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INSTRUCTIONS
Cardinal Industries Inc.® LIC, NY 11101
Made in China.
www.cardinalgames.com.
1- Chess
Players: 2
Equipment: Chess Board, 32 Chess Pieces, each player takes 16 of the same color
Object: To checkmate or trap the opponent’s King.
Set-Up: Each player has 16 pieces arranged on each end of the board as follows: First Row - Rook, Knight, Bishop,
Queen, King, Bishop, Knight, Rook Second Row - 8 Pawns.
The board has 64 squares, just like a checkerboard. Make sure it is placed so that a white square is always at the
right hand of each player. Note: Queen is always placed on a square of her own colour.
To Play:
1. White is always the first to move.
2. Players alternate turns, one move at a time.
3. If a player lands on an occupied square he or she captures the piece on the square. A player doesn’t have to
capture, but if he or she does, the captured piece is removed from the board
4. Only the Knight can jump over other pieces.
The King:
The King is the all-important piece. He moves only one square at a time in any direction – forward, backward,
sideways or diagonally. The King can capture any enemy piece that is undefended, whereas he himself is not
subject to capture. He must not at any time move into a “check” that is controlled by the opponent. The King must
always stay at least one square away from the opposing King. Both Kings always remain on the board.
The Queen:
Like the King, the Queen can move forward, backward, sideways or diagonally in a straight line. She can move any
number of squares, provided there is no obstructing piece in her path. She may capture an enemy piece by
removing the captured piece and occupying the vacated square.
The Rook:
The Rook is next in power to the Queen, and it moves forward, backward, or sideways (but not diagonally) any
number of squares in a straight line, provided there is no obstruction. The Rook captures by taking the space of
the piece it is capturing. The Rook is also used in “castling.”
The Bishop:
The Bishop moves only diagonally, either forward or backward and any number of squares in a straight line,
provided there is no obstruction. The Bishop captures on the diagonal.
The Knight:
The Knight moves in a very special way: either he goes forward one square and then one square diagonally to the
right or left, or he goes immediately to a diagonally right or left square, and then forward one square (this move
forms an “L”). The Knight is the only piece that can leap over obstructing pieces. The Knight captures in the same
way as the other pieces. When a Knight leaves his square he always lands on a square of the opposite colour.
The Pawn:
The Pawn moves forward only (never backward). On its first move it may go either one or two squares. After that it
may move only one square at a time, capturing like the Bishop on a diagonal. When any Pawn arrives at the last
square of the opposite side, the player may substitute for it any other piece except the King. As the game’s end
nears, the Pawns become increasingly valuable.
Castling:
Each player has the privilege of “castling” once in the game. Castling is the moving of the King two squares to his
right or left toward the Rook and then placing the Rook on the square on the other side of the King. A player may
castle subject to the following restrictions:
1. The King must not be in check.
2. He must not pass over or land on a square commanded by a hostile chess piece.
3. Neither King nor Rook must have been previously moved.
4. No piece may intervene between the King and the Rook.
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Check: The King is in check when he is attacked by one of the opponent’s pieces. His capture is not
permissible.Player making check must say “check” when attacking opponent’s King. Now the opponent must do
one of three things:
1. The King must move out of check.
2. The hostile piece that checks must be captured.
3. A piece must be placed between King and attacking piece.
Checkmate: This means the King has been captured. Because the object of the game is the capture of the
opponent’s King, the game is lost if none of the above three moves can be made. The “check” then turns into a
“checkmate.”
To Win: To achieve checkmate.
2- Checkers
Players: 2
Equipment: Checker Board, 24 Checker Pieces, each player takes 12 of the same color
Object of the Game: To capture and remove the opponent’s checkers from the game board.
Game Play: Each player selects a checker color and places their twelve (12)playing pieces on alternate squares of
the first three (3) rows on the game board. Both players must place their checkers on the same color squares.
Each player moves a checker, in turn.. To remove the opponent’s checker from the board, the player must jump
that piece. To jump an opponent’s piece, the jumping checker passes over the checker to be captured in a diagonal
direction and must land on a square that is vacant. All moves must be made in a diagonal fashion and must always
be moved to the same color square. Double and triple jumps may be made in the same sequence as long as vacant
squares exist in any forward diagonal direction. When a player’s checker reaches the opponent’s last row on the
other side of the game board – this checker becomes a "King". It becomes a "King" by having another checker (of
the same color) placed on top of it. A "King" may move both forward as well as backward on the game board in a
diagonal direction.
3-Chinese Checkers
Players: 2-6
Equipment: Chinese Checkers Board, 60 Pawns, each player takes 10 of the same color
Object of the Game: To gain control of the star point directly opposite the player.
Game Play: Each player selects a playing piece color and then places ten (10) playing pieces into the holes in their
home base. Each player’s home base is the star point that is directly in front of him or her. Each piece is moved by
placing a playing piece in an adjacent hole or by jumping another playing piece. Only one (1) move may be made at
a time, except when jumping; at that time any number of jumps may be made. This can include straight-line jumps
or zigzag jumps. At no time are any playing pieces to be removed from the playing board. Eventually, all playing
pieces must be moved regardless as to whether a player wants to block another player’s move. Players may jump
their own playing pieces as well as their opponent’s.
4-Backgammon
Players: 2
Equipment: Backgammon Board, 30 Checker Pieces, each player
takes 15 of the same color
Object of the Game: To be the first player to remove their playing
pieces from the game board.
Board Set Up: See diagram. Each player has fifteen(15) playing
pieces .
Game Play: Each player casts a single die to determine who has
the first move. High roll between the two players goes first –
with this initial throw of the dice being the first move of the
game. Any doubles requires a new
throw of the dice.
a) Moving Playing Pieces: Numbers on both dice must be played
if possible. The same playing piece may be moved for both
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numbers, but the two numbers cannot be added and played as one move. Two different pieces
may also be moved according to the numbers shown on the individual die. There is no limit to the number of men
of the same player can place on one point. A point with two or more men is blocked against an opponent, although
it may be jumped. When a player cannot move because of blocked points, they lose a turn. If a player throws
doubles on their dice, they can move four (4) playing pieces one move the number shown on the dice, two (2)
playing pieces two moves the number shown on the dice, or one (1) playing piece four moves the number shown
on the dice.
b) Hitting an Opponent’s Playing Piece: A single playing piece is not protected and is open to be hit. If the
opponent’s dice allows the hitting of their opponent’s playing piece, this piece is sent to the center bar. This playing
piece must start over and can only re-enter the board in the opponent’s inner table and cannot enter on a blocked
point. Two (2) or more playing pieces may be hit in one play.
c) Bearing Off: When either player succeeds in moving all of their playing pieces in to their own inner table, they
may start to bear off (remove pieces from the board). The player can remove these pieces from points that
correspond to the number shown on the thrown dice. Player may either move their playing pieces or take them off
of the game board. When throwing a number that is higher than any point covered, a playing piece from the next
highest point may be removed. A playing piece may not be removed if the point indicated is vacant and there is a
playing piece on a higher counting point. If, while bearing off, a playing piece is hit, that playing piece must go
back to the center bar and re-enter the game in the usual way. That playing piece must then travel all around the
game board back to their own inner table before any more playing pieces can be removed from the game board.
5-Solitaire
Players: 1
Equipment: Soltaire Board, 32 Checker Pieces
Object of the Game: To remove all the playing pieces from the game board except for a single playing piece. The
single playing piece is to be left in the game board center.
Game Play: Game is to be played by one player. To begin the game, place all of the playing pieces on the game
board – leaving the center space open. Playing pieces are to be moved by jumping over adjoining pieces into a
vacant space. The playing piece that is jumped is removed from the game board. The playing pieces may only be
moved vertically or horizontally but never in a diagonal direction.
6-Pachisi
Players: 2-4
Equipment: Pachisi Board, 2 Dice, 16 Pawns, each player takes 4 of the same color
Object of the Game: To be the first player to move all four (4) playing pieces from their entry point to their HOME.
Game Play: Each player selects four (4) playing pieces of the same color and places them in their starting area (red
enter, blue enter, etc…) The game board should be positioned so that each player’s "enter" space is at their right
hand. Each player then rolls the dice and the highest number goes first. Play then continues on passing to the left.
a) To enter a Playing Piece: A player may enter a playing piece only if they throw a total of five (5) with the two dice
or if one of the two dice shows a five (5). For every five (5) thrown, the player must enter a playing piece.
If a double five (5) is thrown the player must enter two (2) playing pieces.
b) After a Playing Piece Has Entered: If one die shows a five (5) and the other die a different number, another
playing piece is entered (using the 5), and a playing piece already on the board moves the number of spaces
indicated by the other die. Once a playing piece has entered, it can be moved the number of spaces that match the
number shown on the dice. Should a player not be able to use the total shown on the dice, they may use the
number shown on one of them. During the game, a player may not have more than two (2) of his/her playing
pieces occupying the same space.
c) When All Playing Pieces (4) Are in Play: If a player throws the dice and gets "doubles", he/she may move any
combination of his/her playing pieces the number of spaces indicated on the dice. One (1) playing piece may use
all the spaces, or the number may be divided by 4, 3 or 2. Any time a player throws "doubles", they are allowed
another turn.
d) Capturing an Opponent’s Playing Piece: If in his/her turn, a player’s playing piece lands (by exact count) on a
space occupied by another player’s playing piece, that opponent’s piece is "captured" and sent back to its starting
corner. It then must re-enter the board as noted above. The player who makes the capture may either throw the
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dice again or move any one (1) of their playing pieces ten (10) spaces. When a playing piece is on its home path, it
cannot be captured. No opponent may enter any home path except its’ own. If two (2) playing pieces of the same
color rest on the same space anywhere on the board, they cannot be passed by any player, regardless of color. The
player whose pieces are blocking the path may keep them there as long as they can move another playing piece.
Once the "block" is broken, the two (2)-playing pieces may not travel together; they must be on different spaces at
the end of the move. Should a "block" occupy an entry space, it will prevent any playing pieces from entering the
path.
e) Going Home: The home space may only be entered by an exact throw of the dice. For every playing
piece moved into HOME, that player is given a bonus of ten (10) spaces, which must be used by only one
(1) playing piece. If the ten (10) cannot be used it is then forfeited. The first player to get all four (4) playing pieces
HOME wins!
7- Snakes & Ladders
Players: 2-4
Equipment: Snakes & Ladders Board, 4 Pawns, each player takes 1
All players start at the space marked “1”
Players move around the board hoping not to be ‘swallowed’ by a snake, and getting a raise up a ladder. First
player to land on the one-hundred square by exact count wins.
Each player moves his marker according to the number thrown on the die. If the marker lands on a square at the
foot of a ladder, the player may move the marker to the top of the ladder. If the marker lands on the head of a
snake, the marker slides down the snake to the square at its tail!
8- Tic Tac Toe
Players: 2
Equipment: Tic Tac Toe Board, 10 Checker Pieces, each player takes 5 of the same color
Object of the Game: To be the first player to get three (3) of their playing pieces in a row – horizontally, diagonally,
or vertically.
Game Play: After the players select their color (playing pieces) the game can begin. The first player to move places
a playing piece on a vacant square on the game board. The players then take alternate turns until the game is
finished.
9- Tiddlywinks
Players: 2
Equipment: Tiddlywinks Board, 12 Checker Pieces, each player takes 6 of the same color
Player use 5 pieces for shooting and one as the shooter.
Player places a piece outside the board then holds the shooter between thumb and forefinger and presses on the
edge of the playing piece. The piece should then shoot into the air. If player gets the piece into the center circle first
time, 100 points are scored. If the piece lands onthe board, a player scores either 5, 10 or 25 points depending on
which ring it falls closer to. A piece that falls off the board scores no points. Players alternate turns. Whoever has
the most points after all the pieces have been shot is the winner.
10- Giveaway Checkers
Players: 2
Equipment: Checker Board, 24 Checker Pieces, each player takes 12 of the same color
The object of Giveaway Checkers is the reverse of regular Checkers. In this variation, players try to be the first to
have all their checkers captured or blocked. The checkers themselves move in the same way as in regular
Checkers, but in this case players try to put their pieces in the path of their opponent, forcing their opponent to
take their checkers. Players must make any possible jump. Kings are crowned the same way but players should
avoid getting Kings. Since Kings must also jump if the opportunity arises, savvy players will try to set up multiple
jumps that an enemy King cannot avoid making. The first player either to lose all of his pieces or to be unable to
make any more moves is the winner.
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11- All Kings
Players: 2
Equipment: Checker Board, 24 Checker Pieces (12 of each color)
A variation of the game Checkers. In this version (very popular with children) all 12 pieces are ‘kings’ from the
start. There is no need to “crown” the pieces. Winner is the first player to capture all the opponent’s pieces or
prevent him from moving.
Choose another player to be the Traffic Light. After everyone has a turn as dice roller and Traffic Light, scores are
added up. The player with the highest score wins the game.
12-Acey-Deucy
Players: 2
Equipment: Backgammon Board, 30 Backgammon Pieces (15 of each color), 2 dice for each player
A variation of Backgammon. All the men are entered from the bar in the same manner as re-entering in the regular
game. All 15 men must be entered into the opponent’s inner table before any man may move around the board. If a
player throws a 1 and a 2 (Acey-Deucy), he may move his man in the usual manner. Player may then select any
double he desires and moves this 4 times. For example, if he selected double 4, he may make 4 moves of 4 points
each. All other rules and scoring procedures are exactly the same as Backgammon.
13-Diagonal Checkers
Players: 2
Equipment: Checker Board, 24 Checker Pieces (12 of each color)
An interesting variation of the regular game, except that each player positions his twelve men on the tan squares in
the three diagonal rows on his left… 2, 4, 6. Rules are the same as regular Checkers except that play is on the tan
squares. A “King” can be crowned only when it arrives at either of the 2 tan squares diagonally opposite its starting
position.
14-Diagonal Chess
Players: 2
Equipment: Chess Board, 32 Chess Pieces (16 of each color)
A variation of the game of Chess. All the pieces except the pawns move and capture in the normal way. The game
is played corner to corner. And because of this the pawn always moves ahead on the same color space and
captures by moving forward diagonally to a different color space. The board is arranged as shown:
15-Fox in the Henhouse
Players: 2
Equipment: Checker Board, 1 Dark Checker Piece & 12 Light Checker Pieces
A delightful strategy game played on the blue squares of a regular checkerboard. One player (the Fox) has one dark
piece. The other player has twelve pieces (Hens). The Hens are placed on the blue squares on the first three rows
(just like the checkers) and the Fox is placed on the blue corner square on the opposite side of the board. The Hens
move just like the regular checkers and the Fox moves like a “King”. The Fox moves first. The Fox wins if it can
reach the last row in the “Hen House.” The Hens win if they can “Trap” the Fox or keep him from moving.
16-Gomoku
Players: 2
Equipment: Checker Board, 24 Checker Pieces (12 of each color)
Played on a standard checkerboard with 12 pieces for each player. Play start with the board empty. Players take
turns placing one piece at a time on any square. All the squares are used. After the pieces have all been placed on
the board, each player uses his turn to move any one piece into a vacant adjoining square. When the player
succeeds in placing five of his pieces in a row (vertically, horizontally or diagonally) he must remove one of his
opponent’s pieces. The winner is the first player to remove all the opponent’s pieces.
17-Knight’s Tour
Players: Solo Play
Equipment: Chess Board, 1 Knight Piece
A challenging game for one player at a time. Place the Knight in the far right corner (dark brown square) of your
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rewarded with earning the letter “S.” More rounds are played with the highest scorers earning letters. Players are
trying to spell out the 5-letter word S-P-O-O-K. The winner is the first player to get “SPOOK”.
side of the board. Object is to move the knight from his starting position and in exactly 64 moves touch each space
on the board. It helps if the player uses a paper sketch of the board and marks each space as he lands on it.
64-Rung Race
Players: 2 to 3
Equipment: 4 or 6 Dice (2 dice per player), Paper and Pencil
Have someone draw a ladder with 10 rungs. Give each player two dice. Each player rolls a pair of dice and the total
of whatever is tossed becomes their special number.
Now start play. The first player rolls his dice. Play will continue to the left with all players throwing the dice once on
a turn. If the toss matches anyone’s special number including the dice roller’s, then their initials are placed on the
first rung of the ladder. If no matching number is tossed no one climbs the ladder. It’s now the next players turn to
roll. Play as above adding players’ initials to the ladder and moving them up on matching die rolls. The first player
to reach rung 10 is the winner.
18-Nine Men’s Morris
Players: 2
Equipment: Morris Game board, 9 Tan Checkers , 9 Brown Checkers
There are three steps to play: (1) Placing men on the board, one at a time alternately. (2) Moving the men around,
and (3) “Hopping.” Players try to get three of their own men into a straight line along one of the lines on the board.
This is called a “mill”. Once a player forms a mill, He may remove one of the opponent’s men from the board. If an
opponent’s man is part of the mill, however, that piece may not be removed. Play continues until both players have
placed their nine men on the board.
Players now take alternate turns, moving a man from an existing position on the board to an adjacent vacant point
of intersection. If there is a vacant space that can be reached by jumps over an opponent’s piece, a player may
jump and capture that piece. Play continues in this manner until one player is reduced to only two men. That player
then becomes the loser.
65-In the Dark
Players: Any Number
Equipment: All 32 chess pieces
Mix up all the chess pieces in the center of the table. The first player closes his eyes. The player to his right calls
out the name of a chess piece. For example: He might say, “Brown Queen.” The player whose eyes are closed
must now try to blindly feel for that piece. If he finds it, he keeps it. If it’s not the correct piece, he returns it to the
pile and it’s the next player’s turn. Everyone picks a piece on a turn. Because a player must correctly identify the
piece and its color there can be a lot of fun missed call-outs. Play until there are no pieces left in the center of the
table. Players then count the pieces they found. Whoever has the most, wins the game.
66-Tic-Tac-Toe Toss
Players: 2 Players
Equipment: Tic-Tac-Toe Board, 18 Checkers (9 of each color)
Each player takes 10 checkers of one color. Place the gameboard on the floor. The first player standing 4 feet away
from the board thows a checker trying to put it on a square of the board. If it lands on a line, a player can put it
inside any square. If there’s an opponent’s checker already in that square, the opponent must remove his checker.
Players alternate turns . To win, be the first player to get three of your checkers in a row, either horizontally,
vertically or diagonally; or be the first person to get 9 of your checkers in all the squares.
67-Bowled Over
Players: 2 to 6 players
Equipment: 6 Dice, 10 Chinese Checkers Playing Pieces (all of one color)
Set up the 10 playing pieces on the table the way 10 bowling pins would be set up: one in the first row, two in the
second row, three in the third row and four in the fourth row. Stand 4 feet away from the “pins.” On you turn, slide
your die across the table trying to knock down as many as you can. Any downed pins are counted as your score.
The pins are set up again and the next player bowls. After all players have a turn, the player with the highest scores
wins.
68-Red Light, Green Light
Players: 2 or More
Equipment: 6 Dice, Paper and Pencil
Here’s a fun dice game for children. One player is picked as the Traffic Light and turns his back to the play area.
Another player is the first dice roller.
Dice Rolls:
1, 2 and 3 match the Green Light
4, 5 and 6 match the Red Light
The first player rolls all 6 dice. The Traffic Light player then calls out either Red Light or Green Light. Count the dice
that match the called out color. Each match is worth one point. Each player gets three rolls on a turn with the
Traffic Light player calling out each roll. The first player’s score is recorded and it’s the next player’s turn to roll.
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19-Twelve Men’s Morris
Players: 2
Equipment: Morris Game board, 12 Tan Checkers , 12 Brown Checkers
Each player starts with 12 men. Players draw lots to see who begins, and then take turns placing men on the
intersections of the lines. The object is to form a “mill” — three of your men in a straight line (as in Tic-tac-toe).
The diagonal lines connecting the corners of the board can be used both for moving pieces, as well as for making
diagonal mills. Whenever a player creates a mill, they can capture any one of their opponent’s men on the board.
Once a man is removed from the board, it is dead and cannot be played again. The players continue to take turns
placing their men until all of the live pieces are on the board. At that point, players begin to take turns sliding their
men along the lines. They can move only one space at a time, to any vacant intersection. Their goal is to continue
making new mills and capturing enemy pieces, or blocking the opponent from making mills. If a player breaks up
his own mill while sliding a piece, he cannot reform that mill on his next turn using the same piece. The winner is
the player who reduces his opponent down to just two men on the game board.
20-Dutch Backgammon
Players: 2
Equipment: Backgammon Board, 30 Backgammon Pieces (15 of each color), 2 dice for each player
This variation is played the same as Backgammon except that all the men start on the bar. A player must enter all
15 of his men before he can move any of them. A player is not permitted to hit an opponent’s blot until the player
has moved at least one of his own men around the board to his own inner table.
21-German Checkers
Players: 2
Equipment: Checker Board, 24 Checker Pieces (12 of each color)
It is played in the same way as regular checkers with the following exceptions:
1.The playing board has a non-playing tan square at the left of each player’s first row.
2. Each player must make a capturing move whenever possible; if not, he forfeits the game.
3. An uncrowned piece may not capture a King.
4. If a player has a choice, he must make the move that yields the greatest number of captures.
5. Capturing moves can be made either forward or backward.
6. If a player with a King to move has a choice of capturing equal numbers of pieces, he must capture the most
valuable pieces, that is, Kings rather than regular pieces.
7. A piece is crowned only when its move ends on the far row.
22-French Checkers
Players: 2
Equipment: Checker Board, 24 Checker Pieces (12 of each color)
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As in regular Checkers, players try both to capture enemy checkers and to advance their pieces to their opponent’s
back row to become Kings. In this variation, these two goals can often be in conflict. For example, even though,
they may move forward, uncrowned checkers may not jump forward. They may only jump backward, once or
multiple times. This rule can lengthen a game considerably. Only Kings, can jump forward and backward. A very
challenging game!
23-Gotcha
Players: 2
Equipment: Checker Board, 16 Checker Pieces (8 of each color)
Playing is not on the spaces, the pieces are placed on the intersection of the lines.
To start, brown moves first, and play alternates. Each player places one of his pieces on any vacant intersection,
alternating turns.
The object of the game is to be the first player to get 5 pieces in a straight line, vertical, horizontal or diagonal, with
no empty intersections between the pieces. If all the (16) pieces are played before a winner happens, each player,
in turn, moves any one of his pieces to a new intersection.
24-Ludo
Players: 2, 3 or 4
Equipment: Ludo Game Board, Chinese Checkers Playing Pieces (4 of one color for each player), 1 die.
Ludo is a modified version of Pachisi, with the same objective and similar rules. There are no resting squares, and
once a playing piece reaches its own colored column leading to the finish, it cannot be followed or taken. Each
player selects a set of four playing pieces. The die is thrown to determine the order of play. Players then take turns
and try to throw a 6, the number needed to get a playing piece from its home base to its starting square. If a player
throws a 6, he is allowed another throw, and may move one playing piece the number of squares indicated. Playing
pieces move clockwise, as in Pachisi. If a player has more than one playing piece on the board and has a double
throw (6+ another throw) he may move a different playing piece for each part of the throw. If a player throws two
6’s and his playing piece lands on an occupied square, the occupying playing piece must return to its home and
can only re-enter on a throw of 6.
The finish space can only be reached by exact count. The winner is the first player to get all four playing pieces to
the finish space first.
25-Polish Checkers
Players: 2
Equipment: Checker Board, 24 Checker Pieces (12 of each color)
Each player using 12 men positioned in the normal way. The play is as follows:
1. The pieces move forward, as in the regular game; but capture forward or backward.
2. The crowned piece becomes a Queen, not a King.
3. Each player must make a capturing move whenever possible or forfeit the game.
4. Maximum capture is compulsory (see Game #21 German Checkers # Rule 4)
5. In capturing, the Queen takes any unguarded pieces or on any diagonal she controls by jumping over the
captured piece and remaining on any unoccupied square of that diagonal beyond the captured piece.
A piece is “Queened” only when the move ends on the back row. For example, in a capturing play, an uncrowned
piece must jump into and out of the back row, it continues without being crowned.
26-Pyramid
Players: 2
Equipment: Checker Board, 20 Checker Pieces (10 of each color)
To start: Only the 32 blue squares are used. Each player has 10 pieces set up in a pyramid (triangle) shape. The
first row (closest to player) gets four pieces, the second row three, the third row two, and the fourth row one. The
points of the two should touch diagonally. The brown player moves first and the players than alternate turns.
The play: The pieces move and jump the same as in Checkers. However, when an enemy piece is jumped it is not
captured and removed. A player is forced to jump if possible. A piece reaching the opposite end of the board is not
crowned and remains in this position until the end of the game.
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58-HI-LO Hooligan
Players: Any Number
Equipment: 2 Dice, Pencil and Paper.
Players alternate turns. The object is to anticipate your throw and be the first to score 24 points.
A player on his turn must announce what he expects to throw. The possibilities are:
• ODD
3, 5, 7, 9,11
= 2Points
• EVENS
2, 4, 6, 8, 10,12 =2Points
• HIGH
7 and over
=2Points
• LO
6 and under
=2Points
• HOOLIGAN
Double 6
=12Points
If any player guesses wrong the score is 0.
59-Hot Shot
Players: Any Number
Equipment: 4 Dice, Pencil and Paper
First player to score 15 points wins the game. Each player in turn, rolls 4 dice. If a player fails to “shoot” a 6 his
turn ends, and he passes the dice to the player on his left. If that player shoots a 6 or six or sixes, he may continue
to roll the dice. Scoring: one 6 = one point; two 6s = three points; four 6s at one time = automatic win! Highest
score after four turns wins.
60-Insect
Players: 2 to 4
Equipment: 1 Dice, Paper and Pencil for Each Player
One of the players draws a picture of an insect for reference clearly showing six parts: Head, Body, Tail, Eyes, Legs,
and Feelers, and numbers each part. (Ex: Head=1, Body=2, etc.)
The object is to be the first to complete his drawing of the insect by throwing the die. 13 points wins the game; (1
Head, 1 Body, 1 Tail, 2 Eyes, 6 Legs, 2 Feelers = 13 points). Each player throws the die once each turn and must
throw a 1 first to draw the body. Then other parts of the insect can be added logically, Head to Body, Tail to Body,
Feelers to Head, Leg’s to Body, etc. Simply, it goes as it follows: 1=Body, 2=Head, 3= three Legs on one side, etc.
61-Pig-Out
Players: Any Number
Equipment: Requires 1 Die, Pencil and Paper
Playing order is determined by throwing the die. Each player throws once and the lowest score goes first. Players
alternate turns. First player throws the die as many times as he wants to. Score is totaled throw by throw until
player decides to stop. The object of the game is to be the first player to reach 100 points. If player throws a 1, the
total score for that turn is lost and the next player throws. Play continues until someone reaches 100 points.
62-Splat
Players: Any Number
Equipment: 2 Dice, Pencil and Paper for Each Player
Players alternate turn. Each player should make a line of numbers from 2 to 12 on the paper, but leave out 7. The
first player throws the dice and crosses out the number equal to the total of the spots on the 2 dice. He continues
to throw the dice until he throws a 7 or a number he has already crossed out. It’s now the next player’s turn. Each
time a player throws a 7 he must make a mark (an x) on his paper. This x is a “splat”. When a player gets a 7
“splats”, he is out of the game. The winner is the player who crosses out all his numbers before he gets seven
“splats.”
63-Spook
Players: Any Number
Equipment: 3 Dice, Paper and Pencil
Players alternate turns throwing dice. Each roll is recorded. After a round, the player with the highest score is
29 17
Here’s the ranking, from lowest to highest: Pair, 3 of a Kind, Run of 5 / Straight, Full House, 4 of a Kind, 5 of a
Kind
The player to the left of the thrower may accept the call, or if he thinks the thrower is lying, the dice must be
exposed. If the player lied, he must put a checker in the pot. If he was telling the truth, the challenger must pay a
checker to the pot. Now it’s the challenger’s turn to throw. If the next player accepts the thrower’s call, and doesn’t
look at the dice, he has three throws to beat the hand. Play continues to the left until only one person has a chip
left. This lone survivor wins, and collects the pot.
56-Basketball
Players: Any Number
Equipment: 2 Dice
Roll dice. Score the following on a total of both dice:
2 = 3 Pt. Field Goal
3 = Walking Violation
4 = 2 Pt. Field Goal
5 = 1 Pt. Foul Shot
6 = 2 Pt. Field Goal
7 = Double Dribble Violation
8 = Score 2 Foul Shots
9 = Miss Jump Shot
10 = 3 Pt. Play Field Goal and Foul Shot
11 = Offensive Foul
12 = 3 Pt Field Goal
+3 Pts.
Lose Ball
+2 Pts.
+1 Pt.
+2 Pts.
Lose Ball
+2 Pts.
Lose Ball
+3 Pts.
+3 Pts.
Lose Ball
Play continues to the left with each player rolling the 2 dice. Keep track of your points.
The first player to score 21 points wins the game.
57-Cheers
Players: Any Number
Equipment: 5 Dice, Paper and Pencil
The following possible scoring combinations should all be written down with a points-earned column for each
player.
ONES- one point for each die showing one spot
TWOS- two points for each die showing two spots
THREES- three points for each three spot die
FOURS- four points for each four spot die
FIVES- five points for each five spot die
SIXES- six points for each six spot die
SMALL STRAIGHT 1-2-3-4-5 scores 25 points
BIG STRAIGHT 2-3-4-5-6 scores 25 points
FULL HOUSE Three of one kind, plus two of another, scores according to the spot value. For example,
3-3-3-2-2 scores 13
BIG HOUSE Four of one kind plus one of another, scores according to the spot value. For example,
4-4-4-4-1 scores 17
CHEERS Five of any given number scores 50 points
Each player in turn rolls the 5 dice trying to score the maximum for each of the 11 combinations, and may throw
any or all the dice again to improve his hand. After the second throw, however, he must declare one of the
combinations and fill in the points earned column on the score sheet. If on a later roll, he improves one of the
already filled in combinations, too bad, the earlier declaration must stand. If a roll cannot fit one of the scoring
combinations, a zero must be entered instead.
After each player has scored each of the 11 combinations, the points are added up. The player with the most points
wins the game.
16
27-Spanish Checkers
Players: 2
Equipment: Checker Board, 24 Checker Pieces (12 of each color)
In this variation all of the rules of Checkers apply, with the following modification.
A King may pass over one or more vacant spaces in the diagonal line before jumping an enemy piece, and may
continue over one or more vacant spaces on the other side after jumping/landing on a vacant space. When a player
has a choice of captures, he must capture the maximum number of enemy pieces possible. If a King can land in a
position to make another jump, it must do so.
28-Turkish Checkers
Players: 2
Equipment: Checker Board, 30 Checker Pieces (15 of each color). Since each player needs 16 pieces to move, you
and your opponent must choose one Chinese Checker to add to your playable pieces.
In this variation all the rules of Checkers apply, with the following modification:
Each player has 16 “checkers” to set up. All 64 squares of the board are used. A checker moves one space forward
or one space to either side; diagonal moves are never permitted. A checker jumps in these same three directions
over an adjacent enemy piece and into an empty square next to it on the other side.
A King moves forward, backward, or to either side and it can move more than one square as long as its vacant. A
King jumps in the same four directions (Remember a King can move backwards). A King may pass over one or
more vacant squares before jumping an enemy piece and may continue over one or more vacant squares on the
other side after jumping. When a player has a choice of captures, he must capture the maximum number of enemy
pieces possible.
29-Wolf & Sheep
Players: 2
Equipment: Checker Board, 12 Brown Checker Pieces and 1 Tan Checker Piece
Only the 32 blue squares are used. One player has 12 brown pieces (Sheep) are set up on the blue squares in the
three rows closest to him (As in Checkers). The other player has one tan piece (Wolf) which is started in any one of
the four blue squares he wishes in the row closest to him. The brown player moves first and the players then
alternate.
The play: The brown player moves one of his sheep one space diagonally forward (like a man in Checkers). The tan
player moves the wolf one space in any diagonal directions or jumps in any diagonal direction (like a King in
Checkers). The wolf wins by breaking through the lines of sheep. The sheep win by blocking the wolf so that, on its
turn, it cannot move.
30-Chase
Players: 2
Equipment: Backgammon Board, 24 Backgammon Pieces (12 of each color)
In this variation all of the rules of Backgammon apply, with the following modifications. The tan player starts with 2
men, one on each point of his inner table. The brown player starts with 2 men on each point of his outer table.
Both players move in a clockwise direction and pieces are moved between 1- points as well as between 12- points
making the board into a continuous track.
When a player throws a double he makes four moves in the usual manner and then throws again. He continues
re-throwing as long as he throws doubles, even if he is not able to move part of a throw.
When a player lands on an opponent’s blot, that piece is captured and is out of the game. A player wins by
capturing all of the opponent’s pieces.
31-Dice Baseball
Players: 2
Equipment: 2 Dice, 8 Chinese Checkers Pieces (4 of each color), Sheet of Paper (with a baseball diamond drawn
on it)
BATTING TABLE
Dice Rolls = Strikes and Hits
9
2 =Strike
3= Fly out
4=Single
5=Ground out
6=Strike
7=Fly out
8=Double
9=Ground out
10=Triple
11=Foul ball
12=Home run
Game Rules
1) Basic baseball rules are followed for this game: Three outs for each team in an inning; a run is scored when a
player crosses home plate; the winner has the most runs at the end of the game.
2) To start the game, roll the dice to determine who will bat first. That player then puts his marker behind home
plate.
3) Each player keeps one dice. To begin a game, each player rolls his (or makes the pitch). The two dice are added
together for the result of the at bat (see the Batting Table). For example, a 3 and 5 equals 8 for a double.
4) A game can be as many innings as you wish.
32-Mexico
Players: 2-4
Equipment: 2 Dice (plus 1 extra die per player used as a “life” counter)
Aim of the game: To be the only player left in the game, after all the others have been forced out due to rolling low
combinations.
How to play:
Each player places the extra die in front of him on the table, with the 6 side face up. Decide who starts; the turn
order then proceeds clockwise. A player rolls two dice on each turn. A round is complete when both players have
taken their turn.
You play several rounds, and in each round the player with the lowest combination loses a ”life” – which is shown
by his die being rotated to the next lower number. Everyone therefore starts with 6 lives. If your die goes down to
0, you are out of the game.
When it is your turn, you roll both dice in the middle of the table. If you are not satisfied with the result you may
re-roll, and if you wish re-roll a second and final time. If you choose to re-roll you must do so with both dice – it is
not permitted to keep one and re-roll the other.
The highest possible throw is ”Mexico”: 2-1.
Ranking just below Mexico are the pairs:
6-6 is the highest pair, and 1-1 is the lowest.
Ranking below the pairs are two different numbers on the dice, with the highest always being the decider and
mentioned first: 6-5 is the highest combination here, followed by 6-4, 6-3, 6-2, 6-1, 5-4, 5-3 and so on all the way
down to 3-1 which is the lowest possible throw.
When all players have rolled according to the above rules, the player who made the lowest result loses the round
and one ”life”.
Example: On the first round, A rolled 5-4, B rolled 2-2, C rolled 6-1 and D rolled 4-4. Player A has made the lowest
roll and loses one life, turning his life counter die to show a 5 instead of a 6.
If two or more players are equally low, they both lose one life each.
Special rule: Whenever a Mexico (or several) is rolled in the round, the loser loses two of his remaining lifes!
When you are down to 0 you are out of the game. The last remaining player is of course the winner. If both players
are left in the game, with 1 life each remaining, and they both lose the round because of a tie on the dice results, a
”dead game” without a winner declared.
33-5,000
Players: 2 or more
Equipment: 5 Dice, Paper and Pencil
The objective of the game is to be the first player to get 5,000 points. This is done through rolling the five dice, and
earning points. Once a player goes over 5,000 points, then all other players get one last turn to try and beat the
score! The player with the most points wins.
Points are obtained through “counters.” Counters are 1’s or 5’s and three of a kind. In addition, a combination of
1,2,3,4,5 thrown all in one roll counts as “The Big One.”
Points:
1 = 100 points 5 = 50 points
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if the first throw contains a 6 and 4, but not a 5, only the 6 is put aside and the rest of the dice, including the 4, are
rolled again. If a player fails to throw the 6, 5, and 4 after their three throws they score nothing. If after three
throws a player has put aside the ship, captain and mate the remaining two dice (the crew) are totaled to form the
player's score. If all three in the sequence are rolled before the third and final throw then the remaining two dice
(the crew) are rolled in the remaining turn(s) to improve the total of the player's score. The player with the highest
crew total wins the game. In the case of an equally high total, all players must play the round again.
51-Dice Golf
Players: Any Number
Equipment: 3 Dice, Paper and Pencil
Each player in turn rolls three dice and continues to throw them until a double is thrown. Each throw that doesn't
contain a double, counts as a stroke. The throw that contains a double, counts as the hole. The number of strokes
and the throw that contained the double are counted and noted down for each player. 18 rounds are played,
representing the 18 holes of a golf course, and the player with the lowest total of throws at the end of the game,
wins.
52- Flower Petals
Players: Any Number
Equipment: 3 Dice, Paper and Pencil
Players take turns throwing the dice. On each turn, players roll all three dice three times. They score for every
occurrence of a 1, 3 or 5. 1 scores one point, 3 scores two points and 5 scores four points. Should a player throw
a triple 2, 4 or 6 they double their score for their turn and the throw is not counted as one of the three. A second
throw of triple 2, 4 or 6 cancels out the previous one and their score is no longer doubled. Four rounds are played
and the players' scores are noted. The player with the highest total wins the game.
53-Drop Dead
Players: Any Number
Equipment: 5 Dice, Paper and Pencil
The object is to attain the highest score. Players alternate turns. Each player throws the dice and totals the spot
value of the dice. But if there is a 2 or a 5 in the throw, those dice are removed, the score is 0 and on the next
throw those 2 spot or 5 spot dice are taken out of play. The player may continue his turn, but every time a 2 or a 5
shows, that die is taken out of play. Sooner or later that player could end up with a single die and if that shows a 2
or a 5 he “drops dead” and his turn ends. It’s now the next player’s turn to roll. After everyone has a turn, players
total their scores. Whoever has the most points wins the game.
54- Indian Dice
Players: Any Number
Equipment: 5 Dice
Players attempt to record the highest poker hand. Hands ranked in the following order: Five of a kind, four of a
kind, full house, three of a kind, two pair, and one pair. There are no straights in this game. 6s rank highest, 2s are
and 1s (aces) are wild.
Decide who goes first, and the play goes to the left. First player may have up to three throws to build his hand. A
player may “stand” on the first throw, or pick up any or all the dice for a second throw. He may then either stand or
throw again. The other players may not take more throws than the first player in each round. A game normally
consists of two rounds, with the winners of each round “playing off”.
55-Liar’s Dice
Players: 3 or More
Equipment: 5 Dice, 5 Checkers for Each Player
All players start with 5 checkers. Starting player is determined by a throw of the dice. Highest scorer goes first.
First player throws all 5 dice, hiding them from the other players. He keeps the dice he wants to build on, and rolls
the ones he wishes to change. This can be done twice. After the third roll, the player must declare a hand. It can be
the truth or he can lie about it.
15
players are only allowed one roll too. Then each player in turn throws the three dice and tries for a higher ranked
hand. The player with the highest ranked hand at the end of a round scores a point. Usually ten rounds are
played in a game and the winner is the player with the highest score.
Hands rank as follows...
4, 2, 1 (Scores double on first throw.)
Triples: 6, 6, 6 ranks highest; 1, 1, 1 ranks lowest.
Any pair plus backer: 6, 6, 5 ranks highest; 1, 1, 2 ranks lowest.
Unmatched (no two dice alike): 4, 5, 6 ranks highest; 1, 2, 3 ranks lowest.
46-Rotation
Players: Any Number
Equipment: 2 Dice, Paper and Pencil
Eleven rounds are played in which each player in turn throws the dice and successively tries to score all the
possible totals of two dice, 2 to 12. If a player calls out Round 1 and then rolls a “2”, he scores 2 points which is
recorded on the score sheet. On Round 2, he must roll a 3 for 3 points, on Round 3 he must roll a 4 for 4 points,
etc. If he doesn’t, he scores zero for that round. He continues rolling and scoring until he completes all 11 rounds.
The dice are then “rotated” to the next player who then takes the 11 round challenge. The player with the highest
total score after all eleven rounds, wins the game.
47-Round the Clock
Players: Any Number
Equipment: 2 Dice
The aim of this game is to roll in sequence 1 up to 12. Each player, in turn, rolls the dice and increments their
position in the sequence if they are successful in rolling the number they require. For numbers up to 6, either die
or the total of both may be counted. For example, if a player requires a 5, they will succeed if either dice shows a
5, or if together they show 3 and 2, or a 4 and 1. For numbers above 6, the total of both dice is needed. When a
player misses the number he’s throwing for, his turn is over. Each player must remember the last number they
rolled successfully. The player who reaches 12 first, wins the game.
48-Sevens
Players: Any Number
Equipment: 6 Dice, Paper and Pencil
Each player in turn rolls six dice and removes any combination of numbers thrown that add up to seven. The aim
is to score the highest possible total by adding together the numbers shown on the remaining dice. The first
player may take as many as three throws but may stop on the first or second. The following players may only take
as many throws as the first. For example, the first player rolls 5, 2, 1, 1, 1, 2. The 5 and a 2 are removed and the
player may decide to score with the remaining dice (1 + 1 + 1 + 2 = 5), but decides to roll the remaining 4 dice and
try and score higher. The second throw yields 6, 1, 6, 6. The 6 and 1 are removed and the player scores 12 with
the remaining two 6s. He could throw a third time but can't score higher than 12 with the remaining two dice and
elects to end his turn. The other players then have two throws in their turn to score higher than 12.
49-Fifty
Players: Any Number
Equipment: 2 Dice, Paper and Pencil
Each player in turn throws the dice and scores points whenever a double is thrown. Double 6 scores 25 points; a
double 3 cancels out a player's score and puts them back to zero. Any double other than a 3 or 6 scores 5 points.
Scores are recorded and the first player to obtain a total score of 50 points wins the game.
50-Mariner
Players: Any Number
Equipment: 5 Dice
Each player takes a turn throwing the dice. On each turn, a player has three throws of the dice and tries to roll and
put to one side a 6 (the ship), a 5 (the captain), and 4 (the mate). The 6, 5, and 4 may not be rolled out of order so
14
Three of a kind, thrown at one time counts as follows:
2s = 200, 3s = 300, 4s = 400, 5s = 500, 6s = 600, 1s = 1000
1,2,3,4,5 all at once = 1,500 for The Big One. (You can usually keep rolling with the “and rolling” rules to rack up
even bigger points!)
1.You must have at least 350 points in one turn before you can begin the game and start scoring.
2. Each roll requires that you have at least one counter that gets set aside in order to continue rolling.
3. If you roll no counters, or “garbage,” then your turn is done. You pass the dice to the next player.
4.You can stop rolling and take your points at any time, once you have started the game with the minimum 350
point roll.
5. “And Rolling” allows you to continue rolling and counting if all five of the dice are counters. If you are
successful turning all the five dice into counters, you may continue your turn by picking up all five dice “and
rolling.” This way, you can build up more points, but all the points are at risk of loss if you roll “garbage.”
6. The first one to reach 5,000 or more establishes the end of the game, however, everyone else gets one more
chance to score. If they can exceed the score, they win! That’s why we say, “You need to go out big!”
34-Helpful Neighbor Dice Game
Players: 2 or more (6 is best)
Equipment: 3 Dice and 6 Chinese Checkers playing pieces per player
To begin, everyone picks a number 1 - 6.
Note: If you only have 5 players, don't assign the number "6" and ignore that number when it is rolled. If you only
have 4 total players, don't assign the number 5 & 6 and ignore those numbers when rolled. In a 3-player game
each player gets 2 numbers. In a 2-player game each player gets 3 numbers. Each player takes a turn throwing
three dice. If any player’s number is thrown they get to put a playing piece into a pile in the center of the table. The
first player to put all of playing pieces into the center pile wins.
35-Hazard Dice Game
Players: Any number
Equipment: 2 dice
Any player may begin the game as the first shooter, or caster. If two or more players wish to begin, they roll the
dice and the highest decides. The player begins by throwing the dice to establish his main point, or “main” which
is any number from 5 to 9, inclusive. (This may take several throws.) Once he has established his main, the other
players may make their bets, wagering on whether the caster will win or lose, when he throws the dice again. If he
“throws in,” or “nicks,” he wins. Here are the winning numbers: Five is nicked by 5, 6 by 6 or 12, 7 by 7 or 11, 8 by
8 or 12, and 9 by 9. The caster loses (“outs,” or “throws out”) when throwing aces or deuce-ace (crabs, or craps)
or when throwing 11 or 12 to a main of 5 or 9, 11 to 6 or 8, and 12 to 7. Any other throw is his “chance”; he, in
this case, keeps throwing until the chance comes up again, when he wins, or until the main comes up, when he
loses. The dice are then passed to the next caster.
36-Five Rolls
Players: Any Number
Equipment: 1 Die
A player rolls the die five times. If he rolls an even number at least three times, he wins. If less than three even
numbers are rolled, he loses.
37-Sevens Out
Players: Any Number
Equipment: 2 Dice, Pencil and Paper
Each player takes a turn rolling the dice. They roll and continue to roll the dice until they throw a 7. They score the
sum of all the numbers thrown before the 7. Players announce their tally after every throw and once they have
thrown a 7 their score is noted on the score sheet. Doubles score double the value. For example: 4 and 4 makes 8,
and scores 16. The player who scores a pre-arranged total of say, 500 or 1000 points, is the winner.
11
38-Going to Boston
Players: Any Number
Equipment: 3 Dice, Pencil and Paper
Roll the dice and keep the highest. Roll the remaining dice and again set aside the highest. Roll the last die, and
add up your total. Write down your score. After all players take a turn a round is over. The player with the highest
score after 3 rounds wins.
6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6 (Known as tái min yéung or "large sheep")
5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5 (Any other six-of-a-kind is known as min yéung kung or "rams")
4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4
"
"
39-Stuck In The Mud Dice Game
Players: Any Number
Equipment: 5 Dice, Paper and Pencil
The aim of the game is to achieve the highest score. You can only score on a roll which does not include the
numbers 2 and 5. Any dice which show a 2 or a 5 become “stuck in the mud.”
Choose a player to start. Player 1 rolls all 5 dice: If there is no 2 or 5, he adds the numbers and remembers it. Then
rolls again. Any throws without 2s and 5s are always added to Player 1’s previous total. If Player 1 did roll a 2 or
5, this roll doesn’t score at all. He discards all 2 or 5 dice because they are now stuck in the mud and rolls again.
Player 1’s turn continues until all 5 dice are stuck in the mud. When this happens, his turn is over and his score is
recorded. It’s now the next player’s turn to roll. After all players have a turn getting their dice stuck in the mud, a
round of play is over. Agree on a number of rounds (five works well) to play, and total up the final scores. The
winner is the player with the highest score.
3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3
"
"
2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2
"
"
1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1
"
"
40-Run For It!
Players: Any Number
Equipment: 6 Dice, Paper and Pencil
Players take turns rolling the dice and looking for runs (sequences) starting with 1 (so 1-2, 1-2-3 and so on). Each
dice that is part of a run scores five points. There can be more than one run in each roll. The first player to score
100 points is the winner.
Example, Hand 1:
6 dice rolled give us the numbers 1, 4, 2, 1, 3, 2
The following sequences can be scored:
1, 2 (10 points)
1, 2, 3, 4 (20 points)
The hand is therefore worth a maximum 30 points.
Example, Hand 2:
6 dice rolled give us the numbers 1, 4, 6, 6, 3, 3
No sequences can be formed, and no score is recorded.
43-Passage
Players: Any Number
Equipment: 2 Dice
Each player rolls a die, with the highest throwing first in the game and the lowest "setting the point". The player
with the lowest roll throws a die again and the number rolled becomes the point number.
Each player in turn rolls the dice and scores one for every occurrence of the point number. The first player to
reach 11 points wins the game.
Variation:
A player who rolls a double point number scores 3 points instead of 2.
41-21 Dice Game
Players: Any Number
Equipment: 3 Dice
Roll two dice and set them aside. Total the amount rolled with the first two dice and do either of the following:
• If the amount is close to 21, you may choose to “stay.” If you stay, then pass the dice to another player.
Remember your score.
• If the amount is not close to 21, roll the third die. Continue rolling the third die as many times as you wish to
make your total score as close to 21 as possible. Each roll of the third die counts toward your total score.
Going Bust: If you roll the third die too many times and your score exceeds 21, you’re out of the game. Play then
moves to the person to your left.
Win by rolling 21 or the highest score closest to 21.
42-Pursuing Sheep Dice Game
Players: Any Number
Equipment: 6 Dice
Players first put up an agreed stake. Each player in turn throws the dice until they roll three-of-a-kind. Dice
combinations are ranked below, highest to lowest:
12
#, #, #, 6, 6, 5 (Three-of-a-kind and 6, 6, 5 is known as min yéung ná or "ewes")
#, #, #, x, x, x (Three-of-a-kind and the other three dice not being 6,6,5. The total of these three odd dice
determine the rank of the hand. The greatest total ranks highest.)
Any six-of-a-kind wins all stakes without further play. When a player rolls any three-of-a-kind, the subsequent
player rolls and wins the previous player's stake if his hand is ranked higher, and loses his stake to him if lower.
44-Intelligence
Players: Any Number
Equipment: 5 Dice
Players take their turn rolling the dice to try and build the best possible Poker/Indian Dice hand (See below for
hand rankings). Players do this by repeatedly rolling the dice and setting aside at least one die, after each roll, for
their final hand. 1s (Aces) are wild and can be used to represent any value. The catch with this game is that each
time the dice are rolled and at least one is set aside, one of the dice set aside must be turned upside down. Once
any dice have been set aside they may not be re-rolled. The player with the highest ranked hand, after everyone
has had his turn, wins the game.
Poker/Indian Dice Hands Ranked High to Low
1 Five-of-a-Kind
6s ranking highest; 2s lowest.
2 Four-of-a-Kind
6s ranking highest; 2s lowest.
3 Full House (Three-of-a-kind and a pair)
6, 6, 6, 2, 2 beats 5, 5, 5, 3, 3.
4 Straight (Five consecutive values)
5 Three-of-a-Kind
6s ranking highest; 2s lowest.
6 Two Pairs
6, 6, 3, 3, 5 beats 5, 5, 4, 4, 6
7 One Pair
1s ranking highest; 2s lowest
45-Four Twenty-One
Players: Any Number
Equipment: 3 Dice
The first player has two rolls of the dice to settle on a hand. If the first player only uses one roll then subsequent
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