3Com NBX 100 Owner's Manual

3Com NBX 100 Owner's Manual
NBX Administrator’s Guide
®
Release 4.2
http://www.3com.com/
Part Number 900-0130-01 Rev AA
Published: October 2003
■
SuperStack 3 NBX
■
NBX 100
3Com Corporation
350 Campus Drive
Marlborough, MA
01752-3064
Copyright © 2003, 3Com Corporation. All rights reserved. No part of this documentation may be reproduced
in any form or by any means or used to make any derivative work (such as translation, transformation, or
adaptation) without written permission from 3Com Corporation.
3Com Corporation reserves the right to revise this documentation and to make changes in content from time
to time without obligation on the part of 3Com Corporation to provide notification of such revision or change.
3Com Corporation provides this documentation without warranty, term, or condition of any kind, either
implied or expressed, including, but not limited to, the implied warranties, terms, or conditions of
merchantability, satisfactory quality, and fitness for a particular purpose. 3Com may make improvements or
changes in the product(s) and/or the program(s) described in this documentation at any time.
If there is any software on removable media described in this documentation, it is furnished under a license
agreement included with the product as a separate document, in the hardcopy documentation, or on the
removable media in a directory file named LICENSE.TXT or !LICENSE.TXT. If you are unable to locate a copy,
please contact 3Com and a copy will be provided to you.
UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT LEGEND
If you are a United States government agency, then this documentation and the software described herein are
provided to you subject to the following:
All technical data and computer software are commercial in nature and developed solely at private expense.
Software is delivered as “Commercial Computer Software” as defined in DFARS 252.227-7014 (June 1995) or
as a “commercial item” as defined in FAR 2.101(a) and as such is provided with only such rights as are
provided in 3Com’s standard commercial license for the Software. Technical data is provided with limited rights
only as provided in DFAR 252.227-7015 (Nov 1995) or FAR 52.227-14 (June 1987), whichever is applicable.
You agree not to remove or deface any portion of any legend provided on any licensed program or
documentation contained in, or delivered to you in conjunction with, this guide.
Unless otherwise indicated, 3Com registered trademarks are registered in the United States and may or may
not be registered in other countries.
3Com, NBX, the 3Com logo, and SuperStack are registered trademarks of 3Com Corporation. NBX NetSet and
pcXset are trademarks of 3Com Corporation.
Adobe is a trademark and Adobe Acrobat is a registered trademark of Adobe Systems Incorporated.
InstallShield is a registered trademark of InstallShield Software Corporation. 5ESS is a registered trademark and
4ESS is a trademark of Lucent Technologies. Microsoft, Windows, Windows 2000, and Windows NT are
registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.
All other company and product names may be trademarks of the respective companies with which they are
associated.
CONTENTS
ABOUT THIS GUIDE
How to Use This Guide 15
Conventions 16
International Terminology 16
Your Comments 17
1
INTRODUCTION
Network-based Telephony 19
Overview of the System Software 20
Auto Attendant 20
Auto Discovery and Auto Relocation 20
Virtual Tie Lines 20
Integrated Voice Mail and Messaging Features
Redialing From Call Logs 21
Call Recording 21
NBX NetSet Administration Utility 22
NBX NetSet Features 23
2
DIAL PLAN
Dial Plan Concepts and Overview 28
Call Process Flow 29
Inbound and Outbound Call Processing
NBX System Database 30
NBX System Dial Plan 30
Pretranslation 31
29
20
Routing 31
System Features Affected by the Dial Plan Configuration 32
Dial Plan Tables 34
Dial Plan Command Format 34
Internal Dial Plan Table 38
Incoming Dial Plan Table 38
Least Cost Routing Dial Plan Table 39
Adding New Dial Plan Tables 40
Dial Plan Pretranslators 40
Pretranslators for Incoming Calls 41
Pretranslators for Certain Outgoing Calls 42
Managing the Dial Plan Configuration File 44
Accessing the Dial Plan 44
Creating Dial Plan Configuration Files 44
Importing and Exporting Dial Plan Configuration Files 45
Importing a User-Defined Dial Plan 47
Exporting (Saving) a Dial Plan Configuration File 48
Testing a Dial Plan 49
Generating a Dial Plan Report 50
Modifying a Dial Plan Configuration File 51
Outdialing Prefix Settings 52
Managing Extensions 52
Extension Settings Overview 52
Changing Extension Length and Ranges 56
How Auto Discovery Assigns Extensions 56
Modifying Extensions 57
Managing Extension Lists 58
Adding an Extension List 60
Modifying an Extension List 61
Removing an Extension List 62
Managing Dial Plan Tables 62
Determining Which Devices Use Dial Plan Tables 63
Removing a Dial Plan Table 64
Managing Dial Plan Pretranslators 64
Identifying Devices Using Pretranslators 64
Identifying Devices Using Pretranslators for CLI 65
Removing a Pretranslator from the Dial Plan 65
Configuring the Dial Plan for the 4ESS Protocol (T1) 66
Overview of Voice Profile for Internet Mail 67
Configuring the Dial Plan for VPIM 68
Configuring VPIM Parameters Using NBX NetSet 71
VPIM Control Parameters 71
Operations Management 71
Statistics 73
Advanced Settings 74
Configuring Domain Name Server Information 77
Overview of Virtual Tie Lines 77
VTL Connections Using Unique Extension Ranges 78
VTL Connections Using Site Codes 79
Conference Calls 80
How to Configure a Virtual Tie Line 81
License Installation 81
Dial Plan Configuration 82
Updating the Extension List 85
Adding VTL Devices to the Pretranslators (Optional) 86
Verification of the Virtual Tie Line 87
Call Rerouting for Virtual Tie Lines 90
Example Dial Plan Entries 90
Managing Existing Virtual Tie Lines 92
Modifying a Virtual Tie Line Name 92
Viewing and Resetting Virtual Tie Line Statistics 93
Enabling Audio Compression 94
Enabling System-wide Silence Suppression 94
Using a VTL Password 95
Configuring a VTL Password 95
Configuring VTL Passwords in the Dial Plan 96
Toll Calls Without a VTL Password 99
Music On Hold 99
Troubleshooting VTL Calls 99
Dial Plan Configuration File Commands 100
Dial Plan Command Summary 100
List of Dial Plan Commands 103
Sample Solutions Using Dial Plan Configuration File Commands
116
3
DEVICE CONFIGURATION
Adding, Removing, and Modifying Telephones 126
Adding a New Telephone 126
Modifying a Telephone 131
Checking a Telephone’s Status 131
Removing a Telephone 133
Rebooting a Telephone 133
Adding a Remote Telephone 134
Remote NAPT Device Configuration 134
Creating and Managing Bridged Extensions 135
Example Bridged Extensions Configurations 137
Defining Bridged Extensions 138
Defining Bridged Extensions on a Primary Telephone 138
Defining Bridged Extensions on a Secondary Telephone 139
Modifying Bridged Extensions 140
Sample Calling Situations Using Bridged Extensions 140
Viewing Bridged Extension Information 142
Creating and Managing Telephone Groups 143
Creating a New Telephone Group 143
Modifying a Telephone Group 143
Removing a Telephone Group 144
Viewing Telephone Group Membership 144
Recording and Monitoring Telephone Calls 144
Recording Calls Between Telephones with Different Recording Settings
145
Remote Telephones 146
Music On Hold 146
Non-NBX Telephones 146
Creating and Managing Button Mappings 147
Mapping Access Buttons 147
Mappings for Users and Groups 148
Creating a Busy Lamp/Speed Dial Button Mapping 148
Creating a Delayed Ringing Pattern 149
Creating Groups and Button Mappings 150
Changing Device IP Settings 161
Configuring Call Park 162
Adding a Call Park Extension 162
Changing the Name of a Call Park Extension 163
Removing a Call Park Extension 163
Configuring the NBX 1105 Attendant Console 163
Adding an Attendant Console 164
Modifying an Attendant Console 165
Viewing Attendant Console Status 165
Removing an Attendant Console 167
Configuring Attendant Console Buttons 167
Changing Attendant Console IP Settings 186
Configuring and Managing Analog Line Card Ports 186
Configuring a Line Card Port 187
Modifying a Line Card Port 191
Removing a Line Card Port 192
Verifying Line Card Port Status 192
Rebooting a Line Card Port 194
Advanced Settings 195
Connecting and Managing Analog Devices 199
Adding an Analog Terminal Card 199
Adding an Analog Terminal Adapter (ATA) 201
Modifying an Analog Terminal Port 203
Removing an Analog Terminal Adapter 205
Viewing The Status of an Analog Terminal Adapter 206
Advanced Settings 207
Configuring and Managing BRI-ST Digital Line Cards 213
Adding an ISDN BRI-ST Digital Line Card 213
Configuring the BRI-ST Digital Line Card 216
BRI-ST Card Status Lights 218
Modifying a BRI-ST Card 219
Adding or Modifying a BRI Group 220
Modifying BRI Card Channels 223
Modifying IP Settings for a BRI Card 225
Removing a BRI Digital Line Card 225
Configuring and Managing E1 Digital Line Cards 226
Adding an E1 Digital Line Card 227
Configuring the E1 Digital Line Card 229
E1 Card Status Lights 231
Modifying an E1 Card 231
Adding or Modifying an E1 Group 234
Modifying E1 Card Channels 237
Modifying IP Settings for an E1 Card 239
Removing an E1 Digital Line Card 240
Configuring and Managing T1 Digital Line Cards 240
Adding a T1 Digital Line Card 241
Configuring a T1 Digital Line Card for the DS1 Protocol 244
Configuring a T1 Digital Line Card for ISDN PRI Signaling 248
T1 Card Status Lights 252
Modifying a T1 Card 252
Support of AT&T’s 4ESS Switch Protocol 254
Modifying a T1 Group 257
Modifying T1 Card Channels 259
Modifying IP Settings for a T1 Card 261
Removing a T1 Digital Line Card 261
4
USER CONFIGURATION
Users 263
Phantom Mailboxes 263
Call Pickup 264
Group Numbers 264
TAPI Route Points 265
Redirect Behaviors 265
TAPI Route Point Capacities 267
Creating a TAPI Route Point 267
Modifying a TAPI Route Point 268
Viewing TAPI Route Point Statistics 269
Specifying TAPI Line Redirect Timeout 270
Hunt Groups 271
Hunt Group Considerations 271
Linear and Circular Hunt Groups 272
Calling Groups 272
Call Coverage 273
Class of Service (CoS) 273
5
SYSTEM CONFIGURATION
System Settings 275
System-wide Settings 277
Audio Settings 280
Regional Settings 282
Date and Time 283
Timers 283
Ringing Patterns 284
Multicast Addresses 285
IP Addresses 286
Maintenance Alerts 286
Speed Dials 287
Business Identity 288
Business Information 288
Business Hours 288
System Mode 288
Security 289
TAPI Settings 289
Disk Mirroring 290
Adding a Mirror Disk 290
Verifying a Failed Disk Drive 292
Reverting to a Single-Disk System 293
6
NBX MESSAGING
NBX Voice Mail 295
Voice Mail Extensions 298
Voice Mail Passwords 298
IMAP for Integrated Voice Mail
Off-Site Notification 300
Status 301
Port Usage 302
User Usage 306
Auto Attendant 307
298
Overview of Auto Attendant Features
Adding an Auto Attendant 308
Managing Auto Attendants 319
Voice Application Setup Utility 321
Testing the Auto Attendant 322
Voice Profile for Internet Mail 323
Control Parameters 324
Operations Management 324
Statistics 326
Advanced Settings 327
7
307
OPERATIONS
Software Upgrade 331
System Software Licensing 332
Restricted Operation 333
Considerations 334
Customer Service 335
Reboot/Shutdown 335
Manage Data 335
Backup 336
Restore 338
Convert Database 339
Purge Database 339
Purge Database and CDR 339
Purge All Voice Mail 339
Event Log 339
Licenses 340
Add a License 340
Remove a License 341
Usage Report 341
Backing Up Licenses 341
Restoring Backed-Up Licenses 341
Obtaining Details of License History 342
Regional Software 342
Install 342
Remove 343
Details 343
Third-Party Drivers 344
NBX Software Upgrades 344
Third-Party Telephone Groups 344
8
REPORTS
Directory 345
Device List 346
System Data 346
Disk Status 346
Power Supply Status 346
Call Reporting 347
Windows Environment Specifications
Installing Call Reports 347
Configuring Call Reporting 348
Purge CDR 348
9
347
DOWNLOADS
Software 349
Additional Applications 349
Label Makers 350
Quick Reference Guides 350
10
TROUBLESHOOTING
Overview 351
Telephone Troubleshooting 352
Using the Telephone Local User Interface (LUI) Utility
Using H3PingIP 359
System-level Troubleshooting 360
Digital Line Card Troubleshooting 363
Alarm Conditions (Overview) 363
352
Alarm Descriptions 364
Alarms on NBX Digital Line Cards 365
Configuration and Status Reports 366
Connecting a Computer to a Serial Port 370
Servicing the Network Call Processor Battery 371
Getting Service and Support 372
A
INTEGRATING THIRD-PARTY MESSAGING
Installing Software on the Third-Party Messaging Server
Configuring the NBX System 373
Configuring NBXTSP on the Server 375
373
B
ISDN COMPLETION CAUSE CODES
C
CONFIGURING OPTION 184 ON A WINDOWS 2000 DHCP
SERVER
Overview 383
Assumptions 383
Creating Option 184 383
Editing Option 184 Values 384
Activating Option 184 385
D
CONNEXTIONS H.323 GATEWAY
Overview of ConneXtions 388
Installation Requirements 388
WAN Router 388
Windows-based System 389
ConneXtions Software 392
Preparing for Installation 392
Assembling System Information 392
Verifying the G.723 Converter 393
Checking Service Pack (Windows NT Only)
393
Configuring Licenses 393
Installing ConneXtions 395
Finishing the Installation 397
Overview of H.323 398
Negotiated Connections 398
Negotiated Voice Compression 399
Standard Extensions 400
Remote Internet Device Connections 400
The H.323 Connection 401
Connection Considerations 402
Overall Connectivity 402
Quality of Service 403
Quality of Service Control 406
Special Issues 408
Firewall Security 408
Gateway Load 410
Remote Access 410
PBX Connections 411
Class of Service 414
IP Type of Service and Differentiated Services
Alternate Gatekeepers 415
Checking Connections 415
Gateway Checks 415
Network Checks 416
Placing Calls 420
IP Address Entry 420
Speed Dials 421
One Button Access 423
Entering Digits During Calls 423
Receiving Calls 424
Auto Attendant 424
Attendant Console 425
Other Extensions 425
Handling Conference Calls 426
Related H.323 Documentation 426
414
E
CALLER ID
Forwarded Calls and Caller ID 427
Long Caller ID Character Strings 427
Specific Caller ID Situations 428
Analog Telephones 428
Bridged Extension Telephones 429
Calls That Are Forwarded Multiple Times
External Calls 429
Internal Calls 431
Nortel Phones 431
Parked Calls 431
Second Incoming Call 431
TAPI Calls 431
TAPI Redirected Calls 431
VTL Calls 431
Calls Transferred to Hunt Groups 431
429
GLOSSARY
INDEX
FCC CLASS A VERIFICATION STATEMENT
INDUSTRY CANADA NOTICE
3COM END-USER SOFTWARE LICENSE AGREEMENT TERMS AND
CONDITIONS AND LIMITED WARRANTY
ABOUT THIS GUIDE
This guide describes how to configure and manage the SuperStack® 3
NBX® and the NBX® 100 Networked Telephony Solutions. For information
about installing either system for the first time, see the NBX Installation
Guide.
If the information in the release notes differs from the information in this
guide, follow the instructions in the release notes. Release notes are
available on the NBX Resource Pack CD and the 3Com Partner Access
Web Site.
How to Use
This Guide
Table 1 can help you find information in this guide.
Table 1 Overview of This Guide
If you are looking for
Turn to
An overview of the NBX systems
Chapter 1
How to prepare and configure the dial plan
Chapter 2
How to configure devices
Chapter 3
How to configure user settings
Chapter 4
How to configure system settings
Chapter 5
How to configure NBX Voice Messaging (voice mail), the Auto
Attendant, and Voice Profile for Internet Mail (VPIM)
Chapter 6
Basic operations information
Chapter 7
How to create reports
Chapter 8
How to download software and label makers
Chapter 9
Troubleshooting information
Chapter 10
Using a third-party messaging system
Appendix A
Information about ISDN Completion Cause Codes
Appendix B
How to configure Option 184 on a Windows 2000 DHCP server
Appendix C
How to configure 3Com ConneXtions software
Appendix D
16
ABOUT THIS GUIDE
Table 1 Overview of This Guide
If you are looking for
Turn to
Called ID behavior
Appendix E
Definitions of telephony and networking terms
Glossary
References to all topics in this book
Index
FCC and Industry Canada information, Software End-User License End of the book
Agreement, and Limited Warranty for Software and Hardware
Conventions
Table 2 lists conventions that are used throughout this guide.
Table 2 Notice Icons
Icon
International
Terminology
Notice Type
Description
Information note
Information that describes important features
or instructions.
Caution
Information that alerts you to potential loss of
data or potential damage to an application,
device, system, or network.
Warning
Information that alerts you to potential personal
injury.
Table 3 lists the United States and international equivalents of some of the
specialized terms that are used in the NBX documentation.
Table 3 International Terminology
Term used in U.S.
Term used outside the U.S.
Toll restrictions
Call barring
Pound key (#)
Hash key (#)
CO (central office)
Telephone Exchange
Toll-free
Free-phone
Analog Line Card
Analog Trunk Line Interface Module
Your Comments
Your Comments
Your suggestions are important to us. They help us to make the NBX
documentation more useful to you.
Send comments about this guide or any of the 3Com NBX
documentation and Help systems to:
[email protected]
Please include the following information with your comments:
■
Document title
■
Document part number (found on the front or back page)
■
Page number
Example:
NBX Administrator’s Guide
Part Number 900-0130-01 Rev AA
Page 25
As always, address all questions regarding the NBX hardware and
software to your authorized 3Com NBX Voice - Authorized Partner.
17
18
ABOUT THIS GUIDE
1
INTRODUCTION
The NBX Administrator’s Guide explains how to configure your NBX®
system. This chapter covers these topics:
■
Network-based Telephony
■
Overview of the System Software
■
NBX NetSet Administration Utility
■
NBX NetSet Features
For information about installing hardware components, see the
NBX Installation Guide.
Network-based
Telephony
3Com Networked Telephony Solutions merge telephony with networking
by delivering business telephone service over a data network.
To the telephone user, an NBX Telephone is a typical office telephone. You
can use it to make and receive calls, transfer calls, park calls, use voice
mail, and so on. Inside, the NBX Telephone is an Ethernet device that can
communicate over the LAN using Ethernet frames or, with the optional
upgrade, IP packets. The telephone also serves as an Ethernet switch or
hub (depending on the model of telephone) for your computer. You can
connect your computer network interface card (NIC) to your network
(LAN) through the telephone and avoid the need for a second LAN
connection at the desktop.
The core of 3Com Networked Telephony Solutions is the Network Call
Processor (NCP). The NCP manages the processes of making and
receiving calls, providing voice mail and auto attendant services, and
responding to requests for special services, such as access to the
NBX NetSet administration utility, Computer Telephony Integration (CTI)
services, or the system’s IMAP (Internet Message Access Protocol) server.
20
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
The NBX system provides the reliability required in a business environment
because NBX system voice traffic is independent of computer traffic on
the same network. In fact, after the NCP completes the processing
required to connect two telephones, the telephones communicate
directly with each other. Therefore, existing conversations are not
affected if power to the NCP fails.
Overview of the
System Software
Auto Attendant
Auto Discovery and
Auto Relocation
Virtual Tie Lines
This section describes the major features of the NBX system.
With the Auto Attendant, a full-featured call answering service, you set
up automated call answering, including multiple Auto Attendants, each
with separate menu structures, to manage incoming calls.
The Network Call Processor and the NBX Telephones communicate with
each other to streamline configuration. When you connect a new
telephone, the system discovers it and adds it to the configuration
database. The communication between devices means that if telephone
users move their telephones to a new location, the telephones retain their
extension number and personal settings. You do not have to change
telephone addresses and data for them.
You can connect two or more NBX systems that are connected to your
Wide Area Network. Calls made over Virtual Tie Lines incur no toll
charges.
Integrated Voice Mail
and Messaging
Features
NBX Voice Messaging is a standard feature of the 3Com Networked
Telephony Solution. Voice Messaging supports Off-Site Notification,
which alerts you if you receive new voice messages when you are out of
the office. Voice Messaging also includes an IMAP (Internet Message
Access Protocol) mail server that allows you to retrieve voice mail
messages through any IMAP4-compatible e-mail client.
Standard NBX
Telephone Features
NBX systems support the standard features, such as call park, conference,
speed dial, and paging, that you expect in a business telephone system.
Overview of the System Software
21
Redialing From
Call Logs
In the NBX Business Telephone and NBX Basic Telephone display panels,
you can view logs of recent Missed Calls, Answered Calls, and Dialed
Calls. You can select and redial a call from any of these lists, as well as
from the directory of internal users, your personal speed dial list, or the
system-wide speed dial list.
Calling Line Identity
Restriction (CLIR)
When an NBX Telephone user makes a call on an ISDN channel, the
receiving party can see the identity of the caller (normal ISDN behavior).
When the NBX option Calling Line Identity Restriction (CLIR) is enabled,
the receiving party cannot see your identity when you call.
Computer Telephony
Integration (CTI)
Connectivity
3Com Networked Telephony Solutions provide a software-based CTI
solution through the Microsoft Telephony Applications Programming
Interface (TAPI). Your telephone and your computer connect to the same
LAN so that your computer does not need any special hardware, such as
proprietary cards. The NBX system works with TAPI 2.X-compliant CTI
applications.
Call Recording
You can integrate a third-party call recording system into your NBX
system so that selected calls can be recorded. (Optional license required.)
NBX Call Reports
NBX Resource
Pack CD
Support for Multiple
Languages
NBX Call Reports, a Windows client program, is a standard feature of
3Com Networked Telephony Solutions. Call Reports allows you to save
calling data about inbound and outbound calls, present it in a report, or
export it to spreadsheets, word processors, or reporting programs.
3Com Networked Telephony Solutions include the NBX Resource Pack CD
with the most recent system software for backup and upgrade purposes,
optional Microsoft Windows software from 3Com and third-party
vendors, and electronic versions of system documentation.
The NBX system’s Administrator Help is in English, by default, but the
User side of the NetSet administration utility’s Help system can be
configured for other languages. In addition, the three telephone Quick
Reference Cards, the NBX Telephone Guide, and the voice prompts are
available in multiple languages on the NBX Resource Pack CD.
22
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
NBX NetSet
Administration
Utility
The NBX NetSet Administration utility is an HTML-based web interface in
which you configure and manage the NBX system. You need Microsoft
Internet Explorer (version 5.5 or later is optimal) to administer the system.
(You do not need Internet access.)
Figure 1 shows the NBX NetSet - Main Menu window, which appears
when you log on to the NBX NetSet utility.
Figure 1 NBX NetSet - Main Menu Window
NBX systems present the NBX NetSet utility through an embedded web
server. NBX NetSet passwords grant system administrators and users
different levels of access privileges.
Individual telephone users can view or change their personal settings
such as personal speed dial lists, off-site notification settings, and ringing
tones.
System administrators can manage user profiles and devices, change
system parameters, such as speed dial lists and dial plan settings, and
upgrade the system software.
NBX NetSet Features
NBX NetSet
Features
23
Table 4 describes the features that administrators can access through the
NBX NetSet - Main Menu window.
Table 4 NBX NetSet Features for the NBX Administrator
Icon
Description
Configure and manage system-wide NBX Voice Messaging, Auto
Attendants, and VPIM settings. If you install a license for a third-party
messaging application and disable NBX Messaging, this icon is not
available.
Configure and manage NBX devices, such as:
■
Telephones and telephone groups
■
Analog Line Cards
■
Digital Line Cards (T1, E1, and BRI-ST cards)
■
Analog Terminal Adapters (ATAs)
■
Call Park
■
Attendant Consoles
■
Virtual Tie Lines
Configure and manage your system Dial Plan.
Download, install, configure, and manage additional system features,
such as:
■
Optional NBX software, such as NBX Call Reports and TAPI software
■
Multiple Label Makers for telephones and NBX Attendant Consoles
■
Quick Reference Guides for the NBX Business and Basic Telephones,
and analog telephones on the NBX system
■
NBX manuals including the NBX Installation Guide, NBX
Administrator’s Guide, NBX Telephone Guide, and NBX Feature
Codes Guide
24
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
Table 4 NBX NetSet Features (continued)for the NBX Administrator
Icon
Description
Configure and manage these system-level operations:
■
Upgrading software
■
Rebooting and shutting down the NBX system
■
Managing data (database backup and restore)
■
Viewing and managing event log files
■
Viewing and adding licenses for optional features
■
Setting regionally different information (voice-prompt language, dial
tones and cadences, and documentation language)
■
Installing third-party drivers (for example, for telephones other than
NBX Telephones)
View and manage system reports:
■
Directory lists of users
■
Device List
■
System Data
■
Call Reporting
Configure and manage the system-level settings for:
■
System Settings
■
Audio Settings
■
System-wide Speed Dials
■
Business Identity
■
Security
■
TAPI Settings
Configure settings for TAPI (Telephony Applications Programming
Interface). (Can also be configured from the System Configuration icon.)
Configure and manage:
■
Users
■
Call Pickup Groups
■
TAPI Route Points
■
Hunt Groups
■
Class of Service (CoS) Settings for users
NBX NetSet Features
25
Table 5 describes the additional icons that appear on or below the NBX
NetSet - Main Menu window. They are shortcuts to specific areas within
the NBX NetSet utility and to some of the online documentation.
Table 5 NBX NetSet Shortcuts
Icon
Description
The Help icon in the NBX NetSet - Main Menu window provides access
to the Contents, Index, and search features of the online Help system.
The Help icon on individual dialog boxes takes you directly to
content-specific Help in addition to accessing the global Help features.
Displays Tab To It, a window that shows all the tabs for the entire
system. Click on a tab in the Tab to It window to go directly to that tab’s
interface. The Tab To It icon also appears on most dialog boxes
throughout the NBX NetSet utility.
If you install a license for a third-party messaging application, the tab for
NBX Messaging is disabled in the Tab To It window
Opens the online (PDF) version of the NBX Installation Guide. This icon is
available in the NBX NetSet - Main Menu window only.
Opens the online (PDF) version of the NBX Administrator’s Guide (this
book). This icon is available in the NBX NetSet - Main Menu window
only.
Opens the online (PDF) version of the NBX Telephone Guide. This icon is
available in the NBX NetSet - Main Menu window, and below the User
Settings window when users log on to the NBX system.
Opens the online (PDF) version of the NBX Feature Codes Guide. This
icon is available in the NBX NetSet - Main Menu window, and in the
User Settings window when users log on to the NBX system.
Returns you to the NBX NetSet - Main Menu window.
26
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
2
DIAL PLAN
The NBX system’s dial plan determines how the system handles calls. It
defines the set of destinations that the system can reach, how to get to
these destinations, and which telephone numbers to dial to reach these
destinations. This chapter provides information about understanding,
developing, and managing the dial plan. It covers these topics:
■
Dial Plan Concepts and Overview
■
Dial Plan Tables
■
Dial Plan Pretranslators
■
Managing the Dial Plan Configuration File
■
Outdialing Prefix Settings
■
Managing Extensions
■
Managing Extension Lists
■
Managing Dial Plan Tables
■
Managing Dial Plan Pretranslators
■
Configuring the Dial Plan for the 4ESS Protocol (T1)
■
Overview of Voice Profile for Internet Mail
■
Configuring the Dial Plan for VPIM
■
Configuring VPIM Parameters Using NBX NetSet
■
Overview of Virtual Tie Lines
■
How to Configure a Virtual Tie Line
■
Call Rerouting for Virtual Tie Lines
■
Managing Existing Virtual Tie Lines
■
Using a VTL Password
■
Dial Plan Configuration File Commands
■
Sample Solutions Using Dial Plan Configuration File Commands
28
CHAPTER 2: DIAL PLAN
Dial Plan Concepts
and Overview
The dial plan configuration file is an ASCII text file that implements the
dial plan and specifies pretranslation (digit manipulation). The system is
shipped with several default dial plan configuration files, typically, a
3-digit and a 4-digit file for each supported country.
The dial plan configuration file includes several tables:
■
Internal — Must be table ID 1
■
Incoming — Must be table ID 2
■
Least Cost Routing — Must be table ID 3
■
Routes
■
Pretranslators
You can create additional tables if necessary.
Each dial plan table consists of a series of entries, each of which includes
a sequence of digits and the action to be performed by the NBX system in
response to sending or receiving those digits. For more information on
the Internal, Incoming, and Least Cost Routing dial plan tables, see “Dial
Plan Tables” on page 34.
Usually, you access the dial plan configuration file and manage dial plan
operations, tables, pretranslators, and extension lists through the NBX
NetSet administration utility. If your dial plan is larger than 32,000
characters, however, you cannot edit the dial plan using the NBX NetSet
utility. You must export the dial plan, edit it, and then import it.
Before you configure the dial plan, please be sure that you understand
these concepts:
■
Call Process Flow (page 29)
■
Inbound and Outbound Call Processing (page 29)
■
NBX System Database (page 30)
■
NBX System Dial Plan (page 30)
■
Pretranslation (page 31)
■
Routing (page 31)
In addition, be sure to understand how the dial plan configuration file
can affect other parts of the NBX system. See “System Features Affected
by the Dial Plan Configuration” on page 32.
Dial Plan Concepts and Overview
Call Process Flow
29
The dial plan configuration file is a key component of inbound and
outbound call processing. The dial plan tables in the configuration file
process incoming calls in this order:
1 Incoming Dial Plan Table
2 Pretranslator Table
The dial plan tables process outgoing calls in this order:
1 Internal Dial Plan Table
2 Least Cost Routing Table
After pretranslation (if performed), the final translation process routes the
call to the destination.
Inbound and
Outbound Call
Processing
The system routes all inbound and outbound calls through the dial plan.
Inbound Call Processing
The system processes inbound calls using the Incoming table. The system
can also use pretranslators to perform digit manipulations on incoming
calls before it uses the Incoming table.
Each pretranslator operation performs a digit manipulation operation on
the dialed digits. For incoming calls, if the DID/DDI range matches the
internal extensions, the dial plan requires no pretranslator. However, you
can use pretranslators to map nonmatching dialed numbers on an
incoming DID/DDI channel to desired internal extensions. See the
example in Customer Requirement 1 in “Sample Solutions Using Dial Plan
Configuration File Commands” on page 116.
Outbound Call Processing
The system processes outbound calls using the Internal dial plan table or
the Least Cost Routing table.
You can add entries to the Internal dial plan table to match the system to
your service. See Customer Requirement 2 in “Sample Solutions Using
Dial Plan Configuration File Commands” on page 116.
If you have entries in both the Least Cost table and the Internal table for
the same purpose, the behavior of the dial plan can be confusing. 3Com
recommends that you accomplish least cost routing using Internal Table
30
CHAPTER 2: DIAL PLAN
entries. For more information, see TimedRoute Create, TimedRouteEntry
Create, and TimedRouteOperation Create later in this chapter.
NBX System Database
The NBX system database contains a default dial plan that is initially
loaded at the factory and is reloaded if you purge the database. The
default dial plan for the SuperStack 3 NBX system is a 4-digit plan; for the
NBX 100, it is a 3-digit plan.
Changes that you make to any system settings, including changes made
by importing a modified dial plan configuration file, are reflected in the
database. When you reboot the system, it loads the database with any
changes that you have made.
The NBX system database includes all of the settings necessary for system
operation:
NBX System Dial Plan
■
IP and MAC addresses for the Network Call Processor, telephones, and
line cards
■
Auto Attendant definitions and menus
■
Dial plan configuration file information
■
Voice mail settings and messages
■
Telephone extensions
■
Hardware configuration information
■
Button mappings for NBX and third-party telephones
■
Call group definitions
■
Software license information
■
User profiles
You can import a dial plan configuration file to provide the system with a
set of operating instructions for managing the telephone system.
Alternatively, if you have made changes to the currently loaded
instructions through the NBX NetSet utility, you can export the dial plan
configuration file to save it. You can also make changes by editing the
configuration file off-system, using any ASCII editor, and then importing
the modified file. You can easily reuse a given configuration file on many
systems. For more information, see “Importing and Exporting Dial Plan
Configuration Files” on page 45.
Dial Plan Concepts and Overview
31
The system is shipped with several default dial plan configuration files,
typically, a 3-digit and a 4-digit file for each country that is supported.
In addition, the file samples.txt contains several examples that illustrate
how you can configure the dial plan configuration file to control how the
system manages incoming and outgoing calls.
Normally, you completely configure a dial plan before you start to use the
system to control the telephones. Although you can make changes later,
major changes in the dial plan can disrupt the system.
Decide whether you want to use a 3-digit or 4-digit dial plan before you
create the dial plan, autodiscover, or manually add telephones or other
devices to the NBX system.
When you import a dial plan, some parameters of the system change
immediately. Others change only when you reboot the NBX system.
3Com recommends that you reboot the NBX system each time that you
change the dial plan.
Rebooting the system disrupts service to the telephones. Plan to reboot at
a time that does not inconvenience telephone users.
Pretranslation
Routing
Pretranslation is the process of translating (or manipulating) dialed digits
before they are passed to the appropriate dial plan table for subsequent
routing. You can set the dial plan to perform pretranslation on incoming
or outgoing calls. For more information, see “Dial Plan Pretranslators” on
page 40.
Routing specifies how a call reaches a destination. You define the routes
for the system to use in the Routes section of the dial plan configuration
file.
When you define call routing, you can also instruct the system to perform
pretranslations (digit manipulations). Both destination routes and timed
routes have digit manipulation operations (append, prepend, replace,
stripLead, or stripTrail).
The system passes dialed digits first through the device’s Least Cost
Routing table (if there is one). If the system finds no entry there, it then
uses the Normal dial plan table. If it does find an entry in the Least Cost
Routing table, it attempts to use that entry and, even if the attempt is
unsuccessful, it does not use the Normal table.
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CHAPTER 2: DIAL PLAN
You can route incoming calls to the Auto Attendant port, and you can
instruct the Auto Attendant to route these calls to any internal or external
number.
CAUTION: If you configure the Auto Attendant so that it can access any
external number, you risk the possibility of toll fraud. You can reduce the
possibility of toll fraud by explicitly putting specific external numbers into
the outgoing dial plan table. This precaution prevents outside callers from
dialing any external number except the ones that you define.
There are two types of routes:
■
Destination routes — Specify the extension of a destination device.
They can also perform digit manipulation operations on the dialed
digits that resulted in the selection of this route before those digits are
dialed on the destination device.
■
Timed routes — Specify time of day and day of week criteria which,
when met, result in a particular destination route being selected.
CAUTION: If you operate the NBX system in Keyset Mode, routes are not
applicable.
For more information, see “DestinationRoute Create” on page 103,
“TimedRoute Create” page 112, and related entries under “Dial Plan
Configuration File Commands” on page 100.
System Features
Affected by the Dial
Plan Configuration
The dial plan configuration affects several system features:
■
Keyset Mode Operation Using the Dial Plan
■
Hybrid Mode Operation Using the Dial Plan
■
Off-Site Notification
Keyset Mode Operation Using the Dial Plan
If you map any telephone buttons that have LEDs to specific Analog Line
Card ports, you enable Keyset mode in the NBX system. Instead of dialing
a single digit (typically 8, 9, or 0) before placing an outside call, the user
presses a button to select an available Analog Line Card port. The user
defines the routing (that is, the selection of a destination device) by
pressing the button to select the Analog Line Card port; however the NBX
system controls the call using the dial plan.
You cannot map a digital line extension in Keyset mode.
Dial Plan Concepts and Overview
33
The NBX system applies any Class of Service restrictions that are
associated with the user's telephone to determine whether to make a
call. The system also uses any pretranslator that a device uses and
performs any required digit manipulation operations before it actually
transmits the digits on the Analog Line Card or Digital Line Card port.
Hybrid Mode Operation Using the Dial Plan
If you map telephone buttons for some telephones but not others, you
enable Hybrid mode (a mixture of standard and Keyset behaviors). The
system provides a system-wide External Prefix setting, which allows the
administrator to establish a prefix.
Off-Site Notification
The NBX system uses off-site notification to notify users when new voice
mail messages arrive. You can define notification devices and assign them
in the Internal dial plan as well as through the NBX NetSet utility.
Example: When voice mail arrives, the NBX system dials the telephone
number of the user’s pager. Typically, you use a system-wide prefix to
designate the device or devices you want to use for outdialing purposes,
including off-site notification calls.
Example: If the user’s pager number is 800-555-3751, and the
system-wide prefix digit is 9, the system dials 98005553751 to send
a call to the user’s pager.
To tell the system to dial a single Line Card port or a restricted number of
Line Card ports, create a suitable pool of Line Card ports for that purpose,
and then use an existing set of dial plan table entries (such as the entries
that begin with 8) or create a new set of entries to allow the dial plan
devices to route calls via the selected line card ports.
Example: You set up one 4-port card to handle all off-site notification calls.
You create a set of entries in the Internal dial plan table that each start
with the digit 8. You define a route to the 4-port card for all of these dial
plan entries so that whenever the system acts on one of these entries, it
uses one of the 4 ports on that card to dial out and notify the user.
To apply different off-site CoS restrictions to different users, you need
multiple dial plan entries. If you are not trying to apply the CoS
restrictions, then a single dial plan entry is sufficient.
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CHAPTER 2: DIAL PLAN
Dial Plan Tables
Dial plan tables contain information that controls how the system routes
calls. Each dial plan configuration file consists of at least three dial plan
tables. This section discusses these topics:
■
Dial Plan Command Format
■
Internal Dial Plan Table — Must be table ID 1
■
Incoming Dial Plan Table — Must be table ID 2
■
Least Cost Routing Dial Plan Table — Must be table ID 3
■
Adding New Dial Plan Tables
CAUTION: Tables 1, 2, and 3 must exist. Do not delete them. You may
create additional dial plan tables if necessary, but they must be numbered
4 or higher.
If the Least Cost Routing table exists, it takes precedence over the Internal
table. If the system cannot find a Least Cost Routing table, it attempts to
find a corresponding entry in the Internal table. If you have entries for the
same purpose in both the Least Cost and Internal tables, the behavior of
the dial plan can be confusing.
See “Dial Plan Command Format” next for a description of dial plan
command syntax and structure. For a complete list and description of dial
plan commands, including command arguments and examples, see “Dial
Plan Configuration File Commands” on page 100.
Dial Plan Command
Format
Each dial plan table contains a sequence of commands. These commands
collectively determine how calls are handled.
Most of the dial plan commands have a very similar format, as shown in
Figure 2.
Dial Plan Tables
35
Figure 2 Dial Plan Command Format
Call Classification — Used
with Class of Service
Leading Digits to Collect
Table Entry ID Number
Table Name
Table ID Number
Maximum and Minimum
Characters to Collect
Number of the
route (dial tone
facility) from
Routing Tables
Priority
(Not Used)
Command
Table Create 1 Internal
/
Id Entry
/
TableEntry Create
1
1
TableEntry Create
1
2
TableEntry Create
1
3
Table Create 2 Incoming
/
Id Entry
/
TableEntry Create
2
1
TableEntry Create
2
2
Digits
0
1
2
Digits
0
1
Table Create 3 Least Cost Routing
/
Id Entry Digits
TableEntry Create
3
1
91607387
Min Max
1
3
3
1
3
3
Min Max
1
3
1
3
Min Max
12
12
Class
Prio Route
Internal
Internal
Internal
Class
0
0
0
Prio Route
Internal
Internal
Class
LongDistance
4
0
0
0
0
4
0
Prio Route
0
10
Table 6 describes each field of a dial plan command.
Table 6 Dial Plan Command Fields
Field
Description
Command
Command name. For example, TableEntry Create is the command that make Class of Service
and call routing decisions based on the correspondence of dialed digits and table entry digits.
See “Dial Plan Configuration File Commands” later in this chapter for a description of each
command.
Table ID Number
Table ID number. This is always 1 for the Internal dial plan table, 2 for the Incoming dial plan
table, and 3 for the Least Cost Routing Table.
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CHAPTER 2: DIAL PLAN
Table 6 Dial Plan Command Fields (continued)
Field
Description
Table Entry ID
Number
Table entry number (a unique number for each entry in the table). These numbers are usually
in ascending order in the table, but you can change the order. For example, you might want
to place a new item near other items of the same type (that begin with the same digit) in
order to help you when you troubleshoot the configuration file.
Digits
One or more digits that begin the dial sequence. Either single or multiple entries can start
with the same digit. The system uses this field in conjunction with Min and Max to determine
when to make the call routing decision.
Most sample tables have a single entry for digit 0 (zero) to specify how the system handles a
telephone number which has zero as the first digit.
If you want the system to handle calls differently, depending on whether they start with 90
or 91, you must have one entry in the table for each of these 2-digit sequences.
Min
Minimum number of digits that the system collects before routing the call.
Max
Maximum number of digits the system collects before routing a call.
Class
Class of Service (CoS). The system uses this information to decide whether a caller is allowed
to make this specific type of call. The possible classifications are:
Internal, Local, LongDistance, International, WAN, Toll- Free, Emergency, COCode,
Wireless, Toll, Operator, AlternateLong, TrunkToTrunk, Diagnostics, NotAllowed, Other
Each of these values corresponds to a selection in the NBX NetSet utility.
Priority
Priority number. This field is not used at this time, but must be present and should always be
0 (zero).
Route
Route number. This identifies an entry in the Routes section of the dial plan. Zero is a typical
value for internal calls, and indicates that this call uses no route, in which case, digits are
transmitted as soon as they are dialed.
If a new entry in the Internal table appears not to work, it is possible that
the system is using an entry from the Least Cost table instead. To avoid
such conflicts, you can accomplish least cost routing using only the
Internal table. 3Com strongly recommends that, to keep the dial plan as
simple as possible, you use only the Internal table for least cost routing.
For more information on how to use the dial plan configuration file,
see “Managing the Dial Plan Configuration File” on page 44.
Basic Dial Plan Table Examples
These examples describe the basic operation of a dial plan table.
Example: If you are using a 4-digit dial plan and the telephone
extensions start with 2, then the table entry with 2 in the Digits column
typically has 4 in the Min column. Before making a decision, the system
Dial Plan Tables
37
would collect all 4 digits of the extension. If the caller dials fewer than the
Min number of digits, the system times out in 20 seconds.
Example: If Digits = 2, Min = 4, and Max = 4, the system knows that if
the first digit is 2, it must collect no less than 4 and no more than 4 digits
before making the call routing decision.
If the caller dials at least the minimum number of digits and not more
than the maximum number of digits, the system waits 5 seconds and
then routes the call based on the digits dialed.If the caller dials more than
the maximum number of digits, the system attempts to place the call.
Often, Max value and the Min value are identical, because you want the
system to collect a specific number of digits, no more and no less.
Example: For internal extensions, you want the system to collect exactly
3 digits (4 in a 4-digit dial plan) before making a decision, so you would
set both Min and Max to 3 (4 in a 4-digit dial plan).
The two columns may be different if the table entry applies to more than
one situation.
Example: In the United States, the Min value for the 90 entry is 2,
because 90 allows an internal caller to reach a telephone company
operator (9 to get an outside line, and then 0 to get the operator). The
Max value is 64, because the caller can continue to dial after the zero,
entering a number to call, plus a telephone credit card number, and
possibly an identification code number.
If the caller dials only 90 (which satisfies the minimum of two digits) and
stops dialing, the system waits for 5 seconds. If no other digits are
entered, the system connects the caller to the operator.
If other digits are dialed, the system accepts them up to the limit of 64. If
the caller stops after dialing fewer than 64 digits, the system again waits
5 seconds before acting on the dialed sequence of digits.
Example: You can assign a new employee to the Default User Group.
You can then set the permissions for that group so that group members
have permission to make LongDistance calls when the system mode is
Open or Lunch, but not when the system mode is Closed or Other.
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CHAPTER 2: DIAL PLAN
Example: You can assign the company’s Vice President of Finance to a
group that you name the All Privileges Group. You can set the
permissions for that group so that group members have permission to
make LongDistance calls during all system modes.
Internal Dial
Plan Table
The Internal dial plan table (table ID 1) defines how to handle calls placed
from internal devices, such as NBX Business or Basic Telephones, to a
destination. A destination can be another internal device, such as a local
telephone, or an external telephone line (Analog Line Card or Digital Line
Card) that connects the NBX system to other facilities.
The Internal dial plan table consists of a series of commands. For an
example of the command format, see “Dial Plan Command Format”
earlier in this chapter. Table 6 on page 35 describes each element of the
command. Table 7 describes the predefined routes.
Table 7 Predefined Routes
Route Number
Description
1
Local CO (strip)
2
Local CO (no strip)
3
Voice Application (Auto Attendant on extension 500)
4
Attendant (person)
5
H.323 Gateway
6
Least Cost Route example
Other
User-defined routes
You cannot delete or modify predefined routes, only create new routes.
Each device must have a Normal table. The Least Cost Routing table is
optional. Telephones use the Internal dial plan table (table ID 1) as their
normal outbound table and the Least Cost Routing table (table ID 3) as
their long distance routing table.
Incoming Dial
Plan Table
The Incoming dial plan table (table ID 2) defines how calls arriving from
outside the NBX system are routed to extensions. Incoming calls can
arrive on analog telephone lines or through Digital Line Card ports.
The incoming dial plan table consists of a series of commands. For an
example and basic understanding of the command format, see “Dial Plan
Dial Plan Tables
39
Command Format” on page 34. For a description of the each element of
a dial plan command, see Table 6 on page 35.
By default, Line Card ports, Digital Line Card ports, and H.323 gateways
use the Incoming dial plan table as their normal dial plan table. An
Incoming dial plan table typically has a more restricted list of dialable
digits than the Internal dial plan table. You usually cannot dial extensions
associated with internal paging or Analog or Digital Line Card ports.
Least Cost Routing
Dial Plan Table
The Least Cost Routing table (table ID 3) defines how to route calls in
order to minimize the cost of those calls.
Example: You might use two different long distance carriers, one for a
specific geographic region, and one for all other areas of the country. In
the Least Cost Routing table, you can create entries that route calls
differently for those two geographic areas. Each country uses a different
method to accomplish this. In the United States, you can specify the area
codes that apply to a geographic region. In France, you can specify a
carrier by adding prefix digits to the telephone number.
By default, internal telephones specify the Least Cost Routing table as
their least cost table. Typically, devices associated with the Incoming dial
plan table (Line Card ports, Digital Line Card ports, and H.323 gateways)
do not use the Least Cost Routing table.
The Least Cost Routing table is optional. If it does not exist, the system
uses the Internal table routing destinations. If you have entries in both the
Least Cost and Internal tables for the same purpose, the behavior of the
dial plan can be confusing. Therefore, 3Com recommends that you
accomplish least cost routing using Internal Table entries. See TimedRoute
Create, TimedRouteEntry Create, and TimedRouteOperation Create.
Example: If a new entry in the Internal table appears not to work, it is
possible that the system is using an entry from the Least Cost table
instead. To avoid such conflicts, accomplish least cost routing using only
the Internal table. 3Com strongly recommends that you keep the dial
plan as simple as possible by using only the Internal table.
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CHAPTER 2: DIAL PLAN
Adding New
Dial Plan Tables
If you are sharing the system with another company or group and want
to control calls differently at the two sites, you can add a fourth table.
Example: You assign one extension range to Company A and a different
range to Company B. The fourth table controls the extension range for
Company B, so that outbound calls from Company B’s extensions use
only their external telephone lines.
You might also need a fourth table if a single company had two sites but
only one NBX system. In order to properly route emergency (911) calls,
you use the fourth table to define which extensions use each dedicated
911 telephone line.
Example: Users at site A dial 911 and the system uses the Internal table
(table ID 1) to make the emergency call on one external telephone line.
Users at site B dial 911 and the system uses table ID 4 to make the
emergency call on a different external telephone line. The emergency
staff know, based on the dialing number, which site has the emergency.
Enhanced 911, E911, is available in some areas. This service enables
emergency staff to identify the specific location of the emergency. For
example, in a campus of buildings, the emergency staff can identify the
specific building, floor, and location from which the emergency call
originated. The NBX system supports E911 over ISDN. The administrator
must define an outbound call pretranslator to provide the specific
extension number from which the 911 call originated.
Dial Plan
Pretranslators
The system uses pretranslators to modify digit sequences of incoming or
outgoing calls. On incoming calls, pretranslators can map the entire
dialed number (including area code) to an internal extension number.
For example, an external party dials 978-555-0101 to reach the person
on extension 101. Pretranslators ensure that the proper digits are
mapped to the correct extension number.
For more information, see:
■
Pretranslators for Incoming Calls on page 41
■
Pretranslators for Certain Outgoing Calls on page 42
A typical pretranslator function involves mapping incoming DDI/DID
telephone calls to internal extension numbers.
Dial Plan Pretranslators
41
Example: Say that the DDI/DID telephone numbers range from
508-555-4200 through 508-555-4299. The telephone company sends
you the last 4 digits of the total telephone number. Internally, you want
to use extensions 2000 through 2099. You can define a pretranslator to:
■
Remove (stripLead) the first two digits of the incoming 4-digit
sequence.
■
Add (prepend) the digits 20 in front of the remaining 2 digits.
See “Managing Dial Plan Pretranslators” on page 64 for detailed
information and examples on creating and managing dial plan
pretranslators.
Pretranslators for
Incoming Calls
For incoming calls, pretranslation reformats the dialed number before it is
passed to the Incoming dial plan table (Table ID 2). See “Incoming Dial
Plan Table” on page 38.
Incoming Pretranslator Example 1
If, for an incoming telephone call, the telephone company passes you
4-digit numbers from 6100 through 6199, the system can use a
pretranslator to remove the first digit; the remaining 3 digits can then be
used as internal extension numbers in a 3-digit dial plan. Tell the system
which pretranslations you want to perform by defining digit manipulation
operations (append, prepend, replace, stripLead, or stripTrail) within the
PreTranslator section of the dial plan configuration file.
Incoming Pretranslator Example 2
Assume the telephone company passes 10-digit numbers to the system
for each incoming telephone call (for example, numbers in the range
4567-89-3000 to 4567-89-3500). If the system uses 4-digit extensions in
the range 2000 to 2500, you could pass an incoming 10-digit number
such as 4567-89-3210 to extension 2210.
This strategy requires two pretranslation operations: The first operation
performs a stripLead operation to remove the initial 7 digits, leaving 210.
The second operation prepends the number 2 in front of the remaining 3
digits. The result is 2210, which matches an extension within the
extension range. “Sample Solutions Using Dial Plan Configuration File
Commands” on page 116 shows how to accomplish this pretranslation
using the dial plan configuration file.
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CHAPTER 2: DIAL PLAN
Each device can specify only one DDI/DID pretranslator and one CLIP
pretranslator. To create or modify a pretranslator, you either edit a dial
plan configuration file and import it, or use the NBX NetSet utility and
modify an existing dial plan configuration file.
The system performs operations in ascending order of operation ID.
Operations are both sequential and cumulative.
You can also use pretranslators with virtual tie lines to link multiple
NBX systems. Incoming calls within a defined numeric range arrive at the
first system, are modified through digit manipulation operations, and are
then routed to a tie line connected to a second system.
Each sample dial plan that is shipped with the system includes a default
pretranslator.
Pretranslator Example 3
Assume that the telephone company passes 4-digit numbers to the
system for each incoming telephone call (for example, numbers in the
range 5200 through 5300). If the system uses 3-digit extensions in the
range 200 through 300, you could define a single pretranslation
operation to stripLead (remove) the first digit, for instance, the number 5
from an incoming number such as 5278, and pass the call to extension
278. “Sample Solutions Using Dial Plan Configuration File Commands”
on page 116 shows how to accomplish this pretranslation using the dial
plan configuration file.
Pretranslators for
Certain
Outgoing Calls
On outgoing calls using an ISDN PRI card, pretranslators allow the
external called party to identify the full number of the internal calling
party, including the area code. For example, if the person on extension
101 within a company calls an external number, the caller’s entire number
is displayed to the called party when Calling Line ID Presentation (CLIP)
pretranslators are used. Pretranslation reformats the outgoing dialed
number before it is passed to the Internal dial plan table (Table ID 1) or
possibly the Least Cost Routing table (Table ID 3). For more information,
see “Internal Dial Plan Table” on page 38 and “Least Cost Routing Dial
Plan Table” on page 39.
Example: If the DDI/DID telephone numbers range from 508-555-4200
through 508-555-4299, internally, you dial extensions from 2000
through 2099 to reach another internal telephone.
Dial Plan Pretranslators
43
When you place a call to an external telephone number, the system can
use these pretranslator steps to create the full 10-digit number:
1 Remove (stripLead) the first two digits (20) from the internal extension
number of the telephone making the call.
2 Add (prepend) the digit sequence 50855542 to the two remaining digits,
creating the full DDI/DID telephone number.
3 Pass the full number to the telephone company.
Example: To transmit Calling Line ID Presentation (CLIP) information on
outgoing calls, you can define a pretranslator that transforms internal
extensions into full telephone numbers (the numbers that someone
external to the company uses to dial in). Assume that you are using
telephone extension numbers from 1000 to 1099 and that only the last
two digits match the DDI/DID (Direct Inward Dial/Direct Dial Inward)
numbers that are assigned to the company. You can define a
pretranslator to remove (stripLead) the first two digits from the internal
extension number and add (prepend) the appropriate digit string. This
pretranslator constructs the full telephone number.
Example: If you use two different long-distance carriers at different times
of the day to save costs, you can prepend different digit sequences to the
outgoing dialed number to select which carrier you want. If you prepend
1010321 between the time the business opens and 3:00 p.m., you select
one long-distance carrier. If you prepend 1010220 from 3:00 p.m. until
the next time the business opens (including weekends), you select the
other carrier and obtain a lower rate.
To tell the system which outgoing pretranslations you want to perform,
you define digit manipulation operations (append, prepend, replace,
stripLead, or stripTrail) in the Routes section of the dial plan configuration
file. You can define these commands for both destination routes and
timed routes. For more information on configuring pretranslators, see
“Managing Dial Plan Pretranslators” on page 64.
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CHAPTER 2: DIAL PLAN
Managing
the Dial Plan
Configuration File
Accessing the
Dial Plan
Creating Dial Plan
Configuration Files
This section describes the dial plan configuration file and how to manage
it. From the Operations tab of the Dial Plan window, you can perform
these tasks:
■
Accessing the Dial Plan
■
Creating Dial Plan Configuration Files
■
Importing and Exporting Dial Plan Configuration Files
■
Importing a User-Defined Dial Plan
■
Exporting (Saving) a Dial Plan Configuration File
■
Testing a Dial Plan
■
Generating a Dial Plan Report
■
Modifying a Dial Plan Configuration File
To import a dial plan configuration file and modify it, select NBX NetSet
> Dial Plan > Operations. From this tab, you can access
customer-defined and default dial plans.
The simplest way to create a new dial plan is to model it after an
existing one.
1 Go to the Operations tab.
2 Browse for a dial plan, or select one from the pull-down list.
3 Click Open to open the file in your browser.
4 Click Save As and save the dial plan as a new file.
You can now edit the file with an ASCII editor. After you customize the
new dial plan, Import it to the NBX system. see “Importing and Exporting
Dial Plan Configuration Files” on page 45.
3Com recommends that you enter these commands at the top of every
dial plan configuration file:
Table Delete *
DestinationRoute Delete *
TimedRoute Delete *
PreTranslator Delete *
Managing the Dial Plan Configuration File
45
When you subsequently import this dial plan, these commands purge any
traces of the old dial plan and prevent any conflicts that can result from
importing one dial plan on top of an existing one.
You create new entries in the dial plan configuration file by typing in new
commands (see “Dial Plan Configuration File Commands” on page 100)
or by cutting, pasting, and editing existing lines in the file.
When you cut and paste new lines into dial plan tables, be sure to change
the Entry number in the pasted line. If two or more lines have the same
Entry number, only the last one takes effect.
Importing and
Exporting Dial Plan
Configuration Files
You import a dial plan configuration file either to implement changes you
have made by editing the file, or to reload a previously saved
configuration.
From the Operations tab of the Dial Plan window, you can:
■
Import a North American Dial Plan
■
Import an International Dial Plan
This section concludes with a discussion of International Dial Plan Issues.
When you export the working dial plan, the NBX system constructs a new
configuration file from the values in the database and displays it. The new
file shows the current date and time. You name the file when you save it.
The sample default files include examples of such things as timed routes
and pretranslators. To preserve the default (sample) dial plan
configuration included with the system, 3Com advises you to choose a
unique file name different than any of the default (sample) dial plan
configuration files so that you do not overwrite the sample default files.
Import a North American Dial Plan
The default dial plan for the SuperStack 3 NBX system is
NorthAmerica-4-digit.txt. The default dial plan for the NBX 100
system is NorthAmerica.txt. Some customized dial plans are provided
for use in other countries.
Always read the system Release Notes (called readme.txt) for the most
up-to-date information on dial plans.
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CHAPTER 2: DIAL PLAN
To import a default dial plan configuration file:
1 In the NBX NetSet – Main Menu window, click Dial Plan. The Dial Plan
window appears, displaying the Operations tab.
2 Click the Default File radio button. From the Default File pull-down list,
select the default file that you want to use.
3 Click Import.
4 Reboot the system.
CAUTION: When you import a dial plan configuration file, the
NBX system immediately implements the dial plan. You are always
warned that the system may become inoperative. The system becomes
inoperative only if you have manually modified a dial plan and have
made syntax or content errors. Carefully check any changes that you
make to the configuration file before you import.
Import an International Dial Plan
To change the default North American dial plan to a country-specific dial
plan:
1 In the NBX NetSet – Main Menu window, click Dial Plan. The Dial Plan
window appears, displaying the Operations tab.
2 Click the Default File radio button.
3 In the list next to the Default File button, select the default file that you
want to use.
4 Click Import.
CAUTION: When you import a dial plan configuration file, a message
warns you that the dial plan may become inoperative. The system
becomes inoperative only if you have manually modified a dial plan and
have made syntax or content errors. Carefully check any changes that you
make to the configuration file before you import.
5 Click Yes. The system imports the new dial plan and produces a report of
any errors.
6 Reboot the system.
You may see a warning that “destination extension list is empty.” This
means that a particular type of device is not installed. You may safely
ignore this type of warning.
Managing the Dial Plan Configuration File
47
International Dial Plan Issues
Several international dial plan issues warrant attention. See these topics:
Customizing an International Dial Plan. If there is no customized
dial plan for your country, you may need to modify the default dial plan.
See “Modifying a Dial Plan Configuration File” on page 51. If you edit the
default dial plan, you can test the changes by making a simulated call.
See “Testing a Dial Plan” on page 49.
Autodiscovering Internal Telephones. The default dial plan for the
NBX 100 allows you to allocate internal telephones to extension numbers
100 through 449. The default dial plan for the SuperStack 3 NBX system
allows you to allocate internal telephones to extension numbers 1000
through 3999. If you autodiscover your company’s internal telephones,
Auto Discovery usually begins at number 100 or 1000. However, for
some countries, internal telephones begin at a higher number to allow
you to directly dial numbers of “national importance.” Auto Discovery
allocates telephone extensions numbers within this range. For more
information on Auto Discovery, see “Using Auto Discovery for Initial
System Configuration” in the NBX Installation Guide.
Dialing Outside Lines. To obtain an outside line, dial 9 or 0 as
appropriate for your country.
WARNING: You must first obtain an outside line before you can dial
emergency numbers.
Importing a
User-Defined Dial Plan
To import a customer-defined (user-defined) dial plan configuration file:
1 In the NBX NetSet – Main Menu window, click Dial Plan. The Dial Plan
window appears, displaying the Operations tab.
2 In the User-Defined File box, enter the path and name of the user-defined
configuration file, or click Browse to find the file that you want.
The NBX system has no predefined location for dial plan configuration
files. You can specify any directory or path that you want.
3 Click Import and reboot the system.
CAUTION: When you import a dial plan configuration file, the
NBX system immediately implements the dial plan. You are always
warned that the system may become inoperative. The system becomes
inoperative only if you have manually modified a dial plan and have
48
CHAPTER 2: DIAL PLAN
made syntax or content errors. Carefully check any changes that you
make to the configuration file before you import them.
Exporting
(Saving) a Dial Plan
Configuration File
When you export (save) the current configuration, the system creates
a new dial plan configuration file from the current database. You save the
new text file using a name that you choose.
This example refers to Internet Explorer. If you use another browser, you
may need to use slightly different procedures.
To export a dial plan configuration file:
1 In the NBX NetSet – Main Menu window, click Dial Plan. The Dial Plan
window appears, displaying the Operations tab.
2 Click Export. The system constructs a new configuration file from the
current values in the database and displays it. Figure 3 shows a partial
display. Scroll your browser window to see your complete dial plan.
Figure 3 Dial Plan Configuration File (partial)
3 Click the File menu and select Save As.
4 From the list box at the top of the Save As window, select the destination
folder.
5 In the File Name text box, replace the default file name with a new name.
Managing the Dial Plan Configuration File
49
The sample default files include examples of such things as timed routes
and pretranslators. Verify that you rename the new configuration file with
a unique file name so that you do not overwrite the sample default file.
6 Click Save.
Testing a Dial Plan
This section describes how to test the currently loaded dial plan by
placing a simulated call.
Even if the NBX system is completely installed and operational, a test
places a simulated, not an actual call.
Example: If you have an entry in the dial plan for digit sequences starting
with 91, with MIN and MAX set to 5, and you test the sequence 9123,
the dial plan test reports an insufficient number of digits. However, in
actual operation, the NBX system would time out waiting for the fifth
digit, and then attempt to place the call. Assuming that the outside line
prefix is 9 (such as in the United States), this situation would obtain an
outside line (9) and then dial the numbers 123.
You can specify a day of the week and a time by selecting entries from
the Day/Time list boxes. This choice instructs the system to act as if the
day and time you select are the current day and time.
If you have timed routes defined in the dial plan, you use different day
and time settings to determine whether the timed route works properly.
Example: Assume that you want a timed route to select route 35 during
open business hours Monday through Friday, but route 36 when business
is closed on those days and on weekends. After you define the timed
route commands and import the modified file, you then test using days
and times within business hours (to verify that the system selects route 35)
and during closed hours and weekends (to verify that it selects route 36).
You can also use day and time settings to test whether the Class of
Service settings operate as expected.
Example: You can configure the dial plan to allow toll calls from an
extension during open business hours, but to disallow such calls when
the business is closed and on weekends. Test using days and times within
business hours (to confirm that you can make toll calls from that
extension) and during closed hours and weekends (to confirm that the
system prevents such calls).
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CHAPTER 2: DIAL PLAN
To create and run a test using the currently loaded dial plan:
1 In the NBX NetSet – Main Menu window, click Dial Plan. The Dial Plan
window appears, displaying the Operations tab.
2 Click Test. The Test Dial Plan dialog box appears.
3 To set up the simulated call, from the Device to dial from list box, select
the number from which you want to dial.
4 In Number to dial, enter the number that you want the system to dial.
5 Select the desired date and time in the Day/Time pull-down lists.
For some tests, the day and time settings are irrelevant. You can leave the
settings at their default values (Sunday, 00, and 00).
6 Click Test. The test runs and the results appear in the dialog box.
Generating a
Dial Plan Report
This section describes how to create a report containing all dial plan
settings, tables, routes, and pretranslators. The report also performs
a consistency check to ensure that all dial plan table entries point to valid
routes which, in turn, point to valid extensions. The report also identifies
how many devices are using each dial plan table and each pretranslator.
Consider these common dial plan problems:
■
Dial plan table entries that point to nonexistent routes
■
Timed route entries that point to nonexistent destination routes
■
Destination route entries that point to nonexistent extensions or
empty extension lists
■
Timed route entries that overlap
■
Devices that do not specify a normal table
■
Devices that point to nonexistent Normal tables, Least Cost Routing
tables, or pretranslators
■
Pretranslator entries that have no operations
If a telephone has no table assigned, that telephone does not have
permission to dial. This error is flagged in Reports. If a device has only a
Normal table, no error is reported.
If a device has only a Least Cost table, an error is reported. The telephone
is still usable and has permissions defined in whatever table has been
chosen as Least Cost. If a device has both a Normal and Least Cost table,
no error is reported (the usual condition).
Managing the Dial Plan Configuration File
51
When the NBX system detects an error in any line of an imported dial
plan configuration file, it ignores that line and continues to process all
remaining lines in the file. This precaution minimizes the impact of errors
on the dial plan.
To generate a dial plan report:
1 In the NBX NetSet – Main Menu window, click Dial Plan. The Dial Plan
window appears, displaying the Operations tab.
2 Click Report. The dial plan report appears. Scroll up and down the
browser window to see the full display.
3 Click Close.
The person validating the dial plan test is responsible for verifying that the
test call used the correct dial plan table and dial plan table entry.
To record test results and send them to someone, select the text in the
results pane and use the browser’s copy function (typically found in the
Edit menu) to copy the test results to another application window, such
as an editor or e-mail.
Errors can prevent calls from being successfully routed. Warnings are
conditions that you can easily correct to successfully route the call.
4 When you are finished, click Close at the bottom of the screen.
Modifying a Dial Plan
Configuration File
This section describes how to modify the currently loaded dial plan
configuration file.
CAUTION: Modifications must be syntactically correct. Each time that the
system imports a dial plan configuration file, it verifies the file for errors
and displays the results. To avoid typing mistakes, 3Com suggests that
you start with an existing dial plan (for example, one of the default plans
that are shipped with the NBX system or a plan from another NBX
system), modify it, and save it as a renamed file.
To modify a dial plan configuration file:
1 In the NBX NetSet – Main Menu window, click Dial Plan. The Dial Plan
window appears, displaying the Operations tab.
2 Click Modify. The Modify Dial Plan dialog box shows a partial display.
Scroll up and down the browser window to see the complete dial plan.
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CHAPTER 2: DIAL PLAN
3 Edit the dial plan configuration file. A single line of space is required
between each dial plan entry. You can type a complete dial plan entry
anywhere in the file.
4 Click OK. The Import Confirmation dialog box prompts you to confirm
the changes.
5 Click Yes. The system imports the modified dial plan. The Dial Plan
Consistency dialog box appears, displaying the results of the error and
consistency checks.
6 Make a note of any errors, and correct them by editing the file.
You may be required to make changes based on warning messages.
7 Click Close.
Outdialing Prefix
Settings
A telephone user can look up a call in the call logs (Missed Calls,
Answered Calls, and Dialed Calls) using the telephone display panel,
select a telephone number from any of the logs, and redial it.
To redial a number from the Missed Calls or Answered Calls list, the NBX
system needs to know the appropriate dial prefix to prepend to the digits
in the telephone number.
For information and examples about how to configure outdialing
prefixes, see the Help at NBX NetSet > Dial Plans > Operations >
Outdialing Prefixes.
Managing
Extensions
Extension Settings
Overview
This section describes how to add, change, and manage extensions:
■
Extension Settings Overview
■
Changing Extension Length and Ranges
■
How Auto Discovery Assigns Extensions
■
Modifying Extensions
The NBX system establishes connections between extension numbers.
The concept of an extension applies to more than just telephones.
Extensions are also assigned to NBX applications such as Call Park zones,
Auto Attendants, hunt groups, Line Card ports, voice mail ports, and
Managing Extensions
53
virtual devices such as the pcXset™ PC soft telephone Client and the
ConneXtions H.323 Gateway.
The extension length (either 3 or 4), which applies to all extensions on a
system, indicates that all extensions contain that number of digits. You
cannot mix 3-digit and 4-digit extensions within the same NBX system.
The NBX 100 and the SuperStack 3 NBX systems both support 3-digit and
4-digit dial plans, although there are some differences in the extension
ranges as noted in these tables. By default, the NBX 100 uses a 3-digit
dial plan, and the SuperStack 3 NBX uses a 4-digit dial plan.
Table 8 lists typical extension ranges in a 3-digit and a 4-digit dial plan.
Table 9 describes these ranges in more detail and gives the default ranges
and values for 3-digit and 4-digit dial plans.
Table 8 Typical Extension Ranges for 3-digit and 4-digit Dial Plans
Extension Type
3-digit
4-digit
Telephones
NBX 100:
100–449
SuperStack 3 NBX:
1000–3999
Auto Attendant
500–599
500, 501, plus 5500–5599
Hunt Group
NBX 100:
450–499
SuperStack 3 NBX:
4000–4099
External Extensions
(includes line card
ports and Call Park)
600–799
(external Auto Discovery
starts at 750)
6000–7999
(external Auto Discovery
starts at 7250)
Call Park (must fall
within External
Extension range)
NBX 100:
601–609
SuperStack 3 NBX:
6000–6099
Note 1: The NBX 100 is shipped with a factory default 3-digit dial plan. If you import
any 4-digit plan, you must manually specify any 4-digit extension ranges that are not
set by the imported plan. You must also manually change any device extensions so
that they fall within the appropriate range.
Note 2: The Superstack 3 NBX is shipped with a 4-digit dial plan. If you import any
3-digit plan, you must manually specify any 3-digit extension ranges that are not set
by the imported plan. You must also manually change any device extensions so that
they fall within the appropriate range.
Note 3: TAPI Route Point extensions occur in the same range as telephones. TAPI
Route Point extensions do not appear in telephone lists within the NBX NetSet utility.
For more information about TAPI Route Points, see TAPI Route Points on page 263.
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CHAPTER 2: DIAL PLAN
Table 9 provides a more detailed explanation of extension types, including
default extension ranges and values for 3-digit and 4-digit dial plans.
Table 9 Dial Plan Extension Settings
Field
Purpose (See Notes 1 and 2)
Telephone
Extensions Range
The range of extensions for telephones.
■
SuperStack 3 NBX: 1000–3999
■
NBX 100: 100–449
TAPI route point extensions are included in the telephone
extensions range.
Length — This pull-down field specifies the number of digits for
telephone extensions.
Auto Attendant
Extensions Range
The range of extensions for Auto Attendants.
Default:
SuperStack 3 NBX: 5500–5599
NBX 100: 500–599
For both 3-digit and 4-digit dial plans:
Default Auto
Attendant
Extensions
■
Extension 500 is reserved as the default Auto Attendant.
■
Extension 501 is reserved as the voice mail Auto Attendant.
Default extension that the NBX system assigns to the default
Auto Attendant. The Auto Discovery process assigns this
extension.
The system must direct each call coming in on an external line to
an extension. During the Auto Discovery of external lines
(analog lines and Digital Line Card channels), the NBX system
assigns the default extension (500) as the Auto Attendant
extension. After you import the dial plan configuration file and
complete the Auto Discovery process, you can manually
configure the extension for each analog line and each Digital
Line Card channel, if you want.
For both 3-digit and 4-digit dial plans:
Hunt Group
Extensions Range
■
Extension 500 is reserved as the default Auto Attendant.
■
Extension 501 is reserved as the voice mail Auto Attendant.
The range of extensions for hunt groups.
■
SuperStack 3 NBX: 4000–4099
■
NBX 100: 450–499
Managing Extensions
55
Table 9 Dial Plan Extension Settings (continued)
Field
Purpose (See Notes 1 and 2)
External
Extensions Range
The range of extensions that are connected to external devices,
such as Analog Line Card ports, Digital Line Card ports (BRI-S/T,
T1, E1, ISDN PRI), Call Park, and Paging extensions.
Default:
Call Park
Extensions Range
Start External
Discovery At
■
SuperStack 3 NBX: 6000–7999
■
NBX 100: 600–799
The range of extensions for Call Park. This feature allows the
user to temporarily park a telephone call and then pick it up at a
different telephone. Call Park extensions must be a subset of
external extensions.
■
SuperStack 3 NBX: 6000–6099
■
NBX 100: 601–609
The extension to use when autodiscovering external devices.
The system assigns extensions starting with this number and
incrementing upward as they are discovered. If the highest
extension is reached, the system starts looking from the
beginning of the external range and selects the first unused one.
Typically, systems do not use all of the available external
extensions from 600–799 in a 3-digit dial plan or from
6000–7999 in a 4-digit dial plan.
Default:
External Keyset
Prefix
■
SuperStack 3 NBX: 7250
■
NBX 100: 750
In Keyset mode, when a button on an NBX Business Telephone
directly accesses an outside line, the NBX system must check
Class of Service. The system prepends the External Keyset Prefix
value (typically 8, 9, or 0) when it makes a call in Keyset mode.
Note 1: The NBX 100 is shipped with a factory default 3-digit dial plan. If you import
any 4-digit plan, you must manually specify any 4-digit extension ranges that are not
set by the imported plan. You must also manually change any device extensions so
that they fall within the appropriate range.
Note 2: The Superstack 3 NBX is shipped with a 4-digit dial plan. If you import any
3-digit plan, you must manually specify any 3-digit extension ranges that are not set
by the imported plan. You must also manually change any device extensions so that
they fall within the appropriate range.
Some countries reserve numbers beginning with 11 for numbers of
national importance. To accommodate this requirement, you can begin
the telephone extension range at 120.
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CHAPTER 2: DIAL PLAN
Changing Extension
Length and Ranges
You can view and change extension settings, such as extension length
and extension ranges.
If you are changing from a 3-digit to a 4-digit plan, import the 4-digit dial
plan configuration file before you configure or autodiscover any devices.
To view and change extension settings:
1 On the Operations tab, click Settings. The Settings dialog box appears.
2 Make the desired changes to the extension settings. Table 9 describes
each field.
3 Click OK to enable your changes and exit the dialog box.
Planning Extension Ranges
By planning extension range on your system, you can accommodate your
present and future needs.
Example: If you initially have 60 telephones and expect to add no more
than 100 additional telephones in the future, choose 100–299 as the
telephone extension range (1000–1199 in a 4-digit system). This
arrangement provides 200 extension numbers to handle the planned
160 telephones plus 40 extra extensions to handle unexpected additions.
Once you set the telephone extension range, you can extend it later,
provided that the new range does not overlap any other number range.
Example: For a 4-digit dial plan, you can set the initial telephone
extension range to 1000–1099. This arrangement allows for up to 100
telephone extensions. Later, you can extend the range up to 3999 to
allow for 400 telephone extensions. By default, the Hunt Group range
starts at 4000 on the SuperStack 3 and 450 on the NBX 100, so you
cannot assign telephone extensions in either of those ranges.
How Auto Discovery
Assigns Extensions
The Auto Discovery process assigns new extensions to telephones and
other devices. For example, if you install a T1 or E1 card, you can use
Auto Discovery to assign extension numbers to each port on the card.
The Auto Discovery process initially assigns a default name (new user) to
each new telephone, and assigns the next available extension number.
Later, you can replace (new user) with the appropriate user’s name.
It is possible to bypass the Auto Discovery process and to manually add a
new telephone and assign an extension. However, 3Com strongly
Managing Extensions
57
recommends that you take advantage of the Auto Discovery process. For
instructions on using the Auto Discovery process or manually adding and
configuring a new telephone, see the section on “Adding a New
Telephone” on page 125.
You can define a user in the system database without assigning a telephone
to that user. By defining a user with no device, but with a telephone
extension only, you create a phantom mailbox. The NBX system associates
an extension with this phantom mailbox so that the user can have voice
mail capability. To access voice mail from any telephone, the user calls
either extension 500 (the default Auto Attendant extension), or 501 (the
default Auto Attendant voice mail extension.)
Telephones and Line Card ports reserve most of the extensions within the
system. However, there are other extensions within the system. Table 8
shows the default extension ranges for 3-digit and 4-digit dial plans.
Modifying Extensions
You can modify the extension number of any device in the system.
Normally, you make changes only after you have changed the extension
ranges for the NBX system, in order to align the extensions with the new
ranges.
CAUTION: Be very careful when you change extensions. The system does
not validate changes that you make here, and there is no Undo or Cancel
function. A mistake can compromise the operation of the system.
To modify extensions:
1 From the NBX NetSet main menu, click Dial Plan > Operations > Modify
Extensions to open the Modify Extensions dialog box.
2 In the extensions list, select the extensions that you want to modify. Use
Shift-click to select a block of extensions or Ctrl-click to select several
extensions at different locations in the list.
3 Select an operation from the Operation drop-down list. Table 10 lists and
describes the operations.
4 Make the appropriate entry in the text box to the right of the Operation
list. The system uses this number in conjunction with the operation that
you selected in step 3. For examples, see “Changing Extensions” below.
5 Click Apply. If the requested change creates a duplicate extension or an
extension of zero length, the change is discarded.
6 Click OK to enable your changes and exit the dialog box.
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CHAPTER 2: DIAL PLAN
Table 10 Modify Extension Operations
Operation
Purpose
Change Extension
Modifies the first selected extension. Change Extension
applies to only one extension at a time. If you select multiple
extensions, the NBX system changes only the first extension
that you selected.
Prepend
Prepends the digits in front of all selected extensions.
Append
Appends the digits to the end of all selected extensions.
Strip Leading Digits
Strips (removes) the specified number of digits from the
beginning of all selected extensions.
Strip Trailing Digits
Strips (removes) the specified number of digits from the end
of all selected extensions.
Changing Extensions
You can perform several operations through the Modify Extensions dialog
box (Table 10). This section describes several examples.
Example: If you select Change Extension from the Operation list, the
system replaces the selected extension with the number you type in the
text box.
Example: If you select Strip Leading Digits from the Operation list, and
type the number 2 in the text box, the system strips (removes) two digits
from the beginning of the extension.
Example: If you select extensions 1000 through 1009 and select Strip
Trailing Digits from the Operation list, the system does not make any
change, because the result is a series of identical numbers (all 100).
Managing
Extension Lists
An extension list contains NBX extension numbers that are assigned and
dedicated to specific dial tone facilities or to specific NBX applications
(such as voice mail, Auto Attendant, and so on), or both. You can add an
extension list to define a subset of devices such as fax machines.
Extension lists are typically numbered upward starting at *0001 in either
a 3-digit or 4-digit plan. By convention, the extension list number is
preceded by an asterisk. See Table 11 for a description of the standard
extension lists.
CAUTION: Extension lists must not overlap.
Managing Extension Lists
59
Table 11 Extension Lists
Extension List ID Description
*0001
Contains extension numbers assigned to Line Card ports, for
example, TLIM ports.
Routes 1 and 2 use this list.
*0002
Contains extension numbers assigned to Digital Line Card ports.
Routes 1 and 2 use this list.
*0003
Contains extension numbers assigned to voice mail.
■
SuperStack 3 NBX: 6400–6499 (See Note 1)
■
NBX 100: 651-662 (See Note 2)
Route 3 uses this list.
*0004
Contains the extension for the attendant (that is, the person
who monitors incoming calls). The system automatically assigns
to this list the lowest extension found during Auto Discovery.
Route 4 uses this list.
*0005
Contains extension numbers assigned to H.323 ports.
*0006
Contains extension numbers assigned to Virtual Tie Lines.
*0008
Contains extension numbers assigned to the 8-pool.
Note 1: The NBX 100 is shipped with a factory default 3-digit dial plan. If you
import any 4-digit plan, you must manually specify any 4-digit extension ranges that
are not set by the imported plan. You must also manually change any device
extensions so that they fall within the appropriate range.
Note 2: The Superstack 3 NBX is shipped with a 4-digit dial plan. If you import any
3-digit plan, you must manually specify any 3-digit extension ranges that are not set
by the imported plan. You must also manually change any device extensions so that
they fall within the appropriate range.
Within an extension list, you can assign a priority to each extension.
When the system accesses an extension list, it tries to use the highest
priority extension first. The highest priority is 1 and the lowest is 99.
For example, If the extension list contains extensions that are assigned to
T1 channels, you can assign unique priorities to each of the extensions.
If you instruct the system to place an outgoing call using the T1 line,
it attempts to use the highest priority extension/channel first. If the first is
unavailable, it tries the next highest priority extension/channel, and so on.
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From the Extensions List tab of the Dial Plan window, you can perform
these tasks:
■
Adding an Extension List
■
Modifying an Extension List
■
Removing an Extension List
The system restricts access to any specific Analog Line Card port or Digital
Line Card port. To directly dial the extension number that is associated
with one of these devices, you must have diagnostic privileges. In
addition, you cannot dial a prefix to obtain a Digital Line Card port.
Adding an
To add a new extension list:
Extension List
1 From the Dial Plan window, click the Extension Lists tab.
2 Click Add. The Add Extension List dialog box appears.
3 In the List Extension text box, type the number that you want to assign to
the new extension list. Do not select a number that is currently in use by
the system as either an extension or as the number of an extension list.
You may use the default extension number.
4 Type an asterisk preceding the extension number. By convention, the
asterisk indicates that the number represents an extension list.
5 In the Name text box, type the name that you want to assign to the new
extension list. Names can include uppercase and lowercase alphanumeric
characters, spaces, underscores, and hyphens.
6 If you want calls to cycle through the extensions in the list, check the
Cycle Extensions checkbox. Each time the system accesses the extension
list, it uses the next extension in the list. Calls effectively progress through
the list to balance the load of calls. If Cycle Extensions is not checked, the
extension selection always starts from the top of the list.
If an extension in the list has a higher priority, the highest priority
extension is used regardless of the Cycle Extension setting.
7 To move an extension from Extensions not in List to Extensions in List,
select the extension and click <<.
Use Shift-click to select a block of extensions, and Ctrl-click to select
several extensions in different locations in the list.
8 To change the priority of extensions:
Managing Extension Lists
61
a Select the extension from the Extensions in List scroll list.
b Enter a priority number in the text box below the list (from a high
of 1 through a low of 99).
c Click the Change Priority in List button.
The new priority appears as the number to the left of the item within
square brackets. The default value is 50. When the system accesses an
extension list, it first attempts to use the highest priority extension.
9 Click OK to enable your changes and leave the dialog box.
Example: If the extension list contains extensions that are assigned to
T1 channels, you can assign unique priorities to each extension. If you
instruct the system to place an outgoing call using the T1 line, it attempts
to use the highest priority extension/channel first, and, if the first is
unavailable, tries the next highest priority extension/channel, and so on.
Priorities range from 1 (highest) through 99 (lowest).
CAUTION: If you add an extension list, you must change the dial plan
configuration file to create a destination route to the new list. This
arrangement enables the system to route calls to the new list.
Modifying an
Extension List
To modify an extension list:
1 On the Extension Lists tab, select an extension list.
2 Click Modify. The Modify Extension List dialog box appears.
3 To modify the name of the Extension List, edit the contents of the Name
text box.
If you change the name of an extension list, you invalidate any aspect
of the dial plan that refers to the name. You must change all references
to the extension list name in the dial plan configuration file. If you made
your changes using an editor (as opposed to modifying the dial plan from
within the NBX NetSet utility), you must reimport the dial plan.
4 If you want calls to cycle through the extensions in the list, check the
Cycle Extensions checkbox. Each time that the system accesses the
extension list, it uses the next extension in the list. This arrangement
effectively progresses through the list to balance the load of calls. If Cycle
Extensions is not checked, the extension selection always starts from the
top of the list.
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CHAPTER 2: DIAL PLAN
5 To add an extension to the Extensions in List scroll list, select it in the
Extensions not in List scroll list and click the << button. Use Shift+click to
select a block of extensions, or Ctrl+click to select several extensions at
different locations in the list.
6 To remove an extension from the extension list, select it the Extensions in
List scroll list and click the >> button. The extension moves to the
Extensions not in List scroll list.
7 To change the priority of extensions:
a Select the extension from the Extensions in List scroll list.
b Enter a priority number in the text box below the list (from a high of
1 through a low of 99).
c Click the Change Priority in List button.
The new priority appears as the number to the left of the item within
square brackets. The default value is 50. When the system accesses an
extension list, it attempts to use the highest priority extension first.
8 Click OK to enable your changes and exit the dialog box.
Removing an
Extension List
The system does not let you remove an extension list that the dial plan
is using even if that extension list is empty. You must remove the
extension list from the dial plan before you can delete the extension list.
To remove an extension list:
1 On the Extension Lists tab, select the extension list you want to remove.
2 Click Remove. A dialog box prompts you to confirm the removal.
3 Click Yes.
CAUTION: Do not remove any of the predefined lists (lists 1 through 8).
Managing
Dial Plan Tables
The NBX system associates a normal dial plan table and a Least Cost
Routing table with each device. Devices include, for example, telephones,
Analog Line Card ports, or Digital Line Card ports. A telephone that has
no table assigned does not have permission to dial. A telephone without
an assigned table is flagged in Reports. For details, see “Generating a
Dial Plan Report” on page 50. For more information, see these topics:
■
Determining Which Devices Use Dial Plan Tables
■
Removing a Dial Plan Table
Managing Dial Plan Tables
Determining Which
Devices Use
Dial Plan Tables
63
You can view or change the devices associated with a particular dial plan:
1 In the NBX NetSet – Main Menu window, click Dial Plan. The Dial Plan
window appears, displaying the Operations tab.
2 Click the Tables tab.
3 From the list, select a dial plan table for which you want to list associated
devices. To list devices not assigned to any table, select (none).
4 Click Devices Using to open the Devices Using Dial Plan dialog box. For
descriptions of the field, see Table 12. If you select (none), the Devices
That Have No Dial Plan dialog box appears.
5 Select Normal to see which devices use table ID 1 (in this example) as the
Normal table.
6 Click Least Cost to see which devices use table ID 1 (in this example) as
the Least Cost table. Each device can use only one normal and one least
cost table.
7 To move a device to the Devices Using Table list, select it in the Devices
Not Using Table list and click <<. To move a device to the Devices Not
Using Table list, select it in the Devices Using Table list and click >>.
8 Click Close.
Table 12 Devices Using Dial Plan Table Fields
Field
Purpose
Dial Plan Table ID
The identification number of the dial plan table as
specified in the dial plan configuration file.
Dial Plan Table Name
The name of the dial plan table.
Table Usage
The type of table (either Normal or Least Cost). To select
a type, click either Normal or Least Cost.
Devices Using Table
A list of devices using this Normal or Least Cost
Routing table.
Devices Not Using Table
A list of devices not using this Normal or Least Cost
Routing table.
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CHAPTER 2: DIAL PLAN
Removing a
Dial Plan Table
Note that you must not remove any of the predefined tables (Internal,
Incoming, or Least Cost).
CAUTION: You cannot remove a dial plan table if a device is using it.
To remove the table, you must first remove all devices from the Devices
Using Table list.
To remove a dial plan table:
1 In the NBX NetSet – Main Menu window, click Dial Plan. The Dial Plan
window appears, displaying the Operations tab.
2 Click the Tables tab.
3 Select the table you want to remove.
4 Click Remove. A dialog box prompts you to confirm the removal.
5 Click Yes.
Managing Dial Plan
Pretranslators
Pretranslators are tables in the dial plan configuration file. Each entry in
a pretranslator table contains a string of one or more digits that are
compared to incoming or outgoing digits. When the digits match an
entry in the table, the NBX system performs the associated pretranslator
operations.
For more information, see:
Identifying Devices
Using Pretranslators
■
Identifying Devices Using Pretranslators
■
Identifying Devices Using Pretranslators for CLI
■
Removing a Pretranslator from the Dial Plan
To view a list of devices and their associated pretranslators, or to associate
a pretranslator with a specific device:
1 In the NBX NetSet – Main Menu window, click Dial Plan.
2 Click the Pretranslators tab.
3 Select a pretranslator, or (none) for devices that have no pretranslator.
4 Click Devices Using. The Devices Using Pretranslator dialog box appears.
If you selected (none) in step 3, you see a list of devices that do not use a
pretranslator. Table 13 describes each field. The fields are the same for the
Devices Using Pretranlator for CLI dialog box.
Managing Dial Plan Pretranslators
65
5 To move a device to the Devices Using Pretranslator list, select it in the
Devices Not Using Pretranslator list and click <<. To move a device to the
Devices Not Using Pretranslator list, select it in the Devices Using
Pretranslator list and click >>. Then
6 Click Close.
Table 13 Pretranslator Fields
Field
Purpose
Pretranslator ID
The identification number of the pretranslator as
specified in the dial plan.
Pretranslator Name
The name of the pretranslator as specified in the dial plan.
Devices Using
Pretranslator
Devices currently using the pretranslator.
Devices Not Using
Pretranslator
Devices not using the pretranslator.
To enable a specific pretranslator, update the dial plan. See “Importing
and Exporting Dial Plan Configuration Files” on page 45.
Identifying Devices
Using Pretranslators
for CLI
To view a list of devices that use a particular pretranslator to present
Calling Line ID (CLI) information on outgoing calls:
1 In the NBX NetSet – Main Menu window, click Dial Plan.
2 Click the Pretranslators tab and select a pretranslator from the scroll list.
For a list of devices that have no pretranslator, select (none).
3 Click Devices Using Pretranslator for CLI. The Devices Using Pretranslator
for CLI dialog box appears. If you selected (none) in step 3, you see a list of
devices that do not use a pretranslator for Calling Line ID.
4 To move a device to the Devices Using Pretranslator list, select it and click
<<. To move a device to the Devices Not Using Pretranslator list, select it
and click >>. Then click Close. See Table 13 for field descriptions.
Removing a
Pretranslator from
the Dial Plan
To remove a pretranslator:
1 In the NBX NetSet – Main Menu window, click Dial Plan.
2 Click the Pretranslators tab.
3 Select a pretranslator from the scroll list.
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CHAPTER 2: DIAL PLAN
4 Click Remove.
CAUTION: You cannot remove a pretranslator if any device is currently
using it. If you want to remove the pretranslator, you must first remove all
devices from the Devices Using Pretranslator list.
Configuring the
Dial Plan for the
4ESS Protocol (T1)
The 4ESS protocol, used on T1 Digital Line Cards that are configured for
PRI operation, requires specific configuration entries in the NBX system
dial plan. If you purchase the 4ESS protocol and SDN (Software Defined
Network) service from your long-distance carrier, you must make dial plan
changes similar to those outlined in “Configuring the Dial Plan for
Software-Defined Network Calls” on page 66. If you want to make long
distance calls or international long distance calls using the 4ESS protocol,
you must make dial plan changes similar to those outlined in
“Configuring the Dial Plan for North American Long Distance” on
page 66 and “Configuring the Dial Plan for International Long Distance”
on page 67.
Configuring the Dial Plan for Software-Defined Network Calls
In the NBX system dial plan, if you are using the 4ESS protocol and you
want to make SDN calls, you must configure a unique route to use for
SDN calls and include the letters SDN at the beginning of the dial string.
Example: The dial plan entry shown in adds the characters SDN (must be
capital letters) before the long-distance dialed digits. This example
assumes that route 4 is used for SDN calls.
Figure 4 Dial Plan Entries for SDN
/
Route Entry OperID Operation Value
/
----- ----- ------ --------- ----DestinationRouteOperation Create
4
1
1
prepend
SDN
Configuring the Dial Plan for North American Long Distance
In the NBX system dial plan, if you are using the 4ESS protocol and you
want to make long-distance calls, you must remove from the dial string
any digits that are dialed by users to access the long-distance service. For
example, if users normally dial 9 and then 1 to obtain a long-distance dial
tone, and then dial a 10-digit number, the dial plan must remove the 9
and the 1 and present only the 10-digit number to the long-distance
carrier. Otherwise, the 4ESS protocol rejects the call.
Overview of Voice Profile for Internet Mail
67
Example: If you use route 1 in the dial plan for Long Distance, and users
must dial 91 to make a long-distance call, the dial plan entries shown in
Figure 5 remove the first two digits (91) and submit the remaining 10
digits to the long-distance carrier.
Figure 5 Dial Plan Entries for North American Long Distance
Table Create 1 Internal 4 Digit Extensions
/
ID Entry Digits Min Max Class
Prio Route
/
-- ----- ------ --- --- ------------ ---- ----TableEntry Create 1
2 91
12 12 LongDistance
0
1
/
Route Entry OperID Operation Value
/
----- ----- ------ --------- ----DestinationRouteOperation Create
1
1
1
stripLead
2
Configuring the Dial Plan for International Long Distance
In the NBX system dial plan, if you are using the 4ESS protocol and you
want to make international long-distance calls, you must remove from
the dial string the digits 9011 that are dialed by users to access the
international long-distance service. For example, if the user dials the
string 9-011-44-1234-567890, the dial plan must remove the 9011
before passing the dialed digits to the long-distance carrier or the 4ESS
protocol rejects the call. See Figure 6.
Figure 6 Dial Plan Entries for International Long Distance
Table Create 1 Internal 4 Digit Extensions
/
ID Entry Digits Min Max Class
Prio Route
/
-- ----- ------ --- --- ------------ ---- ----TableEntry Create 1
3 9011
12 64 International
0
1
/
Route Entry OperID Operation Value
/
----- ----- ------ --------- ----DestinationRouteOperation Create
3
2
1
stripLead
Overview of Voice
Profile for Internet
Mail
4
With Voice Profile for Internet Mail (VPIM), users on one NBX system can
send voice mail to a user on another NBX or VPIM-compliant system.
VPIM is an optional component that requires a license, which appears in
the NBX NetSet Licenses dialog as Internet Voice Messaging License.
VPIM uses an SMTP server that is embedded in the NBX operating system.
To avoid abuse by spammers, an SMTP server should always be protected
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CHAPTER 2: DIAL PLAN
by a firewall. Configure the firewall to allow access to port 25 on the NBX
system only from valid VPIM systems that need to deliver VPIM messages
to the phone system. The NBX SMTP server is started only when the
system has a valid license for VPIM.
To send a voice mail message to a user on another VPIM-compliant
system, an NBX user first composes the voice mail message, using the
commands in the user’s voice mailbox. Depending on how the system’s
dial plan is configured, the user can specify the destination in two ways:
■
If the dial plan is configured for site codes, the user specifies the
destination site code followed by the star key (*) and the extension of
the person for whom the voice mail message is intended.
■
If the dial plan is configured without site codes, the user specifies the
extension of the person for whom the message is intended. This is
easier, but requires that each site use a unique extension range for
telephones.
■
A user who knows the IP address of a VPIM-compliant voice mail
system and the extension of a person who uses that system can
compose a voice mail message and then send it using these steps:
■
■
Dial the IP address, pressing the * key after each field in the
address, including the last field.
Dial the extension of the person followed by #.
The system administrator configures the dial plan and decides whether to
use site codes or unique extension ranges.
Configuring the
Dial Plan for VPIM
To fully define a VPIM connection between two NBX systems, you must
create entries in the dial plan for the following items:
■
The digit sequence that a telephone user must dial to access the VPIM
connection
■
The route number that is used to access the other NBX system
■
The extension list to which the VPIM route belongs
■
The operations that must be performed on the dialed digits in order to
create the appropriate outgoing digit sequence
Configuring the Dial Plan for VPIM
69
Figure 7 contains sample lines which, when added to an existing dial
plan, implement VPIM connections to two other NBX systems, one in
Atlanta and one in Dallas. Table 14 explains each entry.
Figure 7 Dial Plan with VPIM Implementation Commands
Table Create 1 Internal Extensions
/
Id Entry Digits
Min Max Class
/
-- ----- ----------- --- --- ------------TableEntry Create
1
45 V82
5
5 WAN
TableEntry Create
1
46 V83
6
6 WAN
Prio Route
---- ----0
532
0
533
/
Route Description
/
----- ----------DestinationRoute Create
532 Atlanta VPIM Connection
DestinationRoute Create
533 Dallas VPIM Connection
/
Route Entry DestinationExtension
/
----- ----- -------------------DestinationRouteEntry Create
532
1 *0003
DestinationRouteEntry Create
533
1 *0003
/
/
DestinationRouteOperation
DestinationRouteOperation
DestinationRouteOperation
DestinationRouteOperation
Create
Create
Create
Create
Route Entry OperId Operation
----- ----- ------ --------532
1
1 stripLead
532
1
2 prepend
533
1
1 stripLead
533
1
2 prepend
Value
----3
10*234*101*222*
3
10*234*101*100*
Table 14 Explanation of Entries in Figure 7
Field
Purpose
Table Create 1 Internal Extensions
This command is already present in all default dial
plans, and is included here as a reference point for
subsequent commands.
TableEntry Create 1
45
TableEntry Create 1 45
V82
5 5 WAN
0 532
This portion of the command creates entry 45 in
dial plan table 1 (the Internal Extensions table). The
choice of 45 as the entry number depends on how
many entries exist in table 1. This example assumes
that the highest number assigned to a previously
existing entry was 44.
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CHAPTER 2: DIAL PLAN
Table 14 Explanation of Entries in Figure 7 (continued)
Field
Purpose
V82 (Digits column)
The letter V (required, and must be a capital letter)
indicates that this is a VPIM connection, and the
82 indicates that the user must dial 82 to access
the VPIM connection and then dial the extension
the user wants to reach.
You can select any number of digits for a site
code. The selected number must not conflict with
other dial plan entries. This example assumes that
82 is not used in any other way in the dial plan.
Long digit sequences can annoy telephone users
and create the opportunity for dialing errors.
Min (5) Max (5)
Indicates that the total digit sequence dialed by
the user is 5 digits. The first two digits are the site
code (82 in this example) and the remaining 3
digits are the destination extension.
Class (WAN)
Indicates that this call is classified as WAN. All
VPIM calls have this classification.
Priority (0)
This field is unused by the dial plan; the default
value is zero (0).
Route (532)
In this example, the VPIM connection to the other
NBX system uses route 532. The route number
must be unique in the dial plan and in the range of
1–32768.
DestinationRoute Create 532 Atlanta VPIM Connection
This command creates route number 532 and
gives it the name Atlanta VPIM Connection.
DestinationRouteEntry Create 532
1 *0003
This command (mandatory for all VPIM routes)
assigns route 532 to the extension list *0003.
DestinationRouteOperation Create 532
1
1 stripLead 3
For DestinationRoute 532, entry 1, this command
creates operation 1, which removes the first three
digits, including the letter V, from the digit string,
leaving only the extension that the user dialed.
DestinationRouteOperation Create 532
1
2 prepend
10*234*101*222*
For DestinationRoute 532, entry 1, this command
creates operation 2, which places the string
10*234*101*222* in front of the extension. This
string represents the IP address of the target NBX
system. You must use the star character (*) to
separate the fields within the IP address and to
separate the IP address from the extension field.
Configuring VPIM Parameters Using NBX NetSet
Configuring VPIM
Parameters Using
NBX NetSet
VPIM Control
Parameters
71
Using the NBX NetSet utility, you can configure several VPIM control
parameters, check the status of the VPIM queues, and obtain statistics on
recent VPIM activity.
To set the VPIM control parameters:
1 In the NBX NetSet - Main Menu window, click NBX Messaging.
2 Click the VPIM tab. Table 15 describes the fields.
Table 15 VPIM Tab Fields
Field
Purpose
Max message size
Controls the size of incoming messages from other
sites. If a message is larger than the specified
value, the NBX system rejects it. The default value
represents a voice mail message approximately 4
to 5 minutes in length.
Default: 3000 Kbytes
Time between send
attempts (minutes)
For outgoing messages, the NBX system may not
be able to contact the target system on the first
attempt. If so, the NBX system attempts to contact
the target system later. To change the time
between attempts, change this number.
Default: 15 minutes
Minimum: 1 minute
Maximum: 60 minutes
Max number of send attempts
Specifies the number of times (Default: 4) that the
NBX system tries to connect to the target system.
After the specified number of send attempts, the
message is returned to the sender’s voice mailbox
with a notice that the message could not be sent.
Operations
Management
To manage outgoing voice mail messages, click Queue Management. The
Operations Management dialog box appears. See Table 16.
Table 16 Operations Management Dialog Box Fields
Field
Purpose
Operations status
The status of the queue of outgoing voice mail messages.
Possible values: Starting, Ready, Processing, Stopped.
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CHAPTER 2: DIAL PLAN
Table 16 Operations Management Dialog Box Fields (continued)
Field
Purpose
Number of outgoing
messages
The number of messages in the outgoing queue when this
dialog box was last accessed or refreshed.
Outgoing Messages
Time Waiting
The number of minutes that the voice mail message has
been waiting in the queue.
# Attempts
The number of times the NBX system has attempted to
send the voice mail message.
Sender
The e-mail address of the user who sent the voice mail
message.
Destination
The IP address and extension to which the voice mail
message is to be sent.
Remove
NOTE: You must stop the message queue before you can
remove any message.
Select a voice mail message in the scroll list and click this
button to remove the message from the queue. The NBX
system prompts you to confirm that you want to delete the
selected message.
Use Shift+Click to select a block of messages, or Ctrl+Click
to select several messages that are not in a single block.
Apply Buttons
Send all messages now The NBX system attempts to send all messages immediately
and then waits for the required number of minutes before
making another send attempt.
Send all messages now The NBX system makes a single attempt to send each
and then delete them message on the queue.
Any undelivered messages are returned to sender with
delivery failure notices, and then deleted from the outgoing
mail queue.
Delete all messages
now
The NBX system deletes all messages from the outgoing
mail queue.
These messages are not returned to sender with delivery
failure notices.
Stop operations
Stops the queue if it is currently active.
Start operations
Starts the queue if it is stopped.
Configuring VPIM Parameters Using NBX NetSet
Statistics
73
To view the most recent statics for voice mail messages, click the Statistics
button. The Statistics window appears. Table 17 lists the fields in this
window and explains their purpose.
Table 17 Statistics Window Fields
Field
Purpose
Incoming Messages
Total messages received
by system
The number of messages received by this NBX system
from voice mailboxes on other systems
Total messages delivered
to user mailboxes
The number of voice mail messages delivered to user
voice mailboxes on this NBX system. If this number is
smaller than the total number of messages received,
some messages have not yet been delivered.
Outgoing Messages
Total messages submitted The number of messages submitted by users of this
for external delivery
NBX system for delivery to voice mailboxes on other
systems
Total messages delivered
to external recipients
The number of messages for which a confirmation of
delivery has been received.
Total messages returned
to sender on failed
delivery
The number of messages that have been returned
because they could not be delivered.
Failed Outgoing Messages
If a message appears in this list, the NBX system has tried to deliver the message and
has failed. The NBX system attempts to resend the message up to the retry limit.
Default: 4. Minimum: 1. Maximum: 10.
Date/Time
The date and time that the message was originally
submitted for delivery
Attempts
The number of attempts that the NBX system has made
to send each message
Sender
The person on the local NBX system who created and
sent the voice mail message
Destination
The defined target for the voice mail message
Reason
The reason for the most recent failure to deliver the
message
Reset and Reboot Times
Last reset command
The date and time of the last reset command. Sets all
VPIM statistics to 0 (zero) and deletes all messages from
the Failed Outgoing Messages queue.
If this field’s date and time are more recent than Last
system reboot, then the NBX system began to collect
the currently displayed statistics at this date and time.
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CHAPTER 2: DIAL PLAN
Table 17 Statistics Window Fields (continued)
Field
Purpose
Last system reboot
The date and time of the most recent reboot of the NBX
system. An NBX system reboot resets all VPIM statistics
to 0 (zero).
If this field’s date and time are more recent than Last
reset command, then the NBX system began to collect
the currently displayed statistics at this date and time.
Advanced Settings
The NBX system transmits VPIM voice mail messages by attaching them
to e-mail messages that are sent using SMTP (Simple Mail Transfer
Protocol) or ESMTP (Extended Simple Mail Transfer Protocol).
Click the Advanced Settings button to access the Advanced Settings
dialog box. Set the parameters to control the behavior of SMTP. Table 18
describes the fields.
Table 18 VPIM Advanced Settings Dialog Box
Field
Purpose
SMTP OK response
Definition: The amount of time that the local
system waits for a response from the remote system.
Detail: After the local system attempts to open a
connection to the remote system, it waits for a
response giving the status of the connection.
Minimum: 5 minutes
Default: 5 minutes
SMTP HELO response
Definition: The amount of time that the local
system waits for an acknowledgement of a HELO
message.
Detail: After the greeting, the local system sends
either a HELO (or EHLO to get ESMTP) message to
identify itself. The other site then responds with an
acknowledgement of that message.
Minimum: None defined.
Default: 5 minutes
Configuring VPIM Parameters Using NBX NetSet
75
Table 18 VPIM Advanced Settings Dialog Box (continued)
Field
Purpose
SMTP EHLO response
Definition: The amount of time that the local
system waits for acknowledgement of a EHLO
message.
Detail: After the greeting, the local system sends
either a HELO (or EHLO to get ESMTP) message to
identify itself. The other site then responds with an
acknowledgement of that message.
Minimum: None defined.
Default: 5 minutes
SMTP MAIL response
Definition: The amount of time that the local
system waits for an acknowledgement of a MAIL
command.
Detail: After the local system sends out a MAIL
command along with the From information, it waits
for a response from the other site to indicate that the
MAIL command was received.
Minimum: 5 minutes
Default: 5 minutes
SMTP RCPT response
Definition: The time that the local system waits for
an acknowledgement of a RCPT command.
Detail: After the system sends out a RCPT command
(one per recipient), it waits for a response from the
other site indicating acceptance or rejection of the
recipient.
Minimum: 5 minutes
Default: 5 minutes
SMTP DATA response
Definition: The time that the local system waits for
an acknowledgement of a DATA command.
Detail: After the local system has specified all of the
recipient information, it sends a DATA command to
indicate that it is ready to send the mail message
itself. It then waits for the other site to acknowledge
the DATA command.
Minimum: 2 minutes
Default: 2 minutes
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CHAPTER 2: DIAL PLAN
Table 18 VPIM Advanced Settings Dialog Box (continued)
Field
Purpose
SMTP DATA END response
Definition: The time that the local system waits,
after sending the entire message, for an
acknowledgement from the other site that the
message was received.
Detail: After the local system sends the entire
message, it waits for a response from the other site
indicating acceptance of the message.
Minimum: 10 minutes
Default: 10 minutes
SMTP RSET response
Definition: The time that the local system waits for
an acknowledgement of a RSET command.
Detail: Since the RSET command resets the SMTP
connection, the local system must wait for the other
site to reset itself and acknowledge.
Minimum: None defined
Default: 10 minutes
SMTP QUIT response
Definition: The time that the local system waits for
an acknowledgement of the QUIT command.
Detail: When the local system is finished
transmitting a message and wants to break the
connection, it sends a QUIT command. It then waits
for the other site to acknowledge the QUIT
command. When the acknowledgement arrives, or
when the time-out value is reached, whichever
comes first, the local system breaks the connection.
Minimum: None defined
Default: 5 minutes
Overview of Virtual Tie Lines
Configuring Domain
Name Server
Information
77
When the SMTP utility attempts to send e-mail, it must be able to resolve
a host name within an e-mail address and determine the proper IP
address from that name. Domain Name Servers on the Internet perform
this function. You can configure up to three DNS entries with the NBX
NetSet utility. The NBX system uses the second and third entries if the first
or second cannot be reached. To configure DNS information in the NBX
NetSet utility:
1 In the NBX NetSet - Main Menu window, click System Configuration.
2 Click the System Settings tab and the System-wide button. The System
Settings dialog box appears.
3 In the Primary DNS, Secondary DNS, and Tertiary DNS text boxes, type the
IP addresses of three Domain Name Servers. If you have the IP address of
only one server, type it in the Primary DNS text box. If you have the IP
address of only two servers, type them in the Primary and Secondary DNS
text boxes. Click OK.
Overview of
Virtual Tie Lines
A Virtual Tie Line (VTL) provides a way to make calls between NBX system
sites that are separated geographically but tied together by a Wide Area
Network (WAN) connection. An NBX 100 system can support up to 8
simultaneous VTL connections; a SuperStack 3 NBX system can support
up to 48. VTLs are a licensed feature of the NBX systems.
On any NBX system, any licensed VTL connection can be used either for
an incoming VTL call from any site or for an outgoing VTL call to any site.
A VTL connection is not dedicated in the same way as a physical tie line,
which always connects the same pair of sites. In the example in Figure 8,
the VTLs on the Chicago NBX system can be used for any combination of
incoming and outgoing VTL calls to either Atlanta or Dallas.
The NBX system can reroute VTL calls that fail to reach their destination
on the first attempt. For details, see “Call Rerouting for Virtual Tie Lines”
on page 90.
■
You must implement either IP On-the-Fly or Standard IP on an NBX
system in order to use VTL connections to other NBX systems.
■
VTL connections cannot be configured to run through firewalls or NAT
routers.
■
When you calculate the number of devices on an NBX system, do not
include the number of VTLs.
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CHAPTER 2: DIAL PLAN
There are two implementation techniques you can use: unique extension
ranges or site codes, as described next.
VTL Connections
Using Unique
Extension Ranges
If you can restrict the extension ranges on each of the NBX systems so
that they do not overlap, you can configure the dial plans to route calls
based only on the extension that is being dialed. The caller does not have
to dial any digits to specify the site.
Assess your growth plans for each site to verify that, as you add
telephones, you do not exceed the extension ranges that you have
defined.
Figure 8 depicts a configuration that uses unique extension ranges
Figure 8 Multi-site Network using Virtual Tie Lines
Chicago
NBX System
Extensions
1000 – 1999
WAN
Atlanta
NBX System
Extensions
2000 – 2999
Dallas
NBX System
Extensions
3000 – 3999
In the sample network shown in Figure 8, each site is set up to use a
unique range of telephone extensions. The dial plan on each of the
systems is configured so that whenever a call is made to an extension not
located at the local site, the NBX system sets up a VTL connection to the
appropriate site.
To make a call to a user in Dallas, a user in Chicago dials a Dallas
extension (3000 through 3999). The dial plan on the Chicago NBX system
is configured to set up the necessary VTL connection to the Dallas NBX
system, and then to the extension at that site.
Overview of Virtual Tie Lines
79
See “Dial Plan Configuration” on page 82 for further information on
how to set up VTLs in the dial plan.
VTL Connections
Using Site Codes
The simpler way to implement VTL connections uses a site code,
consisting of one or more digits that a user must dial to specify the site
that is being called. This approach requires no restriction on the
telephone extension ranges, but does require the caller to dial the site
code digits as well as the extension.
A site code can by any number of digits you want, but typically, one- or
two-digit numbers make the most sense. The dial plan at each site must
include appropriate routing instructions for each of the possible site code.
Figure 9 shows three sites connected by VTLs. All sites use the same
range of extension numbers (1000 through 3999). To reach someone on
another NBX system, a user must dial a site code (61, 62, or 63 in this
example) followed by an extension.
Figure 9 Virtual Tie Lines Using Site Codes
Chicago
NBX System
Extensions
1000 – 3999
Site Code 61
WAN
Atlanta
NBX System
Extensions
1000 – 3999
Site Code 62
Dallas
NBX System
Extensions
1000–3999
Site Code 63
To call someone in Atlanta, a user in Chicago must dial the site code 62
and then the appropriate extension (1000 through 3999). To reach a user
in Dallas, a user in Chicago must dial 63 and then the appropriate
extension (1000 through 3999). Because the extension is preceded by the
site code, there is no conflict between the extension dialed and an
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CHAPTER 2: DIAL PLAN
identical extension number at the local site (Chicago). The choice of site
codes is made by the person who configures the dial plans for the sites.
See “Dial Plan Configuration” on page 82 for more information on how
to set up VTLs in the dial plan.
Conference Calls
Users can set up conference calls over VTLs in much the same way that
they set up conference calls with other users at their local site, or at a site
reachable by an external telephone line. On NBX 100 systems, you can
have up to four 4-person conference calls simultaneously. On a
SuperStack 3 NBX system, you can have up to twelve 4-person
conference calls simultaneously.
To be able to make conference calls between sites, you must have IGMP
(Internet Group Management Protocol) implemented on your network.
Conference Calls Using Site-Unique Extensions
In Figure 8, a user in Chicago establishes a conference call with two users
in Atlanta and one user in Dallas as follows:
1 Dial the first extension in Atlanta.
2 After the user answers, press Conference and dial the second extension
in Atlanta.
3 When the second user answers, press Conference again to connect all
three users.
4 Press Conference again and dial the extension of the user in Dallas.
5 When the fourth party answers, press Conference to connect all four
users.
Conference Calls Using Site Codes
In Figure 9, if you work in the Chicago office, to establish a conference
call with two people in Atlanta and one person in Dallas:
1 Dial the site code (62) and the first extension.
2 After the first user answers, press Conference, dial the same site code
(62) and the second extension in Atlanta.
3 When the second Atlanta user answers, press Conference again to
connect all three users.
4 Press Conference again and dial the Dallas site code (63) and then the
extension of the user in Dallas.
How to Configure a Virtual Tie Line
81
5 When the Dallas user answers, press Conference again to connect all
four users.
Conference Calls Involving Site Codes and Off-Site Telephones
In Figure 9, you work in the Chicago office and want to establish a
conference call with someone in Atlanta, someone in Dallas, and
someone at an external telephone number, you:
1 Dial the Atlanta site code (62) and then the extension.
2 After the Atlanta user answers, press Conference and dial the Dallas site
code (63) and then the extension.
3 When the Dallas user answers, press Conference again to connect all
three users.
4 Press Conference again and dial the external telephone number.
If the site requires that you dial 9 to reach an outside telephone line, and
if the call is a long-distance call, the user might dial a number in area
code 367 using the digit sequence 913675551212.
5 When the person answers, press Conference again to connect all four
users.
How to Configure a
Virtual Tie Line
License Installation
Configuring a working VTL connection between two systems involves:
■
License Installation
■
Dial Plan Configuration
■
Verification of the Virtual Tie Line
■
You must obtain a license for VTLs. License levels are 2, 4, or 8 VTLs on
the NBX 100 system, and 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, or 48 VTLs on a SuperStack 3
NBX system.
■
Each VTL license applies only to the NBX system on which it is
installed. To connect three sites by VTLs and to have each site support
up to 8 simultaneous active VTL connections, you must install a
separate license key for 8 VTLs on each of the three NBX systems.
■
To increase the number of VTLs above one of the levels on a system,
you must add one or more incremental licenses of 2 VTLs each.
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CHAPTER 2: DIAL PLAN
To install a VTL license:
1 In the NBX NetSet - Main Menu window, click Operations. Click the
Licenses tab and the Add License button. In the text boxes, type the
license key code.
2 Click OK and then restart the NBX system.
Dial Plan
Configuration
You configure the dial plan after you install the VTL license. See “License
Installation” on page 81 for information about VTL licenses.
To configure the dial plan for VTLs, you must define:
■
Routes within the dial plan
■
Digit sequences to be used to select those routes
■
Operations to be performed for each route
Example: Dial Plan with Site-Unique Extensions
In Figure 8, each of the three sites uses a unique extension range. In the
Internal table in the Chicago system dial plan, the entries shown in
Figure 10 control the routing of calls if a user dials an extension in the
2000 through 2999 range (Atlanta extensions) or the 3000 through 3999
range (Dallas extensions) respectively. The dial plans for the Atlanta and
Dallas NBX systems would contain similar, but not identical entries.
An explanation of each line in the dial plan follows Figure 10.
How to Configure a Virtual Tie Line
83
Figure 10 Sample Dial Plan Entries for Chicago Using Site-Unique Extensions
Table Create 1 Internal 4 Digit Extensions
/
Id Entry Digits
Min Max Class
/
-- ----- ----------- --- --- ------------TableEntry Create
1
3 2
4
4 WAN
TableEntry Create
1
4 3
4
4 WAN
Prio Route
---- ----0
522
0
523
/
Route Description
/
----- ----------DestinationRoute Create
522 Atlanta VTL Connection
DestinationRoute Create
523 Dallas VTL Connection
/
Route Entry DestinationExtension
/
----- ----- -------------------DestinationRouteEntry Create
522
1 *0006
DestinationRouteEntry Create
523
1 *0006
/
Route Entry OperId Operation
/
----- ----- ------ --------DestinationRouteOperation Create
522
1
1 prepend
DestinationRouteOperation Create
523
1
1 prepend
Value
----192*168*25*100*
192*168*35*100*
The first TableEntry Create command modifies entry 3 in Table 1. Entry 3
watches for 4-digit sequences (Min = 4, Max = 4) beginning with 2
(extensions 2000 through 2999) and specifies route 522 whenever a
4-digit sequence falls within this range. Entry 4 watches for 4-digit
sequences (Min = 4, Max = 4) beginning with 3 (extension 3000 through
3999) and specifies route 523 whenever a 4-digit sequence falls within
this range. Route numbers 522 and 523 are examples only. The choice of
route numbers is made by the person who configures the dial plans for
the sites.
Two DestinationRoute Create commands create routes 522 and 523. The
Description field contains any text you want to use to describe each
route.
Two DestinationRouteEntry Create commands specify the extension list
for routes 522 and 523. Extension list *0006 is reserved for VTLs.
Two DestinationRouteOperation Create commands prepend the IP
Address of the destination NBX system to the extension that the user
dialed. In this example, the IP address for Atlanta is 192.169.25.100 and
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CHAPTER 2: DIAL PLAN
for Dallas, the IP address is 192.168.35.100. You must use the asterisk (*)
character to separate fields within the IP address and to separate the IP
address from the destination extension.
Example: Dial Plan with Site Codes
In Figure 9, each of the three sites uses the same extension range. In the
Internal table in the Chicago system dial plan, the entries shown in
Figure 11 select route 522 and 523 if a user dials the site codes 62 and 63
respectively, and then dials an extension. The dial plans for the Atlanta
and Dallas NBX systems would contain similar, but not identical entries.
An explanation of each line in the dial plan follows Figure 11.
Figure 11 Sample Dial Plan Entries for Chicago Using Site Codes
Table Create 1 Internal 4 Digit Extensions
/
Id Entry Digits
Min
/
-- ----- ----------- --TableEntry Create
1
100 62
6
TableEntry Create
1
101 63
6
Max
--6
6
Class
------------WAN
WAN
Prio Route
---- ----0
522
0
523
/
Route Description
/
----- ----------DestinationRoute Create
522 Atlanta VTL Connection
DestinationRoute Create
523 Dallas VTL Connection
/
Route Entry DestinationExtension
/
----- ----- -------------------DestinationRouteEntry Create
522
1 *0006
DestinationRouteEntry Create
523
1 *0006
/
/
DestinationRouteOperation
DestinationRouteOperation
DestinationRouteOperation
DestinationRouteOperation
Create
Create
Create
Create
Route Entry OperId Operation
----- ----- ------ --------522
1
1 stripLead
522
1
2 prepend
523
1
1 stripLead
523
1
2 prepend
Value
----2
192*168*25*100*
2
192*168*35*100*
The first TableEntry Create command creates entry 100 in Table 1. This
assumes that the highest previous entry in Table 1 was 99 or lower. Entry
100 watches for the 2-digit sequence 62 followed by a 4-digit extension
and specifies route 522 whenever a user dials such a 6-digit (Min = 6 and
How to Configure a Virtual Tie Line
85
Max = 6) sequence. Entry 101 watches for the 2-digit sequence 63
followed by a 4-digit extension and specifies route 523 whenever a user
dials such a 6-digit sequence. The choice of route numbers is made by the
person configuring the dial plans for the sites.
Two DestinationRoute Create commands create routes 522 and 523. The
Description field contains any text you want to use to describe each
route.
Two DestinationRouteEntry Create commands specify the extension list
for routes 522 and 523. Extension list *0006 is the default extension list
for VTLs.
For each DestinationRoute, two DestinationRouteOperation Create
commands perform two functions:
Updating the
Extension List
■
The stripLead command removes the two digits (62 or 63) leaving the
4-digit extension the user dialed.
■
The prepend command adds the IP Address of the destination NBX
system to the extension that the user dialed. In this example, the IP
address for Atlanta is 192.169.25.100 and for Dallas, the IP address is
192.168.35.100. In the dial plan, you must use an asterisk (*) instead
of a period (.) to separate the fields within the IP address, and to
separate the IP address from the destination extension.
The final step in activating the virtual tie lines is to add the VTL extensions
to the appropriate extension list (*0006).
To update the extension list:
1 In the NBX NetSet - Main Menu window, click Dial Plan.
2 Click the Extension Lists tab.
3 Select the Virtual Tie Lines extension list (*0006).
4 Click Modify.
5 In Extensions not in List, scroll down until you see the first VTL item.
The number of VTL items depends on the VTL license you have.
Each VTL item has (VTL) at the beginning of the line, followed by the
name of the virtual tie line.
Table 19 describes the VTL extension ranges.
6 Select the first VTL, and click << to move the VTL to Extensions in List.
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7 Repeat until all VTLs are moved to Extensions in List.
Table 19 Virtual Tie Line Extension Ranges
Adding VTL Devices
to the Pretranslators
(Optional)
Platform
Extension Range
SuperStack 3
4-digit dial plan
6500–6523
SuperStack 3
3-digit dial plan
The default dial plan for a SuperStack 3 NBX system is
4-digit. If you convert to a 3-digit dial plan, you must
manually change each 4-digit extension to a 3-digit
extension. For VTLs, you can select any unused 3-digit
extension from the external extension range (600–799).
NBX 100
4-digit dial plan
The default dial plan for an NBX 100 system is 3-digit. If you
convert to a 4-digit dial plan, you must manually change
each 3-digit extension to a 4-digit extension. For VTLs, you
can select any unused 4-digit extension from the external
extension range (6000–7999).
NBX 100
3-digit dial plan
623–630
If you optionally added a pretranslator to the dial plan to reformat the
information on incoming calls, you must add the VTL devices to that
pretranslator.
To add the VTL devices to the pretranslator:
1 In the NBX NetSet - Main Menu window, click Dial Plan.
2 Click the PreTranslators tab.
3 In the scroll list, select VTL.
4 Click the Devices Using button.
5 In the Devices Using Pretranslator window, scroll down in the Devices Not
Using Pretranslator list until you see the devices associated with VTLs. For
a 4-digit dial plan, the VTL device extensions range from 6500 through
6523. For a 3-digit dial plan, VTL device extensions range from 623
through 630.
6 Select the first VTL device extension.
7 Scroll until you can see all of the VTL device extensions.
8 Simultaneously press the Shift key and click the last VTL device extension
to select the entire block of VTL device extensions.
9 To move all VTL device extensions to the Devices Using Pretranslator list,
click <<.
How to Configure a Virtual Tie Line
Verification of the
Virtual Tie Line
87
After you have configured the VTLs on each of two NBX systems, you
must verify that the VTL connection works properly.
To verify that a working VTL connection exists between two systems, you
must verify that:
■
Local System Verification — Verify that the configured VTLs appear on
each system.
■
Remote Access Verification — Verify that each of the systems can
access each other.
■
Placing Telephone Calls — Verify that telephone calls can be made
between all pairs of connected systems in both directions.
Local System Verification
On each system you must verify that you can view the VTLs using the NBX
NetSet utility. To verify that you can view the local VTLs:
1 In the NBX NetSet - Main Menu window, click Device Configuration.
2 Click the Virtual Tie Lines tab.
3 Verify that all of VTLs you have configured appear in the list.
In our example, if you perform this verification test on the Chicago NBX
system, the results appear as shown in Figure 12.
Figure 12 Example: Virtual Tie Lines Tab
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CHAPTER 2: DIAL PLAN
Remote Access Verification
To verify that each system can access the other, on each system:
1 On the Virtual Tie Lines tab, select the VTL and then click the Query
Remote button.
2 In the Query Remote System window, type the IP address of the remote
system in the IP address text box. Click the Query button. If the
verification is successful, the window displays the VTLs configured at the
remote site.
Example: You have installed an NBX system in Chicago, Atlanta, and
Dallas, and you have configured two VTL connections on each of the
Chicago and Atlanta systems. The IP addresses of the three systems are:
■
Chicago — 192.168.15.100
■
Atlanta — 192.168.25.100
■
Dallas — 192.168.35.100
If you perform the Query Remote operation from the Chicago system to
the Atlanta system, the results might look like Figure 13.
Figure 13 Query Remote Window (Example)
The Atlanta system (IP address 192.168.25.100) shows two installed but
idle VTL connections. If you performed the Query Remote test from the
How to Configure a Virtual Tie Line
89
Atlanta office and specified the IP address of the Chicago system, it
should show two installed but idle VTL connections.
If the local NBX system fails to access the remote system, an error
message appears similar to the one shown in Figure 14.
Figure 14 Query Remote Error Message
If you have not yet configured the remote system to support VTLs, this
message indicates that you must do so before the Query Remote
operation can succeed.
If you have configured the remote system to support VTLs, the error
message indicates that the local NBX system cannot access the remote
system using the IP address you specified. To remedy the problem:
1 Verify that you specified the correct IP address for the remote system.
2 Verify that the remote NBX system is running properly.
3 Verify that the remote NBX system is using the dial plan which you
modified to configure VTLs on that system.
4 Work with your network administrator to verify that WAN connection
between the two sites is properly configured and is working.
5 Verify that the VTL extensions are included in the Devices Using
Pretranslator table.
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CHAPTER 2: DIAL PLAN
Placing Telephone Calls
The final step when verifying a virtual tie line connection is to place
telephone calls in both directions between each pair of connected sites.
Call Rerouting for
Virtual Tie Lines
To enable the NBX system to better deal with network problems, you can
configure the system dial plan so that some virtual tie line (VTL) calls can
be rerouted if a VTL connection cannot be made.
VTL calls can be rerouted if:
■
The dial plan contains an invalid IP address
■
The remote NBX system is not responding
■
All VTL channels on the remote NBX system are currently busy
■
All IP addresses in the IP On-the-Fly address pool are in use
Some VTL calls are not rerouted. Example situations in which a call is not
rerouted include:
■
Placing a VTL call to another system with the intention of hopping off
(dialing a telephone number local to the other system) when all trunks
are busy on the other system
■
Dialing an invalid telephone number
If you normally connect calls from site A to site B using VTL connections,
you can define an alternate route to site B using Analog Line Card ports,
Digital Line Card channels, etc. If a network problem such as a router
failure occurs, or if all VTL ports on the site A NBX system are busy, VTL
calls that fail to reach site B are then dialed using the alternate route.
If your VTL call is rerouted, you see additional routing information in the
display panel on your NBX telephone.
The NBX system log file contains records of failed VTL calls that were
rerouted.
Example Dial Plan
Entries
If you normally dial a site code such as 72 to reach site B, and if the
telephones at the other site use four-digit extensions, the dial plan entries
to handle the initial call and the rerouting of the call might look like the
example shown in Figure 15.
Call Rerouting for Virtual Tie Lines
91
Figure 15 Sample Dial Plan Entries for Rerouting VTL Calls
Table Create 1 Internal 4 Digit Extensions
/
Id Entry Digits
Min Max Class
/
-- ------ ------------ --- --- ------------TableEntry Create
1
8 72
6
6 WAN
Prio Route
---- ----0
6
/
Routes
/
Route Description
/
----- ----------DestinationRoute Create
6 Site B
/
Route Entry DestinationExtension
/
----- ----- -------------------DestinationRouteEntry Create
6
1 *0006
DestinationRouteEntry Create
6
2 *0001
/
/
DestinationRouteOperation
DestinationRouteOperation
DestinationRouteOperation
DestinationRouteOperation
Create
Create
Create
Create
Route Entry OperId Operation
----- ----- ------- --------6
1
1 stripLead
6
1
2 prepend
6
2
1 stripLead
6
2
2 prepend
Value
----2
192*168*155*100*
2
1978247
Explanation:
The TableEntry Create command specifies that when a user on the local
NBX system dials a six-digit number beginning with the digits 72, the call
is routed via route 6, which is the route that normally contains only the
VTL extension list (*0006).
To allow VTL calls to be rerouted, route 6 is configured to use both the
VTL extension list and the Line Cards extension list (*0001). Calls that use
route 6 can be completed using devices in either of these extension lists.
There are four DestinationRouteOperation lines. The first two lines specify
the primary way to handle the call, using VTL methods. The last two lines
specify the backup way to handle the call if the first method fails.
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Successful VTL Call
If there are no network problems:
1 The first line (Entry 1, OperId 1) removes the digits 72.
2 The second line (Entry 1, OperId 2) prepends the IP address of the NBX
system at site B in front of the dialed extension number.
Unsuccessful VTL Call
If a network problem or a lack of VTL ports prevents the VTL call from
reaching its destination:
1 The third line (Entry 2, OperId 1) removes the digits 72.
2 The fourth line (Entry 2, OperId 2) prepends an appropriate dial string and
dials out over an analog telephone line.
Managing Existing
Virtual Tie Lines
Modifying a Virtual
Tie Line Name
After VTLs are installed and you have verified that they are working
properly, you can manage them using the NBX NetSet utility. There are
NBX NetSet utility functions for:
■
Modifying a Virtual Tie Line Name
■
Viewing and Resetting Virtual Tie Line Statistics
■
Enabling Audio Compression
■
Enabling System-wide Silence Suppression
You can change the name of a VTL. The name appears in NBX NetSet
lists, and helps you identify each VTL.
To modify the name of a VTL:
1 In the NBX NetSet - Main Menu window, click Device Configuration.
2 Click the Virtual Tie Lines tab. The window that appears contains the list
of existing VTLs, and the status of each one.
3 Select a VTL from the list.
4 Click Modify. The Modify dialog box appears.
5 In the New VTL name text box, type the name you want to assign to this
VTL. Click OK. Verify that the name change is on the Virtual Tie Lines tab.
Managing Existing Virtual Tie Lines
Viewing and
Resetting Virtual Tie
Line Statistics
93
You can view the statistics for a VTL at any time.
To view statistics for a VTL:
1 In the NBX NetSet - Main Menu window, click Device Configuration.
2 Click the Virtual Tie Lines tab.
3 From the list, select the VTL.
4 Click the Statistics button. The Statistics dialog box appears. The fields are
described in Table 20.
5 To reset all VTL statistics, click Reset.
Another way to reset all VTL statistics is to restart the NBX system.
6 When you are finished, click Close.
Table 20 Virtual Tie Line Statistics Fields
Field
Description
NOTE: All statistics apply to the time period since the most recent Reset command
or since the most recent system reboot, whichever was more recent. To determine
the starting time for the displayed statistics, compare the Last reset command with
the time of the Last system reboot. Both are displayed at the bottom of the VTL
Statistics window.
Number of outgoing
VTL calls made
The number of outgoing calls made over all virtual tie lines
(VTLs) since the most recent reset command or since the time
the NBX system was last restarted. Each time you restart the
NBX system, you reset the statistics for all VTLs.
Number of incoming
VTL calls received
The number of incoming calls received over all VTLs since the
most recent reset command or since the time the NBX
system was last restarted.
Number of active VTL The number of calls currently active on all VTLs.
calls
Maximum number of The maximum number of VTL calls that have been active at
concurrently active
the same time on this NBX system since the most recent
VTL calls
reset command or since the time the NBX system was last
restarted.
Incoming VTL calls
rejected due to all
VTLs busy
The number of telephone calls that would have arrived from
other NBX systems over VTL channels, but could not be
accepted because all local VTL ports were busy when the
calls arrived.
Outgoing VTL calls
rejected due to all
VTLs busy
The number of telephone calls that would have been sent
from the local NBX system over VTL channels, but could not
be sent because all local VTL ports were busy when the calls
were made.
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Table 20 Virtual Tie Line Statistics Fields
Enabling Audio
Compression
Field
Description
Rerouted VTL calls
The number of calls that did not reach their destination
when attempted over VTL channels, and were rerouted using
another device.
Last reset command
The date and time of the most recent Reset for this VTL.
Last system reboot
The date and time of the most recent reboot of the NBX
system.
You can enable or disable ADPCM (Adaptive Differential Pulse Code
Modulation) audio compression on a system-wide basis for VTLs. The
default condition disables audio compression.
Do not enable any of the bandwidth controls unless you have network
congestion problems you cannot solve otherwise. The bandwidth
controls can reduce network traffic, but they result in compromises to
audio quality.
When you enable VTL audio compression on an NBX system the VTL
software attempts to use audio compression on all VTL calls. If the NBX
system on the other end of the VTL call is not configured to support
audio compression, the local VTL software attempts to find a compatible
communications mode.
To enable VTL audio compression:
1 In the NBX NetSet - Main Menu window, click System Configuration.
2 On the System Settings tab click Audio Settings.
3 Click the Audio Compression on VTL Calls check box and then click OK.
Enabling
System-wide Silence
Suppression
You can enable or disable silence suppression on a system-wide basis for
VTLs. The default condition disables silence suppression. When you
enable VTL silence suppression on an NBX system, the VTL software
attempts to use silence suppression on all VTL calls. If the other NBX
system is not configured to support silence suppression, the local VTL
software attempts to find a compatible communications mode.
Do not enable silence suppression unless you have network congestion
problems you cannot solve otherwise. Enabling silence suppression can
reduce network traffic, but the result is a compromise to audio quality.
Using a VTL Password
95
To enable silence suppression on VTLs:
1 In the NBX NetSet - Main Menu window, click System Configuration.
2 On the System Settings tab click Audio Settings.
3 Click the System-wide Silence Suppression on VTL Calls check box, and
then click OK.
Using a VTL
Password
To allow users on one NBX system to place VTL calls to another NBX
system and then place long-distance (toll) calls from that location (a
practice called ‘hop off’), you can configure a VTL password.
When an NBX system receives a VTL call from a user on another NBX
system, it can allow that user to make long-distance calls if the incoming
VTL call contains the password. Otherwise, such calls are not allowed. If
you set up two classes of VTL calls (with and without passwords), you can
permit or disallow hop off.
To enable an NBX system to handle incoming hop off calls, use the NBX
NetSet utility to create or modify a VTL password. (See the next topic,
Configuring a VTL Password.) To enable an NBX system to send hop off
VTL calls, configure the dial plan to include the VTL password. (See
Configuring VTL Passwords in the Dial Plan on page 96.)
Configuring a VTL
Password
For each NBX system that can receive VTL calls, you use the NBX NetSet
utility to configure a local system VTL password.
To configure the password:
1 In the NBX NetSet - Main Menu window, click System Configuration.
2 Click the Security tab.
3 Click the Virtual Tie Lines Password button. The Change Virtual Tie Lines
Password dialog box appears.
4 Type the administrator password in the Current Admin Password text box.
5 Type the new VTL password in the New Virtual Tie Line Password text
box.
Passwords are from 8 to 15 characters in length and must contain only
letters and numbers. Upper and lower case letters are permitted.
6 Retype the new VTL password in the Re-enter New Password text box.
7 Click OK.
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CHAPTER 2: DIAL PLAN
Configuring VTL
Passwords in the
Dial Plan
For each remote NBX system that controls hop-off by means of a VTL
password, you must configure that password into the VTL commands in
the local dial plan.
If you use site codes to access other NBX systems through VTL
connections, you can configure one set of VTL connections that permit
hop-off and are accessed one set of site codes. You can configure
another set of VTL connections that do not permit hop-off and are
accessed using a different set of site codes.
If you use unique extension ranges at each site, and therefore do not dial
a site code when placing VTL calls to users at those sites, you can still use
codes to access VTL connections that permit hop-off at the far end.
Figure 16 shows how to configure VTL passwords in a dial plan, using site
codes that permit hop-off and other site codes that do not. Each entry is
explained following the figure.
Using a VTL Password
97
Figure 16 Dial Plan Entries for VTL Passwords
Table Create 1 Internal 4 Digit Extensions
/
Id Entry Digits
Min
/
-- ----- ----------- --TableEntry Create
1
100 62
6
TableEntry Create
1
101 63
6
TableEntry Create
1
102 72
6
TableEntry Create
1
103 73
6
/
/
DestinationRoute
DestinationRoute
DestinationRoute
DestinationRoute
Create
Create
Create
Create
/
/
DestinationRouteEntry
DestinationRouteEntry
DestinationRouteEntry
DestinationRouteEntry
Route
----522
523
524
525
Create
Create
Create
Create
/
/
DestinationRouteOperation
DestinationRouteOperation
DestinationRouteOperation
DestinationRouteOperation
DestinationRouteOperation
DestinationRouteOperation
DestinationRouteOperation
DestinationRouteOperation
Max
--6
6
32
32
Class
------------WAN
WAN
WAN
WAN
Prio Route
---- ----0
522
0
523
0
524
0
525
Description
----------Atlanta VTL Connection
Dallas VTL Connection
Atlanta VTL Connection with password
Dallas VTL Connection with password
Route Entry DestinationExtension
----- ----- -------------------522
1 *0006
523
1 *0006
524
1 *0006
525
1 *0006
Create
Create
Create
Create
Create
Create
Create
Create
Route Entry OperId Operation Value
----- ----- ------ --------- ----522
1
1 stripLead 2
522
1
2 prepend
192*168*25*100*
523
1
1 stripLead 2
523
1
2 prepend
192*168*35*100*
524
1
1 stripLead 2
524
1
2 prepend192*168*25*100*ATLPassW*
525
1
1 stripLead 2
525
1
2 prepend 92*168*35*100*DALPWord*
The first TableEntry Create command creates entry 100 in Table 1. This
assumes that the highest previous entry in Table 1 was 99 or lower. Entry
100 watches for the 2-digit sequence 62 followed by a 4-digit extension
and specifies route 522 whenever a user dials such a 6-digit (Min = 6 and
Max = 6) sequence. Entry 101 watches for the 2-digit sequence 63
followed by a 4-digit extension and specifies route 523 whenever a user
dials such a 6-digit sequence. The choice of route numbers is made by the
person configuring the dial plans for the sites.
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CHAPTER 2: DIAL PLAN
The next two TableEntry Create commands are set up in a similar manner
to handle VTL connections with passwords. If a user dials 72 followed by
a 4-digit extension, the VTL call uses route 524. If a user dials 73 followed
by a 4-digit extension, the VTL call uses route 525. These two commands
specify a minimum of 6 digits (for example, if the caller is calling an
internal extension preceded by the site code) and a maximum of 32 digits
(for example if the caller is calling a long-distance or international number
preceded by the site code).
The first two DestinationRoute Create commands create routes 522 and
523. The Description field contains text that describes each route.
The second two DestinationRoute Create commands create routes 524
and 525, the routes that are used with a VTL password.
The four DestinationRouteEntry Create commands specify the extension
list for routes 522, 523, 524, and 525. Extension list *0006 is the default
extension list for VTLs.
For the first two DestinationRoutes, two DestinationRouteOperation
Create commands perform two functions:
■
The stripLead command removes the two digits (62 or 63) leaving the
4-digit extension the user dialed.
■
The prepend command adds the IP Address of the destination NBX
system to the extension that the user dialed. In Figure 16, the IP
address for Atlanta is 192.169.25.100; for Dallas, 192.168.35.100. In
the dial plan, you must use an asterisk (*) instead of a period (.) to
separate the fields within the IP address, and to separate the IP
address from the destination extension.
For the second two DestinationRoutes, two DestinationRouteOperation
Create commands perform two similar functions.
■
The stripLead command removes the two digits (72 or 73) leaving the
4-digit extension the user dialed.
■
The prepend command adds the IP address and system password of
the destination NBX system to the extension dialed by a user. In
Figure 16, the IP address for Atlanta is 192.169.25.100 and the
password is ATLPassW. For Dallas, the IP address is 192.168.35.100
and the password is DALPWord. In the dial plan, you use an asterisk
(*) instead of a period (.) to separate fields within the IP address and to
separate the IP address from the destination extension.
Using a VTL Password
99
To place a hop-off call to 555-1212 in area code 903 through the Atlanta
system, a user on a remote system would dial 72919035551212. The 72
code sets up a VTL connection to Atlanta that incudes the Atlanta
system’s VTL password, and the remaining digits are used to dial the
number (9 accesses an outside line to obtain dial tone from the local
carrier, 1 accesses the long-distance carrier, and the remaining digits
specify the long-distance number).
If the same user used site code 62 to place a call to the Atlanta office,
only toll-free, emergency, and internal call would be allowed.
Toll Calls Without a
VTL Password
If a local user has configured his telephone to forward calls to a
long-distance number, then an incoming VTL call to that telephone does
not need to supply the local system’s VTL password in order for the call to
be forwarded.
Music On Hold
If two users are talking on a VTL connection, and the first user places the
call on hold, the second user hears Music On Hold only if his local system
is configured to play it.
Troubleshooting VTL
Calls
Table 21 contains a list of error situations, the possible causes and the
action to take in each case.
Table 21 VTL Errors and Corrections
Error Condition
Possible Causes
Actions
Long pause after dialing. Telephone display contains Remote server does not
“VTL” during the pause. Busy signal is then heard. respond
Test the connection to the
remote system using the
Query Remote function.
After you finish dialing a VTL call, you get a busy
signal and the message “All ports busy” appears in
the telephone display panel.
1. Verify that the licenses
appear when you access the
tab.
1. No VTL license installed.
2. VTL device extensions not
added to Extension List
*0006.
3. All local VTL connections
are currently in use.
4. All VTL connections at the
remote site are currently in
use.
2. Verify that the *0006
extension contains the VTL
device extensions.
3. On the Virtual Tie Line tab,
verify that there is at least one
idle VTL connection.
4. Use the Query Remote
function to verify that there is
at least one idle VTL
connection.
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Table 21 VTL Errors and Corrections
Error Condition
Possible Causes
Actions
After you finish dialing a VTL call, you get a busy
1. Local dial plan is not
signal and the message “Invalid Number” appears in properly configured.
the telephone display panel.
2. Dial plan on the remote
(target) system in not properly
configured.
1. Examine the local dial plan
for errors.
No audio
1. Verify that the IP setting in
the System Settings,
System-wide dialog box is “IP
On-the-Fly” or “Standard IP.”
Install a license and change
the setting, if necessary.
2. Examine the dial plan on
the remote system for errors.
3.Verify that the password for
3. You are trying to use
the remote system is used in
hop-off without the necessary both dial plans.
password.
1. Telephones are not
configured to use either IP
On-the-Fly or Standard IP.
2. VTL Audio compression is
supported on only one of the
two NBX systems.
2. Verify that audio
compression is enabled on
both systems.
Caller ID information does not appear correctly in
the telephone display panel.
Dial Plan
Configuration File
Commands
1. Invalid local pretranslator.
1. Examine the local dial plan
for pretranslator errors.
2. VTL extensions are not in
the VTL pretranslator “Devices 2. Verify that VTL extensions
Using” table.
appear in the left-hand table
for the pretranslator.
This section provides the syntax and description of each command used
to create the information in the dial plan configuration file. In addition,
Table 22 categorizes and summarizes all the dial plan commands.
The Alphabetical List of Dial Plan Commands provides a detailed
description and syntax of each command. See the next topic, “Dial Plan
Command Format” for a description of each component of dial plan
commands.
To see how these commands are implemented in a dial plan, see “Sample
Solutions Using Dial Plan Configuration File Commands” on page 116.
You can also open and examine any of the dial plans shipped with your
NBX system.
Dial Plan Command
Summary
Table 22 provides a brief summary the dial plan commands. These
commands are listed and categorized in the order that they might
logically appear in a working dial plan.
Dial Plan Configuration File Commands
101
See “List of Dial Plan Commands” on page 103 for a complete list and
description of each dial plan command, including syntax and arguments.
Command syntax is case insensitive. In the sample dial plans (supplied
with the system), and in this section, commands use upper and lower
case to make them easier to read.
An entry that begins with “n” for example, nDialPlanID, indicates an
integer field. Integer IDs are used in many places, and must be within
the range 1 through 32768. The system reserves dial plan table ID
numbers 1, 2, and 3 for Internal, Incoming, and Least Cost Routing,
respectively.
An entry that begins with “sz” (for example, szDescription) indicates a
field composed of alphanumeric characters. Acceptable characters are
a through z, A through Z, and 0 through 9.
Each line in the configuration file must contain a complete command.
The NBX system reads all lines in the configuration file, and ignores only
those lines containing one or more syntax errors. The system treats any
line beginning with / (forward slash) as a comment and ignores it.
CAUTION: Do not place comments at the end of a command line.
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Table 22 Dial Plan Command Summary
Command Name
Description
Table Create
Creates a dial plan table.
TableEntry Create
Creates an entry in a dial plan table.
DestinationRoute Create
Creates a route that specifies the primary and
alternative destination device of a call.
DestinationRouteEntry Create
Creates a destination route entry that
identifies a single destination device or device
list.
DestinationRouteOperation Create
Creates a digit manipulation operation for a
destination route entry.
TimedRoute Create
Creates a timed route (a route that the system
uses based on defined criteria for time of day
and day of week).
TimedRouteEntry Create
Creates a timed route entry specifying either a
time of day or system mode, day of the week
criteria, and the destination route to use if
that criteria are met.
TimedRouteOperation Create
Creates a digit manipulation operation for a
timed route entry.
PreTranslator Create
Creates a pretranslator entry and specifies a
string of digits that are compared to the
incoming digits.
PreTranslatorEntry Create
Creates a pretranslator entry and specifies a
string of digits that are compared to the
incoming digits.
PreTranslatorEntry Delete
Deletes a pretranslator entry or deletes all
entries for a particular pretranslator.
PreTranslatorOperation Create
Creates a digit manipulation operation for a
pretranslator entry.
ExtensionLength
Specifies the length of extension numbers for
system devices.
ExtensionRange
Specifies a range of extensions for each type
of device.
ExternalSettings
Specifies settings for several aspects of
external devices.
Dial Plan Configuration File Commands
List of Dial Plan
Commands
103
The dial plan commands are described in this section. They are listed in
alphabetical order:
■
DestinationRoute Create
■
DestinationRouteEntry Create
■
DestinationRouteOperation Create
■
ExtensionLength
■
ExtensionRange
■
ExternalSettings
■
PreTranslator Create
■
PreTranslatorEntry Create
■
PreTranslatorEntry Delete
■
PreTranslatorOperation Create
■
Table Create
■
TableEntry Create
■
TimedRoute Create
■
TimedRouteEntry Create
■
TimedRouteOperation Create
DestinationRoute Create
Syntax
DestinationRoute Create nRouteId szDescription
Description Creates a route that specifies the primary and alternative
destination device of a call (for example, which CO Line or Digital Line
Card port over which to route the call). If the destination route already
exists, this command removes all of its entries and operations, and
overwrites its description with the new information.
Arguments
nRouteId — An integer in the range 1 – 32768, uniquely identifying this
destination route.
szDescription — The description or name of the destination route.
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Example: This example creates destination route 3 and names it “Voice
Application”: DestinationRoute Create 3 Voice Application
DestinationRouteEntry Create
Syntax
DestinationRouteEntry Create nRouteId nEntryId szExtension
Description creates a destination route entry that identifies a single
destination device or device list.
If the specified destination route entry already exists, this command
overwrites it with the new information. During routing, the system
checks the list of destinations in ascending nEntryId order (nEntryId 1 first).
Arguments
nRouteId — An integer in the range 1 through 32768.
nEntryId — An integer in the range 1 through 32768. The system checks
the list of destinations in ascending nEntryId order, and uses the first
available one.
szExtension — The extension of the destination device or device list. Note
that the system does not dial this extension (that is, it neither checks the
extension against a dial plan nor subjects it to Class of Service restrictions,
digit manipulation, or routing) but instead uses the extension only to look
up the device in the internal device directory.
Example: This example command creates, in route table 3, entry 1
and defines extension list *0003 as the destination for this route entry.
Extension list *0003 contains the voice mail extensions/ports.
DestinationRouteEntry Create 3 1 *0003
DestinationRouteOperation Create
Syntax
DestinationRouteOperation Create nRouteId nEntryId nOperId
szOperation szValue
Description Creates a digit manipulation operation for a destination
route entry. If the specified digit manipulation operation already exists,
this command overwrites it with the new information. During routing the
Dial Plan Configuration File Commands
105
system processes the entire list of operations in ascending nOperId order
(nOperId 1 first).
Arguments
RouteId — An integer in the range 1 through 32768.
nEntryId — An integer in the range 1 through 32768 specifying the
destination route entry to which this operation applies.
nOperId — An integer in the range 1 through 32768. The system
processes the list of operations in ascending nOperId order.
szOperation — The name of the digit manipulation operation to perform:
stripLead, stripTrail, replace, prepend, append.
szValue — A value used by the operation, either the string of digits to
prepend, append, replace with, or the number of digits to strip.
Example: This example command creates, for destination route 3,
entry 1, an operation numbered 1, with the associated function
stripLead, and an argument of 1, indicating that the command removes
(strips) one leading digit from the dialed number before dialing.
DestinationRouteOperation Create 3 1 1 stripLead 1
ExtensionLength
Syntax
ExtensionLength nExtensionLength
Description The length of extension numbers for system devices. The
default is 3 for NBX 100 systems. The default is 4 for SuperStack 3 NBX
systems.
Arguments
nExtensionLength — specifies either 3 to designate a a 3-digit dial plan, or
4 to designate a 4-digit dial plan.
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ExtensionRange
Syntax
ExtensionRange szExtensionType szLowestExtension szHighestExtension
Description A range of extensions for each type of device. When the
system automatically generates extensions it assigns them from within
this range. When you manually generate an extension number, verify that
it is within the valid range. During a dial plan import operation, the
system does not validate that existing extensions are within the specified
range. 3Com strongly recommends that you configure the dial plan
before you define any devices in the system.
Arguments
szExtensionType — One of these: Telephone, Park, Auto Attendant, Hunt
Group, External.
szLowestExtension — The lowest desired extension for this device type.
szHighestExtension — The highest desired extension for this device type.
Example: These commands define the extension range for telephones as
100 through 449, for call park as 601 through 609, for Auto Attendants
as 500 through 599, for hunt groups as 450 through 499, and for
external lines as 600 through 799.
ExtensionRange
ExtensionRange
ExtensionRange
ExtensionRange
ExtensionRange
Telephone 100 449
Park 601 609
Autoattendant 500 599
HuntGroup 450 499
External 600 799
CAUTION: Do not define extension ranges that overlap. The only
exception is Park, which must be within the External range.
Dial Plan Configuration File Commands
107
ExternalSettings
Syntax
ExternalSettings szExternalKeysetPrefix
szFirstAutoDiscoverExtension szDefaultAutoExtension
Description Specifies settings for several aspects of external devices.
Arguments
szExternalKeysetPrefix — The digits that are prepended to external calls
made in Keyset mode. This is used to determine the Class of Service (CoS)
for external calls made in Keyset mode. Typical values for this digit are 8,
9, or 0 (zero). This prefix is set to the appropriate number in each
country’s dial plan.
Example: In the default internal dial plan table, the digit 9 instructs the
system to connect the call to an external line. When a telephone has a
button mapped to an external device, and the user places a call using
that external device, the system prepends the szExternalKeysetPrefix digit
to the digits dialed by a user; then the system applies the dial plan tables
to determine call Class of Service.
szFirstAutoDiscoverExtension — The first extension used when
autodiscovering external devices. This must be in the specified range of
lowest/highest external extensions.
The system assigns extensions starting with this number and
incrementing upward. For information on the Auto Discovery topic, see
“Using Auto Discovery for Initial System Configuration” in the
NBX Installation Guide.
The default value for a 3-digit system is 750, and for a 4-digit system is
7250. Typically, systems do not use all of the extensions from 600
through 799 (or 6000 through 7999). If, however, the system uses all of
these extensions and needs another one, it starts looking from the
beginning of the range and selects the first unused one.
szDefaultAutoExtension — The default extension the system uses for
forwarding incoming calls. This is always 500.
The system must direct each incoming call (on an external line) to an
extension. After you import the dial plan configuration file, and complete
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the Auto Discovery process, you can manually configure the extension for
each analog line and each Digital Line Card channel, if you want.
PreTranslator Create
Syntax
PreTranslator Create nPreTranslatorId szDescription
Description Creates a pretranslator. If the pretranslator already exists,
this command removes all of its entries and operations, and overwrites its
description with the new information.
Arguments
nPreTranslatorId — An integer in the range 1 through 32768.
szDescription — The description or name of the pretranslator.
Example: This command creates a pretranslator, designates it as the first
one (number 1) and give it the title “4-to-3-digit DID/DDI pretranslator.”
PreTranslator Create 1 4-to-3-digit DID/DDI pretranslator
PreTranslatorEntry Create
Syntax
PreTranslatorEntry Create nPreTranslatorId nEntryId szDigits
Description Creates a pretranslator entry and specifies a string of digits
that are compared to the incoming digits. If the pretranslator entry
already exists, this command overwrites it with the new information.
Arguments
nPreTranslatorId — An integer in the range 1 through 32768.
nEntryId — An integer in the range 1 through 32768.
szDigits — The digits to compare to the incoming digits.
Example: These example commands create, in pretranslator 1, entries 1
through 10, each of which looks for a different single digit (0 through 9)
in the incoming digits.
PreTranslatorEntry Create 1 1 0
Dial Plan Configuration File Commands
PreTranslatorEntry
PreTranslatorEntry
PreTranslatorEntry
PreTranslatorEntry
PreTranslatorEntry
PreTranslatorEntry
PreTranslatorEntry
PreTranslatorEntry
PreTranslatorEntry
Create
Create
Create
Create
Create
Create
Create
Create
Create
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
109
2 1
3 2
4 3
5 4
6 5
7 6
8 7
9 8
10 9
PreTranslatorEntry Delete
Syntax
PreTranslatorEntry Delete nPreTranslatorId nEntryId
Description Deletes a pretranslator entry or deletes all entries for a
particular pretranslator.
Use caution when using this command to delete Pretranslator entries in
an existing Dial Plan. In general, it is best to delete all tables, routes, and
pretranslators at the beginning of each dial plan configuration file. This
precaution avoids the potential conflicts or unpredictable actions caused
by importing new dial plan entries on top of an existing dial plan.
For instructions on how to edit the dial plan configuration file to delete
existing tables, routes, and pretranslators, see “Creating Dial Plan
Configuration Files” on page 44.
Arguments
nPreTranslatorId — An integer in the range 1–32768.
nEntryId — An integer in the range 1–32768 or * for all entries.
Example: This command deletes pretranslator entry 3 from
pretranslator 2.
PreTranslatorEntry Delete 2 3
This command deletes all pretranslator entries from pretranslator 2.
PreTranslatorEntry Delete 2 *
Normally this command is not necessary. It is better to delete an entire
dial plan rather than import a new dial plan over it. To accomplish this,
3Com recommends using specific commands at the top of every dial plan
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configuration file. For an example of this technique, see “Creating Dial
Plan Configuration Files” on page 44.
PreTranslatorOperation Create
Syntax
PreTranslatorOperation Create nPreTranslatorId nEntryId
nOperId szOperation szValue
Description Creates a digit manipulation operation for a pretranslator
entry. If the specified digit manipulation operation already exists, this
command overwrites it with the new information. During pretranslation,
the system processes the list of operations in ascending nOperId order
(nOperId 1 first).
Arguments
nPreTranslatorId — An integer in the range 1 through 32768.
nEntryId — An integer in the range 1 through 32768 specifying the
pretranslator entry to which this operation applies.
nOperId — An integer in the range 1 through 32768. The
system processes the list of operations in ascending nOperId order
(nOperId 1 first).
szOperation — The name of the digit manipulation operation to perform.
Values are: stripLead, stripTrail, replace, prepend, append.
szValue — The value to use in the operation, either the string of digits to
prepend, append, replace with, or the number of digits to strip.
Table Create
Syntax
Table Create nDialPlanTableId szDescription
Description Creates a dial plan table to control the routing of calls
placed by devices. Dial plan tables apply to internal devices such as
telephones, incoming calls from outside the NBX system, and Least Cost
Routes. If the dial plan table already exists, this command removes all
entries from the table, and fills the table with the new information.
Dial Plan Configuration File Commands
111
Arguments
nDialPlanTableId — An integer in the range 1 through 32768. The default
dial plan tables use ID numbers 1 through 3:
1 — Internal dial plan table
2 — Incoming dial plan table
3 — Least Cost Routing table
szDescription — The description or name of the dial plan table. the NBX
NetSet utility uses this name to refer to the table.
Example: This example command creates dial plan table 1 and names it
“Internal 4 Digit Extensions.”
Table Create 1
Internal 4 Digit Extensions
TableEntry Create
Syntax
TableEntry Create nDialPlanTableId nEntryId szDigits
nMinDigits nMaxDigits szCallClass nPriority nRouteId
Description Creates an entry in a dial plan table that specifies a string
of digits that are compared to the dialed digits. If the dial plan table entry
already exists, this command overwrites it with the new information.
Dial plan table entries make Class of Service and call routing decisions
based on the correspondence of dialed digits and table entry digits.
Arguments
nDialPlanTableId — An integer in the range 1 through 32768. The system
reserves three ID numbers:
1 — Internal dial plan table
2 — Incoming dial plan table
3 — Least Cost Routing table
nEntryId — An integer in the range 1 through 32768. Each entry must
have a unique ID. If two entries have the same ID, the system uses the
entry closer to the bottom of the configuration file (the one processed last).
szDigits — A string of dialed digits in a dial plan entry.
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nMinDigits — An integer specifying the minimum number of digits to
collect.
nMaxDigits — An integer specifying the maximum number of digits to
collect.
szCallClass — The call class for this dial plan entry. The call class
corresponds to permissions granted to users in their Class of Service.
Values are Internal, Local, LongDistance, International, WAN, TollFree,
Emergency, COCode, Wireless, Other, Toll, AlternateLong, Operator,
TrunkToTrunk, Diagnostics, and NotAllowed.
nPriority — Not presently used. Always set to zero (0).
nRouteId — An integer specifying the ID of the route to use when this dial
plan entry is matched. A route ID of zero (0) indicates that this entry has
no defined route; digits are transmitted ed as soon as they are dialed.
Example: This example command creates (in table ID 1) table entry 1,
which looks for 3 as the first digit in a 4-digit string (minimum and
maximum number of characters are both specified as 4), classifies the call
type as “Internal”, assigns the call a priority of zero (the only acceptable
priority in this product release). Because the destination is an internal
extension, there is no need for a defined route so the route number is zero.
TableEntry Create
1 1
3
4 4
Internal
0 0
TimedRoute Create
Syntax
TimedRoute Create nRouteId nDefaultDestinationRouteId
szDescription
Description Creates a timed route (a route that the system uses based
on defined criteria for time of day and day of week). If the timed route
already exists, this command removes all of its entries and overwrites its
description and defaultDestinationRoute with the new information.
Arguments
nRouteId — An integer in the range 1 through 32768 which uniquely
identifies this timed route.
Dial Plan Configuration File Commands
113
nDefaultDestinationRouteId — An integer in the range 1 through 32768
identifying the destination route the system must use if none of the
entries in this timed route match the current time of day.
szDescription — A description or name of the timed route.
Example: This example command creates timed route 7 which uses
destination route 1, defined in the “Routes” section of the system
configuration file. The description of route 7 is “Business Hours Long
Distance.”
TimedRoute Create 7 1 Business Hours Long Distance
TimedRouteEntry Create
Syntax
TimedRouteEntry Create nRouteId nEntryId szStartTime
szEndTime szDaysOfWeek nDestinationRouteId
Description Creates a timed route entry specifying either a time of day
or system mode, day of the week criteria, and the destination route to
use if that criteria are met. If the specified timed route entry already
exists, this command overwrites it with the new information. During
routing, the system checks the list of timed route entries in ascending
nEntryId order (nEntryId 1 first). The system performs any digit
manipulation operations that apply to the specified destination.
Arguments
nRouteId — An integer in the range 1 through 32768.
nEntryId — An integer in the range 1 through 32768. The system checks
the list of timed routes in ascending order based on nEntryId.
szStartTime — Start time in 24-hour format, for example, 13:30 for
1:30 p.m. You can use either 24:00 or 00:00 to specify midnight. Instead
of specifying times, you can enter a system mode name (open, closed,
lunch, or other). For each system mode, the system knows the start and
stop times. If you use one of the system modes, both szStartTime and
szEndTime parameter must be the same.
You define start and end times for system modes through the NBX NetSet
utility. Click System Configuration, then the Business Identity tab, and the
Business Hours button. Enter the times you want and click OK.
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Example: If you define business hours from 8:00 to 17:00 on Mondays,
Wednesdays and Fridays, and from 9:00 to 18:00 Tuesdays and
Thursdays, then a timed route entry both szStartTime and szEndTime set
to “open” applies differently on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday than on
Tuesday and Thursday.
You set the beginning and ending times for open, lunch, and other using
the NBX NetSet utility. Click System Configuration, then the Business
Identity tab, and the Business Hours button. The NBX system treats all
times not included these three categories as closed.
szEndTime — End time in 24-hour format, for example, “18:30” for
6:30 p.m. You can use either 00:000 or 24:00 to indicate midnight. If you
use a system mode (open, lunch, or other) for szStartTime, you must use
the same system mode for szEndTime.
szDaysOfWeek — A seven character mask in which each character
position represents one day of the week, beginning with Sunday as the
first character and ending with Saturday as the last character. The NBX
system excludes any day if a dot “.” character appears in that day's
position. (As a convention, you place the first letter of each day in the
appropriate character position to indicate that the day is included, but
you can use any letter you want; the presence of a dot “.” in a given
position excludes the day of the week and the presence of any other
character in that position selects that day.
You use the szDaysOfWeek parameter to specify when this timed route is
active. You can specify that the timed route entry apply to all days of the
week. If you specify the start and end times for open mode differently on
some days of the week than for other days, one timed route entry can
operate differently depending on the day.
Example: The system interprets “SMT.T.S” (or “XXX.X.X”) as “all days
except Wednesday and Friday.” The “dot” characters in positions four
and six exclude the fourth and sixth days of the week (Wednesday and
Friday).
nDestinationRouteId — The Id of the destination route to use if this entry’s
time of day and day of week criteria are met.
Example: This example command creates two entries, one to define the
route to use during business hours (open) and the other to define the
route when the business is closed.
Dial Plan Configuration File Commands
115
The first entry is timed route 7, timed route entry 1. The two occurrences
of the word “Open” instruct the system to use the start time and end
time defined by the “open for business” hours, and the letters
“SMTWTFS” indicate that this entry applies to all seven days of the week
(Sunday through Saturday).
The number 6 designates destination route 6, defined in the system
routes table. Because this entry applies to the “open for business” hours,
route 6 could define a least cost route for outgoing long distance calls.
The second entry is timed route 7, timed route entry 2. The two
occurrences of the word “Closed” instruct the NBX system to use the
start time and end time defined by the “business closed” hours, and the
letters “SMTWTFS” indicate that this entry applies to all seven days of the
week (Sunday through Saturday). The number 3 designates destination
route 3, defined in the system routes table. Because this route applies to
the “business closed” hours, route 3 could connect the incoming call to
an Auto Attendant menu that tells the caller that the company is closed
and gives instructions on how to leave a message and how to reach
someone in an emergency.
TimedRouteEntry Create 7 1 Open Open SMTWTFS 6
TimedRouteEntry Create 7 2 Closed Closed SMTWTFS 3
TimedRouteOperation Create
Syntax
TimedRouteOperation Create nRouteId nEntryId nOperId
szOperation szValue
Description Creates a digit manipulation operation for a timed route
entry. If the specified digit manipulation operation already exists, this
command overwrites it with the new information. During routing, the
system processes the list of operations in ascending nOperId order
(nOperId 1 first).
CAUTION: Timed route operations are performed before
Destination Route operations. So if you strip a leading 9 using a
TimedRouteOperation Create command verify that you don't mistakenly
perform the same action in a DestinationRouteOperation Create
command. If you made that error, you would lose the first dialed digit.
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Arguments
nRouteId — An integer in the range 1 through 32768.
nEntryId — An integer in the range 1 through 32768 specifying the timed
route entry to which this operation applies.
nOperId — An integer in the range 1 through 32768. The
system processes the list of operations in ascending nOperId order
(nOperId 1 first).
szOperation — The name of the digit manipulation operation to perform:
stripLead, stripTrail, replace, prepend, append.
szValue — The value used by the operation, either the string of digits to
prepend, append, replace with, or the number of digits to strip.
Sample Solutions
Using Dial Plan
Configuration File
Commands
This section describes several requirements that a customer might have,
and for each one, provides a sample solution. An explanation follows
each step in the solution.
For a detailed explanation of each command, see “Dial Plan
Configuration File Commands” on page 100.
Customer Requirement 1. Assume that the telephone company
passes 4-digit numbers to the NBX system for each incoming telephone
call (for example, numbers in the range 5200 through 5300). If the
system uses 3-digit extensions in the range 200 through 300, you could
define a single pretranslation operation that performed a stripLead to
remove the first digit. For example, the system could remove the number
five from an incoming number such as 5278, and pass the call to
extension 278.
To accomplish the pretranslation:
PreTranslator Create 1 4-to-3-digit T1 DID/DDI Pretranslator
Explanation: Create pretranslator table 1, called “4-to-3-digit T1
DID/DDI Pretranslator.”
PreTranslatorEntry Create 1 1 5
Explanation: Create, in pretranslator table 1, entry number 1, which
applies when the first digit in the sequence is 5.
Sample Solutions Using Dial Plan Configuration File Commands
117
PreTranslatorOperation Create 1 1 1 stripLead 1
Explanation: For pretranslator table 1, PreTranslatorEntry 1, create the
first PreTranslatorOperation. This performs a stripLead operation,
removing a single leading digit from the incoming number.
Customer Requirement 2. Assume that the telephone company
passes 10-digit numbers to the NBX system for each incoming telephone
call (for example, numbers in the range 4567-89-3000 through
4567-89-3500). If the system uses 4-digit extensions in the range 2000
through 2500, you can pass an incoming 10-digit number such as
4567-89-3210 to extension 2210 by using two pretranslation operations.
The first operation performs a stripLead operation to remove the first 7
digits, leaving 210. The second would perform a prepend to add the digit
2 to the front of the number, creating 2210, which matches an extension
within the extension range.
These entries in a dial plan configuration file would accomplish the
pretranslation:
PreTranslator Create 1 10-to-3-digit T1 DID/DDI Pretranslator
Explanation: Create pretranslator table 1, called “10-to-3-digit T1
DID/DDI Pretranslator.”
PreTranslatorEntry Create 1 1 4567893
Explanation: Creates the first entry in pretranslator table 1. This entry
looks for sequence of digits 4567893.
This example assumes that all numbers begin with the same 7 digits
(4567-89-3) and differ only in the last 3 digits. If this assumption is
incorrect, you can add PreTranslatorEntry Create lines to describe all of
the possible variations.
PreTranslatorOperation Create 1 1 1 stripLead 7
PreTranslatorOperation Create 1 1 2 prepend 2
Explanation: For PreTranslator table 1, PreTranslatorEntry 1, create the
first PreTranslatorOperation. This performs a stripLead operation,
removing the first seven leading digits from the incoming number.
Then create operation 2, which prepends the digit 2 to the remaining
3-digit number. The resulting 4-digit number matches one of the internal
extensions in the system.
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Customer Requirement 3. Assume that the telephone company
assigns a group of 4-digit DID/DDI numbers from 6000 through 6199;
however, you want to use internal telephone extensions from 3000
through 3199. Also, you want the number 6111 to connect the caller to
an Auto Attendant line for the customer service group.
Add these lines to the dial plan configuration file:
PreTranslator Create 1 6XXX to 3XXX Translator
Explanation: Creates PreTranslator 1, and names it “6XXX to 3XXX
Translator”
PreTranslatorEntry Create 1 1 6111
Explanation: Creates the first entry in Pretranslator 1. This entry looks
for the specific sequence of digits 6111.
PreTranslatorOperation Create 1 1 1 replace 5502
Explanation: Creates the first operation associated with PreTranslator 1,
PreTranslatorEntry 1. Defines a replace operation that replaces all digits in
the incoming sequence (6111) with 5502. In this example, 5502 connects
you to the Auto Attendant menu for customer service.
PreTranslatorEntry Create 1 2 6
Explanation: Creates, the second entry in Pretranslator 1; this entry
looks for any incoming digit string beginning with the number 6.
PreTranslatorOperation Create 1 2 1 stripLead 1
Explanation: Creates the first operation associated with PreTranslator 1,
PreTranslatorEntry 2. Defines a stripLead operation that removes (strips)
the first (leading) digit from the incoming 4-digit sequence. This removes
the 6 from the incoming numbers (6000 through 6199) leaving 3-digit
numbers from 000 through 199.
PreTranslatorOperation Create 1 1 2 prepend 3
Explanation: Creates the second operation associated with PreTranslator 1,
PreTranslatorEntry 2. Defines a prepend operation that adds the digit 3 at
the beginning of the 3-digit string (created by the previous operation). The
incoming numbers from 000 through 199 become numbers from 3000
through 3199.
The Incoming dial plan table may already contain this line. If necessary,
modify the line to match.
Sample Solutions Using Dial Plan Configuration File Commands
119
TableEntry Create 2 4 3 4 4 Internal 0 0
Explanation: In table ID 2 (Incoming dial plan table) entry 4 instructs the
system to look for 3 as the first in a sequence of 4 digits (both Min and
Max are 4). If the system finds such a sequence, it assigns Internal as the
call class. The system does not use the number in the priority column,
so it remains 0 (zero). The system directs the call to route 0 (zero),
the default route for internal extensions.
Customer Requirement 4. Assume that the company is located in
New York, and has two long distance telephone carriers: ABC, which
provides a low-cost service to four Boston area codes (508, 617, 781, and
978), and DEF, which provides service to the rest of the United States. You
want to use one 4-port Analog Line Card, connected to analog trunk
lines owned by ABC, for all calls to the Boston area. You want to use the
T1 line, which you lease from DEF, for all other long distance calls within
the United States.
The system users dial 9 to get an outside line, 1 to obtain a long distance
carrier, 3 digits to specify the area code, and 7 digits to specify the
telephone number. To ensure that long distance calls are handled in the
least-cost way you want, you place these entries in the Internal dial plan
table. The numbering of the entries assumes that the table has 46 entries
before you make any additions. Columns in each table entry are titled:
Command, Table Number, Entry Number, Digits, Min, Max, Class, Priority,
and Route Number.
Add these lines to the dial plan configuration file:
TableEntry Create 1 47 91 12 12 LongDistance 0 2
Explanation: Creates, in table ID 1 (the Internal table), entry 47, which
directs the system to look for the digits 91 at the beginning of any
12-digit sequence (Min and Max are both 12). If the system detects such
a sequence, it assigns LongDistance as the class of service.
Because the system software does not use the priority value, the system
leaves 0 (zero) as the value, and assigns the call to route 2 (the T1 route).
Dial plan entries are searched in sequential order. As soon as dialed digits
match a dial plan entry, the dial plan acts on that match without further
analysis. So if a previous dial plan entry (entries 1 through 46 in this
example) was matched, entry 47 would not be found or used.
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TableEntry Create 1 48 91508 12 12 LongDistance 0 1
Explanation: In table ID 1 (the Internal table), creates entry 48, which
directs the system to look for the digits 91508 at the beginning of any
12-digit sequence (Min and Max are both 12). If the system detects such a
sequence, it assigns LongDistance as the class of service. Because the system
software does not use the priority value, the system leaves 0 (zero) as the
value, and assigns the call to route 1 (the route that uses the 4-port card).
TableEntry Create 1 49 91617 12 12 LongDistance 0 1
Explanation: In table ID 1 (the Internal table), creates entry 49, which
directs the system to look for the digits 91617 at the beginning of any
12-digit sequence (Min and Max are both 12). If the system detects such
a sequence, it assigns LongDistance as the class of service. Because the
system software does not use the priority value, the system leaves 0 (zero)
as the value, and assigns the call to route 1 (the route that uses the 4-port
card).
TableEntry Create 1 50 91781 12 12 LongDistance 0 1
Explanation: In table ID 1 (the Internal table), creates entry 50, which
directs the system to look for the digits 91781 at the beginning of any
12-digit sequence (Min and Max are both 12). If the system detects such
a sequence, it assigns LongDistance as the class of service. Because the
system software does not use the priority value, the system leaves 0 (zero)
as the value, and assigns the call to route 1 (the route that uses the 4-port
card).
TableEntry Create 1 51 91978 7 7 LongDistance 0 1
Explanation: In table ID 1 (the Internal table), creates entry 51, which
directs the system to look for the digits 91978 at the beginning of any
12-digit sequence (Min and Max are both 12). If the system detects such
a sequence, it assigns LongDistance as the class of service. Because the
system software does not use the priority value, the system leaves 0 (zero)
as the value, and assigns the call to route 1 (the route that uses the 4-port
card).
Sample Solutions Using Dial Plan Configuration File Commands
121
In combination, the five lines in the internal table work with these two
lines in the Routes section of the dial plan.
DestinationRoute Create 1 Boston Low-cost Carrier
DestinationRoute Create 2 T1 Line to DEF Telephone Company
Explanation: Creates two routes, numbered 1 and 2, with the names
“Boston Low-cost Carrier” and “T1 Line to DEF Telephone Company.”
DestinationRouteEntry Create 1 1 *0001
DestinationRouteEntry Create 2 1 *0001
Explanation: In route 1, creates entry number 1, which defines
extension list *0001 (TLIM extensions) as the destination. Then creates, in
route 2, an entry that defines extension list *0002 (Digital Line Card
extensions) as the destination.
DestinationRouteOperation Create 1 1 1 stripLead 1
DestinationRouteOperation Create 2 1 1 stripLead 1
Explanation: Creates, in route 1, entry 1, operation number 1. This is a
stripLead operation, which removes the first digit from the dialed string,
then and passes the remaining digits to the carrier.
Customer Requirement 5. Assume that you want to transmit Calling
Line ID Presentation (CLIP) information on outgoing calls. You use internal
telephone extension numbers from 3000 to 3099. There is no DDI/DID, so
the T1 or E1 line has only a single number (555-555-1212). All incoming
calls are routed by default to the Auto Attendant.
Add these lines to the dial plan configuration file:
PreTranslator Create 1 CLIP Internal Ext to Single Number
Explanation: Create pretranslator table 1 called “CLIP Internal Ext to
Single Number.”
PreTranslatorEntry Create 1 1 3
Explanation: For pretranslator 1, create entry 1, which applies when the
first digit in the sequence is 3. (All internal telephone extensions begin
with the number 3.)
PreTranslatorOperation Create 1 1 1 replace 555 555 1212
Explanation: For pretranslator 1, entry 1, create operation 1, which
replaces the extension number with the string 555 555 1212.
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Customer Requirement 6. Assume that you want to use two different
long distance carriers at different times of the day, to obtain a cost saving.
To select one long distance carrier from 7:30 a.m.) to 3:00 p.m., prepend
1010321 to each call. To select another carrier and obtain a lower rate
from 3:00 p.m. until opening business hours the next day, prepend
1010220. This assumes the business is not open on weekends.
Add these lines to the dial plan configuration file:
TableEntry Create 1 99 91 12 12 LongDistance 0 27
Explanation: In Table 1 (Internal table) entry 99, creates an entry which
looks for the digits 91 at the beginning of any 12-digit sequence (since
both Min and Max are set to 12). If the system detects such a sequence, it
assigns LongDistance as the class of service.
Because system software does not use the priority value, the system
leaves 0 (zero) as the value, and assigns the call to route 27.
If Table 1 already contains an entry with 91 in the digits column, delete
it and substitute the above TableEntry Create line.
TimedRoute Create 27 28 3PM Switchover
Explanation: Create TimedRoute 27, with a default DestinationRoute
of 28. Assign the title “3PM Switchover” to TimedRoute 27.
TimedRouteEntry Create 27 1 7:30 15:00 .MTWTF. 29
Explanation: For TimedRoute 27, create entry 1, which applies from
7:30 a.m. through 3:00 p.m. Monday through Friday. The route to use is 29.
DestinationRouteCreate 29 Open Hours Carrier
Explanation: Create DestinationRoute 29, and call it “Open Hours
Carrier.”
DestinationRouteEntry Create 29 1 *0002
Explanation: For DestinationRoute 29, create entry 1, which uses
extension list *0002, the extension list that contains all extensions
associated with Digital Line Cards.
DestinationRouteOperation Create 29 1 1 stripLead 2
Explanation: For DestinationRoute 29, entry 1, create operation 1,
which strips 2 digits (9 and 1) from the beginning of the dialed string.
Sample Solutions Using Dial Plan Configuration File Commands
123
DestinationRouteOperation Create 29 1 2 prepend 1010321
Explanation: For DestinationRoute 29, entry 1, create operation 2,
which prepends 1010321 to select the long distance carrier to use from
7:30 a.m. Monday through Friday.
DestinationRoute Create 28 Carrier After 3pm and Closed
Explanation: Create DestinationRoute 28 and call it “Carrier After
3 p.m. and Closed.”
DestinationRouteEntry Create 28 1 *0002
Explanation: For DestinationRoute 28, create entry 1, which uses
extension list *0002, the extension list that contains all extensions
associated with Digital Line Cards.
DestinationRouteOperation Create 28 1 1 stripLead 2
Explanation: For DestinationRoute 28, entry 1, create operation 1,
which strips 2 digits (9 and 1) from the beginning of the dialed string.
DestinationRouteOperation Create 28 1 2 prepend 1010220
Explanation: For DestinationRoute 28, entry 1, create operation 2,
which prepends 1010220 to select the other long distance carrier.
Route 28 is the default route, so it is used at all other times than those
defined for route 29.
Example 1 If you make a long distance call at 2:00 p.m. on any Tuesday,
the system uses these timed route definitions, and:
■
Determines that the date is a valid business date.
■
Determines that the time is prior to 3:00 p.m.
■
Selects timed route 29.
■
Prepends 1010321 to the outgoing call to select the first long distance
carrier.
Example 2 If you make a long distance call at any time on any Saturday,
the system uses these timed route definitions, and:
■
Determines that the date is not a valid business date.
■
Selects timed route 28.
■
Prepends 1010220 to the outgoing call to select the second long
distance carrier.
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3
DEVICE CONFIGURATION
This chapter describes how to configure and manage devices on the NBX
system. It covers these topics:
■
Adding, Removing, and Modifying Telephones
■
Adding a Remote Telephone
■
Creating and Managing Bridged Extensions
■
Creating and Managing Telephone Groups
■
Recording and Monitoring Telephone Calls
■
Creating and Managing Button Mappings
■
Changing Device IP Settings
■
Configuring Call Park
■
Configuring the NBX 1105 Attendant Console
■
Configuring and Managing Analog Line Card Ports
■
Connecting and Managing Analog Devices
■
Configuring and Managing BRI-ST Digital Line Cards
■
Configuring and Managing E1 Digital Line Cards
■
Configuring and Managing T1 Digital Line Cards
For information about installing the system hardware components, see
the NBX Installation Guide.
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Adding, Removing,
and Modifying
Telephones
Adding a New
Telephone
This section describes how to add, remove, and modify telephones in the
NBX NetSet utility. You can also review the status of each device and
configure button mappings for NBX telephones.
You can configure a new telephone in two ways: using Auto Discovery or
manually.
■
Auto Discovery method — Auto Discovery is the simplest and most
common method of adding a new telephone. When you enable Auto
Discovery and then connect a new NBX Business or Basic Telephone to
the LAN, several messages pass between the Call Processor and the
telephone. The result is that the new telephone receives a default
telephone number, which appears on the telephone’s display panel.
The telephone receives the next lowest available extension and a
default set of properties.
■
Manual method — You can disable Auto Discovery and configure
telephones manually using the NBX NetSet utility. However, if you
have many telephones to configure, manual configuration can be a
tedious and error-prone process.
For either method of adding a telephone, you must connect the
telephone to the network. If you use Auto Discovery, you must enable the
Auto Discover Telephones check box before you connect the telephone. If
you add a telephone manually, it does not matter whether you connect
the telephone before or after you use the NBX NetSet utility to add it.
Connecting the Telephone
Instructions for connecting the phone to power and the network depend
on your power source and the type of telephone. See Chapter 3 in the
NBX Installation Guide or the telephone packing sheet for telephone
connection information.
Adding a New Telephone Using Auto Discovery
Before you enable Auto Discovery, verify that a 3-digit or 4-digit dial plan
is installed on the Network Call Processor and that you have specified a
starting extension. See the NBX Installation Guide.
To add a new telephone using Auto Discovery:
1 Select System Configuration > System Settings tab.
2 Click System-wide. The System Settings dialog box appears.
Adding, Removing, and Modifying Telephones
127
3 Optionally, clear all check boxes associated with autodiscovering devices.
4 Enable Auto Discover Telephones, and then click Apply.
5 Optionally, enable the Auto Add Phones to Call Pickup Group 0 check
box.
Regardless of whether you select this check box, you can change the call
pickup group for any telephone later. See “Call Pickup” on page 264 for
information about Call Pickup Groups.
6 Click OK.
7 For each telephone that you want to autodiscover:
a Remove the telephone from the packing box.
b Connect the phone to power and the network according to the
instructions in the telephone packing sheet or the NBX Installation
Guide.
c Wait until an extension number appears in the telephone’s display
panel.
You can now disconnect the telephone and move it to its destination. The
telephone retains its extension and button mappings.
Adding a Telephone Manually
To add a new telephone manually:
1 From the NBX NetSet main menu, click Device Configuration > Telephones.
2 Click Add. The Add Telephones dialog box appears.
3 Fill in the fields with the appropriate values. See Table 23.
Table 23 Add Telephone Dialog Box Fields
Field
Description
MAC Address
The hardware address assigned at the factory to each device.
To find the MAC Address of an NBX Business Telephone,
look at the label on the bottom of the telephone.
When you type the address, use the format: XX:XX:XX:XX:XX,
where each X represents a hexadecimal digit (0–f).
If you are configuring a pcXset client, the MAC address is the
address of the network interface card in the computer that
hosts the pcXset client.
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CHAPTER 3: DEVICE CONFIGURATION
Table 23 Add Telephone Dialog Box Fields (continued)
Field
Description
Channel Number
Not used when adding a telephone.
If you add a telephone that is connected to a 3C10117 or a
3C10117C ATC, leave this field empty. If you modify the
settings for a telephone that is connected to an ATC, this field
contains N/A (not applicable).
Device Name
The name that appears in device lists to help you identify this
device. You can use any word with up to 16 characters.
Telephone Group
Assigns a set of Button Mappings that correspond to the
group you select. The default groups are:
■
Default Business Phone Group — The default group to
which the NBX system assigns NBX 2102 and 1102
Business Telephones during the Auto Discovery process.
■
Attendant Telephone Group — The default group to
which you assign NBX Business Telephones that have
1105 Attendant Consoles attached.
■
Default Basic Phone Group — The default group to which
the NBX system assigns NBX Basic Telephones during the
Auto Discovery process.
■
Default 3102 Business Group — The default group to
which the NBX system assigns NBX 3102 Business
Telephones during Auto Discovery.
■
Default Uniden Phone Group — The default group to
which the NBX system assigns Uniden Cordless
Telephones during Auto Discovery. This group appears
only if you have added a Uniden interface card to your
NBX system.
If you have created additional telephone groups, their names
appear in this list.
Class of Service
Sets calling permissions. See Class of Service (CoS) on
page 273 for information about creating and managing CoS
settings.
Adding, Removing, and Modifying Telephones
129
Table 23 Add Telephone Dialog Box Fields (continued)
Field
Description
Telephone Type
Indicates the device type.
■
NBX Business Phone — An 1102- or 2102 NBX Business
Telephone.
■
NBX Basic Phone — An NBX Basic Telephone.
■
NBX pcXset — A pcXset client application that runs on a
computer.
■
NBX Wav Phone — A type of pseudo-device that
simulates a telephone connection and uses .WAV files for
the audio.
■
Third Party Phone — A telephone, manufactured by one
of the 3Com partner companies, that is licensed for
attachment to an NBX system.
■
Polycom — A Polycom speaker phone.
■
3102 Business Phone — An NBX 3102 Business
Telephone.
■
Uniden Phone — A Uniden cordless telephone.
You cannot configure a pcXset client or a third-party device
unless you first enter the proper license key.
Silence Suppression
When it is set to Default, Silence Suppression allows this
telephone to operate under system-wide Silence Suppression
control. For more information on configuring system-level
settings, see the Help for NBX NetSet > System Configuration
> System Settings > Audio Controls
Choose On or Off to override the System-wide setting.
Although enabling Silence Suppression reduces the number of
packets transmitted during a conversation, it also results in a
compromise in audio quality. Do not enable Silence
Suppression unless you have bandwidth issues to resolve.
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Table 23 Add Telephone Dialog Box Fields (continued)
Field
Description
Call Record &
Monitor
Determines the default setting for recording information
about calls made to or from this telephone.
■
On — Enables recording for all calls to or from this
telephone.
■
Off — Disables recording for all calls to or from this
telephone.
■
Group Default — Uses the setting (either On or Off) for
the telephone group to which this telephone belongs.
Both the Off and the Group Default settings can be
overridden. If either telephone in a two-person call or any
telephone in a conference call has call recording enabled, the
NBX system enables call recording for the other telephone(s)
for the duration of the call.
NOTE: If you do not have a call recording license installed, this
item is not activated (it is grayed out).
Fwd to Auto
Attendant
Enable this check box to route unanswered calls to the
Default Auto Attendant instead of voice mail.
Select this option only if the Default Auto Attendant menu
has been properly configured to handle calls routed in this
way.
Low Bandwidth
Turns on all low bandwidth measures designed to reduce the
packet stream to a minimum.
Enable the Low Bandwidth check box for a telephone you link
to the network by a low bandwidth connection such as an
ISDN line. Low bandwidth options result in compromises to
audio quality. Do not enable any low bandwidth setting for
the following:
ADPCM Audio Only
■
Normal telephone operation
■
A remote telephone connected through a broadband
connection through a router/firewall device on the remote
end
Restricts the telephone to ADPCM audio.
Conference Disabled Prohibits this telephone from participating in conference calls.
Line Appearance/BLF Disables Line Appearance/BLF for this telephone.
Disabled
Paging Output
Disabled
Prevents this telephone from playing NBX system pages.
Extension Number
The telephone’s dialing extension. By default, the system
automatically assigns the lowest unused Extension. You can
change it to any unused number between 100 and 449
(3-digit dial plan) or 1000 and 3999 (4-digit dial plan).
Adding, Removing, and Modifying Telephones
131
Table 23 Add Telephone Dialog Box Fields (continued)
Field
Description
First Name,
Last Name, Title,
Location 1,
Location 2, and
Department
These optional fields appear in NBX NetSet lists that display
the telephone information and can help you identify it. Last
Name is used to find a user in the dial by name directory of
the Auto Attendant.
Location 1 and Location 2 enable you to provide detailed
information about the location of the telephone (required for
E911 (Enhanced 911) emergency service).
4 Click Apply to configure this telephone. You can then configure
additional telephones using the same menu.
5 Click OK.
Modifying a
Telephone
To modify a telephone:
1 Select NBX NetSet > Device Configuration > Telephones.
2 Select the telephone that you want to modify from the list.
3 Click Modify. The Modify Telephones dialog box appears.
4 Change the desired fields. See Table 23 for definitions of each field.
5 Click Apply to make your changes.
6 Click OK.
Checking a
Telephone’s Status
To check the status of a telephone:
1 Select Device Configuration > Telephones.
2 Select the telephone for which you want a status report from the list box.
3 Click Status. The Device Status dialog box appears.
4 View the device status and make any desired changes. Table 24 describes
the fields and check boxes on this dialog box.
5 When you finish, click Apply, and then click OK.
Table 24 Device Status Fields
Field
Description
MAC Address
The telephone’s hardware address. The MAC address
appears on the bottom of the telephone.
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Table 24 Device Status Fields (continued)
Field
Description
Name
A unique name associated with this telephone. This
name appears in lists to help you identify the telephone.
Typically, Name identifies the telephone’s user.
Extension
The extension assigned to this telephone.
Dialog Refresh
Specifies how often to renew the information that
appears in the Status dialog box.
Device Refresh
Forces the telephone to send a status message to the Call
Processor. During normal operation a telephone sends a
status message to the Call Processor every 30 seconds.
Reset Device
Reboots the telephone, which means it renews
communications with the Call Processor and receives a
new download of its operating software. You can also
reboot a telephone by cycling power to the telephone.
If the telephone has an active call, resetting the
telephone disconnects the call.
Status
Identifies the state of the telephone when it was last
involved in a call. Telephones normally send a status
message to the Call Processor every 30 seconds.
Values:
Online — The telephone was available when last
accessed by the Call Processor.
Offline — The telephone was not available the last time
that the Call Processor attempted to set up a call
involving this telephone.
Unknown — The telephone has not communicated with
the Call Processor during the previous 5 minutes.
Unknown-LB — This telephone is configured as a Low
Bandwidth device (that is, it does not send status
messages to the Call Processor), and it has not
communicated with the Call Processor for at least 5
minutes.
Software Version
Identifies the telephone’s software version. Note that the
telephone software version may be different than the
system software version.
Time Last Seen
A date/timestamp that identifies the last time the
telephone communicated with the Call Processor. During
normal operation, the Call Processor gathers status
information from each device every 30 seconds. Format:
YYYYMMDD:HHMMSS
Adding, Removing, and Modifying Telephones
133
Table 24 Device Status Fields (continued)
Field
Description
Error Count, Error Code, Advanced diagnostic data for use by technical support.
Performance Data,
Debug Data, and Actor
Data
Removing a
Telephone
To remove a telephone from the system:
1 Select Device Configuration > Telephones tab.
2 Select the telephone that you want to remove from the list box.
3 Click Remove. A dialog box prompts you to confirm removal.
4 Click Yes. The system removes the selected telephone.
5 On the Users tab, delete the extension. If you do not perform this step,
the extension of the removed telephone becomes a phantom mailbox.
Rebooting a
Telephone
To reboot a telephone:
1 Select Device Configuration > Telephones.
2 Choose a telephone from the list, and then click the Status button to
open the Telephones Status dialog box.
3 Click Reset Device and then click OK.
If the telephone has an active call, rebooting the telephone disconnects
the call.
You can also reboot the telephone by unplugging the power connector
from the telephone and then plugging it in again.
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Adding a Remote
Telephone
Remote NAPT Device
Configuration
NBX system software (release R4.2 and higher) supports Network Address
Port Translation (NAPT, also called NAT overloading). NAPT allows you to
put an NBX Telephone behind a device that applies network address
translation at a remote location, such as a home office, and connect to
the NBX call processor through an Internet connection. One typical
configuration is to connect a cable/DSL modem to a small office/home
office router that includes a firewall and Ethernet ports. You connect the
NBX Telephone directly to one of the Ethernet ports. Another option is
use the pcXset soft telephone application instead of an NBX Telephone.
This section summarizes the tasks you must complete to configure an
NBX Telephone for operation behind the NAPT device. Because the
configuration interface on each device varies, detailed procedures for
NAPT device configuration are beyond the scope of this document. For
information about configuring the NAPT device, see the documentation
for that device.
To add a broadband connected telephone behind a NAPT device:
1 Make sure the NBX system is set up for IP operations, either Standard IP
or IP-on-the-fly. The NBX system must have a public IP address.
2 Use the NBX NetSet utility to enable Auto Discover Telephones and then
connect the NBX Telephone to the NBX system.
Auto discovering the telephone allows the system to configure the phone
in the database and assign an extension number. You could manually add
the telephone to the database instead of using the Auto Discover feature.
3 Move the telephone to its intended location. Connect it to power and
then use the telephone Local User Interface (LUI) utility to program these
settings:
■
NCP MAC address — Required only when the network has more than
one network call processor.
■
Telephone IP address — A private IP address matching the IP address
scheme on the LAN side of the NAPT device but outside of the DHCP
address range configured in the NAPT device. The telephone must
have a static IP address.
■
NCP IP address — The IP address of the call processor that the phone
must communicate with. The NBX system must have a public IP
address.
Creating and Managing Bridged Extensions
135
■
Subnet Mask — The address mask in use on the LAN side of the NAPT
device.
■
Default Gateway — The IP address of the NAPT device on the LAN.
For details on how to use the LUI utility, see “Using the Telephone Local
User Interface (LUI) Utility” on page 352.
4 Configure the NAPT device:
■
Creating and
Managing Bridged
Extensions
Use the device’s virtual server feature to map UDP ports 2093-2096 to
the NBX telephone. These are registered ports for NBX operations.
This device feature, known as virtual server, port mapping, port range
forwarding, or rules, is required to allow traffic to pass to and from the
NBX Telephone.
Bridged extensions allow you to have the extension of a primary
telephone appear on one or more secondary telephones. Most activities
associated with the extension can be performed on both the primary
telephone and any of the secondary telephones. However, you cannot
use a bridged extension on a secondary telephone to place a call.
On any NBX system, you can configure a maximum number of primary
telephones and a maximum number of bridged extension on primary
telephones. See Table 25.
Table 25 Maximum Bridged Extensions
System
Device Limit
Maximum
Number of
Primary
Telephones
Maximum Number
of Bridged
Extensions on
Primary Phones
NBX 100
200
100
300
SuperStack 3 NBX
250
250
1200
SuperStack 3 NBX
More than 250
400
1200
There are no restrictions on the number of secondary telephones or the
number of bridged extensions on secondary telephones.
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Provided that you do not exceed the limits shown in Table 25, you can
configure the maximum number of bridged extensions using any
combination of primary telephones and bridged extensions. For example,
on a SuperStack 3 NBX system, you can configure 400 primary
telephones with three bridged extensions each or 300 primary telephones
with 4 bridged extensions each to reach the limit of 1200.
You can configure a different number of bridged extension buttons on a
primary and an associated secondary telephone. For example, if a primary
telephone has 5 bridged extensions, one of the secondary telephones can
be configured to have fewer (1 through 4) bridged extensions. However,
if all of the primary bridged extensions are in use, the person at the
secondary telephone will not be able to see all of the calls.
You can configure as few as one bridged extension on a telephone, or as
many as 11. The maximum number derives from the fact that an NBX
1102 or 2102 Business Telephone, which has 12 buttons, can be a
secondary telephone, and each secondary telephone must have at least
one button reserved for its own extension.
If a secondary telephone has an 1105 Attendant Console associated with
it, there can be bridged extension buttons on the Attendant Console for
more than one primary telephone, but no more than 11 buttons per
primary telephone.
You can define any one telephone as either a primary telephone or a
secondary telephone, but not both. If the telephone has an Attendant
Console associated with it, the bridged extension functions for the
telephone extend to the Attendant Console. For example, an NBX Basic
Telephone with an associated Attendant Console, can be configured as a
primary telephone with up to 11 bridged extensions on Attendant
Console buttons.
You can configure bridged extensions on the same buttons that are used
for the telephone’s extension (by default, buttons 1, 2 and 3 on an
NBX 1102 or 2102 Business Telephone) or on non-extension buttons.
Before you can create a bridged extension on a telephone, you must
unlock the button settings in the telephone group button mappings
dialog box for the telephone group to which the telephone belongs.
You can view a report that lists the primary and secondary telephones on
which bridged extensions have been defined. See “Viewing
Bridged Extension Information” on page 142.
Creating and Managing Bridged Extensions
137
When you define bridged extension appearances on a primary telephone:
Example
Bridged Extensions
Configurations
■
Incoming calls appear on the bridged extension buttons first, followed
by the buttons (if any) associated with the primary telephone’s
extension. For example, by default, buttons 1, 2, and 3 are extension
appearances of the primary telephone. If you define buttons 4, 5, 6,
and 7 as bridged extensions on the primary telephone, incoming calls
appear on primary telephone buttons in the order 4, 5, 6, 7, 1, 2, 3.
■
Any bridged extension appearance that overlaps one of the defined
extension appearances for the primary telephone (by default, buttons
1, 2, and 3 on an NBX Business Telephone) take precedence over
those extension appearances. For example, if you define buttons 3, 4,
5, 6, and 7 as bridged extension appearances on the primary
telephone, incoming calls appear on primary telephone buttons in the
order 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 1, 2.
Example 1: An NBX Business Telephone, extension 1044, is defined as a
primary telephone and buttons 2, 3, and 4 are defined as bridged
extension buttons. Two other NBX Business Telephones, extensions 1055
and 1066, are defined as secondary telephones on which extension 1044
appears. On the 1055 telephone, buttons 10, 11, and 12 are configured
as the three bridged extension buttons for the 1044 telephone. On the
1066 telephone, buttons 4, 5, and 6 are configured as bridged extension
appearances.
If a call is made to extension 1044, it can be answered using any of the
following buttons:
■
Extension 1044 (primary telephone) — button 2
■
Extension 1055 (secondary telephone) — button 10
■
Extension 1066 (secondary telephone) — button 4
In this example, both secondary telephones use buttons 1, 2, and 3 as
extensions appearances for their own extensions.
Example 2: An NBX Business Telephone with extension 1077 is defined
as a primary telephone and buttons 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 are defined as
bridged extension buttons. Two other NBX Business Telephones
(extensions 1088 and 1099) are defined as secondary telephones on
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which extension 1077 is to appear. On the 1088 telephone, buttons 10,
11, and 12 are configured as bridged extension buttons. On the 1099
telephone, buttons 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 are configured as bridged extension
appearances for extension 1077.
If a call is made to extension 1077, it can be answered using any of the
following buttons:
■
Extension 1077 (primary telephone) — button 4
■
Extension 1088 (secondary telephone) — button 10
■
Extension 1099 (secondary telephone) — button 3
Secondary telephone 1099 has only two extension appearances for the
1099 extension because button 3, by default an extension appearance
for the local telephone, has been used as a bridged appearance of
extension 1077.
The primary telephone has buttons 1, 2, and 3 as local appearances of its
own extension (1077). If multiple calls arrive at this telephone, they
appear on buttons 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8, followed by 1, 2, 3.
Buttons 1, 2, and 3 on the 1077 telephone are not defined as bridged
extension appearances. Therefore, they do not appear on either of the
secondary telephones. If the owner of the 1077 telephone makes a call
using any of these buttons, there is no indication (status light) of the call
on either secondary telephone. If there are five active calls on the 1077
telephone, and a sixth call is made to that extension, it rings only on the
1077 telephone, on the first unused button in the 1, 2, 3 group).
Defining Bridged
Extensions
Defining Bridged
Extensions on a
Primary Telephone
The process of defining bridged extensions involves:
■
Defining Bridged Extensions on a Primary Telephone
■
Defining Bridged Extensions on a Secondary Telephone
On a primary telephone, you can define from 1 to 11 buttons as bridged
extensions. The buttons do not have to be next to each other.
To define the bridged extensions for the primary telephone:
1 Select NBX NetSet > Device Configuration > Telephones.
2 Select the primary telephone from the scroll list.
Creating and Managing Bridged Extensions
139
3 Click Button Mappings. The Telephone Button Mappings dialog box
(Figure 17) appears.
Figure 17 Telephone Button Mappings Dialog Box
4 For each button that you want to include in the group of bridged
extension buttons:
a Select Bridged Extension from the drop-down list in the Type column.
b Type the extension number of the primary telephone in the Number
column.
Figure 17 shows a group of three buttons that have been configured as
bridged extension appearances for the extension (1066) on the primary
telephone.
5 Click OK.
Defining Bridged
Extensions on a
Secondary Telephone
After you have defined the bridged extension buttons on the primary
telephone, you can define the corresponding bridged extension buttons
on a secondary telephone. You can do this for as many secondary
telephones as you want.
To define the bridged extensions for a secondary telephone:
1 Select NBX NetSet > Device Configuration > Telephones.
2 Select the secondary telephone from the scroll list.
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3 Click Button Mappings. The Telephone Button Mappings dialog box
appears.
4 For each button that you want to include in the group of bridged
extension buttons:
a Select Bridged Extension from the drop-down list in the Type column.
b Type the extension number of the primary telephone in the Number
column. See Figure 18.
Figure 18
Button Mapping Dialog Box After Mapping
Figure 18 shows a group of three buttons that have been configured as
bridged extension appearances for the extension (1066) associated with
the primary telephone.
5 Click OK.
Modifying Bridged
Extensions
You can modify bridged extensions on a primary telephone at any time.
Bridged extensions do not need to be on adjacent buttons on a primary
or a secondary telephone. You can have a different number of bridged
extensions on a primary and a secondary telephone.
Sample Calling
Situations Using
Bridged Extensions
This section describes typical telephone call situations involving bridged
extensions on primary and secondary telephones. For all of the examples:
Creating and Managing Bridged Extensions
141
■
The primary telephone is an NBX Business telephone (extension 1027)
used by a manager (Alicia). This telephone has buttons 2, 3, and 4
defined as bridged extension buttons. Button 1 is the manager’s
private line.
■
One secondary telephone, an NBX Business Telephone (extension
1051), is used by the manager’s assistant (Bradley). On this telephone,
buttons 1, 2, and 3 are extension appearances for extension 1051 and
buttons 4, 5, and 6 are configured as bridged extension appearances
of the manager’s telephone (1027).
■
The other secondary telephone is also an NBX Business Telephone
(extension 1018). The telephone is used by the person (Connie) who
answers the manager’s telephone whenever the manager’s assistant is
not available. Buttons 10, 11, and 12 are configured as bridged
extension appearances of the manager’s telephone (1027).
Example 1: If there are no active calls on Alicia’s telephone, a call made
to her telephone from either an internal or outside telephone rings on
button 2 on her telephone, button 4 on Bradley’s telephone and button
10 on Connie’s telephone.
Bradley answers the call by pressing button 4. After identifying the
person who is calling, Bradley places the call on hold and informs Alicia of
the call. Alicia presses button 2 on her telephone to take the call.
During the time that Bradley is talking to the caller, neither Alicia nor
Connie can access the call. Alicia can pick up the call only after it is placed
on hold by Bradley. Similarly, after Alicia picks up the call, neither Bradley
nor Connie can access the call. If Alicia wants to include either Bradley or
Connie in the call, she can set up a conference call.
Example 2: Alicia wants to place a call but wants to keep all three
bridged extensions available for incoming calls. Alicia can place the call
using button 1.
Neither Bradley’s telephone nor Connie’s telephone shows any indication
that there is a call on Alicia’s telephone, because button 1 on Alicia’s
telephone is not configured as a bridged extension.
Example 3: Three incoming calls have arrived on Alicia’s telephone (on
buttons 2, 3, and 4). Alicia is talking on button 2, Bradley has placed the
second call on hold, and is talking to the third caller.
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A fourth call arrives at Alicia’s extension and rings on button 1. Neither
Bradley nor Connie can answer this call because that button on Alicia’s
telephone is not a bridged extension appearance.
If a fifth call arrives at Alicia’s extension before the fourth call stops
ringing, it is sent directly to Alicia’s voice mailbox, because all buttons are
being used.
Example 4: A call arrives at Alicia’s telephone and the building has been
evacuated because of a fire. Neither Alicia, nor Bradley, nor Connie is
available to answer the call. After the number of rings that are configured
for Alicia’s telephone, the call is sent to Alicia’s voice mailbox.
Example 5: A call arrives at Alicia’s telephone and Bradley answers the
call, then places it on hold, and Alicia picks up the call. Bradley leaves the
area, asking Connie to answer his telephone and Alicia’s until he returns.
Alicia places the call on hold in order to pass the call back to Bradley but
finds that he is not available. Connie is not close enough to Alicia’s office
to permit Alicia to talk directly to her, so Alicia presses another button on
her telephone, calls Connie’s extension, and asks her to pick up the call.
Viewing
Bridged Extension
Information
You can view a list of all telephones on the NBX system and determine
which are primary telephones and which are secondary telephones.
To view the bridged extensions information, select NBX NetSet >
Device Configuration > Telephones > Bridged Extensions. The NBX
Bridged Extensions Report appears.
If a telephone is a primary telephone, the Bridged Exts column contains
the extension of the telephone and the extension of each associated
secondary telephone. The Mapped Buttons column displays the
telephone’s extension once for each button that is mapped as a bridged
extension.
Example: If extension 1002 is a primary telephone and extensions 1005,
1008, and 1019 are secondary telephones with 1002 mapped to them,
the Bridged Exts column contains four extension numbers (1002, 1005,
1008, and 1019). If 3 buttons on the 1002 telephone are mapped as
bridged extensions, the Mapped Buttons column contains extensions
1002, listed 3 times.
Creating and Managing Telephone Groups
Creating and
Managing
Telephone Groups
143
Telephone groups let you create common Button Mappings. Button
mappings let you assign specific actions to the buttons on an
NBX Business Telephone. When you associate a Group with a specific
telephone, the telephone inherits all the mappings of the Group.
For example, you can create a Group called Sales that includes Access
buttons mapped to a set of CO lines. When you add a new salesperson to
the group, you simply specify the Sales group for the telephone assigned
to that person. All of the Sales group’s Button Mappings are then
available on that person’s telephone.
This section covers these topics:
Creating a New
Telephone Group
■
Creating a New Telephone Group
■
Modifying a Telephone Group
■
Removing a Telephone Group
■
Viewing Telephone Group Membership
To create a new telephone group,
1 Select NBX NetSet > Device Configuration.
2 Click the Telephone Groups tab.
3 Click Add. The Add Telephone Group dialog box appears.
4 Enter the name of the new group in the Group Name field.
5 Select an entry from the Telephone Type drop-down list.
6 To enable call recording and monitoring as the default setting for all
telephones in this group, enable the Call Record & Monitor check box.
7 Click OK.
The group now appears in the Telephone Group group list box.
Modifying a
Telephone Group
You may want to change the name of a telephone group to reflect a
change in your organization, or you may want to change whether the
group is configured for call recording and monitoring.
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To change the name of a telephone group:
1 Select NBX NetSet > Device Configuration > Telephone Groups.
2 Select the group whose name you want to change.
3 Click Modify. The Modify Telephone Group dialog box appears.
4 Change the name of the telephone group in the Group Name field.
5 To set call recording and monitoring as the default condition for all
telephones in this telephone group, enable the Call Record & Monitor
check box. To disable call recording and monitoring, clear the check box.
You must have installed a call recording license before you can enable the
Call Record & Monitor check box.
6 Click OK.
Removing a
Telephone Group
You can remove a telephone group if it is no longer needed.
To remove a telephone group:
1 Select NBX NetSet > Device Configuration > Telephone Groups.
2 Select the group you want to remove.
3 Click Remove. A confirmation window appears.
4 Click Yes.
The system removes the group.
Viewing Telephone
Group Membership
You can view a report that describes which telephones belong to each
telephone group. The report also includes membership information about
Class of Service groups.
To view the membership report, click Membership.
You do not need to select a telephone group first. The report includes
information about all telephone groups.
In the report window, click any of the column headings to arrange the
information in ascending or descending order.
Recording and
Monitoring
Telephone Calls
If you have call recording application software that runs on a PC that is
external to the NBX system, you can record and monitor telephone calls
to and from telephones on the NBX system.
Recording and Monitoring Telephone Calls
145
To enable call recording and monitoring on the NBX system, you must
purchase a system-wide license. After you install the license, you can
enable call recording and monitoring for these devices:
■
■
■
Recording Calls
Between Telephones
with Different
Recording Settings
Analog telephones connected to ports on an Analog Terminal Card or
to a Single-Port Analog Terminal Adapter. For instructions on enabling
these features, see:
■
“Adding an Analog Terminal Card” on page 199
■
“Adding an Analog Terminal Adapter (ATA)” on page 201
■
“Modifying an Analog Terminal Port” on page 203
NBX Telephones. For instructions on enabling these features, see:
■
“Adding a New Telephone” on page 126
■
“Modifying a Telephone” on page 131
Telephone Groups. For instructions on enabling these features, see:
■
“Creating a New Telephone Group” on page 143
■
“Modifying a Telephone Group” on page 143
For a call that involves NBX telephones or analog telephones that are
connected to either ATC ports or to ATAs, the NBX system verifies the
current recording setting for each NBX device involved in order to
determine which recording setting to use for the call.
Two-party Calls
In a two-party call involving only NBX devices, if either NBX device has
recording enabled, the NBX system enables recording for both devices for
the duration of the call. When the call has been completed, the NBX
system restores the recording settings that were in effect prior to the call.
Conference Calls
If any NBX device in a conference call has recording enabled, the NBX
system enables recording for all NBX devices for the duration of the
conference call. When the call has been completed, the NBX system
restores the recording settings that were in effect prior to the call.
Example:
A three-party conference call involves these telephones:
■
An NBX Business Telephone on the local NBX system
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■
An analog telephone connected to an ATC port on the local NBX
system
■
An NBX Basic Telephone on a different NBX system, connected to the
local NBX system by a virtual tie line (VTL)
Only the NBX Basic Telephone has recording enabled. For the duration of
the conference call, the NBX system enables recording for the analog
telephone and the NBX Business Telephone. After the call ends, the NBX
system disables the recording for the analog telephone and the NBX
Business Telephone.
Remote Telephones
Music On Hold
If an NBX telephone or an analog telephone connected to an ATA is
connected to a subnetwork different than the NBX Call Processor’s, you
can enable recording for that remote device.
On an NBX system, music on hold is always recordable. During a call with
two NBX devices (NBX telephones, or analog telephones attached to ATC
ports or to ATAs) that both normally have recording disabled, if either
person puts the call on hold, the NBX system enables recording while
music on hold is playing. When the call is taken off hold, the NBX system
restores the recording settings that were in effect prior to the call.
If music on hold is disabled for the NBX system, recording is not enabled
while the call is on hold.
Non-NBX Telephones
If your NBX system has telephones other than NBX Telephones attached,
you can include these telephones in NBX telephone groups, provided that
the other telephones are configured to emulate an NBX telephone.
CAUTION: If a telephone other than an NBX Telephone is configured to
emulate an NBX telephone, then you can add the telephone to the
associated telephone group (for example, the Default Business Phone
Group or the Default Basic Telephone Group). However, the other
telephone may only partially emulate an NBX Business Telephone and
may not respond to the commands to enable or disable call recording. If
you disable recording for the Default Business Phone Group, it may still
be possible to record calls involving the telephones that are not NBX
Telephones in that group.
Creating and Managing Button Mappings
Creating and
Managing Button
Mappings
147
Button Mappings allow you to place features, such as speed dial numbers
and shortcuts, on telephone buttons for individual telephones or for
telephone groups. In addition, you can use Button Mappings to map CO
telephone lines to buttons and set up your system in one of these modes:
■
Key Mode system — In Key Mode, all outside lines map to individual
buttons on users’ telephones. You can share lines by assigning one
line to multiple telephones. Incoming calls ring on all telephones that
have that line assigned. Any of those telephones can answer the call.
■
PBX (Private Branch eXchange) system — In a PBX system, outside
lines are pooled and arbitrated by the Call Processor. To call an outside
number, a user must dial the line pool access number, typically 9, and
the Call Processor assigns the next available line.
■
Hybrid Mode system — In hybrid mode, some lines are assigned as
keyed lines, while the rest are pooled.
You must use NBX Business Telephones to operate the system in key
mode or hybrid mode. NBX Basic Telephones operate in PBX mode only.
This section covers these topics:
Mapping Access
Buttons
■
Mapping Access Buttons
■
Mappings for Users and Groups
■
Creating a Busy Lamp/Speed Dial Button Mapping
■
Creating a Delayed Ringing Pattern
■
Creating Groups and Button Mappings
NBX Business Telephones include 18 Access buttons. These buttons have
these characteristics:
■
You must use two as System Access buttons.
■
On NBX 2102 and 1102 Business Telephones, you can assign CO
telephone lines or line pool access only to buttons that have lights.
■
You can assign one-touch actions such as Speed Dial or system
features such as Do Not Disturb to any of the 18 buttons.
■
If you do not assign a function to a button, the user can assign
personal settings to it.
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NBX Basic Telephones include three Access buttons. NBX Basic
Telephones operate in PBX mode only, that is, you cannot map CO lines
directly to telephone buttons.
Mappings for Users
and Groups
When you create a new user and assign the user to a group, the button
mappings for that group become active for the user’s telephone. You can
override group mappings and create mappings for individual telephones.
For example, you can create a Group called Sales and assign three shared
direct lines to the group. Then you can assign one unshared direct line to
each of the telephones currently in use by people in the Sales group.
The Lock feature (see “Creating Groups and Button Mappings” on
page 150) allows you to control button behavior. If you enable Lock, a
change that you make at the group level passes to every telephone in the
group and it cannot be overridden for individual telephones. If you
disable Lock, you can override group button mappings at the device level.
(This Lock feature is not the same as the Telephone Locking feature that a
user can apply to an individual telephone. See the NBX Telephone Guide.)
Creating a Busy
Lamp/Speed Dial
Button Mapping
A Busy Lamp/Speed Dial button is an Access button, with a light, that is
mapped so that it can function as a speed dial to another extension and
also indicate when that extension is in use. When you press the Access
button mapped to the Busy Lamp/Speed Dial button, you dial the
mapped extension. When the other extension is in use, the lamp lights on
your telephone.
For the NBX 1105 Attendant Console, the default configuration created
by the Auto Discovery process creates Busy Lamp/Speed Dial mappings
for every extension on the system.
A CO line mapped directly to telephones (Key mode) does not get
transferred to any user’s voice mail. For more on key mode, see Creating
and Managing Button Mappings on page 147.
To create a Busy Lamp/Speed Dial button mapping:
1 Select NBX NetSet > Device Configuration > Telephones.
2 Select a telephone in the list and click the Button Mappings button.
3 On the Telephone Configuration dialog box, select an available Access
button that has a light. In the Type box, select Line/Extension. In the
Number box, specify the extension of the telephone that you want as the
Busy Lamp/Speed Dial target.
Creating and Managing Button Mappings
Creating a Delayed
Ringing Pattern
149
You can define a ringing progression for a line that is mapped to multiple
telephones. For example, you can configure a call to ring immediately at
telephone 1, begin ringing at telephone 2 after 4 rings, and then begin
ringing at telephone 3 after 8 rings. Any of the telephones can pick up
the call at any time, even if it has not yet started audibly ringing at a
particular telephone. (The light flashes during all rings.)
Delayed ringing works with Key mode only, that is, with line card ports
mapped to buttons on two or more telephones.
Delayed ringing is useful for backup coverage on shared lines, such as for
secretaries who must cover each other’s lines.
Additional considerations:
■
The first telephone and each succeeding telephone in a delayed
ringing pattern continue to ring until the call is answered or
transferred to the Auto Attendant.
■
Telephones belonging to a delayed ringing pattern do not need to
belong to the same group. As long as all the telephones have the
same line mapped, you can create the delayed ringing pattern.
To create a delayed ringing pattern:
1 Use the Group Button Mappings feature of the NBX NetSet utility to map a
CO line. See Creating and Managing Button Mappings on page 147.
2 Set Ring to Yes.
3 Clear the Lock check box.
4 In the NBX NetSet - Main Menu window, click Device Configuration.
5 On the Telephones tab, choose the second telephone in the progression
of telephones where you want to create the Delayed Ringing pattern, and
then click the Button Mappings button.
6 For the shared line appearance button, set the Ring box to the behavior
that you want.
To have the telephone begin ringing after one ring, select 1; after two
rings, select 2. Select No to disable ringing entirely. (The indicator light still
functions to indicate ringing/call status.) Do not change the settings in
the Type, Number, and Prty boxes.
7 Repeat the procedure for each telephone in the Delayed Ringing pattern,
taking care to set the Ring delay to create the appropriate delay for each
extension.
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Creating Groups and
Button Mappings
Telephone Button Mappings are part of a device. You assign a set of
mappings to an individual by associating a particular device or group to
that user.
A user can see the Button Mappings in effect for an assigned telephone
by logging on to the NBX NetSet utility with a personal password. The
user can also use the NBX NetSet utility to create and print labels for the
Access Buttons on the telephone.
An administrator can define the button mappings for telephone groups
and also define exceptions to the group mappings for individual
telephones.
To create groups and button mappings:
1 Select NBX NetSet > Device Configuration > Telephone Groups.
2 Click Add, type a Group Name, and click OK.
3 Click the Group that you want to apply mappings to.
4 Click Button Mappings.
To define button mappings for an individual telephone:
1 Select NBX NetSet > Device Configuration > Telephones.
2 Click the telephone that you want to apply mappings to.
3 Click Button Mappings.
Button Mapping Notes
■
Not all Button Type functions are available on all models of
telephones.
■
The use of the Prty (priority) and Number fields depend on the
selected Button Type function.
■
The Ring field is used to enable and disable ringing for a lone
appearance button and to set delayed ringing patterns. See “Creating
a Delayed Ringing Pattern” on page 149 for details.
■
A Lock check box at the Group Mappings level lets you control button
inheritance behavior. If you lock a button at the Group Mappings
level, a change made to the Group always passes to every telephone
in the Group. If you clear the Lock box at the Group Mappings level,
you can override the mapping at the device level. An icon at the
device level indicates whether the button can be remapped.
Creating and Managing Button Mappings
151
■
The large Access buttons (the buttons without lights on NBX 2102
and 1102 Telephones) cannot serve as line appearances.
■
NBX Basic Telephones do not support line appearance.
■
Telephone Button Mappings are part of a device. You assign a set of
mappings to an individual by associating a particular device or group
to the user.
■
Users can see the Button Mappings in effect for their telephones by
accessing the NBX NetSet interface with a personal password.
■
Users can use the NBX NetSet interface to create and print labels for
the Access buttons on their telephones.
Table 26 describes each button Type and its associated settings.
Table 26 Button Type Functions
Button
Type
Description
Account
Code
Allows you to map the account code function to this button.
Account codes allow you to keep track of calls associated with a
particular client or account. The codes appear in Call Detail reports.
To use the function while you are on a call, press the button, enter
the account code that you want, and press the # key.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
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Table 26 Button Type Functions (continued)
Button
Type
Description
Bridged
Extension
Maps this button as a Bridged Extension, which is an extension that
appears on more than one telephone (one primary telephone and
one or more secondary telephones).
CAUTION: On any NBX system you can configure a maximum
number of bridged extensions on primary telephones. The maximum
numbers are:
NBX 100 (maximum number of devices = 200)
Maximum Number of Primary Telephones: 100
Maximum Number of Bridged Extensions on Primary Telephones:
300
SuperStack 3 NBX System (licensed device limit = 250)
Maximum Number of Primary Telephones: 250
Maximum Number of Bridged Extensions on Primary Telephones:
1200
SuperStack 3 NBX System (licensed device limit > 250)
Maximum Number of Primary Telephones: 400
Maximum Number of Bridged Extensions on Primary Telephones:
1200
There is no restriction on the number of secondary telephones or the
number of bridged extensions that appear on secondary telephones.
Number — When mapping a button on either the primary or
secondary telephone, enter the primary telephone’s extension
number in this field.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
CLIR-All
Assigns Calling Line Identity Restriction to this button. When you
press the button, all subsequent ISDN calls made by from this
telephone no longer contain CLIR information.
If the button has a light beside it, pressing the button causes the
light to turn on.
To turn off CLIR-All, press the button again. The light turns off.
Normally, when an ISDN call is made, the identity of the caller is
provided to the PSTN and may be seen by the called user if they
subscribe to the Caller-ID service. CLIR allows you to withhold this
information from the called user.
NOTE: Enabling CLIR-Next does not cause the lamp to light.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
Creating and Managing Button Mappings
153
Table 26 Button Type Functions (continued)
Button
Type
Description
CLIR-Next
Assigns Calling Line Identity Restriction to this button. When you
press the button, the next ISDN call made from this telephone does
not contain CLIR information.
If the button has a light beside it, pressing the button does not cause
the light to turn on.
After you complete the call and hang up, CLIR-Next becomes
inactive.
Normally, when an ISDN call is made, the identity of the caller is
provided to the PSTN and may be seen by the called user if they
subscribe to the Caller-ID service. CLIR allows you to withhold this
information from the called user.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
Call Toggle
Allows a user to switch between the two incoming lines on an NBX
Basic Telephone.
For example, if a user is on a call and then receives a second call,
pressing the Call Toggle button places the first call on Hold and
switches to the second call. Pressing Call Toggle while there are two
active calls switches between the active call and the call on Hold. If
both calls are on Hold, Call Toggle always connects the user to the
call that was most recently placed on Hold.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
Conference
Maps the Conference function to this button. Conference allows the
user to set up conference calls. The Conference button mapping
type is available only on telephones that do not have a dedicated
Conference button, such as the NBX Basic Telephone.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
Conference
Drop
Maps the Conference Drop function to this button. Conference
Drop drops the last person who joined the conference call.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
Default
Indicates that this button has no mapping.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
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CHAPTER 3: DEVICE CONFIGURATION
Table 26 Button Type Functions (continued)
Button
Type
Description
Directory
Maps the Directory function to this button. Directory lets you access
the Name Directory, a list of telephone users, displayed in the LCD
window of your telephone.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
Do Not
Disturb
Maps the Do Not Disturb feature to this button. Press this button
once to enable the Do Not Disturb feature for this telephone. Press
the button a second time to disable the Do Not Disturb feature.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
DP 540–589
(SuperStack
3)
DP 540–549
(NBX 100)
Maps one of the Directed Call Pickup extensions to this button.
Directed Call Pickup allows a user to pick up a call that is ringing on
someone’s telephone. The user’s telephone and the ringing
telephone must be part of the same pickup group unless the “Allow
Non-Member Pickup” check box is enabled for the ringing
telephone’s group.
After you map the Directed Pickup extension to a button on one or
more user telephones, each user with that button mapping can log
into the NBX NetSet utility and select the telephone extension that is
picked up when the button is pressed (Personal Settings > Speed
Dials > Directed Pickup). Each user can select a telephone extension
that is different than the telephone extensions chosen by other
users.
Example: You map DP 545 to button 10 for a telephone group that
includes user extension 3504. In the Extension text box, the user
3504 enters 3500 as the extension to be picked up. When a call
rings on 3500, user 3504 picks up the handset, presses button 10,
and is connected to the caller.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
Feature
A Feature button lets you access any system feature by pressing it
and then dialing a Feature Code.
For example, if a telephone does not have a button programmed for
Call Park, you can press the Feature button, and then dial the Call
Park Feature Code (444) to access the Call Park feature.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
NOTE: To see a list of the feature codes and how to use them, click
the Feature Codes icon in the NBX NetSet – Main Menu window.
Creating and Managing Button Mappings
155
Table 26 Button Type Functions (continued)
Button
Type
Description
Flash
Sends a special signal to the Call Processor to begin a call transfer.
On an NBX telephone, you cannot depress the switch hook to send a
Flash signal. You must use a button mapped to the Flash function.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
Headset
Maps a headset/handset toggle function to this button.
The Headset button mapping type is available only on telephones
that have a dedicated headphone jack, such as the NBX 3102
Business Telephone.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
hg login/out
0–99
(SuperStack
3)
hg login/out
0–29 (NBX
100)
Maps one of the hunt group login/logout Feature Codes to this
button. Each login number logs the user in or out of the associated
hunt group. You must first associate a Hunt Group with a Hunt
Group Feature Code. See the NBX NetSet Help: User Configuration >
Hunt Groups > Feature Mappings.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
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CHAPTER 3: DEVICE CONFIGURATION
Table 26 Button Type Functions (continued)
Button
Type
Description
Line /
Extension
You can map a button to the extension of another telephone (to
create a Busy Lamp/Speed Dial), a line card port extension (external
line), an Analog Terminal Adapter, an Analog Terminal Card port, or
a Call Park extension (to park a call or to pick up a call parked at that
extension).
Number — Enter a number:
■
For a telephone extension, enter the extension number.
■
For an external line, enter the full telephone number associated
with the incoming line.
■
For an Analog Terminal Adapter or an Analog Terminal Card
port, enter the extension associated with the ATA or the ATC
port.
■
For Call Park, enter a Call Park extension.
To park a call, you must first press the Call Park button (mapped by
default NBX Business Telephones), and then press the button that is
mapped to a particular Call Park extension:
■
SuperStack 3 NBX: 6000–6099 (See note 1)
■
NBX 100: 601–609 (See note 2)
Prty (Priority) — Enter a number to identify which button has
precedence. The button with the lowest value becomes active when
you lift the receiver or press the Speaker button.
Note 1: The Superstack 3 NBX is shipped with a factory default
4-digit dial plan. If you import any 3-digit plan, you must manually
specify any 3-digit extension ranges that are not set by the imported
plan.
Note 2: The NBX 100 is shipped with a 3-digit dial plan. If you
import any 4-digit plan, you must manually specify any 4-digit
extension ranges that are not set by the imported plan.
MWI
Assigns the Message Waiting Indicator to this button. The lamp next
to the button lights when you have a message in your mailbox.
Number — Enter the voice mailbox number (telephone extension).
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
Other
Lets you assign any feature code to a button.
Number — Enter the feature code number in this field.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
Example: On the NBX 100, use Other to map the personal speed
dials from 11–99. In the Number field, enter an extension from the
personal speed dial extension range. Personal speed dial 11
corresponds to extension 610.
Creating and Managing Button Mappings
157
Table 26 Button Type Functions (continued)
Button
Type
Description
Park
Maps the Call Park feature to this button. To park the current call,
you must press the button and dial a valid Call Park extension:
SuperStack 3: 6000–6099 (See note 1)
NBX 100: 601–609 (See note 2)
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
You can also map a button to a specific Call Park extension by
choosing Line / Extension as the Type and entering a Call Park
extension in the Number box. Then, when users are on a call, they
can press the Park button (by default, the third button below the
PROGRAM button on an NBX Business Telephone) and then press
the button that you mapped to a specific Call Park extension. If the
mapped call park extension is not busy, the call is parked on that
extension.
To retrieve a parked call from a Call Park extension:
Pick up your telephone handset.
Press the Park button (by default, the third button below the
PROGRAM button on an NBX Business Telephone) and then dial the
extension on which the call was parked. If you have a button
mapped to a particular call park extension, you can press the Park
button and then the mapped button to pick up a call that is parked
on the extension that is mapped to the button.
Note 1: The Superstack 3 NBX is shipped with a factory default
4-digit dial plan. If you import any 3-digit plan, you must manually
specify any 3-digit extension ranges that are not set by the imported
plan.
Note 2: The NBX 100 is shipped with a 3-digit dial plan. If you
import any 4-digit plan, you must manually specify any 4-digit
extension ranges that are not set by the imported plan.
PG 482–531
(SuperStack
3)
PG 500–531
(NBX 100)
Identifies a specific Pickup Group extension and maps it to this
button.
This setting allows a user to pick up a call on any extension in the
selected Pickup Group without dialing the Pickup Group extension.
Your telephone and the ringing telephone must be part of the same
Pickup Group unless the “Allow Non-Member Pickup” check box is
enabled for the group.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
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CHAPTER 3: DEVICE CONFIGURATION
Table 26 Button Type Functions (continued)
Button
Type
Description
Pickup Ext.
Maps the Pickup Extension function to this button.
The Pickup Extension function picks up a call for a particular
extension.
After you press this button, you must enter the extension number of
the ringing telephone.
This function is similar to Directed Call Pickup (see DP 540–589 and
DP 540–549, later in this table).
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
Pickup Group Maps the Pickup Group function to this button.
This setting allows you to pick up a call on any extension in the
selected Pickup Group. Your telephone and the ringing telephone
must be part of the same Pickup Group unless the “Allow
Non-Member Pickup” check box is enabled for the group.
To use the Pickup Group button, the user presses the mapped
button and then dials the Pickup Group extension. For one-touch
access to a specific Pickup Group extension, see the description for
for PG 482–531 (SuperStack 3) and PG 500–531 (NBX 100) later in
this table).
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
PSD 1–99
(SuperStack
3)
PSD 1–10
(NBX 100)
Assigns a Personal Speed Dial (PSD) number to the button.
The NBX system includes 100 Personal Speed Dials (PSDs), which can
be programmed by either the administrator or the user.
For the NBX 100, you can map the first 10 personal speed dials using
the Button Mappings window. To map the remaining 90 personal
speed dials, use the Other button mapping, described earlier in this
table.
You define the telephone numbers for each PSD in NBX NetSet
Personal Settings.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
Redial
Maps the Redial function to this button. Redial places a new call to
the same number as the most recent call made from this telephone.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
Creating and Managing Button Mappings
159
Table 26 Button Type Functions (continued)
Button
Type
Description
Release
Maps the Release function to this button. Release disconnects the
current call and leaves the telephone idle (on hook). This feature is
useful if you use a headset when you make calls.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
SSD 0–99
(SuperStack
3)
SSD 1–10
(NBX 100)
Maps a System Speed Dial (SSD) number to the button.
Both the SuperStack 3 NBX and the NBX 100 system includes 100
System Speed Dials (SSDs), which can be programmed by the
administrator (NBX NetSet System Configuration - Speed Dials).
For the NBX 100, you can map the first 10 system speed dials using
the Button Mappings window. To map the remaining 90 system
speed dials, use the Other button mapping, described earlier in this
table.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
Switch to
DTMF
Maps this button to the feature that switches this Analog Line Card
port from pulse dialing to tone dialing (DTMF). Press this button
once to switch to tone dialing. You cannot switch from tone dialing
back to pulse dialing during a call. When you hang up the
telephone, the Analog Line Card port reverts to its default setting,
either pulse dialing or tone dialing, as configured by the system
administrator.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
System
Intercom calls and outside calls from lines not mapped to specific
buttons ring on a System button. To call an outside number from a
System line, you must access a line pool by dialing either 9 or 8,
depending on your line pool configuration.
By default, the bottom 3 buttons with lights have their Type set to
System.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — The button with the lowest value in the Prty (Priority)
field is the one that becomes active when you lift the receiver or
press the Speaker button.
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Table 26 Button Type Functions (continued)
Button
Type
Description
System Open, Maps one of four system modes to this button. When the button is
Closed,
pressed, it sets the Automated Attendant to play the prompts
Lunch, Other appropriate to the selected mode (Open, Closed, Lunch, or Other)
when callers dial into the system.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
Transfer
Allows you to transfer a caller to an internal extension or an external
telephone number.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
Xfer Vmail
Allows you to transfer a caller directly to another person’s mailbox.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
Changing Device IP Settings
Changing Device IP
Settings
161
If you are using Standard IP network protocol, you can manually change
the IP address of telephones, Line Card ports, Attendant Consoles, and
Analog Terminal Cards. You modify the IP settings of a device if you plan
to move the device to a different subnetwork than the one on which the
Call Processor resides. If the new subnetwork is served by a DHCP server,
the IP address you assign to the device must be outside the address range
that the DHCP server uses.
See the Help for NBX NetSet System Configuration > System Settings >
System-Wide for more information on IP network protocols.
To change the IP settings of a telephone:
1 Select NBX NetSet > Device Configuration > Telephones.
If you are updating the IP Settings of a different type of device (such as an
Attendant Console or a Digital Line Card), click the appropriate tab to see
a list of devices.
2 Select the telephone or other device that you want to update and click
IP Settings.
3 Type the new IP values for IP Address, Subnet Mask, and Default Gateway
address in the text boxes.
4 Click OK.
5 Unplug the device from the Call Processor subnetwork.
6 Connect the device to the new subnetwork as follows:
■
Connect a telephone or a single-port Analog Terminal Adapter to a
port on a switch or hub that is connected to the new subnetwork.
■
Plug a card into an NBX chassis that is connected to the new
subnetwork.
7 Reboot the device as follows:
■
Remove power from a telephone or a single-port Analog Terminal
Adapter, and then reconnect it.
■
If the device is a card, it reboots automatically when you insert it into
the new chassis. You do not need to remove power to the chassis
when adding or removing cards.
When you change IP Settings, all current calls through this device are
terminated.
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CHAPTER 3: DEVICE CONFIGURATION
8 In the NBX NetSet utility, return to the IP Settings dialog box for the
device.
9 Verify that the IP settings that you entered are now reported by the
device.
CAUTION: If you have configured an NBX telephone for operation on a
subnetwork other than the Call Processor’s subnetwork, and if you access
the Modify IP Settings dialog box to verify that the device settings are
correct, you must exit the dialog box by clicking the Cancel button. If you
click OK, the NBX system applies the IP settings in the Manually Assigned
IP Settings text boxes. By default, all of these fields contain 0.0.0.0, and if
you click OK, all of the IP settings for the telephone are set to 0.0.0.0,
and the telephone no longer works on the “remote” subnetwork.
Configuring Call
Park
When you park a call, anyone can retrieve it from any other telephone in
the system by entering the Call Park extension that is associated with that
call. Example: You need to transfer an incoming caller, but the person
that you need to reach is not available. You can park the call on any
unused Call Park extension and then page the person, announcing the
Call Park extension where the call is parked. The person can then retrieve
the parked call from any internal telephone by dialing the Call Park
extension on which you parked the call.
These are the default system configuration extensions for Call Park:
■
SuperStack 3 NBX: 6000 through 6099
The Superstack 3 NBX is shipped with a 4-digit dial plan. If you import
any 3-digit plan, you must manually specify any 3-digit extension ranges
that are not set by the imported plan.
■
NBX 100: 601 through 609
The NBX 100 is shipped with a factory default 3-digit dial plan. If you
import any 4-digit plan, you must manually specify any 4-digit extension
ranges that are not set by the imported plan.
Adding a Call Park
Extension
To add a Call Park extension or change the name of a default Call Park
extension:
1 Select NBX NetSet > Device Configuration > Call Park tab.
2 Click Add. The Add Call Park dialog box appears.
Configuring the NBX 1105 Attendant Console
163
3 Enter the number of an extension you have previously removed in the
Extension field.
4 Enter a name for the extension in the Name field.
5 Click OK.
Changing the Name
of a Call Park
Extension
You can change the name of any Call Park extension.
To change the name of an extension:
1 Select NBX NetSet > Device Configuration > Call Park.
2 Select the extension name that you want to change. Click Modify. The
Modify Call Park dialog box appears.
3 Enter the new name for the Call Park extension in the Name field.
4 Click OK.
Removing a Call Park
Extension
You can remove a Call Park extension at any time.
To remove a Call Park extension:
1 Select NBX NetSet > Device Configuration > Call Park.
2 Select the extension that you want to remove.
3 Click Remove. You are prompted to confirm that you want to remove this
extension.
4 Click Yes.
To replace any extension that you remove, see “Adding a Call Park
Extension” on page 162.
Configuring the
NBX 1105
Attendant Console
The NBX 1105 Attendant Console provides extended button mappings
and displays the current status of each extension. A receptionist typically
uses the Attendant Console to connect incoming calls to telephone
extensions.
This section describes how to configure the Attendant Console manually.
Alternatively, you can use Auto Discovery to add and configure the device
automatically, and then use the manual configuration procedures in this
section to fine-tune your mappings.
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If you auto discover the Attendant Console, do so after you have auto
discovered all telephones, Analog Terminal Adapters, and Analog
Terminal Cards. The Auto Discovery process maps all existing telephones
to the Attendant Console.
This section covers these topics:
Adding an Attendant
Console
■
Adding an Attendant Console
■
Modifying an Attendant Console
■
Viewing Attendant Console Status
■
Removing an Attendant Console
■
Configuring Attendant Console Buttons
■
Changing Attendant Console IP Settings
On a SuperStack 3 NBX system, you can configure up to 100 Attendant
Consoles; on an NBX 100 system, you can configure up to 50. For either
system, you can associated at most 3 Attendant Consoles with any one
telephone.
To add a new NBX 1105 Attendant Console:
1 Select NBX NetSet > Device Configuration > Attendant Console.
2 The Add Attendant Console dialog box appears.
3 Fill in the fields for the new Attendant Console, as described in Table 27.
Table 27 Add Attendant Console Fields
Field
Purpose
MAC Address
The MAC (Media Access Control) address of the Attendant
Console (appears on the label on the bottom of the device.
Device Name
(Optional) A name that identifies this device when it
appears in lists in the NBX NetSet utility.
Associated Telephone
The telephone extension to associate with this Attendant
Console. Each Attendant Console must be associated with
a single NBX Business Telephone.
Configuring the NBX 1105 Attendant Console
165
Table 27 Add Attendant Console Fields (continued)
Auto-Assign Button
Mappings
Based on what is in the database, maps all existing
extensions, except for the Associated Telephone, to the
Access buttons on the Attendant Console. Each extension
has its own button on the Attendant Console.
The four Feature buttons along the bottom of the
Attendant Console are mapped, from left to right, to
Transfer, Transfer to Voice Mail, Park, and Hold.
Auto-Assign Button Mappings works with a new device
only. After it has been initially configured, changes to the
mappings must be done manually.
Mapping can be done manually by selecting Device
Configuration, Attendant Console, Button Mappings.
4 Click OK. The system adds the new NBX 1105 Attendant Console.
Modifying an
Attendant Console
This section describes how to modify an existing Attendant Console. You
can change an Attendant Console’s device number or associated
telephone. Every Console must be associated with a telephone. To modify
an existing NBX 1105 Attendant Console:
1 Select NBX NetSet > Device Configuration > Attendant Console.
2 Select the Attendant Console that you want to modify and click Modify.
The Modify dialog box appears.
3 Change the desired fields. Table 28 describes each field.
Table 28 Modify Attendant Console Status Fields
Field
Purpose
MAC Address
The MAC (Media Access Control) address of the
Attendant Console.
Device Name
(Optional) A name that identifies this device when it
appears in lists in the NBX NetSet utility.
Associated Telephone
The telephone extension associated with this Console.
4 Click Apply to make the changes and then click OK.
Viewing Attendant
Console Status
Use the Status button on the Attendant Console tab to check the status
of an Attendant Console. You can also reboot it from this tab with the
Reset Device option.
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To view the status of an Attendant Console:
1 Select NBX NetSet > Device Configuration > Attendant Console.
2 Select the Attendant Console for which you want to view the status and
click Status. The Device Status dialog box appears.
3 View the settings and optionally change the Dialog Refresh, Device
Refresh, and Reset Device settings. Table 29 describes each field.
4 Click Apply to apply the settings and then click OK.
Table 29 Device Status Fields
Field
Purpose
MAC Address
The MAC (Media Access Control) address of the
Attendant Console.
Name (Device Name)
(Optional) A name that identifies this device when it
appears in lists in the NBX NetSet utility.
Extension (Associated
Telephone)
The telephone extension associated with this Attendant
Console.
Dialog Refresh
How often to renew the information that appears on this
dialog box.
Choices: Manual; 5 10, 15, 30, or 60 seconds.
Device Refresh
Forces the device to send a status message to the Call
Processor. (If you select this setting, you must click the
Apply button to make the change take effect.)
Reset Device
Reboots the Attendant Console. Rebooting renews the
Console’s communications with the Call Processor and
causes the Attendant Console to receive a new
download of its operating software.
CAUTION: If the device has an active call, then Reset
Device disconnects the call.
Status
The state of the device as of the last Dialog Refresh.
Online: The device was available.
Offline: The device was not available the last time that
the Call Processor tried to set up a call with this device.
Unknown: The device has not communicated with the
Call Processor during the previous 5 minutes.
Software Version
The software version downloaded to the device.
Time Last Seen
A timestamp identifying the last time the device
communicated with the Call Processor. During normal
operations, the Call Processor gathers status information
from each device every 30 seconds.
Configuring the NBX 1105 Attendant Console
167
Table 29 Device Status Fields (continued)
Removing an
Attendant Console
Field
Purpose
Error Count,
Error Code,
Performance Data,
Debug Data,
Actor Data
Advanced diagnostic data for use by technical support
personnel.
To remove an NBX 1105 Attendant Console from the system:
1 Select NBX NetSet > Device Configuration > Attendant Console.
2 Select the Attendant Console that you want to remove.
3 Click Remove. A dialog box prompts you to confirm the removal.
4 Click Yes. The system removes the Attendant Console.
Configuring
Attendant Console
Buttons
This section describes how to configure the buttons on the NBX 1105
Attendant Console. The Attendant Console buttons include:
■
50 Access buttons. You can assign each button two settings.
■
A Shift button. This button switches between the two settings
allowed for each Access button.
■
Four Feature buttons, located below the Access buttons.
Configuring Feature Buttons
To map the Attendant Console Feature Buttons:
1 Select NBX NetSet > Device Configuration > Attendant Console.
2 Select the Attendant Console for which you want to map Feature
Buttons.
3 Click Feature Buttons. The Feature Button Mappings dialog box appears.
4 To assign each Feature button, use the drop down list to select the
feature you want to assign to the button. Table 30 describes each
feature.
5 Click Apply to implement the new mappings.
6 Click OK.
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Table 30 Feature Button Mappings
Function
Description
Account Code
Allows you to map the account code function to this
button. Account codes allow you to keep track of calls
associated with a particular client or account. The codes
appear in Call Detail reports.
To use the function while you are on a call, press the
button, enter the account code you want, and press the #
key.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
CLIR-All
Assigns Calling Line Identity Restriction to this button.
When you press the button, all subsequent ISDN calls made
by from this telephone no longer contain CLIR information.
If the button has a light beside it, pressing the button
causes the light to turn on.
To turn off CLIR-All, press the button again. The light turns
off.
Normally, when an ISDN call is made, the identity of the
caller is provided to the PSTN and may be seen by the called
user if they subscribe to the Caller-ID service. CLIR allows
you to withhold this information from the called user.
NOTE: Enabling CLIR-Next does not cause the lamp to
light.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
CLIR-Next
Assigns Calling Line Identity Restriction to this button.
When you press the button, the next ISDN call made from
this telephone does not contain CLIR information.
If the button has a light beside it, pressing the button does
not cause the light to turn on.
After you complete the call and hang up, CLIR-Next
becomes inactive.
Normally, when an ISDN call is made, the identity of the
caller is provided to the PSTN and may be seen by the called
user if they subscribe to the Caller-ID service. CLIR allows
you to withhold this information from the called user.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
Configuring the NBX 1105 Attendant Console
169
Table 30 Feature Button Mappings (continued)
Function
Description
Conference
Maps the Conference function to this button. Conference
allows the user to set up conference calls. The Conference
button mapping type is available only on telephones that
do not have a dedicated Conference button, such as the
NBX Basic Telephone.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
Conference Drop
Maps the Conference Drop function to this button.
Conference Drop drops the last person who joined the
conference call.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
Default
Indicates that this button has no mapping.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
DP 540–589
(SuperStack 3)
Maps one of the Directed Call Pickup extensions to this
button.
DP 540–549
(NBX 100)
Directed Call Pickup allows a user to pick up a call that is
ringing on someone’s telephone. The user’s telephone and
the ringing telephone must be part of the same pickup
group unless the “Allow Non-Member Pickup” check box is
enabled for the ringing telephone’s group.
After you map the Directed Pickup extension to a button
on one or more user telephones, each user with that
button mapping can log into the NBX NetSet utility and
select the telephone extension that is picked up when the
button is pressed (Personal Settings > Speed Dials >
Directed Pickup). Each user can select a telephone
extension that is different than the telephone extensions
chosen by other users.
Example: You map DP 545 to button 10 for a telephone
group that includes user extension 3504. In the Extension
text box, the user 3504 enters 3500 as the extension to be
picked up. When a call rings on 3500, user 3504 picks up
the handset, presses button 10, and is connected to the
caller.
Number -- Not used.
Prty (Priority) -- Not used.
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Table 30 Feature Button Mappings (continued)
Function
Description
Feature
A Feature button lets you access any system feature by
pressing it and then dialing a Feature Code.
For example, if a telephone does not have a button
programmed for Call Park, you can press the Feature
button, and then dial the Call Park Feature Code (444) to
access the Call Park feature.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
NOTE: To see a list of the feature codes and how to use
them, click the Feature Codes icon in the NBX NetSet –
Main Menu window.
Flash
Sends a special signal to the Call Processor to begin a call
transfer. On an NBX telephone, you cannot depress the
switch hook to send a Flash signal. You must use a button
mapped to the Flash function.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
Hold
Maps a headset/handset toggle function to this button.
The Headset button mapping type is available only on
telephones that have a dedicated headphone jack, such as
the NBX 3102 Business Telephone.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
hg login/out 0–99
(SuperStack 3)
hg login/out 0–29
(NBX 100)
Maps one of the hunt group login/logout Feature Codes to
this button. Each login number logs the user in or out of
the associated hunt group. You must first associate a Hunt
Group with a Hunt Group Feature Code. See the NBX
NetSet Help: User Configuration > Hunt Groups > Feature
Mappings.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
Configuring the NBX 1105 Attendant Console
171
Table 30 Feature Button Mappings (continued)
Function
Description
Line / Extension
You can map a button to the extension of another
telephone (to create a Busy Lamp/Speed Dial), a line card
port extension (external line), an Analog Terminal Adapter,
an Analog Terminal Card port, or a Call Park extension (to
park a call or to pick up a call parked at that extension).
Number — Enter a number:
■
For a telephone extension, enter the extension number.
■
For an external line, enter the full telephone number
associated with the incoming line.
■
For an Analog Terminal Adapter or an Analog Terminal
Card port, enter the extension associated with the ATA
or the ATC port.
■
For Call Park, enter a Call Park extension.
To park a call, you must first press the Call Park button
(mapped by default NBX Business Telephones), and then
press the button that is mapped to a particular Call Park
extension:
■
SuperStack 3 NBX: 6000–6099 (See note 1)
■
NBX 100: 601–609 (See note 2)
Prty (Priority) — Enter a number to identify which button
has precedence. The button with the lowest value becomes
active when you lift the receiver or press the Speaker
button.
Note 1: The Superstack 3 NBX is shipped with a factory
default 4-digit dial plan. If you import any 3-digit plan, you
must manually specify any 3-digit extension ranges that are
not set by the imported plan.
Note 2: The NBX 100 is shipped with a 3-digit dial plan. If
you import any 4-digit plan, you must manually specify any
4-digit extension ranges that are not set by the imported
plan.
MWI
Assigns the Message Waiting Indicator to this button. The
lamp next to the button lights when you have a message in
your mailbox.
Number — Enter the voice mailbox number (telephone
extension).
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
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Table 30 Feature Button Mappings (continued)
Function
Description
Other
Lets you assign any feature code to a button.
Number — Enter the feature code number in this field.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
Example: On the NBX 100, use Other to map the personal
speed dials from 11–99. In the Number field, enter an
extension from the personal speed dial extension range.
Personal speed dial 11 corresponds to extension 610.
Park
Maps the Call Park feature to this button. To park the
current call, you must press the button and dial a valid Call
Park extension:
SuperStack 3: 6000–6099 (See note 1)
NBX 100: 601–609 (See note 2)
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
You can also map a button to a specific Call Park extension
by choosing Line / Extension as the Type and entering a Call
Park extension in the Number box. Then, when users are on
a call, they can press the Park button (by default, the third
button below the PROGRAM button on an NBX Business
Telephone) and then press the button that you mapped to
a specific Call Park extension. If the mapped call park
extension is not busy, the call is parked on that extension.
To retrieve a parked call from a Call Park extension:
Pick up your telephone handset.
Press the Park button (by default, the third button below
the PROGRAM button on an NBX Business Telephone) and
then dial the extension on which the call was parked. If you
have a button mapped to a particular call park extension,
you can press the Park button and then the mapped button
to pick up a call that is parked on the extension that is
mapped to the button.
Note 1: The Superstack 3 NBX is shipped with a factory
default 4-digit dial plan. If you import any 3-digit plan, you
must manually specify any 3-digit extension ranges that are
not set by the imported plan.
Note 2: The NBX 100 is shipped with a 3-digit dial plan. If
you import any 4-digit plan, you must manually specify any
4-digit extension ranges that are not set by the imported
plan.
Configuring the NBX 1105 Attendant Console
173
Table 30 Feature Button Mappings (continued)
Function
Description
PG 482–531
(SuperStack 3)
Identifies a specific Pickup Group extension and maps it to
this button.
PG 500–531
(NBX 100)
This setting allows a user to pick up a call on any extension
in the selected Pickup Group without dialing the Pickup
Group extension. Your telephone and the ringing
telephone must be part of the same Pickup Group unless
the “Allow Non-Member Pickup” check box is enabled for
the group.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
Pickup Ext.
Maps the Pickup Extension function to this button.
The Pickup Extension function picks up a call for a
particular extension.
After you press this button, you must enter the extension
number of the ringing telephone.
This function is similar to Directed Call Pickup (see DP
540–589 and DP 540–549, later in this table).
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
Pickup Group
Maps the Pickup Group function to this button.
This setting allows you to pick up a call on any extension in
the selected Pickup Group. Your telephone and the ringing
telephone must be part of the same Pickup Group unless
the “Allow Non-Member Pickup” check box is enabled for
the group.
To use the Pickup Group button, the user presses the
mapped button and then dials the Pickup Group extension.
For one-touch access to a specific Pickup Group extension,
see the description for PG 482–531 (SuperStack 3) and PG
500–531 (NBX 100) later in this table).
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
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Table 30 Feature Button Mappings (continued)
Function
Description
PSD 1–99
(SuperStack 3)
Assigns a Personal Speed Dial (PSD) number to the button.
PSD 1–10
(NBX 100)
The NBX system includes 100 Personal Speed Dials (PSDs),
which can be programmed by either the administrator or
the user.
For the NBX 100, you can map the first 10 personal speed
dials using the Button Mappings window. To map the
remaining 90 personal speed dials, use the Other button
mapping, described earlier in this table.
You define the telephone numbers for each PSD in NBX
NetSet Personal Settings.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
Redial
Maps the Redial function to this button. Redial places a
new call to the same number as the most recent call made
from this telephone.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
Release
Maps the Release function to this button. Release
disconnects the current call and leaves the telephone idle
(on hook). This feature is useful if you use a headset when
you make calls.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
SSD 0–99
(SuperStack 3)
SSD 1–10
(NBX 100)
Maps a System Speed Dial (SSD) number to the button.
Both the SuperStack 3 NBX and the NBX 100 system
includes 100 System Speed Dials (SSDs), which can be
programmed by the administrator (NBX NetSet System
Configuration - Speed Dials).
For the NBX 100, you can map the first 10 system speed
dials using the Button Mappings window. To map the
remaining 90 system speed dials, use the Other button
mapping, described earlier in this table.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
Configuring the NBX 1105 Attendant Console
175
Table 30 Feature Button Mappings (continued)
Function
Description
Switch to DTMF
Maps this button to the feature that switches this Analog
Line Card port from pulse dialing to tone dialing (DTMF).
Press this button once to switch to tone dialing. You
cannot switch from tone dialing back to pulse dialing
during a call. When you hang up the telephone, the Analog
Line Card port reverts to its default setting, either pulse
dialing or tone dialing, as configured by the system
administrator.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
System
Intercom calls and outside calls from lines not mapped to
specific buttons ring on a System button. To call an outside
number from a System line, you must access a line pool by
dialing either 9 or 8, depending on your line pool
configuration.
By default, the bottom 3 buttons with lights have their
Type set to System.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — The button with the lowest value in the
Prty (Priority) field is the one that becomes active when you
lift the receiver or press the Speaker button.
System Open, Closed,
Lunch, Other
Maps one of four system modes to this button. When the
button is pressed, it sets the Automated Attendant to play
the prompts appropriate to the selected mode (Open,
Closed, Lunch, or Other) when callers dial into the system.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
Transfer
Allows you to transfer a caller to an internal extension or an
external telephone number.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
Xfer Vmail
Allows you to transfer a caller directly to another person’s
mailbox.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
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Mapping the Attendant Console Access Buttons
To map the NBX 1105 Attendant Console Access buttons:
1 Select NBX NetSet > Device Configuration > Attendant Console.
2 Select the Attendant Console you want.
3 Click Button Mappings.
4 To map the buttons that you want, follow these steps:
a Select the appropriate column of buttons. Click 1-50 to select columns
A through E, or 51 through 100 to select columns F through J. (This
choice emulates the function of the Shift button on the physical
Attendant Console.)
b Click the letter (A through J) that corresponds to the column of
buttons that you want to map.
c Map the buttons for the column that you selected using the
drop-down list boxes. Table 31 describes each mapping type.
5 Click Apply for the changes to take effect.
Table 31 Attendant Console Button Mappings
Button Type
Description
Default
If you select this setting for a button and click Apply, the
default value defined for the telephone group is applied
to this button.
Example: You have set a button on a user’s telephone as
a hunt group login button, but the user no longer wants
to use the button this way.
You select Default for the button and click Apply.
If the normal setting for the button (defined for the
corresponding telephone group) is PSD12 (personal
speed dial 12) that setting becomes active on the button.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
Other
Lets you assign any feature code to a button.
Number — Enter the feature code number in this field.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
Example: On the NBX 100, use Other to map the
personal speed dials from 11–99. In the Number field,
enter an extension from the personal speed dial
extension range. PSD 11 corresponds to extension 610.
Configuring the NBX 1105 Attendant Console
177
Table 31 Attendant Console Button Mappings (continued)
Button Type
Description
Feature
A Feature button lets you access any system feature by
pressing it and then dialing a Feature Code.
For example, if a telephone does not have a button
programmed for Call Park, you can press the Feature
button, and then dial the Call Park Feature Code (444) to
access the Call Park feature.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
Release
Maps the Release function to this button. Release
disconnects the current call and leaves the telephone idle
(on hook). Use this feature if you use a headset.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
Flash
Sends a special signal to the telephone company to
activate optional features such as Call Waiting. Enter
nothing in the Number or the Prty fields.
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CHAPTER 3: DEVICE CONFIGURATION
Table 31 Attendant Console Button Mappings (continued)
Button Type
Description
Feature
A Feature button lets you access any system feature by
pressing it and then dialing a Feature Code.
For example, if a telephone does not have a button
programmed for Call Park, you can press the Feature
button, and then dial the Call Park Feature Code (444) to
access the Call Park feature.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
Release
Maps the Release function to this button. Release
disconnects the current call and leaves the telephone idle
(on hook). Use this feature if you use a headset.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
Flash
Sends a special signal to the telephone company to
activate optional features such as Call Waiting. Enter
nothing in the Number or the Prty fields.
Configuring the NBX 1105 Attendant Console
179
Table 31 Attendant Console Button Mappings (continued)
Button Type
Description
Line / Extension
You can map a Line / Extension button to the extension
of another telephone (to create a Busy Lamp/Speed Dial),
a line card port extension (external line), or a Call Park
extension.
Number — Enter a number:
■
For a telephone extension, enter the extension
number.
■
For an external analog telephone line, enter the
extension associated with the Analog Line Card port
to which the incoming line is attached.
■
For Call Park, enter a Call Park extension. When you
want to park a call, you must first press the Call Park
button (by default, the third button below the
PROGRAM button on an NBX Business Telephone)
and then press the button that is mapped to a
particular Call Park extension.
NBX 100: 601–609. NOTE: The NBX 100 is shipped
with a factory default 3-digit dial plan. If you import any
4-digit plan, you must manually specify any 4-digit
extension ranges that are not set by the imported plan.
SuperStack 3 NBX: 6000–6099. NOTE: The
Superstack 3 NBX is shipped with a 4-digit dial plan. If
you import any 3-digit plan, you must manually specify
any 3-digit extension ranges that are not set by the
imported plan.
Prty (Priority) — Enter a number to identify which button
has precedence. The button with the lowest value is the
one that becomes active when you lift the receiver or
press the Speaker button.
Bridged Extension
For a primary telephone, defines this button as a bridged
extension appearance on the primary telephone.
For a secondary telephone, maps the extension of a
primary telephone to this button.
Number — Enter the primary telephone extension
number.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
180
CHAPTER 3: DEVICE CONFIGURATION
Table 31 Attendant Console Button Mappings (continued)
Button Type
Description
MWI
Assigns the Message Waiting Indicator to this button.
The lamp next to the button lights when you have a
message in your mailbox.
Number — Enter the voice mailbox number (telephone
extension).
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
NOTE: You cannot map the MWI function to a button if
you use a third-party voice mail system instead of NBX
Voice Messaging.
System Open
Assigns the System Open feature to the button. This
allows the user to implement the System Open Business
Hours setting by pressing this button.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
System Closed
Assigns the System Open feature to the button. This
allows the user to implement the System Closed Business
Hours setting by pressing this button.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
System Lunch
Assigns the System Open feature to the button. This
allows the user to implement the System Lunch Business
Hours setting by pressing this button.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
System Other
Assigns the System Open feature to the button. This
allows the user to implement the System Other Business
Hours setting by pressing this button.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
Conference Drop
Maps the Conference Drop function to this button.
Conference Drop drops the last person who joined the
conference call.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
Xfer Vmail
Allows the user to transfer a caller directly to another
person’s mailbox.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
Configuring the NBX 1105 Attendant Console
181
Table 31 Attendant Console Button Mappings (continued)
Button Type
Description
Park
Maps the Call Park feature to this button. To park the
current call, the user must press the button and dial a
valid Call Park extension:
NBX 100: 601–609. NOTE: The NBX 100 is shipped
with a factory default 3-digit dial plan. If you import any
4-digit plan, you must manually specify any 4-digit
extension ranges that are not set by the imported plan.
SuperStack 3 NBX: 6000–6099. NOTE: The
Superstack 3 NBX is shipped with a 4-digit dial plan. If
you import any 3-digit plan, you must manually specify
any 3-digit extension ranges that are not set by the
imported plan.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
You can also map a button to a specific Call Park
extension by choosing Line / Extension as the Type and
entering a Call Park extension in the Number box. Then,
when you are on a call and want to park it to the
mapped call park extension:
■
Press the Call Park Access button (by default, the third
Access button below the PROGRAM button).
■
Press the button to which you mapped the call park
extension.
To retrieve a parked call from a Call Park extension:
■
Pick up your telephone handset.
■
Press the button to which you mapped the Call Park
extension.
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Table 31 Attendant Console Button Mappings (continued)
Button Type
Description
Do Not Disturb
Maps the Do Not Disturb function to this button.
Pressing the button the first time turns on the Do Not
Disturb functions and prevents incoming calls from
ringing on the telephone. The words DO NOT DISTURB
appear in the telephone’s display panel.
Pressing the button again disables the Do Not Disturb
function and returns the telephone to normal operation.
The words DO NOT DISTURB disappear from the
telephone’s display panel.
When the user enables Do Not Disturb and the telephone
is part of a hunt group, calls to the hunt group ring on
the telephone, but calls directed specifically to the
telephone do not.
NOTE: Under the following circumstances, users must
use Feature Code 446 to disable Do Not Disturb on the
telephone:
Example:
■
You map Do Not Disturb to a button on an NBX
telephone. It does not matter whether you do this for
the individual telephone or for the telephone group to
which the telephone belongs.
■
The user presses the mapped button and enables Do
Not Disturb. The status light beside the button turns
on.
■
You unmap the button. It does not matter whether
you unmap it for the individual telephone or for the
telephone group.
■
The status light beside the button on the user’s
telephone goes out when you unmap the button.
■
The Do Not Disturb function remains in effect on the
telephone.
■
If the user presses the previously mapped button,
nothing happens.
■
To remove Do Not Disturb from the telephone, the
user must press the Feature button and then dial 446.
Configuring the NBX 1105 Attendant Console
183
Table 31 Attendant Console Button Mappings (continued)
Button Type
Description
CLIR-All
Assigns Calling Line Identity Restriction to this button.
When you press the button, all subsequent ISDN calls
made by from this telephone no longer contain calling
party information.
If the button has a light beside it, pressing the button
causes the light to turn on.
To turn off CLIR-All, press the button again. The light
turns off.
Normally, when an ISDN call is made, the identity of the
caller is provided to the PSTN and may be seen by the
called user if they subscribe to the Caller-ID service. CLIR
allows you to withhold this information from the called
user.
NOTE: Enabling CLIR-Next does not cause the lamp to
light.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
CLIR-Next
Assigns Calling Line Identity Restriction to this button.
When you press the button, the next ISDN call made
from this telephone does not contain calling party
information.
If the button has a light beside it, pressing the button
does not cause the light to turn on.
After you complete the call and hang up, CLIR-Next
becomes inactive.
Normally, when an ISDN call is made, the identity of the
caller is provided to the PSTN and may be seen by the
called user if they subscribe to the Caller-ID service. CLIR
allows you to withhold this information from the called
user.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
Switch to DTMF
Enables this button to switch the currently active call
from pulse dialing to DTMF.
NOTE: This applies only to calls made using Analog Line
Card ports.
184
CHAPTER 3: DEVICE CONFIGURATION
Table 31 Attendant Console Button Mappings (continued)
Button Type
Description
PSD 1–99
(SuperStack 3 NBX)
Assigns a Personal Speed Dial (PSD) number to the
button.
PSD 1–10
(NBX 100)
The NBX system includes a list of 100 Personal Speed
Dials (PSDs), which can be programmed by either the
administrator or the user.
On the NBX 100, map the first 10 personal speed dials
using the Button Mappings window. To map the
remaining 90 personal speed dials, use the Other button
mapping, described earlier in this table.
You define the numbers for each extension in NBX
NetSet Personal Settings.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
SSD 0–99
(SuperStack 3 NBX)
SSD 1–10
(NBX 100)
Maps a System Speed Dial (SSD) number to the button.
The NBX system includes a list of 100 System Speed Dials
(SSDs), which you can program (NBX NetSet > System
Configuration > Speed Dials).
For the NBX 100, you can map the first 10 system speed
dials using the Button Mappings window. To map the
remaining 90 system speed dials, use the Other button
mapping, described earlier in this table.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
hg login/out 0–99
(SuperStack 3 NBX)
hg login/out 0–29
(NBX 100)
Maps one of the hunt group login/logout Feature Codes
to this button. Each login number logs the user in or out
of the associated hunt group. You must first associate a
Hunt Group with a Hunt Group Feature Code. See the
NBX NetSet Help: User Configuration > Hunt Groups >
Feature Mappings.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
Pickup Ext.
Maps the Pickup Extension function to this button. The
Pickup Extension function picks up a call for a particular
extension.
After you press this button, you must enter the extension
number of the ringing telephone.
This function is similar to Directed Call Pickup. See DP
540–589 and DP 540–549, later in this table.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
Configuring the NBX 1105 Attendant Console
185
Table 31 Attendant Console Button Mappings (continued)
Button Type
Description
Pickup Group
Maps the Pickup Group function to this button.
This setting allows you to pick up a call on any extension
in the selected Pickup Group. Your telephone and the
ringing telephone must be part of the same Pickup
Group unless the “Allow Non-Member Pickup” check
box is enabled for the group.
To use the Pickup Group button, the user presses the
mapped button and then dials the Pickup Group
extension. For one-touch access to a specific Pickup
Group extension, see the description for PG 482–531
(SuperStack 3) and PG 500–531 (NBX 100) later in this
table).
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
DP 540–589
(SuperStack 3 NBX)
Maps one of the Directed Call Pickup extensions to this
button.
DP 540–549
(NBX 100)
Directed Call Pickup allows a user to pick up a call that is
ringing on someone’s telephone. The user’s telephone
and the ringing telephone must be part of the same
pickup group unless the “Allow Non-Member Pickup”
check box is enabled for the ringing telephone’s group.
After you map the Directed Pickup extension to a button
on one or more user telephones, each user with that
button mapping can log into the NBX NetSet utility and
select the telephone extension that is picked up when the
button is pressed (Personal Settings > Speed Dials >
Directed Pickup). Each user can select a telephone
extension that is different than the telephone extensions
chosen by other users.
Example: You map DP 545 to button 10 for a telephone
group that includes user extension 3504. In the Extension
text box, the user 3504 enters 3500 as the extension to
be picked up. When a call rings on 3500, user 3504 picks
up the handset, presses button 10, and is connected to
the caller.
Number -- Not used.
Prty (Priority) -- Not used.
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Table 31 Attendant Console Button Mappings (continued)
Button Type
Description
PG 482–531
(SuperStack 3 NBX)
Identifies a specific Pickup Group extension and maps it
to this button.
PG 500–531
(NBX 100)
This setting allows a user to pick up a call on any
extension in the selected Pickup Group without dialing
the Pickup Group extension. Your telephone and the
ringing telephone must be part of the same Pickup
Group unless the “Allow Non-Member Pickup” check
box is enabled for the group.
Number — Not used.
Prty (Priority) — Not used.
Changing Attendant
Console IP Settings
Although most configurations use IP On-the-Fly or DHCP to assign IP
addresses (and thus cannot manually change the addresses), if you use
Standard IP network protocol, you can manually change the IP address of
Attendant Consoles and other devices.
To set Attendant Console Feature IP settings:
1 Select NBX NetSet > Device Configuration > Attendant Console.
2 Select the Attendant Console you want, and click IP Settings.
When you change IP Settings, all current calls through this device are
terminated.
Configuring and
Managing
Analog Line Card
Ports
Each NBX Analog Line Card provides access for up to four local telephone
lines into your NBX system. The Call Processor treats a line card port as an
extension, so each line card port needs its own extension number.
You use Auto Discovery to detect Line Card ports, and you define the
starting address for Auto Discovery of devices in the system dial plan. For
a 3-digit dial plan, the default starting address is 750; for a 4-digit dial
plan, the default starting address is 7250. Auto Discovery assigns the first
unassigned number, starting at 750 (or 7250 for a 4-digit dial plan), to
the first Line Card port.
You typically configure Line Cards during installation. See the NBX
Installation Guide for more information.
Configuring and Managing Analog Line Card Ports
187
If you remove a line card from the system, the port information remains in
the database. The extension numbers assigned to the four ports do not
become available for reuse unless you use the NBX NetSet utility to
remove the line card from the configuration database.
This section covers these topics:
Configuring a
Line Card Port
■
Configuring a Line Card Port
■
Modifying a Line Card Port
■
Removing a Line Card Port
■
Verifying Line Card Port Status
■
Rebooting a Line Card Port
■
Advanced Settings
When you configure a line card port, you can assign it as a member of a
line pool.
You can configure a line card port automatically (recommended) or
manually.
Verify that you have chosen a 3-digit or 4-digit dial plan before you begin
to configure line card ports. See Chapter 2.
Configuring a Line Card Port Automatically
To configure a line card port automatically:
1 Select NBX NetSet > System Configuration.
2 Click System-wide. The System Settings dialog box appears.
3 Enable the Auto Discover Line Cards check box.
4 Click OK.
Configuring a Line Card Port Manually
Most organizations use Auto Discovery to automatically configure line
card ports. However, you can configure a line card port manually and
select all settings.
To configure a line card port manually:
1 Select NBX NetSet > Device Configuration > Line Card Ports.
2 Click Add.
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CHAPTER 3: DEVICE CONFIGURATION
3 In the Add Line Card Port dialog box, specify the port information, and
then click OK. The fields are described in Table 32.
Table 32 Add Line Card Port Fields
Field
Purpose
Port Type
Select POTS (Plain Old Telephone Service) when
configuring a port to connect to an analog telephone
line.
Select ConneXtions H.323 Gateway if you are using this
port to support the H.323 gateway product. NOTE:
You cannot add a ConneXtions H.323 Gateway unless
you have entered the proper license key using the NBX
NetSet utility.
MAC Address
The hardware address of the port, assigned at the
factory.
If you are configuring a ConneXtions H.323 Gateway,
the MAC address is the address of the network
interface card of the computer that is hosting the
gateway program. ConneXtions generates the address
automatically, so do not enter a MAC address for H.323
Gateway.
For more about installing line cards and determining the
port MAC address, see the NBX Installation Guide.
When you type a MAC Address, use the format
XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX, where each X represents a
hexadecimal digit (0 through f).
Channel Number
The number of the port or channel on the Analog Line
Card.
The 3C10114C (Analog Terminal Card) uses a single
MAC address (there was one MAC address per port on
the previous model of the ALC, the 3C10114). To
specify a port on the card, you must enter a channel
number (1 to 4) in this field.
If you add a 3C10114 ALC, leave this field empty. If you
modify the settings for a port on a 3C10114 ALC, this
field contains N/A (not applicable).
Name
A unique name for the port.
This name appears on the telephone display and in
reports, to help you identify the port.
Extension Number
Type an Extension Number or leave this box empty to
have the system use Auto Discovery to assign the next
unused extension for line card ports.
By default, Auto Discovery begins at extension 750 for a
3-digit dial plan, or 7250 for a 4-digit dial plan.
Configuring and Managing Analog Line Card Ports
189
Table 32 Add Line Card Port Fields (continued)
Field
Purpose
AutoExt
Specify the Attendant Console extension or 500. (The
default is 500 if you leave this box empty.)
Auto Ext works with the Button Mappings feature,
which lets you map CO lines directly to Access buttons
on individual telephones and determine the destination
path for an incoming call on this line. See Table 33 for
details.
Time Out
Specify the time, in seconds, after which this line goes
to the Attendant Console.
Silence Suppression
If you enable silence suppression, the system transmits
fewer packets during a conversation. However, silence
suppression results in compromises to audio quality.
The silence suppression setting for each port works in
conjunction with the system-wide silence suppression
setting.
If you select Default, this port operates under the
control of the system-wide Silence Suppression control.
(Default is followed by either On or Off to indicate the
current setting of System-wide Silence Suppression.)
Select On or Off to override the system-wide setting.
With Silence Suppression enabled, the line card port
detects silence in the audio stream, such as a pause in
conversation, and sends no packets. This reduces
network traffic during silences in conversations.
The receiving NBX telephone generates white noise for
the periods represented by silence indicator packets. A
careful listener might notice the difference between
generated and actual background noise.
Trunk to Trunk
Select Unrestricted to enable incoming calls to be
transferred to another line card port.
For example, enable Trunk to Trunk transfers if you plan
to connect a Voice Over IP (VOIP) gateway to a line card
port and let callers use the NBX system to access the
telephone system from a remote location and use it to
make CO calls.
Select Restricted to prevent transfers from one line card
port to another. For example, disable Trunk to Trunk
transfers if you are concerned about whether a caller
might use this feature to avoid normal toll charges.
If a telephone is locked, the user cannot make a Trunk
to Trunk transfer.
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Table 32 Add Line Card Port Fields (continued)
Field
Purpose
Disable Caller ID
Optionally enable or disable the caller ID function. This
also eliminates the approximately six-second delay on
the Auto Attendant.
Table 33 describes the behavior in Auto Extension Configuration:
Table 33 Auto Extension Configuration
Button Mapping Setting
for This Line
Auto Extension
Setting
Not mapped to any telephone Extension of the
Receptionist
Incoming Call Behavior
Receptionist’s telephone rings. If no one answers, the call
transfers to the call coverage point defined for the
Receptionist’s telephone.
User Configuration > Users > User Settings > Call Forward
The transfer occurs after the number of rings specified for the
Receptionist’s telephone.
User Configuration > Users > User Settings > Call Forward
Because the analog line is not mapped to any telephone, the
Time-out values (Open, Closed, Lunch, and Other) for the
Analog Line Card port are not used.
Device Configuration > Line Card Ports > Modify
Not mapped to any telephone 500
Calls go directly to the Automated Attendant without ringing
any telephone.
Mapped to a button on the
Receptionist’s Telephone (or
to a button on an Attendant
Console associated with the
Receptionist’s telephone)
Receptionist’s telephone rings. If no one answers, the call
transfers to call coverage point defined for the Receptionist’s
telephone.
Extension of the
Receptionist
User Configuration > Users > User Settings > Call Forward
The transfer occurs after:
■
The number of seconds specified on the Time Out line in
the Modify Line Card Port dialog box for the appropriate
time of day (Open, Closed, Lunch, Other):
Device Configuration > Line Card Ports > Modify
PLUS
■
The number of rings specified in the user settings for the
Receptionist’s telephone.
User Configuration > Users > User Settings > Call Forward
Example: If the Time Out value for the Analog Line Card port
is 12 seconds, the equivalent number of rings is 2. If the Call
Forward settings for the receptionist’s telephone is 4 rings,
then the call transfers after 6 rings.
Configuring and Managing Analog Line Card Ports
191
Table 33 Auto Extension Configuration (continued)
Button Mapping Setting
for This Line
Auto Extension
Setting
Incoming Call Behavior
Mapped to a button on the
Receptionist’s Telephone (or
to a button on an Attendant
Console associated with the
Receptionist’s telephone)
500
Receptionist’s telephone rings. If no one answers, the call
transfers to the Automated Attendant.
NOTE: The call coverage point defined for the receptionist’s
telephone has no affect.
The transfer occurs after the number of seconds specified on
the Time Out line in the Modify Line Card Port dialog box for
the appropriate time of day (Open, Closed, Lunch, Other).
Device Configuration > Line Card Ports > Modify
Mapped to a button on a user Extension of the
telephone (or to a button on Receptionist
an Attendant Console
associated with the user’s
telephone)
User telephone rings. If no one answers, the call transfers to
the Receptionist’s telephone.
The transfer occurs after the number of seconds specified on
the Time Out line in the Modify Line Card Port dialog box for
the appropriate time of day (Open, Closed, Lunch, Other).
Device Configuration > Line Card Ports > Modify
If the receptionist’s telephone is not answered, the call
transfers to the call coverage point defined for the
receptionist’s telephone.
User Configuration > Users > User Settings > Call Forward
Mapped to a button on a user 500
telephone (or to a button on
an Attendant Console
associated with the user’s
telephone)
User telephone rings. If no one answers, the call transfers to
the Automated Attendant.
The transfer occurs after the number of seconds specified on
the Time Out line in the Modify Line Card Port dialog box for
the appropriate time of day (Open, Closed, Lunch, Other).
Device Configuration > Line Card Ports > Modify
4 Click OK.
5 Connect your CO line to the configured port.
Modifying a
Line Card Port
You can modify a line card port that is already configured.
To modify a line card port:
1 Select NBX NetSet > Device Configuration > Line Card Ports.
2 Select the port you want to modify from the list.
3 Click Modify.
4 Specify the port information. The fields are the same as those described
in “Configuring a Line Card Port Manually” on page 187.
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CHAPTER 3: DEVICE CONFIGURATION
5 Click OK.
Removing a
Line Card Port
When you remove a line card port that is already configured, you remove
the port information from the database.
To remove a line card port:
1 Select NBX NetSet > Device Configuration > Line Card Ports.
2 Select the port that you want to remove from the list.
3 Click Remove. A prompt asks you to confirm that you want to remove the
port.
4 Click Yes to remove the port.
Verifying Line Card
Port Status
You can verify the status of a configured line port at any time.
To view the status of a line card port:
1 Select NBX NetSet > Device Configuration > Line Card Ports.
2 Select the port that you want and click Status.
Table 34 describes the fields in the Device Status dialog box.
Table 34 Device Status Dialog Box Fields
Field
Purpose
MAC Address
The hardware address of the port, assigned at the factory.
If you are configuring a ConneXtions H.323 Gateway, the
MAC address is the address of the network interface card of
the computer that hosts the gateway program.
ConneXtions generates the address automatically, so do
not enter a MAC address for H.323 Gateway.
For information about installing line cards and determining
each port’s MAC address, see the NBX Installation Guide.
The format for a MAC Address is XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX. Each
X represents a hexadecimal digit (0 through f).
Name
A unique name for the port.
This name appears on the telephone display and in reports,
to help you identify the port.
Extension
Type an Extension Number or leave this box empty to use
Auto Discovery to assign the extension for line card ports.
By default, Auto Discovery begins at extension 750 for a
3-digit dial plan, or 7250 for a 4-digit dial plan.
Configuring and Managing Analog Line Card Ports
193
Table 34 Device Status Dialog Box Fields (continued)
Field
Purpose
Status
The state of the port when it was last polled by the NCP.
Status does not indicate the current state of dial tone at the
port. The NCP polls each port for its status every 30
seconds.
Values:
OnCall— The port was in use when last polled by the NCP.
Idle — The port was available for a call when last polled by
the NCP.
Unknown — The port has not communicated with the call
processor during the previous five minutes. Indicates a likely
problem with the port.
Software Version
The version of software currently installed on the line card
and used by the Digital Signal Processors (DSPs).
Dialog Refresh
Specifies how often to renew the information that appears
in the Status dialog box.
Device Refresh
Forces the port to send a status message to the Call
Processor. (A port sends a status message to the Call
Processor every 30 seconds.)
Reset Device
Reboots the port, which resets communications with the
Call Processor and receives a new download of its operating
software.
If a call is in progress on the port, resetting the port
disconnects the call.
Time Last Seen
A time stamp that identifies the date and time the line card
port communicated with the Call Processor.
Error Count,
Advanced diagnostic data for use only by a qualified service
Error Code,
person.
POTS State, POTS Init,
Ring State, Loop State,
Performance Data,
Debug Data,
Actor Data
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CHAPTER 3: DEVICE CONFIGURATION
Table 34 Device Status Dialog Box Fields (continued)
Rebooting a
Line Card Port
Field
Purpose
Details of last 5 calls
Information about the most recent five completed calls on a
port:
■
Call Direction: Indicates whether the call originated
from inside the NBX system (outgoing call) or from
outside (incoming call). Values: Incoming, Outgoing.
■
Duration: Length of the call in seconds.
■
Called Party: The number or extension receiving the
call.
■
Calling Party: The number or extension originating the
call.
■
Disconnect: Indicates that a disconnect signal has been
received (the external party has hung up) or not
received. Values: Received, Not Received.
■
DTMF Digits: The digits that were dialed during the
call. This information appears only if the check box is
enabled.
■
Compression: Indicates the audio compression
technique used during the call. MULAW is used for
voice calls. ADPCM is used for voice mail.
Values: MULAW, ADPCM, ALAW, Linear.
To reboot a line card port:
1 Select NBX NetSet > Device Configuration > Line Card Ports.
2 From the list, select the port that you want to reboot.
3 Click Status. The Device Status dialog box appears.
4 Click Reset Device.
5 Click OK.
CAUTION: On the 3C10117 Analog Line Card, you can reboot individual
ports without affecting the other ports. However, if you reboot a port on
the 3C10117C Analog Line Card, all four ports on the card are rebooted.
Active telephone calls on any of these ports are disrupted.
Configuring and Managing Analog Line Card Ports
Advanced Settings
195
The Advanced Settings button enables you to set the audio gain and
timing controls on each port of an Analog Line Card.
To set these parameters:
1 Select NBX NetSet > Device Configuration > Line Card Ports.
2 Select one of the items from the list and click Advanced Settings. The
Advanced Settings dialog box appears.
If you change any of the values in the Advanced Settings dialog box, the
settings that you change persist if you later upgrade the NBX system
software or change the regional software.
Default Values
To reset all parameters to the default values, click the Reset button.
Table 35 describes each field in the dialog box.
Table 35 Analog Line Card Ports - Advanced Settings Parameters
Field
Purpose
MAC Address
The factory-assigned MAC address for the Analog Line
Card port.
Audio Level Controls
Audio Input Gain (dB)
Set this value to control the volume of the audio signal
from the telephone company’s central office (CO).
Default: Depends on the country in which the NBX
system is operating.
When you load a regional pack (Operations >
Regional Software) and select the tones and cadences
appropriate for your location (System Configuration >
System Settings > Regional Settings > Advanced), the
default value is set on your NBX system.
Minimum: - 10 dB
Maximum: + 10 dB
Mute is a choice provided for testing purposes.
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CHAPTER 3: DEVICE CONFIGURATION
Table 35 Analog Line Card Ports - Advanced Settings Parameters (continued)
Field
Purpose
Audio Output Gain (dB)
Set this value to control the volume of the audio signal
sent to the telephone company’s central office (CO).
Default: Depends on the country in which the NBX
system is operating.
When you load a regional pack (Operations >
Regional Software) and select the tones and cadences
appropriate for your location (System Configuration >
System Settings > Regional Settings > Advanced), the
default value is set on your NBX system.
Minimum: - 10 dB
Maximum: + 10 dB
Mute is a choice provided for testing purposes.
DTMF Output Level (dBm)
Set this value to control the volume of the tones sent to
the telephone company’s central office (CO).
Default: Depends on the country in which the NBX
system is operating.
When you load a regional pack (Operations >
Regional Software) and select the tones and cadences
appropriate for your location (System Configuration >
System Settings > Regional Settings > Advanced), the
default value is set on your NBX system.
Minimum: - 14 dBm
Maximum: 0 dBm
Increment: 2 dBm per step
Call Progress Output Level
(dBm)
Set this value to control the volume of call progress
tones (such as Ring-back and Dial Tone) sent to
telephone company’s central office (CO).
Default: Depends on the country in which the NBX
system is operating.
When you load a regional pack (Operations >
Regional Software) and select the tones and cadences
appropriate for your location (System Configuration >
System Settings > Regional Settings > Advanced), the
default value is set on your NBX system.
Minimum: - 30 dBm
Maximum: 0 dBm
Increment: 2 dBm per step
Configuring and Managing Analog Line Card Ports
197
Table 35 Analog Line Card Ports - Advanced Settings Parameters (continued)
Field
Purpose
Line Interface Controls
Minimum On-Hook Time
(msec)
Sets this value to control the minimum time that this
port goes on-hook as part of a normal disconnect. This
parameter helps prevent the CO from falsely detecting
Flash-Hook events.
Default: Depends on the country in which the NBX
system is operating.
When you load a regional pack (Operations >
Regional Software) and select the tones and cadences
appropriate for your location (System Configuration >
System Settings > Regional Settings > Advanced), the
default value is set on your NBX system.
Minimum: 500 msec
Maximum: 5000 msec
Minimum Off-Hook Time
(msec)
Sets this value to control the minimum time that this
port goes off-hook as part of a normal call connect.
Default: Depends on the country in which the NBX
system is operating.
When you load a regional pack (Operations >
Regional Software) and select the tones and cadences
appropriate for your location (System Configuration >
System Settings > Regional Settings > Advanced), the
default value is set on your NBX system.
Minimum: 500 msec
Maximum: 5000 msec
Flash-Hook Pulse (msec)
Set this value to control the time period that this port
goes on-hook to generate a Flash-Hook signal to the
telephone company’s Central Office.
Default: Depends on the country in which the NBX
system is operating. When you load a regional pack
(Operations > Regional Software) and select the tones
and cadences appropriate for your location
(System Configuration > System Settings >
Regional Settings > Advanced), the default value is set.
Minimum: 25 msec
Maximum: 1000 msec
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CHAPTER 3: DEVICE CONFIGURATION
Table 35 Analog Line Card Ports - Advanced Settings Parameters (continued)
Field
Purpose
Supervisory Disconnect
Pulse Minimum (msec)
Set this value to define the minimum on-hook time that
this port accepts as a valid supervisory disconnect pulse
(battery denial) from the telephone company’s central
office (CO).
Default: Depends on the country in which the NBX
system is operating. When you load a regional pack
(Operations > Regional Software) and select the tones
and cadences appropriate for your location
(System Configuration > System Settings >
Regional Settings > Advanced), the default value is set.
Minimum: 200 (this setting disables the function)
Maximum: 2000 msec
Caller-ID Receiver
The format used to interpret caller ID information sent
by the telephone company. The choice depends on the
country in which the NBX system is operating. Consult
with your telephone service provider to determine the
correct format.
Default: Depends on the country in which the NBX
system is operating.
When you load a regional pack (Operations >
Regional Software) and select the tones and cadences
appropriate for your location (System Configuration >
System Settings > Regional Settings > Advanced), the
default value is set.
Choices:
■
Bellcore GR-30-CORE
■
ETSI FSK
■
ETSI DTMF
■
British Telecom SIN 242
■
NTT Telephone Interface Services
Dial Tone Detection for CO For all ports on the Analog Line Card, this check box
Line Access
enables or disables the detection of dial tone
transmitted by the telephone company's central office
(CO) equipment.
Values:
Checked: Dial tone detection enabled
Unchecked: Dial tone detection disabled
Connecting and Managing Analog Devices
Connecting and
Managing Analog
Devices
199
An Analog Terminal Card (ATC) or an Analog Terminal Adapter (ATA)
allows ordinary analog (2500-series compliant) telephones, including
cordless telephones and Group-3 facsimile (fax) devices, to operate with
NBX systems.
Certain limitations apply because of the differences between an analog
device and the custom NBX Telephone:
■
A user dials 500, then ** on a telephone connected to an ATA to gain
access to voice mail.
■
A telephone can make or answer only one call. The second incoming
call goes to voice mail.
■
ATC ports and ATAs support call transfer.
This section discusses these topics:
Adding an Analog
Terminal Card
■
Adding an Analog Terminal Card
■
Adding an Analog Terminal Adapter (ATA)
■
Modifying an Analog Terminal Port
■
Removing an Analog Terminal Adapter
■
Viewing The Status of an Analog Terminal Adapter
To add an Analog Terminal Card to the NBX system using Auto Discovery:
1 Select NBX NetSet > System Configuration > System-wide.
2 Click the Auto Discover Telephones check box to select it.
3 Click OK.
4 Insert the Analog Terminal Card into the chassis.
5 Wait 1 minute for the system to discover the card.
6 In the NBX NetSet - Main Menu window, click Device Configuration.
7 In the Device Configuration dialog box, click the ATA tab.
8 The four ports of the Analog Terminal Card appear in the list of ATAs,
along with the ports of any previously discovered Analog Terminal Cards,
and any previously discovered Single-Port Analog Terminal Adapters
(ATAs).
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CHAPTER 3: DEVICE CONFIGURATION
Extension Assignments (3C10117 ATC)
Each of the four ports on a 3C10117 Analog Terminal Card has a MAC
address. The first port has the same MAC address as the card, and the
remaining three ports have sequential MAC addresses incremented by
one hexadecimal digit. See Table 36:
Table 36 MAC Addresses of Analog Terminal Card Ports (3C10117)
Card or Port
MAC Address
Analog Terminal Card
00:e0:bb:00:f8:c8
Port 1
00:e0:bb:00:f8:c8
Port 2
00:e0:bb:00:f8:c9
Port 3
00:e0:bb:00:f8:ca
Port 4
00:e0:bb:00:f8:cb
The extensions assigned to these ports by the NBX system may not be in
order. For example, if the NBX system assigns extensions 7258, 7259,
7260, and 7261 to the ATC ports, it might assign 7258 to port 3.
To determine which extension is associated with a given port, you must
access the ATA tab in the NBX NetSet utility and examine the list of ATAs
and ATC ports. For example, to determine the extension assigned to the
third port, look for the ATC port with a MAC address that is two
hexadecimal digits higher than the MAC address of the board. The
extension of the port is in the first column (Ext.).
After you have added the Analog Terminal Card, you can configure the
parameters for each of the four ports. See “Modifying an Analog
Terminal Port” on page 203.
Extension Assignments (3C10117C ATC)
On a 3C10117C Analog Terminal Card, there is only one MAC address.
Each of the four ports is assigned a unique virtual device number
(1 through 4) so that the NBX software can address each port separately.
When you select the ATA tab, and view the information, the port number
appears after the MAC address, enclosed within square brackets.
See Table 37.
Connecting and Managing Analog Devices
201
Table 37 MAC Addresses of Analog Terminal Card Ports (3C10117C)
Card or Port
MAC Address
Analog Terminal Card
00:e0:bb:00:f8:c8
Port 1
00:e0:bb:00:f8:c8[1]
Port 2
00:e0:bb:00:f8:c8[2]
Port 3
00:e0:bb:00:f8:c8[3]
Port 4
00:e0:bb:00:f8:c8[4]
The extensions that are assigned to these ports by the NBX system may
not be in order. For example, if the NBX system assigns extensions 7258,
7259, 7260, and 7261 to the ATC ports, it might assign 7258 to port 3.
To determine the extension assigned to any port on a 3C10117C ATC:
1 Click the ATA tab.
2 Look for the combination of MAC address and port number that you
want. The extension associated with the port is in the first column (Ext.).
After you have added the Analog Terminal Card, you can configure the
parameters for each of the four ports. See “Modifying an Analog
Terminal Port” on page 203.
Adding an Analog
Terminal Adapter
(ATA)
To add an Analog Terminal Adapter (ATA) to the NBX system:
1 Select NBX NetSet > Device Configuration > ATA.
2 Click Add. The Add ATA dialog box appears.
3 Fill in the fields in the Add ATA dialog box. Table 38 describes each field.
Table 38 Add ATA Fields
Field
Purpose
MAC Address
The MAC hardware address of this ATA, recorded during
installation of the ATA. The MAC address appears on the
label on the bottom of the ATA.
Channel Number
This does not apply to a single-port ATA.
Device Name
A name to help identify this ATA.
Class of Service
A Class of Service for users of this device.
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Table 38 Add ATA Fields (continued)
Field
Purpose
Silence Suppression
Enables the Silence Suppression feature, which reduces
network traffic by replacing a period of silence with a
small silence indicator packet.
Call Record & Monitor
Determines whether calls made to or from the telephone
attached to this ATA can be recorded.
Enabled — Enables recording for all calls to or from the
analog telephone attached to this ATA or ATC port.
Disabled — Disables recording for all calls to or from the
analog telephone attached to this ATA or ATC port.
Fwd to Auto Attendant
Redirects unanswered calls to the Auto Attendant instead
of voice mail.
Extension Number
The extension number assigned to the device connected
to this ATA.
First Name, Last Name,
Title, Location 1,
Location 2, Department
Enter information about the user associated with the
device connected to this ATA.
Low Bandwidth
Configures the device to operate over a low-bandwidth
link such as an ISDN connection. Some features not
available to a low-bandwidth device: paging,
conferencing, and Music-on-Hold.
Location 1 and Location 2 enable you to provide detailed
information about the location of the ATA (required for
E911 (Enhanced 911) emergency service).
Do not enable low bandwidth for a device that is
connected through a broadband connection through a
router/firewall device on the remote end.
ADPCM Audio Only
Restricts the ATA to support ADPCM audio only.
NOTE: If you are connecting a fax device, do not select
this option. Fax requires Mulaw audio.
Conference Disabled
Prevents this device from being used for conference calls.
Fax Machine
Alerts the PSTN that voice data must be uncompressed.
Check this box when sending or receiving faxes over
ISDN PRI lines.
CAUTION: Configuring an ATA device (either a single-port analog terminal adapter
or a port on an analog terminal card) for fax operation optimizes the performance
for inbound and outbound faxes. If you make a voice call using the ATA device (for
example, if you use the telephone portion of the fax machine), the quality of the
audio may be affected. If you make a VTL call using the ATA device, the audio may
be unusable. If you configure the port for fax operation, expect lower quality voice
calls on that port. If you configure the port for voice calls, the performance is not
optimized for faxes.
Connecting and Managing Analog Devices
203
Table 38 Add ATA Fields (continued)
Field
Purpose
Return busy tone when
device is in use
Returns a busy tone to the caller if the telephone
attached to this ATC port or ATA is in use.
NOTES:
■
If you enable this check box and the user enables the
Do Not Disturb feature on the analog telephone,
callers hear a busy tone whether or not the telephone
is in use.
■
If you enable this check box and configure an Analog
Line Card port such that the ATA is the auto
extension, when an external call arrives on the Analog
Line Card port and rings directly on the ATA, the
caller hears Ring No Answer instead of a busy tone.
This is the way that the NBX system works; it cannot
seize the Analog Line Card port until the ringing
telephone is answered.
4 Click Apply to add the new ATA to the system.
5 Repeat as necessary to add more ATAs.
6 When you are finished adding ATAs, click OK.
Modifying an Analog
Terminal Port
You can modify the configuration of an Analog Terminal Card port or a
Single-Port ATA at any time.
To modify an analog device configuration:
1 Select NBX NetSet > Device Configuration > ATA.
2 Select the port that you want to modify and click Modify.
3 Modify the desired fields. Table 39 lists the field definitions.
Table 39 Modify ATA Fields
Field
Purpose
Current Extension
The extension number assigned to the device connected
to this ATA. You cannot modify this field.
MAC Address
The hardware address of this ATA. You cannot modify it.
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Table 39 Modify ATA Fields (continued)
Field
Purpose
Channel Number
The number of the Analog Terminal Card port (1 to 4).
The 3C10117C (Analog Terminal Card) uses a single
MAC address (there was one MAC address per port on
the previous model of the ATC, the 3C10117). To specify
a port on the card, you must enter a channel number (1
to 4) in this field.
If you are modifying a port on a 3C10117 ATC, this field
contains N/A (not applicable).
If you are modifying a port on a 3C10117C ATC, this
field contains a port number (1 through 4).
Device Name
A name to help identify this ATA.
Silence Suppression
Enables the Silence Suppression feature, which reduces
network traffic by replacing a period of silence with a
small silence indicator packet.
Call Record & Monitor
Determines whether calls made to or from the telephone
attached to this ATA can be recorded.
Enabled — Enables recording for all calls to or from the
analog telephone attached to this ATA or ATC port.
Disabled — Disables recording for all calls to or from the
analog telephone attached to this ATA or ATC port.
Low Bandwidth
Configures the device to operate over a low-bandwidth
link, such as an ISDN line. Do not enable low bandwidth
for a device that is connected through a broadband
connection through a router/firewall device on the
remote end.
ADPCM Audio Only
Restricts the ATA to support ADPCM audio only.
NOTE: Fax devices require Mulaw audio.
Conference Disabled
Prevents this device from being used for conference calls.
Fax Machine
Alerts the PSTN that voice data must be uncompressed.
Select this to send or receive faxes over ISDN PRI lines.
CAUTION: Configuring an ATA device (either a single-port analog terminal adapter
or a port on an analog terminal card) for fax operation optimizes the performance
for inbound and outbound faxes. If you make a voice call using the ATA device (for
example, if you use the telephone portion of the fax machine), the quality of the
audio may be affected. If you make a VTL call using the ATA device, the audio may
be unusable. If you configure the port for fax operation, expect lower quality voice
calls on that port. If you configure the port for voice calls, the performance is not
optimized for faxes.
Connecting and Managing Analog Devices
205
Table 39 Modify ATA Fields (continued)
Field
Purpose
Return busy tone when
device is in use
Returns a busy tone to the caller if the telephone
attached to this ATC port or ATA is in use.
NOTES:
■
If you enable this check box and the user enables the
Do Not Disturb feature on the analog telephone,
callers hear a busy tone whether or not the telephone
is in use.
■
If you enable this check box and configure an Analog
Line Card port such that the ATA is the auto
extension, when an external call arrives on the Analog
Line Card port and rings directly on the ATA, the
caller hears Ring No Answer instead of a busy tone.
This is the way that the NBX system works; it cannot
seize the Analog Line Card port until the ringing
telephone is answered.
4 Click Apply to effect the changes.
5 Click OK.
Removing an Analog
Terminal Adapter
You can remove either an Analog Terminal Adapter (ATA) or one of the
ports on an Analog Terminal Card (ATC) from the system at any time. Any
device connected to the ATA is also removed from the system.
To remove an Analog Terminal Adapter:
1 Select NBX NetSet > Device Configuration > ATA.
Use the MAC addresses to determine whether an item in the list is an
Analog Terminal Adapter (ATA) or one of the ports on an Analog Terminal
Card. Ports on a 3C10117 Analog Terminal Card have MAC addresses
that differ by two hexadecimal digits. Ports on a 3C10117C Analog
Terminal Card all have the same MAC address and use a Virtual Device
Number to identify each port. The port number appears after the MAC
address, enclosed in square brackets. An ATA has a unique MAC address
with no port number.
2 Select the ATA or the port on an ATC you want to remove.
3 Click Remove. A dialog box prompts you to confirm the removal.
4 Click Yes. The system removes the item you selected.
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Viewing The Status
of an Analog
Terminal Adapter
You can view the status of either an Analog Terminal Adapter or one of
the ports on an Analog Terminal Card at any time.
To view the status of an Analog Terminal Adapter or a port on an Analog
Terminal Card:
1 Select NBX NetSet > Device Configuration > ATA tab.
Use the MAC addresses to determine whether an item in the list is an ATA
or one of the ports on an ATC. Ports on a 3C10114 Analog Terminal Card
have sequential MAC addresses. Ports on a 3C10114C Analog Terminal
Card all have the same MAC address followed by a Virtual Device Number
(VDN), enclosed in square brackets. An Analog Terminal Adapter has a
unique MAC address with no port number.
2 Select an ATA or port from the list.
3 Click Status. The Device Status dialog box appears.
4 View the device status and make any necessary changes. Table 40
describes each Device Status field.
Table 40 Device Status Fields
Field
Purpose
MAC Address
The hardware address of this Analog Terminal Adapter or
of the port on an Analog Terminal Card.
NOTE: The ports on a 3C10114 Analog Terminal Card
have sequential MAC addresses. The ports on a
3C10114C Analog Terminal Card have the same MAC
address, and a Virtual Device Number, in square brackets
after it to provide a unique number to each port.
Name
A name to help identify this ATA or ATC port.
Extension
The extension number assigned to the device connected
to this ATA or ATC port.
Status
The state of the ATA or ATC port when it was last
involved in a call. Devices send status messages to the
Call Processor every 30 seconds.
Software Version
The software version downloaded to this ATA or ATC
and used by the Digital Signal Processors (DSPs).
Dialog Refresh
How often to renew Status information. You can select
either Manual, for manual refresh, or an interval of from
5–60 seconds, at 5–second intervals.
Device Refresh
Forces the ATA or ATC port to send a status message to
the Call Processor immediately.
Connecting and Managing Analog Devices
207
Table 40 Device Status Fields (continued)
Field
Purpose
Reset Device
Reboots the ATA or ATC port. The ATA or ATC port
renews communications with the Call Processor and
receives a new download of its operating software.
Time Last Seen
The time when the ATA or ATC port last communicated
to the Call Processor.
Error Count
Error Code
Performance Data
Debug Data
Actor Data
Advanced diagnostic data for use by technical support
personnel.
5 To optionally send a status message to the Call Processor about the ATA
or ATC port, select Device Refresh and click Apply.
6 To optionally reset the ATA or ATC port, select Reset Device and click
Apply. A dialog box prompts you to confirm the reset.
7 Click Yes. The ATA or ATC port resets itself.
CAUTION: On the 3C10114 Analog Terminal Card, you can reboot
individual ports without affecting the other ports. However, if you reboot
a port on the 3C10114C Analog Terminal Card, all four ports on the card
are rebooted. Active calls on any of these ports are disrupted.
8 Click OK.
Advanced Settings
You can set the audio gain and timing controls on each port of an Analog
Terminal Card, or on an Analog Terminal Adapter. To set these
parameters:
1 Select NBX NetSet > Device Configuration > ATA.
2 Select one of the ports in the list and click Advanced Settings.
If you change any of the values in the Advanced Settings dialog box, the
settings you change persist if you later upgrade the NBX system software
or you change the regional software.
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Table 41 describes each field in the dialog box.
Table 41 Analog Terminal Adapter - Advanced Settings Parameters
Field
Purpose
MAC Address
The factory-assigned MAC address for the Analog
Terminal Card or the Analog Terminal Adapter.
NOTE: The ports on a 3C10114 Analog Terminal Card
have sequential MAC addresses.
The ports on a 3C10114C Analog Terminal Card have
the same MAC address, and a Virtual Device Number
(VDN), in square brackets after it, provides a unique
identifying number to each port.
Audio Level Controls
Audio Input Gain (dB)
Set this value to control the volume of the audio signal
from the analog telephone attached to this ATA or ATC
port.
Default: Depends on the country in which the NBX
system is operating. When you load a regional pack
(Operations > Regional Software) and select the tones
and cadences appropriate for your location
(System Configuration > System Settings >
Regional Settings > Advanced), the default value is set.
Minimum: - 10 dB
Maximum: + 10 dB
Mute is a choice provided for testing purposes.
Audio Output Gain (dB)
Set this value to control the volume of the audio signal
sent to the analog telephone attached to this ATA or
ATC port.
Default: Depends on the country in which the NBX
system is operating. When you load a regional pack
(Operations > Regional Software) and select the tones
and cadences appropriate for your location
(System Configuration > System Settings >
Regional Settings > Advanced), the default value is set.
Minimum: - 10 dB
Maximum: + 10 dB
Mute is a choice provided for testing purposes.
Connecting and Managing Analog Devices
209
Table 41 Analog Terminal Adapter - Advanced Settings Parameters (continued)
Field
Purpose
DTMF Output Level (dBm)
Set this value to control the volume of the tones sent to
the analog telephone attached to this ATC port or ATA.
Default: Depends on the country in which the NBX
system is operating. When you load a regional pack
(Operations > Regional Software) and select the tones
and cadences appropriate for your location
(System Configuration > System Settings >
Regional Settings > Advanced), the default value is set.
Minimum: - 14 dBm
Maximum: 0 dBm
Increment: 2 dBm per step
Call Progress Output Level
(dBm)
Set this value to control the volume of call progress
tones sent to the analog telephone attached to this
ATA or ATC port.
Default: Depends on the country in which the NBX
system is operating. When you load a regional pack
(Operations > Regional Software) and select the tones
and cadences appropriate for your location
(System Configuration > System Settings >
Regional Settings > Advanced), the default value is set.
Minimum: - 30 dBm
Maximum: 0 dBm
Increment: 2 dBm per step
Line Interface Controls
Flash-hook Minimum
(msec)
Set this value to define the minimum time hook switch
must be depressed for the NBX system to recognize the
event as a valid flash hook signal.
Default: Depends on the country in which the NBX
system is operating.
When you load a regional pack (Operations >
Regional Software) and select the tones and cadences
appropriate for your location (System Configuration >
System Settings > Regional Settings > Advanced), the
default value is set on your NBX system.
Minimum: 0 msec
Maximum: 1000 msec
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CHAPTER 3: DEVICE CONFIGURATION
Table 41 Analog Terminal Adapter - Advanced Settings Parameters (continued)
Field
Purpose
Flash-hook Maximum
(msec)
Set this value to define the maximum time the hook
switch can be depressed for the NBX system to
recognize the event as a valid flash hook signal. If the
hook switched is depressed longer than this time, the
NBX system treats the event as if you had hung up the
telephone.
Default: Depends on the country in which the NBX
system is operating.
When you load a regional pack (Operations >
Regional Software) and select the tones and cadences
appropriate for your location (System Configuration >
System Settings > Regional Settings > Advanced), the
default value is set on your NBX system.
Minimum: 0 msec
Maximum: 2000 msec
Supervisory Disconnect
Pulse (msec)
Set this value to define the duration of the supervisory
disconnect pulse (battery denial) that disconnects the
current call.
Default: Depends on the country in which the NBX
system is operating.
When you load a regional pack (Operations >
Regional Software) and select the tones and cadences
appropriate for your location (System Configuration >
System Settings > Regional Settings > Advanced), the
default value is set on your NBX system.
Minimum: 0 (this setting disables the function)
Maximum: 2000 msec
Connecting and Managing Analog Devices
211
Table 41 Analog Terminal Adapter - Advanced Settings Parameters (continued)
Field
Purpose
Disconnect Tone Select
A tone that disconnects the current call. The choice of
disconnect tone depends on the country in which the
NBX system is operating.
Choices:
Ring Frequency (Hz)
■
None – Use this setting if you do not want the
Analog Line Card to sense any disconnect signals.
■
Dial Tone (default setting) – Use this setting to select
the dial tone associated with the Regional Pack that
is being used on the NBX system.
■
Busy – Use this setting to select the busy signal
associated with the Regional Pack that is being used
on the NBX system.
■
Congestion – Also sometimes called Fast Busy, this
tone indicates that the Central Office equipment is
busy. Use this setting to select the congestion signal
associated with the Regional Pack that is being used
on the NBX system.
■
US Dial Tone – Use this setting to select the dial
tone used in the United States.
■
Disconnect Tone – Use this setting to select the
disconnect tone associated with the Regional Pack
that is being used on the NBX system.
The frequency of the ring signal sent to the analog
telephone attached to this ATA or ATC port.
Default: Depends on the country in which the NBX
system is operating. When you load a regional pack
(Operations > Regional Software) and select the tones
and cadences appropriate for your location
(System Configuration > System Settings >
Regional Settings > Advanced), the default value is set.
Minimum: 10 Hz
Maximum: 100 Hz
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Table 41 Analog Terminal Adapter - Advanced Settings Parameters (continued)
Field
Purpose
Caller-ID Generator Format The format in which caller ID information is passed. The
choice depends on the country in which the NBX
system is operating. Consult with your telephone
service provider to determine the correct format.
Default: Depends on the country in which the NBX
system is operating. When you load a regional pack
(Operations > Regional Software) and select the tones
and cadences appropriate for your location
(System Configuration > System Settings >
Regional Settings > Advanced), the default value is set.
Values:
Caller-ID Generator Level
(dBm)
■
Bellcore GR-30-CORE
■
ETSI FSK
■
ETSI DTMF
■
British Telecom SIN 242
■
NTT Telephone Interface Services
Select this value to control the output level of the caller
ID generator.
Default: Depends on the country in which the NBX
system is operating.
When you load a regional pack (Operations >
Regional Software) and select the tones and cadences
appropriate for your location (System Configuration >
System Settings > Regional Settings > Advanced), the
default value is set on your NBX system.
Minimum: - 30 dBm
Maximum: 0 dbm
Increment: 2 dBm per step
Caller-ID Generator Timing Set this value to control the time delay from the end of
(msec)
the Ring Signal to the beginning of the Caller ID signal.
Default: Depends on the country in which the NBX
system is operating.
When you load a regional pack (Operations >
Regional Software) and select the tones and cadences
appropriate for your location (System Configuration >
System Settings > Regional Settings > Advanced), the
default value is set on your NBX system.
Minimum: 100 msec
Maximum: 2000 msec
Configuring and Managing BRI-ST Digital Line Cards
213
Table 41 Analog Terminal Adapter - Advanced Settings Parameters (continued)
Configuring and
Managing BRI-ST
Digital Line Cards
Field
Purpose
Reset
Click the Reset button to set all parameters to the
default values.
These sections describe how to add and configure a BRI-ST Digital Line
Card to handle a BRI line with four BRI spans using the ST interface.
This section covers these topics:
■
Adding an ISDN BRI-ST Digital Line Card
Configuring the BRI-ST Digital Line Card
■
BRI-ST Card Status Lights
■
Modifying a BRI-ST Card
■
Adding or Modifying a BRI Group
■
Modifying BRI Card Channels
■
Modifying IP Settings for a BRI Card
■
Removing a BRI Digital Line Card
■
Each BRI-ST Digital Line Card (3C10164C) supports the Basic Rate
Interface protocol (ST interface only).
Adding an ISDN
BRI-ST Digital Line
Card
To add a BRI-ST Digital Line Card to an NBX system, use the information
in these sections:
■
Preparing the NBX System for BRI Cards
■
Ordering DID, CLIP, and MSN Services for BRI
■
Inserting the BRI-ST Digital Line Card
Preparing the NBX System for BRI Cards
Before you insert the BRI-ST Digital Line Card into the chassis, order an
ISDN BRI-ST line from your telephone carrier, and have them install the
line.
Ordering DID, CLIP, and MSN Services for BRI
When you order BRI services with DID, CLIP, or MSN, the local telephone
carrier assigns a block of telephone numbers to you. Usually, you can
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CHAPTER 3: DEVICE CONFIGURATION
request a specific range of numbers, but sometimes the carrier assigns
numbers other than the ones you request.
You may be able to request that the local telephone carrier pass you a
specific number of digits for each incoming telephone call. Sometimes
the carrier does not offer any choice. In either situation, you need to
know how many digits the carrier passes.
Example: Carriers commonly pass either the last three digits or last four
digits of the number for each incoming call.
Sometimes the last digits of the telephone numbers the carrier assigns to
you do not match the telephone extension numbers you want to use for
internal calls. Create entries in your Dial Plan configuration file to translate the incoming numbers into the corresponding extension numbers.
Example: You want to use internal extensions from 4000 through 4999,
but the local telephone carrier assigns you numbers from 617-555-3500
through 617-555-4499. You can create translator entries in the Dial Plan
configuration file to translate an incoming digit sequence such as 3795
into extension number 4295, and a sequence such as 4213 into 4713.
The configuration would require several translator entries to handle
subsets of the total range. A unique set of entries would handle incoming
digit sequences from 3500 through 3599, from 3600 through 3699, and
each of the other sequences in which the first two digits were unique in
the range from 37XX through 44XX.
If the DDI/DID numbers match your internal extension numbers, the
translator entries in your Dial Plan configuration file can be much simpler.
Example: You plan to use internal extensions from 100 through 299,
and the local telephone company assigns you numbers from
617-555-4100 through 617-555-4299. If the local telephone carrier
passes you three digits, you need no translator entries in the Dial Plan
configuration file. If the carrier passes you four digits, you could add a
single set of translator entries to the configuration file to remove the first
digit (4) and use the remaining three digits as the internal extension.
Enabling Auto Discovery for Digital Line Cards
To enable Auto Discovery for Digital Line Cards:
1 Select NBX NetSet > System Configuration > System Settings.
2 Click the Auto Discover Digital Line Cards check box.
Configuring and Managing BRI-ST Digital Line Cards
215
Other check boxes may be selected based upon previous Auto
Discoveries. You do not need to clear these check boxes to install the
BRI-ST card.
3 Click OK.
Inserting the BRI-ST Digital Line Card
You do not need to remove the power cable from the chassis before you
insert the BRI-ST card.
To insert the BRI-ST card into the chassis:
1 Write down the MAC address of the BRI-ST card.
2 Select a slot for the BRI-ST card in the chassis, and use a Phillips
screwdriver to remove the blank faceplate from the slot.
3 Insert the BRI-ST card into the slot.
4 Slide the BRI-ST card into the chassis until you feel it touch the
connectors.
5 To seat the BRI-ST card into the connectors, press the front of the card
firmly.
6 Tighten the left and right screws on the front of the BRI-ST card to secure
it to the chassis.
7 Wait 3 minutes.
CAUTION: When you insert the BRI-ST Digital Line Card, it begins an
initialization sequence. Also, because you enabled the Auto Discover
Digital Line Cards check box, the system recognizes the addition of the
BRI-ST card and begins to update its database. Allow 3 minutes for both
of these processes to be completed.
You are now ready to configure the BRI-ST Digital Line Card.
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CHAPTER 3: DEVICE CONFIGURATION
Configuring the
BRI-ST Digital Line
Card
These sections tell you how to use the NBX NetSet utility to set up your
BRI-ST Digital Line Card parameters:
■
Configuring for ISDN BRI Signaling
■
Configuring BRI Groups
■
Verifying BRI Group Membership
■
Completing the BRI-ST Configuration
Before you configure the BRI-ST card, you must configure the Dial Plan as
described in Chapter 2.
Configuring for ISDN BRI Signaling
CAUTION: Before you begin to configure the BRI-ST card, be sure to wait
3 minutes after you insert the BRI-ST card into the chassis.
To configure for ISDN BRI signaling:
1 Select NBX NetSet > Device Configuration > Digital Line Cards.
2 In the T1/ISDN Board List, find the MAC address of the BRI-ST board that
you recorded before you inserted the card into the chassis.
3 Select the BRI-ST card from the list and click Modify.
4 Scroll through the Channel List to verify that the system lists all eight
channels. The channel numbers appear after the MAC address, separated
by a hyphen.
Example:
2...00:01:03:48:e0:4e-4...New Trunk.
The 4 after the hyphen indicates channel number 4.
5 To change the name of the BRI-ST card, edit the contents of the Board
Name field to help you to identify the BRI-ST card in device lists.
6 Enable the On Line check box.
7 Click OK.
To connect the BRI line and activate the span:
1 Plug the BRI line into the BRI interface box.
2 Using a category 5 Ethernet cable, connect the BRI interface box to one
of the four ports on the front panel of the BRI-ST card.
Configuring and Managing BRI-ST Digital Line Cards
217
3 The Card Type field should contain ISDN BRI. If it does not, the system has
not properly auto discovered the card. Restart the installation process.
To verify that the span status changes from Offline to Ready:
1 On the Digital Line Cards tab, select ISDN BRI Span List from the Select
Device Type list and then click Apply.
2 Enable the On Line check box.
3 Click Apply.
4 Verify that the word Ready appears in the ISDN BRI Span List line item
that corresponds to this span.
The Digital Line Cards dialog box includes buttons named Config & Status
Report and Export Report. Both of these buttons generate configuration
and status information for the selected Digital Line Card. Because this
information is used for troubleshooting purposes, these buttons and the
generated reports are described in “Digital Line Card Troubleshooting” on
page 351.
Configuring BRI Groups
To configure the BRI groups:
1 On the Digital Line Cards tab, from the Select Device Type list, select ISDN
BRI Group List and then click Apply.
2 From the ISDN BRI Group List, select BRI Group 1.
3 Click Modify. The Modify Group dialog box appears.
4 Select Restricted from the Trunk to Trunk drop-down list.
CAUTION: If you select Unrestricted, users can transfer incoming calls to
outgoing trunks. 3Com does not recommend this setting because it
enables the possibility of toll fraud.
5 Click the On Line check box.
6 Enter 500 in each of the four AutoExt text boxes.
7 Click OK.
Verifying BRI Group Membership
To verify that all channels are in the member list:
1 On the Digital Line Cards tab, from the Select Device Type list, select BRI
Group List and then click Apply.
2 Select the group you want, and click Membership.
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3 Scroll through the Member List to verify that all eight channels are
present.
4 To transfer a channel from the non-member list to the member list, select
the channel and click <<.
You cannot transfer a channel from the Member List to the Non-Member
list.
Completing the BRI-ST Configuration
To complete the BRI-ST installation:
1 Return to the Digital Line Cards tab.
2 From the Select Device Type list, select ISDN BRI Channel List.
3 Click Apply.
4 Wait approximately 30 seconds for the status of each channel to change
from Ready to Idle.
If the channel status does not change to Idle, verify that you have enabled
the On Line check box for the card, the span, and the group.
While you are waiting, click Apply to refresh the list of channels and to
see the updated status.
BRI-ST Card Status
Lights
Each of the four spans on a BRI-ST card has status lights that indicate the
status of the span (Table 42).
Table 42 BRI-ST Card Status Lights
Status
D
B1
B2
Off
No Layer 1 connection is
established with the Central
Office (CO).
The channel is not
carrying a call.
The channel is not
carrying a call.
Yellow
A Layer 1 connection is
established but the channel
is not yet ready to make or
receive calls.
A call build-up is
occurring.
A call build-up is
occurring.
Green
The channel is ready to make A call is connected. A call is connected.
and receive calls.
Configuring and Managing BRI-ST Digital Line Cards
Modifying a
BRI-ST Card
219
These sections tell you how to modify a BRI card that is already installed in
the system:
■
Modifying a BRI Span
■
Modifying Audio Controls
For the BRI-ST card, you can modify only a BRI span. You cannot modify
the board type for a BRI-ST card.
Modifying a BRI Span
To modify a span:
1 On the Digital Line Cards tab, from the Select Device Type drop-down list,
select ISDN BRI Span List and then click Apply.
2 Select the span you want to modify from the Span List. Click Modify. The
Modify Span dialog box appears.
3 Make the changes that you want. Table 43 lists all span parameters. The
ISDN BRI-ST Digital Line Card supports two channels per span.
Table 43 Span Parameters
Parameter
ISDN BRI Options
Span Name
A name that helps you identify this span in span
lists.
Interface Type
N/A
CO Switch Protocol
ETSI
Framing Type
N/A
Line Code
N/A
Line Length
N/A
Timing Mode
N/A
Terminal Endpoint Identifier
(TEI)
Enter the TEI number in the Manual TEI field or
select the Assign Automatic TEI check box. (When
this value is changed, the card reboots itself and all
current calls on the card are lost.)
4 Click Apply.
5 Enable the On Line check box to bring the span online. Note that the
span does not come online unless the card is online first.
6 Click Apply to make the changes and then click OK.
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Modifying Audio Controls
In a normal environment, you should not need to change the Audio
Controls from their default settings. If you have an issue with sound
quality and you cannot resolve it using the volume controls on the NBX
Telephones, contact your technical support representative.
CAUTION: Do not change your Audio Controls settings unless you are
instructed to do so by a qualified support representative.
Adding or Modifying
a BRI Group
A BRI-ST Digital Line Card group is one or more BRI channels that are
assigned the same characteristics. These sections tell you how to perform
these tasks:
■
Adding a BRI Group
■
Modifying a BRI Group
■
Changing BRI Group Membership
■
Removing a BRI Group
Adding a BRI Group
You add a new group when you need to assign common characteristics
to several BRI channels.
To add a BRI Digital Line Card group:
1 On the Digital Line Cards tab, select ISDN BRI Group List from the Select
Device Type drop-down list and click Apply.
2 In the dialog box that appears, click Add. The Add Group dialog box
appears.
Modifying a BRI Group
You may want to modify a Digital Line Card group to change its name,
Auto Extension assignments, or other parameters. When you modify a
group, the changes affect all of the Digital Line Cards assigned to that
group.
CAUTION: Modifying a BRI group disconnects any active calls on any
channels that are associated with the group.
Configuring and Managing BRI-ST Digital Line Cards
221
To modify a BRI group:
1 On the Digital Line Cards tab, from the Select Device Type drop-down list,
select ISDN BRI Group List.
2 Click Apply.
3 Select the group that you want to modify.
4 Click Modify. The Modify Group dialog box appears.
5 Make the changes that you want to the group parameters. See Table 44.
6 Enable the On Line check box to bring the group on line. Click Apply for
the changes to go into effect and then click OK.
Table 44 Group Parameters
Parameter
ISDN BRI Options
Group Name
A name to help you to identify this group in a list.
Channel Protocol
N/A
E&M Direction
N/A
Start Type
N/A
Digit Collection
N/A
Called Party Digits
N/A
Calling Party Digits
N/A
Auto Extension
The Auto Extension number to handle this group for any of the
Business Hours. Extension 500 is the Auto Attendant.
Trunk to Trunk
The Unrestricted setting enables and the Restricted setting
disables the transfer of incoming calls to another line card port.
For example, enable Trunk to Trunk transfers if you plan to
connect a Voice Over IP (VOIP) gateway to a line card port,
permit callers to use the system to access the telephone system
from a remote location, or use it to make CO calls.
Timer Values
N/A
New Value
N/A
Changing BRI Group Membership
You may want to change the channel membership in a group to
accommodate changing needs.
To change group membership:
1 On the Digital Line Cards tab, from the Select Device Type drop-down list,
select ISDN BRI Group List and then click Apply.
2 Select the group for which you want to change membership.
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3 Click Membership. The Manage Group Membership dialog box appears.
4 To add a channel to the Member List, select the channel in the Non
Member List and click <<.
If you select the Copy Group Settings to Channels check box, the system
copies the settings of the selected group to each channel you add or
remove. If you do not select this check box, the channel settings are not
changed.
5 Optionally enable the Refresh Channels on Add/Remove check box. This
refreshes each channel as you add or remove it.
You cannot move a channel from the Member List to the Non-Member
List.
Each channel must belong to a group. A channel can belong to only one
group at a time. You cannot move a channel from the members list to the
non-members list of a group unless the system can assign the channel to
another group. If a channel has never been a member of another group,
the system cannot determine a group to which it can move the channel.
Therefore, it cannot remove the channel from the member list. If a
channel has been a member of another group in the past, the system
moves the channel to the group of which the channel was most recently
a member.
Example: By default, the system creates two groups, Group 1 and Group
2, and places all channels in Group 1. If you try to move a channel to the
non-member list of Group 1, the operation fails. If you select Group 2,
click Membership, move a channel from the non-member list to the
member list, and then move the same channel back to the non-member
list, the operation succeeds because the channel was previously a
member of Group 1. If you then view the Group 1 membership list, it
contains the channel you just removed from Group 2.
6 Click Close.
Removing a BRI Group
You may want to remove any group that you no longer need.
To remove a group:
1 Return to the Digital Line Cards tab.
2 From the Select Device Type drop-down list, select ISDN BRI Group List.
3 Click Apply.
4 Select the group you want to remove.
Configuring and Managing BRI-ST Digital Line Cards
223
5 Click Remove. A prompt appears asking if you want to remove the group.
6 Click Yes to remove the group.
Modifying BRI Card
Channels
A channel is an ISDN logical B channel. A channel can take a single call.
This section describes how to modify channels for an installed BRI card
and how to view the status of an existing channel.
CAUTION: Do not modify channels unless a 3Com Technical Support
representative advises you to do so. Modifying an ISDN channel
disconnects any existing calls on that channel.
To modify a channel on an installed BRI-ST card:
1 On the Digital Line Cards tab), from the Select Device Type drop-down
list, select ISDN BRI Channel List.
2 Click Apply. The system updates the window to show the BRI channels.
3 Select the channel that you want and click Modify. The Modify Channel
dialog box appears.
4 Fill in or change the fields in the appropriate Modify Channel dialog box.
Table 45 describes each parameter.
5 Enable the On Line check box to bring the channel on line. Note that the
channel does not come online unless, previously, the card and the span
have come online. Click OK.
Table 45 Channel Parameters
Parameter
ISDN BRI Options
Board MAC Address
The MAC address of the board.
Channel MAC Address
The MAC address of the channel.
Current State
The state of the board and channel.
Span ID/Device #
The span number and device number.
Group Name
A name that helps you identify this group in a list.
Channel Name
Enter a unique name for the channel.
Trunk to Trunk
Unrestricted enables and Restricted disables the transfer
of incoming calls to another line card port. Example: You
could enable Trunk to Trunk transfers to connect a Voice
Over IP (VOIP) gateway to a line card port and let callers
use the system to access the telephone system from a
remote location and use it to make CO calls.
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Table 45 Channel Parameters (continued)
Parameter
ISDN BRI Options
AutoExt
The extension to which an unanswered call on this line
card port is directed. You can assign a different AutoExt
for each period of the day: Open, Closed, Lunch, and
Other.
Viewing the Status of a BRI Channel
To view the status of a channel on an installed BRI-ST card:
1 On the Digital Line Cards tab, select ISDN BRI Channel List.
2 Click Apply.
3 Select the channel for which you want status information.
4 Click Status. The BRI Channel Status dialog box appears.
5 View the status of the channel.
6 Refresh the Channel Status dialog box.
To manually refresh the Channel Status dialog box, select Manual from
the Dialog Refresh list, and click Apply.
To automatically refresh the Channel Status dialog box, select Auto from
the Dialog Refresh list, and click Apply.
7 To reboot the card, select the Device Refresh check box.
Viewing Digital Signal Processor Status
To view DSP (Digital Signal Processor) details:
1 Return to the Digital Line Cards tab.
2 From the Select Device Type list, select T1/ISDN Board List and click Apply.
3 Select the BRI card you want and click Status.
4 In the Board Status dialog box, select a DSP from the DSP List and click
Details. The DSP Status window appears.
5 Click Close to close the DSP Status window.
6 Click OK.
Configuring and Managing BRI-ST Digital Line Cards
Modifying IP Settings
for a BRI Card
225
You can modify the IP settings for a Digital Line Card to meet changing
requirements.
The card must be on the same subnetwork as the Call Processor to
modify IP settings.
To modify the IP settings of a BRI Digital Line Card:
1 On the Digital Line Cards tab, from the Select Device Type drop-down list,
select T1/ISDN Board List.
2 Click Apply.
3 Select the BRI card for which you want to change the IP settings.
4 Click IP Settings.
If there is no IP Settings button in the dialog box, you have not yet
installed the IP licenses. You must install them before you can proceed.
5 To assign IP addresses, enter the first address in the First IP Address field.
The system sequentially adds the remaining addresses.
To assign IP addresses one at a time:
1 In the Digital Line Card IP Settings dialog box, click Assign Addresses
Individually.
2 Enter the desired IP addresses for the channels.
You must have IP licenses installed before you can enter addresses.
3 Enter the mask number appropriate for your site in the Common Subnet
Mask field.
4 Enter IP address for the Common Default Gateway.
5 Click Apply.
6 Click OK.
7 In the Digital Line Card IP Settings dialog box dialog box, click OK.
Removing a BRI
Digital Line Card
You can remove a Digital Line Card at any time.
CAUTION: Removing a Digital Line Card may affect your Dial Plan.
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To remove a Digital Line Card:
1 On the Digital Line Cards tab, from the Select Device Type drop-down list,
select T1/ISDN Board List and click Apply. A list of installed T1, ISDN PRI,
or ISDN BRI boards appears in the T1/ISDN Board List.
2 Select the board (Digital Line Card) you want to remove from the list.
3 Click Remove. A dialog box prompts you to confirm the removal.
4 Click Yes.
Configuring and
Managing E1
Digital Line Cards
This section describes how to add and configure an E1 Digital Line Card
(3C10165C) to connect to an E1 service provided by the local telephone
company. In the NBX NetSet utility, Digital Line Cards are referred to as
either cards or boards.
This chapter covers these topics:
■
Adding an E1 Digital Line Card
Configuring the E1 Digital Line Card
■
E1 Card Status Lights
■
Modifying an E1 Card
■
Adding or Modifying an E1 Group
■
Modifying E1 Card Channels
■
Modifying IP Settings for an E1 Card
■
Removing an E1 Digital Line Card
■
You can configure an E1 Digital Line Card for ISDN PRI signaling only.
Configuring and Managing E1 Digital Line Cards
Adding an E1 Digital
Line Card
227
These sections tell you how to add an E1 Digital Line Card to an NBX
system:
■
Preparing the NBX System for E1 Cards
■
Ordering DID, CLIP, and MSN Services for E1
■
Inserting the E1 Digital Line Card
Preparing the NBX System for E1 Cards
Before you insert the E1 Digital Line Card into the chassis, order an E1
line, with the specifications you want, from your telephone carrier, and
have them install the line.
Ordering DID, CLIP, and MSN Services for E1
When you order E1 with DID, CLIP, or MSN services, the local telephone
carrier assigns a block of telephone numbers to you. Usually, you can
request a specific range of numbers, but sometimes the carrier assigns
numbers other than the ones you request.
You may be able to request that the local telephone carrier pass you a
specific number of digits for each incoming telephone call. Sometimes
the carrier does not offer any choice. In either situation, you need to
know how many digits the carrier passes.
Example: Carriers commonly pass either the last three digits or last four
digits of the number for each incoming call.
Sometimes the last digits of the telephone numbers the carrier assigns to
you do not match the telephone extension numbers you want to use for
internal calls. You can create entries in your Dial Plan configuration file to
translate the incoming numbers into the corresponding extension
numbers.
Example: You want to use internal extensions from 4000 through 4999,
but the local telephone carrier assigns you numbers from 617-555-3500
through 617-555-4499. You can create translator entries in the Dial Plan
configuration file to translate an incoming digit sequence such as 3795
into extension number 4295, and a sequence such as 4213 into 4713.
The configuration would require several translator entries to handle
subsets of the total range. A unique set of entries would handle incoming
digit sequences from 3500 through 3599, from 3600 through 3699, and
each of the other sequences in which the first two digits were unique in
the range from 37XX through 44XX.
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If the DDI/DID numbers match your internal extension numbers, the
translator entries in your Dial Plan configuration file can be much simpler.
Example: You plan to use internal extensions from 100 through 299,
and the local telephone company assigns you numbers from
617-555-4100 through 617-555-4299. If the local telephone carrier
passes you three digits, you need no translator entries in the Dial Plan
configuration file. If the carrier passes you four digits, you could add a
single set of translator entries to the configuration file to remove the first
digit (4) and use the remaining three digits as the internal extension.
Enabling Auto Discovery for Digital Line Cards
To enable Auto Discovery for Digital Line Cards:
1 Select NBX NetSet > System Configuration > System Settings >
System-wide.
2 Enable the Auto Discover Digital Line Cards check box.
Other check boxes may be selected based upon previous
Auto Discoveries. You do not need to clear these check boxes to install
the E1 card.
3 Click OK.
Inserting the E1 Digital Line Card
You do not need to remove the power cable from the chassis before you
insert the E1 card.
To insert the E1 Digital Line Card into the chassis:
1 Write down the MAC address of the E1 card.
2 Select a slot for the E1 card in the chassis, and use a Phillips screwdriver
to remove the blank faceplate from the slot.
3 Insert the E1 card into the slot.
4 Slide the E1 card into the chassis until you feel it touch the connectors.
5 To seat the E1 card into the connectors, press the front of the card firmly.
Configuring and Managing E1 Digital Line Cards
229
6 Tighten the left and right screws on the front of the E1 card.
7 Wait 3 minutes.
CAUTION: When you insert the E1 Digital Line Card, it begins an
initialization sequence. Also, because you enabled the Auto Discover
Digital Line Cards check box, the system recognizes the addition of the
E1 card and begins to update its database. Allow 3 minutes for both of
these processes to be completed.
You are now ready to configure the E1 Digital Line Card.
Configuring the
E1 Digital Line Card
These sections tell you how to use the NBX NetSet utility to set up your
E1 Digital Line Card parameters.
■
Configuring for ISDN PRI Signaling
■
Configuring E1 Groups
■
Verifying E1 Group Membership
■
Completing the E1 Configuration
Before you configure an E1 card, you must configure the Dial Plan as
described in Chapter 2.
Configuring for ISDN PRI Signaling
Before you configure the E1 card, read the cautionary note. This section
describes how to configure an E1 Digital Line Card for ISDN PRI (Primary
Rate Interface) signaling.
CAUTION: Before you configure the E1 card, you must wait 3 minutes
after you insert the E1 card into the chassis.
1 Select NBX NetSet > Device Configuration > Digital Line Cards.
2 Use the MAC address of the E1 card to identify the board in the T1/ISDN
Board List. You recorded this address before inserting the board into the
chassis.
3 Select the E1 board from the T1/ISDN Board List and click Modify.
4 Scroll through the Channel List to verify that the system lists all
30 channels. The channel numbers appear after the MAC address,
separated by a hyphen.
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Example:
1...00:e0:bb:04:4e:a5-4 Trunk
The 4 after the hyphen indicates channel number 4.
5 To change the name of the E1 board, edit the contents of the Board
Name field. This name helps you identify the E1 board in a list.
6 Enable the On Line check box.
7 Click Apply and then click OK.
To connect the E1 line and activate the span:
1 Plug the E1 line into the E1 board.
2 Select ISDN PRI Span List from the Card Type drop-down list.
3 Select the E1 span from the list and click Modify.
4 Click the On Line check box.
5 Click Apply.
To verify that the span status changes from Offline to Ready:
1 On the Digital Line Cards tab, select ISDN PRI Span List from the Select
Device Type list.
2 Click Apply.
Configuring E1 Groups
To configure the E1 Groups:
1 On the Digital Line Cards tab, select ISDN PRI Group List from the Select
Device Type list.
2 Click Apply.
3 From the ISDN PRI Group List, select PRI Group 1.
4 Click Modify. The Modify Group dialog box appears.
5 Select Restricted from the Trunk to Trunk drop-down list.
If you select Unrestricted, users can transfer incoming calls to outgoing
trunks. 3Com does not recommend this setting because it enables the
possibility of toll fraud.
6 Click the On Line check box.
7 Enter 500 in each of the four AutoExt text boxes and click OK.
Configuring and Managing E1 Digital Line Cards
231
Verifying E1 Group Membership
To verify that all channels are in the member list:
1 On the Digital Line Cards tab, select ISDN PRI Group List from the Select
Device Type list and click Apply.
2 Select the group that you want, and click Membership.
3 Scroll through the Member List to verify that all 30 channels are present.
Completing the E1 Configuration
To complete the E1 configuration, perform these steps:
1 On the Digital Line Cards tab, select ISDN PRI Channel List from the
Select Device Type list and click Apply.
2 Wait approximately 30 seconds for the status of each channel to change
from Ready to Idle. You can also watch the Nominal status light on the E1
card front panel. When it stops flashing and stays on, the board is active.
If the channel status does not change to Idle, verify that you have enabled
the On Line check box for the card and the span.
While you are waiting, you can click Apply to refresh the list of channels
and to see the updated status.
E1 Card Status Lights
Modifying an E1 Card
The E1 card contains these status lights:
■
CF — Carrier Fail (when lit, indicates either a red alarm or blue alarm)
■
RA — Remote Alarm (yellow alarm)
■
LB — Loopback
■
Nominal — E1 card is framed
These sections tell you how to modify a E1 card that is already installed in
the system:
■
Modifying the E1 Card Name
■
Modifying an E1 Span
■
Configuring Partial E1 Lines
■
Modifying Audio Controls
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Modifying the E1 Card Name
You can change the name of an E1 Digital Line Card at any time. The
name you pick helps you identify the E1 card in device lists.
To modify an E1 card name:
1 Select NBX NetSet > Device Configuration > Digital Line Cards.
2 Select the board in the T1/ISDN Board List, and click Modify.
3 In the Board Name field, you can enter a name for the board, if you want,
or you can accept Trunk, the default name that the NBX system assigns.
The name that you enter helps you to identify the board in device lists.
Modifying an E1 Span
To modify an E1 span:
1 On the Digital Line Cards tab, select ISDN PRI Span List from the Select
Device Type drop-down list.
2 Click Apply.
3 Select the span you want to modify from the Span List.
4 Click Modify.
5 Make the desired changes. Table 46 lists all span parameters for
reference. The number of channels supported per span depends on the
configuration of the Digital Line Card. E1 cards support 30 channels per
span.
Table 46 Span Parameters
Parameter
E1 ISDN PRI Options
Span Name
A name that helps you identify this span in lists.
Interface Type
E1*
CO Switch Protocol
ETSI**
Framing Type
Multiframe with CRC4*
Double Frame (Multiframe without CRC4)*
Line Code
AMI*
HDB3*
Line Length
N/A - E1
Timing Mode
N/A
Terminal Endpoint Identifier (TEI) N/A
*When this value is changed, the card reboots itself and all current calls on the card are lost.
Configuring and Managing E1 Digital Line Cards
233
Table 46 Span Parameters (continued)
Parameter
E1 ISDN PRI Options (continued)
**When this value is changed, the card is temporarily offline, and all current calls on the card
are lost.
6 Click Apply.
7 Enable the On Line check box to bring the span online.
Before the span can come online, the board must be online.
8 Click Apply for the changes to take effect.
9 Click OK.
Configuring Partial E1 Lines
Some telephone companies offer an E1 line that has less than the
maximum number of channels implemented. This is called a Fractional,
Partial, or Subequipped E1. Example: To reduce near-term costs, you may
decide to purchase 15 channels now and implement more later in order.
Some telephone companies offer Partial E1 lines as their standard
offering and provide fully implemented E1 lines only if you make a
specific request. If you are unaware of this, outbound calls using the E1
line may fail because the system places outbound calls using high
numbered channels first, and a Fractional E1 typically has the lower
numbered channels implemented.
In the Span Status dialog box, under Details of last five calls, if you see the
error message REQ_CHANNEL_UNAVAIL, determine if the error is caused
by a Partial E1:
1 Remove the highest numbered channel from service (set it to offline in
the Modify Channel dialog box) and retry the outbound call.
2 Continue to remove channels until an outbound call succeeds.
3 When the first outbound call succeeds, the highest numbered channel
still in service represents the number of active (provisioned) channels in
the Partial E1.
4 Create two groups. Put all of the active channels in one group, and all of
the inactive channels in the other. Mark the active group “online” and
the inactive group “offline.”
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Modifying Audio Controls
In a normal environment, do not change the Audio Controls from their
default settings. If you have an issue with sound quality and you cannot
resolve it using the volume controls on the NBX Telephones, contact your
technical support representative.
CAUTION: Do not change your Audio Controls settings unless you are
instructed to do so by a qualified support representative.
Adding or Modifying
an E1 Group
A digital line card group is one or more E1channels that are assigned the
same characteristics, such as Channel Protocol. This section describes
how to perform these actions:
■
Adding an E1 Group
■
Modifying an E1 Group
■
Changing E1 Group Membership
■
Removing an E1 Group
CAUTION: Modifying an E1 group disconnects any calls in process on
any channels associated with the group.
Adding an E1 Group
You add a new group when you need to assign common characteristics
to several E1channels.
To add a digital line card group:
1 On the Digital Line Cards tab, select ISDN PRI Group List from the Select
Device Type drop-down list and click Apply.
2 In the dialog box that appears, click Add.
To modify ISDN PRI group parameters:
1 Type a name for the new group in the Group Name field.
2 To enable the transfer of incoming calls to another line card port, select
Unrestricted from the Trunk to Trunk list. To disable this feature, select
Restricted.
3 Use the AutoExt fields to select the extension to which calls are routed
when they are not answered. You can select different extensions for
different times of the day. The default settings route all calls to the
Auto Attendant (extension 500). Click Apply to add the group.
Configuring and Managing E1 Digital Line Cards
235
4 Repeat these steps to add additional groups, if desired, and then click OK.
Modifying an E1 Group
You may want to modify a digital line card group to change its name,
Auto Extension assignments, or other parameters. When you modify a
group, the changes affect all the Digital Line Cards assigned to that
group. To modify a digital line card group:
1 On the Digital Line Cards tab, select ISDN PRI Group List from the Select
Device Type drop-down list and click Apply.
2 Select the group that you want to modify.
3 Click Modify.
4 Make the changes that you want to the group parameters. Table 47
describes each parameter.
Table 47 Group Parameters
Parameter
E1 ISDN PRI Options
Group Name
Enter a name to help you to identify this group in lists.
Trunk to Trunk
The Unrestricted setting enables and the Restricted setting
disables the transfer of incoming calls to another line card port.
For example, you could enable Trunk to Trunk transfers if you
plan to connect a Voice Over IP (VOIP) gateway to a line card
port, permit callers to use the system to access the telephone
system from a remote location, and use it to make CO calls.
Auto Extension
Enter the Auto Extension number that you want to handle this
group for any of the Business Hours. Extension 500 is the Auto
Attendant.
5 Enable the On Line check box to bring the group on line.
The group does not come online unless the card and the span are online.
6 Click Apply to effect the changes.
7 Click OK.
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Changing E1 Group Membership
You may want to change the channel membership in an E1 group to
accommodate changing needs.
To change group membership:
1 On the Digital Line Cards tab, select ISDN PRI Group List from the Select
Device Type drop-down list and click Apply.
2 Select the group for which you want to change membership.
3 Click Membership.
4 To add a channel to the Member List, select the channel in the Non
Member List and click <<. If you select the Copy Group Settings to
Channels check box, the system copies the settings of the selected group
to each channel that you add or remove. If you do not select this check
box, the channel settings are not changed.
5 Optionally, enable the Refresh Channels on Add/Remove check box. This
refreshes each channel as you add or remove it.
6 To remove a channel from the Member List, select the channel in the
Member List and click >>.
Each channel must belong to a group. A channel can belong to only one
group at a time. You cannot move a channel from the members list to the
non-members list of a group unless the system can assign the channel to
another group. If a channel has never been a member of another group,
the system cannot determine a group to which it can move the channel,
so it cannot remove the channel from the member list. If a channel has
been a member of another group in the past, the system moves the
channel to the group of which the channel was most recently a member.
Example: By default, the system creates two groups, Group 1 and
Group 2, and places all channels in Group 1. If you try to move a channel
to the non-member list of Group 1, the operation fails. If you select
Group 2, click Membership, move a channel from the non-member list to
the member list, and then move the same channel back to the
non-member list, the operation succeeds because the channel was
previously a member of Group 1. If you then view the Group 1
membership list, it contains the channel you just removed from Group 2.
7 Click Close.
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237
Removing an E1 Group
You may want to remove groups if you no longer need them.
To remove a group:
1 On the Digital Line Cards tab, select ISDN PRI Group List from the Select
Device Type drop-down list and click Apply.
2 Select the group you want to remove.
3 Click Remove. A prompt appears asking if you want to remove the group.
4 Click Yes to remove the group.
Modifying E1 Card
Channels
A channel can take a single call. This section describes how to modify
channels for an installed E1 card and how to view the status of an
existing channel.
CAUTION: Do not modify channels unless a 3Com Technical Support
representative advises you to do so. Modifying an ISDN channel
disconnects any existing calls on that channel.
If you use Auto Discovery to add channels on an E1 PRI line, note that the
30 channels discovered are numbered 1 through 15, and 17 through 31.
This reflects the physical channel mapping on the E1 interface, where
channel 16 is the ISDN D-channel, used for signaling.
To modify a channel on an installed E1 card:
1 On the Digital Line Cards tab select ISDN PRI Channel List from the
Select Device Type drop-down list and click Apply.
2 Select the channel that you want to modify.
3 Click Modify.
4 Fill in or change the fields in the appropriate Modify Channel dialog box.
Table 45 describes each parameter.
Table 48 Channel Parameters
Parameter
E1 ISDN PRI Options
Group Name
A name that helps you identify this group in lists.
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Table 48 Channel Parameters (continued)
Parameter
E1 ISDN PRI Options
Trunk to Trunk
Unrestricted enables and Restricted disables the transfer of
incoming calls to another line card port. For example, you
could enable Trunk to Trunk transfers if you plan to
connect a Voice Over IP (VOIP) gateway to a line card port
and let callers use the system to access the telephone
system from a remote location and use it to make CO calls.
AutoExt
The extension to which an unanswered call (on this line
card port) is directed. You can assign a different AutoExt
for each period of the day: Open, Closed, Lunch, and
Other.
Channel Name
A name that helps you identify this channel in lists.
Board MAC Address
The MAC address of the board.
Channel MAC Address
The MAC address of the channel.
Current State
The state of the board and channel.
Span ID/Device #
The span number and device number.
Extension
The extension number assigned to this channel.
5 To bring the card online, enable the On Line check box. Click Apply and
then click OK.
Viewing the Status of an E1 Card Channel
To view the status of a channel on an installed E1 card:
1 On the Digital Line Cards tab, select ISDN PRI Channel List from the
Select Device Type drop-down list and click Apply.
2 Select the channel for which you want status information.
3 Click Status.
4 View the status of the channel and then refresh the Channel Status
dialog box.
a From the Dialog Refresh drop-down list, select:
■
■
Manual — To manually refresh the Channel Status dialog box each
time that you click the Apply button.
A time interval (5, 10, 15, 30, or 60 seconds) — To refresh the
Channel Status dialog box at the specified intervals.
b Enable the Device Refresh check box.
5 Click Apply and then click OK.
Configuring and Managing E1 Digital Line Cards
239
Viewing DSP (Digital Signal Processor) Details
To view DSP (Digital Signal Processor) details:
1 Return to the Digital Line Cards tab.
2 From the Select Device Type list, select T1/ISDN Board List and click Apply.
3 Select the board you want and click Status.
4 In the Board Status dialog box, select a DSP from the DSP List and click
Details.
5 Click Close to close the DSP Status window.
Modifying IP Settings
for an E1 Card
You can modify the IP settings for an E1 card to meet changing
requirements.
The board must be on the same subnetwork as the Call Processor to
modify IP settings.
To modify the IP settings of a Digital Line Card:
1 Select NBX NetSet > Device Configuration > Digital Line Cards.
2 From the Select Device Type drop-down list, select T1/ISDN Board List.
3 Click Apply.
4 Select the board (ISDN PRI) for which you want to change the IP settings.
5 Click IP Settings.
If there is no IP Settings button in the dialog box, you have not yet
installed the IP licenses. You must install them before you can proceed.
6 To assign IP addresses automatically, enter the first address in the
First IP Address field. The system sequentially adds the remaining
addresses.
To assign IP addresses one at a time:
1 In the Digital Line Card IP Settings dialog box, click Assign Addresses
Individually.
2 Enter the desired IP addresses for the channels.
You must have IP licenses installed before you can enter addresses.
3 Enter the mask number for your site in the Common Subnet Mask field.
4 Enter IP address for the Common Default Gateway.
5 Click Apply.
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6 Click OK.
7 In the Digital Line Card IP Settings dialog box, click Apply.
8 Click OK.
Removing an E1
Digital Line Card
You can remove a Digital Line Card at any time.
CAUTION: Removing a Digital Line Card may affect your Dial Plan.
To remove a Digital Line Card:
1 Select NBX NetSet > Device Configuration > Digital Line Cards.
2 From the Select Device Type drop-down list, select T1/ISDN Board List and
click Apply. A list of installed T1, ISDN PRI, and ISDN BRI boards appears in
the T1/ISDN Board List.
3 Select the board (Digital Line Card) you want to remove from the list.
4 Click Remove. A dialog box prompts you to confirm the removal.
5 Click Yes.
Configuring and
Managing T1
Digital Line Cards
These sections describe how to add and configure a T1 Digital Line Card
(3C10116B and 3C10116C) to connect to a T1 service provided by the
local telephone company:
■
Adding a T1 Digital Line Card
■
Configuring a T1 Digital Line Card for the DS1 Protocol
■
Configuring a T1 Digital Line Card for ISDN PRI Signaling
■
T1 Card Status Lights
■
Modifying a T1 Card
■
Modifying a T1 Group
■
Modifying T1 Card Channels
■
Modifying IP Settings for a T1 Card
■
Removing a T1 Digital Line Card
In the NBX NetSet utility, Digital Line Cards are referred to as cards or
boards.
Some people refer to a T1 Digital Line Card by using the category name
TEP (T1, E1, ISDN PRI).
Configuring and Managing T1 Digital Line Cards
241
You can configure the T1 Digital Line Card to use one of two types of
signaling:
■
DS1 protocol (sometimes referred to as “Standard T1”)
■
ISDN PRI (Primary Rate Interface) signaling
By default, the Auto Discovery process selects DS1 as the signaling type
for a T1 Digital Line Card.
The system provides E911 (emergency) connectivity if the T1 Digital Line
Card is configured for ISDN PRI (Primary Rate Interface) signaling. The
system provides the calling number (ANI) so that the emergency services
personnel can determine the location of the caller from the E911
database. You must update the CO (PSAP) databases.
Adding a T1 Digital
Line Card
Adding a T1 Digital Line Card to a system requires these procedures:
■
Preparing the NBX System for T1 Cards
■
Ordering DID (Direct Inward Dialing) Services for T1
■
Enabling Auto Discovery for Digital Line Cards
■
Inserting the T1 Digital Line Card
Preparing the NBX System for T1 Cards
Before you insert the T1 Digital Line Card into the chassis, order a T1 line
from your telephone carrier and have them install the line. In some cases,
the telephone company offers T1 services only with specific, pre-defined
parameters. However, some telephone companies offer a number of
configuration choices with their T1 services.
Ordering DID (Direct Inward Dialing) Services for T1
When you order a T1 line with DID capability (Direct Inward Dial), the
local telephone carrier assigns a block of telephone numbers to you.
Usually, you can request a specific range of numbers, but sometimes the
carrier assigns numbers other than the ones you request.
You may be able to request that the local telephone carrier pass you a
specific number of digits for each incoming telephone call. Sometimes
the carrier does not offer any choice. In either situation, you need to
know how many digits the carrier passes.
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Example: Carriers commonly pass either the last three digits or last four
digits of the number for each incoming call.
Sometimes the last digits of the telephone numbers that the carrier
assigns to you do not match the telephone extension numbers that you
want to use for internal calls. You can create entries in your Dial Plan
configuration file to translate the incoming numbers into the
corresponding extension numbers.
Example: You want to use internal extensions from 4000 through 4999,
but the local telephone carrier assigns you numbers from 617-555-3500
through 617-555-4499. You can create translator entries in the Dial Plan
configuration file to translate an incoming digit sequence such as 3795
into extension number 4295, and a sequence such as 4213 into 4713.
The configuration requires several translator entries to handle subsets of
the total range. A unique set of entries handles incoming digit sequences
from 3500 through 3599, from 3600 through 3699, and each of the
other sequences in which the first two digits are unique in the range from
37XX through 44XX.
If the DDI/DID numbers match your internal extension numbers, the
translator entries in your Dial Plan configuration file can be much simpler.
Example: You plan to use internal extensions from 100 through 299,
and the local telephone company assigns you numbers from
617-555-4100 through 617-555-4299. If the local telephone carrier
passes you three digits, you need no translator entries in the Dial Plan
configuration file. If the carrier passes you four digits, you could add a
single set of translator entries to the configuration file to remove the first
digit (4) and use the remaining three digits as the internal extension.
Enabling Auto Discovery for Digital Line Cards
To enable Auto Discovery for Digital Line Cards:
1 Select NBX NetSet > System Configuration > System Settings >
System-wide.
2 Click the Auto Discover Digital Line Cards check box (may already be
selected).
Other check boxes may be selected based on previous Auto Discoveries.
You do not need to clear these check boxes to install the T1 Digital Line
Card. However, it is good practice to clear all check boxes other than the
Configuring and Managing T1 Digital Line Cards
243
one that you want to select so that the Call Processor does not continue
to search for added devices.
3 Click OK.
Inserting the T1 Digital Line Card
This section describes how to insert the T1 Digital Line Card into the
chassis. Read this cautionary note before you insert the T1 Digital Line
Card.
CAUTION: To insert the T1 Digital Line Card into the chassis, you must
leave the system powered on.
To insert the T1 card:
1 Find the MAC address of the T1 card on the label on the card.
2 Record the MAC address for the configuration process.
3 Select a slot for the T1 card in the chassis and use a Phillips screwdriver to
remove the blank faceplate from the slot.
4 Insert the T1 card into the slot.
5 Slide the T1 card into the chassis until you feel it touch the connectors.
6 To seat the T1 card into the connectors, apply firm pressure to both the
left and right sides of the front of the card.
7 Tighten the left and right screws on the front of the T1 card to secure it
to the chassis.
CAUTION: Wait 3 minutes for the T1 card to initialize and for the system
to update its database. You must wait this long because the T1 card
reboots twice during the initialization process. If you attach a console
cable to the COM1 port on the T1 card and use Hyperterm software to
view the text output from the card, you see status messages associated
with the two reboot processes. See “Connecting a Computer to a Serial
Port” on page 370.
Another way that you can be sure that it is safe to proceed is to examine
the status lights on the front panel of the T1 card. After the Auto
Discovery process has completed, and before you connect the T1 Digital
Line Card to the telephone company’s T1 line, the CF (Carrier Fail) light
should appear solid green.
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You are now ready to configure the T1 Digital Line Card for either
DS1 signaling or ISDN PRI signaling. Before you configure a T1 card, you
must configure the system Dial Plan as described in Chapter 2.
Configuring a
T1 Digital Line Card
for the DS1 Protocol
These sections tell you how to use the NBX NetSet utility to set up your T1
Digital Line Card for DS1 protocol:
■
T1 DS1 Configuration
■
Configuring T1 Groups (DS1)
■
Verifying T1 Group Membership (DS1)
■
Completing the T1 Configuration (DS1)
Before you configure a T1 Digital Line Card for DS1 protocol, read the
cautionary note.
CAUTION: Wait 3 minutes for the T1 card to initialize and for the system
to update its database. You must wait this long because the T1 card
reboots twice during the initialization process. If you attach a console
cable to the COM1 port on the T1 card and use Hyperterm software to
view the text output from the card, you see status messages associated
with the two reboot processes. See “Connecting a Computer to a Serial
Port” on page 370.
Another way that you can be sure that it is safe to proceed is to examine
the status lights on the front panel of the T1 card. After the Auto
Discovery process has completed, and before you connect the T1 Digital
Line Card to the telephone company’s T1 line, the CF (Carrier Fail) light
should appear solid green.
T1 DS1 Configuration
To set up the T1 card for the DS1 protocol:
1 On the Digital Line Cards tab, select T1/ISDN Board List from the Select
Device Type list, and click Apply. All Digital Line Cards (T1, E1, or BRI-ST)
that the system has discovered appear in the list. By default, the NBX
system autodiscovers a T1 Digital Line Card as a T1 DS1 card and displays
it in the list as T1 (not PRI).
2 From the list, select the new T1 Digital Line Card. Use the MAC address of
the T1 Digital Line Card to identify the card in the list. You recorded the
MAC address before inserting the card.
3 Click Modify.
Configuring and Managing T1 Digital Line Cards
245
4 Scroll through the Channel List to verify that the system lists all
24 channels. The channel numbers appear after the MAC address,
separated by a hyphen.
Example:
00:e0:bb:00:bd:f0-4...New Trunk
The 4 after the hyphen indicates channel number 4.
5 To change the name of the T1 Digital Line Card, enter a new name in the
Board Name field. The name you choose helps identify this card in lists
that contain similar cards. You can use alphanumeric characters, hyphens,
and underscores. The maximum name length is 30 characters, but some
dialog boxes truncate the name field to 15 characters.
6 Click Apply to verify your changes.
7 Click OK to exit.
Connecting the T1 Line and Activating the Span
To connect the T1 line and activate the span:
1 Plug the T1 line into the T1 Digital Line Card.
2 On the Digital Line Cards tab, select T1/ISDN Board List from the Select
Device Type list and click Apply.
3 From the list, select the new T1 Digital Line Card. Use the MAC address of
the T1 Digital Line Card to identify the card in the list. You recorded the
MAC address before inserting the card.
4 Click Modify. The Modify Board dialog box appears.
5 Click the On Line check box.
6 Click Apply.
7 Click OK.
8 In the T1/ISDN Board List, verify that the entry for this card in the Status
column changes from Offline to Online. You may need to wait a minute
or two, and then refresh your browser window to see this change.
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Verifying the T1 Span Status
To verify the T1 span status:
1 On the Digital Line Cards tab, select T1 Span List from the Select Device
Type list and click Apply.
2 Select the span and click Modify.
3 Enable the On Line check box.
4 Click OK.
5 Verify that the word Ready appears next to the T1 span list line item that
corresponds to this span.
Configuring T1 Groups (DS1)
To configure a T1 DS1 Group:
1 On the Digital Line Cards tab, select T1 Group List from the Select Device
Type list and click Apply.
2 From the T1 Group List, select Group 1.
3 Click Modify. The Modify Group dialog box appears.
The fields in the Modify Group dialog box contain default values. No
default values are assumed for Called Party Digits or Calling Party Digits.
4 Modify the Wink Wait value:
a Select Wink Wait from Time Values list.
b Type 3000 in the New Value text box.
c Click Apply.
d Ask your telephone service provider to set their Wink Wait value to
3000 msec.
5 Modify the Guard Value:
a Select Guard from Time Values list.
b Type 2200 in the New Value text box.
c Click Apply.
d Ask your telephone service provider to set their Guard value to
2200 msec.
6 Click the On Line check box.
7 Enter 500 in each of the four AutoExt text boxes.
8 Click OK.
Configuring and Managing T1 Digital Line Cards
247
The NBX system now begins to create the group. If you connect the
telephone company’s T1 line to the T1 Digital Line Card, or if you connect
a loopback cable to the T1 card, the Nominal light turns on.
Verifying T1 Group Membership (DS1)
To verify that all channels are in the Member List of a T1 Digital Line Card:
1 On the Digital Line Cards tab, select T1 Group List from the Select Device
Type list and click Apply.
2 From the list, select the group you want.
3 Click Membership. The Manage Group Membership dialog box appears.
4 Scroll through the Member List to verify that all 23 channels are present
for each T1 Digital Line Card in the system.
Completing the T1 Configuration (DS1)
To complete the T1 installation:
1 On the Digital Line Cards tab, select T1 Channel List from the Select
Device Type list and click Apply.
2 Wait approximately 30 seconds for the status of each channel to change
from Ready to Idle.
Click Apply to refresh the list of channels and to see the updated status. If
you have connected the Telephone company’s T1 line to the T1 Digital
Line Card or if you have connected a loopback connector to the T1 card,
the Nominal status light on the front panel of the T1 board should now
turn on (solid green). If the Nominal status light does not turn on and you
have the telephone company’s T1 line connected, disconnect the T1 line
and connect a loopback connector. If the Nominal light now turns on,
contact the telephone company for assistance with the T1 line. If the
Nominal light does not turn on, contact 3Com Technical Support.
Enabling and Disabling Echo Cancellation
There are two situations in which it may be desirable to disable echo
cancellation on a T1 Digital Line Card.
■
An NBX system is connected to a telephone carrier (Central Office) by
a T1 Digital Line Card, and the telephone carrier guarantees to provide
echo cancellation on all channels, all of the time.
■
Two NBX systems are connected together directly using T1 Digital Line
Cards and the network between the two is completely composed of
digital circuitry, thus eliminating sources of echo.
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You can enable or disable echo cancellation for each T1 Digital Line Card.
You cannot enable or disable echo cancellation on individual channels.
Before you enable echo cancellation for a T1 Digital Line Card you must
verify that the card is configured for DS1 operation and not ISDN PRI.
To enable echo cancellation:
1 On the Digital Line Cards tab, select T1 Span List from the Select Device
Type drop-down list and click Apply.
2 Select the span for which you want to set echo cancellation.
3 Click the Audio Controls button.
4 Enable the Echo Canceller Enabled check box to turn on echo
cancellation.
5 Click OK.
Configuring a T1
Digital Line Card for
ISDN PRI Signaling
These sections tell you how to use the NBX NetSet utility to set up your T1
Digital Line Card for ISDN PRI signaling:
■
T1 ISDN PRI Configuration
■
Configuring T1 Groups (ISDN PRI)
■
Verifying T1 Group Membership (ISDN PRI)
■
Completing the T1 Configuration (ISDN PRI)
Before you configure a T1 Digital Line Card for ISDN PRI (Primary Rate
Interface) signaling, read the cautionary note.
CAUTION: Wait 3 minutes for the T1 card to initialize and for the system
to update its database. You must wait this long because the T1 card
reboots twice during the initialization process. If you attach a console
cable to the COM1 port on the T1 card and use Hyperterm software to
view the text output from the card, you see status messages associated
with the two reboot processes. See “Connecting a Computer to a Serial
Port” on page 370.
Another way that you can be sure that it is safe to proceed is to examine
the status lights on the front panel of the T1 card. After the Auto
Discovery process has completed, and before you connect the T1 Digital
Line Card to the telephone company’s T1 line, the CF (Carrier Fail) light
should appear solid green.
Configuring and Managing T1 Digital Line Cards
249
T1 ISDN PRI Configuration
When you configure a T1 Digital Line Card for ISDN PRI operation, verify
that the Auto Discover Digital Line Cards check box is enabled (System
Configuration > System Settings > System-wide).
To configure the T1 card for ISDN PRI signaling:
1 On the Digital Line Cards tab select T1/ISDN Board List from the Select
Device Type drop-down list and click Apply.
2 From the list, select the new T1 Digital Line Card. Use the MAC address of
the T1 Digital Line Card to identify the card in the list. You recorded the
MAC address before inserting the card.
3 Click Modify. The Modify Board dialog box appears.
4 To change the name of the T1 Digital Line Card, enter a new name in the
Board Name field. You can use alphanumeric characters, hyphens, and
underscores. The maximum name length is 30 characters.
5 From the Card Type drop-down list, select ISDN PRI.
6 Click OK. The Digital Line Cards tab reappears.
7 Wait until the entry for this Digital Line Card in the Type column changes
to PRI. To see the change, you may need to wait a minute or two, and
refresh your browser window.
8 After the board type changes, from the Select Device Type drop-down
list, select ISDN PRI Channel List.
9 Click Apply. The dialog box is updated to show the ISDN PRI Channel List.
10 Verify that the highest channel in the Chan column is 23.
When you configure a T1 Digital Line Card for ISDN PRI signaling, one of
the 24 channels is allocated for signaling, leaving 23 for data (voice).
Connecting the T1 Line and Activating the Span
To connect the T1 line and activate the span:
1 Plug the T1 line into the T1 Digital Line Card.
2 On the Digital Line Cards tab, select T1/ISDN Board List from the Select
Device Type list and click Apply.
3 From the list, select the new T1 Digital Line Card.
To identify the card, look for those cards that have PRI in the Type column
and use the MAC address to identify the specific card. You recorded the
MAC address before inserting the card.
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4 Click Modify. The Modify Board dialog box appears.
5 Click the On Line check box.
6 Click OK.
7 In the T1/ISDN Board List, verify that the entry for this card in the Status
column changes from Offline to Online. You may need to wait a minute
or two, and then refresh your browser window to see this change.
Verifying the Change in Span Status
To verify that the Span status changes from Offline to Ready:
1 On the Digital Line Cards tab, select ISDN PRI Span List from the Select
Device Type list and click Apply.
2 Select the span from the list and click Modify.
3 Enable the On Line check box and click OK.
4 Verify that the word Ready appears in the ISDN PRI Span List line item
that corresponds to this span.
Configuring T1 Groups (ISDN PRI)
To configure a T1 ISDN PRI Group:
1 On the Digital Line Cards tab, select ISDN PRI Group List from the Select
Device Type list and click Apply.
2 From the ISDN PRI Group List, select PRI Group 1.
3 Click Modify. The Modify Group — T1 ISDN PRI dialog box appears.
4 To modify the name of the group, enter a new name in the Group Name
field. You can use alphanumeric characters, hyphens, and underscores.
The maximum name length is 30 characters.
5 To prohibit call transfers between trunk lines, select Restricted (the
default value) from the Trunk to Trunk drop-down list. Otherwise, select
Unrestricted.
6 Click the On Line check box.
7 Verify that 500 (the default) is in each of the four AutoExt text boxes.
8 Click OK.
Configuring and Managing T1 Digital Line Cards
251
Verifying T1 Group Membership (ISDN PRI)
To verify that all channels are in the Member List:
1 On the Digital Line Cards tab, select ISDN PRI Group List from the Select
Device Type list and click Apply.
2 Select the group you want.
3 Click Membership. The Manage Group Membership dialog box appears.
4 Scroll through the Member List to verify that all 23 channels are present.
5 To change the membership of a group, you must move channels from the
Non-Member List to the Member List. You cannot move a channel from
the Member List to the Non-Member list of a group.
For each channel that you move to the Member List, you have two
options:
a To copy the current group settings, and apply them to the channel in
the new group, enable the Copy Group Settings to Channels on
Add/Remove check box.
b To update the status of a channel, enable the Refresh Channels on
Add/Remove check box.
Completing the T1 Configuration (ISDN PRI)
To complete the T1 ISDN PRI installation:
1 On the Digital Line Cards tab, select ISDN PRI Channel List from the Select
Device Type list and click Apply.
2 Wait approximately 30 seconds for the status of each channel to change
from Ready to Idle.
Click Apply to refresh the list of channels and to see the updated status. If
you have connected the Telephone company’s T1 line to the T1 Digital
Line Card or if you have connected a loopback connector to the T1 card,
the Nominal status light on the front panel of the T1 board should now
turn on (solid green). If the Nominal status light does not turn on and you
have the telephone company’s T1 line connected, disconnect the T1 line
and connect a loopback connector. If the Nominal light now turns on,
contact the telephone company for assistance with the T1 line. If the
Nominal light does not turn on, contact 3Com Technical Support.
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T1 Card Status Lights
Modifying a T1 Card
The T1 card contains these status lights:
■
CF — Carrier Fail (when lit, indicates red alarm or blue alarm)
■
RA — Remote Alarm (yellow alarm)
■
LB — Loopback (when lit, indicates that the card is in loop-back
testing mode; does not indicate any of the red, blue, or yellow alarms)
■
Nominal — T1 card is framed
These sections describes how to modify a T1 card that is already installed
in the system.
■
Modifying the T1 Card Name or Type
■
Modifying a T1 Span
■
Configuring Partial T1 Lines
■
Modifying Audio Controls
Modifying the T1 Card Name or Type
You can change the name of a Digital Line Card at any time. You can also
set the type to T1 or ISDN PRI.
To modify a T1 card name or type:
1 On the Digital Line Cards tab, select the board in the T1/ISDN Board List.
2 Click Modify.
3 To modify the name of the board, enter a new name in the Board Name
field. You can use alphanumeric characters, hyphens, and underscores.
The maximum name length is 30 characters.
4 To change the type of card, in the Card Type field, select either T1 (for T1
DS1 protocol) or ISDN PRI (for T1 ISDN PRI).
5 Click OK.
Modifying a T1 Span
To modify a span:
1 On the Digital Line Cards tab, select either T1 Span List (for T1 DS1) or
ISDN PRI Span List (for T1 ISDN PRI) from the Select Device Type
drop-down list and click Apply.
2 Select the span you want to modify from the Span List.
3 Click Modify.
Configuring and Managing T1 Digital Line Cards
253
The dialog box that appears depends on which span list you select, either
the T1 DS1 Modify Span dialog box or the ISDN PRI Modify Span dialog
box.
4 Make the desired changes. Table 43 lists all span parameters for
reference. The number of channels supported per span depends on the
configuration of the Digital Line Card. If you configure the T1 Digital Line
Card for DS1, it supports 24 channels. If you configure the card for ISDN
PRI, it supports 23 channels. See “Support of AT&T’s 4ESS Switch
Protocol” on page 254 for details on configuring the NBX system for this
protocol.
Table 49 Span Parameters
Parameter
T1 DS1 Options
Span Name
Enter as required. Enter as required.
Interface Type
N/A
T1*
CO Switch
Protocol
N/A
ETSI**
AT&T Custom 4ESS**
AT&T Custom 5ESS**
DMS Custom**
National ISDN-NI1/NI2**
QSIG slave**
Framing Type
D4**
ESF – Extended Super Frame*
F4 – 4 Frame Multiframe*
F12 – 12 Frame Multiframe (D4/SF)*
F72 – 72 Frame Multiframe (SLC96)*
ESF – Extended
Super Frame **
Line Code
AMI**
B8ZS**
ISDN PRI (T1) Options
HDB3*
B8ZS*
Line Length
Reflects the
physical line
length.**
Reflects the physical line length.*
Timing Mode
Loop
N/A
Internal
Call-By-Call Service Configuration (4ESS only) ***
Enable
Call-By-Call
Service
N/A
Select this only if your carrier provides,
call-by-call service, you have AT&T Custom 4ESS as your line protocol, and you want to
change the type of call for each call.
Carrier Code
N/A
Each long distance carrier has a unique Carrier
Identification Code (CIC). Obtain the code (up
to 4 digits) from your carrier.
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CHAPTER 3: DEVICE CONFIGURATION
Table 49 Span Parameters (continued)
Parameter
T1 DS1 Options
ISDN PRI (T1) Options
Default
Outbound
Service
N/A
Determines the type of outbound call if no type
is specified in your dial plan commands.
If you purchased MEGACOM service from your
service provider, you must select it.
If you purchased only long distance service or
SDN (Software Defined Network) service, select
Standard (LDS). SDN cannot be the default
selection.
*If this value changes, the card reboots itself and all current calls on the card are lost.
**If this value changes, the card is temporarily offline, and all current calls on the card are lost.
*** See “Support of AT&T’s 4ESS Switch Protocol” on page 254.
5 Click Apply.
6 Enable the On Line check box to bring the span online.
The span does not come online unless the card is online.
7 Click OK to effect the changes.
Support of AT&T’s
4ESS Switch Protocol
You can select AT&T’s 4ESS switch protocol when you configure a T1
Digital Line Card for PRI (Primary Rate Interface) operation. If you select
the 4ESS protocol, you can optionally use Call By Call Service
Configuration which enables you to select one of three access services:
■
Long Distance — The default service if the customer selects the 4ESS
protocol, but purchases no other services. Long Distance can be used
with SDN but not with MEGACOM.
■
MEGACOM — A high-volume outward calling service. MEGACOM
can be the default setting.
■
SDN (Software Defined Network) — A premises-to-premises service
with voice and voice-grade data transport, plus a number of
customer-controllable call management and call monitoring features
(for example, Virtual Private Networking). You cannot configure SDN
as the default setting but you can configure the NBX system dial plan
to use SDN.
Configuring and Managing T1 Digital Line Cards
255
Selecting the 4ESS Protocol
To select the 4ESS protocol:
1 On the Digital Line Cards tab, select ISDN PRI Span List from the Select
Device Type drop-down list and click Apply.
2 From the CO Switch Protocol drop-down list, select AT&T Custom - 4ESS.
3 Click OK to enable the 4ESS protocol and exit from the dialog box.
Otherwise click Apply to enable 4ESS, stay in the Modify Span dialog box,
and configure Call-By-Call Service. See “Configuring Call-By-Call Service”
in the next section.
Configuring Call-By-Call Service
You order the optional Call-By-Call Service from your long-distance
carrier, only if you order the 4ESS protocol. 3Com does not support
Call-By-Call Service with any other protocol.
To configure Call-By-Call Service:
1 In the Modify Span dialog box, click the Enable Call-By-Call Service check
box.
2 In the Carrier Identification Code text box, type the identification code for
your long-distance carrier.
Your long-distance carrier can supply this code when you order PRI
services, or you can ask the carrier for their code number. Another way to
obtain the code is to access the web site for the North American Number
Plan Administration (http://www.nanpa.com). In the menu in the left
frame, expand Number Assignments, and click Carrier Identification
Codes. Follow the instructions to download and unzip the two files
(Current Feature Group B (950-XXXX) CIC Assignments and Current
Feature Group D (101-XXXX) CIC Assignments). Search the documents to
determine the identification code for your long-distance carrier. For
example, AT&T is listed next to code 288 in the Group D document.
3 From the Default Outbound Service drop-down list, select either
MEGACOM or Standard (LDS) as the service to use as the default. You
can configure the NBX system dial plan to use a particular service.
Select MEGACOM as the default service only if you purchased
MEGACOM from your long-distance carrier. You cannot select Standard
(LDS) as the default service if you purchased MEGACOM, because these
two services do not work together.
4 Click OK.
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Configuring Partial T1 Lines
Sometimes the telephone company supplies a T1 line which has less than
the maximum number of channels implemented. This is called a
Fractional, Partial, or Subequipped T1. For example, you may decide to
purchase 15 channels now and implement more later in order to reduce
your near-term costs.
Some telephone companies offer Partial T1 lines as their standard
offering, and provide fully implemented T1 lines only if you make a
specific request. If you are unaware of this policy, outbound calls using
the T1 line may fail because, by default, the system places outbound calls
using high numbered channels first, and a Fractional T1 typically has the
lower numbered channels implemented.
In the Span Status dialog box, under Details of last five calls, if you see the
error message REQ_CHANNEL_UNAVAIL, determine if the error is caused
by a Partial T1:
1 Remove the highest numbered channel from service (set it to offline in
the Modify Channel dialog box) and retry the outbound call.
2 Continue to remove channels until an outbound call succeeds.
3 When the first outbound call succeeds, the highest numbered channel
still in service represents the number of active (provisioned) channels in
the Partial T1.
4 Create two groups. Put all of the active channels in one group, and all of
the inactive channels in the other. Mark the active group online and the
inactive group offline.
Modifying Audio Controls
In a normal environment, you should not need to change the Audio
Controls from their default settings. If you have an issue with sound
quality and you cannot resolve it using the volume controls on the NBX
Telephones, contact your technical support representative.
CAUTION: Do not change your Audio Controls settings unless you are
instructed to do so by a qualified 3Com Technical Support representative.
Configuring and Managing T1 Digital Line Cards
Modifying a T1 Group
257
A Digital Line Card group is one or more T1 channels that are assigned
the same characteristics, such as Channel Protocol and DS1 direction. This
section describes how to perform these actions:
■
Modifying a T1 Group
■
Changing T1 Group Membership
■
Removing a T1 Group
CAUTION: Modifying a T1 group disconnects any calls in process on any
channels associated with the group.
Modifying a T1 Group
You may want to modify a Digital Line Card group to change its name,
Auto Extension assignments, or other parameters. When you modify a
group, the changes affect all the Digital Line Cards assigned to that
group. To modify a Digital Line Card group:
1 On the Digital Line Cards tab, from the Select Device Type drop-down list,
select one:
■
T1 Group List (for T1 DS1)
■
ISDN PRI Group List (for T1 ISDN PRI)
2 Click Apply.
3 Select the group that you want to modify.
4 Click Modify. The dialog box that appears depends on the Group List that
you selected either the T1 DS1 Modify Group dialog box or the T1 ISDN
PRI Modify Group dialog box.
5 Make the desired changes to the group parameters. See the Help for
details on each parameter.
6 Enable the On Line check box to bring the group on line.
7 Click Apply to effect the changes.
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CHAPTER 3: DEVICE CONFIGURATION
Changing T1 Group Membership
You can change the channel membership in a group to accommodate
changing needs.
To change group membership:
1 On the Digital Line Cards tab, select either T1 Group List (for DS1), or
ISDN PRI Group List (for ISDN PRI) from the Select Device Type drop-down
list and click Apply.
2 Select the group for which you want to change membership.
3 Click Membership. The dialog box that appears depends on the group list
you select.
4 To add a channel to the Member List, select the channel in the Non
Member List and click <<.
If you select the Copy Group Settings to Channels check box, the system
copies the settings of the selected group to each channel you add or
remove. If you do not select this option, the channel settings do not
change.
5 Optionally enable the Refresh Channels on Add/Remove check box. This
refreshes each channel as you add or remove it.
6 To remove a channel from the Member List, select the channel in the
Member List and click >>.
Each channel must belong to a group. A channel can belong to only one
group at a time. You cannot move a channel from the members list to the
non-members list unless the system can assign the channel to another
group. If a channel has never been a member of another group, the
system cannot determine a group to which it can move the channel.
Therefore, it cannot remove the channel from the member list. If a
channel has been a member of another group the system moves the
channel to the group of which the channel was most recently a member.
Example: By default, the system creates two groups, Group 1 and
Group 2, and places all channels in Group 1. If you try to move a channel
to the non-member list of Group 1, the operation fails. If you select
Group 2, click Membership, move a channel from the non-member list to
the member list, then move the same channel back to the non-member
list, the operation succeeds because the channel was previously a
member of Group 1. If you then view the Group 1 membership list, it
contains the channel you just removed from Group 2.
7 Click Close.
Configuring and Managing T1 Digital Line Cards
259
Removing a T1 Group
To remove a group:
1 On the Digital Line Cards tab, select either T1 Group List (for T1 DS1), or
ISDN PRI Group List (for T1 ISDN PRI) from the Select Device Type
drop-down list and click Apply.
2 Select the group you want to remove.
3 Click Remove. A prompt appears asking if you want to remove the group.
4 Click Yes to remove the group.
Modifying T1 Card
Channels
A channel is either a T1 DS1 or T1 ISDN PRI time slot. Each channel can
accommodate a single telephone call. This section describes how to
modify channels for an installed T1 Digital Line Card and how to view the
status of an existing channel.
CAUTION: Do not modify channels unless a 3Com Technical Support
representative advises you to do so. Modifying an ISDN channel
disconnects any existing calls on that channel.
To modify a channel on an installed T1 card:
1 On the Digital Line Cards tab, select either T1 Channel List (for T1
channels), or ISDN PRI Channel List (for T1 PRI channels) from the
Select Device Type drop-down list and click Apply.
The window that appears depends on the channel list you select. shows
the T1 Channel List.
2 Select the channel that you want to modify.
3 Click Modify. The dialog box that appears depends on the channel list
that you selected either the T1 DS1 Modify Channel dialog box or the T1
ISDN PRI Modify Channel dialog box.
4 Fill in or change the fields in the appropriate Modify Channel dialog box.
See the Help for a description of each parameter. Enable the On Line
check box to bring the channel on line. Click Apply and then OK.
The channel does not come online unless the card and the span are
online.
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CHAPTER 3: DEVICE CONFIGURATION
Viewing the Status of a T1 Card Channel
To view the status of a channel on an installed T1 Digital Line Card:
1 On the Digital Line Cards tab, select either T1 Channel List (for T1 DS1
channels) or ISDN PRI Channel List (for T1 ISDN PRI channels) from the
Select Device Type drop-down list.
2 Click Apply.
3 Select the channel for which you want status information.
4 Click Status. A Channel Status dialog box appears.
5 The dialog box that appears depends on the channel list that you select.
6 View the status of the channel.
7 Refresh the Channel Status dialog box.
a From the Dialog Refresh drop-down list, select:
■
■
Manual — To manually refresh the Channel Status dialog box each
time you click the Apply button.
A time interval (5, 10, 15, 30, or 60 seconds) to automatically
refresh the Channel Status dialog box at the specified intervals.
b Enable the Device Refresh check box.
8 Click Apply, and then click OK.
Viewing DSP (Digital Signal Processor) Details
To view DSP (Digital Signal Processor) details:
1 On the Digital Line Cards tab, select T1/ISDN Board List from the Select
Device Type list and click Apply.
2 Select the board you want and click Status.
3 In the Board Status dialog box, select a DSP from the DSP List and click
Details.
4 Click Close to close the DSP Status window.
5 Click Apply to make the changes.
6 Click OK.
Configuring and Managing T1 Digital Line Cards
Modifying IP Settings
for a T1 Card
261
You can modify the IP settings for a T1 Digital Line Card to meet
changing requirements. The board must be on the same subnetwork as
the Call Processor to modify IP settings.
To modify the IP settings of a T1 Digital Line Card:
1 On the Digital Line Cards tab, select T1/ISDN Board List from the Select
Device Type drop-down list and click Apply.
2 Select the board for which you want to change the IP settings and click IP
Settings.
If the dialog box has no IP Settings button, you have not yet installed the
IP licenses. You must install them before you can proceed.
3 To assign IP addresses automatically, enter the first address in the First
IP Address field. The system sequentially adds the remaining addresses.
Assigning IP Addresses One at a Time
To assign IP addresses one at a time:
1 In the Digital Line Card IP Settings dialog box, click Assign Addresses
Individually.
2 Enter the IP addresses that you want for the channels. You must have IP
licenses installed before you can enter addresses.
3 Enter the mask number appropriate for your site in the Common Subnet
Mask field.
4 Enter IP address for the Common Default Gateway, and then click Apply
and OK.
5 In the Digital Line Card IP Settings dialog box dialog box, click Apply to
effect the changes.
Removing a T1 Digital
Line Card
You can remove a T1 Digital Line Card at any time.
CAUTION: Removing a Digital Line Card may affect your Dial Plan.
To remove a Digital Line Card:
1 On the Digital Line Cards tab, select T1/ISDN Board List from the Select
Device Type drop-down list and click Apply.
2 From the list, select the Digital Line Card you want to remove.
3 Click Remove. A dialog box prompts you to confirm the removal.
4 Click Yes.
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CHAPTER 3: DEVICE CONFIGURATION
4
USER CONFIGURATION
This chapter describes these elements of the NBX system:
Users
■
Users (including phantom mailboxes)
■
Call Pickup
■
TAPI Route Points
■
Hunt Groups
■
Class of Service (CoS)
You use the User Configuration tab in the NBX NetSet utility to add users
and phantom mailboxes to the NBX system and remove them. You can
also modify and maintain user profiles and parameters.
To perform these tasks, in NBX NetSet, select User Configuration > Users
and then see the Help for these buttons: Add, Modify, Remove, and User
Settings. For information about User Settings that individual users can
configure, see Chapter 1 in the NBX Telephone Guide.
Phantom Mailboxes
A phantom mailbox is an extension that has no associated physical
telephone. A caller can dial directly into a phantom mailbox, the person
assigned to the phantom mailbox can create and send a message from
within the voice mail system, and the Auto Attendant can route voice
messages to the phantom mailbox.
Example: A user is never in the office can use a phantom mailbox to
receive and manage messages, even though no telephone is associated
with the mailbox extension. The user can call in to the Auto Attendant to
retrieve and send messages, log onto the NBX NetSet utility to manage
messages, including having the system forward voice messages using the
Off-Site Notification feature, or use an e-mail client to manage the
messages. See “IMAP for Integrated Voice Mail” in Chapter 6.
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Call Pickup
Group Numbers
In some organizations, it can be useful if any user who hears a telephone
ringing can pick up the call on her or his own telephone. Using the Call
Pickup feature, you can create one or more Call Pickup groups to allow
this convenient sharing.
Pickup group numbering differs for SuperStack 3 NBX systems and
NBX 100 systems.
SuperStack 3 NBX systems:
■
■
50 Call Pickup groups:
■
Group 0 through group 31 (extension 500 through 531)
■
Group 32 through group 49 (extension 482 through 499)
50 Directed Call Pickup groups (extension 540 through 589)
NBX 100 systems:
■
32 Call Pickup groups from group 0 (extension 500) through group 31
(extension 531)
■
10 Directed Call Pickup groups from 540 through 549
See the NBX Telephone Guide for user instruction on how to use Call
Pickup.
If you select Auto Add Phones to Call Pickup Group 0 (System Settings >
System-wide), every telephone that is added to the system is a member of
Call Pickup group 0. Administrators can add and remove users to and
from any of the groups. Users can remove themselves from Call Pickup
group 0, but not from any other Call Pickup groups.
Calls to a user who is a member of default Call Pickup Group 500 can be
picked up from any telephone. Users can add or remove their own
telephone extensions from Group 500 to allow or prevent others from
picking up their calls. See the NBX Telephone Guide and the User Help.
You can map Call Pickup Groups to user telephone buttons to provide
one-touch access to the Call Pickup groups. See “Creating and Managing
Button Mappings” in Chapter 3.
To modify call pickup groups, select User Configuration > Call Pickup. See
the Administrator Help for procedures on modifying call pickup groups.
TAPI Route Points
TAPI Route Points
265
A TAPI Route Point is a virtual device within the NBX system where calls
are held pending action by an external TAPI application. Route points are
typically used by call center applications to redirect calls. A redirected call
is one that is sent from its original destination (the route point) without
being answered, to a new location specified in the external application.
A TAPI Route Point in the NBX system is an extension with a voice mailbox
in the normal extension range: 1000 - 3999 for the SuperStack3 NBX;
100 - 449 for the NBX 100.
You create the TAPI Route Point, configure the NBX system to route calls
to it, and then configure the external application to monitor it. For
example, you can configure a line card port to send all incoming calls on
that line to a specific TAPI Route Point. When a call arrives at the route
point extension, it is queued until the external application examines it and
then instructs the NCP to redirect the call to a destination specified in the
external application. Typically, the redirect action is based on the caller ID
information of the incoming call.
Redirect Behaviors
Table 50 describes the behavior of TAPI Route Points and redirected calls
within the NBX system.
Table 50 TAPI Route Points and NBX System Features
Call Redirected to
Description
Internal extension
If the internal extension has activated Do Not Disturb, a call
redirected to that extension goes immediately to the
extension’s Call Forwarding setting.
If the TAPI Line Redirect Timeout is set to a value greater
than the extension’s Call Forwarding setting and the call is
not answered, the redirected call will be handled by the
extension’s Call Forwarding setting. The system will log a
successful redirect. If the TAPI Line Redirect Timeout is set
to a value less than the extension’s Call Forwarding setting
and the call is not answered, the call will return to the
route point. For more information, see “Specifying TAPI
Line Redirect Timeout” on page 270.
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CHAPTER 4: USER CONFIGURATION
Table 50 TAPI Route Points and NBX System Features (continued)
Call Redirected to
Description
External number
Subject to the route point extension’s Class of Service
setting.
The call connects as soon as the external line resource (line
card port, a PRI line, or a T1 channel) is acquired. The caller
hears the call progress tones directly from the CO. At this
point, the NBX system logs a successful connection. Calls
redirected to an external number cannot timeout, even if
the call was redirected to a busy or an invalid number.
Call Park extension
If a call has been previously parked at the specified Call
Park extension, the redirected call is connected to the
parked call.
If no call is waiting at the specified Call Park extension, the
call returns to its original destination when the TAPI Line
Redirect Timeout expires and the external application can
redirect it again. After two failures, the call goes to the Call
Coverage specified for the Route Point.
Hunt Group extension
Calls redirected to a Hunt Group extension do not timeout.
Once the call is passed to the Hunt Group, the system
reports that the call has been successfully redirected.
Calls can be redirected from a Hunt Group extension.
You cannot add a TAPI Route Point extension to a Hunt
Group.
Hunt Group member
A Hunt Group takes precedence over a Route Point. If a call
arrives on a Hunt Group member phone because it is a
member of a Hunt Group, a redirect is not permitted. If a
call arrives on the phone’s extension (not as a result of a
Hunt Group action), the call can be redirected.
Phantom Mailbox
A call can be redirected to a phantom mailbox.
Mapped Line
Calls that arrive through an incoming line that is mapped
to a line appearance button on a phone cannot be
redirected.
If you redirect a call to a mapped line, the call does not
timeout. It fails and is routed back to the route group until
the caller disconnects.
Bridged Station
Appearance
Calls can be redirected to or from a phone that has a
bridged station appearance. Once a call to a primary
bridged station appearance reaches the secondary bridge
station appearance, the call cannot be redirected.
TAPI Route Points
TAPI Route Point
Capacities
267
When the maximum number of calls on a route point is reached (see
Table 51), subsequent calls routed into the route point from an internal
extension or through a Virtual Tie Line ring for 10 seconds and are then
disconnected. If the call arrives through a line card port, the call continues
ringing.
Table 51 TAPI Route Point Capacities
Creating a
TAPI Route Point
System
Maximum Number Maximum Number of Calls per
of Route Points
Route Point
SuperStack3 NBX
100
400
NBX 100
48
50
To create a new TAPI Route Point, the NBX system administrator performs
these steps:
1 Log on to the NBX NetSet utility using the administrator login ID and
password.
2 In the NBX NetSet - Main Menu window, click User Configuration > TAPI
Route Points tab.
3 Click Add to open the Add TAPI Route Point dialog box.
4 Enter the appropriate information in the fields. Table 52 describes each
field.
Table 52 Add TAPI Route Point Dialog Box — Fields and Their Purposes
Field
Purpose
Name
Enter a description of the TAPI Route Point that will help you
differentiate it from other TAPI Route Points.
The name must be no longer than 30 characters and can
contain the characters from A through Z, a through z,
0 through 9, hyphens (-), and underscores (_).
TAPI Password
Enter a password that must be used by any external TAPI
application that wants to monitor the route point. The
password must be at least 4 digits and no more than ten
digits in length and must contain only numeric characters.
NOTE: For security reasons, the NBX system always requires
that an external application supply a password to access a
route point. The state of the Require passwords for TAPI
clients field in the System Configuration > TAPI Settings tab
has no effect on TAPI route point security.
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CHAPTER 4: USER CONFIGURATION
Table 52 Add TAPI Route Point Dialog Box — Fields and Their Purposes
Field
Purpose
Re-enter TAPI
Password
Enter the password a second time. The two passwords must
be identical or the NBX system does not create the TAPI
Route Point.
Extension
To have the NBX system assign an extension to the TAPI
Route Point, click Assign Automatically.
To specify an extension for the TAPI Route Point, click Use
this: and enter the extension in the text box. The extension
must be an unused extension within the telephone extension
range specified in the NBX system dial plan.
Class of Service
Select Default Route Point Group or a Class of Service that
you have previously created. You can create a Class of
Service by using the Add button on the User Configuration >
CoS tab.
Call Coverage
Select the call coverage point that you want for the TAPI
Route Point. If you select Auto Attendant, you must select
Default Menu (the default) or Voicemail from the pull-down
list.
NOTE: If you select Disconnect for Call Coverage, and the
incoming call comes from an analog line card port, the caller
will hear ringing until the caller disconnects.
Timeout
Specify a time, in seconds. The Timeout is the amount of
time a call can remain queued in the route point before it
goes to the route point call coverage. For example, a call that
does not have enough caller ID information to allow the
external application to redirect it will eventually time out. A
call can also time out if the Timeout value is set so low that
the external application does not have enough time to
process all the calls in the route point queue.
Values: 0 through 999 (must be numeric)
Modifying a
TAPI Route Point
To modify a TAPI Route Point:
1 Log on to the NBX NetSet utility using the administrator login ID and
password.
2 In the NBX NetSet - Main Menu window, click User Configuration > TAPI
Route Points tab.
3 From the list of TAPI Route Points, select the one you want to modify.
4 Click Modify to open the Modify TAPI Route Point dialog box.
5 Modify the information in the fields. Table 52 describes the fields.
TAPI Route Points
269
To modify the password for the TAPI Route Point, you must enter the
administrator password for the NBX system in the Current Admin
Password field.
Viewing TAPI Route
Point Statistics
You can view the statistics for all of the TAPI Route Points on your NBX
system. The NBX system starts to accumulate new statistics each time you
reboot the system or each time you click the Reset button in the TAPI
Route Point Statistics dialog box.
To view TAPI Route Point statistics:
1 Log on to the NBX NetSet utility using the administrator login ID and
password.
2 In the NBX NetSet - Main Menu window, click User Configuration > TAPI
Route Points tab.
3 Click the Statistics button. The Statistics dialog box appears.
4 Click the heading of any column to sort the data in ascending or
descending order.
5 Click Reset to erase all data. The NBX system begins collecting new
statistical data.
The Last reset command field displays the date and time of the most
recent Reset. A row of hyphens (---------------) indicates no Reset since the
most recent system reboot.
The Last system reboot field contains the date and time when the NBX
system was most recently rebooted.
Table 53 describes the columns in the Statistics dialog box:
Table 53 TAPI Route Point Statistics
Column
Explanation
Ext.
The extension of the TAPI Route Point. The extension was
assigned either by the NBX system or by the administrator.
Name
The name of the TAPI Route Point, assigned by the
administrator.
Current Queue
The number of calls currently in the queue waiting to be
redirected by the TAPI Route Point.
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CHAPTER 4: USER CONFIGURATION
Table 53 TAPI Route Point Statistics (continued)
Column
Explanation
% Used
The percentage of the maximum queue size used by the calls
that are currently queued and waiting to be redirected. The
maximum queue sizes are:
SuperStack NBX: 400 calls
NBX 100: 50 calls
NOTE: To facilitate sorting, numbers in this column are
rounded up to the next highest integer.
Example:
178 calls in queue on a SuperStack 3 NBX system
% Used = 178/400 = 44.5 = 45 (after rounding)
Specifying TAPI Line
Redirect Timeout
Max Ever Queued
The maximum number of calls that have been queued at any
time for this TAPI Route Point.
% of Limit
The percentage of the maximum queue size represented by
the Max Ever Queued value.
Timed out Calls
The number of calls that have timed out and gone to the
Route Point call coverage while waiting in the queue to be
redirected.
Redirect Failures
The number of calls that were redirected by the TAPI Route
Point but failed to reach their destination.
The TAPI Line Redirect Timeout is a system-wide timer that specifies the
amount of time before a redirected call goes back to its original
destination, which allows the TAPI application to redirect the call again.
When a redirected call times out, the system also sends a failure code
back to the TAPI application. After two failures, the call goes to the route
point’s call coverage option.
To set the TAPI Line Redirect Timeout:
1 Log on to the NBX NetSet utility using the administrator login ID and
password.
2 In the NBX NetSet - Main Menu window, click System Configuration.
System Settings > Timers. See the Help for the procedure on setting
timers.
Hunt Groups
Hunt Groups
271
A hunt group is a set of users that can be accessed by dialing a single
extension. A call routed to the hunt group extension can reach any
member of the group who is currently logged into the group. A static
hunt group is one in which all members are permanently logged in
(locked). A dynamic hunt group is one where users can be logged in and
out of the group by you, the administrator, or you can allow them to log
into or out of the group themselves, using the hunt group password you
create.
You can associate one or more of the hunt group login/logout feature
codes with a particular group and then map that feature code to a
telephone access button to allow users to easily login and logout of the
hunt group. The access button light remains lit while the user is logged
into the hunt group.
Hunt groups are specified by extension, in these ranges:
■
SuperStack 3 NBX: 4000–4099 (All 100 can be assigned.)
■
NBX 100: 450–499 (A maximum of 48 can be assigned.)
To configure hunt groups, select User Configuration > Hunt Groups in
NBX NetSet and then see the Help topics associated with these buttons:
Add, Modify, Remove, Status, and Feature Mappings.
Hunt Group
Considerations
■
For a telephone to participate in a hunt group, the user must be
logged into the hunt group. See the NBX Telephone Guide.
■
When you create a hunt group, you specify one of three types: linear
hunt group, circular hunt group, or calling group. Your choice is
based largely on the ringing pattern that you want.
■
For each group that you define, you also specify:
■
■
■
■
The Total Timeout — The length of time in seconds that the call
will ring on the group’s telephones before the call goes to the
group’s call coverage point.
The Per-Device Timeout — The length of time in seconds that
each phone rings in the cycle. (Ignored for Calling Groups.)
Whether you want the system to log a phone out of the hunt
group if it does not answer. (Ignored for Calling Groups.)
For linear and circular hunt groups, the order in which a group
telephone rings (the telephone’s “priority”) is the same as the order in
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which you added it to the group. For calling groups, all phones ring
simultaneously.
Linear and Circular
Hunt Groups
In linear and circular hunt groups, calls ring sequentially on telephones in
the group, but the behavior differs when the time specified in the Total
Timeout field elapses:
■
If the Total Timeout value is less than the sum of all of the Per-Device
Timeout values, a call that is routed to either a linear and circular hunt
group rings on some, but not all of the telephones in the group and
then is routed to the group’s call coverage point.
■
If the Total Timeout value is greater than the sum of the Per-Device
Timeouts:
■
■
For a Linear Hunt Group, the call rings in order on each group
telephone and then goes to the group’s call coverage point. Any
time remaining in the Total Timeout is ignored, and the call does
not ring again on any telephone in the group.
For a Circular Hunt Group, the call rings in order on each group
telephone and then, for the remainder of the Total Timeout, begins
ringing again through the telephones, in order. Depending on the
Total Timeout value, an unanswered call may ring through all
telephones in the group multiple times.
If the Total Timeout value exactly matches the sum of the Per-Device
Timeouts, the behavior of a single incoming call is the same for both
linear and circular hunt groups.
When a second call is routed to a linear or circular hunt group, the
telephone on which the second call first rings is different:
Calling Groups
■
For Linear Hunt Group, the new call rings on the first telephone in the
group.
■
For a Circular Hunt Group, the new call rings on the telephone that is
next in the ringing sequence.
In this special type of hunt group, an incoming call rings on all telephones
in the group simultaneously. After the Total Timeout value is reached, a
call that is still unanswered is routed to the group’s call coverage point.
The value in the Per Device Timeout field has no effect on the behavior of
telephones in a calling group.
Class of Service (CoS)
Call Coverage
Class of Service
(CoS)
273
For each type of hunt group, use this set of check boxes to define where
the NBX system routes an unanswered call (the call coverage point):
■
Voice Mail — An unanswered call goes to the hunt group extension’s
voice mailbox.
■
Auto Attendant — An unanswered call goes to the Automated
Attendant that you specify.
■
Phone Number — An unanswered call goes to the extension that
you specify, such as the receptionist, or another hunt group.
Class of Service (CoS) is a set of calling permissions that you assign to
users. Most permissions are subject to the Business Hours parameters:
Open, Lunch, and Other. For example, you can create a class that allows
toll calls during normal business hours, but denies them at other times.
Additional considerations:
■
Emergency calls (such as calls to 911) are not subject to CoS
restrictions.
■
System-wide Speed Dial numbers are not subject to Class of Service
restrictions. For example, if you want to enable calling to a specific toll
number to all users without regard to their CoS settings, create a
System Speed Dial for that number.
■
When you create a new profile, the system assigns the default CoS
unless you specify a different one. If you edit the properties of the
default CoS, verify that it contains a minimum set of permissions.
■
You can enable or disable Offsite Notification at the system level. The
system-wide setting takes precedence over the CoS setting.
Service classes control these types of calls:
■
Intercom
■
External (local, long distance, international, long distance toll-free,
and long distance toll)
■
CO Code (optional telephone company services, such as Call Waiting)
■
Trunk to trunk transfers
■
Off-site Notification
To configure Class of Service, select User Configuration > CoS and then
see the Help screens for these buttons: Add, Modify, Remove, and View.
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5
SYSTEM CONFIGURATION
This chapter provides information about using the System Configuration
function of the NBX NetSet™ utility to configure system level settings. It
covers these topics:
System Settings
■
System Settings
■
Speed Dials
■
Business Identity
■
Security
■
TAPI Settings
■
Disk Mirroring
You can use the System Settings tab to configure these system-level
items:
■
System-wide Settings
■
Audio Settings
■
Regional Settings
■
Date and Time
■
Timers
■
Ringing Patterns
■
Multicast Addresses
■
IP Addresses
■
Maintenance Alerts
On the System Settings tab, you can also view the current system
settings, such as the software version, the IP address of the system, and
the amount of free memory. Table 54 describes the fields.
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To view system settings, select System Configuration > System Settings.
Table 54 System Settings
Field
Purpose
Software Version
The call control software for the NBX system.
System Serial #
The serial number on the Call Processor circuit board.
Host Name
This is an IP setting. It is a name you can give to the NBX
system so you do not have to specify the IP address when
accessing NBX NetSet through a browser. A host name
works only if you add the name to the name resolution
system. If you do not use a name resolution system, you
must specify the IP address in the browser.
IP Address
The IP address of the NBX system.
Default Gateway
The IP address of the destination host for any IP packet not
addressed to a host on the local subnetwork.
Subnet Mask
An IP setting that identifies the network and host portions
of an IP address on the network.
Network Protocol
The transport mechanism for voice packets.
Ethernet only: All communications are at the Ethernet
frame layer.
Standard IP: IP communications are used for traffic
between NBX system addresses. Every device needs an
IP address.
IP-On-the-Fly: An implementation of IP communications in
which Layer 2 (Ethernet) devices are temporarily assigned a
Layer 3 (IP) address only when they need to communication
with a Layer 3 device on a different subnetwork. The IP
address is assigned from an address pool defined by the
NBX system administrator. After the Layer 2 device returns
to the idle state the IP address is returned to the pool of
available addresses for future use.
MOH MAC Address
The hardware address of the Music-on-Hold device.
Free Memory
Available memory on the NBX system.
Date and Time
The current system date and time. To modify, click the Date
and Time button.
System Start Time
The last time the system was initialized (boot time).
System Settings
System-wide Settings
277
You use the System-wide dialog box to make changes to System-wide
settings. Table 55 describes each setting.
To configure system-wide settings, select System Configuration > System
Settings > System-wide. See the Help for procedures on modifying
system-wide settings.
Table 55 System Settings System-wide Dialog Box Fields
Field
Purpose
Host Name
An IP setting for the NBX system.
A Host name functions only if you add the name to the name
resolution system. If you do not do this, then you must enter
the IP address in the browser when you want to access NBX
NetSet.
SMTP Domain
Name
The name of your SMTP domain.
IP Address
The IP address of the NBX system.
Default Gateway
The IP address of the destination host for any IP packet not
addressed to a host on the local subnetwork.
Subnet Mask
An IP setting that identifies the network and host portions of
an IP address on the network.
Primary DNS
The IP address of the primary DNS server. You must specify at
least a primary address to use e-mail Off-Site Notification.
Secondary DNS
The IP address of the secondary DNS server. If you specify two
DNS IP addresses, they must be the primary and secondary
addresses.
Tertiary DNS
The IP address of the tertiary DNS server.
Required for Off-Site Notification by e-mail.
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Table 55 System Settings System-wide Dialog Box Fields (continued)
Field
Purpose
Network Protocol
The transport mechanism for voice packets.
Ethernet only: All communications are at the Ethernet frame
layer.
Standard IP: IP communications are used for traffic between
NBX system addresses.
NOTE: Every device needs an IP address.
IP communications are optional features of the NBX system
and require separate licensing.
IP On-the-Fly: An implementation of IP communications in
which Layer 2 (Ethernet) devices are temporarily assigned a
Layer 3 (IP) address only when they need to communicate with
a Layer 3 device on a different subnetwork. The IP address is
assigned from an address pool defined by the NBX system
administrator. After the Layer 2 device returns to the idle state
the IP address is returned to the pool of available addresses for
future use.
If you have the appropriate license and select IP On-the-Fly in
the Network Protocol list, you must return to the Current
System Settings window, select IP Addresses and add the
IP addresses associated with IP-on-the-Fly. There may be
unpredictable results in other system functions if you have
Network Protocol set to IP-on-the-Fly but do not have any
IP telephones or addresses.
Extensions Start at
The starting extension number used by Auto Discover
Telephones.
You may select any unused telephone number extension from
these ranges:
NBX 100:
3-digit dial plan — 100–449
4-digit dial plan — 1000–4949
SuperStack 3 NBX:
3-digit dial plan — 100–399
4-digit dial plan — 1000–3999
External Prefix
The prefix required for an outside line.
Caller ID Wait
Timer
Amount of time to wait for receiving Caller ID information.
Auto Add Phones
to Call Pickup
Group 0
When selected, this adds telephones to the default Call Pickup
Group 0 (zero) when telephones are added to the system. Turn
this ON before Auto Discovering telephones if you want the
telephones to appear in Call Pickup Group 0.
System Settings
279
Table 55 System Settings System-wide Dialog Box Fields (continued)
Field
Purpose
Handsfree on
Transfer
(Affects NBX Business Telephones only) This setting governs
the way an NBX Business Telephone responds to a transferred
call when a user enables the HANDS FREE button on the
telephone or uses the HANDS FREE feature code (100).
Transferred calls include:
■
Internal calls from other NBX users, both direct and
transferred
■
External calls transferred via an automated attendant
NOTE: Calls that directly arrive at an NBX Business Telephone
via an analog telephone line or Digital Line Card channel ring
on the telephone in the normal way. To answer the call, the
user must either pick up the handset or press the Speaker
button.
Handsfree on Transfer Enabled
When the HANDS FREE button on an NBX Business Telephone
is activated and the Handsfree on Transfer function is enabled
on the NBX system, a call that is transferred to the telephone
causes the telephone to issue a two-second hands-free
warning tone.
The telephone user does not need to take any action to
answer the call because, immediately after the warning tone,
the call is connected using the speaker phone.
Handsfree on Transfer Disabled
When the HANDS FREE button on an NBX Business Telephone
is activated but the Handsfree on Transfer function is disabled
on the NBX system, a call that is transferred to the telephone
ring in the normal manner, whether or not the HANDS FREE
button is activated.
Internal calls cause the telephone to issue a two-second
hands-free warning tone. The user does not need to take any
action to answer the internal call because, immediately after
the warning tone, the system connects the call using the
speaker phone.
If an external call is blind transferred manually to the NBX
Business Telephone, the call rings on the telephone in the
normal manner and the HANDS FREE button is ignored.
Virtual LAN
Enabled
Adds a Priority 6 Virtual LAN identifier to each Ethernet frame.
Virtual LAN ID
If the VLAN Enabled box is checked, you must add the Virtual
LAN identifier in this field.
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Table 55 System Settings System-wide Dialog Box Fields (continued)
Field
Purpose
IP VLAN Tagging
Enabled
If you enable the IP VLAN Tagging Enabled check box, the NBX
system VLAN tags outgoing voice and control packets
intended for devices on the VLAN you specified in the Virtual
LAN ID text box.
System-wide CLIR
Suppresses the transmission of caller ID for outgoing calls.
Music On Hold
Enables Ethernet multicasts for Music On Hold (MOH). MOH is
automatically enabled if Music on Transfer is enabled.
MOH Audio should be enabled only if you have a MOH device
connected to the system.
Audio Settings
Music on Transfer
Enables MOH audio for Call Transfer; requires MOH to be
installed and enabled. Music on Transfer is automatically
disabled if MOH is disabled.
One Button
Transfer
Enables system users to transfer a call by pressing the Transfer
button only once. If this box is not checked, call transfers
require users to press the Transfer button once to start the call
transfer and another time to complete the transfer of the call.
NBX Messaging
Allows you to enable or disable NBX Messaging after you
install a third-party messaging license. By default, this check
box is selected but not accessible until you install a third-party
messaging license. If you disable NBX Messaging by clearing
this check box, all NBX Messaging icons and headings become
inactive throughout NBX NetSet.
Third-Party
Messaging
This check box is active only if you have installed a third-party
messaging license. You can enable the third-party messaging
application by selecting this check box or by clearing the NBX
Messaging check box.
Pulse Dialing
Enables pulse dialing for all telephones in the system.
Audio Settings enable you to affect audio quality issues that are related to
feedback (echo) or network congestion. Do not enable any Audio
Settings check boxes unless you have a specific issue to resolve. You
should rarely need to enable more than one check box to resolve an issue.
What is Silence Suppression?
Silence suppression is a method of reducing the number of packets
transmitted during a conversation. Silence suppression can help you avoid
dropped packets on a congested network. During a conversation there
are periods of silence. A packet of silence takes up just as much
bandwidth as a packet with audio data. If you enable Silence
Suppression, the phone sends a 'silence indicator' when it senses the start
of a silent period and it suppresses all subsequent voiceless frames. When
System Settings
281
another NBX device receives this indicator, it generates and inserts white
noise until it receives the next frame that contains audio data. If you
enable Silence Suppression, a careful listener might notice a difference in
audio quality. The background white noise generated by the receiving
phone is subtly different from the silence in an audio stream.
What is Echo Suppression?
Echo suppression is a method of reducing or eliminating audio feedback
(echo). The NBX system has internal mechanisms to deal with echo,
however, external conditions can induce echo that is beyond the scope of
the internal mechanisms. Echo on external calls is usually due to older
equipment at the phone company's central office. Echo can also be
caused by user behavior. If a caller has the phone volume turned up and
then that caller does not hold the phone flush to their ear, the handset's
mouthpiece can pick up audio from the ear piece, which causes echo.
To enable audio settings, select System Configuration > System Settings >
Audio Settings.
Table 56 System Settings Audio Settings Dialog Box Fields
Field
Purpose
Bandwidth Controls reduce the number or the size of packets transmitted during
a conversation. You can enable bandwidth controls to help reduce network
congestion, however, enabling bandwidth controls can compromise audio quality.
System-wide
Reduces the number of packets transmitted during a
Silence Suppression conversation by not transmitting packets during times of
silence during a conversation. Enabling this check box enables
silence suppression on all conversations.
System-wide
Implements silence suppression on calls carried over Virtual Tie
Silence Suppression Lines.
on VTL Calls
Audio Compression Enables ADPCM compression, which reduces the number of
on VTL Calls
packets as compared to the normal PCM format of audio data
on virtual tie line calls. Enable this check box only if you have
network congestion on the VTLs that connect your NBX
systems and those issues have not been resolved by enabling
System-wide Silence Suppression or System-wide Silence
Suppression on VTL Calls.
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Table 56 System Settings Audio Settings Dialog Box Fields (continued)
Field
Purpose
Echo Troubleshooting controls can reduce or eliminate audio feedback (echo)
during conversations. The NBX system has default mechanisms to deal with echo,
however, extreme conditions can induce echo that is beyond the scope of the
default mechanisms.
NOTE: When additional echo suppression is enabled for analog and digital line
cards, echo should be reduced or eliminated. However, in rare conditions, the
additional echo suppression may cause incoming audio to occasionally fade in and
out.
Regional Settings
NBX Handset
Acoustic Echo
Suppression
Enables additional echo suppression on calls between internal
extensions. Acoustic echo typically occurs when the phone
volume is set to maximum and audio feeds back from the ear
piece to the mouthpiece.
Analog Line Cards
Echo Suppression
Enables echo suppression on calls between internal extensions
and outside callers.
Digital Line Cards
Echo Suppression
Enables echo suppression on calls that use digital line
connections.
After you install regional software and components from the regional
packs, you can enable regional settings. To enable these regional settings
in NBX NetSet, you select the appropriate country and language for the
system voice prompts, the technical tones and cadences, and the online
user documentation.
To enable regional settings, select System Configuration > System
Settings > Regional Settings. See the Help for the procedure on enabling
regional settings.
See “Regional Software” on page 342 for information on installing
regional language packs.
Advanced Regional Settings
The NBX system also allows you to choose different regional settings for
the system voice prompts, the technical tones and cadences, and the
online user (not administrator) documentation. For example, you may
require local tones and cadences but may want the documentation to be
in English and the voice prompts in Australian English.
You can select separate regional settings for:
■
Voice prompts — The Auto Attendant voice prompts.
System Settings
283
■
Documentation — The NBX Telephone Guide, the User Help, and the
quick reference cards.
■
Tones and Cadences — The tones and the patterns of rings (cadence)
versus silence. Tones and cadences vary from country to country.
Examples:
■
■
■
United States ringing cadence (pattern) is 2 seconds of ring
followed by 4 seconds of silence.
United Kingdom ringing cadence is 2 rings within approximately 2
seconds followed by 2 seconds of silence.
United States busy tone is 0.75 seconds of tone followed by 0.75
seconds of silence.
To enable different regional settings, select System Configuration >
System Settings > Regional Settings > Advanced. See the Help for
procedures on selecting regional settings.
Date and Time
If necessary, you can set the NBX system date and time. It is important
that the date and time are accurate because the system date and time:
■
Appear on an idle NBX telephone display
■
Affect business hours behavior
■
Affect time-dependent prompts in the Auto Attendant
■
Affect the time and date stamp on voicemail
To select the system date and time, select System Configuration > System
Settings > Date and Time. See the Help for the procedure on setting the
system date and time.
Timers
System timers enable you to set time-out periods for the NBX system
features that are described in Table 57. To set timers, select System
Configuration > System Settings > Timers. See the Help for the procedure
on setting timers.
Table 57 System Timers Fields
Field
Purpose
Forward Voice Mail On When a telephone’s FWD VMAIL button is enabled, this
Timeout
field specifies the duration of ringing before a call is
forwarded to voice mail.
If you set this time to under 6 seconds, caller
ID information is not captured in voicemail.
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Table 57 System Timers Fields (continued)
Field
Purpose
Forward Voice Mail Off When a telephone’s FWD VMAIL button is disabled, this
Timeout
field specifies the duration of ringing before a call is
forwarded to voice mail.
Line Port Hold Timeout For a call originating on an outside line (Analog Line Card
port), the length of time that the call remains on hold
before it rings at the extension that placed the call on hold.
Call Park Timeout
The length of time that a call can be parked before it rings
at the extension that parked the call.
Conference Timeout
The length of time before a conference attempt is
abandoned. Applies to a blind (unannounced) conference
only. The timeout takes effect under these conditions:
■
Two people, A and B, are involved in a call and one of
them attempts to blind conference another person, C.
■
C does not answer and C’s voice mail does not pick up
the call.
After the Conference Timeout period, the system stops
ringing C’s telephone, stops attempting to conference
with C, and reverts to the call between A and B.
Ringing Patterns
Transfer Timeout
The length of time that a transferred call attempts the
transfer before it rings back to the caller’s extension.
TAPI Line Redirect
Timeout
The length of time before a call redirected from a TAPI
route point by an external application goes back to its
original destination. After two failures, the call goes to the
TAPI route point’s call coverage option. For more
information, see “TAPI Route Points” on page 265.
You can set system-wide ringing patterns to distinguish between internal
and external calls. You can choose one, two, or three rings to distinguish
between internal and external calls.
Do not confuse ringing patterns with ringer tones, which NBX system
users can set for their telephones using NBX NetSet. For information on
setting a user’s ringing tones, see the NBX Telephone Guide or the User
Help.
To set ringing patterns, select System Configuration > System Settings >
Ringing Patterns. See the Help for instructions.
System Settings
Multicast Addresses
285
The NBX system uses IP multicast addressing to distribute information for
these system features:
■
Mapped line appearances
■
Music on hold
■
Internal page
■
External page
■
Conference calls
These features are available on Layer 2 and Layer 3 IP devices. The
IP implementation uses Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP)
to transmit and distribute the necessary data and audio.
If you configure your NBX system to use IP On-the-Fly or Standard IP and
your switches use IGMP Snooping, you must have an IGMP Host on the
network. Typically, an IGMP Host is an IP Multicast Router or a switch that
has IGMP Query capability.
The NBX system IGMP is an implementation of administratively scoped
IP multicast that uses three scopes of administration:
■
Local scope — Limited by local routers with IP addresses 239.255.0.0
through 239.255.0.16
■
Organizational local scope — Limited by boundary routers with
IP addresses 239.192.0.0 through 239.192.0.14
■
Global scope — IP addresses 224.2.0.0 through 224.2.127.253
IGMP may not be available in all systems or network topologies. All of the
routers between the various components must support IGMP and the
necessary router protocols to establish a path for the IP multicast packets.
Each event that occurs in an IGMP setup, such as taking a telephone off
the hook, causes a packet of 200 Kb to 300 Kb to be sent.
The default settings for the IP multicast addresses should work in most
network environments. Certain addresses are reserved.
The MAC address and the IP address displayed on any one line of the
Multicast Address List window are not related.
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There are two methods for selecting multicast addresses:
■
Change IP — Lets you select a starting address for all entries.
Changing IP multicast addresses is a quick way to change the range of
NBX system multicast addresses, to avoid conflicts with other
equipment on your network.
■
Change bins — Lets you change a single entry by selecting from a list
of available bins. Changing IP bins is useful for changing a single
address that may conflict with another system device. Consult your
network administrator to determine which address is in conflict and
the new address to choose.
To change multicast addresses, select System Configuration > System
Settings > Multicast Addresses. See the Help for instructions.
IP Addresses
This window allows you to add or delete a range of IP On-the-Fly
addresses. Select System Configuration > System Settings > IP Addresses
to perform these functions. See the Help for the procedure on adding or
deleting IP addresses.
The IP Addresses button appears only if you have IP On-the-Fly enabled in
System Configuration > System Settings > System-wide.
Maintenance Alerts
If you have a SuperStack 3 NBX system with disk mirroring or dual power
supplies and with NBX Messaging enabled, you can:
■
Configure maintenance alert voice mail messages so that they appear
to come from one NBX system user.
■
Designate up to 15 NBX system users to receive maintenance alerts.
Alert messages are defined by the NBX system. The content depends on
the cause of the alert.
When a user receives a maintenance alert message, the source of the
message depends on whether you have configured an NBX system user
as the author of maintenance alert messages. See Table 58 for details.
Table 58 Source of Maintenance Alert Messages
Message Type
Author Configured
No Author Configured
Local Voice Mail
Message
The configured system user is
announced as the sender of the
message.
An outside caller is announced as the sender of the
message.
Speed Dials
287
Table 58 Source of Maintenance Alert Messages (continued)
Message Type
Author Configured
No Author Configured
Offsite E-mail
Message
The name of the configured system user The From field in the e-mail contains the word
appears in the From field of the e-mail. anonymous.
Offsite Voice Mail
Message
The system user is announced as the
sender of the message.
An outside caller is announced as the sender of the
message.
See the Help for the procedures on setting the maintenance alert author
and specifying users to receive maintenance alerts.
Speed Dials
You can create up to 100 System Speed Dial numbers. You can also
create system speed dial and personal speed dial button definitions and
assign them to groups.
Any telephone in a group has access to the same button definitions.
Users can create personal speed dial definitions for buttons that do not
already have a button mapping. Users can also change definitions for any
buttons mapped as personal speed dial buttons, even if those buttons are
defined in the Group Button Mappings.
System speed dial numbers are not subject to Class of Service (CoS)
restrictions, so a speed dial number mapped to a number that is a toll call
is available to users even if their CoS does not allow toll calls. Personal
speed dial numbers are subject to CoS.
Do not confuse speed dial codes with extension numbers.
To set up system speed dials, select System Configuration > Speed Dials.
See the Help for these speed dial procedures:
■
Adding or modifying a system speed dial
■
Removing a system speed dial
■
Printing system speed dials
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Business Identity
You can configure information about the your business, such as business
address and business hours, including time of day service modes. You can
also view the current system mode and force the system into a different
mode.
To enter business information, select System Configuration > Business
Identity. See the Help for procedures to modify these types of
information:
■
Business information
■
Business hours
■
System mode
Business Information
You can enter basic information about your business on this dialog box,
including name, address, and telephone and Fax numbers.
Business Hours
The business hours dialog box allows you to define business hours for
three separate times of day, or service, modes: Open, Lunch, and Other.
Any time period that does not fall within these specified hours is
considered Closed. Business hours are directly linked to time-of-day
service modes and can affect other settings in the system, such as the
Auto Attendant.
You can manually specify that the system operate in a given mode, or set
it to operate automatically. See “System Mode” next.
If the system is left in an automatic state, it constantly compares the
current time of day and day of week with the business hour tables. The
system knows the current day of the week and proceeds across the tables
in a sequential manner, looking for business hours that match the current
time of day. The system examines the three tables sequentially: first the
Other mode, then the Lunch mode, and then the Open mode. The
system moves across the tables until it finds a match.It skips a blank table.
System Mode
You can manually specify that the system operate in a given mode, or set
it to operate automatically. If necessary, you can force the system into a
specific Time of Day Service mode without having to reconfigure other
system settings, such as Business Hours. If the system is left in an
automatic state, it constantly compares the current time of day and day
of week with the business hour tables.
Security
Security
289
To set system passwords, select System Configuration > Security. See the
Help for procedures on changing these types of passwords:
■
Change Administrator Password — Resets the password for
administrator access to NBX NetSet.
After you change an administrator password, write it down and store
it appropriately. There is no “back door” password to use if this
password is lost. If you change the default 4-digit password to an
8-digit or longer password, you cannot revert to a 4-digit password.
TAPI Settings
■
Reset User Password — Resets the password to a user’s telephone
extension. After you reset the password, instruct the user to change to
a new password as soon as possible to ensure system security.
■
Auto Attendant Password — Limits access to Auto Attendant
settings and functions.
■
System Backup Password — Enables automated backups from an
external system.
■
Reporting Password — Limits access to Call Detail Reports, an
optional component of the NBX system. See “Call Reporting” on
page 347 for more information.
■
Virtual Tie Lines Password — Enables calls over virtual tie lines to
“hop off” after they reach the destination NBX system. The call then
appears to originate at the destination NBX system. See Chapter 2 for
more information on setting up VTLs.
■
Reset Password for a Hunt Group — The password for the Hunt
Group is reset to the extension number of the Hunt Group.
■
Reset Password for a TAPI Route Point — The password for the
TAPI Route Point is reset to the extension number of the Route Point.
You must configure system-wide Telephony Application Programming
Interface (TAPI) settings before users can download the NBX TAPI Service
Provider (NBXTSP). You can set a maximum number of TAPI clients in the
system. You can also require users to enter passwords for TAPI devices.
Before you configure system-wide TAPI settings, install the appropriate
TAPI software. After you have the software installed, select System
Configuration > TAPI Settings to configure TAPI settings. See the System
Configuration Help for procedures on configuring TAPI settings. See the
Downloads Help for procedures on downloading NBX TSP software.
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The System Configuration TAPI settings do not apply to TAPI Route Points.
For security reasons, the NBX system always requires that an external
application supply a password to access a TAPI Route Point.
Disk Mirroring
The SuperStack 3 NBX Solution supports disk mirroring, using RAID1
technology, to provide data security and throughput speed. When the
mirror disk is fully partnered with the master system disk, all data that is
written to the master disk is also written to the mirror disk. If data is read
from disk, the software has the option of reading from either disk, which
can improve data access times.
If either disk fails in a fully mirrored system, the system software switches
to use only the remaining good disk, and system operation continues.
Status information is available on the Call Processor front panel LEDs to
indicate when a disk has failed and which disk to replace. After you
replace a failed disk and restart the system, the software starts bringing
the new disk up to a fully mirrored state. The system typically takes from
30 to 90 minutes to complete the mirroring process, depending on the
amount of data on the master disk.
Adding a Mirror Disk
If your SuperStack 3 NBX system uses a single disk, you can add a mirror
disk. The disk you add must have at least the same storage capacity as
the disk in the system. You must obtain a disk mirroring license to convert
a single-disk system to use disk mirroring. You need a Phillips screwdriver
to complete this process.
CAUTION: Adding a mirror disk involves a system database backup and a
system shutdown. 3Com advises that you add a mirror disk during
nonbusiness hours.
To add a mirror disk:
1 Back up the database on the system.
a Select Operations > Manage Data.
b Click Backup and specify a location for the backup file.
2 Install the disk mirroring license.
a Obtain the license key from your dealer.
b Select Operations > Licenses > Add License.
c Type the license key in the two license key fields.
Disk Mirroring
291
d Click OK.
3 Shut down the system by selecting Operations > Reboot/Shutdown >
Shutdown.
4 Install the second disk drive.
a Unlock the disk tray.
b Unscrew the two retaining screws.
c Remove the disk tray.
d Connect the IDE disk cable to the disk drive.
e Connect the power harness to the disk drive.
f Fasten the new disk to the disk tray using your Phillips screwdriver and
the screws provided with the disk.
g Reinsert the disk tray.
h Screw in the two retaining screws and lock the disk tray in place.
5 Restart the system.
6 Verify that the disks begin the mirroring process.
On the Call Processor front panel, check the four LEDs under the PWR
and S1 labels. The LEDs labeled 1, 2, and 3 (Figure 19) indicate disk
status.
Figure 19 Disk and Power LEDs
S
1
P
W
R
1
2
3
Table 59 describes the possible states of the LEDs.
Table 59 Disk LED States
Explanation
LED 1
LED 2
LED 3
PWR
Attempting to boot from disk 0 (zero)
Off
On
Off
On
Attempting to boot from disk 1
Off
Off
On
On
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Table 59 Disk LED States (continued)
Explanation
Boot process completed, system initializing
LED 1
LED 2
LED 3
PWR
Flashing
N/A
N/A
On
N/A
N/A
On
System is running
On
Flash codes indicate disk problem:
N/A
■
2 flashes: No valid disk (system is halted)
■
3 flashes: Two valid disks, but they are not
paired (system is halted)
■
4 flashes: Configuration problem (system is
halted)
■
5 flashes: Two disks present, but no
mirroring license
Flashing Flashing
On
Using disk 0 (zero) only
N/A
On
Off
On
Using disk 1 only
N/A
Off
On
On
Synchronizing — disk 0 is valid, disk 1 is
becoming a fully mirrored disk. LED 3 flash rate
indicates progress.
N/A
On
Flashing
On
N/A
Flashing
On
On
LED 2 and LED 3 flash alternately: the two disks
are resynchronizing
N/A
Flashing Flashing
Synchronized
N/A
If LED 3 stops normal flashing and intermittently
flashes twice, the mirroring process has failed.
Synchronizing — disk 1 is valid, disk 0 is
becoming a fully mirrored disk. LED 2 flash rate
indicates progress.
If LED 2 stops normal flashing and intermittently
flashes twice, the mirroring process has failed.
Verifying a Failed
Disk Drive
On
On
On
On
If either disk fails while in a fully mirrored state, the system continues to
operate. The disk LED states described in Table 59 indicate which drive
has failed. In addition, the Disk Status window in NBX NetSet shows the
status of your disk drives.
To verify the status of a disk drive, select Reports > System Data > Disk
Status. See the Help for information on verifying disk status.
Disk Mirroring
Reverting to a
Single-Disk System
293
If the disk mirroring is currently active, you can convert the system to
operate with a single disk. You need a Phillips screwdriver to complete
this process.
To revert to a single-disk system:
1 Use Table 59 to determine which disk is the mirrored disk.
2 Shut down the system. In NBX NetSet, select Operations >
Reboot/Shutdown > Shutdown.
3 Remove the mirrored disk drive:
a Unlock the disk tray.
b Unscrew the two retaining screws.
c Remove the disk tray.
d Disconnect the disk data cable from the mirrored disk drive.
e Disconnect the power harness from the mirrored disk drive.
f Unfasten the mirrored disk from the disk tray using the Phillips
screwdriver and the screws provided with the disk.
g Reinsert the disk tray.
h Screw in the two retaining screws and lock the disk tray in place.
4 Restart the system.
5 Remove the disk mirroring license from NBX NetSet:
a Select Operations > Licenses > Remove License.
b In the Remove License dialog box, select Disk Mirroring License from
the list.
c Click OK.
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6
NBX MESSAGING
This chapter describes how to configure these features of NBX
Messaging:
■
NBX Voice Mail
■
Auto Attendant
■
Voice Profile for Internet Mail
If you have installed a third-party messaging system, the NBX Messaging
screen is not available in the NBX NetSet utility. Follow the
documentation for your voice messaging system.
NBX Voice Mail
You use the NBX Voice Mail tab on the NBX Messaging screen to
configure system-wide settings for users’ voice mailboxes. When you add
new users to the system, the system creates a mailbox for each user.
Users must record a name announcement, a personal greeting, and
create a password before they can retrieve their messages.
The system also creates mailboxes for extensions that are not associated
with a particular telephone, such as hunt group extension or a TAPI route
point extension.
To configure system-wide voice mail settings, select NBX Messaging >
NBX Voice Mail. See the Help for instructions.
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Table 60 describes the fields on the NBX Voice Mail tab.
Table 60 Voice Mail Settings
Field
Purpose
Max Number of
Messages
The number of messages, regardless of length, that an
individual mailbox can have. A typical voice message lasts
about 20 to 30 seconds.
Default: 30 messages
Maximum: 512 messages
Minimum: 1 message
New Msg Retention
(days)
The maximum number of days that a new (unheard)
message remains in a voice mailbox before the NBX system
marks it for deletion. However, the message is not deleted
until the end of this sequence of events:
■
The user logs in.
■
The NBX system informs the user that the message will be
deleted.
■
The user takes no action to prevent the deletion of the
message.
■
The user logs out.
Default: 30 days
Maximum: 1826 days (5 years)
Minimum: 1 day
NOTE: When a user listens to a new message or saves it, the
system resets the time stamp for that message. The Msg
Retention value (described next) controls when the system
marks the message for deletion.
Msg Retention (days) The maximum number of days that a message remains in the
mailbox after a user has listened to it or saved it. The NBX
system then marks the message for deletion. However, the
message is not deleted until the end of this sequence of
events:
■
The user logs in.
■
The NBX system informs the user that the message will be
deleted.
■
The user takes no action to prevent the deletion of the
message.
■
The user logs out.
Default: 30 days
Maximum: 1826 days (5 years)
Minimum: 1 day
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297
Table 60 Voice Mail Settings (continued)
Field
Purpose
Max Incoming Msg
Length (minutes)
The maximum length, in minutes, for any one message.
Default: 5 minutes
Maximum: 10 minutes
Minimum: 1 minute
Voice Mail
Compression Format
The system uses ADPCM as the voice mail compression
format for voice prompts and messages.
On Disk Voice Mail
Format
The system uses ADPCM as the compression format for voice
prompts and mail on your disk.
Disable AA Transfer
Prompt
Enables or disables the transfer prompt (“Please hold while
your call is transferred”) when a call is transferred from the
Auto Attendant.
Default: disabled (unchecked)
Additional Considerations
■
The maximum length of a voice mail message is 10 minutes. If
accumulated messages use up the system’s message storage space
before individual users reach their capacity limits, you should either
lower the mailbox settings or upgrade your message storage option.
Decreasing mailbox settings does not affect data already in storage.
You can also encourage users to delete old messages.
■
To view your system’s current message storage capacity, select
Operations > Licenses. The system displays the number of NBX Voice
Mail/Auto Attendant ports and storage space (in hours on an NBX 100
system). The number of ports determines how many voice mail
sessions and Auto Attendants can be in use simultaneously.
■
Each voice mail extension (port) enables one voice message session. If
all voice mail extensions are in use, call behavior differs depending on
the operation. If the Attendant Console is forwarding calls to the Auto
Attendant, and all voice mail extensions are in use, a caller from
outside the system hears ringing but no answer until an extension is
free. If an internal user transfers a caller to voice mail, but no voice
mail extensions are available, the call rings back to the caller’s
extension.
■
As the administrator, you can configure voice mail extensions,
settings, passwords, and off-site notification. The NBX NetSet utility
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also offers reports on the status and usage of voice mail ports and
voice mail storage usage by user. For details, see these sections:
■
Voice Mail Extensions
■
Voice Mail Passwords
■
IMAP for Integrated Voice Mail
■
Off-Site Notification
■
Status
■
Port Usage
■
User Usage
Voice Mail Extensions
The number of voice mail ports on your system determines the number of
voice mail sessions that can take place at one time. The default NBX
system includes 4 voice mail ports. You can purchase a license for
additional capacity. Each voice mail port has an extension number. See
“Extension Settings Overview” on page 52 for more information.
Voice Mail Passwords
To retrieve voice messages, a user must log on using the extension
number and password. The password, a 4-digit to 10-digit number,
allows access to Personal Settings in the NBX NetSet utility and to voice
mail from the telephone.
IMAP for Integrated
Voice Mail
■
The user can change the password from the telephone or by logging
in to the NBX NetSet utility
■
The administrator can reset a user password to the user’s extension
number. See “Security” on page 289 for information on Security
features.
■
For more information about the menus and features available to users,
see the NBX Telephone Guide and the Help available on User screens
in the NBX NetSet utility.
NBX Voice Mail uses an Internet Message Access Protocol (IMAP) server,
which enables users to access and manage their voice messages through
any IMAP-compliant e-mail client. As the administrator, you may need to
help users to configure e-mail clients.
Voice mail messages can be sent as mail messages with .WAV file
attachments. Double-clicking an attachment activates the computer’s
media player, and the voice message plays through the speakers or
NBX Voice Mail
299
earphones on the user’s computer. After the user listens to a message, it
loses its “new” status, but it remains on the server until the user deletes it
using the IMAP e-mail client, the telephone, or the Personal Settings
screen in the NBX NetSet utility, or until the system deletes it when it is
older than the system limit (after a warning message to the user). The
computer used to receive messages must support multimedia.
Users cannot compose new voice mail messages through their IMAP
e-mail client. They must use their NBX Telephones.
To process both e-mail and voice mail on one computer, the user needs:
■
An e-mail client that can connect to two servers
OR
■
Two instances of the e-mail client
Each e-mail client has a unique configuration interface, so the following
procedure is presented in general terms only. See your e-mail client’s
documentation to determine how to accomplish a specific task.
Setting Up an e-mail Client to Access Messages
1 Determine if the e-mail client can communicate with an IMAP 4 server.
Some versions of Microsoft Outlook and Outlook Express, Netscape, and
Eudora support IMAP. Check the documentation that came with your
e-mail program to determine if it supports IMAP.
2 Set the Incoming Mail Server to the IP address or to the host name of your
NBX system.
Set the Outgoing Mail Server to the mail server in use for regular e-mail.
The NBX IMAP server cannot perform address translation, so you cannot
use the NBX system as your company e-mail server.
3 If necessary, identify the server type as IMAP.
4 For the username, specify the user’s telephone extension number. For the
password, specify the user’s NBX voice mail password.
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Off-Site Notification
Off-site Notification can notify users by pager, e-mail, or telephone when
they receive a new voice mail message. Users can specify the methods by
which they receive notification.
You can configure these system-wide Off-site Notification settings:
■
Enable or disable Off-site Notification for the entire system
■
Set the maximum number of out-calling ports
■
Assign an out-dialing prefix for Off-site Notification
To configure Off-site Notification, select NBX Messaging > NBX Voice Mail
> Off Site Notification. See the Help for the procedure on setting up
Off-site Notification.
Notes About Off-Site Notification
■
To allow users to take advantage of Off-Site Notification, verify that
Off-Site Notification is enabled in System-wide Settings, the group
Class of Service settings, and by the individual user. For Off-Site
Notification to work correctly, it must be enabled in all these locations.
To change group Class of Service settings, select User Configuration >
CoS > CoS Group Name > Modify.
■
Before Off-Site Notification can send e-mail, you must define an SMTP
Domain Name and one or more valid Domain Name Servers. These
settings are configured in System Settings > System-wide.
■
If users choose Pager or Voice Mail as the first notification method,
they are notified only of the first new message they receive after the
time they have most recently logged in to their voice mailbox. They are
not notified each time they receive a new message. The next time they
log on to their voice mailbox, Off-Site Notification is re-enabled.
■
If users choose EMail as the first notification method, they receive a
notice for each message. The message is attached to the e-mail as a
.WAV file. If users configure any method in any of the remaining four
attempt lines, each specified method is also attempted for each new
voice mail message.
■
If you configure more than one notification attempts, you must
configure them in order. For example, if you configure three attempts,
you must configure them on lines 1 through 3, with no unconfigured
lines in between.
NBX Voice Mail
■
301
If you disable NBX Messaging in favor of another messaging
application, the Off-Site Notification button on the Voice Mail tab is
disabled.
Table 61 provides details on Off-site Notification fields.
Table 61 Systemwide Settings Fields
Field
Purpose
Enabled
Check the box to enable Off-site Notification throughout the
system. By default, Off-site Notification is disabled.
If you select Enabled, you must also enable Off-site
Notification in these locations:
■
Class of Service Settings. See “Configuring Class of
Service” in Chapter 4.
■
User’s personal settings. See “Off-Site Notification” in the
NBX Telephone Guide.
Max Out-calling Ports The number of voice mail ports available for simultaneous
use by Off-site Notification. This parameter can be
configured up to the number of voice mail ports licensed for
the NBX system. The system ships with 4 ports; you must
purchase an upgrade license to enable additional ports.
Out-dialing Prefix
A prefix used by every call made by Off-Site Notification.
If this setting is empty, the call uses only the information
specified by the user.
Status
To view the status of all voice mail ports on your NBX system, click the
Status button.
In the status window, to reset a voice mail port, select it and click Reset.
Table 62 explains the information in the Status window.
Table 62 Fields in the Status Window
Column
Purpose
Ext.
The extension associated with the voice mail port.
Name
The name associated with the voice mail port.
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Table 62 Fields in the Status Window (continued)
Column
Purpose
Used By
The person or device that is using the voice mail port.
Values:
In Use (Secs)
■
Extension number, name — An internal user is using the
voice mail port. The user’s extension number and name
appear in this column.
■
Auto Attendant — The automated attendant is using the
port.
■
Blank — The port is not being used. The word Idle
appears in the In Use column.
The length of time, in seconds, that the voice mail port has
been in use.
If the port is not in use, the word Idle appears in this column.
On Hold
Indicates whether the voice mail port is on hold. Voice mail
ports can be placed on hold in the same way that a call can
be placed on hold.
Values: Yes, No
Port Usage
To help you determine how busy the NBX system’s voice mail ports are,
and whether additional ports may be necessary, click the Port Usage
button. See Figure 20. Table 63 explains the fields in the report.
If a parameter in the Port Usage window turns red, the NBX system is
alerting the system administrator that a problem exists. For example, if
“Missed messages caused by full mailboxes” turns red, it may be time to
increase the maximum number of messages allowed per mailbox.
NBX Voice Mail
303
Figure 20 Port Usage Report
Table 63 Fields in the Ports Usage Window
Field
Purpose
NOTE: Port Usage statistics are reset to zero whenever the NBX system is rebooted.
Therefore, statistics that appear in the Port Usage dialog box apply to the period
since the most recent system reboot.
■
The first column shows the maximum number. You can configure parameters
such as Maximum messages per mailbox and Maximum message length. For
parameters such as Maximum number of Voice Mail ports active at one time, the
number represents a count since the most recent system reboot.
■
The Number of Occurrences column indicates how many times the number in
the first column has occurred.
■
The Most Recent Occurrence column contains the date and time of the most
recent occurrence.
Use these numbers to help you determine whether you need additional voice mail
ports.
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Table 63 Fields in the Ports Usage Window (continued)
Field
Purpose
Example: The statistics shown in Figure 20 indicate that over a period of
approximately 2 weeks, the system has used all voice mail ports many times and that
several calls are getting queued while waiting for a voice mail port. A large number
of voice mail messages could not be delivered because user mail boxes contained
the maximum number of messages. As system administrator, you might consider
these actions:
■
Increase the number of voice mail ports
■
Either increase the number of messages allowed in each mailbox, or encourage
users to delete some messages (or both)
Maximum messages
per mailbox
This number defines the number of messages a voice
mailbox holds when it is full.
When a voice mailbox is full, the NBX system advises callers
who are trying to leave a voice mail message that they
cannot.
You can configure this on the NBX Voice Mail tab.
Licensed Voice Mail
ports
The number voice mail ports licensed on this NBX system.
Maximum number of The number in the first column represents the number of
Voice Mail ports
voice mail ports that have ever been simultaneously in use.
active at one time
The number in the second column represents the number of
times this maximum has been reached.
Example: There are eight licensed voice mail ports on an
NBX system. After the most recent system reboot, there have
been 12 separate times that a maximum of 5 ports have
been in use at the same time. The first column contains 5
and the second column contains 12.
At a later time, if 6 voice mail ports are in use simultaneously,
the first column is incremented to 6 and the second column
is reset to 1, because this new maximum has occurred only
once so far.
Later, if 6 ports are again in use at the same time, the first
column still contains 6 and the second column is
incremented to 2.
Later still, if seven ports are used at one time, the first
column contains 7 and the second column is reset to 1.
NBX Voice Mail
305
Table 63 Fields in the Ports Usage Window (continued)
Field
Purpose
Maximum number of When all voice mail ports are in use, incoming calls are
calls queued at one
queued until a port becomes available.
time while waiting
The number in the left column represents the maximum
for a port
number of calls that have ever been waiting for a voice mail
port.
The number of occurrences indicates how many times the
maximum shown in the left column has happened.
Example: If you have 4 voice mail ports and all ports are in
use, calls are queued until a port becomes available.
If a maximum of 4 calls are queued on 3 separate occasions,
the number in the left column is 4 and the number of
occurrences is 3.
Later, if all ports are busy and 5 calls are queued waiting for
a port to become available, the first number increases to 5,
and the number of occurrences becomes 1.
Missed messages
caused by full
mailboxes
You cannot leave a voice mail message for a user whose
voice mailbox is full. When anyone tries to leave a voice mail
message in a full mailbox, the NBX system informs them that
the mailbox is full and that the message cannot be delivered.
This count indicates, for all voice mailboxes in the NBX
system, how many messages were not deposited in a
mailbox because the mail box was full.
Maximum message
length (minutes)
The maximum length, in minutes, of any one voice mail
message. When the maximum length is reached on any voice
mail message, the NBX system truncates the message at the
maximum length. The caller is prompted with options to
send, rerecord, or delete the message.
The number of occurrences indicates how many messages,
from both internal and external callers, have reached the
maximum length. All mailboxes are included.
You can configure this parameter on the NBX Voice Mail tab.
No Voice Mail ports
available
The number of times that the NBX system needed at least
one more voice mail port than was available.
When all voice mail ports are in use:
■
An external call is queued until a voice mail port becomes
available.
■
An internal caller sees an “All ports busy” message in the
display panel of the NBX telephone.
■
An internal caller who is using an analog telephone hears
a fast busy tone.
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Table 63 Fields in the Ports Usage Window (continued)
Field
Purpose
Message Storage
Used
The disk space, reported in both hours and KB (kilobytes)
currently used by all voice mail messages stored on the NBX
system disk.
Message Storage
Remaining
The disk space, reported in both hours and KB (kilobytes)
currently available for storing voice mail messages on the
NBX system disk.
(NBX 100 only)
NOTE: This parameter is reported only for the NBX 100
system. Voice Mail licenses on the SuperStack 3 NBX system
are based only on the number of voice mail ports.
Last system reboot
User Usage
The date and time when the NBX system was most recently
rebooted.
To help you determine the impact that users are having on the NBX voice
mail voice mail system, you can click the User Usage button.
The User Usage report provides the current number of new and saved
voice mail messages for each user and calculates the amount of storage
each user’s messages consume. This report lists any type of mailbox,
including telephone, phantom, TAPI route point, and hunt group
mailboxes.
Deleting User Voice Mail
From the User Usage report dialog box, you can also delete the voice mail
messages for a selected user. Table 64 describes the information in the
User Usage report.
The time required to delete a user’s voice mail depends on the number of
voice mail messages in the user’s mailbox.
Table 64 User Usage Dialog Box Fields
Field
Purpose
Ext.
The user’s extension number
First Name
The user’s first name
Last Name
The user’s last name
New
The number of new messages a user has
Saved
The number of messages a user has saved
Total
The user’s total number of messages
Storage
The percentage of the disk space used by a user’s messages
Auto Attendant
Auto Attendant
Overview of Auto
Attendant Features
307
The NBX Messaging system includes an Auto Attendant that answers
incoming calls. The Auto Attendant includes a series of recorded
messages (prompts) describing actions that a caller can take to access
individual services. You can customize the menu structure and record or
import your own prompts to fit the system to your business needs. This
section provides information on these topics:
■
Overview of Auto Attendant Features
■
Adding an Auto Attendant
■
Voice Application Setup Utility
■
Testing the Auto Attendant
The Auto Attendant is the centerpiece of the voice mail system. The
administrator can create and configure Auto Attendants, and can record
or import messages and prompts to direct the actions of callers.
Use the NBX NetSet utility to administer and configure these Auto
Attendant features:
■
Multiple Auto Attendants — The system supports multiple,
independent Auto Attendants. Different Auto Attendants can be
assigned to different extensions, inbound lines or DID numbers. See
“Adding an Auto Attendant” on page 308 for more information.
■
Multiple-Level Menus — Each Auto Attendant can support a main
menu and up to 19 levels of submenus. This enables you to configure
an automated system in which inbound callers can select specific
departments or groups, and then further select subgroups or
individuals. See “Prompt Menus” on page 311 for more information.
■
Voice Prompts — To the caller, the time-dependent greeting, main
menu prompt, and submenu prompt are integrated into the Auto
Attendant system. The administrator can customize the system by
recording or importing voice prompts in a time-dependent greeting
main menu, or submenu. Depending on the time of day and
selections that the caller makes, the caller hears the appropriate
prompts and receives appropriate directions.
■
Default Time-out — If a caller does not respond to the Auto
Attendant prompts (for example, a caller using a rotary telephone),
the system routes the call to a designated time-out destination. See
“Prompt Menus” on page 311 for more information. (Note: if you do
not specify a valid time-out destination for an Auto Attendant, the
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system drops a call when it reaches the time-out value.) To set the
default timeout, click NBX Messaging > Auto Attendant > Menu Tree.
■
Shortcuts — Callers can move to a function without listening to an
entire greeting or prompt. For example, if you call to leave a message
for a person, you can bypass the greeting by pressing the appropriate
shortcut button.
■
Dialing by Extension or Name — A caller can reach a party either
by dialing the person’s extension or by using the telephone key pad to
spell the person’s name. The system plays the announcement of each
person identified as a possible match and asks the caller to pick one.
■
Manual and Automatic Activation — You can activate the Auto
Attendant manually, by pressing the FWD MAIL button on the
Attendant Console. The system also activates automatically, according
to the Business Hours settings (see “Business Hours” on page 288), or
after an incoming call exceeds a set number of rings. To set the
number of rings, select User Configuration > Users > User Settings >
Call Forward.
■
Routing Calls to Specific Auto Attendants — You can use the dial
plan to map Auto Attendants to specific extensions of analog
telephones. This enables incoming calls to go directly to a specific
Auto Attendant.
■
Voice Application Setup Utility — From the NBX Business
Telephone, you can use the Auto Attendant Voice Application Setup
utility to set up these Auto Attendant features:
■
Button actions
■
Time-dependent greetings and schedule
■
Main menu greeting
■
Administrator’s Auto Attendant password
For more information, see “Voice Application Setup Utility” on
page 321.
Adding an Auto
Attendant
The NBX system includes two Auto Attendants: the Default Menu
(extension 500), which handles incoming calls, and the VoiceMail Menu
(extension 501), for employee access to voice mail. These two Attendants
cannot be deleted. The default Auto Attendant processes calls as soon as
you install the system. When you add a new Auto Attendant, you are
adding a “blank” Auto Attendant, which you can configure.
Auto Attendant
309
To add a new Auto Attendant, select NBX Messaging > Auto Attendant >
Add, and then click Add.
Table 65 describes the entries and checkbox that appear on the Add Auto
Attendant Menu dialog box.
Table 65 Add Auto Attendant Menu Fields
Field
Purpose
Name
In the Name field, enter the name of the new Auto
Attendant.
Extension
The next available extension is automatically assigned when
you add a new Auto Attendant. You can change the
extension number to an unused number that falls within the
Auto Attendant extension range of your dial plan.
Default range:
3-digit dial plan: 500–599
4-digit dial plan: 5500–5599
For both 3-digit and 4-digit dial plans, the default Auto
Attendant is extension 500 and the voice mail Attendant is
extension 501.
Maximum number of Select the number of times the Auto Attendant prompt
prompt repeats
repeats. You can select a number from 1 through 3. The
default is 3.
CAUTION: If Maximum number of prompt repeats is set to 1
and the time-out action for the Auto Attendant menu tree is
set to Disabled, the system disconnects a call forwarded to
the Auto Attendant because the forwarding party always
hears a portion of the Auto Attendant prompt. Likewise, if
the time-out action for the Auto Attendant Menu Tree is set
to Disabled, and Maximum number of prompt repeats is set
to 2 or 3, the system disconnects the forwarded call if the
forwarding party stays on the line long enough to hear at
least a portion of the final repeated prompt. To ensure that
forwarded calls eventually reach a valid destination, you
must configure a time-out action for each Auto Attendant
menu tree.
Use System-wide
Greetings checkbox
If you select the Use System-wide Greetings check box, all
three system-wide greetings (Morning, Afternoon and
Evening) are used by default. To enable or disable individual
system-wide greetings for a particular Auto Attendant, select
the required Auto Attendant in the main Auto Attendant
screen, click Menu Tree and then click TD Greetings.
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After you add or modify an Auto Attendant, you can configure the
following features:
■
Play/Record Extension
■
Time-dependent Greetings
■
Prompt Menus
■
Auto Attendant Buttons
Play/Record Extension
The Play/Record Extension identifies the telephone where you can work
interactively with the NBX NetSet utility to record and listen to Auto
Attendant prompts. Typically, this is the extension of the person who is
configuring and administering the Auto Attendant. An Auto Attendant
prompt is simply an audio file (.WAV) that is associated with a specific
Auto Attendant. It describes the actions a caller can take.
When you click the button in the NBX NetSet utility to record or play a
prompt, the extension rings. When you answer it, you either hear the
prompt you selected to play or you are prompted to record a prompt.
You cannot customize any greetings or prompts until you have specified
this extension.
You can specify a play/record extension in any of these locations:
■
NBX Messaging > Auto Attendant
■
NBX Messaging > Auto Attendant > Menu Tree > Prompt
■
NBX Messaging > Auto Attendant > Menu Tree > TD Greetings
■
NBX Messaging > Auto Attendant > System Wide Greetings
See the Help for the procedure on specifying a play/record extension.
Time-dependent Greetings
The system clock and the greeting schedule control when the system
changes from one time-dependent greeting to the next. For example, the
morning greeting might start at 12 midnight, the afternoon greeting
would begin at noon, and the evening greeting might begin at 6 p.m. If
time-dependent greetings are enabled, the caller hears the current active
one before the main menu prompt.
Auto Attendant
311
You can create time-dependent greetings that are enabled on all Auto
Attendants in your system. An example of this system-wide greeting
would be “Good morning.” To record or to import system-wide
time-dependent greetings and define the times during which they play,
select NBX Messaging > Auto Attendant > System-wide Greetings.
See the Help for the procedures on setting up system-wide greetings.
You can also create and schedule time-dependent greetings for individual
Auto Attendants. These greetings can be up to five minutes long. To
record, import, or schedule customized time-dependent greetings, select
NBX Messaging > Auto Attendant > Menu Tree > TD Greetings.
See the Help for the procedures on setting up time-dependent greetings.
Prompt Menus
You can use a main menu and submenus of prompts to direct callers to
individuals and services in your organization. You configure prompt
menus for each Auto Attendant by using the Menu Tree dialog box. The
Menu Tree dialog box consists of 13 button rows that you use to assign
actions to the key pad buttons (see“Auto Attendant Buttons” on
page 316). Be sure to define the menu time-out behavior so that if a
caller does not respond to the Auto Attendant prompts (for example, a
caller using a rotary telephone) the system automatically routes the call to
a time-out destination.
CAUTION: To ensure that forwarded calls eventually reach a valid
destination, you must configure a time-out action for each Auto
Attendant menu tree. For example, if the time-out action for the Auto
Attendant menu tree is set to Disabled, and Maximum number of prompt
repeats is set to 1, the system disconnects a call forwarded to the Auto
Attendant because the forwarding party always hears a portion of the
Auto Attendant prompt. Likewise, if the time-out action for the Auto
Attendant Menu Tree is set to Disabled, and Maximum number of prompt
repeats is set to 2 or 3, the system disconnects the forwarded call if the
forwarding party stays on the line long enough to hear at least a portion
of the final repeated prompt.
Main Menus The main menu prompt follows the time-dependent
greeting if you have one enabled. The main menu prompt should
describe all Auto Attendant options and can be up to five minutes long.
The default Auto Attendant main menu prompt says:
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“If you know the extension of the party you want to reach, you may enter
it at any time. To reach the name directory, press 9. To reach the Auto
Attendant, press 0 or remain on the line. Thank you for calling.”
By default, the Auto Attendant main menu provides callers with the
functions that are described in Table 66.
Table 66 Auto Attendant Default Configuration
Button
Action
1–4
Identifies internal extension range and allows callers to dial user
extensions.
NBX 100: 100–449 (See note 1)
SuperStack 3 NBX: 1000–3999 (See note 2)
9
Goes to the Name Directory.
0
Performs a single-digit transfer to the extension specified in the menu
tree for the auto attendant, usually the extension of the receptionist’s
telephone. The default extension is the lowest extension specified in the
factory default dial plan:
SuperStack 3 NBX: 1000
NBX 100: 100
*
Transfers to voice mail box.
#
Exits from the system.
T/O
Defines what happens when a call times out, typically, a transfer to the
extension specified in the menu tree for the auto attendant, usually the
extension of the receptionist’s telephone. You should always define a
time-out action. If a call times and there is no time-out action defined,
the system disconnects the call.
To create a main menu, select NBX Messaging > Auto Attendant > Menu
Tree. To create or import voice prompts, select NBX Messaging > Auto
Attendant > Menu Tree > Prompt. See the Help for these procedures.
Submenus An Auto Attendant main menu can branch to submenus to
keep the main menu brief, and to give the caller a variety of choices. Each
submenu should have a prompt that informs the caller of the option that
each key pad button provides.
If you have a large organization, the caller may have to enter several
digits and listen to several submenus before reaching the person or
department. For example, the caller may hear:
”To reach our Sales Department, press 1. For Technical
Support, press 2...”
Auto Attendant
313
The caller selects option 1 for sales and hears:
”For European Sales, press 1. For North American sales, press
2.”
The caller requires North American sales, presses 2, and is connected to a
sales hunt group.
To configure submenus, select NBX Messaging > Auto Attendant > Menu
Tree. See the Help for procedures on setting up submenus.
For an example that uses submenus, see “Three Greetings, a Main Menu,
and a Submenu” in the next section.
Examples
These examples illustrate some typical Auto Attendant systems. They
illustrate the kind of information that you might include in your
time-dependent greetings, main menu prompts, and submenu prompts.
No Greetings Figure 21 shows the simplest configuration. The
time-dependent greetings are disabled; the Main Menu contains all of the
prompts. In Example 1, callers hear the same message no matter what
time they call.
Figure 21 No Time-dependent Greetings, All Prompts in Main Menu
Morning
Greeting
disabled
Afternoon
Greeting
disabled
Evening
Greeting
disabled
Main
Menu
“Thank you for calling XYZ Corporation. If you know your party’s
extension, you can enter it now. To reach our Sales department,
press 3. For Marketing and Public Relations, press 4. To reach the
company directory, press 9.”
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In this example, the main menu is configured to have button 3 mapped
to a Sales submenu and button 4 to a Marketing and Public Relations
submenu. Button 9 is mapped to the Name Directory.
Three Greetings and a Main Menu Figure 22 shows a simple Auto
Attendant that uses time-dependent greetings to provide different
messages for different times of the day.
Figure 22 Three Time-dependent Greetings and Main Menu
Morning
Greeting
8 am...
Afternoon
Greeting
noon
Evening
Greeting
6 pm
Main
Menu
“Good morning. Thank you for calling XYZ Corporation. If you know
your party’s extension, you can enter it now. To speak to an operator,
press 0.”
“Good afternoon. Thank you for calling XYZ Corporation. If you know
your party’s extension, you can enter it now. To speak to an operator,
press 0.”
“Good evening. Thank you for calling XYZ Corporation. Our normal
business hours are 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday. If you know
your party’s extension, you can enter it now.”
“To reach our Sales department, press 3. For Marketing and Public
Relations, press 4. To leave a message in the general mailbox,
press 6. To reach the company directory, press 9.”
In Figure 23, the morning greeting starts at 8 a.m. and is active until the
afternoon greeting begins at noon. The evening greeting begins at
6 p.m.
The function that you allocate to a button on the keypad remains the
same throughout the day.
Three Greetings, a Main Menu, and a Submenu Figure 23 shows
an example that uses time-dependent greetings, a Main Menu, and a
Submenu.
Auto Attendant
315
Figure 23 Three Time-dependent Greetings, a Main Menu and a Submenu
Morning
Greeting
“Good morning.”
12 am...
Afternoon
Greeting
“Good afternoon.”
noon
Evening
Greeting
“Good evening.”
6 pm
Main
Menu
“Thank you for calling XYZ Corporation. If you know your party’s
extension, you may dial it now. To speak to an operator, press 0. For
Sales, press 3. For Support, press 4. To leave a message in the genera
mailbox, press 5. To reach the company directory, press 9.”
Sub
Menu
“You have reached the customer support line. To speak with a support
technician about a new issue, press 1. For returns and warranty
information, press 2. To check the status of an existing support issue,
press 3. To return to the previous menu, press star.”
This example uses time-dependent greetings to greet callers according to
the time of day. The main menu prompt presents callers with options for
reaching the operator, specific departments, or the company directory of
names. It also uses a submenu to direct callers to subgroups within the
Support department.
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Auto Attendant Buttons
From the Menu Tree dialog box, you can configure the key pad button
actions presented to a caller by the Auto Attendant. For examples of how
you can use prompts and greetings in an Auto Attendant, see
“Examples” on page 313. Table 67 describes the fields of the Menu Tree
dialog box.
Table 67 Menu Tree
Field
Purpose
Button
Lists the buttons on the telephone key pad.
Task Description
Describes the key pad button operation. If you assign the
Enter Submenu action to the button, this description is used
as the Submenu name.
Action
Contains a drop-down list box that lists the actions you can
assign to a key pad button. The Auto Attendant prompts
callers to press buttons to perform specific actions. You must
configure the Menu Tree to so that each button performs
the proper action.
For a complete list of button actions, see Table 68.
Value
Describes the value associated with each key pad button
action. For a complete list of key pad button actions, see
Table 68.
You can assign keypad actions to each button on a typical telephone key
pad, 0 through 9, #, and *. Table 68 describes the actions you can assign
to buttons. Most systems use no more than five action choices to avoid
confusing callers. If you need to present more than five choices, use
submenus to configure these additional options. See “Submenus” on
page 312.
You can create an unannounced option by mapping a button without
creating a corresponding prompt. Callers do not hear a message that the
choice is available.
Auto Attendant
317
Table 68 Button Actions
Action
Description
Disabled
The system takes no action when the user presses that
button. A prompt announces “invalid key.”
If assigned as a menu time-out action (T/O), Disabled either
leaves the system or goes to a parent menu, depending on
where the attendant is in the menu hierarchy.
CAUTION: If the time-out action for the Auto Attendant
menu tree is set to Disabled, and Maximum number of
prompt repeats is set to 1, the system disconnects a call
manually forwarded to the Auto Attendant because the
forwarding party always hears a portion of the Auto
Attendant prompt and the system then performs the
time-out action. Likewise, if the time-out action for the Auto
Attendant Menu Tree is set to Disabled, and Maximum
number of prompt repeats is set to 2 or 3, the system
disconnects the forwarded call if the forwarding party stays
on the line long enough to hear at least a portion of the
final repeated prompt. To ensure that forwarded calls
eventually reach a valid destination, make sure you have
configured a time-out action for the top-level Auto
Attendant menu tree.
Value — Not used.
Name Directory
Transfers the user to the name directory, which allows a
caller to reach a person by spelling the person’s name on
the dialpad. The system matches the letters entered by the
caller to a Last Name in the list of User Profiles. If the system
finds more than three matches, it prompts the caller to enter
more letters. When the system narrows the choice to three
or fewer, it offers the caller a choice by playing the recorded
name greeting of each choice. During a search, the system
ignores any User Profile that does not have a recorded
greeting.
Value — Not used.
System Disconnect
Allows the caller to have the system close the connection.
This feature can save time for callers who call into the
system using a calling card. By having the system disconnect
them instead of breaking the connection themselves, callers
can make other calls without re-entering all of their calling
card information. To activate System Disconnect, the user
must press the key defined in the menu and then, when
prompted, the key defined in the Value box. Typically, you
do not include these instructions in the Auto Attendant
prompt, which is heard by all callers. Instead, you make your
system users aware of this sequence.
Value — Any of 0-9, #, *
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Table 68 Button Actions (continued)
Action
Description
Transfer to Voice Mail Allows callers to leave a voice message for a person without
ringing that person’s phone, or allows users to call in and
listen to their voice mail from a remote location.
Value — Not used.
Exit Menu
Available in submenus only. Allows the caller to return to
the next menu up in the menu tree.
Value — Not used
Prompted Transfer
Instructs callers to press a button before dialing a known
extension. The prompt should include a message something
like this: “If you know your party’s extension, press 5, and
then dial the extension.“
Value — Not used.
Reserved in Dial Plan
Interprets a specified button as the first number of an
extension. For example, in the default 4-digit dial plan,
extensions begin at 1000, so you could not use 1 as an
option for an Auto Attendant menu.
Value — Not used
Single Digit Transfer
Allows a caller to reach a specific destination by pressing a
specific button.
For example, you could assign button 6 to a hunt group
extension in the Sales Department. In the menu prompt, you
would record: “To reach our Sales Department,
press 6.” You could also use Single Digit Transfer to
specify a destination, typically the Attendant Console
extension, for the time-out option (T/O).
By default, Single Digit Transfer can forward only to internal
extension numbers. To transfer calls to an external number,
you must first alter Table 2 of the dial plan (Incoming Table)
to specify the external number.
Value — Any valid extension
CAUTION: Use care when allowing access to PSTN ports using Dial Plan Table 2,
as this can create the possibility of toll fraud.
Auto Attendant
319
Table 68 Button Actions (continued)
Action
Description
Enter Submenu
Puts the caller into a submenu of options. When you assign
the Enter Submenu action to a button and then click Apply,
a down-arrow button appears to the right of the row. Click
this down-arrow button to configure the submenu that you
want to associate with the main menu. The entry in the
Task Description field for this button becomes the submenu
name.
Submenu button actions include “Exit menu” to allow
callers to return to the next highest menu. Otherwise,
submenu button actions are identical with main menu
button actions.
Each menu can have up to 20 levels of submenus.
For an example that uses submenus, see “Three Greetings, a
Main Menu, and a Submenu” on page 314.
Value — Not used
To configure telephone buttons, select NBX Messaging > Auto Attendant
> Menu Tree. See the Help for procedure on configuring telephone
buttons for Auto Attendant actions.
Activating Changes
After you modify a greeting or prompt (or any Auto Attendant setting),
you must activate these changes in the Auto Attendant before they
become effective. The characters “!>” next to an Auto Attendant in the
list on the Auto Attendant tab indicate that an Auto Attendant must be
activated.
This procedure is very important. If you change an Auto Attendant,
clicking Apply does not implement the changes.
To activate changes, select NBX Messaging > Auto Attendant > Activate.
See the Help for more information on activating changes to Auto
Attendants.
Managing Auto
Attendants
This section describes additional ways in which you can manage Auto
Attendants.
■
Modifying an Auto Attendant
■
Removing an Auto Attendant
■
Restoring Auto Attendant Greetings
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Modifying an Auto Attendant
To modify an Auto Attendant, select NBX Messaging > Auto Attendant >
Modify. See the Help for procedures on modifying Auto Attendants.
Table 65 describes the entries and checkbox that appear on the Modify
Auto Attendant Menu dialog box.
Table 69 Modify Auto Attendant Menu Dialog Box
Field
Purpose
Name
Edit the name of the Auto Attendant.
Extension
Edit the extension number by changing it to an unused
number that falls within the Auto Attendant extension range
of your dial plan.
Default range:
3-digit dial plan: 500–599
4-digit dial plan: 5500–5599
For both 3-digit and 4-digit dial plans, the default Auto
Attendant is extension 500 and the voice mail Attendant is
extension 501.
Maximum number of Edit the number of times the Auto Attendant prompt
prompt repeats
repeats. You can select a number from 1 through 3. The
default is 3.
CAUTION: If the time-out action for the Auto Attendant
menu tree is set to Disabled, and Maximum number of
prompt repeats is set to 1, the system disconnects a call
forwarded to the Auto Attendant because the forwarding
party always hears a portion of the Auto Attendant prompt
and the system then performs the time-out action. Likewise,
if the time-out action for the Auto Attendant Menu Tree is
set to Disabled, and Maximum number of prompt repeats is
set to 2 or 3, the system disconnects the forwarded call if the
forwarding party stays on the line long enough to hear at
least a portion of the final repeated prompt. To ensure that
forwarded calls eventually reach a valid destination, make
sure you have configured a time-out action for the Auto
Attendant menu tree.
Use System-wide
Greetings
If you select the Use System-wide Greetings check box, all
three system-wide greetings (Morning, Afternoon and
Evening) are used by default. To enable or disable individual
system-wide greetings for a particular Auto Attendant, select
the required Auto Attendant in the main Auto Attendant
screen, click Menu Tree and then click TD Greetings.
Auto Attendant
321
Removing an Auto Attendant
To remove an Auto Attendant, select NBX Messaging > Auto Attendant >
Remove. See the Help for procedures on removing an Auto Attendant.
You cannot remove the Default Menu Auto Attendant or the Voice Mail
Auto Attendant.
Restoring Auto Attendant Greetings
You can restore the greetings to their default values:
■
aamenu.wav and aamenu2.wav prompts
■
System-wide Morning, Afternoon and Evening greetings
This feature restores all of these prompts and greetings at the same time.
No other user-defined prompt is affected.
To restore greetings, select NBX Messaging > Auto Attendant > Restore
AA Greetings. See the Help for procedures on restoring greetings.
Voice Application
Setup Utility
The Auto Attendant Voice Application Setup utility provides a series of
voice prompts to guide you in configuring your Auto Attendant. You can
access the setup utility through any NBX Business Telephone.
The Voice Application Setup utility is useful for making short-term
changes to your Auto Attendant. For example, if you must close your
office because of bad weather, you can edit the main menu and direct
callers to a message telling them that your office is closed. However, you
cannot use the Voice Application Setup to configure submenus. That
must be done using the NBX NetSet utility. See “Submenus” on
page 312.
Although the setup utility lets you perform tasks in any sequence, 3Com
recommends this sequence when setting up the system for first time:
1 Plan the system.
2 Create profiles (phantom mailboxes and destination extensions).
3 Start the Auto Attendant Setup utility.
4 Change the Auto Attendant Setup utility password.
5 Assign actions to key pad buttons.
6 Record greetings and main menu prompts.
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7 Set the greeting schedule.
8 Review and test the system.
Using the Voice Application Setup Utility
From an NBX telephone, you can use the Auto Attendant Setup Utility.
Follow these steps:
1 Lift the NBX telephone handset, and then press the MSG button to access
the Voice Mail system.
2 At the voice mail password prompt, press *.
3 At the voice mail extension prompt, dial 999 if you are using a 3-digit dial
plan or 9999 if you are using a 4-digit dial plan.
4 Enter the Auto Attendant password. The default password is 0000. 3Com
recommends that you change this password.
0000 press 1 to assign actions to dial pad key, 9 to record
greetings, schedules, change password
5 Follow prompts to assign key pad button actions, record and play back
greetings, change the schedule (morning, afternoon, and evening) and
change the Auto Attendant password.
Testing the Auto
Attendant
Before using your system, 3Com strongly recommends that you review
and test it to verify that all features work as you intend. Use this checklist
to verify that your system is ready:
■
Do your recorded prompts match your key pad button actions?
You can define key pad button actions through the NBX NetSet utility
(see “Auto Attendant Buttons” on page 316) or through the Voice
Application Setup utility.
■
Do your time-dependent greetings become active at the times you
want?
If not, you can use the NBX NetSet utility (see “Time-dependent
Greetings” on page 310) or the Voice Application Setup utility to
change the start times of your morning, afternoon, and evening
greetings.
■
Do your single-digit transfers and transfer to the general mailbox take
a caller to a valid destination?
■
When callers reach a mailbox of a single-digit transfer and transfer to
the general mailbox, do they hear an appropriate greeting?
Voice Profile for Internet Mail
Voice Profile for
Internet Mail
323
■
Is someone responsible for checking messages sent to single-digit
transfers and transfer to the general mailbox?
■
Do you get an “invalid key” message when you press a button that
should not have an action assigned?
■
Does the Auto Attendant time-out action perform the correct action?
You should always have a time-out action for a top-level Auto
Attendant menu tree. Leaving the time-out action set to Disabled, the
default, can result in calls being disconnected.
■
Do all of your submenu prompts match the submenu key pad button
actions?
Voice Profile for Internet Mail (VPIM) is an optional feature of the NBX
system. You must enter a license key through the NBX NetSet utility
before you can configure and use VPIM.
The NBX system transmits VPIM voice mail messages by attaching them
to e-mail messages. The system then uses SMTP (Simple Mail Transfer
Protocol) or ESMTP (Extended Simple Mail Transfer Protocol) to send the
e-mail message and its VPIM attachment.
Using VPIM, users on an NBX system can send voice mail to a user on any
voice mail system that is VPIM-compliant.
Using the NBX NetSet utility, you can configure several VPIM parameters
and check VPIM status. See these sections for more information:
■
Control Parameters
■
Operations Management
■
Statistics
■
Advanced Settings
VPIM uses an SMTP server that is embedded in the NBX operating system.
To avoid abuse by spammers, an SMTP server should always be protected
by a firewall. Configure the firewall to allow access to port 25 on the NBX
system only from valid VPIM systems that need to deliver VPIM messages
to the phone system. The NBX SMTP server is started only when the
system has a valid license for VPIM.
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Control Parameters
To configure VPIM control parameters, select NBX Messaging > VPIM. See
the Help for the procedure on configuring control parameters.
Table 70 explains the VPIM control parameter fields and their purpose.
Table 70 VPIM Tab Fields
Field
Purpose
Max message size
Controls the size of incoming messages from other
sites. If a message is larger than the specified
value, the NBX system rejects it. The default value
represents a voice mail message approximately 4
to 5 minutes in length.
Default: 3000 Kbytes
Minimum: 500 Kbytes
Maximum: 5000 Kbytes
Time between send attempts
(minutes)
For outgoing messages, the NBX system may not
be able to contact the target system on the first
attempt. If so, the NBX system attempts to contact
the target system later. To change the time
between attempts to send a voice mail message,
change this number.
Default: 15 minutes
Minimum: 1 minute
Maximum: 60 minutes
Max number of send attempts
To change the number of times the NBX system
attempts to connect to the target system, modify
the number (default is 4 attempts) in this text box.
If the NBX system is unsuccessful in contacting the
target system after the specified number of send
attempts, the voice mail message is returned to the
sender’s voice mail box along with an indication
that the message could not be sent.
Default: 4 attempts
Minimum: 1 attempt
Maximum: 10 attempts
Operations
Management
The Operations Management dialog box allows you to manage the
queue of outgoing voice mail messages.
To select queue management parameters, select NBX Messaging > VPIM
> Operations Management. See the Help for procedures on configuring
queue management parameters.
Table 71 contains a list of the fields within this dialog box along with a
description of their purpose.
Voice Profile for Internet Mail
325
Some commands require that operations be stopped or started. For
example, to remove a message from the queue, you must first stop
operations. Similarly, unless you start operations or they are currently
running, you cannot use the “Send all messages now” command.
Table 71 Operations Management Dialog Box Fields
Field
Purpose
Operations status
The status of the queue of outgoing voice mail messages.
Possible values: Ready, Starting, Processing, Stopped
Number of outgoing
messages
The number of messages in the outgoing queue when this
dialog box was last accessed or refreshed.
Time Waiting
The time that the voice mail message has been waiting in
the queue.
# Attempts
The remaining number of attempts to send the message.
Sender
The IP address and extension of the user who sent the voice
mail message.
Destination
The IP address and extension to which the voice mail
message is to be sent.
If a message has multiple destinations, the first destination
is listed, and three dots are displayed immediately after the
extension number.
Example: [email protected]
Remove
Select a voice mail message in the scroll list and click this
button to remove the message from the queue. The NBX
system prompts you to confirm that you want to delete the
selected message.
To remove a block of messages, use Ctrl/Shift. Hold down
the Ctrl key to select several non-contiguous messages for
removal.
Send all messages now The NBX system attempts to send all messages
immediately, and changes the status of each successfully
sent message to Sent.
Send all messages now The NBX system attempts to send all messages in the queue
and then delete them and deletes each message that is sent successfully.
If a message cannot be sent, it is also deleted.
Delete all messages
now
The NBX system empties the queue of all messages
Stop operations
Stops the queue if it is currently active.
Start operations
Starts the queue if it is stopped.
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Statistics
The Statistics window allows you to view the most recent statistics for
voice mail messages.
To view statistics, select NBX Messaging > VPIM > Statistics. See the Help
for information on viewing VPIM statistics.
Table 72 lists the fields in this window and explains their purpose.
Table 72 Statistics Window Fields
Field
Purpose
Total messages received
Contains the number of messages received from voice
mailboxes on other systems.
Total messages submitted The number of voice mail messages in the queue.
for delivery
Total messages queued
for external delivery
The number of messages in the queue for delivery
outside the system.
Total messages delivered
to external recipients
The number of messages for which a confirmation of
delivery has been received.
Total messages returned
to sender on failed
delivery
The number of messages that have been returned
because they could not be delivered.
Failed messages
The number of messages that never left the queue
either because every attempt to deliver them failed and
the retry limit was reached, or because the type of
failure caused the retry limit to be ignored (example: a
non-existent address would be tried only once).
If a message has multiple destinations, the first
destination is listed, and three dots are displayed
immediately after the extension number.
Example: [email protected]
Reset
This button allows you to reset the message totals to
zero and clear the listing of failed messages.
Last reset command
The date and time of the last reset command. If this
field contains a more recent date and time than Last
system reboot, then this is the date and time that the
NBX system began collecting the currently displayed
statistics.
Last system reboot
The date and time of the most recent reboot of the NBX
system. An NBX system reboot resets all VPIM statistics
to zero. If this field contains a more recent date and
time than Last reset command, then this is the date and
time that the NBX system began collecting the currently
displayed statistics.
Voice Profile for Internet Mail
Advanced Settings
327
The Advanced Settings dialog box allows you to control the behavior of
SMTP and how it sends the e-mail messages with VPIM attachments.
To make SMTP settings, select NBX Messaging > VPIM > Advanced
Settings. See the Help for information on SMTP settings.
Table 73 lists the fields in this dialog box and describes their purpose.
Table 73 VPIM Advanced Settings Dialog Box
Field
Purpose
SMTP OK response
Definition: The amount of time that the local
system waits for an acknowledgement of a From
message.
Detail: After the local system sends a MAIL
command specifying the sender of the message, it
waits for acknowledgement from the other site. The
acknowledgement is an OK message.
Minimum: 5 minutes
Default: 5 minutes
SMTP HELO response
Definition: The amount of time that the local
system waits for an acknowledgement of a HELO
message.
Detail: After the greeting, the local system sends
either a HELO (or EHLO to get ESMTP) message to
identify itself. The other site then responds with an
acknowledgement of that message.
Minimum: None defined.
Default: 5 minutes
SMTP EHLO response
Definition: The amount of time that the local
system waits for an acknowledgement of a EHLO
message.
Detail: After the greeting, the local system sends
either a HELO (or EHLO to get ESMTP) message to
identify itself. The other site then responds with an
acknowledgement of that message.
Minimum: 0 minutes
Default: 5 minutes
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Table 73 VPIM Advanced Settings Dialog Box (continued)
Field
Purpose
SMTP MAIL response
Definition: The amount of time that the local
system waits for an acknowledgement of a MAIL
command.
Detail: After the local system sends out a MAIL
command along with the From information, it waits
for a response from the other site to indicate that the
MAIL command was received.
Minimum: 5 minutes
Default: 5 minutes
SMTP RCPT response
Definition: The time that the local system waits for
an acknowledgement of a RCPT command.
Detail: When the local system receives and SMTP or
ESMTP message, it returns a RCPT command to the
sending system for each recipient listed in the To:
field.
Minimum: 5 minutes
Default: 5 minutes
SMTP DATA response
Definition: The time that the local system waits for
an acknowledgement of a DATA command.
Detail: After the local system has specified all of the
recipient information, it sends a DATA command to
indicate that it is ready to send the mail message
itself. It then waits for the other site to acknowledge
the DATA command.
Minimum: 2 minutes
Default: 2 minutes
SMTP DATA END response
Definition: The time that the local system waits,
after sending the entire message, for an
acknowledgement from the other site that the
message was received.
Detail: After the local system sends the entire
message, it sends a single dot (ascii code 056) to the
other site. It then waits for an acknowledgement
from the other site that the dot has been received.
Minimum: 10 minutes
Default: 10 minutes
Voice Profile for Internet Mail
329
Table 73 VPIM Advanced Settings Dialog Box (continued)
Field
Purpose
SMTP RSET response
Definition: The time that the local system waits for
an acknowledgement of a RSET command.
Detail: Maintaining a cached connection between
the local system and any other site requires
additional system resources compared to a
non-cached connection. If connection caching is
enabled, the local system waits for the defined
time-out period and if no message is received, it
sends a RSET command to the other site.
Minimum: None defined.
Default: 10 minutes
SMTP QUIT response
Definition: The time that the local system waits for
an acknowledgement of the QUIT command.
Detail: When the local system is finished
transmitting a message and wants to break the
connection, it sends a QUIT command. It then waits
for the other site to acknowledge the QUIT
command. When the acknowledgement arrives, or
when the time-out value is reached, whichever
comes first, the local system breaks the connection.
Minimum: None defined.
Default: 5 minutes
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7
OPERATIONS
This chapter describes how to manage system-level operations for your
NBX system.
You can perform these operations from NBX NetSet:
■
Software Upgrade
■
Reboot/Shutdown
■
Manage Data
■
Event Log
■
Licenses
■
Regional Software
■
Third-Party Drivers
See the Help for the procedures for each function.
Software Upgrade
As part of the upgrade and reboot process, you can choose to use your
existing configuration data with the new version of the software or use a
new (empty) database. NBX NetSet allows you to choose which software
version to use when you reboot the system. The ability to select which
version to boot allows you to restore an earlier operating environment
(both software and configuration data) if you need to.
Release 4.2 introduced NBS system software licensing. Be sure to review
the information in the next topic, System Software Licensing, before you
upgrade your NBX system software.
Additional considerations:
■
When you upgrade the system software, do not enter any “cd...”
commands using the terminal emulation software on a PC attached to
the NBX Network Call Processor.
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■
When the software upgrade is complete, a new window, containing a
confirmation message, appears in NBX NetSet.
■
At certain times during an upgrade, the system reboots itself. Do not
interrupt the reboot; wait until the upgrade is complete.
■
Before you upgrade your system software, 3Com recommends that
you back up your system data. (See “Backup” on page 336.)
■
If you are using NBX PC applications, such as pcXset, you must also
upgrade these applications after upgrading the NBX software.
■
If you are connected to the NCP COM1 port, you see the upgrade
activity messages during the upgrade process, but you cannot issue
any commands.
■
After you upgrade your system software, you must reboot the system.
To upgrade or remove software, select Operations > Software Upgrade.
See the Help for procedures on upgrading or removing software.
System Software
Licensing
To run release R4.2 and all later releases of the NBX system software on
your NBX system, you must have and install a license. A license key is
required only for upgrading to major releases, RX.X. All minor releases,
RX.X.X, use the corresponding major release license key. All NBX systems
that ship from the factory with software release R4.2 or any later release,
include a license for the software version that is shipped with the system.
Upgrading to R4.2 From a Previous Release
To upgrade an NBX system to release R4.2 you must first upgrade to
release R4.1.
Upgrading From R4.1.14 and Prior Releases
If your NBX system software is release R4.1.14 or a previous release, you
cannot enter the license key for R4.2 before you upgrade because the
NBX system software will not recognize the R4.2 license as valid.
Use these steps to upgrade to R4.2:
1 Upgrade to R4.2 in the usual way.
2 Reboot to R4.2.
3 When you see the warning message that indicates you must install a
license, click the License button and install the R4.2 license.
Software Upgrade
333
If you decide not to install the R4.2 license key, you can click the Reboot
button and select a different release.
Upgrading From R4.1.15 and Later Versions
If you are running R4.1.15 or a later release of R4.1, you can enter the
R4.2 license key and then upgrade. When you enter the license key, the
NBX system software accepts the license key as valid for an unknown
feature. When you upgrade and reboot to R4.2, the license for R4.2 takes
effect.
Upgrading From Release 4.2
In the future, if you are running R4.2 and you upgrade to a new NBX
software version, the final step is to reboot the NBX system specifying the
new release. At that time, the NBX software verifies that you have the
proper license installed. If you have installed the license prior to the
reboot, the upgrade is completed.
If you have not installed the correct license prior to the reboot phase of
the upgrade, the NBX system provides a warning message and guidance
on the appropriate action for you to take.
Restricted Operation
If you reboot the NBX system without installing the required license, the
NBX system remains operational with these restrictions:
■
NBX NetSet is not available.
■
Each NBX telephone display panel periodically displays a NO LICENSE
message.
■
Auto discovery is turned off for all device types.
■
Voice mail messages are not allowed.
■
The Automated Attendant software is not operational.
■
The ability to configure user groups and Automated Attendants from
a telephone is not operational.
■
If you connect a PC to the NBX system COM1 port using a terminal
emulation software application such as Hyperterm, the NBX system
sends a message to the Hyperterm application indicating that a
required software license has not been installed.
If you log on using the administrator ID and password, a screen appears
giving you two options:
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■
You can click the Reboot button to go to a reboot screen and reboot
to a previous NBX software release.
■
You can click the License button to go to a license screen and enter a
license key for R4.2.
The installation of a valid upgrade license removes all restrictions without
the need for an NBX system reboot operation.
Considerations
Some situations require specific actions because of the system software
licensing mechanism.
Chassis or Disk Tray Replacement
If you have an NBX 100 system and you need to replace the main system
chassis for any reason, you must provide a valid license backup file to
your 3Com NBX Voice-Authorized Partner. This file enables them to
provide you with license keys equivalent to those that were associated
with the replaced chassis.
If you have a SuperStack 3 NBX system and you need to replace the
system disk tray for any reason, you must provide a valid license backup
file to your 3Com NBX Voice-Authorized Partner. This file enables them to
provide you with license keys equivalent to those that were associated
with the replaced disk tray.
Licenses for Future Releases
If you purchase a license for a future NBX software release, all software
releases up to that version are included. For example, if you purchase a
license for release R5.0 and you are currently running R4.2, you can
upgrade to any R4.X release without the need to purchase an additional
license.
Downgrading to Previous Releases
If you are running R4.2 with a valid system software license and you want
to downgrade to a previous, unlicensed software version (for example,
R4.0 or R4.1) you can do so by rebooting to the previous version. No
other action is required.
Reboot/Shutdown
Customer Service
Reboot/Shutdown
335
If you reboot to R4.2 without installing a valid license, and you run your
system with the restrictions in place (see “Restricted Operation” on
page 333), 3Com Customer Service cannot access the information
required to help you with problems. To obtain assistance from 3Com
Customer Service, you must either reboot to a previous version of the
NBX system software or install a license for R4.2.
You must reboot the system after you upgrade software. You must shut
down the system software before you turn off power to your NBX
system.
To reboot or shutdown the system, select Operations >
Reboot/Shutdown.
See the Help for procedures on rebooting and shutting down the system.
CAUTION: If you remove power from the NBX system without first
shutting down the system software using the NBX NetSet Shutdown
button, the operating system must perform a file system check during the
next startup cycle to ensure file integrity. The file system check
significantly increases the time it takes for the system to come to a ready
state. During a file system check operation, the NCP status lights S1 and
S2 flash in an alternating pattern.
Manage Data
This section describes these system data management operations:
■
Backup
■
Restore
■
Convert Database
■
Purge Database
■
Purge Database and CDR
■
Purge All Voice Mail
To perform data management operations, select Operations > Manage
Data. See the Help for procedures on managing your system data.
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Backup
Back up your system data:
■
After you change system settings
■
Immediately before you change any system hardware or software
When you back up your system data, you can choose to include or not
include the voice mail messages for all system users.
License backup operations are part of a separate backup operation. To
backup your licenses, select Operations > Licenses.
During a backup operation, NBX NetSet displays a series of progress
screens. Some steps may happen quickly enough that the status screen
may not appear. For example, you may see the status screen appear to go
from step 1 to step 4 if steps 2 and 3 are completed quickly.
The six steps in the backup process are:
■
Backing up NBX Database — The databases are locked during this
step. The status bar shows step 1 of 6.
■
Backing up Voice Mail — If you enabled the Include NBX Voice Mail
check box, voice mail messages for all users are backed up. Auto
discovery and voice mail access are locked during this step. The status
bar shows step 2 of 6.
■
Backing up Voicemail Data — Greetings and name announcements
of all users are backed up. The status bar shows step 3 of 6.
■
Creating Backup file — All files created during the backup process
are added to a single backup file. The status bar shows step 4 of 6.
■
Backup Finishing — Temporary files created during the backup
operation are now deleted. The status bar shows step 5 of 6.
■
Backup Finished — A new screen appears containing the name of
the backup file and prompting you to save the backup file in a
location of your choice. This screen indicates that the backup process
has been completed and represents the last of the six steps.
Backing up your database is done by a system task that is independent of
all other system tasks. This means that you can safely perform any of
these actions before the backup operation has been completed without
interfering with the backup:
■
Click your browser’s Back button
■
Click your browser’s Stop button
Manage Data
■
Exit your browser
■
Shut off your computer
337
If another administrator tries to back up the system database before the
current backup task has been completed, a message appears that warns
them that a backup is currently in progress.
The message includes:
■
The IP address of the computer from which the backup was started
Use the IP address to find the person who started the backup and
coordinate their backup and yours.
■
The time that the backup was started
■
The step of the upgrade process that is currently being performed
Cancelling a Backup Operation
You can cancel the currently active backup operation if you want. When
you click Cancel, the NBX system immediately asks you to confirm that
you want to cancel the backup operation. If you click Yes, the NBX system
first completes the step of the backup operation that it is performing and
then cancels the backup operation.
Depending on the size of your NBX database, some of the steps in the
backup operation can take several minutes to be completed. Please allow
some time for the NBX system to complete the current step and respond
to your cancel command.
After the backup operation has been completed, the final screen displays
the name of the backup file and gives you the opportunity to save the file
in a location you choose, typically on the disk drive of your PC or on the
disk of another computer in your network.
If you choose not to save the database backup file, the file remains on the
NBX system disk until the next time you perform a backup operation.
Accessing the Most Recent Backup File
During the backup procedure, the NBX system prompts you to save the
backup file in a location you choose. 3Com recommends that you save
the backup file when prompted to do so.
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The NBX system keeps a copy of the most recent backup file on your NBX
system. Each time you perform a backup operation on the NBX database,
the NBX system overwrites this file.
If you choose to not save the backup file during the backup procedure or
if you forget to save it, you can save it later. However, if you perform
another backup, the prior backup file is no longer available.
To save the most recent backup file to a location you choose:
1 Click the Save As button.
If you do not see a date and time next to Last Backup or if the words
Download last backup file are gray, the NBX system does not have a
backup file for you to download.
2 In the window that appears, click the Save button.
3 In the Save As window that appears, browse to the location in which you
want to save the most recent backup file and click Save.
Restore
You can restore the NBX database from any backup file you have saved,
provided that:
■
The database was saved using the same major release (for example
R4.0 or R4.1) of NBX software
■
The minor release of the NBX software under which the database was
saved is less than or equal to the minor release of the NBX software on
which you are restoring the database.
Example:
A database that is saved on R4.1.21 can be restored on R4.1.21 or on
R4.1.24.
Voice mail is included in a backup of your system data only if you specify
that you want it included. If voice mail was not included when the system
data was backed up, you cannot specify that you want to restore voice
mail during a restore operation.
To restore your NBX database from a saved backup file:
1 On the NBX NetSet Manage Data tab, click the Browse button.
2 In the window that appears, locate the backup file that you want to
restore and click Open.
The Manage Data tab reappears.
Event Log
339
3 Click Restore.
4 In the window that appears, the NBX system provides cautionary
information about the effect of a restoration on system operation and
prompts you to confirm that you want to restore the database. Click Yes
to restore the database, or No to cancel the operation.
If you choose to restore the database, the NBX system automatically
reboots after the database file is loaded.
Convert Database
Purge Database
You can migrate configuration data stored with an older software version
to a newer software version. You may need to do this if you have installed
a new version of the software but you want to use older configuration
data. During normal operation, you should not need to use the Convert
Database function.
Purging the database removes existing user and device data you have
added to the system, restores factory defaults, and causes an automatic
reboot.
The Purge Database feature does not affect your IP connectivity to NBX
NetSet. After a database purge, the system continues to use the
IP address, subnet mask, default gateway, and host name that you have
assigned.
Purge Database and
CDR
If you want to purge Call Detail Reports (CDR) data as well as user and
device data, you can perform these functions at the same time.
Purge All Voice Mail
When you perform this operation, the NBX system deletes all voice mail
messages for all users. Mailbox greetings are not affected. After the
database is purged, the system reboots automatically.
Event Log
You can view these event logs that are maintained by the system:
■
Adminlog — Tracks activities performed in NBX NetSet under the
administrator login. The Adminlog is never renamed or deleted. It
continues to grow over time, but it is unlikely that the size of the
Adminlog file will ever grow to be a problem.
■
Upglog — Tracks the history of upgrades and processes that occur
during upgrades.
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To view event logs, select Operations > Event Log.
See the Help for the procedure on viewing event logs.
Licenses
You can install licenses for these components:
■
NBX system software
■
IP telephones (Standard IP or IP-on-the-fly)
■
H.323 Gateway
■
pcXset™ (Soft Telephone)
■
Voicemail (Additional voice mail and Auto Attendant ports and voice
mail storage)
■
Disk mirroring (for Superstack 3 NBX only)
■
Devices (specifies the total number of devices allowed on the system)
■
Windows Audio Volume (WAV) devices
■
Virtual Tie Lines
■
Internet Voice Messaging (VPIM)
■
Third-Party Messaging
■
Complement Attendant Software
■
Call Recording & Monitoring
■
Polycom Phones
■
Citel Nortel Phones
■
Citel Analog Phones
■
Uniden Phones
■
3102 Business Phones
To manage your software licenses, select Operations > Licenses.
See the Help for procedures on managing licenses.
Add a License
Each NBX system includes a factory default license, tied to the system
serial number. On NBX 100 systems, the serial number is located on the
Call Processor backplane. On SuperStack 3 systems, the serial number is
located on the disk tray.
Licenses
341
To configure the system to support new licenses, contact your 3Com
Voice Solutions dealer and provide the serial number. The dealer obtains a
new license key from 3Com Customer Support that enables the upgrade.
See the Help for procedures for adding a license to an NBX system.
Remove a License
The only license that you can remove from an NBX system is the disk
mirroring license, which enables a SuperStack 3 NBX system to use two
disks in a mirrored configuration.
CAUTION: See “Reverting to a Single-Disk System” on page 293 for
instructions on how to remove the disk mirroring license. If you do not
follow the correct procedure, you may not be able to restart the
SuperStack 3 NBX system.
Usage Report
The Usage Report displays, for each license installed on the NBX system,
the current number of devices in use for the license type and the
maximum number of devices allowed by that license.
Backing Up Licenses
3COm recommends that you make a backup of all licenses on your NBX
system.
1 In the Operations > Licenses dialog box, click Backup Licenses.
2 Click Save, choose a location to save the backup file, and click Save.
Restoring Backed-Up
Licenses
You can restore all licenses from a previously created backup file.
1 In the Operations > Licenses dialog box, click Restore Licenses, and
browse to the location in which you saved the licenses backup file.
Alternatively, type full path to the license backup file in the Enter path to
restore license(s) on this system: text box.
2 Click Restore.
3 Respond to the confirmation prompt message that appears.
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Obtaining Details of
License History
You can view a detailed history, including the date and time on which
each license was added to the NBX system.
In the Operations > Licenses dialog box, click Details. Table 74 describes
each column in the Details report window.
Table 74 Explanation of License Details Window
Field
Purpose
Name
The name of the license.
Description
A description of the license.
A site license indicates one of these two things:
■
Enables the function across the entire NBX system.
Example: The Internet Voice Messaging license (VPIM)
allows you to compose and send voice mail messages to
other NBX systems or any voice mail system that is
VPIM-compliant.
■
Enables an unlimited number of devices of this type. The
actual limit is set by the system maximum (up to 200
devices for the NBX 100 and up to 1500 devices for the
SuperStack 3 NBX system).
Example: You can install a site license for pcXset and
then add any number of pcXset clients to your NBX
system (up to the total licensed device limit).
The list of licenses may contain several licenses of the same
type, each one permitting a number of devices.
License Date
The date on which the license was generated.
Expires
The date on which the license will expire.
A date in this column indicates that the license is a trial
license that will expire on the given date.
The word Never indicates that the license is a permanent
license and will not expire.
Regional Software
To manage regional software, select Operations > Regional Software.
See the Help for procedures on managing your regional software.
Install
You can install regional software including local language voice prompts,
regional tones and cadences, and local language versions of certain user
documentation for your region.
Regional Software
343
After you install regional software, you must designate it to be the
current system regional software by selecting System Configuration >
Regional Settings.
Remove
You can remove regional software at any time. All versions of the regional
software that you select are removed. For example, if you choose to
remove the “Mexico - Spanish” regional pack, all versions of the selected
regional software are removed from the system.
U.S. English cannot be removed.
When you remove a version of system software, the system verifies
whether the removal might leave any regional software unassigned to a
system software version.
Specific regional languages, tones and cadences, or voice prompts that
were associated with earlier releases may no longer be usable by recent
system software versions. 3Com recommends that you purge unused
regional software to conserve disk space.
You can only remove unused regional software immediately after you
delete a version of system software. If you choose not to remove this
software when prompted, you must either:
Details
■
Wait until you remove a subsequent version of system software before
you can delete any unused regional software.
■
Remove all versions of the selected regional software on the system.
You can then install the required version.
The Regional Software Diagnostic Details window displays the status of
each region in the current system software. Table 75 defines the
displayed values.
Table 75 Diagnostic Details
Values
Description
In Use
The regional software is currently being used by the system.
Available
The regional software is fully loaded on the system, but it is
not currently in use.
Not Fully Installed
The system can access some parts of the regional software,
but not all. You probably have not loaded the correct
regional software version for the system software you are
running.
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Table 75 Diagnostic Details (continued)
Third-Party Drivers
Values
Description
Error While Loading
An error occurred while loading the regional software.
Re-install the software.
Nothing Installed
The system is aware that this regional software exists, but no
version is installed.
You can add and configure third-party telephones for use on an NBX
system. The third-party vendor supplies the interface hardware and a
software package to support the telephones.
The process of adding third-party telephones has these steps:
■
Install the device type license — Each third-party device type
(typically a telephone) must be licensed for use on the NBX system.
The license governs the type of device and the number of devices of
that type that can be added to the NBX system.
■
Installing the software driver — This step places the third-party
driver software on the NBX system disk.
■
Importing — This step activates the third-party driver software.
See the Help for instructions on these procedures.
NBX Software
Upgrades
When you upgrade the NBX system software, you do not need to reinstall
and import the third-party drivers, provided that you continue to use the
same NBX database after the upgrade.
If you upgrade the NBX system software and choose to start with a new
database, or if you revert to a database that did not include the
third-party driver, you must import the third-party driver again.
Third-Party
Telephone Groups
When you install and import a third-party driver, a new telephone group
is created for the third-party telephone type. When you add third-party
telephones to the NBX system, by default they are added to this group.
You cannot delete the default third-party telephone group.
A third-party telephone can belong to the default third-party telephone
group, or to a telephone group that you create for that third-party
telephone.
8
REPORTS
This chapter describes how to access details of NBX system data traffic.
It covers these topics:
■
Directory
■
Device List
■
System Data
■
Call Reporting
See the Help for procedures on accessing this data.
Directory
The NBX system provides a directory listing of all the telephone
extensions in the system (except for special use extensions such as TAPI
Route Point extensions).
If a call is picked up by the Auto Attendant, the caller can search this
same directory for the person by using the phone’s key pad to type the
first letters of the person's last name. The Last Name parameter of each
user profile forms the dial-by-name directory.
Only mailboxes that have been initialized and have a recorded greeting
are included in the directory. Special purpose mailboxes, such as a
mailbox associated with a TAPI Route Point are not included in the
directory. You can exclude a user from the directory when you add or
modify a user.
To view, print, or search the system directory, select Reports > Directory.
See the Help for the procedures on viewing, printing, and searching the
directory.
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CHAPTER 8: REPORTS
Device List
The NBX system provides a list of the devices and functions such as
telephones, line card ports, voice mail ports, Call Park extensions, and
Groups that are currently being used.
To view or print a report of system devices, select Reports > Device List.
See the Help for procedures on viewing and printing the system device
list.
System Data
NBX NetSet provides basic data about the NBX system.
Before you contact your 3Com Voice - Authorized Partner or 3Com
Technical Support, access this report and record the information.
To view system data, select Reports > System Data.
See the Help for procedures on viewing system data.
Disk Status
In addition to viewing basic system data, you can also view data
specifically about disk drives. If you are using disk mirroring, you can
confirm the status of both disks.
To view disk status, select Reports > System Data > Disk Status.
See the Help for procedures on viewing disk status.
Power Supply Status
If your system is configured with two power supplies (SuperStack 3 NBX
only), you can view the status of each power supply on the Power Supply
Status report. To view power supply status, select Reports > System Data
> Power Supply Status. See the Help for procedures on viewing power
supply status.
For each power supply, the report displays these types of information:
Table 76 Power Status Report Information
Field
Purpose
Connected
The connection status for each power supply.
Values: True or False
Output voltage
The output voltage status.
Values: Valid or Invalid
Call Reporting
Call Reporting
347
The NBX Call Processor captures information about all outgoing and
incoming calls made through the system. To view this call information in
detail, you must install Call Reports (Downloads > Software > NBX Call
Detail Reports) on a networked computer as specified later in this section.
Then, you must download the call report information, which is referred to
as call detail reports, from the system to a local hard drive.
After you install NBX Call Detail Reports, you can:
■
Retrieve calling data from the system.
■
Generate formatted reports.
■
Export reports in formats suitable for use with third-party reporting
software, spreadsheets, databases, and word processing applications.
■
Export your call data in HTML format for publication on a web server.
■
Export reports to a disk file or directly to a Microsoft mail message or a
Microsoft Exchange folder.
Call reports do not include information on the locked or unlocked status
of telephones.
See the Help in the NBX Call Detail Reports application software for
procedures.
Windows
Environment
Specifications
Installing Call Reports
Your computer must have these minimum requirements to run Call
Reports:
■
Processor — Pentium 166MHz or higher
■
Operating System — Windows NT 4.0 (Service Pack 6a), Windows
98, Windows 2000 (Service Pack 2), or Windows XP
■
RAM — 32 MB on Windows 98; 64 MB on Windows NT or Windows
2000; 128 MB on Windows XP
■
Network — Network connectivity to the NBX Call Processor
■
Disk Space — At least 40 MB of free disk space
To install NBX Call Reports, select Downloads > Software > NBX Call
Reports.
See the Help topic for Downloads > Software in the NBX Call Reports
installation procedures.
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CHAPTER 8: REPORTS
Configuring Call
Reporting
You can configure your system to save call information, and then use the
Call Reports function to view the information in a variety of formats. You
can create a password-protected logon for users so that the users can
access call report information. This logon does not provide administrator
privileges to users.
The NBX software supplied by or on behalf of 3Com has the ability to
mask or scramble the last four digits on call records. If you do not select
this function, call numbers are recorded without any digits masked or
scrambled.
The collection, storage, or manipulation of personal data such as these
call numbers may incur obligations under local laws, such as those
relating to data protection or privacy. These legal requirements differ
from country to country and it is your responsibility to comply with all
such obligations.
3Com accepts no liability for your failure to comply with local laws
regarding the collection, storage, or manipulation of such information
and data.
To configure call reporting, select Reports > Call Reporting.
See the Help for procedures on configuring call reporting.
Purge CDR
You can purge old Call Detail Report (CDR) data from the system.
To purge CDR data, select Reports > Call Reporting > Purge CDR.
See the Help for the procedure on purging call report data.
DOWNLOADS
9
This chapter provides information about downloading:
Software
■
Software
■
Label Makers
■
Quick Reference Guides
You can download these applications to the management PC:
■
NBX Call Reports — You can install NBX® Call Reports on a Microsoft
Windows NT 4.0, Windows 98, or Windows 2000 computer. The
application enables you to retrieve call logging information from the
NBX system for reporting purposes. See Chapter 8 for prerequisites
and details on running these reports.
■
NBX TAPI Service Provider (NBX TSP) — You can install NBX TSP on
a Microsoft Windows NT 4.0, Windows 98, or Windows 2000
computer. The application enables you to use TAPI-enabled programs
with the NBX system. For more information, see Chapter 5.
To download software applications, select Downloads > Software.
See the Help for procedures on downloading the software.
Additional
Applications
Other optional software is available on the NBX Resource Pack CD, which
is shipped with the NBX system. See the browser on the CD for
information about the additional documentation and applications.
350
CHAPTER 9: DOWNLOADS
Label Makers
Each NBX Telephone and NBX Attendant Console comes with a set of
blank labels on which you can hand write to identify the Speed Dials and
other unique settings that have been applied to the buttons. When you
are setting up many telephones with similar features, you can use the
multiple-label files on the Downloads tab.
To print labels from the Label Maker files, you need Adobe Acrobat
Reader. A free copy of Acrobat Reader is available at www.adobe.com
and on the NBX Resource Pack CD-ROM. The Label Maker files for the
NBX Telephones are compatible with Acrobat Reader version 4.0 and 5.0.
The Label Maker file for the Attendant Console is compatible with
Acrobat Reader version 5.0.
Adobe Acrobat Reader cannot save a file, so after you close a Label
Maker file, you cannot open it and print your changes again. You must
recreate your edits. To save your edits, you must purchase the complete
Adobe Acrobat application. See www.adobe.com.
To create telephone labels, select Downloads > LabelMakers.
See the instructions in each file for procedures on creating and printing
labels.
Users can create a their own labels by clicking Speed Dials > Telephone
Labels.
Quick Reference
Guides
Quick Reference Guides are shipped with each telephone, analog
terminal adapter, and NBX Analog Terminal Card. You can also download
and print a copy of the Adobe Acrobat PDF version of each quick
reference guide from the Reference Sheets tab. You can download Adobe
Acrobat Reader from the NBX Resource Pack CD or from the Adobe web
site at www.adobe.com.
Reference sheets are also available to individual users by selecting
Personal Settings > User Information.
To download reference sheets, select Downloads > Reference Sheets.
See the Help for procedures on downloading reference sheets.
10
Overview
TROUBLESHOOTING
This chapter contains maintenance and troubleshooting information that
can help you resolve simple problems. It covers these topics:
■
■
Telephone Troubleshooting
■
Using the Telephone Local User Interface (LUI) Utility
■
Using H3PingIP
System-level Troubleshooting
■
Digital Line Card Troubleshooting
■
Alarm Conditions (Overview)
■
Alarm Descriptions
■
Alarms on NBX Digital Line Cards
■
Configuration and Status Reports
■
Connecting a Computer to a Serial Port
■
Servicing the Network Call Processor Battery
■
Getting Service and Support
The SuperStack 3 NBX hardware needs no routine maintenance.
However, you should perform periodic backups of the configuration
database, especially after you make changes to system or user
configurations.
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CHAPTER 10: TROUBLESHOOTING
Telephone
Troubleshooting
Using the Telephone
Local User Interface
(LUI) Utility
If you believe that a problem is associated with a particular telephone,
use these telephone troubleshooting procedures.
The firmware within each NBX Telephone includes a telephone diagnostic
and configuration utility called the Local User Interface (LUI). You can use
the LUI to manually configure a telephone and to test the telephone
To run the LUI utility:
1 Disconnect the telephone from the LAN.
2 Cycle power to the telephone by disconnecting and then reconnecting its
power connector.
For telephones that use a powered Ethernet cable instead of a power
adapter, disconnect and then reconnect the Ethernet cable, and then
press the Program button before the telephone finishes its download of
code from the call processor.
3 To start the LUI:
■
On the NBX 2102 or 3102 Business Telephones, press the Program
button.
■
On the NBX 2101 Basic Telephone, press the MSG button.
4 The buttons you use to access and use the LUI utility vary with each type
of supported telephone:
■
NBX 3102 Business Telephone buttons are described in Figure 24.
■
NBX 2102 Business Telephone buttons are described in Figure 25.
■
NBX 2101Basic Telephone buttons are described in Figure 26.
Table 77 describes the LUI menu items.
Telephone Troubleshooting
353
Figure 24 Local User Interface (LUI) Controls on the NBX 3102 Business
Telephone
7
1
6
NBX Test Menu
Scroll-- Options
2
5
3
4
1 Display panel.
2 Soft buttons. The left and right buttons move the cursor left or right. The
middle button is not used.
3 Key pad for selecting menu items or entering numeric characters.
4 Access buttons AB1-AB9 (from bottom to top) for selecting menu items.
When you enter a MAC address, you use AB1-AB6 to enter hex digits A-F.
5 Access buttons AB10-AB18 (from top to bottom) for selecting menu
items or functions.
6 Program button for starting or exiting the LUI utility.
7 Scroll buttons to move up or down through the LUI menu.
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CHAPTER 10: TROUBLESHOOTING
Figure 25 Local User Interface (LUI) Controls on the NBX 2102 Business
Telephone
1
7
NBX Test Menu
Scroll--Options
2
3
6
4
5
1 Display panel.
2 Soft buttons. The left and right buttons are for moving the cursor left or
right. The middle button is not used.
3 Program button for starting or exiting the utility.
4 Key pad for selecting menu items or entering numeric characters.
5 Access buttons AB1-AB6 (from top to bottom) for selecting menu items.
When you enter a MAC address, you use AB1-AB6 to enter hex digits A-F.
6 Access buttons AB7-AB18 (from top to bottom) for selecting menu items
or functions.
7 Scroll buttons.
Telephone Troubleshooting
355
Figure 26 Local User Interface (LUI) Controls on the NBX 2101 Basic Telephone
1
NBX Test Menu
Scroll--Options
2
8
7
3
6
5
4
1 Display panel.
2 Soft buttons. The left and right buttons move the cursor left or right. The
middle button is not used.
3 Key pad for selecting LUI menu items or entering numeric characters.
4 Access buttons AB1-AB3 for selecting LUI menu items. When you enter a
MAC address, you use AB1-AB3 to enter hex digits A-C.
5 Hold button. When you enter a MAC address, you use Hold to enter hex
digit D.
6 Volume buttons. When you enter a MAC address, you use Volume Down
and Volume Up to enter hex digits E and F.
7 MSG (voice mail message) button. You use the MSG button to start and
stop the LUI utility.
8 Scroll buttons to move through the LUI utility menu.
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CHAPTER 10: TROUBLESHOOTING
Table 77 LUI Menu Items — Business and Basic Telephones
Option Name
Description
1 View Settings
Press 1 on the number pad to access a menu in which
you use the scroll buttons to view these options:
■
MAC Address – MAC address of this telephone.
■
NCP MAC Address – MAC address of call processor
All Fs indicates that the telephone responds to any
Control Processor. This is the default setting.
■
SW Build Ident. – Revision of software running on
this telephone.
■
Serial #
Rev – Serial number and hardware
revision of this telephone.
■
My IP Address – IP address of this telephone.
■
Subnet Mask – The IP mask applicable to this
subnetwork.
■
Gatwy IP Address – IP address of the default
gateway for this subnetwork.
■
NCP IP Address – IP address of the call processor with
which this telephone communicates.
To return to the main menu:
2 Set my IP
■
On the NBX Business Telephone, press Program.
■
On the NBX Basic Telephone, press MSG.
Lets you specify the IP address of this telephone.
When entering an IP address:
■
Use the key pad to enter digits 0–9.
■
Use the left and right soft keys to move the cursor left
or right.
■
If any of the fields within the IP address contain only
one or two digits, add leading zeros.
Example: Enter 10.234.1.125 as 010.234.001.125
■
Press the # key to commit your address change.
■
To exit without saving any changes:
On the NBX Business Telephone, press Program.
On the NBX Basic Telephone, press MSG.
To change a telephone back to its default setting, enter
all Fs for the NCP IP address.
3 Set SubNMsk
Lets you specify the mask that is appropriate for this
subnetwork.
Telephone Troubleshooting
357
Table 77 LUI Menu Items — Business and Basic Telephones (continued)
Option Name
Description
4 Set Gatwy IP
Lets you specify the IP address of the default gateway for
this subnetwork.
5 Set NCP IP
Lets you specify the IP address of the Network Call
Processor (NCP). In all but special circumstances, the
system status messages communicate this information.
When entering an IP address:
■
Use the key pad to enter digits 0–9.
■
Use the left and right soft keys to move the cursor left
or right.
■
Press the # key to commit your address change.
■
To exit without saving any changes:
On the NBX Business Telephone, press Program.
On the NBX Basic Telephone, press the MSG button.
To change a telephone back to its default setting, enter
all Fs for the NCP IP address.
6 Test – Run Ping H3/IP
For use only by a qualified 3Com service person. Contact
3Com before using this test.
7 Test – LEDs
On the NBX Business Telephone, turns on all LEDs for
5 seconds. Lets you quickly check for inoperative lights.
On the NBX Basic Telephone, turns on the icons and
words on the right side of the display panel for 5
seconds.
Icons: Telephone icon plus the number 1 (top line) and
telephone icon plus the number 2 (bottom line)
Words: FWD (top line) and IN (bottom line)
8 Test – LCD
Illuminates every pixel on the display for 5 seconds.
9 Test – Buttons
Puts the telephone in the button test state. Press any
telephone button to hear a tone and see a description of
the button’s function.
To return to the main menu:
■
On the NBX Business Telephone, press Program twice.
■
On the NBX Basic Telephone, press MSG twice.
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CHAPTER 10: TROUBLESHOOTING
Table 77 LUI Menu Items — Business and Basic Telephones (continued)
Option Name
Description
* Test – Handset
Sounds a tone through the earpiece of the telephone’s
handset for 5 seconds.
0 Test – Speaker
Sounds a tone through the telephone’s speaker for 5
seconds.
NOTE: NBX Business Telephone only.
# Audio X-Conn
Cross connects the audio channels - handset mouthpiece
to speaker, microphone to handset earpiece. The
connection times out after 10 seconds. (The telephone’s
microphone is located in the lower right corner of the
telephone.)
NOTE: NBX Business Telephone only.
AB1 Set NCP MAC
Lets you specify the MAC address of the Network Call
Processor (NCP). In all but special circumstances, the
system status messages communicate this information.
When entering a MAC address:
■
Use the key pad to enter digits 0–9.
■
To enter the hex digits A–F:
On the NBX Business Telephone, use Access buttons
1–6.
On the NBX Basic Telephone, use buttons AB1, AB2,
AB3, Hold, Volume Down, and Volume Up.
■
Use the left and right soft keys to move the cursor left
or right.
■
Press the # key to commit your address change, or to
exit without saving the changes:
On the NBX Business Telephone, press Program.
On the NBX Basic Telephone, press MSG.
To change a telephone back to its default setting, enter
all Fs for the NCP MAC address.
AB2 EEProm Mem
Lets you scroll through the locations in the memory of the
telephone. The information is presented in hexadecimal
format and can be properly interpreted only by a
qualified 3Com service person. Contact 3Com before
using this test.
Program – Exits
Press the Program button to exit from the LUI menu.
NOTE: NBX Business Telephone only.
MSG BTN – Exits
Press the MSG button to exit from the LUI menu.
NOTE: NBX Basic Telephone only.
Telephone Troubleshooting
Using H3PingIP
359
You can use the H3PingIP menu item to ping another device on the
network to test the telephone’s connectivity and to check the packet
delay.
When using H3PingIP to test for connectivity, you must use the IP address
of a device that is connected to the NBX system NCP. You should not use
the NCP IP address. The NBX Business Telephone uses the IP Gateway and
subnet mask information programmed into it using the AB16 and AB17
buttons.
H3PingIP shows the following information:
■
Port — The UDP Destination Port
■
Tx — The number of packets transmitted
■
Rx — The number of packets received
■
mS — The delay time, in milliseconds
If you ping a device on a subnetwork different than the one on which the
telephone is located, the delay time is greater.
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CHAPTER 10: TROUBLESHOOTING
System-level
Troubleshooting
For each symptom listed in Table 78, perform the suggested actions in the
order listed.
WARNING: Before you remove any component, shut down the system
software and then turn off the power to the chassis by removing the
chassis power cord. If the system has two power supplies, remove both
power cords.
Table 78 Troubleshooting Actions
Symptom
Possible Cause
Date/time display A power surge has
on telephones is corrupted the system
wrong, either
time.
incorrect date or
shows random
characters.
Suggested Action
If the display shows incorrect date, use
NBX NetSet to reset the system time. If the
display shows random characters, for
example, 00; 0 #, you must:
1 Disconnect power to the chassis that
holds the Call Processor.
2 Wait 60 seconds.
3 Reconnect power to the system.
4 Use NBX NetSet to enter the correct
date and time.
Problem with
Network Call
Processor battery.
Your browser
No IP connectivity
cannot find NBX
NetSet.
Routing problems
Contact your 3Com NBX Voice Authorized Partner.
Verify that the computer you are using to
run the browser has network connectivity.
See “Establishing IP Connectivity” in the
NBX Installation Guide.
If your local IP environment includes a
proxy server, you might need to
reconfigure your browser parameters to
ignore the proxy server. See the Help for
your browser.
System-level Troubleshooting
361
Table 78 Troubleshooting Actions (continued)
Symptom
Possible Cause
Suggested Action
Invalid IP
configuration
The system has a default IP configuration
which might need to be changed to
match your local IP environment.
Temporarily change the IP configuration
of your computer so that the subnet
configuration matches the system
configuration. Specify 255.255.255.0 as
the subnet and use IP address
192.168.1.191. After you change your
computer’s IP configuration, connect to
the system and change its IP configuration
to match the IP environment of your
local network. Change your computer’s
IP configuration back to its original
settings, and then connect to NBX NetSet
using the new IP address. See
“Establishing IP Connectivity” in the NBX
Installation Guide.
Cannot open
NBX NetSet
using the
administrator
username and
password.
The CAPS LOCK key
on your keyboard is
activated.
NBX NetSet username and passwords are
case-sensitive. For example, NBX NetSet
accepts “administrator” but it rejects
“Administrator” and “ADMINISTRATOR”.
Callers on hold
do not hear
music.
No music source is
connected to the
Call Processor.
See “Adding External Hardware” in the
NBX Installation Guide for more
information.
MOH audio is
disabled.
Enable MOH audio in NBX NetSet >
System Configuration > System Settings >
System-wide. See “Connecting a
Music-on-Hold (MOH) Input Device” in
the NBX Installation Guide.
MOH volume is set
too low.
See “Adjusting Music-on-Hold (MOH)
Volume” in the NBX Installation Guide.
Problem with the
battery on the
Call Processor.
See “Servicing the Network Call Processor
Battery” on page 371.
Lose date and
time when
rebooting the
system.
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CHAPTER 10: TROUBLESHOOTING
Table 78 Troubleshooting Actions (continued)
Symptom
Possible Cause
Suggested Action
NBX NetSet is
very slow in
responding.
Your network uses a
proxy server for
Internet access.
A common networking practice is to
employ a proxy server to shield your
network from intrusion by unauthorized
users. However, communications with
NBX NetSet do not need to pass through
the proxy server. To speed access to NBX
NetSet, configure your browser to access
the NBX system without going through
the proxy server.
All greetings and The wrong message
prompts are
compression format
missing. For
was selected.
example, calling
the Auto
Attendant or a
user’s mailbox
produces silence
instead of the
expected
greetings.
Prior to R1.1.0, all audio used MuLaw
compression. With R1.1.0, audio, that is,
any prompt, message, or greeting, was
recorded using ADPCM compression. If
you are running R1.1.0 or higher, you
must leave the compression format set to
ADPCM. The ability to select the format
allows you to migrate existing data into an
older database for backwards
compatibility.
Caller ID
information is
not appearing
when an outside
call arrives.
Your local telephone
company is not
providing Caller ID
service to you.
Caller ID is typically an optional service
which you must order from your
telephone company.
You are answering
the telephone before
the Caller ID
information is fully
received.
Caller ID information does not appear
immediately. It usually appears between
the first and second rings. If you answer
the call too quickly, the information is
never received. If you transfer the call, the
person you transfer the call to sees your
ID instead of the ID of the original caller.
In release R2.6 and all later releases, the
compression is set to ADPCM and you
cannot change it.
You may be able to see caller ID by
number or by name (or both) depending
on the service your telephone company
provides.
System-level Troubleshooting
Digital Line Card
Troubleshooting
363
In order to correctly troubleshoot a Digital Line Card, you must determine
whether the origin of the problem is:
■
The hardware
■
The software configuration
■
The CSU (Channel Service Unit)
■
The telephone company’s line
To eliminate the Digital Line Card (T1 or E1) attach a loop back connector
in place of the telephone company’s line. Configure the card as described
in the appropriate section of Chapter 3.
After you complete the configuration, and with the loopback connector
in place, verify that the Nominal status light on the front panel of the T1
or E1 Digital Line Card is turned on (appears steady and green).
Alarm Conditions
(Overview)
■
If the Nominal status light does not turn on, the problem is most likely
in the Digital Line Card, and you should contact your 3Com
Voice-Authorized Partner to report the problem.
■
If the Nominal light turns on, the problem is either in the CSU
(Channel Service Unit) or in the telephone company’s line. Contact the
telephone company for assistance.
T1 and E1 Digital Line Cards may experience these alarm conditions:
■
Red Alarm — Indicates one of these conditions:
■
Loss of Signal (LOS)
■
Loss of Framing (LOF) also known as Out of Frame (OOF)
■
Blue Alarm — Indicates an Alarm Indication Signal (AIS)
■
Yellow Alarm — Indicates a Remote Alarm Indication (RAI)
An alarm condition may be a:
■
Signal — Information transmitted either in the upstream or
downstream direction, warning of a detected failure:
■
State — A condition, activated at a terminal device, indicating that a
problem exists and remedial action is required.
T1 and E1 Digital Line Cards are considered “downstream” equipment.
364
CHAPTER 10: TROUBLESHOOTING
Alarm Descriptions
Red Alarm
■
Carrier Fail Alarm (Red CFA) — A state that exists at a downstream
terminal device, based upon the terminal device detecting an
incoming LOS or LOF.
Blue Alarms
■
AIS, Keep-alive/Blue — A signal that is transmitted instead of the
normal signal to maintain transmission continuity and to indicate to
the receiving equipment that there is a transmission interruption either
at the equipment that is generating the AIS signal or upstream of that
equipment. The all ones signal is generated:
■
To maintain transmission continuity
■
To notify downstream equipment of a transmission fault
■
To indicate to downstream equipment that a DS1 framed signal is
not being generated
The transmission fault may be located at the equipment that is
generating the alarm signal, or it may be located upstream of that
equipment.
■
AIS CFA (also known as Blue CFA) — A state that exists at the
downstream equipment and indicates that it has detected an AIS
signal from the upstream equipment.
Yellow Alarms
■
RAI (also known as Yellow Alarm Signal) — A signal transmitted in
the outgoing direction when a terminal determines that it has lost the
incoming signal. The terminal equipment generates the Yellow Alarm
Signal for a minimum of 1 second using one of these methods:
■
■
■
If you are using Super Frame (SF), the terminal equipment
generates the Yellow Alarm Signal by setting the second bit in all
channels of the Super Frame to 0 (zero).
If you are using Extended Super Frame (ESF), the terminal
equipment generates the Yellow Alarm Signal by sending an
alternating pattern of 8 ones followed by 8 zeros on the Facilities
Data Link (FDL).
Yellow CFA — A state that is activated at the terminal equipment
when the terminal equipment detects a Yellow Alarm Signal. The
Yellow Alarm Signal comes from the equipment at the other end
System-level Troubleshooting
365
when the far end equipment enters a Red CFA state. See Red Alarm,
earlier in this section.
Alarms on NBX
Digital Line Cards
The T1 and E1 Digital Line Cards support all of the alarm states and
signals described in “Alarm Descriptions” on page 364. Two status lights
indicate the status of the T1 and E1 cards:
Table 79 Digital Line Card Status Lights
Status Light
Purpose
Nominal
On: Indicates that there are no error or alarm conditions.
Flashing: Indicates that a call is active on at least one channel
of the T1 or E1 Digital Line Card.
CF (Carrier Fail)
On: Indicates that a Red Alarm state or Blue Alarm state exists
on the card.
To determine which alarm state exists:
1 Log on to NBX NetSet using the administrator login ID and
password.
2 In the NBX NetSet - Main Menu window, click Device
Configuration.
3 Click the Digital Line Cards tab.
4 In the Select Device Type drop-down list, select T1 Span
List or, if you are using an E1 card, select ISDN PRI Span
List.
5 Click Apply.
6 Select the span you want.
7 Click Status. The words Red Alarm or Blue Alarm appear in
the Status field.
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CHAPTER 10: TROUBLESHOOTING
Table 79 Digital Line Card Status Lights (continued)
Status Light
Purpose
RA (Remote Alarm)
On: Indicates a Yellow Alarm state on the card.
To confirm that the Yellow Alarm state exists:
1 Log on to NBX NetSet using the administrator login ID and
password.
2 In the NBX NetSet - Main Menu window, click Device
Configuration.
3 Click the Digital Line Cards tab.
4 In the Select Device Type drop-down list, if you are using a
T1 Digital Line Card, select T1 Span List or, if you are using
an E1 Digital Line Card, select ISDN PRI Span List.
5 Click Apply.
6 Select the span you want and click Status. The words
Yellow Alarm appear in the Status field.
NOTE: This light is used only on the T1 Digital Line Card.
LB (Loop Back)
On: Indicates that the card is in loop-back testing mode.
NOTE: This light is not used to indicate any of the Red, Blue,
or Yellow alarms.
Configuration and
Status Reports
You can obtain the status of all Digital Line Cards in the NBX system with
either of these two methods:
Select NBX NetSet > Device Configuration > Digital Line Cards and:
■
Click Config & Status Report. The formatted report appears on the
screen with headings shown in a larger font.
■
Click Export Report. The unformatted report appears on the screen. To
save the report as an ASCII text file, select Save as from the File menu
of your browser.
Table 80 describes in alphabetical order (not the order of appearance) the
headings in the Configuration and Status Report.
Table 80 Configuration and Status Report Headings
Heading
Description
#Chs
Number of channels.
#Dsp
Number of digital signal processors.
#OffCh
Number of channels in the offline state.
System-level Troubleshooting
367
Table 80 Configuration and Status Report Headings (continued)
Heading
Description
#OnChs
Number of channels in the online state.
AEClosed
Autoattendant extension when business is closed.
AELunch
Autoattendant extension when business is at lunch.
AEOpen
Autoattendant extension when business is open.
AEOther
Autoattendant extension for Other hours.
ANI
Automatic Number Identification. The telephone number from
which the call originated.
Audio Input
Numeric value of audio input control setting.
Audio Output
Numeric value of audio output control setting.
BdId
Board (card) ID number.
BdId Name
Board (card) name.
Brd
The number of the board (card) in a multiple board system.
CO Switch Protocol Protocol (ETS1, QSIG Slave) used by the CO switch (not
applicable to T1).
Card Type
Type of card (T1, ISDN PRI, E1, BRI).
Ch
Channel.
Ch List
Channels supported by a DSP.
Ch MAC Address
MAC address of a channel.
Ch Name
Name of a channel.
ChId
Unique identifying number of a channel in a list of channels,
possibly including channels from more than one board.
ChNo
Channel number. For example: 1–24 for a T1 board.
CurState
Current state of a channel (in use, idle, available).
DNIS/DID
Number of digits passed that identify the called party.
DSP Name
Name of a digital signal processor.
DSP Status
Status of a digital signal processor.
DSP Version
Version of code running on a digital signal processor.
Digit Collection
Specifies the data the CO sends and the format in which it is
sent over the span of an incoming call. Can include both
DNIS/DID and ANI, and can specify the order in which they
arrive, and the number of digits involved.
Echo Canceller
The state of the echo cancellation function. Values: Enabled,
Disabled.
E&M Direction
For a T1 line, the direction of the E&M signaling. Values: Two
Way, One Way. Default: Two Way.
368
CHAPTER 10: TROUBLESHOOTING
Table 80 Configuration and Status Report Headings (continued)
Heading
Description
ErrorCnt
The number of errors for this channel.
ErrorCode
The code that identifies the type of error.
Ext.
Extension.
FlashHookTransfer
Status of flash hook transfer function. If enabled, allows user
receiving a call to do a flash hook transfer to another trunk line
Values: Enabled, Disabled. Default: Enabled
Framing Type
Type of framing used on this board (ES4, D4). For a T1 board,
ESF is always associated with a B8ZS line coding, and D4 is
always associated with AMI line coding.
GpId
Group ID number.
Group Name
Group name.
Guard
A time out value that controls the waiting period after a call
completes, before the channel can be used for another
outbound call from NBX system.
InterfaceType
Type of interface. Values: E1, T1, ISDN, no config. Default: T1.
Does not apply to T1 E&M.
Intl. Prefix
An advanced configuration setting. An identifier, up to
five-digits, that can be manually configured for outgoing calls
on this span. Manual configuration of the international prefix is
for situations where the telephone company equipment
requires special configuration on the NBX system.
Line Code
Type of line coding used (HDB3, AMI). For a T1 board, AMI line
coding is always associated with D4 framing, and B8ZS line
coding is always associated with ESF framing.
Line Length
Length of the line between the termination and the board.
MAC Address
A 48-bit address unique to each network device.
Model Number
The model number of the board.
National Prefix
An advanced configuration setting. An identifier, up to
five-digits, that can be manually configured for outgoing calls
on this span. Manual configuration of the national prefix is for
situations where the telephone company equipment requires
special configuration on the NBX system.
NCP Conne
The amount of time that the digital line card waits for the NCP
to connect the call. “USER_ALERTING_NO_ANSWER” errors
mean that this value may be too small.
NCP Gener
A time-out value that controls how long the digital line card
waits for a response from the call processor. Do not modify this
value.
Network Digit
A time-out value that controls how long the digital line card
waits between digits sent on an incoming call.
System-level Troubleshooting
369
Table 80 Configuration and Status Report Headings (continued)
Heading
Description
OffHk Min
The minimum time an analog telephone, connected to an
Analog Terminal Card, must be off hook for the NBX system to
recognize that the telephone has been picked up.
On Line
One possible status of a channel.
Prepend Prefix
Full text: Prepend prefix to Calling Party Number in Setup
Indication.
Either enabled or disabled. National and international prefixes
can be added for outgoing calls. The prefix is for situations
where the telephone company equipment requires special
configuration on the NBX system.
Protocol
A signaling method used to make calls.
Recv. Timer
Full Text: Overlap Receiving timer (T302).
PRI span only. An advanced configuration setting for situations
where the telephone company equipment requires special
configuration on the NBX system.
Release Complete
Full Text: Send “Release Complete” if incoming call is from
incompatible equipment.
Either enabled or disabled. An advanced configuration setting
for situations where the telephone company equipment
requires special configuration on the NBX system.
RxWnkMax
The maximum duration of a received Wink signal.
RxWnkMin
The minimum duration of a received Wink signal.
SpId
Span ID.
SpNo
Span number.
Sending Complete
Full Text: Send “Sending Complete IE” in Setup Request
IE (Information Element) refers to the data fields within an
ISDN layer 3 message. An advanced configuration setting for
situations where the telephone company equipment requires
special configuration on the NBX system.
Span MAC Address MAC address assigned to this span.
Span Name
Name of span.
SpanNo
Identifying number for a span.
Start Type
Mechanism used to indicate start of a call.
Status
Status of a channel, span, card. Values: Online, Idle, Unknown.
Default: Online
370
CHAPTER 10: TROUBLESHOOTING
Table 80 Configuration and Status Report Headings (continued)
Heading
Description
Strip #
Full Text: Strip trailing # from Called Party Number in Setup
Request.
Either enabled or disabled. An advanced configuration setting
for situations where the telephone company equipment
requires special configuration on the NBX system.
Connecting a
Computer to a
Serial Port
TEI
Terminal Equipment Identification number (of BRI board). The
telephone company may provide this number or the system
may assign it, depending on how you purchased the BRI lines.
TEP Version
The version of software running on the board.
Time Last Seen
Last time activity was recorded for this board.
Timing Mode
Internal: Timing is generated from within the digital line card.
Loop: Timing is taken from the central office.
Trunk to Trunk
Whether call transfers are allowed from one trunk to another.
Values: Enabled (default), Disabled, Restricted, Unrestricted.
TxGudMin
The minimum duration of a transmitted Guard signal.
TxWnkDura
The duration of a transmitted Wink signal.
Wink Wait
This time out value controls how long the digital line card waits
to respond with a wink signal on an outgoing call. If you see
“no_wink_received” errors, this value may be too small.
On the SuperStack 3 Call Processor, the NBX 100 Call Processor, and on
some of the NBX cards, you can connect a computer to a serial port and,
by running a terminal emulation program on the computer, you can
obtain information about the status of the card or the NBX system.
You can connect a computer directly to the serial port on these cards:
Table 81 Serial Port Connections
Card
Port
SuperStack 3 NBX Call Processor
COM1
NBX 100 Call Processor
COM1
BRI-ST Digital Line Card
CONSOLE
E1 Digital Line Card
CONSOLE
T1 Digital Line Card
CONSOLE
NBX Analog Line Card (3C10114C only)
CONSOLE
NBX Analog Terminal Card (3C10117C only)
CONSOLE
Servicing the Network Call Processor Battery
371
It does not matter which computer operating system you use. As long as
the computer has a terminal emulation program that can emulate a
VT100 terminal (for example, Microsoft Hyperterminal), it can
communicate with any of the cards listed in Table 81.
To connect the computer to the COM1 or CONSOLE port on a board:
1 Using a standard computer serial cable (9-pin male to 9-pin female),
connect the male end of the cable to the female connector (COM1 or
CONSOLE) on the front panel of the board.
2 Connect the female end of the cable to an available serial port on the
computer.
3 Start the terminal emulation software and create a new connection.
4 Configure the connection to use the serial port to which you connected
the cable and to use the settings in Table 82.
Table 82 Terminal Emulation Program Properties
Property
Value
Emulation
VT100
Baud Rate
9600
Data bits
8
Parity
None
Stop bits
1
Flow control
None
All messages associated with the board (for example, the initialization
process) appear in the terminal emulation window.
Servicing the
Network Call
Processor Battery
If you lose the system date and time when you reboot the
SuperStack 3 NBX system, it could mean that the Call Processor battery
must be replaced. The battery is not a user-serviceable item. If you
suspect a problem with the battery, contact your 3Com Technical Support
representative.
WARNING: There is a danger of explosion if the battery is incorrectly
replaced. Replace only with the same or equivalent type recommended
by the manufacturer. Dispose of used batteries according to the
manufacturer’s instructions.
372
CHAPTER 10: TROUBLESHOOTING
Getting Service and
Support
Your authorized 3Com NBX Voice-Authorized Partner can assist you with
all of your support needs, including systems and cable plant design,
installation, configuration, and project management.
A choice of maintenance services, including remote diagnostics, on-site
support, telephone technical support, and hardware replacement, is
available from your 3Com NBX Voice-Authorized Partner. Training and
enhancement services are also available.
A
INTEGRATING THIRD-PARTY
MESSAGING
The NBX system can operate with a third-party messaging system. This
appendix describes the steps that you must perform to use a third-party
messaging system with the NBX system:
Installing Software
on the Third-Party
Messaging Server
■
Installing Software on the Third-Party Messaging Server
■
Configuring the NBX System
■
Configuring NBXTSP on the Server
You must install the NBX Media Driver and the NBX TAPI Service Provider
(NBXTSP) on the third-party messaging server. See your messaging
application’s documentation for server requirements.
1 Install the NBX Media Driver application from the NBX Resource Pack CD
or the NBX Partner Access website.
2 Install the NBXTSP from the NBX Resource Pack CD or the NBX Partner
Access website.
You can also download the NBXTSP from your NBX system by connecting
to the NBX NetSet utility from a browser located on the third-party
messaging server.
Configuring the
NBX System
To activate third-party messaging on the NBX system use the NBX NetSet
utility to perform the tasks described in this section.
■
Add the NBX Third-party Messaging and Media Driver licenses
■
Make sure Auto Discover Telephones is enabled
■
Disable NBX messaging
■
Create a Hunt Group for the third-party messaging system
■
Modify the Voice Mail Extensions List
All NBX NetSet procedures require an administrator login.
374
APPENDIX A: INTEGRATING THIRD-PARTY MESSAGING
Add the NBX Third-Party Messaging and Media Driver licenses to your
NBX system:
1 Select NBX NetSet > Operations > Licenses > Add License.
2 In the License Key field, enter the license key provided by your 3Com
Voice-Authorized Partner.
3 Click Apply.
4 Add any additional licenses. When you are finished adding licenses, click
OK.
5 Reboot the system.
3Com strongly recommends that you back up your licenses each time you
make a license change.
Verify that Auto Discover Telephones is enabled and NBX Messaging is
disabled:
1 Select NBX NetSet > System Configuration > System-wide.
2 Verify that Auto Discover Telephones is enabled.
3 Clear the check box for NBX Messaging.
4 Click OK.
Create an NBX Hunt Group for third-party messaging:
1 Select NBX NetSet > User Configuration > Hunt Groups > Add.
2 Set the following parameters:
■
Name — UM Hunt Group (or some similar name)
■
Type — HuntGroup - Circular.
3Com recommends that you use a circular hunt group rather than a
linear hunt group.
■
Extension — Enter the appropriate extension for your hunt group.
■
Password — Set the password for this hunt group.
■
Logout if no answer — Verify that this check box is empty.
■
Users — Select the WAV phones and the ATA ports that are
connected to the third-party messaging system.
■
Call Coverage — Set to Voicemail.
3 Click OK.
Configuring NBXTSP on the Server
375
Edit the Voice Mail Extensions list:
1 Select NBX NetSet > Dial Plan > Extension Lists.
2 Click *0003 VoiceMail, and then click Modify.
3 In Extensions in List, select all of the Voicemail extensions and then click
the >> button.
4 In Extensions not in List, select the Hunt group extension that you created
for third-party messaging and click the << button.
5 Click OK.
Configuring
NBXTSP on the
Server
On the third-party messaging server, you must add the WAV extensions
to the NBX TAPI Control Panel. If your third-party messaging system
needs TAPI messages from NBX Analog Terminal Adapter devices or NBX
Telephones, you must also add these devices to the NBX TAPI Control
Panel.
Update the devices in the NBX TAPI Control Panel:
1 WinNT — On the server, select Control Panel > Telephony >
Telephony Drivers > NBX TAPI Service Provider.
Win2K — On the server, select Control Panel >
Phone and Modem Options > Advanced > NBX TAPI Service Provider.
2 Click Configure and add the extension numbers.
3 Click OK.
You are now ready to install your third-party messaging software. See
your application’s documentation for installation and configuration
instructions.
376
APPENDIX A: INTEGRATING THIRD-PARTY MESSAGING
ISDN COMPLETION CAUSE CODES
B
This appendix lists the Completion Cause Codes displayed in one of the
Span Status dialog boxes:
■
Digital Line Cards > T1 Span List > Status
■
Digital Line Cards > ISDN PRI Span List > Status
■
Digital Line Cards > ISDN BRI Span List > Status
The codes, listed in Table 83, detail the reasons for the termination of a
call. See “Configuring and Managing E1 Digital Line Cards” on
page 226.
These completion cause code descriptions are only guidelines.
The detailed cause may vary according to the Public Switched Telephone
Network (PSTN) to which your NBX system is connected.
Table 83 Completion Cause Codes
Class Grouping Hex Code
Decimal
Code
Description
Normal events
0x00
0
No diagnostic
0x01
1
Unassigned
number
The requested destination, although valid, cannot be
reached.
0x02
2
No route
The sending equipment (sending the cause)
is requested to route the call through an unrecognized
transit network.
0x03
3
No route to
destination
The called user cannot be reached because the
network does not serve the destination.
0x06
6
Channel
unacceptable
The last identified channel is not acceptable to the
sending entity.
0x07
7
Call awarded
The incoming call is connected to a channel already
established for similar calls (e.g. packet-mode X.25
virtual calls).
0x10
16
Normal
clearing
This call is being cleared by one of the users involved.
Details
378
APPENDIX B: ISDN COMPLETION CAUSE CODES
Table 83 Completion Cause Codes (continued)
Decimal
Code
Description
Details
0x11
17
User busy
The called user cannot accept another call although
compatibility is established.
0x12
18
No user
responding
The user does not respond to call establishment
messages with either an alerting or connect indication
within the allowed time.
0x13
19
User alerting
no answer
The user has provided an alerting indication but no
connect indication within the allowed time.
0x15
21
Call rejected
Equipment sending the cause does not wish to accept
this call although it is not busy or incompatible.
0x16
22
Number
changed
The called party number is not assigned.
0x1A
26
Non-selected
user clearing
The user has not been awarded the incoming call.
0x1B
27
Destination out The destination interface is not operating correctly.
of order
0x1C
28
Invalid number The called party number is invalid, or incomplete.
format
0x1D
29
Facility rejected The network cannot provide the facility requested.
0x1E
30
Response to
status enquiry
The reason for the STATUS message was the prior
receipt of a STATUS ENQUIRY message.
0x1F
31
Unspecified
cause
Used to report normal events only when no other
cause in the normal class applies.
0x22
34
No circuit
available
An appropriate circuit or channel is not currently
available to handle the call.
0x23
35
Call queued
(AT&T)
The network is not functioning. Immediate redial is
unlikely to be successful.
0x26
38
Network out of The network is not functioning. Immediate redial is
order
unlikely to be successful.
0x29
41
Temporary
failure
The network is not functioning. Immediate redial is
unlikely to be successful.
0x2A
42
Network
congestion
The switching equipment generating this cause is
experiencing a period of high traffic.
0x2B
43
Access info
discarded
The network could not deliver access information to
the remote user as requested. May include the type of
discarded information (user-to-user information, low
layer or high layer compatibility, or sub-address).
0x2C
44
Requested
channel not
available
Returned when the circuit (or channel) indicated by the
requesting entity cannot be provided by the other side
of the interface.
Class Grouping Hex Code
Resource
unavailable
379
Table 83 Completion Cause Codes (continued)
Decimal
Code
Description
0x2D
45
Pre-empted
0x2F
47
Resources
unavailable –
unspecified
Reports a resource unavailable event only when no
other cause in the resource unavailable class applies.
Service or option 0x31
not available
49
Quality of
service
unavailable
Throughput or transit delay cannot be supported and
that the Quality of Service (as defined in
Recommendation X.213) cannot be provided.
0x32
50
Facility not
subscribed
The requested supplementary service could not be
provided by the network because the user has not
completed the necessary administrative arrangements
with its supporting networks.
0x34
52
Outgoing call
barred
0x36
54
Incoming call
barred
0x39
57
Bearer
capability not
authorized
The user is trying to make unauthorized use of
equipment providing a bearer capability.
0x3A
58
Bearer
capability not
available
The user has requested a bearer capability, which is
implemented by the equipment generating the cause,
but is not available at this time.
0x3F
63
Service not
available
Reports a service (or option) not available event only
when no other cause in the service (or option) not
available class applies.
Service or option 0x41
not implemented
65
Capability not
implemented
The equipment sending this cause does not support
the requested bearer capability.
0x42
66
Chan not
implemented
The equipment sending this cause does not support
the requested channel type.
0x45
69
Facility not
implemented
The equipment sending this cause does not support
the requested supplementary service.
0x46
70
Only restricted One equipment has requested an unrestricted bearer
digital available service but the equipment sending this cause only
supports the restricted version.
0x4F
79
Service not
implemented,
unspecified
Reports the service (or option) not implemented event
only when no other cause in the service (or option) not
implemented class applies.
0x51
81
Invalid call
reference
The equipment sending this cause has received a
message with a call reference that is not currently in
use on the user network interface.
Class Grouping Hex Code
Invalid message
Details
380
APPENDIX B: ISDN COMPLETION CAUSE CODES
Table 83 Completion Cause Codes (continued)
Class Grouping Hex Code
Protocol error
Decimal
Code
Description
Details
0x52
82
Chan does not
exist
The equipment sending this cause has received a
request to use a channel that is not activated on the
interface for a call.
0x53
83
Suspended call A call resume has been attempted with a call identity
exists, call
that differs from that in use for any currently
identity does
suspended calls.
not
0x54
84
Call identity in
use
0x55
85
Incompatible
destination
0x58
88
Incompatible
destination
0x5B
91
Transit network
does not exist.
0x5F
95
Invalid message Reports an invalid message event only when no other
(unspecified)
cause in the invalid message call applies.
0x60
96
Mandatory IE
missing
The equipment sending this cause has received a
message that is missing an information element that
must be present in the message before that message
can be processed.
0x61
97
Nonexistent
message
The equipment sending this cause has received a
message with a message type that it does not
recognize, either because it is an undefined message,
or it is defined but not implemented by the equipment
sending the cause.
0x62
98
Wrong
message
The equipment sending this cause has received a
message that it considers as not permitted while in the
call state; or a STATUS message was received
indicating an incompatible call state.
The network has received a call suspended request
that contained a call identity (including the null call
identity) that is already in use for a suspended call
within the domain of interfaces over which this call
may be resumed.
The equipment sending this cause has received a
request to establish a call that has low layer
compatibility, high layer compatibility, or other
compatibility attributes (for example, data rate) that
cannot be handled.
381
Table 83 Completion Cause Codes (continued)
Class Grouping Hex Code
Interworking
Decimal
Code
Description
Details
0x63
99
Bad info
element
The equipment sending this cause has received a
message that includes information elements not
recognized because the information element identifier
is not defined, or it is defined but not implemented by
the equipment sending the cause. However, the
information element is not required to be present in
the message to enable the equipment sending the
cause to process the message.
0x64
100
Invalid element The equipment sending this cause has received an
contents
information element that it has implemented.
However, the sending equipment was not able to
implement the code because one or more of the fields
were incorrectly coded.
0x65
101
Wrong
message for
state
The received message is incompatible with the call
state.
0x66
102
Timer expiry
A timer has expired and an associated Q.931 error
handling procedure has been initiated.
0x67
103
Mandatory IE
length error
0x6F
111
Protocol error
reports an error event only when no cause in the
protocol error class applies.
0x7F
127
Interworking
unspecified
There has been interworking with a network that does
not provide cause codes for its actions. Therefore, the
precise cause for a message being sent is not known.
382
APPENDIX B: ISDN COMPLETION CAUSE CODES
C
Overview
CONFIGURING OPTION 184 ON A
WINDOWS 2000 DHCP SERVER
RFC 2132 (DHCP Options and BOOTP Vendor Extensions) allows for
vendor-specific extensions to the DHCP protocol. It defines that all tags in
the range 128 through 254 are set aside for site-specific extensions.
When you configure option 184 on a Windows 2000 DHCP server, you
enable the server to pass the IP address of the NBX Call Processor to NBX
devices such as telephones.
This appendix provides information on how to configure option 184 on
an existing Windows 2000 server system that has been configured to run
the DHCP server software. It covers these topics:
Assumptions
■
Creating Option 184
■
Editing Option 184 Values
■
Activating Option 184
■
The information in this appendix pertains only to a Windows 2000
server. The configuration instructions differ for other DHCP servers.
■
This appendix describes only the configuration of option 184, not the
installation of the Windows 2000 server or the configuration of the
DHCP server software.
Creating
Option 184
1 Start the DHCP Microsoft Management Console:
Start > Programs > Administrative Tools > DHCP
The DHCP dialog box appears. In the left pane, look for the name of your
Windows 2000 DHCP server.
384
APPENDIX C: CONFIGURING OPTION 184 ON A WINDOWS 2000 DHCP SERVER
2 Right click the name of your DHCP server. From the menu that appears,
select Set Predefined Options. The Predefined Options and Values dialog
box appears.
3 Click Add. The Option Type dialog box appears.
4 In the Name field, type a name of your choice. For example, because you
are configuring this option to work with the NBX system, you might
choose NBX as the name.
5 From the Data Type drop-down list, select Byte.
6 Enable the Array check box.
7 In the Code text box, type 184.
8 In the Description text box, enter a description of your choice. Example:
NBX NCP IP Address.
9 Click OK.
In the Predefined Options and Values dialog box, the DHCP Microsoft
Management Console creates a new option name by combining the
option number with the name that you chose and adds this name to the
Option name drop-down list. Example: If you used NBX as the option
name, the system adds 184 NBX to the drop-down list.
Editing Option 184
Values
1 Select the new option name from the Option name drop-down list, and
click Edit Array. The Numeric Value Array Editor dialog box appears.
2 In the Data entry area of the dialog box, click the Decimal radio button at
the right of the word Format.
3 In the Current Values text box, highlight the 0 (zero), and click Remove.
4 To create the new value, enter each element of the new value:
a Click in the New value text box.
b Type the individual element value.
c Click Add.
5 Repeat steps 4 a, b, and c for each element in the following table. As you
add each element, it appears in the Current values list, above previously
added values.
Activating Option 184
385
Add these elements in this order:
What You Type
Description
1
Enter 1 as the only suboption code for option 184. (Some
options can have more than one suboption.)
4
The length of the argument that applies to this suboption.
For option 184, suboption 1, the argument is an IP address,
which is composed of four numerical fields (octets).
NOTE: The next four fields use 10.234.1.254 as the sample IP address of the
NBX Call Processor. Enter the IP address of your NBX Call Processor.
10
The first octet in the IP address of the NBX Call Processor.
234
The second octet in the IP address of the NBX Call Processor.
1
The third octet in the IP address of the NBX Call Processor.
254
The fourth octet in the IP address of the NBX Call Processor.
6 After you have entered all elements in the new value, click OK. You return
to the Predefined Options and Values dialog box. The values that you
entered appear in the Value area of the dialog box under Byte.
The values appear in hexadecimal format although you entered them in
decimal format.
7 To accept the values, click OK. You return to the DHCP Microsoft
Management Console dialog box.
Activating Option
184
To activate option 184, decide whether you want to apply the option to a
specific scope or globally, that is, to all scopes that are served by the
DHCP server software.
To activate option 184 for a specific scope:
1 In the left pane of the DHCP Microsoft Management Console dialog box,
find the scope that you want. Then highlight Scope Options.
2 Right click Scope Options, and, from the menu that appears, select
Configure Options. The Scope Options dialog box appears.
3 Scroll down in the Available Options list until you find the option that you
just added (184 NBX in this example).
4 Enable the check box to the left of the option.
5 Click OK.
386
APPENDIX C: CONFIGURING OPTION 184 ON A WINDOWS 2000 DHCP SERVER
In the right pane, the option name now appears in the Option Name
column. The Vendor column contains the word Standard. The values of
the individual elements that you entered appear in the Value column.
The values appear in hexadecimal format although you entered them in
decimal format.
To activate option 184 globally:
1 In the left pane of the DHCP Microsoft Management Console dialog box,
highlight Server Options.
2 Right click Server Options, and from the menu that appears, select
Configure Options. The Server Options dialog box appears.
3 Scroll down in the Available Options list until you find the option that you
just added (184 NBX in this example).
4 Enable the check box to the left of the option.
5 Click OK.
In the right pane, the option name now appears in the Option Name
column. The Vendor column contains the word Standard. The values of
the individual elements that you entered appear in the Value column.
The values appear in hexadecimal format although you entered them in
decimal format.
D
CONNEXTIONS H.323 GATEWAY
This appendix provides information on how to install and configure the
3Com ConneXtions H.323 Gateway.
It covers these topics:
■
Overview of ConneXtions
■
Installation Requirements
■
Preparing for Installation
■
Installing ConneXtions
■
Overview of H.323
■
The H.323 Connection
■
Connection Considerations
■
Special Issues
■
Checking Connections
■
Placing Calls
■
Receiving Calls
■
Handling Conference Calls
■
Related H.323 Documentation
388
APPENDIX D: CONNEXTIONS H.323 GATEWAY
Overview of
ConneXtions
ConneXtions is a 3Com software product that allows you to use an
appropriately configured Windows system as an H.323 gateway for use
with NBX systems.
H.323 gateways implement an ITU standard that allows telephone-like
call connections to occur through an IP network. Although this standard
addresses the means for transferring data, voice, and images, the NBX
ConneXtions H.323 Gateway focuses on delivering low-cost, high-quality,
voice connections through IP networks.
The ConneXtions software adapts internal NBX system protocols to
equivalent H.323 protocols that are carried across a WAN in IP packets.
The H.323 protocol addresses:
■
Negotiated connections.
■
Negotiated voice compression.
■
Standard extensions.
■
Remote Internet device connections.
For more information, see “Overview of H.323” on page 398.
Installation
Requirements
The ConneXtions H.323 Gateway software requires an NBX system and
at least four additional components:
■
A router with access to a wide area network (WAN)
■
A Windows-based server connected to the NBX LAN
■
ConneXtions software (on the NBX Resource Pack CD)
■
A ConneXtions license
Systems that receive H.323 calls through the public Internet may also
need a firewall. See “Firewall Security” page 408.
WAN Router
WAN Routers typically connect to ISDN, T1, E1, Frame Relay, or
Asynchronous Transfer Mode facilities, depending on the load they carry.
A dedicated router can often reduce problems encountered with
firewalls. Firewalls often interfere with connections because they are
designed to admit only authorized addresses, and because they
discriminate against specific types of packets. The unusual complexity of
Installation Requirements
389
the H.323 protocol presents special problems for firewalls because it
requires additional processing. To minimize packet delay through a
firewall, verify that the firewall is configured to give H.323 packets a high
processing priority.
During installation, you can select a range of TCP or UDP ports to use
with H.323 connections to provide more flexibility when using firewalls.
A ConneXtions gateway can use a separate network interface card to
bypass the firewall delay. However, you should implement this solution
only if it is consistent with your company’s network security policy. For
more information, see “Firewall Security” on page 408.
Windows-based
System
The ConneXtions software requires a dedicated computer system that is
running Windows NT version 4.0 with service pack 4 (or higher), or
Windows 2000. The system hardware must be certified by Microsoft. The
installation software checks for the presence of Windows 2000 or
Windows NT and then loads the correct NBX packet driver from the
NBX Resource Pack CD.
Although the ConneXtions software requires little disk storage,
processing and memory requirements are crucial, and you may need
multiple gateways. Microsoft server licenses do not apply because no
additional operating system logons are involved.
The main considerations are “Windows Compatibility” and “Processor,
Memory, and Bandwidth Requirements”, discussed next, and “Firewall
Security”, on page 408.
Windows Compatibility
To check the compatibility of your system:
1 On a computer that has Internet access, enter
www.microsoft.com/hwdq/hwtest
2 Locate the link to the Hardware Compatibility List.
3 Verify that your intended Windows 2000 or Windows NT system is on the
Hardware Compatibility List.
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APPENDIX D: CONNEXTIONS H.323 GATEWAY
Processor, Memory, and Bandwidth Requirements
Each G.711 call needs about 50 MHz on a Pentium II or 20 Mhz on a
Pentium III. Each G.723 call needs about 128 MHz on a Pentium II or 75
Mhz on a Pentium III. These speed requirements increase directly with the
number of ports. The IP router bandwidth requirements also increase
directly with the number of ports.
The bandwidth requirements for a Pentium II and a Pentium III are
identical.
Table 84 shows the speed and bandwidth requirements for different
numbers of ports. It assumes that each packet carries a 50-byte overhead.
Table 84 Pentium Processor Capabilities
Pentium II Speed (MHz)
Pentium III Speed (MHz)
Bandwidth (Kbps) on the LAN
Ports
G.711
G.723
G.711
G.723
G.711
G.723
2
100
256
40
150
153.6
38.4
4
200
512
80
300
307.2
76.8
8
400
1000
160
600
614.4
153.6
16
800
2000
320
1200
1228.8
307.2
32
1600
4000
640
2400
2457.6
614.4
64
3200
10000
1280
4800
4915.2
1228.8
100
5000
12800
2000
7500
7680
1920
The memory requirements to support port processing also increase with
each new port. A fully configured system, with the maximum number of
ports (100), needs 600 MB of main memory. Hard disk requirements are
less than 40 MB.
Table 85 lists the theoretical maximum number of ports that typical
Pentium processors can handle.
Installation Requirements
391
Table 85 Pentium II and III Processor Capabilities
Pentium II
Ports
Pentium III
Ports
(MHz)
G.711
G.723
(MHz)
G.711
G.723
300
6
2
450
22
6
400
8
3
500
25
6
500
10
4
533
26
7
600
12
4
550
27
7
650
13
5
600
30
8
Dual 500
20
8
650
32
8
667
33
8
700
35
9
733
36
9
750
37
10
800
40
10
1500
74
20
The maximum number of ports can be limited by the number of licenses.
If your port processing requirements exceed the capacity of a single
processor, ConneXtions software supports either multiprocessor (dual
and quad Pentium processors) or multiple gateway solutions. A Windows
2000 or Windows NT system that uses a dual 800 MHz Pentium
processor achieves the same result.
Other System Requirements
Each H.323 port requires 6 MB of memory. 3Com recommends a PC with
at least 128 MB of memory. Disk storage requirements are minimal. In
addition to memory and disk storage, the operating system needs:
■
A compact disk drive for loading ConneXtions software from the
NBX Resource Pack CD.
■
A 3Com Network Interface Card for connecting to the NBX LAN
(10BASE-T or 100BASE-T).
■
A 3Com Network Interface Card for connecting to a separate firewall
or router (optional).
The Call Processor coordinates its activities with the gateway through
a Network Interface Card (NIC) in that gateway system. The same NIC
can also be used to communicate with the IP router. This single NIC
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APPENDIX D: CONNEXTIONS H.323 GATEWAY
configuration is appropriate if the firewall, which separates Internet
and intranet, is either unnecessary or is required by company policy.
ConneXtions
Software
You use the NBX Resource Pack CD to install ConneXtions software. The
ConneXtions software performs the protocol conversions between an
NBX system and the international H.323 standards. To a system
administrator, H.323 ports look like PSTN line ports. Both have extensions
and are configured the same way but have different license requirements.
The NBX Resource Pack CD is also required to change H.323 gateway
parameters after installation. A dealer who wants to explore possible
hardware incompatibilities by running ConneXtions from a substitute
laptop must reinstall ConneXtions on the laptop at each site.
Preparing for
Installation
Before you install a ConneXtions H.323 Gateway:
■
Assemble system information.
■
Check for the G.723 convertor (optional).
■
Verify and install the NT Service Pack (Service Pack 4) (if required).
■
Assemble permissions, licenses, and notifications.
Do not uninstall the current version. You would remove the current
settings.
Assembling System
Information
ConneXtions is installed through an InstallShield wizard. It presents a
series of dialog boxes that request specific permissions and configuration
information. Assemble this information before you begin an installation:
■
NBX administrator login name: <administrator>
■
NBX administrator password: <xxxxxxxx>
■
NBX H.323 software and associated port licenses.
■
Caller ID label for outgoing calls. The default is the caller’s extension.
Use the main office telephone number (10 digits in the United States).
■
NBX system name. Supply the name that H.323 callers see when they
connect to the Auto Attendant.
■
The TCP or UDP port ranges for use with a firewall, if any.
Preparing for Installation
Verifying the
G.723 Converter
393
Installations that need G.723.1 audio compression require access to a
converter in Microsoft NetMeeting 2.1 or 3.01. NetMeeting must be
installed on the same PC that holds the ConneXtions software, but the
two cannot run simultaneously.
G.723.1 does not appear as a selectable option in ConneXtions unless the
converter is accessible.
To confirm that the convertor is present, search for the msg723.acm file
on your hard drive or download it from the Microsoft web site.
Checking Service Pack
(Windows NT Only)
If you are using Windows NT 4.0 to run the ConneXtions software, you
require Service Pack 4 (or higher).
To verify that you are running Service Pack 4 or higher:
1 On the Start menu, select Programs > Administrative Tools (Common).
2 Select Windows NT Diagnostics, and click the Version tab.
3 Verify that the NT version is 4.0 with Service Pack 4 or higher. If it is not,
download the latest version from the Microsoft web site.
Configuring Licenses
To configure licenses, you must enter system information, such as the
number of H.323 ports that you want to install. You can find this
information through NBX NetSet.
You can purchase licensed keycodes to unlock additional ports. A license
provides a software key that unlocks ports that are already loaded. You
can purchase licenses to enable or upgrade a system to 1, 2, 4, 8, or 16
ports on an NBX 100 system, or to 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64 or 100 ports on
a SuperStack 3 system. Software keys are tied to the system serial
number.
To configure licenses:
1 Log on to NBX NetSet:
a Open your browser and connect to the Call Processor by using its IP
address (example: 192.168.1.190) or host name (example: Home).
b Click Administrator.
c Enter your username and password.
d Click OK.
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APPENDIX D: CONNEXTIONS H.323 GATEWAY
2 Access and record the Call Processor MAC address:
a In the NBX NetSet - Main Menu window, click Reports.
b Click the System Data tab.
c Record the MAC address.
MAC addresses use colons as separators. Take care to record the Call
Processor MAC Address, not the Music-on-Hold MAC address, which also
appears in the System Data tab.
3 Determine the number of port licenses:
a Return to the NBX NetSet - Main Menu window.
b Click Operations.
c Click the Licenses tab.
d Record the number of licenses for the H.323 Gateway.
e Click Add License.
f Enter the License Key (must be purchased) to unlock the license. To
obtain a license key, contact 3Com order management or your
supplier.
g Click OK.
Do NOT click Apply. If you click Apply and then OK, the system warns you
that you have an invalid license.
4 Specify Auto Discovery:
a Return to the NBX NetSet - Main Menu window.
b Click System Configuration.
c On the System Settings tab, click System Wide.
d Check Auto Discover Line Cards.
e Click OK.
Installing ConneXtions
Installing
ConneXtions
395
To install the NBX ConneXtions H.323 Gateway:
1 Insert the NBX Resource Pack CD into the PC. Click NBX Applications, and
then click NBX ConneXtions, and then click OK.
If the program does not start automatically, click the Windows Start
menu, and then Run. Type D:autorun, substituting the letter of your
CD-ROM drive for D, and click OK.
2 Respond to these initial InstallShield dialog boxes:
a In the Welcome dialog, click Next.
b In the License Agreement dialog, click Yes.
c In the Default Destination Location dialog, click Next or browse for an
alternative destination location.
d In the NBX license request dialog, click Yes. This confirms that the NBX
system is legal.
3 Specify the Audio Channel Format:
a Select first option (G.711 only) for uncompressed connections
b Select one of the other two options to configure G.723.1 connections.
These options require the file msg723.acm. See “Verifying the
G.723 Converter” on page 393.
4 Information Block - click OK.
5 Specify the number of configured H.323 ports for this ConneXtions
gateway. 3Com recommends that licenses are allocated equally when
using multiple gateways.
6 Optionally, specify a Caller ID Label by entering an outgoing caller
ID notification label of up to 33 digits. Enter numbers only, no other
characters or spaces.
Example: 9787490000
(The Caller ID shows the caller’s extension number followed by the
[User Name] if the entry is left blank.)
7 Specify the Call Processor name. Enter the name H.323 callers see when
they reach the Auto Attendant.
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APPENDIX D: CONNEXTIONS H.323 GATEWAY
8 Only one Gateway? - Click Yes if the NBX system has only one H.323
gateway system.
CAUTION: Multiple gateways must have unique configurations. Multiple
gateways need a distinguishing “Gateway Number”. Assign the first
installed gateway to number 0; the second to number 1; and so on.
3Com recommends that licenses be allocated equally when using
multiple gateways.
9 Enter the Call Processor MAC Address. To find it, log on as an
administrator in NBX NetSet, and click Reports, followed by the System
Data tab.
Be sure to record the Call Processor (NCP) MAC Address, not the
Music-On-Hold MAC address, which also appears in the System Data tab.
10 Select the country in which you are using ConneXtions. This defines the
tones and cadences that ConneXtions uses.
11 Specify the UDP and TCP port ranges for use with a firewall. If these
ranges are not important in your system, use the default settings. You can
coordinate these settings with the firewall administrator.
12 Do you want to interface with a Gatekeeper? Click Yes if you want to use
a gatekeeper. Gatekeepers act as the central point for all calls within their
zones and provide call control services to registered endpoints.
13 If you have chosen to use a gatekeeper, enter the IP address of the
preferred gatekeeper. This forces ConneXtions to try to use this
gatekeeper first and provides a more secure option. If you want
ConneXtions to autodiscover a gatekeeper, leave the field empty. You
might chose to do this if you only have one gatekeeper on your network.
14 Choose what you want ConneXtions to do if it cannot register with the
preferred gatekeeper:
Autodiscover a new Gatekeeper — ConneXtions allows you to make
direct H.323 (unregistered calls) while attempting to contact an
alternative gatekeeper on the network.
Continue unregistered — ConneXtions continues to function without
using a gatekeeper.
Block Calls — ConneXtions blocks calls if it cannot register with a
gatekeeper. (You must either have a gatekeeper on the network, or select
one of the other options which enables ConneXtions to work without a
gatekeeper present.) If a gatekeeper becomes available, you must stop
the ConneXtions service and then restart it.
Installing ConneXtions
397
15 Do you want to use alternate Gatekeepers? If you select Yes, the chosen
gatekeeper maintains a list of alternate gatekeepers to be used if the
preferred gatekeeper does not respond.
If you choose to use alternate gatekeepers and have also selected to
autodiscover new gatekeepers if ConneXtions cannot contact the
preferred gatekeeper, ConneXtions first tries to use alternate gatekeepers
from the list (in priority order); if this fails, it then tries to autodiscover a
new gatekeeper.
16 Do you want to route calls through the Gatekeeper? You can route H.323
calls through the gatekeeper for these reasons:
■
To control calls more effectively. For example, service providers need to
be able to control call flow to allow them to bill for calls placed
through the network.
■
To reroute a call to another endpoint if a called endpoint is
unavailable.
■
To maintain interoperability with multi-vendor equipment which
routes all calls directly using the gatekeeper.
■
To use address resolution in large multi-zone configurations which
have one or more gatekeepers in each zone.
17 You are prompted to set the size of the log files. The default value is 1
Mb. ConneXtions maintains two log files, named ConneXtions01.log
and ConneXtions02.log. Data is logged to only one of these at a time.
Once the active log file reaches a specified size, data logging switches to
the second log file. Any data previously stored in that log file is
overwritten.
18 Setup Complete: Click Finish.
Finishing the
Installation
Verify the installation:
1 Select the Line Card Ports tab under the Device Configuration heading in
NBX NetSet.
2 Note the MAC Address, extension, status, and group for each port.
3 Record the extension numbers for each H.323 port.
4 Enter user-friendly port names that appear when a user dials an H.323
port.
5 Close the browser to exit NBX NetSet and end the installation.
398
APPENDIX D: CONNEXTIONS H.323 GATEWAY
Overview of H.323
The H.323 standard provides a foundation for audio, video, and data
communications across IP-based networks, including the Internet. By
complying with H.323, multimedia products and applications from
different vendors can interoperate, allowing users to communicate
without concern for compatibility.
An NBX ConneXtions H.323 Gateway provides connections similar to
tie lines between existing NBX systems across an IP network. However, it
can also support voice connections between a 3Com NBX Telephone and
other H.323-compliant devices.
ConneXtions H.323 Gateways support communication with:
■
Extensions on other NBX systems that have a ConneXtions gateway.
■
Extensions on PBX systems that have an attached H.323 gateway.
■
H.323 gatekeepers.
■
Miscellaneous H.323-compliant end-point devices such as:
■
H.323 telephones.
■
Suitably equipped personal computers.
■
An emerging class of wireless handsets.
The quality of H.323 calls over the Internet is determined by the quality of
the connection provided by your ISP.
The H.323 protocol addresses these main areas:
Negotiated
Connections
■
Negotiated Connections
■
Negotiated Voice Compression
■
Standard Extensions
■
Remote Internet Device Connections
The H.323 protocol adds negotiated call setup and tear-down capabilities
to Internet Protocol (IP) connections. It exists because Internet protocols
were designed to deliver text messages and computer files in data
packets. IP networks were not originally concerned about involving a
person in a real-time conversation as a telephone does.
H.323 provides call setup capability to negotiate the readiness of two
parties to exchange information and how they do it. It then keeps the
Overview of H.323
399
connection alive until one of the parties ends the connection. A call
tear-down signal indicates to the network, and to the other party, when a
call ends. On standard telephone networks, the telephone company uses
this signal to determine when to start and stop charging for long distance
calls, but long distance charges do not normally apply to H.323 calls.
Other reasons for call setup and tear-down signals are to indicate when
an IP network can release bandwidth to support other calls, and to
inform other devices, such as voice mail systems, when to stop their
conversation-related activities.
Negotiated Voice
Compression
IP networks can carry a lot of traffic, creating competition for the
available bandwidth. Devices have the best access, and the least delay,
when they communicate messages by using fewer and smaller packets.
This also means lower cost.
Voice compression offers a way to reduce the number and size of the
data packets needed to carry each second of a voice conversation.
However, voice compression needs high-speed processors to remove the
redundancies that are inherent in the way standard voice is represented.
The international standard for representing voice (G.711) requires 64 Kb
for each second of conversation. NBX Business and Basic Telephones
contain a digital signal processor (DSP) that transforms spoken voice into
this form. An Ethernet interface, also within each telephone, breaks up
the 64 Kbps stream into frames, adds addressing and error checking, and
dumps the voice-data frames (now 83 Kbps) onto a 10 Mbps LAN.
Elsewhere on the LAN (local or remote), the destination telephone detects
its address, recovers the frames, extracts the bit stream, and reproduces
the voice.
While LANs have enough bandwidth to support uncompressed digitized
voice transfers, WAN bandwidth is less generous. For this reason,
compression is often used to squeeze the digitized voice into a smaller
bandwidth that can be carried across an Internet in smaller packets.
When an NBX call passes through an H.323 gateway, the ConneXtions
software performs an intermediate step that extracts the essential voice
information, encapsulates it in packets, and sends it across an IP network.
G.723 is a compression standard that represents each second of voice
conversation with 6.3 Kbps. ConneXtions software supports the use of
this compression standard. With more than one way to represent voice
400
APPENDIX D: CONNEXTIONS H.323 GATEWAY
(G.711 and G.723), H.323 gateways negotiate the type of compression
they use during each call setup. Negotiation ensures that the compression
on the transmit side matches the decompression processing on the
receiving side. With the frame and packet overhead, each G.723 channel
needs about 19.2 Kbps of the available bandwidth.
Standard Extensions
Remote Internet
Device Connections
ConneXtions routes incoming H.323 calls to one designated extension,
usually the Auto Attendant. Callers can dial additional digits to redirect
calls to internal extensions, but cannot access outside lines by dialing 9.
A NBX system with a ConneXtions gateway can communicate with
remote H.323 devices other than NBX Business and Basic Telephones,
such as:
■
Wireless handsets
■
Personal computers
■
Ordinary telephones (POTS) with adapters
■
H.323 gatekeepers
Wireless Handsets
An emerging class of H.323 wireless handsets is being used by some
large outlet stores as portable PBX telephones. A ConneXtions H.323
server is well suited for use with these H.323 handsets.
Personal Computers
Microsoft NetMeeting software supports H.323 voice connections over
the Internet. The personal computer must be equipped with Internet
access, a sound system, and a microphone.
The current version of Microsoft NetMeeting (3.01) cannot conveniently
place calls through the Auto Attendant because it has no way of entering
extension digits after it reaches an IP address (the Auto Attendant). This is
a temporary limitation that usually disappears when those programs
upgrade to H.323 version 2. Version 2 requires that compliant devices
support out-of-band DTMF (touch-tone) signaling.
If you choose ConneXtions as the gateway under the Advanced Calling
options, and if you configure NetMeeting to “speed-dial” the IP address
and extension, Microsoft NetMeeting can place calls to an extension.
The H.323 Connection
401
POTS Adapters
You can purchase circuit boards that plug into a personal computer and
adapt an analog telephone (POTS) for use with an H.323 connection.
H.323 Gatekeepers
The gatekeeper is an H.323 entity on the network that provides address
translation and controls access to the network for H.323 terminals,
Gateways, and MCUs. The gatekeeper also provides services to the
terminals, Gateways, and MCUs, such as managing bandwidth and
locating Gateways.
The H.323
Connection
H.323 calls between local and remote NBX Business and Basic Telephones
are transparent to users, except for the IP dial plan. The Call Processor
sets up the local end of the H.323 call as though it were setting up a call
through a line card. However, this connection actually goes to a network
interface card (NIC) in a dedicated Windows 2000 or Windows NT system
that is running the ConneXtions software.
The Call Processor requests an H.323 port in the ConneXtions software
by sending a frame, with a simulated Ethernet address, that contains a
requested IP address. The ConneXtions gateway uses this address to
request a level three connection between the local router and the remote
router associated with another PBX or NBX system.
After an IP connection has been established, the ConneXtions software
begins a series of H.323 exchanges by using TCP packets on the IP
connection.
These H.323 exchanges set up the call and negotiate the type of voice
compression that is used. They also cause the remote NBX (or PBX)
system to begin setting up the remote end of the connection.
402
APPENDIX D: CONNEXTIONS H.323 GATEWAY
Connection
Considerations
As soon as an end-to-end connection has been set up, all three networks
(local LAN, WAN, and remote LAN) are ready to pass voice packets. The
NBX Business and Basic Telephones use their DSP to convert spoken
words into digital voice packets. The voice packets are transferred across
the Ethernet to the local H.323 gateway. The gateway strips off the
Ethernet frames, compresses the voice, and encapsulates it within UDP
packets which are delivered to the router, again via the Ethernet. The UDP
packets are placed on the WAN for IP delivery to a remote H.323
gateway. The remote gateway undoes the process and sends the
decompressed voice to an extension.
Connection considerations apply to two areas:
Overall Connectivity
■
Overall Connectivity
■
Quality of Service
An end-to-end NBX H.323 connection consists of a succession of Physical
Connections and Logical Connections, both local and external.
Physical Connections
An NBX H.323 gateway has few physical connections. An installer can
add an H.323 gateway to an existing NBX system by creating one physical
connection on the LAN that links a network interface card in an operating
system to a hub or to a switch. The same connection also gives the H.323
gateway a direct connection to every other device on the near-end LAN.
Those devices include any NBX Business or Basic Telephone, the Call
Processor, and the firewall or router.
Alternatively, you can use a second NIC in the gateway system to provide
a separate connection between the H.323 gateway and the IP router.
Logical Connections
Locally, every device on an NBX LAN has the same physical access to the
local network traffic as any other device. Consequently, addresses control
connections because devices can only read information that is addressed
to them. This makes addressing, and managing addresses, a key concern
for logical continuity.
Logical continuity concerns extend throughout a network connection
because the identity of a frame (or packet) and its destination determine
where it goes, how it is handled, and what happens to it.
Connection Considerations
403
Because so many devices share the same physical media on the Internet
and on the local network, there is always the possibility of incomplete or
degraded connections that arise from network congestion, device
configuration, or addressing problems.
Bridges, switches, routers, and firewalls can help to manage network
congestion, conversions, and security. Configuration problems with of
any of these devices can cause connection difficulties.
Bridges and switches are used to segregate areas of congestion within a
local network (switches are multiport bridges). Routers perform a similar
function but at the Layer-3 level where they perform conversions
between LAN and WAN protocols. Firewalls, which are often built into
routers, protect intranets from unauthorized internet users.
All of these devices can filter packets based on source address,
destination address or packet type. Depending on how the devices are
configured, they can let packets pass or they can block them.
Quality of Service
Unlike switched network connections, Internet voice connections consist
of a sequence of numbered data packets. Packet transfers across the
Internet are subject to delays or loss or both. If these delays are great
(larger than 200 ms), or if the packet loss is excessive, voice quality
deteriorates noticeably. The round-trip delay is typically no greater than
400 ms. You can test this by using several “ping” commands.
Voice conversations occur in “real-time,” so these packets need to be
delivered in a consistent manner and with the shortest delay. The goal is
to deliver 32 regularly spaced packets to the recipient every second.
The frequency response, dynamic range, and noise of a voice
conversation depend on the voice representation. If all data packets reach
their destination, the system provides voice of a specified quality.
The H.323 standard accommodates alternative voice compression
standards that allow users to trade some voice quality for bandwidth by
selecting a different compression standard (G.711 or G.723).
Consequently, packet loss and delay are crucial to the Quality of Service.
Packet Loss
Packet loss can occur for reasons discussed in Bandwidth, Congestion,
and Connections, next.
404
APPENDIX D: CONNEXTIONS H.323 GATEWAY
Bandwidth
Bandwidth is the capacity to carry information. By using H.323, the same
bandwidth that supports one uncompressed G.711 voice connection can,
instead, support several compressed G.723 conversations with little
noticeable difference in quality.
Networks differ in the age of their equipment and in the quality of their
service. Traffic can form a bottleneck if network loads force a wide area
service provider to route traffic through old equipment.
Congestion
Users notice congestion when audio “breaks up” during a call.
Congestion can occur anywhere on the network, for example, at an
overloaded LAN (local or remote), at an overloaded router or firewall, or
within an overloaded internet. Because voice packets are only significant
during a conversation, IP networks respond to congestion by discarding
data packets they cannot accommodate. Resending or delaying packets is
not an effective solution.
At the local level, congestion symptoms can be subtle. For example,
routers from different vendors can respond differently to congestion
because of the way they prioritize their response to packet congestion.
When considering communications problems, it is important to maintain
reserve capacity and to use a systematic approach that considers the
entire, end-to-end, connection.
You can reduce NBX system’s bandwidth requirements by enabling
“silence suppression,” but doing so compromises audio quality. NBX
Business and Basic Telephones generate voice frames at regular intervals
for the duration of a connection. These frames normally continue when
no one is speaking. When silence suppression is enabled, the NBX system
sends a “silence indicator” when the NBX Telephone senses the start of a
silent period. When another NBX device receives this indicator, it inserts
“white noise” until it receives the next frame that contains real voice. All
subsequent “voiceless” frames are suppressed during the silent period.
However, most telephone users will notice the difference between
genuine silence and generated silence.
This type of silence suppression applies to Layer 2 Ethernet transfers. At
Layer 3, the ConneXtions software achieves a similar result by not
sending empty packets during a silent period. The receiving ConneXtions
Connection Considerations
405
gateway generates a silence indicator or sends frames filled with silence,
depending on the silence suppression mode.
Connections
Sometimes packet loss is caused by a poor physical connection. This type
of packet loss is more likely to occur in a LAN than in a WAN. Typical
causes are faulty wiring, connectors, and termination. High-bandwidth
LANs (100BASE-T) are more likely to have termination problems than
10BASE-T LANs.
Packet Delay
Latency and jitter delays affect the Quality of Service.
Latency
Latency is the sum of all the fixed delays in an end-to-end connection.
Latency prevents a caller from responding immediately to another caller’s
remarks.
Most people notice latency when the end-to-end delay is above 200 ms.
(The round-trip delay is typically no greater than 400 ms.) Conversations
sound most natural when latency is below this range. Network latency
can be measured by “pinging” the network connection, but the network
connection is only part of the delay. The entire end-to-end delay also
includes the H.323 gateway, firewall or router, and the LAN itself. System
administrators can control some local device delays by controlling the
system load and by upgrading system components as needed.
Jitter
Momentary transmission delays can affect the pace of a conversation
and, if severe, cause the voice to “break up.” This is known as “jitter.”
All voice-over-internet devices have a “jitter buffer” at the receiving end
whose purpose is to absorb jitter. It does this by delaying the first packets
that arrive by some significant amount (from 50 to 200 ms). This delay
creates a window of time for receiving the next group of related samples
which are then forwarded to a callee at a regular rate. However, if some
packets are too late, and exceed the jitter buffer capacity, those packets
are lost and there are gaps in the audio.
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APPENDIX D: CONNEXTIONS H.323 GATEWAY
Quality of
Service Control
NBX systems address Quality of Service (QoS) issues using methods that
are discussed in this section.
Adaptive Jitter Buffering
All IP network devices use buffers to retime the packets that they receive
from a network. Retiming allows these devices to compensate for the
variable delays that occur as the packets pass through an IP network.
H.323 calls take different paths through a network so the ConneXtions
gateway uses an adaptive “jitter buffer” to minimize delay variability.
Initially, the jitter buffer delays the entire packet stream by 50 ms, an
amount that is too small to be noticed in conversation, but large enough
to account for the variability.
If the packet delays are too variable, packets may not arrive in time to be
useful. This can result in lost packets and gaps in the conversation. When
ConneXtions detects the gaps caused by late-arriving packets, it
automatically extends the jitter buffer delay to match the delay so similar
packets are not lost. ConneXtions can extend the jitter buffer delay up to
its 200 ms limit.
Reconstruction
NBX Business and Basic Telephones expect to receive voice packets at
regular intervals, but unanticipated network delays can cause lost packets
and gaps in the conversation. Reconstruction makes these gaps less
noticeable with “best guess” substitutes based on the preceding and
following samples.
If your network is not optimized for voice, the quality of voice can be
affected.
Priority Schemes
Packet-based voice systems depend on the speedy and consistent delivery
of voice packets for good voice quality. This dependency presents an
obstacle to H.323 communication on the Internet because it was
designed to treat all packets alike with respect to time. By treating
packets that carry e-mail with the same priority as packets that carry
real-time voice, the Internet ignores the important differences between
these applications.
Connection Considerations
407
NBX systems use the latest developments to address voice packet priority
concerns at the Layer 2 Ethernet level and at the Layer 3 IP network level.
Layer 2 NBX systems address Layer 2 priority concerns through the
802.1(p and q) standards. These standards have two parts. The first part
addresses the way Ethernet frames get onto the local “wire.” The NBX
system uses a special “back-off” algorithm that gives voice frames a
higher priority when both voice frames and data frames try to access the
Ethernet wire at the same time.
The second part of the 802.1(p and q) standards addresses the way LAN
switches prioritize different packets that are competing to enter a
different LAN segment. This scheme is based on a 3-bit priority field
within the Ethernet header.
NBX ConneXtions does not support the Layer 2 (Ethernet) 802.1 (p and q)
priority field. However, it is usually possible for IP routers to use these
priority schemes if they are configured to prioritize H.323 packets.
Layer 3 NBX systems address Layer 3 priority concerns through a
packet priority scheme called “IP/DS” (for differentiated services). Many
routers support this scheme, which replaces an earlier scheme (TOS),
which uses a 6-bit priority field within the IP header of every packet. Most
routers examine this field and base their pass-through priorities on it.
NBX systems are designed to use the default values that come with 3Com
switches. If you use other routers, you may need to reprogram their
diff-serv settings. The 3Com default is 101110xx. This setting must be
consistent at both ends of the connection. Note that some routers
overwrite the TOS field (diff-serv priority field) and eliminate the priority
distinctions between packets.
NBX ConneXtions does not support the Layer 3 (IP) 6-bit TOS/DS priority
field. However, it is usually possible for IP routers to use these priority
schemes if they are configured to prioritize H.323 packets.
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APPENDIX D: CONNEXTIONS H.323 GATEWAY
Special Issues
Firewall Security
This section describes issues related to H.323 telephony in general and to
ConneXtions gateways in particular. These include:
■
Firewall Security
■
Gateway Load
■
Remote Access
■
PBX Connections
■
Class of Service
■
IP Type of Service and Differentiated Services
■
Alternate Gatekeepers
Firewalls determine which packets can cross the boundary between a
protected network (intranet) and the public internet. The network
administrator specifies crossing privileges according to network needs
and policies. Control criteria consists of direction of transfer, source and
destination address, packet type, and access ports.
Firewalls affect, and are affected by, H.323 gateways. For example,
firewall processing increases packet delay while the complexity of the
H.323 protocol complicates the firewall programming.
The only way to safely avoid firewall delays is to exclude outside internet
access. This means calls can only be made within the secure intranet.
In some business applications, it is possible to eliminate the firewall delay
by setting up a dedicated physical connection between the H.323
gateway and the router. This approach, which requires a second NIC in
the ConneXtions PC system, bypasses the firewall and puts the burden of
discriminating against non-H.323 packets on the gateway. The PC system
that runs the ConneXtions software must be secure.
Systems that must conform to very conservative firewall policies can use a
Virtual Private Network (VPN) if they need to filter incoming H.323 calls
from the public Internet. An alternative is to use a firewall with H.323
proxy support.
While the operating system that runs the H.323 gateway can be
programmed to serve both as an H.323 gateway and as an IP router, such
arrangements are usually impractical because the gateway needs so
much processing power just to handle audio conversions.
Special Issues
409
3Com recommends that a high-performance PC be dedicated to the
ConneXtions software.
The question of whether an operating system is adequately “secure” is a
subject of debate. The concern is that Windows has many IP ports of its
own. One way to deal with these ports is to set up a firewall that limits
the range of externally accessible ports. However, some organizations
connect the ConneXtions gateway directly to the Internet through a
second NIC that bypasses the firewall protecting the rest of the local
network. ConneXtions supports either configuration.
Organizations that want to completely bypass firewall delays can research
the large volume of security information on the subject.
These descriptions focus on the firewall-protected approach, and offer
guidelines for programming a firewall that can be used to support H.323
connections that are accessible to the public internet.
Outbound Calls
Most firewalls do not restrict outbound packets or IP packets that
respond to outbound initiatives. They are configured for unrestricted
outbound packets with unrestricted reply packets. They do not have to be
changed to support outbound H.323 calls from an NBX system.
Inbound Calls
Firewalls usually discriminate against incoming packets. The network
administrator configures a list of acceptable sources for each destination
address within a protected network. The configuration list includes a list
of entries that the firewall compares to the IP address of the local H.323
gateway and the IP address of an external caller. The configuration list
also discriminates for or against specific types of packets. IP addresses
and packet types must match for packets to pass.
The H.323 protocol uses TCP packets for call setup, and UDP packets to
carry the voice payload. Each type of packet includes an array of port
addresses that are used during the connection. Ports 1720 negotiates
which of the other available ports is used to carry the connection.
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APPENDIX D: CONNEXTIONS H.323 GATEWAY
The ConneXtions gateway uses these default port assignments:
■
For UDP traffic, ConneXtions uses ports 8000-8099 by default. Calls
require four UDP ports each.
■
ConneXtions uses ports 1025-5000 for TCP traffic. You can configure
TCP ports during installation.
During ConneXtions installation, you can configure the TCP ports that are
used for incoming calls. For outgoing calls, no control is possible. Port
1720 must be preserved.
You must configure a firewall to accommodate both TCP and UDP ports
on the same system.
Gateway Load
If the gateway system NIC is attached to a LAN with heavy packet traffic
(more than 700 non-H.323 packets per second), the extra address
processing burden, which requires processing power, can slow down the
gateway. This occurs because the ConneXtions software makes H.323
ports look like hardware line cards to a Call Processor.
To emulate a group of simulated line cards, the gateway system must
read the destination address of every frame that is presented to its
Network Interface Card, instead of responding to only one hard-coded
Ethernet address. The gateway system is able to examine every Ethernet
frame because its NIC does not discriminate between frames. The NIC
passes every frame that it sees to the software for address evaluation.
To reduce the load on an H.323 gateway, you can connect it to an
existing multi-port switch. For optimum performance, use switches that
support 802.1(p and q). The 802.1(p and q) standard offers priority
enhancement which NBX systems exploit. Most 3Com switches support
this feature.
Remote Access
Business people who travel can make routine calls without long distance
line charges by using an internet-ready laptop with Microsoft NetMeeting
to make H.323 calls, and a Virtual Private Network (VPN) connection to
the NBX system LAN. Microsoft NetMeeting software works with
Windows 9x, Windows 2000 and Windows NT, and it can be
downloaded for free from www.microsoft.com.
Special Issues
411
You can use Microsoft’s VPN Dial Up Networking (version 1.3) to establish
a virtual private network connection between a roaming laptop and the
NBX system LAN. One end of the VPN connection is in the laptop while
the other end must be located in a VPN server between the router and
firewall.
The VPN server provides caller authentication and a secure (encrypted)
channel across the internet. After a caller has been authenticated, the
connection is passed to the firewall, which sees the VPN connection as
coming from a recognizable (and therefore firewall-configurable)
IP address. VPN allows a business person to establish an IP connection
into the NBX LAN from a hotel room with internet service.
After an Internet connection has been established, you must change your
automatic call forwarding number:
1 Log on to NBX NetSet as a user.
2 On the User Information tab, click Call Forward.
3 Click the telephone number radio button.
4 Enter the number to which you want to forward the call and click OK.
The caller is now ready to use NetMeeting to place an H.323 to the NBX
system at the office. Configure NetMeeting with the IP address of the
ConneXtions gateway as the gateway in Advanced Calling options. Dial
the NBX extension to place the call.
The call passes through the Auto Attendant to your extension and
forwards the call to your previously specified number.
After the call, return to NBX NetSet and remove the forwarded number
so that work-related calls to your extension are not forwarded to your
home, or to wherever you placed your last H.323 call.
PBX Connections
H.323 gateways allow NBX systems to establish IP connections to other
H.323-equipped PBXs as well as to similarly equipped NBX systems.
Although H.323 standards describe a universally accepted interface for
interconnecting similar systems, each of the 20 or 30 PBX manufacturers
brings its own PBX solution to the marketplace. This complexity is further
increased by the diversity of products and release levels that are
associated with each manufacturer. Because any implementation
differences can affect connectivity, this manual can only offer guidelines
for connecting NBX and PBX systems.
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APPENDIX D: CONNEXTIONS H.323 GATEWAY
Tie-line connections between NBX and PBX systems require technical
people from both ends of the connection to collaborate in these major
areas, discussed next:
■
H.323 Interoperability
■
IP Addressing
■
Voice Ports
■
Extension Dial Plans
■
Extension Delay
H.323 Interoperability
H.323 protocol stacks provide the foundation for H.323 compatibility.
Each consists of a collection of engineered software products that
implements the H.323 standard. Although PBX manufacturers can
develop their own H.323 software stacks, it is more efficient to purchase
software licenses from a company that specializes in developing H.323
protocol stacks.
The ConneXtions gateway has been tested for compatibility with PBX
H.323 gateways that are licensed to use Lucent Elemedia and RADVision
H.323 protocol stacks. It has also been tested with these H.323
telephones:
■
Siemens HiNet LP 5100 (phone application version 1.1.3)
■
ACT Sagitta PH200
■
Microsoft NetMeeting (version 3.0)
IP Addressing
The main goal of an H.323 gateway is to provide telephone-like service
through IP connections. This means each end-to-end connection involves
two types of addresses: a normal telephone number (E.164 address) and
an intermediate IP address. Some H.323 implementations use a
“gatekeeper” to convert the E.164 number into the appropriate
IP address at the calling side, and then to reconvert the IP address to the
E.164 number at the receiving side (for caller ID purposes). ConneXtions
allows you to choose if you want to use a gatekeeper on your network.
Special Issues
413
Outgoing IP addresses can be entered:
■
As pre-programmed speed dial numbers that forward callers to the
Auto Attendant at a remote NBX system.
■
By modifying the dial plan.
You can configure the speed dial numbers to include an appended
extension if a person in one NBX system needs to make frequent calls to
someone in another NBX system. Alternatively, you can configure the dial
plan to route these calls seamlessly to the caller.
NBX system calls to outside numbers must use IP addresses or host
names. The ConneXtions software automatically converts host names to
their corresponding IP address.
Voice Ports
Multiple voice ports allow the Auto Attendant to respond to multiple
incoming calls at the same time. However, since these ports are also used
by the voice mail system, voice mail inquiries can slow down incoming
H.323 calls. You may have to increase the number of voice port licenses.
On the NBX 100 system, 3Com offers 4 license levels:
■
4 ports, 30 minutes
■
4 ports, 4 hours
■
6 ports, 20 hours
■
12 ports, 80 hours
On the SuperStack 3 NBX system, 3Com offers 1, 6, 8, 12, 20, 24, 48,
and 72-port licenses. The administrator selects the maximum time for
voice mail storage.
If you choose to increase your existing level of port licenses, you can
purchase additional 1-port incremental licenses.
Extension Dial Plans
PBX systems can use different dial plans. You must consider dial plan
differences when setting up calls between systems. Dial plans differ in
their use of leading digits, number of digits, and excluded numbers. For
more information, see Chapter 2.
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APPENDIX D: CONNEXTIONS H.323 GATEWAY
Extension Delay
Call setup times for digital connections, compared to analog connections,
are instantaneous so there is no need to include a delay between the
IP address and an appended extension.
Incoming H.323 calls to an NBX system usually go directly to the
Automated Attendant. Although the Auto Attendant can respond with
voice instructions, the call does not have to wait until the end of the voice
instruction to respond. The Auto Attendant accepts extensions whether
they are entered manually or as part of a speed dial number.
Class of Service
The use of an H.323 gateway affects the Class of Service assignments
that are applied to extensions because:
■
H.323 calls use IP addresses instead of the familiar numbers that are
used for public switched network calls (different dial plan).
■
The cost of an H.323 call is distance-independent, so you do not need
to limit long distance calling for cost reasons.
External Call Control
Users of ConneXtions-equipped NBX systems can place H.323 calls to
other H.323 systems anywhere in the world without having to pay long
distance charges. Since there are no long distance charges for H.323
calls, there is no need to restrict them for cost reasons.
IP Type of Service and
Differentiated
Services
The header of each IP packet contains an 8-bit Type of Service (TOS) field
that indicates the precedence (relative importance) of the packet. Routers
then examine the TOS field and give precedence to packets with a higher
TOS setting.
Although your telephone system supports prioritization using the TOS
field, this facility is not supported for H.323 calls. However, for H.323 calls
over the WAN, routers can prioritize voice traffic using alternative means.
For example, during installation, you can select a range of UDP or TCP
port addresses to help with router setup.
Checking Connections
Alternate
Gatekeepers
415
A zone can contain only one gatekeeper at a time, although multiple
distinct devices can provide the gatekeeper function in a zone. Multiple
devices that provide the RAS signaling function for the gatekeeper are
called alternate gatekeepers. Each alternate gatekeeper appears to each
endpoint as a distinct Gatekeeper.
To ensure system availability, redundancy, and scalability, the gatekeeper
can provide RAS signaling function by using multiple physical or logical
devices, referred to as alternate gatekeepers.
Checking
Connections
Gateway Checks
You can use connection checks to pre-qualify an installation and to help
localize connection problems. H.323 gateway installers can conduct
connection checks for:
■
Gateway Checks
■
Network Checks
Gateway checks can verify that the NBX systems at each end of an H.323
connection are working properly.
Gateway Self-Check
A gateway self-check is simply an H.323 call that returns to the local
IP address (loopback test).
To perform a gateway loopback test:
1 Access a ConneXtions H.323 port from an NBX Business or Basic
Telephone by dialing an H.323 port line number or by using a dial plan
configured with a ConneXtions pool number.
You must have Super User Group CoS allowed to dial in to a line port
number directly.
2 Enter the IP address of the gateway.
3 Verify the connection. If you are using default settings, you are connected
to the Auto Attendant. If you are not using default settings, you may be
connected to a different extension number.
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APPENDIX D: CONNEXTIONS H.323 GATEWAY
Local Considerations
All voice packets that move between an NBX Business or Basic Telephone,
Call Processor, ConneXtions gateway, and router on the LAN have a high
priority and high quality of service.
However, at the router and beyond, network administrators can influence
H.323 call quality through the priority that they give to H.323 packets at
both the internet router and at the firewall.If H.323 connections
consistently experience significant delays, you should review the local
router and firewall configurations at each side of the H.323 connection.
Network Checks
A network check uses:
■
Network Ping
■
NetMeeting Connections
Network Ping
A network ping is a packet transfer that checks the logical continuity
between a personal computer and a specified IP (router) address. For
example, you can ping your own address, or the default gateway. The
next ping checks the connection to the IP router at the remote end of the
intended H.323 connection.
The easiest way to initiate a ping is with a DOS ping command. This
command sends four pings to the specified IP address. The router at that
address immediately returns the ping, and the command notes the round
trip delay for each ping packet. Some firewalls do not return pings for
security reasons. If the ping test fails, you can use a “trace router”
command (“tracert”) to find out where the logical connection failed.
To check a connection:
1 Access the DOS command prompt from the DOS shell in Windows.
2 Enter ping on the command line:
ping <192.168.1.190> (sample IP address)
3 Interpret ping results:
a Request timed out (all four times)
■
Ping reached the network but couldn’t connect to the host
■
(No such address; or the device is down.)
■
Initial request timed-out
Checking Connections
■
■
■
417
(It is normal for a first ping to fail and subsequent pings to
succeed.)
Subsequent requests timed-out
(Indicates some packet loss. Rerun using the “-n 100” option. The
“request timed out” number represents the percentage of lost
packets. These packets could have been lost in either direction.)
b Destination host not reachable
■
Ping couldn’t negotiate a path to the specified address
(PC is not plugged into LAN, incorrect gateway address in route,
or a firewall blocked the ping.)
c
Approximate round-trip times in milliseconds
■
Ping time greater than 10 ms but preferably less than 300 ms.
(Ping times can differ because the network often routes individual
packets along different internal routes depending on congestion.)
4 Use tracert on the command line:
tracert <192.168.1.190> (example IP address)
5 Interpret trace results:
The tracert command lists every IP gateway it encounters as it tries to
reach the specified destination. It also includes the number of times (3)
required to reach each intermediate gateway. If a network connection
failure occurred in route, this command indicates where it occurred.
Because the tracert command reveals the chain of logical connections
across a network, it can be useful for comparing the performance of
alternative internet service providers.
NetMeeting Connections
You can also check H.323 voice packets that are sent between systems
that are running Microsoft NetMeeting. ConneXtions software requires it
to run G.711 (CCITT mu-law) or G.723.1 compression. NetMeeting is
available on the Resource Pack CD, or it is available as a free download
from www.microsoft.com.
You can conduct the NetMeeting connect test from the operating system
that runs the ConneXtions software, or from another PC on the LAN.
You must run NetMeeting and ConneXtions on different PCs.
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APPENDIX D: CONNEXTIONS H.323 GATEWAY
In addition to the NetMeeting software, participating computers need an
audio card with a headset (or speakers) and a microphone. The audio
card must support full-duplex 64 Kbps transfers.
Note that it is possible for a NetMeeting connection to be unsuccessful
and still have a successful ConneXtions installation. This can occur
because ConneXtions restricts the range of TCP and UDP ports used but
NetMeeting allocates its ports from a wider pool. For more information,
see “Firewall Security” on page 408. If ConneXtions is installed with a
limited range of allowable ports, and the firewall is configured to pass
only those ports, it is possible that NetMeeting cannot pass a call through
the firewall while the more restricted ConneXtions calls can pass through.
The following procedure uses NetMeeting to test the connection
between the operating system that runs the NBX ConneXtions H.323
Gateway and a remote IP address. This end-to-end NetMeeting check can
help to recognize firewall problems without the complexity of the NBX
system and ConneXtions H.323 server.
To make a NetMeeting check:
1 From the Start menu, select Settings, and then Control Panel.
2 If you are using Windows NT, double-click Services. If you are using
Windows 2000, select Applications, and then Services.
3 Select 3ComConnextions from the list, and click Stop.
4 Access www.microsoft.com using a web browser.
a Click Downloads in the navigation bar.
b In the Product Name field, select NetMeeting.
c In the Operating System field, select Windows 95, Windows 98,
Windows 2000 or Windows NT.
d Click Find It! The latest versions of NetMeeting are displayed. Click the
version you require.
5 Download NetMeeting files and respond to the prompts.
a Click the program name (NM30.exe) next to Download Now.
b Click OK.
c In the Save As dialog box, select a folder for the downloaded files.
d Click Save.
6 Install the NetMeeting files and respond to the prompts:
Checking Connections
419
a Select Open when the download is complete.
b Click Yes to confirm installation.
c Click Yes to acknowledge the legal agreement.
d Click OK to accept the default installation directory.
e Click OK to acknowledge successful installation.
7 Open NetMeeting:
a Click Next on next two screens.
b Enter your details as required.
c Click Next on next two screens.
d Click Put a Shortcut to NetMeeting on My Desktop.
e Click Next on next two screens.
f Click Test.
g Adjust the speaker volume.
h Click Next.
i
Click Test.
j
Adjust the microphone Record Volume.
k Click Next.
l
Click Finish.
8 To attempt a NetMeeting call:
a Click the NetMeeting icon, followed by the telephone icon.
b Enter the IP address of similar system at remote end, after To.
c Select Network or Direct Call, after using.
d Click Call.
e Confirm the connection using a speaker or headset and microphone.
9 To end the call, click the “hang-up” icon.
Interpreting the Results
The NetMeeting check has three possible outcomes:
■
No communication with remote NetMeeting.
Wrong IP address.
Firewall is blocking call setup (TCP) packets.
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APPENDIX D: CONNEXTIONS H.323 GATEWAY
■
Call rings remote end and it answers, but there is no audio.
Faulty connection to a microphone, speaker or both.
Firewall is blocking audio (UDP) packets.
■
Placing Calls
Calls work in one direction, but not in the reverse direction. Place a
call to determine which firewall is blocking TCP traffic. Once you
determine this, it is the remote firewall that is blocking the traffic.
You can place an outgoing H.323 call from an NBX system in one of
several ways, as discussed in this section.
See Chapter 2 for information on how to use the dial plan to set up the
NBX system to use H.323 ports.
IP Address Entry
Depending on how you set up the dial plan, the most convenient way to
place a call to a new number is to dial a ConneXtions extension list
(configured within the dial plan), which provides a connection to an
available H.323 port. If a port is available (not busy), enter the extension
and IP address from the telephone key pad. Use the key to separate
the four “octets” in the IP address, and then press the # key to “dial
now.”
*
You must configure the dial plan to use ConneXtions. You must have
Super User Group CoS privileges to perform this test.
These examples show key pad sequences that request an extension list
connection and a specific port connection:
8192 168 1 15#
*
**
where extension list access is used
OR
754 192 168 1 15#
*
**
if there is no extension list access, or if you want to test specific ports.
The first example begins with an 8 to request any available H.323 port.
The second example begins with the 3-digit extension (754) of a specific
H.323 port. The remaining digits in both examples represent the IP
address of the remote H.323 gateway (192.168.1.15). Note that IP
addresses are always four octets long. In this case, 15 is the last octet.
Placing Calls
421
Extension Lists
You can configure H.323 ports for single-digit access (usually 8) instead of
a specific 3-digit line extension. The single-digit access allows the NBX
system to select an available line port when you place an external call.
Internet IP line ports and CO (central office) line ports must never be
assigned to the same extension list because they use very different dial
plans. Conventional practice is to use 9 for external switched network
(PSTN) connections and 8 for external IP network connections.
Calls to other NBX systems (or PBX systems) can include a destination
extension. This example represents a call to an extension (273) on a
remote NBX system that has an H.323 ConneXtions gateway:
8192 168 1 15 273#
*
** *
The # sign tells ConneXtions to “dial now.” The last asterisk, ,
terminates the IP address, but ConneXtions cannot dial the number until
it sees the “# sign,” or until 4 seconds pass after the last digit. In the
preceding example, the IP address (192.168.1.15) and the extension are
presented to the device as the “called party.”
*
The # sign also precedes the extension as shown below. This allows the
ConneXtions gateway to complete the IP connection before it presents
the remaining digits to the remote terminal:
8192 168 1 15#273
*
**
Both configurations produce the same result when dialing into another
NBX system; however, other PBXs can be position-sensitive. If you are not
sure, use the first format with the # sign after the extension.
Speed Dials
Your telephone system has a speed dial capability that offers a quick way
to dial frequently called numbers. Each telephone is capable of accessing
199 previously stored dial sequences with up to 30 characters in each
sequence. These sequences can represent switched network numbers or
Internet addresses. Special 3-digit speed dial numbers specify each dial
sequence.
Speed dial numbers must be preceded by the “Feature” button when
entered from a telephone. This button distinguishes NBX speed dial
numbers from ordinary extensions that use the same three digits.
422
APPENDIX D: CONNEXTIONS H.323 GATEWAY
Speed dial numbers can be system-wide or personal. System speed dial
numbers (700-799) apply system-wide and are programmed by the
system administrator. Personal speed dial numbers (601 through 699)
apply only to an individual telephone; they are programmed by its owner.
You can assign any of the first ten speed dial numbers in each type group,
system or personal, to any Access button on a telephone. For more
information, see Chapter 6 of the NBX Telephone Guide.
Setting Up Speed Dials
The following procedure assumes that you are logged on to NBX NetSet
as an administrator, and that you know the H.323 port extensions that
were established during installation.
To set up speed dials:
1 In the NBX NetSet - Main Menu window, click Device Configuration.
2 Click the Line Card Ports tab.
3 Note the extension number of each listed NBX H.323 port.
4 Return to the NBX NetSet - Main Menu window, and click System
Configuration.
5 Click the Speed Dials tab.
6 To complete the fields:
a Note a speed dial number. (One-button dialing requires system speed
dial numbers 700 through 709.
b In the New Number field, type an H.323 extension, or an 8 (for
extension list), followed by an IP address, or a system name. Examples
are:
8192 168 1 15 273# (IP address plus extension)
*
** *
*
8192.168.1.15 273#
(IP address plus extension)
[email protected]#
(extension plus host name)
8h323.nbx.com#
(host name, defaults to AA)
Use those characters shown here, that is, no spaces, hyphens or & signs.
c In the Comment field, enter a description with up to 30 characters,
such as Tie-line to NYC, and then click Apply.
7 Verify the speed dial entry by pressing the Feature button followed by the
new speed dial number.
Placing Calls
One Button Access
423
You can configure an Access button on a NBX system to dial a complete
H.323 (or switched) dial sequence.
This procedure assumes that all buttons available for one-button access
are configured in the first ten system (or personal) speed dial locations.
To set up one-button dials:
1 In the NBX NetSet - Main Menu window, click Device Configuration.
2 Click the Telephones tab or the Group Telephones tab. Select a telephone
extension or a telephone group.
3 Click Button Mappings.
4 Associate one of the first ten speed dial numbers with a telephone Access
button:
a Locate the Type field associated with an available button.
b Select the speed dial selection (SSD 0 through 9) that is associated
with a previously programmed speed dial code (700 through 709).
c Click Apply and then click OK (to return).
5 Verify the one-button dial feature operation by pressing the new button
and confirming that it dials the specified number.
Entering Digits
During Calls
When ConneXtions dials a call, it stores the dialed digits until it connects
the call. Then it sends those digits, and any subsequent digits, to the
remote H.323 device if the device supports version 2, or later, of the
H.323 standard.
The behavior of ConneXtions depends on when the # sign is entered
during this process.
ConneXtions sends digits as messages, which are more reliable than
audio tones. ConneXtions also expects to receive digits from H.323
devices in the same way, and therefore does not have a tone detector.
This means older (H.323 version 1) devices cannot send or receive digits
to or from ConneXtions. For example, the current version of Microsoft
NetMeeting, which sends DTMF tones in the audio stream (in-band
signaling), cannot use DTMF signaling to pass the Auto Attendant.
In instances where other devices might listen for in-band DTMF signaling,
the quality of the tone recognition depends on the selected voice
compression. Tones transmitted by G.711 can be reproduced, but tones
transmitted by G.723.1 are degraded.
424
APPENDIX D: CONNEXTIONS H.323 GATEWAY
Receiving Calls
Auto Attendant
ConneXtions gateways route incoming calls to any available H.323 port.
The NBX system then connects this port to the extension specified during
port configuration. H.323 ports are configured through the NBX software
just like line card ports. Selectable extensions are:
■
Auto Attendant (500)
■
Receptionist’s telephone (usually the lowest numbered extension on
the system, with a default of 1000 on the SuperStack 3 NBX system or
100 on the NBX 100 system)
■
Other extensions (each ConneXtions H.323 port can go to a single
extension)
H.323 calls are usually routed to the Auto Attendant. From there,
NBX callers can reach internal extensions without operator assistance by
supplying a 3-digit extension when setting up the call (as the called
party), or by dialing an extension after the Auto Attendant answers.
Callers cannot get an outside line through the Auto Attendant because
dialing 9 normally diverts incoming calls to the name directory.
You can configure H.323 calls to appear to go directly to an internal
extension by adding a 3-digit extension immediately after the last octet in
an H.323 IP address. Do not use commas, spaces, or hyphens between
the IP address and an extension when programming an H.323 speed dial
number. IP network connections do not incur delays like those that occur
with analog PSTN connections.
8192 168 1 15 273#
*
** *
The # sign in this example indicates when the last digit was entered so
that the Call Processor does not have to wait 4 seconds to determine that
a caller has no other digits to dial.
Caller ID Response
The Auto Attendant receives caller ID information from an outside
caller and passes it to a caller-selected extension. On a telephone, the
caller ID name and extension (if applicable) appear in brackets to indicate
that the network has not authenticated the enclosed information.
Receiving Calls
425
Attendant Console
By convention, NBX systems reserve extension 100 or 1000 for the
Attendant Console (receptionist), although the Attendant Console can be
assigned any internal extension number. Outside callers cannot reach
internal extensions without operator involvement when incoming calls
are directed to the Attendant Console. See “Adding an Auto Attendant”
in Chapter 6.
Other Extensions
Incoming H.323 calls can be routed directly to some other extension or to
a phantom mailbox. Sales people often have phantom mailboxes because
they are never in the office. Calls to their extension go directly to their
voice mailbox. Note that phantom mailbox extensions cannot be used to
forward calls.
Setting Up an H.323 Port Route
After you install an H.323 line port, you need to configure it.
To configure a H.323 line port:
1 In the NBX NetSet - Main Menu window, click Device Configuration.
2 Click the Line Card Ports tab.
3 Select an H.323 port. This port has the default setting from the Auto
Discovery installation process.
4 Click Modify.
5 In the AutoExt field, enter the required extension number.
CAUTION: Do not route an H.323 port directly to another line port.
Routing an H.323 call to a PSTN line, from the Internet, is dangerous
because it would allow anyone to make long distance toll calls through
the Call Processor — with no accountability.
6 Click OK.
426
APPENDIX D: CONNEXTIONS H.323 GATEWAY
Handling
Conference Calls
You can include gateway port connections in local conference calls along
with PSTN line connections. However, ConneXtions does not support
conferences at the H.323 level, so, if two or more of the conferring
parties are at a remote NBX system, each requires a separate port
connection. This characteristic determines who can initiate the
conference call.
A four-way conference call with three people at one NBX site and one
person at the other site uses one H.323 port if it is set up from the side
with three people. Otherwise, it needs three ports.
Related H.323
Documentation
Here are some useful sources of information on the H.323 standard:
Web Sites
■
http://www.packetizer.com/iptel/h323/
■
http://www.itu.int/itudoc/itu-t/rec/h/
Book
IP Telephony: Packet-Based Multimedia Communications Systems —
Olivier Hersent, David Gurle, Jean-Pierre Petit (1999).
E
CALLER ID
Caller ID behavior varies depending on the type of device and the
conditions under which the call is received. This appendix describes these
caller ID conditions:
Forwarded Calls
and Caller ID
■
Forwarded Calls and Caller ID
■
Long Caller ID Character Strings
■
Specific Caller ID Situations
While a forwarded call is ringing on a telephone:
■
On the top line in the telephone’s display panel, the Caller ID of the
original caller appears and a greater than (>) character on the left side
of the display helps you to visually identify the Caller ID of the original
caller.
■
On the bottom display panel line, the Caller ID of the telephone that is
performing the transfer appears.
After the call is answered, only the Caller ID of the original caller remains
in the display and the greater than (>) character is removed.
Long Caller ID
Character Strings
Some models of the NBX Business Telephone can display two lines of 16
characters while other models of the NBX Business Telephone can display
two lines of 24 characters. The displays of different brands and models of
analog telephones with built-in Caller ID can show either 16 or 24
characters per line. The same is true of Caller ID boxes that are connected
in-line with analog telephones.
If the length of the Caller ID information on either the top or bottom line
exceeds the width of the NBX telephone display panel, the information is
truncated for the first five seconds. After five seconds, the Caller ID
information on the bottom line is cleared, and any truncated information
428
APPENDIX E: CALLER ID
from the top line appears on the bottom line. After an additional five
seconds, if the Caller ID information from the top line exceeds the
capacity of both display lines, the numeric portion is removed and only
the name portion appears in the display.
Specific Caller ID
Situations
Analog Telephones
The Caller ID information that appears in the telephone display panel can
be different in some specific call situations.
Analog telephones can be connected to the NBX system using these
interfaces:
■
NBX single port Analog Terminal Adapter
■
A port on an NBX Analog Terminal Card
■
Citel Analog Interface Card
Analog Terminal Adapter and Analog Terminal Card Ports
If you have an analog telephone connected to the NBX system using a
single port Analog Terminal Adapter or to a port on an Analog Terminal
Card, the behavior of Caller ID on the analog telephone (or on Caller ID
boxes connected in-line with the analog telephone) depends on whether
the Caller ID device/telephone supports 2-line Caller ID display.
■
Most analog telephones with built-in Caller ID and most Caller ID
boxes do not support 2-line display of Caller ID information. For this
type of device, only the Caller ID of the original caller appears.
■
If the analog telephone or Caller ID box supports 2-line display of
Caller ID information, the information appears in the same way as it
does on an NBX telephone.
If the Caller ID information exceeds the capacity of the Caller ID display
(some can display 16 characters and others can display 24 characters) the
Caller ID information is typically truncated at the width of the display.
Citel Analog Interface Card
If you have analog telephones connected to the NBX system using the
Citel analog interface card, the behavior of Caller ID on the analog
telephones is the same as the behavior of analog telephones connected
to a single port Analog Terminal Adapter or a port on an Analog Terminal
Card. See “Analog Terminal Adapter and Analog Terminal Card Ports” on
page 428.
Specific Caller ID Situations
Bridged Extension
Telephones
Calls That Are
Forwarded Multiple
Times
429
Caller ID information appears in exactly the same way on a bridged
extension telephone as it does on a non-bridged extension telephone.
See “Caller ID” on page 427 and “Long Caller ID Character Strings” on
page 427.
If a call is forwarded several times, the Caller ID information of the
original caller appears on the top line of the display panel of the ringing
telephone and the Caller ID of the telephone that most recently
forwarded the call appears on the bottom line. A greater than (>)
character appears to the left of the original Caller ID on the top line in the
telephone display panel.
Example: A places a call to B, who answers the call and forwards it to C,
whose telephone is forwarded to D. While telephone D is ringing, the top
line in the display panel contains the Caller ID for A and the bottom line
contains the Caller ID for C. After 5 seconds, only the Caller ID
information for A appears.
External Calls
The display of Caller ID information for external calls depends on how the
call arrives at the NBX system.
External Analog Line Card Calls
An external call arrives at an NBX system on an Analog Line Card port
and is routed to A’s telephone.
When A transfers the call to B, the Caller ID (if any is provided by the
telephone company) appears in the top line of B’s telephone display
panel. If no Caller ID information is available, the extension associated
with the Analog Line Card port appears on the top line. A’s Caller ID
information appears in the bottom line.
Exception: An Analog Line Card port is mapped to an internal extension.
The call is not answered and goes to the call coverage point for the
extension. If the coverage point is the receptionist’s telephone, for
example, the receptionist sees the Caller ID information only for the
external call, and not for any telephone on which the mapped Analog
Line Card Port appears.
430
APPENDIX E: CALLER ID
External ISDN BRI Calls
An external call arrives at an NBX system on an ISDN BRI channel and is
routed to A’s telephone.
When A transfers the call to B, the Caller ID (if any is provided by the
telephone company) appears for five seconds in the top line of B’s
telephone display panel. If no caller ID information is available, the Trunk
name and channel number from the Digital Line Card appear on the top
line of B’s telephone display panel. A’s ID appears on the bottom line.
External ISDN PRI Calls
An external call arrives at an NBX system on an ISDN PRI channel and is
routed to A’s telephone.
When A transfers the call to B, the Caller ID (if any is provided by the
telephone company) appears for five seconds in the top line of B’s
telephone display panel. If no caller ID information is available, the Trunk
name and channel number from the Digital Line Card appear on the top
line of B’s telephone display panel. A’s ID appears on the bottom line.
External T1 Calls
An external call arrives at an NBX system on a T1 channel and is routed to
telephone A. If the call is transferred to B, the display of caller ID
information on B’s telephone depends on which Incoming Call Digit
Format is configured on the T1 board.
■
DNIS/DID — The T1 board is configured to expect either Dialed
Number Identification System digits or Direct Inward Dialing digits.
If DNIS digits arrive, there is no Caller ID information. Instead, the NBX
system displays the name of the T1 trunk and the extension associated
with the T1 channel.
■
DNISANI — The T1 board is configured to expect Dialed Number
Identification System digits followed by Automatic Number
Identification digits.
The NBX system displays the ANI portion of the incoming digit
sequence followed by the name of the T1 trunk and the extension
associate with the T1 channel. The ANI field can be configured to
capture either 7 or 10 digits of ANI information.
Specific Caller ID Situations
Internal Calls
Nortel Phones
Parked Calls
431
On a single NBX system, user A calls B who transfers the call to user C. In
C’s telephone display panel, the top line contains Caller ID information for
A and the bottom line contains Caller ID information for B.
If you have Nortel telephones connected to your NBX system using the
Nortel interface card, the behavior of Caller ID on these telephones is
identical to the behavior on NBX telephones.
When you retrieve a parked call, the Caller ID associated with the call
appears for approximately five seconds in your telephone display panel.
You do not see the Caller ID of the person who parked the call.
Second Incoming Call
If you are currently involved in a call on your telephone and another call
arrives, for approximately five seconds you see “Incoming Call” on the
top line of the telephone display panel and the Caller ID of the incoming
call appears on the bottom line.
TAPI Calls
If a call is forwarded to a telephone that is controlled by TAPI software,
both the original Caller ID and the Caller ID of the person forwarding the
call are sent to the TAPI software.
TAPI Redirected Calls
If telephone A is being monitored by an external TAPI application and a
forwarded call to A is redirected to telephone B, the TAPI software passes
the Caller ID of the original caller and the Caller ID of the forwarding
telephone to telephone B.
VTL Calls
If A1 calls A2 who then forwards the call to B1 over a Virtual Tie Line
connection, the Caller ID information for A2 appears in the display panel
on B1’s telephone. The Caller ID information includes the IP address of
NBX system A and the extension number of A2.
Calls Transferred to
Hunt Groups
When someone performs a blind transfer to a hunt group, telephones in
the hunt group display the called ID information of the original caller on
line 1 and the hunt group name and number on line 2. After a hunt
group member answers the call, only the caller ID information of the
original caller appears.
432
APPENDIX E: CALLER ID
GLOSSARY
10BASE-T
A form of Ethernet and IEEE 802.3 network cabling using twisted pair. It
provides 10Mbits/s with a maximum segment length of 100 m (382 ft).
10BASE2
An implementation of IEEE 802.3 Ethernet standard, often called thinnet
or cheapernet, because it uses thin coaxial cable. 10BASE2 runs at a data
transfer rate of 10 Mbits/s with a maximum segment length of 185 m
(607 ft) per segment.
911
The emergency service that provides a single point of contact for police
and fire departments. See also E911.
account codes
ADSL
ATM
Codes that allow you to keep track of calls associated with a client or
account for bookkeeping or billing purposes.
Asymmetrical Digital Subscriber Line. A telephone line that delivers
high-speed data services, such as Internet access, videoconferencing,
interactive TV, and video on demand. The line is split asymmetrically so
that more bandwidth can be used from the telephone company to the
customer (downstream) than from the customer to the telco (upstream).
Asynchronous Transfer Mode. A cell-based data transfer technique in
which channel demand determines packet allocation. ATM offers fast
packet technology, real-time, demand-led switching for efficient use of
network resources.
Attendant Console
The Attendant Console is a standard telephony device that shows the
status of each extension in a telephone system. The Attendant Console is
usually used by a receptionist to connect incoming calls to the correct
extension. All incoming calls ring at the Attendant Console.
AUI
Attachment Unit Interface. The IEEE 802.3-specified cable and connector
used to attach single-channel and multiple-channel equipment to an
Ethernet transceiver. Defined in Section 7 of the 802.3 standard.
434
GLOSSARY
auto dial
A feature that opens a line and dials a preprogrammed telephone
number.
Auto Attendant
A system feature that provides incoming callers with menu options to
help them reach the appropriate person or information.
Auto Discovery
A feature that “discovers” a new telephone or other device on the
network. A new telephone receives a default telephone number that
appears on the telephone display panel. A new device is assigned one or
more extension numbers or device numbers.
auto redial
A modem, fax, or telephone feature that redials a busy number a fixed
number of times before giving up.
autorelocation
A feature that allows a telephone to keep its extension number and
personal and systems settings when you connect it to a different Ethernet
jack on the same LAN.
backbone
A high-capacity network that links together other networks of lower
capacity. A typical example is a Frame Relay or ATM backbone that serves
a number of Ethernet LAN segments.
bandwidth
The capacity of a connection method to carry data.
BRI
Basic Rate Interface. An ISDN standard that allows two circuit-switched B
(bearer) channels of 64 Kbit/s each plus one D (data) channel at 16 Kbit/s
for a total of 144 Kbit/s to be carried over a single twisted pair cable.
bridge
A networking device that connects two separate local area networks and
makes the LANs look like a single LAN, passing data between the
networks and filtering local traffic.
bridged extension
An extension of a primary telephone that appears on one or more
secondary telephones. Incoming calls and indeed any activity associated
with the primary telephone can be handled on any of the secondary
telephones.
broadcast
A simultaneous transmission method that sends each packet from one
node to all other nodes.
buffer
A temporary storage area for data that compensates for a difference in
transmission speeds.
GLOSSARY
bus topology
byte
call coverage point
caller ID
435
A type of network in which all devices are connected to a single cable. All
devices that are attached to a bus network have equal access to it, and
they can all detect all of the messages that are put on to the network.
A unit of 8 bits that forms a unit of data. Usually each byte stores one
character.
The user-specified destination for the call forward feature, that is, how
the system is to handle incoming calls when the user is unable to
answer the telephone.
A telephone company service that displays the name and number
associated with an incoming call. Also called calling line ID or CLI. See
also CLIR.
call forward
A feature that allows calls to be transferred to a call coverage point (voice
mail, the Auto Attendant, or a prespecified telephone number) when the
user is unable to answer the telephone.
calling groups
A feature that transfers incoming calls to a specified group of telephones.
All telephones ring at the same time. See also hunt groups.
call park
A feature that places a call in a “holding pattern” and makes it available
for others to pick up from any telephone on the system.
call permissions
Restrictions that an administrator establishes to control the types of calls
that users can place from their telephones. Can be based on time of day.
call pickup
A feature that allows users to retrieve calls that ring on other telephones.
call reports
A feature that downloads data about calls and creates simple reports or
exports the data for use in spreadsheets, word processors, or reporting
programs.
category 3
The cable standard for UTP (unshielded twisted pair) voice-grade cabling
that is specified by EIA/TIA 568 for use at speeds of up to 10Mbit/s,
including 10BASE-T Ethernet.
category 4
The cabling standard specified by EIA/TIA 568 for use at speeds of up to
20Mbit/s, including 16Mbit/s token ring.
category 5
The cabling standard specified by ElA/TIA 568 for use at speeds of up
to 100 Mbit/s including FDDI (TP PMD), 100BASE-T and
100BASE-VG-AnyLan, and potentially ATM at 155Mbit/s.
436
GLOSSARY
client/server
computing
CLI
CLIR
The division of an application into two parts that are linked by a network.
A typical example is a database application in which the database and
application software reside on a server, and the interface for entering or
retrieving information resides on individual workstations (clients).
See caller ID.
Calling Line Identity Restriction. A telephone company option that allows
the caller to withhold caller identity from the person being called.
coaxial cable
High-capacity networking cable that is formed by an outer braided wire
or metal foil shield surrounding a single inner conductor, with plastic
insulation between the two conducting layers. “Coax” cable is used for
broadband and baseband communications networks. Ethernet employs
thin coaxial cable in 10BASE2 and thick cable in 10BASE5.
CODEC
COmpressor/DECompressor. A hardware circuit or software routine that
compresses and decompresses digitized audio, video, or image data.
Most codecs include the functions of A/D and D/A conversion as well as
compression and decompression.
COder/DECoder. A hardware circuit that converts analog audio or video
signals into digital code, and vice versa, using techniques such as pulse
code modulation and delta modulation. A CODEC is an A/D and
D/A converter.
collapsed backbone
Network architecture in which the backplane of a device, such as a hub,
performs the function of a network backbone. Example: The backplane
routes traffic between desktop nodes and between other hubs serving
multiple LANs.
collision
The result of two devices on a shared transmission medium, like Ethernet,
transmitting simultaneously. Both devices must retry their transmissions.
A delay mechanism used by both senders drastically reduces the chances
of another collision.
collision detection
Ethernet devices detect collisions instantly and attempt to resend. This is
the principle on which CSMA/CD (Carrier Sense Multiple Access with
Collision Detection) is based and the access control method for Ethernet.
concentrator
A central chassis into which various modules, such as bridging,
supervisory, and 10BASE-T cards are plugged.
GLOSSARY
437
congestion
The result of increased network use on a LAN segment. Standard
network partitioning practices must be invoked to reduce bottlenecks
and maximize throughput speeds on the segment.
contention
The method used to resolve which users gain access to crowded
bandwidth.
CO
Central Office. A telephony term for the telephone company site that
houses the PSTN switching equipment.
CoS
Class of Service. A collection of calling permissions that are assigned to
individual users and govern the times and types of calls these users can
make.
CPE
Customer Premises Equipment. Telecommunications equipment,
including PBXs and wiring, that is located in a user’s premises.
CSU
Channel Service Unit. Data transmission equipment to repeat the signal
from the carrier and link to CPE. Vendors add value to CSUs by adding
performance monitoring and management features.
CTI
Computer Telephony Integration. A generic name for the technology that
connects computers and telephone systems through software
applications.
data compression
A method of reducing the amount of data to be transmitted by reducing
the number of bits needed to represent the information.
delayed ringing
Prevents a telephone on a shared line from ringing until the incoming call
has rung on other telephones a set number of times.
delayed ringing
pattern
The definition for the order in which telephones ring and how many
times each telephone rings.
demand priority
access
A method for supporting time-sensitive applications such as video and
multimedia as part of the proposed 100BASE-VG standard offering
l00Mbit/s over voice-grade UTP cable.
DHCP
DID/DDI
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol. A method by which devices are
assigned temporary, renewable IP addresses by a server when the devices
become active on the network.
Direct Inward Dial/Direct Dialing Inward. A feature that allows outside
calls to reach an internal extension without going to an operator or
Automated Attendant.
438
GLOSSARY
direct mail transfer
domain
DSP
Transfers a caller directly to another user’s voice mail without requiring
them to wait through ringing and without interrupting the recipient.
A group of nodes on a network that form an administrative entity. A
domain can also be a number of servers that are grouped and named to
simplify network administration and security.
Digital Signal Processor. A special-purpose CPU tailored to handle
complex mathematical functions. A DSP takes an analog signal and
reduces it to numbers so its components can be isolated, sampled, and
rearranged more easily than in analog form.
DSU/CSU
Digital (or Data) Service Unit/Channel Service Unit. A pair of
communications devices that connect an in-house line to an external
digital circuit (such as T1 and DDS). It is similar to a modem, but connects
a digital circuit rather than an analog circuit.
DTMF
Dual Tone Multi-Frequency. A term for push button dialing. The pushed
button generates a pair of tones which uniquely identify the button that
was pressed.
E911
Enhanced 911. The addition of two features to the standard 911 service:
one is ANI (Automatic Number Identification) to identify the person
associated with the calling telephone, and the other is ALI (Automatic
Location Identification) to identify the physical location of the calling
telephone.
encapsulation
The process of sending data encoded in one protocol format across a
network operating a different protocol, where it is not possible or
desirable to convert between the two protocols. Also known as protocol
tunneling.
error correction
A technique to restore data integrity in received data that has been
corrupted during transmission. Error correction techniques involve
sending extra data. The correct form of the data can be reconstructed
from the extra information.
error detection
A set of techniques that can be used to detect errors in received data.
Parity checking techniques include the use of parity bits, checksums or a
Cyclic Redundancy Check (CRC).
Ethernet
The most widely used LAN transmission protocol. Based on a network bus
topology, it runs at a maximum 10Mbit/s and can use a wide variety of
cable types. The IEEE Ethernet standard is IEEE 802.3.
GLOSSARY
Ethernet switching
fast Ethernet
fast packet switching
439
A technique that brings the advantages of a parallel networking
architecture to contention-based Ethernet LANs. Each LAN can be
segmented with its own path. When users on different segments
exchange data, an Ethernet switch dynamically connects the two
separate Ethernet channels without interfering with other network
segments.
An evolution of Ethernet that raises the bandwidth to 100 Mbit/s.
A WAN technology for transmitting data, digitized voice, and digitized
image information. It uses short, fixed length packets.
FDDI
Fiber Distributed Data Interface. An optical fiber-based token-passing ring
LAN technology that carries data at a rate of 100 Mbit/s.
FRAD
Frame Relay Access Device. A wide-area networking device that forwards
traffic to and from the endpoint of a the network.
frame
A structured group of bits sent over a link. A frame can contain control,
addressing, error detection, and error correction information. The term is
often used synonymously with the term packet.
frame relay
gateway
gigabit Ethernet
glare
group mailboxes
H.323
A packet-switching wide-area technology for interconnecting LANs at
high speeds.
A network device that provides a means for network traffic to pass from
one topology, protocol, or architecture into a different topology, protocol,
or architecture.
An Ethernet technology that raises transmission speed to 1 Gbit/s,
targeted primarily for use in backbones.
A condition in telephony where both ends of an available connection are
seized at the same time.
Mailboxes that are not associated with a single telephone but allow a
group of users to have joint access to a single mailbox.
An ITU standard for the transmission of real-time audio, video, and data
communications over packet-switched networks, such as local area
networks (LANs) and the Internet. H.323 is the basis for Internet
telephony.
440
GLOSSARY
header
hierarchical network
hot swap
The control information added to the beginning of a transmitted
message. This may consist of packet or block address, destination,
message number and routing instructions.
A network with one host at its hub, which is the major processing center,
and one or more satellite processing units.
The ability of a device to have parts removed and replaced without
turning off the device and without interrupting the service the device
provides.
hub
The center of a star topology network or cabling system. A multi-node
network topology that has a central multiplexer with many nodes feeding
into and through the multiplexer or hub. The nodes do not directly
interconnect.
hunt groups
Informal “call centers” in which a call rings to one member of the group.
If there is not answer, the call rings at the next member’s telephone and
so on until a member answers.
hybrid mode
A PBX operating mode in which some outside lines are grouped together
in pools while other lines are assigned directly to buttons on telephones.
Users access outside lines by dialing a pool access code. See also key
mode.
IEEE
Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers. A U.S. publishing and
standards organization responsible for many LAN standards, such as the
802 series.
IEEE 802.2
The Data Link standard for use with IEEE 802.3, 802.4 and 802.5
standards. It specifies how a basic data connection should be set up over
the cable.
IEEE 802.3
The Ethernet standard. A physical layer definition that includes
specification for cabling plus the method of transmitting data and
controlling access to the cable.
IETF
IMAP
Internet Engineering Task Force. The standards-setting body for the
Internet. Protocols adopted by the IETF define the structure and the
operation of the Internet.
Internet Message Access Protocol. A method of accessing electronic
messages that are kept on a server. IMAP defines how an e-mail program
can access messages that are stored on a remote server.
GLOSSARY
intelligent hub
441
See managed hub.
IP
Internet Protocol. The TCP/IP standard protocol that defines the IP
datagram as the unit of information passed across an Internet. IP provides
the basis for connectionless packet delivery service.
IP address
The address used by devices on the network to establish their unique
identity. IP addresses are composed of four fields separated by dots. Each
field is an 8-bit number (0 through 255). IP addresses can be permanently
assigned, or they can be temporarily assigned by DHCP.
IP telephony
ISDN
ITU
jitter
key mode
Technology that allows voice, data, and video to be transmitted over
IP-based networks.
Integrated Services Digital Network. An international telecommunications
standard for transmitting voice, video and data over digital lines running
at 64 Kbit/s. ISDN uses B channels, or “bearer” channels, to carry voice
and data. It uses a separate D channel, or “delta,” channel for control
signals to the telephone company computer.
International Telecommunication Union. An international standards
organization for telecommunications.
The variation in latency (waiting time) for different packets on the
network. For real time data such as voice transmission, jitter must be kept
to a minimum.
A telephone system operating model in which each telephone in the
system has buttons for each available outside line. Also known as a
square plan or a direct system inward access (DISA) system. See also
hybrid mode.
LAN
local area network. A communications system that links computers,
printers, and other devices. LANs allow users to communicate and share
resources like hard disk storage and printers. Devices linked by a LAN may
be on the same floor or within a building or campus.
LAN segment
A section of a local area network that is used by a particular workgroup or
department and separated from the rest of the LAN by a bridge, router or
switch.
LAN switch
A network device that connects stations or LAN segments, also known as
a frame switch.
442
GLOSSARY
latency
layering
The sum of all the delays in an end-to-end connection.
The process of dividing complex software up into several layers, each of
which performs a specific task. Layering allows faster and easier software
development and is often used in public, open software.
LCD
Liquid Crystal Display. A low cost display technology.
LLC
Logical Link Control. A data link protocol for LANs that is part of the IEEE
802.2 standard and common to all LAN standards for OSI model data
link, level two transmissions.
loop start
MAC
MAC address
managed hub
MAU
MIB
modem
The most common signaling method in the public telephone network,
typically used for residence and business CO lines.
Media Access Control. A sub-layer of the Data Link layer (Layer 2) of the
ISO OSI model responsible for media control. Also known as the “MAC
layer.”
A unique 48-bit number that is encoded in the circuitry of a device to
identify it on a LAN. Also known as a “hardware address” or an
“Ethernet address.”
A network device in which each port on the hub can be configured,
monitored, and enabled or disabled by a network administrator from a
hub management console or utility tied into an SNMP (Signaling Network
Management Protocol) platform. Hub management can also include
gathering information on network parameters.
Medium Attachment Unit. A transceiver that provides the correct
electrical or optical connection between the computer and IEEE 802.3
LAN media.
Management Information Base. A database that can be accessed by a
gateway running CMIP (Common Management Information Protocol),
CMOT (CMIP Over TCP/IP), or SNMP (Signaling Network Management
Protocol) network management protocols. The MIB defines variables
needed by the protocol to monitor and control components in a network.
Managers can fetch or store these variables.
MOdulator/DEModulator. A modem converts a binary bit stream to an
analog signal and vice versa.
GLOSSARY
multiplexer
multi-tasking
NCP
443
A device that can send several signals over a single line. A similar device
at the other end of the link then separates the signals.
The concurrent execution of two or more tasks or the concurrent use of a
single program that can carry out many functions.
Network Call Processor. The device that manages call traffic, voice mail,
the Auto Attendant, and related applications in an NBX system.
NetBEUI
NetBios Extended User Interface. A network device driver or transport
protocol that is the transport driver supplied with LAN Manager.
NetBios
Network Basic Input/Output System. Software developed by IBM that
provides the interface between the PC operating system, the I/O bus, and
the network. Since its design, NetBIOS has become a de facto standard.
NetWare
network collisions
network congestion
network layer
LAN Network Operating System and related products developed by
Novell. NetWare is based on the SPX/IPX networking protocols.
Result of two stations simultaneously attempting to use a shared
transmission medium. See collision.
Result of increased network utilization. Creates traffic bottlenecks on
a LAN segment. See congestion.
Layer 3 in the OSI model responsible for the routing and relaying through
one or more networks in multiple link or wide area environments.
network
management
The process and technique of remotely or locally monitoring and
configuring networks.
network ping
A packet transfer that checks logical continuity between a PC and a
specified IP address.
NIC
node
Network Interface Card. Controller circuitry that connects a node to a
network, usually in the form of a card in a PC expansion slot. In
conjunction with the NOS (Network Operating System) and PC operating
system, it helps transmit and receive messages on the network.
Device on a network that demands or supplies services. Also, a location
where transmission paths are connected.
444
GLOSSARY
NOS
Network Operating System. Software that connects all the devices on a
network so that resources can be shared efficiently and managed from a
central location. Novell NetWare is one example of a network operating
system.
OEM
Original Equipment Manufacturer. The maker of a product or component
that is marketed by another vendor, integrator, VAR (Value Added
Reseller), or reseller.
off-hook
off-site notification
on-hook
OSI model
The state of a telephone line that allows dialing and transmission but
prohibits incoming calls from being answered. The term stems from the
days when a telephone handset was lifted off of a hook. Contrast with
on-hook.
A feature that sends a message to a pager, outside telephone number, or
email account that informs a user of a voice mail message. The user can
retrieve the messages remotely.
The state of a telephone line that can receive an incoming call.
A conceptual model of hardware and software layers that define when,
how, and in what order data can be transmitted on a network. The OSI
Model defines seven layers:
Layer 7
Layer 6
Layer 5
Layer 4
Layer 3
Layer 2
Layer 1
Application layer
Presentation layer
Session layer
Transport layer
Network layer
Data Link layer
Physical layer
out-of-band signaling
An extra signal transmitted with the information signal to monitor and
control a transmission. It provides an additional layer of resilience by using
a separate channel.
packet
A collection of bits, including address, data, and control information, that
are transmitted together. The terms frame and packet are often used
synonymously.
packet buffer
Memory space reserved for storing a packet awaiting transmission or for
storing a received packet.
GLOSSARY
packet switching
paging
445
A method of switching data in a network. Individual packets of a set size
and format are accepted by the network and delivered to their
destination. The sequence of packets is maintained, and destination
established, by the exchange of control information (also contained in the
packets) between the sending terminal and the network before the
transmission starts.
1) A communications service that includes a one-way beeper service,
one-way text service, and two-way text and voice service.
2) A public address announcement system. Many PBX telephone systems
can do paging through the speakers in the telephone sets.
PBX
Private Branch eXchange. An in-house telephone switching system that
interconnects telephone extensions to each other, as well as to the
outside telephone network. It can include functions such as least cost
routing for outside calls, call forwarding, conference calling, and call
accounting.
PCS
Personal Communications Services. Refers to a variety of wireless services
emerging after the U.S. Government auctioned commercial licenses in
late 1994 and early 1995.
phantom mailbox
port
POTS
PPP
predictive dialing
pretranslator
A user profile that uses a telephone number with no associated
telephone. Messages can be sent to the phantom mailbox from within
the voice mail system. The Auto Attendant can route messages to the
phantom mailbox, and you can dial the phantom mailbox directly.
A computer interface capable of attachment to another device, such as a
modem for communicating with a remote terminal or, if the port is within
a hub, to a workstation.
Plain Old Telephone Service.
Point-to-Point Protocol. An addition to the Internet protocol suite to help
connect devices where dissimilar transport protocols exist. Typically used
for serial connections to the Internet.
Automated dialing feature in which CTI software predicts when you will
end your current call, and dials the next call in advance.
A device that interprets and modifies a sequence of incoming digits or
transmits outgoing digits.
446
GLOSSARY
preview dialing
PRI
protocol
protocol converter
PSTN
punch-down block
Q.921/931
reconfiguration
redundancy
Automated dialing feature in which CTI software queues the next call to
be made but allows you to check and activate the call.
Primary Rate Interface. An ISDN service for users with large bandwidth
requirements, such as large PBXs or high performance video desktop
conferencing systems; the ISDN equivalent of a T1 circuit.
A set of rules governing the information flow within a communications
infrastructure. A protocol typically specifies the structure of parameters
like format, timing, and error correction.
A device that translates between two protocols to facilitate
communications between different computers or different systems.
Public-Switched Telephone Network. The term describes the national
telephone network.
Telephony term describing the connector arrangements for distributing
and connecting unshielded and shielded twisted pair wiring inside a
building. Typically found in telephone wiring closets.
ITU-TS “Q Series” Recommendations describing Lap-D, the Layer 2
protocol for an ISDN D-channel. See OSI model.
The process of physically altering the location or functionality of network
or system elements. Automatic configuration describes the way
sophisticated networks can readjust themselves in the event of a link or
device failing, enabling the network to continue operation.
In data transmission, this refers to characters and bits that can be
removed from a transmission without affecting the message. In data
processing and data communications, it means providing backup for
components so that if one of them fails, the system continues to run
without interruption.
REN
Ringer Equivalency Number. A number that indicates how much power is
required by a telephone to make it ring. When connecting telephones to
a telephone line, the sum of the RENs of the telephones must be less than
the rated REN capacity of the telephone line.
repeater
A device that extends the maximum length of cable that can be used in a
single network.
GLOSSARY
RMON
447
Remote Monitoring. A facet of SNMP-based network management, the
RMON MIB (Management Information Base) defines the standard
network monitoring functions for communication between SNMP-based
management consoles and remote monitors. A typical MIB captures
information about a device, but RMON captures information about traffic
between devices.
RJ-11
A four-wire modular connector used by the telephone system.
RJ-45
An eight-wire modular connector used by telephone systems. The
eight-pin modular connectors used for 10BASE-T UTP cable resemble
RJ-45 connectors, but they have substantially different electrical
properties.
router
routing
SA
screen POP
segment
serial interface
A network device that links LANs together locally or remotely as part of a
WAN. A network built using routers is often termed an internetwork.
The process of delivering a packet across one or more networks via the
most appropriate path.
System Appearance
A CTI term for a window that automatically opens on a user’s computer
when a predefined telephone event occurs. For example, an incoming call
could generate a screen pop that lists caller ID information.
A LAN term meaning an electrically continuous piece of the bus.
Segments can be joined together using repeaters or bridges.
Hardware for sending and receiving data one bit at a time.
SMDR
Station Message Detail Recording. A stream of call data from the
telephone system. Typically, the data is not stored on the telephone
system itself. Rather, it is captured by an external device that connects to
the telephone system through an RS232 port.
SMTP
Simple Mail Transfer Protocol. The TCP/IP standard protocol for
transferring electronic mail messages from one machine to another. SMTP
specifies how two mail systems interact and the format of control
messages they exchange to transfer mail.
SNA
Systems Network Architecture. IBM’s layered communications protocol
for sending data between IBM hardware and software.
448
GLOSSARY
STP
Shielded Twisted Pair. A twisted pair of wires surrounded by a shield that
is typically made of braided wire or metal foil.
switched Ethernet
An Ethernet network that allows each user the full Ethernet bandwidth of
10 Mbit/s to another node.
system-wide
greetings
A special type of time-dependent greeting that is used throughout the
system.
T1/E1
A high-speed data channel that can handle 24 voice or data channels (T1)
or 30 voice or data channels (E1) at 64Kbit/s. Refers to the U.S. T1 line or
European E1 equivalent.
T3
A U.S. standard for high-speed data transmission at 44.736 Mbit/s,
providing the equivalent bandwidth of 28 T-1 circuits. The carrier channel
can handle 672 voice or data channels.
TAPI
Telephony Applications Programming Interface
A Microsoft Windows standard interface for integration between
telephone systems and Windows-based software. A typical example is
integrating Caller ID with a database on your computer that contains
detailed information about potential callers. When your telephone rings,
a window pops up on your computer with information about the caller.
TCP/IP
thin Ethernet
time-dependent
greeting
token ring
Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol. The suite of protocols
that define how to move information over the Internet.
An 802.3 LAN that uses smaller than normal diameter coaxial cable; often
used to link PCs together. Also known as 10BASE2.
Greetings that usually indicate the time of day that the caller is calling
(morning, afternoon, evening) and are an optional feature of the
Automated Attendant.
A communications protocol in which a special data packet, called a
token, is passed from node to node on the network ring. Only the
terminal or workstation that currently has the token can transmit data.
toll-free
The U.S. term for “free phone.”
toll restrictions
The U.S. term for “call barring.”
GLOSSARY
translation
trunk
twisted pair
449
The process of interpreting or modifying dialed digits for incoming or
outgoing calls and allows the call to progress through the network.
A communications channel between two points. It often refers to
large-bandwidth telephone channels between major switching centers,
capable of transmitting many simultaneous voice and data signals.
Two insulated wires twisted together with the twists varied in length to
reduce potential signal interference between the pairs. Twisted pair is the
most common medium for connecting telephones, computers and
terminals.
UPS
Uninterruptible Power Supply. A secondary power source attached to a
piece of hardware, for example a server, which provides backup power
for conducting an orderly shutdown if the server’s normal power supply
fails.
UTP
Unshielded Twisted Pair. Two insulated wires twisted together with the
twists varied in length to reduce potential signal interference between the
pairs. The standard cabling used for telephone lines and Ethernet
10BASE-T.
virtual LAN
A logical, rather than a physical, LAN that includes workgroups drawn
together for business reasons or for a particular project regardless of the
location of the members.
VPIM
Voice Profile for Internet Mail. A set of Internet protocols that merges
voice messaging and e-mail. VPIM lets voice mail and e-mail servers
exchange messages across TCP/IP-based intranets and the Internet.
VTL
Virtual Tie LIne. Allows several NBX domains to create tie lines on
demand and to place calls over a WAN. Uses peer-to-peer connections for
the audio.
WAN
Wide Area Network. A network that covers a larger geographical area
than a LAN. In a WAN, telecommunications links are normally leased from
the appropriate Public Telephone Operator (PTO).
wiring closet
The location, usually a physical box, in which the cabling on one floor of a
building is terminated.
workstation
Another name for a computer, typically running UNIX or the Windows NT
operating system.
450
GLOSSARY
INDEX
Symbols
271
Numbers
10BASE2, definition 433
10BASE-T, definition 433
3102 headset configuration 155
4ESS protocol
call-by-call service 255
on T1 spans 254
overview 66
selecting 255
4-Port Analog Terminal Card
adding 199
911
and Class of Service 273
specifying location 131
A
access buttons
Attendant Console 176
H.323 calls 423
mapping 147
telephone groups 151
Account Code
group button mapping 151
adding
Attendant Console 164
BRI-ST Digital Line Card 213
E1 Digital Line Card 227
extension lists 60
mirror disk 290
T1 Digital Line Card 241
telephones 126 to 127
address, IP
Call Processor 356
configuring DHCP server to provide Call
Processor’s IP address 383
gateway 356
viewing 356
address, MAC
definition 442
specifying from a telephone 356
viewing in telephone diagnostics 356
administrator password 289
alarms, T1 and E1, Digital Line Cards
blue alarm 364
red alarm 364
yellow alarm 364
analog devices
connecting 199
Analog Line Card
audio gain controls 195
timing parameters 195
Analog Terminal Adapter (ATA)
adding 201
MAC address 201
modifying 203
removing 205
status 206
Analog Terminal Card
audio gain controls 207
connecting analog devices 199
timing parameters 207
Attendant Console
Access buttons 176
adding 164
configuring 163
Feature buttons 167
modifying 165
removing 167
audio controls
modifying for BRI-ST card 220
modifying for E1 card 234
modifying for T1 card 256
audio gain controls
4-Port Analog Line Card 195
Analog Terminal Card 207
audio quality
VTL calls 281
audio recording
music on hold 146
on other than NBX Telephones 146
phones with different settings 145
452
INDEX
remote telephones 146
audio settings 280
Auto Discovery
Analog Line Cards 186
Attendant Console 163
BRI-ST Digital Line Card 214
E1 channel numbering 237
E1 Digital Line Card 228
first extension used 107
T1 Digital Line Card 242
telephones 47, 126
Automated Attendant
activating changes 319
adding 308
buttons 316
configuring 308
default functions 312
default timeout 307
dial by extension or name 308
examples 314
extension range 54
greetings 310
H.323 calls 424
importing prompts 307
importing system-wide greetings 310
importing time-dependent greetings 310
modifying 320
overview 307
recording prompts 307
restoring defaults 321
testing 322
timeout 307
voice application setup utility 321
Automated Attendant Setup Utility
default password 322
automatic reboot 339
B
bandwidth
configuring an ATA for low bandwidth 202,
204
Basic Telephone, NBX
diagnostics 352
battery
replacing on the SuperStack 3 Call
Processor 371
blue alarm, T1 and E1 Digital Line Cards 364
brackets
attaching to the telephone 126
BRI channels
modifying 223
status 224
BRI groups
changing membership 221
configuring 217
membership status 217
modifying 220
parameters 221
removing 222
Bridged Extension
group button mapping 152
bridged extensions
and TAPI Route Points 266
defining 138
mapped extensions report 142
modifying on the primary telephone 140
on the primary telephone 138
on the secondary telephone 139
overview 135
sample calling situations 140
sample configurations 137
BRI-ST Digital Line Card
BRI signaling 216
channel status 224
configuring 216 to 218
DSP (Digital Signal Processor) status 224
inserting (caution) 215
modifying 219
modifying IP settings 225
removing (caution) 225
span parameters 219
status lights (LEDs) 218
business information 288
business hours and CoS (Class of Service) 288
modifying 288
modifying business hours 288
modifying system mode 288
Business Telephone, NBX
diagnostics 352
Busy Lamp/Speed Dial
mapping buttons 148
buttons, Automated Attendant 316
buttons, telephone
mapping 147
testing 357
C
call coverage
for hunt groups 273
Call Detail Reports
purging data 339, 348
Call Park
adding extensions 162
and TAPI Route Points 266
INDEX
changing extension name 163
configuring 162
extension range 55
group button mapping 157
removing extensions 163
call processing
inbound 29
outbound 29
Call Processor
configuring DHCP server to provide 383
specifying the MAC address from a
telephone 356
Call Reports
capabilities 347
configuring 348
installing 347
call restrictions 273
Call Toggle
group button mapping 153
call-by-call service 255
caller ID, line card port 190
calling access permissions 273
Calling Line Identification Restriction
attendant console button mapping 168
group button mapping 152
Calling Line Identity Restriction (CLIR)
CLIR-All 183
CLIR-Next 183
Central Office (CO)
code 273
definition 437
changing IP bins 286
changing multicast addresses 286
changing multicast bins 286
Class of Service (CoS)
user settings 273
CLIR-All
telephone button mapping 152, 168
CLIR-Next
attendant console button mapping 168
group button mapping 153
CO (Central Office)
code 273
definition 437
collision, defined 436
Conference Drop
group button mapping 153
configuration file, dial plan 30, 44
configuring
BRI groups 217
BRI-ST Digital Line Card 216 to 218
E1 Digital Line Card 229 to 230
E1 groups 230
453
line card port 187
T1 Digital Line Card 240 to 247
T1 groups 246, 250
configuring Automated Attendant 308
configuring membership
BRI groups 221
E1 groups 236
T1 groups 258
congestion, defined 437
connecting
BRI lines 216
E1 lines 230
T1 lines 245
ConneXtions H.323 gateway
and line card ports 188
installation preparation 392
installation procedure 395
installation requirements 388
MAC address of line card port 188, 192
overview 388
software 392
conventions
notice icons, About This Guide 16
cordless telephones 199
CoS (Class of Service)
speed dial numbers 287
user settings 273
CPE (Customer Premises Equipment), definition 437
creating the dial plan configuration file 44
CSU (Channel Service Unit), definition 437
CTI (Computer Telephony Integration),
definition 437
D
database operations
backing up 336
migrating data 339
purging 339
purging CDR data 339
restoring 338
date and time settings 283
DDI (Direct Dialing Inward) services
dial plan configuration (BRI) 214
dial plan configuration (E1) 227
Default
group button mapping 153
delayed ringing pattern 149
DHCP
configuring option 184 383
diagnostics 352
LUI (local user interface) 352
NBX Basic Telephone 352
454
INDEX
NBX Business Telephone 352
telephone buttons 357
telephone display panel 357
telephone LEDs 357
telephone speaker 358
dial by extension or name 308
dial by name directory
configuring names 131
dial plan
3-digit and 4-digit 53
configuration file 30, 44
configuring VTLs 82
default Auto Extension 107
exporting 48
extension settings 52
extension settings (table) 54
External Keyset Prefix 107
first Auto Discover Extension 107
Hybrid mode 33
importing 47
Keyset mode 32
modifying 51
off-site notification 33
overview 28
pretranslation 31
pretranslators 31, 64
routing 31
sample solutions 116
tables 34
testing 49
timed routes 49
VPIM configuration 68
VTL configuration 77
VTL password 96
VTLs and site-unique extensions 82
VTLs with site codes 84
dial plan configuration file
4ESS protocol 66
accessing 44
commands 100
creating 44
DDI/MSN services for BRI 214
DDI/MSN services for E1 227
DID services for T1 242
translator entries for BRI 214
translator entries for E1 227
translator entries for T1 242
dial plan report
creating 50
dial plan settings
changing 56
dial plan tables
incoming 38
internal 38
managing 28
dial prefix settings 52
DID (Direct Inward Dialing) services
dial plan configuration 242
T1 242
Digital Line Cards, BRI-ST
channel parameters 223
channel status 224
DSP (Digital Signal Processor) status
modifying span 219
span parameters 219
status lights (LEDs) 218
Digital Line Cards, E1
channel parameters 237
channel status 238
channels per span 232
configuring 229 to 230
DSP (Digital Signal Processor) status
ISDN PRI signaling 229
modifying span 232
partial E1 233
span parameters 232
status lights (LEDs) 231
status lights and alarms 365
Digital Line Cards, T1
channel status 260
DSP (Digital Signal Processor) status
modifying name and type 252
modifying span 252
partial T1 256
span parameters 253
status lights (LEDs) 252
status lights and alarms 365
Direct Dialing Inward (DDI) services
dial plan configuration (BRI) 214
dial plan configuration (E1) 227
Direct Inward Dialing (DID) services
dial plan configuration 242
T1 241
Directed Call Pickup
attendant console button mapping
group button mapping 154
Directory
group button mapping 154
directory
configuring names 131
disabled button 317
disabling transfer prompt 297
disk mirroring
adding mirror disk 290
LEDs 291
overview 290
224
239
260
169
INDEX
replacing disk 292
reverting to a single disk 293
display panel, testing 357
DNS (Domain Name Server)
configuring for VPIM 77
number of servers 77
Do Not Disturb
and TAPI Route Points 265
group button mapping 154
downloading software
Label Makers 350
NBX Call Reports 349
NBX Resource Pack CD 349
NBX TAPI Service Provider (NBXTSP) 349
DP (Directed Call Pickup)
group button mapping 154
DS1 protocol, configuring T1 Digital Line Card 244
DSP (Digital Signal Processor), description 438
E
E1 Digital Line Card
channel parameters 237
channel status 238
configuring 229 to 230
DSP (Digital Signal Processor) status 239
inserting (caution) 229
ISDN PRI signaling 229
modifying IP settings 239
modifying span 232
removing (caution) 240
status lights (LEDs) 231
E1 groups
adding 234
changing membership 236
modifying 235
removing 237
E1 span, modifying 232
E911
specifying location 131
E911, ISDN PRI signaling 241
echo cancellation
disabling 247
enabling 247
echo suppression
system-wide 280
e-mail, configuring for IMAP 299
emergency calls
911 40
Class of Service 273
E911 241
emergency dialing 241
emergency service
specifying location 131
Enhanced 911
specifying location 131
enter submenu, button 319
Ethernet (Layer 2) 276
event logs, viewing
Adminlog 339
upgrade log 339
Exit Menu, button 318
exporting dial plan 48
extension length 54
extension lists 58
adding 60
managing 52
modifying 61
removing 62
updating for VTLs 85
extension numbers
adding Call Park 162
changing Call Park 163
changing settings 57
line card port 56
managing 52
phantom mailbox 57
removing Call Park 163
extension ranges
Automated Attendant 54
Call Park 55
changing 56
external extensions 55
hunt groups 54
telephones 54
extension settings, dial plan 52
external extensions, extension ranges 55
External Keyset Prefix, dial plan 55, 107
F
fax machines
Group-3 199
FCC
rules 463
Feature button
attendant console button mapping 170
group button mapping 154
Feature buttons
Attendant Console 167
telephone 177, 178
455
456
INDEX
firewalls 408
firmware, NBX Business and Basic Telephones 352
Flash
attendant console button mapping 170
group button mapping 155
Frame Relay, definition 439
G
Gateway IP Address 356
glare, definition 439
greetings
importing 307
greetings and main menu
example 314
greetings, Automated Attendant
description 310
example 314
H
H.323 calls 420
access buttons 423
dialing 423
receiving 424
H.323 connections 401
and firewalls 408
controlling quality 406
gateway checks 415
gateway loads 410
logical 402
physical 402
quality 403
receiving calls 424
remote calls 410
security 408
verifying 415
H.323 gateway
class of service 414
H.323 standard 398
H3PingIP 359
handset echo 282
Headset
group button mapping 155
hexadecimal codes
ISDN completion codes 377
Hold
attendant console button mapping 170
hop off
enabling 95
hunt group
telephone priority 271
hunt groups
and TAPI Route Points 266
calling groups 271
configuring 271
extension range 54
linear 271
Hybrid mode
button mapping 147
dial plan 33
I
IMAP (Internet Message Access Protocol)
configuring an e-mail client 299
definition 298, 440
importing
International dial plan 46
North American dial plan 45
prompts 307, 312
system-wide greetings 311
time-dependent greetings 311
user-defined dial plan 47
inbound call processing 29
incoming calls
DDI/MSN for BRI-ST 213
DID 243
H.323 424
pretranslator 41
trunk-to-trunk transfers 189
incoming dial plan table 38
installing
ConneXtions H.323 gateway 388
internal dial plan table 38
international dial plan, importing 46
Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) 285
Internet Message Access Protocol (IMAP)
definition 298
IP
address, viewing 356
bins, changing 286
configuring DHCP server to pass address of
NCP 383
modifying BRI-ST Digital Line Card settings 225
modifying E1 Digital Line Card settings 239
modifying T1 Digital Line Card settings 261
multicast bins 286
IP On-the-Fly 276
ISDN completion cause codes (table) 377
ISDN PRI signaling
configuring T1 Digital Line Card 248
E911 connectivity 241
INDEX
J
jitter buffers 406
K
key mode
configuration 156
key mode, definition 441
key pad button actions 317
Keyset mode
dial plan 32
prefix 55
L
labels, downloading software 350
LCD display panel, testing 357
Least Cost Dial Plan table 39
LEDs
BRI-ST Digital Line Card 218
E1 Digital Line Card 231
T1 Digital Line Card 252
LEDs (status lights)
telephone diagnostics 357
licenses
status 340
viewing 340
lights
testing on the telephone 357
line access button 179
group button mapping 156
telephone button mapping 171
line card port 186
Attendant Console extension 189
automatic configuration 187
caller ID 190
configuring 187
configuring automatically 187
configuring manually 187
extension number 56, 188, 192
manual configuration 187
modifying 191
name 188, 192
port address 188, 192
port type 188
rebooting 194
removing 192
silence suppression 189
status 192
trunk-to-trunk call transfers 189
457
line pool 147
Loop Start, definition 442
Low Bandwidth 130
LUI
and PoE 352
LUI (Local User Interface)
diagnostic/configuration utility 352
M
MAC address
Analog Terminal Adapter (ATA) 201
definition 442
specifying NCP address from a telephone 356
viewing in telephone diagnostics 356
mailbox, phantom
extensions 57
H.323 425
main menu
default functions 312
main menu window, NBX NetSet utility 22
maintenance alerts
configuring the sender 286
mapped extensions report 142
mapping buttons
access 147
Attendant Console 167, 176
Busy Lamp/Speed Dial 148
telephone groups 148, 150
Media Driver, and third-party messaging 373
menu time-out action 317
menu tree dialog box 311
message storage capacity, viewing 297
Message Waiting Indicator
group button mapping 156
messages
maximum length allowed 297
maximum number allowed 296
retaining 296
messaging, voice
overview 295
phantom mailboxes 263
third-party 373
modifying
audio controls for BRI-ST card 220
audio controls for E1 card 234
audio controls for T1 card 256
BRI channels 223
BRI groups 220
BRI-ST Digital Line Card 219
BRI-ST Digital Line Card IP settings 225
channels 237, 259
E1 Digital Line Card 231
458
INDEX
E1 Digital Line Card IP settings 239
E1 Digital Line Card name and type 232
E1 groups 234
T1 Digital Line Card 252
T1 Digital Line Card IP settings 261
T1 groups 257
modifying Automated Attendant 320
modifying dial plan 51
modifying extension lists 61
modifying system settings 285
administrator password 289
advanced regional settings 282
audio settings 280
Auto Attendant password 289
business information 288
date and time 283
disk mirroring 290
multicast addresses 285
regional settings 282
removing a system speed dial 288
reverting to single disk 293
ringing patterns 284
speed dial numbers 287
system mode 288
TAPI telephony 289
timers 283
multicast addresses
changing IP addresses 286
changing IP bins 286
overview 285
MWI (message waiting indicator)
group button mapping 156
NBX Resource Pack CD 21
NBX system database 30
NBX system software, overview 20
NBXTSP 373
NCP IP Address 356
NCP MAC Address 356
NetSet, NBX administration utility 22
Network Address Port Translation 134
network protocol
Ethernet only 276
IP On-the-Fly 276
standard IP 276
North American dial plan, importing 45
Number
telephone button mapping 150
N
P
name directory
configuring names 131
name directory button 317
NAPT 134
NBX Call Reports software 349
NBX NetSet utility 22
icons 25
main menu window 25
shortcuts 25
packet reconstruction 406
paging, disabling output on telephone 130
Park
group button mapping 157
partial E1 233
partial T1 256
password
TAPI Route Point 267
passwords
administrator 289
voice mail 298
PBX connections 411
pcXset
MAC address 127
permissions 273
Personal Speed Dial 184
personal speed dial (PSD)
group button mapping 158
O
off-site notification 300
behavior 300
configuring 301
dial plan 33
enabling 300
system-wide settings 301
Option 184, configuring on DHCP server 383
Other
group button mapping 156
outbound call processing 29
outgoing calls
H.323 420
pretranslator 42
overloading 134
INDEX
telephone button mapping 174
phantom mailbox 263
and TAPI Route Points 266
extensions 57
H.323 calls 425
overview 263
Pickup Ext.
group button mapping 158
Pickup Group
group button mapping 157, 158
play/record extension
where to specify 310
Port Usage, voice mail 302
powered Ethernet cable
and LUI 352
pretranslation
dial plan 31
pretranslators 40
assigning 64
dial plan 31, 40
incoming calls 41
managing in dial plan 64
optional for VTLs 86
outgoing calls 42
removing from dial plan 65
viewing devices 64
PRI signaling, configuring
T1 Digital Line Card 248
prompted transfer, button 318
prompts 307
importing 307
prompts, defining 311
Prty
telephone button mapping 150
PSD (Personal Speed Dial) 184
telephone button mapping 158, 174
pulse dialing to tone dialing 159
Q
Quality of Service (QoS) 406
Quick Reference Guides, viewing 350
R
rebooting
automatically 339
line card port 194
telephones 133
recording
time-dependent greetings 311
red alarm, T1 and E1 Digital Line Cards 364
redial button
group button mappings 158
telephone button mappings 174
redialing, dial prefix settings 52
redirected call, definition 265
regional settings 282
regional software
installing and configuring 342
release button
group button mappings 159
telephone 177, 178
telephone button mappings 174
remote calls 189
removing
Analog Terminal Adapter (ATA) 205
Attendant Console 167
BRI groups 222
BRI-ST Digital Line Card 225
E1 Digital Line Card 240
E1 groups 237
line card port 192
T1 Digital Line Card 261
T1 groups 259
telephones 133
removing extension lists 62
removing telephone groups 144
REN (Ringer Equivalency Number)
definition 446
replacing a failed disk 292
replacing NCP battery 371
reports
calls 347
dial plan 50
system data 346
system devices 346
system directory 345
rerouting, VTL calls 90
reserved in dial plan, button 318
restoring factory defaults 339
Ring
telephone button mapping 150
ringing patterns 284
Route Point
definition 265
system capacities 267
routing dial plan 31
S
SDN (Software Defined Networks) 66
security
firewalls 408
459
460
INDEX
system settings 289
serial number, telephone 356
settings
system-level 275
system-wide 301
signaling, configuring
BRI 216
E1 ISDN PRI 229
T1 DS1 244
T1 ISDN PRI 248
silence suppression 189, 404
system-wide 280
single digit transfer button 318
site codes
using for VPIM 68
using for VTLs 79
software
downloading NBX Label Makers 350
NBX Call Reports 349
NBX Label Makers 350
NBX Resource Pack CD 349
NBX TAPI Service Provider (NBXTSP) 349
software version number 356
span
activating for T1 lines 245
modifying, for BRI-ST card 219
status for T1 lines 246
speed dial numbers 287
Class of Service 273
mapping 148
SSD 184
SSD (System Speed Dial)
telephone button mapping 159, 174
standard IP 276
statistics
TAPI Route Point 269
voice mail port usage 302
status
Analog Terminal Adapter (ATA) 206
BRI channels 224
BRI group membership 217
Digital Line Card troubleshooting 363
disk 292
E1 channels 238
E1 DSP (Digital Signal Processor) 239
licenses 340
line card port 192
T1 channels 260
T1 Digital Line Card DSP (Digital Signal
Processor) 260
T1 group membership 251
T1 span 246
telephones 131
status lights (LEDs)
BRI-ST Digital Line Card 218
E1 Digital Line Card 231, 365
T1 Digital Line Card 252, 365
submenus for greetings 314
subnet mask 276
switch hook 155
Switch to DTMF
group button mapping 159
System
group button mapping 159
telephone button mapping 175
system database 30
system disconnect button 317
system level operations
installing licenses 340
system mode 288
system security 289
system settings
advanced regional settings 282
audio settings 280
Auto Attendant password 289
business hours 288
business information 288
disk mirroring 290
multicast addresses 285
regional settings 282
reverting to single disk 293
ringing patterns 284
speed dial numbers 287
TAPI telephony 289
timers 283
viewing 275
system speed dial 184
telephone button mapping 174
system speed dial (SSD)
group button mapping 159
system-level operations
installing software upgrades 331
managing data 335
viewing event logs 339
system-wide greetings 311
system-wide settings 277
T
T1 channel status 260
T1 Digital Line Card
adding 241
configuring 240 to 247
DS1 protocol 244
ISDN PRI signaling 248
removing (caution) 261
INDEX
T1 groups
changing membership 258
configuring 246, 250
membership status 251
modifying 257
removing 259
T1 lines, connecting 245
T1 span
activating 245
echo cancellation 247
modifying 252
status 246
TAPI
route point password 267
Route Point, definition 265
TAPI (Telephony Application Programming Interface)
definition 448
maximum clients 289
system settings for 289
TAPI Line Redirect Timeout 270
TAPI Route Point
statistics 269
system capacities 267
telephone
adding 126 to 127
analog 199
Auto Discovery 126
button mappings 147
connections 359
cordless 199
diagnostics 352
disabling paging output 130
extension length 54
extension range 54
rebooting 133
status 131
viewing MAC address through 356
telephone groups
Access Button types 151
call recording and monitoring 143
changing names 143
creating 143
mapping buttons 148, 150
removing 144
telephone handset
diagnostics 358
testing 358
testing
Automated Attendant 322
dial plan 49
telephone buttons 357
telephone connections 359
telephone display panel 357
telephone handset 358
telephone LEDs 357
telephone speaker 358
third-party messaging 373
third-party telephones 344
time-dependent greetings
adding 310
example 314
importing 311
recording 311
timers 283
timing parameters
4-Port Analog Line Card 195
4-Port Analog Terminal Card 207
Transfer
group button mapping 160
transfer prompt, disabling 297
transfer to voice mail button 180, 318
troubleshooting 360
trunk-to-trunk call transfers 189
U
unique extension ranges for VTLs 78
upgrading software 331
migrating data 339
user settings
Class of Service 273
V
version number, software 356
voice application setup utility 321
voice mail 295
extensions 298
incoming call behavior 297
password 298
phantom mailboxes 263
port usage 302
storage space 297
transferring calls to 180, 318
VPIM (Voice Profile for Internet Mail) 67
advanced settings 74, 327
configuring DNS server information 77
configuring parameters 71
configuring the dial plan for 68
control parameters 71
managing the message queue 71
operations management 324
overview 323
statistics 73, 326
using unique extension ranges 68
461
462
INDEX
VTL (Virtual Tie Line) 77
audio compression option 94
configuring 81
dial plan configuration 82
license installation 81
managing VTLs 92
modifying name of 92
music on hold 99
password configuration 95
password in dial plan 96
rerouting VTL calls 90
silence-suppression option 94
statistics 93
toll calls 99
troubleshooting 99
unique extension ranges 78
using site codes 79
verifying access to remote system 88
verifying local system operation 87
verifying operation of 87
VTL Calls
audio quality 281
X
Xfer Vmail
group button mapping 160
telephone button mapping 175
Xfer Vmail button 180
Y
yellow alarm, T1 and E1 Digital Line Cards 364
FCC CLASS A VERIFICATION STATEMENT
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital device, pursuant to
Part 15 of FCC rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference
when the equipment is operated in a commercial environment. This equipment generates, uses, and can
radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instruction manuals, may
cause harmful interference to radio communications. Operation of this equipment in a residential area is
likely to cause harmful interference, in which case the user will have to correct the interference at his or her
own expense.
Changes or modifications not expressly approved by 3Com could void the user’s authority to operate this
equipment.
This equipment complies with Part 68 of the FCC rules. This unit bears a label which contains the FCC
registration number and Ringer Equivalency Number (REN). If requested, this information must be provided to
the telephone company.
This equipment uses the following standard FCC Part 68-compliant jacks and plugs for network connections:
USOC RJ11C for connecting to the telephone network
USOC RJ45 and BNC connectors for connecting to the local area network
This equipment contains FCC-compliant modular jacks. It is designed to be connected to the telephone
network or premises wiring using compatible modular plugs and cabling which comply with the
requirements of FCC Part 68 rules.
The Ringer Equivalency Number (REN) is used to compute the number of devices that can be connected to a
telephone line. An excessive REN value on a line can result in the devices not ringing in response to incoming
calls. In most, but not all areas, the sum of the RENs should not exceed five (5.0). To be certain of the number
of devices that may be connected to a line, as determined by the total RENs, contact the local telephone
company. For products approved after July 23, 2001, the REN for this product is part of a product identifier
that has the format US:AAAEQ##TXXXX. The digits represented by ## are the REN without a decimal point
(for example, 03 is a REN of 0.3). For earlier products, the REN is separately shown on the label.
In the unlikely event that this equipment causes harm to the telephone network, the telephone company can
temporarily disconnect your service. The telephone company will try to warn you in advance of any such
disconnection, but if advance notice is not practical, it may disconnect the service first and notify you as soon
as possible afterwards. In the event that such a disconnection is deemed necessary you will be advised of your
right to file a complaint with the FCC.
From time to time, the telephone company may make changes in its facilities, equipment, operations, or
procedures which could affect the operation of this equipment. If this occurs, the telephone company is
required to provide you with advance notice so you can make the modifications necessary to maintain
uninterrupted service
Repairs to this equipment can be made only by the manufacturer or its authorized agents. In the event that
this equipment requires service, contact your equipment vendor or the manufacturer, 3Com Corporation.
NBX Telephones are compatible with inductively coupled hearing aids.
If trouble is experienced with this NBX equipment, for repair or warranty information, please contact 3Com
Corporation, 5400 Bayfront Plaza, P.O. Box 58145, Santa Clara, California, USA, Telephone: 800-NET-3Com
or visit the web site at www.3com.com. If the equipment is causing harm to the telephone network, the
telephone company may request that you disconnect the equipment until the problem is resolved.
Connection to party line service is subject to state tariffs. Contact the state public utility commission, public
service commission or corporation commission for information.
If your home has specially wired alarm equipment connected to the telephone line, ensure the installation of
this NBX equipment does not disable your alarm equipment. If you have questions about what will disable
alarm equipment, consult your telephone company or a qualified installer.
This equipment is capable of providing users access to interstate providers of operator services through the
use of access codes. Modification of this equipment by call aggregators to block access to dialing codes is a
violation of the Telephone Operators Consumers Act of 1990.
INDUSTRY CANADA NOTICE
NOTICE: The Industry Canada (IC) label identifies certified equipment. This certification means that the
equipment meets the telecommunications network protective, operational, and safety requirements as
prescribed in the appropriate Terminal Equipment Technical Requirements document(s). The department
does not guarantee the equipment will work to the user’s satisfaction.
Before installing this equipment, users should ensure that it is permissible to be connected to the facilities of
the local telecommunications company. The equipment must also be installed using an acceptable method of
connection. The user should be aware that compliance with the above conditions might not prevent
degradation of service in some situations.
Repairs to certified equipment should be coordinated by a representative designated by the supplier. Any
repairs or alterations made by the user to this equipment, or equipment malfunctions, may give the
telecommunications company cause to request the user to disconnect the equipment.
Users should ensure for their own protection that the electrical ground connections of the power utility,
telephone lines, and internal metallic water pipe system, if present, are connected together. This precaution
may be particularly important in rural areas. Caution: Users should not attempt to make such connections
themselves, but should contact the appropriate electrical inspection authority or electrician, as appropriate.
NOTICE: The Ringer Equivalency Number (REN) assigned to each terminal device provides an indication of the
maximum number of terminals allowed to be connected to a telephone interface. The termination of an
interface may consist of any combination of devices subject only to the requirement that the sum of the
ringer equivalency numbers of all devices does not exceed 5.
Important: Read before using this product.
3COM END-USER SOFTWARE LICENSE AGREEMENT TERMS AND CONDITIONS AND
LIMITED WARRANTY
READ THE TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF THIS AGREEMENT CAREFULLY BEFORE USING THE 3Com PRODUCT
ACCOMPANYING THIS AGREEMENT (THE “PRODUCT”). BY USING THE PRODUCT YOU ARE ACCEPTING
AND AGREEING TO BE BOUND BY THIS AGREEMENT. IF YOU ARE NOT WILLING TO BE BOUND BY THE
TERMS OF THIS AGREEMENT, YOU SHOULD PROMPTLY RETURN THE UNUSED PRODUCT AND PACKAGING
TO THE DEALER THAT SOLD THE PRODUCT TO YOU, AND YOU WILL RECEIVE A REFUND OF THE PURCHASE
PRICE. THIS AGREEMENT REPRESENTS THE ENTIRE AGREEMENT CONCERNING THE PRODUCT BETWEEN
YOU AND 3Com CORPORATION (“3Com”), AND IT SUPERSEDES ANY PRIOR PROPOSAL, REPRESENTATION,
OR UNDERSTANDING CONCERNING THE PRODUCT BETWEEN YOU AND 3Com.
3Com and you, the purchaser, agree that the following terms and conditions (sometimes referred to herein
as this “Agreement”) shall govern your purchase of the Product from an authorized 3Com dealer. The term
“Product” includes (i) the equipment accompanying these terms and conditions and (ii) the software included
in such equipment or otherwise furnished to you in connection with your purchase and/or use of such
equipment (the “Software”). This Agreement covers Products for use only in the United States and Canada.
1 Software License.
(a) License Grant. Subject to the terms and conditions contained herein, 3Com grants you a personal,
non-transferable and non-exclusive license to use the Software, in object code form only, for your
internal business needs on a single Product in accordance with the accompanying system
documentation (the “Documentation”). This license grant shall be limited to use with the equipment
for which the Software was obtained, or, on a temporary basis, on back-up equipment when the
original equipment is inoperable. Use of the Software on multiple processors is prohibited unless
otherwise agreed to in writing by 3Com.
(b) Restrictions. Except as expressly authorized by this Agreement or under applicable law, you are not
permitted to copy or use the Software in any manner. Without limiting the generality of the foregoing,
you agree that you will not do any of the following: (i) decompile, reverse engineer, disassemble, or
otherwise reduce the Software to a human-perceivable form; (ii) transfer the Software from one
computer to another, including other servers and/or other storage devices; (iii) transfer the Software to
any other party, except when transferring it with the Product in accordance with the terms of this
Agreement; or (iv) modify, adapt, translate, rent, sublicense, lease, loan, resell for profit, distribute,
network or create derivative works based upon the Software or any part thereof.
(c) Ownership of Software. Title to and ownership of the Software shall remain with 3Com and its
suppliers. This license is not a sale of the Software or any copy.
(d) Third-Party Applications. Any third party supplier of computer programs included in the Software is a
third party beneficiary of the provisions of this Section 1, and such third party may protect its rights in
the Software against violations of this license.
(e) Confidentiality. You agree to maintain the Software in confidence and to not disclose the Software to
any third party without the express written consent of 3Com. You further agree to take all reasonable
precautions to preclude access of unauthorized persons to the Software.
(f) Termination. 3Com may terminate this Section 1 and the licenses granted hereby upon the breach by
you of any the provisions of this Section 1. Upon such termination, you agree to return the Product,
including the Software and all copies and portions thereof, to 3Com.
2 Limited Warranty. If the Product does not operate in accordance with 3Com’s standard specifications or
Documentation during the Warranty Period, you must promptly notify the authorized 3Com dealer from
whom you purchased the Product. You must provide your authorized 3Com dealer with proof of purchase
price and dated invoice. During the Warranty Period, upon being contacted, your authorized 3Com dealer
(or another authorized 3Com dealer designated by 3Com) will, at its option, either repair or replace the
Product, provided it is delivered at your expense to an authorized 3Com service facility designated by
3Com or your authorized 3Com dealer. Your authorized 3Com dealer (or another authorized 3Com
dealer designated by 3Com) will provide you with a replacement Product if either the NCP (Network Call
Processor) Card fails and/or if 25% of the system (lines and/or stations) becomes inoperable at any time
during the Warranty Period. You have the right, as your exclusive remedy, to return the Product to your
authorized 3Com dealer (or another authorized 3Com dealer designated by 3Com) for a refund of the
purchase price from such authorized 3Com dealer if such authorized 3Com dealer is unable to repair or
replace the Product pursuant to the terms of this warranty. You shall bear all shipping, packing, and
insurance costs and all other costs, excluding labor and parts, necessary to effectuate repair, replacement
or refund under this warranty.
The “Warranty Period” shall commence on the date that the Product was purchased by the authorized
3Com dealer from whom you purchased the Product and shall expire on the second anniversary thereof.
At the time of purchase, your authorized 3Com dealer will notify you in writing of the commencement
date and the expiration date of the Warranty Period.
Purchased or replacement parts and products may be new, remanufactured or refurbished. Any removed
parts and/or Products shall become the property of 3Com.
Coverage under this warranty program shall require the authorized 3Com dealer to contact the 3Com
Customer Service Department to generate a Return Merchandise Authorization (RMA) Number for any
Product(s) the 3Com Service Representative deems defective.
3 Warranty Exclusions. EXCEPT AS STATED IN SECTION 2 HEREOF, 3Com AND ITS AFFILIATES,
DISTRIBUTORS, DEALERS AND SUPPLIERS, MAKE NO WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, AND TO THE
EXTENT PERMITTED BY APPLICABLE LAW, 3Com DISCLAIMS ALL OTHER WARRANTIES WHETHER
EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, TITLE, FITNESS FOR
A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NON-INFRINGEMENT. IF IMPLIED WARRANTIES MAY NOT BE DISCLAIMED
UNDER APPLICABLE LAW, THEN ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES ARE LIMITED IN DURATION TO 90 (NINETY)
DAYS AFTER DELIVERY OF THE PRODUCT TO YOU. SOME STATES DO NOT ALLOW LIMITATIONS ON
HOW LONG AN IMPLIED WARRANTY LASTS SO THE ABOVE LIMITATION MAY NOT APPLY TO YOU. THIS
WARRANTY GIVES YOU SPECIFIC LEGAL RIGHTS, AND YOU MAY HAVE OTHER RIGHTS WHICH VARY
FROM STATE TO STATE.
THE WARRANTY SET FORTH IN SECTION 2 HEREOF, DOES NOT EXTEND TO ANY PRODUCT, WHICH HAS
BEEN DAMAGED AS A RESULT OF (1) ACCIDENT, MISUSE OR ABUSE; (2) YOUR FAILURE TO FOLLOW
3Com’S INSTALLATION, OPERATION OR MAINTENANCE INSTRUCTIONS; OR (3) UNAUTHORIZED SERVICE
OR PARTS.
4 Post-Warranty Service. 3Com highly recommends purchasing an extended warranty for all 3Com Products
to significantly reduce unexpected repair costs after the Warranty Period. You can purchase a
post-warranty service contract from your authorized 3Com dealer. Please contact your authorized 3Com
dealer for post-warranty service on all 3Com Products.
5 Infringement. 3Com shall defend you, at 3Com’s expense, from and against any claim brought by a third
party alleging that the Product infringes any: (i) United States patent issued on or before the
commencement date of the Warranty Period; (ii) United States trademark issued on or before the
commencement date of the Warranty Period; (iii) copyright, or (iv) trade secret, and shall indemnify you
against all damages and costs assessed against you that are payable as part of a final judgment or
settlement. The indemnification obligation of this Section 5 shall not apply to any claim arising out of (i)
the combination of the Product with other products not claimed to be owned or developed by or on
behalf of 3Com; (ii) the modification of the Product, or any part thereof, unless such modification was
made by or on behalf of 3Com; (iii) any software or other technology not claimed to be owned by 3Com;
or (iv) any infringement caused by your action.
If you seek indemnification pursuant to this Section 5 from or against the assertion of any claim by a third
person (a “Third Person Assertion”), you shall give prompt notice to 3Com. Within twenty (20) business
days of receipt of notice from you pursuant to this Section 5, 3Com shall have the right exercisable by
written notice to you, to assume the defense of a Third Person Assertion. If 3Com assumes such defense,
3Com may select counsel. If 3Com controls the defense of a Third Person Assertion, 3Com shall have the
right to consent to the entry of judgment with respect to, or otherwise settle, such Third Person Assertion
with your prior written consent, which consent shall not be unreasonably withheld. You shall reasonably
cooperate in the defense of any Third Person Assertion.
6 Exclusive Remedies and Limitations of Liability. THE ENTIRE LIABILITY OF 3Com AND ITS AFFILIATES,
DISTRIBUTORS, DEALERS AND SUPPLIERS (AND THE DIRECTORS, OFFICERS, EMPLOYEES, AGENTS AND
AFFILIATES OF ALL OF THEM) AND YOUR EXCLUSIVE REMEDIES FOR ANY DAMAGES SHALL BE (1) FOR
FAILURE OF PRODUCTS DURING THE WARRANTY PERIOD, THE REMEDIES STATED IN SECTION 2 HEREOF;
(2) FOR INFRINGEMENT, THE REMEDIES STATED IN SECTION 5 HEREOF; AND (3) FOR CLAIMS OTHER
THAN SET FORTH ABOVE, 3Com LIABILITY SHALL BE LIMITED TO PROVEN DIRECT DAMAGES IN AN
AMOUNT NOT TO EXCEED THE ORIGINAL DISCOUNTED PURCHASE PRICE OF THE PRODUCT.
3Com SHALL IN NO EVENT BE LIABLE FOR THE FOLLOWING TYPES OF DAMAGES: (1) INCIDENTAL
DAMAGES; (2) SPECIAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES; (3) LOST PROFITS, SAVINGS OR REVENUES OF
ANY KIND, INCLUDING WITHOUT LIMITATION LOSS OF DATA, MESSAGES, OR TELEPHONE CALLS; AND
(4) CHARGES FOR COMMON CARRIER TELECOMMUNICATIONS SERVICES OR FACILITIES ACCESSED
THROUGH OR CONNECTED TO PRODUCTS. TO THE EXTENT PERMITTED BY LAW, SUCH DAMAGES ARE
HEREBY EXCLUDED BOTH FOR PROPERTY DAMAGE, AND TO THE EXTENT NOT UNCONSCIONABLE, FOR
PERSONAL INJURY DAMAGE.
THE FOREGOING LIMITATIONS OF LIABILITY SHALL APPLY REGARDLESS OF THE CAUSE OF ACTION
UNDER WHICH SUCH DAMAGES ARE SOUGHT.
SOME STATES DO NOT ALLOW THE EXCLUSION OR LIMITATION OF INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL
DAMAGES, SO THE ABOVE LIMITATION OR EXCLUSION MAY NOT APPLY TO YOU.
7 Third-Party Products. The decision to acquire hardware, software (in any form), supplies or service (other
than the Product accompanying this Agreement) from parties other than 3Com (“Third Party Products”) is
yours, even if 3Com helps you identify, evaluate or select them. EXCEPT AS SPECIFICALLY AGREED TO IN
WRITING, 3Com IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR, AND EXPRESSLY DISCLAIMS LIABILITY FOR, PERFORMANCE
OR QUALITY OF THIRD PARTY PRODUCTS OR THEIR SUPPLIERS; any claim that you have in connection
with the Third Party Products and any remedies for such claim will be against the supplier of such Third
Party Products.
8 Assignment. You may not assign this Agreement (including the licenses granted hereby), either in whole
or in part, whether by operation of law or otherwise, without the prior written consent of 3Com. Any
attempt to assign your rights, duties or obligations under this Agreement without such consent shall be
null and void. Subject to the foregoing, the rights and liabilities of the parties under this Agreement will
bind and inure to the benefit of the parties’ respective successors and permitted assigns.
9 General. You acknowledge that you have read this Agreement, understand it, and that by using the
Product you agree to be bound by the terms and conditions of this Agreement. You assume full
responsibility for the use of the Software and agree to use the Software legally and responsibly. This
Agreement shall be governed by the substantive laws of the State of California, without regard to conflicts
of law principles, except as to copyright matters, which are governed, by federal law. This Agreement is
deemed entered into, by both parties, in Santa Clara, California. In the event that any provision of this
Agreement shall be held by a court or other tribunal of competent jurisdiction to be unenforceable, such
provision shall be enforced to the maximum extent permissible and the remaining provisions of this
Agreement shall remain in full force and effect. All rights in the Software not specifically granted in this
Agreement are reserved by 3Com, and, except for the express licenses granted herein, no other licenses
are granted by 3Com by implication, estoppel or otherwise. You agree not to export the Product, without
the express written consent of 3Com.
Should you have any questions concerning this Agreement, you may contact 3Com at the address set
forth below.
3Com Corporation
5400 Bayfront Plaza
P.O. Box 58145
Santa Clara, California, USA
95052-8145
North America:
Tel: 800-NET-3Com
Outside North America:
www.3com.com
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