1 1A Standard Package

1 1A Standard Package
TABLE OF CONTENTS
PAGE
1.
Description of Package Styles……………………………….
1A Standard Package ………………………………………..
1B Gasketed Package ……………………………………..
1C Open Chassis Version …………………………………
1
1
1
2
2.
Circuit Description…………………………………………….
2A Control Specifications (Table II)………………………..
2
3
3.
Installation (Enclosed Versions)………………………………
3
4.
Initial Turn On Procedure (Enclosed Versions)………………
5
5.
Installation (Open Chassis Version)………………………….
5
6.
Initial Turn On Procedure (Open Chassis Version)…………..
6
7.
Control Operation ……………………………………………..
6
8.
Trouble Shooting Chart ………………………………………
7
9.
Trouble Shooting Procedure –In case of Fuse Blowing 115
Volt control – Enclosed and Open Chassis……………………
8
Trouble Shooting Procedure –In case of Fuse Blowing 230
Volt controls –Enclosed and Open Chassis……………………
10
11
Motor Tests …………………………………………………
10
12
Control Maintenance ………………………………………..
11
13
Maintenance – Motor…………………………………………
11
14.
Maintenance – Speed Reducer ………………………………
12
10
1.
DESCRIPTON OF PACKAGE STYLES
1A.
STANDARD PACKAGE
The Spartan I standard package consists of either a 115V or 230V control supplied in a
small metal enclosure. The speed potentiometer, fuse (s) and On/Off switch are supplied
as an integral part of the cover of the box enclosure. External wiring to the motor and
AC lines is accomplished by using wire nuts, which are supplied with the control.
Table I below gives the various horsepower sizes and corresponding control model
numbers. AC input currents and proper control fusing is also given.
TABLE -I
MODEL
HP
INPUT
VOLT AC
NORMAL
RMS LINE
CURRENT
RATED
MOTOR
CURRENT
FUSE TYPE
ENCLOSED
CONTROL
FUSE TYPE
OPEN CHASSIS
S12
S16
S25
S33
S34
S50
S51
S75
S76
S101
S150
1/8
1/6
1/4
1/3
1/3
1/2
1/2
3/4
3/4
1
1.5
115
115
115
115
230
115
230
115
230
230
230
2.5
3.0
5.0
8.0
3.0
9.0
5.0
14.0
6.0
9.0
14.0
1.35
1.75
3.00
3.50
1.75
6.00
3.00
7.50
3.50
5.50
8.00
B
B
B
B
C
B
C
B
C
C
C
B
B
B
B
E
B
E
B
E
E
E
Fuse Type B - Shawmut A13 X 20 or IR SF 13 X 20
Fuse Type C - Bussmann ABC20 or Littelfuse 314020
Fuse Type E - Shawmut A25 X 20 or IR SF 25 X 20
1B. GASKETED UNIT
The model numbers in Table I will be prefixed by the letter “G”.
The gasketed Spartan I is identical to the standard Spartan I described above except
gaskets will be found in the following locations:
1. Between the faceplate (cover) and enclosure bottom.
2. Between fuse post (s) and the faceplate.
3. Between removable portion of fuse holder (s) and
fixed part of the fuse holder (s).
4. Under cover mounting screws.
In addition to the above gaskets a pot nut with an “O” ring seal and a rubber boot over the
“On/Off” switch are provided.
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1C. OPEN CHASSIS VERSION
The model numbers in Table I will be prefixed by the letter “O”.
In the open chassis version the heatsink with PC board, which is mounted to the box cover
on enclosed Spartan I controls, is mounted on a fla t aluminum baseplate. The speed
potentiometer, “On/Off “ switch , and fuse (s) are provided for customer mounting remote
from the control .External connections are made to the control by wiring to the terminal
strips mounted on the baseplate.
2.
GENERAL CIRCUIT DESCRIPTION
A Polyspede Spartan I drive system consists of a shunt field or permanent magnet DC
motor, and an adjustable SCR controller. A motor speed reducer may be supplied as an
option .Two separate Spartan I control circuits have been designed for operation on either
115V or 230V AC.
The Spartan I controller provides variable armature voltage and constant field voltage.
Variable armature voltage is provided by a phase controlled full wave bridge consisting
of two SCR’s and two power diodes. Field voltage is provided by a full wave diode
bridge which utilizes the power diodes as one half of the bridge. Therefore, the power
diodes are common to both armature and field supplies.
There are two control lo ops, speed and torque, that operate simultaneously and
independently of each other. In most cases the speed loop is in control. Armature voltage
feedback is used by the speed loop, when it is in control, to provide speed regulation. The
torque loop takes command when the load requires more than approximately 150% of the
rated motor current. Armature current is continuously monitored by a very low wattage
dissipation current shunt. The signal from this shunt is also used in the speed loop to
provide IR compensation. IR compensation makes it possible to have good speed
regulation with fluctuating load demand. The transition between the speed and torque
loops is smooth. This is accomplished by using the latest in integrated circuitry in both
loops. Because of this advanced design, the speed and torque loops are the utmost in
accuracy, stability, and reliability. Therefore the motor can be controlled over a wide
speed range, even creep speeds, without cogging .Figure 1 is block diagram of the
Spartan I control system.
On enclosed controls pre-stripped loose leads are provided for AC line and motor
connections. In addition, wire nuts are provided for making these required connections.
Each lead is color coded for easy identification .An identification label that is located on
the PC board protective cover indicates proper external connections. Figure 4 of this
manual also depicts the proper external connections.
Open chassis models provide terminal strips to make necessary external connections. An
external connections label is provided on the protective PC board cover. In addition,
Figure 9 of this manual supplies more detailed information on external connections.
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Refer to the sections on “Installation” and “Initial Turn On Procedures” given below that
specifically pertain to the type of control, either enclosed (standard package or gasketed
version) or open chassis control that is being installed.
2A.
CONTROL SPECIFICATIONS
TABLE II
3.
Input Voltage (single phase) ………………..
115 VAC ± 10 (115V Models)
230 VAC ± 20 (230V Models)
Input Frequency ……………………………...
50 /60 Hz
Output Voltage to Armature
(Rectified and Unfiltered) … ………………...
0-90 VDC (0 -180 VDC on 230V.
controls)
Output Voltage to Field
(Rectified and Unfiltered) ……………………
100 VDC (200 VDC on 230V
controls)
Speed Range ………………………………….
0 – 100%
Regulation……………………………………..
Better than ± 3% of Base Speed
Speed Range for Specified Regulation……….
20:1
Speed Dial Characteristic. ……………………
Linear
Soft Start Acceleration Time (Fixed)…………
.75 sec
Torque Limit, % of Rated Motor Current
(Fixed)…………………………………………
Approx. 150%
Maximum Ambient Temperature …………….
40° C
INSTALLATION (ENCLOSED VERSION)
On enclosed versions of the Spartan I two holes in the back of the box allow it to be
fastened to any support. Two conduit ho les in the bottom allow entry of the AC
lines and exit of motor wiring.
Remove the six faceplate screws. Use two screws (not supplied) to mount the box
on a suitable vertical surface in an area where the ambient temperature does not
exceed 40°C (104° F). On gasketed controls two circular gaskets will be mounted
over the mounting holes. Use a flat metal washer underneath the mounting screw
head in order to avoid tearing the gasketing. Figures 2 and 3 show the mounting
hole locations and overall dimensions of the 115 and 230 volt enclosed Spartan I
controls, respectively.
Install two conduit runs ; one from the AC disconnect panel to the left hand
conduit hole in the box, and another from the right hand conduit hole to the
motor. Refer to the table in Figur e 4 which gives input and armature current
requirements of the various horsepower sizes in order to size external wiring
properly.
Pull wires of the required size into the Spartan I box and tag the wire ends to
avoid mixing of the wires.
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If the Spartan I unit is a gasketed model (“G” prefix in front of the model number)
watertight conduit fittings must be used. With the motor wiring connected to the
motor but not to the control; check each of the motor leads for continuity to
ground. (Use a Simpson model 260 meter set to R x 10,000 OHMS scale.) No
continuity should exist. If a short to ground is indicated, locate and correct the
short before connecting wiring to the control unit. Also check resistance between
A1 and A2 wires using the Simpson 260 on the R x 1 OHMS scale. Resistance
should be in the order of 1 to 5 OHMS. If a reading lower than 1 OHM is
observed, check for possible wiring shorts in the motor conduit box. Check
resistance between motor field wires. Resistance is typically 100 to 300 OHMS
for motors used on 115 VAC service, and 200 to 600 OHMS for motors used in
230 VAC service.
WARNING NOTES ON MOTOR FIELD CONNECTIONS
1.
If the motor has four field leads, connect them as shown in the external
connections diagram, Figure 4. If only two leads are supplied as field leads
on the motor, connect F2 of the motor to the F-(yellow-white) control
lead. Make sure that the motor, if not supplied by Polyspede, is compatible
with the control. Control voltage between F+ and F- should read
approximately:
a) 100 VDC – 115 VAC Input
b) 200 VDC – 230 VAC Input
2.
If the motor is a permanent magnet type, it will not have field leads.
Therefore, insulate the two field leads on the Spartan I unit using the
provided wire nuts and electrical tape to avoid shorts between the leads or
to the box.
Double check to be sure that the AC Input voltage which you are providing
agrees with the voltage warning tag attached to the control unit.
If the preceding wiring checks are all correct, connect wiring from the conduit
runs to the correct wires on the control faceplate assembly, using the wire nuts
provided. Refer to figure 4 in making the proper connections or the external
connections label located on the protective PC board cover.
After making all connections, the wiring should be properly positioned in the
Spartan I box. Figure 5 gives an illustration of how the wiring should be placed
behind the printed circuit board. After the wiring is neatly placed in the Spartan I
box, the faceplate should be attached by reusing the six screws previously
removed.
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4.
INITIAL TURN ON PROCEDURE (ENCLOSED VERSIONS)
Make sure the AC switch on the faceplate is in the “Off” position. Set the speed
pot fully counterclockwise. Apply power by closing the AC disconnect switch
supplying power to the control.
Switch the AC switch on the control cover to the “On” position. The motor should
not rotate. By advancing the speed pot the motor should accelerate in speed. If the
motor rotates in the opposite direction to that desired, it will be necessary to
remove the faceplate and reverse the A1 and A2 motor leads. Be sure to turn off
power at the AC disconnect before removing the faceplate.
Proceed to the section entitled “Control Operation”.
5.
INSTALLATION (OPEN CHASSIS VERSION)
Four holes are provided in the base plate for mounting purposes. Vertical
mounting is preferable with the heatsink toward the top. Figure 8 shows the
preferred mounting position and also the open chassis mounting dimensions. The
control should be mounted in an area where the ambient temperature does not
exceed 40 o C.
Connections are made to open chassis control by means of terminal strips 1TB
and 2TB. Use spade or ring lugs to make these connections. Figure 9 shows the
proper external connections. In addition, in Figure 9 a table is given indicating AC
line input and armature currents for the various horsepower sizes.
Dress the leads from the speed pot away from the power leads, preferably in a
separate conduit run. Do not use a speed pot of value less than 10,000 OHMS
impedance in the installation or control malfunction will occur. (A 10K speed pot
is provided with the control.) Most reliable control operation will occur if the
speed pots leads are kept as short as possible.
Terminals 1 and 2 on 2TB are the reset terminals. These terminals must be
connected to run. Normally, these two terminals are jumpered at the factory by
means of a metal jumper. In systems that will not wire the motor armature directly
to terminals 3 and 4 on the control because of use of a DC loop contactor, the wire
jumper should be removed. In its place an auxiliary contact on the DC loop
contactor or relay contact that works in conjunction with the DC contactor should
be connected terminals 1 and 2 on 2TB. This contact must close when the DC
contactor energizes to permit the motor to run, and must open to reset the
electronic circuitry when the contactor de- energizes.
-5-
Since this auxiliary contact will be used in low level signal circuitry, it should
have a gold contact surface preferably with good wiping action. Failure to follow
these instructions on contactor operated systems could cause fuse blowing and
possible drive damage.
WARNING NOTES ON MOTOR FIELD CONNECITONS
1) If the motor has four field leads, connect them as shown in the open chassis
external connections diagram, Figure 9. If only 2 leads are supplied as field
leads on the motor, connect F2 of the motor to 1TB terminal 6. Make sure that
the motor, if not supplied by Polyspede, is compatible with the control.
Voltage between the terminals 5 and 6 should read approximately:
a) 100 VDC - 115 VAC Input
b) 200 VDC - 230 VAC Input
2) If the motor is a permanent magnet type, it will not have field leads .In this
case no connections should be made to terminals 5 and 6 on 1TB.
6.
INITIAL TURN ON PROCEDURE
(OPEN CHASSIS VERSION)
Make sure the AC disconnect switch is in the “Off” position. Double check to be
sure the AC input voltage which is being provided agrees with the voltage
warning tag attached to the control unit. Set the speed pot fully counterclockwise.
Activate the control by closing the AC disconnect. (In contactor operated systems
also energize the DC contactor). The motor should not be running at this time. If
the motor does run rotate the speed pot in the clockwise direction. If the motor
now slows down, the speed pot has been wired into the circuit backwards. Reverse
the outer leads of the speed pot. If the motor rotates in a direction opposite to that
desired, turn off power and interchange the motor armature leads A1 and A2
connected to terminals 3 and 4 and 1TB.
7.
CONTROL OPERATION
Prior to shipment all controls are tested and completely adjusted at the Polyspede
factory. Therefore, after properly wiring and furnishing AC power as explained in
previous sections, the control should be capable of running the motor at the
desired speed as set by the speed potentiometer. If the motor speed cannot be
controlled, fuses blow, or other problems are experienced with the control, refer to
the Trouble Shooting Chart, the Trouble Shooting Fuse Blowing, and/or the Motor
Test Sections.
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8. TROUBLE SHOOTING CHART
MALFUNCTION
a) Motor does
not run or will not
run to top speed.
POSSIBLE CAUSE
a) AC input to control missing.
b) Fuse blown
c)
Motor jammed mechanically.
d) Field voltage low or missing causing insufficient
torque under heavy loads. (Does not apply to PM
motors) .
e)
Motor field open or disconnected and operating
under heavy loads. (Does not apply for PM
motors) .
f)
Terminals 1 and 2 on 2TB not connected (Open
Chassis control only)
g) External speed p ot not properly connected
(Open Chassis control only)
h) Problems in control circuitry
b)Motor runs
only at full
speed or
overspeed.
a) Motor field open or disconnected and operating under
light load. (Does not apply to PM motors).
b) Motor field voltage low or missing and operating under
light load
c) External speed pot not properly connected. (Open chassis
control only)
-7-
ACTION
Check AC line voltage
Remove check and if
necessary replace the
fuse.
Check by rotating the
shaft manually.
Check field voltage,
field voltage should be:
a) 100 VDC of 115V
input controls.
b) 200 VDC on 230V
input controls
Check motor field
wiring .Check
resistance of the field as
given in motor tests
with the power off.
Either a permanent
jumper or contact
closure must be used to
permit control
operation. See A1103000-EW for further
details (Figure 9).
With speed pot
disconnected resistance
should measure 10K or
greater. With pot wired
up the voltage between
terminals 7 to 8 should
vary between 0 to 6
VDC
Return to Polyspede
factory for repair
Check motor field
wiring .Check
resistance of the field as
given in motor tests
with the power off.
Check field voltage,
field voltage should be:
a) 100 VDC on 115V
input controls
b) 200 VDC on 230V
input controls
Voltage should vary
between 0 to 6 VDC
between terminals 7 to 8
on 2TB as the speed pot
is rotated.
(Cont. Trouble Shooting Chart)
MALFUNCTION
POSSIBLE CAUSE
d) Control board problems.
c)Repeated
control fuse
blowing
a) Incorrect AC input voltage.
b) Incorrect connections between motor and control.
c) Shorts between internal control wiring and enclosure or
mounting base.
d) Shorts in external wiring
e)Faulty SCR’s, power diodes and/or field diodes
ACTION
Return to Polyspede
factory for repair
Check that voltage
supplied agrees with
voltage warning label.
Recheck
all
motor
connections as given
in :
A1101-000-EWEnclosed controls
A1103-000-EW-Open
Chassis
Visual inspection and
routine checks.
Refer to Section on
testing in case of fuse
blowing.
Refer to Section on
testing in case of fuse
blowing.
9. TROUBLE SHOOTING PROCEDURE – IN CASE OF FUSE BLOWING
115 VOLT CONTROLS –ENCLOSED AND OPEN CHASSIS
If fuses blow, a light bulb checkout procedure may be used without danger of
damaging the control and without excessive fuse blowing during checkout.
Proceed as follows:
a. Turn power off at the service disconnect ahead of the control.
b. Connect a 120 volt 100 watt incandescent light bulb in series with the
ungrounded AC input line (L1).
c. Replace any blown control fuse with a good fuse.
d. Disconnect A1, A2, and field wires at the motor. Insulate wire ends.
e. Turn power on at the service disconnect; turn the control “On/Off” switch
to the “On” position on enclosed controls. On open chassis controls
without a DC loop contactor make sure terminals 1 and 2 on 2TB are
connected. On open chassis controls with a DC loop contactor make sure
that an auxiliary contact working in conjunction with the contactor is
closed when the DC contactor is energized. The bulb should not burn at
any setting of the speed control pot. If the bulb does light, the Spartan I is
probably defective in the case of the enclosed version. For the enclosed
control go to step (f). In open chassis controls turn off power and remove
any speed pot connections. If the bulb still burns, move on to step (f). If
the bulb does not burn on the open chassis version after removing the
speed pot connections, put back the wires one at a time until the wire
causing the problem is located.
-8-
Replace any defective wires. If the bulb still burns after all external
connections haven been removed, move on to step (f). If the problem has
been corrected go to step (g).
This step is to be done if step (e) shows that the light bulb still lights with
all external connections removed including A1, A2, F1 and F2. This
probably indicates that the Spartan I's, SCRs, Field diodes, and/or power
diodes are defective. The only semiconductor components that are
recommended field replaceable are the power diodes located in the
rectifier assembly mounted on the U shaped heatsink.
There are 4 terminals on the rectifier assembly. On three of the terminals
only one lug is connected. One terminal has double lug connections.
With power off, remove the connections on the three single lug terminals.
Leave the double lug connections as is. Insulate the bare lugs before
reapplying power. Reapply power. If light bulbs do not light, problem
could be confined solely to the rectifier assembly. Turn off power. Using
a Simpson 260 or equivalent check for proper diode action on the bridge
assembly and power diodes. There are three diodes inside. Place the plus
lead of the meter on the terminal next to the black dot. The other meter
lead should be placed on one of the three other terminals. Diode action
should be observed. That is, with the meter on the R X 1 scale, when the
black dotted terminal is plus in respect to the other terminal a reading of
between 10-15 OHMS will be read on the meter. With the opposite
polarity, the meter will show an open. In the same manner check the other
two terminals in respect to the black dot terminal. If the diode assembly is
faulty, replace. After replacing the rectifier assembly reconnect the wires
to the diode assembly. If the bulb still lights, the SCRs or field diodes are
probably the cause of the problem. Since these components are not
recommended field replaceable, the control should be returned to the
Polyspede factory for repair.
If the bulb does not now light on enclosed controls, proceed to step (g).
On open chassis controls turn off power and reconnect speed pot
connections and any other external connections if they presently are not
connected. Reapply power. If bulbs now burn go back to step (e). If
bulb does not burn go to step (g).
g) If no faults are located in the preceding steps or if they have already been
corrected, leave light bulb connected as in the preceding steps and
reconnect A1 and A2 wires at the motor. Leave field wires disconnected
and insulated. (Open chassis controls should also have all wires except
field leads connected at this time.) Set speed control pot at zero and turn
on all power. Light should not burn. Increase speed setting to 20%. Lamp
brilliance should increase smoothly to nearly full brilliance. (Note- lamp
flicker and erratic brilliance may be observed at settings above 15% 20%-- this is normal).
-9-
h) Repeat step (g) with motor field wires connected. Results should be
similar except that bulb will burn at about 1/2 brilliance with speed control
set at zero (due to motor field current) and will increase to nearly full
brilliance at a 15% or 20% setting of the speed pot. (If the control is used
on PM motor, skip this step)
i) If operation is normal in all preceding steps, remove light bulb and
reconnect all wiring for normal operation.
j) If occasional fuse blowing occurs, an intermittent short or ground is
indicated. Inspect motor leads on motor brush pigtails for possible faults.
Inspect Spartan I unit for loose foreign objects. (washers, nuts, wire
clippings, etc) Test all external wiring. If the problem seems to be in the
DC motor, refer to the Motor Tests Section.
10.
TROUBLE SHOOTING PROCEDURE – IN CASE OF
FUSE BLOWING, 230 VOLT CONTROLS- ENCLOSED AND OPEN CHASIS
If fuses blow, a light bulb checkout procedure may be used without the danger of
damaging the control and without excessive fuse blowing during checkout.
Proceed as follow:
Perform all of the steps used in the checkout of 115 Volt controls previously
explained except with the following changes:
a) Use two 115 volt 100 watt light bulbs connected in series in each of the
two AC input lines (a total of four bulbs). This is necessary since both
lines may be “hot” in a 230 volt service and either line may be susceptible
to faults to ground.
b) Results should be the same in the preceding section for 115 volt controls
except that bulb brilliance may be less than that described for 115 volt
controls because of the number of bulbs used.
11 MOTOR TESTS:
The following tests will be helpful in pinpointing possible motor problems.
Before making any tests, remove the armature and field leads from the control.
a) Shorts To the Frame - Using a Megger set for 400 volt test potential, check
leakage resistance between the A1, A2, motor field leads and the motor frame.
Readings of less than 10,000 OHMS indicate possible problems. A dead short
indicates need for immediate repair. Checks for dead shorts may be made
with an ohmmeter of a continuity tester if a Megger is not available. Retest
while rotating armature by hand.
b) Open or Shorted Field - A resistance check between F1 and F2 (also F3 and
F4) should indicate a resistance between 100 to 600 ohms.
c) Open Armature - An ohmmeter between A1 and A2 should indicate a
resistance of less than 10 ohms. Rotate the motor shaft very slowly, while
observing the ohmmeter. Because of the residual magnetism on shunt field
motors or the field on permanent magnet motors a CEMF will be produced in
rotating.
- 10 -
This will cause the ohmmeter readings to change during rotation. Therefore, after
moving the shaft a small amount stop and check the resistance reading. A high
resistance reading at any position of the rotated motor shaft when it is stopped is a
trouble indication. Armature opens are usually the result of bad brushes, burned
commutator segments, or severed wires.
12.
CONTROL MAINTENANCE
The control requires practically no maintenance once it has been installed. It is a
rugged piece of equipment, but can be damaged if abused.
IF FUSE REPLACEMENT BECOMES NECESSARY, USE ONLY THE
SPECIFIED FUSES. THE USE OF SUBSTITUTE FUSES MAY CAUSE
CONTROL DAMAGE AND VOID THE CONTROL WARRANTY.
Correct fuses to be used are listed in page 1 of this manual and on the fuse
warning tags located on control. On open chassis controls a fuse warning label is
also supplied on the fuseholder.
13
MAINTENANCE
MOTOR
Polyspede motors are rugged machines specifically designed for SCR controllers.
There are no adjustments to make and maintenance is quite simple. All moving
parts are subject to wear. Brushes are perhaps the only component requiring
periodic maintenance.
Motor brush life is related to motor speed, loading, cycling rate, ambient
temperature, and other variables not controlled by Polyspede. Therefore, only
guide lines can be given for checking this item. Experience has shown that each
applicatio n has its own wear rate. Removal of the brushes after each three months
of operation during the first year will give an indication of your specific wear rate.
After three sets of brushes have been used, remove the motor armature for
checking by a competent motor repair shop for possible commutator refacing.
Armature bearings are sealed and require no additional lubricating. Replacement
should be performed by a reputable service shop if the bearings become noisy.
Occasional cleaning of motor vent holes or removal of fan guard to remove dust
accumulation from fans is the only additional maintenance required.
- 11 -
14.
MAINTENANCE – SPEED REDUCER
1. Use type and grade of oil specified on the gear nameplate. Keep in mind
proper viscosities for various temperatures. Note: Most reducers are shipped
from the manufacturer without oil.
2. Keep oil at proper level.
3. Drain, flush, and refill reduction unit after initial run in period.
4. Replace shaft seals at first sign of leakage not only to avoid damage due to
loss of lubricant but also to eliminate the possible entrance of contaminants
into housing.
5. If detailed instructions for assembly and disassembly of a particular unit is
required, write the factory for this information.
6. If your drive is coupling connected, and requires lubricating, the coupling
should be checked on start-up and semi-annually.
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