Small Premises Blank Fire Risk Assessment

Small Premises Blank Fire Risk Assessment
Fire Risk Assessment for:
Sharpnage House
Checkley
Herefordshire
HR1 4NF
August 2015
1
FIRE RISK ASSESSMENT
FIRE RISK ASSESSMENT
PREMISES PARTICULARS
Premises Name:
Sharpnage House
Use of Premises:
Holiday Let- 10 Guests
Address:
Checkley
Herefordshire
HR1 4NF
Tel No:
Owner Charmaine Brooks
07887714973
Date of Risk Assessment:
11th March 2016
Date of Review:
10th March 2016
GENERAL STATEMENT OF POLICY
The Regulatory Reform Order places duties on the responsible person to include:
 Carrying out a fire risk assessment
 Provide adequate means of escape in the case of a fire such as sufficient and
suitable fire exits; fire doors and compartments; signs, notices and emergency
lighting
 Take measures for firefighting e.g. fire extinguishers
 An effective fire emergency plan to be followed in the event of a fire
 Maintenance of all fire safety systems and equipment
 Keep the risks, and the fire safety measures, under review
In most cases the local fire and rescue authority are charged with a duty to enforce the Fire
Safety Order and have a range of enforcement options, from education and advice, through
agreed action plans to formal enforcement notices and prohibition notices.
Failure to comply with the Fire Safety Order may constitute a criminal offence.
Fire Risk Assessment Undertaken by:
Print Name: Bryan Morgan
Signed:
Date: 11th March 2016
2
GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF PREMISES
Description:
A restored cottage with stone walls under a slate roof.
There are 4 bedrooms- I en-suite- on the first floor along with a bathroom all accessed
from the landing.
On the ground floor is the large kitchen dinner with living area and a further living area.
The ground floor also incorporates a toilet and controls for the underfloor heating housed
under the staircase.
Occupancy:
Size:
Times the Premises are in use:
Building footprint
15m x20
All Year
The Total Number of Persons Employed
within the Premises at any one time:
10
Number of Floors:
NA
Number of Stairs:
1
The Total Number of Persons who may
resort to the premises at any one time.
10
FIRE SAFETY SYSTEMS WITHIN THE PREMISES
Fire Warning System: (ie automatic fire detection, break-glass system to BS 5839, other)
Yes
Emergency Lighting (ie maintained/non-maintained, 1hr/3hr duration to BS 5266)
Partial with Safety light on ground floor
Other: (ie Sprinkler System to LPC rules BS 5306)
3
IDENTIFY FIRE HAZARDS
Source of Ignition:
Kitchen
Hot Surfaces and cooking
Electric AGA as well as electric hob and
oven
Electrical Supply
Electrical Appliances
Lounges
Hot surfaces-wood burning stove
Electrical Supply
Electrical Appliances
Bedrooms
Electrical Supply
Electrical Appliances
Source of Fuel:
Food and Cooking Oils
Furniture, Furnishings and fixtures
Wood and tar form open fire
Work Processes:
None
Structural features that could promote spread of fire:
None
IDENTIFY PEOPLE AT RISK
The people at risk are visitors to the property who stay for short periods of time. The
provision of a downstairs bedroom now makes the premises suitable for person with
mobility issues.
However, consideration should also be given to gusts with other disabilities and this
should be considered as part of the booking arrangements. For example, a profoundly
deaf guest would not be able to hear the fire alarms and this would need to be
established.
There are a number of risks associated with the use of cooking and use of wood burning
stoves.
4
These risks are not unique but visitors may not always appreciate some of the risks
relating to a more rural lifestyle which is the unique selling point of this type of
accommodation.
The site is considered to be suitable for people with poor mobility with a ground floor
bedroom and en-suite wet room. The doors are wide enough to meet the requirements
for wheelchair access.
MEANS OF ESCAPE – HORIZONTAL EVACUATION
Commentary:
The building is provided with 5 exits from the ground floor. This includes an exit direct to
open air form the ground floor bedroom.
All exits lead directly to a place of safety outside the building and no concerns are
identified with the escape from the ground floor.
MEANS OF ESCAPE – VERTICAL EVACUATION
Commentary:
Escape for the first floor is achieved by means of a single staircase which discharges
adjacent to the main entrance. From here escape can be directly to a place of safety
outside the building.
As only a single staircase is available for use in emergency Automatic Fire Detection is
provided on the fire floor landing, ground floor hallway and in the higher risk kitchen areas
and both lounges
FIRE SAFETY SIGNS AND NOTICES
Commentary:
There is no exit signage in the premises but as the escape routes are obvious they are not
required.
Firefighting equipment in required and this should be provided with signage as a means of
ensuring guests are familiar with the operation.
FIRE WARNING SYSTEM
Commentary:
The property is provided with a system incorporating interlinked mains powered smoke
alarms (and heat alarms in the kitchen), each with an integral stand-by supply. The inter
5
The system has been installed in accordance with BS5839 Part 6 and is a Grade D system
designed to protect the means of escape.
6
EMERGENCY LIGHTING SYSTEM
Commentary:
One mains operated “night light” on the ground floor. As there is no opportunity to
borrow light from another source, there a provision is required in the form of rechargeable
torches or similar
FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT
Commentary:
There is currently only a single 6L foam extinguisher provided and this is currently situated
on the ground floor.
7
MANAGEMENT – MAINTENANCE
Is there a maintenance programme for the fire safety provisions
in the premises:
Yes
No √
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
No√
Yes
No√
Yes
No√
Yes
No√
Commentary:
Are regular checks of fire resisting doors, walls and partitions
carried out:
Commentary:
NA
Are regular checks of escape routes and exit doors carried out:
Commentary:
NA
Are regular checks of fire safety signs carried out:
Commentary:
NA
Is there a maintenance regime for the fire warning system:
Commentary:
Weekly
Annually
Is there a maintenance regime for the emergency lighting system:
Commentary:
Monthly
Annually
Is there maintenance of the firefighting equipment (by
competent person?)
Commentary:
Monthly
Annually
Are records kept and their local identified;
Commentary:
8
METHOD FOR CALLING THE FIRE SERVICE
Specify:
999.
EMERGENCY ACTION PLAN (EAP)
Commentary:
There is no emergency action plan currently in place and examples will be provided as part
of the Fire Risk Assessment.
TRAINING
Commentary:
NA
9
SIGNIFICANT FINDINGS
Significant Finding
Control Measure/Action
Fire Hazards
Wood Burning Stoves
Recommendations
Wood burning stoves are provided in each of
the living areas.
As log burners are provided, the following
controls should be applied to reduce
potential risk
 The chimney must be swept at
least annually but preferably 6
monthly to reduce potential buildup of soot and tar on the flue.

Consideration should be given to
providing a guard to prevent sparks
and to protect younger guests from
touching the fire.

The disposal of potentially hot
ashes can also pose a problem so a
suitable metal container, away for
the building, should be considered
to collect the ashes.
Electrical Hazards
Installation
The electrical installation is relatively new.
Recommendation:

No additional controls required.
The electrical installation is required to be
subjected to periodic inspection at 5-yearly
intervals in line with IEE Regulations.
10
Appliances
As the property is new to the holiday let
market the appliances are new so there is no
requirement for any testing at this.
However, it is good practice to have the
equipment checked at regular intervals
thereafter, but there is no legal requirement
to do so unless appliances are used by
employees.
Recommendations:


It is considered good practice to ensure
appliances likely to be used by guests are
subjected to Portable Appliance Testing(PAT)
and this is considered to be best practice.
Extension Leads
The survey identified that extension leads
were being used behind TV sets. It is
accepted that it is unavoidable not to have
to use one, but there is potential to increase
fire risk by:
 Damaged cable, due to leads being
walked over, continually bent at the
same point or stored badly.
 Leads on power tools frequently
become tangled, leading to one of
the conductors eventually failing –
this could cause danger,
A suitable visual inspection
programme should be introduced, as
part of the changeover routines, to
monitor condition of electrical
appliance condition between periods
of PAT.
To include:
 a smell of hot plastic or
burning near an appliance or
socket
 sparks or smoke coming from
a plug or appliance
 blackness or scorch marks
around a socket or plug, or on
an appliance
 damaged or frayed leads
 coloured wire inside leads
showing at the plug or
anywhere else
 melted plastic on appliance
casings or leads
 fuses that blow or circuitbreakers that operate for no
obvious reason
Recommendations

Only use extension leads fitted with
suitably insulated connectors and
plugs.
Position an extension lead carefully
to prevent any risk of damage.
If the cable has to cross a pathway,
cover it with a rubber protector
strip.
Always check that leads, plugs and
sockets are undamaged.
Always check the extension lead plug
contains the correctly rated fuse for
the equipment being used.




Fire Detection
Testing and Maintenance
Grade D System- Main Building
The levels of fire detection are suitable for the
levels of risk.

This system should be tested at
11
The system is a Grade D installation in
accordance with BS5839 Part 6 - fire
detection and fire alarm systems in
domestic premises fire detection and fire
alarm systems in domestic premises
Grade D: a system of one or more mainspowered smoke (or heat) alarms each with
integral battery standby supply-10 year in
this situation. These are designed to
operate in
the event of mains failure and therefore
could be connected to the local lighting
circuit rather than an independent circuit at
the dwelling’s main distribution
board. There is no control panel.
The coverage is LD 2- LD2 - A system
incorporating detectors in all circulation
spaces that form part of the escape routes
from the premises, and in all rooms or areas
that present a high risk of fire to occupants.
least every week* by operating the
fire alarm devices in the property.
The weekly test can be carried out
by using the test switch located
near the distribution board in the
cabinet off the kitchen.
The audibility of all the heads
should be monitored at this time.

The installation should be inspected
by a competent person in line with
the manufacturer’s guidance- the
system is likely to require an annual
inspection
* During periods when the property may be
unoccupied the test should be conducted
prior to a new letting.
Record all the testing, maintenance and
servicing for audit and monitoring
purposes.
This system consists of 7 smoke detectors and
1 heat detector.
The current legislation places duties on the
responsible person to maintain test and
inspect all fire safety equipment.
Therefore, a systematic and thorough test
regime for the fire detection will need to be
introduced.
Emergency Lighting
Recommendation
The only means of emergency lighting
observed during the survey was a night light
on the ground floor
A suitable means of illumination is provided
to illuminate the escape in an emergency.
Due to the lack of opportunity to borrow light A good example if the “Safe T Light”
form another source some form of emergency
lighting is required.
12
An ordinary night light provides a degree of
safety, but, when the power fails, you're
left in the dark.
Once power is cut, the re-chargeable
internal battery in Safe T Light takes over.
As the only light in the dark, the torch head
is easily located and can then be gently
pulled from the base unit. You now have a
torch that will last up to 4 hours. No
scrabbling around in drawers or falling on
the stairs in the dark.
Economical Night Light
During the night, when the “Safe T Light” is
illuminating your stairs, hallway, landing or
your bedroom, the unit is consuming less
than 0.5 watt so costs less than 50 pence a
year to run. This is far more economical
than conventional 7-watt night lights and is
due to the LED technology used.
The units should be tested weekly or at the
start of every letting.
Firefighting Equipment – Extinguishers and Fire Blankets
Provision
Recommendations
There is only a single fire 6l Foam Extinguisher
currently provided and this located on the
ground floor
The following provision of firefighting
equipment is provided sites inspected and
test in line with the guidance provided:
13
First Floor- Landing
Once the additional fire extinguishers is
provided all firefighting equipment will need
to be inspected and tested as outlined.

1 x 6l AFFF Extinguisher
Ground Floor- Kitchen

1 x Fire Blanket
Siting- Fire Extinguishers





Extinguishers should be located in
conspicuous positions, available at
all times for immediate use and
fitted on brackets or stands where
they will be readily seen by any
person following an escape route.
Fire extinguishers should be
securely hung on wall brackets.
Where this is impractical
extinguishers should be located on
suitable extinguisher stands so the
extinguisher is not in direct contact
with the floor.
If wall mounted the carrying handle
of larger, heavier extinguishers
should be 1 metre from the floor
but smaller extinguishers with total
mass up to and including 4Kg
should be mounted so that the
carrying handle is 1.5 metres from
the floor.
If possible extinguishers should be
sited in such a way that it is not
necessary to travel more than 30
metres from the site of a fire to
reach an extinguisher.
Siting- Fire Blankets

Do not put your blanket too close
to your cooker, you may not reach
it in the event of a fire.
14
Testing and Maintenance
Monthly (Fire Extinguishers)
A visual user check on the fire extinguishers
should be carried out…






Ensure that they are in their
designated position,
… are unobstructed
…. have not been discharged or
tampered with,
…have not lost pressure where
extinguishers are fitted with
pressure indicator,
Have not suffered any obvious
damage such as dents to the casing.
Record the inspection In the fire
safety logbook
Monthly (Fire Blanket)
 Ensure each fire blanket is correctly
located in the designated place;
 ….each fire blanket is unobstructed
and visible;
 … the operating instructions of
each fire blanket are clean and
legible and face outwards;
 each fire blanket container is not
obviously damaged and that the
hand hold devices are visible and
undamaged
 … any tamper indicators of each fire
blanket, where fitted, are not
broken or missing.
 Record the inspection In the fire
safety logbook
Annual
 All businesses, are required to carry
out annual servicing of their fire
extinguishers and fire blankets.
 To complete this work in
accordance to the relevant BSI
standards the work must be carried
out by a competent person
15
The result must be recorded and if failures
are detected, these must be remedied as
soon as possible
Fire Safety Management
Emergency Action
Recommendation
There is currently no Emergency Action Plan
in place.
The emergency action plan should include
the following:
 how people will be warned if there
is a fire;
 where people should assemble
 identification of key escape routes,
how
 how the fire and rescue service,
and any other necessary services,
will be called and who will be
responsible for doing this;
 arrangements for fighting the fire;
You could include a sketch showing
essential features such as:
 the layout of the site,
 escape routes
 the number, type and location of
fire-fighting equipment available,
for example extinguishers and fire
blankets;
Inspections and Record Keeping
Regular inspections will need to take place, to
identify and remedy any fire safety
deficiencies, and this should include
firefighting equipment, warning systems,
emergency lighting, emergency routes and
signage to ensure that they are still in place
Recommendation
The records should be kept in a specified
place on the premises and should include:
 details of any significant findings
from the fire risk assessment and
any action taken;
 testing of fire warning systems,
including weekly alarm tests
 testing of the emergency lighting
provision;
 testing and maintenance of fire
extinguisher and fire blankets etc.
16
Recommendation
Review of the Fire Risk Assessment
The fire risk assessment is required to be kept
live by at least an annual review.
The fire risk assessment can be reviewed
“in-house” using the proforma contained in
additional information.
Should any change be considered
“significant” than the Fire Risk Assessor
should be contacted.
17
Action Plan
and
Additional Information
18
Fire Safety Action Plan
Fire hazards – Elimination and Control
Ref
Action relating to
1
2
Ensure that arrangements are in place for the
sweeping and cleaning of the flues for all wood
burning stoves- 6 monthly recommended.
Provide guests with information about safe
cooking and include it the welcome booklet for
reference
Priority
Attention from
Action by date
3
Responsible
Person
Within 8 weeks
3
Responsible
Person
Within 8 weeks
2
Responsible
Person
Within 4 weeks
3
Responsible
Person
Within 8 weeks
2
Responsible
Person
Within 4 weeks
Date rectified or
followed up
Fire Detection and Alarm
3
4
Ensure that all fire detectors are tested weekly, as
outlined in the significant findings, and record the
outcomes in the Fire Safety Logbook.
Ensure that arrangements are in place for the
annual maintenance of the fire detection system or as manufacturer recommends
Emergency Lighting
5
Provide additional means of emergency
illumination on the first floor and ensure the
system is tested weekly and record the outcomes
in the Fire Safety Logbook.
1
Fire Fighting Equipment
6
7
Provide additional firefighting equipment as
outlined and site as outlined in the significant
findings
Ensure that the fire extinguishers are subjected to
a monthly inspection and an annual service as
outlined in the significant findings and record the
outcomes in the Fire Safety Logbook.
2
Responsible
Person
Within 4 weeks
2
Responsible
Person
Within 4 weeks
2
Responsible
Person
Within 4 weeks
4
Responsible
Person
Within 52
weeks
Fire Safety Management
8
9
Create and communicate an Emergency Action
Plan so that all guests are made aware of the
action on hearing the alarm or discovering a fire.
This should be included in the welcome pack.
Ensure that the Fire Risk Assessment is reviewed at
least annually to confirm that the contents are still
valid and appropriate.
2
FIRE SAFETY MANAGEMENT PLAN
FIRE SAFETY PLAN
PERSON WITH OVERALL RESPONSIBILITY
FOR FIRE SAFETY
RESPONSIBLE PERSON
Name: Charmaine Brooks
POSITION
Role: Owner
FIRE RISK ASSESSMENT
PERSONS RESPONSIBLE FOR
CARRYING OUT AND REVIEW
MAINTENANCE PROGRAMME
 FIRE ALARM TEST
(Weekly Test)
 EMERGENCY LIGHTING
(Weekly Test)
 FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT
(Weekly Inspection and Annual Service)
EMERGENCY ACTION PLAN
PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR
PRODUCTION AND REVIEW
RESPONSIBLE PERSON
Name: Bryan Morgan
POSITION
Role : Fire Risk Assessor
RESPONSIBLE PERSON
Name:
POSITION
Role: House Keeper
RESPONSIBLE PERSON
Name:
POSITION
Role:
STAFF TRAINING


TESTING AND INSPECTION OF EQUIPMENT
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
RESPONSIBLE PERSON
Name:
POSITION
Role:
(Example)
1
EMERGENCY ACTION PLAN
ASSEMBLY POINT
THE CAR PARK
ACTION ON DISCOVERY OF FIRE







SOUND THE ALARM by shouting “FIRE”
LEAVE THE UNIT BY THE NEAREST OR SAFEST ROUTE
REPORT TO THE ASSMBLY POINT
CALL THE FIRE BRIGADE BY PHONE- ENSURE FULL ADDRESS IS PROVIDED
LIAISE WITH THE FIRE BRIGADE ON THEIR ARRIVAL
ONLY ATTEMPT TO TACKLE SMALL FIRES IF CONFIDENT TO DO SO
DO NOT PUT YOURSELF AT RISK
ACTION ON HEARING ALARM




LEAVE E THE HOUSE BY THE NEAREST ROUTE
REPORT TO THE ASSEMBLY POINT
CALL THE FIRE BRIGADE BY PHONE- ENSURE FULL ADDRESS S PROVIDED
LIAISE WITH THE FIRE BRIGADE ON THEIR ARRIVAL
CALLING THE FIRE SERVICE
To call the Fire and Rescue Service in an emergency, use the nearest telephone and
dial 999 or the European number, 112.
The fire control operator will now ask you for details of the emergency, such as;
 What the emergency is
 Where the emergency is
 The nearest town
 Any landmarks that will assist the fire crews in finding the incident
 Whether anyone is in immediate danger
2
Fire Risk Assessment Review Proforma
The Fire Risk Assessment (FRA) should be under constant review. By completing the
routine daily, weekly and annual checks, you’ll be aware of any new fire risks as they
occur. However the FRA should be formally reviewed at a period of no longer than 12
months.
Name of person undertaking the review
Date review undertaken
Premises name and location
Yes
No
1
Have there been any major structural changes since the last review?
2
Have there been any changes in fire legislation that affect you?
3
Have any new sources of ignition been introduced on to the premises?
4
Have any new flammable materials been introduced on to the premises?
5
Have there been significant personnel changes? Is the fire training in place still
adequate? Do you need to appoint new Fire Wardens?
3
N/A
How to cook safely
There are several things that can be do to prevent fires in the kitchen. Make sure
you don’t get distracted when you are cooking, and:

take pans off the heat or turn the heat down if you're called away from the
cooker, eg by a phone call

take care if you’re wearing loose clothing as it can catch fire easily

don't cook if you have been drinking alcohol or taken prescription drugs - you may
get drowsy or lose concentration
Cooker and toaster safety
You can prevent fires when using a cooker or a toaster by following these simple tips:

turn saucepans so the handles don't stick out over the edge of the hob or over
another ring

double check that the cooker is off when you have finished cooking

make sure tea-towels aren’t hanging over the cooker and don't put oven gloves on
top of a hot cooker

keep the oven, hob and grill clean - built-up fat and bits of food can start a fire

check that the toaster is clean and well away from curtains and empty the crumb
tray regularly
Cooking with oil
You need to be especially careful when you are deep-fat frying or cooking with oil because
hot oil can catch fire easily. Make sure you:

don’t fill a chip pan or other deep-fat fryer more than one-third full of oil

use a thermostat-controlled deep-fat fryer, which will make sure the fat doesn’t
get too hot
Dealing with a fire in your kitchen
If a pan catches fire in your kitchen:

don't move it because it will be very hot

turn off the heat if it's safe to do so - don’t lean over the pan to reach the controls

don’t use a fire extinguisher on a pan of oil because the force of the extinguisher
can spread the fire. Never use water on chip pan fires as this will cause a fireball

get out, stay out and call 999
If an electrical appliance catches fire, don’t throw water on it. If it is safe to do so, you may
be able to put out the fire immediately by:

pulling the appliance’s plug out

switching off the power at the fuse box
A FIRE BLANKET IS PROVIDED BUT PLEASE DO NOT PUT
YOURSELF AT RISK
4
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