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Oil Spill Contingency
Manual
July 2013
Please see www.wcss.ab.ca for complete
up-to-date contact information.
IMPORTANT NOTICE
Upon receipt of this manual, please update section 2.3 from the WCSS website,
if necessary. This can be done by visiting http://www.wcss.ab.ca. Click on the
Contingency Manual Tab, and choose Generic Updates.
Updating Section 2.3
Section 2.3 and any other manual updates can be found by selecting Generic
Updates. Section 2.3 will already be in your manual; simply check the date at
the bottom of the page to ensure that it is the same as what is on the website. A
date is provided for the latest update in the left hand column of the Generic
Update table. If it is not the same, then you will need to print this updated
material and replace Section 2.3. Please see Section 2.3 for further instruction.
It is the responsibility of the manual holder to update his/her manual
annually or at a more frequent basis (i.e. at the end of each quarter or in
line with company policy). Please note that all updated documents are
designed to be printed double-sided.
Hard copies of the WCSS Oil Spill Contingency Manual for each Cooperative are
available through WCSS.
To Order:
By Phone:
Western Canadian Spill Services Ltd.
Phone: (403) 516-8160
Or visit us at:
#280, 6815 – 8 Street NE
Calgary, Alberta
T2E 7H7
Mailing Address:
Box 503, 3545 – 32nd Ave NE
Calgary, AB
T1Y 6M6
1
INTRODUCTION
2
CONTACT CHECKLIST
3
SPILL ASSESSMENT CHECKLIST
4
CONTAINMENT & RECOVERY CHECKLIST
5
WILDLIFE RECOVERY
6
IN-SITU BURNING
7
JOB DESCRIPTIONS
8
PUBLIC RELATIONS CHECKLIST
9
DOCUMENTATION CHECKLIST
10
LEASE AGREEMENT
11
MAPS
OIL SPILL
CONTINGENCY
MANUAL
SECTION
1
INTRODUCTION
Introduction
How to
Use Manual
1.1
Table of
Contents
1.2
Copyright
& Disclaimer
1.3
How to
Use Manual
1.1
NOTE:
This manual has been designed to help the oil and gas
industry in Western Canada effectively deal with a petroleum
product spill that may impact the community or the
environment.
Although certain portions of this manual have been prepared
using the Canadian standard for industrial emergency
response, it is not designed to be an all-event emergency
response plan. For information on the preparation of this
type of plan, refer to CAN/CSA-Z731-03 Emergency
Preparedness and Response, available from Canadian
Standards Association.
In general, there are four categories of information in the Oil Spill Contingency
Manual.
1
Contacts (Section #2)
This section outlines contacts that would likely be required during the initial stages
and on-going control operations of a spill response.
 Company Responsibility – On receipt of this manual, companies should complete
Section 2.2 and Section 2.4 and/or maintain this manual with the Corporate and/or facility
Emergency Response Plan.
It is the responsibility of the manual holder to obtain manual updates from the
Note:
WCSS website (www.wcss.ab.ca). The local cooperative will no longer distribute hard
copies of the manual updates.
2
Checklists (Section #3-8)
These sections are intended to provide initial spill responders with specific checklists
that will assist them with their spill control activities.
3
Documentation (Section #9-10)
This section contains the documentation required to lease WCSS equipment.
pertains to both members and non-members.
4
It
Maps (Section #11)
This section will include maps that are relevant to the Cooperative geographic area.
Abacus Datagraphics Ltd. is responsible for the WCSS mapping. The present mapping is
consistent in format for all area Cooperatives, excluding Area C. Any required mapping can be
quickly provided by simply contacting:
ABACUS DATAGRAPHICS LTD.
300 - 484 Ross Street
Red Deer, AB T4N 1X4
Phone: (403) 346-7555
Fax: (403) 346-7530
MCELHANNEY & ASSOCIATES (Area C)
202-10014 97 Avenue
Fort St John, BC V1J 5P3
(250) 787-0356
Information available through Abacus includes:







control point maps
cooperative area maps
water users
trap line boundaries
routing and ownership of high-pressure pipelines
topographical maps
custom mapping showing whatever information is needed
Manual Updates
It is the manual owner’s responsibility to update his or her manual at a minimum of
once per year. Updates are available through the WCSS website: www.wcss.ab.ca/
Ordering Oil Spill Contingency Manuals
Copies of this manual are available from:
Western Canadian Spill Services Ltd.
#280, 6815 – 8 Street NE
Calgary, AB
T2E 7H7
Phone: (403) 516-8160
Table of
Contents
1.2
SECTION 1INTRODUCTION
1.1 How to Use Manual
1.2 Table of Contents
1.3 Copyright and Disclaimer
SECTION 2 CONTACT CHECKLIST
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
Spill Report Form
Company Resources
WCSS Resources & Contact Information, Equipment Locations
Emergency Services and Local Resources
Government Contacts
SECTION 3 SPILL ASSESSMENT CHECKLIST
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
Spill Prevention
Initial Actions
Safety and Hazard Assessment
Land – Assessment
Watercourses – Assessment
Ice Covered Watercourses
SECTION 4 CONTAINMENT AND RECOVERY CHECKLIST
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5
4.6
4.7
4.8
Safety
Establishing Command Centres
Establishing Decontamination Areas
Land – Containment and Recovery
Watercourses – Containment and Recovery
Ice-Covered Watercourse – Containment and Recovery
Evaluation of Containment and Recovery Operations
Waste Disposal at the Spill Site
SECTION 5 WILDLIFE RESPONSE
5.1 Wildlife Response
SECTION 6 IN-SITU BURNING
6.1 Introduction
6.2 Purpose
6.3 Considerations for In-Situ Burning
6.4 Regulatory Approval
6.5 Safety Considerations
6.6 Spill Site Assessment
6.7 Burn Plan Preparation
6.8 Post Burn Activities
SECTION 7 JOB DESCRIPTIONS
7.1 Command Function
7.2 Operations Function
7.3 Planning Function
7.4 Logistics Function
7.5 Financial Function
7.6 ICS Forms
SECTION 8 PUBLIC RELATIONS CHECKLIST
8.1 Managing Media Relations
8.2 Media Fact Sheet
8.3 Key Message Sample / Worksheets
SECTION 9 DOCUMENTATION CHECKLIST
9.1 Spill Site Sketches
9.2 Spill Site Photographs
9.3 Record of Key Events
9.4 Safety Aspects
9.5 Environmental Aspects
9.6 Negotiations and Agreements
SECTION 10 LEASE AGREEMENT
10.1 WCSS Equipment Lease Agreement
SECTION 11 MAPS
11.1 Control Points
11.2 Access Maps
For up-to-date information regarding:
WCSS contacts
Cooperative contacts
Cooperative boundaries
WCSS regional custodians
Equipment Locations
General information
Please visit our website at
www.wcss.ab.ca
Copyright and
Disclaimer
1.3
WCSS will not assume responsibility
for inappropriate spill response activities
related to the use of this Oil Spill Contingency Manual.
© WCSS, 2010
REVISED 2013
All rights reserved. No part of the generic portion of this publication may be reproduced,
stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means: photocopying,
electronic, mechanical, recording or otherwise, without the prior express written permission of
the copyright holder. Manual updates are intended to be copied and inserted into the manual
owner’s manual annually or as required.
WARNING: The doing of an unauthorized act in relation to a copyrighted work may result in
both a civil claim for damages and criminal prosecution.
OIL SPILL
CONTINGENCY
MANUAL
SECTION
2
CONTACT CHECKLIST
Contact Checklist
SPILL
REPORT FORM
EMERGENCY
SERVICES & LOCAL
RESOURCES
2.1
2.4
COMPANY
RESOURCES
GOVERNMENT
CONTACTS
2.2
2.5
WCSS RESOURCES &
CONTACT INFORMATION,
EQUIPMENT LOCATIONS
2.3
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
SPILL
REPORT FORM
2.1
Action

Obtain and record incident reporting information.
Procedure
1. Name of person reporting the incident
Name
Telephone
Cellular
Day/Month/Year
Time of report
Location of person
reporting
2. Person completing this form:
Name
Telephone
Cellular
Email address
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
3. Identify responsible party
Name of company that has the incident
Company contact name (24 hr)
Contact telephone number
Cellular telephone number
Email address for contact
Location of contact
Other:
Action
Obtain incident information
Procedure
Date release was discovered
Time of discovery
Estimated time of release
Cause of release
Type of substance released
Quantity of substance released
(barrels)
Location of release
General description of surrounding
area
Describe extent of the area impacted
by the spill (approximate dimensions)
If spill is in surface water what is the
name of the lake, river of stream
Is the health or safety of any individual (residents, communities, etc) being
compromised?
Yes
No
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
If Yes describe:
Is the property at risk or being damaged?
Yes
No
If Yes describe:
What types of land uses are impacted by the incident?
What are the obvious impacts to the environment (ie: wildfire, water pollution, wildlife,
air quality, vegetation damage, surface disturbance, other:
Other relevant information:
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Action
Document other parties notified / involved in the spill.
Procedure
List names and contact information for other regulatory agencies that have
been notified:
Agency
Contact
(telephone, cell,
email)
Date and Time
Requests from
Agency
List names and contact information for regulatory personnel on-site:
Agency
Contact
(telephone, cell,
email)
When arrived or
expected
Requests from
Representative
List others that have been notified of the incident:
Name
Company
Contact Information
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Action
Outline details of actions taken to date.
Procedure
Utilize the following checklist and provide a general summary of actions
taken to date:
Initial Actions
Implement the emergency response plan(s)
Shut-in the spill source
Identify level of emergency
Report the spill (internal, regulators, public)
Dispatch Spill Responders
Evacuate people if necessary (identify when / where)
Dispatch equipment (type, estimated time of arrival)
Identify staging area (if yes; location)
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Identify on-site command post location
Control point description
Identify spill perimeter
Conduct hazard assessment
Identify safety controls
Containment steps to date
Other actions
Meeting with regulators scheduled:
Agency / Company
Representative
Contact Information
Date
Time
Location
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Action
Outline details of future actions that are anticipated.
Procedure
Utilize the following checklist and provide an overview of anticipated
actions:
future
Complete a situation analysis
Develop an Incident Command System
Conduct a detailed hazard assessment
Develop an Incident Safety Plan
Develop an Incident Action Plan
Identify emergency operations centre
Initiate containment and recovery
Identify decontamination issues
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Identify waste management issues
Develop a Communications Plan
Schedule public information meetings
Identify subject matter experts that will be involved
Identify specialized equipment that will likely be required
Other anticipated future actions
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Action
Determine the level of emergency.
Procedure
Emergency Level
Criteria
Risk Control
Containment
Alert: Minimal
Level 1: Low
Immediate
Immediate
control of hazard
control of
is becoming
hazard, with
progressively
progressive
more complex
resolution of the because of
situation
deteriorating
conditions
Control and
Control and
relief systems
relief systems
functioning
functioning
correctly
correctly
Level 2:
Medium
Level 3: High
Imminent and/or
intermittent
Imminent control
control of the
of the hazard is
hazard is
not possible
possible
Some control
and/or relief
systems not
operational
Key control and
relief systems
not operational
Impact
Public/worker On site only
safety
On site, with
On site, with
Potential for
possible impact possible impact public safety to
off site
off site
be jeopardized
Environment
On site, with
some potential
off site. Minor or
short term.
On site only
On site, with
some off site.
Minor or short
term.
On site, with
significant off
site. Long term.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Action
Determine possible response for specified incidents.
Procedure
Emergency Level
Alert:
Level 1: Low
Level 2: Medium
Level 3: High
Internal
Discretionary,
depending on
company policy
Discretionary,
depending on
company policy
Immediate notification of
off site management
Immediate notification of offsite management
External public
Courtesy at
company
discretion
Mandatory for
Immediate multi-agency
individuals within the Planned and instructive as
(operator, municipal, provincial,
EPZ requiring
per the specific ERP
or federal) response
notification
Media
Reactive, as
required
Proactive media
Reactive, as required management to local or
regional interest
Proactive media management
to national interest
Government
Notify AER if
public contacted
Notify AER and local
Notify AER and local
authority, if required
authority
for initial response
Notify AER and local authority
Internal
On site, as
required by
company
On site, as required
by company. Initial
response undertaken
in accordance with
the specific or
corporate-level ERP
Predetermined public
safety actions are under
way. Corporate
Full implementation of
management team alerted emergency management
and may be appropriately system
engaged to support onscene responders.
External
On site, as
required by
company
On site, as required
by company
Potential for multi-agency
Immediate multi-agency
(operator, municipal,
(operator, municipal, provincial,
provincial, or federal)
or federal) response
response
Immediate and
local. No
additional
personnel
required.
Establish what
resources would be
required
Limited supplemental
resources or personnel
required
Communications
Actions
Resources
Internal
Significant incremental
resources required
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
COMPANY
RESOURCES
2.2
INTERNAL COMPANY NOTIFICATION


Fill out the following table on receipt of this manual (update when appropriate). Based
on company policy, contact the individuals listed and advise them of the spill situation.
Ensure that the appropriate company internal contacts are made.
NAME
TITLE
WORK
PHONE
WORK FAX CELLULAR RESIDENCE
EMAIL
NOTES:
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
COMPANY SPILL RESPONSE PERSONNEL


Fill in the following table on receipt of this manual (refer to Section 7 for job
descriptions).
Obtain company equipment as required.
NAME
TITLE
WORK
PHONE
WORK
FAX
CELLULAR RESIDENCE
EMAIL
RESPONSE POSITION
INCIDENT (ON-SCENE COMMANDER)
DEPUTY INCIDENT (ON-SCENE COMMANDER)
SAFETY OFFICER
PUBLIC INFORMATION OFFICER
OPERATIONS CHIEF (CONTROL POINT SUPERVISOR)
BOOM CAPTAIN
SKIMMER / PUMP CAPTAIN
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
BOAT CAPTAIN
CLEANUP SUPERVISOR
PLANNING CHIEF (ENVIRONMENT ADVISOR)
TECHNICAL SPECIALISTS
LOGISTICS CHIEF
EQUIPMENT / LOGISTICS OFFICER
COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER
FINANCE CHIEF (COSTS STATISTICIAN)
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
COMPANY EQUIPMENT – SPILL RESPONSE UNITS


Fill in the following table on receipt of this manual.
Obtain company equipment as required.
LOCATION
GENERAL
DESCRIPTION
CONTACT NAME
& 24 hr NUMBER
REQUIREMENTS TO
TRANSPORT UNIT
Note: Insert Company Equipment Inventory Lists at the end of this section.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
COMPANY SPILL EQUIPMENT - GENERAL


Identify equipment that your company can provide from the following list.
Complete the table below on receipt of this manual.
-
G
Airpacks
-
-
Hardware
G
Bridges,
G Portable
Communication
G
Equipment
-
Laboratories
G
-
Compressor,
Air
G
Spill
G Response Units
Fire
GFighting Equipment
Fixed-Wing
Aircraft
G
-
-
Fluid
G Disposal
Gas
GMonitors
-
Pumps
G
Pressure
G Trucks
ATV’s
G
Backhoes
G
Bed
GTrucks
Boats,
G Jet
Boats,
G Prop
Boom
G
Dozers
G
Helicopters
G
Highway
G Trucks
Hose
G
Hot
GWater Units
Ice
GCutting Equipment
Initial
G Spill Response
Units
G
Labour Crews
Oilfield
G Supplies
Pickers
G
Power
G Plants
-
Safety
G Supplies
Shelters
G
Sorbents
G
Snow
G Vehicles
Steam
G Units
Straw
G
Tanks
G
- Tank
G Trucks
- G
Toilet Facilities
-
Vacuum
G Units
Valves
G / Parts
Welders
G
Winter
G Spill Response
Units
- Other
G
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
LOCATION
GENERAL
DESCRIPTION
CONTACT NAME
& 24 hr NUMBER
REQUIREMENTS TO
TRANSPORT UNIT
Name:__________________
___
Phone:__________________
___
Name:__________________
___
Phone:__________________
___
Name:__________________
___
Phone:__________________
___
Name:__________________
___
Phone:__________________
___
Name:__________________
___
Phone:__________________
___
Name:__________________
___
Phone:__________________
___
Name:__________________
___
Phone:__________________
___
Name:__________________
___
Phone:__________________
___
Name:__________________
___
Phone:__________________
___
Name:__________________
___
Phone:__________________
___
Name:__________________
___
Phone:__________________
___
Name:__________________
___
Phone:__________________
___
Name:__________________
___
Phone:__________________
___
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
LOCATION
GENERAL
DESCRIPTION
CONTACT NAME
& 24 hr NUMBER
REQUIREMENTS TO
TRANSPORT UNIT
Name:__________________
___
Phone:__________________
___
Name:__________________
___
Phone:__________________
___
Name:__________________
___
Phone:__________________
___
Name:__________________
___
Phone:__________________
___
Name:__________________
___
Phone:__________________
___
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
COMPANY CONSULTANTS


Fill in the following table on receipt of this manual.
Advise contacts that they are included in the manual and ensure roles are discussed.
A) SPILL RESPONSE SPECIALISTS
LOCATION
COMPANY
CONTACT
WORK
CELLULAR
RESIDENCE
DESCRIPTION OF
EXPERTISE
B) ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING &
ASSESSMENT SPECIALISTS; SAMPLING SPECIALISTS
C) ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORIES
D) FISHERIES, HABITAT BIOLOGISTS
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
COMPANY CONSULTANTS (CONTINUED)
E) GROUNDWATER CONSULTANTS
LOCATION
COMPANY
CONTACT
WORK
CELLULAR
RESIDENCE
DESCRIPTION OF
EXPERTISE
F) HYDROLOGY CONSULTANTS
G) DIVERS
H) ICE RESCUE SPECIALISTS
I) TRANSPORTATION
J) WASTE MANAGEMENT
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
COMPANY CONSULTANTS (CONTINUED)
K) RECLAMATION
LOCATION
COMPANY
CONTACT
WORK
CELLULAR
RESIDENCE
DESCRIPTION OF
EXPERTISE
L) OILFIELD CONTRACTORS (labourers)
M) BOAT OPERATORS
N) OTHER
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
WCSS RESOURCES &
CONTACT INFORMATION,
EQUIPMENT LOCATIONS
2.3
For specific information contact:
Western Canadian Spill Services Ltd. (WCSS)
Box 503, 3545 - 32 Avenue NE
Calgary, AB T1Y 6M6
24 Hour………………………1 (866) 541-8888
Telephone………………..……..…….. (403) 516-8160
E-Mail…………………………………[email protected]
ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE
WCSS Oil Spill Contingency Manual
March 12, 2015
Please refer to our website for the most updated version of this section for your
manual. We recommend that you check for updates in each quarter, in order to
maintain up to date information. The following instructions will assist you in
updating section 2.3 of this manual.
1. www.wcss.ab.ca
2. Under NEWS UPDATES heading, click Contingency Manual Section 2.3 Update
Check the footer date in your printed section 2.3. If this is a different date than what is
indicated in the update link (i.e.: the footer in your manual says December 2009, and
the Date on the website says January 2013), click on the link, print double-sided, and
place in your manual.
NOTE
If your manual has a Lease Agreement in Section 2.4, remove it and refer to
Section 10. The most recent version of the WCSS Lease Agreement is
located in Section 10 of this manual.
REMEMBER: to ensure that your manual is always up to date, check these links every
4 months.
Contact information regarding Co-op Area Steering Committees and Initial
Response Teams are kept with your Area Chairman and Administrators. Please
ensure you have their contact information readily available to you at all times.
WCSS Oil Spill Contingency Manual
March 12, 2015
2.3.1 WCSS CONTACTS
President & COO
Alan B. McFadyen
Western Canadian Spill Services Ltd.
#280, 6815 – 8th Street NE
Calgary, AB T2E 7H7
Telephone: .................................. (403) 516-8017
Cellular: ....................................... (403) 860-8985
E-Mail: ......................... [email protected]
Operations Manager
Michael Locke
Western Canadian Spill Services Ltd.
1803 – 11 Street
Nisku, AB T9E 1A8
Telephone: .................................. (780) 955-6008
Facsimile: .................................... (780) 955-2454
Cellular: ...................................... (780) 288-4114
E-Mail: .......................... [email protected]
Accounting
Shiela Wooldridge
Western Canadian Spill Services Ltd.
#280, 6815 – 8th Street NE
Calgary, AB T2E 7H7
Telephone: .................................. (403) 516-8073
E-Mail : ................ [email protected]
Communications & Training
Coordinator
Shannon Jarrell
Western Canadian Spill Services Ltd.
#280, 6815 – 8th Street NE
Calgary, AB T2E 7H7
Telephone: .................................. (403) 516-8019
E-Mail: ..................... [email protected]
Administrative Support
Leona Boisselle
Western Canadian Spill Services Ltd.
#280, 6815 – 8th Street NE
Calgary, AB T2E 7H7
Telephone:……………………...…(403) 516-8160
E-Mail: ………….. [email protected]
Alberta Provincial Co-op
Chairman
Mike Gadde
Talisman Energy
Telephone: ................................... (403) 237-4623
Facsimile:…………………………...(403) 231-2816
Cellular: ........................................ (403) 880-9296
E-Mail: ................. [email protected]
Internet Web Site
www.wcss.ab.ca
WCSS Oil Spill Contingency Manual
1
March 12, 2015
WCSS EXECUTIVE SUB-COMMITTEE
Lorne Schmidt
Zone 1
Marvin St. Louis
Zone 2
Nolan Steinwand
Zone 3
Chris Labrie
Zone 4
Trent Myck
Zone 5
Ken Chalmers
Zone 6
Co-op Areas P, Q, S
Telephone: ………………………………… (403) 362-7733 ext.25
Cellular:…………………………………….. (403) 501-8673
Facsimile:
(403) 377-2635
Email:……………………………………..… [email protected]
Co-op Area H, M, N, O, U
Telephone:…………………………………..(403) 788-2350
Cellular:........................................................(403)740-6095
Facsimile: ………………………………… (403) 788-2351
Email:…………….………............. [email protected]
Co-op Area G, I/J
Telephone: ………………………………….. (403) 351-4051
Cellular:……………………………….…….... (587) 215-5442
Facsimile: ……………………………………
Email:………………………… [email protected]
Co-op Area D, W
Telephone:…………………………………….(780) 849-6942
Cellular:.....................................................(780) 805-5480
Facsimile:……………………………………...(780) 849-6972
Email:………………………. [email protected]
Co-op Areas VR-1, Y
Telephone: ……………………………………. (907) 929-4115
Cellular:......................................................(907) 952-6138
Facsimile: ……………………………………… (907) 646-9138
Email: ……………………………… [email protected]
Co-op Areas A, C, E, T
Telephone:…………………………………….(403) 845-4728 Ext:3
Cellular:……………………………….……….(403) 861-3645
Facsimile: …………………………………….. (403) 845-4738
Email:…………………….. …………[email protected]
Dave Clough
Ad Hoc
Telephone:…………………………………….(403) 729-2286
Cellular:………………………………………...(403) 844-7433
Email:…………………………[email protected]
Darren Stang
Ad Hoc
Telephone:…................................................(780) 514-7057
Cellular:………………………………………..(780) 621-6769
Email:……………………………… [email protected]
WCSS Oil Spill Contingency Manual
2
March 12, 2015
WCSS CHAIRMEN & ALTERNATE CHAIRMEN
Please refer to our website www.wcss.ab.ca for up-to-date information.
CHAIRMEN AND ALTERNATE CHAIRMEN
Area A
Chairman
(Zama-Virgo)
James Barnhill
Husky Energy
Ph:
(780) 956-8052
Cell: (780) 956-1814
Fax: (780) 956-8088
[email protected]
Area A
Alternate Chairman
Mark Weinberger
Plains Midstream Canada
Ph:
(780) 956-3852
Cell: (780) 956-4382
Fax: (780) 956-3311
[email protected]
Area C Chairman
(Northeast BC)
Don Brown
Nexen
Cell: (250) 775-0364
[email protected]
Area C
Alternate Chairman
(Northeast BC)
Trevor Purves
Canadian Natural Resources Ltd.
Ph:
Cell:
(780) 544-2312
(780) 217-5048
[email protected]
Area D Chairman
Chris Labrie
Plains Midstream Canada
Ph:
(780) 849-6942
Cell:
(780) 805-5480
Fax:
(780) 849-6972
[email protected]
Area D Alternate Chairman
Douglas Boisvert
Husky Energy
Ph:
(780) 849-4708
Cell:
(780) 805-0571
Fax:
(780) 849-5500
[email protected]
Area E Chairman
(Smoky River Basin)
Nolan Steinwand
Progress Energy Canada Ltd.
Ph:
(403) 351-4051
Cell:
(587) 215-5442
[email protected]
Area E Alternate Chairman
Michael Krawetz
Canadian Natural Resources Ltd
Ph:
(780) 831-7466
Cell: (780) 882-6303
[email protected]
WCSS Oil Spill Contingency Manual
3
March 12, 2015
CHAIRMEN AND ALTERNATE CHAIRMEN
Area G Chairman
(Pembina)
Kevin Oscar
Penn West Energy
Ph:
Cell:
(780) 542-8600
(780) 621-7141
[email protected]
Area G Alternate
Chairman
Rob Jacobi
ARC Resources Ltd.
Ph:
(780) 542-8313
Cell: (780) 621-7470
[email protected]
Area H Chairman Interim
(Red Deer - Rocky
Mountain House)
Ron Matchett
TransCanada
Ph:
(403) 845-1202
Cell:
(403) 846-1471
[email protected]
Area H Alternate
Chairman
Ed Szymanek
NAL Resources
Ph:
(403) 746-1117
Fax:
Cell:
(403) 350-2677
[email protected]
Area I/J Chairman
(Redwater/Devon)
Mark Jones
Interpipeline Ltd
Ph:
(780) 720-2561
Cell:
(780) 720-2561
Fax:
(780) 449-2267
[email protected]
Area I/J Alternate
Chairman
Bill Hawes
Plains Midstream Canada
Ph:
(587) 986-3625
[email protected]
Area M Chairman
(Harmattan-Innisfail)
Stephen Michalsky
Bonavista Petroleum
Ph:
(403) 638-3208
Cell:
(403) 636-1090
Fax:
(403) 638-3216
[email protected]
Area M Alternate
Chairman
Dayle Murray
Apache Canada Corp.
Ph:
Cell:
Fax:
(403) 722-3785 ext. 2704
(403) 559-7796
[email protected]
Area N Chairman
(Joarcam-Clive-JoffreBonnie Glen)
Marvin St. Louis
Ember Resources Ltd.
Ph:
(403) 788-2350
Cell:
(403) 740-6095
Fax:
(403) 788-2351
[email protected]
Area N Alternate
Chairman
Jack Dawbin
Ember Resources Ltd.
Ph:
(403) 788-2350
Cell:
(403) 620-1107
Fax:
(403) 788-2351
[email protected]
WCSS Oil Spill Contingency Manual
4
March 12, 2015
CHAIRMEN AND ALTERNATE CHAIRMEN
Area O Chairman
(Stettler-Wimborne)
Duane Bolin
Ember Resources Ltd.
Ph:
Cell:
(403) 361-2225
(403) 823-0532
[email protected]
Area O Alternate Chairman
Craig Stanger
Cenovus
Ph:
(403) 644-2428
Cell:
(403) 334-0023
Fax:
(403) 644-2440
[email protected]
Area P Chairman
(Calgary)
Jared Serviss
Inter Pipeline Ltd.
Ph:
(403) 717-5744
Fax:
Cell:
(403) 510-9082
[email protected]
Area P Alternate Chairman
Shannon Lightle
Murphy Oil Company Ltd.
Ph:
Cell:
(403) 294-8907
(403) 540-0533
[email protected]
Area Q Chairman
(Turner Valley)
Dan Janicki
Legacy Oil & Gas
Ph:
Cell:
Fax:
(403) 558-3757 ext.245
(403) 312-3617
(403) 558-3985
[email protected]
Area Q Alternate Chairman
Scott McLean
TAQA North
Ph:
Cell:
Fax:
(403) 510-9762
[email protected]
Area VR-1 Chairman
(Lakeland-Lloydminster)
Joe Reid
Devon Canada
Ph:
Cell:
(780) 214-1272
Fax:
[email protected]
Area VR-1 Alternate Chairman
Dallas Morrell
Northern Blizzard
Ph:
(780) 871-8737
Cell:
(306) 821-6879
Fax:
(780) 871-8704
[email protected]
Area S Chairman
(Southeast Alberta)
Adam Szoke
Husky Energy
Ph:
(403) 362-7137
Cell:
(403) 952-9760
Fax:
(403) 362-9042
[email protected]
Area S Alternate Chairman
Gary Lobdell
Husky Energy
Ph:
Cell:
(403) 423-0098
Fax:
(403) 792-3615
[email protected]
WCSS Oil Spill Contingency Manual
5
March 12, 2015
CHAIRMEN AND ALTERNATE CHAIRMEN
Area T Chairman
(Grande Prairie)
Allan Alstad
Conocophillips Canada
Ph:
(780) 832-0630
Cell:
(780) 876-5303
Fax:
(780) 532-3569
[email protected]
Area T Alternate Chairman
(Grande Prairie)
Blaine Monagle
Centrica Canada Ltd.
Ph:
(780) 539-2657
Cell:
(780) 518-1001
[email protected]
Area U Chairman
(Coronation)
Dale Ness
Inter Pipeline Ltd.
Ph:
(780) 888-2606
Cell:
(780) 888-7382
Fax:
[email protected]
Area U Alternate Chairman
Todd Baumgartner
Gibson Energy Ltd.
Ph:
(780) 888-8250
Cell:
(780) 252-0003
Fax:
(780) 888-2253
[email protected]
Area W Chairman
(Swan Hills)
Neale Rushoway
Apache Corporation Canada
Cell:
(780) 333-5195
[email protected]
Area W Alternate Chairman
VACANT
Area Y Chairman
(Fort McMurray)
Kevin Mosich
Pembina Pipeline
Ph:
Cell:
(780) 743-2580
(780) 520-1249
[email protected]
Area Y Alternate Chairman
Ashley Forrest
Enbridge
WCSS Oil Spill Contingency Manual
Ph:
Cell:
(587) 337-2076
[email protected]
6
March 12, 2015
WCSS ADMINISTRATORS
ADMINISTRATORS
Administrator
- Area A
- Area C
- Area D
- Area E
- Area G
- Area H
- Area I/J
- Area M
- Area N
- Area O
- Area P
- Area Q
- Area S
- Area T
- Area U
- Area Y
Shannon Jarrell
PO Box 503, 3545 32nd Ave NE
Calgary, AB
T1Y 6M6
Ph: (403) 516-8019
Cell: (403) 650-4765
Administrator
- Area VR-1
Audrey Campbell
Silver & Gold Direct Ltd.
Box 6023
Bonnyville, AB T9N 2G7
Ph:
Cell:
Fax:
April Poirier
ADP Admin Services
Box 656
Swan Hills, AB T0G 2C0
Ph:
Cell:
Fax:
Administrator
- Area W
WCSS Oil Spill Contingency Manual
[email protected]
(780) 826-4146
(780) 812-5245
(780) 826-2676
[email protected]
(780) 333-7804
(780) 333-8622
(780) 333-7840
[email protected]
7
March 12, 2015
2.3.2 MAP OF PROVINCIAL COOPERATIVE BOUNDARIES



Identify area of interest.
Refer to the following map that outlines Cooperative geographic areas.
Contact WCSS as necessary: Box 503, 3545 - 32 Avenue N.E., Calgary, Alberta T1Y 6M6
Telephone: (403) 516-8160 E-Mail: [email protected].ca
Website : www.wcss.ab.ca
WCSS Oil Spill Contingency Manual
8
March 12, 2015
2.3.3 WCSS EQUIPMENT CUSTODIAN
CONTACT LIST
To view a detailed list of WCSS Equipment Inventory, please refer to
www.wcss.ab.ca
Z
O
N
E
CO-OP
P
Q
EQUIPMENT
STORAGE
LOCATION
CUSTODIAN
H
2
M
N
EQUIPMENT
TRANSPORT
REQUIREMENTS
Calgary
(City of Calgary
Maintenance
Yard)
SWAT
Trever Miller
Cell: (403) 863-7928
24-hr: 1-866-610-7928
Fax: (403) 901-1018
OSCAR
Workboats (2)
Hydraulic Drum
Skimmer with Diesel
Power-Pak and Pump
Semi-truck
½ ton truck (2” ball
hitch)
Turner Valley
Legacy Oil & Gas
Mini-OSCAR
¾ ton truck (ball hitch)
Pincher Creek
Area
Shell Canada Ltd.
Mini-OSCAR
¾ ton truck (ball hitch)
Lethbridge
Midwest Pumps Ltd.
Dan Janicki
Ph: (403) 558-3757 ext.
245
Cell: (403) 312-3617
Fax: (403) 558-3985
Bill Andrew
Ph:
(403) 627-7284
Cell: (403) 627-6610
Fax: (403) 627-7129
24 hr: (403) 627-4200
Adrian Schuurman
Ph: (403) 329-0427 (24
hour) ext.205
Cell: (403) 795-9985
Fax: (403) 327-4660
¾ ton truck (2 5/16”
ball hitch)
(2” ball hitch for
boats)
Brooks
Absolute Safety
Mini-OSCAR
400’ Shallow Water
Boom
Workboats (2)
Turner Valley Gates
(5)
24’ Mini OSCAR
Medicine Hat
Absolute Safety
Mini OSCAR Unit
Bed Truck
Sylvan Lake
HSE Integrated Ltd.
Semi-truck
½ ton truck (ball hitch)
Rocky Mountain
House
Challand Excavating
Ltd.
OSCAR
Workboats (2)
40’ Lake Boom Skid
Unit
Skid Units (2)
Sundre
Bonavista Energy
Bonavista Energy
24 hr: 1-866-971-8317
24’ Initial Response
Unit
¾ ton truck (2-5/16”
ball hitch
Performance Steam
Ltd
Lee Borsheim
24 hr: 403-820-0582
Mini-OSCAR
¾ ton truck (ball hitch)
Bromby Welding
Gary Bromby
Ph: (780) 888-0005
Cell: (780) 888-1095
OSCAR
Semi-truck
1
S
CONTACT
INFORMATION
See Acheson,
Sylvan Lake or
Hardisty
Drumheller
O
Hardisty
U
WCSS Oil Spill Contingency Manual
Rob Drader
24 hr: (403) 362-7100
Cell: (403) 362-1945
Rob Drader
24 hr: (403) 362-7100
Cell: (403) 362-1945
Rob Graefer
Ph: (403) 887-1111
24 hr: 1-866-347-3911
Fax: (403) 887-3339
Clint Challand or Rick
24 hr: (403) 845-2469
Cell: (403) 845-0018
Fax: (403) 845-4844
9
¾ ton truck (25/16”ball hitch)
Bed Trucks
March 12, 2015
Z
O
N
E
CO-OP
CO-OP
EQUIPMENT
PG
ME
ENT
SETQ
OU
RIA
TA
OTRIO
AG
LOSC
NE
LOCATION
CUSTODIAN
CUSTODIAN
CONTACT
INFORMCAOTNIO
NCT
TA
INFORMATION
Drayton Valley
PennWest Petroleum
Storage
Area G Spill Cooperative
Ph: (780) 542-8738
Skid Units (2)
Oil Debris Separator
Acheson
DWC Oilfield
Construction &
Maintenance
Ric Fairclough
Ph: (780) 962-1503
24 hr: (780) 983-3416
Fax: (780) 962-1504
OSCAR (2)
Workboats (2)
Barge
G
EQUIPMENT
EQUIPMENT
Winter OSCAR
Boom Vane (Shallow
Draft)
Hydraulic Drum
Skimmer (4) (with
pump and Hydraulic
power pack)
Incinerator
Inflatable Lake Boom
trailer
3
I/J
Bow Collector
Airboats (3)
Training Trailer
River Boom trailer
Boom Deflectors (10)
Wildlife Response
Unit (4)
Slave Lake
Slave Lake Safety
Ph: (780) 849-1111
24 hr :(780) 849-4214
Ken Bolan
Nipisi
Canadian Natural
Resources Ltd.
Red Earth
Plains Midstream
Canada L.P.
Wabasca
Molloy’s Welding &
Construction
Rob Larson (CNRL)
Ph: (780) 849-7017
Cell: (780) 849-0350
Fax: (780) 849-7003
Chris Labrie
Ph: (780) 849-6942
Cell: (780) 805-5480
24 hr: (780) 649-2122
Molloy’s Welding &
Construction
Pat Molloy (780) 891-0477
Ph: (780) 891-2224
Peace River
Apex Distributors
Swan Hills
Whitecourt
D
4
W
OSCAR
Workboats (2)
Hydraulic Drum
Skimmer with Diesel
Power Pac
Lake Boom Skid Unit
Skid Unit
TRANSPORT
RET
QRUAIR
NESM
PE
ON
RTTS
REQUIREMENTS
Bed Truck
Bed Truck
Semi-truck
½ ton truck (ball hitch)
1 ton truck (2 5/16”
ball hitch) and electric
brakes
¾ ton truck (ball hitch)
½ ton truck
Semi-truck
¾ ton truck (2 5/16”
ball hitch and electric
brake)
½ ton truck (ball hitch)
¾ ton truck (ball hitch)
¾ ton truck (2 5/16”
ball hitch and electric
brake)
½ ton truck (2” ball
hitch)
Semi-truck
½ ton truck (ball hitch)
Bed Truck
Bed Truck
Skid Units (2)
Bed Trucks
Skid Unit
Bed Truck
David Bentley
Ph: (780) 624-0035
Skid Unit
Bed Truck
KMC Oilfield
Maintenance Ltd.
Aaron Kilpatrick
Ph: (780) 333-4300
Skid Unit
Bed Truck
KMC Oilfield
Maintenance Ltd.
(780) 778-0691 (24-hour
dispatch)
45’ Trailer
Semi-truck
WCSS Oil Spill Contingency Manual
10
March 12, 2015
Z
O
N
E
CO-OP
EQUIPMENT
STORAGE
LOCATION
CUSTODIAN
CONTACT
INFORMATION
Y
A
TRANSPORT
REQUIREMENTS
Husky Pipeline
Yard
Lloydminster, AB
Husky Pipeline
Control Room
Control Room
24 hr: (780) 871-6621
Cell: (780) 205-2222
Dave Watt
OSCAR Trailers (2)
Workboats (3)
Winter OSCAR
Hydraulic Drum
Skimmer with Power
Pak and Pump
Lake Boom Sea-can
Tractor Trucks
½ ton truck (ball hitch)
¾ ton truck (ball hitch)
Cenovus Parking
Lot. Junction of
Hwy 41 & 55 at
La Corey,
Alberta
Cenovus Energy
24 hr: (780) 573-7375
Mini OSCAR Trailer
Heavy Oil Sea-can (2)
Semi-truck
Grassland
Clean Harbors
Skid Unit
Bed Truck
Fort McMurray
Clean Harbors
24’ OSCAR Trailer
Workboat
Boom Vane
Barge
Skid Unit (1)
Skid Unit
1 ton truck
½ ton truck (ball hitch)
VR-1
5
EQUIPMENT
24 hr: (780) 525-3588
Warren Petten
Ph: (780) 743-0222
Cell: (780) 598-5281
Warren Petten
Ph: (780) 743-0222
Cell: (780) 598-5281
James Barnhill
Ph: (780) 956-8052
Cell: (780) 956-1814
Fax: (780) 956-8088
Conklin
Clean Harbors
Rainbow Lake
(Husky Oil
Operations Yard)
Husky Energy
Zama
Apache/Zama
516039 Alberta Ltd
Fort St. John
Clean Harbors
Fort Nelson
Clean Harbors
Eric Pike
Ph: (250) 233-8811 24hr
Fax: (250) 233-5060
Valleyview
Pembina
Valleyview Pump
Station
Pembina Pipelines
Snipe Lake Gas
Plant
Long Run Exploration
Ltd.
Fox Creek
Penn West Energy
Trust
Edson
Withers Trucking
Sea-can
Bed Truck
Bed Truck
Skid Units (2)
Bed Truck
OSCAR Trailer
Barge
Workboats (2)
OSCAR Skid Unit
requiring Bed Truck
Drum Skimmer
Skid Unit
Workboats (2)
Tractor Truck
½ ton truck (ball
hitch)
½ ton truck (ball hitch)
Dwayne Jones
Ph: (780) 524-3392 ext.261
Cell: (780) 524-8877
Fax: (780) 524-4676
Skid Units (2)
Bed Truck
Andy Ringas
Ph: (780) 524-8006
24hr: (780) 524-8430
Cell: (780) 524-7518
Blaine Bjarnason
Ph: (780) 778-8502
Cell: (780) 706-0890
Skid Unit
Bed Truck
Skid Unit
Bed Truck
Casey Ferguson
Ph: (780) 723-6455
24hr: (866) 523-6455
Cell: (780) 728-8848
Skid Units (2)
Bed Truck
Bruce Muzichuk
Ph: (780) 683-2242
Cell (780) 926-9797
Fax: (780) 683-2707
Apache Control Room –
(780) 683-8011
Gail O’Neill
Ph: (250) 785-8500
Cell: (250) 261-9163
Fax: (250) 785-8450
C
6
E
WCSS Oil Spill Contingency Manual
¾ ton truck (2-5/16
ball hitch)
11
Bed Truck or Oilfield
Float Trailer
March 12, 2015
Z
O
N
E
6
CO-OP
EQUIPMENT
STORAGE
LOCATION
CUSTODIAN
Grande Prairie
Clean Harbors
CONTACT
INFORMATION
Ph: (780) 532-4331
Fax: (780) 538-9116
EQUIPMENT
TRANSPORT
REQUIREMENTS
OSCAR
Winter OSCAR
Hydraulic Drum
Skimmer (with
pump and
hydraulic power
pack)
Workboats (2)
Semi-truck
¾ ton truck (ball hitch)
Skid Unit
Bed Truck
½ ton truck (ball hitch)
T
Manning
Canadian Natural
Resources Ltd.
Chinchaga Gas Plant
WCSS Oil Spill Contingency Manual
Canadian Natural
Resources Ltd.
Chinchaga Gas Plant
Ph: (780) 836-3364
ext.25
For transportation call:
Silvertip Oilfield Services
Ph: (780) 836-3792
12
March 12, 2015
EMERGENCY
SERVICES & LOCAL
RESOURCES
2.4
EMERGENCY SERVICES

Determine your location using, exact legal land description, place name or GPS
coordinates.
LSD____ Sec____ Twp____ Rge____ W___M
Coordinates: ______________________________
______________________________


If emergency medical care is required, call 911 immediately.
If the medical emergency occurs outside of the local 911 service area or in a remote
area or you are at a STARS Emergency Link Centre (ELC) registered site, contact the
ELC at 1 (888) 888-4567 (or *4567 on cellular). The STARS Emergency Link Centre
allows:





Pre-registration of remote sites such as spill sites for assistance with emergency
response if required.
Coordination of medical, search and rescue, ground ambulance, RCMP,
helicopter and airplane emergency response.
Coordination with ground and air ambulance dispatch for ground ambulance,
fixed wing or helicopter support.
Coordination with emergency services for direct scene call helicopter response
or ground ambulance meeting the helicopter on the highway.
Site registration can be done by contacting the STARS Emergency Link Centre
at 1-888-888-4567 or by email at [email protected]
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
LOCAL RESOURCES



The Coordination and Information Centre (CIC) serves as the Government of Alberta
emergency response centre for all natural and man-made disasters. During an
emergency, the CIC can provide assistance and technical information to emergency
response personnel attending the scene of an accident in which dangerous goods are
involved, or may become a matter for concern. The centre can contact personnel in
other government departments who are to be notified in the event of an emergency or
safety-related incident. (1-800-272-9600)
Identify local resources that are available for emergency spill response.
Complete the following table upon receipt of this manual.
COMPANY /
NAME
DESCRIPTION OF
SERVICE
LOCATION
PHONE NUMBER
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
LOCAL RESOURCES
COMPANY / NAME
DESCRIPTION OF
SERVICE
LOCATION
PHONE NUMBER
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
LOCAL RESOURCES – SPILL EQUIPMENT


-
Identify equipment that is available locally from the following list.
Complete the table below on receipt of this manual.
G
Airpacks
ATV’s
G
Backhoes
G
Bed
G Trucks
Boats,
G Jet
Boats,
G Prop
G
Boom
- Bridges,
G Portable
- Communication
G
Equipment
-
Compressor,
Air
G
Dozers
G
Fire
G Fighting Equipment
G
Fixed-Wing Aircraft
- Fluid
G Disposal
- Gas
G Monitors
LOCATION
Hardware
G
Helicopters
G
Highway Trucks
G
Hose
G
Hot Water Units
G
Ice Cutting Equipment
G
Initial
Spill Response
G
Units
- Laboratories
G
- G
Labour Crews
-
Spill
G Response Units
Oilfield
G Supplies
Pickers
G
G
Power Plants
-
-
-
Pumps
- G
Trucks
- Pressure
G
GENERAL
DESCRIPTION
Safety
G Supplies
Shelters
G
Sorbents
G
Snow
G Vehicles
Steam
G Units
Straw
G
G
Tanks
- Tank
G Trucks
- Toilet
G Facilities
Vacuum
Units
G
Valves
G / Parts
Welders
G
Winter
Spill
G
Units
Response
- Other
G
CONTACT NAME
& 24 hr NUMBER
REQUIREMENTS TO
TRANSPORT UNIT
Name:__________________
___
Phone:__________________
___
Name:__________________
___
Phone:__________________
___
Name:__________________
___
Phone:__________________
___
Name:__________________
___
Phone:__________________
___
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
LOCATION
GENERAL
DESCRIPTION
CONTACT NAME
& 24 hr NUMBER
REQUIREMENTS TO
TRANSPORT UNIT
Name:__________________
___
Phone:__________________
___
Name:__________________
___
Phone:__________________
___
Name:__________________
___
Phone:__________________
___
Name:__________________
___
Phone:__________________
___
Name:__________________
___
Phone:__________________
___
Name:__________________
___
Phone:__________________
___
Name:__________________
___
Phone:__________________
___
Name:__________________
___
Phone:__________________
___
Name:__________________
___
Phone:__________________
___
Name:__________________
___
Phone:__________________
___
Name:__________________
___
Phone:__________________
___
Name:__________________
___
Phone:__________________
___
Name:__________________
___
Phone:__________________
___
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
GOVERNMENT
CONTACTS
2.5
SPILL RESPONSE FLOWCHART – ALBERTA
UNREFINED
PRODUCT
RELEASE
Alberta Energy Regulator (AER)
(refer to government contact list for appropriate
AER Field Office)
REPORTING
REQUIRED
WHEN
Volume exceeds 2 m3 on lease
Any volume off-lease
All pipeline releases
Volume is less than 2 m3 on lease, but
may, has, or is causing an adverse effect
through cumulative releases (i.e.: A
number of small releases that occur at the
same location over a prolonged period of
time may have the potential to cause an
adverse effect).
PLUS
If the release may, has or is causing an
adverse effect, a written report must be
submitted to Alberta Environment.
NO REPORTING
REQUIRED
WHEN
Volume is less than 2 m3 on lease, and has
no potential to cause an adverse effect.
UNREFINED &
REFINEDPRODUCT
RELEASE
REFINED
PRODUCT
RELEASE
Alberta Environment (AENV)
1 (800) 222-6514 24Hrs.
Dangerous Goods Control Coordination and
Information Centre
Province Wide: 1 (800) 272-9600
and local police
Edmonton: Ph. (780) 422-9600
Fax (780) 427-1044
REPORTING
REQUIRED
WHEN
REPORTING
REQUIRED
WHEN
Release of any size that may, has, or is
causing an adverse effect, on or offlease
Volume exceeds those specified in Table
1 (on reverse)
Volume is less than those specified in
Table 1, but may, has, or is causing an
adverse effect through cumulative
releases (i.e.: A number of small
releases that occur at the same location
over a prolonged period of time may
have the potential to cause an adverse
effect).
Release is associated with road
transportation, and released product is
TDG regulated and volume exceeds
those specified in Table 1 (on reverse).
PLUS
If the release may, has or is causing an
adverse effect, a written report
confirming the oral report, must be
submitted to Alberta Environment,
Environmental Service Response
Centre.
NO REPORTING
REQUIRED
WHEN
Release is fully contained by a
containment device/facility or confined by
an acceptable barrier, has no potential to
cause an adverse effect and does not
have odours or vapour that may cause
an adverse effect.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
The written report to AE must be submitted within 7 days of the oral report and must include the following information, where reasonably
available:
a) The date and time of the release.
b) The location of the point of the release.
d) The composition of the release showing with respect to each
substance, its concentration, and the total weight, quantity or
c) The duration of the release and the release rate.
amount released.
e) A detailed description of the circumstances leading up to the f) The steps or procedures which were taken to minimize, control or
release.
stop the release.
g) The steps or procedures which will be taken to prevent similar
release.
h) Any other information required by the Director.
This flowchart is compiled from information received from government departments regarding reporting of types of spills common to the
oil and gas industry. All persons utilizing this flowchart are reminded it has no legislative sanction and that the AEPEA Release
Reporting Regulation, Oil and Gas Conservation Regulations and Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations should be consulted
for all purposes of interpretation and application of the law.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
TRANSPORTATION OF DANGEROUS GOODS
TABLE 1
Quantities or Levels for Immediate Reporting
ITEM
CLASS DIVISION
QUANTITIES OR LEVELS
1.
1
Explosives
All
2.
2.1
Flammable Gases
At least 100 L (22 Gallons)*
3.
2.2
Non-Flammable,
Non-Poisonous,
Non-Corrosive
At least 100 L*
4.
2.3
Poisonous Gases
All
5.
2.4
Corrosive Gases
All
6.
3
Flammable Liquids
At least 200 L (44 Gallons)
7.
4
Flammable Solids
At least 25 kg (55.12 lbs)
8.
5.1
Oxidizing Substances
At least 50 kg or 50 L (110.2 lbs)
9.
5.2
Organic Peroxides
At least 1 kg (2.2 lbs) or 1 L (0.22 Gallons)
10.
6.1
Poisonous Substances
At least 5 kg (11.02 lbs) or 5 L (1.10 Gallons)
11.
6.2
Infectious Substances
All
Any discharge or a radiation level exceeding 10
12.
7
Radioactive Materials
1 m (39.37 inches) from the package surface.
13.
8
Corrosive Substances
At least 5 kg or 5 L
14.
9.1
Miscellaneous Dangerous
Goods
At least 50 kg
15.
9.2
Environmentally Hazardous
Substances
At least 1 kg
9.3
16.
Dangerous Wastes
* Container Capacity
At least 5 kg or 5 L
ALBERTA PROVINCIAL NUMBERS
Alberta Provincial Government Operator (connect to all Government Departments) .................. (403) 310-0000
Alberta Environment — Land and Forest Service — 24-hour Forest Fire Emergency ............... 310-FIRE(3473)
Alberta Environment — Spill Response ......................................................................................... 1-800-222-6514
Dangerous Goods Control — Coordination and Information Centre — Alberta Infrastructure ..... 1-800-272-9600
or
................................................................................ (780) 422-9600
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
ALBERTA ENERGY REGULATOR
ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL 24-HOUR RESPONSE LINE
1-800-222-6514
Calgary Head Office
#1000, 250 – 5th Street SW
Calgary, AB T2P 0R4
Tel: (403) 297-8311 (24 hour)
Fax: (403) 297-7336
Fort McMurray Regional Office
2nd Floor, Provincial Building, Box 15
9915 Franklin Avenue
Fort McMurray, AB T9H 2K4
Tel: (780) 743-7214
Fax: (780) 743-7141
Bonnyville Field Centre
PO Box 5169
4903 – 51A Street
Bonnyville, AB T9N 2G4
Tel: (780) 826-5352
Fax: (780) 826-2366
Midnapore Field Centre
#333, 31 Sunpark Plaza SE
Calgary, AB T2X 3W5
Tel: (403) 297-8303
Fax: (403) 340-5136
Drayton Valley Field Centre
Box 7048, 5005 – 61st Street
Drayton Valley, AB T7A 1S3
Tel: (780) 542-5182
Fax: (780) 542-2540
Grande Prairie Field Centre
9815 – 115th Street
Grande Prairie, AB T8V 7R3
Tel: (780) 538-5138
Fax: (780) 538-5582
High Level Field Centre
PO Box 3069
#205, 9808-9814 – 100th Ave
High Level, AB T0H 1Z0
Tel: (780) 926-5399
Fax: (780) 926-4721
Medicine Hat Field Centre
#302, 346 – 3rd Street SE
Medicine Hat, AB T1A 0G7
Tel: (403) 527-3385
Fax: (403) 529-3103
Red Deer Field Centre
#201, 5002 – 55th Street
Red Deer, AB T4N 7A4
Tel: (403) 340-5454
Fax: (403) 340-5136
St. Albert Field Centre
Main Floor
30 Sir Winston Churchill Ave
St. Albert, AB T8N 3A3
Tel: (780) 460-3800
Fax: (780) 460-3802
Wainwright Field Centre
801 – 2nd Avenue
Wainwright, AB T9W 1C4
Tel: (780) 842-7570
Fax: (780) 842-7536
ALBERTA ENVIRONMENT
Enforcement and
Monitoring Public Emergency
& Complaints
Fax: (780) 427-3178
Industrial Incident 24-hour
Reporting Number
Tel: (780) 422-4505
Pollution Emergency
Response Team (P.E.R.T.)
1 (800) 222-6514
SPILL RESPONSE FLOWCHART – BRITISH COLUMBIA
OIL / PRODUCED
WATER
SPILLS
Emergency Management BC
(EMBC)
1 (800) 663-3456
WHEN
 all oil spills, produced water spills
related to the oil & gas industry
including pipeline spills
ALL
OTHER
SPILLS
Emergency Management BC
(EMBC)
1 (800) 663-3456
WHEN
 substances spilled and
reportable qualities are
outlined in table on following
page (“Special Waste
Regulations” 63/88)
 SPILLS MUST BE REPORTED PROMPTLY TO AVOID POSSIBLE PROSECUTION.
 THE REPORT SHALL INCLUDE (TO EXTRACT PRACTICAL):
a) the reporting person’s name and telephone
number;
c) the location and time of the spill;
e) the cause and effect of the spill;
g) a description of the spill location and of the area
surrounding the spill;
i) the names of agencies on the scene; and
b) the name and telephone number of the person
who caused the spill;
d) the type and quantity of the substance spilled;
f) details of action taken or proposed to comply with
Section 3;
h) the details of further action contemplated or
required;
j) the names of other persons or agencies advised
concerning the spill
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
WASTE MANAGEMENT ACT – SPILL REPORTING REGULATION
166/93
TABLE 1
Quantities or Levels for Immediate Reporting
ITEM SUBSTANCE SPILLED
SPECIFIED AMOUNT
1.
Class 1, Explosives as defined in section 2.9 of the Federal Regulations
Any quantity that could pose a danger to public safety or 50 kg
2.
Class 2.1, Flammable Gases, other than natural gas, as defined in section
2.14 (a) of the Federal Regulations
10 kg
3.
Class 2.2 Non-Flammable and Non-Toxic Gases as defined in section 2.14
(b) of the Federal Regulations
10 kg
4.
Class 2.3, Toxic Gases as defined in section 2.14 (c) of the Federal
Regulations
5 kg
5.
Class 3, Flammable Liquids as defined in section 2.18 of the Federal
Regulations
100 L
6.
Class 4, Flammable Solids as defined in section 2.20 of the Federal
Regulations
25 kg
7.
Class 5.1, Oxidizing Substances as defined in section 2.24 (a) of the Federal
Regulations
50 kg or 50 L
8.
Class 5.2, Organic Peroxides as defined in section 2.24 (b) of the Federal
Regulations
1 kg or 1 L
9.
Class 6.1, Toxic Substances as defined in section 2.27 (a) of the Federal
Regulations
5 kg or 5 L
10.
Class 6.2, Infectious Substances as defined in section 2.27 (b) of the Federal
Regulations
1 kg or 1 L, or less if the waste poses a danger to public safety
or the environment
11.
Class 7, Radioactive Materials as defined in section 2.37 of the Federal
Regulations
Any quantity that could pose a danger to public safety and an
emission level greater than the emission level established in
section 20 of the "Packaging and Transport of Nuclear
Substances Regulations"
12.
Class 8, Corrosives as defined in section 2.40 of the Federal Regulations
5 kg or 5 L
13.
Class 9, Miscellaneous Products, Substances or Organisms as defined in
section 2.43 of the Federal Regulations
25 kg or 25 L
14.
waste containing dioxin as defined in section 1 of the Hazardous Waste
Regulation
1 kg or 1 L, or less if the waste poses a danger to public safety
or the environment
15.
leachable toxic waste as defined in section 1 of the Hazardous Waste
Regulation
25 kg or 25 L
16.
waste containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as defined in section 1 of
the hazardous Waste Regulation
5 kg or 5 L
17.
waste asbestos as defined in section 1 of the Hazardous Waste Regulation
50 kg
18.
waste oil as defined in section 1 of the Hazardous Waste Regulation
100 L
19.
waste containing a pest control product as defined in section 1 of the
Hazardous Waste Regulation
5 kg or 5 L
20.
PCB Wastes as defined in section 1 of the Hazardous Waste Regulation
200 kg
21.
waste containing tetrachloroethylene as defined in section 1 of the Hazardous
Waste Regulation
50 kg or 50 L
22.
biomedical waste as defined in section 1 of the Hazardous Waste Regulation
1 kg or 1 L, or less if the waste poses a danger to public safety
or the environment
23.
A hazardous waste as defined in section 1 of the Hazardous Waste
Regulation and not covered under items 1 – 22
25 kg or 25 L
24.
A substance, not covered by items 1 to 23, that can cause pollution
200 kg or 200 L
25.
Natural Gas
10 kg, if there is a breakage in a pipeline or fitting operated
above 100 psi that results in a sudden and uncontrolled release
of natural gas
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
TRANSPORTATION OF DANGEROUS GOODS
TABLE 1
Quantities or Levels for Immediate Reporting
ITEM
CLASS
DIVISION
QUANTITIES OR LEVELS
1.
1
Explosives
All
2.
2.1
Flammable Gases
At least 100 L (22 Gallons)*
Non-Flammable,
3.
2.2
At least 100 L*
Non-Poisonous,
Non-Corrosive
4.
2.3
Poisonous Gases
All
5.
2.4
Corrosive Gases
All
6.
3
Flammable Liquids
At least 200 L (44 Gallons)
7.
4
Flammable Solids
At least 25 kg (55.12 lbs)
8.
5.1
Oxidizing Substances
At least 50 kg or 50 L (110.2 lbs)
9.
5.2
Organic Peroxides
At least 1 kg (2.2 lbs) or 1 L (0.22 Gallons)
10.
6.1
Poisonous Substances
At least 5 kg (11.02 lbs) or 5 L (1.10 Gallons)
11.
6.2
Infectious Substances
All
12.
7
Radioactive Materials
Any discharge or a radiation level exceeding 10 mSv/h at the
package surface.
13.
8
Corrosive Substances
At least 5 kg or 5 L
14.
9.1
Miscellaneous Dangerous Goods
At least 50 kg
15.
9.2
Environmentally Hazardous
Substances
At least 1 kg
16.
9.3
Dangerous Wastes
At least 5 kg or 5 L
* Container Capacity
BRITISH COLUMBIA PROVINCIAL NUMBERS
Emergency Management BC - Emergency Coordination Centre ........................................ 1-800-663-3456
(will arrange emergency services as required if local authorities are unknown) ............................... (24 hrs)
Inquiry B.C. - To find numbers for government departments ............................................... 1-800-663-7867
(when calling within B.C.)
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
SPILL REPORTING FLOWCHART —
SASKATCHEWAN
DOWNSTREAM RELEASE AND/OR
UPSTREAM
RELEASE 1
RELEASE RELATED
TO TRANSPORT
Saskatchewan Ministry of Energy & Resources (ER)
Area Office
Saskatchewan Environment (SE)
Spill Control Centre and to Saskatchewan Energy &
4
Resources (ER)
REPORTING
REQUIRED
WHEN



REPORTING
REQUIRED
WHEN
3
Release is greater than 2m on lease
Any volume off lease.

3
A vapour release greater than 28,000 m .
NO REPORTING
REQUIRED
WHEN

3
NO REPORTING
REQUIRED
WHEN

Release is less than 2m contained on lease.
Volume exceeds spill control regulations
2
reportable quantities .
Volume is less than the spill control regulations
2
reportable quantities .
(1) Spills of petroleum, natural gas or salt water directly associated with the construction or operation of petroleum
or natural gas; or flowlines and pipelines for the gathering and distribution of petroleum and natural gas, other
than flowlines or pipelines located on property for the purpose of delivering petroleum or natural gas to, or
gathering it from, other facilities located on that property.
(2) Refer to Appendix Table from the Saskatchewan Environment Spill Control Regulations.



When releases meet dangerous occurrence criteria as stipulated with the Transportation of Dangerous
Goods Regulations, the party is required to adhere to the 3 day reporting requirement.
For further information on upstream releases, or area office contact numbers, contact Todd Han (306) 7872221 at Saskatchewan Energy & Resources
For further information on downstream releases, contact the Saskatchewan Environment Spill Control
Centre 1 (800) 667-7525.
(4) Saskatchewan Energy & Resources (SER) needs a secondary report if spills of refined products occur on
upstream leases and facility sites.
This flowchart is compiled from information received from government departments regarding reporting of types of
spills common to the oil and gas industry. All persons utilizing this flowchart are reminded it has no legislative
sanction and that the Saskatchewan Environment Spill Control Regulations, the Oil and Gas Conservation
Regulations and the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations should be consulted for all purposes of
interpretation and application of the law.
SASKATCHEWAN PROVINCIAL NUMBERS
R.C.M.P. Regina Head Office ................................................................................................. (306) 780-5563
Spill Report Centre ............................................................................................................... 1-800-667-7525 1-800-667
Report-a-Fire (Forestry).......................................................................... (306) 953-3473 OR 1-800-667-9660
Air Ambulance (Emergency) — Saskatchewan ................................................................... (306) 933-5360
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS FIELD OFFICES
AREA VR-1 OFFICE
LLOYDMINSTER (Area #1 in SK Spill Cooperative)
Saskatchewan Industry & Resource
4815 50 Street
Lloydminster, SK S9V 0M8
Tel: (306) 825-6434
Fax: (306) 825-6433
ADDITIONAL
SASKATCHEWAN
AREA SPILL
COOPERATIVES
KINDERSLEY (Area #2)
Saskatchewan Energy & Resources
Box 850
Kindersley, SK S0L 1S0
Tel: (306) 463-5400
Fax: (306) 463-5405
SWIFT CURRENT (Area #3)
Saskatchewan Energy & Resources
350 Cheadle Street West
Swift Current, SK S9H 4G3
Tel: (306) 778-8252
Fax: (306) 778-8256
WEYBURN & ESTEVAN (Areas #4 & 5)
Saskatchewan Energy & Resources
1302 3rd Street
PO Box 5000-120
Estevan, SK S4A 0S5
Tel: (306) 637-4541
Fax: (306) 637-4547
REGINA (Area #6)
2103 - 11th Avenue, 4th Floor
REGINA SK S4P 3V7
Phone: (306) 787-2593
Fax: (306) 787-2478
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
OIL SPILL
CONTINGENCY
MANUAL
SECTION
3
SPILL ASSESSMENT CHECKLIST
Spill Assessment Checklist
SPILL
LAND
PREVENTION
- ASSESSMENT
3.1
3.4
INITIAL
ACTIONS
WATERCOURSES
- ASSESSMENT
3.2
3.5
SAFETY & HAZARD
- ASSESSMENT
ICE-COVERED
WATERCOURSES ASSESSMENT
3.3
3.6
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
SPILL
PREVENTION
3.1
WELLHEADS
Action
Conduct an on-site inspection to ensure spill prevention methods are in place.
Procedure











Confirm adequate lubricant application of the stuffing box on pumping oil wells.
If in an environmentally sensitive area, verify whether a second stuffing box has
been considered to minimize spill in the event of rod breakage.
Check that the need for installation of a secondary pressure switch has been
addressed.
Ensure that the radigan rubbers have been checked and, if necessary, replaced
each time the well was serviced.
Confirm that vibration switches have been installed on pump jacks.
Verify that the safety bolts on pump jacks are in place on the horse’s head.
Ensure that the bridle cables have been inspected for fraying and, if necessary,
replaced on pump jacks.
Ensure wellhead barricades have been installed to prevent vehicle collision.
Check that the wellhead stuffing box has, where necessary, a built-in BOP
capability.
Confirm that wellhead piping is regularly checked for corrosion.
Verify that the fluid is properly inhibited on wells with packers and annulus fluid to
protect the well casing from corrosion.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
PIPELINES
Action
Conduct an on-site evaluation of pipeline and surrounding area to ascertain spill
prevention preparedness measures in place.
Procedure

















Check that pipeline warning signs are in place on all road and watercourse
crossings.
Confirm that adequate brushing is conducted on pipeline right-of-ways.
Verify that all ground disturbances on and around the pipeline right-of-way have
been reported to the field office.
Determine whether the company is a member of Alberta One Call (or similar
systems in other province(s)).
Confirm that high volume NGL and oil pipeline right-of-ways are patrolled regularly
(i.e. aircraft or ground surveillance).
Check that above-ground structures have been adequately protected against
vandalism or collision by vehicles.
Verify that the downstream pipeline pressure on pipelines that cross large
watercourses is monitored daily.
Confirm that periodic underwater inspections of pipeline river and creek crossings
are conducted.
Verify that annual visual inspections of pipeline river and creek crossings are
conducted.
Determine whether visual monitoring has been conducted where pipeline right-ofways may be subjected to erosion (i.e. hill sloughing).
Confirm that all pipelines have been ranked as to their risk if a leak occurs.
Check that there is a plan to monitor high-risk pipelines.
Determine the pipeline field operator’s knowledge of the maximum operating
pressure for each pipeline system.
Verify whether the maximum operating pressure has ever been exceeded during
pigging operations.
Check that annual pressure tests are conducted on pipelines that cross rivers.
Ensure that meter or pressure gauges have been installed to monitor daily line inlet
and outlet volumes and pressures.
Determine whether all inlet line headers are protected by check valves.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013










Confirm that tests are routinely conducted on ESD piping systems.
Check that the pipeline operating pressure has been reduced where possible.
Verify whether spools have been installed or considered to monitor internal
corrosion.
Determine whether a chemical inhibition program to prevent internal pipeline
corrosion is in place.
Where corrosion has caused a failure, confirm that the section of the pipe has been
removed and analyzed.
Check whether the pipeline has been internally coated with polyethylene liners in
areas of high environmental sensitivity.
Verify whether de-scaling programs are considered in the planning of internal
pipeline chemical treatment.
Confirm that a rectifier has been used in the monthly readings recorded from a
cathodic protection system.
Confirm that the lines on pipelines which have persistent pro-ration factor problems
have been checked for integrity.
Verify that chemical pumps are monitored and adequately maintained.
PRODUCTION FACILITIES
Action
Conduct an on-site inspection of the production facilities and surrounding vicinity
to determine the spill prevention / preparedness measures implemented.
Procedure






Ensure that tanks and dikes are of regulation size to hold the production volumes
during unattended hours of operation.
Check that pop tanks are of adequate size and kept empty at all times.
Confirm that the integrity of the dike has been adequately maintained.
If the facility is located in an environmentally-sensitive area, determine whether
more diking was considered.
Check whether dikes have been constructed around chemical storage tanks.
Verify whether the chemical consumption on the site is high enough to replace
drums with bulk storage.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013























Ensure that chemical pumps are checked daily.
Determine whether “no flow” controls have been installed on recycle pumps.
Check whether recycle pumps could be mounted on top of a volume tank to contain
any packing drips.
Confirm that bull plugs or blank flanges have been installed on all open-ended
pipes or dead-end valves.
Ensure that all lines indicate flow direction.
Ensure that all lines indicate the contents.
Check whether valves are tagged to prevent erroneous operation.
Ensure that drip barrels have been placed under the end of loading lines.
Determine whether the end on truck loading lines terminates within the tank dike.
Determine whether the line goes into the top of the tank for truck unloading.
Verify whether the proper pump packing is used with the type of service.
Check for a guideline on what type of packing should be used for what service.
Ensure that, where possible, 24-hour alarms have been installed.
Confirm that sight-glass valves are closed when not in use. Determine whether
they are adequately protected from breakage.
Check whether the scrubber drains are tied into a common drain system or tank.
Determine whether there is a by-pass on the discharge side of all high-pressure
positive displacement pumps.
Verify whether fired equipment is inspected regularly (i.e. burner gaskets in good
shape, bolts tight).
Ensure that internal inspection programs are conducted on vessels during
processing plant and facility turnarounds.
Ensure that steps are taken to eliminate problem within the operation when internal
corrosion is found in a vessel.
Check whether there is a procedure in place to conduct daily mass balances on
produced products and waste liquids.
Determine whether there are adequate vandalism prevention methods in place.
Determine whether there is an adequate training program in place for new and
existing personnel.
Verify that a facility walk-around is conducted prior to leaving a facility.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
INITIAL
ACTIONS
3.2
1
UPON RECEIPT OF INITIAL REPORT
Action
Analyse the situation.
Procedure



Identify problem
Identify variables that have an impact on the problem
Identify possible consequences of the variables
Consider using the following tools to analyze the situation:













Emergency response plans
Spill report form information
Spill responders; filed reconnaissance
Internal resources (i.e. headquarters specialists, area operators)
Helicopter surveillance
Use of boats
Material Safety Data Sheets
Shipping documents
Safety markings
Air monitoring equipment
Sampling equipment
Laboratories
Maps
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013




Emergency response guidebooks
Emergency response information call centres (i.e. CANUTEC (613) 996-6666)
Land standings from provincial regulators, emergency response community, land
owners, community leaders, disposition holders, subject matter experts
Weather networks
Action

Define critical issues.
Procedure



Identify the most important issues
Ensure that the critical issues align with the response priorities; safety, property
and the environment
Forecast issues; identify what issues are ahead
Action

Identify preventative and corrective strategies.
Procedure


Identify what can be done to prevent losses and correct the problems
Identify short term and longer term strategies
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Action

Develop an incident action plan (ICS) or company specific response plan.
Procedure

Identify response objectives; overall objective will be to manage a coordinated
response that ensures safety of the public and spill responders, protects
property and minimizes impacts to the environment.
Consider the following typical specific objectives during the initial spill
response:
















Activate the ER Plan
Ensure the safety of the public and spill responders
Shut in the source of the spill
Dispatch spill response team
Conduct a hazard assessment
Identify staging areas
Dispatch equipment
Conduct an aerial surveillance
Identify control points
Contain and recover spilled product
Identify critical issues
Ensure that the public and stakeholders are well informed
Protect property
Keep wildlife from entering heavily oiled areas (i.e. hazing)
Minimize economical
Prepare incident briefing form and/or an incident status summary (ICS 201)
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013




Conduct a planning meeting
Finalize, approve and implement the incident action plan
Ensure documentation is completed
Start process from the beginning of each operational period
PRIORITY
Protect lives, losses to private, and public / company property,
and minimize adverse environmental impact.
Action

Utilize ICS forms as a supplement to the incident action plan
Procedure

Following are some of the typical forms that are utilized during the initial response
for inland spills:















ICS 202 – Response Objectives
ICS 209 – Incident Status Summary
ICS 201 – Incident Briefing
ICS 214a – Individual Log
ICS 206 – Medical Plan
ICS 305 – Safety Plan
ICS 207 – Organizational Chart
ICS 205 – Communications Plan
ICS 306 – Press Release
ICS 204 – Team Assignment Sheet
ICS 215 – Operational Planning Sheet
ICS 231 – Meeting Summary
ICS General Plan
ICS 211p – Check-In List (Personal)
ICS 211e – Check-In List (Equipment)
NOTE
Only attempt what you are capable of doing; otherwise, request
additional resources and wait for assistance.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
SAFETY & HAZARD ASSESSMENT
3.3
Action

Assess potential hazards to responders, residents, public.
IMPORTANT
RE-ASSESS HAZARDS CONTINUALLY THROUGHOUT THE SPILL.
Procedure











Determine the type of spilled product, volume spilled and concerns related to its
location.
Identify product characteristics and concerns. Utilize Material Safety Data Sheets
(MSDS) and/or other informational sources as required.
Identify areas where flammable and/or toxic vapours may be a concern (i.e. downwind, under snow, low areas, confined spaces, etc.).
Identify areas that may be oxygen deficient.
Identify potential consequences of an uncontrolled ignition.
Continuously monitor weather conditions (i.e. wind speed / direction, temperature,
lightning, forecasts). Ensure that an appropriate number of wind socks are
installed and forecasts available.
Identify confined spaces.
Identify slippery and/or unstable surfaces.
Identify overhead/underground power lines, pipelines and utilities.
Identify other physical hazards (i.e. thin ice, water hazards, traffic, wild animals,
dangerous trees, etc.).
Install warning markers as necessary.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Action
Determine the level of emergency.
Procedure
Emergency Level
Criteria
Alert: Minimal Level 1: Low
Risk Control
Immediate
control of
hazard, with
progressive
resolution of the
situation
Containment
Control and
relief systems
functioning
correctly
Impact
Public/worker
safety
Environment
Immediate
control of hazard
is becoming
progressively
more complex
because of
deteriorating
conditions
Control and relief
systems
functioning
correctly
Level 2:
Medium
Level 3: High
Imminent and/or
intermittent
Imminent control
control of the
of the hazard is
hazard is
not possible
possible
Some control
and/or relief
systems not
operational
Key control and
relief systems not
operational
On site, with
possible impact
off site
Potential for
public safety to
be jeopardized
On site only
On site, with
possible impact
off site
On site only
On site, with
On site, with
some potential off some off site.
site. Minor or
Minor or short
short term.
term.
On site, with
significant off
site. Long term.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Action
Determine the possible response for specified incidents.
Procedure
Emergency Level
Alert:
Level 1: Low
Level 2:
Medium
Level 3: High
Communications
Internal
Discretionary,
depending on
company policy
Discretionary,
depending on
company policy
Immediate
Immediate notification of off-site
notification of off site
management
management
External public
Mandatory for
Planned and
Immediate multi-agency
Courtesy at company individuals within the
instructive as per the (operator, municipal, provincial,
discretion
EPZ requiring
specific ERP
or federal) response
notification
Media
Proactive media
Proactive media management
Reactive, as required Reactive, as required management to local
to national interest
or regional interest
Government
Notify AER if public
contacted
Notify AER and local
Notify AER and local
authority, if required
Notify AER and local authority
authority
for initial response
Internal
On site, as required
by company
Predetermined public
safety actions are
On site, as required
under way.
by company. Initial
Corporate
Full implementation of
response undertaken
management team
emergency management
in accordance with
alerted and may be system
the specific or
appropriately
corporate-level ERP
engaged to support
on-scene responders.
External
On site, as required
by company
On site, as required
by company
Actions
Potential for multiImmediate multi-agency
agency (operator,
(operator, municipal, provincial,
municipal, provincial,
or federal) response
or federal) response
Resources
Internal
External
Immediate and local. Establish what
No additional
resources would be
personnel required. required
None
Begin to establish
resources that may
be required
Limited supplemental
Significant incremental
resources or
resources required
personnel required
Possible assistance
from government
Assistance from government
agencies and
agencies and external support
external support
services, as required
services, as required
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Action
Develop a site safety plan.
Procedure

Implement measures to identify and eliminate or mitigate hazards.
Action

Control access to authorized personnel only.
boundaries can change as the incident evolves.
Recognize that zone
Procedure



Identify the area impacted by the spill and implement zones of control.
 Hot Zone (Hazard Area) – this area is outlined and restricted to authorized
personnel only
 Warm Zone (Limited Access) – this is a buffer area around the Hot Zone, and is
off-limits to unauthorized personnel and equipment
 Cold Zone (Support Zone) – area used for on-site command post (OSCP)
equipment and staging and support functions.
It may be necessary to obtain a closure order to restrict access to unauthorized
personnel. The closure order is that area within the boundaries described in an
order issued by the Alberta Energy Regulator under Section 89 of the Oil and Gas
Conservation Act.
A NOTAM (Notice to AirMen) is issued to close a specific airspace to unauthorized
commercial aviation. The dimensions of the airspace described are issued by
Transport Canada.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Action

Ensure all personnel on site understand the safety concerns and their
responsibilities.
Procedure




Conduct regular safety meetings (tail-gate safety meetings); document attendees.
Maintain complete documentation at safety meetings and ensure follow-up items
are recorded and managed.
Have spill response team identify personal health problems that could be
compounded by their involvement (i.e. respiratory ailments, heart conditions,
allergies to hydrocarbons, etc.)
Each member of the response team must use common sense and, when in doubt,
check with the supervisor prior to carrying out a task. The worker should also:
 understand the hazards associated with the spill and identify escape routes for
each worker station
 be familiar with locations and operations of all safety equipment and wear
appropriate personal protective equipment
 be trained to recognize that a signal such as sirens, air horn blast or whistle
means that they must stop work, evacuate the worksite and meet at
predetermined locations (Muster Stations)
 follow outlined procedures
 communicate concerns to the supervisors and report near-misses
 work in a responsible manner at all times and follow good housekeeping
practices
 not assume that a safety person or other individuals are solely responsible for
safety
Action
Reduce risk to emergency responders, public property and the environment.
Procedure

Identify manpower and equipment requirements to ensure site safety:
 safety personnel
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013





flammable / toxic / O2 deficiency monitors
respiratory equipment
personal protective equipment
fire-fighting equipment
sanitation equipment

Evacuate the public if necessary. Pre-plan for evacuation, document carefully and
take into consideration
 change of wind direction and weather conditions
 arrangements for a hosting area (to receive and care for evacuees)
 special needs (i.e. hospital patients, elderly, handicap, etc.)
 ensure all persons within the area at risk receive emergency instructions (deaf, nonEnglish speaking, etc.)
 identify evacuation routes
 resident concerns should be identified and recorded (i.e. pets, livestock, etc.)
 determine security requirements
 notification of transients (i.e. campers, hunters, trappers, etc.)
 establish a communication network for advising evacuees of status, etc.

Ensure required hazard remediation equipment and information is available on site
and workers understand and are competent in its use (i.e. monitors, working
around helicopters, etc.)

Utilize appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE). Required PPE is based
on hazards associated with the incident, company policy and legislative
requirements. Typical equipment includes:
 hard hats
 gloves
 fire retardant clothing
 rain suits, steel-toed rubber boots, rubber gloves, and duct tape to seal openings
 eye protection
 hearing protection
 respiratory protective equipment (air purifying respirator, self-contained breathing
apparatus / air line system)
 traffic vests
 personal floatation devices
 harness and life-lines
 safety-toed footwear
 foul-weather clothing


Maintain a head-count for all personnel on site.
Predetermine a meeting location (muster station) where personnel meet if a signal
is given (i.e. siren, air horn blast).
Place marking / flagging at areas of concern (i.e. pipelines, unstable banks, etc.).
Erect appropriate warning signs, barricades and barriers.
Ensure that there is adequate first aid and emergency personnel on site.
Identify access / egress in the event of a vapour plume shift or uncontrolled ignition.
Monitor conditions on a continuous basis.





Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013


Utilize wind socks and have personnel work up-wind of hydrocarbon vapours.
Ensure that there are no sources of ignition in areas of concern.
Action
Designate a safety supervisor to:
Procedure
 participate in the preparation and implementation of a site safety plan
 assess situation for additional hazards
 establish monitoring requirements and intervals for flammable / toxic /















O2 deficient
atmospheres
work with emergency response groups (i.e. local authority) in the event that resident
evacuation is required
oversee proper provision / usage and maintenance of personal protective equipment
monitor positioning and usage of equipment
o potential ignition sources
o hazard to workers / equipment operators
o site hazards (i.e. buried lines, overhead power lines)
ensure access to site is controlled
implement the site emergency response plan with egress routes / muster stations
monitor changing site hazards and conditions (i.e. previous / new hazards, weather,
wind and site conditions)
monitor workers for signs of stress, fatigue, exposure to elements (heat, cold, rain)
and critically observe work practices
ensure adequate first aid and emergency equipment is available on site
coordinate off-site emergency medical aid if required
ensure adequate method of communication required for minor injuries or to summon
help
provide assistance for major injuries or other emergencies
coordinate emergency medical aid
ensure compliance with applicable government regulations
prepare shift arrangements for workers
coordinate safety meetings and maintain documentation
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
LAND
- ASSESSMENT
3.4
Action

Following the initial hazard assessment and development of a site safety
plan, gather detailed information on the location and effects of the spill on
the land base.
Procedure


Identify and document the spill boundary with the appropriate equipment including:
 personal protective equipment (PPE)
 gas detection monitors
 compass
 measuring device (i.e. topofil, tape, chain)
 shovel
 quantabs or conductivity meter for produced water or emulsion spills
 clipboard and pens
 ribbon to mark spill perimeter
 hoe, drill or sampling equipment if sub-surface contamination is suspected
 camera
Produce a sketch of the spill and take appropriate photographs (ensure no
flammable vapours are in area).
Action
Identify land uses in the areas affected by the spill.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Procedure


Determine if any of the following groups are affected by the spill:
 private land owners (i.e. farm, acreage, residential, etc.)
 public land (i.e. green area, public lands)
 dispositions (i.e. pipelines, utilities, roads, facilities, trapper, etc.)
 sensitive areas (i.e. key wildlife habitat, recreational, protected areas,
archeological resources, etc.)
Resources available to assist you with the identification of land users affected by
the spill include:
 local companies in the area — interview
 local area residents — interview
 local regulatory agency contacts
 Land Titles Offices
 Alberta One Call — 1 (800) 242-3447
NOTE

When contacting Alberta One Call, be prepared to provide
the following information:
 telephone number where the caller can be reached
 caller’s name, company affiliation and address
 site location (legal land description)
 type of work being done or planned
 approximate depth of ground disturbance
 type of property — public or private
 who the work is being done for
 date and time ground disturbance is to begin
For information regarding Crown Land activities and dispositions, contact:
Crown Land Data Support
Energy
10th Floor, Petroleum Plaza NT
9945 – 108th Street
Edmonton, AB T5K 2G6
Phone: (780) 422-1395 (call toll free: 310-0000)
http://www.energy.gov.ab.ca/OurBusiness/1076.asp
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013

In Alberta you can obtain aerial photography of the land base that is affected by a
spill from the following:
Air Photo Distribution
Environment and Sustainable Resource Development
Main Floor, Great West Life Building
9920 – 108th Street
Edmonton, AB T5K 2M4
Phone: (780) 427-3520
Action
Assess the potential impacts on stakeholders affected by the spill.
Procedure






Determine the area residents directly impacted (evacuation, notification).
Identify risk of public inadvertently entering the area of concern at the site.
Evaluate the site for access to livestock, wildlife.
Identify sensitive environmental areas (i.e. proximity to surface water, ground
water, crops, special areas).
Determine effect on the land use dispositions in the area (i.e. pipelines, utilities).
Determine the approval requirements that are necessary to access the spill site.
Action
Identify terrain characteristics in the area of the spill.
Procedure





Note any available natural features that can be used advantageously for
containment and recovery operations (i.e. slope, approaches, ditches, low areas).
Identify access routes into the spill area and equipment requirements to improve
access.
Evaluate the area for stability and erosion potential.
Identify surface run-off patterns in the area and requirements to divert and control
the flows from having a negative impact on the spill site.
Select an equipment staging area and location for the On-Site Command Post (if
required).
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Action
Evaluate soil types, characteristics and conditions.
Procedure






Identify the types of soils that are affected by the spill.
Determine how prone to fluid penetration the soil is.
Evaluate erosion potential.
Identify moisture levels, and location and movement of the water table.
Assess the potential of clean soils becoming contaminated during containment and
recovery operations and determine soil salvaging requirements.
Determine if there is a need to add a calcium amendment to a produced water spill
to prevent soil dispersion (refer to page 4.4-5).
Action
Determine the vegetation types on site and their general condition.
Procedure






List the types of vegetation that are affected by the spill (i.e. crops, tree species,
etc.).
Evaluate the extent that the vegetation is covered with contaminants (totally
saturated vs. fine spray).
Estimate the value of vegetation damaged (i.e. crops, shelter bets, merchantable
timber).
Assess the erosion potential if vegetation is removed.
Consider the potential and effects of an uncontrolled wildland fire if ignition occurs
at the spill site.
Photograph the vegetation during the initial assessment and at intervals following
containment and recovery operations to reassess and document the damage.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Action
Determine equipment resources that are required to control the spill.
Procedure

Identify equipment requirements based on the initial site assessment:
 containment and recovery equipment
 equipment to transport containment and recovery equipment to the site
 equipment to improve or create access
 safety equipment (i.e. personal protective equipment, monitors, warning signs,
barricades, fire fighting, First Aid, etc.)
 worker support equipment (i.e. shelter, washroom / wash up facilities, food /
drink, etc.)
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
WATERCOURSES
- ASSESSMENT
3.5
Action
Assess characteristics of affected watercourse.
Procedure


Hydrology characteristics, width, depth, current velocity.
Determine shoreline characteristics and sensitivities.
 degree of sensitivity (ecological, cultural, human use, etc.)
 degree of oil impact
 physical limitations (i.e. ice, debris)
 access
 natural features (dams, culverts, bridges, etc.)
Action
Assess and take action to prevent potential impacts on stakeholders.
Procedure


Identify downstream water users and advise of the time that contaminated water
may pass their intakes. Their reserve water supplies (if any) may permit them to
close the intakes until the product passes by. Users could include:
 water users
 area residents
 water intakes (city, private, irrigation)
 recreational users
Others impacted by the spill include:
 livestock
 fishery, waterfowl, wildlife
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Action
Determine the location of the appropriate control point.
Procedure




Assess the amount, location and degree of oil impact.
Utilize Oil Spill Contingency Manual or natural control point (i.e. road crossing).
Conduct visual assessment (normally air surveillance is most effective).
Calculate distance to control point:
 current velocity (km/hr) times total hours of time to deliver equipment to the site
plus total hours to deploy equipment = control point distance in kilometres
downstream of spill to control lead end of spill
 current velocity (km/hr) times (delivery time [hr] plus setup time [hr]) = required
distance to control point (km)
NOTE

Example
 River current velocity – 4 km/hr
 3 hours to deliver equipment
 2 hours to deploy equipment
 Distance from leading edge of spill to control point =
4X(3+2)=20 km
 Expect portions of oil migrating downstream to evaporate,
become stranded on the shoreline, collect in backwaters and
emulsify. (This could be a significant quantity 25-50%)
Select additional control points where containment and recovery operations are
feasible.
DETERMINING CURRENT SPEED
STEP 1
Measure 30 metres (100 feet) along the shoreline.
STEP 2
Throw a stick upstream of the “0” metre line and record the number of
seconds that it takes for the stick to travel from 0 to 30 metres (100
feet)
STEP 3
Use the following chart to determine the approximate current speed.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
DETERMINING CURRENT SPEED
Time in seconds
stick travels 30 m
(100 ft)
Current
km/hr
Current
Mph
Current
(metres per
second)
Current (feet
per second)
216
108
72
54
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
0.31
0.62
0.93
1.25
0.14
0.28
0.42
0.56
0.46
0.92
1.38
1.84
43
36
31
27
2.5
3.0
3.5
4.0
1.5
1.9
2.2
2.5
0.69
0.83
0.97
1.11
2.26
2.72
3.18
3.60
24
22
18
4.5
5.0
6.0
2.8
3.1
3.7
1.25
1.39
1.67
4.10
4.56
5.48
15
14
12
11
7.0
8.0
9.0
10.0
4.3
5.0
5.6
6.2
1.94
2.22
2.50
2.78
6.36
7.28
8.20
9.12
Action
Determine access considerations.
Procedure




Specialized equipment requirements.
Equipment required to improve access / worksite at edge of water.
Permission requirements from landowner, occupant (if applicable) and/or
government.
Improvements at water edge.
 determine regulatory approval requirements
Action
Note available natural features that may assist in containment and recovery.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Procedure

Determine presence of:
 Dams (man-made, beaver).
 Flat work areas.
 Natural backwaters.
 Oxbows
Action
Determine manpower / equipment resources that will be required.
Procedure









Identify initial manpower required to manage the containment and recovery
operations (i.e. in-house, cooperative, contractors, etc.).
Identify technical specialist (i.e. biologist, river hydrologist, containment and
recovery specialist, laboratory technician, etc.) as required.
Identify appropriate containment and recovery equipment (i.e. company,
cooperative, WCSS, contractor).
Arrange for equipment to transport recovery equipment to site.
Arrange for equipment to improve / create access, if required.
Ensure appropriate safety equipment is on-site:
 monitors, PPE
 warning signs
 fire fighting / first aid
Work support services required.
Shelter and food / drink.
Washroom / wash-up facilities.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
WATERCOURSES
- ASSESSMENT
3.6
Action
Utilize an ice evaluation team to conduct an assessment of ice-covered water.
Procedure







Ensure workers are protected against exposure to cold, have warm-up facilities,
food, and designate a rest area off the ice.
Conduct a safety briefing and review ice assessment procedure(s).
Identify an ice rescue team, ready equipment and position rescue team slightly
upstream of the assessment team.
Anchor two-man ice assessment team with ropes and harnesses to shore.
Ice Assessment team proceed from shore and drill one test hole in the ice to
determine:
 ice thickness
 current velocity
 water depth below ice
 current direction (mark current direction at each hole on the ice
surface with marker paint or ribbon)
Cut a small block of ice at the first hole and remove. Evaluate the ice quality (clear
ice and white ice, visible cracks, space between water and ice, etc.). See table on
page 3.6-6.
If safe to continue, the ice assessment team can proceed across the watercourse
to assess the parameters outlined in the steps above. (Data can be recorded on
the table located on page 3.6-3.)
NOTE
As the assessment team moves away from the shore, it may
be necessary to re-position anchors from shore to on-ice
with the use of ice anchors.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013

Following initial assessment of the ice across the watercourse, the team may move
downstream (approximately 9 metres [30 feet]) and drill test holes across the
watercourse. At this point, be sure to stagger the holes from the first set in order to
obtain a more accurate assessment.
NOTE
At this time, the on-site safety supervisor may declare the
weight bearing capacity sufficient to continue work without
the use of safety lines and anchors. It is recommended that
workers who remain on the ice wear personal flotation
devices (PFD)
Action
Determine manpower / equipment resources that will be required.
Procedure


Identify initial manpower resources:
On-Scene Commander
Safety Supervisor
Ice Rescue Team
Ice Assessment Team
Identify initial equipment resources:
 personal floatation devices (PFD)
 harnesses
 rope
 shoreline anchors
 ice cleats
 chainsaws and appropriate safety
gear
 ice auger
 current velocity meter
 marker paint or ribbon
 ice thickness measuring stick
 communications equipment
 clipboard and ice assessment form
 ice tongs and T-bar
 snow shoes
 rescue equipment (ladder, throw
bags, sled, reach pole, etc.)
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
ICE-COVERED WATERCOURSE ASSESSMENT WORKSHEET
DATE:
TIME:
HOLE #
CONTROL POINT#:
1
2
3
4
1
2
3
4
1
2
3
4
1
2
3
4
Ice Thickness (in.)
Water Depth (in.c)
Current Velocity (km/hr)
HOLE #
Ice Thickness (in.)
Water Depth (in.c)
Current Velocity (km/hr)
HOLE #
Ice Thickness (in.)
Water Depth (in.c)
Current Velocity (km/hr)
HOLE #
Ice Thickness (in.)
Water Depth (in.c)
Current Velocity (km/hr)
NOTE
Indicate the direction of flow at each augured hole with an
arrow on the surface. Once direction of flow and main
current has been identified, mark out a pattern for slot
location or deflection boards.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
TABLE OF CURRENT VELOCITY CONVERSIONS
Feet / Second
X 0.305 = metres / second
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
3.0
3.5
4.0
4.5
5.0
5.5
6.0
6.5
7.0
7.5
8.0
8.5
9.0
9.5
10.0
0.15
0.31
0.46
0.61
0.76
0.92
1.07
1.22
1.37
1.53
1.68
1.83
1.98
2.14
2.29
2.44
2.59
2.75
2.90
3.05
X 1.097 = kilometres /
hour
0.55
1.10
1.65
2.19
2.74
3.29
3.84
4.39
4.94
5.49
6.03
6.58
7.13
7.68
8.23
8.78
9.32
9.87
10.42
10.97
REFER TO THE FOLLOWING TABLE
Freshwater Ice Bearing Capacity Chart (Blue Ice)
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
ICE STRENGTH FOR STATIONARY LOADS AND WORKING ON ICE
Permissible Load
Effective Ice Thickness
(clear, blue ice)
Lake
River
Pounds
Kgs
Tons
Inches
mm
Inches
mm
2,200
1,000
1.1
8.0
200.0
9.0
230.0
4,400
2,000
2.2
12.0
300.0
14.0
350.0
8,800
4,000
4.4
18.0
450.0
21.0
520.0
17,600
8,000
8.8
24.0
600.0
27.0
690.0
55,000
25,000
27.5
44.0
1,100.0
50.0
1,270.0
99,000
45,000
49.5
59.0
1,500.0
68.0
1,730.0
154,000
70,000
77.0
71.0
1,800.0
82.0
2,070.0
242,000
110,000
121.0
91.0
2,300.0
105.0
2,650.0
ICE STRENGTH FOR CONTINUOUS TRAVEL
(i.e.: moving vehicle)
Permissible Load
Effective Ice Thickness
Lake
(clear, blue ice)
River
inches
mm
inches
mm
One person on foot
2.0
50.0
2.5
60.0
Group, in single file
3.2
80.0
3.5
90.0
Passenger car
2,000 kg
7.1
180.0
8.3
210.0
Light truck
2,500 kg
7.9
200.0
9.1
230.0
Medium truck
3,500 kg
10.2
260.0
11.8
300.0
7,000 - 8,000 kg
13.8
350.0
16.1
410.0
10,000 kg
( 11.0 tons)
15.0
380.0
17.3
440.0
25,000 kg
( 27.5 tons)
24.8
630.0
28.7
730.0
45,000 kg
( 49.5 tons)
31.5
800.0
36.2
920.0
70,000 kg
( 77.0 tons)
39.4
1,000.0
45.3
1,150.0
110,000 kg
(121.0 tons)
49.2
1,125.0
56.7
1,440.0
Heavy truck
NOTE
This table is for clear, blue ice on lakes and on rivers. This
table does not apply for parked loads, or where ice faults
are evident.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
RECOMMENDED SPEEDS FOR CONTINUOUS TRAVEL
Water Depth
Critical Velocity (Speed)
Metres (m)
Feet (ft)
Kilometre/hour
Miles/hour
1.21
4
14.48
9
1.82
6
17
11
2.43
8
19.3
12
3.04
10
22.5
14
4.50
15
27.3
17
6.09
20
30
19
9.10
30
35
22
WEIGHT OF ICE BLOCKS
Thickness (Feet)
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
Length (Feet)
1
2
3
1
2
3
1
2
3
1
2
3
Width (Feet)
1
2
3
1
2
3
1
2
3
1
2
3
Weight (Pounds)
56
224
504
84
336
756
112
448
1,008
140
560
1,260
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
OIL SPILL
CONTINGENCY
MANUAL
SECTION
4
CONTAINMENT AND RECOVERY
CHECKLIST
SAFETY
WATERCOURSES
– CONTAINMENT
& RECOVERY
4.1
4.5
ESTABLISHING
COMMAND
CENTRES
ICE-COVERED
WATERCOURSES
– CONTAINMENT
& RECOVERY
4.2
4.6
ESTABLISHING
DECONTAMINATION
CENTRES
EVALUATION OF
CONTAINMENT &
RECOVERY
OPERATIONS
4.3
4.7
LAND –
WASTE DISPOSAL
AT THE SPILL SITE
CONTAINMENT &
RECOVERY
4.4
4.8
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
SAFETY
4.1
Action
Ensure that safety of the response team and individuals during containment
and recovery operations is of highest priority.
Procedure








Assess the site and potential hazards associated with containment and
recovery operations prior to the commencement of work.
Ensure that personnel on-site understand the safety issues and their
responsibilities.
Document issues discussed, concerns raised, actions taken and attendees
at all safety briefings.
Implement measures to eliminate or mitigate hazards.
Control access into the site.
Designate a safety supervisor.
Develop spill site safety policy in regard to equipment requirements, ensure
the appropriate equipment is available and workers are competent in its
usage (i.e. Self Contained Breathing Apparatus, wind socks, barricades,
warning tape, etc.).
Common safety equipment at a spill site includes:
 monitors for combustible gas, toxic substances, O2 deficiency
 span / calibration gas to test monitors
 chemical-resistant suits to prevent contact with hazardous chemicals
 safety footwear (neoprene / rubber as required)
 hard hats
 hearing protection
 safety glasses / goggles
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013









respiratory protection:
 supplied / self contained air
 cartridge-type respirator
specialized, job-specific equipment (i.e. chainsaw protective pants, face shield,
safety belts and lifelines, etc.)
identification markers to be worn by key response staff (i.e. marked arm bands,
hard hats, or vests)
communication equipment
facilities (i.e. shelter, food and water, rest rooms, etc.)
First Aid kits sized for the number of workers on site
other equipment based on policy, hazards and number of workers (i.e. eye wash
kits, burn blankets, stretchers, hearing protection, etc.)
fire suppression equipment (i.e. portable extinguishers, water truck, pumps, etc.)
wind socks
Action
Ensure that precautions are taken during the utilization of equipment.
Procedure




Conduct routine air monitoring in the vicinity of the equipment being utilized.
Position equipment so that it is outside of the hot zone unless authorization
is given and controls are established.
Control the movement of equipment being utilized by spotters, minimizing
the number of workers in the area.
Ensure hazardous areas are well marked (i.e. buried lines, power lines,
rough topography, restricted areas, weak ice, etc.) and that equipment
operators understand the conditions related to the hazards.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
ESTABLISHING
COMMAND
CENTRES
4.2
Action
Establish an “On-Site Command Post” (OSCP) where the On-Scene
Commander, supported by appropriate regulatory agencies, manages
spill control operations.
Procedure

Choose a suitable location for the OSCP:
 identify safe areas outside the immediate spill recovery operations site
(cold zone) that can be used by workers, visitors, media, etc.
 establish post in a position near enough to site entry to allow activity to be
monitored, but remote enough to avoid repetitive unwarranted
interruptions
 appropriate signage should be used throughout the site including:
 directional signs indicating OSCP location
 command centre signs at site
 hazard warning signs to inform workers / visitors entering spill site
from the building
Action
Ensure that the OSCP is equipped with appropriate amenities.
Procedure

Consider having the following building amenities available:
 use grid or generator as a source of electricity, but ensure that system is
surge protected and properly grounded
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013







ensure that building has a water system sufficient for drinking and
domestic use
ensure there is enough washroom capacity. Provide a shower if workers
will be on site for extended periods
a quiet, separate rest area should be provided for short breaks
sufficient room and desk space should be made available for several key
response staff. This should include:
 separate room / space for clerical staff
 separate reception area at entry to screen new arrivals
a separate coffee room area complete with refrigerator and supplies.
This space could double as “conference room” if required
a separate area for briefings and meeting with staff and/or media
a storage area for supplies / safety equipment required by key response
staff
Action
Ensure that the OSCP is equipped with sufficient office equipment and
supplies.
Procedure

Consider having the following office equipment and supplies available:
 two telephone lines — one reserved for outgoing calls if possible
 two radio systems — one compatible with area operations, the second
compatible with on site portables
 a facsimile (fax) machine on separate line from the telephone system.
This machine may initially double as a photocopier
 a photocopier to duplicate records, documents, etc.
 a computer with software compatible with company accounting and word
processing formats
 a minimum of 2 flip charts or white boards complete with markers
 wall maps indicating area access, watercourses, control points, etc.
 sufficient equipment to facilitate adequate documentation of the events
related to the spill site recovery, and include as a minimum:
 log book to record workers on site and log visitors in and out
 camera to take pictures of progression of operations
 pocket memo recorder to assist in documentation of events
 a variety of office supplies to meet the initial needs of command centre
staff:
 pens / pencils
 stationery
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013

 company forms, quickrite stationery, etc.
an extra refrigerator clearly identified for sample storage only
Action

Have appropriate resource and technical information available at the
OSCP.
Procedure

Have the following resource and technical information available:
 spill contingency manuals for the spill / recovery site with information that
includes:
 contact numbers for key response staff and alternates
 standard and specialized equipment resource lists
 government contacts
 oil spill cooperative and WCSS information
 emergency numbers (police / fire / ambulance / hospitals)
 specialized consultants
 downstream water users / stakeholders
 land owners / area stakeholders
 technical information regarding equipment usage and diagrams to assist
response personnel in giving instructions on deployment including:
 response checklist
 safety assessment / documentation checklists
 equipment deployment checklists / diagrams
 organizational flow charts
 responsibility summaries by position
 Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) for all regulated substances that
workers may be exposed to on-site should be maintained in a file on-site
 telephone books for local area
Action
Develop a site layout plan for the OSCP and containment and recovery
operations.
Procedure

Produce a sketch of the site layout with appropriate buffer areas and
equipment positioning (see sample).
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Action
For larger spills (i.e. Level 3 Emergency), it may be necessary to establish
off-site operational centres to support the On-Scene Commander.
Procedure



Establish a corporate “Emergency Response Centre” if required. This is
normally located in the company’s regional office.
A Government Emergency Operations Centre (EOC) may be established offsite where representatives from industry, local authorities and government
department / agency representatives coordinate activities to assist the OnScene Commander.
Provide a company representative with the necessary authority, technical
and news media relations skills.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
ESTABLISHING
DECONTAMINATION
AREAS
4.3
Action
Establish an area where response personnel can remove soiled clothing,
wash up, return / clean equipment and change into street clothes.
NOTE
The need for, and type of, decontamination process varies and can
be altered according to the type of spill.
Procedure





Ensure that the decontamination area is in a safe, convenient location.
Select an area where contaminated wash water can be collected for
disposal.
Have the area identified with ribbon and appropriate signage (i.e. no
smoking).
Cover area with a bermed plastic sheet or tarp.
Consider having the following equipment at the site:
 kiddies’ pool that responders can step into and have his/her outer rubber
suit washed
 warm water supply and detergents
 washing supplies including hand soap, scrub brushes, wash basins and
portable showers
 long-handled, soft-bristled scrub brushes
 small tables, and a variety of containers
 racks for drying and storing clothing and boots, and for equipment
storage
 disinfectant for boots and breathing apparatus
 field showers
 dressing area (i.e. tent, trailer) for inclement weather
 lined bins for waste materials
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
LAND CONTAINMENT AND
RECOVERY
4.4
Action
Following the detailed site evaluation, select one of, or a combination of the
following containment techniques:







culvert blocks
bell holes / trenches
dikes / inverted weirs
water flushing
in-situ burning
sorbents for residual oil
equipment
Regardless of the technique chosen:













remember that safety is the number one priority
determine spill boundaries and flag area
test for sub-surface contamination if appropriate
consult with regulatory agencies, stakeholders and spill specialists
secure site and control access
minimize use of heavy equipment where possible
salvage soils and never bury contaminated soil
remove as much free fluid as possible (a thorough clean up will reduce
reclamation costs and the time required to rehabilitate the site)
prevent surface water from entering site
avoid unnecessary damage to vegetation
preference should be to treat the soil on site and not to remove
contaminated soil
if spill has the potential to reach ground water or a used water resource,
consider excavation and removal of contaminated soil
apply calcium soil amendment (ASAP) for produced water spills in soils
with heavy clay content
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
CULVERT BLOCKS
Action
Utilize a culvert block to contain spilled product from migrating through the
culvert.
Procedure



Consider installing culvert gates in sensitive areas where spill potential is
high.
Ensure plywood, vetter bags or other culvert block material is available for
initial spill response.
Monitor water levels when blocking culverts to ensure that wash-outs don’t
occur.
BELL HOLES / TRENCHES
Action
Utilize bell holes / trenches to contain a spill, and prevent further migration
of fluids and to collect fluids for recovery by vacuum, tank truck or
pump suction hose.
Procedure

Ensure safety aspects are considered, including:
 monitor for toxic and combustible vapours before and during the use of
hand tools or equipment that could be potential ignition sources
 site hazards (i.e. buried lines, overhead power lines, etc.) must be
identified and marked
 pre-job safety meeting required to discuss:
 all hazards and methods to be used to eliminate or mitigate hazards
 personal protective equipment required
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013

 emergency egress plan
 other safety concerns
 firefighting equipment should be on stand by
When utilizing bell holes and trenches, consider the following:
 preferable to utilize more numerous shallow bell holes or trenches to
minimize risk of fluid penetration into soil. Shallow depth also reduces
risk of striking buried hazards
 natural depressions should be used if possible. Natural seams can be
utilized to collect and direct fluid instead of digging trenches
 when possible, excavated material should be placed away from path of
draining fluids
 trenches can be used to direct spilled material and collect fluid for
draining into bell holes. Use a herring bone pattern to aid in fluid
recovery and feeder trenches to divert fluid into bell holes
 fluids can be squeegeed or allowed to drain into bell holes or trenches
 properly positioned bell holes or trenches at the perimeter of the spill site
can be used to prevent further migration of fluids
 a disc or drum skimmer should be considered to recover oil from the bell
hole
DIKES / INVERTED WEIRS
Action
Utilize dikes and inverted weirs to contain and recover fluids.
Procedure


Ensure safety aspects are considered, including:
 monitor to ensure no toxic or combustible vapours are present prior to,
and during, construction
 pre-job safety meeting should be held to discuss:
 method to be used to install dikes / weirs
 potential hazards and method to be used to eliminate or mitigate the
hazards
 monitoring requirements, frequency, levels
 personal protective equipment requirements
 emergency response and egress plan
 adequate fire-fighting equipment must be on site.
When utilizing dikes, consider the following:
 utilize natural low areas and seams to minimize construction and
disturbance
 keep height and width to minimum to reduce construction time and
disturbance
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013


existing roads may be used by blocking culvert, but flow must be
monitored to prevent wash out and losses of contaminants
 straw bales may be utilized in certain areas requiring oil retention oil (filter
fence):
 constructed of double bales, with overlap, set evenly on level ground
 some site preparation to ensure level ground for good seal with bales
may be required
 bales may have to be staked or re-enforced to prevent failure if
significant flow expected
 a snow and ice dike can be used to contain a spill during winter months
(see diagram on following page.)
When utilizing an inverted weir, consider the following:
 used to contain oil and permit water to flow on through culvert (note: will
not hold / retain high salinity water)
 utilize natural seams or low areas to minimize construction and
disturbance
 if inadvertent failure could contaminate sensitive areas, construct 2
inverted weirs in succession to lessen risk
 utilize properly-sized culvert at appropriate angle to control water / oil
level in the dike:
 if expected flow / culvert size not known, use bigger size culvert
 if large flows expected, use two culverts — one set slightly higher to
act as overflow if required
 bottom edge of culvert discharge will determine level of oil / water in
dike
 bottom of culvert inlet (within dike) should be approximately two feet
below expected water surface to prevent siphoning of oil and off
bottom far enough to prevent plugging by siltation
 dike should be constructed of material with sufficient clay content to
permit sealing around culvert and provide a strong dike
 consider reinforcing the dike walls with sand bags and plastic when it is in
loose material
 straw or other sorbent material should be placed at discharge to catch
small amounts of oil
 prepare for the release of a small slug of oil when weir is first put into
operation
 install culverts with gates or pipes with vales, if there is need to control
high fluid levels:
 gates / valves should be locked to prevent tampering and possible
loss of contaminants
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
WATER FLUSHING
Action
In forested soils or soils with a high organic matter content, a low-pressure
cold water flush may be appropriate to direct produced water (salt
water) spills to a recovery area.
NOTE





Flushing a salt water spill on cultivated land and soils with a high clay content
may cause additional damage (soil dispersion) unless a calcium amendment is
first added to the flush water.
For produced water spills on soils with a high clay content, add a calcium
amendment (i.e. calcium nitrate fertilizer) in a water-soluble form while the
soil is still wet.
Follow-up with an application of calcium nitrate in less-soluble form
(i.e. gypsum).
Use caution when using calcium nitrate if there is a risk of contaminating
surface or ground water with nitrates.
Consult with company specialists or laboratory for recommendations on
appropriate soil amendments.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Procedure






Construct containment trenches in the appropriate location.
Flush the contaminated area as soon as possible (not a produced water spill
in mineral soil without calcium amendment).
Preservation of native vegetation is a priority and minimizing the length of
time salt water is in contact with plant roots is critical for their survival.
Use water with conductivity less than 1 mmhos/cm. Apply by sprinkler or
discharge from header pipes located above the spill.
Collect leachate, etc. in trenches or bell holes.
Repeating flushing at 3-4 day intervals may be advantageous.
Action
Utilize hot water flushing to direct oil to a recovery area.
Procedure

Ensure safety aspects are considered, including:
 hot water can increase the volatilization of light ends and vapours which
can increase the risk of flammability and exposure of workers to
hazardous vapours
 monitoring for toxic and flammable vapours required
NOTE


Exposure to water vapour may impair or render monitor
sensors ineffective. Calibrate monitors frequently to ensure
that they are operating properly.
personal protective equipment required to mitigate risk of inhaling
vapours and exposure to eye and skin. Hearing protection may be
required for personnel using spray nozzles
pre-job meetings should discuss:
 task
 hazards
 methods to eliminate or reduce hazard exposure
 monitoring requirements, frequency and limits
 personal protective equipment requirements, and emergency
response plan / egress plan
 other safety issues
 fire equipment should be on stand-by at the site
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013

When utilizing hot water flushing, consider the following:
 flush to bell holes or ditches to keep distances short and minimizing
repeated effort to move same amount of oil
 flush from perimeter inward to keep a cleaned area between the workers
and perimeter (provides safe egress route in case of ignition)
 flush with wind at workers back to reduce risk of inhaling vapours and in
case of ignition
 separate debris when recovering fluid to minimize costs of fluid
processing
 utilize squeegee, if safe to do so, to increase effectiveness by physically
moving large amount of oil and washing remainder
 when possible, take recovered fluids back to the company facility for
treatment
IN-SITU BURNING
Action
Utilize in-situ burning of an oil spill when:








regulatory approval has been given and the appropriate contacts made
it is unsafe to contain and recover the product with men and equipment
burning would prevent imminent contamination of a sensitive area
equipment usage would cause a greater overall negative impact
oil on water or thin / broken ice is of an adequate thickness (2 mm+) and
in-situ burning is the best response
further mechanical clean up is unfeasible
a controlled burn is possible
controls are in place to ensure a safe, effective burn and it is contained to
the spill site
NOTE
If in water, a system is in place to contain and dispose of
potentially contaminated water from snow / ice melt.
Procedure

Refer to “Section 6”.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
SORBENTS
Action
Sorbents are used to recover residual oil that cannot effectively be
recovered by mechanical equipment.
Procedure

Select sorbents that:
 recover product effectively
 are readily available
 are easy to apply and recover
 do not create a disposal problem (reduce waste on-site)
 are economical (consider using natural materials i.e. straw)
EQUIPMENT
Action
Following the site assessment and the development of a plan that identifies
techniques for containment and recovery, select the appropriate
equipment.
Procedure

Refer to the table on the following pages for information on typical equipment
used for containment and recovery operations.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
EQUIPMENT
TYPES

Wheeled


Backhoes

Tracked
SAFETY
CONSIDERATIONS
USAGE


More mobile, easier /
faster to move without
trailers
Limited use in softer
ground conditions
Newer 4-wheel and/or
extend-a-hose have
increased versatility
Less mobile, requires
trailer to move longer
distances
More versatile in soft
ground conditions
Usually larger, more
powerful, longer reach





Standard

Suitable for average to 
soft ground
Safe positioning
required within spill site
Potential ignition source
from equipment
components (exhaust,
alternator, etc.) as well
as steel striking steel /
rock, etc.
On-site hazards must
be identified (i.e. power
lines, underground
lines, etc.)
Continuous monitoring
for combustible / toxic
vapours is required
Potential ignition
sources:
- engine and
components;
- steel striking steel /
rock.
Monitoring is required
for combustible/toxic
gases.
OPERATING










Dozers

Wide Pad / Extended 
Track




Dozers with winches are
preferred:
- winching out if stuck;
- winching / towing other
equipment
Performance enhanced by
tilt / angle blade.
Maintaining/preparing
access.
Removing obstacles/
debris for equipment /
workers.
Towing equipment.
Making ditches, dikes,
inverted weirs.
Piling debris for disposal.
More versatile in soft
ground conditions
Skimming operations. 
Transporting fluids.
Flushing and cleaning

operations.
Fire suppression.


Pumps
Do not dig deeper than
minimum depth required
Can be used to install bell
holes, trenches, ditches,
dikes, inverted weirs
Can clear debris for other
equipment workers
Can position equipment
matting for other
equipment, towing build
ramps to open tankage,
etc.
Various


Continuous monitoring 
of the area for toxic /
flammable vapours.
Follow manufacturer
recommendations for
operation.
Ensure that gasoline
and diesel engines are
equipped with flame and
spark arrestors on the
exhaust system.
Electric motors must be
explosion-proof and
grounded when
necessary.
Cool engines and
ensure they are in a
safe area (no ignition
sources) prior to
refuelling.
Ensure operators wear
appropriate personal
protective equipment,
including hearing
protection.
Follow manufacturer
operating guidelines.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
EQUIPMENT
Skimmers
TYPES
Vacuum units, Disc 
skimmer, Drum
skimmer, Rope mop 
skimmer, Acme
skimmer, Mantaray
skimmer, PEDCO
skimmer, Skim-pak



Oily Debris
Separation
Tank
½ Railway Tank with
Series of Screens






Tank Trucks
Wheeled




Closed
Tanks


Open
SAFETY
USAGE

OPERATING
CONSIDERATIONS
Normally used in bell 
holes for land spills.
Disc skimmer, drum
skimmer and rope mop 
will reduce the amount
of water collected.
Specialized tank used
for separating debris
from recovered
hydrocarbons.
Position a minimum of
25 metres from ignition
source.
Portable open tank
with compartments
and screens.
Separates debris from
recovered fluid by
screening fluid as it
flows between
compartments.
Equipped with heating
coils for use in winter.
Available from Area G
Co-op in Alberta

For removal of
recovered
hydrocarbons and also
have some capability
for recovering spilled
materials
Can recover fluids if
sufficient volume of
spilled material is
present at point of
suction to keep unit
from breaking suction.
Are the cheapest type
of truck unit to recover
fluid
Are not as efficient as
vacuum trucks at
removing oil from
water since they
cannot continually
maintain suction.
Efficiency can be
enhanced by skimmer
heads.
Can be used to mix
calcium amendment
and apply to a
produced water spill.
Suitably sized valves /
ports for unloading
from large discharge
hose.
If solids / debris
expected, should have
man-ways to facilitate
periodic clean-out.
Preferred if large
amounts of solids /
debris expected.
Overflow piping can be
connected to prevent
further spillage.




Monitoring for
combustible and toxic
vapours is required.
Workers in or near
water should wear life
jackets.



Ground tank to proper 
ground rod:
- provide trucks with
ability to ground to
rod or tank.
Screens should be

bonded to tank during
insertion / removal.
Guard rolls should be in
position.

Monitor the area for
hydrocarbon gases.

Should operate from

outside spill perimeter
and have gas
monitoring to ensure

they are not operating in
potentially explosive /
toxic atmospheres.








Tankage should be

located a safe distance
from ignition source.
There should be

adequate secondary
containment around
tankage.
Overflow piping can be 
connected to open tank
with portable hose to
eliminate overflow spills.
Should be accessible
for trucking.
Adequate signage and
grounding must be
used.
Position skimmers to be
presented with maximum
amount of oil.
Ensure that skimmer is
adjusted to work efficiently.
Locate recovery / storage
tank close to skimmer.
Tank should be positioned
as close to spill site as
safety allows. This will
minimize haulage
distances.
Vacuum trucks can
discharge into inlet and
tank trucks can haul fluids
back from discharge for
processing.
Periodically, inlet baskets /
compartment should be
cleaned by vacuum units
and debris taken to
approved disposal site.
On produced water spills,
recovered produced water
can be cleaned using bulk
furnace filter inside the
double screen.
Hoses can be swedged
down to increase recovery
distance.
Properly maintained pump
on tank truck can greatly
increase suction distance /
efficiency.
Workers at hose suction
end can increase
efficiency through proper
positioning (suction
strainer reduces recovered
debris).
Portable pump used as a
booster near suction end
can increase suction
distance.
Can be used as short-term
stationary pump to recover
fluids and pump directly
into tank.
Adequate storage volume
must be calculated and
provided.
Sufficient retention time to
facilitate separation
decreases cost, especially
in remote areas.
Regulatory approval
required to release water
from tankage following oil /
water separation at the
site.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
EQUIPMENT
TYPES
USAGE


Port-A-Tanks




Temporary Lined
Pits




Standard


Vacuum
Trucks


All-Terrain


Portable, transportable
by air or all-terrain
vehicles.
Best-suited for remote
areas.
Usually a temporary
solution until large
tankage can be
installed.
Usually very limited
volumes.
Should be constructed
as shallow as possible
and larger in
dimension.
Lined with
impermeable synthetic
liner of the proper type
for product to be
stored.
Provision must be
made during
construction to ensure
integrity of the liner
(i.e. sand bed).
Used only as
temporary solution for
remote areas.
Single axle or tandem. 
Require good ground
conditions to operate
without towing
assistance.

Tandems utilizing only
partial loads can
operate on semi-soft
ground.

Are able to travel from
spill right onto road.
Caution required to
avoid increasing safety
risk by operating in
unacceptable areas.
Large tires provide
capability to operate
on soft ground
unaided.
Limited, cost-effective
travelling distances.
Must have on-site
tankage to reduce
costs.
SAFETY
CONSIDERATIONS
Monitor area to ensure 
that trucks are not within
zone of combustible /
toxic gas.

Keep trucks outside of
spill perimeter and use
hoses to recover
products.
Vacuum pump air

discharge should be
piped away from
engine.
OPERATING
Position outside spill
perimeter, recover product
utilizing hoses.
Proper hose placement
improves efficiency:
- hoses can be swedged
down to increase
recovery distance;
worker at hose suction
end can increase
efficiency through proper
positioning.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
WATERCOURSES –
CONTAINMENT AND
RECOVERY
4.5
RIVERS AND STREAMS
Action
Determine appropriate control points for containment and recovery
operations.
Procedure




Activate the area “Oil Spill Contingency Manual”.
Complete an assessment of the spill (see Section 3.5).
Develop a containment and recovery plan in consultation with company
representatives, lead government agencies and other stakeholders.
Mobilize appropriate resources, and make necessary contacts (i.e. internal,
regulatory agency, dam operators, etc.).
Action
Select the exact location in the control point area to deploy containment and
recovery equipment.
Procedure





Choose a site where the current is directed towards the recovery area.
When possible, the equipment deployment site should be in slower-moving
current (less than 4 km/h).
On larger rivers, ensure that the site is on the same side of the river as the
spilled hydrocarbon.
Consider access when choosing the site.
Determine current speed and corresponding boom angles from the following
charts.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
CURRENT SPEED AND BOOM ANGLE REQUIREMENTS
Time in
seconds stick
travels
30 m (100 ft)
Current
Km/hr
Current
Mph
Current
(metres per
second)
Current
(feet per
second)
Boom angle
(degrees to
current)
216
108
72
54
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
0.31
0.62
0.93
1.25
0.14
0.28
0.42
0.56
0.46
0.92
1.38
1.84
30 degrees
43
36
31
27
2.5
3.0
3.5
4.0
1.5
1.9
2.2
2.5
0.69
0.83
0.97
1.11
2.26
2.72
3.18
3.60
20 degrees
24
22
18
4.5
5.0
6.0
2.8
3.1
3.7
1.25
1.39
1.67
4.10
4.56
5.48
15 degrees
15
14
12
11
7.0
8.0
9.0
10.0
4.3
5.0
5.6
6.2
1.94
2.22
2.50
2.78
6.36
7.28
8.20
9.12
10 degrees
Action
Ensure safety of workers and visitors.
Procedure



Conduct a safety and hazard assessment and take precautionary measures
(see Section 3.3).
Deploy marker buoys and signage both upstream and downstream of the
equipment deployment site to warn watercraft.
Monitor safety on a continuous basis and consider key issues:
 monitoring for hydrocarbon vapours
 identification of restricted areas
 placement of appropriate signage and barricades
 provision of personal protective equipment
 proper usage of equipment
 emergency services are available if required
 unnecessary personnel and equipment are kept out of work areas
 personnel are briefed on a continuous basis and understand their
responsibilities
 documentation of all safety aspects maintained
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Action
Select an anchoring method to secure the lead end of the boom.
Procedure

Select one of, or a combination of, the following anchoring techniques:
 Shoreline Pins — in narrow watercourses with slower-moving current,
utilize shoreline pins, screw in anchors, or natural anchors (i.e. trees,
rocks)
 Trolley Line — rope or cable is deployed on an angle with the anchoring
point further upstream on the side of the river where equipment is being
deployed. A split pulley is connected to the trolley line from which the
boom is anchored. A rope is connected to the pulley to adjust the boom
angle
 Bridge Pier Bridle — the work boat crew wrap the bridle around the
bridge pier to anchor boom (ensure that the boom angle is appropriate)
 In-Stream Anchors — have the boat crew deploy anchors at the
appropriate angle. Ensure that there is sufficient chain on the anchor’s
shaft (minimum 8 metres), and a series of anchors is deployed if
necessary
 Boom Vane — the Boom Vane and containment boom are deployed
from shore and typically, boats are not required unless there is
insufficient water depth near shore. If so, a small boat may be needed to
deploy to deeper water.
Action
Refer to the following charts as a guideline to deploy containment and
recovery equipment.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
TROLLEY LINE BOOM DEPLOYMENT
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Step 1

Determine
target
recovery
point.
Consider skimmer options; look for deep
slow water with good access for trucks
and storage.

Determine optimum location for trolley
line taking into consideration river width
and current speed and boom angle.

Install Marker Buoys upstream and
downstream or place signage on
shoreline to advise water users of the
potential hazard.

Install a ½” rope across the river on an
angle with the intended anchor point
farther upstream on the side of the river
where the skimmer will be deployed.

Securely anchor the rope on both sides
of the river using trees, rocks, shoreline
anchors, equipment or a combination of
the above.
Step 2
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Step 3

Lay out boom along shoreline, connect
ATSM connectors, a tow bridle or tow
paravane and a split pulley.

Attach split pulley to trolley line.

Attach the Pedco skimmer to Boom.

Attach handline bridles every 7 meters
or as required and attach an adequate
length of ½” shoreline rope to each
handline bridle.

Shoreline ropes must be set at an
angle facing downstream when in the
river.

Ensure there are enough workers to
work manage each rope.
Step 4
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Step 5

Attach shoreline boom to skimmer.

Attach equalizer ropes on both sides of
the split pulley.

Attach suction hose, hose floats and an
anchor rope to the discharge end of the
Pedco skimmer.

Have adequate number of workers
managing each shoreline rope.

Push split pulley out into current to allow
current to deploy. Depending on current
speed, workers may have to use
equalizer ropes to assist in moving the
boom out into the current.

Once the boom is at the appropriate
angle, tie off both equalizer ropes to a
suitable anchor point.
Step 6

Use a combination of handlines, and
the ropes on the skimmer and shoreline
boom to straighten out the river side
boom.

Attach the Suction hose to a trash
pump or directly to a vacuum truck or
tank truck.

Recovery system can be expanded
through manifold systems to allow
pumping into temporary storage tanks
or trucks.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Step 7

Install a secondary recovery system
using either another trolley line, or
instream, anchor setup.

If conditions permit, a drum skimmer,
and sorbents can be used to contain
and recover product that migrates past
the primary system.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
BRIDGE PIER BOOM DEPLOYMENT
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Step 1

Determine
target
recovery
point.
Consider skimmer options; look for deep
slow water with good access for trucks
and storage.

Install Marker Buoys upstream and
downstream or place signage on
shoreline to advise water users of the
potential hazard.

Ensure bridge pier bridle is long enough
to go around the bridge pier.

Install marker buoys on each end and in
the middle of the bridle.

Attach 8m rope to front end of bridle and
wrap around boat tow post.

Travel slowly upstream and within safe
distance of bridge pier.
Step 2
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Step 3

When safely past the upstream end of
the bridge pier, start ferrying across the
front until the boat is on the opposite
side of the bridge pier, and then
continue upstream until the middle
marker buoy is visible.

When you can see the middle marker
buoy, release the tow rope and allow the
current to wrap the bridge pier bridle
around the bridge pier, using caution to
keep the boat away from the upstream
end of the bridge pier.
Step 4
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Step 5

The boat can then attach both ends
together by connecting the safety snap
hook onto the bridge pier bridle ring.
Remove one of the marker buoys.

The tow rope can be removed or left
attached.

Set up boom on shore so that it can be
safely towed out.

Attach a tow paravane or tow bridle on
the upstream side and a minimum 8m
½” rope.

Attach a minimum 15m rope on the back
end of the boom.

The boat starts pulling the boom
upstream, staying as close to shore as
possible.
Step 6
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Step 7

The boat attaches the tow rope to the
bridge pier bridle.

The boat starts attaching handline
bridles and ropes to the river boom and
ferrying them across to shoreline crews
starting at the upstream end. As the boat
is ferrying lines across, shoreline crews
begin pulling the boom toward shore and
securing to predetermined anchor points.
Step 8
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Step 9

When the shoreline crews have moved
the boom close enough to shore, the
skimmer crew attaches the shoreline
boom, Pedco Skimmer, Hose Floats,
Suction Hose and a tie off line.

Use a combination of handlines, and the
ropes on the skimmer and shoreline
boom to straighten out the river side
boom.

Attach the Suction hose to a trash pump
or directly to a vacuum truck or tank
truck.

Recovery system can be expanded
through manifold systems to allow
pumping into temporary storage tanks or
trucks.
Step 10
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Step 11

Install a secondary recovery system
using either another trolley line, or
instream, anchor setup.

If conditions permit, a drum skimmer,
and sorbents can be used to contain
and recover product that migrates past
the primary system.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
INSTREAM ANCHOR BOOM DEPLOYMENT
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Step 1
Step 2


Determine target recovery point.
Consider skimmer options; look for deep
slow water with good access for trucks
and storage.

Install Marker Buoys upstream and
downstream or place signage on
shoreline to advise water users of the
potential hazard.

Ensure anchor assembly is complete
with anchor, chain, rope and marker
buoy.
For most deployments there
should be at least 15m of ½” chain and
potentially 2 anchors.

Determine optimum location for Anchor,
considering river width, current speed
and boom angle. Consider setting
anchor 30m upstream of intended point
to allow for anchor slippage.

When the boat is at the anchor
deployment location, boat will hold river
and crew will start deploying the anchor,
chain rope and marker buoy. When the
anchor is on the bottom of the river bed,
the boat will start drifting downstream at
a speed that allows the chain and rope to
deploy safely.

When there is about 3m of rope and
marker buoy left in the boat, the boat
operator will add power to hold his
position in the water. The crew will wrap
the rope around a front tow post and the
boat operator will then begin drifting
downstream again to try and set the
anchor into the river bed.

The anchor is considered set when the
boat cannot pull the anchor assembly
backwards with full power.
The operator then moves ahead to take the slack out of the assembly, and the crew
removes the rope from the tow post and allows it to settle into the water.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Step 3

Set up boom on shore so that it can be
safely towed out.

Attach a tow paravane or tow bridle on
the upstream side with a minimum 8m
½” rope.

Attach a minimum 15m rope on the
back end of the boom.

The boat starts pulling the boom
upstream, staying as close to shore as
possible.

The boat approaches the marker buoy
and the crew attaches the rope to the
marker buoy.
Step 4
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Step 5

The boat starts attaching handline
bridles and ropes to the river boom
and ferrying them across to shoreline
crews starting at the upstream end.
As the boat is ferrying lines across,
shoreline crews begin pulling the
boom toward shore and securing it to
predetermined anchor points.
Step 6

When the shoreline crews have
moved the boom close enough to
shore, the skimmer crew attaches the
shoreline boom, Pedco Skimmer,
Hose Floats, Suction Hose and a tie
off line.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Step 7

Use a combination of handlines, and
the ropes on the skimmer and
shoreline boom to straighten out the
river side boom.

Attach the Suction hose to a trash
pump or directly to a vacuum truck or
tank truck.

Recovery system can be expanded
through manifold systems to allow
pumping into temporary storage
tanks or trucks.
Step 8

Install a secondary recovery system
using either another trolley line, or
instream, anchor setup.

If conditions permit, a drum skimmer,
and sorbents can be used to contain
and recover product that migrates past
the primary system.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
DEPLOYMENT GUIDELINES USING BOOM
DEFLECTORS
Boom deflectors can be used to help angle boom towards a
containment
and recovery area near a shoreline.
STEP #1
Install
the
boom
deflectors
between each 50’ length of boom
using
the
ASTM
common
connector.
Ensure that the
deflector wing is locked in place
prior to boom deployment.
STEP #2
Tow the boom with the deflectors
to the anchoring point
STEP #3
The work boat crew next pull
alongside each other
STEP #4
Once all deflectors have been set it may be necessary to change the angle on
some of the wings to achieve the appropriate boom angle.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
RIVER OSR APPLICATION
BOOMVANE
NOTE
The BoomVane is a versatile spill control tool — perfect for
both recovery and deflection modes of operation. Moored
with only one line, the BoomVane is completely selftrimming and requires no attendance once deployed. The
BoomVane may be used with any type or make of oil boom
or skimming system, although shallow draught river booms
and Circus-type recovery systems are recommended (i.e.
FLEXI system).
BOOMVANE RIVER DEPLOYMENT PROCEDURE (TYPICAL)
STEP #1
Determine the recovery point; lay
out the entire system along the
bank (with some slack on the
boom). Connect the BoomVane,
line and boom to the connector
plate.
* “BoomVane” patent pending by ORC AB. Material in this manual pertaining to BoomVane has been
excerpted from “Fast Water Oil Spill Control Technology” by ORC AB.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
STEP #2
With the mooring line and boom
end secured to shore, push out
the BoomVane from the bank to
let it float free. The BoomVane
swings out towards midstream
with the boom in tow.
STEP #3
When
the
BoomVane
has
tightened up the boom, further
mooring line is paid out until the
optimum boom-to-current angle is
achieved.
STEP #4
The BoomVane control rudder
(operated by the control line run
along (i.e. the boom to the
recovery point)), brings the system
back to the bank (i.e. to let vessels
pass or for system recovery).
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
NOTE
The BoomVane
the current while the boom, suspended in a curve between
the vane connector plate and the shore-side recovery point
downstream, is set at approximately 10 –
(Regardless of boom type, the boom-to-current angle is
limited if the oil is to be prevented from diving under the
boom.) The width or “swath” of the system is controlled by
a number of variables, the length and angle of the mooring
line and the length of the oil boom are two. Water velocity,
type and state of oil are others.
A very important feature of the
rigging
arrangement
—
contributing to the exceptional
stability of the BoomVane system
— is the connector plate
arrangement. The boom is not
suspended from the vane but
connected directly to the mooring
line.
The BoomVane itself is
hooked up to the connector plate
by a bridle, thereby allowed to “fly
free” like a kite.
A mooring line with a break load of 5,000 – 6,000 kp is recommended. A lowfriction, small diameter line reduces drag — thereby allowing for a longer boom to
be deployed.
NOTE
Should the current be insufficient near the bank (<1 knot)
for system deployment — but stronger in mid-stream — a
strap can be inserted between the connector plate and vane
bridle block to allow the BoomVane to “reach” the midstream flow without being held back by the boom.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
LAKES AND SLOUGHS
Action
Predict locations where oil will contact shore.
Procedure

Determine wind speed and direction and through a visual assessment,
identify the direction the spilled product is moving and the area of shoreline
that will be affected.
NOTE
To reduce the need for shoreline clean-up, place booms
along shore before contact with oil is made.
Action
Ensure safety of workers.
Procedure







Identify restricted areas.
Place appropriate signage and barricades.
Provide appropriate personal protective equipment for response teams.
Provide training on use of personal protective equipment.
Ensure proper use of all equipment.
Ensure that a rescue team is on stand-by at all times.
Keep unnecessary personnel and equipment out of work areas.
Action
Contain and recover the spilled oil.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Procedure







If slick is blown onto one portion of shoreline, deploy a barrier (i.e. boom,
straw bale, filter fence, etc.) to ensure that it is contained.
Use a series of booms to hold stranded oil in place.
Consider all options for removing oil from contaminated shoreline (including
in-situ burning).
If the spilled hydrocarbon is on open water, away from the shoreline, utilize
boats, boom and skimmers to contain and recover or sweep the product to a
recovery area on shore.
Consider using in-situ burning (see Section 5).
Utilize a combination of floating “scarecrows” and other devices (i.e. gas
cannons) to keep waterfowl and other animals out of the spill site.
Pump recovered product to holding tanks for temporary storage and eventual
disposal.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
ICE-COVERED
WATERCOURSES –
CONTAINMENT &
RECOVERY
4.6
NOTE
This section describes the use of the ice slotting technique
and a technique utilizing deflection boards for recovering
oil from under solid ice cover. These techniques should be
considered when the ice is thick enough to support
equipment and personnel, and when the water beneath the
ice is deep enough. Where these situations do not exist,
other techniques (burning, booming, etc.) should be
considered.
Action
Following the site assessment, determine the ice slot location.
Procedure





The slot or series of slots should be situated to contain any product from
migrating downstream.
The slot should be angled approximately 30 degrees to the river’s edge.
The width of the slot should be approximately 1.5 times the ice thickness and
be wide enough for the skimmer (approximately 1 metre [3.25 feet]).
There should be a slight “J angle” curve at the lead end of the slot to provide
current flow towards the shoreline recovery angle.
It may be necessary to create a larger opening in the ice by breaking it with
larger equipment.
Action
Following the site and ice assessment, determine the location for the series
of deflection boards and oil recovery hole.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Procedure






The deflection boards (1¼ × 2½ m [4 ft × 8 ft] plywood or plastic — 2 or 4
centimetres [c or ¼ inch] thickness) can be either cascaded or can be
inserted in a continuous series, towards a recovery hole in the ice.
The deflection boards should be angled at approximately 15-to-30 degrees
to the river’s current.
The width of the slot in which the deflection boards are inserted should be
just slightly larger than the width of the board. The boards are then held in
place with shims. A typical chainsaw blade will cut a slot just slightly larger
than 4 centimetres (¼ inch).
If the boards are inserted in a cascade, each board should overlap the
previous one by approximately ¼ of the board length, and should be
approximately 30 to 50 centimetres (12 to 18 inches) apart.
The deflection boards should be inserted into the water to an approximate
depth of 30 centimetres (12 inches).
The recovery hole should be large enough to accommodate the skimmer
used to recover the spilled oil. The hydraulic drum skimmer works very well
in this application.
Action
Choose the appropriate equipment to create the ice slot or deflection board
slot based on the site assessment.
Procedure

Options for creating the slot include:
 chainsaws
 backhoe with a frost bucket and ice cleats
 ditch witch
 steam line
Action
Remove ice blocks from the slot, if using the ice slotting technique.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Procedure






Auger holes in the centre of each ice block.
Utilize a T-bar with chain and tractor or hand winch with frame to remove
blocks.
If possible, float blocks towards shore for removal.
Remove ice blocks from the ice surface.
If the water depth under the ice is adequate, blocks can be pushed under.
Remove slush from the open slot with a scoop shovel with holes, screen
mesh on a frame or rakes.
Action
Recover product that migrates into the ice slot or opening.
Procedure



Place a skimmer at the downstream end of the slot, close to shore.
A steamer may be useful to help keep equipment thawed.
Ensure that ice slot remains open.
Action
Remove accumulations of spilled product upstream of the ice slot, or
deflection board site.
Procedure


Locate accumulations and remove or burn.
It may be necessary to remove ice if it becomes heavily contaminated with
the spilled product.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
OIL UNDER ICE – ICE SLOTTING TECHNIQUE
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
OIL UNDER ICE – DEFLECTOR BOARD DEPLOYMENT
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
EVALUATION OF
CONTAINMENT &
RECOVERY
OPERATIONS
4.7
Action
As spill containment and recovery operations proceed, conduct routine
evaluations to ensure safe, efficient control.
Procedure









Bird-scaring devices can be obtained through the custodian of the WCSS
spill units or through Fish & Wildlife.
Ensure that a safety plan has been implemented and is effective.
Evaluate documentation to ensure that it is satisfactory.
Check to verify that appropriate contacts have been made.
Re-assess the site conditions and modify the containment and recovery plan
if required.
Continue with routine weather checks and continuously monitor wind speed
and direction.
Assess the effectiveness of resources and determine requirements for future
operations.
Collect necessary samples for analysis (i.e. water samples upstream of the
pollution source and downstream of the last containment point).
Conduct site-specific evaluations (i.e. effectiveness of recovery operations in
a watercourse):
 safety
 anchoring systems
 boom deployment
 skimmer efficiency
 pumping system
 tankage
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013





secondary containment and recovery
waste management system
resource requirements
contact updates
documentation
Action
Adjust operations based on the evaluations.
Procedure



Ensure response team is fully briefed of changes, and that they understand
their responsibilities.
Adjust the containment and recovery plan and ensure that appropriate inhouse personnel are advised, and that the lead government agency, land
owners, etc., are in agreement.
Continue with adjustments until the operation is running safely, effectively
and cost-efficiently.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
WASTE DISPOSAL
AT THE SPILL SITE
4.8
Action
Identification of wastes at the spill site.
Procedure

Common wastes at a spill site could include:
 contaminated debris and soil from crude oil and condensate spills
 contaminated debris and soil from produced water spills
 produced water
 oily rags
 contaminated fresh water from washing and flushing operations
 crude oil or condensate
 domestic garbage
 glycol
 diesel fuel or lube oil
 contaminated sorbent material
Action
Develop a strategy for minimizing the amount of waste at the spill site.
Procedure

Utilize the “Four ‘R’s” principle:
 reduce
 re-use
 recycle
 recover
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Action
Determine the proper waste storage requirements.
Procedure





Selected storage area should be large enough to accommodate anticipated
waste volumes.
Area should be identified with appropriate signage (i.e. WHMIS, TDG, etc)
and barricades.
Secondary containment is not required for temporary storage.
Lined, bermed areas may be constructed for temporary storage of
contaminated solid materials (free fluids must be removed).
Temporary storage is restricted to 180 days maximum duration. If storage is
required for longer periods, the requirements of AER Directive 55 must be
met.
Action
Determine the waste disposal options.
Procedure





Refer to the “Waste Management Table” for a list of wastes and their
required transportation, storage and disposal requirements.
The information in the table should also be used when completing AER or
TDG waste manifests.
It is the responsibility of the waste generator to select the proper waste
receiver. Once the waste has been identified, contact the nearest waste
receiver to ensure that they are approved to receive the waste.
Refer to the “Table of AER-Approved Oilfield Waste Management Facilities”.
Consider the use of the WCSS mobile air curtain incinerator to dispose of oilcontaminated debris at the spill site (see Section 2.4 of this manual for
contact information). Regulatory approval from lead government agency is
required to utilize the incinerator (Alberta Energy Regulator (“AER”) in
Alberta; Oil and Gas Commission (“OGC”) in British Columbia;
Saskatchewan Energy and Mines (“SEM”) in Saskatchewan) — see Section
2.6 in this manual for contact information.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
WASTE MANAGEMENT TABLE
WASTE NAME [AER
WASTE CODE]
WASTE CLASS
Absorbents
[OILABS]
N-DOW
N-HAZ
TDG:
– SHIPPING NAME
– PIN
– CLASS
PACKING GROUP / REQUIRED
DOCUMENT
S: None
P: N/A
T:
Drain and recovery any free liquids
P: N/A
R: Recycle Docket
S:
Covered, labelled container
D:
• Recycle via Waste Broker
• Landfill – Class II (AB)
T:
Neutralize acid, if possible. pH should be
between 6.0 and 9.9
S:
Store in appropriate lined container
D:
• Deep Well Disposal
• Disposal Well Class Ib if pH is (6.0 –
9.o) or Class Ia (higher than 12.5 or
lower than 4.5)
Re-use, neutralize pH
C: N/A
Acid Solutions
(Unneutralized)
[ACID]
DOW
S.W.
WDG
S: Corrosive Liquids, N.O.S.
P: II
P: UN1760
R: Manifest
C: 8 (9.2)
Caustic Solutions
(Unneutralized, Spent)
[CAUS]
DOW
S.W.
WDG
S: Corrosive Liquids, N.O.S.
P: I
T:
P: UN1760
R: Manifest
S:
Store in a corrosive-resistant container
(fibreglass, etc.)
D:
• re-use, neutralize pH, surface
discharge
• Disposal Well
Remove any free liquids prior to disposal.
C: 8
Contaminated Soil
(Chemicals)
[SOILCH]
DOW
S.W.
WDG
S: Solids Containing Corrosive
Liquid N.O.S.
P: I
T:
P: UN3244
R: Manifest
S:
Store on a covered, lined pad until
disposal
D:
• On-site bioremediation or
• Waste Treatment Facility
• Landfill
(Dependent on contaminant)
C: 8
Contaminated Soil
(Crude / Condensate)
[SOILCO]
DOW
S.W.
WDG
S: Solids Containing Flammable
Liquid N.O.S.
P: II
T:
Remove any free liquids prior to disposal
P: UN3175
R: Manifest
S:
Store on a covered, lined pad until
disposal
D:
• On-site bioremediation or
• Waste Treatment Facility
• Landfill
C: 9.1
Contaminated Soil
(Produced Water)
[SOILPW]
N-DOW
N-HAZ
S: None
P: N/A
T:
Remove any free liquids prior to disposal
P: N/A
R: Bill of Lading
S:
Store on a covered, lined pad until
disposal
D:
• Waste Treatment Facility
• Landfill at approved Class Ia, Ib or II
facility
Remove any free liquids prior to disposal
C: N/A
Contaminated Soil
(Refined Oils / Fuel)
[SOILRO]
DOW
S.W.
WDG
S: Solids Containing Flammable
Liquid N.O.S.
P: II
T:
P: UN3175
R: Manifest
S:
Store on a covered, lined pad until
disposal
D:
• On-site bioremediation
• Waste Treatment Facility or
• Industrial Landfill
C: 4.1
Contaminated Soil
(Sulphur)
[SOILPW]
N-DOW
S: None
P: N/A
T:
On-site treatment may include lime
addition to neutralize
P: N/A
R: N/A
S:
Store in a covered container prior to
disposal
D:
Material may be taken to an approved
Class II or higher landfill
C: N/A
Crude Oil Emulsion
[COEMUL]
DOW
S.W.
WDG
TREATMENT / STORAGE / DISPOSAL OPTION
S: Flammable Liquids N.O.S.
P: II
T:
Remove any free oil or water
P: UN1993
R: Manifest
S:
Store in a covered container prior to
disposal
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
WASTE MANAGEMENT TABLE
WASTE NAME [AER
WASTE CODE]
WASTE CLASS
Domestic Garbage
[DOMWST]
N-DOW
N-HAZ
Drums / Barrels
(Methanol, oil, etc.)
[EMTCON]
N-DOW
N-HAZ
TDG:
– SHIPPING NAME
– PIN
– CLASS
PACKING GROUP / REQUIRED
DOCUMENT
C: 3
D:
Waste Treatment Facility
S: None
P: N/A
T:
Municipal landfill
P: N/A
R: N/A
S:
Store in a designated domestic garbage
container
C: N/A
D:
Municipal landfill
S: None
P: N/A
T:
Return to vendor. Recycle. Landfill.
P: N/A
R: Bill of Lading
S:
Empty. Store covered to prevent access
to the elements.
D:
• Return to vendor
• Recycle
• Approved industrial landfill
C: N/A
Filters (Lube oil,
DRAINED)
[FILLUB]
N-DOW
N-HAZ
S: None
P: N/A
T:
Drain and crush — capture and contain
drained liquid for separate disposal
P: N/A
R: Recycle Docket
S:
Store drained filters in a covered sealed
container, away from sources of heat or
spark
D:
• Recycle via Waste Broker
• Approved industrial landfill if crushed
C: N/A
Filters (Lube oil,
UNDRAINED)
[FILLUB]
DOW
S.W.
WDG
S: Leachable Toxic Waste
P: III
T:
Drain and crush
P: NA9500
R: Recycle Docket
S:
Store filters in a covered sealed container,
away from sources of heat or spark
D:
• Recycle via Waste Broker
• Incinerate
• Approved industrial landfill
C: 9.3
Hydraulic Oil
[HYDOIL]
N-DOW
N-HAZ
S: Petroleum Oil
P: II
T:
Do not mix waste with other materials (i.e.
glycol, etc.)
P: UN1270
R: Recycle Docket
S:
Store in a covered sealed container, away
from sources of heat or spark
D:
• Return to supplier
• Recycle through Waste Broker
C: 3
Lube Oils
[LUBOIL]
DOW
S.W.
WDG
S: Leachable Toxic Waste
P: III
T:
Do not mix waste with other materials (i.e.
glycol, etc.)
P: NA9500
R: Recycle Docket
S:
Store in a covered sealed container, away
from sources of heat or spark
D:
• Return to supplier
• Recycle through Waste Broker
C: 9.3
Oily Rags
[OILRAG]
N-DOW
N-HAZ
S: None
P: N/A
T:
Remove all free liquids prior to disposal
P: N/A
R: Recycle Docket
S:
Store material in a covered, sealed
container
D:
• Recycle through Waste Broker
• Remove free liquids and landfill
None
C: N/A
Metal (scrap)
[SMETAL]
N-DOW
N-HAZ
S: None
P: N/A
T:
P: N/A
R: Bill of Lading
S:
Store away from other wastes to prevent
contamination
D:
• Recycle
S: Methanol
P: II
T:
Re-use material in other processes
P: UN1230
R: Manifest
S:
store in a covered sealed container, away
form sources of heat or spark
D:
• Re-use
• Recycle
• Disposal Well
T:
Remove all hydrocarbons
C: N/A
Methanol
[METHNL]
DOW
S.W.
WDG
C: 3.2 (6.1)
Produced Water
N-DOW
TREATMENT / STORAGE / DISPOSAL OPTION
S: None
P: N/A
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
WASTE MANAGEMENT TABLE
WASTE NAME [AER
WASTE CODE]
WASTE CLASS
N-HAZ
TDG:
– SHIPPING NAME
– PIN
– CLASS
P: N/A
PACKING GROUP / REQUIRED
DOCUMENT
R: Truck Ticket
C: N/A
Sludge (Crude Oil,
Tank Bottoms)
[SLGHYD]
DOW
S.W.
WDG
DOW
S.W.
WDG
S: Solids Containing Flammable
Liquids N.O.S.
P: II
T:
Remove and collect all free fluids prior to
disposal
P: UN3175
R: Manifest
S:
Store material in a covered container to
prevent access to the elements. Store
away from sources of spark or flame
D:
Waste Treatment Facility should recover
oil, and solids should be landfilled
S: Solids Containing Flammable
Liquids N.O.S.
P: II
T:
Remove and collect all free fluids prior to
disposal
P: UN3175
R: Manifest
S:
Store material in a covered container to
prevent access to the elements. Store
away from sources of spark or flame
D:
• Free fluids should be deep well
disposed
• Solids should be treated and then
landfilled
C: 4.1
Sludge (Flare Pit)
[SLGPIT]
DOW
S.W.
WDG
S: Solids Containing Flammable
Liquids N.O.S.
P: II
T:
Remove and collect all free fluids prior to
disposal
P: UN3175
R: Manifest
S:
Store material in a covered container to
prevent access to the elements. Store
away from sources of spark or flame
D:
• Free fluids should be deep well
disposed
• Solids should be treated and then
landfilled
C: 4.1
Spill Material
(Hydrocarbon)
[SOILCO]
DOW
S.W.
WDG
S: Solids Containing Flammable
Liquids N.O.S.
P: II
T:
Remove and collect all free fluids prior to
disposal
P: UN3175
R: Manifest
S:
Store material in a covered container to
prevent access to the elements. Store
away from sources of spark or flame
D:
• Free fluids should be deep well
disposed
• Solids should be treated and then
landfilled
C: 4.1
Spill Material (Produced
Water)
[SOILPW]
N-DOW
N-HAZ
S: None
P: N/A
T:
Remove and collect all free fluids prior to
disposal
P: N/A
R: Bill of Lading
S:
Store material in a covered container to
prevent access to the elements. Store
away from sources of spark or flame
D:
• Free fluids should be deep well
disposed
• Solids should be treated and then
landfilled
C: N/A
SSpill Material (Refined
Oil / Fuel)
[SOILRO]
DOW
S.W.
WDG
S: Solids Containing Flammable
Liquids N.O.S.
P: II
T:
Remove and collect all free fluids prior to
disposal
P: UN3175
R: Manifest
S:
Store material in a covered container to
prevent access to the elements. Store
away from sources of spark or flame
D:
• Free fluids should be deep well
disposed
• Waste Treatment Facility should
recover oil
• Solids should be landfilled
C: 4.1
Waste Water (Wash
Water)
N-DOW
N-HAZ
S:
D:
C: 4.1
Sludge (Glycol)
[SLGGLY]
TREATMENT / STORAGE / DISPOSAL OPTION
S: None
P: N/A
T:
Recover all hydrocarbons if possible
P: N/A
R: Bill of Lading
S:
Store material in an appropriate container
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
WASTE MANAGEMENT TABLE
WASTE NAME [AER
WASTE CODE]
TDG:
– SHIPPING NAME
– PIN
– CLASS
WASTE CLASS
[WSHWTR]
Wash Fluids
(Hydrocarbon)
[WSHWTR]
PACKING GROUP / REQUIRED
DOCUMENT
C: N/A
DOW
S.W.
WDG
DOW
S.W.
WDG
D:
Water may be released if it meets the
Surface Water Discharge Criteria or send
to a disposal well
S: Flammable Liquids N.O.S.
P: II
T:
Recover all hydrocarbons prior to disposal
P: UN1993
R: Manifest
S:
Store material in a covered container to
prevent access to the elements. Store
away from sources of spark or flame
D:
• Free fluids should be deep well
disposed
• Waste Treatment Facility should
recover oil
C: 3
Wash Fluids (ACID)
[WSHWTR]
TREATMENT / STORAGE / DISPOSAL OPTION
S: Corrosive Liquids N.O.S.
P: II
T:
Remove all hydrocarbons prior to
disposal. Neutralize acids
P: UN1760
R: Manifest
S:
Store material in a covered container to
prevent access to the elements. Store
away from sources of spark or flame
D:
• Free fluids should be deep well
disposed
• Waste Treatment Facility should
recover oil
C: 8
NOTE
Produced water containing H2S / iron sulphide and any
other non-DOW material is a Non-Listed waste and does not
have to be manifested or tracked as a waste. If produced
water has products in them such as heavy metals, etc. from
glycol or xylene from a completion job then it would
become a DOW because of products in the water, not
because it is produced water.
NOTE
 It

is the responsibility of the waste generator to select
the proper waste receiver. Once the waste has been
identified, contact the nearest waste receiver to ensure
that they are approved to receive the waste.
Below is a list of the AER Approved Waste Receivers
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
AER APPROVED THIRD PARTY OILFIELD WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITIES
Updated: January 10, 2013
Company
1367290 Alberta Ltd. (Rig
Rentals)
Box 1805
Whitecourt AB T7S 1P5
780-778-5455
Facility Name
Location
Application #
Approval
Amendments
Whitecourt Area (TS)
03-34-059-12 W5M
1731319
WM 145
N/A
Anterra Energy Inc.
1420, 1122 – 4th Street SW
Calgary AB T2R 1M1
403-215-3282
Suffield Area (SFW)
08-12-015-10 W4M
1695834
WM 099
B
Bredal Energy Corp.
Box 7859
Drayton Valley, AB T7A 1S9
780-580-1000
Bredal Medicine Hat (SFW)
11-08-011-04 W4M
1583526
WM 071
A
Brian's Oilfield Rentals
(538080 Alberta Corporation)
Box 1788
Fairview, AB T0H 1L0
780-835-5362
Fairview Area (TS)
NE 1/4-36-081-04 W6M
1327402
WM 081
A
CNRL Elkpoint (WPF)
14-28-055-06 W4M
1741887
WM 034
F
CNRL Frog Lake (WPF, TS)
SE1/4-32-055-03 W4M
1488757
WM 058
C
CNRL Wild River (SFW)
03-03-057-23 W5M
1722946
WM 129
A
New Sereptra (WPF, CT)
06-11-050-22 W4M
1648941
WM 023
G
Joarcam (SFW)
14-10-050-22 W4M
1653044
WM 115
A
Central Disposal Inc.
Box 058
Eckville, AB T0M 0X0
403-746-3130
Eckville (SFW)
02-29-039-03 W5M
1645969
WM 135
N/A
City of Medicine Hat
Environmental Utilities
717 - 16 Street SW
Medicine Hat, AB T1A 4X3
403-529-8176
Medicine Hat (WPF, TS)
SW1/4-03-013-05W5M
1458083
WM 062
A
Canadian Natural Resources
Limited
2500, 855-2 Street SW
Calgary, AB T2P 4J8
403-517-6700
Cancen Oil Processors Inc.
11464 - 149 Street
Edmonton, AB T5M 1W7
780-452-7205
AER APPROVED THIRD PARTY OILFIELD WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITIES
Updated: January 10, 2013
Edson Anchors
P.O. Box 5237
Edson AB T7E 1T4
780-723-3113
Four Winds Energy Services
Ltd.
Edson/Wolf Lake (TS)
SW-03-054-17 W5M
1620768
WM 120
A
Gordondale (WPF)
16-12-079-11 W6M
1728570
WM 133
B
Edson (WPF)
08-23-053-17 W5M
1673455
WM 123
B
Claresholm (WPF, CT)
11-30-012-25 W4M
1712782
WM113
E
Minnow (WPF, CT)
01-19-057-05 W6M
1712778
WM 074
L
Paddle River (WPF, CT)
16-31-056-08 W5M
1712774
WM 060
G
Rycroft (WPF, CT)
08-18-078-05 W6M
1712776
WM 116
C
Medicine River Eckville (WPF, CT)
01-29-039-03 W5M
1440835
WM 020
G
Eckville Area (SFW)
14-28-039-03 W5M
1423739
WM 085
A
Newalta Brooks (WPF, CT, WT)
01-25-018-14 W4M
1685962
WM 013
M
Newalta Clairmont (SFW) Newalta
16-35-072-06 W6M
1672650
WM 065
C
Drayton Valley (SFW) Newalta
08-23-048-08 W5M
1373492
WM 043
D
Drayton Valley (WPF, CT,
WT)
12-28-048-07 W5M
1677658
WM 010
H
Newalta Drumheller Area (WPF,
WT)
13-09-027-20 W4M
1660930
WM 088
B
Newalta Eckville (SFW)
01-30-039-03 W5M
1373615
WM 069
A
Newalta Eckville (WPF, CT, WT)
11-21-039-03 W5M
1648982
WM 003
E
Newalta Elk Point (WPF, WT)
03-15-055-06 W4M
1661783
WM 042
M
Newalta Grande Prairie (WPF, WT)
06-02-071-06 W6M
1724086
WM 017
I
P.O. Box 28, 9909 - 102 Street
Grande Prairie AB T8V 2V4
780-538-3977
Gibson Energy ULC
1700, 440 - 2 Avenue SW
Calgary AB T2P 5E9
403-206-4000
Medicine River Oil Recyclers
Ltd.
P.O. Box 58
Eckville, AB T0M 0X0
403-746-3130
Newalta Corporation
211 - 11 Avenue SW
Calgary, AB T2R 0C6
403-266-6556
AER APPROVED THIRD PARTY OILFIELD WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITIES
Updated: January 10, 2013
Newalta Corporation
211 - 11 Avenue SW
Newalta Green Court (SFW, CT)
12-29-058-09 W5M
1509808
WM 106
A
Newalta Gordondale (WPF, CT,
WT)
09-10-079-10 W6M
1662170
WM 021
M
Newalta Hays (WPF, CT, WT)
05-19-013-14 W4M
1399586
WM 025
H
Newalta Hughenden (WPF, WT)
16-33-040-07 W4M
1697840
WM 001
I
Newalta Kitscoty (WPF, WT)
14-31-051-02W4M
1681734
WM 014
E
Newalta Niton Junction (WPF, CT,
WT)
06-33-053-12 W5M
1692055
WM 024
J
Newalta Red Earth (WPF, CT, WT)
12-13-087-09 W5M
1618552
WM 002
F
Newalta Redwater (SFW)
07-04-057-21 W4M
1708173
WM 064
B
Newalta Seal (WPF)
11-07-082-15 W5M
1731668
WM 119
C
Newalta Stauffer (WPF, WT, CT)
16-11-037-05 W5M
1731228
WM 012
L
Newalta Stettler (WPF, CT, WT)
16-18-038-20 W4M
1655200
WM 018
L
Newalta Taber (WPF, CT, WT)
03-04-009-16 W4M
1695230
WM 022
H
Newalta Valleyview (WPF, WT, CT) 04-21-069-22 W5M
1398858
WM 047
G
Newalta Zama (SFW)
08-21-116-06 W6M
1677731
WM 063
B
Newalta Zama (WPF, CT, WT)
SE-13-116-06 W6M
1743758
WM 011
I
Northwest Sanitation
Box 1226
Whitecourt, AB T7S 1P1
780-778-4888
Whitecourt Area (TS)
W1/2-25-059-12 W5M
N/A
WM 080
A
Oil Boss Rentals Ltd.
PO Box 2084
Rocky Mountain House, AB
T4T 1B5
403-844-3031
Rocky Mountain House (TS)
SE 01-039-07 W5M
1686261
WM 140
N/A
NW1/4-12-048-4 W5M
N/A
WM 051
C
Calgary, AB T2R 0C6
403-266-6556
RemedX Remediation Services
Inc.
RemedX Breton (BF)
305, 1550 - 5 Street SW
Calgary, AB T2R 1K3
(403) 209-0004
AER APPROVED THIRD PARTY OILFIELD WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITIES
Updated: January 10, 2013
Secure Energy Services Ltd
Bow Valley Square 2
1900, 205 - 5 Avenue SW
Calgary, AB T2P 2V7
403-984-6100
Brazeau (WPF, CT)
1/4-12-047-11W5M
1733418
WM 132
C
Drayton Valley (WPF, CT)
SW-05-049-06 W5M
1702891
WM 138
A
Emerson (WPF)
05-09-073-07 W6M
1733569
WM 131
C
Fox Creek (WPF, CT)
12-36-062-20 W5M
1731834
WM 126
D
Judy Creek (WPF, CT)
01-03-064-10 W5M
1729187
WM 147
N/A
La Glace (WPF, CT, WT)
NE-07-073-08 W6M
1736213
WM 117
D
Nose Hill (WPF, CT)
11-21-055-20 W5M
1733422
WM 130
C C
Obed (WPF, CT)
16-26-052-23 W5M
1723997
WM 128
N/A
Rocky Moutian House (WPF, CT)
03-04-040-08 W5M
1729204
WM 146
E
South Grande Prairie (SFW, CT)
06-036-068-06 W6M
1731702
WM 122
A
Wild River (SFW)
10-03-057-23 W5M
1744463
WM 143
Calmar Area (SFW)
12-28-049-26 W4M
1691697
WM 077
A
Brooks (WPF, WT)
SE ¼-09-019-14 W4M
1512002
WM 110
A
Tero Oilfield Services Ltd.
Box 28
Wardlow, AB T0J 3M0
403-566-3985
Cessford Area (SFW)
11-32-024-12 W4M
1316973
WM 079
A
Tervita Corporation
1800, 140 - 10 Avenue SE
Calgary, AB T2G 0R1
403-233-7565
Tervita Big Valley (WPF, CT)
10-36-035-20 W4M
1724054
WM 005
J
Tervita Brooks (WPF, CT)
12-16-018-13 W4M
1747990
WM 097
F
Tervita Buck Creek (WPF, CT)
12-05-047-06 W5M
1743124
WM 127
D
Tervita Coronation (WPF, CT)
12-30-034-09 W4M
1735668
WM 004
H
Tervita Drayton Valley/Brazeau
(WPF, CT)
11-03-047-11 W5M
1723988
WM 048
G
Seller's Oilfield Services Ltd.
Box 5330
Devon, AB T9G 1Y1
780-985-2243
Smithbrook Waste
Management
Systems Inc.
P.O. Box 686
Brooks AB T1R 1B6
403-362-4905
AER APPROVED THIRD PARTY OILFIELD WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITIES
Updated: January 10, 2013
Tervita Corporation
1800, 140 - 10 Avenue SE
Calgary, AB T2G 0R1
403-233-7565
Viro Energy Services Ltd.
Box 1887
Whitecourt AB T7S 1P6
780-778-6045
1-877-778-6045
Tervita Fox Creek (WPF, CT)
03-29-062-20 W5M
1724063
WM 040
K
Tervita High Prairie (WPF, CT)
SE 1/4-14-073-17 W5M
1737087
WM 112
D
Tervita Judy Creek (WPF CT)
04-05-063-11 W5M
1737088
WM 009
J
Tervita LaGlace (WPF, CT)
12-08-073-08 W6M
1735343
WM 027
N
Tervita Lindbergh (WPF, SFC)
05-26-056-05 W4M
1722253
WM 061
K
Tervita Mitsue (WPF, CT)
04-29-072-04 W5M
1724021
WM 007
F
Tervita Moose Creek (SFW)
15-08-053-16 W5M
1724025
WM 141
A
Tervita Peace River (WPF, CT)
NW 1/4-24-085-19 W5M 1736750
WM 104
F
Tervita Rainbow Lake (WPF, CT)
16-32-110-05 W6M
1738569
WM 057
J
Tervita South Grande Prairie (WPF) 15-13-069-06 W6M
1724028
WM 102
E
Tervita Spirit River (WPF, CT)
NW-31-077-05 W6M
1738567
WM 098
E
Terivta Standard (WPF)
NE 1/4-03-025-22 W4M
1707747
WM 052
J
Tervita Stanmore (SFW)
05-23-030-11W4M
1724078
WM 107
A
Tervita Valleyview (WPF, CT)
09-16-069-22 W5M
1737091
WM 006
E
Tervita West Edson (WPF, CT)
07-18-053-18 W5M
1724041
WM 078
D
Tervita Wolf Lake (WPF)
09-01-048-14 W5M
1739790
WM 056
G
Whitecourt (WT)
3747 – 39 Street
Whitecourt
1503439
WM 114
N/A
SFW = Surface Facilities associated with a disposal well (class 1b or 1a): Receiving system for oilfield
waste prior to deep well injection.
SFC = Surface Facilities associated with a cavern: Receiving system that enables slurrying of oilfield
waste into a cavern.
LF = Landfill (class 1a, 1b, II or III): Final disposal location for solid oilfield waste that involves the
disposition of waste material into a cell and then capping the cell upon closure
WPF = Waste Processing Facility: Normally tanks used for purposes such as neutralization of materials,
solids processing and hydrocarbon extraction. Facility may also include deep well injection of fluids
and cavern disposal.
BF = Biodegradation Facility: Enables the removal of hydrocarbon contamination from soil by
optimizing environmental conditions for microbial activity.
TS = Transfer Station: Provides short term storage for 3rd party oilfield waste and, if approved, non-oilfield
waste which is later transferred to an appropriate facility for processing.
CT = Custom Treater: Separates oil/water emulsions received directly from well licensees, and treats the oil
to meet pipeline specifications. Facility may also include deep well injection of fluids.
WT = Waste Transfer Area: Provides short term storage for 3rd party oilfield waste and, if approved,
non-oilfield waste which is later transferred to an appropriate facility for processing located on an
oilfield waste management facility.
 Information
NOTE
provided above reflects that found in the most recent approvals and
approval amendments. Some services may no longer be available, and construction
of certain facilities may not be complete. Oilfiled waste generators are encouraged to
contact the waste company to confirm the services offered by a facility of interest.
Action
Consider the use of the mobile air curtain incinerator to dispose of oil
contaminated debris at the spill site.
Procedure

WCSS “Mobile Air Curtain Incinerator” is in Spruce Grove, AB and available
through:
All Terrain Industries
Phone:
(780) 960-2004
Mobile:
(780) 778-0433
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013



Regulatory approval from the lead government agency is required to utilize
the incinerator (i.e. AER in Alberta; OGC in British Columbia; and SEM in
Saskatchewan).
This unit is diesel driven.
Water is required to cool the tank. The unit is capable of generating
approximately 16 m3 of hot water per hour at an average temperature of 82
°
C (180 °F).
Action
 Ensure waste manifesting requirements are met.
Procedure






The requirements for waste manifesting are dependent on the TDGR
classifications of the waste material. The TDGR classifications are included
in the “Waste Management Table”. If a waste is TDG regulated, the TDG
shipping name must be used on the TDGR or AER manifest, the common
AER is not sufficient.
If a waste is TDG regulated, it must be manifested. When the waste volume
is less than 500 kg or 500 L, the company may use the CAPP Equivalency to
Safety Permit.
If a waste is TDG regulated, it must be classified as the following:
 Dangerous Oilfield Waste (“DOW”) in Alberta
 Special Waste (“S.W.”) in British Columbia, or
 Waste Dangerous Goods (“WDG”) in Saskatchewan.
Each province has agreed to maintain equivalency between the federal TDG
regulations and those enforced at the provincial level; therefore, a hazardous
waste by federal standards is a DOW in Alberta, a S.W. in British Columbia,
and a WDG in Saskatchewan.
TDGR-regulated wastes that are to cross provincial or federal borders for
treatment and disposal must be shipped using a federal TDG Manifest.
All copies of the manifests for wastes leaving the location should be stored in
one file to ensure that all waste disposal data is collected.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Action
Ensure waste tracking requirements are met.
Procedure








In Alberta, the AER requires that all DOW and certain non-DOW be tracked
from “cradle-to-the-grave”. This requirement applies to wastes created as a
result of a spill, leak or accident.
At present, the other provinces do not require a waste tracking system;
however, a tracking system will provide a record of due diligence for all
regulatory agencies.
At the spill site, all shipments of waste that leave the site should be
accompanied by the waste manifest, a recycle docket or some form of truck
ticket, indicating at least the following information:
 the generator location (point of disposition)
 transporter name
 an estimate of the waste volume, and
 a record of receipt from the waste receiver.
The manifest system provides a complete record of waste movement, from
the site to its point of disposal.
Alternatively, a Waste Tracking Worksheet may be completed for all waste
shipments. This worksheet provides spaces for recording the particulars of
waste transport and disposal.
All records of waste disposal must be given to the operator (generator of the
waste). This includes all records of waste disposal. The operator is
responsible for tracking these waste details and reporting them to the
government.
In Alberta, all waste disposal of DOW must be tracked. This is typically
recorded using a manifest. Wastes that are non-DOW (i.e. not TDG
regulated) should be transported and disposed using a manifest as well,
although this is not a requirement. An entry into the Waste Tracking
Worksheet would provide a record of waste disposal.
The AER, in Directive 58, provides a list of wastes that may or may not be
DOW that are required to be tracked.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
MANIFEST
NUMBER
NOTE
CLASS
Company:
WASTE NAME
WASTE
CODE
VOLUME
(UNITS)
TRANSPORTER
Location:
RECEIVER
HANDLING
CODE
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
 A book of Alberta Oilfield Waste Manifest Forms can be purchased from AER.
SHIPPING
DATE
WASTE TRACKING WORKSHEET
OIL SPILL
CONTINGENCY
MANUAL
SECTION
5
WILDLIFE RECOVERY
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
WILDLIFE RECOVERY
5.1
Action

Consult with Canadian Wildlife Service and/or Fish and Wildlife authorities to
obtain approval prior to implementing a bird deterrent or rescue program
Procedure



Contact CWS for all migratory bird species.
Alberta: John Dunlop, Acting Permits Officer
o
Prairie and Northern Region, Saskatoon
o
306-975-4090

British Columbia:
o
Contact local Fish & Wildlife office (See Appendix A)

Saskatchewan: John Dunlop, Acting Permits Officer
o
Prairie and Northern Region, Saskatoon
o
306-975-4090
Contact Fish & Wildlife local offices for all species of animals and birds. (See
appendix A for directory of offices.) If uncertain as to migratory status, contact
either provincial or federal authorities.
Action

Prevent birds and wildlife from entering spill site.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Procedure

Dispatch company and/or WCSS wildlife response units to the appropriate staging
areas.
Consider supplementing the wildlife response unit with equipment from the local
Area Oil Spill Cooperative and/or regional equipment (i.e. OSCAR units, boats).
Ensure the Canadian Wildlife Service and local Fish & Wildlife office is consulted
with prior to any hazing operations.
See Appendix B for various deterrent methods. Note: options may not be limited to
those listed.
Note wildlife (including birds) will become habituated to most deterrent techniques.
Onset of habituation can be very rapid, from several minutes to several days.




Action

Notify government emergency response in the event of an oil spill affecting
wildlife.
Procedure





Call Environmental Protection Emergency Response
Alberta: 1-800-222-6514
British Columbia: 1-800-663-3456
Saskatchewan: 1-800-667-7525
Northwest Territories & Nunavut: 1-867-920-8130
Action

Assuming appropriate permission and direction is obtained, prepare for
capture and containment of oiled wildlife.
Procedure


Ensure safety and preparedness of workers prior to handling wildlife.
Provide access to personal protective equipment (PPE) for all workers.
o
Eye goggles.
o
Non-skid boots or shoes.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Long sleeved shirt or jacket. Best choice is oil resistant rain gear or
protective clothing such as TyvekTM.
o
Gloves must protect handler from the contaminant as well as from
injury.
o
The following is recommended:
- Leather and/or neoprene gloves for the handling of raptors, small
mammals, or birds with long beaks such as loons, herons,
grebes, and pelicans. It may be possible to put neoprene or
nitrile gloves over leather gloves in some cases. Care must be
taken to avoid being punctured by a talon or tooth.
- Disposable latex or rubber glove under nitrile or neoprene
gloves, for handling ducks, geese, and small shorebirds.
- Respirators may be necessary when working around some
contaminants.
- Earplugs may be necessary when working around heavy
equipment.
- Personal flotation devices may be necessary when working
around water.
All personnel must have current tetanus shots.
Keep food, drink, and smoking areas separate from wildlife.
Immuno-compromised or pregnant personnel must not handle oiled wildlife.
Wash hands and face with soap and water immediately after handling oiled
wildlife.
o





Prepare containers for individual birds and mammals before placing them inside.
 Birds: Cardboard boxes are best for holding and transport of all bird species.
(Figure 1)
 Mammals: Cardboard boxes may be adequate for holding and transport of small
mammals, particularly if they are oiled and weak. Place a towel inside the box for
warmth and privacy and to reduce likelihood of escape. Vigorous and/or larger
mammals may be able to chew or claw their way out of a box. Alternate
containers include plastic pet carriers (Figure 2) or plastic storage containers
(e.g. Rubbermaid storage bin). If using storage bins, it will be necessary to punch
air holes in the sides and/or lids. Lids must close securely or be taped shut.
 Line the bottom of boxes and kennels with clean rags, towels, or blankets. As a
last resort, use multiple layers of paper towels. This lining is essential to provide
traction, warmth, and absorption of blood, feces, and contaminants.
 Punch ventilation holes that are large enough to allow air circulation but will not
allow heads or long beaks to stick out.
 Close tops of boxes with duct tape to prevent escape.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013

Figure 1: Prepared cardboard box
Figure 2: Pet kennel
Action

Capture oiled birds and/or mammals. Avoid excessive handling.
Procedure
Birds


Approach from the side or behind if possible. (Note: Some birds will circle so they
are always facing the threat. In such cases, capture can proceed regardless of
approach as long as the handler remains aware of where the head and feet are.)
Drop a towel, light sheet, or blanket completely over the bird. (Figure 3a and 3b.)
3a: Drop towel onto bird
3b: Cover and wrap bird
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013









For highly mobile birds, a fish net may be required to immobilize and capture. If
this is necessary, once caught in the net, cover the bird with the towel and press
down gently on its body as the net is slowly lifted. (Figure 4) Note: net may
become tangled around wings and/or legs; care must be taken to avoid injury!
Control wings by keeping them tight against the bird’s body while encased in the
towel and tucked under your arm. (Figure 5.)
Control feet:
o
Birds of prey: interlock fingers between legs and above feet, taking care to
avoid contact with talons. (Figure 6.)
o
Waterfowl: Keep legs tucked under the body wrapped in the towel.
Keep bird’s head under the towel but allow sufficient flow of air for breathing.
Hold the bird at hip-level and upright, away from the face.
Do not hold or wrap birds too tightly. Constriction of the chest causes suffocation
as it prevents expansion of the keel and lungs.
Do not put any food or water in the box.
Lower wrapped bird into box, placing gentle pressure on bird’s back for restraint.
As the box is closed, lift and remove capture towel and remove completely.
(Figure 7) Note: leaving capture towels inside the box can cause injury,
overheating, and suffocation.
If encountering difficulties, or for species-specific tips on capture methods, call
the Alberta Institute for Wildlife Conservation at 403-946-2361.
Figure 4a: Using a fish net to capture active birds
Figure 4b: Removing bird from net
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Figure 5: Correct restraint of waterfowl
Figure 6: Correct restraint of raptor feet
Safety note: The handler in these illustrations
is not wearing appropriate safety gear for the
capture of oiled wildlife. The photos are for
illustration purposes. Please ensure proper
PPE as needed.
Figure 7: Remove capture towel from box, applying light pressure on bird’s back to keep it
immobilized

Mammals




(Note: Due to large variation in the handling of different mammal species, it may
be necessary to consult with a wildlife center on the phone during capture
attempt.)
Approach from the side or behind if possible. (Note: some mammals will circle so
they are always facing a threat. In such cases, rescue can proceed regardless.)
Drop a towel, light sheet, or blanket completely over the animal and immediately
press down gently on its back while wrapping the towel around the body.
For highly mobile mammals, a fish net may be required in order to immobilize
and capture. If this is necessary, once caught in the net, cover the animal with
the towel and press down gently on its body as the net is slowly lifted away.
Control legs, feet, and teeth by keeping the animal tucked within the towel.
Immediately place entire ‘bundle’ inside container or hold snugly against
handler’s body while moving to container. Keep the animal’s eyes covered at all
times but be careful not to rub or irritate them, particularly if there is contaminant
around the head and eyes.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013



Remove the capture towel as the mammal is lowered into the box. However, if
the animal is lethargic or comfortably ‘snuggled’ in the towel, it can be left inside
the box for extra security and warmth. (Note: this is opposite of bird protocol.)
If encountering difficulties, or for species-specific tips on capture methods, call
403-946-2361.
Clean and treat cuts, scratches, or bites immediately.
Action

Consider first aid for affected animals.
Procedure

In most cases, first aid is not recommended. Administer first aid to affected
animals only if all the following conditions are met.
o
Transfer to qualified facility will not occur within two to four hours of
capture, and
o
The animal’s condition is deemed to be an ‘emergency’, and
o
Handler can consult with trauma specialist during administration of first
aid. (Call 403-946-2361.)
NOTE
Without proper training, providing first aid or treatment can
cause death to the animal.
 Do not attempt to wash oiled wildlife.
Procedure

Collect documentation for each animal.
 Attach information sheet directly to each box. (If paper is not available, write
directly on the box with permanent marker.) Information should include the
following.
o
Date and time of capture.
o
Date of spill, if known.
o
Name of handler(s).
o
Contact info of handler(s).
o
Location animal was found. Name of location as well as details of site.
(Example: Ghost Lake, grounded on-shore, gravel beach at campsite.)
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
o
o
o
MSDS for contaminant, if available. If MSDS is not available, write
known contaminants directly on the document or on the box.
Name of species, if known. Description of species, if name not known.
(Example: duck, hawk, fawn, etc.)
Description of any first aid, food, or water given to the animal.
Action

Hold animals for transportation.
Procedure
 Keep oiled wildlife contained in a warm, dark, well-ventilated, and quiet place
until transportation commences.
 Do not stack boxes on top of one another.
 Allow at least 4 cm. of space between boxes.
 Avoid keeping predator and prey species near each other.
 Contact wildlife trauma facility to arrange transfer of animals.
Action

Transport oiled wildlife to treatment facility.
Procedure
 Arrange boxes and/or containers in vehicle as follows.
o
Keep box tops clear; do not stack on top of one another.
o
Allow at least 4 cm. of space between them and/or adjacent walls to
ensure adequate air flow.
o
Prevent boxes from shifting during transport.
o
Keep out of direct sunlight.
o
Transport in an enclosed vehicle, free of drafts, with adequate
ventilation, and temperature control. Do not transport in an open truckbed.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
o
o
o
o
o
NOTE
Provide a room temperature of 21 - 24 degrees Celsius for dry birds.
Provide a room temperature of 26 - 27 degrees Celsius for wet birds.
Provide a room temperature of 21 - 23 degrees Celsius for dry
mammals.
Provide a room temperature of 25 - 27 degrees Celsius for wet
mammals.
Do not play stereo or radio during transport. Keep conversation to a
minimum.
Ideal transport conditions for oiled wildlife can cause discomfort to the
driver(s) of the vehicle. Drivers should dress in layers to avoid overheating
and must be aware of the potential effects of fumes on their own safety.
Action

Contact wildlife treatment facilities for transport arrangements, assistance,
or advice.
Procedure
 For spills affecting more than ten animals consider:
o
Focus Wildlife: serving western Canada 778-294-1501
o
Tri-State Bird Rescue & Research 302-737-7241
 For spills affecting less than ten animals; we recommend calling:
o Calgary Area: Alberta Institute for Wildlife Conservation 403-9462361
o Edmonton Area: Wildlife Rehabilitation Society of Edmonton 780-9144118
o Red Deer Area: Medicine River Wildlife Center 403-728-3467
o British Columbia: Wildlife Rehabilitation Network of B.C.
www.wrnbc.org/
o Omineca & Peace:
o Prince George 250-963-3373
o Dawson Creek 250-843-7681
Action

Consult with Fish and Wildlife and obtain prior approval prior to disposing of
any wildlife mortalities.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Procedure
 Bag and label each carcass individually.
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
Date and time animal was found.
Name of finder.
Contact info of finder.
Location animal was found. Name of location as well as details of site.
(Example: Copper Creek, pulled from water at outflow pipe.)
MSDS for contaminant, if available. If MSDS is not available, write
known contaminants directly on the document or on the bag.
Name of species, if known. Description of species, if name not known.
(Example: duck, hawk, fawn, etc.)
Transfer body to Fish and Wildlife officer, OR
If permission is given, dispose of carcasses in Hazardous Materials
waste disposal area.
Action

Record all actions taken in the capture, handling, possession, transport, and
disposal of wildlife.
Procedure
 It is illegal to harm, possess, or interfere with migratory birds without a permit.
For all other wildlife, regulations vary depending on classification and
status. Therefore, it is recommended that records are made and stored for
later reference. All of the following documents could prove useful (in
exonerating or prosecuting), at a later date.
o
Photos of the following
- Spill site
- Finders, handlers, and witnesses
- Animals rescued
- Animals found dead
- Spill control measures
- Hazing operation
o
Hand drawn maps of site, showing location of identifiable structures
and geography in relation to location of animals.
o
Procedures utilized to prevent wildlife from entering the contaminated
area.
o
List of individuals who assisted in rescue.
o
Number and list of affected animals, both live and dead.
o
List of agencies contacted and who contacted them at what time.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
o
Chain of custody record for each animal. (Table 1) This document
tracks possession of wildlife from point of rescue to final disposition.
The layout of the document is not important. The information can be
hand-written or prepared on a company form.
Chain of Custody
Date
Time
Location found
Case number/Animal number/Identifying marks
Transfer 1
From: (print name, agency, location, date, time)
Signature
To: (print name, agency)
Signature
Transfer 2
From: (print name, agency, location, date, time)
Signature
To: (print name, agency)
Signature
Transfer 3 etc.
Additional comments:
Table 1: Sample of a Chain of Custody document
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Appendix A: Field Offices, Fish and Wildlife
Fish and Wildlife Offices in Alberta
Athabasca District Office: 780-675-2419
Barrhead District Office: 780-674-8236
Blairmore District Office: 403-562-3289
Bonnyville District Office: 780-826-3142
Brooks District Office: 403-362-1232
Calgary (Prairies) District Office: 403-297-6423
Calgary (Southern Rockies) District Office: 403-297-8800
Camrose District Office: 780-679-1225
Canmore District Office: 403-678-2373
Cardston District Office: 403-653-5158
Claresholm District Office: 403-625-1450
Cochrane District Office: 403-932-2388
Cold Lake District Office: 780-594-7876
Coronation District Office: 403-578-3223
Drayton Valley District Office: 780-542-6616
Drumheller Office: 403-823-1670
Edmonton Office: 780-427-3574
Edson Office: 780-723-8244
Evansburg Office: 780-727-3635
Fairview Office: 780-835-2737
Foremost Office: 403-867-3826
Fort Chipewyan Office: 780-697-3511 (not always there - call Edmonton office)
Fort McMurray Office: 780-743-7200
Fort Vermilion Office: 780-927-4488
Fox Creek Office: 780-622-3421
Grande Cache Office: 780-827-3356
Grande Prairie Office: 780-538-5265
Hanna Office: 403-854-5540
High Level Office: 780-926-2238
High Prairie Office: 780-523-6521
High River Office: 403-652-8330
Hinton Office: 780-865-8264
Lac La Biche Office: 780-623-5247
Lethbridge Office: 403-381-5266
Lloydminster Office: 780-871-6495
Manning Office: 780-836-3065
Medicine Hat Office: 403-529-3680
Nordegg Office: 403-721-3965
Olds Office: 403-556-4215
Oyen Office: 403-664-3614
Peace River District Office: 780-624-6405
Peace River Area Office: 780-624-6405
Pincher Creek Office: 403-627-1116
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Ponoka Office: 403-783-7093
Provost Office: 780-753-2433
Red Deer Office: 403-340-5142
Red Earth Creek Office: 780-649-3853
Rocky Mountain House Office: 403-845-8230
Slave Lake Office: 780-849-7123
Smoky Lake Office: 780-656-3556
Spirit River Office: 780-864-4101
Stony Plain/Spruce Grove Office: 780-960-8190
St. Paul Office: 780-645-6313
Stettler Office: 403-742-7510
Strathmore Office: 403-934-3422
Sundre Office: 403-638-3805
Swan Hills Office: 780-333-2229
Valleyview Office: 780-524-3605
Vegreville Office: 780-632-5410
Vermilion Office: 780-853-8137
Vulcan Office: 403-485-6971
Wetaskiwin Office: 780-361-1250
Whitecourt Office: 780-778-7112
Fish & Wildlife Offices in Saskatchewan: Note all area codes are 306
Assiniboia: 642-7242
Battlefords; 386-2212
Beauval: 288-4710
Big River: 469-2520
Blackstrap/Dundurn: 492-5675
Buffalo Narrows: 235-1740
Candle Lake: 929-8400
Chitek Lake: 984-2343
Christopher Lake: 982-6250
Creighton: 688-8812
Cumberland House: 888-5810
Cypress Hills: 662-5435
Dorintosh: 236-7680
Duck Mountain: 542-5500
Estevan: 637-4600
Fort Qu'Appelle: 332-3215
Greenwater Lake: 278-3515
Hudson Bay: 865-4400
Humboldt: 682-6726
Kindersley: 463-5458
LaRonge: 425-4234
Leader: 628-3100
Lloydminster: 825-6430
Loon Lake: 837-2410
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Maple Creek: 662-5434
Meadow Lake: 236-7557
Melfort: 752-6214
Melville: 728-7480
Moose Jaw: 694-3659
Moose Mountain: 577-2600
Moosomin: 435-4545
Nipawin: 862-1790
North Battleford: 446-7416
Outlook: 867-5560
Pelican Narrows: 632-5510
Pierceland: 839-6250
Pike Lake: 933-6966
Pinehouse: 884-2060
Porcupine Plain: 278-3540
Preeceville: 547-5660
Prince Albert: 953-2322
Regina: 787-2080
Rowan's Ravine: 725-5200
Saskatoon: 933-6240
Shaunavon: 297-5433
Southend: 758-6255
Spiritwood: 883-8501
Stony Rapids: 439-2062
Swift Current: 778-8205
Wadena: 338-6254
Weyburn: 848-2344
Yorkton: 786-1463
Fish & Wildlife Offices in Northern BC
Prince George, Regional Headquarters and Field Office: (250) 565-6140
Atlin: (250) 651-7501
Burns Lake: (250) 692-7777
Chetwynd: (250) 788-3611
Dawson Creek: (250) 784-2304
Dease Lake: (250) 771-3566
Fort Nelson: (250) 787-3225
Ft. St. John: (250) 787-3225
Mackenzie: (250) 997-6555
Queen Charlotte City: (250) 559-8431
Smithers: (250) 847-7266
Terrace: (250) 638-6530
Vanderhoof: (250) 567-6304
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Appendix B: Sample Deterrent Techniques
Gas-Operated Exploders (Propane Combustion Cannon)
Detonators consist of a bottled gas supply, separate pressure and combustion
chambers, an igniting mechanism and a barrel to aim and magnify the blast. Gasoperated exploders produce a loud directional shotgun-like noise by slowly filling a
bellows with propane gas from a tank, then rapidly transferring this gas to a firing
chamber and igniting it with a spark. Blasts are emitted at adjustable time intervals. The
interval between detonations can be varied from less than one minute to 30 minutes.
Some gas operated exploders can be set to fire at random intervals and rotate after
each explosion so that subsequent shots are aimed in different directions. The sound
level is approximately 120 dB. Tripods can be used to elevate the Zon Gun or the unit
can be directed into a drum to enhance the blast sound.
Note: Gas-operated exploders can be extremely dangerous and should be used only by
trained personnel.
Advantages
• Deployable in onshore and offshore situations (when placed on anchored
rafts) especially when the oil is well confined and where birds are
particularly susceptible;
• Protective of relatively large areas (200 - 1000 m or 30 - 50 ha);
• Rapidly remobilized;
• Automatically operated and require only minimal staffing;
• Effective during both day and night;
• Especially effective in deterring dabblers and geese;
• Inexpensive to operate and require little maintenance;
• Inexpensive to purchase; and
• Widely available.
Disadvantages
• Birds rapidly habituate to the sound of the blasts (no more than two or
three days and sometimes less than a few hours for some bird species);
• Not effective in deterring most shorebird species as well as gulls, coots,
grebes and loons;
• Significantly reduced effective range and sound intensity when used in fog
and wind;
• Difficult to install and operate on an anchored raft in open water and in
bad weather; and
• Disturbing to local residents and responders.
Pyrotechnics (bangers, screamers and whistlers)
These devices frighten birds by producing a whistling noise, explosion and/or flash of
light. Types include shotgun-launched projectiles (shell crackers) and a variety of pistollaunched projectiles; typically starter pistols with 6mm (22 cal.) crimpled blank
cartridges. When using pyrotechnics, the danger of igniting spilled oil and vegetation
should always be avoided. Both shotgun- and pistol-launched devices should be fired
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
with the wind, and away from personnel. Safety goggles and ear protectors (muff or ear
plug type) are worn, and personnel using pyrotechnics are expected to be trained in
firearms safety. Shotgunlaunched projectiles include shell crackers and scare cartridges. They are fired from a
12-guage shotgun with the shell shot being replaced by a bulldog or M-80 firecracker
that explodes at 100-150 yards (91-136 m).
Single barrel shotguns that break and load at the breech are recommended. The
shotgun should be fired from the hip at a 45° angle, and shell crackers should explode
as close to the birds as possible. Because of the light charge, the shotgun has only a
slight recoil.
Note: Pyrotechnics can be extremely dangerous and should be used only by trained
personnel.
Advantages
• Effective both day and night;
• Easily directed close to water birds;
• Especially effective in deterring open-water birds;
• Relatively high radius of effectiveness (at least 200 m from the source and
up to 1 km for some bird species);
• Effective on land or in offshore situations;
• Highly effective in combination with other deterrents (motorboats, ATV,
effigies); and
• Relatively inexpensive (roughly $50 per hundred).
Disadvantages
• Short duration of effectiveness (one or two hours);
• Less effective in deterring dabbling ducks;
• Ineffective in deterring gulls and shorebirds;
• Significantly reduced effective range and sound intensity when used in
windy situations;
• Requires continuous staffing;
• Potentially hazardous to operators and bystanders if not used carefully;
• Potentially hazardous if used in areas containing volatile oil components;
and
• Disturbing to local residents and responders.
Aircraft
Aircraft, especially helicopters, are effective deterrents because of the combination of
loud noise and rapid approach from above. They are often effective for hazing birds
away from large areas. Helicopters may also be used to herd flightless (young and
moulting) birds. Aircraft are considered to be especially useful during the early stages of
cleanup and hazing operations. They are more effective if used in combination with
other devices such as shell crackers and gas-operated exploders. Because of their
manoeuvrability and noise, helicopters are probably more effective than fixed wing
aircraft. Not all bird species will take flight in response to overhead disturbances. Some
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
water birds (e.g., loons and alcids) dive rather than fly when approached by aircraft, and
others who are young or in their moulting or brood-rearing stage may be incapable of
flight. Flightless birds can be herded with a helicopter (Alaska Regional Response
Team, 1991), or ground patrols after the helicopter has departed. Helicopters have been
used successfully to drive flightless Canada geese over water, exposed tidal flats, and
dense sedge in Alaska with the helicopter remaining 10 to 20 m (33-66 ft) behind the
geese at an altitude of 1-15 m (3-49 ft). (Timm and Bromley, 1976).
Advantages
• Readily available to remote and roadless areas;
• Disperses birds in different types of habitats (marsh birds, offshore birds);
• Rapidly disperses birds while oil is still offshore;
• Requires minimal staffing; and
• Highly effective at deterring geese.
Disadvantages
• Less effective at deterring species other than geese, especially during
moult;
• Less effective for birds gathered in very attractive sites like feeding or
nesting grounds;
• Increased potential of bird-aircraft collisions during low flying activities;
• Ineffective at night;
• Reduced or limited feasibility during bad weather (especially fog);
• Time consuming for deterring birds on a large scale basis;
• Limited ability to procure helicopters, in heavy demand during an oil spill;
and
• Relatively high cost of charter aircraft.
Motorboats
Motorboats can be used to deter birds located offshore where hazing from the shoreline
with other techniques is ineffective in driving birds away. A few studies conducted
during the last 20 years have demonstrated the potential of boats as an effective
deterrent. Birds are more sensitive to boats propelled by outboard motors. A powerboat
causes virtually instantaneous flight as soon as it appears on the water, causing a
majority of birds to leave. There is some speculation that the larger the flock, the more
sensitive it is to an approach (Batten, 1977). The hazing of diving birds with boats is
generally considered slow, labour intensive, and may be ineffective. Boats may be
useful for herding flightless waterfowl away from spilled oil to boomed areas of lagoons,
or overland to inland lakes (Alaska Regional Response Team, 1991). Note: Remote
controlled boats have also been used successfully in waterfowl hazing operations.
Advantages
• Useful in deterring birds located at some distance from the shoreline;
• Rapidly implemented for deterring birds while oil is still offshore;
• Works well with most species except diving birds;
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
•
•
Covers relatively large areas; and
Requires limited staffing.
Disadvantages
• Deployment potentially hazardous during bad weather, ice conditions or
darkness;
• Limited ability to locate birds, especially in rough seas; and
• Difficult to direct dispersed birds to un-oiled waters.
All-Terrain Vehicles (ATVs)
All-Terrain Vehicles (ATVs) such as quad-runners are moderately effective for hazing
many species of waterfowl and shorebirds. Human presence reinforces the effects of
the noise and rapid movement of the vehicle. A quad-runner can also be equipped with
air horns or sirens, or used with pyrotechnics.
Advantages
• More efficient for covering larger shore areas (between 3 and 5 km
instead of 1-2 km by foot); and
• Most effective when used in combination with other methods (e.g.
noisemakers).
Disadvantages
• Limited to birds onshore;
• Limited to daylight use; and
• Potentially destructive to certain habitat types.
Electronic Sound Generators
These devices, broadcast loud, intermittent electronically synthesized sounds that are in
the audible range of birds. The units can be adjusted to the most effective range of
sound patterns for the target bird species, and sound patterns within this range can be
varied over time to decrease habituation. Sound generators can be positioned on land,
mounted on boats, or housed within a raft or buoy for effectiveness in open water and
marine situations.
Advantages
• Useful in open water environments;
• Rapidly deployed;
• Projects over large areas;
• Readily deployed on leading edge of drifting oil slick;
• Maximizes potential of dispersing birds away from contamination, when
deployed directly into oil slick;
• Reduces potential of bird habituation because buoy is moving with the
wind and current and regularly encounters new groups of birds;
• Limited habituation of birds, even when anchored, due to the diversity of
sounds produced;
• Operable and effective day and night;
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
•
•
•
•
•
•
Operable during bad weather (fog and rain);
Readily retrievable;
Easy to handle and operate by two persons;
Constructed to withstand the hazards of fire and explosion sometimes
associated with oil slicks;
Long-lasting effectiveness (>two weeks);
Low maintenance (requires four marine batteries: two in the unit and two
on full charge).
Disadvantages
• May be less efficient in areas where birds are accustomed to loud
background noises, where
• hunting pressure is low; or where birds congregate in very secure habitats;
• Batteries must be replaced or recharged after 72 hours of operation;
• Requires a boat or a helicopter to be deployed offshore;
• Regular monitoring (daily) is recommended to ensure effectiveness;
• Range of effectiveness decreases during high winds and rough seas;
• Requires monitoring, when used in oil slick, to ensure that device stays in
oil slick;
• Duration of effectiveness unknown when the buoy is used in a stationary
mode;
• Disturbing to local residents and responders;
• Expensive, more so if the costs of radio beacon transmitters and receivers
are included; and
• May not be immediately available.
Biosonics
These techniques use distress, warning, or alarm calls that are broadcast by tape
players to disperse single or closely related species from the immediate area. In
general, individuals or small flocks are less responsive than large flocks. The
effectiveness of biosonics can be increased by supplementation with pyrotechnics.
Advantages
• Effective at lower sound intensities; and
• Slower habituation.
Disadvantages
• Highly species specific;
• May attract rather than deter birds, depending on life stage; and
• May attract predators and scavengers.
Underwater Acoustics
These include devices that put sound into water, such as sweep frequencies, killer
whale vocalizations, and underwater percussion devices. These devices have not been
studied enough to allow for guidance or to determine advantages and disadvantages
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
and, therefore, are NOT recommended for use as bird deterrents during oil spill
response.
Balloons
All-weather helium balloons are considered effective if properly maintained and
frequently refilled and repositioned. They are generally 20-30 inches (50-75 cm) in
diameter, and should not be fully inflated in order to reduce stress from wind resistance.
Balloons may be suspended from land or from a floating object in the water. They
should not be located near trees or other objects that could cause puncturing. Balloons
should be tethered on 40-75 feet (12-23 m) of 48 lb (22 kg) or stronger monofilament
line and initially spaced at least every 200 yards (183 m). Some balloons should be set
very high to deter birds from flying overhead.
Advantages
• Inexpensive; and
• Readily available.
Disadvantages
• Rapid habituation;
• Ineffective at night;
• Do not function well in winds over 10 mph; and
• Potentially subject to ultraviolet degradation.
Flags
Flags are considered an effective and inexpensive hazing device for waterfowl. They
can be constructed by mounting a three-by-two-foot (91-61 cm) sheet of black plastic to
a four-foot (1.2 m) stake. The stakes should be driven into the ground at an angle so the
flags will move in light wind. They should be erected every 100 to 200 feet (30-61 m) on
land, or on buoys over water. Mylar car dealership flags can also be effective for hazing
waterfowl. Flags can be used in conjunction with gas-operated exploders.
Advantages
• Inexpensive; and
• Readily available.
•
Disadvantages
• Rapid habituation; and
• Ineffective at night.
Human Effigies and Predator Models
Human effigies (e.g., traditional scarecrows) and raptor models may be effective if they
appear lifelike, have motion, are frequently repositioned, and are used in combination
with loud sounds or recorded distress calls. Human effigies are more effective if you
first establish the human form as being potentially detrimental (e.g., have response
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
personnel create disturbance in the area before deploying human effigies), and are
dressed similarly to personnel operating in the area.
Advantages
• Readily put in place
• Easily remobilized;
• Does not constitute an auditory disturbance near populated areas or
responders;
• Effective in good and bad (winds, rain, etc.) weather; and
• Relatively inexpensive (<$200).
Disadvantages
• Effectiveness limited to daylight, except if equipped with lights or
combined with audio
• deterrents;
• Rapid habituation by birds (a few days); and
• Small range of effectiveness (100m or 4-8 ha).
Reflectors, Mirrors, and Reflecting Tape
Reflector devices can be constructed by attaching aluminum or tinfoil pie plates to a line
suspended over land or water. These devices can be used in association with lights to
haze waterfowl. Hand-held mirrors that reflect sunlight may also be effective. Mylar
reflecting tape is another deterrent for many species of birds. This silver and red-coated
tape is generally twisted and strung between support posts. The tape reflects sunlight,
and vibrates under windy conditions producing a humming noise.
Advantages
• Inexpensive.
Disadvantages
• May attract, rather than deter, birds; and
• Ineffective at night
Lights
Strobe, barricade, search, and revolving fixed lights have been used to haze birds, and
they should be combined with other deterrent techniques such as exploders and
pyrotechnics. Although lights may be partially effective for deterring waterfowl during the
night, some bird species may be attracted to lights, especially during rain, fog, or heavy
cloud cover.
Advantages
• Inexpensive.
Disadvantages
• May attract, rather than deter, birds.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Lure Areas and Bait Stations
Birds may be lured from one area to another with the use of bait food. However, bait
stations require that large quantities of bait food be available over a period of days.
Because lure areas need to be relatively close to a spill so that the food can be
detected, this proximity may increase the oiling risk to birds attracted into the general
area. Lure areas are recommended only when, after careful evaluation, alternative
techniques would be expected to be ineffective.
Advantages
• Passive form of deterrence.
Disadvantages
• May attract birds not normally present in the area and increase potential
for oiling as birds disperse from baited site.
Dyes
The feasibility of using dyes for deterring birds from oil spills is unknown because of
data gaps including: species-specific reactions to colors, habituation potential, dye
toxicity, dye solubility in various types of oil, concentration required, and rates of dye
weathering. Therefore, use of dyes is NOT recommended as a bid deterrent during oil
spill response at this time.
Trained Falcons and Hawks
Trained falcons and hawks are sometimes used at airports to chase away birds and
disperse birds from runways. If used in a contaminated or oiled area, there is the
potential that these trained birds could themselves become oiled or contaminated, or
could potentially chase or disperse birds into contaminated areas. Using trained falcons
and hawks is NOT recommended as a bird deterrent during oil spill response.
Decoys and Visual Devices
Dead-bird decoys or bird carcasses are sometimes used to discourage birds from using
an area. However, placing dead-bird decoys or bird carcasses in a contaminated or
oiled area may attract healthy birds of prey or other mammalian predators, potentially
causing these predatory species to become contaminated or oiled. Using decoys and
carcasses is NOT recommended as a bird deterrent during oil spill response.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
CONTACT NUMBERS FOR REPORTING
ENVIRONMENTAL EMERGENCIES (24 HOURS)
Alberta ......................................................................................... 1 (800) 222-6514
British Columbia .......................................................................... 1 (800) 663-3456
British Columbia Federal ............................................................. 1 (604) 666-6100
Manitoba ..................................................................................... 1 (204) 944-4888
Northwest Territories ................................................................... 1 (867) 920-8130
Saskatchewan ............................................................................. 1 (800) 667-7525
Yukon Territories ......................................................................... 1 (867) 667-7244
CONTACT NUMBERS FOR SPECIALISTS
Ducks Unlimited .......................................................................... 1 (403) 362-4827
Wildlife Help Line (Alberta) .......................................................... 1 (888) 924-2444
Wildlife Rescue of British Columbia............................................. 1 (604) 526-7275
Wildlife Help Line (Saskatchewan) .............................................. 1 (306) 780-9273
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
OIL SPILL
CONTINGENCY
MANUAL
SECTION
6
IN-SITU BURNING GUIDELINES
In-Situ Burning
Guidelines
SAFETY
INTRODUCTION
CONSIDERATIONS
6.1
6.5
PURPOSE
SPILL SITE
ASSESSMENT
6.2
6.6
CONSIDERATIONS
FOR IN-SITU
BURNING
BURN PLAN
PREPARATION
6.3
6.7
REGULATORY
APPROVAL
POST-BURN
ACTIVITIES
6.4
6.8
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
INTRODUCTION
6.1

In-situ burning of an oil spill refers to the on-site combustion of the spilled product
in a controlled manner.
A thorough site assessment and investigation of response options is required
during the initial phase of a spill response. If in-situ burning is the best option, a
detailed burn plan will assist the response team in the implementation of the burn
in a safe, effective manner.
This document outlines the decisional framework and provides the key action items
and procedures for creating an in-situ burn plan for approval by the appropriate
regulatory agencies.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
PURPOSE
6.2

Timely decision making (within 48 hours) is essential to the success of an oil spill
burning program. The required decision making process can be facilitated through
the use of this document and the implementation of advanced planning,
communications and training.
The purpose of this guideline is to provide practical information for use by spill
responders in the planning and implementation of an in-situ oil spill burning
program by providing:
 regulatory requirements which must be considered
 positive and negative impacts of in-situ burning
 assistance to the response team during initial assessment
 safety and communications procedures to follow
 procedures for preparing a burn plan
 various ignition procedures that can be utilized
 spill control and fire prevention techniques
 post burn activities to enable proper evaluation of the burn
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
CONSIDERATIONS
FOR IN-SITU
BURNING
6.3

1
Each spill is different and numerous variables should be considered prior to the
initiation of an in-situ burn. Specialists should be utilized where possible to assist
the response team with:
 identification of hydrocarbon type and characteristics
 predict and analyse weather conditions
 identify adjacent fuel types
 evaluate topography
 identify soil structure
 identify environmental sensitivities
 identify site accessibility
 identify available resources (manpower and equipment)
IN-SITU BURN ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
Action
Consider in-situ burning of a hydrocarbon spill when:
Procedure





It is unsafe to contain and recover the product mechanically.
Burning would prevent imminent contamination of a sensitive area.
Burning would reduce the potential for soil and surface / groundwater
contamination.
Soils in the spill area are wet or frozen.
Equipment usage for mechanical clean-up would cause a greater overall negative
impact.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013

Oil on water or thin / broken ice is of an adequate thickness (>2-3 mm) and in-situ
burning is the best response.



Further mechanical clean up is not possible.
A controlled burn is possible.
Controls are in place to ensure a safe and effective burn, where the burn will be
contained to the spill site.
Regulatory approval has been given and the appropriate contacts made (refer to
Section 2.6 of this manual)

Action
Consider the following to determine if in-situ burning of a hydrocarbon spill is not
feasible.
Procedure






Land owner and regulatory approvals are not in place.
Conventional methods of spill response are possible with minimal impact on the
environment.
The oil is less than 2 mm thick.
The smoke and soot released during the burn will generate unresolvable localized
concerns relating to environmental or human health, aesthetics and safety.
Fireguards required to establish a safe burning condition may create additional
environmental damage exceeding the impact of the spill.
There is a risk that changing weather conditions could result in an uncontrolled
secondary fire.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
REGULATORY
APPROVAL
6.4

In-situ burning operations require proper regulatory authorization and notification
(may involve several regulatory agencies) prior to conducting the burn.
There are no set standards for obtaining formal government approval(s) in any of
the Western Provinces. Each spill is considered on a case by case basis.
Approvals will depend on the quality of the spill site assessment and proposed
burn plan.
Due to the physical nature of spilled hydrocarbons, the “window of opportunity” for
implementing an in-situ burn program can be very short.
Action
Obtain all necessary approvals from the appropriate government agencies and
other stakeholders affected by the proposed in-situ burn.
Procedure




Discuss the overall burn plan with the landowner and appropriate regulatory
agencies, and obtain their consent.
Contact other stakeholders around the burn area (timber operators, disposition
holders, recreation facilities, neighbours, etc.).
In high-profile areas, notify the local media and assign an individual to supply
information and answer questions.
Obtain a burning permit from the appropriate government agency (use “one
window approach” where possible)
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013

Maintain on-going communications with the lead government agency(s) and
stakeholders, and provide timely follow-up information pertaining to the success of
the burn and reclamation activities.
Procedure

Specific Provincial Government Requirements
British Columbia
Contact the local representatives of:
 BC Ministry of Environment (MOE) (for spills off lease)
 Oil and Gas Commission (OGC) (for spills on lease)
 Emergency Management BC (EMBC)
 BC MOE is responsible for spills off lease and/or there is a request for a burn
permit
 BCE will advise if there are any monitoring requirements
 local office of B.C. Forestry, Mines and Lands should be contacted
Alberta
Contact the local representatives of:
 Alberta Energy Regulator (AER)
 Alberta Environment (AENV)
o AENV will advise of any monitoring requirements
 Sustainable Resources Development (SRD) in the Green Zone for a burn
permit
Saskatchewan
Contact the local representatives of:
 Saskatchewan Energy & Resources (SER)
 issues related to in-situ burning will be referred to the air quality section of
Saskatchewan Environment and Resource Management (SERM)
 conditions regarding the burn will be issued by SERM
Manitoba
Contact the local representatives of:
 Manitoba Department of Energy & Mines (Petroleum Branch)
 requests for in-situ burning will be referred to Manitoba Environment
 Manitoba Environment will issue the permit and specify any conditions
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
SAFETY
CONSIDERATIONS
6.5

During an initial spill response, personnel will be under pressure to make decisions
based on limited information. This, coupled with the physical and chemical
hazards of hydrocarbons, may create an unsafe situation for response personnel.
Safety considerations are unique to each burn plan and every member of the spill
response team has the responsibility to ensure that their actions do not endanger
themselves, their co-workers or the public at large.
Action
Identify and continuously re-assess any hazards associated with the spilled
product, site conditions, and other factors.
Procedure





Identify hazards associated with the product by utilizing MSDS and/or other
information sources.
Check for flammable, toxic, and oxygen-deficient atmospheres and other hazards
in:
 confined spaces
 low areas
 areas downwind
 bermed areas created by snow ploughing
 or under ice and snow
Identify unstable and/or slippery surfaces.
Identify and mark overhead or underground power lines, pipelines and utilities.
Identify and mark other physical hazards, including:
 confined spaces
 thin ice
 water hazards
 traffic
 dangerous trees / snags
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013

Monitor weather conditions and forecasts for:
 Wind speed and direction
 temperature
 moisture and humidity
 potential for lightening
Action
Communicate safety concerns and worker / supervisor responsibilities to all
personnel on-site.
Procedure








Conduct regular safety meetings. Maintain complete records of attendees, meeting
topics and follow-up to items raised.
Have spill responders identify personal health problems that could be compounded
by their involvement in response work.
Ensure workers and contractors understand the hazards associated with the spill
response and are familiar with emergency response procedures and escape
routes.
Ensure workers are provided with, and knowledgeable in the use and maintenance
of, required personal protective equipment.
Ensure adequate first aid and emergency equipment is on-site.
Ensure workers are familiar with location and operation of all emergency and
safety equipment.
Maintain a head count of all personnel on-site.
Communicate the requirement to report all safety-related hazards, incidents and
near-misses throughout the response.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
SPILL SITE
ASSESSMENT
6.6
Action
Conduct an evaluation of the spill area, and collect information that will assist in
the preparation of a response plan.
Procedure





Shut in the source of the spill, if safe to do so.
Determine the appropriate action required to contain the spill.
Activate the necessary resources to initiate containment.
Take necessary steps to secure the area from unauthorized personnel.
Notify appropriate government agencies, landowners and stakeholders.
Action
Assess the site characteristics as required to prepare a burn plan.
Procedure


Determine type and volume of product spilled
 light hydrocarbon
 medium hydrocarbon
 heavy hydrocarbon
Estimate size and type of affected area and potential for further migration.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013









Identify the environmental issues within and adjacent to the spill area
 water bodies
 land use
 soil porosity
 wildlife habitat
 groundwater usage
 livestock dugouts, etc.
Identify potential ignition sources.
Determine if spill will remain contained in adverse weather conditions.
Identify type and condition of vegetation in affected area.
Determine if the site can be accessed without creating significant additional
damage.
Identify if a water source is available for fire control.
Identify locations for safety and firefighting equipment (must be accessible after fire
starts).
Identify and mark overhead / underground power lines, pipelines and utilities in the
spill and surrounding areas.
Identify and mark any other physical hazards.
Action
Assess the off-site characteristics needed to make the decision to burn.
Procedure







Determine weather conditions and forecasts
 immediate
 long range
 particular attention to wind direction and speed
Identify important topographical features adjacent to the spill area.
Identify the adjacent land-use.
Determine potential impacts on surrounding area from an uncontrolled burn.
Determine effects of black smoke on surrounding area.
Determine if residents should be evacuated from area.
Identify any other potential concerns.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
BURN PLAN
PREPARATION
6.7

The key to a successful in-situ burn is the development of a detailed burn plan that
outlines the overall strategy of the burn, equipment and manpower requirements,
safety considerations of responders, residents and the public and potential impacts
on the surrounding area.
Action
Prepare an in-situ burn plan using the form provided at the end of this section.
Procedure




1

Document and implement measures that will be taken to ensure worker and public
safety.
Identify all existing environmentally sensitive sites within the burn and fireguard
areas.
Identify and communicate emergency procedures to be followed if control of the
burn is lost.
Prepare a map of the burn area, including control measures and safety zones.
SITE PREPARATION
Proper site preparation is essential to ensure not only a successful in-situ burning
program, but to maintain standards of environmental health and worker safety.
Action

Upon completion of the burn plan, ensure all aspects related to preliminary
preparation, safety, environmental and containment have been addressed
and adequately communicated to workers and stakeholders.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Procedure




Preliminary
 Review the action plan with all workers and stakeholders to ensure they are
aware of their responsibilities and hazards.
 Review the safety requirements with all contractors and workers prior to
commencing on-site work and as necessary during the pre-burn construction.
 Ensure that the work area has been assessed for buried equipment through
use of Alberta First Call (or equivalent) and other resources (regulatory agency
records, survey searches, etc.) and/or by line locating by a qualified person /
company.
Safety
 In snow covered and frozen conditions, it is important to determine the outer
spill edge to ensure a safe work site
- explosive / toxic vapours can become trapped under snow and ice and/or
collect in low or bermed areas created by snow plough
- snow and debris should be removed as close to the perimeter of the spill as
possible, to enhance access and safety in carrying out the burn
 Determine the depth of ice thickness and frost prior to accessing any spill area,
to help avoid safety hazards and environmental damage.
 Identify the location of the fire control equipment (i.e. fire trucks, water pumps,
extinguishers) and fire guard crews ensuring that there is an adequate escape
route in the case of emergency.
Environmental Concerns
 Restrict heavy equipment access to designated areas and routes.
 Avoid disturbing soils that may be prone to erosion.
 Remove and conserve all top soil for final reclamation.
 Ensure disturbed soil is not allowed to enter moving or standing water bodies.
 During fire guard construction:
- avoid mixing oil contaminated soil with clean material
- salvage merchantable timber removed as required
 Use specialized equipment (i.e. track and low pressure tire units, etc.) in high
water table areas or in muskegs where conventional equipment may damage
organic soils
Containment
 Protect the area adjacent to the spill by constructing a fire guard or berm
around the site.
 Ensure the extensive pre-heat capability of an hydrocarbon fire is taken into
account when sizing the type and width of fireguard required.
- may not be required in areas with sufficient snow cover
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013


2

Fire guard — dry land
 clear all surface fuels for at least 30 metres (98 feet) from the edge of the burn
to closest standing timber
 these distances may be altered depending upon circumstances for both crown
and private lands
Fire guard — wet / inaccessible areas
 trees, vegetation and organic soil may have to be removed by hand. Width of a
hand constructed guard is dependent on local conditions and would likely have
to be supplemented by additional measures to provide adequate containment
for an in-situ burn
 a hand-constructed guard to mineral soil of 0.5 to 1 metres (1.5 to 3 feet) in
width may be sufficient if used in conjunction with predetermined ignition
methods such as “backfire”. The pre-calculated width of the backfired area
could provide additional fireguard sufficient to withstand the preheat from the insitu burn
- use of backfires to supplement hand fire guards should only be undertaken
by experienced personnel
 in standing water conditions, confine spill material to minimize shoreline
contamination
 utilize available natural barriers (bare soil, rushes, sedges)
 remove trees outside of the fireguard area to eliminate the possibility of a
secondary fire caused by sparks or radiant heat
 in muskegs, ensure outer spill boundary has been properly determined
 in winter conditions, burning may generate significant volumes of water
(possibly contaminated with unburned hydrocarbons) that will have to be
contained and collected using trenches, berms, inverted weirs and other
devices. Containment and processing for these volumes of water will have to
be planned in advance
 construct secondary containment devices in areas of concern
IGNITION CONSIDERATIONS AND PROCEDURES
After completing all the pre-burn requirements, the in-situ burning program should
be implemented, taking the following into consideration:
 every in-situ burn is unique
 ignition procedures vary with prevailing conditions and available equipment,
manpower and emergency resources
 on-going monitoring of local weather conditions and long range forecasts is
essential to permit a safe and effective burn
Action
Determine the appropriate time and conditions for igniting the spill.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Procedure








Use experienced personnel to oversee the burning activities and monitor the burn
plan.
The area around the spill site should be monitored using an explosive / toxic gas
meter to determine any explosive / toxicity hazards.
The spill should be approached from upwind during all phases of the operation by
personnel who are properly equipped and trained to monitor the conditions.
Continually monitor weather conditions.
 burning should occur only when wind conditions are low (<10km/hr on Beaufort
Wind Scale)
 weather should be stable
Ignition should not occur until entire area is secured.
Ensure there is a sufficient supply of the following on-site (actual numbers will be
determined based on the individual spill conditions)
 fire-fighting equipment
 personnel (workers and emergency staff)
 water supplies
If potential exists for secondary fires, ignition should take place during low burning
period (i.e. 1800 to 1000 hrs).
If the product is heavy oil, or it is severely weathered, it may be advantageous to
burn during the heat of the day in order to assist with ignition, if safe to do so.
Action
Determine what method of ignition will work the best while still allowing for safe
implementation.
Procedure



Ignition procedures should be designed to allow the response team to be well back
of the site when the spill is ignited. Individual companies may have their own
ignition procedures based on the type of product and ignition devices available.
Ensure the oil at point of ignition is between 2-3 mm thick to create a sustained
burn. Ignition source should generate sufficient heat long enough to cause the oil
to ignite.
Spills which contain light ends will probably ignite without the assistance of an
auxiliary fuel source. A flare shell propelled from a safe distance should be
adequate.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013




Spills which contain a high percentage of heavy ends may require the use of an
auxiliary fuel or ignition promoter
 auxiliary fuel usually consists of diesel, kerosene and gasoline but can also be
in the form of dry straw, etc.
 diesel and kerosene are considered to be the best ignition promoters as the
flame temperature is higher
 lighter products, such as gasoline, evaporate much faster than diesel which
results in faster cooling of the slick
 dry straw can be effective but application must be able to be done in a safe
manner
Ignite the outer edge of the spill and allow the fire to burn from the outside in (helps
to reduce chances of fluid migration).
Use multiple ignition points, where possible, to encourage the spreading of flames
throughout the spill area and improve burn efficiencies.
Ignition devices may include:
 flare shells
 gelled gasoline
 diesel or kerosene
 mixtures of gasoline and diesel fuel
 crude oil
 organic matter such as peat moss or straw
 canister igniters
 aerial ignition devices
 dry straw
 propane torches
Action
Ignite the spill.
Procedure






Determine flammability / toxicity around the spill using an explosive / toxic gas
meter.
Apply the auxiliary fuel agents (if necessary) to the determined ignition areas.
Approach the ignition points from upwind.
Ensure ignition workers are in a safe zone by continuously monitoring for explosive
/ toxic mixtures.
Ignite all sites of the spill at the same time, using the selected method.
Allow initial burn to complete without adding any additional fuel.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Action
Monitor the spill site during the burn period to ensure that no hazards exist.
Procedure










Monitor the weather conditions on a regular basis.
Be prepared to implement the emergency plan should the conditions change for
the worse.
Ensure the workers are in a safe area.
Monitor the success of the burning procedures as they are implemented and at
completion of the burn.
For larger spills, burning may continue over an extended period of time, involving
night-time conditions.
Maintain security until the hazards have been totally eliminated.
Utilize a fire guard crew on the entire perimeter to ensure no secondary fires occur.
Monitor the site for black smoke.
Ensure that regulatory agencies, landowner(s), stakeholders, the public, and media
are kept informed.
Ambient air monitoring programs should be implemented as required.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
IN-SITU
BURN PLAN
OBJECTIVES:
LOCATION:
What is the objective of the burn?
1/4
Section
FUEL INVENTORY:
Twp.
Rge.
Mer.
(Type and condition of spilled hydrocarbon)
ORGANIC FUELS:
Depth to mineral soil
Grass:
dry%
green%
Shrubs:
dry%
green%
Slash load light
medium
Timber type in immediate vicinity of
burn
ADJACENT FUELS:
heavy
(identify fuel types as trees or slash)
North
Continuous
Patchy
East
Continuous
Patchy
South
Continuous
Patchy
West
Continuous
Patchy
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
SOILS:
Type:
Condition
Permeabilit
y
Dry
Wet
Frozen
Low
Med.
High
Erodability
Low
Med.
High
Identify soil abnormalities such as rock outcrops, cracks, etc.
TOPOGRAPHY:
Level
Gentle
rolling
WEATHER FORECAST
Steep
terrain
% of
slope
(proposed at ignition):
Temperature:
Relative
humidity:
Wind speed:
Wind direction:
Stability:
SITE PREPARATION:
Describe what action has been taken to prepare the site for
burning (length and width of guard, etc.)
MANPOWER NEEDS:
Burn (fire) Boss
Ignition Boss
Line Boss
Safety Officer
Number of Firefighting
personnel
Location and number of
backup personnel immediately
available
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
EQUIPMENT NEEDS:
Ignition equipment:
Suppression
equipment:
Hand tools:
Heavy Equipment:
Type
:
Type
:
Type
:
Type
:
No:
No:
No.
No.
Dozers:
Water
Trucks:
Others:
Fire Pumps:
Length of hose, nozzles, Y’s, etc.:
Radio Equipment:
Location and number of backup equipment immediately
available:
IGNITION:
Date:
Time of Day:
Ignition Method:
Estimated duration of ignition
phase
Estimated duration of burnout
phase
hours
hours
IGNITION AND CONTROL:
Identify ignition points on attached map.
Identify area on map with the greatest potential for secondary fires.
What countermeasures have been taken on critical control points (secondary
fires)?
Location of firefighting resources and instructions:
Identify who will be responsible for monitoring and reviewing on-site
observations during the burn.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Safety Hazards:
PUBLIC INFORMATION AND NOTIFICATION:
Identify stakeholders in the burn area that have been contacted:
Name
Date
Time
Identify the public information officer, if the position is filled, to communicate with the
general public and media.
SMOKE MANAGEMENT:
Identify any potential adverse impact of smoke off-site:
i)
populated areas, distance and direction from burn:
ii)
highways, major roads, airports, distance and direction from burn:
iii) public facilities (campground, etc.) distance and direction from burn:
iv) other:
Identify any potential adverse impact of smoke on-site:
i)
safety, ensure safety plan has considered smoke
ii)
control problems
SMOKE CONTROL STRATEGY:
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Describe what action will be taken to avoid or reduce problems listed above (i.e. burning
schedule, wind direction, unstable conditions, etc.).
SMOKE EMERGENCY PLAN:
Explain steps to be taken if traffic control on any nearby roads becomes necessary due
to unexpected wind changes, etc.
SECURITY:
Outline measures to be taken to secure the area ensuring public safety. What
resources will be required and person responsible for security?
POST BURN ACTIVITIES:
Outline action to be taken to ensure all organic fires are extinguished.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
SAFETY CHECKLIST:
In the absence of a safety officer, the line boss and ignition boss must ensure the
following:













Are all staff familiar with anticipated fire behaviour during the burn?
Do all supervisors have a map of the area with safety routes identified?
Are line staff familiar with areas where spotting and jump fires pose a high risk?
Are staff equipped and wearing proper protective clothing?
Have all pieces of equipment been checked for workability?
Are first aid supplies available?
Has a first aid station or emergency response team been identified?
Have staff been briefed on action to take in excessively smoky areas?
Have staff been briefed on how to protect themselves from heat exposure?
Have staff been made aware of all hazards such as possible slippery conditions
during winter burn activities?
Are staff aware of the importance of reporting and documenting any injury -minor or major?
Are staff aware of the need to use the buddy system?
Are staff aware of the meeting location (muster station) in the event of an
emergency?
APPROVALS:
Regulatory
Agency /
Stakeholder
Contact
Name
Position
Contact
Number
Signature
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
POST BURN
ACTIVITIES
6.8

The follow-up of an in-situ burning event is as important as the original
assessment, especially when dealing with landowners and other stakeholders
affected by the spill. Open communications will promote positive aspects of the
spill response.
As soon as possible after completion of the burn, the area should be inspected to
determine the success of the burn. A soil sampling program should be initiated to
determine the amount of oil residue left on the site.
Action
Assess the burned spilled area and implement follow-up remediation work.
Procedure











Check the burn area and take required action to extinguish all burning organic
material.
Be aware of potential hydrocarbon areas that may be hazardous due to ignition
sources (burning material) present.
Area should be kept secure until thoroughly inspected.
Safely remove dead and leaning tree hazards to ensure safety of workers.
Complete spot burns required to remove hydrocarbons from specific areas.
Conduct safety assessments prior to re-burning.
Ensure adequate site drainage to ensure that soils and vegetation are exposed to
sufficient aeration. Promote aeration of the site without enhancing soil erosion.
Physically remove residues (heavy hydrocarbons) to accelerate reclamation of the
site.
Document all aspects of the in-situ burn program.
Conduct a procedural post mortem.
Ensure all parties are satisfied with the spill response approach and planned
follow-up reclamation program.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
OIL SPILL
CONTINGENCY
MANUAL
SECTION
7
JOB DESCRIPTIONS
Job Descriptions
COMMAND
FUNCTION
LOGISTICS
FUNCTION
7.1
7.4
OPERATIONS
FUNCTION
FINANCE /
ADMINISTRATION
FUNCTION
7.2
7.5
PLANNING
FUNCTION
ICS FORMS
7.3
7.6
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
COMMAND
FUNCTION
7.1
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
COMMAND
OPERATIONS
INCIDENT COMMANDER
DEPUTY INCIDENT COMMANDER
SAFETY OFFICER
PUBLIC INFORMATION OFFICER
LIAISON OFFICER
OPERATIONS SECTION CHIEF
BRANCH DIRECTOR
GROUP SUPERVISOR
STRIKE TEAM LEADER
BOOM CAPTAIN
BOAT CAPTAIN
CLEAN-UP SUPERVISOR
manage field operations
supervises Branch Operations
works under Branch Director
special team leader
deployment of anchors/boom
deployment of skimmers, pumps and
tanks
oversee boat operations
clean-up and debris disposal
PLANNING SECTION CHIEF
RESOURCES UNIT
SITUATION UNIT
DOCUMENTATION UNIT
DEMOBILIZATION UNIT
TECHNICAL SPECIALISTS
planning and monitoring
keeps status of all resources
collection, organization of information
keeps files
organizes demobilizaton
as required
LOGISTICS SECTION CHIEF
SUPPLY UNIT
FACILITIES UNIT
GROUND SUPPORT UNIT
facilities, services and materials
equipment, goods and services
facilities as needed
mobile equipment and vehicles
develops and implements
communication plan, communications
equipment
provides food
medical assistance plan
SKIMMER / PUMP CAPTAIN
PLANNING
LOGISTICS
COMMUNICATIONS UNIT
FOOD UNIT
MEDICAL UNIT
FINANCE
overall management
special projects and replacement
overall safety
public relations
liaison with agencies/companies
FINANCE SECTION CHIEF
TIME UNIT
PROCUREMENT UNIT
COMPENSATION/CLAIMS UNIT
COST UNIT
accounting function
maintains personnel time logs, etc.
obtains needed equipment
WCB, Work Safe BC claims
cost analysis
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Incident Commander (On-Scene Commander)
 Responsible to provide leadership for overall coordination and management of spill
control activities including:
 activates initial response activities
 ensures company policies and procedures are followed
 coordinates the development and implementation of an Incident Action Plan
(IAP) including setting objectives and strategies
 assigns individuals to fill key spill response team positions
 approves the ordering and release of resources
 oversees spill control operations (i.e. containment and recovery, clean up and
waste management)
 ensures that appropriate documentation is maintained
 coordinates regulatory agency, landowner and other stakeholder input and
concerns
 authorizes release of information to the news media
 coordinates follow-up activities related to the spill
 protects life and property
 ensures that risk management is being used
Deputy Incident Commander (On-Scene Commander)
 The deputy may work directly with the Incident Commander on special projects and

relieves Incident Commander when he/she is off duty.
The deputy may also be assigned charge of a certain part of the response team
Safety Officer
 Responsible for overall coordination of the spill safety program including:









coordinates a spill site hazard assessment
determines appropriate safeguards to minimize the health risk to the public and
response team
establishes and oversees a monitoring program that ensures that hazards
associated with the spill are closely evaluated on a continuous basis
develops the spill site safety program, and ensures that the response teams are
continually briefed and that they work in a safe manner
conducts periodic inspections to ensure that the safety program is being
followed
coordinates emergency medical care
coordinates accident investigations
ensures appropriate documentation is maintained
reviews the Incident Action Plan for safety implications
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013


maintain Unit log
review and approve the medical plan
Public Information Officer
 Responsible for the coordination of a public relations program including:











develops a plan to interface with the media and public
develops a news media fact sheet
organizes meetings and on-site visits
maintains records and documentation
company liaison with the government public affairs representative
coordinates follow-up activities
determines from Incident Commander if there are any limits on information
release
informs media and conduct media briefings
obtains media information that may be useful to incident planning
maintains Unit log
maintains current information summaries and/or displays on the incident and
provide information on status of incident to assigned personnel
Liaison Officer
 Responsible for being the primary contact for the personnel assigned to the incident
by assisting or cooperating agencies and companies:






acts as the contact point for agency representatives
maintains a list of assisting and cooperating agencies/companies and their
representatives
keeps agencies supporting the incident aware of incident status
monitors incident operations to identify current or potential inter organizational
problems
participates in planning meetings, providing current resource status, including
limitations and capability of assisting agency resources
maintains Unit log
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
OPERATIONS
FUNCTION
7.2
Operations Section Chief (Control Point Supervisor)
 Responsible
for the management of all operations directly applicable to the spill
control operations at one or more control points identified in the Incident Action
Plan:
 interacts with next lower level of Section (Branch, Division/Group) to develop
the operations portion of the Incident Action Plan
 selects the appropriate control points and works with the team to develop a
containment and recovery strategy
 determines resource requirements
 supervises containment and recovery and clean-up activities at control points
 establishes decontamination requirements for responders
 reports activities and provides status reports to the Incident Commander
 maintains appropriate documentation
 maintains close contact with subordinate positions
 ensures safe tactical operations
 requests additional resources to support tactical operations
 approves release of resources from assigned status (not release from Incident)
 makes or approves expedient changes to the IAP during the Operational Period
as necessary
 maintains Unit log
Branch Director
 Branches may be functional or geographic or jurisdictional.




obtains briefing from the Operations Section Chief
supervises Branch operations
develops alternatives for Branch control operations
interacts with the Operations Section Chief and other Branch Directors to
develop tactics to implement incident strategies
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013






prepared to attend incident planning meetings at the request of the Operations
Chief
reviews Division/Group Assignments within the Branch and report status to
Operations Section Chief
assigns specific work tasks to Division/Group Supervisors
monitors and inspects progress and makes changes as necessary
resolves logistics problems reported by subordinates
maintains Unit log
Division/Group Supervisor
 Works under the Branch Director.










obtains briefings from the Operations
review assignments with subordinates
informs Resource Unity (if established) of status changes of resources
assigned to the Division/Group
coordinates activities with adjacent Divisions/Groups
monitors and inspects progress and makes changes as necessary
keeps supervisor informed of situation and resources status
resolves tactical assignment and logistics problems within the Division/Group
keeps supervisor informed of hazardous situations and significant events
ensures that assigned personnel and equipment get to and from their
assignments in a timely and orderly manner
maintains Unit log
Task Force/Strike Team Leader
 Is assigned specific tasks to perform








obtains briefing from supervisor, depending on how the incident is organized
reviews assignment with subordinates and assign tasks
travels to and from active assignment area with assigned resources
monitors and inspects progress and makes changes as necessary
coordinates activities with adjacent Task Force/Strike Team, single resources,
or with a functional group working in the same location
keeps supervisor advised of situation and resources status
retains control of assigned resources while in available or out-of-service status
maintains Unit log
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Boom Captain
 Responsible
for the coordination and deployment of anchors and boom at
designated control points.
 assists with the selection of the equipment deployment site





measures current velocity, and determines the appropriate boom angle and
anchoring method
oversees the installation of anchors
supervises the primary boom deployment operations
coordinates boom deployment for secondary recovery
identifies equipment requirements
Skimmer and Pump Captain
 Responsible for overseeing the deployment of the skimming unit, pumps and hoses,
manifold for directing fluids and tankage for fluid recovery.
 assists with the selection of the equipment deployment site
 oversees the placement and deployment of skimmers, pumps, hoses and fluid
storage tanks
 ensures that pumps are operational and maintained
 identifies equipment requirements
Boat Captain
 Responsible for all operations conducted by spill response boats.





conducts safety briefings for boat crews
deployment of upstream and downstream warning marker buoys and signs
installs in-stream anchors
tows boom and moves men and equipment to appropriate sites
conducts in-stream work as required
Clean-Up Supervisor
 Responsible for the clean-up of the area impacted by the spill and waste disposal.

oversees clean-up operations and waste disposal
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
PLANNING
FUNCTION
7.3
Planning Section Chief (Environmental Advisor)
 Responsible for the coordination of planning activities related to spill mitigation.


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















consults with specialists and is the liaison with regulatory agencies, nongovernment organizations and stakeholders to develop strategies and control
options
coordinates the development and implementation of an environmental
protection plan
coordinates appropriate field surveys, sampling programs, impact assessments
and mitigative measures
monitors weather conditions that could affect spill response activities
maintains appropriate documentation
collects and processes situation information about the incident
supervises preparation of the IAP
provides input to the Incident Commander and Operations Section Chief in
preparing the IAP
reassigns out-of-service personnel already on assignment to ICS organizational
positions as appropriate
establishes information requirements and reporting schedules for Planning
Section Units
determines need for any specialized resources in support of the incident
if requested, assembles and disassemble strike teams and task forces not
assigned to Operations
establishes special information collection activities as necessary, e.g. weather,
environmental, toxics, etc.
assembles information on alternative strategies
provides periodic predictions on incident potential
reports and significant changes in incident status
complies and displays incident status information
oversees preparation of incident demobilization team
incorporates the incident traffic plan (from Ground Support) and other
supporting plans to the IAP
maintains Unit log
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Resources Unit
 Responsible
for maintaining the status of all assigned resources (primary and
support) at an incident.
 oversees the check-in of all resources
 maintains a status-keeping system indicating current location and status of all
resources
 maintains a master list of all resources, e.g. key supervisory personnel, primary
and support resources, etc.
Situation Unit
 Responsible for the collection, processing and organizing of all incident information
as well as preparing future projections of incident growth, maps and intelligence
information.
Documentation Unit
 Responsible
for the maintenance of accurate, up-to-date incident files as well as
duplication services and storage if needed.
Demobilization Unit
 Responsible for developing the Incident Demobilization Plan.








determines the likely size and extent of demobilization effort
coordinate demobilization with agency/company representatives
monitors Operations Section resource needs
identifies surplus resources and probable release time
develops incident check-out function for all units
evaluates logistics and transportation capabilities to support demobilization
ensures that all Sections/Units understand their specific demobilization
responsibilities
supervises execution of the incident demobilization plan
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Technical Specialists

These are advisors with special skills and are utilized to support incident
operations.
 reports to the Section Chief or designated Unit Leader
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
LOGISTICS
FUNCTION
7.4
Logistics Section Chief
 Responsible
for coordinating the provision of facilities, services and materials in
support of the spill response.
 consults with specialists and is the liaison with regulatory agencies, nongovernment organizations and stakeholders to develop strategies and control
options
 coordinates the development and implementation of an environmental
protection plan
 coordinates appropriate field surveys, sampling programs, impact assessments
and mitigative measures
 monitors weather conditions that could affect spill response activities
 maintains appropriate documentation
 provides logistical input to the Incident Commander in preparing the IAP
 identifies anticipated and known incident services and support requirements
 requests additional resources as needed
 reviews and provides input to the Communications Plan, Medical Plan and
Traffic plan
 oversees demobilization of Logistics Section
Supply Unit
 Responsible
for ordering, receiving, processing and storing all incident-related
resources.
 provides supplies to Planning, Logistics and Finance/Administration Sections
 determines the type and amount of supplies en route
 orders, receives, distributes and stores supplies and equipment
 responds to requests for personnel, equipment and supplies
 maintains an inventory of supplies and equipment
 services reusable equipment as needed
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Facilities Unit
 Responsible
for set up, security, maintenance and demobilization of all incident
support facilities except Staging Areas.
 obtains and supervises personnel to operate facilities, including Base and
Camp Managers
 provides maintenance such as sanitation and lighting
 demobilizes base and camp facilities
Ground Support Unit
 Responsible for the maintenance, service, and fuelling of all mobile equipment and
vehicles with the exception of aviation resources and is also responsible for the
ground transportation of personnel, supplies and equipment and the development
of the Incident Traffic Plan.
 maintains an inventory of support and transportation vehicles
 records time use for all incident assigned ground equipment (including contract
equipment)
 updates the Resources Unity with the status (location and capability) of
transportation vehicles
 maintains a transportation pool on larger incidents as necessary
 maintains incident roadways as necessary
Communications Unit
 Responsible for developing plans for the use of incident communications equipment
and facilities; installing and testing of communications equipment; supervision of
the Incident Communications Center; and the distribution and maintenance of
communications equipment.
 establishes telephone, computer links, and public address systems
 establishes communications equipment distribution and maintenance locations
 installs and tests all communications equipment
 provides technical advice on adequacy of systems, geographical limitations,
equipment capabilities, amounts and types of equipment available and potential
problems with equipment
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Food Unit
 Responsible for supplying the food needs for the entire incident, including all remote
locations and providing food for personnel unable to leave their tactical field
assignments.
 determines method of feeding to best fit each facility or situation
 obtain necessary equipment and supplies and establish cooking facilities
 ensures that well-balanced menus are provided
 maintains food service areas, ensuring that all appropriate health and safety
measures are being followed.
 Supervises caterers, cooks, and other Food Unity personnel as appropriate
Medical Unit
 Responsible
for developing an Incident Medical Plan (to be included in the IAP),
procedures for managing major medical emergencies, providing medical aid and
assisting the Finance/Administration Section with processing injury-related claims.
This is not for the public or victims (done by Operations Section)
 establishes procedures for handling serious injuries of responder personnel
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
FINANCE/
ADMINISTRATION
7.5
Finance Section Chief (Cost Statistician)
 Responsible for providing accounting functions related to the spill response activities
including:
 Provides for time / cost reporting of labour, materials and supplies
 Coordinates the collection, approval and payment of invoices
 Administers necessary contracts
 Initiates investigation and documentation on all claims other than personal
injury
 Manages all financial aspects of an incident
 Provides financial and cost analysis information as requested
 Develops an operating plan for the Finance/Administration Section
 Determines the need to set up and operate an incident commissary
 Ensures that all personnel time records are accurately completed and
transmitted to home companies/agencies according to policy.
 Provides financial input to demobilization planning
 Ensures that all obligation documents initiated at the incident are properly
prepared and completed.
Time Unit
 Responsible for ensuring the accurate recording of daily personnel time, compliance
with specific company/agency time recording policies, and managing commissary
operations if established at the incident. As applicable, personnel time records will
be collected and processed for each operational period.
 Maintains separate logs for overtime hours
 Maintains records security
 Ensures that all records are current and complete prior to demobilization
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013

Releases time reports from assisting company/agency personnel to the
respective representatives prior to demobilization.
Procurement Unit
 Responsible for all financial matters pertaining to vendor contracts, leases, and fiscal
agreements and maintaining equipment time records. The Unit also establishes
local sources for equipment and supplies; manages all equipment and rental
agreements; and processes all rental and supply fiscal document bulling invoices.
The unit works closely with local fiscal authorities to ensure efficiency.
 Reviews incident needs and any special procedures with Unit Leaders, as
needed
 Prepares and authorizes contracts and land use agreements, as needed.
 Drafts memoranda of understanding.
 Provides coordination between the Ordering Manager, agency dispatch, and all
other procurement organizations supporting the incident.
 Interprets contracts and agreements and resolves disputes.
 Coordinates with Compensation/Claims Unit for processing claims.
 Coordinates use of imprest funds as required
 Completes final processing of contracts and sends documents for payment.
Compensation/Claims Unit
 Responsible for completion of all forms required for Worker’s Compensation (Work
Safe BC) and other local agencies and maintaining the files associated with those
claims. Also responsible for investigating all claims involving property associated
with or involved with the incident.




Establishes contact with incident Safety Officer and Liaison Officer.
Determine the need for Compensation-for-Injury and Claims specialists and
order personnel as needed.
Review Incident Medical Plan.
Periodically review logs and forms produced by specialist in Unit to ensure
compliance with requirements and policies.
Cost Unit
 Responsible for all incident cost analysis. It ensures the property identification of all
equipment and personnel requiring payment; records all cost data; analyzes and
prepares estimates of incident costs; and maintains accurate records of incident
costs.

Ensures compliance with cost reporting procedures.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013




Collects and records all cost data
Develops incident cost summaries
Prepares resources-use cost estimates for the Planning Section
Makes cost-saving recommendations to the Finance/Administration Section
Chief
ICS FORMS
7.6
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
OIL SPILL
CONTINGENCY
MANUAL
SECTION
8
PUBLIC RELATIONS
CHECKLIST
Public Relations Checklist
MANAGING MEDIA
RELATIONS
8.1
MEDIA FACT SHEET
8.2
KEY MESSAGE
SAMPLE/
WORKSHEETS
8.3
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
MANAGING MEDIA
RELATIONS
8.1
Action

Prepare to respond quickly to the media should they become involved in
your spill.
Procedure







Ensure that you are aware of company policy with respect to media inquiries and
on-site media response.
Pre-designate a media spokesperson (Public Information Officer).
Utilize one official spokesperson only; ideally person will know the area well and
have credibility in the area.
Advise the Spill Response Team regarding who will be responsible for dealing with
the media and the responsibility of each member should they be approached by
media personnel.
Ensure that the Public Information Officer is fully briefed at regular intervals with
respect to the status of the spill and can answer the following questions:
 Who does the spill affect or could it affect?
 What happened?
 When were you first made aware of the situation?
 Where did it occur?
 Why did it happen?
 How is the problem being resolved?
Prepare a plan for receiving media on-site (meeting location, parking
arrangements, personal protective equipment, areas of spill that can be safely
visited, news media fact sheet).
Develop a documentation strategy (i.e. record of who was on-site, contact
numbers, questions and concerns, and follow-up items).
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Action

Develop a spill preliminary statement (news media fact sheet).
Procedure


Use W5 and 2 H’s (who, what, when, where, why, how is the problem being resolved and
housekeeping information for follow-up meetings, etc.) in the preliminary statement format
(see Section 7.2).
Avoid including the following issues in a preliminary statement:
 names of fatalities or injured people
 liability issues
 anything that is not factual (i.e. spill volumes, time required to clean-up, clean-up costs,
etc.)
Action

Ensure other stakeholders are in the communications loop (i.e. employees, investors,
regulators, community neighbours, local business)
Procedure











Quickly design and implement a communications plan for all audiences.
Establish a 1-800 number and corporate website link; advise all stakeholders of contact
information.
Post media releases.
Schedule open houses.
Provide updates at specific meetings.
Respond to inquiries.
Develop and distribute internal updates.
Organize photo / video shoots.
Provide statistics, maps, etc.
Maintain complete documentation.
Be flexible, transparent, accommodating and accessible at all times.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Action

Respond to media questions in an effective manner.
Procedure













Ensure that first message that is delivered indicates a concern for people affected
by the spill.
Be honest (if you don’t have the answers, respond “We don’t know yet”).
Be available at reasonable request.
Listen carefully to questions and don’t answer more than asked.
Politely disagree if questions contain false accusations and calmly set the record
straight.
Avoid hypothetical questions.
Have the media representative clarify vague questions.
Answer only one question at a time and keep answers short.
Never say “no comment”.
Use positive statements whenever possible (i.e. trained personnel, spill
preparedness, equipment readiness, prevention programs, containment and
recovery, contingency planning).
Portray a positive, concerned, professional appearance.
Give a brief and positive summary at the end of the question period.
Develop a documentation strategy (ie: record of who was on-site, contact phone
numbers, questions and concerns, and follow-up items.
NOTE
Rule of Thumb: If you don’t want to see it in print, don’t say it.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
MEDIA FACT
SHEET
8.2
WHO
Responsible Company, who discovered
WHEN
Spilled material, approximate volume (if
known), effects of spilled material on people,
property and environment
When spill occurred, discovered
WHERE
Where spill originated, where has it migrated to,
size of spill
WHAT
WHY
HOW
HOUSEKEEPING
Spill cause
Safety measures, containment and recovery
operations, monitoring, clean-up and debris
disposal
Contact name and number of Public
Information Officer, arrangements for media
follow-up meetings, site tours, etc.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
KEY MESSAGE
SAMPLE /
WORKSHEETS
8.3
SAMPLE
Key Message 1
Key Message 2
Key Message 3
Unfortunately AB Oil has
experienced a rupture and
subsequent release of oil into
Swallow Lake.
Our greatest concern at this
time is the safety of the
community and incident
responders.
Supporting Fact 1.1
Supporting Fact 2.1
We are developing an Incident
Action Plan and oil spill
containment and recovery
equipment is en-route to the
site.
Supporting Fact 3.1
The line break occurred on
Tuesday, July 5th at
approximately 10:00hrs. It is
estimated that 30m3 of sweet
crude oil was released into
Swallow Lake.
We are working with
provincial regulators and the
RCMP to notify recreational
users and local residents.
Human resources have been
assigned to the response
following the Incident
Command System (ICS).
Supporting Fact 1.2
Supporting Fact 2.2
Supporting Fact 3.2
The break-site has been
located and the line was shutin at 11:43hrs.
We have established a 1800 number (1-800-6634292) where we will post
updates and respond to
inquiries.
Equipment identified for the
incident includes:
-
WCSS spill response
trailers (see
www.wcss.ab.ca)
-
Jet boats
Wildlife Response untis
Specialized skimmers
Supporting Fact 1.3
Supporting Fact 2.3
Supporting Fact 3.3
AB Oil Reported the spill to
provincial regulators
immediately upon discovery of
the incident and activated our
corporate emergency
response plan.
\We will begin a water
sampling / analysis program
immediately and will publish
results on our corporate
website (www.ABOil.ca)
The local WCSS Oil Spill
Cooperative are assisting with
logistics and initial response.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Key Message Worksheet
Key Message 1
Key Message 2
Key Message 3
Supporting Fact 1.1
Supporting Fact 2.1
Supporting Fact 3.1
Supporting Fact 1.2
Supporting Fact 2.2
Supporting Fact 3.2
Supporting Fact 1.3
Supporting Fact 2.3
Supporting Fact 3.3
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Key Message Worksheet
Key Message 1
Key Message 2
Key Message 3
Supporting Fact 1.1
Supporting Fact 2.1
Supporting Fact 3.1
Supporting Fact 1.2
Supporting Fact 2.2
Supporting Fact 3.2
Supporting Fact 1.3
Supporting Fact 2.3
Supporting Fact 3.3
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Key Message Worksheet
Key Message 1
Key Message 2
Key Message 3
Supporting Fact 1.1
Supporting Fact 2.1
Supporting Fact 3.1
Supporting Fact 1.2
Supporting Fact 2.2
Supporting Fact 3.2
Supporting Fact 1.3
Supporting Fact 2.3
Supporting Fact 3.3
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Key Message Worksheet
Key Message 1
Key Message 2
Key Message 3
Supporting Fact 1.1
Supporting Fact 2.1
Supporting Fact 3.1
Supporting Fact 1.2
Supporting Fact 2.2
Supporting Fact 3.2
Supporting Fact 1.3
Supporting Fact 2.3
Supporting Fact 3.3
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Key Message Worksheet
Key Message 1
Key Message 2
Key Message 3
Supporting Fact 1.1
Supporting Fact 2.1
Supporting Fact 3.1
Supporting Fact 1.2
Supporting Fact 2.2
Supporting Fact 3.2
Supporting Fact 1.3
Supporting Fact 2.3
Supporting Fact 3.3
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
OIL SPILL
CONTINGENCY
MANUAL
SECTION
9
DOCUMENTATION CHECKLIST
Documentation
SPILL SITE
SKETCHES
SAFETY
ASPECTS
9.1
9.4
SPILL SITE
PHOTOGRAPHS
ENVIRONMENTAL
ASPECTS
9.2
9.5
RECORD OF KEY
EVENTS
NEGOTIATIONS &
AGREEMENTS
9.3
9.6
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
SPILL SITE
SKETCHES
9.1
Action

Prepare a sketch of the spill site
Procedure

As soon as possible, prepare a sketch of the area and add to it as work progresses
at the site. It should include the following:
 direction of true north
 location of source spill (i.e. pipeline break, tank, etc.)
 boundaries of area affected by spill
 approximate location(s) and size of obvious heavily and lightly affected areas
 natural slope direction(s)
 natural features including:
- watercourses (indicate the name, size, flow direction and special features)
- location / direction of flow, type (permanent / intermittent) and size
- heights of land (i.e. indicate rises / ridges)
- vegetation types

approximate location and generic type (i.e. trees, grass, etc.) of
vegetation within spill site

locations showing how recovery was done
 sample locations and identifiers with approximate distances to tie points (i.e.
survey pins, trees, large rock, etc.)
 off-site features including:
- vegetation types
- natural features
- access into spill (direction and location of access)
- control sample locations
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013



permanent features that will remain after spill is completed
- indicate type and brief description
spill dimensions and area affected
- include approximate dimensions and calculated area
- tie points and off-site environmentally-sensitive areas
- show approximate distances from tie points to key spill features (i.e. source,
sample locations, etc.)
show approximate distances from edge of spill to nearest environmentallysensitive areas of concern
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
N
Approximate Scale =
Spill Name
Location
All distances approximately
LSD
SEC
(indicate m or ft)
W
TWP
RGE
Meridian
SKETCH GUIDE – INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING, IF APPLICABLE







orientation to north
location of spill source
edge of affected area
lightly / heavily /
affected area
slope
on-site features
natural features
- watercourses
- heights of land
- vegetation types
- recovery bell holes,
trenches, inverted
weirs, major
recovery / storage
locations


off-site features
- vegetation types
- natural features
- access to spill site
- control sample
locations
sample locations
- sample locations
and identifiers

tie / reference points
- permanent features
that will remain onsite

approximate
measurements
- spill dimensions and
area affected
- to tie points and offsite environmentally
sensitive areas
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
SPILL SITE
PHOTOGRAPHS
9.2
Action

Take photographs of spill site.
document:




These will provide useful information to
initial conditions at spill site
containment and recovery operations
conditions at end of spill response
recovery of area over time
Procedure

Photographs are an important component of the documentation required during a
spill response.
The following information should be documented using
photography:
 if possible, aerial photographs of spill site
 containment and recovery operations
 areas of light and heavy accumulations of spilled material
 any impacts caused by the spill material
 a series of pictures documenting the recovery of an area over time.
NOTE
The following information should be written on each
photograph:

spill name and location (i.e. legal subdivision)

date and time

direction that photograph is facing

specific information being documented

name of person who took each photograph
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
RECORD OF
KEY EVENTS
9.3
Action

Keep a chronological record of the key events related to the spill.
Procedure

The chronological record of the key events should include the following information
as a minimum:
 copy of initial spill report form
 information on how spill was reported (date, time, individual)
 information on internal and external reporting including copies of all reports
 reports produced by initial responders
 decisions regarding containment and recovery operations
 successes and limitations of method selected
 modifications to selected methods
 any factors affecting clean-up operations
 indications of success and failure
 volumes of recovered materials
 methods used in disposing of recovered materials
 cost incurred on a daily basis
 records of meetings, discussions, telephone calls, etc.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
SAFETY
ASPECTS
9.4
Action

Document all aspects related to safety at the spill site.
Procedure

The following information should be collected regarding safety:
 designation of Safety Supervisor
- who was designated
- timing
- duties
 safety meetings
- date
- time
- location
- topics discussed
- attendance (names and signatures or initials)
- actions taken
 identification and resolution of concerns
- identify all concerns raised by workers
- indicate method chosen to resolve concern(s)
- comment on acceptability of resolution to worker
 identify hazards and methods used to mitigate
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013




worker requirements
- keep records of equipment and resources used to meet workers’ requirements (i.e.
washroom, washing facilities, rest areas, food services, rotations, etc.)
incidents / accident
- keep record of incidents (near-misses) and accidents
- record internal company and government notifications
- record steps taken to prevent reoccurrence
- use internal company incident / accident report
safety equipment and resource
- keep records of types of safety equipment and expert consultants retained
- keep records of maintenance and calibration of equipment
- keep specific information on speciality equipment
emergency equipment
- document emergency fire, medevac equipment, etc. required on site
- document review of ERP with workers (i.e. at safety meetings)
- document results of ERP drills and exercises
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
ENVIRONMENTAL
ASPECTS
9.5
Action

Designate an Environmental site Supervisor.
Procedure

Document information on the person identified as Environmental Site Supervisor
including person chosen qualifications, source, etc.
Action

Identify environmental sensitivities / issues.
Procedure


Environmental sensitivities / issues.
 document environmentally sensitive areas in/adjacent to the spill site
 describe assessment results of these areas
 outline measures implemented to prevent or lessen impacts to these areas
 describe the results of these measures
 document agreements reached on key issues with government, land owners and other
stakeholders
Provide details on the process used for taking samples including:
 list of parameters chosen
 rationale for selecting the parameters
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013








identification of sampling locations
rationale for selecting these sites
frequency of sampling
rationale for selecting this frequency
methods for taking samples including, container types, preservation techniques,
sample numbering, etc.
information on sample handling, storage and transport
information on laboratory analysis
information on results
NOTE
This is especially important where continuity of evidence is
an issue.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
NEGOTIATIONS
& AGREEMENTS
9.6
Action

Document all negotiations and agreements with internal
representatives, government representatives and third parties.
company
Procedure
The following documentation should be kept on negotiations and agreements related to
the spill.


Internal to Company
 authority limits granted by company
- financial limits
- contractual authority
- supervisory
- media / public relations
 work delegation agreements
 government approvals requested and obtained
 departments and individuals involved
 details on consensus, mitigating factors
 follow-up requirements / responsibilities
 agreements regarding clean-up methods, goals, etc.
Landowner(s) / Stakeholders
 permission from owner / government to enter property
 consensus reached on how to deal with sensitive areas
 consensus on alternate requirements regarding items such as accommodation, water,
livestock relocation, etc.
 alternate measures required
 initial costs / inconveniences
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013

Contractual Agreements
 agreements with contract labour suppliers, equipment suppliers, etc., regarding:
- site responsibilities
- worker capability, knowledge and training
- compensation rates
- equipment requirements
 agreements for use of WCSS equipment
 land entry agreements
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
OIL SPILL
CONTINGENCY
MANUAL
SECTION
10
EQUIPMENT LEASE AGREEMENT
EQUIPMENT
LEASE
AGREEMENT
10.1
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
EQUIPMENT LEASE AGREEMENT
Dated ___________________________
Document Number (office use only):
BETWEEN
WESTERN CANADIAN SPILL SERVICES LTD.
Box 503, 3545-32 Avenue N.E.
Calgary, AB T1Y 6M6
– and –
WCSS Member Company in Good Standing
___________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________
WCSS Member Company in good standing outside of the WCSS boundaries
___________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________
Non-Member Company
___________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________
Date of Last Revision: February 10, 2015
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Following are highlights of the contents of this lease agreement:

Member companies in good standing are not charged rental for the equipment but
are responsible to pay for transportation to/from an incident, as well as any repairs,
maintenance or replacement of equipment used during the incident. This could
include replacement costs for containment boom, skimmers, and rotating
equipment. Equipment that has not been decontaminated enough to be used in a
clean environment will be replaced at the user’s cost.

Member companies outside of the WCSS jurisdictional boundaries agree to pay
1/3 of the rental rates stated in Schedule “B” of this document, as well as
transportation to/from the incident as well as any repairs, maintenance or
replacement of equipment used during the incident. This could include replacement
costs for containment boom, skimmers, and rotating equipment.

Member companies agree to pay 1/3 of the rental rates stated in Schedule “B”
applies if the spill is from a facility (downstream and/or midstream) or rail incident,
if the member company is held liable for the spill and requests WCSS equipment.

Non-member companies accept the terms of this lease, and agree to pay the rental
rates outlined in Schedule “B”; applicable taxes as well as transportation to/from
the incident as well as any repairs; and maintenance or replacement of equipment
used during the incident. This could include replacement costs for containment
boom, skimmers, and rotating equipment. Acceptance of the terms of this lease
also include the understanding that the equipment may be required by a member
company and, therefore relocated prior to completion of the incident.

Access to WCSS equipment for non-member companies is at the discretion of
*WCSS Management; where there is an oil spill in surface water WCSS will assist
the non-member if we are able and provide equipment provided the use of the
equipment does not compromise access to the equipment by WCSS members. To
obtain WCSS equipment the non-member must:




Request and obtain approval for the use of the equipment from the WCSS
Operations Manager, WCSS Operations Coordinator or other WCSS
designate.
Sign the non-member equipment use agreement before the equipment is
utilized.
Reimburse WCSS for the daily rental charges for the equipment that is
utilized (see schedule “B” in the non-member equipment use agreement).
Reimburse WCSS for any consumables, equipment repairs and/or
maintenance and equipment replacement if required.
*WCSS Management – WCSS Operations Manager, WCSS Operations Coordinator or
WCSS President & COO
Date of Last Revision: February 10, 2015
1

Although the term of the lease will not expire, the expectation is that, if the
anticipated use of the equipment lasts beyond 14 days, the WCSS Operations
Manager will negotiate an extension with the lessee.

Only persons who have successfully completed the WCSS Boat Handling Course
and have certification (including MED training), shall be permitted to operate the
Corporations’ boats.
The Lessee shall, at its expense, comply with and conform to all federal,
provincial, municipal and other laws, ordinances and regulations in any way
relating to the possession, use and maintenance of the Equipment. This
includes procuring a research permit prior to deploying any wildlife
deterrents.

From and including the time the Equipment is removed from the Storage Site to
and including the time that the Equipment is returned to the Storage Site, the
Lessee will at its own expense maintain “all-risk” property insurance of not less
than the replacement cost of the Equipment, together with comprehensive general
liability insurance (including coverage for property damage, bodily injury and
contractual liability).
Date of Last Revision: February 10, 2015
2
TABLE OF CONTENTS
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
ARTICLE 1 ......................................................................................................................................... 6
INTERPRETATION ....................................................................................................................... 6
1.1
Definitions ........................................................................................................................ 6
1.2
Headings ........................................................................................................................... 6
1.3
Number and Gender .......................................................................................................... 6
1.4
Calculation of Time Periods ............................................................................................. 7
1.5
Currency ........................................................................................................................... 7
ARTICLE 2 ......................................................................................................................................... 7
LEASE OF EQUIPMENT .............................................................................................................. 7
2.1
Lease of Equipment .......................................................................................................... 7
2.2
Term.................................................................................................................................. 7
ARTICLE 3 ......................................................................................................................................... 7
FEES AND COSTS .......................................................................................................................... 7
3.1
Fee .................................................................................................................................... 7
3.2
GST ................................................................................................................................... 7
3.3
Other Costs ....................................................................................................................... 8
3.4
Interest .............................................................................................................................. 8
ARTICLE 4 ......................................................................................................................................... 8
SELECTION OF EQUIPMENT .................................................................................................... 8
4.1
Check List ......................................................................................................................... 8
4.2
Selection of Equipment..................................................................................................... 8
4.3
Authorization .................................................................................................................... 8
ARTICLE 5 ......................................................................................................................................... 9
HANDLING, MAINTENANCE, REPAIR AND USE ................................................................. 9
5.1
Handling of Specified Equipment..................................................................................... 9
5.2
Maintenance, Repair and Alterations................................................................................ 9
5.3
Inspection and Repair Following Use ............................................................................. 10
5.4
Other Equipment ............................................................................................................. 10
5.5
Use .................................................................................................................................. 10
5.6
Inspection........................................................................................................................ 10
5.7
No Warranties ................................................................................................................. 10
5.8
Liens ............................................................................................................................... 10
ARTICLE 6 ....................................................................................................................................... 11
EQUIPMENT RISKS, INSURANCE AND TITLE.................................................................... 11
6.1
Equipment Risks ............................................................................................................. 11
6.2
Insurance ......................................................................................................................... 11
6.3
Title ................................................................................................................................. 11
Date of Last Revision: February 10, 2015
3
ARTICLE 7 12
INDEMNIFICATION BY LESSEE ............................................................................................. 12
7.1
Indemnification ............................................................................................................... 12
ARTICLE 8 ....................................................................................................................................... 12
DEFAULT....................................................................................................................................... 12
8.1
Default ............................................................................................................................ 12
8.2
Remedies Upon Default .................................................................................................. 13
8.3
Expenses Upon Default .................................................................................................. 13
8.4
Effective Waiver ............................................................................................................. 13
ARTICLE 9 ....................................................................................................................................... 14
MISCELLANEOUS....................................................................................................................... 14
9.1
Notice.............................................................................................................................. 14
9.2
Further Assurances ......................................................................................................... 14
9.3
Governing Laws.............................................................................................................. 14
9.5
Entire Agreement ............................................................................................................ 15
9.6
Time of the Essence ........................................................................................................ 15
9.7
Severability ..................................................................................................................... 15
9.8
Enurement ....................................................................................................................... 15
9.9
Assignment ..................................................................................................................... 15
9.10
Force Majeure ................................................................................................................. 15
9.11
No Amendment Except in Writing ................................................................................. 15
Date of Last Revision: February 10, 2015
4
EQUIPMENT LEASE AGREEMENT
THIS AGREEMENT made as of the _____ day of _______________, _______.
BETWEEN:
WESTERN CANADIAN SPILL SERVICES LTD., a body
corporate having an office at in the City of Calgary, in the
Province of Alberta (hereinafter referred to as the “Corporation’)
– and –
__________________________________________________, a
body
corporate
having
an
office
in
the
City
of
________________, in the Province of ________________
(hereinafter referred to as the “Lessee”)
WHEREAS the Corporation owns, manages or leases certain oil spill emergency response
equipment; and
WHEREAS the Lessee desires to lease from the Corporation certain oil spill emergency response
equipment,
NOW THEREFORE in consideration of the mutual covenants and agreement herein contained, the
Corporation and the Lessee agree as follows:
Date of Last Revision: February 10, 2015
5
ARTICLE 1
INTERPRETATION
1.1
Definitions
In this Agreement the following words and expressions shall have the following meanings:
“Agreement”, “this Agreement”, “herein”, “thereof”, “hereunder” and similar
expressions mean or refer to this Equipment Lease Agreement and any subsequent
amendments thereto;
“Business Day” means any day which is not Saturday, Sunday or a statutory holiday in
Alberta;
“Co-op” means the Western Canadian Spill Services Cooperative organized under the
Canada Cooperative Association Act;
“Deployment Site” means the location or locations where the Lessee uses or wishes to use
all or some of the Equipment for emergency oil spill containment and recovery operations;
“Equipment” means the oil spill emergency response equipment owned, managed or leased
by the Corporation, and leased to the Lessee hereunder for the purpose of emergency oil spill
containment and recovery operations at the Deployment Site;
“GST” means the Goods and Services Tax imposed under the provisions of Part IX of the
Excise Tax Act, R.S.C. 1985, C. E-15, as amended, or any successor or parallel provincial or
federal legislation that imposes a tax on the recipient of goods and services;
“Party” means a person who has agreed to be bound by this Agreement;
“person” includes an individual, a partnership, an incorporated company, an unincorporated
association and the legal representatives of an individual; and
“Storage Site” means the location or locations designated by the Corporation for storage of
all or any of the Equipment from time to time.
1.2
Headings
The insertion of headings is for convenience of reference only and shall not affect the construction or
interpretation of this Agreement. Unless something in the subject matter or context is inconsistent
with such references, references in this Agreement to Articles, Sections, subsections and paragraphs
are to Articles, Sections, subsections and paragraphs of this Agreement.
1.3
Number and Gender
Words importing the singular number only shall include the plural and vice versa, and words
importing the masculine gender shall include the feminine and neuter genders and vice versa.
Date of Last Revision: February 10, 2015
6
1.4
Calculation of Time Periods
Unless otherwise specified in this Agreement, when calculating the period of time within which or
following which any act is to be done or step taken pursuant to this Agreement, the date which is the
reference day in calculating such period shall be excluded. If the last day of such period is not a
Business Day, the period in question shall end on the next Business Day.
1.5
Currency
All dollar amounts referred to herein are expressed in Canadian funds.
ARTICLE 2
LEASE OF EQUIPMENT
2.1
Lease of Equipment
The Corporation hereby leases to the Lessee and the Lessee hereby leases from the Corporation, the
Equipment as set out in the attached Schedule “A”. The lessee accepts the terms of this lease with the
understanding that the equipment may be required by a member company and, therefore relocated
prior to completion of the incident.
2.2
Term
The term of this Agreement and the lease of the Equipment shall commence on the calendar day on
which (i) the Corporation, or an agent of the Corporation, or (ii) the Lessee, or an agent of the Lessee,
removes the Equipment from the Storage Site and shall continue to and including the later of (i) the
calendar day on which the Equipment is returned to the Storage Site; and (ii) the date on which all
outstanding obligations of the Lessee to the Corporation hereunder are satisfied.
Although the term of this lease will not expire, the expectation is that, if the expected use of the
equipment lasts beyond 15 days, that lessee pursues other equipment options.
ARTICLE 3
FEES AND COSTS
3.1
Fee
The Lessee shall pay to the Corporation those fees set forth and described in Schedule “B” hereto.
3.2
GST/PST (Saskatchewan, British Columbia)
The Lessee shall be responsible for the payment of GST/PST with respect to the Equipment. The
Corporation will collect from the Lessee such GST/PST and remit the GST/PST to the appropriate
governmental agency. Any such GST shall be paid by the Lessee in addition to the fees contemplated
in Section 3.1.
Date of Last Revision: February 10, 2015
7
3.3
Other Costs
Except as specifically provided herein, all costs associated with the transportation, storage,
maintenance and use of the Equipment, including insurance, and all costs of Corporation’s employees
or agents for their performance of services required under this Agreement during the term of this
Agreement shall be for the account of the Lessee.
3.4
Interest
All fees and all other costs under this Agreement shall be paid within thirty (30) days of receipt by the
Lessee of an invoice issued by the Corporation. All overdue accounts shall bear interest at the rate of
15% per annum from the last day of the term period without prejudice to the rights and remedies of
the Corporation under law.
ARTICLE 4
SELECTION OF EQUIPMENT
4.1
List of Equipment
Prior to the commencement of the term of this Agreement, the Corporation shall complete all relevant
sections of Schedule “A”. The Lessee is entitled to inspect and verify the condition of the Equipment
prior to leasing the same hereunder. Subject to any dispute by the Lessee as to the condition of the
Equipment, the Equipment shall be deemed to be in the condition set forth in Schedule “A” prepared
by the Corporation.
4.2
Selection of Equipment
The Lessee may use some or all of the Equipment. Prior to removal of such Equipment from the
Storage Site, the Lessee and the Corporation shall designate on Schedule “A” which Equipment is to
be removed by the Lessee from the Storage Site. The execution of Schedule “A” by the Lessee shall
be deemed to be an acknowledgement by the Lessee of all of the provisions set forth therein including
the equipment which has been removed by the Lessee from the Storage Site.
4.3
Authorization
The Parties agree that the Corporation shall not be obligated to make inquiry into the authority of any
officer or employee executing Schedule “A” on behalf of the Lessee and the Corporation shall be
entitled to rely on such execution as sufficient authorization by the Lessee of the matters set out in
Schedule “A”.
Date of Last Revision: February 10, 2015
8
ARTICLE 5
HANDLING, MAINTENANCE, REPAIR AND USE
5.1
Handling of Specified Equipment
(a)
Only persons who have successfully completed the “WCSS Boat Handling Course(including
Marine Emergency Duties 3) and additional training on barges and airboats shall be permitted
to operate the Corporation’s workboats, barges and airboats.
(b)
The persons described in subsections (a) and (b) above shall, while operating the
Corporation’s barges, airboats and work/safety boats, be deemed to be agents of the Lessee
and the Lessee shall indemnify and hold harmless such person from and against any losses,
costs, damages or expenses incurred in respect of any action taken on the Lessee’s behalf
except where such action by the person was grossly negligent or willfully damaging.
5.2
Maintenance, Repair and Alterations
(a)
The Lessee shall keep the Equipment in good repair, condition and working order and shall
be responsible for all expenses incurred in respect of necessary maintenance and repair
(including replacements) of the Equipment as a result of the use of the Equipment by the
Lessee. Prior to conducting any repairs or maintenance, the Lessee shall obtain the
Corporation’s approval of the nature and scope of repairs and maintenance to be conducted;
provided however that repairs and maintenance of a routine nature, which for greater
certainty shall not include replacement of parts or other major repairs, shall not require
the Corporation’s approval. All maintenance and repair of the Equipment shall be
conducted by a person acceptable to the Corporation. Specifically, the Lessee shall:
(i)
supply all fuel and lubricants necessary to operate the Equipment. It is understood
that although all Equipment will have been serviced at the Storage Site, fuel may
not be available;
(ii)
execute all repairs necessary to keep the Equipment in good repair, condition and
working order; and
(iii)
return the Equipment in a dry, clean and unmarred condition.
If the Lessee fails to comply with the foregoing provisions of this subsection 5.2(a), the
Corporation may, at the Lessee’s expense, take any action it deems necessary and shall be
entitled to immediate reimbursement from the Lessee for any costs or expenses incurred
without prejudice to any other rights or remedies of the Corporation set out in this
Agreement.
(b)
The Lessee shall not without the prior written consent of the Corporation make any
alterations to the Equipment. Any alterations so made to the Equipment shall be at the
Lessee’s expense and shall belong to and become the property of the Corporation subject to
the terms of this Agreement.
Date of Last Revision: February 10, 2015
9
5.3
Inspection and Repair Following Use
Within ten (10) Business Days after return of Equipment to the Storage Site, the Corporation shall
inspect the Equipment (with the Lessee or its representative if possible) and identify the items which
must be cleaned, drained, dried, repaired or replaced by the Lessee in order to restore the Equipment
to the same condition (reasonable wear and tear excepted) and cleanliness in which it was delivered to
the Lessee. The Lessee shall confirm the same by signing Schedule “A” which shall then be
sufficient authority for the Corporation to commence the required work. The Lessee shall be
responsible for all costs and expenses incurred in accordance with Schedule “A” or required to restore
the Equipment to the condition of the Equipment prior to removal from the Storage Site as described
in Schedule “A” and the Corporation will invoice the Lessee and the Lessee shall pay directly to the
Corporation all such amounts (including a twenty per cent (20%) administrative fee) incurred for such
maintenance, repair or replacement.
5.4
Other Equipment
The Lessee agrees and acknowledges that additional equipment other than the Equipment leased
hereunder may be required by the Lessee in the performance of necessary oil spill emergency
response procedures. The Lessee shall be solely responsible for supplying such additional equipment
including, without limitation, additional radio and other communication and safety equipment.
5.5
Use
The Lessee shall use the Equipment in a careful and prudent manner and for the purposes of
emergency oil spill containment and recovery operations or training exercises approved by the
Corporation. The Lessee shall, at its expense, comply with and conform to all federal, provincial,
municipal and other laws, ordinances and regulations in any way relating to the possession, use and
maintenance of the Equipment.
5.6
Inspection
The Corporation shall at all times during business hours have the right upon reasonable prior notice to
enter into and upon the lands and premises where the Equipment may be located for the purposes of
inspecting the Equipment and observing its use or to repossess and/or remove the Equipment.
5.7
No Warranties
No warranty, express or implied is made by the Corporation or its agents, employees or directors as to
the ability of the Corporation’s employees or agents or the correctness, sufficiency or suitability of
the Equipment, or that any information, recommendation or suggestions including the use or
deployment of Equipment supplied or made by the Corporation or its employees or agents will
provide for total or effective cleanup or containment of a spill, nor do they assume any responsibility
in connection therewith.
5.8
Liens
The Lessee will ensure that all Equipment leased from the Corporation hereunder is kept free and
clear of all liens, charges and encumbrances. The Lessee shall give the Corporation immediate notice
of any seizure, attachment, lien or other judicial process affecting any item of the Equipment.
Date of Last Revision: February 10, 2015
10
ARTICLE 6
EQUIPMENT RISKS, INSURANCE AND TITLE
6.1
Equipment Risks
Upon removal of the Equipment from the Storage Site, the Lessee shall bear all risk of loss with
respect to damage, destruction, loss, theft or governmental taking of any kind of any item of the
Equipment as well as all risks to the Lessee and others in connection with the Equipment. The Lessee
will notify the Corporation of any damage, destruction, loss, theft or governmental taking and, unless
the Corporation is otherwise agreeable, the Lessee shall either:
(a)
immediately on demand pay to the Corporation the replacement value; or
(b)
subject to the written consent of the Corporation, repair or replace the Equipment or the items
or parts of the Equipment that are the subject of such damage, destruction, loss, theft or
governmental taking with equipment of like manufacture, value, class, utility and quality so
that the Equipment is put into first class mechanical and working order as determined by the
Corporation.
6.2
Insurance
From and including the time the Equipment is removed from the Storage Site to and including the
time that the Equipment is returned to the Storage Site, the Lessee will at its own expense maintain
“all-risk” property insurance of not less than the replacement cost of the Equipment, together with
comprehensive general liability insurance (including coverage for property damage, bodily injury and
contractual liability) and any other form of insurance covering the Equipment against risks as
considered prudent for that type of property by operators of business similar to that run by the Lessee
or as may be reasonably required by the Corporation. The Lessee, will, upon request, give the
Corporation evidence acceptable to the Corporation that the insurance coverage is in effect. If the
Lessee fails to obtain or maintain such insurance, the Corporation may do so and shall be entitled to
immediate reimbursement from the Lessee without prejudice to any other rights or remedies of the
Corporation set out in this Agreement. The Lessee shall immediately advise the insurer and the
Corporation of any and all accidents or claims involving the Equipment. Any insurance proceeds
paid in respect of a loss of Equipment shall be paid to the Corporation.
6.3
Title
Nothing in this Agreement shall give or convey to the Lessee any right, title, estate or interest in and
to the Equipment together with any alterations thereof except as Lessee hereunder.
Date of Last Revision: February 10, 2015
11
ARTICLE 7
INDEMNIFICATION BY LESSEE
7.1
Indemnification
The Lessee hereby agrees to indemnify and save harmless the Corporation, its directors, officers,
employees or agents from and against any and all actions, causes of action, suits, claims, demands,
costs, losses and expenses resulting from loss, injury, death or damage in respect of any party or
person or government or government agency which may be brought against or incurred or suffered by
the Corporation, its directors, officers, employees or agents or which the Corporation, its directors,
officers, employees or agents may sustain, pay or incur by reason of or which may be attributable to
or arise out of:
(a)
any act, omission, misrepresentation or breach of warranty or covenant or obligation by the
Lessee in connection with this Agreement.
(b)
the maintenance, repair, use, operation, possession, storage, delivery or transportation of the
Equipment by the Lessee or the failure to maintain, repair, use, operate, store, deliver or
transport the Equipment in a manner required hereunder or by applicable laws;
(c)
the condition (including without limitation latent and other defects with respect thereto,
whether or not discoverable by the Corporation or the Lessee) of the Equipment and or
surface rights upon which the Equipment is located or the escape, release or spill of any
containment or other substance processed in or used in connection with the Equipment; and
(d)
all removal, abandonment, salvage, reclamation, environmental and health matters pertaining
to the Equipment and all obligations, damages, costs, fines and penalties associated therewith
whether arising by or imposed by applicable laws, agreements or otherwise;
and the Lessee agrees to assume liability for all losses, costs, expenses, liabilities and damages
suffered or incurred by the Corporation, its directors, officers, employees or agents resulting from or
in any way attributable or arising out of the foregoing matters.
ARTICLE 8
DEFAULT
8.1
Default
The Corporation shall be entitled to exercise the rights and remedies set out below on the occurrence
of any one or more of the following events, each of which is an event of default (herein called an
“Event of Default”) under this Agreement:
(a)
the Lessee fails to perform any of its obligations (including failure to pay any amount when
due) under this Agreement and the default continues for 15 days;
Date of Last Revision: February 10, 2015
12
(b)
any of the Equipment is subjected to any lien, charge, encumbrance, levy, seizure, attachment
or judicial process or the Lessee sells, leases, mortgages or pledges, or attempts to sell, lease,
mortgage or pledge any of the Equipment;
(c)
the Lessee makes an assignment for the benefit of its creditors, becomes insolvent, commits
any act of bankruptcy, ceases or threatens to cease to do business as a going concern, or seeks
any arrangement or composition with its creditors;
(d)
any proceeding in bankruptcy, receivership, liquidation or insolvency is commenced by or
against the Lessee or a substantial part of its property; or
(e)
in the opinion of the Corporation, acting reasonably, an event has occurred or is reasonably
likely to occur which may materially reduce the value of the Equipment or the Corporation’s
interest in it or increase the risk to it (normal wear and tear excluded).
8.2
Remedies Upon Default
Upon the occurrence of any Event of Default, the Corporation may in its sole discretion exercise one
or more of the following remedies without prejudice to any other right it may have at law or
otherwise:
(a)
the Corporation may, at its option and without terminating this Agreement, do all acts and
make all expenditures to remedy such default and the Lessee shall forthwith, upon demand,
reimburse the Corporation for any and all expenditures; and
(b)
the Corporation may, at its option, declare this Agreement to be terminated.
Notwithstanding anything contained elsewhere in this Agreement, no Event of Default shall be cured
or remedied under this Agreement until all defaults under this Agreement are cured and all amounts
owing under this Agreement are paid.
8.3
Expenses Upon Default
The Corporation’s costs and expenses incurred in respect of legal proceedings to recover any monies
due hereunder, taking possession of the Equipment and enforcement of any of the Corporation’s
rights, including, without limitation, legal costs on a solicitor-client basis, shall be paid by the Lessee
to the Corporation immediately upon demand.
8.4
Effective Waiver
No delay or omission to exercise any right or remedy accruing to the Corporation upon any breach or
default of the Lessee will impair any such right or remedy or be construed to be a waiver of any such
breach or default, nor will a waiver of any single breach or default be deemed a waiver of any other
breach or default occurring prior thereto or thereafter. Any waiver, permit, consent or approval on the
part of the Corporation of any breach or default under this Agreement, or of any provision or
condition hereof, must be in writing and will be effective only to the extent specifically set forth.
Date of Last Revision: February 10, 2015
13
ARTICLE 9
MISCELLANEOUS
9.1
Notice
Any disclosure, notice, direction or other communication required or permitted to be given by any
party to any party hereunder (a “notice”) shall be in writing and delivered personally or by registered
mail to the parties at the following addresses:
(a)
To the Lessee:
_________________________________
_________________________________
_________________________________
_________________________________
Attention:
(b)
To the Corporation:
Western Canadian Spill Services Ltd.
Box 503, 3545-32nd Avenue N.E
Calgary, Alberta
T1Y 6M6
Attention: Alan B. McFadyen
Any notice shall, if delivered, be deemed to have been given and received on the date on which it was
delivered if a Business Day and on the next succeeding Business Day if not a Business Day and if
given by registered mail shall be deemed to have been received by the party to whom the same is
addressed on the second Business Day following the day upon which such notice sent by registered
mail has been deposited with the appropriate post office, postage and cost of registration prepaid.
Any of the parties may change its designated address for notices by notice in writing to the other
party. In the event of an interruption in postal service, any notice shall be delivered personally.
9.2
Further Assurances
The Parties shall promptly sign such further and other papers, and do and perform or cause to be done
and performed any further and other acts and things as may be necessary or desirable in order to give
full effect to this Agreement.
9.3
Governing Laws
This Agreement shall be governed by and construed in accordance with the laws of the Province of
Alberta and each of the Parties exclusively attorn to the jurisdiction of the courts of Alberta.
9.4
Counterparts
This Agreement may be executed in as many counterparts as are deemed necessary by the Parties and,
when so executed, each counterpart shall be as valid and binding on all Parties as every other
counterpart.
Date of Last Revision: February 10, 2015
14
9.5
Entire Agreement
This Agreement constitutes the entire agreement among the Parties and there are no other written or
verbal agreements or representations.
9.6
Time of the Essence
Time shall be of the essence of this Agreement.
9.7
Severability
If any provision of this Agreement, or the application of such provision to any person or in any
circumstance, shall be held to be invalid, the remaining provisions of this Agreement, and the
application of such provision to any persons or in any circumstances other than those as to which it is
held invalid, shall not be affected thereby.
9.8
Enurement
The Agreement shall enure to the benefit of and be binding upon the Parties and their respective
personal representatives, successors and assigns.
9.9
Assignment
This Agreement shall enure to the benefit of and be binding upon the Parties and their respective
personal representatives, successors and assigns.
9.10
Force Majeure
The Parties shall be excused from the performance of any of their obligations herein from time to
time, but only so long as it is prevented from performance by any cause beyond its reasonable control
including, but not limited to, acts of God or of the Queen’s enemies, strike, walkout, fire or explosion;
provided however, that the lack of funds shall never be considered a cause beyond the reasonable
control of either party.
9.11
No Amendment Except in Writing
No amendment or variation of the provisions of this Agreement shall be binding upon any Party
unless and until it is evidenced in writing executed by all Parties.
Date of Last Revision: February 10, 2015
15
IN WITNESS WHEREOF the Parties have executed this Agreement as of the day and year first
above written.
LESSOR:
WESTERN CANADIAN SPILL SERVICES LTD.
NAME: _____________________________TITLE:____________________________________
SIGNATURE: _____________________________ PHONE NUMBER: ____________________
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------LESSEE: ________________________________________________________________________
NAME:_______________________________TITLE:____________________________________
SIGNATURE: _____________________________PHONE NUMBER: _____________________
BILLING CONTACT INFORMATION:
NAME__________________________________________________________
ADDRESS_______________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________
Date of Last Revision: February 10, 2015
16
Equipment
Location
SPILL 
(Year/Month/Day)
Date Out
EXERCISE 
Condition
S - Satisfactory
U - Unsatisfactory
(Year/Month/Day)
Date Returned
Condition
S - Satisfactory
U - Unsatisfactory
(repairs, replaced, etc.)
Follow-up Required
OTHER ________________________________________________________
Date of Last Revision: February 10, 2015
17
LESSEE NAME: _______________________LESSEE SIGNATURE:_______________________________ DATE: _________________
Equipment Description
TYPE OF USAGE:
________________________________________________________________________________
LESSEE (USER) NAME/COMPANY:
TELEPHONE: _________________ FAX: _______________ CELL: _______________________
________________________________________________________________________________
EQUIPMENT DESTINATION :
WCSS EQUIPMENT LEASE AGREEMENT
SCHEDULE “A”
SCHEDULE “B”
Fee Schedule





















Oily Debris Separator
Test Tank
Boom Vane
Heavy Oil Skimmer
Wildlife Trailer
Training Trailer
OSCAR Trailer
Air Curtain Incinerator
Containment Boom rental (fast water)
Containment Boom rental (oil stained, fast water)**
Containment Boom rental (lake boom)
Containment Boom rental (oil stained, lake)**
Cooperative Initial Response Units
Lake Boom Sea-can and Lake Boom trailer
Winter OSCARS
Work Boats
Barges
Barge with Bow Collector
Air Boats
Drum Skimmers
WCSS Operations Manager or designate
$650 per day
$1,000 per day
$500 per day
$1,500 per day
$1,500 per day
$1,800 per day
$3,000 Per day
$3,000 per day
$50.00/day for each 50 foot section
$25.00/day for each 50 foot section
$75.00/day for each 50 foot section
$37.50/day for each 50 foot section
$1,800 per day
$1,800 per day
$1,800 per day
$1,000 per day
$1,800 per day
$3,000 per day
$1,800 per day
$500 per day
$800 per day plus expenses
**WCSS maintains an inventory of oil-stained boom that could be utilized in surface water
contaminated by oil; the stained boom must not be used in clean, fresh surface water. If the stained
boom cannot be returned to WCSS after use because it is heavily stained and with free oil trapped
in the chain pockets, the user will be charged 20% of the boom’s replacement value and is
responsible for disposal of the boom.
Note: Companies that are charged for equipment as non-members may be exempted for a portion
of or the entire daily rental fee if they are in fact WCSS members in good standing at the
time of equipment use.
Revised February 2015
18
OIL SPILL
CONTINGENCY
MANUAL
SECTION
11
MAPS
Maps
CONTROL POINTS
11.1
ACCESS MAPS
11.2
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
CONTROL POINTS
11.1
Emergency Services and Local Resources
Local Resources – Stakeholders Contacts – Spills on Water
CO-OP AREA
 Information to be inserted by Co-op
RIVER / CREEK NAME
Geographical
Location (LSD
/ TWP / RGE /
MER)
Irrigation
Nearest
Control
Point #
Organization
Name
Contact
Name
Contact
Work /
Residence
Number
Municipal Water Intake
Contact
City / Contact
Work /
Town
Name
Residence
Number
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
Geographical
Location (LSD
/ TWP / RGE /
MER)
NOTE
Private Water User
Nearest
Control Point #
Contact Name
Contact Work
/ Residence
Number
Municipal Water Intake
Contact
City /
Contact
Work /
Town
Name
Residence
Number
Photocopy and complete the above table for each
watercourse.
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
ACCESS MAPS
11.2
Oil Spill Contingency Manual July 2013
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