Agilent Technologies E3632A User's Manual
User’s Guide
Part Number: E3632-90001
October 2007.
For Safety information, Warranties, and Regulatory information,
see the pages behind the Index.
© Copyright Agilent Technologies, Inc. 2000-2007
All Rights Reserved.
Agilent E3632A
DC Power Supply
The Agilent E3632A is a high performance 120 watt-dual range DC power
supply with GPIB and RS-232 interfaces. The combination of bench-top and
system features in this power supply provides versatile solutions for your
design and test requirements.
Convenient bench-top features
• Dual range
• Easy-to-use knob control settings
• Highly visible vacuum-fluorescent display meters
• High accuracy and high resolution
• Remote voltage sensing
• Overvoltage and overcurrent protection
• Output on/off
• Excellent load and line regulation and low ripple and noise
• Operating states storage
• Portable, ruggedized case with non-skid feet
Flexible system features
• GPIB (IEEE-488) and RS-232 interfaces are standard
• SCPI (Standard Commands for Programmable Instruments) compatibility
• I/O setup easily done from front-panel
• Software calibration, no internal adjustments required
Agilent E3632A
DC Power Supply
The Front Panel at a Glance
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
2
15V/7A range selection key
30V/4A range selection key
Overvoltage protection key
Overcurrent protection key
Display limit key
Recall operating state key
Store operating state/Local key
8
9
10
11
12
13
Error/Calibrate key
I/O Configuration/Secure key
Output On/Off key
Control knob
Resolution selection keys
Voltage/current adjust selection key
1 15V/7A range selection key Selects the 15V/7A range and allows the full rated output
to 15V/7A.
2 30V/4A range selection key Selects the 30V/4A range and allows the full rated output
to 30V/4A.
3 Overvoltage protection key Enables or disables the overvoltage protection function,
sets trip voltage level, and clears the overvoltage condition.
4 Overcurrent protection key Enables or disables the overcurrent protection function,
sets trip current level, and clears the overcurrent condition.
5 Display limit key Shows voltage and current limit values on the display and allows
knob adjustment for setting limit values.
6 Recall operating state key Recalls a previously stored operating state from location
‘‘1’’, ‘‘2’’, or ‘‘3’’.
7 Store operating state / Local key1 Stores an operating state in location ‘‘1’’, ‘‘2’’, or
‘‘3’’ / or returns the power supply to local mode from remote interface mode.
8 Error / Calibrate key2 Displays error codes generated during operation, self-test and
calibration / or enables calibration mode (the power supply must be unsecured before
performing calibration). See Service Guide for more details on calibration.
9 I/O Configuration / Secure key3 Configures the power supply for remote interfaces
/ or secure or unsecure the power supply for calibration. See Service Guide for more
details on how to secure or unsecure the power supply.
10 Output On/Off key Enables or disables the power supply output. This key toggles
between on and off.
11 Control knob Increases or decreases the value of the blinking digit by turning
clockwise or counter clockwise.
12 Resolution selection keys Move the blinking digit to the right or left.
13 Voltage/current adjust selection key Selects the knob control function for voltage
or current adjustment.
The key can be used as the ‘‘Local’’ key when the power supply is in the remote
interface mode.
2
You can enable the ‘‘calibration mode’’ by holding down this key when you turn on
the power supply.
3You can use it as the ‘‘Secure’’ or ‘‘Unsecure’’ key when the power supply is in the
calibration mode.
1
3
Front-Panel Voltage and Current Limit Settings
You can set the voltage and current limit values from the front panel using the
following method.
Use the voltage/current adjust selection key, the resolution selection keys, and
the control knob to change the voltage and current limit values.
1 Select the desired range using the range selection keys after turning on the power
supply.
2 Press the Display Limit key to show the limit values on the display.
3 Move the blinking digit to the appropriate position using the resolution selection keys
and change the blinking digit value to the desired voltage limit by turning the control
knob. If the display limit times out, press the Display Limit key again.
4 Set the knob to current control mode using the voltage/current adjust selection key.
5 Move the blinking digit to the appropriate position using the resolution selection keys
and change the blinking digit value to the desired current limit by turning the control
knob.
6 Press the Output On/Off key to enable the output. After about 5 seconds, the
display will go to output monitoring mode automatically to display the voltage and
current at the output or the display will go to output monitoring mode immediately by
pressing the Output On/Off key again.
Note
All front panel keys and controls can be disabled with remote interface
commands. The Agilent E3632A must be in "Local" mode for the front panel
keys and controls to function.
4
Display Annunciators
Adrs
Rmt
15V
30V
OVP
OCP
CAL
Limit
ERROR
OFF
Unreg
CV
CC
Power supply is addressed to listen or talk over a remote interface.
Power supply is in remote interface mode.
Shows the 15V/7A range is selected.
Shows the 30V/4A range is selected.
The overvoltage protection function is enabled when the annunciator
turns on or the overvoltage protection circuit has caused the power
supply to shutdown when the annunciator blinks.
The overcurrent protection function is enabled when the annunciator
turns on or the overcurrent protection circuit has caused the power
supply to shutdown when the annunciator blinks.
The power supply is in calibration mode.
The display shows the limit values of voltage and current.
Hardware or remote interface command errors are detected and the error
bit has not been cleared.
The output of the power supply is disabled (See page 52 for more
information).
The output of the power supply is unregulated (output is neither CV
nor CC).
The power supply is in constant voltage mode.
The power supply is in constant current mode.
To review the display annunciators, hold down Display Limit key as you
turn on the power supply.
5
The Rear Panel at a Glance
1 Power-line voltage setting
2 Power-line fuse-holder assembly
3 AC inlet
4 Power-line module
5 GPIB (IEEE-488) interface connector
6 RS-232 interface connector
Use the front-panel I/O Config key to:
•
•
•
6
Select the GPIB or RS-232 interface (see chapter 3).
Set the GPIB bus address (see chapter 3).
Set the RS-232 baud rate and parity (see chapter 3).
In This Book
General Information Chapter 1 contains a general description of your power
supply. This chapter also provides instructions for checking your power
supply, connecting to ac power, and selecting power-line voltage.
Initial Operation Chapter 2 ensures that the power supply develops its rated
outputs and properly responds to operation from the front panel.
Front-Panel Operation Chapter 3 describes in detail the use of front-panel
keys and how they are used to operate the power supply from the front panel.
This chapter also shows how to configure the power supply for the remote
interface and gives a brief introduction to the calibration features.
Remote Interface Reference Chapter 4 contains reference information to help
you program the power supply over the remote interface. This chapter also
explains how to program for status reporting.
Error Messages Chapter 5 lists the error messages that may appear as you are
working with the power supply. Each listing contains information to help you
diagnose and solve the problem.
Application Programs Chapter 6 contains some remote interface applications
to help you develop programs for your application.
Tutorial Chapter 7 describes basic operation of linear power supplies and
gives specific details on the operation and use of the Agilent E3632A power
supply.
Specifications Chapter 8 lists the power supply’s specifications.
If you have questions relating to the operation of the power supply, call
1-800-829-4444 in the United States, or contact your nearest Agilent
Technologies Sales Office.
If your Agilent E3632A fails within one year of purchase, Agilent will
repair or replace it free of charge. Call 1-800-258-5165 ("Express
Exchange") in the United States, or contact your nearest Agilent
Technologies Sales Office.
7
8
Contents
Chapter 1 General Information
Safety Considerations 14
Safety and EMC Requirements 14
Options and Accessories 15
Options 15
Accessories 15
Description 16
Installation 19
Initial Inspection 19
Cooling and Location 19
Input Power Requirements 22
Power-Line Cord 22
Power-Line Voltage Selection 22
Contents
Chapter 2 Initial Operation
Preliminary Checkout 27
Power-On Checkout 28
Output Checkout 29
Voltage Output Checkout 29
Current Output Checkout 30
Chapter 3 Front-Panel Operation
Front-Panel Operation Overview 35
Constant Voltage Operation 36
Constant Current Operation 38
Storing and Recalling Operating States 40
Programming Overvoltage Protection 42
Setting the OVP Level and Enable the OVP Circuit 42
Checking OVP Operation 43
Clearing the Overvoltage Condition 43
Programming Overcurrent Protection 45
Setting the OCP Level and Enable the OCP Circuit 45
Checking OCP Operation 46
Clearing the Overcurrent Condition 46
Remote Voltage Sensing 48
CV Regulation 48
Output Rating 48
Output Noise 48
Stability 49
Remote Voltage Sensing Connections 49
9
Contents
Chapter 3 Front-Panel Operation (continued)
Contents
Disabling the Output 50
Disabling the Output Using an External Relay 51
Knob Locking 51
System-Related Operations 52
Self-Test 52
Error Conditions 53
Display Control 54
Firmware Revision Query 55
SCPI Language Version 55
Remote Interface Configuration 56
Remote Interface Selection 56
GPIB Address 57
Baud Rate Selection (RS-232) 57
Parity Selection (RS-232) 57
To Set the GPIB Address 58
To Set the Baud Rate and Parity (RS-232) 59
GPIB Interface Configuration 61
RS-232 Interface Configuration 62
RS-232 Configuration Overview 62
RS-232 Data Frame Format 62
Connection to a Computer or Terminal 63
DTR / DSR Handshake Protocol 64
RS-232 Troubleshooting 65
Calibration Overview 66
Calibration Security 66
Calibration Count 70
Calibration Message 70
10
Contents
Chapter 4 Remote Interface Reference
Contents
SCPI Command Summary 73
Simplified Programming Overview 78
Using the APPLy Command 78
Using the Low-Level Commands 78
Reading a Query Response 79
Selecting a Trigger Source 79
Power Supply Programming Ranges 80
Using the APPLy Command 81
Output Setting and Operation Commands 82
Triggering Commands 89
Trigger Source Choices 89
Triggering Commands 91
System-Related Commands 92
Calibration Commands 96
RS-232 Interface Commands 99
The SCPI Status Registers 100
What is an Event Register? 100
What is an Enable Register? 100
SCPI Status System 101
The Questionable Status Register 102
The Standard Event Register 103
The Status Byte Register 104
Using Service Request (SRQ) and Serial POLL 105
Using *STB? to Read the Status Byte 106
Using the Message Available Bit (MAV) 106
To Interrupt Your Bus Controller Using SRQ 106
To Determine When a Command Sequence is Completed 107
Using *OPC to Signal When Data is in the Output Buffer 107
Status Reporting Commands 108
An Introduction to the SCPI Language 111
Command Format Used in This Manual 112
Command Separators 113
Using the MIN and MAX Parameters 113
Querying Parameter Settings 114
SCPI Command Terminators 114
IEEE-488.2 Common Commands 114
SCPI Parameter Types 115
Halting an Output in Progress 116
SCPI Conformance Information 117
IEEE-488 Conformance Information 120
11
Contents
Chapter 5 Error Messages
Execution Errors 123
Self-Test Errors 128
Calibration Errors 129
Chapter 6 Application Programs
C++ Example for GPIB(IEEE 488) 133
Excel 5.0 Example for Windows 3.1 and GPIB 135
Chapter 7 Tutorial
Contents
Overview of Agilent E3632A Operation 141
Output Characteristics 143
Unregulated State 145
Unwanted Signals 145
Connecting the Load 147
Output Isolation 147
Multiple Loads 147
Remote Voltage Sensing 148
Load Consideration 149
Extending the Voltage and Current Range 151
Series Connections 151
Parallel Connections 151
Remote Programming 152
Reliability 154
Chapter 8 Specifications
Performance Specifications 157
Supplemental Characteristics 159
Index 163
12
1
General Information
General Information
This chapter provides a general description of your power supply. This chapter
also contains instructions for initial inspection, location and cooling for bench
and rack operation, selecting the power-line voltage, and connecting your
power supply to ac power.
Safety Considerations
This power supply is a Safety Class I instrument, which means that it has a
protective earth terminal. That terminal must be connected to earth ground
through a power source with a 3-wire ground receptacle.
Before installation or operation, check the power supply and review this
manual for safety markings and instructions. Safety information for specific
procedures is located at the appropriate places in this manual. See also
‘‘Safety’’ at the beginning of this manual for general safety information.
Safety and EMC Requirements
This power supply is designed to comply with the following safety and EMC
(Electromagnetic Compatibility) requirements:
• IEC 1010-1(1990)/EN 61010-1(1993) + A2 (1995): Safety Requirements for
Electrical Equipment for Measurement, Control, and Laboratory Use
• CSA C22.2 No.1010.1-92: Safety Requirements for Electrical Equipment for
Measurement, Control, and Laboratory Use
• UL 1244: Electrical and Electric Measuring and Testing Equipment
• EMC Directive 89/336/EEC
• Low Voltage Directive: 73/23/EEC
• EN 55011(1991) Group I, Class A/CISPR II(1990): Limits and Methods of
Radio Interface Characteristics of Industrial, Scientific, and Medical(ISM)
Radio-Frequency Equipment.
• EN50082-1(1992):
IEC 801-2(1991): Electrostatic Discharge Requirements
IEC 801-3(1984): Radiated Electromagnetic Field Requirements
IEC 801-4(1988): Electrical Fast Transient/Burst Requirements
• ICES/NMB-001
This ISM device complies with Canadian ICES-001.
Cet appareil ISM est conforme à la norme NMB-001 du Canada.
14
Chapter 1 General Information
Options and Accessories
1
Options and Accessories
Options
Options 0EM, 0E3, and 0E9 determine which power-line voltage is selected at
the factory. The standard unit is configured for 115 Vac ± 10%, 47-63 Hz input
voltage. For more information about changing the power-line voltage setting,
see ‘‘Power-Line Voltage Selection’’, starting on page 22 in this chapter.
Option
0EM
0E3
0E9
1CM
0L2
Description
115 Vac ± 10%, 47-63 Hz input voltage
230 Vac ± 10%, 47-63 Hz input voltage
100 Vac ± 10%, 47-63 Hz input voltage
Rack mount kit (Agilent part number 5063-9243)
Extra English manual set (local language manual files are included
on the CD-ROM, Agilent part number 5964-8251)
Accessories
The accessories listed below may be ordered from your local Agilent
Technologies Sales Office either with the power supply or separately.
Agilent No. Description
10833A
GPIB cable, 1 m (3.3 ft.)
10833B
GPIB cable, 2 m (6.6 ft.)
34398A
RS-232, 9 pin (f) to 9 pin (f),
34399A
2.5 m (8.2 ft.) cable; plus 9 pin (m) to
25 pin (f) adapter
RS-232 adapter kit (contains 4 adapters):
9 pin (m) to 25 pin (m) for use with PC or printer
9 pin (m) to 25 pin (f) for use with PC or printer
9 pin (m) to 25 pin (m) for use with modem
9 pin (m) to 9 pin (m) for use with modem
15
Chapter 1 General Information
Description
Description
The Agilent E3632A DC power supply feature a combination of programming
capabilities and linear power supply performance that makes it ideal for power
systems applications. The power supply is programmable locally from the front
panel or remotely over the GPIB and RS-232 interfaces. This power supply has
two ranges, allowing more voltage at a lower current. The desired output range
is selected from the front panel or over the remote interfaces.
Operational features include:
• Dual range of 15V/7A or 30V/4A
• Constant voltage (CV) or constant current (CC) operation
• Overvoltage protection (OVP) and overcurrent protection (OCP)
• Three storage locations (1 to 3) for user-defined operating states
• Automatic turn-on self-test
• Remote sensing for load voltage
• User calibration from the front panel or over the remote interfaces
The front panel operation permits:
• Easy-to-use of knob control
• Output range selection
• Enabling or disabling OVP and OCP features
• Setting the OVP and OCP trip levels
• Clearing OVP and OCP conditions
• Setting and displaying the voltage and current limit values
• Saving and recalling operating states
• Returning the power supply to local mode from remote interface mode
• Displaying remote interface error message
• Calibrating the power supply, including changing the calibration secure
code
• Configuring the power supply for remote interfaces
• Enabling or disabling the output
16
Chapter 1 General Information
Description
1
When operated over the remote interface, the power supply can be both a
listener and a talker. Using an external controller, you can instruct the power
supply to set the output and to send the status data back over the GPIB or RS232. Capabilities include the following features:
•
•
•
•
•
Voltage and current programming
Voltage and current readback
Present and stored status readback
Programming syntax error detection
Complete self-test
The front-panel VFD (Vacuum-Fluorescent Display) includes:
•
•
•
•
Displaying actual values of output voltage and current (meter mode)
Or displaying the limit values of voltage and current (limit mode)
Checking the operating status from the annunciators
Checking the type of error from the error codes (messages)
Connections to the power supply’s output and to chassis ground are made to
binding posts on the front panel
Warning
Floating the power supply output more than ±60 Vdc from the chassis presents an
electric shock hazard to the operator. Do not float the outputs more than ±60 Vdc
when metal shorting bars without insulation are used to connect the (+) output to the
(+) sense and the (-) output to the (-) sense terminals.
17
Chapter 1 General Information
Description
Warning
Outputs can be floated to maximum of ±240 Vdc provided that the metal shorting bars
without insulation are either replaced with insulated conductors or they are removed
from the terminals so there is no operator access to the output conductors without
insulation. All field wiring insulation must be adequate for the voltage present.
The power supply is shipped with a detachable, 3-wire grounding type power
cord. The ac line fuse is an extractor type on the rear panel. The power supply
can be calibrated from the front panel directly or with a controller over the
GPIB or RS-232 interface using calibration commands. Correction factors are
stored in non-volatile memory and are used during output programming.
Calibration from the front panel or a controller eliminate the need to remove
the top cover or even the need to remove the power supply from your system
cabinet. You can guard against unauthorized calibration by using the “Secured”
calibration protection function.
18
Chapter 1 General Information
Installation
1
Installation
Initial Inspection
When you receive your power supply, inspect it for any obvious damage that
may have occurred during shipment. If any damage is found, notify the carrier
and the nearest Agilent Sales Office immediately. Warranty information is
shown in the front of this manual.
Keep the original packing materials in case the power supply has to be returned
to Agilent Technologies in the future. If you return the power supply for service,
attach a tag identifying the owner and model number. Also include a brief
description of the problem.
Mechanical Check
This check confirms that there are no broken keys or knob, that the cabinet
and panel surfaces are free of dents and scratches, and that the display is not
scratched or cracked.
Electrical Check
Chapter 2 describes an initial operation procedure which, when successfully
completed, verifies to a high level of confidence that the power supply is
operating in accordance with its specifications. Detailed electrical verification
procedures are included in the Service Guide.
Cooling and Location
Cooling
The power supply can operate without loss of performance within the
temperature range of 0 °C to 40 °C, and with derated output current from
40 °C to 55 °C. A fan cools the power supply by drawing air through the rear
panel and exhausting it out the sides. Using an Agilent rack mount will not
impede the flow of air.
Bench Operation
Your power supply must be installed in a location that allows sufficient space
at the sides and rear of the power supply for adequate air circulation. The
rubber bumpers must be removed for rack mounting.
19
Chapter 1 General Information
Installation
Rack Mounting
The power supply can be mounted in a standard 19-inch rack cabinet using one
of three optional kits available. A rack-mounting kit for a single instrument is
available as Option 1CM (P/N 5063-9243). Installation instructions and
hardware are included with each rack-mounting kit. Any Agilent System II
instrument of the same size can be rack-mounted beside the Agilent E3632A
power supply.
Remove the front and rear bumpers before rack-mounting the power supply.
To remove the rubber bumper, stretch a corner and then slide it off.
To rack mount a single instrument, order adapter kit 5063-9243.
20
Chapter 1 General Information
Installation
1
To rack mount two instrument of the same depth side-by-side, order
lock-link kit 5061-9694 and flange kit 5063-9214.
To install two instruments in a sliding support shelf, order support shelf
5063-9256, and slide kit 1494-0015.
21
Chapter 1 General Information
Input Power Requirements
Input Power Requirements
You can operate your power supply from a nominal 100 V, 115 V, or 230 V single
phase ac power source at 47 to 63 Hz. An indication on the rear panel shows
the nominal input voltage set for the power supply at the factory. If necessary,
you can change the power-line voltage setting according to the instructions on
the next page.
Power-Line Cord
The power supply is shipped from the factory with a power-line cord that has
a plug appropriate for your location. Contact the nearest Agilent Technologies
Sales and Service Office if the wrong power-line cord is included with your
power supply. Your power supply is equipped with a 3-wire grounding type
power cord; the third conductor being the ground. The power supply is
grounded only when the power-line cord is plugged into an appropriate
receptacle. Do not operate your power supply without adequate cabinet
ground connection.
Power-Line Voltage Selection
Power-line voltage selection is accomplished by adjusting two components:
power-line voltage selector and power-line fuse on the power-line module of
the rear panel. To change the power-line voltage, proceed as follows:
22
Chapter 1 General Information
Input Power Requirements
1
1 Remove the power cord. Remove the
fuse-holder assembly with a flat-blad
screwdriver from the rear panel.
2 Install the correct line fuse. Remove
the power-line voltage selector from the
power-line module.
100 or 115 Vac, 4 AT fuse
230 Vac, 2.5 AT fuse
3 Rotate the power-line voltage selector
until the correct voltage appears.
4 Replace the power-line voltage selector
and the fuse-holder assembly in the rear
panel.
100, 115, or 230 Vac
23
Chapter 1 General Information
Input Power Requirements
24
Chapter 1 General Information
Input Power Requirements
1
25
2
Initial Operation
Initial Operation
There are three basic tests in this chapter. The automatic power-on test
includes a self-test that checks the internal microprocessors and allows the
user visually to check the display. The output check ensures that the power
supply develops its rated outputs and properly responds to operation from the
front panel. For complete performance and/or verification tests, refer to the
Service Guide.
This chapter is intended for both the experienced and the inexperienced user
because it calls attention to certain checks that should be made prior to
operation.
Throughout this chapter the key to be pressed is shown in the left margin.
26
Chapter 2 Initial Operation
Preliminary Checkout
Preliminary Checkout
1
2
3
The following steps help you verify that the power supply is ready for use.
Verify the power-line voltage setting on the rear panel.
The power-line voltage is set to the proper value for your country when the
power supply is shipped from the factory. Change the voltage setting if it is not
correct. The settings are: 100, 115, or 230 Vac.
Verify that the correct power-line fuse is installed.
The correct fuse is installed for your country when the power supply is shipped
from the factory. For 100 or 115 Vac operation, you must use a 4 AT fuse. For
230 Vac operation, you must use a 2.5 AT fuse.
Connect the power-line cord and turn on your power supply.
The front-panel display will light up and a power-on self-test occurs
automatically when you turn on the power supply.
See "Power-Line Voltage Selection", starting on page 22 in chapter 1 if you
need to change the power-line voltage or the power-line fuse.
To replace the 4 AT fuse, order Agilent part number 2110-0996.
To replace the 2.5 AT fuse, order Agilent part number 2110-0999.
27
2
Chapter 2 Initial Operation
Power-On Checkout
Power-On Checkout
The power-on test includes an automatic self-test that checks the internal
microprocessors and allows the user visually to check the display. You will
observe the following sequence on the display after pressing the front panel
power switch to on.
1 All segments of the display including all annunciators will turn on for about one
second.
To review the annunciators, hold down
the power supply.
Display Limit
key as you turn on
2 The GPIB address or RS-232 message will then be displayed for about one
second.
ADDR 05 (or RS-232)
The GPIB address is set to ‘‘5’’ when the power supply is shipped from the
factory for remote interface configuration. If this is not the first time the power
supply is turned on, a different interface (RS-232) or a different GPIB address
may appear.
See "Remote Interface Configuration" in chapter 3 starting on page 56 if you
need to change the remote interface configuration.
3 The “15V”, “OVP”, “OCP” and “OFF” annunciators are on. All others are off.
The power supply will go into the power-on / reset state; the output is disabled
(the OFF annunciator turns on); the 15V/7A range is selected (the 15V
annunciator turns on); and the knob is selected for voltage control. Notice that
the OVP and OCP annunciator also turn on.
Output On/Off
4 Enable the outputs.
Press the Output On/Off key to enable the output. The OFF annunciator turns
off and the 15V, OVP, OCP, and CV annunciators are lit. The blinking digit can
be adjusted by turning the knob. Notice that the display is in the meter mode.
‘‘Meter mode’’ means that the display shows the actual output voltage and
current.
Note
If the power supply detects an error during power-on self-test, the ERROR
annunciator will turn on. See "Error Messages" for more information
starting on page 121 in chapter 5
28
Chapter 2 Initial Operation
Output Checkout
Output Checkout
The following procedures check to ensure that the power supply develops its
rated outputs and properly responds to operation from the front panel. For
complete performance and verification tests, refer to the Service Guide.
For each step, use the keys shown on the left margins.
Voltage Output Checkout
The following steps verify basic voltage functions with no load.
Power
1 Turn on the power supply.
The power supply will go into the power-on / reset state; the output is disabled
(the OFF annunciator turns on); the 15V/7A range is selected (the 15V
annunciator turns on); and the knob is selected for voltage control.
Output On/Off
2 Enable the outputs.
3
4
The OFF annunciator turns off and the 15V, OVP, OCP, and CV annunciators are
lit. The blinking digit can be adjusted by turning the knob. Notice that the
display is in the meter mode. ‘‘Meter mode’’ means that the display shows the
actual output voltage and current.
Check that the front-panel voltmeter properly responds to knob
control for the 15V/7A range.
Turn the knob clockwise or counter clockwise to check that the voltmeter
responds to knob control and the ammeter indicates nearly zero.
Ensure that
the voltage can be adjusted from zero to the full rated
value. 1
Adjust the knob until the voltmeter indicates 0 volts and then adjust the knob
until the voltmeter indicates ‘‘15.0 volts’’.
You can use the resolution selection keys to move the blinking digit to the
right or left when setting the voltage.
1
29
2
Chapter 2 Initial Operation
Output Checkout
Current Output Checkout
The following steps check basic current functions with a short across the
power supply’s output.
Power
1
2
Output On/Off
Display Limit
Volt/Curr
Turn on the power supply.
The power supply will go into the power-on / reset state; the output is disabled
(the OFF annunciator turns on); the 15V/7A range is selected (the 15V
annunciator turns on); and the knob is selected for voltage control.
Connect a short across (+) and (-) output terminals with an insulated
test lead.
3
Enable the output.
The OFF annunciator turns off and the 15V, OVP, and OCP annunciators are lit.
The CV or CC annunciator turns on depending on the resistance of the test
lead. The blinking digit can be adjusted by turning the knob. Notice that the
display is in the meter mode. ‘‘Meter mode’’ means that the display shows the
actual output voltage and current.
4
Adjust the voltage limit value to 1.0 volt.
Set the display to the limit mode (the Limit annunciator will be blinking).
Adjust the voltage limit to 1.0 volt to assure CC operation. The CC annunciator
will turn on.
5
Check that the front-panel ammeter properly responds to knob control
for the 15V/7A range.
Set the knob to the current control, and turn the knob clockwise or counter
clockwise when the display is in the meter mode (the Limit annunciator is off).
Check that the ammeter responds to knob control and the voltmeter indicates
nearly zero (the voltmeter will show the voltage drop caused by the test lead).
30
Chapter 2 Initial Operation
Output Checkout
6
Note
Ensure that the current can be adjusted from zero to the full rated
value.
Adjust the knob until the ammeter indicates 0 amps and then until the ammeter
indicates 7.0 amps. 1
If an error has been detected during the output checkout procedures, the
ERROR annunciator will turn on. See "Error Messages" for more information
starting on page 121 in chapter 5.
You can use the resolution selection keys to move the blinking digit the right
or left when setting the current.
1
31
2
Chapter 2 Initial Operation
Output Checkout
32
3
Front-Panel Operation
Front-Panel Operation
So far you have learned how to install your power supply and perform initial
operation. During the initial operation, you were briefly introduced to
operating from the front panel as you learned how to check basic voltage and
current functions. This chapter will describe in detail the use of these frontpanel keys and show how they are used to accomplish power supply operation.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Front-Panel Operation Overview, page 35
Constant Voltage Operation, page 36
Constant Current Operation, page 38
Storing and Recalling Operating States, page 40
Programming Overvoltage Protection, page 42
Programming Overcurrent Protection, page 45
Remote Voltage Sensing, page 48
Disabling the Output, page 50
Disabling the Output Using an External Relay, page 51
Knob Locking, page 51
System-Related Operations, page 52
Remote Interface Configuration, page 56
GPIB Interface Configuration, page 61
RS-232 Interface Configuration, page 62
Calibration Overview, page 66
Throughout this chapter the key to be pressed is shown in the left margin.
Note
See "Error Messages", starting on page 121 in chapter 5 if you encounter any
errors during front-panel operation.
34
Chapter 3 Front-Panel Operation
Front-Panel Operation Overview
Front-Panel Operation Overview
The following section describes an overview of the front-panel keys before
operating your power supply.
• The power supply is shipped from the factory configured in the front-panel
operation mode. At power-on, the power supply is automatically set to
operate in the front-panel operation mode. When in this mode, the frontpanel keys can be used. When the power supply is in remote operation mode,
you can return to front-panel operation mode at any time by pressing the
Local key if you did not previously send the front-panel lockout command.
A change between front-panel and remote operation modes will not result
in a change in the output parameters.
• The power supply has two output ranges of 15V/7A or 30V/4A. This feature
allows more voltage at a lower current or more current at a lower voltage.
The desired output range is selected from the front panel or over the remote
interfaces. The 15V or 30V annunciator indicates the presently selected
range.
• When you press Display Limit key (the Limit annunciator blinks), the
display of the power supply goes to the limit mode and the present limit
values will be displayed. In this mode, you can also observe the change of
the limit values when adjusting the knob. If you press the Display Limit
key again or let the display time-out after several seconds, the power supply
will return the display to the meter mode (the Limit annunciator turns off).
In this mode, the actual output voltage and current will be displayed.
• The output of the power supply can be enabled or disabled from the front
panel using the Output On/Off key. When the output is off, the OFF
annunciator turns on and the output is disabled.
• The display provides the present operating status of the power supply with
annunciators and also informs the user of error codes. For example, the
power supply is operating in CV mode in the 15V/7A range and controlled
from the front panel, then the CV and 15V annunciators will turn on. If,
however, the power supply is remotely controlled, the Rmt annunciator will
also turn on, and when the power supply is being addressed over GPIB
interface, the Adrs annunciator will turn on. See "Display Annunciators"
on page 5 for more information.
35
3
Chapter 3 Front-Panel Operation
Constant Voltage Operation
Constant Voltage Operation
To set up the power supply for constant voltage (CV) operation, proceed as
follows.
• Front-panel operation:
1 Connect a load to the output terminals.
With power-off, connect a load to the (+) and (-) output terminals.
Power
Display Limit
2
Turn on the power supply.
The power supply will go into the power-on / reset state; the output is disabled
(the OFF annunciator turns on); the 15V/7A range is selected (the 15V
annunciator turns on); and the knob is selected for voltage control.
To operate the power supply in the 30V/4A range, press the 30V,4A key before
proceeding to the next step. The 30V annunciator turns on.
3
Set the display to the limit mode.
Notice that the Limit annunciator blinks, indicating that the display is in the
limit mode. When the display is in the limit mode, you can see the voltage and
current limit values of the power supply.
In constant voltage mode, the voltage values between the meter and limit
modes are the same, but the current values are not. Moreover, if the
display is in the meter mode, you cannot see the change of current limit
value when adjusting the knob. We recommend that you should set the
display to “limit” mode to see the change of current limit value in the
constant voltage mode whenever adjusting the knob.
Volt/Curr
4
Adjust the knob for the desired current limit. 1
Check that the Limit annunciator still blinks. Set the knob for current control.
The second digit of the ammeter will be blinking. The blinking digit can be
changed using the resolution selection keys and the blinking digit can be
adjusted by turning the knob. Adjust the knob to the desired current limit.
You can use the resolution selection keys to move the blinking digit to the
right or left when setting current.
1
36
Chapter 3 Front-Panel Operation
Constant Voltage Operation
Volt/Curr
Display Limit
Output On/Off
5
Adjust the knob for the desired output voltage. 1
Check that the Limit annunciator still blinks. Set the knob for voltage control.
The second digit of the voltmeter will be blinking. Change the blinking digit
using the resolution selection keys and adjust the knob to the desired output
voltage.
6
Return to the meter mode.
Press Display Limit key or let the display time-out after several seconds to
return to the meter mode. Notice that the Limit annunciator turns off and the
display shows “OUTPUT OFF” message.
7
8
Note
Enable the output.
The OFF annunciator turns off and the 15V or 30V, OVP, OCP and CV
annunciators are lit. Notice that the display is in the meter mode. In the meter
mode, the display shows the actual output voltage and current.
Refer to “Programming Overvoltage Protection” and “Programming
Overcurrent Protection” sections, starting on page 42 and page 45 for more
information on OVP and OCP annunciators.
Verify that the power supply is in the constant voltage mode.
If you operate the power supply in the constant voltage (CV) mode, verify that
the CV annunciator is lit. If the CC annunciator is lit, choose a higher current
limit.
During actual CV operation, if a load change causes the current limit to be
exceeded, the power supply will automatically crossover to the constant
current mode at the preset current limit and the output voltage will drop
proportionately.
• Remote interface operation:
CURRent {<current>|MIN|MAX}
VOLTage {<voltage>|MIN|MAX
OUTPut ON
Set the current
Set the voltage
Enable the output
You can use the resolution selection keys to move the blinking digit to the
right or left when setting voltage.
1
37
3
Chapter 3 Front-Panel Operation
Constant Current Operation
Constant Current Operation
To set up the power supply for constant current (CC) operation, proceed as
follows.
• Front-panel operation:
1 Connect a load to the output terminals.
With power-off, connect a load to the (+) and (-) output terminals.
Power
Display Limit
2
Turn on the power supply.
The power supply will go into the power-on / reset state; the output is disabled
(the OFF annunciator turns on); the 15V/7A range is selected (the 15V
annunciator turns on); and the knob is selected for voltage control.
To operate the power supply in the 30V/4A range, press 30V,4A key before
proceeding to the next step. The 30V annunciator turns on.
3
Set the display to the limit mode.
Notice that the Limit annunciator blinks, indicating that the display is in the
limit mode. When the display is in the limit mode, you can see the voltage and
current limit values of the selected supply.
In constant current mode, the current values between the meter mode and
limit mode are the same, but the voltage values are not. Moreover, if the
display is in the meter mode, you cannot see the change of voltage limit
value when adjusting the knob. We recommend that you should set the
display to “limit” mode to see the change of voltage limit value in the
constant current mode whenever adjusting the knob.
4
Adjust the knob for the desired voltage limit. 1
Check that the Limit annunciator still blinks and the second digit of voltmeter
blinks to indicate the knob is selected for voltage control. The blinking digit
can be changed using the resolution keys and the blinking digit can be adjusted
by turning the knob. Adjust the knob for the desired voltage limit.
You can use the resolution selection keys to move the blinking digit to the
right or left when setting the voltage.
1
38
Chapter 3 Front-Panel Operation
Constant Current Operation
Volt/Curr
Display Limit
Output On/Off
5
Adjust the knob for the desired output current. 1
Check that the Limit annunciator still blinks. Set the knob for current control.
The second digit of the ammeter will be blinking. Change the blinking digit
using the resolution selection keys and adjust the knob to the desired output
current.
6
Return to the meter mode.
Press Display Limit key or let the display time-out after several seconds to
return the meter mode. Notice that the Limit annunciator turns off and the
display shows “OUTPUT OFF” message.
7
8
Note
Enable the output.
The OFF annunciator turns off and the 15V or 30V, OVP, OCP and CC
annunciators are lit. Notice that the display is in the meter mode. In the meter
mode, the display shows the actual output voltage and current.
Refer to “Programming Overvoltage Protection” and “Programming
Overcurrent Protection” sections, starting on page 42 and page 45 for more
information on OVP and OCP annunciators.
Verify that the power supply is in the constant current mode.
If you operate the power supply in the constant current (CC) mode, verify that
the CC annunciator is lit. If the CV annunciator is lit, choose a higher voltage
limit.
During actual CC operation, if a load change causes the voltage limit to be
exceeded, the power supply will automatically crossover to constant voltage
mode at the preset voltage limit and the output current will drop
proportionately.
• Remote interface operation:
VOLTage {<voltage>|MIN|MAX}
CURRent {<current>|MIN|MAX}
OUTPut ON
Set the voltage
Set the current
Enable the output
You can use the resolution selection keys to move the blinking digit to the
right or left when setting the current.
1
39
3
Chapter 3 Front-Panel Operation
Storing and Recalling Operating States
Storing and Recalling Operating States
You can store up to three different operating states in non-volatile memory.
This also enables you to recall the entire instrument configuration with just a
few key presses from the front panel.
The memory locations are supplied with the reset states from the factory for
front-panel operation. Refer to the description of *RST command, starting on
page 94 in chapter 4 for more information. The following steps show you how
to store and recall an operating state.
• Front-panel operation:
1 Set up the power supply for the desired operating state.
The storage feature “remembers” output range selection, the limit value
settings of voltage and current, output on/off state, OVP and OCP on/off state,
and OVP and OCP trip levels.
Store
2
Turn on the storage mode.
Three memory locations (numbered 1, 2 and 3) are available to store the
operating states. The operating states are stored in non-volatile memory and
are remembered when being recalled.
STORE 1
3
This message appears on the display for approximately 3 seconds.
Store the operating state in memory location “3”.
Turn the knob to the right to specify the memory location 3.
STORE 3
To cancel the store operation, let the display time-out after about 3 seconds
or press any other function key except the Store key. The power supply
returns to the normal operating mode and to the function pressed.
40
Chapter 3 Front-Panel Operation
Storing and Recalling Operating States
Store
4
Save the operating state.
The operating state is now stored. To recall the stored state, go to the following
steps.
DONE
This message appears on the display for approximately 1 second.
Recall
5
Turn on the recall mode.
Memory location “1” will be displayed in the recall mode.
3
RECALL 1
6
This message appears on the display for approximately 3 seconds.
Recall the stored operating state.
Turn the knob to the right to change the displayed storage location to 3.
RECALL 3
If this setting is not followed within 3 seconds with Recall key stroke, the
power supply returns to normal operating mode and will not recall the
instrument state 3 from memory.
Recall
7
Restore the operating state.
The power supply should now be configured in the same state as when you
stored the state on the previous steps.
DONE
This message appears on the display for approximately 1 second.
• Remote interface operation:
*SAV {1|2|3}
*RCL {1|2|3}
Store an operating state to a specified location
Recall a previously stored state from a specified location
41
Chapter 3 Front-Panel Operation
Programming Overvoltage Protection
Programming Overvoltage Protection
Overvoltage protection guards the load against output voltages that reach a
specified value greater than the programmed protection level. It is
accomplished by shorting the output via an internal SCR when the trip level is
set to equal or greater than 3 volts, or by progamming the output to 1 volt when
the trip level is set to less than 3 volts.
The following steps show how to set the OVP trip level, how to check OVP
operation, and how to clear overvoltage condition.
• Front-panel operation:
Setting the OVP Level and Enable the OVP Circuit
Power
Output On/Off
Over Voltage
1
Turn on the power supply.
The power supply will go into the power-on / reset state; the output is disabled
(the OFF annunciator turns on); the 15V/7A range is selected (the 15V
annunciator turns on); and the knob is selected for voltage control.
2
Enable the output.
The OFF annunciator turns off and the display will go to the meter mode.
3
Enter the OVP menu and set the trip level.
LEVEL 32.0 V
You will see the above message on the display when you enter the OVP menu.
Adjust the control knob for the desired OVP trip level.
Note that you cannot set the trip levels to lower than 1.0 volt.
Note
Over Voltage
4
Enable the OVP circuit.
OVP ON
You will see the above message after pressing
42
Over Voltage
key.
Chapter 3 Front-Panel Operation
Programming Overvoltage Protection
Over Voltage
5
Exit the OVP menu.
CHANGED
The “CHANGED” message is highlighted for a second to show that the new
OVP trip level is now in effect. If the OVP settings are not changed, “NO
CHANGE” will be displayed. The power supply will exit the OVP menu and the
display will return to the meter mode. Check that the OVP annunciator turns
on.
Checking OVP Operation
To check OVP operation, raise the output voltage to near the trip point. Then
very gradually increase the output by turning the knob until the OVP circuit
trips. This will cause the power supply output to drop to near zero, the OVP
annunciator to blink, and the CC annunciator to turn on. The “OVP TRIPPED”
message also appears on the display.
Clearing the Overvoltage Condition
When the OVP condition occurs (the “OVP TRIPPED” message is shown on
the display), the OVP annunciator blinks. When it was caused by external
voltage source such as a battery, disconnect it first. The following steps show
how to clear the overvoltage conditions and get back to normal mode
operation. In the following steps, the display will go back to "OVP TRIPPED"
if you let the display time out after about several seconds.
Over Voltage
or
Display Limit
1
Readjust the OVP trip level or the output voltage level.
Lower the output voltage level below the OVP trip point after pressing the
Display Limit or raise the OVP trip level by using the knob after pressing
the Over Voltage key.
Over Voltage
2
Move to the clear mode.
ovp on
You will see the above message after pressing the Over Voltage key. If you
changed the output voltage level, press the Over Voltage key twice. Turn the
knob to the right until the "OVP CLEAR" appears on the display.
43
3
Chapter 3 Front-Panel Operation
Programming Overvoltage Protection
Over Voltage
Clear the overvoltage condition and exit this menu.
Now, when you press Over Voltage key again, the “DONE” message is
displayed for a second and the OVP annunciator will not blink any more. The
output will return to meter mode.
• Remote interface operation:
3
VOLT:PROT {<voltage>|MIN|MAX}
VOLT:PROT:STAT {OFF|ON)
VOLT:PROT:CLE
Note
Set the OVP level
Disable or enable the OVP circuit
Clear the tripped OVP circuit
The power supply’s OVP circuit contains a crowbar SCR, which effectively
shorts the output of the power supply whenever the overvoltage condition
occurs. If external voltage source such as a battery is connected across the
output, and the overvoltage condition inadvertently occurs, the SCR will
continuously sink a large current from the source; possibly damaging the
power supply. To avoid this a diode must be connected in series with the
output as shown below.
Figure 3-1. Recommended Protection Circuit for Battery Charging
44
Chapter 3 Front-Panel Operation
Programming Overcurrent Protection
Programming Overcurrent Protection
Overcurrent protection guards the load against output currents that reach a
specified value greater than the programmed protection level. It is
accomplished by programming the output current to zero.
The following steps show how to set the overcurrent protection trip level, how
to check OCP operation and how to clear overcurrent condition.
• Front-panel operation:
Setting the OCP Level and Enable the OCP Circuit
Power
Output On/Off
Over Current
3
1
Turn on the power supply.
The power supply will go into the power-on / reset state; the output is disabled
(the OFF annunciator turns on); the 15V/7A range is selected (the 15V
annunciator turns on); and the knob is selected for voltage control.
2
Enable the output.
The OFF annunciator turns off and the display will go to the meter mode.
3
Enter the OCP menu and set the trip level.
LEVEL 7.5 A
You will see the above message on the display when you enter the OCP menu.
Adjust the knob for the desired OCP trip level.
Over Current
4
Enable the OCP circuit.
OCP ON
You will see the above message after pressing the
Over Current
key.
45
Chapter 3 Front-Panel Operation
Programming Overcurrent Protection
Over Current
5
Exit the OCP menu.
CHANGED
The “CHANGED” message is displayed for a second to show that the new OCP
trip level is now in effect. If the OCP settings are not changed, “NO CHANGE”
will be displayed. The power supply will exit the OCP menu and the display
will return to the meter mode. Check that the OCP annunciator turns on.
Checking OCP Operation
To check OCP operation, raise the output current to near the trip point. Then
very gradually increase the output by turning the knob until the OCP circuit
trips. This will cause the power supply’s output current to drop to zero and the
OCP annunciator to blink. The “OCP TRIPPED” message also appears on the
display.
Clearing the Overcurrent Condition
When the OCP condition occurs (the “OCP TRIPPED” message is shown on
the display), the OCP annunciator blinks. When it was caused by external
voltage source such as a battery, disconnect it first. The following steps show
how to clear the overcurrent conditions and get back to normal mode
operation. In the following steps, the display will go back to "OCP TRIPPED"
if you let the display time out after about several seconds.
Over Current
Display Limit
or
1
2
Readjust the OCP trip level or the output current level.
Lower the output current level below the OCP trip point after pressing the
Display Limit or raise the OCP trip level by using the knob after pressing
the Over Current key.
Move to the clear mode.
ocp on
You will see the above message after pressing the Over Current key. If you
changed the output current level, press the Over Current key twice. Turn the
knob to the right until the "OCP CLEAR" appears on the display.
46
Chapter 3 Front-Panel Operation
Programming Overcurrent Protection
Over Current
Clear the overcurrent condition and exit this menu.
Now, when you press Over Current key again, the “DONE’’ message is
displayed for a second and the OCP annunciator will not blink any more. The
output will return to meter mode.
• Remote interface operation:
3
CURR:PROT {<current>|MIN|MAX}
CURR:PROT:STAT {OFF|ON}
CURR:PROT:CLE
Set the OCP level
Disable or enable the OCP circuit
Clear the tripped OCP circuit
3
47
Chapter 3 Front-Panel Operation
Remote Voltage Sensing
Remote Voltage Sensing
Remote voltage sensing is used to maintain regulation at the load and reduce
the degradation of regulation that would occur due to the voltage drop in the
leads between the power supply and the load.
By connecting the power supply for remote voltage sensing, voltage is sensed
at the load rather than at the power supply’s output terminals. This will allow
the power supply to automatically compensate for the voltage drop in
applications with long lead lengths as well as to accurately read back the
voltage directly across the load.
When the power supply is connected for remote sensing, the OVP circuit senses
the voltage at the sensing points (load) and not the output terminals.
CV Regulation
The voltage load regulation specification in chapter 8 applies at the output
terminals of the power supply. When remote sensing, add 5 mV to this
specification for each 1 V drop between the positive sensing point and (+)
output terminal due to the change in load current. Because the sense leads are
part of the power supply’s feedback path, keep the resistance of the sense leads
at or below 0.5 Ω per lead to maintain the above specified performance.
Output Rating
The rated output voltage and current specifications in chapter 8 apply at the
output terminals of the power supply. With remote sensing, any voltage
dropped in the load leads must be added to the load voltage to calculate
maximum output voltage. The performance specifications are not guaranteed
when the maximum output voltage is exceeded. If the excessive demand on
the power supply forces the power supply to lose regulation, the Unreg
annunciator will turn on to indicate that the output is unregulated.
Output Noise
Any noise picked up on the sense leads also appears at the output of the power
supply and may adversely affect the voltage load regulation. Twist the sense
leads to minimize external noise pickup and run them parallel and close to the
load leads. In noisy environments it may be necessary to shield the sense leads.
Ground the shield at the power supply end only. Do not use the shield as one
of the sense conductors.
48
Chapter 3 Front-Panel Operation
Remote Voltage Sensing
Stability
Using remote sensing under certain combinations of load lead lengths and
large load capacitances may cause your application to form a filter, which
becomes part of the voltage feedback loop. The extra phase shift created by
this filter can degrade the power supply’s stability, resulting in poor transient
response or loop instability. In severe cases, it may cause oscillations. To
minimize this possibility, keep the load leads as short as possible and twist
them together. As the sense leads are part of the power supply’s programming
feedback loop, accidental open-connections of sense or load leads during
remote sensing operation have various unwanted effects. Provide secure and
permanent connections.
Remote Voltage Sensing Connections
Remote voltage sensing requires connecting the load leads from output
terminals to the load and connecting the sense leads from sense terminals to
the load as shown below. Observe polarity when connecting the sensing leads
to the load.
Notice that the metal shorting bars should be removed from the output and
sense terminals for remote voltage sensing connections.
Note
For local voltage sensing connections, the sense leads must be connected to
the output terminals.
Note
During remote sensing setup, it is strongly recommended to power off (by
presssing power ON/OFF button) the power supply to avoid undesirable
damage to the load or the power supply.
Figure 3-2. Remote Voltage Sensing Connections
49
3
Chapter 3 Front-Panel Operation
Disabling the Output
Disabling the Output
The output of the power supply can be disabled or enabled from the front panel.
• When the power supply is in the “Off” state, the OFF annunciator turns on and
the output is disabled. The OFF annunciator turns off when the power supply
returns to the “On” state. When the output is disabled, the voltage value is 0
volts and the current value is 0.02 amps.
• The output state is stored in volatile memory; the output is always disabled
when power has been off or after a remote interface reset.
While the output is disabled, the range selection keys, the control knob,
resolution selection keys, and adjust selection key are still working. If the
display is in the meter mode, you cannot see the changes of output
voltage and current settings on the display when turning the knob. To see
or check the changes when the outputs are disabled, the display should be
in the limit mode.
• Front-panel operation:
You can disable the output by pressing
between output “Off” and “On” states.
Output On/Off
• Remote interface operation:
OUTP {OFF|ON}
50
Disable or enable the output
key. This key toggles
Chapter 3 Front-Panel Operation
Disabling the Output Using an External Relay
Disabling the Output Using an External Relay
When the output of the E3632A is turned off, it is implemented by setting the
output to 0 volts and 0.02 amps. This gives a zero output voltage without
actually disconnecting the output. To disconnect the output an external relay
must be connected between the output and the load. A TTL signal of either low
true or high true is provided to control an external relay. This signal can only
be controlled with the remote command OUTPut:RELay {OFF|ON}. The TTL
output is available on the RS-232 connection pin 1 and pin 0.
When the OUTPut:RELay state is “ON”, the TTL output of pin 1 is high
(4.5 V) and pin 9 is low (0.5 V). The levels are reversed when the
OUTPut:RELay state is “OFF”.
Note
TTL output of pin 1 or pin 9 of the RS-232 connector is available only after
installing two jumpers inside the power supply. See the Service Guide for
more information.
Note
Do not use the RS-232 interface if you have configured the power supply to
output relay control signals. Internal components on the RS-232 circuitry
may be damaged.
Knob Locking
The knob locking function can be used to disable the knob, thereby preventing
any unwanted changes during an experiment, or when you leave the power
supply unattended. To disable the knob, press the resolution selection key until
the blinking digit disappears.
Notice that the knob and front panel keys are disabled when in the remote
interface mode.
51
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Chapter 3 Front-Panel Operation
System-Related Operations
System-Related Operations
This section gives information on topics such as self-test, error conditions, and
front-panel display control. This information is not directly related to setting
up the power supply but is an important part of operating the power supply.
Self-Test
A power-on self-test occurs automatically when you turn on the power supply.
This test assures you that the power supply is operational. This test does not
perform the extensive set of tests that are included as part of the complete selftest described below. If the power-on self-test fails, the ERROR annunciator
turns on.
• A complete self-test performs a series of tests and takes approximately 2
seconds to execute. If all tests pass, you can have a high confidence that the
power supply is operational.
• If the complete self-test is successful, “PASS” is displayed on the front panel.
If the self-test fails, “FAIL” is displayed and the ERROR annunciator turns on.
See the Service Guide for instructions on returning the power supply to Agilent
Technologies for service.
• Front-panel operation:
The complete self-test is enabled by pressing the
Recall the(actually any front
panel keys except the Error key) and the power-line switch simultaneously
and then continuing to press the Recall key for 5 seconds. The complete selftest will be finished in 2 seconds.
• Remote interface operation:
*TST?
Returns “0” if the complete self-test passes or “1” if it fails.
52
Chapter 3 Front-Panel Operation
System-Related Operations
Error Conditions
When the front-panel ERROR annunciator turns on, one or more command
syntax or hardware errors have been detected. A record of up to 20 errors can
be stored in the power supply’s error queue. See chapter 5 “Error Messages”,
starting on page 121 for a complete listing of the errors.
• Errors are retrieved in first-in-first-out (FIFO) order. The first error returned
is the first error that was stored. When you have read all errors from the queue,
the ERROR annunciator turns off. The power supply beeps once each time an
error is generated.
• If more than 20 errors have occurred when you operate the power supply over
the remote interface, the last error stored in the queue (the most recent error)
is replaced with -350, “Too many errors”. No additional errors are stored until
you remove errors from the queue. If no errors have occurred when you read
the error queue, the power supply responds with +0, “No error” over the remote
interface or “NO ERRORS” from the front panel.
• The error queue is cleared when power has been off or after a *CLS (clear
status) command has been executed. The *RST (reset) command does not
clear the error queue.
• Front-panel operation:
If the ERROR annunciator is on, press the Error key repeatedly to read the
errors stored in the queue. All errors are cleared when you read all errors.
ERR -113
• Remote interface operation:
SYST:ERR?
Reads and error from the error queue
Errors have the following format (the error string may contain up to 80
characters).
-113, "Undefined header"
53
3
Chapter 3 Front-Panel Operation
System-Related Operations
Display Control
For security reasons, you may want to turn off the front-panel display. From
the remote interface, you can display a 12-character message on the front
panel.
The display can be enabled / disabled from the remote interface only.
• When the display is turned off, outputs are not sent to the display and all
annunciators are disabled except the ERROR annunciator. Front-panel
operation is otherwise unaffected by turning off the display.
• The display state is stored in volatile memory; the display is always enabled
when power has been off, after a remote interface reset, or after returning to
local from remote.
• You can display a message on the front panel by sending a command from the
remote interface. The power supply can display up to 12 characters of the
message on the front panel; any additional characters are truncated. Commas,
periods, and semicolons share a display space with the preceding character,
and are not considered individual characters. When a message is displayed,
outputs are not sent to the display.
• Sending a message to the display from the remote interface overrides the
display state; this means that you can display a message even if the display is
turned off.
The display state is automatically turned on when you return to the local (front
panel) operation. Press Local key to return to the local state from the remote
interface.
• Remote interface operation:
DISP {OFF|ON}
DISP:TEXT <quoted string>
DISP:TEXT:CLE
Disable / enable the display
Display the string enclosed in quotes
Clear the displayed message
The following statement shows how to display a message on the front panel
from a Agilent Technologies controller.
"DISP:TEXT ‘HELLO’ "
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Chapter 3 Front-Panel Operation
System-Related Operations
Firmware Revision Query
The power supply has three microprocessors for control of various internal
systems. You can query the power supply to determine which revision of
firmware is installed for each microprocessor.
You can query the firmware revision from the remote interface only.
• The power supply returns four fields separated by commas and the fourth field
is a revision code which contains three numbers. The first number is the
firmware revision number for the main processor; the second is for the input/
output processor; and the third is for the front-panel processor.
• Remote interface operation:
*IDN?
3
Returns "HEWLETT-PACKARD,E3632A,0,X.X-X.X-X.X"
Be sure to dimension a string variable with at least 40 characters.
SCPI Language Version
The power supply complies with the rules and regulations of the present
version of SCPI (Standard Commands for Programmable Instruments). You
can determine the SCPI version with which the power supply is in compliance
by sending a command from the remote interface.
You can query the SCPI version from the remote interface only.
• Remote interface operation:
SYST:VERS?
Query the SCPI version
Returns a string in the form “YYYY.V” where the “Y’s” represent the year of the
version, and the “V” represents a version number for that year (for example,
1995.0).
55
Chapter 3 Front-Panel Operation
Remote Interface Configuration
Remote Interface Configuration
Before you can operate the power supply over the remote interface, you must
configure the power supply for the remote interface. This section gives
information on configuring the remote interface. For additional information
on programming the power supply over the remote interface, See "Remote
Interface Reference", starting on page 71 in chapter 4.
Remote Interface Selection
The power supply is shipped with both an GPIB (IEEE-488) interface and an
RS-232 interface on the rear panel. Only one interface can be enabled at a time.
The GPIB interface is selected when the power supply is shipped from the
factory.
The remote interface can be selected from the front-panel only.
• The interface selection is stored in non-volatile memory, and does not
change when power has been off or after a remote interface reset.
• If you select the GPIB interface, you must select a unique address for the
power supply. The current address is displayed momentarily on the front
panel when you turn on the power supply.1
• Your GPIB bus controller has its own address. Be sure to avoid using the
bus controller’s address for any instrument on the interface bus. Agilent
Technologies controllers generally use address “21”.
• If you enable the RS-232 interface, you must select the baud rate and parity
to be used. “RS-232” is displayed momentarily on the front panel when you
turn on the power supply if you have selected this interface.2
1Refer to "GPIB Interface Configuration" starting on page 61
for more information
on connecting the power supply to a computer over the GPIB interface.
2Refer to "RS-232 Interface Configuration" starting on page 62 for more information
on connecting the power supply to a computer over the RS-232 interface.
56
Chapter 3 Front-Panel Operation
Remote Interface Configuration
GPIB Address
Each device on the GPIB (IEEE-488) interface must have a unique address.
You can set the power supply’s address to any value between 0 and 30. The
current address is displayed momentarily on the front panel when you turn on
the power supply. The address is set to “05” when the power supply is shipped
from the factory.
The GPIB address can be set from the front-panel only.
• The address is stored in non-volatile memory, and does not change when
power has been off or after a remote interface reset.
• Your GPIB bus controller has its own address. Be sure to avoid the bus
controller’s address for any instrument on the interface bus. Agilent
Technologies controllers generally use address “21”.
Baud Rate Selection (RS-232)
You can select one of six baud rates for RS-232 operation. The rate is set to
9600 baud when the power supply is shipped from the factory.
The baud rate can be set from the front-panel only.
• Select one of the following: 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600 baud. The factory
setting is 9600 baud.
• The baud rate selection is stored in non-volatile memory, and does not
change when power has been off or after a remote interface reset.
Parity Selection (RS-232)
You can select the parity for RS-232 operation. The power supply is configured
for no parity and 8 data bits when shipped from the factory.
The parity can be set from the front-panel only.
• Select one of the following: None (8 data bits), Even (7 data bits), or Odd
(7 data bits). When you set the parity, you are indirectly setting the number
of data bits.
• The parity selection is stored in non-volatile memory, and does not change
when power has been off or after a remote interface reset.
57
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Chapter 3 Front-Panel Operation
Remote Interface Configuration
To Set the GPIB Address
To configure the power supply for the GPIB interface, proceed as follows:
I/O Config
1
Turn on the remote configuration mode.
GPIB / 488
You will see the above message on the front-panel display if the power supply
has not been changed from the factory setting. If “RS-232” appears, choose
“GPIB / 488” by turning the knob to the right.
I/O Config
2
Move to the GPIB address setting mode.
ADDR 05
3
I/O Config
4
The address is set to “05” when the power supply is shipped from the factory.
Notice that a different GPIB address may appear if the power supply has been
changed from the factory setting.
Turn the knob to change the GPIB address.
The displayed address is changed when turning the knob to the right or left.
Save the change and turn off the I/O configuration mode.
CHANGE SAVED
The address is stored in non-volatile memory, and does not change when
power has been off or after a remote interface reset. The power supply displays
a message to show that the change is now in effect. If the GPIB address is not
changed, “NO CHANGE” will be displayed for one second.
Note
To exit the I/O configuration mode without any further changes, press the
“I/O Config” key until the “NO CHANGE” message is displayed.
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Chapter 3 Front-Panel Operation
Remote Interface Configuration
To Set the Baud Rate and Parity (RS-232)
To configure the power supply for the RS-232 interface, proceed as follows:
I/O Config
1
Turn on the remote configuration mode.
GPIB / 488
You will see the above message on the display if the power supply has not been
changed from the factory setting.
2
Notice that if you changed the remote interface selection to RS-232 before,
“RS-232” message will be displayed.
Choose the RS-232 interface.
RS-232
You can choose the RS-232 interface by turning the knob to the left.
I/O Config
3
Move to the RS-232 interface setting mode and select the baud rate.
9600 BAUD
The rate is set to 9600 baud when the power supply is shipped from the factory.
Choose from one of the following by turning the knob to the right or left: 300,
600, 1200, 2400, 4800, or 9600 baud.
I/O Config
4
Save the change and choose the parity.
NONE 8 BITS
The power supply is configured for 8 data bits with no parity when shipped
from the factory. Choose from one of the following by turning the knob to the
right or left: None 8 Bits, Odd 7 Bits, or Even 7 Bits. When you set parity, you
are indirectly setting the number of the data bits.
59
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Chapter 3 Front-Panel Operation
Remote Interface Configuration
I/O Config
5
Save the change and turn off the I/O configuration mode.
CHANGE SAVED
The RS-232 baud rate and parity selections are stored in non-volatile memory,
and does not change when power has been off or after a remote interface reset.
The power supply displays a message to show that the change is now in effect.
If the baud rate and the parity are not changed, “NO CHANGE” will be displayed
for one second.
Note
To exit the I/O configuration mode without any further changes, press the
“I/O Config” key until the “NO CHANGE” message is displayed.
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Chapter 3 Front-Panel Operation
GPIB Interface Configuration
GPIB Interface Configuration
The GPIB connector on the rear panel connects your power supply to the
computer and other GPIB devices. Chapter 1 lists the cables that are available
from Agilent Technologies. An GPIB system can be connected together in any
configuration (star, linear, or both) as long as the following rules are observed:
• The total number of devices including the computer is no more than 15.
• The total length of all the cables used is no more than 2 meter times the
number of devices connected together, up to a maximum of 20 meters.
Note
IEEE-488 states that you should exercise caution if your individual cable
lengths exceed 4 meters.
Do not stack more than three connector blocks together on any GPIB
connector. Make sure that all connectors are fully seated and that the lock
screws are firmly finger tightened.
61
3
Chapter 3 Front-Panel Operation
RS-232 Interface Configuration
RS-232 Interface Configuration
You connect the power supply to the RS-232 interface using the 9-pin (DB-9)
serial connector on the rear panel. The power supply is configured as a DTE
(Data Terminal Equipment) device. For all communications over the RS-232
interface, the power supply uses two handshake lines: DTR (Data Terminal
Ready, on pin 4) and DSR (Data Set Ready, on pin 6).
The following sections contain information to help you use the power supply
over the RS-232 interface. The programming commands for RS-232 are
explained on page 99.
RS-232 Configuration Overview
Configure the RS-232 interface using the parameters shown below. Use the
front-panel I/O Config key to select the baud rate, parity, and number of data
bits (see page 59 for more information to configure from the front panel).
• Baud Rate: 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, or 9600 baud (factory setting)
• Parity and Data Bits: None / 8 data bits (factory setting)
Even / 7 data bits, or
Odd / 7 data bits
• Number of Start Bits: 1 bit (fixed)
• Number of Stop Bits: 2 bits (fixed)
RS-232 Data Frame Format
A character frame consists of all the transmitted bits that make up a single
character. The frame is defined as the characters from the start bit to the last
stop bit, inclusively. Within the frame, you can select the baud rate, number of
data bits, and parity type. The power supply uses the following frame formats
for seven and eight data bits.
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Chapter 3 Front-Panel Operation
RS-232 Interface Configuration
Connection to a Computer or Terminal
To connect the power supply to a computer or terminal, you must have the
proper interface cable. Most computers and terminals are DTE (Data Terminal
Equipment) devices. Since the power supply is also a DTE device, you must
use a DTE-to-DTE interface cable. These cables are also called null-modem,
modem-eliminator, or crossover cables.
The interface cable must also have the proper connector on each end and the
internal wiring must be correct. Connectors typically have 9 pins (DB-9
connector) or 25 pins (DB-25 connector) with a “male” or “female” pin
configuration. A male connector has pins inside the connector shell and a
female connector has holes inside the connector shell.
If you cannot find the correct cable for your configuration, you may have to
use a wiring adapter. If you are using a DTE-to-DTE cable, make sure the
adapter is a “straight-through” type. Typical adapters include gender changers,
null-modem adapters, and DB-9 to DB-25 adapters.
The cable and adapter diagrams shown below can be used to connect the
power supply to most computers or terminals. If your configuration is
different than those described, order the Agilent 34399A Adapter Kit. This kit
contains adapters for connection to other computers, terminals, and modems.
Instructions and pin diagrams are included with the adapter kit.
DB-9 Serial Connection If your computer or terminal has a 9-pin serial port
with a male connector, use the null-modem cable included with the Agilent
34398A Cable Kit. This cable has a 9-pin female connector on each end. The
cable pin diagram is shown below.
5182-4794
Cable
Instrument
PC
DCD
RX
TX
DTR
1
2
3
4
1
2
3
4
DCD
RX
TX
DTR
GND
DSR
RTS
CTS
RI
5
6
7
8
9
5
6
7
8
9
GND
DSR
RTS
CTS
RI
DB9
Male
DB9
Female
DB9
Female
DB9
Male
63
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Chapter 3 Front-Panel Operation
RS-232 Interface Configuration
DB-25 Serial Connection If your computer or terminal has a 25-pin serial
port with a male connector, use the null-modem cable and 25-pin adapter
included with the Agilent 34398A Cable Kit. The cable and adapter pin
diagram are shown below.
5182-4794
Cable
Instrument
DCD
RX
TX
DTR
GND
DSR
RTS
CTS
RI
DB9
Male
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
DB9
Female
5181-6641
Adapter
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
DB9
DB9
Female Male
PC
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
20
TX
RX
RTS
CTS
DSR
GND
DCD
DTR
DB25 DB25
Female Male
DTR / DSR Handshake Protocol
The power supply is configured as a DTE (Data Terminal Equipment) device
and uses the DTR (Data Terminal Ready) and DSR (Data Set Ready) lines of
the RS-232 interface to handshake. The power supply uses the DTR line to send
a hold-off signal. The DTR line must be TRUE before the power supply will
accept data from the interface. When the power supply sets the DTR line
FALSE, the data must cease within 10 characters.
To disable the DTR/DSR handshake, do not connect the DTR line and tie the
DSR line to logic TRUE. If you disable the DTR/DSR handshake, also select a
slower baud rate to ensure that the data is transmitted correctly.
The power supply sets the DTR line FALSE in the following cases:
1
When the power supply’s input buffer is full (when approximately 100
characters have been received), it sets the DTR line FALSE (pin 4 on the RS232 connector). When enough characters have been removed to make space
in the input buffer, the power supply sets the DTR line TRUE, unless the
second case (see next) prevents this.
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Chapter 3 Front-Panel Operation
RS-232 Interface Configuration
2
When the power supply wants to “talk” over the interface (which means that
it has processed a query) and has received a <new line> message terminator,
it will set the DTR line FALSE. This implies that once a query has been sent to
the power supply, the bus controller should read the response before
attempting to send more data. It also means that a <new line> must terminate
the command string. After the response has been output, the power supply sets
the DTR line TRUE again, unless the first case (see above) prevents this.
The power supply monitors the DSR line to determine when the bus controller
is ready to accept data over the interface. The power supply monitors the DSR
line (pin 6 on the RS-232 connector) before each character is sent. The output
is suspended if the DSR line is FALSE. When the DSR line goes TRUE,
transmission will resume.
The power supply holds the DTR line FALSE while output is suspended. A form
of interface deadlock exists until the bus controller asserts the DSR line TRUE
to allow the power supply to complete the transmission. You can break the
interface deadlock by sending the <Ctrl-C> character, which clears the
operation in progress and discards pending output (this is equivalent to the
IEEE-488 device clear action).
For the <Ctrl-C> character to be recognized reliably by the power supply
while it holds DTR FALSE, the bus controller must first set DSR FALSE.
RS-232 Troubleshooting
Here are a few things to check if you are having problems communicating over
the RS-232 interface. If you need additional help, refer to the documentation
that came with your computer.
• Verify that the power supply and your computer are configured for the same
baud rate, parity, and number of data bits. Make sure that your computer is
set up for 1 start bit and 2 stop bits (these values are fixed on the power
supply).
• Make sure to execute the SYSTem:REMote command to place the power
supply in the remote mode.
• Verify that you have connected the correct interface cable and adapters.
Even if the cable has the proper connectors for your system, the internal
wiring may be incorrect. The Agilent Technologies 34398A Cable Kit can
be used to connect the power supply to most computers or terminals.
• Verify that you have connected the interface cable to the correct serial port
on your computer (COM1, COM2, etc).
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Chapter 3 Front-Panel Operation
Calibration Overview
Calibration Overview
This section gives an overview of the calibration features of the power supply.
For more detailed discussion of the calibration procedures, see the Service
Guide.
Calibration Security
This feature allows you to enter a security code to prevent accidental or
unauthorized calibrations of the power supply. When you first receive your
power supply, it is secured. Before you can calibrate the power supply, you
must unsecure it by entering the correct security code.
• The security code is set to “HP003632” when the power supply is shipped
from the factory. The security code is stored in non-volatile memory, and
does not change when power has been off or after a remote interface reset.
• To secure the power supply from the remote interface, the security code
may contain up to 12 alphanumeric characters as shown below. The first
character must be a letter, but the remaining characters can be letters or
numbers. You do not have to use all 12 characters but the first character
must always be a letter.
A _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ (12 characters)
• To secure the power supply from the remote interface so that it can be
unsecured from the front panel, use the eight-character format shown
below. The first two characters must be “H P” and the remaining characters
must be numbers. Only the last six characters are recognized from the front
panel, but all eight characters are required. To unsecure the power supply
from the front panel, omit the “H P” and enter the remaining numbers as
shown on the following pages.
H P _ _ _ _ _ _ (8 characters)
If you forget your security code, you can disable the security feature by
adding a jumper inside the power supply, and then entering a new code.
See the Service Guide for more information.
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Chapter 3 Front-Panel Operation
Calibration Overview
To Unsecure for Calibration You can unsecure the power supply for
calibration either from the front panel or over the remote interface. The power
supply is secured when shipped from the factory, and the security code is set
to “HP003632”.
• Front-Panel Operation:
SECURED
If the power supply is secured, you will see the above message for one second
by holding the Calibrate key for 5 seconds when you turn on the power
supply. To unsecure the power supply, press the Secure key after the “CAL
MODE” message is displayed in the calibration mode, enter the security code
using the knob and resolution selection keys, and then press the Secure key.
000000 CODE
When you press the Secure key to save the change, you will see the message
below for one second if the security code is correct. The unsecured setting is
stored in non-volatile memory, and does not change when power has been off
or after a remote interface reset. To exit the calibration mode, turn the power
off and on.
Notice that if the security is incorrect, the power supply displays an
"INVALID" message for a second and returns to the code entering mode for
you to enter the correct code.
UNSECURED
• Remote Interface Operation:
CAL:SEC:STAT {OFF|ON},<code>
Secure or unsecure the power supply
To unsecure the power supply, send the above command with the same code
used to secure. For example,
"CAL:SEC:STAT OFF, HP003632"
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Chapter 3 Front-Panel Operation
Calibration Overview
To Secure Against Calibration You can secure the power supply against
calibration either from the front panel or over the remote interface. The power
supply is secured when shipped from the factory, and the security code is set
to “HP003632”.
Be sure to read the security code rules on page 66 before attempting to secure
the power supply.
• Front-Panel Operation:
UNSECURED
If the power supply is unsecured, you will see the above message for one
second by holding the Calibrate key for 5 seconds when you turn on the
power supply. To secure the power supply, press the Secure key after the
“CAL MODE” message is displayed in the calibration mode, enter the security
code using the knob and resolution selection keys, and then press the Secure
key.
Notice that you should omit the “H P” and enter the remaining numbers as
shown below.
000000 CODE
When you press Secure key to save the change, you will see the message
below. The secured setting is stored in non-volatile memory, and does not
change when power has been off or after a remote interface reset. To exit the
calibration mode, turn the power off and on.
SECURED
• Remote Interface Operation:
CAL:SEC:STAT {OFF|ON},<code>
Secure or unsecure the power supply
To secure the power supply, send the above command with the same code as
used to unsecure. For example,
"CAL:SEC:STAT ON, HP003632"
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Chapter 3 Front-Panel Operation
Calibration Overview
To Change the Security Code To change the security code, you must first
unsecure the power supply, and then enter a new code.
Be sure to read the security code rules on page 66 before attempting to secure
the power supply.
• Front-Panel Operation:
To change the security code, first make sure that the power supply is
unsecured. Press Secure key after the “CAL MODE” message is displayed in
the calibration mode, enter the new security code using the knob and
resolution selection keys, then press Secure key.
Changing the code from the front panel also changes the code required from
the remote interface.
• Remote Interface Operation:
CAL:SEC:CODE <new code>Change the security code
To change the security code, first unsecure the power supply using the old
security code. Then, enter the new code. For example,
"CAL:SEC:STAT OFF, HP003632*"
"CAL:SEC:CODE ZZ001443"
"CAL:SEC:STAT ON, ZZ00143"
Unsecure with old code
Enter new code
Secure with new code
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Chapter 3 Front-Panel Operation
Calibration Overview
Calibration Count
You can determine the number of times that your power supply has been
calibrated. Your power supply was calibrated before it left the factory. When
you receive your power supply, read the count to determine its initial value.
The calibration count feature can be performed from the remote interface
only.
• The calibration count is stored in non-volatile memory, and does not change
when power has been off or after a remote interface reset.
• The calibration count increments up to a maximum of 32,767 after which it
wraps-around to 0. Since the value increments by one for each calibration
point, a complete calibration will increase the value by 5 counts.
• Remote Interface Operation:
CAL:COUN?
Query the number of times of calibration
Calibration Message
You can use the calibration message feature to record calibration information
about your power supply. For example, you can store such information as the
last calibration date, the next calibration due date, the power supply’s serial
number, or even the name and phone number of the person to contact for a
new calibration.
You can record and read information in the calibration message from the
remote interface only.
• The power supply should be unsecured before sending a calibration
message.
• The calibration message may contain up to 40 characters.
• The calibration message is stored in non-volatile memory, and does not
change when power has been off or after a remote interface reset.
• Remote Interface Operation:
CAL:STR <quoted string> Store the cal message
The following command string shows how to store a calibration message.
"CAL:STR ‘CAL 05-1-97’ "
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Chapter 3 Front-Panel Operation
Calibration Overview
3
71
4
Remote Interface Reference
Remote Interface Reference
SCPI
SCPI
SCPI
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
SCPI Command Summary, page 73
Simplified Programming Overview, page 78
Using the APPLy Command, page 81
Output Setting and Operation Commands, page 82
Triggering Commands, page 89
System-Related Commands, page 92
Calibration Commands, page 96
RS-232 Interface Commands, page 99
The SCPI Status Registers, page 100
Status Reporting Commands, page 108
An Introduction to the SCPI Language, page 111
Halting an Output in Progress, page 116
SCPI Conformance Information, page 117
IEEE-488 Conformance Information, page 120
If you are a first-time user of the SCPI language, you may want to refer to
these sections to become familiar with the language before attempting to
program the power supply.
72
Chapter 4 Remote Interface Reference
SCPI Command Summary
SCPI Command Summary
This section summarizes the SCPI (Standard Commands for Programmable
Instruments) commands available to program the power supply over the
remote interface. Refer to the later sections in this chapter for more complete
details on each command.
Throughout this manual, the following conventions are used for SCPI
command syntax.
• Square brackets ([ ]) indicate optional keywords or parameters.
• Braces ({ }) enclose parameters within a command string.
• Triangle brackets (< >) indicate that you must substitute a value or a code
for the enclosed parameter.
• A vertical bar ( | ) separates one of two or more alternative parameters.
SCPI
4
First-time SCPI users, see page 111.
73
Chapter 4 Remote Interface Reference
SCPI Command Summary
Output Setting and Measurement Commands
APPLy {<voltage>|DEF|MIN|MAX}[,{<current>|DEF|MIN|MAX}]
APPLy?
[SOURce:]
CURRent[:LEVel][:IMMediate][:AMPLitude]{<current>|MIN|MAX|UP|DOWN}
CURRent[:LEVel][:IMMediate][:AMPLitude]? [MIN|MAX]
CURRent[:LEVel][:IMMediate]:STEP[:INCRement]
{<numeric value> |DEFault}
CURRent[:LEVel][:IMMediate]:STEP[:INCRement]? {DEFault}
CURRent[:LEVel]:TRIGgered[:AMPLitude] {<current>|MIN|MAX}
CURRent[:LEVel]:TRIGgered[:AMPLitude]? [MIN|MAX]
CURRent:PROTection[:LEVel] {<current>|MIN|MAX}
CURRent:PROTection[:LEVel]? {MIN|MAX}
CURRent:PROTection:STATe {0|1|OFF|ON}
CURRent:PROTection:STATe?
CURRent:PROTection:TRIPped?
CURRent:PROTection:CLEar
VOLTage[:LEVel][:IMMediate][:AMPLitude]{<voltage>|MIN|MAX|UP|DOWN}
VOLTage[:LEVel][:IMMediate][:AMPLitude]? [MIN|MAX]
VOLTage[:LEVel][:IMMediate]:STEP[:INCRement]
{<numeric value>|DEFault}
VOLTage[:LEVel][:IMMediate]:STEP[:INCRement]? {DEFault}
VOLTage[:LEVel]:TRIGgered[:AMPLitude] {<voltage>|MIN|MAX}
VOLTage[:LEVel]:TRIGgered[:AMPLitude]? [MIN|MAX]
VOLTage:PROTection[:LEVel] {<voltage>|MIN|MAX}
VOLTage:PROTection[:LEVel]? {MIN|MAX}
VOLTage:PROTection:STATe {0|1|OFF|ON}
VOLTage:PROTection:STATe?
VOLTage:PROTection:TRIPped?
VOLTage:PROTection:CLEar
VOLTage:RANGe {P15V|P30V|LOW|HIGH}
VOLTage:RANGe?
MEASure
:CURRent[:DC]?
[:VOLTage][:DC]?
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Chapter 4 Remote Interface Reference
SCPI Command Summary
Triggering Commands
INITiate[:IMMediate]
TRIGger[:SEQuence]
:DELay {<seconds>|MIN|MAX}
:DELay?
:SOURce {BUS|IMM}
:SOURce?
*TRG
System-Related Commands
DISPlay[:WINDow]
[:STATe] {OFF|ON}
[:STATe]?
:TEXT[:DATA] <quoted string>
:TEXT[:DATA]?
:TEXT:CLEar
SYSTem
:BEEPer[:IMMediate]
:ERRor?
:VERSion?
OUTPut
:RELay[:STATe] {OFF|ON}
:RELay[:STATe]?
[:STATe] {OFF|ON}
[:STATe]?
4
*IDN?
*RST
*TST?
*SAV {1|2|3}
*RCL {1|2|3}
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Calibration Commands
CALibration
:COUNt?
:CURRent[:DATA] <numeric value>
:CURRent:LEVel {MIN|MID|MAX}
:CURRent:PROTection
:DAC:ERRor
:SECure:CODE <new code>
:SECure:STATe {OFF|ON},<code>
:SECure:STATe?
:STRing <quoted string>
:STRing?
:VOLTage[:DATA] <numeric value>
:VOLTage:LEVel {MIN|MID|MAX}
:VOLTage:PROTection
Status Reporting Commands
STATus:QUEStionable
:CONDition?
[:EVENt]?
:ENABle <enable value>
:ENABle?
SYSTem:ERRor?
*CLS
*ESE <enable value>
*ESE?
*ESR?
*OPC
*OPC?
*PSC {0|1}
*PSC?
*SRE <enable value>
*SRE?
*STB?
*WAI
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RS-232 Interface Commands
SYSTem
:LOCal
:REMote
:RWLock
IEEE-488.2 Common Commands
*CLS
*ESE <enable value>
*ESE?
*ESR?
*IDN?
*OPC
*OPC?
*PSC {0|1}
*PSC?
*RST
*SAV {1|2|3}
*RCL {1|2|3}
*SRE <enable value>
*SRE?
*STB?
*TRG
*TST?
*WAI
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Simplified Programming Overview
Simplified Programming Overview
This section gives an overview of the basic techniques used to program the
power supply over the remote interface. This section is only an overview and
does not give all of the details you will need to write your own application
programs. Refer to the remainder of this chapter and also chapter 6,
“Application Programs”, for more details and examples. Also refer to the
programming reference manual that came with your computer for details on
outputting command strings and entering data.
Using the APPLy Command
The APPLy command provides the most straightforward method to program
the power supply over the remote interface. For example, the following
statement executed from your computer will set the power supply to an output
of 3 V rated at 1 A:
‘‘APPL 3.0, 1.0’’
Using the Low-Level Commands
Although the APPLy command provides the most straightforward method to
program the power supply, the low-level commands give you more flexibility
to change individual parameters. For example, the following statements
executed from your computer will set the power supply to an output of 3 V
rated at 1 A:
‘‘VOLT 3.0’’
‘‘CURR 1.0’’
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Set output voltage to 3.0 V
Set output current to 1.0 A
Chapter 4 Remote Interface Reference
Simplified Programming Overview
Reading a Query Response
Only the query commands (commands that end with “ ? ” ) will instruct the
power supply to send a response message. Queries return either output values
or internal instrument settings. For example, the following statements
executed from your computer will read the power supply’s error queue and
print the most recent error:
dimension statement
Dimension string array (80 elements)
‘‘SYST:ERR?’’
Read error queue
bus enter statement
Enter error string into computer
print statement
Print error string
Selecting a Trigger Source
The power supply will accept a ‘‘bus’’ (software) trigger or an immediate
internal trigger as a trigger source. By default, the ‘‘BUS’’ trigger source is
selected. If you want the power supply to use an immediate internal trigger,
you must select ‘‘IMMediate’’. For example, the following statements executed
from your computer will set to an output of 3 V/1 A immediately:
‘‘VOLT:TRIG 3.0’’
Set the triggered voltage level to 3.0 V
‘‘CURR:TRIG 1.0’’
Set the triggered current level to 1.0 A
‘‘TRIG:SOUR IMM’’
Select the immediate trigger as a source
‘‘INIT’’
Cause the trigger system to initiate
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Power Supply Programming Ranges
The SOURce subsystem requires parameters for programming values. The
available programming value for a parameter varies according to the desired
output range of the power supply. The following table lists the programming
values available and MINimum, MAXimum, DEFault and reset values of the
Agilient E3632A power supply.
Refer to this table to identify programming values when programming the power
supply.
Table 4-1. Agilent E3632A Programming Ranges
Voltage
0 - 15V/7A Range
0 - 30V/4A Range
Programming Range
0 V to 15.45V
0 V to 30.9 V
MAX Value
15.45 V
30.9 V
MIN Value
0V
0V
DEFault Value
0V
*RST Value
Current
Programming Range
0 A to 7.21 A
0 A to 4.12 A
MAX Value
7.21 A
4.12 A
MIN Value
0A
0A
DEFault Value
7A
4A
*RST
80
0V
0V
7A
Chapter 4 Remote Interface Reference
Using the APPLy Command
Using the APPLy Command
The APPLy command provides the most straightforward method to program
the power supply over the remote interface. You can select the output voltage
and current in one command.
APPLy {<voltage>| DEF | MIN | MAX}[,{<current>| DEF | MIN | MAX}]
This command is combination of VOLTage and CURRent commands. As long
as the newly programmed values are within the presently selected range, the
output voltage and current are changed as soon as the command is executed.
The APPLy command changes the power supply’s output to the newly
programmed values only if the programmed values are valid within the
presently selected range. An execution error will occur if the programmed
values are not valid within the selected range.
You can substitute ‘‘MINimum’’, ‘‘MAXimum’’, or ‘‘DEFault’’ in place of a
specific value for the voltage and current parameters. MIN selects the lowest
values of ‘‘0’’ volts and ‘‘0’’ amps. MAX selects the highest values allowed for
the selected range.
The default values of voltage and current are ‘‘0’’ volts and ‘‘7’’ amps regardless
of the presently selected range. See Table 4-1 for details of parameters.
If you specify only one parameter of the APPLy command, the power supply
regards it as voltage setting value.
APPLy?
This command queries the power supply’s present voltage and current setting
values and returns a quoted string. The voltage and current are returned in
sequence as shown in the sample string below (the quotation marks are
returned as part of the string).
"15.00000,4.00000"
In the above string, the first number 15.00000 is the voltage setting value and
the second number 4.00000 is the current setting value.
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Output Setting and Operation Commands
Output Setting and Operation Commands
This section describes low-level commands used to program the power supply.
Although the APPLy command provides the most straightforward method to
program the power supply, the low-level output setting commands give you
more flexibility to change the individual parameters.
CURRent{<current>|MINimum | MAXimum|UP|DOWN}
This command programs the immediate current level of the power supply. The
immediate level is the current value of the output terminals.
The CURRent command changes the output of the power supply to the newly
programmed value regardless of the output range presently selected.
You can substitute ‘‘MINimum’’ or ‘‘MAXimum’’ in place of a specific value for
the current parameter. MIN selects the lowest current values of ‘‘0’’ amps. MAX
selects the highest current values allowed for the selected range.
This command also increases or decreases the immediate current level using
the ‘‘UP’’ or ‘‘DOWN’’ parameter by a predetermined amount. The command
CURRent:STEP sets the amount of increase or decrease. Notice that a new
increment setting will cause an execution error -222 (Data out of range) when
the maximum or the minimum rated current is exceeded.
CURRent
Example
The following program segments show how to use the CURR UP or CURR DOWN
command to increase or decrease the output current with the CURR:STEP
command.
82
"CURR:STEP 0.01"
"CURR UP"
Set the step size to 0.01 A
Increase the output current
"CURR:STEP 0.02"
"CURR DOWN"
Set the step size to 0.02 A
Decrease the output current
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Output Setting and Operation Commands
CURRent? [MINimum | MAXimum]
This query returns the presently programmed current level of the power
supply. CURR? MAX and CURR? MIN return the highest and lowest
programmable current levels for the selected range.
CURRent:STEP {<numeric value>|DEFault}
This command sets the step size for current programming with the CURRent
UP and CURRent DOWN commands. See the example in the previous page.
To set the step size to the minimum resolution, set the step size to ‘‘DEFault’’.
The minimum resolution of the step size is approximately 0.12 mA. The
CURR:STEP? DEF returns the minimum resolution of your instrument. The
immediate current level increases or decreases by the value of the step size.
For example, the output current will increase or decrease 10 mA if the step
size is 0.01.
This command is useful when you program the power supply to the allowed
minimum resolution. At *RST, the step size is the value of the minimum
resolution.
CURRent:STEP? {DEFault}
This query returns the value of the step size currently specified. The returned
parameter is a numeric value. ‘‘DEFault’’ gives the minimum resolution of the
step size in unit of amps.
CURRent:TRIGgered {<current>| MINimum | MAXimum}
This command programs the pending triggered current level. The pending
triggered current level is a stored value that is transferred to the output
terminals when a trigger occurs. A pending triggered level is not affected by
subsequent CURRent commands.
CURRent:TRIGgered? [MINimum | MAXimum]
This query returns the triggered current level presently programmed. If no
triggered level is programmed, the CURRent level is returned. CURR:TRIG?
MAX and CURR:TRIG? MIN return the highest and lowest programmable
triggered current levels.
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CURRent:PROTection {<current>|MINimum|MAXimum}
This command sets the current level at which the overcurrent protection
(OCP) circuit will trip. If the peak output current exceeds the OCP level, then
the output current is programmed to zero. The Questionable Status register
‘‘OC’’ bit is set (see page 101). An overcurrent condition can be cleared with
the CURR:PROT:CLE command after the condition that caused the OCP trip
is removed.
CURRent:PROTection? {MINimum|MAXimum}
This query returns the overcurrent protection trip level presently programmed.
CURR:PROT? MAX and CURR:PROT? MIN return the maximum and minimum
programmable overcurrent trip levels.
CURRent:PROTection:STATe {0|1|OFF|ON}
This command enables or disables the overcurrent protection function of the
power supply. An overcurrent condition can be cleared with the
CURR:PROT:CLE command after the condition that caused the OCP trip is
removed. At *RST, this value is set to ‘‘ON’’.
CURRent:PROTection:STATe?
This query returns the state of the overcurrent protection function. The
returned parameter is ‘‘0’’ (OFF) or ‘‘1’’ (ON).
CURRent:PROTection:TRIPped?
This query returns a ‘‘1’’ if the overcurrent protection circuit is tripped and not
cleared or a ‘‘0’’ if not tripped.
CURRent:PROTection:CLEar
This command causes the overcurrent protection circuit to be cleared. After
this command, the output current is restored to the state it was in before the
current protection tripped and the OCP trip level remains unchanged to the
value presently programmed. Before sending this command, lower the output
current below the trip OCP point, or raise the OCP trip level above the output
setting.
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VOLTage {<voltage>| MINimum | MAXimum|UP|DOWN}
This command programs the immediate voltage level of the power supply. The
immediate level is the voltage value of the output terminals.
The VOLTage command changes the output of the power supply to the newly
programmed value regardless of the output range presently selected.
You can substitute ‘‘MINimum’’ or ‘‘MAXimum’’ in place of a specific value for
the voltage parameter. MIN selects the lowest voltage values of ‘‘0’’ volts. MAX
selects the highest voltage values allowed for the selected range.
This command also increases or decreases the immediate voltage level using
the ‘‘UP’’ or ‘‘DOWN’’ parameter by a predetermined amount. The command
VOLTage:STEP sets the amount of increase or decrease. Notice that a new
increment setting will cause an execution error -222 (Data out of range) when
the maximum or the minimum rated voltage is exceeded.
VOLTage
Example
The following program segments show how to use the VOLT UP or
VOLT DOWN command to increase or decrease the output voltage with the
VOLT:STEP command.
"VOLT:STEP 0.01"
"VOLT UP"
Set the step size to 0.01 V
Increase the output voltage
"VOLT:STEP 0.02"
"VOLT DOWN"
Set the step size to 0.02 V
Decrease the output voltage
4
VOLTage? [MINimum | MAXimum]
This query returns the presently programmed voltage level of the power
supply. VOLT? MAX and VOLT? MIN return the highest and lowest
programmable voltage levels for the selected range.
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Output Setting and Operation Commands
VOLTage:STEP {<numeric value>|DEFault}
This command sets the step size for voltage programming with the VOLT UP
and VOLT DOWN commands. See the above example in the previous page.
To set the step size to the minimum resolution, set the step size to ‘‘DEFault’’.
The minimum resolution of the step size is approximately 0.55 mV. The
VOLT:STEP? DEF returns the minimum resolution of your instrument. The
immediate voltage level increases or decreases by the value of the step size.
For example, the output voltage will increase or decrease 10 mV if the step size
is 0.01.
This command is useful when you program the power supply to the allowed
minimum resolution. At *RST, the step size is the value of the minimum
resolution.
VOLTage:STEP? {DEFault}
This query returns the value of the step size currently specified. The returned
parameter is a numeric value. ‘‘DEFault’’ gives the minimum resolution step
size in unit of volts.
VOLTage:TRIGgered {<voltage>| MINimum | MAXimum}
This command programs the pending triggered voltage level. The pending
triggered voltage level is a stored value that is transferred to the output
terminals when a trigger occurs. A pending triggered level is not affected by
subsequent VOLTage commands.
VOLTage:TRIGgered? [MINimum | MAXimum]
This query returns the triggered voltage level presently programmed. If no
triggered level is programmed, the VOLT level is returned. VOLT:TRIG? MAX
and VOLT:TRIG? MIN return the highest and lowest programmable triggered
voltage levels.
VOLTage:PROTection {<voltage>|MINimum|MAXimum}
This command sets the voltage level at which the overvoltage protection (OVP)
circuit will trip. If the peak output voltage exceeds the OVP level, then the
power supply output is shorted by an internal SCR. The Questionable Status
register ‘‘OV’’ bit is set (see page 101). An overvoltage condition can be cleared
with the VOLT:PROT:CLE command after the condition that caused the OVP
trip is removed.
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VOLTage:PROTection? {MINimum|MAXimum}
This query returns the overvoltage protection trip level presently programmed.
VOLT:PROT? MAX and VOLT:PROT? MIN return the maximum and minimum
programmable overvoltage trip levels.
VOLTage:PROTection:STATe {0|1|OFF|ON}
This command enables or disables the overvoltage protection function. An
overvoltage condition can be cleared with the VOLT:PROT:CLE command
after the condition that caused the OVP trip is removed. At *RST, this value is
set to ‘‘ON’’.
VOLTage:PROTection:STATe?
This query returns the state of the overvoltage protection function. The
returned parameter is ‘‘0’’ (OFF) or ‘‘1’’ (ON).
VOLTage:PROTection:TRIPped?
This query returns a ‘‘1’’ if the overvoltage protection circuit is tripped and not
cleared or a ‘‘0’’ if not tripped.
VOLTage:PROTection:CLEar
This command causes the overvoltage protection circuit to be cleared. After
this command, the output voltage is restored to the state it was in before the
protection feature occurred and the OVP trip level remains unchanged to the
value presently programmed. Before sending this command, lower the output
voltage below the trip OVP point, or raise the OVP trip level above the output
setting.
VOLTage:RANGe {P15V|P30V||LOW|HIGH}
This command selects an output range to be programmed by the identifier.
When 15V/7A range is selected, the maximum programmable voltage and
current are limited to 15.45 volts and 7.21 amps. When 30V/4A range is selected,
the maximum programmable voltage and current are limited to 30.09 volts
and 4.12 amps. ‘‘P30V’’ or ‘‘HIGH’’ is the identifier for the 30V/4A range and
‘‘P15V’’ or ‘‘LOW’’ is for the 15V/7A range. At *RST, the 15V/7A range is selected.
VOLTage:RANGe?
This query returns the currently selected range. The returned parameter is
‘‘P30V’’ (HIGH) or ‘‘P15V’’ (LOW).
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MEASure:CURRent?
This command queries the current measured across the current sense resistor
inside the power supply.
MEASure[:VOLTage]?
This command queries the voltage measured at the sense terminals of the
power supply.
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Triggering Commands
Triggering Commands
The power supply’s triggering system allows a change in voltage and current
when receiving a trigger, to select a trigger source, and to insert a trigger.
Triggering the power supply is a multi-step process.
• First, you must specify the source from which the power supply will accept
the trigger. The power supply will accept a bus (software) trigger or an
immediate trigger from the remote interface.
• Then, you can set the time delay between the detection of the trigger on the
specified trigger source and the start of any corresponding output change.
Notice that the time delay is valid for only the bus trigger source.
• Finally, you must provide an INITiate command. If the IMMediate
source is selected, the selected output is set to the triggered level
immediately. But if the trigger source is the bus, the power supply is set to
the triggered level after receiving the Group Execute Trigger (GET) or *TRG
command.
Trigger Source Choices
You must specify the source from which the power supply will accept a trigger.
The trigger is stored in volatile memory; the source is set to bus when the power
supply has been off or after a remote interface reset.
Bus (Software) Triggering
• To select the bus trigger source, send the following command.
TRIG:SOUR BUS
• To trigger the power supply from the remote interface (GPIB or RS-232)
after selecting the bus source, send the *TRG (trigger) command. When the
*TRG is sent, the trigger action starts after the specified time delay if any
delay is given.
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Triggering Commands
• You can also trigger the power supply from the GPIB interface by sending
the IEEE-488 Group Execute Trigger (GET) message. The following
statement shows how to send a GET from a Agilent Technologies controller.
TRIGGER 705 (group execute trigger)
• To ensure synchronization when the bus source is selected, send the *WAI
(wait) command. When the *WAI command is executed, the power supply
waits for all pending operations to complete before executing any additional
commands. For example, the following command string guarantees that the
first trigger is accepted and is executed before the second trigger is
recognized.
TRIG:SOUR BUS;*TRG;*WAI;*TRG;*WAI
• You can use the *OPC? (operation complete query) command or the *OPC
(operation complete) command to signal when the operation is complete.
The *OPC? command returns ‘‘1’’ to the output buffer when the operation
is complete. The *OPC command sets the ‘‘OPC’’ bit (bit 0) in the Standard
Event register when the operation is complete.
Immediate Triggering
• To select the immediate trigger source, send the following command.
•
90
TRIG:SOUR IMM
When the IMMediate is selected as a trigger source, an INITiate
command immediately transfers the VOLT:TRIG or CURR:TRIG value to
VOLT or CURR value. Any delay is ignored.
Chapter 4 Remote Interface Reference
Triggering Commands
Triggering Commands
INITiate
This command causes the trigger system to initiate. This command completes
one full trigger cycle when the trigger source is an immediate and initiates the
trigger subsystem when the trigger source is bus.
TRIGger:DELay {<seconds>| MINimum | MAXimum}
This command sets the time delay between the detection of an event on the
specified trigger source and the start of any corresponding trigger action on
the power supply output. Select from 0 to 3600 seconds. MIN = 0 seconds. MAX
= 3600 seconds. At *RST, this value is set to 0 seconds.
TRIGger:DELay?
This command queries the trigger delay.
TRIGger:SOURce {BUS | IMMediate}
This command selects the source from which the power supply will accept a
trigger. The power supply will accept a bus (software) trigger or an internal
immediate trigger. At *RST, the bus trigger source is selected.
TRIGger:SOURce?
This command queries the present trigger source. Returns ‘‘BUS’’ or ‘‘IMM’’.
*TRG
This command generates a trigger to the trigger subsystem that has selected a
bus (software) trigger as its source (TRIG:SOUR BUS). The command has
the same effect as the Group Execute Trigger (GET) command. For RS-232
operation, make sure the power supply is in the remote interface mode by
sending the SYST:REM command first.
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System-Related Commands
System-Related Commands
DISPlay {OFF | ON}
This command turns the front-panel display off or on. When the display is
turned off, outputs are not sent to the display and all annunciators are disabled
except the ERROR annunciator.
The display state is automatically turned on when you return to the local mode.
Press the Local key to return to the local state from the remote interface.
DISPlay?
This command queries the front-panel display setting. Returns ‘‘0’’ (OFF) or
‘‘1’’ (ON).
DISPlay:TEXT <quoted string>
This command displays a message on the front panel. The power supply will
display up to 12 characters in a message; any additional characters are
truncated. Commas, periods, and semicolons share a display space with the
preceding character, and are not considered individual characters.
DISPlay:TEXT?
This command queries the message sent to the front panel and returns a quoted
string.
DISPlay:TEXT:CLEar
This command clears the message displayed on the front panel.
OUTPut {OFF | ON}
This command enables or disables the outputs of the power supply. When the
output is disabled, the voltage value is 0 V and the current value is 20 mA. At
*RST, the output state is OFF.
OUTPut?
This command queries the output state of the power supply. The returned value
is ‘‘0’’ (OFF) or ‘‘1’’ (ON).
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OUTPut:RELay {OFF | ON}
This command sets the state of two TTL signals on the RS-232 connector. These
signals are intended for use with an external relay and relay driver. The TTL
output is available on the RS-232 connector pin 1 and pin 9. When the
OUTPut:RELay state is ‘‘ON’’, the TTL output of pin 1 is high (4.5 V) and pin
9 is low (0.5 V). The levels are reversed when the OUTPut:RELay state is
‘‘OFF’’. At *RST, the OUTPut:RELay state is OFF.
Note
TTL output of pin 1 or pin 9 of the RS-232 connector is available only after
installing two jumpers inside the power supply. See the Service Guide for
more information.
Note
Do not use the RS-232 interface if you have configured the power supply to
output relay control signals. Internal components on the RS-232 circuitry
may be damaged.
OUTPut:RELay?
4
This command returns the state of the TTL relay logic signals. See also
OUTP:REL command.
SYSTem:BEEPer
This command issues a single beep immediately.
SYSTem:ERRor?
This command queries the power supply’s error queue. When the front-panel
ERROR annunciator turns on, one or more command syntax or hardware
errors have been detected. Up to 20 errors can be stored in the error queue.
See ‘‘Error Messages’’ for a complete listing of the errors in chapter 5.
• Errors are retrieved in first-in-first-out (FIFO) order. The first error returned
is the first error that was stored. When you have read all errors from the
queue, the ERROR annunciator turns off. The power supply beeps once each
time an error is generated.
• If more than 20 errors have occurred, the last error stored in the queue (the
most recent error) is replaced with -350, ‘‘Too many errors’’. No additional
errors are stored until you remove errors from the queue. If no errors have
occurred when you read the error queue, the power supply responds with
+0, ‘‘No error’’.
• The error queue is cleared when power has been off or after a *CLS (clear
status) command has been executed. The *RST (reset) command does not
clear the error queue.
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SYSTem:VERSion?
This command queries the power supply to determine the present SCPI
version. The returned value is of a string in the form YYYY.V where the ‘‘Y’s’’
represent the year of the version, and the ‘‘V’’ represents a version number for
that year (for example, 1995.0).
*IDN?
This query command reads the power supply’s identification string. The power
supply returns four fields separated by commas. The first field is the
manufacturer’s name, the second field is the model number, the third field is
not used (always ‘‘0’’), and the fourth field is a revision code which contains
three numbers. The first number is the firmware revision number for the main
power supply processor; the second is for the input/output processor; and the
third is for the front-panel processor.
The command returns a string with the following format (be sure to dimension
a string variable with at least 40 characters):
HEWLETT-PACKARD,E3632A,0,X.X-X.X-X.X
*RST
This command resets the power supply to its power-on state as follows:
Command
state
CURR
7A
CURR:STEP
0.12 mA (typical value)
CURR:TRIG
7A
CURR:PROT
7.5 A
CURR:PROT:STAT
ON
DISP
ON
OUTP
OFF
OUTP:REL
OFF
TRIG:DEL
0
TRIG:SOUR
BUS
VOLT
0V
VOLT:STEP
0.55 mV (typical value)
VOLT:TRIG
0V
VOLT:PROT
32 V
VOLT:PROT:STAT
ON
VOLT:RANG
P15V (Low)
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*TST?
This query performs a complete self-test of the power supply. Returns ‘‘0’’ if
the self-test passes or ‘‘1’’ or any non-zero value if it fails. If the self-test fails,
an error message is also generated with additional information on why the test
failed.
*SAV { 1 | 2 | 3 }
This command stores the present state of the power supply to the specified
location in non-volatile memory. Three memory locations (numbered 1, 2 and
3) are available to store operating states of the power supply. The state storage
feature ‘‘remembers’’ the states or values of the following commands:
CURR, CURR:STEP, CURR:TRIG, CURR:PROT, CURR:PROT:STAT DISP,
OUTP, OUTP:REL, TRIG:DEL, TRIG:SOUR, VOLT, VOLT:STEP, VOLT:TRIG,
VOLT:PROT, VOLT:PROT:STAT, and VOLT:RANG
To recall a stored state, you must use the same memory location used
previously to store the state.
*RCL { 1 | 2 | 3 }
This command recalls a previously stored state. To recall a stored state, you
must use the same memory location used previously to store the state.
Note
can be stored and recalled in remote interface mode only.
Going to local mode automatically sets the display state to ON.
DISP {OFF|ON}
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Calibration Commands
Calibration Commands
See chapter 3 ‘‘Calibration Overview’’, starting on page 66 for an overview
of the calibration features of the power supply. For more detailed discussion
of the calibration procedures, see the Service Guide.
Note
When you calibrate the power supply, you should not set the OVP and OCP
to ON state in order to prevent OVP or OCP from tripping.
CALibration:COUNt?
This command queries the power supply to determine the number of times it
has been calibrated. Your power supply was calibrated before it left the factory.
When you receive your power supply, read the count to determine its initial
value. Since the value increments by one for each calibration point, a complete
calibration will increase the value by 5 counts.
CALibration:CURRent <numeric value>
This command can only be used after calibration is unsecured and the output
state is ON. It enters a current value that you obtained by reading an external
meter. You must first select the minimum calibration level (CAL:CURR:LEV
MIN) for the value being entered. You must then select the middle and
maximum calibration levels (CAL:CURR:LEV MID and CAL:CURR:LEV MAX
) for the value being entered. Three successive values must be selected and
entered. The power supply then computes new calibration constants. These
constants are then stored in non-volatile memory.
CALibration:CURRent:LEVel {MINimum | MIDdle|MAXimum}
This command can only be used after calibration is unsecured and the output
state is ON. It sets the power supply to a calibration point that is entered with
CAL:CURR command. During calibration, three points must be entered and the
low-end point (MIN) must be selected and entered first.
CALibration:CURRent:PROTection
This command calibrates the overcurrent protection circuit of the power
supply. It takes about 7 seconds to execute the command. The calibration must
be unsecured and the output shorted before calibrating the overcurrent
protection. The power supply automatically performs the calibration and
stores the new overcurrent constant in nonvolatile memory. Notice that
current calibration precedes before sending this command.
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CALibration:DAC:ERRor
This command corrects the differential nonlinearity error of the internal DAC
without an external meter. You must send this command before calibrating the
voltage. It takes about 30 seconds to execute the command.
CALibration:SECure:CODE <new code>
This command enters a new security code. To change the security code, first
unsecure the power supply using the old security code. Then, enter the new
code. The calibration code may contain up to 12 characters over the remote
interface but the first character must always be a letter.
CALibration:SECure:STATe {OFF | ON},<code>
This command unsecures or secures the power supply for calibration. The
calibration code may contain up to 12 characters over the remote interface.
CALibration:SECure:STATe?
This command queries the secured state for calibration of the power supply.
The returned parameter is ‘‘0’’ (OFF) or ‘‘1’’ (ON).
CALibration:STRing <quoted string>
This command records calibration information about your power supply. For
example, you can store such information as the last calibration date, the next
calibration due date, or the power supply’s serial number. The calibration
message may contain up to 40 characters. The power supply should be
unsecured before sending a calibration message.
CALibration:STRing?
This command queries the calibration message and returns a quoted string.
CALibration:VOLTage[:DATA] <numeric value>
This command can only be used after calibration is unsecured and the output
state is ON. It enters a voltage value that you obtained by reading an external
meter. You must first select the minimum calibration level (CAL:VOLT:LEV
MIN) for the value being entered. You must then select the middle and
maximum calibration levels (CAL:VOLT:LEV MID and CAL:VOLT:LEV MAX)
for the value being entered. Three successive values must be selected and
entered. The power supply then computes new voltage calibration constants.
These constants are then stored in non-volatile memory.
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CALibration:VOLTage:LEVel {MINimum | MIDdle|MAXimum}
This command can only be used after calibration is unsecured and the output
state is ON. It sets the power supply to a calibration point that is entered with
CAL:VOLT command. During calibration, three points must be entered and the
low-end point (MIN) must be selected and entered first.
CALibration:VOLTage:PROTection
This command calibrates the overvoltage protection circuit of the power
supply. It takes about 7 seconds to execute the command. The calibration must
be unsecured and the output be opened before calibrating the overvoltage
protection circuit. The power supply automatically performs the calibration
and stores the new overvoltage constant in nonvolatile memory. Notice that
voltage calibration precedes before sending this command.
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RS-232 Interface Commands
RS-232 Interface Commands
Use the front-panel ‘‘I/O Config’’ key to select the baud rate, parity, and the
number of data bits (see chapter 3 ‘‘Remote Interface Configuration’’,
starting on page 56).
SYSTem:LOCal
This command places the power supply in the local mode during RS-232
operation. All keys on the front panel are fully functional.
SYSTem:REMote
This command places the power supply in the remote mode for RS-232
operation. All keys on the front panel, except the ‘‘Local’’ key, are disabled.
It is very important that you send the SYST:REM command to place the
power supply in the remote mode. Sending or receiving data over the RS232 interface when not configured for remote operation can cause
unpredictable results.
SYSTem:RWLock
This command places the power supply in the remote mode for RS-232
operation. This command is the same as the SYST:REM command except that
all keys on the front panel are disabled, including the ‘‘Local’’ key.
Ctrl-C
This command clears the operation in progress over the RS-232 interface and
discards any pending output data. This is equivalent to the IEEE-488 device
clear action over the GPIB interface.
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The SCPI Status Registers
The SCPI Status Registers
All SCPI instruments implement status registers in the same way. The status
system records various instrument conditions in three register groups: the
Status Byte register, the Standard Event register, and the Questionable Status
register groups. The status byte register records high-level summary
information reported in the other register groups. The diagram on the
subsequent pages illustrates the SCPI status system used by the power supply.
What is an Event Register?
An event register is a read-only register that reports defined conditions within
the power supply. Bits in an event register are latched. Once an event bit is set,
subsequent state changes are ignored. Bits in an event register are
automatically cleared by a query of that register (such as *ESR? or
STAT:QUES:EVEN?) or by sending the *CLS (clear status) command. A reset
(*RST) or device clear will not clear bits in event registers. Querying an event
register returns a decimal value which corresponds to the binary-weighted sum
of all bits set in the register.
What is an Enable Register?
An enable register defines which bits in the corresponding event register are
logically ORed together to form a single summary bit. Enable registers are both
readable and writable. Querying an enable register will not clear it. The *CLS
(clear status) command does not clear enable registers but it does clear the
bits in the event registers. To enable bits in an enable register, you must write
a decimal value which corresponds to the binary-weighted sum of the bits you
wish to enable in the register.
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SCPI Status System
4
Binary Weight
20 = 1
21 = 2
22 = 4
23 = 8
24 = 16
25 = 32
26 = 64
27 = 128
28 = 256
29 = 512
210 = 1024
211 = 2048
212 = 4096
213 = 8192
214 = 16384
215 = 32768
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The Questionable Status Register
The Questionable Status register provides information about voltage and
current regulation. Bit 0 is set when the voltage becomes unregulated, and bit
1 is set if the current becomes unregulated. For example if the power supply
momentarily goes to constant current mode when the power supply is
operating as a voltage source (constant voltage mode), bit 0 is set to indicate
that the voltage output is not regulated.
The Questionable Status register also provides information that the power
supply has an overtemperature condition and that the overvoltage and
overcurrent protection circuits have tripped. Bit 4 reports an overtemperature
condition of the fan, bit 9 reports that the overvoltage protection circuit has
tripped, and bit 10 reports that the overcurrent protection circuit has tripped.
To read the register, send STATus:QUEStionable?.
Table 4-2. Bit Definitions - Questionable Status Register
Bit
Decimal Definition
Value
0
Voltage
1
The power supply is/was in the constant current
mode.
1
Current
2
The power supply is/was in the constant voltage
mode.
2-3
Not Used
0
Always set to 0.
4
Overtemperature
16
The fan has a fault condition.
5-8
Not Used
0
Always set to 0.
9
Over Voltage
512
The overvoltage protection circuit has tripped.
10
Over Current
1024
The overcurrent protection circuit has tripped.
11-15 Not Used
0
Always set to 0.
The Questionable Status Event register is cleared when:
• You execute the *CLS (clear status) command.
• You query the event register using STAT:QUES? (Status Questionable
Event register) command.
For example, 16 is returned when you have queried the status of the
questionable event register, the temperature condition is questionable.
The Questionable Status Enable register is cleared when:
• You execute STAT:QUES:ENAB
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The Standard Event Register
The Standard Event register reports the following types of instrument events:
power-on detected, command syntax errors, command execution errors, selftest or calibration errors, query errors, or when an *OPC command is executed.
Any or all of these conditions can be reported in the standard event summary
bit (ESB, bit 5) of Status Byte register through the enable register. To set the
enable register mask, you write a decimal value to the register using the *ESE
(Event Status Enable) command.
An error condition (Standard Event register bit 2, 3, 4, or 5) will always
record one or more errors in the power supply’s error queue. Read the
error queue using the SYST:ERR? command.
Table 4-3. Bit Definitions – Standard Event Register
Bit
Decimal
Value
0
OPC
1
Not Used
2
QYE
3
DDE
4
EXE
5
CME
6
Not Used
7
PON
Definition
4
1
Operation Complete. All commands prior to and
including an *OPC command have been executed.
0
Always set to 0.
4
Query Error. The power supply tried to read the output
buffer but it was empty. Or, new command line was
received before a previous query had been read. Or,
both the input and output buffers are full.
8
Device Error. A self-test or calibration error occurred
(see error numbers 601 through 750 in chapter 5).
16
Execution Error. An execution error occurred (see error
numbers -211 through -224 in chapter 5).
32
Command Error. A command syntax error occurred
(see error numbers -101 through -178 in chapter 5).
0
Always set to 0.
128
Power On. Power has been turned off and on since the
last time the event register was read or cleared.
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The Standard Event register is cleared when:
• You execute the *CLS (clear status) command.
• You query the event register using the *ESR? (Event Status register)
command.
For example, 28 (4 + 8 + 16) is returned when you have queried the status of
the Standard Event register, QYE, DDE, and EXE conditions have occurred.
The Standard Event Enable register is cleared when:
• You execute the *ESE 0 command.
• You turn on the power and have previously configured the power supply
using the *PSC 1 command.
• The enable register will not be cleared at power-on if you have previously
configured the power supply using the *PSC 0 command.
The Status Byte Register
The Status Byte summary register reports conditions from the other status
registers. Query data that is waiting in the power supply’s output buffer is
immediately reported through the “Message Available” bit (bit 4) of Status Byte
register. Bits in the summary register are not latched. Clearing an event register
will clear the corresponding bits in the Status Byte summary register. Reading
all messages in the output buffer, including any pending queries, will clear the
message available bit.
Table 4-4. Bit Definitions – Status Byte Summary Register
Bit
Decimal
Value
Definition
0-2 Not Used
0
Always set to 0.
3
QUES
8
One or more bits are set in the questionable status
register (bits must be “enabled” in the enable
register).
4
MAV
16
Data is available in the power supply output buffer.
5
ESB
32
One or more bits are set in the standard event
register (bits must be “enabled” in the enable
register).
6
RQS
64
The power supply is requesting service (serial poll).
7
Not Used
0
Always set to 0.
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The Status Byte Summary register is cleared when:
• You execute the *CLS (clear status) command.
• Querying the Standard Event register (*ESR? command) will clear only bit
5 in the Status Byte summary register.
For example, 24 (8 + 16) is returned when you have queried the status of the
Status Byte register, QUES and MAV conditions have occurred.
The Status Byte Enable register (Request Service) is cleared when:
• You execute the *SRE 0 command.
• You turn on the power and have previously configured the power supply
using the *PSC 1 command.
• The enable register will not be cleared at power-on if you have previously
configured the power supply using *PSC 0.
Using Service Request (SRQ) and Serial POLL
You must configure your bus controller to respond to the IEEE-488 service
request (SRQ) interrupt to use this capability. Use the Status Byte enable
register (*SRE command) to select which summary bits will set the low-level
IEEE-488 service request signal. When bit 6 (request service) is set in the Status
Byte, an IEEE-488 service request interrupt message is automatically sent to
the bus controller. The bus controller may then poll the instruments on the bus
to identify which one requested service (the instrument with bit 6 set in its
Status Byte).
The request service bit is cleared only by reading the Status Byte using an
IEEE-488 serial poll or by reading the event register whose summary bit is
causing the service request.
To read the Status Byte summary register, send the IEEE-488 serial poll
message. Querying the summary register will return a decimal value which
corresponds to the binary-weighted sum of the bits set in the register. Serial
poll will automatically clear the “request service” bit in the Status Byte
summary register. No other bits are affected. Performing a serial poll will not
affect instrument throughput.
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The IEEE-488 standard does not ensure synchronization between your bus
controller program and the instrument. Use the *OPC? command to
guarantee that commands previously sent to the instrument have completed.
Executing a serial poll before a *RST, *CLS, or other commands have
completed can cause previous conditions to be reported.
Caution
Using *STB? to Read the Status Byte
The *STB? (Status Byte query) command is similar to a serial poll but it is
processed like any other instrument command. The *STB? command returns
the same result as a serial poll but the “request service” bit (bit 6) is not cleared.
The *STB? command is not handled automatically by the IEEE-488 bus
interface hardware and will be executed only after previous commands have
completed. Polling is not possible using the *STB? command. Executing the
*STB? command does not clear the Status Byte summary register.
Using the Message Available Bit (MAV)
You can use the Status Byte “message available” bit (bit 4) to determine when
data is available to read into your bus controller. The power supply
subsequently clears bit 4 only after all messages have been read from the
output buffer.
To Interrupt Your Bus Controller Using SRQ
1
2
3
4
5
Send a device clear message to clear the power supply’s output buffer (e.g.,
CLEAR 705).
Clear the event registers with the *CLS (clear status) command.
Set up the enable register masks. Execute the *ESE command to set up the
Standard Event register and the *SRE command for the Status Byte.
Send the *OPC? (operation complete query) command and enter the result to
ensure synchronization.
Enable your bus controller’s IEEE-488 SRQ interrupt.
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To Determine When a Command Sequence is Completed
1
2
3
4
5
6
Send a device clear message to clear the power supply’s output buffer (e.g.,
CLEAR 705).
Clear the event registers with the *CLS (clear status) command.
Enable the “operation complete” bit (bit 0) in the Standard Event register by
executing the *ESE 1 command.
Send the *OPC? (operation complete query) command and enter the result to
ensure synchronization.
Execute your command string to program the desired configuration, and then
execute the *OPC (operation complete) command as the last command. When
the command sequence is completed, the “operation complete” bit (bit 0) is
set in the Standard Event register.
Use a serial poll to check to see when bit 5 (standard event) is set in the Status
Byte summary register. You could also configure the power supply for an SRQ
interrupt by sending *SRE 32 (Status Byte enable register, bit 5).
Using *OPC to Signal When Data is in the Output Buffer
Generally, it is best to use the “operation complete” bit (bit 0) in the Standard
Event register to signal when a command sequence is completed. This bit is
set in the register after an *OPC command has been executed. If you send
*OPC after a command which loads a message in the power supply’s output
buffer (query data), you can use the “operation complete” bit to determine
when the message is available. However, if too many messages are generated
before the *OPC command executes (sequentially), the output buffer will fill
and the power supply will stop processing commands.
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Status Reporting Commands
Status Reporting Commands
See diagram ‘‘SCPI Status System’’, on page 101 in this chapter for detailed
information of the status register structure of the power supply.
SYSTem:ERRor?
This query command reads one error from the error queue. When the frontpanel ERROR annunciator turns on, one or more command syntax or hardware
errors have been detected. A record of up to 20 errors can be stored in the
power supply’s error queue. See ‘‘Error Messages’’ for a complete listing of the
errors in chapter 5.
• Errors are retrieved in first-in-first-out(FIFO) order. The first error returned
is the first error that was stored. When you have read all errors from the
queue, the ERROR annunciator turns off. The power supply beeps once each
time an error is generated.
• If more than 20 errors have occurred, the last error stored in the queue (the
most recent error) is replaced with -350, ‘‘Too many errors’’. No additional
errors are stored until you remove errors from the queue. If no errors have
occurred when you read the error queue, the power supply responds with
+0, ‘‘No error’’.
• The error queue is cleared when power has been off or after a *CLS (clear
status) command has been executed. The *RST (reset) command does not
clear the error queue.
STATus:QUEStionable:CONDition?
This command queries the Questionable Status condition register to check CV
or CC mode of the power supply. The power supply returns a decimal value
which corresponds to the binary-weighted sum of all bits in the register. These
bits are not latched. If ‘‘0’’ is returned, the power supply is in output off or
unregulated state. If ‘‘1’’ is returned, the power supply is in the CC operating
mode and if ‘‘2’’ is returned, the power supply is in the CV operating mode. If
‘‘3’’ is returned, the power supply is in failure.
STATus:QUEStionable?
This command queries the Questionable Status event register. The power
supply returns a decimal value which corresponds to the binary-weighted sum
of all bits in the register. These bits are latched. Reading the event register
clears it.
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STATus:QUEStionable:ENABle <enable value>
This command enables bits in the Questionable Status enable register. The
selected bits are then reported to the Status Byte.
STATus:QUEStionable:ENABle?
This command queries the Questionable Status enable register. The power
supply returns a binary-weighted decimal representing the bits set in the enable
register.
*CLS
This command clears all event registers and Status Byte register.
*ESE<enable value>
This command enables bits in the Standard Event enable register. The selected
bits are then reported to the Status Byte.
*ESE?
This command queries the Standard Event enable register. The power supply
returns a decimal value which corresponds to the binary-weighted sum of all
bits in the register.
*ESR?
This command queries the Standard event register. The power supply returns
a decimal value which corresponds to the binary-weighted sum of all bits in
the register.
*OPC
This command sets the ‘‘Operation Complete’’ bit (bit 0) of the Standard Event
register after the command is executed.
*OPC?
This command returns ‘‘1’’ to the output buffer after the command is executed.
*PSC { 0 | 1 }
(Power-on status clear.) This command clears the Status Byte and the Standard
Event register enable masks when power is turned on (*PSC 1). When *PSC
0 is in effect, the Status Byte and Standard Event register enable masks are
not cleared when power is turned on.
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*PSC?
This command queries the power-on status clear setting. The returned
parameter is ‘‘0’’ (*PSC 0) or ‘‘1’’ (*PSC 1).
*SRE <enable value>
This command enables bits in the Status Byte enable register.
*SRE?
This command queries the Status Byte Enable register. The power supply
returns a decimal value which corresponds to the binary-weighted sum of all
bits set in the register.
*STB?
This command queries the Status Byte summary register. The *STB? command
is similar to a serial poll but it is processed like any other instrument command.
The *STB? command returns the same result as a serial poll but the ‘‘Request
Service’’ bit (bit 6) is not cleared if a serial poll has occurred.
*WAI
This command instructs the power supply to wait for all pending operations
to complete before executing any additional commands over the interface.
Used only in the triggered mode.
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An Introduction to the SCPI Language
An Introduction to the SCPI Language
SCPI (Standard Commands for Programmable Instruments) is an ASCIIbased instrument command language designed for test and measurement
instruments. Refer to ‘‘Simplified Programming Overview’’, starting on page 78
for an introduction to the basic techniques used to program the power supply
over the remote interface.
SCPI commands are based on a hierarchical structure, also known as a tree
system. In this system, associated commands are grouped together under a
common node or root, thus forming subsystems. A portion of the SOURce
subsystem is shown below to illustrate the tree system.
[SOURce:]
CURRent {<current>|MIN|MAX|UP|DOWN}
CURRent? [MIN|MAX]
CURRent:
TRIGgered {<current>|MIN|MAX}
TRIGgered?{MIN|MAX}
VOLTage {<voltage>|MIN|MAX|UP|DOWN}
VOLTage? [MIN|MAX]
VOLTage:
TRIGgered {<voltage>|MIN|MAX}
TRIGgered? {MIN|MAX}
4
SOURce is the root keyword of the command, CURRent and VOLTage are
second-level keywords, and TRIGgered is third-level keywords. A colon (:)
separates a command keyword from a lower-level keyword.
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Command Format Used in This Manual
The format used to show commands in this manual is shown below:
CURRent {<current>|MINimum|MAXimum|UP|DOWN}
The command syntax shows most commands (and some parameters) as a
mixture of upper- and lower-case letters. The upper-case letters indicate the
abbreviated spelling for the command. For shorter program lines, send the
abbreviated form. For better program readability, send the long form.
For example, in the above syntax statement, CURR and CURRENT are both
acceptable forms. You can use upper- or lower-case letters. Therefore,
CURRENT, curr, and Curr are all acceptable. Other forms, such as CUR and
CURREN, will generate an error.
Braces ( { } ) enclose the parameter choices for a given command string. The
braces are not sent with the command string.
A vertical bar ( | ) separates multiple parameter choices for a given command
string.
Triangle brackets ( < > ) indicate that you must specify a value for the enclosed
parameter. For example, the above syntax statement shows the current
parameter enclosed in triangle brackets. The brackets are not sent with the
command string. You must specify a value for the parameter (such as ‘‘CURR
0.1”).
Some parameters are enclosed in square brackets ( [ ] ). The brackets indicate
that the parameter is optional and can be omitted. The brackets are not sent
with the command string. If you do not specify a value for an optional
parameter, the power supply chooses a default value.
Some portions of commands are enclosed in square brackets( [ ]). The brackets
indicate that this portion of the command is optional. Most optional portions
of the command are not shown in the command description. For the full
command showing all the options, see ‘‘SCPI Command Summary’’, starting
on page 73.
A colon ( : ) separates a command keyword from a lower-level keyword. You
must insert a blank space to separate a parameter from a command keyword.
If a command requires more than one parameter, you must separate adjacent
parameter using a comma as shown below:
‘‘SOURce:CURRent:TRIGgered’’
‘‘APPLy 3.5,1.5’’
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Command Separators
A colon ( : ) is used to separate a command keyword from a lower-level
keyword as shown below:
"SOURce:CURRent:TRIGgered"
A semicolon ( ; ) is used to separate two commands within the same subsystem,
and can also minimize typing. For example, sending the following command
string:
"SOUR:VOLT MIN;CURR MAX"
... is the same as sending the following two commands:
"SOUR:VOLT MIN"
"SOUR:CURR MAX"
Use a colon and a semicolon to link commands from different subsystems.
For example, in the following command string, an error is generated if you do
not use the colon and semicolon:
‘‘DISP:TEXT:CLE;:SOUR:CURR MIN’’
Using the MIN and MAX Parameters
You can substitute MINimum or MAXimum in place of a parameter for many
commands. For example, consider the following command:
CURRent {<current>|MIN|MAX}
Instead of selecting a specific current, you can substitute MINimum to set the
current to its minimum value or MAXimum to set the current to its maximum
value.
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Querying Parameter Settings
You can query the value of most parameters by adding a question mark (?) to
the command. For example, the following command sets the output current
to 5 amps:
‘‘CURR 5’’
You can query the value by executing:
‘‘CURR?’’
You can also query the minimum or maximum value allowed with the present
function as follows:
‘‘CURR? MAX’’
‘‘CURR? MIN’’
Caution
If you send two query commands without reading the response from the first,
and then attempt to read the second response, you may receive some data
from the first response followed by the complete second response. To avoid
this, do not send a query command without reading the response. When you
cannot avoid this situation, send a device clear before sending the second
query command.
SCPI Command Terminators
A command string sent to the power supply must terminate with a <new line>
character. The IEEE-488 EOI (end-or-identify) message is interpreted as a
<new line> character and can be used to terminate a command string in place
of a <new line> character. A <carriage return> followed by a <new line> is
also accepted. Command string termination will always reset the current SCPI
command path to the root level. The <new line> character has the ASCII
decimal code of 10.
IEEE-488.2 Common Commands
The IEEE-488.2 standard defines a set of common commands that perform
functions like reset, self-test, and status operations. Common commands
always begin with an asterisk ( * ), are four to five characters in length, and
may include one or more parameters. The command keyword is separated
from the first parameter by a blank space. Use a semicolon ( ; ) to separate
multiple commands as shown below:
‘‘*RST; *CLS; *ESE 32; *OPC?”
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SCPI Parameter Types
The SCPI language defines several different data formats to be used in program
messages and response messages.
Numeric Parameters Commands that require numeric parameters will
accept all commonly used decimal representations of numbers including
optional signs, decimal points, and scientific notation. Special values for
numeric parameters like MINimum, MAXimum, and DEFault are also accepted.
You can also send engineering unit suffixes (V, A or SEC) with numeric
parameters. If only specific numeric values are accepted, the power supply will
automatically round the input numeric parameters. The following command
uses a numeric parameter:
CURR {<current>|MIN|MAX|UP|DOWN}
Discrete Parameters Discrete parameters are used to program settings that
have a limited number of values (like BUS, IMM). Query responses will always
return the short form in all upper-case letters. The following command uses
discrete parameters:
TRIG:SOUR {BUS|IMM}
Boolean Parameters Boolean parameters represent a single binary
condition that is either true or false. For a false condition, the power supply
will accept ‘‘OFF’’ or ‘‘ 0 ’’. For a true condition, the power supply will accept
‘‘ON’’ or ‘‘ 1 ’’. When you query a boolean setting, the power supply will always
return ‘‘ 0 ’’ or ‘‘ 1 ’’. The following command uses a boolean parameter:
DISP {OFF|ON}
String Parameters String parameters can contain virtually any set of ASCII
characters. A string must begin and end with matching quotes; either with a
single quote or with a double quote. You can include the quote delimiter as part
of the string by typing it twice without any characters in between. The
following command uses a string parameter:
DISP:TEXT <quoted string>
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Halting an Output in Progress
Halting an Output in Progress
You can send a device clear at any time to stop an output in progress over the
GPIB interface. The status registers, the error queue, and all configuration
states are left unchanged when a device clear message is received. Device clear
performs the following actions.
• The power supply’s input and output buffers are cleared.
• The power supply is prepared to accept a new command string.
• The following statement shows how to send a device clear over the GPIB
interface using Agilent Technologies BASIC.
CLEAR 705
IEEE-488 Device Clear
• The following statement shows how to send a device clear over the GPIB
interface using the GPIB Command Library for C or QuickBASIC.
IOCLEAR (705)
For RS-232 operation, sending the <Ctrl-C> character will perform the
same operation as the IEEE-488 device clear message. The power
supply’s DTR (data terminal ready) handshake line is set true following
a device clear message. See ‘‘DTR/DSR Handshake Protocol’’, on page 64
in chapter 3 for further details.
Note
All remote interface configurations can be entered only from the front panel.
See ‘‘Remote Interface Configuration’’ in chapter 3 to configure for GPIB or
RS-232 interface before operating the power supply remotely.
116
Chapter 4 Remote Interface Reference
SCPI Conformance Information
SCPI Conformance Information
The Agilent E3632A Power Supply conform to the ‘1995.0’ version of the SCPI
standard. Many of the commands required by the standard are accepted by the
power supply but are not described in this manual for simplicity or clarity. Most
of these non-documented commands duplicate the functionality of a command
already described in this manual.
SCPI Confirmed Commands
The following table lists the SCPI-confirmed commands that are used by the
power supply.
DISPlay
[:WINDow][:STATe] {OFF|ON}
[:WINDow][:STATe]?
[:WINDow]:TEXT[:DATA] <quoted string>
[:WINDow]:TEXT[:DATA]?
[:WINDow]:TEXT:CLEar
4
INITiate[:IMMediate]
MEASure
:CURRent[:DC]?
[:VOLTage][:DC]?
OUTPut
[:STATe] {OFF|ON}
[:STATE]?
[SOURce]
:CURRent[:LEVel][:IMMediate][:AMPLitude] {<current>|MIN|MAX|UP|DOWN}
:CURRent[:LEVel][:IMMediate][:AMPLitude]? [MIN|MAX]
:CURRent[:LEVel][:IMMediate]:STEP[:INCRement] {<numeric value>|DEFault}
:CURRent[:LEVel][:IMMediate]:STEP[:INCRement]? {DEFault}
:CURRent[:LEVel]:TRIGgered[:AMPLitude] {<current>|MIN|MAX}
:CURRent[:LEVel]:TRIGgered[:AMPLitude]?[MIN|MAX]
:CURRent:PROTection[:LEVel] {<current>|MIN|MAX}
:CURRent:PROTection[:LEVel]? {MIN|MAX}
:CURRent:PROTection:STATe {0|1|OFF|ON}
:CURRent:PROTection:STATe?
:CURRent:PROTection:TRIPped?
:CURRent:PROTection:CLEar
117
Chapter 4 Remote Interface Reference
SCPI Conformance Information
SCPI Confirmed Commands (continued)
[SOURce]
:VOLTage[:LEVel][:IMMediate][:AMPLitude] {<voltage>|MIN|MAX|UP|DOWN}
:VOLTage[:LEVel][:IMMediate][:AMPLitude]?[MIN|MAX]
:VOLTage[:LEVel][:IMMediate]:STEP[:INCRement] {<numeric value>|DEFault}
:VOLTage[:LEVel][:IMMediate]:STEP[:INCRement]? {DEFault}
:VOLTage[:LEVel]:TRIGgered[:AMPLitude] {<voltage>|MIN|MAX}
:VOLTage[:LEVel]:TRIGgered[:AMPLitude]?[MIN|MAX]
:VOLTage:PROTection[:LEVel] {<voltage>|MIN|MAX}
:VOLTage:PROTection[:LEVel]? {MIN|MAX}
:VOLTage:PROTection:STATe {0|1|OFF|ON}
:VOLTage:PROTection:STATe?
:VOLTage:PROTection:TRIPped?
:VOLTage:PROTection:CLEar
:VOLTage:RANGe {P15V|P30V|LOW|HIGH}
:VOLTage:RANGe?
STATus
:QUEStionable:CONDition?
:QUEStionable[:EVENt]?
:QUEStionable:ENABle <enable value>
:QUEStionable:ENABle?
SYSTem
:BEEPer[:IMMediate]
:ERRor?
:VERSion
TRIGger
[:SEQuence]:DELay {<seconds>|MIN|MAX}
[:SEQuence]:DELay?
[:SEQuence]:SOURce{BUS|IMM}
[:SEQuence]:SOURce?
118
Chapter 4 Remote Interface Reference
SCPI Conformance Information
Device Specific Commands
The following commands are device-specific to the Agilent E3632A power
supply. They are not included in the ‘1995.0’ version of the SCPI standard.
However, these commands are designed with the SCPI standard in mind and
they follow all of the command syntax rules defined by the standard.
Non-SCPI Commands
APPLy {<voltage>|DEF|MIN|MAX>}[,{<current>|DEF|MIN|MAX}]
APPLy?
CALibration
:COUNt?
:CURRent[:DATA] <numeric value>
:CURRent:LEVel {MIN|MID|MAX}
:CURRent:PROTection
:DAC:ERRor
:SECure:CODE <new code>
:SECure:STATe {OFF|ON},<code>
:SECure:STATe?
:STRing <quoted string>
:STRing?
:VOLTage[:DATA] <numeric value>
:VOLTage:LEVel {MIN|MID|MAX}
:VOLTage:PROTection
4
OUTPut
:RELay[:STATe] {OFF|ON}
:RELay[:STATE]?
SYSTem
:LOCal
:REMote
:RWLock
119
Chapter 4 Remote Interface Reference
IEEE-488 Conformance Information
IEEE-488 Conformance Information
Dedicated Hardware Lines
ATN
IFC
REN
SRQ
Attention
Interface Clear
Remote Enable
Service Request Enable
Addressed Commands
DCL
EOI
GET
GTL
LLO
SDC
SPD
SPE
120
Device Clear
End or Identify
Group Execute Trigger
Go To Local
Local Lockout
Selected Device Clear
Serial Poll Disable
Serial Poll Enable
IEEE-488 Common Commands
*CLS
*ESE <enable value>
*ESE?
*ESR?
*IDN?
*OPC
*OPC?
*PSC {0|1}
*PSC?
*RST
*SAV {1|2|3}
*RCL {1|2|3}
*SRE <enable value>
*SRE?
*STB?
*TRG
*TST?
*WAI
5
Error Messages
Error Messages
When the front-panel ERROR annunciator turns on, one or more command
syntax or hardware errors have been detected. A record of up to 20 erros is
stored in the power supply’s error queue. The power supply beeps once each
time an error is generated.
• Errors are retrieved in first-in-first-out (FIFO) order. The first error returned
is the first error that was stored. When you have read all errors from the queue,
the ERROR annunciator turns off.
• If more than 20 errors have occurred, the last error stored in the queue (the
most recent error) is replaced with -350, ‘‘Too many errors’’. No additional
errors are stored until you remove errors from the queue. If no erros have
occurred when you read the error queue, the supply responds with +0, ‘‘No
error’’ over the remote interface or ‘‘NO ERRORS’’ from the front panel.
• The error queue is cleared when power has been off or after a *CLS(clear
status) command has been executed. The *RST (reset command) command
does not clear the error queue.
• Front-panel operation:
If the ERROR annunciator is on, press the Error key repeatedly to read the
errors stored in the queue. The error queue is cleared when you read all errors.
error -113
• Remote interface operation:
SYSTem:ERRor?
Reads one error from the error queue
Errors have the following format (the error string may contain up to 80
characters).
-113, "Undefined header"
122
Chapter 5 Error Messages
Execution Errors
Execution Errors
-101
Invalid character
An invalid character was found in the command string. You may have inserted
a character such as #, $, or % in the command keyword or within a parameter.
Example: OUTP:STAT #ON
-102
Syntax error
Invalid syntax was found in the command string. You may have inserted a blank
space before or after a colon in the command header, or before a comma.
Example: VOLT:LEV ,1
-103
Invalid separator
An invalid separator was found in the command string. You may have used a
comma instead of a colon, semicolon, or blank space - or you may have used
a blank space instead of a comma.
Example: TRIG:SOUR,BUS or APPL 1.0 1.0
-104
Data type error
The wrong parameter type was found in the command string. You may have
specified a number where a string was expected, or vice versa.
-105
GET not allowed
A Group Execute Trigger (GET) is not allowed within a command string.
-108
Parameter not allowed
More parameters were received than expected for the command. You may
have entered an extra parameter, or you added a parameter to a command that
does not accept a parameter.
Example: APPL? 10
-109
Missing parameter
Fewer parameters were received than expected for the command. You omitted
one or more parameters that are required for this command.
Example: APPL
123
5
Chapter 5 Error Messages
Execution Errors
-112
Program mnemonic too long
A command header was received which contained more than the maximum 12
characters allowed.
-113
Undefined header
A command was received that is not valid for this power supply. You may have
misspelled the command or it may not be a valid command. If you are using
the short form of the command, remember that it may contain up to four letters.
Example: TRIGG:DEL 3
-121
Invalid character in number
An invalid character was found in the number specified for a parameter value.
Example: *ESE #B01010102
-123
Numeric overflow
A numeric parameter was found whose exponent was larger than 32,000.
-124
Too many digits
A numeric parameter was found whose mantissa contained more than 255
digits, excluding leading zeros.
-128
Numeric data not allowed
A numeric parameter was received but a character string was expected.
Example: DISP:TEXT 123
-131
Invalid suffix
A suffix was incorrectly specified for a numeric parameter. You may have
misspelled the suffix.
Example: TRIG:DEL 0.5 SECS
-134
Suffix too long
A suffix for a numeric parameter contained too many characters.
-138
Suffix not allowed
A suffix was received following a numeric parameter which does not accept a
suffix.
Example: STAT:QUES:ENAB 18 SEC (SEC is not a valid suffix).
124
Chapter 5 Error Messages
Execution Errors
-141
Invalid character data
Either the character data element contained an invalid character or the
particular element received was not valid for the header.
-144
Character data too long
The character data element contained too many characters.
-148
Character data not allowed
A discrete parameter was received but a character string or a numeric
parameter was expected. Check the list of parameters to verify that you have
used a valid parameter type.
Example: DISP:TEXT ON
-151
Invalid string data
An invalid character string was received. Check to see if you have enclosed
the character string in single or double quotes.
Example: DISP:TEXT ’ON
-158
String data not allowed
A character string was received but is not allowed for the command. Check
the list of parameters to verify that you have used a valid parameter type.
Example: TRIG:DEL ‘zero’
-160 to -168
Block data errors
The power supply does not accept block data.
-170 to -178
Expression errors
The power supply does not accept mathematical expressions.
-211
Trigger ignored
A Group Execute Trigger (GET) or *TRG was received but the trigger was
ignored. Make sure that the trigger source should be selected to the bus and
the trigger subsystem should be initiated by INIT[:IMM] command.
-213
Init ignored
An INITiate command was received but could not be executed because a
measurement was already in progress. Send a device clear to halt a
measurement in progress and place the power supply in the ‘‘idle’’ state.
125
5
Chapter 5 Error Messages
Execution Errors
-221
Settings conflict
Indicates that a legal program data element was parsed but could not be
executed due to the current device state.
-222
Data out of range
A numeric parameter value is outside the valid range for the command.
Example: TRIG:DEL -3
-223
Too much data
A character string was received but could not be executed because the string
length was more than 40 characters. This error can be generated by the
CALibration:STRing command.
-224
Illegal parameter value
A discrete parameter was received which was not a valid choice for the
command. You may have used an invalid parameter choice.
Example: DISP:STAT XYZ (XYZ is not a valid choice).
-330
Self-test failed
The power supply’s complete self-test failed from the remote interface (*TST?
command). In addition to this error, more specific self-test errors are also
reported. See also ‘‘Self-Test Errors’’, starting on page 128.
-350
Too many errors
The error queue is full because more than 20 errors have occurred. No
additional errors are stored until you remove errors from the queue. The error
queue is cleared when power has been off, or after a *CLS (clear status)
command has been executed.
-410
Query INTERRUPTED
A command was received which sends data to the output buffer, but the output
buffer contained data from a previous command (the previous data is not
overwritten). The output buffer is cleared when power has been off, or after a
*RST (reset) command has been executed.
-420
Query UNTERMINATED
The power supply was addressed to talk (i.e., to send data over the interface)
but a command has not been received which sends data to the output buffer.
For example, you may have executed an APPLy command (which does not
generate data) and then attempted an ENTER statement to read data from the
remote interface.
126
Chapter 5 Error Messages
Execution Errors
-430
Query DEADLOCKED
A command was received which generates too much data to fit in the output
buffer and the input buffer is also full. Command execution continues but all
data is lost.
-440
Query UNTERMINATED after indefinite response
The *IDN? command must be the last query command within a command
string.
Example: *IDN?;:SYST:VERS?
501
Isolator UART framing error
502
Isolator UART overrun error
511
RS-232 framing error
512
RS-232 overrun error
513
RS-232 parity error
514
Command allowed only with RS-232
There are three commands which are only allowed with the RS-232 interface:
SYSTem:LOCal, SYSTem:REMote, and SYSTem:RWLock.
521
Input buffer overflow
522
Output buffer overflow
550
Command not allowed in local
You should always execute the SYSTem:REMote command before sending
other commands over the RS-232 interface.
127
5
Chapter 5 Error Messages
Self-Test Errors
Self-Test Errors
The following errors indicate failures that may occur during a self-test. Refer
to the Service Guide for more information.
601
Front panel does not respond
602
RAM read/write failed
603
A/D sync stuck
604
A/D slope convergence failed
605
Cannot calibrate rundown gain
606
Rundown gain out of range
607
Rundown too noisy
608
Serial configuration readback failed
624
Unable to sense line frequency
625
I/O processor does not respond
626
I/O processor failed self-test
630
Fan test failed
631
System DAC test failed
632
Hardware test failed
128
Chapter 5 Error Messages
Calibration Errors
Calibration Errors
The following errors indicate failures that may occur during a calibration.
Refer to the Service Guide for more information.
701
Cal security disabled by jumper
The calibration security feature has been disabled with a jumper inside the
power supply. When applicable, this error will occur at power-on to warn you
that the power supply is unsecured.
702
Cal secured
The power supply is secured against calibration.
703
Invalid secure code
An invalid calibration security code was received when attempting to unsecure
or secure the power supply. You must use the same security code to unsecure
the power supply as was used to secure it, and vice versa. The security code
may contain up to 12 alphanumeric characters. The first character must be a
letter.
704
Secure code too long
A security code was received which contained more than 12 characters.
705
Cal aborted
A calibration in progress is aborted when you press any front-panel key, send
a device clear, or change the local/remote state of the instrument.
708
Cal output disabled
Calibration is aborted by sending OUTP
output.
712
Bad DAC cal data
The specified DAC calibration values (CAL:VOLT or CAL:CURR) are out of
range. Note that the new calibration constants are not stored in the non-volatile
memory.
713
Bad readback cal data
The specified readback calibration values (CAL:VOLT or CAL:CURR) are out
of range. Note that the new calibration constants are not stored in the nonvolatile memory.
OFF command during calibrating a
129
5
Chapter 5 Error Messages
Calibration Errors
714
Bad OVP cal data
The overvoltage protection calibration constant is out of range. Note that the
new calibration constants are not stored in the non-volatile memory.
715
Bad OCP cal data
The overcurrent protection calibration constant is out of range. Note that the
new calibration constants are not stored in the non-volatile memory.
716
Bad DAC DNL error correction data
Invalid data measured during the calibration for DAC differential nonlinearity
error correction.
717
Cal OVP or OCP status enabled
Overvoltage protection status or overcurrent protection status is enabled. You
must set both overvoltage and overcurrent protection status to OFF before and
during the calibration.
740
Cal checksum failed, secure state
741
Cal checksum failed, string data
742
Cal checksum failed, store/recall data in location 0
743
Cal checksum failed, store/recall data in location 1
744
Cal checksum failed, store/recall data in location 2
745
Cal checksum failed, store/recall data in location 3
746
Cal checksum failed, DAC cal constants
747
Cal checksum failed, readback cal constants
748
Cal checksum failed, GPIB address
749
Cal checksum failed, internal data
750
Cal checksum failed, DAC DNL error correction data
130
6
Application Programs
Application Programs
This chapter contains two application programs over the remote interface to
help you develop programs for your own application. Chapter 4, “Remote
Interface Reference,” starting on page 71, lists the syntax for the SCPI
(Standard Commands for Programmable Instruments) commands available to
program the power supply.
All program examples have been tested on a PC with Windows 3.1 or Windows
for Workgroups. Both examples are for use with GPIB (IEEE 488). These
examples require a VISA (Virtual Instrument Software Architecture) driver
with your GPIB PC card. You should have the “visa.dll” in your windows/system
directory for the GPIB examples to work. All program examples perform the
same task. They step through voltages and make corresponding current
readings to characterize a power diode.
132
Chapter 6 Application Programs
C++ Example for GPIB(IEEE 488)
C++ Example for GPIB(IEEE 488)
This following C programming example shows sending and receiving
formatted I/O. Also see your VISA user’s guide for non-formatted I/O. This
example program is intended to show the use of SCPI commands and VISA
functionality and does not include error trapping. Error trapping, however, is
good programming practice and is recommended in your application. See your
VISA user’s guide for more information about error trapping.
The example program was written in Microsoft Visual C++ ver 1.52, project
type “QuickWin application’’, using the large memory model. Be sure to move
the “visa.lib and “visa.h” file to the lib and include development directory.
These are usually found at c:\vxipnp\win\lib\msc\ and c:\vxipnp\win\include.
Diode.c
/*Diode.C
This example program steps the E3632A DC Power Supply through 10 voltages and measures the
current response. It prints the voltage step and the current response as a table. Note that
the GPIB address is the default address from the factory for the E3632A.*/
#include
#include
#include
#include
<visa.h>
<stdio.h>
<string.h>
<time.h>
/* Provides a delay of the specified time wait in milliseconds*/
void delay( clock_t wait );
void main ()
{
ViSession defaultRM;
ViSession power_supply;
char reply_string [256];
char GPIB_address [3];
char Visa_address[40];
double voltage;
double current;
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
resource manager id
session id to an instrument
string returned from instrument
GPIB address of instrument
Complete VISA address send to card
value of voltage sent to power supply
value of current output of power supply
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
6
/* build the address needed to open communication with GPIB card */
/* address format looks like this; GPIB0::5::INSTR */
/*
*/
strcpy(GPIB_address, "5"); /****** Change GPIB address here *****/
strcpy(Visa_address, "GPIB0::");
strcat(Visa_address, GPIB_address);
133
Chapter 6 Application Programs
C++ Example for GPIB(IEEE 488)
...continued
/* Open communication (session) with power supply */
viOpenDefaultRM (&defaultRM);
viOpen (defaultRM, Visa_address, 0,0, &power_supply);
/* Query the power supply id, read response and print */
viPrintf (power_supply, "*IDN?\n");
viScanf (power_supply, "%s", &reply_string);
printf ("Instrument identification string:\n
%s\n\n", reply_string);
/* Initialize Power Supply */
viPrintf (power_supply, "*RST\n");
viPrintf (power_supply, "Current 2\n");
viPrintf (power_supply, "Output on\n");
/* Set power on condition
/* Set Current limit to 2A
/* Turn output on
*/
*/
*/
printf("Voltage
/* Print heading
*/
Current\n\n");
/* Step from 0.6v to 0.8 volt in .02volt steps */
for(voltage =.6;voltage <<=.8001;voltage +=.02)
{
viPrintf (power_supply, "Volt %f\n",voltage);
/*set voltage
*/
printf("%.3f",voltage);
/* print power supply setting */
delay(500);
/* allow output to settle for 500 msec */
viPrintf(power_supply,"Measure:Current?\n");
/*measure output current
*/
viScanf (power_supply, "%lf",&current);
/* retrieve reading
*/
printf("
%.3lf\n",current);
/* print reading
*/
}
viPrintf (power_supply, "Output Off\n");
/* Close communication session */
viClose (power_supply);
viClose (defaultRM);
}
/* Pauses for a specified number of milliseconds. */
void delay( clock_t wait )
{
clock_t goal;
clock_t delay;
wait = wait/1000;
delay = (clock_t)wait * CLOCKS_PER_SEC;
goal = delay + clock();
while( goal > clock() );
}
End of Program
134
/* turn off
output
*/
Chapter 6 Application Programs
Excel 5.0 Example for Windows 3.1 and GPIB
Excel 5.0 Example for Windows 3.1 and GPIB
Excel VB Macros may be used to control your Agilent E3632A. With Excel you
can take the value of a cell in a spread sheet, send it to the power supply, and
then record the response on the worksheet. The example on the following
pages characterizes a component across the Agilent E3632A terminals. This
example reads 11 voltages from a worksheet, programs the Agilent E3632A to
that voltage, and then reads the current. The value of current is recorded next
to the voltage on the spread sheet. The example is for Excel 5.0 in Windows 3.1.
To write macros and control the power supply in Excel first open a module in
Excel. From the “Insert” menu choose “Macro” and then “Module”. Name the
module created this way “Diode bas” (click the right mouse button on the tab).
Create one more module named “GPIB bas”. The module “GPIB bas” will set
up all the overhead needed to talk to the GPIB port. This module will
subroutines that allow the communication in a simple form. The macro called
“Diode” is an example that tests a diode using the other module.
To try the example for characterizing a diode, type in both modules. Once the
modules are completed, go to a worksheet. In cell A4 type “Volts”, in cell B4
type “Current”. In cells A5 type 0.6. Fill in the cells A4 to A15 in 0.02 increments
so that cell A15 contains 0.8.
Now while the cursor is still in the worksheet, select “Tools, Macro” from the
menu. Double click on the Diode macro in the Macro dialog box. The power
supply will reset to power on condition and then step through the voltages in
the worksheet. After each step the current is measured, and recorded in the
worksheet.
Make any changes to suit your needs in the “Diode bas” module. Change the
GPIB address in the routine “OpenPort( )” contained in the “GPIB bas” module.
If there is a system error when trying to run the macro, you may have to reboot
the PC for the GPIB port to work.
135
6
Chapter 6 Application Programs
Excel 5.0 Example for Windows 3.1 and GPIB
Diode bas Macro
Option Explicit
'"""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""
' This is the subroutine first executed. Modify this routine
' to suit your needs. To change the GPIB address, go to the module GPIB,
' Sub OpenPort(), and change the variable VISAaddr = "5" to the
' required GPIB address
'"""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""
Sub Diode()
Range("B5:B15").ClearContents
Dim I As Integer
OpenPort
SendSCPI "*RST"
'Reset E3632A to power on condition
SendSCPI "Output ON"
'Turn on the output
For I = 5 To 15
' Convert the worksheet value to a string, add to SCPI command
SendSCPI "Volt" & Str$(Cells(I, 1))
' Request a current measurement, put response in worksheet
Cells(I, 2) = Val(SendSCPI("meas:current?"))
Next I
SendSCPI "Output OFF"
'Turn off the output
ClosePort
End Sub
136
Chapter 6 Application Programs
Excel 5.0 Example for Windows 3.1 and GPIB
GPIB bas Macro
Option Explicit
' - Declarations for VISA.DLL, additional declarations are usually in the
' directory c:\vxipnp\win\include in file visa.bas, also see the VISA manual
Declare Function viOpenDefaultRM Lib "VISA.DLL" Alias "#141" (sesn As Long) As Long
Declare Function viOpen Lib "VISA.DLL" Alias "#131" (ByVal sesn As Long, _
ByVal desc As String, ByVal mode As Long, ByVal TimeOut As Long, vi As Long) As Long
Declare Function viClose Lib "VISA.DLL" Alias "#132" (ByVal vi As Long) As Long
Declare Function viRead Lib "VISA.DLL" Alias "#256" (ByVal vi As Long, _
ByVal Buffer As String, ByVal Count As Long, retCount As Long) As Long
Declare Function viWrite Lib "VISA.DLL" Alias "#257" (ByVal vi As Long, _
ByVal Buffer As String, ByVal Count As Long, retCount As Long) As Long
' Error Codes and other global variables
Global Const VI_SUCCESS = &h0&
Global videfaultRM As Long
' resource manager id for VISA GPIB
Global vi As Long
' stores the session for VISA
Dim errorStatus As Long
' VTL error code
''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
' This routine requires the file VISA.dll. It typically resides under
' the directory c:\windows\system. This routine uses the VTL Library to
' send commands to an instrument. A description of these and additional
' VTL commands are contained in the Hewlett Packard Visa Transition
' Library book Agilent PN E2094-90002.
''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
Function SendSCPI(SCPICmd As String) As String
' This function will send a SCPI command string to the
' GPIB port. If the command contains a question mark,
' the response is read, and returned.
Dim
Dim
Dim
Dim
Dim
readbuf As String * 512
crlfpos As Integer
cmdString As String
ReturnString As String
actual As Long
'
'
'
'
'
buffer used for returned string
location of CR's and LF's in readbuf
command passed to instrument
string returned from instrument
number of characters send/returned
6
'Set up an error handler within this subroutine that will get
'called if an error occurs.
On Error GoTo VIerrorHandler
'Write the command to the instrument terminated by a linefeed.
cmdstring = SCPICmd & Chr$(10)
errorStatus = viWrite(vi, ByVal commandstr, Len(commandstr), actual)
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Excel 5.0 Example for Windows 3.1 and GPIB
...continued
If InStr(SCPICmd, "?") Then
'If a query read the response string
errorStatus = viRead(vi, ByVal readbuf, 512, actual)
ReturnString = readbuf
'Strip out any nul's from the response string.
crlfpos = InStr(ReturnString, Chr$(0))
If crlfpos Then
ReturnString = Left(ReturnString, crlfpos - 1)
End If
SendSCPI = ReturnString
'return the remaining string
End If
' end of query to instrument for a response
Exit Function
VIerrorHandler:
'Display the error message in the txtResponse TextBox
MsgBox " I/O Error: " & Error$()
'Close the device session
errorStatus = viClose(vi)
Exit Function
End Function
Sub OpenPort()
Dim VISAaddr As String
'****************************
'Change the GPIB address here
'****************************
VISAaddr = "5"
errorStatus = viOpenDefaultRM(videfaultRM)
'open the visa session
'Open communication to instrument
errorStatus = viOpen(videfaultRM, "GPIB0::" & VISAaddr & "::INSTR",0, 1000, vi)
If errorStatus < VI_SUCCESS Then
' on error give message
Cells(1, 1) = "Unable to Open port"
End If
End Sub
Sub ClosePort()
errorStatus = viClose(vi)
'close the session
errorStatus = viClose(videfaultRM)
End Sub
End of Program
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Tutorial
Tutorial
The Agilent E3632A is a high performance instruments capable of delivering
clean dc power. But to take full advantage of the performance characteristics
designed into the power supply, certain basic precautions must be observed
when connecting it for use on the lab bench or as a controlled power supply.
This chapter describes basic operation of linear power supplies and gives
specific details on the operation and use of the Agilent E3632A DC power
supply:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Overview of Agilent E3632A Operation, page 141
Output Characteristics, page 143
Connecting the Load, page 147
Extending the Voltage and Current Range, page 151
Remote Programming, page 152
Remote Programming, page 152
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Chapter 7 Tutorial
Overview of Agilent E3632A Operation
Overview of Agilent E3632A Operation
Series regulated power supplies were introduced many years ago and are still
used extensively today. The basic design technique, which has not changed
over the years, consists of placing a control element in series with the rectifier
and load device. Figure 7-1 shows a simplified schematic of a series regulated
supply with the series element depicted as a variable resistor. Feedback
control circuits continuously monitor the output and adjust the series
resistance to maintain a constant output voltage. Because the variable
resistance of Figure 7-1 is actually one or more power transistor operating in
the linear (class A) mode, supplies with this type of regulator are often called
linear power supplies. Linear power supplies have many advantages and
usually provide the simplest most effective means of satisfying high
performance and low power requirements.
Figure 7-1. Diagram of Simple Series Power Supply with Tap Selection
To keep the voltage across the series resistance low, some supplies use
preregulation before the rectifier bridge. Figure 7-1 shows a controlled
transformer tap as used in the Agilent E3632A. This is one of several techniques
using semiconductors for preregulation to reduce the power dissipated across
the series element.
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Overview of Agilent E3632A Operation
In terms of performance, a linear regulated supply has a very precise regulating
properties and responds quickly to variations of the line and load. Hence, its
line and load regulation and transient recovery time are superior to supplies
using other regulation techniques. The power supply also exhibits low ripple
and noise, is tolerant of ambient temperature changes, and with its circuit
simplicity, has a high reliability.
The Agilent E3632A contains a linear regulated power supply. It is controlled
by a control circuit that provides voltages to program the outputs. The power
supply sends back to the control circuits a voltage representing the output at
the terminals. The control circuits receive information from the front panel
and send information to the display. Similarly the control circuits ‘’talk’’ to the
remote interface for input and output with the GPIB and RS-232 interfaces.
The remote interface is at earth ground and optically isolated from the control
circuit and the power supply.
Figure 7-2. Block Diagram of the Power Supply Showing the Optical Isolation
142
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Output Characteristics
Output Characteristics
An ideal constant-voltage power supply would have a zero output impedance
at all frequencies. Thus, as shown in Figure 7-3, the voltage would remain
perfectly constant in spite of any changes in output current demanded by the
load.
Figure 7-3. Ideal Constant Voltage
Power Supply
Figure 7-4. Ideal Constant Current
Power Supply
The ideal constant-current power supply exhibits an infinite output impedance
at all frequencies. Thus as Figure 7-4 indicates, the ideal constant-current
power supply would accommodate a load resistance change by altering its
output voltage by just the amount necessary to maintain its output current at
a constant value.
The output of the E3632A power supply can operate in either constant-voltage
(CV) mode or constant-current (CC) mode. Under certain fault conditions, the
power supply can not operate in either CV or CC mode and becomes
unregulated.
7
143
Chapter 7 Tutorial
Output Characteristics
Figure 7-5 shows the operating modes of the output of the Agilent E3632A
power supply. The operating point of one supply will be either above or below
the line RL = RC. This line represents a load where the output voltage and the
output current are equal to the voltage and current setting. When the load RL
is greater than RC, the output voltage will dominate since the current will be
less then the current setting. The power supply is said to be in constant voltage
mode. The load at point 1 has a relatively high resistance value (compared to
RC), the output voltage is at the voltage setting, and the output current is less
than the current setting. In this case the power supply is in the constant voltage
mode and the current setting acts as a current limit.
Figure 7-5. Output Characteristics
When the load RL is less than RC, the output current will dominate since the
voltage will be less than the set voltage. The power supply is said to be in
constant current mode. The load at point 2 has a relatively low resistance, the
output voltage is less than the voltage setting, the output current is at the
current setting. The supply is in constant current mode and the voltage setting
acts as a voltage limit.
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Output Characteristics
Unregulated State
If the power supply should go into a mode of operation that is neither CV or
CC, the power supply is unregulated. In this mode the output is not predictable.
The unregulated condition may be the result of the ac line voltage below the
specifications. The unregulated condition may occur momentarily. For
example when the output is programmed for a large voltage step; the output
capacitor or a large capacitive load will charge up at the current limit setting.
During the ramp up of the output voltage the power supply will be in the
unregulated mode. During the transition from CV to CC as when the output is
shorted, the unregulated state may occur briefly during the transition.
Unwanted Signals
An ideal power supply has a perfect dc output with no signals across the
terminals or from the terminals to earth ground. The actual power supply has
finite noise across the output terminals, and a finite current will flow through
any impedance connected from either terminal to earth ground. The first is
called normal mode voltage noise and the second common mode current
noise.
Normal mode voltage noise is in the form of ripple related to the line frequency
plus some random noise. Both of these are of very low value in the Agilent
E3632A. Careful lead layout and keeping the power supply circuitry away from
power devices and other noise sources will keep these values low.
Common mode noise can be a problem for very sensitive circuitry that is
referenced to earth ground. When a circuit is referenced to earth ground, a low
level line—related ac current will flow from the output terminals to earth
ground. Any impedance to earth ground will create a voltage drop equal to the
current flow multiplied by the impedance. To minimize this effect, the output
terminal can be grounded at the output terminal. Alternately, any impedances
to earth ground should have a complementary impedance to earth ground to
cancel any generated voltages. If the circuit is not referenced to earth ground,
common mode power line noise is typically not a problem.
The output will also change due to changes in the load. As the load increases
the output current will cause a small drop in the output voltage of the power
supply due to the output impedance R. Any resistance in the connecting wire
will add to this resistance and increase the voltage drop. Using the largest
possible hook up wire will minimize the voltage drop. Using the remote sense
leads at the load will compensate for lead resistance in the load leads.
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Output Characteristics
Figure 7-6. Simplified Diagram of Common Mode and Normal Mode Sources of Noise
When the load changes very rapidly, as when a relay contact is closed, the
inductance in the hook up wire and in the power supply output will cause a
spike to appear at the load. The spike is a function of the rate of change of the
load current. When very rapid changes in load are expected, a capacitor with
a low series resistance, in parallel with the power supply, and close to the load
is the best way to minimize these voltage spikes.
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Chapter 7 Tutorial
Connecting the Load
Connecting the Load
Output Isolation
The output of the power supply is isolated from chassis ground. Any output
terminal may be grounded, or an external voltage source may be connected
between any terminal output and ground. However, output terminals must be
kept within ±60 Vdc when metal shorting bars without insulation are used to
connect the (+) output to the (+) sense and the (-) output and the (-) sense
terminals or ±240 Vdc of ground when metal shorting bars without insulation
are either replaced with insulated conductors or they are removed from the
terminals so there is no operator access to the output conductors without
insulation. A chassis ground terminal is provided on the front panel for
convenience.
Multiple Loads
When connecting multiple loads to the power supply, each load should be
connected to the output terminals using separate connecting wires. This
minimizes mutual coupling effects between loads and takes full advantage of
the low output impedance of the power supply. Each pair of wires should be
as short as possible and twisted or shielded to reduce lead inductance and
noise pick-up. If a shield is used, connect one end to the power supply ground
terminal and leave the other end disconnected.
If cabling considerations require the use of distribution terminals that are
located remotely from the power supply, connect output terminals to the
distribution terminals by a pair of twisted or shielded wires. Connect each load
to the distribution terminals separately.
Table 7-1. Wire Rating
AWG
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
26
28
Suggested
40
maximum
Current(amps)*
25
20
13
10
7
5
3.5
2.5
1.7
mΩ/ft
1.00
1.59
2.53
4.02
6.39
10.2
16.1
25.7
40.8
64.9
mΩ/m
3.3
5.2
8.3
13.2
21.0
33.5
52.8
84.3
133.9 212.9
*Single conductor in gree air at 30 °C with insulation
147
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Chapter 7 Tutorial
Connecting the Load
Warning
To satisfy safety requirements, load wires must be heavy enough not to
overheat while carrying the short-circuit output current of the power supply.
Remote Voltage Sensing
Normally, a power supply operating in the constant voltage mode achieves its
optimum line and load regulations, its lowest output impedance, drift, and
ripple and noise, and its fastest transient recovery performance at the power
supply output terminals. If the load is separated from the output terminals by
any lead length, some of these performance characteristics will be degraded
at the load terminals - usually by an amount proportional to the impedance of
the load leads compared with the output impedance of the power supply.
With remote voltage sensing, a feature included in the Agilent E3632A power
supply, it is possible to connect the input of the voltage feedback amplifier
directly to the load terminals so that the regulator performs its function with
respect to the load terminals rather than with respect to the power supply
output terminals. Thus, the voltage at the power supply output terminals shifts
by whatever amount is necessary to compensate for the voltage drop in the
load leads, thereby maintaining the voltage at the load terminals constant.
Figure 7-7. Regulated Power Supply with Remote Sensing
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Chapter 7 Tutorial
Connecting the Load
Load Consideration
Capacitive Loading
In most cases, the power supply will be stable for almost any size load
capacitance. Large load capacitors may cause ringing in the power supply’s
transient response. It is possible that certain combinations of load capacitance,
equivalent series resistance, and load lead inductance will result in instability.
If this occurs, the problem may often be solved by either increasing or
decreasing the total load capacitance.
A large load capacitor may cause the power supply to cross into CC or
unregulated mode momentarily when the output voltage is reprogrammed.
The slew rate of the output voltage will be limited to the current setting divided
by the total load capacitance (internal and external).
Table 7-2. Slew Rate
Internal
Capacitance
Internal Bleed
Resistor
Slew Rate at No Load and
Full Scale Currnet Setting
470 μF
5 KΩ
1.5 V/msec
Inductive loading
Inductive loads present no loop stability problems in constant voltage mode.
In constant current mode, inductive loads form a parallel resonance with the
power supply’s output capacitor. Generally this will not affect the stability of
the power supply, but it may cause ringing of the current in the load.
Pulse Loading
In some applications the load current varies periodically from a minimum to
a maximum value. The constant current circuit limits the output current. Some
peak loading exceeding the current limit can be obtained due to the output
capacitor. To stay within the specifications for the output, the current limit
should be set greater than the peak current expected or the supply may go into
CC mode or unregulated mode for brief periods.
7
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Chapter 7 Tutorial
Connecting the Load
Reverse Current Loading
An active load connected to the supply may actually deliver a reverse current
to the supply during a portion of its operating cycle. An external source can
not be allowed to pump current into the supply without risking loss of
regulation and possible damage. These effects can be avoided by preloading
the output with a dummy load resistor. The dummy load resistor should draw
at least the same amount of current from the supply as the active load may
deliver to the supply. The value of the current for the dummy load plus the
value of the current the load draws from the supply must be less than the
maximum current of the supply.
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Chapter 7 Tutorial
Extending the Voltage and Current Range
Extending the Voltage and Current Range
The power supply may be able to provide voltages and currents greater than
its rated maximum outputs if the power-line voltage is at or above its nominal
value. Operation can be extended up to 3% over the rated output without
damage to the power supply, but performance can not be guaranteed to meet
specifications in this region. If the power-line voltage is maintained in the upper
end of the input voltage range, the power supply will probably operate within
its specifications. The power supply is more likely to stay within specifications
if only one of the voltage or current outputs is exceeded.
Series Connections
Series operation of two or more power supplies can be accomplished up to the
output isolation rating of any one supply to obtain a higher voltage than that
available from a single supply. Series connected power supplies can be
operated with one load across both power supplies or with a separate load for
each power supply. The power supply has a reverse polarity diode connected
across the output terminals so that if operated in series with other power
supplies, damage will not occur if the load is short-circuited or if one power
supply is turned on separately from its series partners.
When series connection is used, the output voltage is the sum of the voltages
of the individual power supplies. The current is the current of any one power
supply. Each of the individual power supplies must be adjusted in order to
obtain the total output voltage.
Parallel Connections
Two or more power supplies being capable of CV/CC automatic cross over
operation can be connected in parallel to obtain a total output current greater
than that available from one power supply. The total output current is the sum
of the output currents of the individual power supplies. The output of each
power supply can be set separately. The output voltage controls of one power
supply should be set to the desired output voltage; the other power supply
should be set for a slightly higher output voltage. The supply with the higher
output voltage setting will deliver its constant current output, and drop its
output voltage until it equals the output of the other supply, and the other
supply will remain in constant voltage operation and only deliver that fraction
of its rated output current which is necessary to fulfill the total load demand.
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Remote Programming
Remote Programming
During remote programming a constant-voltage regulated power supply is
called upon to change its output voltage rapidly. The most important factor
limiting the speed of output voltage change is the output capacitor and load
resistor.
Figure 7-8. Speed of Response - Programming Up (Full Load)
The equivalent circuit and the nature of the output voltage waveform when the
supply is being programmed upward are shown in Figure 7-8. When the new
output is programmed, the power supply regulator circuit senses that the
output is less than desired and turns on the series regulator to its maximum
value IL, the current limit or constant current setting.
This constant current IL charges the output capacitor CO and load resistor RL
parallel. The output therefore rises exponentially with a time constant RLCL
towards voltage level ILRL , a value higher than the new output voltage being
programmed.
When this exponential rise reaches the newly programmed voltage level, the
constant voltage amplifier resumes its normal regulating action and holds the
output constant. Thus, the rise time can be determined approximately using
the formula shown in Figure 7-8.
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Chapter 7 Tutorial
Remote Programming
If no load resistor is attached to the power supply output terminal, then the
output voltage will rise linearly at a rate of CO/IL when programmed upward,
and TR = CO(E2 -E1 )/IL, the shortest possible up-programming time.
Figure 7-9. Speed of Response - Programming Down
Figure 7-9 shows that when the power supply is programmed down, the
regulator senses that the output voltage is higher than desired and turns off
the series transistors entirely. Since the control circuit can in no way cause the
series regulator transistors to conduct backwards, the output capacitor can
only be discharged through the load resistor and internal current source (IS).
The output voltage decays linearly with slope of IS/CO with no load and stops
falling when it reaches the new output voltage which has been demanded. If
full load is connected, the output voltage will fall exponentially faster.
Since up-programming speed is aided by the conduction of the series regulating
transistor, while down programming normally has no active element aiding in
the discharge of the output capacitor, laboratory power supplies normally
program upward more rapidly than downward.
7
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Chapter 7 Tutorial
Reliability
Reliability
Reliability of electronic semiconductor equipment depends heavily on the
temperature of the components. The lower the temperature of the
components, the better the reliability. The Agilent E3632A incorporate
circuitry to reduce the internal power dissipation of the power supply and
therefore reduce the internal heat of the power supply. Maximum internal
power dissipation occurs at maximum current. The internal power dissipation
further increases as the output voltage is lowered. A fan internal to the Agilent
E3632A is essential to keep internal temperatures low. To assist in cooling the
Agilent E3632A, the sides and rear of the Agilent E3632A should be kept clear.
154
8
Specifications
Specifications
The performance specifications are listed in the following pages.
Specifications are warranted in the temperature range of 0 to 40°C with a
resistive load. Supplemental characteristics, which are not warranted but are
descriptions of performance determined either by design or testing. The
service guide contains procedures for verifying the performance
specifications.
156
Chapter 8 Specifications
Performance Specifications
Performance Specifications
Output Ratings(@0°C - 40°C)
Low range
0 to +15 V/0 to 7 A
High range
0 to +30 V/0 to 4 A
Programming Accuracy[1] 12 months(@25°C ± 5°C), ±(% of output + offset)
Voltage
0.05% + 10 mV
Current
0.2% + 10 mA
Readback Accuracy[1] 12 months(over GPIB and RS-232 or front panel with respect
to actual output @25°C ± 5°C), ±(% of output + offset)
Voltage
0.05% + 5 mV
Current
0.15% + 5 mA
Ripple and Noise (with outputs ungrounded, or with either output terminal grounded,
20 Hz to 20 MHz)
Normal mode voltage
<0.35 mV rms and 2 mV p-p
Normal mode current
<2 mA rms
Common mode current
<1.5 μA rms
Load Regulation, ±(% of output + offset)
Change in output voltage or current for any load change within ratings with remote
sensing connected
Voltage
<0.01% + 2 mV
Current
<0.01% + 250 μA
Line Regulation, ±(% of output + offset)
Change in output voltage and current for any line change within ratings
Voltage
<0.01% + 2 mV
Current
<0.01% + 250 μA
[1]Accuracy specifications are after an 1-hour warm-up with no load and calibration at
25 °C.
157
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Chapter 8 Specifications
Performance Specifications
Programming Resolution
Voltage
1 mV
Current
0.5 mA
Readback Resolution
Voltage
0.5 mV
Current
0.1 mA
Front Panel Resolution
Voltage
1 mV
Current
1 mA
Transient Response Time
Less than 50 μsec for output to recover to within 15 mV following a change in output
current from full load to half load or vice versa
Command Processing Time
Average time for output voltage to begin to change after receipt of digital data when
the power supply is connected directly to the GPIB or RS-232 is less than 100 msec
OVP and OCP Accuracy, ±(% of output + offset)
OVP
0.5% + 0.5 V
OCP
0.5% + 0.5 A
Activation time : Average time for output to start to drop after OVP or OCPcondition
occurs.
OVP
<1.5 msec when the trip voltage is equal or greater than 3 V
<10 msec when the trip voltage is less than 3 V
OCP
<10 msec
158
Chapter 8 Specifications
Supplemental Characteristics
Supplemental Characteristics
Output Programming Range (maximum programmable values)
Low range
0 to 15.45 V/0 to 7.21A
High range
0 to 30.9 V/0 to 4.12 A
OVP
1 V to 32 V
OCP
0 A to 7.5 A
Remote Sensing Capability
Voltage drop
Up to 1 V per each lead
Load regulation Add 5 mV to spec for each 1-volt change in the + output
lead due to load current changes.
Load voltage
Subtract voltage drop in load leads from specified output
voltage rating.
Temperature Coefficient, ±(% of output + offset)
Maximum change in output/readback per °C after a 30-minute warm-up
Voltage
0.01% + 3 mV
Current
0.02% + 3 mA
Stability, ±(% of output + offset)
Following 1 hour warm-up, change in output over 8 hours under constant load, line,
and ambient temperature
Voltage
0.02% + 1 mV
Current
0.1% + 1 mA
Voltage Programming Speed
Maximum time required for output voltage to settle within 1% of its total excursion (for
resistive load). Excludes command processing time.
Full load
No laod
Up
50 msec
20 msec
Down
45 msec
400 msec
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Chapter 8 Specifications
Supplemental Characteristics
Output Terminal Isolation (maximum, from chassis ground)
±60 Vdc when connecting shorting conductors without insulation to the (+) output to
the (+) sense and the (-) output and the (-) sense terminals.
±240 Vdc when connecting insulated shorting conductors to the (+) output to the (+)
sense and the (-) output and the (-) sense terminals.
AC Input Ratings (selectable via rear panel selector)
std
115 Vac ± 10%, 47 to 63 Hz
opt 0E3
230 Vac ± 10%, 47 to 63 Hz
opt 0E9
100 Vac ± 10%, 47 to 63 Hz
Maximum Input Power
500 VA with full load
Cooling
Fan cooled
Operating Temperature
0 to 40 °C for full rated output. At higher temperatures, the output current is derated
linearly to 50% at 55 °C maximum temperature.
Output Voltage Overshoot
During turn-on or turn-off of ac power, output plus overshoot will not exceed 1 V if the
output control is set to less than 1 V. If the output control is set to 1 V or higher, there
is no overshoot.
Programming Language
SCPI (Standard Commands for Programmable Instruments)
State Storage Memory
Three (3) user-configurable stored states
Recommended Calibration Interval
1 year
160
Chapter 8 Specifications
Supplemental Characteristics
Dimensions*
213 mmW x 133 mmH x 348 mmD (8.4 x 5.2 x 13.7 in)
*See below for detailed information.
Weight
Net
Shipping
9.5 kg (21 lb)
12 kg (26 lb)
Figure 8-1. Dimensions of Agilent E3632A Power Supply
161
8
Chapter 8 Specifications
Supplemental Characteristics
162
Index
If you have questions relating to the operation of the power supply,
call 1-800-829-4444 in the United States, or contact your nearest
Alient Technologies Sales Office.
A
accessories, 15
active load, 150
adapter kit, Agilent 34399A, 63
address, GPIB, 57-58
address, GPIB bus controller, 56
annunciators, 5
application programs, 132-138
asterisk ( * ), 114
C
cable
crossover, 63
DTE-to-DTE interface, 63
modem-eliminator, 63
null-modem, 63
cable kit, Agilent 34398A, 63-64
calibration
changing security code, 69
count, 70
error, 129-130
message, 70
secure, 68
security, 66
security code, 66
unsecure, 67
calibration commands, 96-98
character frame, 62
checkout
current output, 30
output checkout, 29-31
power-on checkout, 28
preliminary checkout, 27
voltage output, 29
colon, 111-113
command
*CLS, 109
DISPlay?, 92
INITiate, 91
MEASure:CURRent?, 88
MEASure?, 88
OUTPut, 92
OUTPut:RELay, 93
OUTPut:RELay?, 93
OUTPut?, 92
STATus:QUEStionable:CONDition?, 108
STATus:QUEStionable:ENABle, 109
STATus:QUEStionable:ENABle?,
109
STATus:QUEStionable?, 108
SYSTem:BEEPer, 93
SYSTem:ERRor?, 93, 108
SYSTem:LOCal, 99
SYSTem:REMote, 99
SYSTem:RWLock, 99
SYSTem:VERSion?, 94
TRIGger:DELay, 91
TRIGger:DELay?, 91
TRIGger:SOURce, 91
TRIGger:SOURce?, 91
VOLTage, 85
VOLTage:PROTection, 86
VOLTage:PROTection:CLEar, 87
VOLTage:PROTection:STATe, 87
VOLTage:PROTection:STATe?, 87
VOLTage:PROTection:TRIPped?, 87
VOLTage:PROTection?, 87
VOLTage:RANGe, 87
VOLTage:RANGe?, 87
VOLTage:STEP, 86
VOLTage:STEP?, 86
VOLTage:TRIGgered, 86
VOLTage:TRIGgered?, 86
VOLTage?, 85
commands format, 112
command separator, 113
command syntax, 112
command terminator, 114
common commands, 114
configuration, remote interface, 56-60
connections
parallel, 151
series, 151
connector, GPIB, 61
constant current operation, 38, 39
constant voltage amplifier, 152
163
Index
B
basic tests
output checkout, 29-31
power-on self-test, 28
preliminary checkout, 27
battery charging, 44
baud rate, 57, 62
bench operation, 19
brace, 73, 112
bus controller, interrupt, 106
*ESE, 109
*ESR?, 109
*IDN?, 94
*OPC, 107, 109
*OPC?, 109
*PSC, 109
*PSC?, 110
*RCL, 95
*RST, 94
*SAV, 95
*SRE, 110
*SRE?, 110
*STB?, 106, 110
*TRG, 91
*TST?, 95
*WAI, 110
APPLy, 81
APPLy?, 81
CALibration:COUNt?, 96
CALibration:CURRent, 96
CALibration:CURRent:LEVel, 96
CALibration:CURRent:PROTection, 96
CALibration:DAC:ERRor, 97
CALibration:SECure:CODE, 97
CALibration:SECure:STATe, 97
CALibration:SECure:STATe?, 97
CALibration:STRing, 97
CALibration:STRing?, 97
CALibration:VOLTage:LEVel, 98
CALibration:VOLTage:PROTection,
98
CURRent, 82
CURRent:PROTection, 84
CURRent:PROTection:CLEar, 84
CURRent:PROTection:STATe, 84
CURRent:PROTection:STATe?, 84
CURRent:PROTection:TRIPped?,
84
CURRent:PROTection?, 84
CURRent:STEP, 83
CURRent:STEP?, 83
CURRent:TRIGgered, 83
CURRent:TRIGgered?, 83
CURRent?, 83
device clear, 99
DISPlay, 92
DISPlay:TEXT, 92
DISPlay:TEXT:CLEar, 92
DISPlay:TEXT?, 92
Index
Index
constant voltage operation, 36, 37
constant-current mode, 143, 144
constant-voltage mode, 143, 144
controller, 17
cooling, 19
cooling fan, 19
coupling effects, 147
current limit, 36, 144
current output checkout, 30
D
data frame, 62
deadlock, 65
device specific commands, 119
disabling output, 50
display annunciators, 5
display control, 54
distribution terminals, 147
down-programming speed, 153
DSR, 64
DTE, 63-64
DTR, 64
DTR/DSR handshake protocol, 64
dummy load resistor, 150
E
enable register?, 100
error, 122
calibration, 129-130
excution, 123-127
self-test, 128
error conditions, 53
error message, 122-130
error queue 122
event register, 100
external voltage source, 147
F
features, 1
feedback control, 141
firmware revision query, 55
front panel
drawing, 2
enable/disable, 54
key descriptions, 3
operation overview, 35
voltage and current settings, 4
front panel message, 54
fuse rating, 27
164
G
GPIB address, 57-58
factory setting, 28
GPIB cable, 15
GPIB connector, 61
GPIB interface, 56
GPIB interface configuration, 61
active, 150
capacitive loading, 149
inductive loading, 149
pulse loading, 149
reverse current loading, 150
locking knob control, 50-51
loop stability, 149
low-level commands, 78
H
halting an output, 116
M
MAV bit, 106
MAX parameter, 113
memory locations , 95
message
CAL MODE, 67-69
meter mode, 17, 28
MIN parameters, 113
multiple loads, 147
I
ideal constant-current supply, 143
ideal constant-voltage supply, 143
ideal power supply, 145
IEEE-488 common commands, 114
IEEE-488 conformance information,
120
initial inspection, 19
electrical check, 19
mechanical check, 19
input power, 22-23
input power selection, 22
installation, 19-21
interface, GPIB, 56
interface, RS-232, 56
K
key
Calibrate, 67-68
Display Limit, 35
I/O Config, 6
Local, 35
On/Off, 35, 50
Secure, 67-69
key descriptions, 3
keyword
root, 111
second-level, 111
third-level, 111
knob locking, 50-51
L
limit mode, 17, 35
line fuse, 22
linear power supplies, 141
load
N
noise
common mode current, 145
normal mode voltage, 145
non-SCPI commands, 119
O
OCP programming
enable OCP, 45
OCP programming, 45-47
check OCP operation, 46
clear OC condition, 46
trip level setting, 45
operating range, 151
operation overview, 141-142
options, 15
output buffer, 104, 107
output characteristics, 143-146
output identifier, 80
output impedance, 143
output isolation, 147
output Off state, 50
output setting commands, 82-88
OVP programming, 42-44
check OVP Operation, 43
clear OV condition, 43
enabling OVP, 42
trip level setting, 42
Index
Q
query, 79, 114
query command, 79
query response, 79
questionable status register, 102
R
rack mounting, 20
rack mounting kit
adapter kit, 20
filler panel, 21
flange kit, 21
lock-link kit, 21
shelf, 21
slide kit, 21
sliding support shelf, 21
rear panel
drawing, 6
GPIB connector, 6
RS-232 connector, 6
recall mode, 41
recalling operating states, 40-41
rectifier, 141
resister
questionable status, 102
questionable status enable, 102
questionable status event, 102
standard event, 103-104
standard event enable, 104
status byte, 104, 106
status byte enable, 105
status byte summary, 105
register, enable, 100
register, event, 100
reliability, 154
remote interface configuration, 56-60
remote voltage sensing, 48-49, 148
connections, 49
reverse polarity diode, 151
RS-232 adapter, kit, 15
RS-232 interface, 56
RS-232 interface command, 99
RS-232 interface configuration, 62-65
subsystems, 111
supplemental characteristics, 156, 159161
system-related commands, 92-95
S
safety and EMC requirements, 14
safety considerations, 14
SCPI command summary, 73-77
SCPI command terminator, 114
SCPI confirmed command, 117
SCPI conformance, 117-119
SCPI language introduction, 111-115
SCPI parameters, 115
SCPI status registers, 100-107
SCPI version, 55
SCPI version query, 55
self-test, 52
semicolon, 113
series connection, 151
series regulated power supplies, 141
series resistance, 141
service request, 105
setting baud rate, 59
setting GPIB address, 58
setting parity, 59
slew rate, 149
specifications, 156-161
square brackets, 73, 112
stability, 149
standard event register, 103
start bit, 62
status byte register, 104
status register, 100-107
status reporting commands, 108-110
command, 109
stop bit, 62
storing operating states, 40-41
U
unregulated state (condition), 145
unregulated sate, 145
unwanted signal, 145
up programming response, 152
T
temperature range, 19
transformer tap, 141
tree system, 111
triangle brackets, 73, 112
trigger source, 79, 89
bus (software) triggering, 89
immediate triggering, 90
triggering commands, 89-91
troubleshooting, RS-232, 65
V
vertical bar, 73
VFD, 17
voltage limit, 38, 144
voltage output checkout, 29
voltage spikes, 146
W
wiring adapter, 63
165
Index
P
parameter
boolean, 115
discrete, 115
numeric, 115
string, 115
parity, 57, 59, 62
performance specifications, 156-158
power dissipation, 154
power-line cord, 22
Power-line voltage selection, 22
power-on/reset state, 29-30, 36
preregulation, 141
program, 132-138
programming overview, 78-80
programming ranges, 80
programming speed, 152-153
down, 153
up, 152
protocol, DTR/DSR handshake, 64
Index
Index
166
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Agilent Technologies
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Calls attention to a procedure, practice, or condition
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Earth ground symbol.
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!
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Warning
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Warning
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Printed: October 2007 Edition 3
Printed in Malaysia
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Model Number:
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Date
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Revision: B.00.00
Issue Date: Created on 11/24/2003 3:10
PM
Document No. KIO_10-32.11.24doc.doc
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Third Edition, October 2007
E3632-90001
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