111II 1111 - American Radio History
$2.50
AUGUST 1981
NUMBER
VOLUME 12
-
ENGINEER PRDUCER
Big Hits From A Smaller Studio
'onsoles of the '80s
...
... Page 90
Filters
Page 18
...
.`if1,
111II
Page 70
Hz
H
.....
-10
_20
-30
RELATING RECORDING ART
N
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TO RECORDING SCIENCE
www.americanradiohistory.com
TO RECORDING EQUIPMENT
4
AUDIO AFFECTS
Los Angeles
AUDIO INNOVATORS
Pittsburgh
AXENT RECORDERS
Sydney, Australia
BROADCAST ASSISTORS
Los Angeles
BUCKSKIN
Los Angeles
CASTLE SOUND
Edinburgh, Scotland
CENTRAL RECORDERS
Sydney, Australia
CLAN STRUMENTI
Milan
CREAM MUSIC
Frankfurt, Germany
DIDECA
Guatemala City
GENESIS (Rock band's
private studio) London
GOOSEBERRY STUDIOS
London
MUSIC WORKS
London
PAT WOMACK
San Francisco
RADIUS STUDIO
Milan, Italy
SERI SYSTEMS
Los Angeles
STUDIO LIBREVILLE
Gabon, Africa
STUDIO 19
Frankfurt, Germany
STUDIO RAMSES
Compare quality, features,
and price. These studios did.
Then they bought
the Amek Series 2500.
AMEK SERIES 2500: Four band detented
parametric EQ, Eleven VCA groups, six
auxiliary outputs, four mono and one stereo
auxiliary sends, one mic and two line inputs
per module, balanced differential amps on all
inputs and returns, stereo solo in place - with
or without echo, variable hi and lo pass filters,
master controls for module functions, equalization and echo to monitor, master automation
controls, phantom power on and off per
module, 24 mix bus with odd/even panning.
AMEK SERIES 2500
$75,000
$81,254 Automated
$100,000 Auto -Pak automated
Call for information and color brochure
AMEK
AMEX SYSTEMS AND CONTROLS, LTD.
Islington Mill, James St. Salford M3 5HW, England
Phone 061 -834 6747 Telex 668127
Paris
TONSTUDIO STROHER
Innsbruck, Austria
UNIVERSAL STUDIOS
Johannesburg, South Africa
R-e/p 2
August 1981
EVERYTHING AUDIO
16055 Ventura Boulevard, Suite 1001
Encino, California 91436
Phone (213) 995 -4175 Telex 651485
MARTIN AUDIO VIDEO CORP.
423 West 55th Street
New York, NY 10019
Phone (212) 541 -5900
www.americanradiohistory.com
WESTBROOK AUDIO, INC.
11836 Judd Court, Suite 336
Dallas, Texas 75243
Phone (214) 699 -1203
For additional information circle
www.americanradiohistory.com
+r
1
Neve proudly announces Columbia Recording Studios as the
first New York studio to install the Neve Model 8108
fdva tik; chnology eccor g Console with CAM..
www.americanradiohistory.com
SCAM
Neve Computer Assisted Mixing System
Capitol Records
First NECAM in North America
Pinewood Studios
Queen Village
RCA Records
Ronnie Milsap
RPM Sound
Rumbo Recorders
Skaggs Video
Soundcastle
Sound City
Sound Labs
Sound Stage Studio
Studio 55
United Sound
United Western
Universal Recording
The Village Recorder
Waterstreet
A &R Recording
Automated Sound
Axis Sound
Damon Productions
Eastern Sound
Electric Lady
Emerald City
Fantasy Records
Goodnight L.A.
The Hit Factory
Hollywood Sound
Lion Share Recording
Motown/Hitsville
Muscle Shoals Sound
Phil Ramone
Pierce Arrow Recorders
CBS Records
Latest NECAM in New York
Still Number One
keep it that way! Neve introduced the NECAM Computer Assisted Mixing System in 1976,
immediately accepted by the recording industry as the only practical computer assisted mixdown system
available. And in 1981, 5 years later, NECAM is not only maintaining but rather advancing its lead on the
competition with the recent introduction of NECAM II. Ask the artists, the producers, the mixing engineers.
Most of the top professionals in our industry agree NECAM is still the only practical automation system around.
And it is fully compatible with video sound production facilities. Advance with NECAM, and
join the Neve world of Excellence.
And determined to
to be
Some of the unique NECAM features:
Exclusive instinctive update Store and recall up to 999 mixes Time independent Full auto locate to anywhere
No multiple pass delay
Compatible studio to studio SMPTE time code based
on the tape by 999 point memory
Merge mixes /tracks Unlimited grouping Auto -mute on wind/rewind Auto pre -roll Up to 64 circuits
with 999 programmable events for trigger of external effects and functions Programmable
roll-back and repeat Memorized track muting
N Neve
Rupert Neve Incorporated Berkshire Industrial Park, Bethel, Connecticut 06801 Tel: (203)744 -6230 Telex: 969638
Rupert Neve Incorporated 7533 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, California 90046 Tel: (213)874 -8124 Telex: 194942
Rupert Neve Incorporated P.O. Box 120907, Nashville, Tennessee 37212 Tel: (615)385 -2090
Rupert Neve of Canada, Ltd. 2721 Rena Road, Malton, Ontario L4T 3K1, Canada Tel: (416)677 -6611 Telex: 983502
Neve Electronics International, Ltd. Cambridge House, Melbourn, Royston, Hertfordshire, SG8 6AU England Tel: (0763)60776
Rupert Neve GmbH 6100 Darmstadt Bismarckatrasse 114, West Germany Tel: (06151)81764
www.americanradiohistory.com
-August
Number
1981
Volume
-
RECORDING
magazine to exclusively serve the
STUDIO and CONCERT SOUND
industries
those whose work involves the
engineering and production of commercially
marketable product for:
Records and Tape
Film
Live Performance
Video and Broadcast
...
---
-ART ...
the magazine produced to relate recording
to recording SCIENCE ... to recording
EQUIPMENT.
- Contents -
4
Production Viewpoint
REO Speedwagon co- producer and engineer
KEVIN BEAMISH ...using technology to better
the performance ... and not vice versa
by Robert Carr
page 30
.
the
12
.
.
.
.
Concert Sound Reinforcement
.
.
-
.
-
Wolf & Rissmiller's COUNTRY CLUB
... Today's Concert Alternative
by Robert Carr
Audio /Video Recording
.
- page
-
44
THE VISUAL MUSIC ALLIANCE (V.M.A.)
C
Audio/Video Perspectives
by Tom Seufert
by Martin Polon
-- page
page
58
61
Electronics, Troubleshooting and Maintenance
Editor /Publisher
MARTIN GALLAY
Editor at Large
MEL LAMBERT
Feature Writer
ROBERT CARR
Consulting Editors
PETER BUTT ... Technical Operations
MARTIN POLON ... Video
DOUGLAS HOWLAND ... Broadcast
-
Theory and Practice
--Two
Projects
-a Construction
de- popper and a hum filter
by Ethan Winer - page
FILTERS
-
...
STEVEN BARNETT
Film
Staff Illustrator
HOLLY FERGUSON
Advertising Service
Manager ....
PATTY COLLINS
.
........
Circulation /Subscription
Manager
SANDY ST. CLAIRE
-
Film Sound
FILM SOUND EDITING TECHNIQUES
by Steue Barnett
Recording and Studio Techniques
-
- page
-
o
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R -e p 6
- Departments
page
Views: Console Design for the
Eighties - Centralized Control of Outboard Electronics,
Richard Swettenham - page
News - page28
New Products - page
Classified - page
Studio Update - page
Book Review: The
Musician's Guide Independent Record Production, by
Jimmy Stewart - page
Advertiser's Index page
Letters
10
by
17
100
111
108
to
126
126
-
-
The Cover
Upper photograph: The control room at Alpha
Studios, North Hollywood, California, which despite its
small size has been the recording venue for the Robbie
Dupree hits.
Lower left: Sphere Electronics' new digital fader and
attenuator package, designed to retrofit conventional
console VCAs, and indicative of the coming consoles of
the Eighties.
R -e /p RETAIL SALES DISTRIBUTORS
Copies of the latest issue of R -eip may be purchased from the following dealers:
0
78
A Small Studio Success . .. ALPHA STUDIOS
.. Hit Sounds from a 12' by 15' Room
by Jimmy Stewart page 90
.
"RECORDING Engineer: Producer
70
-- --- - - -
Hollywood, California
WORLD BOOK AND NEWS,Cahuenga Blvd. at Hollywood Blvd.
OP -AMP BOOKS, 1033 N. Sycamore Avenue
O Sherman Oaks, California
SHERMAN OAKS NEWS, Van Nuys Blvd. at Ventura Blvd.
Van Nuys. California
SUNTRONICS MULTITRACK, 7760 Balboa Blvd.
Upland. California
SUNTRONICS, 1620 W. Foothill Blvd.
San Francisco, California
SOUND GENESIS, 2001 Bryant Street
Seattle, Washington
PRO AUDIO /SEATTLE, 11057 8th St. NE
New York, New York
INSTITUTE OF AUDIO RESEARCH, 64 University Place
MARTIN AUDIO VIDEO, 4423 West 55th Street
O St. Louis. Missouri
ANTECH LABS, 8144 Big Bend Boulevard
Atlanta. Georgia
METRO MUSIC CENTER, 3100 Roswell Road NW
D Minneapolis. Minnesota
AUDIO PERFECTION, 7401 Lyndale Ave South
London, England
FUTURE FILM DEVELOPMENTS, 36/38 Lexington Street
Hamburg, West Germany
SAITEN 8 SEITEN, Gartnerstr 109
Tokyo. Japan
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Sydney, Australia
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Circulation Manager,
August 1981
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1981
R-e p 7
ready to move up
to a specialized mixer,you're ready for Ramsa.
If you're
The Sound
Reinforcement
Specialist:
Ramsa WR-8716
When your sound says you're
professional but your mixer
doesn't. When you're wasting
your subtlety and style on
"make -do" boards. When
you're creating compromises
instead of clear -cut distinctions. Then you're ready for
Ramsa -the new mixers that
are specialized so you won't
have to compromise.
The WR-8716 is a fully
modular sound reinforcement console with 16 input
i
R -e p 8
r
wr
.
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r:
.:
f
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modules, 4 group modules,
and 2 masters. It features 16
input pm-fader solo buttons,
4 group modules with prefader insertion patch points,
and lockable post -fader solo
buttons. Them are 6 illuminated VU meters with peak
LED's for easy outdoor
,
.t t
August 1981
www.americanradiohistory.com
_
reading and a separate
stereo variable frequency EQ
for monitor sends. Pan pot
controls allow panning to the
left or right masters while
level controls permit 16 x 6
board operation. The left and
right direct channel assign
function lets you bypass the
group modules for individual
sources. Portable operation
is a snap with easy access
connectors.
And the WR-8716 features
plastic conductive faders
for greater reliability and
smooth, low -noise operation;
external power supply for
light weight, and switchable
48V DC phantom power
for condenser mics.
The Recording
Specialist:
RamsaWR-8816
midran
The WR-8816 recording
console includes the same
e. Stereo echo send like low noise electronically
replaces the separate mcno balanced mic inputs with
modular construction, input controls you'll find on con - new high -speed IC's, 16
modules, power supplies, ai petitive boards. And you get switchable post -fader solo
faders as the WR -8716 plus two independent stereo
controls and XLR -type mic
many important recording
monitor controls -one for
connectors.
Ramsa offers a full line of
advantages. Like direct out- musician's headphones, one
puts for 4, 8, or 16 track re-' for control room monitors
specialty mixers including
cording and peak- reading
a special feature for any
the more compact WR -8210
LED meters that let you morn mixer in this class. And there
recording mixer and WR -130
tor any 4 out of 24 signals
are other important features sound reinforcement mixer
with clear, quick response.
So don't hold down your
professional sound, call
You'll command a variable
frequency EQ section with
(201) 348 -7470, because
you're ready for Ramsa.
3 frequency settings for the
high and low frequencies
plus continuously variable
-
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PROFESSIONAL AUDIO DIVISION
August 1981
For additioral information circle
www.americanradiohistory.com
107
R -e p 9
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-
The Audio Heritage Center
-
Foundation
from: Dale Manquen and
Terry Howell
P.O. Box 9923
SIERRA /EASTLAKE
DEVELOPMENTS
North Hollywood, CA 91609
We
are looking for R -e/p readers that
are interested in preserving and
Variable Studio Acoustics
As the digital age accelerates the technology of the recording science, we risk
depending too heavily on the gadgetry
available rather than emphasizing the
craft. The journals of the professional
audio industry keep us keenly aware of
technological advances as they occur. But
what about putting a good microphone in
the right place in a good room?
At SIERRA/EASTLAKE we invest much
time studying the science of acoustics as it
applies to the recording art. This continual
research has given us a new generation of
acoustic design providing the artist as
much sonic control and flexibility in the
studio itself, as was previously only possible in the control room.
Its called Variable Acoustics. And it
transforms the compartmentalized, inflexible studio layout of the past into a totally
variable sonic environment, where the
entire room, or individual segments, can
be acoustically "tuned" from dead to live,
or anywhere in- between. The key is not
only variability, but the capability to select
specific decay times by frequency.
The system is surprisingly simple. Added
to the familiar layout of absorptive acoustic
traps, is an array of continuously adjustable
wall and ceiling louvres, sliding mirror
panels and removable carpet sections. The
louvre panels can be controlled electrically
from the control room and are grouped in
sections which can be tuned individually.
The benefits of Variable Acoustic Design
are many. The studio itself can be designed
as an open area; free from the corners and
tiny booths which rob musicians of a
natural performing environment. The multiple adjustability of the room's acoustics
permits the area surrounding each instrument to be voiced individually for proper
decay times, while also providing the
necessary isolation between instruments.
And all without having to reach for EQ or
echo send busses! After all, isn't EQ introducing phase shift? Another advantage of a
large, open, tunable room is ease in record-
ing large orchestras and big bands.
The SIERRA/EASTLAKE Variable Acoustic Design is a most flexible and functional
approach to recording studio acoustics. It's
an important element of the industry's only
Acoustic Guarantee, in which you are assured. in front, of the exact cost, completion
date, and acoustic performance of your
custom design.
Cat vencll Wells or Kent Duncan at:
SIERRA /EASTLAKE
621 South Glenwood Place
Burbank, California 91506
(213) 843 -8115 Telex: 691138
R -e /p 10
reconstructing audio history.
Many of you will remember Jack
Mullin's awesome exhibit of audio
artifacts at the 1977 Audio Engineering
Society Convention. That exhibit
stimulated our personal realization of
the need for an ongoing active effort by
the present generation to preserve those
wonderful moments in audio history,
and make them available for public
appreciation.
We
re
cttcr5
spent
a
year
vacillating as to what should be done
first. Discussions with Jack, a long-time
friend and associate of Dale, left us with
one resolve: "AUDIO MUST BE USED
TO TELL ITS OWN STORY."
Since 1970, we have collaborated on
several unique production ventures,
and over the years have developed a
technique combining entertaining and
educational values we call Theatronics.
It was suddenly apparent to us that
Theatronics was the perfect medium to
reconstruct history, especially audio
history.
In July of 1978, using our own funds,
energies, and Jack's antiquities, we
organized the Audio Heritage Center
Project to conceive and produce a
prototype exhibit illustrating, to some
degree, our concept of a living museum.
We took it to San Francisco for private
showings at the 1978 National Radio
Broadcaster's Association Convention,
exhibited at the 1979 Audio Engineering Society Los Angeles Convention, and at Cal State University
Northridge.
In 1980 we began non -profit
incorporation procedures, and on
January 13 of this year became the
Audio Heritage Center Foundation, a
non -profit California corporation. Our
first exhibition in this capacity was at
the Las Vegas National Association of
Broadcasters convention in April. We
have met many loyal and supportive
friends of audio in the last few years,
and we thank them for their continued
interest and faith.
Our ultimate objective for the A.H.C.
is to establish a permanent facility to
house the museum and serve as a worldwide center for audio information and
education.
"We want to make the public
aware of how the methods of
audio communication affect their
lives by showing the historic
evolution of those techniques, and
August 1981
www.americanradiohistory.com
S
showing how we can use them to
shape our future."
Our immediate objective is to begin
developing a series of episode modules,
each telling a specific part of the overall
audio story (i.e., magnetic recording,
broadcast, film sound etc.), and each
designed for eventual assembly into a
total audio -history experience, an
integral part of the permanent museum
facility. We hope to find corporate
sponsorship for each of these initial
modules, that could be used at fairs,
expositions, trade shows, schools, or
shopping malls with retail tie -ins.
Brand names and logos are very
much a part of the audio story, and we
know there are many corporations that
could benefit by our documentation of
their efforts. But we will not re -write
history.
We want the audio industry to use its
own magic to initiate and build a center
so unique and entertaining, it will be of
major interest to the general public, and
thus be self-sustaining.
As we have sought the direction of the
A.H.C., Jack has continued to collect
artifacts. Our future is more tangible
every day, but we need lots of help.
Interested individuals, associations,
and companies please contact us for
more information.
- On the Right Track -
from: T. Young
Waterbury, CT
just want to compliment you on the
April 1981 issue of R-e/ p. The article by
Ethan Winer on constructing peak
program meters was very interesting
as are all of his past articles
and I
look forward to future constructional
articles by him and perhaps others.
Clifford Henricksen's article on the
"mysteries" of the Leslie Cabinet was
especially interesting to me. As a freelance live sound engineer I have
frequently worked with Leslie Cabinets
in need of maintenance and /or
modification. The article has certainly
given me some insight into solving
some of the more common ailments.
Personally, I would like a follow-up on
more elaborate modifications, or an
article by someone else who has
perhaps other ideas regarding the
I
- -
Leslie.
I also wish to bring to your attention
my interest in your continuing articles
on live sound (for example, the Stevie
Wonder /Britannia Row piece by Chris
Michie in the April issue). There are
always neat tricks and methods which
are invaluable to me that I learn from
such articles.
Keep up the great work!
... continued overleaf -
l l I!
l l Il Il ll l
Mr NM
r
I WANT PROFESSIONALISM,
NOT JUST BELLS AND
WHISTLES.
THAT'S WHY I
DEMAND MCI.
1400
VJ.
MD
sow *ms
MI!
Straightforward. That's the kind of
person Donny Osmond is, and that's the
quality he demands in recording equipment. He gets it with his full./
equipped MCI recording studio located in
the audio'video Osmond Entertainment
Center in Orem, Utah. Sensible design.
Clean sound. And the kind of versatility no
other recording equipment at any price
can beat.
MCI. Not always the most expensive,
but always the best.
Commercial Boulevard, Fort Lauderdale Florida 33309 USA. Telephone: 305) 491 -0825. Telex: 514362 MCI FTL.
For additio,al information circle
TWA6001- 000681
# 3
www.americanradiohistory.com
-A Leslie Mystery Unearthed Starobin
Starr Recording Inc.
Philadelphia, PA
from: David
Burbank
We
Honolulu
Montreux
won't promise
the world,
but we will deliver
what we promise!
Now installing the SM 3
Two -way monitor system.
And we've recently delivered for these clients:
Kuangchi Program Service
Taipei
studio)
(1
Paradise Studios
Sydney
studio)
(1
Wing Hang Records
Hong Kong (I studio)
Fantasy Records
Berkeley (1 studio,
1
disk room)
Osmond Entertainment
Orem (I studio)
South Coast Studios
Austin
(1
studio)
Warehouse Recording
New York City
(1
studio)
CBS /Sony Studios
Tokyo (12 studios)
Nightwind Studios
Honolulu (2 studios)
Sugar
Hill
Englewood
Records
(1
studio)
Donny Osmond
Provo
(1
studio)
CBS /Sony Records
Roppongi (2 studios)
Chick Corea
Mad Hatter Studios
Contec Television
Hong Kong (2 studios)
On six continents some 304 studios altogether.
SIERRA /EASTLAKE
621 South Glenwood Place
Burbank, California 91506
(213) 843 -8115 Telex: 691138
R-e p 12
I read with interest the various
miking techniques for capturing the
Leslie sound [ Unearthing the Mysteries
of the Leslie Cabinet, Page 130, R -e/p,
April 19811. Try this: Put a PZM inside
the treble cabinet, below the horn. Yep,
right there on the wooden shelf by the
bearing plate.
It's awesome!
- Video /Music Productionfrom: Marc Schwartz
Video Consultant
Ford Audio & Acoustics
Tulsa, Oklahoma
It was a pleasure to pick up your April
1981
issue and discover that it
contained enlightening and informa
tive articles on video music production.
As both a free -lance video artist and
sales engineer ... I have been observing
the tremendous changes in the record
industry and the simultaneous growth
of video. The obvious movement
towards fully integrating audio and
video is being more fully realized as
technology moves forward. Space for
discussion of the uses for new
production systems and techniques is a
welcome sight in your publication.
My experience in the audio /video
equipment industry has lead me to the
conclusion that even with a lack of
standardization
a
product whose
concept has enough merit will sell. The
sales figures of VHS and Beta format
consumer VCRs bear this out.
Competing formats that are incompatible is a fact of life in the electronics
business and will continue to be as each
manufacturer attracts its own segment
of the market. The fact that no
standards exist for digital recording
and video disk is no excuse not to
produce product. That conservative an
attitude is detrimental to the continued
health and growth of the video /music
industry.
Undoubtedly cable television,
new can of worms. Now there is an
established forum on which music video
can be seen nationwide as well as in
high fidelity stereo. The importance of
this event is that Tulsa was selected
because it is the fourth largest cable
television market in the United States,
and a test market was needed.
-v
an audio engineer
from: Clara Werse
-
Rockwurst Productions
Boston, Massachusetts
... there are so many love songs around
these days, appealing to the general
crowd, I thought you might be get a kick
out of this; a love song written
especially for the audio engineer
-
"We Were On The Same Track"
(but you reassigned your heart)
© 1980 C. Werse
Chorus:
We were on the same track
But you reassigned your heart
Thought we had a final mix
From the very start
You cut me off, you baffle me
you're tearing me apart
were on the same track
But you reassigned your heart!
We
First Verse:
You put me into ready
You solo all my dreams
You put my heart in overdub
My VU meters steam
But your channel switches
back and forth
My life's in stereo
I know I'm losing signal
But my fader won't let go
(Chorus)
Second Verse:
Seems you found another love
To turn your dials for you
She's got all kinds of LEDs
Instead of good old VU
satellite technology, digital computer
technology, and video recording and
She's got phantom power
playback are no longer ideas of the
Instead of batteries
future. They are in use now and are
But she ain't got the love you
having an impact that will surely
want
change the face of the recording
So please come back to me
industry. Emphasis should be put on
producing new products and new
(Chorus)
formats for exploration of the
possibilities with new technology. Third Verse:
While experience is an important asset,
How my heart goes vari -speed
no one has any experience with these
When I'm thinking of you
new concepts, and old ideas are not
Starts at 30 ips
valid. New ways of producing must be
Then slides down to 2
devised; and as Ms. Dempster stated in
her article, "it's wide open."
Now I'm so unbalanced
The most important event that took
Can't seem to EQ
place recently was the beginning of
Keep on panning left and right
MTV, Warner Amex Satellite EnterDiodes blinking day and night
tainment's bid to attract viewers to
'til I see that ready light
watch music video, full time, 24 hours a
Guiding me to you.
day. MTV's radio station approach to
video music has opened up an entirely
(Chorus)
August 1981
www.americanradiohistory.com
6
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.
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"Our Auditronics 720 combines recording studio quality
with live broadcast flexibility,"
says raham Simmons, Chief Engineer at Miami's WPM
Channel 2. "Auditronics developed this 36 in
16 out audio mixing
console to give us
£Q, reverb and signal processing we ne
"Whether it's multi-track recording, live
broadcast at post -production, our Auditronics 720
does everything we want it to do, and does it very
foroptudio quality
track recording of our productions."
"When you're a national production facility 'ike we ark
you've got to have an audio signal pa
strictly state -of- the -art
For example, our Auditronics 720
designs the late
generation and gives us the best signal-to -noise performance ava
able. It allows us to do multiple generation dubbing and mi
without noise build up."
"In addition to its multi-track recording advan
ur
720 has the flexibility to do all the necessary mixing
signal
processing in real time for a mono mix for TV, a stereo mix for FM
simulcast, including network satelite feeds, as well as a scratch mix on
videotape for later synchronization in post -production e(5ting."
nicely."
-
If you'd like to know what WPBT -Miami
and over x00 other satisfied users know about
Auditronics broadcast consolele reader service
number or contact:
limp
For additiorel information circle
auditronicf inc.
750 Old Getwell Rood
Memphis, Tennessee 38118
901) 362 -1350
$
4
www.americanradiohistory.com
Lee Herschberg
Director of Engineering
Warner Bros. Records
. .
3
to very loud, and digital captures that."
Lee began his engineering career with Decca in 1956,
moved to Warner Bros. in 1966, and became Warner's Di-
Q. What do you say to an artist who's considering a digital
rector of Engineering in 1969. His experience spans the recording of such artists as Frank Sinatra, James Taylor, and
most recently, Rickie Lee Jones. Herschberg is a true believer
in digital recording, and agreed to tell us why.
A. I'd say, yes, if it's up to me, go ahead and do it with digital.
Sometimes, on an analog session when the digital is
available, l'il record the first couple of tracks on both machines. Then, on the first couple of playbacks, we'll listen
to them side by side. That usually does it right there.
There's no comparison.
Q. You've probably had as much experience with the 3M
Digital System as anyone.
A. Yes, probably. I've been working with it for two years and
had one of the first systems. We've been through the ups
and downs and it's been well worth it. At this point, the
3M digital machine works as well as most analog
machines.
Q. How do you justify the extra expense of digital recording?
think from any studio point of view, you've got to
have the equipment that will bring in the artists. And if
digital recording is truly the state -of-the -art, you've got to
consider the clients you'll attract, and their needs.
A. Well,
project?
There's nothing wrong with analog recording. And
never has been. It's just that, with digital, you're hearing
on playback what you just did in the studio. And you begin
to hear all the shortcomings of analog machines
the
things you've come to accept. And suddenly, those things
are no longer acceptable.
-
Q. What musical formats are suited to digital?
I
Q. You've obviously done a lot of projects digitally. Why?
A. To me, digital recording is almost like the tape machine
is nonexistent. You don't have any of the inherent problems
you have with analog. think everybody is aware of the
major benefits of digital recording. No wow or flutter, lack
of tape noise and no need for noise reduction. And digital
allows you to do things you couldn't do with analog. Like
compiling 3 or 4 tracks onto one. There's no degradation
of quality.
Having 32 tracks has helped, and so has the addition
of a digital editor.
I
A. Any format, really. It's particularly good for music with a
lot of dynamic range. Like Rickie Lee.
would you say to other engineers and producers considering digital?
A. Well, digital isn't for everybody. And I'm not trying to say
it is. There will always be people who prefer analog, and a
lot of great records are made
Q. What
that way. It's just that, to my
ears, digital is far superior,
and it's the next logical step.
Lee Herschberg recently recorded Rickie Lee Jones on the 3M Digital
System. The album, Pirates, is available from Warner Bros. Records.
3M
R -e/p 16
Hears You
...
3M
August 1981
For additional information circle
# 6
www.americanradiohistory.com
Progress ..
... continued from page
12
.
-
CONSOLE DESIGN FOR
THE EIGHTIES
CENTRALIZED CONTROL
OF OUTBOARD ELECTRONICS
by Richard Swettenham
Over the last few decades, the design
of multitrack recording consoles has
passed through some radical changes,
both in complexity and layout. Sweep
and parametric equalization sections;
cue monitor sends from input channels
and monitors, with dedicated echo
returns for musicians' foldback sends;
combination control -room and stereo/
quad mixdown outputs, plus sub grouping during remix
all of these
features have gradually found their
way into mixing boards.
From these various considerations
developed the two main directions in
console design: the "separate monitor,"
and the "in- line" concepts. The origin of
the in-line format was partly spacesaving; partly ease of manufacture and
cost saving; and partly the sharing of
facilities between input and track
monitor paths. From regarding the
monitor mix as a preview of the future
mixdown session, it became common to
record a stereo tape from this mix to aid
in planning the mixdown. Console
busses one and two were always used
for the real mixdown, for the very
sensible reason of minimizing the
number of circuit elements in the signal
path. When subgrouping was necessary, and only then, other busses were
regrouped into the first two. So a switch
appeared to transfer the stereo tape machine feed from busses one and two
to the monitor mix.
Then somebody said: "Why don't we
always mix the stereo through the
monitor system? After all, it only means
going through two more amplifiers, and
saves duplicating the panpots." For
-
Mn
EMI, Abbey Road ... about 1954
mD
-
Zr
- the author Richard- Swettenham went straight
from technical college to the famous
EMI Abbey Road Studios, London.
After five years as a maintenance
engineer he joined Argo Records, then
a small independent label, and taught
himself classical mixing, editing and
disk mastering. He was in at the
foundation of Olympic Sound Studios,
one of London's first and best known
independent studios, spending 11
years as Technical Director. In 1969
he founded Helios Electronics to build
custom consoles, at the same time
consulting to various new studio
projects. For the last year he has been
consulting to other console manufacturers, and is a partner in Baskind
Bissot and Associates, the Californiabased design company.
Or
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EMI, Abbey Road,
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... about 1960 -
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-
1974
EMI, Abbey Road
this school of thought, track monitor
and mixdown then became one and the
same thing. With the addition of
switches to exchange main fader and
monitor pot, and to flip the equalizer
from input to track, we have the basis of
the in-line console. Today the in -line
console is the most familiar design
found in multitrack studios; a
generation of young engineers has
grown up whose experience is totally
bounded by such consoles, and it may
not even occur to many of them that
there are virtues and advantages in any
other approach.
The main things that have happened
since the firm establishment of the inline console are the introduction of VCA
grouping and so- called "logic"
switching systems; centrally -controlled
assignment; and the promotion of the
many competing automation systems.
Other than this, the main stream of
console design seems to have been
concerned with "sales features," and
engineering for minimum production
cost. To this extent the last few years
have lacked the excitement of the early
Seventies; but the time for real advance
is coming again.
...
continued overleaf
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August 1981
www.americanradiohistory.com
R-ep
17
ruutnn
antfA9l
r
original problem, but also created a
great deal of usable space which did not
exist before, in the triangular areas
between the straight banks of channels.
Towards The Future
-
-
Is Console Concept
(Topology Guide & Text on Page 22)
Ergonomic Considerations
With the in -line design and quantity
production techniques came two
apparent "fixed rules," which certainly
never conformed to ergonomic ideals:
1) The operating area of a console is a
flat rectangular surface tilted only
slightly from the horizontal;
2) Because
input channels are
constructed as modules of a certain
width, everything else in the console
also has to be in a module of the same
size.
Such a design philosophy may make
life simple for factory production
engineers, but it isn't the way nature
intended when the human body was
dimensioned. Nor is it the way a large
organ console or the cockpit of an
aircraft are laid out. It is not at all
irrelevant to draw these parallels;
where concentration and quick action
are essential, either to human safety or
to a superb performance (and what else
are we seeking in the control room ?),
sight, reach, and the organization of
priority in controls and displays are of
top importance. A control surface with
several angles coming up towards the
vertical is preferable, both for reach and
because more usable panel length is
generated. If more channels call for
extension beyond this width and they
usually do
the logical way to avoid
having to use extreme arm reach, stand
up, or roll the chair up and down the
console, is to pivot the ends round
towards the operator until the faders
once again fall under the extended
hand. Not only have we eased the
-
-
SONY
IMPROVES THE
MID -SIDE MIC
BY ONE G.
In the world of dB's and kHz's, Sony is
an unquestioned leader. As is the case when it
comes to G's. A fact most recently proven
when Sony priced its new ECM -989 mid side mic a whopping one grand below the
nearest competitor without sacrificing
quality. In fact, the ECM -989 even allows
the capsule assembly to be remoted from its
power supply.
So, if you want an M -S stereo mic that's
equally at home in the studio as the concert hall,
ask your Sony dealer about the new Sony ECM -9
It'll sound just as good to you as it will
to your accountant.
Professional Audio
s ON
01951 Sony Corporation of America. 9 West 57th Street. New York. NY IOOI
Sorry is a registered trademark of the So.,, Corporal inn
'Shown with optional cable ECIF(S5P
R -e/p 18
August 1981
www.americanradiohistory.com
Let us now come to the real question:
"Where are consoles going now ?" Well,
the "kitchen tables covered with knobs"
don't seem to be going anywhere. For
those about to ask "Digital ?" here is a
very brief summary of the situation:
The acceptance of digital multitrack
tape as a serious technique does raise
the question of whether the console
would now be reconceived in digital
form. In terms of sound handling from
the live studio, the benefits are much
more marginal than in the recording
process. Console noise and distortion,
much improved in recent years, has
always been superior to analog tape,
and noise reduction has only narrowed
that gap. Modern consoles and
peripherals contain a vast body of
circuitry for signal modification, most
of which does its job well, and is
thoroughly understood by its operators.
It is questionable whether detectable
improvement would be perceived from
full console digitisation, at least until
the consumer playback medium
reaches the same level of quality. There
is also, for what it is worth, the
subjective impression of "something
odd" reported by certain experienced
professional listeners on hearing
digital master tapes.
One thing is sure though: the console
of the future must not be allowed to get
any bigger, nor its controls get any
smaller or closer together. And, despite
the constant demand for more
headroom and output level, derived
from competitive specmanship, a
console's increasing heat dissipation
must be halted and then reduced. The
quantity of active devices inside console
modules cannot increase any further.
So, the directions of development to
be considered are two, which can be
applied singly or together:
a) Simplification of the signal path
b) Getting active elements out of
console modules.
It was an inevitable consequence of
the rationalized production approach to
consoles that if you were going to put all
your commercial eggs in the basket of
one design, you had to please the
greatest number, turn out the largest
production quantity of one module, and
look good in the "knobs per dollar"
ratings. So you included the greatest
possible number of features you could
afford to put in each and every module.
Provision of options became difficult or
impossible once hand wiring inside a
module is ruled out, every substantial
change or option in panel layout
requires either a new printed circuit
board, or the complication of "universal" boards providing for a number of
options by component and wire link
changes.
All this tended to lead to an extended
-
I ncredib I
the "Acoustic Chamber Synthesizer'
Totally new design approach
The sound
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live acoustic chamber
TM
Natural sound, even on percussion
Self- contained rack mount unit
Full two- channel stereo
The Master Room XL -305 is a totally new design approach in reverberation technology. For the first time, the
qualities and properties of a live acoustic chamber are available in a rack mount unit at an affordable price.
There is a natural sound on percussion, as well as voices and all other musical instruments. This quality has not
been obtainable from other compact reverberation devices. The XL -305 exhibits no unwanted side effects; it's
as natural as a live chamber itself.
To hear this new advancement in reverberation, see your professional audio dealer and ask for a
of this exciting new unit.
Hear the XL -305 "Acoustic Chamber Synthesizer"
demonstration
for yourself, and you too will agree ..
It's INCREDIBLE.
MICMIX Audio Products, Inc.
2995 Ladybird Lane
(214) 352 -3811
Dallas, Texas 75220
For additional Information circle
# 8
www.americanradiohistory.com
.
regarded as outboard, switched in only
as required. Many top engineers have
always patched out unnecessary
CONSOLES for the '808.. .
continued
signal path, through very many devices
that were not necessarily all doing
anything useful to the signal at the one
-
-
time.
Minimum Signal Path
Now, however meticulous our circuit
design, it cannot be denied that a long
chain of amplifiers must degrade the
signal more than a few to whatever
small an extent. Hence the approach of
the future should be based on the
philosophy of Minimum Signal Path.
The essential functions in a recording
-
chain are: Amplify, Equalize (if
necessary), Fade, and Combine. If we
are sensible about it, this can mean one
mike pre -amp, equalizer (switched out
when not needed), one VCA as fader,
and an active combining amplifier
giving the proper level to drive the
recorder. In the "one mike /one track"
case we can omit the combining amp,
and go straight to tape. Anything else is
elements when the system allowed
them to do so. It has been found in
practice that the resulting cleaning up
of sound means that EQ tends to be used
less, and that the ancient art of mike
placement is often enough to obtain the
desired sound.
In mixdown, the signal path is simply
EQ, VCA, Mix. Unless audio subgroups
are really necessary, which in a system
with VCA control throughout is most
unlikely, the direct mix to stereo
which serves as track monitor during
recording
is the only combining
stage, and the track assign system is
not part of the mixdown path.
-
Outboard Electronics
The second approach is a much bolder
step: the whole of the basic audio
circuitry is removed from the console,
which then becomes simply a DC
control panel, with the possible
exception of those analog processing
devices whose controls cannot be
extended, and which the engineer must
have within his reach.
Thus we have come full circle from the
tube -operated equipment of long ago,
with banks of exchangeable amplifiers
connected to a passive console, and
regained its benefits on a higher level,
since it is no longer necessary to send
the audio signal itself back and forth.
Used recording equipment
is a better buy.
And the best buys are at Sye Mitchell Sound.
LOWER PRICES: We're not a dealer,
we're a broker. Without all the high
costs of running a dealership, we're
able to sell used equipment for
less money.
You see, we don't have money tied
up in inventories, warehouses, and
showrooms. So, unlike dealers, we
don't have to inflate our equipment
prices with a lot of overhead. We
simply don't have that overhead.
That's why YOU SAVE MONEY with
Sye Mitchell Sound.
insurance, and handle other details
for you. And if you're not sure which
gear is right for you, call us for help.
We'll gladly make recommendations
tailored to your needs and budget.
More services: We put together
complete studio equipment packages,
from 8 track to 24 track. We do custom
installations and wiring. We can even
help with your studio design.
LARGER SELECTION: We currently
offer over two million dollars worth of
used recording gear, including 43 consoles and 45 multitrack tape machines.
We're not limited to just a few brands;
we have consoles, tape machines,
microphones, and outboard gear
write today.
from every major manufacturer. And
we're constantly searching for more.
BETTER SERVICE: Buying from us is
easy. We arrange for shipping and
R -e /p 20 August 1981
-
EQUIPMENT LIST: Our regularly published used equipment list
will be sent free upon request. Call or
FREE
SYE
MITCHELL SOUND COMPANY, INC.
22301 Cass Avenue
Woodland Hills, California 91364
(213) 348 -4977
All equipment available for inspection
Financing available
We ship anywhere in the world
No order too small
Also available: Rare TUBE microphones,
mastering equipment, video, and support gear.
www.americanradiohistory.com
In the rack, audio control cards can be
laid out for optimum circuit considerations of stability and crosstalk
reduction, without constraints of space
or panel -control layout. The need for
shielded and balanced cable is vastly
reduced as the physical signal paths
come down from yards to inches. The
assignment matrix and active combining amplifiers can occupy minimum
space and be optimally shielded; indeed
the whole audio system may be
protected from the strongest RF fields,
and elements subject to thermal drift
may be temperature controlled as
closely as desired.
Maintenance advantages are obvious
fairly small family of active cards
can replace all positions in systems of
very varying size and complexity,
whose "character" is defined by the
console. A malfunctioning card may be
exchanged at the rack, possibly located
outside the control room, without
disturbing a nervous producer. In a live
performance situation, with suitable
switching and patching a doubtful
element may be bypassed via a spare
card, and then exchanged at the first
break. The possibility to update plug compatible cards when a worthwhile
-a
improvement in performance is
achieved should be good news to an
industry that has become used to
replacing whole consoles on a five -year
cycle or less.
The cost saving of using standard
cards in the rack, and standard
electronics industry packaging formats
for them, opens the door for the return of
virtually open -ended custom design
possibilities in the arrangement of the
control console itself. Heat is gone, and
depth behind panel and weight are
minimized. Modular construction in the
panel area is no longer essential for cost
or serviceability, but can be used where
appropriate. Additional sections can be
added to a control panel as need arises.
Also, since the cost of the console part is
envisaged as less than 30% of the
system value, replacement of quite
large sections
or conceivably of the
whole panel surface
cart be
-
-
contemplated when changes of
operating technique or the availability
of new control and display components
make it desirable.
Advantages are available in panel
space saving by calling up functions
associated with every channel, but
presented only once as panel controls.
This has been put forward as a feature
of a fully digital system (for example,
the EMI Digital Mixing Console,
currently being used for classical
sessions at Abbey Road Studios). To
realize the full space- saving advantage,
however, it does not necessarily require
the digitising of the audio signal; it is
simply a function of how the control of
the rack by the console is exercised.
Control of the audio signal may
equally be accomplished by the
extensive use and novel applications of
voltage -controlled amplifiers. There
CLEAN DISTRIBUTION
IS YOURS WITH THE
2 IN/
8 OUT
SO8 DA MODULE.
JPTIMIZE YOUR
MONITOR SPEAKERS.
HE COMPACT 507
OCTAVE EQUALIZER
5 CLEAN AND
COST EFFECTIVE.
FAST RESPONSE
AND EASY TO READ:
THE S14 LED QUAD
METER IPPM OR VU).
DrNAMITE ADT AND
FLANGING EFFECTS
FROM A S24 TIME
SI-APE MODULE.
STEREO PANNING.
AUTOMA-ICALLYI
THE S23 PAN
EFFECTS MODULE.
ELIMINATE HISS
WI -H THE SO6
DYNAMIC FILTER/
GATE MODULE.
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REMOVE LF NOISE
WITH THE 505
DYNAMIC FILTER/
CATE MODULE.
-
SCAMPS LATEST:
525 DUAL
DE -ESSER
FOR SUPERLATIVE
SIBILANCE CONTROL.
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For additional information circle
# 10
www.americanradiohistory.com
EXTENDER BOARD.
SCAMP 3LAYK
MODULE SITS.
(AVAI_ABLE IN 1. TO 8
MODULE WIDTHS.)
CONSOLES for the '80s
- continued -
..
.
has been argument in the pages of R -e /p
and in various AES papers about the
performance of different VCA devices,
and the possible advantage of digitally addressed attenuators as faders. But
the VCA has been improved considerably over the last 10 years (and what opamps could we use with confidence in
1970 ?) for use as the basic element of
compressors, noise reduction units as
well as nearly all automation systems
and is now a solidly accepted
industry device. Its application to
functions other than gain control has
hardly been explored until recently, and
it now forms the basis of remotely addressable equalizers and filters.
-
-
DC Voltage and Logic Control
In the system envisaged, communication between console and rack is
effectively by means of DC voltage
levels and logic on -off states. The
sophistication of the link may be
determined by the requirements and
size of the system; note that the same set
of panel controls will work the same set
of audio cards however we send the
information.
In the very simplest terms, and for a
-
CONSOLE TOPOLOGY
-
1- Per channel: 8 buttons, pan -pot, and 1 dedicated auxiliary pot. 2- VCA fader: 1 -inch pitch.
3- Channel to track assign, fader VCA group central
assign. 4- Display: EQ: Auxiliary VCA levels: Assignments.
5- Display: 24 -track PPM. 6- Tally LEDs for track recordenabled and record on. (Or
color change on display.) 7- Aux send levels (assigned). 8- Automation master buttons
and legend display. 9- Autolocator (e.g. Q- Lock). 10A- 10B- EQ panels (see text).
11- Function buttons, some dedicated, some user assignable. 12- Alphanumeric keyboard (optional), otherwise #7 moves down. 13-8 VCA group faders. 14- Grand master
fader. 15- Stereo machine remotes. 16- Talkback, studio light dimmer, red -light, etc.
17- Control and studio monitor select and level. 18- Track monitor and track mode
select. 19- Stereo PPM. 20- Space for controls of outboard equipment or analog modules.
small system, control could be via direct
DC, carried on multi -pair telephone
wire; the more elements to be controlled,
the more wire. The next step would be to
multiplex all the control signals by
serial scanning. For this we could use
more or less directly the kind of encoder decoders used in the earlier automation
systems to lay the data on audio tape.
However, to be as flexible as possible,
and provide for longer term develop-
ments, the optimum would be to use
existing data logging hardware at each
end of the link. At first sight this might
seem overkill, but it enables a further,
fairly obvious, step to be taken. If we
chop the data bus and insert an
interface to magnetic disk or tape
memory, we then have an automation
and setting recall system that can
remember absolutely everything!
Console Layout
The Sound Workshop Series 20: Available in 12 & 20
input capability mainframe with optional meter bridge.
Given these dimensions of freedom,
how do we employ them? We could, of
course, build a console that looks just
like a present day one with the usual
column of knobs on the pitch of the
faders. If a user felt most comfortable
with this, it would present no problems.
One of the objectives we set up,
however, was to strive to reduce console
size if we possibly can, without
sacrificing facilities.
Among other things, we can now
make any control act as master on any
other, or act in addition to it. We can
choose which functions will be
- to be called up demand
-assignable
and which ones remain on dedicated
controls to instantly accessible.
on
be
We can produce a
destination matrix
in which each crosspoint is not only on
or off, but can have programmed gain or
loss. And we have the ability to make
any panel control become something
else. However, care must also be taken
to reject concepts which force us to do in
a serial manner things that we would
normally wish to do simultaneously.
- roducts, Inc.
ew York 11788
R -e /p 22
The following is one possible
realization of a console arrangement for N
multitrack music recording:
It seems to be generally agreed that it a
is safest to retain a separate fader for
every input signal, whatever form the á
fader may take. If the pitch of the faders
is no longer dictated by a module
packed with components, we can make
it the minimum that feels comfortable
to the hand, say 1 -inch. If space is even
I
August 1981
www.americanradiohistory.com
PLANNING A STUDIO?
UPGRADING YOUR FACILITY?
When you think of Valley People ..
... you probably associate us with technology. The technology that has
brought you Kepex®, Fadex, Trans -Amp, the EGC 101 Series VCAs. And
most recently, Dyna- MiteTM, which has broken the price /performance
barrier as the dynamics processing device of the year.
Consider what may just be
the best kept secret around.
Fact is, you may not associate Valley People's Retail Division as a leading
supplier of studio equipment from the rest of the industry's premier manufacturers. As the source for intelligent acoustic design and implementation
for competent system consultation.
Last year, when Allison Research and Valley Audio merged with Valley
People, we promised you a unique organization. We figured it this way:
Specifying and selling audio gear takes more than a crack salesman and a
shipping department. Sure, you can buy it out of a box, plug it in and hope
for the best. But what if it doesn't interface properly? Can that salesman
give you the technical support you need?
We felt we had the capability to offer an alternative
sales and service
organization based on technical expertise, rather than on sheer promotion.
Intrinsic to our product development/manufacturing operation, we
possessed a level of technological know -how considerably beyond what you
might expect from your typical equipment sales company. Add to this a
diversity of up -to -date analytical equipment, an unusually large inventory of
electronic components, and staffers who, themselves, own a few gold
records ... and you get an organization uniquely suited to serving the
recording industry.
So, while the competition shouted from the rooftops, and displayed page
after page of color advertising, we quietly fine-tuned our retail operation.. .
to enable us to offer you the highest possible levels of technical and
business integrity.
-
-a
Word gets out.
The result? You came; you returned; we thank you. Thanks for making
Valley People the nation's current #1 dealer for some of the hottest lines,
like Otari MTR -90 Multi -Track Recorders and Sound Workshop Series
30 & 40 Audio Consoles. Thanks for letting us prove the value of competent
engineering and acoustic design -the art of doing it right the first time.
For those of you who may not have had first -hand experience with Valley
People, the secret is out: Valley People's Retail Division delivers the goods,
the services, the technology. Call Mike Feniello or Bob Todrank today,
at 615/383 -4737, to find out what Valley People can do for you.
VALLEY PEOPLE, INC.
RETAIL DIVISION
P.O. Box 40306 Nashville, Tennessee 37204
Telephone: 615/383 -4737
TELEX 558610 VAL PEOPLE NAS
2820 Erica Place
August 1981
c
www.americanradiohistory.com
R -e /p 23
www.americanradiohistory.com
THE NEW TOA
RX-7 SERIES
MIXING CONSOLES.
THE NEVER -ENDING
CONSOLE RACE.
Year -in, year -out, it seems like
there's never any clearcut winner.
With dozens to choose from, it's
been easy for the sound pro to make
the wrong choice.
Until now.
Introducing the new TOA RX -7
Series machines: from 16 to 32 inputs (and anywhere in- between) to
4 or 8 program outputs. The RX -7's
are completely modular consoles
built to take the bumps along any
road they travel. Whether you need
an RX -7 for reinforcement or recording, or both -we designed them to
be small and agile enough to move out easily and big enough to handle
just about any conceivable fixed or
remote sound requirement. They
give you incredible flexibility,
RX -5A
It rot( nerd a
more INnnhle hexer, but
don't want to eat the pie, we make a
leu lower horsepower, two eh innr! eeononn'
models patterned on the RX -7 Series.
R-\"-6.41
Thscam -all the rest. We stripped
down the look -alikes that think
they're in the fast lane. We saw that
a sound pro has a slim chance of
seeing the winner's circle by spinning -out on yesterday's technology.
So at TOA, we started from scratch.
And here's why we're so confident:
gives you switchable phantom power
for your condensers.
DRIVER'S EDUCATION.
EVEN A PADDED ARMREST.
Because an RX -7 is fully modular,
you create the board you need. Start
with input modules
that feature three band
E.Q., two echo and
foldback sends, long
travel faders, peak
indicators, stereo panning -and more. A lot
more. Going in, you're
transformer isolated
And a lot more convenience and
useful features make the TOA RX -7
-
via XLR from 60 to
+ 10 dBm; insert any
signal processing
devices you want in the
signal path; and, take
a direct out for
recording.
Add two foldback and
echo return Buss Master modules.
For your outputs, add either 2 or 4
modules that feature +4 dBm on
XLR's. To complete your board, just
plug -in a Phones module, a Talkback
module and of course, a Power Supply
module. A multipin plug connects the
remote power supply unit which also
GREAT VISIBILITY.
14
large, illuminated V.U.'s (Model
328) are easily seen as well as accessible on a hinged, low -profile meter
pod. Easy to see, easy to use, easy to
service.
Series the professional mixers that
they are; for any critical and demanding sound environment.
THE FASTEST WAY TO SHIFT
INTO FIRST GEAR.
Give us a call at (415) 588-2538.
We'll rush out all the spec's and the
name of your nearest qualified TOA
dealer. We're confident you'll want to
sit behind the superb handling of an
RX -7. The one that has performance
to spare -and the serious machines
that won't drive you to the poorhouse
while you're on
your way to
the top.
Every picture tells a story-like these Cully prowess(o od, and castle
accessible hack panel interconnections.
copious features and the kind of
performance you might expect from
a board that can cost up to twice as
much. Or more.
SIT BEHIND SOME REAL
PERFORMANCE.
Before we engineered the RX -7's
we looked at 'em all: Yamaha, Ramsa,
Crafted in Japan,
Proven in the States.
e
T9A
Communications
TOA
I
For additional information circle # 13
www.americanradiohistory.com
Electronics, Inc.
Grandview Drive
S. San Francisco, CA 94080
(415) 588-2538
"Iì e x:331-332
August 1981 R -e/p 25
11)23
CONSOLES for the '80s
... continued from page 22 -
...
tighter,
-inch or 20 mm is quite
feasible, and indeed has been used in
conventional consoles.
Immediately behind the fader will
come those controls which have to exist
on a per channel basis: six to eight
pushbuttons, including "Call EQ" and
"Call Aux" connecting the channel to
the centralized control and display of
these functions. We also need an
assignment set -up switch, mike /line
select, and input overload indication.
There will be a panpot, input gain trim,
and possibly one dedicated Aux Send
pot, for use mainly for reverb. All other
channel controls may be centralized.
Two central equalizer panels would
be provided in the middle of the console,
set back behind the run of the channel
controls. Touching the "Call EQ"
button in any channel engages one EQ
panel, lights a numerical indication of
the channel number to which it is now
connected, and displays either on the
panel or on a graphic display the
existing settings in that channel.
Because, on engagement, the panel
must not alter the setting it finds until
the controls are touched, its controls
must not have any inherent position,
but just be a means of making changes.
One means of achieving this was
proposed some years ago by Paul Buff
in his "Great Equalizer" design.
Frequencies and quantities of lift and
.%a
cut were set by rows of touch-sensitive
pads, with indicating LEDs above them
and calibrations printed on the panel.
Status of the engaged channel appeared
on the LEDs, and could be modified
experimentally by sliding the fingertip
along the row, or jumping to a desired
setting by touching the desired values.
This, like other later systems, provided
discrete steps of changes.
If it is felt to be more instinctive to use
rotary knobs, the panel layout might
look more like a rack -mount outboard
equalizer. However, these controls
cannot now be conventional pots with a
physical maximum and minimum end
stop, but rather incremental devices
such as optical shaft encoders that add
or subtact small amounts to the values
existing when the knob is turned.
The next EQ call button pressed
above another fader will engage the
second EQ panel. The idea of having
two such panels, though not essential,
is to permit the equalization of two
channels to be "held" for manual
modification during a take. The panels
remain engaged to the last channels
called until a further button is pressed,
when control passes to the new
channels. A "copy" button is also
possible, which would permit the same
setting to be dumped into any number of
channels.
A similar panel with continuously
rotating knobs or thumbwheels would
control the set-up of Aux Send levels
Design
Excellence
REAL TIME MEASUREMENT
R.Te60 MEASUREMENT
ANALOG AND DIGITAL DELAY
DIGITAL REVERE
BROADCAST DELAY LINE
.
r data sheets and related literature
U.K. and WORLDWkbE
U.S.A.
Klark-Teknik Research Ltd.
Coppie
ng Estats, Kidderminster,
Wores,
11 7HJ England.
105821741615 Telex:339821
Klark -Teknik Electronics 100,.
282a Eastern Parkway, Farmingdale,
N:Y:11735.
=71518)249 -3680.
î
R -e/p 26
-
)
Please có act us a
printout. All console functional
commands would be given by dedicated
and clearly labelled buttons.
A further facility easy enough to
provide by software would be "Relabel
Faders." For mixdown, instead of being
tied to the sequence 1, 2, 3 from one end
of the console, the tracks would be
rearranged to appear under the control
of the most convenient central run of
faders to fall physically under the
engineer's hands.
Once the console length has been
reduced by choosing a narrower fader
pitch, and the depth of panel behind the
faders greatly reduced by centralizing
many functions, there is adequate space
at a short arm reach behind the
channels for control of monitoring, tape
machine track modes, compressor
controls and meters, and perhaps some
favorite analog processing modules
all on clearly visible semi -vertical
panels.
All metering and other display could
be concentrated behind the central
control area; for example, on two video
screens, of which one could show EQ,
Aux, and assignment information, and
the other a track level PPM display.
Alternatively, there might be LED or
plasma level displays, a dot matrix
panel for graphics and alphànumerics,
and conventional level meters.
This article merely intends to give an
indication of the field opened up by the
separate -audio mixing concept. For
each different application
location
trucks, film dubbing, television studios,
and even concert sound reinforcement
the ideal human engineered console
panel may be configured, and linked to
a suitable package of control elements
located separately.
In addition to the standard hardware
family, users would be able, where
necessary, to configure special
processing modules, or specify rack
backplane wireable options. In its fully
developed form of the control interface,
user-exclusive software would enable
the tools available to the creative
engineer to be constantly extended and
refined.
-
E.UA ZERS
s
from each channel when engaged by
the Call Aux button of the channel.
Control of input gain could also be in
this panel. Buttons would transfer the
Aux control pre- or post-fader in the
channel being addressed, and LEDs
would indicate the position of the level
control; alternatively a full graphic
display of levels could be provided.
Assignment of channels to tracks
could be indicated by numerics above
the faders. In the vast majority of cases
two assignments per channel will be
sufficient, so there will be two pairs of
digits, with perhaps an LED to indicate
the existence of further assignments.
Located also in the center area of the
console may be the set-up buttons (one
per track) for assignment, and perhaps
an alphanumeric keyboard for writing
information to displays and to memory,
for subsequent recall and hard copy
August 1981
www.americanradiohistory.com
-
-
An evolution of high- powered audio
that develops pure, unadulterated
sound. Uncolored and vibrant. The
evolution that begins with TAD.
As evidenced by the TD -4001 compression driver. With pure Beryllium
diaphragms and surrounds that are
extremely lightweight and rigid, the
TD -4001 provides unsurpassed high
frequency response and sensitivity.
The TD -2001 compression driver
combines the features of the TD -4001
and packs them into a driver that is
half the size. Yet, the TD -2001 delivers
the kind of high frequency sensitivity
that outperforms drivers of any size.
Without sacrificing power handling.
The TD -4001 and TD -2001 compression drivers. Their unprecedented
clarity represents a milestone in the
evolution of sound.
Then there's the TAD TL -1600 15"
low frequency loudspeaker series that
advances sound delivery another step.
With select high purity materials and
precise machining tolerances, the
powerful Alnico Ring Magnets produce
the kind of strong linear fields necessary for the most demanding
application. High -power voice coils on
four-inch heat resistant glass fiber bobbins assure long-term dependability.
The TL -1600 series, a continuation in
the evolution of sound.
Pure sound evolves with quality and
performance in equipment.
The evolution of sound
begins with TAD.
I
(A'
.1 Technical
Audio Devices
A division of U.S. Pioneer Electronics Corp.
142 Redneck Ave., Moonachie, N.J. 07074
(201) 440 -8234 Telex: 133484 PIONERUSA MOON
For additional Information circle # 15
www.americanradiohistory.com
II
broadcast industry, the new facility will
feature greatly expanded sales and service
capacity.
The old telephone number, (213) 6550303, will continue to be operational for an
interim period, although the new primary
number given below should be noted for
future use.
WESTLAKE AUDIO, INC.
PROFESSIONAL SALES GROUP
7265 SANTA MONICA BLVD
LOS ANGELES, CA 90046
MITSUBISHI AND
AEG -TELEFUNKEN REACH
AGREEMENT ON
DIGITAL RECORDING
The German electronics concern has
many years of experience in the
development and production of
professional audio recorders, and has
been active for a long period in the
research and development of digital
recording. On the other hand,
Mitsubishi Electric has already created
a standard for this technology which,
the company claims, has been proved in
practical recording use in several
countries, including the United States
and Japan.
AEG -Telefunken will join the
Mitsubishi PCM format for professional PCM stereo and multi -channel
audio recorders on an exclusive OEM
basis. By this agreement, the Mitsubishi PCM format will be introduced
under the AEG -Telefunken brand
throughout Europe, except for Sweden.
QUINTEK APPOINTS
EAST -COAST DEALERS
FOR AMS UNITS
'l'he three recently -appointed dealers for
the AMS line, including the new Model
DMX 15 -R Digital Reverb, which features
stereo outputs and full 18 kHz bandwidth,
are as follows:
Martin Audio /Video Corp.
324 West 55th Street
New York, NY 10019
(212) 541 -5900
Trident (USA), Inc.
652 Glenbrook Road
Stamford, CT 16906
(213) 851 -9800
SLEEPY HOLLOW/
VALLEY PEOPLE
LICENSING DEAL
Under the terms of the new licensing
agreement, Valley People Inc. will now
(203) 348-4969
Professional Recording & Sound
1616 Soldiers Field road
Boston, MA 02135
have exclusive manufacturing and
distribution rights to all Sleepy Hollow
products. At present, Valley People will be
marketing and manufacturing the Sleepy
Hollow Headroom Horseman I and II:
interface devices that compensate for the
differences in level and impedance
between semi -pro -10 dBv levels, and pro audio /broadcast +4 and +8 dBm standards.
According to Winn Schwartau of Sleepy
Hollow, and Norman Baker of Valley
People, the manufacturing and marketing
agreements will permit expanded U.S.
sales in pro audio /video, semi -pro and
broadcast markets, as well as the
European marketplace through Valley
People's established dealer network.
WESTLAKE AUDIO
MOVES TO NEW
LOS ANGELES LOCATION
After 10 years on Wilshire Boulevard,
the Westlake Audio Professional Sales
Group has moved to Santa Monica
Boulevard in Los Angeles. Centrally
located in the heart of the recording and
(617) 254 -2110
PEOPLE ON THE MOVE
C.W. "Willie" Scullion has been
appointed national sales manager of
Ampex Corporation's Audio -Video
Systems Division. Scullion, who will direct
U.S. sales activities for the division's
complete line of professional audio and
videotape recorders, cameras and
computerized editiing systems, succeeds
Howard Lilley, who has been named
regional manager of Ampex Australia Pty.
Ltd.
Anthony H. Langley has been
appointed as vice president sales of Rupert
Neve, Inc.
Peter Horsman has been appointed to
the newly- created position of national
sales manager, Professional Products, for
Phase Linear Corporation. In his new
post, under the direction of sales vice
president Bruce Lowry, Horsman will
work to establish a broad -based national
network of professional audio dealers and
representatives for the company's line of
power amplifiers, graphic equalizers and
active crossovers.
Joe Bean has joined Studer ReVox
America as a sales representative, and will
concentrate on developing the broadcast
market for Studer professional lines in the
Southeast. Bean comes to Studer after 3'/2
years as a sales representative for Audio
Consultants, a Nashville -based studio
supply and design company.
Ampex Corporation's Audio -Video
Systems Division has expanded its
marketing staff with the addition of three
new sales engineers: Gareth Nelson,
who will be responsible for sales in 13
The DYNEX Noise Suppressor helps
get rid of electronic and environmental background noise without
filming or studio recording and
production.
sacrificing program clarity.
Choose low-frequency, high frequency or wideband noise
suppression. As legitimate program
energy in the suppressed band
don't have to live with noise. Find
out more about the DYNEX. Call or
write us today. Model 241,
Increases, suppression is progressively reduced. The result is a cleaner DYNEX -$300.
sound for broadcasting, location
You
Inovonics Inc.
503 -B Vandell Way
Campbell, CA 95008
R -e/p 28
Midwest states and coordination of
Ampex's dealer program within the
region; James Walsh, who will be
responsible for product sales in Wisconsin,
Minnesota, and North and South Dakota;
and Richard Lipson, who will handle
video sales in New York and western New
England.
Ken Hirono has been appointed
operations manager of the recently
established Otani Electric Deutschland
GMBH, Dusseldorf, West Germany, which
will serve as sales and service center for all
Otani products in Europe.
Jim Guthrie has been named national
sales manager for Sony Professional
Audio, and will be responsible for
implementing marketing strategy
through the company's network of
Telephone
(408) 374-8300
representatives and dealers.
August 1981
www.americanradiohistory.com
August i981
www.americanradiohistory.com
R-eip 29
by Robert Carr Staff Feature Editor
REO Speedwagon's album Hi Infidelity is expected to become the second biggest -selling album in the
history of CBS Records by mid -summer, and has an outside chance of catching up with Boston's
debut album if sales continue at their current pace. No small part of that success is due to co- producer
and engineer Kevin Beamish. Once a recording musician himself, Kevin took a slight detour in college
to obtain a degree in mathematics, with a minor in physics and music, from California State University
at Stanislaus. After graduation, however, his technical and musical background made a career in
engineering a logical choice. Since his first job at Los Angeles' Crystal Recording Studio in 1974, Kevin
Beamish has put together an impressive list of credits, doing dates for the likes of Nigel Olsson, Lenny
Williams, Freda Payne, Airto, Flora Purim, The Miracles, Marilyn McCoo & Billy Davis, Lamont
Dozier, and many more. The following interview took place at Kendun's Studio D, Burbank,
California, during overdub sessions for a new album by the Henry Paul Band.
R -e /p (Robert Carr): Now that you're
just producing
as opposed to engineering and producing
do you still
have the urge to run over and twist
knobs?
Kevin Beamish: Yes, it's difficult to
somebody "go back to here;" you're
doing it. You're rolling back to the place
while talking to the artist. This hand is
doing this and you're watching the
meter at the same time. You get to the
point where it's all one motion; it is a
avoid doing it once you've been in
control. I'm sure I'm talking for the
other engineers- turned producers in the
business, such as Keith Olsen, Alan
Parsons, and Roy Thomas Baker. You
get to a point where the engineering is
so much a natural part of making a
record that you feel like you have to do
it. The problem, as you mentioned, is
how do you delegate that authority?
It's so hard, because you've learned to
trust yourself in engineering. It's sofast
when you're producing and engineering, because you know exactly what you
want and you don't have to tell
flow of creative activity.
-
R -e/p 30
-
The only drawback to that is you
don't always want to worry about the
engineering. Even though you can
handle the technical aspects in your
sleep, you want to just sit there and
devote all your concentration to the
music part of it. That's the hardest part,
because sometimes you get bored. It's
fun running the tape machine and
doing everything that you've always
done.
But I believe that in management or
in big corporate business, the successful
high -level managers are ones who can
August 1981
www.americanradiohistory.com
delegate their responsibility and feel
good about it. The unsuccessful ones are
the people who can't do that who feel
totally responsible for everything, and
just can't give up any of the important
stuff. I'm not doing any engineering on
the project that I'm working on right
now, other than saying what I like and
don't like about the sounds and the
-
music.
R -e /p (Robert Carr): You're keeping
your hands off the board.
Kevin Beamish: I'm keeping them off
as much as I can. As a matter of fact,
through the whole tracking I didn't
come into the studio except to listen
back. I stayed out with the musicians,
conducting and guiding them along. I
didn't worry about meters, levels or
... continued overleaf
-
4
4
"Scotch" is a registered trademark of 3M.
If you've been using Ampex 456,
you've been setting yourself up for Scotch 226.
Our new Scotch® 226 is compatible with
Ampex 456. But that's about the only way
the two tapes are equal. Scotch 226 gives
you much lower modulation noise and 2 to
3dB less print-through. Yet there's no
compromise in headroom, signal -to- noise,
biased tape noise, distortion levels or
frequency response.
And because Scotch 226 delivers fewer
print-through problems, we can offer Scotch
227, a one -mil version for longer playing
will find it's just the ticket. And together with
Scotch 250, it gives you an unbeatable tape
combination.
Most of the major equipment makers
have already recommended Scotch 226.
But you don't have to take their word for it.
Test it for yourself. It's as simple as changing
reels.
time.
Best of all, you'll find Scotch 226 to
be consistent in quality reel after reel, batch
after batch. And that may be the most
important difference to consider.
We developed Scotch 226 because we
heard you wanted it. Those of you who like
our mastering tape, but don't like to rebias,
3M hears you.
3M
August 1981
For additional information circle # 18
www.americanradiohistory.com
R -e /p 31
The UREI power amplifiers are
designed to extend tIREI quality from our
low level signal processing all the way
through to our exclusive Time Align'
studio monitors.
Careful evaluation
of competitive power
amplifiers indicates
that while in some
cases adequate reliability has been
achieved, audible performance is often
marginal.
The URE16000 Series amplifiers offer
the knowledgeable professional the reliability he demands and the sound quality
The New uir.I
Power Amplifiers
he deserves.
Exceptionally large power supplies and
exceedingly high speed, high current circuitry combine to produce low -end
punch and high -end sparkle which is
unexcelled in professional power amps.
Moderate use of negative feedback results
in fast recovery from transient overloads
and avoids excessive high order harmonic
distortion when the amplifier is
driven into clipping.
The Model 6500
Listening Amplifier
Two totally independent plug -in channels, removable from the front panel,
a.
IMM1I
each with its own power supply and continuously variable cooling fan. Exclusive
Conductor Compensation' corrects for
wire loss and transducer related load
anomalies, resulting in absolutely accurate waveforms at the speaker terminals.
275 Watts per channel into 8 ohms, 600
Watts per channel into 2 ohms. Standard
rack mount, 7" high.
The Model 6300
Dual Channel Power Amplifier
225 Watts per channel into 8 ohms,
380 Watts per channel into 4 ohms. 5,
rack space!
The Model 6250
Dual Channel Power Amplifier
150 Watts per channel into 8 ohms,
200 Watts per channel into 4 ohms. 31"
rack space!
The Model 6150
Dual Channel Power Amplifier
80 Watts per channel into 8 ohms, 80
Watts per channel into 4 ohms. 13/4" rack
space!!
Audition the 1112E1 Power Amplifiers at
your professional sound dealer and dis-
cover how good a reliable amplifier can
sound.
From One Pro to Another -trust all
your toughest signal processing needs to
UREI.
semi
wo,
.d.
'Time-Align
is a Trademark of E M. Long Assoc., Oakland. CA
All referenced Trademarks are property of, or licensed by.
United Recording Electronics Industries, a URC Company.
meEM IMO POWER 00110.E'E'
Y
¢i
ly ,YnM,
win'
goo_
.w'
"
rnRw`
iJ 6,^""R
EDFrom One Pro To Another
United Recording Electronics Industries
8460 San Fernando Road, Sun Valley, California 91352 (213) 767 -1000 Telex: 65 -1389 UREI SNVY
Worldwide: Gotham Export Corporation, New York: Canada: Gould Marketing, Montreal H471 E5
R -eip 32
August
See your professional audio products
dealer for full technical information.
1981
www.americanradiohistory.com
urtE11Y81
anything
-
other than the first day
when I supervised getting the sounds. It
was hard, but it certainly made for a
better record, because I was more
involved with the musicians, as
opposed to sitting there having to worry
about the technical aspects. I was
involved with the emotional aspects of
the music instead; whether you like it or
not music is emotional, not technical.
R -e /p (Robert Carr): Is therea technique
to being a good co-producer, as opposed
to being just the engineer or just the
producer?
Kevin Beamish: Yes there is. My
particular situation with REO Speedwagon is much more than just a coproducer. We have several diverse
talents and opinions in REO Speed wagon, of which I'm the center where
everything pulls against and comes
back in. In other words, on occasion I
have to be psychiatrist as well as
mediator and arbitrator, in addition to
making the records.
To be a successful co- producer is
really difficult. Every engineer who has
any musical ability thinks that he can
be a co-producer, just by throwing ideas
out here and there. That is not it. Any
engineer who's worth anything from a
musical point of view is going to come
up with ideas; that doesn't make him a
co- producer. It's a totally different
thing.
A co-producer is not less than a
producer; he's an additional producer
on a session, and there is a big
difference. In my case, I'm totally
involved from day one with the
songwriting, the arrangements,
months and months of rehearsals, and
pre -production. I mean, you don't walk
into a session cold not knowing the
songs, the arrangements, or what key
anything is in. I can play on the guitar
every one of the songs I have recorded.
To me, that is what production is all
about.
R -e /p: What does the pre -production
entail? Is there a certain pattern that
you follow, or is it still evolving?
Beamish: Well, as far as preproduction goes, I start right with the
songs. I pick the songs or, if there are
extras, I will pick the songs that I think
are the ones to go with. I don't believe in
recording a couple of extra and picking
out the best ones, unless there are two
Kevin Beamish with engineer Tom Cummings
that I think are just as good.
R -e/p: Sometimes, a song will sound
really good when you're writing or
rehearsing it, and then once it's
recorded, it's like a different song
"Jeckel and Hyde" situation.
Beamish: In that case, it's your fault
for doing it, because if something is
good as a demo you should make it
better. I'm not saying that it doesn't
happen the way you just described it. It
definitely does; some things don't turn
out the way you expect them to. To me, if
they are going to turn out different than
you expected them to, they should turn
out better not worse.
If you have one extra song you just
can't decide on, you don't go in with the
idea of seeing which one comes out
worse, and throwing it out. You go in to
see which one comes out better and use
that one; it's sort of a different slant on
your attitude.
-a
R-e /p: Keep
that positive attitude.
Beamish: Exactly! From choosing a
song and going to rehearsals, I'll
arrange, re- arrange, or anything that a
song needs. I'll check keys, tempos;
always have a metronome going;
always tape all of the rehearsals to
make sure it's really coming together.
Rehearsal is a time to figure out what is
going to happen for the song, although
it always changes a bit in the studio.
You hear things that you might not
have heard during rehearsals.
R-e/p: So you work out all the
parts
before the fact- even things that would
be an overdub, or used as background
material?
Beamish: Not necessarily the background vocals. That's really the least of
my worries at that particular time, but
I'll definitely look at how the different
guitars will interact. The worst thing
you can do is have three guitar players
-
fighting for the same spot playing the
same part. You have to find out who is
doing what and why. Sometimes you
have to come down to the fact: "Look!
We can cut this better without you, Mr.
Guitar Player #2, and you can't worry
about egos." You have to do it for the
sake of making a better record.
So we work out all parts in advance,
even though we may not cut them like
that. Sometimes it's advantageous to
cut three or four pieces as opposed to
cutting the whole band just because
--
the more people you have, the more
likely they are to make mistakes. Studio
time is costly. The record companies are
always on your tail for bringing things
in under budget. You really have to do
your homework, and make sure your
songs are in the right key. If you get
pumped up in the studio, and you
always play everything fast, you have
to make sure you know what the tempos
are; when they feel right; when they
actually lock into the groove. And then
have a metronome on hand to be sure
the band is playing them right.
R -e/p: I get the impression that the way
you record a song would change
according to the tune, or the particular
group.
Beamish: I never like to record with
less than three or four musicians. I
think that cutting records in a
piecemeal fashion is not the same as
making music. I mean, you can start
with a click track and add your drums
and so on, but I don't think that's a very
judicious way of making records. I
think that what the listener hears is
feeling and performance
-
not
technicality, beautiful drum sounds,
and perfect records. I'm convinced that
we put far too much emphasis on
technicalities, rather than on putting
emotion into making music.
R -e/p: You feel recording has become
too sterile?
Beamish: Very sterile. I made several
perfect records which later proved to be
very boring, and very stale. The
opposite is true with REO Speedwagon.
They always wanted to do the perfect
record, and we finally did it on Hi
Infidelity. Yet, seven out of the ten
songs on that album are demo tracks.
R-e /p: You
tunes?
aren't happy with the seven
Beamish: I'm totally happy with them,
but they are demos. What I'm saying is
that we went into the studio after
rehearsing for a long period of time
about two months worth of rehearsals,
arrangements and writing. The band
was at its peak as far as the rehearsal of
-
songs. We walked into Crystal Studios
in Los Angeles just to demo the songs;
just to hear what we had. We cut 10
songs in two days, working about four
or five hours each day. Immediately
after we cut each song with the full band
playing, the lead singer [Kevin Cronin]
On Hi- Infidelity seven out of the ten songs are
demo tracks ... "Keep On Loving You" was a demo (we]
recut ... that's a slow ballad, flaws will show up in
a slower song quicker than in a fast song! 919
August 1981
www.americanradiohistory.com
R -e /p 33
McNichols Arena or in The Los Angeles
Forum, that's what it would sound like.
Obviously, it wouldn't sound as good as
the record, but it would have that
spaciousness and that big long delay
and decay on it. That's what we went for
and, sure enough, it comes across on the
radio as sounding live, but without
being overly echoed.
Crystal is one of the studios in Los
Angeles that appeals to English rock `n'
rollers as well as to R&B clientele. You
may wonder what the connection is
between those two types of music. The
fact is that they both like a huge sound.
Crystal is not a new studio, so it's not
really acoustically "designed." It was
built before the advent of all this
technology and design. Crystal is a
huge control room with tall ceilings
it's the livest control room with sound
bouncing around everywhere, but that's
the way the studios in England were in
the early days. Even now there are a lot
of them like that. You get that huge
the biggest kick-drum
drum sound
sound you will ever hear. Nigel Olsson,
with whom I have done several albums,
wouldn't record his drums anywhere
else but in Crystal, just because what
appeals to him is that huge kind of
auditorium sound. Yeah, it does sound a
bit like The Hollies due to the popness of
it, and the way that it's echoed.
-
R -e/p: And yet it's all clean!
Beamish: It uses the technology to
better the performance, and doesn't do
it the other way around. In other words,
it doesn't use the technology to make a
performance; technology, in this case,
doesn't get in the way. We don't have 24
tracks there just to fill up every one with
a different part; instead we have 24
tracks for the versatility. In a lot of
cases, like I said, we didn't need all of
them just 12 or 13 tracks out of 24.
But it's a good thing we had it,
because if the 24 -track technology
hadn't been there we wouldn't have
been able to make this album. We would
have gone into a demo studio, and done
it on 4- track. Then we wouldn't have
been able to redo the things that we
needed to correct; we wouldn't have
been able to recapture this album. In
fact, we did it on 24-track just as a safety
measure, and it worked to our
advantage. We came out with a product
that was basically fabulous; we could
fix up certain parts that needed to be
fixed up. It's just the way you use the
technology; you don't let it use you.
-
-
R -e/p: Did you put echo on all the
tracks?
Beamish: No. It was done on
individual tracks while it was being
mixed. There was no echo on bass
guitar and bass drum necessarily;
maybe some for effect here and there,
but not overall. It's used especially on
the vocals, and the drums in general
have a nice big slap echo.
While we were doing the mix it was
like, "should we use this much echo ?"
or, "are we going to get panned for
doing this ?" I kept thinking, "No! If I
was the fan, and I was sitting in
R -e /p: Technology tends to run
away
with a lot of engineers and producers.
For awhile I thought we were overdubbing all the magic
out of the music. That's why I insist on having the artist
in there singing as we are cutting tracks!
®
ROOM AMBIENCE
UFO
50W
MARSHALL COMBO
e
e
SM -57
087
DRUM MINING
Kick: MD421
12: KMM
TI: KMM
Snare Under: MD421
0/H Right C451
Snare Oren SM -57
0/H Lett C451
T5: UB7
T4: KIM
TT RUSH
Ride: C414
HI -HM: KAHN
Rida
TRACKING SETUP FOR
'KEEP ON LOVING YOU:'
BY REO SPEEDWAGON
STUDIO: CRYSTAL SOUND, L.A.
ENGINEER: TOM CUMMINGS
Crash
Crash
DRUMS:
ALAN ORATZER
FI
Hi-Hal
-
most important thing on earth was how
wonderful my records sounded, 'And I
have learned that it doesn't really
matter how your records sound. Sound
is not what a record is all about. The
song and performance is what makes a
record happen. I used to beat my brains
out to get the most incredible sounds,
but often what that can do is frustrate
musicians. They're sitting out there
waiting to play while you're fooling
around with the sound of the snare
drum. What you have is actually the
sound of the snare drum, but you're just
trying to beat your own ego into shape gt
tl
by making it sound bigger than life.
It's a fine thing to do, but you can't get
hung-up on it. When it comes down to 0
the fmal analysis, it's not the individual ÿ
sounds that make up a mix; it's not how
the snare drum sounds, or how the bass
drum sounds, or how the guitar sounds. c
It's how the mix is in general how the
individual parts come across as a
t
PIANO:
KEVIN CRONIN
BASS:
BRUCE HALL
U472
plus
Fa! Boa DI
us7
ROOM AMBIENCE
R -e /p 36
-
R-e /p: Have you seen a change over the
years in your approach to engineering?
Beamish: Yes. I used to think that the
GUITAR:
GARY RICHRATH
CONTROL
ROOM
Very often an artist will lay down a
track, and achieve a great intensity or
energy on tape. Then some time later
it doesn't have to be a long period of
time
let's say the lead vocalist goes
back into the studio, but is unable to
recreate that intensity for an overdub or
punch -in. Is there something you can do
from an engineering standpoint to help
marry those two parts together to
recreate that energy, or to make them
blend better?
Beamish: You are at the mercy of how
the artist feels. That's why when I cut a
track, I immediately have the artist
sing a vocal to it. It's not necessarily to
sing the vocal, but to sing a vocal while
he's in the vibe of cutting a song. You've
spent a couple of hours doing it;
everything gels together in everyone's
mind. That's what makes a take. Then,
while you still have that particular vibe
going, put down a vocal; maybe blow a
solo over it; maybe put down a couple of
rhythm guitar parts while you're in the
same groove. The hardest thing to do is
to recreate what you got, and how you
got it. Sometimes there is no reason why
you got it other than everything just
came together at the same time.
One thing that I definitely learned
from this last REO album is that there
is still magic left in recording. For a
while there I thought that we had
learned how to overdub all the magic
out of the music. That's why I insist on
having the artist there singing along as
we are cutting the tracks. It helps the
musicians get the feel. Sometimes,
when you're playing the bare-bones
skeleton of a track, you're trying to
make it technically right, and you lose
all the feel. If you have the singer
singing in your earphones while you're
cutting, it helps a lot.
August 1981
www.americanradiohistory.com
-
,
The Unlimited Limiter.
...
INPUT
.,
OUTPUT
ATTACK
4...+tw.
.
RELEASE
INPUT
GAIN REDUCTION
STEREO
-IN
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ATTACT
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If
AST
OUT
CHANNEL ONE
DUAL LUWTER
GAIN REDUCTION
AIM
ONANNEL TWO
keeping with MXRs expanding commitment to the professional recording industry.
cur engineers have designed and built the
Cue Limiter. A world class mono -stereo
limiter offering total flexibility and ease of
operation, the Dual Limiter produces a
musically natural response in any comp-ession- limiting application. All of this
versatility is built into a compact. rack mountable package.
The totally unique VCA's at the heart of the
Dual Limiter provide an exceptionally wide
dynamic range with low levels of distortion.
Cont nuous bass distortion is much lower
in level than typical compresscr-limiters,
allowing more freedom in setting release
characteristics.
-The Dual_imiter is also a forgiing limiter.
Atack and release characteristics dictated
by the front panel controls are modified
by program dynamics and compression
requirements. The slope increases
srroo.hly past the threshold point, allowing
a Gradual transition into compression.
Va -yi -g the Dual Limiters threshold region
prcduoes a variety of intermediate slopes
wit the primary slope being that cnosen
by -he slope switch. These features permit
apparent dynamics to be maintained even
though the dynamic range is being control ab y limited.
The Dual Limiter's remarkable versatility is
based on the fact that it can be viewed as
two independent mono limiters that can be
patched together via front panel switches
for stereo limiting applications. Each
channel has an In /Out switch, Slope
swittih, Input, Output, Attack and Release
con roll and an LED display, showing the
amcun- of gain reduction. On the rear are
In
both XLR and i a ' phone jack (ring -tipsleeve) input anc output connectors. Each
channels detector is accessible via rear
panel phone jacks to permit external
tailoring of the detectors frequency
response. This feature allows for de- essing
(reduction of vocal sibilance) and a wide
variety of frequency dependent limiting
needs.
Because virtually every form of musical
signal was used to evaluate the Dual
Limiter's response during the initial stages
of development. its sophisticated internal
circuitry enables i- to sound musically
natural even at extreme compression
settings.
Balanced inputs, the ability to drive 600
ohm loads, +19 dBm input and output and
standard rack dimensions (13/4" high) allow
the Dual Limiter to be easily integrated into
any professional system. With an extremely
rugged case, metal knobs and reliable
internal construction. the new MXR Dual
Limiter reflects the highest professional
standards and has been fully designed and
built in the U.S.A.
The Unlimited Limiter MXR s natural
response to the question of performance
and versatility in a space- efficient and cost effective package. See the MXR Dual
Limiter at your nearest MXR dealer.
-
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r
MXR
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Products Group
MXR Innovations Inc.,
740 Driving Park Avenue
Rochester, New York 14613
(716) 254-2910
:1r1ort;
'414^w-!11-11f'=-
;,4= `tY°#
-
August 1981
www.americanradiohistory.com
R -e/p 37
.,_.
'`.
-+-
.
III
1GY11MG
-
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to
Guet
CROUP
www.americanradiohistory.com
The entertainment industry is changing
radically. We are creating a world of global
satellite simulcasts, digital multi-track motion picture scoring stages, fiber optic cable
networks and laser -scanned rock and roll
videodiscs.
To the recording executive who must meet
the imminent needs of an aware and creative
clientele; and to the film, video and broadcast specialists confronted by increasingly
sophisticated live and post-production audio
requirements; and to the producers, directors
and performers who rightly insist on subtler
perfection and bolder invention; to all of these
professionals, one good thing is becoming
increasingly clear.
Enlightened Professionals
ABC Television
New York
Battery Studios
London
British Broadcasting Corporation
Bullet Recording
Nashville
Milan, Italy
CGD Records
Country Lane
Munich
Danish Broadcasting System
Los Angeles
Golden Age
Montreal
Munich
Olympia Studios
Tokyo
Hansa
Berlin
Onkio Haus Studios
London
R.G. Jones Studios
London
Pete Townshend
Tokyo Power Station
New York
JVC Recording Center
Detroit
Kendun Recorders
Burbank Producer's Color
Mexico City
RCA Records
Larrabee Sound
Surrey, U.K.
Norway
Ridge Farm
U.K. & Europe
The Americas
Solid State Logic
Churchfields, Stonesfield
Oxford, England OX7 2PQ
2352 Wisconsin Avenue NW
Washington, D.C. 20007 USA
-
(099 389) 8282
Tlx 837400
--- -
-Stockholm
Tonstudios --Hollywood
Nidaros Studios Eden Studios
Europa Film
London
Musicworks International
- ---
Le Studio
-- -- -
Los Angeles
Naples
Splash Studios
Tocano Studios
Denmark
London
Townhouse Studios
Munich
Union Studios
Tokyo
Warner Pioneer
Los Angeles
Yamaha R &D
Yamaha Epicurus
Japan
Record Plant
Solid State Logic
(202) 333 -1500
Tlx 440519
Master Studio Systems
August
For additional information circle
#
108
www.americanradiohistory.com
1981
R -e /p 39
Professional
Product
Subject:
The Breakthrough
of Accessible
Automation
Series
Now, for the first time,
automation is within the
reach of any professional.
Roland Corporation, for
years a leader in advanced
microprocessor -based
musical electronics
announces a
breakthrough in
automation with the
introduction of the
CPE -800 Compu Editor
from our professional
division -Roland Studio
Systems.
The CPE-800 has been
designed to provide
automation in a simple,
economical format for many
uses from recording to live
performance and lighting.
The CPE -800 and its
companion unit the VCA-800
Voltage Controlled Amplifier
provide automated fader
and mute control when
inserted between any
multitrack deck and mixing
console. The CPE -800 can
also be used to expand
existing automation systems
to include echo send, cue
mixes and special effects
control.
The CPE -800 provides 15
channels of simultaneous
fader and mute control, and
allows individual channel
updates at any time. All
motions are timed off a
self -contained SMPTE
generator /reader, which
also allows the CPE -800 to
interface with any other
system using a SMPTE
time base.
The 32k bytes of on -board
data storage prevents the
punch -in delay caused in
We
R -e/p 40
automation systems using
tape storage. The entire
memory can be dumped
and re- loaded at any time
to facilitate multiple uses.
Software includes in
addition, a scene -by -scene
cue automation system, and
internal clock programming
for non -recording
applications.
The Outputs of the CPE -800
allow the connection to any
X -Y oscilloscope for a visual
indication of all fifteen fader
positions. Fader level
comparator LEDs indicate
the difference between data
and current fader positions
to enable smooth punch -ins.
Two CPE -800 units can be
coupled together to control
30 individual channels or
functions.
Design the Future
August 1981
For additional information circle # 22
www.americanradiohistory.com
CPE-800
If you've found the high cost
of conventional automation
systems to be prohibitive,
you're going to like the
CPE -800. You'll find that
automation is a lot more
accessible than you think.
Roland Studio Systems Inc.
1022 S. La Cienega Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90035
.
continued from page 36
-
complete sound. The overall mix is the
sound.
R -e /p: Even though you get a good solo
sound, it doesn't mean that it's going to
sound great in the track?
Beamish: That's right, exactly. You
can make the world's greatest sound on
an instrument and it just might not fit
in at all.
One of the best things that an
engineer can do is to always have the
multitrack tape machine in record
mode. In other words, if the vocalist
goes out to sing, or the guitar player is
playing a solo while you are in the booth
screwing around with a limiter or
whatever, put the machine in record
when you're running it down, because
you are inevitably going to miss that
one magic moment. It has happened
over and over again over the years. So
what if the levels are screwed up, or the
hard to get that magic. If you miss one
because you were worried about
something less important than' the
performance
you are making a
serious mistake.
-
-
R -e /p: I've listened to a lot of tracks
from supposedly good engineers, and
when I put it on the speakers, I can't
pick out where the instruments are in
the mix. While they are not exactly
"muddy," they are not distinct.
Beamish: Well, I think that engineers
in general like to have a big stereo
sound. Back in the old days they almost
used to cut drums in mono, and it wasn't
really that big of a spread. Now we use
six tracks on drums, and the toms and
cymbals will be in full stereo.
Everything from right to left is just
totally drums, and so you don't have
anywhere to go. So what do you do? You
track the guitar, double it, and you have
Often the engineer/producer's preoccupation with
getting incredible sounds frustrates the musicians ..
they're sitting around, while you're fooling around!
.
R -e /p: A lot of Hi Infidelity was
recorded at Kendon's Studio D. How did
you like that particular room?
Beamish: I think the Solid State Logic
[B- Series 40 -in /32 -out] console is
probably the best that there is. I believe
that the transformerless console is the
way to go. It makes for an incredible
difference in the transient response,
especially on things with a lot of snap to
them, like the bass drum, snare drum,
bass guitar, and so on, which are totally
eaten up by transformers. If you have
too many transformers in your line, you
can take all the life out of an
instrument. Transformers don't pass
all the signal fast enough. This SSL
console is incredible. The tape recorder
is a Studer A-800, which is by far one of
the best multitracks.
The Sierra Audio SM -3 monitor
speakers powered by Studer A-68 power
amps are absolutely flat, and that is
where I run into disagreement with
their design. Flat only means flat to a
technician. We are currently building
studios that are so perfectly right, that
they sound terrible. In other words, the
speaker that is absolutely flat, with no
colorations whatsoever, doesn't sound
good to me. The reason why speakers
sound good isn't necessarily because
they are flat, but because they have
particular characteristics. JBL
loudspeakers sound like JBL speakers,
because they haye that particular
coloration to them, and I actually like
JBLs.
There are a lot of different attitudes
about monitoring systems. I like the
particular characteristics of a speaker if
it makes it more pleasant to listen to,
and easier for me to listen for long
periods of time. You just have to be
careful when you are mixing that you
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.
don't let those colorations and
.
.
in Studio `D'
...
the SSL console, floppies and a variety of monitors
limiter is not right on the vocal. Sure
enough, he sang it great but. . .you
didn't have the machine in record.
When the musician is out there,
regardless of whatever you're doing,
punch record. If you have to erase and
go over again, fine, but if you've missed
that one natural moment, then you may
never get it again. Those magic
moments are rare.
If you've got that energy on the
track you can always double -track it
and mix up more of that energy track, or
supplement it with a fresh one.
Beamish: That's true. Or, things like:
so you didn't have quite enough high
end on it, or the sound wasn't quite
right, or the levels jumped around.
These are things that you can deal with.
What you can't do is get the artist to be
magical on every take. You work so
R -e /p:
-
that in stereo. The next thing, you use
digital delay on the guitar.
Everything gets to be so stereo that
there is no definition. It makes for a
great overall sounding record, but you
have to be very careful with it,
otherwise you run into problems with
lack of distinguishability on certain
things; you have to use your echo
judiciously, otherwise you will wash
everything out.
It's just a matter of technique and
how you hear things. A lot of people
slide through mixes by putting delay on
anything, and using their echo just to
cover up the poorness of their mix, as
opposed to using echo to accentuate and
help the liveness of it. It's definitely a
matter of how you use your tools;
whether you use them as a crutch, or as
they were meant to be used to make it
sound better.
-
characteristics get in the way of the
total overall sound. You have to listen
on several different sets of speakers to
make sure that you are not making a
mistake.
So, in answer to your question, I've
done a lot of work at Kendon's Studio D.
It's a superior state -of-the -art room. I
like to work there. There are a few places
I like to work that are less nice than
that, and yet they still seem to get good
sounds. One thing that an engineer has
to be good at if he is going to be an
independent engineer, is being able to
get a good sound at many different and
varied studios. A lot of engineers say,
"Well, I can only work here or here."
That's only because they are probably
used to the particular sound of that
room. It's a poor showing on their part
that they can't go out and record a
session anywhere. A good independent
engineer should be able to work
anywhere and make it sound good.
R-e/p: Is there
any particular piece of
outboard gear you find yourself coming
August 1981
www.americanradiohistory.com
R -e/p 41
If you miss one because you are worried about something less
important than the performance ... you are making a serious mistake! 941
back to frequently? Or maybe a favorite
piece that you like to use?
Beamish: Well, to create the digital
glaze I use a Lexicon Delta T, and for
vocal limiting I own a Vocal Stresser,
which is by far the most versatile
instrument. The Stresser's limiter is so
fast, and doesn't color the sound
whatsoever. A lot of limiters are fast,
but you can hear them work. You can't
hear this unit work. It's the most
incredible de -esser that I've ever used.
You can put the unit's equalizer section
into the side chain of the compressor. If
you have a vocalist that has incredible
sibilance, you can use the equalizer to
find out where those "esses" are, and
accentuate them. In other words, boost
the problem frequency as loud as
necessary, and pump that to your
compressor. The compressor sees this
incredible "ess" coming at it, and
dumps it without affecting the program
at all. I have had luck at dumping
"esses" 20 dB without affecting the
overall sound. It really works well.
Then during mixing I use two different
kinds of echo. I use a Lexicon Delta T
Digital Delay, in addition to an EMT
140 with a slap for the return, which is
set for about 13 IPS delay
little bit
under 15 IPS. It's a combination of the
double digital delay and the echo that
make that sound.
It is a beautiful vocal sound, but credit
has to go to Kevin Cronin for being able
to double so well. Electronic doubling is
fine, but it's sometimes too perfect. He
doubles perfectly, but it is not
electronically perfect; it's humanly
perfect. You get random things that
your ear can't hear as two separate
events, but which almost creates a
natural phase in places. It's not far
enough apart to actually be able to
distinguish what the effect is, but it does
create a sound.
-a
R -e/p: On "Don't Let Him Go," the
guitar sustain that came in and rang
forever. How did you get that?
Beamish: I used a very long decay time
-withabouttape slap
seconds - on the EMT
before What you are
4'/2
R -e /p: I'm curious how you got a couple
of sounds on the REO Speedwagon
album
like the effect on the voice on
the track "Keep On Loving You."
Beamish: It's a combination of several
things. First of all, Kevin Cronin is
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hearing when the guitar starts out is
just the echo. In other words, there is no
signal in there at all. The echo send is
pre -fader with the fader off, and all you
are hearing is the echo returning.
Each time that particular part comes
in, as he is holding the note, we are
doing the same thing. We are riding the
echo, and moving the fader in and out of
the echo, as the echo is coming up and
down itself. As the echo is coming up,
the signal is moving down, and vice-
probably the world's best doubler of
vocals; he sings the vocal, and then
sings another without hearing the first
one, and it doubles precisely every time.
What we do is have him double the
vocal, so we have a natural delay as
opposed to a perfect electronic delay.
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REO Speedwagon and production staff at the presentation of an Ampex Golden Reel
Award honoring "HI-Infidelity." At Kendun Recorders (Burbank) from the left, Kendun's
Kent Duncan; mastering engineer Greg Fulginiti (Artisan Sound Recorders); Rick Kelly,
band equipment technician; band members Kevin Cronin, Gary Richrath and Neal
Doughty (Alan Gratzerand Bruce Hall not pictured); engineer Tom Cummings; co-producer Kevin Beamish; Dick Antonio, Ampex Magnetic Tape Division national sales
manager; and Elizabeth Frye the band's assistant.
R-e /p 42
-
that all done as an overdub?
Beamish: No. The part was there
before. It was just amplifier feedback,
and to accentuate that we put it through
R -e/p: Was
the echo system.
R-e /p: Was that the Vocal Stresser you
put those high background vocals
through?
Beamish: Right. The background
singers on "Keep On Loving You" and
"Wish You Were There" are Kevin
Cronin, Tom Kelly and Richard Page.
Tom and Richard can sing real high,
and it's just a combination of those
three beautifully sweet voices in the
same kind of echo I described before
that was used on the lead vocal. There is
really no trick there at all; it's just how
good they sing.
140
a
-
versa. It's just constantly swirling
around. The sound is always in the
EMT, and I just mix it in whenever I
need it it's always there regardless of
signal fader lever.
August 1981
www.americanradiohistory.com
R -e /p: Have you used much automa-
tion?
Beamish: I use it all the time in mixing.
A lot of people are afraid of automation,
because it's a little more complex.
Actually, if I cut in a studio that has
automation, I use it from day one. After
the tracks are cut, it's so easy to have
your rough mixes on a floppy disk.
When you walk in at the start of the
session, or when you change songs, you
can get your rough mix together in a few
billionths of a second, as opposed to
spending over a half an hour or so.
You simply pop in the disk, and there
is your rough mix exactly the same way
you left it the last time you were in the
studio. You can also list all your cues.
"Let's go to the first verse." You don't
have to reel in and try to remember
whether it's 30 seconds in, or60 seconds
in. You just push a button, and there
they are.
During the mixing process automation is invaluable, because it frees your
hands from making the moves every
time, which in turn frees your ears to
listen. When you're concentrating on
making moves, often times you're not
concentrating on listening. It is more
important that you listen, and the
computer does your moves more
precisely and correctly every time. You
can continually update your mixes and
come back the next day or the next
week, and set -up is a five -minute job as
opposed to a 12 -hour one.
The technology is there for the user to
use to his own advantage, as long as he
doesn't let it get control of him. It really
helps, and that's all it should do.
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For these ar d other reasons, not the least of which is
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club r/' ües ...
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number of factors, both social and economic, have resulted in fewer bands being able to
afford to embark on extensive tours. As an alternative, over the last few years there has been
an increasing emphasis on performance in smaller venues clubs seating fewer than a
thousand fans. In such clubs a custom -designed sound system can provide the quality of sound
and "intimate atmosphere many bands are finding more acceptable than the traditional large scale halls and outdoor locations. The Country Club represents a good example of a small club
capable of attracting big name artists, due in no small part to the excellence of its sound system.
A
-
For most musicians, the thought of
playing in a club conjures up visions of
thick smoke, obnoxious drunks, a poor
to adequate sound system, and the
provision of little or no lighting.
Los Angeles has long been known for
venues such as The Roxy, The
Lighthouse, and The Palomino; New
York has Max's Kansas City, The
Village Gate, and the Lone Star Cafe.
Although these historic establishments
are, in some cases, exceptions to the
previous statement, none of them really
differs that much from the traditional
beer and wine bar atmosphere.
At the same time, the only other
possible options open to contemporary
music groups are the sometimes
shocking, and often unrealistic, jump to
the several thousand -seat arenas
and auditoriums, with 120 dB
screaming guitars, practically
no audience intimacy, and the
attendant semi -trailers stuffed
with gear; or the equally stereotyped "extravaganzas" of Las
Vegas, Miami and Atlantic City.
Aside from the performance problems that artists often encounter when
making such transitions, there is the
real and disturbing truth that state -ofthe-art tours, as we have known them,
are, and have been pricing themselves
out of existence.
With only a handful of successful
tours still making the rounds of the
concert circuit, major promoters, as well
as sound reinforcement companies,
record labels, and groups, are all
looking for alternative opportunities
that will rejuvenate their once booming
business.
Over the past decade the name Wolf
and Rissmiller has become synonymous with live concert promotion in
Southern California. A large percentage of the major acts and most of the
R -e/p 44 August 1981
biggest venues displayed Wolf and
Rissmiller's banner at the top of their
advertising. Today, however, the Los
Angeles Times Calendar Section
carries very few ads for any live
concerts at all.
Rather than be a victim of such a
potentially disastrous turn of events,
Jim Rissmiller turned his sights
towards establishing a smaller venue
with a concert arena feel. A room, in
fact, that would emphasize all the
reasons why large concerts became so
popular in the first place, and yet
eliminate the negatives which, over the
years, have made that particular art form less attractive to the 25- to 45 -year
WOff 6 RISSMI«NS
by Robert Carr
old rock and rollers. The result was a
1,000 -seat club located in Reseda,
California, just north of Los Angeles,
called The Country Club.
The Demise of The Larger Music
Venue?
"The days of the big outdoor show
and concerts at the big coliseums are no
longer," predicts the Country Club's
general manager Mike Osterman. "The
economics aren't there anymore.
Record companies are not supporting
that type of venue; kids don't have the
money to pay the big ticket prices; and
there aren't that many groups who can
draw large audiences these days.
www.americanradiohistory.com
-
Wolf /Rissmiller will continue to book
large arenas when they can get good
groups, but the Country Club is like a
farm system. We can bring acts in here
that can't play the Santa Monica Civic
Auditorium, for example, or the
Palladium, or The Forum, or the L.A.
Sports Arena. They can build their
audience here. We form an allegiance
with them
and vice versa. As the
artists grow, we can use them on
different shows; we can put them in
bigger rooms when they can draw."
Record companies don't usually
subsidize their artists' performances in
the Country Club either. Groups play to
the size of the room. All fees paid to the
performers are negotiable, and are
dependent on the drawing power and
size of the room. (Room size varies in
accordance with the size of the
dance floor, or whether or not a
dance floor is provided at any
given show.) These factors, in
turn, determine how long the
engagement will be, and the price
of admission. Most groups are
booked for one -night stands. Someone like Chuck Mangione, however, who
was booked for four nights a week for
two consecutive weeks, filled the house
for the majority of his eight performances. Osterman notes that, "We had
Rockpile here for three nights. If an act
can draw we'll keep them here."
Ticket prices generally hover around
$10, but occasionally rise to $11 or
$12.50; admission for Mangione's
concerts was $11.
A universal truth in the nightclub
business is that Monday and Tuesday
are the two slowest times of the week.
Occasionally the Country Club has
designated Monday as "Talent Night."
It gives locals a chance to work out their
acts (or inhibitions; or fantasies
choose one), and the club charges just a
-
-
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Even if you're on a "bouncy"
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Distracting noises are reduced ...not
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August 1981
For additional information circle
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24
www.americanradiohistory.com
R -e/p 45
club Venues...
(00/4"0,,t)1
buck at the door. Tuesday is "Inflation Fighting Night," and is sponsored in
conjunctior with local rock station
KMET. Admission price starts at $2 to
see two or three bands.
Unlike most concert presentations,
every night of the week the Country
Club offers a full selection of alcoholic
beverages, soft drinks, and fruit juices,
and a complete dinner menu, ranging
from steaks to chicken, to fruit and
cheese plates. But once the gate fee is
paid, there is no required minimum, and
no one is forced to eat or drink. The
solitary, Tiffany -style bar visible to the
patrons is against the back wall of the
second -floor balcony. The kitchen and
main floor service bars are discretely
out of the audience's sight and mind,
and are accessible only through
inconspicuous, solid wood doors.
Because the club serves food, there is
no age restriction imposed on who can
be admitted.
"When we have New Wave groups,"
Osterman says, "it's not unusual to
have 12 -, 13 -, and 14 -year olds in here,
along with people in their thirties.
We've had the Glen Miller Orchestra,
and everybody was over 50 for that
show. We're doing another night like
that with Tex Beneke, so there's really
no one age group."
The name of the game though, is
drawing the crowd that will drink. As
Mike explains: "When we had Joe
Cocker, the audience was in their late
twenties to early forties. It was the same
with Canned Heat and Spirit. Every old
surfer in the county showed up. They
have the bucks, and came to drink their
Scotch, or Rum and Cokes. We'd much
rather have them. Beverage prices
remain fairly consistent from night to
night, except when we have a cheap
night. There's no point in having an
admission of one or two dollars, and
charging the guy $3.00 for a beer."
From Country to Rock..
.
The Country Club was originally
conceived by music promoter Chuck
Landis as a vehicle for presenting
country music to the residents of the
San Fernando Valley- hence the name
Country Club. Landis put together the
basics of the room, kept it open six
nights a week, but was unsuccessful
with the limited format. Wolf and
Rissmiller approached Landis in the
early part of 1980, and took over
management of the establishment
around the end of that year.
The size and layout of the facility
makes it adaptable to a variety of uses.
By adding or removing tables,
extending the stage, adding a dance
floor, or altering the lighting system,
R -e /p 46
the room can be practically all things to
we do that, we have to start worrying
all people.
"We'll use the venue for anything,"
Osterman points out, "and have booked
everybody from Martin Mull, to swap
meets, to live radio broadcasts, to the
biggest names in rock and country." A
typical month could see acts like Emmy
about royalties and record companies.
Admission has to be free at least for
the time being."
Other than that one experience, the
Country Club uses video pieces
primarily between sets, or to augment
an artist's performance. Many record
companies are said to be eager to put
their product into such a specialized
venue, and make a habit of sending
their samples as promotional items.
What could be more perfect than
running a video clip from an artist's
new album for an audience o f 1,000 fans
who, by their very presence, are proven
music freaks, and have the money to
buy the albums or videos? Video
presentations run the gamut from
concerts, to visual songs, to complete
storyline vignettes.
As Osterman points out, "We're not
like a New York club that plays only
video, and people come to dance. You
might be able to do that on the Sunset
Strip, but the way our room is set up
and the name of Wolf/Rissmiller is
almost a connection to a live concert.
People who come here treat the place as
a live concert hall. People don't hang
out much in Reseda; they have to be
drawn here. It's not like the Whiskey,
where you can have 250 people hanging
out, and have a full house."
Audience reaction to the club is
unanimously favorable, but mixed.
Some people think it would be great to
have an informal atmosphere by
pulling out all the chairs and tables,
and letting everyone dance. Others
don't want The Forum or Sports Arena
feeling. They want a Las Vegas
showroom where they can get served;
where they can sit down, be comfortable, enjoy a show, and not be pushed
around. The chameleon approach to
operating the Country Club seems to be
the most successful course of action so
far.
For the typical touring group,
management has made a concerted
effort to provide all of the related
amenities. Four dressing rooms are
provided (one with a private bath), as
well as facilities for showers. Under the
supervision of Kimberly Shaw, the inhouse kitchen caters meals for the road
crews, and handles all the preparations
and service for pre- and post-show
parties in the VIP lounge.
Lou Harris, Elvis Costello, REO
Speedwagon, Ramsey Lewis, McLaughlin/ DiMeola/ DeLucia, Santana,
Tammy Wynette, Tina Turner, Motels,
Dr. Hook, and. ..well, I'm sure you get
the picture.
... to Video
"We did a videodisk shoot for The
Ventures, which was strictly for sale in
Japan," continues Osterman. "The
Japanese want anything now that is
American Rock and Roll, and The
Ventures are especially popular there.
We also did a Home Box Office Country
Special with George Jones that is being
released this month [July, 1981]."
The room doesn't have its own video
gear, but does supply everything else.
An artist normally hires a video
company's mobile facilities to do the
shoot.
"For HBO's special we put an 8-foot
extension on the stage so that that
would give some depth to the shoot. We
hung extra lights, but not much more
than that. We had more than enough
AC power. We're well equipped for just
about anything."
In addition to shooting, the club can
also show videos as part of the
entertainment. The club has installed a
20- by 14 -foot video screen on the front
wall at stage left. Suspended from the
ceiling about 25 feet in front of the
screen is a custom-built three -tube ITC
projector. Tapes are replayed from a
Sony 3/4 -inch video cassette machine
located in the lighting booth, which is
extended in front of and slightly below
the balcony. Although most of the
videos have mono soundtracks, audio
feeds are dropped down to the house
console directly underneath the
lighting controls, and run through the
sound system.
"Because we have the equipment,"
explains Osterman, "the live shows are
getting more sophisticated." He cites
the following example:
"We had Lee Ritenour in last week
and, for his encore, he ran a video tape
of one of the songs off his new album.
We were showing the video ofhim at the
same time he was performing the song
live. You can do that in a big hall, but it
wouldn't have the same impact; it's
much more intimate here. Most
performers get off on it. They like the
feedback from the audience; they like
the closeness. As a result, they put on a
better show.
"We did one all -video night in
conjunction with another local FM
station, KROQ. We showed nothing but
New Wave and Punk. It was fun and
successful. The only drawback is that
we can't charge admission. As soon as
August 1981
www.americanradiohistory.com
-
--
Sound System and Acoustics
"This isn't really a night club," says
Jeff Forbes, resident monitor mixer.
"People think of this
as a concert hall. The
facilities are almost
on a par with what
you'd find out on the
road on a major tour.
Any big shows that
you'd see, like Chris
Cross, Ted Nugent,
Jeff Forbes
or the Tubes, use primarily what we have here the same
consoles, effects, and so on."
-
VIDEO SCREEN
STAGE
PLATFORM
MONITOR
DESK
KITCHEN
BAR
STORAGE
Figure 1: Floor plan of the Country Club, showing positions of the stage
area, house mixing postion, monitor desk, lighting booth and video screen.
need of reinforcement, so that it would
support the almost 1.5 tons of speakers.
Steel truss rods were added to the
already existing massive wood beams
to provide the required strength, but the
combination of high ceiling and cross
pieces still presents one or two
acoustical problems. Metal sheets
What this means to groups who play
there is that all they need for a show is
their backline amps, and instruments.
For the Country Club, it means a big
responsibility to ensure quality room
sound through dependable personnel
and equipment and, most of all,
efficient planning. Even in a tiny club,
that's a tall order. The Country Club
met the challenge, but the quality came
at no small price.
The building originally housed aSavOn Drug Store, and practically all of the
interior had to be restructured. As
previously mentioned, Wolf /Rissmiller
took over management duties after the
major reconstruction work was
completed. Unfortunately, a large
amount of detailed data, such as
electrical wiring schematics, was never
properly recorded and filed, and the
previous acoustical philosophies did
not meet with the specifications of the
new tenants.
TFA, a North Hollywood, California,
sound reinforcement company known
for their work at the California Jam
series of outdoor concerts, was
contracted to do the acoustical testing,
as well as to design, install, and
maintain the present sound system.
This includes a house console, monitor
station, outboard gear, power amps, a
flown speaker system, monitors, and
microphones.
When it was decided to fly the PA, the
ceiling was checked and judged to be in
attached to the underside of the roof
also create resonance effects, and may
eventually have to be shot with
acoustical foam to dampen out
vibrations.
The back wall of the main room (stage
left, as shown in Figure 1) is red brick.
The rest of the walls are also relatively
hard surfaces and, to date, possess no
visible acoustic treatment of any kind.
One -inch thick sheets of compressed
most likely Owens fiberglass
were mounted behind
Corning 703
the stage backdrop, above the lighting
system, and under the balcony where
the volumeis now 10 to 15 dB lower than
the rest of the hall.
The area above the balcony was
--
found to be deficient in high end, so
high-frequency horns needed to be
flown specifically to rectify that
balance.
After the initial set up, the house crew
took over many of the maintenance jobs
themselves. The fiberglass needed to be
painted to blend with the environment,
so the crew rented an airless and
sprayed the insulation. They did much
of the wiring for the patch bays, amp
racks, and outboard systems, and even
measured the walls of the stage and
hung curtains for increased acoustical
damping.
"We've all gotten the opportunity to
do a lot of the troubleshooting here,"
says Forbes, "so we're pretty good now.
We don't have anything as elaborate as
oscilloscopes, but we have VOMs to
check continuity, correct phase, and
voltage; that's about it. Anything that
has to be really tested is done by TFA,
because they're responsible if we have
any difficulties. Usually we can locate
what's wrong, and tell them if it's a bad
crossover, driver, or whatever. They'll
drop off the part, or put it in for us. The
majority of the time we'll do it ourselves,
because it saves us time. The club owns
the system, but, we [the crew] feel it's
our system, too, so we take care of it."
Stage Design and Layout
The 4 -foot high stage is 28 feet deep
from front to back, 43 feet wide, 17 feet
from floor to the beams above, and has
easily accommodated up to 30 -piece
acts. Stage manager Paul "Duff" Lord
feels that, "We probably won't ever be
able to do symphonies here, because the
wall at stage right cuts back too fast,
and limits the amount of space
available. But we're willing to try
anything."
AC power is 300 amp, 3 -phase (180
amps stage right; 120 left), accessible
from either Hubbell or Edison wall
jacks that are hidden by the stage wall
curtains. A separate 100 amp, 3-phase
line is ready for any audio or video truck
that pulls up to the back door.
As can be seen from Figure 1, the
stage is located in the corner of the
room, and was prone to resonate about
100 to 125 Hz. The crew reinforced the
under section with 2x4s and 4x4s. The
Figure 2: TFA /Soundcraft Series 111 house mixing console, equipped with
32 inputs, eight subgroups and two main plus eight effects outputs.
August 1981 R -e/p 51
www.americanradiohistory.com
club mues...
plugged into the original eight
amp room. If the levels get too high, we
have to bring the amp levels down to
avoid clipping, or blowing one out."
In the foot of the L -shape effects
console is a Technics M85 cassette deck,
an Eventide Harmonizer, Lexicon
Prime Time DDL, Court Acoustics
Spectrum Analyzer, and an Orban
Parasound Parametric Equalizer. Four
additional inputs and outputs are
provided for the act's touring effects.
Cassette tapes for music during the
breaks are kept on the far right in their
channels, and the sound check settings
are ready to go. It's certainly a
convenience, but it may be interesting
to note that it took three weeks to wire
the junction box!
House Console
performance area was floated by
glueing 3/4-inch foam over the entire
existing top, covering the foam with 3/4inch plywood, and then sealing that
with a durable paint which is replaced
every three or four months. There is no
more floor resonance.
To achieve a clean look, and all but
eliminate the possibility of any
musicians getting tangled in wires, the
monitor patches and some of the mike
patches are built into the floor. Under a
flush -mount trap door positioned on
each side of the stage, two retractable
monitor cables can be pulled out,
attached to the appropriate speaker
boxes, and allowed to return neatly into
the floor pocket. In that way, no excess
wire tempts a stray foot. Eight
microphone inputs are also available in
the same pockets. Although not
retractable, cable lengths can be
shortened to go directly from mike to
floor connection, and thus accomplish
the same end.
Four additional 8-input splitter boxes
are moveable, and generally assigned
specific groupings. A unique junction
box mounted on the wall behind the
monitor mix station lends flexibility,
and reduces set up time between acts.
It's actually a 32- channel microphone
patch bay that allows access through
XLR or multi -pin connectors. Since the
32 -input house board is broken down
into four groups of eight channels, in
effect each eight inputs has its own
remote box on stage. For example: one
splitter box may be used for the main
act's drum kit; one for the backline
amps; another for vocal mikes; and the
fourth for the opening act's trap set. The
other end of the splitter box's multicore
is a multi-pin connector that plugs into
the junction box feeding the control
boards. As a result, a drum set never has
to be torn down or set up during a
performance. The entire pre-miked kit
can be connected to the control board by
plugging in one multi -pin to the
junction box, once the drum riser
holding the trap set and mikes had been
moved into place.
Guitars, basses and keyboards are
approximately the same settings from
one music group to the next, and
therefore utilize the same patches.
If the headliner has a vocal blend that
demands the exact EQ and volume
settings for the main show that were
obtained during the sound check, the
front line mike splitter box can be
routed instantly to another eight
channels of the house console for the
opening act, simply by plugging the
multi -pin into another eight inputs at
the junction box. Before the headliner
returns to the stage, the connector is
R -e/p 52 August 1981
Mark Wilson is the resident house
sound engineer, although that doesn't
assure him that he'll be mixing sound at
every show.
"About two-thirds of the acts coming
through here have their own sound
man," he says. "Sometimes it's actually
harder for me to sit next to the guy all
night
and explain the room and
board to him than it is to do the mix
myself."
The house position is 45 feet out
from the stage, house right of center,
and sunk about two feet into the floor.
The mix console is a
TFA /Soundcraft Series III with 32 mike/
line inputs, and eight
subgroups, two main
outputs, and eight
effect outputs (Figure 2). Each input,
Mark Wilson
subgroups, and output is equipped with LED bargraph
meters, and insert points for interfacing
any piece of outboard gear. Every input
channel has four peak/dip -type equalizer filters, phase- reverse switch, a
20 dB pad, and a continuously variable
input trim attenuator.
All the standard house outboard gear
is flush mounted in an L- shaped
wooden console, about the same height
as the mix controls. From top to bottom
and to the right of the board is a dbx
Model 162 stereo compressor -limiter; a
208-point, normalled patch bay; a
digital clock; and an RTS intercom
system. The dbx is usally used for
compressing the snare, bass, and lead
vocals, to protect the power amps from
sharp transients when loud groups are
performing.
"Motorhead has to be the loudest
band in the world," Wilson offers.
"When they play here, I have to keep an
eye on the dbx all the time, and I have to
stay in touch with whoever is up in the
own case.
TFA graphed the room, and obtained
a fairly consistent soundfield.
- -
"There are hot spots," confides
Wilson, "but they're predictable. If you
were to draw a line parallel with the PA,
the sound would be about the same all
the way along that line regardless of
how close you are to the stage. There's a
dip in the high -end under the balcony,
which translates to about a 10 to 15 dB
drop, but I think it's a good idea to have
a quieter area with a good view of the
show.
"One thing I'd like to see is a more
punchy low -end around 125 Hz and
down. I don't think it would be boomy
with the room full. The flying cabinets
are all front-loaded, and you don't get
the feeling of the air physically moving
and hitting you. If they were reflex
cabinets or folded horns, I think the
audience would feel the sound more,
although sometimes when I'm mixing I
can feel the bass drum shaking the
board."
House Speaker System
TFA's design for the Country Club
consists of six full -range cabinets
arranged in an arc around the top of the
stage, with four front-fill boxes just
beneath the four middle -full ranges
(Figure 3). The tri- amped, full -range
cabinets are comprised:
Two JBL E140 15 -inch Bass
Drivers
Two JBL E120 12 -inch Extended
-Range Drivers
One TAD 2001
One Altec 511B Horn
And the bi -amped front -fills each
contain:
... continued overleaf
ir ~
ro(:)
HIGH FREOUENCY HORNS FOR BALCONY
ooO
HAO
HIE
PORTS
J
00
L_l-L'
, 5
,5
10 oo
110 oo
O
F.
OEEE
Figure 3: Flown sound system, comprising a pair of high-frequnecy horn
units, six tri-amped full-range cabinets, and four bi-amped front -fill
cabinets. The entire system is angled along its mid-axis, to provide
coverage throughout the club. In addition, the lower front -fills have
been tilted down to cover the front portion of the audience.
www.americanradiohistory.com
-
WHEN FOUR-TIME GRAMMY WINNER CARSON
TAYLOR GETS DOWN TO WORK WITH A
CONSOLE HE DEMANDS THE BEST. Whether its direct
to stereo or multitrack remix, the console is the central tool. Carson
Taylor's sound demands the finest tools.
And that's what you get from Audio Engineering Associates and
Soundcraft.
Consistent Performance: all boards from two buss to twenty -four
buss use the same advanced transformerless circuitry and high
quality parts.
Fast Set Up: all inputs and outputs are on connectors. Even the
biggest boards can be interfaced on a prewired basis within
minutes.
Rugged Construction: Soundcraft users report exceptional
reliability in the studio and on the road.
Excellent Documentation and Customer Service: No "secret"
components or mysterious proprietary circuits.
-
"Superclean, exceptional value."
Bob Wolstein, Gingerbread Studios
"I was impressed with how logical and well laid out the consoles are. I've
been using my Series 3, eight to ten hours a day, six days a week for two
years, and it's holding its own beautifully."
Mike Fisher, former live sound mixer
and co-producer with Heart
"Great sound in
a
-
compact board."
Jeff Peters, The Results
"Everything worked right out of the box. was especially impressed with
AEA. They supplied the cable and console manual ahead of time and
worked with me unpacking and setting the unit up."
Mike Dorrough, Dorrough Electronics
I
-
At Audio Engineering Associates, our sales engineers will help you find
the Soundcraft console that fits your needs. So call us and remember,
Grammies are made by excellent engineers using excellent equipment.
What are West Coast musicians and engineers saying about Soundcraft?
"The clarity appealed to me.
versatile."
It is very
quiet and the EQ is remarkably
-
Roger Meyer, Electra/Asylum
audio engineering airociater
1029 North Allen Avenue / Pasadena, CA 91104 / (213) 798 -9127
www.americanradiohistory.com
club Venues...
-
Front Fills ... continued
One JBL E130 15 -inch Extended Range Driver
One TAD 2001
One JBL 2308 Slant Plate Lens
One JBL 2312 Exponential Throat
The two high- frequency balcony
units, which are suspended above the
center of the rest of the flown system,
consist of:
One JBL 2420 Wide-Range Driver
One JBL 2355 Horn Assembly
There are seven Crest P3501 and two
P2501 power amps wired for two
channels of 3 -way active crossover,
using JBL model 5234 units. Total
house power is 6,500 watts.
Measurements at the house mix
location showed sound pressure levels
of 110 dB with no appreciable
distortion. TFA claims the frequency
response throughout the main seating
area is within 2 dB from 63 Hz to 2 kHz.
Starting at 2 kHz, a 3 dB per octave roll off is induced into the response of the
system, with a 2 dB fluctuation around
the prescribed curve. They made all
measurements with random noise in
third-octave bands. Room equalization
is handled with two White Model 4001
third-octave equalizers.
Monitor System
Stage left is the monitor mix station
built around a Soundcraft Series II
console, equipped with 24 mike /line
inputs, eight outputs, and features
similar to the house board (Figure 4).
Monitor engineer Jeff Forbes finds that,
"A lot o f groups say they all work off the
same mix. After I tell them I can give
them all their own mix, they're in
heaven, because now one guy can hear
the kick drum without the other four
guys having to hear kick, too. A third of
the acts are so demanding in terms of
what they want to hear in their
monitors, that they bring their own
mixer who knows the songs. I don't feel
there has been a monitor system
brought in that has been better than
ours. Some groups just have idiosyncrasies; they have to have their own
system."
Each of the bi-amped house monitor
wedges is comprised:
One JBL E130 15 -inch Extended
-Range Driver
One JBL 2441 Wide-Range
Top -End Driver
One JBL 2311 Exponential Horn
One JBL L94
The two tri- amped, side -fill cabinets
used primarily for the drummers mix
contain:
Two JBL E140 15 -inch Bass
Drivers
R-e/p 54 August 1981
Figure 4: Soundcraft Series H monitor console, alongside the rack-mounted KlarkTeknik graphic equalizers, Audioarts parametric EQ, plus Crest 3501, 2501 and Yamaha
P2101 power amplifiers.
Two JBL E120 12 -inch Extended
as they have to to hear themselves. If
-Range Drivers
One TAD 2001
One JBL 2390 Horn Assembly
Power for the eight monitor channels
is supplied by six Crest 3501, two Crest
2501, and four Yamaha P2101 amplifiers, providing a total of 4,500 watts.
The rack next to the monitor desk
houses eight Klark -Teknik third-octave
and two AudioArts parametric
equalizers.
"I have total flexibility," says Forbes,
"in the sense that I can patch anything
just about anywhere EQ to any input
or output, inputs to any channel, and
outputs to any amp."
TFA lists the frequency response for
the wedge design as being within 2 dB
from 63 Hz to 16 kHz, and 40 Hz to 16
kHz for the side-fills. SPL measurements are 127 dBA and 130 dBA,
respectively, readings being taken with
random noise in third-octave bands.
"The only problem wehaveis that the
groups play louder than they normally
would," Forbes continued, "because
they're used to performing in bigger
rooms. We tell them to play only as loud
Country Club
-
MICROPHONE INVENTORY
Pre -TFA installation:
Beyer 500
Beyer 400
Electro -Voice RE -15
Shure SM -81
Shure SM-62
Shure SM -58
Shure SM -57
Additional mikes,
post -TFA installation:
Shure SM -77
Shure SM -78
Electro -Voice RE -20
AKG D12
Beyer 201
.
Sennheiser MD421
2
.1
.1
1
2
4
2
6
4
4
2
2
4
www.americanradiohistory.com
they play loud enough for the guy on the
other side of the stage to hear, then we
have too much noise. We have monitors
to take care of that. If the guy on the side
can't hear, we raise the sound in his
monitors; that's what monitors were
designed for.
For mixing bass especially, we keep
the volume as low as possible on stage
[from the stage amp] and crank it up in
the monitor in front of the bass player.
That way the bass facing forward
doesn't interfere with the sound coming
from the house PA. Some of the groups
demand a lot of power. We haven't
blown anything in the house yet, but
I've been losing 15's every now and
then. Changing a driver takes about 5
minutes."
All AC grounds in the house are lifted,
and the equipment "see" their grounds
at the monitor board. Han artist brings
in his own monitors, the practice has
been to un- ground the house monitor
console, float the group's monitors (the
stage splitters have provisions for
lifting grounds), and tie everything to
the main house console out front.
Guitar amps, usually the primary
hum offenders, are almost always
miked, but bass, some keyboards and
some horns are direct -injected.
Depending on the prevailing conditions
of the day, grounds can be lifted at the
amp or in the DI.
According to Forbes, "A lot of
guitarists are mike-shy as a result of
getting severe shocks before. If their
equipment is not defective, we reverse
the polarity on their amps. The only
group we've had problems with was The
Vapors. Their gear came over from
England, and was impounded by
customs. They had to rent and borrow
what they could, and some of it was on
the flaky side. There were a couple of
shock problems in the middle of the
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Two delay ourpurs independently adjustable from 0 ro
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Complete mixing for delay and reverb processing, freeing up main console channels and rape racks
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Lexicon, Inc., 60 Turner Street
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Export Gotham Export Corporation, New York, New York
For additional information circle # 27
www.americanradiohistory.com
August 1981
R -e /p 55
club mues...
NOISE GATE GT -4
The remarkable low cost noise gate that is
so simple and economical to use
that people are finding new
applications for them every day.
show. We got around it by putting wind
screens over the mikes. As long as they
don't get the wind screens too wet, they
won't be shocked."
Lighting Rig
Use one
The lighting system was installed
when the club was first opened.
channel for each
mike in your P.A.
System and drastically increase loudness without
feedback. Gate your echo returns to adjust
decay time without running to the chamber.
Gate your cue feeds and rid the headphones of distracting hum and noise. Gate each
mike on the drum kit, the sound is spectacular!
For the full story and a list of dealers call or write
Omni Craft Inc. Rt. 4 Box 40, Lockport, Illinois 60441
(815) 838 -1285
1111
OMNI CRAFT
-
OMNI CRAFT INC.
RT. 4 BOX 40
LOCKPORT, IL. 60441
"I don't get many complaints,"
claims technical director Bob Walker.
"Groups are generally set back in shock
at the range of equipment available to
them. If someone comes in with a plot,
with a little bit of advance work we can
pretty much duplicate most road
designs. If a group comes in with their
own lights, they can plug into our
dimmers as long as they have regular
American stage -pin connectors."
The system is made by Century
Strand, and features a Micro Q lighting
board with 48 dimmers and 154 preset
capability. The instrument list includes
an assortment of Fresnels, Lekos, and
Pars
about 105 instruments
altogether. The two Follow Spots one
on each side of the balcony
are 575
watt HMI Satellite I's. Lighting power
capacity is 3- phase, 500 amp service,
and all the grounding is independent of
the audio ground.
According to Walker, "The main
problem so far is that we have to add
more lights to do video tapings. I'd like
to see another 50 or 60 instruments, a
rock and roll control board, and a patch
bay similar to an audio patch bay,
where we can plug a lamp into a circuit
and assign it to a dimmer. Then a video
crew could walk in with five cameras,
and we could give them whatever they
need. There's some positive talk about
upgrading in the near future."
815- 838 -1285
THE 1604 SATELLITE MIXER
- -
Group Needs and Reactions:
Chuck Mangione, the, headliner
Sphere
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R -e /p 56
Chatsworth, CA 91311
(213) 349 -4747
August 1981
www.americanradiohistory.com
during the two-week period I visited the
Country Club, usually plays larger
venues such as the Universal Amphitheater.
"I definitely like bigger rooms,"
states Larry Swist, Mangione's studio
and road engineer, "because there are,
for the most part, less low-frequency
hassles. The stage level in here just
seems too potent for us. There seems to
be a problem around 120 Hz down to
about 80. I'm dipping it out about 6 dB
in the main system. I tried to lift the
extreme bottom in here, but the system
couldn't support it. It doesn't couple
with anything flying up in the air like
that. The best I can hope for is to define
things a little better as they're coming
off the stage (Figure 5)."
Swist joined Chuck Mangione right
after the Children of Sanchez album,
which was released a little more than
®SM -57
Figure 5:
Stage Layout and Microphone
Selection and Position for
Chuck Mangione appearances.
E-V
RE-15
(Behind Horn
Directly in
®
0
SM -57
Bell)
a good show. Plus the audience that
comes to see the show ranges from 4years old to 84. We really can't hit them
with 120 dB.
"The overall reading I got from the
Court Spectrum Analyzer in the house
mixing pit was 90 to 95 dB SPL with the
RE-15
E-V
RE-15
OMBONFS
SM-57
DRUMS
Stare Gadd
SM 57
SM-57
®
,(Szp
á
SNARE: SM -57
HI -HAT: E -V RE -15
RACK TOMS: SM -56
FLOOR TOM: MD021
KICK: MD021 & SM -57
SM-S7I
®
~
LL
SM-57
®
o
_
SAX /FLUTE
Chris Vadala
O
SM-58
(Flute)
®®
SM-57
KEYBOARDS
Richard Tee
FLUGAL HORN
Chuck Mangione
®
(Sax)
SM -58
FENDER
RHODES
SM-57
40
three years ago. He recorded the later
material in the studio, and knows all the
nuances of the music.
"It's pretty much of a handstand to
keep the level down," he finds. "Chuck's
show is unique, because it's a
combination of acoustic [14 horns
including Chuck and saxophonist
Chris Vadala up front], and miked or
electric rhythm section instruments
[Steve Gadd on drums; Richard Tee,
Rhodes and Yamaha acoustic grand;
-
The LM -1 Drum Computer
a new breed of rhythm machine.
* Real Drum Sounds -digital recordings
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* 100 Drumbeats -all programmable in
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Grant Geissman, guitars; and Dave
Pilch, electric bass.] A correct balance
between live sound and reinforced
sound is critical to accurate fidelity and
high trumpet parts, and an occasional
loud solo reading about 100 dB. In the
context of the musical dynamics, this
level was, in my opinion, by no means
offensive or annoying. I also moved
around to every area in the club during
the show, and found I was able to
discern individual instumental parts
with little effort. The bass was not deep
and full, but certainly loud enough, and
very clean.
Just before I left the Country Club,
stage manager Paul Lord emphasized
the versatility of the club once more.
"In addition to these shows, we've
done live simulcasts with KMET; we'll
do another this Friday. We had the ON
subscription TV microwave for the
Leonard Fight that we showed here live.
The first week in September we plan on
broadcasting Roy Orbison live to 11
cities via satellite. That's aboutthe only
thing we haven't done yet, and it'll
require us putting a dish up on the roof.
I'm looking forward to that. I want to
operate the crane."
* Versatile editing
* Separate Outputs
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August 1981
For additional information circle
#
www.americanradiohistory.com
30
R -e/p 57
A
frame from Recent L i .. video synthesist
Michael Scroggins, sound by Jim Gable.
.
Adolf Scaller's interstellar artwork
Daniel Sofer's Silk Aurora Laserium effect ..
.
.
.
Laser/music sequence by Barney Kaelin ..
-"4UD/0/V/DEO-
.
John Allison's spot animated to the music
.
.
.
CODIt--
V. M. A.
This magazine has detailed in recent
issues that the coming revolution for
recording studios, engineers and
producers working in various areas of the
professional audio industry is video and
film; anybody who ignores the immense
creative
and financial
potential
offered by music -video production does so
at their own risk. In some cases, the visual
embellishment of an audio performance
by a band or solo artist can enhance their
appeal, and enable them to explore
exciting new possibilities in musical/
visual presentation. Recording studios
and producers are in a somewhat unique
-
-
position in this respect. Having
established a creative rapport during the
recording session, this affinity can be
tapped when (and if) the occasion arises to
take the production one stage further, and
record a visual "interpretation" of the
artist's music.
With the introduction of Warner Amex
Satellite channel dedicated to music visual presentations, and video cassette/
videodisk manufacturers searching for
alternatives to the traditional fare of
feature films and erotica, the question in
everybody's mind is: Where will the visual
software come from to satisfy the growing
demand? And, of equal importance, what
direction will creative visual music take in
the next decade?
While groups have been formed across
the country to address themselves to such
questions, it is perhaps inevitable that the
most active of these alliances is based in
Los Angeles America's audio recording
and motion picture capital. A group of
professionals working in music, film,
-
by Tom Seufert
video, photography, analog and computer
graphics, and promotion has gathered
together to form an organization known
as the Visual Music Alliance (V.M.A.).
The Visual Music Alliance was formed
to generate the kind of innovation
necessary to support a new art form.
Visual music promises to become one of
the most important types of software:
more creative than current music promos;
more involving than films
in other
words, simply more captivating than the
material currently available to the public.
It is important, however, to try to
describe /define just what visual music is.
-
Visual Music
- Its Historical Origins
In fact, visual music can take many
forms; it's almost easier to describe what
visual music isn't. But for the purposes of
this article let's postulate that visual
music is a dynamic art form combining
visuals and music, which interact in such
-
-
the author
Tom Seufert is a singer/songwriter, and
owner of Redwing Sound, a 24 -track
recording studio. He received a B.A. in
journalism /public relations from Cal
State University at Los Angeles, and
was signed as a solo artist to Epic and
Ariola America records. He has had a
Top Ten single in Holland with his
group, La Seine. Having co- founded
and organized the Visual Music
Alliance, Tom Seufert is currently
developing a major feature film that will
showcase visual music vignettes, with
music performed by his new group,
Trance.
www.americanradiohistory.com
a way as to achieve a unique effect that
would be impossible with either discipline
alone. In its ideal form, visual music is an
exciting combination of the two
disciplines,
each other
effective
they complement
-aswherein
each being as strong and
the other. This unique
combination of form, color, motion and
music promises unlimited avenues for
creative expression.
In 1734, a French -born Jesuit named
Louis Bertrand Castle built the first light
show projector, called the ClavessinOculaire. Castle also formulated a general
theory of color music, which was simply
the manipulation of color changes to
music. In 1895, an Englishman, Wallace
Rimington, patented a color organ that
employed 14 arc lamps, and pulled 150
amps of power! This device resembled a
church organ with additional switches,
relays and wires running-to arc lamps.
The real innovator and literal father of
visual music light shows, however, was
Thomas Wilfred. An American, born in
Denmark in 1889, Wilfred was the first
person to stress color, form and placement
of manipulated imagery with music. He
began experimenting with color music in
1905, and gave his first public performance in 1922. The audio- visual device he
built was called the Clavilux, and looked
rather like a large contemporary audio
mixing console, with massive levers and
knobs.
In more recent times, during the late
Sixties the Fillmore and Avalon Ballroom
in San Francisco regularly provided
audiences with an encompassing
... continued overleaf -
A work of art should be rewarded
with another work of art.
Introducing the Scotty Award.
The Scotty Award is an original oil portrait
commissioned for each of the best recording
artists in the business. It's a work of art as unique
as the honor it represents. And it represents
quite an honor.
Just to qualify, you have to master on Scotch®
Recording Tape and achieve RIAA gold or
platinum status. Even then, only a select few will
be chosen.
But these select few will not be the only ones
who win. A $5000 music scholarship will be
awarded by 3M to a promising new artist chosen
Magnetic A/V Products Division
by the Best of Show winner. An additional $1000
will be awarded by 3M to the Muscular
Dystrophy Foundation in the name of each
winning artist. And $100 will be awarded to
Muscular Dystrophy for each qualified nomination.
Who will the first Scotty Award winners be?
That's up to you. We're now accepting nominations
for recordings that reached gola or platinum
status during 1980.
So contact your 3M Field Representative for
details and nomination forms. Help the fortunate,
and the less fortunate, win a Scotty Award.
Scotch Recording Tape
Scotch" is a registered trademark of'3M.
3M Hears You
3M
August 1981
For additional information circle
=
31
www.americanradiohistory.com
R -e p 59
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TDK brings two new standards
to open reel.
Raising sound standards is nothing new to
TDK. For years, TDK cassettes have set reference standards in metal and high bias. Now
TDK announces two breakthroughs in open
reel -GX and LX. Both are formulated to be fully
compatible with your present system. You don't
have to rebias to appreciate them.
TDK GX Studio Mastering tape handles the
most critical demands of live music mastering
beautifully. TDK's new ultra refined ferric oxide
particle gives GX superior MOL, low distortion
and a wide dynamic range. Equallvimpressive is
TDK LX. Its super refined particle gives g high
performance with low noise and low distortion
throughout an extended frequency range. LX is
ideal for both professional and audiophile use.
The refinements don't stop with the
© Copyright 1981
R -e/p 60
TDK Electronics Corp., Garden Ciiy. J
`r
formulations. A unique calendering and
binding process rivets the particles to the tape
surface, making dropouts practically a thing
of the past. A special graphite and carbon
backcoating, found on all GX and most LX tapes,
reduces friction for the smoothest possible
winding. At the same time, it prevents static
discharge and reduces wow and flutter.
These high standards are carried through to
the newly designed 10" metal and 7" plastic
reels. Each has a separately molded hub and
flange to ensure circularity and high strength. If
you think open reel has gone as far as it can go,
listen to the finest. TDK GX and LX. They could
open up a whole new
standard of recording
excellence.
11530
August 1981
For ,additional information circle # 32
www.americanradiohistory.com
&TIDK
--74UD/0/V/DEO
AUDIO/VIDEO PERSPECTIVES
by Martin Polon'-
Over the last year, sagging audio disk sales have impacted all levels of the record
industry, from studio production to disk -pressing. To survive financially, record
merchandisers have adopted sales of non -traditional items such as video
cassettes, posters and even plug -in game cartridges for Mattel and Atari
computers. And all of this at a time when recording studios have the best equipped
mixing facilities in history: 24- and 32 -track recording with computer mixdown is
commonplace. Digital recording of studio sessions is becoming an accepted
practice. Home audio systems have more amplifier power, with less distortion
driving better speakers than ever before. Turntables, cartridges and tuners
produce audio signals of studio fidelity. But the question that remains: "Why with
all this quality is the record industry still in the disk doldrums ?"
The answer involves several separate issues, such as a dearth of powerhouse
recording super -groups, but focuses on the confusion of the record -buying public.
The four skeletons in the quad closet are trotted out regularly by the consumer
press, as is the parallel spectre of "just how bad" regular records are today. Even
the record industry and the home Hi -Fi manufacturers have begun to believe the
chain- reaction view that "standard" records are dead. This form of professional
incest, coupled with the public's confusion, has brought the life of the LP record full
circle in approximately 30 years. The result is an apathy towards conventional vinyl
records that is now perceived as a reality to be transcended only by the much
promised, but seldom seen, digital disk.
The public is being asked, first to consider the ownership of four different disk
players for the home. The basic analog LP record player will remain a household
necessity for the millions of records already sold, and the millions more that will be
bought by those unwilling to pay the premium for digital quality. Then, there will be
a state -of- the -art digital disk player for digital disks. Next, the well- equipped home
will possess a video disk player of some type for the pre -recorded video
entertainment. Lastly, there will be a digital player to put computer software into
the home computer; possibly a Winchester hard -disk, or mini-floppy drive. The
disk question of the decade is: Will the public accept four separate units that play
disks, when one player could do it all? What the audio -video recording industry
needs, from studio to store, is sales. A common disk standard, like the Philips audio
cassette, could mean sales of hardware and software in the billions. A single digital
player that would utilize disks for audio, video and home computer software would
pump life back into the business of making and selling records.
A single -disk standard is exactly what the consumer electronics industry does
not have at this time. There are three different audio -ready, non -compatible video
disk systems. The RCA SelectaVision system, although ostensibly the most
affordable in price, lacks the video motion control and still -frame capability of its
two more expensive competitors. But, the RCA CED (capacitive -electronic disk)
system has the advantage of nearly conventional disk pressing techniques, and
would offer high -quality stereo reproduction in an audio -only mode. Currently, the
RCA system is without stereo audio accompanying the video. The 10,000 groove
record is tracked directly and physically by a capacitive pickup; the diamond pickup requires eventual replacement.
The Philips /MCA /IBM /Pioneer laser- tracked video disk would offer two- or fcurchannel audio in an audio -only mode with one- to two -hour capacity. There is no
direct contact with the optical laser, and the multiple motion and groove
indentification would lend itself well to identifying audio selections. The platter
itself is assembled from two separate sides adhesively sealed, making disk
production complex. The disk uses an optical coating, eliminating the need for a
cardboard caddy used by the RCA and VHD systems.
IBM's involvment with videodisks is explained by their enormous data storage
capacity; some 100 times greater than conventional media. The Pioneer laser disk
player has a companion data adapter available for computer usage.
The VHD system, developed by Matsushita subsidiaries JVC and Panasonic,
utilizes an electomagnetic tracking system with an invisible "grooveless" groove. It
has the widest range of playing time, multiple -sound channels, and control and
speed functions. However, it will not be available on the American market until
early in 1982, while the RCA and laser disk systems can be purchased today.
A fourth audio -video disk system of sorts is based on the Philips-MCA format,
made and marketed by Sony for industrial use. Over 4,000 have been sold to Ford
Motor Company for training and communications for Lincoln- Mercury dealers.
Sony will handle mastering and pressing of the audio -video disks.
There are several digital audio disk systems being heavily promoted at this time.
The Philips /Sony Compact Disk system seems to have the best chance of
becoming a standard, but there is strong pressure from other manufacturers to
delay reaching a standard decision now. Other proposed units include the AEGTelefunken Mini -Disk, which has some similarities to the RCA CED video disk. In
addition, Victor of Japan (JVC) is showing an audio pulse-code modulation
decoder for its VHD video disk system. Pioneer has a mini -optical audio disk player
as well. There is a potential for a non -disk optical card, played by an optical
... continued overleaf
-
www.americanradiohistory.com
environment of music and visuals. In
those drug- influenced psychedelic days,
many rock groups, including Jefferson
Airplane and Grateful Dead, often
employed live visuals to augment their
concerts. Recently, laser shows have
become popular with some larger rock
acts.
Animation and Films
Back in the late Twenties, a man named
Oskar Fischinger was developing
animation techniques that would
eventually be used in one of the most
successful animated visual music pieces of
all time: Fantasia. Although initially
misunderstood by the critics, Walt
Disney's Fantasia, with its unique use of
moving animated imagery, color and form
set to music, ultimately became a classic.
Many other film experimenters, including
Fritz Lang, Norman McLaren and others
working in Europe, were delving into the
special world of effects and collages,
which were often combined with music.
More recently, the Beatles' films, Hard
Days Night and Help, set a precedent for
popular recording groups to visually act
out certain songs against some sort of plot.
Eventually, artists would employ these
and other techniques to produce music
promotional pieces. Woodstock, the music
film, was a socio-musical documentary
that proved to be a groundbreaker.
Although these aforementioned films
could not be accurately termed visual
music per se, nevertheless their
contribution to expanding the horizons of
visual music must be recognized.
Film Special Effect Sequences
Employing Music
In some cases, it becomes difficult to
draw a hard line between film scoring and
visual music. Many popular and unique
films have used stunning special-effect
sequences coupled with music and /or
sound effects. The majority of films,
however, use music more as background or
"muzak." The slit-scan tunnel and other
special effects used in Stanley Kubrick's
2001, A Space Odyssey represent unique
imagery presented with classical music.
In the Demon Seed, Julie Christie is
electronically assaulted by a computer,
during which sequences the abstract
analog graphics and sound effects are
particularly effective. There are numerous
examples of films that contain sequences
that may be interpreted as a form of visual
music.
Potential Outlets for Visual Music
Io
Before discussing how the V.M.A.
foresees the market for visual music z
developing over the next decade it would ç
be worthwhile to document the various o
media channels which, we predict, will
provide viable outlets for our work.
August 1981 R -e/p 61
-
proposed videodisk systems
the
MCA /Magnavox laser-disk Disco Vision,
RCA's grooved capacitive format
SelectaVision, and the Matsushita's VHD
--74UD/0/V/DEO
-
V. M. A.
mNJGId GeO.M
1)
MEAN
Television Networks. Although
there are several programs currently
being aired on network TV that feature
music promotion video, plus specially
staged studio presentations, by and large
these shows are run late at night on
weekends Rock Concert and Solid Gold
being good examples of the kind of show
seen on the West Coast. However, faced
with increasing competition from the
newer specialist cable stations springing
up around the country, the Networks are
going to be forced to increase the
frequency
as well as improving the
quality and content of such television
-
re
e
o
-
\
-
shows.
Cable Networks. Warner-Amex was
scheduled to begin delivery of a dedicated
24 -hour music -video satellite channel
MTV: Music Television
on August 1 of
this year. It plans to provide stereophonic
Dolby- encoded sound in conjunction with
cable's first all -music channel.
3)Specialist Clubs. Clubs specializing in
live music have been running music video
for quite a while now particularly some
of the more progressive New York
establishments
and are providing an
2)
a
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R -e/p 62
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important outlet for music -video
-
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Ca
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SP
-
-
-
member, Quantum Leap, Venice,
California, plans to construct a new visual
"environment," which will feature
hemispherical, multi -screen projection.
Similar centers can be expected to spring
up as an increasing number of people
AUDIO /VIDEO PERSPECTIVES
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-
composers. Such establishments frequently make use of large- screen projectors,
being fed from professional-quality 3/4-inch
video cassette machines.
4) Videodisk. Of the three currently
ere'14
Se
-
-
grooveless capacitive technique
only
manufacturers of VHD hardware appear
to be presently seeking out innovative
visual music presentations. Music-video
software for the pair of presently available
formats DiscoVision and SelectaVision
is rather limited, apart from one or two
notable exceptions, including Ron Hays'
Odyssey.
Without doubt, however, the videodisk
software market for visual music will grow
rapidly over the next decade once the
manufacturers of such players discover
the marketing possibilities offered by this
new art form.
5) Multi- media. As well as the
"traditional" domestic outlets available
for video promos, we foresee a growing
number of specialized presentations
developing over the next few years.
Various laser shows around the country
have illustrated what can be achieved
with the application of visual "embellishments" for well -known pieces of
(usually) rock music albeit with the use
of high -technology laser systems operated
under computer control. Such environments will proliferate during the next
decade, we predict, and would provide an
ideal vehicle for the showing of complex
multi -media visual-music compositions.
By way of an example, one VMA
by Martin Polon
scanner, from the Soundstream group. Other systems are in development or
testing.
Even if the professional recording area is surveyed, the digital standards problem
does not appear to be any better. While Sony, Studer, and MCI have linked up fora
professional multitrack commonality as well as Mitsubishi and AEG -Telefunken
with a different system
none of these professional systems are compatible.
Neither are the 3M or the Soundstream systems compatible with any other
professional system or grouping of systems. In a word, no standards or
compatibility at the consumer or professional level.
Although it may appear as bitter medicine for the recording and consumer
electronics industries, the solution to the sales doldrums and the key to a healthy
future in a decade of competitive high -technology entertainment is going to
revolve around two standards. There can be a standard for consumer disks, and a
standard for professional recording. But, there must be some kind of standards.
Consumer audio disk equipment has to be inexpensive and attractive, and the
software affordable. The fact that the digital disk or the video disk is good will not
be sufficient to guarantee success; success comes only with the mass marketplace.
Looking back, we find that quadraphonic sound was good; so was the recording
and playback performance of the '/4-inch Elcaset. The measure of success in the
marketplace will rest with consumer acceptance. It is not the Electronic Industries
Association of Japan or the Audio Engineering Society that purchases home
electronics; it is the world consumer, and the consumer is going to purchase only
those entertainment appliances that truly provide a service.
The incredible success of the personal portable audio market, buoyed by
Walkman -type tape- players and FM stereo radios with lightweight mini headphones, has shown that audio is not "dead," contrary to the reports of its
skeptics. Like Mark Twain, who objected that the "reports of my death were greatly
exaggerated," the audio industry needs only to agree on a direction and move with
it. That done, the audio entertainment industry will stand equal with video and
home -computing in moving towards the 21st Century.
-
August 1981
www.americanradiohistory.com
-
become turned on to the exhilarating
experience of such multi-media shows.
are two examples of live- concert footage
that was edited and released as a feature
film.
Where Visual Music Is At The Moment
It's very important to keep in mind that
not all the following examples will fit
squarely into the visual music definition.
And, since that is to be expected, these
categories should be taken as representing
relative visual music types.
Conventional Lip -sync Shoots
These are the standard promotional
films currently to be seen on television or
cable networks. Such promos are shot on
video tape or film transferred to tape. The
Knack's first video of their song, My
Sharona, represents a good example of a
group of artists lip -syncing to a prerecorded performance. The audience gets
to see the group from many different
angles, coupled with creative staging,
lighting effects and editing. The range of
conventional lip -sync shoots can run from
Old Hat, to New Wave, to Experimental.
However, it is not so much visual music as
it is a promotional tool used to sell the
artist and the song.
Live Concert Footage
A live music concert is either filmed,
videotaped or broadcast live, and can be
very effective as entertainment when an
artist gives a great performance. This is
because footage of a live concert can carry
an aura of authenticity and interest not
usually generated with lip -sync promotional films. The Last Waltz and No Nukes
-
we delve
Lip -sync or Live With
Conceptual Imagery
This is an area of music promotional
pieces that comes closer to the concept of a
true alliance between visuals and music
than any of the preceding forms. Live or
lip- synced footage of a group can be
combined with a concept or storyboard
that helps visualize the song's music and
lyrics. When this is accomplished
effectively and tastefully, the results can
be most interesting. The Buggles' Video
Killed The Radio Star, David Bowie's
Ashes to Ashes, and the Boomtown Rats' I
Don't Like Mondays represent attempts to
creatively visualize a piece of music, while
still promoting the artist's physical
presence. Although the future promises
more innovation in this area, the sheer
expense shooting such a video can impose
serious limitations; many state -of-the -art
video promos cost in excess of $25,000 per
song!
into any further detailed
examples of these techniques, let's take a
look at what's potentially available:
Digital and computer processing
and graphics
Analog Processing and graphics
Lasers Imagery and Spatial Projection
Animation and Pixilation
Special Artwork and Animation Stand
work
3 -D and Holographic Processes
Specialized Film Techniques
Many of these techniques can be used
with either film or video tape, and have
specific advantages and disadvantages
for each medium. Of course, many new
techniques are being developed and old
secrets are being constantly refined, so the
above is really only a partial list.
1)Digital Processing and Graphics.
Digital processing of video tape is now
employed in many video post-production
facilities to shape and affect images.
Sometimes entirely new textures and
images are generated with these
Specialized Techniques/
techniques. The drawback of such units,
The Surreal and Abstract
There exists an incredible array of however, is their high cost: exclusive of
special effects and techniques potentially other production gear needed, the price
available for visual music. The main can run from $75,000 to $250,000, and
problem, however, is that many of them possibly beyond. Several companies
are very expensive. High -resolution manufacture computer-assisted sketch
computer scene simulation of the sort that pads which allow an artist to "draw"
was used to produce, for example, KCET
and Pyramid Films logo, are out of reach
directly in the video domain, using floppy-
... continued overleaf -
NEOTEK
While we think there are many good
reasons
for the average filmmaker or visual-music
a 30- second sequence might
producer
cost close to $100,000 or more! But, before
for choosing NEOTEK
consoles, one fact above all has been
conclusively established: When it
comes to sound, nothing compares to
the quality of a NEOTEK.
DISTRIBUTED IN THE MIDWEST BY
FLANNER'S PRO -AUDIO
Broadcasters such as WFMT /Chicago and WNET /New
York as well as production companies such as Dick and
Burt and John Doremus Associates find that the clarity
from their NEOTEK consoles is superior, even over the
air. In addition to production /syndication work,
NEOTEKs are used in regular remote broadcasts, such as
the Chicago Lyric Opera and specials like the 1980
Chicago Jazz Festival broadcast over their satellite
system by National Public Radio.
All of these users and applications are but a part of the
unequalled reputation for quality and value which comes
standard on every console bearing the name NEOTEK. If
you are involved in broadcast, recording, theater, sound
reinforcement, or film sound, NEOTEK is a name you will
hear more often. Being one of the largest NEOTEK
dealers in the country, Flanner's Pro -Audio can provide
the expertise, product, consultation, service and
installation help needed to select and set up the right
NEOTEK console for your needs. Call us TOLL FREE. We
can tell you all about the many NEOTEK models and their
options. You'll be surprised just how affordable a new
NEOTEK console can be!
Your Source For The Finest Broadcast And Recording Equipment
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2500 N Mayfair Rd. P.O. Box 26005 Milwaukee, WI 53226
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800-558-088Q,
August 1981
For additional information circle # 34
www.americanradiohistory.com
R -e/p 63
-74UD/0/V/DEO
colored abstract imagery. Animations are
either projected on screens or into the air to
usually reserved for feature films or high budget commercials.
shooting beams of light. Such effects have
been used in TV commercials, and motion
pictures such as Outland, Cheech And
Chong's Next Movie, Star Trek
The
Motion Picture, and others. Laser systems
cost between $30,000 and $100,000.
4) Animation and Pixilation, or the
moving of inanimate objects using stopmotion techniques to create the illusion of
movement, are effective vehicles for the
imagination. Because they can involve
original artwork, such techniques are
flexible to surreal and abstract appli-
But What Does The Audience Want?
"They don't know what they want, but
they know what they like," is a phrase
often heard in Hollywood agents' offices.
create
V. M. A.
oc man
dopa
disk storage as well as video tape.
Computer graphics represent the highend of visual imagery and effects, since
some systems offer incredible resolution.
Information International, Inc. presently
has such a system available with a 4,000 -
line resolution, compared to 525 lines on
domestic television receivers. Hence, it is
feasible to generate graphics with a
computer, and project a high -quality
image onto a large screen without the
graininess usually associated with an
enlarged video. Computer generated and
enhanced imagery is used frequently in
television commercials.
2) Analog processing and graphics
achieve their own particular look and feel.
Ron Hays, a visual -music designer,
employed both analog and digital effects
and imagery on his recent videodisk
release, Odyssey.
3) Lasers Several laser entertainment
companies have achieved success
presenting live performances of laser
visual music. These laser shows use
abstract imagery performed in accompaniment to music. Red, green, blue and
yellow laser beams, generated by krypton
and argon ion lasers, are directed through
electro-optical devices that create multi-
3 -D
light "sculptures," and
-
cation.
5) 3 -D and Holographic Processes
are software vehicles that hold the
promise for whole new dimensions for
entertainment and visual music. Current
research points to major breakthroughs
soon in 3 -D television, and projected three dimensional moving pictures.
6) Specialized Film Techniques is a
grab bag heading for any techniques not
already mentioned, and encompasses
many of the "miracles" you've witnessed
in such films as Star Wars and The Empire
Strikes Back. It includes computer -
controlled camera work (space ships
zipping around the heavens), streaking
(used in the film Resurrection), Matte work
(used to create cities and background
landscapes), optical work, and many other
techniques too numerous and complicated
to mention here. Because such techniques
are costly and time consuming, they are
Visual Music Alliance Membership
Currently, the VMA has an active
Signal- Processed
Audio
Exclusive
Technique for
eliminating
dropouts
R -e/p 64
PROFESSIONALS
WHO TRY HME . . .
BUY HME.
h
performances of top music groups have
sometimes fared a little better with the
public: for example, Woodstock, The Last
Waltz, and No Nukes.
An ironic quote from the late Twenties
states: "...it's not that people waited for
the radio, but that the radio waited for the
people..." (taken from Brecht, Theory of
Radio, 1927). People are waiting for visual
music; they just haven't experienced it yet.
The fact remains, however, that the
technology exists today to create
visual music.
WIRELESS MICROPH
THAT WORK
These are the actual words that hundreds of
professional end -users and dealers have used
to describe their HME experience.
Who are our users? Academy Award -winning
Hollywood mixers, network audio engineers
and sound men for Broadway and Las Vegas
productions. We'll send you a users list with
product literature on request.
Once they tried our systems and compared them
to the other wireless microphones, they bought
HME. Call Dale Scott and ask for a demo. We
know you'll buy an HME system too.
Feature films that showcase live
amazingly diverse and entertaining
"I'VE NEVER USED A
TfflS
But there are different audiences for
specifically produced promotional music
pieces. The visual and/or music artist
wants to visualize themselves and their
music in such a way that an image and
statement is created. The record/distribution complex (which usually finances the
promo) wants a product that can gain
exposure for their artist, look like a million
and cost less than $10,000 per song. Even
so, record companies are keenly aware
that because of skyrocketing touring
costs, a less expensive way to glean
exposure for their acts in many diverse
markets is to distribute promotional video
tapes of selected artists.
On the whole, the American public is
somewhat apathetic about rock music
shows and "promo" clips in general. With
one or two notable exceptions, few of these
promos warrant viewing more than once.
e
HM ELECTRONICS, INC.
6151 FAIRMOUNT AVE.
SAN DIEGO, CA 92120
PHONE (714) 280 -6050
TELEX: 697 -122
membership of some 50 individuals and
organizations , the majority of whom are
somehow involved in the production of
visual music. A brief rundown of the
various categories into which these people
fall will illustrate the talents being
harnessed by the VMA.
Multi -media Production
As mentioned previously, Quantum
Leap, with members Jerome Armstrong
and Alan Kozlowski, represents a good
example of a company actively engaged in
helping visual music, move beyond the
traditional small- screen format, and into
larger, more ambitious presentations.
Quantum Leap is also one of the leading
multi -media production centers on the
West Coast, and has been involved in the
production of many promotional
campaigns for large corporations, such as
MCA and Paramount.
Film Special Effects Director
Artist and musician/composer John
Allison was the supervising artist for Carl
Sagan's PBS series Cosmos. (He also
contributed sound effects for the
programs.) He's currently developing an
original videodisk concept of his own
music and visual designs. Allison's
expertise in special effects has helped
other VMA members to come to grips with
August 1981
www.americanradiohistory.com
r
Queen of the Angels, comprised a poem
written by science -fiction author Ray
Bradbury and narrated by Charlton.
Heston, with musical accompaniment by
Hudson.
using the visual medium to its full
potential.
Artist
Adolf Schaller is an extraordinary artist
who was responsible for much of the
artwork used on Cosmos, for which he also
functioned as a supervising artist.
Schaller composes music and, with a
Laser Company
Barney Kaelin of Laser Magic
planetary geologist from the Jet
Propulsion Laboratory, is currently
working on a book about the solar system
as seen anew by the most recent planetary
probes.
-
Video Synthesis
Stephen Beck is a pioneer of visual
music and inventor of the Beck Direct
Videosynthesizer, which creates images
from circuit cards that control the color,
shape, textures and movement of the
images. He is also the president of a
computer company, Beck Tech.
Denise Gallant, of Synopsis, is a video
synthesis composer, director and
technician, who has worked on a video
promotion for the band Suburban Lawns,
entitled Janitor. She has also worked on
video pieces with Brian Eno, provided
visual accompaniments to live music
presentations in San Francisco and Los
Angeles, and prepared animation
sequences for Theta Cable Television.
Musicians
Garth Hudson, ex- organist with The
Band, recently completed the music for a
special environmental exhibit designed by
Tony Duquette, which took the form of a
bicentennial gift to the City of Los
Angeles. The piece, entitled Our Lady
Have You
Seen
This Man?
Productions specializes in laser visual
music. He has created laser special effects
for major studios, including Universal,
Walt Disney and Paramount, with laser
work for Buck Rogers, Black Hole and Star
The Motion Picture. CBS Records
Trek
recently used his "laser tunnel" effect in a
video promo tape and commercial for
Michael Jackson.
Hardware Developers /Software
Producers
Peter and Coco Conn, of Homer and
Associates, have spent the last two years
developing a 24-channel visual mixing
console with digital frame storage. This
device functions as a preview optical
printer that enables visual mixes of up to
24 channels of film and slide material. The
company is currently involved in a
videodisk project for EMI Videograms, as
well as having done numerous promotional films for most of the major record
companies.
Digital Scene Simulation
Richard Taylor and Mark Jaffe of
Information International Inc., Culver
City, California, work with a high resolution digital scene simulator, which
has been used to produce, among other
things, logos for Los Angeles PBS station
KCET and Pyramid Films. Taylor and
.. video music producer/artist Gary McKinnon
(now with Image West) setting up a specially
drawn piece of artwork, in which various scales
of gray will later be used to trigger up to eight
levels of color to produce different specialeffects.
Jaffe have also handled special effects
scenes for such films as Looker and Trott.
The system, which has a horizontal
resolution of more than 6,000 lines, and
vertical resolution of 4,000 lines, is ideal
for eventual projection via film.
Visual Music Composers
Jbhn Whitney, one of the acknowledged
pioneers in the field of visual music, has
developed an art form he calls "motion
graphics." His recently published book,
Digital Harmony, is concerned with the
complementary nature of music and
visual art. He has produced many well known experimental visual -music films,
including Permutations, and Arabesque,
using a mechanical analog computer as
well as working with current state- of -the-
art equipment.
... continued on page 68 -
He is known for designing and building the most successful
recording facilities all over North America!
THE FORMULA:
Good design quality acoustical construction
superior recording studio.
(no middlemen).
Rudi is on the job from concept to reality
Below are some of his more recently completed projects:
--
-
--
Studios and Film Mix, New Studio D
Chicago Recording
Florida, New Studio
Bayshore Recording
Wisconsin, New Studio
The Shade Tree
California, New Studio
Group Four
Missouri, New Studio
KBK Earth City Studios
Tennessee, New Studio
Ground Star (Ronnie Milsap)
California, Two New Studios
Rumbo Recording (Captain & Tennille)
California, Studios D and B, Control Room A
Village Recording
California, New Studio
Frank Zappa
Calgary, New Studio, Redesigned
Smooth Rock Studio
Encino, California, New Studio
Rick Davies (Supertramp)
Sherman Oaks, California, New Studio
Gardenrake (Jay Graydon)
-
- -
- ---
-
For information, please call
RUDI BREUER
He goes to any length to get the
job done right the first time!
(805) 273 -3792
License No. 238315
employing your ideas as well!
you
We work with
-
For additional information circle # 36
www.americanradiohistory.com
August 1981
R -e/11
A DECADE OF EXPERIENCE AND PROGRESS
CONSOLES:
WESTLAKE AUDIO HAS JUST
COMPLETED ITS MOVE INTO ITS
NEW 13,000 SQUARE FOOT SALES
AUDITRONICS
DDL /EFFECTS:
SOUNDCRAFT
GML NOVA - YAMAHA - SOUND
WORKSHOP - TASCAM - U.R.E.I.
FACILITY. THE FACILITY OFFERS
COMPLETE DEMONSTRATION,
SALES AND SERVICE FOR OVER 100
MAJOR MANUFACTURERS OF
PROFESSIONAL AUDIO EQUIPMENT.
-
- LEXICON - DELTA LABS
MARSHALL - SCAMP
EVENTIDE
-
-
MXR
-
ECHO CHAMBERS:
MODULAR AUDIO (MAP)
AKG
-
ECHO PLATE - EMT - MICMIX
- ORBAN - LEXICON
(MASTER ROOM)
//mtriluni
Scotch
AMPLIFIERS:
AB SYSTEMS
-
CROWN
-
H
&
H
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BGW
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U.R.E.I.
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BRYSTON
YAMAHA
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JBL
MARK LEVINSON
MAGNETIC TAPE:
AMPEX
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3M
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NAKAMICHI
TAPE RECORDERS:
SYNCHRONIZERS AND
AUTOMATION:
AMPEX - OTARI - SOUNDCRAFT
TASCAM - TECHNICS
BIX - ALLISON RESEARCH - SOUND
WORKSHOP - GML NOVA
CASSETTE /CARTRIDGE
RECORDERS:
TEST EQUIPMENT:
EUMIG
INSTRUMENTS - INOVONICS
- U.R.E.I - CROWN
TEST TAPES:
MRL
-
NAKAMICHI
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AMPEX
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NAKAMICHI
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TECHNICS
UMC BEAUCART
BPI
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AMBER
SOUNDER
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WHITE
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NOISE REDUCTION:
DOLBY
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MICROPHONES:
AKG
- SONY - ELECTRO -VOICE
SCHOEPS - NEUMANN SENNHEISER - HME WIRELESS SHURE - BEYER - MILAB - CROWN
"PZM" - WRIGHT
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HEADPHONES:
AKG
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SENNHEISER
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KOSS
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BEYER
CULVER
www.americanradiohistory.com
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DBX
NAKAMICHI
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INOVONICS
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TELCOM
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TTM
IVIE
1111111111111V
All
11."1711111
www.americanradiohistory.com
MN/
LI INN
No doubt you've heard of us. Many of
you have worked with our boards. The
purpose of this brochure is to reacquaint
or formally introduce you to our full line of
consoles.
From the industry accepted portable
Model 1S to our most advanced automation ready Series 2400, we design
and manufacture all of our products in
London, England. Our only business since
1973 has been to produce the most
useful, reliable and technically advanced
pro audio equipment that doesn't cost
outrageous pounds...or dollars. With this
philosophy, we have become the largest
selling console brand in Europe.
Within our line, there's a console you
should get your hands on. Fixed installation or traveling, a Soundcraft board is
built to take the incredible demands you
ask of a fully professional audio mixer.
The Soundcraft Challengers
More for Less
Soundcraft Series 2400, 800, 400 and 1S
consoles are sophisticated designs
sharing many common features.
Transformerless MIC input, electronically balanced insures the lowest
possible level of noise, excellent
transient response and high frequency
common mode rejection.
MIC phase reversal switch corrects for
out of phase mic pickup in multimicrophone situations or miswired mics.
Detented potentiometers with 41
precision positions except for pan and
amplitude pots which are center
detented.
Push button switches throughout.
Long -travel faders.
www.americanradiohistory.com
four band equalization, high and
low frequency shelving with sweep able high and low mid -range. EQ may
be switched in or out, independent of
the high pass filter.
High resolution LED bargraph meters
standard on Series 800 and 400,
switchable for Peak or VU.
Continuous ribbon cable connecting
each module.
Full
Our top -of- the -line, split console.
Available in a 16 buss, 24 -track monitoring
or a full 24 buss version. Because of its
unique design, the Series 2400 is like
getting two consoles in one...it can be
what you want it to be, when you need it.
All monitor /output modules have full EQ
which allow you to use these modules to
build your final mix...or even use them as
additional inputs when you're ready to
add your second tape machine! Unlike
other split consoles, the Series 2400 is
compact enough for one engineer to
reach everything, but flexible enough for
two men to work it without getting in
each other's way.
The Series 2400 is ready for optional
Soundcraff automation and bargraph
metering which includes a 27 band 1/3
octave spectrum analyzer. (Standard with
VU's.)
Get your hands on a Series 2400 and
you will know why it's called "The
Challenger"
The Series 800
is
a
compact 8
buss
console available in 18, 26 or 32 input
mainframes and can be configured for
16
track recording, sound reinforcement or
stage monitoring...with no compromises
in performance or quality. In fact, the
Series 800 is built using the same quality
components that go into the Series 2400.
The Series 800 18 in/8 out fits in 31/2 feet of
space and the full bore 32 in /8 out takes
less than 6 feet. More for less!
The Series 400 is a fully modular 4 -buss
console for up to 8-track recording and
for sophisticated sound reinforcement,
available in two mainframes, up to 18
inputs or up to 26. Series 400 has more
facilities than any other console in its
class. All controls are laid out logically
and are easy to use. Outputs and
playback are nominal +4 dBv, but the
console may be ordered with -10 dB.
Another example of how Soundcraff
offers more for less.
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The ultimate traveling SR console.
Available in 12, 16 or 20 input formats with
stereo outputs, plus three effects outputs.
XLR type inputs with a 20 dB mic pad
followed by a variable gain amplifier,
combined with a hi -pass filter. 4-band EQ
standard, 2-band on outputs. Peak clipping
LED's and channel switching. Optional
conductive plastic faders available. Balanced output available with optional
transformers. Available in walnut case as
shown or durable aluminum flight case.
More...for the asking.
Comprehensive brochures with
engineering details and full specifications
and features on each Soundcraff console
are available for the asking. We want you
to compare our consoles to anyone's with
the confidence that when you do, you
will readily see why we claim that with
a Soundcraff console you receive MORE
FOR LESS. Much more.
Specifications
Series 2400
Mic pre-amp, -30dBv In. +4dBv out
Channel line In to mix out, + 4dBv In. +4dBv out
40f2 0008.
1kHz 0.008.
40Hz: 0.005.
1kHz
Line in through pan control to stereo mix buss
40Hz -64dB.
1kHz
Adjacent channel
40I-le -100dB.
1kHz:
Equivalent input ref 200!1
Mix noise: 28 Inputs and 24 monitors routed to
mix at unity gain
- 128.5dBv
Mic Input
2kf! (5kí1 with pad)
Line. input
10kí1
Output impedance
My output
<400
Output capability
Any group or mix into 6000
+21dBv
Gain
Max mic
75dB
Max line
40dB
Distortion
Crossstolk
Noise
Input Impedance
Frequency response
20Hz
Line input at unity gain to mix
20Hz:
Phase response
Line input to mix output
24/16 Input
IMD:
0015
18kHz 0.01.
IMD:
0.009
IMD:
0.02
18kHz
18kHz:
-55dB
-85dB
- 1.6dB.
20kHz -0.2dB
1kHz: 0dB.
20kHz: -02dB
-0-8dB. 1kHz OdB.
20kHz -20°
1kHz Of
20Hz +20!
73.75x37.23x 3675 ins (1873x964.65x933 mm)
87.5x 3723 x36.75 ins (2222x964.65x 933 mm)
28/24 input
NB: OdBv
18kHz 0.01.
-74dBv (DIN Audio)
Mic input at 50dB gain to mix
Dimensions
0005.
-63dB.
-95dB.
= 0.775vrms
Series 800
Distortion
Crosstalk
Noise
0.05.
Mic pre -amp, -30dBv In, +4dBv out
Channel line in to mix out, +4dBv in. +4dBv out
40Hz 0.01.
1kHz 0.01.
18kHZ:
40HZ: 0.01.
1kHz 0.01.
18kHz 0-05.
Line in through pan control to stereo mix buss
401-Iz
1kHz -63d13.
18MHz:
Adjacent channel
40Hz -100dB.
-95dB.
18kHz
Equivalent Input ref 2000
-127-5dBv
-64dB.
1kHz
IMD: 0.02
-55dB
-85dB
Mix noise: 32 Inputs and 16 monitors routed to mix at unity gain
-74dBv (DIN Audio)
Mic input
2k12 (5kO
Line input
10kO
Output impedance
Output capability
My output
<750
Any group or mix into 6000
+21dBv
Gain
Max mic
90dB
Max line
40dB
Mic input at 50dB gain to mix
Line input at unity gain to mix
25Hz:
1kHz OdB.
20kHz -0.5dB
25Hz -1.5dB.
1kHz: OdB.
20kHz
Phase response
Line Input to mix output
25Hz +30°
1kHz Of
20kHz:
Dimensions
18
Input impedance
Frequency response
with pod)
-2dB.
-0.5dB
-20°
42.52x 29.25x 7.64 ins (1080x 743x194mm)
inputs
63.5x29-25x7.6-4 ins (1613x743x194mm)
32 inputs
NB: OdBv =
0.775vrms
Series 400
From mic Input-at 50dB gain to +4dBv at Group Output
From line input at unity gain to +4dBv at Group Output
40Hz 0-02.
Crosstalk
Stereo mix buss measured at mix outputs
Adjacent channel at insert send. line input selected
40Hz:
Noise
Equivalent input noise ref 1500
-127-8dBv
Distortion
Input impedance
1kHz 0-015.
-58dB.
40Hz & 1kHz:
18kHz 0.015.
1kHz 0.005.
40Hz 0.015.
18kHz:
IMD:
0.025.
Mix noise: 16 channels routed to mix at unity gain
-73dBv (DIN Audio)
Mic input
>2.5k0
Line input
10k0
Tape return
7-5611
<4011
My output
My group or
Gain
Max mic
+75dB
Max line
+40dB
Mic Input at 50dB gain
20Hz -1.6dB.
1kHz 0dB.
20kHz: -0.1dB
Line input at unity gain
20Hz
-0.6dB
1kHz OdB.
20kHz:
Phase response
Liner input to mix output
20Hz +20? 1kHz 0°
Dimensions
18/4
422x29.3x7.4
26/4
54.3x29.3x7.4 ins (137.8x74.5x18.8cm
NB: OdBv
0.005
-5818. 18kHz -51dB
below noise. 18kHz -102dB
119HZ
Output impedance
Output capability
Frequency response
0-025
IMD:
+21dBv
mix Into 60011
20kHz
-0.1dB
-20°
Ins (107.3x74.5x18.8cm)
)
= 0.775vrms
Serles IS
Distortion
From mic Input raise 50dB to +4dBv at output at any frequency
20Hz to 20kHz
<0.03% THD
20Hz
Noise
at 50dB mic gain
Equivalent input ref 20011
Input Impedance
Mic input
1kO (1.6k0
Insert return (line)
360
Echo return
10k0
Max mic
90dB
Max line
32dB
Max echo return
63dB
Any output into 6000
+21 dBu
Mic ( +20dB with pad)
OdBv @ 30Hz (1% THD)
Frequency response
Gain
Output capability
Input capability
- 1.5dß. 20kHz -1db
- 126dBv, 20kHz
+3dBv@
1kHz (.01% THD)
+23dBv
Insert return
any level
Echo return
Metering
bandwidth
withpad)
Ovu Is factory set
at +4dBv but may be altered internally down to -10dBv
Peak LEDs come on 8dB above Oyu.
Dimensions
12
input
33x22x10 ins (84x56x26cm)
16
input
39x22x10ins (99x56x26cm)
45x22x10 ins (115x56x26cm)
20 Input
NB: OdBv =
0.775vrms
Soundcraft Electronics Limited reserves the right to alter design and specifications of
Soundcraft
THE CHALLENGER
its
products without prim nonce.
Soundcraft Electronics U.S.A.
20610 Manhattan Place, Suite 120
Torrance, CA 90501
(213) 328 -2595 Telex: 182 -499
Soundcraft Electronics Limited
5 -8 Great Sutton Street
London EC1V OBX England
01 -251 3631 Telex: 21198
www.americanradiohistory.com
Printed In U.S.A 8/8
-THE PROFESSIONALS CHOICE
////////////li/0111IIIUiU!IIIIIIIIUII}II1111IÍIlllllll
,
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.á .l
'i'
.iIril. r.i r.:.r : rarrJrr:
.
.
'-vr'vú
SUPPORT EQUIPMENT:
AUDIO INTERFACE - R T S - ESE INOVONICS - U.R.E.I. - IMAGE
FORMATIONS - ADRISCAMP ANNIS - ATLAS - VALLEY PEOPLE
- EDITAL - KAHN - MXR WHIRLWIND - STANTRON
ELECTRONICS
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DIRECT BOXES:
COUNTRYMAN
AUDIO
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WESTLAKE
WESTLAKE PRODUCTS:
SPEAKER
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CETECiGAUSS - JBL - T.A.D.
- POLYDAX - ATC - ELECTRO -VOICE
DIRECT BOXES - HEADPHONE
BOXES - AUDIO SWITCHING
SYSTEMS - MULT BOXES - HIGH
RESOLUTION MONITOR SPEAKERS
EQUALIZERS:
AND CROSSOVERS
WHITE INSTRUMENTS - U.R.E.I. ORBAN - PULTEC - LANG - KLARK
TEKNIKS
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SONTEC
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SCAMP
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DBX
MONITOR SYSTEMS:
WESTLAKE AUDIO - JBL - U.R.E.I.
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WESTLAKE SERVICES:
ACOUSTIC DESIGN /CONSULTATION
SYSTEM DESIGN - SYSTEM
INSTALLATION AND INTERFACE
- TURN -KEY CONSTRUCTION CONSTRUCTION SUPERVISION
- REAL -TIME DEMONSTRATIONS
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ea
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MAKE WESTLAKE AUDIO YOUR
CHOICE FOR THE FINEST AUDIO
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AVAILABLE.
from acoustic design
to down beat...
wwatìake
Audio
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Professional Audio Sales Group
7265 Santa Monica Boulevard
Los Angeles. California 90046
(213) 851 -9800 Telex 698645
-GALLANT.
from the portfolio of
video music composer DENISE
(upper left) Part of a sequence produced
for
a San
Francisco -based cable operator. Having colorized the
guitar fingerboard and hand, the backgound was added,
and caused to fluctuate according to the pitch of the
music.
(upper right) The output of a black and white TV camera
pointing at a photograph which has been processed
through her home-built eight -level keyer /colorizer to
produce varying color hues. Each of the eight layers can be
controlled independently
for example, a particular
color can be arranged to change in time to the
accompanying music. The various units have taken some
six years to develop and perfect.
-
(adjacent) ... showing a live demonstration performance of
her visual music compositions.
-74U0/0/VrDEo
T,i%i
á
a
E
V. M. A.
2
-o
NMI IMO paaopM
Daniel Safer is a visual -music designer
electronic music performer /composer,
and
c
whose pieces were shown at the recent AFI
Video Festival in Washington, D.C. He
has co-directed three laserium shows, and
his piece Silk Aurora is part of the
Laserium Starship presentation.
Michael Scroggins, who teaches video
synthesizer at California Institute of the
Arts, Valencia, is a visual -music composer
whose most recent piece, Recent Li, was
awarded an Honorable Mention last June
in the 23rd Annual American Film
Festival held in New York City.
«
:
Sound Engineers /Producers
Robert Margouleff and Howard Seigel
have worked with Devo and on several of
Stevie Wonder's album projects. They are
actively pursuing ways in which visuals
can be utilized to enhance a musical
performance, and are currently developR-e/p 68
ing six one -hour music shows for
worldwide distribution.
Publishing and Record Companies
Peter Burke, ex- assistant regional
director of A.S.C.A.P. and formerly on the
A&R staff at United Artists, is looking
into the problems of copyrighting visual
music performances, and liasing with
record companies regarding the creative
marketing possibilities offered by visual
music.
* **
The Visual Music Alliance represents
what we consider to be a unique
organization, in that its membership
includes profession&s working in various
fields of music, video, film, and computer
graphics. Members have been involved in
numerous projects, ranging from feature
films, music promos and album projects,
to avant -garde experimental video- music,
commercials and laser shows.
One of the primary goals of the VMA is
to promote an interaction between the
individuals who have command of various
technologies, so that new processes and
techniques can evolve. These new
"alliances" will ultimately create the kind
of diversity and quality necessary to
August 1981
www.americanradiohistory.com
support the hardware systems
-
videodisk, cassette and related industries.
Although visual music as a contemporary art form is still only in its infancy,
there are many creative people who desire
to connect with other talented artists.
Through an organization such as the
VMA
and similar groups springing up
around the country such individuals are
given an opportunity to interact and learn
about what is possible with this new, and
relatively unexplored medium. They are
able to tap each others energy and
enthusiasm. The VMA represents, we feel,
the ultimate Interface for professionals
-
-
with diverse visual and musical
backgrounds.
Activities of The Visual Music
Alliance
VMA activities include monthly general
membership meetings, where members
discuss techniques and applications of
visual music. There are also screenings of
VMA member projects in progress, some
of which showcase original music and
visuals. Smaller get-togethers, committee
meetings and workshops occur on a
spontaneous basis. There are also many
VMA members involved in trading
services and combining talents to make
individual projects and goals a reality. It
is in these small gatherings that the
musician, visual designer and technical
coordinator are able to focus their energies
on creating visual music. In addition, the
VMA plans to provide a resource center,
telephone information line and job
referral service (with a directory
computerized by function), as well as a
monthly newsletter.
Works by several VMA members were
shown last June at the AFI Video Festival,
held at the Kennedy Center, Washington
D.C. The pieces included: Stephen Beck's
Union; Homer and Associates' Blame It
On The Boogie; Daniel Sofer's Silk Aurora
and Third World of Dreams; Denise
Gallant's Suburban Lawns `Janitor';
Michael Scroggins' Recent Li; and Barney
Kaelin's Laser Viewsic. The pieces were
shown by Videodisk jockey, VMA member
John Hunt.
having an effective promotional piece for
their artists, and have been increasing the
breadth of their video/film promotion
departments. The de- regulation of
television will open up many new
channels for low -power stations specializing in "narrowcasting," and which may
provide some further outlets for visual
music.
There will be an emergence of a new
kind of artist. It will involve an individual
or, more likely, a team of diversely
talented people working together to
coordinate many different mediums. The
future will truly be open to those who are
willing to educate themselves, and
interface with others who are "on the
path." Today, many recording studios and
personnel are wisely aligning themselves
with video and film production
companies. It's important to initiate the
kind of dialogue that brings technical and
artistic people together. These people and
their creative ideas are far more important
than all the hardware systems combined.
The Visual Music Alliance is a concept
and an organization that has developed
out of a need. It is a germinating ground
for new ideas and techniques. The
diversity of its membership is the
foundation that will generate the kind of
innovation necessary to develop and
support a new art form. The challenge
inherent in the VMA is to continue to
expand the possibilities.
Many collaborative projects are
currently being developed among VMA
members, including a feature film
showcasing visual music; a live multimedia experience environment in a huge
dome theatre; and new combinations of
real and synthesized imagery with music.
As an organization, the VMA has
enormous collaborative potential for
generating new forms of visual music
entertainment.
The Future Of Visual Music
The major corporations that have spent
millions of dollars researching and
developing the videodisk, cassette and
related industries will soon be taking a
hard look at the lack of effective software
necessary to support their products. How
many times can somebody watch a film or
a music promotional piece? The average
consumer will be reluctant to spend
between $500 and $900 for a videodisk
system that can only playback, when he
already has so many options open to him
through cable, television and video
cassette (including rentals). The hardware
problems with videodisk, et al, will
eventually be worked out. Nonetheless,
innovative visual music programming is,
we feel, crucial to the future of the various
videodisk formats, especially since the
audio quality of a videodisk is superior to
any other form of consumer playback
no scratches or clicks from a needle, and
more headroom for better dynamics.
Because, at present, there is a definite
lack of interesting software, there will
have to be a revolution
loosening of
the corporate purse strings
to help
stimulate the kind of experimentation
necessary to create new techniques and
product. One way to come up with effective
and unique visual music programming is
to finance creative and experimental
-
-a -
projects.
There has been a tremendous growth in
the video and film industry, with many
post-production facilities being built and
used by a seemingly ever increasing
amount of producers. Record companies
are acutely aware of the importance of
The Only 14 Hz Digital
Reverb Under $10,000!
than half the price of an
About the same as the
Lexicon 224. Compare System 5
with either of them. You'll see Ws
the most advanced digital electronic reverb system available,
with a dynamic range of 103 dB;
a signal -to -noise of 83 dB; total
Less
EMT 251.
THD of less than
0.02 %; and a real
frequency re-
sponse in excess
of 14 kHz.
System 5 has
four individual reverb programs, four presets, 16 equalization settings
and the microprocessor control
which combine to give you infinitely more settings than you'll
O
ever need. The compact remote
control can be patched up to 200
feet through a normal audio
trunk line. System 5 is the only
one that gives you the option of
automated reverb addressable
from a tape or disk for reverb
changes on cue.
And, if System 5 is too much system for your needs, Quad- Eight,
the pioneer in digital reverb,
has other reverb
systems to meet
your needs and
budget, with
prices as low as
$1000. Call us direct, now, to audition System 5 or any
Quad -Eight reverb
(213) 764-1516
Quad -Eight Electronics
11929 Vose Street, North Hollywood, CA 91605
(up
1981
Quad -Eight Electronics
August 1981
www.americanradiohistory.com
R -e/p 69
Simply
The Best!
0
True stereo
4:1 sweep VCO
Stereo flanging
Double & Triple
Tracking
Chorusing
Reverb
Spatial
Manipulation
95db typical
20-15kHz at
ris..
ii
--
theory and practice
.
two filter construction projects
... a de- popper,
... a hum -filter.
all
delay lengths
252 mS
standard
Long delays
(up to 2 sec.)
with memory
module
by Ethan Winer
In the June issue of R-e /p, capacitors
were considered as being frequency -
dependant resistors. This capacitive
reactance is at the heart of all active
filters being used for audio today,
including the ones shown in Figures 5
and 6. Rather than get into a nuts -andbolts type description at this time
though, let's instead review some filter
basics using terms a recording engineer
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10
DeltaLab Research, Inc
-30
Aveurle
Chelmsford, MA 01824
27 Industrial
Telex951205
Canadian Distributor:
Hein) Audio
Developments. Inc.
Markham, Ontario,
Canada (416)495 -0688
R -e /p 70
August
--
ii
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You can
pay less
(or more) for
digital delay,
but you can't
buy any better.
Compare features,
performance, &
warranty and
find out for
yourself why top
artists and studios
insist upon
0
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can readily understand.
One type is the high -pass filter shown
schematically in Figure 1, along with
the resultant frequency response. At
some specified frequency, the capacitor's impedance will be equal to that of
the resistor, and it is here that the
response will be 3 dB down. If this
frequency is 1 kHz, then the filter will be
referred to as a "1 kHz high -pass."
Really, what could be easier? As the
applied frequency is lowered, the output
level continues to drop at a rate of 6 dB
per octave, or 20 dB per decade.
Obviously, filters can be built with
sharper cutoffs, but to do this you would
need to cascade several stages.
In the "Popping P" filter, two stages
are used, creating a 12 dB per octave
rolloff. The op-amp buffers are needed to
provide isolation between stages;
otherwise the impedances would
combine, and the expected response
would not be achieved. The low -pass
filter, shown in Figure 2 is constructed
m11111rin11111m1111
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1981
www.americanradiohistory.com
-40
50
1111111!;MI11I1
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11111 w11111=II
BAND -STOP FILTER
11NNME11111
111111=1E11111 Figure
4
by transposing the resistor and
capacitor. Everything previously stated
still applies, only now the output level
goes down as the input frequency is
raised.
A third kind of filter is the band -pass
shown in Figure 3. The classic
our noise reduction
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the job it should
In twice the space
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making your frame a crucial factor to your success.
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Transformer coupled
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Common calibration
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Led alignment
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Timing circuits for
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Alignment meter with
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good reminder that your
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741 Washington Street, New York, NY 10014 (212) 741 -7411
International: +1 212 741 7411 Telex 23 -6779 GOTHM UR
August 1981
www.americanradiohistory.com
R -e/p
71
.a`°¢
A.a.
Fi Mors
-
¢`rocs
-
theory and practice .
two filter construction projects
... a de- popper,
.
...
.
a hum -filter.
implementation is with a capacitor and
an inductor, but all we care about at this
point is what the circuit actually does.
In this case, a range of frequencies is
allowed to pass through the filter, and
these are centered around
you
guessed it the center frequency. This
point of minimum attenuation occurs at
a frequency for which the inductor's
impedance equals that of the capacitor,
and can be achieved with a variety of
values. That is, if you halve the
-
-
capacitance but then double the
inductance, the frequency will remain
the same, even though the ratio has
been altered.
On a parametric equalizer, there is a
control for varying bandwidth, or how
far from the center the boost and cut
action extends. When boosting highs on
a "broad" setting, the effect is smooth
and uncolored. When using the narrow
settings, however, the sound is very
resonant, like a wah -wah or synthesizer
filter. Although the bandwidth in this
simple circuit can be altered by varying
the ratio of the inductor to the capat;itor,
a much better approach involves the use
of an op -amp that can provide positive
feedback. Where negative feedback is
used in circuits to lower distortion and
flatten response, positive feedback will
reinforce the band -pass action, giving
the capability for extremely narrow
bandwidths. In the active filters used
here, of course, only capacitors are
employed
in a combination high pass/low -pass configuration. Studio
talk would refer to bandwidth in terms
of octaves or parts of an octave. Design
engineers, on the other hand, call this
filter quality "Q."
A typical octave graphic equalizer
would have a Q of 1 or so, on each of the
control bands. Notch filters used for
controlling hum (you know, the old
way) might need a Q as high as 100, if
adjacent frequencies are to be left
untouched. The filters described in this
simple active band -pass filter, even
though the bandwidth may be very
narrow at the tuning point, eventually
the response falls off at the usual 6 dB
per octave rate as the feedback
article to isolate different hum
contributes less and less. A Q of 10 is
sufficient for our purposes to effectively
isolate each frequency, and yet not so
severe as to require the use of 1%
tolerance components.
Similar to the band -pass is the band stop, which is probably best known as a
notch filter. Again, although a coil and
capacitor can be used
as shown in
Figure 4 most modern versions use an
active design with capacitors and
resistors only. Naturally, the terms used
for the band -pass filter will still apply in
this case, and feedback continues to
take the credit for high Q.
At some point in the future, we will
look at active filters in greater depth,
and provide "cookbook" style formulas
so you can design these circuits to suit
your own needs.
frequencies have a Q of 10 or, more
specifically, the center frequency is 10
times the number of Hz attenuated by
an amount less than 3 dB. Which means
that for a 1 kHz filter, there will be 100
cycles encompassed between the -3 dB
points, as shown in the illustration. For
a Q of 50, only 20 Hz would be contained
within these bounds.
It is important to point out that in a
In the meanwhile, the following pair
of books may be of interest for the
reader wanting to find out more about
filter design:
L Audio IC Op -Amp applications, by
W.G. Jung. Howard W. Sams & Col,
1978.
2. IC Op -Amp Cookbook, by W.G.
Jung. Howard W. Sams & Co., 1977.
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Distributed by
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NEW STORE: 7760 Balboa Boulevard Van Nuys, CA 91406 (213) 781 -2537
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R -e/p 72
August 1981
For additional Information circle # 40
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- The Construction Projects It was strictly amateur night as I
rewound the tape for the twentieth time,
and the lead singer tried "just one more
take." Well, he finally did get a good one
that is, on tune at least most of the
time
but the only problem was this
big, fat popping "P," right in the middle
of a verse. Out of time and out of money
(not to mention out of talent), the group
had little choice but to proceed to the
mix, popping "P" and all.
I have always had it in the back of my
mind to someday make the removal of
popping "P's" a pet project. (Sorry.)
After all, there are de-essers for
controlling excess sibilance; why not a
gadget that could detect and filter these
problem P's? A limiter is unacceptable
you just get an enormous drop-out
and while a low -cut filter can help in
some cases, you'd have to make it pretty
darn thin sounding to eliminate a really
bad pop. Popping P's have been with us
- -
input. When the input and output of this
circuit are combined, a null in the
response will be created at that
frequency. The phase-shifted signal is
used to oppose the original input, and if
the two are of equal magnitude,
complete cancellation will result.
Now, we've all seen those brain
teasers where because of preconditioned thinking, we will overlook an
otherwise obvious solution to a
problem. In the case of cancelling hum,
who says the opposing frequency must
be derived from the original signal? If,
instead, we use a sample of the actual
power line as the hum -bucking medium,
we can exactly balance any hum in the
program while allowing the music to
remain untouched. The only possible
drawback to this approach is that it
must be done in real time, so that the
hum source and the hum cure will be
synchronized. This means, of course,
that it won't work on tracks aready
recorded, but then, who cares? I mean,
why save for later what could be fixed
now especially when it's so easy to do.
Also, I suspect that the biggest need for
this device would be in live sound
reinforcement anyway.
-
Anti -Popping Filter
Before we get to the specifics,
however, let's return to the Popping P
-
-
for as long as there have been
microphones, and I've heard from
nobody that has come up with a
satisfactory solution to the problem:
removing them from a track after the
fact.
The Solution
So I'm thinking about all of this while
I'm starting the mixdown, when an idea
suddenly came to me from out of the
blue. Why not try shelving the lows, but
only for the duration of the "pop." So,
when I got to the offending place in the
verse, I slammed the EQ knob to -15,
then quickly brought it back to flat. The
popping disappeared completely, and
all of those present at the remix session
agreed that the EQ was inaudible; just
so long as I brought the knob back fast
enough. At last, I had found an effective
method; now it simply remained to be
automated.
Another difficult problem exists
when trying to filter out power -line
hum, especially in the presence of
music. Often there will be more than one
offending frequency present, requiring
several notch filters to be cascaded, and
if a musical note happens to be near one
of those frequencies, then the note will
be removed as well. Let's face it, it's
impossible to filter out 60 Hz hum
without affecting a bass note at exactly
the same frequency isn't it? Well, the
answer is no, it's not. And, what's more,
the "filter" we're about to look at is so
slick, you don't even have to pass the
signal through it, thereby eliminating
any chance of degrading the audio
quality.
But before you start thinking I'm
crazy, take a moment to consider how a
conventional notch filter works. The
audio signal is sent through a phase shift circuit that provides 1800 of shift at
some specified frequency, relative to the
-
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®NeutrikAG. Liechtenstein ©Neutrik, 1980
August 1981
www.americanradiohistory.com
R -e/p 73
+15V
o
0.1 mFd Disk
--i
mFd
0
INPUT>---I
I
1
0.1 mFd
1
t
I
100K
150
390
OUTPUT
w.
7K
D4
S
02
47K
2N5457
V
220K
+15V
04
2N5457
LED
S
+15V
10K
0.1 mFd
-15V
TL074 Top View
14
13
12
11
10
1458 Top View
9
V+
8
7
10K
6
/-
10K
470K
0.1
mFd
10K
100K
0I
2N3906
V
V+
3
4
Project, whose schematic is shown in
Figure 5. As stated earlier, the heart of
this device is a low -cut filter, only this
one can be activated automatically, on
command from the pop detector.
Identifying the plosive is not too
difficult; all we need to look for is
significant low-frequency energy. When
4
V-
Figure
5
a "pop" is detected, the filter is instantly
engaged. Then the low -end response
fades back up to normal over a period of
a few tenths of a second or so. This
single -timed release approach eliminates the distortion that is usually
associated with a combination of fast
release times and low- frequency
signals. Needless to say, it is essential
that the response return to normal
immediately following the offending
"P," if the filtering is to remain
unobtrusive.
Referring to the schematic shown in
Figure 5, amplifier Al is used at unity
gain solely to isolate the filter and
enofiNtmonal
fino
HOLLYWOOD SOUND S
EMS
(213)466 -2416
"
Audio Support for Recording, Broadcast, TV, Film, Lim Events, Concerts
Warranty Speaker Pe- Coning
R -e/p 74
August 1981
For additional information circle
#
42
www.americanradiohistory.com
detector inputs from the outside world.
This is important since most active
filters like to be fed from a very low
source impedance. Were the input buffer
not to be included, performance of the
filters could vary, depending on the
preceding equipment. The actual low cut filtering is accomplished by the 0.1
mFd capacitors in conjunction with the
390 ohm resistors. Amplifiers A2 and
A3 are also used for isolation but, in this
case, when coming out of the filters.
Automatic operation is realized by
the 2N5457 FET's voltage-controlled
resistance. When a negative voltage is
applied to the gate, the resistance
between source and drain is high. But,
when this voltage is removed, the FET's
internal resistance drops dramatically.
This then causes the 390 ohm resistors
to become essentially grounded,
creating a severe reduction in low-end
response.. A third FET, Q4, is optional,
and drives an LED to indicate
activation of the de -pop process.
IC op -amp A4 and it's associated
components comprise a 50 Hz low-pass
filter with an 18 dB per octave cutoff
slope. This steep filtering action is
required to ensure that only the popping
"P's" will trigger the unit. The filter
output is then sent to a pair of level
detectors A5 and A6 one to sense
each polarity. If the signal below 50 Hz
ever reaches 0.7 V in either direction,
one of these comparators will switch,
energizing Ql.
It might be worth mentioning that
although A5 and A6 are conventional
op -amps, they are operated without any
negative feedback, yielding an
extremely high gain. Therefore the
-
-
output doesn't vary, as in the case of a
normal linear amp: it is either full
positive or full negative. Hence, an
input voltge can be compared to a
reference, with even the tiniest
difference in level being amplified
essentially to infinity. As a general rule
of thumb when dealing with comparators, if the plus input is more
positive than the negative, the output
will be full positive. And when the
negative input is more positive, the
output will be negative.
The FET gates and the 0.1 mFd
release capacitor are normally held at
7.5 V by the 10 kohm voltage- divider
network. When either comparator
switches, Q1 is activated, thereby
instantly discharging the capacitor,
and the low-cut filtering begins. The
moment the "pop" goes away, Ql is
IMO
Installation
Smocth operation is crucial for
your studio's sw_cess, and
smooth operation takes
careful Tannin g.
a..
;.:°NSF raw=á
erced in
resigning,
equipping,
interfacing ind man:taining the leading muti -tra z
recording facilities in the Upper
Midw. st. Whether is s a patch
cord or a complete ir.qallation,
call the AVC locati:n nearest
you fcr the best slp:ort t)
comp_ement your system needs.
-
arry Fasman,
producer/arranger,
working behind a Soundcraft
Studio Design
e
Series 1624 mixing console recently
supplied by AVG Systems. His credits include
Melissa Manchester's 'Don't Cry Out Loou,d; "Air
Supply's "Every Woman in the World, " and Diana
Ross' `It's My Turn."
Minneapolis, MN 55407 (612) 729-8305
..
AVC
SYSTEMS
INCORPORATED
people behind the people behind the sound.
1517 E. Lake St.
.
7116 W. Higgins Ave. Chicago, IL 60656 (311.) 763 -6010
For additional information circle
#
www.americanradiohistory.com
43
C2
60 Hz Level
Cl
CW
100K
R3
1K
Audio
100K
R1
1K
C3
R2
H
ALTERNATIVE
TRANSFORMER WIRING
I
OUTPUT
'
CW
60 Hz
100K Audio
Phase
C2
120 Hz Level
udio
100K
R3
Cl
CW
1K
100K
R1
R2
I
cW}
120 Hz
1K
f
Audio
1K
FOUR FILTERS TOTAL
turned off, which allows the capacitor to
recharge, thus restoring normal
response. It may be necessary to
experiment with the value of the 470
kohm release resistor if you plan to use a
different type of FET. Also, a P- channel
device will require connecting the 10
kohm network to V+ instead of V -.
Op -amps Al through A4 should be
Hum Filter
Now let's return to the hum filter
circuit, the schematic of which is shown
in Figure 6. When I first set out to do this
project, I analyzed the residual hum
that was present in various pieces of
outboard equipment. By sweeping the
frequency on a parametric equalizer, it
was easy to audibly determine the
major hum components. Since most
devices use full-wave rectification in
their power supplies, it is not surprising
that 120 Hz was the most predominant.
Also present, of course, were 60 Hz, 180
Hz and 300 Hz
the fundamental,
third and fifth harmonics. The higher I
swept the equalizer, the more the
harmonics diminished, indicating that
four stages would probably be
sufficient.
Since the audio signal does not pass
through this filter, some other method
must be employed to create the hum cancelling frequencies. In this case, a
6.3 V center- tapped transformer is used
to furnish the 60 Hz signal, though we
-
-vsn--46
Figure 6
r
I00K
I
Phase
180 Hz Level
Audio
1K
C3
-1
such as the 1N914 or 1N4148, except of
course for the LED. And while it may
not always be shown, every IC should
have a 0.1 mFd disk capacitor
connected between ground and each of
it's power supply pins. These caps must
be located as close to the op-amps as
possible.
high performance types, such as the
TL074 quad. A 1458 dual package will
be sufficient for the comparators, and
nearly any PNP transistor will work as
Ql. You might as well use good quality
Mylar capacitors throughout, since the
slight increase in price is more than
offset by the improved stability they
offer. All diodes are small signal types,
PRICE REDUCTION!
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splitting transformer available
Jensen Transformers is overstocked with
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This high quality transformer, which features better specs than any other four-way
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1-19
quantity
20-39
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For larger quantities, please give us a call.
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Only PREPAID OR C.O.D. accepted for this
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R -e/p 76
a
schematic to
Model JE -MB -E Transformer
1
transformers
ensen
REICHENBACH ENGINEERING
By
10735 Burbank Boulevard /N. Hollywood, CA 91601
(213) 876 -0059
(Visitors by appointment only- Closed Fridays.)
August 1981
www.americanradiohistory.com
TABLE
1:
Component Values for 60 Hz Hum Filter
FILTER
Hz
R1
R2
R3
C1&C2
0.27µF
50
330K
1K6
620K
0.1 µF
0.33µF
160K
82052
300K
0.1µF
0.18µF
FILTER
Hz
R1
TABLE 2: Component Values for 50 Hz Hum Filter
R2
R3
C1&C2
C3
0.1µF
C3
60
270K
1K2
560K
120
150K
68052
270K
0.1µF
0.15µF
100
180
82K
43011
180K
0.1 µF
0.1 µF
150
91K
56011
200K
0.1µF
0.12µF
300
56K
27011
100K
0.1 µF
0.068µF
250
68K
33011
120K
0.1 µF
0.1 µF
All filter components should be 5% tolerance, although the va ue of phase shift capacitor C3 is less critical. In this case, it would be
satisfactory to use the next larger size.
still need some way to generate all of
those harmonics. The necessary
distortion is provided here by the
1N4001 diode. Four separate high -Q
band-pass filters are then used to isolate
each of the desired frequencies,
component values for which are listed
in Table 1. A variable phase shift circuit
is also provided to ensure maximum
rejection capability of the hum. (This is
particularly important when equalizers
or other phase affecting devices are in
the audio path.)
To save circuitry, only one stage, or 0180 degrees, is used. Sometimes it may
be necessary, therefore, to reverse the
plug in the wall outlet. Or, better yet,
you could use a DPDT power switch
with a center-off position, wired as
shown in the diagram inset. This
scheme is commonly used for switching
the polarity on guitar amps and bass
amps.
I
have also included the
component values required for use on
systems with 50 Hz power, which are
shown in Table 2. The filtered and
phase shifted hum frequencies are
finally combined, and the composite
signal sent to the console to be mixed
with the program material.
Once the unit is built and working,
adjustment of the controls for hum
elimination will be relatively straightforward, although it probably wouldn't
hurt to go over the procedure here. First,
turn all four level controls and four
phase controls to full counter- clockwise,
or minimum setting. Then, just to
familiarize yourself with the sound of
each hum element that you will be
nulling out, advance the level controls
one by one noting the difference, and
then return them all to off. Since 120 Hz
will probably be the worst offender,
start by increasing the level for that
frequency very slowly, until the 120 Hz
hum component goes down in level,
leaving the knob at the optimum point.
The 120 Hz phase control should also be
adjusted for minimum hum at that
frequency, then go back to the level pot
and finish the job. It should be possible
to completely eliminate all hum at this
frequency in only two or three steps. If
the hum only goes up in level no matter
how you set the controls, reverse the
polarity switch or the wall plug, and
repeat the above steps. Next, adjust the
60 Hz frequency, followed by 180 and
300 Hz until you are satisfied that these
frequencies have been completely
eliminated from the program.
Once you have used this device a few
times, it should be easy to complete the
entire process in under a minute or so.
Also, the unit does put out a healthy
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August 1981
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R -e /p 77
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R -e/p 78
August
"As sound editors," says Stephen
Flick, describing his job in the simplest
terms, "we prepare the soundtracks of a
motion picture for mixing." Flick, if
anyone, however, knows the incredible
understatement of such a definition.
Although this is indeed the task, such
"preparation" will involve hundreds of
man hours, as many as 60 reels of sound
per reel of picture, and imagination and
creativity limited only by the post production budget. And all this labor to
produce what film re- recording
mixer /sound editor Richard Portman
refers to as "the aural image of the
motion picture."
The preparation of such a soundtrack
is really their creation: cleaning up the
quality of the dialogue; adding sound
effects to give the scenes a feeling of
reality; And establishing a mood for the
drama using sound. The job's rewards,
however, are minimal in relationship to
the work involved. There is little
recognition accorded the sound
craftsman, for few people in the public
or industry audience consciously notice
sound unless there is something wrong.
Also, in general audio holds a second class status in Hollywood, where
budgets rarely allow for a full, first class creative effort on the part of the
sound personnel. It is an intregal part of
the motion picture experience,
nonetheless, and a major, if little
appreciated, portion of making a movie.
There is a view within the industry
that the sound editor should be involved
in a film from the pre -production stages.
Current industry practice brings them
in late in the post -production stage,
1981
www.americanradiohistory.com
however, after the film has been shot
and roughly edited.
"Once the picture is filmed," explains
Richard Portman, who mixed The
Deerhunter, Nashville, and Coal
Miner's Daughter, "it's turned over to
the picture editor, who
then cuts the picture and
dialogue track for story
and dramatic content.
The production dialogue
track was recorded on
the set during filming,
probably on 1/4-inch tape,
Portman
and then transferred to
35 mm mag -stripe [magnetic sound
stock] for editing purposes."
During the editing process, the
picture is divided into units or "reels," of
approximately 10 minutes in length, for
both ease of handling and identification of sections of the film during
cutting. A two -hour movie will have 12
reels of picture and 12 corresponding
reels of dialogue track. Reels are
numbered in story order.
"Generally," Portman continues,
"after the picture has been rough cut,
the company will hire a sound editor,
and he will be called in to screen the film
with the editor and the director."
"We'll screen the film with the powers
that be," adds Richard Anderson, "and
make notes, discuss with them any
problems there may be, and what they
want in the way of sound."
"We'll also set our budget and
schedule," Flick says.
The editing team of Anderson and
Flick, both graduates of University of
...
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#
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www.americanradiohistory.com
R -e/p 79
I
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Southern California, have cut the audio
portions of such films as Star Trek
The Motion Picture, The Final
Countdown, The Hand, and Raiders of
-
the Lost Ark.
"They'll tell us things
like: `At this point the
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actor hears an off-screen
car crash," Anderson
continues. "Where all
we see on the screen is
the actor looking nervous and agitated and
Flich
leaving the room. We'll
jot that down, along with other specific
things they want to emphasize; as well
as more general things,
like the mood they want
to create with the sound
in different scenes, and
the picture as a whole."
"Also," says Portman,
"the editor will tell you
what has to be fixed on
Anderson
the dialogue track: lines
to be extended, and what have you."
With regard to the dialogue,
Anderson says, "we'll also discuss
which lines have to be looped[replaced].
Some are done for technical reasons,
like airplane noises in the background,
or they might say: `We really hate this
guy's voice, or performance, and we
want to completely re -do it.'
"Often after the initial screening we'll
go over the film on a Movieola or a
flatbed editing machine with the
director, or whoever, and discuss inch
by inch what the picture needs."
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.
The Movieola (Figure 1) is an upright
editing machine that allows the film to
be viewed in sync with the separate
soundtrack. It provides easy access to
both the picture and sound materials,
and permits the editor to manipulate
their relationship by hand or with the
motors. The actual physical cutting of
the 35 mm materal is done on a splicer
fitted on an adjoining bench or
extension of the Movieola. The flatbed
editing machine is the modern
counterpart of the upright. It features a
table -like surface on which the reels of
picture and sound film are held on
plates, rather than unwound from the
bench or out of a cloth bin, as in the case
of the upright machine.
"Then they all go their separate ways,
so to speak," continues Portman. "The
Neiman -Tillar Associates, where the
sound was handled for Roots, Centennial, Days of Heaven, and The National
Geographic Specials, among others.
Keene is a UCLA graduate, and was
post -production supervisor for the
syndicated TV series This is the Life,
before joining Neiman -Tillar.
She explains that the methods of
assignment vary from shop to shop.
Some have several editors working
concurrently on the different areas of a film's
sound, with one handling
all the picture's dialogue,
while another cuts the
sound effects, and still
another doing all the
Foley editing. At NeiKeene
man- Tillar, each editor
usually cuts all the sound for an
assigned reel. N -T Associates has been
using computer-digital technology for
sound effects, but dialogue is handled in
the usual fashion. It is the dialogue
that's the sound editor's first concern.
sound editor opens up his shop, and
when the picture editor has `locked' a
reel when he says `This is our picture'
that particular film is duped into
black and white with no splices." The
dupe is then turned over to the sound
editors, along with the originally-edited
production soundtrack or, in some
cases, a one-to -one dupe of that sound
track.
"He or she then breaks down that reel;
that is, they go through and make a list
of what needs to be done to the dialogue,
and then what sound effects are
needed." In addition the track is usually
cued for Foley, which is the replacement
or addition of actor's movement sounds,
such as footsteps or clothes rustling.
At this stage, Flick and Anderson,
whose independent company Thunder tracks Ltd. is hired on a picture by
picture basis, will commence their work.
Sound for many motion pictures,
however, is handled by staff cutters in a
studio shop, or post- production house.
In these instances, a sound supervisor
will act as liaison between the film
makers and the editors. He or she will
also coordinate the effort, assigning
individual reels and tasks to different
members of the staff, and keeping the
approach uniform throughout.
Elodie Keene is currently a free -lance
editor, but recently served as a sound
editor at the post-production house of
- -
Dialogue Processing
"The dialogue track," says Keene,
"has to be worked on and smoothed out,
with the basic objective being to create a
dialogue track in which nobody notices
anything: changes in background, or
clunks, or whistles, or anything that
might distract the audience."
The first step in this process is
splitting off the one dialogue track
received from the picture editor, into
two or more different tracks to facilitate
the sound editing and mixing processes.
One of the reasons for splitting off the
tracks is to extend lines of dialogue cut
short in the course of editing the picture.
A case in point would be a scene of an
argument where two close -ups are inter cut with the master shot of the scene.
Putting the dialogue of the three
separate shots on to three separate
soundtracks would allow for overlapping the voices slightly for dramatic
effect, and
should one be distinctly
louder or softer than the other
to
provide the mixer with the ability to
blend the voices into one level. Another
reason would be if the editor wished to
carry an actor's lines from one scene
over the picture and sound of the next,
perhaps to act as a voice-over narration
of sorts, or possibly to ease a transition
of locale in the story.
This splitting may require retransfering or "re- printing " the
dialogue from certain scenes from their
original '/a -inch format, to the 35 mm
magnetic stripe used in the editing
-
process.
When the re -prints arrive, they are
put in sync with the original 35
millimeter track by matching modulation on a sync block or synchronizer
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50
-
(Figure 2). The two tracks are adjusted
in relationship to one another until,
upon playback, the two tracks sound as
one. The re -print then replaces the
original in the dialogue reels. When the
budget allows, some sound editors will
call for reprints of all the sound turned
over by the picture editor on his
dialogue track.
"On large films," explains Stephen
Flick, "where the picture is cut and recut again, the 35 mm dialogue master
suffers degradation from, among other
things, loosing oxides from the physical
scraping of being played over and over
again."
"There's a terrific high -end loss,"
adds Richard Anderson, "and magnetization is something that people don't
take into account. A non -demagnetized
head on a dubbing machine will put
In- studio or on- location
from a whisper to the
roar of a full -blown rock
concert, nothing can
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Figure 2: A five -gang sync block and
"squawk box" or sound monitoring unit
on an English style bench, being used by
a sound editor during post -production
stages of "Raiders of the Lost Ark."
down a rumbling noise onto the
soundtrack."
"They run these tracks on pieces of
equipment that you wouldn't believe,"
STL
agrees Richard Portman. "They
haven't been checked or degaussed or
maintained in years, and picture editors
will cut in their homes, or on boats, or in
houses on top of hills using splicers that
haven't been demagnetized."
"We cut one picture in a high -rise
building," continues Anderson, "and
due to the structure, and the type of
carpet, and whatever else, we had to
demagnetize our splicers everday.
PRECISION
Otherwise they would build up a "pop"
that would be audible on the soundtrack
at every cut. Well, the picture editor
didn't think about this, and every time
1/
he made a splice, it would pop on the
track, so we had to re-order all the
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August 1981
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dialogue."
"High-rise buildings don't have the
anti -static matting under their carpet,"
Flick explains, "but generally film
editing is done in very old Hollywood
buildings on the first or second floor,
and this is not as much of a problem."
"We feel, however," adds Anderson,
"that it's really worth the effort on a
Class 'A' film to take the time and cost
to re -print the soundtrack from the
original 1/4-inch tape."
"It really reflects the producer's
attitude towards the soundtrack," Flick
director's cue and it's all filled
Picture
CLOSE UP
CLOSE UP #2
#1
CLOSE UP
#1
Dialogue Track A
Dialogue With Noise C.U. at
Dialogue Track
B
BLANK STOCK
Noise From C.U. #1 With No Dialogue
Itlll ltl
Dialogue Without Noise C.U. 112
BLANK STOCK
Figure 3: The Backfill Technique on two dialogue tracks.
The two areas of magnetic material on the pair of dialogue tracks comprise a
lower recording track, and an upper "balance stripe" to ensure that the 35 mm
mag stock packs properly on to the film reels.
offers. "It's an expensive proposition, director's voice giving cues is a very
which is why a blanket re- ordering is common problem that has to be dealt
with in this regard."
not usually done on TV programs."
"Those have to be taken out,"
Re- prints, as well as one -to -one dupes
Portman continues, "so I'll make a little
of the edited 35 millimeter production
track, can also provide matching note that at 47 feet, remove this cue.
ambience from the scenes themselves, Now I'll look back in the code book for
for use in filling gaps and plugging the scene number, and I'll get a re-print
holes in the process of cleaning up the of the same shot. Then I'll run it
dialogue tracks. It is critical that these through my machine until I find a piece
of track from that shot in which no one
re -prints be made at the same transfer
level as the originals, so that the is speaking, cut the director's cue from
the original dialogue track, and then cut
background levels match.
As the work continues, Keene in this new piece of mag. If it's been
explains, "you're also looking for duped properly, this will have the same
extraneous noises, bumps of chairs or background, the same ambience, and
the creaking of dolly tracks anything the same tonal structure as the original.
that's not supposed to be there. The So now I've got the track without the
-
The Dream Equalizer:
Now Mono Or Stereo
through."
Unwanted sounds are eliminated
throughout the entire picture by the
sound editors in pretty much this
fashion. In some cases, the picture
editor may have drawn out a piece of
dialogue by cutting leader in between
lines, or even words. These spacers are
filled in using the same technique,
making the manipulation invisible.
Separation of the dialogue tracks
continues as required by the situation,
and depending upon the time, budget,
and special sound needs. The latter are
determined by carefully listening to the
production tracks.
"You'd think that what you want to
listen to is the quality of the voice," says
Keene, "but that doesn't really matter.
Oddly enough, what it amounts to is
listening to the backgrounds that draw
your ear."
"As a rule," offers Anderson, "you
split a track when there is a change, or
you want to create a change. If you hear
a change because of the background
when the track is supposed to be smooth
you split it."
"In that case," says Flick, "you want
the track to sound like one continuous
take even though the shots were filmed
and recorded at different times, and
from different camera and microphone
angles."
"Or if you want to impose a change
that's not there," Anderson adds, "such
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#
53
www.americanradiohistory.com
R -e /p 83
Picture
CLOSE UP
Dialogue Track
CLOSE UP #2
#1
CLOSE UP
#1
A
IITIVITOTraTrrirgwrgyro
Dialogue With Nolte C.U. #1
BLANK STOCK
Dialogue Track
B
nvvvrvvrvIrrrrivrrrrn
Dialogue Without Nolte C.U. e2
BLANK STOCK
Presence Track
BLANK STOCK
TTTrirnnrgyirm
Noise From C.U.
BLANK STOCK
#1
With No Dialogue
BLANK STOCK
WELWALLumiziajz
Figure 4: Backfill Technique using a third track.
as a scene in which an actor is speaking
into a phone, and we cut to the other end
on the line. To allow the mixer to alter
the quality of the voice, you split the
track again."
background to jump. But if you have a
straight dialogue scene, and in one shot,
because of a bad mike angle, you have
generator or freeway noise, and in the
other shot it's quiet, you'll end up with
an in-and-out effect everytime a cut is
made."
This in- and -out effect can call
attention to the noise and distract the
audience from the story, pulling them
out of the suspension of disbelief
necessary for the dramatic success of
the picture.
"What you have to do in this case,"
says Portman, "is continue through the
high side. You have to go back to the
Background Noise Problems
Making the soundtrack unobtrusive,
however, does not necessarily mean
making the sound better from a
technical audio point of view. For a
background noise to detract from a
scene, it must call attention to itself.
"If you have a straight cut from scene
to scene [with different locales]," says
Keene, "obviously you expect the
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daily tracks (or re- prints) and find that
sound without anybody talking in it,
and continue that through the entire
scene to give it a continuous flow."
The dialogue track without the
background noiseis cut, for instance, on
to Track A, and the dialogue track with
the obtrusive background noise is cut on
to Track B (Figure 3). To continue the
sound all the way through the scene, the
noise is placed or backfilled in between
the dialogue on Track B, so that it
doesn't just disappear when Track A is
playing.
The background fill might also be
placed on a third track for convenience
(Figure 4). In this case, the sound on
Track C is put directly opposite the
dialogue on Track A, taking care not to
double it up on top of the dialogue and
noise on Track B. In many cases, in
order to get enough of the noise, a loop of
the sound must be made, from which is
run off the amount of mag- stripe
necessary to make the fill.
"In The Hand," Anderson recalls,
"there was a scene in a mountain cabin,
most of which was shot on an interior
set on a sound stage. At one point, the
guy opens the door, and in the middle of
all these scenes shot on the stage, we cut
to an exterior shot of him looking out
the door as a girl pulls up. So right on
the cut, all these birds and background
noises come in. Then, she walks into the
cabin, and we cut back to the quiet,
interior set again."
"We had to back-fill the entire cabin
scene," explains Flick, "with real
production sound culled from the
exterior scene's soundtrack."
If the background sounds have a
noticeable pattern, and the dialogue
cannot be replaced, a different
approach must be taken, since a loop
would only repeat the pattern over and
over again much to the distraction of
the audience. Beach scenes are a good
example of this type of problem. A cut
made by the picture editor at the end of a
line may bring to a sudden halt a
building wave about to crash on the
beach. This can become annoying if
repeated often enough, or even once.
"Now you don't want to have to run a
companion track with the scene from
start to finish," explains Portman,
"because of the wearing effect caused
by having to hold the surf at a level loud
enough to mask the irregularities in the
dialogue tracks. Plus, the surf mixed in
with the dialogue, coupled with the
companion track, can make it so noisy
as to drive you crazy.
"On this one picture, free -lance sound
editor Kay Rose listened to the track to
where the surf built up, and then cut off
on the picture editor's cut. She then took
a backward recording of the surf,
recorded at the same level, and cut a
descending wave sound to continue the
swell so it didn't just disappear. Then
that backward track would be faded out,
but the transition was smoothed."
The problem of changing background
sound levels on a cut may not even be
-
the varying ambiences from shot to
shot, minimizing the shifts in presence.
To facilitate the technique, the sound
editor will often make a physical wipe
on the mag- stripe to fade out the outgoing presence, while the other is
brought in in a similar fashion. Using a
razor blade, the editor will reduce the
width of the magnetic emulsion from
about a quarter of an inch to nothing
(Figure 5). This would be in an angle
covering about two feet of film. In some
cases, such as a television show under
Picture
CLOSE UP
Dialogue Track
#1
A
Dialogue With Mild Naia. C.U.
Dialogue Track
CLOSE UP
CLOSE UP k2
#1
B
Last Word C.U.
k1
Dialogue With Mild Nola. C.U. #1
BLANK STOCK
First Word C.U.
#1
#1
rerrryvviirevirriwrrvirrrrrrvirtirrrrinrwri
Dislogus With No Noia. C.U. k2
BLANK STOCK
BLANK STOCK
tight schedules and with limited
Figure 5: Extension with a physical wipe.
Picture
CLOSE UP
CLOSE UP k1
CLOSE UP k2
#1
Dialogue
Dialogue Without Noise C.U. #2
Last Word C.U. #1
Dialogue With Noise C.U. #2
Last Word C.U. #2
First Word C.U. #2
First Word C.U. #1
Figure 6: Backfill with all sound recorded on a single track.
that of a specific noise, but rather a track will be cut into master shots, two subtle change of ambience. The shots, and close-ups, and then the
noticeable change is all that has to be presence extended on either side of the
eliminated so, in these cases, extensions dialogue on each track to smooth it for
are used, rather than back -fill for the blending in the mix. This process will
entire scene. Quite often the dialogue allow the mixer to sneak in and out of
budgets, splitting tracks may become
impractical.
In these instances, as Keene puts it,
"you have to try and make an imperfect
so>indtrack perfect on one track, which
is very difficult. You extend the louder
backgrounds from one actor's dialogue
over the picture editors cut to.the next
shot, and right up to the very beginning
of the first word of the next actor's lines.
Hopefully, as soon as the audience
hears the word, they will cease to hear
the background, and the change won't
be noticeable."
This procedure is shown in Figure 6.
Automatic Dialogue Replacement
Another way around the problem of
distracting backgrounds is by means of
replacing the dialogue through looping,
or Automatic Dialogue Replacement
(A.D.R.).
With the older of the two methods,
model 140 sound analyzer,
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production dialogue on 35 mm magstock is spliced into an actual loop, with
an equal amount of bland fill stock.
When this is played back, the actor
listens to his original words, and during
the gap attempts to duplicate them in
both feeling and pace. The new dialogue
is layed down on a separate 35 mm
recorder, and the loop run over and over
again until the director and sound
editor are satisfied with the replacement dialogue.
A disadvantage to this system is that
all the lines to be replaced must be
spliced into individual loops, which
need to be threaded one at a time on the
looping stage. In addition, the new
dialogue must be cut in sync into the
looped dialogue reels.
With Automatic Dialogue Replacement, the full reels of picture and
production dialogue are programmed to
repeatedly play a set footage. While
listening to the original recording
through one side of his headphones, the
actor watches the picture and repeats
the lines in sync. The new dialogue is
recorded on a three -track 35 mm
recorder run in interlock with the
picture and original dialogue. This
allows for several alternate takes of
replacement dialogue, all of which will
be in sync with the picture when one
line finishes, the next one is programmed to be repeated.
The film's director is usually present
during the dialogue replacement
process, as is the looping editor, whose
job it is to make any subtle adjustments
necessary to ensure that the newly
recorded dialogue track fits the picture
in sync. How much looping is done on a
film depends on the budget, and the
artistic concerns of the director. The
story itself also plays a part.
"If you can see the source of the
noise," says Richard Portman, "it's
much easier to back -fill, since it's
justified. But what do you do to alibi a
freeway noise when you can't see it, and
the story point of the scene makes it
obvious that there's not supposed to be a
freeway there?"
"Interference is a very important
concern," Anderson adds. "If you're
doing a western, and you keep having
jets and car noise, it's obviously going
to artistically affect the film."
A.D.R. and looping do present their
own inherent problems, however.
"Because of the fact that you've
replaced all the dialogue," explains
Keene, "you've also lost all the
production sound, so now you only have
dead words coming at you. Everything
else that makes up the sound for that
scene has got to be replaced: all the
footsteps, all the clothes noise, all the
specific sound effects, and all the
presence and ambience."
A similar situation occurs when radio
mikes are used to record a scene:
although the actor's voices are picked
up, the track will be dry and flat because
August 1981
www.americanradiohistory.com
of the lack of presence and production
sound.
Foley Process
These missing sounds are replaced in
what is known as the Foley process.
Actors on a sound stage watch the
projected film and perform in sync to
the action on the screen, recreating the
movement sounds lacking in the
production dialogue or A.D.R. tracks.
The most common of these recreated
sounds are footsteps and clothing
rustle, but anything from rattling rifle
slings, to clanging pots and pans, to
scrubbing a person's back in a bath tub,
to roller skates hitting the pavement,
can all be recorded in sync on the Foley
stage.
"The sound effects editors look at the
picture," explains Keene, "and they
make up a set of cue sheets that indicate
all the sounds they want the Foley
person to create. That person will then
return the reels to the sound effects
editor and, hopefully, they're in sync. If
they aren't then we make some
adjustments and corrections to make
them fit. Sometimes there will be as
many as five or six tracks of Foley,
depending on how many people are
involved in the scene; how many Foley
people we have working; and how many
different things are going on in the
scene.
"Also, a picture may be going to go
into foreign distribution, so they'll have
to pull out all the dialogue and,
consequently, all the production sounds
as well. So they pretty much cue the
track for a complete Foley of everything
that happens in the picture."
Any scenes shot M.O.S. (a quaint
Hollywood term of Germanic derivation
meaning "mit out sound ") must also be
cued for Foley, as well as the addition of
ambience and backgrounds.
The Foley Stage is equipped with a
variety of walking surfaces to simulate
those found in the film. Sections of
concrete, linoleum, carpet, and metal
are provided, as are pits of sand, dirt,
gravel, and grass and leaves. Tanks of
water and mud are also used.. In
addition, all manner of props are
brought in by the Foley actors and the
sound editors, in order to recreate other
sounds in the picture. These props can
be but do not necessarily have to be
the same objects seen in the picture as
long as they sound the same, or so long
as they "work."
The Foley actors will wear clothing
that makes little or no noise of its own,
and will then either put on or carry
articles of clothing that will sound like
those worn by their counterparts on
screen. Care is also taken to match the
type of shoes worn by the film's
performers. During walking sequences,
the Foley actors may have to rub or
stroke their clothing in order to get the
right sound. It is a craft that requires a
great deal of skill since, by their very
-
-
Il
nature, Foley tracks are designed to be
cut into a reel of sound with little or no
editorial adjustments. Such Foley
tracks are as important as the ambience
tracks in reels with replaced dialogue.
The absence of these sounds would be
immediately apparent, distracting the
audience from the story.
The challenge to the editor and the rerecording mixer, then, is to blend these
A.D.R. tracks and their Foley and
ambience reels with the production
dialogue recordings without anyone
noticing. The change must be invisible,
and this can often border on the
impossible.
"The worst thing," says Anderson,
"is when they want to loop Character A
because they don't like his voice, but
they don't want to loop Character B,
because his voice is fine, or the actor is
unavailable for dialogue replacement."
"You'll have a sequence," offers
Portman, "where a portion of it will be
replaced dialogue recorded on a
soundstage, more often than not with a
different microphone from the production recording. Then you'll have the live
outside track with all this noise and
presence. Now it's up to the sound editor
to somehow continue the background so
you'll have something to lay the looped
lines against. Then it's up to the rerecording mixer to try and make the one
sound match the other. Well, it's the
same as taking an orchestra out and
recording half of a piece in a field,
bringing them into a stage and
recording the rest of the music, and then
trying to match them.
Another concern, according to
Portman, "is that often you'll get on the
A.D.R. stage and give the actor a list of
lines to replace. Then he'll say, `I don't
hear anything wrong with that,' and
he'll refuse to redo it. Now you come
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UNDERSTANDING THE FOLEY TECHNIQUE
In Studio F, the Foley Stage at Goldwyn Sound in Hollywood, Foley person John, Roesch is
recreating the body movements of actor Burt Young as he removes his trousers in a scene with
Ann -Margret. Rather, Roesch is recreating the sound of the body movements by rubbing and
twisting a pair of pants clutched to his chest before the microphone. Sound editor Jim Bullock
waves to the booth, and the picture projected before Roesch stops.
"I think," he says, "we need a little belt buckle rattle in that."
The scene is projected again, and the two examine it closely, trying to make out in the dim black
and white print just what Young is doing. They decide to add the buckle. With Roesch at his
original position before the mike, and Bullock standing a few feet back and off to the side, they
rehearse the rattle and clothing rustle so that mixer Bob Litt can set a level. Litt asks Bullock to
move away from the mike a few more feet, and they are ready.
Litt rolls the film back to the footage called by Roesch, and the picture and 35 mm mag stock are
run forward in sync. Roesch begins his action to get into sync with Young on the screen, and Litt
punches in to record the new sound, now with Bullock on the belt buckle. A wave from Roesch
says that it's a take, and a replay shows that it works, so they go on to the next sound to be
recreated: Young picking up a champagne bottle from a coffee table, and setting it
down on the bar.
Roesch is one of the dozen or so first class Foley persons in Hollywood, and has
worked on such films as Black Stallion, Thief, Raiders of the Lost Ark, and the forhcoming Body Heat.
"We're not called Foley `walkers'," says Roesch, "because the term implies that
all we do is footsteps. In fact, we do much more."
"It's much easier and faster," says Bullock, "to Foley effects such as this bottle,
rather than to cut them in individually."
In fact, the process was originally designed for both walking and sound effects.
"In the early Thirties," says Bullock, "Jack Foley was doing sound effects for 1. e
theater performances, and he moved into motion pictures with the coming of sound.
The film would be projected and he and his crew would recreate the sounds absent
from the reproduction recording, laying them down on an acetate disk run in sync
with the picture. The system was called Sync Sound Effects. Many sound editors
had worked with Jack Foley at Universal at one time or another, so when the studio
system died out and the sound editors went independent, they started calling the
that Bullock Ileti)
process `Foley'. The name stuck."
John Hoesch (right,
"John's job," continues Bullock, "came into existence only in the last three or four
years. Before that the sound editors did it. But with increasingly tighter deadlines, the amount of
time in post- production has been decreased on most pictures. Now, rather than take two or three
editors away from the bench, it's easier to hire a Foley person to work under the supervision of the
sound editor. A lot of features these days will even split up the responsibilities, and have a specific
Foley editor."
Roesch usually works with another Foley person, Joan Rowe, but on this picture, Hal Asby's
Lookin to Get Out, he's working with Bullock alone.
"1 was an assistant sound editor on a low -budget feature," he says, "and since I was the only one
wearing sneakers, they figured I had some agility, so I did the Foley movement. I had no intention
of getting into it, but after that they just kept calling. I feel that, like acting, it takes a basic innate
talent to do this well. You need excellent coordination, timing and reflexes, as well as a good sense
of sound and the creativity to find ways to make the sound."
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August 1981
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R -e /p 87
A NEW
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R -e/p 88
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along, and there's no way that you can can't understand, it effectively ruins
make it consistent except by piling on more lines, because when line 'A' goes
more noise so that you can make it `by, and the audience doesn't hear it,
consistent from shot to shot"
they'll turn to their friends and ask,
"It's an inherent tragedy about `What'd he say?,' and then they miss
dialogue editing," says Anderson, "that line B'."
you have to pull all the good stuff down
"As soon as they say that, they're
to the level of the bad stuff to make it out," argues Portman. "And it takes a
match."
while for them to pick it up again. You
"We're faced with this unfortunate see, the play's the thing, and in
reality," agrees Keene. "The audience everything that we do, we want people
will pick up that noise eventually, but to hear the words, and not be disturbed
they will forget it or ignore it if they or distracted by outside influences."
aren't constantly reminded of the sound
Along these same lines, Portman
by it jumping in and out."
points out another situation that can
Complicating Anderson's job, he present problems: "The editor might
says, is that "we find a lot of actors and say, `This is the dialogue I want you to
directors are scared to death that if you use,' because he likes the reading, or
loop, you're going to hurt the what have you. Well, you may find that
performance."
this track has a very bad sound
"What they don't realize," says Flick, problem. Now you don't want to take
"is that if you can't understand the out what you were told to leave in, so
dialogue, the audience won't under- you lay out alternate readings of the
stand the characterizations."
line culled from other takes and, during
Further than that, continues the mix, you demonstrate to the people
Anderson: "If you get one line that you that the show isn't hurt by using
The Foley Technique
... continued -
"Anything that can be recreated on the Foley stage will be recreated," says Bullock. Jingling
keys, held close to a mike became marching troops, or a certain mike handled in a certain way can
recreate a horse fall. Creativity is again only limited by the imagination of the Foley, person and the
post -production budget.
"Most features are now Foleyed wall to wall," says Bullock, "so that the sounds will be there in
the Music and Effects following dubbing into foreign languages."
"Another reason," adds Litt, "is the increasingly popular use of radio mikes. Those tracks need
an element of movement, or they just sound dead.
"With a good recording, you can blend the dialogue and Foley with a little EQ, and maybe some
reverb. But, if the production sound of the dialogue is a bad recording, you can only clean it up so
much with EQ. Consequently, you have to rip the high -end out of the Foley to get it to match."
The supervising sound editor will usually consult with the Foley editor about the sounds to be
recreated, and to what tracks they will be assigned.
Roesch likes to view the picture and go over these cue sheets before the actual Foley session
begins, so that he can begin thinking in advance about the sounds to be done, and the props
needed to make them.
"Before we record each sound," he explains, "I watch the picture and get a feeling about what
might work. On the stage, I try it out before we roll, and I can usually tell if it will fit. If rm given time,
I try to get all the little sound elements of a movement. Not, say, just the thump
of a hand on a wall,
but the light touches that follow as wet."
"Foley works best, and sounds the most realisitic," says Litt, "when you see a guy
walking , and maybe you don't hear every step. That's the way it is in real life.
Directors complain that Foley always sounds like Foley; the effects all sound alike
and too clean."
Roesch tries to adjust for this criticism by attention to detail.
"A lot of Foley people will do their sidewalk footsteps on a clean concrete slab, but
sidewalks aren't like that. I add some coffee grounds to get that gritty sound of
concrete in a city."
This sort of attention is important to getting a realistic feel.
"Also," says Bullock, "Foley can be quite stylized. You usually don't 'hear' footsteps in real life, as clearly as you do in the movies."
In this case, the team is working with four tracks of 35 mm mag stock: one three track, full coat, and one single stripe. In one scene, Jon Voight's footsteps and body
movement are married on one track, as are those of Ann -Margaret. Burt Young's
footsteps, however, are placed on a separate track from his clothing and body
movement, so that his walk can be adjusted in the mix to fit his weight. Young
outweighs Roesch by at least 60 pounds.
walking in sync with
For safety, a quarter-inch protection track is run as well.
The sound effects are noted and recorded separately in most cases. In this Ann-Margaret's footsteps
instance, the champagne bottle movements are recorded on the single-stripe 35 mm mag, and will
be cut in fairly easily later on.
A discovery has been made, however, following the first pass. Young is taking the bottle from an
ice bucket on the coffee table that can just barely be made out in this print. A quick search turns up
no ice in the building.
Roesch scoops up a handful] of gravel from one of the walking pits on the Foley stage, and drops
them into a large glass mug from his collection of props. They roll the film and mag again, and with
a rattle of the mug, he recreates the sound of the bottle being pulled from the ice bucket. A
moment later, he sets a bottle down on the wooden floor surface serving as his bar. It works.
"The ultimate compliment you can get," says Roesch, "is when a scene is so good you don't
know it's Foleyed. They say: 'You mean that wasn't production?'."
-
.
August 1981
www.americanradiohistory.com
.
.
1
another line. You note that for the
mixer, along with the accompanying
backgrounds that make the alternative
dialogue fit properly."
Other ways of saving dialogue can be
found in the physical manipulation of
the magnetic film. According to Elodie
Keene: "You can scrape the thickness of
the emulsion, so that you're actually
dealing with less sound. You're not
totally obliterating something, but
simply reducing the level."
"Level is determined by the width of
the oxide stripe," Anderson adds. "The
track is about '/a -inch wide, so if you
scrape it to 1/8-inch, you've reduced your
level by about half. That's also the
principle of the scraped fade outs. So
now, if there's an impact you want to
lessen, you can take a razor blade and
make a little dip in the track. It won't get
rid of the noise, but it will lower the level
of the sound relative to the rest of the
track."
"These are the ways of minimizing
unwanted sounds on tracks that you
can't get out of using," Keene continues.
"Many times something will happen in
the middle of a sentence so that you
can't cut it out. But if it's in between
words, or even syllables, you can scrape
the track to lessen the level and save the
word."
35 mm Versus 16 mm Soundtracks
"This is one of the advantages of 35
millimeter," says Anderson. "In 16
millimeter, the minumum you can cut is
one frame. But in 35 mm, which goes
faster per second and has four sprocket
holes per frame, you can cut in quarter
frames."
"You have a whole lot more track in
which to handle things," agrees Keene.
"Also, because it goes so much faster
than 16 millimeter, the pauses in
between the words are longer physically and easier to identify andisolate."
The larger format film also allows for
easier and more accurate matching of
tracks via modulation, as the mag -stock
can be moved or adjusted in quarter frame increments. This brings the two
--
different soundtracks
1
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/
/
11
whatever reason," Anderson adds.
"One thing the editor can do to help out
the mixer is to scrape the edge of the
track to lower the impact."
"Also," Keene says, "you can lay the
mag film emulsion side up on a piece of
opaque glass that has a raised pebble
surface. When you scrape with a razor
blade over the magnetic track, it pulls
off the oxide layer where the pebbles
are, but leaves the rest." Lightly
sandpapering the track will achieve
similar results, and is useful in a
situation where perhaps the actor's
heavy breathing is breaking up the
track, and needs to be softened.
"You do a little bit of scraping or
scratching," Anderson continues "and
then you run it through the Movieola
and listen. Because the trick is that you
can take more off, but you can't put
more back." These techniques can also
be applied to sound effects and to ease
the cuts from shot to shot if a splice is
making a noise, or one piece of mag film
is louder than the previous one.
"For instance," says Keene, if you
change from one scene to another with
an extreme difference in the background, and you don't mind it being
somewhat different, just less noticible.
You can scrape part of the width of the
emulsion of the louder incoming shot, in
order to reduce the effect of it jumping
out at you. Scraping is one of those
things that looks like all the editor is
doing is screwing around. In fact, he's
1
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1
taking advantage of many years of
training and experience that provides
him with the knowledge of what he'll
get if he does this or that to the track."
Adjustments for a number of these
problems could conceivably be handled
in the mix, although not nearly as
effectively, let alone the additional cost
of renting more time on a re- recording
stage for the additional time when all
the fixes add up.
"The object is to let the dialogue mixer
just set those pots and let it play," says
Keene. "If you can do these things for
him so that he doesn't have to worry
about them, you're way ahead of the
game."
"And it's a wierd sort of job, because
after you've made this incredible thing
after hours and hours of
work
scraping tracks and eliminating things
with all the little tricks that make
backgrounds smooth all the way
through if after all that you bring in a
layman in to listen to it, he'd say, `So
what's the big deal? There's nothing
there.' And that's the object of the entire
-
-
process."
In the next installment of Film
Sound Editing, Steve Barnett will
discuss the areas in which sound
editors make their greatest
creative contribution to the motion
picture: sound effects and backgrounds used to establish character and mood.
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into closer
original and a re -print
alignment. Greater fidelity is also
offered by 35 mm.
"It runs at 90 feet per minute, which is
18 inches per second," explains Flick,
"and, because of its size, the material is
physically easier to handle."
Another area of dialogue repair is the
adjustment of the words themselves;
occasionally a very sibilant track may
be encountered, in which the sound
really breaks up.
"What you can do," says Flick, "is
take the tip of a razor blade or an X-acto
knife and make a single razor slice,
removing maybe a strip of mag 1/32 of
an inch wide from the center of the tape
strip, for the length of the `S' sound.
This will reduce the volume of the
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intelligibility of the word."
"Or an actor will suddenly shout for
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August 1981
www.americanradiohistory.com
R -e/p 89
ROBB
I
E
"Making the most of what you have!"
DUPREE
STREET
--
CORNER
HEROES
a
small studio success:
ALPHA
STUDIOS
... leading up to, andrecordingthe
Robbie Dupree hits
..
.
by Jimmy Stewart
"Making the most of what you have," might well be the watchword for engineers and producers
working in smaller recording studios. Certainly, for today's multitrack sessions, ensuring
adequate separation is vital. But how do you acheive acoustical isolation while recording in a
small studio area? Despite having a studio floor measuring just 12 by 15 feet plus an even
smaller 8 by 12 vocal and keyboard booth Alpha Studios in North Hollywood was the
recording venue for Robbie Dupree's successful debut album Robbie Dupree, which included the
single hits "Stealaway" and "Hot Rod Hearts," and latest LP, Street Corner Heros. So how does
Alpha Studios' owner and resident engineer Gary Brandt make the most of the space that he has
at his dosposal?
-
Having grown up in the San Gabriel
Valley, Gary Brandt started engineering on a three -track Ampex in a small
independent production studio owned
by a friend. His first assignment was to
engineer a young new artist by the
name of Bobbie Gentry, which was to
prove an immediate success: "Ode to
Billy Joe" and "Mississippi Delta" went
to the top of the charts. Eventually Gary
moved on to Sunwest Recording
studios, engineering Gordon Light foot's "If You Could Read My Mind"
album, and also working with Doctor
John, Ike and Tina Turner, Neil
Diamond, to name but a few. He then
moved on to Sound City Studios, Van
Nuys, until 1975, at which point he
decided to stop working for somebody
else, and open up his own studio.
Studio Construction
Alpha Studios was constructed from
the shell of an 850 square foot building
in North Hollywood. Originally, the
outside of the building had a 2- by 4 -inch
- The Author Jimmy Stewart has appeared as a
guitarist and arranger on more than
a thousand recordings made in Los
Angeles studios. He has served as
Musical Director for various artists,
including Lainie Kazan, Chita
and Andy Williams. His
widely read column in Guitar Player
magazine is now in its tenth year, and
he has also published many books on
music. Currently, Jimmy is involved
in a 16/24 -track studio developing
songs and recording artists. He has
musically coached Juice Newton,
Tommy Chong and Linda Ronstadt.
R -e/p 90
August
stud wall with no special foundations,
and an inner wall made of a very light
layer of drywall. Everything else was
on a floating foundation, which is the
standard for this type of building, with
18 inches of crawl space underneath.
The studio's control room section was
expanded in the front by putting in a
bay window, and adding about 300
square feet as a hallway for the
entrance, which acted like a sound trap.
The control room was also layered with
particle board to add mass and weight
to the floor, thereby eliminating some of
the resonance present in the original
floor.
The recording area itself was
constructed from two rooms of the
original structure. Floor joists were cut
out of one 15- by 12 -foot section of the
combined rooms. A new foundation was
poured through the window around the
inside of the remaining structure,
remounting and re- establishing the
piers that held up the new floor. A new
wall was added to the outside wall, with
three layers of drywall between, plus a
one-inch air gap. Installation of a
sunken floor increased the ceiling
height by some 18 inches, thereby
giving Alpha Studios a 10 -foot ceiling
from a room that originally had been
only eight feet high. In addition, the
new concrete foundation prevented
sound from leaking from the control
room into the recording area.
Walking into the 12 by 15 studio, to
my surprise the room still retained a
touch of liveness. A lot of rooms that
I've used in the past have been too dead
every bit of ambiance had been
sucked out of my ears. So, my first
question: How had Gary acoustically
treated the recording area?
-
1981
www.americanradiohistory.com
-
"I put Helmholtz resonators in the
ceiling," he replied, "which were spaced
16 inches apart on 2- by 8 -inch ceiling
joists. Above that there is some
fiberglass for absorption. The studio's
ceiling appears to be a standard 8-feet
from floor level but, acoustically, it
actually goes up another 10 to 15 inches.
The resonators attenuate low- frequency
waves by virtue of their volume and
size. We made up different size boxes to
cover different areas, and left them
completely open, with just fiberglass
acoustic treatment above them to
prevent floor -to- ceiling reflection. The
end result is that you walk into this
room and you do not feel the pull on your
ears that happens with very dead
rooms. For a space measuring only 15
by 12 that was quite an accomplishment.
"The 2- by 4 -inch studs on the
secondary wall we left completely open
into the room, layed fiberglass in
2.6
4.6
Three Layers
'/. -Inch Drywall
1/4-inch Panel
Plywood to Stud
1
-Inch Alr Gap
RECORDING AREA
1 -inch Plywood to
Back of Inside Stud
Wall and Ceiling Joists
CROSS -SECTION OF 1-06Eatr----ALPHA STUDIO'S
NALL CONSTRUCTION,
SHOWING LAYERS OF
tCOUSTIC TREATMENT
SLÁ B FL
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Making The Most
Of What You Have!
:HT'
from
a
12' by 15' STUDIO
between them, and then simply put
material over the top. That allowed us to
have a little bit more actual volume of
low- frequency absorbent material in
the room. So we kept the room as big as
we could to deal with what we had to
deal with, and between that and the
ceiling treatment we were able to retain
a certain degree of liveness."
The Control Room
Alpha's control room measures 22
feet wide by 20 deep, with a bay window
on one side. The sound in the room is
crisp and tight, with excellent
transients. I queried Gary on how he
controlled the low- frequency room
resonances.
"Well, I haven't done a lot," he
confessed. "To be honest with you, I
treated the walls in here as anechoically
as I could
lot of absorbent material,
and very few reflective surfaces. It may
not be the greatest control room in the
world, but I haven't had one complaint
from a musician that: `The room doesn't
-a
sound good.'
"We worked on the monitoring to
eliminate problems with the original
Westlake TM -1 horn. We also did some
work with traps for the ceiling, but it's
still an 8 -foot ceiling room
nothing
more than that."
The ceiling appears to drop down
visually to about 71/2 feet right at the
control room. But, acoustically, it went
all the way up to the 8 -foot ceiling mark.
Sound definition while moving from a
sitting to a standing position was
excellent.
"I would call it an anechoic control
room with very light reflection," Gary
continued. "It's very quick and non dispersed not because I wanted it, but
because it was the way it had to be for
this facility. It is a very defined
sounding control room."
-
took one blockline amplifier, and
evaluated its sonic quality, bandwidth,
slew rate, and distortion. Basically, we
listened to the amplifier, decided what
we wanted to hear, and then custom built our console around that concept.
"Producers that work here find a split
console
with separate input and
output/monitor sections
to be 100%
more desirable than an in -line board
where the monitor package is built into
every line input
because they don't
have to walk around the engineer to
turn up an instrument. Here they just
walk over to the monitor section, which
is all in a separate area.
"I can be mixing and doing whatever
to the inputs, and the producer is free to
reach over and at least get a little more
of one instrument that they need to
hear. If I had a monitor section built
into the same channel, producers would
be working around me, which would be
more of a nuisance than them actually
working a separate monitor control.
"Also, by having the cue controls in a
separate panel, I find that in a lot of
cases a producer can actually help with
setting up the cue mix. You often have a
lot less problem with a musician
blaming an engineer for a problem with
the cue sends, if the producer is sitting
-
-
-
-
there working the system, Gary
offered."
Speaking from the viewpoint of a
studio musician for over 20 years, a
studio's cue system is one of my most
important considerations. It is the
element in a studio that helps me
understand the feel of a tune. Musicans
need to hear a good rough, if not
finished, mix in their headphones.
Many studios don't set up the cue
system to enable a player to get the
feeling of a performance. A musician
has to achieve that sonic "high" to get
into his licks. Broken headphones with
shorted wires and a cue system with no
echo sends can easily turn a player off.
Alpha Studios' cue system uses a
Crown D150 power amp, sending out a
quiet, high -quality sound into the
headphones. The only drawback for me
was the provision of a single stereo cue.
This could be worked out by splitting it
into two mono sends, giving players two
tracking options. Masking of frequencies can often pose problems when
working with a mono cue send. One way
of preventing that problem is by
running a stereo cue mix with panpots:
drums and bass center; guitar far right,
etc.
The Outboard Hardware
In the past few years, many producers
have become more aware of a studio's
outboard gear. However, they should be
warned to stay away from Electric
Larry: the guy who gimmicks the
sound, heavy echo, phase this, flange
that. If it adds to the musicial product, a
more subtle way should be tried. A good sounding studio should offer you a
sufficient choice. Gary ran down a list
of pros and cons, starting with
compressor -limiters and expanders.
"LA -4s are still my favorite overall
limiter; they seem to have a real nice
bandwidth, even more than the 1176.
-
The Mixing Console
Alpha's customized API console
features balanced, transformerless
mike pre -amps, B &B F -2 parametric
equalizers on every input, 32- channel
metering, and a 32- channel monitor
matrix that can also be used during
remix. This gives a total of 64 inputs
plus eight subgroups for mixdown.
Gary outlined his philosophy for
selecting a console to suit his particular
requirements of working in a modestsize studio.
-
"Basically, the API board
along
with all the more basic meat and potato
consoles
has been constructed to a
basic concept: it needs gain points at
particular points in its signal flow.
Some mixers have more amplifiers and
some have less; in this board we went
for less
less is more, sonically. We
R -e/p 92 August 1981
-
-
ALPHA Control Room
www.americanradiohistory.com
... console and tape machine bay -
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But look again.
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And look for the sophisticated back panel that allows a wide variety of patching applications.
There's even more that you can't see. Things like the
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Visit your Peavey Dealer today. He'll be glad to give
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RATED POWER:
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800 watts RMS into 8 ohms
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FREQUENCY RESPONSE:
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RATED POWER:
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INTERMODULATION DISTORTION:
Less than 0.1% from 40 mW to 400
watts RMS into 4 ohms. Typically
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Less than 0.1% from 20 mW to 200
watts RMS, 20 Hz to 20 KHz into 4
ohms. Typically below .04^/o
August 1981
ror aaa
c
www.americanradiohistory.com
R -e/p 93
Making The Most
Of What You Have!
1J
J
TRACK
REELNO
MASTER
from a
[}"-
POP
'
Spectrum Analyser approach. It
sounded a little funny, so we went back
and tuned it sonically. I use the EMT
just for ambience; to add color to
program material. For vocals I have an
AKG BX-20. For the Robbie Dupree
sessions I usually bring in an EMT 251
reverb, which I find to be just real
usable because of its digital format. It's
real flexible; you can obtain short
delays with it, as well as long decay
patterns. I use it mostly in the short
ranges for tom -tom echo, and just a little
bit of that roundness of the mid-range
the system seems to have. I didn't want
to buy one though. They cost over
$20,000 now, so I just rent it for mixes.
One effect unit that Gary uses most
frequently is the Lexicon Prime Time
digital delay.
"If you run two mono sources through
a pair of Prime Times, you can actually
cross phase the outputs and get almost
total cancellation of the program,
which can result in a real nice
phase /flange effect. Although the built in VCO affects both sides equally and
so provides a fixed, non -random sound
as the flange moves up and down by
using two of them going up and down at
different rates you have effectively
created a random effect. So you can do a
lot more with two Prime Times than you
-
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Those are the ones I'm familiar with,
and I plan to do a lot more research in
looking into other limiters in the
future."
What about reverb, I asked?
"I have a stereo EMT140 plate with a
remote control unit. I spent a lot of time
tuning it myself. We first tried the
NAB
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TABLE 1: Robbie Dupree session log, . track layout and microphones
can with one."
According to Gary, one of the hardest
instruments to get a decent flanging
sound from is the Fender Rhodes
electric piano.
"If you use a Boss Chorus
like
many guys do the flanging effect is so
wide that it actually shifts the tone. In a
lot of cases the Rhodes can sound
tremendous. It just depends on where
the envelope happens to be sleeping at
any particular time. So I have to use the
Prime Times and, by mixing in, say, a
Harmonizer into these two inputs, I can
create random effects and delays. You
end up with this real envelope -type of
sound that sounds more harmonized
than it does effected."
-
-
The Importance of
Flexible Equalization
Earlier this year, while working on
my new album, I had two separate outtakes that I didn't turn in to the
company. In my demo studio I had
experimented with guitar sounds, and
had them on tape with a hot L.A.
rhythm section used on the project.
There were many equalization prob-
lems on this tape, ranging from a noisy
Fender Rhodes electric piano, to a
popping bass track
the kinds of
problem that cancel out a good
performance on tape. Plus, I had added
my electric guitar and one classical
guitar part at my demo studio, which
features a board equipped with a fairly
modest EQ capability. If Gary could
make this tape sound better by reequalizing and mixing it at his studio, I
knew he had the hit sound covered in
more ways than one. The next day, I
-
brought in the renegade tape, and
quizzed Gary on the creative use of
equalization.
"Every engineer has his own ideas
about EQ," he explained, "and mine is
to stay away from equalizing the
fundamental frequency as much as
possible. I equalize the subsonic regions
where necessary to break up ambient
sounds, and, in a nutshell, fill in the
voids that might better be served
acoustically by, say, a guitar. A guitar
is one of the most variable sources for
equalization, because you have a range
that can literally encompass the entire
spectrum of a track.
"The key to getting a good sound on
tape is to try and pull from the
instruments being recorded as much
bandwidth as possible. For instance,
when I mike snare drum, I try and mike
it from underneath as well. Because,
when you are on top, you've got this
drum head between the mike and the
snare wires, and it doesn't necessarily
mean that you're going to get enough of
the sound to make it sound like a proper
snare drum. So, I will mike underneath
as well as on top, with the mikes out of
phase. You flop the phase around, and
you attenuate all the low- frequency and
mid -range out of this low snare mike. By
mounting the bottom mike as far away
from the drum as possible, but still
facing up towards it, this creates a little
bit of time delay and doesn't cause
complete phase cancellation. If a little
of this is mixed back into the source, you
can fill out the sound."
Examples of microphone selection
and EQ setting for the Robbie Dupree
album sessions at Alpha Studios are
detailed in Table 1.
... continued overleaf -
... partial view of outboards rack www.americanradiohistory.com
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Making The Most
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1JJJ
from
a
12' by 15' STUDIO
Basic Tracking
Upon arrival for a tracking session at
Alpha Studios, the first thing I wanted
to do was talk with the musicians,
beginning with the drummer. Drummers, I have found, can tell you a lot
about the sound of a particular studio.
Their job is surely one of the toughest on
a session, since they act as the
backbone of any recording date. If there
are any problems concerning sound or
the working atmosphere, this guy will
know it.
Peter Bunetta was the drummer on
the day of my visit, and has co- produced
and played drums on both of Robbie
Dupree's albums. We got to talking, and
he told me how much he loves the sound
at Alpha, and the way that Gary Brandt
engineers. In fact, Peter explained, the
band affectionately refer to Gary as
"Eagle ears," since he can catch any
mistake they make
wrong chord or
a wrong note
and will even suggest
changing a part if it doesn't fit the
musical concept.
- -a
"The studio itself," continued Peter,
"gives us a feeling of playing in a small
Checklist for Setting Up a Small
Studio
1)
Why this location?
2) Is it better to buy, build or lease?
3) What about taxes and zoning?
4) How do you control impact and
airborne noises? (Exterior walls, inside
partitions, ceilings, roof.)
5) How do you stop the sounds generated
inside the studio from disturbing the
neighbors?
6) What is the acoustical treatment of the
studio itself, and its effect on the sounds
recorded in it? (Example: air -conditioning
sounds; door panels; windows; solid
doors; door seals; sound -lock sealing
doors; observation windows; noise from
ground vibrations; noise from lamps.)
7) Who will supervise the construction?
Business Checklist
Get an attorney!
2. Get a CPA.
3. Get a maintenance man.
4. Never sign a leasing agreement without
thinking it through, and asking professional advice from your attorney and CPA.
5. Get cash from your clients until you
trust them.
I.
Partnerships?
Only if you have to!
2. You must be of like minds musically.
3. Hands on the table attitude (honest
common-sense).
4. Both of you make decisions and sign
1.
checks.
5. Get in writing your specific
handshakes).
R -e/p 96
duties (no
120 Hz
SM -57 UJ
® SM -S7
Roll -off
®SM -7
9:50
CONGAS
VOCAL
U -87
STUDIO LAYOUT AND
MIKE PLACEMENT
FOR "STEAL AWAY"
BASIC TRACKS
*Gary Brandt now prefers to use C414
mikes on upper toms, set to hypercardioid pickup pattern.
club; very tight with good eye contact,
which keeps the energy contained. I
know what to expect from the sounds
here, which cuts down on the time it
takes me to warm up to a track. When
making hits, my job is the mood and
feel. No problems at Alpha; I can get
into it all the way."
For the tracking date the studio floor
had been set up with 4 -foot hard baffles
around the drums. The piano was
covered with an Alpha Acoustic Control
piano bag, designed by Gary. Comprising a large quilted vinyl cover lined
with absorbent material that completely encompasses the chamber area
of the piano, the bag has zipper
openings for mike stands. The
enclosure provides up to 15 dB of sound
isolation at 15 kHz. The bass was run
through a direct box.
I asked Gary about his techniques for
achieving a good guitar sound.
"I will baffle and sometimes put a
cover blanket over the guitar amplifier
if he is essentially loud," he says, "and
mike it with an SM-57 or U -87. If I want
a nice rich but elastic electric guitar
sound that a lot of the players like to
hear, I use an 87. But if I want a real
gritty, present mid -range I go to a SM57, which is a dynamic mike. I'll go back
and forth between a dynamic and
condenser for that."
And the guide/scratch vocal?
"In a small facility like this," Gary
continued, "you are only dealing with a
distance of 15 feet from, say, the drum
kit, which is your primary problem in
terms of separation, particularly the
cymbals. I have to keep a vocalist pretty
close in this facility to get a scratch
vocal that is useable. I may even take
advantage of another room by running
a snake out into the lounge, for example,
and sticking the vocalist in there. I've
even put vocalists in the bathroom
before, and that can give a good sound."
August 1981
www.americanradiohistory.com
GUITAR
AMP
Small Room =Close Miking
In a room of this size, close miking
must surely be the key to getting a
sufficient isolation, I queried.
"Without a doubt," Gary agreed. "In a
small room like this you really only
have a couple of ways you can set up. I
put the drums in the most open
sounding part of the room which, in my
case, is back in the corner of the room
that has two dead surfaces. I play
around with a couple of baffles faced
with live and absorbent surfaces.
Basically, it is a very anechoic sound. I
have a floating wooden floor, on top of
which I lay a carpet. Putting a layer of
carpet between the live-sounding floor
and the drum kit gives it a liveness that
the room would not have added to the
sound.
"My basic miking set-up for drums
comprises an AKG C452 with a 20 dB
pad and a swivel on the capsule for the
top of the snare drum, and one
underneath with a 10 dB pad. As
mentioned earlier, I filter the wire
underneath, flop the phase, add a little
of that into the top mike, and generally
EQ the high end of the top mike. I try
and mike reasonably close to where the
snare head is going to be hit, without
getting in the drummer's way. That
gives me reasonable cymbal or hi -hat
separation.
"Then I'll take a pair of AKG C414s
for overheads, and try to mike the hi -hat
and the left crash cymbal if, indeed, I
have a left crash cymbal on the kit. If I
have another set of mini -toms to the left,
which some drummers use occasionally I will put an SM -57 on those. On
toms I use SM -57s, with the exception of
the floor tom, where I use a Sony C37FET. A C -37 has a nice round low end;
it really shakes the room up when he
hits the drums, and is an exciting
sounding floor tom mike.
-
... continued overleaf -
This is not the only
reason to
buyJBL's
new 2441
compression driver.
Brüel
Mal a qor
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235OJ/Q(t/i(/232PAOAPTOR
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s0
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Unequalizedfrequency response ofa typical
2441 on a JBL 2350 horn.
As you can see from this frequency
response curve, the new JBL 2441
delivers impressive levels of performance. From extended bandwidth to
high sensitivity and smooth, peak -free
response.
But as important as these performance parameters are, they're only
part of the story. Using the latest laser
holography and computer analysis
techniques, JBL engineers have developed a unique diaphragm design that
allows the 2441 to match its outstanding response with unprecedented
reliability and power capacity. That
means you get exceptionally high
performance without the trade -offs
found in previous driver designs.
The secret behind this increased
performance lies in the diaphragm's
three -dimensional, diamond - pattern
surround! As outlined in a paper
published in the Journal of the Audio
Engineering Society* this surround
is both stronger and more flexible
than conventional designs. This permits the diaphragm to combine all
the traditional reliability and power
capacity benefits of its aluminum
construction with the extended frequency response of more exotic metals.
It also maintains consistent diaphragm
control throughout the driver's
usable frequency range to eliminate
uncontrolled response peaks.
Additionally, each 2441 is built
to JBL's exacting standards. The
magnetic assembly is machined from
rugged cast iron and steel. Extremely
tight machining tolerances and hand
tolerance matching maintain unit
to unit consistency. And finally, each
2441 is individually tested to ensure
that it meets published specifications.
So before you buy any
compression
driver, ask your JBL professional
products dealer about the 2441. It'll
deliver a lot more than just an
impressive frequency response.
I. Patent Applied For
*Journal of the Audio Engineering Society, 1980
October, Volume 28 Number 10. Reprints
available upon request.
James B. Lansing Sound, Inc.
8500 Balboa Boulevard,
Northridge, California 91329 U.S.A.
Specifications
Horn Throat
Diameter
Nominal Impedance
50 mm
Power Capacity
Sensitivity 11 Watt,
meter)
Frequency Range
70 W
Voice Coil Diameter
100 mm
Voice Coil Material
Edgewound aluminum ribbon
Flux Density
1.8
in
16 S2
continuous program
dB SPL Ion axis of a JBL
2350 90° radial horn)
500 Hz to 18 kHz
111
1
JBL
2
T
4
JBL1 diamond suspen-
in
sion diaphragm combines
performance with relia-
)18,000 gauss)
bility.
Professional
Products
Division
!nada through Gould Marketing, Montreal, Quebec.
August 1981
For additional information circle
#
63
www.americanradiohistory.com
R -e/p 97
Reading this ad
may solve
your next audio
problem
Solving audio problems is a daily requirement for the
professional. Often, the solution requires the use of
accurate test instruments, with a high degree of reliability.
The Spectra Sonics Model 510 Bandpass Filter and
the Model 802 Signal Generator are the answer to your
service requirements, permanent or portable. The
battery powered units are accurate, reliable, compact,
affordable, and easy to use.
THE MODEL 510 BANDPASS FILTER
The Model 510 is a 20Hz to 20kHz, ( -3dB), bandpass
filter with a gain of 60dB. The 510 may be utilized with a
standard voltmeter to make unweighted noise measurements on individual pieces of electronics, or complete
systems. The 510 may also be used with existing noise
analyzers for unweighted noise measurement. Battery
operation eliminates ground current flow between
instruments, resulting in consistent and accurate measurements not previously available.
THE MODEL 802 SIGNAL GENERATOR
The Model 802 is a signal generator capable of
developing five selectable frequencies. An adjustable
gain control allows the user any number of gain
settings with impedances of 600 ohms or greater.
The Model 802 may be used for tape machine calibration, signal to noise measurement, as well as low and
high level amplifier trouble shooting.
The Model 510 Bandpass Filter and the Model 802
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today at your nearest distributor or contact Spectra Sonics.
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PECTRA
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For additional information circle # 64
www.americanradiohistory.com
R -e/p 98
Y
1
August
1981
Making The Most
Of What You Have!
1JJJta
from
a
12' by 15' STUDIO
snare drum sits. In this way, he tries to
eliminate some of the high-frequency
mid -range sounds from getting into the
bass drum mike, which can upset
separation.
Overdubbing
"My choice for the kick drum can
vary. Most of the time I use an SM -7,
which has a nice low- frequency
response, and a lot of punch. Sometimes
I will go to a U47FET, or even a Sony C500. It depends mainly on the way the
drummer plays, what kind of sound you
are trying to achieve, and the way you
want it to mix into the bass sound. You
want the bass and the kit to be a real
harmony of sound, so that they are both
up front and have a lot of definition."
"I try not to use a separate hi -hat mike
if at all possible. The sound of, say, a
C414 set to cardioid, and positioned
below aiming up at the ride or crash
cymbal, provides sufficient pickup for
the crash, and you still have some of
that stick sound. When you spread the
overheads in the stereo mix there is an
ambience about the sound you pick up,
but without getting too much of the
snare drum."
Gary finds that filtering out a little bit
on the low end from the overheads also
helps get rid of some of the mid -range
from the snare. He can achieve a nice
"crystally" cymbal sound that is very
realistic, even though it has been
recorded in a dead room.
Much to my surprise, Gary makes
little use of expansion or gating to help
achieve adequate separation between
instruments while working in such a
confined area. As he explained: "I don't
ever gate critical instruments. Tom toms are about the only thing that I
During a subsequent overdub session
a guitar was the first instrument to be
added. The studio had been cleared, and
the amplifier miked in the middle of the
room with a couple of live baffles placed
adjacent to one another to achieve a
"coning" effect. Brian Ray, guitarist for
the session, brought his guitar into the
control room and went to work.
Acoustic piano was the next
instrument to be overdubbed, for which
the lid of the piano cover had been lifted,
allowing the piano to breath through
the chamber created by the bag. Then
keyboard player Michael Bodiker set up
his three stacks of synthesizers and
effects devices in the control room.
In the afternoon, it was the turn of the
horn section, with the following line -up:
trumpet playing three parts; tenor
playing two parts; and a baritone sax.
For the trumpet overdubs a U87 was
placed about 10 to 12 feet from the bell.
Although a trombone wasn't used on
this date, Gary would normally have
used a C -24 or any tube mike. Sony C -37
FETS covered the saxes. Saxplayer
Jerry Peterson likes the "good vibe" he
gets working at Alpha. "Gary gets a
crisp sound similar to the Stax Record
horn sound," Jerry offered. "And when
Gary's dog, Platinum, barks, you've got
a hit!"
Jerry then went into the studio to lay
in a sax solo, and Platinum promptly
started barking; he obviously knew
what he was talking about!
For percussion miking, Gary tends to
use a C -37FET or a Neumann tube U67.
"I will use two C -37s in stereo for such
things as congas and light overdubbing; they are real crisp sounding. I
have actually miked a tambourine with
a 67 mounted between a pair of C -37s,
and the harmonization of those three
microphones two of them being solid produces
state and one tubed
cancellations that actually create a
tremendous high -frequency sound. You
get the mid -range from the 67, the top end from the Sony's, and they blend in
real nice."
-
-
The Future
Gary Brandt is currently working
towards albums for two new artists:
Leslie Smith and David Anderson.
Working once again with Rick
Chudacoff and Peter Bunetta (producers of the two Robbie Dupree albums
recorded at Alpha Studios) but now in
the capacity of co- producer /engineer,
Gary looks set to repeat his achievement of getting a good sound from his
12 by 15 studio. Which, as mentioned in
the introduction to this article, is the
key to success for any small studio
where recording space is at a premium.
... vocal/ keyboard room (8' x 12') looking into main (12' x 15') studio -
might conceivably gate, mainly
because I look for a degree of separation
in my drum sounds that most people
don't. A good snare drum sound is the
most important sound you want to
achieve. When you have four tom -tom or
other microphones sitting there open,
the snare sound is going to suffer
considerably. So you have to strive for
an almost ultimate separation on that
drum in order to get a good sound.
"No matter what the mike sounds like
by itself, when you add in the overheads
it will not sound good. So I Kepex the
toms. If I need to use a Kepex later, I do
it in mix because you are also going to
eliminate noise at that stage. If you gate
the sound while going to tape, and you
have to do it again to cut down noise, the
transient response will be cut back
twice in a row."
Toms are miked within about three or
four inches, slightly at an angle, with
the mike axis pointed away from the
snare drum. When working with two
overhead toms, the mikes would be
aimed in an approximately 30 degree
off-axis direction across the tom -tom
from the snare drum. Gary also baffles
off the kick drum not only at the front,
but also by pulling a cover around the
back beater side of the drum, where the
August 1981
www.americanradiohistory.com
R -e /p 99
MICMIX MASTER -ROOM XL -121
REVERBERATION SYSTEM
According to the manufacturer, the
new monaural XL-121 System produces
none of the unwanted sounds such as
boing, twang, and flutter common to
most spring -type reverbs. This
outstanding performance is said to be
achieved without utilizing internal
limiting or any other signal processing
intended to compensate for reverb
deficiencies. It is claimed that the XL121 sounds as good on drums as it does
G
FROM PRS
on any other musical instrument.
XL-121 is designed to interface with
virtually any audio equipment. The Pre amp Gain control allows the unit to
accept a low -level musical instrument
output, such as a guitar, or higher level
signals associated with recording and
sound reinforcement consoles.
An Output Level control permits
further flexibility in interfacing with
other signal processing equipment. A
front-panel Output Mix control allows
blending of the direct and reverberated
signals. The unit's three -band Equalization section enables sound of the
reverb to be tailored to suit the
application.
The XL -121 incorporates 1/4 -inch
signal connections located on both the
front and rear panels. Also included on
the rear panel is a patch point designed
to allow an external equalizer or other
high-level effects device to interface
directly with the XL -121. Suggested
users price: $450.00.
MICMIX AUDIO
PRODUCTS, INC.
2995 LADYBIRD LANE
DALLAS, TX 75220
(214) 352 -3811
For additional information circle It 66
PANASONIC INTRODUCES
DIGITAL AUDIO
CASSETTE RECORDER
The Technics R&B Series SV -P100
digital studio cassette recorder
combines a PCM processor and a built in VHS tape recording system in a
single, integrated chassis. The new unit
is described as being simpler to operate
than a standard open -reel tape deck,
and more economical in tape consumption than two -track 15 IPS recording.
THE OTARI MTR -90
PRS is proud to have Good Advice affects
been selected New the success of your
England's exclusive
activities, which
MTR-90 dealer.
directly affects the
success of ours.
Professional Recording
R -e p 100
&
RES
Professionals
helping
Professionals
Sound, 1616 Soldiers Field Road, Boston, Mass 02135 Telephone (617) 254 -2110
August 1981
www.americanradiohistory.com
Designed as a compact table -top unit,
the system has most of its controls
conveniently arranged on a slanted
console panel. The cassette is held
vertically, permitting easy verification
OUR COMPRESSORS
GO OVER SO WELL BECAUSE
THEY GO OVER SO EASY.
OUTPUT (dbV)
-30
Cross the threshold on a dbx Over Easy'
compressor and you'll never know it. Because
-50
our Over Easy compression occurs gradually
over a range of several dB. Which gives you the
smoothest, most natural sound around. You
never hear the compressor kick in. And the
music never sounds choked.
-70 -60 -50 -40 -30 -20 -10
But Over Easy compression is just one of
Hard knee compression vs. Over Easy comthe features you'll like about our compressor/
pression. You can see the difference. But
more important, you can hear it.
limiters. In the dbx tradition, each of our compressors incorporates true RMS level detection,
-2 -4 -6 -6 -10 -12 -15 -18 -21 -24 -27 -30
which closely simulates the response of
the human ear for the smoothest, most
COMPRESSION
natural sound you'll find. And feedforward
gain reduction means absolute stability
and distortion -free sound at any cornMORE
pression ratio. Even infinite compression.
compressor /limiterThis is the only slider on our
automatically
as you move it from left to right, the
With features like these, no wonder
provides the proper balance of threshold level, compression ratio and output gain for each setting - which
you find dbx compressors working for some is why its the simplest compressor you'll find.
The
and the RM
is available in two models -the single
of the most demanding engineers in the
integrated
of
163's
in
an
which incorporates a pair
rack mount unit.
world.
dbx compressors. They go over easy. Which is why they go over big.
-40
NORMAL -
OVER EASY 165)_
(e:1 COMPRESSION)
60
70
0
+ 10
INPUT (dbV)
I
H.H-163
163
163
163,
163,
OVER EASY >OMPPESSORíL IMITER
AK
10
The dbx 165 is our top of the line, and it's as flexible as you want it to be. Attack and release rates can
be adjusted manually or automatically. Both threshold and output levels are adjustable. And the 165 can
be strapped for stereo, with a front panel master /slave switch for easy operation.
For more information, write Professional Products Division, dbx, Inc.
71 Chapel St., Newton, Mass. 02195 U.S.A. Tel.(617) 964 -3210. Telex: 92 -2522.
Distributed in Canada by BSR (Canada), Ltd., Rexdale, Ontario.
dbx®
dbx
and Over Easy ® are trademarks of dbx, Inc.
For additional information circle # 67
www.americanradiohistory.com
August 1981
R -e /p 101
WESTLAKE UNVEILS
MODEL CMB -2
CONNECTOR AND
INTERFACE BOX
The new unit functions as an
interface adaptor box, signal multing
box, signal switching box, as well as a
trouble shooting aid.
Completely passive in design, the
CMB -2 accomodates male and female
XLR, phone (TRS), TT (tiny telephone
patchcord), phone, BNC, banana and
of the amount of tape remaining.
The Technics SV -P100 allows PCM
recording and playback with the same
operational convenience as a conventional cassette deck. A microcomputer
provides full logic control with precise,
comfortable -to -use controls grouped
together in a central location.
Other features include an automatic
open /close cassette holder; large fader
for easy adjust recording and playback
level adjust; preset playback switching
and convenient cueing; large, easy-toread LED tape counter and level
indicators (with peak hold function);
digital in and out terminals for digital
dubbing; and front-panel headphone
and microphone jacks.
PANASONIC PROFESSIONAL
AUDIO DIVISION
TECHNICS R &B SERIES
50 MEADOWLANDS PARKWAY
SECAUCUS, NJ 07094
(201) 348 -7000
For additional information circle # 68
NEW MILAB LINE -LEVEL
CONDENSER MICROPHONE
FROM CARA INTERNATIONAL
Developed particularly for use in
direct-to -disk and digital or analog
recording, the Milab LC -25 trans -
formerless cardioid microphone
provides line-level output (0.775 V) into
a standard 1 kohm input, and operates
on standard 48 V power supplies.
The microphone capsule contains a
large diameter circular element which
is isolated from shock and vibration.
Frequency range is a quoted 20 Hz to 20
kHz, with extremely smooth response
through the range 30 to 15 Hz. Front-toback ratio is said to be better than 25 dB
at 1 kHz, and dynamic range exceeds
130 dB SPL.
Measuring only 71/4- inches long, the
LC -25 body is made of solid brass
finished in chrome black. The
protective grill is styled in black
stainless steel mesh, providing
protection from damage. $845.00.
CARA INTERNATIONAL LTD
P.O. BOX 9339
MARINA DEL REY, CA 90291
(213) 821 -7898
For additional information circle # 70
terminal -strip connections. Through
use of switch selection, the connectors
can be isolated into a maximum of four
sections, or they can function as one
continuous 26-connector, 3- conductor
mult.
This compact box measures 4.5x2.5x
7.5 inches, and weighs less than 2
pounds.
WESTLAKE AUDIO, INC.
7265 SANTA MONICA BLVD
LOS ANGELES, CA 90046
(213) 851 -9800
For additional information circle # 71
I. ON LINE
Z. ON BUDGET
3. ON TIME
LEXICON ANNOUNCES
WIDEBAND AUDIO
TIME COMPRESSOR
The new Model 1200B broadcast quality audio time compressor provides
5 kHz greater bandwidth
now to 15
kHz
than the existing Model 1200,
and is designed to meet the future needs
of audio and video producers and
-
-
broadcasters as the anticipated
upgrading of audio broadcast standards for network television and AM
radio occur.
Three good reasons
to skip the big guys
and buy from
Pro Audio Systems.
for orders call:
1- 800 -426 -6600
(including Alaska & Hawaii)
Featuring MCI, Sound Workshop, Tascam & other fine audio equipment.
110578th Avenue
R -e/p 102
N.E.
Seattle, Washington 98125
(206) 367 -6800
August 1981
www.americanradiohistory.com
The unit plays back recorded audio,
video and /or film material at faster or
slower speeds without changing the
original pitch. It allows the playing
time of commercials, films and other
program material to be reduced or
expanded to meet time requirements. It
is also said to provide significant
benefits to primary and post -production
operations by eliminating expensive
retakes and time consuming editing to
fit material to specific time slots.
Model 1200B will allow reduction of
play time by up to 25 %, or lengthening
Introducing the TASCAM1? Model
16 Mixer with the SS -16 1"
Recorder
85-16 1" 16 -Track
with dbx
Tascam Model 16 Mixing Console
8 main program mixing busses with
16 or 24 input positions
Stereo Solo Inplace,
8 main board outputs
submaster faders
Input
Remix Solo Enable
Input, monitor and effects returns
16
2 independent stereo mixing busses
PFL/Solo Select
100 mm
meters switchable to read buss or external source
4 -band
conductive plastic faders for smooth, positive control
8 -knob parametric (sweep type) equalizers that may be switch
16 x 2 channel or dual
4 auxiliary mixing busses
bypassed
8 x 2 channel monitor selection
SU\
IIC
/7
-ROX.
CREATIVE AUDIO TECHNOLOGY
AVAILABLE THROUGH
SUNTRONICS
P.O. Box 734
1620 W. Foothill Blvd.
Upland, CA 91786
(714) 985-0701/985 -5307
AUDIO IMAGE
AVC SYSTEMS INC
3685 N. Federal Hwy.
Pompano Beach, FL 33064
(305) 943 -5590
Minneapolis, MN 55407
MARTIN AUDIO VIDEO CORP.
ANTECH LABS, INC.
AVC SYSTEMS INC
423 West 55 Street
New York, NY 10019
(212) 541 -5900
8144 Big Bend Blvd.
St. Louis, MO 63119
(800) 325 -1960
For additional information circle
1517 E. Lake Street
(612) 729-8305
7116 W. Higgins Avenue
Chicago, IL 60656
(312) 763 -6010
#
72
www.americanradiohistory.com
by up to 33 %. All other specifications
including automatic computer control
of external audio, video and film
transports remain identical to those in
the current Model 1200. The new unit is
engineered for convenient interface to
virtually any variable -speed audio or
video tape machine, or film to tape
converter.
Professional price of the Model 1200B
.
is $8,500.
LEXICON, INC.
60 TURNER STREET
WALTHAM, MA 02154
(617) 891 -6790
For additional information circle
73
dbx REDUCES PRICE
ON FRAME FOR
900 SERIES MODULES
According to David Roudebush,
National Sales Manager of the
Professional Products Division of dbx,
Inc., the company is reducing the
suggested retail price of its F -900
Powered Frame, from $800 to $695.
Ofittfttt
ftc
30 Hz, 18 dB per octave subsonic filter,
switchable in or out. The DN30/30
incorporates an earth -lift switch and a
system -bypass facility for power
interruptions. The unit can also be
fitted with internal active crossover
circuit cards in either a bi- or tri -amp
configuration. Slope and center
frequency are user selectable.
Dimensions of the DN30/30 are
51/4x19x8- inches, and the professional
user price is $1,450.00.
KLARK -TEKNIK
ELECTRONICS INC.
262 A EASTERN PARKWAY
FARMINGDALE, NY 11735
(516) 249 -3660
For additional information circle
The F -900 provides power, input and
output connections, and serves as a
mounting device for up to eight 900
Series signal processing modules. The
rack mount unit measures just 5'/4inches high, and is designed to allow
fast and easy installation.
Standard connectors are said to make
it simple to wire the rack into any
system. The interchangeable signal
processing modules slip in and out in
seconds, offering the user flexibility in
sound production.
The frame provides sufficient power
for four additional external modules via
a back panel connector, and contains a
spare bay for module storage.
Modules available for use in the F -900
Frame include the 902 De- esser, 903
Over -Easy® Compressor /Limiter, 904
Noise Gate, 905 Parametric Equalizer,
906 Flanger +, 411 Type I Noise
Reduction module, and the new dbx 941
and 942 Type II Broadcast Noise
Reduction modules.
75
AUDIO MONITOR
MIXING CONSOLE
FROM AUDY
The new Series 2000M Monitor
Mixing Console provides 16 inputs
(stackable to 32) with separate output
mixes that permit control of up to six
independent monitor sends. Use of
high- speed, low -noise IC op -amp
technology is said to minimize
transient and slewing- induced inter modulation distortion. A dual LED
system assures proper adjustments of
input attenuation switches, and
maintains
25 dB of headroom
through-
out.
Standard with Penny & Giles faders
and sealed conductive plastic rotaries,
the Series 2000M console provides
smooth, quiet control. Other standard
features include: input and output
channel patching; EQ in /out switch for
each input mix control; individual
channel muting; talkback; six auxillary
.
dbx, INC.
71 CHAPEL STREET
NEWTON, MA 02195
(617) 964 -3210
For additional Information circle
74
KLARK -TEKNIK INTRODUCES
DN 30/30 GRAPHIC EQUALIZER
The new third -octave equalizer has
two completely discrete channels, with
30 bands of control each, centered on
standard I.S.O. frequencies. The range
control is switchable for each channel
between 6 dB and 12 dB of cut or boost.
In addition, each channel contains a
R -e/p 104
August 1981
www.americanradiohistory.com
inputs; headphone monitoring with
solo priority system; high-resolution,
20- segment LED bargraph meters;
phantom power; work lamp socket; and
flight case.
The Audy Series 2000M Monitor
Mixing Console is list priced at $6,995.
AUDY INSTRUMENTS, INC
SHETLAND INDUSTRIAL PARK
P.O. BOX 2054
SALEM, MA 01970
(617) 744 -5320
For additional information circle
76
ELECTRO -VOICE UNVEILS
PL88 VOCAL MICROPHONE
According to Bob Morrill, E -V's vice
president of marketing and sales, "The
PL88 dynamic cardioid microphone
features voice -tailored frequency
response characteristics,
superb resistance to handling
noise and, of course, E -V's
reputation for reliability. In
addition, the PL88 is priced
at under $70, making it the
perfect entry level microphone for the vocalist on a
tight budget who is unwilling
to compromise his or hel
standards of quality."
The PL88 is finished in
non -reflecting snow gras
with a contrasting charcoal
grille, features an on /off switch, and is
available in both high and low- impedance models.
ELECTRO- VOICE, INC.
600 CECIL STREET
BUCHANAN, MI 49107
(616) 695 -6831
For additional information circle
77
Designing a console to follow one of
for all professional 8 and 16 track
the worlds best selling 16/24 track
studios and yet with no factory
consoles is obviously not an easy
modification can be expanded to
task. Syncon series B, however,
a 44 x 24 fully automated console
proves that it is not impossible.
with full function patchbay.
ALLEN AND HEATH
ENELL LTC
Pembroke House, Cumpsbourne Road,
in its most basic format,
Price? We think you
Hornsey. London N8
the series B is the ideal choice
-340 3291 Telex: BATGRP 267727
will be surprised.
E1
Tel: 01
G
Main London Warranty Agent: Studio Equipment Services. 100 Hamilton Road, London N W 11 Tel: D1-4589133 USA, East Coast: AudiomarketingLtd, Stamford, Connecticut 06906, USA
Tal: 0,433) 369-2312 USA, West Coast: Cara Pacific Sales, So:: 9339, Marina Del Rey, California 90291, USA Tel (213) 321 -7898 W Germany: Studio Sound & Music, Frankfurt, Main 1,
W Germany Tel: 0611/28 49 28 Japan: Otari Electric Company Ltd, Tokyo 167, Japan Tel: (03) 3339631 Australia, Audio Mix Systems (Int.) Pty. Ltd. Tel: Sydney 3710893 Holland: Special
Audio Products, Amsterdam, Holland Tel: 02079 7(55 Italy: Audio Consultants SPA, Modena (Italia),ltaly Tel: :059) 225762 Spain: Fading, Madrid 15, Spain Tel: 4579568 or 4468325 Sweden:
Intersonic AB, Stockhollm, Sweden Tel: 01- 88.03 20
For additional inlormation circle # 78
www.americanradiohistory.com
-
of chorus effects without the need for
six separate delay lines. The extensive
control section for the delay time
includes capabilities for mixing fixed
delay, slow sweeps, and a higher
frequency sweep modulation, to
generate a wide variety of special
effects.
The regeneration circuit allows for
selection of feedback from one of three
taps, with variable gain and high -cut to
simulate a wide range of acoustic
TASCAM UNVEILS
M -16 RECORDING CONSOLE
The new mixer can be configured with
16 or 24 input positions. Eight main
program mixing busses are provided,
complete with submaster faders, plus
eight main board outputs, two
independent stereo mixing busses, four
auxiliary mixing busses, 16 meters
switchable to read buss or external
source, and a 16 by 2 monitoring section
with eight assignable effects returns.
The M -16 offers stereo solo in -place
for input, monitor, and effects returns,
and all inputs have pre-fader- listen
capability. During remix, the solo logic
permits instant comparisons between
effects send /receive.
The new console also features 4 -band,
8 -knob parametric equalizers that may
be switch bypassed, and three filters.
Faders are conductive plastic with a 100
mm throw.
Suggested retail price of the M -16
console is $12,900.00.
TEAC CORP OF AMERICA
7733 TELEGRAPH ROAD
MONTEBELLO, CA 90640
(213) 726 -0303
For additional Information circle # 79
NEW OCTAVE AND
1651A for each of two channels. Both
the Models 1651A and the 1652A
incorporate a continuously variable
high -pass filter with 18 dB per octave
roll -off, and a user -selectable low -pass
filter with 6 dB roll -off at 12.5 kHz.
For maximum detail in the modification of frequency response, Altec has
introduced the Model 1653A third octave Active Graphic Equalizer. The
result of over 12 years of sound equalization research, the 1653A is
described as a fourth-generation EQ
device that features 29 minimum phase
shift, active band rejection filter
sections (25 Hz to 16 kHz), with center
detented slide controls to provide up to
12 dB of boost /cut. Continuously
variable high -pass and low -pass filters
provide roll off at 18 dB per octave from
off position to 20 through 160 Hz (highpass), and from off position to 5 kHz
through 20 kHz (low- pass).
Filters in all three units are parallel
summed, so that failure of one section
will not affect remaining filter sections
operation.
ALTEC CORPORATION
1515 S. MANCHESTER AVENUE
ANAHEIM, CA 92803
(714) 774 -2900
THIRD- OCTAVE EQUALIZERS
FROM ALTEC
The Model 1651A Active Graphic
Equalizer is a single channel unit with
10 minimum phase shift, active band
rejection filter sections. Easy to read,
center detented slide controls provide
up to 12 dB of boost /cut at ISO preferred
octave frequencies (31.5 Hz to 16 kHz).
The Model 1652A is a stereo graphic
equalizer with the same features as the
ALTEC 1653A
1
For additional Information circle # 80
"liveness" and ambiences. All of these
features working independently and in
conjunction, enable such effects as high
flanging, low flanging, chorusing, voice
doubling, multi-voice choruses, echo,
reverberation, and machine gun reverb
all at full bandwidth and in stereo.
The STD -1 has a delay range of 1.3 to
55 milliseconds, with regeneration
decay time up to 20 seconds. The unit
occupies one standard rack space, and
features an 8-step LED headroom
indicator.
-
A /DA
2316 FOURTH STREET
BERKELEY, CA 94710
(415) 548 -1311
For additional Information circle # 81
ASHLY SC -68 PARAMETRIC
NOTCH FILTER
The SC -68 is a cut-only equalizer that
is used to insert relatively sharp dips in
the frequency spectrum. Eight
individual filter circuits are applied to a
common buss, with each filter acting as
a frequency-dependent resistance. The
resistance drops to zero at the center
frequency, providing a nearly infinite
cut (30 dB guaranteed) for each band.
Also included is a unique setup
system with a built-in limiter to aid in
reducing feedback. In the setup mode,
the limiter increases system gain until
STEREO TAPPED DELAY UNIT
UNVEILED BY A /DA
The STD -1 is a voltage -controlled
analog delay with six taps, which can
each be assigned to one of two output
channels. Each delay tap is non harmonically related to the other taps,
and when combined is said to simulate
natural random doubling and a myraid
/3- Octave
Equalizer
feedback occurs, and holds the feedback
at a controlled low level. When feedback
is notched out the limiter automatically
increases the gain until a new feedback
is established. A meter is provided to
indicate gain- before-feedback improvement.
Bypass switching, inputs and outputs
that can be used balanced or unbalanced, peak overload warning light, and
variable bandwidth adjustments are
also featured.
ASHLY AUDIO, INC.
100 FERNWOOD AVE.
ROCHESTER, NY 14621
(716) 544-5191
ALTEC 1651A Single Channel Equalizer
R -e,/p 106
ALTEC 1652A Dual Channel Equalizer
August 1981
www.americanradiohistory.com
For additional Information circle # 82
There are better reasons
to come to Martin than our new
24-track demonstration rooms.
Nakamichi
Neumann
Orban
Otari
Publison
Pultec
Roland
AKG
Amek
Ampex
Audio & Design
Recording
Auratone
Beyer
BGW
BTX
Burhoe
Countryman
Crown
Crown PZM
RTS
Scamp
Scully
Sennheiser
Shure
Sony Pro
Sony Video
Sound Workshop
Studer /Revox
dbx
DeltaLab
Dolby
Ecop ate
Electro -Voice
EMT
Eventide
Inovonics
Tangent
Tannoy Pro
Tapco
TEAC /TASCAM
Technics R &B
360 Systems
TTM
!vie
JBL Pro
JVC Video
Klark -Teknik
UREI
Ursa Major
Valley People
(Allison)
Visonik
White
Yamaha
Lexicon
Marshall
Master -Room
McIntosh
MXR
A demo room is like a studio: without the talent and the right
equipment, it's only a room. At Martin Audio Video, we have
the products and the people to help you make it happen,
whether you're building a studio from the ground up or
selecting a microphone.
Martin represents more than 70 of the most important
manufacturers of professional audio and video equipment.
Our million -dollar inventory means that you're likely to find
what you need, when you need it (and the parts to repair it,
should it ever break down).
Our extensive staff is made up of experienced profess;onals.
They come from major recording and broadcast operations
in New York, so they speak your language. Through their
knowledge and experience in the field, they can help you plan
your studio, evaluate your needs and solve your proolems.
Our sales, custom fabrication, and technical services people
have been helping meet the diverse needs of our worldwide
clientele for more than 15 years.
Our new 24 -track control room features the latest thinking in
professional audio equipment and technology. From the Otari
and Ampex pinch- rollerless recorders, to the hottest new
signal processors and reverbs. Our speaker evaluation room
offers a wide range of monitors, including the newest JBL
and UREI Time Aligned " monitor speakers.
-
These rooms are available to all of our clients to audition and
evaluate a wide range of equipment in a hands -on setting.
And they're only a small part of Martin's extensive midtown
Manhattan facilities.
Any dealer can sell equipment. Experience, Service and
Support are what make Martin special. We're committed to
providing it all ... and commitment is everything.
martin audio video corp.
423 West 55 Street /New York,
N Y. 10019/(212) 541 -5900
*TM -Time Aligned is a trademark of E.M. Long Associates.
www.americanradiohistory.com
August 1981
R -e/p 107
-
BACK ISSUES AVAILABLE
While They Last!
Limited Quantity
R -e /p
April 1975
December 1975
February 1976
August 1976
August 1977
December 1977
Classified
-
RATES
$56.00 Per Column Inch
(2Y4'
x
1
")
-
One -inch minimum, payable in advance. Four inches maximum. Space
over four inches will be charged for
at regular display advertising rates.
.
Volume
Volume
7,
7,
No
No
1
4
February 1978
June 1978
October 1978
December 1978
August 1979
February 1980
April 1980
June 1980
August 1980
October 1980
December 1980
Volume 11, No,
Volume 11, No.
Volume 11, No.
Volume 11, No.
Volume 11, No.
Volume 11, No.
1981 Issues
-
Volume
1
2
3
4
12, No.
5
For more information write to:
SHERMAN KEENE
RECORDING COURSE
6
1
P.O. Box 2449
1626 N WILCOX, Suite 677A
HOLLYWOOD, CA 90028
Hollywood, CA 90028
Foreign orders payable in U.S. funds only by bank
check or money order. Foreign checks requiring
collection fees paid by R -e /p will not be accepted.
.
theory and working
information and emphasis on
practical uses
"MICROPHONES
HOW
THEY WORK AND HOW
TO USE THEM"
by Martin Clifford
224 Pages
97 Illustrations
$10.95 Hardbound; $7.95 Paperback
Postpaid
R -e /p Books
P.O. Box 2449 Hollywood CA 90028
the new
-
BASIC DISK MASTERING
by Larry Boden
- - - Soft Cover
Perfect Bound 52 Pages
SOUND RECORDING
by John Eargle
JME Associates
The best hook on the technical side of recording
thoroughly recommended
Studio Sound
now available from:
BOX 3043
GLENDALE, CA 91201
-
Illustrated with 232 tables,
curves, schematic diagrams, photographs, and cutaway views of equipment.
S21 95 each. Hardbound
355 Pages,
/p Books
Box 2449
Hollywood, CA 90028
R -e
-
$12.50 (US) Postage Paid
-
per level.
$2.50 each
Mall orders to: R -e /p
"The book logically progresses from the
basics in the first chapters ..."
it is likely that it will become a
primary reference source for recording
engineers, producers and, perhaps,
knowledgeable musicians."
.
6, No. 2
6, No. 6
Volume 8, No 4.
Volume 8, No. 6
Volume 9, No.1
Volume 9,No. 3
Volume 9, No. 5
Volume 9, No. 6
Volume 10, No 4
- All
BOOKS
Volume
Volume
RECORDING ENGINEERING
CORRESPONDENCE COURSE
An intensive and comprehensive
correspondence course based on the
new, acclaimed textbook, "Sherman
Keene's Practical Techniques for the
Recording Engineer ", is now available
from the author. The course includes
textbook study, additional reading,
thought provoking homework assignments, and question and answer
dialogue via cassette. There are eight
lessons per level, three levels (Basic,
$250
Intermediate, and Advanced)
P. O.
HANDBOOK OF
MULTICHANNEL RECORDING
by F. Alton Everest
201 illustrations
320 pages
The book that covers It all ..
a comprehensive guide to all facets of
multitrack recording ... acoustics .
construction ... studio design . .
equipment ... techniques ... and
much, much more!
Paperback: $9.95
R-e/p Books
-
.
.
FORCE IN THE MIDWEST"
.
-
P.O. Box 2449
-
Hollywood, CA 90028
AKG
AD
COMPLETE YOUR
UNDERSTANDING OF
RECORDING ENGINEERING
Have you read other books and still
feel that a great part of the story of
CRErv
CRpyjS;EMS
,'
professional recording remains
ELECTRO_ Dty
EVENTIDE
IDE Ego'
. LEXICON
MICE
mix,
ORg
"''''SoSÑ
untold? Well it has. Read "Sherman
Keene's Practical Techniques for the
Recording Engineer" and learn the
A1RL .
IVOTE
O TqR PMLK
CRAFT . UREHURE .
WHITE
'
Pro Audio Equipment Sales
Pro Studio Design and Consultation
Pro Sound Reinforcement
,A
ramdudiolu,
Eleven Years of Audio Experience
16240 Prince Drive South Holland, IL 60473
(312) 339 -8014 in the Pebblewood, Plaza
R -e/p 108
August 1981
www.americanradiohistory.com
rest.
"Its content and progression are the
best I've come across as far as
presenting the real world experience
of doing sessions."
David Schwartz (Mix Magazine)
381 pages; 28 chapters (four on
computer- assisted mixing)
Not Another Dry Technical Book
actual methods and practices for
doing sessions, avoiding problems,
keeping details straight, and doing
things right!
Book Price: $37.50 plus 6% (California
only), plus $3.00 shipping. You may
order by phone: (213) 464 -4322.
Available at:
OPAMP TECHNICAL BOOKS
1033 N SYCAMORE, Suite A
LOS ANGELES, CA 90038
-
-
"THE PLATINUM RAINBOW"
is available from
R -e /p BOOKS
P.O. Box 2449
Hollywood, CA 90028
THE PLATINUM RAINBOW"
will be shipped postpaid upon receipt of
" FOR SALE "
PROFESSIONAL AUDIO EQUIPMENT
Shop for pro audio from N.Y.'s leader, no
matter where you live! Use the Harvey Pro
Hot Line. (800) 223 -2642 (except N.Y.,
Ak., & Hi.). Expert advice, in- c-epth parts
Scully Model 100-16 track s/n 200. One
owner since new; plenty of spare parts.
Mint Condition. $12,500.00, including
full remote control.
Call Bob or Bubba on:
dept.,
(512) 690-8888
in check or money order.
The Platinum Rainbow (How To
Succeed In The Music Business Without
Selling Your Soul) by Grammy Award
winning record producer Bob Monaco
and syndicated music columnist James
Riordan. Complete sections on
producing and engineering including
the practical aspects of pursuing a
career. Also contains a complete
DIRECTORY of the music business
including studios and engineering
schools.
HOW TO BUILD A SMALL BUDGET
RECORDING STUDIO
FROM SCRATCH
with 12 Tested Designs
.
Alton Everest
Soft Cover - 326 Pages
$9.95 Postpaid
R -e /p Books
P.O. Box 2449 Hollywood, CA 90028
by
F.
For Sale: MIDAS CONSOLES
24 , 8 * 2 Pr04 Monitor
PRICED FOR IMMEDIATE SALE WILL SELL SEPARATELY
213/391-0952 201/227 -5878
EVENINGS
readout.
Excellent Working Condition.
$7,000 each.
Scully 24/16 playback -only tape
machine. Mint Condition. $4,500
(213) 467 -9375
moGAm'
SUPERFLEXIBLE CABLES
Mogami is a world leader in the research
and manufacturing of advanced high
definition audio cables, now available in
the U.S.
MICROPHONESNAKEINTERCONNECT
GUITAR SPEAKERTONEARMMINIATURE COAX
MOGAMI PRODUCTS DIVISION
P.O. BOX 2027
CULVER CITY,CA 90230
(213) 836 -4288
-
-
FOR SALE
Ecoplate II, Master Room XL -210, XL305, Symetrix Valley People.
TOP DOLLAR FOR TRADES.
video systems available.
25 W. 45th Street
New York, NY 10036
(212) 921 -5920
40.8. 2 PrO3 /PrO5
FOR SALE
Two Scully 284 Series 16-track tape
machines with remotes and digital
3/4"
Broadest selection such as Otani, EXR,
Ampex, Tascam and more. Write or call
for price or product info:
Harvey Professional Products Division
$11.00 (U.S.)
,
HOW TO START A RECORD
OR INDEPENDENT
PRODUCTION COMPANY
by Attorney Walter Hurst
Illustrated. 46 Chapters. Many Forms
$10.00 Paper; $15.00 Hardcover
Seven Arts Press, Inc. Code R
P.O. Box 649
Hollywood CA 90028
HOW TO MAKE AND SELL
YOUR OWN RECORD
by Diane Sward Rapaport
"A trusty guide through the thickets
awaiting the ambitious young band or
mini- record mogul..."
- John Rockwell
New York Times
"Without question the best book on the
subject: definitive, down to earth and
practical."
Len Chandler & John Braheny
Alternative Chorus, L.A.
-
$11.50
AUDIO HOUSE
4675 S YOSEMITE #203
DENVER, CO 80237
(303) 741-4746
please mention
YOU SAW IT IN R -E /P
.
Summit Audio
CA. 95030 (408) 353-2932
EQUIPMENT for SALE
TEN BAND
more information on our new 560A or any
of our other API products contact us or your
nearest distributor.
For
LABS
LOS ANGELES, CA.
9003E
(213) 934 -3566
Angeles
(213) 469 -9593
Studio Consultants, Inc. New York
(212) 586-7376
Nissho-lwai American Corporation
Japan (212) 730 -2228
RAS, Inc.
Los
DATATRONIXINC
MIC., FO, ACN,LINE
TAPE, DISC, POWER
103QN.S CAMOREI AVE.
GRAPHIC
Improved version of the popular
Automated Processes, Inc. Model 560
Available in Transformer Coupled
and Transformerless versions
AMPI IF IE RS
P
PAM
INC.
(815) 968 -2902
EQUALIZER
CONSOLES
KITS a WIRED
OSCILLATORS
AUDIO, TAPE RIAS
.
-
560A
EQUIPMENT WANTED
PO Box 1678 Los Gatos,
offer
!vie IE -30 with IE -20B
$2,700
Scamp Rack with 8 modules -$3,100
AUDIO TRAK RECORDING, INC
New from Datatronix, Inc.
R -e /p Books
P.O. Box 2449 Hollywood, CA 90028
WE HAVE BUYERS
For Multitrack Recorders
Consoles Outboard
Gear Mica
.
-
FOR SALE
MCI JH -536 Console
$64k or best
A
subsidiary of ATLANTIC RESEARCH CORPORATION
2100 Reston Ave., Reston, VA 22091
(703) 620-5300
For additional information circle # 85
August 1981
www.americanradiohistory.com
R -e /p 109
EQUIPMENT for SALE
FOR SALE
MCI Series 400 Console
** For Sale **
(Available in December 1981)
Scully Model 100 -16 with 8 -track head
assembly, full remote, index master,
spares, manuals, Excellent Condition.
$12,500. 24 -Track conversion kit for
above: $7,000. 24 Channels of dbx
noise reduction: $5,500. 16- Channel
mixing console: $6,000.
Package Price: $24,500.
Call: (805) 482 -7495
Dolby M -16; Telex Cassette Duplicator;
Ampex 300 Transport Only; Pandora
Time Line; DuKane Tone Generator.
WANTED
Used MCI 500 Console.
Call: JIM, (513) 681 -8400
FOR SALE
Neumann microphone Model BV -30A
with M -7 Capsule. Built circa 1930,
Serial #3!
A real collector's item!
$4,500, or best offer
(714) 697 -8719
Or Write: P.O. Box 651
Camarillo, CA 93010
$$ FOR SALE $$
Blank Audio and Video Cassettes:
Direct from manufacturer: Below
Wholesale! Any length cassettes. Four
different qualities to chose from. Bulk
& Reel Mastertape: from 1/4-inch to 2inch. Cassette Duplication also
available. Brochure.
ANDOL AUDIO PRODUCTS, INC.
Dept. REP
4212 14th AVENUE
BROOKLYN, NY 11219
TOLL FREE: 1- 800-221 -6578
N.Y. Res: (212) 435-7322/Ext. 5
FOR SALE
Automated Processes 16 -in /16 -out
console, Studer A -80 Mk
16 -track
recorder with remote, Dolby M -16
noise reduction unit with remote, AKG
BX -20E stereo reverb with remote.
Will sell separately, or as a package.
CALL: (214) 521 -8738
or (213) 556-2458
-
-
FOR SALE
AMPEX, OTARI, SCULLY
In stock,
all major professional lines; top dollar
trade -ins; write or call for prices.
PROFESSIONAL AUDIO VIDEO
CORP
384 GRAND STREET
PATERSON, NJ 07505
(201) 523 -3333
SIZZLE Into Echo
-AI an Affordable Price-
-
\
with high -level 1000 Hz tone. backed with special pressuresensitive adhesive Industry -wide acceptance Send $3 75
for postpaid packet containing 20 strips totaling 10035mm
Irames CA res add 6% tax Dealer inquiries vded
COGSWELL LABORATORIES
Dept R, P O. Box 9374. Glendale. CA 91206
STUDIOS for SALE
FOR SALE
24 -TRACK STUDIO
Operating Studio in Hollywood, or
may be moved. Enough equipment for
two studios. Owner may keep some,
but sold as package only.
$60,000 to $80,000.
(213) 784 -2143
or leave message for P -10 at:
(213) 464 -0300
1
** FOR SALE **
Ampex MM -1100 24/16 track recorder, remote and digital counter.
Recent LP's on this machine: Talking
Heads, Eno /Byrne, Sue Saad Band.
Make Offer
(213) 467 -6151
We've Put
SYNC BEEPS
Quickly attic audible 6 visible sync indication on any magnetic ham or tape Easily removable
tape prerecorded
m,nooe,rw..
+
A.a.,a.
a000inwo
and Reverb
*iotws
,.`
-Recording Studio.
FOR SALE
Multi-track
8 -4 -2
Track, Hammond -Piano -EMT Echo, etc.
Lease 6 years.
$75,000
CALL: (213) 626 -5319
or (213) 939-2390
Post Office Box 71013
Los Angeles, CA 90071
** FOR SALE * **
Mobile Recording Studio
housed in a 27 foot Fruehof Trailer
with lift gate and air ride. Featuring
only the Best Equipment: Neve 8068
32x32 Console. Studer A -80 Mark Il
24-Track Recorder and A -80 2 -Track
*
32 -Track
Recorder. Two -Camera Closed
Circuit Video Systems with 25 -inch
Color Monitor. Full Array of Outboard
Gear and microphones featuring *
UREI *DOLBY * EVENTIDE * ORBAN
* NEUMANN * SENNHEISER *
ELECTRO -VOICE * SHURE * AKG
including two rare AKG C -24's. Tools
and Maintenance Equipment including Tektronix Scope & Function
Generator
and Much, Much More
POSSIBLE LEASE ASSUMPTION OR
PURCHASE TERMS NEGOTIABLE.
Contact Richard Casares at WAVES
Recording Santa Barbara for details
or an appointment to inspect the
,
The main problem with most echo and reverb units is that they don't have the high
frequency response it takes to "cut" through the mix and add the type of clarity and depth
that vocals in particular need. Our Echo Control Center provides over twice the frequency
response of units costing almost twice as much as ours. The reverb section is the quietest,
crispest, and least boomy portable unit we have seen.
Capabilities include: Straight Delay Echo and Reverb Doubling Slapback
Chorus and Vibrato Over 95 dB Delay Dynamic Range.
Price: 8595.00
Write for a 24 page brochure on our full product line and a demo record.
Send $1 to: LT
Dept REE , PO Box 338,
Stone Mountain, GA 30086
Phone 404 493 -1258
Sound,
.
facility.
(805) 966 -2291
PUT YOUR PIANO IN OUR BAG!
Test results demonstrate a 15 dB Inside-to -out
reduction In high frequency Information at 15 kHz,
and a 3 dB downpolnt at 500 Hz, as pictured
.
.
EMPLOYMENT
DESIGN ENGINEER
Must be totally familiar with audio
.
NOHOW
1111111111
11IIri
circuitry.
I:11Iri
1'h111'
O1NIC1
11'cDrs,%!rÌ]
.11i!il wain i:
Call: (717) 733 -1211
9 -6 EST
1il'
11111,1111111,7/111611'11
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7
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ALPHA ACOUSTIC CONTROL, LTD.
(213) 760- 1139 (213) 845-0197
Burbank, California
UIIri
;PrírS r(1A0E
RECORDING ENGINEER T -SHIRT
cotton T -shirt - Black with White
letters that say: "Recording Engineers
Always Get Knob Jobs ". State Size S,
M, L, XL. Send $5.95 plus $1.25 for
shipping and handling to:
E- SHIRT, PO Box 50556
Columbia, SC 29250
100p /o
:;ri
'!_
CUSTbM PlANb
R -e/p 110
MISCELLANEOUS
oé1=L;
1/1l
(11-1 YO(lR
P1G1Ni0 /N
MIND
August 1981
www.americanradiohistory.com
-
Northeast:
BOOGIE HOTEL STUDIOS (Port Jefferson, New York) has opened its 24 -track live-in facility on
Long Island. The studio was built in a theater housed in a 130-year -old Victorian mansion, and until recently
was owned by the band, Foghat. The room is equipped with a modified Neve 8058 console feeding a 3M M79
multitrack. Two Studer two -track recorders are also featured, as well as monitors by JBL and Tannoy, several
live echo chambers, and a collection of vintage guitar amps and microphones. The old theater studio offers a
20 -foot ceiling and a large 50 by 60 -foot room. The living quarters can accommodate 8 to 10 guests, and are
equipped with a kitchen and club -sized bar. Boogie Hotel is owned by Don Berman, formerly of Media Sound
and the Power Station, and who has served as Foghat's engineer and producer on a number of projects; Steve
Bramberg, late of Media Sound and Electric Lady and Kingdom Sound Studios; Jeffery Kawalek, ex -chief
engineer of House of Music Studios; and Ron Bretone, a former member of The Music Explosion and Crazy
ElepFant.709 Main Street, Port Jefferson, NY 11777. (516) 473 -6655.
ROXY RECORDERS (New York City) announces the installation of a new Tangent Series 16 console
with modifications by Paul Blank of Omnisound/The Mike Shop. The studio was recently used to complete
two new albums for the Muse label: the Kenny Burrell Trio, and guitaristVic Juris. Independent engineer
Malcolm Addey was at the board for both sessions, with Mike Friese assisting. Roxy is an 8 -track studio
owned by musicians Steve Manes and Greg DeBelles.648 Broadway, New York, NY 10012. (212) 475 -6571.
SORCERER SOUND (New York City) has taken delivery of a newly rebuilt Steinway B grand piano,
and has enlarged the studio with the addition of a vocal/keyboard room equipped with a 13 -foot ceiling. Other
additions include 24 tracks of dbx into the 24 -track Dolby noise reduction frame, and the alteration of the two
and 24 -track Studer machines to transformerless operation by Acoustilog, Inc./9 Mercer Street, New York,
By REICHENBACH ENGINEERING
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10013. (212) 925-1365.
KAJEM RECORDING STUDIOS (Gladwyne, Pennsylvania) announces the aquisition of a Sony
DRE 2000 Digital Reverberator, which will be available for both studio work and on a rental basis.1400 Mill
Creek Road, Gladwyne, PA 19035. (215) 649 -3813.
-- NORTHEAST ACTIVITY
ATLANTIC
CITY
RECORDING
STUDIO
(Blackwood, New Jersey) is laying down tracks for an
upcoming EP by pop rocker/songwriter Ed
Majewski. Production is being handled by Eddie Jay
Harris for Record Room Productions.Blackwood,
NJ.
At SECRET SOUND STUDIO(New
York City) Kool And The Gang have been recording
tracks with Eumir Deodato and engineer Scott
Noll, for De -Lite Records, while Diva Gray is in
recording new material for Little Macho Productions,
with producer Gordon Grody and engineer Nina
Rhodes.147 West 24th Street, New York, NY 10011.
(212) 691 -7674.
FILMSPACE AUDIO(State
College, Pennsylvania)has officially initiated its new
studio with the help of Van Dyke Parks. who has
been in producing a project for The Arthur
Goldstein Band. Co- owner/Engineer Tom Keiter
has also been co- producing with Jon Rounds on
projects for Menagerie and Whetstone Run.615
Clay Lane, State College, PA 16801. (814) 2376462.
At ELECTRIC LADY STUDIO(New
York City) Carlelie Couture is recording a new
album, produced by Michael Zilkha for Island
Records. Couture's last album was produced by Chris
Blackwell at Island's Compass Point Studios in
Nassau, The Bahamas. The new album will be titled
Rock Poems. Michael Frondelli is the engineer on
the session.52 West 8th Street, New York, NY 10011.
6774700.
At BOOGIE HOTEL
STUDIOS(Port Jefferson, New York), Foghat
(212)
recently finished recording their new album for
Bearsville /Warner Brothers Records, with
producer/engineer Nick Jameson, while Good
Rats have an album in progress being produced by
the band and Dan Berman. Also at Boogie Hotel: Jay
Gold with Rob Freeman producing and engineering;
and Levi Dexter And The Rip Cords with producer
Richard Gottehrer and Freeman at the board.709
Main Street, Port Jefferson, NY 11777. (516) 4736655.
TROD NOSSEL RECORDING
STUDIOS(Wallingford, Connecticut) has finished
recording an album for The Ancient Mariners Fife
And Drum Corps, while Plan 9 was in laying down
tracks for Bomp Records. Other activity included
work by Redhot And Blue, and John Kimlingen
producing an album for Truth For Youth.10 George
Street,
-
Wallingford, CT 06492. (203) 265THE RECORDING CENTER(East
0010.
Norwalk, Connecticut) is recording a second album
by The Elevators for Arista Records, with producers
Mark Nicyper and Doug McLennan of Widespread
Productions. Peter Hodgson is at the console. Other
work includes sessions for the first album by
Canadian band Bounty Hunter, produced by Tom
Scott and engineered by Hodgson, and bookings with
producer Rob Carlson and engineer Pete Bastoni
to record various jingles.East Norwalk, CT. (203)8533433.
At SPECTRUM RECORDERS(Lanes
borough, Massachusetts) Mark Cushing was back
-
to add some tracks and to remix some songs recorded
earlier in the year, while Windfahl recorded some of
their original tunes, and backed Pam Peterson as she
cut some of her songs. Shepardson Advertising has
also been recording a number of jingles for New
England clients.151
South Main Street,
Lanesborough, MA 01237. (413) 499-1818.
At
NORTH LAKE SOUND(North White Plains, New
York) Chuck Rainey is recording his first solo album
in 12 years, with David Ackerman producing and
Chris Cassone engineering, while Phil Ramone is
working on tapes from the last Billy Joel tour for an
upcoming live LP; Jim Boyer is engineering. North
Lake has also been playing host to Peter Frampton
and his new bapd, rehearsing for their summer
Breaking All the R 's tour.3 Lakeview Drive, North
White Plains, Neu, 'ork 10603. (914) 682-0842.
SIGMA SOUND STUDIOS (New York City) has
begun recording a new album project by The
Spinners, with producers Mtume & Lucas and
engineer Jim Dougherty, while Ashford And
Simpson is putting the finishing touches on their live
album with engineer Michael Hutchinson. Also in
Sigma, The Jacksons are overdubbing and mixing a
single for CBS with John Loungo mixing and Jay
Mark engineering, while producer Jimmy Simpson
is mixing a Gladys Knight project with engineers
Hutchinson and John Potoker for CBS
Records.1697 Broadway, 10th Floor, New York, NY
(212) 582 -5055.
10019.
SIGMA SOUND
STUDIOS(Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) will
inaugurate it's new 48 -track studio with a mixing
session for PIR's Teddy Pendergrass, produced by
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Ta
Eladio
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Northeast Activity
continued
.
Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff, with Joe Tarsia,
Sigma's president, engineering. Work proceeding
down the hall includes dates by Sister Sledge to
professionals
record
a single
for Atlantic with producer Arthur
Stoppe, and Instant Funk tracking a 45 with
producer Bunny Sigler for Sal Soul Records. Just
completed is an album project by The Temptations
for Motown, produced by Thom Bell and engineered
by Dirk Devlin. 212 North 12th Street, Philadelphia,
THE BARN(North
PA 19107. (215) 56I -3660.
Ferrisburg, Vermont) is recording Kilimanjaro's
upcoming second LP. The jazz quartet's album is
scheduled for a Fall release, following their
appearance at the jazz festival in Montreaux,
Switzerland on Lake Geneva. Wild Rice, featuring
Derrick Semler, is also in the facility to record a
demo tape and, with Gordon Stone and Robin
Remaily, to back up Michael Hurley on his
upcoming project. Michael Couture is chief
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New York, NY 10013. (212) 925 -1365.
At ROSE
HILLS STUDIOS(Syracuse, New York) Meat Loaf
guitarist Mark Doyle has completed production on
singles for Joe Whiting & The Bandit Band and
The New York Flyers, just in time to rejoin Meat
Loaf in preparation for their upcoming world tour.
Other activity includes Doug Moncrief of the Todd
Hobin Band in producing Vulcano & Micaroni.3929
New Seneca Turnpike, Marcellus, NY 13108. (315)
673 -1117.
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engineer, and Charles Eller studio manager.North
Ferrisburg, VT 05473. (802) 425 -2111.
SORCERER SOUND(New York City) has been
recording Sal Soul artists Inner Life and Log with
Larry Levan in the control room, while the studio
recently finished dates with The Del Byzanteens for
their upcoming album. In addition, producer Bill
Curtis is mixing The Fatback Band, while Die
Hausefrauen are recording a single with producers
Eric Dufaure and Robert Derby.19 Mercer Street,
CRITERIA RECORDING STUDIOS (Miami, Florida) has completed its new East Wing studio, and
begun production in the new facility. The two -story complex contains private lounges, offices, and a new
mastering suite. The studio itself, designed by John Storyk, with input from the Criteria staff, is totally
asymmetrical: it has no parallel walls, and a ceiling that rises to 28 feet and then stairsteps down to eight. The
nine -sided control room features a fully automated and completely transformerless MCI JH-556/48 console
feeding two JH -24 24 -track tape machines and a digital two -track recording system. Monitors are of an Edward
M. Long design utilizing a three -way Time -Aligned" system with cone mid -range drivers. The facility was
designed to accommodate video taping sessions as well as audio. John Cougar And The Zone innaugurated
the studio, recording an album for Riva Records produced by Cougar and Don Gehman, with Gehman
doubling as engineer. Don Felder of The Eagles was also one of the first customers, scoring the title song for
the animated film Heavy Metal. The sessions were engineered by Joel Moss, with Felder producing.1755 NE
149th Street, Miami, FL 33181. (305) 947-5611.
MARK FIVE STUDIOS/THE ROOM (Greenville, South Carolina) has taken delivery of a new Neve
8058 fully automated console with a Fadex/16K automation package. Also, a new Studer B-67 has been
installed to accompany the 16- and 24 -track MCI machines previously in use. In addition, reconstruction is
beginning on Studio A, which includes the installation of a wide variety of noise reduction and outboard
gear.lOMichael Drive, P.O. Box 7084, Greenville, SC 29610. (802) 269-3961.
WEB IV STUDIO (Atlanta, Georgia) recently remodeled its studio and added 24 tracks of Dolby, in
addition to its dbx noise reduction. The studio's lounge and recreation areas have also been expanded.2107
Faulkner Road North East, Atlanta, GA 30324. (404) 321 -5993.
REFLECTION SOUND STUDIOS (Charlotte, North Carolina) has recently upgraded its Studio A
with the installation of an MCI JH -636 console with Plasma Display Metering, and 1 -A1 monitoring system with
TAD components. Reflection is also expanding with the construction of Studio C, a 24 -track room designed by
John Gardner of Nashville.1018 Central Avenue, Charlotte, NC 28204. (704) 377-4596.
-
-
SOUTHEAST ACTIVITY
At REFLECTION SOUND STUDIO (Charlotte, Blackmon and engineer Richard WeIls.2107
North Carolina) the Marshall Tucker Band and Faulkner Road North East, Atlanta, GA 30324. (404)
engineer Kevin Herron recently mixed a live
321 -5993.
MASTER SOUND RECORDING
performance for broadcast via NBC's The Source
STUDIOS(Atlanta, Georgia) reports mixing Dionne
Radio, while The Killer Whales are also in recording
Warwick's latest Arista release, Hot, Liue, and
tracks for their upcoming Moonlight LP with producer
Otherwise, produced by Steve Buckingham and
Don Dixon. In addition, John Anthony is in engineered by Joe Neil, while Isaac Hayes just
producing studio sessions for Arrogance, with
completed his latest effort for Polygram with Neil and
engineer Steve Haigler. The band recently finished a
Ron Cristopher mixing. Other activity includes
live double album utilizing the Reflection mobile 24dates by cabaret singer Dale Elliot produced by Mac
track unit, with Chip Garrett and Haigler at the
Frampton with Christopher at the board, and an
board.1018 Central Avenue, Charlotte, NC 28204.
extended play of At Buckhead Beach by The
(704)
377-4596.
ARTISAN RECORDERS Embers for Tim McCabe Productions' Star Song
(Pompono Beach, Florida) recently provided location
Records.1227 Spring Street North West, Atlanta,
services for a live broadcast of Earl Klugh and
GA. (404) 873 -6425.
CRITERIA RECORDMichael Johnson from the Gusman Cultural Center ING STUDIOS(Miami, Florida) reports Liza
in Miami, Florida; Peter Yianilos and Richard
Minnelli in recording vocals for a new single, with Bill
Hilton engineered the dates. The same personnel and Lavorgna producing and Al Steegmeyer at the
equipment also recorded The Temptations live in
board, while The Rossington Collins Band, former
Fort Lauderdale, while Yianilos is also instructing onmembers of Lynyrd Skynyrd, were in doing final
location recording techniques at the Full Sail overdubs for their upcoming MCA album. Gary
Recording Workshop in Orlando.1421 South West
Rossington, Alan Collins, and Howard Steele
12th Avenue, Pompano Beach, FL 33060. (305) 786produced, with Steele doubling as engineer. Also in
0660.
WEB IV STUDIO(Atlanta, Georgia) Criteria, Pablo Cruise is recording Reflector, a new
reports Peabo Bryson in recording his new album for
album for A &M Records, with Tom Dowd producing
Capitol, with producer Johnny Pate and engineer Ed and Greg Price engineering, and the Florida -based
Seay; the S.O.S. Band recording their second album Critical Mass is in trackinga new album produced by
for Tabu /CBS Records with Sidgi producing and
Ron and Howard Albert./755 NE 149th Street,
Steve Williams at the board; and Cameo in laying Miami, FL 33181. (305) 947-5611.
down tracks for a new album, with producer Larry
Southcentra):
SOUND STAGE STUDIOS(Nashville, Tennessee) has updated their "A" studio with the installation
of a new Trident TSM console. The unit was custom designed with an overbridge housing 32 meters, and a
R -e/p 112
August 1981
www.americanradiohistory.com
separate monitor mixing section. The new desk, supplied by Wilson Audio of Franklin, Tennessee, has 32
inputs with graphic EQ, and is pre -wired for 40 inputs. There are 24 bus outputs with 24 monitor channels
expandable to 32. Each monitor control can serve as a mixing input with its own EQ, fader, and auxiliary sends,
providing a total of 56 inputs during remix. The console is automated by VCA groupings 10 Music Circle South,
Nashville, TN 37203. (615) 256 -2676.
RUFF CEDAR SOUND STUDIO(Austin, Texas) announces the acquisition of a Cinema Product s
CP 16 /A motion -picture camera, thus allowing the studio to offer film/video production in addition to its G4
track audio services. Facilities are available for studio and location filming concurrently with album
projects.5012 Brighton Road, Austin, TX 78745. (512) 444 -0183.
NORTH TEXAS STATE UNIVERSITY(Denton, Texas) has upgraded the School of Music's
recording studio with the expansion of its TEAC Tascam Model 15 console to 24- tracks, and the addition of a
custom remote control to allow single or group operation of the facility's five Ampex two -tracks. Two PZMs
have also been added to the collection of Neumann, Beyer, Sony, and RCA microphones. The operation
recently utilized an Otani MTR -90 24 -track machine to record an album by the NTSU Symphony, conducted
by Anshel Brusilow. Richard Dupree is the studio manager, while staff engineers are Tim Kloth, Rob
Ensey, Pat Moriarty, and Neil Rutland.Denton, TX 76203.
-
SOUTHCENTRAL ACTIVITY
Brighton Road, Austin, IX 78745. (512) 444
Tennessee) is recording Sammy Davis Jr.'s
0183.
MUSIC CITY MUSIC HALL(Nashville,
Tennessee) is playing host to Eddy Arnold as he
upcoming album on it's 3M 32-track digital recorder
finishes up his next album for RCA, with producer
with subsequent mixdown to two -track digital,
Norro Wilson and engineer Bill Harris. Loretta
making the project one of the first completely digital
Lynn has been in to cut more tracks with producer
multitrack sessions in the city. Back -up recordings are
Owen Bradley and engineer Bill Vandevort for her
also being made on the studio's analog gear so, upon
next MCA album. Jerry Reed also recorded a single
completion, both types of masters will be available.
for RCA, with producer Rick Hall and Harris at the
Equipment includes 32 -track and four -track digital
board. Bradley and Harris are also working on a
machines supplied by 3M, the studio's own Studer 24special project for RCA involving the combination of
track analog recorder, and an SMPTE Q -Lock time
Patsy Cline and Jim Reeves tracks to form duets.30
code reader and autolocaton from Audio Kinetics.
Music Square West, Nashville, TN 37203. (615) 244Involved in the project are producer Larry Butler,
1060.
SOUND EMPORIUM(Nashville,
independent engineer Billy Sherrill, Rodney
Tennesse) has seen Bobby Goldsboro returning to
Pearson of Audio Kinetics, maintenence engineer
begin an album with producer Larry Butler, Billy
John Abbott of Sound Emporium, and studio
Sherrill engineering. Producer Ed Penny continues
president Jim Williamson. In other activity, the
mixing Terri Gibbs' upcoming album, by Sound
studio recently played host to Grand Records artist
Emporium president Jim Williamson. Mutual
Jonathan Edwards recording his debut album for
Managements's production team of Patty Parker
the Toronto -based label. Larry Butler is producing
and Frank Fara have also been in to work with two
the project, Grand's first U.S. release due for
distribution by Capitol /EMI in Canada and new Comstock Records artists, Jennifer
independents in the U.S. Nashville, TN.
Eisenhower and Julie Hupe.3102 Belmont
OMEGA AUDIO(Garland, Texas) reports the use Boulevard, Nashville, TN 37212. (615) 383
1982.
MUSCLE SHOALS SOUND STUof its 24 -track truck to record the audio portion of a
DIOS(Sheffield, Alabama) is recording Levon
television special with Delbert McClinton. The
program was a part of the Dallas Symphony
Helm's upcoming solo album on MSS Records /Capitol, with producers Jimmy Johnson and Barry
Orchestra's Outdoor Summer Fest. and Omega was
Beckett and engineer Gregg Hamm, while Glen
called upon to record the program using SMPTE time Frey and Jerry Wexler are co- producing Lou Ann
codes and to post -produce the audio portion of the
Barton's next effort with Steve Melton engineering.
program using their new B"I-X Interlock system.
In addition, Barry Beckett is producing the next
Engineering was handled by Paul Christensen and
Delbert McLinton LP with Hamm at the board./000
Russell L. Hearn, while the video portion of the
Alabama Avenue, P.O. Box 915, Sheffield, AL 35660.
program was by Richard Kidd Productions of
(205) 381 -2060.
WOODEN STUDIOS(HousDallas. The Omega Audio mobile truck was also used
ton, Texas) has completed the single A Good Man Is
to record a television special hosted by the Gatlin
Brothers at the Hyatt Regency in Dallas for the Hard to Find, by Donna and the Survivors, picked
up by Bomp Records for national distribution. Other
benefit of the Muscular Dystrophy Accosiation.2805
projects include Jimmy Leggs, Louis Carrington,
Clouer Valley Drive, Garland, TX 75043. (214) 226and Ken Grumbel's I Talk In My Sleep, and Holland
At ARDENT RECORDING(Memphis,
7179.
Young's solo album.7334 Rampart, Suite 102,
Tennessee) Isaac Hayes has been recording tracks,
Houston, TX. (713) 988.9872.
THE MUSIC
while Keith Sykes is completing a new album for
PLACE(Birmingham, Alabama) was the recording
Back Street Records, with producer Jerene Sykes
venue for the latest Eddie Kendricks album, as well
and engineer John Hampton. Point Blank is also in
as two single releases by Riverchase and
the studio to mix live tapes for London Wavelength
Hotrocket. Currently in the studio is Marilyn
and the King Biscuit Flower Hour, with Bill Ham
McCoo under the production of Randy Richards.
producing and Terry Manning engineering.2000
who is also working on his own album project. Mike
RUFF
Madison Avenue, Memphis, TN 38104.
Matos has been producing The Mortals with new
CEDAR SOUND STUDIO(Austin, Texas) has
completed an album with Extreme Heat, produced
staff engineer Mike Guerra at the console. Engineer
Jerry Masters is another new addition to the
by Neil Pederson and Ben Thornton. Currently in
personal list.1817 Oxmoor Road, Birmingham. AL
the studio, Lucky Stripes has been recording an LP
35209. (205) 871 -4221.
for Brighton Road Productions with Russell
Whitaker and Peter Butcher co- producing.5012
SOUND EMPORIUM STUDIOS(Nashville,
Midwest
STREETERVILLE RECORDING STUDIOS (Chicago, Illinois) has taken delivery of the first of
three MCI 3H -24 recorders for their three 24 -track studios. All three rooms are equipped with Harrison
consoles and 3M M -79 multitracks. Besides the new equipment, several staff additions have been made,
including mixers Bill Beyer, Fred Breitberg, and Larry Huerta. New facilities have also been added,
including a kitchen, a client lounge, and a post -production rooms/61 East GrandAuenue, Chicago, IL 60611.
(312) 644-1666.
RED ENTERPRISES (Chicago, Illinois) announces the completion of its new 24 -track studio facility.
The room was designed by Tom Irby and George Zriaick, and features a Harrison /Studer equilnr.0 -et
1981 Pro -Line Guide
A comprehensive 64 pg. color guide to al
Carvin Pro-Line equipment including illustra
tions, technical information and specifica
Lions with Special Direct Prices.
Carvin's new products for the 80's include;
double neck guitars, modular power amps up
to 700w RMS. Recording and road mixing
boards, JBL Pro speakers, bi- channel tube
guitar amps, Parts, plus much, much more.
As we introduce you to the finest Pro Equip-
ment available, you'll appreciate Carvin's
policy of selling Direct for exceptional values.
Write:GARVIN Dept. RP80, 155 Industrial Ave.,
Escondido,CA 92025 Phone: (714)747 -1710
CARVIN FREE CATALOG
Name
Address
City
State
Zip
WANTED
F(,'
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INSTRUCTORS
part
Time
FOR
AUDIO TECHNOLOGY
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and or
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and ur
GENERAL ELECTRONICS
TECHNOLOGY
Career positions immediately available in
teaching and preparation of practical curricula for the dynamic, professional recording industry. Work in a congenial,
professionally satisfying atmosphere.
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Salary- attractive; commensurate with
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Send detailed resume, including salary
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New York, N.Y. 10003
August 1981
www.americanradiohistory.com
RP80
R -e/p 113
(.7.the year
extraordinary
marketing
opportunity
package from Studio Supply /Chicago. The operation also offers a screening room with 35 mm, 16 mm, and
video capabilities interfaced with the studio's audio equipment.Chicogo, IL.
E/R MULTIMEDIA RECORDING COMPANY (Chicago, Illinois), which specializes in location
recordings and video teleproductions, is equipped with Tapco C -12 and Tascam Model 5 and 3 mixers, noise
reduction by Dolby and dbx, mikes by Shure, Audio -Technica, and Beyer, monitors by JBL, EQ and delays by
MXR, and tape machines, including a TEAC Tascam 80 -8, 3440, and 35-2 models.Chicago, /L.
KELLER- CRESCENT COMPANY (Evansville, Indiana) has appointed Jack K. Sweeney to the
position of chief recording engineer, according to Jack Fenimore, vice -president of the company's
audio/ visual division. Sweeny's background includes work with RCA Service Corporation, Universal
Recording, Altec Service Corporation, and Wilding Pictures, Inc. Keller- Crescent is an advertising agency with
an in -house audio/video production section avialable for hire.1100 East Louisiana Street, P.O. Box 3,
Euansville, IN 477101. (812) 426-7781.
-
The All Stars
Advertise
in the
OCTOBER 1981
AES
CONVENTION
ISSUE
7
ECO DING
ENGINEER PRODUCER
Outstanding editorial
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Patti Collins
Martin Gallay
R -e/p 114
-
MIDWEST ACTIVITY
East Grand Auenue, Chicago, IL 60611. (312)
AUDIO SERVICES COMPANY(Mishawaka,
Indiana) is hosting Autry Walker of Jr. Walker And
1666.
644-
FAITHFUL SOUND STUDIOS(Urb-
as he lays down tracks for an album
project. Meanwhile, Indiana -based band Pedaler has
completed two sides for a regional release.3016 Home
Street, Mishawaka, IN 46544.
At THE
ana, Illinois) announces the installation of an 8-track
Ampex 440B master recorder. According to chief
CHICAGO RECORDING COMPANY(Chicago,
Illinois)Jerry Butler is working on his new, self
production work with Adrian Belew. The
Vertebrats, Big Daddy Sun, and the Rocking
produced LP with engineer Hank Neuberger; jazz
keyboardist Charles Earland recorded his
forthcoming Columbia album with the Earth, Wind &
Fire horn section, and producer Tom-Tom84; Keith
Thomas produced Christian -rock artist Steve
Camp's new LP for Word Records; and Billy Squier
mixed a live performance tape for broadcast on the
nationally- syndicated "King Biscuit Flower Hour,"
assisted by mix engineer Jeff Newsome.528 North
Michigan, Chicago, IL 60611. (312) 822 -9333.
At
FIFTH FLOOR RECORDING(Cincinnati, Ohio)
Godmoma is working with producer Bootsy Collins
on mixes for their debut album on Elektra Records.
Rich Goldman is engineering with Bob Craig and
Greg McNeily assisting.517 West Third Street,
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202. (513) 651 -1871.
At
HOME GROWN STUDIOS(Bloomington, Indiana)
Jan Henshaw's as yet untitled album for RedBud
Records is now in the mixing stages, co- produced by
Henshaw and Bob Lucas of the group Eclectricity.
Ruthie Allen and TJ Jones have also been laying
basic tracks for a new single. Dan Radcliffe and the
Emolvees are near completion of their EP project for
Sirius Music, and The Riff-o-matics, described as a
cosmic funk jam band, are in the middle of a singles
project.611 East Empire Road, Bloomington, IN
Clones have all recently released singles recorded at
(812)
824 -2400.
STREETERVILLE
RECORDING STUDIOS(Chicago, Illinois) has
been tracking album projects for Roscoe Mitchell,
Albert Collins, The Blue Riddim Band, and KoKo
Taylor with Fred Breitberg at the console, and an
LP by Rocken Horse with Todd Von Ohlen
engineering. Also in the studio, Big Twist and The
Mellow Fellows are recording their second album for
Flying Fish Records, produced by Jim Tullio.161
Burgess, who also engineered dates with Poison
Squirrel, Sport of Kings, and Fawn. The
Wildwood Pickers are in recording their second
album with Joe Ott, while mastering at the studio has
included dates by Phil `n' The Blanks, The Red Ball
Jets, and The Odd. Kevin Vogts is Hedden's staff
-
47401.
engineer Mark Rubel, initial 8-track projects included
sessions with The Edge, Erin Isaac, and album pre-
the studio in the past several months.P.O. Box 2359,
Champaign, IL 61820. (217) 328-5065.
THE
RECORDING CONNECTION(Beachwood,
Ohio) has been providing its Roadmaster II 24 -track
mobile recording truck to NBC Radio, for taping of
Joe Walsh and Friends in Columbia, Maryland,
Jefferson Starship at The Greek Theater, Los
Angeles, and The Tubes at The Cleveland Coliseum.
Westwood One has also utilized the van to record
Rick James and Maze at the Meadowlands in New
York, Stanley Clarke and George Duke at the
Front Row Theater in Cleveland, and Deadly
Earnest in Columbus, Ohio.23330 Commerce Park
Road, Beachwood, OH 44122. (216) 4644141.
UNIVERSAL RECORDING CORPORATION(Chicago, Illinois) provided its digital
recording operation to The Lettermen, produced by
Tony Butala and engineered by Universal's Bill
Bradley. Other dates in the studio include gospel
singer Inez Andrews for Savoy Records, with
producer Milton Bingham and engineer Danny
Leake.46 East Walton Street, Chicago, IL 60611.
(312) 642 -6465.
HEDDEN WEST RECORD-
ING STUDIO(Schaumburg, Illinois) recently
recorded tracks for The Buzzards with engineer lain
cutting engineer.1200 Remington Road, Schaumburg, IL 60195. (312) 885 -9378.
Southern California:
THAT STUDIO (North Hollywood) announces the opening of
its
16 -track
facility. Design and construction of the studio was handled by
Michael Ebert and studio manager Richard Holbrook, while the facility's
equipment roster features Otani 16 -, 8- and two -track machines, a ReVox
stereo machine, and an Auditronics 110-8 24x8 mixing console. Monitoring
is handled by JBL 4311, Altec 604, and Auratone speakers driven by Crown
and BGW amps. Outboards include units by dbx, Lexicon, MicMix, Sound Workshop, Bi -Amp, UREI, and Audio Design and Recording. Microphones
are by Sennheiser, Beyer, Sony, Electro-Voice, Shure, AKG, PZM and
PML, while the instrument list offers a Yamaha 7 -foot grand piano, HamTHAT STUDIO
mond B3 organ, Fender Rhodes, and Sonar drum kit. P.O. Box 958, North
Hollywood, CA (213) 764 -1421.
MAD HATTER STUDIOS(Los Angeles) announces the opening of its new 24-track recording facility.
The studio covers 1,300 square feet of area, with 13- to 18 -foot sloped ceilings and an adjoining isolation booth.
The control room is equipped with a Trident console, two Studer tape recorders, two EMT 140As and a 240
Gold Foil for reverberation, and monitoring delivered by a John Meyer ACD system. The first recording
project at the facility is a Warner Brothers LP entitled Three Quarters, featuring Steve Gadd, Eddie Gomez,
Michael Brecker, and studio co -owner Chick Corea.2635 Griffith Park Bouleuard, Los Angeles, CA 90039.
(213)
6M -5766.
SOUNDTEK STUDIO(Campbell) has announced the forthcoming opening of a new 16-track studio,
featuring a Neotek Series III 26x24 console, Ampex tape recorders, a full complement of outboard gear and
microphones. Soundtek will also feature a complete assortment of acoustical and electronic keyboards.85
South 2nd Street, Campbell, CA. (408) 370 -3313.
August 1981
www.americanradiohistory.com
MIRROR IMAGE CASSETTE COPIES(Hollywood) has moved to a new location in Hollywood, and offers real -time copying from tape, cassette, or disk on to
ten Hitachi D -90 decks with metal tape capability and comprehensive EQ by Audio Control. Owner Tony Rockliff is a British producer/engineer/musician, while the
chief engineer is Paul Gibbons, formerly of ASR and Superscope.7113 Hawthorn Avenue, Hollywood, CA 90046. (213) 669-0813.
INTERNATIONAL AUTOMATED MEDIA(Irvine) has announced that Jerry Shirar will assume the post of president of the corporation following the
resignation of former IAM president Skip Konte, who left to pursue a career in independent production. Additionally, Terry Sheppard, formerly the studio's director
of marketing, has been appointed to the post of vice -president operations by Shirar.17422 Murphy Avenue, ¡ruine, CA 92714. (714) 751 -2015.
QUAD TECH STUDIO(Los Angeles) owners Hank and Joani Waring are preparing their Studio #7 for recording and mixdown sessions, featuring a 32x24
Neotek Series III console, 3M M79 24- and two -track machines, JBL and E -V monitors, and a full complement of outboard gear. 4007 West 6th Street, Los Angeles, CA
90020. (213) 383 -2155.
HOUSTON RECORDING(Cucamonga) is opening a remote facility in San Francisco with dual 24 -track recorders and an MCI JH -636 automated
console.9340 Foothill, #32, Cucamonga, CA 91730. (714) 987 -0379.
-
-
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA ACTIVITY
United/Western: Michael Chapman is producing Exile for Warner Curb
SPINDLETOP RECORDING STUDIOS(Hollywood) is tracking the Brian
Records, with Doug Schwartz and Michael Boatner assisting; while Oingo
Chatter Band with Shel Talmy (former producer of The Who and The Kinks).
In the mix stages at the facility is a children's soundtrack under the direction of
Boingo has finished its A &M album with Pete Solley producing and Steve
producer writer Don Goodman. Both projects are being engineered by Charlie
Brown at the board.6050 Sunset Boulevard, Hollywood, CA 90028. (213) 469
KENDUN RECORDERS(Burbank) reports Kool And The Gang
Paakkari with Steve Thume assisting.3449 Cahuengo Boulevard, Hollywood,
3983.
are in laying down instrumental and vocal overdubs for De -Lite Records, with
CA 90068. (213) 851 -1250.
CALIFORNIA RECORDING STUDIOS
(Hollywood) finds Emmy Lou Harris' fiddle player, Wayne Goodwin, finishing
producer Deodato and staff engineers Mallory Earl and Mack Sackett, while
his new single Rocky's Breakdown, with producer /engineer Steve Pouliot. Also
Carol King is in cutting tracks with producer Mark Hallman and engineer Chet
in the studio, country singer Eddie Marie recently finished her latest LP with
Himes and assistant Tom Cummings. Also at Kendun, Motown artists Nolen
And Crossley are mixing their self -produced project with engineers Barney
producer Tony Adams and engineer John Brady, while Jan and Dean have
Perkins and Sackett.619 South Glenwood Place, Burbank, CA 91506. (213)843been tracking their latest single with producer Alan Miles.5203 Sunset
8096.
K -DISC MASTERING(Hollywood) reports that Jo Hansch and
Boulevard, Hollywood, CA 90027. (213) 666 -1244.
INTERNATIONAL
assistant Ray Olson recently cut the master for Tinsel Town Rebellion, Frank
AUTOMATED MEDIA(lrvine) will be recording the new MCA album by The
Zappa's latest for Barking Pumkin Records. Other projects include Tom Scott's
Archers, Spreuding Like Wild Fire, with producer Dony McGuire.17422
Murphy Avenue, ¡ruine, CA 92714. (714) 751 -2015.
live LP, Apple Juice for CBS, Teena Marie's latest on Motown, It Must Be
At RUDY
Magic, and Pure Prairie League's Somewhere in the Night on Casablanca
RECORDS(Hollywood) Graham Nash and Stephen Stills are reported to be
nearing completion of their new album. Equipment being used on the project
produced by Rob Fraboni.6550 Sunset Boulevard, Hollywood, CA 90028. (213)
At ARTISAN SOUND RECORDERS(Hollywood) engineer
includes a Studer A80 !z -inch stereo machine, and an EMT 251 digital reverb.
466 -1323.
Gregory Fulginiti recently finished mastering the new Pat Benatar album,
Stan Johnston and Steve Gursky are engineering, with Jay Parti
Precious Time, with producer Keith Olsen for Chrysalis Records, Ella
assisting. 1522 Crossroads of The World, Hollywood, CA 90028. (213) 467Fitzgerald's International release with producer Eric Miller for Pablo Records,
6000.
UNITED WESTERN STUDIOS(Hollywood) reports that The
Rick Springfield's latest for RCA with producer Bill Drescher, and the new
Little River Band was in the studio with producer George Martin laying down
tracks for the motion -picture soundtrack of Hooky Tonk Freeway, while
Warner Brothers project by The Tazmanian Devils with producer Eric
Jacobsen.1600 North Wilcox Avenue, Hollywood, CA 90028. (213) 843Michael Miller has been producing Dionne Warwick, Chuck Mangione, Rick
8096.
CLOVER
Nelson, and Don Wilson for the syndicated television show, Solid Gold. Also at
continued overleaf
-
-
.
PZM -"BEST PIANO
MIKE EVER.!'
"
"...We get a multitude of natural piano sounds...without EQ :
...on the grand piano, the sound was fantastic: "...heard the solo
piano without echo or tubbiness :' "...nice to have a crisp piano:'
"...natural...non- resonant." "...sounded better than it had a right to :
Performers, engineers, reviewers -all notice a delightful
improvement when the piano is miked with the new Crown
PZMTM Recording or reinforcement- upright or grand piano miking is simpler and better with PZM.
Write for your free copy of PZM Application Notes today.
Contains fresh, new ways to use PZM microphones.
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1718 W.
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Quotations are from contributors to recent issues of PZMemo.
a
1- 219 - 294
August 1981
For additional information circle
#
97
www.americanradiohistory.com
-5571
newsletter of PZM ideas published by Crown
R -e/p 117
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA ACTIVITY
- continued ..
.
RECORDERS(Los Angeles) was the recording venue of Bob Dylan's
upcoming album,Shot of Loue. Produced by Chuck Plotkin and
engineered by Toby Scott, the album features guest appearances by
Ringo Starr, Ron Wood, Andrew Gold, and Ry Cooder. For echo
and reverb, the new Sony DRE 2000 digital reverberator was utilized on
all cuts, to give a live sound to the controlled studio acoustics. The
project was completed shortly before Dylan left for his summer
European tour. Other notable projects out of Clover include Bruce
Springsteen's The River, which was mastered digitally using the Sony
PCM system.Los Angeles, CA.
DAVLEN. SOUND
STUDIOS(Universal City) is recording Polygram artist Bobby
Caldwell as he does overdubs with keyboardist Steve Porcaro for his
new album. Down the hall, Air Supply producer Robbie Porter is
tracking a Teri Desario album for Polygram with Jim Hilton at the
console, and Mike Stone is mixing the new April Wine video
presentation to be aired soon for Capitol Records.4162 Lankershim
Boulevard, Universal City, CA 91602. (213) 980-8700.
TiM
PiNCH RECORDING(Van Nuys) recently supplied its 24 -track
remote truck to record Humble Pie at Wolf & Rissmiller's Country
Club in Reseda, California, for the BBC Rock Hour. Tom Johnston
was also recorded in the same venue by Pinch for a video presentation;
while other dates include A Day in the Country video production at the
Rose Bowl in Pasadena, California, starring The Gatlin Brothers,
Merle Haggard, and Rossanne Cash; and a television production
with Tina Turner and Jim Stafford at the California Expo Fair in Del
Mar, California. Pinch also provided its services for the recently
released Friday Night in San Francisco LP with John McLaughlin, Al
DiMeola, and Paco DeLucia, recorded live at the Warfield Theater in
December of 1980. All dates were engineered by Tim Pinch and Rex
`
Olson.62011/2 Van Nuys Boulevard, Van Nuys, CA 91401. (213) 988-
WESTLAKE AUDIO(Los Angeles) reports artist Patti
recording a new album with Quincy Jones producing for
Qwest Records, with Bruce Swedien engineering assisted by Ed
Cherney. Meanwhile, Roberta Flack was doing tracks for the new
Richard Pryor movie with Joe Ferla engineering and Erik Zobler
1160.
Austin
is
assisting for MCA/Universal, and Don Felder and several of The
Eagles were in to finish up the title track to the movie Heavy Metal. Joe
Moss and Matt Forger handled the control room chores. Also in the
studio, George Benson is finishing up overdubs for a forthcoming
Warner Brothers album, with Wayne Henderson producing and Alan
Sides and Brian Reeves engineering.6311 Wilshire Boulevard, Los
THE PASHA MUSiC
Angeles, CA 90048. (213) 655.0303.
HOUSE(Hollywood) is finishing up Billy Thorpe's first album for the
Pasha /CBS label, with producer Spencer Proffer and engineer Larry
Brown in the control booth. Proffer is also producing sides for the
Florida artist Keith L'Neire, with Brown and Duane Baron handling
the engineering chores. Meanwhile, producers Charlie Calello and
Steve Bedell are recording Phylliss Baily with Baron at the board,
and Brown is also mixing Rochelle Robertson with producer Jeff
Rich.5615 Melrose Avenue, Hollywood, CA 90038. (213) 4663507.
SUNSET SOUND STUDIO(Hollywood) finds Eddie
Rabbitt finishing the mix on his upcoming LP for Elektra, with
producer David Malloy and engineer Peter Granet, while Neil
Diamond is in Studio 2 recording strings for his next CBS album with
Bob Gaudio producing and Ron Hitchcock at the board. Nicolette
Larson was also in Sunset to track a song for the soundtrack of Arthur
on Warner Brothers, with Andrew Gold producing and Jim Isaacson
engineering. Other dates include sessions by Pat Simmons of the
Doobie Brothers, working on a solo LP with producer Ted
Templeman and engineer Donn Landee, and The Dirt Band in
mixing a new release for United Artists/EMI, co- produced by Jeff
Hanna and Bob Edwards.6650 Sunset Boulevard, Hollywood, CA
90028. (213) 469 -1186.
RUSK SOUND STUDiOS(Hollywood)
finds The Chipmonks in to record their new Christmas album,
produced by Ross Bagdasarian and Janice Karman, with Randy
Tominaga at the console. Roberta Kelly is also in laying down tracks
with producer Juergen Koppers and engineer Steven D. Smith. The
album is for Bloody Hehl Productions, which is also recording Marlene
Ricci in the studio with the same control -room crew.1556 North La
Brea Avenue, Hollywood, CA 90028. (213) 462 -6477. II At
EXCHANGE STUDIOS(Granada Hills) The
SKYLIGHT
"We Deliver Performance!"
You've known us for our expertise as a service organization. In
addition, here are some of the fine equipment lines that we sell:
AB Systems
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Crown
dbx
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Electro -Voice
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R -e/p 118
August 1981
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TEAC /Tascam
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CUSTOM DESIGN & MODIFICATIONS, SALES &
SERVICE OF PROFESSIONAL AUDIO EQUIPMENT
Suite 215
Burbank, California 91502
For additional information circle
# 98
www.americanradiohistory.com
(213) 843 -6320
Lettermen
have recorded radio promotion spots for KYA -FM, San
Francisco, with Tony Butala of the band producing; producer
engineer Steven Richardson is cutting tracks with singer songwriter
Rory O'Brien for his up- coming EP release; and British rock group
Jersey cut three songs with Richardson at the console.P. O. Box 3173,
Granada Hills, CA 91344. (213) 363 -8151.
HOUSTON
RECORDING(Cucamonga) recently sent its remote truck to Las
Vegas, Nevada, to record
a live 24 -track audio: video taping of Kool
And The Gang, Johnathan Winters, and Waylon and Madame.
Engineers were Fred Tator, Rich Houston, and Steve Hawk. Video
Productions of Nevada handled the visual end, while sound
reinforcement was provided by A -1 Audio Services. The shows at the
Aladdin Theater were taped for cable television release.9340 Foothill,
#32, Cucamonga, CA 91730. (714) 987 -0379.
Northern California:
El SHOE STORE RECORDING(Berkeley) announces the completion of its new recording studio located in the basement of McElroy Shoes
in downtown Berkeley, making it the city's first truly "underground" recording studio. The Shoe Store is the result of a partnership between Hank
Ceigler, Calvin McElroy, and Dr. Richie Moore. Moore designed and interfaced the studio after totally gutting the basement. The facility is
equipped with a TEAC Tascam 80 -8 8 -track recorder, said to have been modified for improved frequency response and faster, noise -free punchins. The console is an upgraded Sound Workshop 1280 -B, with Tannoy monitors powered by Yamaha amplifiers. Auratones are also available,
along with a Furman and Orban reverb system, Symetrix compressors and noise -gates, an MXR Flanger Doubler, and an Aphex Aural Exciter.
Microphones are by AKG, Sennheiser, Shure, and Beyer. The equipment can also be utilized for remote recording. #1 Shattuck Square, Berkeley,
CA. (415) 540 -6055.
AUDIO TRANSFER RECORDERS(Lafayette) announces the opening of its new 8 -track recording facility. Designed and interfaced by
Dr. Richie Moore of Studio Operations Service, San Rafael, the studio features the new "Auracoustic" room design that is said to promote even
frequency response and optimum reverberation time in both the recording and control room. The recording room measures 19- by 22 -foot, and the
control room 171,2 by 19; both areas have a variable ceiling that averages at 13 feet. Equipment comprises a new and upgraded Sound Workshop
Series 30 console; Scully 280 1 -inch 8- track; Scully 280 two -track; and a wide range of outboard gear and microphones. The monitoring system is a
pair of flush -mounted UREI Time- Aligned 811As and Auratones.3327 Mt. Diablo Boulevard, Lafayette, CA 94549. (415) 283 -4094.
SENSA STUDIO (Sunnyvale) announces the recent installation of an Ampex MM -1000 16-track recorder, purchased from Fantasy
Studios, Berkeley, California. The new multitrack features many modifications and retrofits, including Variable Speed Oscillator and provisions
for SMPTE time -code. Recent projects at the studio include a radio commercial for Laurence of London,
an album by Ray Nelson, a 45 by Bryan Cannon, and a four song demo by Michael Silversher.
1016 Morse Avenue, a16, Sunnyvale, CA 94086. (408) 734 -2438.
BODACIOUS AUDIO (San Mateo) has announced the addition of the new Sony PCM Digital
Recording System. 4114 George Avenue, #1, San Mateo, CA 94403. (415) 573 -5297.
BAY SOUND REPRODUCTION (Oakland) has updated their 16-channel/8-track studio with the
purchase of new Crown PZM microphones, EXR Exciter, Eventide Instant Phaser, and MIC MIX Master
Room Super C reverb. 5 Yorkshire Drive, Oakland, CA 94618. (415) 655 -4885.
UNICORN STUDIO (Nevada City) has purchased a Studer A800 24 -track machine to handle
master recording chores. The facility is owned by Roger Hodgson of the rock group Supertramp. Nevada
-
City, CA.
Bay Sound
Total control-with verification-
-
at
the
crossover.
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the crossover
Crown's new
mono electronic MX-4 controls bandwidth for four
outputs (high, mid-range, low and sub -woofer), with
separate level control for each output and for input.
The MX -4 includes signal -present and
overload indicators for each band. At a
glance it tells you how well it's working.
Precision stepped rotary switches select
18 dB /octave Butterworth filters. Easy to set. Easier
to reset.
XLR balanced, or phone -jack unbalanced, input/
output. Extra XLR input connector for "daisy- chaining: Built -in polarity switches on XLR outputs.
Total control. Total convenience. Totally Crown.
Cr
®w
...WHEN YOU'RE READY FOR REAL!
h
1718 W. Mishawaka Road, Elkhart, IN 46517
Please write us, or call
219/294 -5571 for further information.
August 1981
For additional information circle
#
99
www.americanradiohistory.com
R -e/p 119
L
.J
L
J
l
J
-- NORTHERN CALIFORNIA
At AUDIO TRANSFER RECORDERS(Lafayette)
The Tickets
recording several singles for Associated Broadcasters with Richie
Moore engineering and producing, and Mary Davis assisting. The
Mark Stanley Band recorded a single, with Duncan Rowe
engineering and Peter Rowe assisting. Other activity has been a
commercial for "This Month In The East Bay," produced by Bob
Fa'stein; a single by Japanese artist Takami Umehara for release in
Japan; and pre- production album work by the group Tattoo; all
engineered by Moore assisted by Davis. Jimmy Lyon, guitarist with
Eddie Money, was also in mixing demos of Kid Palomino with Rowe
engineering.3327 Mt. Diablo Boulevard, Lafayette, CA 94549. (415)
283 -4094.
SHOE STORE RECORDING(Berkeley) has been
recording The Roosters for their upcoming EP with Calvin McElroy
and Richie Moore co- producing and engineering, with assistance from
studio manager Mike Beynon. Ken Greenberg is in the studio
producing The Lawyers with Hank Ceigler at the console, while
Holly Hanson is also finishing an independent album. #1 Shattuck
At VILLA
Square, Berkeley, CA. (415) 540 -6055.
RECORDERS(Modesto)Cornelius Bumpus of the Doobie Brothers
has been mixing a solo album project with John Wright engineering.
Also, Nigel Benjamin, former lead singer of Mott, has started an album
project with Ashley Brigdale engineering and producing.3013
At
Shoemake Avenue, Modesto, CA 95351. (209) 521 -1494.
FANE PRODUCTIONS(Santa Cruz) Ray Bolger is wrapping up his
narrative version of Peter and the Wolf, with the Santa Cruz Chamber
ACTIVITY - Orchestra and engineer Peter Carlson. The Garcia Brothers have
also been in, recording tracks for their new LP with Tom Anderson
producing and engineering, while Interface is finishing up their latest
single for Bluebeat productions, with Fane Opperman at the
console.115 -B Harvey West Boulevard, Santa Cruz, CA 95060. (408)
425 -0152. IN BAY SOUND REPRODUCTION( Oakland)
recorded the recently released EP by Back Up & Push with producer
Tim Ware and engineer Glen Oey. Also in the studio, Rasul Saddik
has finished mixing his upcoming album, while Holy Smoke and
Napata were in to record demo tracks, the latter with producer
Joachim Young.5 Yorkshire Drive, Oakland, CA 946I8. (415) 655At HEAVENLY RECORDING STUDIOS(Sacramento) Dewayne Blackwell is working on new material for Snuff
Garrett Productions, Larry Lauzon engineering; B.Y.U. Music
Director Newell Dayley has finished producing the new Synthesis
jazz album, Lauzon engineering with Ray Pyle assisting; Ted Kimura
producing Odysus with Lauzon engineering; and Perry Jones
producing and Lauzon engineering on Bob Crocker's new album.1020
Recent
35th Avenue, Sacramento, CA 95822. (916) 428 -5888.
sessions with the BODACIOUS AUDIO(San Mateo) remote truck
includes The Johnny Van Zant Band recorded live for Polygram
Records at the Keystone, Palo Alto, for future radio broadcast. Dave
Haynes engineering with Herb Pallant assisting. Also, The Casuals
recorded at various Bay Area clubs for a future live album.4114 George
Avenue #1, San Mateo, CA 94403. (415) 573 -5297.
4885.
Mountain:
El BONNEVILLE PRODUCTIONS(Salt Lake City) has installed an Audio -Kinetics Q -Lock 310 SMPTE time -code synchronizer system.
The portable system can be used in any of Bonneville's three specialized studios to run two or three tape sources simultaneously, including Ampex
MM1200 24- track, 440C 8- track, and ATR -104 4 -track audio machines, and a Sony 2860 U-matic video cassette recorder.130 Social Hall Avenue,
Salt Lake City, UT 84111. (80I) 237-2800.
MOUNTAIN ACTIVITY
SOUND COLUMN STUDIOS(Salt Lake City, Utah) reports that producer Lawrence Tamblyn has just finished overdubbing and mixing The
I..olliwinks, a children's album for K -Tel Records. Jim Anglesey engineered the sessions.46 East Herbert Avenue, Salt Lake City, UT 84111. (801)
-
-
355-5327.
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R -e/p 120
August 1981
For additional information circle
#
100
www.americanradiohistory.com
Northwest:
SOUND SMITH STUDIOS(Portland, Oregon) has begun construction on a state -of- the -art control room designed by Tom Gandy using
Energy Time Curve Analysis. According to Sound Smith vice -president David Tower, Gandy is one of the 50 individuals in the world licensed to
use this method of analysis.426 North West 6th Street, Portland, OR 97209. (503) 224 -7680.
Hawaii:
KONA GOLD RECORDING (Hawaii) has acquired an Ampex MM -1100 16 -track with Search -To -Cue. The deck was formerly the
property of Sea -West Studios, and has been linked to a Sound Workshop Series 30 console equipped with
full sweep EQ. A good selection of outboard gear and microphones is also said to be available. The studio
boasts a large selection of instruments: ARP string ensemble; Hobart Cable acoustic upright grand piano,
ARP 2600; Rogers and Ludwig drum kits; Digital Sequencer; 1980 Fender/Rhodes with active EQ; Les Paul
Stratocaster; and Gibson Hummingbird. Kailua -Kona, Hawaii. (808) 329 -6439.
Canada:
LE STUDIO (Montreal, Quebec) has acquired a two -channel JVC Model BP90 Digital Recording
Processor, which features 16 -bit linear quantization. The unit was elected the best choice by producers
Andre Perry, Terry Brown and Le Studio's engineers Nich Blagona and Paul Northfield, after comparison tests made with other available systems. The facility is already equipped with a 36- channel Solid State
Le Studio's Perry, Brown, Northfield
Logic console, and Studer A800 Mark II 24 -track recorders. Morin Heights, Quebec, Canada JOR 1H0.
Mexico:
SONIDO GRAB, S.A.(Mexico City) is a new 24- and 4 -track studio, the main control room of which features a Neotek 24x24 Series III
console custom built for the facility, MCI JH -24 and JH -110A tape machines, and a complete array of outboard equipment. There are two studios
and a vocal booth serving the main control room. The 4 -track studio is intended primarily for radio commercials, and features a 16x4 console,
TEAC /Tascam 40 -4 with dbx, and a good selection of outboard equipment.Mexico City.
Great Britain:
THE BRITISH BROADCASTING CORPORATION (London) have installed a Solid State Logic
SL4000 E-Series Master Studio Systems at its prime rock recording venues: Studios 4 and 5 in the BBC music
production complex at Maida Vale, London. The 40 -input E- Series console in Maida Vale 4, which is interfaced
with a Studer A800 24 -track machine and A80 twin- tracks, may be switched between track -laying, overdubbing and mixing configurations. This flexibility may be extended to the point of live transmission, with
simultaneous feeds to two -track tape machines, sync -locked multitrack machines for simulcast repeats, and
off -air dynamic mixing memory. Other broadcasting features include safety switching logic, which locks out all
potentially dangerous switching functions that could interrupt main signal paths during transmission or live BBC's Chinnery, McEwan ..
... SSL's Sanders
recording. Broadcasting House, Portland Place, London W1A 1AA, England. 01 -580 4468.
... continued overleaf
.
-
,.r-fU.
100
Aw
2
!
000 -M1
01//
11
tin
10100
ro..w/..oa..
.mn
/
1
Four programs: Plate I, Plate II, Hall, and Space, with
Clean, high -quality reverberation
decay times from 0.2 to 20 seconds "Friendly," microprocessor -based control and display of
all seven programable reverberation parameters
LED display of the dynamic properties of
input and processed signal levels Non -volatile storage registers for 32 separate reverb set-ups
Input Mute and Reverb Clear functions for extra control of long decay times
Compact
(3'/2 "x19 ")
Moderately priced ($5995 U.S.)
Optional remote control
URSA MAJOR, Inc., Box 18,
Belmont, Mass. 02178 USA. Telephone 617-489 -0303 Telex 921405 URSAMAJOR BELM
August 1981
For additional information circle
# 101
www.americanradiohistory.com
R -e/p 121
h.lê ?ÁPBd,;°r9b;lg
9
Great Britain:
GENESIS' PRIVATE STUDIOS(Surrey) was recently completed with equipment provided by HHB Sales of London. The facility includes
an Amek 36x24 M2000A console linked to Studer A80 24- and two -track recorders. EMT Echo Plate is also featured, as well as UREI monitors
powered by Crown amps and mikes by Shure, Beyer, Neumann, and PZM.Surrey, England.
R G JONES RECORDING STUDIOS(Wimbledon, London) is to embark on a major studio redesign, involving the installation of a Solid
State Logic 4000 E- Series Master Studio System. The SSL will be interfaced with a Studer A80 Mk3 in a control room, which will have completely
new acoustic architecture by Eastlake Audio. The Total Recall Studio Computer will provide all title, track, cue and mix listings either on a video
screen, or on a printed copy for production planning outside the studio. As studio owner Robin Jones, explains: "We had a good look at
everything on the market, but we kept coming back to the SSL, not just on the sound, but also because of the flexibility in both mixing and
maintenance. The other thing that attracted me, is that hooking up a synchroniser to an already integrated Studio System is a neat and easy task,
and the inevitable expansion to 48 -track recording and to audio /video sweetening for videodisks will be very cost effective. "Beulah Road, London
SW19 35B, England.
01 -540 9881.
Denmark:
DANMARKS RADIO (Copenhagen) recently took delivery of what has been described as the
World's first computer -controlled sound recording truck. At the heart of the project is the Solid State Logic
Master Studio System, which includes a 44 -input SL4000 E- Series console. While primarily intended for
location recording, the truck will provide the necessary facilities to create separate mixes for live stereo
broadcasts plus simultaneous twin 24 -track recording, and either mono or stereo feeds to a location video
truck. Additionally, the unit will be equipped with Solid State Logic's Total Recall computers, which provide
complete tape machine management, and store every detail of the console set -up, including all mixes and
foldbacks, panning, equalization and filters, compression, limiting and gating, as well as input and output
selections. Acoustics of the truck were designed by Tom Hidley of Si orra Eastlake.
AUDIO /VIDEO UPDATE
Eastern Activity:
ADWAR VIDEO CORPORATION(New York City) announces the addition to its staff of John Trayna as director of special projects.
Previously a corporate consultant to the company, Trayna recently finished design and installation of Adwar's new post -production center, which
features a CMX on- line/off-line editing suite. He was also previously a director of video resources at Electronic Arts Intermix, and an instructor in
video at New York University.100 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY. (212) 691 -0976.
BO HIGBEE PRODUCTIONS(Atlantic City, New Jersey) has been supplying broadcast -quality video tape services for such stars as
Ben Vereen, Bill Cosby, and Neil Sedaka, and non broadcast tapes for the likes of Frank Sinatra and Jerry Lewis. Equipment used includes
fed by Ikegami HL -79A camera systems.
one -inch Type "C" highband tape machines with both 3í"a- and ;z -inch formats also being available
The company has also produced tapes for corporate documentaries and training tapes, industrial presentations, TV commercials, and remote
news broadcasts.P.O. Box 779, Atlantic City, NJ 08404. (609) 653 -1833.
-
-
-
PL TE
ECOPLATES offer useful
reverberation throughout the
entire audible range, a quality
not available in other types of
reverb systems, regardless of
cost.
Now you can have the
very best at an
affordable price.
For Demo Tapes, Users List, and
Literature, contact your
dealer, or
ECOPLATE
ECOPLA
$5000
$2750.;
Both ECOPLATES offer variable
reverb times, 1 to 6 seconds.
Motorized remote control opti
e
R-e/p 122
STUDIO
TECHNOLOGIES
6666 North Lincoln Avenue
Lincolnwood, IL 60645
312/676 -9400
an affiliate of Programming Technologies, Inc.
August 1981
For additional information circle # 102
TM
1.
ql_WO111
AUDIONIDEO UPDATE
COLUMBIA PICTURES and RCA(New York City) have announced the formation of a joint venture for the marketing of home video
entertainment programs throughout the world, excluding the U.S. and Canada. Under the new arrangement, the organization will open offices
around the world to distribute existing and future theatrical and television programs produced by participants in the venture, and by outside
producers. RCA Records video music programs and RCA Selecta Vision videodisks will be processed by the operation, which will also handle all
formats of home video, including the various formats in disk, and cassette tapes.711 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10022. (212) 751 -4400.
DEVLIN PRODUCTIONS(New York City) provided video editing time for the British New Wave band, The Stranglers, to promote
their appearance at Bond's International Casino in Manhattan, as well as the release of their new album on Stiff Records. The editing was
performed by Gregg Featherman, and supervised by the band's manager Ed Klieman. Devlin has also been handling a number of commercial
bookings in their post- production suites.150 West 55th Street, New York, NY 10019. (212) 582 -5572.
E.J. STEWART(Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) recently recorded a video promotion of Columbia Records artists, The Quincy Band. The
presentation features the five -member band performing atop a glowing stage, and is highlighted by special effects generated by the company's
Grass Valley Group Mk II digital special effects system. The band was also taped on location for intercutting wi h the stage performance. The piece
was produced for E.J.S. by Corrine Cardillo, with an assist from music director Marcus Peterzell.
525 Mildred Avenue, Primos, PA 19018. (215) 626 -6500.
MAGNOSOUND AND VIDEO (New York City) has added a seventh 3M TT -7000 one -inch
C- formatt video tape recorder with time base corrector. All VTRs are interfaced with the CMX editing
hardware, which includes in its outboards a 3M D -8000 graphics generator. Other services offered include
original video production, film -to -tape transfer, cassette and tape duplication, editing, and PAL SECAM and
NTSC conversions. 212 West 48 Street, N.Y. NY 10036. (212) 757-8855.
NATIONAL VIDEO CENTER AND RECORDING STUDIOS (New York City) has completed
post production video special effects for a one -hour stereo special featuring MCA jazz -fusion artist Spyro
Gyra. Video engineer Steve Fitzpatrick utilized National's Grass Valley Mark II digital effects unit to Magno's Murk Yopal *IT
John Delatorre (rioc'
achieve the producer's goals, including superimposed laser visuals to accompany the song Laser Material.
The program was produced by Steve Benton and Gary Donatelli for Axial Productions. Kent Watsonand Cat Bennett were executive
producers. 460 West 42nd Street, New York, NY 10036. (212) 279 -2000.
SCHARFF COMMUNICATIONS(New York City) has opened its new demo room to offer clients hands -on experimentation with an
extensive collection of audio/video gear. According to company president Peter B. Scharff, the equipment includes an MCI JH -114 24 -track tape
deck interlocked with a Sony U-matic ;'4 -inch video recorder to showcase the new BTX Shadow SMPTE code unit, UREI 813 -A studio monitors,
and McIntosh power amps. Any one unit can be routed through a patch bay to interface with any other piece of equipment in the room.1600
Broadway, New York, NY 10019. (212) 582 -7260.
WINDSOR TOTAL VIDEO(New York City) has opened a new CMX 340X editing suite centered around a Grass Valley Group Series
300 switcher, with a DVE Mark that offers two channels for digital video effects. The unit has infinite re -entry and past key features, plus a myriad
of wipes and optical effects. Other features of the suite include a Chyron IV Title Generator, two Cohu title cameras, a 16 -track Neve audio
console, and a Scully 1/4-inch tape deck slaved to the VTRs via BTX's new Shadow SMPTE reader /controller. The room can accommodate one- or
tR.o -inch formats, or both. Bob Henderson is Windor's chairman and the chief executive officer.565 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10017.
)
11
Look
to
For Professional Recordin g
it together quite like the
sod
. No one ca n hape s un
put
Masters of the recording console. Come
24 track Soundcraft 2400. From microphones
British.Consoles..
see the new generation 16 &
to multi- track, studio owners and recording engineers
Look to Lake. For information or a demonstration contact:
LakeThe Pro Audio Group, Lake Systems Corporation,
55 Chapel St, Newton, MA 02160 (617) 244 -6881
(«a
pNr
irraiii
LAKE SYSTEMS
CORPORATION
August 1981
For additional information circle # 103
www.americanradiohistory.com
R -e /p 123
AUDIO/VIDEO UPDATE
Central Activity:
CINEMA AMERICA(Houston, Texas) has moved to a new 5,000 square foot production center, which includes executive offices, editing
and studio facilities, plus a 35 mm and 16 mm interlock screening room with video capability. The company is currently producing films for Capitol
National Bank, Oceaneering, and Shey Advertising.P.O. Box 56566, Houston, TX 77027. (713) 757 -0028.
1NNERVISION PRODUCTIONS(St. Louis, Missouri) has acquired a newly developed two -person studio camera crane, said to be one
of the first in use in a mid -West video production. The Tulip crane by Matthews Studio Equipment, Burbank, California, allows for easy
disassembly and complete portability for location shooting. The unit can be transported anywhere a 4x4 truck or a helicopter can travel. The 18l/foot crane has a range of from five feet below ground level, to 16 feet above ground level and, with all its components, weighs less than 1,500
pounds.11783 Borman Driue, St. Louis, MO 63141. (314) 569 -2500.
ON TRACK PRODUCTIONS(Chicago, Illinois) announces the completion on its first in -house project: a TV documentary focusing on
the Chicago rock scene. Tapings for the program took place on locations throughout the city, with musical segments complemented by rehearsal
rehearsal sequences. Partners on On Track include David Webb, vice president, sales and marketing for Third Coast Records and a record
producer for Tails Out Productions; Tom Pabich, also a producer for Tails Out, and Brian Boyer, an
Emmy Award winning television producer and author. 817 W. Hillgrove, La Grange, IL 60525. (312) 352 -3022.
THE ROCKY MOUNTAIN BROADCAST CENTER (Denver, Colorado) has completed the
major redesign of its Denver facility, and will soon provide expanded video editing and general post production services. The facility can handle two- and one -inch time code editing, film on tape editing, multitrack
sound mixing, and satellite distribution of programming. The sound suite includes a Neotek audio board
with a 16 -track tape machine, while the video editing suite was laved out to offer a face -to -face approach
to editing. The RMBC is a division of the Rocky Mountain Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Suite 50B,
the RMBC Center
Diamond Hill, 2480 West 26th Avenue, Denver, CO 80211. (303) 455 -1514.
-
.
Western Activity:
CHRONICLE PRODUCTIONS(San Francisco, California), a video/film production house, unveiled its new Aurora Videographics
System to provide clients with three types of real -time animation. The Aurora features a variety of brush shapes, and can create custom shapes. A
tilting function with multiple fonts, drop shadow, and overlay capability is included in the system.1001 Van Ness, San Francisco, CA 94109. (415)
561 -8663.
COMPACT VIDEO SERVICES(Burbank, California) has purchased four Ampex Digital Optics systems to create sophisticated special
effects in its post -production facilities. ADO is a new digital video effects system which enables a picture to be rotated in a three- dimensional
perspective.Burbank, CA.
IMAGE RESOURCE CORPORATION(Westlake Village, California) announces the appointment of Richard Sager to the position of
vice- president of engineering for the company. Prior to joining Image Resource, Sager founded and was the general manager of the Video Display
division of Bell and Howe11.2260 Townsgate Road, Westlake Village, CA 91361. (805) 496 -3317,
LUCASFILM LTD.(San Rafael, California) has officially located its Los Angeles office to its Marin County headquarters in Northern
California. Previously, two- thirds of Lucasfilm's operation was located in Marin: its special effects division, Industrial Light and Magic, which
Your master tape deserves
the finest disk mastering!
Quality conscious producers, artists, and recording engineers know the JVC Cutting
Center in Hollywood is the place for superior disk cutting. Pioneering the modern half speed mastering process, we achieved greater headroom, wider bandwidth and better
separation than ever. At full speed, we still spin circles around the competition for one
simple reason -we're used to hearing the improvement that a truly good master
lacquer will make in the end product.
/
At JVC we've mastered the art of keeping distortion below audibility
while cutting lacquers so hot that the only real limit is your cartridge's
compliance.
Our two Neumann lathes are retrofitted with custom built JVC
120 pole quartz controlled motors whose exceptionally smooth, high torque performance reduces
wow and flutter to insignificance. To minimize phase shift and optimize low
frequency response, the audio chains are totally transformerless from tape head
to cutter head,- including our custom built low -noise consoles with state -of-the
art 990 op -amps designed by Deane Jensen.
"Audiophile" labels are not the only ones to profit from our high
standards.
Is your tape worthy of release and promotion? Then it deserves the JVC
touch. We invite you to visit the JVC cutting center -a showcase of modern
technology. If you've worked with us in the past, you'll notice some changes,
like our 16 -bit linear digital system *, the superb new monitor speakers now
being installed, and something else, too...
By the time you read this ad, we'll have an advanced new device
that promises to set the disk mastering standard for the 1980'sboth for analog and digital masters.
Curious? Call Larry Boden at (213) 467-1166 for details.
,
*We also market and rent the JVC DAS Series 90 digital audio recording /editing/
mastering system, and we'll cut from your JVC digital master tape at no extra charge.
R -e /p 124
August 1981
For additional information circle
JVC Cutting Center, Inc.
ä
104
www.americanradiohistory.com
su b
3 SUNSET BLVD., Suite 503
HOLLYWOOD, CA 90028.''
i iaryf
the Victor Company of Japan, Ltd.
NMIMI
provided the visuals for Raiders of the Lost Ark, and its post -production facility and research and development division, Sprocket Systems.
Joining them now are the administration, Marketing, legal, art, and photo departments, as well as the Star Wars Fan CIub.P.O. Box 2009, San
Rafael, CA 94912. (415) 457 -5282.
RUSK SOUND STUDIOS(Hollywood, California) was the mix -down site for a 90- minute television special on the Carridine family
narrated by Peter Fonda. Mixdown was done with picture and interlocked with multitrack and mag recorders via an Audio Kinetics Q -Lock 310
synchronizer locked with the film distributor bus. Steven Smith engineered the sessions with producer Jay Ginsburg for Alfie Productions.1556
North La Brea Avenue, Hollywood, CA 90028. (213) 462 -6477.
SOUND FX(Burbank, California), a full- service post -production complex, now has a dubbing stage equipped for film and television rerecording and featuring Dolby stereo and stereo video equipment. A Neotek three- position dubbing console is provided for the stage, as well as a
new Neotek Series (console used in automated dialogue replacement and for live sound effects recording. The machine room, which houses the
two digitally controlled, high -speed, servo- driven MTM four -track recorders and one single -track recorder, also has 23 high -speed dubbers with up
to 73 tracks available. Rounding out the facility is a staff of sound effects editors, a comprehensive sound -effects library, offices, and a guest
lounge.2603 West Magnolia, Burbank, CA 91505. (213) 841 -4023.
SOUND MASTER RECORDING ENGINEER SCHOOLS(North Hollywood, California) announces the opening of a video
engineering program designed to provide students with both the theory and "hands -on" experience necessary for work in the audio /video fusion
area of the recording industry. The course will be given in 10 week increments, alternating lecture and lab classes, with all students participating in
the `Showcase" productions, in which students will record live groups in the 24 -track studio using the SMPTE sync format. The bands will later be
videotaped performing to this track. All aspects, from lighting to make -up to editing will be covered in the Showcase productions. A fully- equipped
color studio and remote facility are used in instruction.10747 Magnolia Boulevard, North Hollywood, CA 91601. (213) 650 -8000.
TRANS -AMERICAN VIDEO(Hollywood, California) provided post -production and film to tape transfer facilities to Kramer/Rocklen
Studios, Hollywood, to prepare a new opening prologue for this summer's re-release of The Beatles A Hard Days Night. The film will now begin
with a segment incorporating 2,000 production stills set to the song, I'll Cry Instead. Editing and transfer work for the film's distribution were also
handled at TAV. The film's producer, Walter Shenson, and Jim Katz selected Kramer/Rocklen for the assignment. The company also recently
completed work at TAV on promotional films for The Brothers Johnson and for Michael Jackson. 1541 North Vine Street, Hollywood, CA
90028. (213) 466 -2141.
TRANS- AMERICAN VIDEO (Las Vegas, Nevada) provided mobile facilities for a live satellite feed
to Japanese television over the Memorial Day weekend. The program originated from the the Griffith Park
Observatory in Los Angeles, and featured the Japanese group, The Chanels. Under the direction of American Production Services president Mark Omodaka, the signal was fed from the site via a microwave dish to
the San Francisco area, where it was transmitted from an uplink to a Pacific Telephone satellite. This marks
the fourth time the production company has utilized TAV's services for a live feed to Japan. 3349 South Highland, Suite 403, Las Vegas, Nevada. (702) 733 -2922.
THE VIDTRONICS COMPANY (Hollywood, California) has expanded the post production div.. the TAV shoot
ision's staff to provide for night time services with no labor premiums. The special staff on hand Monday
through Friday until midnight, to supply post production services such as one- and two -inch on -line/off line editing, film transfers (Rank Cinteli.
and commercial and program dubbing in formats from -inch to two -inch. 6671 Sunset Boulevard, #1525, Hollywood, CA 90028. (213) 462 -6260.
-
1/2
44
0a9
1,000 pure vinyl records in Plastic Sleeves
One color printed labels
All metal parts and processing
Mastering with Neumann VMS 70 Lathe and SX 74 Cutter
7" 45 RPM
Record Package
$
12" Album Package
Records and Printed Covers
399. $1372.
(FOB Dallas)
includes full color stock jackets or
custom black and white jackets.
Package includes full processing. Re- orders available at reduced cost.
We make full 4 -color Custom Albums, too!
12" 33-1/3 Album Package
CALL TOLL FREE FOR MORE INFORMATION
(800) 527 -9026
0+11
record manufacturing corp.
902 Industrial Boulevard, Dallas, Texas 75207
(214) 741 -2027
August 1981
For additional information circle
a 105
www.americanradiohistory.com
R -e /p 125
THIS ISSUE OF R -e /p IS SPONSORED
BY THE FOLLOWING LIST OF
ADVERTISERS
A &R Record Manufacturing Corp.
125
AVC Systems, Inc.
75
Advanced Music Systems
77
Agfa -Gevaert
7
Allen & Heath /Brenell
105
Alpha Acoustic Control Ltd.
110
Audio Engineering Associates
53
Audio & Design Recording
21
Audio Kinetics
29
Audio Technica US
45
Auditronics
Brystonvermont
Rudi Breuer
Carvin Manufacturing Co.
Crown International
Countryman Associates
dbx, Inc
Datatronix, Inc.
DeltaLab Research
Electo- Voice, Inc.
Eventide Clockworks
Everything Audio
Flanner's Pro Audio
Gotham Audio Corp.
HM Electronics, Inc.
Hardy Company
Hollywood Sound
Industrial Tape Applications /ITAM
Inovonics, Inc
Institute of Audio Research
JBL
JVC Cutting Center
Jensen Transformers
Klark- Teknik
LT Sound
Lake Systems
Lexicon, Inc
Linn Electronics, Inc
MCI
MXR Pro Audio
Magnetic Reference Labs
Martin Audio
MICMIX Audio
Midas Audio Systems
Mike Shop
Sye Mitchell Sound Company
Neotek West
Neutric Professional Products
Rupert Neve, Inc.
Omnicraft, Inc
Orban Associates
Otani Corporation
Panasonic RAMSA
Panasonic Technics
Peavey Electronics
Polyline Corp
Pro Audio Systems
Professional Audio Services
Professional Recording & Sound
Pyramid Audio
Quad -Eight Electronics
Roland Studio Systems
Rumbo Recorders
Saki Magnetics
Sennheiser Electronic Corp
SESCOM, Inc.
Shure Brothers
Sierra Audio
Solid State Logic
Sony Corporation
Soundcraft Electronics
Sound Genesis
Sound Workshop
Spectra Sonics
Spectrum Fidelity Magnetics
Sphere Electronics
Standard Tape Labs
Studer ReVox /America
Studio Technologies
Summit Audio
Suntronics
TTM
TOA Electronics, Inc
TAD /Pioneer Electronics
TDK
TEAC/Tascam
3M Companies
UREI
URSA Major
80
65
113
117,119
88
101
109
70
43
86
2
63
71
64
78
74
35
28
113
97
124
76,111
26
110
123
55
57
11
37
87
107
19
91
80
20
120
73
4-5
56
83
3
8-9
95
93
112
102
118
100
108
69
40
81
89
82
112
128
10,12
38-39
18
47 -50
62
22
98
111
56
82
127
122
84
72,103
71
24 -25
27
60
79
16,31,59
32
121
Valley People
Westlake Audio
White Instruments
Yale Radio Electric Company
R -e /p 126
15
23
66 -67
85
17
cook review
THE MUSICIAN'S GUIDE TO INDEPENDENT RECORD PRODUCTION
by Will Connelly
208 pages; $8.50 including postage
This book could definitely be a good
companion in the library of any person
interested in producing and marketing
records. It is contemporary, and pointed
at the independent record trend
anticipated during the Eighties. The
author, Will Connelly, writes from
experience: he has been a musician and
producer for his own firm, Star Jazz
Records, concentrating in the musical
area of traditional jazz recordings.
Don't let the words Musician and Jazz
turn you off though. This book is well
researched, with plenty of graphs and
tables to explain how the independent
record game is played.
Opening chapters provide the reader
with information about the nuts and
bolts of the record -making business,
from the artist's performance to the
final disk. The technical vocabulary is
explained in graphs and prose, with a
brief history of how this process of
record making came about. Many of the
options are explained and explored for
the independent producer.
My favorite chapters are: "The
Producer's Role," and "Related
Operations." Reading through these
pages, you get the feeling you are
already doing it: producing records! Not
one stage is overlooked, from the type of
personalities a producer will encounter,
through the mastering process and the
jacket, artwork, and layout stages. All
these processes are explained in the
easy -to -read text.
The book's next two chapters,
"Budget Preparation," and "Record
Business Economics," are of the most
value. It is in these areas that an
independent producer can really get
into trouble. (How much do you pay?
How much do you get back ?) This
economic game plan reveals the
monetary side of the business; the yard
stick by which success and failure are
measured. If the game plans explained
in these chapters are followed, the
maximum amount of money lost in an
unsuccessful venture can be closely
predicted. In the chapter, "Budget
Preparation," every stage has its own
breakdown into sub -categories, giving
you a working plan to prevent any
unpleasant cost surprises.
Such surprises can be a strong
negative force if they arise just when
your project is getting underway. There
are enough examples to lead you
through the maze of applicable union
agreements, and even if you are a non-
union producer, many of these
principles will apply. (For example:
estimating manufacturing costs, metal
work, packaging, printing plates,
labels, pressings, cassettes, cartridges,
sleeves, etc.) Workable formulas are
layed out in easy to read examples,
August 1981
www.americanradiohistory.com
ranging from the pressing of 1,000 units
to 100,000 units.
The chapter entitled "Record
Business Economics" could have been
called "The Producer's P &L Statement
Guide." Income, cost and profit interrelationship are examined clearly. In
this section it doesn't matter if you are a
high -school band director producing a
fund -raising album for the local high
school, or a famous recording artist
starting your own record label. You'll
all need to know how to equate sales,
profits and losses. This chapter is the
shortest in the book, but covers the
subject well, explaining how to gather
the necessary information.
At the end of the book there appears a
series of three appendices. Appendix C,
"Phonograph Record Labor and
Related Agreements," is the most
interesting, and covers all of the
Musician Union Guidelines relating to
the making of phonograph records.
Such information is a must for the
person starting a small, independent
record label.
This book should be a big help in
reducing the financial risks involved in
making independent records. More
could have been said, however, about
getting air play for your product. A list
of radio stations with their programming format would have been a nice
addendum, such as: Middle of the Road
(MOR); Adult Oriented Radio (AOR);
Contemporary Adult (CA); Top 40;
Country; Jazz; Soul; Album Reels; etc.
Half of a producer's working time is
involved with the artist: picking tunes
and making those tough decisions in
the studio. A list of mikes, multitrack
and two -track recorders, effects devices,
etc., might also have been listed in the
addendum, as a useful aid to the kind of
recording facilities to look for.
In the Eighties, the quality of a
recording is also judged with the artist's
performance. A badly-recorded product
can work against you. A well- recorded
product stands a much better chance in
the music marketplace. I would suggest
wedding this book with additional
information on multitrack recording,
and possibly basic electronics.
The Musician's Guide to Independent
Recording Production teaches you the
business side of making records.
Jimmy Stewart
"THE MUSICIAN'S GUIDE
TO INDEPENDENT
RECORD PRODUCTION"
is available by sending:
in
$8.50
check or money order to
R-e /p Books
P.O. Box 2449
Hollywood, CA 90028
Taken
1'4
», gi.iitcd.
tie Studer B67 gets considerable use.
But not much a .tea-I ion. It mere:y does everything it's
supposed to co, ;with a minimum of fuss and bother.
True, most -:tagineers appreciate the smooth performance and thoughtful :eature;. The quartz PLL capstan drive and servo- controlled spooling motors. The
three speed (15 /7.5/3.75 or 3015/7.5 ipsî operation.
Headblocks tha_. Flug in with no heed for realignment.
Fader start, cu-r , edit, and a real time counter will
plus or minus readout. Improvements on the new B67
MKII include Icciing tension sensor arms and beteer
head access fir easier editing, plus record drop -oLt by
punching the "PLAY" button.
In the er.d though, 2ngine2rs mainly applaud the
way a B67 does what they expo :t it to do... without
doing the unexpected. Year after year.
In this ulcer :ain business, .t's good to have sjmething you can sruly take for granted. Studer qual_ty.
Contact us directly for details on the affordably priced
B67 MKII.
In most studios
STUDER
Studer Revox Arne± Inc
1425 Elm Hill Pike, Na4ivil e, TN 37210 (4.5) 254 -5651
Offices: Los Angdet '23j 780 -4234 / Neu York (212) 2E5-4462
Canada: Studer R vo» Canada, Lid.
a
C
For additic nal irrormatior circle
#
105
www.americanradiohistory.com
resolved:
microphones
should not
stand in the
way of your
music
fact:
you're a musician on drums or keyboards you know only
too well the difficulties of singing while you play:
Straining your neck to reach the microphone
Trying to play and stay "on mic" simultaneously
Being unable to hear your vocal monitor
Trying to keep your vocal isolated from the instrument
If
'
( "leakage ")
And (for drummers) the problem of hitting the microphone boom with your drum sticks
Shure's SM10 and SM12 Microphones
solve these problems
Shure's SM10 and SM12 noise-canceling, dynamic Microphones are not only an excellent solution to these problems
but offer you top level, professional sound quality in the
bargain. Both units are extremely lightweight (less than three
ounces) and offer a full- range, smooth frequency response
especially tailored for vocals.
Moreover they have an adjustable boom to maintain
proper mouth -to- microphone distance and feature a
unidirectional pickup pattern to effectively cancel unwanted
background noise and control feedback. This gives the
sound engineer complete control over the voice -instrument
mix. What's more, the SM12 features an in- the -ear receiver
for use as a monitor.
If you play the drums, keyboards, or other percussion
instruments, Shure's SM10 and SM12 Microphones may be
the answer to your problems.
SM10 Head -Worn
Microphone
SHUR
Shure Brothers Inc., 222 Hartrey Ave., Evanston, IL 60204
In Canada: A. C. Simmonds & Sons Limited
Manufacturers of high fidelity components, microphones,
sound systems and related circuitry.
R-e/p 128
August 1981
For additional information circle # 109
www.americanradiohistory.com
n
SM12 Microphone
with Receiver
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