3Com Projection Television 11.3 Owner's Manual

3Com Projection Television 11.3 Owner's Manual
®
New Installation for
Enterprise OS Software
Version 11.3
http://www.3com.com/
Part No. 09-1550-001
Published May 1999
3Com Corporation
5400 Bayfront Plaza
Santa Clara, California
95052-8145
Copyright © 1999, 3Com Corporation. All rights reserved. No part of this documentation may be reproduced
in any form or by any means or used to make any derivative work (such as translation, transformation, or
adaptation) without written permission from 3Com Corporation.
3Com Corporation reserves the right to revise this documentation and to make changes in content from time
to time without obligation on the part of 3Com Corporation to provide notification of such revision or change.
3Com Corporation provides this documentation without warranty, term, or condition of any kind, either
implied or expressed, including, but not limited to, the implied warranties, terms or conditions of
merchantability, satisfactory quality, and fitness for a particular purpose. 3Com may make improvements or
changes in the product(s) and/or the program(s) described in this documentation at any time.
If there is any software on removable media described in this documentation, it is furnished under a license
agreement included with the product as a separate document, in the hard copy documentation, or on the
removable media in a directory file named LICENSE.TXT or !LICENSE.TXT. If you are unable to locate a copy,
please contact 3Com and a copy will be provided to you.
UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT LEGEND
If you are a United States government agency, then this documentation and the software described herein
are provided to you subject to the following:
All technical data and computer software are commercial in nature and developed solely at private expense.
Software is delivered as “Commercial Computer Software” as defined in DFARS 252.227-7014 (June 1995)
or as a “commercial item” as defined in FAR 2.101(a) and as such is provided with only such rights as are
provided in 3Com’s standard commercial license for the Software. Technical data is provided with limited
rights only as provided in DFAR 252.227-7015 (Nov 1995) or FAR 52.227-14 (June 1987), whichever is
applicable. You agree not to remove or deface any portion of any legend provided on any licensed program
or documentation contained in, or delivered to you in conjunction with, this User Guide.
Unless otherwise indicated, 3Com registered trademarks are registered in the United States and may or may
not be registered in other countries.
3Com, Net Age, NETBuilder, and NETBuilder II, are registered trademarks of 3Com Corporation. 3ComFacts
is a service mark of 3Com Corporation.
All other company and product names may be trademarks of the respective companies with which they are
associated.
ii
CONTENTS
ABOUT THIS GUIDE
Introduction 5
How to Use This Guide
Conventions 6
Year 2000 Compliance
1
5
6
OVERVIEW
NETBuilder II Systems 7
EZBuilt Preassembled NETBuilder II System
Component System 7
NETBuilder II Chassis DPE Module 7
Software 7
Installation Checklist 8
2
INSTALLING SOFTWARE AND
A NETBUILDER II SYSTEM
7
BOOTING
Installing Software and Performing Initial Boot 9
Booting from the Flash Memory Card 9
Prerequisites 9
Booting an EZBuilt NETBuilder II System 9
Booting a Component NETBuilder II System 10
Making a Backup of the Flash Memory Card 10
Prerequisites 10
Procedure 10
Using the Backup Flash Card 11
3
CHANGING THE BOOT SOURCE
Using the Boot Command 13
Configuring the Primary Boot Source
Prerequisites 14
Procedure 14
4
14
CONFIGURING BASIC SETTINGS
Logging on to the System 17
Setting Up IP Routing 18
Learning About the User Interfaces
18
Accessing the User Interface 19
Web Link Versus Menu-Driven Versus Command-Line Interface
Using the Web Link Application 19
Web Link Interface Description 20
Using the Menu-Driven Interface 20
Using the Command-Line Interface 21
19
iii
Full-Form Syntax 22
Abbreviated Syntax 22
Symbols 23
Full and Abbreviated Syntax Examples 24
Variations in Command Syntax 25
Entering Service Names in Command Lines 25
Determining the Display of Ports and Virtual Ports 25
Using Aliases 26
Command History Substitution 26
Privilege Level 27
Command-Line Parameter Attributes 27
Syntax for Assigning Values 28
Numeric Values 28
Names 28
Strings 28
Port and Path Naming Restrictions 29
ISDN-Related Syntax Variation 29
Address Formats 30
Media Addresses 30
Network Layer Addresses 32
Getting Help
34
Storing Configuration Parameter Values 34
Obtaining Network Manager Privilege Level 35
Changing the Password 35
Setting the Time and Date 36
Setting System Administrator Information 36
Assigning Internet Addresses 37
Assigning Internet Addresses to a Bridge 37
Assigning Internet Addresses to a Router 38
Obtaining an Internet Address 39
Setting Up the Simple Network Management Protocol 40
Modifying SNMP Parameters 40
NETBuilder Security 41
Building Firewalls for Security 41
Security Commands and Parameters 41
What Next? 41
A
TECHNICAL SUPPORT
Online Technical Services 43
World Wide Web Site 43
3Com Knowledgebase Web Services 43
3Com FTP Site 43
3Com Bulletin Board Service 44
Access by Analog Modem 44
Access by Digital Modem 44
3Com Facts Automated Fax Service 44
Support from Your Network Supplier 44
Support from 3Com 45
Returning Products for Repair 46
3COM CORPORATION LIMITED WARRANTY
iv
ABOUT THIS GUIDE
Introduction
This guide describes how to get started with your new NETBuilder II®
bridge/router. It describes how to install Enterprise OS software and perform the
initial system boot. It also explains how to access and use the command-line
interface to establish basic settings.
If you are upgrading software from an earlier version, see Upgrading Enterprise OS
Software.
If the information in the release notes shipped with your product differs from the
information in this guide, follow the release notes.
Before you use the information in this guide, you must first install the
bridge/router according to your hardware installation guide.
Additional Information
Audience Description
How to Use
This Guide
When you have completed the procedures in this guide, you will find valuable
information in Using Enterprise OS Software, which will help you configure your
software for bridging, routing, and wide area protocols, according to the
particular needs of your network. For a comprehensive description of NETBuilder®
software commands, see Reference for Enterprise OS Software.
This guide is intended for network administrators who:
■
Have experience in planning, maintaining, and troubleshooting local or wide
area networks.
■
Are familiar with network protocols, bridging and routing, and network
management.
■
Will be responsible for configuring and operating NETBuilder II bridge/routers.
The chapters in this guide include the following information to help you install and
configure NETBuilder software:
■
Chapter 1 describes NETBuilder II systems that can use Enterprise OS software
version 11.3 and it also provides start-up checklists.
■
Chapter 2 describes how to install Enterprise OS software and boot a
NETBuilder II system.
■
Chapter 3 describes how to change the primary boot source on a NETBuilder II
system.
■
Chapter 4 describes how to log on to the system; obtain Network Manager
privileges; set passwords, time, date, and system administrator information;
assign Internet addresses; set up security; and verify system operation.
■
Appendix A has instructions on how to obtain technical support.
6
ABOUT THIS GUIDE
Conventions
Table 1 and Table 2 list conventions that are used throughout this guide.
Table 1 Notice Icons
Icon
Notice Type
Alerts you to...
Information note
Important features or instructions
Caution
Risk of personal safety, system damage, or loss of data
Warning
Risk of severe personal injury
Table 2 Text Conventions
Convention
Description
Syntax
Evaluate the syntax provided and supply the appropriate values.
Placeholders for values you must supply appear in angle brackets.
Example:
Enable RIPIP using:
SETDefault !<port> -RIPIP CONTrol = Listen
In this example, you must supply a port number for <port>.
Commands
Enter the command exactly as shown in text and press the Return or
Enter key. Example:
To remove the IP address, enter:
SETDefault !0 -IP NETaddr = 0.0.0.0
This guide always gives the full form of a command in
uppercase and lowercase letters. However, you can
abbreviate commands by entering only the uppercase letters
and the appropriate value. Commands are not case-sensitive.
Screen displays
This typeface represents information as it appears on the screen.
The words “enter”
and “type”
When you see the word “enter” in this guide, you must type
something, and then press the Return or Enter key. Do not press the
Return or Enter key when an instruction simply says “type.”
[Key] names
Key names appear in text in one of two ways:
■
■
Referred to by their labels, such as “the Return key” or “the Escape
key”
Written with brackets, such as [Return] or [Esc].
If you must press two or more keys simultaneously, the key names are
linked with a plus sign (+). Example:
Press [Ctrl]+[Alt]+[Del].
Year 2000 Compliance
For information on Year 2000 compliance and 3Com products, visit the
3Com Year 2000 Web page:
http://www.3com.com/products/yr2000.html
1
OVERVIEW
This chapter is an overview of how to get started with your new NETBuilder II®
system. This chapter provides you with an installation checklist that describes the
basic steps for starting a NETBuilder II system with a Dual Processor Engine (DPE)
module.
NETBuilder II Systems
The NETBuilder II system consists of a 4-Slot, 8-Slot, or 8-Slot Extended chassis
with a main processor (DPE) module, and Enterprise OS software.
Your new bridge/router is either an EZBuilt preassembled NETBuilder II system or a
NETBuilder II system that you have assembled from components.
EZBuilt Preassembled
NETBuilder II System
Component System
NETBuilder II Chassis
DPE Module
Software
If you have an EZBuilt NETBuilder II system, it was preassembled before delivery.
This guide assumes that you have followed the instructions in the hardware
installation guide to:
■
Set up the system.
■
Attach the network and power cables.
■
Install a local terminal, PC (with a terminal emulation application), or modem to
the console port of the main processor module.
If you have a NETBuilder II system that you have assembled yourself from
components, this guide assumes that you have followed the instructions in each
hardware installation manual to:
■
Install the system components.
■
Attach the network and power cables.
■
Install a local terminal, PC (with a terminal emulation application), or modem to
the console port of the main processor module.
The DPE module has two built-in flash memory drives. The upper drive is drive A,
and the lower drive is drive B.
The Enterprise OS software is available from 3Com on a preinstalled 20 MB flash
memory card or on CD-ROM. 3Com recommends that you buy the preinstalled
flash memory card for first time NETBuilder II installations.
See the Enterprise OS Software Release Notes for information about the different
software packages that are available for your NETBuilder II system. The procedures
in this guide apply to all software packages.
8
CHAPTER 1: OVERVIEW
Installation Checklist
This section contains a checklist for installing software and booting a NETBuilder II
system with a DPE module.
Install System Software and Boot — See Chapter 2.
❑ Install software from a flash memory card.
Change the Primary Boot Source — See Chapter 3.
❑ Change the primary boot source default as needed.
Configure Basic Settings — See Chapter 4.
❑ Log on to the system.
❑ Familiarize yourself with the command-line or menu-driven user interface (UI),
storing configuration parameter values, and getting help.
❑ Obtain Network Manager privilege level.
❑ Change the Network Manager password.
❑ Adjust the time and date if necessary. Time and date are preset and may need
to be adjusted for your time zone.
❑ Set system administrator information:
❑
System name and location
❑
System contact name and phone number
❑
Login banner
❑ Assign IP addresses/subnet masks to individual ports or one address to
the system.
❑ Set up the bridge/router for SNMP.
❑ Set up system security.
❑ Use the browser-based Web Link application for further configuration.
Configure Specific Services for Your Network — See Using Enterprise OS
Software and Reference for Enterprise OS Software.
INSTALLING SOFTWARE AND BOOTING
A NETBUILDER II SYSTEM
2
This chapter contains the following procedures:
Installing Software
and Performing Initial
Boot
■
Installing and booting Enterprise OS software
■
Making a backup copy of the software flash memory card
Enterprise OS software can be installed in the following ways:
■
From a flash memory card with preinstalled software. 3Com recommends this
method.
EZBuilt NETBuilder II systems have a factory-installed software flash memory
card. To boot your EZBuilt system, see “Booting an EZBuilt NETBuilder II
System.”
For component NETBuilder II systems to boot from a flash memory card, they
must have a flash memory drive installed. For installation instructions, see the
NETBuilder II Flash Memory Drive Installation Guide. After you have installed a
flash memory drive, see “Booting a Component NETBuilder II System” on
page 10 for instructions on booting your system.
■
Booting from the
Flash Memory Card
Prerequisites
Booting an EZBuilt
NETBuilder II System
From CD-ROM on a UNIX or Windows network management station using
TFTP
To start the NETBuilder II system from a flash memory card with preinstalled
software, follow the procedures in this section.
Before you boot your new NETBuilder II system, you need to complete all setup
and installation instructions in the hardware guide provided with the system and
system components. You also need to connect a console to your system.
The EZBuilt NETBuilder II system comes with a factory-installed flash memory card
that contains the Enterprise OS software. To boot an EZBuilt NETBuilder II system,
follow these steps:
1 Turn on the EZBuilt NETBuilder system.
The NETBuilder II system boots from the default boot source a:/primary/boot.29K
(the flash memory drive).
2 When the boot operation is complete, press the Return key on the console.
The Enterprise OS console prompt should appear on the screen.
If the console is not operating properly (if you see incorrect characters, or no
characters), see the setup instructions in the hardware installation guide.
You are ready to establish basic settings on your system. See Chapter 4 for more
information.
10
CHAPTER 2: INSTALLING SOFTWARE AND BOOTING A NETBUILDER II SYSTEM
Booting a Component
NETBuilder II System
To boot a component NETBuilder II system, follow these steps:
1 Insert a flash memory card with preinstalled software in drive A on the DPE
module.
2 Turn on the NETBuilder II bridge/router.
The NETBuilder II system boots from the default boot source a:/primary/boot.29K
(the flash memory drive).
3 When the boot operation is complete, press the Return key on the console.
The Enterprise OS console prompt should appear on the screen.
If the console is not operating properly (if you see incorrect characters, or no
characters), see the setup instructions in the hardware installation guide.
You are ready to establish basic settings on your system. See Chapter 4 for more
information.
If you want to change the primary boot source from the default or adjust system
configuration parameters, see Chapter 4 and the description in the SysconF
appendix in Reference for Enterprise OS Software.
Making a Backup of
the Flash Memory
Card
Prerequisites
As part of the installation procedure, 3Com recommends that you create a backup
of your Enterprise OS software on a blank flash memory card. See the software
release notes for a list of flash memory cards that can be used with the DPE
module.
Before you begin this procedure, complete the following tasks:
1 Boot your NETBuilder II system with software on a flash memory card inserted into
drive A of the DPE module.
PACKET
FORWARD
STATUS
2 3
POWER/
FAULT
A
B
RESET ATTENTION
Insert NETBuilder software
flash memory card into drive A
4
NETBuilder II 4-Slot chassis
2 Log on to the system as root.
Procedure
To make a backup copy of the Enterprise OS software flash memory card, follow
these steps:
1 Insert a supported blank flash memory card into drive B of the DPE module.
PACKET
FORWARD
STATUS
2 3
POWER/
FAULT
RESET ATTENTION
A
B
Original flash memory card in drive A
4
Insert blank flash memory card in drive B
Using the Backup Flash Card
11
2 Format the blank flash memory card in drive B by entering:
FORMAT b:
Type Y for yes when the formatting confirmation message is displayed.
3 Create a directory on the formatted flash memory card by entering:
MakeDir b:\primary
4 Copy the software from the Enterprise OS software flash memory card in drive A
to the formatted flash memory card in drive B by entering:
COpy a:\primary\* b:\primary
PACKET
FORWARD
ATUS
2 3
POWER/
FAULT
RESET ATTENTION
A
B
Copy contents of drive A to the directory
you created on drive B
4
5 After you have copied the software, replace the original Enterprise OS software
flash memory card in drive A with the backup copy from drive B.
PACKET
FORWARD
ATUS
2 3
4
POWER/
FAULT
RESET ATTENTION
A
B
Replace original card in drive A
with new copy from drive B.
Keep the original card as a backup.
Keep the original Enterprise OS software flash memory card in a safe place and
protect it from accidental damage. The original is your backup in the rare event
that the Enterprise OS software or the backup flash memory card becomes
corrupted. See ”Using the Backup Flash Card” on page 11 for instructions on
installing the backup flash memory card.
6 The Enterprise OS software boot files for a DPE module are factory shipped with
a:/primary/boot.29k as the default primary boot source. If you have installed the
Enterprise OS software on drive A, and you want to keep the same boot file as the
boot source, reboot your NETBuilder II bridge/router by entering:
ReBoot
7 If you want to configure your primary boot source to a drive and file other than
the default, see Chapter 3 for instructions on configuring the boot source for the
NETBuilder II bridge/router.
Using the Backup
Flash Card
If the Enterprise OS software has been corrupted and you need to reboot, use
your original Enterprise OS software flash memory card to reset your system by
following these steps:
1 Remove the corrupted flash memory card from the DPE module.
2 Insert the original Enterprise OS software flash memory card into drive A on the
DPE module.
12
CHAPTER 2: INSTALLING SOFTWARE AND BOOTING A NETBUILDER II SYSTEM
3 Reboot the NETBuilder II bridge/router by pressing the two outer buttons on the
LCD control panel.
Attention
Reset
Press Reset buttons to reboot
The system boots from the Enterprise OS software flash memory card in drive A.
4 Make a copy of the flash memory card in drive A by following the steps in the
previous procedure.
You will need to either obtain an additional flash memory card or reformat the
corrupted flash memory card. If you choose to reformat a corrupted flash memory
card, inspect the card to make sure that it is not damaged. Always keep the
original Enterprise OS software flash memory card in a safe place and protect it
from accidental damage.
CHANGING THE BOOT SOURCE
3
This chapter describes how to change the primary boot source on a bridge/router or
tunnel switch.
The Enterprise OS software boot files for the main processor module are factory
shipped with a:/primary/boot.29k as the default primary boot source for NETBuilder
bridge/routers. If you have installed the Enterprise OS software flash memory card
into drive A, and you want to keep the default boot source, go to Chapter 4.
If you want to adjust system configuration settings, see the SysconF appendix in
Reference for Enterprise OS Software for instructions.
3Com recommends that you initially use the ReBoot command to boot the
bridge/router or tunnel switch. If this command fails, use the BT command.
Using the Boot
Command
The Boot Monitor utility Boot (BT) command allows you to reboot or to override the
default boot path. The BT command is useful if the boot path has a typing error or
if you have a malfunctioning drive. If you enter a new boot path, the Primary Boot
Source parameter is updated to reflect the new path.
To reboot the NETBuilder II bridge/router (or tunnel switch) using the Boot Monitor
utility Boot command, follow these steps:
1 Reset the system in one of two ways. Either press the two outer buttons on the LCD
control panel on the front of the NETBuilder chassis, or press the reset button on
the main processor module.
LCD control panel buttons on front panel
of a NETBuilder II bridge/router
Main processor module
STATUS
PACKET
FORWARD
POWER/
FAULT
RESET ATTENTION
1 2 3 4
Reset
Reset
Reset button
Attention
Reset
Push both reset buttons simultaneously
The console displays the following startup message:
Do you want to enter the boot monitor? (y/n)
Entering Y within five seconds enters the boot monitor. If you enter N or enter
nothing, the NETBuilder II system begins booting the software.
14
CHAPTER 3: CHANGING THE BOOT SOURCE
For more information about the Boot Monitor utility, see the Firmware appendix in
Reference for Enterprise OS Software.
2 To enter the Boot Monitor utility, enter r:
3 Enter a boot path using:
BT <drive>:/<path>/<filename>
If you do not enter the <drive> value, drive A is used. To boot from drive A, enter:
BT a:/primary/boot29.k
The system attempts to boot from the specified image file. If an error occurs, a
message is sent to the console and you are returned to the boot monitor.
For more information about the Boot Monitor utility, see the Boot Monitor
appendix in Reference for Enterprise OS Software.
Configuring the
Primary Boot Source
Drive A is the default primary boot source. This procedure establishes drive B as
the primary boot source.
This procedure is provided as an example showing how to use the command.
For actual operations, 3Com recommends that you boot from drive A and assign
drive B to capture dumps.
Prerequisites
Procedure
Before beginning this procedure, complete the following tasks:
■
Install the system software and boot the NETBuilder II system according to the
instructions in Chapter 2.
■
Attach a terminal, a PC with a terminal emulation program, or a modem for
using a remote PC to the console port on the main processor module and
make sure the terminal is operating properly. If the terminal is not operating
properly, see the hardware installation guide for setup instructions.
To change the primary boot source to a drive or file other than the default or the
current drive setting, follow these steps:
1 Press the Return key.
The following prompt is displayed on your console:
NetLogin:
2 Log on as root by entering:
root
3 Press the Return key.
Pressing the Return key when prompted for the password enters a null string,
which is the default local password.
The bridge/router system prompt is displayed:
Enterprise OS #
You are now ready to enter software commands.
Configuring the Primary Boot Source
15
4 At the Enterprise OS prompt, enter:
SysconF 2
The Primary Boot Source menu is displayed:
Primary Boot Source:
1. Boot Filename:
a:/primary/boot.29k
2. Config File Source
a:/primary
3. IP Addresses
Client:none Subnet Mask:none
4. FTP Login Parameters
Enter parameter number or press Q to quit:
5 Enter 1 to select a boot filename.
Information similar to the following is displayed:
Current Boot Filename: a:/primary/boot.29k
Enter Boot Filename (CR = no change):
6 Enter a new boot filename (such as b:/primary/boot.29k) and press the Return key.
The configuration files must reside on the same drive as the boot source. If the
drive you specify is different from the configuration boot source drive, you are
prompted to change the configuration file source to the same drive.
If the boot drive you specify conflicts with the one set in the Dump Destination
parameter, you are prompted for a different drive.
7 Enter q to quit the menu.
The System Configuration menu showing the new entries is displayed:
System Configuration
1. Serial Ports
2. Primary Boot Source
3. Secondary Boot Source
4. Test Boot Source
5. Boot Sources
6. Dump Destination
7. Recovery Procedure
8. MP Boot Source
9. Boot Statistics
Enter parameter number or press
Console: 9600
b:/primary/boot.29k, b:/
b:/secondar/boot.29k, b:/
a:/primary/boot.29k, a:/:
Primary and Secondary
Partial dump only
Booted: 1 Exceptions:
Q to quit:
0
8 Enter q to quit the configuration program.
9 At the prompt, enter:
ReBoot
The NETBuilder II bridge/router reboots using the newly established drive B as the
primary boot source.
For drive B to function as the boot source, a flash memory card with software
version 11.3 must be installed in drive B.
16
CHAPTER 3: CHANGING THE BOOT SOURCE
4
CONFIGURING BASIC SETTINGS
This chapter describes preliminary tasks for configuring basic bridge/router
settings. Before you begin configuring ports and paths (described in Chapter 1 of
Using Enterprise OS Software), complete the following tasks:
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
Log on to the system.
Familiarize yourself with the user interface.
Learn how to get help.
Set up IP routing.
Store configuration parameter values.
Obtain Network Manager privileges.
Change the Network Manager password.
Set the time and date.
Set system administrator information.
Assign IP addresses and subnet masks to individual ports or one address for the
bridge/router or tunnel switch.
Set up the Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP).
Set up NETBuilder security.
To perform these tasks, you can either attach a console to the console port and log
onto the system locally, or you can use the Web Link applications, which is a
web-based configuration tool. For information on how to log on to the system
locally, see “Logging on to the System” on page 17.
Web Link contains a complete user interface to the configuration parameters
required to set up and configure a bridge/router or tunnel switch.
Logging on to the
System
To log on to the bridge/router or tunnel switch, follow these steps:
1 Turn the bridge/router on or press the two outer (reset) buttons on the LCD panel
on the front of the chassis.
The bridge/router takes a few minutes to complete the initialization process.
Startup messages appear on your console display.
When you see the following message:
System Initialized and Running
the bridge/router has finished booting.
2 Press the Return key.
The following prompt is displayed on your console:
NetLogin:
18
CHAPTER 4: CONFIGURING BASIC SETTINGS
3 Log on as root:
root
4 Press the Return key.
Pressing the Return key when prompted for the password enters a null string,
which is the default local password. Later in this chapter, you will be instructed on
how to change the password.
The bridge/router system prompt is displayed:
Enterprise OS #
You are now ready to begin entering software commands.
Setting Up IP Routing
You must set up the port that accesses the server for IP routing. To set up IP
routing, follow these steps:
1 Log on as root and press the Return key.
The password prompt is displayed.
2 At the password prompt, press the Return key.
The network manager prompt (Enterprise OS #) is displayed.
3 Set up an IP address and subnet mask using:
SETDefault !<port> -IP NETaddr = <IP address> [<subnet mask>]
For more information on IP configuration, see Reference for Enterprise OS
Software.
This step needs to be completed using the console port before telnet or Web Link
can be used.
4 Enable IP routing by entering:
SETDefault -IP CONTrol = RO
5 Enable a routing protocol. For example, to enable RIP use:
SETDefault !<port> -RIPIP CONTrol = (Listen, Talk)
This step is optional.
6 Ensure your configuration by verifying that the bridge/router can access other
devices on the network, use:
PING <IP address>
where <IP address> is the IP address of another device on the network.
Learning About the
User Interfaces
This section describes how to access the bridge/router user interface and provides
an overview of the Web Link, menu-driven, and command-line interfaces.
This section also includes the following information:
■
■
How to specify values, set members, or set addresses when using either the
Web Link, menu-driven or command-line interface
How to use online help
Learning About the User Interfaces
Accessing the User
Interface
19
To access the user interface or to modify the configuration of the bridge/router or
tunnel switch, use one of the following methods:
■
Access the bridge/router commands locally through the console port.
■
Establish an HTTP session with the bridge/router using the Web Link
application.
■
Establish a Telnet session with the bridge/router using security passwords.
■
Use a device (for example, a workstation) on the same extended network or
internetwork to access the bridge/router through the Telnet protocol.
Enterprise OS software also supports outgoing Telnet.
The software supports TCP and UDP over Bigger Addresses (TUBA), which
means you can Telnet to the bridge/router using an IP address or an OSI NSAP
address from a PC or workstation. For more information about using Telnet on
a workstation, see the manual that accompanies the workstation.
■
Web Link Versus
Menu-Driven Versus
Command-Line Interface
View and configure a subset of bridge/router parameters from a remote host
using SNMP. For information on preparing the bridge/router to run SNMP, see
Using Enterprise OS Software.
After accessing the bridge/router user interface, you can issue a command in one
of three ways:
■
Use the Web Link application if you are unsure of the command syntax and you
have a compatible web-based browser on your network management station.
■
Use the menu-driven interface if you are unsure of the command syntax.
For more information about the MEnu command, see Reference for
Enterprise OS Software. For information on how to use the menu-driven
interface, see the next section.
■
Enter the command at the system prompt if you know the exact syntax.
For information about the command line and rules for entering commands, see
“Using the Command-Line Interface” on page 21.
The syntax for each command and parameter is described in Reference for
Enterprise OS Software.
Using the Web Link
Application
To log onto and configure a bridge/router using Web Link, follow these steps:
1 Install the hardware and install all cables.
2 Log on to the system and set up IP routing. See “Setting Up IP Routing” on
page 18 for instruction on how to set up the IP address.
3 Set up your management workstation with a valid IP address.
To communicate with the bridge/router or tunnel switch, the IP address of the
management station should be an unused IP address in the range 10.1.0.2 10.1.255.254; subnet mask 255.255.0.0.
Once your management station possesses a valid IP address, the Web Link
application can be opened in the web browser running on the management
station.
4 Point your browser at the bridge/router interface IP address.
You are prompted to enter a user name and password.
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CHAPTER 4: CONFIGURING BASIC SETTINGS
5 Log in as root. Type:
root
or
admin
6 Click the OK button to enter a null string as the password, which is the default local
password.
The default Web Link page opens in the browser window.
Web Link Interface Description
The Web Link application window has three frames. All of the frames can be resized
by dragging the frame borders using the left mouse button.
Web Link Banner Frame Click Help, Documentation, the 3Com Library, 3Com
Support, and 3Com Contacts in the banner to access these resources.
The Configuration shortcut takes you to the configuration form for the
bridge/router or tunnel switch. The Diagnostics shortcut provides access to further
diagnostics of the bridge/router or tunnel switch. The Health shortcut provides
access to device statistics.
Web Link Navigator Frame The Web Link Navigator Frame provides links to the
Health, Configuration, Diagnostics and Help Functions
Web Link Summary Frame The Summary Frame contains a graphic of the
device being configured and a form showing current values for the selected
parameters.
After you have entered Web Link, you can use the options to configure whatever
services are required.
Using the Menu-Driven
Interface
The MEnu command allows you to perform the following operations:
■
List the services available on the bridge/router or tunnel switch.
■
Choose a service and see the list of parameters available for the service.
■
List the parameters in the current service.
■
Choose a parameter and see the commands used with it.
■
Check the active and default values of a particular parameter.
■
Display the syntax of a particular parameter.
■
Enter the new value of a parameter.
To use the menu-driven interface, you must have Network Manager privilege. When
using the menu-driven interface, you cannot access some parameters; for example,
you cannot alter the number of lines on the screen, or change privilege level.
Accessing the NETBuilder bridge/router through the REMote command requires the
command-line interface.
To use the menu-driven interface, follow these steps:
1 Access the main menu by entering:
MEnu
Learning About the User Interfaces
21
The Main menu (Level 1) is displayed.
Depending on your software package, the number of services in your Main menu
may vary.
2 Select the service you want to use.
For example, selecting 1 from the Main menu (Level 1) display generates a menu
for the SYS Service.
3 Select the parameter you want to configure.
For example, if you select the NMPrompt parameter from the SYS Service menu
(Level 2) menu, information for that parameter is displayed.
The first part of the screen displays the value of the parameter; the second part
lists the commands you can choose. For information on help menus, see “Getting
Help” on page 34. For complete rules for entering commands and using aliases
and history substitution, see “Using Aliases” on page 26, “Command History
Substitution” on page 26, and “Command-Line Parameter Attributes” on
page 27.
4 To return to the previous menu level, press the Return key.
If you are at the Main menu (level 1) and press the Return key, you return to the
command-line interface.
Using the
Command-Line Interface
This section describes how to enter commands and provides detailed information
about using the command-line interface.
To use the command-line interface, follow these steps:
1 Type the command name.
If the command does not include a service name, parameter, or values, skip to
step 3. If the command requires more information or if you want to include
optional arguments, continue to step 2a.
If you need help identifying the parts of a command, see Figure 1.
a If the command has additional options, such as a port or path number, include
them after the command name.
Including a specific port or path number in the command focuses the
command on that port or path. If the port or path number is not included, the
command acts on all ports or paths.
For more information on ports and paths, see Chapter 1 in Using Enterprise OS
Software. For more information on commands, see Chapter 1 in Reference for
Enterprise OS Software.
b If the command includes a parameter, type the service name (if necessary), the
parameter name, and values.
The service name focuses the action of the command on a particular
bridge/router or tunnel switch service.
In some cases, you may not need to enter the service name. For example, if a
parameter is unique to a service, the service does not need to be specified. If
two or more services have parameters of the same name, you must include the
service name in the syntax. For more information, see “Entering Service Names
in Command Lines” on page 25.
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CHAPTER 4: CONFIGURING BASIC SETTINGS
The value part of the command specifies how you want the parameter to be
set. Values include numerics, strings, or addresses, depending on the
parameter. For additional information, see “Syntax for Assigning Values” on
page 28.
2 After entering the complete command, press the Return key.
The bridge/router software includes online help for commands, services,
parameters, and syntax, described in “Getting Help” on page 28. The syntax that
appears in online help is the full-form syntax; it contains full names and visual cues
for entering commands. You can also enter commands using an abbreviated
version of the syntax.
For information on full-form and abbreviated syntax, read the following sections
and see Figure 1 and Figure 2. For additional information on short cuts for
entering commands, see “Using Aliases” on page 26 and “Command History
Substitution” on page 26.
Full-Form Syntax
To display the full-form syntax (provided by online help in Enterprise OS software)
type a question mark (?) or a question mark with other options, as described in
“Getting Help” on page 34.
Figure 1 shows the parts and symbols that make up command syntax. For more
information on symbols, see “Symbols” on page 23.
Figure 1 Full-Form Syntax
Angle brackets enclose
variable parameters or
values. Do not enter brackets.
A hyphen always precedes service name and must
be entered if the service name is entered.
Service name
Command name
A vertical bar separates mutually exclusive
values in a list, one of which can be entered.
Do not enter the bar itself.
SETDefault !<path> -FDDI InsertPolicy = [Insert | DoNotInsert]
An exclamation point
must precede a port,
virtual port, or path number.
Parameter name
Square brackets enclose optional
values or a list of optional arguments.
Do not enter the square brackets.
NETBuilder bridge/router or PathBuilder switch guides and online help use upperand lowercase letters to distinguish the full form of commands and command
syntax from the abbreviated form. You can enter a command in abbreviated form
by typing only the uppercase portion. It does not matter whether you type the
command in upper- or lowercase letters.
Abbreviated Syntax
Abbreviated syntax is the shortest unambiguous abbreviation of a command,
parameter, or value that can be entered. You can enter the abbreviated form in
lower- or uppercase letters at the Enterprise OS prompt.
Figure 2 shows the abbreviated syntax that corresponds to the full-form syntax in
Figure 1.
Learning About the User Interfaces
23
Figure 2 Abbreviated Syntax
Commands, parameters, and service names can be entered in abbreviated form.
Uppercase denotes the shortest unambiguous abbreviation of a command,
service name, or parameter.
Command name
SETD !1
Parameter name
-FDDI IP = DNI
Value
Additional syntax examples are provided in “Full and Abbreviated Syntax
Examples” on page 24.
Symbols
You may see a variety of symbols shown as part of the command syntax. These
symbols usually explain how to enter the command, and you do not type them as
part of the command itself. The exceptions to this rule are parentheses, the
hyphen, and the exclamation point, which you do type as part of the command.
Table 3 summarizes command syntax symbols.
Table 3 Command Syntax Symbols
Symbol
Description
angle brackets < >
Enclose a variable or value. You must specify the variable or value; for
example, in the syntax:
DELete -IP ADDRess <IP address>
you must supply an address for <IP address> when you enter the
command. Do not type the angle brackets.
square brackets[ ]
Enclose an optional value or a list of optional arguments. One or more
values or arguments can be specified. For example, in the syntax:
SET PRIvilege = [User | NetMgr]
you can specify either User or NetMgr when you enter the command. Do
not type the square brackets.
parentheses ( )
Enclose a list of values that can be assigned to a single parameter. At least
one of them must be selected. You must type the parentheses and
separate the values with a comma if you are assigning more than one
value. For example, in the syntax:
SET CurrentPorts = ALL | (<port>, <port>)
you can specify two port numbers by enclosing them in parentheses and
separating them with a comma when you enter the command.
vertical bar |
Separates mutually exclusive items in a list, one of which must be
entered. For example, in the syntax:
SET ScreenLength = [None | <line>(6–100)]
you can specify either the word None or a number between 6 and 100
when you enter the command. Do not type the vertical bar.
ellipsis ...
Following a parameter name or value, indicates that one or more
additional arguments may be specified on the same command line. For
example, in the syntax:
ADD !<port> -IP SecAuthIn <authority> [<authority> ...]
[ANY]
you can specify multiple authorities (GENSER, SIOP, SCI, NSA, DOE,
NONE) when you enter the command. Do not type the ellipsis.
24
CHAPTER 4: CONFIGURING BASIC SETTINGS
Table 3 Command Syntax Symbols (continued)
Symbol
Description
hyphen -
A letter preceded by a hyphen represents a command option. Also, when
you enter a service name as part of the command, you must precede the
service name with a hyphen. For example, in the command:
SETDefault -BRidge CONTrol = Bridge
You must include the hyphen with the service name BRidge when you
enter the command.
braces { }
Enclose a list of values, one of which must be entered. For example, in
the syntax:
SETDefault !<subaddr #> -Gateway SubAddrMap = {(<IPaddr>
| <PSAPaddr>) | None}
you must enter either an IP address, PSAP address, or the word None
when you enter the command. Do not type the braces.
exclamation point !
A number preceded by an exclamation point represents a port, virtual
port, or path number. For example, in the syntax:
SHow [!<port>] -DECnet CONFiguration
the exclamation point must be included before the port number when
you enter the command.
The exclamation point is also used to see a profile number. See the
PROFile Service chapter in Reference for Enterprise OS Software.
Full and Abbreviated Syntax Examples
The following examples show the full form first, followed by the abbreviated
command syntax.
The full-form command syntax:
ADD !<port> -NRIP AdvToNeighbor <network>%<mac address> [...]
can be abbreviated to:
ADD !<port> -NRIP ATN <network>%<mac address> [...]
Replacing the variables in this abbreviated command syntax with values might
specify, for example, that a neighbor on port 2, network number &10, with
address %080002030ef2, receives RIP and SAP updates:
ADD !2 -NRIP ATN &10%080002030ef2
The full-form command syntax:
SETDefault -IP CONTrol = ([ROute | NoROute], [RelaySrcRoute |
NoRelaySrcRoute], [SplitLoad | NoSplitLoad], [Filtering | NoFiltering],
[SECurity | NoSECurity], [FwdSubnetBcast | NoFwdSubnetBcast],
[FwdAllSubnetBcast | NoFwdAllSubnetBcast])
can be shortened by abbreviating it to:
SETD -IP CONT = ([RO | NRO], [RSR | NRSR], [SL | NSL], [F | NF], [SEC |
NSEC],[FSB | NFSB], [FASB | NFASB])
The following command uses this abbreviated syntax to enable IP routing, packet
filtering, and security:
SETD -IP CONT = (RO, F, SEC)
Learning About the User Interfaces
25
Variations in Command Syntax
Each command has its own syntax. When a command is used for configuring
parameters, its syntax or values may change according to the parameter and
service. For example, the SETDefault command sets the NetMapTime parameter in
the SYS Service and the MaxAge parameter in the STP Service. In the following
example, the general syntax is followed by the syntax variations (different values
for different parameters) appropriate to each parameter:
SETDefault <parameter> = <value>
SETDefault -SYS NetMapTime = <number>(0 to 120 seconds)
SETDefault -STP MaxAge = <second> (6-40)
Entering Service Names in Command Lines
When you are configuring or displaying parameters that appear in more than one
service, you must provide a service name to distinguish them. You can enter the
service name in abbreviated form, but the name must be preceded by a hyphen.
For example, to indicate BRidge Service, type -BR.
Abbreviated service names are indicated in uppercase in this guide.
There are three exceptions:
■
If you have previously set the CurrentServices parameter to the desired service,
you do not need to enter the service name. The system prompt indicates the
current service if you set a single service with the CurrentServices parameter.
For information on using the CurrentServices parameter, see Reference for
Enterprise OS Software.
■
Environment parameters do not have a service name. For descriptions of these
parameters, see Reference for Enterprise OS Software.
■
You do not need to enter a service name when the parameter name is unique.
Determining the Display of Ports and Virtual Ports
You can control which ports are displayed in the output of the SHow and
SHowDefault commands by setting the CurrentPorts parameter. If you have a
bridge/router with several ports, for example a NETBuilder II bridge/router with
multiport I/O modules installed, you may want to limit the display to information
on certain ports instead of all ports. If you are interested only in displaying
information for port 2 and virtual port V3, as well as the paths mapped to these
ports, set the CurrentPorts parameter by entering:
SET CurrentPorts = (2, V3)
Now when you enter SHow and SHowDefault commands, only information for
port 2 and virtual port V3, and the paths mapped to these ports, is displayed.
If you have a NETBuilder II bridge/router with a multiport module installed, you
must enter its ports individually when setting the CurrentPorts parameter. For
instance, if you have an Ethernet 2-Port 10BASE-FL module, the A and B ports are
distinct. If you specify port 1 with the CurrentPorts parameter, the software
assumes you mean port 1A. For information on port and path numbering
conventions for multiport modules, see Chapter 1 in Using Enterprise OS
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CHAPTER 4: CONFIGURING BASIC SETTINGS
Software. For more information about the CurrentPorts parameter, see Reference
for Enterprise OS Software.
The syntax convention for ports, virtual ports, and group ports is:
!<port>
For a port, <port> is a variable ID number, for example, !1. For a virtual port or
group port, <port> is the letter V followed by a variable ID number, for example,
!V1.
When you create a virtual port or group port, it functions in the same way as a port.
Unless otherwise specified, the term “port” refers to virtual ports and group ports as
well as ports. For more information on ports, virtual ports, and group ports, see
Chapter 1 in Using Enterprise OS Software.
Using Aliases
To avoid entering lengthy commands, you can create an alias to represent any
command. To define an alias, use:
ADD -SYS ALias <alias name> <arguments…>
For example, if you use the SHow -SYS NetMAP command often, create an alias
called ntmap by entering:
ADD -SYS ALias ntmap SHow -SYS NetMAP
When you want to display the network map, at the bridge/router prompt enter:
ntmap
For more information about aliases, see Reference for Enterprise OS Software.
Command History Substitution
The bridge/router “remembers” the last 10 commands you enter. To display a list of
these commands, at the bridge/router prompt enter:
SHow History
For more information see Reference for Enterprise OS Software. Each command in
the display is numbered. To repeat any of the commands, use the event designator,
represented by an exclamation point (!).
You can use history substitution with the following options:
!!
!<n>
!-<n>
Repeats the previous command.
Repeats the command numbered <n>. For example,
entering !100 repeats the command numbered 100. If
you know the command number, you do not need to
display it first.
Repeats the command whose number is the current
command number minus <n>. The current command
number is shown on the screen preceding the
bridge/router prompt. For example, if the current
command is 100 and <n> is 2, command number 98 is
repeated.
Learning About the User Interfaces
!<string>
27
Repeats the most recent command that starts with the
variable <string>. The SHow History command might
display:
166
167
168
169
170
171
setdefault !1 -path control = enabled
show -path configuration
show history
set screenlength = 23
setdefault -bridge control = bridge
show statistics ?
If you enter !SETD at the prompt, the most recent
occurrence of the SETDefault command is executed:
setdefault -bridge control = bridge
!?<string>
Repeats the most recent command containing <string>.
In the preceding example, if you enter !?stat, the
command show statistics ? (number 171) is executed.
You can also repeat a previous command with
modifications by using the syntax described next.
^<string1>
Repeats the most recent command that contains
^<string1>^<string2> <string1>. If <string2> is specified, it replaces <string1>
in that command. For example, suppose you made a
typing mistake when you entered the following
SETDefault command:
seed welcomestring = “You are talking to the 3Com NETBuilder”
To repeat the command with the correct spelling of SETD,
you do not need to reenter the entire command. Enter:
^seed^setd
The following command is then displayed and executed:
setd welcomestring = “You are talking to the 3Com NETBuilder”
Privilege Level
The privilege level determines which commands and parameters a user can access.
The network manager must set the Network Manager password and the User
password to be the same in order to provide equal levels of security. If only the
Network Manager password is set, any other user receives User level privileges.
See “Changing the Password” for more information.
You can change the privilege level with the SET PRIvilege command. For more
information, see Reference for Enterprise OS Software.
Command-Line
Parameter Attributes
Parameter values, set members, and addresses can be expressed either as numbers
or as text. This section provides guidelines for specifying numeric values, strings,
and addresses. For details on the values permitted for each parameter, see
Reference for Enterprise OS Software.
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CHAPTER 4: CONFIGURING BASIC SETTINGS
Syntax for Assigning Values
Most parameters must be assigned a value of a particular type. Table 4 shows the
possible types.
Table 4 Parameter Value Types
Type
Meaning
Example
Numbers
Represent the numerical value of a parameter.
15, 1024
Names
Usually represent either system-defined parameter or
parameter values (written as param-name or value) or
user-defined macros or files (written as macroname or
filename).
Route, None
Strings
Some parameter values can be set to user-defined strings,
ranging from a single character (written as char) to a
multicharacter string (written as string).
“A,” “B,”
“password”
Addresses
Two types of addresses can be assigned: media addresses for
Ethernet, FDDI, token ring, and wide area protocols (SMDS,
X.25, Frame Relay) and network layer addresses.
#311040800245,
129.213.24.30
The SET, SETDefault, and SYSgen commands require both parameter names and
parameter values. The parameter name is followed by an equal sign (=) and a value.
Spaces are permitted, but not required, before and after the equal sign, for example:
SETDefault -SYS ScreenLength = 30
The ADD and DELete commands also require both parameter names and parameter
values. These commands modify sets of objects. No equal sign precedes the value
that is added or deleted as a set member, for example:
ADD -IP ADDRess 10.0.0.1 %080002001234
Numeric Values
To assign a hexadecimal value to a parameter, precede the number with a percent
sign (%). Alphabetic characters can be entered in upper- or lowercase letters.
To assign a decimal number, type the number without any preceding symbol.
Names
To assign a name, type the name in the command. Names, unlike strings, do not
require quotation marks; however, the character length of the name may be limited.
Strings
String values fall into two categories: single characters and variable-length strings.
Table 5 lists the conventions for entering string values.
Table 5 Conventions for Entering Strings
String Type
Single characters
Variable-length
strings
Characters
Enclose in
apostrophes.
Enclose in
quotation marks.
Valid Characters
Examples
All alphanumeric characters and 'S', 's','$'
symbols
All alphanumeric characters and “Hello!”
symbols
Characters in a string are case-sensitive. For example, “ABC” is different from “abc.”
A few characters have special meaning to the bridge/router and must be preceded
by a backslash (\) in string text to prevent them from being misinterpreted. These
symbols are the apostrophe ('), backslash (\), caret (^), and quotation mark (“). For
Learning About the User Interfaces
29
example, to include an apostrophe in string text, enter a backslash followed by an
apostrophe (\'). To include a backslash (\) in string text, enter two backslashes (\\).
The first backslash prevents the bridge/router from treating the second as a
special character.
When specifying AppleTalk zone strings, you can use the extended AppleTalk
ASCII character set. For more information, see Using Enterprise OS Software.
You can assign a string to the PATH NAme parameter, and use this string as an
instance identifier. For example, you can assign the name “testnet” to path 2 by
entering:
SETDefault !2 -PATH NAme = “testnet”
In subsequent path-specific commands, you can substitute the path name for !2.
For example, if you want to set the connector type on path 2 after assigning a
name to this path, enter:
SETDefault !testnet -PATH CONNEctor = RS232
This same feature is available for port-specific commands. You can assign a name
to a port and then substitute the port name for !<port> in subsequent commands.
To assign a name to a port, use:
SETDefault !<port> -PORT NAme = “<string>”
For more information on the NAme parameter, see Reference for Enterprise OS
Software.
Port and Path Naming Restrictions
Port and path names are subject to the following restrictions:
■
The name string can contain a maximum of eight characters, the first of which
must be alphabetic.
■
No blank spaces are allowed. The only nonalphanumeric characters allowed are
the asterisk (*), underscore (_), period (.), and hyphen (-).
■
Two ports or two paths cannot have the same name, but a port name can be
the same as a path name.
■
Alphabetic characters are stored and displayed as entered. Names are
case-insensitive when compared with previously entered names. For example,
port2 and PORT2 are evaluated as the same name.
ISDN-Related Syntax
Variation
The syntax for some parameters is different for built-in Integrated Services Digital
Network (ISDN) interfaces. The syntax variation for these parameters is presented
in Reference for Enterprise OS Software in the following format:
For non-ISDN interfaces
SETDefault !<path> -PATH remoteDialNo = “<string>”
SHow [!<path> | !*] -PATH remoteDialNo
SHowDefault [!<path> | !*] -PATH remoteDialNo
For built-in ISDN interfaces
SETDefault !<connectorID.channelID> -PATH remoteDialNo = “<string>”
SHow [!<connectorID.channelID> | !<connectorID>.*] -PATH remoteDialNo
SHowDefault [!<connectorID.channelID> | !<connectorID>.*] -PATH
remoteDialNo
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CHAPTER 4: CONFIGURING BASIC SETTINGS
The syntax variation for non-ISDN interfaces applies to local area network (LAN)
and data terminal equipment (DTE) interfaces.
Enterprise OS software menus and help strings do not display the syntax variation
for ISDN interfaces.
The variation in syntax is caused partially by the different path-numbering
convention used for ISDN. For information, see Using Enterprise OS Software.
Special parameter values related to built-in ISDN interfaces can also cause a
variation in syntax.
Some parameters in ISDN-specific software are connector-related and require that
you specify a connector number (<connectorID>), for example, 2. Other
parameters are channel-related and require that you specify both a connector and
a channel number (<connectorID.channelID>), for example, 2.1. When you specify
both a connector and a channel number, you must separate them with a decimal
point.
If you do not specify a channel number in a command that requires both a
connector and a channel number, the software assumes the first channel
associated with the connector. For example, if you specify connector number 2
when the syntax requires that you to specify both a connector and a channel
number, the software assumes you mean 2.1.
To specify all channels associated with a connector, specify the connector number,
a decimal point, and an asterisk, for example, 2.*
Address Formats
The following summary describes media addresses and network layer addresses
the bridge/router uses and their formats. For detailed information on
protocol-specific addressing, see Reference for Enterprise OS Software.
Media Addresses
MAC
Contains 12 hexadecimal digits preceded by a percent sign (%).
The NETBuilder II bridge/router has a media access control (MAC)
address (physical) for each LAN interface (Ethernet, FDDI, or token
ring), for each HSS interface, and for the main processor module.
The MAC address and the network identifier constitute a network
address, which is the only address used by Xerox Network Systems
(XNS) and Internetwork Packet Exchange (IPX) routers. IP routers
have both MAC addresses for their LAN interfaces and Internet
addresses for their configured ports. Internet addresses are
described in “Network Layer Addresses.”
Each MAC address is assigned by 3Com. A MAC address can be
displayed by entering:
SHow -SYS ADDRess
The following is an example of a MAC address:
%080002001326
Learning About the User Interfaces
31
Frame Relay Requires an address called a Data Link Connection Identifier (DLCI).
DLCIs are assigned by the appropriate authority at subscription
time. A DLCI follows an at sign (@) and can range from 1 through
1022 decimal. The DLCI identifies a virtual circuit on the Frame
Relay network, and is used by the local bridge/router to send a
packet to a router on the other end of the circuit. The following is
an example of a Frame Relay address:
@22
In the standard (local) addressing convention, the DLCI number has
only local significance; a duplicate number can be used by other
bridge/router or tunnel switches. In the global addressing
convention, identifiers used throughout the Frame Relay network
are unique, and all traffic to a node has the same destination DLCI
number.
ATM
Consists of an 8-bit virtual path identifier (VPI) and a 16-bit virtual
circuit identifier (VCI), usually represented in VPI.VCI format, where
VPI is a decimal number between 0 and 255 and VCI is a decimal
number between 0 and 65,535. The following is an example of an
Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) address:
107.44
Some vendors’ DSUs require an ATM address that consists of a 0-bit
VPI and a 10-bit VCI. In this case, the 10-bit VCI maps directly to a
Frame Relay DLCI.
SMDS
There are two types of Switched Multimegabit Data Service (SMDS)
addresses: individual addresses, for unicast traffic, and group
addresses, for multicast traffic. An individual address routes data to
a unique node. Packets sent to a group address are delivered to all
nodes that share that address. Both types of address begin with a
dollar sign. They are distinguished by the first or control digit:
hexadecimal C for an individual address and hexadecimal E for a
group address. Each address has 15 decimal digits following the
control digit and resembles a telephone number. The software
automatically right-pads shorter addresses with hexadecimal F to
the full length. The following are examples of individual and group
SMDS addresses:
C14085551212FFFF
Individual Address
E14085551234FFFF
Group Address
X.25
Consists of up to 15 decimal digits and can vary in length. The
address looks similar to a telephone number and is preceded by a
pound sign (#). An X.25 address is also referred to as a data
terminal equipment (DTE) address.
When a device is attached to a public data network (PDN), the
network provider assigns it an X.25 address or an international data
number (IDN). The first four digits indicate the country and PDN to
which the device is attached. The remaining digits represent a
unique device address determined by the network provider. The
following is an example of an X.25 address:
#311041503333
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CHAPTER 4: CONFIGURING BASIC SETTINGS
ISDN
An ISDN address is a phone number provided by your
telecommunications carrier. It can include a dial prefix, country
code, area code, and phone number. It can consist of a maximum
of 30 characters. If you create a subaddress, you must separate the
phone number and the subaddress with a semicolon (;). The
subaddress can be composed of a maximum of 20 characters.
The following is an example of a valid ISDN address, including
a subaddress:
011122134567000;200
For complete information on ISDN addresses, see Using
Enterprise OS Software.
Network Layer Addresses
AppleTalk
DECnet
Internet
Consists of the network number and node ID. Each AppleTalk node
address is unique throughout the AppleTalk Internet. For details on
assigning an AppleTalk address, see Reference for Enterprise OS
Software. The following is an example of an AppleTalk address:
4.23
Consists of an area address and a node address. The area number
identifies the area to which the router belongs. Enter an area
number between 1 and 63. The node number assigned to the router
must be unique within the area. Enter a node number between 1
and 1,023. For details on assigning a DECnet address, see Reference
for Enterprise OS Software. The following is an example of a
DECnet address:
1.15
Also known as an IP address. It consists of up to 12 decimal digits
arranged in four three-digit fields separated by periods, as shown in
the following format:
xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx
Leading zeros can be omitted. For example, the following addresses
are the same:
010.002.002.001
10.2.2.1
An Internet address is required for:
■
A bridge/router port to perform IP routing
■
The bridge/router to be accessed via Telnet
■
The bridge/router to respond to the PING command from
another host
■
The bridge/router to participate in SNMP-based network
management
An address includes both a network number and a host number. The
actual format of these numbers varies depending on the class of
address being designated. Address class is determined by the value
in the first octet of the address.
Table 6 shows valid address classes, the range of the first address
field, and the resulting address format. The maximum value for any
single field is 255.
Learning About the User Interfaces
33
Table 6 Internet Address Format
Class
Range of First Address Field
Address Format
A
0–127
nnn.hhh.hhh.hhh*
B
128–191
nnn.nnn.hhh.hhh*
C
192–223
nnn.nnn.nnn.hhh*
D
224–239
yyy.yyy.yyy†
* n represents a digit of the network number; h represents a digit of the host number.
† Class D addresses are used for multicast applications as assigned by the Internet Assigned
Numbers Authority (IANA).
IPX
OSI
VIP
For more information on Internet addresses, subnet masks, and
variable length subnet masks, see Using Enterprise OS Software.
Leading zeros can be omitted. Consists of an ampersand (&) followed
by a network address, which contains eight hexadecimal digits,
followed by the MAC address.
You may need to enter an IPX address when using the bridge/router
for IPX routing. The network address uniquely distinguishes one IPX
network from all other IPX networks. The following example
addresses are the same:
&00003333%080002005678
&3333%080002005678
Open System Interconnection (OSI) network addresses are called
network service access points (NSAPs). NSAPs are of variable length
and format, although they are always considered to have the
following three parts:
■
Area address (variable length)
■
System ID (six octets)
■
N-selector (one octet)
The system ID and N-selector are the last seven octets of the MAC
address, and the area address is everything but the system ID and
N-selector. The following is an example of an OSI address:
/49/0053080002A0089D01
where the area address is:
/49/0053
the system ID is:
080002A0089D
and the N-selector is:
01
For more information on the OSI addressing scheme, OSI routing
domains, and area addresses, see Using Enterprise OS Software.
A VINES Internet Protocol (VIP) address is globally unique, fixed, and
permanent for servers and routers only. Each node has a two-field,
48-bit Internet address, which is derived from the 32-bit VINES
network number and the 16-bit subnetwork number.
The Internet address has eight hexadecimal digits (VIP network ID)
and four hexadecimal digits (subnetwork ID) separated by a colon (:).
The Internet address (logical network) is independent of any data link
layer address assigned to a node on a physical medium. The
following is an example of a VIP address:
02A01339:0001
34
CHAPTER 4: CONFIGURING BASIC SETTINGS
XNS
Getting Help
Consists of a network address followed by a MAC address. The
network address distinguishes between different XNS Ethernet
networks. It contains eight hexadecimal digits, and is preceded by an
ampersand (&), which is used for identification. Leading zeros can be
omitted. The following addresses are the same:
&3333%080002001326
&00003333%080002001326
The user interface provides help menus as memory aids. To display the help menu,
enter a question mark (?). The question mark can be used with different options as
described in Table 7.
Table 7 Online Help Syntax Summary
Syntax
?
-?
-service?
Description
Displays the help menu. Different commands are displayed depending on whether Network Manager privilege or User privilege is in
effect. The commands are organized according to services.
Displays a list of services.
Displays a list of commands within the service.
For example, to display a list of commands in the SYS Service, enter:
-SYS?
If there are no commands under the service, a message is displayed to
indicate this. For example, enter this command at the prompt:
-IDP?
command -service?
command ?
command -service
parameter?
Storing Configuration
Parameter Values
A message similar to the following appears:
No commands available in IDP service
Displays a list of parameters that can be used with the command
within the service.
For example, to display a list of PORT Service parameters that can be
used with the SETDefault command, enter:
SETDefault -PORT?
Displays parameters by service name that can be used with the
command. Only parameters in services specified by the
CurrentServices parameter are displayed.
Displays syntax for the command used with the parameter.
For example, to display the syntax for the SETDefault command used
with the CONTrol parameter in the SNMP Service, enter:
SETDefault -SNMP CONTrol?
Configuration parameters are stored in flash memory or on the disk of another
server (for example, the TFTP/FTP server that boots the bridge/router or tunnel
switch). In this guide, the term “disk” refers to either the local flash memory drive
or the hard disk on another server.
When the bridge/router is booted, it copies configuration parameters from the disk
to memory. Parameter values on the disk are default values and values in memory
are active values. You can alter the default and active values with the SETDefault
and SET commands. For more information, see Reference for Enterprise OS
Software.
When the new value of a parameter takes effect depends on whether its active
value has been changed. Some commands change the active value only, some
change the default value, and some change both. If you display the parameter after
Obtaining Network Manager Privilege Level
35
modifying it and see the new value, the new value has taken effect immediately. If
a command changes only the default value, the new value takes effect only after
reboot. In this guide, if the description does not specify when the new value of a
parameter takes effect after being enabled or disabled, it is effective immediately
after it is set.
Obtaining Network
Manager Privilege
Level
Before changing the Network Manager password, you must obtain Network
Manager privilege.
To display or change the privilege level, follow these steps:
1 To determine the current privilege level, enter:
SHow PRIvilege
If the following message is displayed, you already have Network Manager privilege:
PRIvilege = NetMgr
If the following message is displayed, go to step 2:
PRIvilege = User
You also can determine the privilege level from the Enterprise OS prompt. The
following prompt is displayed at the Network Manager privilege level:
Enterprise OS #
The following prompt is displayed at the User privilege level:
Enterprise OS >
2 If you are currently at User privilege level, enter the following command to change
the privilege level from User to Network Manager:
SET PRIvilege = NetMgr
The following prompt is displayed:
Password:
3 Press the Return key.
A null string is entered, which is the default password.
After obtaining Network Manager privilege, proceed to the next section to change
the Network Manager password.
Changing the
Password
Changing the Network Manager password prevents unauthorized users from
accessing the bridge/router or tunnel switch. You should change the password
immediately after you log on for the first time.
The privilege level determines which commands and parameters a user can access.
Each level has its own password. You must set the Network Manager password and
the User password to be the same in order to provide equal levels of security. If only
the Network Manager password is set, any other user receives User level privileges.
Users with NetMgr privileges can lower their privileges without a password. Users
with User privileges cannot raise their privileges. To raise privileges after lowering
them, you must enter the password again.
The Network Manager password must be set before the User password. The User
password must be cleared before the Network Manager password.
36
CHAPTER 4: CONFIGURING BASIC SETTINGS
To change the password, follow these steps:
1 At the Enterprise OS prompt (Enterprise OS #), enter:
SysPassWord
When a menu is displayed, Select 1, Set Network Manager Privilege Password.
2 Enter the new Network Manager password. Retype it when prompted to do so.
You are returned to the SysPassWord menu.
3 Enter 2.
4 Enter the new User password and retype it when prompted to do so.
5 Press the Return key to exit the SysPassWord menu and return to the
Enterprise OS prompt (Enterprise OS #).
Go to the next section to set the time and date on the system.
Setting the Time and
Date
To set the time and date on your system, use:
SET -SYS DATE = YY/MM/DD HH:MM[:ss]
For example, to set the date and time to January 10, 1995, 9:40 a.m., enter:
SET -SYS DATE = 1995/1/10 09:40
The NETBuilder II bridge/router contains a real-time clock, so you do not need to
set the date after each reboot to keep it correct.
For more information on these parameters, see Reference for Enterprise OS
Software. Proceed to the next section to enter system administrator information.
Setting System
Administrator
Information
As system administrator, you can set the system name, location, and system
contact so that other system administrators can contact you for information. If you
are planning to use SNMP, you must set the system administrator information;
otherwise, these settings are optional.
Before performing the procedure, you need to decide on or obtain the following
information:
■
System name
■
System location
■
System contact person and phone number
To set system administrator information, follow these steps:
1 Specify a name for the node, using:
SETDefault -SYS SysNAMe = “<string>”
For example, to set the bridge/router name as “Sales.SanJose,” enter:
SETDefault -SYS SysNAMe = “Sales.SanJose”
The system name can contain no more than 255 characters. The default value is
“ “ (null string).
2 Specify the system location, using:
SETDefault -SYS SysLOCation = “<string>”
For example, to set the system location as “SecondFloor.Lab,” enter:
SETDefault -SYS SysLOCation = “SecondFloor.Lab”
Assigning Internet Addresses
37
The system location can contain no more than 255 characters. The default value is
“ “ (null string).
3 Specify a string that identifies the contact person managing the bridge/router or
tunnel switch, using:
SETDefault -SYS SysCONtact = “<string>”
For example, to specify John Smith as the system contact and a number to reach him,
enter:
SETDefault -SYS SysCONtact = “John Smith (408) 555-1111”
The system contact string can contain no more than 255 characters. The default
value is “ “ (null string). Users can obtain this information by entering:
SHow -SYS SysCONtact
Proceed to the next section to assign an Internet address.
4 Specify a banner string to be displayed by the bridge/router or tunnel switch:
The banner string can contain no more than 110 characters. The default value is “ “
(null string). Use:
SETDefault -SYS BannerString = “<string>
The SYStem service BannerString parameter allows you to input a text string that is
used as a information message for a bridge/router or tunnel switch. The string can be
up to 110 characters long and is displayed immediately prior to the word
“NetLogin:” when you are connecting to a bridge/router console. The banner string
is suppressed if the InterAction parameter is set to NoLOGin. This banner string is
redisplayed with each login retry.
Assigning Internet
Addresses
This section describes how to assign one or more Internet addresses to the system
using the NETaddr parameter in the IP Service. Before you assign an Internet address,
you must determine:
■
■
■
Whether you want your network to connect to the Internet, and how to obtain a
unique Internet address.
Whether you want to use the system as a bridge, a router, a bridge/router or a
tunnel switch.
Whether you need subnet addressing.
If you have already decided on these issues, proceed to “Assigning Internet
Addresses to a Bridge” on page 37 or to “Assigning Internet Addresses to a Router”
on page 38. If you need more information to make your decision, see “Obtaining an
Internet Address” on page 39 and see the subnet information in the Using
Enterprise OS Software.
Assigning Internet
Addresses to a Bridge
Even though a bridge does not route IP traffic, it needs an Internet address to
participate in network management and to be accessible from other devices through
Telnet or the SNMP.
When assigning an Internet address to an entire bridge, assign the address to port 0
using:
SETDefault !0 -IP NETaddr = <IP address>
An Internet address assigned to port 0 is considered an Internet address for the
entire bridge.
38
CHAPTER 4: CONFIGURING BASIC SETTINGS
The following example illustrates how to assign an Internet address to a bridge.
Example
Figure 3 shows a configuration in which you need to assign an Internet address to
a bridge. Hosts A and B are two hosts belonging to the same IP network, network
10. The IP host on Network A has an Internet address 10.0.0.1, and the one on
Network B has an Internet address 10.0.0.2. The bridge forwards packets between
these segments. To allow communication between the hosts and the bridge, ports
1 and 2 must reside on the same network. Assigning the same network number to
two or more bridge ports is prohibited, so you must assign the address to the
entire bridge, entering a command similar to the following:
SETDefault !0 -IP NETaddr = 10.0.0.3
Figure 3 Assigning an IP Address to the Entire Bridge
IP address
= 10.0.0.1
IP A
host
IPX
host
OSI
host
Segment A
Port 1
Assign IP address 10.0.0.3 to Port 0
for the IP hosts to access the bridge
Bridge
Port 2
Segment B
IP address
= 10.0.0.2
IP
host
B
IPX
host
OSI
host
After assigning an Internet address to the bridge, go to Chapter 1 in the Using
Enterprise OS Software.
Assigning Internet
Addresses to a Router
If the bridge/router is used to route IP traffic, you must configure the ports on
which IP packets are routed by assigning Internet addresses to them. You can
assign Internet addresses to individual ports using:
SETDefault !<port> -IP NETaddr = <IP address>
For more information, see the Reference for Enterprise OS Software.
CAUTION: Do not assign an Internet address to port 0, or the IP routing function
will be disabled.
The next example illustrates how to assign Internet addresses to a bridge/router or
tunnel switch.
Example
In Figure 4, Networks A and B are two different IP networks, and the bridge/router
is used for routing IP packets and for bridging OSI packets. To assign an IP address
to port 1, enter a command similar to the following:
SETDefault !1 -IP NETaddr = 192.1.5.1
To assign an address to port 2, enter a command similar to the following:
SETDefault !2 -IP NETaddr = 192.1.3.1
Assigning Internet Addresses
39
Figure 4 Assigning an IP Address to a bridge/router Port
Network B
Network A
Assign an IP address
to Port 2 so that the
host can access the
bridge/router via Telnet
Assign an IP address
to Port 1 so that the
bridge/router can boot
from the TFTP server
OSI
host
192.1.3.2
Host
192.1.5.4
Bridge/Router
192.1.5.1
Port 1
Port 2
192.1.3.1
OSI
host
TFTP
For additional information on Internet addresses and subnet masks, see Using
Enterprise OS Software. After assigning an Internet address or addresses to the
bridge/router or tunnel switch, go to Chapter 1 in Using Enterprise OS Software.
Obtaining an
Internet Address
If you want to connect your TCP/IP network to the Internet, you must obtain a
unique address from the central authority, the InterNIC. This central authority
provides the following services:
■
■
■
Registration Services
Assists in registering networks and domains, and assigns network numbers and
other entities to the Internet community.
Directory and Database Services
Maintains lists of FTP sites, various types of servers available on the Internet,
white and yellow page directories, library catalogs, and data archives. For more
information, phone (908) 668-6587 or use network mail
([email protected]).
Information Services
Offers information about how to get connected to the Internet, pointers to
network tools and resources, and seminars on various topics held in locations
around the country. For more information, phone (800) 444-4345 or use
network mail ([email protected]).
The Registration Service of the InterNIC assigns a globally unique network number,
leaving responsibility for assigning a unique local host number to the network
administrator.
To obtain a unique Internet address, contact the following organization:
Network Solutions
Attn: InterNIC Registration Services
505 Huntmar Park Drive
Herndon, VA 22070
1-703-742-4777
800-444-4345 (Referral Desk)
Network mail: [email protected]
For customers in Europe (including the former Soviet Union and the Middle East),
contact the Reseaux IP European (RIPE) Network Coordination Center in the
Netherlands using telephone number 3120592 5065.
All other customers abroad should contact Network Solutions at the telephone
number given above for assistance in locating network providers in your region.
40
CHAPTER 4: CONFIGURING BASIC SETTINGS
If you do not plan to be connected to the Internet, you can assign network
addresses on your own. However, if you plan on accessing the Internet in the
future, you may want to apply for an Internet network address so you will not
have to change network addresses when you make the connection.
After obtaining your Internet address, see “Assigning Internet Addresses to a
Bridge” on page 37 or to “Assigning Internet Addresses to a Router” on page 38.
For additional information on Internet addresses and subnets, see Using
Enterprise OS Software.
Setting Up the Simple
Network
Management Protocol
The bridge/router participates in different types of network management activities.
Most management activities require configuration because they are disabled by
default. The bridge/router manages networks in the following ways:
■
Configuring and monitoring from a UNIX or Windows network management
station using Transcend Enterprise Manager.
■
Remote upgrade management using the Enterprise OS Remote Upgrade
Management Utilities supplied on CD-ROM with every Enterprise OS release.
■
Building network maps (netmaps).
This guide does not describe in detail how to set up the SNMP Service. See Using
Enterprise OS Software and Reference for Enterprise OS Software for more
information.
SNMP allows you to modify and display some Enterprise OS parameters from a
network management station. You do not need to attach a terminal to the
bridge/router console port to change its configuration. To implement SNMP, follow
specifications in RFC 1155, RFC 1157, and RFC 1213. System parameters
described in RFC 1213 and 3Com extended parameters can be accessed from the
host.
Modifying SNMP
Parameters
To enable SNMP read/write access, you need to modify two parameters in the
SNMP Service: COMmunity and MANager.
The COMmunity parameter is an SNMP Service parameter that modifies the list of
communities. For information on how to use the COMmunity parameter, see
Using Enterprise OS Software and to Reference for Enterprise OS Software.
By default, the community name “ANYCOM” exists with read access to the
management information base (MIB) variables and allows unrestricted access to
the bridge/router or tunnel switch. To ensure that access is available only to the
proper system administrator, 3Com recommends that you delete the “ANYCOM”
community name, and add the appropriate community string and the IP address
of the manager.
To modify SNMP parameters, follow these steps:
1 Delete the default community string “ANYCOM” by entering:
DELete -SNMP COMmunity “ANYCOM”
2 Configure at least one new community string with read/write access.
For example:
ADD -SNMP COMmunity “private” TRiv RW AL1
3 Add other community strings with read-only access as required.
NETBuilder Security
41
For example:
ADD -SNMP COMmunity “public” TRiv RO AL1
4 Create a new manager with read/write access to the bridge/router or tunnel
switch. For security reasons, limit the number of network management stations.
For example:
ADD -SNMP MANager “private” 129.213.224.1 255.255.0
5 Enable the SNMP service by entering:
SETDefault -SNMP CONTrol = (Manage, Trap)
NETBuilder Security
Building Firewalls for
Security
Security Commands and
Parameters
NETBuilder security can be obtained many ways including limiting the access to a
particular network or by limiting the access to certain files. Limiting access to a
particular network can be accomplished by building Internet firewalls. Limiting
access to particular files can be accomplished by using certain commands and
parameters.
A firewall allows users inside a private network to have outbound access, while
restricting outside users from inbound access. For more conceptual information
about firewall and its capabilities, and details on how to configure firewalls, see
Using Enterprise OS Software. For a description and syntax of the various firewall
service parameters, see Reference for Enterprise OS Software.
To make sure that some designated files are accessible only to the system
administrator, use the following commands and parameters:
■
■
■
■
What Next?
NetAccess
This parameter is a SYS Service parameter that determines how a bridge/router
can be accessed from another device on the network. For information on how
to use the NetAccess parameter, see Using Enterprise OS Software and
Reference for Enterprise OS Software.
SysPassWord
This command brings up a menu allowing you to specify the password for the
Network Manager and User privilege levels. For information on how to use the
SysPassWord command, see Reference for Enterprise OS Software.
RemoteManager
This parameter is a SYS Service parameter that specifies the Internet addresses
of devices that can connect to the bridge/router through the REMote
command. For information on how to use the RemoteManager parameter, see
Using Enterprise OS Software and Reference for Enterprise OS Software.
COMmunity
This parameter is an SNMP Service parameter that modifies the list of
communities. For information on how to use the COMmunity parameter, see
Using Enterprise OS Software and Reference for Enterprise OS Software.
You are now ready to see Using Enterprise OS Software to configure your
bridge/router for your specific network needs.
42
CHAPTER 4: CONFIGURING BASIC SETTINGS
A
TECHNICAL SUPPORT
3Com provides easy access to technical support information through a variety of
services. This appendix describes these services.
Information contained in this appendix is correct at time of publication. For the
most recent information, 3Com recommends that you access the 3Com
Corporation World Wide Web site.
Online Technical
Services
World Wide Web Site
3Com offers worldwide product support 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, through
the following online systems:
■
World Wide Web site
■
3Com Knowledgebase Web Services
■
3Com FTP site
■
3Com Bulletin Board Service (3Com BBS)
■
3Com Facts Automated Fax Service
SM
To access the latest networking information on the 3Com Corporation World Wide
Web site enter this URL into your Internet browser:
http://www.3com.com/
This service provides access to online support information such as technical
documentation and software library, as well as support options that range from
technical education to maintenance and professional services.
3Com Knowledgebase
Web Services
3Com FTP Site
This interactive tool contains technical product information compiled by 3Com
expert technical engineers around the globe. Located on the World Wide Web at
http://knowledgebase.3com.com, this service gives all 3Com customers and
partners complementary, round-the-clock access to technical information on most
3Com products.
Download drivers, patches, software, and MIBs across the Internet from the 3Com
public FTP site. This service is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
To connect to the 3Com FTP site, enter the following information into your FTP
client:
■
Hostname: ftp.3com.com
■
Username: anonymous
■
Password: <your Internet e-mail address>
44
APPENDIX A: TECHNICAL SUPPORT
You do not need a user name and password with Web browser software such as
Netscape Navigator and Internet Explorer.
3Com Bulletin Board
Service
The 3Com BBS contains patches, software, and drivers for 3Com products. This
service is available through analog modem or digital modem (ISDN) 24 hours a
day, 7 days a week.
Access by Analog Modem
To reach the service by modem, set your modem to 8 data bits, no parity, and
1 stop bit. Call the telephone number nearest you:
Country
Data Rate
Telephone Number
Country
Data Rate
Telephone Number
Australia
Up to 14,400 bps
61 2 9955 2073
Japan
Up to 14,400 bps
81 3 5977 7977
Brazil
Up to 28,800 bps
55 11 5181 9666
Mexico
Up to 28,800 bps
52 5 520 7835
France
Up to 14,400 bps
33 1 6986 6954
P.R. of China
Up to 14,400 bps
86 10 684 92351
Germany
Up to 28,800 bps
4989 62732 188
Taiwan, R.O.C.
Up to 14,400 bps
886 2 377 5840
Hong Kong
Up to 14,400 bps
852 2537 5601
U.K.
Up to 28,800 bps
44 1442 438278
Italy
Up to 14,400 bps
39 2 27300680
U.S.A.
Up to 53,333 bps
1 847 262 6000
Access by Digital Modem
ISDN users can dial in to the 3Com BBS using a digital modem for fast access up to
64 Kbps. To access the 3Com BBS using ISDN, call the following number:
1 847 262 6000
3Com Facts Automated
Fax Service
The 3Com Facts automated fax service provides technical articles, diagrams, and
troubleshooting instructions on 3Com products 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
Call 3Com Facts using your Touch-Tone telephone:
1 408 727 7021
Support from Your
Network Supplier
If you require additional assistance, contact your network supplier. Many suppliers
are authorized 3Com service partners who are qualified to provide a variety of
services, including network planning, installation, hardware maintenance,
application training, and support services.
When you contact your network supplier for assistance, have the following
information ready:
■
Product model name, part number, and serial number
■
A list of system hardware and software, including revision levels
■
Diagnostic error messages
■
Details about recent configuration changes, if applicable
If you are unable to contact your network supplier, see the following section on
how to contact 3Com.
Support from 3Com
Support from 3Com
45
If you are unable to obtain assistance from the 3Com online technical resources or
from your network supplier, 3Com offers technical telephone support services. To
find out more about your support options, please the 3Com technical telephone
support phone number at the location nearest you.
When you contact 3Com for assistance, have the following information ready:
■
Product model name, part number, and serial number
■
A list of system hardware and software, including revision levels
■
Diagnostic error messages
■
Details about recent configuration changes, if applicable
Here is a list of worldwide technical telephone support numbers:
Country
Telephone Number
Country
Telephone Number
Asia Pacific Rim
Australia
Hong Kong
India
Indonesia
Japan
Malaysia
New Zealand
Pakistan
Philippines
1 800 678 515
800 933 486
+61 2 9937 5085
001 800 61 009
0031 61 6439
1800 801 777
0800 446 398
+61 2 9937 5085
1235 61 266 2602
P.R. of China
10800 61 00137 or
021 6350 1590
800 6161 463
Europe
From anywhere in Europe, call:
Singapore
S. Korea
From anywhere in S. Korea:
From Seoul:
Taiwan, R.O.C.
Thailand
00798 611 2230
(0)2 3455 6455
0080 611 261
001 800 611 2000
+31 (0)30 6029900 phone
+31 (0)30 6029999 fax
Europe, South Africa, and Middle East
From the following countries, you may use the toll-free numbers:
Austria
Belgium
Denmark
Finland
France
Germany
Hungary
Ireland
Israel
Italy
0800 297468
0800 71429
800 17309
0800 113153
0800 917959
0800 1821502
00800 12813
1800 553117
1800 9453794
1678 79489
Netherlands
Norway
Poland
Portugal
South Africa
Spain
Sweden
Switzerland
U.K.
0800 0227788
800 11376
00800 3111206
0800 831416
0800 995014
900 983125
020 795482
0800 55 3072
0800 966197
Latin America
Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Colombia
AT&T +800 666 5065
0800 13 3266
1230 020 0645
98012 2127
Mexico
Peru
Puerto Rico
Venezuela
01 800 CARE (01 800 2273)
AT&T +800 666 5065
800 666 5065
AT&T +800 666 5065
North America
1 800 NET 3Com
(1 800 638 3266)
Enterprise Customers:
1 800 876-3266
46
APPENDIX A: TECHNICAL SUPPORT
Returning Products
for Repair
Before you send a product directly to 3Com for repair, you must first obtain an
authorization number. Products sent to 3Com without authorization numbers will
be returned to the sender unopened, at the sender’s expense.
To obtain an authorization number, call or fax:
Country
Telephone Number
Fax Number
Asia, Pacific Rim
+65 543 6500
+65 543 6348
Europe, South Africa, and
Middle East
+31 30 6029900
+31 30 6029999
Latin America
1 408 326 2927
1 408 326 3355
From the following countries, you may call the toll-free numbers; select option 2 and then
option 2:
Austria
Belgium
Denmark
Finland
France
Germany
Hungary
Ireland
Israel
Italy
Netherlands
Norway
Poland
Portugal
South Africa
Spain
Sweden
Switzerland
U.K.
0800 297468
0800 71429
800 17309
0800 113153
0800 917959
0800 1821502
00800 12813
1800 553117
1800 9453794
1678 79489
0800 0227788
800 11376
00800 3111206
0800 831416
0800 995014
900 983125
020 795482
0800 55 3072
0800 966197
U.S.A. and Canada
1 800 NET 3Com
(1 800 638 3266)
Enterprise Customers:
1 800 876 3266
23 MAR 99
1 408 326 7120
(not toll-free)
47
INDEX
Numerics
3Com bulletin board service (3Com
BBS) 44
3Com URL 43
3ComFacts 44
A
abbreviated command syntax 22, 24
address formats
media
AppleTalk 32
Frame Relay 31
ISDN 32
MAC 30
SMDS 31
X.25 31
network layer
DECnet 32
Internet 32
IP 32
IPX 33
OSI 33
VIP 33
XNS 34
addresses
Internet, assigning to bridge/router 37
Internet, assigning to switch 37
IP, obtaining 39
media 30
specifying 27, 30
aliases 26
AppleTalk address format 32
attributes, parameter 27
B
Boot Monitor 13
Boot command 13
BT command 13
boot source, setting up Primary 14
bridge/router
assigning IP addresses 37
logging on 14, 18
security 41
setting
system administrator
information 36
time and date 36
user interface 19
BT command 14
bulletin board service 44
C
command-line interface
assigning
names 28
numeric values 28
strings 28
attribute assignment rules 27
entering service names 25
help 34
privilege level 27
short cuts
using aliases 26
using history substitution 26
specifying values, set members, or
addresses 27
syntax
abbreviated 22, 24
full form 22, 24
symbols used 23
variations 25, 29
using 21
when to use 19
Commands
Boot 13
BT 13
menu 20
ReBoot 15
SysconF 15
SysPassWord 41
commands
accessing 19
history of substitution 26
MEnu 20
COMmunity parameter 41
Configuration files 15
configuration parameters 34
conventions
notice icons, About This Guide 6
string values 28
text, About This Guide 6
values
names 28
numerics 28
CurrentPorts parameter 25
CurrentServices parameter 25
D
DECnet address format 32
Default primary boot source 13
displays, ports 25
Dual Processor Engine, See DPE 40 and DPE
80
Dump Destination parameter
System Configuration menu 15
E
event designators 26
EZBuilt preassembled NETBuilder II 7
I
Initial Boot 9
Installing software 9
Internet address
assigning to a bridge 37
assigning to bridge/router 38
assigning to switch 38
format 32
internet address
obtaining 39
IP routing setup 18
IPX address format 33
ISDN
address format 32
syntax variation 29
L
logging on
as root 18
switch
logging on 14
from console 17
M
MAC address format 30
media addresses 30
MEnu command 20, 21
menu-driven interface
accessing 20
limitations 21
limitations (Note) 20
menus, accessing 20
MIBs 43
N
names
assigning 28
service, entering 25
naming restrictions, port/path 29
NetAccess parameter 41
network layer addresses 32
network management 40
Network Manager privilege level
changing password 35
obtaining 35
network service access point. See NSAP
network supplier support 44
NSAP 33
numeric values, assigning 28
O
F
fax service (3ComFacts) 44
formats, address 30
Frame Relay address format 31
online help 34
online technical services 43
OSI address format 33
P
H
help menu 34
history substitution 26
parameters
information displayed on selection 21
values
assigning 28
storing 34
passwords, changing 35
48
paths
naming restrictions 29
using instance identifiers 29
ports
naming restrictions 29
syntax conventions 26
using instance identifiers 29
privilege level
changing 35
changing SNMP access to files 40
obtaining Network Manager 35
to access commands and
parameters 27
Q
question mark(?) help command 34
R
ReBoot command 15
RemoteManager parameter 41
repeating displayed commands 26
restrictions, naming 29
returning products for repair 46
root login 17
S
security 41
service names, entering 25
services, selecting 19
set members, specifying 27
Simple Network Management Protocol. See
SNMP
SNMP
changing manager access to files 40
displaying/modifying system
parameters 40
strings
case-sensitivity 28
entering 28
using as instance identifiers 29
switch
assigning IP addresses 37
logging on 18
security 41
setting
system administrator
information 36
time and date 36
user interface 19
syntax, command
abbreviated 22, 24
assigning parameter values 28
full form 22, 24
ISDN variation 29
symbols used 23
variations 25
SysconF command 15
SysPassWord command 41
system administrator information,
setting 36
System Configuration menu 15
Dump Destination parameter 15
T
technical support
3Com URL 43
bulletin board service 44
fax service 44
network suppliers 44
product repair 46
time and date, setting 36
U
URL 43
user interface
command-line 19
menu-driven 19
V
values
assigning numeric 28
specifying 27
storing parameter 34
syntax for assigning 28
VIP address format 33
virtual ports
displaying 25
functionality (Note) 26
syntax conventions 26
W
World Wide Web (WWW) 43
X
X.25 address format 31
XNS address format 34
3Com Corporation LIMITED WARRANTY
HARDWARE
3Com warrants its hardware products to be free from defects in workmanship and materials, under normal use and service, for
the following lengths of time from the date of purchase from 3Com or its authorized reseller:
Network Interface Cards
Lifetime
Other hardware products
*unless otherwise specified above
1 year*
Spare parts and spares kits
90 days
If a product does not operate as warranted above during the applicable warranty period, 3Com shall, at its option and expense,
repair the defective product or part, deliver to Customer an equivalent product or part to replace the defective item, or refund
to Customer the purchase price paid for the defective product. All products that are replaced will become the property of
3Com. Replacement products may be new or reconditioned. Any replaced or repaired product or part has a ninety (90) day
warranty or the remainder of the initial warranty period, whichever is longer.
SOFTWARE
3Com warrants that the software programs licensed from it will perform in substantial conformance to the program
specifications therefor for a period of ninety (90) days from the date of purchase from 3Com or its authorized reseller. 3Com
warrants the media containing software against failure during the warranty period. No updates are provided. 3Com’s sole
obligation with respect to this express warranty shall be (at 3Com’s discretion) to refund the purchase price paid by Customer
for any defective software products, or to replace any defective media with software which substantially conforms to applicable
3Com published specifications. Customer assumes responsibility for the selection of the appropriate applications program and
associated reference materials. 3Com makes no warranty or representation that its software products will meet Customer’s
requirements or work in combination with any hardware or applications software products provided by third parties, that the
operation of the software products will be uninterrupted or error free, or that all defects in the software products will be
corrected. For any third party products listed in the 3Com software product documentation or specifications as being
compatible, 3Com will make reasonable efforts to provide compatibility, except where the non-compatibility is caused by a
“bug” or defect in the third party's product.
YEAR 2000 WARRANTY
In addition to the Hardware Products Warranty and Software Products Warranty identified above, 3Com warrants that all
Heritage 3Com products sold or licensed to Customer on and after January 1, 1998 that are date sensitive will continue
performing properly with regard to such date data on and after January 1, 2000, provided that all other products used by
Customer in connection or combination with the 3Com products, including hardware, software, and firmware, accurately
exchange date data with the 3Com products, with the exception of those products identified at 3Com’s Web site,
http://www.3com.com/products/yr2000.html, as not meeting this standard. A product is considered a “Heritage 3Com product”
if it is a member of a product family which was manufactured by 3Com prior to its merger with US Robotics Corporation. This
Year 2000 limited warranty does not apply to Heritage US Robotics Corporation products. If it appears that any such product
does not perform properly with regard to such date data on and after January 1, 2000, and Customer notifies 3Com before the
later of April 1, 2000, or ninety (90) days after purchase of the product from 3Com or its authorized reseller, 3Com shall, at its
option and expense, provide a software update which would effect the proper performance of such product, repair such
product, deliver to Customer an equivalent product to replace such product, or if none of the foregoing is feasible, refund to
Customer the purchase price paid for such product.
Any software update or replaced or repaired product will carry a Year 2000 Warranty for ninety (90) days or until April 1, 2000,
whichever is later.
OBTAINING WARRANTY
SERVICE
Customer must contact 3Com’s Corporate Service Center or an Authorized 3Com Service Center within the applicable
warranty period to obtain warranty service authorization. Dated proof of purchase may be required. Products returned to
3Com’s Corporate Service Center must be pre-authorized by 3Com with a Return Material Authorization (RMA) number
marked on the outside of the package, and sent prepaid and packaged appropriately for safe shipment, and it is recommended
that they be insured. The repaired or replaced item will be shipped to Customer, at 3Com’s expense, not later than thirty (30)
days after receipt of the defective product by 3Com.
Dead- or Defective-on-Arrival. In the event a product completely fails to function or exhibits a defect in materials or
workmanship within the first forty-eight (48) hours of installation but no later than thirty (30) days after the date of purchase,
and this is verified by 3Com, it will be considered dead- or defective-on-arrival (DOA) and a replacement shall be provided by
advance replacement. The replacement product will normally be shipped not later than three (3) business days after 3Com’s
verification of the DOA product, but may be delayed due to export or import procedures. When an advance replacement is
provided and Customer fails to return the defective product to 3Com within fifteen (15) days after shipment of the
replacement, 3Com will charge Customer for the replacement product, at list price.
3Com shall not be responsible for any software, firmware, information, or memory data of Customer contained in, stored on,
or integrated with any products returned to 3Com for repair, whether under warranty or not.
WARRANTIES EXCLUSIVE
IF A 3COM PRODUCT DOES NOT OPERATE AS WARRANTED ABOVE, CUSTOMER’S SOLE REMEDY FOR BREACH OF THAT
WARRANTY SHALL BE REPAIR, REPLACEMENT, OR REFUND OF THE PURCHASE PRICE PAID, AT 3COM’S OPTION. TO THE FULL
EXTENT ALLOWED BY LAW, THE FOREGOING WARRANTIES AND REMEDIES ARE EXCLUSIVE AND ARE IN LIEU OF ALL OTHER
WARRANTIES, TERMS, OR CONDITIONS, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, EITHER IN FACT OR BY OPERATION OF LAW, STATUTORY OR
OTHERWISE, INCLUDING WARRANTIES, TERMS, OR CONDITIONS OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR
PURPOSE, AND SATISFACTORY QUALITY. 3COM NEITHER ASSUMES NOR AUTHORIZES ANY OTHER PERSON TO ASSUME FOR
IT ANY OTHER LIABILITY IN CONNECTION WITH THE SALE, INSTALLATION, MAINTENANCE OR USE OF ITS PRODUCTS.
3COM SHALL NOT BE LIABLE UNDER THIS WARRANTY IF ITS TESTING AND EXAMINATION DISCLOSE THAT THE ALLEGED
DEFECT IN THE PRODUCT DOES NOT EXIST OR WAS CAUSED BY CUSTOMER’S OR ANY THIRD PERSON'S MISUSE, NEGLECT,
IMPROPER INSTALLATION OR TESTING, UNAUTHORIZED ATTEMPTS TO REPAIR OR MODIFY, OR ANY OTHER CAUSE BEYOND
THE RANGE OF THE INTENDED USE, OR BY ACCIDENT, FIRE, LIGHTNING, OR OTHER HAZARD.
LIMITATION OF LIABILITY
TO THE FULL EXTENT ALLOWED BY LAW, 3COM ALSO EXCLUDES FOR ITSELF AND ITS SUPPLIERS ANY LIABILITY, WHETHER
BASED IN CONTRACT OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE), FOR INCIDENTAL, CONSEQUENTIAL, INDIRECT, SPECIAL, OR
PUNITIVE DAMAGES OF ANY KIND, OR FOR LOSS OF REVENUE OR PROFITS, LOSS OF BUSINESS, LOSS OF INFORMATION OR
DATA, OR OTHER FINANCIAL LOSS ARISING OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SALE, INSTALLATION, MAINTENANCE,
USE, PERFORMANCE, FAILURE, OR INTERRUPTION OF ITS PRODUCTS, EVEN IF 3COM OR ITS AUTHORIZED RESELLER HAS BEEN
ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES, AND LIMITS ITS LIABILITY TO REPAIR, REPLACEMENT, OR REFUND OF THE
PURCHASE PRICE PAID, AT 3COM’S OPTION. THIS DISCLAIMER OF LIABILITY FOR DAMAGES WILL NOT BE AFFECTED IF ANY
REMEDY PROVIDED HEREIN SHALL FAIL OF ITS ESSENTIAL PURPOSE.
DISCLAIMER
Some countries, states, or provinces do not allow the exclusion or limitation of implied warranties or the limitation of incidental
or consequential damages for certain products supplied to consumers or the limitation of liability for personal injury, so the
above limitations and exclusions may be limited in their application to you. When the implied warranties are not allowed to be
excluded in their entirety, they will be limited to the duration of the applicable written warranty. This warranty gives you
specific legal rights which may vary depending on local law.
GOVERNING LAW
This Limited Warranty shall be governed by the laws of the State of California, U.S.A. excluding its conflicts of laws principles
and excluding the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods.
3Com Corporation, 5400 Bayfront Plaza, Santa Clara, CA 95052-8145 (408) 764-5000
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