Full Ohio RESA 2014

Full Ohio RESA 2014
Ohio Resident Educator Summative Assessment
Participant Handbook
2014–2015
VERSION 1.1
SEPTEMBER 1, 2014
(UPDATED MARCH 6, 2015)
© 2013 Teachscape, Inc., Stanford Center for Assessment, Learning & Equity, and The Danielson Group
OH RESA 2013-14 CONFIDENTIAL DRAFT - DO NOT REPRODUCE OR SHARE
Table of Contents
Overview of the Ohio Resident Educator Summative Assessment................................................... 1 How to Read This Document ................................................................................................................. 7 Ohio RESA at a Glance .......................................................................................................................... 8 Ohio Resident Educator Summative Assessment: Submission Dates ........................................... 11 First Lesson Cycle (Task 1) ................................................................................................................. 12 Second Lesson Cycle (Task 3) ............................................................................................................ 28 Formative and Summative Assessment (Task 2) .............................................................................. 45 Communication and Professional Growth (Task 4) .......................................................................... 65 Reflection on Teaching Practice Based on Feedback from Students
and/or Colleagues (Task 5) ........................................................................................................ 80 Appendix A: Ohio Standards for the Teaching Profession .............................................................. 90 Appendix B: Crosswalk of Ohio Teaching Standards, RESA Tasks, and RESA Rubrics .............. 92 Appendix C: Guide to Using the Online RESA Submission System ............................................... 96 Appendix D: Recommendations for Task and Evidence Selection ................................................. 98 Appendix E: Glossary ........................................................................................................................ 100 Appendix F: Uploading, Segmenting, and Submitting Evidence Reference Guide
(Video, Audio, and PDFs) ........................................................................................................ 101 Appendix G: RESA Instructional Evidence Reference Guide ........................................................ 109 Appendix H: Evidence Scorability .................................................................................................... 113 Appendix I: Support for Resident Educators ................................................................................... 114 Ohio RESA 2014-15 © 2014 Teachscape, Inc. and Charlotte Danielson
This 2014-2015 edition of the Resident Educator Summative Assessment (RESA) was developed by
Teachscape, Inc. and Charlotte Danielson, in collaboration with the Ohio Department of Education. An
earlier pilot version of the RESA was developed with the support of the Stanford Center for
Assessment, Learning and Equity. The RESA is grounded in the Ohio Standards for the Teaching
Profession (OSTP) and assesses the skills developed within the Resident Educator Program. The
RESA takes into account the developmental continuum of teachers’ practice from developing to
proficient teaching performance. As established in the Ohio Administrative Code, successful completion
of the RESA is a prerequisite for professional licensure: “Passage of the assessment and successful
completion of the four year resident educator program results in eligibility for the professional educator
license (OAC 3301-24-04).”
The 2014–2015 edition of this handbook has been developed with thoughtful input from the Ohio RESA
Design Team, which included teachers, principals, higher education faculty, consultants, and staff from
the Ohio Department of Education. All contributions are recognized and appreciated.
Ohio RESA 2014-15 © 2014 Teachscape, Inc. and Charlotte Danielson
Overview of the Ohio Resident Educator Summative
Assessment
The Ohio Resident Educator Program requires teachers to begin their careers with four-year resident
educator licenses. During this time, Resident Educators (RE) must complete all four years of the
program and successfully pass the Resident Educator Summative Assessment (RESA) in their third or
fourth year of the program. The Resident Educator Program and the RESA are aligned to the Ohio
Standards for the Teaching Profession. The rigorous performance tasks within the RESA are carefully
designed to reflect and reinforce the goals of the Ohio standards and of the RE program.
Purpose
The Ohio Resident Educator Program is a formal four-year program of support for beginning teachers.
It is part of a comprehensive system that provides job-embedded, professional growth for Ohio’s
teachers from pre-service and throughout their professional life. With the support of certified mentors
and the larger learning community in years 1–2, REs discover, practice, and refine the art and science
of teaching as they learn to self-assess, adjust their teaching, reflect upon their progress, and
continually strengthen their teaching practices. In year 3 or 4, REs are asked to demonstrate these
teaching skills and assess their teaching performance by taking the RESA.
RESA results will not be used by a school or district for the evaluation of teacher performance or to
make hiring decisions.
“The RESA was developed for use in teacher licensing decisions made by states
or local agencies empowered to license teachers. Under the guidelines that
govern its use, the Ohio RESA may not be used for the purpose of making
employment decisions about teachers who are already licensed.”
(From the Praxis Series Praxis III: Classroom Performance Assessments Orientation Guide, 2001, p. 5)
Description
The RESA is a performance assessment that requires candidates to demonstrate their knowledge and
skills in real time. Over the past 25 years, performance assessments have become an increasingly
valued and integral part of teacher preparation and growth. They allow teachers to show what they
know by demonstrating their teaching skills in action. Performance assessments provide direct
evidence of what teachers do in the classroom, supported by required written commentary, evidence,
and artifacts.
The RESA consists of five tasks. For each task, you are asked to provide evidence of your teaching
and its impact on student learning, based on the Ohio Standards for the Teaching Profession:
1. Teachers understand student learning and development and respect the diversity of the
students they teach.
2. Teachers know and understand the content area for which they have instructional responsibility.
3. Teachers understand and use varied assessments to inform instruction, evaluate, and ensure
student learning.
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4. Teachers plan and deliver effective instruction that advances the learning of each individual
student.
5. Teachers create learning environments that provide high levels of learning and achievement for
all students.
6. Teachers collaborate and communicate with students, parents, other educators, administrators,
and the community to support student learning.
7. Teachers assume responsibility for professional growth, performance, and involvement as an
individual as a member of a learning community.
As a participant in the assessment, you will be prompted to reflect upon and synthesize what you have
learned throughout the Resident Educator Program and its application to your teaching context. The
evidence you collect and the commentary you submit will demonstrate your teaching proficiency and
readiness for a professional license.
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RESA Readiness Assumptions
Resident Educators who are prepared to take the Resident Educator Summative Assessment
• Understand that teaching is a complex act
• Complete the rigorous work of years 1 and 2 of the residency program by teaching in their area
of license and by developing sound habits of teaching: thinking, writing, practicing, conversing,
planning, assessing, videotaping, collaborating, and reflecting on their teaching impact
• Continually work toward developing the artful, skilled teaching that develops from hours of
practice supported by deliberate feedback, collaborative observations, conversations, and
intentional teaching adjustments
• Connect their teaching practices to the Ohio Standards for the
Teaching Profession, the Ohio Continuum of Professional
Important Reminder:
Development, and the Teaching-Learning Cycle
Unlike the first two years of the
• Implement the Teaching-Learning Cycle both automatically
Resident Educator Program
and formally as they assess, plan, teach, reflect, and revise
where formative feedback is
lessons and units of study
given, the RESA is a
• Collect evidence/artifacts of their teaching journey (build a
summative assessment.
Therefore, you will not receive
repertoire of practice)
feedback during the
• Recognize that the Resident Educator Summative
administration of the RESA.
Assessment asks them to showcase their teaching progress,
The RESA score report will
demonstrate how they implement the Teaching-Learning
include a score for each of the
RESA tasks and forms (subCycle on a daily basis, and assess their teaching impact by
tasks). These scores may be
addressing the self-reflection questions
compared to the scoring rubrics
• Approach the Resident Educator Summative Assessment as
found in the RESA Participant
a formal performance assessment that requires thoughtful
Handbook, and used, as
needed, by you and your
and skillful attention to each task
mentor to improve the re• Understand that the successful completion of the Resident
submission of any deficient
Educator Summative Assessment and four years of the
portions of the RESA.
Resident Educator Program lead to professional licensure
Getting Started
Two important sources of information are this Handbook and OhioRESA.com. The Handbook contains
the full text of each task and rubric, as well as informative appendices. You should read the
Handbook in its entirety. OhioRESA.com is your source for the most current information on the
RESA, including candidate Resources, and will serve as the website on which you will log on to the
RESA submission system.
Registration
If you are a RE who is eligible to take the 2014–2015 RESA, your
Candidates can find their
Program Coordinator must register you as a RESA candidate with the
Educator State IDs here:
Ohio Department of Education (ODE) CORE no later than November
https://coreprodint.ode.state.oh.
15, 2014. CORE registration will open on September 1, 2014, and the
us/core2.3/ode.core.EducatorPr
ODE will send candidate data to Teachscape in three phases
ofile.UI/EducatorSearch.aspx
between then and November 15, 2014. After Teachscape receives
candidate registration confirmation from the ODE, Teachscape will
send you an activation email that contains a unique link to a registration page. You will be asked to
create an online account with a username and password and supply an answer to a security question.
You will also need your Educator State ID to complete registration.
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If you do not receive an invitation to register with Teachscape by
November 24, 2014, you should first check all email folders to see if
your email provider automatically sorted Teachscape’s email. Next,
you should contact your Program Coordinator to confirm that you
have been registered as a RESA candidate with the ODE and confirm
that the correct email address was used.
If you have confirmed that you have been accurately registered with
the ODE and have still not received an activation email from
Teachscape, you should contact Teachscape’s RESA Help Desk by
calling 855-538-8634, Monday through Friday, 2 p.m.–10 p.m. EST.
Using the Online RESA Submission System
For step-by-step instructions for using the online RESA Submission
System, see Appendix C of this Handbook.
To ensure that you receive the
activation email, you should
confirm that your Program
Coordinator uses your most
current email address when
registering with the ODE. You
should also add the following
email domains to your
contacts or safe-sender list:
• @teachscape.com
• @mailchimp.com
• @cambridgeeducation.zen
desk.com
• @cambeducation.com Candidate Resources and Help
OhioRESA.com is your source for all RESA information, candidate resources and important updates,
and candidate communications (posted on the News page).
Guide to RESA Support
The RESA Help Desk is available Monday through Friday, 2 p.m.–10 p.m. EST, by calling toll free 855538-8634 or by emailing [email protected]
Questions about registering for the RESA with Teachscape or submitting forms and evidence should be
directed to the RESA Help Desk.
Questions about the Tripod Survey should be directed to the Tripod Help Desk, available at
TripodProject.org/ODE. Questions related to licensure, RESA eligibility, and the RE Program should
be sent to the ODE at [email protected] Candidates can also find information at the
ODE RESA webpage: education.ohio.gov/Topics/Teaching/Resident-EducatorProgram/Resident-Educator-Summative-Assessment-RESA.
Important Reminder: All candidates for the RESA must be participants in the Resident
Educator Program and have met the eligibility requirements below.
Resident Educator Program Eligibility
To be eligible to participate in the Resident Educator program, beginning teachers must
•
•
•
•
•
•
Hold a valid resident educator license or alternative resident educator license of any type, or a
one-year out-of-state educator license;
Be employed by an ODE-chartered educational entity, ODE- or ODJFS-licensed preschool,
Ohio Correctional facility, or a private educational agency located in Ohio;
Teach at least two classes or .25 FTE in their area of licensure or in the area in which the
teacher holds a supplemental teaching license;
Be responsible for planning and delivering standards-based, pre-K–12 curriculum to students
and evaluating their progress;
Work 120 days as defined by Ohio Revised Code; and
Be assigned an ODE-certified, trained mentor by their employer.
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Process for Candidates Retaking the RESA in 2014–2015
The 2013–2014 RESA candidates who did not complete one or more RESA tasks will need to submit
each of those tasks during the 2014–2015 school year. In addition, if any of the tasks that candidates
submitted were deemed “unscorable” by the RESA assessors, candidates will be required to resubmit
those tasks as well. A 2013–2014 candidate notification regarding which submitted tasks were deemed
“unscorable” will be sent out in October 2014 The score report for the 2013–2014 RESA will be
available in mid-December. At that time, 2013–2014 candidates will receive an email with instructions
on how to retrieve their final scores from a secure website. Candidates must resubmit any task that
does not receive a passing score.
Reminder: If you have to resubmit a task for any reason, you must compile your submission data from
students you are teaching during the 2014–2015 school year. You cannot use any data from students
obtained during the 2013–2014 year, nor can you resubmit evidence from last year’s RESA.
Candidates will not be able to access their submissions from 2013–2014 in the RESA submission
system.
If you have to resubmit a task for any reason, you will receive a three-month extension on the general
candidate Profile deadline, so you must complete a new Profile by February 15, 2015. The deadline for
all resubmitted tasks is May 15, 2015.
Special Circumstances and Task Modification Request Process
The RESA is comprised of 5 required performance tasks. The RESA handbook provides detailed
descriptions of the requirements for the completion of each task. It is understood that particular
conditions may exist (special circumstances) that will not allow you to complete tasks 1, 2, and 3 as
they are outlined in the RESA handbook.
The Ohio Department of Education currently recognizes the following special circumstances:
1. Learning Institutions that guarantee individual client confidentiality and privacy, afforded by law,
and therefore prohibit the use of any media that records an image or voice of a client or client
family (i.e. youth correctional facilities, residential facilities, etc.).
2. A class that is comprised of less than 3 students who are studying a common lesson and taking
a common assessment.
If you believe that any of the above special circumstances apply to your teaching assignment and make
it impossible to complete the RESA task(s) as outlined in the RESA Handbook, see the task
modification process below.
Task Modification Process and Timeline
In order to make a RESA task modification request, you will need to work with your Program
Coordinator to complete the Special Circumstances Form (available on the Ohio RESA Candidate
Resources page). On the Special Circumstances Form, you must describe why your teaching
circumstances make it impossible for you to complete the task as described and propose a plan for the
task modification required.
Your completed Special Circumstances Form must be returned to the ODE
at [email protected] no later than the following deadlines:
•
•
November 15, 2014 for candidates who are taking the RESA for the first time
January 15, 2015 for candidates re-taking portions of the RESA
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The ODE will review your request and inform you of their decision. If your request is approved,
Teachscape will contact your Program Coordinator and determine the appropriate modifications and
accommodations for that particular task. If a live observation is granted for Tasks 1 and 3, you and your
Program Coordinator must follow the Live Observation Policy and Protocols (which will be distributed
after task modification approval).
Note: Submissions by candidates who are granted special circumstances approval will be separated
from the general RESA scoring pool. These submissions will be scored by an assessor who
understands both the task modifications and the unique context under which the candidate has been
teaching. Completion of the RESA Special Circumstance Form does not exempt Resident Educators
from a task, BUT if approved, may allow for modifications to be made for specific tasks by Teachscape.
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How to Read This Document
This handbook details each task and provides guidance on how to complete each task including
additional reference materials and the corresponding rubrics. The handbook also includes the following
resources in Appendices A–I:
Ohio Standards for the Teaching Profession (Appendix A)
Crosswalk of Ohio Teaching Standards, RESA Tasks, and RESA Rubrics (Appendix B)
Guide to Using the Online RESA Submission System (Appendix C)
Recommendations for Task and Evidence Selection (Appendix D)
Glossary of Key Terms as they are used in the RESA (Appendix E)
Uploading, Segmenting and Submitting Evidence Reference Guide) (Video, Audio and PDFs)
(Appendix F)
RESA Instructional Evidence Reference Guide (Appendix G)
Evidence Scorability (Appendix H)
Support for Resident Educators (Appendix I)
To assist you in using the handbook each task has been organized in the following format.


Purpose: This section briefly describes why the task is being completed.

Evidence Sources: This section identifies and describes the mandatory and optional evidence
you will submit for each task.

What You Must Do: This section explains the specific actions required for successful
completion of a task.

Glossary (where applicable): This section defines any technical or potentially unfamiliar terms
associated with each task.

Forms: This section contains any forms you will need to complete a task.

Rubrics: This section contains the scoring rubrics that will be used to score your performance
on the task.
Overview: This section explains which Ohio Teaching Standard(s) is addressed through the
task and provides a general overview of the task.
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Ohio RESA at a Glance
Task
First Lesson Cycle
(Task 1)
What to Submit*
Ohio
Teaching
Standards
1.1 Teaching and Learning Context Form,
Not Scored
1.2 Lesson Overview and Commentary Form
Not Scored
Standard 1
Standard 2
Standard 4
1.2 A: Quality of Learning
Outcomes
1.2 B: Teacher’s Knowledge of
Content
1.3 A: Teacher’s Knowledge of
Students
1.3 B: Quality of Learning
Activities
1.3 C: Plan for Using Formative
Assessment
1.3 D: Quality of Instructional
Evidence
Standard 1
Standard 2
Standard 3
Standard 4
Standard 5
1.4 A: Teacher’s Knowledge of
Content
1.4 B: Teacher’s Explanation of
Content
1.4 C: Classroom Environment
Conducive to Learning
1.4 D: Student Engagement
1.4 E: Use of Formative
Assessment and Feedback in
Instruction
Standard 1
Standard 3
1.5 A: Overall Lesson Reflection
1.3 Instructional Strategies Overview Form
Rubrics
Instructional evidence
1.4 Video Overview Form
Video Observation
1.5 Overall Lesson Analysis Form
Second Lesson
Cycle (Task 3)
3.1 Teaching and Learning Context Form,
Not Scored
3.2 Lesson Overview and Commentary Form
3.3 Instructional Strategies Overview Form
Instructional Evidence
Ohio RESA 2014-15 © 2014 Teachscape, Inc. and Charlotte Danielson
Rubrics
Not Scored
Standard 1
Standard 2
Standard 4
3.2 A: Quality of Learning
Outcomes
3.2 B: Teacher’s Knowledge of
Content
3.3 A: Teacher’s Knowledge of
Students
3.3 B: Quality of Learning
Activities
3.3 C: Plan for Using Formative
Assessment
3.3 D: Quality of Instructional
Evidence
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3.4 Video Overview Form
Standard 1
Standard 2
Standard 3
Standard 4
Standard 5
3.4 A: Teacher’s Knowledge of
Content
3.4 B: Teacher’s Explanation of
Content
3.4 C: Classroom Environment
Conducive to Learning
3.4 D: Student Engagement
3.4 E: Use of Formative
Assessment and Feedback in
Instruction
3.5 Overall Lesson Analysis Form
Standard 1
Standard 3
3.5 A: Overall Lesson Reflection
2.1 Teaching and Learning Context Form,
Not Scored
Standard 3
Standard 4
Not Scored
Video Observation
Formative and
Summative
Assessment
(Task 2)
2.2 A: Quality of Learning
Outcomes
2.2 Instructional Unit Context Form
2.3 Assessments, Not Scored
2.4 A: Quality of Learning
Outcomes
2.4 B: Alignment of
Assessments with Learning
Outcomes
2.4 Assessment Plan
Three Selected Student Responses to Formative
Assessment 1, Formative Assessment 2, and
Summative Assessment for the Cycle,
Not Scored
Formative and Summative Assessment
Samples, Not Scored
2.5 A: Analyzing Individual
Student Data to Monitor
Achievement
2.5 B: Using Assessments to
Inform Instruction for Three
Selected Students
2.5 Assessment Results Analysis/
Three Selected Students
Communication and
Professional Growth
(Task 4)
4.1 Rationale for Communication with Parents
and Caregivers Form
Examples of communication with parents or
other caregivers
4.2 Rationale for Professional
Collaboration Form
Standard 6
Standard 7
4.1 A: Quality and Clarity of
Information
4.1 B: Professionalism and
Tone
4.2 A: Commitment and
Initiative
4.2 B: Teacher’s Explanation of
Impact on Practice
Example of communication and collaboration
with colleagues
4.3 Professional Development and Professional
Growth Form
Ohio RESA 2014-15 © 2014 Teachscape, Inc. and Charlotte Danielson
4.3 A: Analysis of Professional
Growth
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Reflection on
Teaching Practice
Based on Feedback
from Students
and/or Colleagues
(Task 5)
5.1 Teaching and Learning Context Form,
Not Scored
5.2 Reflection on Practice and Feedback Form,
Not Scored
Standard 1
Standard 4
Standard 5
Standard 6
This task is not scored against a
rubric; instead, it will be scored
for responsiveness to the
questions in the Reflection on
Practice and Feedback Form.
Note that this task must be
complete and the responses
appropriate in order to pass
the RESA.
*As indicated in the table, you will complete a number of forms throughout the RESA tasks. There are
word limits for each form; therefore, it is important that your responses are clear, concise, and
complete. In some cases, this may be accomplished through bulleted responses, while others may lend
themselves to a narrative response. You should respond in the format that you believe best answers
the prompt. The content of your response should only address the questions asked. Additional
information may be considered superfluous and may adversely affect the scoring.
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Ohio Resident Educator Summative Assessment:
Submission Dates
As shown above, due dates are staggered for each task, with Task 1 due no later than December 15,
2014; Task 3 due no later than February 15, 2015; Tasks 2 due no later than April 15, 2015; and Task 4
and Task 5 due no later than May 15, 2015. These dates are due dates and should not be interpreted
as dates to start working on each task. For example, if you are using the Tripod Survey report for Task
5, you will need to complete the Tripod Survey Form with your Profile (due December 15) and
administer the Tripod Survey before February 23rd. In short, you are encouraged to begin working on
each task as soon as you are able.
Tip: The tasks must be submitted by the associated deadlines listed above, but can be worked on in
any order. Refer to each task description for guidelines on how to begin working on the requested
materials.
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First Lesson Cycle (Task 1)
Purpose
In years 1 and 2, Resident Educators, through the support of mentors, have systematically and
continually engaged in the cycle of inquiry and reflection as they progressed through the TeachingLearning Cycle. The RESA asks that Resident Educators demonstrate their acquired knowledge and
skills.
Self-reflection on instructional practices and the use of instructional evidence are essential
components to ongoing professional development and growth. This First Lesson Cycle Task requires
Resident Educators to perform both of these processes; professional growth occurs as Resident
Educators progress through the task.
Task 1 asks you to demonstrate your understanding of and ability to implement the plan, teach, reflect
elements of the Teaching-Learning Cycle in real time, and to describe, reflect on, and analyze how and
why lesson planning decisions were made and how they were implemented.
Overview
In this task, you will assemble a portfolio of evidence that demonstrates your work with students in the
context of a single lesson. You will submit
•
•
•
•
•
•
A description of the students and your classroom
A lesson overview
A videotape of that lesson identifying specific segments for assessors to watch
A commentary on that videotape
All instructional evidence associated with the lesson
An analysis of the entire lesson
Evidence Sources
Note: In this task, you must choose a lesson different from the one chosen for Task 3.
All forms, instructional evidence, and video segment(s) will be submitted online.
 Teaching and Learning Context Form (Form 1.1)
 Lesson Overview and Commentary Form (Form 1.2)
 Up to 10 pages of instructional evidence that students used during the lesson (see directions,
Form 1.2)
 Instructional Strategies Overview Form (Form 1.3)
 Video Overview Form (Form 1.4)
 Video segment(s)
 Overall Lesson Analysis Form (Form 1.5)
Note: The questions on each of the required forms for this task will help you to understand the kind of
lesson you should select in order to demonstrate your practice and comment on it appropriately.
Therefore, we recommend that you review the forms before selecting a lesson to submit. You will not
be required to submit a formal lesson plan, though you may find that you can insert parts of your lesson
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plan in response to the specific questions on the forms below. All lesson information will be provided
through the forms, instructional evidence, and video segments.
What You Must Do
1. Choose a lesson that allows you to demonstrate all of the following:
a. Important content clearly connected to your school and district priorities, the Ohio
Academic Content Standards, and/or national standards for subject areas that do not
have Ohio Academic Content Standards
b. Academically rigorous expectations for student learning
c. Explanation of content
d. Direct engagement with students during the lesson, allowing you to demonstrate
questioning strategies and other varied instructional strategies and materials
differentiated as appropriate for student needs
e. The way(s) you use formative assessment strategies as part of the instructional process
f. Your provision of a classroom environment conducive to learning—for example, positive
interactions, academic rigor, and efficient management of learning activities, students,
and materials
2. Record the lesson. Refer to the Uploading, Segmenting and Submitting Evidence Reference
Guide in Appendix F for details on recording lesson videos.
3. Collect all of your instructional evidence for this lesson and convert the related digital files into
acceptable file formats as required (see the technical FAQs, available on OhioRESA.com, for
information on which file types are acceptable). Form 1.3 and the RESA Instructional Evidence
Reference Guide in Appendix G provide more information about instructional evidence.
4. Complete Forms 1.1–1.5 online.
5. Note that each form is scored separately. Assessors do not have access to the entire response
while they are scoring the individual forms. You will be asked to provide contextual information
within the forms that is itself not scored, but provides essential information for assessors as
they evaluate the score portions of the response.
Glossary
Academic language: Oral and written language appropriate for academic purposes across content
areas as well as the content-specific vocabulary for a particular discipline or area of study.
Academic rigor: Appropriately high expectations for students in their use or application of central
concepts, skills, higher-order thinking, and/or problem solving in your content discipline.
Differentiated: Instruction is differentiated when it accounts for the various learning styles of students
and uses different strategies as a result.
Formative assessment: A formal or informal assessment used to evaluate students’ understanding
and skills in relation to learning outcomes. The results of a formative assessment are used to inform
instruction or to make modifications and adjustments during the lesson, which may be part of a larger
instructional unit or cycle. Formative assessments may take many forms, including oral or visual
presentations, group activities, performances, quizzes, anecdotal records based on systematic
observations of student behavior, running records, and written tasks during instruction and in homework
assignments.
Instructional evidence: Instructional materials, student assignments, and other kinds of teaching
materials that are used in your teaching. See Appendix G for guidelines on selecting appropriate
instructional evidence.
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Learning outcomes: The objectives of the lesson that reflect desired student learning.
Scaffolding: Ongoing support provided by the teacher to students as they acquire complex skills.
Form 1.1: Teaching and Learning Context Form
Complete the following Teaching and Learning Context Form online to provide information about the
students within the class.
This form is provided as context for the scoring of your analyses below, and is unscored. However, your
responses on this form will provide critical information that will help assessors to understand and
interpret the parts of the task that are scored.
School setting/environment*
Student ethnicity
Cauc
Hisp
Afr
Am
Multiracial
Native
Am
Subject area and course title (for example,
third-grade reading or U.S. History 1)
Asian
or
A-P Is
Characteristics of student population in this
class
Grade level(s)
Number of English Language Learners:
How often does the class meet (e.g., daily,
three days a week)?
How long is each class session (in minutes)?
What is the length of the course (e.g.,
quarterly, semester, yearlong)?
Total number of students
Students with Learning Disabilities:
Students struggling with grade-level
academic content but not yet diagnosed
with a disability:
Students who are gifted:
Total number of students with
exceptionalities:
Total number of students in the class section
who are high, mid, and low performing based
on data and/or your observations of student
proficiency with respect to the content area.
HIGH
Number of males
MID
LOW
Number of females
*For example: traditional elementary/middle/high school; school for the blind; magnet school for science
and mathematics; online education program; school for incarcerated students.
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Form 1.2: Lesson Overview and Commentary Form
Complete the following Lesson Overview and Commentary Form online to provide information about
the learning outcomes and overall structure of the lesson you selected for this task. This lesson
overview must describe the lesson you captured in the video. This form will be scored using Rubrics 1.2
A–1.2 B.
Each response should be complete and concise. Each answer (that is, each box) must not exceed 200
words unless otherwise noted. If you choose, your response may be in a bulleted list, in whole or in
part. Be brief and specific. We suggest that you write a first draft and carefully edit before you complete
each answer on this form.
1. Describe the content focus of the selected lesson and its importance in the overall context of the
content area. (Rubric 1.2 B)
2. List the learning outcomes for this lesson using the table below, explaining (a) why they are
academically rigorous and (b) how they are connected to your school and district priorities and the
Ohio Academic Content Standards or relevant national standards if the Ohio Academic Content
Standards do not apply. (Rubric 1.2 A) – (200 words for each of the three boxes below)
 Learning Outcomes:
Why are these learning outcomes academically
rigorous?
How are they connected to your school and
district priorities, and the Ohio Academic
Content Standards or relevant national
standards if the Ohio Academic Content
Standards do not apply?
3. Describe the prior knowledge and skills (including general language skills and academic language
skills) students need in order to achieve these learning outcomes. (Rubric 1.2 B)
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First Lesson Cycle (Task 1): Rubrics 1.2
First Lesson Cycle, Rubric 1.2 A Quality of Learning Outcomes
1.2 A: What does the evidence indicate about the quality of the teacher’s stated learning outcomes?
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Level 4
The learning outcomes as a whole are
characterized by most of the following:
The learning outcomes as a whole are
characterized by most of the following:
The learning outcomes as a whole are
characterized by most of the following:
The learning outcomes as a whole are
characterized by most of the following:
• low expectations for students
• lack of academic rigor in the
discipline
• lack of connection to school and
district curriculum priorities or state
academic content standards
• moderate expectations for students
• moderate academic rigor in the
discipline
• vague or unclear connection to
school and district curriculum
priorities and state academic
content standards
• some high expectations for students
• some indication of high levels of
academic rigor in the discipline
• generally clear connection to school
and district curriculum priorities and
state academic content standards
• high expectations for students
• consistent evidence of academic
rigor for all students
• full alignment with school and district
curriculum priorities and state
academic content standards
First Lesson Cycle, Rubric 1.2 B Teacher’s Knowledge of Content
1.2 B: What does the evidence indicate about the depth of the teacher’s knowledge of the content?
Level 1
Level 2
Level 4
The teacher displays the following:
The teacher displays the following:
The teacher displays the following:
The teacher displays the following:
• little depth of content knowledge
• little understanding of prerequisite
knowledge important to student
learning of the content
• familiarity with the important
concepts in the discipline but little to
no knowledge of how these
concepts are related to one another
• some awareness of prerequisite
knowledge important to student
learning of the content
• accurate understanding of important
concepts in the discipline and how
these relate to one another
• accurate understanding of
prerequisite relationships among
topics
• extensive knowledge of the important
concepts in the discipline and how
these relate to one another
• understanding of prerequisite
relationships among topics and
concepts and necessary cognitive
structures that ensure student
understanding
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Level 3
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Form 1.3: Instructional Strategies Overview Form
Complete the following Instructional Strategies Overview Form online to provide information about
the instructional strategies you used in the lesson you selected for this task. This form will be scored
using Rubrics 1.3 A–1.3 C.
Each response should be complete and concise. Each answer (that is, each box) must not exceed 200
words unless otherwise noted. If you choose, your response may be presented in a bulleted list, in
whole or in part. Be brief and specific. We suggest that you write a first draft and carefully edit before
you complete each answer on this form.
1. 275 words total for A and B
(A) Describe the sequence or order of instructional strategies during the lesson.
(B) Describe how you have differentiated your instruction in this lesson to appropriately meet the
needs of all of the students in this class (in particular, the subgroups you have mentioned in
Form 1.1: Teaching and Learning Context, and the range of student understandings in the
particular group of students shown in the video). Describe how the differences among students
in what they know, what they are struggling with, and what they are working on are addressed
in your plan to help students achieve the desired learning outcomes of this lesson.
(Rubric 1.3 A)
2. Analyze how your selected instructional strategies and learning activities support the academic
rigor of your learning outcomes for this lesson and the range of student understandings and varied
learning needs of students in this class. (Rubric 1.3 B)
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3. Describe the plan you made for formative assessment during this lesson prior to teaching the
videotaped lesson you have submitted. Note that this description does not deal with what actually
happened in the lesson, but rather with your planned strategy for formative assessment to monitor
progress toward learning outcomes. (Rubric 1.3 C)
Instructional Evidence
Submit at least one (1) and no more than ten (10) pages of instructional evidence that students
interacted with during the lesson to illustrate your teaching of this lesson. Note that instructional
evidence in this case includes the assignment, activity, etc., that students used or responded to during
the lesson; you should not submit student work as instructional evidence. (Rubric 1.3 D)
 You will be submitting evidence online, so, if the evidence is not a text-based document (a
physical manipulative material, for example), you will need to take a picture of the evidence and
scan or convert it to an acceptable file format. See the technical FAQs (available at
OhioRESA.com) for information on which file types are accepted.
 If one or more of your instructional strategies involved an activity that does not have tangible
evidence to submit, use the fields provided online to briefly and specifically analyze that activity
and its place in the lesson (each description will count as one page).
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First Lesson Cycle (Task 1): Rubrics 1.3
First Lesson Cycle, Rubric 1.3 A Teacher’s Knowledge of Students
1.3 A: What does the evidence indicate about the teacher’s understanding of the students’ knowledge and skills, special needs, interests, and cultural heritage?
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Level 4
The teacher displays minimal or
inaccurate knowledge of the students’
knowledge and skills, special needs,
interests, and cultural heritage.
The teacher displays minimal or
inaccurate knowledge of such
differentiators in the whole class as
student knowledge and skills, interests,
special needs, and/or cultural heritage,
and gives no evidence of applying any
knowledge of differentiation to plan
instruction.
The teacher displays limited but mostly
accurate knowledge of such
differentiators as student knowledge
and skills, interests, special needs,
and/or cultural heritage, and applies
this knowledge to plan instruction for
the class as a whole.
The teacher displays accurate
knowledge of such differentiators as
knowledge and skills, interests, special
needs, and/or cultural heritage for the
whole class as well as for specific
subgroups of students, and applies this
knowledge to differentiate instruction
for some subgroups in the class.
The teacher displays accurate and
detailed knowledge of such
differentiators as knowledge, skills,
special needs, interests, and/or cultural
heritage of individuals and subgroups
of students, and uses this knowledge
to consistently differentiate instruction
for individuals and subgroups in the
class.
First Lesson Cycle, Rubric 1.3 B Quality of Learning Activities
1.3 B: What does the evidence indicate about the quality of learning activities planned by the teacher?
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Level 4
The instructional strategies and
learning activities are characterized by
most or all of the following:
The instructional strategies and
learning activities are characterized by
most or all of the following:
The instructional strategies and
learning activities are characterized by
most or all of the following:
The instructional strategies and
learning activities are characterized by
most or all of the following:
• poorly aligned with the learning
outcomes
• limited cognitive challenge to engage
students in active intellectual activity
• not differentiated for different
students
• not supported by selected resources,
including, but not limited to,
technology
• partially aligned with the learning
outcomes
• moderate cognitive challenge
• not differentiated for different
students
• partially supported by selected
resources, including, but not limited
to, technology
• aligned with the learning outcomes
• examples of significant cognitive
challenge
• differentiated for different groups of
students
• supported by selected resources,
including, but not limited to,
technology
• aligned with the learning outcomes
• consistent significant cognitive
challenge
• differentiated, as needed, for
individual learners
• fully supported by the selected
resources, including, but not limited
to, technology
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First Lesson Cycle, Rubric 1.3 C Plan for Using Formative Assessment
1.3 C: What does the evidence indicate about the teacher’s plan for using assessments to monitor learning outcomes?
Level 1
Level 2
The teacher has no plan to incorporate
formative assessment in the lesson or
articulates a plan that does not
address the stated learning outcomes.
The teacher’s plan for using formative
assessment is general, and addresses
only some of the stated learning
outcomes.
Level 3
The teacher’s plan for using formative
assessment is detailed and includes
specific approaches to be used in
assessing most learning outcomes.
Level 4
The teacher’s plan for using formative
assessment includes assessment
strategies that evaluate all learning
outcomes and teacher use of the
assessment information.
First Lesson Cycle, Rubric 1.3 D Quality of Instructional Evidence
1.3 D: What does the evidence indicate about the quality of the activities, materials, and tasks for student use, and their support of the learning outcomes?
Level 1
The materials and tasks are minimally
or not at all aligned with the learning
outcomes.
Instructional activities require students
only to recall information.
Level 2
Level 3
The materials and tasks are partially
aligned with learning outcomes.
The materials and tasks are mostly
aligned with learning outcomes.
Instructional activities primarily require
students to recall information, but
include some indication that students
must comprehend and explain that
information as well.
Instructional activities require students
to go beyond recalling information,
asking them to analyze it or apply it in
other contexts.
Ohio RESA 2014-15 © 2014 Teachscape, Inc. and Charlotte Danielson
Level 4
The materials and tasks are well
aligned with learning outcomes, and
work to deepen student understanding.
Instructional activities require students
to evaluate quality, synthesize
information from multiple sources,
draw conclusions, make
generalizations, and/or produce
arguments.
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Form 1.4: Video Overview Form
Videos provide opportunities for you to showcase particular elements of the lesson that you will discuss
in your commentary. Videos provide depth and insights into teaching moments that go beyond what
can be captured in a real-time classroom observation. Take time to carefully choose the video
segments that provide the clearest demonstration of the lesson elements that you will write about in
your commentary. Careful selection of the video segments is itself an act of self-reflection, one of the
most important practices of effective teachers.
Complete the following Video Overview Form online. You will submit a video of an entire lesson (see
Appendix D for recommendations on choosing a lesson for videotaping), and select either one or two
segments from the lesson to illustrate your teaching skills as requested in this task. Each segment must
be at least 2 minutes in length, and the segments, taken together, cannot be more than 15 minutes in
length.
Each response should be complete and concise. Each answer (that is, each box) must not exceed 200
words unless otherwise noted. If you choose, your response may be presented in a bulleted list, in
whole or in part. Be brief and specific. We suggest that you write a first draft and carefully edit before
you complete each answer on this form.
1. Describe anything that happened in your classroom just prior to the videotaped segment that you
believe will help the assessor understand the context. (“Just prior” means that it occurred in the
minutes before the segment you have chosen begins, or, in the case of a segment that shows the
beginning of the class, the day before this class.) This answer is provided as context for the scoring
of your analyses below, and is unscored. However, your response will provide critical information
that will help assessors to understand and interpret the parts of the task that are scored.
2. What aspect of the content focus of this lesson is illustrated in the video segment(s)? Why is this
segment important? (Rubric 1. 4 A-1.4 B)
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3. Think about what actually took place when you taught this lesson. What, specifically, in the video
segment(s) demonstrates a method of formative assessment you used in this lesson? Briefly and
specifically articulate what you learned from this formative assessment and how you used this
information in this lesson or in subsequent lessons. (Rubric 1.4 E)
Video Observation
Your video of this lesson will be scored using Rubrics 1.4 A–1.4 E
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First Lesson Cycle (Task 1): Rubrics 1.4
First Lesson Cycle, Rubric 1.4 A Teacher’s Knowledge of Content
1.4 A: What does the evidence indicate about the depth of the teacher’s knowledge of the content?
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Level 4
The teacher displays the following:
The teacher displays the following:
The teacher displays the following:
The teacher displays the following:
• little depth of content knowledge
• little understanding of prerequisite
knowledge important to student
learning of the content
• familiarity with the important
concepts in the discipline but little to
no knowledge of how these
concepts are related to one another
• some awareness of prerequisite
knowledge important to student
learning of the content
• accurate understanding of important
concepts in the discipline and how
these relate to one another
• accurate understanding of
prerequisite relationships among
topics
• extensive knowledge of the important
concepts in the discipline and how
these relate to one another
• understanding of prerequisite
relationships among topics and
concepts and necessary cognitive
structures that ensure student
understanding
First Lesson Cycle, Rubric 1.4 B Teacher’s Explanation of Content
1.4 B: What does the video demonstrate about the teacher’s command of academic language in explaining content, the clarity of the teacher’s explanations, and the
teacher’s connections of content with students’ knowledge and experience?
Level 1
Level 2
The teacher’s explanation of the content
contains major errors and imprecise
academic language. There is no attempt
to connect with students’ knowledge
and experience.
The teacher’s explanation of the content
contains minor errors and/or imprecise
academic language. Some portions
may be clear, while others may be
difficult to follow. There is minimal
connection with students’ knowledge
and experience.
Ohio RESA 2014-15 © 2014 Teachscape, Inc. and Charlotte Danielson
Level 3
The teacher’s explanation of content is
appropriately scaffolded, accurate, and
uses appropriate academic language.
The explanation consistently connects
with students’ knowledge and
experience.
Level 4
The teacher’s explanation of content is
accurate, thorough, and clear,
developing conceptual understanding
through clear scaffolding and
connecting with students’ knowledge
and experience. Students contribute to
extending the content by explaining
concepts to their classmates and
sharing their own approaches to
learning the content.
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First Lesson Cycle, Rubric 1.4 C Classroom Environment Conducive to Learning
1.4 C: What does the video indicate about the classroom environment, related to the following?
• Respectful interactions
• Efficient routines and procedures
• Appropriate student behavior
• Student participation
Level 1
Overall, the class is disorganized,
student behavior is inappropriate, and
students are disengaged from the
lesson. There may be disrespectful
interactions, inefficient routines and
procedures, inappropriate student
conduct, and clear signs of boredom
and a lack of student participation.
Level 2
Level 3
Level 4
Overall, the class is somewhat
organized, with occasional
disrespectful interactions, inappropriate
conduct, some confused routines and
procedures, and generally low levels of
student participation in the lesson.
Overall, the class is well organized,
with consistently respectful
interactions, largely efficient routines
and procedures, generally appropriate
student conduct, and evidence of
student participation in the lesson.
Overall, the class is highly organized,
with students contributing to a
classroom atmosphere of high levels of
civility and respectful interactions,
smooth and practiced routines and
procedures, and consistently
appropriate student behavior. More
than half of the students are active
participants in the lesson.
First Lesson Cycle, Rubric 1.4 D Student Engagement
1.4 D: What does the video indicate about the level of intellectual engagement in the class?
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Level 4
The learning tasks/activities, materials,
and resources the teacher uses require
only rote responses. Very few students
appear intellectually engaged.
The learning tasks and activities the
teacher uses require only minimal
intellectual activity by students. Most
students appear to be passive or merely
compliant.
The learning tasks and activities the
teacher uses are designed to challenge
student thinking, inviting students to
make their thinking visible. Active
cognitive engagement by most students
is visible or audible.
Virtually all students are cognitively
engaged through learning tasks and
activities that require complex thinking
by students. There may be evidence of
some student initiation of inquiry and
student contributions to the exploration
of important content. Students may
serve as resources for one another.
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First Lesson Cycle, Rubric 1.4 E Use of Formative Assessment and Feedback in Instruction
1.4 E: What does the video indicate about the teacher’s use of formative assessment and feedback during the lesson?
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Level 4
The teacher demonstrates little or no
monitoring of student learning.
Feedback to students is absent or of
poor quality. Students do not engage in
self- or peer-assessment.
The teacher monitors student learning
for the class as a whole. Questions and
assessments are rarely used to
diagnose evidence of learning during
the lesson. Feedback to students is
general. The teacher’s reflection on the
formative assessment used indicates
some limited understanding of the
value of the formative assessment in
the lesson segment.
The teacher monitors student learning
for groups of students. Questions and
assessments are regularly used to
diagnose evidence of learning during
the lesson. Teacher feedback to
groups of students is accurate and
specific. The teacher’s reflection on the
formative assessment used indicates
understanding of the value of the
formative assessment in the lesson
segment, and the teacher draws some
specific conclusions from the
assessment about the status of student
learning.
The teacher fully integrates
assessment into instruction. Questions
and assessments are used regularly
throughout the lesson to diagnose
evidence of learning by individual
students, as well as groups and the
class. Teacher feedback is varied in
form, accurate and specific, and
advances learning. The teacher’s
reflection on the formative assessment
used indicates conscious command of
formative assessment in the lesson
segment, and the teacher draws
specific and insightful conclusions from
the assessment about the status of
student learning.
The teacher’s reflection on the
formative assessment used does not
indicate an understanding of the value
of formative assessment methods.
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Form 1.5: Overall Lesson Analysis Form
Complete the following Overall Lesson Analysis Form online. This form will be scored using Rubric
1.5 A. Please note that whether or not the lesson was completely successful in achieving all of your
learning outcomes is less important than your ability to convincingly identify the reasons it fell short (if it
did) of your intentions.
Each response should be complete and concise. Each answer (that is, each box) must not exceed 200
words unless otherwise noted. If you choose, your response may be presented in a bulleted list, in
whole or in part. Be brief and specific. We suggest that you write a first draft and carefully edit before
you complete each answer on this form.
1. Overall, how successful was this lesson in relation to the learning outcomes stated in your lesson
overview? Be specific in your answer, and explain what evidence (student behaviors, responses)
supports your answer. (Rubric 1.5 A)
2. Which of your selected instructional strategies for this lesson was/were most successful in
supporting the range of student understandings and varied learning needs of students in this
class? (Rubric 1.5 A)
3. Which instructional strategies, if any, would you change in re-teaching this lesson, and why? If you
would not change anything, explain why you would make that decision. (Rubric 1.5 A)
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f
First Lesson Cycle (Task 1): Rubric 1.5
f:
First Lesson Cycle, 1.5 A Overall Lesson Reflection
1.5 A: What does the evidence indicate about the teacher’s ability to accurately evaluate the lesson, using the video and other evidence, and to suggest specific
alternatives for improvement?
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Level 4
The teacher cannot accurately evaluate
the lesson.
• The teacher draws a partly accurate
conclusion or conclusions about the
extent to which learning outcomes
were met.
• The teacher shows limited
awareness of the evidence for the
relative effectiveness of instructional
strategies in the lesson.
• The teacher makes general or
surface-level suggestions about how
the lesson could be improved but
does not explain why these
suggestions might be effective or
offers only a vague explanation of
their potential effectiveness.
• The teacher draws accurate
conclusions about the extent to which
learning outcomes were met, and
can cite general references to
support those conclusions.
• The teacher offers some specific
suggestions for alternative
instructional strategies to improve the
lesson and explains why they are
likely to be effective.
• The teacher draws accurate
conclusions about the extent to which
learning outcomes were met, citing
specific examples from the lesson to
support a judgment that draws clear
distinctions about effectiveness of
strategies.
• The teacher offers a convincing
rationale for either keeping the lesson
the same or adding alternative
instructional strategies to improve the
lesson.
• The teacher does not know whether
the lesson was effective or if it
achieved its expected learning
outcomes.
or
• The teacher profoundly misjudges the
success of a lesson.
The teacher makes no relevant or
actionable suggestions for how the
lesson could be improved.
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Second Lesson Cycle (Task 3)
Purpose
In years 1 and 2, Resident Educators, through the support of mentors, have systematically and
continually engaged in the cycle of inquiry and reflection as they progressed through the TeachingLearning Cycle.
Self-reflection on instructional practices and the use of instructional evidence are essential
components to ongoing professional development and growth.
Task 3, like Task 1, asks you to demonstrate your understanding of and ability to implement the plan,
teach, reflect elements of the Teaching-Learning Cycle, in real time, and to describe, reflect on, and
analyze how and why lesson planning decisions were made and how they were implemented.
As in Task 1, Task 3 asks that you carefully select a video segment that showcases particular elements
of the lesson that you will discuss in your commentary. The Second Lesson Cycle Task provides you with
the opportunity to think deeply and reflect upon your teaching progress and its impact on student
learning.
Overview
In this task, you will assemble a portfolio of evidence that demonstrates your work with students in the
context of a single lesson. You will submit
•
•
•
•
•
•
A description of the students and your classroom
A lesson overview
A videotape of that lesson identifying specific segments for assessors to watch
A commentary on that videotape
All instructional evidence associated with the lesson
An analysis of the entire lesson
Evidence Sources
Note: In this task, you must choose a lesson different from the one chosen for Task 1.
All forms, instructional evidence, and video segment(s) will be submitted online.
 Teaching and Learning Context Form (Form 3.1)
 Lesson Overview and Commentary Form (Form 3.2)
 Up to 10 pages of instructional evidence that students used during the lesson (see directions,
Form 3.2)
 Instructional Strategies Overview Form (Form 3.3)
 Video Overview Form (Form 3.4)
 Video segment(s)
 Overall Lesson Analysis Form (Form 3.5)
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Note: The questions on each of the required forms for this task will help you to understand the kind of
lesson you should select in order to demonstrate your practice and comment on it appropriately.
Therefore, we recommend that you review the forms before selecting a lesson to submit. You will not be
required to submit a formal lesson plan, though you may find that you can insert parts of your lesson plan
in response to the specific questions on the forms below. All lesson information will be provided through
the forms, instructional evidence, and video segments.
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What You Must Do
1. Choose a lesson that allows you to demonstrate all of the following:
a. Important content clearly connected to your school and district priorities, the Ohio
Academic Content Standards and/or national standards for subject areas that do not have
Ohio Academic Content Standards
b. Academically rigorous expectations for student learning
c. Explanation of content
d. Direct engagement with students during the lesson, allowing you to demonstrate
questioning strategies and other varied instructional strategies and materials differentiated
as appropriate for student needs
e. The way(s) you use formative assessment strategies as part of the instructional process
f. Your provision of a classroom environment conducive to learning—for example, positive
interactions, academic rigor, and efficient management of learning activities, students, and
materials
2. Record the lesson. Refer to the Uploading, Segmenting, and Submitting Evidence Reference
Guide in Appendix F for details on recording lesson videos.
3. Collect all of your instructional evidence for this lesson and convert the related digital files into
acceptable file formats as required (see the technical FAQs, available on OhioRESA.com, for
information on which file types are acceptable). Form 3.3 and the RESA Instructional Evidence
Reference Guide in Appendix G provide more information about instructional evidence.
4. Complete Forms 3.1–3.5 online.
5. Note that each form is scored separately. Assessors do not have access to the entire response
while they are scoring the individual forms. You will be asked to provide contextual information
within the forms that is not itself scored, but provides essential information for assessors as they
evaluate the score portions of the response.
Glossary
Academic language: Oral and written language appropriate for academic purposes across content
areas as well as the content-specific vocabulary for a particular discipline or area of study.
Academic rigor: Appropriately high expectations for students in their use or application of central
concepts, skills, higher-order thinking, and/or problem solving in your content discipline.
Differentiated: Instruction is differentiated when it accounts for the various learning styles of students
and uses different strategies as a result.
Formative assessment: A formal or informal assessment used to evaluate students’ understanding and
skills in relation to learning outcomes. The results of a formative assessment are used to inform
instruction or to make modifications and adjustments during the lesson, which may be part of a larger
instructional unit or cycle. Formative assessments may take many forms, including oral or visual
presentations, group activities, performances, quizzes, anecdotal records based on systematic
observations of student behavior, running records, and written tasks during instruction and in homework
assignments.
Instructional evidence: Instructional materials, student assignments, and other kinds of teaching
materials that are used in your teaching. See Appendix G for guidelines on selecting appropriate
instructional evidence.
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Learning outcomes: The objectives of the lesson that reflect desired student learning.
Scaffolding: Ongoing support provided by the teacher to students as they acquire complex skills.
Form 3.1: Teaching and Learning Context Form
Complete the following Teaching and Learning Context Form online to provide information about the
students within the class.
This form is provided as context for the scoring of your analyses below, and is unscored. However, your
responses on this form will provide critical information that will help assessors to understand and
interpret the parts of the task that are scored.
School setting/environment*
Student ethnicity
Cauc
Hisp
Afr
Am
Multiracial
Native
Am
Subject area and course title (for example,
third-grade reading or U.S. History 1)
Asian
or
A-P Is
Characteristics of student population in this
class
Grade level(s)
Number of English Language Learners:
How often does the class meet (e.g., daily,
three days a week)?
How long is each class session (in minutes)?
What is the length of the course (e.g.,
quarterly, semester, yearlong)?
Total number of students
Students with Learning Disabilities:
Students struggling with grade-level
academic content but not yet diagnosed
with a disability:
Students who are gifted:
Total number of students with
exceptionalities:
Total number of students in the class section
who are high, mid, and low performing based
on data and/or your observations of student
proficiency with respect to the content area.
HIGH
Number of males
MID
LOW
Number of females
*For example: traditional elementary/middle/high school; school for the blind; magnet school for science
and mathematics; online education program; school for incarcerated students.
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Form 3.2: Lesson Overview and Commentary Form
Complete the following Lesson Overview and Commentary Form online to provide information about
the learning outcomes and overall structure of the lesson you selected for this task. This lesson
overview must describe the lesson you captured in the video. This form will be scored using Rubrics 3.2
A–3.2 B.
Each response should be complete and concise. Each answer (that is, each box) must not exceed 200
words unless otherwise noted. If you choose, your response may be in a bulleted list, in whole or in
part. Be brief and specific. We suggest that you write a first draft and carefully edit before you complete
each answer on this form.
1. Describe the content focus of the selected lesson and its importance in the overall context of the
content area. (Rubric 3.2 B)
2. List the learning outcomes for this lesson using the table below, explaining (a) why they are
academically rigorous and (b) how they are connected to your school and district priorities and the
Ohio Academic Content Standards or relevant national standards if the Ohio Academic Content
Standards do not apply. (Rubric 3.2 A) - (200 words for each of the three boxes below)
 Learning Outcomes:
Why are these learning outcomes academically
rigorous?
How are they connected to your school and
district priorities, and the Ohio Academic
Content Standards or relevant national
standards if the Ohio Academic Content
Standards do not apply?
3. Describe the prior knowledge and skills (including general language skills and academic language
skills) students need in order to achieve these learning outcomes. (Rubric 3.2 B)
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Second Lesson Cycle (Task 3): Rubrics 3.2
Second Lesson Cycle, Rubric 3.2 A Quality of Learning Outcomes
3.2 A: What does the evidence indicate about the quality of the teacher’s stated learning outcomes?
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Level 4
The learning outcomes as a whole are
characterized by most of the following
The learning outcomes as a whole are
characterized by most of the following
The learning outcomes as a whole are
characterized by most of the following
The learning outcomes as a whole are
characterized by most of the following
• low expectations for students
• lack of academic rigor in the
discipline
• lack of connection to school and
district curriculum priorities or state
academic content standards
• moderate expectations for students
• moderate academic rigor in the
discipline
• vague or unclear connection to
school and district curriculum
priorities and state academic
content standards
• some high expectations for students
• some indication of high levels of
academic rigor in the discipline
• generally clear connection to school
and district curriculum priorities and
state academic content standards
• high expectations for students
• consistent evidence of academic
rigor for all students
• full alignment with school and district
curriculum priorities and state
academic content standards
Second Lesson Cycle, Rubric 3.2 B Teacher’s Knowledge of Content
3.2 B: What does the evidence indicate about the depth of the teacher’s knowledge of the content?
Level 1
The teacher displays the following:
•
•
little depth of content knowledge
little understanding of prerequisite
knowledge important to student
learning of the content
Level 2
Level 3
Level 4
The teacher displays the following:
The teacher displays the following:
The teacher displays the following:
• familiarity with the important
concepts in the discipline but little to
no knowledge of how these
concepts are related to one another
• some awareness of prerequisite
knowledge important to student
learning of the content
• accurate understanding of important
concepts in the discipline and how
these relate to one another
• accurate understanding of
prerequisite relationships among
topics
• extensive knowledge of the important
concepts in the discipline and how
these relate to one another
• understanding of prerequisite
relationships among topics and
concepts and necessary cognitive
structures that ensure student
understanding
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Form 3.3: Instructional Strategies Overview Form
Complete the following Instructional Strategies Overview Form online to provide information about
the instructional strategies you used in the lesson you selected for this task. This form will be scored
using Rubrics 3.3 A–3.3 D.
Each response should be complete and concise. Each answer (that is, each box) must not exceed 200
words unless otherwise noted. If you choose, your response may be presented in a bulleted list, in
whole or in part. Be brief and specific. We suggest that you write a first draft and carefully edit before
you complete each answer on this form.
1. 275 words total for A and B
(A) Describe the sequence or order of instructional strategies during the lesson.
(B) Describe how you have differentiated your instruction in this lesson to appropriately meet the
needs of all of the students in this class (in particular, the subgroups you have mentioned in Form
3.1: Teaching and Learning Context Form, and the range of student understandings in the particular
group of students shown in the video). Describe how the differences among students in what they
know, what they are struggling with, and what they are working on are addressed in your plan to
help students achieve the desired learning outcomes of this lesson. (Rubric 3.3 A)
2. Analyze how your selected instructional strategies and learning activities support the academic rigor
of your learning outcomes for this lesson and the range of student understandings and varied
learning needs of students in this class. (Rubric 3.3 B)
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3. Describe the plan you made for formative assessment during this lesson prior to teaching the
videotaped lesson you have submitted. Note that this description does not deal with what actually
happened in the lesson, but rather with your planned strategy for formative assessment to monitor
progress toward learning outcomes. (Rubric 3.3 C)
Instructional Evidence
Submit at least one (1) and no more than ten (10) pages of instructional evidence that students
interacted with during the lesson to illustrate your teaching of this lesson. Note that instructional
evidence in this case includes the assignment, activity, etc., that students used or responded to during
the lesson; you should not submit student work as instructional evidence. (Rubric 3.3 D)
 You will be submitting evidence online, so, if the evidence is not a text-based document (a
physical manipulative material, for example), you will need to take a picture of the evidence and
scan or convert it to an acceptable file format. See the technical FAQs (available at
OhioRESA.com) for information on which file types are accepted.
 If one or more of your instructional strategies involved an activity that does not produce tangible
evidence to submit, use the fields provided online to briefly and specifically analyze that activity
and its place in the lesson (each description will count as one page).
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Second Lesson Cycle (Task 3): Rubrics 3.3
Second Lesson Cycle, Rubric 3.3 A Teacher’s Knowledge of Students
3.3 A: What does the evidence indicate about the teacher’s understanding of the students’ knowledge and skills, special needs, interests, and cultural heritage?
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Level 4
The teacher displays minimal or
inaccurate knowledge of the students’
knowledge and skills, special needs,
interests, and cultural heritage.
The teacher displays minimal or
inaccurate knowledge of such
differentiators in the whole class as
student knowledge and skills, interests,
special needs, and/or cultural heritage,
and gives no evidence of applying any
knowledge of differentiation to plan
instruction.
The teacher displays limited but mostly
accurate knowledge of such
differentiators as student knowledge
and skills, interests, special needs,
and/or cultural heritage, and applies
this knowledge to plan instruction for
the class as a whole.
The teacher displays accurate
knowledge of such differentiators as
knowledge and skills, interests, special
needs, and/or cultural heritage for the
whole class as well as for specific
subgroups of students, and applies this
knowledge to differentiate instruction
for some subgroups in the class.
The teacher displays accurate and
detailed knowledge of such
differentiators as knowledge, skills,
special needs, interests, and/or cultural
heritage of individuals and subgroups
of students, and uses this knowledge
to consistently differentiate instruction
for individuals and subgroups in the
class.
Second Lesson Cycle, Rubric 3.3 B Quality of Learning Activities
3.3 B: What does the evidence indicate about the quality of learning activities planned by the teacher?
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Level 4
The instructional strategies and
learning activities are characterized by
most or all of the following:
The instructional strategies and
learning activities are characterized by
most or all of the following:
The instructional strategies and
learning activities are characterized by
most or all of the following:
The instructional strategies and
learning activities are characterized by
most or all of the following:
• partially aligned with the learning
outcomes
• moderate cognitive challenge
• not differentiated for different
students
• partially supported by selected
resources, including technology
• aligned with the learning outcomes
• examples of significant cognitive
challenge
• differentiated for different groups of
students
• supported by selected resources,
including technology
• aligned with the learning outcomes
• consistent significant cognitive
challenge
• differentiated, as needed, for
individual learners
• fully supported by the selected
resources, including but not limited to
technology
•
•
•
•
poorly aligned with the learning
outcomes
limited cognitive challenge to
engage students in active
intellectual activity
not differentiated for different
students
not supported by selected
resources, including technology
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Second Lesson Cycle, Rubric 3.3 C Plan for Using Formative Assessment
3.3 C: What does the evidence indicate about the teacher’s plan for using assessments to monitor learning outcomes?
Level 1
Level 2
The teacher has no plan to incorporate
formative assessment in the lesson or
articulates a plan that does not
address the stated learning outcomes.
The teacher’s plan for using formative
assessment is general, and addresses
only some of the stated learning
outcomes.
Level 3
The teacher’s plan for using formative
assessment is detailed and includes
specific approaches to be used in
assessing most learning outcomes.
Level 4
The teacher’s plan for using formative
assessment includes assessment
strategies that evaluate all learning
outcomes and teacher use of the
assessment information.
Second Lesson Cycle, Rubric 3.3 D Quality of Instructional Evidence
3.3 D: What does the evidence indicate about the quality of the activities, materials, and tasks for student use, and their support of the learning outcomes?
Level 1
The materials and tasks are minimally
or not at all aligned with the learning
outcomes.
Instructional activities require students
only to recall information.
Level 2
Level 3
The materials and tasks are partially
aligned with learning outcomes.
The materials and tasks are mostly
aligned with learning outcomes.
Instructional activities primarily require
students to recall information, but
include some indication that students
must comprehend and explain that
information as well.
Instructional activities require students
to go beyond recalling information,
asking them to analyze it or apply it in
other contexts.
Ohio RESA 2014-15 © 2014 Teachscape, Inc. and Charlotte Danielson
Level 4
The materials and tasks are well
aligned with learning outcomes, and
work to deepen student understanding.
Instructional activities require students
to evaluate quality, synthesize
information from multiple sources,
draw conclusions, make
generalizations, and/or produce
arguments.
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Form 3.4: Video Overview Form
Complete the following Video Overview Form online. You will submit a video of an entire lesson (see
Appendix D for recommendations on choosing a lesson for videotaping), and select either one or two
segments from the lesson to illustrate your teaching skills as requested in this task. Each segment must
be at least 2 minutes in length, and the segments, taken together, cannot be more than 15 minutes in
length.
Each response should be complete and concise. Each answer (that is, each box) must not exceed 200
words unless otherwise noted. If you choose, your response may be presented in a bulleted list, in
whole or in part. Be brief and specific. We suggest that you write a first draft and carefully edit before
you complete each answer on this form.
1. Describe anything that happened in your classroom just prior to the videotaped segment that you
believe will help the assessor understand the context. (“Just prior” means that it occurred in the
minutes before the segment you have chosen begins, or, in the case of a segment that shows the
beginning of the class, the day before this class.) This answer is provided as context for the scoring
of your analyses below, and is unscored. However, your response will provide critical information
that will help assessors to understand and interpret the parts of the task that are scored.
2. What aspect of the content focus of this lesson is illustrated in the video segment(s)? Why is this
segment important? (Rubric 3.4 A-B)
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3. Think about what actually took place when you taught this lesson. What, specifically, in the video
segment(s) demonstrates a method of formative assessment you used in this lesson? Briefly and
specifically articulate what you learned from this formative assessment and how you used this
information in this lesson or in subsequent lessons. (Rubric 3.4 E)
Video Observation
Your video of this lesson will be scored using Rubrics 3.4 A–3.4 D
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Second Lesson Cycle (Task 3): Rubrics 3.4
Second Lesson Cycle, Rubric 3.4 A Teacher’s Knowledge of Content
3.4 A What does the evidence indicate about the depth of the teacher’s knowledge of the content?
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Level 4
The teacher displays the following:
The teacher displays the following:
The teacher displays the following:
The teacher displays the following:
• little depth of content knowledge
• little understanding of prerequisite
knowledge important to student
learning of the content
• familiarity with the important
concepts in the discipline but little to
no knowledge of how these
concepts are related to one another
• some awareness of prerequisite
knowledge important to student
learning of the content
• accurate understanding of important
concepts in the discipline and how
these relate to one another
• accurate understanding of
prerequisite relationships among
topics
• extensive knowledge of the important
concepts in the discipline and how
these relate to one another
• understanding of prerequisite
relationships among topics and
concepts and necessary cognitive
structures that ensure student
understanding
Second Lesson Cycle, Rubric 3.4 B Teacher’s Explanation of Content
3.4 B: What does the video demonstrate about the teacher’s command of academic language in explaining content, the clarity of the teacher’s explanations, and the
teacher’s connections of content with students’ knowledge and experience?
Level 1
Level 2
The teacher’s explanation of the content
contains major errors and imprecise
academic language. There is no attempt
to connect with students’ knowledge
and experience.
The teacher’s explanation of the content
contains minor errors and/or imprecise
academic language. Some portions
may be clear, while others may be
difficult to follow. There is minimal
connection with students’ knowledge
and experience.
Ohio RESA 2014-15 © 2014 Teachscape, Inc. and Charlotte Danielson
Level 3
The teacher’s explanation of content is
appropriately scaffolded, accurate, and
uses appropriate academic language.
The explanation consistently connects
with students’ knowledge and
experience.
Level 4
The teacher’s explanation of content is
accurate, thorough, and clear,
developing conceptual understanding
through clear scaffolding and
connecting with students’ knowledge
and experience. Students contribute to
extending the content by explaining
concepts to their classmates and
sharing their own approaches to
learning the content.
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Second Lesson Cycle, Rubric 3.4 C Classroom Environment Conducive to Learning
3.4 C: What does the video indicate about the classroom environment, related to the following?
• Respectful interactions
• Efficient routines and procedures
• Appropriate student behavior
• Student participation
Level 1
Overall, the class is disorganized,
student behavior is inappropriate, and
students are disengaged from the
lesson. There may be disrespectful
interactions, inefficient routines and
procedures, inappropriate student
conduct, and clear signs of boredom
and a lack of student participation.
Level 2
Level 3
Level 4
Overall, the class is somewhat
organized, with occasional disrespectful
interactions, inappropriate conduct,
some confused routines and
procedures, and generally low levels of
student participation in the lesson.
Overall, the class is well organized,
with consistently respectful interactions,
largely efficient routines and
procedures, generally appropriate
student conduct, and evidence of
student participation in the lesson.
Overall, the class is highly organized,
with students contributing to a
classroom atmosphere of high levels of
civility and respectful interactions,
smooth and practiced routines and
procedures, and consistently
appropriate student behavior. More
than half of the students are active
participants in the lesson.
Second Lesson Cycle, Rubric 3.4 D Student Engagement
3.4 D: What does the video indicate about the level of intellectual engagement in the class?
Level 1
The learning tasks/activities, materials,
and resources the teacher uses require
only rote responses. Very few students
appear intellectually engaged.
Level 2
Level 3
The learning tasks and activities the
teacher uses require only minimal
intellectual activity by students. Most
students appear to be passive or merely
compliant.
The learning tasks and activities the
teacher uses are designed to challenge
student thinking, inviting students to
make their thinking visible. Active
cognitive engagement by most students
is visible or audible.
Ohio RESA 2014-15 © 2014 Teachscape, Inc. and Charlotte Danielson
Level 4
Virtually all students are cognitively
engaged through learning tasks and
activities that require complex thinking
by students. There may be evidence of
some student initiation of inquiry and
student contributions to the exploration
of important content. Students may
serve as resources for one another.
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Second Lesson Cycle, Rubric 3.4 E Use of Formative Assessment and Feedback in Instruction
3.4 E.4: What does the video indicate about the teacher’s use of formative assessment and feedback during the lesson?
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Level 4
The teacher demonstrates little or no
monitoring of student learning.
Feedback to students is absent or of
poor quality. Students do not engage in
self- or peer-assessment.
The teacher monitors student learning
for the class as a whole. Questions and
assessments are rarely used to
diagnose evidence of learning during
the lesson. Feedback to students is
general. The teacher’s reflection on the
formative assessment used indicates
some limited understanding of the
value of the formative assessment in
the lesson segment.
The teacher monitors student learning
for groups of students. Questions and
assessments are regularly used to
diagnose evidence of learning during
the lesson. Teacher feedback to groups
of students is accurate and specific.
The teacher’s reflection on the
formative assessment used indicates
understanding of the value of the
formative assessment in the lesson
segment, and the teacher draws some
specific conclusions from the
assessment about the status of student
learning.
The teacher fully integrates assessment
into instruction. Questions and
assessments are used regularly
throughout the lesson to diagnose
evidence of learning by individual
students, as well as groups and the
class. Teacher feedback is varied in
form, accurate and specific, and
advances learning. The teacher’s
reflection on the formative assessment
used indicates conscious command of
formative assessment in the lesson
segment, and the teacher draws
specific and insightful conclusions from
the assessment about the status of
student learning.
The teacher’s reflection on the
formative assessment used does not
indicate an understanding of the value
of formative assessment methods.
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Form 3.5: Overall Lesson Analysis Form
Complete the following Overall Lesson Analysis Form online. This form will be scored using Rubric
3.5 A. Please note that whether or not the lesson was completely successful in achieving all of your
learning outcomes is less important than your ability to convincingly identify the reasons it fell short (if it
did) of your intentions.
Each response should be complete and concise. Each answer (that is, each box) must not exceed 200
words unless other noted. If you choose, your response may be presented in a bulleted list, in whole
or in part. Be brief and specific. We suggest that you write a first draft and carefully edit before you
complete each answer on this form.
1. Overall, how successful was this lesson in relation to the learning outcomes stated in your lesson
overview? Be specific in your answer, and explain what evidence (student behaviors, responses)
supports your answer. (Rubric 3.5 A)
2. Which of your selected instructional strategies for this lesson was/were most successful in
supporting the range of student understandings and varied learning needs of students in this
class? (Rubric 3.5 A)
3. Which instructional strategies, if any, would you change in re-teaching this lesson, and why? If you
would not change anything, explain why you would make that decision. (Rubric 3.5 A)
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Second Lesson Cycle (Task 3): Rubric 3.5
Second Lesson Cycle, Rubric 3.5 A Overall Lesson Reflection
3.5 A: What does the evidence indicate about the teacher’s ability to accurately evaluate the lesson, using the video and other evidence, and to suggest specific
alternatives for improvement?
Level 1
The teacher cannot accurately
evaluate the lesson.
• The teacher does not know whether
the lesson was effective or if it
achieved its expected learning
outcomes.
or
• The teacher profoundly misjudges
the success of a lesson.
The teacher makes no relevant or
actionable suggestions for how the
lesson could be improved.
Level 2
•
•
•
The teacher draws a partly
accurate conclusion or conclusions
about the extent to which learning
outcomes were met.
The teacher shows limited
awareness of the evidence for the
relative effectiveness of
instructional strategies in the
lesson.
The teacher makes general or
surface-level suggestions about
how the lesson could be improved
but does not explain why these
suggestions might be effective or
offers only a vague explanation of
their potential effectiveness.
Ohio RESA 2014-15 © 2014 Teachscape, Inc. and Charlotte Danielson
a
Level 3
•
•
The teacher draws accurate
conclusions about the extent to
which learning outcomes were met,
and can cite general references to
support those conclusions.
The teacher offers some specific
suggestions for alternative
instructional strategies to improve
the lesson and explains why they
are likely to be effective.
Level 4
•
•
The teacher draws accurate
conclusions about the extent to
which learning outcomes were met,
citing specific examples from the
lesson to support a judgment that
draws clear distinctions about
effectiveness of strategies.
The teacher offers a convincing
rationale for either keeping the
lesson the same or adding
alternative instructional strategies
to improve the lesson.
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Formative and Summative Assessment (Task 2)
Purpose
In years 1 and 2, Resident Educators, through the support of mentors, have systematically and
continually engaged in the cycle of inquiry and reflection as they progressed through the TeachingLearning Cycle.
Self-reflection on instructional practice and the use of instructional evidence are essential
components to ongoing professional development and growth. The Formative and Summative
Assessment Task asks you to demonstrate your understanding of and ability to implement the plan,
teach, reflect elements of the Teaching-Learning Cycle, and to describe, analyze, and reflect upon
how evidence from assessments was used to modify your teaching practice as needed and to improve
student learning.
An instructional unit provides students with learning experiences that address an integrated set of
connected topics and concepts over the course of multiple lessons. Task 2 addresses your ability to
use formative and summative assessment in an instructional unit to monitor student progress toward
the intended learning outcomes and to adjust your instruction as needed based on the assessment
results. Your instructional unit should consist of a minimum of 10 days or class periods and a
maximum of 20 days or class periods.
Overview
To complete Task 2, you will submit information about an instructional unit you have taught. This
consists of several parts:
•
•
•
•
•
A description of the students and your classroom, to provide assessors with the context in which
you work
A commentary about your instructional unit explaining your intended learning outcomes—both
the interim outcomes at important check points during the unit and the final outcomes at the end
of the unit—and the alignment of your selected formative and summative assessments with
these outcomes
Two formative assessments you used during the unit to assess important interim learning
outcomes
One summative assessment you used to assess the learning outcomes of the unit as a whole
Individual assessment responses for three students and an analysis of what these tell you about
each individual student’s progress toward mastery of your learning outcomes
Evidence Sources
All forms and additional evidence sources, such as the selected student responses, will be submitted
online.




Teaching and Learning Context Form (Form 2.1)
Instructional Unit Context Form (Form 2.2)
Assessments (Form 2.3)
Assessment Plan (Form 2.4)
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 Three (3) student responses to Formative Assessment 1, one low-performing, one midperforming, and one high-performing, as measured on whatever scoring criteria are used. Note
that the requirement here is to find examples of student understanding of the interim learning
objectives that represent the full range—top, middle, bottom—of your class
 The same three students’ responses to Formative Assessment 2 and the Summative
Assessment
 Assessment Results Analysis/Three Selected Students (Form 2.5)
What You Must Do
1. Choose an instructional unit that demonstrates the following and does not include the lessons
featured in the individual Lesson Cycle tasks (Tasks 1 and 3) in this assessment.
a. Important content clearly connected to your school and district priorities, the Ohio
Academic Content Standards and/or national standards for subject areas that do not
have Ohio Academic Content Standards
b. Academically rigorous expectations for student learning
c. Formative and summative assessments of student learning of content across the
instructional unit and aligned to the learning outcomes
d. Opportunities for students to self-assess and set learning goals during the instructional
unit
2. Select two formative assessments (Formative 1 and 2) and one summative assessment
that you used in the instructional unit. These assessments should provide evidence of student
progress toward academically rigorous learning outcomes and/or standards that are the focus of
the instructional unit. Assessments may take many forms, from specially designed questions to
ask of students during instruction, or more formal solicitations of their understanding of the
content through written, oral, material and/or visual responses, or performances. Assessments
that are not written may be captured through photographs, audio clips, and video clips. Indicate,
for each assessment, how the student responses were evaluated, e.g., a rubric or a point
system.
3. Using results from Formative Assessment 1, choose one low-performing, one mid-level
performing, and one high-performing student. These are the three students you will track
across all three assessments. By analyzing their responses to each assessment, you will
demonstrate your use of formative assessment results to adjust your instruction, when that is
needed. You will submit each student’s responses to each assessment (Formative Assessment
1, Formative Assessment 2, and Summative Assessment).
4. Complete Forms 2.1–2.5.
Notes for Candidates:
• You will have better opportunities to demonstrate your ability to analyze student learning if you
choose an instructional unit in which there was considerable variability in student performance.
In that way, you’ll be able to demonstrate your skill in analyzing the performance of, and
planning subsequent instruction for, students representing the full range of performance.
• Formative assessment is often a spontaneous outgrowth of what is happening right at the
moment in your teaching and students’ learning. This means that formative assessments may
be as simple as a single question, a call for an immediate response in student notebooks or on
the board, or a brief survey of student comprehension across the whole class. However, to be
useful to you, any formative assessment must be evaluated, and some sense of the individual
difference in student understandings must result from this evaluation. Summative assessment,
on the other hand, is typically a planned and more formal assessment of what students know
and are able to do at some particular point in your instructional unit—typically at the end.
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•
•
•
Remember also that “interim learning outcomes” are the steps in learning that are necessary for
students to eventually master the learning outcomes for the entire unit.
Each of the formative assessments you select should offer students an opportunity for selfassessment. You will be asked to comment on those self-assessments in your analysis.
This task asks you to articulate the next steps in instruction for each of the three selected
students, based on the results of the assessments you are submitting. This part of the task
invites you to describe the ways in which you may have individualized instruction for each
student on some part of the content. For example, your response to an individual student’s
assessment response might be that he or she needs more practice (or possibly enrichment) in
one of the skills or areas you are emphasizing for the whole class.
Note that your submission for this task will be deemed unscorable if there are substantive errors
in the scoring/grading of the student assessment in the student samples you provide. Scoring
errors will result in a failing score for Task 2. Please review your submissions carefully for
accuracy.
Glossary
Academic rigor: Appropriately high expectations for students in their use or application of central
concepts, skills, higher-order thinking, and/or problem solving in the discipline.
Assessment criteria: Performance indicators used to evaluate what students have learned.
Assessment criteria describe expected levels of achievement on an assessment and may examine
correctness of answers or the accuracy or quality of student responses. Examples include rubrics,
checklists, point systems for indicating different levels of performance, or criteria for measuring full
versus partial credit.
Central focus: The primary topic(s), concept(s), or essential question(s) that represent the ultimate
learning target for the instructional cycle.
Formative assessment: A formal or informal assessment used to evaluate students’ understanding
and skills in relation to learning outcomes. The results of a formative assessment are used to inform
instruction or to make modifications and adjustments during the lesson, which may be part of a larger
instructional unit or cycle. Formative assessments may take many forms, including oral or visual
presentations, group activities, performances, quizzes, anecdotal records based on systematic
observations of student behavior, running records, and written tasks during instruction and in homework
assignments.
Higher-order thinking: Thinking skills that go beyond recalling facts or correct answers and involve
some cognitive complexity, for example, analysis, interpretation, compare/contrast, categorization,
evaluation, synthesis, drawing evidence-based conclusions, and generating rules, questions, or ideas.
Interim Student Learning Outcomes: The learning objectives that represent essential steps toward
mastery of the larger (overall) learning goals of the unit of study.
Language needs: Refers to the needs of students who are English language learners and native
English speakers with different levels of language proficiency.
Learning outcomes: The objectives of the lesson that reflect desired student learning.
Summative assessment: A formal assessment that is typically implemented at the end of an
instructional unit to measure student learning and performance against learning outcomes and to plan
future instruction.
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Form 2.1: Teaching and Learning Context Form
Complete the following Teaching and Learning Context Form online to provide information about the
students within the class.
This form is provided as context for the scoring of your analyses below, and is unscored. However, your
responses on this form will provide critical information that will help assessors to understand and
interpret the parts of the task that are scored.
School setting/environment*
Student ethnicity
Cauc
Hisp
Afr
Am
Multiracial
Native
Am
Subject area and course title (for example,
third-grade reading or U.S. History 1)
Asian
or
A-P Is
Characteristics of student population in this
class
Grade level(s)
Number of English Language Learners:
How often does the class meet (e.g., daily,
three days a week)?
How long is each class session (in minutes)?
What is the length of the course (e.g.,
quarterly, semester, yearlong)?
Total number of students
Students with Learning Disabilities:
Students struggling with grade-level
academic content but not yet diagnosed
with a disability:
Students who are gifted:
Total number of students with
exceptionalities:
Total number of students in the class section
who are high, mid, and low performing based
on data and/or your observations of student
proficiency with respect to the content area.
HIGH
Number of males
MID
LOW
Number of females
*For example: traditional elementary/middle/high school; school for the blind; magnet school for science
and mathematics; online education program; school for incarcerated students.
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Form 2.2: Instructional Unit Context Form
Each response should be complete and concise. Each answer (that is, each box) must not exceed 200
words unless otherwise noted. If you choose, your response may be in a bulleted list, in whole or in
part. Be brief and specific. We suggest that you write a first draft and carefully edit before you complete
each answer on this form.
1. Describe your instructional unit. (Rubric 2.2 A)
Focus for the unit:
Learning outcomes for the unit
School/district priorities or state/national content
standards addressed by the learning outcomes
2. Briefly explain how you planned to differentiate instruction for the particular students in your class.
You may wish to comment on how and why you adapted learning activities and/or outcomes to
meet the needs of particular students or groups of students. (Rubric 2.2 A)
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3. How many lessons are included in this instructional unit? This answer is provided as context for the
scoring of your analyses below, and is unscored. However, your response will provide critical
information that will help assessors to understand and interpret the parts of the task that are scored.
4. When during the instructional unit did the Formative 1, Formative 2, and Summative Assessments
take place (for example, on day 3, day 7, and day 10)? This answer is provided as context for the
scoring of your analyses below, and is unscored. However, your response will provide critical
information that will help assessors to understand and interpret the parts of the task that are scored.
Formative 1:
Formative 2:
Summative:
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Formative and Summative Assessment (Task 2): Rubric 2.2
Assessment Task, Rubric 2.2 A Quality of Learning Outcomes
2.2 A: What does the evidence indicate about the quality of the teacher’s stated outcomes for student learning?
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Level 4
The learning outcomes as a whole are
characterized by most of the following:
• low expectations for students
• lack of academic rigor in the
discipline
• lack of connection to school and
district curriculum priorities or state
academic content standards
• no differentiation for students
The learning outcomes as a whole are
characterized by most of the following:
• moderate expectations for students
• moderate academic rigor in the
discipline
• vague or unclear connection to
school and district curriculum
priorities or state academic content
standards
• no differentiation for students
The learning outcomes as a whole are
characterized by most of the following:
• some outcomes represent high
expectations for students; others
reflect only moderate expectations
• some indication of high levels of
academic rigor in the discipline
• generally clear connection to
school and district curriculum
priorities or state academic content
standards
• some indication of differentiation for
groups of students
The learning outcomes as a whole are
characterized by most of the following:
• consistently high expectations for
all students
• consistent evidence of high levels
of academic rigor in the discipline
• full alignment with school and
district curriculum priorities or state
academic content standards
• differentiation, as appropriate, for
groups and for individual students
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Form 2.3: Assessments
This form is provided as context for the scoring of your analyses below, and is unscored. However, your
response on this form will provide critical information that will help assessors to understand and
interpret the parts of the task that are scored.
What You Must Do
1. Choose three assessments you used during this instructional unit. See the notes below for
important reminders about these assessments. You must submit both the assessment itself
(or a description of the assessment if it is not a tangible object) and three student
responses, one for each of your selected students.
2. Collect the assessment responses of the three students whose progress you are
following across all three assessments. Remember that you must choose a low-performing,
a mid-performing, and a high-performing student on the initial formative assessment.
Remember that students A, B, and C are the same three people, and that student A is low
performing on Formative Assessment 1, student B is mid-performing on Formative
Assessment 1, and student C is high-performing on Formative Assessment 1.
3. Upload the assessments and the student responses in the spaces provided on
Form 2.3.
Note: You are asked to provide basic information about each of your assessments:
• The content focus of the assessment and the learning outcomes you were interested in
assessing
• The instructions you gave to students when you gave them the assessment
• How you evaluated the assessment
o This could be a range of possible descriptors, depending on your assessment
methodology: low/mid/high; no understanding/partial understanding/full
understanding; five-point writing rubric with categories such as basic, partially
proficient, proficient, advanced; total score scale of 1–10, etc.
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Formative Assessment 1
Interim Learning Outcomes
Assessed
Assessment Description and
Instructions to Students
Scoring Criteria/Range
Student A Response (low-performing on this assessment)
Student B Response (mid-performing on this assessment)
Student C Response (high-performing on this assessment)
Formative Assessment 2
Interim Learning Outcomes
Assessed
Assessment Description and
Instructions to Students
Scoring Criteria/Range
Assessment Description and
Instructions to Students
Scoring Criteria/Range
Student A Response
Student B Response
Student C Response
Summative Assessment
Learning Outcomes Assessed
Student A Response
Student B Response
Student C Response
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Selecting Good Evidence of Assessment Practices
Remember that these assessments should provide evidence of student progress toward academically
rigorous outcomes and/or standards across the instructional unit. These assessments may take a
number of different forms, from specially designed questions to ask of students during instruction, or
more formal solicitations of their understanding of the content through written, oral, material and/or
visual responses, or performances. Assessments that are not written may be captured through
photographs, audio clips, and video clips.
Be sure to reread the “Notes for Candidates” at the beginning of this task.
 You will be submitting evidence online, so if any one of the assessments is not a text-based
document, you will need to take a picture of the assessment and scan or convert it to an
acceptable file format. See the technical FAQs (available at OhioRESA.com) for information
on which file types are accepted.
 If one or more of your assessments involved an activity that does not produce tangible
student evidence to submit (for example, video of student presentations, hand signals, or
audio recording of student verbal response to a question), you may use the fields provided
in the form above (Form 2.3) to briefly and specifically describe that assessment, including
specific details about the instructions to students to complete the assessment.
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Form 2.4: Assessment Plan
Each response should be complete and concise. If you choose, your response may be presented in a
bulleted list, in whole or in part.
Each answer (that is, each box) must not exceed 200 words unless otherwise noted. Be brief and
specific. We suggest that you write a first draft and carefully edit before you complete each answer on
this form.
1. Explain how the central focus and key learning outcomes for this instructional unit that you described
in Form 2.2 represent appropriately high expectations for students’ learning. (Rubric 2.4 A)
2. For Formative Assessment 1 and Formative Assessment 2, explain why each assessment
represents a useful check-in point, or measures important interim learning outcomes in relation to
your learning outcomes for the entire instructional unit. (Rubric 2.4 A)
3. Explain how the method of student self-assessment that is embedded in each of the formative
assessments you have chosen is designed to lead students to meaningful conclusions about the
status of their progress toward the learning objectives. (Rubric 2.4 B)
4. How is the planned sequence of the three assessments you have submitted designed to
demonstrate the extent to which students are progressing toward and, ultimately, have mastered
the learning outcomes of the instructional unit? Remember that formative assessments are
designed to give you specific information about each student’s learning progress so that you can
differentiate subsequent instruction as needed. Cite specific evidence from the assessments and
explain how they connect to your learning outcomes. (Rubric 2.4 B)
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Formative and Summative Assessment (Task 2): Rubrics 2.4
Assessment Task, Rubric 2.4 A Quality of Learning Outcomes
2.4 A: What does the evidence indicate about the quality of the teacher’s stated outcomes for student learning?
Level 1
The learning outcomes as a whole are
characterized by most of the following:
• low expectations for students
• lack of academic rigor in the
discipline
• lack of connection to school and
district curriculum priorities or state
academic content standards
• no differentiation for students
Level 2
The learning outcomes as a whole are
characterized by most of the following:
• moderate expectations for students
• moderate academic rigor in the
discipline
• vague or unclear connection to
school and district curriculum
priorities or state academic content
standards
• no differentiation for students
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Level 3
Level 4
The learning outcomes as a whole are
characterized by most of the following:
• some outcomes represent high
expectations for students; others
reflect only moderate expectations
• some indication of high levels of
academic rigor in the discipline
• generally clear connection to school
and district curriculum priorities or
state academic content standards
• some indication of differentiation for
groups of students
The learning outcomes as a whole are
characterized by most of the following:
• consistently high expectations for all
students
• consistent evidence of high levels of
academic rigor in the discipline
• full alignment with school and district
curriculum priorities or state
academic content standards
• differentiation, as appropriate, for
groups and for individual students
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Assessment Task, Rubric 2.4 B Alignment of Assessments with Learning Outcomes
2.4 B: To what extent are the assessments described in the assessment plan and submitted in Form 2.3 aligned with the learning outcomes for the instructional unit and
to what extent do they permit monitoring of student learning across the instructional unit?
Level 1
The assessment plan and the sample
assessments, taken together, exhibit
most or all of these characteristics:
Level 2
Level 3
The assessment plan and the sample
assessments, taken together, exhibit
most or all of these characteristics:
The assessment plan and the sample
assessments, taken together, exhibit
most or all of these characteristics:
Level 4
The assessment plan and the sample
assessments, taken together, exhibit
most or all of these characteristics:
•
Provide little or no evidence that the
teacher will be able to monitor
student progress across the
instructional unit
or
• Provide limited evidence that the
teacher will be able to monitor
student progress across the
instructional unit
and
•
Provide specific and relevant
evidence that the teacher will be
able to monitor student progress
across the instructional unit
and
•
•
The set of assessments is not
aligned to the learning outcomes
the teacher articulated for this
instructional unit.
The teacher offers little or no
explanation of the connections
between the instructional outcomes
and the assessments.
The assessments provide students
little or no opportunities for
meaningful self-assessment.
• Important learning outcomes in the
instructional unit are only partially or
weakly addressed by the sample
formative assessments.
• The rationale for the focus of the
formative assessments is vague or
general.
• The explanation of the connections
between the learning outcomes for
the whole instructional unit and all
three assessments is unconvincing,
general, or vague.
•
Important learning outcomes for the
instructional unit are directly
addressed by the three assessments
and yield some information about
students that can be used to
differentiate subsequent instruction.
The rationale for the focus of the
formative assessments is
satisfactory.
The explanation of the connections
between the learning outcomes for
the whole instructional unit and all
three assessments is specific and
supported by some relevant
examples from the assessments.
The assessments provide students
opportunities for meaningful selfassessment, but the results of the
self-assessment are not used in
subsequent learning.
Important learning outcomes for the
instructional unit are directly
addressed by the three assessments
and yield abundant information
about students that can be used to
differentiate subsequent instruction.
• The rationale for the focus of the
formative assessments is thorough
and supported by specific details.
• The explanation of the connections
between the learning outcomes for
the whole instructional unit and all
three assessments is
comprehensive and fully supported
by multiple relevant examples from
the assessments.
• The assessments provide students
opportunities for meaningful selfassessment as the cycle proceeds,
and the results of the selfassessment are used in subsequent
learning.
•
•
The assessments provide students
opportunities for self-assessment, but
these assessments are not
meaningful for current or subsequent
learning.
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•
•
Provide specific and relevant
evidence that the teacher will be
able to monitor student progress
across the instructional unit
and
•
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Form 2.5: Assessment Results Analysis/Three Selected Students
Form 2.5.1
In the boxes below, complete the following analyses:
a. Analyze each student’s learning based on the results of Formative Assessment 1. Explain
where each student succeeded and struggled in relation to the learning objectives and your
assessment criteria. Then explain how the assessment results affected the instruction that
followed for each student.
b. Analyze each student’s learning based on the results of Formative Assessment 2. Explain
where each student succeeded and struggled in relation to the learning objectives and your
assessment criteria. Then explain how the assessment results affected the instruction that
followed for each student.
c. Analyze each student’s learning based on the results of the Summative Assessment.
Explain where each student succeeded and struggled in relation to the learning objectives
and your assessment criteria. Then explain how the assessment results affected the
instruction you planned to follow this instructional unit.
Each response should be complete and concise. If you choose, your response may be presented in a
bulleted list, in whole or in part.
Each answer (that is, each box) must not exceed 200 words unless otherwise noted. Be brief and
specific. We suggest that you write a first draft and carefully edit before you complete each answer on
this form. Answers are scored using Rubrics 2.5 A and 2.5 B.
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2.5.1a: Formative Assessment 1
What does the assessment response indicate about progress toward your interim learning outcomes for
each of the selected students? What next steps in instruction for each student were indicated by the
assessment results? (Rubrics 2.5 A and 2.5 B)
Student A (low-performing on Formative Assessment 1) (Rubric 2.5 A)
Next Steps in Instruction, Student A (Rubric 2.5 B)
Student B (mid-performing on Formative Assessment 1) (Rubric 2.5 A)
Next Steps in Instruction, Student B (Rubric 2.5 B)
Student C (high-performing on Formative Assessment 1) (Rubric 2.5 A)
Next Steps in Instruction, Student C (Rubric 2.5 B)
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2.5.1b: Formative Assessment 2
What does the assessment response indicate about progress toward your interim learning outcomes for
each of the selected students? (Rubrics 2.5 A and 2.5 B)
Student A (low-performing on Formative Assessment 1) (Rubric 2.5 A)
Next Steps in Instruction, Student A (Rubric 2.5 B)
Student B (mid-performing on Formative Assessment 1) (Rubric 2.5 A)
Next Steps in Instruction, Student B (Rubric 2.5 B)
Student C (high-performing on Formative Assessment 1) (Rubric 2.5 A)
Next Steps in Instruction, Student C (Rubric 2.5 B)
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2.5.1c: Summative Assessment
What does the assessment response indicate about each student’s progress toward mastery of the
learning outcomes for the instructional unit? (Rubric 2.5 B)
Student A (low-performing on Formative Assessment 1)
Student B (mid-performing on Formative Assessment 1)
Student C (high-performing on Formative Assessment 1)
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2.5.2: Analysis of Learning Progress for Individual Students across the Set
of Assessments
Consider the progress toward mastery of the learning outcomes of the unit for each of the three
selected students. For each student, describe his or her learning progress over the course of the unit,
as demonstrated in the results of the set of three assessments. To what extent did the student’s
understanding evolve toward mastery of the learning outcomes for the unit? (Rubric 2.5 A)
Student A (low-performing on Formative Assessment 1): Consider the set of assessment results
and describe the overall progress of the student over the course of the unit.
Student B (mid-performing on Formative Assessment 1): Consider the set of assessment results
and describe the overall progress of the student over the course of the unit.
Student C (high-performing of Formative Assessment 1): Consider the set of assessment results
and describe the overall progress of the student over the course of the unit.
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Formative and Summative Assessment (Task 2): Rubrics 2.5
Assessment Task, Rubric 2.5 A Analyzing Individual Student Data to Monitor Achievement
2.5 A: How well does the teacher use the three individual student assessment responses to analyze each student’s progress toward mastery of the learning outcomes for
the instructional unit?
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Level 4
There are no substantive content-based
errors in the scoring of student
responses.
The analysis as a whole is characterized
by most of the following:
There are no substantive content-based
errors in the scoring of student
responses.
The analysis as a whole is characterized
by most of the following:
There are no substantive content-based
errors in the scoring of student
responses.
The analysis as a whole is characterized
by most of the following:
Analysis is general and does not
mention some obvious features of the
student responses.
• Analysis connects some specific
features of the responses from each
of the three students to his or her
learning progress in relation to the
learning outcomes for the unit.
• Analysis does not differentiate among
the three assessments in terms of
what is learned from each about
student progress.
• Analysis draws some specific and
accurate conclusions about learning
progress from each student’s
assessment responses.
• Analysis presents an adequate
account of the learning progress for
each of the selected students in
relation to the learning outcomes for
the unit.
• Analysis cites some evidence from
each of the student responses to
support this account.
There are no substantive contentbased errors in the scoring of student
responses.
The analysis as a whole is
characterized by the following:
• Analysis draws multiple specific and
accurate conclusions from the
student responses about each
student’s learning progress.
• Analysis presents a thorough and
detailed account of the learning
progress for each of the selected
students in relation to the learning
outcomes for the unit.
• Analysis cites strong and specific
evidence from each of the student
responses to support this account.
•
•
•
Analysis is inaccurate.
Analysis draws inappropriate
inferences.
Analysis fails to align student results
with the intended learning outcomes
for the unit.
•
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Assessment Task, Rubric 2.5 B Using Assessments to Inform Instruction for Three Selected Students
2.5 B: How well supported by the assessment data and the learning outcomes for the instructional unit was the teacher’s account of how he or she used the results of the
set of assessments to inform subsequent instruction for the three selected students?
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Level 4
The teacher’s account of next steps in
instruction for the three selected
students is characterized by most of the
following:
The teacher’s account of next steps in
instruction for the three selected
students is characterized by most of the
following:
The teacher’s account of next steps in
instruction for the three selected
students is characterized by most of the
following:
The teacher’s account of next steps in
instruction for the three selected
students is characterized by most of the
following:
•
•
The teacher does not connect
assessment results with instructional
decisions.
The teacher describes future
instructional strategies that have little
to no relationship to the results of the
assessments or to the learning
outcomes of the unit.
•
•
The teacher makes only very general
connections between assessment
results and instructional decisions.
The teacher describes future
instructional strategies that are only
generally related to the results of the
assessments or are only partially
related to the learning outcomes of
the unit.
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•
•
The teacher connects assessment
results with instructional decisions.
The teacher describes some specific
future instructional strategies that
address needs indicated by the
assessment data and that are
focused on the learning outcomes of
the unit.
•
•
The teacher connects assessment
results with instructional decisions,
explaining specifically how the
assessment results led to particular
instructional strategies.
The teacher describes multiple
specific future instructional strategies
that are appropriate to each of the
selected students and are focused
on the learning outcomes of the unit.
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Communication and Professional Growth (Task 4)
Purpose
The Resident Educator Program provides four years of ongoing job-embedded professional
development through support and professional conversations with State-certified instructional mentors
and collaborations and observations with veteran teachers, facilitators, and colleagues. In Task 4 you
are asked to reflect on these experiences to this point in your residency and analyze their impact on
your professional progress.
Overview
In this task you will submit examples of your practice that illustrate your approach to three areas of
professional responsibility: communication with parents or caregivers, communication and collaboration
with colleagues, and purposeful development of your own professional growth.
Evidence Sources
All forms and examples will be submitted online.
 Two (2) examples of your communication with parents or other caregivers (select two examples
from four options; see Form 4.1 for details)
 Rationale for Communication with Parents and Caregivers Form (Form 4.1)
 One (1) example of your communication and collaboration with colleagues (select one example
from three options; see Form 4.2 for details)
 One (1) example of a collaboration you initiated with colleagues, with your contributions (see
Form 4.2 for details)
 Rationale for Professional Collaboration Form (Form 4.2)
 An analysis of one (1) professional development experience (Form 4.3: Professional
Development and Professional Growth Form)
Note: These evidence sources may be the actual written communication, an audio recording, or a brief
narrative description of a telephone or other interpersonal communication, with date and specific
occasion noted. You must ask for and receive permission from all parties participating in a phone call
before recording and submitting the call.
When submitting authentic evidence sources, be sure to remove the names of parents and students
from communications. Submissions that include personally identifiable information (PII) of students,
parents, caregivers, teachers who are not the submitting candidate, school administrators, or others will
be deemed unscorable and result in a failing score on this task. PII includes but is not limited to first
and last name, phone numbers, non-school email addresses, mailing addresses, Social Security
numbers, or anything else that identifies an individual specifically or would permit direct communication
with him or her.
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What You Must Do
Category I: Communication with Parents and Caregivers
1. Review all of your communications with parents and caregivers from the start of the
current school year until the present time, and then select and submit two (2) examples
that best reflect clarity in communication, appropriateness for the audience, and a
professional tone. Your examples must represent two of the four communication options
listed below, and you must submit evidence to support each of these two communications
in addition to responding to the items on Form 4.1.
a. How you communicate about instruction with a group of parents or caregivers
(Example A)
b. How you communicate about individual students with their parents or caregivers
(Example B)
c. How you respond to an inquiry or concern initiated by a parent or caregiver
(Example C)
d. How you tailor your communications for particular characteristics of the community in
which you teach (Example D)
2. Complete Form 4.1.
Category II: Collaboration with Colleagues
3. Select and submit two examples of your collaboration with colleagues from the start of the
current school year until the present time.
a. Choose one (1) example from the three (3) types of collaboration below.
i. Collaboration with colleagues to analyze and/or address a common challenge
of teaching practice (Example E)
ii. Collaboration with colleagues in specialized support services to create richer
learning opportunities for students (Example F)
iii. Collaboration with an individual or an agency from your local community to
substantially increase the resources available to directly support student
learning (Example G)
b. Choose one (1) example of your collaboration with colleagues that best represents
your initiative in seeking out opportunities to collaborate, and your contributions to
those collaborations. (Example H).
4. Complete Form 4.2.
Category III: Professional Development
5. Consider all of the professional development activities you have engaged in from the start
of the current school year until the present time as well as the previous academic
school year, both formal (such as classes and workshops) and informal (such as
professional learning community sessions, collaboration over time with a colleague, and
action research you have devised and pursued). Choose one (1) that had a significant
impact on your growth as a professional. You will be asked to explain how this engagement
changed your practice and your view of yourself as an educator. You may choose to submit
evidence to support this example in addition to responding to the items on Form 4.3, but it is
not required that you do so and choosing not to do so will not affect your score.
6. Complete Form 4.3.
Caution: Avoid Disqualification
The checklist below gives you a way to be certain that you have complied with all of the requirements
for this task. Please use this checklist as a final step before you submit Task 4.
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
Form 4.1: Note that communications that occurred outside of the current academic year will be
deemed unscorable, and submission of evidence of communication outside the allowable
window will result in a failing score on the task. Similarly, submission of two examples of the
same type of communication (categories a–d above under Category I) will be deemed
unscorable and will result in a failing score on the task; you must select two different options
from the choices provided.

Form 4.2: Your examples must represent one of the three options listed in 3.a. plus the one
described in 3.b. You may choose to submit evidence to support each of these examples in
addition to responding to the items on Form 4.2, but it is not required that you do so and
choosing not to do so will not affect your score. Note that examples that occurred outside of the
current academic year will be deemed unscorable, and submission of evidence of collaboration
outside the allowable window will result in a failing score on this task.

Form 4.3: Note that an example that occurred outside of the current and previous academic
year will be deemed unscorable, and submission of evidence of professional development
outside the allowable window will result in a failing score on this task.
Glossary
Professional tone: An overall quality that is confident, courteous, sincere, at an appropriate level for
the audience, written with a suitable level of formality, and free of unnecessary jargon or complexity.
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Form 4.1: Rationale for Communication with Parents and Caregivers Form
Complete only the sections of this form relevant to the examples that you selected. You must submit
two (2) examples from A–D that reflect your communication with parents and caregivers. This
form, and the examples that you submit, will be scored using Rubrics 4.1 A and 4.1 B.
Each response should be complete and concise. Each answer (that is, each box) must not exceed 200
words unless otherwise noted. If you choose, your response may be in a bulleted list, in whole or in
part. Be brief and specific. We suggest that you write a first draft and carefully edit before you
complete each answer on this form.
Example A: Communication with parents and caregivers about the instructional program
1. What was the occasion for this communication? (for example, beginning of school)
2. What did you want to accomplish with this communication? Do you believe you accomplished this
goal? Why or why not?
3. Why did you select this communication as an exemplar of the way you communicate with parents
or caregivers about the instructional program?
a
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Example B: Communication with parents and caregivers about individual students
1. What was the occasion for this communication? (for example, beginning of school)
2. What did you want to accomplish with this communication? Do you believe you accomplished this
goal? Why or why not?
3. Why did you select this communication as an exemplar of the way you communicate with parents
or caregivers about individual students?
4. Did the parents or caregivers respond to this communication? If so, how? If not, what did you do to
follow up?
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Example C: Response to parental or caregiver concerns or inquiries
1. What was the occasion, concern, or inquiry from a parent or caregiver that prompted this
communication?
2. What did you want to accomplish with this communication? Do you believe you accomplished this
goal? Why or why not?
3. Why did you select this communication as an exemplar of the way you respond to concerns or
inquiries expressed by parents or caregivers?
4. Did the parents or caregivers respond to this communication? If so, did it resolve the concern or
inquiry? If not, what did you do to follow up?
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Example D: Tailoring communications to a specific community
1. What was the occasion for this communication?
2. What are the essential characteristics you have identified as important to keep in mind when you
communicate with parents and caregivers in this particular community?
3. How does this communication show your awareness of and responsiveness to these particular
characteristics, which may include but are not limited to cultural and linguistic diversity?
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Communication and Professional Growth (Task 4): Rubric 4.1
Rubric 4.1 A Quality and Clarity of Information
4.1 A: Does the teacher communicate clearly with parents and caregivers and invite their follow-up to any communication?
Level 1
The information that the teacher
provides to parents or caregivers is
confusing and does not convey how
parents and caregivers can follow up for
more information if necessary.
Level 2
The information provided to parents or
caregivers is imprecise or vague and
does not help parents and caregivers
know how to follow up if necessary.
or
The evidence the teacher submits is
uneven, with one communication
markedly more effective than the other.
Level 3
The information provided to parents or
caregivers is clear and sufficient for
informing the intended audience. The
communication provides adequate
directions for how parents and
caregivers can follow up with the
teacher.
Level 4
The information provided to parents and
caregivers is clear, comprehensive, and
actionable. The communication makes
clear that the teacher welcomes followup questions or comments from parents
and caregivers and gives clear
directions for how to follow up with the
teacher.
Rubric 4.1 B Professionalism and Tone
4.1 B: Are the teacher’s communications with parents and caregivers respectful, clearly addressing concerns and encouraging families to participate in the life of the
school?
Level 1
The tone of the communications is
inappropriate or insensitive. The
communication does not address the
concerns and needs of parents and
caregivers. It may convey negativity
about students, the classroom,
instruction, or the school; or it may
discourage family engagement in the
life of the school.
Level 2
The tone of communications with
parents and caregivers is neutral. The
communication does not adequately
address the concerns and needs of
parents and caregivers. It neither
discourages nor encourages family
engagement in the life of the school.
or
Level 3
The tone of communications with
parents and caregivers is appropriate,
professional, and positive. The
communication addresses some
concerns and needs of parents and
caregivers. It offers some opportunity
for family engagement in the life of the
school.
Level 4
The tone of communications with
parents and caregivers is highly positive
and professional, is responsive to
concerns and needs, and encourages
family engagement in the life of the
school.
The two communications differ
markedly in tone, with one much more
professional and positive than the other.
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Form 4.2: Rationale for Professional Collaboration Form
Complete only the sections of this form for the examples that you selected. You must submit one (1)
example from E–G and one (1) of your choosing (Example H) that reflect your collaboration with
colleagues. This form, and the examples you submit, will be scored using Rubrics 4.2 A and 4.2 B.
Each response should be complete and concise. Each answer (that is, each box) must not exceed 200
words unless otherwise noted. If you choose, your response may be in a bulleted list, in whole or in
part. Be brief and specific. We suggest that you write a first draft and carefully edit before you complete
each answer on this form.
Example E
1. What example have you chosen to demonstrate the way(s) in which you have collaborated and
communicated with your colleagues to analyze and/or address a common challenge of teaching
practice?
2. Why did you choose this particular example?
3. How, specifically, did this collaboration improve or change your practice in some way that would not
have been possible without the collaboration?
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Example F
1. What example have you chosen to demonstrate the way(s) in which you have collaborated with
your colleagues in specialized support services to create richer learning opportunities for students?
2. Why did you choose this particular example?
3. How, specifically, did this collaboration improve your teaching practice in some way that would not
have been possible without the collaboration?
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Example G
1. What example have you chosen to demonstrate the way(s) in which you have collaborated with
some individual or an agency from your local community to increase the resources available to
directly support student learning?
2. Why did you choose this particular example?
3. Why did you choose to collaborate with this particular person or agency?
4. How, specifically, did this collaboration improve your teaching practice and/or directly support
student learning in some way that would not have been possible without the collaboration?
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Example H: Example of your choosing
1. What example have you chosen to demonstrate your initiative in seeking out opportunities to
collaborate with colleagues, and your contributions to those collaborations?
2. Explain how this example shows how you took initiative.
3. Briefly analyze your specific contribution(s) to the collaboration.
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Communication and Professional Growth (Task 4): Rubric 4.2
Rubric 4.2 A Commitment and Initiative
4.2 A: What is the extent of the teacher’s participation and initiative in collaborative activities with colleagues?
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Level 4
The teacher demonstrates, through the
examples selected and the explanations
given, neither initiative to collaborate nor
substantial contributions to outcomes for
students from professional
collaboration.
The teacher demonstrates, through the
examples selected and the explanations
given, some initiative to collaborate or
minimal contributions to outcomes for
students from professional
collaboration.
or
The teacher demonstrates, through the
examples selected and the explanations
given, initiative in professional
collaboration and substantial
contributions to outcomes for students
from professional collaboration.
The teacher demonstrates, through the
examples selected and the explanations
given, that he or she takes a leadership
role in professional collaboration and
actively contributes to collaborative
activity that results in substantial
benefits to students and teachers.
The teacher’s examples exhibit
markedly different levels of initiative and
contribution, with one example weak
and one much stronger.
Rubric 4.2 B Teacher’s Explanation of Impact on Practice
4.2 B: How well is the teacher able to articulate the impact of professional collaboration on his or her teaching practice?
Level 1
The teacher is not able to explain the
impact on teaching practice.
Level 2
Level 3
Level 4
The teacher’s explanation of the impact
on practice is limited and/or vague.
or
The teacher’s explanation of the impact
on practice is clear and detailed.
The teacher explains how the
collaboration will have an ongoing effect
on his or her practice.
The teacher’s explanation of one
example is much clearer and more
detailed than the other.
a
a
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Form 4.3: Professional Development and Professional Growth Form
Select one example of a professional development and growth experience that has changed your
teaching practice and answer the questions below. This form will be scored using Rubric 4.3 A.
Each response should be complete and concise. Each answer (that is, each box) must not exceed 200
words unless otherwise noted. If you choose, your response may be in a bulleted list, in whole or in
part. Be brief and specific. We suggest that you write a first draft and carefully edit before you complete
each answer on this form.
1. Describe the example you chose.
2. Why did you choose this example to demonstrate significant impact on your growth as a
professional?
3. How has this opportunity or experience changed the way you work with students?
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Communication and Professional Growth (Task 4): Rubric 4.3
Rubric 4.3 A Teacher’s Analysis of Professional Growth
4.3 A: What is the significance and impact on his or her own teaching practice of the professional development activities the teacher has chosen to undertake and
analyze?
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Level 4
The teacher’s analysis has most or all of
the below characteristics.
The teacher’s analysis has most or all of
the below characteristics.
The teacher’s analysis has most or all of
the below characteristics.
The teacher’s analysis has most or all of
the below characteristics.
• The teacher shows little awareness
of the potential impact of
professional development activities
on his or her own teaching practice.
• The professional development
activities the teacher describes are
trivial or unlikely to enhance his or
her knowledge and skills.
• The teacher is unable to explain
what he or she learned from these
activities.
• The teacher shows some awareness
of the value of professional
development for improving his or her
own teaching practice.
• The professional development
activities the teacher describes are
limited in their enhancement of his or
her own teaching practice.
• The teacher is not able to clearly
explain what he or she learned from
these activities.
• The teacher shows evidence of
seeking out opportunities for
professional development to
enhance his or her own teaching
practice.
• The professional development
activities the teacher describes
represent professional learning
resulting in substantive
enhancements to his or her own
teaching practice.
• The teacher clearly explains what he
or she learned from these activities.
• The teacher provides evidence of
seeking out specific opportunities for
professional development chosen to
address his or her own challenges in
content knowledge and/or
pedagogical skills, explaining how the
choice of PD was made.
• There is some evidence that the
teacher systematically tries to
implement new learning from
professional development activities in
his or her teaching practice.
• The teacher shows evidence of
initiating important activities to
contribute to the profession, such as
leading a professional development
session for other teachers. The
teacher makes an evidence-based
case for the importance of these
activities to changes in practice.
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Reflection on Teaching Practice Based on Feedback from
Students and/or Colleagues (Task 5)
Purpose
In Tasks 1–4 you were asked to analyze, discuss, and demonstrate your understanding of and ability
to implement the Teaching-Learning Cycle and reflect on the impact of these experiences on your
professional progress.
Task 5 provides another type of professional growth opportunity; you will be analyzing the perceptions
of others for the insights they can provide into your teaching practice and its impact. Task 5 invites you
to reflect on and synthesize what you’ve learned from self-assessment with the understanding gained
through the confident and thoughtful consideration of feedback from others. Task 5 provides you with
an opportunity to look at patterns and trends, to make discoveries about your teaching, and to begin to
plan for next steps.
Overview
In this task, you will assemble feedback on your teaching practice from one of two sources. Using that
feedback, you will respond to a set of prompts that require you to reflect on your teaching practice. You
will submit a set of written responses to the prompts. This task is not scored against a rubric but will be
scored as complete or incomplete. In order to successfully pass the RESA, you must complete the
evidence submission and respond to the prompts by reflecting upon your teaching practice and
demonstrating your ability to understand, analyze, and apply feedback received from others.
Evidence Sources


Teaching and Learning Context Form (Form 5.1)
Reflection on Practice and Feedback Form (Form 5.2)
Successful completion of this task requires you to analyze one of two possible sources: a student
perception survey or colleague feedback.
Tripod Student Perception Survey
The Tripod Student Perception Survey, managed by Cambridge
Education, contains survey questions aimed at capturing key
dimensions of school life and teaching practice as students experience
them. Candidates will use the report generated from the Tripod
Surveys to complete Task 5.
Prior to administering the survey,
candidates must give notice to
parents/caregivers that they will
be administering the survey and
give them the opportunity to opt
out of the survey. Candidates are
not required to obtain signed
permission to administer the
survey.
Students in grades K–2 will complete a paper version of the survey
containing 28 questions, and students in grades 3–12 will complete an
online version, which will contain 52 questions and 76 questions, for
upper elementary and secondary students respectively. Students are
not required to answer every question in the survey, and survey
reports will be confidential. Only the RESA candidate will see the report, and no individual responses
will be identifiable.
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Who Must Use the Tripod Survey for Task 5?
All candidates are required to complete the Tripod Student Perception Survey, unless they fall into one
of the following categories:
•
•
•
Teach fewer than five students
Teach pre-kindergarten
Teach exclusively in an online context
Note: In order to complete the Tripod Survey, you must have at
least five students who are able to complete the survey. You must
administer the Tripod Survey to your entire class, not just a select
few. However, we recommend that you choose a class with at
least 15 students if possible. Cambridge Education needs at least
five responses to each question in order to produce a valid report.
If you administer the Tripod Survey to a class totaling only five
students, you run the risk of student absences. If this happens and
there are not enough responses to each question, you will not
receive a survey report. If you think that there is a reasonable
chance that you will not be able to collect at least five responses
for each question on the survey, we recommend that you request
permission to use the alternative observation to complete Task 5.
As explained in the “Profile” section in
Appendix C of this Handbook, candidates
will choose a class to complete the
Tripod Survey when filling out their
profile. When it is time to administer the
survey, candidates can choose a
different class to complete the survey as
long as the survey is appropriate for the
class grade level (i.e., paper surveys
must be administered to students in
grades K–2, online surveys must be
administered to students in grades 3–12).
If you teach grades 3-12 and cannot
access the technology to administer the
survey online, please contact the help
desk before December 15th and indicate
that you will need paper surveys.
What You Must Do
1. When completing your Profile in the RESA submission system, select one class with five or
more students to whom you plan to administer the Tripod Survey. If you are in a co-teaching
arrangement, this class should be one in which you play a leading role or teach equally as often
as your co-teacher. The Profile must be completed by December 15, 2014, and you will not be
able to submit Task 1 until your Profile is complete.
2. Schedule a time to administer the Tripod Survey between February 2 and February 23. If you
are signed up to administer the Tripod Survey but do not administer and return the Tripod
Survey by February 23 Task 5 will be locked and you will not be able to complete this task.
3. Give notice to parents/caregivers that you will be administering the Tripod Survey and give them
the opportunity to opt out of the survey. (A sample parent letter will be included in your survey
materials.) You are not required to obtain signed permission to administer the survey.
4. If you teach grades K–2, you will receive an individually shipped class packet with paper
surveys, the administration protocol, script, and a prepaid return envelope—all of which can be
tracked—before January 30. Students completing the paper survey do not have to be able to
read the survey themselves. Instead, a proctor (someone other than the teacher) will administer
the survey to small groups (5–10 students at a time) by reading each question. Proctors cannot
interpret the survey questions, but can define unknown terms. K–2 students will complete the
survey using pen and paper. Once completed, all survey materials, used and unused, including
the class cover sheets, must be shipped back to the scanning facility for processing using the
provided envelope. Please follow the directions included in the survey packet shipped to you.
5. If you teach grades 3–12, you will receive an email with instructions and login information, the
administration protocol, script, and unique logins for each student before January 30. You can
administer the online Tripod Survey to your class yourself. Students completing the online
version will need a computer with Internet connection and will be given a unique login code to
access the survey. When students complete and submit the Tripod Survey, it will automatically
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be returned electronically. After all students have completed the Tripod Survey, you must log in
and sign off that all surveys have been completed.
Note: You cannot share login codes, or your results will be invalid.
6. You will receive a report based on the survey results during the first week of April, in time to
complete Task 5. (Individual survey results will not be reported to the State.) Review your
results and reflect on the responses by completing the Reflection on Practice and Feedback
Form (Form 5.2), which asks questions about what you learned from the report and how you
may use the feedback to inform your teaching practice. You will not submit your Tripod Survey
report in the submission system.
Note: In the event that Cambridge Education is not able to produce a valid report as a result of there
being fewer than five responses for each question, the candidate will be notified in early April that the
survey results were inconclusive. These candidates will then need to complete the task alternative by
having a colleague complete the Observation Response Form and then reflect on that feedback using
Form 5.2 (See “Colleague Feedback” below).
For more information about the Tripod Survey, including instructions, sample letters, and webinars on
how to complete the survey, please visit the project website, www.TripodProject.org/ODE.
Colleague Feedback
Candidates who fall into one of the categories listed above and cannot administer the Tripod Survey will
complete an alternative observation by having a colleague observe a class and complete the
Observation Response Form.
What You Must Do
1. Select a colleague (this can be, but is not required to be, your facilitator or Program
Coordinator) to observe you while you teach one of your classes.
2. Give your selected colleague a copy of the Tripod 7Cs Framework (below) and the observation
form that he or she will fill out prior to observation.
3. Schedule a time for your colleague to observe a class.
4. Have your colleague complete the Observation Response Form within a timeframe that gives
you enough time to reflect on the feedback and answer the questions in Task 5. This form
includes questions that are aligned to the questions that students will answer on the student
survey. The observer should return this form to you when it is complete. You are not required
to submit this Observation Response Form in the submission system.
5. Review the feedback you received on the Observation Response Form and complete the online
Reflection on Practice and Feedback Form (Form 5.2), which asks questions about what you
learned from the feedback you received and how you may use the feedback to inform your
practice.
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Form 5.1: Teaching and Learning Context Form
Complete the following Teaching and Learning Context Form online to provide information about the
students within the class that you will use to complete Task 5. Your responses submitted in the forms
for this task must relate to the class described in this form.
School setting/environment*
Student ethnicity
Cauc
Hisp
Afr
Am
Multiracial
Native
Am
Subject area and course title (for example,
third-grade reading or U.S. History 1)
Asian
or
A-P Is
Characteristics of student population in this
class
Grade level(s)
Number of English Language Learners:
How often does the class meet (e.g., daily,
three days a week)?
How long is each class session (in minutes)?
What is the length of the course (e.g.,
quarterly, semester, yearlong)?
Total number of students
Students with Learning Disabilities:
Students struggling with grade-level
academic content but not yet diagnosed
with a disability:
Students who are gifted:
Total number of students with
exceptionalities:
Total number of students in the class section
who are high, mid, and low performing based
on data and/or your observations of student
proficiency with respect to the content area.
HIGH
Number of males
MID
LOW
Number of females
*For example: traditional elementary/middle/high school; school for the blind; magnet school for science
and mathematics; online education program; school for incarcerated students.
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Form 5.2: Reflection on Practice and Feedback Form
Complete the following Reflection on Practice and Feedback Form online.
Each response should be complete and concise. You should respond in the format that you believe
best answers the prompt. In some cases, this may be accomplished through bulleted responses, while
others may lend themselves to a narrative response. The content of your response should only address
the questions asked. Additional information may be considered superfluous and may adversely affect
the scoring. The submission system will not allow a response of more than 200 words, and if any
responses exceed 200 words, you will not be able to successfully submit your work.
1. What is one area of your practice that you believe, and your feedback source(s) agrees, is your
greatest strength? Be specific in your statements, citing specific details from the submitted feedback.
2. In this area of strength, for you, what are three specific actions, activities, or strategies that you
use successfully and that you would advise a colleague who is struggling in this area to try? Why do
you believe these actions, activities, or strategies in particular work well for you?
3. What is one area of your practice that you believe, and your feedback source(s) agrees, is most
important to improve? Be specific in your statements, citing specific details and support from the
submitted feedback.
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4. In this area of improvement, for you, what are three specific actions, activities, or practices that
you intend to try or alter in order to improve your teaching? Why do you believe trying or changing
these actions, activities, or practices will work well for you?
5. What areas of the feedback were the most surprising to you? Cite one or two specific items from the
submitted feedback, and describe why they surprised you.
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Observation Response Form (for those not completing the survey)
Directions: Prior to the lesson observation, have your observer (either your facilitator or a colleague of
your choice) familiarize him- or herself with the Tripod 7Cs Framework (see information about Tripod’s
7Cs™ framework below). Then, your observer should complete the form that follows after observing
your class and submit it to you after it is completed.
Tripod’s 7Cs™ framework captures the central constructs used by the Tripod Project ® to measure
effective teaching. Each construct is supported by research in peer-reviewed publications that have
appeared in education books and journals over the past several decades. Prior to observing your
colleague’s lesson, review and think about how you would recognize these seven components of
effective classroom instruction:
1. Care pertains to teacher behaviors that help students to feel emotionally safe and to rely on the
teacher to be a dependable ally in the classroom. Caring reduces anxiety and provides a sense
of positive affiliation and belonging. Caring goes beyond “niceness”; caring teachers work hard,
and they go out of their way to help. They signal to their students, “I want you to be happy and
successful, and I will work hard to serve your best interest; your success is an important source
of my personal satisfaction.”
2. Confer concerns seeking students’ points of view by asking them questions and inviting them to
express themselves. When students expect that the teacher might call on them to speak in
class, they have an incentive to stay alert. In addition, believing that the teacher values their
points of view provides positive reinforcement for the effort that it takes to formulate a
perspective in the first place.
3. Captivate concerns teacher behaviors that make instruction stimulating, instead of boring.
Captivating teachers make the material interesting, often by making it seem relevant to things
about which students already care. Brain research establishes clearly that stimulating learning
experiences and relevant material make lessons easier to remember than when the experience
is boring and the material seems irrelevant.
4. Clarify concerns teacher behaviors that promote understanding. Interactions that clear up
confusion and help students persevere are especially important. Each student comes with
particular gaps in understanding and with both correct and incorrect interpretations of the world
around him or her. To be most effective, teachers should be able to diagnose students’ skills
and knowledge, and they need multiple ways of explaining ideas that are likely to be difficult for
students to grasp.
5. Consolidate concerns how teachers help students to organize material for more effective
encoding in memory and for more efficient reasoning. These practices include reviewing and
summarizing material at the end of classes and connecting ideas to material covered in
previous lessons. Teachers who excel at consolidation talk about the relationships between
ideas and help students to see patterns.
6. Challenge concerns both effort and rigor—pressing students to work hard and to think hard.
Challenging teachers tend to monitor student effort and to confront students if their effort is
unsatisfactory. Students who do not devote enough time to their work or who give up too easily
in the face of difficulty are pushed to do more. Similarly, students who do not think deeply or try
to reason their way through challenging questions are both supported and pushed. The teacher
may ask a series of follow-up questions intended to elicit deeper, more thorough reasoning.
7. Control pertains to classroom management. Teachers need skills to manage student
propensities toward off-task or out-of-order behaviors, in order to foster conditions in the
classroom that allow for effective communication and focus. Effective control helps to maintain
order and supplements caring in making the classroom calm and emotionally safe from such
things as negative peer pressures.
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Using the Tripod 7Cs of Effective Teaching,1 describe some things that you notice about
teaching in this classroom.
The left column provides some guidance about what you might look for during the observation. Please
note that this is not an all-inclusive list, but rather is intended to serve as an indicative set of examples
to help you in the observation process.
1
Tripod 7Cs of Effective Teaching
Note: For each of the 7Cs below please briefly
describe what you observed in relation to each “C”
and describe at least one way the teacher could
have done more in relation to each particular C
during the course of the lesson you observed.
For Care, you might observe, for example:
1. How the teacher responds when students
appear to be sad or upset.
2. The rules the teacher has set for how
students should support one another.
3. The words the teacher uses when providing
encouragement.
4. The words the teachers uses if students
misbehave.
5. The interest the teacher expresses in the
students’ interests.
6. The nature of comments on students’ work
when they do well, or not.
What did you observe that demonstrates teaching
practices related to Care? Please describe at
least one way the teacher could do more in this
area.
For Confer, you might observe, for example:
1. Any influence that students have over
aspects of how the lesson is organized.
2. If the students and teacher are effectively
communicating with each other.
3. If students are encouraged to discuss their
perspectives with one another.
4. If students are asked to solve problems
together then discuss their findings.
5. If the teacher sincerely expresses respect for
students’ perspectives.
What did you observe that demonstrates teaching
practices related to Confer? Please describe at
least one way the teacher could do more in this
area.
Tripod 7Cs™ of Effective Teaching, copyright 2013, Tripod Project ®.
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Tripod 7Cs of Effective Teaching
Note: For each of the 7Cs below please briefly
describe what you observed in relation to each “C”
and describe at least one way the teacher could
have done more in relation to each particular C
during the course of the lesson you observed.
For Captivate, you might observe, for
example:
1. How the teacher works to make the lessons
relevant to students’ lives.
2. Whether the lesson is geared to be
interesting even to students at low skill levels.
3. Whether the lesson seems clear and
engaging.
4. Whether the teacher notices when students
are not paying attention and responds
appropriately to get them interested.
5. If the teacher uses a range of communication
styles and methods to connect with students.
What did you observe that demonstrates teaching
practices related to Captivate? Please describe at
least one way the teacher could do more in this
area.
For Clarify, you might observe, for example:
1. If the teacher provides orderly, structured
explanations when introducing new ideas.
2. If the teacher checks for understanding and
responds appropriately.
3. If the teacher speaks at the right pace and
communicates clearly when covering difficult
topics.
4. Whether, when students do not understand
something, the teacher recognizes this and
effectively clears up the confusion.
5. Whether the teacher provides multiple
explanations or examples for tricky concepts.
What did you observe that demonstrates teaching
practices related to Clarify? Please describe at
least one way the teacher could do more in this
area.
For Consolidate, you might observe, for
example:
1. If the teacher encourages students to identify
their own connections to previous lessons.
2. If the material is delivered in a manner that
connects past, current, and future lessons.
3. If the teacher makes sure the lesson is
summarized at the end of each class.
4. If the teacher helps students relate lessons to
what they are learning in other classes.
What did you observe that demonstrates teaching
practices related to Consolidate? Please
describe at least one way the teacher could do
more in this area.
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Tripod 7Cs of Effective Teaching
Note: For each of the 7Cs below please briefly
describe what you observed in relation to each “C”
and describe at least one way the teacher could
have done more in relation to each particular C
during the course of the lesson you observed.
For Challenge, you might observe, for
example:
1. Whether the teacher knows how to
encourage students when they express
doubts about their own abilities.
2. If the teacher sets challenges that are hard
enough, but not too hard, for each student.
3. If the teacher is able to motivate students to
persist at moments when he or she sees
them beginning to give up.
4. If the teacher requires students to
understand, not just memorize material.
5. If, when students do well, success is
recognized and celebrated.
What did you observe that demonstrates teaching
practices related to Challenge? Please describe
at least one way the teacher could do more in this
area.
For Control, you might observe, for example:
1. Whether the teacher responds appropriately if
students treat one another disrespectfully.
2. How students are responded to if they speak
to the teacher disrespectfully.
3. How the teacher responds when students
appear to be off task—not focused on their
work.
4. Whether the class is generally busy and
accomplishing what needs to get done during
class time.
What did you observe that demonstrates teaching
practices related to Control? Please describe at
least one way the teacher could do more in this
area.
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Appendix A: Ohio Standards for the Teaching Profession
1. Teachers understand student learning and development and respect the diversity of the students
they teach.
1.1 Teachers display knowledge of how students learn and of the developmental characteristics
of age groups.
1.2 Teachers understand what students know and are able to do and use this knowledge to
meet the needs of all students.
1.3 Teachers expect that all students will achieve to their full potential.
1.4 Teachers model respect for students’ diverse cultures, language skills and experiences.
1.5 Teachers recognize characteristics of gifted students, students with disabilities and at-risk
students in order to assist in appropriate identification, instruction and intervention.
2. Teachers know and understand the content area for which they have instructional responsibility.
2.1 Teachers know the content they teach and use their knowledge of content-area concepts,
assumptions and skills to plan instruction.
2.2 Teachers understand and use content-specific instructional strategies to effectively teach
the central concepts and skills of the discipline.
2.3 Teachers understand school and district curriculum priorities and the Ohio academic content
standards.
2.4 Teachers understand the relationship of knowledge within the discipline to other content
areas.
2.5 Teachers connect content to relevant life experiences and career opportunities.
3. Teachers understand and use varied assessments to inform instruction, evaluate and ensure
student learning.
3.1 Teachers are knowledgeable about assessment types, their purposes and the data they
generate.
3.2 Teachers select, develop and use a variety of diagnostic, formative and summative
assessments.
3.3 Teachers analyze data to monitor student progress and learning, and to plan, differentiate
and modify instruction.
3.4 Teachers collaborate and communicate student progress with students, parents and
colleagues.
3.5 Teachers involve learners in self-assessment and goal setting to address gaps between
performance and potential.
4. Teachers plan and deliver effective instruction that advances the learning of each individual
student.
4.1 Teachers align their instructional goals and activities with school and district priorities and
Ohio’s academic content standards.
4.2 Teachers use information about students’ learning and performance to plan and deliver
instruction that will close the achievement gap.
4.3 Teachers communicate clear learning goals and explicitly link learning activities to those
defined goals.
4.4 Teachers apply knowledge of how students think and learn to instructional design and
delivery.
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4.5 Teachers differentiate instruction to support the learning needs of all students, including
students identified as gifted, students with disabilities and at-risk students.
4.6 Teachers create and select activities that are designed to help students develop as
independent learners and complex problem-solvers.
4.7 Teachers use resources effectively, including technology, to enhance student learning.
5. Teachers create learning environments that promote high levels of learning and achievement for
all students.
5.1 Teachers treat all students fairly and establish an environment that is respectful, supportive
and caring.
5.2 Teachers create an environment that is physically and emotionally safe.
5.3 Teachers motivate students to work productively and assume responsibility for their own
learning.
5.4 Teachers create learning situations in which students work independently, collaboratively
and/or as a whole class.
5.5 Teachers maintain an environment that is conducive to learning for all students.
6. Teachers collaborate and communicate with students, parents, other educators, administrators
and the community to support student learning.
6.1 Teachers communicate clearly and effectively.
6.2 Teachers share responsibility with parents and caregivers to support student learning,
emotional and physical development and mental health.
6.3 Teachers collaborate effectively with other teachers, administrators and school and district
staff.
6.4 Teachers collaborate effectively with the local community and community agencies, when
and where appropriate, to promote a positive environment for student learning.
7. Teachers assume responsibility for professional growth, performance and involvement as an
individual and as a member of a learning community.
7.1 Teachers understand, uphold and follow professional ethics, policies and legal codes of
professional conduct.
7.2 Teachers take responsibility for engaging in continuous, purposeful professional
development.
7.3 Teachers are agents of change who seek opportunities to positively impact teaching quality,
school improvements and student achievement.
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Appendix B: Crosswalk of Ohio Teaching Standards,
RESA Tasks, and RESA Rubrics
Ohio Teaching Standards
1. Teachers understand student learning and
development and respect the diversity of the
students they teach.
Tasks
Rubrics
Task 1 – First Lesson Cycle
Task 3 – Second Lesson Cycle
1.2 A / 3.2 A: Quality of Learning
Outcomes
1.2 B / 3.2 B: Teacher’s Knowledge
of Content
1.3 A / 3.3 A: Teacher’s Knowledge
of Students
1.3 B / 3.3 B: Quality of Learning
Activities
1.5 A / 3.5 B: Overall Lesson
Reflection
Task 1 – First Lesson Cycle
Task 3 – Second Lesson Cycle
1.2 A / 3.2 A: Quality of Learning
Outcomes
1.2 B / 3.2 B: Teacher’s Knowledge
of Content
1.3 B / 3.3 B: Quality of Learning
Activities
1.3 D / 3.3 D: Quality of Instructional
Evidence
1.4.B / 3.4 B: Explanation of Content
1.1 Teachers display knowledge of how
students learn and of the developmental
characteristics of age groups.
1.2 Teachers understand what students
know and are able to do and use this
knowledge to meet the needs of students.
1.3 Teachers expect that all students will
achieve to their full potential.
1.4 Teachers model respect for students’
diverse cultures, language, skills, and
experiences.
1.5 Teachers recognize characteristics of
gifted students, students with disabilities and
at-risk students in order to assist in
appropriate identification, instruction, and
intervention.
2. Teachers know and understand the
content area for which they have
instructional responsibility.
2.1 Teachers know the content they teach
and use their knowledge of content-area
concepts, assumptions and skills to plan
instruction.
2.2 Teachers understand and use contentspecific instructional strategies to effectively
teach the central concepts and skills of the
discipline.
2.3 Teachers understand school and district
curriculum priorities and the Ohio academic
content standards.
2.4 Teachers understand the relationship of
knowledge within the discipline to other
content areas.
2.5 Teachers connect content to relevant life
experiences and career opportunities.
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Ohio Teaching Standards
Tasks
3. Teachers understand and use varied
assessments to inform instruction, evaluate
and ensure student learning.
Task 1 – First Lesson Cycle
3.1 Teachers are knowledgeable about
assessment types, their purposes and the
data they generate.
Task 2 – Formative and Summative
Assessment
Task 3 – Second Lesson Cycle
3.2 Teachers select, develop and use a
variety of diagnostic, formative and
summative assessments.
Rubrics
1.3 C / 3.3 C: Plan for Using
Formative Assessment
1.3.D / 3.3 D: Use of Formative
Assessment and Feedback in
Instruction
1.5 A / 3.5 A: Overall Lesson
Reflection
2.4 A: Quality of Learning Outcomes
2.4 B: Alignment of Assessments
with Learning Outcomes
2.5 A: Analyzing Individual Student
Data to Monitor Achievement
2.5 B: Using Assessments to Inform
Instruction for Three Selected
Students
3.3 Teachers analyze data to monitor
student progress and learning, and to plan,
differentiate and modify instruction.
3.4 Teachers collaborate and communicate
student progress with students, parents and
colleagues.
3.5 Teachers involve learners in selfassessment and goal setting to address
gaps between performance and potential.
4. Teachers plan and deliver effective
instruction that advances the learning of
each individual student.
4.1 Teachers align their instructional goals
and activities with school and district
priorities and Ohio’s academic content
standards.
Task 1 – First Lesson Cycle
Task 3 – Second Lesson Cycle
Task 2 – Formative and Summative
Assessment
4.2 Teachers use information about
students’ learning and performance to plan
and deliver instruction that will close the
achievement gap.
1.2 A / 3.2 A: Quality of Learning
Outcomes
1.3 A / 3.3 A: Teacher’s Knowledge
of Students
1.3 B / 3.3 B: Quality of Learning
Activities
1.3 D / 3.3 D: Quality of Instructional
Evidence
1.4 D / 3.4 D: Student Engagement
1.5 A / 3.5 A: Overall Lesson
Reflection
2.4 A: Quality of Learning Outcomes
4.3 Teachers communicate clear learning
goals and explicitly link learning activities to
those defined goals.
4.4 Teachers apply knowledge of how
students think and learn to instructional
design and delivery.
4.5 Teachers differentiate instruction to
support the learning needs of all students,
including students identified as gifted,
students with disabilities and at-risk
students.
4.6 Teachers create and select activities that
are designed to help students develop as
independent learners and complex problemsolvers.
4.7 Teachers use resources effectively,
including technology, to enhance student
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Ohio Teaching Standards
Tasks
Rubrics
learning.
5. Teachers create learning environments
that promote high levels of learning and
achievement for all students.
Task 1 – First Lesson Cycle
Task 3 – Second Lesson Cycle
1.3 C / 3.3 C: Teacher’s Knowledge
of Students
1.4 C / 3.4 C: Classroom
Environment Conducive to Learning
1.4 D / 3.4 D: Student Engagement
Task 4 – Communication and
Professional Growth
4.1 A: Quality and Clarity of
Information
5.1 Teachers treat all students fairly and
establish an environment that is respectful,
supportive and caring.
5.2 Teachers create an environment that is
physically and emotionally safe.
5.3 Teachers motivate students to work
productively and assume responsibility for
their own learning.
5.4 Teachers create learning situations in
which students work independently,
collaboratively and/or as a whole class.
5.5 Teachers maintain an environment that
is conducive to learning for all students.
6. Teachers collaborate and communicate
with students, parents, other educators,
administrators and the community to support
student learning.
6.1 Teachers communicate clearly and
effectively.
4.1 B: Professionalism and Tone
4.2.A: Commitment and Initiative
4.2.B: Impact on Practice
4.2 C: Growing and Developing
Professionally
6.2 Teachers share responsibility with
parents and caregivers to support student
learning, emotional and physical
development and mental health.
6.3 Teachers collaborate effectively with
other teachers, administrators and school
and district staff.
6.4 Teachers collaborate effectively with the
local community and community agencies,
when and where appropriate, to promote a
positive environment for student learning.
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Ohio Teaching Standards
7. Teachers assume responsibility for
professional growth, performance and
involvement as an individual and as a
member of a learning community.
Tasks
Task 4 – Communication and
Professional Growth
Rubrics
4.1 A: Quality and Clarity of
Information
4.1 B: Professionalism and Tone
4.2.A: Commitment and Initiative
7.1 Teachers understand, uphold, and follow
professional ethics, policies and legal codes
of professional conduct.
7.2 Teachers take responsibility for engaging
in continuous, purposeful professional
development.
7.3 Teachers are agents of change who
seek opportunities to positively impact
teaching quality, school improvements and
student achievement.
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Appendix C: Guide to Using the Online RESA Submission
System
Getting Started
Once your RESA account is created with Teachscape, you can log on to the RESA submission system
at www.OhioRESA.com. You will be taken to the “Submission Overview and Status” page where you
can complete your Profile (see information below) and begin to work on the RESA tasks. The
“Submission Overview and Status” page is also where you can download the Media Uploader, which
will be used to upload video and media evidence submissions. (See Appendix F for more information
about the Media Uploader.)
To work on a specific task, you will click on a task and follow the
instructions, either by typing answers in the forms or uploading
evidence. You can save your work and log back in at a later time to
edit or complete the task. Before submitting the task, you should
review your work and use the video and PDF previewers to ensure
that all evidence is scorable. (For more information on how to ensure
evidence is scorable, see Appendix H.) When you are ready to
submit the task, you simply click the “submit” button.
You are not required to work on the RESA tasks in order. Rather, you
can work on and submit any of the tasks at any time prior to the
submission deadline for that task. However, if you do not complete
a task by that task’s submission deadline, the task will be locked
and you will not be able to work on it after the deadline has
passed.
Tip:
Once a task is submitted, it will
be locked and you will no longer
be able to edit your work. While
you will be able to view your
submission after you have
submitted it, we strongly
recommend that you save your
work (e.g., videos, PDFs,
answers to forms in word
processing document) on a local
computer so you have a local
record of your submission.
Profile
All RESA candidates must complete a Profile, a series of online forms detailing a candidate’s specific
education, work, and professional association history, before they can submit any task. The
information submitted in the Profile is confidential and secure and will only be used to ensure
fairness and anonymity in assigning assessors to tasks within the submission scoring system.
In your Profile, you will be asked to provide information about your
education, training, employment, and selected professional and
school-related volunteer activities for the past five years. Assessors
will be asked similar questions, and Teachscape will use this
information to assign submissions to assessors for scoring.
Assessors will not be paired with candidates with whom they may
have had contact in the past. We ask that you provide as much
information as possible to help ensure that your submissions will be
assigned to assessors who are not likely to know you.
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The information provided in the
Profile will only be used in the
scoring assignment process and
will only be viewed by individuals
who have signed a strict Nondisclosure Agreement.
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Pre-populated Data
Wherever possible, your Profile forms have been populated with data already on file with the ODE. For
these items, you will only have to confirm that the information is correct. However, if you teach at a
private school or have an unusual or complicated work and education history, you may have to enter
that information onto the form. In these complex cases, the form may take up to an hour to complete. It
may be helpful to have a current résumé or CV on hand when completing your Profile.
If any of the pre-populated information is inaccurate, you should indicate that it is incorrect by checking
the “yes” box in response to the question “Are there errors in the employment history above?”
within the Profile form. You should then provide specific information about what is incorrect in response
to the question “What is inaccurate about the displayed employment history?” within the Profile.
Teachscape cannot change the information but will give the corrected employment and work history to
the ODE so that state records can be updated.
Subject Area
Within your Profile, you will also be required to select one subject
that best represents your teaching area. We understand that many
candidates may teach in more than one subject area; therefore,
you are not required to use classes in this subject area for all RESA
tasks.
You may submit materials from any class you feel best suits the
task requirements. For content-specific tasks, you will complete the
“Teaching and Learning Context Form” to provide information
on the number of students, content area, and grade level for that
specific task. Teachscape will use this information to ensure that
the assessor assigned will be matched correctly for that grade level
and content area.
Tip:
Within each task, you may only
submit materials from one class.
For example, a candidate who
teaches third grade can use a math
lesson for Task 1, a reading
instruction cycle for Task 2, and a
science lesson for Task 3.
However, all Task 1 forms and
evidence must be related to the
math lesson; the Task 2 forms and
evidence must be related to the
reading instruction cycle; and the
Task 3 forms and evidence must
be related to the science lesson.
Tripod Student Perception Survey
Within your Profile, you will also identify the class you intend to use
for the Tripod Student Perception Survey. You will administer the
Tripod Survey during the winter and reflect on the survey report for
Task 5. To complete this Profile form, you will need to provide the
course content area, grade level, number of students in the class,
and mailing address or email where surveys should be sent. We
recommend that you choose a class with 15 students, but you
must choose a class with at least 5 students. All students in the
class should be given the opportunity to complete the Tripod
Survey.
More information on administering the Tripod Survey can be found
in the Task 5 instructions in this handbook and at
TripodProject.org/ODE.
Candidates who teach a semester
class and do not know their rosters
for the class that will complete the
survey should provide the general
information about course content
area and grade level in the Profile
and estimate how many surveys
they need based on average class
size. Cambridge Education will
automatically add three paper
surveys and five online surveys to
each candidate’s estimates.
Note: You do not need to contact Cambridge Education, the vendor managing the Tripod Survey,
directly to obtain surveys.
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Appendix D: Recommendations for Task and Evidence
Selection
Selecting a Lesson for Task 1 and Task 3: First and Second Lesson Cycles
Your lesson should reflect a balance of teaching lower-order knowledge and skills (e.g., facts, skills,
procedures, conventions) and higher-order knowledge or thinking skills (such as strategies for
interpreting or reasoning from facts or evidence, evaluating and synthesizing ideas, deepening
conceptual understandings). The decision on what to teach should be driven by what students are
expected to learn at a particular grade level, coupled with students’ own particular development and
academic learning needs. You should be specific about how your knowledge of your students informed
the lesson plan, such as the materials used, how groups were formed or structured, and how you
modified the lesson to address students with special needs. District guidelines, school focus, gradelevel expectations, classroom curriculum maps, and/or pacing guides should be considered as well.
Selecting a Video Segment for Task 1 and Task 3: First and Second Lesson
Cycles
The goal of the video segment is to show how you structure learning activities, tasks, or discussions to
engage students in developing their own understandings of the content and how you further your
students’ knowledge and skills by actively eliciting and monitoring their understanding while teaching.
The video that you select should clearly show student engagement in the learning activities. The
individual voices of students as they are working should be audible as much as possible so that an
observer can hear their engagement. Lessons that require students to engage in passive learning, such
as activities that only focus on recall of facts or information, or to practice a set of narrow skills,
conventions, or procedures are not appropriate choices, as they are unlikely to show the instructional
skills you are asked to demonstrate.
Responding to Commentary Prompts and Providing Evidence
The commentary sections are an opportunity for you to explain the rationale for your instructional
decisions and demonstrate your ability to analyze and reflect upon your teaching practice and
instructional decision-making. Instructional decisions include decisions you make about the content,
standards, and elements of your teaching practice that you identify as central to student learning, as
well as the criteria you use to evaluate the effectiveness of your teaching. In completing the
commentary sections it is important to cite specific details or examples from the evidence you have
provided that supports your analysis. The evidence you select should be directly connected to the
central focus of the analysis and be observable to an assessor.
It is important that your responses are clear, concise, and complete. In some cases, this may be
accomplished through bulleted responses, while others may lend themselves to a narrative response.
You should respond in the format that you believe best answers the prompt. The content of your
response should only address the questions asked. Additional information may be considered
superfluous and may adversely affect the scoring.
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Selecting Assessments for Task 2: Formative and Summative Assessment
The assessments you choose should be tightly linked to the central focus, content standards, and
learning outcomes for the instructional unit. The data from the formative assessments should provide
specific information to assist you in monitoring student learning and modifying your instruction as
needed during the cycle. The criteria you use to evaluate both formative and summative assessments
should be identified before implementing the assessment and should make it clear what qualities you
are looking for in student responses. These criteria should go beyond whether a student has the right
answer; they should provide an opportunity to evaluate the depth of student knowledge about a concept
and to identify potential student misunderstandings. The summative assessment should provide
evidence of what students have learned over the entire instructional cycle in relation to the cycle’s
central focus as well as the stated learning outcomes.
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Appendix E: Glossary
This glossary provides definitions of key terms as they are used in the RESA.
Academic language: Oral and written language appropriate for academic purposes across content
areas as well as the accurate use of content-specific vocabulary for a particular discipline or area of
study.
Academic rigor: Appropriately high expectations for students in their use or application of central
concepts, skills, higher-order thinking, and/or problem solving in your content discipline.
Assessment criteria: Performance indicators used to evaluate what students have learned.
Assessment criteria describe expected levels of achievement on an assessment and may examine
correctness of answers or the accuracy or quality of student responses. Examples include rubrics,
checklists, point systems for indicating different levels of performance, or criteria for measuring full
versus partial credit.
Central focus: The primary topic(s), concept(s), or essential question(s) that represent the ultimate
learning target for the instructional cycle.
Differentiated: Instruction is differentiated when it accounts for the various learning styles of students
and uses different strategies as a result.
Formative assessment: A formal or informal assessment used to evaluate students’ understanding
and skills in relation to learning outcomes. The results of a formative assessment are used to inform
instruction or to make modifications and adjustments during the lesson, which may be part of a larger
instructional unit or cycle. Formative assessments may take many forms, including oral or visual
presentations, group activities, performances, quizzes, anecdotal records based on systematic
observations of student behavior, running records, and written tasks during instruction and in homework
assignments.
Higher-order thinking: Thinking skills that go beyond recalling facts or correct answers and involve
some cognitive complexity, for example, analysis, interpretation, compare/contrast, categorization,
evaluation, synthesis, drawing evidence-based conclusions, and generating rules, questions, or ideas.
Instructional evidence: Instructional materials, student assignments, and other kinds of teaching
materials that are used in your teaching. See Appendix G for guidelines on selecting appropriate
instructional evidence.
Language needs: Refers to the needs of students who are English language learners and native
English speakers with different levels of language proficiency.
Learning outcomes: The objectives of the lesson that reflect desired student learning.
Professional tone: An overall quality that is confident, courteous, sincere, at an appropriate level for
the audience, written with a suitable level of formality, and free of unnecessary jargon or complexity.
Scaffolding: Ongoing support provided by the teacher to students as they acquire complex skills.
Summative assessment: A formal assessment that is typically implemented at the end of an
instructional cycle to measure student learning and performance against instructional outcomes and to
plan future instruction.
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Appendix F: Uploading, Segmenting, and Submitting
Evidence Reference Guide (Video, Audio, and PDFs)
What are the technical requirements for submitting evidence?
In 2014–2015, most candidates will be able to upload video and audio files directly to the RESA online
submission system and will not need to download an application. For larger video and audio file sizes
(over 1.5 GB), you will still have the option of downloading the Media Uploader application on your
computer.
If you will be using the Media Uploader, refer to the System Requirements to ensure that your
computer has the necessary technology to use the RESA submission software.
Evidence must be uploaded in the following formats:
•
Text and images must be saved as a PDF.
•
Video files must be saved as one of the following: MP4, M4V, WMV, AVI, or MOV.
•
Audio files must be saved as WAV or MP3.
The following tips are helpful in using the RESA submission software to upload evidence:
•
Turn off pop-up blockers. Refer to your Internet browser’s help section for specific instructions
on how to turn off pop-up blocking software.
•
Use Microsoft Word or a PDF converter, such as Adobe Acrobat Pro, to convert images and
documents to PDF files. There are many PDF converters that can be downloaded online for
free. You may need assistance from your school IT staff if using a school computer.
•
Keep your computer from timing out: Step-by-step instructions that describe how to keep a
computer from going into “sleep” mode while uploading video to the Media Library can be found
in the “Video Evidence in the Submission System” support document on the Resources page of
www.OhioRESA.com. If you are using a school computer to upload video, you may need to
contact your IT staff to change the computer settings.
•
Candidates who use computers at their school computer labs to upload videos are advised to
check with their IT staff to see if their network can access ftp.video.limelight.com as that will
be needed for video uploading.
Uploading and Segmenting Video and Audio Evidence
The video segment(s) that you submit for Tasks 1 and 3 must address all components outlined in the
task description found in the “What You Must Do” section. This is your opportunity to demonstrate your
teaching practice through a brief, authentic video “observation” of your classroom. For Tasks 2 and 4,
candidates have the option of uploading video evidence, and that evidence will not be subject to the
same time limit restrictions as the video evidence submissions for Tasks 1 and 3.
You may also find advice on selecting a lesson in Appendix D: Recommendations for Task and
Evidence Selection.
Before recording: You should explain the purpose of the video to your students before recording, and
remind students that they should try to ignore the camera. Candidates must make a good faith effort
to obtain the necessary consent forms from any parties who will be recorded. A sample consent
form can be found on the Resources page of the OhioRESA.com website.
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Students who have not consented to be videotaped should be seated in some part of the classroom
that is not covered by the planned camera shot and instructed to remain out of any areas being
captured.
If a non-permitted student is accidentally filmed during a lesson, the candidate should not select that
portion of the video when specifying segments to be scored. For more information, refer to the
Incidental Video Capture Policies located on the Resources page at www.OhioRESA.com.
Consent forms are not submitted or uploaded to the Ohio RESA submission system. However,
Candidates should keep consent forms on hand, as they may be requested at a later date.
Obtaining permission for recording calls: If you are recording a phone call or a conversation with a
parent for Tasks 2 or 4, at the beginning of the call or meeting with a parent or caregiver ask permission
to record the call before you proceed with your conversation.
Remember: While using only first names is OK, candidates may not refer to a parent or child’s first and
last name together in any videos or audio recordings or that submission will be disqualified for a
Personally Identifiable Information Violation.
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Uploading Video and Audio Media
In 2014–2015, most candidates will be able to upload video and audio files directly to the RESA online
submission system and will not need to download an application. For larger video and audio file sizes
(over 1.5 GB), you will still have the option of downloading the Media Uploader application on your
computer.
To upload a video using RESA’s web interface, first make sure you have a strong, fast, Internet
connection for the upload, and that the video file you intend to upload is no larger than 1.5 GB. The
recommended file size for the web interface is under 1 GB.
To get started, log in with your username and password on OhioRESA.com, select the Media Library
tab, and then select Upload new video.
On the Upload Video page, select Upload to browse for your file. You will only be able to upload one
file at a time.
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Verify that you’ve selected the correct file, and that the file size is no larger than 1.5 GB. Then select
the Start Upload button.
While the video is uploading, be careful not to disrupt the process by closing your browser window,
selecting the Back button, or otherwise navigating away from the upload process. Upload times can
vary significantly and will depend on factors such as the speed of your Internet connection and the size
of the video file.
If the upload attempt is successful, an Upload Attempt Complete message will be displayed.
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When the uploaded video has been fully processed, it is ready be used.
Note: The video evidence selected must not be upside-down or sideways. Make sure that the video is
upright prior to uploading it to the RESA media library. Videos with no sound, distracting sound, poor
video quality, or orientation at an angle that does not allow an assessor to clearly see what is going on
in the class will be disqualified.
If the video or audio file size is larger than 1.5 GB, you will need to download and use the Media
Uploader application to transfer video and audio files to the RESA submission system. You must first
install the Media Uploader on your computer. The program for installing the Media Uploader can be
found on the Media Library page in the submission system. If you would like to use this option,
download the program and follow the installation instructions prior to uploading video to the RESA
submission system. You may need assistance from your school IT staff if using a school computer.
Once the Media Uploader application is installed, launch the application (this will vary depending on the
computer and operating system but will either be in the “Applications” folder or will appear as an icon on
the desktop). After launching the application, enter your RESA username and password created during
registration.
Before uploading video to the RESA submission system, first transfer the video and audio recordings
from the recording device, such as an iPhone or iPad, to your computer. To upload a file, choose the
Select Video option, navigate to the folder where the video file is stored, and then select the video file
to upload. The program will compress the file to minimize its size and then upload the file to the Media
Library within the RESA submission system. Screencasts for this process will be available in the
Resources section of OhioRESA.com. Length of Video
RESA candidates should submit an unedited video of a classroom lesson for Task 1 and
another video of a different lesson for Task 3. The lesson should be filmed in its entirety and
uploaded without editing, even if it includes pauses for breaks, jerky video from moving cameras, focus
changes, and periods of little or no activity.
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If the recording of a lesson is stopped for any reason, you may need to
record a different lesson. However, if there is enough content in an
uninterrupted portion of the lesson to fulfill the requirements of the task,
then you may upload that uninterrupted portion and choose a segment
for the assessor to view. If a pause or edit is included in the segment for
review, the assessor may infer that the video has been edited and is
allowed to reject the submission for that reason. A video split between
two different days will also be disqualified.
Remember:
Candidates may not edit the
video of the class lesson
prior to uploading it.
You are free to film any lesson; however, note that the longer the lesson that is filmed, the more time it
will take to upload that video to the online submission system. As a general rule, you can assume each
minute of video will take up to a minute to upload. We recommend that you try to keep video length to
less than one hour, though there is no technical limit to the length of video that may be uploaded.
Segmentation
To complete Tasks 1 and 3, you will be asked to identify a segment(s) of the lesson to be scored. The
segment(s) must be at least 2 minutes, but no more than 15 minutes in length. This selected portion of
the lesson is the only portion of the video that will be scored. Assessors will not be able to watch any
other portion that is not selected by candidates.
You should choose segments that provide the best evidence of your teaching practices. If you feel that
one segment of up to 15 minutes does not adequately capture the best evidence, you may choose 2
segments of video for the assessor to view. In this case, each segment should be no less than 2
minutes, but the total time selected for the assessor to view can be no more than 15 minutes (for both
segments).
There is no penalty for choosing only one segment. You are given the option to choose one or two
segments in order to focus on the events you feel are the best illustrations of your teaching practice.
There are specific and detailed directions on how to indicate the segments of the video within the RESA
software.
If the lesson is 15 minutes or less in its entirety—as may be the case in early childhood and elementary
settings—you should upload the entire unedited class video. For such a video, you would indicate that
the start time of the segment is the beginning of the video and the end time of the segment is the end of
the video.
The following are examples of acceptable videos and segmentation for Tasks 1 and 3:
•
A ninth-grade Spanish teacher films a 30-minute lesson on verb conjugation. The teacher will
upload the entire 30 minutes using the Media Uploader. After viewing the video, he decides the
best evidence of his teaching practice is the middle portion of the lesson, so he indicates within
the RESA software that the assessor should watch the segment of the video starting at minute 7
and ending at minute 22.
•
A science teacher films her 55-minute twelfth-grade AP Physics class. She uploads the entire
55-minute video but, after viewing the lesson, decides that the best evidence of her teaching
practice is during the beginning of the lesson when she is explaining the concepts the students
are learning, and at the end of the lesson when the students explain the results of their small
discussion group problems. So the teacher indicates within the RESA software that the
assessor should score the segments of the video starting at minute 2 and ending at minute 10,
and starting at minute 40 and ending at minute 48 (a total of 15 minutes).
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•
A first-grade teacher films a 12-minute lesson on telling time. She uploads the entire video to
the submission system and indicates that the assessor should score the segment starting at
minute 1 and ending at minute 12.
Once you have identified the segment(s) for review, use the Video Previewer to ensure that the video is
visible, audible, and correctly uploaded. Videos that are inaudible or not visible will not be scored. For
more information on how to ensure your evidence is scorable, see Appendix H.
Recommendations for Recording Lessons
Capture video at a minimum video resolution of 640x480 (VGA or DVD) to preserve detail, and do not
use video captured at a resolution above 1280x720 (720p). Refer to your video recording device
owner’s manual for directions on setting the video resolution.
External microphones are recommended if the video capture device is a smart phone, tablet, Flip-style
camera, or a camera optimized for still images. Place an external microphone where it is least likely to
distract learning and most likely to optimize sound quality. Options include an external stand or podium
microphones pointed at the classroom or wireless microphones placed around the classroom and/or
pinned to the teacher’s clothing.
Other Tips:
 Ensure that you have the appropriate permission from the parents or caregivers of
students who appear on the video.
 Make arrangements for the necessary video and audio equipment well in advance.
 Align the height of the camera with the tallest student while sitting down.
 Ensure the lights are on and windows are covered.
 Plug in the recording device ahead of time and/or ensure all batteries are charged.
 Use large and empty memory cards.
 Use zooming or rotate the camera to a new position to capture what you or the
students are doing.
 Use a sturdy tripod to ensure a steady image. Do not have someone use a handheld camera.
 Explain the purpose of the recording to the students and tell the students to forget
that the camera is in the room.
 Know where you and your students will be located in the classroom during the
activities.
 The video should capture interactions between you and your students and your
responses to student comments, questions, and needs.
 The video should feature either the whole class or a targeted group of students
within the class.
 The teacher and students should be visible and clearly heard on the video recording
submitted.
 Try not to introduce routines or procedures with which your students are unfamiliar.
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Accessing Equipment and Other Video Resources
Consider the following resources for equipment and videotaping assistance:
•
•
•
•
School or district technology staff or administrators
Another teacher who has recorded video in the past
Your Program Coordinator or facilitator who can identify potential resources in the school as
well as assist you with video recording
Web-based resource collections (e.g., YouTube) to help identify recording devices and tips on
producing video
The Benefits of Practicing Beforehand
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Provides the opportunity to get familiar with the equipment
Ensures the equipment is working properly
Tests the quality of the video and the sound
Helps you and your students become comfortable with the process
Provides the opportunity to get used to the camera and reduce “capture anxiety”
Allows you to review your teaching practice
Allows you to identify areas of focus in your classroom
After Recording
Make a backup copy either on your hard drive, USB drive, or on a CD or DVD. Refer to
OhioRESA.com for more information on submitting the video required for the RESA.
Uploading PDF Evidence
Before uploading PDF evidence, candidates should redact any personally identifiable information.
PDFs that are 28 MB or larger will not upload successfully to the RESA submission system. Candidates
who see that their PDF evidence is 28 MB or larger will need to shrink down the size before they upload
it to the submission system. One program that has been shown to successfully reduce PDF file sizes is
the PDFCreator program, which reduces file size without reducing file quality. The PDFCreator program
is a free program found here: http://www.pdfforge.org/pdfcreator. Candidates will need to “print” the
PDF file to this program and should call the RESA Help Desk if they need additional assistance.
Another software program that the Help Desk has used in assisting educators is HandBrake, which is a
cost-free, malware-free program that can convert videos into a format that the RESA website can
accept, as well as reduce the file size of a video without reducing its quality. This program can be found
here: http://handbrake.fr.
Candidates should use the latest version of Java (http://java.com/en) and Adobe Reader
(http://adobe.com/downloads.html), especially in order to view uploaded PDFs to make sure that
they are scorable (i.e., PDFs that are either too dark or too light to read or make out or contain
personally identifiable information cannot be scored). Ohio RESA 2014-15 © 2014 Teachscape, Inc. and Charlotte Danielson
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Appendix G: RESA Instructional Evidence Reference
Guide
What is instructional evidence in the RESA?
Instructional evidence consists of materials or assessments that
were a part of your teaching. It may include, but is not limited to,
models, manipulatives, lab setups, blackboard notes, PowerPoint
slides, in-class assignments, differentiation plans, handouts sent
to parents, a picture of a bulletin board, lesson or unit plans,
samples of teacher-constructed assessments, classroom
management plan, or samples of student work indicating different
levels of performance (with personally identifying information
removed).
You must use lessons and
evidence from the current school
year. The one exception is
evidence in support of Task 4,
Form 4.3, regarding professional
development activities you have
engaged in over the past two
academic years.
While some materials, such as excerpts from textbooks or class readings, may have been used in your
preparation, these materials on their own would not be considered appropriate evidence because they
would not specifically address aspects of your teaching that are relevant for the assessors. In other
words, an assessor would gather more information from a handout than he or she would from seeing
photocopied pages from a textbook. You may reference articles or textbook pages in a handout, for
example, but you should not include copies of those readings as evidence.
For each task, you should select those materials that you feel best illustrate the focal areas of your
instruction.
Task
1: First Lesson
Cycle
2: Formative and
Summative
Assessment
Required Evidence to Submit (in addition to any forms)
•
•
Up to ten (10) pages of instructional evidence
One video file (see Appendix F: Uploading, Segmenting, and Submitting
Evidence Reference Guide (Video, Audio, and PDFs) for details)
•
Three (3) focal student responses for each of the following: Formative
Assessment 1, Formative Assessment 2, and Summative Assessment
Two formative assessment examples
One summative assessment example
•
•
3: Second Lesson
Cycle
•
•
4: Communication
and Professional
Growth
•
•
•
Up to ten (10) pages of instructional evidence
One video file (see Appendix F: Uploading, Segmenting, and Submitting
Evidence Reference Guide (Video, Audio, and PDFs) for details)
Two examples of parent/caregiver communication
One example of collaboration with colleagues
One example of collaboration with colleagues initiated by the teacher
You do not have to use the same students/class for all of the
RESA tasks. However, it is expected that the evidence provided
within a single task will come from a single class. For example, all
the student assessment samples in Task 2 should come from the
same class of students.
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You must get the appropriate
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Likewise, if you teach more than one subject, you are not limited to the subject listed in your Profile.
You may submit materials from any class you feel best suits the task requirements. For content-specific
tasks, you must complete the Teaching and Learning Context Form to provide information on the
number of students, content area, and grade level for that specific task. Therefore, if you use different
classes for different tasks, you must also complete a new Teaching and Learning Context Form for
each of those tasks. Teachscape will use this information to ensure that the assessor assigned will be
matched correctly for that grade level and content area.
However, within each task, you must submit materials from only one class. For example, a candidate
who teaches third grade can use a math lesson for Task 1, a reading instruction cycle for Task 2, and a
science lesson for Task 3. However, all Task 1 forms and evidence must be related to the math lesson;
the Task 2 forms and evidence must be related to the reading instruction cycle; and the Task 3 forms
and evidence must be related to the science lesson.
Tasks 1 and 3: Examples of Instructional Evidence
The purpose of submitting instructional evidence in Tasks 1 and 3 is to allow the assessors to see the
things that students are interacting with in the class session and/or materials that support the lesson
and enhance the students’ learning experience. You should use your professional judgment to
determine what is most relevant and provides the best evidence of your teaching practice.
Examples of instructional evidence include, but are not limited to:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Handouts given to students
Detailed photos of manipulatives or lab setups and equipment
Images of pictures, charts, or diagrams from an overhead projector
Posters on the wall or bulletin board that the students use or reference in their work
Copies of any materials sent out to the students or parents in advance of the class session
Directions or other relevant materials written on a chalkboard, whiteboard, or SMART Board that
may be difficult to see on video (candidates should review the video to determine what the
assessor cannot see)
What Is One Page of Instructional Evidence?
For the purposes of Tasks 1 and 3, a page is one image or one document. If you use a slide
presentation, each individual slide in the presentation is considered one page, even if the entire
presentation is saved as a single PDF document. You should select from the set only slides that
are most relevant and that provide the best evidence of your teaching practice as described in the task.
While it is possible to put several small images, pictures, or PowerPoint slides on one physical page,
unless each is important to the instructional content and is clearly visible at that small scale, you
should not combine them in this way. Note that only one page of instructional evidence is required,
and there is no penalty for submitting fewer than 10 pages.
The following are examples of how to determine the number of instructional pages submitted:
•
In a high school science class, a candidate may have three photos of a chemistry lab setup and
four pages of handouts to direct the lab. If the candidate also had a large periodic table chart on
the wall that students used in the lab, he or she could take a photo of it. If the candidate
displayed a set of lab safety rules on the projector during the lab, he or she could include that
document as well, making a total of nine pages of instructional materials. If the candidate had
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the same lab safety rules on a set of PowerPoint slides, the slides should not be included,
because the information is redundant and this would exceed the 10-page limit.
•
In teaching an elementary-level reading class, a candidate may include a picture of the cover of
the book or pages of the book if they are important to the instruction (e.g., the pages were used
explicitly to help students form or support an inference about the action, context, or feelings of a
character). Including images or pages from a book that students did not analyze or otherwise
use in their learning would not be appropriate.
•
In a middle school physical education class on basketball free throws, a candidate may use film
of professional players in class to analyze various details of form, arm position, and style. This
candidate might choose to describe this class activity in the provided fields in the online form,
and also analyze why he or she chose to do it, its place in the lesson, and the impact on the
intended learning outcomes. This would be considered one page as long as it was completed
within a single form.
Tasks 2 and 4: Use of Audio and Video Files
Written evidence is the best evidence whenever such responses are possible and appropriate.
However, you can use audio and video files in circumstances where it is the best or only medium for
capturing evidence. Audio and video cannot be used in Task 5, as there is no place to upload evidence
documents. If you elect to record and submit an oral response to a prompt when you could have written
the same response, you will be penalized in scoring for not following directions.
You are encouraged to use common sense when deciding if audio or video is truly necessary. Some
examples where audio or video might provide unique insight or evidence include:
•
•
•
•
Telephone or face-to-face parent/teacher conferences
Assessment (formative or summative) of students who cannot write (including, for example,
early childhood or special education settings)
Assessment of student oral performance (including, for example, speaking a foreign language,
or a vocal or instrumental music performance)
Assessment of student performance tasks (including, for example, theater performance, auto
mechanics, food preparation, physical education and coaching, or life skills)
In cases of assessment of a student vocal or instrumental music performance, audio or video will be the
preferred format. However, you should consider whether it is possible to convey the essential aspects
in your written summary and how much audio or video is required to support the summary. If the
contents of a parent/teacher conference and interactions can be conveyed clearly in a written summary,
then the summary is sufficient for the submission. However, if the tone of the interaction is an important
aspect of your submission, then you may choose to include the portion of the audio that supports the
submission.
When submitting video or audio files as evidence, candidates must comply with the following:
•
•
They must obtain the necessary consent and forms from any parties recorded. The Ohio
Resident Educator Program strongly recommends that candidates have parents sign the
release forms found on the Resources page of the OhioRESA.com, for themselves and for their
children.
All recordings should be limited to essential information. Subsets of complete performances
are encouraged if they provide sufficient information to respond to the prompts in the
assessment tasks. For example:
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o
o
Task 2 requests work samples from only three students. Candidates should use their
professional judgment about how much evidence is sufficient to support their responses.
Note that the student assessment samples themselves are not scored; they are
supporting evidence for the candidate responses to the prompts in the task.
Similarly, in Task 4, an audio or video submitted as evidence of a parent/teacher
communication should be limited to just the part of the discussion regarding student
progress and solutions to issues. The entire conversation should not be submitted.
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Appendix H: Evidence Scorability
What makes evidence scorable or unscorable?
In general, evidence must match the requirements listed in the task description and assessors must be
able to see and/or view the evidence. Video evidence must be submitted in the proper format (see
Appendix F) and must be visible and audible. PDFs and other scanned documents must be legible.
After uploading evidence, you should use the PDF and Video Previewers found in the submissions
system to check that there are no technical issues that make it difficult or impossible to view the
evidence and/or understand why the evidence is being submitted. Sideways or upside-down videos are
scorable as assessors will have a tool to “flip” the video right-side up.
No Personal Student or Parent/Caregiver Information
Written Evidence
You must remove or redact all student and parent/caregiver names from written evidence. Written
evidence that includes this information will be considered a blatant violation and will be deemed
unscorable.
Video/Audio Evidence
You should not refer to students and parents/caregivers by their full
names while videotaping a lesson or recording a meeting, instead
referring only to first names. You should also avoid writing students’
full names where they will be visible in the video.
Reminder:
You must make a good faith effort
to obtain the necessary consent
forms from any parties who will be
recorded.
Candidate Identification
You should try to avoid identifying yourself in evidence submitted in support of the RESA tasks. For
example, you should not introduce yourself at the beginning of videotaped lessons and should remove
your name from documents used as evidence.
However, you will not be penalized if you have identified yourself in evidence. All submissions are
confidential, and individuals who have access to submissions are being trained in confidentiality
protocols. Additionally, the assessor-candidate matching system will work to ensure that assessors do
not score submissions from candidates they know. Assessors will be instructed to stop scoring a
submission if they recognize the candidate and return the submission so that it can be assigned to a
different assessor.
Building or District-Level Identifiers
You should make your best efforts to ensure that video used as evidence in submissions does not
contain any obvious identification of the school (for example, a large poster with the school name on
the board in the camera shot). However, it is OK if students are wearing clothing showing the school
name or mascot, and assessors will not mark the segments as unscorable if identifying school
information is in the segments that will be scored.
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Appendix I: Support for Resident Educators
The goal of the Ohio Resident Educator Program is to provide systematic, comprehensive support to
beginning teachers in K–12 and to deepen their understanding of teaching and learning as an ongoing,
reciprocal, and collaborative process. The program aims to accelerate teachers’ development of the
skills they need to positively engage students in learning experiences that nurture student growth and
improve student academic performance.
To this end, the support provided Resident Educators begins with mentors and extends to additional
support during their first years of teaching. This extended support takes the form of facilitators,
collaborative teams of veteran and beginning teachers, and district sponsored workshops and
networks. Each resource supports a primary goal of the Resident Educator program, the formation of
teachers who systematically and regularly engage in the process of inquiry and reflection.
In years 1 and 2, Resident Educators practice inquiry and reflection as it relates to their teaching. They
learn that experience is not the greatest teacher unless it is thought about, reflected upon, and used as
a catalyst for action. They learn that this reflective action requires an ongoing self- assessment of the
impact of their teaching on student growth and academic performance.
In year 3, Resident Educators take the lead and demonstrate their ability to reflect on and assess the
impact of their teaching practices through participation in the Resident Educator Summative
Assessment: RESA.
Trained facilitators as well as school and district personnel support Resident Educators through the
RESA experience. The method of this support continues to be deep inquiry leading to critical reflection.
However, while support in the first years of the program is formative in nature, with Resident Educators
receiving structured and collegial feedback on their performance, the RESA is a “summative
assessment” that requires Resident Educators to demonstrate what they have learned, including the
processes and procedures that have been identified as best practices of reflective and effective
educators. Since the RESA is a summative assessment that leads to professional licensure, only
certain types of district and external support are appropriate once the candidate has officially begun the
process, while other types of support are not appropriate.
The following table highlights different types of support that may be appropriate or inappropriate to
provide to Resident Educators when they are participating in the RESA.
Type of Support
Appropriate
Intellectual Support
General overview of the format,
expectations, requirements, and
timelines; use of facilitative
questions to lead Resident
Educators to deeper
understandings
Direct instruction on the
meaning of the prompts and
interpretation of scoring rubrics
Feedback
Use of feedback questions to
guide Resident Educators to
richer demonstrations of their
knowledge and skills
Predict a possible score;
provide additional information to
prompts; revise commentary
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Editing
No editing is acceptable.
Stylistic or conventional
corrections
Technical Support
Provide technical support;
connect Resident Educators
with the local IT department and
the Teachscape Help Desk; use
of facilitative feedback and
reflective questions to
“sharpen the critical lens” of
Resident Educators
Review video clips and provide
feedback; weigh in on the
selection of videos
Chart has been adapted from edTPA and Stanford Center for Assessment, Learning, and Equity
(SCALE). Samples of appropriate question stems can be found in the online Facilitation Training:
ohioresa.mopi16.com.
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