An object that displays flash
content such as an instructional
video..
Field
Designed for
interactive forms.
Usingflash fields
HTTP
Submit
Button
A button that form users can
click to return form data by
HTTP post to a specified URL.
Field
Designed for
interactive forms.
HTTPsubmit buttons
Image
An object that displays an
image such as a logo or icon.
Static
Designed for any
type of form.
Usingimage fields
Working with Objects
Object
Description
Category
Use
For more
information
Image
Field
A placeholder for loading an
image dynamically when the
form is rendered.
Field
Designed for any
type of form.
Usingimage fields
Lines
A solid, dashed, or dotted line.
Static
Designed for any
type of form.
Usingcircles, lines, and
rectangles
List Box
A list of multiple options from
which one option can be
selected. More than one option
appears at a time.
Field
Designed for
interactive forms.
Usingdrop-down lists
and list boxes
Numeric
Field
A field that accepts and displays
numeric data and supports
pattern recognition.
Field
Designed for any
type of form.
Aboutnumeric fields
Paper
Forms
Barcode
A 2D barcode that encodes
user-entered data in an
interactive form. To use the
paper forms barcode, your
organization must have the
Acrobat Reader DC extensions
implemented.
Field
Designed for
interactive forms.
Usingdrop-down lists
and list boxes
Password
Field
A field that accepts and masks
the display of alphanumeric
passwords.
Field
Designed for any
type of form.
Usingpassword fields
Print
Button
A button that is configured for
form users to print the form.
Field
Designed for
interactive forms.
Printbuttons
Radio
Button
An object that represents a
single choice in a group of
mutually exclusive choices.
Field
Designed for any
type of form.
Usingradio buttons
Rectangle
A rectangle with regular,
notched, or rounded corners.
Static
Designed for any
type of form.
Usingcircles, lines, and
rectangles
Reset
Button
A button that form users can
click to reset the contents of the
form’s fields to their default
values.
Field
Designed for
interactive forms.
Resetbuttons
Subform
A container that controls the
positioning of objects. Each
page is a subform and may
contain additional subforms.
Static
Designed for any
type of form.
Aboutsubforms
243
Working with Objects
7
Object
Description
Category
Use
For more
information
Table
A container made up of rows
and columns of cells that you
can fill with form fields or
merge with data.
Can be a
static
object or
field
object
Designed for any
type of form.
Usingtables
Text
Read-only text.
Static
Designed for any
type of form.
Usingtext
Text Field
A field that accepts and displays
textual data and supports
pattern recognition.
Field
Designed for any
type of form.
Usingtext fields
RELATED LINKS:
Usingcustom objects
Tocreate a custom object
7.1.2.
To change an object type
There are several ways you can change the object type:
•
Delete the object on your form design and then drag the required object from the Object
Library palette
•
Use the Type list in the Field tab of the Object palette (for field objects such as text fields,
numeric fields, and buttons)
•
Use the list in the Object Editor (for field objects such as text fields, numeric fields, and
buttons)
•
Use the Type list in the Draw tab of the Object palette (for static objects such as circles, lines,
and text)
To change an object type using the Type list in the Object palette tabs
244
1)
Select the object you want to change.
2)
In the Object palette, click either the Field tab or the Draw tab and then select another object
type from the Type list.
Working with Objects
To change an object type using the Type list in the Object Editor
1)
Select the object you want to change. If the Object Editor does not appear around the object,
select View > Object Editor.
2)
Select another object type from the Type list.
7.1.3.
To name and rename objects
When you drag an object from the Object Library palette onto your form design, its default name is
the name of the object followed by a number that represents the number of copies of the same object
in the form design. For example, if you have two list box objects on your form design, the default
names are ListBox1 and ListBox2. This naming is called the occurrence number.
While creating the form design, you can see the name of the object in the following places:
•
Hierarchy palette
•
Binding tab of the Object palette
•
Object Editor
•
A pop-up tool tip on the form design when you position the pointer over the object
You can name or rename an object by using the Hierarchy palette, the Binding tab of the Object
palette, or the Object Editor.
If you plan to create calculations or scripts to enhance your form, avoid using the names of
scripting properties, methods, and objects when naming your form objects. Using similar names can
result in calculations and scripts not executing properly.
NOTE:
To name or rename an object by using the Hierarchy palette
1)
In the Hierarchy palette, right-click the object and select Rename Object.
2)
Type the new name and press Enter.
To name or rename an object by using the Binding tab of the Object palette
1)
Select the object.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Binding tab.
3)
In the Name box, type a new name for the object and press Enter.
245
Working with Objects
7
To name or rename an object by using the Object Editor
1)
Select the object. If the Object Editor does not appear, select View > Object Editor.
2)
In the Name box, type a new name for the object and press Enter.
7.1.4.
To set the border style
•
To set the border style for an object, in the Object palette, click the Field tab and select a border
style for the box from the Appearance list.
•
To define a custom look for an object, select Custom from the Appearance list.
•
To define a border for the whole object, use the Border palette.
RELATED LINKS:
Borderproperties in the Border palette
7.1.5.
To specify a locale (language and country or region) for an object
1)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab.
2)
In the Locale list, select one of these options or one of the provided alternatives for the object’s
localization setting:
•
To use the default locale specified in the Defaults tab of the Form Properties dialog box,
select Default Locale.
•
To use the system locale of the user’s computer, select Viewer’s System Locale.
At design time and run time, formatted values in the field are displayed in the locale-sensitive format.
NOTE:
RELATED LINKS:
Locales
7.1.6.
Objects that support scripting and calculations
Objects that accept data can be associated with FormCalc or JavaScript expressions. For example,
you can use scripts to calculate a value or validate user-entered data. In most cases, the validity of
data is controlled through the attributes of the object. In the case of objects that require complex
input (edit) patterns, the validity is controlled through pattern settings in the Value tab of the Object
palette.
Some objects can be used to initiate client requests. For example, you can set up a button to query a
data source at run time. In this case, you must also write a script to return the requested data value
to a specific field in the form.
246
Working with Objects
You can write scripts to execute commands, functions, or calculations when any of an object's events
occur at run time. An event will initiate at run time when the user performs the action that the event
specifies. You can call any of an object's supported methods and examine or set properties by
defining a script.
Some objects, such as circles and content areas, do not support events. The objects that support
scripting and calculations or that initiate events include barcodes, buttons, check boxes, date/time
fields, drop-down lists, flash fields, image fields, list boxes, numeric fields, password fields, radio
buttons, signature fields, subforms, and text fields. The supported events are object-specific and vary
from one object to the next.
RELATED LINKS:
Usingobjects in interactive forms
7.1.7.
Using objects in interactive forms
Designer includes several standard and custom objects that provide data entry and access capabilities, and support calculations and scripts to initiate actions and handle data capture and manipulation. You can use any of these objects on a form, as well as objects such as text fields and drawing
objects.
In addition, you can create custom objects whose properties and characteristics you plan to use often
in your forms. You create custom objects by defining properties and adding required functionality
such as scripts or calculations to standard Designer objects. You save custom objects in the Object
Library palette, either in the Custom category or in a category you create yourself.
When choosing objects, you should understand what functions and capabilities the objects provide.
There are several things to consider when selecting objects:
•
Determine the type of information you need to include in your forms and familiarize yourself
with the characteristics of the objects.
•
Be aware that fields have varying length and appearance requirements and options, as well as
data entry restrictions and requirements.
•
Analyze the types of data that you want to display and capture, and determine which objects
support those types of data.
•
Certain objects allow you to add calculations and write scripts to initiate actions on the field.
Determine what types of scripts you can use with particular objects.
RELATED LINKS:
AboutObjects
Tocreate a custom object
247
Working with Objects
7.2.
Using objects
7.2.1.
Using barcodes
7
Businesses use barcodes extensively, particularly for inventory control. Barcodes can be used to
identify forms, but they are often printed on adhesive paper to create labels for inventory purposes.
Designer supports two types of barcodes:
Hardware barcodes
Only use when the form is being printed directly to the printer from the server. Because a
printer is required to print them, Designer uses a placeholder to represent hardware barcodes
in the form.
Software barcodes
Can be drawn by Designer and are visible in Acrobat and Adobe Reader. They can be printed
on any general-purpose printer.
Some types of barcodes can hold arbitrary binary data. Others are limited to a particular set of
characters or codes. It is the responsibility of the form author to ensure that the data is appropriate for the barcode, for example, by imposing a validation on the field.
RELATED LINKS:
Supportedbarcode formats
Validbarcode text characters
Todynamically populate a validation pattern message
Todynamically populate a validation script message
Barcodeproperties in the Field tab
Barcodeproperties in the Value tab
Barcodeproperties in the Binding tab
Barcode formats
Designer provides a variety of barcode formats that you can work with. The supported barcode
formats are listed in the Barcodes category of the Object Library palette. If you use a barcode that
requires a specific type of printer, Designer represents the barcode as a shaded rectangle in the form.
Interactive barcodes that can accept user input are only supported for PDF forms that are filled
in Acrobat 7.0.5 or Adobe Reader 7.0.5 or later.
NOTE:
Designer also supports the two-dimensional paper forms barcode. For more information, see Usingpaper forms barcodes.
248
Working with Objects
Barcode position and appearance
The function of a barcode is to be read by a specialized piece of hardware called a barcode reader.
Since the barcode is intended to be read by a machine, its appearance is usually strictly constrained.
For example, for a particular type of barcode, the bars may have to be a particular height and distance
apart. In addition it is common for a barcode to require a minimum amount of white space around
it (the quiet zone) and a particular range of distances from a designated edge of the page.
Designer does nothing to express or enforce positioning or quiet zone requirements. It is up to the
form creator to ensure that these requirements are met.
Barcode properties
After you add a barcode to the form design, you can manipulate the object’s properties in the Field,
Value, and Binding tabs of the Object palette. You can define these properties:
•
Text position
•
Length of the data
•
Any additional properties supported by the barcode (for example, optional checksum capabilities, and text positioning and embedding)
•
Presence of the barcode as visible, invisible, or hidden
•
Binding method for storing and retrieving bound data
To define barcode field properties
To define the properties of a barcode, you must first select the barcode and set basic characteristics
in the Field tab of the Object palette. The number and type of barcode properties vary from one
barcode to another.
1)
Select the barcode.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Value tab and then type the barcode text in the Default box.
3)
Click the Field tab and, in the Location box, select the placement of the text.
The PDF 417 format does not support text positioning. It supports binary data of size upto 1
Mb. The EAN8, EAN13, and UPC-A formats support the Below Embedded option only.
4)
In the Value column, do one or more of the following actions:
•
In the Data Length box, type the length of the data. If you are defining an MSI barcode,
the data length must be a value between 1 and 14. The MSI, UPC-E, UPC EAN2, UPC
EAN5, US Postal Zip-5, US Postal DPBC, and US Postal Standard barcode formats have
fixed data lengths that cannot be changed.
249
Working with Objects
7
•
If a Checksum box is displayed, enable or disable the checksum.To enable the default
checksum, select Auto.To disable the checksum, select None. If you are defining an MSI
barcode, select one of the available checksum methods.
•
If an End Char or Start Char box is displayed, type the end character, start character, or
both. If you are defining a Codabar barcode, the valid end and start characters are A, B,
C, D, a, b, c, d, *, N, T, E, n, t, and e. If you are defining a Code 49 barcode, the valid start
characters are A, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5.
•
If a Wide/Narrow Ratio box is displayed, type a wide-narrow-ratio value. For Codabar,
Code 2 of 5 (Industrial, Interleaved, and Matrix), and Code 3 of 9, the wide-narrow-ratio
value must be a value from 2.2 to 3.0. For Code 11, Logmars, MSI, and Plessey barcodes,
the value must be a value from 2.0 to 3.0.
To set the default value for the barcode
1)
In the Object palette, click the Value tab and then type a default value in the Default box.
To control how a barcode obtains data
To define the properties of a barcode, you must first select the barcode. Set properties that control
how the barcode obtains data in the Value tab of the Object palette.
You can dynamically populate a validation pattern or script message with a value from a data
source. This allows you to ensure users enter the correct value in the field.
TIP:
1)
2)
250
In the Object palette, click the Value tab and then select one of these options from the Type list:
•
To allow users to choose to enter data or not, select User Entered - Optional.
•
To prompt users to enter data and make the field recommended, select User Entered Recommended and type a custom message in the Empty Message box.
•
To prompt users to enter data and make the field required, select User Entered - Required
and type a custom message in the Empty Message box.
•
To make the field read only and display a data value that is calculated and displayed
through an attached script, select Calculated - Read Only. Users cannot edit the calculated value.
•
To make the field editable and display a data value that is calculated and displayed
through an attached script, select Calculated - User Can Override. Users can edit the
value if the calculation script has been written to accept the input. If a user does edit the
calculated value, the custom message you specify in the Override Message box appears.
•
To make the field read only and display a data value that is merged or calculated and
displayed at run time, select Read Only. Users cannot edit the value.
If the value is recommended or required, type a prompt in the Empty Message box.
Working with Objects
3)
If the value will be calculated, attach the calculation script to the object by using the Script
Editor.
4)
(Optional) If a calculated value can be overridden, type a message into the Override Message
box.
To define custom data-binding properties for a barcode
Binding options enable you to build a form that captures data for enterprise infrastructures and/or
use an external data source to populate a form at run time. Set data-binding properties in the Binding
tab of the Object palette.
1)
Select the barcode.
2)
Enable the form to connect to the data source when the form is opened.
3)
Bind the barcode to its corresponding data node. For information about how to bind objects
to a data source, see Binding fields to a data source.
Encoding non-printing characters in barcode data
You can encode hidden, non-printing characters between the data in Code 128 barcodes. For
example, you can encode the characters that represent the prefix and the delimiter as part of the
Code 128 barcode standard. The application that reads the barcode then decodes the meaning of
these characters.
Some characters are reserved for use as non-printing characters in Code 128 barcodes. To encode
these characters in a barcode, use the following mechanism in Designer.
Code 128 non-printing characters
Use these values in Designer
FNC1
[F1]
FNC2
[F2]
FNC3
[F3]
SHIFT
[SH]
Change to Subset A
[CA]
Change to Subset B
[CB]
Change to Subset C
[CC]
Start in Subset A
[SA]
Start in Subset B
[SB]
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Working with Objects
7
Code 128 non-printing characters
Start in Subset C
Use these values in Designer
[SC]
For example, to encode FNC1 in a Code 128 barcode, insert [F1] as follows: 00[F1]12345[F1]67890.
7.2.2.
Using buttons
If you want users to initiate actions such as submitting data, executing a web service operation, or
executing a database query, you can add a button to the form. With the help of Designer’s built-in
support for client-server communications and scripting, forms can support these kinds of actions
through buttons:
•
Execute a calculation
•
Process and manipulate data through a script
•
Submit data (including optional attachments) to a server
•
Sign submitted form content
•
Encrypt submitted form content
•
Open a connection to a host
•
Submit client requests to a server
•
Invoke a web service operation
•
Query a data source
The actions associated with the button are initiated when the user clicks the button.
After you add a button object to the form design, you can edit the caption text and manipulate the
object’s properties in the Field, Submit, and Execute tabs of the Object palette. You can define these
properties:
•
Change the caption for the button
•
Set a border style for the button
•
Specify the highlight style for the button
•
Define the button as visible, invisible, or hidden
•
Specify a locale for the button
•
Specify run-time behavior
Designer also includes four additional buttons that are preconfigured to provide specific functions.
They include an email submit button, an HTTP submit button, a print button, and a reset button.
RELATED LINKS:
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Working with Objects
Usingdigital signatures
UsingXML encryption
Buttonproperties in the Field tab
HTTPsubmit button properties in the Field tab
Emailsubmit button properties in the Field tab
Aboutprocessing options for a button
Working around web browserlimitations
Email submit buttons
The email submit button is a standard button that has certain properties already set and a specialized
Object palette. This object makes it easier for you to create buttons that users can click to return their
form data by email. Because Adobe Reader does not save changes to PDF files, including form data,
it is a good idea to include an email submit button on forms that users may fill in Adobe Reader.
The email submit button operates like a standard button object with these settings:
•
Control Type set to Submit
•
Submit Format set to XML Data
•
Submit To URL set to use the mailto: protocol, such as mailto:[email protected]
•
Encoding set to UTF-8
If you use the New Form Assistant to create a form and select one of the Submit return methods, an
email submit button will be included on the form automatically.
After you add a button to the form design, you can edit the caption text, and you can manipulate the
object’s properties in the Field tab of the Object palette. You can define these properties:
•
Change the caption for the button
•
Set a border style for the button
•
Specify the highlight style for the button
•
Set the To address and the Subject of the email message
•
Sign submitted form content
•
Encrypt submitted form content
•
Define the button as visible, invisible, or hidden
•
Specify a locale for the button
You can also change the button name in the Hierarchy palette and set a style for the caption in the
Font and Paragraph palettes.
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Working with Objects
7
To configure the email submit button
You can specify the e-mail address that the form data will be sent to and the subject line of the email
that will be sent.
1)
Add an email submit button to the form design. See To add objects to a form design.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab.
3)
In the Email Address box, type the e-mail address you want to send the submission to.
4)
(Optional) In the Email Subject box, type a subject line for the e-mail.
5)
(Optional) To apply a data signature to the submitted data, select Sign Submission and then
click Settings to configure optional signature settings.
6)
(Optional) To apply XML encryption to the form content, select Encrypt Submission and then
click Settings to configure optional encryption settings.
HTTP submit buttons
The HTTP submit button is a standard button that has certain properties already set and a specialized Object palette. This object makes it easier for you to create buttons that users can click to return
their form data by HTTP post.
The HTTP submit button operates like a standard button object with these settings:
•
Control Type set to Submit
•
Submit Format set to URL-Encoded Data
•
Submit To URL set to use the http: protocol
If your data needs to be returned through the secure https: protocol, you can also use the standard
button object.
After you add a button to the form design, you can edit the caption text, and you can manipulate the
object’s properties in the Field tab of the Object palette. You can define these properties:
254
•
Change the caption for the button
•
Set a border style for the button
•
Select the highlight style for the button
•
Specify the URL that the data will be sent to
•
Sign submitted form content
•
Encrypt submitted form content
•
Define the button as visible, invisible, or hidden
•
Specify a locale for the button
Working with Objects
You can also change the button name in the Hierarchy palette and set a style for the caption in the
Font and Paragraph palettes.
To configure the HTTP submit button
1)
Add an HTTP submit button to the form design. See To add objects to a form design.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab and type the URL protocol in the URL box.
To
Use this URL protocol
Example
Submit the package to an ftp site
ftp
ftp://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/GPL
Submit the package to a web server
http
http://myserver/cgi-bin/
Submit the package to a secure web
server
https
https://myserver/cgi-bin/
Submit the package to an email address
mailto
mailto:[email protected]
When submitting data to a URL, it is recommended that you specify an absolute target.
Relative targets are interpreted relative to the user environment, which can vary from one user
to the next at run time.
NOTE:
3)
(Optional) To apply a data signature to the submitted data, select Sign Submission and then
click Settings to configure optional signature settings.
4)
(Optional) To apply XML encryption to the form content, select Encrypt Submission and then
click Settings to configure optional encryption settings.
Print buttons
The print button opens a Print dialog box so that the user can print the form. A Print button is a
standard button object that has the Control Type set to Regular and a script included in the button’s
click event that prints the form when the button is clicked.
In the stand-alone version of Designer, if you use the New Form Assistant to create a form and select
one of the Print return methods, a print button will be included on the form automatically.
Reset buttons
A reset button resets all fields on the form to their default values. The Reset button object is a standard button object that has the Control Type set to Regular and a script included in the button’s
click event that resets the field values when the button is clicked.
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Working with Objects
7
To insert a standard button that runs a calculation or script
1)
Add the button to a form design. See To add objects to a form design.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab.
3)
Select an event from the Show box. For example, if you want the button to perform a calculation, select Click.
4)
In the Script Editor, select a language from the Language list.
5)
Type the calculation or script in the Script Editor.
7.2.3.
Processing options for a button
In the Execute tab in the Object palette, you can select a data connection for the button and specify
whether the associated processing will be carried out on the client computer, the server, or both. The
data connection must provide access to a web-service interface or OLEDB database server that will
either return data to the form at run time or perform an action elsewhere.
After you specify the data source (see Working with Data Sources), you can specify the operation or
query to run. When the button is clicked at run time, processing is completed as defined through the
operation or query.
Returned data can be merged with the form so that only data associated with existing objects is overwritten without refreshing the structure of the form. Alternatively, you can choose to update the
structure of the form based on the returned XML data. In this case, the structure of the form is
updated, and the returned data is merged after processing is completed.
To define processing options for a button, you must first select the button. The processing options
are set in the Execute tab of the Object palette. To view the Execute tab, the Execute option must be
selected in the Control Type area in the Field tab.
RELATED LINKS:
Buttonproperties in the Execute tab
Previewingand testing forms
Workingwith Data Sources
Tocreate a bound field or subform
To execute a web service operation or database query using a button
Using an Execute button type, you can execute a process request to a web service. A web service
processes operations that you send to it to define input and output information in your form.
You add a connection to the web service and then create or bind fields to the request and response
messages. The bound fields can generate input data to send to the service or receive data from the
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Working with Objects
service. Multiple fields can be used to create the request message, and the response message can
populate multiple fields. To process the operation, you can use an Execute button or write a script.
For example, you can use a web service to look up an interest rate, a currency exchange rate, or a
stock quote.
1)
Add a button to the form design. See To add objects to a form design.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab.
3)
In the Control Type area, select Execute. A web-service operation or database query will be
executed according to the settings in the Execute tab.
4)
Click the Execute tab and select New Data Connection from the Connection list.
5)
Select WSDL File and click Next.
6)
In the WSDL File box, type the URL to the WSDL document, or click Browse to locate and
select the document on your computer’s hard disk. If the WSDL document is stored on a secure
server, either the Authentication Required dialog box or the Select a Digital ID dialog box is
displayed.
7)
Perform one of the following actions:
8)
•
In the Authentication dialog box, type the correct user name and password, and click OK.
•
In the Select A Digital ID dialog box, select the correct digital ID to use as a client certificate, and click OK.
Select the operation to call, and click Next.
The window on the right displays details for the selected operation. If the selected operation is
not SOAP-encoded or is not doc-literal, a warning appears in this window and you cannot
continue.
9)
(Optional) To set up client authentication, perform one of the following actions:
•
To define HTTP or HTTPS authentication, select Requires HTTP/HTTPS Authentication, and then optionally select the credentials to accept for verification.
•
To define SOAP message authentication, select Requires Message Level Authentication,
and then optionally select Accepts User Name and Password.
10) Click Finish.
11) In the Run At list, specify where the processing will take place:
•
To process the request on the client computer, select Client.
•
To process the request on the server, select Server.
•
To process the request on the client computer and server, select Client And Server.
12) To update the structure of the form and merge returned data after processing is completed,
select Re-merge Form Data. You must use the Re-merge Form Data option if the response data
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Working with Objects
7
is going to populate dynamic data (such as a repeating subform) that is bound to WSDL data,
which may occur a variable number of times in the response. Dynamic data requires a full
remerge to generate the correct number of repeating subforms. If the WDSL response data is
bound to a fixed number of fields, the response data will populate the existing fields, such that
you do not need to re-merge the form data.
To attach a database script to a button
You can use scripting to perform more complex data manipulation on an enterprise system. In this
example, you can see how to add some simple script to button fields to do basic database operations,
including moving to the first, previous, next, and last records, adding new records, updating existing
records, and deleting records.
NOTE: This example is based on a particular database and configuration that is not included in the
Designer samples.The example is intended as a reference for creating your own databaselookup scripts.
1)
In the Object Library palette, click the Standard category and drag eight button objects onto
the form design. When you add a button object, the default control type is Regular. Accept the
default setting.
2)
Name the buttons as follows: First, Previous, Next, Last, AddNew, Update, Delete, and Cancel.
3)
Select the first button, in this case the one named First.
4)
In the Script Editor, select click from the Show list, select JavaScript from the Language list,
and select Client from the Run At list.
5)
In the Script Editor, add the following JavaScript script:
xfa.sourceSet.DataConnection.first();
6)
258
Repeat step 5 for each of the remaining buttons, using the following scripts:
•
Previous:xfa.sourceSet.DataConnection.previous();
•
Next:xfa.sourceSet.DataConnection.next();
•
Last:xfa.sourceSet.DataConnection.last();
•
AddNew:xfa.sourceSet.DataConnection.addNew();
•
Update:xfa.sourceSet.DataConnection.update();
•
Delete:xfa.sourceSet.DataConnection.delete();
•
Cancel:xfa.sourceSet.DataConnection.cancel();
7)
Save the form design.
8)
Test the form using the Preview PDF tab. If such a form were being filled in Adobe Reader, you
would have to set usage rights for the form by using Acrobat Reader DC extensions in order
for Adobe Reader to access the database.
Working with Objects
9)
Click the different buttons to display the data associated with each record. The example shows
that the Last button causes the ID, part number, description, and unit price for the last record
to appear in the applicable fields.
Using a button to populate fields from a database
You can use a database to provide the data for fields in your form, including text and numeric fields.
In this example, the Retrieve Record button and the list box are bound to the database (named DataConnection) shown in the Data View palette at the left. The button also has a FormCalc script
attached to it to retrieve information based on the part number selected in the List Box field. The
retrieved records appear in the ID, PART_NO, UNITPRICE, and DESCRIPTION fields.
1)
Connect to the database.
2)
In the Data View palette, drag the UNIT_PRICE, DESCRIPTION, PART_NO, and ID
elements under DataConnection onto the form design. Each node dragged onto the form
design creates a bound field.
3)
In the Object palette, click the Standard tab and drag a button object onto the form design.
4)
Enter a new name for the button. The example uses RETRIEVE RECORD.
5)
Select the button and, in the Script Editor, select click from the Show list, select FormCalc from
the Language list, and select Client from the Run At list.
6)
Enter a FormCalc script similar to the following example. The script retrieves the data in the
specified records and prints it in the corresponding fields when the user clicks the button.
//Change the commandType from TABLE to TEXT. TEXT
//is the equivalent of SQL Property
$sourceSet.DataConnection.#command.query.commandType = “text”
259
Working with Objects
7
//Set the Select Node. Select in this case will be
//whatever SQL Property you want
$sourceSet.DataConnection.#command.query.select.nodes.item(0).value =
Concat(“Select*from OfficeSupplies Where ID = “, DataListBox1.rawValue,””)
//Reopen the Data connection
$sourceSet.DataConnection.open()
7)
Save the form design as a PDF file.
8)
Test the form using the Preview PDF tab to verify that the script works as expected.
7.2.4.
Submitting data using a button
You can add a button to a form so form fillers can submit the information or data they enter into the
various fields in the form. The Object Library provides three button objects you use to submit form
data, the Button, Email Submit Button, and HTTP Submit Button objects.
To define the properties of a button for submitting data, you select the button object in the Layout
Editor and select options on either the Submit or Field tab in the Object palette. With the Button
object, you first select the Submit option in the Control Type area on the Field tab, to display the
options for submitting data on the Submit tab. With the Email Submit Button and the HTTP Submit
Button objects, the options for submitting data are located on the Field tab.
Each submit button provides options for different purposes. For example, if you want to submit data
to a URL, use the Button or the HTTP Submit Button objects. However, if you want to submit the
data as an XML Data Package (XDP) including attachments like annotations, PDF documents, or
signatures, use the Button object.
Use the Button object to submit form data to a URL in XML Data Package (XDP), PDF, XML Data
(XML), or URL-encoded data format. The Button object is the only button that provides the options
to include attachments like annotations, templates, and PDFs. You can also use the Button object to
submit form data by email using the mailto protocol.
Use the Email Submit Button object to submit form data to an e-mail address in XDP or PDF format.
Use the HTTP Button object to submit form data to a URL in URL-encoded data format.
All three buttons provide options for signing and encrypting submitted data.
RELATED LINKS:
Usingdigital signatures
UsingXML encryption
Buttonproperties in the Submit tab
Emailsubmit button properties in the Field tab
HTTPsubmit button properties in the Field tab
260
Working with Objects
To add a button that submits an XML Data Package (XDP) to a URL
1)
Add a Button object to the form design. See To add objects to a form design.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab.
3)
In the Control Type area, select Submit. Data will be submitted according to the settings in the
Submit tab.
4)
Click the Submit tab, and in the Submit to URL box, type the URL protocol.
To
Use this URL protocol
Example
Submit the package to an ftp site
ftp
ftp://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/GPL
Submit the package to a web server
http
http://myserver/cgi-bin/
Submit the package to a secure web server
https
https://myserver/cgi-bin/
When submitting data to a URL, it is recommended that you specify an absolute target.
Relative targets are interpreted relative to the user environment, which can vary from one user
to the next at run time.
NOTE:
5)
In the Submit As list, select XML Data Package (XDP).
These formats initiate server-side processing. The XML Data Package (XDP) option submits
the form data and optionally includes other information, such as the form design, annotations,
and signatures, that is needed for Forms to subsequently render the form at run time. Attachments may be included with XDP files only.
6)
(Optional) To apply a signature to the submitted data, select Sign Submission and then click
Settings to select optional signature settings.
7)
(Optional) To apply XML encryption to the form content, select Encrypt Submission and then
click Settings to select optional encryption settings.
8)
In the Include area, select the types of attachments to include:
•
To include review comments, tool tips, and any other special tags needed to capture
screen reader text, select Annotations.
•
To include a PDF version of the form (including signatures) when it is submitted as an
attachment, select PDF (Includes Signatures). Otherwise, a reference to an embedded
PDF file is included.
•
To include a copy of the form design, select Template.
•
To include one or more <xdp> elements in the XDP source file, select Other. The specified elements must be separated by commas and white space is optional; for example:
xci, xslt, sourceset.
261
Working with Objects
9)
7
In the Data Encoding list, select one of the data encoding schemes:
•
UTF-8
•
UTF-16
•
Shift_JIS
•
Big5
•
GBK
•
KSC_5601
To add a button that submits an embedded PDF to a URL
1)
Add a Button object to the form design. See To add objects to a form design.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab.
3)
In the Control Type area, select Submit. Data will be submitted according to the settings in the
Submit tab.
4)
Click the Submit tab and type the URL protocol in the Submit to URL box.
To
Use this URL protocol
Example
Submit the package to an ftp site
ftp
ftp://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/GPL
Submit the package to a web server
http
http://myserver/cgi-bin/
Submit the package to a secure web server
https
https://myserver/cgi-bin/
Submit the package to an email address
mailto
mailto:[email protected]
NOTE: When submitting data to a URL, it is recommended that you specify an absolute target.
Relative targets are interpreted relative to the user environment, which can vary from one user
to the next at run time.
5)
In the Submit As list, select PDF.
This format submits a package containing an embedded PDF file.
Choose this format if the form contains a signature field, or if a copy of the form together with
its data needs to be saved by Forms or submitted to another type of target server. Do not choose
this option if the form initiates server-side processing, and if Forms will be used to render
HTML or dynamic forms at run time. Keep in mind that if you want to submit data in PDF
format, ensure that the Save usage right is applied to the form using Acrobat Reader DC extensions. No data can be submitted if the Save useage right is not applied to the form.
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Working with Objects
6)
(Optional) To apply a signature to the submitted data, select Sign Submission in the Field tab
and then click Settings to select optional signature settings.
7)
(Optional) To apply XML encryption to the form content, select Encrypt Submission and then
click Settings to select optional encryption settings.
To add an email submit button that submits an embedded PDF to an email address
1)
Add an Email Submit Button object the form design. See To add objects to a form design.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab.
3)
In the Email Address box, type the email address you want to submit the PDF to.
4)
(Optional) In the Email Subject box, type a subject line for the email message.
5)
In the Submit As list, select PDF.
This format submits a package containing an embedded PDF file.
Choose this format if the form contains a signature field, or if a copy of the form together with
its data needs to be saved by Forms or submitted to another type of target server. Do not choose
this option if the form initiates server-side processing, and if Forms will be used to render
HTML or dynamic forms at run time. Keep in mind that if you want to submit data in PDF
format, ensure that the Save usage right is applied to the form using Acrobat Reader DC extensions. No data can be submitted if the Save useage right is not applied to the form.
6)
(Optional) To apply a signature to the submitted data, select Sign Submission in the Field tab
and then click Settings to select optional signature settings.
7)
(Optional) To apply XML encryption to the form content, select Encrypt Submission and then
click Settings to select optional encryption settings.
To add a button that submits XML data to a URL
1)
Add a Button object to the form design. See To add objects to a form design.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab.
3)
In the Control Type area, select Submit. Data will be submitted according to the settings in the
Submit tab.
4)
Click the Submit tab and type the URL protocol in the Submit to URL box.
To
Use this URL protocol
Example
Submit the package to an ftp site
ftp
ftp://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/GPL
Submit the package to a web server
http
http://myserver/cgi-bin/
263
Working with Objects
7
To
Use this URL protocol
Example
Submit the package to a secure web server
https
https://myserver/cgi-bin/
Submit the package to an email address
mailto
mailto:[email protected]
When submitting data to a URL, we recommend that you specify an absolute target. Relative targets are interpreted relative to the user environment, which can vary from one user to the
next at run time.
NOTE:
5)
In the Submit As list, select XML Data (XML).
This format submits an XML data stream, which allows for the hierarchical representation of
data and can be parsed by any generic XML parser. Choose this format if the server that
communicates with the run-time user application program must receive an XML data steam.
6)
(Optional) To apply a signature to the submitted data, select Sign Submission in the Field tab
and then click Settings to select optional signature settings.
7)
(Optional) To apply XML encryption to form content, select Encrypt Submission and then
click Settings to select optional encryption settings.
8)
In the Encoding list, select one of the data encoding schemes:
•
UTF-8
•
UTF-16
•
Shift_JIS
•
Big5
•
GBK
•
KSC_5601
To add an email submit button that submits XML data to an email address
1)
Add an Email Submit Button object to the form design. See To add objects to a form design.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab.
3)
In the Email Address box, type the email address you want to submit the PDF to.
4)
(Optional) In the Email Subject box, type a subject line for the email message.
5)
In the Submit As list, select XML Data (XML).
This format submits an XML data stream, which allows for the hierarchical representation of
data and can be parsed by any generic XML parser. Choose this format if the server that
communicates with the run-time user application program must receive an XML data steam.
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Working with Objects
6)
(Optional) To apply a data signature to the submitted data, select Sign Submission in the Field
tab and then click Settings to select optional signature settings.
7)
(Optional) To apply XML encryption to form content, select Encrypt Submission and then
click Settings to select optional encryption settings.
To add a button that submits XML data to an e-mail address
1)
Add a Button object to the form design. See To add objects to a form design.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab.
3)
In the Control Type area, select Submit. Data will be submitted according to the settings in the
Submit tab.
4)
Click the Submit tab and, in the Submit to URL box, type the mailto protocol as shown in the
following example:
mailto:[email protected]
5)
In the Submit As list, select XML Data (XML).
This format sends an XML data stream, which allows for the hierarchical representation of data
and can be parsed by any generic XML parser. Choose this format if the server that communicates with the run-time user application program must receive an XML data steam.
6)
(Optional) To apply a data signature to the submitted data, select Sign Submission in the Field
tab and then click Settings to configure optional signature settings.
7)
(Optional) To apply XML encryption to form content, select Encrypt Submission and then
click Settings to configure optional encryption settings.
8)
In the Encoding list, select one of the data encoding schemes:
•
UTF-8
•
UTF-16
•
Shift_JIS
•
Big5
•
GBK
•
KSC_5601
To add a button that submits a text stream using the POST method
1)
Add a Button object to the form design. See To add objects to a form design.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab.
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7
3)
In the Control Type area, select Submit. Data will be submitted according to the settings in the
Submit tab.
4)
Click the Submit tab and type the URL protocol in the Submit to URL box.
To
Use this URL protocol
Example
Submit the package to an ftp site
ftp
ftp://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/GPL
Submit the package to a web server
http
http://myserver/cgi-bin/
Submit the package to a secure web
server
https
https://myserver/cgi-bin/
Submit the package to an email address
mailto
mailto:[email protected]
NOTE: When submitting data to a URL, it is recommended that you specify an absolute target.
Relative targets are interpreted relative to the user environment, which can vary from one user
to the next at run time.
5)
In the Submit As list, select URL-Encoded Data (HTTP Post).
This format submits a text stream to the specified Uniform Resource Locator (URL) by using
the POST method. The text stream can be parsed by an FTP server, a mail server, a web server,
or a CGI script that processes HTML forms. To use this method, users must open the form in
Adobe Reader 6.0 or later or a web browser unless the URL specifies the mailto protocol.
6)
In the Encoding list, select one of the data encoding schemes:
•
UTF-8
•
UTF-16
•
Shift_JIS
•
Big5
•
GBK
•
KSC_5601
To add an email submit button that submits encrypted form content to an e-email
266
1)
Add an Email Submit Button object to the form design. See To add objects to a form design.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab.
3)
In the Email Address box, type the e-mail address you want to send the submission to.
4)
(Optional) In the Email Subject box, type a subject line for the e-mail.
Working with Objects
5)
In the Submit As list, select PDF or XML Data (XML).
6)
Select Encrypt Submission, and click Settings.
7)
In the Encrypt Data And Submit Settings dialog box, select options as needed. See EncryptData
and Submit Settings dialog box.
To add a button that submits encrypted and encoded form content to an e-mail address
1)
Add a Button object to the form design. See To add objects to a form design.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab.
3)
In the Control Type area, select Submit. Data is submitted according to the settings in the
Submit tab.
4)
Click the Submit tab and, in the Submit to URL box, type the mailto protocol as shown in the
following example:
mailto:[email protected]
5)
In the Submit As list, select either PDF or XML Data (XML).
6)
Select Encrypt Submission, and click Settings.
7)
In the Encrypt Data And Submit Settings dialog box, select options as needed. See EncryptData
and Submit Settings dialog box.
8)
In the Encoding list, select one of the data encoding schemes:
•
UTF-8
•
UTF-16
•
Shift_JIS
•
Big5
•
GBK
•
KSC_5601
To add an HTTP button that submits encrypted form content to a URL
1)
Add an HTTP Submit Button object to the form design. See To add objects to a form design.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab.
3)
In the URL box, type the URL that the form data will be posted to.
4)
Select Encrypt Submission, and click Settings.
5)
In the Encrypt Data And Submit Settings dialog box, select options as needed. See EncryptData
and Submit Settings dialog box.
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7.2.5.
7
Using check boxes
If you want to provide users with individual choices that are either turned on or off, add check boxes
to the form. The user can toggle the state of a check box. When the check box is selected, its state is
on. When the check box is deselected, its state is off. Check boxes can be turned on and off in any
combination and may be used to set the properties of a selection.
After you add a check box to the form design, you can edit the caption text and manipulate the
object’s properties in the Field, Value, and Binding tabs of the Object palette. You can define these
properties:
•
Change the caption for the check box. See Formatting captions.
•
Set a border style for the box. See To set the border style.
•
Define the object as visible, invisible, or hidden. See Making objects visible, invisible, orhidden.
•
Specify a locale for the check box. See To specify a locale (language and countryor region) for
an object.
•
Specify the size for the check box.
•
Specify the check style.
•
Specify the states for the check box.
•
Select the default state of the check box.
•
Specify values for the on, off, and neutral states of the check box.
•
Specify a binding method for storing and retrieving bound data.
Check boxes support scripting and calculations. If a user is to supply data, you can define whether
the input is recommended or required, and you can set up messages to prompt users appropriately.
All user input may be validated through scripting.
You can bind check box objects to data elements in a source data file to derive the On and Off values
from the source file when the form is rendered
To specify the size for the check box
1)
To set the size for a check box, in the Object palette, click the Field tab.
2)
In the Size box, type a different value (in points) and press Enter.
Depending on the size you enter, you may have to resize the check box.
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Working with Objects
To specify the check style
1)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab.
2)
Select an option in the Check Style list:
•
To set the check style to the default, which is an X, select Default.
•
To set the check style to a check mark, select Check.
•
To set the check style to a circle, select Circle.
•
To set the check style to a cross, select Cross.
•
To set the check style to a diamond, select Diamond.
•
To set the check style to a square, select Square.
•
To set the check style to a star, select Star.
To specify the states for the check box
1)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab.
2)
Under States, select an option:
•
To specify that the check box will have On (selected) and Off (clear) states, select On/Off.
•
To specify that the check box will have On (selected), Off (clear), and Neutral (not
selected or clear) states, select On/Off/Neutral.
Values for each state must be defined in the Binding tab of the Object palette.
To define the behavior of the check box
1)
In the Object palette, click the Value tab and select one of these options:
•
To allow users to choose whether to enter data, select User Entered - Optional.
•
To make the field read only and display a data value that is calculated and displayed
through an attached script, select Calculated - Read Only. Users will not be able to edit
the calculated value.
•
To make the field editable and display a data value that is calculated and displayed
through an attached script, select Calculated - User Can Override. Users can edit the
value if the calculation script has been written to accept the input. If a user does edit the
calculated value, the custom message you specify in the Override Message box appears.
•
To make the field read only and display a data value that is merged or calculated and
displayed at run time, select Read Only. Users will not be able to edit the value.
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Working with Objects
7
2)
If the value will be calculated, attach the calculation script to the object by using the Script
Editor.
3)
(Optional) If a calculated value can be overridden, type a message in the Override Message box.
You can dynamically populate a validation pattern or script message with a value from a
data source. This allows you to ensure that users enter the correct value in the field.
TIP:
To specify the default state of the check box
1)
In the Object palette, click the Value tab.
2)
Select a state from the Default list:
•
To set the default state to On, select On. The check box is selected initially.
•
To set the default state to Off, select Off. The check box is deselected initially.
•
To set the default state to Neutral, select Neutral. The box is filled with grey initially.
The Default list is available only when the Type option is set to User Entered or Read Only.
The Neutral option is available from the Default list only when the States area in the Field tab is
set to On/Off/Neutral.
NOTE:
To change the values assigned to check box states
By default, check boxes use numbers to represent values in the form data. The default values are “1”
for On, “0” for Off, and “2” for Neutral. You can change these values to match existing values in a
data source or to provide more meaningful terms related to the purpose of the check box in the data
file.
1)
In the Object palette, click the Binding tab.
2)
In the On Value box, specify the value of the check box’s On state in the data source
3)
In the Off Value box, specify the value of the check box’s Off state in the data source.
4)
If On/Off/Neutral was selected in the Field tab, in the Neutral Value box, specify the value of
the check box’s Neutral state in the data source.
To define custom data-binding properties for a check box
Binding options enable you to build a form that captures data for enterprise infrastructures and/or
use an external data source to populate a form at run time. Set data-binding properties in the Binding
tab of the Object palette.
270
1)
Select the check box.
2)
Enable the form to connect to the data source when the form is opened.
Working with Objects
3)
Bind the check box to its corresponding data node.
For information about how to bind objects to a data source, see Binding fields to a data source.
RELATED LINKS:
Checkbox properties in the Field tab
Checkbox properties in the Value tab
Checkbox properties in the Binding tab
Todynamically populate a validation pattern message
Todynamically populate a validation script message
7.2.6.
Using circles, lines, and rectangles
The drawing objects in the Object Library palette provide you with a way to enhance forms graphically.
•
Using the Circle object, you can draw circular, elliptical, or arc shapes anywhere on the page.
•
Using the Line object, you can draw solid, dashed, or dotted lines anywhere on the page.
•
Using the Rectangle object, you can draw rectangles that have 90° or rounded corners. Use
rectangles to graphically frame an area of the form or provide a rectangular area as a background for other objects.
After you add a drawing object to the form design, you can manipulate the object’s properties in the
Draw tab of the Object palette. You can define these properties:
•
Change the line style.
•
Change the thickness of the line.
•
Select a line color.
•
Specify the shape of the circle.
•
Specify the start and end points of an arc.
•
Fill the circle or rectangle with color or a pattern.
•
Change the slope of the line.
•
Change the corners of the rectangle.
•
Make the object visible, invisible, or hidden.
•
Define the object as visible, invisible, or hidden. See Making objects visible, invisible, orhidden.
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Working with Objects
To change the line style
1)
Select the circle, line, or rectangle.
2)
In the Object palette, select a style from the Line Style list.
You may have to zoom in or increase the thickness of the line to see the style.
To change the thickness of the line
1)
Select the circle, line, or rectangle.
2)
In the Object palette, in the box to the right of the Line Style, type a new thickness.
If you type a number that makes the line very thick (for example, 1 in), then the line will be
difficult to select. Use the Hierarchy palette to select the line.
To select a line color
1)
Select the circle, line, or rectangle.
2)
In the Object palette, click the color selector button and select a color.
To specify the shape of the circle
1)
Select the circle.
2)
In the Object palette, select the shape of the object from the Appearance list.
•
To draw an elliptical shape, select Ellipse.
•
To draw a circular shape, select Circle.
•
To draw an arc, select Arc.
To specify the start and end points of an arc
1)
Select the arc.
2)
In the Object palette, type the start and end points of the arc (in degrees) into the Start and
Sweep boxes respectively.
To fill the circle or rectangle with color or a pattern
272
1)
Select the circle or rectangle.
2)
In the Object palette, select an option from the Fill list.
7
Working with Objects
3)
Using the adjacent color selector buttons, select appropriate fill colors.
To change the slope of the line
You can change the slope of the line. This is useful if you have drawn a line that is crooked. You can
use this option to straighten the line.
1)
Select the line.
2)
In the Object palette, click one of the Appearance buttons
.
To change the corners of the rectangle
1)
Select the rectangle.
2)
In the Object palette, click one of the Corners buttons.
3)
In the Radius box, define the corner radius.
RELATED LINKS:
Rectangleproperties in the Draw tab
Circleproperties in the Draw tab
Lineproperties in the Draw tab
Layoutproperties in the Layout palette
7.2.7.
Using content areas
Content areas provide anchoring and layout management for all the objects in a form, including
subforms.
It is usually unnecessary to modify the properties of a content area. However, if you are designing a
form that contains subforms that are set to flow content, becoming familiar with the properties of
content areas will help you to understand the behavior of subforms. For information about the properties of content areas, see Content area properties in the ContentArea tab.
Content areas cannot be selected or manipulated through the Design View tab of the Layout Editor.
If required, you can select, cut, copy, paste, move, delete, or resize content areas through the Master
Pages tab of the Layout Editor. A rectangle on the master page delimits the area bounded by a
content area.
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Working with Objects
7
This rectangle delimits the content area
New forms have a default content area. If required (for example, when designing a form that
contains subforms set to flow content), you can add additional content areas to the form. All content
areas are displayed in the Hierarchy palette.
Default content area
Data flow between content areas
When more than one content area has been defined, objects flow from one content area to the next
when the form is rendered. You can select a flow direction for the objects and their data. The flow
direction controls when an object receives the focus relative to the other objects in the form during
a tabbing sequence. It also determines when an object receives merged data relative to the other
objects in the form. Specifying the flow direction of one content area automatically sets the flow
direction of all other content areas in the form.
When the form is rendered, if an object that merges data expands so much that it will no longer fit
in one content area, the object spills into the next and subsequent content areas. Similarly, when you
are designing a form, you cannot add more objects to a content area than will fit within the area
bounded by the content area. As soon as the content area has been filled, the remaining objects overflow into the next available content area. If another content area is not available to catch the overflow, the data will not be rendered properly.
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Working with Objects
To select a content area
You can select a content area using the Hierarchy palette or the Master Pages tab of the Layout
Editor.
1)
Select a content area by doing one of the following actions:
•
In the Layout Editor, click the Master Pages tab. Click the blue rectangle that delimits the
content area.
•
In the Hierarchy palette, click the content area.
To rename a content area
•
To rename a content area using the Hierarchy palette, right-click the object and select Rename
Object. Type the new name and press Enter.
•
To rename a content area using the Object palette, select the content area. In the Object palette,
type a new name for the content area in the Name box and press Enter. Designer maintains the
occurrence number automatically.
To define the tabbing and data-fill order for the subforms within the content area
1)
In the Object palette, select one of these options from the Flow Direction list:
•
To set the default tabbing order and data-fill order starting from the top of the page and
moving to the bottom of the page, select Top To Bottom.
•
To set the default tabbing order and data-fill order starting from the top of the page and
moving to the right until the last object on the right edge of the page has been reached,
select Western Text. When the right edge of the page has been reached, continue the
tabbing order and flow direction at the next object down on the left side of the page.
•
To set the default tabbing order and data-fill order starting from the right of the page and
moving to the left of the page, select Right to Left.
Copying, moving, and resizing content areas
You can cut, copy, paste, delete, resize, or reposition content areas through the Master Pages tab of
the Layout Editor. You can only cut or delete content areas that you have added to a master page. A
form must have at least one content area. The default content area cannot be deleted.
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Working with Objects
7
To cut, copy, paste, or delete a content area
1)
In the Layout Editor, click the Master Pages tab. Right-click the content area and select the
appropriate menu command.
To resize a content area
1)
Resize the content area in the Master Pages tab of the Layout editor using one of these methods:
•
Click the border of the content area and drag any of the resizing handles to resize the
object.
•
Select the content area, and then in the Layout palette, adjust the size settings.
To move a content area
1)
In the Master Pages tab of the Layout editor, select the content area.
2)
Move the content area using one of these methods:
•
Drag the content area to a new location.
•
Edit the x and y coordinates in the Layout palette.
•
Use an arrow key to move the content area slightly in one direction.
Adding content areas
You can add a content area using the Insert menu or the Object Library palette. Content areas can
be added to master pages only.
To add a content area using the menu
1)
With the master page of the form displayed, select Insert > Standard > Content Area.
To add a content area using the Object Library palette
1)
Do one of the following actions:
•
In the Object Library palette, click the Standard category. Click the Content Area object
and draw the object on the master page of the form.
•
From the Standard category of the Object Library palette, drag a Content Area object
onto the master page of the form.
•
In the Object Library palette, click the Standard category. Double-click the Content Area
object.
RELATED LINKS:
Toname and rename objects
Layoutproperties in the Layout palette
276
Working with Objects
Masterpage properties in the Master Page tab
7.2.8.
Using date/time fields
If you want to provide the ability to record the date, the time, or both in a form, add a date/time field
to the form. The value in a date/time field can be formatted and displayed according to predefined
patterns and according to the locale specified for the field.
For example, you can add a date/time field to your form design so that the user can enter the date or
select it from a calendar window.
After you add a date/time field to the form design, you can edit the caption text and manipulate the
object’s properties in the Field, Value, and Binding tabs of the Object palette. You can define these
properties:
•
Change the caption for the field. See Formatting captions.
•
Set a border style for the field. See To set the border style.
•
Define the field as visible, invisible, or hidden. See Making objects visible, invisible, orhidden.
•
Specify a locale for the field. See To specify a locale (language and countryor region) for an
object.
•
Specify the comb format for the field. See Using text fields.
•
Specify that Designer use the horizontal length of the text field to determine the maximum
number of characters and numbers to allow.
•
Define the display pattern.
•
Define the edit pattern (which is the format in which the date is entered).
•
Specify an initial default value to display.
•
Define a run-time property (for example, insert the date and time on which the form is
rendered).
•
Define the validation pattern.
•
Choose whether to display the date, the time, or both.
•
Specify a data-binding pattern.
•
Specify a binding method for storing and retrieving bound data.
Date/time fields support scripting and calculations. If a user is to supply data, you can define whether
the input is recommended or required, and you can set up messages to prompt users appropriately.
All user input may be validated through scripting.
RELATED LINKS:
Date/timefield properties in the Field tab
Formattingfield values and using patterns
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Working with Objects
7
Date/timefields
Date/timefield properties in the Value tab
Date/timefield properties in the Binding tab
Tospecify a default value
Todynamically populate a validation pattern message
Todynamically populate a validation script message
To add current date fields
You can use a date/time field to automatically show the current date by using the Runtime Property
option in the Value tab of the Object palette.
When using a current date field, the date updates to reflect the system’s current date each time
a user opens the form.
NOTE:
1)
In the Object Library palette, click the Standard category and drag a Date/Time Field object
onto the form design.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Value tab and select Calculated - Read Only from the Type list.
3)
Select the Runtime Property option.
4)
View the form in the Preview PDF tab.
To define the behavior of date/time fields
1)
2)
278
In the Object palette, click the Value tab. Select one of these options:
•
To allow users to choose whether to enter data, select User Entered - Optional.
•
To prompt users to enter data and make the field recommended, select User Entered Recommended and type a custom message in the Empty Message box.
•
To prompt users to enter data and make the field required, select User Entered - Required
and type a custom message in the Empty Message box.
•
To make the field read only and display a data value that is calculated and displayed
through an attached script, select Calculated - Read Only. Users cannot edit the calculated value.
•
To make the field editable and display a data value that is calculated and displayed
through an attached script, select Calculated - User Can Override. Users can edit the
value if the calculation script has been written to accept the input. If a user does edit the
calculated value, the custom message you specify in the Override Message box appears.
•
To make the field read only and display a data value that is merged or calculated and
displayed at run time, select Read Only. Users cannot edit the value.
If the value is recommended or required, type a prompt in the Empty Message box.
Working with Objects
3)
If the value will be calculated, attach the calculation script to the object by using the Script
Editor.
4)
(Optional) If a calculated value can be overridden, type a message into the Override Message
box.
You can dynamically populate a validation pattern or script message with a value from a
data source. This allows you to ensure that users enter the correct value in the field.
TIP:
To define custom data-binding properties for date/time fields
Binding options enable you to build a form that captures data for enterprise infrastructures and/or
use an external data source to populate a form at run time. Set data-binding properties in the Binding
tab of the Object palette.
1)
Select the date/time field.
2)
Enable the form to connect to the data source when the form is opened.
3)
Bind the field to its corresponding data node. For information about how to bind objects to a
data source, see Binding fields to a data source.
To specify the data to display in date/time fields
You can choose to display the date, the time, or both.
1)
In the Object palette, click the Binding tab.
2)
From the Data Format list, specify what to display in the field:
•
Date Specifies the object as a date.
•
Time Specifies the object as a time.
•
Date and Time Specifies the object as a date and time.
To define the pattern for displaying date/time fields
1)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab.
2)
Click Patterns > Display.
3)
In the Select Type list, select the pattern used to display data in the date/time field.
To display all date, time, and date/time formats in the Select Type list, you must first select
Date and Time in the Data Format list of the Binding tab in the Object palette.
NOTE:
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Working with Objects
7
To specify the comb format for date/time fields
Use the comb format when you want to separate numbers added to date/time fields by border lines.
1)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab.
2)
Select Comb of Characters to includes border lines that separate each number within the
date/time field.
3)
Enter how many numbers will be separated by border lines within date/time text field.
To limit the numbers in date/time fields
You can limit how many numbers can be entered in date/time field by specifying that Designer use
the horizontal length of the date/time field to determine how many numbers to allow.
1)
7.2.9.
In the Object palette, click the Field tab and select Limit Length to Visible Area.
Using decimal and numeric fields
Decimal fields are very similar to numeric fields. The following table describes the differences
between decimal and numeric fields.
Field
Description
Decimal field
Displays numbers in decimal format.
You can set the maximum number of leading and trailing digits.
You can set a display pattern to restrict the formatted value with the leading and trailing
digits.
You cannot specify a data format for a decimal field; it is always stored as decimal.
By default, the formatted value includes two digits following the radix character.
Numeric fields
Displays numbers in float or integer format.
You cannot set the maximum number of leading and trailing digits.
You can set a data pattern and data format (either float or integer).
The formatted value includes only two digits following the radix character.
Use the decimal field in the following cases:
•
If you want to set the number of leading or trailing digits
•
If you want the precision of decimal or integer data to be shown exactly as it is entered (by
ensuring the Limit Trailing Digits option is deselected) without any truncating
For example, a field called Qty is located within a repeating subform. In the first instance of the
subform, the Qty field may have the value 3, and in the second instance of the subform, the Qty field
may have the value 3.123:
280
Working with Objects
•
If the Limit Trailing Digits option is set to a maximum of 2, the first number is stored as 3
(because trailing 0s are removed) and the second number is stored as 3.12 (because the number
is truncated).
•
If the Limit Trailing Digits option is deselected, both numbers are stored exactly as they are
entered (the first number is stored as 3 and the second number is stored as 3.123).
To learn more about the options for decimal fields, see the section on numeric fields because many
of the options are identical.
NOTE:
To use the decimal field object in an interactive form, you must have Adobe Reader 6.0.3 or
later.
RELATED LINKS:
Numericfield properties in the Field tab
DecimalField properties in the Field tab
Numericpatterns
Formattingcaptions
Formattingfield values and using patterns
Numericfield properties in the Value tab
Numericfield properties in the Binding tab
Tospecify a default value
Todynamically populate a validation pattern message
Todynamically populate a validation script message
Tospecify a data pattern
About numeric fields
If you want to support the collection or display of float or integer data, including currency, add a
numeric field to the form. The value in a numeric field can be formatted and displayed according to
predefined patterns and according to the locale specified for the field.
After you add a numeric field to the form design, you can edit the caption text and manipulate the
object’s properties in the Field, Value, and Binding tabs of the Object palette. You can define these
properties:
•
Change the caption for the field. See Formatting captions.
•
Set a border style for the field. See To set the border style.
•
Define the field as visible, invisible, or hidden. See Making objects visible, invisible, orhidden.
•
Specify a locale for the field. See To specify a locale (language and countryor region) for an
object.
•
Specify the comb format for the field. See Using text fields.
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7
•
Specify that Designer use the horizontal length of the text field to determine how many
numbers to allow.
•
Define the display pattern.
•
Define the edit pattern.
•
Specify an initial value to display.
•
Define a run-time property (for example, insert the number of a rendered page).
•
Define the validation pattern.
•
Choose whether the field will support floating point or integer values.
•
Specify a data-binding pattern.
•
Specify a binding method for storing and retrieving bound data.
Numeric fields support scripting and calculations. If a user is to supply data, you can define whether
the input is recommended or required, and you can set up messages to prompt users appropriately.
All user input may be validated through scripting.
Numeric fields have a maximum user-entered or calculated value of 2,147,483,647. This
number is the largest number that can fit into a 32-bit signed integer on a computer.
NOTE:
To define a radix (decimal point) alignment for numeric values
1)
In the Paragraph palette menu, select Edit Value.
2)
Click Radix Alignment
3)
In the adjacent box, type the amount of space to create between the radix point and the right
edge of the fillable area.
4)
Press Enter.
.
Acrobat 6.0.2 and Adobe Reader 6.0.2 do not support the radix alignment setting.
If you intend to save the design as an Acrobat 6.0.2-compatible PDF form, do not use radix alignment. If you do, users cannot edit the values.
IMPORTANT:
To define the behavior of decimal or numeric fields
1)
282
In the Object palette, click the Value tab and select one of these options from the Type list:
•
To allow users to choose whether to enter data, select User Entered - Optional.
•
To prompt users to enter data and make the field recommended, select User Entered Recommended and type a custom message in the Empty Message box.
•
To prompt users to enter data and make the field required, select User Entered - Required
and type a custom message in the Empty Message box.
Working with Objects
•
To make the field read only and display a data value that is calculated and displayed
through an attached script, select Calculated - Read Only. Users cannot edit the calculated value.
•
To make the field editable and display a data value that is calculated and displayed
through an attached script, select Calculated - User Can Override. Users can edit the
value if the calculation script has been written to accept the input. If a user does edit the
calculated value, the custom message you specify in the Override Message box appears.
•
To make the field read only and display a data value that is merged or calculated and
displayed at run time, select Read Only. Users cannot edit the value.
2)
If the value is recommended or required, type a prompt in the Empty Message box.
3)
If the value will be calculated, attach the calculation script to the object by using the Script
Editor.
4)
(Optional) If a calculated value can be overridden, type a message in the Override Message box.
To define custom data-binding properties for decimal or numeric fields
Binding options enable you to build a form that captures data for enterprise infrastructures and/or
use an external data source to populate a form at run time. Set data-binding properties in the Binding
tab of the Object palette.
1)
Select the field.
2)
Enable the form to connect to the data source when the form is opened.
3)
Bind the field to its corresponding data node. For information about how to bind objects to a
data source, see Binding fields to a data source.
To specify the data format for numeric fields
Numeric fields can save data in Float or Integer format. The default is Float.
By default, numeric data in a Decimal Field will only save a maximum of two digits after the decimal.
Data beyond the second decimal place will be rounded.
1)
In the Object palette, click the Binding tab.
2)
Select the appropriate format from the Data Format list:
•
To specify the number format as a three-part representation of a number that contains a
radix character, select Float.
•
To specify the number as any sequence of the digits 0 through 9, possibly preceded by a
minus sign, select Integer.
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7
To limit the numbers entered in decimal and numeric fields
You can limit how many numbers may be entered in decimal and numeric fields by specifying that
Designer use the horizontal length of the decimal or numeric field to determine how many numbers
to allow.
1)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab and select Limit Length to Visible Area.
To perform a calculation with decimal fields by using JavaScript
You can perform calculations with decimal fields by using FormCalc. However, if the Limit Trailing
Digits option is deselected, and you want to use JavaScript to perform a calculation with decimal
fields, you must use a script. To maintain a high degree of precision, Designer stores the value of
decimal fields as a string. The script indicates to the decimal field that it is a number.
For example, you have three decimal fields in your form design. The first is named a, the second b,
and the third Total. You want to perform a calculation that adds a and b.
1)
If the Script Editor is not already displayed, select Window > Script Editor.
2)
(Optional) Drag the Script Editor palette bar until the palette is larger.
3)
Select the decimal field that you want to use in a calculation.
4)
Select Calculate from the Show list, JavaScript from the Language list, and Client from the Run
At list.
5)
In the Script Source field, type the following script:
Total.rawValue = Number(a.rawValue) + Number (b.rawValue)
6)
•
Total is the name of the decimal field that you want to use in a calculation.
•
a is the first decimal field.
•
b is the second decimal field.
View the form in the Preview PDF tab.
To specify the comb format for decimal and numeric fields
Use the comb format when you want to separate characters and numbers added to decimal and
numeric fields by border lines.
284
1)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab.
2)
Select Comb of Characters to includes border lines that separate each number within the
decimal or numeric field.
3)
Enter how many numbers will be separated by border lines within the decimal or numeric
field.
Working with Objects
7.2.10. Using drop-down lists and list boxes
Drop-down lists and list boxes provide users with a way to select a single choice from a list. The
choices are represented by text. You define the list of default options.
Drop-down list
List box
Only one choice is visible until the
user opens the list.
Any number of options can be visible at once. When the display area of the
list box is too small to display all of the items in the list, a vertical scroll bar
is displayed.
Accepts custom user entries.
Does not accept custom user entries.
Unlike check boxes and radio buttons, drop-down lists and list boxes support variable sizes of data
and variable sets of choices. Clicking the drop-down arrow button displays the full set of choices, and
clicking a choice in the list selects a single item. When the layout of the form prohibits the use of
check boxes or radio buttons, consider using a list box to present options.
After you add a drop-down list or list box to the form design, you can edit the caption text and
manipulate the object’s properties in the Field, Value, and Binding tabs of the Object palette. You
can define these properties:
•
Change the caption for the list. See Formatting captions.
•
Set a border style for the list. See To set the border style.
•
Define the list as visible, invisible, or hidden. See Making objects visible, invisible, orhidden.
•
Specify a locale for the list. See To specify a locale (language and countryor region) for an
object.
•
Add initial choices to the list and provide a default selection.
•
Sort the choices in ascending or descending order.
•
Enable or disable user input (drop-down lists only).
•
Specify a locale for the list.
•
Specify custom data values for each list item.
•
Specify a binding method for storing and retrieving bound data.
TIP:
You can dynamically populate a drop-down list or list box with values from a data source.
RELATED LINKS:
Workingwith Data Sources
Todynamically populate a drop-down list or list box
Drop-downlist properties in the Field tab
Drop-downlist properties in the Value tab
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7
Drop-downlist properties in the Binding tab
Listbox properties in the Field tab
Listbox properties in the Value tab
Listbox properties in the Binding tab
Todynamically populate a validation pattern message
Todynamically populate a validation script message
To specify the list of options for a drop-down list or list box
You can add a list of options to a drop-down list or list box by using either of these two ways:
•
By copying the data from Microsoft Excel or a text editor
•
Individually by using the Add Item button
The data that you are copying must be in tab-delimited format. You can copy and paste text or
a text and value pair. If you choose to paste text, you place the text in a single column. If you
want to paste a text and value pair, place the text in one column and the value in a second
column. Here are examples of text and value pairs in Excel and Notepad. Always place the list
items in the first column.
TIP:
286
You can dynamically populate a drop-down list with values from a data source.
Working with Objects
To add items from Excel or text editor
1)
Select the drop-down list or list box.
2)
Do one of the following actions:
•
In Excel, copy the spreadsheet cells that contain the text (or text and value pair) you want
in the drop-down list or list box.
•
In a text editor, copy the text (or text and value pair) you want in the drop-down list or
list box.
3)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab, and then click Paste
4)
You can do any of the following actions:
.
•
To reorder an item in the list, select the item and click Move Up
or Move Down
.
•
To delete an item in the list, select the item and click Delete Item
.
•
To sort the list in ascending order, select Sort Ascending
•
To sort the list in descending order, select Sort Descending
•
For a drop-down list only, to enable users to specify an item that does not appear in the
list, select the Allow Custom Text Entry option.
.
.
To add items individually
1)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab, and do one of the following actions:
•
Double-click below the Text column heading in the List Items box.
•
Click Add Item
.
2)
Type the text corresponding to the first option and press Enter.
3)
Type the text corresponding to the next option and press Enter.
4)
Repeat step 3 for each option that you want to add to the list.
5)
You can do any of the following actions:
•
To reorder an item in the list, select the item and click Move Up
or Move Down
.
•
To delete an item in the list, select the item and click Delete Item
.
•
To sort the list in ascending order, select Sort Ascending
•
To sort the list in descending order, select Sort Descending
•
For a drop-down list only, to enable users to specify an item that does not appear in the
list, select the Allow Custom Text Entry option.
.
.
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7
To define the behavior of a drop-down list or list box
1)
In the Object palette, in the Value tab. From the Type list, select one of these options:
•
To allow users to choose to enter data or not, select User Entered - Optional.
•
To prompt users to enter data and make the field recommended, select User Entered Recommended and type a custom message in the Empty Message box.
•
To prompt users to enter data and make the field required, select User Entered - Required
and type a custom message in the Empty Message box.
•
To make the field read only and display a data value that is calculated and displayed
through an attached script, select Calculated - Read Only. Users will not be able to edit
the calculated value.
•
To make the field editable and display a data value that is calculated and displayed
through an attached script, select Calculated - User Can Override. Users can edit the
value if the calculation script has been written to accept the input. If a user does edit the
calculated value, the custom message you specify in the Override Message box appears.
•
To make the field read only and display a data value that is merged or calculated and
displayed at run time, select Read Only. Users will not be able to edit the value.
2)
If the value is recommended or required, type a prompt into the Empty Message box.
3)
If the value will be calculated, attach the calculation script to the object using the Script Editor.
4)
(Optional) If a calculated value can be overridden, type a message into the Override Message
box.
To display a default selection in the drop-down list or list box
You can set a default selection for the drop-down list or list box. You must first specify the list of
options for a list.
1)
In the Object palette, click the Value tab.
2)
Select the default option from the Default list.
The Default list is not available when the Type option is set to Calculated - Read Only or
Calculated - User Can Override.
NOTE:
The options in the Default list correspond to the list items in the Field tab of the Object palette.
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Working with Objects
To define custom data-binding properties for a drop-down list or list box
Binding options enable you to build a form that captures data for enterprise infrastructures or use
an external data source to populate a form at run time. Set data-binding properties in the Binding
tab of the Object palette.
1)
Select the drop-down list or list box.
2)
Enable the form to connect to the data source when the form is opened.
3)
Bind the list to its corresponding data node. For information about how to bind objects to a
data source, see Binding fields to a data source.
To specify list item values for a drop-down list or list box
Each item in a list is associated with a data value that represents the list item. By default, the values
match the text for the list item. You can change these values, for example, to match existing values
in a data source.
When you choose to specify item values for the first time, the values will change to integer values
starting with “1” for the first item. If you deselect the Specify Item Values option, the values will
revert to match the list item text.
TIP:
You can dynamically populate a list box with values from a data source.
1)
Select the drop-down list or list box object.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Binding tab.
3)
Select Specify Item Values.
4)
Double-click the first value that you want to change.
5)
Type the new value.
6)
Press Enter to change the next value or double-click any other value to change it.
7.2.11. Using flash fields
Use the Flash Field object in interactive forms to deliver rich media content like embedded videos
and data graphically displayed in charts.
NOTE: Flash Field objects are supported in Acrobat and Adobe Reader 10.0 or later. Remember to select
this target version option on the Defaults panel in the Form Properties dialog box.
When you add a Flash Field object to a form, you specify the URL of the SWF file. You can also
specify the location of an image file to use as a poster image. The poster image file is rendered any
time the flash field is not in use or deactivated.
If you plan on using the form offline, you can embed flash data and poster image files in the form so
that all components of the form are available. Keep in mind that embedding multiple SWF files and
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Working with Objects
7
image files can significantly increase the size of the PDF file. To know more about the differences
between embedding versus referencing objects, see this article.
You can display rich media content in a floating window, as well as add Flash assets like video, sound,
image, text, XML, and SWC files. You can embed or reference Flash assets, or have a combination
of both. You can also bind Flash Fields to a content provider such as an XML schema or a WSDL file.
In addition, you can configure various aspects of how rich media content is presented in a form. For
example, in the Object palette you can define these properties:
•
Change the caption for the field. See Formatting captions.
•
Set a border style for the field. See To set the border style.
•
Define the field as visible, invisible, or hidden. See Making objects visible, invisible, orhidden.
•
Specify a locale for the field. See To specify a locale (language and countryor region) for an
object.
•
Position and position the field. See Layout properties in the Layout palette.Layout properties
in the Layout palette
To specify the URL of a SWF file
1)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab.
2)
Do one of the following actions:
•
If you know the location of the SWF file, in the URL box, type the URL to the file and
press Enter.
•
To browse to the location of the SWF file, click the Browse button to the right of the URL
box, navigate to and select the SWF file, and click Open.
To embed flash data in the form
1)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab and select Embed Flash Data.
If you are using the paper forms barcode object, do not select the Embed Flash Data option
unless you have assigned a collection to the barcode, which does not include Flash Field objects.
The embedded flash data is larger than the paper forms barcode object can hold.
NOTE:
To specify the location of a poster image
You can use BMP, JPG, GIF, PNG, or TIFF files as a poster image.
290
1)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab.
2)
Do one of the following actions:
Working with Objects
•
If you know the location of the poster image file, in the Poster box, type the URL to the
file and press Enter.
•
To browse for the location of the image file, click the Browse button to the right of the
Poster box, navigate to the image file, and click Open.
To embed a poster image
1)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab and select Embed Poster Image.
If you are using the paper forms barcode object, do not select the Embed Poster Image
option unless you have assigned a collection to the barcode, which does not include Flash Field
objects. The size of the embedded poster image file is larger than the paper forms barcode object
can hold.
NOTE:
To display rich media content in a floating window
1)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab and select Display Flash Content In Floating Window.
2)
To configure the size and position of the floating window, in the Property list, enter values as
needed. Values are measured in points. (see Flashfield properties in the Field tab.)
To add an additional asset
1)
Click Edit.
2)
Click Add (+).
3)
In the Browse for Additional Asset dialog box, select the file you want to add, and click Open.
4)
(Optional) To embed the file, select Embed Asset.
5)
Click OK.
To unembed or delete an additional asset
1)
Click Edit.
2)
In the Additional Assets dialog box, do one of the following actions:
3)
•
To unembed an asset, select the asset in the list and deselect Embed Asset.
•
To delete an asset, select the asset in the list and click Delete (+).
Click OK.
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7
To define custom data-binding properties for a flash field
1)
Select the flash field.
2)
Enable the form to connect to the data source when the form is opened.
3)
Bind the check box to its corresponding data node. For information about how to bind objects
to a data source. (see Binding fields to a data source.)
RELATED LINKS:
Flashfield properties in the Field tab
Flashfield properties in the Binding tab
7.2.12. Using image fields
Designer has two types of image objects.
•
Image objects let you add a read-only image that users cannot edit on the form. This object is
useful for enhancing the look of the form. For more information about this type of image
object, see Using images.
•
Image field objects let you add an image that can be changed in an interactive form.
Image fields can be bound to an external data source or they can be scripted. Image fields support
the merging of external image data through binding. When the data source contains a value for an
image field, the image is rendered in the form. With this capability, images can be selected and
loaded dynamically. For example, a form can enable users to choose catalog items and, through
scripting, a picture of each item could be displayed as a result. If the form contains an empty image
field, the path to the image identifies which image to display in the form.
NOTE: Interactive images in image field objects can be updated when the form is opened in Acrobat
and Adobe Reader 7.0.5 and later. Interactive images become read-only and cannot be updated when
the form is opened in Acrobat 6.0.2 and Adobe Reader 6.0.2. However, through scripting in an interactive PDF or HTML form created by Forms, a user could request the same form again merged with a
different image.
Image field objects support these file formats:
Windows Bitmap (BMP)
Designer supports BMP images.
Joint Photographic Experts Group variations (JPG)
Designer supports JPG images that include digital camera Exchangeable Image File (EXIF)
data.
Graphics Interchange Format (GIF)
Although Designer supports GIF images, animated GIF files are not supported. Designer also
supports transparency within GIF files to allow for overlaying images on forms.
292
Working with Objects
Portable Network Graphics (PNG)
Designer supports one transparency color within PNG files to allow for overlaying images on
forms.
Tagged Image File (TIF)
Designer supports Monochrome (1 color component 1-bit depth), Greyscale (1 color component 8-bit depth), RGB (3 color components 8-bit depth), and Palette (1 color component
1,2,4,8-bit depths) TIF images.
An initial (default) image to insert at run time can be specified by either a file name or a
Uniform Resource Locator (URL). Initially, the image is linked, which means that it is stored
separately from the form and displayed when the form is opened. Alternatively, the image data
can be embedded in the form when the form is created.
Linking to an image is not a secure way to protect sensitive business data. If the
image data is considered sensitive, you should embed it in the form. Also, you can use a secure
HTTPS connection in conjunction with a URL. However, HTTPS protects the transmission of the
image data only while the data is being transmitted; it does not protect access to the image (that
is, no authentication is performed).
IMPORTANT:
After you add an image field to the form design, you can manipulate the object’s properties in
the Object palette. You can choose to define these properties:
•
Change the caption for the field. See Formatting captions.
•
Set a border style for the field. See To set the border style.
•
Define the image as visible, invisible, or hidden. See Making objects visible, invisible, orhidden.
•
Specify a locale for the field. See To specify a locale (language and countryor region) for an
object.
•
Embed the image in the form.
•
Scale the image to size.
•
Instead of or in addition to specifying a path to an initial (default) image file, specify a binding
method for storing and retrieving bound image data.
Keep in mind that if the image file or a link to the image file is in the data file, the image only appears
when the form is rendered and is not visible when you are designing the form. Also, if you plan on
using the form offline, select the Embed Image Data option in the Field tab in the Object palette so
that all components of the form are available.
RELATED LINKS:
Working around web browserlimitations
Imagefield properties in the Field tab
Imagefield properties in the Binding tab
Imagefield properties in the Field tab
293
Working with Objects
7
To specify an initial (default) image to link
1)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab
2)
Do one of the following actions:
•
If you know the location of the image file, in the URL box, type the URL to the image file
and press Enter.
•
To browse for the location of the image file, click the Browse button to the right of the
URL box, navigate to the image file that you want to insert and click Open.
To use relative path names for retrieving linked images when the form is opened, the image
files must be stored in a folder that is accessible to users. If Forms is available, the path must be
relative to Forms.
NOTE:
To embed image data in the form when the form is created
1)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab and select Embed Image Data.
When you embed the image in the form, a copy of the image information is stored in the form.
If the image field will be used to load images dynamically when the form is rendered, do not
select the Embed Image Data option. To know more about the differences between embedding
versus linking images, see this article.
If you are using the paper forms barcode object, you should not select the Embed Image
Data option unless you have assigned a collection, that does not include image fields, to the
barcode. The embedded image data is larger than the paper forms barcode object can hold.
NOTE:
To size an image
294
1)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab.
2)
In the Sizing list, select one of these options to determine what happens when the image is
loaded:
•
To resize the image in the object, ensure that the aspect ratio of the image is preserved,
and select Scale Image Proportionally.
•
To resize the image to match the dimensions of the object, select Scale Image to Fit Rectangle. The aspect ratio of the image is not preserved.
•
To preserve the actual size of the image, select Use Original Size. The image is not resized.
Working with Objects
To define custom data-binding properties for an image field
You can use binding options to build a form that captures data for enterprise infrastructures and/or
use an external data source to populate a form at run time.
1)
Select the image field.
2)
Enable the form to connect to the data source when the form is opened.
3)
Bind the field to its corresponding data node. For information about how to bind objects to a
data source, see “Binding fields to a data source.
7.2.13. Using images
If you want to enhance the way that a form looks, consider adding images to the form. You use image
objects to contain images such as logos, icons, graphics, and photographs. An image object provides
a graphic element that users cannot edit. Image objects support these file formats:
Windows Bitmap (BMP)
Encapsulated PostScript (EPS)
Joint Photographic Experts Group variations (JPG)
Designer supports JPG images that include digital camera Exchangeable Image File (EXIF)
data.
Graphics Interchange Format (GIF)
Although Designer supports GIF images, animated GIF files are not supported. Designer also
supports transparency within GIF files to allow for overlaying images on forms.
Portable Network Graphics (PNG)
Designer supports one transparency color within PNG files to allow for overlaying images on
forms.
Tagged Image File (TIF)
Designer supports Monochrome (1 color component 1-bit depth), Greyscale (1 color component 8-bit depth), RGB (3 color components 8-bit depth), and Palette (1 color component
1,2,4,8-bit depths) TIF images.
The image to insert can be specified by either a file name or a Uniform Resource Locator
(URL). By default, the image is linked, which means that it is stored separately from the form
and displayed whenever the form is opened. You can also embed the image in the form.
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Working with Objects
7
IMPORTANT: Linking to an image is not a secure way to protect sensitive business data. If the
image is considered sensitive, you should embed it in the form. Also, you can use a secure HTTPS
connection in conjunction with a URL. However, HTTPS protects the transmission of the image
data only while the data is being transmitted; it does not protect access to the image (that is, no
authentication is performed).
After you add an image object to the form design, you can manipulate the object’s properties
in the Object palette. You can choose whether to define these properties:
•
Embed the image in the form.
•
Scale the image to size.
•
Define the image as visible, invisible, or hidden. See Making objects visible, invisible, or
hidden.
RELATED LINKS:
Imageproperties in the Draw tab
Working around web browserlimitations
To specify the image to link
1)
In the Object palette, use one of these methods:
•
If you know the location of the image file, in the URL box, type the URL to the image file
and press Enter.
•
To browse for the location of the image file, click the Browse button to the right of the
URL box, navigate to the image file that you want to insert and click Open.
To use relative path names for retrieving linked images when the form is opened, the image
files must be stored in a folder that is accessible to users. If Forms is available, the path must be
relative to Forms.
NOTE:
To embed an image into a form
1)
In the Object palette, select Embed Image Data.
NOTE:
When you embed an image in the form, a copy of the image information is stored in the
form.
To size the image
296
1)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab.
2)
In the Sizing list, select one of these options to determine what happens when the image is
loaded:
Working with Objects
•
To resize the image in the object, ensure that the aspect ratio of the image is preserved
and select Scale Image Proportionally.
•
To resize the image to match the dimensions of the object, select Scale Image to Fit Rectangle. The aspect ratio of the image is not preserved.
•
To preserve the actual size of the image, select Use Original Size. The image is not resized.
7.2.14. About paper forms barcodes
A paper forms barcode electronically captures user-supplied data in an interactive PDF form. When
an end user fills the form using Adobe Reader or Acrobat, the barcode is updated automatically to
encode the user-supplied data. The user can then return the filled form by printing it and returning
it by fax, mail, or hand. Upon receipt, the user-supplied data can be decoded using a scanning device.
To use the paper forms barcode object, your organization must have implemented Acrobat Reader
DC extensions.
The barcoded forms solution provides a workflow where users completes the form using Adobe
Reader and the data is automatically encoded into the barcode. After the form is printed and the
paper copy returned to you, you can extract the form data by using a common barcode scanner. The
result is 100% data accuracy, eliminating the need for rekeying data.
Using the paper forms barcode in a form eliminates the need for manual data entry or OCR-based
forms processing. Data captured from fill-and-print paper forms can be reinserted into the electronic workflow quickly and accurately, with no loss of data caused by scanning or manual rekeying
mistakes. Furthermore, you can retain a digital copy of the transaction, complete with ink signatures.
For example, a company has a PDF form that can be filled electronically. However, the form requires
the user’s signature; therefore, the completed form must be printed, signed, and returned by fax or
mail. By including a paper forms barcode on the form, the data entered electronically is encoded into
the barcode. When the printed form is returned, a barcode reader can read all of the captured data
into a structured data file. Only the signature needs to be verified.
NOTE: The paper forms barcode object cannot be used on a form saved as an Acrobat 6.0-compatible
PDF form. Users filling a form that contains a paper forms barcode require Acrobat 7.0 or later, or
Adobe Reader 7.0 or later for PDF 417 barcodes, and Acrobat 7.0.5 or later, or Adobe Reader 7.0.5 or
later for QR Code, DataMatrix, and GS1 DataMatrix barcodes in order for the barcode to encode the
captured data.
RELATED LINKS:
Toadd objects to a form design
Tocontrol how a paper forms barcode encodes data
Paperforms barcode properties in the Field tab
Paperforms barcode properties in the Value tab
Layoutproperties in the Layout palette
Borderproperties in the Border palette
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Accessibilityproperties in the Accessibility palette
How the paper forms barcode works
The paper forms barcode object is a two-dimensional (2D) barcode that is encoded with an industry
standard PDF417, QR Code (Version 2), or DataMatrix (the ECC200 model) symbology. It includes
an intelligent calculation script that encodes the data captured in a form’s fields.
You select the form fields to be encoded by the paper forms barcode. However, because the barcodes
have limited storage capacity, it is important that you select only required fields.
After you add a paper forms barcode to the form design, you specify its properties so that it behaves
in the manner appropriate for your requirements. Using the Object palette, you can define these
properties and others for the paper forms barcode:
•
Barcode label
•
Symbology encoded in the barcode
•
Scanning method used to decode the paper forms barcode
•
Error correction level, and the module width and height of the barcode (when you choose a
custom scanning method)
•
Object’s visibility on the form
•
Data compression options
•
Form data to include in the barcode
•
Data format that the paper forms barcode uses to encode data and the fields to be included
When you distribute your finished form, users fill the form, print it, and return it. After received, the
user-supplied data is decoded by using a scanning device.
Consider the following points when designing forms that include the Paper Forms barcode object:
•
The Paper Forms Barcode object encodes data that users type in a fillable PDF form. The use
of paper forms barcodes for paper forms processing requires Acrobat Reader DC extensions.
•
Users must use Acrobat or Adobe Reader 7.0.5 or later to fill a form using QR Code or Data
Matrix Paper Forms Barcode. Therefore, form authors must not save the form as either
Acrobat 7.0.5 Compatible or Acrobat 6.0.2 Compatible.
•
Users must use Acrobat or Adobe Reader 7.0.5 or later to fill a form that includes the PDF417
Paper Forms Barcode.
NOTE: To make use of the paper forms barcode, your organization must have implemented
Acrobat Reader DC extensions.
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Working with Objects
7.2.15. Using paper forms barcodes
To specify a unique caption for the paper forms barcode
1)
On the form design, select the paper forms barcode.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab, deselect Generate Label Automatically, and type a
caption in the Label box.
To generate a caption for the paper forms barcode
1)
On the form design, select the paper forms barcode.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab and select Generate Label Automatically.
To specify the symbology for the paper forms barcode
1)
On the form design, select the paper forms barcode.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab and select one of the following options from the
Symbology list:
•
PDF417
•
QR Code
•
Data Matrix
End users filling a form that contains a QR Code, DataMatrix, or GS1 DataMatrix
barcode require Acrobat 7.0.5 or later, or Adobe Reader 7.0.5 or later. Decoding of QR Code and
DataMatrix barcodes is supported by Barcoded Forms 7.0 but is not supported by barcoded forms
7.0 Standalone (ST).
NOTE:
To specify the paper forms barcode scanning method
1)
On the form design, select the paper forms barcode.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab and select one of the following options from the Scanning Method list:
•
Hand-held Scanner
•
Fax Server
•
Document Scanner
•
Custom
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3)
7
If you select Custom, you can also specify custom decoding settings.
To specify custom decoding settings for a paper forms barcode
1)
On the form design, select the paper forms barcode.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab and select Custom from the Scanning Method list.
3)
To change the decoding properties, select the value from the Value list beside the property.
If you are planning to decode the barcode by using a handheld barcode scanner, avoid
creating barcodes wider than four inches. Taller and narrower barcodes generally work better
with handheld scanners.
NOTE:
To control how a paper forms barcode encodes data
When using a paper forms barcode object in a form design, you must specify the format that the
barcode will use when encoding the data, as well as which data will be encoded. You can specify the
following types of data formats:
•
XML
•
Delimited
Both options provide a script for the paper forms barcode object that instructs it to use a particular
data type when encoding the data.
You can provide your own script for encoding the data. For more information, see Tocreate a
custom script for encoding data for a paper forms barcode.
To define how the paper forms barcode object obtains data, use the options in the Value tab of the
Object palette. You can also specify whether the data is compressed before encoding.
To automatically generate a script to encode barcode data
300
1)
On the form design, select the paper forms barcode.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Value tab and select Automatic Scripting.
3)
In the Format list, select one of these options:
•
XML
•
Delimited.
4)
(Optional) Select Include Field Names and Include Label.
5)
In the Apply To list, select one of these options:
•
Entire Form Data
•
Collection Data. Select the collection from the Collection menu.
Working with Objects
To compress the data before encoding
1)
On the form design, select the paper forms barcode.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Value tab and select Compress Data Before Encoding.
To create a custom script for encoding data for a paper forms barcode
In situations when you need to follow government or other specifications for encoding data, you
may find that the preset data encoding options do not meet your requirements. Using the Custom
option, you can provide your own script for encoding the data. The script could be quite simple, as
in this example:
this.rawValue=NumericField1.rawValue
Alternatively, you could create a more complex script that determines which fields to encode based
on certain conditions.
1)
On the form design, select the paper forms barcode object.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Value tab and deselect Automatic Scripting.
3)
In the Script Editor, you can modify the sample custom script or write your own script.
For example, the following sample code illustrates the JavaScript script required to retrieve a form’s
field values, format a string representing a Comma Separated Value (CSV) instance containing the
form fields, and update a paper forms barcode for an interactive PDF form. The form contains fields
namedaccountNum, formerFirstName, formerMiddleInitial, formerLastName,
newFirstName, newMiddleInitial, and newLastName.
// This function ensures that the barcode will update
// when a change is made to any field on the form.
function depends(node)
{
for (var i = 0; i < node.nodes.length; ++i)
{
var child = node.nodes.item(i);
if (child.isContainer)
depends(child);
}
}
// Return a field surrounded by quotes and followed with a separator
function fmtField(fieldName, separator)
{
var str = "\"" + fieldName.rawValue + "\"" + separator;
return str;
}
// Force all fields in the form to be updated in the dataset
depends(xfa.form);
// Generate the CSV string that will be encoded in the barcode
var comma = ",";
var newLine = "\n";
var s = fmtField(accountNum, comma);
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Working with Objects
7
s += fmtField(formerFirstName, comma)
s += fmtField(formerMiddleInitial, comma);
s += fmtField(formerLastName, comma);
s += fmtField(newFirstName, comma)
s += fmtField(newMiddleInitial, comma);
s += fmtField(newLastName, newLine);
// Assign the string to the barcode for encoding
this.rawValue = s;
To use legacy encoding format
By default, Designer uses a new encoding format that uses the XFA JavaScript function
xfa.record.saveXML() to produce XML encoded data. However, you can still use the legacy
encoding format that uses the old function xfa.datasets.saveXML(). For example, you may
be processing forms with barcode data by using an application that can only parse the old XML
format.
The legacy encoding format is used in paper forms barcode XML scripts in Designer 7.0 to 8.0. When
you open a form that contains the legacy encoding format, the Use Legacy Format option is selected
automatically.
1)
On the form design, select the paper forms barcode object.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Value tab.
3)
In the Format list, select XML and then select Use Legacy Format.
To specify a delimiter
You can choose the delimiter character that is used to separate field data, such as field names, field
values, and barcode labels.
With all delimiters other than Carriage Return, the first line starts with the optional barcode label
heading, followed by the form object names, and ends with a delimiter and a new line character. The
second line starts with the barcode label, which is a globally unique identifier (GUID) by default,
followed by the form object data, and ends with a delimiter and a new line character.
With the Carriage Return delimiter, field names, barcode labels, and field values are listed over
multiple lines, with field names and barcode labels listed first, each on a separate line, followed by
either a carriage return, a new line character, and then with the field values, each of which are on a
separate line.
If a field name or value in the form is empty, the barcode encoding script will insert a delimiter and
encode the next field name or value. The barcode data will not contain a space, or any special
marking, as the placeholder for the empty text.
With all types of delimiters, you can control whether field names and barcode labels are
included in the barcode content by selecting the Include Field Names and Include Label options in the
Value tab of the Object palette.
NOTE:
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Working with Objects
To avoid incorrect decoding results when you choose the delimited format for a paper forms
barcode, make sure that the delimiter you select is not a part of your form's textual contents. That is,
do not choose a delimiter that may be a part of the paper forms barcode field value. For instance, if
you choose tab, comma, or space as the delimiter, the contents of the form fields you are encoding
cannot contain any tab, comma, or space characters because it will confuse the decoder.
You can always choose a different character as the delimiter if the form contents change and the
character that was originally chosen to be the delimiter becomes a part of the contents.
It is recommended that you do not select the Carriage Return option as a delimiter, because the
carriage return character is already used in the paper forms barcode values as a delimiter to separate
the header and value rows.
NOTE:
1)
On the form design, select the paper forms barcode object.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Value tab.
3)
In the Format list, select Delimited and, in the Delimiter list, select the type of delimiter you
want.
To specify character encoding
You can select the character encoding of the value that is encoded into a barcode.
1)
On the form design, select the paper forms barcode object.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Value tab.
3)
In the Character Encoding list, select the option that suits your needs.
7.2.16. Design tips for using a paper forms barcode
Creating an effective paper forms barcode means designing a barcode so that information is encoded
into it in a useful way that can be easily decoded into understandable information. Here are some
things to keep in mind when designing a usable, decodable barcode.
Barcode design tip
Details
Design a barcode that is
appropriate for its
intended use.
Think about how the users will submit the form to you or your processing organization.
Make sure the barcode is designed to survive the printing, mailing in, faxing, and
scanning processes.
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Working with Objects
7
Barcode design tip
304
Details
Use collections
Use Collections in paper forms barcodes instead of applying the barcode to the entire
form. Collections ensure that you include the relevant fields in the barcode.
NOTE: If you add a List Box object with the Allow Multiple Selection option selected on the
Field tab to a paper forms barcode collection, you must also select the Enforce Strict
Scoping Rules in JavaScript option on the Defaults tab in the Form Properties dialog.
Otherwise, any values that a form filler selects in the List Box object may not encode
properly in the paper forms barcode.
The Paper forms
barcode collection
name must be different
from the object
collection name.
Make sure that the paper forms barcode name is different from the object name.
Otherwise, the paper forms barcode will not update at the run time.
Paper forms barcodes in
subforms with default
names may cause
unexpected results.
When you include a paper forms barcodes in multiple unnamed subforms, you may get
unexpected results. Rename the subforms instead of using the default name.
Consider the placement
of the barcode on the
form design.
You can place a paper forms barcode anywhere on the form design. Always place the
barcode where it can be seen and scanned easily. Keep barcodes at least a half-inch from
the edge of the paper to ensure that they are included when the form is printed.
Size a barcode for the
amount of data to be
captured.
There is a limit to the amount of data that can be encoded into a paper forms barcode.
The size of the barcode also affects the amount of data that it can encode. If the barcode is
too small to hold the user-supplied data, a red marker appears on the upper-right corner
of the barcode, with a message informing you that the data set to be encoded is too large
for the barcode to contain. You should perform one of these steps:
•
Resize the barcode, making it bigger to accommodate more data.
•
Reduce the data set by changing the default data size for some form
objects, such as text fields. For example, the default limit length of
each text field is 255. However, if a text field will only contain a first
name, last name, or even a full name, the limit could be reduced to 20
or 50 characters, potentially solving the barcode size issue.
•
Using extended characters and both uppercase and lowercase letters
increases the size of the data. Write a script to restrict data to alphanumeric characters and uppercase letters.
•
If field names are included in the data, use shorter object names.
•
Use form object collections.
Working with Objects
Barcode design tip
Details
Delimiter must not be
part of textual content.
When you choose the delimited format for a paper forms barcode, make sure that the
delimiter is not a part of your form's textual contents. For instance, if you choose Tab as
the delimiter, the contents of the form fields you are encoding cannot contain tabs
because it will confuse the decoder. To avoid this confusion and to ensure that the
encoder will work correctly, if the character originally chosen to be the delimiter becomes
a part of the contents, you can choose a different character (such as a pipe or a comma) as
the delimiter instead.
Do not embed data for
image fields.
Paper forms barcodes cannot hold enough data to embed data for images. If you have an
image field object on the form, either do not select the Embed Image Data option for the
image field object or exclude the object from the barcode data. If the image field is
included in the barcode data, the barcode displays a warning that the data length cannot
be calculated.
Do not rotate Paper
Forms barcodes.
Rotating a paper forms barcode will cause it to become clipped when the form is filled in
Acrobat and Adobe Reader versions less than 8.0.
Test the form before
distributing it.
It is critical that you test your completed form in Adobe Reader as well as in Acrobat.
Most users of these types of forms will only have Adobe Reader installed.
Determine what version
of Adobe Reader users
will utilize to fill the
form and ensure the
correct right is applied
to form.
When a form that contains one or more Paper Forms Barcode objects is opened in Adobe
Reader 8.1 or later, the Paper Forms Barcode objects appear greyed-out when a user
begins to fill the form, unless the 2DBarcode right has been applied to the form using
Acrobat Reader DC extensions.
Ensure that users fill the
form electronically
Make it clear to your users that they must fill the form electronically. If they print the
form and then fill it, the paper forms barcode cannot encode any of the user-supplied
data.
Test the maximum
capacity of the paper
forms barcode
You must test your forms in both Adobe Reader and in Acrobat to ensure that the
capacity of each barcode is large enough to capture all of the required data. This can be
done by filling each field with realistic entries of maximum length and ensuring that the
barcode does not turn gray. You need to use Adobe Reader to test documents that have
Acrobat Reader DC extensions barcode usage rights applied to them.
RELATED LINKS:
Usingpaper forms barcodes
Tospecify a unique caption for the paper forms barcode
Usingform object collections
7.2.17. Using password fields
If you want to control access to a form through a password, add a password field to the form. When
a user types in the password field, the characters are masked by a character that you select. If
required, you can define a specific input pattern that the user must match to gain access to the form.
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Working with Objects
7
After you add a password field to the form design, you can edit the caption text and manipulate the
object’s properties in the Field, Value, and Binding tabs of the Object palette. You can define these
properties:
•
Change the caption for the field. See Formatting captions.
•
Set a border style for the field. See To set the border style.
•
Define the field as visible, invisible, or hidden. See Making objects visible, invisible, orhidden.
•
Specify a locale for the list. See To specify a locale (language and countryor region) for an
object.
•
Specify that Designer use the horizontal length of the text field to determine how many characters to allow in the password field.
•
Select the password display character.
•
Define the edit pattern.
•
Define the validation pattern.
•
Specify a data-binding pattern.
•
Specify a binding method for storing and retrieving bound data.
A password field can be present without forcing users to supply a password. You can define whether
the password is optional, recommended, or required, and you can set up messages to prompt users
appropriately. All user input can be validated through scripting.
RELATED LINKS:
Formattingcaptions
Formattingfield values and using patterns
Passwordpatterns
Passwordfield properties in the Field tab
Passwordfield properties in the Value tab
Passwordfield properties in the Binding tab
Todynamically populate a validation pattern message
Todynamically populate a validation script message
To specify the password display character
306
1)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab.
2)
In the Password Display Character box, type the character that will be used to hide the password value when it is displayed at run time.
Working with Objects
To define the behavior of the field
1)
2)
In the Object palette, click the Value tab and select one of these options from the Type list:
•
To allow users to choose whether to enter data, select User Entered - Optional.
•
To prompt users to enter data and make the field recommended, select User Entered Recommended and type a custom message in the Empty Message box.
•
To prompt users to enter data and make the field required, select User Entered - Required
and type a custom message in the Empty Message box.
If the value is recommended or required, type a prompt in the Empty Message box.
To define custom data-binding properties for a password field
Binding options enable you to build a form that captures data for enterprise infrastructures and/or
use an external data source to populate a form at run time. Set data-binding properties in the Binding
tab of the Object palette.
1)
Select the password field.
2)
Enable the form to connect to the data source when the form is opened.
3)
Bind the field to its corresponding data node. For information about how to bind objects to a
data source, see Binding fields to a data source.
To limit the characters entered in password fields
You can limit the number of characters entered in password fields by specifying that Designer use
the horizontal length of the decimal or numeric field to determine how many characters to allow.
1)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab and select Limit Length to Visible Area.
7.2.18. Using radio buttons
Radio buttons provide a way to present users with a number of mutually exclusive choices. Users can
toggle the state of any radio button in a group between on and off. When the radio button is selected,
its state is On and its value is registered. When the radio button is cleared, its state is Off and its value
is not registered. Only one radio button object in a group can be in the On state.
TIP: You can make a radio button look like a check box by setting its appearance characteristics in the
Field tab of the Object palette. Before doing so, however, consider the expectations of users with respect
to the behavior of check boxes. Do they expect check boxes to provide multiple choices? If so, you should
maintain the standard and not apply radio button functionality to check box images.
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Working with Objects
7
After you add a radio button to the form design, you can edit the caption text and manipulate the
object’s properties in the Field, Value, and Binding tabs of the Object palette. You can define these
properties:
•
Change the caption for the radio button. See Formatting captions.
•
Set a border style for the radio button. See To set the border style.
•
Define the radio button as visible, invisible, or hidden. See Making objects visible, invisible, or
hidden.
•
Specify a locale for the radio button. See To specify a locale (language and countryor region)
for an object.
•
Assign a value to each radio button’s On state in the exclusion group.
•
Specify the style for the radio button.
•
Specify the default selection for the group.
•
Specify a binding method for storing and retrieving bound data.
Radio buttons support scripting and calculations. If a user is to supply data, you can define whether
the input is recommended or required, and you can set up messages to prompt users appropriately.
User input may be validated through scripting.
An exclusion group is a group of radio buttons. Only one radio button in the exclusion group can be
selected at a time.
You can work with an exclusion group as one object. Some options on the Object palette apply to all
of the radio buttons in the same exclusion group. You can move radio buttons between exclusion
groups and create new exclusion groups. If you have several radio buttons that are part of the same
exclusion group, you can easily break some of the objects out into another exclusion group.
When you add a new radio button to the form, if the last object you added to the same subform was
also a radio button, the new button will be part of the same exclusion group. If the last object you
added was not a radio button, the radio button will create a new exclusion group.
Exclusion groups automatically resize to fit all of the radio buttons within the group. If you drag a
radio button to an empty area of the page, the exclusion group will expand to contain the radio
button. If you manually resize the exclusion group, all of the contained radio buttons will be resized
accordingly.
RELATED LINKS:
Formattingcaptions
Tomake radio buttons accessible
Radiobutton properties in the Field tab
Radiobutton properties in the Value tab
Radiobutton properties in the Binding tab
Workingwith Data Sources
308
Working with Objects
To set the size for a radio button
1)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab.
2)
In the Size box, type a different value (in points) and press Enter.
Depending on the size you enter, you may have to resize the radio button.
To specify the radio button style
1)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab.
2)
Select an option in the Button Style list:
•
To set the check style to the default, which is a filled circle, select Default.
•
To set the button style to a check mark, select Check.
•
To set the button style to a circle, select Circle.
•
To set the button style to a cross, select Cross.
•
To set the button style to a diamond, select Diamond.
•
To set the button style to a square, select Square.
•
To set the button style to a start, select Star.
To assign On values to radio buttons
Each radio button in an exclusion group is associated with an On value that represents the selected
radio button in the form data. You can change these values, for example, to match existing values in
a data source.
When you specify On values, the default values are integer values starting with “1” for the first radio
button in the exclusion group that was added to the form. If you deselect the Specify Item Values
option, the On values will match the radio button caption text.
1)
Select the exclusion group or one of the radio buttons within the group.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Binding tab and select Specify Item Values.
3)
Double-click the first On value that you want to change.
4)
Type the new On value.
5)
Press Enter to change the next On value or double-click any other On value to change it.
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Working with Objects
7
To define custom data-binding properties for radio buttons
Binding options enable you to build a form that captures data for enterprise infrastructures and/or
use an external data source to populate a form at run time. Set data-binding properties for radio
buttons in the Binding tab of the Object palette.
1)
Select the group.
2)
Enable the form to connect to the data source when the form is opened.
3)
Bind the exclusion group to its corresponding data node. For information about how to bind
objects to a data source, see Binding fields to a data source.
To create a new exclusion group
1)
Select the radio buttons that you want to make part of a separate exclusion group in the Layout
Editor or the Hierarchy palette.
2)
Do one of the following actions:
•
Right-click one of the selected objects in the Layout Editor and select Wrap In New Radio
Button Group.
•
Right-click one of the selected objects in the Hierarchy palette and select Wrap In New
Radio Button Group.
NOTE: After you add a group of radio buttons, add a different object to the page. (For example,
add a text object.) Now, any new radio buttons you add to the form design start a new exclusion
group.
To move a radio button to a different exclusion group
1)
Select the radio button that you want to move to a different exclusion group in the Layout
Editor or the Hierarchy palette.
2)
Do one of the following actions:
•
To move the radio button on the form, drag the object in the Layout Editor to a position
within the borders of another exclusion group.
•
To change exclusion groups without moving the button on the page, drag the radio
button to another exclusion group in the Hierarchy palette.
To move an exclusion group
310
1)
Click the border of the exclusion group to select it.
2)
Drag the group to a new position on the page. All of the radio buttons in the group will move
together.
Working with Objects
To merge exclusion groups
1)
Click the border of the exclusion groups to select them.
2)
Select Layout > Merge Radio Button Groups.
To define the behavior of the exclusion group
1)
In the Object palette, click the Value tab and, in the Type list, select one of these options:
•
To allow users to choose whether to enter data, select User Entered - Optional.
•
To prompt users to enter data and make the field recommended, select User Entered Recommended and type a custom message in the Empty Message box.
•
To prompt users to enter data and make the field required, select User Entered - Required
and type a custom message in the Empty Message box.
•
To make the field read only and display a data value that is calculated and displayed
through an attached script, select Calculated - Read Only. Users cannot edit the calculated value.
•
To make the field editable and display a data value that is calculated and displayed
through an attached script, select Calculated - User Can Override. Users can edit the
value if the calculation script has been written to accept the input. If a user does edit the
calculated value, the custom message you specify in the Override Message box appears.
•
To make the field read only and display a data value that is merged or calculated and
displayed at run time, select Read Only. Users cannot edit the value.
2)
If the value is recommended or required, type a prompt in the Empty Message box.
3)
If the value will be calculated, attach the calculation script to the object by using the Script
Editor.
4)
(Optional) If a calculated value can be overridden, type a message in the Override Message box.
To specify the default selection for the exclusion group
1)
In the Object palette, click the Value tab.
2)
In the Default list, select the value that identifies the radio button that you want to set to the
On state.
The Default list is available only when the Type option is set to User Entered or Read Only. The
value of a radio button’s On state can be changed in the Binding tab.
NOTE:
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Working with Objects
7
7.2.19. Using signature fields
If you want to authenticate the identity of a user and the document's content, add a signature field
to the form. A digital signature stores information about the signing party and the state of the document when it is signed. Adobe signatures support the Public Key Cryptography Standard (PKCS) #7,
using the RSA MD5, RSA SHA-1, or DSA SHA-1 hash algorithm.
You can specify whether a signature covers an entire form or a collection of objects in a form. If you
want the signature to apply to a collection of objects, the signing party must use Acrobat or Adobe
Reader version 8.0 or later.
If the signature covers a collection of objects, the fields are locked and cannot be modified after the
document is signed. The lock is inherited. For example, when a subform is locked, all the objects in
the subform inherit the lock.
To sign the form, the user clicks the signature field. For more information about signing PDF forms
in Acrobat, see Acrobat Help.
The signature field does not generate a digital signature directly. It invokes a third-party signature
handler through scripting, and the signature handler provides the required digital signature functionality. Users cannot sign forms without an appropriate signature handler.
If required, you can change the signature field name in the Hierarchy palette after you add the object
to the form design.
After you add a signature field to the form design, you can define the signature properties in the
Signature tab of the Object palette. You can define whether the signature covers the entire form or a
collection of field objects and specify default signature properties.
You can edit the caption text and manipulate the object’s properties in the Field tab of the Object
palette. You can define these properties:
•
Change the caption for the field. See Formatting captions.
•
Set a border style for the field. See To set the border style.
•
Define the field as visible, invisible, or hidden. See Making objects visible, invisible, orhidden.
•
Specify a locale for the field. See To specify a locale (language and countryor region) for an
object
RELATED LINKS:
Formattingcaptions
Layoutproperties in the Layout palette
Borderproperties in the Border palette
Drop-downlists
Usingdigital signatures
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Working with Objects
7.2.20. Using text
Text objects present read-only text that users cannot edit. You can use text objects to do these tasks:
•
Label an area in the form
•
Provide instructions for filling out the form
•
Include a header and footer
After you add a text object to the form design, you can define these properties:
•
Define the text as visible, invisible, or hidden. See Making objects visible, invisible, orhidden.
•
Specify a locale for the text. To specify a locale (language and countryor region) for an object.
•
Type and style the text.
•
Allow page breaks within the content of the field.
•
Keep a text object with the next object in the document when a page break is introduced.
•
Apply font properties to all of the text or selected portions of the text.
In addition, you can insert placeholders, such as floating text fields, and the values of run-time properties, such as page count, current page, and current date/time, into text objects.
The text object has the Make Fixed-Sized Text Objects Auto-fit While Editing option (Tools >
Options > Workspace) selected by default. Therefore, the object automatically resizes at design time
to accommodate the text you enter and the property settings you change, such as margins, borders,
and font type and size.
To type characters into a text object
You can type characters into the object after you add the object to the form.
By default, the Make Fixed-Size Text Objects Auto-Fit While Editing option on the Workspace panel
of the Tools > Options dialog is selected. This option allows the width and height of text objects to
expand as you type characters. To expand only either the width or height of a text object, deselect
Make Fixed-Size Text Objects Auto-Fit While Editing and then select the appropriate Expand To Fit
option on the Layout palette.
1)
Select Edit and ensure that the Lock Text and Lock Static Objects commands are not selected.
2)
Double-click the text object and type the characters you want to add.
To insert a floating text field into a text object
You can embed a floating text field in a text object. Floating text fields support the merging of
different text values within text objects. For example, you could embed a floating text field to
generate a customer name in the salutation of a form letter.
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Working with Objects
7
A floating text field does not have a caption and can be edited as if it were a single character of text.
The properties of the floating text field must be defined separately in addition to the properties of
the text object.
NOTE:
When merging floating fields with data, keep in mind that floating fields cannot span pages.
1)
In the text object, place the cursor where you want the floating text field to be merged.
2)
Select Insert > Floating Field.
3)
Select the floating text field and edit its properties.
To insert the value of a run-time property into a text object
You can insert the values of run-time properties into a text object. When the form is viewed, the
actual value is inserted automatically.
The inserted value can have a different font, font size, and font style than the text object.
1)
In the text object, place the cursor where you want the value of the run-time property to be
merged.
2)
Select Insert > [run-time property value].
3)
•
To insert the current page number of the finished form, select Current Page Number.
•
To insert the total number of pages making up the finished, select Number of Pages.
•
To insert the current date/time, select Current Date/Time.
•
To insert the value of the locale setting for the application processing the form, select
Viewer Locale.
•
To insert the name of the application processing the form, select Viewer Name.
•
To insert the version number of the application processing the form, select Viewer
Version.
Select the run-time property value and edit its properties.
To merge text objects
When you import a PDF file into Designer, depending on the import options you choose, title and
instruction text may be broken up into multiple text objects. This import behavior makes the text
difficult to edit because individual words or individual letters may be broken into separate text
objects. If you need to edit the text, you can merge text objects together to make the text easier to
update.
1)
Select the text objects that you want to merge.
If you also select an object of a different type, it will not be included in the merged object.
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Working with Objects
2)
Select Layout > Merge Selected Text Objects.
All selected text objects combine into a single object.
To create a caption by merging a text object and a field object
You can create a caption for a field object that does not have a caption by merging it with a text
object.
For example, if you have a text object above a text field whose caption is set to none, you can merge
the two objects to create one field. The text from the text object becomes the caption for the text field.
Before Merging: A.
Text object
B.
Text field
After Merging: Text object
Before you perform this task, you must ensure the following settings are in effect:
•
Ensure you have one text object.
•
Ensure you have one field object whose caption is set to none in the Layout palette or the
caption is empty.
The field object can be one of the following objects:
•
Check Box
•
Date/Time Field
•
Decimal Field
•
Signature Field
•
Drop-down List
•
Image Field
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Working with Objects
•
List Box
•
Numeric Field
•
Password Field
•
Radio Button
•
Text Field
7
You can merge only one text object to one field object.
1)
Select the text object that you want to become the caption for the field object.
2)
Ctrl+click or Shift+click to select the field object that you want to merge with the text object.
The field object must have its caption set to none in the Layout palette or the caption must be
empty.
3)
Select Layout > Merge as Caption.
The new object’s caption becomes the text from the text object. The new object's size and position matches the total boundaries of the merged objects.
You may have to edit the font of the caption and the value after you merge the objects.
To insert language-specific numbers in text or captions
Most regions of the world use a numbering system that is often called Roman or European (1, 2, 3,
...). However, the numbering system in Arabic is different; it is derived from Hindi or Indic numbers.
Although Arabic letters are written from right-to-left, numbers in Arabic are written from
left-to-right. This numbering system is often called Arabic-Indic.
You can insert language-specific numbers in text or captions if your locale, such as Arabic (Egypt),
supports it. The following locales support this feature:
•
Arabic (all except Algeria, Morocco, and Tunisia)
•
Thai (Thailand Traditional)
The options described in this Help topic are available only if support for the appropriate language is
enabled through Microsoft Office Language Settings.
1)
Select the text.
2)
Right-click and ensure the language-specific Use Digits command is selected.
If this menu item is not there, ensure the locale set for this object supports this feature.
3)
Type the numbers.
This example is of a caption that shows three types of language-specific numbers.
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Working with Objects
A. Arabic (Egypt) B. English (USA) C.Thai (Thailand Traditional)
To allow page breaks within a text object
The Allow Page Break Within Content option is enabled for a text object if the parent subform allows
page breaks. This option is deselected by default.
Here are a few things to consider when allowing page breaks within a text object:
•
The Allow Page Break Within Content option is enabled for a text object only when the parent
object allows page breaks.
•
Page breaks are not supported in rotated text objects.
•
The Allow Page Breaks Within Content option is disabled for floating fields. Instead, select the
Allow Page Break Within Content option for the text object referencing the floating field.
•
A page break is not allowed when an object that can accept a page break is positioned beside
an object that cannot.
•
When the Make Fixed-Size Text Objects Auto-Fit While Editing option (in Tools > Options >
Workspace) or the Expand to Fit options (in the Layout palette) are deselected, the boilerplate
text does not expand at design time, which means that page breaks are prevented.
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Working with Objects
7
To allow page breaks within a text object
1)
In the Object palette, click the Draw tab and select Allow Page Breaks Within Content.
To keep a text object with the next object in the form
The Keep with Next option is enabled for a text field if the parent object allows page breaks and is a
flowed container.
The Keep With Next option is disabled for floating fields. Instead, select the Keep With Next option
for the text object referencing the floating field.
1)
In the Object palette, click the Draw tab and select Keep With Next.
RELATED LINKS:
Layoutproperties in the Layout palette
Borderproperties in the Border palette
Fontproperties in the Font palette
Paragraphproperties in the Paragraph palette
Textproperties in the Draw tab
Tomake objects expand to fit
Usingdate/time fields
Usingtext fields
Formattingcaptions
7.2.21. Using text fields
If you want to provide users with a way to enter textual data, add text fields to the form. Text fields
enable users to type, select, edit, cut, copy, paste, and delete any of the text inside the field.
Text fields can accept one or more lines of wrapping text and support enhanced formatting capabilities. For example, text fields can display blocks of text in different typefaces and colors. Text can be
stored and retrieved as plain text or XHTML. If required, the data in a text field can be formatted and
displayed according to predefined patterns.
After you add a text field to the form design, you can edit the caption text and manipulate the object’s
properties in the Field, Value, and Binding tabs of the Object palette. You can define these properties:
318
•
Change the caption for the field. (See Formatting captions.)
•
Set a border style for the field. (See To set the border style.)
•
Define the field as visible, invisible, or hidden. (See Making objects visible, invisible, orhidden.)
•
Specify a locale for the field. (See To specify a locale (language and countryor region) for an
object.)
Working with Objects
•
Specify the comb format for the field.
•
Enable or disable multiple lines of text.
•
Enable or disable the field to be filled with rich-formatted text.
•
Limit the number of characters in the field.
•
Allow page breaks within the content of the field.
•
Keep a text field object with the next object in the document when a page break is introduced.
•
Define the display pattern.
•
Define the edit pattern.
•
Specify an initial value to display.
•
Define a run-time property (for example, insert the page number).
•
Define the validation pattern.
•
Choose whether the field will support plain text or XHTML.
•
Specify a data-binding pattern.
•
Specify a binding method for storing and retrieving bound data.
Text fields support scripting and calculations. If a user is to supply data, you can define whether the
input is recommended or required, and you can set up messages to prompt users appropriately. All
user input may be validated through scripting.
RELATED LINKS:
Formattingcaptions
Tolock objects
Formattingfield values and using patterns
Textfield patterns
Textfield properties in the Field tab
Textfield properties in the Value tab
Textfield properties in the Binding tab
Tospecify a default value
Todynamically populate a validation pattern message
Todynamically populate a validation script message
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Working with Objects
7
To allow multiple lines of text in text fields
1)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab and select Allow Multiple Lines.
To limit the number of characters in text fields
You can limit the number of characters in text fields in one of two ways:
•
You can specify the maximum number of characters allowed.
•
You can specify that Designer use the horizontal length of the text field to determine how many
characters to allow.
To specify the number of characters in text fields
1)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab.
2)
Select the Limit Length and, in the Max Chars box, type the maximum number of characters
that users will be permitted to enter into the text field.
To limit the number of characters to the width of text fields
1)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab and select Limit Length to Visible Area.
Allowing page breaks within a text field
The Allow Page Break Within Content option is enabled by default for a text field if the parent
subform allows page breaks.
Here are a few things to consider when allowing page breaks within a text field:
320
•
The Allow Page Break Within Content option is available only if the parent object allows page
breaks.
•
The caption text of a text field object will not break between pages when Top or Bottom is
selected for the position for the caption in the Field tab of the Object palette.
•
Page breaks are not supported in rotated text field objects.
•
A page break is not allowed when an object that can accept a page break is positioned beside
an object that cannot.
Working with Objects
To allow page breaks within a text field
1)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab and select Allow Page Breaks Within Content.
To keep a text field with the next object in the form
The Keep with Next option is enabled for a text field if the parent object allows page breaks and is a
flowed container.
The Keep With Next option is disabled for floating fields. Instead, select the Keep With Next option
of the text field object referencing the floating field.
1)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab and select Keep With Next.
To enable the field to be filled with rich-formatted text
By default, a text field is set to display and capture plain text. In this case, if the data value associated
with the text field includes text formatting information, the formatting is ignored and the data value
is displayed as plain text. You can set it so that any rich-text formatting of the data is preserved.
1)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab and select Rich Text from the Field Format list.
To define the behavior of the field
1)
2)
In the Object palette, click the Value tab and, in the Type list, select one of these options:
•
To allow users to choose whether to enter data, select User Entered - Optional.
•
To prompt users to enter data and make the field recommended, select User Entered Recommended and type a custom message in the Empty Message box.
•
To prompt users to enter data and make the field required, select User Entered - Required
and type a custom message in the Empty Message box.
•
To make the field read only and display a data value that is calculated and displayed
through an attached script, select Calculated - Read Only. Users cannot edit the calculated value.
•
To make the field editable and display a data value that is calculated and displayed
through an attached script, select Calculated - User Can Override. Users can edit the
value if the calculation script has been written to accept the input. If a user does edit the
calculated value, the custom message you specify in the Override Message box appears.
•
To make the field read only and display a data value that is merged or calculated and
displayed at run time, select Read Only. Users cannot edit the value.
If the value is recommended or required, type a prompt in the Empty Message box.
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Working with Objects
7
3)
If the value will be calculated, attach the calculation script to the object by using the Script
Editor.
4)
(Optional) If a calculated value can be overridden, type a message in the Override Message box.
To define custom data-binding properties for text fields
Binding options enable you to build a form that captures data for enterprise infrastructures and/or
use an external data source to populate a form at run time. Set data-binding properties in the Binding
tab of the Object palette.
1)
Select the text field.
2)
Enable the form to connect to the data source when the form is opened.
3)
Bind the field to its corresponding data node. For information about how to bind objects to a
data source, see Binding fields to a data source.
To specify the data format for text fields
Text fields can save data in plain text only or with XHTML text formatting information included as
part of the value. The default is plain text. If you change the data format to XHTML, the Rich Text
option in the Field Format list in the Field tab of the Object palette is automatically selected.
1)
Select the text field object.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab.
3)
Select the appropriate format from the Field Format list.
To specify the comb format for text fields
Use the comb format when you want to separate characters and numbers added to text fields by
border lines.
1)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab.
2)
Select Comb of Characters to includes border lines that separate each character within the text
field.
3)
Enter the number of characters that will be separated by border lines within the text field.
7.2.22. Using form object collections
You can select only the required objects to be covered by a signature field or encoded in a paper
forms barcode, and save them as a collection.
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Working with Objects
A collection applies to either signature fields or to paper forms barcodes, but not to both, because
the objects are represented differently. The collections that are available for signature fields appear
in the Signature tab in the Object palette. The collections that are available for paper forms barcodes
appear in the Value tab in the Object palette.
RELATED LINKS:
Usingdigital signatures
Usingpaper forms barcodes
Toadd a signature field
Signaturefield properties in the Signature tab
Designtips for using a paper forms barcode
Paperforms barcode properties in the Value tab
CollectionEditor dialog box
CollectionList dialog box
Signaturefield properties in the Field tab
To create a form object collection
You can create a collection for signature fields or for paper forms barcodes. You can create one or
many collections and select the one you want to use for a particular signature field or paper forms
barcode.
If you add a List Box object with the Allow Multiple Selection option selected on the Field tab
to a paper forms barcode collection, you must also select the Enforce Strict Scoping Rules in JavaScript
option on the Defaults tab in the Form Properties dialog. Otherwise, any values that a form filler selects
in the List Box object may not encode properly in the paper forms barcode.
NOTE:
1)
Select File > Form Object Collections.
2)
Click New and type a name for the collection in the box.
3)
Click Modify and select the appropriate option from the Collection Type List. The list displays
the available objects for the selected collection type.
4)
Select the objects to include in the collection. To hide unsupported objects for the type of
collection, select Hide Unsupported Nodes.
5)
Click OK.
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Working with Objects
7
To create a form object collection
You can create a collection for signature fields or for paper forms barcodes. You can create one or
many collections and select the one you want to use for a particular signature field or paper forms
barcode.
1)
On the form design, select the signature field or paper forms barcode.
2)
Do one of the following actions:
•
To create a collection for a paper forms barcode, in the Object palette, click the Value tab,
select Collection Data from the Apply To list and select New/Manage Collection from the
Collection list.
•
To create a collection for a signature field, in the Object palette, click the Signature tab,
select Lock Fields After Signing, and select <New/Manage Collection>.
3)
Click New and type a name for the collection in the box.
4)
Click Modify and select the appropriate option from the Collection Type List.
5)
Select the objects to include in the collection. To hide unsupported objects for the type of
collection, select Hide Unsupported Nodes.
6)
Click OK.
To copy a form object collection
1)
Select File > Form Object Collections.
2)
Select a collection from the list and click Duplicate.
3)
Double-click the collection and type a name.
4)
To specify the position of the collection, click Move Up or Move Down.
To copy a form object collection
324
1)
On the form design, select a signature field or a paper forms barcode.
2)
Do one of the following actions:
•
To copy a collection for a paper forms barcode, in the Object palette, click the Value tab,
select Collection Data from the Apply To list, and select New/Manage Collection from
the Collection list.
•
To copy a collection for a signature field, in the Object palette, click the Signature tab,
select Lock Fields After Signing, and select <New/Manage Collection>.
3)
Select a collection from the list and click Duplicate.
4)
Double-click the collection and type a name.
Working with Objects
5)
To specify the position of the collection, click Move Up or Move Down.
To rename a form object collection
1)
Select File > Form Object Collections.
2)
Double-click the collection in the list and type the new name.
To rename a form object collection
1)
On the form design, select a signature field or a paper forms barcode.
2)
Do one of the following actions:
3)
•
To rename a collection for a paper forms barcode, in the Object palette, click the Value
tab, select Collection Data from the Apply To list, and select New/Manage Collection
from the Collection list.
•
To rename a collection for a signature field, in the Object palette, click the Signature tab,
select Lock Fields After Signing, and select New/Manage Collection.
Double-click the collection in the list and type the new name.
To modify a form object collection
1)
2)
Choose one of these methods:
•
Select File > Form Object Collections and go to step 3.
•
Select a signature field or paper forms barcode object on the page.
Do one of the following actions:
•
To modify a collection for a paper forms barcode, in the Object palette, click the Value
tab.
•
To modify a collection for a signature field, in the Object palette, click the Signature tab.
3)
In the Collection list, select New/Manage Collection.
4)
Select the collection that you want to modify and click Modify.
5)
Select the appropriate option from the Collection Type List.
6)
Select the objects to remove or include in the collection. To hide unsupported objects for the
type of collection, select Hide Unsupported Nodes.
7)
Click OK.
8)
To specify the position of the collection, click Move Up or Move Down.
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Working with Objects
7
To modify a form object collection
1)
On the form design, select a signature field or a paper forms barcode.
2)
Do one of the following actions:
•
To modify a collection for a paper forms barcode, in the Object palette, click the Value
tab.
•
To modify a collection for a signature field, in the Object palette, click the Signature tab.
3)
In the Collection list, select New/Manage Collection.
4)
Select the collection that you want to modify and click Modify.
5)
Select the appropriate option from the Collection Type List.
6)
Select the objects to remove or include in the collection. To hide unsupported objects for the
type of collection, select Hide Unsupported Nodes.
To delete a form object collection
1)
Select File > Form Object Collections.
2)
Select a collection from the list, click Delete, and then click Yes.
To delete a form object collection
1)
On the form design, select a signature field or a paper forms barcode.
2)
Do one of the following actions:
•
To delete a collection for a paper forms barcode, in the Object palette, click the Value tab.
•
To delete a collection for a signature field, in the Object palette, click the Signature tab.
3)
In the Collection list, select New/Manage Collection.
4)
Select a collection from the list, click Delete, and then click Yes.
7.2.23. Using custom objects
In addition to the objects in the Standard category of the Object Library palette, Designer includes
some predefined custom objects, which are configured to provide functionality that form authors
frequently need in a form solution. These custom objects have properties and scripts that you can
adjust to suit your requirements.
The following predefined custom objects are located in the Custom category of the Object Library
palette.
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Working with Objects
Object
Description
Address Block
Accepts and displays addresses in United States Postal Service format. The
Address Block is a group of text fields that lets users enter their name, address,
city, state, zip code, and country.
Designed for any type of form.
Process Fields
A block of objects designed for Process Management forms. It includes a submit
button, an action drop-down list, and other hidden fields used to transport data
needed by Process Management to route the form data correctly.
Countries
Displays a drop-down list populated with country names. You can add, move,
and delete any country from the list.
Designed for interactive forms.
Current Date
A date/time field with a script that displays the current date according to the
viewer’s system locale.
Designed for any type of form.
Data Drop-down List
A drop-down list with a script that populates the list from an OLEDB data
source.
Designed for interactive forms.
Data List Box
A list box with a script that populates the list from an OLEDB data source.
Designed for interactive forms.
Email Address
A text field that captures and validates an email address.
Designed for interactive forms.
Form Bridge
A hidden object that enables communication to the PDF outside of Acrobat.
Name
A group of text objects that accepts and displays name information. End users
can enter their last name, first name, and initial.
For any type of form.
Page n of m
A text field with a script that displays the current page and total page count of
the form at run time.
Example: Page 1 of 30
For any type of form.
Page Navigation
A group of buttons with scripts to navigate to first, last, previous, and next
pages.
Designed for interactive forms.
Phone Number - UK
A text field that formats input as a United Kingdom (UK) telephone number.
Designed for interactive forms.
Phone Number - North America
A text field that formats input as a North American telephone number.
Designed for interactive forms.
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Working with Objects
7
Object
Description
Sheet n of m
Displays a text object that indicates the value of the current piece of paper
(sheet) within the range of sheets required for a form.
Example: Sheet 1 of 5
For any type of form.
Signature - Print and Sign
Displays a space on a printed form where a user can provide a signature.
Designed for print forms.
Survey Question
A text object for a survey question and a group of radio buttons for selecting the
answer.
Designed for interactive forms.
U.S. Social Security Number
A text field that lets a user enter a United States social security number.
Designed for interactive forms.
U.S. States
Displays a drop-down list populated with U.S. state names. You can add, move,
and delete any state from the list.
Designed for interactive forms.
Most of the custom objects are ready-to-use, requiring only minor changes such as changing the
captions, formatting numbers, or changing the font type to meet your requirements. Simply drag the
custom objects onto the form design and make the changes. When you place a custom object on the
form design, notice that it also appears in the Hierarchy palette. For custom objects that consist of
several standard objects formatted in a particular manner and grouped together, such as the address
block custom object, you will see the individual text field objects (Name, Address, City, State, Zip
Code, Country) in the Hierarchy palette.
Two of the custom objects, the data drop-down list and the data list box, consist of a single object
that has a custom script associated with it. That script enables you to populate two columns with data
from an OLEDB data connection. When you place the object on the form design, you can see the
script in the Script Editor. The script includes comments that explain which modifications are
needed to make the script compatible with your particular run-time environment. For more information, see To dynamically populate a drop-downlist or list box from an OLEDB data connection.
The Process Fields object is a special object that is designed strictly for use with forms workflow.
RELATED LINKS:
Toadd objects to a form design
ObjectLibrary palette
Managinglibrary palettes
Objectsthat support scripting and calculations
Objectsthat support scripting and calculations
Layoutproperties in the Layout palette
Borderproperties in the Border palette
Fontproperties in the Font palette
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Working with Objects
Paragraphproperties in the Paragraph palette
About custom objects for the SAP environment
You can use this predefined set of custom objects in the SAP environment. The custom objects
appear in the Object Library palette.
Object
Description
Check
Fields
A button with a script that sends the form’s data to the SAP system for verification.
Designed for interactive forms built for Adobe Reader 8.0 or later.
Requires the Web Dynpro environment.
Enumerated
Drop-down
List
A drop-down list where the list of data values is supplied in the data. It uses data binding values to
locate a list of elements in the data source. This object selects the first item in the list if the default
value is not found.
Designed for interactive forms built for Acrobat 8.0 or later and for use in the Web Dynpro
environment.
For more information, see To dynamically populate a drop-downlist in the Web DynPro
environment.
You can set up dynamic properties for drop-down lists and list boxes. (See To dynamically populate a
drop-downlist or list box.)
Decimal
Field Value
Help
The Decimal Field combined with Value Help. Value Help contains a script that queries the SAP
system for help in filling a field.
Designed for interactive forms built for Adobe Reader 8.0 or later.
Enumerated
Drop-down
List (no
select)
A drop-down list (no select) where the list values come from the data. It uses data binding values to
locate a list of elements in the data source. This object does not select the first item in the list if the
default value is not found.
Designed for interactive forms built for Adobe Reader 8.0 or later and for use in the Web Dynpro
environment.
For more information, see To dynamically populate a drop-downlist in the Web DynPro
environment.
You can set up dynamic properties for drop-down lists and list boxes. (See To dynamically populate a
drop-downlist or list box.)
Hidden
Bound Text
Field
A hidden field that contains script for detecting changes in unbound form data for forms opened in
Adobe Reader 7.0.5 or earlier.
Launch
URL
A button that contains a script that launches a hard-coded URL.
Designed for interactive forms.
For more information, see About URL links.
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Working with Objects
Object
330
7
Description
Localized
Friendly
Date
A date/time field that contains a script for entering the date in three date formats. Users can enter
dates in the short, medium, and long date formats.
The format of the field depends on the default locale. For example, if the locale is set to English (U.S.),
the fields follows the M/D/YY|MMM D, YYYY|MMMM D, YYYY format.
Example of short date display for U.S. display: 1/6/08
Example of medium date display for U.S. display: Jan 6, 2008
Example of long date display for U.S. display: January 6, 2008
Designed for interactive forms.
Localized
Full Date
A date/time field that contains a script for entering the date in the full date format.
The format of the field depends on the default locale. For example, if the locale is set to English (U.S.),
the field follows the EEEE, MMMM D, YYYY format.
Example of U.S. display: Thursday, January 6, 2008
Designed for interactive forms.
Localized
Long Date
A date/time field that contains a script for entering the date in the long date format.
The format of the field depends on the default locale. For example, if the locale is set to English (U.S.),
the field follows the MMMM D,YYYY format.
Example of U.S. display: January 6, 2008
Designed for interactive forms.
Localized
Medium
Date
A date/time field that contains a script for entering the date in the medium date format.
The format of the field depends on the default locale. For example, if the locale is set to English (U.S.),
the field follows the MMM D, YYYY format.
Example: Jan 6, 2008
Designed for interactive forms.
Localized
Short Date
A date/time field that contains a script for entering the date in the short date format.
The format of the field depends on the default locale. For example, if the locale is set to English (U.S.),
the field follows the M/D/YY format.
Example: 1/6/08
Designed for interactive forms.
Numeric
Field Value
Help
The Numeric Field combined with Value Help. Value Help contains a script that queries the SAP
system for help in filling a field.
Designed for interactive forms built for Adobe Reader 8.0 or later.
RFID Fields
RFID label support for hexadecimal data that enables binary data as hexadecimal values in RFID
fields. You can use hexadecimal data for Zebra RFID.
Set Fields
Properties
A script object that sets the properties of grouped fields.
Designed for any type of form on the server side.
For more information, see To group interactive fields and settheir properties.
Working with Objects
Object
Description
Subform
Instance
Controls:
Add
Lets a user add new input fields to a form on the client. A button with a script that creates a new
instance of a repeating subform.
For example, use this object on an order form for a number of customers. The customers can use
Adobe Reader to add as many line items as they need.
The script consists of a single button with a click event specified to run at the client. See the script
for instructions.
Designed for forms whose layout adjusts to accommodate data.
For more information, see To add repeating fields.
Subform
Instance
Controls:
Insert
Remove
Move
Lets a user insert, remove, and move new input fields on a form on the client. The object consists of
four buttons, each containing a script. The scripts contain click events specified to run at the client.
See the script for instructions.
For example, use this object on an order form for a number of customers. Using Adobe Reader, the
customers add, remove, and move as many line items as needed.
Designed for forms whose layout adjusts to accommodate data.
For more information, see To add repeating fields.
SubmitToS
AP
A button that contains a script that submits the form data to the SAP system.
Designed for interactive forms built for Adobe Reader 8.0 or later.
SubmitSucc
essClose
A hidden field that contains a script that closes the PDF form when a user successfully submits form
data. This script executes when new data arrives from the server.
Designed for interactive forms.
For more information, see About setting a PDF form action.
SubmitSucc
essReadOnl
y
A hidden field that contains a script that sets all fields to read-only when an end user successfully
submits form data. This script executes when new data arrives from the server.
Designed for interactive forms.
For more information, see About setting a PDF form action.
TableCalcs
A script object that counts, adds, and averages fields in a table on any number of pages.
For more information, see To use the TableCalcs custom object.
Text Field
Value Help
The Text Field combined with Value Help. Value Help contains a script that queries the SAP system
for help in filling a field.
Designed for interactive forms built for Adobe Reader 8.0 or later.
Value Help
A script that queries the SAP system for help in filling a field. You must customize this script.
Designed for interactive forms built for Adobe Reader 8.0 or later.
Requires the Web Dynpro environment.
Value Help
Drop-down
List
A drop-down list field that is enabled so that users can make a Value Help request to the SAP server.
Designed for interactive forms built for Adobe Reader 8.0 or later.
Requires the Web Dynpro environment.
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Working with Objects
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To create a custom object
To create a custom object
Designer enables you to create your own custom objects that you can save and reuse. Creating a
custom object involves adding one or more objects from the Standard tab to the form design and
then defining the properties of the objects to suit your requirements.
You can save the object in the Custom category of the Object Library palette, or you can create your
own category in the Object Library palette and save the object there. Creating your own Object
Library categories is a good way to organize the custom objects that you create and keep them separate from the predefined custom objects provided with Designer. For information about creating
your own categories, see To add a category to the Object Librarypalette.
1)
In the Object Library palette, drag the object that you want to customize onto the form design.
2)
Define the properties of the object.
3)
In the Object Library palette, click the Custom category.
4)
Drag your object to the Custom category in the Object Library palette.
5)
In the Add Library Object dialog box, type a name and description for the custom object, and
click OK.
Multiple objects can be saved as a single custom object. When you drag multiple objects to the
Custom tab together, a single object is created in the Custom tab.
NOTE:
7.3.
Adding, copying, and deleting objects
7.3.1.
To add objects to a form design
You can add objects to a form design in several ways. After you add an object, you can define the
object’s properties.
To add an object using the Insert menu
1)
332
Do one of the following actions:
•
Select Insert > Standard > [object].
•
Select Insert > Barcodes >[object].
•
Select Insert > Custom >[object].
Working with Objects
To add an object from the Object Library palette
1)
Do one of the following actions:
•
Drag the object onto the form design.
•
Double-click the object.
•
Click the object and drag in the form design to draw the object.
To add several objects of the same type
1)
Do one of the following actions:
•
In the Object Library palette, click the object and then select View > Keep Drawing. You
can use the Keep Drawing command for any object. To disable this feature, select View
> Keep Drawing again or press Escape.
•
Click the Draw Fields button in the Tools toolbar and then select the object from the
drop-down list. The Draw Fields button is only available for those objects in the
drop-down list. To disable this feature, click the Select Tool or the Hand Tool button in
the Tools toolbar.
When these commands are selected, you can insert as many copies of an object as you require
without selecting the object from the Object Library palette each time.
7.3.2.
To cut, copy, and paste objects
You can cut, copy, and paste objects by using the menu or keyboard shortcuts.
Duplicating an object is the equivalent of copying and pasting an object. By default, the duplicate is
placed just below and to the right of the original. If you drag the duplicate to a new position and then
duplicate it, the next duplicate and any subsequent duplicates are placed the same distance and
direction away from the last duplicate. You can make as many duplicates as will fit in the active
content area.
To cut or copy and paste an object
1)
Select one or more objects.
2)
Do one of the following actions:
3)
•
To cut an object, select Edit > Cut.
•
To copy an object, select Edit > Copy.
Select Edit > Paste.
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7
If the pointer is on a page, the object is pasted beneath the pointer. Otherwise, the object is pasted in
the upper left corner of the active content area.
To copy a group of objects
1)
In the Hierarchy palette, select the group node.
2)
Select Edit > Copy.
To make multiple copies of one or more objects
1)
In the form design or in the Hierarchy palette, select one or more objects.
2)
Select Edit > Copy Multiple.
3)
Type a number in the Number Of Copies box. You can make as many copies as will fit in the
active content area.
4)
Select options for Vertical Placement and Horizontal Placement.
5)
To increase the amount of vertical space between the copied and original objects, in the
Vertical Spacing area, select Offset By and type the distance in the adjacent box.
6)
To increase the amount of horizontal space between the copied and original objects, in the
Horizontal Spacing area, select Offset By and type the distance in the adjacent box.
7)
Click OK. The copies are added to the page and all of the objects, both original and copied, are
selected.
To duplicate objects
1)
Select one or more objects.
2)
Select Edit > Duplicate.
To duplicate an object by dragging it
334
1)
Drag the object to the spot where you want to place the duplicate.
2)
Press Ctrl and release the mouse button.
Working with Objects
7.3.3.
To delete objects
You can delete any selected object.
1)
Select one or more objects.
2)
Do one of the following actions:
7.4.
•
Select Edit > Delete.
•
Press Delete.
Selecting, grouping, and moving objects
RELATED LINKS:
Keysfor selecting text
Keysfor manipulating objects
Usingsubforms
Layoutproperties in the Layout palette
7.4.1.
To select objects
You can select an object by using familiar mouse and keyboard methods:
•
To select a single object, click the Select Tool
button in the toolbar and click the object.
•
To select multiple objects, Ctrl+click each of the objects you want to select or lasso (drag the
pointer over) the objects you want to select.
•
To select all objects, select Edit > Select All.
•
To select all static objects, select Edit > Select All Static Objects.
•
To select all fields, select Edit > Select All Fields.
To select objects using the Hierarchy palette
The Hierarchy palette assists with the selection and manipulation of objects.
When you select an object in the Hierarchy palette, the object is selected in the form simultaneously.
However, when you make a selection in the Hierarchy palette, all keystrokes (for example, F2 or
Shift+click) are directed to the Hierarchy palette until you work in the form again.
•
To display the Hierarchy palette, select Window > Hierarchy.
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7
•
To select a single object in the Hierarchy palette, click the object.
•
To select multiple adjacent objects in the Hierarchy palette, click the first object and then
Shift+click the last object.
•
To select multiple non-adjacent objects in the Hierarchy palette, Ctrl+click each of the objects.
•
To select a group of objects in the Hierarchy palette, click the group node.
If you select an item in the Hierarchy palette and click the Design View tab, the object is selected
on the form design, and you can also use the keyboard to manipulate the selected object.
NOTE:
7.4.2.
To group and ungroup objects
You can group and ungroup objects by using the Layout menu, the Hierarchy palette, or the Layout
toolbar:
•
To group objects, in the form design or Hierarchy palette, select the objects you want to group
and then either select Layout > Group or click Group .
•
To ungroup objects, in the form design or Hierarchy palette, select the group of objects you
want to ungroup and then either select Layout > Ungroup or click Ungroup .
•
To add a new object to a group by using the mouse, in the form design, drag the object to the
group.
•
To add a new object to a group by using the Hierarchy palette, drag the object to an existing
group node.
7.4.3.
To group interactive fields and set their properties
You can use the Set Fields Properties custom object to group multiple interactive fields and set their
properties. The properties of the groups of interactive fields are enabled when a user opens the PDF
form. For example, in a guided procedure, you could have a three-step form where the first step
contains visible and editable areas, and the second and third steps remain read-only.
You can set these properties on groups of interactive fields on a PDF form:
Visible
Makes the fields visible.
Invisible
Makes the fields invisible.
Open
Lets users edit or modify the fields.
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Working with Objects
Not Editable
Makes the fields read-only so that users cannot edit them.
Mandatory
Users must fill the fields before submitting the form.
Optional
Users can submit the form without filling the fields.
The Set Fields Properties object consists of a script object nested inside an untitled subform.
The script object called groupedFields defines a function called setProperty.
See the object’s script for more details.
To use the object, a form developer must write a function call to invoke the object’s
setProperty function:
a)
In the Object Library palette, click the category that contains the Set Fields Properties
object and drag it onto the existing form design.
b)
Write a script that invokes the function of the script object. Here is the list of function
calls to set the status of grouped fields:
groupedFields.setProperty(this.parent,
groupedFields.setProperty(this.parent,
groupedFields.setProperty(this.parent,
groupedFields.setProperty(this.parent,
groupedFields.setProperty(this.parent,
groupedFields.setProperty(this.parent,
“presence”, “visible”)
“presence”, “invisible”)
“access”, “open”)
“access”, “readOnly”)
“mandatory”, “disabled”)
“mandatory”, “error”)
The SOM expression may vary depending on the position of the script object in the
form hierarchy.
NOTE:
c)
Save, preview, and test the form in the Preview PDF tab. You may want to enable the
JavaScript Debugger to catch any errors while testing the form. See “JavaScript Debugger
in Acrobat Professional” in Scripting Using Designer for more information about the
debugger.
NOTE:
7.4.4.
An invalid property value will not generate an error message.
To move objects
You can move objects by dragging them with the mouse, using the arrow keys on the keyboard, or
entering precise values in the Layout palette.
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Working with Objects
7
To move or duplicate objects by pasting
1)
Select one or more objects.
2)
Select Edit > Cut to move the selection or Edit > Copy to duplicate the selection.
3)
(Optional) To paste an object into another file, open the file.
4)
Select Edit > Paste to paste the object into the active window.
To move an object by dragging it
1)
Select one or more objects.
2)
Drag the object to a new location.
To move an object by using the arrow keys
1)
Select one or more objects.
2)
Press the arrow key for the direction in which you want to move the object. The default
distance is 1 point (1/72 of an inch, or .3528 millimeter).
3)
To move the object 10 points at once, press Shift+arrow.
To move objects by using x and y coordinates in the Layout palette
1)
Select one or more objects.
2)
In the Layout palette, enter new values in either the X or the Y box, or both.
7.4.5.
To stack objects
Designer stacks successively drawn objects, beginning with the first object drawn. How objects are
stacked determines how they appear when they overlap. You can change the stacking order of objects
in your form design at any time by using the arrange commands in the Layout menu.
338
1)
Select the object.
2)
Use one of these methods:
•
To bring the object forward, select Layout > Bring Forward, or click Bring Forward
.
•
To bring the object to the front, select Layout > Bring To Front, or click Bring To Front
.
•
To send an object backward, select Layout > Send Backward, or click Send Backward
•
To send an object to the back, select Layout > Send To Back, or click Send To Back
.
.
Working with Objects
7.4.6.
To lock objects
Locking the objects in a form design prevents you from selecting, moving, and editing the objects in
the Layout Editor.
You can lock the following parts of your form design:
Text
Includes text in a text object or text in the captions of objects. When you select Lock Text, you
must double-click the appropriate text or caption to edit it. This makes it not as easy to modify
the text. If Lock Text is not enabled, you click in the caption or text object to start editing the
text. Using Lock Text is particularly useful if you want to select and move objects but not make
any changes to the text. You can single-click the object to select it, but you must double-click
the caption or text to make changes.
Static objects
Includes text, circles, lines, and rectangles.
Field objects
Includes buttons, check boxes, date/time fields, decimal fields, signature fields, drop-down
lists, image fields, list boxes, numeric fields, paper forms barcodes, password fields, radio
buttons, and text fields.
After locking static objects and field objects, you must unlock them to add new static objects
and field objects.
The lock commands are useful in situations when you have finished formatting specific objects
in the form design and want to continue working with other types of objects. For example, your
form includes a large number of text field objects, as well as text objects that provide instructions about filling the form. You have positioned and formatted all the text objects and need to
apply a different font to the text field objects. You can easily do this by locking the text objects
and then using Edit > Select All Fields to select all the text field objects at once and then change
the font.
•
To lock text, select Edit > Lock Text. To unlock text, select Edit > Lock Text.
•
To lock static objects, select Edit > Lock Static Objects. To unlock static objects, select
Edit > Lock Static Objects.
•
To lock fields, select Edit > Lock Fields. To unlock fields, select Edit > Lock Fields.
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7.4.7. To manipulate objects in a form design by selecting them in the Hierarchy
palette
If you have multiple overlaid objects in a form design, you can use the Hierarchy palette to select and
manipulate an object. This may be easier than selecting the object directly on the form design.
1)
In the Hierarchy palette, click the object you want to manipulate. The object will be selected in
the Hierarchy palette and on the form design.
2)
Click the Design View tab.
3)
Use the keyboard to manipulate the object on the form design. For example, to nudge an object
2 points, press the arrow key twice for the direction you want to move the object. The object
on the form design will move in the required direction.
7.5.
Aligning and sizing objects
7.5.1.
To align objects to each other
When you align objects to each other, the last object you select determines the point of alignment.
For example, if you Shift+click several objects to left align them, the objects are aligned to the left
edge of the object that you selected last. In a group of selected objects, the last object selected has solid
resizing handles.
RELATED LINKS:
Toalign objects to a grid
Tocenter objects on the page
Todistribute objects
Keysfor manipulating objects
To align the edges of objects
340
1)
Select the objects that you want to align.
2)
Do one of the following actions:
•
To align the left edges of the objects, select Layout > Align > Left or click Align Left
•
To align the right edges of the objects, select Layout > Align > Right or click Align Right
.
•
To align the tops of objects, select Layout > Align > Top or click Align Top
.
.
Working with Objects
•
To align the bottoms of objects, select Layout > Align > Bottom or click Align Bottom
.
To align the vertical centers of objects
1)
Select the objects that you want to align.
2)
Select Layout > Align > Vertical Center or click Align Vertical Center
.
To align the horizontal centers of objects
1)
Select the objects that you want to align.
2)
Select Layout > Align > Horizontal Center or click Align Horizontal Center
7.5.2.
.
To align objects in subforms that flow content
You can align objects, except table rows and table cells, in subforms that flow content.
1)
Select the objects that you want to align.
2)
7.5.3.
To align objects to a grid
You can align objects to the closest grid increment. The grid settings can be adjusted in the Drawing
Aids palette.
1)
Select the objects that you want to align.
2)
Select Layout > Align > To Grid.
RELATED LINKS:
UsingSnap to Grid
Keysfor manipulating objects
DrawingAids palette
7.5.4.
To center objects on the page
You can position an object in the horizontal or vertical center of the page. The center is based on the
defined page size.
1)
Select the objects that you want to center.
2)
Select Layout > Center In Page > Horizontally, or Layout > Center In Page > Vertically.
RELATED LINKS:
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Working with Objects
7
Toalign objects to a grid
Toalign objects to each other
Todistribute objects
7.5.5.
To rotate objects
You can rotate an object around its anchor point in a 90°, 180°, or 270° increment. The anchor point
is defined by the X and Y coordinates of an object and provides a starting place for rotating the
object.
1)
Select the object.
2)
In the Layout palette, select the position of the anchor point relative to the perimeter of the
object from the Anchor list.
3)
Click one of the rotation buttons
.
RELATED LINKS:
Layoutproperties in the Layout palette
7.5.6.
To distribute objects
Distributing objects spaces them evenly within the area bounded by the current selection. The
selected objects can be spaced evenly across or down, or arranged in rows and columns. When you
distribute objects in the current selection area, the objects are spaced evenly between the leftmost
and rightmost edges of the objects in the selection area.
Before distribution, the amount of space between each object differs.
After distribution, the amount of space between each object is the same.
When you distribute a number of objects in rows and columns, the objects closest to the outer edges
of the selection area determine the positions of the leftmost and rightmost columns and the top and
bottom rows.
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Working with Objects
Before distribution, the objects are not positioned in columns and rows
After distribution, the objects are positionedin columns and rows
For complex layouts, distributing a single row or column at a time provides more control than
distributing all of the objects in rows and columns at once. For the best results, you could try distributing the leftmost column first, followed by the topmost row. Afterward, select and left align each row
with the leftmost column.
TIP:
1)
Select the objects that you want to distribute.
2)
Do one of the following actions:
•
To distribute the objects evenly across the current selection area, select Layout >
Distribute > Across or click Distribute Evenly Across .
•
To distribute the objects evenly down the current selection area, select Layout >
Distribute > Down or click Distribute Evenly Down .
•
To distribute the objects in rows and columns, select Layout > Distribute > In Rows &
Columns or click Distribute Evenly In Rows And Columns .
RELATED LINKS:
Toalign objects to each other
Toalign objects to a grid
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Working with Objects
7
Tocenter objects on the page
Keysfor manipulating objects
7.5.7.
To resize objects
You can change the size of an object or a group of objects by using the mouse. When you resize more
than one object at a time, the objects are resized proportionally. To change the size of several objects
by different amounts, you select and change the size of each object individually.
You can also change the size of an object by editing the settings in the Layout palette.
You can only resize an image field if its Sizing option (located in the Field tab of the Object
palette) is set to an option other than Use Image Size.
NOTE:
1)
Select each object that you want to resize.
2)
Position the pointer over one of the selection handles, and when the pointer becomes a
double-headed arrow, do one of the following steps:
•
To make the object larger, drag the handle away from the selection.
•
To make the object smaller, drag the handle toward the middle of the selection.
As you drag the handle, the status bar displays the size of the object.
RELATED LINKS:
Tomake objects the same size
Layoutproperties in the Layout palette
7.5.8.
To make objects the same size
You can make two or more objects the same width, height, or both. The dimensions of the last object
you select determine which width or height are used. For example, if you Shift+click several objects
to make the same width, the objects are resized to match the width of the object that you selected last.
In a group of selected objects, the last object has solid resizing handles.
You can only resize an image field if its Sizing option (located in the Field tab of the Object
palette) is set to an option other than Use Image Size.
NOTE:
1)
Select the objects that you want to make the same size.
2)
Select Layout > Make Same Size > [dimension].
RELATED LINKS:
Toalign objects to each other
Toresize objects
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Working with Objects
7.5.9.
To make objects expand to fit
When data is merged, objects can grow in both width and height from the anchor point. Because any
expansion of the object occurs in the opposite direction from the anchor point, the anchor point may
restrict the direction in which an object may grow. For example, if you choose an anchor point of
Top Middle, the object may grow to the left, right, and down.
IMPORTANT: The Expand To Fit option should not be selected for Acrobat 6-compatible forms. Users
cannot edit the data in expandable fields in Acrobat 6 compatible forms. Instead, you should position
and size fields to accommodate the longest possible user-entered data value.
To manually expand objects, you can also select the Show Text Overflow Indicators option on the
Wizards and Tips panel in the Options dialog box. See Wizardsand Tips (Options dialog box).
1)
Select the object.
2)
In the Layout palette, select the Expand To Fit option for the width, height, or both.
RELATED LINKS:
Layoutproperties in the Layout palette
7.5.10. To position objects
You can specify the precise position of an object using the X and Y coordinates in the Layout palette.
The X coordinate defines the horizontal position of the object relative to the left edge of the subform.
The Y coordinate defines the vertical position of the object relative to the top edge of the subform.
The overall size of an object includes the caption (if any) and the associated fillable area.
1)
Select the object.
2)
From the Layout palette menu, select either of these options:
3)
•
Absolute Coordinates
•
Relative Coordinates
In the Layout palette, specify the X and Y coordinates of the object.
RELATED LINKS:
UsingSnap to Grid
Layoutproperties in the Layout palette
7.5.11. Using Snap to Grid
You can use the Snap to Grid option to automatically snap objects that you place on the form design
to the nearest point on the grid. The Snap to Grid option is available in the Drawing Aids palette and
from the View menu.
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Working with Objects
7
When you move an object, Snap to Grid ensures that the X and Y coordinates of the object's anchor
point are evenly divisible by the grid unit. If an object's width or height is not evenly divisible by the
current grid unit, you cannot position the object beyond that last grid point where it will not exceed
the extent of the page content area.
If you want to position an object tightly against the right or bottom edge of a page, keep the following
points in mind:
•
If Snap to Grid is selected, the only way to position an object tightly against the right or bottom
edge of the page is to ensure that its width and height are evenly divisible by the grid unit. The
simplest way to achieve this is to resize the object by dragging the bottom-left corner while
Snap to Grid is selected. Snap to Grid will restrict the size of the object to even multiples of the
grid unit.
•
If Snap to Grid is not selected, you can manually position the object as close as possible to the
right and bottom edge of the page.
RELATED LINKS:
Toalign objects to a grid
DrawingAids palette
7.5.12. Using to Snap to Guideline
Use the Snap to Guideline option to automatically place objects on guidelines you define. The Snap
to Guideline option is available in the Drawing Aids palette and from the View menu. Use the
Drawing Aids palette to add or delete guidelines.
When Snap to Guideline is enabled, an object that you move to within one grid space of a guideline
snaps to the guideline automatically. If additional snapping options are enabled, the object must be
closer to the guideline before it snaps to the guideline.
When you select multiple objects, the objects are treated as one object for snapping.
RELATED LINKS:
DrawingAids palette
Touse the drawing aids
7.5.13. Using Snap to Object
Use the Snap to Object option to automatically position the edge of an object using the edge of
another object. The Snap to Object option is available in the Drawing Aids palette and from the View
menu.
When Snap to Object is enabled, an object that you move to within one grid space of another object
snaps to the other object automatically. If additional snapping options are enabled, the objects must
be closer to each other before the object you are moving snaps.
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Working with Objects
Snap to Object snaps objects to other objects even if the objects do not touch. For example, in the
following illustration, the bottom edge of object B snaps to the top edge of object A.
When the Snap to Object option is enabled, you can disable it temporarily by pressing the Alt key
when you position the object. Pressing the Alt key temporarily enables the option when it is disabled.
Because the Alt key disables the arrow keys, you cannot use it to toggle Snap to Object on or off
when you use arrow keys to move objects.
NOTE:
When you select multiple objects, the objects are treated as one object for snapping.
RELATED LINKS:
DrawingAids palette
Touse the drawing aids
7.5.14. Using Snap to the Center of the Page
Use Snap to the Center of the Page to automatically place the center of an object at the vertical or
horizontal center of the page. The Snap to the Center of the Page option is available in the Drawing
Aids palette and from the View menu.
The center lines are not objects. They are displayed only when you are positioning objects near them
and Snap to the Center of the Page is enabled.
When Snap to the Center of the Page is enabled, an object that you move to within one grid space of
a page center line snaps to the line automatically. If additional snapping options are enabled, the
object must be closer to the center line before it snaps to the line. An object can snap to the vertical
and horizontal center lines at the same time, which places it at the exact center of the page.
When you select multiple objects, the objects are treated as one object for snapping.
RELATED LINKS:
DrawingAids palette
Touse the drawing aids
7.6.
Formatting
347
Working with Objects
7.6.1.
7
Formatting text
You can define font properties for text objects, object captions, and data values.
The Font palette contains all of the font properties available. You can define these font properties in
the Font palette:
•
Type of font
•
Font size and style
•
Baseline shift
•
Vertical and horizontal scale of font
•
Letter spacing
•
Auto kern
You can use the Font toolbar to quickly define common text formatting properties, including font
type, size, and style.
If you are creating objects that may display text in languages that use non-Latin-1 characters,
make sure that you choose a font for the object that supports the full character set of the language and
the appropriate locale by using the Field tab of the Object palette.
NOTE:
RELATED LINKS:
Fontproperties in the Font palette
Fontpalette
Formattingparagraphs
Paragraphproperties in the Paragraph palette
To apply a different font
1)
Select the text you want to change or select the object.
If Edit > Lock Text is enabled, double-click the text.
2)
3)
348
Do one of the following actions:
•
To edit the caption and data value, in the Font palette, click the Currently Editing palette
menu and select Edit Caption and Value.
•
To edit only the caption, in the Font palette, click the Currently Editing palette menu and
select Edit Caption.
•
To edit only the data value, in the Font palette, click the Currently Editing palette menu
and select Edit Value.
In the Font palette, from the Font list, select a font name.
Working with Objects
To change the font size
1)
Select the text you want to change or select the object.
If Edit > Lock Text is enabled, double-click the text.
2)
3)
Do one of the following actions:
•
To edit the caption and data value, in the Font palette, click the Currently Editing palette
menu and select Edit Caption and Value.
•
To edit only the caption, in the Font palette, click the Currently Editing palette menu and
select Edit Caption.
•
To edit only the data value, in the Font palette, click the Currently Editing palette menu
and select Edit Value.
In the Font palette, from the Font Size box, type or select a point size.
To apply bold, italic, underline, or strikethrough formatting
1)
Select the text you want to change or select the object. If Edit > Lock Text is enabled,
double-click the text.
2)
Do one of the following actions:
3)
•
To edit the caption and data value, in the Font palette, click the Currently Editing palette
menu and select Edit Caption and Value.
•
To edit only the caption, in the Font palette, click the Currently Editing palette menu and
select Edit Caption.
•
To edit only the data value, in the Font palette, click the Currently Editing palette menu
and select Edit Value.
In the Font palette, do one of the following actions:
•
To apply bold formatting, click Bold.
•
To apply italic formatting, click Italic.
•
To apply underline formatting, click Underline.
•
To apply strikethrough formatting, click Strikethrough.
To change the color of text
1)
Select the text you want to change or select the object. If Edit > Lock Text is enabled,
double-click the text.
2)
Do one of the following actions:
349
Working with Objects
3)
7
•
To edit the caption and data value, in the Font palette, click the Currently Editing palette
menu and select Edit Caption and Value.
•
To edit only the caption, in the Font palette, click the Currently Editing palette menu and
select Edit Caption.
•
To edit only the data value, in the Font palette, click the Currently Editing palette menu
and select Edit Value.
In the Font palette, click the color selector and select the color you want.
To change the baseline shift of text
Use the baseline shift option to specify the amount of space to move a character (or group of characters) up or down relative to the baseline. Positive numbers shift characters up, and negative
numbers shift characters down.
You can use baseline shift to make small adjustments to text such as positioning copyright and trademark symbols (© and ™), or to create superscript or subscript such as a number or figure used in a
formula or mathematical expression, which is smaller than the adjacent text, and is set slightly above
or below the line of type.
Adjusting the baseline shift does not change the line spacing or font size of the characters. When you
change the spacing between lines or the font size, the baseline-shift position is maintained proportionally. You can change font sizes in the Font palette, and adjust line spacing in the Paragraph
palette.
1)
Select the text to change or select the object. If Edit > Lock Text is enabled, double-click the
text.
2)
Do one of the following actions:
3)
•
To edit the caption and data value, in the Font palette, click the Currently Editing palette
menu and select Edit Caption and Value.
•
To edit only the caption, in the Font palette, click the Currently Editing palette menu and
select Edit Caption.
•
To edit only the data value, in the Font palette, click the Currently Editing palette menu
and select Edit Value.
In the Font palette, in the Baseline Shift box, type the amount of shift to apply.
To change the letter spacing of text
Use the letter spacing options to adjust the amount of space between the letters in a word or group
of words. Designer uses EM units of measure (proportional width of a letter m) to space letters. The
minimum value you can enter is -1 000 (-1em). The maximum value you can enter is 10 000 (10em).
350
Working with Objects
The default value is 0 (no spacing). You must enter whole numbers; fractions are rounded off to the
nearest whole number.
The Letter Spacing box displays Mixed when you apply different letter-spacing values within
one or more selected objects.
NOTE:
1)
Select the text to change or select the object. If Edit > Lock Text is enabled, double-click the
text.
2)
In the Font palette, do one of the following actions:
3)
•
To edit the caption and data value, click the Currently Editing palette menu and select
Edit Caption and Value.
•
To edit only the caption, click the Currently Editing palette menu and select Edit
Caption.
•
To edit only the data value, click the Currently Editing palette menu and select Edit
Value.
In the Font palette, in the Letter Spacing box, type the amount of letter spacing to apply.
To change the vertical or horizontal scale of text
Use the vertical and horizontal scale options to increase or decrease the size of text. Designer calculates font scaling in percentage units. The default value for the vertical and horizontal scale is either
100% or no scaling. The minimum value you can enter is 1%. The maximum value you can enter is
1000%. Negative values are not applicable. You can enter values that have up to two decimal places
(for example, 50.75%).
The percentage symbol (%) is automatically generated when the value in the box is validated. If you
type an invalid value, the last correct value is displayed instead.
NOTE: The Vertical Scale and Horizontal Scale boxes display Mixed when you apply different vertical
or horizontal scale values within one or more selected objects.
1)
Select the text to change or select the object. If Edit > Lock Text is enabled, double-click the
text.
2)
In the Font palette, do one of the following actions:
3)
•
To edit the caption and data value, click the Currently Editing palette menu and select
Edit Caption and Value.
•
To edit only the caption, click the Currently Editing palette menu and select Edit
Caption.
•
To edit only the data value, click the Currently Editing palette menu and select Edit
Value.
In the Font palette, in the Vertical Scale box, or in the Horizontal Scale box, or in both, type the
percentage of scaling to apply.
351
Working with Objects
7
To auto kern text
Use the auto kern option to reduce the amount of space between certain letters. Auto kerning minimizes uneven spacing and maintains a uniform distance between the letters within a word or group
of words. For example, letter combinations, such as WA, MW, and TA, are typically kerned for a
better appearance.
1)
Select the text to change or select the object. If Edit > Lock Text is enabled, double-click the
text.
2)
In the Font palette, do one of the following actions:
3)
7.6.2.
•
To edit the caption and data value, click the Currently Editing palette menu and select
Edit Caption and Value.
•
To edit only the caption, click the Currently Editing palette menu and select Edit
Caption.
•
To edit only the data value, click the Currently Editing palette menu and select Edit
Value.
In the Font palette, select Auto Kern.
Formatting paragraphs
You can define paragraph properties for text objects, object captions, and data values. To define
these properties, you must first select the object.
The Paragraph palette contains all of the paragraph properties available in Designer. You can define
these paragraph properties in the Paragraph palette:
•
Alignment and spread
•
Lists
•
Indentation
•
Line spacing
•
Hyphenation
You can use the Text Formatting toolbar to quickly access the most common paragraph formatting
commands.
RELATED LINKS:
Hyphenatetext
Paragraphproperties in the Paragraph palette
352
Working with Objects
To align paragraphs
1)
Select the text you want to change or select the object. If Edit > Lock Text is enabled,
double-click the text.
2)
Do one of the following actions:
3)
•
To edit the caption and data value, in the Paragraph palette, click the Currently Editing
palette menu and select Edit Caption and Value.
•
To edit only the caption, in the Paragraph palette, click the Currently Editing palette
menu and select Edit Caption.
•
To edit only the data value, in the Paragraph palette, click the Currently Editing palette
menu and select Edit Value.
Do one of the following actions:
•
To align text left of right, in the Paragraph palette, click Align Left or Align Right.
•
To center text, in the Paragraph palette, click Align Center.
•
To justify text, in the Paragraph palette, click Justify.
•
To align text to the top of the area reserved for the caption and value, in the Paragraph
palette, click Align Top.
•
To align text to the middle of the area reserved for the caption and value, in the Paragraph
palette, click Align Middle.
•
To align text to the bottom of the area reserved for the caption and value, in the Paragraph palette, click Align Bottom.
To create a bulleted list
1)
Select the text that you want to add bullets to, and then click Bulleted List.
2)
To select a bullet style, click the arrow next to Bullets.
3)
Do one of the following actions:
•
To increase the list indentation, click Increase Indent.
•
To decrease the list indentation, click Decrease Indent.
To create a numbered list
1)
Select the text that you want to add numbering to, and then click Numbered List.
2)
To select a number style, click the arrow next to Numbered List.
3)
Specify the starting number in the Start box.
353
Working with Objects
4)
7
Do one of the following actions:
•
To increase the list indentation, click Increase Indent.
•
To decrease the list indentation, click Decrease Indent.
To add compound tags to a numbered list
1)
Click anywhere within the numbered list.
2)
Select the Compound Tags checkbox.
3)
Select the items in the numbered list that you want to apply the compound tags to, and then
click Increase Indent.
For example, in the following list:
1. Item A.
2. Item B.
3. Item C
4. Item D
increasing the indent of Item B and Item C, results in the following numbered list:
1. Item A.
1.1. Item B.
1.2. Item C
2. IItem D
To change the indentation of paragraphs
354
1)
Select the text you want to change or select the object. If Edit > Lock Text is enabled,
double-click the text.
2)
Do one of the following actions:
•
To edit the caption and data value, in the Paragraph palette, click the Currently Editing
palette menu and select Edit Caption and Value.
•
To edit only the caption, in the Paragraph palette, click the Currently Editing palette
menu and select Edit Caption.
•
To edit only the data value, in the Paragraph palette, click the Currently Editing palette
menu and select Edit Value.
Working with Objects
3)
Do one of the following actions:
•
To increase or decrease the left indent of text, in the Paragraph palette, under Indents,
enter the indent you want in the Left box.
•
To change the right indent of text, in the Paragraph palette, under Indents, enter the
indent you want in the Right box.
•
To create a first-line indent, in the Paragraph palette, in the First list, select First Line. In
the By box, type the measurement to indent.
•
To create a hanging indent, in the Paragraph palette, in the First list, select Hanging. In
the By box, type the measurement to indent.
To change the spacing of paragraphs
1)
Select the text you want to change or select the object. If Edit > Lock Text is enabled,
double-click the text.
2)
Do one of the following actions:
3)
7.6.3.
•
To edit the caption and data value, in the Paragraph palette, click the Currently Editing
palette menu and select Edit Caption and Value.
•
To edit only the caption, in the Paragraph palette, click the Currently Editing palette
menu and select Edit Caption.
•
To edit only the data value, in the Paragraph palette, click the Currently Editing palette
menu and select Edit Value.
Do one of the following actions:
•
To change the spacing before or after text, in the Paragraph palette, under Spacing, enter
the spacing you want in the Above or Below box.
•
To space lines, in the Paragraph palette, from the Line Spacing list, select an option.
Hyphenation in selected paragraphs
Although the hyphenation values you select in the Form Properties and Options dialog boxes apply
to the text in the entire form, you can use the Hyphenate option in the Paragraph palette to add or
remove hyphenation in individual paragraphs. Use the Hyphenate option to manually adjust text
layout on an object-by-object basis.
You can hyphenate the text in the caption area of objects such as text fields, decimal fields, and
numeric fields, and the value area of text field objects (default text and text the form filler enters).
It is recommended that you become familiar with the various options you need to select for objects
that contain hyphenated text. (See Hyphenatetext.)
355
Working with Objects
7
When the Hyphenate New Items is selected in the Options dialog box on the Formatting page, the
Hyphenation option is automatically selected with new objects added to a form.
TIP:
RELATED LINKS:
Hyphenatetext
Considerationsfor setting hyphenation
Settingand removing hyphenation in forms
Paragraphproperties in the Paragraph palette
Formatting(Options dialog box)
Formattingtab (Form Properties dialog box)
To hyphenate the text in a selected paragraph
1)
To enable) the Hyphenate option in the Paragraph palette, do one of the following actions:
•
(New forms) Select Tools > Options > Formatting, and then choose Allow Hyphenation
in Text and Field Captions, or Allow Hyphenation in Text Field Values, or both.
•
(Current form) Select File > Form Properties > Formatting > and choose Allow Hyphenation in Text and Field Captions, or Allow Hyphenation in Text Field Values, or both.
2)
Select the text to hyphenate.
3)
(Does not apply to text objects) In the Paragraph palette, click the Currently Editing palette
menu and do one of the following actions:
•
To hyphenate caption and data value text, select Edit Caption and Value.
•
To hyphenate only caption text, select Edit Caption.
•
To hyphenate only data value text, select Edit Value.
4)
To hyphenate the text in the value area of text field objects, in the Object palette, on the Field
tab, select Allow Multiple Lines.
5)
In the Layout palette, select Expand to Fit (Width), or Expand to Fit (Height), or both.
6)
In the Paragraph palette, select Hyphenate. The change is applied.
To remove hyphenation from a selected paragraph
1)
7.6.4.
356
Click the text to remove hyphenation from and, in the Paragraph palette, deselect Hyphenate.
The change is applied.
Formatting objects
Working with Objects
RELATED LINKS:
Fontproperties in the Font palette
Paragraphproperties in the Paragraph palette
Layoutproperties in the Layout palette
Borderproperties in the Border palette
To add space around an object
All objects have a certain amount of white space or margin around them.
1)
Select the object.
2)
In the Layout palette, set the margins for Left, Right, Top, and Bottom.
To add a border around an object
To define border properties for an object that supports borders, you must first select the object. The
properties that you define in the Border palette apply to the whole object.
1)
Select the object.
2)
In the Border palette, from the Edges list, select an editing option.
•
To apply a border to each edge separately, select Edit Individually. This option does not
apply to three-dimensional borders.
•
To apply the same border to all edges, select Edit Together.
3)
Beneath the Edges list, select a style, width, and color for the borders.
4)
To have notched corners, click one of the Corners buttons and, in the Radius box, define the
corner radius (in inches, centimeters, or points).
5)
To fill the object with color or a pattern, select an option from the Style list and, using the adjacent color selector buttons, select appropriate fill colors.
To add a border around the fillable area
You can also specify the border properties of the fillable areas of an object. For example, for a text
field, you can apply one type of border and fill to the overall object and another type of border and
fill to the value area that displays data. These objects have fillable areas:
•
Command buttons
•
Check boxes
•
Signature Fields
•
Drop-down lists
357
Working with Objects
7
•
List boxes
•
Numeric fields
•
Password fields
•
Radio buttons
•
Text fields
1)
Select the object.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab. From the Appearance list, select Custom.
3)
Select a style for the border of the fillable area. The options are the same as those in the Border
palette.
4)
If applicable for the object, type a border width and select a color for the border.
5)
To have notched corners, click one of the Corners buttons and in the Radius box, define the
corner radius (in inches, centimeters, or points).
6)
To fill the fillable area with color or a pattern, select an option from the Style list and using the
adjacent color selector buttons, select appropriate fill colors.
To change the default formatting for new objects
You can set the default formatting for new objects and save it in the Object Library. For example, you
can change the default font for all new Text objects to Times New Roman.
1)
Insert an object.
2)
Make the changes to the object. For example, add a border, apply a different font, change the
size of the text.
3)
Drag the object into a category in the Object Library palette.
4)
In the Add Library Object dialog box, type the name of the object and click OK.
If another object of the same name already exists in that tab, Designer asks you to confirm that
you want to replace the existing object.
7.6.5.
Using leaders in text
Use leaders to guide the reader from one piece of information to another across a page, such as in a
table of contents, price list, or invoice. You can add leaders to a line or block of text in text objects
and in the caption area of objects such as text fields, decimal fields, and numeric fields. When the
text object or caption area is in edit mode, the Leader command is available in the Insert menu and
the Context menu.
358
Working with Objects
You can define and edit leader properties such as the end position, pattern, line thickness or dot
spacing, and alignment. You can also adjust the positioning, size, and appearance of leaders by using
the options in the Font and Paragraph palettes.
When you add a leader, Designer draws a leader from the insertion point to the end position that
you specify. The leader end position is based on ruler increments. The default end position extends
the leader to the right edge of the caption or static text object. You can only define or edit one leader
at a time. All changes are applied immediately.
You can define different leaders for each paragraph of text. However, it is important to understand
that a new paragraph inherits the leader properties from the previous paragraph. In other words,
when you create a new paragraph, any leaders defined in the previous paragraph apply to the new
paragraph.
Designer can not anticipate the content of run-time data. If you intend to populate a form with
rich text that contains leaders, you must set the target version to Acrobat 9 when you design the form.
NOTE:
RELATED LINKS:
DeleteTab Stops dialog box
Fontproperties in the Font palette
Fontpalette
To add a leader
1)
Place the insertion point where you want the leader to start within the text object or caption
area, and then select Insert > Leader.
2)
In the Leader End Position box, type the ruler position where you want the leader to end.
3)
In the Leader Pattern list, select the pattern to fill the leader.
4)
In the Leader Dot Spacing or Leader Underline Weight list, select the amount of space to
appear between dots or dashes, or select the thickness of the line.
5)
Set the alignment for the leader by doing one of these actions:
6)
•
To align the left side of the text that follows the leader (immediately before the first letter)
with the specified end position, click Left Align Leader.
•
To align the right side of the text that follows the leader (immediately after the last letter)
as the end position for the leader, click Right Align Leader.
Click anywhere in the Layout Editor to close the dialog box.
To edit a leader
1)
Select the leader and edit it.
2)
Click anywhere in the Layout Editor to close the dialog box.
359
Working with Objects
7
To delete a leader
The Delete Leader command removes the selected leader (tab), the associated tab stops, as well as
any leader properties, such as pattern, spacing, and alignment.
The Delete Leader command is available on the Edit menu after you select a leader. However,
if the Delete Leader command remains unavailable after you select a leader, this means that the leader
is not associated with a tab stop. When this is the case, you can use the Delete key to remove the leader.
NOTE:
1)
Select the leader to delete.
2)
Select Edit > Delete Leader.
To enable a visual clue for No Leader
When you select the No Leader option while inserting Leaders, the leaders are not displayed in both,
the Preview PDF and the final PDF form. You can turn on a visual indicator to display tab stops
when No Leader is selected. As this value is read while opening the document, close and reopen
already open documents for this value to take effect.
1)
In Tools > Options > Formatting, check Show non blank tab stop in design view option.
2)
Specify a character to see in place of blanks.
To delete tab stops
If you use the Delete key on the keyboard to delete a selected leader, only the tab character is
removed. Any associated tab stops or leader properties such as pattern, spacing, and alignment are
not removed.
To delete unused tab stops, you must use the Delete Tab Stops dialog box.
The Delete Tab Stops command is available on the Edit menu when there are one or more tab
stops in the current paragraph. If there are two or more paragraphs within a selection, the dialog is
unavailable.
NOTE:
1)
Select Edit > Delete Tab Stops.
2)
Complete one of the following actions:
3)
360
•
To delete selected tab stops, select one or more tab stops from the list, and then click
Clear.
•
To delete all tab stops, click Clear All.
Click OK.
Working with Objects
7.7.
Creating an insertion point
Use insertion points in forms that are assembled on a server by using the Assembler services.
An insertion point is a subform that acts as a placeholder for a fragment that is inserted into the form
when the form is assembled. You can add one or more insertion points to the body or the master
pages of a form.
Use one of these methods to create an insertion point:
•
•
•
•
Insert an insertion point object into a form:
–
Inserts a subform with the default name InsertionPoint.
–
Inserts an insertion point subform that contains an insertion point placeholder (a text
object that contains temporary placeholder content).
–
Sets the Data Binding (Open, Save, Submit) option on the Binding tab to No Data
Binding.
Insert an insertion point into an existing subform:
–
Inserts an insertion point subform within the selected subform. The default name is
(untitled Subform)
–
Inserts an insertion point placeholder into the insertion point subform.
–
For the existing subform, sets the Data Binding (Open, Save, Submit) option on the
Binding tab to Use Name (<object name>). For the insertion point subform, sets the Data
Binding (Open, Save, Submit) option on the Binding tab to No Data Binding.
–
Selects the Expand To Fit options on the Layout tab for the insertion point placeholder
(text object). Therefore, the insertion point placeholder can expand according to the
amount of text contained in the insertion point placeholder.
Define an existing subform as an insertion point:
–
Makes the select subform an insertion point.
–
Maintains all existing option settings for the subform. For example, if the Data Binding
(Open, Save, Submit) option on the Binding tab is set to Use Name (<object name>)
before you define the subform as an insertion point, this option setting is retained after
the change.
Does not insert an insertion point placeholder. You can manually add a text object as an insertion point placeholder.
You can insert one or more insertion points into an insertion point. By default, each new (child)
insertion point occupies the same area as the parent insertion point. As such, multiple insertion
points can overlap. Therefore, it is recommended that you use the Hierarchy palette to select the
individual objects that make up an insertion point. The Hierarchy palette is a graphical representa-
361
Working with Objects
7
tion of the contents in the Design View and Master Pages tabs. What you select in the Hierarchy
palette is also selected in the body or master page that it is associated with.
In the Draw Aids palette, you can select various border styles for an insertion point on the Drawing
Aids palette.
You can optionally name an insertion point subform in the Name box on the Subform tab. To relate
the insertion point subform to the associated fragment when the form is assembled, use the same
name for the insertion point and the fragment. It is recommended that you type the name in medial
capitals, a mix of uppercase and lowercase (for example, LiveCycle or InDesign).
7.7.1.
Insert an insertion point object into a form
1)
In the Hierarch palette, select where to insert the insertion point object.
2)
Click Insert > Custom > Insertion Point.
3)
(Optional) In the Name box, type a name for the insertion point subform.
4)
Position the insertion point within the form as required.
7.7.2.
Insertion point into an existing subform
1)
In the Hierarch palette, select the subform to insert an insertion point into.
2)
Click Insert > Insertion Point.
3)
(Optional) In the Name box, type a name for the insertion point subform.
7.7.3.
Define a subform as an insertion point
1)
In the Hierarchy palette, select the subform to define as an insertion point.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Subform tab and select This Subform Is An Insertion Point.
3)
(Optional) In the Name box, type a name for the insertion point subform.
7.7.4. Add an insertion point placeholder (to a subform that is defined as an
insertion point)
362
1)
In the Hierarchy palette, select a subform that is defined as an insertion point, and click Insert
> Standard > Text.
2)
In the Object palette, on the Draw tab, select This Is An Insertion Point Placeholder.
3)
Click inside the text object and type the text to identify the subform as an insertion point. For
example, type This is temporary placeholder content.
Working with Objects
7.8.
Formatting captions
A number of the standard field objects in the Object Library palette support captions. Captions
provide textual information to the viewers about the form field.
When you add an object that supports captions, Designer assigns a default name for the caption. The
default name is the name of the object. For example, if you add a list box object to the form design,
the default caption is List Box.
When creating the form design, you can see the caption for the object in two places: on the form
design next to the object (the default position) or in the Field tab of the Object palette.
You can edit the caption text by using the Field tab of the Object palette or by editing the caption text
directly on the page. If the text wraps as you type, increasing the size of the object will display the text
properly. If the object displays a white cross in a red box , the object either needs to be resized or
have the caption reserve adjusted. A reserve of 0 sets the caption area to auto-fit so that it adjusts to
fit the entire caption. The caption is protected and users cannot be modified it when filling the form.
NOTE: When you bind a caption to a data source, the caption is always shown in the form, even if you
have set Caption Position in the Layout tab to None.
If you need to rearrange field objects, but do not want to risk modifying their captions, you can use
the Lock Text command. Using this command lets you to move the field objects around easily but
makes the caption not as easy to modify.
NOTE:
You cannot select or edit captions if a field object is locked. See To lock objects.
RELATED LINKS:
Formatting
Tocreate a caption by merging a text object and a fieldobject
Fontproperties in the Font palette
Paragraphproperties in the Paragraph palette
Layoutproperties in the Layout palette
Tolock objects
Todynamically populate a caption
7.8.1.
To set a default font for captions in new forms
1)
Click Tools > Options.
2)
Click Default Fonts.
3)
Under Default Caption Font Properties For New Forms, select Typeface, Size, and Style
options, as needed.
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Working with Objects
7.8.2.
To set a default font for captions in an existing form
1)
Click File > Form Properties.
2)
Click Default Fonts.
3)
Under Default Caption Font Properties, select Typeface, Size, and Style options. as needed.
7.8.3.
To rename a caption
1)
Select the object.
2)
Do one of the following actions:
•
To change the caption in the Layout Editor, select the text of the caption and type a new
caption. If Edit > Lock Text is enabled, double-click the text.
•
To change the caption by using the Object palette, click the Field tab type a new caption
in the Caption box.
TIP:
7.8.4.
7
You can dynamically populate a caption with a value from a data source.
To position a caption
Captions are positioned relative to the fillable area of an object.
1)
Select one or more objects.
2)
In the Layout palette, select a position for the caption from the Position list.
When you bind a text field caption to a data source, the text field's caption label is always
shown in the form, even if you selected None for the caption position in the Layout tab
NOTE:
7.8.5.
To specify the amount of space for a caption
You can adjust the amount of white space between the caption and the fillable area.
1)
Select one or more objects.
2)
In the Layout palette, type a new value in the Reserve box.
If you enter a reserve space before selecting a position for the caption, Designer adjusts the
reserve space automatically.
NOTE:
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Working with Objects
7.8.6.
To set the caption area to auto-fit
1)
Select one or more objects.
2)
In the Layout palette, type 0 in the Reserve box. This number sets the caption area to auto-fit
so that it adjusts to fit the entire caption.
7.8.7.
To hide a caption
1)
Select one or more objects.
2)
In the Layout palette, select None from the Position list.
7.9.
Making objects visible, invisible, or hidden
Depending on the purpose of the form, you may want to control which objects are displayed in a
PDF form when users view the form in Acrobat or Adobe Reader, or when users print the form from
within Acrobat or Adobe Reader. With the various options in the Presence list in the Object palette,
you can selectively make different objects in a PDF form visible, invisible, or hidden when the form
is viewed on-screen or printed from within Acrobat or Adobe Reader. You can also specify that an
object only print when the form is printed on the front or both sides of the printed page.
Keep in mind the following factors when applying presence options to objects:
•
The Invisible and Hidden options are unavailable for groups, content areas, master pages, page
sets, and subform sets.
•
The presence option you apply to container objects such as subforms overrides the presence
option applied to each contained object. For example, if you apply the Visible (Print Only)
option to a subform set, the subform and the collected objects will not appear on-screen but
will appear in the printed form, regardless of the presence setting of the individual objects.
•
If you want to print a form in Acrobat or Adobe Reader, do not apply the Visible (Screen Only)
option to any content area objects that contain objects you want to display in the printed form.
When you apply the Visible (Screen Only) option to a content area object, the objects within
the content area are only displayed onscreen and do not appear in the printed form. A warning
marker appears in the upper-right corner of the master page when a content area or master
page object is not present in both the screen and the print views. If you want to display one set
of objects when a form is printed and another when the form is viewed onscreen, you can
create one master page with two content area objects, one for each set of objects. You apply the
Visible (Print Only) option to one content area object, and the Visible (Print Only) option to
the other.
•
When you apply the Visible (Print Only) option to an object, the object will appear in the
Design View and Master Page tabs but will not appear in the Preview PDF tab.
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7
The following list describes some of the ways you can use the presence options:
Visible
The object is visible on-screen, visible in the printed form (when printed from within Acrobat,
Adobe Reader, or the server), and occupies space in the form layout. For example, if you want
the form to look the same on-screen and in print, you can apply the Visible option to all of the
objects in the form. Visible is the default presence setting for all objects.
Visible (Screen Only)
The object is visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form if printed from within Acrobat
or Adobe Reader, and occupies space in the form layout. The object is visible in the printed
form if printed from the server. For example, if you have a form that users will fill, submit
online, and then print, you can apply the Visible (Screen Only) option to Print and Submit
buttons so that the buttons are visible on-screen but not visible in the printed form.
Visible (Print Only)
The object is not visible on-screen, visible in the printed form if printed from within Acrobat
or Adobe Reader, and occupies space in the form layout. The object is visible in the printed
form if printed from the server. For example, if you need to include some instructional text in
the printed form that is not required on-screen, such as mailing instructions, you can apply the
Visible (Print Only) option to Text Field objects that contain the instructions so that the text
is visible in the printed form but not visible on-screen.
Inactive
Inactive presence indicates that an object is hidden and excluded from event processing.
Calculations, validations, and other events do not trigger for inactive objects. The enumeration
of the presence attribute determines which of the form processing stages a form object participates in. Inactive objects participate in the step of merging data with template to create Form
DOM.NOTE: Presence Inactive applies to all Designer objects.
Invisible
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the
form layout. For example, if you want an area in a form to remain invisible until a user selects
a certain option, such as the section for payment-type information in a billing form, you can
apply the Invisible option to the text field objects used for gathering credit card information so
that they remain invisible until the user selects a Radio button that indicates the credit card
type.
Hidden (Exclude from Layout)
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and does not occupy any
space in the form layout. For example, if you want a section in a form to remain hidden until
a user selects a certain option and to not occupy space in the form layout when the section is
hidden, you can apply the Hidden (Exclude from Layout] option to the subform that contains
the various objects in the section so that the form layout adjusts as needed.
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Working with Objects
The Hidden (Exclude from Layout) option works as described only when you apply this
option to objects that are placed within a subform that is set to Flowed.
NOTE:
One-sided Printing Only
The object is visible on-screen, visible on the front side of each printed page of the form (when
printed from within Acrobat, Adobe Reader, or the server), and occupies space in the form
layout. For example, to have the page number appear at the lower-right of the pages, apply the
One-sided Printing Only option to the page number object.
Two-sided Printing Only
The object is visible on-screen, visible on the both sides of each printed page of the form (when
printed from within Acrobat, Adobe Reader, or the server), and occupies space in the form
layout. For example, to have the page number appear at the lower-right of each odd-numbered
printed page and at the lower-left of each even numbered printed page when double-sided
printing, you must create two master pages. In the first master page, you place the page number
object at the lower-right and apply the Visible option. In the second master page, you create
two page number fields. Place one at the lower-left and apply the Two-sided Printing Only
option; place the other at the lower-right and apply the One-sided Printing Only option.
7.9.1.
To make an object visible, invisible, or hidden
The Presence list appears in a different tab, depending on the object selected.
1)
Select the object.
2)
In the Object palette, click the appropriate tab.
3)
In the Presence list, select one of the following options:
•
To make the object visible on-screen, visible in the printed form, and occupy space in the
form layout, select Visible.
•
To make the object visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and occupy space
in the form layout, select Visible (Screen Only).
•
To make the object not visible on-screen, visible in the printed form, and occupy space
in the form layout, select Visible (Print Only).
•
To make the object not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and occupy
space in the form layout, select Invisible.
•
To make the object not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and not occupy
any space in the form layout, select Hidden (Exclude from Layout).
•
To make the object visible on-screen, visible on only the front side of each sheet in the
printed form, and occupy space in the form layout, select One-sided Printing Only.
•
To make the object visible on-screen, visible on both sides of each sheet in the printed
form, and occupy space in the form layout, select Two-sided Printing Only.
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7
7.10. Formatting field values and using patterns
Depending on the requirements of your situation, you can specify one or more of the following
patterns to control how field values, such as text fields, numeric fields, and date/time fields are
formatted at run time:
•
A display pattern, which describes how data will be displayed in the form. If you define an
initial default value, it is formatted according to the display pattern. The display pattern is also
responsible for formatting user input and any bound values retrieved at run time.
•
An edit pattern, which describes the syntax for entering data into a date/time field, numeric
field, text field, or password field at run time.
•
A validation pattern, which is used to validate user input at run time.
•
A data pattern, which describes the syntax of bound or saved data.
The formatting options that you choose will depend on the purpose of your form. For example, if
you are designing an interactive form, for each field you should define an edit pattern to process user
input and a validation pattern to validate the input. You would only define a data pattern if the fields
are bound to a data source.
Keep in mind that if you specify only an Edit pattern for a Numeric Field or Decimal fields object,
form fillers can still enter alphabetic characters in the field. To avoid this behaviour, do one of the
following actions:
•
Do not specify just an Edit pattern. Ensures that Acrobat and Adobe Reader filter out
unwanted alphabetic characters.
•
Specify Edit and Display patterns. Ensures that the data is formatted correctly according to the
Display pattern.
•
Specify Edit and Validation patterns. Ensures that the value is rejected and the field is cleared
when a form filler enters an alphabetic character.
7.10.1. When to use patterns
Use patterns to control how field values are processed at run time. For example, users can enter
letters and numbers into a text field and any special punctuation or spacing can be applied automatically according to a predefined pattern before the value is displayed.
Capturing and displaying user input
If you are creating a form to capture data, you can specify how data should be formatted. You specify
how the data should appear using a display pattern. If you do not specify a display pattern, the data
appears according to Designer defaults.
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Working with Objects
If users will be entering data that does not match the Designer defaults, you must specify an edit
pattern. The edit pattern describes the syntax of the user input. Given the pattern, the run-time
application converts the user input into a raw value and then formats the value according to the
display pattern.
If you are designing an interactive form, consider what user input must be validated. For example, a
text field may or may not require validation depending on usage. A multiple line text field allowing
the form filler to enter a comment does not need to be validated. Similarly, a numeric field will automatically prevent the form-filler from entering any non-numeric data. However, if the data has to be
restricted to a specific range of numbers, you will want to validate the user input. You can choose to
display a custom message to prompt users for a correct value at run time. If you do not specify a
custom message, the system generates one automatically.
Remember that by using the options on the Form Validations tab in the Form Properties dialog box,
you can configure how Acrobat displays validations messages, highlights failed or mandatory fields
that contain invalid data or no data, and sets the focus on the first field that fails to validate. See
Displaying validation errors in AdobeAcrobat.
User input can be processed through FormCalc formulas and JavaScript scripts (for example, a
script can request the raw value of a field). Because formulas and scripts operate on raw and formatted
values, it is important to validate those fields where input is restricted.
NOTE:
One example of how an edit and validation pattern may be used together is a credit card or social
security number entry. You could define a text field with the following edit patterns:
text{9999-9999-9999-9999}|text{9999 9999 9999 9999} for credit cards
or
text{999-99-9999}|text{999 99 9999} for a US social security number
In both cases, the user may enter the number with hyphen(-), space ( ), or just the 16 or 9 digit
number. The canonical, or simplest form of the number is the 16 or 9 digit number.
You may also choose to add the following validation pattern:
text{9999999999999999}
or
text{999999999}
In this case, only the number is stored and the validation checks for the correct number of digits.
However, in this case, it might be more useful to specify a validation script rather than a pattern.
There are algorithms that will checksum a credit card number to ensure that it looks like a valid
credit card number and not just a random 16 digit number. An example is the Luhn Algorith for
credit cards.
The result is a form that has a text field where the edit pattern allows user entry in one of three typical
ways for typing a credit number, and the validation runs a script that validates that the number looks
like a valid credit card number.
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Retrieving and displaying bound data
If bound data will be merged with a form, you can specify how the data should be formatted for
display using a display pattern. If you do not specify a display pattern, the data is displayed according
to Designer defaults.
If the bound data does not match Designer defaults, you must specify a data pattern. The data pattern
describes the syntax of the bound data. Given the pattern, the run-time application converts the
retrieved data into raw values and then formats them for display.
7.10.2. Defaults for value formatting
Default values must conform to the following rules, depending on the type of field.
Field
Rule
Date/Time Field
A default date/time value must conform to the short format for the locale specified for the
date/time field. However, by default, Designer displays the default value in the medium locale
format at both design time and run time.
For example, consider a form with a Date/Time Field set to use the German (Germany) locale.
You enter the default value for a date in the short format DD.MM.YY. After you change the focus
to another field, the value specified in the field on the page is displayed in the medium format
DD.MM.YYYY. The formatted value also appears in the medium format if you view the form in
the Preview PDF tab.
NOTE: At run time, by default, form fillers must edit the value of date/time fields using the short
format for the locale specified for the field. If you specify an Edit Pattern on the Edit tab in the
Patterns dialog box (Field tab > Patterns), that pattern overrides the short format, and users must
enter data that conforms to the Edit Pattern.
Numeric Field or
Decimal Field
A default numeric value can be any integer or any decimal number that contains a single radix
point. The radix character can be either a “.” (period) or “,” (comma) depending on the locale
selected. Thousands separators (or grouping symbols) and currency symbols are not valid as
part of the default value.
For example, if a numeric field is set to the locale English (USA), and you specify the default
value $1,234.56, both the currency symbol “$” (dollar sign) and the thousands separator “,”
(comma) are not valid.
Text Field
A default text value (including passwords) can be any alphanumeric text string, including spaces.
NOTE: Only those fields listed in the table have default values that must conform to locale-specific
formatting.
7.10.3. To specify a default value
Date/time fields, numeric fields, and text fields can display an initial (default) value when the form
is opened. The value can be derived from a run-time property, or you can specify the value explicitly
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in Designer. The value can also be derived from an external data source through binding. At run
time, Designer formats field default values according to the locale specified for each field.
1)
Select a date/time field, decimal field, numeric field, or text field.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab. Select a locale from the Locale list.
3)
In the Object palette, click the Value tab. Type the value into the Default box.
The default value must be specified in locale-sensitive format.
If the data is bound and a data pattern has been specified, the value must match the data
pattern specified in the Binding tab.
NOTE:
7.10.4. To specify a display pattern
At run time, Designer displays date, time, and numeric field values in locale-sensitive format. If you
want to display a field value in a format other than the default, you can specify the custom pattern
by clicking the Patterns button on the Field tab.
Drop-down lists support custom user entries, but a display pattern for custom user entries
cannot be specified. You can write a script to format the user input if required.
NOTE:
Because the display pattern describes how data will be displayed in the form, all default values,
user-entered values, and values retrieved from a database are converted to the format described by
the display pattern.
NOTE:
Dates earlier than January 1, 1900 are not formatted by the display pattern.
1)
Select the date/time field, numeric field, or text field.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab.
3)
Click Patterns and either select one of the predefined display patterns from the Select Type list
or type a custom pattern in the Pattern box.
7.10.5. To prompt users to enter data
Prompts are useful for situations where users are expected to enter data or make a selection. You can
write a message to prompt users to enter a value into a date/time field, numeric field, text field, password field, or drop-down list, or prompt users to select an option from a drop-down list, list box, or
radio button group.
Recommending that users enter data
You can recommend that users enter data in a field but still let them submit the form if they do not.
If a user enters data in the field, leaves the field and then clears it, a message box appears. A custom
message appears if one written in the Empty Message box. A standard empty field message appears
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7
if you do not type a custom message. A message only appears if there was data in the field, the value
was deleted, and the user exited the field without re-entering data. If the user never attempts to enter
data in the field and tries to submit the form, a field is required message appears. The user can choose
to ignore the message and submit the form. Choose User Entered - Recommended to recommend
that users enter data in a field.
Requiring that users enter data
You can make it mandatory for users to enter data in a field before they can submit a form. If a user
enters data in the field, tabs out, and then returns to clear it, a message box appears. A custom
message appears if one written in the Empty Message box. A standard empty field message appears
if you do not type a custom message. A message only appears if there was data in the field, the value
was deleted, and the user exited the field without re-entering data. If the user never attempts to enter
data in the field and tries to submit the form, a field is required message appears. Choose User
Entered - Required to make it mandatory that users enter data in a field.
Remember that by using the options on the Form Validations tab in the Form Properties dialog box,
you can configure how Acrobat displays validations messages, highlights failed or mandatory fields
that contain invalid data or no data, and sets the focus on the first field that fails to validate. See
Displaying validation errors in AdobeAcrobat.
If users do not enter a value into the field and try to submit the form, the error message field is
required appears. However, users can save and close a PDF form without providing recommended or
required values. In this case, no messages appear to prompt users for input.
NOTE:
1)
Select the field, drop-down list, list box, or radio button group.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Value tab. From the Type list, select one of these options:
3)
•
User Entered - Recommended
•
User Entered - Required
In the Empty Message box, type the prompt. If applicable, the prompt should specify the
required input format. For example, if you defined an edit pattern, the user input must
conform to the edit pattern.
7.10.6. To specify an edit pattern
At run time, Designer displays date, time, numeric, and decimal field values in locale-sensitive
format. If you want to permit form fillers to edit field values in a format other than the locale-sensitive default, you can specify an Edit Pattern on the Field tab. If the user’s input does not conform to
the edit pattern, the data is input as-is.
If you specify only an Edit pattern for a Numeric or Decimal field object, form fillers can still enter
alphabetic characters in the field.
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Working with Objects
The edit pattern can be different than the display pattern. For example, because it is easier for users
to enter short dates and read long dates, you could consider specifying a short date for a date/time
field’s edit pattern and a long date for its display pattern. When the display and edit patterns are
different, the value is formatted to match the display pattern as soon as the user exits the field.
This option is not available when the Type option in the Value tab of the Object palette is set to
Protected, Calculated - Read Only or Read Only.
NOTE:
1)
Select the date/time field, numeric field, text field, or password field.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab.
3)
Click Patterns, click the Edit tab, and either select one of the predefined display patterns from
the Select Type list or type a custom pattern in the Pattern box.
7.10.7. To validate user input
Three separate validations are possible for any field. The order of initiation of these validations is as
follows:
•
Test the field for null content.
•
Verify the format of the field value against a specific field pattern. For more information about
field patterns, see Simple patterns.
•
Invoke a validation script.
You can define a validation pattern to validate user input for date/time fields, numeric fields, text
fields, and password fields. By default, null entries are not accepted when a value is required. Raw
values are compared to the validation pattern directly and, if the raw value matches the validation
pattern, it is formatted for display.
If the user-entered value does not match the validation pattern, a programming error or warning
appears. The error/warning is trapped by Acrobat, Adobe Reader, or Forms, which returns a
message to the user automatically. If an edit pattern has not been specified and the user input does
not match Designer defaults, validation fails.
A validation message appears if objects that require values contain null values and the user attempts
to submit data to Forms.
Users can save and close a PDF form without providing required values. In this case, no validation is performed.
NOTE:
If needed, you can write a custom validation pattern message to replace the default error or warning
message.
In addition to a validation pattern, or in cases where a validation pattern is not supported (for
example, for radio button groups and check boxes), you can validate user input by using a validation
script. Validating input through a script ensures that the data is acceptable for your application. A
custom message and run-time error or warning is also supported in this case.
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7
Remember that by using the options on the Form Validations tab in the Form Properties dialog box,
you can configure how Acrobat displays validations messages, highlights failed or mandatory fields
that contain invalid data or no data, and sets the focus on the first field that fails to validate. (See
Displaying validation errors in AdobeAcrobat.)
TIP: You can dynamically populate a validation pattern message with a value from a data source. This
option allows you to ensure that users enter a valid value in the field.
To define a validation pattern and custom message
1)
Select the date/time field, numeric field, text field, password field, drop-down list, or list box.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Value tab.
3)
Click Validation Pattern and either select one of the predefined validation patterns from the
Select Type list or type a custom pattern in the Pattern box.
4)
In the Validation Pattern Message box, type a message to prompt users to enter the correct
value. The message should specify the required input format. To start a new line in the
message, press Ctrl+Enter.
5)
To have a programming error to appear instead of a warning, select the Error option.
To display a message when an attached script detects unacceptable input
1)
Select the date/time field, numeric field, text field, password field, drop-down list, list box,
check box, or radio button group.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Value tab. In the Validation Script Message box, type the
message.
3)
To have a programming error appear instead of a warning, select the Error option.
7.10.8. To specify a data pattern
Data binding options enable you to build a form that captures data for enterprise infrastructures
and/or use an external data source to populate a form at run time. For example, given appropriate
binding information (see Binding fields to a data source) and access to the data source (see Workingwith Data Sources), Acrobat and Adobe Reader can import and display data from an OLEDB
database when the form is opened. Objects can also be bound to an XML schema, an XML file, or a
WSDL data source.
Acrobat, Adobe Reader, and Forms interpret the data-binding properties to store captured data and
parse retrieved data. By default, an object’s data is stored and merged according to Adobe
data-merging rules. When a form opens in Acrobat or Adobe Reader, or is rendered by Forms, the
field values are populated from the data source. Any changes to a field’s value by the user are
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committed to the associated data source when the form is saved in Acrobat or Adobe Reader or the
data is submitted to Forms.
If the data is not bound to a data source (for example, if the form data will be returned by email), the
data pattern specifies the format that the data is saved in. If you do not create a data pattern, the data
will be saved in canonical format. If a form may be filled by end users in a variety of locales or if the
data may be returned to more than one locale, having the data in canonical format helps ensure that
it is interpreted the same way by all users.
You can specify data patterns for date/time fields, numeric fields, text fields, and password fields. If
the data pattern prevents Acrobat or Adobe Reader, or Forms from parsing a retrieved value, the
value appears in the form unchanged (it is not formatted for display).
1)
Select the date/time field, numeric field, text field, or password field.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab.
3)
Click Patterns, click the Data tab, and either select one of the predefined data-binding patterns
from the Select Type list or type a custom pattern in the Pattern box.
7.10.9. Simple patterns
Simple patterns can be used to format the values of date/time fields, numeric fields, text fields, and
password fields. They each have their own rules governing the valid formation of patterns. There is
a limited set of characters that you can use in a pattern, and the syntax of a valid pattern differs
among date/time fields, numeric fields, text fields, and password fields.
For information about the valid characters that you can use in a pattern and examples of valid
constructs, see one of the sections listed below. For information about complex patterns for a
date/time field, numeric field, or text field, see Complex field patterns.
7.10.10. Locales
A locale is a standard term used when developing international standards to identify a particular
nation (language, country or region). For the purposes of FormCalc, a locale defines the format of
dates, times, numeric, and currency values relevant to a specific nation or region so that users can
use the formats they are accustomed to.
Each locale is comprised of a unique string of characters called a locale identifier. The composition
of these strings is controlled by the international standards organization (ISO) Internet Engineering
Task Force (IETF), a working group of the Internet Society (www.isoc.org).
Locale identifiers consist of a language part, a country or region part, or both. The following table
lists valid locales for this release of Designer.
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Language
376
Country or Region
ISO Code
Arabic
Algeria
ar_DZ
Arabic
Bahrain
ar_BH
Arabic
Egypt
ar_EG
Arabic
Iraq
ar_IQ
Arabic
Jordan
ar_JO
Arabic
Kuwait
ar_KW
Arabic
Lebanon
ar_LB
Arabic
Libya
ar_LY
Arabic
Morocco
ar_MA
Arabic
Oman
ar_OM
Arabic
Qatar
ar_QA
Arabic
Saudi Arabia
ar_SA
Arabic
Sudan
ar_SD
Arabic
Syria
ar_SY
Arabic
Tunisia
ar_TN
Arabic
United Arabian Emirates
ar_AE
Arabic
Yemen
ar_YE
Armenian
Armenia
hy_AM
Azerbaijani-Cyrillic
Azerbaijan
az_Cyrl_AZ
Azerbaijani-Latin
Azerbaijan
az_Latn_AZ
Basque
Spain
eu_ES
Bosnain
Bosnia and Herzegovina
bs_BA
Bulgarian
Bulgaria
bg_BG
Catalan
Spain
ca_ES
Working with Objects
Language
Country or Region
ISO Code
Chinese
People’s Republic of China
(Simplified)
zh_CN
Chinese
Hong Kong S.A.R., China
zh_HK
Chinese
Taiwan (Traditional)
zh_TW
Croatian
Croatia
hr_HR
Czech
Czech Republic
cs_CZ
Danish
Denmark
da_DK
Dutch
Belgium
nl_BE
Dutch
Netherlands
nl_NL
English
Australia
en_AU
English
Belgium
en_BE
English
Canada
en_CA
English
Hong Kong S.A.R., China
en_HK
English
India
en_IN
English
India Rupee
en_IN_RUPEE
English
Ireland
en_IE
English
New Zealand
en_NZ
English
Philippines
en_PH
English
Singapore
en_SG
English
South Africa
en_ZA
English
United Kingdom
en_GB
English
United Kingdom Euro
en_GB_EURO
English
United States of America
en_US
English
U.S. Virgin Islands
en_VI
Estonian
Estonia
et_EE
Finnish
Finland
fi_FI
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Language
378
Country or Region
ISO Code
French
Belgium
fr_BE
French
Canada
fr_CA
French
France
fr_FR
French
Luxembourg
fr_LU
French
Switzerland
fr_CH
German
Austria
de_AT
German
Germany
de_DE
German
Luxembourg
de_LU
German
Switzerland
de_CH
Greek
Greece
el_GR
Hebrew
Israel
he_IL
Hindi
India
hi_IN
Hungarian
Hungary
hu_HU
Indonesian
Indonesia
id_ID
Italian
Italy
it_IT
Italian
Switzerland
it_CH
Japanese
Japan
ja_JP
Kazakh
Kazakhstan
kk_KZ
Khmer
Cambodia
km_KH
Korean
Korea
ko_KR
Korean
Korea Hanja
ko_KR_HANI
Lao
Laos
lo_LA
Latvian
Latvia
lv_LV
Lithuanian
Lithuania
lt_LT
Malay
Malaysia
ms_MY
Working with Objects
Language
Country or Region
ISO Code
Norwegian - Bokmal
Norway
nb_NO
Norwegian - Nynorsk
Norway
nn_NO
Persian
Iran
fa_IR
Polish
Poland
pl_PL
Portuguese
Brazil
pt_BR
Portuguese
Portugal
pt_PT
Romanian
Romania
ro_RO
Russian
Russia
ru_RU
Serbian-Cyrillic
Serbia and Montenegro
sr_Cyrl_CS
Serbian-Latin
Serbia and Montenegro
sr_Latn_CS
Slovak
Slovakia
sk_SK
Slovenian
Slovenia
sl_SI
Spanish
Argentina
es_AR
Spanish
Bolivia
es_BO
Spanish
Chile
es_CL
Spanish
Columbia
es_CO
Spanish
Costa Rica
es_CR
Spanish
Dominican Republic
es_DO
Spanish
Ecuador
es_EC
Spanish
El Salvador
es_SV
Spanish
Guatemala
es_GT
Spanish
Honduras
es_HN
Spanish
Mexico
es_MX
Spanish
Nicaragua
es_NI
Spanish
Panama
es_PA
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Language
Country or Region
ISO Code
Spanish
Paraguay
es_PY
Spanish
Peru
es_PE
Spanish
Puerto Rico
es_PR
Spanish
Spain
es_ES
Spanish
United States of America
es_US
Spanish
Uruguay
es_UY
Spanish
Venezuela
es_VE
Swedish
Sweden
sv_SE
Tagalog
Philippines
tl_PH
Thai
Thailand
th_TH
Thai
Thailand Traditional
th_TH_TH
Turkish
Turkey
tr_TR
Turkish (Turkey Lira)
Turkey
tr_TR_LIRA
Ukrainian
Ukraine
uk_UA
Vietnamese
Vietnam
vi_VN
Usually, both elements of a locale are important. For example, the names of weekdays and months,
in English, for Canada and Great Britain are formatted identically, but dates are formatted differently. Therefore, specifying an English language locale is insufficient. Also, specifying only a country
as the locale is insufficient. For example, Canada has different date formats for English and French.
For information about how to set the locale in Designer, see To specify a locale (language and
country orregion) for an object.
In general, every application operates in an environment where a locale is present. This locale is
known as the ambient locale. In some circumstances, an application might operate on a system, or
within an environment, where a locale is not present. In these rare cases, the ambient locale is set to
a default of English United States (en_US). This locale is known as a default locale.
7.10.11. Epoch
Date values and time values have an associated origin or epoch, which is a moment in time from
which time begins. Any date value and any time value prior to its epoch is invalid.
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The unit of value for all date functions is the number of days since the epoch. The unit of value for
all time functions is the number of milliseconds since the epoch.
Designer defines day one for the epoch for all date functions as Jan 1, 1900, and millisecond one for
the epoch for all time functions is midnight, 00:00:00, Greenwich Mean Time (GMT). This definition means that negative time values can be returned to users in time zones east of GMT.
7.10.12. Date formats
A date format is a shorthand specification of how a date appears. It consists of various punctuation
marks and symbols that represent the formatting that the date must use. The following table lists
examples of date formats.
Date format
Example
MM/DD/YY
11/11/78
DD/MM/YY
25/07/85
MMMM DD, YYYY
March 10, 1964
The format of dates is governed by an ISO standard. Each country or region specifies its own date
formats. The four general categories of date formats are short, medium, long, and full. The following
table contains examples of different date formats from different locales for each of the categories.
Locale identifier and description
Date format (Category)
Example
en_GB
English (United Kingdom)
DD/MM/YY (Short)
08/12/92
08/04/05
fr_CA
French (Canada)
YY-MM-DD (Medium)
92-08-18
de_DE
German (Germany)
D. MMMM YYYY (Long)
17. Juni 1989
fr_FR
French (France)
EEEE, ' le ' D MMMM YYYY (Full)
Lundi, le 29 Octobre, 1990
7.10.13. Time formats
A time format is a shorthand specification to format a time. It consists of punctuations, literals, and
pattern symbols. The following table lists examples of time formats.
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Time format
Example
h:MM A
7:15 PM
HH:MM:SS
21:35:26
HH:MM:SS 'o''clock' A Z
14:20:10 o’clock PM EDT
Time formats are governed by an ISO standard. Each nation specifies the form of its default, short,
medium, long, and full-time formats. The locale identifies the format of times that conform to the
standards of that nation.
The following table contains some examples of different date formats from different locales for each
of the categories.
Locale identifier and description
Time format (Category)
Example
en_GB
English (United Kingdom)
HH:MM (Short)
14:13
fr_CA
French (Canada)
HH:MM:SS (Medium)
12:15:50
de_DE
German (Germany)
HH:MM:SS z (Long)
14:13:13 -0400
fr_FR
French (France)
HH ' h ' MM Z (Full)
14 h 13 GMT-04:00
7.10.14. Date and time patterns
The following symbols must be used to create date and time patterns for date/time fields. Certain
date symbols are only used in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean locales. These symbols are also specified below. For more information, see Examples of date/time patterns.
NOTE: The comma (,), dash (-), colon (:), slash (/), period (.), and space ( ) are treated as literal values
and can be included anywhere in a pattern. To include a phrase in a pattern, delimit the text string
with single quotation marks ('). For example, 'Your payment is due no later than'
MM-DD-YYcan be specified as the display pattern.
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Date symbol
Description
Formatted value for English (USA) locale
where the locale-sensitive input value is
1/1/08 (which is January 1, 2008)
D
1 or 2 digit (1-31) day of the month
1
DD
Zero-padded 2 digit (01-31) day of the month
01
J
1, 2, or 3 digit (1-366) day of the year
1
JJJ
Zero-padded, three-digit (001-366) day of the year
001
M
One- or two-digit (1-12) month of the year
1
MM
Zero-padded, two-digit (01-12) month of the year
01
MMM
Abbreviated month name
Jan
MMMM
Full month name
January
E
One-digit (1-7) day of the week, where (1=Sunday)
3 (because January 1, 2008 is a Tuesday)
EEE
Abbreviated weekday name
Tue (because January 1, 2008 is a Tuesday)
EEEE
Full weekday name
Tuesday (because January 1, 2008 is a
Tuesday)
YY
Two-digit year, where numbers less than 30 are
considered to fall after the year 2000 and numbers
30 and higher are considered to occur before 2000.
For example, 00=2000, 29=2029, 30=1930, and
99=1999
08
YYYY
Four-digit year
2008
G
Era name (BC or AD)
AD
w
One-digit (0-5) week of the month, where week 1 is
the earliest set of four contiguous days ending on a
Saturday
1
WW
Two-digit (01-53) ISO-8601 week of the year, where
week 1 is the week containing January 4
01
Several additional date patterns are available for specifying date patterns in Chinese, Japanese, and
Korean locales.
Japanese eras can be represented by several different symbols. The final four era symbols provide
alternative symbols to represent Japanese eras.
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CJK date symbol
DDD
The locale’s ideographic numeric valued day of the month
DDDD
The locale’s tens rule ideographic numeric valued day of the month
YYY
The locale’s ideographic numeric valued year
YYYYY
The locale’s tens rule ideographic numeric valued year
g
The locale’s alternate era name. For the current Japanese era, Heisei, this pattern displays
the ASCII letter H (U+48)
gg
The locale’s alternate era name. For the current Japanese era, this pattern displays the
ideograph that is represented by the Unicode symbol (U+5E73)
ggg
The locale’s alternate era name. For the current Japanese era, this pattern displays the
ideographs that are represented by the Unicode symbols (U+5E73 U+6210)
g
The locale’s alternate era name. For the current Japanese era, this pattern displays the full
width letter H (U+FF28)
g g
The locale’s alternate era name. For the current Japanese era, this pattern displays the
ideograph that is represented by the Unicode symbol (U+337B)
Time
symbol
384
Description
Description
Locale-sensitive
input value
Formatted value
for English (USA)
locale
h
One- or two-digit (1-12) hour of the day (AM/PM)
12:08 AM or 2:08 PM
12 or 2
hh
Zero-padded 2 digit (01-12) hour of the day (AM/PM)
12:08 AM or 2:08 PM
12 or 02
k
One- or two-digit (0-11) hour of the day (AM/PM)
12:08 AM or 2:08 PM
0 or 2
kk
Two-digit (00-11) hour of the day (AM/PM)
12:08 AM or 2:08 PM
00 or 02
H
One- or two-digit (0-23) hour of the day
12:08 AM or 2:08 PM
0 or 14
HH
Zero-padded, two-digit (00-23) hour of the day
12:08 AM or 2:08 PM
00 or 14
K
One- or two-digit (1-24) hour of the day
12:08 AM or 2:08 PM
24 or 14
KK
Zero-padded, two-digit (01-24) hour of the day
12:08 AM or 2:08 PM
24 or 14
M
One- or two-digit (0-59) minute of the hour
NOTE: You must use this symbol with an hour symbol.
2:08 PM
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Working with Objects
Time
symbol
MM
Locale-sensitive
input value
Description
Formatted value
for English (USA)
locale
Zero-padded, two-digit (00-59) minute of the hour
NOTE: You must use this symbol with an hour symbol.
2:08 PM
08
One- or two-digit (0-59) second of the minute
You must use this symbol with an hour and
minute symbol.
2:08:09 PM
9
Zero-padded, two-digit (00-59) second of the minute
You must use this symbol with an hour and
minute symbol.
2:08:09 PM
09
Three- digit (000-999) thousandth of the second
You must use this symbol with an hour, minute,
and seconds symbol.
2:08:09 PM
09
A
The part of the day that is from midnight to noon
(AM) or from noon to midnight (PM)
2:08:09 PM
PM
z
ISO-8601 time-zone format (for example,Z, +0500,
-0030, -01, +0100)
NOTE: You must use this symbol with an hour symbol.
2:08:09 PM
-0400
zz
Alternative ISO-8601 time-zone format (for example,
Z, +05:00, -00:30, -01, +01:00)
NOTE: You must use this symbol with an hour symbol.
2:08:09 PM
-04:00
Z
Abbreviated time-zone name (for example, GMT,
GMT+05:00, GMT-00:30, EST, PDT)
NOTE: You must use this symbol with an hour symbol.
2:08:09 PM
EDT
S
NOTE:
SS
NOTE:
FFF
NOTE:
Reserved symbols
The following symbols have special meanings and cannot be used as literal text.
Symbol
Description
?
When submitted, the symbol matches any one character. When merged for display, it
becomes a space.
*
When submitted, the symbol matches 0 or Unicode white space characters. When merged
for display, it becomes a space.
+
When submitted, the symbol matches one or more Unicode white space characters. When
merged for display, it becomes a space.
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7.10.15. Complex field patterns
In addition to defining simple patterns for date/time fields, numeric fields, and text fields, you can
define a locale-specific pattern or handle variable patterns.
Locale-specific patterns
If you want to force a locale on a pattern, regardless of the locale that has already been assigned to an
object, you can define a locale-specific pattern. The syntax of a locale-specific pattern is defined as
follows:
category_name(locale_name){pattern}
where
•
category_namecan bedate,time,num, ortext.
•
locale_nameis identified by a language and/or country or region code, as defined in RFC
1766 (Tags for the Identification of Languages, 1995).
•
patternis the simple pattern for processing values.
For example, to force a date/time field to translate a date into the French language according to
France’s country code, you would define the pattern as follows:
date(fr_FR){DD MMMM, YYYY}
Variable patterns
In cases where the user input or bound data is available in more than one format (for example, telephone numbers may or may not have a three-digit area code), you can define a pattern that accounts
for the differences. The syntax for defining a number of acceptable patterns is as follows:
category_name{pattern}|category_name{pattern}|category_name{pattern}
where each pattern is separated by a vertical bar (|). You can specify an unlimited number of
patterns. For example, the following construct handles two different text patterns:
text{999*9999}|text{999*999*9999}
7.10.16. To set a default font for values in new forms
386
1)
On the Tools menu, select Options.
2)
Click Default Fonts.
3)
Under Default Value Font Properties For New Forms, select Typeface, Size, and Style options.
as needed.
Working with Objects
7.10.17. To set a default font for values in an existing form
1)
Click File > Form Properties.
2)
Click Default Fonts.
3)
Under Default Value Font Properties, select Typeface, Size, and Style options. as needed.
RELATED LINKS:
FormValidation tab (Form Properties dialog box)
Todynamically populate a validation pattern message
Numericpatterns
Textfield patterns
Passwordpatterns
7.11. Setting up an object for other languages
7.11.1. To set up an object for Arabic and Hebrew
Objects, which are the building blocks of every form, have different appearances depending on the
language the form is designed for.
For example, a drop-down list in an English form has the caption typically on the left and the
drop-down arrow on the right. However, in Arabic and Hebrew, the drop-down list has the caption
on the right and the drop-down arrow on the left because these are right-to-left languages.
To set up an object for Arabic and Hebrew, you must do the following steps:
•
Set the locale to Arabic or Hebrew.
•
Position the caption on the right (except for check boxes and radio buttons, which need to be
positioned on the left).
•
Right-align the caption and value.
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•
7
Set the font to one that the language supports.
Setting up an object for Arabic and Hebrew applies to the following objects:
•
Check boxes
•
Date/time fields
•
Decimal fields
•
Signature Fields
•
Drop-down lists
•
List boxes
•
Numeric fields
•
Password fields
•
Radio buttons
•
Text fields
The options described in this Help topic are available only if support for the appropriate
language is enabled through Microsoft Office Language Settings.
NOTE:
1)
Add the object.
For example, from the Object Library palette, drag the Drop-Down List object onto the form
design.
2)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab.
3)
From the Locale box, select a language and country or region option.
For example, select Arabic (Bahrain).
4)
Select the object.
5)
In the Font palette, select the font that supports the locale you selected.
For example, Adobe Arabic supports Arabic and Adobe Hebrew supports Hebrew. You can
locate the font you need for your language on the Internet if it is not already on your system.
6)
Select the object.
7)
In the Paragraph palette, click Right Align to right-align the caption and value.
8)
In the Layout palette, select the appropriate option from the Position list for the caption.
Object
Check boxes
388
Position
Left
Working with Objects
Object
TIP:
Position
Date/time fields
Right
Decimal fields
Right
Signature Fields
Right
Drop-down lists
Right
List boxes
Right
Numeric fields
Right
Password fields
Right
Radio buttons
Left
Text fields
Right
View the object in the Preview PDF tab to ensure that it appears properly.
7.11.2. To set up an object for Thai and Vietnamese
To set up an object for Thai and Vietnamese, you must do the following steps:
•
Set the locale to Thai or Vietnamese.
•
Set the font to one that the language supports.
The options described in this Help topic are available only if support for the appropriate
language is enabled through Microsoft Office Language Settings.
NOTE:
a)
Add the object.
For example, from the Object Library palette, drag the Drop-Down List object onto the
form design.
b)
In the Object palette, click the Field tab.
c)
From the Locale box, select a language and country or region option.
For example, select Thai (Thailand Traditional).
d)
Select the object.
e)
In the Font palette, select the font that supports the locale you selected.
For example, Adobe Thai supports Thai and Myriad® Pro and Minion® Pro support Vietnamese. You can locate the font you need for your language on the Internet if it is not
already on your system.
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f)
7
View the object in the Preview PDF tab to ensure that it appears properly.
7.11.3. To set up a date field for other languages
1)
Ensure that the regional and language options are set to the appropriate language in the Microsoft® Windows® Control Panel.
2)
In Designer, drag the Date/Time field object onto the form design from the Object Library
palette.
3)
In the Object palette, select the Field tab and click the Patterns button.
4)
On the Display tab, in the Pattern box, type DD/MM/gYY.
For example, for Thai dates use the following:
5)
390
•
gshows B.E
•
ggshows the abbreviation of B.E in Thai
•
gggshows the full name of B.E in Thai
In the Preview PDF tab, the Date/Time field and calendar look like this.
Working with Objects
7.12. Using special objects
In addition to the standard and custom objects in the Object Library palette, Designer includes a
number of objects and/or properties that provide special functionality in a form at run time. These
objects and properties include:
•
Global fields
•
Floating fields
•
Run time properties
•
Variables
7.12.1. To define a global field
A global field contains information that appears in multiple locations on your form. For example, an
invoice contains an invoice number that must appear in multiple places on the form. In the form
design, you could set the invoice number to be a global field and reuse it elsewhere as needed.
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Global fields are extremely useful when you have information that you know will be repeated in
multiple places. Not only does the use of global fields reduce the amount of data that needs to be sent,
they help ensure that exactly the same data appears in the necessary areas of the form.
Using the Global binding property, you can apply the same value to all objects in the form that have
the same name.
When you apply the global setting to an object, all objects with the same name will be bound to the
same data at run time. Because identically named global objects are linked to the same data value,
the data displayed in one global object is automatically displayed in all other global objects having
the same name. You cannot have more than one identically named object in a form where some, but
not all, of the objects are set to global.
You can apply the global binding setting to the following types of objects:
•
check boxes
•
date/time fields
•
drop-down lists
•
image fields
•
list boxes
•
numeric fields
•
decimal fields
•
password fields
•
radio buttons
•
text fields
•
barcoded fields (excluding Paper Form Barcode)
When you apply the global setting to an object, Designer automatically applies the global value to all
other objects in the form with the same name. Conversely, if you remove the global setting from an
object, Designer removes the value from all other objects with the same name and setting.
When you apply global binding to an object, you cannot add run-time properties such as the
current page, number of pages, and current date/time to that object.
NOTE:
1)
Add the required objects to the form design.
2)
Give each object the same name.
3)
Select one of the like-named objects.
4)
In the Object palette, click the Binding tab and select Use Global Data from the Data Binding
list. Designer displays a message confirming that global binding will be applied to all objects
that have the same name as the selected object.
RELATED LINKS:
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Working with Objects
Workingwith Data Sources
Toname and rename objects
7.12.2. To insert a floating field
You can insert a floating field into a text object to display different types of information. Floating
fields are objects that support the merging of text, numeric values, run-time properties, and scripting
within a text object when the form is rendered. You can insert floating fields into text objects only.
Floating fields are text field objects by default, but you can change the object type from the Type list
in the Field tab of the Object palette.
You can also bind floating fields to a data source to display specific text or numeric values. For
example, you can insert a floating field to render individual customer names in the introductory
greeting of a form letter. The floating field appears as a TextField object, as shown in this example.
(Dear Mr./Ms. {TextField})
1)
Click inside the Text object in which you want to place the floating Text Field object.
2)
Place your cursor on the line where you want Designer to insert the floating Text Field object.
3)
Select Insert > Floating Field.
4)
To set the properties of the Floating Field, click the Floating Field marker inside the Text
object, and then select options as needed. It is good practice to rename the floating Text Field
object and specify the necessary binding.
Set the properties of the floating field object independently of setting the properties of the text
object. By default, floating field objects are set to Hidden (Exclude from layout) in the Presence
list.
TIP:
If you want to dynamically update the value of a floating field inside Adobe Reader (through
scripting, for example), you must use Adobe Reader 9.1 or later. Set the target version to Acrobat and
Adobe Reader 9.1 or later and save the form as a dynamic PDF form. If you expect a large amount
of text to exceed the bounds of the floating field, set the Expand to Fit option for both the floating
field and its parent text container to make them growable.
RELATED LINKS:
Toinsert run-time properties
Usingtext
Usingtext fields
7.12.3. To insert run-time properties
Using run-time properties in a form design, you can display certain types of information in the form
at run time. The types of information you can display are the current page, page count, current
date/time, viewer locale, viewer name, and viewer version.
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7
You can insert run-time properties into the following objects:
•
Numeric field
•
Text
•
Text field
You can only insert run-time properties into the value portion of the field and not the field’s caption.
You use the commands in the Insert menu to add run-time properties to a text object. Alternatively,
you can use the Type list to add run-time properties to either a text field object or a numeric field
object. Designer adds the run-time property to the selected object, along with a calculate script that
generates the intended value and a default value based on the property.
When you add the current page run-time property to an object, do not apply the global binding
option as well because Designer will apply the same page number on every page instead of unique
values.
NOTE:
To add a run-time property to a text object
1)
Click the text field.
2)
Select Insert and select the run-time property you want to insert.
To add a run-time property to a text field or numeric field object
1)
Click the text field or numeric field.
2)
On the Object palette, click the Value tab and select Calculated - Read Only from the Type list.
The Runtime Properties option appears.
3)
Select Runtime Properties and, in the list below it, select the run-time property you want to
insert.
RELATED LINKS:
Aboutnumeric fields
Usingtext
Usingtext fields
7.12.4. To add variables to a form
Use variables to insert varying text or values. A variable is a segment of text or values that Designer
can automatically update or change (on demand) using scripting.
The variables element can hold any number or any kind of separate data items. Because each data
item is individually named with its own name attribute, they can be individually addressed by
scripts.
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Working with Objects
You can define text variables and then insert them into captions or other text. For example, you
could apply variables to product terminology that may change at some point. If the variable (term)
needs to change, you can open the affected form and update the variable value, and Designer will
automatically update all instances of the term.
To create a variable, you must name the variable and provide the value you want Designer to use.
For example, you might create a variable called ProductName that contains the current name of a
product, which you can update if needed.
Variable values are saved with the form.
RELATED LINKS:
Variablestab (Form Properties dialog box)
7.13. Adding repeating fields in a form design
7.13.1. About repeating text fields
You can use the Subform Instance Controls custom objects to add repeating text fields in a form
design. For example, a company sends an order form to their end users. The end user clicks a button
to add as many line items to the form as required.
There are two Subform Instance Controls custom objects:
Subform Instance Controls - Add
Adds a new instance of a repeating subform. The object consists of a single button with a click
event specified to run at the client.
Subform Instance Controls - Insert Remove Move
Inserts, removes, and moves a new instance of a repeating subform. The object consists of four
buttons with a click event specified at the client.
Moves the current instance up and down in the form hierarchy.
Inserts one instance below the current one.
Removes the current instance.
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7
7.13.2. To add repeating fields
The following instructions provide guidance on how to add repeating text fields to a form design.
You must customize the script in the Script Editor to make it work for your form design.
1)
Add the Subform Instance Controls - Add and Subform Instance Controls - Insert Remove
Move objects to your existing form design.
2)
Edit the caption text and define the object’s properties in the Field tab of the Object palette.
NOTE:
Do not change the button’s type, because it will delete the script.
1)
In the Hierarchy palette, move the Add Item button under the repeating subform’s header. In
doing so, the button remains visible, even when all instances of the repeating subform are
removed from the form.
2)
If there is a possibility that the repeating subform will spill over onto a new page, move another
instance of the Add Item button under the overflow leader subform in the Hierarchy palette.
3)
In the Hierarchy palette, move the insert, remove, and move buttons under the repeating
subform.
4)
Customize the buttons’ scripts in the Script Editor. Here are some examples:
5)
•
For the Add Item button, provide the SOM expression of the repeating subform:var
sSubformSOM = “xfa.form.form1.Subform1”;The SOM expression may
vary upon the position of the button relative to the repeating subform.
•
For the Add Item, Insert, and Remove buttons, set the bCalc variable to true if the fields
of the new subform instance are referenced by other calculations.
Save, preview and test the form in the PDF Preview tab. You may want to enable the JavaScript
Debugger to catch any errors while testing the form. See “Debugging Calculations and Scripts”
in Scripting Using Designerfor more information about the JavaScript Debugger.
RELATED LINKS:
Usingtext fields
Textfield properties in the Binding tab
Todefine custom data-binding properties for text fields
7.14. Adding URL links to a PDF form
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Working with Objects
7.14.1. About URL links
You can use the Launch URL custom object to add URL links to a PDF form. At run time, a user can
click the button to launch the URL in a new browser window.
The Launch URL custom object contains a button and a hidden text field nested inside a subform
with a binding set to none. The button’s click event script launches the URL. The URL is specified
by invoking thelaunchURL() Appmethod in the Acrobat JavaScript object model.
Button
The button contains script that launches the URL, displays the button tool tip, and displays an error
message if the URL is not available.
Hidden text field
The hidden text field contains the script that sets the tool tip text of URLButton1. It is
aform:readyscript that looks up the hidden field’s raw value to set the button’s tool tip.
You make a URL launch in a PDF form by hard-coding the URL in the form design or passing the
URL from data.
RELATED LINKS:
Bindingfields to a data source
Tohard-code a URL link
Topass a URL from data
7.14.2. To hard-code a URL link
When adding the Launch URL custom object to a form design, you can hard-code a URL link by
typing the URL value in the hidden field, URL Field1. See To align objects to each otherfor more
information about the Launch URL custom object.
1)
In the Object Library palette, click the tab that contains the Launch URL object and drag it onto
the form design.
2)
Select the hidden field, URLField1.
3)
In the Object Palette, click the Value tab and type the URL in the Default box.
4)
If you want to prevent the URL from being submitted with the data, do the following steps:
•
Click the Binding tab.
•
In the Default Binding box, select None.
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Working with Objects
5)
7
Save, preview, and test the form in the PDF Preview tab. You may want to enable the Acrobat
JavaScript Debugger to catch any errors while testing the form. See “Debugging Calculations
and Scripts” in Scripting Using Designer for more information about the JavaScript Debugger.
7.14.3. To pass a URL from data
When adding the Launch URL custom object to a form design, you can pass the URL value from data
by binding the hidden field, URLField1, explicitly or implicitly. Binding explicitly means binding the
field to an XML schema. Binding implicitly means letting Adobe document services find and map
the field to the URL value. See To align objects to each otherfor more information about the Launch
URL custom object.
To bind the hidden field explicitly
1)
In the Object Library palette, click the tab that contains the Launch URL object and drag it onto
the form design.
2)
Select the hidden field, URLField1.
3)
In the Object Palette, click the Binding tab and bind URLField1 to the XML schema.
4)
Save, preview, and test the form in the PDF Preview tab.
To bind the hidden field implicitly
1)
In the Object Library palette, click the tab that contains the Launch URL object and drag it onto
the form design.
2)
Rename the hidden field, URLField1, to match the data node name and structure.
3)
In the Object Palette, click the Binding tab and set the binding to Normal.
4)
Click the Value tab and remove the URL value in the Default box.
5)
Save, preview, and test the form in the PDF Preview tab.
You may want to enable the JavaScript Debugger to catch any errors while testing the form. See
“Debugging Calculations and Scripts” in Scripting Using Designerfor more information about the
JavaScript Debugger.
NOTE:
7.15. Setting a PDF form action upon submission of data
398
Working with Objects
7.15.1. About setting a PDF form action
You can use the SubmitSuccessClose or SubmitSuccessReadOnly custom object to set an action
when a user successfully submits form data. The object contains a script in the form:ready event
that executes automatically when new data arrives from the server.
The script in both objects relies on the value of a specific field. The name of the data field is
$record.CONTROL_PARAM.SUBMIT.RESULT. The value of the field is true upon a successful
submit.
You can use the object when you have not bound the pdfSource attribute of InteractiveFormsElement in your Web Dynpro application:
•
The application server processes the submit request from the form.
•
The form data includes a special field that indicates the result of the submit request.
•
The application server sets the value of the special field after it successfully processes the
submit request and returns the XML data to the client application.
•
The XML data merges into the existing data DOM.
•
The merging of the XML data into the existing data DOM triggers the form:ready scripts
of all fields on the form. All form:ready events execute when the XML form data is modified.
•
The script inside the form:ready event inspects the value of the field and then takes the
appropriate action. The action is to set all fields in the form to read-only or close the form,
depending on the object you use.
RELATED LINKS:
Usingbuttons
7.15.2. To set a PDF form to close after data submission
The SubmitSuccessClose object is a subform that contains a script that closes a PDF form after a
successful data submission by a user. The form:ready script invokes the closing of the PDF form.
See the object’s script for more details.
1)
In the Object Library palette, click the tab that contains the SuccessfulSubmitClose object and
drag it onto the form design.
2)
Create a Submit button and add the following script:
$record.CONTROL_PARAM.SUBMIT_RESULT.value = "true";
$form.remerge();
3)
Save and test the form in the PDF Preview tab. You cannot test the closing of the form within
Designer. You may want to enable the JavaScript Debugger to catch any errors while testing
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Working with Objects
7
the form. See “Debugging Calculations and Scripts” in Scripting Using Designerfor more information about the debugger.
7.15.3. To set PDF form fields to read-only
The SubmitSuccessReadOnly object is a subform that contains a script that makes PDF form fields
read-only after a successful data submission by a user. The form:ready script changes the PDF
form fields to read-only.
See the object’s script for more details.
1)
Add the SubmitSuccessReadOnly object to your form design.
2)
Create a Submit button and add the following script to it:
$record.CONTROL_PARAM.SUBMIT_RESULT.value = "true";
$form.remerge();
3)
400
Save, preview, and test the form in the PDF Preview tab. You may want to enable the JavaScript
Debugger to catch any errors while testing the form. See “Debugging Calculations and Scripts”
in Scripting Using Designerfor more information about the debugger.
Object Properties
8.
Object Properties
8.1.
Layout properties in the Layout palette
Using the Layout palette, you can specify a number of characteristics that apply to the selected object,
including its size and position, margins, and location of captions. You can specify layout properties
for each object on the page.
X and Y
Sets the horizontal and vertical position of the object’s anchor point. If the setting in the
Anchor list is not Top Left, X and Y options change to AnchorX and AnchorY. See Toposition
objects
Width, Height, and Expand to Fit/Auto-fit
Sets the minimum overall height and width of the object and enables expansion in that direction if required. See To position objects and To make objects expand to fit.
NOTE: To manually expand objects, you can also select the Show Text Overflow Indicators option
on the Wizards and Tips panel in the Options dialog box. See Wizards and Tips (Options dialog
box).
The Auto-fit options appears for subform objects only. When selected, the subform changes
size in Designer to fit the enclosed content.
Anchor
Sets the object’s anchor point. See To rotate objects.
Rotate
Rotates the object around its anchor point. See To rotate objects.
Content Alignment in a Flowed Container
Sets the alignment of the selected object in a subform that flows content.
Margins
Sets the amount of white space on the left and right sides of the object and above and below the
object. See Formatting objects.
Caption
Sets the position of a caption. See Creating an insertion point.
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Object Properties
8
Reserve
Sets the amount of space reserved for a caption. See Formatting objects.
A reserve of 0 sets the caption area to auto-fit. It adjusts the size of the object to fit the caption.
8.2.
Border properties in the Border palette
Using the Border palette, you can edit the border properties for objects that have borders. You can
edit the borders individually or together.
Edges
Sets border properties for all or individual edges:
Edit Individually
Applies a border to each edge separately. This option does not apply to three-dimensional
borders.
Edit Together
Applies the same border to all edges.
Side
Sets the style and width of the borders.
Color Picker
Sets the line color.
Corners
Applies a style to border corners.
Radius
Sets the radius of notched corners.
Omit Border Around Page Breaks
Omits the selected object’s bottom border on the first page and top border on the second page.
Style
Sets the background fill color or pattern:
Color Picker
Sets the background fill colors.
RELATED LINKS:
402
Object Properties
Understanding Borders andMargins in Flowed Layouts
s
8.3.
Font properties in the Font palette
Using the Font palette, you can change the font family, size, style, and scale, as well as the baseline
shift, letter spacing, and kerning of the text in one or more selected objects.
Font
Sets the typeface.
Font Size
Sets the typeface size.
Style
Sets the typeface style.
Baseline Shift
Sets the amount of space to move a character (or group of characters) up or down relative to
the baseline. Positive numbers shift characters up, and negative numbers shift characters
down.
Letter Spacing
Sets the amount of space to leave between the letters in a word or between a group of words.
Vertical Scale
Sets the degree (percentage) by which to increase or decrease the vertical size of text.
Horizontal Scale
Sets the degree (percentage) by which to increase or decrease the horizontal size of text.
Auto Kern
Reduces the amount of space between letters within a word or group of words.
The Font Size and Style options are available with fixed size fonts (for example, Courier
New). However, it is recommended that you do not modify fixed sized fonts. Fixed sized fonts are
printed in their original size and style.
NOTE:
403
Object Properties
8.4.
8
Paragraph properties in the Paragraph palette
Using the Paragraph palette, you can change the justification, indentation, and line spacing of the
selected text.
Align
Sets horizontal alignment options:
Align Left
Left-aligns the caption or value.
Align Center
Center-aligns the caption or value.
Align Right
Right-aligns the caption or value.
Justify
Justifies the caption or value. Full justification is applied to all of the lines except the last line in
a multiple-line caption or value (single-line paragraphs cannot be justified).
Radix
Sets the alignment for numeric fields based on the radix (decimal point). This option appears
on the Paragraph palette only when a numeric field object is selected.
IMPORTANT: Numeric fields with a defined radix alignment setting are not supported in PDF
forms for Acrobat 6.0.2 and Adobe Reader 6.0.2.
Vertical Alignment
Sets vertical alignment options:
Align Top
Aligns to the top of the area reserved for the caption and value.
Align Middle
Aligns to the middle of the area reserved for the caption and value.
Align Bottom
Aligns to the bottom of the area reserved for the caption and value.
Lists
Sets list options:
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Object Properties
Bulleted List
Starts a bulleted list. Click the arrow to choose different bullet styles.
Numbered List
Starts a numbered list. Click the arrow to choose different number styles.
Decrease Indent
Decreases the indent level of the list.
Increase Indent
Increases the indent level of the list.
Start
Sets the start number for the selected item in the numbered list.
Compound Tags
Creates a multi-level numbered list.
First
Sets the first line indentation:
None
Indents all lines by the same amount.
First line
Indents the first line only.
Hanging
Indents all lines except the first.
By
Sets the amount of the first line or hanging indentation.
Spacing
Sets the amount of space above and below the paragraph:
Above
Sets the amount of vertical space above the paragraph. This value is added to any value specified in the Below box.
Below
Sets the amount of vertical space below the paragraph. This value is added to any value specified in the Above box.
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Object Properties
8
Line Spacing
Sets the amount of space between lines:
Single
Makes the line height equivalent to the height of the tallest character in the line.
1.5 Lines
Makes the line height one and a half times the height of the tallest character in the line.
Double Line
Makes the line height twice the height of the tallest character in the line.
Exactly
Makes the line height equivalent to the setting in the At box.
Hyphenate
Adds or removes hyphenation in individual objects (text objects, the caption area of objects
such as text fields, decimal fields, numeric fields, and signature fields, and the value area of text
field objects). Use the Hyphenate option to manually adjust the layout of text on an
object-by-object basis. This option is available when you select Allow Hyphenation in Text and
Field Captions, or Allow Hyphenation in Text Field Values, or both.
8.5.
Accessibility properties in the Accessibility palette
Designer includes a number of options that support screen readers. For each field object in a form,
you can specify one of several settings for screen reader text:
•
Custom screen reader text, which you set in the Accessibility palette
•
Tool tips for objects, which you set in the Accessibility palette
•
Captions for fields
•
Names of objects, as specified in the Name option in the Binding tab
The settings determine the information that screen readers read for objects on PDF forms.
Only one setting is spoken for each object.
When the form is saved as tagged PDF, Designer searches the form for these settings. The
default search order is Custom Text, Tool tip, Caption, and Name. You can override this
default order by using the Screen Reader Precedence option in the Accessibility palette.
You can dynamically populate a tool tip and custom screen reader text with values from a
data source.
TIP:
406
Object Properties
Tool tips appear at run time when the user hovers the pointer over an object. The settings
on the Accessibility palette have no effect on objects when the form is rendered as a PDF form.
NOTE:
Role
Determines how screen readers interpret the subform, table, selected row in a table, list,
heading, or heading level:
Table
Assigns the role of a table to the selected subform. When the user navigates to this subform,
most screen readers identify it as a table and indicate the number of rows and columns.
Header Row
Assigns the role of a header row to the selected subform or table row. When speaking the
contents of a body row cell, most screen readers first identify the content of the corresponding
cell in the header row.
Body Row
Assigns the role of a body row to the selected subform or table row. If a cell contains a subform,
screen readers typically speak the content of the corresponding cell in the header row, followed
by the fields in the subform.
Footer Row
Assigns the role of a footer row to the selected subform or table row.
List
Assigns the role of a list to the selected subform.
List Item
Assigns the role of a list item to the selected subform. A list item role can only be assigned to a
subform that is contained in a subform that has a List role specified. You cannot define a table
or table row as a list or list item; however, a list item can contain a table.
Heading
Assigns the role of heading to the selected text object.
Heading Level 1 to Heading Level 6
Assigns the role of the heading level to the selected text object.
(None)
Specifies a row that conveys information about the table or its content. The row is not considered to be part of the table; however, the screen reader will read its contents.
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8
Tool Tip
Defines a tool tip for the object. Tool tips appear at run time when the user hovers the pointer
over the object. A screen reader can read the text entered in this box.
You cannot have both unique custom tool-tip text and unique custom screen-reader text for
one object. You must choose one or the other. If you want to use the same text for the tool tip
and the text read by the screen reader, type a tool tip and select Tool Tip from the Screen
Reader Precedence list.
Tool Tip is a dynamic property for most objects. Dynamic properties are identified
by active labels that have a green underline that you can click to dynamically bind the property to a data source. To turn active labels on and off, use the Show Dynamic Properties
command in the Object palette menu.
NOTE:
Screen Reader Precedence
Indicates which setting the screen reader should read. Only one setting is spoken for each
object:
Custom Text
Reads the text specified in the Custom Screen Reader Text box. This setting is the default.
Tool Tip
Reads the text specified in the Tool Tip box.
Caption
Reads the caption specified for the object. The position of the caption relative to the object does
not change the order in which the screen reader reads the caption. By default, the screen reader
reads the caption if nothing is specified in the Tool Tip box or the Custom Screen Reader Text
box. This setting is the preferred choice for screen readers.
Name
Reads the name of the object, as specified in the Name field in the Binding tab of the Object
palette.
None
Disables the custom tool tip or custom screen reader text for the field.
Custom Screen Reader Text
Defines custom text for the selected object. The screen reader reads the text entered in this box.
You cannot have both unique custom tool tip text and unique custom screen reader text for
one object. You must choose one or the other. If you want custom screen reader text to be both
the tool tip text and the screen reader text, type the custom text and select Custom Text from
the Screen Reader Precedence list.
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Object Properties
Custom Screen Reader Text is a dynamic property for most objects. Dynamic properties are identified by active labels that have a green underline that you can click to
dynamically bind the property to a data source. To turn active labels on and off, use the
Show Dynamic Properties command in the Object palette menu.
NOTE:
8.6.
Master page properties in the Master Page tab
Use the Master Page tab of the Object palette to set the page name and various layout options for
each master page. To display the Master Page tab, select the master page you want to work with in
the Hierarchy palette.
Name
Sets the name of the master page.
Paper Type, Height, and Width
Sets the size of the master page. The dimensions are displayed in the Height and Width boxes
and can be modified when the Paper Type option is set to Custom.
Orientation
Sets the orientation of the master page:
Portrait
The page height is greater than or equal to the page width.
Landscape
The page width is greater than or equal to the page height.
Set the page orientation explicitly as portrait or landscape for the Custom Paper Type. If
the form width is greater than the form height, the orientation does not change to landscape automatically when Custom Paper Type is selected.
NOTE:
Restrict Page Occurrence, Min Count, and Max
Select this option only for creating forms whose layout adjusts to accommodate data. It enables
or disables the repetitive rendering of pages that are based on the selected master page. When
the option is selected, you can enter a minimum number of repetitions in the Min Count box
and a maximum number of repetitions in the Max box.
8.6.1.
Presence
Controls whether an object is displayed in a PDF form when users view the form in Acrobat or
Adobe Reader, or when users print the form:
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Object Properties
8
Visible
The object is visible on-screen, visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the form
layout. Visible is the default presence setting for all objects.
Visible (Screen Only)
The object is visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form when printed from within
Acrobat or Adobe Reader, and occupies space in the form layout.
Visible (Print Only)
The object is not visible on-screen, visible in the printed form (when printed from within
Acrobat, Adobe Reader, or directly from the server), and occupies space in the form layout.
One-sided Printing Only
The object is printed only when using single-sided printing.
Two-sided Printing Only
The object is printed when using double-sided printing. This option is useful when you want
to place the page number in a different corner of the page when using double-sided printing
than when using single-sided printing.
8.7.
Master page properties in the Pagination tab
When you select a Master Page, the Pagination tab in the Object palette presents a number of pagination options.
Odd / Even
Specifies whether the master page appears on the front (odd) side, back (even) side, or both
sides of the paper when the rendered form is printed:
Odd (Front) Pages
The master page appears on the odd-numbered printed pages.
Even (Back) Pages
The master page appears on the even-numbered printed pages.
Blank Pages
Inserts a blank page with no flowed content. This option is useful in double-sided printing
when you want the back (even) side of the printed page to be blank so that the next section
starts on the front (odd) side of the next printed page.
410
Object Properties
No Odd/Even Restrictions
There are no restrictions on the master page during double-sided printing. This option is the
default for all master pages.
Placement
Specifies the page that the master page is applied to in the form design:
First Page (in Page Set)
The master page is applied to the first page within the page set.
Last Page (in Page Set)
The master page is applied to the last page within the page set.
Only Page (in Document)
The master page is applied to the only page within the page set. Choose the Only Page (in
Document) option when the data merged into the form does not cause the content area to flow
onto more than one page. Only one master page can have a placement set to Only Page (in
Document).
Rest of Pages
The master page is applied to pages between, but not including, the first and last pages generated by the page set.
No Placement Restrictions
No restriction is applied to the master page’s location. No Placement Restrictions is the default
placement.
Include Page in Numbering
Specifies whether pages that have been rendered according to the selected master page should
contribute to the total page count. By default, the option is selected and all pages are counted.
If First Page in Document
Sets the page numbering for pages that have been rendered, according to the selected master
page:
Continue Numbering from Previous Document in Batch
The numbering increments from the last document processed by Forms.
Start At
The numbering starts at this specified value.
411
Object Properties
8.8.
8
Page set properties in the Page Set tab
Use the Page Set tab of the Object palette to set the name and occurrence options for each page set.
To display the Page Set tab, select the page set you want to work with in the Hierarchy palette.
You can set these options for each page set.
Name
Sets the name of the page set.
Printing
Controls whether the page set is printed on only the front side of each sheet of paper or on both
sides of each sheet of paper.
Restrict PageSet Occurrence, Min Count, and Max
Select this option only for creating interactive forms. It enables or disables the repetitive
rendering of pages that are based on master pages in the selected page set. When the option is
selected, you can enter a minimum number of repetitions in the Min Count box and a
maximum number of repetitions in the Max box.
8.8.1.
Presence
Controls whether an object is displayed in a PDF form when users view the form in Acrobat or
Adobe Reader, or when users print the form:
Visible
The object is visible on-screen, visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the form
layout. Visible is the default presence setting for all objects.
Visible (Screen Only)
The object is visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form when printed from within
Acrobat or Adobe Reader, and occupies space in the form layout.
Visible (Print Only)
The object is not visible on-screen, visible in the printed form (when printed from within
Acrobat, Adobe Reader, or directly from the server), and occupies space in the form layout.
One-sided Printing Only
The object is printed only when using single-sided printing.
412
Object Properties
Two-sided Printing Only
The object is printed when using double-sided printing. This option is useful when you want
to place the page number in a different corner of the page when using double-sided printing
than when using single-sided printing.
413
Properties in the Object palette
9.
Properties in the Object palette
9.1.
Barcode
9.1.1.
Barcode properties in the Field tab
9
When you select a barcode, the Field tab in the Object palette displays several options for formatting
barcodes.
Location
Sets the location of the barcode text. The options available on the list change depending on the
barcode selected. This list is unavailable with certain barcodes.
Property/Value
Sets barcode-specific properties.
Presence
Controls whether an object is displayed in a PDF form when users view the form in Acrobat or
Adobe Reader, or when users print the form:
Visible
The object is visible on-screen, visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the form
layout. Visible is the default presence setting for all objects.
Visible (Screen Only)
The object is visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form when printed from within
Acrobat or Adobe Reader, and occupies space in the form layout.
Visible (Print Only)
The object is not visible on-screen, visible in the printed form (when printed from within
Acrobat, Adobe Reader, or directly from the server), and occupies space in the form layout.
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Properties in the Object palette
Invisible
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the
form layout.
Hidden (Exclude from Layout)
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and does not occupy any
space in the form layout.
One-sided Printing Only
The object is only printed when using single-sided printing.
Two-sided Printing Only
The object is printed when using double-sided printing. This option is useful when you want
to place the page number in a different corner of the page when using double-sided printing
than when using single-sided printing.
RELATED LINKS:
Usingbarcodes
9.1.2.
Barcode properties in the Value tab
When you create a barcode, the Value tab displays several options that you can apply to the object.
Type
Enables run-time calculations and prompts:
User Entered - Optional
Users can choose whether to enter data.
User Entered - Recommended
A user is recommended to enter a value in the field. If the user enters a value, leaves the field
and then clears it, a custom message box appears (if written in the Empty Message box). A standard empty message appears if you do not type a custom message. If the user never attempts
to enter a value in the field and tries to submit the form, a field is required message appears and
the user can choose to ignore the message and submit the form.
User Entered - Required
A user must enter a value in the field. If the user enters a value, leaves the field and then clears
it, a custom message box appears (if written in the Empty Message box). A standard empty
message appears if you do not type a custom message. A message only appears if there was a
value in the field, the value was deleted, and the user exited the field without re-entering a
value. If the user never attempts to enter a value in the field and tries to submit the form, a field
is required message appears.
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Properties in the Object palette
9
Calculated - Read Only
A data value will be calculated and displayed through an attached script. Users cannot edit the
calculated value.
Calculated - User Can Override
A data value will be calculated and displayed through an attached script. Users can edit the
value if the calculation script has been written to accept the input. If a user does edit the calculated value, the custom message you specify in the Override Message box appears.
Protected
Prevents a user from making changes to the value in the field. Indirect changes such as calculations can occur. The protected field is not included in the tabbing sequence and it does not
generate events.
Read Only
A data value will be merged or calculated and displayed at run time. Users cannot edit the
value.
Default
Sets an initial value for the barcode. The length of the default value entered can effect the displayed
width of certain barcodes.
This option is available only when the Type option is set to User Entered - Optional, User
Entered - Recommended, User Entered - Required, or Read Only.
NOTE:
Empty Message
Sets a message for prompting users to enter a recommended or required value. See Toprompt users
to enter data.
This option is available only when the Type option is set to User Entered - Recommended or
User Entered - Required.
NOTE:
Validation Pattern
Sets a validation pattern for validating user input. The pattern must match the syntax of the user
input and be compatible with the data format selected on the Binding tab. See Tovalidate user input.
This option is not available when the Type option is set to Protected, Calculated - Read Only,
or Read Only.
NOTE:
416
Properties in the Object palette
Validation Pattern Message and Error
Sets a custom message to display when a raw value does not match the validation pattern. By default,
this situation causes a programming error to be generated at run time. To generate a warning
instead, deselect the Error option. See To validate user input .
Dynamic properties are identified by active labels that have a green underline that you can click
to dynamically bind the property to a data source. To turn active labels on and off, use the Show
Dynamic Properties command in the Object palette menu. See To dynamically populate a validation
patternmessage.
NOTE:
Validation Script Message and Error
Sets a custom message to display when an attached validation script detects an unacceptable value.
By default, this situation causes a programming error to be generated at run time. To generate a
warning instead, deselect the Error option. See To validate user input .
This option is not available when the Type option is set to Calculated - Read Only or Read Only.
Validation Script Message is a dynamic property. Dynamic properties are identified by active labels
that have a green underline that you can click to dynamically bind the property to a data source. To
turn active labels on and off, use the Show Dynamic Properties command in the Object palette menu.
See To dynamically populate a validationscript message.
NOTE:
Form Level Validation Settings
Open the Forms Properties dialog box on the Form Validation tab. See Form Validationtab (Form
Properties dialog box).
Override Message
Sets a custom message to inform users that they are changing the value of a calculated field. The
message appears when a user changes the calculated value.
NOTE:
This option is available only when the Type option is set to Calculated - User Can Override.
RELATED LINKS:
Usingbarcodes
Tocontrol how a barcode obtains data
Todynamically populate a validation pattern message
Todynamically populate a validation script message
417
Properties in the Object palette
9.1.3.
9
Barcode properties in the Binding tab
The Binding tab displays several options for binding barcodes. Options that are not specifically
related to creating a data connection apply both to data bound to a data source and data saved to a
file when the object is not bound to a data source.
Name
Sets the barcode name. See To name and rename objects.
Data Binding
Sets the default data-binding method:
Use name
Enables data merging and saving options. Data values are merged and stored implicitly
according to Adobe data-merging rules.
Use global data
Associates a single data value with all objects that have the same name (see To define a global
field).
New Data Connection
Starts the New Data Connection wizard. To define a connection using the wizard, see Tocreate
a data connection to an XML schema or To create a data connection to an OLEdatabase.
No data binding
Disables data binding. Because the object will not capture or display merged data, any information associated with the object is not written as output when the form data is
saved/submitted.
Import/Export Bindings
Sets an import/export binding for a WSDL data connection. See To create a data connection using a
WSDLfile.
RELATED LINKS:
Workingwith Data Sources
Usingbarcodes
Todefine custom data-binding properties for a barcode
418
Properties in the Object palette
9.1.4.
Supported barcode formats
The following is a list of supported barcode formats:
Aztec
Aztec format (hardware-rendered)
AUS Post Custom2
AUSPOST Custom 2 format
AUS Post Custom3
AUSPOST Custom 3 format
AUS Post Reply Paid
AUSPOST Reply Paid format
AUS Post Standard
AUSPOST Standard format
Codabar
Codabar format, which offers USD-4, NW-7, and 2-of-7 Code compatibility.
Code 11
Code 11 format (hardware-rendered)
Code 128SSCC
UCC/EAN 128 Serial Shipping Container Code (SSCC) format
Code 128
Code128 format
Code 128A
Code128, set A format
Code 128B
Code128, set B format
Code 128C
Code128, set C format
Code 2 of 5 Industrial
2 of 5 Industrial format
419
Properties in the Object palette
Code 2 of 5 Interleaved
2 of 5 Interleaved format, which offers Code 25, I2of5, ITF, and I25 compatibility
Code 2 of 5 Matrix
2 of 5 Matrix format
Code 2 of 5 Standard
Code 2 of 5 standard format (hardware-rendered)
Code 3 of 9 - 3
3 of 9 format
Code 93
Code 93 format (hardware-rendered)
Code 49
Code 49 format (hardware-rendered)
Data Matrix
Data Matrix format
GS1 Data Matrix
GS1 Data Matrix format
EAN13
EAN13 format
EAN8
EAN8 format
Japanese Postal Barcode
Japanese Postal barcode format
Logmars
Logmars format (hardware-rendered)
MSI
MSI format (hardware-rendered)
PDF 417
A two-dimensional format that accommodates up to 1 800 ASCII characters and supports
binary data of upto 1 Mb in size.
420
9
Properties in the Object palette
Paper Forms Barcode
Paper Forms Barcode format
Planet Code
Planet Code format (hardware-rendered)
Plessey
Plessey format (hardware-rendered)
QR Code
Quick Response (QR) 2-D Code format (hardware-rendered)
RFID
Radio frequency identification barcode (hardware-rendered)
RSS 14 Stacked
RSS 14 Stacked format (hardware-rendered)
RSS 14 Omni
RSS 14 Omni format (hardware-rendered)
RSS 14 Truncated
RSS 14 Truncated format (hardware-rendered)
RSS Expanded
(RSS Expanded format (hardware-rendered)
RSS Limited
RSS Limited format (hardware-rendered)
UK Post RM4SCC
UK/Royal Mail RM4SCC format
UPC-A
UPC-A format
UPC-E
UPC-E format (hardware-rendered)
UPS Maxicode
UPS Maxicode format (hardware-rendered)
UPC EAN2
UPC EAN2 format (hardware-rendered)
421
Properties in the Object palette
9
UPC EAN5
UPC EAN5 format (hardware-rendered)
US Postal Zip-5
US Postal 5-digit (ZIP) format
US Postal DPBC
Delivery Point ZIP +6 format
US Postal Standard
US Postal Standard format
US Postal Intelligent Mail
US Postal Intelligent Mail Barcode
Additional hardware-specific barcode formats can be added to the default set of supported
barcode formats.
NOTE:
RELATED LINKS:
Usingbarcodes
9.1.5.
Valid barcode text characters
This table identifies the characters that you can use in barcode text.
422
Properties in the Object palette
Barcode
Valid Characters
Aztec
AUS Post Custom2
AUS Post Custom3
AUS Post Reply Paid
AUS Post Standard
Code 2 of 5 Industrial
Code 2 of 5 Standard
Code 3 of 9 - 3
Code 2 of 5 Interleaved
Code 2 of 5 Matrix
EAN13
EAN8
MSI
UPC-A
UPC-E
UPC-EAN2
UPC-EAN5
US Postal Zip-5
US Postal DPBC
US Postal Standard
UPS Maxicode
0123456789
Codabar
0123456789
-$:/.+
Code 11
0123456789
-
Code 128SSCC
Code 128
Code 128A
Code 128B
Code 128C
0123456789
!#&'<>`
$ % ( ) * + , - . / : ; ? @ # = [ ] \ ^ _ { } | ~ SPACE
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz
Code 3 of 9
0123456789
- . $ / + % * SPACE
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
Code 49
0123456789
<>-.$/+%:;?=
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
Code 93
0123456789
& ' - . $ ( ) / + % , SPACE
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
Logmars
0123456789
- . $ / + % SPACE
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
423
Properties in the Object palette
9
Barcode
Valid Characters
RSS 14
RSS 14 Stacked
RSS 14 Stacked Omni
RSS 14 Truncated
RSS Expanded
RSS Limited
0123456789
PDF 417
No restrictions
Plessey
0123456789
ABCDEF
UK Post RM4SCC
0123456789
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
Japanese Postal
0123456789
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
RELATED LINKS:
Usingbarcodes
9.2.
Button
9.2.1.
Button properties in the Field tab
When you select a button, the Field tab in the Object palette displays several options for formatting
buttons.
Type
Sets the type of object. Objects are the building blocks of every form.
Caption
Sets a caption for the object.
Caption is a dynamic property. Dynamic properties are identified by active labels that have a
green underline that you can click to dynamically bind the property to a data source. To turn active
NOTE:
424
Properties in the Object palette
labels on and off, use the Show Dynamic Properties command in the Object palette menu. See Todynamically populate a caption.
Appearance
Sets the border style:
No Border
Removes the line around the button.
Solid Border
Creates a thick line around the button.
Raised Border
Creates a shadow around the button so that the button looks three-dimensional.
Custom
Opens the Custom Appearance dialog box. Select this option if you want to define a custom
look for the button.
Highlighting
Sets the button highlight when the button is clicked:
None
Removes the button highlight.
Inverted
Inverts the button highlight when the button is clicked.
Push
Creates a shadow around the button so that the button looks like it is recessed.
Outline
Creates a line around the button when the button is clicked.
Rollover Caption
Sets a rollover caption when the button highlight is set to Push. This caption appears when the
mouse pointer moves over the button.
425
Properties in the Object palette
9
Down Caption
Sets a down caption when the button highlight is set to Push. This caption appears when the button
is clicked.
Control Type
Determines what happens when a user clicks the button. These options are not displayed for the
Print or Reset buttons:
Regular
The attached script or calculation will run. The script or calculation is provided by the user.
Submit
Data will be submitted according to the settings in the Submit tab. See Button properties in the
Submit tab.
Execute
A web-service operation or database query will be executed according to the settings in the
Execute tab. See Button properties in the Execute tab.
Presence
Controls whether an object is displayed in a PDF form when users view the form in Acrobat or
Adobe Reader, or when users print the form:
Visible
The object is visible on-screen, visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the form
layout. Visible is the default presence setting for all objects.
Visible (Screen Only)
The object is visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form when printed from within
Acrobat or Adobe Reader, and occupies space in the form layout.
Visible (Print Only)
The object is not visible on-screen, visible in the printed form (when printed from within
Acrobat, Adobe Reader, or directly from the server), and occupies space in the form layout.
Invisible
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the
form layout.
426
Properties in the Object palette
Hidden (Exclude from Layout)
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and does not occupy any
space in the form layout.
One-sided Printing Only
The object is only printed when using single-sided printing.
Two-sided Printing Only
The object is printed when using double-sided printing. This option is useful when you want
to place the page number in a different corner of the page when using double-sided printing
than when using single-sided printing.
Locale
Renders the data according to the specified locale for language and country or region. You can select
a specific language and country from the list, or you can specify one of these options:
Default Locale
Uses the Default Locale specified in the Defaults tab of the Form Properties dialog box.
Viewer’s System Locale
Uses the system locale of the user’s computer.
NOTE:
Locales in the Locale list are organized first by language and then by country or region.
RELATED LINKS:
Usingbuttons
9.2.2.
Print button properties in the Field tab
When you select a button, the Field tab in the Object palette displays several options for formatting
buttons.
Type
Sets the type of object. Objects are the building blocks of every form.
Caption
Sets a caption for the object.
NOTE: Caption is a dynamic property. Dynamic properties are identified by active labels that have a
green underline that you can click to dynamically bind the property to a data source. To turn active
427
Properties in the Object palette
9
labels on and off, use the Show Dynamic Properties command in the Object palette menu. See Todynamically populate a caption.
Appearance
Sets the border style:
No Border
Removes the line around the button.
Solid Border
Creates a thick line around the button.
Raised Border
Creates a shadow around the button so that the button looks three-dimensional.
Custom
Opens the Custom Appearance dialog box. Select this option if you want to define a custom
look for the button.
Highlighting
Sets the button highlight when the button is clicked:
None
Removes the button highlight.
Inverted
Inverts the button highlight when the button is clicked.
Push
Creates a shadow around the button so that the button looks like it is recessed.
Outline
Creates a line around the button when the button is clicked.
Rollover Caption
Sets a rollover caption when the button highlight is set to Push. This caption appears when the
mouse pointer moves over the button.
428
Properties in the Object palette
Down Caption
Sets a down caption when the button highlight is set to Push. This caption appears when the button
is clicked.
Presence
Controls whether an object is displayed in a PDF form when users view the form in Acrobat or
Adobe Reader, or when users print the form:
Visible
The object is visible on-screen, visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the form
layout. Visible is the default presence setting for all objects.
Visible (Screen Only)
The object is visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form when printed from within
Acrobat or Adobe Reader, and occupies space in the form layout.
Visible (Print Only)
The object is not visible on-screen, visible in the printed form (when printed from within
Acrobat, Adobe Reader, or directly from the server), and occupies space in the form layout.
Invisible
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the
form layout.
Hidden (Exclude from Layout)
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and does not occupy any
space in the form layout.
One-sided Printing Only
The object is only printed when using single-sided printing.
Two-sided Printing Only
The object is printed when using double-sided printing. This option is useful when you want
to place the page number in a different corner of the page when using double-sided printing
than when using single-sided printing.
Renders the data according to the specified locale for language and country or region. You can
select a specific language and country from the list, or you can specify one of these options:
Default Locale
Uses the Default Locale specified in the Defaults tab of the Form Properties dialog box.
429
Properties in the Object palette
9
Viewer’s System Locale
Uses the system locale of the user’s computer.
NOTE:
Locales in the Locale list are organized first by language and then by country or region.
RELATED LINKS:
Usingbuttons
9.2.3.
Reset button properties in the Field tab
When you select a button, the Field tab in the Object palette displays several options for formatting
buttons.
Type
Sets the type of object. Objects are the building blocks of every form.
Caption
Sets a caption for the object.
NOTE: Caption is a dynamic property. Dynamic properties are identified by active labels that have a
green underline that you can click to dynamically bind the property to a data source. To turn active
labels on and off, use the Show Dynamic Properties command in the Object palette menu. See Todynamically populate a caption.
Appearance
Sets the border style:
No Border
Removes the line around the button.
Solid Border
Creates a thick line around the button.
Raised Border
Creates a shadow around the button so that the button looks three-dimensional.
Custom
Opens the Custom Appearance dialog box. Select this option if you want to define a custom
look for the button.
430
Properties in the Object palette
Highlighting
Sets the button highlight when the button is clicked:
None
Removes the button highlight.
Inverted
Inverts the button highlight when the button is clicked.
Push
Creates a shadow around the button so that the button looks like it is recessed.
Outline
Creates a line around the button when the button is clicked.
Rollover Caption
Sets a rollover caption when the button highlight is set to Push. This caption appears when the
mouse pointer moves over the button.
Down Caption
Sets a down caption when the button highlight is set to Push. This caption appears when the button
is clicked.
Presence
Controls whether an object is displayed in a PDF form when users view the form in Acrobat or
Adobe Reader, or when users print the form:
Visible
The object is visible on-screen, visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the form
layout. Visible is the default presence setting for all objects.
Visible (Screen Only)
The object is visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form when printed from within
Acrobat or Adobe Reader, and occupies space in the form layout.
Visible (Print Only)
The object is not visible on-screen, visible in the printed form (when printed from within
Acrobat, Adobe Reader, or directly from the server), and occupies space in the form layout.
431
Properties in the Object palette
9
Invisible
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the
form layout.
Hidden (Exclude from Layout)
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and does not occupy any
space in the form layout.
One-sided Printing Only
The object is only printed when using single-sided printing.
Two-sided Printing Only
The object is printed when using double-sided printing. This option is useful when you want
to place the page number in a different corner of the page when using double-sided printing
than when using single-sided printing.
Locale
Renders the data according to the specified locale for language and country or region. You can select
a specific language and country from the list, or you can specify one of these options:
Default Locale
Uses the Default Locale specified in the Defaults tab of the Form Properties dialog box.
Viewer’s System Locale
Uses the system locale of the user’s computer.
NOTE:
Locales in the Locale list are organized first by language and then by country or region.
RELATED LINKS:
Usingbuttons
9.2.4.
Button properties in the Submit tab
When you create a button and set its Control Type to Submit, the Submit tab appears in the Object
palette. It displays several options specific to formatting buttons that submit data.
Submit to URL
Sets the location of a web-hosted server. You can specify the ftp, http, https, or mailto protocol.
432
Properties in the Object palette
Submit As
Sets the format of the data to submit.
XML Data Package (XDP)
Submits a package in the file format created by Designer. Choose this format if the form initiates server-side processing, or to submit the form design, the form data, annotations, and all
other relevant information needed for Forms to subsequently render the form at run time.
PDF
Submits a package containing an embedded PDF file. Choose this format if the form contains
a signature field, or if a copy of the form along with its data needs to be saved by Forms, or
submitted to another type of target server. Do not choose this option if the form initiates
server-side processing, if Forms will be used to render at run time HTML forms or forms
whose layout adjusts, or if the form is a PDF form that will be filled in Adobe Reader without
the use of Acrobat Reader DC extensions.
XML Data (XML)
Submits an XML data stream, which allows for the hierarchical representation of data and can
be parsed by any generic XML parser. Choose this format if the server that communicates with
the run-time user application program must receive an XML data steam.
URL-Encoded Data (HTTP Post)
Submits a text stream to the specified Uniform Resource Locator (URL) using the POST
method. The text stream can be parsed by an FTP server, a mail server, a web server, or a CGI
script that processes HTML forms. To use this method, users must open the form in Adobe
Reader 6.0 or later or in a web browser unless the URL specifies the mailto protocol.
Sign Submission
Applies a data signature to the submitted data. When a form filler clicks the button, a digital
signature is created to cover the submitted data and attachments. Data signatures secure the
signed data and guarantee the data integrity during transmission. You apply data signatures to
the form data or to the entire submission, including attachments. Click the Settings buton to
define optional security properties for the data signature, such as the signature handler, signing
certificates, and certificate issuers.
Encrypt Submission
Encrypts form content. When a form filler clicks the button, the form content is encrypted
before submission to secure the form content during transmission. You apply encryption to
the form data or to the entire submission, including attachments. Click the Settings buton to
433
Properties in the Object palette
9
define optional encryption properties such as encryption algorithm, encryption certificate,
certificate issuers, and key usage.
Include
Sets the items to include as attachments. Attachments may be included with XDP files only.
Annotations
Includes review comments, tool tips, and any other special tags needed to capture screen reader
text.
PDF (Includes Signatures)
When selected, includes a PDF version of the form when it is submitted as an attachment;
otherwise, a reference to an embedded PDF file is included.
Template
Includes a copy of the form design without merged data.
Other
Includes one or more <xdp> elements in the XDP source file. The specified elements must be
separated by commas and white space is optional. For example:xci, xslt, sourceset.
Data Encoding
Sets the encoding format for data transfers.
UTF-8
Unicode Transformation Format 8.
UTF-16
Unicode Transformation Format 16.
Shift_JIS
Shifted encoding of the Japanese Industrial Standard.
Big5
Common standard for encoding traditional Chinese characters.
GBK
Simplified Chinese (GB 13000.1-93) character encoding (an extension of GB 2312-80).
KSC_5601
Korean encoding.
434
Properties in the Object palette
GB18030
People's Republic of China (PRC) official character set encoding (supersedes GB2312).
RELATED LINKS:
Usingbuttons
Aboutsubmitting data using a button
9.2.5.
Button properties in the Execute tab
When you create a button and set its Control Type to Execute, the Execute tab appears in the Object
palette. It displays several options specific to formatting buttons with a data connection.
Connection
Sets the connection. See To create a data connection using aWSDL file.
Connection Info
Provides connection information and the name of the operation or query to run.
Run At
Sets the execution location.
Client
Processes the request on the client computer.
Server
Processes the request on the server.
Client And Server
Processes the request on the client computer and server.
Re-merge Form Data
Enables or disables the updating of the form structure after processing completes.
RELATED LINKS:
Usingbuttons
Aboutprocessing options for a button
435
Properties in the Object palette
9.3.
Check box
9.3.1.
Check box properties in the Field tab
9
When you select a check box, the Field tab in the Object palette displays several options for formatting check boxes.
Type
Sets the type of object. Objects are the building blocks of every form.
Caption
Sets a caption for the object.
Caption is a dynamic property. Dynamic properties are identified by active labels that have a
green underline that you can click to dynamically bind the property to a data source. To turn active
labels on and off, use the Show Dynamic Properties command in the Object palette menu. See Todynamically populate a caption.
NOTE:
Appearance
Sets the border style for the fillable area of the check box:
None
Does not include a border around the box.
Solid Square
Uses a solid square to represent the box.
Sunken Square
Creates a square shadow for the box so that it looks three dimensional.
Solid Circle
Uses a solid circle to represent the box.
Sunken Circle
Creates a circular shadow for the box so that it looks three dimensional.
436
Properties in the Object palette
Custom
Opens the Custom Appearance dialog box. Select this option if you want to define a custom
look for the fillable area.
States
Sets the number of supported states:
On/Off
The check box will have On (selected) and Off (clear) states.
On/Off/Neutral
The check box will have On (selected), Off (clear), and Neutral (not selected or clear) states.
Values for each state must be defined in the Binding tab of the Object palette.
Size
Sets the size of the box.
Check Style
Sets the check style:
Default
Uses an X for the check style.
Check
Uses a check mark for the check style.
Circle
Uses a circle for the check style.
Cross
Uses a cross for the check style.
Diamond
Uses a diamond for the check style.
Square
Uses a square for the check style.
437
Properties in the Object palette
9
Star
Uses a star as the check style.
Presence
Controls whether an object is displayed in a PDF form when users view the form in Acrobat or
Adobe Reader, or when users print the form:
Visible
The object is visible on-screen, visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the form
layout. Visible is the default presence setting for all objects.
Visible (Screen Only)
The object is visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form when printed from within
Acrobat or Adobe Reader, and occupies space in the form layout.
Visible (Print Only)
The object is not visible on-screen, visible in the printed form (when printed from within
Acrobat, Adobe Reader, or directly from the server), and occupies space in the form layout.
Invisible
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the
form layout.
Hidden (Exclude from Layout)
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and does not occupy any
space in the form layout.
One-sided Printing Only
The object is only printed when using single-sided printing.
Two-sided Printing Only
The object is printed when using double-sided printing. This option is useful when you want
to place the page number in a different corner of the page when using double-sided printing
than when using single-sided printing.
Locale
Renders the data according to the specified locale for language and country or region. You can select
a specific language and country from the list, or you can specify one of these options:
Default Locale
Uses the Default Locale specified in the Defaults tab of the Form Properties dialog box.
438
Properties in the Object palette
Viewer’s System Locale
Uses the system locale of the user’s computer.
NOTE:
Locales in the Locale list are organized first by language and then by country or region.
RELATED LINKS:
Usingcheck boxes
9.3.2.
Check box properties in the Value tab
When you create a check box, the Value tab displays several options that you can apply to the object.
Type
Enables run-time calculations and prompts.
User Entered
Users may choose to enter data or not.
Calculated - Read Only
A data value will be calculated and displayed at run time through an attached script. Users will
not be able to edit the calculated value.
Calculated - User Can Override
A data value will be calculated and displayed through an attached script. Users can edit the
value if the calculation script has been written to accept the input. If a user does edit the calculated value, the custom message you specify in the Override Message box appears.
Read Only
A data value will be merged or calculated and displayed at run time. Users will not be able to
edit the value.
Default
Sets the initial state of the check box.
On
The default state is On. The check box is selected initially.
Off
The default state is Off. The check box is deselected initially.
439
Properties in the Object palette
9
Neutral
The default state is Neutral. The box is filled with grey initially.
The Default list is available only when the Type option is set to User Entered or Read Only.
The Neutral option is available from the Default list only when the States area in the Field tab is
set to On/Off/Neutral.
NOTE:
Validation Script Message and Error
Sets a custom message to display when an attached validation script detects an unacceptable value.
By default, this situation causes a programming error to be generated at run time. To generate a
warning instead, deselect the Error option. See To validate user input.
This option is not available when the Type option is set to Protect, Calculated - Read Only, or
Read Only. Validation Script Message is a dynamic property. Dynamic properties are identified by
active labels that have a green underline that you can click to dynamically bind the property to a data
source. To turn active labels on and off, use the Show Dynamic Properties command in the Object
palette menu. See To dynamically populate a validationscript message.
NOTE:
Form Level Validation Settings
Open the Forms Properties dialog box on the Form Validation tab. See Form Validationtab (Form
Properties dialog box).
Override Message
Sets a custom message to inform users that they are changing the value of a calculated field. The
message appears when a user changes the calculated value.
NOTE:
This option is available only when the Type option is set to Calculated - User Can Override.
RELATED LINKS:
Usingcheck boxes
9.3.3.
Check box properties in the Binding tab
When you create a check box, the Binding tab presents data binding options that you can apply to
the object. Options that are not specifically related to creating a data connection apply both to data
bound to a data source and data saved to a file when the object is not bound to a data source.
Name
Sets the name of the check box. See To name and rename objects.
440
Properties in the Object palette
Data Binding
Sets the default data-binding method:
Use name
Enables data merging and saving options. Data values are merged and stored implicitly
according to Adobe data-merging rules.
Use global data
Associates a single data value with all objects that have the same name (see To define a global
field).
New Data Connection
Starts the New Data Connection wizard. To define a connection using the wizard, see Tocreate
a data connection to an XML schema or To create a data connection to an OLEdatabase.
No data binding
Disables data binding. Because the object will not capture or display merged data, any information associated with the object is not written as output when the form data is
saved/submitted.
On Value
Specifies the value of the check box’s On state in the data source. See To change the values assigned
to checkbox states.
Off Value
Specifies the value of the check box’s Off state in the data source.
Neutral Value
Specifies the value of the check box’s Neutral state in the data source.
Import/Export Bindings
Sets an import/export binding for a WSDL data connection. See To create a data connection using a
WSDLfile.
RELATED LINKS:
Workingwith Data Sources
Usingcheck boxes
441
Properties in the Object palette
9.4.
Circle
9.4.1.
Circle properties in the Draw tab
9
When you create a circle, the Draw tab in the Object palette presents options specific to formatting
circles.
Type
Sets the type of object. Objects are the building blocks of every form.
Appearance
Sets the shape of the object.
Ellipse
Draws an elliptical shape.
Circle
Draws a circular shape.
Arc
Draws an arc.
Start
Sets the start point of an arc.
Sweep
Sets the end point of an arc.
Line Style
Sets the line style and thickness.
Color Picker
Sets the line color.
442
Properties in the Object palette
Fill
Sets a fill style.
Color Picker
Sets fill colors.
Presence
Controls whether an object is displayed in a PDF form when users view the form in Acrobat or
Adobe Reader, or when users print the form:
Visible
The object is visible on-screen, visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the form
layout. Visible is the default presence setting for all objects.
Visible (Screen Only)
The object is visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form when printed from within
Acrobat or Adobe Reader, and occupies space in the form layout.
Visible (Print Only)
The object is not visible on-screen, visible in the printed form (when printed from within
Acrobat, Adobe Reader, or directly from the server), and occupies space in the form layout.
Invisible
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the
form layout.
Hidden (Exclude from Layout)
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and does not occupy any
space in the form layout.
One-sided Printing Only
The object is only printed when using single-sided printing.
Two-sided Printing Only
The object is printed when using double-sided printing. This option is useful when you want
to place the page number in a different corner of the page when using double-sided printing
than when using single-sided printing.
RELATED LINKS:
Usingcircles, lines, and rectangles
443
Properties in the Object palette
9.5.
Content area
9.5.1.
Content area properties in the Content Area tab
9
When a content area is selected, the Content Area tab presents two options.
Name
Sets the name of the content area.
Flow Direction
Sets the flow direction for subforms within the content area.
Top to Bottom
Sets the default tabbing order and data-fill order starting from the top of the page and moving
to the bottom of the page.
Western Text
Sets the default tabbing order and data-fill order starting from the top of the page and moving
to the right until the last object on the right edge of the page has been reached. When the right
edge of the page has been reached, continue the tabbing order and flow direction at the next
object down on the left side of the page.
Right to Left
Sets the default tabbing order and data-fill order starting from the right of the page and moving
to the left of the page.
Presence
Controls whether an object is displayed in a PDF form when users view the form in Acrobat or
Adobe Reader, or when users print the form:
Visible
The object is visible on-screen, visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the form
layout. Visible is the default presence setting for all objects.
Visible (Screen Only)
The object is visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form when printed from within
Acrobat or Adobe Reader, and occupies space in the form layout.
444
Properties in the Object palette
Visible (Print Only)
The object is not visible on-screen, visible in the printed form (when printed from within
Acrobat, Adobe Reader, or directly from the server), and occupies space in the form layout.
One-sided Printing Only
The object is printed only when using single-sided printing.
Two-sided Printing Only
The object is printed when using double-sided printing. This option is useful when you want
to place the page number in a different corner of the page when using double-sided printing
than when using single-sided printing.
RELATED LINKS:
Usingcontent areas
Dataflow between content areas
9.6.
Date/time field
9.6.1.
Date/time field properties in the Field tab
When you select a date/time field, the Field tab displays several options specific to formatting
date/time fields.
Type
Sets the type of object. Objects are the building blocks of every form.
Caption
Sets a caption for the object.
Caption is a dynamic property. Dynamic properties are identified by active labels that have a
green underline that you can click to dynamically bind the property to a data source. To turn active
labels on and off, use the Show Dynamic Properties command in the Object palette menu. See To
dynamically populate a caption.
NOTE:
Appearance
Sets the border style for the fillable area of the field:
445
Properties in the Object palette
9
None
Does not display a border around the field.
Underlined
Underlines the field.
Solid Box
Displays a solid border around the field.
Sunken Box
Creates a shadow around the field so that the field looks three-dimensional.
Custom
Opens the Custom Appearance dialog box. Select this option if you want to define a custom
look for the fillable area.
Limit Length to Visible Area
Sets the maximum amount of characters and numbers allowed in the field according to the horizontal length of the date/time field.
Use Cells and Cells
Enables the comb format.
Patterns
Sets the pattern for displaying formatted values in a form, for syntax of user input, for validating user
input, and for storing and retrieving bound data or saving data when the form is not bound to a data
source. See Patterns dialog box.
Presence
Controls whether an object is displayed in a PDF form when users view the form in Acrobat or
Adobe Reader, or when users print the form:
Visible
The object is visible on-screen, visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the form
layout. Visible is the default presence setting for all objects.
446
Properties in the Object palette
Visible (Screen Only)
The object is visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form when printed from within
Acrobat or Adobe Reader, and occupies space in the form layout.
Visible (Print Only)
The object is not visible on-screen, visible in the printed form (when printed from within
Acrobat, Adobe Reader, or directly from the server), and occupies space in the form layout.
Invisible
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the
form layout.
Hidden (Exclude from Layout)
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and does not occupy any
space in the form layout.
One-sided Printing Only
The object is only printed when using single-sided printing.
Two-sided Printing Only
The object is printed when using double-sided printing. This option is useful when you want
to place the page number in a different corner of the page when using double-sided printing
than when using single-sided printing.
Locale
Renders the data according to the specified locale for language and country or region. You can select
a specific language and country from the list, or you can specify one of these options:
Default Locale
Uses the Default Locale specified in the Defaults tab of the Form Properties dialog box.
Viewer’s System Locale
Uses the system locale of the user’s computer.
NOTE:
Locales in the Locale list are organized first by language and then by country or region.
RELATED LINKS:
Usingdate/time fields
Tospecify a display pattern
Tospecify an edit pattern
Dateand time patterns
447
Properties in the Object palette
9.6.2.
9
Date/time field properties in the Value tab
When you create a date/time field, the Value tab displays several options that you can apply to the
object.
Type
Enables run-time calculations and prompts:
User Entered - Optional
Users can choose whether to enter data.
User Entered - Recommended
A user is recommended to enter a value in the field. If the user enters a value, leaves the field
and then clears it, a custom message box appears (if written in the Empty Message box). A standard empty message appears if you do not type a custom message. If the user never attempts
to enter a value in the field and tries to submit the form, a field is required message appears and
the user can choose to ignore the message and submit the form.
User Entered - Required
A user must enter a value in the field. If the user enters a value, leaves the field and then clears
it, a custom message box appears (if written in the Empty Message box). A standard empty
message appears if you do not type a custom message. A message only appears if there was a
value in the field, the value was deleted, and the user exited the field without re-entering a
value. If the user never attempts to enter a value in the field and tries to submit the form, a field
is required message appears.
Calculated - Read Only
A data value will be calculated and displayed through an attached script. Users cannot edit the
calculated value.
Calculated - User Can Override
A data value will be calculated and displayed through an attached script. Users can edit the
value if the calculation script has been written to accept the input. If a user does edit the calculated value, the custom message you specify in the Override Message box appears.
Protected
Prevents a user from making changes to the value in the field. Indirect changes such as calculations can occur. The protected field is not included in the tabbing sequence and it does not
generate events.
Read Only
A data value will be merged or calculated and displayed at run time. Users cannot edit the
value.
448
Properties in the Object palette
Default
Sets an initial value for the field. The value is formatted according to the option selected in the Select
Type list in the Patterns dialog box, but must conform to the value in the short date or time format
according to the locale specified for the field. See Date formatsand Timeformatsto learn more about
short dates and times. If the data is bound and a data pattern has been specified, the value must
match the data pattern specified in the Binding tab. See To specify a default value.
This option is available only when the Type option is set to User Entered - Optional, User
Entered - Recommended, User Entered - Required, or Read Only.
NOTE:
Empty Message
Sets a message for prompting users to enter a recommended or required value. See Toprompt users
to enter data.
This option is available only when the Type option is set to User Entered - Recommended or
User Entered - Required.
NOTE:
Validation Pattern
Sets a validation pattern for validating user input. The pattern must match the syntax of the user
input.
This option is not available when the Type option is set to Protected, Calculated - Read Only or
Read Only.
NOTE:
Validation Pattern Message and Error
Sets a custom message to display when a raw value does not match the validation pattern. By default,
this situation causes a programming error to be generated at run time. To generate a warning
instead, deselect the Error option. See To validate user input.
Dynamic properties are identified by active labels that have a green underline that you can click
to dynamically bind the property to a data source. To turn active labels on and off, use the Show
Dynamic Properties command in the Object palette menu. See To dynamically populate a validation
patternmessage.
NOTE:
Validation Script Message and Error
Sets a custom message to display when an attached validation script detects an unacceptable value.
By default, this situation causes a programming error to be generated at run time. To generate a
warning instead, deselect the Error option. See To validate user input .
This option is not available when the Type option is set to Calculated - Read Only or Read Only.
Validation Script Message is a dynamic property. Dynamic properties are identified by active labels
NOTE:
449
Properties in the Object palette
9
that have a green underline that you can click to dynamically bind the property to a data source. To
turn active labels on and off, use the Show Dynamic Properties command in the Object palette menu.
See To dynamically populate a validationscript message.
Form Level Validation Settings
Open the Forms Properties dialog box on the Form Validation tab. See Form Validation tab (Form
Propertiesdialog box).
Calculation Script
The value will be calculated by a script written for the object’s calculate event.
NOTE:
This option is available only when the Type option is set to Calculated - Read Only.
Runtime Property
Sets the following run-time property for the object. When you select a run-time property, the actual
value corresponding to the option is inserted dynamically when the form is rendered.
Current Date/Time
Display the current date and time in the date/time field.
NOTE:
This option is available only when the Type option is set to Calculated - Read Only.
Override Message
Sets a custom message to inform users that they are changing the value of a calculated field. The
message appears when a user changes the calculated value.
NOTE:
This option is available only when the Type option is set to Calculated - User Can Override.
RELATED LINKS:
Usingdate/time fields
9.6.3.
Date/time field properties in the Binding tab
When you create a date/time field, the Binding tab presents data binding options that you can apply
to the field. Options that are not specifically related to creating a data connection apply both to data
bound to a data source and data saved to a file when the object is not bound to a data source.
Name
Sets the name of the date/time field. See To name and rename objects.
450
Properties in the Object palette
Data Binding
Sets the default data-binding method:
Use name
Enables data merging and saving options. Data values are merged and stored implicitly
according to Adobe data-merging rules.
Use global data
Associates a single data value with all objects that have the same name (see Todefine a global
field).
New Data Connection
Starts the New Data Connection wizard. To define a connection using the wizard, see Tocreate
a data connection to an XML schema or To create a data connection to an OLEdatabase.
No data binding
Disables data binding. Because the object will not capture or display merged data, any information associated with the object is not written as output when the form data is
saved/submitted.
Data Format
Sets the format in which data in the field is displayed.
Date
Displays the data in the field in date format.
Time
Displays the data in the field in time format.
Date and Time
Displays the data in the field in date/time format.
Import/Export Bindings
Sets an import/export binding for a WSDL data connection. See Tocreate a data connection using a
WSDL file.
RELATED LINKS:
Workingwith Data Sources
Usingdate/time fields
Tospecify the data to display in date/time fields
Dateand time patterns
451
Properties in the Object palette
9.6.4.
9
Examples of date/time patterns
A formatted value can be displayed or processed. A raw value conforms to Designer defaults.
Predefined patterns
The following table shows the predefined date and time patterns that you can specify by using the
Patterns option in the Field tab of the Object palette and the results of formatting some examples of
input default values according to the locale specified. In these examples, the locale is English (USA).
Predefined pattern
Input value (using the short
format, which is M/D/YY for
date and h:MM A for time)
Formatted value
YYYY-MM-DD
8/23/08
2008-08-23
EEEE, MMMM D, YYYY
8/23/08
Saturday, August 23, 2008
HH:MM:SS
5:02 PM
17:02:00
date{YYYY-MM-DD}
time{HH:MM:SS}
8/23/08 5:02 PM
2008-08-23 17:02:00
To find the default short format for date and time, select View > XML Source and search for the
following lines:
NOTE:
<datePatterns>
<datePattern name="full">EEEE, MMMM D, YYYY</datePattern>
<datePattern name="long">MMMM D, YYYY</datePattern>
<datePattern name="med">MMM D, YYYY</datePattern>
<datePattern name="short">M/D/YY</datePattern>
</datePatterns>
<timePatterns>
<timePattern name="full">h:MM:SS A Z</timePattern>
<timePattern name="long">h:MM:SS A Z</timePattern>
<timePattern name="med">h:MM:SS A</timePattern>
<timePattern name="short">h:MM A</timePattern>
</timePatterns>
Custom patterns
The following table shows some custom display patterns that you can define for formatting input
default values according to the locale specified. In these examples, the locale is English (USA).
452
Properties in the Object palette
Custom pattern
Input value (using the short
format, which is M/D/YY for
date and h:MM A for time)
Formatted value
MMMM DD, YYYY
8/23/08
August 23, 2008
EEEE, 'the' D 'of ' MMMM,
YYYY
8/23/08
Saturday, the 23 of August, 2008
HH:MM
5:02 PM
17:02
h:MM:SS 'o''clock' A Z
5:02 PM
5:02:00 o'clock PM EDT
HH:MM:SS Z
5:02 PM
17:02:00 EDT
9.7.
Decimal field
9.7.1.
Decimal Field properties in the Field tab
When you select a decimal field, the Field tab in the Object palette presents options for decimal
fields. All but two of the options are the same as the options for numeric fields.
Type
Sets the type of object. Objects are the building blocks of every form.
Caption
Sets a caption for the object.
NOTE: Caption is a dynamic property. Dynamic properties are identified by active labels that have a
green underline that you can click to dynamically bind the property to a data source. To turn active
labels on and off, use the Show Dynamic Properties command in the Object palette menu. See Todynamically populate a caption.
Appearance
Sets the border style for the fillable area of the field:
453
Properties in the Object palette
9
None
Does not display a border around the field.
Underlined
Underlines the field.
Solid Box
Displays a solid border around the field.
Sunken Box
Creates a shadow around the field so that the field looks three-dimensional.
Custom
Opens the Custom Appearance dialog box. Select this option if you want to define a custom
look for the fillable area.
Limit Length to Visible Area
Sets the maximum amount of numbers allowed in the field according to the horizontal length of the
numeric field.
Comb of <x> characters
Enables the comb format.
Patterns
Sets the pattern for displaying formatted values in a form, for syntax of the user input, for validating
user input, and for storing and retrieving bound data or saving data when the form is not bound to
a data source. See Patterns dialog box.
Limit Leading Digits and Max
Sets the maximum number of digits that can appear before the decimal separator. If the maximum
is exceeded, a zero displays.
Default: Unlimited
Maximum: 15 (including trailing digits). Designer displays a warning message if the leading digits
exceed 15 digits.
454
Properties in the Object palette
Limit Trailing Digits and Max
Sets the maximum number of digits that can appear after the decimal separator. If the maximum is
exceeded, the number is truncated.
If you deselect the Limit Trailing Digits option, the precision of decimal data is reflected exactly as
it is entered.
Default: 2
Maximum: 15 (including leading digits). Designer displays a warning message if the trailing digits
exceed 15 digits.
Presence
Controls whether an object is displayed in a PDF form when users view the form in Acrobat or
Adobe Reader, or when users print the form:
Visible
The object is visible on-screen, visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the form
layout. Visible is the default presence setting for all objects.
Visible (Screen Only)
The object is visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form when printed from within
Acrobat or Adobe Reader, and occupies space in the form layout.
Visible (Print Only)
The object is not visible on-screen, visible in the printed form (when printed from within
Acrobat, Adobe Reader, or directly from the server), and occupies space in the form layout.
Invisible
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the
form layout.
Hidden (Exclude from Layout)
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and does not occupy any
space in the form layout.
One-sided Printing Only
The object is only printed when using single-sided printing.
Two-sided Printing Only
The object is printed when using double-sided printing. This option is useful when you want
to place the page number in a different corner of the page when using double-sided printing
than when using single-sided printing.
455
Properties in the Object palette
9
Locale
Renders the data according to the specified locale for language and country or region. You can select
a specific language and country from the list, or you can specify one of these options:
Default Locale
Uses the Default Locale specified in the Defaults tab of the Form Properties dialog box.
Viewer’s System Locale
Uses the system locale of the user’s computer.
NOTE:
Locales in the Locale list are organized first by language and then by country or region.
RELATED LINKS:
Usingdecimal and numeric fields
Overviewof numeric fields
Numericfield properties in the Field tab
Numericfield properties in the Value tab
Numericfield properties in the Binding tab
9.8.
Drop-down list
9.8.1.
Drop-down list properties in the Field tab
When you select a drop-down list, the Field tab displays several options specific to formatting
drop-down lists.
Type
Sets the type of object. Objects are the building blocks of every form.
Caption
Sets a caption for the object.
Caption is a dynamic property. Dynamic properties are identified by active labels that have a
green underline that you can click to dynamically bind the property to a data source. To turn active
labels on and off, use the Show Dynamic Properties command in the Object palette menu. See Todynamically populate a caption.
NOTE:
456
Properties in the Object palette
Appearance
Sets the border style for the fillable area of the field:
None
Does not display a border around the field.
Underlined
Underlines the field.
Solid Box
Displays a solid border around the field.
Sunken Box
Creates a shadow around the field so that the field looks three-dimensional.
Custom
Opens the Custom Appearance dialog box. Select this option if you want to define a custom
look for the fillable area.
List Items
Sets the items in the list and their positions. You can add or remove list items, paste items, move
them up or down, or sort the items in ascending or descending order using the buttons beside the
label.
List Items is a dynamic property. Dynamic properties are identified by active labels that have a
green underline that you can click to dynamically bind the property to a data source. To turn active
labels on and off, use the Show Dynamic Properties command in the Object palette menu.
NOTE:
Allow Custom Text Entry
Enables or disables custom user entries. User-entered values must match the Designer defaults. See
Defaultsfor value formatting.
Commit On
Determines when the selected option is commited.
Select
Commits the option when it is selected.
457
Properties in the Object palette
9
Exit
Commits the selected option when the user exits the list box, moving the focus to another
object.
Presence
Controls whether an object is displayed in a PDF form when users view the form in Acrobat or
Adobe Reader, or when users print the form:
Visible
The object is visible on-screen, visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the form
layout. Visible is the default presence setting for all objects.
Visible (Screen Only)
The object is visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form when printed from within
Acrobat or Adobe Reader, and occupies space in the form layout.
Visible (Print Only)
The object is not visible on-screen, visible in the printed form (when printed from within
Acrobat, Adobe Reader, or directly from the server), and occupies space in the form layout.
Invisible
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the
form layout.
Hidden (Exclude from Layout)
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and does not occupy any
space in the form layout.
One-sided Printing Only
The object is only printed when using single-sided printing.
Two-sided Printing Only
The object is printed when using double-sided printing. This option is useful when you want
to place the page number in a different corner of the page when using double-sided printing
than when using single-sided printing.
Locale
Renders the data according to the specified locale for language and country or region. You can select
a specific language and country from the list, or you can specify one of these options:
458
Properties in the Object palette
Default Locale
Uses the Default Locale specified in the Defaults tab of the Form Properties dialog box.
Viewer’s System Locale
Uses the system locale of the user’s computer.
NOTE:
Locales in the Locale list are organized first by language and then by country or region.
RELATED LINKS:
Usingdrop-down lists and list boxes
9.8.2.
Drop-down list properties in the Value tab
When you create a drop-down list, the Value tab displays several options that you can apply to the
object.
Type
Enables run-time calculations and prompts:
User Entered - Optional
Users can choose whether to enter data.
User Entered - Recommended
A user is recommended to enter a value in the field. If the user enters a value, leaves the field
and then clears it, a custom message box appears (if written in the Empty Message box). A standard empty message appears if you do not type a custom message. If the user never attempts
to enter a value in the field and tries to submit the form, a field is required message appears and
the user can choose to ignore the message and submit the form.
User Entered - Required
A user must enter a value in the field. If the user enters a value, leaves the field and then clears
it, a custom message box appears (if written in the Empty Message box). A standard empty
message appears if you do not type a custom message. A message only appears if there was a
value in the field, the value was deleted, and the user exited the field without re-entering a
value. If the user never attempts to enter a value in the field and tries to submit the form, a field
is required message appears.
Calculated - Read Only
A data value will be calculated and displayed through an attached script. Users cannot edit the
calculated value.
459
Properties in the Object palette
9
Calculated - User Can Override
A data value will be calculated and displayed through an attached script. Users can edit the
value if the calculation script has been written to accept the input. If a user does edit the calculated value, the custom message you specify in the Override Message box appears.
Protected
Prevents a user from making changes to the value in the field. Indirect changes such as calculations can occur. The protected field is not included in the tabbing sequence and it does not
generate events.
Read Only
A data value will be merged or calculated and displayed at run time. Users cannot edit the
value.
Default
Sets the default selection. If Allow Custom Text Entry is selected on the Field tab, you can type a
default selection that is not one of the list items.
This option is available only when the Type option is set to User Entered - Optional, User
Entered - Recommended, User Entered - Required, or Read Only.
NOTE:
Empty Message
Sets a message for prompting users to enter a recommended or required value. See Toprompt users
to enter data.
This option is available only when the Type option is set to User Entered - Recommended or
User Entered - Required.
NOTE:
Validation Pattern
Sets a validation pattern for validating user input. The pattern must match the syntax of the user
input and be compatible with the data format selected on the Binding tab. See Tovalidate user input.
This option is not available when the Type option is set to Protected, Calculated - Read Only,
or Read Only.
NOTE:
Validation Pattern Message and Error
Sets a custom message to display when a raw value does not match the validation pattern. By default,
this situation causes a programming error to be generated at run time. To generate a warning
instead, deselect the Error option. See To validate user input .
460
Properties in the Object palette
Dynamic properties are identified by active labels that have a green underline that you can click
to dynamically bind the property to a data source. To turn active labels on and off, use the Show
Dynamic Properties command in the Object palette menu. See To dynamically populate a validation
patternmessage.
NOTE:
Validation Script Message and Error
Sets a custom message to display when an attached validation script detects an unacceptable value.
By default, this situation causes a programming error to be generated at run time. To generate a
warning instead, deselect the Error option. See To validate user input .
NOTE: This option is not available when the Type option is set to Protect, Calculated - Read Only, or
Read Only. Validation Script Message is a dynamic property. Dynamic properties are identified by
active labels that have a green underline that you can click to dynamically bind the property to a data
source. To turn active labels on and off, use the Show Dynamic Properties command in the Object
palette menu. See To dynamically populate a validationscript message.
Form Level Validation Settings
Open the Forms Properties dialog box on the Form Validation tab. See Form Validationtab (Form
Properties dialog box).
Override Message
Sets a custom message to inform users that they are changing the value of a calculated field. The
message appears when a user changes the calculated value.
NOTE:
This option is available only when the Type option is set to Calculated - User Can Override.
RELATED LINKS:
Usingdrop-down lists and list boxes
9.8.3.
Drop-down list properties in the Binding tab
When you create a drop-down list, the Binding tab presents data binding options that you can apply
to the list. Options that are not specifically related to creating a data connection apply both to a data
source and to data saved to a file when the object is not bound to a data source.
Name
Sets the name of the list. See To name and rename objects.
461
Properties in the Object palette
9
Data Binding
Sets the default data-binding method:
Use name
Enables data merging and saving options. Data values are merged and stored implicitly
according to Adobe data-merging rules.
Use global data
Associates a single data value with all objects that have the same name (see Todefine a global
field).
New Data Connection
Starts the New Data Connection wizard. To define a connection using the wizard, see Tocreate
a data connection to an XML schema or To create a data connection to an OLEdatabase.
No data binding
Disables data binding. Because the object will not capture or display merged data, any information associated with the object is not written as output when the form data is
saved/submitted.
Specify Item Values
Lets you specify custom data values for each list item. If this option is not selected, the data values
will match the text for the list items. If this option is selected, the default values will be sequential
integers, starting at "1" for the first list item. See Tospecify list item values for a drop-down list or list
box.
NOTE: Specify Item Values is a dynamic property. Dynamic properties are identified by active labels
that have a green underline that you can click to dynamically bind the property to a data source. To
turn active labels on and off, use the Show Dynamic Properties command from the Object palette
menu.
Up, Down, Sort Ascending, Sort Descending
Reorders the items in the list (for example, if the data should be stored in a different order
compared to the display order of options in the drop-down list). You can move list items up or down,
or sort them ascending or descending using the buttons beside the label.
Import/Export Bindings
Sets an import/export binding for a WSDL data connection. See To create a data connection using a
WSDLfile.
RELATED LINKS:
462
Properties in the Object palette
Workingwith Data Sources
Usingdrop-down lists and list boxes
9.9.
Email submit button
9.9.1.
Email submit button properties in the Field tab
When you select an email submit button, the Field tab in the Object palette displays several options
for formatting email submit buttons.
Type
Sets the type of object. Objects are the building blocks of every form.
Caption
Sets a caption for the object.
Caption is a dynamic property. Dynamic properties are identified by active labels that have a
green underline that you can click to dynamically bind the property to a data source. To turn active
labels on and off, use the Show Dynamic Properties command in the Object palette menu. See Todynamically populate a caption.
NOTE:
Appearance
Sets the border style:
No Border
Removes the line around the button.
Solid Border
Creates a thick line around the button.
Raised Border
Creates a shadow around the button so that the button looks three-dimensional.
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Properties in the Object palette
9
Custom
Opens the Custom Appearance dialog box. Select this option if you want to define a custom
look for the button.
Highlighting
Sets the button highlight when the button is clicked:
None
Removes the button highlight.
Inverted
Inverts the button highlight when the button is clicked.
Push
Creates a shadow around the button so that the button looks like it is recessed.
Outline
Creates a line around the button when the button is clicked.
Rollover Caption
Sets a rollover caption when the button highlight is set to Push. This caption appears when the
mouse pointer moves over the button.
Down Caption
Sets a down caption when the button highlight is set to Push. This caption appears when the button
is clicked.
Email Address
Sets the recipient of the email message and the attached form data.
Email Subject
Sets the subject line for the email message.
Submit As
Sets the format of the data to submit.
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Properties in the Object palette
PDF
Submits a package containing an embedded PDF file. Choose this format if the form contains
a signature field, or if a copy of the form along with its data needs to be saved by Forms, or
submitted to another type of target server. Do not choose this option if the form initiates
server-side processing, if Forms will be used to render at run time HTML forms or forms
whose layout adjusts, or if the form is a PDF form that will be filled in Adobe Reader without
the use of Acrobat Reader DC extensions.
XML Data (XML)
Submits an XML data stream, which allows for the hierarchical representation of data and can
be parsed by any generic XML parser. Choose this format if the server that communicates with
the run-time user application program must receive an XML data steam.
URL-Encoded Data (HTTP Post)
Submits a text stream to the specified Uniform Resource Locator (URL) using the POST
method. The text stream can be parsed by an FTP server, a mail server, a web server, or a CGI
script that processes HTML forms. To use this method, users must open the form in Adobe
Reader 6.0 or later or in a web browser unless the URL specifies the mailto protocol.
Sign Submission
Applies a data signature to the submitted data. When a form filler clicks the button, a digital
signature is created to cover the submitted data and attachments. Data signatures secure the
signed data and guarantee the data integrity during transmission. Data signatures can apply to
the form data or to the entire submission, including attachments. Click the Settings buton to
define optional security properties for the data signature, such as the signature handler, signing
certificates, and certificate issuers.
Encrypt Submission
Encrypts form content. When a form filler clicks the button, the form content is encrypted
before submission to secure the form content during transmission. You apply encryption to
the form data or to the entire submission, including attachments. Click the Settings buton to
define optional encryption properties such as encryption algorithm, encryption certificate,
certificate issuers, and key usage.
Presence
Controls whether an object is displayed in a PDF form when users view the form in Acrobat or
Adobe Reader, or when users print the form:
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Properties in the Object palette
9
Visible
The object is visible on-screen, visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the form
layout. Visible is the default presence setting for all objects.
Visible (Screen Only)
The object is visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form when printed from within
Acrobat or Adobe Reader, and occupies space in the form layout.
Visible (Print Only)
The object is not visible on-screen, visible in the printed form (when printed from within
Acrobat, Adobe Reader, or directly from the server), and occupies space in the form layout.
Invisible
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the
form layout.
Hidden (Exclude from Layout)
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and does not occupy any
space in the form layout.
One-sided Printing Only
The object is only printed when using single-sided printing.
Two-sided Printing Only
The object is printed when using double-sided printing. This option is useful when you want
to place the page number in a different corner of the page when using double-sided printing
than when using single-sided printing.
Locale
Renders the data according to the specified locale for language and country or region. You can select
a specific language and country from the list, or you can specify one of these options:
Default Locale
Uses the Default Locale specified in the Defaults tab of the Form Properties dialog box.
Viewer’s System Locale
Uses the system locale of the user’s computer.
NOTE:
Locales in the Locale list are organized first by language and then by country or region.
RELATED LINKS:
Usingbuttons
HTTPsubmit button
466
Properties in the Object palette
9.10. (Deprecated) Flash field
The Flash field is not available in Designer 6.1. Your existing forms containing Flash field
continue to work but you cannot use Designer 6.1 to add a Flash field or change the properties of an
existing Flash field.
NOTE:
9.10.1. (Deprecated)Flash field properties in the Field tab
Caption
Sets a caption for the object.
URL
Specifies the URL of the Flash source file (SWF) to be displayed in the currently selected Flash
field. Enter the location of the file or click the browse button to select the file.
Embed Flash Data
Stores flash data in the form.
Poster
Specifies the URL of the image file to display in the currently selected Flash field, when the
Flash file (SWF) is not displayed.
Embed Poster Image
Stores the image file in the form.
Property/Value
Activation
Explicit
Flash content is activated with a user action or script.
Page Current
Flash content is activated when the page that the Flash field is located on is the current page.
Page Visible
Flash content is activated when the page that the Flash field is located on is visible.
467
Properties in the Object palette
9
Deactivation
Explicit
Flash content is deactivated with a user action or script.
Page Current
Flash content is deactivated when the page that the Flash field is located on is no longer the
current page.
Page Invisible
Flash content is deactivated when the page that the Flash field is located on is no longer visible.
Pass Context Click
A flag indicating whether a context-click on the Flash content should be passed to the Flash
player runtime or should be handled by the viewer application. A context-click is usually
generated by a mouse right-click, but may be invoked by other means. This can include, but is
not limited to, an explicit context-menu keyboard key or the combination of a mouse click and
a keyboard modifier key.
Yes
Indicates that the context menu in the viewer application will not be visible, and the user will
see the context menu and any custom items generated by the Flash player runtime.
No
the viewer application handles the context click.
Display Flash Content in Floating Window
enables floating window property and value settings.
Property/Value
Default Width
Specifies the default width of the floating window.
Max Width
Specifies the maximum width of the floating window.
Min Width
Specifies the minimum width of the floating window.
Default Height
Specifies the default height of the floating window.
468
Properties in the Object palette
Max Height
Specifies the maximum height of the floating window.
Min Height
Specifies the minimum height of the floating window.
Horizontal Alignment
Specifies the horizontal alignment of the Flash content window. Horizontal alignment determines how horizontal offset is applied. Options include Near, Center, or Far.
Vertical Alignment
Specifies the vertical alignment of the Flash content window. The vertical alignment determines how the vertical offset is applied. Options include Near, Center, or Far.
Horizontal Offset
Specifies the offset from the alignment point specified by the Horizontal offset. A positive value
for Near and Center alignments produces an offset towards the Far direction. A positive value
for Far alignment produces an offset towards the Near direction.
Vertical Offset
The offset from the alignment point specified by the Vertical Alignment. A positive value for
Near and Center alignments produces an offset towards the Far direction. A positive value for
Far alignment produces an offset towards the Near direction.
Edit
Opens the Addtional Assets dialog box so you can add, remove, and embed assets like video,
sound, image, text, XML, and SWC files.
Presence
Controls whether an object is displayed in a PDF form when users view the form in Acrobat or
Adobe Reader, or when users print the form:
Visible
The object is visible on-screen, visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the form
layout. Visible is the default presence setting for all objects.
Visible (Screen Only)
The object is visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form when printed from within
Acrobat or Adobe Reader, and occupies space in the form layout.
Visible (Print Only)
The object is not visible on-screen, visible in the printed form (when printed from within
Acrobat, Adobe Reader, or directly from the server), and occupies space in the form layout.
469
Properties in the Object palette
9
Invisible
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the
form layout.
Hidden (Exclude from Layout)
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and does not occupy any
space in the form layout.
One-sided Printing Only
The object is only printed when using single-sided printing.
Two-sided Printing Only
The object is printed when using double-sided printing. This option is useful when you want
to place the page number in a different corner of the page when using double-sided printing
than when using single-sided printing.
If you select the Hidden (Exclude from Layout) option, and apply a script to make the
Flash Field visible and enabled when a form filler clicks the field, form fillers must click the field
twice to initiate both changes.
NOTE:
Locale
Renders the data according to the specified locale for language and country or region. You can select
a specific language and country from the list, or you can specify one of these options:
Default Locale
Uses the Default Locale specified in the Defaults tab of the Form Properties dialog box.
Viewer’s System Locale
Uses the system locale of the user’s computer.
NOTE:
Locales in the Locale list are organized first by language and then by country or region.
RELATED LINKS:
Flashfield properties in the Binding tab
Usingflash fields
9.10.2. Flash field properties in the Binding tab
Name
Sets the Flash field name. See To name and rename objects.
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Properties in the Object palette
Data Binding
Sets the default data-binding method:
Use name
Enables data merging and saving options. Data values are merged and stored implicitly
according to Adobe data-merging rules.
Use global data
Associates a single data value with all objects that have the same name. (See Todefine a global
field).
New Data Connection
Starts the New Data Connection wizard. To define a connection using the wizard. (see
Tocreate a data connection to an XML schema or To create a data connection to an OLEdatabase.)
No Data Binding
Disables data binding. Because the object will not capture or display merged data, any information associated with the object is not written as output when the form data is
saved/submitted.
Import/Export Bindings (Execute WSDL)
Sets an import/export binding for a WSDL data connection. (See To create a data connection
using aWSDL file.)
RELATED LINKS:
Workingwith Data Sources
Flashfield properties in the Field tab
Usingflash fields
9.11. HTTP submit button
9.11.1. HTTP submit button properties in the Field tab
When you select an HTTP submit button, the Field tab in the Object palette displays several options
for formatting HTTP submit buttons.
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Properties in the Object palette
9
Type
Sets the type of object. Objects are the building blocks of every form.
Caption
Sets a caption for the object.
NOTE: Caption is a dynamic property. Dynamic properties are identified by active labels that have a
green underline that you can click to dynamically bind the property to a data source. To turn active
labels on and off, use the Show Dynamic Properties command in the Object palette menu. See Todynamically populate a caption.
Appearance
Sets the border style:
No Border
Removes the line around the button.
Solid Border
Creates a thick line around the button.
Raised Border
Creates a shadow around the button so that the button looks three-dimensional.
Custom
Opens the Custom Appearance dialog box. Select this option if you want to define a custom
look for the button.
Highlighting
Sets the button highlight when the button is clicked:
None
Removes the button highlight.
Inverted
Inverts the button highlight when the button is clicked.
Push
Creates a shadow around the button so that the button looks like it is recessed.
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Properties in the Object palette
Outline
Creates a line around the button when the button is clicked.
Rollover Caption
Sets a rollover caption when the button highlight is set to Push. This caption appears when the
mouse pointer moves over the button.
Down Caption
Sets a down caption when the button highlight is set to Push. This caption appears when the button
is clicked.
URL
The URL that the form data will be posted to.
Sign Submission
Applies a data signature to the submitted data. When a form filler clicks the button, a digital
signature is created to cover the submitted data and attachments. Data signatures secure the
signed data and guarantee the data integrity during transmission. Data signatures can apply to
the form data or to the entire submission, including attachments. Click the Settings buton to
define optional security properties for the data signature, such as the signature handler, signing
certificates, and certificate issuers.
Encrypt Submission
Encrypts form content. When a form filler clicks the button, the form content is encrypted
before submission to secure the form content during transmission. You apply encryption to
the form data or to the entire submission, including attachments. Click the Settings buton to
define optional encryption properties such as encryption algorithm, encryption certificate,
certificate issuers, and key usage.
Presence
Controls whether an object is displayed in a PDF form when users view the form in Acrobat or
Adobe Reader, or when users print the form:
Visible
The object is visible on-screen, visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the form
layout. Visible is the default presence setting for all objects.
473
Properties in the Object palette
9
Visible (Screen Only)
The object is visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form when printed from within
Acrobat or Adobe Reader, and occupies space in the form layout.
Visible (Print Only)
The object is not visible on-screen, visible in the printed form (when printed from within
Acrobat, Adobe Reader, or directly from the server), and occupies space in the form layout.
Invisible
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the
form layout.
Hidden (Exclude from Layout)
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and does not occupy any
space in the form layout.
One-sided Printing Only
The object is only printed when using single-sided printing.
Two-sided Printing Only
The object is printed when using double-sided printing. This option is useful when you want
to place the page number in a different corner of the page when using double-sided printing
than when using single-sided printing.
Locale
Renders the data according to the specified locale for language and country or region. You can select
a specific language and country from the list, or you can specify one of these options:
Default Locale
Uses the Default Locale specified in the Defaults tab of the Form Properties dialog box.
Viewer’s System Locale
Uses the system locale of the user’s computer.
NOTE:
Locales in the Locale list are organized first by language and then by country or region.
RELATED LINKS:
Overviewof HTTP submit buttons
Usingbuttons
474
Properties in the Object palette
9.12. Image field
9.12.1. Image field properties in the Field tab
When you select an image field, the Field tab displays several options specific to formatting image
fields.
Type
Sets the type of object. Objects are the building blocks of every form.
Caption
Sets a caption for the object.
Caption is a dynamic property. Dynamic properties are identified by active labels that have a
green underline that you can click to dynamically bind the property to a data source. To turn active
labels on and off, use the Show Dynamic Properties command in the Object palette menu. See Todynamically populate a caption.
NOTE:
URL
Sets the location of the source image file. To employ relative path names for retrieving linked images
when the form is opened, the image files must be stored in a folder that is accessible to users. If Forms
is available, the path must be relative to Forms.
Embed Image Data
When selected, a copy of the image information is stored in the form. When deselected, the image
data is stored separately from the form and the image is resolved when the form is opened.
If the image field will be used to load images dynamically when the form is rendered, do not select
the Embed Image Data option.
Sizing
Enables or disables image resizing when the image is loaded.
Scale Image Proportionally
Resizes the image in the object, ensuring that the aspect ratio of the image is preserved.
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Properties in the Object palette
9
Scale Image to Fit Rectangle
Resizes the image to match the dimensions of the object. The aspect ratio of the image is not
preserved.
Use Original Size
Does not resize the image. The object is resized to preserve the actual size of the image.
Presence
Controls whether an object is displayed in a PDF form when users view the form in Acrobat or
Adobe Reader, or when users print the form:
Visible
The object is visible on-screen, visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the form
layout. Visible is the default presence setting for all objects.
Visible (Screen Only)
The object is visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form when printed from within
Acrobat or Adobe Reader, and occupies space in the form layout.
Visible (Print Only)
The object is not visible on-screen, visible in the printed form (when printed from within
Acrobat, Adobe Reader, or directly from the server), and occupies space in the form layout.
Invisible
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the
form layout.
Hidden (Exclude from Layout)
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and does not occupy any
space in the form layout.
One-sided Printing Only
The object is only printed when using single-sided printing.
Two-sided Printing Only
The object is printed when using double-sided printing. This option is useful when you want
to place the page number in a different corner of the page when using double-sided printing
than when using single-sided printing.
476
Properties in the Object palette
Locale
Renders the data according to the specified locale for language and country or region. You can select
a specific language and country from the list, or you can specify one of these options:
Default Locale
Uses the Default Locale specified in the Defaults tab of the Form Properties dialog box.
Viewer’s System Locale
Uses the system locale of the user’s computer.
NOTE:
Locales in the Locale list are organized first by language and then by country or region.
RELATED LINKS:
Usingimage fields
9.12.2. Image field properties in the Binding tab
When you create an image field, the Binding tab presents data binding options that you can apply to
the object. Options that are not specifically related to creating a data connection apply both to data
bound to a data source and data saved to a file when the object is not bound to a data source.
Name
Sets the image field name. See To name and rename objects.
Data Binding
Sets the default data-binding method:
Use name
Enables data merging and saving options. Data values are merged and stored implicitly
according to Adobe data-merging rules.
Use global data
Associates a single data value with all objects that have the same name (see Todefine a global
field).
New Data Connection
Starts the New Data Connection wizard. To define a connection using the wizard, see Tocreate
a data connection to an XML schema or To create a data connection to an OLEdatabase.
477
Properties in the Object palette
9
No data binding
Disables data binding. Because the object will not capture or display merged data, any information associated with the object is not written as output when the form data is
saved/submitted.
Import/Export Bindings
Sets an import/export binding for a WSDL data connection. See To create a data connection using a
WSDLfile.
RELATED LINKS:
Workingwith Data Sources
Usingimage fields
9.13. Image
9.13.1. Image properties in the Draw tab
When you create an image object, the Draw tab in the Object palette presents options specific to
formatting images.
Type
Sets the type of object. Objects are the building blocks of every form.
URL
Sets the location of the source image file. To employ relative path names for retrieving linked images
when the form is opened, the image files must be stored in a folder that is accessible to users. If Forms
is available, the path must be relative to Forms.
Embed Image Data
When selected, a copy of the image information is stored in the form. When deselected, the image
data is stored separately from the form and the image is resolved when the form is opened.
478
Properties in the Object palette
Sizing
Enables or disables image resizing when the image is loaded:
Scale Image Proportionally
Resizes the image in the object, ensuring that the aspect ratio of the image is preserved.
Scale Image to Fit Rectangle
Resizes the image to match the dimensions of the object. The aspect ratio of the image is not
preserved.
Use Original Size
Does not resize the image. The object is resized to preserve the actual size of the image.
Presence
Controls whether an object is displayed in a PDF form when users view the form in Acrobat or
Adobe Reader, or when users print the form:
Visible
The object is visible on-screen, visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the form
layout. Visible is the default presence setting for all objects.
Visible (Screen Only)
The object is visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form when printed from within
Acrobat or Adobe Reader, and occupies space in the form layout.
Visible (Print Only)
The object is not visible on-screen, visible in the printed form (when printed from within
Acrobat, Adobe Reader, or directly from the server), and occupies space in the form layout.
Invisible
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the
form layout.
Hidden (Exclude from Layout)
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and does not occupy any
space in the form layout.
One-sided Printing Only
The object is only printed when using single-sided printing.
479
Properties in the Object palette
9
Two-sided Printing Only
The object is printed when using double-sided printing. This option is useful when you want
to place the page number in a different corner of the page when using double-sided printing
than when using single-sided printing.
RELATED LINKS:
Usingimages
9.14. Line
9.14.1. Line properties in the Draw tab
When you create a line, the Draw tab in the Object palette presents options specific to formatting
lines.
Type
Sets the type of object. Objects are the building blocks of every form.
Appearance
Sets the slope of the line.
Line Style
Sets the line style and thickness.
Color Picker
Sets the line color.
Presence
Controls whether an object is displayed in a PDF form when users view the form in Acrobat or
Adobe Reader, or when users print the form:
480
Properties in the Object palette
Visible
The object is visible on-screen, visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the form
layout. Visible is the default presence setting for all objects.
Visible (Screen Only)
The object is visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form when printed from within
Acrobat or Adobe Reader, and occupies space in the form layout.
Visible (Print Only)
The object is not visible on-screen, visible in the printed form (when printed from within
Acrobat, Adobe Reader, or directly from the server), and occupies space in the form layout.
Invisible
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the
form layout.
Hidden (Exclude from Layout)
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and does not occupy any
space in the form layout.
One-sided Printing Only
The object is only printed when using single-sided printing.
Two-sided Printing Only
The object is printed when using double-sided printing. This option is useful when you want
to place the page number in a different corner of the page when using double-sided printing
than when using single-sided printing.
RELATED LINKS:
Usingcircles, lines, and rectangles
9.15. List box
9.15.1. List box properties in the Field tab
When you select a list box, the Field tab displays several options specific to formatting list boxes.
481
Properties in the Object palette
9
Type
Sets the type of object. Objects are the building blocks of every form.
Caption
Sets a caption for the object.
NOTE: Caption is a dynamic property. Dynamic properties are identified by active labels that have a
green underline that you can click to dynamically bind the property to a data source. To turn active
labels on and off, use the Show Dynamic Properties command in the Object palette menu. See Todynamically populate a caption.
Appearance
Sets the border style for the fillable area of the field:
None
Does not display a border around the field.
Underlined
Underlines the field.
Solid Box
Displays a solid border around the field.
Sunken Box
Creates a shadow around the field so that the field looks three-dimensional.
Custom
Opens the Custom Appearance dialog box. Select this option if you want to define a custom
look for the fillable area.
List Items
Sets the items in the list and their positions. You can add or remove list items, paste items, move
them up or down, or sort the items in ascending or descending order using the buttons beside the
label.
List Items is a dynamic property. Dynamic properties are identified by active labels that have a
green underline that you can click to dynamically bind the property to a data source. To turn active
labels on and off, use the Show Dynamic Properties command in the Object palette menu.
NOTE:
482
Properties in the Object palette
Allow Multiple Selection
Enables users to select more than one option in the list (run-time).
NOTE: If you add a List Box object with the Allow Multiple Selection option selected on the Field tab
to a paper forms barcode collection, you must also select the Enforce Strict Scoping Rules in JavaScript
option on the Defaults tab in the Form Properties dialog. Otherwise, any values that a form filler selects
in the List Box object may not encode properly in the paper forms barcode.
Commit On
Commits the selected option when the user exits the List box, moving the focus to another object.
Presence
Controls whether an object is displayed in a PDF form when users view the form in Acrobat or
Adobe Reader, or when users print the form:
Visible
The object is visible on-screen, visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the form
layout. Visible is the default presence setting for all objects.
Visible (Screen Only)
The object is visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form when printed from within
Acrobat or Adobe Reader, and occupies space in the form layout.
Visible (Print Only)
The object is not visible on-screen, visible in the printed form (when printed from within
Acrobat, Adobe Reader, or directly from the server), and occupies space in the form layout.
Invisible
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the
form layout.
Hidden (Exclude from Layout)
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and does not occupy any
space in the form layout.
One-sided Printing Only
The object is only printed when using single-sided printing.
483
Properties in the Object palette
9
Two-sided Printing Only
The object is printed when using double-sided printing. This option is useful when you want
to place the page number in a different corner of the page when using double-sided printing
than when using single-sided printing.
Locale
Renders the data according to the specified locale for language and country or region. You can select
a specific language and country from the list, or you can specify one of these options:
Default Locale
Uses the Default Locale specified in the Defaults tab of the Form Properties dialog box.
Viewer’s System Locale
Uses the system locale of the user’s computer.
NOTE:
Locales in the Locale list are organized first by language and then by country or region.
RELATED LINKS:
Usingdrop-down lists and list boxes
9.15.2. List box properties in the Value tab
When you create a list box, the Value tab displays several options that you can apply to the object.
Type
Enables run-time calculations and prompts:
User Entered - Optional
Users can choose whether to enter data.
User Entered - Recommended
A user is recommended to enter a value in the field. If the user enters a value, leaves the field
and then clears it, a custom message box appears (if written in the Empty Message box). A standard empty message appears if you do not type a custom message. If the user never attempts
to enter a value in the field and tries to submit the form, a field is required message appears and
the user can choose to ignore the message and submit the form.
User Entered - Required
A user must enter a value in the field. If the user enters a value, leaves the field and then clears
it, a custom message box appears (if written in the Empty Message box). A standard empty
message appears if you do not type a custom message. A message only appears if there was a
value in the field, the value was deleted, and the user exited the field without re-entering a
484
Properties in the Object palette
value. If the user never attempts to enter a value in the field and tries to submit the form, a field
is required message appears.
Calculated - Read Only
A data value will be calculated and displayed through an attached script. Users cannot edit the
calculated value.
Calculated - User Can Override
A data value will be calculated and displayed through an attached script. Users can edit the
value if the calculation script has been written to accept the input. If a user does edit the calculated value, the custom message you specify in the Override Message box appears.
Protected
Prevents a user from making changes to the value in the field. Indirect changes such as calculations can occur. The protected field is not included in the tabbing sequence and it does not
generate events.
Read Only
A data value will be merged or calculated and displayed at run time. Users cannot edit the
value.
Default
Sets a default selection.
This option is available only when the Type option is set to User Entered - Optional, User
Entered - Recommended, User Entered - Required, or Read Only.
NOTE:
Empty Message
Sets a message for prompting users to enter a recommended or required value. See Toprompt users
to enter data.
This option is available only when the Type option is set to User Entered - Recommended or
User Entered - Required.
NOTE:
Validation Pattern
Sets a validation pattern for validating user input. The pattern must match the syntax of the user
input and be compatible with the data format selected on the Binding tab. See Tovalidate user input.
This option is not available when the Type option is set to Protected, Calculated - Read Only,
or Read Only.
NOTE:
485
Properties in the Object palette
9
Validation Pattern Message and Error
Sets a custom message to display when a raw value does not match the validation pattern. By default,
this situation causes a programming error to be generated at run time. To generate a warning
instead, deselect the Error option. See To validate user input .
Dynamic properties are identified by active labels that have a green underline that you can click
to dynamically bind the property to a data source. To turn active labels on and off, use the Show
Dynamic Properties command in the Object palette menu. See To dynamically populate a validation
patternmessage.
NOTE:
Validation Script Message and Error
Sets a custom message to display when an attached validation script detects an unacceptable value.
By default, this situation causes a programming error to be generated at run time. To generate a
warning instead, deselect the Error option. See To validate user input .
NOTE: This option is not available when the Type option is set to Protect, Calculated - Read Only, or
Read Only. Validation Script Message is a dynamic property. Dynamic properties are identified by
active labels that have a green underline that you can click to dynamically bind the property to a data
source. To turn active labels on and off, use the Show Dynamic Properties command in the Object
palette menu. See To dynamically populate a validationscript message.
Form Level Validation Settings
Open the Forms Properties dialog box on the Form Validation tab. See Form Validationtab (Form
Properties dialog box).
Override Message
Sets a custom message to inform users that they are changing the value of a calculated field. The
message appears when a user changes the calculated value.
NOTE:
This option is available only when the Type option is set to Calculated - User Can Override.
RELATED LINKS:
Usingdrop-down lists and list boxes
9.15.3. List box properties in the Binding tab
When you create a list box, the Binding tab presents data binding options that you can apply to the
list. Options that are not specifically related to creating a data connection apply both to a data source
and to data saved to a file when the object is not bound to a data source.
486
Properties in the Object palette
Name
Sets the name of the list. See To name and rename objects.
Data Binding
Sets the default data-binding method:
Use name
Enables data merging and saving options. Data values are merged and stored implicitly
according to Adobe data-merging rules.
Use global data
Associates a single data value with all objects that have the same name (see To define a global
field).
New Data Connection
Starts the New Data Connection wizard. To define a connection using the wizard, see Tocreate
a data connection to an XML schema or To create a data connection to an OLEdatabase.
No data binding
Disables data binding. Because the object will not capture or display merged data, any information associated with the object is not written as output when the form data is
saved/submitted.
Specify Item Values
Lets you specify custom data values for each list item. If this option is not selected, the data values
will match the text for the list items. If this option is selected, the default values will be sequential
integers, starting at "1" for the first list item. See To specify list item values for a drop-downlist or list
box.
NOTE: Specify Item Values is a dynamic property. Dynamic properties are identified by active labels
that have a green underline that you can click to dynamically bind the property to a data source. To
turn active labels on and off, use the Show Dynamic Properties command from the Object palette
menu.
Up, Down, Sort Ascending, Sort Descending
Reorders the items in the list (for example, if the data should be stored in a different order
compared to the display order of options in the drop-down list). You can move list items up or down,
or sort them ascending or descending using the buttons beside the label.
487
Properties in the Object palette
9
Import/Export Bindings
Sets an import/export binding for a WSDL data connection. See To create a data connection using a
WSDLfile.
RELATED LINKS:
Workingwith Data Sources
Usingdrop-down lists and list boxes
9.16. Numeric field
9.16.1. Numeric field properties in the Field tab
When you select a numeric field, the Field tab in the Object palette displays several options for
formatting fields.
Type
Sets the type of object. Objects are the building blocks of every form.
Caption
Sets a caption for the object.
Caption is a dynamic property. Dynamic properties are identified by active labels that have a
green underline that you can click to dynamically bind the property to a data source. To turn active
labels on and off, use the Show Dynamic Properties command in the Object palette menu. See Todynamically populate a caption.
NOTE:
Appearance
Sets the border style for the fillable area of the field:
None
Does not display a border around the field.
Underlined
Underlines the field.
488
Properties in the Object palette
Solid Box
Displays a solid border around the field.
Sunken Box
Creates a shadow around the field so that the field looks three-dimensional.
Custom
Opens the Custom Appearance dialog box. Select this option if you want to define a custom
look for the fillable area.
Limit Length to Visible Area
Sets the maximum amount of numbers allowed in the field according to the horizontal length of the
numeric field.
Comb of <x> characters
Enables the comb format.
Patterns
Sets the pattern for displaying formatted values in a form, for syntax of the user input, for validating
user input, and for storing and retrieving bound data or saving data when the form is not bound to
a data source. See Patterns dialog box
Presence
Controls whether an object is displayed in a PDF form when users view the form in Acrobat or
Adobe Reader, or when users print the form:
Visible
The object is visible on-screen, visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the form
layout. Visible is the default presence setting for all objects.
Visible (Screen Only)
The object is visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form when printed from within
Acrobat or Adobe Reader, and occupies space in the form layout.
Visible (Print Only)
The object is not visible on-screen, visible in the printed form (when printed from within
Acrobat, Adobe Reader, or directly from the server), and occupies space in the form layout.
489
Properties in the Object palette
9
Invisible
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the
form layout.
Hidden (Exclude from Layout)
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and does not occupy any
space in the form layout.
One-sided Printing Only
The object is only printed when using single-sided printing.
Two-sided Printing Only
The object is printed when using double-sided printing. This option is useful when you want
to place the page number in a different corner of the page when using double-sided printing
than when using single-sided printing.
If you select the Hidden (Exclude from Layout) option, and apply a script to the Flash Field
object to make it visible and activated when a form filler clicks the field, form fillers must click the
field twice, once for each event.
NOTE:
Locale
Renders the data according to the specified locale for language and country or region. You can select
a specific language and country from the list, or you can specify one of these options:
Default Locale
Uses the Default Locale specified in the Defaults tab of the Form Properties dialog box.
Viewer’s System Locale
Uses the system locale of the user’s computer.
NOTE:
Locales in the Locale list are organized first by language and then by country or region.
RELATED LINKS:
Overviewof numeric fields
Usingdecimal and numeric fields
9.16.2. Numeric field properties in the Value tab
When you create a numeric field, the Value tab displays several options that you can apply to the
object.
490
Properties in the Object palette
Type
Enables run-time calculations and prompts:
User Entered - Optional
Users can choose whether to enter data.
User Entered - Recommended
A user is recommended to enter a value in the field. If the user enters a value, leaves the field
and then clears it, a custom message box appears (if written in the Empty Message box). A standard empty message appears if you do not type a custom message. If the user never attempts
to enter a value in the field and tries to submit the form, a field is required message appears and
the user can choose to ignore the message and submit the form.
User Entered - Required
A user must enter a value in the field. If the user enters a value, leaves the field and then clears
it, a custom message box appears (if written in the Empty Message box). A standard empty
message appears if you do not type a custom message. A message only appears if there was a
value in the field, the value was deleted, and the user exited the field without re-entering a
value. If the user never attempts to enter a value in the field and tries to submit the form, a field
is required message appears.
Calculated - Read Only
A data value will be calculated and displayed through an attached script. Users cannot edit the
calculated value.
Calculated - User Can Override
A data value will be calculated and displayed through an attached script. Users can edit the
value if the calculation script has been written to accept the input. If a user does edit the calculated value, the custom message you specify in the Override Message box appears.
Protected
Prevents a user from making changes to the value in the field. Indirect changes such as calculations can occur. The protected field is not included in the tabbing sequence and it does not
generate events.
Read Only
A data value will be merged or calculated and displayed at run time. Users cannot edit the
value.
Default
Sets an initial value for the field. The value is formatted according to the setting specified using the
Patterns option on the Field tab, but must conform to the value according to the locale specified for
491
Properties in the Object palette
9
the field. If the data is bound and a data pattern has been specified, the value must match the data
pattern specified in the Binding tab. See To specify a default value.
This option is available only when the Type option is set to User Entered - Optional, User
Entered - Recommended, User Entered - Required, or Read Only.
NOTE:
Empty Message
Sets a message for prompting users to enter a recommended or required value. See Toprompt users
to enter data.
This option is available only when the Type option is set to User Entered - Recommended or
User Entered - Required.
NOTE:
Validation Pattern
Sets a validation pattern for validating user input. The pattern must match the syntax of the user
input and be compatible with the data format selected on the Binding tab. See To validate user input.
This option is not available when the Type option is set to Protected, Calculated - Read Only or
Read Only.
NOTE:
Validation Pattern Message and Error
Sets a custom message to display when a raw value does not match the validation pattern. By default,
this situation causes a programming error to be generated at run time. To generate a warning
instead, deselect the Error option. See To validate user input .
Dynamic properties are identified by active labels that have a green underline that you can click
to dynamically bind the property to a data source. To turn active labels on and off, use the Show
Dynamic Properties command in the Object palette menu. See To dynamically populate a validation
patternmessage.
NOTE:
Validation Script Message and Error
Sets a custom message to display when an attached validation script detects an unacceptable value.
By default, this situation causes a programming error to be generated at run time. To generate a
warning instead, deselect the Error option. See Tovalidate user input .
NOTE: This option is not available when the Type option is set to Protect, Calculated - Read Only, or
Read Only. Validation Script Message is a dynamic property. Dynamic properties are identified by
active labels that have a green underline that you can click to dynamically bind the property to a data
source. To turn active labels on and off, use the Show Dynamic Properties command in the Object
palette menu. See To dynamically populate a validationscript message.
492
Properties in the Object palette
Form Level Validation Settings
Opens the Forms Properties dialog box on the Form Validation tab. See Form Validationtab (Form
Properties dialog box).
Calculation Script
The value will be calculated by a script written for the object’s calculate event.
NOTE:
This option is available only when the Type option is set to Calculated - Read Only.
Runtime Property
Sets one of the following run-time properties for the object. When you select a run-time property,
the actual value corresponding to the option is inserted dynamically when the form is rendered.
Current Page Number
Displays the number of the current page in the numeric field.
Number of Pages
Inserts the total number of pages making up the form.
Current Sheet Number
Inserts the number of the current piece of paper (sheet) in the numeric field.
Number of Sheets
Inserts the total number of pieces of paper (sheets) that make up the form.
NOTE:
This option is available only when the Type option is set to Calculated - Read Only.
Override Message
Sets a custom message to inform users that they are changing the value of a calculated field. The
message appears when a user changes the calculated value.
NOTE:
This option is available only when the Type option is set to Calculated - User Can Override.
RELATED LINKS:
Overviewof numeric fields
Usingdecimal and numeric fields
493
Properties in the Object palette
9
9.16.3. Numeric field properties in the Binding tab
When you create a numeric field, the Binding tab presents data binding options that you can apply
to the object. Options that are not specifically related to creating a data connection apply both to data
bound to a data source and data saved to a file when the object is not bound to a data source.
Name
Sets the name of the numeric field. See Toname and rename objects.
Data Binding
Sets the default data-binding method:
Use name
Enables data merging and saving options. Data values are merged and stored implicitly
according to Adobe data-merging rules.
Use global data
Associates a single data value with all objects that have the same name (see Todefine a global
field).
New Data Connection
Starts the New Data Connection wizard. To define a connection using the wizard, see Tocreate
a data connection to an XML schema or To create a data connection to an OLEdatabase.
No data binding
Disables data binding. Because the object will not capture or display merged data, any information associated with the object is not written as output when the form data is
saved/submitted.
Data Format
Sets the format of the data. See To specify a data pattern:
Float
A three-part representation of a number that contains a radix character. The number is represented by the following parts: a sign, a number, and a radix character. Some examples of
floating point numbers are 4.23423412, 1234.1234234, or 4.00. Note that in some locales, the
radix character is not a decimal point. For example, in a German (Germany) locale, the radix
character is a comma (as in 1234,1234).
494
Properties in the Object palette
Integer
Any sequence of the digits 0 through 9 possibly preceded by a minus sign. For example, the
number may be a positive (such as 1, 2, or 3), a zero, or a negative whole number (such as -1,
-2, or -3).
Import/Export Bindings
Sets an import/export binding for a WSDL data connection. See Tocreate a data connection using a
WSDL file.
RELATED LINKS:
Workingwith Data Sources
Overviewof numeric fields
Usingdecimal and numeric fields
9.16.4. Numeric patterns
Specific symbols must be used to create numeric patterns for numeric fields. You can also use these
symbols to create numeric patterns for decimal fields.
NOTE: The dash (-), colon (:), slash (/) and space ( ) are treated as literal values and can be included
anywhere in a pattern. To include a phrase in a pattern, delimit the text string with single quotation
marks ('). For example,'Your balance is' z,zz9.99can be specified as the Display Pattern.
Use these pattern symbols to create patterns. The pattern determines the format for users to enter or
format data. The formatted results in the Example column are delimited by double quotation marks
so that you can see where spaces would appear in the result. The quotation marks are not part of the
result. In these examples, the locale is English (USA).
Numeric
symbol
Description
Example
9
Single digit or the zero digit if the input is empty. When
following the decimal radix, indicates the exact number
of digits as contained in the data value.
Display Pattern: zzz,zz9.999
Input Value: 123456.1236 or 1234
Formatted Value: “123,456.124” or
“1,234.000”
z
Single digit or no output if the input is the leading zero
digit, or no output if the input is empty
Display Pattern: $zzz9
Input Value: 123
Formatted Value: “$123”
z
Single digit or a space if the input is the leading zero
digit, or a space if the input is empty
Display Pattern: $ZZZ9
Input Value: 123
Formatted Value: “$ 123”
495
Properties in the Object palette
Numeric
symbol
496
9
Description
Example
s
Minus sign (-) if the number is negative (when the
number is positive, no symbol is required)
Display Pattern: $szzz9
Input Value: 123 or -123
Formatted Value: “$123” or “$-123”
S
Minus sign (-) if the number is negative, or a space if the
number is positive
Display Pattern: $Szzz9
Input Value: 123 or -123
Formatted Value: “$ 123” or “$-123”
E
Exponential symbol (E+3 means exponent value is 3 and
E-2 means exponent value is -2).
The exponential symbol (E) may be used after a 9, z, or Z
digit only.
Display Pattern: 99.999E
Input Value: 12345 or 0.12345
Formatted Value: “12.345E+3” or
“12.345E-2”
$
Currency symbol, whichever one corresponds to the
object’s current Locale setting
Display Pattern: $zzz9
Input Value: 123
Formatted Value: “$123”
cr
Credit symbol (CR) if the number is negative (when the
number is positive, no symbol is required)
Display Pattern: cr$zzz9
Input Value: 123 or -123
Formatted Value: “$123” or “CR$123”
CR
Credit symbol (CR) if the number is negative, or spaces
if the number is positive
Display Pattern: CR$zzz9
Input Value: 123 or -123
Formatted Value: “ $123” or “CR$123”
db
Debit symbol (DB) if the number is negative (when the
number is positive, no symbol is required)
Display Pattern: db$zzz9
Input Value: 123 or -123
Formatted Value: “$123” or “DB$123”
DB
Debit symbol (DB) if the number is negative, or spaces if
the number is positive
Display Pattern: DB$zzz9
Input Value: 123 or -123
Formatted Value: “ $123” or “DB$123”
()
Left and right parenthetic characters to show a negative
number. If the number is a positive number, the
parenthetic characters become spaces.
NOTE: The left and right parenthetic characters may
enclose an 8, 9, z, or Z digit only.
Display Pattern: ($zzz9)
Input Value: 123 or -123
Formatted Value: “ $123 ” or “($123)”
.
Decimal radix, whichever one corresponds to the
object’s current Locale setting
Display Pattern: zzz9.99
Input Value: 123.45
Formatted Value for a German
(Germany) locale: “123,45”
v
Implied decimal radix, whichever one corresponds to
the object’s current Locale setting (the decimal radix is
stripped out before the output is written)
Display Pattern: zzz9v99
Input Value: 123.45
Formatted Value: “12345”
Properties in the Object palette
Numeric
symbol
Description
Example
,
Grouping character, whichever one corresponds to the
object’s current Locale setting
Display Pattern: z,zz9.99
Input Value: 1234.56
Formatted Value for a German
(Germany) locale: “1.234,56”
%
Percentage symbol, whichever one corresponds to the
object’s current Locale setting
Display Pattern: z9.99%
Input Value: 0.123
Formatted Value: “12.30%”
Reserved symbols
The following symbols have special meanings and cannot be used as literal text.
Symbol
Description
?
When submitted, the symbol matches any one character. When merged for display, it
becomes a space.
*
When submitted, the symbol matches 0 or Unicode white space characters. When
merged for display, it becomes a space.
+
When submitted, the symbol matches one or more Unicode white space characters.
When merged for display, it becomes a space.
RELATED LINKS:
Formattingfield values and using patterns
Tospecify a data pattern
Tospecify an edit pattern
Examplesof numeric patterns
9.16.5. Examples of numeric patterns
The following table shows some example display patterns and the results of formatting some
example input values (user input or bound data) using the display pattern. The formatted results are
delimited by double quotation marks so that you can see where spaces would appear in the result.
The quotation marks are not part of the result. In these examples, the locale is English (USA).
Pattern
Input value
Formatted value
497
Properties in the Object palette
9
Pattern
Input value
Formatted value
zzz,zz9.99
123456.1236
123456.4
123456
“123,456.12”
“123,456.40”
“123,456.00”
$Z,ZZ9.99
123.4
“ 123.40”
$z,zz9.99CR
1234
-1234
“$1,234.00”
“$1,234.00CR”
$Z,ZZ9.99DB
123
-123
“$ 123.00”
“$ 123.00DB”
($z,zz9.99)
1234
-1234
“ $1,234.56 “
“($1,234.00)”
zzz9
12.0
“12”
Szzz,zz9.99
1234.56
-1234.56
“1,234.56”
“-1,234.56”
$9,999.99
123.4
“$0,123.40”
$Z,999.99
123.4
“$ 123.40”
99999
1234
“01234”
S999v99
-1.23
"-00123"
S999V99
-1.23
123
"-001.23”
" 123.00"
SZZ9.99
12.3
-12.3
" 12.30"
"- 12.30"
szz9.99
12.3
-12.3
“12.3”
“-12.3”
99.999E
12345
0.12345
"12.345E+3"
"12.345E-2”
The table below shows the results of converting some example input values (user input or bound
data) into raw values using an edit pattern or data pattern.
Custom pattern
99V99
498
Input value
1050
3125
Raw value
10.50
31.25
Properties in the Object palette
Custom pattern
Input value
Raw value
99.999E
12.345E3
12.345E-2
12345
0.12345
z999
150
0150
150
150
z,zz9.99
10.50
3,125.00
10.50
3125.00
$z,zz9.99DB
$1,234.00
$1,234.00DB
1234.00
-1234.00
9.17. Paper Forms Barcode
9.17.1. Paper forms barcode properties in the Field tab
When you select a paper forms barcode object on the form design, the Field tab in the Object palette
displays several options specific to formatting paper forms barcodes.
Type
Sets the type of object. Objects are the building blocks of every form.
Label
A custom or automatically generated caption that appears below the barcode. Useful for distinguishing barcodes in distinct versions of barcoded forms.
Generate Label Automatically
When selected, the barcode label is automatically generated. Deselect the option to specify a custom
label.
Symbology
Specifies the symbology for the barcode:
499
Properties in the Object palette
•
PDF417
•
QR Code
•
Data Matrix
9
End users filling a form that contains a QR Code or DataMatrix barcode require Acrobat
7.0.5 or later, or Adobe Reader 7.0.5 or later. Decoding of QR Code and DataMatrix barcodes is
supported by barcoded forms 7.0 but is not supported by barcoded forms 7.0 Standalone (ST).
NOTE:
Scanning Method
Specifies the conditions for decoding the information in the paper forms barcode after it is printed
on a form. The decode condition determines the horizontal and vertical data cell size and the error
correction level for the barcode. Designer contains the following preset and custom options:
Document Scanner (Default)
Selecting this option automatically sets the Error Correction Level, Module Height/Width, and
Module Width to values that work well when scanning a paper forms barcode using a 300-dpi
scanner. Designer specifies these values:
•
Error Correction Level: 5
•
Module Height/Width: 2 (PDF417), 1 (QR Code and Data Matrix)
•
Module Width: 0.0133 inches
Hand-held Scanner
Selecting this option automatically sets the Error Correction Level, Module Height/Width, and
Module Width to values that work well when scanning a paper forms barcode using a
hand-held scanner. Designer specifies these values:
•
Error Correction Level: 5
•
Module Height/Width: 3 (PDF417), 1 (QR Code and Data Matrix)
•
Module Width: 0.0133 inches
Fax Server
Selecting this option automatically sets the Error Correction Level, Module Height/Width, and
Module Width to values that work well when scanning a paper forms barcode that was printed
on a form received by a fax machine. Designer specifies these values:
500
•
Error Correction Level: 6
•
Module Height/Width: 2 (PDF417), 1 (QR Code and Data Matrix)
•
Module Width: 0.0133 inches
Properties in the Object palette
Custom
Selecting this option activates the Property/Value list and lets you set the properties for the
Error Correction Level, Module Height/Width, and Module Width to any values within the
following ranges:
•
Error Correction Level: 1 - 8
•
Module Height/Width: 1 - 4 (whole numbers for PDF417), 1 (QR Code and Data Matrix)
•
Module Width: 0.0133 - 0.04 inches
•
Columns/Rows: Specify number of columns or rows (Data Matrix)
When Custom is selected, the Property list remains activated, regardless of the Error Correction Level, Module Height/Width, and Module Width property values, even if they are identical to those of a preset condition.
NOTE:
The Error Correction Level setting is disabled for Data Matrix barcodes.
Property/Value
When the Custom option is selected, you must set the property values for the error correction level,
module height-over-width ratio, and module width:
Error Correction Level
Specifies the level of data redundancy that is added to the barcode to help correct for possible
scanning errors. Acceptable levels for Value range from 1 to 8. Higher levels allow for more
redundancy and a more robust barcode. Higher levels will also require a larger barcode. A
more robust barcode can recover from errors, such as pen marks or folds in the document, by
including redundant information in the barcode. Designer will automatically set an Error
Correction Level based on the type of scanning device you select.
An Error Correction Level of 5 tends to provide good performance and still allow the barcode
to be a reasonable size. It is recommended that you keep the Error Correction Level above 5
unless you are very familiar with barcode decoding technology.
NOTE:
The Error Correction Level setting is disabled for Data Matrix barcodes.
Module Height/Width
Sets the height of the barcode, as a ratio of the module height over width. Acceptable levels for
Value are integers (whole numbers) from 1 to 4 (PDF417), 1 (QR Code and Data Matrix).
Module Width
Sets the width of the smallest bar in the barcode. Every other bar in the barcode will be a
multiple of this dimension. Acceptable levels for Value range between 0.0133 inches and 0.04
inches.
501
Properties in the Object palette
9
The Module Width value will be rounded to the nearest 1/300 inch when the barcode is
rendered in Acrobat or Adobe Reader. You should be very familiar with barcode decoding
technology when selecting the module width.
Presence
Controls whether an object is displayed in a PDF form when users view the form in Acrobat or
Adobe Reader, or when users print the form:
Visible
The object is visible on-screen, visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the form
layout. Visible is the default presence setting for all objects.
Visible (Screen Only)
The object is visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form when printed from within
Acrobat or Adobe Reader, and occupies space in the form layout.
Visible (Print Only)
The object is not visible on-screen, visible in the printed form (when printed from within
Acrobat, Adobe Reader, or directly from the server), and occupies space in the form layout.
Invisible
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the
form layout.
Hidden (Exclude from Layout)
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and does not occupy any
space in the form layout.
One-sided Printing Only
The object is only printed when using single-sided printing.
Two-sided Printing Only
The object is printed when using double-sided printing. This option is useful when you want
to place the page number in a different corner of the page when using double-sided printing
than when using single-sided printing.
RELATED LINKS:
Usingpaper forms barcodes
9.17.2. Paper forms barcode properties in the Value tab
When you select a paper forms barcode object on the form design, the Value tab of the Object palette
presents options specific to formatting paper forms barcodes.
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Properties in the Object palette
Compress Data Before Encoding
Indicates whether the data is compressed before it is encoded by the paper forms barcode object. The
default setting is to not compress the data.
The data compression uses the Flate method. When this option is selected, compression is
performed inside Acrobat or Adobe Reader when the barcode is drawn.
Compressed data requires less storage space in the barcode, allowing more form data to be stored in
the barcode.
Typically, you will want data compressed unless the data will be decoded with a handheld
scanner or your own decode solution that does not include decompression software. For more information about compressing data, see the Acrobat Help.
NOTE:
Automatic Scripting
Specifies whether the barcode data is obtained automatically or through custom scripting.
Format
Specifies the format of the barcode data that is automatically scripted. When an option is selected,
the associated script appears in the Script Editor. If required, you can edit the predefined scripts.
Select from the following formats:
XML
The value of the barcode is obtained through a script that encodes the data in XML format.
Delimited
The value of the barcode is obtained through a script that encodes the data in a delimited
format (a flat ASCII representation of field values separated by the specified delimiter character).
Include Field Names
Separates the field names using the specified delimiter and encodes them. Field names are listed first,
followed by the field values. This option is available when the Delimited option is selected in the
Format list.
Include Label
Encodes the label (shown in Field tab) as the first delimited field in the barcode contents. This option
is available when the Delimited option is selected in the Format list.
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Properties in the Object palette
9
Use Legacy Format
Uses a legacy encoding format to produce XML barcode content. The legacy encoding format is used
in paper forms barcode XML scripts in Designer 7.0 to 8.0. This option is selected automatically
when you open a form that uses the legacy encoding format in Designer. By default, Designer uses a
new encoding format.
The paper forms barcode object supports two XML encoding formats produced by two XFA JavaScript functions, xfa.datasets.saveXML() and xfa.record.saveXML(). The legacy
encoding format uses the function xfa.datasets.saveXML() and the new encoding format
uses the function xfa.record.saveXML()to produce XML encoded data. The legacy encoding
format produces longer XML data output than the new encoding format. The new encoding format
produces more compact XML data output that provides more barcode space and is better suited for
XML encoding scripts.
Delimiter
Specifies the delimiter character that is used to separate field names, field values, and barcode labels
in the encoded data. This option is available when the Delimited option is selected in the Format list.
It is recommended that you do not select the Carriage Return option as a delimiter, because the
carriage return character is already used in the paper forms barcode values as a delimiter to separate
the header and value rows. See Tospecify a delimiter.
NOTE:
Character Encoding
Specifies the character set used for barcode content. Select one of these options.
UTF-8
Characters are encoded using Unicode code points as defined by Unicode-3.2, and UTF-8 serialization as defined by ISO/IEC 10646. There is no byte order mark. This option is selected by
default.
UTF-16
Characters are encoded using Unicode code points as defined by Unicode-3.2, and UTF-16
serialization as defined by ISO/IEC 10646 and ISO-10646. There is no byte order mark.
UCS-2
Characters are encoded using Unicode code points as defined by Unicode 3.2, and UCS-2 serialization as defined by ISO/IEC 10646. There is no byte order mark.
ISO-8859-1
Characters are encoded using ISO-8859-1, also known as Latin-1.
504
Properties in the Object palette
ISO-8859-2
Characters are encoded using ISO-8859-2.
ISO-8859-7
Characters are encoded using ISO-8859-7.
Shift_JIS
Characters are encoded using JIS X 0208, also known as Shift_JIS.
KSC_5601
Characters are encoded using the Code for Information Interchange (Hangul and Hanja).
GB-2312
Characters are encoded using Simplified Chinese.
Big Five
Characters are encoded using Traditional Chinese (Big-Five). Note that there is no official
standard for Big-Five and several variants are in use.
Font Specific
Characters are encoded in a font-specific way. Each character is represented by one 8-bit byte.
None
No special encoding is specified. Characters are encoded using the ambient encoding for the
operating system.
Keep in mind that some scanning devices do not support certain character sets. Also,
Acrobat and Adobe Reader 7.0. and earlier do not support character encoding.
NOTE:
Apply To
Specifies what the selected format applies to. Select from the following list:
Entire Form Data
Encodes the data from all form fields in the selected format
Collection Data
Encodes the data from all fields specified in the selected collection.
Collection
Specifies the collection to use to encode the data. Select from the following list:
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Properties in the Object palette
9
Collection name
The name of the collection that you created.
New/Manage Collection
Creates, deletes, duplicates, renames, and modifies collections in the Collection list.
If you add a List Box object with the Allow Multiple Selection option selected on the Field
tab to a paper forms barcode collection, you must also select the Enforce Strict Scoping Rules in
JavaScript option on the Defaults tab in the Form Properties dialog. Otherwise, any values that
a form filler selects in the List Box object may not encode properly in the paper forms barcode.
NOTE:
Modify
Displays the selected fields for the current collection. You can also edit the fields in the collection and
rename the collection in this window.
RELATED LINKS:
Usingpaper forms barcodes
Tocontrol how a paper forms barcode encodes data
Designtips for using a paper forms barcode
9.18. Password field
9.18.1. Password field properties in the Field tab
When you select a password field, the Field tab in the Object palette displays several options for
formatting password fields.
Type
Sets the type of object. Objects are the building blocks of every form.
Caption
Sets a caption for the object.
NOTE: Caption is a dynamic property. Dynamic properties are identified by active labels that have a
green underline that you can click to dynamically bind the property to a data source. To turn active
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Properties in the Object palette
labels on and off, use the Show Dynamic Properties command in the Object palette menu. See Todynamically populate a caption.
Appearance
Sets the border style for the fillable area of the field:
None
Does not display a border around the field.
Underlined
Underlines the field.
Solid Box
Displays a solid border around the field.
Sunken Box
Creates a shadow around the field so that the field looks three-dimensional.
Custom
Opens the Custom Appearance dialog box. Select this option if you want to define a custom
look for the fillable area.
Password Display Character
Sets the display character.
Limit Length to Visible Area
Sets the maximum number of characters allowed in the field according to the horizontal length of
the password field.
Patterns
Sets the pattern for the syntax of the user input, for validating user input, and for storing and
retrieving bound data or for saving data when the form is not bound to a data source. See Patternsdialog box.
Presence
Controls whether an object is displayed in a PDF form when users view the form in Acrobat or
Adobe Reader, or when users print the form:
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Properties in the Object palette
9
Visible
The object is visible on-screen, visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the form
layout. Visible is the default presence setting for all objects.
Visible (Screen Only)
The object is visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form when printed from within
Acrobat or Adobe Reader, and occupies space in the form layout.
Visible (Print Only)
The object is not visible on-screen, visible in the printed form (when printed from within
Acrobat, Adobe Reader, or directly from the server), and occupies space in the form layout.
Invisible
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the
form layout.
Hidden (Exclude from Layout)
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and does not occupy any
space in the form layout.
One-sided Printing Only
The object is only printed when using single-sided printing.
Two-sided Printing Only
The object is printed when using double-sided printing. This option is useful when you want
to place the page number in a different corner of the page when using double-sided printing
than when using single-sided printing.
Locale
Renders the data according to the specified locale for language and country or region. You can select
a specific language and country from the list, or you can specify one of these options:
Default Locale
Uses the Default Locale specified in the Defaults tab of the Form Properties dialog box.
Viewer’s System Locale
Uses the system locale of the user’s computer.
NOTE:
Locales in the Locale list are organized first by language and then by country or region.
RELATED LINKS:
Usingpassword fields
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Properties in the Object palette
9.18.2. Password field properties in the Value tab
When you create a password field, the Value tab displays several options that you can apply to the
object.
Type
Enables run-time calculations and prompts:
User Entered - Optional
Users can choose whether to enter data.
User Entered - Recommended
A user is recommended to enter a value in the field. If the user enters a value, leaves the field
and then clears it, a custom message box appears (if written in the Empty Message box). A standard empty message appears if you do not type a custom message. If the user never attempts
to enter a value in the field and tries to submit the form, a field is required message appears and
the user can choose to ignore the message and submit the form.
User Entered - Required
A user must enter a value in the field. If the user enters a value, leaves the field and then clears
it, a custom message box appears (if written in the Empty Message box). A standard empty
message appears if you do not type a custom message. A message only appears if there was a
value in the field, the value was deleted, and the user exited the field without re-entering a
value. If the user never attempts to enter a value in the field and tries to submit the form, a field
is required message appears.
Empty Message
Sets a message for prompting users to enter a recommended or required value. See Toprompt users
to enter data.
This option is available only when the Type option is set to User Entered - Recommended or
User Entered - Required.
NOTE:
Validation Pattern
Sets a validation pattern for validating user input. The pattern must match the syntax of the user
input and be compatible with the data format selected on the Binding tab. See Tovalidate user input.
This option is not available when the Type option is set to Protected, Calculated - Read Only,
or Read Only.
NOTE:
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Properties in the Object palette
9
Validation Pattern Message and Error
Sets a custom message to display when a raw value does not match the validation pattern. By default,
this situation causes a programming error to be generated at run time. To generate a warning
instead, deselect the Error option. See Tovalidate user input .
Dynamic properties are identified by active labels that have a green underline that you can click
to dynamically bind the property to a data source. To turn active labels on and off, use the Show
Dynamic Properties command in the Object palette menu. See Todynamically populate a validation
pattern message.
NOTE:
Validation Script Message and Error
Sets a custom message to display when an attached validation script detects an unacceptable value.
By default, this situation causes a programming error to be generated at run time. To generate a
warning instead, deselect the Error option. See Tovalidate user input .
NOTE: This option is not available when the Type option is set to Protect, Calculated - Read Only, or
Read Only. Validation Script Message is a dynamic property. Dynamic properties are identified by
active labels that have a green underline that you can click to dynamically bind the property to a data
source. To turn active labels on and off, use the Show Dynamic Properties command in the Object
palette menu. See To dynamicallypopulate a validation script message.
Form Level Validation Settings
Open the Forms Properties dialog box on the Form Validation tab. See Form Validationtab (Form
Properties dialog box).
RELATED LINKS:
Usingpassword fields
9.18.3. Password field properties in the Binding tab
When you create a password field, the Binding tab presents data binding options that you can apply
to the object. Options that are not specifically related to creating a data connection apply both to data
bound to a data source and data saved to a file when the object is not bound to a data source.
Name
Sets the name of the field. See Toname and rename objects.
Data Binding
Sets the default data-binding method:
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Properties in the Object palette
Use name
Enables data merging and saving options. Data values are merged and stored implicitly
according to Adobe data-merging rules.
Use global data
Associates a single data value with all objects that have the same name (see Todefine a global
field).
New Data Connection
Starts the New Data Connection wizard. To define a connection using the wizard, see Tocreate
a data connection to an XML schema or Tocreate a data connection to an OLE database.
No data binding
Disables data binding. Because the object will not capture or display merged data, any information associated with the object is not written as output when the form data is
saved/submitted.
Import/Export Bindings
Sets an import/export binding for a WSDL data connection. See Tocreate a data connection using a
WSDL file.
RELATED LINKS:
Workingwith Data Sources
Usingpassword fields
9.18.4. Password patterns
If you choose, you can define password patterns for fields. Note however, that defining a specific
pattern may make passwords more vulnerable to attack as it reduces the possible character combinations that may be used. If you want to define a pattern, use these symbols.
The comma (,), dash (-), colon (:), slash (/), period (.), and space ( ) are treated as literal values
and can be included anywhere in a pattern.
NOTE:
Password symbols
Description
A
Single alphabetic character
X
Single character
O
Single alphanumeric character
0
Single alphanumeric character
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Properties in the Object palette
9
Password symbols
Description
9
Single digit
The O (capital o) and 0 (zero) symbols are intentional synonyms in recognition that these two
characters are often mistyped and misread.
NOTE:
Reserved symbols
The following symbols have special meanings and cannot be used in a password.
Symbol
Description
?
When submitted, the symbol matches any one character. When merged for display,
it becomes a space.
*
When submitted, the symbol matches 0 or Unicode white space characters. When
merged for display, it becomes a space.
+
When submitted, the symbol matches one or more Unicode white space characters.
When merged for display, it becomes a space.
RELATED LINKS:
Formattingfield values and using patterns
Examplesof password patterns
9.18.5. Examples of password patterns
The following table shows some example edit patterns that you can define for processing
user-entered passwords.
Custom pattern
512
Input value
AAA999
MAB123
XXX-9
MA2-4
99999
12345
9009AA9
1M23BE4
1m23be4
1MA3BE4
Properties in the Object palette
9.19. Radio button
9.19.1. Radio button properties in the Field tab
When you select a radio button or exclusion group, the Field tab in the Object palette displays several
options for formatting radio buttons.
Type
Sets the type of object. Objects are the building blocks of every form.
Appearance
Sets a border style for the button.
If a single radio button is selected, these options are available:
None
Does not display a border around the button.
Solid Square
Uses a solid square to represent the button.
Sunken Square
Creates a square shadow for the button so that the button looks three -dimensional.
Solid Circle
Uses a solid circle to represent the button.
Sunken Circle
Creates a circular shadow for the button so that the button looks three-dimensional.
Custom
Opens the Custom Appearance dialog box. Select this option if you want to define a custom
look for the fillable area.
If the exclusion group is selected, these options are available:
No Border
Does not display a line around the group.
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Properties in the Object palette
9
Solid Border
Creates a thick line around the group.
Raised Border
Creates a shadow around the group so that it looks three-dimensional.
Custom
Opens the Custom Appearance dialog box. Select this option to define a custom look for the
group.
Size
Sets the size of the radio button.
Check Style
Sets the radio button style:
Default
Uses a filled circle for the button style.
Check
Uses a check mark for the button style.
Circle
Uses a circle for the button style.
Cross
Uses a cross for the button style.
Diamond
Uses a diamond for the button style.
Square
Uses a square for the button style.
Star
Uses a star as the button style.
Item
Lists all of the radio buttons in the current exclusion group. You can double-click a radio button
name to edit its caption.
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Properties in the Object palette
Presence
Controls whether an object is displayed in a PDF form when users view the form in Acrobat or
Adobe Reader, or when users print the form:
Visible
The object is visible on-screen, visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the form
layout. Visible is the default presence setting for all objects.
Visible (Screen Only)
The object is visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form when printed from within
Acrobat or Adobe Reader, and occupies space in the form layout.
Visible (Print Only)
The object is not visible on-screen, visible in the printed form (when printed from within
Acrobat, Adobe Reader, or directly from the server), and occupies space in the form layout.
Invisible
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the
form layout.
Hidden (Exclude from Layout)
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and does not occupy any
space in the form layout.
One-sided Printing Only
The object is only printed when using single-sided printing.
Two-sided Printing Only
The object is printed when using double-sided printing. This option is useful when you want
to place the page number in a different corner of the page when using double-sided printing
than when using single-sided printing.
Locale
Renders the data according to the specified locale for language and country or region. You can select
a specific language and country from the list, or you can specify one of these options:
Default Locale
Uses the Default Locale specified in the Defaults tab of the Form Properties dialog box.
Viewer’s System Locale
Uses the system locale of the user’s computer.
NOTE:
Locales in the Locale list are organized first by language and then by country or region.
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Properties in the Object palette
9
RELATED LINKS:
Usingradio buttons
9.19.2. Radio button properties in the Value tab
When you create an exclusion group of radio buttons, the Value tab displays several options that you
can apply to the entire group.
Type
Enables run-time calculations and prompts:
User Entered - Optional
Users can choose whether to enter data.
User Entered - Recommended
A user is recommended to enter a value in the field. If the user enters a value, leaves the field
and then clears it, a custom message box appears (if written in the Empty Message box). A standard empty message appears if you do not type a custom message. If the user never attempts
to enter a value in the field and tries to submit the form, a field is required message appears and
the user can choose to ignore the message and submit the form.
User Entered - Required
A user must enter a value in the field. If the user enters a value, leaves the field and then clears
it, a custom message box appears (if written in the Empty Message box). A standard empty
message appears if you do not type a custom message. A message only appears if there was a
value in the field, the value was deleted, and the user exited the field without re-entering a
value. If the user never attempts to enter a value in the field and tries to submit the form, a field
is required message appears.
Calculated - Read Only
A data value will be calculated and displayed through an attached script. Users cannot edit the
calculated value.
Calculated - User Can Override
A data value will be calculated and displayed through an attached script. Users can edit the
value if the calculation script has been written to accept the input. If a user does edit the calculated value, the custom message you specify in the Override Message box appears.
Protected
Prevents a user from making changes to the value in the field. Indirect changes such as calculations can occur. The protected field is not included in the tabbing sequence and it does not
generate events.
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Properties in the Object palette
Read Only
A data value will be merged or calculated and displayed at run time. Users cannot edit the
value.
Default
Sets a default selection.
This option is available only when the Type option is set to User Entered - Optional, User
Entered - Recommended, User Entered - Required, or Read Only.
NOTE:
Empty Message
Sets a message for prompting users to enter a recommended or required value. See Toprompt users
to enter data.
This option is available only when the Type option is set to User Entered - Recommended or
User Entered - Required.
NOTE:
Validation Script Message and Error
Sets a custom message to display when an attached validation script detects an unacceptable value.
By default, this situation causes a programming error to be generated at run time. To generate a
warning instead, deselect the Error option. See Tovalidate user input.
NOTE: This option is not available when the Type option is set to Protect, Calculated - Read Only, or
Read Only. Validation Script Message is a dynamic property. Dynamic properties are identified by
active labels that have a green underline that you can click to dynamically bind the property to a data
source. To turn active labels on and off, use the Show Dynamic Properties command in the Object
palette menu. See To dynamicallypopulate a validation script message.
Form Level Validation Settings
Open the Forms Properties dialog box on the Form Validation tab. See Form Validationtab (Form
Properties dialog box).
Override Message
Sets a custom message to inform users that they are changing the value of a calculated field. The
message appears when a user changes the calculated value.
NOTE:
This option is available only when the Type option is set to Calculated - User Can Override.
RELATED LINKS:
Usingradio buttons
517
Properties in the Object palette
9
9.19.3. Radio button properties in the Binding tab
When you create a radio button exclusion group, the Binding tab presents data binding options that
you can apply to the group. Options that are not specifically related to creating a data connection
apply both to data bound to a data source and data saved to a file when the object is not bound to a
data source.
Name
Sets the name of the exclusion group.
Data Binding
Sets the default data-binding method:
Use name
Enables data merging and saving options. Data values are merged and stored implicitly
according to Adobe data-merging rules.
Use global data
Associates a single data value with all objects that have the same name (see Todefine a global
field).
New Data Connection
Starts the New Data Connection wizard. To define a connection using the wizard, see Tocreate
a data connection to an XML schema or Tocreate a data connection to an OLE database.
No data binding
Disables data binding. Because the object will not capture or display merged data, any information associated with the object is not written as output when the form data is
saved/submitted.
Specify Item Values
Lets you specify custom On values for each radio button in the exclusion group. The value of each
radio button in the group must be unique compared to the values of all other radio buttons in the
group.
When this option is not selected, the On values will match the caption for the radio button. When
this option is selected, the default values are sequential integers starting at “1” for the first radio
button in the group. See Toassign On values to radio buttons.
518
Properties in the Object palette
Import/Export Bindings
Sets an import/export binding for a WSDL data connection. See Tocreate a data connection using a
WSDL file.
RELATED LINKS:
Workingwith Data Sources
Usingradio buttons
9.20. Rectangle
9.20.1. Rectangle properties in the Draw tab
When you create a rectangle, the Draw tab in the Object palette presents options specific to formatting rectangles.
Type
Sets the type of object. Objects are the building blocks of every form.
Line Style
Sets the line style and thickness.
Color Picker
Sets the line color.
Corners
Sets the corner style.
Radius
Sets the radius of notched corners.
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Properties in the Object palette
9
Fill
Sets a fill style.
Color Picker
Sets fill colors.
Presence
Controls whether an object is displayed in a PDF form when users view the form in Acrobat or
Adobe Reader, or when users print the form:
Visible
The object is visible on-screen, visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the form
layout. Visible is the default presence setting for all objects.
Visible (Screen Only)
The object is visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form when printed from within
Acrobat or Adobe Reader, and occupies space in the form layout.
Visible (Print Only)
The object is not visible on-screen, visible in the printed form (when printed from within
Acrobat, Adobe Reader, or directly from the server), and occupies space in the form layout.
Invisible
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the
form layout.
Hidden (Exclude from Layout)
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and does not occupy any
space in the form layout.
One-sided Printing Only
The object is only printed when using single-sided printing.
Two-sided Printing Only
The object is printed when using double-sided printing. This option is useful when you want
to place the page number in a different corner of the page when using double-sided printing
than when using single-sided printing.
RELATED LINKS:
Usingcircles, lines, and rectangles
520
Properties in the Object palette
9.21. Signature field
9.21.1. Signature field properties in the Field tab
When you select a signature field, the Field tab in the Object palette displays several options for
formatting signature fields.
Type
Sets the type of object. Objects are the building blocks of every form.
Caption
Sets a caption for the object.
Caption is a dynamic property. Dynamic properties are identified by active labels that have a
green underline that you can click to dynamically bind the property to a data source. To turn active
labels on and off, use the Show Dynamic Properties command in the Object palette menu. See Todynamically populate a caption.
NOTE:
Appearance
Sets the border style for the fillable area of the field:
None
Does not display a border around the field.
Underlined
Underlines the field.
Solid Box
Displays a solid border around the field.
Sunken Box
Creates a shadow around the field so that the field looks three-dimensional.
Custom
Opens the Custom Appearance dialog box. Select this option if you want to define a custom
look for the fillable area.
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Properties in the Object palette
9
Presence
Controls whether an object is displayed in a PDF form when users view the form in Acrobat or
Adobe Reader, or when users print the form:
Visible
The object is visible on-screen, visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the form
layout. Visible is the default presence setting for all objects.
Visible (Screen Only)
The object is visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form when printed from within
Acrobat or Adobe Reader, and occupies space in the form layout.
Visible (Print Only)
The object is not visible on-screen, visible in the printed form (when printed from within
Acrobat, Adobe Reader, or directly from the server), and occupies space in the form layout.
Invisible
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the
form layout.
Hidden (Exclude from Layout)
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and does not occupy any
space in the form layout.
One-sided Printing Only
The object is only printed when using single-sided printing.
Two-sided Printing Only
The object is printed when using double-sided printing. This option is useful when you want
to place the page number in a different corner of the page when using double-sided printing
than when using single-sided printing.
Locale
Renders the data according to the specified locale for language and country or region. You can select
a specific language and country from the list, or you can specify one of these options:
Default Locale
Uses the Default Locale specified in the Defaults tab of the Form Properties dialog box.
Viewer’s System Locale
Uses the system locale of the user’s computer.
NOTE:
522
Locales in the Locale list are organized first by language and then by country or region.
Properties in the Object palette
RELATED LINKS:
Usingsignature fields
Usingdigital signatures
9.21.2. Signature field properties in the Signature tab
When you select a signature field object, the Signature tab in the Object palette displays various
options that control which fields (form objects) you can lock after the signature field is signed. The
object types you can lock are buttons, check boxes, date/time fields, decimal fields, drop-down lists,
image fields, list boxes, numeric fields, paper forms barcodes, password fields, radio buttons, other
signature fields, and text fields.
You can also click the Settings button to define optional security properties for the signature, such
as the signature handler, signing certificates, and certificate issuers.
Lock Fields After Signing
Specifies which fields (objects) the signature applies to. The signature field can apply to all of the
fields in the document, all of fields inside a collection of selected objects, or all of the fields outside
of a collection of selected objects. After the signing party signs the signature field, the fields in the
specified area are locked. This option is selected be default when you add a signature field to a form
design. If you deselect this option, none of the fields in the form will be locked after the signing party
signs the signature field.
You can select one of options in the drop-down list to indicate which fields to lock or to manage
collections.
All Fields in Document
Locks all the fields in the document.
Collection - <name>
Locks all fields in the selected collection.
New/Manage Collection
Opens the Collection List dialog box, where you can create, modify, duplicate, delete, and sort
object collections.
All Fields in Collection
Locks all of the fields that are included in the selected collection.
All Fields not in Collection
Locks all of the fields that are not included in the selected collection.
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Properties in the Object palette
9
RELATED LINKS:
Usingsignature fields
Usingdigital signatures
Usingform object collections
9.22. Subform
9.22.1. Subform properties in the Subform tab
When you select a subform, the Subform tab in the Object palette displays several formatting
options.
Source File
Sets the source file for the fragment reference. This property is visible only when the selected object
is a fragment reference.
Fragment Name
Sets the name of the fragment. You can click the Frag Info button
tion.
to view the fragment informa-
This property is visible when a fragment reference or a fragment that is defined in a source file is
selected. When the selected object is a fragment reference, this property does not appear if the source
file is not specified. The Fragment Name list includes all the fragments in the specified source file.
The Custom option directly supports setting a SOM expression or an ID value as the fragment reference and supports the implementation in the XML Forms Architecture.
Content
Sets positioned or flowed subform content.
Positioned
Positions the objects in the subform according to their individual X and Y coordinates.
Flowed
Positions the objects in the subform during the data-merging process so that no objects are
rendered on top of each other.
524
Properties in the Object palette
Flow Direction
Sets a flow direction for flowed objects:
Top to Bottom
Lays down the objects one beneath the other.
Western Text
Lays down the objects from left to right, and when the objects wrap at the right edge of the
subform, continue laying down objects one object down from left to right.
Right to Left
Sets the default tabbing order and data-fill order starting from the right of the page and moving
to the left of the page.
NOTE:
This option is unavailable unless the Flowed option is selected in the Content list.
Allow Page Breaks Within Content
Enables or disables page breaks in the middle of a subform.
This Subform Is An Insertion Point
Defines the selected subform as an insertion point. See Creatingan insertion point.
Name
Name of the insertion point subform.
Presence
Controls whether an object is displayed in a PDF form when users view the form in Acrobat or
Adobe Reader, or when users print the form:
Visible
The object is visible on-screen, visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the form
layout. Visible is the default presence setting for all objects.
Visible (Screen Only)
The object is visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form when printed from within
Acrobat or Adobe Reader, and occupies space in the form layout.
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Properties in the Object palette
9
Visible (Print Only)
The object is not visible on-screen, visible in the printed form (when printed from within
Acrobat, Adobe Reader, or directly from the server), and occupies space in the form layout.
Invisible
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the
form layout.
Hidden (Exclude from Layout)
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and does not occupy any
space in the form layout.
One-sided Printing Only
The object is only printed when using single-sided printing.
Two-sided Printing Only
The object is printed when using double-sided printing. This option is useful when you want
to place the page number in a different corner of the page when using double-sided printing
than when using single-sided printing.
Locale
Renders the data according to the specified locale for language and country or region. You can select
a specific language and country from the list, or you can specify one of these options:
Default Locale
Uses the Default Locale specified in the Defaults tab of the Form Properties dialog box.
Viewer’s System Locale
Uses the system locale of the user’s computer.
NOTE:
Locales in the Locale list are organized first by language and then by country or region.
RELATED LINKS:
Aboutsubforms
Tospecify a subform to span multiple pages
9.22.2. Subform properties in the Pagination tab
When you select a subform, the Pagination tab in the Object palette displays several pagination
options.
526
Properties in the Object palette
Place
Determines where the subform will be placed.
Following Previous
Places the subform after the previous object in the parent subform.
In Content Area > [name_of_content_area]
Places the subform in the specified content area.
Top of Next Content Area
Places the subform at the top of the next content area.
Top of Content Area > [name_of_content_area]
Places the subform at the top of the specified content area.
On Page > [name_of_page]
Places the subform on the specified page (introduces a page break if one does not occur naturally).
Top of Next Page
Places the subform at the top of the next page (introduces a page break if one does not occur
naturally).
Top of Page > [name_of_page]
Places the subform at the top of the page, whenever the specified page is rendered (introduces
a page break if one does not occur naturally).
On Odd Page
Places the subform on pages that are set to print on odd pages.
Top of Next Odd Page
Places the subform at the top of the odd page whenever the specified page is rendered (introduces a page break if one does not occur naturally).
On Even Page
Places the subform on pages that are set to print on even pages.
Top of Next Even Page
Places the subform at the top of the even page whenever the specified page is rendered (introduces a page break if one does not occur naturally).
527
Properties in the Object palette
Keep With Previous
Keeps the subform within the same content area as the previous subform.
Keep With Next
Keeps the subform within the same content area as the next subform.
After
Determines which area to fill after the subform is placed.
Continue Filling Parent
Continues merging data for all objects remaining to be filled in the parent subform.
Go to Next Content Area
Starts filling the next content area.
Go To Content Area > [name_of _content_area]
Starts filling the specified content area.
Go To Next Page
Starts filling the next page.
Go To Page > [name_of _page]
Starts filling the specified page.
Go To Next Odd Page
Starts filling the next odd page.
Go to Next Even Page
Starts filling the next even page.
Conditional Breaks
Specifies the number of conditional breaks that have been defined for the subform.
Overflow
Sets an overflow for a subform that spans pages.
None
Starts filling the next page (introduces a page break if one does not occur naturally).
528
9
Properties in the Object palette
Go To Content Area > [name_of _content_area]
Starts filling the specified content area.
Go To Page > [name_of _page]
Starts filling the specified page.
Overflow Leader
Specifies an overflow leader for a subform that must be paginated.
[name_of_subform]
Uses this existing subform as the overflow leader.
None
Does not use an overflow leader when paginating the subform.
New
Creates a new overflow leader subform in Designer and set it as the overflow leader when paginating this subform.
Overflow Trailer
Specifies an overflow trailer for a subform that must be paginated.
[name_of_subform]
Uses this existing subform as the overflow trailer.
None
Does not use an overflow trailer when paginating the subform.
New
Creates a new overflow trailer subform in Designer and set it as the overflow trailer when paginating this subform.
RELATED LINKS:
Aboutsubforms
Subformproperties in the Subform tab
Subformproperties in the Binding tab
529
Properties in the Object palette
9
9.22.3. Subform properties in the Binding tab
When you select a subform, the Binding tab in the Object palette displays several data binding
options. Options that are not specifically related to creating a data connection apply both to data
bound to a data source and data saved to a file when the object is not bound to a data source.
Name
Sets the name of the subform. By default, subforms have no name. See Toname a subform.
Data Binding
Sets the default data-binding method.
Use name
Enables data merging and saving options. Data values are merged and stored implicitly
according to Adobe data-merging rules.
New Data Connection
Starts the New Data Connection wizard. To define a connection using the wizard, see Tocreate
a data connection to an XML schema or Tocreate a data connection to an OLE database.
No data binding
Disables data binding. The subform will not be involved in any data-merging operations, but
its objects (including any nested subforms) may still capture or display data.
Import/Export Bindings (Execute WSDL)
Sets an import/export binding for a WSDL data connection. See Tocreate a data connection using a
WSDL file.
Initial Count
Sets the number of occurrences of the currently selected object to initially display on the form,
regardless of the quantity of data from any data connection. The value you specify must be equal to
or larger than the value for Min Count, and less than or equal to the value of Max.
RELATED LINKS:
Workingwith Data Sources
Aboutsubforms
530
Properties in the Object palette
9.23. Subform set
9.23.1. Subform set properties in the Subform Set tab
When you select a subform set, the Subform tab in the Object palette displays several formatting
options.
Edit Alternatives is unavailable unless the Select One Subform from Alternatives option is
selected in the Type list.
NOTE:
Type
Sets the order that subforms within the subform set are rendered on a form.
Use All Subforms in Order
All subforms within the subform set are rendered in the order in which they appear on the
form design.
Select One Subform from Alternatives
Only one of the subforms from within the subform set is rendered based on conditions specified by the form author.
Presence
Controls whether an object is displayed in a PDF form when users view the form in Acrobat or
Adobe Reader, or when users print the form:
Visible
The object is visible on-screen, visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the form
layout. Visible is the default presence setting for all objects.
Visible (Screen Only)
The object is visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form when printed from within
Acrobat or Adobe Reader, and occupies space in the form layout.
Visible (Print Only)
The object is not visible on-screen, visible in the printed form (when printed from within
Acrobat, Adobe Reader, or directly from the server), and occupies space in the form layout.
One-sided Printing Only
The object is printed only when using single-sided printing.
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Properties in the Object palette
9
Two-sided Printing Only
The object is printed when using double-sided printing. This option is useful when you want
to place the page number in a different corner of the page when using double-sided printing
than when using single-sided printing.
RELATED LINKS:
Usingsubform sets
Subformset properties in the Pagination tab
Subformset properties in the Binding tab
EditData Nominated Subforms dialog box
9.23.2. Subform set properties in the Pagination tab
When you select a subform set, the Pagination tab in the Object palette displays several pagination
options.
Place
Determines where the subform set will be placed.
Following Previous
Lays down the subform set after the previous object in the parent subform.
In Content Area > [name_of _content_area]
Lays down the subform set in the specified content area.
Top of Next Content Area
Lays down the subform set at the top of the next content area.
Top of Content Area > [name_of _content_area]
Lays down the subform set at the top of the specified content area.
On Page > [name_of _page]
Lays down the subform set on the specified page (introduces a page break if one does not occur
naturally).
Top of Next Page
Lays down the subform set at the top of the next page (introduces a page break if one does not
occur naturally).
Top of Page > [name_of _page]
Lays down the subform set at the top of the page, whenever the specified page is rendered
(introduces a page break if one does not occur naturally).
532
Properties in the Object palette
On Odd Page
Places the subform set on pages that are set to print on odd pages.
Top of Next Odd Page
Places the subform set at the top of the odd page whenever the specified page is rendered
(introduces a page break if one does not occur naturally).
On Even Page
Places the subform set on pages that are set to print on even pages.
Top of Next Even Page
Places the subform set at the top of the even page whenever the specified page is rendered
(introduces a page break if one does not occur naturally).
After
Determines which area to fill after the subform set is placed.
Continue Filling Parent
Continues merging data for all objects remaining to be filled in the parent subform.
Go to Next Content Area
Starts filling the next content area.
Go To Content Area > [name_of _content_area]
Starts filling the specified content area.
Go To Next Page
Starts filling the next page.
Go To Page > [name_of _page]
Starts filling the specified page.
Go To Next Odd Page
Starts filling the next odd page.
Go to Next Even Page
Starts filling the next even page.
Conditional Breaks
Specifies the number of conditional breaks that have been defined for the subform set.
533
Properties in the Object palette
9
Overflow
Sets an overflow for a subform set that spans pages.
None
Starts filling the next page (introduces a page break if one does not occur naturally).
Go To Content Area > [name_of _content_area]
Starts filling the specified content area.
Go To Page > [name_of _page]
Starts filling the specified page.
Overflow Leader
Specifies an overflow leader for a subform set that must be paginated.
None
Does not use an overflow leader when paginating the subform set.
[name_of_subform]
Uses this existing subform set as the overflow leader.
New
Creates a new overflow leader subform set and sets it as the overflow leader when paginating
this subform.
Overflow Trailer
Specifies an overflow trailer for a subform set that must be paginated.
None
Does not use an overflow trailer when paginating the subform set.
[name_of_subform]
Uses this existing subform set as the overflow trailer.
New
Creates a new overflow trailer subform and sets it as the overflow trailer when paginating this
subform.
RELATED LINKS:
Usingsubform sets
Subformset properties in the Subform Set tab
534
Properties in the Object palette
Subformset properties in the Binding tab
9.23.3. Subform set properties in the Binding tab
When you select a subform set, the Binding tab in the Object palette displays several data binding
options.
Name
Sets the name of the subform set. By default, subform sets have no name.
Repeat Subform For Each Data Item
Enables or disables subform repetition.
Min Count
Sets the minimum number of occurrences of the currently selected object to display on the form.
Max
Sets the maximum number of occurrences of the currently selected object to display on the form.
Import/Export Bindings (Execute WSDL)
Sets an import/export binding for a WSDL data connection. See Tocreate a data connection using a
WSDL file.
RELATED LINKS:
Usingsubform sets
9.24. Table
9.24.1. Table properties in the Table tab
When you select a table, the Table tab in the Object palette displays several formatting options.
535
Properties in the Object palette
9
Source File
Sets the source file for the fragment reference. This property is visible only when the selected object
is a fragment reference.
Fragment Name
Sets the name of the fragment. You can click the Frag Info button
tion.
to view the fragment informa-
This property is visible when a fragment reference or a fragment that is defined in a source file is
selected. When the selected object is a fragment reference, this property does not appear if the source
file is not specified. The Fragment Name list includes all the fragments in the specified source file.
The Custom option directly supports setting a SOM expression or an ID value as the fragment reference and supports the implementation in the XML Forms Architecture.
Body Rows
Shows the number of body rows.
Header Rows
Shows the number of header rows.
Columns
Shows the number of columns.
Footer Rows
Shows the number of footer rows.
Allow Page Breaks Within Content
Enables or disables page breaks in the middle of a table.
Presence
Controls whether an object is displayed in a PDF form when users view the form in Acrobat or
Adobe Reader, or when users print the form:
536
Properties in the Object palette
Visible
The object is visible on-screen, visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the form
layout. Visible is the default presence setting for all objects.
Visible (Screen Only)
The object is visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form when printed from within
Acrobat or Adobe Reader, and occupies space in the form layout.
Visible (Print Only)
The object is not visible on-screen, visible in the printed form (when printed from within
Acrobat, Adobe Reader, or directly from the server), and occupies space in the form layout.
Invisible
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and occupies space in the
form layout.
Hidden (Exclude from Layout)
The object is not visible on-screen, not visible in the printed form, and does not occupy any
space in the form layout.
One-sided Printing Only
The object is only printed when using single-sided printing.
Two-sided Printing Only
The object is printed when using double-sided printing. This option is useful when you want
to place the page number in a different corner of the page when using double-sided printing
than when using single-sided printing.
Locale
Renders the data according to the specified locale for language and country or region. You can select
a specific language and country from the list, or you can specify one of these options:
Default Locale
Uses the Default Locale specified in the Defaults tab of the Form Properties dialog box.
Viewer’s System Locale
Uses the system locale of the user’s computer.
NOTE:
Locales in the Locale list are organized first by language and then by country or region.
RELATED LINKS:
Usingtables
Tableproperties in the Row Shading tab
537
Properties in the Object palette
9
Tableproperties in the Pagination tab
Tableproperties in the Binding tab
9.24.2. Table properties in the Row Shading tab
When you select a table, the Row Shading tab in the Object palette presents options for applying
shading colors to alternating rows.
Apply Alternating Row Shading
Enables or disables shading of body rows in a table.
For a table in which data is merged when the form is rendered, shading is applied only to body rows
in which merged data appears. Shading is not applied to body rows that are not part of the
data-merging process. All rows to which shading is applied must have a name. See Bodyrow properties in the Binding tab.
First Sets the number of body rows that the first shading color is applied to, starting from the first
body row.
Color Picker
Sets the first fill color used for shading.
Next
Sets the number of body rows that the second shading color is applied to, following the body rows
shaded using the first shading color.
Color Picker
Sets the second fill color used for shading.
RELATED LINKS:
Usingtables
Applyingborders and shading to a table
Tableproperties in the Table tab
Tableproperties in the Pagination tab
Tableproperties in the Binding tab
538
Properties in the Object palette
9.24.3. Table properties in the Pagination tab
When you select a table, the Pagination tab in the Object palette displays several pagination options.
Place
Determines where the table will be placed.
Following Previous
Lays down the table after the previous object in the parent subform.
In Content Area > [name_of _content_area]
Lays down the table in the specified content area.
Top of Next Content Area
Lays down the table at the top of the next content area.
Top of Content Area > [name_of _content_area]
Lays down the table at the top of the specified content area.
On Page > [name_of _page]
Lays down the table on the specified page (introduces a page break if one does not occur naturally).
Top of Next Page
Lays down the table at the top of the next page (introduces a page break if one does not occur
naturally).
Top of Page > [name_of _page]
Lays down the table at the top of the page, whenever the specified page is rendered (introduces
a page break if one does not occur naturally).
On Odd Page
Places the subform on pages that are set to print on odd pages.
Top of Next Odd Page
Places the subform at the top of the odd page whenever the specified page is rendered (introduces a page break if one does not occur naturally).
On Even Page
Places the subform on pages that are set to print on even pages.
539
Properties in the Object palette
9
Top of Next Even Page
Places the subform at the top of the even page whenever the specified page is rendered (introduces a page break if one does not occur naturally).
Keep With Previous
Keeps the table within the same content area as the previous table.
Keep With Next
Keeps the table within the same content area as the next table.
After
Determines which area to fill after the table is placed.
Continue Filling Parent
Continues merging data for all objects remaining to be filled in the parent subform.
Go to Next Content Area
Starts filling the next content area.
Go To Content Area > [name_of _content_area]
Starts filling the specified content area.
Go To Next Page
Starts filling the next page.
Go To Page > [name_of _page]
Starts filling the specified page.
Go To Next Odd Page
Starts filling the next odd page.
Go to Next Even Page
Starts filling the next even page.
Conditional Breaks
Specifies the number of conditional breaks that have been defined for the table. See Tocontrol table,
header row, body row, footer row, and section breaksusing conditional statements.
540
Properties in the Object palette
Overflow
Sets an overflow for a table that spans pages. See Toset up a table to span multiple pages.
None
Starts filling the next page (introduces a page break if one does not occur naturally).
Go To Content Area > [name_of _content_area]
Starts filling the specified content area.
Go To Page > [name_of _page]
Starts filling the specified page.
RELATED LINKS:
Usingtables
Toset up a table to span multiple pages
Tableproperties in the Table tab
Tableproperties in the Row Shading tab
Tableproperties in the Binding tab
9.24.4. Table properties in the Binding tab
When you select a table, the Binding tab in the Object palette displays several data binding options.
Options that are not specifically related to creating a data connection apply both to data bound to a
data source and data saved to a file when the object is not bound to a data source.
Name
Sets the name of the table. If existing tables in the form use the same name, the number beside the
name identifies the instance for the current table. See To nameand rename objects.
Data Binding
Sets the default data-binding method:
Use name
Enables data merging and saving options. Data values are merged and stored implicitly
according to Adobe data-merging rules.
Use global data
Associates a single data value with all objects that have the same name (see Todefine a global
field).
541
Properties in the Object palette
9
New Data Connection
Starts the New Data Connection wizard. To define a connection using the wizard, see Tocreate
a data connection to an XML schema or Tocreate a data connection to an OLE database.
No data binding
Disables data binding. Because the object will not capture or display merged data, any information associated with the object is not written as output when the form data is
saved/submitted.
Import/Export Bindings
Sets an import/export binding for a WSDL data connection. See Tocreate a data connection using a
WSDL file.
Repeat Table For Each Data Item
Enables or disables table repetition.
Min Count
Sets the minimum number of occurrences of the currently selected object to display on the form.
Max
Sets the maximum number of occurrences of the currently selected object to display on the form.
Initial Count
Sets the number of occurrences of the currently selected object to initially display on the form,
regardless of the quantity of data from any data connection. The value you specify must be equal to
or larger than the value for Min Count, and less than or equal to the value of Max.
RELATED LINKS:
Usingtables
Tableproperties in the Table tab
Tableproperties in the Row Shading tab
Tableproperties in the Pagination tab
542
Properties in the Object palette
9.24.5. Header row properties in the Row tab
When you select a header row or footer row, the Row tab in the Object palette displays several
formatting options.
Source File
Sets the source file for the fragment reference. This property is visible only when the selected object
is a fragment reference.
Fragment Name
Sets the name of the fragment. You can click the Frag Info button
tion.
to view the fragment informa-
This property is visible when a fragment reference or a fragment that is defined in a source file is
selected. When the selected objec