Safety Program Master-3-4-2015.indd

Safety Program Master-3-4-2015.indd
The Raymond Group
Safety and Health
Program
Corporate Of ice:
520 W. Walnut Avenue
Orange, California 92868
Toll Free: 800.874.4878
Phone: 714.771.7670
Fax: 714.633.1558
www.RaymondGroup.com
License Numbers:
Southern California - 243645, 104881, 877824, 811408
Northern California - 307786
Nevada - 35448, 37659, 37484, 39983, 46243, 68579,
68584, 68582, 68581,68583
Washington - RAYMOL*877CO
Arizona - ROC236764
Louisiana - 29558
New Mexico - 90694
Oregon - 204718
Texas - Cert. of Authority# 00108299
Includes Required Elements of:
CAL OSHA Title 8 CCR 3202 Injury
and Illness Prevention Program
Nevada Revised Statute 618.383
Written Workplace Safety Program
WA Administrative Code
296.800.14005
Written Accident Prevention Plan
Revised March 2015
Copyright © 2008 by The Raymond Group
SAFETY & HEALTH
PROGRAM
Our Safety and Health Vision
To be the safest specialty contractor
in each of our market areas.
Our Safety and Health Objective
Prevention of all injuries and illness at work.
Our Safety and Health Policy
We promote and protect the health and well-being
of our employees, subcontractors and visitors and
effectively manage illness and injury to reduce cost.
SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM
Revised March 2015
SAFETY & HEALTH
PROGRAM
SAFETY AND HEALTH POLICY SUMMARY
Policy
Our foremost objective is the prevention of injury and illness at work. We will promote and protect
the health and well being of our employees and effectively manage illness and injury to reduce
cost.
Expectations
We will:
•
Operate in full compliance with all applicable Federal, State and Local codes and regulations.
•
Establish and support procedures and rules that promote health and safety of people and
operations.
•
Treat injured employees with dignity and respect and provide the best medical treatment for
workplace injury and illness.
•
•
Maintain a workplace absent of the effects of alcohol and other drugs of abuse.
Maintain a high level of awareness within the company regarding health and safety, including
ongoing promotion and support of healthy and safe personal lifestyles for our employees and
their families.
Employee
Employees are responsible for:
Responsibilities
•
Working diligently to protect their own health and safety and that of their co-workers on
the job.
•
Maintaining safety awareness during off-the-job activities.
•
Understanding the benefits of wellness behavior and principles for a healthy lifestyle.
Every employee has the responsibility and the right to refuse to perform work they believe is unsafe
without fear of reprisal.
If you have concerns as to whether or not a task is safe for you to perform, please discuss the
situation with your manager or you may contact the Safety Department
Supervisor
Manager’s responsibilities include:
Responsibilities
SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM
Revised March 2015
SAFETY & HEALTH
PROGRAM
Planning
•
Establishing health and safety goals.
•
Helping to develop health and safety procedures and rules, and enforcing their use.
•
Helping develop, practice and maintain emergency procedures.
•
Keeping updated on current health and safety practices.
•
Providing a clean, orderly operating environment that is free of physical, chemical,
mechanical, biological and ergonomic hazards.
Education
•
Providing education and training regarding job hazards and ways to eliminate risks.
•
Encouraging employee feedback regarding job safety.
•
Modeling and reinforcing safe and healthy behaviors.
•
Developing and maintaining an environment that supports the practice of healthy lifestyles
and encourages employee involvement in health and safety activities.
Investigation and recordkeeping
•
Ensuring thorough critical incident investigation.
•
Ensuring accurate reporting and recording of incidents.
•
Documenting corrective actions taken to avoid recurring incidents.
Evaluations and audits
•
Evaluating health and safety performance using tools such as internal audits and inspection
checklists.
Consequences Failure to comply with this policy could lead to:
•
Adverse fines and legal actions taken against the company.
•
Disciplinary action taken against an employee, up to and including dismissal.
Safety and Health performance is taken into consideration for job promotion and pay increases.
Approval
Approved by Senior Management Team May 6, 2008
SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM
Revised March 2015
SAFETY & HEALTH
PROGRAM
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Chapter 1
Statement of Policy
Chapter 2
Responsibility for Safety and Health
Chapter 3
Code of Safe Work Practices
Chapter 4
Communicating Safety and Health Issues
Chapter 5
Hazard Assessment Control
Chapter 6
Incident Investigating & Reporting
Chapter 7
Fall Protection
Chapter 8
Hazard Communication
Chapter 9
Respiratory Protection
Chapter 10
Emergency Actions
Chapter 11
Electrical Safety
Chapter 12
Safety Program Compliance
Chapter 13
Asbestos and Lead Policy
Chapter 14
Mold Policy
Chapter 15
Safety Committees
Chapter 16
Substance Abuse Policy
Chapter 17
Heat Illness Prevention
SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM
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SAFETY & HEALTH
PROGRAM
APPENDICES
Appendix A
Supplemental Safety Training/Meeting
Appendix B
Tailgate Meeting
Appendix C
Employee Safety Suggestion
Appendix D
Employee Safety Orientation
Appendix E
Supervisory Role in New Employee Training
Appendix F
Daily Job Site Safety Inspection
Appendix G
Daily Scaffold Inspection
Appendix H
Forklift Operator Daily Checklist
Appendix I
Office Safety Inspection
Appendix J
Warehouse/Yard Inspection Checklist
Appendix K
Incident Investigation Report
Appendix L
Incident Investigation Tips
Appendix M
Employee Disciplinary Warning Notice
Appendix N
Hazardous Substance List
Appendix O
Hazard Communication –Employee Rights
Appendix P
How to Read an MSDS
Appendix Q
OSHA Form 300 – Log & Summary of Occupational Injuries & Illnesses
Appendix R
Incentive Program (Field/Foreman)
Appendix S
Emergency/Disaster Responses
Appendix T
Bomb Threat Checklist/Response
Appendix U
Contaminant Color Code Table
Appendix V
Mastclimber Scaffold
Appendix W
Suspension Scaffold
Appendix X
Scissorslift
Appendix Y
Boomlift
Appendix Z
Welders
Appendix AA
Sample Asbestos and Lead Templates
Appendix AB
Sample Mold Templates
Appendix AC
Respirator Use Chart
Appendix AD
Respirator Protection Program Evaluation
Appendix AE
Qualitative Respirator Fit-Test Documentation
Appendix AF
Stilts
Appendix AG
Supplemental Policies
SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM
Revised March 2015
CHAPTER ONE
POLICY
The Raymond Group is committed to protecting the safety and health of each employee as a value of the
organization. The implementation of actions to help achieve a healthy, injury-free work environment is a leadership
responsibility. To help ensure that policy commitments are translated into appropriate actions, we recognize the
importance of employee participation. We have a commitment to continual improvement of employee safety and
health. Finally, the organization must conduct operations in compliance with applicable law and regulations, as well
as in conformance with its own safety and health standard. To assure the success of our policy, the company has
implemented this Safety and Health Program. The program encompasses the following items:
• Identifying roles and responsibilities.
• Providing you with workplace safety practices.
• Conducting safety and health inspections to find and eliminate unsafe working conditions
or health hazards.
• Investigating workplace accidents promptly and thoroughly to find the cause and to
make corrections so that it does not happen again.
• Training all employees in good safety and health practices.
• Establishing communications regarding workplace safety and health.
• Developing and enforcing safety and health rules and requiring employees to follow
these rules as a condition of employment.
• Recognizing employees for safe practices or performance, and counseling employees
for failure to follow safe and healthful practices.
Raymond recognizes that safety is a shared responsibility. These responsibilities can be met only by working continuously
to promote safe work practices among all employees and to maintain property and equipment in safe operating
condition. By working together we can maintain a safe working environment for all employees.
Every employee has the responsibility and the right to refuse to perform work they believe is unsafe without fear of
reprisal.
_______________________________________________
Travis W. Winsor, Chief Executive Officer
SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM
Revised March 2015
CHAPTER TWO
ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
President, Chief Executive Officer
•
Issues the Raymond Safety and Health Policy and sets the example for the Safety and
Health culture.
•
•
Is responsible for the overall implementation of the Raymond Safety and Health Program.
Provides the time and personnel necessary to complete the required training, obtain the
necessary safety equipment and provide supervision to monitor safety activities meeting
Raymond’s safety policies.
Senior Management
•
Provides visible guidance and operational leadership for implementing the culture, and the Safety
and Health Program consistently with the organization’s policy in all facilities and operations.
•
Assess information provided during a management review, and direct actions to continually
improve the Safety and Health Program and reduce risk in the workplace.
Directors, Managers and Department Heads
•
Communicate and implement the organization’s Safety and Health Program and its requirements
to employees, visitors, and contractors.
•
Direct individuals under your supervision, including but not limited to supervisors; regular and
temporary employees, contractors, and other affected personnel to obtain any required
Safety and Health Program - related training.
•
Develop a process to maintain incident/illness prevention and Safety and Health programs.
•
Develop a process to perform risk assessments.
•
Determine that Safety and Health Program objectives and needs for units/departments are met.
•
Incorporate Safety and Health Program requirements and responsibilities into each appropriate job
description, and ensure that system requirements and expectations are communicated to each
employee.
•
(Engineering) Assess the Safety and Health impact of new processes and equipment, and
incorporate appropriate controls.
•
(Procurement/Contractor) Include Safety and Health Program performance when evaluating and
selecting suppliers and contractors.
•
Maintain and improve programs for occupational health, hazardous materials management,
radiation safety, general safety, incident/fire prevention, and biological safety.
SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM
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CHAPTER TWO
Directors, Managers and Department Heads (cont.)
•
Conduct periodic Safety and Health audits (hazards, risks, and management systems) of work areas
and/or facilities.
•
Maintain and improve emergency action and disaster preparedness plans that provide clear roles
and responsibilities for all personnel, in order to ensure familiarity and coordination between facility
personnel and emergency responders.
Supervisors
•
Implement the Safety and Health Program and all other organizational safety practices and
programs under your supervision or control.
•
Require all employees under your direction to successfully complete required Safety and Health
Program training.
•
Recommend, and implement Safety and Health Program improvements.
•
Collect appropriate data per the Safety and Health Program.
•
Ensure that there is a process in place to maintain workplaces and equipment under your direction
that are safe, well kept, and in compliance with the Safety and Health Policy.
•
Ensure that procedures are developed for the safe use of hazardous chemical, physical,
radiological, and biological substances.
•
Conduct or arrange for risk assessments.
•
Conduct incident investigations.
•
Meet all Safety and Health needs for units/departments (e.g., engineering controls, training,
personal protective equipment, and corrective measures including non-compliance items
identified in Safety and Health audits).
Employees
•
Comply with the organization’s Safety and Health Policy and all other Safety and Health
practices, programs, and procedures.
•
Successfully complete required Safety and Health Program training.
•
Participate in the Safety and Health Program by reporting incidents or near misses, attending
Safety and Health meetings, reporting problems and recommending improvements, and other
related activities.
•
Inform a supervisor or instructor of any safety hazards or system deficiencies in the workplace.
SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM
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CHAPTER TWO
Safety and Health Department
•
Advise management and employees about responsibilities regarding the
Safety and Health Program.
•
Develop a process that prepares documents and guidelines for programs to ensure individual
and organizational compliance with relevant Safety and Health laws, regulations, policies, and
guidelines.
•
•
Recommend programs and actions for compliance.
Develop effective programs for occupational health, hazardous materials management,
general safety, accident and fire prevention, biological safety, and disaster preparedness
and emergency response.
•
Provide guidance and technical assistance to supervisors and managers in departments and
other work units in identifying, evaluating, and correcting Safety and Health hazards.
•
Provide guidance and assistance in performing risk assessments.
•
Provide training and materials assistance to ensure safe and healthful work practices.
•
Conduct analyses of occupational incidents and injuries.
•
Analyze injury and illness and monitoring data for trends.
•
Monitor compliance with the Safety and Health Program including Safety and Health statutes
and regulations and organizational Safety and Health policies, programs, and guidelines.
•
Note instances of noncompliance, and recommend improvements of the
Safety and Health Program.
SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM
Revised March 2015
CHAPTER THREE
CODE OF SAFE WORK PRACTICES
1.
General Rules
a. Horseplay, scuffling, and other acts that tend to have an adverse influence on the safety or wellbeing of the employees shall be prohibited.
b. Observe all signs intended to caution and/or instruct employees.
c. Report any unsafe condition to your supervisor immediately.
d. Report any accident or injury to your supervisor immediately when the injury occurs.
e. No one is allowed to work under trucks solely supported by jacks. Trucks must be secured with
stands.
f. No employee shall be permitted to remove or make ineffective any safeguard/safety device in
use for personnel protection.
g. Use only tools in good condition; check them prior to use.
h. Never operate machinery or equipment unless authorized and qualified to do so.
i. Employees who drive on company property must obey speed limit (5 m.p.h.).
j. Only authorized employees may make repairs to machinery and equipment. Advise your
supervisor when repairs are needed.
k. The use of drugs or alcoholic beverages is prohibited during working hours. Anyone known to be
under the influence of drugs or alcohol shall be subject to immediate dismissal.
l. No one shall knowingly be permitted or required to work while the employee’s ability or alertness
is so impaired by fatigue, illness, or other causes that it might unnecessarily expose the employee
or others to injury.
m. When lifting heavy objects, the large muscles of the leg instead of the smaller muscles of the
back shall be used.
n. Inappropriate footwear or shoes with thin or badly worn soles shall not be worn.
o. Materials, tools, or other objects shall not be thrown from buildings or structures until proper
precautions are taken to protect others from the falling objects.
p. Use “whip checks” at all concrete pump hose line connections, and on air compressor hoses that
do not have a positive means to prevent accidental disconnection.
q. Always wear rubber gloves when working with paints or solvents.
r. Seatbelts must be worn at all times. This includes; driving forklifts, driving company vehicles, and
driving personal vehicles while conducting company business.
SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM
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CHAPTER THREE
2.
Housekeeping
a. Each employee is responsible for keeping his/her work area clean and in order.
b. Working areas are to be kept free from all debris and waste materials (no trash should hit the
ground).
c. Return all tools and other equipment to proper places after use.
d. Flammable liquids, waste and other materials must be stored in approved, marked containers.
e. Do not place materials in aisle ways or doorways which block the passage of others.
f. Keep all extension cords out of the middle of walkways, and as close to wall as possible.
3.
Injury Reporting
a. Every injury sustained while at work, no matter how small, must be reported immediately to your
supervisor.
b. All employees requiring medical treatment must notify their supervisor prior to obtaining
treatment except in cases of emergency. Employees requiring emergency care shall be taken
to the nearest medical facility as soon as possible. In severe cases, the transportation shall be
provided by an ambulance.
4.
Ladders
a. Use care in placing a ladder. The foot of the ladder shall be one fourth of the ladder length
away from the support.
b. Always place ladders against a solid backing.
c. Always face the ladder and use both hands when ascending and descending.
d. Do not use metal ladders to work on or near electrical circuits or power
lines.
e. Never work above the second rung from the top of a ladder or stepladder (except for platform
ladders).
f. Do not use broken or damaged ladders.
g. Do not leave tools on top of a stepladder or on any other elevated place.
h. Don’t over-reach - move the ladder.
i. Do not use a stepladder as a straight ladder.
j. Place ladders on hard level surfaces.
k. Must be trained by a Competent Person.
5.
Stilts
a. Work areas shall be inspected and should be clear of obstructions and debris prior to daily tasks.
b. Work areas shall have holes and other tripping hazards identified and clearly marked prior to
daily tasks.
c. Daily inspections shall be documented.
SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM
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CHAPTER THREE
5.
Stilts (cont.)
d. Elevated surface shall be used for stilts being put on and when stilts are taken off.
e. Altered/modified stilts will not be permitted on Raymond jobsites.
f. Stilt use in stairwells or on ladders shall not be permitted on Raymond jobsites.
g. Guardrail height shall be increased or other protection will be added when daily tasks require
work near potential Fall Hazards.
h. Area Superintendent and Safety Department shall review potential hazards and Safe Work
Practices, before use of stilts on a large area scaffold.
i. Safe Work Practices shall be used when Tapers are working with hand tools, Bazookas, Boxes,
sanding poles and sanding sponges while on stilts.
6.
Scaffolds - General
a. A qualified/competent person shall inspect scaffolds each morning to ensure they are safe.
b. Guardrails, midrails, and toeboards shall be installed where required.
c. Keep platforms free from debris and waste materials.
d. Notify your supervisor of any unsafe scaffold so that it can be repaired. Do not work on unsafe
scaffolding.
e. Use ladders to mount and dismount the scaffold. Do not jump to or from the scaffold. Do not use
guardrails or cross braces to climb scaffolds.
Do not use a scaffold that is not tied securely to a building.
f. All employees working over 6 feet will use appropriate fall protection equipment/provisions.
g. Work from scaffolds is prohibited when exposed to storms or high winds in excess of 30 mph, or
when conditions are determined to be unsafe by a competent person.
h. Ensure that all scaffolds in use are properly tagged according to their condition. Red – Do not
use, Yellow – Warning, Green – Safe for access.
7.
Rolling Scaffolds
a. Where height of scaffold exceeds three times the width of the base, use outriggers.
b. Caster brakes must be set when climbing or working from scaffolds.
c. Riding on a Self-Propelled Scaffold. One employee may ride on and move a rolling scaffold while
on the platform without assistance from others below provided the following conditions are met:
i. The floor or surface is within 3 degrees of level, and free from pits, holes, or obstructions.
ii. The wheels are equipped with rubber or similar resilient tires.
iii. The scaffold platform shall not be more than 4 feet above the floor level.
iv. The working platform shall be no less than 20 inches in width with a maximum 1 inch space
between platform planks.
SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM
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CHAPTER THREE
7.
Rolling Scaffolds (cont.)
v. Wheels or casters of rolling scaffolds shall be provided with an effective locking device
or rolling scaffolds shall be provided with an effective device that is used to prevent
movement of the scaffold when workers are climbing or working on the scaffold.
vi. The use of power systems such as motor vehicles, add-on motors, or battery powered
equipment to propel a rolling scaffold is prohibited
8.
Aerial Work Platforms
a. Only certified operators will operate specific models.
b. Ensure the operator is familiar with the Aerial Work Platform to be operated.
c. When operating a Boom-assisted lift, Personal Fall Restraint System will be worn.
d. An equipment inspection will be conducted, by the operator prior to use, every shift and kept
with the equipment; along with the Owner’s Manual & Safety Manual.
e. When moving in any direction (up, down, forward, back) clear & loud communication will be
used, announcing your direction of movement.
f. When at all possible, DO NOT roll/drive over electrical cords. NEVER rest a list over an electrical
cord.
g. Inspect the work area obstructions. Keep a clear path of travel when moving. BE AWARE OF
YOUR SURROUNDING.
9.
Equipment - Trucks, Mixers, Pumps, Compressors
a. Only authorized employees may make repairs to machinery and equipment. Advise your
supervisor when repairs are needed.
b. The operator shall inspect equipment at the beginning of each shift. Any unsafe condition must
be reported to the job supervisor or to the company mechanic immediately.
c. Do not remove protective guards from equipment.
d. Do not attempt to make repairs or adjustments to moving equipment. Lock-out procedures will
be used.
e. Inspect hoses each day for cuts, abrasive wear, or weak casings.
f. Do not wear loose or frayed clothing around operating equipment
g. Use extreme caution when refueling equipment to avoid the danger of fire and/or explosion.
10. Hand and Power Tools
a. General
i. All hand tools shall be kept in good repair and used only for the purpose for which
designed.
ii. Do not drop or throw tools from one location to another.
SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM
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10.
Hand and Power Tools (cont.)
iii. Sharp edged or pointed tools shall not be carried in employee’s pockets.
iv. Only non-sparking tools shall be used in locations where sources of ignition may cause a fire
or explosion.
v. Do not operate a saw, grinder, drill, rivet gun or any other power tool unless you have been
authorized to do so by your supervisor.
vi. Never use a saw or grinder without the blade or wheel guard in place.
vii. Never leave an operating machine unattended. Turn off and wait for blade, wheel, etc. to
stop.
viii. Do not use chisels, hammers or other tools on which the heads have become
mushroomed.
ix. All operators shall make a careful inspection of their machinery and tools at the beginning
of each shift.
b. Grinding tools
i. Grinding wheels shall be guarded for at least three fourths of the circumference.
ii. Work or tool rests shall not be adjusted while grinding wheel is in motion. Tool rests on
power grinders shall not be allowed to be more than 1/8” distance from the wheel.
iii. Cracked or damaged grinding wheel shall not be used and must be reported to your
supervisor. DO NOT DROP grinding equipment.
c. Power Saws
i. Portable circular power saws must be equipped with guards that automatically and
completely enclose the cutting edges when not in use.
ii. Cracked, bent, or damaged blades must not be used.
iii. Power saws shall not be left running while unattended.
iv. Hearing protection shall be worn when operating power saws.
d. Pneumatic Tools
i. Safety clips or retainers shall be installed on pneumatic impact tools to prevent dies and
tools from being accidentally expelled from the barrel.
ii. Leaking, or defective hoses shall be removed from service and reported to your supervisor.
iii. Hoses shall not be laid over ladders, steps, scaffolds or walkways in such a manner as to
create a tripping hazard.
iv. The use of compressed air for blowing dirt from hands, face, or clothing is prohibited.
v. All pneumatic tools shall have an approved safety check-valve installed at the manifold
outlet of each supply line.
vi. When required by manufacturer’s recommendations, hearing protection shall be worn
when operating pneumatic tools.
SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM
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CHAPTER THREE
11. Material Handling
a. Always lift properly. Keep back straight and lift with leg muscles. Get assistance where needed.
b. Wear full fingered cut/puncture resistant gloves when handling sharp or rough materials.
c. Never relocate compressed gas cylinders without first properly securing them so as to prevent
their falling or striking an object during transit.
d. Stack, pile or rack materials in a stable manner, so as to prevent tipping, rolling, falling, etc...
e. Do not place materials in aisle ways or doorways which block the passage of others.
12. Forklifts
a. Only drivers authorized by the company and trained in the safe operations of industrial trucks or
industrial tow tractors shall be permitted to operate such vehicles.
b. Drivers shall check the vehicle at least once per shift, and if it is found to be unsafe, shall report
it immediately to the manager, superintendent, or supervisor, and the vehicle shall not be put in
service until it has been made safe. Attention shall be given to the proper functioning of tires,
horn, lights, battery, controller, brakes, steering mechanism, and the lift system of fork lifts (forks,
chains, cable and limit switches).
c. No riders shall be permitted on, or in vehicles unless provided with adequate riding facilities.
d. Stunt driving and horseplay are prohibited.
e. Loaded vehicles shall not be moved until the load is safe and secure.
f. When leaving a vehicle unattended, the power shall be shut off, brakes set, the mast brought to
the vertical position, and forks left in the down position. When left on an incline, the wheels shall
be blocked.
Note: A powered industrial truck is unattended when the operator is 25 or more feet away from
the vehicle which remains in his/her view, or whenever the operator leaves the vehicle and it is
not in his/her view.
g. When the operator of an industrial truck is dismounted and within 25 feet of the truck still in his
view, the load engaging means shall be fully lowered, controls neutralized, and the brakes set to
prevent movement.
h. The forks shall always be carried as low as possible, consistent with safe operation.
i. The driver shall slow down and sound the horn at cross aisles and other locations where vision is
obstructed. If the load being carried obstructs forward view, the driver shall be required to travel
with the load trailing.
j. Trucks shall not be loaded in excess of their rated capacity.
k. The load engaging device shall be placed in such a manner that the load will be securely held or
supported.
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13. Personal Protective Equipment
a. Use the protective equipment indicated by the job you are doing.
b. No employee shall be permitted to remove or make ineffective any safeguard/safety device in
use for personal protection.
c. All personal protective equipment must be maintained in proper condition.
d. Where there is a risk of receiving eye injuries such as punctures, abrasions, contusions, or burns
as a result of contact with flying particles, hazardous substances, projections or injurious light
rays which are inherent in the work or environment, shall be safeguarded by means of ANSI Z87
approved face shield and eye protection. In addition, ANSI Z87 safety glasses shall be worn by
all employees at all times on job sites.
e. When removing fireproofing or similar materials ANSI Z87 approved safety goggles shall be worn.
f. All personnel must wear hard sole work boots while on job sites.
g. Hard hats shall be worn by all employees at all times on job sites.
h. Full fingered cut resistant gloves shall be worn by all employees at all times on job sites.
i. Hearing protection shall be worn when:
i. Firing powder actuated tools.
ii. Operating any electric powered saw.
iii. Noise levels in the work area exceed Permissible Exposure Limits or require you to shout in
order to be heard.
j. Employees working in any area where dust is generated, sanding or sweeping joint compound,
must wear a N95 particulate respirator. Additional respirator types may be required based on the
hazards identified in the applicable MSDS.
14. Welding and Cutting
a. Wear required protective clothing when welding or cutting.
b. Protect others by using shields when required.
c. Always keep acetylene and oxygen cylinders secured by use of a safety chain.
d. Cylinders shall be maintained in an upright position at all times.
e. Never transport cylinders without first properly securing them, so as to prevent their falling or
striking an object during transit.
f. Only authorized persons are permitted to do any welding or burning.
g. Never use oil around oxygen, since a highly flammable mixture is formed.
h. Rod ends shall not be allowed to accumulate on floors. Rod buckets shall be utilized.
i. Never lay a burning torch aside.
j. Open valves slowly - never force open. 1/4 to 1/2 turn is sufficient.
k. Turn off valves completely when not in use. Keep protective cap over a valve.
l. If gas leaks are detected, notify your supervisor immediately.
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CHAPTER THREE
15. Powder Actuated Tools
a. The operator must possess a valid OPERATOR’S CARD for the tool which he uses.
b. Each tool should be tested each day before loading to see that the safety devices are in proper
working condition.
c. No tool should be loaded unless it is being prepared for immediate use, nor should a loaded tool
be left unattended.
d. No tool should be stored loaded. Tools should be stored with barrels removed or breach open.
e. Cartridges or shells should be kept in the original containers and charges of different force should
be kept separated from each other. Cartridges must never be carried loose in the operator’s
clothing.
f. Eye or face and hearing protection should be worn by the operators and assistants when tool is in
use.
g. Powder actuated tools should always be handled like firearms, with hand clear of the muzzle,
and barrel pointed away from all persons, especially when the tool is being closed or assembled
after loading.
h. Appropriate caution signs shall be posted.
i. A lockable container shall be provided and kept with each tool. The words “POWDER-ACTUATED
TOOL” shall appear in plain sight on the outside of the container.
j. Powder-actuated tools and power loads shall be locked in a container and stored in a safe
place when not in use and shall be accessible only to authorized personnel.
k. A loaded tool shall never be left unattended (not in sight of operator, or more than 25 feet away
while in sight of operator).
l. Power loads of different power levels and types shall be maintained and stored in such a way
that they do not become intermixed.
m. All misfired loads shall be collected and stored in a labeled container that is kept in a lockable
gang box. Once full the labeled container shall be sent into the warehouse for proper disposal.
All empty (fired) loads shall be disposed of in the trash.
16. Fire Protection and Prevention
a. Use the proper type of extinguisher for each class of fire.
b. Know where the fire extinguishers are located in your work area. If one is not located within
75 feet of the work area, then one must be provided. All fire extinguishers shall be properly
mounted.
c. Portable fire extinguishers shall be fully charged, inspected monthly and serviced annually.
d. Follow these fire prevention rules:
i. Keep oily or greasy rags in closed metal containers.
ii. Never use gasoline or other highly flammable liquids for cleaning purposes.
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16.
Fire Protection and Prevention (cont.)
iii. Store flammable liquids in approved closed storage cans and keep containers properly
marked.
iv. When refueling a vehicle or machine, turn motor off and use correct refueling procedure.
v. Never pour flammable liquids in sewer or drains.
vi. Keep all exits and fire doors and fire fighting equipment clear of obstruction.
vii. Report all fire hazards to your manager, superintendent, or supervisor immediately.
viii. Observe NO SMOKING signs.
17. Laser Safety
a. Only qualified and trained employees shall be assigned to install, adjust, and operate laser
equipment.
b. Post work area with standard laser warning signage.
c. The laser beam shall not be directed at employees.
d. Laser equipment shall bear a label to indicate maximum output.
e. Beam shutters or caps shall be utilized, or the laser turned off, when laser transmission is not
actually required. When the laser is left unattended for a substantial period of time, such as
during lunch hour, overnight, or at change of shifts, the laser shall be turned off.
f. When it is raining or snowing, or when there is dust or fog in the air, the operation of laser systems
shall be prohibited where practicable; in any event, employees shall be kept out of range of the
area of source and target during such weather conditions.
18. Machinery and Vehicles
a. Only authorized persons shall operate machinery or equipment.
b. Loose or frayed clothing, or long hair, dangling ties, finger rings, etc., shall not be worn around
moving machinery or other sources of entanglement.
c. Machinery shall not be serviced, repaired or adjusted while in operation, nor shall oiling of
moving parts be attempted, except on equipment that is designed or fitted with safeguards to
protect the person performing the work.
d. Where appropriate, lock-out procedures shall be used.
e. Employees shall not work under vehicles supported by jacks or chain hoists without protective
blocking that will prevent injury if jacks or hoist should fail.
f. Air hoses shall not be disconnected at compressors until hose line has been bled.
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19. Fall Protection
a. Raymond employees shall not be exposed to fall hazards. 100% continuous fall protection for
fall hazards greater than six (6) feet will be enforced for the duration of the project (Exception:
Washington is greater than four (4) feet). See below for application to work on ladders.
b. All floor holes and floor openings in areas where employees may be exposed must be covered as
required by OSHA standards.
c. All fall protection equipment / systems used on this project shall comply with OSHA standards
and all project safety guidelines. The primary fall protection equipment / systems to be used by
Raymond are guardrails / cables and personal fall arrest systems. Fall protection is required, as a
minimum, under the following examples.
i. When working on either fixed or rolling scaffold platforms above 6 feet, guardrails will be
the primary fall protection system. If rails are removed, for any reason, fall protection will
be provided by personal fall arrest systems.
ii. If working from a telescoping, articulating, or rotating type lift, personnel shall wear a
full body harness attached to a shock absorbing lanyard, secured to an appropriate
anchorage point.
iii. When working off of an extension ladder higher than ten (10) feet from a solid surface for
more than 5 minutes, then fall protection will be provided using a personal fall arrest system.
iv. When working on the project’s roof area and more than ten (10) feet from the building’s
perimeter the primary means of fall protection will be perimeter safety cables.
v. When working on the project’s roof area within ten (10) feet of the building’s perimeter or
if perimeter safety cables have been removed, a lifeline system (i.e. lifeline, body harness,
rope grab lanyard, appropriate anchorage point) will be used.
20. Electrical
a. All portable electrical tools and equipment must be grounded or be of the double insulated type.
b. All extension cords must have ground pin in place and undamaged.
c. Exposed wiring and cords with frayed or deteriorated insulation must be placed out of service
and sent into the yard for repair or replacement. All flexible cords and cables must be free of
splices or taps.
d. Ground-fault circuit interrupters shall be installed on each temporary 15 or 20 ampere, 120 volt
AC circuit at locations where construction, demolition, modifications, alterations or excavations
are being performed.
21. Employee Responsibilities
a. Work diligently to protect your own health and safety and that of your co-workers on the job.
b. Comply with the Raymond Safety and Health Policy and all other safety and health practices,
programs, illness, near mishaps, and property damage.
c. Report all work related incidents, which include: injury, illness, near mishaps, and property
damage.
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EVERY EMPLOYEE HAS THE RESPONSIBILITY AND THE RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PERFORM WORK THEY BELIEVE IS
UNSAFE WITHOUT FEAR OF REPRISAL
If you have any safety concerns please notify your supervisor immediately or contact the Safety
Department:
Director of Safety:
Kirk Williamson
(925) 680-8300, ext. 319
Insurance Program Manager
Margie Loya
(714) 771-7670, ext. 241
EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
It is Raymond’s policy to employ, retain, promote, terminate, and otherwise treat all employees and job
applicants on the basis of merit, qualifications, and competence. This policy shall be applied without
regard to any individual’s sex, race, color, religion, national origin, ancestry, pregnancy, age, sexual
orientation, creed, veteran status, marital status, physical and mental handicap or medical condition/
disability. Raymond complies with the law regarding reasonable accommodation for handicapped and
disabled employees.
HARASSMENT POLICY
It is the policy of The Raymond companies to prevent and prohibit misconduct on the job, including sexual
harassment and harassment because of race, religious creed, color, national origin, ancestry, physical or
mental disability, medical condition, marital status, age, sexual orientation or any other basis protected
by federal, state or local law or ordinance or regulation. All such harassment is unlawful. Policy violations
shall be subject to appropriate disciplinary action, including warnings, reprimands, suspensions, and/or
discharges.
UNLAWFUL HARASSMENT may take many forms, including;
VERBAL CONDUCT such as epithets, derogatory comments, slurs or unwanted sexual advances, invitations,
or comments.
VISUAL CONDUCT such as derogatory posters, cartoons, drawings, or gestures.
PHYSICAL CONDUCT such as assault, blocking normal movement, or interference with work directed at you
because of your sex or other protected basis.
THREATS AND DEMANDS to submit to sexual requests in order to keep your job or avoid some other loss, and
offers of job benefits in return for sexual favors.
RETALIATION for having reported the harassment.
If you believe you have been unlawfully harassed, report your complaint to one of the following:
Insurance Program Manager (Field Issues):
Margie Loya
714-771-7670, ext. 241
HR/Personnel Dept. (Office Issues):
Scott Johnson
714-771-7670, ext. 215
Chief Executive Officer:
Travis Winsor
HR Hotline:
714-771-7670, ext. 262
800-97STOPIT / 900-997-8674
Your Supervisor: Supervisors will refer all harassment complaints to Insurance Program Manager or HR.
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COMMUNICATING SAFETY AND HEALTH ISSUES
An open line of communication within the Raymond organization between management and employees concerning
safety and health matters must be fostered and remain open at all times. This will include continuous encouragement
of employees to inform management of workplace hazards.
This system of communication is to be accomplished through a readily understandable format using the following
activities:
-
Safety Committee meetings
-General Training
-
Safety/Tailgate meetings
-Check attachments/letters
-
Safety Suggestion program
-Field Employee Incentive Program
-
Safety Training programs
It shall be a Raymond policy that employees can discuss or notify management of workplace hazards without the
threat of punishment or reprisal. If appropriate, communications shall be documented with date, persons involved
and topic(s) covered/discussed. Documentation procedures for the various communication activities are explained
in the activity descriptions which follow:
1. Safety Meeting (Office/Warehouse)
Safety meetings shall be conducted monthly by warehouse and office supervisors. During these meetings, each
supervisor shall discuss with the employees under his/her direct supervision such issues as:
a. New hazards that have been introduced or discovered in the workplace.
b. Causes of recent accidents or injuries and the methods adopted by the company to prevent
similar incidents in the future.
c. Any health or safety issue deemed by the supervisor to require reinforcement.
d. Topics provided by the company.
Office safety meetings shall be documented using the form provided at appendix A. Completed forms should be
sent to the Safety Department in Orange.
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Warehouse safety meetings will be documented using the 3-part form provided at appendix B. Distribution of the
documentation shall be as follows:
-
Original (White) to the Safety Department for review/file.
-
Yellow to be discarded.
-
Pink retained in booklet.
2. Tailgate Safety Meeting (Job Sites)
Tailgate safety meetings shall be conducted by job-site supervisors on a weekly basis, and shall include all Raymond
employees on the job site. Issues/topics to be discussed include the weekly safety topic and/or those items listed in
paragraph 1, a-c for Safety Meeting (Office/Warehouse).
Tailgate safety meeting shall be documented using the form provided at appendix B. Distribution of the documentation
shall be as follows:
-
Original (White) to the Safety Department for review/file.
-
Yellow to General Contractor.
-
Pink retained in booklet.
3. Safety Suggestion Program
Raymond has established a Safety Suggestion Program to provide employees an opportunity to suggest to the
company a better way to maintain a safe and healthy work environment. Suggestions should be submitted in writing
using the form provided at appendix C. The written suggestion should be sent to the appropriate office where the
suggestion will be investigated/evaluated in a prompt and thorough manner.
4. Safety Training Program
The Raymond organization realizes that safety training is a key element in the success of our Safety Program. All
employees will be instructed in general safe and healthy work practices and provided with special instructions
concerning hazards specific to each employee’s job assignment.
a. Training shall be provided for all employees when the training program is first established.
b. Training shall be provided to all new employees and to all employees given a new job assignment.
This includes both general safe work practices and safe practices specific to the job. Training topics
include, but are not limited to, the following:
i.
Employee Code of Safe Practices
ii. New employee orientation presented by Supervisor
iii. General or individual on job training provided by Supervisor
iv. Tailgate meetings/Safety Meetings
v. Formal seminars or classroom training sessions.
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4. Safety Training Program (cont.)
c. Employees shall be trained whenever new substances, processes, procedures or equipment are
introduced to the workplace and represent a new hazard and whenever the employer receives
notification of a new previously unrecognized hazard.
d. Supervisors must be knowledgeable of the safety and health hazards to which employees under their
direction and control may be exposed. This knowledge can be obtained by the following:
i.
Experience
ii. Prior training
iii. Knowledge of Federal, State and local standards
iv. Safety department or safety designee.
v. Formal seminars or classroom training sessions
e. All training shall be documented using one of the following forms:
-
Safety Meeting (Office) appendix A
-
Safety Meeting (Warehouse/Yard) appendix B
-
Tailgate Safety Meeting, appendix B
-
Employee Safety Orientation, appendix D
-
Supplemental Training (i.e. forklift, fall protection, 1st Aid) appendix A
5. Employee Safety Orientation
Many on the job accidents and injuries occur to employees who are new to the job, even though they may have years
of experience in our type of work. The employee orientation for both employees new to Raymond and employees
transferred from other Raymond job sites is one effort to solve this problem and can be effective if applied with a
conscientious effort.
Every new and transferred employee shall receive a verbal and written safety orientation by their supervisor. The
purpose of the orientation is multiple. It informs the employee of the emphasis placed on safety and creates a
degree of safety awareness in their mind, usually in proportion to the quality of the orientation. It also provides them
with knowledge of specific requirements and hazards which may be unique to a particular job or which may be
particularly hazardous.
a. New and transferred employees shall receive their orientation on the first day they report for work.
b. The amount of information provided to an employee who is new to Raymond will be more detailed
than a transferred employee who is already familiar with Raymond’s safety program. Subjects to be
covered during the orientation are listed on the form provided at appendix D. An orientation
discussion guide is provided on the reverse side of the form’s first page.
c. The importance of the supervisor’s role in orientations is discussed in the article provided as appendix E.
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HAZARD ASSESSMENT CONTROL
Hazard identification is an important part of the total Safety and Health Program. Efficient hazard identification
systems will help to detect and to eliminate typical accident producing situations and help prevent injuries and
property damage. One of the most effective means of hazard identification is work area/job site safety inspections.
Other methods of hazard identification to be used are:
1. Hazards reported by employees.
2. Periodic safety surveys made by Raymond safety personnel, insurance representatives or
independent qualified consultants.
3. Incident investigation reports.
4. Information gained at safety meetings or training sessions.
5. Safety suggestions.
Once hazards are identified they shall be corrected in a timely manner based on the severity of the hazard and
the potential of injury to Raymond employees. Hazards which are not correctable upon identification are to be
monitored until corrected. Monitoring to be conducted by Foreman, Superintendents, Managers, Supervisors and
Safety Department Personnel.
Procedures used to achieve risk reduction include:
1. Elimination of the hazard
2. Engineering controls
3. Warnings
4. Administrative Controls
5. Use of personal protective equipment
6. Substitution of less hazardous materials, processes, operations or equipment.
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1. Periodic Scheduled Inspections
Periodic inspections shall be conducted using the following schedule:
a. Job site – daily with documentation on the form provided at appendix F.
b. Scaffolds – daily when scaffolding is present at a job site. Documentation on the form provided at
appendix G, V or W.
c. Forklift – daily when a forklift is being used at a job site. Inspection to be completed by the forklift operator
before the forklift is placed into operation. Documentation on the form provided at appendix H.
d. Aerial Devices – daily by operator when aerial devices are being used at a jobsite. Document on form
provided in appendix X or Y.
e. Welding Equipment – daily when welding equipment is used on a jobsite. Document on form provided
in appendix Z.
f. Office – at least quarterly with documentation provided at appendix I.
g. Warehouse/Yard – monthly with documentation on the form provided at appendix J.
2. Unscheduled Inspections
In addition to scheduled inspections and ongoing review, the Safety Department shall arrange for unscheduled
inspections. Subjects for these inspections shall be chosen randomly but with particular emphasis placed on previously
identified hazards, employee suggestions and recommendations, and incident causal factors.
3. New Matters
The Safety Department shall arrange for an inspection and investigation of any new substance, process, procedure,
or equipment introduced into the workplace. The Safety Department shall also arrange for an inspection and
investigation whenever the Raymond organization is made aware of a new or previously unrecognized hazard.
4. Employee Reporting of Hazards
Raymond employees are encouraged to report unsafe conditions/hazards at their worksite without fear of reprisal.
Reports can be either verbal or written. Written reports will be submitted using the form provided at appendix C. Use
of names is optional.
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INCIDENT INVESTIGATION REPORTING PROCEDURES
We will report all incidents including:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Employee & Non-Employee Injury Incidents
Unsafe Conditions
Near Mishaps
Property Damage
Theft
Auto Accidents
Fatalities
Employee Injury Incidents
1.
Render assistance; call 9-1-1 if necessary.
2.
Notify the employee’s supervisor of the incident immediately.
3.
Employee’s supervisor must notify Margie Loya immediately.
4.
All injured employees will be accompanied to the designated medical treatment facility by their
supervisor.
5.
Perform a thorough incident investigation. Investigations must be performed for by someone
who has received Qualified Incident Investigation Training.
6.
Complete an Incident Investigation Report (appendix K). This report cannot be completed by
the injured employee or any employee involved in the incident.
7.
Within 24 hours, send or fax initial information to the Safety Department attention Margie Loya.
Send or fax Margie a complete incident report after all information has been gathered (within 72
hours). If more time is needed to complete the investigation, please notify Margie Loya. Fax #
(714) 919-0109
8.
Injured employee must call Margie Loya immediately after doctor visit to report results.
FAILURE TO REPORT INJURIES ON TIME IS A MANDATORY WRITTEN WARNING WITH 1 DAY OFF. Subsequent violations
will result in disciplinary action, up to and including termination.
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Non-Employee Injury Incidents (Subcontractors, general public, vendors, etc.)
1.
Render assistance; call 9-1-1 if necessary.
2.
Notify Margie Loya in the Safety Department of the incident immediately.
3.
Perform a thorough incident investigation. Investigations must be performed for by someone who
has received Qualified Incident Investigation Training.
4.
Complete the Incident Investigation Report (appendix K). This form must only be completed by a
Raymond qualified incident investigator.
5.
Within 24 hours, send or fax (714-919-0109) initial information to the Safety Department, attention
Margie Loya. Send or fax Margie a complete incident report after all information has been
gathered (within 72 hours). If more time is needed to complete the investigation, please notify
Margie Loya.
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Verbal Incident
Notification
Incident occurs.
Employee notifies
Immediate Supervisor/
General Foreman/
Project Superintendent
Foreman notifies
Jobsite
Superintendent/
Regional General
Superintendent
Immediate Supervisor
calls Margie Loya,
Insurance Program
Manager
Margie notifies the
following individuals
via telephone
Director of
Safety
CEO
Area
President
Project Manager
Regional Safety
Manager
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Vehicle Accident Reporting
These reporting procedures apply to all drivers of company owned or leased vehicles as well as employees who
drive personal vehicles or rental cars for company business.
1.
Render assistance to anyone injured; call 9-1-1 if necessary.
2.
Call Police and give the location and nature of the accident.
3.
Call Margie Loya immediately to report incident at 714-771-7670 ext. 241.
4.
If a company owned or leased vehicle was involved in the accident, follow the directions on the
envelope in your glove compartment. Complete Driver’s Accident Report (pages 19.5 & 19.6).
Send a copy to Margie Loya.
5.
For all other vehicle accidents, complete the Incident Investigation Report (appendix K). Within
24 hours, send or fax initial information to the Safety Department attention Margie Loya. Send or
fax Margie a complete incident report after all information has been gathered (within 72 hours).
If more time is needed to complete the investigation, please notify Margie Loya. Fax (714) 9190109
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Incident Investigation Procedures
Incident Investigation is a tool used to prevent injuries. Every incident will be investigated no matter how minor, to
prevent its reoccurrence.
We will report all incidents. We will investigate the following incidents using the Raymond Incident Investigation
severity matrix as a guide:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Unsafe Conditions
Near Misses
Property Damage
Auto Accidents
Theft
Employee Injuries and Illnesses
Incident Investigation Guidelines
All incidents will be reported immediately and investigation will be started within 4 hours.
Within 24 hours, send or fax initial information to the Safety Department attention Margie Loya. Send or fax Margie
a complete incident report after all information has been gathered (within 72 hours). If more time is needed to
complete the investigation, please notify Margie Loya. Fax (714) 919-0109
All incidents will be reported using the Incident Investigation Report Form (appendix K)
Trained investigator must determine the incident severity level to determine who should make up the investigation
team. If you have any questions about the severity level, contact your Regional Safety Department personnel.
Severity Levels
There are four Incident Investigation Severity Levels:
Level 1 Incidents
•
•
•
•
Fatalities
Property damage in excess of $500,000
Vehicle accident resulting in a fatality
Near miss or unsafe condition that could have resulted in a fatality or major property loss
Level 2 Incidents
•
•
•
•
•
•
Someone admitted to hospital or probable permanent disability
$100,000 to $499,000 of property damage
Hazmat incident with over $50,000 in property damage
Public evacuation
Spill/fire of radioactive or infectious materials
Near miss with a high risk for serious injury or potential for permanent disability or serious property
damage
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Level 3 Incidents
• Injured so unable to perform regular duties
• Property damage between $10,000 and $99,000
• Vehicle incident where injured need medical treatment away from the scene and/or where the
vehicle is towed.
• Near miss or unsafe condition with significant risk for potential injury, property damage or product
loss.
Level 4 Incidents
• Injured but able to perform regular duties
• Less than $10,000 in property damage
• Vehicle accident with no injury or tow-away
Investigation Team Responsibilities
All investigators will receive Qualified Incident Investigation training.
The following employee positions will receive the Qualified Incident Investigation training:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Area Presidents
Superintendants
Safety Managers/Coordinators
Foremen
Safety Committee Members
Managers
Employees initially at the scene should take pictures and gather information without disturbing the scene until
investigators arrive. Take down names of witnesses and collect as much information as possible.
Level One Investigation Team
The investigation team will consist of:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Director of Safety
Regional Safety Manager/Coordinator
Area President
Area Superintendent
General Foremen (Job Site)
Foremen (Job Site)
The Investigation Team Leader will be the Area President or Director of Safety.
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Level 2 Investigation Team
The investigation team will consist of:
•
•
•
•
Regional Safety Manager/Coordinator
Area Superintendent or Department Manager
Foremen (Job Site)
If additional investigators are needed, use trained Safety Committee members or additional
trained Superintendents.
The Investigation Team Leader will be the Area Superintendent or the Regional Safety Manager/Coordinator.
Level 3 Investigation Team
The investigation team will consist of:
•
•
•
•
Regional Safety Manager/Coordinator
Area Superintendent or Department Manager
Foremen (Job Site)
If additional investigators are needed, use trained Safety Committee members or additional
trained Superintendents.
The Investigation Team Leader will be the Jobsite Foremen.
Level 4 Investigation Team
The investigation team will consist of:
• Foremen (Job Site) or Department manager
• If additional investigators are needed, use trained Safety Committee members or additional
trained Superintendents.
The Investigation Team Leader will be the Foremen (Job Site) or Department Manager.
In all cases, once the Investigation Team has been established, follow the investigation guidelines outlined in the
Raymond Incident Investigation Handbook.
How to Handle the Media
If an incident attracts the attention of the media, all questions and/or interviews must be directed to an employee
authorized to make statements for the company. The only people authorized to make public statements for
Raymond are listed at the end of this section.
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Completing the Safety Incident Investigation Report
This report must be completed by a Raymond Foremen or higher who has been trained in Raymond’s incident
investigation procedures.
This report cannot be filled out by the injured employee or anyone involved in the incident.
Completing Page 1
Date of Incident – enter date that incident occurred
Incident # - will be assigned by the safety department
Name of Injured Person – enter the name of the person that was injured
Select employee, subcontractor or general public – fill out the information under the appropriate category
Area – check where the incident occurred
Job Site Description – check the job site description where incident occurred
Witnesses – collect information on any witnesses to the incident. Get as much information as possible. Use
additional paper if needed
Cell Phone # of Person Completing This Report – enter you cell phone #
Completing Page 2
Name of person reporting incident – enter the name of the person completing the form. This must be a Raymond
Foremen or higher.
Site (business and location) – enter the project name or office name.
Incident No. – leave blank
Incident Information – select the main incident (choose only one)
If Injury/Illness, Enter Person’s Name – enter injured person’s name here
OSHA Recordability of Injury – leave blank
Exact location of incident – enter the address where the incident occurred
Severity Level – determine using Incident Severity Levels outlined above.
Date and Time of Incident – enter date and time incident occurred
Date Reported – enter the date the incident was reported (Incidents should be reported the same day they occur)
Date of Investigation – enter the date the incident investigation was conducted
Sequence of events – Use this area to describe what happened before, during and after the incident. Use
additional paper if needed.
Primary type of Contact – choose only one
Cause(s) of Incident (Substandard Behaviors) – select all that apply based on your incident investigation
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Completing Page 3
Cause(s) of Incident (Substandard Conditions) – select all that apply based on your incident investigation
Brief Description For Each Item Checked – brief explanation for why an item was checked
Basic or Root Causes – focus on finding the basic causes rather than merely reciting immediate causes present at
the scene.
Brief Description For Each Item Checked – brief explanation for why an item was checked
Corrective Actions – based on the thorough investigation, make recommendations for what needs to be done to
correct the immediate situation and to keep it from occurring again. What short and long term actions need to be
taken to prevent this type of incident from occurring in the future? Every action should state who is to do what by
when (or how often).
Approvals 1. Investigation leader must sign and date
2.
Immediate supervisor of the investigation leader must sign and date.
3.
Safety Representative (Regional Safety Manager/Coordinator) must sign and date.
4.
The Director of Safety must approve all reports.
FOR INJURIES OR ILLNESSES page 4 of the report must also be completed.
After the Investigation
Immediately send a copy of all completed incident investigation reports to Margie Loya. Include any pictures,
sketches of the scene, or other documentation gathered. Then Margie will send a copy of all completed Incident
Investigation Reports to the C.E.O., the Director of Safety, the Area President, the Area General Superintendent,
and the Regional Safety Manager/Coordinator.
Secure all damaged and related equipment materials or tools involved in the incident, and send to the Safety
Department, attention Margie Loya.
The Safety Department will review the findings and recommendations on the reports for accuracy, completeness,
corrective actions, etc. using an Incident Investigation Report Review.
The Safety Department will review all incomplete incident investigation reports monthly to ensure corrective action
is being taken. They will use the corrective action tracking system and will follow up via phone or e-mail on all
outstanding items on a monthly basis.
Incidents will be discussed in Safety Committee meetings, Operation Meetings and Foremen Safety Meetings.
OSHA 300A log will be posted February 1 to April 30 each year in all areas.
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Relevant incident findings and corrective actions will be e-mailed or hand copied to the person reporting the
incident, personnel with similar jobs/situations, and all affected personnel. The Safety Director will determine which
incidents and to what extent notification is required.
Sample sharing format:
•
•
•
•
Description of Incident
Nature of Injuries
What we’ve learned so far
Does your site have any suggestions or recommendations from past experience to help prevent
this type of incident from occurring in the future?
This Incident Investigation Procedure will be evaluated for effectiveness annually.
Tracking Employee Incidents
Spectrum reports will be run periodically to identify employees with multiple incidents. All employees with two or
more incidents will be further evaluated. The Safety Director will look at the severity of the incident, attendance,
safety training participation, any reports of substandard behavior, etc.
Employees involved in an incident will be given additional training based on the type of incident,(i.e. back injury will
receive back safety training). The employee will also be asked to complete an Employee Accident Recap.
Employees involved in serious incidents, a recordable injury or multiple incidents may also be required to attend
an individual meeting with Management to discuss the incidents, root causes, management system, work system
design, etc. Recommendations will be made based on the meeting (adequate PPE, training, adequate tools, work
environment, enough management support, etc.) At the meeting, a Health and Safety Improvement Plan will be
developed. (The employee’s supervisor/manager will be brought in as necessary.)
Examples of topics that could be included in a Health and Safety Improvement Plan include:
•
•
•
•
Attending all required training
Attending
training (cause of incident)
Participating on a Safety Committee
Getting adequate PPE
All incidents will be reviewed to determine if disciplinary action should be taken for the involved employee or their
manager.
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How to Handle the Media
From time to time, situations may occur concerning our company, which are considered by the media to be
newsworthy. If such a situation arises on your job and you are questioned or asked for an interview or statement
by TV, radio, or newspaper reporters, do not make any statements. Incorrect statements, misquotes, items out of
context, etc., can be very dangerous, damaging, and costly to Raymond.
The primary contact should be Travis Winsor. If he is not available, contact the Area Manager.
The only people authorized to make public statements for Raymond are:
Area Manager
Area
Phone #
Travis Winsor
All
(714) 714-7670 ext. 262
James Watson
All
(925) 680-8300 ext. 318
Tom O’Brien
All
(714) 714-7670 ext. 247
Michael Potter
All
(714) 771-7670 ext. 120
Jeffrey Shriver
Orange
(714) 714-7670 ext. 222
Forrest Shaffer
San Diego
(858) 292-4499 ext. 123
Tim Stiller
Concord
(925) 680-8300 ext. 312
Kim Lorch
Las Vegas
(702) 891-8875 ext. 435
SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM
Revised March 2015
CHAPTER SEVEN
FALL PROTECTION
Purpose
Written fall protection procedures establish guidelines to be followed whenever an employee works on
ladders, at heights, or with fall protection at our company. The rules established are to be followed to:
• Provide a safe working environment, and
• Govern use of fall protection procedures and equipment.
The effectiveness of the written fall protection procedures depends upon the active support and involvement of all
employees who work with procedures and jobs requiring it. This written plan is intended to be used in implementing
procedures to ensure that work with fall protection is carried out safely to minimize the possibility of injury or harm to
our employees.
These written fall protection procedures establish uniform requirements designed to ensure that fall protection training,
operation, and practices are communicated to and understood by the affected employees. These requirements are
also designed to ensure that procedures are in place to safeguard the health and safety of all employees.
It is the policy of Raymond to permit only employees trained in fall protection procedures to work in areas where fall
hazards occur, to reduce likelihood of fall accidents and to help ensure a safe workplace.
Specific Requirements
• When working on either fixed or rolling scaffold platforms, safety rails (i.e. top and mid) will be the
primary fall protection system. If rails are removed, for any reason, fall protection will be provided by
personal fall arrest systems.
• If working from a telescoping, articulating, or rotating type lift, personnel shall wear a full body harness
attached to a shock absorbing lanyard, secured to an appropriate anchorage point.
• When working on a ladder higher than six (6) feet from a solid surface, or if a vertical ladder extends
twenty (20) feet or greater, then fall protection will be provided using a personal fall arrest system.
• When working on the project’s roof area and more than ten (10) feet from the building’s perimeter the
primary means of fall protection will be perimeter safety cables.
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CHAPTER SEVEN
Specific Requirements (cont.)
• When working on the project’s roof area within ten (10) feet of the building’s perimeter or if perimeter
safety cables have been removed, a lifeline system (i.e. lifeline, body harness, rope grab lanyard,
appropriate anchorage point) will be used.
Administrative Duties
The Director of Safety or designee is responsible for developing and maintaining this written Fall Protection Plan. The
Director of Safety or designee is solely responsible for all facets of the plan and has full authority to make necessary
decisions to ensure the success of this plan. The Director of Safety is also qualified, by appropriate training and
experience that is commensurate with the complexity of the plan, to administer and oversee our fall protection plan
and conduct the required evaluations of plan effectiveness.
If, after reading this plan, you find that improvements can be made, please contact the Director of Safety or designee.
We encourage all suggestions because we are committed to creating a safe workplace for all our employees, and
a safe and effective Fall Protection program is an important component of our overall safety plan. We strive for clear
understanding, safe work practices, and involvement in the program from every level of the company.
List of Affected Areas
It shall be the policy and intent of Raymond to ensure employees shall be protected from fall hazards at all times. A
fall exposure occurs any time an employee’s feet are six (6) feet or more from a work surface.
This fall protection plan shall be developed on all projects. This plan shall include an initial assessment of the work
location and shall include:
• Identification of all potential hazards in the work area.
• Methods of fall restraint that will be provided.
• Inspection methods for the fall protective devices.
• The method for prompt, safe rescue of suspended workers.
• Description of the employee’s role in fall protection.
Pre-Work Check
Prior to beginning work in any area or on any device where fall hazards exist, a pre-work check must be completed
that includes the following items:
Stairs
• All required covers or guardrails must be in place.
• All handrails or guardrails are in place on stairways.
• All treads and risers on stairs are in good repair.
• Non-slip surfaces are in place on stairs.
• All stairs meet OSHA and ANSI specifications for design and safety.
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CHAPTER SEVEN
Ladders
• Gripping safety feet in place and secure on ladders.
• Wooden ladders are coated with suitable protective material.
• All parts and fittings on ladders are secure.
• Non-slip surfaces are in place on ladder rungs.
• When setting ladder up, footing of ladder is secure on a firm, level, and non-skid surface
and top of ladder is placed against a solid, stationary object.
• All ladders meet OSHA specifications for design and safety.
Platforms
• Guardrails are in place and securely attached.
• Toeboards are in place and secure.
• All platforms meet OSHA specifications for design and safety.
Floor & Wall Openings
• All floor and wall openings are safely covered or blocked from access.
• If not safely covered and blocked from access, the opening has someone assigned for constant
attendance to it.
Work Procedures
If any one of the conditions described in Pre-Work Check is not met for the area or piece of equipment posing a
potential fall hazard, then employees may not perform that work until the condition is corrected. If the condition
cannot be remedied immediately, a supervisor must be notified of the problem.
If the situation calls for use of fall protection devices such as harnesses or lanyards and belts because the fall hazard
cannot be reduced to a safe level, then the employee must don such protective equipment before beginning the
work and use it as intended throughout the duration of the work. Before permitting employees into work areas where
fall hazards exist, the operations manager shall:
• Ensure the fall protection plan covers the work performed.
• Ensure employees are trained in the fall protection technique.
• Ensure that fall protection equipment has been inspected.
To prevent slipping, tripping, and falling, all places of employment, job sites passageways, storerooms, and service
rooms must be kept clean and orderly and in a sanitary condition. The floor of every area will be maintained in a
clean and, so far as possible, dry condition. Where wet processes are used, drainage will be maintained and false
floors, platforms, mats, or other dry standing places are provided where practicable.
To facilitate cleaning, every floor, working place and passageway will be kept free from protruding nails, splinters,
holes, or loose boards.
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CHAPTER SEVEN
Rescue Procedures
For employees that have been subject to a fall and whose lanyard is of the self rescue type, they can climb the
attached ladder to the nearest secure location.
Once someone has fallen and is hanging in their safety harness, it is imperative that rescue efforts begin immediately.
Additional serious injury could result if the person is not rescued from his/her harness within 15 minutes. The procedure
is as follows:
CALL 911-Notify the local Fire/Rescue/Paramedic agency and let them know that a construction worker is hanging
in his harness. Provide the address/location and then send a co-worker out to the main street to intercept the arriving
team and direct them to the actual location of the injured worker.
Determine if the victim is conscious and unhurt. If so, see how he/she may be able to reduce the tension on the leg
straps. If he/she can pull up and sit on the rear strap of the harness, thereby releasing the pressure on his leg straps,
or if there is another logical, safe way to otherwise relieve the pressure on the legs, that will reduce the ‘urgentness’
of the rescue effort. He/she should be safe in the harness without stress on the leg arteries and once this is done, will
reduce the complications of the rescue effort.
DON’T ACT HASTILY!
HASTE MAKES WASTE!
DON’T BECOME ANOTHER VICTIM!
Maintain order at the scene of the rescue. Keep everyone away that is not part of the rescue effort. Have a co-worker
notify the General Contractor on site and see if they have resources that can assist. (Some OCIPs have Emergency
Response Teams that should be able to help. Have a co-worker notify your General Superintendent).
Survey the scene. Maintain control and order over the situation. Look around and see what resources are available
for rescue. Look for ladders, forklifts, scissors or boomlifts. Plan your rescue. If you can get a source of platform lifted
under the subject (approved man basket on forklift, Scissorslift or boomlift) and get the subject body weight lifted
from the leg straps of the harness, this will release the crimping of the leg arteries and allow blood to flow freely
throughout the body again.
Alternately, if the subject is awake and aware, he may be able to assist in his own rescue.
Training Program
Under no circumstances will an employee work in areas of high fall hazards, do work requiring fall protection devices,
or use fall protection devices until he/she has successfully completed the Fall Protection Training program. This includes
all new employees, regardless of claimed previous experience.
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CHAPTER SEVEN
The training program includes classroom instruction and operational training on each specific area of fall hazard
involved in the work of the employee. The Director of Safety or designee is responsible for conducting the training.
Classroom training consists of:
• The nature of fall hazards.
• The correct procedures for inspecting and using fall protective equipment.
• The types of fall protective equipment that Raymond commonly uses.
• Review of these written procedures by employee.
• Review of fall protection training video.
• Successful completion of examination.
• Retraining when needed.
Operational training consists of:
• Pre-operational check.
• Operational review of use of lanyards and belts, accessing of areas with fall hazards.
Recordkeeping
The Raymond Safety Department maintains training records, which include the following information:
• The date the training was provided,
• The specific area of fall hazard involved in the work of the employee, and
• A certification signed by the employee receiving the training.
These training records are kept by the Raymond Safety Department.
Disciplinary Procedures
Constant awareness of and respect for fall protection procedures and compliance with all safety rules are considered
conditions of employment. Supervisors and individuals in the Safety Department reserve the right to issue disciplinary
warnings to employees, up to and including termination, for failure to follow the guidelines of this program.
SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM
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CHAPTER SEVEN
Program Evaluation
Although we may not be able to eliminate all hazards, we try to eliminate as many as possible to improve employee
protection and encourage employee safe practices. Therefore, the Director of Safety or designee is responsible for
evaluating and updating this written plan. The evaluation will include a review of reported accidents, as well as near
misses, to identify areas where additional safety measures need to be taken.
The Director of Safety or designee will also conduct a periodic review to determine the effectiveness of the program.
This review may include:
• A walk-through of the facility, and
• Interviews with employees to determine whether they are familiar with the requirements of
this program and if safety measures are being practiced.
SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM
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CHAPTER EIGHT
HAZARD COMMUNICATION
OSHA requires every employer using or producing hazardous chemicals to develop and implement a written hazard
communication program that includes provisions for labels and other forms of warning material safety data sheets
(MSDS), and employee information and training. The Raymond Hazard Communication Program has been developed
to include all OSHA requirements. Employee Rights under the Raymond program are provided at attachment O.
1. Responsibilities
Management
Operations management personnel shall effectively enforce compliance with the Hazard Communications Program
as set forth in this document. Accordingly; management must realize that whenever a breakdown in the system occurs,
that they are ultimately responsible and must act accordingly to impose disciplinary actions as deemed necessary on
supervisory employees found not enforcing the policy herein. All disciplinary actions will be handled according to the
company’s standard disciplinary procedure for failure to comply with location Safety Rules and Procedures.
Safety and Health Department
The Director of Safety is responsible for interpreting OSHA requirements and publishing safety standards to reflect
those OSHA regulations as they affect our industry and specific operations. The Safety and Health Department will
conduct periodic facility inspections to determine compliance and is responsible for notifying upper management
when deficiencies are identified.
Employees
As a condition of employment all employees are expected to abide by company safety rules. Employees must
follow the guidance of all training programs established by the company to protect their well-being.
2. Labels and Other Forms of Warning
a. Raymond’s policy is that no container of hazardous substances will be released for use until and
unless the containers are labeled, tagged, or marked with the following information:
•
Identity of the hazardous substance(s) contained therein.
•
Appropriate hazard warnings.
b. The responsibility for ensuring correct labeling rests with office managers, warehouse/yard
supervisors, and job-site supervisors.
c. Labels are not required on portable containers into which hazardous substances are
transferred from labeled containers and which are intended only for the immediate use
of the employee who performs the transfer.
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CHAPTER EIGHT
3. Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS)
a. Copies of MSDS for all hazardous substances to which Raymond employees may be exposed
are kept in all warehouse locations and on all job sites. Staff employees involved in bid submittal/job
start paperwork and publications are responsible for obtaining and maintaining all MSDS for
their respective office/area. MSDS are reviewed for completeness by the Safety Department.
b. MSDS for specific job sites are assembled during bid submittal/job start activities. One set is provided
to the general contractor and one to our job site supervisor. Raymond supervisors are responsible for
reviewing MSDS provided by other subcontractors on a job. The general contractor will maintain a
master MSDS file on site for review by all subcontractors.
c. MSDS are to be maintained in such a manner so as to be available to all Raymond employees
for review.
d. The Raymond Safety Department will be responsible for supplying copies of MSDS which are
requested by employees or their designated representative/physician.
e. The Raymond hazardous substance list is provided at appendix N. The appendix also provides
a personal protective equipment assessment/assignment matrix.
f. Information on how to read/use an MSDS is provided at appendix P.
4. Employee Information and Training
a. Employees will be provided information and training on hazardous substances using the following
schedule:
•
At the time of hiring (i.e. New Employee Safety Orientation - - appendix D).
•
Whenever a new hazardous substance is introduced into their work area.
•
Refresher training in hazard communication elements will be given periodically.
b. Employee training will include the following topics:
•
A summary of the OSHA Hazard Communication Standard and employee rights under the standard.
•
Where hazardous substances are present.
•
Location of the written hazard communication program.
•
Physical and health effects of the hazardous substances.
•
How to lessen or prevent exposure to these hazardous substances.
•
Steps that have been taken to lessen or prevent exposure to these substances.
•
First aid procedures to follow if employees are exposed to hazardous substances.
•
How to read labels and review MSDS to obtain appropriate hazard information.
Note: When new hazardous substances are introduced or refresher training is provided, only the appropriate items
from above will be reviewed.
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CHAPTER EIGHT
5. Hazardous Non-Routine Tasks
a. Periodically, employees may be required to perform hazardous non-routine tasks. Each
affected employee will be given information by their supervisor about hazards to which they
may be exposed during the activity.
b. Training information will include the following:
•
Specific hazards, related to non-routine tasks.
•
Protective/safety measures which are required.
•
Measures the company has taken to lessen the hazards including ventilation, respirators,
presence of another employee and emergency procedures.
SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM
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CHAPTER NINE
RESPIRATORY PROTECTION PROGRAM
Purpose
In the control of those occupational diseases caused by breathing air contaminated with harmful dust,
fumes, mists, gases, smokes, sprays or vapors, Raymond’s primary objective shall be to protect employee
health and well-being.
This program’s basis is to establish the use of respiratory protection where
employees are exposed to potential respiratory hazards.
Scope
The requirements of this standard apply to all Raymond employees, contractors and visitors who normal
job duties may require them to wear or use a respirator, or who spend a majority of their time in operational
or laboratory areas, or who are emergency responders.
Policy
The control of atmospheric contamination of work areas shall be accomplished as far as feasible by
accepted engineering control measures such as enclosure, local exhaust ventilation and general building
ventilation.
Respiratory protection shall be provided:
•
When effective engineering controls are not feasible,
•
As an interim measure pending installation of engineering controls,
•
As a safeguard in addition to engineering controls,
•
For work in atmospheres where exposure levels are unknown or oxygen levels are deficient.
•
For emergency services use.
Definitions
Air-purifying respirator
Respirators that use filters or absorbents to remove harmful substances from the air.
Ceiling Limit
An airborne concentration of a toxic substance in the work environment, which
should never be exceeded.
Dusts
Solid particles generated by handling, crushing, grinding, rapid impact and
detonation.
End of Service Life Indicator
(ESLI) means a system that warns the respirator user of the approach of the end
of adequate respiratory protection, for example, that the sorbent is approaching
saturation or is no longer effective.
Engineering Controls
Methods of controlling employee exposures by modifying the source of or reducing
the quantity of contaminants released into the workroom environment.
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Exhalation valve
A device that allows air to leave a respirator, prevents outside air to leave a respirator
and prevents outside air from entering through the valve.
Fume
Airborne particles formed by the evaporation of solid materials, e.g., metal fume
emitted during welding.
Gas
A state of matter in which the material can expand and contract in response to
changes in temperature and pressure and uniformly distributes itself throughout any
container.
Immediately Dangerous to
Life and Health (IDLH)
Very hazardous atmospheres where employee exposure can cause serious injury or
death within a short time or serious delayed health effects.
Inhalation valve
A device that allows respirable air to enter the facepiece and prevents exhaled air
from leaving the facepiece through the intake opening.
Mists
Suspended liquid droplets generated by condensation from the gaseous to the liquid
state. Mists are formed by splashing, foaming or spraying.
National Institute for
Occupational Safety
and Health (NIOSH)
A federal agency which conducts research on health and safety concerns, tests and
certifies respirators, and trains occupational health and safety professionals.
Occupational Safety
and Health
Administration (OSHA)
A federal agency responsible for promulgating and enforcing workplace safety
standards.
Odor
The property of a substance that affects the sense of smell.
Permissible Exposure Limit
(PEL) An exposure limit that is published and enforced by OSHA as a legal standard.
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Protection factor (PF)
The ratio of the ambient airborne concentration of the contaminant to the
concentration inside the facepiece.
Respirator
A device to protect the wearer from inhalation of harmful contaminants.
Short-term
exposure limit (STEL)
Maximum concentration to which workers can be exposed for a short period
of time, 15 minutes, for only four (4) times throughout the day with at least one
(1) hour between exposures.
Threshold Limit Value
A time-weighted average concentration, determined by the ACGIH, under
which most people can work consistently for 8 hours a day, day after day, with
no harmful effects.
Time-weighted average
(TWA) concentration
Concentrations of airborne toxic materials which have been weighted for a
certain time duration, usually eight (8) hours.
Vapors
Process by which a liquid is evaporated and mixed with the surrounding air.
Roles and Responsibilities
The Director of Safety shall be responsible for:
•
Coordination of the respiratory protection program,
•
Ensuring a respiratory protection program is established where hazardous or potentially hazardous
atmospheres may be encountered,
•
Ensuring employees in the respiratory protection program receive periodic medical evaluations
and annual fit-testing
•
Ensuring employees in the respiratory protection program receive periodic training per OSHA
requirements.
•
•
Assuring only NIOSH/MSHA approved respirators are used in the facility
Coordinating employee evaluations prior to respirator usage. Evaluation options may include
utilizing U.S. Healthworks or a suitable contract service. Based on an employee’s results, the
medical agency shall determine whether an individual is physically capable of performing routine
tasks with respiratory equipment assigned.
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Foremen and Supervisors shall be responsible for:
• Ensuring that respiratory protection is available,
• Ensuring the proper use of respiratory equipment,
• Ensuring that respiratory equipment is maintained and is periodically inspected,
• Performing and documenting employee respiratory training,
• Ensuring the equipment is worn when required,
• Conducting periodic random checks of employee usage and enforce the use of respirators
when necessary,
• Evaluating employee facial conditions, which may interfere with, face seal. For example:
Growth of facial hair greater than 24-hours, sideburns, the absence of dentures, weight gain or loss, etc.
Employees in the respiratory protection program shall be responsible for:
• Using only approved respiratory protection equipment in accordance with the instruction and
training received,
• Guarding against damage to the respirator and returning to the supervisor for disposal after use,
• Reporting any malfunction of the respirator to the supervisor,
• Being physically able to wear a respirator, i.e., maintaining facial hair to provide proper seal
and notifying the supervisor of any condition(s) which may affect face seal,
• Wearing the proper respirator designated for the hazard to which the employee is exposed,
• Notifying their supervisor in the event they have experienced a physical or psychological symptom,
illness, or an injury that may temporarily or permanently affect their health and safety when wearing
an assigned respirator.
Respirator Selection
Selection of respiratory protective equipment shall be based upon the hazard, the protection factor (PF) required
and the odor-warning properties of the chemical(s) involved. Only respirators certified by NIOSH and/or MSHA and
so labeled shall be used.
• In order to specify respiratory protection equipment for other than emergency use, a reasonable
estimate of employee exposures to respiratory hazard(s) and an identification of the contaminant’s
chemical state and physical form must be evaluated.
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Emergency Use:
• Respirators shall be provided where appropriate for emergency escape.
• “ESCAPE ONLY” respiratory protection (ELSA) may be used for egress from a contaminated area.
Available Respiratory Protection
• Disposable dust/mist masks, half-face, full face air-purifying respirators are available to applicable
employees. Additionally, appropriate cartridges are provided which protect from exposure to organic
vapors, organic vapors/acid gas.
• Employee job requirements shall be reviewed by the supervisor at the beginning of new assignments
and at least annually thereafter to ensure proper respirator and cartridge use. Employees “crossing
over” into several job activities should be assigned respirator cartridges providing protection across all
activities as required.
Limitations
Air purifying respirators shall not be used in atmospheres containing less than 19.5% oxygen or those considered
immediately dangerous to life and health (IDLH).
• Air-purifying respirators do not protect against oxygen deficiency, or hot or cold temperature extremes.
Cartridges, canisters, filters and respirators ARE NOT interchangeable among manufacturers. Interchanging of parts
voids NIOSH/MSHA approval and is expressly prohibited.
Cartridge Service Life
Cartridges or canisters used for protection against gases or vapors with concentrations AT OR BELOW the threshold
limit value shall be replaced at the end of the work shift or a maximum accumulated period of sixty (60) minutes, as
long as odors are not detected.
Cartridges or canisters used for protection against gases or vapors with concentrations ABOVE the threshold limit
value shall be replaced as directed in the cartridge change schedule for the product or process.
•
The Cartridge Change Schedule will be included in the work instructions or posted at the Process.
Mechanical filters (dust pre-filters as an example) shall be replaced whenever noticeable breathing resistance occurs.
Training
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Training is necessary on all types of respirators. Training ensures that employees encountering potentially hazardous
atmospheres are familiar with respiratory protective equipment. Moreover, employees become knowledgeable
about those hazardous atmospheres they may meet.
All employees’ assigned respirators shall receive annual training in accordance with the subject outline below.
• No employee may be assigned a respirator until training has been conducted.
• No employee shall be assigned to a job requiring the use of a respirator until training and fit-testing has
occurred.
Respirator training shall be conducted by persons trained in the proper use and fitting of respirators as accepted and
designated by the Raymond Safety Department. At a minimum, the following topics must be discussed:
• The reasons for the need of respiratory protection.
• The nature of airborne contaminants against which the wearer should be protected, why the
protective device is the proper one for the particular purpose, and the device’s capabilities
and limitations and health effects from overexposure if the respirator is not worn.
• Operations that require the use of respirators (Appendix AC).
• Cartridge Change Schedule and how to determine when it applies.
• Reviewing the difference between the requirement that prohibits facial hair from interfering with the
sealing surface of a respirator
-
Discussing the importance of a good face-fit seal and of adhering to the facial hair policy.
• Reviewing the purpose of qualitative and quantitative fit testing.
• Instruction in inspecting, donning, checking the fit (negative and pressure check) of and wearing the
respirator.
• Allow employees the opportunity to handle the respirator, read labels and instructions for its use and
maintenance, to wear it in an uncontaminated atmosphere.
• An explanation of how to clean and store the respirator.
• Discussing the written Respiratory Protection Program, employee responsibility for compliance, OSHA
regulations and Raymond policies concerning respirator use.
Facial Hair
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Facial hair such as long side burns, long mustaches, goatees, beards and beard stubble that interferes with the
facepiece-to-face seal is not allowed. Employees whose normal job duties may require the use of respirators, or who
spend a majority of their time in operational or who are emergency responders are required to maintain facial hair to
insure interference with the respirator-to-face seal does not occur.
Respirator Fitting and Fit testing
Every respirator user will receive fitting instructions including demonstrations and practices in how the respirator will be
worn, how to adjust it, and how to determine if it fits properly.
Respirators shall not be worn when conditions that could prevent a good face-to-surface seal exist. Such conditions
may be a growth of beard, sideburns, or temple pieces on glasses. Also, absence of dentures can seriously affect
respirator fit.
Fit-testing will be conducted annually in conjunction with respiratory training. Results of the fit-testing must be
documented. Documentation of the fit testing shall be forwarded to the responsible party.
Medical Evaluation surveys must be completed by each employee and reviewed by licensed health care professional
BEFORE any fit testing or use of a respirator.
Maintenance, Care and Inspection
Air purifying respirators
• Check exhalation and inhalation seals to see that they are in-place. Valves must not be deformed, torn
or cracked, and/or tainted with dirt or lint on the valve seating surfaces.
• Check the facepiece for damage that may impair visibility or prevent a seal.
• Where applicable, check to see that the cartridge seating surfaces is not damaged. Ensure that
threads are not damaged.
• Inspect cartridges from damage to threads or cartridge housing. (Over torquing cartridges during
installation will eventually strip threads).
• Check straps and buckles to ensure they are present, flexible and in good working order without breaks,
tears or frays.
• Defective or questionable respirators should be submitted to a supervisor for suitable replacement.
DO NOT USE A RESPIRATOR THAT IS FOUND TO BE DEFECTIVE OR QUESTIONABLE IN ANY RESPECT.
The Supervisor shall conduct semi-annual respirator inspection during the second and forth quarter. These inspections
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CHAPTER NINE
shall be conducted and documented.
Storage of Air Purifying Respirators
• Cleaning is recommended at least once week. For heavy use, daily cleaning may be required.
• Remove cartridges before cleaning, if applicable. Dispose of cartridges as appropriately based
on usage.
• Clean facepiece, straps, valves and gaskets by immersing in warm water containing mild soap
(i.e. dish detergent). DO NOT use harsh cleansers (e.g. ammonia, abrasive). Scrub all surfaces
with a soft cloth or brush.
• Rinse in fresh, warm water and air dry in a non-contaminated atmosphere (e.g. locker).
• When dry, replace in plastic zip-lock bag for future use. Store at room temperature.
Program Evaluation
Annual documented evaluation of the effectiveness of the respiratory protection program is essential to ensure
adequate respiratory protection is continually provided. Program evaluation will be documented using Appendix
AD of this standard and shall include:
• Adequacy of the type, make and model of the respirator for the contaminants, concentrations and
situations encountered.
Proper donning, inspection and wearing of respirators.
• Proper maintenance and storage of respirators.
SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM
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CHAPTER TEN
EMERGENCY ACTIONS
The importance of an effective workplace safety and health program can not be overemphasized. The benefits
of such a program are clearly worth the effort; however, accidents still occur in spite of efforts to prevent them.
Therefore, proper planning for emergencies is necessary to minimize employee injury and property damage.
Effectiveness in the management of emergencies, including disasters, depends on the amount of planning and
training performed. For planning purposes the possible types of emergencies/disasters which may be anticipated
include, but are not limited to:
•
Fire or Explosion
• Bomb threat
•
Power failure, flood, or severe weather
• Earthquake
•
Hazardous materials, spill/release
• Telephone outage
•
Water or fuel shortages
•
Others as designated by the Raymond organization
Accidents involving physical injuries or property damage will be handled using the policies and procedures outlined
in Chapter 6, “Incident Investigation & Reporting” of this written program. Responsibility for the management of
emergency disaster procedures and actions rest with office supervisors, warehouse/yard supervisors, and job-site
supervisors at each Raymond operating location.
1. Supervisory Responsibilities (Office, Warehouse/Yard)
a. Ensure that all office, warehouse/yard employees are aware of company emergency procedures
and their individual responsibilities.
b. Establish employee assembly or safe refuge area (s) and procedures for accounting for employees.
c. Maintain an up-to-date listing of telephone numbers for all individuals who need to be notified in
the event of an emergency/disaster.
d. Maintain up-to-date emergency evacuation route floor plans/signs and ensure they are posted
throughout employee work areas.
e. Direct all actions taken in response to an emergency/disaster until the appropriate emergency/disaster
response agency arrives on scene.
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CHAPTER TEN
2. Supervisory Responsibilities (Job Sites)
a. The general foreman or supervisor in charge of Raymond company activities on a job site will ensure all
employees respond to emergencies/disasters according to the Emergency Actions Plan of the general
contractor.
b. A copy of the general contractor’s Emergency Actions Plan will be maintained at the job site so as to
provide Raymond employees access if desired.
3. Training
Supervisors will advise each employee of his/her responsibilities under the Raymond Company’s Emergency Actions
Plan at the following times:
1.
Initially when the plan is developed,
2.
Whenever the employee’s responsibilities or designated actions under the plan change, and
3.
Whenever the plan is changed.
Emergency/disaster responses and tips which can be used when training employees and are provided at appendix
S. A Bomb Threat checklist is shown in appendix T.
4. Communications
a. Emergency situations often cause confusion and panic which, in turn, can cause more injuries or damage
than the situation itself. It is for this reason that timely and clear communication is used to alert employees
to the nature of the emergency and action (s) to be taken. Possible means of communication are:
•
Fire alarm system
•
Paging/Intercom System
•
Telephone
•
Personal contact
b. The supervisor for the facility or job site experiencing an emergency will be responsible for selecting the
type of communication to be used.
5. Press/TV Control
Information on emergencies and/or disasters will not be released to the news media until reviewed and approved
by senior management.
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CHAPTER TEN
6. Fire Protection
The potential loss from fire to our operations both in the field and office/warehouse can be devastating. The prevention
of loss to fire is, therefore, of primary concern to all employees.
a. The responsibility for fire prevention rests with office managers, warehouse/yard supervisors, and
job-site supervisors at each Raymond operating location.
b. Responsibilities include good housekeeping practices, proper storage of flammable material, proper
handling of potential ignition sources, maintenance of fire detection/fighting equipment, and training
all employees in fire safety and prevention.
c. Supervisors will review all Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) which cover material used and/or stored
in their area(s) of responsibility. Refer to Chapter 8 of this written program for additional information on
MSDS’ and hazardous materials.
d. Inspection checklists designed to monitor housekeeping and storage practices are discussed in
Chapter 5 of this written program.
e. Training employees in fire safety and prevention will follow the guidelines outlined in Chapter 4 of
this written program.
f. Fire detection/fighting equipment (i.e. alarms, sprinkler systems, fire extinguishers) will be placed
on a periodic maintenance schedule. Responsibility for the maintenance program is assigned to
facility/equipment managers at each Raymond operating location.
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CHAPTER ELEVEN
ELECTRICAL SAFETY/GENERAL COMPANY POLICY
The purpose of this program is to inform interested persons, including employees, that Raymond is complying with the
OSHA Standards by determining that this workplace needs written procedures for preventing electric shock or other
injuries resulting from direct/indirect electrical contacts to employees working on or near energized or deenergized
parts. This program applies to all work operations at Raymond where employees may be exposed to live parts and/
or those parts that have been deenergized.
The Director of Safety or designee is the person having overall responsibility for the Electrical Safety Program. The
Director of Safety or designee will review and update the program, as necessary. Under this program, Raymond
employees receive instructions in the purpose and use of energy control procedures, as well as the other required
elements of the Control of Hazardous Energy standard. This policy includes the deenergizing of equipment, applying
locks and tags, verifying deenergization, and equipment reenergizing.
If, after reading this program, you find that improvements can be made, please contact the Safety Department.
We encourage all suggestions because we are committed to creating a safe workplace for all our employees and
a successful electrical safety program is an important component of our overall safety plan. We strive for clear
understanding, safe work practices, and involvement in the program from every level of the company.
Electricity has become an essential element of modern life, both at home and on the job. As a source of power,
electricity is accepted without much thought to the hazards encountered; however, electricity has long been
recognized as a serious job site hazard, exposing employees to such dangers as electrical shock, electrocution, fires,
and explosions.
Electrical accidents are caused by one or more of the following reasons:
•
Unsafe equipment and/or installation.
•
Unsafe workplaces caused by environmental factors.
•
Unsafe work practices.
Protection from electrical hazards is one way to prevent accidents. Protective methods include insulation, electrical
protective devices, guarding, grounding, personal protective equipment (PPE), and safe work practices.
The most common electrical hazard encountered at construction job sites is ground fault electrical shock. This hazard
can be eliminated by the following methods: (1) ground fault circuit interrupters (GFCIs) for receptacle outlets, or (2)
an assured equipment grounding conductor program.
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CHAPTER ELEVEN
Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters (GFCIs)
a. Most of the portable electric tools used by Raymond employees have either an equipment grounding
conductor or are double insulated. However, these two protection methods are not fool proof. A
grounding wire could break or a cord could become defective. Using a GFCI overcomes problems
associated with insulation problems and eliminates the potential for ground fault electrical shock.
b. The use of GFCIs to prevent electrical shock is the preferred method for all Raymond employees using
portable electric tools.
c. Raymond job site supervisors are responsible for ensuring a sufficient number of GFCI protected
electrical power boxes are provided for Raymond work activities.
Training Program
Every employee at Raymond who faces the risk of electric shock from working on or near energized or deenergized
electrical sources receives training in electrical related safety work practices pertaining to the individual’s job
assignment.
The goal of our electrical safety-training program is to ensure that all employees understand the hazards associated
with electric energy and that they are capable of performing the necessary steps to protect themselves and their
co-workers.
Our electrical training program covers these basic elements:
•
Lockout and tagging of conductors and parts of electrical equipment and systems.
•
Safe procedures for deenergizing circuits and equipment.
•
Application of locks and tags.
•
Verification that the equipment has been deenergized.
•
Procedures for reenergizing the circuits or equipment.
•
Other electrically related information which is necessary for employee safety.
In our facility, all the persons working on or near energized or deenergized electric sources are considered “qualified”
to work safely with electrical energy and have received the appropriate training and certification to do so. In addition
to the basic training elements, our “qualified” employees are trained in the skills and techniques necessary to identify
exposed live parts, determine nominal voltages, clearance distances and corresponding voltages.
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CHAPTER ELEVEN
Lockout and Tagging Program
It is a Raymond policy that circuits and equipment must be disconnected from all electric energy sources before
work on them begins. We use lockout and tagging devices to prevent the accidental reenergization of circuits or
equipment. These lockout and tagging procedures are the main component of our electrical safety program. The
safety procedures that make up our lockout and tagging program include these elements:
Deenergizing circuits and equipment. We disconnect the circuits and equipment to be worked on from all electric
energy sources and we release stored energy that could accidentally reenergize equipment.
•
Application of locks and tags. Only authorized employees are allowed to place a lock and tag
on each disconnecting means used to deenergize our circuits or equipment before work begins.
Our locks prevent unauthorized persons from reenergizing the equipment or circuits and the tags
prohibit unauthorized operation of the disconnecting device.
•
Verification of deenergized condition of circuits and equipment. Prior to work on the equipment,
we require that a “qualified” employee verify that the equipment is deenergized and cannot be
restarted or reenergized.
•
Reenergizing circuits and equipment. Before circuits or equipment are reenergized, we follow
these steps in this order:
•
A “qualified” employee conducts tests and verifies that all tools and devices have been removed.
•
All exposed employees are warned to stay clear of circuits and equipment.
•
Authorized employees remove their own locks and tags.
•
We do a visual inspection of the area to be sure all employees are clear of the circuits and
equipment.
Enforcement
Constant awareness of and respect for electrical hazards, and compliance with all safety rules are considered
conditions of employment. Supervisors and individuals in the Safety Department reserve the right to issue disciplinary
warnings to employees, up to and including termination, for failure to follow the guidelines of this program.
SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM
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CHAPTER TWELVE
SAFETY PROGRAM COMPLIANCE
Raymond’s Safety and Health Program contains a series of program elements to ensure employees comply with
safe and healthy work practices. The program contains both positive and negative reinforcement methods which
include the following:
1.
Incentive Program
2.
Training/Retraining Programs
3.
Discipline Program
1. Incentive Program
a. The Raymond Safety Incentive Program has been established to recognize safe job performance,
develop/maintain safety awareness, and to provide positive reinforcement to safety program
compliance. The program is viewed as an addition to, not a substitute for, our Company safety
program.
b. The incentive program will be reviewed and updated each year. Factors to be considered when
reviewing the program include results of the program, safety statistical results, and safety goals/
objectives for the new year. An explanation of the current year’s program is provided at appendix R.
2. Training/Retraining Program
Another way in which positive reinforcement of safety program compliance can be achieved is through training/
retraining. Refer to Chapter 4 of this written program for an explanation of Raymond’s Training Program.
3. Discipline System
Raymond expects all of its employees to be motivated to work safely and to conform to our program of safe work
practices. If non-compliance on the part of our employees does occur, the following disciplinary guidelines shall be
used as a minimum.
Union Bargaining Employees:
1.
First infraction: Written warning - 1 day off without pay.
2.
Second infraction: Written warning - 2 days off without pay.
3.
Third infraction: Written warning - 1 week off without pay.
4.
Fourth Infraction: Termination of employment.
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CHAPTER TWELVE
Non-bargaining employees shall be disciplined according to the policies set forth in Raymond’s Employee Handbook.
•
An infraction is defined as; any safety related non compliance item.
•
Disciplinary action may be expedited at anytime based on the severity of the infraction.
•
A disciplinary notice will be given to employees using the form at appendix M
SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM
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CHAPTER THIRTEEN
ASBESTOS AND LEAD POLICY
Buildings Containing Asbestos/Lead
Raymond does not perform any class/type of asbestos or lead abatement work and does not expose its employees
to environments that contain these materials. The following materials must be treated as asbestos-containing, unless
specified procedures are followed to determine otherwise, in compliance with current EPA and OSHA standards.
1.
Thermal System Insulation (TSI) and surfacing materials which are defined as material that is
sprayed, troweled-on or otherwise applied to surfaces (such as acoustical plaster on ceilings
and fireproofing materials on structural members, or other materials on surfaces for acoustical,
fireproofing, and other purposes) in buildings or substrates constructed in 1980 or earlier.
2.
3.
Asphalt and vinyl flooring material installed in 1980 or earlier.
Any other materials (i.e. Taping mud, plaster, etc.) that the building owner has actual knowledge
that is, or should have known it to be, asbestos and/or lead containing.
Building owners are assigned specific responsibilities under the EPA and OSHA asbestos and lead standards to
identify asbestos/lead containing materials, retaining records of all activities involving asbestos/lead materials, and
conveying this information to all employees working in or on their building.
Early in the bidding/contract process the question of whether asbestos containing materials are present shall be
determined.
A “RFI” (attachment A1) to the general contractor is the required method. The letter must address the following:
1.
Written documentation there is no ACM/LCM within the project area; or,
2. Written documentation identifying the location and quantity of ACM and/or LCM
and method of prior abatement; and,
3. Is any Demolition and/or abatement activity to be done?
When an abatement contractor abates asbestos/lead a “Certificate/Report of Abatement,” will be prepared by the
abatement contractor. You shall acquire a copy of the certification/report before evaluating how to proceed with
work in the area.
Note: Abatement may involve removal or encapsulation in place (EIP). If EIP is done, you shall confirm that our scope
of work will not require activity which will disturb the encapsulation.
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CHAPTER THIRTEEN
Raymond employees do not work in areas containing ACM/LCM if there is any potential for disturbing the material
until abatement is completed and certificate/report of abatement documentation is provided. Also, do not move
equipment and materials into an abatement area until the certificate/report of abatement is provided. Equipment
and materials can become contaminated requiring their abatement (cleaning and/or disposal) at significant cost.
Raymond employees must be briefed on all asbestos/lead issues/activities before starting work. The Raymond Safety
Department will assist you with the employee training and briefing documentation.
Summary
If your project involves a building(s) constructed in 1980 or earlier you must presume the presence of asbestos and/or
lead until you have documentation showing otherwise. Documentation required:
1.
2.
Written documentation there is no ACM/LCM within the project area; or,
Written documentation identifying the location and quantity of ACM and/or LCM and
method of prior abatement.
3.
Is any Demolition and/or abatement activity to be done?
•
Don’t wait until the last minute to ask questions.
•
Use the same process for lead that you use for asbestos.
•
Do not accept verbal assurance…get it in writing.
Installation of Lead Products
Raymond does not have liability insurance covering activities involved with the installation of lead products.
The installation of lead products is normally associated with health care facilities (i.e. x-ray room walls). No estimating
or project management activity concerning the installation of lead products will occur, until the Raymond Safety
Director and CEO are fully briefed and approve the project. There are NO exceptions.
Attachments – See Appendix AA
A. A1 / A2
Sample pre bid RFI templates (2).
B. Sample letter template for initial project inquiry concerning asbestos and/or lead.
C. Sample letter template for follow up on the initial inquiry concerning asbestos and/or lead.
D. Sample exclusions and qualifications appropriate to lead and asbestos.
SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM
Revised March 2015
CHAPTER FOURTEEN
MOLD POLICY
While mold is not a new issue, its rapid growth in some buildings and fears of potential adverse health effects are
a more recent development. Whether these concerns are justified or not, mold has become a serious issue in the
construction industry and will remain so for the foreseeable future.
The key to avoiding mold is the management of moisture at each step of construction from manufacturing to finishing
a building. Raymond’s role in this construction cycle is primarily limited to receiving materials which are subject to
moisture damage, material storage, and installation activities. Our focus should be directed toward prevention steps
and remediation activities conducted under the direction of a general contractor and/or building owner.
It must be clearly understood that Raymond is not a mold expert nor do we intend to acquire the expertise; however,
there are proactive steps we can take to minimize or prevent losses from moisture and mold throughout the building
cycle. These steps are:
Pre-Construction:
1.
At the initial review of contract documents, evaluate the schedule to determine if materials
susceptible to water damage (i.e. Wallboard and insulation) will be installed before the building is
“dried-in.”
2.
Notify the General Contractor either in writing, through RFI”s, qualifications, or other methods of the
potential for water intrusion/damage.
3.
Use the bidding process to inform potential Raymond customers of the various mold resistant
products available as a possible solution to any scheduled installation of products susceptible to
water damage prior to “dry-in.”
Note: Confirm whether the job is classified as a LEED project. If it is, contact the (LEED) consultant to determine if the
installation schedule requires the building(s) to be “dried-in” before wallboard is installed.
Material Delivery/Storage:
1.
Do not have material, subject to water damage, delivered prematurely during forecasted
or actual inclement weather unless protected storage is available.
2.
Inspect materials being delivered to ensure there is no water damage. If there is damage,
document it and inform supplier in writing as soon as possible.
3.
Separate any water damaged materials immediately and place in a quarantine area if
they cannot be returned immediately. Note: Separating water damaged from undamaged
material is important so as to prevent mold migration.
4.
Inspect stored materials frequently for signs of wet conditions, potential protective cover leaks,
condensation or visible mold.
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CHAPTER FOURTEEN
Pre-Installation:
1.
If the installation schedule creates a situation where materials, subject to water damage, are
to be installed before appropriate protection from inclement weather and/or wet processes (i.e.
Fireproofing) is in place; the potential for water damage needs to be brought to the attention of
the general contractor in writing. Refer to attachment 1 for a sample letter.
2.
Do not proceed to the installation phase until the general contractor has acknowledged,
in writing, your concerns over potential water damage if installation proceeds as scheduled.
If the general contractor directs Raymond, in writing, to install as scheduled; ensure the letter
also releases Raymond from liability if water damage occurs.
3.
The pre-installation phase provides another opportunity to advise the general contractor
of the new mold resistant products and chemical sprays which are available to minimize/
eliminate mold resulting from water intrusion.
Installation:
1.
During the job, foremen need to establish a daily routine to check for and document actual
and/or potential damage to materials.
2.
3.
Inspect the work area at the beginning of each day for mold, water intrusion and/or dirt.
Complete end-of-shift inspections to ensure that protective measures have been implemented
(i.e. Wall openings covered, windows/doors closed, etc.)
4.
The handling of water, wet materials, and waste represents an important concern in regard to
material damage. Areas for mixing materials should be set up to keep water from draining into
adjacent workspaces or on to finished work. All spills should be cleaned up immediately.
5.
The practice of using stacks of material (i.e. Wall board) as lunch/break tables should be avoided
since food residue and spills provide an excellent medium for mold growth.
Water Damage/Mold Remediation:
1.
Raymond will conduct water damage/mold remediation only under the direction of the
general contractor. Directions must identify clearly and specifically areas requiring product
removal/replacement. An excellent method of identifying remediation areas is the use of a
floor diagram showing the areas in color.
2.
Contact the Safety Department before beginning remediation activities for guidance in
appropriate PPE to be used, training requirements, and remediation procedures.
3.
Remediation documentation options can include one or more of the following: Photographs,
timelines, T & M tickets, change orders, Foreman’s Job Log, and floor diagrams indicating
completed work in color.
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CHAPTER FOURTEEN
Special Issues & Challenges:
• Documentation is essential to help correct and assign responsibility for the resolution of moisture and
mold problems that may occur in our scope of work on a specific project. The following are basic to the
documentation process:
1.
Verify and document that the material is dry and free of mold at the time it is handed off
to the next party in the process.
2.
Verify and document that water or mold damaged materials are returned or quarantined.
3.
Verify and document conditions on the construction site prior to installation.
4.
Document any events that may result in the introduction of water, moisture or mold during the
installation process, such as leaks or floods.
5.
Verify and document the condition of the completed work.
• Documentation should generally consist of a written record of the event or transaction and photographs.
The Foreman’s Job Log is an excellent option for a written record. The water Intrusion Incident Event Form
is also an excellent documentation tool. The documentation will be most useful if it is done at the time of
the event or transaction. It should include an indication of who was present or involved at the time.
• Again, Raymond is not, nor will we become an expert on mold. Our involvement with mold is limited to
advising the general contractor of possible product damage if the building schedule is followed when
water damage, for any reason, is possible; reporting observed water damage; and damaged product
removal/replacement under the direction of the general contractor.
• It is extremely important to re-emphasize that at no time does Raymond attempt to delineate areas
of mold impact; determine the nature/scope or remediation; and, in any manner, state/indicate that
actions taken resolve the problem.
• Keep in mind also, that Raymond is not qualified, trained, nor licensed to apply chemicals for mold
remediation.
• The limitations on Raymond’s involvement with mold remediation is due to liability issues associated with
mold.
Attachments – See Appendix AB
1. Sample letter template for advising of potential water damage.
2. Sample letter template advising of water damage.
3. Water Intrusion Incident Event form.
4. PPE Protocols for Product Removal.
5. Qualifications/Exclusions
SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM
Revised March 2015
CHAPTER FIFTEEN
EMPLOYEE SAFETY & HEALTH COMMITTEE’S CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS
ARTICLE I - REQUIREMENTS
There will be a Raymond Safety & Health Committee that will represent all employees.
ARTICLE II - OBJECTIVES
Committee objectives/mandates are under the direction of the Raymond Safety Department:
A.
To assure company policies comply with State and Federal Safety Regulations.
B.
To review and make recommendations to prevent incidents.
C.
To promote safety training for all employees.
D.
To promote the health of all employees.
E.
Enforcement of safety rules, policies, and procedures
ARTICLE III - MEMBERSHIP
The Safety & Health Committee shall consist of representatives from labor, management and support personnel.
Membership will include warehouse, field and office employees.
Section 1. Membership: The Safety & Health Committees shall consist of at least 3 bargaining unit employees and
3 management employees in each region. One representative from Senior Management & the Safety
Department must sit on the committee. The committee will be guided under the direction of the elected
Chairperson and Co-Chairperson. At the end of each year the committee will elect a new Co-Chairperson
from current members who voluntary choose candidacy. At the beginning of the next year, the elected
Co-Chairperson will serve as the committee Chairperson. The elected Chairperson will serve on the
committee for one full (1) year. The elected Co-Chairperson will serve on the committee for (2) years.
Section 2. Rotation of Members: In order to give the broadest exposure to all employees, an employee shall serve at
least one (1) year with the exception of the Committee Chairperson and Co-Chairperson. An employee
shall not normally serve more than (2) consecutive terms. A minimum of six (6) months inactive time
between terms shall be required.
New members will be on a voluntary basis. In the event a representative from the specified area does not
volunteer, the committee will ask the appropriate Supervisor to appoint an employee.
SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM
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CHAPTER FIFTEEN
Section 3. Selection Criteria:
A. Ideally, choose a member from a department not already represented.
B.
Has not served within the last six months.
C. Is committed to safety.
D. Wants to serve on the committee.
E.
Willing to serve for a minimum of one year.
F.
Will participate in inspections, incident investigations, safety training/activities, and wellness activities.
The Committee Chairperson must notify managers of all direct reports serving on a Committee.
Section 4. Responsibilities: The Safety & Health Committee shall be responsible for:
A. Conducting monthly inspections (on a rotating basis).
B. Reporting violations of Raymond Safety Policy and make suggestions for improvement.
C. Reviewing the Company’s accident investigation reports.
D. Assisting in the development and refinement of safety processes.
E. Assisting with emergency response.
F. Publicizing the safety program through display of pertinent literature.
G. Assisting with the promotion of safety training activities for employees.
H. Participating in safety and health training.
I.
Assisting in developing and participating in company wellness activities.
J. Monitoring the effectiveness of safety and health activities.
K. Getting input from all departments affected by policy changes.
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CHAPTER FIFTEEN
Section 5. Meetings:
A. The Safety & Health Committee shall meet monthly.
B.
Agenda should be published one week prior to the meeting. The Safety Department
will be copied on all agendas.
C. The committee members shall notify their Supervisors one (1) week prior to scheduled meetings.
D. Attendance must be documented.
E.
Written minutes will be distributed to committee members no later than five (5) working
days following the meeting. The minutes will be posted in each office and posted on the web.
The Safety Department will be copied on all minutes.
F.
Minutes will be kept on file for a minimum of 3 years.
G. Should a member miss more than three (3) meetings without reasonable cause, he/she will
automatically be replaced by committee action. (time & workload is not considered reasonable)
H. The suggested order of business to be observed at the Safety & Health Committee Meetings
is as follows:
1. Call to order.
2. Report on status of outstanding recommendations.
3. Review incidents.
4. Discuss recommendations.
5. New Business.
6. Adjournment.
I.
Where the committee does not agree on any issue, a vote will be taken. The Chairperson
will cast the swaying vote when there is a tie.
J.
Safety Department personnel will not participate in voting, but will provide guidance and
oversight to ensure that all decisions made by the committee are aligned with Raymond
Safety Policies and Procedures, along with State and Federal Safety Regulations
K.
A Safety & Health Committee effectiveness evaluation should be performed annually to rate
the effectiveness of each committee and to determine what was accomplished, etc.
SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM
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CHAPTER FIFTEEN
Section 6. Special Projects:
A. Assign sub-committees for special projects.
B.
Document meeting attendance.
C. Publish minutes for review at regular Safety & Health Committee meetings.
D. Track assignments to completion. Document who will do what, by when.
ARTICLE IV - INSPECTIONS
Section 1. Various members of the Safety & Health Committee shall perform monthly inspections of
Raymond operations.
Section 2. Inspections should be scheduled at the convenience of each inspector’s departmental needs.
Section 3. The Chairperson shall appoint committee members to make inspections.
SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM
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CHAPTER SIXTEEN
POLICY ON ALCOHOL, DRUGS, NARCOTICS AND
OTHER UNLAWFUL SUBSTANCES
Revised February, 2009
THE RAYMOND COMPANIES
Include:
The Raymond Group
Raymond-Southern California, Inc.
George M. Raymond Co.
Raymond-Northern California, Inc.
Raymond-San Diego, Inc.
SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM
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CHAPTER SIXTEEN
THE RAYMOND COMPANIES
POLICY ON
ALCOHOL, DRUGS, NARCOTIC AND
OTHER UNLAWFUL SUBSTANCES
Alcohol, Drug and other illegal substances use in the work place is detrimental to health and safety of the user, other
employees and other people on the jobsites. It also contributes to increased absenteeism, tardiness, medical costs
and decreased productivity, as well as resulting in danger to, or loss of, equipment and property.
The Raymond Companies (including George M. Raymond Co., Raymond Southern-California, Inc, Raymond Northern
California, Inc. ,and Raymond-San Diego, Inc.) are committed to maintaining a safe work environment, free from
intoxicants, illegal drugs and substance abuse. We believe that we have an obligation to take all necessary steps to
provide a safe work environment which is free from avoidable hazards.
Accordingly, except as set forth below (EXCEPTIONS), The Raymond Companies including George M Raymond Co.,
Raymond-Southern California, Inc. Raymond Northern-California, Inc. and Raymond-San Diego, Inc, (“Company”)
has adopted the following policy:
1. The Company strictly prohibits the possession, use, sale, distribution or transfer of alcohol, drugs,
narcotics, intoxicants or other illegal substances while performing work for the Company or while on
Company property. Company property for the purposes of this policy includes all property owned,
leased, used or under the control of The Raymond Companies, its affiliates and subsidiaries, including,
but not limited to, structures, buildings, offices, installations, parking lots, vehicles and jobsites of a client.
All employees must comply with this policy on Company property, whether they are on duty or not.
2. An employee may not report to work or remain on duty impaired or under the influence of alcohol,
drugs or intoxicants.
3. An employee who uses, possesses, sells or provides illegal drugs, controlled substances, or intoxicants
off duty may be subject to discipline or discharge if the off-duty conduct adversely affects job
performance or has a negative impact on the safety of Company personnel or property.
4. All employees are required to notify the Company of any criminal drug statute conviction within five (5)
days after the conviction, if the conviction is based on a workplace violation or otherwise relates to the
employee’s ability to perform his job safely or efficiently. The employee will be subject to discipline or
termination for either a first offense or a subsequent offense.
DEFINITIONS
1. “Employee” means any person employed by The Raymond Companies and its subsidiaries or divisions,
including both hourly and management personnel.
SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM
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CHAPTER SIXTEEN
2. “Drug” or “Intoxicant” means any substance that has known mind or function-altering effects on
a human subject, including but not limited to alcohol, ethanol, amphetamines, barbiturates, other
hypnotics, cocaine, narcotics (opiates such as heroin, morphine and codeine) PCP and other
hallucinogens, marijuana and all substances prohibited or controlled by state or federal controlled
substance laws.
3. “Possess” means to have on one’s person or in one’s personal effects or under one’s control.
4. “Under the Influence” means that an employee is affected by alcohol, drugs or intoxicants. This may,
but need not, be demonstrated by observable symptoms or behavior consistent with impairment such
as slurred speech, or difficulty in maintaining balance. A determination of use, influence or impairment
may be established by professional opinion, testing, or a layperson’s opinion. Drugs in an amount
detectable by a test administered under the terms of this policy and constituting a positive result
according to certified laboratory cut-off guidelines, or applicable labor agreement is presumptive of a
violation of this policy.
5. In the event of a conflict between the provisions set forth in this policy, and any terms or conditions of
any labor agreements covering persons subject to this policy, the existing labor agreements will take
precedence over this policy.
EXCEPTIONS
1. Social Events. Alcohol may be used on company property during organized social occasions with
the expressed permission of the Company’s CEO, President or his/her designee.
2. Prescribed and Over-the Counter Drugs. The use of prescription or over-the-counter drugs, or
possession incident to such use, is not prohibited if: (a) the drug has been legally obtained and is
being used for the purpose for which it was prescribed and manufactured; and (b) the drug is being
used at the dosage prescribed or authorized; and (c) the use of the drug is not inconsistent with the
safe and efficient performance of the employee’s duties.
An employee who is using a prescribed or over-the-counter drug and who has been informed and has reason to
believe or feels that the use of any such drug may affect his or her ability to perform his or her duties safely and/
or efficiently, is required to report such drug use to his or her supervisor. A supervisor who has been informed or
has reason to believe an employee is being prescribed or over-the-counter drugs that may affect the employee’s
ability to perform his or her job safely or effectively shall report that information to the job site superintendent and
the Company’s Safety Director. In those circumstances where the use of a prescribed or over-the-counter drug is
inconsistent with the safe and efficient performance of duties, an employee may be required to take a leave of
absence or other action determined to be appropriate by the Company.
SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM
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CHAPTER SIXTEEN
DISCIPLINE
An employee who violates this policy’s provisions concerning the use, possession, sale, distribution, transfer, reporting
to work, or working under the influence of alcohol, drugs or intoxicants will be subject to immediate termination of
employment.
TESTING
TESTING WILL BE PERFORMED BY A LABORATORY CERTIFIED BY THE NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON DRUG ABUSE.
1. Pre-employment. All applicants considered favorable for employment will be required to submit to
a drug screen. Candidates who refuse to undergo such testing: use chemicals to alter their testing
sample; or fail to pass such testing, will not be eligible for employment. Employees who are laid off due
to the lack of work activity will not be subject to pre-employment drug testing if they are rehired within
120 days of the lay off date.
2. Prior Testing. Applicants who can provide satisfactory evidence (said satisfaction to be determined
within the discretion of the Company), of successfully passing a drug screen administered by the Union
representing that candidate within 120 days prior to the application for employment with the Company,
will not be subject to pre-employment drug testing.
3. Reasonable Cause. Where there is reasonable cause to believe that an employee is impaired, the
employee shall be asked to submit to drug testing. Observation must be made by at least two (2)
persons, one of whom may be a Union Represented employee. For employees who refuse to take
the test where the prerequisites set forth in this paragraph have been met, there will be a rebuttable
presumption that the test result would have been positive for an unlawful substance.
4. Post Accident. Employees who are a contributing factor to an accident requiring medical care other
than first aid treatment or any property damage in excess of $1,500 will be required to submit to a drug
screen where there is reasonable cause to believe that the accident resulted from drug or alcohol usage.
5. Refusal to Test/Alteration of Testing Sample/Failure to Pass. Employees who refuse to test; to alter their
testing sample; or fail to pass the drug/alcohol testing will be immediately terminated.
6. Condition of Contract Award. In the event the Company is required, as a condition of a contract
award, to abide by the terms and conditions of an owner’s drug policy, the company will notify the
Union Representatives of employees who will be subject to said policy before implementing the policy,
and all employees of the Company will be informed that the program they are working under differs
from the Company’s standard policy. Employees shall have the right to request that they be assigned
to another project with no inferences being made.
7. The Company will pay the cost of each applicants’ and employees’ drug test and will pay each
SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM
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CHAPTER SIXTEEN
applicant and employee who take and pass the test for the time it takes to undergo the drug screen up
to a maximum of two hours travel time, plus time at the clinic or collection site.
8. The Company will take care to administer the testing program in a fair, non-discrimnatory manner, and
to maintain the confidentiality of the results. There will be no disclosure of information concerning test
results, corrective action or treatment to a third party who does not have a need to know.
9. Where allowed by the appropriate labor agreement, the Company may use, on a voluntary basis,
an oral fluid test or an equivalent approved by the bargaining parties as an effective low-cost tool for
substance abuse screening for pre-employment, reasonable cause, and post accident testing. Testing
procedures shall be conducted in a manner consistent with the product manufacturers’ specifications.
The employer will maintain a confidential written record of all oral fluid tests administered for a period
of three years. Any “non-negative” test result shall be designated as “inconclusive” and shall be
confirmed by a urine test at a certified laboratory in accordance with the drug testing procedures set
forth below.
10. A sufficient amount of a sample shall be taken to allow for an initial test and a confirmation test. The
initial test will be by Enzyme Multiplied Immunoassay Technique (EMIT). In the event a question or positive
result arises from the initial test, a confirmation test must be utilized before action will be taken against
the employee or applicant. The confirmation test will be Gas Chromatography – Mass Spectrometry
(GC/MS). The cutoff levels for both the intial test and confirmation test will be those established by the
National Institute on Drug Abuse, Substance Abuse Management Health Service Association, or specific
cutoff levels stated in the labor agreement. Which of these cutoff levels are used will be that defined by
the appropriate labor agreements. Confirmed positive samples will be retained by the testing laboratory
in secured long term frozen storage for a minimum of one year. Handling and transportation of each
sample must be documented through strict chain of custody procedures.
11. The Company will notify the employee of results from any test that is positive for any substance included
in the procedure. In the case of a positive result, the employee will be provided with an opportunity
to explain the presence of the identified substance prior to taking disciplinary action. This requirement
will be considered satisfied if the employee has been asked in connection with the sample collection
procedure to provide information concerning all drugs or medications used within the past three weeks.
A drug test that is received with a diluted result, will be reviewed using the DOT guidelines. Employees
not passing the drug screen will be immediately removed from the Employer’s payroll.
12. An employee or applicant who tests positive may request a second confirmation test of the original
urine specimen at his/her own expense.
13. Present employees who tests positive must enroll in a rehabilitation program at his/her own expense to
be considered for rehire. When such program has been successfully completed, and proof has been
presented, the employee may re-apply for employment. The Company reserves the right to determine,
within its discretion, the sufficiency of any proof or certificate of completion from any rehabilitation
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CHAPTER SIXTEEN
program. If work for which the employee is qualified exists after he/she completes a rehabilitation
program, he/she shall be reinstated. Employees shall be considered for reinstatement only after a
rehabilitation program has been completed.
14. An applicant who test positive has the option of reapplying for employment and retesting after six
(6) months from the date of testing positive, with or without completing a rehabilitation program. An
applicant will only be eligible for employment after all of the conditions of employment are satisfied
and there is available work suited for that individual’s qualifications. This policy shall in no way limit the
ability of the Company to exercise its discretion when offering at will employment to any individual. At
all times the Company shall not discriminate for any reason against any person who has tested positive
according to the provisions of this policy. The drug test used in the retesting situation described above
shall be a urine test at a certified laboratory in accordance with procedures set forth previously in this
policy.
15. Any dispute under this policy shall be submitted to the grievance and arbitration procedure set forth
in the applicable Union agreement.
16. Employees must report ALL injuries IMMEDIATELY to their supervisor whether the injury requires medical
treatment or first aid only. Late reporting of any injury may result in discipline and denial of a claim.
17. Subcontractors: The Raymond Companies require that all subcontractors participate in efforts to
prevent and detect the abuse of alcohol and illegal substances by their employees. It is forbidden
to use, possess, distribute, be under the influence, or manufacture illegal drugs or alcohol while on
the jobsite premises. Subcontractors should maintain a substance abuse and prevention policy as
one method to accomplish this. When requested, subcontractors will provide a copy of their program.
18. If an employee or applicant has attended a rehabilitation program, three times and failed a drug test
three times, they will not be eligible for re-employment.
19. The Company reserves the right to use its discretion in the enforcement or waiver of any provision of
this policy to ensure its fair and equitable application. Any useof this discretion will be in a nondiscriminatory manner and consistent with any relevant union agreements and any other applicable
laws.
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CHAPTER SIXTEEN
DRUG USE IN OUR COUNTRY HAS BECOME EPIDEMIC
FACTS
Illegal drug and substance abuse endangers us all. We are all at risk while using public transportation, driving, working
or at play.
W are a country of great personal freedom but drug use endangers us all and cannot be permitted. We all must help
eliminate the problem through our attitude and responsible use of peer pressure.
The Raymond Companies accept their responsibility as a corporate citizen to influence employees away from the
harmful and dangerous effects of drug use. We have adopted a drug policy which is not intended to be punitive,
but rather to provide a safe, secure workplace for our employees and those of our subcontractors.
LET’S ALL WORK TOGETHER TO SOLVE THE PROBLEM.
DON’T USE DRUGS AND DO YOUR BEST TO DISCOURAGE DRUG USE BY OTHERS.
EMPLOYEE ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
The undersigned employee acknowledges that he/she has received and read this drug and substance abuse policy,
and understands that this policy is effective for all employees who are hired or remain employed after January
1, 2003. Any employee who performs services for the Company on or after that date shall be deemed to have
consented to testing as required by this policy.
EMPLOYEE # _________________ EMPLOYEE NAME (Please Print) _________________________________________________
SIGNATURE ______________________________________________________________ DATE ______________________________
SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM
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CHAPTER SEVENTEEN
HEAT ILLNESS PREVENTION
Introduction
The heat illness prevention standard is applicable to any outdoor workplace, whenever environmental risk factors for
heat illness are present. This plan meets or exceeds the T8 CCR 3395 standard.
Definitions
“Access to shade” means employees suffering from heat illness or believing a preventative recovery period is needed
shall be provided access to an area with shade that is either open to the air or provided with ventilation or cooling for
a period of no less than five minutes. Such access to shade shall be permitted at all times.
“Acclimatization” means temporary adaptation of the body to work in the heat that occurs gradually when a person
is exposed to it. Acclimatization peaks in most people within four to fourteen days of regular work for at least two
hours per day in the heat.
“Heat Illness” means a serious medical condition resulting from the body’s inability to cope with a particular heat
load, and includes heat cramps, heat exhaustion, heat syncope and heat stroke.
“Environmental risk factors for heat illness” means working conditions that create the possibility that heat illness
could occur, including air temperature, relative humidity, radiant heat from the sun and other sources, conductive
heat sources such as the ground, air movement, workload severity and duration, protective clothing and personal
protective equipment worn by employees.
“Personal risk factors for heat illness” means factors such as an individual’s age, degree of acclimatization, health,
water consumption, alcohol consumption, caffeine consumption, and use of prescription medications that affect
the body’s water retention or other physiological responses to heat.
“Preventative recovery period” means a period of time to recover from the heat in order to prevent heat illness.
“Provision of water/source” means employees shall have access to potable drinking water. Where it is not plumbed or
otherwise continuously supplied, it shall be provided in sufficient quantity at the beginning of the work shift to provide
one quart per employee per hour for drinking for the entire shift. Water sources are centrally located in each work
area, by a 5 gallon water jug with pump. Employees may begin the shift with smaller quantities of water if they have
effective procedures for replenishment during the shift as needed to allow employees to drink one quart or more per
hour. The frequent drinking of water shall be encouraged.
“Shade” means blockage of direct sunlight. Canopies, umbrellas and other temporary structures or devices may be
used to provide shade. One indicator that blockage is sufficient is when objects do not cast a shadow in the area of
blocked sunlight. Shade is not adequate when heat in the area of shade defeats the purpose of shade, which is to
allow the body to cool. For example, a car sitting in the sun does not provide acceptable shade to a person inside it,
unless the car is running with air conditioning.
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CHAPTER SEVENTEEN
Signs and Symptoms
Heat illnesses are the result of elevated body temperatures due to dehydration and an inability to dissipate the
body’s heat. Common early symptoms and signs of heat illness include headache, muscle cramps, and unusual
fatigue. However, progression to more serious illness can be rapid and include unusual behavior, nausea/vomiting,
weakness, rapid pulse, excessive sweating or hot dry skin, seizures, and fainting or loss of consciousness.
Always remember that mild heat illnesses have the potential of becoming severe life threatening emergencies if not
treated properly.
Table 1 Heat Illness in Ascending Order of Severity
Type of Heat Illness
Signs and Symptoms
Treatment
Heat Edema
Swelling of the hands, feet and ankles
is common during the first few days in a
Hot environment.
Heat edema is usually self-limiting and typically
Does not require any treatment.
Heat Rush
Sweat ducts become plugged, resulting
in itchy, red, bumpy rash on areas of the
Skin kept wet from sweating.
Cool and dry the affected skin and avoid
conditions that may induce sweating.
Heat Cramps
Painful muscle spasms or cramps that
usually occur in heavily exercised
muscles. Spasms often begin when a
person is resting after exercise.
Rest in a cool environment and gently apply
steady pressure to the cramped muscle. Drink
cold water containing a small amount of salt or
diluted sports hydration beverage.
Heat Syncope
Faintness, dizziness, headache, in
creased pulse rate, restlessness, nausea,
Vomiting and possibly even a brief loss of
consciousness.
This is the most common type of heat illness.
Stop all exertion and move to a cool shaded
Place. Remove constrictive clothing. Drink
Water with salt or sports hydration beverages.
Fan and cool by placing ice or cold packs
along neck, chest, armpits and in groin - (do
not place ice directly on skin).
Hot skin and abnormal mental state are
the key symptoms of heat Stroke. Victims
may seem confused, Disoriented, and
may still be sweating. Anyone with an
elevated temperature and an altered
mental state should be considered a
victim of heat stroke. The victim will
also likely have increased Heart and
breathing rates. Seizures, Coma and
death are possible.
Call 911 or seek medical help immediately.
Heat stroke is one of the few life threatening
medical emergencies. A victim can die
Within minutes if not properly treated.
Efforts to reduce body temperature must begin
Immediately! Move (gently) to a cooler spot or
Shade. Fan and cool by placing ice or cold
packs along neck, chest, armpits and in groin (do not Place ice directly on skin). Do not give
anything To drink due to the risk of vomiting and
aspiration.
(Fainting)
Heat Stroke
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CHAPTER SEVENTEEN
Environmental Risk Factors
Working conditions that contribute to the risk of heat illness include air temperature,
relative humidity, radiant
heat from the sun or other sources, conductive heat from the ground or other sources, air movement, workload
severity and duration, and clothing worn by employees. The following “Heat Index” may be used to help determine
if conditions present an increased risk of heat illness. The Heat Index (HI) is the temperature the body feels when heat
and humidity are combined.
Daily weather conditions will be posted, by Foreman, at “daily-huddle” (communication) area, informing the
employees what the current day’s and week’s weather forecast is to be with any significant information.
Table 2 Heat Index (HI) based on Temperature (°F) and Relative Humidity (%)
°F
90%
80%
70%
60%
50%
40%
80
85
84
82
81
80
79
85
98
96
92
90
86
84
90
121
113
105
99
94
90
95
>135
133
122
113
105
98
100
>150
>150
142
129
118
109
105
>150
>150
>150
148
133
121
110
>150
>150
>150
>150
>150
135
Heat Index
Possible Heat Disorder
80°F - 90°F
Fatigue possible with prolonged exposure and physical.
90°F - I05°F
Sunstroke, heat cramps and heat exhaustion possible.
I05°F - 130°F
Sunstroke, heat cramps and heat exhaustion likely, and heat stroke possible.
130°F or greater
Heat stroke highly likely with continued exposure.
Personal Risk Factors
Factors such as an employee’s age, degree of acclimatization, health, water consumption, alcohol consumption,
caffeine consumption, and use of prescription medications may affect the body’s water retention and other
physiological response to heat.
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CHAPTER SEVENTEEN
Procedures for Preventing Heat Illness
Supervisors are responsible for ensuring the following measures are used, as appropriate, to help prevent heat illness
among employees.
Take Breaks - Workers must be provided a “preventative recovery period” in shade to recover from heat in order to
prevent heat illness. Rest breaks also provide an opportunity to drink water. Workers will be monitored for signs and
symptoms of Heat Illness.
Allow for Acclimatization - Acclimatization means a temporary adaptation of the body to work in the heat that
occurs gradually as a person is exposed to hot conditions. Acclimatization peaks in most people within 4 to 14 days of
regular work for at least 2 hours per day in the heat. Cal/OSHA reported that 8o% of the heat illness cases investigated
in 2005 involved employees that had been on the job for fewer than 4 days; 46% of the incidents occurred on the
worker’s first day on the job. Training about heat illness prevention is needed before starting work in hot climates
and, when possible, workers will be encouraged to take more breaks and perform less strenuous tasks during the
acclimatization period.
New employees who are not acclimated to the projects environment and weather conditions will be assigned to an
acclimated employee for 5 days, being constantly observed and encouraged to hydrate and drink water.
When the temperature is predicted to reach 80°, a new employee shall be closely monitored by a Supervisor or their
designee. When the weather prediction is a prolonged 80° or higher temperature, a New Employee will be closely
monitored by a Supervisor or their designee for the employees first 14 days.
Provide Access to Shade - The direct heat of the sun can add as much as 15 degrees F to the heat index. Wide
brimmed hats can decrease the impact of direct heat. If possible, work should be performed in the shade. If not,
supervisors should provide a shaded area for breaks such as canopies, umbrellas, or other structures or devices that
block direct sunlight. Shade is not considered adequate for breaks if heat in the area defeats the cooling purpose of
shade; for example, a car sitting in the sun does not provide acceptable shade to a person inside it, unless the car is
running with air conditioning.
Shade will be provided for employees on the worksite when the temperature reaches 80 degrees F (80°F). The area
of shade shall be large enough to accommodate the number of employees on recovery or rest periods; and the
number of employees on meal period who remain onsite, provided cooled interior spaces are not available. The
shaded area will be sufficiently large enough to accommodate employees, sitting in a normal posture, fully in the
shade without having to be in physical contact with one another.
The Site Specific Heat Illness Prevention Plan (SSHIPP) will specify the main provision of shade (interior structure/pop-up
tents/air conditioned job trailer/etc.).
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CHAPTER SEVENTEEN
Drink Water - Keep hydrated. Frequent drinking of water is encouraged. Supervisors must ensure employees have
access to potable drinking water in sufficient quantity to provide each employee one quart (4 cups) of water per
hour for the entire shift when the work environment is hot. During periods of high risk of heat illness, drinking water is
very important; avoid caffeinated or alcoholic beverages. Generally, dark yellow colored urine indicates dehydration
and the need to drink more water.
Fresh, Pure and suitably cool water will be identified in the SSHIPP and will be communicated to employees on a daily
basis. Employees will provide their own drinking containers and will be responsible for its sanitary condition. Water
cooling will be identified in the SSHIPP.
Water availability and inventory will be checked twice, per 8-hour shift, by Raymond personnel, or their designees in
their absence.
Identify, Evaluate, and Control Exposures - Employees, supervisors, and safety committees should periodically discuss
and/or update procedures to identify, evaluate and control exposures to the environmental and personal risk factors
for heat illness. Supervisors should monitor employees closely for signs and symptoms of heat illness, particularly when
they have not been working in heat for the last few days, and a heat wave occurs.
All workers should be accounted for during and at the end of a work shift. There is no absolute cutoff below which
work in heat is not a risk. As a general rule, actions to prevent heat illness should be implemented when temperatures
approach 8o de¬grees F. During heat waves, it is advised that strenuous outdoor work be performed, if necessary,
early in the morning or late in the afternoon when heat is less intense.
Procedures for Responding to Heat Illness
Employees suffering from heat illness, or believing a preventative recovery period is needed, must be provided access
to an area with shade that is either open to the air or provided with ventilation or cooling for a period of no less than
five minutes. Such access must be permitted at all times.
Other measures for signs and symptoms and treatment to specific heat illnesses are listed in Table 1.
High Heat Procedures
High Heat is considered 95°F or hotter. A pre-shift meeting (huddle) will be conducted to review heightened awareness
(“watching out for the other guys”), identifying signs and symptoms of potential heat related illnesses, encouraging
and emphasizing water consumption, the employees right to take a cool-down rest period when necessary, as well
as emergency procedures.
Ensure that continuous verbal, visual and/or electronic (electronic means may be a cellular phone call or text)
communication/monitoring is maintained with employees, when the temperature meets or exceeds 95°F.
A
mandatory “buddy-system” will be in place.
Employees will be closely monitored by a Supervisor, or their designee, when 20 or fewer employees are in the
workforce. Drink Water!
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CHAPTER SEVENTEEN
Obtaining Emergency Medical Services
Supervisors should reiterate to all employees the importance of immediately reporting any symptoms or signs of heat
illness in themselves or co-workers and should remind employees what to do in case emergency medical treatment is
needed. Procedures for contacting emergency medical services and transporting employees to a point where they
can be reached by an emergency medical provider must be provided.
Refer to site specific Emergency Action Plan for Emergency Response Procedures. Also refer to included Clinical and
Hospital maps and contact information.
A Supervisor, as identified in the SSHIPP, or their designee(s) in their absence, will be the Authorized/Designated
Person to call Emergency Medical Services (EMS/911). When an Authorized/Designated Person is not available, any
employee may call for EMS/911. Clear and concise directions and explanations of events will be required.
In non-remote areas throughout the United States, emergency medical service is generally available by calling 911.
Supervisors are to ensure that employees are able to provide clear concise directions to their work site. In remote field
locations, developing procedures for emergency medical services may require extensive planning, and supervisors
must ensure employees are informed of exactly how and where medical attention may be received.
Documented Training
Documented employee training on the material summarized in this fact sheet shall be provided to all applicable
workers before they begin work in hot environments.
Employee Training - Training in the following topics shall be provided to all supervisory and non-supervisory employees.
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
The environmental and personal risk factors for heat illness
The employer’s procedures for complying with the requirements of this standard.
The employer’s responsibility to provide water, shade, cool-down rests and access to first aid.
The employees right under the Heat Illness Prevention standard without retaliation.
The importance of frequent consumption of small quantities of water, up to 4 cups per hour, when the work
environment is hot and employees are likely to be sweating more than usual in the performance of their duties.
F. The importance of acclimatization
G. The different types of heat illness and the common signs and symptoms of heat illness.
H. The importance to employees of immediately reporting to the employer, directly or through the employee’s
supervisor, symptoms or signs of heat illness in themselves, or in co-workers.
I. The employer’s procedures for responding to symptoms of possible heat illness, including how emergency
medical services will be provided should they become necessary.
J. The employer’s procedures for contacting emergency medical services, and if necessary, for transporting
employees to a point where they can be reached by an emergency medical service provider.
K. The employer’s procedures for ensuring that, in the event of emergency, clear and precise directions to the
work site can and will be provided as needed to emergency responders.
L. Employee notification that Heat Illness symptoms can rapidly progress from mild symptoms to serious and life
threatening illness.
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CHAPTER SEVENTEEN
Supervisor training
Prior to assignment to supervision of employees working in the heat, training on the following topics shall be provided:
A. The procedures the supervisor is to follow to implement the applicable provisions in this section.
B. The procedures the supervisor is to follow when an employee exhibits symptoms consistent with possible heat
illness, including emergency response procedures.
The Employer’s procedures shall be in writing and shall be made available to employees and to representatives of
OSHA upon request.
SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM
Revised March 2015
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