High School Physical Education Curriculum Guide

High School Physical Education Curriculum Guide
High School Physical Education
Curriculum Guide
Acknowledgements
The following have contributed to the successful completion of the Omaha Public Schools High School
Physical Education Guide:
Omaha Public Schools Board of Education (July 2013)
Justin T. Wayne, President
Lou Ann Goding, Vice President
Sarah Brumfield
Marian Fey
Lacey Merica
Matt Scanlan
Marque A. Snow
Katie L. Underwood
Yolanda R. Williams
Mark A. Evans
Superintendent
Physical Education and Athletics Omaha Public Schools Committee Members
Aja Wurth-Jefferson
Chad Townsend-Central
Kate McClain-Rose Hill
Meredith Kinman-Central
Kippy King-Spring Lake
Lisa Studer-Central
Elizabeth Pittacle-Joslyn
Candi Hughes-Burke
Shanda Dominguez-Bancroft
Mary Buresh-Bryan
Colette Christianson-Gomez Heritage
Brett Schnabel-North
Denise Knight-Monroe
Kathy Porter-Benson
Sarah Rittenhouse-Marrs Magnet
Dennis Baker-Central
Justin Thomalla-Marrs Magnet
Renee Saunders-South
Kevin Moon-King Science Magnet
Shannen Peterson-Bryan Middle
Jeanie Weiss-Teacher Administrative Center
Dr. Mike Messerole-University of Nebraska at Omaha, Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance
Dr. Peg Naylon-Coordinator of Physical Education and Athletics
Bob Danenhauer-Supervisor of Physical Education and Athletics
2
Table of Contents:
Philosophy, Vision, Mission and Purpose Statement …………………………………………………….4
Physical Education Standards.……..……………………………………………………………..…… 5-10
Establishing an Effective Classroom……………………………………………………………….…11-14
Wellness Themes……………..……………………………………………………………………… 15-27
Fitness Testing…………………………..…………………………………………………………… 28-31
High School Courses Offered and Course Descriptions……………………………………………... 32-34
Course Outcomes for Content Standards………...………………………………………………….. 35-38
Scope and Sequence for Classes and Activities………...…………………………………………… 39-43
Unit Components…………………………………………………………………………………….. 44-45
Assessment Tools…………………………….……………………………………………………… 46-53
Potential Units of Study…….…………………………………………………………………...….. 54-58
Team Sports Materials…………………………………………………………………………….…59-121
Lifetime Sports Materials…………………………………………………………………………..122-174
Aquatics Materials…………………………………………………………………………….……175-189
Aerobics Materials……………………………………………………………………………….…190-209
Weight Training Materials………………………………………………………………………….210-219
General PE Materials…………………………………………………………………………….….220-225
Fit Club Materials…………………………..……………………………………………………….226-228
People of Reference……………………….…………………………………………………………..…229
Website Resources……………..…………………………………………………………………….….230
Book Resources………………………………………………...............................................................231
3
Our Philosophy…
It is the goal of the Omaha Public Schools physical education program to provide
students with developmentally appropriate learning opportunities with meaningful
content and instruction. All students will develop health-related fitness, physical
competence, cognitive understanding and positive attitudes about physical activity
that promotes a healthy and physically active lifestyle.
Our Vision Statement…
Inspire every student to maintain a healthy lifestyle.
Our Mission Statement…
Physical Education instructors believe that physical education is essential to the
education of the whole child. The physical education program provides
opportunities for students to attain the skills, knowledge and attitudes essential for a
healthy lifestyle.
Our High School Physical Education Purpose…
To introduce our students to a variety of wellness related activities so that they have
the ability to develop a physically active lifestyle for a lifetime.
4
Physical Education Content Standards
*Taken from National Association for Sport and Physical Education. (2004). Moving into
the Future: National Standards for physical Education (2nd ed.). Reston, VA: Author
Definition:
Content standards specify “what students should know and be able to do”. They include the
knowledge and skills—the ways of thinking, communicating, reasoning, and investigating, and
the most important enduring ideas, concepts, issues, dilemmas, and information that
characterize each discipline. In effect, they involve the knowledge and skills essential to a
discipline that students are expected to learn
Content Standard 01:
Demonstrates a variety of physical skills through movement activities.
The intent of this standard is development of the movement/physical skills needed to enjoy
participation in physical activities. Mastering movement fundamentals establishes a foundation
to facilitate continued motor skill acquisition and gives students the capacity for successful and
advanced levels of performance to further the likelihood of participation on a daily basis. In the
primary years, students develop maturity and versatility in the use of fundamental skills (e.g.,
running, skipping, throwing, striking) that are further refined, combined and varied during the
middle school years. These motor patterns, now having evolved into specialized skills (e.g., a
specific dance step, chest pass, catching with a glove) are used in increasingly more complex
movement environments (e.g., more players or participants, rules and strategies) through the
middle school years. On the basis of interest and ability, high school students select a few
activities for regular participation within which more advanced skills are mastered. In
preparation for adulthood, students acquire the basic skills to participate in a wide variety of
leisure and work-related physical activities.
5
Content Standard 02:
Applies movement concepts and principles to develop physical skills.
The intent of this standard is to facilitate the ability of the learner to use cognitive information
to understand and enhance motor skill acquisition and performance. This includes the
application of concepts from disciplines such as motor learning and development, sport
psychology and sociology, and biomechanics and exercise physiology. For example, concepts
like increasing force production through the summation of forces, the effects of anxiety on
performance, and the principle of specificity of training. Knowledge of these concepts and
practices and applying them enhances the likelihood of independent learning and therefore more
regular and effective participation in physical activity. In the lower elementary grades, emphasis
is placed on establishing a movement vocabulary and initial application of introductory
concepts (e.g., application of force). Through the upper elementary and middle school years, an
emphasis is placed on applying and generalizing these concepts to real- life physical activity
situations (e.g., managing stress, effect of growth spurt on movement performance). In high
school, emphasis is placed on students independently and routinely using a wide variety of
increasingly complex concepts (e.g., performance trends associated with learning new motor
skills). By graduation, the student develops a sufficient knowledge and ability to independently
use their knowledge to acquire new skills while continuing to refine existing ones.
6
Content Standard 03:
Participates regularly in and understands the benefits of a physically
active lifestyle.
The intent of this standard is for students to establish patterns of regular participation in
meaningful physical activity. This standard connects what is done in the physical education
class with the lives of students outside of the classroom. While participation within the physical
education class is important, what the student does outside the physical education class is
critical to developing an active, healthy lifestyle that could help prevent a variety of health
problems among future generations of adults. Students make use of the skills and knowledge
learned in physical education class as they engage in regular physical activity outside of the
physical education class. Understanding develops from an initial awareness of cause and effect
relationships between activity and its immediate and identifiable effects on the body to an
increased understanding of the role of physical activity on the physical and psychological health
of the body, social opportunities and relationships, and quality of life. Students are more likely
to participate if they have had opportunities to develop interests that are personally meaningful
to them. Young children learn to enjoy physical activity, yet also learn that a certain level of
personal commitment and work is required to reap the benefits from their participation. They
partake in developmentally appropriate activities that help them develop movement competence
and should be encouraged to participate in moderate to vigorous physical activity and
unstructured play. As students get older the structure of activity tends to increase and the
opportunities for participation in different types of activity increase outside of the physical
education class. Attainment of this standard encourages participation commensurate with
contemporary recommendations regarding the type of activity as well as the frequency,
duration, and intensity of participation believed to promote a healthy lifestyle.
7
Content Standard 04:
Assess and adjusts goals to achieve and maintain a health-enhancing
level of physical fitness.
The intent of this standard is for students to have both the ability and willingness to accept
responsibility for personal fitness leading to an active, health lifestyle. Students develop higher
levels of basic fitness and physical competence as needed for many work situations and active
leisure participation. Health-related fitness components include cardio respiratory endurance,
muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, and body composition. Expectations for students’
fitness levels are established on a personal basis, taking into account variation in entry levels,
rather than setting a single standard for all children at a given grade level or comparing one
student to another. Students progress in their ability to participate in moderate to vigorous
physical activities that address each component of health-related fitness. Moreover, students
become more skilled in their ability to plan, perform, and monitor physical activities
appropriate for developing physical fitness. For elementary children, the emphasis is on an
awareness of fitness components and having fun while participating in health-enhancing
activities that promote physical fitness. Middle school students gradually acquire a greater
understanding of the fitness components, how each is developed and maintained, and the
importance of each in overall fitness. Secondary students are able to design and develop an
appropriate personal fitness program that enables them to achieve desired levels of fitness.
8
Content Standard 05:
Demonstrates responsible personal and social behavior during
physical activities.
The intent of this standard is achievement of self- initiated behaviors that promote personal and
group success in activity settings. These include safe practices, adherence to rules and
procedures, etiquette, cooperation and teamwork, ethical behavior in sport, and positive social
interaction. Key to this standard is developing respect for individual similarities and differences
through positive interaction among participants in physical activity. Similarities and differences
include characteristics of culture, ethnicity, motor performance, disabilities, physical
characteristics (e.g., strength, size, shape), gender, race, and socio-economic status.
Achievement of this standard in the lower elementary grades begins with recognition of
classroom rules and procedures and a focus on safety. In the upper elementary levels, children
learn to work independently, with a partner, and in small groups. Throughout elementary school
students begin to recognize individual similarities and differences and participate cooperatively
in physical activity. In the middle school, adolescents identify the purposes for rules and
procedures and become involved in decision-making processes to establish the rules and
procedures to guide specific activity situations. They participate cooperatively in physical
activity with persons of diverse characteristics and backgrounds. High school students initiate
responsible behavior, function independently and responsibly, and positively influence the
behavior of others in physical activity settings. They are expected to be able to participate with
all people, recognize the value of diversity in physical activity, and develop strategies for
inclusion of others.
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Content Standard 06:
Demonstrates understanding and respect for differences among
people in physical activities.
The intent of this standard is to develop an awareness of the intrinsic values and benefits of
participation in physical activity that provides personal meaning. Physical activity provides
opportunities s for self-expression and social interaction and can be enjoyable, challenging, and
fun. These benefits develop self-confidence and promote positive self-image, thereby enticing
people to continue participation in activity throughout the lifespan. Elementary children derive
pleasure from movement sensations and experience challenge and joy as they sense a growing
competence in movement ability. At the middle school level, participation in physical activity
provides important opportunities for challenge, social interaction, and group membership, as
well as opportunities for continued personal growth in physical skills and their applied settings.
Participation at the high school level continues to provide enjoyment and challenge as well as
opportunities for self-expression and social interaction. As a result of these intrinsic benefits of
participation, students will begin to actively pursue lifelong physical activities that meet their
own needs.
10
Establishing an Effective
Classroom
11
Establishing an Effective Classroom
(Text: Management and Discipline pgs. 147-173)
Best Practices
1. Dress:
*Acceptable shirts, shorts, shoes
*Amount of time allowed at beginning and end of class
*Loaner policies
2. Attendance:
*Squads to expedite organization
*Grade books and Infinite Campus
*Tardy policy
3. Locks and Lockers:
*Padlocks: Organization of combinations, locker assignments
and check in/out procedures
*Built-in locks (yearly combination change)
*Number of students per locker
4. Showers:
*Individual best practice
*Towels provided
*Required for swim
5. Lesson Plan Development:
*Content Standards
*EXCELS
*Multicultural/Non sexist
*Marzano
*High School Strategic plan
*Lesson Title
*Materials
*Anticipatory Set
*Objectives
*Procedures of Instruction
*Summary
12
Rules and Procedures:
1. Emergency: (Please post in ALL areas)
*Fire, Disaster, Lockdown, Evacuation
*Exit routes
2. Safety:
*Indoor facility conditions
*Outdoor facility conditions
*Locker room etiquette
*Hallway transitioning
*Proper equipment usage
3. Medical:
*Location of AED
*Location of nurse’s office
*Building procedures for doctor and parent excuse notes
*Location of First Aid kits
*CPR certification
*Asthma plan and other medical concerns (see nurse)
Effective Learning Environment:
1. Introductory Activity:
*Daily Objectives
*Warm up (Please refer to Chapter 14 in text and lesson plan manual)
2. Fitness and Skill Development
*Percent of class time for each
3. Lesson Focus and Game/Activity:
*Percent of class time used
Technology:
1. Gaming Systems
*Nintendo Wii
*PS2 Dance Dance Revolution
2. Pedometers
3. Heart Rate Monitors
4. Fitnessgram/Activitygram
5. Sound Systems
6. Audio/Video Equipment
13
Ideas for Effective Instruction: (pgs. 338 - 347) (Fitnessgram, pgs. 25-56)
1. Equipment
2. Rules
3. Parent Information
Assessments: (Fitnessgram pgs. 59-68)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Fitness/Exercise Rubrics
Content Standard Proficiency Scales
Standard One Skill Checklists/Rubrics
Fitnessgram (pgs. 59-68)
14
Wellness Themes
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Wellness Themes
Cardio-Respiratory (Fitness for Life ch. 7)
Covered August and September (traditional schedule)
Risk factors, benefits and consequences, goal setting, cholesterol, LDL, HDL, blood pressure,
target HR, resting HR, recovery HR, anaerobic, aerobic, FITT.
Upper and Lower Body Strength and Endurance (Fitness for Life ch 12)
Covered in October (traditional schedule)
Specificity, overload, isometric, isotonic, isokinetic, progression, eccentric, concentric, FITT,
set, rep, endurance, strength, overload, specificity, resistance, plyometrics, periodization,
interval training, goal setting…
Nutrition (Fitness for Life ch 14)
Covered in November (traditional schedule)
Carbohydrate loading, metabolism, calories, goal setting, labels, fluids, nutrients, saturated fat,
unsaturated fat, trans fat, sugars, calories, vitamins, minerals…
Body Image (Fitness for Life ch 13)
Covered in December and January (traditional schedule)
Lifestyle, body comp, eating disorders, weight maintenance, goal setting, heredity, skinfold,
moderation, BMR, RMR, calorie, FITT, BMI, energy expenditure…
Flexibility (Fitness for Life ch. 10)
Covered in February (traditional schedule)
Methods, progression, specificity, joint flexion and extension, static, dynamic, goal setting,
ROM, injury prevention, FITT, ballistic, joint laxity, overload, PNF, hyper-mobility, arthritis,
shin splints…
16
Consumer Issues and Exercise Myths (Fitness for Life ch 15)
Covered in March (traditional schedule)
Consumerism, muscular bulk vs. definition, spot reducing, fad diets, quackery, supplements,
figure wrapping, health clubs, evaluation of resources, dietician, nutritionist…
Fitness for Life ch 12: steroids, creatine, ephedra
Stress Management (Fitness for Life ch 17)
Covered in April and May (traditional schedule)
Stress, general adaptation syndrome, eustress, distress, stressors (physical, emotional, social),
managing stress, stress signals…
17
Sample Wellness Theme
Exam
18
Name______________________
Period_________
Physical Education Wellness Theme Test
Answer all questions! Good luck!
Level 2 Questions:
1. All of the following are risk factors that could lead to cardio-respiratory illness or disease except:
A. Inactivity
B. Obesity
C. Stress
D. Gender
E. All of these are risk factors
2. Which of the following is a benefit of cardio-respiratory fitness?
A. Improved appearance
B. Good PE grades
C. More boy/girl- friends
D. More parties
3. A short term goal is…
A. Specific for a short time
B. General for a short time
C. Specific for a long time
D. General for a long time
4. A long term goal is…
A. Specific for a short time
B. General for a short time
C. Specific for a long time
D. General for a long time
5. All
A.
B.
C.
D.
of the following are goal setting steps except:
Desire
Set realistic goals
Make a plan of action
All of these are steps
6. Which is not a characteristic of muscular strength?
A. 60-90 % of max
B. 1-3 sets
C. 5-8 reps
D. 3-5 sets
7. Which is not a characteristic of muscular endurance?
A. 30-50 % of max
B. 1-3 sets
C. 12-20 reps
D. 3-5 sets
19
8. F.I.T.T. stands for frequency, intensity, time and __________:
A. Typo
B. Type
C. Turkey
D. Taco
9. Frequency is ____________ to exercise:
A. How hard
B. How long
C. How often
D. What kind
10. Intensity is _____________ to exercise:
A. how hard
B. how long
C. how often
D. what kind
11. Time is _______________ to exercise:
A. How hard
B. How long
C. How often
D. What kind
12. Progression is…
A. Increasing workload gradually
B. Increasing workload quickly
C. Not increasing workload
D. Decreasing workload
13. Isometric exercise is …
A. Apply force without moving
B. Contract muscles but do not move
C. Apply force onto self
D. All of the above
14. Leg Press exercises your:
A. Quadriceps
B. Gastrocnemius
C. Tibialis Anterior
D. Triceps
20
15.
Changing calorie consumption will either __________ or __________ body weight.
A. Increase/Decrease
B. Nothing
C. Gain/Lose
D. A and C
16. BMR
A.
B.
C.
D.
stand for…
Best Man Remembers
Basal Metabolic Rerun
Basal Metabolic Rate
Basal Mutant Rat
17. It is recommended that you gain or lose ____ pound per week.
A. 1
B. 2
C. 3
D. 4
E. A and B
18. To lose one pound of body weight you must reduce your calorie intake by___________ calories.
A. 1,500
B. 2,000
C. 3,500
D. 3,000
19. Which of the following factors affect metabolism?
A. Heredity
B. Age
C. Maturity
D. All of the above
20. How
A.
B.
C.
D.
many calories does 1 gram of fat have?
4
9
1
100
21. How many calories does one gram of carbohydrates have?
A. 4
B. 9
C. 1
D. 100
22. How
A.
B.
C.
D.
many calories does one gram of protein have?
4
9
1
100
21
23. Percent Daily Values are based on a _________ calorie diet:
A. 1,000
B. 1,500
C. 2,000
D. 2,500
24. Which of the following is not a benefit of cardio-respiratory fitness?
A. Improved body image
B. More enjoyment in life
C. Decreased energy level
D. Improved Muscular endurance
25. A benefit is something that:
A. Suggests improvement
B. Suggests something negative
C. Is the only reason to do something
D. None of the above
26. If you can bench 100lbs, and you want to increase muscular endurance what weight should
you be lifting for your sets?
A. 60-90 lbs
B. 50-80 lbs
C. 30-50 lbs
D. 40-70 lbs
27. If you can bench 100 lbs, and you want to increase muscular strength, what weight should you
be lifting for your sets?
A. 60-90 lbs
B. 50-80 lbs
C. 30-50 lbs
D. 40-70 lbs
28. Bench Press is which type of exercise?
A. Isometric
B. Isotonic
C. Isokinetic
D. Isolation
29. If I bench press 150lbs max. a realistic goal for one month would be to increase my max
to ____________.
A. 135
B. 155
C. 175
D. 195
22
30. If the cereal you are eating has 2g fat, 24g carbohydrates and 1g protein, how many calories
come from carbohydrate?
A. 66 calories
B. 96 calories
C. 106 calories
D. 116 calories
31. If you want to lose one pound in a week, how many calories per day should you reduce?
A. 3500
B. 500
C. 2500
D. Who cares
32. Goal setting is not important for cardio-respiratory fitness.
A. True
B. False
33. Your bicep is in your arm.
A. True
B. False
34. Your quadriceps is in your leg.
A. True
B. False
35. What you eat can determine how much weight you gain or lose.
A. True
B. False
36. To lose one pound of body weight you must reduce your caloric intake by 3,000 calories.
A. True
B. False
37. As you get older your metabolism speeds up.
A. True
B. False
38. Females tend to have a slower metabolism than males.
A. True
B. False
39. You should eat 6-9 servings of grain a day.
A. True
B. False
40. You should eat 4-5 servings of meat a day.
A. True
B. False
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41. You should eat 3-5 servings of vegetables a day.
A. True
B. False
42. Why
A.
B.
C.
D.
43.
can’t joint movement be changed?
Bone Structure
Head size
Ligament structure
Flexibility
Which of the following is not important about flexibility:
A. It increases injuries
B. It prevents post exercise pain
C. It reduces low back pain
D. It helps relieve emotional tension
44. Which of the following is not a type of stretching?
A. Static
B. Dynamic
C. Ballistic
D. Long
45. Using a partner to help you stretch is:
A. A great idea
B. Safe and fun
C. Not good for you
D. Causes you to get into fights
46. Which of the following is not a real type of stretch?
A. Hamstring stretch
B. Neck stretch
C. Groin Stretch
D. Three Prong Support Side stretch
E. All of the above are types of stretches
47. Which of the following is a harmful stretch?
A. Hurdle stretch
B. Plow stretch
C. Head Circles
D. Deep Knee Bends
E. All of those stretches are dumb and you should never do them.
48. What is an exercise fallacy?
A. A false belief about exercise
B. A false idea about exercise
C. A true belief about exercise
D. A true idea about exercise
24
49. Which of the following does not influence your buying decisions?
A. Influence of peers
B. Influence of habit
C. Influence of parents
D. Influence of advertising
50. Advertisers target:
A. Dogs
B. Cats
C. Teenagers
D. Parents
51. How
A.
B.
C.
D.
do you combat false advertising?
Not watch TV
Hit it in the head
Protest
With Knowledge
52. Which of the following is not an exercise myth or fallacy?
A. You should never drink water while exercising
B. You should use salt tablets to prevent fatigue
C. Sweating gets you in shape
D. You should take a cold shower after a hot one to close your pores
53. When your body is stressed it goes into “______________” mode
A. Frick and Frack
B. Fight or Flight
C. Right or Wrong
D. None of the above
54. It is possible to spot reduce:
A. True
B. False
55. Diuretics are a great quick way to lose weight:
A. True
B. False
56. Advertisers always tell the truth:
A. True
B. False
57. Positive stress is called eustress:
A. True
B. False
25
58. Adrenaline is the chemical in your body that gives you added energy:
A. True
B. False
68. Physiological is the biological or physical response to stress
A. True
B. False
59. Psychological is the Mental or emotional reaction to stress
A. True
B. False
60. Coping techniques teach you ways to run from your stress
A. True
B. False
61. Managing time is a way to relieve stress
A. True
B. False
Level 3 Questions:
62. ______________ is when the body is stressed and adapts.
63. ______________ is doing specific exercises for specific muscles.
64. ______________ is increasing your workload gradually.
65. ______________ is exercise when the muscle contracts but does not move.
66. ______________ exercise is when the muscle contracts and results in movement.
67. _______________ exercise is when the muscles contract and move through a range of motion.
68. Bicep Curls exercise your: _________________
69. The bench press exercises your: __________________
70. Leg Press exercises your: _____________________
71. A _________________ is one complete movement of an exercise.
72. ___________________ is the ability of muscles to exert a fore one time.
73. ___________________ is the heaviness of the weight.
26
Level 4 Questions
74. Name 3 exercise myths and explain why they are considered myths.
75. Develop a 7 day workout plan using the F.I.T.T. principle.
27
Fitness Testing
28
Fitness Testing:
Fitness Testing is mandated to be administered twice a year in a pre-test
and post-test format.
Fitness Tests Include:
 Pacer (15/20 Meter) (pgs 28 & 29)
 Mile Run (pgs 32 & 33)
 Mile Walk (pgs 33 & 34)
 Body Composition (skin fold measurements) (pgs 36-38)
 BMI (pg 38)
 Curl ups (pgs 42-45)
 Trunk Lift (pgs 45-47)
 Push ups (pgs 47-49)
 Modified Pull Ups (pgs 49 & 50)
 Pull ups (pgs 50-52)
 Flexed Arm Hang (pgs 52 & 53)
 Back-saver sit-n-reach (pgs 53-55)
 Shoulder Stretch (pgs 55 & 56)
 Height
 Weight
29
9 – 12 Fitness Testing Rubric
Fitness Test-Females
Pacer-20m
4
3
2
1
0
Advanced
Proficient
Basic
Below Basic
Failing
Ran more than 59
pacers
Ran between 41
and 59 pacers
Ran between
21 and 40
pacers
Performs more than 70
curl ups
Performs
between 55 and
70 curl ups
Performs more than 30
push ups
Ran between 11 and 20
pacers
Ran 10 pacers or
less
Performs
between 36
and 54 curl
ups
Performs between 20
and 35 curl ups
Performs less than
20 curl ups
Performs
between 25 and
30 push ups
Performs
between 15
and 24 push
ups
Performs between 10
and 14 push ups
Performs less than
10 push ups
Stretches 12 on BOTH
legs
Stretches 11 to
12 on each leg
Stretches 9 to
10 on each leg
Stretches 7 to 8 on
each leg
Stretches less than 7
on each leg
Runs under 7:30
minutes
Runs between
7:31 - 9:00
Runs between
9:01 - 12:00
Runs between 12:01 14:00
Over 14:01 minutes
Curl Ups
- arms crossed
- elbows to thighs
- timed 1 minute
Push ups
Sit and reach
Mile Run
Fitness Test-Males
Pacer-20m
4
3
2
1
0
Advanced
Proficient
Basic
Below Basic
Failing
Ran more than 74
pacers
Ran between 60
and 74 pacers
Ran between 20 and 39
pacers
Ran 19 pacers or
less
Performs more than 75
curl ups
Performs
between 60 and
75 curl ups
Performs between 25
and 39 curl ups
Performs less than
24 curl ups
Performs more than 40
push ups
Performs
between 30 and
40 push ups
Performs
between 20
and 29 push
ups
Performs between 10
and 19 push ups
Performs less that 10
push ups
Stretches 12 on BOTH
leg
Stretches 11 to
12 on each leg
Stretches 9 to
10 on each leg
Stretches 7 to 8 on
each leg
Stretches less than 7
on each leg
Runs under 6:30
Runs between
6:30 - 8:00
Runs between
8:01 - 10:30
Runs between 10:31 12:00
Runs above 12:00
Curl Ups
- arms crossed
- elbows to thighs
- timed 1 minute
Push ups
Sit and Reach
Mile Run
Ran between
40 and 59
pacers
Performs
between 40
and 59 curl
ups
30
HIGH SCHOOL PHYSICAL EDUCATION
FITNESS RUBRIC -- FULL BODY, 90 DEGREE PUSH-UPS
LEVEL 4 – Advanced LEVEL 2 ‐ Basic LEVEL 1 ‐ Below Basic LEVEL 0 ‐ Failing FITNESS RUBRIC - LUNGES
LEVEL 4 – Advanced LEVEL 2 ‐ Basic LEVEL 1 ‐ Below Basic LEVEL 0 ‐ Failing LEVEL 2 ‐ Basic LEVEL 1 ‐ Below Basic LEVEL 0 ‐ Failing LEVEL 3 ‐ Proficient LEVEL 3 ‐ Proficient FITNESS RUBRIC - FOREARM PLANKS
LEVEL 4 – Advanced LEVEL 3 ‐ Proficient High School Course
Offerings and
Course Descriptions
High School Course Offerings and Course Descriptions
General Physical Education
*This course is for true freshmen only and is the only physical education option available for
freshmen. Students will learn various fundamentals and rules of a variety of lifestyle sports,
team sports, weight training and aerobic activities. Aquatics will be offered where available.
District mandated fitness gram will be administered in pre- and post- test form.
Team Sports
*This course is offered to 10-12th grade students. Students will learn a variety of rules, skills,
fundamentals and strategies in multiple team activities. Safety and sportsmanship will be
emphasized. Activities include but are not limited to: basketball, volleyball, flag football,
soccer, diamond games and other team sports. District mandated fitnessgram will be
administered in pre- and post- test form.
Fit Club
*This course is offered to 10-12th grade students with a teacher recommendation. Students will
learn about health and nutrition. Knowledge of lifetime wellness and fitness will be covered
and emphasized. Activities include but are not limited to: walking, toning, fitness technology
and orienteering. District mandated fitnessgram will be administered in pre- and post- test
form.
Aquatics
*This course is offered to 10-12th grade students who have satisfied their PE requirements for
graduation. The students will receive instruction in American Red Cross Aquatics. This course
will provide lifeguard candidates and lifeguards with the skills and knowledge needed to
prevent and respond to aquatic emergencies. Students will learn CPR and First Aid. District
mandated fitness gram will be administered in pre- and post- test form.
Weight Training and Conditioning
*This course is offered to 10-12th grade students. Beginning and advanced will be offered to
students. This course is designed for students to learn proper lifting techniques, spotting
methods, weight room safety and workout routines. Activities will include, but are not limited
to, a multitude of lifts utilizing free weights and machine weights, as well as an emphasis on
conditioning and fitness. District mandated fitness gram will be administered in pre and posttest form.
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Lifetime Sports
*This course is offered to 10-12th grade students. Students will learn a variety of rules, skills,
fundamentals and strategies in a variety of individual and dual sport activities. Safety and
sportsmanship will be emphasized. Activities include, but are not limited to: badminton, pickle
ball, tennis, bowling, archery, table tennis and other individual and dual sports. District
mandated fitnessgram will be administered in pre- and post- test form.
Aerobics/Dance
*This course is offered to 10-12th grade students. Students will learn a variety of cardiovascular
fitness activities. Emphasis will be placed on wellness of the student. Activities include but are
not limited to: step, kickboxing, pilates, yoga, toning, circuit training and other continuous
activities. Water aerobics will be offered where available. District mandated fitnessgram will
be administered in pre- and post- test form.
Adaptive Physical Education
*This course is offered to special education students. A variety of skills, rules, fundamentals
and strategies will be taught for a variety of individual and team sport activities. Safety and
sportsmanship will be emphasized. Activities include, but are not limited to: basketball,
soccer, volleyball, badminton, bowling and other individual, dual and team activities. District
mandated fitnessgram will be administered in pre- and post- test form.
Athletic Training Education
*This course is offered to 10-12 graders. A variety of skills, rules, fundamentals and strategies
will be taught for a variety of athletic training needs. Safety and sportsmanship will be
emphasized. Activities include, but are not limited to: evaluating, taping, nutrition and
rehabilitation. District mandated fitnessgram will be administered in pre- and post- test form.
PE Mentors
* This course is designated for exceptional learners to participate in physical education with
ACP students. P.E. Mentors will be responsible for assisting ACP students with their
objectives individually and as a group. This course is designed for all students to improve
cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, and body
composition. Emphasis is placed on sportsmanship and developing motor skills needed for
independent living for the ACP population. Student enrollment will be limited to 11th and 12th
graders and will need both course instructor and administrator approval.
34
Course Outcomes
Based on Content
Standards
35
Course Outcomes based on Content Standards
***By the end of 12th Grade the students should be able to:
General Physical Education
01 Demonstrates a variety of skills and techniques.
02 Demonstrates complex movement concepts and principles
to refine skills and apply them to learning new skills.
03 Demonstrates the ability to monitor and adjust activity to
meet personal physical activity needs.
04 Assesses and maintains appropriate levels of physical
fitness in terms of cardiovascular endurance, muscular
strength and endurance, flexibility and body composition
necessary for a healthy and productive life.
05 Shows leadership by diffusing conflict during competition.
06 Identifies reasons to participate in physical activity (e.g.
health, enjoyment, challenge, self-expression, and social
interaction).
Team Sports
01 Demonstrates the transition from offense to defense and
applies proper techniques of skills.
02 Explains appropriate tactical decisions in a variety of games.
03 Demonstrates the use of appropriate strategies for effecting.
behavior change regarding physical activity among adults.
04 Assesses and maintains appropriate levels of physical fitness
in terms of: cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength and endurance,
flexibility, and body composition necessary for a healthy and productive life.
05 Chooses to participate in an activity because of personal
enjoyment rather than only when friends are participating.
06 Enjoys working with others in a sport activity to achieve a
common goal.
36
Fit Club
01 Demonstrates a variety of proper stretching techniques.
02 Develops realistic short and long term personal fitness goals.
03 Monitors physical activity through the use of a pedometer, heart rate monitor
and/or physical activity log.
04 Assesses and maintains appropriate levels of physical fitness in terms of:
cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility and
body composition necessary for a healthy and productive life.
05 Make enlightened personal choices for engaging in physical activity over the
life span, recognizing the influence of age, disability, gender, race, ethnicity,
socioeconomic status and culture.
06 Identifies reasons to participate in physical activity (e.g. health, enjoyment,
challenge, self-expression, and social interaction).
Aquatics
01 Demonstrates the ability to perform proper stroke techniques.
02 Identifies biomechanical principles related to propelling one-self through the
water using a variety of strokes.
03 Accumulates a specific number of laps during a class period to meet personal
goals.
04 Assesses and maintains appropriate levels of physical fitness in terms of:
cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility and
body composition necessary for a healthy and productive life.
05 Recognizes water safety and etiquette when in or around the pool.
06 Identifies reasons to participate in physical activity (e.g. health, enjoyment,
challenge, self-expression, and social interaction).
Weight Training and Conditioning
01 Demonstrates the ability to safely spot, lift correctly and use a variety of
training methods.
02 Develops an appropriate conditioning program.
03 Demonstrates effective time management skills that allow opportunities for
physical activity to be created or found during a busy day.
04 Assesses and maintains appropriate levels of physical fitness in terms of:
cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility and
body composition necessary for a healthy and productive life.
05 Recognizes and applies proper safety in the weight room.
06 Identifies reasons to participate in physical activity (e.g. health, enjoyment,
challenge, self-expression, and social interaction).
37
Lifetime Sports
01 Demonstrates the transition from offense to defense and applies proper
techniques of skills.
02 Explains appropriate tactical decisions in a variety of games.
03 Demonstrates the use of appropriate strategies for effecting behavior change
regarding physical activity among adults.
05 Assesses and maintains appropriate levels of physical fitness in terms of:
cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility and
body composition necessary for a healthy and productive life.
06 Chooses to participate in an activity because of personal enjoyment rather than
only when friends are participating.
07 Identifies reasons to participate in physical activity (e.g. health, enjoyment,
challenge, self-expression, and social interaction).
Aerobics/Dance
01 Demonstrates the ability to identify rhythms and understands current
fundamental techniques.
02 Plans a personal summer conditioning program.
03 Monitors physical activity through the use of a pedometer, heart rate monitor
and/or physical activity log to evaluate personal fitness levels and set goals.
04 Assesses and maintains appropriate levels of physical fitness in terms of:
cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility and
body composition necessary for a healthy and productive life.
05 Participates successfully in a cooperative learning group with
a wide range of diverse members.
06 Identifies reasons to participate in physical activity (e.g. health, enjoyment,
challenge, self-expression, and social interaction).
PE MENTORS
NEED OUTCOMES
38
Scope and Sequence for
Class Activities
39
Scope and Sequence
BY THE END OF 12TH GRADE THE STUDENT WILL BE ABLE TO:
Aerobics
1. Evaluate personal fitness levels and set goals.
2. Understand importance of aerobic activity in everyday life.
3. Step boxing, kick boxing, stability balls, resistance bands, jump rope.
Archery
1. Demonstrates the appropriate technique; stringing and unstringing the bow,
address the target, hocking the arrow, drawing the bowstring, aim, and releasing
the arrow.
2. Written test; rules, scoring, etiquette, terms, origin, development, safety
Aquatics
1. Demonstrates the ability to; float, glide, different strokes (freestyle, butterfly,
breast, backstroke, sidestroke), dolphin kick, diving, flutter kick, whip kick
2. ARC Levels 1-6, CPR/First Aid/AED
3. Water games
4. Written test; origin, safety, terms, etiquette, strategy
Badminton
1. Demonstrates the appropriate techniques; serve, shots (drop, high clear, lob,
drive), swings (underhand, overhand, side arm).
2. Game play
3. Written test; equipment, rules, history, strategy, etiquette, terms, safety.\
Basketball
1. Rules and regulations
2. Passing; chest, bounce, overhead
3. Dribbling; left, right, alternate, behind back, between legs
4. Shooting; lay up, set shot, free throws, jump shot, hook shot, BEEF
5. Game Play; offensive and defensive strategies
6. Written test; objectives, positions, skills, rules, history, development, safety
Bowling
1. Approach; 3 step, 4 step, 5 step
2. Release; straight ball or hook ball
3. Written test; equipment, etiquette, clothing, pin and spot bowling, rules,
scoring, identify areas, safety
40
Dance
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Origin
Current fundamental techniques; folk dance, traditional
Identify rhythms
Written test; history, notation, rhythms, qualities, elements, composition,
choreography
Improvisation
Choreography
Dance Presentation
Country Line Dances
Deck Tennis
1. Equipment; ring, net
2. Serves and throws; underhand, inside out
3. Game play and strategy
4. Written test; origin, rules, skills, terms, scoring, strategies, safety
Field Hockey/Floor Hockey
1. Offensive, defensive strategy
2. Equipment and safety
3. Demonstrate appropriate technique; dribble, drive, shoot, goalie play
4. Game play
5. Written test; history, rules, regulations, terms, positions, strategy, safety
Frisbee/Frisbee Golf
1. Toss and types of toss
2. Rules and Regulations
3. Catch
4. Target Strategy
5. Individual Play
6. Written test; rules, terms, scoring, etiquette, origin, safety
Golf
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Grip; overlap, interlock
Putting; grip and stance
Stance, address the ball, swing
Equipment
Etiquette and safety
Written test; equipment, origin, regulations, scoring, strategies, terms, safety
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Handball/Team Handball
1. Demonstrate the ability to serve
2. Ability to return the serve
3. Game play
4. Etiquette
5. Written test; origin, equipment, rules, skills, strategy terms, safety
Jumping Rope
1. Individual
2. Long Rope
3. Double Dutch
4. Tricks
5. Written test; equipment, origin, safety, skills, strategy
Lacrosse
1. Demonstrate the ability to cradle, catch, pass, shoot
2. Game play; offensive and defensive
3. Written test; origin, rules, terms, strategy, equipment, safety
Paddleball
1. Demonstrate appropriate techniques; forehand and backhand stroke, serve to
appropriate area, and lob.
2. Written test; origin, equipment, rules, regulation, strategy, scoring, safety, terms
Physical Fitness
1. Demonstrates proper techniques of toning
2. Resistive exercises
3. Proper techniques of stretching and flexibility
4. Fitness components; cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength and muscular
endurance, flexibility, body compositions, FITT
5. Written test; knowledge, basic safety principles of physical fitness
Shuffleboard
1. Terms; stick, slide handling, scoring, disc
2. Written test; origin, rules, scoring, strategy, terms, safety
Soccer
1. Demonstrate the ability to; dribble, pass, one foot, knee trap, goal kick, shot,
heading, lift to self, lift to teammate, roll to self, pass to teammate, juggling
2. Game play and strategy
3. Written test; origin, rules, scoring, etiquette, positions, terms, skills, safety
42
Softball/Diamond Games
1. Demonstrates the ability to; throw, catch, hit, field, bunt, pitch, and run bases.
2. Game play and strategy
3. Written test; origin, rules, strategy, equipment, safety, skills.
Table Tennis/Ping Pong
1. Demonstrate the ability to; serve, return, forehand, and backhand.
2. Game play and strategy
3. Singles and doubles play
4. Written test; origin, etiquette, equipment, regulations, strategy, skills, scoring,
safety
Tennis/Pickleball
1. Demonstrates the ability to; forehand, backhand, serve, return, volley, lob, and
overhead smash.
2. Game play and strategy.
3. Singles, doubles, and court management.
4. Written test; origin, equipment, rules, regulations, strategy, terms, etiquette,
safety
Touch/Flag Football
1. Demonstrates the ability to; spiral pass, catch, throw, receive the ball from snap,
handing off, follow blockers, change of direction while running, kicking,
punting, center the ball, pass patterns,
2. Game play and strategy
3. Written test; origin, rules, terms, strategy, regulations, etiquette, equipment,
safety
Track and Field
1. Demonstrates the ability to; run, jump, sprint, distance, hurdle, throw, relays,
hand offs, starting blocks
2. Written test; origin, skills, strategy, terms, regulations, rules, safety
Volleyball
1. Demonstrate the ability to; serve, set, pass, spike, block, rally
2. Game play and strategy
3. Written test; origin, positions, rotating, rally scoring, equipment, rules,
regulations, terms, safety
Weight Training and Conditioning
1. Demonstrates the ability to; do a multitude of lifts, upper and lower body,
Olympic lifts, free weights, machines, core lifts, auxiliary lifts, spotting, correct
form, use a variety of programs
2. Written test; origin, equipment, rules, regulations, etiquette, technique,
anatomy, nutrition, safety
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Unit Components
44
Unit Components
 All units should include the following components:
1. Unit Description
2. Unit Outcomes
3. Standards
4. Sequence of skills
5. Ideas for effective instruction
6. Lead-up/modified games and/or activities
7. Terminology
8. Performance Objectives
9. Assessment
a. Rubrics
b. Anecdotal Checklist
c. Self-Evaluation
d. Written Test
10. Safety rules for specific units of instruction should be discussed at the onset of each unit.
Rules should be posted and brought to the attention of students regularly. Posters and
bulletin boards can promote safety in an enjoyable and stimulating manner.
45
Assessment Tools
46
Assessment Tools
Rubric
Definition: Scoring tool that lists the criteria for a student task.
Implementation: Choose a task and assign achievement levels.
Example:
Advanced
Proficient
Basic
Below Basic
Failing
4
A
3
B
2
C
1
D
0
F
Anecdotal Checklist
Definition: a checklist is a casual observation of student tasks.
Implementation: Choose tasks and determine if complete or incomplete.
Written Test
Definition: is a series of questions that test students’ knowledge of a unit.
Implementation: Distribute written exam, pencil and scantron sheets (answer sheet) at the
conclusion of a unit.
Review Sheets: study tool for students to prepare for written exam. Provide information from
unit that will potentially appear on the written exam.
47
Omaha Public Schools July 29, 2013 High School Physical Education
Content Standard 1
9‐12 Physical Education Proficiency Scale Learning Goal: Demonstrates competency in motor skills and movement patterns needed to perform a variety of physical activities. In addition to the Proficient (3.0) performance, makes in‐depth inferences and extended applications of what was learned, including connections to other experiences. Advanced Score 4.0 Proficient + Score 3.5 Basic Score 2.0 Below Basic Score 1.0 Failing Score 0 In addition to the complex ideas and processes (Proficient 3.0) performance, partial success at in‐depth inferences and extended applications of what was learned, including connections to other experiences. No major errors or omissions regarding any of the information and simple (Basic, 2.0) or complex processes (Proficient, 3.0) that was explicitly taught. Proficient Score 3.0 Basic + Score 2.5 Student can perform the basic skills and most of the more advanced skills without assistance in a game or competitive setting. Student can perform the basic skills and some of the more advanced skills without assistance in isolation or in a practice setting. No major errors or omissions regarding any of the information and/or simpler details and processes (Basic, 2.0) and partial knowledge of the more complex ideas and processes (Proficient 3.0) No major errors or omissions regarding the simpler details and processes (Basic, 2.0), but major errors or omissions regarding the more complex ideas and processes (Proficient, 3.0). Student can perform some of the basic skills without assistance in isolation or in a practice setting. A partial understanding of some of the simpler details and processes (Basic 2.0), but major errors or omissions regarding the more complex ideas and processes (3.0). No evidence or insufficient evidence of student learning. 48
Omaha Public Schools July 29, 2013 High School Physical Education Content Standard 2 9-12 Physical Education Proficiency Scale Learning Goal:
Demonstrates understanding of movement concepts, principles, strategies, and tactics as they apply to the learning and
performance of physical activities. In addition to the Proficient (3.0) performance, makes in‐depth inferences and extended applications of what was learned, including connections to other experiences. Advanced Score 4.0 Proficient + Score 3.5 Basic Score 2.0 Below Basic Score 1.0 Failing Score 0 In addition to the complex ideas and processes (Proficient 3.0) performance, partial success at in‐depth inferences and extended applications of what was learned, including connections to other experiences. No major errors or omissions regarding any of the information and simple (Basic, 2.0) or complex processes (Proficient, 3.0) that was explicitly taught. Proficient Score 3.0 Basic + Score 2.5 Student has thorough understanding of basic concepts, vocabulary and strategies, and can apply them in game or competitive situations.
Student has good understanding of basic concepts, vocabulary and strategies and can apply them in practice situations but has difficulty applying them in game or competitive situations. No major errors or omissions regarding any of the information and/or simpler details and processes (Basic, 2.0) and partial knowledge of the more complex ideas and processes (Proficient 3.0) No major errors or omissions regarding the simpler details and processes (Basic, 2.0), but major errors or omissions regarding the more complex ideas and processes (Proficient, 3.0). Student has a minimal understanding of basic concepts, vocabulary and strategies but has difficulty applying them in practice situations. A partial understanding of some of the simpler details and processes (Basic 2.0), but major errors or omissions regarding the more complex ideas and processes (3.0). No evidence or insufficient evidence of student learning. 49
Omaha Public Schools July 29, 2013 High School Physical Education Content Standard 3 9-12
Learning Goal:
Proficient + Score 3.5 Basic + Score 2.5 Student participates in all activities and makes an effort to improve their skills and abilities in all activities. Student also helps others improve their skill or ability.
In addition to the complex ideas and processes (Proficient 3.0) performance, partial success at in‐depth inferences and extended applications of what was learned, including connections to other experiences. No major errors or omissions regarding any of the information and simple (Basic, 2.0) or complex processes (Proficient, 3.0) that was explicitly taught. Proficient Score 3.0 Below Basic Score 1.0 Failing Score 0 Participates regularly in physical activity.
In addition to the Proficient (3.0) performance, makes in‐depth inferences and extended applications of what was learned, including connections to other experiences. Advanced Score 4.0 Basic Score 2.0 Physical Education Proficiency Scale
Student participates in all activities and makes an effort to improve their skills and abilities in most, but not all, activities. No major errors or omissions regarding any of the information and/or simpler details and processes (Basic, 2.0) and partial knowledge of the more complex ideas and processes (Proficient 3.0) No major errors or omissions regarding the simpler details and processes (Basic, 2.0), but major errors or omissions regarding the more complex ideas and processes (Proficient, 3.0). Student participates in all activities but only makes effort to improve in some but not all activities. A partial understanding of some of the simpler details and processes (Basic 2.0), but major errors or omissions regarding the more complex ideas and processes (3.0). No evidence or insufficient evidence of student learning. 50
Omaha Public Schools July 29, 2013 High School Physical Education Content Standard 4 9-12 Physical Education Proficiency Scale
Learning Goal:
Advanced Score 4.0 Proficient + Score 3.5 Below Basic Score 1.0 Failing Score 0 Basic + Score 2.5 Student can create a plan to maintain or improve their current level of fitness and demonstrate successful implementation of the plan. In addition to the complex ideas and processes (Proficient 3.0) performance, partial success at in‐depth inferences and extended applications of what was learned, including connections to other experiences. No major errors or omissions regarding any of the information and simple (Basic, 2.0) or complex processes (Proficient, 3.0) that was explicitly taught. Proficient Score 3.0 Basic Score 2.0 Achieves and maintains a health enhancing level of physical fitness.
In addition to the Proficient (3.0) performance, makes in‐depth inferences and extended applications of what was learned, including connections to other experiences. Student can create a plan to either maintain or improve their current level of fitness. No major errors or omissions regarding any of the information and/or simpler details and processes (Basic, 2.0) and partial knowledge of the more complex ideas and processes (Proficient 3.0) No major errors or omissions regarding the simpler details and processes (Basic, 2.0), but major errors or omissions regarding the more complex ideas and processes (Proficient, 3.0). Student can maintain fitness level using current methods, but cannot create and implement a plan. A partial understanding of some of the simpler details and processes (Basic 2.0), but major errors or omissions regarding the more complex ideas and processes (3.0). No evidence or insufficient evidence of student learning. 51
9-12 Physical Education Proficiency Scale
Standards
Standard 1
Standard
Requirements
Demonstrates
competency in motor
skills and movement
patterns needed to
perform a variety of
physical activities
4
3
2
1
0
Advanced
Proficient
Basic
Below Basic
Failing
Student can perform
the basic skills and
most of the more
advanced skills
without assistance in
a competitive setting.
Student can perform
the basic skills and
some of the more
advanced skills
without assistance in
isolation or in a
practice setting.
Student can
perform some of
the basic
skills without
assistance in
isolation or in
a practice setting.
Minimal
achievement
with assistance
from someone
else.
Attempted
and failed
Standard 2
Demonstrates
understanding of
movement concepts,
principles, strategies,
and tactics as they apply
to the learning and
performance of physical
activities
Student has thorough
understanding of
basic
concepts, vocabulary
and strategies,
and can apply them
in game or
competitive
situations.
Student has good
understanding of basic
concepts, vocabulary
and strategies and
can apply them in
practice situations
but has difficulty
applying them in game
or competitive
situations.
Student has a
minimal
understanding of
basic concepts,
vocabulary and
strategies but has
difficulty applying
them in practice
situations.
Minimal
achievement
with assistance
from someone
else.
Attempted
and failed
Standard 3
Participates regularly in
physical activity
Student participates
in all activities and
makes an effort to
improve their skills
and abilities in all
activities. Student
also helps others
improve their skill or
ability.
Student participates in
all activities and
makes an effort to
improve their skills
and abilities in most
but not all activities.
Student
participates in all
activities but
only makes effort
to improve in
some but not all
activities.
Minimal
achievement
with assistance
from someone
else.
Attempted
and failed
Standard 4
Achieves and maintains a
health enhancing level of
physical fitness
Student can create a
plan to maintain
or improve their
current level of fitness
and demonstrate
successful
implementation of the
plan.
Student can create a
plan to either
maintain or improve
their current level
of fitness.
Student can
maintain fitness
level using current
methods, but
cannot create and
implement a plan.
Minimal
achievement
with assistance
from someone
else.
Attempted
and failed
52
OMAHA PUBLIC SCHOOLS
PHYSICAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT
SIX DAY NO DRESS GUIDELINES
OCCURRENCE
CONSEQUENCE
1st
Verbal reminder of guidelines. Teacher will discuss possible
solutions with the student. Student will not receive credit for the day.
2nd
Teacher makes parent contact. Recommended that student be
assigned detention time. Student will not receive credit for the day.
3rd
Teacher makes parent contact. Recommended that student be
assigned detention time. Student will not receive credit for the day.
4th
Teacher makes parent contact. Student may be referred
to their administrator. Student will not receive credit for the day.
5th
Student will receive a referral to their administrator. Student
will not receive credit for the day.
6th
Referral to administration. Possible removal from class due to lack of
participation, cooperation, and failing status.
**Students will have two days to serve detentions.
(If not served, teacher will write a referral to student’s administrator).
I have read and I agree to abide by the above expectations.
Student’s Name (printed): __________________________________________ Class period:_______
PE Teacher: _______________________________________________________________________
Student signature: _________________________________________Date: ____________________
Parent/Guardian Signature: __________________________________Date: ____________________
Best time to contact you? ______________________________
E-mail address: ______________________________________
Home Phone #: ______________________ Work Phone #: ______________________
Other Phone #: _____________________
53
Potential Units of Study
54
Potential Units of Study in Courses Offered
***Each unit is referenced to websites as a resource for games and activities. Not all units
include websites, a reference page is included in this guide.
General Physical Education
Weight Training
Team Sports
Lifetime Sports
Aerobics
Aquatics
Team Sports
Basketball
vyi.org/bballdrills.htm
Diamond Games (mat ball, softball/baseball, kickball, 6 base)
softball.mb.ca
Football/Touch/Flag football
goflagfootball.com
Floor Hockey/Field Hockey
usfieldhockey.com
Lacrosse
lacrosse.org
Net Games (volleyball, cage ball)
avca.org
Soccer
usscocer.org
Team Handball
usateamhandball.org
Ultimate Games (Frisbee, football, etc…)
discgolf.com
Fit Club (teacher recommendation needed)
Dance Dance Revolution
Goal Setting
Health
Low impact aerobics
teachfitness.com
Nutrition
Orienteering
online-orienteering.net
55
Pedometers
steptracker.com
Personal Training
exrx.net
Walking
walk4life.com
Wii Fit
Wii Sports
Aquatics
Beginning Swimming
Intermediate Swimming
Water Games
CPR/First Aid/AED
Weight Training and Conditioning
Agility
BFS
Circuit
Cones
Core Work
Design your own
Endurance
Free Weights
Jump Ropes
Ladders
Lower Body Specific Lifts
Medicine Balls
Plyometrics
Power (Olympic lifts)
Resistance bands
Lifting with Stability Balls
Strength
Toning
Upper Body Specific Lifts
56
Lifetime Sports
Archery
archery.org
Badminton
usabadminton.org
Bocce Ball
bocce.com
Bowling
bowlingindex.com
Cardio/Bikes
Darts
mostdartgames.com
Deck Tennis
mastersgames.com
Frisbee golf
pdga.com
Golf
teachkidsgolf.com
Handball
usateamhandball.org
Horseshoes
horseshoepitching.com
Juggling
juggling.org
Jump Roping
Orienteering
orienteering.org
Pickleball
usapa.org
Racquetball
usra.org
Shuffle Board
shuffleboardfederation.com
Stacking
www.speedstacks.com
Table Tennis
usatt.org
Tennis
ustennis.com
Track and Field
usatf.com
57
Aerobics/Dance
Body Sculpting
Cardio/endurance
Circuit Training-Boot Camp
Core Work
Hand Weights
Jump Roping
Kickboxing
Low Impact
Medicine Balls
Pilates
Recreational Dances
-square, country swing and western, folk and round, waltz,
foxtrot, swing, salsa, merange, line, tango, rumba, samba,
cha-cha, bossa nova
folkdancing.org
sapphireswan.com
dancetv.com
dosado.com
Resistance Bands
Stability Balls
Step
Tae Bo
Yoga
58
Team Sports Materials
59
Team Sports Course Description
*This course is offered to 10-12th grade students. Students will learn
a variety of rules, skills, fundamentals and strategies in multiple team
activities. Safety and sportsmanship will be emphasized. Activities
include but are not limited to: basketball, volleyball, flag football,
soccer, diamond games and other team sports. District mandated
fitnessgram will be administered in pre- and post- test form.
Team Sports Unit Outcomes
01 Demonstrates the transition from offense to defense and applies proper
techniques of skills
02 Explains appropriate tactical decisions in a variety of games
03 Demonstrates the use of appropriate strategies for effecting behavior change
regarding physical activity among adults.
04 Assesses and maintains appropriate levels of physical fitness in terms of:
cardio-respiratory endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility and
body composition necessary for a healthy and productive life.
05 Chooses to participate in an activity because of personal enjoyment rather than
only when friends are participating.
06 Enjoys working with others in a sport activity to achieve a common goal.
Scope and Sequence of Team Sports Activities
Basketball
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Rules and regulations
Passing; chest, bounce, overhead
Dribbling; left, right, alternate, behind back, between legs
Shooting; lay up, set shot, free throws, jump shot, hook shot, BEEF
Game Play; offensive and defensive strategies
Written test; objectives, positions, skills, rules, history, development, safety
Field Hockey/Floor Hockey
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Offensive, defensive strategy
Equipment and safety
Demonstrate appropriate technique; dribble, drive, shoot, goalie play
Game play
Written test; history, rules, regulations, terms, positions, strategy, safety
Handball/Team Handball
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Demonstrate the ability to serve
Ability to return the serve
Game play
Etiquette
Written test; origin, equipment, rules, skills, strategy terms, safety
60
Lacrosse
1. Demonstrate the ability to cradle, catch, pass, shoot
2. Game play; offensive and defensive
3. Written test; origin, rules, terms, strategy, equipment, safety
Soccer
1. Demonstrate the ability to; dribble, pass, one foot, knee trap, goal kick, shot, heading, lift to
self, lift to teammate, roll to self, pass to teammate, and juggling.
2. Game play and strategy
3. Written test; origin, rules, scoring, etiquette, positions, terms, skills, safety
Softball/Diamond Games
1. Demonstrates the ability to; throw, catch, hit, field, bunt, pitch, run bases
2. Game play and strategy
3. Written test; origin, rules, strategy, equipment, safety, skills.
Touch/Flag Football
1. Demonstrates the ability to; spiral pass, catch, throw, receive the ball from snap, handing off,
follow blockers, change of direction while running, kicking, punting, center the ball, and run
pass patterns.
2. Game play and strategy
3. Written test; origin, rules, terms, strategy, regulations, etiquette, equipment, safety.
Volleyball
1. Demonstrate the ability to; serve, set, pass, spike, block, rally
2. Game play and strategy
3. Written test; origin, positions, rotating, rally scoring, equipment, rules, terms, safety
61
Potential Units of Study for Team Sports
Basketball
vyi.org/bballdrills.htm
Diamond Games (mat ball, softball/baseball, kickball, 6 base)
softball.mb.ca
Football/Touch/Flag football
goflagfootball.com
Floor Hockey/Field Hockey
usfieldhockey.com
Lacrosse
lacrosse.org
Net Games (volleyball, cage ball)
avca.org
Soccer
usscocer.org
Team Handball
usateamhandball.org
Ultimate Games (Frisbee, football, etc…)
discgolf.com
62
Team Sports - Proficiency Scale
Standards
Standard 1
Standard 2
Standard 3
Standard 4
Standard
Requirements
Demonstrates
competency in motor
skills and movement
patterns needed to
perform a variety of
physical activities
Demonstrates
understanding of
movement concepts,
principles, strategies,
and tactics as they
apply to the learning
and performance of
physical activities
Participates regularly in
physical activity.
Achieves and maintains
a health enhancing
level of physical
fitness.
4
3
2
1
0
Advanced
Proficient
Basic
Below Basic
Failing
Student can
perform the
required skills and
the advanced skills
without assistance
in a game or
competitive setting.
Student can perform
the required skills
and
some advanced
skills
without assistance in
isolation or in a
practice setting.
Student can
perform basic
skills without
assistance in
isolation or in
a practice
setting.
Minimal
achievement with
assistance from
someone else.
Attempted
and
failed.
Student has
thorough
understanding of
concepts,
vocabulary and
strategies,
and can apply them
in game or
competitive
situations.
Student has
understanding of
concepts and
vocabulary and
can apply them in
practice situations
but has difficulty
applying them in
game
or competitive
situations.
Student has a
minimal
understanding of
basic concepts
and vocabulary
but has difficulty
applying
them in practice
situations.
Minimal
achievement with
assistance from
someone else.
Attempted
and
failed.
Student is prepared
and participates in
all activities and
makes an effort to
improve their skills
and abilities.
Student
participates in all
activities, but
makes minimal
effort to improve.
Minimal
achievement with
assistance from
someone else.
Attempted
and
failed.
Student understands
healthy living
concepts. Student
can create a plan to
maintain their
current level
of fitness.
Student has a
basic
understanding of
healthy living
concepts.
Student
struggles to
maintain current
fitness levels.
Minimal
achievement with
assistance from
someone else.
Attempted
and
failed.
Student is prepared
and participates in
all activities and
makes an effort to
improve their skills
and abilities.
Student also
helps others
improve their skill or
ability.
Student
demonstrates an
understanding of
healthy living
concepts. Student
creates a fitness
plan which
significantly
improves their level
of fitness.
63
Basketball
64
Basketball Study Guide
Basketball is a team sport in which two teams of five active players each try to score points against one another
by placing a ball through a 10 feet (3.048 m) high hoop (the goal) under organized rules. Basketball is one of
the most popular and widely viewed sports in the world.
Points are scored by throwing (shooting) the ball through the basket above; the team with more points at the end
of the game wins. The ball can be advanced on the court by bouncing it (dribbling) or passing it between
teammates. Disruptive physical contact (foul) is not permitted and there are restrictions on how the ball can be
handled (violations).
While competitive basketball is primarily an indoor sport, played on a basketball court, less regulated variations
have become exceedingly popular as an outdoor sport among both inner city and rural groups.
Playing regulations
Games are played in four quarters of 10 (international) or 12 minutes (NBA). College games use two 20-minute
halves while most high school games use eight minute quarters. Fifteen minutes are allowed for a half-time
break, and two minutes are allowed at the other breaks. Overtime periods are five minutes long. Teams
exchange baskets for the second half. The time allowed is actual playing time; the clock is stopped while the
play is not active. Therefore, games generally take much longer to complete than the allotted game time,
typically about two hours.
Five players from each team (out of a twelve player roster) may be on the court at one time. Substitutions are
unlimited but can only be done when play is stopped. Teams also have a coach, who oversees the development
and strategies of the team, and other team personnel such as assistant coaches, managers, statisticians, doctors
and trainers.
Violations
The ball must stay within the court; the last team to touch the ball before it travels out of bounds forfeits
possession. The ball is out of bounds if touches or crosses over a boundary line, or touches a player who is out
of bounds. The ball-handler may not move both feet without dribbling, known as traveling, nor may he dribble
with both hands or catch the ball in between dribbles, a violation called double dribbling. A player's hand
cannot be under the ball while dribbling; doing so is known as carrying the ball. A team, once having
established ball control in the front half of the court, may not return the ball to the backcourt. The ball may not
be kicked nor struck with the fist. A violation of these rules results in loss of possession, or, if committed by the
defense, a reset of the shot clock. There are limits imposed on the time taken before progressing the ball past
halfway (8 seconds in international and NBA; 10 seconds in NCAA and high school), before attempting a shot
(24 seconds in the NBA, 30 seconds in NCAA women's and Canadian Interuniversity Sport play for both sexes,
and 35 seconds in NCAA men's play), holding the ball while closely guarded (5 seconds), and remaining in the
restricted area (the lane, or "key") (3 seconds). These rules are designed to promote more offense.
65
Positions and structures
Basketball positions in the offensive zone
Although the rules do not specify any positions whatsoever, they have evolved as part of basketball. During the
first five decades of basketball's evolution, one guard, two forwards, and two centers or two guards, two
forwards, and one center were used. Since the 1980s, more specific positions have evolved, namely:
1. point guard: usually the fastest player on the team, organizes the team's offense by controlling the ball
and making sure that it gets to the right player at the right time
2. shooting guard: creates a high volume of shots on offense; guards the opponent's best perimeter player
on defense
3. small forward: often primarily responsible for scoring points via cuts to the basket and dribble
penetration; on defense seeks rebounds and steals, but sometimes plays more actively
4. power forward: plays offensively often with his back to the basket; on defense, plays under the basket
(in a zone defense) or against the opposing power forward (in man-to-man defense)
5. center: uses size to score (on offense), to protect the basket closely (on defense), or to rebound.
There are two main defensive strategies: zone defense and man-to-man defense. Zone defense involves players
in defensive positions guarding whichever opponent is in their zone. In man-to-man defense, each defensive
player guards a specific opponent and tries to prevent him from taking action.
66
Basketball – Standard 1 Checklist Assessments (Sample)
Skill 1: Dribbling
_____ Level 2: Student can dribble with dominant hand while moving with eyes up and
using good technique, but has trouble dribbling with opposite hand.
_____ Level 3: Student can dribble with both dominant and opposite hands while
moving with eyes up. Student can dribble moving at a faster pace and
can change hands on the move.
_____ Level 4: Student can perform advanced dribbling skills (between legs, behind the
back, reverse pivot) and can protect the ball from a defender while
playing in game situations.
Skill 2: Passing/Catching
_____ Level 2: Student is able to throw basic passes (chest, bounce, and overhead) to a
partner who catches the ball with both hands.
_____ Level 3: Student is able to throw basic passes using proper footwork and follow
through. Passes are thrown with more velocity on target and catchable.
_____ Level 4: Student is able to throw basic passes using proper footwork and follow
through. Passes are thrown with more velocity on target and catchable.
Student is able to use these skills successfully in the appropriate game situation.
Skill 3: Shooting/Lay-up
_____ Level 2: Student uses correct footwork, hand position, follow through, and
makes < 5 shots out of 10.
_____ Level 3: Student uses correct footwork, hand position, follow through, and
makes 5 to 6 shots out of 10.
_____ Level 4: Student uses correct footwork, hand position, follow through, and
makes 7 < shots out of 10.
67
Team Sports Rubric
(Basketball)
Court/Field Positioning
Court/Field Movement
Strategy
Skills
Rules Application
4 - Advanced
3 – Proficient
2- Basic
1-Below Basic
0 – Failing
*Remains in critical
portions of the
court at all times
*Recognizes when
offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed
at all times
*Attempts to move
opponents from
good court
positioning at all
times
*Quickly moves
into different
positions all the
time
*Following a
court/field event,
quickly moves back
to a neutral position
all the time
*Begins to
anticipate
opponents all the
time
*Recognizes
strengths and
weaknesses of
opponents and
attempts to exploit
them all of the time
*Applies front to
back and side to
side strategy when
appropriate
*Uses a variety of
shots all the time
*Can dribble with
right and left hand
all the time
*Can properly
perform lay ups
from the right and
left side
*Properly passes
and catches in all
situations
*Remains in critical
portions of the court
at all times
*Recognizes when
offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed at
all times
*Attempts to move
opponents from good
court positioning at
all times
*Remains in critical
portions of the court
most of the time
*Recognizes when
offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed
most of the time
*Attempts to move
opponents from good
court positioning
most of the time
*Does not remain in
critical portions of
the court
*Does not recognize
when offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed
*Does not attempt to
move opponents
from good court
positioning
* There is no evidence or
demonstration of student
learning.
*Quickly moves into
different positions all
the time
*Following a
court/field event,
quickly moves back
to a neutral position
all the time
*Begins to anticipate
opponents all the
time
*Quickly moves into
different positions
most of the time
*Following a
court/field event,
quickly moves back
to a neutral position
most of the time
*Begins to anticipate
opponents most of
the time
*Does not move
quickly into different
positions
*Does not quickly
moves back to a
neutral position after
a court/field event
*Does not anticipate
opponents
* There is no evidence or
demonstration of student
learning
*Recognizes
strengths and
weaknesses of
opponents and
attempts to exploit
them all of the time
*Applies front to
back and side to side
strategy when
appropriate
*Uses a variety of
shots all the time
*Can dribble with
right and left hand all
the time
*Can properly
perform lay ups from
the right and left side
*Properly passes and
catches in all
situations
*Quickly moves into
different positions
most of the time
*Following a
court/field event,
quickly moves back
to a neutral position
most of the time
*Begins to anticipate
opponents most of
the time
*Does not recognize
strengths and
weaknesses of
opponents and
attempts to exploit
them
*Does not apply front
to back and side to
side strategy when
appropriate
*Does not use a
variety of shots
*Does not dribble
with the right or left
hand
*Does not know how
to perform a right or
left handed lay up
*Can not catch or
pass in situations
* There is no evidence or
demonstration of student
learning
*Applies rules
appropriately in a
game setting
*Applies rules
appropriately in a
game setting
*Rarely applies rules
appropriately in a
game setting
* There is no evidence or
demonstration of student
learning
*Occasionally
dribbles with the
right and left hand
*Sometimes
performs lay ups
properly from the
right and left side
*Sometimes chooses
the catch and pass in
certain situations
*Sometimes
applies rules
appropriately in a
game setting
68
* There is no evidence or
demonstration of student
learning
BASKETBALL PEER/PARTNER ASSESSMENT
Partner #1__________________________________________
Partner #2 _________________________________________.
Take turns evaluating each other’s proper technique for the following skills.
After each shot, pass or dribble partner makes a check mark by each category done correctly. If your partner
does not demonstrate a step do not put a check mark in that category. Communicate with your partner by
telling him/her what you are looking for during each shot. Notice: you are not being evaluated on making a
basket.
Partners
#1 #2
SET SHOT
1st shot ___ ___
2nd shot ___ ___
3rd shot ___ ___
4th shot ___ ___
Holds ball with shooting hand behind and under the ball.
Bends knees when preparing to shoot.
Straighten legs and arms when shooting the ball.
Follow through with shooting hand. (goose neck)
1st shot ___ ___
2nd shot ___ ___
3rd shot ___ ___
4th shot ___ ___
RIGHT SIDE – Step right, left, hop
Right knee up
LEFT SIDE – Step left, right, hop
Left knee up
LAY UP SHOT
CHEST PASS (to wall)
1st ___
2nd ___
3rd ___
4th ___
___
___
___
___
Fingers spread on both sides of ball.
Step forward with one foot.
Elbows out, and push (snap) ball forward.
After release, back of hands face each other.
BOUNCE PASS (to wall)
1st___
2nd ___
3rd___
4th ___
___
___
___
___
Fingers spread on both sides of ball.
Step forward with one foot.
Elbows out, push ball out and down (snap) more than half way to target.
After release, back of hands face each other.
DRIBBLING (around cones)
1st ___ ___ Keeps head up
2nd ___ ___ Dribbles with finger pads
3rd ___ ___ Dribbles below waist
69
Basketball Quiz
Name:
Directions: Fill in the letter matching the most appropriate. True = A; False=B (Level 2)
True/ False
1.
There are 7 players plus substitutes on an official basketball team.
2.
A field goal is worth 2 points.
3.
A free throw is worth 2 points.
4.
After making a field goal, the team that made goal takes the ball out at the end line.
5.
Blocking is stopping the progress of a person with or without the ball.
6.
Faking or feinting is a defensive technique.
7.
A bounce pass is rarely effective near the goal.
8.
A player should use the dribble to cover the ground.
9.
Man to man defense means that the guards move with the ball.
10.
It is legal to hand the ball to another player.
11.
On a jump ball, a player may not tap the ball until it reaches “its” highest point.
12.
A jump ball is taken in the center-restraining circle only at the beginning of each quarter.
Multiple Choice: Circle the best answer. (Level 2)
13.
is called by the referee if while dribbling you drop the ball, stop and pick up it up,
and then begin dribbling again.
a. traveling
b. double dribbling
c. free throw
d. a & b
e. all of the above
14.
How ling may a player of the offensive team stand in the free throw lane?
a. indefinitely
b. 5 seconds
c. 3 seconds
d. 10 seconds
15. The penalty for two players on opposite teams holding the ball at the same time is
a. a free throw for the first player that got the ball
b. a jump ball for the two players involved in the tie ball
c. the ball is taken
d. all of the above
16. After 5 team fouls, the penalty for unnecessary roughness or over guarding is
a. ball taken out of bounds at the sidelines by the team that was fouled
b. free throw for the team making the foul
c. free throw for the team that was the victim of a foul
d. all of the above
17. Which of the following is the easiest to intercept/
a. long pass
b. low bounce
c. dribble
d. any of the above
18. How long may a player in bounds hold the ball when not being closely guarded?
a.
3 seconds
b.
5 seconds
c.
indefinitely
d.
10 seconds
70
19. Which of the following is illegal?
a. striking the ball with fists
b. holding the ball for six seconds when closely guarded
c. using both hands on the first dribble
d. all of the above
20. How long may a player stand in the free throw lane if her team does not have possession of the ball?
a. 3 seconds
b. 5 seconds
c. 10 seconds
d. indefinitely
Short Answer: (Level 3)
21. Develop a drill to improve dribbling.
22. Identify a situation where over and back would be called.
23. What is the relationship between offense and defense?
Essay: (Level 4)
24. Justify the saying “Defense wins championships.”
71
Diamond Games
72
Sample Baseball/Softball Study Sheet
Team: A team consists of 9 or 10 players. There are 6 infield players and 3/4 outfield players.
The 4th outfielder is called the rover.
Baseball/Softball Field Position Diagram:
Center
Field
Left
Field
Right
Field
Rover
Short
Stop
2nd Base
1st Base
3rd Base
Pitcher
Catcher
Strike Zone: In slow pitch the strike zone is when the ball in an arc passes over home place. In
fast pitch the strike zone is when the ball passes over home plate and is between the top of the
batters knees and his/her armpits.
Fair/ foul: A ball that lands inside the baseline and then rolls out without being touched or
going past 1st or 3rd base and then rolls out is still a fair ball.
Foul balls: Counts as strikes on the 1st and 2nd strike.
Over throws: At 1st or 3rd base the runner may advance to the next base without being put out.
73
Interference: When playing the infield a fielder cannot stand in the baseline in the way of a base
runner unless he/she has the call or is fielding a batted ball. If he/she does so the runner is
awarded the next base, likewise a baser runner cannot interfere with a fielder trying to make a
play and if he/she does they are out.
Batter is out: If he/she has 3 strikes, hits a fly ball that is caught including a foul ball, hits a foul
tip that goes higher than the batters head and is caught, or when he/she steps on home plate
while batting or attempting to run to first base.
Batter walks to 1st base: When umpire calls 4 balls or when hit by a pitched ball he/she tries to
avoid it.
Base runner is out: When touched with the ball off base (called tagging the player). When the
runner must run to the next vase and the ball reaches the base before he/she does (called a force
out). If he/she leaves his/her base before the ball leaves the pitchers hand. When the base
runner is hit with a batted ball while off base and the ball has not been touched by a fielder. If
the runner leaves base before a fly ball is caught he/she must return to his/her base and tag and
is touched with the ball while off base.
Error: A mistake made in fielding the ball.
Inning: When both teams have been up to bat. A softball game consists of 7 innings.
74
Diamond Games
Rubric
Court/Field
Positioning
Court/Field
Movement
Strategy
Skills
Rules Application
4-Advanced
3-Proficient
2- Basic
*Remains in
critical portions of
the court at all
times
*Recognizes when
offensive and
defensive
positions should
be assumed at all
times
*Attempts to
move opponents
from good court
positioning at all
times
*Quickly moves
into different
positions all the
time
*Following a
court/field event,
quickly moves
back to a neutral
position all the
time
*Begins to
anticipate
opponents all the
time
*Recognizes
strengths and
weaknesses of
opponents and
attempts to exploit
them all of the
time
*Applies front to
back and side to
side strategy when
appropriate
*Uses a variety of
shots all the time
*Remains in critical
portions of the court
most of the time
*Recognizes when
offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed
most of the time
*Attempts to move
opponents from
good court
positioning most of
the time
*Always strikes
the object
properly
*Always throws
properly to a
target
*Applies rules
appropriately in a
game setting
1-Below Basic
0 - Failing
*Remains in
critical portions of
the court
sometimes
*Recognizes when
offensive and
defensive
positions should
be assumed
sometimes
*Attempts to
move opponents
from good court
positioning
sometimes
*Quickly moves
into different
positions
sometimes
*Following a
court/field event,
quickly moves
back to a neutral
position
sometimes
*Begins to
anticipate
opponents
sometimes
*Recognizes
strengths and
weaknesses of
opponents and
attempts to exploit
them sometimes
*Sometimes
applies front to
back and side to
side strategy when
appropriate
*Uses a variety of
shots sometimes
*Does not remain
in critical portions
of the court
*Does not
recognize when
offensive and
defensive
positions should
be assumed
*Does not attempt
to move
opponents from
good court
positioning
* There is no
evidence or
demonstration
of student
learning.
*Does not move
quickly into
different positions
*Does not quickly
moves back to a
neutral position
after a court/field
event
*Does not
anticipate
opponents
* There is no
evidence or
demonstration
of student
learning.
*Does not
recognize
strengths and
weaknesses of
opponents and
does not attempt
to exploit them
*Does not apply
front to back and
side to side
strategy when
appropriate
*Does not use a
variety of shots
* There is no
evidence or
demonstration
of student
learning.
*Strikes the object
properly most of
the time
*Throws properly
to a target most of
the time
*Sometimes
strikes the object
properly
*Sometimes
throws properly
to a target
*Never strikes
the object
properly
*Never throws
properly to a
target
* There is no
evidence or
demonstration
of student
learning.
*Sometimes applies
rules appropriately
in a game setting
*Rarely applies
rules appropriately
in a game setting
*Never applies
rules appropriately
in a game setting
* There is no
evidence or
demonstration
of student
learning.
*Quickly moves
into different
positions most of
the time
*Following a
court/field event,
quickly moves back
to a neutral position
most of the time
*Begins to
anticipate opponents
most of the time
*Recognizes
strengths and
weaknesses of
opponents and
attempts to exploit
them most of the
time
*Rarely applies
front to back and
side to side strategy
when appropriate
*Uses a variety of
shots most of the
time
75
Sample Softball Quiz
Name:
True/ False (A=True, B=False) Level 3
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
A base runner may have both feet off the base before the ball is pitched.
A batter is allowed only 2 fouls before being called out.
A player may over-run 3rd base without being put out.
Interference is called on an infielder standing on the baseline and is not playing the ball and gets in
the way of the base runner.
A regulation team consists of 9 or 10 players.
A foul ball always counts as a strike.
Right handed batters should step on home plate before running to 1st base.
If you are running the base and are hit by a batted ball that has not been toughed by a fielder you are
out.
When running to 3rd base and the ball is overthrown, you may advance to home without being put
out.
A call of 4 balls results in the batter walking to first base.
Multiple Choice: Circle the best answer. Level 3
11. How many infielders are there on a softball team?
a. 4
b. 5 c. 6 d. 7
12. A ball that rolls out-of bounds before it gets to 1st base and is not touched by a fielder is:
b. Foul
13. A ball that rolls out-of bounds after it has rolled over 3rd base is:
a. Fair
b. Foul
14. The player who plays midway between 2nd and 3rd base is the:
a. second baseman b. third baseman
c. left fielder d. short stop
15. A batter who tries to avoid a pitched ball and hit is:
a. out
b. awarded 1st base c. still up to bat
d. called for a ball
16. When both teams have each been up once it is the:
a. end of the first inning
b. end of the game
17. The strike zone for slow pitch is:
a. from the top of the knees to the armpits and over home plate
b. from waist to shoulders and over home plate
c. over home plate with an arc on the ball
d. both A and C
18. The strike zone for fast pitch is:
a.
b.
c.
d.
from the top of the knees to the armpits and over home plate
from waist to shoulders and over home plate
over home plate with an arc on the ball
both A and C
76
a. Fair
19. A mistake by an outfielder is called:
a. mistake
b. error
20. On a force play you can tag:
a. the player b. the base
c. either A or B
d. none of these
21. On a caught fly ball, a base runner must:
a. run to the next base
b. return to base, tag up, and then may try to go to the next base
c. stay on present base-cannot advance
22. If there is a 10th player, he/she is the:
a. short left fielder
b. short center fielder
c. short right fielder d. rover
23. When there is an overthrow at 1st base, you may advance without being put out:
a. bases
b. 1 base
c. no bases d. 3 bases
24. One runner is on 2nd, none at 1st base , batter hits the ball and runs to 1st to put the
from second out, you must:
a. tag the runner
b. tag the base
c. either A or B
d. none of these
24. The Omaha professional baseball team is called the:
a. cornhuskers
b. golden spikes
c. royals
base runner
d. packers
Level 4 Questions:
25. _________________ is position 5 on the field.
26. The fourth batter is named the _____________________ hitter.
27. _________________ is when the runner on third attempts to steal home as the
batter attempts to bunt.
28. When the ball crossed the plate between the batter’s knees and arm pits, his area is called the
__________________________________.
77
Level 4 Questions Continued…
29. Label the positions on the field diagram below:
78
Floor Hockey
79
Floor Hockey Study Guide (sample)
Playing Area
The playing area has a center line, usually the mid court line of the basketball court. Center circle is the mid
court jump circle. Play always starts in this circle and resumes from this point after goals, roughing fouls or
misconduct fouls with the offended team given possession. The goal box is a restraining line marked with tape
in front of the goal.
The Team
Each team consists of six players. One goalie who may use his/her hands, stick or feet to stop the puck. One
center who is the only player allowed moving full court and who leads offensive play and is often referred to as
the rover. Two defensive players who cannot go past the center line into the offensive area and whose
responsibility it is to keep the puck out their defensive half of the court. Two forwards who work with the
center on offensive play and who cannot go past the center line into their defensive area.
The Game
A coin flip determines which team gets the puck first. Play cannot start until a whistle is blown or the ref says
“play”. Penalty for starting before whistle is loss of possession.
Center must start play from the center circle with a pass. There is no scoring from the center circle unless first
touched by another offensive or defensive player. If play is started with a shot on the goal, the puck is returned
to center circle with other team gaining possession. All players must be outside the restraining circle with
defensive players in an upright position.
There are no time outs. If the puck becomes unplayable, the ref will designate the closest team player to put it
in play or declare a face off. If playing two games in one gym, the team that hits the puck out of bounds will
give it to other team.
The Play
When any player accumulates five fouls for roughing or misconduct, he/she is out for the duration of the game.
Free substitution is allowed. A player entering the game as a substitute should use the stick of the player being
replaced. Changed of goalies can only take place when the clock is stopped.
Change of position between guards and forwards can only take place when the puck is dead and the clock is
stopped.
Scoring
A goal is scored anytime the puck touches or crosses the goal line or is above the goal line. Under no
circumstances will a goal be counted on a foul with offensive players in the crease (goalies box). Goal will not
count when puck hits off the front frame of the goal and ricochets out. The team behind gets the puck after a
score unless the score is tied then alternate possession.
80
Goal Keeping
The goalie may use either hands or stick to clear puck away from the goal. It is a foul for the goalie to throw
the puck. The goalie has three seconds to play the puck once he/she has gained control or possession. When
the goalie has been pulled in the last minute of play to add offensive strength, any defensive player may cover
the goalie box otherwise only the goalie can be in the goalies box.
Penalty: Loss of Possession. Start play at the center circle.
Fouls
Roughing Fouls
Slashing-When an opponent is hit with the stick and in the judgment of the referee, the player is not
trying to play the puck.
Contact with an opposing player with the stick above the shoulder.
Contact with the goalie while in the goalie box.
Pushing.
Unnecessary blocking with the body.
Tripping or hooking with the stick.
Penalty: Penalty shot
Bench Penalty
Unsportsmanlike like conduct
Excessive Delay
Penalty: Penalty Shot
Misconduct Penalty
Anytime play is deliberately stopped by holding or placing foot on puck.
Players may not deliberately leave feet to block puck (slide).
Guards or forwards across the center line.
Anytime players are in the goalie box (crease).
Hitting the puck with your hand is allowed as long as you play it immediately.
Penalty: Loss of Possession
Techniques of Play
Keep hands separated to 8 to 12 inches apart. Right handed players should have the right hand lower.
Shots may be scored forehand or backhand.
Emphasize control and direction of puck, not distance or speed.
Stick must be carried low at all times in readiness to intercept shots of opponents, to past to teammates, ect..
Get in close, control the puck with the stick blade; pass to a teammate if they are in a better position to score.
Keep your eye on the puck. Follow it. Stay as close as possible.
Follow all shots-Rebound shots are important.
Wrist action is most important. A flicking motion is best for speed and accuracy.
Hands, wrist, and forearm action control the stick most effectively.
81
Hockey Rink Diagram
OFFENSIVE ZONE
NEUTRAL ZONE
DEFENSIVE ZONE
F-O Circle
Goal Line
Blue Line
Blue Line
Center
F-0 Circle
85 ft
Crease
Goal
Center
F-0 Mark
F-O Mark
Red Line
200 ft
82
Floor Hockey Rubric
Team Sports Rubric
(Floor Hockey)
4-Advanced
3-Proficient
2-Basic
1- Below Basic
0-Failing
Court/Field
Positioning
*Remains in critical
portions of the court
at all times
*Recognizes when
offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed
at all times
*Attempts to move
opponents from
good court
positioning at all
times
*Remains in critical
portions of the court
most of the time
*Recognizes when
offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed
most of the time
*Attempts to move
opponents from
good court
positioning most of
the time
*Remains in critical
portions of the court
sometimes
*Recognizes when
offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed
sometimes
*Attempts to move
opponents from
good court
positioning
sometimes
There is no
evidence or
demonstration
of student
learning.
Court/Field
Movement
*Quickly moves into
different positions
all the time
*Following a
court/field event,
quickly moves back
to a neutral position
all the time
*Begins to anticipate
opponents all the
time
*Quickly moves
into different
positions sometimes
*Following a
court/field event,
quickly moves back
to a neutral position
sometimes
*Begins to
anticipate opponents
sometimes
Strategy
*Recognizes
strengths and
weaknesses of
opponents and
attempts to exploit
them all of the time
*Applies front to
back and side to side
strategy when
appropriate
*Uses a variety of
shots all the time
*Always holds and
swings stick
appropriately
*Always keeps eye
on puck
*Always receives
and passes puck
correctly
*Does not
recognize
strengths and
weaknesses of
opponents and
does not attempt
to exploit them
*Does not apply
front to back and
side to side
strategy when
appropriate
*Does not use a
variety of shots
*Never holds and
swings stick
appropriately
*Never keeps eye
on puck
*Never receives
and passes puck
correctly
There is no
evidence or
demonstration
of student
learning.
Skills
*Quickly moves
into different
positions most of
the time
*Following a
court/field event,
quickly moves back
to a neutral position
most of the time
*Begins to
anticipate
opponents most of
the time
*Recognizes
strengths and
weaknesses of
opponents and
attempts to exploit
them most of the
time
*Rarely applies
front to back and
side to side strategy
when appropriate
*Uses a variety of
shots most of the
time
*Holds and swings
stick appropriately
most of the time
*Keeps eye on puck
most of the time
*Receives and
passes puck
correctly most of
the time
*Does not remain
in critical
portions of the
court
*Does not
recognize when
offensive and
defensive
positions should
be assumed
*Does not
attempt to move
opponents from
good court
positioning
*Does not move
quickly into
different
positions
*Does not
quickly moves
back to a neutral
position after a
court/field event
*Does not
anticipate
opponents
Rules Application
*Applies rules
appropriately in a
game setting
*Applies rules
appropriately in a
game setting most
of the time
*Rarely applies
rules appropriately
in a game setting
*Never applies
rules
appropriately in a
game setting
There is no
evidence or
demonstration
of student
learning.
83
*Recognizes
strengths and
weaknesses of
opponents and
attempts to exploit
them sometimes
*Sometimes applies
front to back and
side to side strategy
when appropriate
*Uses a variety of
shots sometimes
*Sometimes holds
and swings stick
appropriately
*Sometimes keeps
eye on puck
*Sometimes
receives and passes
puck correctly
There is no
evidence or
demonstration
of student
learning.
There is no
evidence or
demonstration
of student
learning.
Floor Hockey Quiz
Name________________________
True/False (A=True, B=False) Level 2
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
A goal is scored anytime the puck crosses the goal line.
The team behind gets the puck after score.
A goal will count if there has been a foul by the offense.
The goalie is not allowed to use his/her hands to stop the puck.
The goalie may catch the puck and throw it to his/her teammates.
The goalie can leave the goalie box.
Slashing is called when an opponent is hit with the stick and was not playing the puck.
A penalty shot is awarded for high sticking (contact above the shoulders).
Anytime play is deliberately stopped by holding or placing a foot on the puck, the referee calls a face
off.
10. Touching the puck with your hand is allowed as long as you play it immediately.
11. When playing you should keep your hands on the stick.
12. You should emphasize control and direction of the puck, not distance.
13. Wrist action is most important, a flicking motion is best for speed and accuracy.
14. If the puck bounces off the top of the goal it counts.
15. The center is allowed to move the full length of the court.
Multiple Choice: Circle the correct answer. Level 2
16. Floor hockey is usually played on a
a. volleyball court
c. soccer field
b. basketball court
d. tennis court
17. Play is started from:
a. the center circle
b. free throw line
c. goalies box
d. coaches box
18. Each team consist of :
a. 8 players
b. 11 players
c. 5 players
d. 6 players
19. Each team has:
a. A goalie, 3 forwards , 3 guards
b. 2 offensive players, 2 defensive players, 1 goalie, 1 rover
c. 4 forwards and 4 guards
d. 3 centers, 3fowards,aand a goalie
20. The “center” is often called the:
a. Rover
c. weakest player
b. goal tender
d. guard
21. The only player to move past the center line and play the full court is called:
a. Center
c. forward
b. Guard
d. goalie
84
22. The center must start play with:
a. Pass
c. throw
b. free shot
d. bully
23. If the puck becomes unplayable the referee calls for a:
a. Pass
c. throw
b. face off
d. bully
24. A player is ejected after committing:
a. 3 fouls
c. 5 fouls
b. 4 fouls
d. a player cannot be ejected
25. What determines who gets the puck to start the game?
a. coin toss
c. visiting team gets to
b. home team gets to
d. the team behind
LEVEL 3:
LEVEL 4:
85
Flag Football
Flag Football Study Guide
86
Flag football is a version of American football that is popular worldwide. The basic rules of the
game are similar to those of the mainstream game (often called "tackle football" for contrast),
but instead of tackling players to the ground, the defensive team must remove a flag or flag belt
from the ball carrier ("deflagging") to end a down. In most organized play, players wear a belt.
In Non-Contact flag football, there is no blocking, usually no linemen, and if there are linemen
they cannot use their hands to block an opponent. You cannot get in the way of a runner; you
can only attempt to grab the flag without impeding the path of the runner. Offensive players are
not allowed to hand block defensive players to prevent them from grabbing the flag.
Flag football games involve:







Two teams of usually between 11 and 18 players; some variations that have fewer players
(five or more per team) are also popular
a clearly defined area in which to play the game;
scoring goals and/or points, by moving the ball to an opposing team's end of the field and
either into a goal area, or over a line;
goals and/or points resulting from players putting the ball between two goalposts
the goal and/or line being defended by the opposing team;
players being required to move the ball—depending on the code—by kicking, carrying
and/or hand passing the ball; and
players using only their body to move the ball.
The Field
The football field is 120 yards long including the end zones. 100 yards of field and 10 yards for
each end zone.
Scoring
A touchdown counts for 6 points and a field goal counts as 3 points. A touchdown is scored
when a receiver or running back crosses into the end zone. A field goal is scored by kicking the
ball through the uprights above the end zone.
General Rules
The players may not wear their shirts over their flags. Blocking in the back is also known as
clipping. The quarterback may not pass the ball from in front of the line of scrimmage.
Defense cannot hold runners. The runner may spin to avoid being stopped, and they may also
use their arm to keep the defense away from their flag. The offense has 4 chances to get a first
down. If the ball is fumbled the other team may recover it. If flags are not available, the teacher
may request that two hand touch is played.
Football – Standard 1 Checklist Assessments (Sample)
87
Skill 1: Throwing (stationary target)
_____ Level 2: Student uses proper grip, arm angle, and follow through. Ball is
released with a spiral and hits a stationary target at 15 yd, < 5 times out
of 10 attempts.
_____ Level 3: Student uses proper grip, arm angle, and follow through. Ball is
released with a spiral and hits a stationary target, at 15 yd, 5 or 6 times
out of 10 attempts.
_____ Level 4: Student uses proper grip, arm angle, and follow through. Ball is
released with a spiral and hits a stationary target, at 15 yd, 7 < times
out of 10 attempts.
Skill 2: Throwing (moving target)
_____ Level 2: Student uses proper grip, arm angle, and follow through. Ball is
released with a spiral and hits a moving target at 15 yd, < 5 times out of
10 attempts.
_____ Level 3: Student uses proper grip, arm angle, and follow through. Ball is
released with a spiral and hits a moving target at 15 yd, 5 or 6 times out
of 10 attempts.
_____ Level 4: Student uses proper grip, arm angle, and follow through. Ball is
released with a spiral and hits a moving target at 15 yd, 7 < times out of
10 attempts.
Skill 3: Catching
_____ Level 2: Student has hands ready to catch. Student uses hands and chest to catch
the ball. Student is mostly successful in a stationary position but has
minimal success catching on the move. Shows difficulty judging a ball
that is not thrown directly to them.
_____ Level 3: Student has hands ready to catch. Student uses mostly hands but still
uses their chest to catch the ball. Student is successful in a stationary
position and has moderate success catching on the move. Demonstrates
ability to judge and go catch a ball that is not thrown directly to them.
.
_____ Level 4: Student has hands ready to catch. Student uses only hands to catch the
ball. Student excels in a stationary position and catching on the move.
Demonstrates high level of ability to judge and go catch a ball that is not thrown
directly to them and shows ability to jump and catch when needed.
FLAG FOOTBALL
88
Flag Football
Rubric
Court/Field
Positioning
Court/Field
Movement
Strategy
Skills
Rules Application
4-Advanced
3-Proficient
*Remains in critical
portions of the court
at all times
*Recognizes when
offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed at
all times
*Attempts to move
opponents from good
court positioning at
all times
*Quickly moves into
different positions all
the time
*Following a
court/field event,
quickly moves back
to a neutral position
all the time
*Begins to anticipate
opponents all the
time
*Recognizes
strengths and
weaknesses of
opponents and
attempts to exploit
them all of the time
*Applies front to
back and side to side
strategy when
appropriate
*Uses a variety of
shots all the time
*Remains in critical
portions of the court
most of the time
*Recognizes when
offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed
most of the time
*Attempts to move
opponents from good
court positioning
most of the time
*Quickly moves into
different positions
most of the time
*Following a
court/field event,
quickly moves back
to a neutral position
most of the time
*Begins to anticipate
opponents most of
the time
*Recognizes
strengths and
weaknesses of
opponents and
attempts to exploit
them most of the
time
*Rarely applies front
to back and side to
side strategy when
appropriate
*Uses a variety of
shots most of the
time
*Can throw the
football to a target
most of the time
*Catches a thrown
ball most of the time
*Applies rules
appropriately in a
game setting most of
the time
*Can throw the
football to a target
every time
*Catches a thrown
ball every time
*Applies rules
appropriately in a
game setting
2-Basic
1-Below Basic
0 - Failing
*Remains in critical
portions of the court
sometimes
*Recognizes when
offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed
sometimes
*Attempts to move
opponents from good
court positioning
sometimes
*Quickly moves into
different positions
sometimes
*Following a
court/field event,
quickly moves back
to a neutral position
sometimes
*Begins to anticipate
opponents sometimes
*Does not remain in
critical portions of
the court
*Does not recognize
when offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed
*Does not attempt to
move opponents
from good court
positioning
*There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning.
*Does not move
quickly into different
positions
*Does not quickly
moves back to a
neutral position after
a court/field event
*Does not anticipate
opponents
*There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
*Recognizes
strengths and
weaknesses of
opponents and
attempts to exploit
them sometimes
*Sometimes applies
front to back and
side to side strategy
when appropriate
*Uses a variety of
shots sometimes
*Does not recognize
strengths and
weaknesses of
opponents and does
not attempt to exploit
them
*Does not apply
front to back and
side to side strategy
when appropriate
*Does not use a
variety of shots
*There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
*Can throw the
football to a target
sometimes
*Catches a thrown
ball sometimes
*Rarely applies rules
appropriately in a
game setting
*Never throws the
football to a target
*Never catches a
thrown ball
*There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
*Never applies rules
appropriately in a
game setting
*There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
Name:
89
Sample Flag Football Quiz
Multiple choice: Circle the best answer.
1. The flag football field (not including the end zone) is:
a. 50 yds.
B. 100ft
c. 160 ft.
d. 100 yds
2. The end zone is:
a. 30 yds
b. 20 yds
c. 160 ft
d. 10 yds
3. A touchdown counts:
a. 3 points
b. 7 points
c. 6 points
d. 2 points
4. A field goal counts:
a. 2 points
b. 3 points
c. 6 points
d. 7 points
5. Blocking a player from behind is called:
a. clipping
b. holding
c. illegal procedure d. offside
6. a. offensive b. defensive c. referee
players cannot use their hands to block.
d. linebacker
7. All passes must be thrown from:
a. the end zone
b. the defensive side of the line
c. behind the line of scrimmage
d. the end of the run
8. a. 1 b. 2 c. 3 d. 4
_______out of four passes completed across the line of scrimmage is a first down.
9.
Players may not wear their shirts over their flags. Ruling:
a. ejected from game
b. player tucks in shirt
c. 15 yd penalty
d. 5 yd penalty
10. A runner cannot:
a. spin
b. jump into the air
c. run across the line of scrimmage d. pass the ball backwards
11. Clipping is a:
a. 15 yd penalty from the end of the run
c. 15 yd penalty from the spot of the foul
12. The defense cannot:
c. touch his flags
b. 5 yd penalty from the spot of foul
d. 5 yd penalty from the end of run.
a. hold the runner
b. touch the runner
d. spin in attempting to grab his flag
True/False ( Mark A=True, B=False)
90
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
The teacher may request a one hand touch anywhere instead of flag pulling.
It is a first down for pass interference by the defense.
Off sides or crossing the scrimmage line before the ball is snapped is a 5 yard penalty.
Unnecessary roughness could be any one of the follow illegal acts: pushing, tripping, and hitting.
The runner can spin while running.
The runner may use a stiff arm or guard his flag to avoid having his flag pulled.
All players offensive or defensive are eligible to catch a pass.
A rush is allowed during a fourth down point.
If a runner fumbles the ball to the ground, the other team may recover it.
The captain of each team has his/her option of accepting a penalty or the result of the play.
If the penalty is stepped off it is also the loss or down.
If the penalty is declined they get the down over.
Play Situations
25.
A runner crosses the goal line and then spikes the football. What is the ruling?
A.
B.
C.
D.
Penalty-5 yards is accessed to the pass after touch down.
No touchdown- 15 yard penalty.
Touchdown counts-runner has to run a lap.
Touchdown counts-15 yard penalty accessed on the following kick off.
LEVEL 3:
LEVEL 4:
91
Lacrosse
Lacrosse Study Guide
92
Brief History
With history that spans centuries, lacrosse is the oldest sport in North America. Rooted in Native American
religion, lacrosse was often played to resolve conflicts, heal the sick, and develop strong, virile men. To Native
Americans, lacrosse is still referred to as “The Creator’s Game.”
Ironically, lacrosse also served as a preparation for war. Legend tells of as many as 1,000 players per side, from
the same or different tribes, who took tums engaging in violent contests. Contestants played on a field from 1 to
15 mile in length, and games sometimes lasted for days. Some tribes used a single pole, tree or rock for a goal,
while other tribes had two goalposts through which the ball had to pass. Balls were made out of wood,
deerskin, baked clay or stone.
The evolution of the Native American game into modem lacrosse began in 1636 when Jean de Brebeuf, a Jesuit
missionary, documented a Huron contest in what is now southeast Ontario, Canada. At that time, some type of
lacrosse was played by at least 48 Native American tribes scattered throughout what is now southern Canada
and all parts of the United States. French pioneers began playing the fame a vividly in the 1800s. Canadian
dentist W. George Beers standardized the game in 1867 with the adoption of set field dimensions, limits to the
number players per team and other basic rules
Lacrosse Positions
Attack
The attack man’s responsibility is to score goals. The attack man generally restricts his play to the offensive
end of the field. A good attack man demonstrates excellent stick work with both hands and has quick feet to
maneuver around the goal. Each team should have three attack men on the field during play.
Midfield
The midfielder’s responsibility is to cover the entire field, playing both offense and defense. The midfielder is a
key to the transition game, and is often called upon to clear the ball from defense to offense. A good midfielder
demonstrates good stick work including throwing, catching, and scooping. Speed and stamina are essential.
Each team should have three midfielders on the field.
Defense
The defender’s responsibility is to defend the goal. The defenseman generally restricts his play to the defensive
end of the field. A good defenseman should be able to react quickly in game situations. Agility and
aggressiveness are unnecessary, but great stick work is not essential to be effective. Each team should have
three defense men on the field.
Goal:
The goalie’s responsibility is to protect the goal and stop the opposing team from scoring. A good goalie also
leads the defense by reading the situation and directing the defensemen to react. A good goalie should have
excellent hand/eye coordination and a strong voice. Quickness, agility, confidence and the ability to
concentrate are also essential. Each team has one goalie in the goal during play.
Lacrosse Equipment
93
The Crosse:
The crosse (lacrosse stick) is made of wood, laminated wood or synthetic material, shaped net at the end. The
crosse must be an overall length of 40-42 inches for attack men and midfielders, or 52-72 inches for
defensemen. The head of the crosse must be 6.5-10 inches wide, except a goalies crosse which may be 10-12
inches wide. The pocket of a crosse shall be deemed illegal if the top of lacrosse ball, when placed in the head
of the crosse, is below the bottom edge of the side wall.
The ball:
The ball must be made of solid rubber and can be white, yellow, or orange.
Lacrosse Rules
Lacrosse is a contact game played by 10 players: a goalie, three defensemen, three midfielders, and three attack
men. The object of the game is to shot the ball into the opponent’s goal. The team scoring the most wins.
Each team must keep at least four players, including the goalie, in its defensive half of the field and three in its
offensive half. Three players (midfielders) may roam the field.
The players take their positions on the field: four in the defensive clearing area, one at the center, two in the
wing areas and three in their attack goal area.
Lacrosse begins with a face-off. The ball is place between the sticks of two squatting players at the center of
the field. The official blows the whistle to begin play. Each face-off player tries to control the ball. The players
in the wing areas can run after the ball when the whistle sounds. The other players must wait until one player
has gained possession of the ball, or the ball has crossed a goal area line, before they can release.
Center face-offs are also used at the start of each quarter and after a goal is scored. Field players must use their
crosses to pass, catch and run with the ball. Only the goalkeeper may touch the ball with his hands. A player
may gain possession of the ball dislodging it from an opponent’s crosse with a stick check. A stick check is the
controlled poking and slapping of the stick and gloved hands of the player in possession of the ball.
If the ball or a player in possession of the ball goes out of bounds, the other team is awarded possession. If the
ball goes out of bounds after an unsuccessful shot, the player nearest to the ball when and where it goes out of
bounds is awarded possession.
An attacking player cannot enter the crease around the goal, but may reach in with his stick to scoop a loose
ball. A referee, umpire and field judge supervise field play. A chief bench official, time keepers and scorers
assist.
LACROSSE
94
Lacrosse Rubric
Court/Field
Positioning
Court/Field
Movement
Strategy
4-Advanced
*Remains in critical
portions of the court
at all times
*Recognizes when
offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed at
all times
*Attempts to move
opponents from good
court positioning at
all times
*Quickly moves into
different positions all
the time
*Following a
court/field event,
quickly moves back
to a neutral position
all the time
*Begins to anticipate
opponents all the
time
*Recognizes
strengths and
weaknesses of
opponents and
attempts to exploit
them all of the time
*Applies front to
back and side to side
strategy when
appropriate
*Uses a variety of
shots all the time
Skills
*Always holds the
stick properly
*Always catches in
the basket of the
stick
*Always follows
through to target
Rules Application
*Applies rules
appropriately in a
game setting
3-Proficient
2-Basic
1-Below Basic
0 – Failing
*Remains in critical
portions of the court
most of the time
*Recognizes when
offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed
most of the time
*Attempts to move
opponents from good
court positioning
most of the time
*Quickly moves into
different positions
most of the time
*Following a
court/field event,
quickly moves back
to a neutral position
most of the time
*Begins to anticipate
opponents most of
the time
*Recognizes
strengths and
weaknesses of
opponents and
attempts to exploit
them most of the
time
*Rarely applies front
to back and side to
side strategy when
appropriate
*Uses a variety of
shots most of the
time
*Holds the stick
properly most of the
time
*Catches in the
basket of the stick
most of the time
*Follows through to
target most of the
time
*Applies rules
appropriately in a
game setting most of
the time
*Remains in critical
portions of the court
sometimes
*Recognizes when
offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed
sometimes
*Attempts to move
opponents from good
court positioning
sometimes
*Quickly moves into
different positions
sometimes
*Following a
court/field event,
quickly moves back
to a neutral position
sometimes
*Begins to anticipate
opponents sometimes
*Does not remain in
critical portions of
the court
*Does not recognize
when offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed
*Does not attempt to
move opponents
from good court
positioning
* There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning.
*Does not move
quickly into different
positions
*Does not quickly
moves back to a
neutral position after
a court/field event
*Does not anticipate
opponents
* There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
*Recognizes
strengths and
weaknesses of
opponents and
attempts to exploit
them sometimes
*Sometimes applies
front to back and
side to side strategy
when appropriate
*Uses a variety of
shots sometimes
*Does not recognize
strengths and
weaknesses of
opponents and does
not attempt to exploit
them
*Does not apply
front to back and
side to side strategy
when appropriate
*Does not use a
variety of shots
* There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
*Rarely holds the
stick properly
*Rarely catches in
the basket of the
stick
*Rarely follows
through to target
*Never holds the
stick properly
*Never catches in the
basket of the stick
*Never follows
through to target
* There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
*Rarely applies rules
appropriately in a
game setting
*Never applies rules
appropriately in a
game setting
* There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
Lacrosse Quiz (Sample)
1. On a free position players may run, pass or shoot.
95
a.
b.
True
False
2. Goalkeepers may use any body part to keep the ball out of the goal.
a.
b.
True
False
3. The 8 meter arc is where all draws and face offs are held.
a.
b.
True
False
4. Women lacrosse defensive players use the same type of stick as the other
players on the field.
a.
b.
True
False
5. In men's lacrosse, you may kick the ball and cover it with your stick.
a.
b.
True
False
6. The lacrosse ball is made of solid rubber.
a.
b.
True
False
7. In a woman's lacrosse game when a foul occurs, the player who is fouled is allowed a free shot at the
goal.
a.
b.
True
False
8. A defensive player may reach into the crease with his stick to scoop a loose ball.
a.
b.
True
False
9. All players may touch the ball with their hands.
a.
b.
True
False
10.A goal counts even if an attacking player is inside the goal crease.
a.
b.
True
False
11.When the whistle blows to indicate a penalty all players must remain still in women's lacrosse.
a.
b.
True
False
12.10 to 20 goals may be scored in a typical lacrosse game.
a.
True
b.
False
13.In men's lacrosse, each team must keep at least 4 players in it's defending half of the field.
a.
True
96
b.
False
Level 3:
14.Your little brother or sister wants you to teach them to play lacrosse. List 3 cues to teach them the
following skills: cradle, scoop, throw and catch.
Level 4:
97
Soccer
Soccer Study Guide/Vocabulary
Vocabulary:
98
DIRECT FREE KICK: a free kick from which a goal may be scored against an opponent
without a second player touching the ball
GOALKEEPER: the only designated player of each team who may handle the ball within
his/her own penalty area
INDIRECT FREE KICK: a free kick from which a goal may not be scored unless the ball is
played or touched by another player of either team
PENALTY KICK: awarded when a foul, which ordinarily results in a direct free kick, occurs
within the offending team’s penalty area
TOUCH LINE: another name for the sidelines
GOAL LINE: another name for the end line
CORNER KICK: awarded to the attacking team when the entire ball passes over the goal line
excluding the area between the goal posts having last been touched by the defending team
GOAL KICK: awarded to the defending team when the entire ball crosses the goal line,
excluding the area between the posts, having last been touched by the attacking team
THROW IN: awarded to a team when the opposing team last touches the ball before the entire
ball passes beyond the touch line either on the ground or in the air.
OFF SIDES: a player is off sides when they are on their opponents ½ of the field, nearer to their
opponent’s goal than the ball & closer to the goal than 2 defensive players & the ball is played
to them. All the above must be satisfied for the call to be made
Playing the Game
The length of a varsity game shall be two 40 minute halves
The game shall be played with 2 teams, each consisting of not more than 11 players, one of
which shall be the goalkeeper
Substitutions are unlimited and shall occur:
a. between periods
b. on a goal kick
c. when a goal is scored
d. when a player is cautioned
e. when a player is disqualified
99
f. when an injured player is attended to on the field
A kickoff shall initiate play at the start of each period and after goals. The ball shall be kicked
when it is still and placed in the center of the field. The ball shall not be considered in play
until it moves forward one rotation. After the kickoff any player except the one who kicked off
may play the ball. The kicker may not play the ball until another player on either team has
played it.
The ball is out of play when it has completely crossed a goal line or touch line whether
on the ground or in the air
A goal is one point
A goal is scored when the entire ball passes legally beyond the goal line between the
posts and under the crossbar. A goal may be scored directly from:
1. direct free kick
2. penalty kick
3. corner kick
4. drop ball
5. goalkeeper’s throw, punt or drop kick
goal
A goal may not be scored during play directly from a kickoff, indirect free kick, goal kick,
throw-in, or a free kick into a team’s own goal.
Goalkeepers are allowed 6 seconds once they gain control of the ball in their hands, to disperse
the ball. They may only use their hands inside the penalty area.
Direct free kicks are awarded with fouls resulting in contact are committed. Examples would
include : tripping, hand balls, holding, pushing, or charging
Indirect free kicks are awarded for non contact fouls or violations. Examples would be:
obstruction, dangerous play with out contact, too many steps by the goalkeeper, off sides
All direct and indirect kicks with the exception of penalty kicks and kickoffs, are taken from the
spot of the foul or infraction. Any player of the offended team may take the kick. Opposing
players must be at least 10 yards from the ball until it is kicked unless they are standing on their
own goal line between the goal posts. If the free kick is awarded to the defending team in their
own penalty area, the opposing players must be outside the penalty area in addition to being 10
yards from the ball and must remain there until the ball clears the penalty area.
SOCCER
100
Soccer Rubric
Court/Field
Positioning
Court/Field
Movement
Strategy
4-Advanced
3-Proficient
2-Basic
1-Below Basic
*Remains in critical
portions of the court
at all times
*Recognizes when
offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed at
all times
*Attempts to move
opponents from good
court positioning at
all times
*Quickly moves into
different positions all
the time
*Following a
court/field event,
quickly moves back
to a neutral position
all the time
*Begins to anticipate
opponents all the
time
*Recognizes
strengths and
weaknesses of
opponents and
attempts to exploit
them all of the time
*Applies front to
back and side to side
strategy when
appropriate
*Uses a variety of
shots all the time
*Remains in critical
portions of the court
most of the time
*Recognizes when
offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed
most of the time
*Attempts to move
opponents from good
court positioning
most of the time
*Quickly moves into
different positions
most of the time
*Following a
court/field event,
quickly moves back
to a neutral position
most of the time
*Begins to anticipate
opponents most of
the time
*Recognizes
strengths and
weaknesses of
opponents and
attempts to exploit
them most of the
time
*Rarely applies front
to back and side to
side strategy when
appropriate
*Uses a variety of
shots most of the
time
*Can dribble with
both the right and
left foot most of the
time
*Can shoot with the
right and left foot
most of the time
*Can trap and pass
most of the time
*Remains in critical
portions of the court
sometimes
*Recognizes when
offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed
sometimes
*Attempts to move
opponents from good
court positioning
sometimes
*Quickly moves into
different positions
sometimes
*Following a
court/field event,
quickly moves back
to a neutral position
sometimes
*Begins to anticipate
opponents sometimes
*Does not remain in
critical portions of
the court
*Does not recognize
when offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed
*Does not attempt to
move opponents
from good court
positioning
* There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
*Does not move
quickly into different
positions
*Does not quickly
moves back to a
neutral position after
a court/field event
*Does not anticipate
opponents
* There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
*Recognizes
strengths and
weaknesses of
opponents and
attempts to exploit
them sometimes
*Sometimes applies
front to back and
side to side strategy
when appropriate
*Uses a variety of
shots sometimes
*Does not recognize
strengths and
weaknesses of
opponents and does
not attempt to exploit
them
*Does not apply
front to back and
side to side strategy
when appropriate
*Does not use a
variety of shots
* There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
*Can dribble with
both the right and
left foot sometimes
*Can shoot with the
right and left foot
sometimes
*Can trap and pass
consistently
sometimes
*Can dribble with
both the right and
left foot rarely
*Can shoot with the
right and left foot
rarely
*Can trap and pass
consistently rarely
* There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
*Applies rules
appropriately in a
game setting most of
the time
*Rarely applies rules
appropriately in a
game setting
*Never applies rules
appropriately in a
game setting
* There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
Skills
*Can dribble with
both the right and
left foot
*Can shoot with the
right and left foot
*Can trap and pass
consistently
Rules Application
*Applies rules
appropriately in a
game setting
0-Failing
Sample Soccer Quiz
1. If you were to play soccer, what position would you want to play
2. The soccer field dimensions are
by
to
yards long.
to
101
yards wide
and why?
3. What other part(s) of the body can be used to stop the soccer ball besides the foot.
a. Head
b. Hand
c. Chest
d. Knee
e. All except B
4. Basic skills used in soccer are:
a. kicking
b. dribbling
c. trapping
d. all of the above
5. Number of points scored for a goal in soccer.
a. 1
b. 3
c. 5
d. 6
6. What are soccer shoes commonly called?
a. pumps
b. sticks
c. cleats
d. clogs
7. In indoor soccer there are no goalies.
a. True
b. False
102
8. What is considered the player's most important piece of equipment?
9. In soccer the side boundaries are called sidelines.
a. True
b. False
10. Which of the following is NOT considered standard soccer equipment?
a. shinguards
b. helmet
c. shorts
d. cleats
11. Which of the following is NOT permitted on the soccer field?
a. shin-guards
b. earrings
c. shorts
d. cleats
12. The 3-4-3 formation for a soccer team is:
a. 4 forwards, 3 midfielders, 3 defenders
b. 3 defenders, 4 midfielders, 3 forwards
c. 4 defenders, 3 forwards, 3 midfielders
13. What are three physical benefits of playing soccer?
14. What occurs to start a soccer game? __________________________
15. The longest line on the soccer field is the side line.
a. True
b. False
16. What is used to mark the corner of a regulation Soccer field?
103
a. Painted Line
b. Flag
c. Cone
d. Brick
17. List all player positions on a soccer team.
18. What are the two most common colors found on a soccer ball?
a. green & white
b. blue & white
c. black & white
d. orange & white
19. What is it called when you move the ball from one teammate to the other on the soccer
field? ______________________________
20. With what part of the foot are you supposed to kick the soccer ball?
a. Sole/Bottom of foot
b. Heel
c. Toe
d. Shoelaces/Top of foot
21. What player is allowed to pick up the ball while it is on the soccer field?
a. Sweeper
b. Left Forward
c. Goal Keeper
d. Right Full Back
Soccer Field Diagram
104
105
Team Handball
(Sample)TEAM HANDBALL STUDY GUIDE
I.
Origin
A. Originated in Europe in 1920.
B. Became an Olympic sport in men’s events in the 1972 Munich Games.
106
C.
D.
E.
II.
Included as women’s event in the 1976 Montreal Games.
Fast paced game played by all ages, indoors and outdoors.
Combines the elements of soccer, basketball, hockey, and water polo.
Playing Area
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
F.
20 meters x 40 meters.
6 meter line – goalkeeper area (3 point circle). Neither attacking nor defending
players are allowed in the goal area. If your follow through takes you into the goal
area, you must exit immediately and not make contact with the goalie.
7 meter line – penalty shot – one on one with goalie. One foot must be in contact with
the floor.
9 meter line – free throw line, used to put the ball back in to play after a minor foul.
4 meter line – goalie cannot go passed this point.
Centerline – attacking team starts the game here and restarts play after each goal.
III.
Fundamental Skills - Passing and catching are the most important components of ball
control.
A. Passing
a. Jump pass – in the air over the defense. One hand only.
b. Overhand pass – spread fingers across the ball and grip with fingertips.
Similar to a baseball throw from the outfield.
c. Wrist pass – hold ball with 2 hands, allows quick passes without moving the
torso. Step laterally, flip wrist. Push the ball with the thumb. Hold ball on
top.
B. Catching – two hands for ball control, above and below the waist.
C. Offensive success revolves around a team’s ability to move the move the ball quickly
and accurately from player to player.
D. Keep the ball moving.
E. Play the ball, not the opponent.
IV.
Rules
A. Players – 7 players per team, 6 court players and 1 goalie
B. Passive Play – It is illegal to keep the ball in a team’s possession without making an
attempt to attack and try to score.
C. Throw off – game begins with a throw off. Each team begins the game in its own half
of the court.
D. Scoring a goal – occurs when the entire ball crosses the goal line, inside the goal.
E. Playing the Ball – A player is allowed to:
a. run with the ball 3 steps. Violation for more than 3 steps is a free throw.
b. hold the ball for less than 3 seconds. Violation for more than 3 seconds is a
free throw.
107
c.
F.
unlimited dribble with 3 steps allowed before and after dribbling. No double
dribbling.
A player is NOT allowed to:
a. endanger an opponent with the ball
b. pull, hit, or punch the ball out of the hands of a opponent.
c. contact the ball below the knee.
d. dive on the floor for a rolling or stationary ball.
TEAM HANDBALL - RUBRIC
Team Handball
Rubric
4-Advanced
3-Proficient
2-Basic
108
1-Below Basic
0-Failing
Court/Field
Positioning
Court/Field
Movement
Strategy
*Remains in critical
portions of the court
at all times
*Recognizes when
offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed at
all times
*Attempts to move
opponents from good
court positioning at
all times
*Quickly moves into
different positions all
the time
*Following a
court/field event,
quickly moves back
to a neutral position
all the time
*Begins to anticipate
opponents all the
time
*Recognizes
strengths and
weaknesses of
opponents and
attempts to exploit
them all of the time
*Applies front to
back and side to side
strategy when
appropriate
*Uses a variety of
shots all the time
Skills
*Always holds ball
correctly
*Always throws ball
to target
*Always catches the
ball properly
Rules Application
*Applies rules
appropriately in a
game setting
*Remains in critical
portions of the court
most of the time
*Recognizes when
offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed
most of the time
*Attempts to move
opponents from good
court positioning
most of the time
*Quickly moves into
different positions
most of the time
*Following a
court/field event,
quickly moves back
to a neutral position
most of the time
*Begins to anticipate
opponents most of
the time
*Recognizes
strengths and
weaknesses of
opponents and
attempts to exploit
them most of the
time
*Rarely applies front
to back and side to
side strategy when
appropriate
*Uses a variety of
shots most of the
time
*Holds ball correctly
most of the time
*Throws ball to
target most of the
time
*Catches the ball
properly most of the
time
*Applies rules
appropriately in a
game setting most of
the time
*Remains in critical
portions of the court
sometimes
*Recognizes when
offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed
sometimes
*Attempts to move
opponents from good
court positioning
sometimes
*Quickly moves into
different positions
sometimes
*Following a
court/field event,
quickly moves back
to a neutral position
sometimes
*Begins to anticipate
opponents sometimes
*Does not remain in
critical portions of
the court
*Does not recognize
when offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed
*Does not attempt to
move opponents
from good court
positioning
* There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
*Does not move
quickly into different
positions
*Does not quickly
moves back to a
neutral position after
a court/field event
*Does not anticipate
opponents
* There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
*Recognizes
strengths and
weaknesses of
opponents and
attempts to exploit
them sometimes
*Sometimes applies
front to back and
side to side strategy
when appropriate
*Uses a variety of
shots sometimes
*Does not recognize
strengths and
weaknesses of
opponents and does
not attempt to exploit
them
*Does not apply
front to back and
side to side strategy
when appropriate
*Does not use a
variety of shots
* There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
*Sometimes holds
ball correctly
*Sometimes throws
ball to target
*Sometimes catches
the ball properly
*Never holds ball
correctly
*Never throws ball
to target
*Never catches the
ball properly
* There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
*Rarely applies rules
appropriately in a
game setting
*Never applies rules
appropriately in a
game setting
* There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
Name:
Sample Team Handball Quiz
True/False (A=True, B=False)
109
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
The game is started with a jump ball.
You may dribble the ball 3 times and then take 3 steps before passing the ball.
You have unlimited time to pass the ball.
All passes must be chest passes.
To score, the ball must be thrown two-handed.
The scoring team receives the ball after scoring.
A goal counts as one point.
A shot may rebound off the floor and into the goal for a score.
Team handball is not an Olympic sport.
A free throw is taken when a player is tripped.
A penalty throw is taken when there is unsportsmanlike conduct.
A defensive player may go into the goal area to help the goalie.
A team consists of 7 players which includes the goalie.
During a penalty throw only the goalie may stop the ball.
Team handball is a combination of soccer, basketball, and hockey components.
All players must be at least 2 meters away from the passer during a free throw.
Give the correct call. Write the letter of the correct call in the blank.
A=Penalty Throw
B=Throw in C=Penalty Box D= No Call continue play
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
Repeated unsportsmanlike fouls by the same player.
Defensive player (not the goalie) goes into the goal area.
Offensive player lands in the goal area after throwing the ball for a score.
Kicking the ball.
Pushing an opposing player from behind.
Taking more than 3 steps at a time with the ball.
Double dribble.
A player takes 2 seconds to throw the ball.
A defensive player steals the ball without making contact with the opposing player.
110
Volleyball
Sample VOLLEYBALL STUDY GUIDE
SCORING
111



Rally scoring
Games go to 25
Win by 2
ILLEGAL HITS
 CARRY- Momentarily holding the ball
 LIFT- contacting the ball with an open palm faces an upward direction below the waist
 BLOCKING OR SPIKING SERVES
 DOUBLE HIT- contacting the ball twice by the same person
RULES
 Any ball that lands on the line is good
 Only 3 hits are allowed on a side
 The ball may not be played off the curtain or wall
 If the ball hits an obstruction it is only playable when it comes back down on the side it
originated from (as long as it is not the third hit)
 Service must be from behind the service line. Stepping on or over the service line while
contacting the ball on a serve is a fault (or foot fault)
 If the ball hits the net and goes over on the service, it is a live ball.
 A regulation volleyball game has 6 people per side of the net.
KEY TERMS


Bump, set, spike—three hit progression
Lift, shift, punch (hit)—three key points of an overhand serve
CLASSROOM RULES





Do not spike a serve
If it hits the ceiling on your side, play it, the other side, it is out.
Roll the ball under the net
Rotate into the serving position
Do not kick the Volleyball
HISTORY OF VOLLEYBALL




In 1995, the sport of Volleyball was 100 years old!
The sport originated in the United States, and is now just achieving the type of popularity in
the U.S. that it has received on a global basis, where it ranks behind only soccer among
participation sports.
Today there are more than 46 million Americans who play volleyball. There are 800 million
players worldwide who play Volleyball at least once a week.
In 1895, William G. Morgan, an instructor at the Young Men's Christian Association
(YMCA) in Holyoke, Mass., decided to blend elements of basketball, baseball, tennis, and
handball to create a game for his classes of businessmen which would demand less physical
112

contact than basketball. He created the game of Volleyball (at that time called mintonette).
Morgan borrowed the net from tennis, and raised it 6 feet 6 inches above the floor, just
above the average man's head.
During a demonstration game, someone remarked to Morgan that the players seemed to be
volleying the ball back and forth over the net, and perhaps "volleyball" would be a more
descriptive name for the sport.
VOCABULARY
















Ace - a serve that results directly in a point, usually when the ball hits the floor untouched on
the receiving teams side of the court
Assist - passing or setting the ball to a teammate who attacks the ball for a kill
Back row - the three players who court position is near the baseline
Block - a defensive play by one or more of the front row players meant to intercept a spiked
ball
Bump - descriptive term for a forearm pass
Carry - momentarily holding the ball
Dig - passing a spiked or rapidly hit ball
Double hit - contacting the ball twice by the same person, illegal
Foul - a violation of the rules
Front row - three players whose court position is near the net
Lift - contacting the ball with an open palm; faces in an upward position
Pass - receiving a serve or the first contact of the ball with the intent to control the ball to
another player
Rally scoring - scoring method where points can be won by the serving or receiving team
Set - the tactical skill in which a ball is directed to a point where a player can spike it into the
opponent's court. Proper form would require the elbows to be away from the body, not
tucked in tight.
Side out - when the receiving wins the rally, they gain the right to serve
Spike - a ball contacted with force by a player on the offensive team who intends to
terminate the ball on the opponent's floor or off the opponent's blocker
VOLLEYBALL
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Volleyball Rubric
Court/Field
Positioning
Court/Field
Movement
Strategy
4-Advanced
3-Proficient
*Remains in critical
portions of the court
at all times
*Recognizes when
offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed at
all times
*Attempts to move
opponents from good
court positioning at
all times
*Quickly moves into
different positions all
the time
*Following a
court/field event,
quickly moves back
to a neutral position
all the time
*Begins to anticipate
opponents all the
time
*Recognizes
strengths and
weaknesses of
opponents and
attempts to exploit
them all of the time
*Applies front to
back and side to side
strategy when
appropriate
*Uses a variety of
shots all the time
*Remains in critical
portions of the court
most of the time
*Recognizes when
offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed
most of the time
*Attempts to move
opponents from good
court positioning
most of the time
*Quickly moves into
different positions
most of the time
*Following a
court/field event,
quickly moves back
to a neutral position
most of the time
*Begins to anticipate
opponents most of
the time
*Recognizes
strengths and
weaknesses of
opponents and
attempts to exploit
them most of the
time
*Rarely applies front
to back and side to
side strategy when
appropriate
*Uses a variety of
shots most of the
time
*Occasionally
performs the forearm
pass correctly
*Occasionally
performs the
overhead set
correctly
*Occasionally
performs the
overhand serve
correctly
*Rarely remains in
critical portions of
the court
*Rarely recognizes
when offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed
*Rarely attempts to
move opponents
from good court
positioning
*Does not remain in
critical portions of
the court
*Does not recognize
when offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed
*Does not attempt to
move opponents
from good court
positioning
* There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
*Rarely moves
quickly into different
positions
*Rarely moves
quickly back to a
neutral position after
a court/field event
*Rarely anticipates
opponents
*Does not move
quickly into different
positions
*Does not quickly
moves back to a
neutral position after
a court/field event
*Does not anticipate
opponents
* There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
*Rarely recognizes
strengths and
weaknesses of
opponents and
attempts to exploit
them
*Rarely applies front
to back and side to
side strategy when
appropriate
*Rarely uses a
variety of shots
*Does not recognize
strengths and
weaknesses of
opponents and
attempts to exploit
them
*Does not apply
front to back and
side to side strategy
when appropriate
*Does not use a
variety of shots
* There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
*Rarely performs the
forearm pass
*Rarely performs the
overhead set
*Rarely performs the
overhand serve
*Cannot perform the
forearm pass
*Cannot perform the
overhead set
*Cannot perform the
overhand serve
* There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
*Sometimes applies
rules appropriately in
a game setting
*Rarely applies rules
appropriately in a
game setting
*Rarely applies rules
appropriately in a
game setting
* There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
Skills
*Performs the
forearm pass
correctly and
consistently
*Performs the
overhead set
correctly and
consistently
*Performs the
overhand serve
correctly and
consistently
Rules Application
*Applies rules
appropriately in a
game setting
2-Basic
1-Below Basic
Volleyball – Standard 1 Checklist Assessments (Sample)
Skill 1: Serving (overhand)
114
0-Failing
_____ Level 2: Student uses proper technique (toss, arm swing, and follow through). Majority
of serves go over the net and land inbounds. Student lacks directional control
and velocity on serve.
_____ Level 3: Student uses proper technique (toss, arm swing, and follow through). Majority
of serves go over the net and land inbounds. Student demonstrates moderate
directional control and can increase the velocity on the serve.
_____ Level 4: Student uses proper technique (toss, arm swing, and follow through). Majority
of serves go over the net and land inbounds. Student demonstrates consistent
directional control and has ability to change up velocity on the serve.
Skill 2: Passing
_____ Level 2: Student uses proper technique (interlocked hands, straight arms, knees bent).
Student is able to make contact with the ball and get it into the air on a
consistent basis.
_____ Level 3: Student uses proper technique (interlocked hands, straight arms, knees bent).
Student makes contact with the ball, demonstrating moderate
directional control, with adequate trajectory for setting the next hit.
_____ Level 4: Student uses proper technique (interlocked hands, straight arms, knees bent).
Student makes contact with the ball demonstrating excellent directional
control with high trajectory for setting the next hit.
Skill 3: Overhead Pass (Set)
_____ Level 2: Student uses proper technique (hands above head, finger tips). Student passes
ball into the air but lacks directional control and consistent trajectory for quality
kill attempts.
_____ Level 3: Student uses proper technique (hands above head, finger tips). Student passes
ball into the air and demonstrates moderate directional control and with
improved trajectory for quality kill attempts.
_____ Level 4: Student uses proper technique (hands above head, finger tips). Student passes
ball into the air and demonstrates superior directional control and trajectory for
quality kill attempts.
Sample Volleyball Quiz
Name:
115
1. defense system
2. save
3. offensive system
4. “roof”
5. off-hand spike
6. kill
7. dink
8. strong side right hander
9. strong side left hander
10. topspin
11. W-formation
12. back set
13. bump
14. off-speed hit
15. free ball
16. opening up
17. side out
18. crosscourt
19. double hit
20. floater
21. wrist snap
22. heel plant
23. open hand
24. ace
25. turn outside hand in
a. 4-2
b. the setter is on the side opposite the hitter’s hitting hand
c. offensive drop shot
d. left front position
e. 2-1-3
f. blockers have their hands over the net
g. one-arm desperation play to save a hard driven ball
h. the setter is on the hitter’s strong-arm side
i. no spin
j. a spiked ball that isn’t returned
k. ball will float
l. puts topspin on the ball
m. ball will drop
n. right front position
o. transfers forward momentum into upward momentum
p. setter sets the ball over a head to the player
q. an easy return from the opponent
r. a serve that is not returned
s. serve reception
t. turning to face the player who is playing the ball
u. a spike directed diagonally to the longest part of the court
v. the serve changes hands
w. hand position of the blocker closet to sideline
x. a player plays the ball twice in succession
y. a spike that is hit after the speed of the striking arm greatly repeated
Multiple Choice; Circle the best answer.
26. The main difference in execution between the floater and the topspin serve is
a. how you stand in relation to the net in the ready position
b. where you contact the ball and how you follow through
c. in how you swing your hitting arm
d. how high you release the ball on the toss
27. The reason for a player being unsuccessful in serving accurately with an overhand is
a. no weight shift b. poor ball toss c. no backswing d. no arm extension e. all of the above
28. An on-hand spike is
a. always performed by the right forward
b. hit on the opposite side of your body as the approaching set
c. hit without an approach
d. hit on the same side of your body as the approaching net
29. Once the serve is passed to the setter, the setter should make every effort to the ball using
a. an overhand pass b. an underhand pass c. a block d. a spike
30. A ball that is served to the opponent and hits the court in bounds without anyone hitting it is called
a. a kill
b. a perfect serve
c. an ace
d. a spike
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31. A ball not spiked by your opponent but returned to you high and easy is called
a. a block
b. a free ball
c. a cake
d. a base defense
32. When your opponent plays the ball and you are waiting to see what they will do, you should be in
a. serve reception formation
b. free ball formation
c. base defensive formation
d. block + 2-1-3 defensive formation
33. When spiking a ball, the ball is contacted with
a. the heel of an open hand b. the fingertips
c. the side of a closed fist
d. the front of a closed fist
34. The most accurate method of playing the ball is
a. the block b. the overhead pass c. the spike
d. the forearm pass
35. The reason the floater server moves during flight is because
a. the ball has no spin on it b. the ball has topspin on it
c. the ball has backspin
d. the ball is hit with a closed fist
36. When performing a forearm pass, the arms generally
a. swing upward with force b. make contact at shoulder level
c. remain almost stationary d. follow through above the shoulders
37. The term used describe one team’s losing the serve is
a. hand out b. side out
c. point
d. rotation
38. When the right back has called for the ball, indicating to his/her teammates that he/she will receive the
serve, all of his teammates should
a. open up to the right back
b. run toward the right back to help out
c. get ready for the 2-1-3 formation d. call the lines for him/ her
39. The serve is approaching the left back of the receiving team. The person who has the prime
responsibility of calling the ball out over the end line is the (see diagram)
a. LF b. LB c. RB d. CB
40. The following are all in defensive plays, expect for
a. a spike
b. a block
c. a dig
d. a save
41. All of the following terms are associated with the spike, except
a. off-hand b. cushioning c. off-speed d. step-close take off
42. The primary responsibility of the center back in the 2-1-3 defensive alignment is
a. to dig the spike
b. to block the spike
c. to pick up all dinks that come over the block
d. not to play the ball, if at all possible
43. The purpose of the heel plant in the spike is to
a. avoid too much force on the toes
b. change forward momentum
c. prevent wear and tear on the soles of your sneakers d. help you get greater arm swing
117
Broad Team Sports Quiz
Sample Team Sports Quiz
118
Name__________________
This test contains several questions from activities that we have participated in
during the past semester. Each question is worth 4 points. Read each question
completely before answering.
1. THE PACER TEST MEASURES THE FITNESS LEVEL OF:
a. muscular strength b. flexibility c. coordination d. heart, lungs, muscles.
2. THE ONE-MINUTE SIT-UP TEST MEASURES STRENGTH IN THE:
a. legs b. back c. neck and shoulders d. abdominal area
3. THE PUSH-UP TEST MEASURES STRENGTH AND ENDURANCE IN THE:
a. legs b. abdominal area c. upper body d. lower body
4. THE SIT AND REACH TEST MEASURES FLEXIBILITY IN WHAT AREA:
a. neck and shoulders
d. hands and wrists
b. upper back c. hamstring muscles and lower back
5. THE WALL - SIT TEST MEASURES STRENGTH IN THE:
a. upper back
b. shoulders and neck c. arms and chest d. legs, hips, and knees
6. In the game of ULTIMATE FRISBEE a goal is scored when an offensive player
has both feet in the end zone (behind basketball line) after receiving a pass from a
teammate.
a. T b. F
7. In the game of ULTIMATE FRISBEE the defensive team gains possession
whenever the offensive team’s pass is incomplete, intercepted, knocked down, or
goes out of bounds.
a. T b. F
8. In the game of FLOOR HOCKEY the goalie may use either hands or stick to
clear puck away from the goal.
a. T
b. F
9. In the game of FLOOR HOCKEY it is considered a foul when you contact an
opposing player with the stick above the shoulder.
a. T b. F
10. MAT BALL is a great game that will help increase your _______________.
a. muscular endurance b. abdominal strength c. cardiovascular endurance d. emotional strength
119
11. In the game of MAT BALL runners must tag up when fly balls are caught?
a. T
b. F
12. In the game of BASKETBALL there are how many players on the court at the
same time, per team?
a. 3
b. 5 c.
7
d. 10
13. In BASKETBALL, a field goal is worth how many points?
a.
1
b. 2
c. 3
d. both b & c
14. In BADMINTON, the server must always serve cross-court?
a. T
b. F
15. In BADMINTON, the serve is always an underhand serve?
a. T
b. F
16. In VOLLEYBALL balls landing on the sideline are considered out-of-bounds?
a.
T
b. F
17. In VOLLEYBALL the server is the player in the __________position on the court?
a. left back
b.
right back
c. center
d. middle front
18. In SOCCER you cannot score a goal directly from a kick off.
a. T
b. F
19. In SOCCER a goal is scored when
______.
a. the ball hits the goalie
b. the ball goes over the end line c. the whole
ball crosses the goal line between the two goals posts and underneath the cross bar.
d. none of the above
20. In FLAG FOOTBALL the only legal way to stop the play of the offensive player
with the ball is to:
a. get in the way
b. tackle the offensive player
c. remove the offensive players flag
d. de-pants the offensive player
21 . In FLAG FOOTBALL an interception is when an:
120
a.
offensive player catches the ball
b. the quarterback runs with the ball
c.
a defensive player intercepts the ball in the air
d. the ball bounces off the ground
22. In the game of SIX BASE how many players are allowed on a base at a time?
a. 6. b. as many as you want c. 3
d.
1
23. In the game of SIX BASE bases are placed in what pattern?
a. X X X
b. X
X
.
XXX
X
X
X
X
c. X
X
X
X
X
d. XXXXXX
24. For the following question please select the answer that is not required to earn
daily grade points for physical education.
a. dress daily
b.
be on time
c. participate daily d. sitting or standing
against the wall
25. To successfully complete physical education requirements students must
pass how many semesters of physical education?
a.
1
b.
2
c. 4
d. P.E. is not required for
graduation
121
Lifetime Sports Materials
Lifetime Sports Course Description
*This course is offered to 10-12th grade students. Students will learn
a variety of rules, skills, fundamentals and strategies in a variety of
122
individual and dual sport activities. Safety and sportsmanship will be
emphasized. Activities include, but are not limited to: badminton,
pickle ball, tennis, bowling, archery, table tennis and other individual
and dual sports. District mandated fitnessgram will be administered in
pre- and post- test form.
Lifetime Sports Course Outcomes
01 Demonstrates the transition from offense to defense and applies proper
techniques of skills
02 Explains appropriate tactical decisions in a variety of games.
03 Demonstrates the use of appropriate strategies for effecting behavior change
regarding physical activity among adults.
04 Assesses and maintains appropriate levels of physical fitness in terms of:
cardiorespiratory endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility and body
composition necessary for a healthy and productive life.
05 Chooses to participate in an activity because of personal enjoyment rather than only
when friends are participating.
06 Identifies reasons to participate in physical activity (e.g. health, enjoyment,
challenge, self-expression, and social interaction).
Lifetime Sports Scope and Sequence
Archery
1. Demonstrates the appropriate technique; stringing and unstringing the bow, address the target,
hocking the arrow, drawing the bowstring, aim, and releasing the arrow.
123
2. Written test; rules, scoring, etiquette, terms, origin, development, safety
Badminton
1. Demonstrates the appropriate techniques; serve, shots (drop, high clear, lob, drive), swings
(underhand, overhand, side arm).
2. Game play.
3. Written test; equipment, rules, history, strategy, etiquette, terms, safety.
Bowling
1. Approach; 3 step, 4 step, 5 step
2. Release; straight ball or hook ball
3. Written test; equipment, etiquette, clothing, pin and spot bowling, rules, scoring, identify
areas, safety
Deck Tennis
1.
2.
3.
4.
Equipment; ring, net
Serves and throws; underhand, inside out
Game play and strategy
Written test; origin, rules, skills, terms, scoring, strategies, safety
Frisbee/Frisbee Golf
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Toss and types of toss
Rules and Regulations
Catch
Target Strategy
Individual Play
Written test; rules, terms, scoring, etiquette, origin, safety
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Grip; overlap, interlock
Putting; grip and stance
Stance, address the ball, swing
Equipment
Etiquette and safety
Written test; equipment, origin, regulations, scoring, strategies, terms, safety
Golf
Paddleball
1. Demonstrate techniques; forehand and backhand stroke, serve to appropriate area, and lob
2. Written test; origin, equipment, rules, regulation, strategy, scoring, safety, terms
124
Shuffleboard
1. Terms; stick, slide handling, scoring, disc
2. Written test; origin, rules, scoring, strategy, terms, safety
Table Tennis/Ping Pong
1.
2.
3.
4.
Demonstrate the ability to; serve, return, forehand, backhand
Game play and strategy
Singles and doubles play
Written test; origin, etiquette, equipment, regulations, strategy, skills, scoring, safety
Tennis/Pickleball
1.
2.
3.
4.
Demonstrates the ability to; forehand, backhand, serve, return, volley, lob, overhead
Game play and strategy
Singles and doubles, court management
Written test; origin, equipment, rules, regulations, strategy, terms, etiquette, safety
Track and Field
1. Demonstrates the ability to; run, jump, sprint, distance, hurdle, throw, relays, hand offs,
starting blocks
2. Written test; origin, skills, strategy, terms, regulations, rules, safety
Lifetime Sports Potential Units of Study
Archery
archery.org
Badminton
125
usabadminton.org
Bocce Ball
bocce.com
Bowling
bowlingindex.com
Cardio/Bikes
Darts
mostdartgames.com
Deck Tennis
mastersgames.com
Frisbee golf
pdga.com
Golf
teachkidsgolf.com
Handball
usateamhandball.org
Horseshoes
horseshoepitching.com
Juggling
juggling.org
Jump Roping
Orienteering
orienteering.org
Pickleball
usapa.org
Racquetball
usra.org
Shuffle Board
shuffleboardfederation.com
Table Tennis
usatt.org
Tennis
ustennis.com
Track and Field
usatf.com
Lifetime Sports – Proficiency Scale
Standards
Standard
Requirements
4
Advanced
3
Proficient
126
2
Basic
1
Below Basic
0
Failing
Standard 1
Standard 2
Standard 3
Standard 4
Demonstrates
competency in motor
skills and movement
patterns needed to
perform a variety of
physical activities.
Student can
perform the
required skills and
the advanced skills
without assistance
in a game or
competitive setting.
Student can perform
the required skills and
some advanced skills
without assistance in
isolation or in a
practice setting.
Student can
perform basic
skills without
assistance in
isolation or in
a practice
setting.
Minimal
achievement
with assistance
from someone
else.
Attempted
and failed.
Demonstrates
understanding of
movement concepts,
principles, strategies,
and tactics as they
apply
to the learning and
performance of
physical
activities.
Student has
thorough
understanding of
concepts,
vocabulary and
strategies,
and can apply them
in game or
competitive
situations.
Student has
understanding of
concepts and
vocabulary and
can apply them in
practice situations
but has difficulty
applying them in
game
or competitive
situations
Student has a
minimal
understanding of
basic concepts
and vocabulary
but has difficulty
applying
them in practice
situations.
Minimal
achievement
with assistance
from someone
else.
Attempted
and failed.
Participates regularly in
physical activity.
Student is prepared
and participates in
all activities and
makes an effort to
improve their skills
and abilities.
Student also
helps others
improve their skill or
ability.
Student is prepared
and participates in all
activities and
makes an effort to
improve their skills
and abilities.
Student
participates in all
activities, but
makes minimal
effort to improve.
Minimal
achievement
with assistance
from someone
else.
Attempted
and failed.
Achieves and maintains
a health
enhancing level of
physical fitness.
Student
demonstrates an
understanding of
healthy living
concepts. Student
creates a fitness
plan which
significantly
improves their level
of fitness.
Student understands
healthy living
concepts. Student
can create a plan to
maintain their current
level
of fitness.
Student has a
basic
understanding of
healthy living
concepts.
Student
struggles to
maintain current
fitness levels.
Minimal
achievement
with assistance
from someone
else.
Attempted
and failed.
127
Archery
Sample Archery Study Guide
Archery Range Rules
128
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Know and obey all range commands.
Keep your arrows in your quiver until you are told to shoot.
Only use the arrows the instructor gave you, and remember what they look like.
Always keep your arrows pointed down or towards the target. Shoot only at your target.
If you dropped an arrow, leave it on the ground until you are told to get your arrows.
Always walk at the archery range.
Archery Range Whistle Commands
Two Blasts- “Archers to the shooting line.”
One Blast- “Begin shooting.”
Three Blasts- “Walk forward and get your arrows.”
Four or more blasts(Series of blasts)-“Stop Shooting” Immediately, ‘let’ down your arrow, put the arrow back
in the quiver, place bow back on rack and return behind the waiting line.
Archery Range Procedures
1. Stand behind the waiting line until you hear 2 whistles or “Archers to the shooting line.” Pickup your
bow and straddle the shooting line.
2. Keep your arrows in your quiver until you hear 1 whistle or “Began shooting”.
3. After you have shot all your arrows, stay standing where you are at and wait.
4. After everyone is done shooting the instructor will blow the whistle 3 times. “Walk forward to get your
arrows stopping at the target line”.
Pulling your arrows out
1. One archer at a time walks up to the target. Stand to the side of the target and make sure that no is
standing behind you arrows.
2. Pull your arrows straight out one at a time and put them in your quiver.
3. After you have walked your arrows back to the quiver return to the waiting line.
9 Steps of shooting
1. Stance- place one foot one each side of the shooting line with feet shoulder width apart.
2. Nock- place the arrow on the arrow rest, snapping it on the string below the nock locator.
3. Set- set your bow hand on the grip using only the web and the meaty part of your thumb. Set the first groove
of your first 3 fingers around the bowstring creating a hook.
4. Pre-draw- Raise your bow arm towards the target.
5. Draw- draw the string back until your elbow is directly behind the arrow.
6. Anchor- draw the string to the front of your chin or corner of your smile and hold it there.
7. Aim- focus your eyes and concentration on the center of the target
8. Release- release all the tension in your fingers while counting extending bow arm and focusing on target.
9. Follow-through- drawing hand continues back beside neck with fingers relaxed, ending up near shoulder.
Continue focusing on the target. Maintain follow-through until the arrow hits the target.
Archery Terms
Aim: Any method used to point the arrow in the direction you want it to go.
129
Anchor: Consistent placement of the drawing hand to a position on the face, mouth or jaw.
Arrow Rest: The horizontal projection on the bow upon which the arrow lies.
Bow: A device made of a piece of flexible material with a string connecting the two ends, used to propel an
arrow.
Draw: To pull the bow string back. Also the distance the bow string is pulled back.
End: A set number of arrows that are shot before going to the target to score and retrieve them, 5 arrows.
Fletching: Also known as the feathers that are attached to the arrow shaft.
Follow Through: Maintaining the motion of the upper body muscles after releasing the string.
Let Down: Returning from full draw to undrawn position with control and not releasing string.
Nock: To place the arrow on the string. Also the attachment to the rear end of an arrow, which is placed on the
bow string and holds the arrow on the string.
Nock Locator: The white device that indicates where the arrow is to be placed on the string.
Quiver: The stand on the shooting line that holds the arrows.
Scoring:
Yellow=3 points
Red=2 points
Blue=1 point
Missed=0 points
*An arrow which hits on the line between two colors is scored as the higher of the two.
130
131
ARCHERY - RUBRIC
Archery Rubric
4: Advanced
Line Positioning
*Always steps up
to the line when
instructed
*Always stays
behind the line
*Always has feet
shoulder width
apart when
shooting
*Sometimes steps up
to the line when
instructed
*Sometimes stays
behind the line
*Sometimes has feet
shoulder width apart
when shooting
Shooter
Movement
*Always nocks
arrow when
instructed
*Always draws
bow back when
instructed
*Always releases
arrow when
instructed
*Always aims for
the bullseye
*Always
understands
scoring and aims
appropriately
*Always attempts
to out shoot
opponent
*Always notches
the arrow
correctly
*Always controls
the pull on the
bow
*Always releases
slow and
controlled
*Always holds
bow until arrow is
completely off the
bow
*Applies rules
appropriately in a
game setting
Strategy
Skills
Rules
Application
3: Proficient
2: Basic
1: Below Basic
0: Failing
*Rarely steps up to
the line when
instructed
*Rarely stays behind
the line
*Rarely has feet
shoulder width apart
when shooting
*Never steps up to
the line when
instructed
*Never stays
behind the line
*Never has feet
shoulder width
apart when
shooting
* There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
*Sometimes nocks
arrow when instructed
*Sometimes draws
bow back when
instructed
*Sometimes releases
arrow when instructed
*Rarely nocks arrow
when instructed
*Rarely draws bow
back when instructed
*Rarely releases
arrow when
instructed
* There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
*Sometimes aims for
the bullseye
*Sometimes
understands scoring
and aims appropriately
*Sometimes attempts
to out shoot opponent
*Rarely aims for the
bullseye
*Rarely understands
scoring and aims
appropriately
*Rarely attempts to
out shoot opponent
*Never nocks
arrow when
instructed
*Never draws bow
back when
instructed
*Never releases
arrow when
instructed
*Never aims for the
bullseye
*Never understands
scoring and aims
appropriately
*Never attempts to
out shoot opponent
*Sometimes notches
the arrow correctly
*Sometimes controls
the pull on the bow
*Sometimes releases
slow and controlled
*Sometimes holds bow
until arrow is
completely off the bow
*Rarely notches the
arrow correctly
*Rarely controls the
pull on the bow
*Rarely releases slow
and controlled
*Rarely holds bow
until arrow is
completely off the
bow
*Never notches the
arrow correctly
*Never controls the
pull on the bow
*Never releases
slow and controlled
*Never holds bow
until arrow is
completely off the
bow
* There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
*Sometimes applies
rules appropriately in a
game setting
*Rarely applies rules
appropriately in a
game setting
*Never applies
rules appropriately
in a game setting
* There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
132
* There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
Archery Test
Name:__________________________
True/False (T=True and F=False)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
An end in archery consists of shooting six arrows in a row.
When shooting your toes should be pointing forward toward the target.
The quiver is the device, which holds the arrows when one is shooting.
You may use your bow to retrieve an arrow to shoot over if it is within reaching distance.
The follow through is where you hold the release position until the arrow lands.
Arrows should be nocked only at the shooting line and always pointed away from the targets.
One archer at a time walks up to the target to pull out their arrows.
When you hear four or more whistle blasts in a row you should finish shooting your arrow then return
behind the waiting line.
9. Dry firing a bow is when you make sure it is set at the correct weight for you.
10. The odd colored fletching should always be pointing away from the bow.
11. An arrow that hits on the line between colors is scored as the lower of the two.
12. After 3 whistle blasts you can run to the target line.
Multiple Choice (choose the best answer)
13. In scoring, how many points do you receive for hitting a bull’s eye?
a. 3
c. 5
b. 1
d. 4
14. In scoring, how many points do you receive for hitting the black area?
a. 3
c. 5
b. 1
d. 2
15. In scoring, how many points do you receive for missing the target?
a. 0
c. 5
b. 1
d. 2
16. In scoring, how many points do you receive for missing the target?
a. 0
c. 5
b. 1
d. 2
17. To pull the bow string back is known as:
a. Anchor
c. end
b. Draw
d. nock
18. The device that indicates where the arrow is to be place on the string is?
a. End
c. Fletching
b. Nock
d. Nock locator
19. The feathers on the arrow that help stabilize the flight of the arrow is called?
a. End
c. Nock
b. Fletching
d. Nock locator
133
20. How many blasts should you hear before archers walk to the shooting line?
a. 2 blasts
c. 3 blast
b. 1 blast
d. 4 blast
21. How many blasts should you hear before you began shooting?
a. 2 blasts
c. 3 blasts
b. 1 blast
d. 4 blasts
22. How many blasts should you hear before you walk forward to the target line?
a. 2 blasts
c. 3 blasts
b. 1 blast
d. 4 blasts
23. How many blasts should you hear when you stop shooting immediately?
a. 2 blasts
c. 3 blasts
b. 1 blast
d. 4 blasts
24. Which step of shooting, do you raise your bow arm towards the target?
a. Set
c. draw
b. pre-draw
d. anchor
25. Which step of shooting, do you draw the string to the corner of your smile?
a. Set
c. draw
b. pre-draw
d. anchor
134
Badminton
135
Sample Badminton Study Guide
Court Terms
1.
2.
3.
4.
Back court- The back half of the court behind the service line.
Baseline- The end boundaries of the court.
Forecourt- The area of the court near the net and in front of the service line.
Service court- The area into which the serve must be delivered. Its boundaries are the short service line
in front; the baseline is in the back, the middle dividing line and sidelines.
5. Short service line- The line 6-1/2’ from the net dividing the fore and back courts.
General Terms
1. Shuttlecock (Birdie) – The thing you hit with the racket.
2. Racket- The thing you use to hit the birdie. It has a face-the stringed end that you strike the birdie with,
a neck-shaft, and a grip.
3. Serve- The start of each point. There are rules governing the serve, which we will discuss.
4. Fault- A violation of the rules governing the serve.
5. Rally- An exchange of strokes back and forth between the players.
6. Smash- A kill shot, used to score a point. It is accomplished by a hard overhead strike.
General Rules
1. The first serve shall be from the right side of the court. If the server scores, the next serve is from the left
side of the court, and you keep alternating as long as you keep serving.
2. The serve must be underhand and must go into the diagonal court, or in other words, go across court.
3. The serve must go past the short service line to be good.
4. If a player misses the birdie when serving, you may re-serve it.
5. A player may not reach over the net to hit the birdie; neither may a player touch the net with their racket
or their body.
6. Only one hit on a side is allowed to return the birdie.
7. A team can score only when serving.
8. A game is 15 points and you must win by 2 points.
9. If the birdie lands on the line, it is considered in bounds.
136
BADMINTON
Badminton
Rubric
Court/Field
Positioning
Court/Field
Movement
Strategy
Skills
4: Advanced
3: Proficient
2: Basic
1: Below Basic
0: Failing
*Remains in
critical portions of
the court at all
times
*Recognizes when
offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed
at all times
*Attempts to move
opponents from
good court
positioning at all
times
*Quickly moves
into different
positions all the
time
*Following a
court/field event,
quickly moves
back to a neutral
position all the
time
*Begins to
anticipate
opponents all the
time
*Recognizes
strengths and
weaknesses of
opponents and
attempts to exploit
them all of the time
*Applies front to
back and side to
side strategy when
appropriate
*Uses a variety of
shots all the time
*Remains in critical
portions of the court
most of the time
*Recognizes when
offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed
most of the time
*Attempts to move
opponents from
good court
positioning most of
the time
*Remains in critical
portions of the court
some of the time
*Recognizes when
offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed
some of the time
*Attempts to move
opponents from
good court
positioning some of
the time
*Does not remain in
critical portions of
the court
*Does not
recognize when
offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed
*Does not attempt
to move opponents
from good court
positioning
* There is no evidence
or demonstration of
student learning
*Quickly moves
into different
positions most of
the time
*Following a
court/field event,
quickly moves back
to a neutral position
most of the time
*Begins to
anticipate
opponents most of
the time
*Quickly moves
into different
positions some of
the time
*Following a
court/field event,
quickly moves back
to a neutral position
some of the time
*Begins to
anticipate
opponents some of
the time
*Does not move
quickly into
different positions
*Does not quickly
moves back to a
neutral position
after a court/field
event
*Does not
anticipate
opponents
* There is no evidence
or demonstration of
student learning
*Recognizes
strengths and
weaknesses of
opponents and
attempts to exploit
them most of the
time
*Rarely applies
front to back and
side to side strategy
when appropriate
*Uses a variety of
shots most of the
time
*Sometimes serves
underhand
*Sometimes
controls their racket
*Sometimes
demonstrates a
variety of shots
*Recognizes
strengths and
weaknesses of
opponents and
attempts to exploit
them some of the
time
*Sometimes applies
front to back and
side to side strategy
when appropriate
*Uses a variety of
shots some of the
time
*Rarely serves
underhand
*Rarely controls
their racket
*Rarely
demonstrates a
variety of shots
*Does not
recognize strengths
and weaknesses of
opponents and does
not attempt to
exploit them
*Does not apply
front to back and
side to side strategy
when appropriate
*Does not use a
variety of shots
* There is no evidence
or demonstration of
student learning
*Never serves
underhand
*Never controls
their racket
*Never
demonstrates a
variety of shots
* There is no evidence
or demonstration of
student learning
*Always serves
underhand
*Always controls
their racket
*Always
demonstrates a
variety of shots
137
Badminton Quiz
Name:
Part I. True/False. If the statement is true mark it with +. If it is false mark it with a 0.
1. A women’s singles game consists of 11 points. A doubles game is 15 points.
2. After the serve is made, either side can score a point.
3. The backhand grip is different from the forehand grip.
4. The server serves 5 times and alternating courts for each serve.
5. In men’s singles, if the score is 14 all, it may be set at 3 points.
6. In doubles, after the serve is returned, the partner can cross the mid-court line.
7. In doubles play, the up and back formation is weak in covering side line shots.
8. In singles, the server will serve from the right-hand court when his score is an odd number.
9. In singles play, the long service line is not used.
10. If the shuttlecock is struck above the waist on the serve, it is a fault.
Part II. Best Answer. Select the best answer for the statement.
11. If the serving side touches the net during play it is
a. a point for the server
c. a let
b. side out
d. played over
12. In general, when playing a backhand stroke, the best position is to have the
a. left side toward the net
c. body face the net
b. right side toward the net
d. none of the above
13. In doubles, the most effective defensive formation is the
a. up-and –back position
c. combination
b. rotation
d. side-by-side
14. In doubles, the basic serve is
a. high clear
b. smash
c. drive
d. low and short
15. The around-the-head stroke is used as a
a. substitute for all backhand strokes c. in a place of a high backhand stroke
b. drop shots
d. a recovery stroke
16. If the shuttlecock flight is high and it falls sharply near the baseline it is a
a. high clear
c. drop
b. smash
d. drive
17. In doubles, the combination formation should be changed from an up-and-back to
formation if the shuttlecock is returned by
a. clear
c. drop
b. smash
d. drive
a side-by-side
18. The best stroke for returning a shuttlecock, if you are in doubt, during singles play
a. drive
c. lob
b. drop
d. smash
138
is:
19. In doubles, when the serving team is playing in the up-and-back formation, the short serve is returned
a. with a drive cross the court
c. clear to the backhand corner of the court
b. down with a boundary line
d. with a drop to the server’s backhand
20. If the receiver steps out of his receiving court after the shuttle is served and before it crosses the net, it
is
a. a point for the server
c. a side out
b. a let
d. served over
Part III. Matching. Match the statements in Column B to the terms in Column A.
Column A
21.
22.
23.
24.
___25.
Smash
Hairpin
Drop Shot
High clear
Drive
Column B
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
Upward and back to the baseline
Flat flight and near the top of the net
Straight up and straight down over the net
Falls close to the net between the net and short service line
Sharply downward
139
Bowling
140
Sample BOWLING STUDY GUIDE
GENERAL RULES:








A line or game is composed of 10 frames.
A player is entitled to two balls per frame unless a strike is rolled.
In the 10th frame a strike or spare earn the bowler a third ball.
If a foul is committed, the pins are reset and 0 points are recorded for the ball.
A ball is dead when:
1. One or more pins are missing from the set up
2. Any interference occurs before the ball reaches the pins
3. In team play, if a bowler rolls out of turn or in the wrong lane
If a dead ball is declared, the bowler must re-roll the ball in question
The following situations may occur where the ball rolled and pins cleared do not count:
1. A ball rebounds from the rear cushion of the pit area
2. A ball leaves the alley and returns to knock down pins (out of the gutter)
3. A foul is committed
Bowling may be played on an individual or team basis. A match consists of three games. In competition,
the winner is decided by:
1. Winning 2 out of 3 games
2. Having the highest total of 3 games added together
BASIC SAFETY & ETIQUETTE:











Bowling rules of conduct on and off the lanes are based mostly on common courtesy.
Do not take an excessive amount of time before each ball delivery.
The bowler on your right has the right of way. If he/she has taken a stance in the approach area, wait
until the delivery is complete before you begin yours.
As soon as you have completed your delivery and follow through, move away from the foul line and
wait behind the approach for your ball to return. This courtesy allows the next bowler the make their
approach without being distracted.
When a person is bowling with a particular ball, even if it is a house ball (owned by the bowling alley),
it is their property at the time. Do not use it without their consent.
Keep food and drink out of the playing area.
Use regulation-bowling shoes.
Refrain from talking to a bowler once they have assumed their stance.
Return any ball used to the racks before leaving.
Know how to and share the responsibility of scoring.
Throwing the ball as hard as you are able will NOT cause more pins to drop.
STRATEGY:





Choose the heaviest ball that can be controlled as this will give better pin action.
Establish a consistent starting position by taking four and one half steps back from the foul line.
For a right handed bowler the 1-3 pocket is best to roll a Strike (1-2 pocket for a left hander).
Spot bowling (using the arrows or some other mark on the lane) is the recommended aiming method.
o Aiming at the pins is not recommended.
o Adjust your starting position based on the results of the previous throws.
Use a four step approach (right, left, right, left for a right handed bowler).
o Push the ball forward on the first step
141
Let the ball swing down and back on the 2nd and 3rd steps
Right leg crosses behind on the 4th step
For beginners a straight ball release is best as it is easiest to control.
o Rotate the hand to a natural handshake position.
o Release ball out in front of the body (not dropped beside leg).
o Follow through straight up on the release.
Use a cross-alley technique for picking up spares.
Consistency is the key to good bowling.
o
o



VOCABULARY:
Approach:
the area before the foul line with sets of dots to guide starting position
Arrows:
targets on the lane that help the player align a starting position w/ the pins
Anchorman:
the last player in a team line-up usually maintaining the highest average
Creeper:
an excessively slow rolling bowling ball
Crossover:
throwing the ball past the pocket to the other side of the head pin
Double:
two strikes in a row
Field goal:
rolling a ball between a split without hitting either one
Foul:
touching or going beyond the foul line when delivering the ball. This is indicated on
the score sheet with a ‘f". The score for the ball rolled is 0 regardless of what was
knocked over.
Frame:
1/10 of a game. Each square on a score sheet indicates one frame.
Gutter ball:
a delivered ball that rolls off the lane into the gutter.
Handicap:
a means a placing bowlers and teams with varying degrees of skill on as equitable a
basis as possible for competition against each other.
Head pin:
the number one pin
Hook:
a ball that breaks sharply toward the pocket
Lane:
the area between the foul line and the head pin
Lead-off:
first person in a team line-up
Maples:
bowling pins
Mark:
a strike or spare
Nose hit:
the ball hits fully on the head pin
Open:
a frame in which the player fails to strike or spare
Perfect game:
all strikes, equaling a score of 300
Pin deck:
the area where the pins were placed
Pit:
end of the lane where the deck drops off and the pins fall after being knocked down
Pocket:
the area between the 1-2 pins for a left-hander; the 1-3 pins for a right-hander
Scratch:
a player’s actual score without a handicap added
Set-up:
when all 10 pins are set up in a triangular formation
142
Sleeper:
a pin hidden behind another pin; also called a railroad
Spare:
knocking down all 10 pins using both deliveries (rolls) allowed in a frame
Split:
the head pin and center pins are knocked down
Strike:
all pins down on the first ball
Tap:
a pin left standing on an apparent solid hit
Turkey:
three strikes in a row
SCORING:
The score in bowling consists of the cumulative (on going) record of pins knocked down in each of the 10
frames. It is a means of comparing the performance of the bowlers within a possible perfect total score of 300.
Each game (or line) consists of 10 frames with a maximum of two balls rolled for each frame except in the 10th
frame. In the 10th frame a third ball can be rolled if a strike or spare is earned.



1
If a strike is rolled it will score 10 points for that frame PLUS the adding of the next two balls thrown.
If a spare is made it will score ten points for that frame plus the adding of the next (one) ball rolled.
If a strike or spare is not made, it is an open frame. The total number of pins the two balls rolled in that
frame are totaled and added to the previous frame.
2
3
X
30
10+20
4
X
5
X
57
76
30+27
57+19
6
7|2
85
76+9
7
3|/
8
9|/
104
122
85+19
104+18
143
9
8|1
131
122+9
X
10
9|/
151
169
131+20
151+18
8|/|X
189
169+20
BOWLING RUBRIC
Bowling Rubric
Alley
Positioning
Alley Movement
Strategy
Skills
Rules
Application
4: Advanced
3: Proficient
2: Basic
*Always remains
in appropriate
positions of alley
when rolling ball
*Always clears
from the alley
when not rolling
*Always
practices
bowling etiquette
*Always uses the
correct approach
*Always avoids
foot going over
fault line
*Always releases
the ball beyond
the fault line
*Always
understands
scoring
*Always rolls
ball in correct
place with regard
to the pins
*Always uses the
correct approach
*Always holds
the ball correctly
*Always follows
through
*Applies rules
appropriately in a
game setting
*Sometimes remains
in appropriate
positions of alley
when rolling ball
*Sometimes clears
from the alley when
not rolling
*Sometimes practices
bowling etiquette
*Rarely remains in
appropriate positions
of alley when rolling
ball
*Rarely clears from
the alley when not
rolling
*Rarely practices
bowling etiquette
*Never remains in
appropriate positions
of alley when rolling
ball
*Never clears from
the alley when not
rolling
*Never practices
bowling etiquette
* There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
*Sometimes uses the
correct approach
*Sometimes avoids
foot going over fault
line
*Soemtimes releases
the ball beyond the
fault line
*Sometimes
understands scoring
*Aometimes rolls ball
in correct place with
regard to the pins
*Rarely uses the
correct approach
*Rarely avoids foot
going over fault line
*Rarely releases the
ball beyond the fault
line
*Never uses the
correct approach
*Never avoids foot
going over fault line
*Never releases the
ball beyond the fault
line
* There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
*Rarely understands
scoring
*Rarely rolls ball in
correct place with
regard to the pins
*Never understands
scoring
*Never rolls ball in
correct place with
regard to the pins
* There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
*Sometimes uses the
correct approach
*Sometimes holds the
ball correctly
*Sometimes follows
through
*Sometimes applies
rules appropriately in
a game setting
*Rarely uses the
correct approach
*Rarely holds the ball
correctly
*Rarely follow
through
*Rarely applies rules
appropriately in a
game setting
*Never uses the
correct approach
*Never holds the ball
correctly
*Never follow
through
*Never applies rules
appropriately in a
game setting
* There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
144
1: Below Basic
0: Failing
* There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
Bowling Quiz
Name:
Write an A in the blank for true and B for false.
1.
G=Gutter
2.
F=Foul
3.
- =Strike
4.
/= Spare
5.
X = You’re the Winner
6.
A open frame is when neither a strike nor a spare is rolled.
7.
When four strikes are rolled in consecutive it is called a turkey.
8.
The highest score possible 200.
9.
There are ten frames in a line of bowling.
10.
Mathematically you would score a strike as 10 points plus the next two bowling balls thrown.
11.
Mathematically you would score a spare as 10 points plus the next one bowling ball thrown.
12.
When two bowlers are prepared to throw at the same time the bowler to the right should have the
opportunity to throw first.
13.
The foul line can be ignored during tournament play.
14.
The #1 pin is the lead pin.
15.
When bowling always use your partners’ bowling ball so he/she can never find it.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
In frame one a strike was thrown.
In frame 5 a strike was thrown and the total score up through that frame is correct.
The score in frame 2 is correct.
The score in frame 7 is correct.
The score in frame 3 is correct.
The score in frame 6 is correct.
The score in frame 8 is correct.
The score in frame 1 is correct.
Frame 7 was a spare.
The score in frame 10 is correct.
145
Deck Tennis
146
DECK TENNIS STUDY GUIDE
*The game of Deck Tennis originated on the decks of cruise ships
*A volleyball net/court is used for the game of deck tennis
*The original ring was made of a water hose that had been taped together to form the circular shape
*Scoring is similar to that of volleyball--rally scoring
*The server must use an underhand throw from behind the baseline to start the game. The serve must be thrown in an arc
motion
*Lines are considered “in”
*Players must throw the ring underhand or Frisbee style--inside out
*Players have 1 second to throw the ring after it is caught
*Players must throw the ring with the same hand they catch it
*Players may not catch the ring against their body
*If one player attempts to catch the ring, but misses, another teammate may catch and throw it.
*The ring may touch the net during play (after the serve)
*The ring must be thrown over the net not dropped over
*The ring may not be caught with the forearm and then removed to throw
*Players should throw the ring to open space if possible
*Teams can consist of as many or as few players as the class and space dictates
*The “point game” is a variation of the traditional deck tennis game where multiple deck tennis rings are used. If the ring
lands on the floor of their side they receive a point. The team with the least points wins the game.
*The game of “elimination” is another variation of the traditional deck tennis game. During play if a player doesn’t catch
the ring or errors when catching or throwing they are eliminated.
147
DECK TENNIS RUBRIC
Deck Tennis Rubric
Court/Field
Positioning
Court/Field
Movement
Strategy
Skills
Rules Application
4: Advanced
3: Proficient
2: Basic
*Remains in critical
portions of the court
at all times
*Recognizes when
offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed
at all times
*Attempts to move
opponents from
good court
positioning at all
times
*Quickly moves
into different
positions all the
time
*Following a
court/field event,
quickly moves back
to a neutral position
all the time
*Begins to
anticipate opponents
all the time
*Recognizes
strengths and
weaknesses of
opponents and
attempts to exploit
them all of the time
*Applies front to
back and side to
side strategy when
appropriate
*Uses a variety of
shots all the time
*Remains in critical
portions of the court
most of the time
*Recognizes when
offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed
most of the time
*Attempts to move
opponents from good
court positioning
most of the time
*Sometimes remains in
critical portions of the
court
*Sometimes does not
recognize when
offensive and defensive
positions should be
assumed
*Sometimes attempts to
move opponents from
good court positioning
*Does not remain in
critical portions of the
court
*Does not recognize
when offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed
*Does not attempt to
move opponents from
good court positioning
* There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
*Quickly moves into
different positions
most of the time
*Following a
court/field event,
quickly moves back
to a neutral position
most of the time
*Begins to anticipate
opponents most of
the time
*Sometimes moves
quickly into different
positions
*Sometimes moves
quickly back to a neutral
position after a
court/field event
*Sometimes anticipates
opponents
*Does not move quickly
into different positions
*Does not move quickly
back to a neutral
position after a
court/field event
*Does not anticipates
opponents
* There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
*Recognizes
strengths and
weaknesses of
opponents and
attempts to exploit
them most of the
time
*Rarely applies front
to back and side to
side strategy when
appropriate
*Uses a variety of
shots most of the
time
*Serves underhand
most of the time
* Catches and throws
appropriately most of
the time
*Sometimes applies
rules appropriately in
a game setting
*Sometimes recognizes
strengths and
weaknesses of
opponents and does not
attempt to exploit them
*Sometimes applies
front to back and side to
side strategy when
appropriate
*Sometimes uses a
variety of shots
*Does not recognize
strengths and
weaknesses of
opponents and does not
attempt to exploit them
*Does not apply front to
back and side to side
strategy when
appropriate
*Does not use a variety
of shots
* There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
*Sometimes serves
underhand
*Sometimes catches and
throws appropriately
*Does not serve
underhand
*Does not catch and
throw appropriately
* There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
*Sometimes applies
rules appropriately in a
game setting
*Does not apply rules
appropriately in a game
setting
* There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
*Always serves
underhand
*Always catches
and throws
appropriately
*Applies rules
appropriately in a
game setting
148
1: Below Basic
0: Failing
DECK TENNIS QUIZ
Name________________________________________
TRUE (T) OR FALSE (F)
1.____WHEN PLAYING “ELIMINATION” USUALLY THE WORST PLAYER IS ELIMINATED LAST.
2.____DECK TENNIS IS PLAYED TO 21 POINTS
3.____LINES ARE CONSIDERED OUT
4.____THE RING CAN TOUCH THE NET DURING PLAY AFTER THE SERVE)
5.____THE NET MUST BE AT LEAST 3 FEET HIGH
6.____DECK TENNIS ORIGINATED ON THE DECKS OF SWIMMING POOLS
7.____ONLY ONE FOOT MUST BE BEHIND THE BACKLINE WHEN SERVING
8.____THE RING MUST BE SERVED WITH AN ARC AT LEAST 20 FEET HIGH
9.____A PLAYER HAS 10 SECONDS TO CATCH AND THROW THE RING
10.____THE DECK TENNIS RING WAS ORIGINALLT AN AIR HOSE
11.____IF THE RING LANDS ON PART OF THE BACKLINE OR SIDELINE IT IS CONSIDERED IN
12.____A DECK TENNIS RING CAN BE PURCHASED AT WALGREENS
13.____THE RING CAN BE CAUGHT BY 2 PLAYERS AT THE SAME TIME
USE ONE OF THE FOLLOWING LETTERS TO ANSWER QUESTIONS 14-20:
A. side-out B. point C. re-serve D. re-serve, no point E. play continues
14.____THE SERVING TEAM SERVES AND THEN THE RECEIVING TEAM RETURNS THE RING. A PLAYER ON THE SERVING
TEAM CATCHES AND THROWS THE RING. THE RING HITS THE LIGHT FIXTURE AND THEN TRAVELS OVER THE NET.
WHAT’S THE CALL?
15.____PLAYERS ON BOTH TEAMS HAVE A DISAGREEMENT THAT THEY CAN NOT SEEM TO SOLVE. WHAT’S THE CALL?
16.____THE RECEIVING TEAM CATCHES THE RING AGAINST THEIR BODY AND THEN THROWS IT OVER THE NET. WHAT’S
THE CALL?
17.____THE SERVER STEPS ON THE BACKLINE WHEN SERVING. WHAT’S THE CALL?
18.____TWO MEMBERS OF THE SERVING TEAM CATCH THE RING AT THE SAME TIME AND THEN THROW IT
IMMEDIATELY OVER THE NET. WHAT’S THE CALL?
19.____A MEMBER OF THE RECEIVING TEAM CATCHES THE RING NEAR THE NET AND THEN DROPS IT OVER THE NET.
WHAT’S THE CALL?
20.____THE RECEIVING TEAM RETURNS THE RING AFTER THE SERVE. A PERSON ON THE SERVING TEAM THROWS IT
OVER THE NET USING AN OVERHAND THROW. WHAT’S THE CALL?
149
Frisbee Golf
150
Sample Frisbee Golf Study Guide/Vocabulary
History
Frisbee Golf is a new sport that was first played in the state of California in the late 1960’s. The game is called
disc (disk) golf because the name Frisbee is a trademarked name and cannot be used. The Professional Disk
Golf Association(PDGA) was formed in 1976. The purpose of the PDGA was to promote the sport, govern
rules, and sanction competitive events. The sport of disc golf is unique because it can be played by people of all
ages and is not limited to just the young.
It is also a relatively inexpensive game to play. Many courses are free to play and a beginner only needs a disc
to play.There are three different classifications for discs—driver, mid-range driver and putter. Only one disc is
needed to play disc golf. However, many beginners start with two discs- a driver and a putt/approach. More
experienced players are likely to carry six or more discs in their bag to use on any given course.
Rules of Play
Object—To have fun and play the course from beginning to end in the fewest throws possible.
Tee Off—Tee shots (drives) must be released from within the designated tee area
Lie-- The spot where the disc comes to rest.
Throwing order—The player with the lowest score on the previously played hole tees off first at the next hole
and then the second lowest, third lowest, etc. After the tee shot, the player whose disc is farthest from the hole
shoots next. To be safe and courteous, all players should remain behind the player about to shoot.
Fairway throws—Must be made from where the disc lands (lie). A run-up and follow through is permitted.
Putt--- A player may not step past the lie when making a throw.
Completion of a hole-The hole is completed when the disc is in the basket or supported by the chains
Courtesy—Do not throw until the players and all other students are out of range. Do not attempt to distract
players.
Keeping score—Players count the number of throws used to get the disc into the basket and record the number
of throws on the score card by their name. Once a player has played all 12 holes, he/she should total the scores
for each hole together to come up with their score on the course.
Hole Marker- Located at each hole to provide information about the hole. The marker tells you the hole
number, par for the hole and tee distance(s). If there are two distances listed on the marker, there are two tee
areas at the hole. Normally, the long tee is the men’s tee area and the shorter tee is the women’s tee area.
Captains Choice- Team play as opposed to individual play with traditional golf. In a captain’s choice formatted
game of disc golf, each player tees off on each hole. The best of the tee shots is selected and all players play
their second shots from that spot. The better of the second shots is determined, and then all play their third shots
from that spot, and so on until the disc is in the disc catcher. Players should be designated Player A, Player B,
and Player C, and so on depending
on the total number of players in a group. Players should then play the each shot in the order A thru D until the
hole is completed.
VocabularyPar-the average number of throws for an experienced player to complete a hole. The standard score for a hole.
Birdie-one stroke under par
Eagle-two strokes under par
Bogey- one stroke over par
Double bogey-two strokes over par
Drive-a long distance shot towards the hole
Putt/Approach-short distance shot toward the hole
Lie-the spot where the disc lands and the next shot is taken
151
FRISBEE GOLF - RUBRIC
Frisbee Golf
Rubric
4: Advanced
3: Proficient
2: Basic
1: Below Basic
0: Failing
Course
Positioning
*Always remains in
critical positions of
the course
*Always recognizes
when offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed
*Always practices
course etiquette
*Rarely remains in
critical positions of
the course
*Rarely recognizes
when offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed
*Rarely practices
course etiquette
*Never remains in
critical positions of
the course
*Never recognizes
when offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed
*Never practices
course etiquette
* There is no evidence
or demonstration of
student learning
Course
Movement
*Always moves
quickly between
shots
*Always is aware
of other players
positions on the
course
*Always is aware
of where the
Frisbee lands
*Always keeps
course in same
condition or better
than when they
came
*Always recognizes
strengths and
weaknesses and
attempts to exploit
them
*Always uses a
variety of shots
*Always is aware
of opponents score
*Sometimes
remains in critical
positions of the
course
*Sometimes
recognizes when
offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed
*Sometimes
practices course
etiquette
*Sometimes moves
quickly between
shots
*Sometimes is
aware of other
players positions on
the course
*Sometimes is
aware of where the
Frisbee lands
*Sometimes keeps
course in same
condition or better
than when they
came
*Sometimes
recognizes strengths
and weaknesses and
attempts to exploit
them
*Sometimes uses a
variety of shots
*Sometimes is
aware of opponents
score
*Sometimes grips
and throws Frisbee
properly
*Sometimes keeps
eye on target
*Sometimes
releases to target
*Sometimes applies
rules appropriately
in a game setting
*Rarely moves
quickly between
shots
*Rarely is aware of
other players
positions on the
course
*Rarely is aware of
where the Frisbee
lands
*Rarely keeps
course in same
condition or better
than when they
came
*Rarely recognizes
strengths and
weaknesses and
attempts to exploit
them
*Rarely uses a
variety of shots
*Rarely is aware of
opponents score
*Never moves
quickly between
shots
*Never is aware of
other players
positions on the
course
*Never is aware of
where the Frisbee
lands
*Never keeps
course in same
condition or better
than when they
came
*Never recognizes
strengths and
weaknesses and
attempts to exploit
them
*Never uses a
variety of shots
*Never is aware of
opponents score
* There is no evidence
or demonstration of
student learning
*Rarely grips and
throws Frisbee
properly
*Rarely keeps eye
on target
*Rarely releases to
target
*Rarely applies
rules appropriately
in a game setting
*Never grips and
throws Frisbee
properly
*Never keeps eye
on target
*Never releases to
target
*Never applies
rules appropriately
in a game setting
* There is no evidence
or demonstration of
student learning
Strategy
Skills
Rules
Application
*Always grips and
throws Frisbee
properly
*Always keeps eye
on target
*Always releases to
target
*Applies rules
appropriately in a
game setting
152
* There is no evidence
or demonstration of
student learning
* There is no evidence
or demonstration of
student learning
Frisbee Golf Quiz
Name:_______________________
True/False: Fill in a “+” if the answer is true and “-“if the answer is false.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
A Frisbee is said to have “hooked” when it curves of to the right.
The throwing hand should be pointing to the target at the end of the follow through.
After the drive, the person whose Frisbee is farther from the hole should play first.
One should not play an approach shot to the green until the players ahead have left.
When even a player hits a ball he feels may hit or com close to another player he should yell “fore”.
Multiple Choice: Circle the best answer.
1. What term is used to refer to the first shot on each hole?
a. The drive
b. The pitch
c. The approach
2. In order to best sight the line of a putt. How should a player stand?
a. With eyes to the right of the Frisbee
b. Eyes directly over the Frisbee
c. With eyes to the left of the Frisbee
3. What is the last stoke necessary to reach the green called?
a. Approach shot
b. The drive
c. The putt
d. The bomb
4. Which is common to all stances?
a. Weight on toes
b. Weight back toward heels
c. Weight on whole foot
d. No weight on feet
5. What term refers to the position of the Frisbee on the ground?
a. Flat
b. Lie
c. Set
d. Bummer
153
Golf
154
Sample Golf Study Guide
TERMINOLOGY:
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Ace - a hole in one.
Address - the position taken by the player when setting up to play a stroke.
Albatross - three strokes under par on a hole.
Alignment - position of the body in relation to the target.
Approach shot - a shot played to the green.
Apron - grass area, immediately surrounding green.
Arc - the swing of the clubhead.
Away - player farthest from the hole.
Backspin - reverse spin which causes the ball to stop quickly when it lands.
Backswing - movement of the club away from the ball to the top of the swing.
Birdie - one stroke below par for a hole.
Bogey - one stroke over par on a hole.
Break - the amount a ball will deviate from a straight line on the putting green.
Bunker - depression in the ground, usually filled with sand.
Buzzard - two strokes over par.
Caddie - someone who to carries a player's clubs and gives playing advice.
Chip shot - short, low running shot played from off the green.
Clubhead - part of the club that strikes the ball.
Cup - hole in putting green.
Divot - piece of turf taken out of the ground when striking the ball.
Dogleg - a fairway that runs straight and then bends to the left or the right .
Down - a term meaning a player is behind in a match.
Double bogey - two strokes over par.
Double eagle - three strokes under par.
Downswing - movement of the club from the top of the backswing to the ball.
Drive - a shot hit from the tee, usually on a par four or five.
Driver - number one wood; the club with the least loft, hits the ball the furthest.
Eagle - two strokes below par on a hole.
Even - all even or equal in a match.
Fairway - the mown area of the course between the tee and the green
Flag - marks spot on green where cup is located.
Follow-through - the final part of the swing which occurs after impact
Fore - a warning shouted to players ahead to warn them of an approaching ball.
Four - maximum number of players allowed to play golf in one group.
Green - the putting surface or the closely mown area around the hole.
Grip - the position of the hands on the club. Also known as the handle of the club.
Handicap - the number of strokes a player receives to bring their score down to par
Hazard - any bunker or water hazard
Hole - a 4 1/4 inch diameter hole cut in the putting surfaces.
Honor - the privilege of hitting first off the tee.
Hook - shot that bends from right to left.
Interlocking - hooking the index and little finger together on the club.
Iron - metal-headed club
9 Iron - iron used to hit the ball high and short
3 Iron - iron used to hit the ball longer but is not very accurate
Lie - the manner in which the ball is lying on the grass.
Line - the preferred direction of the shot.
155
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Links - a seaside course.
Major - a term applied to the four biggest championships in gold: the Masters, the British Open, the
United States Open and the United States Professional Golfers' Association Championship.
Out of bounds - stroke penalty and replay from same spot.
Overlapping - grip where the little finger lays over the index finger.
Par - the normal amount of strokes required for a good golfer to play a hole.
o Par is generally set according to length in yards. A par three is never longer than 250; par four is
for holes between 251 - 475; and par five is for 476 yards or longer.
o Par is determined by adding a 2 putt to the number of hits it takes to reach the green
Pin - another name for flagstick.
Pitch - short, high shot to the green.
Punch - shot which flies low to the ground.
Putt - shot played with a putter on the green.
Putter - a straight-faced club used on the green.
Rough - long grass.
Run - the distance the ball travels along the ground.
Sand wedge - heavy, soled club used to play out of bunkers.
Scratch - term given to someone with a handicap of zero.
Short game - those shots played around the green.
Slice - shot which bends drastically from left to right.
Sole - bottom of club
Stance - the placing of the feet when addressing the ball.
Stymie - ball lying directly in line of putt of another.
Swing - the entire action taken when hitting the ball.
Tee - peg used to raise the ball above the surface of the teeing ground.
Teeing ground - the area from which the first shot is played on a hole.
Top shot - shot which catches only the top half of the ball.
Trap - another expression given to a bunker.
Up - being ahead in a match
Waggle - movement of the clubhead prior to the swing.
Wedge - lofted club designed for pitch shots.
Winter rules - the privilege of improving the lie of the ball on the fairway.
Wood - woodenheaded clubs; hits ball longest distance.
Yips - a nervous condition of twitching in the hands and wrists. It plagues golfers particularly on putting
greens.
Ball hit in water - stroke penalty, play from 2 club lengths where the ball went in.
BASIC RULES:
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No Penalty: Free Drop
Shots coming to rest in the conditions listed here are beyond your control and therefore do not result in
penalties. If you find yourself in these situations you may a) hit the ball as it lies or b) seek relief, which
is a free drop.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
ground under repair
staked trees or shrubs
sprinkler head used for course watering
casual water from rain or sprinklers
holes made by burrowing animals
156
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One Stroke Penalty
1. lost ball - one that cannot be found within 5 minutes. "Drop" another ball the point from which
your original ball was hit, or return to the tee if originally hit from the teeing areas.
2. out-of-bounds ball - one that has gone beyond the white stakes placed on the perimeter of the
golf course. Go back to the spot from which the ball was hit and drop it, or re-tee.
3. direct water hazard - water that runs across the fairway (yellow stakes mark).
4. lateral water hazard - water that runs parallel to the fairway. (red stakes mark).
5. unplayable lie - any shot you consider unplayable.
6. accidental moving of ball - occurs when a ball moves from its original position because a player
accidentally touches it.
7. Whiffing - happens when you attempt to hit the ball, but no contact is made.
Two Stroke Penalty
1. Grounding the club in a hazard.
2. Hitting the wrong ball.
3. Hitting a ball or flag on the green.
4. Requesting Assistance. (what club to use, etc.)
Disqualification
1. Hitting the wrong ball and not correcting the error prior to the next teeing off.
2. Making an error in scoring, assigning a lower score than you earned to any hole.
BASIC ETIQUETTE:
(Unwritten courtesy rules of the game)
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Play honestly. (You are your own official.)
Tee off on time
The first player to tee off on a hole is the player with the least strokes on the previous hole
Order of Play on Fairway
1. golfer farthest away from hole hits first
2. all others stay behind hitter
3. everyone walks on toward own ball
Order of Play on Green
1. all on green first
2. longest putt
Tend the flag as a courtesy to group (ask first)
Never step in line of partner’s putt or allow shadow to cross path of putt.
Play without delay
Allow a faster group to play through
Before putting place your clubs on the side of the green closest to the next tee box to facilitate faster
play and allow the group behind you to take their approach shots sooner
Record your scores on next tee
Yell "fore!" if your ball may be dangerous to others
Replace all divots and lift ball marks on the greens
Rake all bunkers / sand traps
All golfers should be quiet while a player is hitting
Do not take golf carts or bag of clubs on the greens
Many golf courses have a maximum 10 hit rule per hole (after 10 hits the ball is picked up and carried to
the green where the golfer may practice putt but the score for the hole will be 10)
Many golf courses require appropriate clothing.
157
GOLF - RUBRIC
Golf Rubric
4: Advanced
3: Proficient
2: Basic
1: Below Basic
0: Failing
Range/Course
Positioning
*Always remains
in critical positions
of the range/course
*Always
recognizes when
offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed
*Always practices
course etiquette
*Rarely remains in
critical positions of
the range/course
*Rarely recognizes
when offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed
*Rarely practices
course etiquette
*Never remains in
critical positions of
the range/course
*Never recognizes
when offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed
*Never practices
course etiquette
* There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
Range/Course
Movement
*Always moves
quickly between
shots
*Always is aware
of other players
positions on the
range/course
*Always is aware
of where the ball
lands
*Always keeps
range/course in
same condition or
better than when
they came
*Always
recognizes
strengths and
weaknesses and
attempts to exploit
them
*Always uses a
variety of shots
*Always is aware
of opponents score
*Always attempts
to make shots
closer to target
than opponents
*Always grips the
club appropriately
*Always uses the
correct stance
*Always completes
the swing
*Sometimes remains
in critical positions
of the range/course
*Sometimes
recognizes when
offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed
*Sometimes
practices course
etiquette
*Sometimes moves
quickly between
shots
*Sometimes is aware
of other players
positions on the
range/course
*Sometimes is aware
of where the ball
lands
*Sometimes keeps
range/course in same
condition or better
than when they came
*Rarely moves
quickly between
shots
*Rarely is aware of
other players
positions on the
range/course
*Rarely is aware of
where the rarely
lands
*Rarely keeps
range/course in
same condition or
better than when
they came
*Rarely recognizes
strengths and
weaknesses and
attempts to exploit
them
*Rarely uses a
variety of shots
*Rarely is aware of
opponents score
*Rarely attempts to
make shots closer
to target than
opponents
*Never moves
quickly between
shots
*Never is aware of
other players
positions on the
range/course
*Never is aware of
where the rarely
lands
*Never keeps
range/course in
same condition or
better than when
they came
*Never recognizes
strengths and
weaknesses and
attempts to exploit
them
*Never uses a
variety of shots
*Never is aware of
opponents score
*Never attempts to
make shots closer
to target than
opponents
* There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
*Rarely grips the
club appropriately
*Rarely uses the
correct stance
*Rarely completes
the swing
*Never grips the
club appropriately
*Never uses the
correct stance
*Never completes
the swing
* There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
*Rarely applies
rules appropriately
in a game setting
*Never applies
rules appropriately
in a game setting
* There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
Strategy
Skills
Rules
Application
*Applies rules
appropriately in a
game setting
*Sometimes
recognizes strengths
and weaknesses and
attempts to exploit
them
*Sometimes uses a
variety of shots
*Sometimes is aware
of opponents score
*Sometimes
attempts to make
shots closer to target
than opponents
*Sometimes grips
the club
appropriately
*Sometimes uses the
correct stance
*Sometimes
completes the swing
*Sometimes applies
rules appropriately
in a game setting
158
* There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
Golf -- Standard 1 Checklist Assessments
Skill 1: Putting
_____ Level 2: Proper grip, stance, and stroke. Makes < 6 of ten 6 ft. putt attempts.
_____ Level 3: Proper grip, stance, and stroke. Makes 6 or 7 of ten 6 ft. putt attempts.
_____ Level 4: Proper grip, stance, and stroke. Makes 8 - 10 of ten 6 ft. putt attempts.
Skill 2: Full Golf Swing (Woods or Irons)
_____ Level 2: Baseball, interlock, or overlap grip. Backswing and follow through lack
sufficient balance and weight shift. Contact with golf ball is
inconsistent with no directional control.
_____ Level 3: Interlock or overlap grip. Better balance and weight shift on backswing and
follow through. Consistent contact with golf ball with moderate directional
control.
_____ Level 4: Interlock or overlap grip. Excellent balance and rhythm on backswing and
follow through. Contact is made with golf ball on every attempt with a high
level of directional control.
Skill 3: Pitch/Chip Shot
_____ Level 2: Proper grip, stance, and shortened swing.
Shot attempt lands within 6 ft. of target < 6 out of ten shots taken.
_____ Level 3: Proper grip, stance, and shortened swing.
Shot attempt lands within 6 ft. of target 6-7 out of ten shots taken.
_____ Level 4: Proper grip, stance, and shortened swing.
Shot attempt lands within 6 ft. of target 8-10 out of ten shots taken.
159
Golf Quiz
Name:
________
True/False Section. Mark a + if the statement is true and a – if the statement is false.
1. A ball is said to be “hooked” when it curves off to the right.
2. The body should be facing the target at the end of the follow through.
3. If a divot is taken, the player should not take time to replace it.
Multiple Choice: Place the corresponding letter of the best answer.
4. What term is used to refer to the first shot on each hole?
a. The drive
b. The pitch and run
c. The approach
5. In order to best sight the line of a putt, how should the player stand?
a. With eyes to the right of the ball
b. With eyes directly over the ball
c. With eyes to the left of the ball
6. What is the last stroke necessary to reach the green called?
a. Approach Shot
b. The drive
c. The putt
7. What determines the amount of height a club gives to a ball?
a. length of a club
b. slant of the club head
c. weight of the head
8. In the grip, the little finger of the right hand overlaps or interlocks with what other finger?
a. the forefinger of the left hand
b. the middle finger of the left hand
c. the little finger of the left hand
9. The part of the swing that allows the golfer to assume a comfortable position in relation to the ball is:
a. the follow through
b. the down swing
c. the address
10. What do you call out loudly if there is any chance that your ball may hit someone?
a. fore
b. look-out
c. heads up
160
True/False: Read each question carefully and circle the correct answer.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
T
T
T
T
T
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
T
T
T
T
T
T
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
T
T
T
T
T
F The part of the club between the grip and the head is known as the shaft.
F The club head should rest on the ground sole of the club finger rather than the heel.
F Golf clubs, classified as wood and irons, vary primarily in loft angle and shaft length.
F As loft increases, shaft length decreases.
F In regulation play, the golfer is allowed to carry 14 clubs: #2 through #9 irons;1, 2, 3, and 4 woods, a
putter, and a wedge.
F A pitching and sand wedge is used primarily to hit out of a sand trap.
F All golf holes are the same length, but bunkers, sand traps, etc. are used to create variety.
F After the drive, the person whose ball is farthest from hole should play the first.
F One should not play an approach shot to the green until the player ahead have left it.
F A ball that falls off the tee may not be re-teed without a penalty stroke.
F Whenever a player hits a ball that feels may hit or come close to another golfer; he should yell
“Fore!”
F At the beginning of the swing, the club should be drawn back slowly rather than rapidly.
F Rhythm in the golf swing is more important than speed.
F The stance has much to do with the direction the ball takes when hit,
F The center of your waist should be facing the target at the end of the follow through.
F A ball is said to have “hooked” when it curves to the right.
Multiple Choice. Circle the best answer.
27. What term is used to refer to the first shot on each hole?
a. The drive
b. The pitch and run
c. The approach
28. What is the last stroke necessary to reach the green called?
a. The putt
b. The approach shot
c. The fairway shot
29. What is the standard of scoring excellence based on the length of a hole and allowing two putts on
the putting green called?
a. Birdie
b. Bogey
c. Par
30. What is moved grassy area between the tee and putting green called?
a. The fairway
b. The rough
c. The green
31. The term “foursome” refers to:
a. The number of strokes taken on the fairway
b. Four players playing together
c. The only number of players allowed to play together on a golf course
161
32. What term refers to the position of the ball on the ground.
a. Flat
b. Lie
c. Set
33. What is the starting place for a hole or the peg on which the ball is placed for driving?
a. Tee
b. Marker
c. Pin
34. In finishing the swing, where should the weight be?
a. On the right foot
b. On the heels
c. On the left foot
d. Pm the toes
35. What will lifting one’s head on a swing cause?
a. Topping ball
b. Lifting ball
c. Hooking ball
d. Slicing ball
36. Which is common to all stances?
a. weight on toes
b. weight back toward the heels
c. weight on whole foot
d.
37. In the interlocking or overlapping grip, the little finger of the right hand interlocks with which
finger?
a. Index of forefinger of the left hand
b. Middle or left
c. Little finger of left
162
Table Tennis
163
TABLE TENNIS STUDY GUIDE

Information obtained from the USA Table Tennis.
BASIC RULES:

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













The "toss" for a serve must be:
1. Resting freely on an open flat palm
2. Lifted a minimum of 16cm (6 inches) above the palm
3. Struck behind the end line
4. Hit above the table surface
5. Tossed without spin
6. Struck (If the ball is totally missed the opponents receive the point.)
After being struck a served ball must first hit the server's side of the table and then the opponent's side of
the table.
A "let" is called and a reserve given if:
1. a served ball touches the net when all other requirements of a good serve are met
2. play is interrupted within a point
3. the receiving team was not ready for the serve and does not attempt to return it
4. the score is called incorrectly
5. the legality of the toss for serve is questionable
There is no limit to the number of let serves a server may serve.
For singles play a serve may be from any place behind the end line to anywhere on the receivers side of
the table.
A player serves 2 points after which their opponent serves 2 points, alternating thereafter.
A team scoring "11 points" first provided there is a 2-point lead wins the game.
If the score is tied at "10" each server only serves 1 point before alternating.
A ball that passes over or around the net assembly is considered legal.
A ball must hit the top of the table surface to be legal (sides are illegal).
During play the ball may touch the net and play continues, except on the serve.
Striking the ball with the racket hand is legal provided the contact is below the wrist.
A point is scored:
1. On each serve unless the rally is a "let"
2. If the opponent fails to make a good serve
3. If the opponent fails to make a good return
4. If the opponent strikes the ball twice successively
5. If the opponent moves the playing surface
6. If the opponent volleys the ball while it is still above the playing surface
7. If the opponent touches the net assembly
8. If the opponents free hand touches the playing surface
9. If a doubles opponent strikes the ball out of sequence
Decided by lot, a player chooses one of the following with their opponent choosing from the remainder:
1. Serving
2. Receiving
3. End (side of the table)
A match consists of the best of any odd number of games with players changing ends after each game.
When it is discovered that a player has served out of turn the correct server is restored and all points
scored up to that point are counted.
164
DOUBLES PLAY:




Partner must serve from the right side crosscourt. Each serve must be diagonal from the right side of the
table to the opponent's right side.
Partners must alternate shots.
Order of service: In doubles the previous receiver shall become the server and the partner of the
previous server shall become the receiver.
Playing Tips:
1. Recommended footwork is for players to take their shot and then move backward & slightly off
to the side.
2. Try to catch opponents out of position.
EQUIPMENT:




Table: Rectangular (2.74m long X 1.525m wide and 76cm above floor)
Net (15.25cm high)
Ball (40 mm in diameter and weighing 2.7 gm)
Racket
1. Any shape, size, or weight with a rigid blade
2. Blade must be 85% wood
3. Blade must be covered with ordinary pimple rubber either in or outward
4. Sandpaper rackets may be used in recreational play but are illegal in official competition.
165
TABLE TENNIS - RUBRIC
Table Tennis
Rubric
4: Advanced
3: Proficient
2: Basic
Table
Positioning
*Always remains
in critical position
when receiving
serve
*Always remains
in critical position
when serving
*Always attempts
to move opponents
from base position
*Rarely remains in
critical position
when receiving
serve
*Rarely remains in
critical position
when serving
*Rarely attempts to
move opponents
from base position
*Never remains in
critical position
when receiving
serve
*Never remains in
critical position
when serving
*Never attempts to
move opponents
from base position
*There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
Table
Movement
*Always moves
quickly into
different positions
*Always moves
quickly back to
base
*Always attempts
to anticipate
opponents
movements
*Rarely moves
quickly into
different positions
*Rarely moves
quickly back to base
*Rarely attempts to
anticipate opponents
movements
*Never moves
quickly into
different positions
*Never moves
quickly back to base
*Never attempts to
anticipate opponents
movements
*There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
Strategy
*Always
recognizes
strengths and
weaknesses of
opponents and
attempts to exploit
them
*Always applies
side to side and
short to deep shots
when appropriate
*Always uses a
variety of shots
*Rarely recognizes
strengths and
weaknesses of
opponents and
attempts to exploit
them
*Rarely applies side
to side and short to
deep shots when
appropriate
*Rarely uses a
variety of shots
*Never recognizes
strengths and
weaknesses of
opponents and
attempts to exploit
them
*Never applies side
to side and short to
deep shots when
appropriate
*Never uses a
variety of shots
*There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
Skills
*Always serves
correctly
*Always holds
paddle properly
*Always uses hand
eye coordination
*Rarely serves
correctly
*Rarely holds
paddle properly
*Rarely uses hand
eye coordination
*Never serves
correctly
*Never holds paddle
properly
*Never uses hand
eye coordination
*There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
Rules
Application
*Always applies
rules appropriately
in a game setting
*Sometimes
remains in critical
position when
receiving serve
*Sometimes
remains in critical
position when
serving
*Sometimes
attempts to move
opponents from
base position
*Sometimes moves
quickly into
different positions
*Sometimes moves
quickly back to
base
*Sometimes
attempts to
anticipate
opponents
movements
*Sometimes
recognizes
strengths and
weaknesses of
opponents and
attempts to exploit
them
*Sometimes
applies side to side
and short to deep
shots when
appropriate
*Sometimes uses a
variety of shots
*Sometimes serves
correctly
*Sometimes holds
paddle properly
*Sometimes uses
hand eye
coordination
*Sometimes
applies rules
appropriately in a
game setting
*Rarely applies
rules appropriately
in a game setting
*Never applies rules
appropriately in a
game setting
*There is no
evidence or
demonstration of
student learning
166
1: Below Basic
0: Failing
Table Tennis – Standard 1 Checklist Assessments (Sample)
Skill 1: Serve
Level 2: Ball lands over the net on the table. Student uses only a forehand or backhand
technique and the serve lacks velocity. Minimal to no spin is used.
Level 3: Ball lands over the net on the table. Student uses both forehand and
backhand serve technique and can apply some spin. Demonstrates ability to
hit serves with more velocity.
Level 4: Ball lands over the net on the table. Student uses both forehand and backhand
serve technique and can strategically use top spin or back spin on the serve.
Demonstrates ability to hit serves with high velocity with a strategic use of offspeed serves.
Skill 2: Forehand
Level 2: Ball lands over the net on the table. Student uses proper forehand grip when
hitting the ball but the shot lacks velocity. Minimal to no spin is used.
Level 3: Ball lands over the net on the table. Student uses proper forehand grip when
hitting the ball and can apply some spin. Demonstrates ability to hit shot with
more velocity.
Level 4: Ball lands over the net on the table. Student uses proper forehand grip when
hitting the ball and can strategically use top spin or back spin. Demonstrates
ability to hit shots with high velocity with a strategic use of off-speed shots.
Skill 3: Backhand
Level 2: Ball lands over the net on the table. Student uses proper backhand grip when
hitting the ball but the shot lacks velocity. Minimal to no spin is used.
Level 3: Ball lands over the net on the table. Student uses proper backhand grip when
hitting the ball and can apply some spin. Demonstrates ability to hit shot with
more velocity.
Level 4: Ball lands over the net on the table. Student uses proper backhand grip when
hitting the ball and can strategically use top spin or back spin. Demonstrates
ability to hit shots with high velocity with a strategic use of off-speed shots.
167
Sample Table Tennis Quiz
Name:
_________________
1. Select the correct order of techniques for a table tennis serve in a doubles match.
a. Toss the ball 10 inches in the air; bounce the ball on the table, hit on the opponent’s side of the table.
b. Using the palm of the hand toss the ball up 6 inches; hit the ball on the way down. Player must be the
net on the diagonal to the opponent’s side of the table.
c. Using the forefinger and the thumb toss the ball in the air, hit the ball on the way down, standing behind
the end of the table, the ball must bounce once on the server’s side and go over the net on the diagonal
of the opponent’s side.
Choose from the following words to answer questions 2& 3.
a. A net ball
b. Two
c. The first fault
d. A good serve
2. If the serve strikes the top of the net and still goes in. This called
.
3. If the serve goes into the net and comes back over the server’s side of the table. This is called
.
4. How many times does a player serve before the other player gets a turn to serve?
a. One
b. Two
c. Four
d. Five
5. The server must toss the ball
a. At least 4 inches in the air
c. 6 inches in the air
b. At least 5 inches in the air
d. 10 inches in the air
6. A game is played to how many points?
a. 21 b. 15
c. 11 d. 13
7. If a game is tied 20-20, by how many points do you need to win?
a. One point b. Two points
c. Three points d. Five
8. Table tennis is a high paying professional sport in some countries. True/ False
9. It is legal to volley in Table Tennis? True/ False
10. If the ball hits the edge of the table is it considered good?
a. yes
b. no
c. sometimes
d. never
168
Tennis
169
TENNIS STUDY GUIDE/VOCABULARY
SERVE:
The serve starts from the right side and alternates to the left side on each point. The serve travels diagonally
across the net into the receiver's serving box. You have two attempts on each point to make a legal serve.
FAULTS:
The server may not touch the baseline until after contacting the ball, if this does not occur, a foot fault is called.
In attempting to hit the ball, if the server misses completely a fault is called. If the ball does not land in the
correct box, a fault is called.
LET:
If a serve touches the net when going over into the receivers court, but still lands successfully in the correct box,
a Let is called. This means the serve did not count for or against the server, and the serve is repeated as if it
never occurred. If a let occurred on the first serve, the server will have two serves remaining. If the let occurred
on the second service, the server would only have one left.
SERVER WINS A POINT:
1. If the ball is served legally into the correct service box and the receiver fails to return the serve.
2. If the ball is not returned legally into the server's court during rally.
3. If the ball touches the receiver or anything the receiver is wearing before it has hit the ground (even if you are
outside the court boundaries).
4. Note: There is only one server per game, the partner in doubles would not serve until the third game, the
opponents do not serve until the second game.
RECEIVER WINS A POINT:
1. If the server serves two consecutive faults.
2. If the server fails to return the ball legally hit into the receiver's court during rally.
3. If the ball touches the receiver or anything the receiver is wearing before it has hit the ground (even if you are
outside the court boundaries).
DO'S:
1. Hit the tennis ball before it bounces twice – otherwise it is a point for the other player.
2. Keep your racket on your side of the net. If you reach over the net , your opponent wins the point.
3. Do not touch the net during play.
4. Play a ball that lands on a line. It is considered a good hit.
170
5. Play a ball that hits the net on a rally (not a serve). It is the luck of the fall and you must play the ball.
6. You must let the serve bounce in the serving box before you return it. Volleys are not allowed on a serve.
7. Change sides of the court with the opponents after odd games.
SCORING:
When the games starts, the score would be love-love (or zero-zero) If a server wins four services points in a
row, he/she would win the game. The scoring would be as follows 15-love, 30-love, 40-love, and game. Both
players have the opportunity to win a point on every serve. It is not correct to think only the server wins points.
The server's score is always announced first. If in the game both players have won three service points, the
score would be 40-40. This has a special term called "DEUCE". This is considered a tie. You must win the
game by a two point difference. The next point won after deuce is called an ADVANTAGE. If the player with
the advantage wins the next point, that player wins the game. If the player with the advantage loses the next
point, you are again tied and back at a deuce score. This continues until someone has won two points in a row.
You may also hear the terms AD-IN or AD-OUT. This also refers to the advantage. AD-IN is the advantage to
the server, AD-OUT is the advantage to the receiver.
SET: A regulation set in when a player wins 6 games and has a margin of two game over the opponent. We do
not play regulation sets in class.
ACE: A serve which is so good, the receiver can not get their racket on the ball. Point awarded.
ALLEY: The area between the singles and doubles sideline. The serving box is not part of the alley.
CANADIAN DOUBLES: When three people play a game. The single person covers only the width of the
singles court but hit into the width of the doubles court. The doubles team must cover the width of their court
but only hit into the width of a singles court.
FAULT: A general term used when a hit does not land into the correct area. It is most often used when
referring to a serve which goes into the net or does not land in the correct service box.
FOOT FAULT: Stepping on the baseline before contact with ball on serve.
LET: A serve with hits the top of the net but falls into the correct serving court.
VOLLEY: Contacting the tennis ball before it bounces. Legal during rally, not legal when returning the
service.
171
TENNIS – RUBRIC
Tennis Rubric
Court
Positioning
Court Movement
Strategy
Skills
Rules
Application
4 -Advanced
3 - Proficient
2 - Basic
1 - Below Basic
0 - Failing
*Always remains
in critical positions
of the court
*Always
recognizes when
offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed
*Always attempts
to move opponents
from good court
positioning
*Always moves
quickly into
different positions
*Always moves
quickly back to a
neutral position
*Always
anticipates
opponents moves
*Always
recognizes
strengths and
weaknesses of
opponents and
attempts to exploit
them
*Always applies
front to back and
side to side strategy
when appropriate
*Always uses a
variety of shots
*Always grips
racket
appropriately
*Always properly
rotates body and
extends racket
*Always serves
appropriately
*Always follows
through with racket
*Applies rules
appropriately in a
game setting
*Sometimes remains
in critical positions of
the court
*Sometimes
recognizes when
offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed
*Sometimes attempts
to move opponents
from good court
positioning
*Sometimes moves
quickly into different
positions
*Sometimes moves
quickly back to a
neutral position
*Sometimes
anticipates opponents
moves
*Sometimes
recognizes strengths
and weaknesses of
opponents and
attempts to exploit
them most of the time
*Sometimes applies
front to back and side
to side strategy when
appropriate
*Sometimes uses a
variety of shots
*Rarely remains in
critical positions of
the court
*Rarely recognizes
when offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed
*Rarely attempts to
move opponents from
good court
positioning
*Never remains in
critical positions of
the court
*Never recognizes
when offensive and
defensive positions
should be assumed
*Never attempts to
move opponents
from good court
positioning
There is no
evidence or
demonstration
of student
learning
*Rarely moves
quickly into different
positions
*Rarely moves
quickly back to a
neutral position
*Rarely anticipates
opponents moves
*Never moves
quickly into
different positions
*Never moves
quickly back to a
neutral position
*Never anticipates
opponents moves
There is no
evidence or
demonstration
of student
learning
*Rarely recognizes
strengths and
weaknesses of
opponents and
attempts to exploit
them most of the time
*Rarely applies front
to back and side to
side strategy when
appropriate
*Rarely uses a
variety of shots
There is no
evidence of
demonstration
of student
learning
*Sometimes grips
racket appropriately
*Sometimes properly
rotates body and
extends racket
*Sometimes serves
appropriately
*Sometimes follows
through with racket
*Rarely grips racket
appropriately
*Rarely properly
rotates body and
extends racket
*Rarely serves
appropriately
*Rarely follows
through with racket
*Never recognizes
strengths and
weaknesses of
opponents and
attempts to exploit
them most of the
time
*Never applies
front to back and
side to side strategy
when appropriate
*Never uses a
variety of shots
*Never grips racket
appropriately
*Never properly
rotates body and
extends racket
*Never serves
appropriately
*Never follows
through with racket
*Sometimes applies
rules appropriately in
a game setting
*Rarely applies rules
appropriately in a
game setting
*Never applies
rules appropriately
in a game setting
There is no
evidence or
demonstration
of student
learning
172
There is no
evidence or
demonstration
of student
learning
Sample Tennis Quiz
Name:
True/False: Please mark a true state with a “+” and if the statement is false mark it with an “O.”
1. Is it legal to step on the base line while serving?
2. If you leave the ground while serving, it is illegal.
3. The serving grip is pure eastern grip.
4. The slide service is less accurate than the flat serve.
5. The ball should be contacted by the racquet on “its” downward flight.
6. In preparing to serve, stand with your right side toward the net.
Multiple Choice: Please circle and write the correct letter on the line.
1. In the set position the feet are:
a. together, weight is even
b. comfortable apart, weight is on balls of feet
c. apart, weight is even
2. In the grip, the racquet is:
a. perpendicular to ground, palm of hand down
b. parallel to ground, racquet face standing on edge
c. parallel, racquet face at a slant
3. Most of the time your knees should be:
a. stiff, and bend when ball reaches the racquet
b. bent and flexible
c. any way that is comfortable
4. The tennis swing should be:
a. in definite steps
b. smooth, slow and continuous motion
c. hurried swing not to loose
5. In the serve the set position is:
a. facing net, feet together, weight is on both feet
b. side toward net, feet shoulder width apart, weight on back foot
c. body and racquet in a comfortable position
Fill in the blank:
1.
2.
3.
4.
In the back swing shift your weight to be (right/left)
foot.
In the forward swing the racquet should be at the (highest/slowest)
point.
For a slice serve, the ball is on the (right/left)
side.
While serving on the right side of the court, the ball should land in the opponent’s
(right/left)
court.
5. In the follow through, the racquet
.
173
Tennis SBG - Sample Test
Name:
True/False: Level 3
1. It is legal to step on the base line while serving.
2. If you leave the ground while serving, it is illegal.
3. The serving grip is pure eastern grip.
4. The slide service is less accurate than the flat serve.
5. The ball should be contacted by the racquet on “its” downward flight.
6. In preparing to serve, stand with your dominant side toward the net.
Multiple Choice: Level 3
7. In the set position the feet are:
a. together, weight is even
b. comfortable apart, weight is on balls of feet
c. apart, weight is even
8. In the grip, the racquet is:
a. perpendicular to ground, palm of hand down
b. parallel to ground, racquet face standing on edge
c. parallel, racquet face at a slant
9. Most of the time your knees should be:
a. stiff, and bend when ball reaches the racquet
b. bent and flexible
c. any way that is comfortable
10. The tennis swing should be:
a. in definite steps
b. smooth, slow and continuous motion
c. hurried swing not to loose
11. In the serve the set position is:
a. facing net, feet together, weight is on both feet
b. side toward net, feet shoulder width apart, weight on back foot
c. body and racquet in a comfortable position
Fill in the blank: Level 4
12.
13.
14.
15.
In the back swing shift your weight to your
foot.
In the forward swing the racquet should be at the
point.
For a slice serve, the ball is on the
side.
While serving on the right side of the court, the ball should land in the opponent’s
court.
16. In the follow through, the racquet
.
Level 5:
17. How would you improve your backhand?
174
Aquatics
Materials
175
Aquatics Course Description
*This course is offered to 10-12th grade students who have satisfied their PE
requirements for graduation. The students will receive instruction in American
Red Cross Aquatics. This course will provide lifeguard candidates and lifeguards
with the skills and knowledge needed to prevent and respond to aquatic
emergencies. Students will learn CPR and First Aid. District mandated
fitnessgram will be administered in pre- and post- test form.
Aquatics Course Outcomes
01 Demonstrates the ability to perform proper stroke techniques.
02 Identifies biomechanical principles related to propelling one-self
through the water using a variety of strokes.
03 Accumulates a specific number of laps during a class period to
meet personal goals.
04 Assesses and maintains appropriate levels of physical fitness in terms of:
cardiorespiratory endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility and
body composition necessary for a healthy and productive life.
05 Recognizes water safety and etiquette when in or around the pool.
06 Identifies reasons to participate in physical activity (e.g. health, enjoyment,
challenge, self-expression, and social interaction).
Aquatics Scope and Sequence
1. Demonstrates the ability to; float, glide, different strokes (freestyle, butterfly,
breast, backstroke, sidestroke), dolphin kick, diving, flutter kick, whip kick
2. ARC Levels 1-6, CPR/First Aid/AED
3. Water games
4. Written test; origin, safety, vocabulary, etiquette, strategy
Aquatics Potential Units of Study
Beginning Swimming
Intermediate Swimming
Water Games
CPR/First Aid/AED
176
Aquatics – Proficiency Scale
Standards
Standard 1
Standard 2
Standard 3
Standard 4
Standard
Requirements
Demonstrates
competency in motor
skills and movement
patterns needed to
perform a variety of
physical activities.
Demonstrates
understanding of
movement concepts,
principles, strategies,
and tactics as they
apply
to the learning and
performance of
physical
activities.
Participates regularly
in physical activity.
Achieves and maintains
a health enhancing
level of physical fitness.
4
3
2
1
0
Advanced
Proficient
Basic
Below Basic
Failing
Student can perform
the required strokes
and the advanced
strokes using proper
technique without
assistance in a group
setting.
Student can perform
the required strokes
and some advanced
strokes without
assistance in isolation
or in a group setting.
Student can
perform basic
strokes without
assistance in
isolation or in
a group setting.
Student has
understanding of
concepts, vocabulary
and techniques and
can apply them in
practice situations
but has difficulty
applying them in a
group setting
Student has a
minimal
understanding of
basic concepts,
vocabulary and
techniques but has
difficulty applying
them in practice
situations.
Student is prepared
and participates in all
activities and
makes an effort to
improve their skills
and abilities.
Student also
helps others improve
their skill or ability.
Student is prepared and
participates in all
activities and
makes an effort to
improve their skills
and abilities.
Student demonstrates
an understanding of
healthy living
concepts. Student
creates a fitness plan
which significantly
improves their level
of fitness.
Student understands
healthy living
concepts. Student can
create a plan to
maintain their current
level
of fitness.
Student has thorough
understanding of
concepts, vocabulary
and techniques,
and can apply them in
a group setting.
177
Minimal
achievement
with
assistance
from someone
else.
Attempted and
failed.
Minimal
achievement
with
assistance
from someone
else.
Attempted and
failed.
Student participates
in all activities, but
makes minimal
effort to improve.
Minimal
achievement
with
assistance
from someone
else.
Attempted and
failed.
Student has a basic
understanding of
healthy living
concepts. Student
struggles to
maintain current
fitness levels.
Minimal
achievement
with
assistance
from someone
else.
Attempted and
failed.
Advanced Swim: Pre-Course Skills
1. 100 yards of front crawl using rhythmic breathing and a stabilizing propellant kick.
2. 100 yards of breaststroke using a pull, breathe, kick and glide sequence.
3. 100 yards of either the front crawl or breast stoke.
4. Starting the in the water, swim 20 yards using the front crawl or breaststroke, surface dive 7-10 feet,
retrieve a 10 pound object, return to the surface, swim 20 yards back to the starting point with the object
and exit the water without using a ladder or steps within one minute and 40 seconds.
5. Treading water – legs only for two minutes.
Aquatics
Exit Skills Assessment:
Level 1 – Introduction to Water Skills
1. Enter unassisted, move 5 yards, bob 5 times to chin level and safely exit the water.
2. Float on front with support for 3 seconds, roll to back and float on back with support for 3 seconds.
Level 2 – Fundamental Aquatic Skills
1. Step from side into chest-deep water, move into a front float for 5 seconds, roll over to a back float, return to
standing position, then move back to back float for 5 seconds and return to a standing position.
2. Push off and swim using a combination of arm and leg actions for 15 feet on the front; push off and swim using a
combination of arm and leg actions for 15 feet on the back.
Level 3 – Stroke Development
1. Jump into chest-deep water from the side, swim front crawl for 15 yards with face in the water and rhythmic
breathing pattern, maintain position by treading or floating for 30 seconds and swim back crawl 15 yards.
Level 4 – Stroke Improvement
1. Perform a feet-first entry into chest-deep water, swim front crawl for 25 yards, maintain position on back 1
minute in deep water and swim elementary backstroke for 15 yards.
2. Swim breaststroke for 15 yards, tread water for 1 minute and swim back crawl for 25 yards.
Level 5 – Stroke Refinement
1. Perform a shallow dive into deep water, swim front crawl for 50 yards, maintain position on back for 2 minutes in
deep water and swim elementary back stroke for 25 yards.
2. Swim breaststroke for 25 yards, tread water for 2 minutes and swim back crawl for 50 yards.
Level 6 – Lifeguard Readiness, Personal Water Safety, Fundamentals of Diving
1. Swim 500 yards continuously using the strokes in the following order: front crawl-100 yards, back crawl-100
yards, breaststroke-50 yards, elementary backstroke-50 yards, sidestroke-50 yards, butterfly-50 yards, and choice
of stroke-100 yards.
2. Swim 20 yards using front crawl or breaststroke to a depth of 7-10 feet, retrieve a 10 pound object, return to the
surface and swim 20 yards on back or side to the starting point with the object.
3. Jump into deep water, perform a survival float for 5 minutes, roll onto back and perform a back float for 5
minutes.
4. Perform a feet-first surface dive, retrieve an object from the bottom of the pool at a minimum depth of 7 feet,
return to surface and return to starting point.
5. Perform a front approach and hurdle with a feet-first entry from a 1-meter springboard.
6. Perform a front approach and hurdle with a head-first entry from a 1-meter springboard.
178
Standard 1: Skills Checklist Assessment: Beginning Swim Front Crawl: Arm Stroke: Level 2: Hand enters water in front of shoulder. Elbow enters water last. Arm extends fully. Hand sweeps downward and outward to just outside the shoulder. Level 3: Elbow bends up to 90 degrees. Hand does not cross midline of body. Arm extends fully, until thumb brushes thigh. Level 4: Elbow is lifted high out of water. Hand exists water little finger first. Hand leads elbow after passing shoulder. Kick: Level 2: Ankles are loose and relaxed. Level 3: Knee flexes during downbeat. Motion begins at hip and continues through entire leg. Level 4: Foot snaps downward. Leg straightens toward surface during recovery. Breathing and timing: Level 2: Head turns to side as arm starts pull. Level 3: Face turns to side and slightly back. Swimmer inhales as recovery starts. Level 4: Face returns to original position before hand enters water. Back Crawl: Arm Stroke: Level 2: Hand enters water outside the shoulder, little finger first. Body rolls toward entry arm. Level 3: Hand sweeps outward and downward while the elbow bends. Elbow bends up to 90 degrees at midpoint as forearm passes chest. Hand sweeps downward and toward feet. Level 4: Arm lifts from water, shoulder first, palm inward. Arm remains straight but relaxed. Hand rotates so that little finger enters water first. Kick: Level 2: Ankles are held loose and floppy. Level 3: Knee flexes on upward kick. Foot whips upward until leg is straight and toes reach surface. Level 4: Leg straightens on downward kick. Breathing and timing: Level 2: Arms move in opposition. Level 3: Head is held back, ears are submerged. Body roll is important. Level 4: Swimmer uses rhythmic breathing pattern. Breaststroke: Arm Stroke: Level 2: Hands angle downward and palms turn outward. Palms press directly out until elbows are wider than shoulders. Level 3: Elbows bend. Hands sweep downward and outward. Hands sweep inward, upward, and back toward feet. Level 4: Hands finish below chin, palms facing each other and almost touching. Arms extend forward to glide position. Kick: Level 2: Hips and knees bend. Heels lift up toward buttocks. Feet and ankles are positioned outside knees. Ankles flex and rotate outward. Level 3: Feet press around, outward, and backward. Feet and legs move in continuous motion. Level 4: Kick ends when feet and ankles touch and legs are straight. Breathing and Timing: Level 2: Swimmer takes a breath. Legs begin recovery. Level 3: Face returns to water. Arms recover. Kick begins. Level 4: Arms reach full extension. Kick ends. Swimmer glides briefly and begins next stroke. 179
Elementary Backstroke: Arm Stroke: Level 2: Swimmer glides in streamlines position. Arms recover. Elbows bend. Hands slide along sides to armpits. Level 3: Fingers point outward. Palms face back toward feet. Arms extend outward. Level 4: Palms sweep toward feet. Arms remain straight or slightly bent. Kick: Level 2: Swimmer recovers legs by bending and separating knees. Heels move downward, under and outside knees. Knees are spread slightly wider than hips. Back, hips, and thighs are nearly in line. Level 3: Knees rotate inward. Ankles flex and feet rotate outward. Level 4: Feet press backward in a rounded motion until they touch. Speed of kick increases through entire motion. Breathing and Timing: Level 2: Arms recover. Arms extend. Legs recover. Swimmer inhales. Level 3: Arms and Legs begin power phase. Arms and legs finish together. Swimmer exhales. Level 4: Body is streamlined for glide. Sidestroke: Arm Stroke: Level 2: Body is streamlined in glide position. Palm is down and angled slightly outward. Elbow bends. Hands sweep downward and back toward feet. Hand almost reaches upper chest. Level 3: Shoulder rotates and elbow drops. Hand passes under ear until fingers point forward. Arm thrusts forward. Palm rotates down to glide position. Forearm recovers along side. Hand nearly reaches front of shoulder. Palm turns down and angles slightly forward. Level 4: Hand sweeps downward and backward to body. Hand continues sweeping motion to reach glide position. Kick: Level 2: Hips and knees flex to begin recovery. Heels draw toward buttocks. Top ankle flexes. Top leg begins extension. Level 3: Bottom foot points. Top leg completes extension. Thigh of bottom leg extends slightly to rear of trunk. Level 4: Top leg presses backward. Bottom leg extends. Legs straighten to glide position. Breathing and timing: Level 2: Leading arm sweeps. Trailing arm recovers. Legs recover. Level 3: Leading arm recovers. Trailing arm sweeps toward feet. Legs press toward midline. Level 4: Arms extend to glide position. Legs extend to glide position. Body is streamlined for glide. Swimmer uses rhythmic breathing pattern. Butterfly: Arm Stroke: Level 2: Arms extend in front of shoulders. Wrists flex downward. Hands angle outward. Hand pitch changes from outward to inward. Hands sweep inward and backward to midline of body. Elbows exit water first. Level 3: Elbows bend to a maximum of 90 degrees. Elbows remain higher than hands. Hands sweep close together, under shoulders. Arms swing wide. Arms are straight or slightly bent. Arms recover just above surface of water. Hands press backward toward feet. Level 4: Wrists relax. Thumbs angle down throughout recovery. Hands enter at shoulder width. Hands continue backward press past hips to sides of thighs. Hands accelerate throughout finish into recovery. Kick: Level 2: Kick begins at hips. Legs extend quickly. Level 3: Knees bend on downbeat. Knees straighten on upbeat. Level 4: Ankles and feet remain relaxed throughout kick. 180
Breathing and timing: Level 2: Correct timing relates kicks to the entry and finish of arm stroke. Catch starts, hips rise, and downbeat of first kick begins. Downbeat of second kick begins. Hands press through finish of power phase. Swimmer completes arm pull. Second kick ends. Level 3: Hands accelerate into recovery. Head lifts for breath as hands press toward hips. Swimmer completes breath as arms begin recovery. Level 4: Chin is thrust forward, not upward. Swimmer breathes as soon as the face clears the water. Head lowers as soon as breath is completed. Arms continue recovery. Hands enter water to begin next stroke. Diving: Progression and Positions: Kneeling: Level 2: Diver kneels on one knee. Toes grip pool edge. Arms extend over head. Level 3 & 4: Diver leans forward and pushes with legs. Body straightens and legs extend for entry. Compact: Level 2: Diver starts in kneeling position. Diver lifts knee off deck. Arms extend above head. Level 3 & 4: Diver leans forward and pushes off toward water. Legs come together for entry. Stride: Level 2: Diver stands with one leg forward, one leg back. Toes of the forward foot grip pool edge. Arms extend above head. Level 3: Diver bends at waist toward water. Diver lifts back leg, leans forward and pushes off toward water. Level 4: Legs are together and straight for entry. Standing: Level 2: Diver stands with feet shoulder‐width apart. Toes of both feet grip edge of pool. Arms extend above head and knees bend. Level 3: Diver bends at waist toward water. Diver pushes off deck. Level 4: Diver lifts hips. Legs extend in line with torso and straighten for entry. Turns: Flip: Level 2: Trailing arm stops one stroke from wall. Leading arm completes last stroke. Both hands stop at thighs. Hands sweep toward head. Swimmer does dolphin kick to begin flip. Head drives downward to complete flip. Body tucks. Level 3: Feet are placed parallel on wall. Toes point up or slightly to side. Swimmer pushes off in face‐up or side‐
lying position. Swimmer extends to streamlined position. Level 4: Swimmer rotates onto stomach. Swimmer surfaces and resumes stroke. Backstroke: Level 2: Swimmer looks toward pulling arm one stroke from wall. Swimmer rotates onto stomach. Trailing arm recovers across body. Level 3: Both hands stop at thighs. Head drives downward to begin flip. Hands sweep toward head. Body tucks. Swimmer completes flip. Level 4: Feet are parallel on wall, toes point upward. Swimmer pushes off in face‐up position. Body extends to streamlined position. Swimmer glides briefly and resumes stroke. Breaststroke: Level 2: Body is in fully extended glide position. Both hands touch wall. Hips and legs tuck. Head moves away from wall. Elbow bends. Arm moves backward as close as possible to body. Other arm moves over the head as close to head as possible. Feet are positioned on wall. Body submerges fully. Level 3: Arms extend. Swimmer pushes off in side‐lying position. Swimmer glides in streamlined position. Swimmer takes complete breaststroke pull to thighs. Level 4: Swimmer glides briefly. Swimmer completes one breaststroke kick. Hands recover close to body. Swimmer surfaces and resumes stroke. 181
Butterfly: Level 2: Body is in fully extended glide position. Both hands touch was Hips and legs tuck. Head moves away from wall. Elbow bends. Level 3: Arm moves backward as close as possible to body. Other arm moves over the head as close to head as possible. Feet are positioned on wall. Body submerges fully. Level 4: Arms extend. Swimmer pushes off in side‐lying position. Swimmer glides in streamlined position. Advanced Swim: Entries: Slide‐In – Sit down on the edge of the pool deck, facing the water. Place the rescue tube on the surface of the pool deck or in the water. Gently slide into the water. Retrieve the rescue tube. Place the rescue tube across the chest with the tube under the armpits and begin your approach. Stride Jump – Squeeze the rescue tube high against your chest with the tube under your armpits. Hold the excess line to keep it from getting caught in the lifeguard chair or other equipment when you jump into the water. Leap into the water with one leg forward and the other leg back. Lean slightly forward, with your chest ahead of your hips, and focus on the victim as you enter the water. Squeeze or scissor your legs together for upward thrust. Focus on the victim and begin your approach. Compact Jump – Squeeze the rescue tube high against your chest with the tube under your armpits. Hold the excess line to keep it from getting caught in the lifeguard chair or other equipment when you jump into the water. Jump out and away from the lifeguard chair or pool deck. Bend your knees and keep your feet together and flat to absorb the shock if you hit the bottom. Do not point your toes or keep your legs straight or stiff. Let the buoyancy of the rescue tube bring you back to the surface. Focus on the victim when you surface, and begin your approach. Rescue Approaches: Front Crawl or Breaststroke Enter the water appropriately. Keep the rescue tube under the armpits or torso. Swim toward the victim with your head up. Slow down as you get closer to the victim. Simple Assist: Keeping the rescue tube between you and the victim, reach across the tube and grasp the victim at the armpit to help the victim maintain his or her balance. If the victim is underwater, grab the victim under the armpits with both hands and help him or her stand up. Extension Assist from the Deck: Remove the shoulder strap. Hold the shoulder strap in one hand, and extend the rescue tube to the distressed swimmer with the other hand. Keep your body weight on the back foot and crouch to avoid being pulled into the water. Tell the victim to grab the rescue tube. Slowly pull the victim to safety. Reaching Assist with Equipment: Brace yourself on the pool deck. Extend a reaching pole or sheperd’s crook to the victim. When the victim grabs the pole or the crook, slowly and carefully pull the victim to safety. Keep your body low and lean back to avoid being pulled into the water. Throwing Assist: Hold the coil of line in the open palm of your non‐throwing hand and grasp the side of the ring buoy with the throwing hand. Step on the non‐throwing end of the line with your foot. Hold the buoy vertically, step back with the leg on your throwing side, swing the buoy backwards and then forward for an underhand toss. Aim your throw so that the buoy lands just beyond the victim with the line lying on the victim’s shoulder. Tell the victim to grab the ring buoy. If there is a crosswind or current, throw upwind or up current of the victim. After the victim has a firm grasp, on the buoy or line, drop the remaining coil, if any, and pull the victim to safety. Keep your body low and lean back to avoid being pulled into the water. Reassure the victim. Slowly pull the victim to safety by reaching out with one hand and grasping the line with your thumb inward. Pull the line in to your side with that hand while reaching out with the other. Continue pulling until the victim is at the side of the pool or is able to stand in shallow water. 182
Swimming Extension Rescue: Approach the victim from the front. Extend the end of the rescue tube to the distressed swimmer. Tell the victim to hold the rescue tube and kick if he or she can. Tow the victim to safety. Be sure to maintain visual contact. Reassure the victim. Active Drowning Victim Rear Rescue: Approach the victim from behind. Reach under the victim’s armpits and grasp the shoulders firmly. Squeeze the rescue tube between your chest and the victim’s back. Keep your head to one side to avoid being hit by the victim’s head. Lean back and pull the victim onto the rescue tube. Use the rescue tube to support the victim with his or her mouth out of the water. Reassure the victim. Tow the victim to safety. Passive Drowning Victim Rear Rescue: Approach the victim from behind. Reach under the victim’s armpits and grasp the shoulders firmly. Squeeze the rescue tube between your chest and the victim’s head. Keep your head to one side to avoid being hit by the victim’s head. Roll the victim over by dipping your shoulder and rolling onto your back so that the victim is face‐
up on top of the rescue tube. Tow the victim to safety. Two‐Person Removal from the Water Using a Backboard: The primary rescuer brings the victim to the side of the pool and turns him or her to face the deck. A second rescuer brings a backboard with the head immobilizer and the straps removed, if possible. The second rescuer on deck crosses his or her hands to grab the victim’s opposite wrists and pulls the victim up slightly to keep the head above the water and away from the pool edge. Support the victim’s head so that it does not fall forward. The primary rescuer climbs out of the water, removes the rescue tube and gets the backboard. The primary rescuer guides the backboard, foot‐end first, straight down into the water next to the victim. The second rescuer then turns the victim onto the backboard. Each rescuer then quickly grasps one of the victim’s wrists and one of the handholds of the backboard. When the primary rescuer gives the signal, both rescuers pull the backboard and victim onto the deck, resting the underside of the board against the edge of the pool. Step backward and then lower the backboard onto the deck. Provide immediate care based on the victim’s condition. Passive Submerged Victim‐ Shallow Water: Approach by swimming or quickly walking to a point near the victim’s side. Let go of the rescue tube but keep the strap around the shoulder. Facing in the same direction as the victim, submerge and reach down to grab the victim under the armpits. Pick the victim up, pulling the victim toward you to a face‐up position at the surface. Grab the rescue tube and position it under the victim’s shoulders. Move the victim’s arm that is closest to you down to the side of the victim. Reach your right arm over the victim’s right shoulder and grasp the rescue tube or reach with your left arm over the victim’s left shoulder and grasp the rescue tube. Move the victim quickly to safety. Multiple‐Victim Rescue: Approach the victim from behind. Reach under the victim’s armpits and grasp his or her shoulders. Squeeze the rescue tube between your chest and the victim’s back. Keep you head to one side of the victim’s head. Use the rescue tube to support both victims with their mouth out of the water. Reassure the victims. Support either victims until other lifeguards arrive or the victims calm down enough to help move to safety. Feet‐First Surface Dive: From a treading water position, let go of your rescue tube but keep the strap around your shoulders. In a vertical position, simultaneously press down with your hands and kick strongly to raise your body out of the water. Take a breath with your arms at your sides and let your body sink underwater. Keep your legs straight and together with your toes pointed. As your downward momentum slows, turn your palms outward and sweep your hands and arms upward and overhead. Repeat these arm movements until your deep enough to reach the victim. Submerged Victim‐Deep Water: Swim to a point near a victim. Do a feet‐first surface dive, and position yourself behind the victim. Reach one arm under the victim’s arm and across the victim’s chest. Hold firmly onto the victim’s opposite side. When you have the victim, reach up above your shoulder with your free hand and grasp the towline. Pull it down and hold it in the same hand that is holding the victim. Keep pulling the towline in this way until you reach the surface. As you surface, grasp and position the rescue tube so that it is squeezed between your chest and the victim’s back. Reach your free arm over the tube and under the victim’s armpit. Firmly grasp his or her shoulder. Move your 183
other arm from across the victim’s chest, and firmly grasp his or her shoulder. Hold the victim in a face‐up position on the rescue tube. Quickly move the victim to safety. Front Head‐Hold Escape: As soon as you’re grabbed, take a quick breath, tuck your chin down, turn your head to either side, raise your shoulders and submerge with the victim. Once underwater, grasp the victim’s elbows or the undersides of the victim’s arms just above the elbows. Forcefully push up and away. Keep your chin tucked, your arms fully extended and your shoulders raised until you are free. Quickly swim underwater out of the victim’s reach. Surface and reposition your rescue tube, and try the rescue again. Rear Head‐Hold Escape: If the victim grabs you from behind, take a quick breath, tuck your chin down, turn your head to either side, raise your shoulders and submerge with the victim. Once underwater, grasp the victim’s elbows or the undersides of the victim’s arms just above the elbows. Forcefully push up and away while twisting your head and shoulders. Keep your chin tucked, your arms fully extended and your shoulders raised until you are free. Quickly swim underwater out of the victim’s reach. Surface and reposition your rescue tube, and try the rescue again. Manual In‐Line Stabilization for a Head, Neck or Back Injury on Land: Minimize movement of the head, neck and back by placing your hands on both sides of the victim’s head. Have the victim remain in the position in which he or she was found until EMS personnel arrive and take over. Monitor the victim‐watch for changes in the consciousness and breathing. Using a Backboard for a Standing Victim on Land: Rescuer 1 approaches the victim from the front and performs in‐line stabilization of the victim’s head and neck by placing one hand on each side of the head. Rescuer 2 retrieves a backboard and places it against the victim’s back, being careful not to disturb Rescuer 1’s in‐line stabilization of the victim’s head. Rescuer 3 assists Rescuer 2 in positioning the backboard so that the board is centered behind the victim. While Rescuer 3 holds the backboard, Rescuer 2 secures the victim to the backboard by placing and securing a: strap high across the victim’s chest and under the victim’s armpits. This helps prevent the victim from sliding on the backboard when it is lowered, strap across the victim’s hips with the victim’s arms and hands secured, and strap across the victim’s thighs. Rescuer 2 rechecks straps to be sure that they are secure. Rescuer 2 then secures the victim’s head to the backboard using a head immobilizer and strap across the victim’s forehead. Rescuer 2 and Rescuer 3 place their inside hands underneath the victim’s armpit, in between the victim’s arm and torso, and grasp the backboard. These rescuers should grasp a handhold that is at the victim’s armpit level or higher. When the victim is secured to the back board, Rescuer 1 moves to the back of the board and grasps the top of the backboard. Rescuer 1 then gives the signal to the other two rescuers to begin lowering the victim to the ground. While lowering the victim to the ground, Rescuer 2 and Rescuer 3 should walk forward and bend at the knees to avoid back injury. Head Splint Technique on a Face‐Up Victim in Shallow Water at or Near the Surface: Approach the victim’s head from behind, or stand behind the victim’s head. Lower your body so that the water level is at your neck. Grasp the victim’s arms midway between the shoulder and elbow with your thumbs to the inside of each of the victim’s arms. Grasp the victim’s right arm with your right hand and the victim’s left arm with your left hand. Gently move the victim’s arms up alongside the head and reposition yourself to the victim’s side as you trap the victim’s head with his or her arms. Slowly and carefully squeeze the victim’s arms against his or her head to help hold the head in line with the body. Do not move the victim any more than necessary. Position the victim’s head close to the crook of your arm, with the head in line with the body. Hold the victim in this position until help arrives. Check for consciousness and signs of life. If there are no signs of life, immediately remove the victim from the water. Head Splint Technique on a Face‐Down Victim in Shallow Water at or Near the Surface: Approach the victim from the side. Grasp the victim’s arms midway between the shoulder and elbow. Grasp the victim’s right arm with your right hand and the victim’s left arm with your left hand. Gently move the victim’s arms up alongside the head. Squeeze the victim’s arms against his or her head to help hold the head in line with the body. Glide the victim slowly forward. Lower yourself to shoulder depth before gliding the victim forward. Continue moving slowly and turn the victim toward you until he or she is face‐up. To do this, push the victim’s arm that is closer to you under the water while pulling the victim’s other arm across the surface toward you. 184
Position the victim’s head close to the crook of your arm, with the head in line with the body. Hold the victim in this position until help arrives. Check for consciousness and signs of life. If there are no signs of life, immediately remove the victim from the water. Head and Chin Support for a Face‐Up Victim in Shallow Water or Near the Surface: Approach the victim from the side. With your body at about shoulder depth in the water, place one forearm along the length of the victim’s breastbone and the other forearm along the victim’s spine. Use your hands to gently hold the victim’s head and neck in line with the body. Place on hand on the victim’s lower jaw and the other hand on the back of the lower head. Be careful not to place pressure or touch the front and back of the neck. Squeeze your forearms together, clamping the victim’s chest and back. Continue to support the victim’s head and neck. Hold the victim face‐up in the water until help arrives. Check for consciousness and signs of life. If there are no signs of life, immediately remove the victim from the water. Head and Chin Support for a Face‐Down Victim in Shallow Water at or Near the Surface: Approach the victim from the side. With your body at about shoulder depth in the water, place on forearm along the length of the victim’s breastbone and the other forearm along the victim’s spine. Use your hands to gently hold the victim’s head and neck in line with the body. Place one hand on the victim’s lower jaw and the other hand on the back of the lower head. Be careful not to place pressure or touch the front and back of the neck. Squeeze your forearms together, clamping the victim’s chest and back. Continue to support the victim’s head and neck. Turn the victim face‐up. Using the head and chin support to stabilize the spine, slowly move the victim forward to help lift the victim’s legs. Turn the victim toward you as you submerge. Roll under the victim while turning the victim over. Avoid twisting the victim’s body. The victim is face‐up when you surface on the other side. Hold the victim face‐up in the water until help arrives. Check for consciousness and signs of life. If there are no signs of life, immediately remove the victim from the water. Head Splint Technique on a Face‐Up Victim in Deep Water at or Near the Surface: Approach the victim’s head from behind using a rescue tube for support. Grasp the victim’s arms midway between the shoulder and elbow with your thumbs to the inside of each of the victim’s arms. Grasp the victim’s right arm with your right hand and the victim’s left arm with your left hand. Gently move the victim’s arms up alongside the head and reposition yourself to the victim’s side as you trap the head with his or her arms. Slowly and carefully squeeze the victim’s arms against his or head to help hold the head in line with the body. Do not move the victim any more than necessary. Position the victim’s head close to the crook of your arm, with the head in line with the body. Hold the victim in this position until help arrives. Move the victim to shallow water if possible. Check for consciousness and signs of life. If there are no signs of life, immediately remove the victim from the water. Head Splint Technique on a Face‐Down Victim in Deep Water at or Near the Surface: Approach the victim from the side using a rescue tube for support. Grasp the victim’s arms midway between the shoulder and elbow. Grasp the victim’s right arm with your right hand and the victim’s left arm with your left hand. Gently move the victim’s arms up alongside the head. Squeeze the victim’s arms against his or her head to help hold the head in line with the body. Glide the victim slowly forward. Continue moving slowly and turn the victim until he or she is face‐up. To do this, push the victim’s arm that is closest to you under the water while pulling the victim’s other arm across the surface toward you. Position the victim’s head close to the crook of your arm, with the head in line with the body. Hold the victim in this position until help arrives. Move the victim to shallow water if possible. Check for consciousness and signs of life. If there are no signs of life, immediately remove the victim from the water. Head and Chin Support on a Face‐Up Victim in Deep Water: Approach the victim from the side. While using the rescue tube to support you above water, place one forearm along the length of the victim’s breastbone and the other forearm along the victim’s spine. Use your hands to gently hold the victim’s head and neck in line with the body. Place one hand on the victim’s lower jaw and the other hand on the back of the lower head. Be careful no to place pressure or touch the front and back of the neck. Squeeze your forearms together, clamping the victim’s chest and back. Continue to support the victim’s head and neck. Hold the victim face‐up in the water until help arrives. Move the victim to shallow water if possible. Check for consciousness and signs of life. If there are no signs of life, immediately remove the victim from the water. 185
In‐Line Stabilization Techniques for a Submerged Victim Face‐Up, Face‐Down or on one Side in Deep Water: Swim to a point near the victim. Do a feet‐first surface dive and position yourself behind the victim. Use either the head splint technique or a head and chin support to provide in‐line stabilization. Move the victim up and forward at an angle to the water’s surface. IF the victim is face‐down, turn the victim face‐up as you move to the surface. Roll under the victim while turning the victim over in the water. Avoid twisting the victim’s body. The victim should be face‐up when surfacing. To provide support above water, a second lifeguard readjusts the rescue tube by placing it under the first lifeguard’s armpits. The second lifeguard submerges on end of the rescue tube under the first lifeguard’s armpits and positions it, without hitting the victim, so that it is under both armpits. Hold the victim face‐up in the water until help arrives. Move the victim to shallow water if possible. Check for consciousness and signs of life. If there are no signs of life, immediately remove the victim from the water. Using a Backboard in Shallow Water: Rescuer 1 continues to provide manual in‐line stabilization until another rescuer(s) arrive(s). Rescuer 2 enters the water, submerges the backboard and positions it under the victim so that it extends slightly beyond the victim’s head. While Rescuer 2 raises the backboard into place, depending on the manual in‐line stabilization technique used, both rescuers should follow the steps below.  Head Splint: Rescuer 1 moves the elbow that is under the victim toward the top of the backboard while continuing to apply pressure on both arms. Rescuer 2 uses that head and chin support to stabilize the victim (one hand and arm on the chin and chest, the other hand and arm under the backboard). Once the backboard is in place, Rescuer 1 lowers the victim’s arms, moves to the victim’s head and places the rescue tube under the head of the backboard. Rescuer 1 supports the backboard with his or her forearms. Lastly, Rescuer 1 stabilizes the victim’s head by placing his or her hands along each side of the victim’s head.  Head and Chin Support: Rescuer 1 carefully removes his or her arm from beneath the victim. Rescuer 1 then keeps the hand on the chin and arm on the chest and places the other hand and arm under the backboard. Once the backboard is in place, Rescuer 2 moves to the victim’s head and places a rescue tube under the head of the backboard. Rescuer 2 stabilizes the victim’s head by placing his or her hands along each side of the victim’s head. The rescuer who is not positioned at the victim’s head secures the victim on the backboard. Secure the victim with a minimum of 3 straps: across the victim’s chest, hips and thighs. Secure the straps in the following order: Strap high across the chest and under the victim’s armpits, strap across the hips with the victim’s arms and hands secured, strap across the thighs, and recheck straps to be sure that they are secure. After all the straps have been checked and properly secured, the rescuer secures the victim’s head to the backboard using a hand immobilizer and a strap across the victim’s forehead. If not done so already, the rescuers bring the victim to the side of the pool: position the backboard with head end by the side of the pool and the foot end straight out into the pool. With one rescuer at each side, lift the head of the backboard slightly and place it on the edge of the gutter or the edge of the pool deck, if possible. One rescuer gets out of the pool while the other rescuer maintains control of the backboard. Once rescuer gets out of the pool the other rescuer maintains control of the backboard. Once out of the pool, the rescuer on deck grasps the head of the backboard while the other rescuer gets out of the pool. Together, the rescuers stand and step backward, pulling the backboard and sliding it up over the edge of the deck and out of and away from the water. If additional lifeguards are available to assist, they can help guide and remove the backboard and victim onto the deck. Using a Backboard in Deep Water: Rescuer 1 minimizes movement of the victim’s head, neck and back by using either the head splint technique or the head and chin support for a face‐up victim. If the victim is submerged, Rescuer 1 leaves the rescue tube on the surface and does a feet‐first surface dive to the victim. He or she brings the victim to the surface using the head splint technique or the head and chin support. Rescuer 2 retrieves Rescuer 1’s rescue tube and inserts it under the Rescuer 1’s armpits. To place and secure the victim on a backboard, Rescuer 1 moves the victim to the side of the pool or, if possible, toward the corner of the pool. Rescuer 2 places a rescue tube under the victim’s knees to raise the legs. Rescuer 2 then places the backboard under the victim while Rescuer 1 continues to maintain in‐line stabilization. 186

Head Splint: As the backboard is raised into place, Rescuer 1 moves the elbow that is under the victim toward the top of the backboard while continuing to apply pressure on both arms. Rescuer 2 uses the head and chin support to stabilize the victim (one hand and arm on the chin and chest, the other hand and arm under the backboard). Once the backboard is in place, Rescuer 1 removes the rescue tube under the victim’s knees by sliding the rescue tube towards him or herself. Rescuer 1 then lowers the victim’s arms, moves to the victim’s head and places a rescue tube under the head of the backboard. Rescuer 1 supports the backboard with his or her forearms. Rescuer 1 then stabilizes the victim’s head by placing his or her hands along each side of the victim’s head.  Head and Chin Support: As the backboard is raised into place, Rescuer 1 carefully removes his or her arm from beneath the victim. Rescuer 1 then keeps the hand on the chin and the arm on the chest and places the other hand and arm under the backboard. Once the backboard is in place, Rescuer 2 removes the rescue tube under the victim’s knees by sliding the rescue tube towards him or herself. Rescuer 2 then moves to the victim’s head and places a rescue tube under the head of the backboard. Rescuer 2 supports the backboard with his or her forearms and stabilizes the victim’s head by placing his or her hands along each side of the victim’s head. The rescuer who is not positioned at the victim’s head secures the victim head secures the victim on the backboard by placing straps at least across the victim’s chest, hips, and thighs. After all straps have been checked and properly secured, the rescuer secures the victim’s head to the backboard, using a head immobilizer and a strap across the victim’s forehead. With one rescuer at each side of the victim, the rescuers position the backboard with the head end by the side of the pool and the foot end straight out into the pool. Use on or two rescue tubes if needed to support the foot end of the backboard. With one rescuer at each side, lift the head of the backboard slightly and place it on the edge of the gutter or the edge of the pool deck, if possible. One rescuer gets out of the pool while the other rescuer maintains control of the backboard. Once out of the pool, the rescuer maintains control of the backboard. Once out of the pool, the rescuer on deck then grasps the head of the backboard while the other rescuer gets out of the pool. Together the rescuers stand and step backward pulling the backboard and sliding it up over the edge of the deck and out of and away from the water. Use proper lifting techniques to prevent injury. If additional lifeguards are available to assist, they can help guide and remove the backboard and victim onto the deck. 187
Sample Aquatics Quiz
Name: __________________________ Block: _____________ Date: ___________
True or False:
______ 1. Aquatic activities are the leading form of recreation in the United States.
______ 2. Proper progressions should be utilized in teaching the forward dive from the pool. The safe
depth recommended for such activity is 5 feet.
______ 3. Water exercise is one of the nation’s fastest growing fitness activities.
______ 4. Safety considerations for water exercise include scheduled lifeguard, pool safety line, trained
instructor and participant fitness evaluations.
______ 5. Even in the best managed pool facilities accidents may be unavoidable.
______ 6. All participants should be taught the correct way of entering and exiting the pool.
______ 7. The breaststroke, back crawl, and sidestroke all have a glide portion separating arm and leg
movements.
______ 8. Breathing on the front crawl is accomplished by lifting the chin out of the water and looking
forward.
______ 9. The sidestroke is the stroke of choice used in lifeguard rescues.
______10. The back crawl stroke is far more difficult to perform than the front crawl stroke.
Multiple Choice: Choose the best answer.
_____ 11. Aquatic activities may be helpful to those who are normally physically challenged on land du
to:
a. increased buoyancy
b. therapeutic affects of water
c. improve cardiorespiratory fitness levels
d. all of the above
_____ 12. Generally it takes a person ______ of time to drown.
a. 30 minutes
b. 5-10 minutes
c. 15-20 minutes
d. 20-60 seconds
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_____13. Which is the proper sequence of instruction for the beginning swimmer?
a. bob, float, glide, kick, stroke
b. float, bob, glide, kick, stroke
c. float, bob, kick, glide, stroke
d. kick, bob, float, glide, stroke
_____14. The fastest swimming stroke is
a. sidestroke
b. breaststroke
c. front crawl
d. butterfly
_____ 15. The ___________ has an underwater recovery with both arms.
a. front crawl
b. breaststroke
c. back crawl
d. butterfly
Level 4 Short answer:
16. Identify the different parts of a breaststroke.
17. List the key points of the front crawl stroke.
Essay: Choose one and write about it.
1. Select one of the major competitive strokes and explain the arm movement, the kick, and the
coordination of the arm and leg movements and the breathing pattern.
2. Suggest an appropriate learning progression for beginners.
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Aerobics
Materials
190
Aerobics/Dance Course Description
*This course is offered to 10-12th grade students. Students will learn a variety of
cardiovascular fitness activities. Emphasis will be placed on wellness of the
student. Activities include but are not limited to: step, kickboxing, pilates, yoga,
toning, circuit training and other continuous activities. Water aerobics will be
offered where available. District mandated fitnessgram will be administered in
pre- and post- test form.
Aerobics/Dance Course Outcomes
01 Demonstrates the ability to identify rhythms and understands current
fundamental techniques.
02 Plans a personal summer conditioning program.
03 Monitors physical activity through the use of a pedometer, heart rate
monitor and/or physical activity log to evaluate personal fitness levels
and set goals.
04 Assesses and maintains appropriate levels of physical fitness in terms of:
cardiorespiratory endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility
and body composition necessary for a healthy and productive life.
05 Participates successfully in a cooperative learning group with a wide
range of diverse members.
06 Identifies reasons to participate in physical activity (e.g. health, enjoyment,
challenge, self-expression, and social interaction).
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High School Aerobics – Proficiency Scale
Standards
Standard
Requirements
Standard 1 Demonstrates
competency in motor
skills and movement
patterns needed to
perform a variety of
physical activities.
Standard 2 Demonstrates
understanding of
movement concepts,
principles,
strategies, and
tactics as they apply
to the learning and
performance of
physical activities.
4
3
2
1
0
Advanced
Proficient
Basic
Below Basic
Failing
Student can perform the
required skills and the
advanced skills
without assistance in
isolation or in a group
setting.
Student can perform
the required skills and
some advanced skills
without assistance in
isolation or in a
group setting.
Student can perform
basic
skills without
assistance in
isolation or in
a group setting.
Minimal
Attempted
achievement
and failed.
with assistance
from someone
else
Student has thorough
understanding of
concepts and vocabulary
and can apply them during
a physical fitness activity.
Student has
understanding of
concepts and
vocabulary and
can apply them during
physical fitness
activities.
Student has a
minimal
understanding of
basic concepts and
vocabulary but has
difficulty applying
them during physical
fitness activities.
Minimal
Attempted
achievement
and failed.
with assistance
from someone
else
Student is prepared
and participates in all
activities and
makes an effort to
improve their skills
and abilities.
Student participates
in all activities, but
makes minimal
effort to improve.
Minimal
Attempted
achievement
and failed.
with assistance
from someone
else.
Student understands
healthy living
concepts. Student can
create a plan to
maintain their current
level
of fitness.
Student has a basic
understanding of
healthy living
concepts. Student
struggles to
maintain current
fitness levels.
Minimal
Attempted
achievement
and failed.
with assistance
from someone
else.
Standard 3 Participates regularly Student is prepared and
in
physical activity.
Standard 4 Achieves and
maintains a
health enhancing
level of
physical fitness.
participates in all activities
and
makes an effort to improve
their skills
and abilities. Student also
helps others improve their
skill or ability.
Student demonstrates an
understanding of healthy
living concepts. Student
creates a fitness plan
which significantly
improves their level of
fitness.
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Step Aerobics
Level 2: Basic, Corner to Corner, Tap up, V step, I step, L step, Over the top, Repeater,
and Straddle.
Tap Up – is simply a basic, but instead of stepping all the way up on the bench,
Just tap your foot on it. This move is done in 4 counts.
1. Step up on the bench with the lead foot.
2. Step up and tap the bench with your other foot.
3. Step back down with your other foot.
4. Step down with your lead foot.
Over the Top – starts next to the bench, facing sideways. This move brings you
over the “short end” of the bench. This move is done in 4 counts.
1. Step sideways up onto the bench with the lead foot.
2. Step up so both feet are on the bench.
3. Step off the other side of the bench with the lead foot.
4. Step down so both feet are on the floor.
Straddle – starts next to the bench, facing sideways. This move is done in 8
counts.
1. Step up to the center of the bench with the lead foot.
2. Bring the other foot up so both are on top of the bench.
3. Step down and back on the other side of the bench with the lead foot.
4. Bring the other foot down on the opposite side of the bench.
5. Step up on the bench again with the lead foot.
6. Bring the other foot up on the bench again.
7. Step back and down with the lead foot.
8. Bring the other foot down next to the lead foot.
Level 3: Around the World, Turnstep, Flamingo, Helicopter, Z-step, Revolving Door.
Around the World – starts next to the bench, facing sideways. This move is a
combination of two turnsteps , and two over the tops. This move is done in 16 counts.
(Turnstep #1)
1. Step up on bench with the lead foot.
2. Bring other foot on bench as you turn.
3. Step off with the same foot.
4. Bring the lead foot down next to the other.
(Over the top #1)
1. Step sideways up onto the bench with the the lead foot.
2. Step up so both feet are on the bench.
3. Step off the other side of the bench with the the lead foot.
4. Step down so both feet are on the floor.
(Turnstep #2)
1. Step up on bench with the lead foot.
2. Bring other foot on bench as you turn.
3. Step off with the same foot.
4. Bring the lead foot down next to the other.
(Over the top #2)
1. Step sideways up onto the bench with the the lead foot.
2. Step up so both feet are on the bench.
3. Step off the other side of the bench with the the lead foot.
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4. Step down so both feet are on the floor.
Turnstep – starts next to the bench, facing sideways. This move is done in 4
counts:
1. Step up on the bench with the lead foot.
2. Bring other foot on bench as you turn.
3. Step off with the lead foot.
4. Bring the other foot down next to the lead foot.
Flamingo – is a knee up, straddle down, up and off the same side that you started
on. This move is done in 8 counts.
1. Step up on the bench with the lead foot.
2. Raise the other knee up.
3. Bring the other knee back down.
4. Step down on the other side of the bench with your other foot. You
are now straddling the bench.
5. Step up on the bench with your lead foot.
6. Step up on the bench with your other foot. Both feet are now on top
of the bench.
7. Step back down with your other foot on the same side as before.
8. Bring the other foot down next to the lead foot. You are in the same
place as when you started the move.
Helicopter – is basically two hop turns that take you over the bench and back,
turning in a complete circle as you go.
1. Step up on the bench with your lead foot and immediately begin to
turn as you lift your knee.
2. Spin on your lead foot, as your other knee raises over the bench.
3. Step down on the far side with your other foot.
4. Step down on the far side with your lead foot.
(Note: Counts 5-8 are the same as 1-4 but on the other side)
5. Step up on the bench with your lead foot.
6. Spin on your lead foot, as your other knee raises over the bench.
7. Step down with your other foot.
8. Step down with your lead foot.
slightly.
Level 4: Putting together combinations on their own with smooth transitions.
Assessment as needed through observation.
Kickboxing
Level 2:
Boxer’s stance
1. Feet shoulder width apart(12 o’clock)
2. One foot is turned to an outward angle no greater than 90 degrees.(3 or 9 o’clock)
3. The foot that remains in the forward facing position determines the lead leg.
4. Weight evenly distributed on both feet emphasis forward on balls of the feet.
5. Arms close to the sides and slightly infront of the body. Elbows pointing down with
forearms almost parallel to each other and hands facing each other at chin level.
6. Making a fist by placing with thumb on the outside knuckles on the index and middle
fingers. Keep knuckles in line with the bones of the forearm.
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Jab
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Begin in boxer stance
Extend the lead arm forward in a straight line at shoulder level.
Keep elbow close to body snapping forward at the elbow without locking the joint.
Rotate the fist forward.
To deliver an effective punch, shift the lead leg forward as the jab is thrown.
Reverse motion to return to the boxer stance
Cross
1. Begin in boxer stance
2. Pivot rear foot as the rear shoulder and hip rotate forward
3. Keep elbow close to the body
4. Shift the weight forward and extend the rear arm forward in a straight line at shoulder
level
5. Snap forward at the elbow without locking the joint
6. Rotate the fist inward
7. Reverse motion to return to the boxer stance
Hook
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Begin in boxer stance
Keep elbows close to the body
Lift lead elbow up and out to the side with the upper arm parallel to the floor
Fist may face in toward the body or down toward the floor
Maintain the bent arm moving the arm horizontally across the face while pivoting on
the lead foot.
6. Shift body weight forward as the rear shoulder and hip rotate to the opposite side.
7. Reverse motion to return to the boxer stance
Uppercut
1. Begin in boxer stance
2. Keep elbows close to the body
3. Slightly bend the knee of the lead leg
4. Pivot on the ball of the lead foot while straightening the leg
Pushing the hips forward and shifting weight to the opposite foot
5. Lower the lead fist to waist level and rotate upward ending by the forehead
6. Maintain a bent arm position as the lead arm travels close to the body
7. Return to the boxer stance after the uppercut is thrown
Front kick
1. Begin in boxer stance
2. Fist up by chin, elbows in
3. Shift the weight to the rear foot
4. Raise the lead knee forward and up
5. Extend the lead leg forward from the knee one-half to two-thirds of its reach
6. Recoil the kick
7. Return to the boxer stance
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Side kick
1. Begin in boxer stance
2. Fist up by chin, elbows in
3. Slightly turn the lead shoulder and chest to the opposite side
4. Shift the body weight to the opposite leg
5. Chamber the lead knee across the body and extend with a firm, solid leg.
6. Strike from the heel with the toes curled and pointed in the opposite direction.
7. Recoil the knee across the body
8. Return the foot to the boxer stance
Level 3:
Flutter or speed jabs
1. Begin in boxer stance
2. Fists up by chin, elbows in
3. Extend the lead arm forward in a straight line at shoulder level.
4. Keep elbow close to body snapping forward at the elbow without locking the joint.
5. Rotate the fist forward.
6. To deliver an effective punch, shift the lead leg forward as the jab is thrown.
7. Reverse motion to return to the boxer stance
8. Switch to other arm and repeat steps 3-7
9. Move from right to left arm continuously at a fast pace
Roundhouse
1. Begin in boxer stance
2. Fists up by chin, elbows in
3. Pivot rear foot as far backward as possible while raising the lead knee
4. Keep the lead foot near the hip
5. Quickly snap the foot forward then retract to boxer stance
Level 4: Putting together combinations on their own with smooth transitions.
Assessment as needed through observation
Dance/Hi Low
Level 2:
Grapevine
1. Step to the side with the lead foot.
2. Bring the other foot slightly behind and past the lead foot.
3. Step to the side with the lead foot.
4. Bring the other foot next to the lead foot.
Step touch
1. Step to the side with the lead foot (right)
2. Bring other foot next to the lead foot and tap (left)
3. Step to the side with (left)
4. Bring other foot next to the lead foot and tap (right)
5. Repeat move
Box step
1. Step forward gracefully with your left foot.
2. Quickly step forward and to the right with your right foot. The motion should look
like an upside-down letter L.
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3.
4.
5.
6.
Shift your weight to your right foot. Keep your left foot stationary.
Slide your left foot quickly over to your right and stand with your feet together.
Step slowly back with your right foot.
Quickly step back and to the left with your left foot, this time tracing a backward L.
Shift your weight to your left foot.
7. Quickly slide your right foot toward your left and bring your feet together.
8. Repeat.
Level 3:
Mambo cha –cha- cha
1. Step forward slightly with your lead foot as you shift your weight forward.
2. Shift your weight backwards onto your other foot. Use your hips.
3. Start the cha-cha-cha portion down with your lead foot, and then very quickly… and
step back onto your other foot. This is done on the half count between three and four,
known as the “and” count.
4. Step back on your lead foot to end the cha-cha-cha
Step ball change
1. Place your lead foot about 6 inches in front of your other foot.
2. Take a step with your other foot.
3. Take a step with your lead foot.
4. Take a small step with your other foot (keep this in mind: front back front. Step back
with your lead foot, then once again step forward with your other foot. Make sure you
are standing straight up.
Charleston
1. Step forward with the lead foot.
2. Step forward with the other foot. You can raise your knee, kick, or just tap.
3. Step back with the other foot.
4. Step backwards and lunge back with the lead foot.
Pony
1. Jump to the right, landing on your right foot with your left foot suspended above the
floor, next to your right ankle.
2. Put your left foot down on the toes only. Lift your right foot off the floor to ankle
height.
3. Step back down with your right foot and again lift your left foot to ankle height above
the floor.
4. Jump to your left and put your left foot down while bringing your right foot above the
ground to ankle height.
5. Put your right foot down on the toes only, lifting your left foot until it is ankle height
above the foot.
6. Step back down with your left foot and again lift your right to ankle height above the
floor.
7. Move your arms up when you are “ponying” right, and down when “ponying” left.
Level 4: Putting together combinations on their own with smooth transitions.
Assessment as needed through observation.
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Pilates
Level 2:
The hundred1. Lie on back with knees bent with feet flat on mat, knees float up when belly is able to
support them
2. Lift head, looking toward thighs, inhale
3. Exhale as you round forward from the upper abdominals
4. Shoulders stay heavy; reach from posterior shoulder to fingers
5. Pump arms 6-8 inches as if to fan a fire
6. Continuous inhale, 2, 3, 4, 5, followed by continuous exhale, 2, 3, 4, 5.
7. Work up to 10 sets
Single leg stretch1. Left hip and knee flexed
2. Right hand on left knee, left hand to left ankle or shin
3. Right leg begins by reaching to the ceiling or if abdominals are stable, the right leg
can begin in a position closer to the floor
4. Inhale as right hip and knee flex and left leg straightens; left hand goes to right knee,
right hand to right shin
5. Exhale as legs trade positions (right leg long, left leg flexed)
6. Repeat through 5-10 breath cycles
The Roll-up1. Lie on back, knees bent, feet on the floor or legs out long
2. Raise arms to ceiling, shoulders stay heavy
3. Left head, look between arms
4. Inhale, then exhale as you curl upper abdominals, peeling spine off floor to round
forward
5. Long inhale there, following by exhale as belly reaches back and spine rolls back
down to the mat bone by bone
The Saw
1. Sit tall, legs shoulder width apart, heels pressing gently into floor to keep front of
thighs quiet
2. Shoulders over hips
3. Crown of head reaches to ceiling
4. Inhale, rotating spine to the left. Bottom stays anchored
5. Exhale as belly scoops to reach right pinky finger to left pinky toe, left arm reaching
back in opposition
6. Inhale, growing tall, keeping the inhale as you rotate to the right
7. Exhale, keeping bottom anchored to floor, reaching left pinky finger to right pinky
toe, right arm back in opposition, palm up
Level 3:
The Scissors
1. Lie on back
2. Legs in open scissors position (right leg closer to head and left down towards floor)
3. Inhale as right thigh pulses toward chest while left leg reaches away in opposition for
two counts, bottom stays heavy
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4. Exhale as legs switch positions for two counts
The Rolling Like a Ball
1. Sitting down, knees bent, feet hovering above the floor, inner thighs engaged
2. Belly scooped
3. Shoulders down, hands behind thighs
4. Neck gently flexed with eyes looking at thighs
5. Inhale; exhale to scoop belly deeper, lifting feet 1 inch off floor
6. Balance to provide deeper abdominal activation
7. Press thighs into hands to activate back of thighs
8. Maintain this thigh-push and head position as you inhale rolling back and exhale
rolling up
The Corkscrew
1. Lie on back
2. Legs up toward ceiling
3. Trace a circle on the ceiling keeping your inner thighs together
4. Inhale as both legs circle counterclockwise
5. Exhale as legs pass halfway point on their way back to the starting position
6. Inhale, reverse leg circle, Exhale as legs pass halfway point on the return to the
starting position
Level 4: Putting together combinations on their own with smooth transitions.
Assessment as needed through observation
Core training
Stability balls
Level 2:
Pushups
1. Lie prone on ball and roll out with ball by thighs, knees, or ankles
2. Place your hands flat on the floor
3. Lower upper body towards the floor in a pushup position
4. Return to starting position
Crunches
1. Lie on ball with ball placed at the lower portion of your back
2. Feet flat on the floor
3. Curl up into a crunch position and return
Ball squats
1. Place the exercise ball against a stable wall and stand with your back against it.
2. Ball should be at the lower back height
3. Feet shoulder width apart
4. Back straight
5. Squat down rolling the ball down the wall to move into squat position.
6. Knees should be 90 degrees, glutes roll under ball slightly
7. Make sure knees stay in line with toes, not in front
8. Roll ball back up as you return to starting position
Swimming
1. Lie prone on ball, legs straight.
2. Extend one arm-palm facing down-overhead, keeping your neck long.
3. Switch arms, extend through fingers keeping your shoulders down the whole time.
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Level 3:
Side Bend with Straight Leg Lift
1. Begin on 2 knees, hug ball into one hip moving your ribcage over the ball.
2. Lean sideways over the ball with your hands behind your head.
3. Straighten leg away from the ball and lift up to hip height.
4. Lower leg back to floor.
Pelvic Lifts
1. Lie on your back on the floor.
2. Place feet on the ball with knees bent.
3. Lift hips off of the ground using hamstrings and butt.
5. Lower hips to the ground.
Supine Alternate Straight Leg Lifts
1. Lie on your back on the floor.
2. Place feet on the ball and lift hips until your weight on your shoulder blades.
3. Raise one leg until it comes to a right angle with your hips.
4. Lower leg back to the ball and switch legs.
5. To simplify keep both knees bent
Inner Thigh Twists
1. Lie on your back on the floor.
2. Place ball in between feet.
3. Using inner thighs begin twisting legs back and forth.
4. Slowly repeat gradually twisting deeper each time.
Level 4:
Pike push-up
1. Begin with the ball under your belly and hands on the floor in a push-up position
2. Walk your hands forward so the ball begins to roll toward your feet
3. Toward the end of the walking, begin to contract your abdominals and flex at your
hips.
4. You will look like an inverted L. Holding this position begin movement
5. Flex at the elbows to slowly lower yourself to the point where your head is almost
touching the floor
6. Press yourself back up to the starting position and repeat
Prone Twist
1. Begin with the ball under your abdomen and hands on the floor in a push-up position
2. Walk your hands forward so the ball begins to roll toward your feet
3. Widen your feet over the ball, and squeeze
4. Shoulders and core must be firing before you initiate movement
5. Laterally roll the ball to one side by rotating your hips
6. Hold end range for a second, then return and rotate to the opposite side.
Push-up position Hip Opener
1. Place both hands on top of the stability ball
2. Feet on the floor in a push-up position
3. Keep abdominals engaged and your low back is flat
4. While holding the push-up position flex your right hip forward until you reach a 90
degree angle of flexion at the hip and knee
5. Adduct your knee across your body
6. Return to the starting position with the hip flexed, and repeat
200
Medicine balls
Level 2:
Chest Pass
1. Stand with feet shoulders width apart, knees slightly bent
2. Place medicine ball between the palms of your hand up by chest
3. Extend your arms out releasing the ball at chest level towards wall or partner
4. Receive the pass with a strong core and legs, catching the ball
Overhead Pass
1. Stand with feet shoulders width apart, knees slightly bent
2. Place medicine ball between your hands above your head
3. Bend forearms back behind head and extend above head and release ball towards wall
or partner.
4. Receive the pass with a strong core and legs, catching the ball
V-sit and rotate
1. Sit on floor leaning back one-third of the way into a sit-up.
2. Feet remain on the floor with knees bent
3. Hold medicine ball out in front of your body
4. Rotate to the left and touch the ball to the floor.
5. Return ball to the middle
6. Rotate ball to the left touching the ball to the floor
7. Return ball to the middle
Level 3:
Lateral squat with ball push
1. Stand with feet at shoulder width.
2. Hold medicine ball with two hands in front of the body.
3. Step out to the left and lower into a lateral squat position, shifting body weight over
the left leg.
4. As you lower the left leg, push the medicine ball out away from your chest until arms
are fully extended.
5. Hold this position for two seconds
6. Push off the left leg to move back into neutral stance and pull the ball back in toward
your chest.
7. Repeat to the right
Overhead bounce to floor
1. Stand with your feet shoulder width apart, raise the ball overhead
2. Set your core and prepare to drive the ball downward
3. As you drive the ball down you want to hit a midpoint on the floor between your feet
4. The ball will bounce up so you can catch it and take your hands up above your head
again.
One handed pushup on ball
1. Place medicine ball on the floor below your right shoulder
2. Get into prone position with right hand on the ball and left hand on the floor
3. Feet extended out into a push-up position
4. Set abdominals to maintain a strong trunk
5. Flex the elbows and lower under control moving the chest toward the floor
201
6. Hold for 2 seconds and extend the arms to push the body back up in a push-up
position
7. Repeat on the left side
Level 4
Medicine ball pushups
1. Place a medicine ball in front of you
2. Get into prone position with the hands on the ball in a push-up position
3. Set abdominals to maintain a strong trunk
4. Hands are at 3 o’clock and 9 o’clock on the ball
5. Flex the elbows and lower under control moving the chest toward the top of the ball
6. Hold and balance before extending the arms to push the body back up in a push-up
position
V-sit Medicine Ball Transfer
1. Lie on your back with arms fully extended over your head holding a medicine ball
2. Begin by engaging your core and flexing at the waist. Your legs and arms will rise at
the same time
3. Flex forward until you can transfer the medicine ball from your hands to your feet
4. Once you transferred the ball to your feet, lower back to the starting position and
repeat
Sample Presentation Grading
Standard 1 (Skills)
__ /5
Rhythm, Individual movement technique, Proper movement progression, Accurate counts, Smooth
transitions, and Creativity)
Standard 2 (Concepts) __ /5
(Concepts, Terminology, Written description of presentation, Proper muscle identification)
Standard 3 (Participation) __ /5
Overall performance, attendance, Voice level, and Partner contribution)
Standard 5 (Behavior) __ /5
(Demeanor, Self Control, Enthusiasm)
Core training
1. Stability balls
1. basic crunch
2. push-ups
3. jack knife
2. Medicine balls
1. partner toss (chest pass, overhead pass, side rotation pass, running toss)
2. squats
3. lunges
4. push-ups
5. crunches
3. Resistance bands * see body sculpting for exercises
202
4. Abdominal activities
1. Basic crunches
2. Oblique crunches
3. Reverse crunches
4. Double crunches
5. Plank
6. Side plank
4. Pilates (see designated pilates section)
5. Balance trainers (Bosu Balls)
1. Balance standing
2. Balance standing on one foot
3. Squat one foot on, one foot off
4. Squat both feet on
5. Lunges, lead foot on trainer
6. Crunches
7. Push-ups
8. Super-man
203
Sample Aerobics – SBG Cognitive Assessment
Directions: Multiple Choice. Choose the best answer to the following questions.
(Level 3)
1. Your target heart rate zone is between ________% and _______% of your maximum heart rate. a. 40 & 60 c. 60 & 80 b. 80 & 100 d. 70 & 90 2. _________ ________ developed aerobic dance in 1969. a. Jackie Moran
c. Jackie Sorenson
b. Jamie Samson
d. Julie Stipler
3. Sprinting is an example of _________ exercise.
a. Anaerobic
c. Aerobic
b. both Anaerobic and Aerobic d. none of the above
4. Volleyball is an example of ________ exercise. a. Anaerobic
c. Aerobic
b. both anaerobic and aerobic d. none of the above
5. Jogging is an example of ___________ exercise.
a. Anaerobic
c. Aerobic
b. flexibility
d. all of the above
6. RHR stands for what?
a. Regular health run
c. right heart rate
b. resting heart rate
d. none of the above
7. Aerobic exercise should be done ___ to ____ times a week.
a. 2 to 3
c. 0 to 3
b. 3 to 5
d. 1 to 2
8. To calculate my Maximum Heart Rate, I must take 220
a. minus my age
c. plus my age
b. minus my weight
d. minus my height
9. To take your pulse, you must count the number of beats you feel for _____
seconds then add a zero to the number.
a. 10
c. 5
b. 6
d. 60
10. THR stands for what?
a. Target Heart Rate c. Timed Health Run b. Timed Heart Rate d. Target Health Rate 204
11. Today Aerobic dance can be done at
a. the gym
c. at home
b. in school
d. all of the above
12. Aerobics done where at least one foot is on the floor at all times is called a. bench step aerobics
c. water aerobics
b. low impact aerobics
d. cycling
13. Aerobics done with a bench step in the routine is called
a. bench step aerobics
c. water aerobics
b. low impact aerobics
d. cycling
14. Ideally you want to take your resting heart rate
a. before working out
c. in bed in the morning
b. before you eat
d. after resting for 5 minutes
True or False (Level 3) Write the word
15. Aerobic exercise is performed at an intensity so great that the body’s demand for oxygen exceeds its ability to supply it. 16. Your heart will get stronger and work more efficiently if you do some type of cardiovascular activity on a regular basis. 17. Cardiovascular activities can cause undue stress on a person.
18. Toning and Pilates done in aerobics will help a person develop their core
muscles.
19. A person is sore after working out due to the amount of lactic acid built up in
the muscles.
20. Ideally a person wants to take their resting heart rate after working out for 30
minutes.
21. Active recovery is when you move at a slow rate after working out to help
your heart rate return to normal and remove lactic acid in your muscles.
22. A person only needs to work out one day a week to become physically fit.
23. Sprinting, weight lifting, and slow walking are an example of anaerobic
exercise.
24. Static stretching could cause damage to muscles and tendons when used after
a warm-up.
25. Your Target Heart Rate Zone is where a person’s heart rate should be during a
workout to receive full benefit from the activity.
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Fill in questions 26-35 (Level 3)
26. ________________ is the substance that causes muscle fatigue and soreness. 27. _________________ is bouncing movements that can cause damage to the muscles and tendons. 28. __________________ is when you move at a slower rate after a vigorous exercise. 29. __________________ exercise is exercise that does not require oxygen. 30. __________________ is the number of times your heart should beat in one minute to achieve aerobic benefits. 31. __________________ is aerobics done when at least half of your body is submerged under water. 32. __________________ stretching is when a muscle is stretched slowly and held for 10‐30 seconds. 33. __________________ exercise that requires oxygen. 34. __________________ is aerobics that is done continuously at a variety of speeds and tensions. 35. __________________ is the number of times your heart beats while at rest. Essay (Level 4) Explain your answers in detail.
36. What 3 alternative exercises would you recommend to someone who wants to improve their cardiovascular endurance but cannot run due to poor knees? 37. How would you explain why your heart beats faster when you exercise? 206
Sample Aerobics Quiz
Name_______________
Date____________
True/False: (1 point Level 3)
____1. To avoid participants becoming chilled, aerobic dance facilities should be kept at temperatures about 70
degrees Fahrenheit.
____2. Aerobic dance activities should be performed at an intensity of 60% to 75% of one’s heart rate reserve.
____3. In a typical aerobic dance routine strength exercises are done prior to the main aerobic activity.
____4. High impact aerobics are less effective than high impact aerobics for already well conditioned
individuals.
____5. Low impact aerobics are less effective than high impact aerobics for already conditioned individuals.
____6. Directional, numerical, rhythmical and footwork are all forms of cuing.
____7. Warm-up and cool-down should be done to music having between 130-144 beats per minute.
____8. Instructors should rarely use music with more than 160 beats per minute.
____9. Teachers in the public schools generally are exempt from having to obtain copyright permission to use
music for aerobic dance classes due to the “fair use” doctrine.
____10. Keeping the arms at or above shoulder level for extended periods of time can help reduce blood
pressure.
Multiple Choice: (1 point Level 2)
____1. Which of the following is an aerobic activity?
a. weight training
b. basketball
c. swimming
d. water
____2. To attain maximum benefits from exercise, it is essential that a regular progressive program be planned
to meet the specific needs of___________.
a. the class
b. the team
c. the age group
d. the individual
____3. Mode refers to ____________.
a. method of determining the heart rate
b. duration of activity
c. intensity
d. type of activity
207
____4. The key to determining intensity in most aerobic conditioning programs is the ____________.
a. heart rate
b. time to exhaustion
c. cardiac output
d. aerobic power
____5. A pulse count of 21 was obtained in a 10-second period. The heart rate is ________.
a. 66
b. 106
c. 126
d. 42
____6. The most difficult factor to determine in aerobic exercise program is probably.
a. mode
b. frequency
c. duration
d. intensity
____7. The ability of the body to utilize adequate oxygen over extended periods of aerobic work is termed.
a. muscular endurance
b. cardiovascular endurance
c. skeletal endurance
d. aeration
____8. What should students know about frequency of exercise to improve fitness?
a. exercise at least 3 times a week
b. exercise at least 5 times a week
c. exercise at least 10 minutes daily
d. exercise vigorously
____9. Which of the following target zones expressed as a percentage of maximum heart rate would be
appropriate for a moderately active beginner?
a. 70-85%
b. 50-75%
c. 85-95%
d. 60-70%
____10. Gradually increasing the intensity, frequency or duration of activity as the student or individual
becomes fitter is an example of
a. physical fitness
b. compensation
c. regression
d. progression
Short Answer: (5 points, Level 3)
1. What are the five components of an aerobic dance class and approximately how long should each one last?
208
Sample Aerobics Quiz (2)
True/False – Please write the word true or false on your paper. (Level 2)
1. Aerobic activity is a vigorous exercise that is used to produce a training effect on the body.
2. Cool down is a period after strenuous exercise in which the body activity is gradually lessened through
slow movements and/or stretching bringing the heart rate down.
3. Tae-bo is a low impact, light movement activity that does not require much movement.
4. Performing a skill correctly for a fewer amount of reps is better than performing a skill many times
incorrectly.
5. When doing any type of physical activity a person should jump right into movement without a proper
warm-up and stretch.
6. According to the National Cancer Institute, antioxidants contained in Vitamins C and E, also found in
products like Green Tea, can actually help protect cells and fight to prevent cancer.
7. Consuming Gatorade as a substitute for pop/soda in the lives of inactive youth is actually a healthy
choice.
8. As long as the media says that something is healthy and good for you, it automatically means it is.
9. Jumping on the diet band wagon and trying the new fad will work for everyone, as long as they follow
the diet exactly and do not change anything about the rest of their habits.
10. Red Bull contains a very high amount of caffeine and can be compared to twice the amount in 12-ounce
can of Pepsi.
Multiple Choice – Please write the letter of the corresponding answer on your paper. (Level 2)
11. What are two benefits of stretching?
a.
increase injury and prevent flexibility
b.
increase flexibility and prevent injury
c.
increase strength and decrease flexibility
d.
increase injury and increase strength
12. Your core consists of muscles in your_________.
a.
hamstring and quad
b.
bicep and tricep
c.
abdomen and lower back
d.
gluteus maximus and calve
13. We should exercise as least_______.
a.
5 minutes a day
b.
2 times a week
c.
1 hour a day
d.
30 minutes a day
14. Exercise should stop when you________.
a.
graduate high school
b.
turn 30
c.
stop living
d.
retire
15. Finding the right exercise program will benefit you because___________________.
a.
you will live a healthy lifestyle
b.
then you won’t have to exercise again
c.
you will immediately have the body you desire
d.
you can eat whatever you want, whenever you want
209
Weight Training
Materials
210
Weight Training and Conditioning Course Description
th
*This course is offered to 10-12 grade students. Beginning and advanced will be
offered to students. This course is designed for students to learn proper lifting
techniques, spotting methods, weight room safety and workout routines. Activities
will include, but are not limited to, a multitude of lifts utilizing free weights and
machine weights. As well as, an emphasis on conditioning and fitness. District
mandated fitnessgram will be administered in pre- and post- test form.
Weight Training and Conditioning Course Outcomes
01
02
03
04
05
06
Demonstrates the ability to safely spot, lift correctly and use a
variety of training methods.
Develops an appropriate conditioning program.
Demonstrates effective time management skills that allow opportunities for
physical activity to be created or found during a busy day.
Assesses and maintains appropriate levels of physical fitness in terms of:
cardiorespiratory endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility
and body composition necessary for a healthy and productive life.
Recognizes and applies proper safety in the weight room.
Identifies reasons to participate in physical activity (e.g. health, enjoyment,
challenge, self-expression, and social interaction).
Weight Training and Conditioning Potential Units of Study
Agility
BFS
Circuit
Cones
Core Work
Design your own
Endurance
Free Weights
Jump Ropes
Ladders
Lower Body Specific Lifts
Medicine Balls
Plyometrics
Power (Olympic lifts)
Resistance bands
Lifting with Stability Balls
Strength
Toning
Upper Body Specific Lifts
211
High School Weight Training – Proficiency Scale
Standards
Standard 1
Standard 2
Standard 3
Standard 4
Standard
Requirements
4
3
2
1
0
Advanced
Proficient
Basic
Below Basic
Failing
Demonstrates
competency in
motor
skills and
movement
patterns needed to
perform a variety of
physical activities.
Student can perform
all lifts with proper
technique without
prompting. Student
has proper spotting
technique and
ensures the lifters
safety.
Student can perform
lifts with proper
technique and
minimal prompting.
Spotting is good,
keeping lifter safety
a priority.
Student has
thorough
understanding of
concepts for a
variety of training
methods and
vocabulary that
apply to improving
strength and fitness.
Student has some
understanding of
concepts and
vocabulary. Student
has difficulty
applying them to a
variety of training
methods.
Demonstrates
understanding of
movement
concepts,
principles,
strategies,
and tactics as they
apply
to the learning and
performance of
physical
activities.
Participates
regularly in
physical activity.
Achieves and
maintains a
health enhancing
level of
physical fitness.
Student is prepared
and participates in all
activities and
makes an effort to
improve their skills
and abilities. Student
also
helps others improve
their skill or ability.
Student
demonstrates an
understanding of
healthy living
concepts. Student
creates a fitness
plan which
significantly
improves their level
of fitness.
Student performs
lifts but needs
prompting on
technique.
Spotting is good
with lifter safety a
priority.
Student has
minimal
understanding of
concepts or
vocabulary.
Student
understands the
need for a variety
of training methods
but does not apply
them to their
routine.
Student has poor
technique and
student needs
prompting. Lifter
safety is of little
concern.
Attempted
and failed.
Student has
minimal
understanding of
concepts and
vocabulary.
Student does not
value a variety of
training methods.
Attempted
and failed.
Student is prepared
and participates in
all activities and
makes an effort to
improve their skills
and abilities.
Student
participates in all
activities, but
makes minimal
effort to improve.
Minimal
achievement with
assistance from
someone else.
Attempted
and failed.
Student understands
healthy living
concepts. Student
can create a plan to
maintain their
current level
of fitness.
Student has a
basic
understanding of
healthy living
concepts. Student
struggles to
maintain current
fitness levels.
Minimal
achievement with
assistance from
someone else.
Attempted
and failed.
212
Weight Training Standard 1- Technique Checklist
Squat/Box Squat
___
Feet Position (Toes slightly pointed outwards, just outside the armpits)
___
Eyes looking up, Chest out
___
Depth (Crease of hip is even with knee)
___
Feet Position (Toes slightly pointed outwards, just outside the armpits)
___
Eyes looking up, Chest out
___
Depth (Crease of hip is even with knee)
___
Push off flat foot
___
Back spotter is present and assisting lifter when needed
Bench/Incline
___
Feet flat on floor throughout entire lift
___
Even firm grip on bar
___
Head, shoulders, and hips flat on bench
___
Full range of motion (bar touches chest, elbows lock out)
___
Breathing (Inhale on the way down, Exhale on the way up)
___
Spotter is present and assisting lifter when needed
Deadlift
___
Feet position (sumo – wide, toes slightly outward / regular – toes straight, feet under armpits)
___
Eyes looking up, chest out
___
Even alternating grip on bar
___
Hips under upper body
___
Push off of flat foot
___
Spotter present and assisting lifter when needed
213
Hang Clean
___
Feet position (toes straight, feet under armpits)
___
Triple joint flexion / extension (ankle, knee, hip)
___
Bar gets chest high
___
Front squat to catch bar
___
Elbows under bar when standing up
___
Spotter present and assisting lifter when needed
Leg Extension
___
Sit upright on seat with legs hanging over the end at a right angle
___
Place top of foot under padded rollers
___
Support upper body by gripping side handles
___
Full range of motion (Extend leg straight, Flex leg back to right angle)
Lunge
___
Start with feet parallel
___
Take a large step forward
___
Back knee touches floor in a 90 degrees angle
___
Push back with the leg stepped forward with
___
Alternating legs
___
Back straight
Biceps Curl
___
Underhand grip at shoulder width
___
Back and legs straight
___
Elbows and upper arms in contact with sides
___
Full range of motion (start with arms fully extended, flex arms curling the bar toward upper chest)
214
Triceps Extension
___
Face machine, stand with back straight, and feet shoulder width apart
___
Narrow overhand grip on the bar (approx. 6 inches)
___
Pull bar to chest until the elbows point straight down
___
Keep upper arms and elbows tight to torso
___
Press bar down until arms are fully extended
___
Control bar slowly back to starting position
Up Right Row
___
Narrow overhand grip (approx. 6 inches)
___
Stand with back straight and feet shoulder width apart
___
Pull bar to chin
___
Keep bar close to body
___
Control bar slowly back to starting position
Low Row
___
Feet on foot pads, extending legs completely and avoid “locking” the knees
___
Straight grip on the bar
___
Back straight and not moving
___
Pull bar to chest
___
Control bar slowly back to starting position
215
Weight Training Final Exam – SBG Sample
Name ____________________________________
Period ___________
Multiple Choice (Level 2)
1.
When your workout consists of sets of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 it is called? ___________
a. Isometric
b. Endurance Training
c. Pyramid
d. Burnouts
2.
The reason for executing the Hang Clean is? ___________
a. Triple Joint Extension
b. Triple Joint Flexion
c. Triple Jump
d. Coach says so
3.
Muscles grow during the ____________ period.
a. Workout
b. Refueling
c. Recovery
d. Water
4.
____________ is the primary nutrient for muscle growth.
a. Carbohydrates
b. Fats
c. Water
d. Protein
5.
The two muscle movements are flexion and _________________.
a. rotation
b. extension
c. fusion
d. contusion
6.
What is it when you put four 5 pound plates on each side of the bar and you do five reps then take a plate off, do five
reps then take one off, etc. it is called? ______
a. Strength Training
b. Isotonic
c. Pyramid
d. Burnouts
_______ is an example of a quality protein.
a. Bread
b. Snickers Bar
c. Corn
d. Eggs
7.
Vocabulary Matching (2)
8. Repetition _____
A. To zero in on a specific muscle
9 . Set _____
B. a clamp that secures the weight on the bar
10. Full Range of Motion____
C. The heaviest weight a lifter can lift on a lift
11. Clamps _____
D. The assistants who stand by to help the lifter in the event of an unsuccessful attempt
12. Core Exercises _____
E. Several repetitions performed one after another with no break between them
13. Isolate _____
F. Help given by a spotter to unrack the bar
216
14. Lift-off _____
G. The act of lifting and lowering a weight once in a controlled manner
15. Max _____
H. Exercises that work the main muscle groups and serve as a base for all strength –
training programs
16. Spotters _____
I. The greatest range of movement a muscle or body part can achieve
Write the primary muscle worked for each exercise (Level3)
17. Skull Crusher _________________________
18. Bench Press ___________________________
19. Curls ___________________________________
20. Leg Curls _______________________________
21. Dips ______________________
22. Leg Press ___________________________
23. Straight Leg Dead Lift ___________________________
24. Calf Raises _____________________________
Short Answer (3)
25. Describe the execution of the squat? Include all key points associated to this lift.
26. __________________ ________________ causes soreness in the muscles after a workout.
Essay (Level 4)
27. Develop a five day workout routine you would use at your local gym.
217
Sample Weight Training Quiz
Name___________________________
1. What does F.I.T.T. stand for? (10pts)
FITT2. Label each of the following with a F, I, Time, or Type. (2pts each)
_____Running a longer distance
_____Increasing the number of repetitions
_____Participate in kick-boxing
_____Stretching more often
_____Bench press instead of doing push ups
3. Match the type of exercise with the definition. (3pts each)
_____Isometric
_____Isotonic
A. Apply force on yourself
B. Hold for a set amount of time
_____Isokinetic
C. Use a machine or free weights
4. Define muscular endurance and fill in the blanks. (20pts)
Muscular endurance is________________________________________
______ to ______ % of maximum
______ to ______ repetitions per set
______ to ______ sets
218
5. Define muscular strength and fill in the blanks. (20 pts)
Muscular strength is _____________________________________
______ to ______ % of maximum
______ to ______ repetitions per set
______ to ______ sets
6. Define specificity. (6pts)
7. Match the exercise to the muscle being used. (10 pts)
_____ Biceps
A. Lat Pull Downs
_____ Triceps
B. Bench Press
_____ Pectoralis Major
C. Bicep Curls
_____ Latissimus Dorsi
D. Shoulder Press
_____ Deltoid
E. Tricep Extension
8. Define Progression. (5pts)
9. Create and example for applying progression to your own work out. Be sure to have a goal, use a time span
of at least 4 weeks, re-establish goals, etc… (10 pts)
219
General PE
Materials
220
General Physical Education Course Description
*This course is for true freshmen only and is the only physical education
option available for freshmen. Students will learn various fundamentals
and rules of a variety of lifestyle sports, team sports, weight training and
aerobic activities. Aquatics will be offered where available. District mandated
fitness-gram will be administered in pre- and post- test form.
General Physical Education Course Outcomes
01 Demonstrates a variety of skills and techniques.
02 Demonstrates complex movement concepts and principles to refine skills and
apply them to learning new skills.
03 Demonstrates the ability to monitor and adjust activity to meet personal
physical activity needs.
04 Assesses and maintains appropriate levels of physical fitness in terms of:
cardio-respiratory endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility and
body composition necessary for a healthy and productive life.
05 Shows leadership by diffusing conflict during competition.
06 Identifies reasons to participate in physical activity (e.g. health, enjoyment,
challenge, self-expression, and social interaction).
General Physical Education Potential Units of Study
Weight Training
Team Sports
Lifetime Sports
Aerobics
Aquatics
221
General Physical Education- Proficiency Rubric
Standards
Standard 1
Standard 2
Standard 3
Standard 4
4
3
2
1
0
Advanced
Proficient
Basic
Below Basic
Failing
Demonstrates
competency in motor
skills and movement
patterns needed to
perform a variety of
physical activities
Student can perform
the basic skills and
most of the more
advanced skills
without assistance in
a game or
competitive setting.
Student can
perform the basic
skills and
some of the more
advanced skills
without assistance
in isolation or in a
practice setting.
Student can
perform some of
the basic
skills without
assistance in
isolation or in
a practice
setting
Minimal
achievement
with
assistance
from someone
else
Attempted
and failed
Demonstrates
understanding of
movement concepts,
principles, strategies,
and tactics as they
apply
to the learning and
performance of
physical
activities
Student has thorough
understanding of
basic
concepts, vocabulary
and strategies,
and can apply them
in game or
competitive situations
Student has
minimal
understanding of
basic
concepts,
vocabulary and
strategies and
can apply them in
practice situations
but has difficulty
applying them in
game
or competitive
situations
Student has a
minimal
understanding of
basic concepts,
vocabulary and
strategies but
has difficulty
applying
them in practice
situations
Minimal
achievement
with
assistance
from someone
else
Attempted
and failed
Participates regularly
in
physical activity
Student participates
in all activities and
makes an effort to
improve their skills
and abilities in all
activities. Student
also
helps others improve
their skill or ability.
Student
participates in all
activities and
makes an effort to
improve their skills
and abilities in all
activities
Student
participates in all
activities but
only makes
effort to improve
in some
but not all
activities
Minimal
achievement
with
assistance
from someone
else
Attempted
and failed
Achieves and
maintains a
health enhancing
level of
physical fitness
Student can create a
plan to maintain
or improve their
current level of fitness
and demonstrate
successful
implementation of the
plan.
Student can create
a plan to either
maintain or
improve their
current level
of fitness.
Student can
maintain fitness
level using
current methods,
but cannot
create and
implement a
plan
Minimal
achievement
with
assistance
from someone
else
Attempted
and failed
Standards
Requirements
222
Sample Physical Education Quiz
Each question is worth 5 pts.
Circle the correct answer or answer question in complete sentence.
1. OFF – SIDE is a term used in which of the following sports?
A. Tennis
B. Basketball
C.
Soccer
D. None of the above.
2. A HEADER is a shot which may occur in:
A. Floor hockey
B. Basketball C. Flag football D. Soccer
3. On what part of the body should the volleyball make contact in the
forearm pass?
A. Wrist B. knuckles of the thumbs C. inside surface of forearm
D. the fist.
4. How many hits does a team get to return the volleyball over the
net?
A. 1
B. 2 C. 3 D. 5
5. A team in volleyball must win by how many points?
A. 4
B. 2
C. 3 D. 1
6. In Soccer the only person allowed to use their hands to stop a goal
shot is?
A. Quarterback
B. Post
C. Anchor D. Goalie
7. Ability to last through an activity:
A. Strength
B. Flexibility C. Tone D. Endurance
8. Ability to bend easily:
A. Strength B. Flexibility C. Tone C. Endurance
223
9. Rate you want during aerobic activity:
A. Resting Heart Rate
Heart Rate
B. Target Heart Rate C. Maximum
D. Recovery Heart Rate.
10. Aerobics help to firm and tone muscles.
A. True
B. False
11. Aerobics helps to make for a more efficient cardiovascular
system.
A. True
B. False
12. For the lifters safety what two things should always be used?
A. Clamps and spotters
and clamps
B. weight belt and chalk C. gloves
D. none of the above.
13. Is the box squat considered a CORE or AUXILARY lift?
A. CORE
B. AUXILARY
14. You must touch the bar down to your chest every repetition of
of the bench press.
A. True
B. False
15. Which of the following lifts have we not done?
A. towel bench
B. squat
C. incline press D. dead lift
16. Explain the difference between sets and reps. After you
explain please show an example.
17. The playing surface in a bowling alley is called the:
A. Wood B. Alley C. Lane
D. Gutter
18. Another name for gutters is:
A. Holes
B. Channels
C. Catchers
224
D. Tracks
19. When scoring a spare you are allowed to add:
A. just the pins knocked down B. pins down plus the next two balls.
C. pins down plus the next ball. D. none of the above
20. When scoring a strike you are allowed to add:
A. just the pins knocked down
C. pins down plus the next ball
B. pins down plus the next two balls
D. none of the above
225
Fit Club
Materials
226
Fit Club Course Description
*This course is offered to 10-12th grade students with a teacher recommendation.
Students will learn about health and nutrition. Knowledge of lifetime wellness
and fitness will be covered and emphasized. Activities include but are not limited
to: walking, toning, fitness technology and orienteering. District mandated fitness
gram will be administered in pre- and post- test form.
Fit Club Course Outcomes
01 Demonstrates a variety of proper stretching techniques
02 Develops realistic short and long term personal fitness goals
03 Monitors physical activity through the use of a pedometer, heart rate monitor
and/or physical activity log.
04 Assesses and maintains appropriate levels of physical fitness in terms of:
cardio-respiratory endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility and
body composition necessary for a healthy and productive life.
05 Make enlightened personal choices for engaging in physical activity over the
life span, recognizing the influence of age, disability, gender, race, ethnicity,
socioeconomic status and culture.
06 Identifies reasons to participate in physical activity (e.g. health, enjoyment,
challenge, self-expression, and social interaction).
Fit Club Scope and Sequence
Physical Fitness
1. Demonstrates proper techniques of toning
2. Resistive exercises
3. Proper techniques of stretching and flexibility
4. Fitness components; cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength and muscular
endurance, flexibility, body compositions, FITT
5. Written test; knowledge, basic safety principles of physical fitness
Fit Club Potential Units of Study
Dance Dance Revolution
Goal Setting
Health
Low impact aerobics
Nutrition
Orienteering
Pedometers
Personal Training
Walking
Wii Fit
Wii Sports
227
High School Fit Club – Proficiency Scale
Standards
Standard
Requirements
4
3
2
1
0
Advanced
Proficient
Basic
Below Basic
Failing
Standard 1
Demonstrates
competency in motor
skills and movement
patterns needed to
perform a variety of
physical activities
Student can perform
the basic skills and
most of the more
advanced skills
without assistance in a
game or
competitive setting.
Student can perform the
basic skills and
some of the more
advanced skills
without assistance in
isolation or in a
practice setting.
Student can
Minimal
Attempted
perform some of achievement with and failed
the basic
assistance from
skills without
someone else
assistance in
isolation or in
a practice setting
Standard 2
Demonstrates
understanding of
movement concepts,
principles, strategies,
and tactics as they apply
to the learning and
performance of physical
activities
Student has thorough
understanding of basic
concepts, vocabulary
and strategies,
and can apply them in
game or
competitive situations
Student has minimal
understanding of basic
concepts, vocabulary
and strategies and
can apply them in
practice situations
but has difficulty
applying them in game
or competitive situations
Student has a
Minimal
Attempted
minimal
achievement with and failed
understanding of assistance from
basic concepts,
someone else
vocabulary and
strategies but
has difficulty
applying
them in practice
situations
Standard 3
Participates regularly in
physical activity
Student participates in
all activities and
makes an effort to
improve their skills
and abilities in all
activities. Student also
helps others improve
their skill or ability.
Student participates in
all activities and
makes an effort to
improve their skills
and abilities in all
activities
Student
Minimal
Attempted
participates in all achievement with and failed
activities but
assistance from
only makes effort
someone else
to improve in
some
but not all
activities
Student can create a
plan to either
maintain or improve their
current level
of fitness.
Student can
Minimal
Attempted
maintain fitness achievement with and failed
level using
assistance from
current methods,
someone else
but cannot create
and implement a
plan
Standard 4
Achieves and maintains a Student can create a
health enhancing level of plan to maintain
physical fitness
or improve their current
level of fitness
and demonstrate
successful
implementation of the
plan.
228
People of Reference and Contact Information
Peg Naylon
office phone: 557-2449
Bob Danenhauer
office phone: 557-2448
High School Curriculum Committee Members (August 2012):
Dennis Baker (Central)
Mary Buresh (Bryan)
Lisa Studer (Central)
Chad Townsend (Central)
229
Website Resources
prevention.com
FitWatch.com
personalhealthzone.com
ShapeupAmerica.com
pecentral.com
fitpro.com
toneteen.com
stretch.com
ivillage.com
turnstep.com
abc-of-yoga.com
doyoga.com
exrx.net
fitnessforlife.org
humankinetics.com
fitnessgram.net
pe4life.org
mypyramid.gov
acsm.org
americanonthemove.org
masterteacher.com
walk4life.com
sparqtraining.com
steptracker.com
uen.org
crossfit.com
crossfitomaha.com
230
Book Resources
Beighle, Aaron, Pangrazi, Robert P., Sidman, Cara L. (2007).
Pedometer Power: Using Pedometers in School and Community
(2nd ed.).
Casten, Carole (2006). Lesson Plans for Dynamic Physical
Education for Secondary Students (5th ed.)
Corbin, Charles B., Lindsey, Ruth (2007). Fitness for Life (5th ed.)
Corbin, Charles B., Dale, Darren, McConnell, Karen (2007).
Fitness for Life: Wraparound Teacher Edition and Resources
Kit (5th ed.)
Darst, Paul W., Pangrazi, Robert P.. Dynamic Physical Education
For Secondary Students (5th ed.)
McManama, Jerre, Schmottlach, Neil (2006). Physical Education
Activity Handbook (11th ed.).
Meredith, Marilu D., Welk, GregoryJ. (2007). Fitnessgram
Activitygram: Test Administration Manual (4th ed.)
National Association for Sport and Physical Education. (2004).
Moving into the Future: National Standards for physical
Education (2nd ed.). Reston, VA: Author
231
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