Keyboard Scaling for Fun and Profit

Keyboard Scaling for Fun and Profit
1
The Independent News
Magazine for Ensontq Users
‘I
Keyboard Scaling for Fun and Profit
Sam S. tllitrts
Articles:
Keyboard Sealing for Fun and Profit
The original idea behind keyboard scal-
ing, and still its most useful function
today, is to add a bit of ooomph to the
filter as notes are played higher up the
keyboard. In other words, let’s say you
create a big, fat sawtooth brass patch
that rattles the rafters down low. Imagine that the filter cutoff frequency is
set to 100 Ha or something, which
means that the filter is not letting any
Keyboard scaling is a wonderful thing.
Now, I'm not talking about those musical exercises the piano lady made you
play each week. (“Play me an F# minor
scale with both hands, young man, up
two octaves and back down. You did
practice it, didn't you?") [TI-I — Editrixf
piano teacher Jane rolls her eyes.] No,
instead, Pm talking about the Keyboard
frequencies over IUD Hz slip through. If
the filter cutoff frequency were unchanging, when higher notes were
played, still nothing over 100 Ha would
get through, and high notes would be
Personalizing Your KT-To or KT-BE
Robby Barman
4
SQIKSIKT Sounds: Sawing Analogs
Mari: Clifton .............................................. 6
Rhodes's Rhodes
.le_fl'Rl:ad‘es . ............................................. .. B
Cheap Junk
Torry Ferrara
ll
Five Gets (Maybe I5) for Classic Loopers
Pat Fiartigaa ............................................ 13
The DP!-4 and MIDI
Steve Bylrarst ........................................... 14
pretty much silent as a result. Keyboard
scaling lets the filter cutoff frequency
track the keyboard, so that when higher
notes are played, the cutoff frequency is
raised as well, so that all notes will seem
to play with a balanced timbre.
Bifurcated Boards - SQ-EUIESQ-l
Kiri: Sliakard ........................................... ll’
Tech Star - Sample Collection Sets
Robby Barman
l5
r
Keyboard scaling is also commonly
used to emphasise higher notes even
Basement Tapes: Bird & Surface Noise
Daniel Mandel
23
The Minimoog sported two Keyboard
Control switches that would allow you
to apply discreet amounts of keyboard
more than lower notes. A trumpet, for
instance, is much brighter when played
higher, as it takes a lot more air and effort to get those high notes out. To
Scaling feature found on most every
synthesizer since the days of Moog and
Arpl
scaling to the filter. These days, things
are a lot more versatile. Ensoniq, in
particular, uses keyboard scaling
(usually encrypted as KBD, or KEYED)
mimic this in a synth patch, the keyboard scaling would be set to open the
filter even more as higher notes are
as a modulator which can be routed darn
near anywhere and applied in a wide
played.
range of amounts, both positive and
negative. I-Iow can that possibly be fun
or profitable, you ask? Well, let's erramine furtl1er....
with the modulation possibilities on Ensoniq keyboards, however, there is so
much more that can be done with keyboard scaling. The most utilitarian func-
|
lSSUE ;'\iUlv‘lBEF£ l25, $2.5:-U
Reviovrs:
Rogtuictr Sintt:
Random Notes ........................................... 2
Ensoniq Clinic Dates
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Trartsoniq-Net
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Hacker Reinitialization - SQIKSIKT Series
Subtractive Synthesis
Clarl: Salisbury .................................... 20
Classifieds ............................................... 24
The Interface ............................................ 25
Current 0.5. ............................................. 30
Hacker Booteeq
31
?-ill?”-firl"--tliiiiil, .1“*-H r-‘Dll“
l
tion Ihave found is using the keyboard scaling to modulate
the output. Even the ESQ-1 allows you to do this in a
wonderful fashion, applying either negative or positive
amounts of scaling. I have used this to create a split patch
without using the Split,r‘Layer page at all. Simply fade one os-
cillator out at the upper end of the keyboard, and fade the
other ones in, all withthe KBD or KBD2 modulation on the
output.
The newer Ensoniq synths allow you to specify a key acne in
which the keyboard scaling works. This is particularly handy
for fading out a wave at the top of its range, when it starts to
suffer from aliasing. For an illustration, play the factory
FOLK-FLUTE patch on a TS-10; you'll hear noticeable aliasing noise on the top key. Now, select the CHLFFLUTE wave,
and go to the Output page. Set the KBD-SCALE to -93,
which fades the sound out rapidly as higher keys are played,
and then set the key acne {LCIII-II KEY) from C6 to CS,
which restricts the keyboard scaling effect to this area of the
keyboard. Now check out that highest note. It still has a little
bit of noise (from the other wavefonn), but is much improved. (Solo just the CHIFFLUTE wave to hear how the
wave dramatically fades out up high.)
You cart apply keyboard scaling to the pitch, to affect the
tuning of a patch, in order to do microtonal things. One of the
first articles I wrote for the Hacker, back in February 1987,
showed how to do this on the ESQ-1, even to the entent of
reversing the keyboard such that the lower one played, the
higher the pitches got. This doesn't work, incidentally, on the
TS boards. Using KBD as a modulator with a mod atnount of
-99 on the Pitch Mods page merely negates the keyboard
tracking, leaving every key playing the same pitch. {Of
course, you always have the pitch table to do any of these
weird things that you might want to.)
A nice, though subtle, effect is to use keyboard scaling as a
modulator of the LFO's rate, when programming a horn or
woodwind patch with vibrato. This way, higher notes will
have a slightly faster vibrato than lower notes, adding a
degree of realism to the patch. In general, a slight bit of
keyboard scaling applied to any number of sources adds a
randomness that is important in creating animated, non-static
sounds. In prograrmnlng a pad, for instance, I might have dif-
ferent waves sweeping back and forth in the stereo field, and
that motion {via the LFO) can be randomised by applying
KBD to the LFO rates in varying amounts.
In the sampler world, keyboard scaling has worked wonderfully for tracking the envelope times when I‘ve done sound
effects samples. Let‘s say I have a sample of a church bell,
but the real sound is longer than my memory allows me to
capture. In other words, when the sample memory runs out,
the bell is still ringing, and the sample then cuts off quite
abruptly and urmaturally. It is a simple matter to program an
envelope that fades out the bell nicely just as the sample
ends. However, what happens when that sample is played
back a fifth higher? Now, the sample ends much quicker, but
the envelope takes just as long to do the fade-out. The result:
another abrupt and unnatural cutoff. The solution: press
Edit-Env 3, and scroll to the KBD TIME SCALING page. Set
it to +3 8, then program the envelope to work correctly. It will
now translate to every other key just fine.
Keyboard scaling isn’t the seniest feature on any keyboard,
but you can see that it sure is a handy thing, especially when
used creatively. Now, isn‘t that a lot of fun? As far as making
a profit goes, I'll guess you'll have to program and sell some
sounds or something. Or maybe write an article about keyboard scaling.... Bio: Sarn Mirns is a professional keyboardist and programrner, and the owner of Syntaur Prodturtions in Houston. He
currently works with Malaysian pop star Zainal Ahidin, and
tours throughout the world.
RND(¢p)
Ensonlq Announcements
In a break from their usual policy, Ensoniq is pre-armonncing
the development of the 1682-fit rniiting board. Projected to ship
in January, the 1682-fit is a I6-chamtel, S-bus rackmonntable
miner with onboard effects. It is designed to provide you with a
full-featured recording miner that cart be rack-mounted, for the
ultimate in portability. Top features include:
-
16 channels (32 total inputs for mittdown)
with input trim, input overload LED, pan.-‘balance, mute
- S mono channels
with 3-band EQ {hillo shelving +,"- 15 dB, 12 kHz high, EU Hz
low, sweepahle mid - Zlllll to S kHz, +,l- 15 dB, bypass)
-
4 stereo channels
with hiflo shelving EQ (+,l- 15 dB, 12. kHz high, Bil Ha low)
High—qual.ity mic preamps on channels 1-B
Phantom power
Phase switch on channels l and 5
fill mm faders
Solo-in-place (post pan}
effective on all channels, effects retinas, tape returns, and bnsses
Insert points on channels 1-S, basses l-S, and LIR (mains)
All balanced inputs
all insert points are noise-cancelling
CD and phono inputs
-
1
-
S basses (with solo-in-place, insert points, and mute switches}
4 Ann sends
3 stereo (post}l1 mono (pro or post}
4 stereo effects retums [tvith bus assign, solo-in-place, and mute
switches}
- Multi-position jack pod for tabletop or rack mounting (10 spaces}
- Ettternal 2U rack power supply
- DB-3'? enpansion-bus connector {compatible with Mackie tm
S tape returns [+41-lfl switchable, with solo-in-place and mute
The 1632-fit. is projected to retail for under $250!]. More news
switches}
S flip switches (1 per tape rettun)
routes tape returns to channels 1-S (for access to EQ) i routes
channels 1-S to tape retums
2-track send-return
+41!-ill switchable
r
24-bit, true stereo inlout
-
1 ESP chip {same as itt our DP,l4-|- and DPR effects processors)
fiver 35 algorithms
I
I
-
354 Presets [3 banks of 123}
MIDI In (for receiving be-nltlprogratn changes)
Ground-compensated outputs
Special sampler outputs
eliminates feedback when routing multiple channels (up to entire
miner output) to sampler with monitor tltru
2 headphone outputs
1) front panel (stereo)
2} ntirmr of Ans l {mono} for cue send
Control room outputs
with mute switch (doesnt affect 2-track or headphone outputs)
2 mono switches
1) switches control room outputs to mono
2) monos frequencies below 100 Ha on LIR mitt output
Talltbaclt mic (assignable to Ann 1 or busses 1-S}
2 twelve-segment LE.lIis (switchable to monitor any 2 busses,
Llll mains, or any soloed channel)
S-bus expander}
when it's ready to ship — start saving nowl
Hacker News
Good news for aol members who receive eTH — aol is now
able to receive the e-mail Hacker complete in one big file.
We‘ll be changing ottr mailing program to reflect this. Please
let us lcnow if for some reason you'd prefer to get eTH in
smaller bundles.
Speaking of aol... there's an aol user going by the name “[email protected]" This is NOT us.
French readers may want to check out the French Ensoniq fan-
aine, Ensoniq Spirit Club. Contact: Philippe Lefevre, 25 rue des
Chenes, S2340 Dunes, France.
And finally — we made a little goof in last month's Hypersoniq announcement for the new KT Set I from Syntaur. The
correct price for the PCMCIA card version is $9195.
Apologies to Syntaur and any confused customers.
Ensoniq Clinic Dates
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Hctndiwork Personalizing Your
KT-76 or KT—88
Port ll: System*‘MlDl
I-Ii again. Time to wcnd our way further through the System*l'vl1D1 landscape of our KTs in order to f'md ourselves
a more comfortable way of musical life. When we left
off, we had traversed the mighty tuning page, climbed the
towering pitch bend and swam (swam? swimmed?) the
raging pitch tables. No need backtracking now, eh,
pioneers?
Let's select a Sound to work with. Press the Select Sound
button. Press the Bank button just below it until you’ve
got the little “r:" in the upper left-hand corner of the dis-
Robby Barman
how much harder you have to play to get Studio Keys to
its fullest volume and brightness. Unless you’re a mighty,
mighty muscled musician, you're likely to find this tiring,
real quick.
So what's a spud to do? Well, at SYNTH VEL1, the lowest SYNTH it-‘EL setting, you can play quite gently and
still get all the dynamics available in Studio Keys; of
course, you may find that you have to hold back your
playing style to keep notes from honking out too loudly
play. Press the button above the “O” and the button below
the “Z” to get to Studio Keys, the Sound in ROM location
U2. Press the System"'MIDI button and then the button
when you least expect (or desire) them to. On the other
hand, to make Studio Keys work for you at SYNTH
VEL6, you'd need hands of steel to maintain such a high
degree of force for very long.
below the number “1.“ The upper line on the display
should be flashing. If it's not, press the left arrow button
once.
out which one is right for you, try them all. Play normally
To Thine Fingerbones Be True
The first parameter we see a-flashing here is “Touch.”
Your KT wants to know how hard you play, since many
of the Sounds in the KT change as you play harder or
softer, and it seeks only to be your obedient servant.
Sounds commonly get louder with hard keystrikes and
quieter with soft ones; some get brighter when you play
with full force and smoother when you lay back. And yet
we all play with different touches, with differing amounts
of force — what may be your hardest lteystrike would be
someone else's softest. The Touch parameter allows you
to customize the KT so that when you play as hard as you
personally feel comfortable playing, the Sounds respond
Fortunately, there are all the steps in between. To figure
at each setting; you’ll soon find the one that lets you play
comfortably and still get at the expressivity programmed
into Studio Keys. Ensoniq has set up their Sounds so that
once you find a Touch setting that works with one sound,
you’ve probably found the one that‘ll work with them all.
Readers with over-ambitious (or under-coordinated) button-pressing fingers may have noticed that there are other
settings below and above SYNTH VEL1-6.
The settings below are PLANO \l'EL1 through PLKNO
VEL6. They’re identical to the SYNTI-I VELs, with one
key difference (Ow, I'm sorry, I didn't mean itl}: With
the PIANO settings, in order to emulate the touch of a
In the MIDI world, the force you play with is referred to
real 88, extremely soft keystrikes produce, well, nut bin‘
- just as they do on a real piano — whereas, with the
SYNTH settings, extremely soft strikes produce extremely soft notes.
as “velocity,” so most of the settings you'll find here have
“VEL“ (for “velocity“) in their names. Use the up or
The two settings above the SYNTH VEL suite (by the
properly.
down buttons to set Touch to SYNTH VEL1. Play a Middle C on the keyboard very softly and listen to what it
sounds like. Now gradually play harder and harder and
listen to how the sound changes: Studio Keys gets louder
and brighter with harder keystrikes (aka “greater
velocity“). Now press the up button to set Touch to
SYNTH VEL6. Play some more and see if you can feel
seashore) are FIXED V 64 and FIXED ‘$127, for “Fixed
Velocity 64“ and “Fixed Velocity 127." Remember that
we said that playing force is described in temts of
velocity? Well, velocity is measured on a scale of U to
127. These two options allow you to set the keyboard so
that, no matter how hard or soft you play, notes will
sound as if you had struck the keyboard exactly half as
hard as possible — with FIXED V 64 — or as if you were
banging the poor thing with a large mallet-FIXED V127.
This can be handy when you want every note to have exactly the same volume or timbral quality, such as when
you're sequencing snare drum or bass drum beats. It's
also handy for achieving that robotic, synthetic quality so
Transoniqs-Net
HELP WITH QUE TIONS
All of the individuals listed below are volunteers! Please take that into consideration when calling. If you get I. recording and leave a message, let ‘em
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_
What We Work Best Under
Once you've finished finding your own optimal Touch
setting, press the right arrow button once-and feel the
Pressure building.
The KT keyboards can sense how hard their keys are
being pressed down, and can use that awareness as a
device to change the quality of the Sound being played.
This can be programmed into a Sound when you want it
to change without having to take your hands off the keyboard to twiddle a wheel or poke a button somewhere.
info, and the liire.
Let's demonstrate this (not the twiddling and poking
All Ensoniq Gear - Electric Factory (Enaostlrfs Jtustralia distributor}.
|nail.com.au,-"--elfa; or e-mail their resident clinician, Michael Allen, at [email protected]:o.com.au. Phone calls, Business hours — lfictoria. {D3} 43D-5933.
part). Press the Select Sound button, and then the lower 5
button to call up the ROM 05 Sound Breathy Tenor. Play
Middle C, and then press down on the keyboard. See?
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With pressure, the note acquires a vibrato.
E-mail address: ell'[email protected]; their web site at hup:Hwww.oce-
9-443-5916, fax (E4) 9-443-$393, or e-mail [email protected] {Geoff
Mason}.
TS Questions - Pat Esslinger,
T424ll,l5t‘:i2, or AOL: ESSLIP.
Internet: [email protected], Compuserve:
TS, VFX, and SD-1 Questions - Stuart I-Iosking, [email protected]
MIDI users and ASH-lli Quedions - Ariel and litlciri Dvorjetsiti, Internet:
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can also call Sincopated BBS at {Israel country code: 972} ll»-'i"Ildli35, 24
hours, 2S.BK Modem. Please Logirr as: ENSOHIQ, Password: M1131.
so-1 Questions - Philip Magnolia, 4o1--tsr-sass, 4 pm -» tans asr.
The Pressure parameter functions much like Touch did.
The question the KT wants answered is: how hard do you
wanna have to press the keyboard for the KT to notice
what you're doing?
Press the System*MlDI button. Press the up button to set
Pressure to HARD. Now play Middle C and notice how
strongly you've got to dig in to get the vibrato happening.
Since this can be a subtle thing to gauge, set Pressure to
WK Sound Programming Questions — Dara Jones, Cornpuservc: I
SOFT and, as a comparison, check out how easily pres-
SD-1, DPI4, ASH-Ill Questions _- John Cox, 609-338-5519, (NI) 5pm — S pm 1
sure can be brought in with that setting. Just as with
Touch, you'll have to experiment with all of the Pressure
options to find the one that lets you use pressure when
r1css,111a or Internet: [email protected] or call 214-asi-cars.
EST weekdays. Any time weekends.
r SQ -SEr VFX Q umtlons — Robert Romano, fill’!-S98 ' 4363 * An1' oi‘ time
- (witl1inreason_lE-ST.
you want to, and without inadvertently switching it on
should your fingers tarry a moment or two too long.
Hard Drives dc Drive Systems, Studios, lit Computers - Rob Fciner,
' tI.‘inetunes. 914-963-5318. llam-3pm EST. Compuscrve: 'i‘1D24,l255.
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Software Call anytime. If message, 24-htnrr callback. {SE5} T92-9231. Cornpuserve; 722li3,23ll=3.
‘
That's it until our next installment, when we get to play
._
-|-qr-an
filial
_
KT fUt}l.Slt".l —
--
-t
ESQ-1 A-ND SQ-Sll Questions — Tom McCa.ffrey. ESQLTPA. 215-S30-D241,
before 1 1 pm Eastern Time.
_P-
1!...
at-1."
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Leave name, nutnbu, address. 24-ltr Callbacit.
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trtttsicion waiting to be swolioweti up the brilliant outset-
so-1, xs-sr,
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31';-‘-462-B-146. stcc am to tctoo pm ms.
trrri splendor of New York's
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tutor Users - Eric Baragar, Canadian aunt Users Group, {E13} ass» sass
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recent album is "Rings and
Rings."
How Sounds Work
Port XVI: Sowing Analogs
Mark Clhfton
Analog flourished while I incubated. Nestled in the womb,
my only musical choices spanning heartbeat and the occasional curious tap tap from the outside, I was, you could
say, somewhat behind on the latest technology. While the
around your bloody dripping head surrounded by a
hundred flopping beached whales and oscillators that fluctuated like a UFO videotape and you loved it!" I did truly
big kids, the really big kids, trekked to the local music
patch cables, the physicality of actual pulsating oscillators, electricity translated directly to sound, no samples
or bits of code to decipher, just wires and transistors —
real electronic music. And the opportunity for sonic
deviance, of course, unbelievable!
store to play with their new polyphonic wonder toys, I was
hanging out in the toddler section of the neighborhood
Toys ‘R’ Us, banging on rainbow-colored xylophones. As
for my long relationship with Ensoniq, well, I was around
eight years old when the Mirage came out. (Ed. —
.5'l:eesh.,l My axe of choice at that time had half-size keys
and a picture of Kermit the Frog on it.
The time did come, though, when I found a nice little
music store to make my playground. Quite a big music
store, actually, packed floor to ceiling with wondrous,
appallingly expensive mirth, an FAD Schwartz for the
tonally-inclined. It was also, by some strange twist of
economic fate, the only registered Ensoniq dealer within a
hundred miles of my digs in Northern Virginia, not exactly the most sparse of population centers. The forty-five
minute drive I was forced to endure was well worth it,
love it, the expression afforded by those little knobs and
The Used Keyboard department has since been moved to
another room and the vintage aspect of its lineup has been
pared down considerably, probably due to the decreased
supply and increased worth of its elderly former denizens.
What seem to be worthless old bones to the average individual can be priceless treasure to the anthropologist,
and everyone seems to be into anthropology these days.
So now I go to look at the new stuff, the Wavedrums and
Nord Leads and Turbo ASRs, while ttuning to current
available technology to resurrect that old sound, specifically, my loyal SQ-1. Of course, it has always been in-
though, as I got to hobnob with all sorts of members of the
musical elite, real musicians, some of whom played on actual stages and record albums for a living {yippeel). And,
sisted that analog, like most of the other non-digital
insuuments we've explored here, can never be adequately
sampled or imitated. This is an old, completely valid argument that I won‘t even attempt to refute. It is accepted that
of course, their wares: DX’s and D-50's, K-250's and
S-50's, S-1000's, M-l’s, EPS’s and VFX’s (it was around
that time), all ripe and quivering for the touch of my
the sounds we create here must be a sort of cyborg variant,
as realistic as possible in appearance and character despite
the chips and servos that lie just beneath their skin.
greasy fingers.
This place was cool, no doubt about it, but the real juicy
red apple was right next door in the equally spacious room
labeled “Used Keyboards." Here they had everything from
broken $100 Casio Cheesemasters to floor models of the
latest turbocharged studio rocket-synths. And it was here
that I played my first lvlinimoog (and a couple other of
Mr. M's namesakes), my first Rhodes, my first Wurlitzer,
my first cheesy combo organ, and a whole heap of Janos.
It was here that I fell in love with analog and all those
glory days of yore where (cue Grumpy Old Man voice},
“If you werenit careful you could program a sound that
would pop your eardrums right out of your head, take the
fingers right of your hand, and cause half the whales on
the North Atlantic coast to beach. And no matter how hard
you tried those oscillators would always go out of tune.
Pretty soon you were waving your bloody fingerless hands
“UFO Bass" is a buzzy, gnashing, fat Oberheim-ish timbre
that, despite its name, also makes a potent lead sound in
its upper register. I chose this sound because it displays all
the basics of analog character and programming as well as
being a good all purpose Swiss Army Knife type patch for
your arsenal. Everyone should have at least one buzzy
analog synth in their sonic lineup, no matter what kind of
music they do. Try dris one for your next portentous
20-minute pro'g solo, or play some pentatonics in the
lower octaves and check yourself into industrial heaven.
Programming analog sounds is also a good way to learn
the basics of general synth programming, since most
modem synthesizers use the same parameters and signal
routings as their forefathers. Only the waveform sources
and a few disparate parameters have changed.
Oscillators 1 and 2 are basically identical, though one has
been tuned down an octave and both are tuned apart a
couple of cents for a fat, chorused unison effect. Oscillator
Resonant filter sweeps and the like can be imitated by
sweeping the transwave with the Mod parameter located in
3 was mainly added to further beef up the sound, especially in the lower range. This is supposed to be a bass, after
all. Glide has been set to MINIMOOE, which simulates a
the Waveform section. Try using the modwheel, modpedal
or timbre slider as your modulators. Envelope 2, in tandem
with the usual filter mod duties, can also be called on
(even subtly, such as to “whaaa" an attack) to create the
Ivlinimoog‘s monophonic operation. Most analog synths,
until the later days, were monophonic. Polyphonic operation was limited to two, maybe four four voices if you
were rich enough to pay for the extra oscillators.
response of resonant filters. You will then have your filters and your transwaves sweeping at the same time,
making them sotmd like one integrated whole, as if only a
single knob is being twisted.
Sawtooth, the overwhelming analog waveform of choice,
was used as the basis for “UFO Bass," though the patch is
really meant as a template onto which you can apply any
waveform you want. lvlost analog synths in the universe
were capable of creating only five waveforms: saw,
Okay, so we have the waveforms all lined up, but there
still seems to be something missing, a certain “liveliness“
in the sawtooth samples. This is where a bit of completely
modem programming comes in. You will notice that I
square, sine, pulse and random noise. Most of these, with
the exception of pulse, are available in the SQ’s wavetable
under the WAVEFORM category (the Noise Loop wave is
outlined by Jim Grote a good half-decade ago in issue 66
(“VFX Sawtooth Tips") and myself in installments I and
located in the INI-LARMONIC section). Pulse waves sound
somewhat like square waves, though their timbre can be
changed by varying the width of the pulses. Try the
Pulse-X Transwaves for imitating a variety of the pulse
wave‘s characteristics. If the SQs analog waveforms strike
III of this series (issues 90 and 94, respectively). Basically, the waveform’s pitch has been permanently bent upwards with a Pitch Mod on FULL ON with a value of +62
{approximately an octave) while the waveforrn's keyrange
has been shifted down an octave using the Oct-Semi-Fine
you as a bit weak or you want the sound of resonant filters, which most analog synths had but the SQ lacks, try
transwaves as livelier stand-ins for the usual choices.
tuning controls located at the beginning of the Pitch section. That’s about all I’ll say about it in this article, and I
invite you to refer back to those other three articles for the
Frog: u|=o sass
By: Mark Clifton “HP
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pickier scientific details behind this procedure, but in the
the modpedal all the way up and turn off the pitch glide
end it helps to produce a buzzier, more harmonically rich
sound. This technique has uaditionally been used with
sawtooth sounds, but I've found that it works equally well
for all of those analog waves, each of which could use a
for polyphonic operation.
bit of perking up.
Simplicity is the key to programming good analog sounds.
Modern conveniences should only be used to imitate old
fashioned ones, such as using transwaves to simulate filter
Q. Route as many parameters as you can to real-time controllers, such as the modwheel, modpedal or timbre slider.
The mom live tweaking of a sound you do the more it
sotmds like you have all of those sliders and knobs laid
out at your disposal. Not everything is modulatable on the
SQ that would have been on an analog synth, though, such
as envelope" times and LFO speeds, or even changing
waveforms. Oh well, such is the folly of modem synth
programming. Gone, at least for now, are the days of real-
time sound sculpting and dynamics. Unless, of course, you
feel like punching through reams of menus from your little
LCD display while onstage playing your big solo (don‘t
laugh, it can, and has been done -- just not too often).
Fast jittery, out of sync LFOs, routed to the modwheel,
serve to further beef up the sound (you know I like ‘em
big and juicy). The filters, at least on Oscillators 1 and 2,
are wide open and flailing. Oscillator 3 is somewhat
muted, serving to balance out the brighmess of the other
two. The filters are modulated entirely by Envelope two,
mainly to get a distinctive “owww" (you see, programming analog is all about phonetics) damping sound on
Envelopes are bone simple, with hard attacks and tight
releases. Feel free to mess with these, especially the attack, if you please. A very slight bit of velocity sensitivity
has been programmed into both envelopes l and 2.
Velocity sensitivity wasn‘t something that was very common in the analog domain, so if you‘re aiming for com-
plete accuracy you might want to nix this parameter.
Effects were like potato chips in the days when analog
flourished. If there's anything the ‘E-Us and ‘?0s should be
remembered for it should probably be a shamefully immoral and gratuitous overuse of flanging. So knock your-
self out with the effects. Some ptuists like to keep their
analog sounds dry or with just a hint of reverb. But hey, if
you dig phasing and distortion and chorus and chains of
twittering stomp boxes, that‘s cool. I personally chose the
B-Voice Chorusing for this one, mainly because I didn't
think it was fat and obscene enough already. It also serves
to add a nice warm resonance to the sound, further helping
to simulate those analog filters. Chorusing amount is controlled by the modpedal, along with the filters. This gives
that soft pad soturd you get with pedal up a silkier, more
voluptuous quality, surrounding it in a resonant cloud.
You can tell when you plug this sound in why everyone
loves analog so much: it just sounds cool, like a synthe-
sizer should. It’s fun, it’s offensive, and completely
expressive, and, if you really have to bring that part up,
kind of educational. Pile this one away with your B-3
keyup. All filters are closed about two thirds of the way
sounds in that naughty cookie jar of chocolaty sonic
by the modpedal, allowing you to do sweeps with your
foot. There is also a nice pad sound to be had if you put
decadence and I'll be back next month with another kind
of chorusing. —
Rhodes’s Rhodes
Jefi’Rhodes
Haven‘t been around for a while... it's been the summer of
broken hearts and broken hips. And mine‘s still broken
(the hip, that is) or at least it still feels that way! The
cumbersome examples of "pianos" that sounded nothing
like a piano but rather like a cross between a bell and an
electric guitar. They were heavy and broke down on a
Medicine Men say stay off those steps to the studio as
regular basis. But they became one of the most popular
“portable” keyboards ever made. By the time John Travolta was Watchamatterwidyu’n in Scrttrday Night Fever, 8
out of IO keyboard players were hooked on Stage and
much as possible so of course I blindly obey... yeah, right.
Let‘s go back, way back, to the keyboard Mesozoic
period. Particular to this period along with Retum to
Forever and Disco (they say it’s coming back) was the
Fender Rhodes and the Rhodes electric pianos. They were
Suitcase (amp and speakers built in) Rhodes pianos.
By 1933, the last Rhodes piano rolled off the line and the
TS-19 PTOQI
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name “Rhodes” was sold to Roland for some later use.
The OX7 with its sine wave architecture and bell-like
timbres re-created the Rhodes, but did it with an overEQed Dyno-My Rhodes approach. (The Dyno-My Rhodes
company supertuned the factory Rhodes, then fitted it with
EQ, Chorus etc. If memory serves, this “treatment” ran
use Velocity as their MODSRC. The harmonic content of
each note on the Rhodes changed with dynamics as it does
on acoustic pianos. And the pitch was subject to amp-
litude: notes hit hardest changed a bit in pitch, both as the
note was hit and as it decayed. Thus Voice I’s Output is
modulated by Pitch.
over $3k. Whewl)
The suitcase Rhodes had a warm stereo vibrato. Alas,
we’re limited to mono here because of our chosen effect
#66 (user) ‘VCF-- IJISTORTION-- VCF. All LFO rates are
Today, in part because of those early DX? patches, every
synth company in the universe offers Rhodes patches in
their modules and keyboards. This, natch, holds true for
Ensoniq.
fairly slow and on our TS (for voices l, 2 and 3) the
MODSRC = Pedal. The original had its speed and depth
potentiometers mounted close to the keyboard, on the
front panel to the far left. Both voices l and 2 are use Envelope l (each has an active Env 1 value on the Pitchlvlods
Many of the factory Rhodes patches included it the TS
series are quite good. They tend, though, to have a DXish
edge to them. (Even when they don‘t want to... this may
he because our ears have been uained to “expect” this par-
easel
ticular sound.) The old Rhodes worked with actual hammers. The hammers’ hard rubber tips struck a thin metal
rod called a tine, causing it to vibrate. The vibration was
captured by a small pick-up at the tip of the tine. The har-
ANA-WAREZ and EL-PLANO 1 comprise the “body” of
our Rhodes; the stringlike ANA-WAVE2 adds some
warmth to “Cut-Rhodes.” Be aware that many analog
synths had to rely on similar waves to roughly ap-
der you hit the key the more the tine vibrated, the louder
the note. But often, new factory Rhodes boards had the
proximate an electric piano. The AGOGO-BEL wave
works really well for the simulation of the tine being
tine and pick-up in a configuration that just made it sound
A lot of factory Rhodes owners went to great lengths to
struck by the hammer tip (as opposed to the EL-PIANO2
wave). The envelope values for voices 1, 2, 3 and 4 are
very similar to one another. Really, the Rhodes had fairly
simple ADSR structure. Note the shorter Decay(1) value
make their instruments come alive, paying particular at-
for voice 4, the AGOGO-BEL.
muddy.
tention to the high end. Moving the pick-ups, changing the
A surprise. Voice 2, the SAW-WAVE, can only be heard
(along with ANA-WAVI-3.2) when the Modwheel is
position of the tine with regard to pick-up, even painting
the hanmier tips with nail polish were attempts to catch
the higher frequencies. I even know a guy who hammered
tacks into the hammer tips. Sotmd obsessive? Nah. Many
of us combined this customization strategy with early
chorus units and graphic or parametric EQs. All this stuff
pushed forward. Its MODSRC=WHEEL, MODAMT=99
is on the Output Page. Also, on the Pitch Page, the
Glidemode is employed (LEGATO) using a Glidetime of
-13. The result is a classic poly-analog patch with a little
portamento. Wily this morphing‘? Who cares?
gave us the desired effect but it distorted like crazy. If you
want some idea of what this sounded like, this listen to
Effect #66 was chosen because A) it contains distortion
Chick Corea‘s “Hymn of the Seventh Galaxy."
and B) the VCF filter and Q are good for simulating the
graphic and parametric EQ’s of prehistory. Once again,
since the Fender Rhodes was a dynamic instrument, the
effect’s Destination=POST-DIST BNV AMT is modulated
Why all this background‘? Because it's important. “Cut
Rhodes“ sounds like the early George Duke Rhodes with
just a touch of choms. It's relatively thin with much of the
bottom end EQed away. But it's highly percussive; you
can hear those hammers strike. Also, it demomuates that
using alternate waveforms can provide surprising results.
This patch is pretty siraightforward.
with Velocity.
Try using “Cut-Rhodes” anywhere you'd usually choose a
Rhodes,.piano, Claviuet or guitar. 1|
Let‘s look at its makeup (with or without nail polish).
Bio: Jefikey Rlroatis has been n fceyooortlistlcomposer on
the Philadelphia Jazz and R + B scene for n period’ of time
resembling forever. He has an interest in cinema and has
developed some film courses. Jefi’ still believes in magic
Voice 1 relies on the ANA-WAVE2. Its pitch is modulated slightly by Velocity and by Envelope I which causes
some movement in the voice. Its pitch drifts back and
forth adding to the chomsing effect. Both Filters 1 and 2
i
and longs for city lights.
1c
Checlp Junk
Tony Ferraro
Welcome to the first in an occasional series dealing with
back sample synths in the music and recording industry.
sampling with your Mirage, EPS, BPS-I6 PLUS, and
ASR-ll]. The first two installments will differ sharply from
Need I mention some of the ROM waveforms found in your
Ensoniq synth, as well as many of the samples from the
EPSIASR sound library? It's high time to examine exactly
most technical articles in that technical procedures are
usually explained and discussed. Although I will be touching on these concepts, I am going to concentrate largely on
what is being sampled. Here we go.
As a music student in college and grad school {Temple
University College of Music, Columbia) I was exposed to
many unusual ideas. Some I agreed with and some I thought
were idiotic. One of my professors repeatedly stressed the
idea that music usually lagged behind the other art forms
(literature, poetry, and visual arts.) For example, Debussy’s
Prelude to the Afternoon of o Frmn was inspired by the
poem by Mallarme; the nationalist composer Mussorsky's
Pictures or on Exhibition was inspired by paintings of Rus-
sian scenes and mythology, etc. I think I am discovering
that my professor was right: Using “junk” as art has had
where some of these neat sounds are coming from, where
you can get them, what to watch out for, and how to incorporate them into your own (ahem) tonal arsenal.
Way back in the ancient days before Waveform ROM, Digital Audio Tape, compact disks (and the Walkman, for that
matter), giants roamed the earth. Keyboard-oriented bands
with name like Emerson, Lake, and Palmer; Yes; Genesis,
and Tangerine Dream and others travelled the world
non-stop playing their music to sell-out crowds in stadiums
that made the roman colosseum look small in comparison.
They halted their nomadic wandering only long enough to
record what was called a new “album” of their music which
was duplicated onto large black plastic disks called LPs. Although Ensoniq was still just a twinkle in the eye of its
precedents in the world of visual arts for many decades, as
in the early paper collage works of Picasso, as in Robert
Rauchenberg's pop art collages and “constructions,” which
consisted of old tires, machine parts, cans, etc.
founders, manufacturers large and small with names like
Moog, ARP, Oberheim, Octave Electronics, and Sequential
Circuits churned out analog mono and polyphonic syn-
Using aural “junk” or non-musical sound has its roots in the
‘fills and "Ills from the academic genre of experimental
appetites of these musical giants, their fans, and the endless
cover bands who imitated them. A universal protocol like
electronic music, musique concrete. The most prominent
MIDI was only a funlristic dream, with Control Voltage in
example of this would be the Poems electronic (I953) by
proprietary, non-standardized values still the norm.
thesizers, drum machines, controllers, and voltage-controlled sequencers in order to feed the insatiable aural
the Frenchfttmerican composer, Edgar Varese, which successfully represented modern urban life in the Industrial
Age by employing natural, industrial, and synthetic sounds
in a carefully spliced and edited analog tape collage.
Now that we are well into the '90s the aforementioned companies, for the most part, are ancient history; the bands
themselves, curiously enough, are back together. For the
past ten years, much of this gear has languished in the base-
The current musical manifestation of this has an interesting
twist. Now use is made of musical instruments long ago discarded as obsolete, and re-invigomting their timbral tone
color palette by integration into the musical mainstream via
ments and attics of people who were unable to sell it once
models like the MIDI-equipped Yamaha DX-7 hit in 1984,
as well as in the back storerooms of dealers who were unable to convince potential buyers of their great features and
the technology of sampling. In the fast- paced world of the
sound-generating capabilities.
conternperary record business, hip-hop and techno are curAlong the same line, I recall a local musical instrument
rently gaining an ever-increasing market share. Especially
ironic is the fact that the artists in question accomplished
dealer in the mid-'80s desperately trying to sell me on an
this by buying old stuff for a hundred bucks or so at a time
when that was all they could afford. Now that many of these
recording stars are leaders in record sales, these formerly
ARP Avatar analog guitar synth as part of a new guitar purchase I was making. His asking price: $100, on an instrument which once listed for $2600. I passed on a deal that I
"grungy" sounds are being used, edited, sampled, in some
form or another in most of the high-end studios and play-
would now jump on in a minute. Many of you may remember how the mere word “digital” when referring to syn-
2) Great programming flexibility, with great mileage as a
sample source. Sure, a Fender Rhodes was a meat sounding
electric piano, but for the purposes of this discussion it is
thesiaers and other hardware invoked semi-magical connotations. Now the tables are turned, with analog gear that
has been sitting in the original shipping cartons for years
commanding top dollar.
not really an ideal sample source, as the sound possibilities
are not variable enough. The great thing about lower cost
sample sources such as the the Moog Prodigy or ARP Odyssey is that although they only have two oscillators, you can
still get a really fat sound through layering with your EPS,
EPS-16 PLUS, or ASR-I0 sampler.
For otu' current purposes, we are going to adhere to three
main criteria:
1) Look at the title of this article. I said cheap! — as in low
cost. The units discussed in these first two articles will run
you anything from $50 (beat up but functional) up to $400
or so (good to mint condition).
3} Non-MIDI, which means its only real-time use would be
as a performance instrument, as opposed to functioning as a
tone module within a MIDI configtnation. Sure, there are a
number of control-voltage to MIDI converters on the
market, but most people (myself included) prefer not to
bother, and would rather sample. The cheapest that --l’ve
Some of you may not consider $400 (or perhaps somewhat
less) to be exactly “cheap,” but that’s certainly relative to
the vintage keyboard market as a whole, where lylellotrons
and modulars by lvloog and Arp are selling for up to several
seen available in the U.S. is the Mi?-G8 MIDI and Control
and Control Voltage Processor by PAIA, which sells direct
for $399. Keep in mind, not all of the models that we will
be talking about even have control voltage input. Three that
thousand dollars each. To put things in their proper perspective, the vintage guitar market has been thriving for many
years, with good condition Fenders and Gibsons that
come to mind immediately are the first rev. ARP Odyssey,
the MOOG OPUS 3, as well as the Moog Prodigy. With
these units, it‘s either sample to Dat{Miragei'EPStEPS-16
Plus.tASR-10, or (horrors!) play them live to tape.
originally sold for maybe a few hundred dollars or so potentially commanding ten times that figure on the current
scene. To show you how big this can be, have you seen the
recent 'y'isa credit card commercial on television featuring
Gruhn Guitars of Nashville, the Mecca of vintage guitar
collectors?
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Home Recording
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Five Gets (Maybe 6) For
Classic Loopers
Pat Finnigan
Did anybody watch the NBC Evening News with Tom
Blowchow, or was I the only one? I caught an “l'nsirier
Edition" (or as Tom likes to adtl,*“late-brealting news”) of
(D) Get the Hacker. This is not a shameless plug: you'll
team more about torquing your instrument here than any
demo recording. Three perspectives were shown: one of
the traditional recording studio, one of a mobile studio,
and one of the lone guy cranking out demos. And, you got
it, the lone guy was cranking away on an EPS, and even
other source; even Ensoniq concluded this in 1985. It's
more bang for your buck than you'll get anywhere else:
consider it a stipend for the illustrious bevy of "regular
(and not so regular)" contributors. Plus, you are granted
membership in that most exclusive fraternitytsorority of
through standard 30H: interlaced NTSC signal (er, TV),
Ensoniq users, the Endless Loop Club, where, for an addi-
there was no mistaking it for anything else but an old
tional $6, you get eTH privileges -and get the honor of
EPS...
proofing this stuff before it gets published...
Needless to say, he was the most productive and most affordable of the trio, which kinda triggered this article. If an
old instrument like our old discontinued friend the EPS
(E) Get some sounds. I know people who have bought
$350,000 homes only to discover they forgot about furni-
could get that kind of airtime, I'll bet there's a whole lot
ture. lJon't do this to your BPS!16+. It's a blank sheet of
staff paper, so you can write with a Bic or a MontBlanc;
more life in the beast than meets the eye. That's what I dis-
But write! Ensoniq's libiaries are the absolute best sonic
covered some four years ago, and it's because of audio
value for the buck you cart buy. In their economy of scale,
sampling with my old EPS Classic that I now work for a
manufacturer of video sampling (er, digitizing) hardware.
So, in the spirit, again, of maximising the potential of your
Ensoniq sampler, be it a Classic or 'tt5+, here's the drill...
nobody can touch them.
But that's not to say that the 3rd party channel isn't keep-
(A) Get the 4X. It's silly not to have as much memory as
ing them honest, either. I've reviewed some spectacular offerings that covered all the bases for just over a yard (CS),
and there are a veritable plethora of stunning samples
possible: since the Classic maxes at 4096 blocks, get flrem
all. If you think it's silly to spend that kind of money on an
older instrument, I paid $649.95 for my 4X new in 1937
dollars during the infamous memory shortage, so I don't
available for the Classic,tl6+. Remember, they're the
world's most supported sampler, so be brave and drop a
coupla bucks. Feed your sampler good stuff: you'll be glad
you did...
warms hear it. lust get it: you'll be glad you did. I purposely did not include the SCSI adapter or CD-ROM
(B) Get the DEX-8. An absolute necessity for the Classic,
since they only way you can route FX is thru an external
processor (shameless plug for the DP)’-ti insert here). It's an
OI-IX-6 for the '16+, an OEX-8 for the Classic. Either way,
you get ten discrete outputs. Imagine dry bass, liquid
drives since they collectively would cost more than half
the street price for the Classic. But rest assured; if you're
as content as I am using that superlative Ensoniq interface
(I'm still as happy as a clam since I wrote my first EPS
sequence in 198?), the value of the SCSI card and a
strings, reverberant pianos. Better still, imagine routing a
dirty strat sample tirru a wah-wah pedal into your mixer.
This single littlc box gives each instrument its own iden-
CD-ROM or SCSI hard drive far outweigh the cost. Club
Mac sells 365 Mb external drives for $189; I bought my S0
Mb Eltekon in I988 for $1200, so, again, I don't wanna
tity, rather titan a track button and a clever patch name.
Remember: layers and patch selects cart address the
OEX's, not just tracks...
hear it. But a fully ‘blown, stroked, ported and relieved EPS
Classic still blows anything the competition has to offer
away. And it's a circa 198'? instrument!
(C) Get the CV-1 Pedal. This is not just a volume control:
So get yours up to speed... -
it's a modulator, it's a pitch pedal, it's myriad controllers
to be assigned myriad routings. It's cool, it's cheap, it's in-
dispensable. I personally guarantee you'll wear it out
before you exhaust its possibilities.
Bio: Pat is a tech support person for Rastertllps. He still
uses a B-3 for a lteyboara‘ stand and watches the alpha
channel.
The DP/4 and MIDI
Port I: System.MIcli Parameters
Steve Byhurst
Hello again and welcome along to a couple of articles looking at the DP!-=l MIDI commands. This time I will “boldly
go" to each of the MIDI parameters in System.Midi mode
and suggest some ways of using them.
you need to achieve what you want, and it can be difficult
to decide on a default. I find it best to work out your most
usual way of working arid set the parameters accordingly.
They can always be changed later and there is a System Enclusive Dump option that can be used to save different
If you are new to the DPI4, or haven‘t tried using its MIDI
functions yet, press the System .Midi butten to start looking
setups for recall at the appropriate time (also detailed in
Part Two).
at the available parameters.
System.Mldi Structure
Once in System.Midi mode you have access to 54 system
and MIDI parameters. Many of these directly or indirectly
relate to MIDI use and it is the setting of these that I will
specifically cover. The remainder are feet switchjpedal
setups and simple preference parameters which control the
way the user interface works. None of the System.Midi
parameters are affected by preset changes — once set they
become your default setup.
There are two categories of parameters in System .Midi
mode, these that are specific to units and these that have a
global or system-wide function. The first 35 parameters are
made up of 5 sets of 1' identical commands. Each effect unit
(A.-D) has a set as well as Config, which here functions as a
"virtual unit” because it has its own set of MIDI parameters
just like one of the units. The remaining parameters are all
global.
We’ll start by looking at the unit-specific parameters. You
can press one of the unit buttons or the config button as a
short-cut to access the relevant set of commands. Remember, there is one of the following commands for each of the
units and their settings are completely independent of one
another.
MIDI Channal!MlDl Enable
These two parameters allow you to set a MIDI channel from
1 to 16 and to enable reception of volume and program
If you are short of spare channels andfor do not wish to
send different MIDI data to each unit, use just two channels
by setting units A-D to the same number and the config unit
to another. There is still much you can achieve with this
setup. Alternatively, if you need absolute control, program
each unit with a different number.
The configs you normally use are also a factor in deciding
how to use different channels. All four MIDI channels are
only active when a 4-source config is in current use. This
means it would be a waste of channels to have each unit set
to a different number if you hardly ever make use of
4-source configs. Also, if you only use the DP)‘-l as a single
processing unit you will only need one channel number.
The Enable parameter can be used to control usage of individual units sharing the same channel number. A simple
trick I sometimes use is to progam the same number for
each unit in a 4-source config and set them all to disabled.
Then, when sending program change or volume data on that
same channel, you can choose to enable only the unit or
units you wish to receive that data.
Program Change
This parameter simply governs whether a unit will ignore or
receive any program changes sent to it on its channel number. If set to receive it will enable presets to he changed and
will select 112,34 unit presets depending on the current config’s source setup.
In a similar way to the MIDI Enable parameter, this allows
change data on that channel (a separate channel is used for
other controller data which we will look at in part two).
There is no restriction on which numbers can be used by the
units A-D, but the config unit must have a different number
you to choose which unit, or units, will respond to program
changes sent on a particular channel even if all units share
to the others to enstue correct reception of data.
Note that there is also a global program change master
switch which must be turned on if any program changes are
to he received.
Many factors can affect the number of different channels
the same number.
Program Change Map
keyboard to control the effects used on its sequencer tracks.
There are three parameters which govern the mapping of in-
issuing a program change. Bear in mind though that the
DP/4 offers other ways of doing this which may be more
They allow you to add, delete or change the effect just by
coming MIDI program numbers to DP/4 preset numbers for
each unit. The first simply turns the mapping on or off,
whilst the second and third are used to input the actual numbers to be mapped. When set to “Off” a default preset map
is used.
There is one thing to note before using this facility. The
DP]-4 displays program change numbers as 1-128 whilst the
actual numbers received are MIDI standard 0-127. This
means that if your MIDI controller (and this includes some
Ensoniq models!) displays standard numbers the two displays will always be out by one. This may be confusing but
is not a problem once you understand why it happens.
The main application for mapping is to allow a MIDI conr.roller’s program change to select an appropriate effect in
the DPI4 without having to get program numbers in both
pieces of equipment to match. There is no problem if you
want a favourite effect to be used by many of your programs as the same preset can be used to map onto multiple
program numbers. You can set individual program numbers
to be ignored and also make a program number bypass,
un-bypass or kill any particular unit you wish. These functions are great for when you are using a workstation-type
suited to a given situation.
Unit Bypass
The last of the unit-specific parameters, this lets you select
a controller source which will act as a bypass switch for
each unit. Among the MIDI options are pitch bend, note
number, note velocity, aftertouch and controller numbers
0-127. I usually make use of controller numbers which are
not being used for modulation purposes.
This parameter comes into its own if you want to bypass
units separately but do want to use any of the other bypass
options the DP/4 provides. These may already be in use or
may be used for another purpose, and because there is a
wide choice of controller you can always find something
which is not being used elsewhere.
Prepare yourselves for nest time when we’ll go global! Bio: Steve Bylrurst is tr British composer of electronic
music. He is still trying to convince people that his work is
serious enough to be porrifor.
Synth When?
Robby Barman
Overview
Product: Sample Disk Collection Sets.
For: asst, es. and TSs.
From: Tech Star Software, PO Boa 463236, Mt. Clemens, MI 48046,
phone: (810) 783-0470.
Prion: $l9.95 each, or $159 for all 10 {free demo available].
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The Tech Star library consists of 10 sub-libraries, each largely populated with classic or new synth-based sounds. To
wit, Tech Star's “The Strings Collection" is not samples of
real, organic wood and gut (ccchh) stuff, but rather of synthesized renditions of same. Each of these collections is
The folks at Tech Star Software obviously know what it's
like to order a set of sounds for your sampler based on the
available separately for 19.95 or as a big bunch for $159.95.
claims of its creator or, worse yet, on the unreliable,
all-too-subjective opinion of one such as I. Really, it's a
memory-efficient and, if my memory and math serve correctly, will fit easily even into an unespanded EPS, not to
mention the TS. ’l6+ and ASR-10/88.
pig-in-the-poke kinda situation (and no, I have no idea
where that expression comes from; l’m a vegan myself).
Tech Star's solution‘? Offer a free cassette demo of their
sotmds in action. That’s right, not for five bucks — free.
Gratis. Boy, do I feel a great weight lifted from my review-
All of the sounds listed in Tech Star's brochure are quite
The demo cassette is in fact very helpful. The music is in a
sorta techno, four-on-the-floor direction, with some etr.pan-
ing shoulders. Why keep reading? Call ‘em now. Go ahead.
sive tetrturing laid over the top. Chords both sizzly and
warm, deep and ethereal swirl in the stereo field against the
boogidy beat. All purple prose aside, I drink it's a very
Still reading, huh? Okay, let us proceed, starting with the
dry stuff.
honest representation of where Tech Staris coming from
and what their sounds are like.
The Sounds
For review, Tech Star sent the Hacker a sampling of their
samples from each of the sets they offer, with the exception
which conjures up images of stained glass and such.
Likewise, B3 ORGAN 2 is a tinkly, cheesy little beast,
while V-OX CONTL, a tinkly, cheesy little device in real
life, sounds like a rich B3. The basic LESLIE B3 sound is
of their two drum collections (dunno why they're missing).
I've‘ got no reason to believe that these sounds aren't
characteristic of the collections overall, so with that little
hyper-bright, with its OX Patch Select sounding like the
Hammond in The Beatles‘ "Blue Joy Way." Oddly, only
leap of faith, we're off....
rithm. Maybe it is time to leave that cliche behind, or at
least not be so knee-jerk about it.
one of the organ sounds use the ROTO SPKR effect algo-
All of the string sounds here are typical of Tech Star's
thorough approach: excellent looping, careful matching of
multisamples and a full use of the real-time modulators
available to Ensoniq samplists (oh, and you, too, TS owners). The Patch Select variations actually provide some of
The brass sounds are fun, though not very homy. Of course
by now, synth brass has become a separate sound type, distinct from real brass, in the same manner as synth strings,
choirs, bass and so on have. The "brass" sound AXBU sure
my favorite sounds in this collection. Tech Star has a talent
for diversity: SMOOTH JUNO is indeed silky smooth,
MATRIX STRNG is crisp and in-your-face and IP8
has a nifty OX Patch Select with Env 2 set to repeat, causing
the sound to pulse rhythmically.
STRINGS is warm and full, as perhaps a JP should be.
Again, make no mistake, these are synth suings: don't expect the real thing. But they are satisfying. Everything is
well de-noised, too.
Well. I didn't expect for the bass sounds to be so much fun.
These may prove to be the standouts in this set (though I
hear FUTURE CHOIR and the electric pianos calling to me,
"Oh, Robby..."). All of them are deep as you need and yet
still very much up front. SECRET BASS is a secret no
The choirs included in my review set are evenly divided between synthy sounds and more realistic efforts. MALE
more, with its delightful use of the ASR's stereo chorus.
SEQ BASS is so plunky it's almost banjo- like, and EIGHT
CHOIR reminds me of a kind of squeaky-clean ESQ-1, if
that's not a contradiction in terms. My fave is more realistic, the delicate and lovely FUTURE CHOIR, based on
BASS is downright stringy. In fact, it sounds like the bassist's strings are a little loose; a clever approach to bass
which I think works well. I do like these.
female voices, I b'lieve. It's about as realistic as samples of
"oohs" (or are they “ohs'?") get, which is to say, not very.
But this sound is really expressive and I found myself rather
Wrapping up, we move into selections from Synrlr Collec-
Tech Star's electric pianos are all synth-based, it appears,
and though two of the review sounds are not too exciting to
my ears, the other two actually are. FM PIANO, with a
tion I and 2. Of course, all of Tech Star's sounds are synthy, so let's see what we've got when their programmers are
set free. D'ohl I'm not as turned on by these as I am by the
other Tech Star sounds. Actually, it's the sounds from Synth
Collection I that failed to do much for me. The samples in
Collection 2 are much more up my alley, especially the
sound name to strike terror -— or at least numbing ennui —
into the hearts of veteran sound collectors, is a most
chrome-plated METAL FILTER (with its hyper-staccato
XX Patch Select) and the delicately clanky OXYGEN.
hooked on it.
pleasant surprise. It's not the same old DX Rhodes. Rather,
it's almost a steel-drum type of electric piano. Somehow it
really captures the FM high end so often lost in sampling.
Really nice. And the D50 E PIANO, oddly enough, is much
like the classic DX chestnut, though derived from a Roland
D-50 and imbued with an unexpected warmth. Often synth
electric piano sounds wind up piercing rather than soothing;
the D50 E PIANO is a happy exception. Now if I layer that
with FUTURE CHOIR....
The Tech Star organs are a bit surprising, never quite turning out to be what you think they'll be, judging by their
Benediction and Farewell
Perhaps you can tell that I suspect these sounds might be
worthwhile additions to the synth side of your sample collection. They contain programming that's thoughtful and
accomplished and, hey, they sound good, too. I must confess that even those that don't rattle my cage are
well-conceived and executed. But ya know what‘? You don't
have to take my word for it. Call up Tech Star and order
their demo. You may very well like what you hear.-
names, though they are usable and enjoyable. CHURCH
ORGAN, which I quite like, is more of a "Will-Clipper-
Bio: Robby Barman is o musician living 'ncutn the starry
autumn skies of New York's mid-Hudson Volley. He's also
leave-Heather-at-the-altar-and-have-the-a1iens-snatchedBill Sr.'s-only-hope-for-happiness" organ for me than one
cxpccrcd in the kitchen right about now to do the dung
dishes. Oh, wcll. His lurcsr album is "Rings artd Rings."
Case: for
Ensoniq Eqvfivmenl
Now available direct from factory (except in cturent dealer
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Keyboards:
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Bifurcated
Boards
An Alternate Way tor the ESQ and SQ-B0 to Do Splits
Kirk Slinkard
The ESQs and SQ-B0 have a remarkably versatile voice architecture that enables them to do some pretty nifty tricks
that most other synthesizers can't even think about doing.
With the technique shown in this article you can split two
only requires one patch for both sounds, you have to divide
up the three oscillators (or just two if you prefer) between
the two different sounds. When doing this, I find it helpful
Specifically, here we use the “KEYBOARD 2" modulator
to think of each oscillatorfamplifier combination within the
voice (for example, OSCILLATOR 1 and DCA 1) as a
separate, independent "sub-voice.“ Each of these three
sub-voices can have its own independent LFO and ENVELOPE before they combine into the master FIL-
(abbreviated “KB D2") because it has a much steeper slope
than the other “KEYBOARD” modulator, and KBD2’s
'I'ER,iEl'~lVELOPE -MAMPLIFIER 4 combination (kind of
analogous to the way more recent Ensoniqs combine the
range is exactly five octaves. The regular KEYBOARD
modulator expands the effect over the full MIDI range, so
discontinue the KBD2 modulator in its synthesizers made
different voices within one patch into a common effects
processor). I have included four patches as application examples, each being optimized to show off a different feature of this sound-splitting technique:
after the SQ-80, so this article just rudely ignores them.
Besides, they can use their KEYBOARD SCALE parameter, at least on this one function). Although this method
The first patch “SPLIT1." shows the shagpest possible split
within one patch using this method. It uses a bass guitar
different sounds on the keyboard using only one patch by
using the keyboard as a volume modulator.
its slope is much more subtle (Ensoniq unwisely decided to
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sound from OSCILLATOR 3 on the lower half of the keyboard and a chorused electric piano sound from OSCILLATORs 1 and 2 on the upper half. This is convenient
because both sounds have similar volume envelope characteristics, so this is handled entirely by ENVELOPE 4 and
DCA 4. This leaves all the first three DCAs open to do just
the split function (and I used to think that my SQ-80 had
too many DCAs). Note that DC!‘-ts 1 through 3 each use
KBD2 twice to double its effect, and AMPLIFIER 3 (the
lower sound) has it reversed in polarity. In fact. the
cumulative volume slope across the keyboard is so steep
that very few notes in the. center of the keyboard actually
have any noticeable mix between the two sounds. Try
playing around middle Fit to check this out. You could
never achieve this with that wimpy KEYBOARD
modulator! In this particular patch, the filter uses KBD2 to
make the bass sound a little less bright than the electric
piano sound, and ENVELOPE 2 is used in the filter to
cause the entire patch to loose brightness as it decays.
KBD2 is also used to modulate the PAN parameter so you
have a little stereo separation between the two sounds. Too
bad we can’t double it up here like in the DCAs.
The second patch “SPLIT2." is optimized to show off how
both halves of the split can have different envelope shapes.
It has a less well-defined split area because it uses the
KBD2 modulator only once in DCAs 1 through 3. So while
using a patch like this in actual performance or recording,
you would probably want to avoid playing in the middle
octave. The upper sound is chorused strings from OSCILLATORs 1 and 2. and the lower sound is a square-wave
bass from OSCILLATOR 3. Note that -the upper sound
fades in gradually where the lower sound doesn't. A side
effect in this patch is that the final volume envelope chan-
ges its shape slightly as you go up or down the keyboard.
This comes from the moving modulation from ENVELOPE 1 or 2 being added to a different constant level
for each key from the KBD2 modulator. I-[mm —- interesting possibilities, but that’s another story.
want it to be. Here. we have a full organ sound tal-ting up
most of the upper four octaves, and a mellower organ
sound in basically just the lowest octave. By juggling
around the voltune and modulator levels in DC!-‘ks 1
through 3, you can independently change the range of each
sub-voice. In this patch, the combination of the LEVEL
parameters and modulators in the first two DCAs {upper
sound) are increased enough so that they take up more of
the keyboard. In the third DCA {lower voice). the reversed
KBD2 combined with the really low LEVEL setting makes
it take up less of the keyboard.
Maybe you have no compelling reason to use the technique
shown here but keep in mind that this way of doing splits
touches on the subject of separating sounds using volume
modulation that has several other applications. For example, on some of the patches in the second Star Trek
sound effects article in a previous issue. the MOD WHEEL
modulated the volume of each sub-voice in such a way that
you could use it to switch between two completely different sounds within just one patch, comparable to the way
the PATCH SELECT buttons are used on some of the more
recent Ensoniq keyboards. This is essentially the same
technique used in this article about keyboard splits, but
with the MOD WHEEL used instead of the KBD2 modulator.
Other common examples of non-keyboard sound separation applications include using velocity, envelopes, or
LFOs to get “cross-wave," "LA," or "wave sequencing"
sounds. You can find many examples of this type of application in Hackerpatches and articles in past Hacker
issues. In this article, I have given you examples of single
patches that have two sounds split across the keyboard, but
it is also possible to split three separate sounds within one
patch in a variety of ways without ever going to the
SPLITJLAYER page — remember, you have three
sub-voices within one patch. And, believe it or not. there
are techniques for getting more than three different sounds
split across the keyboard within just one patch. But that
The third patch "SPLIT3." demonstrates how real-time
modulators can be applied differently to each sound in the
split. It has a variable pulse-width synth bass on the bottom from OSCILLATORs 1 and 2 (OSCILLATOR l is
gets into some much more complicated and unusual situations. Some of the SO-Bil-exclusive waveforms can split in
strange ways when SYNCed or Alvled. And if you load illegal or corrupted data into either the ESQs or SO-80, any
turned off at DCA I — it is only used to SYNC OSCILLATOR 2) and a sawtooth brass sound on top from OSCILLATOR 3. Here again, each of the two sub-patches
oscillator might be set to an illegal waveform and
automatically give you several strange waveform splits
across the keyboard. This certainly opens up some pos-
have different volrune envelope characteristics. On this
patch, the mod wheel increases the vibrato from LFO 1 to
the upper voice only, and velocity controls the volume of
the lower voice only through ENVELOPE 1.
sibilities.
The last patch "SPLIT4." shows that the split point doesn't
have to be right in the middle of the keyboard if you don't
Bio: Now that I think about it, I realty haven’t been doing
all that mach.
Mod you later. -
Elne of om most cenunoe requests from new suhscrfierl {new owners) is for more basic tutorial information. We've all been there. Unfortunately, the
Hnclter is usually "there" when a new instrument first snakes its appearmce — and then we move on. W1-tile back issues can answer rumty questions, not
all are still available and they do represent an aslfiticnal. expense for the new reader. Hence, “Husker Rsirtiriulization" — yup, old goods in a new
wrapper. We feel a little funny aboutthe whole reprint thing — to we're goittg to keep it small. Clark's series on the SQ: is the most requested and the
most generally applicable -[KS1 it KT: in particular — and he‘: checlring ‘em for freshness}, so here we go...
The SQ (KS/KT) Series and
Subtrcrciive Synthesis
Clark Salisbury
not as flexible as to-day's waveform generators. Typically, only
three or four basic waves, such as the sawtooth, sine, triangle
and square waves, could be produced by an analog oscillator.
Not too many years ago, the idea was put forth that in place of
the analog oscillator, why not use digital wavetables — complex waves that could be derived from sampled data or
In terms of basic programrning techniques, the SQ-1 follows
generated on computers. This partially solved the problem of
more or less in the tradition of subtractive synthesis (although
elements of other forms of synthesis come into play). Subtractive synthesis is a technology dating to the golden age of synthesis, back when the Minimoog was king and most of us didn‘t
l-mow which way was ARP. Subtractive synthesis has remained
a viable technology to this day, primarily because of the ease
how to get complex sounds out of subtractive systems, but led
to another problem — wavetables can take up large amounts of
memory. The earliest wavetable synthesizers used short
wavetables in order to conserve memory, but as anyone
familiar with sampling ltnows, looped short waves can be rather
static sounding.
with which sounds can be created and because of its great
flexibility.
The theory of subtractive synthesis is quite the opposite of
additive synthesis {discussed last time). Rather than creating
complex sounds by combining simple sine waves, as with additive synthesis, we start with complex waves and subtract those
components in the sound that we don't need. In other words, to
create a clarinet sound first we'd start with a complex wave,
perhaps a SQUARE wave. Within this wave are contained the
harmonics needed to produce a reasonable imitation of a clarinet wave, but there are a number of other harmonics as well.
These additional harmonics, mostly in the upper frequency
range, make the raw SQUARE wave too bright and buzzy to
sound much like a clarinet. If we subtract some of these upper
harmonics, though, we come much closer to obtaining a
clarinet-type sound.
_., __
Basic Architecture In Subtractlve Systems
The basic SQ-1 voice presents almost a classical subtractive
synthesis signal flow. Sound originates with the wave (in clas-
sic subtractive systems, such as the Mininroog, this corresponds
to the oscillator), moves to the filter (where upper andior lower
harmonics are “filtered out," or removed), then to the amplifier
(where the overall dynamic contour of the voice is shaped), and
finally to the output. In the SQ-1 the output is routed to the
digital effects processor, presenting a minor departure from
A partial solution to these problems was found in LIA synthesis. Basically, the theory behind LIA synthesis is that you
don’t need to stuff an entire wave into a synthesizer’s memory.
If you sample just the attack portions of sounds, and then graft
them to the front of more traditional synthesizer waves, you'll
get a sound that seems quite complex but which takes much
less memory than a sound based entirely on sampled data. The
other obvious advantage is that the synthesizer now has the
ability to generate musically interesting hybrid sounds —
sounds which retain some of the complexities of sampled
sound, but also have some characteristics of synthetic sounds.
Architecture of the SQ-1
The SQ-1 has the capability to combine all three of these tech-
nologies in the creation of soundszits basic voice follows the
blueprint for traditional subtractive synthesizers, but with many
more choices of waves. There are traditional analog-type waves
available, including the sawtooth, square and sine waves. There
are sampled and digitally generated wavetables, as might be
found in wavetable synthesizers. There are sampled attack transients, as might be fotmd in LIA systems (any of the waves can
be shaped into an attack transient if you feel like doing serious
LIA style programming, though). And the addition of waves
with dynamically changeable timbre — the transwaves — helps
to give the SQ-1's sound a richness and movement not possible
with any of the systems discussed so far.
classical subtractive systems.
wavetable and us. Synthesis
Cine of the basic limitations in early subtractive systems was
the difficulty involved in generating complex sounds. The
original subtractive systems used analog oscillators which were
Modulation
Cine of the most important concepts to come to terms with
when learning to program synthesizers is that of modulation.
To modulate something, simply put, is to change it: we can
modulate pitch to create pitch bends or vibrator.-we can modu-
late the amplifier to shape the loudness of a sound, and control
how that loudness changes aver time; filters can be modulated
to control how a sound's harmonic content changes over time.
Without modulation, the sounds produced by the new elec-
straightforward: first, determine what it is you wish to modulate; next, you'll need to decide what to use for a modulator;
finally, determine how (and ii] you'll be controlling the
modulator in real time.
tronic instruments would be pretty dull and static, like the
sounds we produced using additive synthesis in our last installment.
It is in the area of modulation that the SQ-1 excels. Not only
are there a lot of choices for things to modulate in the SQ-1,
but there are a lot of things to modulate them with and a lot of
ways to control the modulation. So to get a handle on modulation, let's take a look at one of its more basic applications on
the SQ-l, vibrato.
Vibrato, as you no doubt brow, is a smooth, more or less subtle
shifting of pitch up and down around the root pitch being
played. The right kind of vibrato does much to add to the
character of a sound, particularly solo sounds.
When creating a vibrato effect, as with any of the modulation
effects, we must take into consideration three things: what is
being modulated, what it is being modulated with, and if and
how the modulator itself is being controlled. In the case of
vibrato, these things may seem fairly obvious (although this
will not be the case with every form of modulation you may en-
counter). Most obvious would be what it is we need to modulate — for a vibrato effect, we need to modulate the pitch. In
the SQ-l, pitch modulation is a function of the "Pitch" bank, so
it follows that our modulator will need to be applied here.
Next we will need to determine what it is we will be using as a
modulator. Since, theoretically, we are on the trail of a vibrato
type of effect, we will select a Low Frequency Oscillator — or
LFO — as our modulator. LFO's are particularly suited to
producing cycling, repetitive changes to some aspect or another
of a sound. We'll be spending a lot more time with them in a
later installment.
Finally, we will need to determine if we wish to control some
aspect of the modulation (such as vibrato depth or rate, for ex-
ample) in real time or perhaps from some other controller. The
most common application for vibrato includes being able to
control the depth of the vibrato effect via the mod wheel, although there are many other ways to control LFO depth.
You can see that the basic approach to modulation is pretty
eTH -- A Faster, Cheaper Hacker
If you can receive e-null via the Internet, you can take advantage
of avoiding the post office and get a fauer, cheaper, e-rnfil vs"sion of the Hacker. The e-mail Trarrsorriq Husker eontairrs all of
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In the SQ-1, there are three basic areas where you might want
to think about the application of a bit of modulation — pitch,
tone color, and volume. Pitch modulation is accomplished via
the "Pitch" bank of the SQ-l, where you can choose which of
the various modulators you might want to apply to whatever
voice you're working with. Tone color modulation is normally
accomplished from the "Filter" bank, where upper andfor lower
harmonics can be filtered out. And finally, control of a sound's
volume over time (or in real time) is accomplished via the
"Output" bank.
The SQ-l also allows for modulation in some rather esoteric
ways. For example, the start point of a wave can be modulated
from the "Waves" section, or the start and end points of the
"Transwaves can be simultaneously modulated to create some
beautiful effects. Also, you can modulate LFO rate and depth
from arty of the modulators, allowing you to create some very
expressive patches. Not to mention the myriad possibilities
available for modulation ip the effects section. But for now,
we'll be sticking to the more basic concepts. We'll be getting
into all these other areas soon enough.
Once you've determined what it is you want to modulate,
you'll need to select an appropriate modulator. Standard LFO's
and envelopes are available, as well as velocity, keyboard position, an external pedal, and the pitch and mod wheels. You can
select "Noise," which provides a random, somewhat unpredictable modulation, or "XCTRL" (extemal controller), which
gives you a way to route in controllers from extemal sources
via MIDI. Other controllers include pressure, timbre, and "Max
Orr." Don't worry, though -- we're not going to try to cover all
of these right now. Suffice it to say that a lot of options exist.
For now, the important thing is to get onto solid mound with
the basic concept of modulation. And as usual, we'll try to accomplish this by example.
Direct Dialing
Up until now, we've been accessing menu displays in the SQ-1
by selecting the edit bank we're interested in, such as the
"Wave" bank, and scrolling to the menu we want But there's a
quicker way to navigate -—- we can think of it as "direct dialmg."
Each of the menus in an SQ-1 edit bank has a number. This allows you to access any menu simply by pressing the edit bank
button for the group of edit functions you want, and then pressing the number button which corresponds to the specific menu
you are looking for. For example, if you want to go directly to
the "Edit Voice" menu, simply hit the "Edit Sounds" button,
the "Wave" button, and then the "screen fl" button. Since the
"Edit Voice" menu is the first page of the. "Wave" edit bank,
pressing the "screen ll" button will take you directly there.
Don't worry about memorizing which screen buttons go with
which pages — you can still scroll to find the pages you want.
But as a convention, from now on we will be direct dialing to
Env1=+ll'U LFO=+{lll
Mod=LFO * +50
get to menus -- it will help to get familiar with the intemal
If you listen, the effect should be fairly subtle -— this is be-
structure of the SQ-l and to assure that we're all on the same
page when navigating SQ-1 programming parameters.
cause there is a level control located in the LFO section -— it is
used to control overall LFO depth — and it may not be act to 1
very high value. Let's check it out.
The Nltty-Gritty
Click the "LFO" button, then the "screen 1" button. Select
Now back to modulation. First, we'll need to select a sound to
“Level=il8," if it isn't already, by scrolling. Increase its value
work with. The ROM sound called "French Horn" {program
to 99 and try playing a note. You'll notice that the vibrato
doesn't kick in too abruptly — the LFO is set to delay for a
13) should provide us with a good basic starting point. It has no
crazy envelopes to deal with, no wacky filter sweeps, and the
sound sustains long enough for us to hear any changes we make
without having to repeatedly strike the keys.
time of 46 before it fully kicks in. To change this, select
"DEI..AY=" and experiment with different values. You'll f'md
that lower values yield faster LFO rise times. For now, leave
this set to [ill — the LFO should kick in as soon as you play a
First, we'll need to make sure that we're dealing with the correct voice — in this case, "voice one" is the only one used in
note.
this program. We can verify this by hitting the "Edit Sounds"
The LFO effect at this point is probably sounding pretty
seasick, so let's back off on the LFO LEVEL — perhaps reset-
button, hitting the "Wave" bank button, the "screen U" button
and checking out the status of the "Edit "sluice" page. You
should be seeing the following in the display window:
EditVoice=Ol'i|E
ON OFF OFF
and the word "ON" in the lower corner should be flashing, to
indicate that voice one is selected for editing. If it isn't, simply
scroll until it is.
Now that we've selected the voice we'll need to route the LFO
to it. Since we're after vibrato, and vibrato is a type of pitch
modulation, it stands to reason that the "Pitch" bank is where
we want to be. Click the "Pitch" button, and then the "screen l"
button to "direct dial" to the "Env1fLFOJ'Mod Source and
Amount" page. You should be seeing the following display:
Env l=+llll l_.FO=+U1
lv’Iod=NOISE * +02
These are all modulation inputs to the pitch of the current
voice. Envl and LFO are "hardwired" to control pitch mod —
they appear as modulation sources along the upper line of the
display, and can't be changed. The numbers showing next to
them, however, can. These represent modulation amounts for
the LFO and Envl. For now, select each of these parameters
and set it to -I-U0 — we're going to be manually routing the
LFO in so it will become obvious exactly how it's done. Now
scroll to select the "lvlod=NOISE" parameter (it should start
flashing) and use the data slider and upfdown arrow buttons to
ting it to its original value of DB or so would sound better, but
set it to whatever you find pleasing.
Select "I'vlod=" from the lower row of the display and use the
data entry sliderlbuttons to set it to "WHEEL." This selects the
mod wheel as a controller for LFO depth. If you push forward
on the wheel now, you'll hear the vibrato effect increase. Now
let's ‘try controlling LFO level from something other than the
wheel — how about key position‘? It's simple enough. Make
sure that "lvlod=" is still selected and use the data entry slider!
buttons to set it to "KEYED."
Now we can control LFO depth from the position of notes on
the keyboard. As you play higher, the vibrato effect increases.
Try setting "Level=" in the LFO section to DU — this way,
you'll have no vibrato at all unless you are playhrg the higher
keys.
Hopefully the program is by now becoming clear —- select
what it is you want to modulate {in this case pitch), select what
it is you want to use to modulate it (in this case, an LFO), and
select what, if anything, it is you want to use to control the
modulator (in this case, the wheel or the keyboard). And don't
worry if this isn't all quite coming together yet — we'll spend
more time with modulation in the next few installments. —
Bio: Clerk Solisbury writes nursic
and words, docs rt
set it to "LFO" — the display should now show "MOD=LFO."
You've just routed the LFO to control pitch modulation!
little nursic pro-
Next, scroll one more tick to the right (this will select the "Mod
duction, engineering, and recording
amotmt" parameter), and use the data entry sliderfbuttons to
select an amount between -99 and +99 (modulation can be
either positive or negative). Try a value of +50 for now. The
SQ-1 display should be looking something like this:
Ifilllws
and
does
sound
design for almost
every
ntrtn1u‘itcirrrer on the planet.
HACKER BASEMENT TAPES
Daniel Mandel
Tunnels of Kineticism
Tape: Horizontal Hold.
Artist: Christopher I. Bird.
Contact info: 116 Dean Street, Stamford, CT, D6902, phone: {Z03}
353-1129.
Equipment: lvi Composition software and Performer sequencing software
on a Mac SEI3l] interfaced to a EPS-16+, a Yamaha SY55 and a Boss
This is a crystal clear recording and a quality work. Chris
has a real flare for the visual as well, from his J-card to his
letterhead design. I get the sense that this is about as creative as you can get these days. Just be sure you are really
locked into the dance music techno genre. It’s much more
fun to shalte to than to write about.
DREISCI.
Tape: Suicide Copy Cat.
l't1'tist: Surface Noise.-
This is high energy driving dance mitsic. Chris wrote:
“I started playing experimental rnasic in high school nsing
Electrocornp equipment. There was no digital sottnd then,
and the control voltages were so powerful, yon cottlci get a
shoclt from the end of the patch cord, of which there were
never enough. At art college I played 6ll"liI'l't$ in a band and
frightened everyone with tape loops and delay effects
created rising a srnall array of reel-to-reel tape decks. Last
year I was able to hay some gear anti create rnasic nsing
Contact info.: PD. Bolt 1315, Station P., Toronto, Chit. MES EST, Internet: [email protected]
Equipment: EPS with EX expander and SCSI.
1
Surface Noise describe themselves as post-media illusion.
This seems quite appropriate, and it sounds a heck of a lot
better than post-modern-alternative-thrash-industrial-
the conrpater I bought to do freelance graphics."
music. In their pullout flyer they put it this way: "Stamhling over barriers between art, crirne, and exploitation,
Gothic Afro starts us off at 'I:36. The sampled chanting
perhaps SI*~I’s rnost recognizable signature is the rhythmic
layering ofsampled vinyl damage into the protittction."
and singing weaves throughout with a mixture of male
voices. middle eastern warbles and almost operatic
qualities being played against each other back and forth.
There is a dueling tonalities section where the middle eastern scales are pitted back and forth against the more
Sometimes it seems that the industrial-sound manipulation
scene is the only place where real honest creativity is
taking place. Maybe it’s because everything else sounds
like a copy of a revival of a rejuvenation of an oldie, or
western scales. All the while a powerful driving dance
beat is maintained.
maybe it's just the continual hunger for something new.
Whatever it is, there is something about the energy, the
Caffeine Cantata 14:11 has all the power and drive you
might need to stay up all night long. The only danger here
is the repetition might start to put you to sleep. There are
some very groovy sampled vocals sprinkled throughout,
but I was left wanting more.
Oddly enough Sptttnih, Baby 23:41 doesn‘t seem to fall
down because of repetition. While not quite as energetic
as Cajjfeine Cantata, Spatniic bubbles and brims with
quality vocal samples. Here the ethnicity seems to have
shifted back to the middle eastern flavoring which offers a
nice contrast in tonality to the dancing rhythms and
sotmds. Sputnik is also much lighter on the bottom end,
favoring lighter percussion with a definite absence of bass.
mix and the drive and the intensity that grab us in a different way than ever before.
I-lelter Boring is slathered heavily with Beatlemania and
the ever famous, “I’ve got blisters on my fingers" wafts
above all else.
F.U. 1’Fair Use) has Mick-Mick with lips so Lhiclt screeching at us rhythmically.
Linltletter-Turner Overdrive has a hip, guitar strurnmiug
groove with a voice-over about the evils of marijuana.
About Tirne has a heavy funk feel, and once again this
anti-pot smoking lecture.
Side Two contains one song and munber of samples that
really are quite fascinating.
postage dz handling. -
The vocals here sound like a cross between Warren Zevon
and Frank Zappa. The best aspect of this tape is that I real-
just mail it off to: Basement Tapes, Transoniq Haclter,
If you want your tape run through the ringer, err, Hacker,
1402 SW Upland Dr., Portland CIR
9'}'22l.
.
ly felt I was being taken by the hand, blindfolded and
walked through something. Sure it made me nervous and
at some points I was downright frightened. Maybe I giggled to make myself feel better. But in the end, looking
back, I was awfully ertcited by all I was hearing. I had a
good time!
Bio: Daniel Mandel is a songwriter,
sound designer, and has sold pro
audio and keyboard equipment and
Surface Noise can be yours for $2.50 + 1.50 CD!‘-I for
produced demo tapes for local
hands.
HAH DWAHEISOFTWAHE
TS-12, new in bos, home use only.
Stand and some erttra disks. All back
issues of TH. $1500. (513) 293-S037‘.
I-
Masterbits CD-Rfilvls for ASR-10:
Tekno Trait (originally $89, sell for
$50), Hot Keys (originally $169, sell for
$100). Call Steve, 203-661-U504.
ASP.-10 Keyboard Version wlSCSl option added. Rorn version 1.5 {latest version}. All systems disks (Sounds and
US) Ensoniq — Mastering the ASE-I0
{liideo Tape}. Original Bo:-tes for ASR
and SCSI in like-new shape. Receipts
for everything. I hope I didn't forget
anything. Please make offer! Also for
sale: X-Static Goldlvline 2 CD set —
Really Awesome Dance Samples! See
Transoniq Hacker review. lvlackie 1202
miser -- Like new. Uriginal Boa.
[email protected]
SQ-80m; ESQ-M module with factory-modified SQ-S0 ROM installation
l
If you’re it;-asy -
i
enough to be
selling your gear...
Please be sure to pass along how absolutely vital it is to have a subscription to the
Transoniqt Hacker. And how wonderful we
are. And how you couldn't have survived
without us. And how they should quick
send us a check before they do anything
else. And...
in excellent condition, with cartridge;
Best offer. Call Tony at 2151742-0'i3S;
leave message and number and I'll be
back with you A.S.A.P.! !!
Sound Tools system. Includes Sound
Accelerator, Dat Ill], current software,
including Sound Designer 2.5. CD
quality audio on any NuBus equipped
Mac. $s't5.os. sos-245-o4e1;
ASR-10 l0lvIb ram, SCSI wISSMb
removeable, s6 output ertpander, pedals,
cover stand, case, 8: Sounds. NEW —
Taking offers. Jon 414-432-2532 or
[email protected]
SAMPLESIPATCHESISOUNDS
TI-I's Jack Tolin presents SYNTH-BITS!
Classic HR-16 drums (2 disks; 49
sounds), M1 synth-ta:-ttures (5 disks; 50
sounds) come in easy to manage samples
catalog.
Tom Shear, 805 5th Avenue,
Williamsport, PA, 12701.
MISC
Mint back issues of Transonio Hacker.
#31 -—- #34, 39, 43 — 6?, ‘ll — 79. $40
for the lot, including UPS. Glen Bering,
Bo:-t ‘I053, Ann Arbor, MI 4810?.
Phone: (313) 995-5445.
“OUT-OF-PRINT BACK ISSUES
IvI.U.G. will provide Out-of-Print issues
for cost of materials and postage.
M.U.G. Hotline: 212-465-3430 or write:
G-4 Productions, PO Boa 615TH,
Yonkers, NY 10'i03. Atui: TH Back Issues. Phone: (2l2) 465-3430. * * * Folks
in the New York City area can get
copies of tmavailable back issues of the
Hacker — call Jordan Scott, 713933-2400.
that turn your EPS-16+ or ASR-I0 into a
synthesizer! Star-Tree SF blurbs (2
FFlEE CLASSIFIEDS!
disks; 20 sounds). Only S4 a disk slh.
Get all for $30! SF blurbs for your PC,
add $2 with your order. lack Tolin, 9314
Myrtle Ave., it 1S6, Karissa City, MO
64132.
Well - within limits. We're offering free
classified advertising (up to 4-0 words)
for your sampled sounds or patches.
Additional words, or ads for other products or services, are $0.25,!’ word per
issue {BOLD type: $0.45lword}. Unless
renewed, freebie ads are removed after 2
issues. While you're welcome to resell
copyrighted sounds and programs that
you no longer have any use for, ads for
copies of copyrighted material will not
be accepted. Sorry - we can't (we
won't!) take ad dictation over the phone!
FINALLY! A new set of 16-bit samples
from Tom Shear. This time he tackles
the Waldorf Microwave! For only $15 +
$3 SIH, you can have 3 disks packed
with the fattest digilog synth sounds
you've ever heard! Send an SASE or
e-mail ([email protected]) for free
24
The Interface
_i..._..L
__
A
A
l
Letters for The Interface may be sent to any of the following addresses:
U.S. Matt - The Interface, Treusoniq Hacker, HD2. SW Upland D-r., Portland, DR 9'i221
Electronic mail - GI-'inie Network: TRANSUNIQ. Iutemet: [email protected]
This is probably one of the most open forums in the music industry. Letter writers are asked to please keep the vitriol to a minimum. Readers are
reurinded to take everything with a grain of salt. Resident answer-man is Clark Salisbury [ES]. Letter publication is subject to space considerations.
__
I
_i
T
Filli-
ii
"
h'
I
Hacker:
faults. Sounds on a track will not work
when recording. The sound will play back
Have you tried the sound editor written by
but I can't hear what l’m recording. Ur
Erwin Petter of Germany - K832-
the sound on the track will change in
name but the originai sound stays on the
track. For example. I change the track
ltl) What computer and software can I use
to give me a sampling option‘?
sound from Drum to ‘ifioliu. The name of
Kind regards,
the track sotmd changes to "v"iolin - but it
keeps playing the Drum.
Dave ‘Ward
Tatanaki, New Zealand
2) The GOTO function won't work with a
{CS - Asfor question ij and 2), it's possibie that your instrument couid benefit
from servicing, hut it aiso occurs to me
EDITOR in MIDIIMUSIC (windows secLion]?
IT's simple but GREAT! The $15.flU paid
for version has enhanced features including drum editing.
Beware. It‘s straightforward. It doesn't
ask “Are You Sure?" before overwriting
sounds. I pressed SEND BANK and wrote
over all of my RAM sounds. The program
lets you save an entire bank of sounds
which means that performance banks are
possible (it takes a few minutes to write
an entire bank of sounds to the KS-32).
This program also means that sounds can
be E-MAILED, not just stored.
It has Preset features but I have not tried
them.
‘[email protected]
Cooper II sync unit hooked up. regardless
of whether it's on intemal or MIDI eontrol. Turning off Cooper II causes Sync
Unit to work.
sampled and spread notewise across the
keyboard‘?
that these prohierns might he caused by a
"MIDI ioop" fa MIDI ioop occurs when
the data sent to a device's MIDI out port is
3) Wlren in Disk Drive I get a lot of “Bad
Data" messages coming up on the display.
I seem to get about 10% failure on disks factory sounds and blank disks.
4) Sometimes when playing a sequence,
the Mi:-t!Par1 function will stay at the
value I change it to and sometimes it
won't. How can I get it to keep the
mi:-ting changes‘? Usually the values
return to defauit when the machine stops.
"echoed" hack to its MIDI in port]. This is
easy enough to check out, though. Just dis-
connect aii MIDI cahies from your TS-I ti,
and see
the prohiem persists. if it does,
then you can ruie out MIDI ioop as the
cause, and start thinking ahout contacting
Ensoniq
3930).
Customer
Service
{6iti-d-=i?'-
3_} I‘vsfound that dish auaiity varies greatiy from one hatch to the next, particuiariy
with tow-cost huff:-purchase diskettes. I
{CS - Thanks for the cooi tip! Uh, mind if
I just caii you 5'5 for short?I
-
5) I have a Syquest ZTEII MB hard drive.
How can I get sounds onto it? I have access to a PC. Would I be better off to
swap it for a CD-RUM and disk‘?
Dear Hackers,
What is the latest news regarding the TS
bug which causes existing track data to be
shifted when a new event is entered in
EVENT LIST‘?
Regards ,
Mel Laraway
Australia
6) Cost of sounds: The wholesale prices
of sounds and disks here are about twice
the retail price in the U.S. For instance,
the TSD 1U[l2 retails for $19.95 in the
U.S. Here in New Zealand, the wholesale
price is $40 and the retail price in $60.
(All prices in U.S. dollars.) Does Ensoniq
have a supplier who can provide a mail
order service for their sounds‘?
wouid say that if you’re using highquaiity, name brand diskettes you
shouta'n’t experience too many errors {as
tong as you don’t store your disks aiong
with your coiiection of refrigerator magnets). With iow-cost disks, a one-in-ten
faiture rate isn’t anything too uncommon;
if you're experiencing this with highauaiity disks, it’s possihie that your dish
drive needs some attention. Again. check
with service.
-=1) The initiai settings for mix and pan are
recorded into your sequence right aiong
with everything eise. ifyou want to change
these, you'ii need to erase the originai mix
regarding this hug.j‘
T) Is it feasible to use a CD RUM player
to play audio CDs through a home stereo?
Dear Hacker.
E) Is it possible to obtain a CD of sound
effects?
you can enter the event editor, and deiete
the mix voiume (ll/f}'fl*’) and pan {PAN}
events from the beginning of any track you
9) I recorded “Zah The Wonder Dog"
which features a dog "singing" a verse on
a Korg. How can I get a dog to “yodel" on
an Ensoniq? Can I have the sound effect
want to change.
{Ensoniq — Sorry, we have no news
I own a TS-10. The problems I have are:
1) Every so often the sequencer will not
work in Song Mode giving the following
25
and pan data from any tracks in question.
You can do this in a coupte of ways. First,
Atternativeiy, you can use the FILTER
command in the trach editing pages to
seiect the type of data you wish to erase,
RUM drives for as iittie as -H00 or so
andfrom which track.
here in the states. At those prices, it's difficuit to see how you coutd go wrong.
.5] The easiest way to get sampied sounds
{you are wondering about sampled
sounds, right?) onto your Syquest drive
wouid be to piug the drive into an
ASH-I 0, and save the sounds you're inter-
ware is inctuded with the drive to provide
a way for you to controi the piayback of
ested in from the ASE to the Syquest.
audio Cfls right from your computer.
Also, Gary Geibier's been working on
SCSI support for his weii-regarded set of
Ensoniq disk utiiities for PCs and compatibies. Since Gary's working for En-
3) Yes, there are tons of sound efiects
avaiiabie in a variety of commerciai
iibraries; try consuiting Mix Iviagaairte,
F’) Yes, most CD-RUM piayers can be
used to piay audio Cfis. Generaiiy, soft-
408-0?4i (outside the U.S) and request
document #0008 pertaining to use of the
TS with an externai sequencer. This document contains correct MTDT settings for
the TS to eiiminate MIDI ioops. The infor-
mation can aiso be found in our CompuServe
Forum
Library
{Go
MTENSGNTQ} as a test fife - 0008.TXT.
2J When using the TS with an esternai
tape sync box, set the TS's ctock to
"MIDI." The TS-10 wiii then respond to
the sync unit's emission of MIDI ciocks or
soniq, perhaps he (or someone eise thereJ
might get in a piug for his stufl‘...
Recording EngineeriProducer Ivlagaeine,
and so on to iocate sources. These, of
course, wiii be audio CDs, from which
you'd need to sampte the appropriate
A CD-ROM drive, on the other hand, wiii
sounds.
give you access to hundreds of megs
worth of sounds that you can use with
There are some sound efiects on En-
drive head may need cleaning. fine can
soniq’s CDR-i, I betieve, from the 2?th
Dimension hotophoniq efiects tibrary,
and Ensoniq may have other effects on
other CDs as weii. Your tocat Ensoniq
purchase a disk drive cieaner at a iocai
computer store.
your TS, and no speciai setup is required
{other than piugging the drive into your
TS-I0}. Keep in mind, though, that you
can't save edited versions of your sounds
back onto the CD-ROM, so if you pian on
doing a iot of editing this may not be the
best choice. Stiii, I've been seeing CD-
3] Another possibiiity is that the disk
representative shouid be abie to ciue you
in as to what's avaiiabie.
9) and I0) First, make sure your yodeiing
@til
lit?
'[email protected]@[email protected]
H_emL_E.e.l_e_a.s_e
In-.""-7* ‘Ii’.-'1-r'_II'J
§""'i'i.f—" 3-
7" FF
"""'E*-gsi
1.-:.
"' Q
'9'. on
Phat Loops ii: Samples
How York 51:3.-'1I|:|.' - ow.-_r roo phat
hl ['1 11 op l oops, ll we drums. Franky
hlte, bane
riffs, melodic loop-5, pncl drum aarnpleest
Sample Attdlofllil $69.95 +s.o5 S-&H
""'1'herr'I no don}-Inn lhnl téle fill.-: u 1
greet biflllrt-" - j:|.|:n Alkln. K-ljlhflllfl Feb- *3-5
Rep-renentllll '
I-I I 1: H or 9
Earner}-'1:-och": glw.-'ln'
up tho prop-rs on t]1..l.5
‘
4..
-
;I-fllilflll It‘! all lJ\.lI:tE.lt'...
Biter TOD loop-B.
acratahes. freaky bits
and drum 51.1-up!-err.
Sample audio [11
$4-'9-Q5
+5.-on sea-t
i 13*?-"
an:‘s’§3I=1-i).sis)
Drtler by phone or rnnil. Fdces goo-d tverldvnrle,
Dvernite delivery {$10.00! available on prepaid orders.
VIEAIMC, EDD, [II-IEtIit. UR M—Dl~lEY DRDER
Toll Free info d'r Urcler: 1-000-331-3341
1-5 IE-33 1-8304 {International}
Clln Point: Productions
61 Superior St.
Port Jefferson Station, HY 1 1'i'?E
Song Position Pointer {SPF} information
for tape sync. if the sync box doesn't send
out SPP data, then the TS wiii not know to
auto-iocate to difierent parts of the song.
dog is hungry. Then, put a big steak on
your Ensoniq...
Sorry, i couidn't resist. Certainty, a dog
fyodeiing or otherwise} can be sampied
for whatever diaboiicai purposes you
might have. Of course, you'ii need something to actuaiiy perform the sampiing
with. if I were you, I'd consider an ASH-
series instrument for that function. It wiii
be tess costly to set up for professionat
sampiing than a PC with the software and
hardware you'd need, and it has the advantage of being reai compatibie with
your TS-I 0.
ifyou have your heart set on using a computer for sampiing, i think you'ii probabiy find that IBMIPC compatibie machines
wiii be your best bet at the current time.
rlithough better software and hardware
seem to exist for the Macintosh piagform,
the PC.‘ ofiers your onty hope (at present)
for being abie to create disks that your
TS-1'0 witi read.,1’
4) Ciark is correct regarding mittdown
voiumetpan info. in addition, if the- individuai track parameter "mi.tipan" data
is changed white the sequence is piaying,
once the sequence starts piaying again
from the beginning of the ioop, the vaiues
wiii go back to the originai settings. Set
the vatues needed without running the sequencer and when you go to a new sequence iocation, make sure that "Yes" is
pressed on the "Save changes“ prompt.
This wiii keep the new data intact.
5] As an addendum to Clark's answer, if
you are using CD-ROM sounds you can
save your edits onto a TS formatted disk
as a fiie type ".5'ampie-edits."
6} Ensoniq is distributed exciusiveiy by
the Eiectric Factory NZ for New Zeaiand.
There are severai factors on US versus
foreign pricing. The first is the vaiue of
the dotiar and the conversion rate to New
Zeaiand currency and the second is import taxes. These hard costs are added to
what the distributor pays for the goods.
Unfortunateiy, they have no controi over
these issues. You can contact the Eiectric
Factory at 011-(049) -M3-5016 for more
information.
{Ensoniq - i J We concur with Ciark - it
1?-i 0) Ciark is right on. Have you thought
sounds as if the keyboard is in a MID!
about sending a video of the yodeiing dog
ioop situation. Try our Fax ifetrievai System at (000) 25?-I439 fU.S.) or (010)
to “America's Funniest Home Videos?"
Couid be a quick £10,000...)
26
Hello TH
Don't despair, though; there are severat
{TH - We've aiso posted Garth's article
things you can do.
at our ftp site (iinked to the web page).,?
I own a KS-32. I have just purchased an
First, check out the Transoniq-A"et; you'it
Editor program {from ottr buddy in Ger-
find the iisting elsewhere in this issue.
Dear Transoniq Hacker,
many) and am starting to explore the
waves of sound programming. In trying
out the appropriate I-Isckerpatches from
within the Hacker, I noticed that some
Second, read the manual again, siowiy.
Do things one at a time, just as they are
outlined. I know the manual can be daunt-
I have enjoyed your magazine for the past
two years — keep up the good work. I cm"rently work in South Korea and I depend
parameters are listed differently than my
KS-32. Can you provide me with some
sort of legend or explanation. As I said, I
am new to sound progranttning and would
like a little help. I apologise if this is a
redundant matter for some.
'['hartks,
Ioseph E. Stokes
[email protected]
{TH - Actually, none of us here are too
sure what you're talking about. We'd
need to know more about the editor program before we can teit just what are the
differences. The SQ patch sheets shouid
fairly cioseiy match the keyboard's parameter organisation — but there may be
minor difierences in abbreviations or
things that have been "scrunched" in
some manner tofu on our page. What this
editor program does with them may be a
whole different thing. We'd realty iike
more info - maybe a screen shot or a
ing, but most foiks can glean the important stufi with a little efiort.
Third, taik to the party you bought the
keyboard from. if it's a dealer, they have
am ethical obtigation to help you understand how to use the equipment you purchased from them. if you bought it
secondhand, you might stiit be able to get
some useful pointers from the person you
bought it from.
Fourth, cait Ensoniq Customer Service
{did-dd?-3930). They wiit be happy to
help you get going.
Finaiiy, check your e-maii. There's a
good chance one of our readers might be
e-mail address above).,l
TH:
Could you please tell me the best way to
Hello, I am Time Neronen from Finland.
I'd like to know if there any sound editing
and librarian programs for the SQ-I
{shareware or commercial). I am interested in both Mac and PC platforms.
use my SQ-1.-"32 voice keyboard with my
computer’? I'm using art IBM compatible
336 running Windows 3.1. My sequenc-
Tiruo Neronen
via Internet
ing program is Powertracks Pro. I was
using a GI-drnidi module, but I would love
to use my new keyboard. I tried reading
the manual but to me it's very confusing
and doesn't mention anything about using
the keyboards with computers.
Thanks,
Pauline Hlackwood
b1vqfl[email protected]
{CS - Sorry, Pauline. but the answer to
your question couid generate several typicai TH articies, and frankiy, the interface
is for answers, not reference works.
One quick question: When using a Roland
GR-l guitar synth to control,-irecord MIDI
on the ASR-10, is it possible to record six
channels of MIDI data on one t.rackh:r1strument using MIDI in mode set to
mono‘? When playing the GR-1, you can
hear all six charmels, but when you
record, only one channel gets recorded.
Yes, I have tried millions of combinations
to get this to work and the only way I
have found to record more than one channel at a time is to use multi mode with six
channels loaded. This works, but it is a
abie to share some tips with you f readers
wishing to respond, please note Pauiine's
manuai page or something.I
TH:
heavily on the Hacker to keep me in-
formed on the latest and greatest technology for the ASR-10, and it does.
{CS - Weft, you might check out the
Hacker's Web page 1"http."tiwww.teieport.com.t-trnsoniq); you'll find a coupie
of shareware programs, a few iinks, and a
couple other things of interest |j'we'ii atso
be trying to add iinks to interesting sites;
if any of you readers have tips on cooi
places to go, drop us a fine). Aiso, check
Tech
S _g'..
s o f t w a r e
ASR-10
EPSt1E+ rs series
Sample collecfion sets"
String lthsirs ltrgsns Ilmsm
Syntln R Planes lrsss llruau
s osa-to disks or s osioo disks
onty$1' 9.95
Sllplss inn: lllnurploug, Prophet 5, llsllutrsn, D50,
Jqutr, RI, Janus, WW, ILRP I600, Fufiss.
Bltllhrlll, Tlfltl, PH Wm, B3, llrtrlr it, at-sc,
Jqltsr I, llltbfl, llllinwng, T3, Iinrlltrsr, Prlctnlies,
0B I, II1, llioiu, Isl Tkiflifflui.
out issues number I22 and I23 for Garth
H__ieite's articles on hackerworthy -net
sites. And, of course, there's always
Ensoniq's web page fhttp.'ittv1t-1»t-'.ensoniq.com_,l. You won't find much in the
way of shareware, but it's an interesting
trip nortetheiess]
2?
Tech Star software
F.tZt. Box 45.1235 Ht. Clemens, tilt tacos
‘price of DSIDD dielte sold in large quantity.
hassle when you want to record. Don't
say set the ASR to omni mode - then
pitch bend is applied to all channels in-
know the official name of the two LIR
buttons anymore) so that the red LED
goes on, like when I want to listen to the
stead of one, and when you are trying to
signal I'm sampling. As soon as I have
simulate guitar or bass each stringIchan-
activated it, I sec the meters on the display teact to the input signal. But until
then, they don't.
net has to be independent from one
another.
Also, I have noticed that when I cue and
review with my CD player {a Phillips, I
Help and thanks,
Merle
South Korea
don't have the exact name present), the
[CS - I'm afraid you're out of luck,
Merle. There's no way to record six channels of MIDI data into a single track the
with the digital signal, and the whole
thing gets out of phase or even starts to
sound like something with a delay on it.
ASR seems to lose the synchronisation
ASII; each AER track can have one, and
only one, MIDI channel on which it trans-
mits. The methods you've already hit
upon are the best for recording from your
Problem #3: Has anyone ever succeeded
in making a backup by digital U0‘? I
saved all my 2'}'0lvtB Syquest cartridges
and tried to verify them on two occasions.
I always got an error (I use two Sony
DATs: a DTC-6T0 and a DTC-60).
GR synth.,I
Hi tcchnoheadsl
I have a question concerning the digital
input of the ASE-Ill. I have noticed that it
only works if I activate the thru {I don't
Has anyone ever experienced
problems‘?
these
Thanks for your Ensoniq support, I love
your magazine.
And thanks to Ensoniq for making great
samplers!
E3
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{CS — I believe that the ASH does not
begin monitoring digital audio until you
.-' 5- -
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have pressed the Audio Track buttons, as
you have discovered. This isn't a problem; it's just the way it works.
, __
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As far as the problems with your CD
player, different products handle digital
audio dbferemly. Without going into a
long discussion, sufiice it to say that when
transferring digital audio from one
machine to another, some kind of synchronisation must take place. Generally, the
playback machine will send sync and the
record machine will slave to it. What
wt
coo scttpqraqi
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.
In the world of backups, I've had no
problem making backups and restoring
from same. The only thing I can think to
suggest is that you make sure you are
using data-quality DAT tapes, as the ASR
is not particularly tolerant qt‘ drop-outs.
Other than that, it might be a good idea
to contact Ensoniq Customer Service
{6I0-64?-3930) to go over some of these
issues.)
{Ensoniq - We designed the digital input
monitoring that way because you may not
always want to monitor the audio upon
input. Specifically, when you are using
the DI-I0 to do a back-up to and then restore data from a DAT there is no reason
for listening. Unless you and your dog
like that sort ofthing. {It might get him to
yodel. You never IcnowI,l,i
TH, Ensoniq,
Is there anyone out there who knows anything about how Poly Pressure works on
Ensoniq keyboards? Specifically, I want
to know if there is a way to accurately
fine lune the poly pressure action.
Best wishes,
Eric Lewis
Ilia Intemet
EIlI~EFl
sending sync when it's in cue or review
mode, and ifas you suspect], the ASE loses
sync.
playback machines do when they are
stopped or paused, though, is not always
consistent. Drte machine may continue to
send sync, while another might not.
PK
This is probably what's going on with
your Phillips player; it probably stops
28
I have owned three Ensoniq keyboards
(original EPS, ‘JFK, and EPS-16 Plus). I
found that the original EPS had the best
action of the three. It required little finger
pressure in order to achieve a good feel
for the pressure zones, but the keyboard
made a clickity-clack sound when played.
I found the VFX and the EPS-16 Plus to
have much firmer pressure. It hurts my
fingers to have to press so hard in order to
get the poly pressure effect. Also, it ap-
pears that some cf the keys respond to
pressure a little more readily than others —
resulting in a non-ruriform keyboard.
It seems to me that the problem of how to
gain more poly pressure sensitivity from
the keyboard could be achieved in at least
three ways:
1) Through software — the operating system could allow for a broader range of
sensitivity levels, so I could select the one
that feels just right.
2) Perhaps there‘s a potentiometer that
cart be tweaked or a modification to die
circuitry that would allow more sensitiviiy.
for my nsu-to will not work with my
EPS-It‘i+iil! SCSI is SCSI right?
WRGNG!
What gives? Is there any workaround for
3) Can the keys themselves be adjusted?
Are there any replacement parts that will
give new life to the keyboard‘? Can I buy
a new keyboard for my instrument? Cine
that is guaranteed to give easy, smooth
and accurate pressure action across the
entire keyboard‘?
If anyone out there has an answer or suggestion, I'd appreciate hearing from you.
Sincerely,
Robert Gately
PG Box 4'? ll
this? Do I have to have two incompatible
SCSI drives for my otherwise incestuously compatible Ensoniq _samp1ers'.i"i' This is
misinterpreted the chart. Please tell me
that lvlr. Giebler has hacked the EPS-16+
US to read and write to the Jae drive.
Otherwise, please explain. This sucks!
I'm not buying two drives! I mean, I was
ready to buy a Syquest until I found out
about the Isa, now ...'l‘? GR%dt*#$aaahAAAHHRGll
hny
suggestions
would also be appreciated.
‘Thanks,
Mark Snyder
could mahe that might affect pressure
{CS - t-is far as l can tell, the information
you have is correct; the Jar drive will not
Yes, you can huy a new heyhoard, if you
want. Contact Ensoniq Customer Service
at (eta) dd?-3930.]
[Ensoniq - 2) This can't he done, since
the sensitivity is digitally controlled.
We're a hit surprised by your comments.
With the System sensitivity set to SUFT
we find it very easy to get into Pressure.
Have you tried that setting F]
-
Dear HackcrlErtsoniq:
Hi!
I am an Ensoniq lover and currently using
EPS-16+, ‘JFK-sd, and DP!-4. Some
Japanese competitor, such as Korg and
Roland, is now producing some new
products, called "Interactive Music Workstation." The new kits the ability to
pro-set "style" with bass line, drum pat-
tem, some background sounds. I think
tore‘?
‘Via Internet
Thanks,
u'[email protected] (*LAi-8:)
worlc with your EPSI6-PLUS {'sorry].,l
{CS - ln my experience, Ensoniq never
lets on what they're doing until they are
[Ensoniq - Unfortunately as with all
"standards" there is no guaranteed
universal adherence to specs. Just hecause SCSI exists does not guarantee that
all devices 1' especially products designed
many years apart from each other} will
worl: together. For example, the original
Apple Macintosh SCSI interface did not
adhere to the spec. it was necessary for
hard drive manufacturers and Ensoniq to
follow suit if they {we} wanted it to worlc.
pretty darn well ready to do it, so l'd he
surprised if they told you they were going
to produce this hind of product. Still, it
As time went on, the implementation was
refined on the Mac, the hard drives, and
I'm at the end. I've tried many combinations but my old brain can't seem to grasp
how to send and receive programs on my
MIDI setup reliably.
our products.
I'm sure I'm not the only bonehead out
there who thought that the new Jae (1 GB,
removable <$i‘.ii]i]} drive would be the
answer to my SCSI dreams. I looked on
the Ensoniq Web page and in the compatibility chart I find that the best drive
trying to find a little "silver-lining" for
your tale ofwoeijj
most of the player know it. Will Ensoniq
introduce a similar product in the near fu-
[CS — Either than the settings that are
available at the System level (which
you've apparently already tried changing), I hnow of no adjustments that you
response.
one drive is nowhere near as expensive as
it once was. (Please don't write hacl.-: to
argue this point — we know it's not the
answer you want to hear. We‘ re just
very annoying. Please tell me that I
Otherwise, everything is fine.
Lancaster, Ch 93539
least the cost of storage is dropping
rapidly, and the idea of having more than
never hurts to asl:...j'
{Ensoniq - J
To; [email protected]
Subject: Send program selection
The EFS-I6 PLUS went out ofproduction
lxefore the current "state-of-the-art" of
ripple-compatible SCSI. And the .las drive
is at the forefront ofSCSl-2 compatibility.
We are sorry for your dilemma, but at
Please let us know at least four weeks in advance to avoid missing
any issues. The Post-‘Office really will HGT reliably forward this
type of
[Believe us, not thernl) We need to know both your
old and your new address. [issues missed due to late or no change
notification are your own dumb fault — we mailed them!)
I
*
I
I
29
Here's the setup: I have a TS-12 as the
controlling station hooked to a SD-1 and
a KS-32. When I call up a sequence and
want to use programs on the other two
Every-month we mail out thousands of issues and every mouth
about a dozen get "misplaced" by the Post Office. If you're ever
one of the winners of this loamy, just flue us a call (503 -21'?-634 S,
S m - E pm Pacific Time) and we'll he happy to mail a replacement copy -- no prob. (However, if you accuse us of nefarious
schemes to "lip you off," you will he offered a refund and given
helpful
info for other musician magazines.)
~
-
Kids, I can never seem to get the right
program loaded. A lot of my confusion
seem to be in die “send program change"
area. When I go above the limit (I think
125, I don't have the I£Bs in front of me
now) the whole thing gets very confusing.
I know I'm making this harder than it is.
lvlaybe you can reprogram my mind and
set me on the right path. Any help is appreciated.
Thanks ,
lfk
‘Via Internet
{CS - Isn't it strange how something as
basic as program changes can be so mys-
tifying? .li‘ut_then, that's the beauty of
seem to have some inkling about this already) what happens when you send program changes numbered above I Ell is not
what you might expect.
Regarding point number one." make sure
that transmission and reception channels
are set up correctly. In other words, if
you want tracl: one of Sequence.IPreset
ly. You need to send the second part of
this message, Ithe program change
number), before anything will actually
change. So cycle through until you reach
the PRtIlGRA.M page, and set the program
to Iti.
sound in your KS-32, you must make sure
that tract: one in the TS-I2 and tracl: one
you're still having trouble, try contacting
Ensoniq Customer Service directly. I'm
sure they'll be delighted to get you on the
in the SD-I are set to the same MIDI
channel, and that the KS-32 has none of
its traclts Ior as basic channelJ set to this
MIDI channel.
That's pretty much all there is to it; if
right tracl:._I
{Ensoniq — Clark's answer is fine for the
RS-32, but the SIJ-I does not respond to
Anyway, you need to tahe a couple of
things into account in your situation.
First is that your TS-I2 can and will send
program changes on multiple MIDI channels when new sequences are selected;
how either of your other keyboards
responds to those is up to you to heep
straight.
Second Iand judging from your letter, you
Current Ensoniq 0.8.
(I3lsltlEPH%l}
ass
cas-u
EPS-16 Pius
uasos
monos
sso
ESQ-M
soac
v|=:-<
vex-so
so-1
so-1 s2
so-1 PLUS
so-n
so-n as
s-on PLUS
‘
Your KS-32 won't do anything immediate-
"X" in the TS-I2 to control the sound assigned to tract: one in SequencetPreset
"Y" on your SI}-I, but not to control any
standards...
‘
number to iltll Inote that banhs are numbered starting with llllll).
2.4-BIZ.-till
2.1-'t~9I2.4i
1..3l1.ililF
so-1
so-1 as
ova
or-on
as-as
ass-is
ass-as
nuns
KMX-to
TS-1oi1‘2
KT-idlee
Sourtdscaps
Bank Select messages. It uses the higher
each ofyour instruments groups its sound
banhs. The TS-I2 has five banhs (not including sampled instruments}, each of
program change numbers asfollows:
which contains 60 sounds. The SD-I has
two banks, each of which has 60 sounds.
And the KS-32 has two banks, each of
which contains Ell sounds.
To select a program in the SD-I or
KS-32, you may need to send a bank
select message, as well as a program
change. In other words, let's say you
want to select program I6 in the INT
bank of your KS-32. You send a program
change of I6, but the wrong sound comes
up. Why? Because sending a program
change without a banlc select message
will load the program from whatever
bank is current. The current bank in the
KS is, by default, the RUM banh.
So, you'll need to send a bani: select message followed by the program change
message. The bank select message can be
accessed in the TS-I2 by pressing the
SCI-2
sodas
As for point two, try to understand how
*a~s oasg "~“ e
:"i“r'.‘i*r *i‘-lr°i“*r‘ i'°9"l'4 ill-4.1il
4.‘tilI4.‘lD
1.1.5
2.02
3.10
&55I1.5
S.53I3.5i'i
2.013
‘L543!
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$3
MIDI Status button in the sequencer section until you see BANK in the display.
This message consists of two parts - the
MSB {Most Signiticant Byte} and the ILSB
(Least Significant Bytej. To select a bani:
remotely on an Ensoniq device, you'll
need to deal only with the MSB, I believe
(I get confused about these, too). To
select the INT bard: in the RS-32, then,
select the Bani: MSR; if LS5‘ is showing in
the display, press the sofl button underneath it, and use the arrow keys or data
slider to change it to MSB. Now set the
30
Program change #I2-it
selects ROM I Programs
Program change III26
selects INT Programs
Program change #I2?
selects ROM II‘ Programs
You need to first send the program
change to choose the desired Bani: followed by another lower program change
to select the correct individual Program
from that Bards. The best way to do this
from the TS is to use two tracks set to the
same MIDI channel (ex. II and I2),
where track I I has the high program
number to select the Bank and tracl: I2
has the specific sound's program number.
Your sequenced data can be on either
track. It doesn't have to be on both Iand
in fact shouldn't be).
Also remember that since each Barth in
the SD-I has 60 programs, program
changes ddi-I24’) will always select
Cartridge programs {if one is available).
Why did we ship Program #I2-B? We
didn't - it selects Presets, with the following program change assignment:
lllll -5'20 selects INT Presets
DZI -E140 selects CRT Presets
i'.l4I -Elfill selects RM] Presets
fldl -II-‘Si? selects RIHII Presets]
'
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lrro llirli Ir-ram to floppies tor use in your e-Imp-ior. i-Ii
Every music aiylo: pianos. synths. drums. loops. tr-ass-es.
pids-. orchestral. tuohrro. brass. strings orro rnu-ch morn.
Lo-ta oi palcrts selects and attectsl Specify format -tPCr‘Ena.Ir
Iririrr HID! Fills: cocoa lot PC. Wail over lrliliiii publicoorrtain iriliii
lites ready ioire ptaysddiraruy iromihcil-D. Firrsiriooiiiasarrd
liratawareutiitiea. Every rrrusicaisiyieirom popioiattbrocirio
rapes: Hoiiot crr:rmmerr'r:i-al use. Hi
"'a"'fi""""""'a"""" """";"""' """' :bJs'l"v'g.Eau1"Etrsiouur no at
m°l'l'°“'“"9“"'
wnrentoo or~rTanr'o'
Mill Blrlillfluil iiiiiu ll"l5ll'lJ'i'H’l'il 'i|'|i9r"I|'E |:A|-.,|ADA_ Hi|_ 541'
iiias rsxr traps] on CD-Roirl. its
51 a-res-eon:
Lhutlro sarripla CD's. I35 each. Bill! |[email protected] ca
__
ASR + 16-PLUS
EFFECTS
The "Ir-'oder synlltesiecs vocals out of any sampled sound. It can sound like a vocodcr, but
there's never been an effect like this for any
other keyboard. The lowest lfr keys of the keyboard each trigger a different vowel or consom=u:rL Your left hand actually forms words by
"spelling" them. (OK, it takes some practice lro
sing a whole sentence.) Your right hand con- _
trots the notes and chords of your robot choir. And how long have you been waiting to make a
big fat breathy choir sing "Louie, Louie?" Or
maybe it was a car crash snare that you needed
to say "mom!" Heed details? The Moder is a
3-band paratncuic HQ effect for the Ensoniq
ASR-lli and EPS-Iii PLUS. This HQ can rapidly "morph" between many different settings.
These different settings impose vocal characteristics onto any sound that is run through the
EQ. It's much cooler than a Morpheus.
Audio-in is supported.
The "r-"odor disk is $49.95 and comes with
sounds: a choir, a solo voice, a robot voice, a
talking rhythm loop. Order by MC.-"VISA by
calling {Elli} 251-9552 or send check or money
order to '1h"A"rlcIlO‘1' Industries, PO BOX 233,
Paroli, PA 19391 USA (Price includes shipping
. but add $6 outside USICANADA. PA. residents
add 6% tart.)
I
TRANSONIQ
HACKER
mes sw UPLAND cs, Pcetuuve, ea s-rest
“%Y'E.'§§§§5E
Pceruuve, ca
PERMIT ND. 1 1
SUBSGRIPTIDH MATERIAL
ADDRESS CORRECTION REQUESTED
DATED MATERIAL _ THE HALUE
Pestmaster: Please return Ferm 354? as seen as pesslble se
we can change eur reccrds. This is a rnenthly publicatien.
Publisher: Eric Geisllnger
Editrhr: Jane Talisman
Advertising rates: Please send fer rate card.
Hates tier authers: Please seed fer writer-infe card.
titur {semewhat regular} illustrieus bevy cf writers includes: Graig llindenen, Ftebby
Elerman, Paul Bissell, Stave Elyhurst, Barry Barsen, lvlarfr Sliftcn, Antheny Ferrara,
Pat Ftnnlgan, C-haries Fl. Fischer, Jeffrey Fisher, Gary Glebler, Jim Greta, Garth
Hjelte, Bryce lnman, Jeri Jetten, Dara Jenes. Brad itautman, Jehnrg ltlenaris,
..iehn Lei inf-t, Daniel Mandel, Sam lvlims, Jeffrey Ftheads, Brian est, Start-t
Salisbury, Tern Shear, Jee Slater. I-tint Silnitard, .lac|-t Telin, and Steve Vincent.
Sulsscrlpitene: 12 menthly issues. US: $23ryear, All ethers: Sflzfyear. Payable
Cepyrlght 1595, Transcniq Hacker, tees SW Upland Drive, Pcrtlend. DR
necessarily reflect these cf the publisher er Enscniq Carp. Printed in the
United States.
Q1-'221. Phene: [EDS] 22?-SE43 |jS am te 9 pm Pacific West Geast Time].
Rubber‘
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Anateg synths have rssenant filters. The EPS and ASH dc net - until yeu get
these samplml Wsvefiey makes a great resenant filter. but it's menephenlc.
These seunds effer pelyphenic sampled filtering te achieve the linear resenant effect you ere after. Great fer retro-se unch, and just gecd stuff.
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wees:
KP-5 '”t;,§§I§I Ij-1;};-i i éi.§1,i§§§i;.,:,i §j§:.f§E,I§i§.t§Iji§§§§§I§£§iEi§I §li§i ‘j'= It super brass seunds, serne
The SampleBe.nk is from GyberSeunds. B50 megs ef great Enseniq seurida -
"SD
The legac fir ntinues with e ur new samples ef the SD-1 -this isrrta eutcf-date din esa ur; it's full ef great seundet re new samples.
SD Seunds. Sfitlmegs mere - let's ef drums, rhythm leeps, l{Ft-10, Fsirlight,
Ghrema, S-4. and mere!
S-B: $74..95 fPlG'..t. $55..55 {Eneeeig)l' Sr-B.‘ $45.85!
§P§/ASH TOM'S fer lM'nd'e|sB..=’?.5
$4.9.951
Our fvtenlterseitware gives you the inside leek intc yeur Ensenlq sampler.
INCH
striarl, - ‘ ds tee! 35 seunds in all.
H“If
Q- WLL
These helpful videes cever haalc functiens as well as advanced techni-ques. Gall fer availability at the end cf Clcte barf
Plucl-ted and picked versiens ef Hamers, Hickenhaclrers, Yamaha
Frei:less‘s, Pedulla*s,.elembics, and Fenders!
$39. es!
The £5-'.t.r§g' Egg}
These are great guitars. Elistcrted and clean. funky and ceuntry. Net
enly have yeu sampled scrtte great guitar seunds and nuances, we
have afse preduced ever SD effects fer mere guitar EtJ‘s and etfects.
$4.9.55'
l
anaieg 5. new synths, drum machines, and mere. The Samplerfienl-t is frutri
includes Wavesample viewingredittttg, advanced lceplngrediting functiens,
Naming tllllzarrt, and full editing!
$55.55!
_.4..!1I1.t!.£.I'_I ..-er.-.r I11,-1 -‘-'1-"_~._.ca-;-r5.;.£._r. 1...: net Era rr _.|.r.-'.' r."-.-'1--1
Brass, natural and syn lttetic, sele and ensettibie, with expression like yeu‘ve
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I
the Enseniq Cerp. Upiniens expressed are these ef the authers and de net
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Enseniq and the names ef their varieus preducts are registered trademarl-ts ef
'. .. .
“-._ . 'l-- - =. -.- I ..~1-:-:-:~:=:-:-:~:~1-;"r 1,1 1 I; III11 -r.
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Trarrseniq Hacker is the independent user's news magazine fer Enseniq
preducts. Trartsenig Hacker is net affiliated in any way with Enseniq Gerp.
afrware
C0. - Your Ensoniq Sample & .£i.cceeeer*-Les ficrrrcef
-‘T
'
.
In US funds.
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never heard befere. ti-let just seunch - includes addttienai hardware and an
insttticfiiertei videe. Drum lvtarhess - OUTHAGEOUS dnsmsl We are weridrtg
with the beet cf the aceustic and electrics - drum seunds bigger and better
than what yeu are used te!
IVQHII Id/HERE CAN YDU §T.¢1.LL THI51-='
byphone er fix" r-sees-.eee.e=s. 1-e12-ass-arse
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by mast‘ FED. Bax ffltl Ptfifieten MN 5620?
by Internet: chr'c.t'enEPS§terittmenceer
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