the Connector
HPE HTTP Connector
Software Version: 11.2
Administration Guide
Document Release Date: October 2016
Software Release Date: October 2016
Administration Guide
Legal Notices
Warranty
The only warranties for Hewlett Packard Enterprise Development LP products and services are set forth in
the express warranty statements accompanying such products and services. Nothing herein should be
construed as constituting an additional warranty. HPE shall not be liable for technical or editorial errors or
omissions contained herein.
The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
Restricted Rights Legend
Confidential computer software. Valid license from HPE required for possession, use or copying. Consistent
with FAR 12.211 and 12.212, Commercial Computer Software, Computer Software Documentation, and
Technical Data for Commercial Items are licensed to the U.S. Government under vendor's standard
commercial license.
Copyright Notice
© Copyright 2016 Hewlett Packard Enterprise Development LP
Trademark Notices
Adobe™ is a trademark of Adobe Systems Incorporated.
Microsoft® and Windows® are U.S. registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.
UNIX® is a registered trademark of The Open Group.
This product includes an interface of the 'zlib' general purpose compression library, which is Copyright ©
1995-2002 Jean-loup Gailly and Mark Adler.
Documentation Updates
The title page of this document contains the following identifying information:
l
l
l
Software Version number, which indicates the software version.
Document Release Date, which changes each time the document is updated.
Software Release Date, which indicates the release date of this version of the software.
To check for recent software updates, go to https://downloads.autonomy.com/productDownloads.jsp.
To verify that you are using the most recent edition of a document, go to
https://softwaresupport.hpe.com/group/softwaresupport/search-result?doctype=online help.
This site requires that you register for an HPE Passport and sign in. To register for an HPE Passport ID, go to
https://hpp12.passport.hpe.com/hppcf/login.do.
You will also receive updated or new editions if you subscribe to the appropriate product support service.
Contact your HPE sales representative for details.
Support
Visit the HPE Software Support Online web site at https://softwaresupport.hpe.com.
This web site provides contact information and details about the products, services, and support that HPE
Software offers.
HPE Software online support provides customer self-solve capabilities. It provides a fast and efficient way to
access interactive technical support tools needed to manage your business. As a valued support customer,
you can benefit by using the support web site to:
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 2 of 156
Administration Guide
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
Search for knowledge documents of interest
Submit and track support cases and enhancement requests
Access product documentation
Manage support contracts
Look up HPE support contacts
Review information about available services
Enter into discussions with other software customers
Research and register for software training
Most of the support areas require that you register as an HPE Passport user and sign in. Many also require a
support contract.
To register for an HPE Passport ID, go to https://hpp12.passport.hpe.com/hppcf/login.do.
To find more information about access levels, go to
https://softwaresupport.hpe.com/web/softwaresupport/access-levels.
To check for recent software updates, go to https://downloads.autonomy.com/productDownloads.jsp.
About this PDF Version of Online Help
This document is a PDF version of the online help. This PDF file is provided so you can easily print multiple
topics from the help information or read the online help in PDF format. Because this content was originally
created to be viewed as online help in a web browser, some topics may not be formatted properly. Some
interactive topics may not be present in this PDF version. Those topics can be successfully printed from
within the online help.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 3 of 156
Administration Guide
Contents
Chapter 1: Introduction
11
HPE HTTP Connector
Features and Capabilities
Supported Actions
Display Online Help
OEM Certification
11
11
12
12
13
Connector Framework Server
13
HPE's IDOL Platform
15
System Architecture
16
Related Documentation
17
Chapter 2: Install HPE HTTP Connector
19
System Requirements
19
Permissions
19
Install HPE HTTP Connector
19
Configure the License Server Host and Port
19
Chapter 3: Configure HPE HTTP Connector
21
HPE HTTP Connector Configuration File
21
Modify Configuration Parameter Values
23
Include an External Configuration File
Include the Whole External Configuration File
Include Sections of an External Configuration File
Include a Parameter from an External Configuration File
Merge a Section from an External Configuration File
24
25
25
25
26
Encrypt Passwords
Create a Key File
Encrypt a Password
Decrypt a Password
27
27
27
28
Register with a Distributed Connector
29
Set Up Secure Communication
Configure Outgoing SSL Connections
Configure Incoming SSL Connections
30
30
31
Backup and Restore the Connector’s State
Backup a Connector’s State
32
32
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 4 of 156
Administration Guide
Restore a Connector’s State
33
Validate the Configuration File
33
Example Configuration File
33
Chapter 4: Start and Stop the Connector
35
Start the Connector
35
Verify that HPE HTTP Connector is Running
GetStatus
GetLicenseInfo
36
36
36
Stop the Connector
36
Chapter 5: Send Actions to HPE HTTP Connector
38
Send Actions to HPE HTTP Connector
38
Asynchronous Actions
Check the Status of an Asynchronous Action
Cancel an Asynchronous Action that is Queued
Stop an Asynchronous Action that is Running
38
39
39
39
Store Action Queues in an External Database
Prerequisites
Configure HPE HTTP Connector
40
40
41
Store Action Queues in Memory
42
Use XSL Templates to Transform Action Responses
Example XSL Templates
43
44
Chapter 6: Use the Connector
45
Create a New Fetch Task
45
Retrieve Data using SSL
46
Schedule Fetch Tasks
47
Troubleshoot the Connector
48
Chapter 7: Manipulate Documents
50
Introduction
50
Add a Field to Documents using an Ingest Action
50
Customize Document Processing
51
Standardize Field Names
52
Run Lua Scripts
Write a Lua Script
Run a Lua Script using an Ingest Action
53
53
55
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 5 of 156
Administration Guide
Example Lua Scripts
Add a Field to a Document
Merge Document Fields
Chapter 8: Ingestion
55
55
56
58
Introduction
58
Send Data to Connector Framework Server
59
Send Data to Haven OnDemand
Prepare Haven OnDemand
Send Data to Haven OnDemand
60
60
60
Send Data to Another Repository
62
Index Documents Directly into IDOL Server
62
Index Documents into Vertica
Prepare the Vertica Database
Send Data to Vertica
63
65
65
Send Data to a MetaStore
66
Run a Lua Script after Ingestion
67
Chapter 9: Monitor the Connector
69
IDOL Admin
Prerequisites
Supported Browsers
Install IDOL Admin
Access IDOL Admin
69
69
69
69
70
Use the Connector Logs
Customize Logging
71
71
Set Up Event Handlers
Event Handlers
Configure an Event Handler
72
73
73
Set Up Performance Monitoring
Configure the Connector to Pause
Determine if an Action is Paused
74
75
76
Set Up Document Tracking
76
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
General Functions
abs_path
base64_decode
base64_encode
convert_date_time
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
79
79
81
81
82
82
Page 6 of 156
Administration Guide
convert_encoding
copy_file
create_path
create_uuid
delete_file
delete_path
doc_tracking
encrypt
encrypt_security_field
extract_date
file_setdates
get_config
get_log
get_task_config
get_task_name
getcwd
gobble_whitespace
hash_file
hash_string
is_dir
log
move_file
parse_csv
parse_xml
regex_match
regex_replace_all
regex_search
script_path
send_aci_action
send_aci_command
send_and_wait_for_async_aci_action
sleep
string_uint_less
unzip_file
url_escape
url_unescape
xml_encode
zip_file
84
85
85
86
86
87
87
88
88
89
91
92
92
93
93
93
94
94
95
95
96
96
97
97
98
99
99
100
100
101
102
103
103
104
104
105
105
106
LuaConfig Methods
getEncryptedValue
getValue
getValues
LuaConfig:new
106
107
107
108
108
LuaDocument Methods
addField
addSection
109
110
111
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 7 of 156
Administration Guide
appendContent
copyField
copyFieldNoOverwrite
countField
deleteField
getContent
getField
getFieldNames
getFields
getFieldValue
getFieldValues
getNextSection
getReference
getSection
getSectionCount
getValueByPath
getValuesByPath
hasField
insertXml
insertXmlWithoutRoot
LuaDocument:new
removeSection
renameField
setContent
setFieldValue
setReference
to_idx
to_json
to_xml
writeStubIdx
writeStubXml
111
112
112
113
113
114
115
115
115
116
117
117
118
118
119
119
120
120
121
121
122
122
123
123
124
125
125
125
126
126
127
LuaField Methods
addField
copyField
copyFieldNoOverwrite
countField
deleteAttribute
deleteField
getAttributeValue
getField
getFieldNames
getFields
getFieldValues
getValueByPath
getValuesByPath
hasAttribute
127
128
129
129
130
130
130
131
131
132
132
133
133
134
135
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 8 of 156
Administration Guide
hasField
insertXml
insertXmlWithoutRoot
name
renameField
setAttributeValue
setValue
value
136
136
137
137
137
138
138
139
LuaLog Methods
write_line
139
139
LuaXmlDocument Methods
root
XPathExecute
XPathRegisterNs
XPathValue
XPathValues
140
141
141
141
142
142
LuaXmlNodeSet Methods
at
size
143
143
144
LuaXmlNode Methods
attr
content
firstChild
lastChild
name
next
nodePath
parent
prev
type
144
145
145
145
146
146
146
147
147
147
147
LuaXmlAttribute Methods
name
next
prev
value
148
148
149
149
149
LuaRegexMatch Methods
length
next
position
size
str
150
150
151
151
151
152
Glossary
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
153
Page 9 of 156
Administration Guide
Send Documentation Feedback
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
156
Page 10 of 156
Chapter 1: Introduction
This section provides an overview of the HPE HTTP Connector.
•
•
•
•
•
HPE HTTP Connector
11
Connector Framework Server
13
HPE's IDOL Platform
15
System Architecture
16
Related Documentation
17
HPE HTTP Connector
HPE HTTP Connector is a powerful tool for retrieving Web site documents. The HPE HTTP Connector uses
spiders to find Web pages and to process the Web pages for content and links to other Web sites. HPE HTTP
Connector can retrieve various document types, including Web documents, Word, Excel, and PDF files.
After the HPE HTTP Connector has identified Web content, the files are sent to a Connector Framework
Server (CFS). CFS processes the information and indexes it into an IDOL Server.
After the documents are indexed, IDOL server automatically processes them, performing a number of
intelligent operations in real time, such as:
l
Agents
l
Eduction
l
Alerting
l
Expertise
l
Automatic Query Guidance
l
Hyperlinking
l
Categorization
l
Mailing
l
Channels
l
Profiling
l
Clustering
l
Retrieval
l
Collaboration
l
Spelling Correction
l
Dynamic Clustering
l
Summarization
l
Dynamic Thesaurus
l
Taxonomy Generation
Related Topics
l
Connector Framework Server, on page 13
l
HPE's IDOL Platform, on page 15
Features and Capabilities
The HTTP Connector (CFS) retrieves files from Web sites, over HTTP.
Repository
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Web sites retrieved over HTTP.
Page 11 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 1: Introduction
Data the connector can
retrieve
All files hosted on a Web site.
Data the connector
cannot retrieve
The connector cannot parse Javascript. This means that some Web pages
(linked from Javascript) are not found by the connector and are not indexed.
Supported Actions
The HTTP Connector (CFS) supports the following actions:
Action
Supported
Synchronize
Synchronize (identifiers)
Synchronize Groups
Collect
Identifiers
Insert
Delete/Remove
Hold/ReleaseHold
Update
Stub
GetURI
View
Display Online Help
You can display the HPE HTTP Connector Reference by sending an action from your web browser.
The HPE HTTP Connector Reference describes the actions and configuration parameters that you can
use with HPE HTTP Connector.
For HPE HTTP Connector to display help, the help data file (help.dat) must be available in the
installation folder.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 12 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 1: Introduction
To display help for HPE HTTP Connector
1. Start HPE HTTP Connector.
2. Send the following action from your web browser:
http://host:port/action=Help
where:
host is the IP address or name of the machine on which HPE HTTP Connector is installed.
port is the ACI port by which you send actions to HPE HTTP Connector (set by the Port
parameter in the [Server] section of the configuration file).
For example:
http://12.3.4.56:9000/action=help
OEM Certification
HPE HTTP Connector works in OEM licensed environments.
Connector Framework Server
Connector Framework Server (CFS) processes the information that is retrieved by connectors, and
then indexes the information into IDOL.
A single CFS can process information from any number of connectors. For example, a CFS might
process files retrieved by a File System Connector, web pages retrieved by a Web Connector, and email messages retrieved by an Exchange Connector.
To use the HPE HTTP Connector to index documents into IDOL Server, you must have a CFS. When
you install the HPE HTTP Connector, you can choose to install a CFS or point the connector to an
existing CFS.
For information about how to configure and use Connector Framework Server, refer to the Connector
Framework Server Administration Guide.
Filter Documents and Extract Subfiles
The documents that are sent by connectors to CFS contain only metadata extracted from the
repository, such as the location of a file or record that the connector has retrieved. CFS uses KeyView
to extract the file content and file specific metadata from over 1000 different file types, and adds this
information to the documents. This allows IDOL to extract meaning from the information contained in
the repository, without needing to process the information in its native format.
CFS also uses KeyView to extract and process sub-files. Sub-files are files that are contained within
other files. For example, an e-mail message might contain attachments that you want to index, or a
Microsoft Word document might contain embedded objects.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 13 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 1: Introduction
Manipulate and Enrich Documents
CFS provides features to manipulate and enrich documents before they are indexed into IDOL. For
example, you can:
l
add additional fields to a document.
l
divide long documents into multiple sections.
l
l
run tasks including Eduction, Optical Character Recognition, or Face Recognition, and add the
information that is obtained to the document.
run a custom Lua script to modify a document.
Index Documents
After CFS finishes processing documents, it automatically indexes them into one or more indexes.
CFS can index documents into:
l
IDOL Server (or send them to a Distributed Index Handler, so that they can be distributed across
multiple IDOL servers).
l
Haven OnDemand.
l
Vertica.
Import Process
This section describes the import process for new files that are added to IDOL through CFS.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 14 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 1: Introduction
1. Connectors aggregate documents from repositories and send the files to CFS. A single CFS can
process documents from multiple connectors. For example, CFS might receive HTML files from
HTTP Connectors, e-mail messages from Exchange Connector, and database records from
ODBC Connector.
2. CFS runs pre-import tasks. Pre-Import tasks occur before document content and file-specific
metadata is extracted by KeyView.
3. KeyView filters the document content, and extracts sub-files.
4. CFS runs post-import tasks. Post-Import tasks occur after KeyView has extracted document
content and file-specific metadata.
5. The data is indexed into IDOL.
HPE's IDOL Platform
At the core of HPE HTTP Connector is HPE’s Intelligent Data Operating Layer (IDOL).
IDOL gathers and processes unstructured, semi-structured, and structured information in any format
from multiple repositories using IDOL connectors and a global relational index. It can automatically
form a contextual understanding of the information in real time, linking disparate data sources together
based on the concepts contained within them. For example, IDOL can automatically link concepts
contained in an email message to a recorded phone conversation, that can be associated with a stock
trade. This information is then imported into a format that is easily searchable, adding advanced
retrieval, collaboration, and personalization to an application that integrates the technology.
For more information on IDOL, see the IDOL Getting Started Guide.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 15 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 1: Introduction
System Architecture
An IDOL infrastructure can include the following components:
l
l
l
l
l
Connectors. Connectors aggregate data from repositories and send the data to CFS.
Connector Framework Server (CFS). Connector Framework Server (CFS) processes and
enriches the information that is retrieved by connectors.
IDOL Server. IDOL stores and processes the information that is indexed into it by CFS.
Distributed Index Handler (DIH). The Distributed Index Handler distributes data across multiple
IDOL servers. Using multiple IDOL servers can increase the availability and scalability of the
system.
License Server. The License server licenses multiple products.
These components can be installed in many different configurations. The simplest installation consists
of a single connector, a single CFS, and a single IDOL Server.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 16 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 1: Introduction
A more complex configuration might include more than one connector, or use a Distributed Index
Handler (DIH) to index content across multiple IDOL Servers.
Related Documentation
The following documents provide further information related to HPE HTTP Connector.
l
HPE HTTP Connector Reference
The HPE HTTP Connector Reference describes the configuration parameters and actions that you
can use with the HPE HTTP Connector.
l
Connector Framework Server Administration Guide
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 17 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 1: Introduction
Connector Framework Server (CFS) processes documents that are retrieved by connectors. CFS
then indexes the documents into IDOL Server, Haven OnDemand, or Vertica. The Connector
Framework Server Administration Guide describes how to configure and use CFS.
l
IDOL Getting Started Guide
The IDOL Getting Started Guide provides an introduction to IDOL. It describes the system
architecture, how to install IDOL components, and introduces indexing and security.
l
IDOL Server Administration Guide
The IDOL Server Administration Guide describes the operations that IDOL server can perform with
detailed descriptions of how to set them up.
l
Intellectual Asset Protection System (IAS) Administration Guide
The Intellectual Asset Protection System (IAS) Administration Guide describes how to use the
Intellectual Asset Protection System (IAS) to protect the information that you index into IDOL
Server.
l
License Server Administration Guide
This guide describes how to use a License Server to license multiple services.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 18 of 156
Chapter 2: Install HPE HTTP Connector
This section describes how to install the HPE HTTP Connector.
•
•
•
•
System Requirements
19
Permissions
19
Install HPE HTTP Connector
19
Configure the License Server Host and Port
19
System Requirements
HPE HTTP Connector can be installed as part of a larger system that includes an IDOL Server and an
interface for the information stored in IDOL Server. To maximize performance, HPE recommends that you
install IDOL Server and the connector on different machines.
For information about the minimum system requirements required to run IDOL components, including HPE
HTTP Connector, refer to the IDOL Getting Started Guide.
Permissions
Some Web sites might require the connector to log in to retrieve some content. You can provide credentials in
the connector’s configuration file.
Install HPE HTTP Connector
The HPE HTTP Connector can be installed using the IDOL Server installer.
For information about installing the HPE HTTP Connector using this installer, refer to the IDOL Getting
Started Guide.
Configure the License Server Host and Port
HPE HTTP Connector is licensed through HPE License Server. In the HPE HTTP Connector configuration
file, specify the information required to connect to the License Server.
To specify the license server host and port
1. Open your configuration file in a text editor.
2. In the [License] section, modify the following parameters to point to your License Server.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 19 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 2: Install HPE HTTP Connector
LicenseServerHost
The host name or IP address of your License Server.
LicenseServerACIPort The ACI port of your License Server.
For example:
[License]
LicenseServerHost=licenses
LicenseServerACIPort=20000
3. Save and close the configuration file.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 20 of 156
Chapter 3: Configure HPE HTTP Connector
This section describes how to configure the HPE HTTP Connector.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
HPE HTTP Connector Configuration File
21
Modify Configuration Parameter Values
23
Include an External Configuration File
24
Encrypt Passwords
27
Register with a Distributed Connector
29
Set Up Secure Communication
30
Backup and Restore the Connector’s State
32
Validate the Configuration File
33
Example Configuration File
33
HPE HTTP Connector Configuration File
You can configure the HPE HTTP Connector by editing the configuration file. The configuration file is located
in the connector’s installation folder. You can modify the file with a text editor.
The parameters in the configuration file are divided into sections that represent connector functionality.
Some parameters can be set in more than one section of the configuration file. If a parameter is set in more
than one section, the value of the parameter located in the most specific section overrides the value of the
parameter defined in the other sections. For example, if a parameter can be set in "TaskName or FetchTasks
or Default", the value in the TaskName section overrides the value in the FetchTasks section, which in turn
overrides the value in the Default section. This means that you can set a default value for a parameter, and
then override that value for specific tasks.
For information about the parameters that you can use to configure the HPE HTTP Connector, refer to the
HPE HTTP Connector Reference.
Server Section
The [Server] section specifies the ACI port of the connector. It also contains parameters that control the
way the connector handles ACI requests.
Service Section
The [Service] section specifies the service port of the connector. It also specifies which machines are
permitted to send service actions to the connector.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 21 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 3: Configure HPE HTTP Connector
Actions Section
The [Actions] section contains configuration parameters that specify how the connector processes
actions that are sent to the ACI port. For example, you can configure event handlers that run when an
action starts, finishes, or encounters an error.
Logging Section
The [Logging] section contains configuration parameters that determine how messages are logged.
You can use log streams to send different types of message to separate log files. The configuration file
also contains a section to configure each of the log streams.
Connector Section
The [Connector] section contains parameters that control general connector behavior. For example,
you can specify a schedule for the fetch tasks that you configure.
Default Section
The [Default] section is used to define default settings for configuration parameters. For example,
you can specify default settings for the tasks in the [FetchTasks] section.
FetchTasks Section
The [FetchTasks] section lists the fetch tasks that you want to run. A fetch task is a task that
retrieves data from a repository. Fetch tasks are usually run automatically by the connector, but you
can also run a fetch task by sending an action to the connector’s ACI port.
In this section, enter the total number of fetch tasks in the Number parameter and then list the tasks in
consecutive order starting from 0 (zero). For example:
[FetchTasks]
Number=2
0=MyTask0
1=MyTask1
[TaskName] Section
The [TaskName] section contains configuration parameters that apply to a specific task. There must be
a [TaskName] section for every task listed in the [FetchTasks] section.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 22 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 3: Configure HPE HTTP Connector
Ingestion Section
The [Ingestion] section specifies where to send the data that is extracted by the connector.
You can send data to a Connector Framework Server, Haven OnDemand, or another connector. For
more information about ingestion, see Ingestion, on page 58.
DistributedConnector Section
The [DistributedConnector] section configures the connector to operate with the Distributed
Connector. The Distributed Connector is an ACI server that distributes actions (synchronize, collect
and so on) between multiple connectors.
For more information about the Distributed Connector, refer to the Distributed Connector Administration
Guide.
License Section
The [License] section contains details about the License server (the server on which your license file
is located).
Document Tracking Section
The [DocumentTracking] section contains parameters that enable the tracking of documents through
import and indexing processes.
Related Topics
l
Modify Configuration Parameter Values, below
l
Customize Logging, on page 71
Modify Configuration Parameter Values
You modify HPE HTTP Connector configuration parameters by directly editing the parameters in the
configuration file. When you set configuration parameter values, you must use UTF-8.
Caution: You must stop and restart HPE HTTP Connector for new configuration settings to take
effect.
This section describes how to enter parameter values in the configuration file.
Enter Boolean Values
The following settings for Boolean parameters are interchangeable:
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 23 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 3: Configure HPE HTTP Connector
TRUE = true = ON = on = Y = y = 1
FALSE = false = OFF = off = N = n = 0
Enter String Values
To enter a comma-separated list of strings when one of the strings contains a comma, you can indicate
the start and the end of the string with quotation marks, for example:
ParameterName=cat,dog,bird,"wing,beak",turtle
Alternatively, you can escape the comma with a backslash:
ParameterName=cat,dog,bird,wing\,beak,turtle
If any string in a comma-separated list contains quotation marks, you must put this string into quotation
marks and escape each quotation mark in the string by inserting a backslash before it. For example:
ParameterName="<font face=\"arial\" size=\"+1\"><b>","<p>"
Here, quotation marks indicate the beginning and end of the string. All quotation marks that are
contained in the string are escaped.
Include an External Configuration File
You can share configuration sections or parameters between ACI server configuration files. The
following sections describe different ways to include content from an external configuration file.
You can include a configuration file in its entirety, specified configuration sections, or a single
parameter.
When you include content from an external configuration file, the GetConfig and ValidateConfig
actions operate on the combined configuration, after any external content is merged in.
In the procedures in the following sections, you can specify external configuration file locations by
using absolute paths, relative paths, and network locations. For example:
../sharedconfig.cfg
K:\sharedconfig\sharedsettings.cfg
\\example.com\shared\idol.cfg
file://example.com/shared/idol.cfg
Relative paths are relative to the primary configuration file.
Note: You can use nested inclusions, for example, you can refer to a shared configuration file that
references a third file. However, the external configuration files must not refer back to your original
configuration file. These circular references result in an error, and HPE HTTP Connector does not
start.
Similarly, you cannot use any of these methods to refer to a different section in your primary
configuration file.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 24 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 3: Configure HPE HTTP Connector
Include the Whole External Configuration File
This method allows you to import the whole external configuration file at a specified point in your
configuration file.
To include the whole external configuration file
1. Open your configuration file in a text editor.
2. Find the place in the configuration file where you want to add the external configuration file.
3. On a new line, type a left angle bracket (<), followed by the path to and name of the external
configuration file, in quotation marks (""). You can use relative paths and network locations. For
example:
< "K:\sharedconfig\sharedsettings.cfg"
4. Save and close the configuration file.
Include Sections of an External Configuration File
This method allows you to import one or more configuration sections from an external configuration file
at a specified point in your configuration file. You can include a whole configuration section in this way,
but the configuration section name in the external file must exactly match what you want to use in your
file. If you want to use a configuration section from the external file with a different name, see Merge a
Section from an External Configuration File, on the next page.
To include sections of an external configuration file
1. Open your configuration file in a text editor.
2. Find the place in the configuration file where you want to add the external configuration file section.
3. On a new line, type a left angle bracket (<), followed by the path to and name of the external
configuration file, in quotation marks (""). You can use relative paths and network locations. After
the configuration file name, add the configuration section name that you want to include. For
example:
< "K:\sharedconfig\extrasettings.cfg" [License]
Note: You cannot include a section that already exists in your configuration file.
4. Save and close the configuration file.
Include a Parameter from an External Configuration File
This method allows you to import a parameter from an external configuration file at a specified point in
your configuration file. You can include a section or a single parameter in this way, but the value in the
external file must exactly match what you want to use in your file.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 25 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 3: Configure HPE HTTP Connector
To include a parameter from an external configuration file
1. Open your configuration file in a text editor.
2. Find the place in the configuration file where you want to add the parameter from the external
configuration file.
3. On a new line, type a left angle bracket (<), followed by the path to and name of the external
configuration file, in quotation marks (""). You can use relative paths and network locations. After
the configuration file name, add the name of the configuration section name that contains the
parameter, followed by the parameter name. For example:
< "license.cfg" [License] LicenseServerHost
To specify a default value for the parameter, in case it does not exist in the external configuration
file, specify the configuration section, parameter name, and then an equals sign (=) followed by the
default value. For example:
< "license.cfg" [License] LicenseServerHost=localhost
4. Save and close the configuration file.
Merge a Section from an External Configuration File
This method allows you to include a configuration section from an external configuration file as part of
your HPE HTTP Connector configuration file. For example, you might want to specify a standard
SSL configuration section in an external file and share it between several servers. You can use this
method if the configuration section that you want to import has a different name to the one you want to
use.
To merge a configuration section from an external configuration file
1. Open your configuration file in a text editor.
2. Find or create the configuration section that you want to include from an external file. For example:
[SSLOptions1]
3. After the configuration section name, type a left angle bracket (<), followed by the path to and
name of the external configuration file, in quotation marks (""). You can use relative paths and
network locations. For example:
[SSLOptions1] < "../sharedconfig/ssloptions.cfg"
If the configuration section name in the external configuration file does not match the name that
you want to use in your configuration file, specify the section to import after the configuration file
name. For example:
[SSLOptions1] < "../sharedconfig/ssloptions.cfg" [SharedSSLOptions]
In this example, HPE HTTP Connector uses the values in the [SharedSSLOptions] section of
the external configuration file as the values in the [SSLOptions1] section of the HPE HTTP
Connector configuration file.
Note: You can include additional configuration parameters in the section in your file. If these
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 26 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 3: Configure HPE HTTP Connector
parameters also exist in the imported external configuration file, HPE HTTP Connector uses
the values in the local configuration file. For example:
[SSLOptions1] < "ssloptions.cfg" [SharedSSLOptions]
SSLCACertificatesPath=C:\IDOL\HTTPConnector\CACERTS\
4. Save and close the configuration file.
Encrypt Passwords
HPE recommends that you encrypt all passwords that you enter into a configuration file.
Create a Key File
A key file is required to use AES encryption.
To create a new key file
1. Open a command-line window and change directory to the HPE HTTP Connector installation
folder.
2. At the command line, type:
autpassword -x -tAES -oKeyFile=./MyKeyFile.ky
A new key file is created with the name MyKeyFile.ky
Caution: To keep your passwords secure, you must protect the key file. Set the permissions on
the key file so that only authorized users and processes can read it. HPE HTTP Connector must
be able to read the key file to decrypt passwords, so do not move or rename it.
Encrypt a Password
The following procedure describes how to encrypt a password.
To encrypt a password
1. Open a command-line window and change directory to the HPE HTTP Connector installation
folder.
2. At the command line, type:
autpassword -e -tEncryptionType [-oKeyFile] [-cFILE -sSECTION -pPARAMETER]
PasswordString
where:
Option
Description
-t
The type of encryption to use:
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 27 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 3: Configure HPE HTTP Connector
Option
EncryptionType
Description
l
Basic
l
AES
For example: -tAES
Note: AES is more secure than basic encryption.
-oKeyFile
AES encryption requires a key file. This option specifies the path and file
name of a key file. The key file must contain 64 hexadecimal characters.
For example: -oKeyFile=./key.ky
-cFILE sSECTION pPARAMETER
(Optional) You can use these options to write the password directly into
a configuration file. You must specify all three options.
l
l
l
-c. The configuration file in which to write the encrypted password.
-s. The name of the section in the configuration file in which to write
the password.
-p. The name of the parameter in which to write the encrypted
password.
For example:
-c./Config.cfg -sMyTask -pPassword
PasswordString The password to encrypt.
For example:
autpassword -e -tBASIC MyPassword
autpassword -e -tAES -oKeyFile=./key.ky MyPassword
autpassword -e -tAES -oKeyFile=./key.ky -c./Config.cfg -sDefault -pPassword
MyPassword
The password is returned, or written to the configuration file.
Decrypt a Password
The following procedure describes how to decrypt a password.
To decrypt a password
1. Open a command-line window and change directory to the HPE HTTP Connector installation
folder.
2. At the command line, type:
autpassword -d -tEncryptionType [-oKeyFile] PasswordString
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 28 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 3: Configure HPE HTTP Connector
where:
Option
Description
The type of encryption:
-t
EncryptionType l Basic
l
AES
For example: -tAES
-oKeyFile
AES encryption and decryption requires a key file. This option specifies
the path and file name of the key file used to decrypt the password.
For example: -oKeyFile=./key.ky
PasswordString The password to decrypt.
For example:
autpassword -d -tBASIC 9t3M3t7awt/J8A
autpassword -d -tAES -oKeyFile=./key.ky 9t3M3t7awt/J8A
The password is returned in plain text.
Register with a Distributed Connector
To receive actions from a Distributed Connector, a connector must register with the Distributed
Connector and join a connector group. A connector group is a group of similar connectors. The
connectors in a group must be of the same type (for example, all HTTP Connectors), and must be able
to access the same repository.
To configure a connector to register with a Distributed Connector, follow these steps. For more
information about the Distributed Connector, refer to the Distributed Connector Administration Guide.
To register with a Distributed Connector
1. Stop the connector.
2. Open the connector’s configuration file in a text editor.
3. In the [DistributedConnector] section, set the following parameters:
RegisterConnector (Required) To register with a Distributed Connector, set this parameter to
true.
HostN
(Required) The host name or IP address of the Distributed Connector.
PortN
(Required) The ACI port of the Distributed Connector.
DataPortN
(Optional) The data port of the Distributed Connector.
ConnectorGroup
(Required) The name of the connector group to join. The value of this
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 29 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 3: Configure HPE HTTP Connector
parameter is passed to the Distributed Connector.
ConnectorPriority (Optional) The Distributed Connector can distribute actions to
connectors based on a priority value. The lower the value assigned to
ConnectorPriority, the higher the probability that an action is assigned
to this connector, rather than other connectors in the same connector
group.
SharedPath
(Optional) The location of a shared folder that is accessible to all of the
connectors in the ConnectorGroup. This folder is used to store the
connectors’ datastore files, so that whichever connector in the group
receives an action, it can access the information required to complete it.
If you set the DataPortN parameter, the datastore file is streamed
directly to the Distributed Connector, and this parameter is ignored.
4. Save and close the configuration file.
5. Start the connector.
The connector registers with the Distributed Connector. When actions are sent to the Distributed
Connector for the connector group that you configured, they are forwarded to this connector or to
another connector in the group.
Set Up Secure Communication
You can configure Secure Socket Layer (SSL) connections between the connector and other ACI
servers.
Configure Outgoing SSL Connections
To configure the connector to send data to other components (for example Connector Framework
Server) over SSL, follow these steps.
To configure outgoing SSL connections
1. Open the HPE HTTP Connector configuration file in a text editor.
2. Specify the name of a section in the configuration file where the SSL settings are provided:
l
l
l
To send data to an ingestion server over SSL, set the IngestSSLConfig parameter in the
[Ingestion] section. To send data from a single fetch task to an ingestion server over SSL,
set IngestSSLConfig in a [TaskName] section.
To send data to a Distributed Connector over SSL, set the SSLConfig parameter in the
[DistributedConnector] section.
To send data to a View Server over SSL, set the SSLConfig parameter in the [ViewServer]
section.
You can use the same settings for each connection. For example:
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 30 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 3: Configure HPE HTTP Connector
[Ingestion]
IngestSSLConfig=SSLOptions
[DistributedConnector]
SSLConfig=SSLOptions
3. Create a new section in the configuration file. The name of the section must match the name you
specified in the IngestSSLConfig or SSLConfig parameter. Then specify the SSL settings to use.
SSLMethod
The SSL protocol to use.
SSLCertificate (Optional) The SSL certificate to use (in PEM format).
SSLPrivateKey
(Optional) The private key for the SSL certificate (in PEM format).
For example:
[SSLOptions]
SSLMethod=SSLV23
SSLCertificate=host1.crt
SSLPrivateKey=host1.key
4. Save and close the configuration file.
5. Restart the connector.
Related Topics
l
Start and Stop the Connector, on page 35
Configure Incoming SSL Connections
To configure a connector or Connector Framework Server to accept data sent to its ACI port over SSL,
follow these steps.
To configure an incoming SSL Connection
1. Stop the connector or CFS.
2. Open the configuration file in a text editor.
3. In the [Server] section set the SSLConfig parameter to specify the name of a section in the
configuration file for the SSL settings. For example:
[Server]
SSLConfig=SSLOptions
4. Create a new section in the configuration file (the name must match the name you used in the
SSLConfig parameter). Then, use the SSL configuration parameters to specify the details for the
connection. You must set the following parameters:
SSLMethod
The SSL protocol to use.
SSLCertificate The SSL certificate to use (in PEM format).
SSLPrivateKey
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
The private key for the SSL certificate (in PEM format).
Page 31 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 3: Configure HPE HTTP Connector
For example:
[SSLOptions]
SSLMethod=SSLV23
SSLCertificate=host1.crt
SSLPrivateKey=host1.key
5. Save and close the configuration file.
6. Restart the connector or CFS.
Related Topics
l
Start and Stop the Connector, on page 35
Backup and Restore the Connector’s State
After configuring a connector, and while the connector is running, you can create a backup of the
connector’s state. In the event of a failure, you can restore the connector’s state from the backup.
To create a backup, use the backupServer action. The backupServer action saves a ZIP file to a path
that you specify. The backup includes:
l
l
l
a copy of the actions folder, which stores information about actions that have been queued, are
running, and have finished.
a copy of the configuration file.
a copy of the connector’s datastore files, which contain information about the files, records, or other
data that the connector has retrieved from a repository.
Backup a Connector’s State
To create a backup of the connectors state
l
In the address bar of your Web browser, type the following action and press ENTER:
http://host:port/action=backupServer&path=path
where,
host The host name or IP address of the machine where the connector is running.
port The connector’s ACI port.
path The folder where you want to save the backup.
For example:
http://localhost:1234/action=backupServer&path=./backups
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 32 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 3: Configure HPE HTTP Connector
Restore a Connector’s State
To restore a connector’s state
l
In the address bar of your Web browser, type the following action and press ENTER:
http://host:port/action=restoreServer&filename=filename
where,
host
The host name or IP address of the machine where the connector is running.
port
The connector’s ACI port.
filename The path of the backup that you created.
For example:
http://localhost:1234/action=restoreServer&filename=./backups/filename.zip
Validate the Configuration File
You can use the ValidateConfig service action to check for errors in the configuration file.
Note: For the ValidateConfig action to validate a configuration section, HPE HTTP Connector
must have previously read that configuration. In some cases, the configuration might be read when
a task is run, rather than when the component starts up. In these cases, ValidateConfig reports
any unread sections of the configuration file as unused.
To validate the configuration file
l
Send the following action to HPE HTTP Connector:
http://Host:ServicePort/action=ValidateConfig
where:
Host
is the host name or IP address of the machine where HPE HTTP Connector is
installed.
ServicePort is the service port, as specified in the [Service] section of the configuration file.
Example Configuration File
[Server]
Port = 5678
Threads = 5
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 33 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 3: Configure HPE HTTP Connector
[service]
ServicePort=5432
ServiceStatusClients=*
ServiceControlClients=*
[Connector]
EnableIngestion=TRUE
[Ingestion]
IngesterType=AsyncPiranha
IngestHost=localhost
IngestPort=7000
BatchSize=100
[FetchTasks]
Number=1
0=MYSITE
[MYSITE]
URL=http://my.site.com/
DIRECTORY=MYSITE
[Logging]
LogLevel=FULL
0=ApplicationLogStream
1=ActionLogStream
2=SynchronizeLogStream
[ApplicationLogStream]
LogFile=application.log
LogTypeCSVs=application
LogEcho=TRUE
[ActionLogStream]
LogFile=action.log
LogTypeCSVs=action
LogEcho=TRUE
[SynchronizeLogStream]
LogFile=synchronize.log
LogTypeCSVs=synchronize
[License]
LicenseServerHost=localhost
LicenseServerACIPort=20000
LicenseServerTimeout=600000
LicenseServerRetries=1
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 34 of 156
Chapter 4: Start and Stop the Connector
This section describes how to start and stop the HPE HTTP Connector.
•
•
•
Start the Connector
35
Verify that HPE HTTP Connector is Running
36
Stop the Connector
36
Note: You must start and stop the Connector Framework Server separately from the HPE HTTP
Connector.
Start the Connector
After you have installed and configured a connector, you are ready to run it. Start the connector using one of
the following methods.
Start the Connector on Windows
To start the connector using Windows Services
1. Open the Windows Services dialog box.
2. Select the connector service, and click Start.
3. Close the Windows Services dialog box.
To start the connector by running the executable
l
In the connector installation directory, double-click the connector executable file.
Start the Connector on UNIX
To start the connector on a UNIX operating system, follow these steps.
To start the connector using the UNIX start script
1. Change to the installation directory.
2. Enter the following command:
./startconnector.sh
3. If you want to check the HPE HTTP Connector service is running, enter the following command:
ps -aef | grep ConnectorInstallName
This command returns the HPE HTTP Connector service process ID number if the service is running.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 35 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 4: Start and Stop the Connector
Verify that HPE HTTP Connector is Running
After starting HPE HTTP Connector, you can run the following actions to verify that HPE HTTP
Connector is running.
l
GetStatus
l
GetLicenseInfo
GetStatus
You can use the GetStatus service action to verify the HPE HTTP Connector is running. For example:
http://Host:ServicePort/action=GetStatus
Note: You can send the GetStatus action to the ACI port instead of the service port. The
GetStatus ACI action returns information about the HPE HTTP Connector setup.
GetLicenseInfo
You can send a GetLicenseInfo action to HPE HTTP Connector to return information about your
license. This action checks whether your license is valid and returns the operations that your license
includes.
Send the GetLicenseInfo action to the HPE HTTP Connector ACI port. For example:
http://Host:ACIport/action=GetLicenseInfo
The following result indicates that your license is valid.
<autn:license>
<autn:validlicense>true</autn:validlicense>
</autn:license>
As an alternative to submitting the GetLicenseInfo action, you can view information about your
license, and about licensed and unlicensed actions, on the License tab in the Status section of
IDOL Admin.
Stop the Connector
You must stop the connector before making any changes to the configuration file.
To stop the connector using Windows Services
1. Open the Windows Services dialog box.
2. Select the ConnectorInstallName service, and click Stop.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 36 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 4: Start and Stop the Connector
3. Close the Windows Services dialog box.
To stop the connector by sending an action to the service port
l
Type the following command in the address bar of your Web browser, and press ENTER:
http://host:ServicePort/action=stop
host
The IP address or host name of the machine where the connector is running.
ServicePort The connector’s service port (specified in the [Service] section of the
connector’s configuration file).
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 37 of 156
Chapter 5: Send Actions to HPE HTTP
Connector
This section describes how to send actions to HPE HTTP Connector.
•
•
•
•
•
Send Actions to HPE HTTP Connector
38
Asynchronous Actions
38
Store Action Queues in an External Database
40
Store Action Queues in Memory
42
Use XSL Templates to Transform Action Responses
43
Send Actions to HPE HTTP Connector
HPE HTTP Connector actions are HTTP requests, which you can send, for example, from your web browser.
The general syntax of these actions is:
http://host:port/action=action&parameters
where:
host
is the IP address or name of the machine where HPE HTTP Connector is installed.
port
is the HPE HTTP Connector ACI port. The ACI port is specified by the Port parameter in the
[Server] section of the HPE HTTP Connector configuration file. For more information about
the Port parameter, see the HPE HTTP Connector Reference.
action
is the name of the action you want to run.
parameters are the required and optional parameters for the action.
Note: Separate individual parameters with an ampersand (&). Separate parameter names from values
with an equals sign (=). You must percent-encode all parameter values.
For more information about actions, see the HPE HTTP Connector Reference.
Asynchronous Actions
When you send an asynchronous action to HPE HTTP Connector, the connector adds the task to a queue
and returns a token. HPE HTTP Connector performs the task when a thread becomes available. You can use
the token with the QueueInfo action to check the status of the action and retrieve the results of the action.
Most of the features provided by the connector are available through action=fetch, so when you use the
QueueInfo action, query the fetch action queue, for example:
/action=QueueInfo&QueueName=Fetch&QueueAction=GetStatus
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 38 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 5: Send Actions to HPE HTTP Connector
Check the Status of an Asynchronous Action
To check the status of an asynchronous action, use the token that was returned by HPE HTTP
Connector with the QueueInfo action. For more information about the QueueInfo action, refer to the
HPE HTTP Connector Reference.
To check the status of an asynchronous action
l
Send the QueueInfo action to HPE HTTP Connector with the following parameters.
QueueName
The name of the action queue that you want to check.
QueueAction
The action to perform. Set this parameter to GetStatus.
Token
(Optional) The token that the asynchronous action returned. If you do not
specify a token, HPE HTTP Connector returns the status of every action
in the queue.
For example:
/action=QueueInfo&QueueName=fetch&QueueAction=getstatus&Token=...
Cancel an Asynchronous Action that is Queued
To cancel an asynchronous action that is waiting in a queue, use the following procedure.
To cancel an asynchronous action that is queued
l
Send the QueueInfo action to HPE HTTP Connector with the following parameters.
QueueName
The name of the action queue that contains the action to cancel.
QueueAction
The action to perform . Set this parameter to Cancel.
Token
The token that the asynchronous action returned.
For example:
/action=QueueInfo&QueueName=fetch&QueueAction=Cancel&Token=...
Stop an Asynchronous Action that is Running
You can stop an asynchronous action at any point.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 39 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 5: Send Actions to HPE HTTP Connector
To stop an asynchronous action that is running
l
Send the QueueInfo action to HPE HTTP Connector with the following parameters.
QueueName
The name of the action queue that contains the action to stop.
QueueAction
The action to perform. Set this parameter to Stop.
Token
The token that the asynchronous action returned.
For example:
/action=QueueInfo&QueueName=fetch&QueueAction=Stop&Token=...
Store Action Queues in an External Database
HPE HTTP Connector provides asynchronous actions. Each asynchronous action has a queue to
store requests until threads become available to process them. You can configure HPE HTTP
Connector to store these queues either in an internal database file, or in an external database hosted on
a database server.
The default configuration stores queues in an internal database. Using this type of database does not
require any additional configuration.
You might want to store the action queues in an external database so that several servers can share
the same queues. In this configuration, sending a request to any of the servers adds the request to the
shared queue. Whenever a server is ready to start processing a new request, it takes the next request
from the shared queue, runs the action, and adds the results of the action back to the shared database
so that they can be retrieved by any of the servers. You can therefore distribute requests between
components without configuring a Distributed Action Handler (DAH).
Note: You cannot use multiple servers to process a single request. Each request is processed by
one server.
Note: Although you can configure several connectors to share the same action queues, the
connectors do not share fetch task data. If you share action queues between several connectors
and distribute synchronize actions, the connector that processes a synchronize action cannot
determine which items the other connectors have retrieved. This might result in some documents
being ingested several times.
Prerequisites
l
l
Supported databases:
l
PostgreSQL 9.0 or later.
l
MySQL 5.0 or later.
If you use PostgreSQL, you must set the PostgreSQL ODBC driver setting MaxVarChar to 0 (zero).
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 40 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 5: Send Actions to HPE HTTP Connector
If you use a DSN, you can configure this parameter when you create the DSN. Otherwise, you can
set the MaxVarcharSize parameter in the connection string.
Configure HPE HTTP Connector
To configure HPE HTTP Connector to use a shared action queue, follow these steps.
To store action queues in an external database
1. Stop HPE HTTP Connector, if it is running.
2. Open the HPE HTTP Connector configuration file.
3. Find the relevant section in the configuration file:
l
l
To store queues for all asynchronous actions in the external database, find the [Actions]
section.
To store the queue for a single asynchronous action in the external database, find the section
that configures that action.
4. Set the following configuration parameters.
AsyncStoreLibraryDirectory The path of the directory that contains the library to use to
connect to the database. Specify either an absolute path, or a
path relative to the server executable file.
AsyncStoreLibraryName
The name of the library to use to connect to the database. You
can omit the file extension. The following libraries are
available:
l
l
ConnectionString
postgresAsyncStoreLibrary - for connecting to a
PostgreSQL database.
mysqlAsyncStoreLibrary - for connecting to a MySQL
database.
The connection string to use to connect to the database. The
user that you specify must have permission to create tables in
the database. For example:
ConnectionString=DSN=my_ASYNC_QUEUE
or
ConnectionString=Driver={PostgreSQL};
Server=10.0.0.1; Port=9876;
Database=SharedActions; Uid=user; Pwd=password;
MaxVarcharSize=0;
For example:
[Actions]
AsyncStoreLibraryDirectory=acidlls
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 41 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 5: Send Actions to HPE HTTP Connector
AsyncStoreLibraryName=postgresAsyncStoreLibrary
ConnectionString=DSN=ActionStore
5. If you are using the same database to store action queues for more than one type of component,
set the following parameter in the [Actions] section of the configuration file.
DatastoreSharingGroupName The group of components to share actions with. You can set
this parameter to any string, but the value must be the same for
each server in the group. For example, to configure several
HPE HTTP Connectors to share their action queues, set this
parameter to the same value in every HPE HTTP Connector
configuration. HPE recommends setting this parameter to the
name of the component.
Caution: Do not configure different components (for
example, two different types of connector) to share the
same action queues. This will result in unexpected
behavior.
For example:
[Actions]
...
DatastoreSharingGroupName=ComponentType
6. Save and close the configuration file.
When you start HPE HTTP Connector it connects to the shared database.
Store Action Queues in Memory
HPE HTTP Connector provides asynchronous actions. Each asynchronous action has a queue to
store requests until threads become available to process them. These queues are usually stored in a
datastore file or in an external database hosted on a database server. However, to increase
performance you can store these queues in memory.
Note: Storing action queues in memory means that the queues (including queued actions and the
results of finished actions) are lost if HPE HTTP Connector stops unexpectedly, for example due
to a power failure. This could result in some requests being lost, and if the queues are restored to a
previous state some actions could run more than once.
Note: Storing queues in memory will increase memory use. The amount of memory required
depends on the size of the queues. Ensure that the server has sufficient memory.
Note: You can not store action queues in memory if you want multiple components to share the
same queues.
If you stop HPE HTTP Connector cleanly, HPE HTTP Connector writes the action queues from
memory to disk so that it can resume processing when it is next started.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 42 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 5: Send Actions to HPE HTTP Connector
To configure HPE HTTP Connector to store asynchronous action queues in memory, follow these
steps.
To store action queues in memory
1. Stop HPE HTTP Connector, if it is running.
2. Open the HPE HTTP Connector configuration file and find the [Actions] section.
3. If you have set any of the following parameters, remove them:
l
AsyncStoreLibraryDirectory
l
AsyncStoreLibraryName
l
ConnectionString
l
UseStringentDatastore
4. Set the following configuration parameters.
UseInMemoryDatastore
A Boolean value that specifies whether to keep the
queues for asynchronous actions in memory. Set
this parameter to TRUE.
InMemoryDatastoreBackupIntervalMins (Optional) The time interval (in minutes) at which
the action queues are written to disk. Writing the
queues to disk can reduce the number of queued
actions that would be lost if HPE HTTP Connector
stops unexpectedly, but configuring a frequent
backup will increase the load on the datastore and
might reduce performance.
For example:
[Actions]
UseInMemoryDatastore=TRUE
InMemoryDatastoreBackupIntervalMins=30
5. Save and close the configuration file.
When you start HPE HTTP Connector, it stores action queues in memory.
Use XSL Templates to Transform Action
Responses
You can transform the action responses returned by HPE HTTP Connector using XSL templates. You
must write your own XSL templates and save them with either an .xsl or .tmpl file extension.
After creating the templates, you must configure HPE HTTP Connector to use them, and then apply
them to the relevant actions.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 43 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 5: Send Actions to HPE HTTP Connector
To enable XSL transformations
1. Ensure that the autnxslt library is located in the same directory as your configuration file. If the
library is not included in your installation, you can obtain it from HPE Support.
2. Open the HPE HTTP Connector configuration file in a text editor.
3. In the [Server] section, ensure that the XSLTemplates parameter is set to true.
Caution: If XSLTemplates is set to true and the autnxslt library is not present in the same
directory as the configuration file, the server will not start.
4. (Optional) In the [Paths] section, set the TemplateDirectory parameter to the path to the
directory that contains your XSL templates. The default directory is acitemplates.
5. Save and close the configuration file.
6. Restart HPE HTTP Connector for your changes to take effect.
To apply a template to action output
l
Add the following parameters to the action:
The name of the template to use to transform the action output.
Exclude the folder path and file extension.
Template
ForceTemplateRefresh (Optional) If you modified the template after the server started, set this
parameter to true to force the ACI server to reload the template from
disk rather than from the cache.
For example:
action=QueueInfo&QueueName=Fetch
&QueueAction=GetStatus
&Token=...
&Template=myTemplate
In this example, HPE HTTP Connector applies the XSL template myTemplate to the response from
a QueueInfo action.
Note: If the action returns an error response, HPE HTTP Connector does not apply the XSL
template.
Example XSL Templates
HPE HTTP Connector includes the following sample XSL templates, in the acitemplates folder:
XSL
Template
LuaDebug
Description
Transforms the output from the LuaDebug action, to assist with debugging Lua
scripts.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 44 of 156
Chapter 6: Use the Connector
This section describes how to use the connector.
•
•
•
•
Create a New Fetch Task
45
Retrieve Data using SSL
46
Schedule Fetch Tasks
47
Troubleshoot the Connector
48
Create a New Fetch Task
To automatically retrieve content from a repository, create a new fetch task by following these steps. The
connector runs each fetch task automatically, based on the schedule that is configured in the configuration
file.
To create a new Fetch Task
1. Stop the connector.
2. Open the configuration file in a text editor.
3. In the [FetchTasks] section of the configuration file, specify the number of fetch tasks using the Number
parameter. If you are configuring the first fetch task, type Number=1. If one or more fetch tasks have
already been configured, increase the value of the Number parameter by one (1). Below the Number
parameter, specify the names of the fetch tasks, starting from zero (0). For example:
[FetchTasks]
Number=1
0=MyTask
4. Below the [FetchTasks] section, create a new TaskName section. The name of the section must
match the name of the new fetch task. For example:
[FetchTasks]
Number=1
0=MyTask
[MyTask]
5. In the new section, set one of the following parameters to specify the sites that you want to index.
URLN
Specify the URLs where you want to start indexing.
URLFile Specify the full path to a file that contains a list of URLs.
For example:
[MyTask]
URL0=http://www.autonomy.com
URL1=http://www.another-website.com
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 45 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 6: Use the Connector
or
[MyTask]
URLFile=C:\autonomy\urls.txt
6. In the [TaskName] section, use further parameters to configure the task. For information about the
parameters that you can use, refer to the HTTP Connector (CFS) Reference. For example, you
can specify how links are followed or the maximum number of pages that are retrieved.
7. Save and close the configuration file. You can now start the connector.
Note: The connector saves a record of the data that is has retrieved for each fetch task. If you
make changes to the configuration and want to reset the connector so that it retrieves all of
your data again, delete the data files (connector_[fetchtask_name]_datastore.db) in the
connector’s installation folder.
Related Topics
l
Start and Stop the Connector, on page 35
l
Schedule Fetch Tasks, on the next page
Retrieve Data using SSL
To retrieve data from an HTTP server using SSL or TLS, you might need to set additional parameters
when you configure your fetch task.
To retrieve data over a secure connection
1. In the HPE HTTP Connector configuration file, find the section where you configured your fetch
task:
[MyTask]
URL0=https://www.hpe.com
2. Specify the required SSL settings, for example:
[MyTask]
URL0=https://www.hpe.com
SSLMethod=TLSV1
SSLCheckCertificate=TRUE
SSLCACertificate=trusted.crt
Tip: In this case, you cannot use the SSLConfig parameter.
For more information about the SSL configuration parameters, refer to the Secure Socket Layer
Parameters in the HPE HTTP Connector Reference.
3. Save and close the configuration file.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 46 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 6: Use the Connector
Schedule Fetch Tasks
The connector automatically runs the fetch tasks that you have configured, based on the schedule in
the configuration file. To modify the schedule, follow these steps.
To schedule fetch tasks
1. Stop the connector.
2. Open the connector’s configuration file in a text editor.
3. Find the [Connector] section.
4. The EnableScheduleTasks parameter specifies whether the connector should automatically run
the fetch tasks that have been configured in the [FetchTasks] section. To run the tasks, set this
parameter to true. For example:
[Connector]
EnableScheduledTasks=True
5. In the [Connector] section, set the following parameters:
ScheduleStartTime
The start time for the fetch task, the first time it runs after you start the
connector. The connector runs subsequent synchronize cycles after the
interval specified by ScheduleRepeatSecs.
Specify the start time in the format H[H][:MM][:SS]. To start running
tasks as soon as the connector starts, do not set this parameter or use
the value now.
ScheduleRepeatSecs The interval (in seconds) from the start of one scheduled synchronize
cycle to the start of the next. If a previous synchronize cycle is still
running when the interval elapses, the connector queues a maximum of
one action.
ScheduleCycles
The number of times that each fetch task is run. To run the tasks
continuously until the connector is stopped, set this parameter to -1. To
run each task only one time, set this parameter to 1.
For example:
[Connector]
EnableScheduledTasks=True
ScheduleStartTime=15:00:00
ScheduleRepeatSecs=3600
ScheduleCycles=-1
6. (Optional) To run a specific fetch task on a different schedule, you can override these parameters
in a TaskName section of the configuration file. For example:
[Connector]
EnableScheduledTasks=TRUE
ScheduleStartTime=15:00:00
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 47 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 6: Use the Connector
ScheduleRepeatSecs=3600
ScheduleCycles=-1
...
[FetchTasks]
Number=2
0=MyTask0
1=MyTask1
...
[MyTask1]
ScheduleStartTime=16:00:00
ScheduleRepeatSecs=60
ScheduleCycles=-1
In this example, MyTask0 follows the schedule defined in the [Connector] section, and MyTask1
follows the scheduled defined in the [MyTask1] TaskName section.
7. Save and close the configuration file. You can now start the connector.
Related Topics
l
Start and Stop the Connector, on page 35
Troubleshoot the Connector
This section describes how to troubleshoot common problems that might occur when you set up the
HPE HTTP Connector.
Connection refused
If the connector cannot connect to the Web site that you want to index, check whether the
connector machine is behind a proxy server. If this is the case, use the configuration parameters
ProxyHost and ProxyPort (or ProxyFromLua) to specify the host name or IP address, and port, of
the proxy server.
Some pages are not indexed
If pages are not indexed, set the configuration parameter LogVerbose=true. You can then view the
synchronize log file to see the links that are extracted from pages. Check your configuration to
ensure that it does not exclude the pages that you want to index. The connector cannot parse
Javascript, so any links contained in Javascript are not found by the connector and those pages are
not indexed.
The connector does not log on successfully
Some Web sites require visitors, and therefore the connector, to log on before they can retrieve
content. You must set the LoginMethod configuration parameter and provide credentials in the
connector’s configuration file.
To determine the correct method to use to log in to a Web site, you can:
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 48 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 6: Use the Connector
l
l
View the page source. If the Web site presents an HTML form, view the page source and check
whether the form uses the POST or GET method to submit the form data to the Web server.
Use a packet analyzer to monitor the data sent from the Web browser to the Web server.
Compare the data sent by the Web browser, when you log in manually, to the data that is sent by
the connector.
If you configure the connector to log on to a Web site by submitting a form, ensure that the
connector submits all of the required fields.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 49 of 156
Chapter 7: Manipulate Documents
This section describes how to manipulate documents that are created by the connector and sent for ingestion.
•
•
•
•
•
•
Introduction
50
Add a Field to Documents using an Ingest Action
50
Customize Document Processing
51
Standardize Field Names
52
Run Lua Scripts
53
Example Lua Scripts
55
Introduction
IDOL Connectors retrieve data from repositories and create documents that are sent to Connector
Framework Server, another connector, or Haven OnDemand. You might want to manipulate the documents
that are created. For example, you can:
l
l
l
Add or modify document fields, to change the information that is indexed into IDOL Server or Haven
OnDemand.
Add fields to a document to customize the way the document is processed by CFS.
Convert information into another format so that it can be inserted into another repository by a connector
that supports the Insert action.
When a connector sends documents to CFS, the documents only contain metadata extracted from the
repository by the connector (for example, the location of the original files). To modify data extracted by
KeyView, you must modify the documents using CFS. For information about how to manipulate documents
with CFS, refer to the Connector Framework Server Administration Guide.
Add a Field to Documents using an Ingest Action
To add a field to all documents retrieved by a fetch task, or all documents sent for ingestion, you can use an
Ingest Action.
Note: To add a field only to selected documents, use a Lua script (see Run Lua Scripts, on page 53). For
an example Lua script that demonstrates how to add a field to a document, see Add a Field to a
Document, on page 55.
To add a field to documents using an Ingest Action
1. Open the connector’s configuration file.
2. Find one of the following sections in the configuration file:
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 50 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 7: Manipulate Documents
l
l
To add the field to all documents retrieved by a specific fetch task, find the [TaskName]
section.
To add a field to all documents that are sent for ingestion, find the [Ingestion] section.
Note: If you set the IngestActions parameter in a [TaskName] section, the connector does
not run any IngestActions set in the [Ingestion] section for documents retrieved by that
task.
3. Use the IngestActions parameter to specify the name of the field to add, and the field value. For
example, to add a field named AUTN_NO_EXTRACT, with the value SET, type:
IngestActions0=META:AUTN_NO_EXTRACT=SET
4. Save and close the configuration file.
Customize Document Processing
You can add the following fields to a document to control how the document is processed by CFS.
Unless stated otherwise, you can add the fields with any value.
AUTN_FILTER_META_ONLY
Prevents KeyView extracting file content from a file. KeyView only extracts metadata and adds this
information to the document.
AUTN_NO_FILTER
Prevents KeyView extracting file content and metadata from a file. You can use this field if you do not
want to extract text from certain file types.
AUTN_NO_EXTRACT
Prevents KeyView extracting subfiles. You can use this field to prevent KeyView extracting the
contents of ZIP archives and other container files.
AUTN_NEEDS_MEDIA_SERVER_ANALYSIS
Identifies media files (images, video, and documents such as PDF files that contain embedded
images) that you want to send to Media Server for analysis, using a MediaServerAnalysis import
task. You do not need to add this field if you are using a Lua script to run media analysis. For more
information about running analysis on media, refer to the Connector Framework Server Administration
Guide.
AUTN_NEEDS_IMAGE_SERVER_ANALYSIS
Identifies images that you want to send to Image Server for image analysis, using an
ImageServerAnalysis import task. You do not need to add this field if you are using a Lua script to run
image analysis. Image Server enriches documents that represent images by running operations such
as optical character recognition, face recognition, and object detection. For more information about
running analysis on images, refer to the Connector Framework Server Administration Guide.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 51 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 7: Manipulate Documents
AUTN_NEEDS_VIDEO_SERVER_ANALYSIS
Identifies video that you want to send to Video Server for analysis, using a VideoServerAnalysis
import task. You do not need to add this field if you are using a Lua script to run video analysis. For
more information about running analysis on video, refer to the Connector Framework Server
Administration Guide.
AUTN_NEEDS_TRANSCRIPTION
Identifies audio and video assets that you want to send to an IDOL Speech Server for speech-to-text
processing, using an IdolSpeech import task. You do not need to add this field if you are using a Lua
script to run speech-to-text. For more information about running speech-to-text on documents, refer to
the Connector Framework Server Administration Guide.
AUTN_FORMAT_CORRECT_FOR_TRANSCRIPTION
To bypass the transcoding step of an IdolSpeech import task, add the field AUTN_FORMAT_CORRECT_
FOR_TRANSCRIPTION. Documents that have this field are not sent to a Transcode Server. For more
information about the IdolSpeech task, refer to the Connector Framework Server Administration
Guide.
AUTN_AUDIO_LANGUAGE
To bypass the language identification step of an IdolSpeech import task add the field AUTN_AUDIO_
LANGUAGE. The value of the field must be the name of the IDOL Speech Server language pack to use for
extracting speech. Documents that have this field are not sent to the IDOL Speech Server for language
identification. For more information about the IdolSpeech task, refer to the Connector Framework
Server Administration Guide.
Standardize Field Names
Field standardization renames document fields so that they follow a standard naming scheme. You can
use field standardization so that documents indexed into IDOL through different connectors use the
same fields to store the same type of information.
For example, documents created by the File System Connector can have a field named FILEOWNER.
Documents created by the Documentum Connector can have a field named owner_name. Both of these
fields store the name of the person who owns a file. Field standardization renames the fields so that
they have the same name.
Field standardization only renames fields that are specified in the standard naming scheme. If a
connector or document does not have any mapping, field standardization does run but has no effect.
The naming scheme is defined in XML format and is supplied with the connector.
Note: You can also configure CFS to run field standardization. To standardize all field names, you
must run field standardization from both the connector and CFS.
To enable field standardization
1. Stop the connector.
2. Open the connector’s configuration file.
3. In the [Connector] section, set the following parameters:
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 52 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 7: Manipulate Documents
EnableFieldNameStandardization A Boolean that specifies whether to enable field
standardization. Set this parameter to true.
FieldNameDictionaryPath
The path to the XML file that contains the field names to
use for field standardization.
For example:
[Connector]
EnableFieldNameStandardization=true
FieldNameDictionaryPath=dictionary.xml
4. Save the configuration file and restart the connector.
Run Lua Scripts
IDOL Connectors can run custom scripts written in Lua, an embedded scripting language. You can use
Lua scripts to process documents that are created by a connector, before they are sent to CFS and
indexed into IDOL Server. For example, you can:
l
Add or modify document fields.
l
Manipulate the information that is indexed into IDOL.
l
Call out to an external service, for example to alert a user.
There might be occasions when you do not want to send documents to a CFS. For example, you might
use the Collect action to retrieve documents from one repository and then insert them into another.
You can use a Lua script to transform the documents from the source repository so that they can be
accepted by the destination repository.
To run a Lua script from a connector, use one of the following methods:
l
l
Set the IngestActions configuration parameter in the connector’s configuration file. For information
about how to do this, see Run a Lua Script using an Ingest Action, on page 55. The connector runs
ingest actions on documents before they are sent for ingestion.
Set the IngestActions action parameter when using the Synchronize action.
Write a Lua Script
A Lua script that is run from a connector must have the following structure:
function handler(config, document, params)
...
end
The handler function is called for each document and is passed the following arguments:
Argument Description
config
A LuaConfig object that you can use to retrieve the values of configuration parameters
from the connector’s configuration file.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 53 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 7: Manipulate Documents
Argument Description
document
A LuaDocument object. The document object is an internal representation of the
document being processed. Modifying this object changes the document.
params
The params argument is a table that contains additional information provided by the
connector:
l
l
l
l
TYPE. The type of task being performed. The possible values are ADD, UPDATE,
DELETE, or COLLECT.
SECTION. The name of the section in the configuration file that contains
configuration parameters for the task.
FILENAME. The document filename. The Lua script can modify this file, but must
not delete it.
OWNFILE. Indicates whether the connector (and CFS) has ownership of the file. A
value of true means that CFS deletes the file after it has been processed.
The following script demonstrates how you can use the config and params arguments:
function handler(config, document, params)
-- Write all of the additional information to a log file
for k,v in pairs(params) do
log("logfile.txt", k..": "..tostring(v))
end
-- The following lines set variables from the params argument
type = params["TYPE"]
section = params["SECTION"]
filename = params["FILENAME"]
-- Read a configuration parameter from the configuration file
-- If the parameter is not set, "DefaultValue" is returned
val = config:getValue(section, "Parameter", "DefaultValue")
-- If the document is not being deleted, set the field FieldName
-- to the value of the configuration parameter
if type ~= "DELETE" then
document:setFieldValue("FieldName", val)
end
---if
If the document has a file (that is, not just metadata),
copy the file to a new location and write a stub idx file
containing the metadata.
filename ~= "" then
copytofilename = "./out/"..create_uuid(filename)
copy_file(filename, copytofilename)
document:writeStubIdx(copytofilename..".idx")
end
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 54 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 7: Manipulate Documents
return true
end
For the connector to continue processing the document, the handler function must return true. If the
function returns false, the document is discarded.
Tip: You can write a library of useful functions to share between multiple scripts. To include a
library of functions in a script, add the code dofile("library.lua") to the top of the lua script,
outside of the handler function.
Run a Lua Script using an Ingest Action
To run a Lua script on documents that are sent for ingestion, use an Ingest Action.
To run a Lua script using an Ingest Action
1. Open the connector’s configuration file.
2. Find one of the following sections in the configuration file:
l
To run a Lua script on all documents retrieved by a specific task, find the [TaskName] section.
l
To run a Lua script on all documents that are sent for ingestion, find the [Ingestion] section.
Note: If you set the IngestActions parameter in a [TaskName] section, the connector does
not run any IngestActions set in the [Ingestion] section for that task.
3. Use the IngestActions parameter to specify the path to your Lua script. For example:
IngestActions=LUA:C:\Autonomy\myScript.lua
4. Save and close the configuration file.
Related Topics
l
Write a Lua Script, on page 53
Example Lua Scripts
This section contains example Lua scripts.
l
Add a Field to a Document, below
l
Merge Document Fields, on the next page
Add a Field to a Document
The following script demonstrates how to add a field named “MyField” to a document, with a value of
“MyValue”.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 55 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 7: Manipulate Documents
function handler(config, document, params)
document:addField("MyField", "MyValue");
return true;
end
The following script demonstrates how to add the field AUTN_NEEDS_MEDIA_SERVER_ANALYSIS to all
JPEG, TIFF and BMP documents. This field indicates to CFS that the file should be sent to a Media
Server for analysis (you must also define the MediaServerAnalysis task in the CFS configuration file).
The script finds the file type using the DREREFERENCE document field, so this field must contain the file
extension for the script to work correctly.
function handler(config, document, params)
local extensions_for_ocr = { jpg = 1 , tif = 1, bmp = 1 };
local filename = document:getFieldValue("DREREFERENCE");
local extension, extension_found = filename:gsub("^.*%.(%w+)$", "%1", 1);
if extension_found > 0 then
if extensions_for_ocr[extension:lower()] ~= nil then
document:addField("AUTN_NEEDS_MEDIA_SERVER_ANALYSIS", "");
end
end
return true;
end
Merge Document Fields
This script demonstrates how to merge the values of document fields.
When you extract data from a repository, the connector can produce documents that have multiple
values for a single field, for example:
#DREFIELD ATTACHMENT="attachment.txt"
#DREFIELD ATTACHMENT="image.jpg"
#DREFIELD ATTACHMENT="document.pdf"
This script shows how to merge the values of these fields, so that the values are contained in a single
field, for example:
#DREFIELD ATTACHMENTS="attachment.txt, image.jpg, document.pdf"
Example Script
function handler(config, document, params)
onefield(document,"ATTACHMENT","ATTACHMENTS")
return true;
end
function onefield(document,existingfield,newfield)
if document:hasField(existingfield) then
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 56 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 7: Manipulate Documents
local values = { document:getFieldValues(existingfield) }
local newfieldvalue=""
for i,v in ipairs(values) do
if i>1 then
newfieldvalue = newfieldvalue ..", "
end
newfieldvalue = newfieldvalue..v
end
document:addField(newfield,newfieldvalue)
end
return true;
end
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 57 of 156
Chapter 8: Ingestion
After a connector finds new documents in a repository, or documents that have been updated or deleted, it
sends this information to another component called the ingestion target. This section describes where you
can send the information retrieved by the HPE HTTP Connector, and how to configure the ingestion target.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Introduction
58
Send Data to Connector Framework Server
59
Send Data to Haven OnDemand
60
Send Data to Another Repository
62
Index Documents Directly into IDOL Server
62
Index Documents into Vertica
63
Send Data to a MetaStore
66
Run a Lua Script after Ingestion
67
Introduction
A connector can send information to a single ingestion target, which could be:
l
l
l
Connector Framework Server. To process information and then index it into IDOL, Haven OnDemand, or
Vertica, send the information to a Connector Framework Server (CFS). Any files retrieved by the connector
are imported using KeyView, which means the information contained in the files is converted into a form
that can be indexed. If the files are containers that contain subfiles, these are extracted. You can
manipulate and enrich documents using Lua scripts and automated tasks such as field standardization,
image analysis, and speech-to-text processing. CFS can index your documents into one or more indexes.
For more information about CFS, refer to the Connector Framework Server Administration Guide.
Haven OnDemand. You can index documents directly into a Haven OnDemand text index. Haven
OnDemand can extract text, metadata, and subfiles from over 1000 different file formats, so you might not
need to send documents to CFS.
Another Connector. Use another connector to keep another repository up-to-date. When a connector
receives documents, it inserts, updates, or deletes the information in the repository. For example, you
could use an Exchange Connector to extract information from Microsoft Exchange, and send the
documents to a Notes Connector so that the information is inserted, updated, or deleted in the Notes
repository.
Note: The destination connector can only insert, update, and delete documents if it supports the
insert, update, and delete fetch actions.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 58 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 8: Ingestion
In most cases HPE recommends ingesting documents through CFS, so that KeyView can extract
content from any files retrieved by the connector and add this information to your documents. You can
also use CFS to manipulate and enrich documents before they are indexed. However, if required you
can configure the connector to index documents directly into:
l
l
l
IDOL Server. You might index documents directly into IDOL Server when your connector produces
metadata-only documents (documents that do not have associated files). In this case there is no
need for the documents to be imported. Connectors that can produce metadata-only documents
include ODBC Connector and Oracle Connector.
Vertica. The metadata extracted by connectors is structured information held in structured fields, so
you might use Vertica to analyze this information.
MetaStore. You can index document metadata into a MetaStore for records management.
Send Data to Connector Framework Server
This section describes how to configure ingestion into Connector Framework Server (CFS).
To send data to a CFS
1. Stop the connector.
2. Open the connector’s configuration file in a text editor.
3. In the [Ingestion] section, set the following parameters:
EnableIngestion To enable ingestion, set this parameter to true.
IngesterType
To send data to CFS, set this parameter to CFS.
IngestHost
The host name or IP address of the CFS.
IngestPort
The port of the CFS.
For example:
[Ingestion]
EnableIngestion=True
IngesterType=CFS
IngestHost=localhost
IngestPort=7000
4. (Optional) If you are sending documents to CFS for indexing into IDOL Server, set the
IndexDatabase parameter. When documents are indexed, IDOL adds each document to the
database specified in the document's DREDBNAME field. The connector sets this field for each
document, using the value of IndexDatabase.
IndexDatabase The name of the IDOL database into which documents are indexed. Ensure
that this database exists in the IDOL Server configuration file.
l
To index all documents retrieved by the connector into the same IDOL database, set this
parameter in the [Ingestion] section.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 59 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 8: Ingestion
l
To use a different database for documents retrieved by each task, set this parameter in the
TaskName section.
5. Save and close the configuration file.
Send Data to Haven OnDemand
This section describes how to configure ingestion into Haven OnDemand. HPE HTTP Connector can
index documents into a Haven OnDemand text index, or send the documents to a Haven OnDemand
combination which can perform additional processing and then index the documents into a text index.
Note: Haven OnDemand combinations do not accept binary files, so any documents that have
associated binary files are indexed directly into a text index and cannot be sent to a combination.
Prepare Haven OnDemand
Before you can send documents to Haven OnDemand, you must create a text index. For information
about how to create text indexes, refer to the Haven OnDemand documentation.
Before you can send documents to a Haven OnDemand combination endpoint, the combination must
exist. HPE HTTP Connector requires your combination to accept the following input parameters, and
produce the following output.
Input Parameters
Name
Type
Description
json
any
A JSON object that contains a single attribute 'documents' that is
an array of document objects.
index
string
The name of the text index that you want the combination to add
documents to. HPE HTTP Connector uses the value of the
parameter HavenOnDemandIndexName to set this value.
duplicate_mode
string
Specifies how to handle duplicates when adding documents to
the text index. HPE HTTP Connector uses the value of the
parameter HavenOnDemandDuplicateMode to set this value.
Name
Type
Description
result
any
The result of the call to AddToTextIndex made by the
combination.
Output
Send Data to Haven OnDemand
This section describes how to send documents to Haven OnDemand.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 60 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 8: Ingestion
To send data to Haven OnDemand
1. Stop the connector.
2. Open the connector’s configuration file in a text editor.
3. In the [Ingestion] section, set the following parameters:
EnableIngestion
To enable ingestion, set this parameter to true.
IngesterType
To send data to Haven OnDemand, set this parameter to
HavenOnDemand.
HavenOnDemandApiKey
Your Haven OnDemand API key. You can obtain the key
from your Haven OnDemand account.
HavenOnDemandIndexName
The name of the Haven OnDemand text index to index
documents into.
IngestSSLConfig
The name of a section in the connector's configuration file
that contains SSL settings. The connection to Haven
OnDemand must be made over TLS. For more information
about sending documents to the ingestion server over TLS,
see Configure Outgoing SSL Connections, on page 30.
HavenOnDemandCombinationName (Optional) The name of the Haven OnDemand combination
to send documents to. If you set this parameter, HPE
HTTP Connector sends documents to the combination
endpoint instead of indexing them directly into the text
index.
Note: Haven OnDemand combinations do not accept
binary files. Therefore any document that has an
associated binary file is indexed directly into the text
index.
If you don't set this parameter, HPE HTTP Connector
indexes all documents directly into the text index specified
by HavenOnDemandIndexName.
For example:
[Ingestion]
EnableIngestion=True
IngesterType=HavenOnDemand
HavenOnDemandApiKey=[Your API Key]
HavenOnDemandIndexName=MyTextIndex
IngestSSLConfig=SSLOptions
HavenOnDemandCombinationName=MyCombination
[SSLOptions]
SSLMethod=TLSV1
4. Save and close the configuration file.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 61 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 8: Ingestion
Send Data to Another Repository
You can configure a connector to send the information it retrieves to another connector. When the
destination connector receives the documents, it inserts them into another repository. When
documents are updated or deleted in the source repository, the source connector sends this information
to the destination connector so that the documents can be updated or deleted in the other repository.
Note: The destination connector can only insert, update, and delete documents if it supports the
insert, update, and delete fetch actions.
To send data to another connector for ingestion into another repository
1. Stop the connector.
2. Open the connector’s configuration file in a text editor.
3. In the [Ingestion] section, set the following parameters:
EnableIngestion To enable ingestion, set this parameter to true.
IngesterType
To send data to another repository, set this parameter to Connector.
IngestHost
The host name or IP address of the machine hosting the destination
connector.
IngestPort
The ACI port of the destination connector.
IngestActions
Set this parameter so that the source connector runs a Lua script to convert
documents into form that can be used with the destination connector's
insert action. For information about the required format, refer to the
Administration Guide for the destination connector.
For example:
[Ingestion]
EnableIngestion=True
IngesterType=Connector
IngestHost=AnotherConnector
IngestPort=7010
IngestActions=Lua:transformation.lua
4. Save and close the configuration file.
Index Documents Directly into IDOL Server
This section describes how to index documents from a connector directly into IDOL Server.
Tip: In most cases, HPE recommends sending documents to a Connector Framework Server
(CFS). CFS extracts metadata and content from any files that the connector has retrieved, and can
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 62 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 8: Ingestion
manipulate and enrich documents before they are indexed. CFS also has the capability to insert
documents into more than one index, for example IDOL Server and a Vertica database. For
information about sending documents to CFS, see Send Data to Connector Framework Server, on
page 59
To index documents directly into IDOL Server
1. Stop the connector.
2. Open the connector’s configuration file in a text editor.
3. In the [Ingestion] section, set the following parameters:
EnableIngestion To enable ingestion, set this parameter to true.
IngesterType
To send data to IDOL Server, set this parameter to Indexer.
IndexDatabase
The name of the IDOL database to index documents into.
For example:
[Ingestion]
EnableIngestion=True
IngesterType=Indexer
IndexDatabase=News
4. In the [Indexing] section of the configuration file, set the following parameters:
IndexerType To send data to IDOL Server, set this parameter to IDOL.
Host
The host name or IP address of the IDOL Server.
Port
The IDOL Server ACI port.
SSLConfig
(Optional) The name of a section in the connector's configuration file that
contains SSL settings for connecting to IDOL.
For example:
[Indexing]
IndexerType=IDOL
Host=10.1.20.3
Port=9000
SSLConfig=SSLOptions
[SSLOptions]
SSLMethod=SSLV23
5. Save and close the configuration file.
Index Documents into Vertica
HPE HTTP Connector can index documents into Vertica, so that you can run queries on structured
fields (document metadata).
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 63 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 8: Ingestion
Depending on the metadata contained in your documents, you could investigate the average age of
documents in a repository. You might want to answer questions such as: How much time has passed
since the documents were last updated? How many files are regularly updated? Does this represent a
small proportion of the total number of documents? Who are the most active users?
Tip: In most cases, HPE recommends sending documents to a Connector Framework Server
(CFS). CFS extracts metadata and content from any files that the connector has retrieved, and can
manipulate and enrich documents before they are indexed. CFS also has the capability to insert
documents into more than one index, for example IDOL Server and a Vertica database. For
information about sending documents to CFS, see Send Data to Connector Framework Server, on
page 59
Prerequisites
l
l
HPE HTTP Connector supports indexing into Vertica 7.1 and later.
You must install the appropriate Vertica ODBC drivers (version 7.1 or later) on the machine that
hosts HPE HTTP Connector. If you want to use an ODBC Data Source Name (DSN) in your
connection string, you will also need to create the DSN. For more information about installing Vertica
ODBC drivers and creating the DSN, refer to the HPE Vertica documentation.
New, Updated and Deleted Documents
When documents are indexed into Vertica, HPE HTTP Connector adds a timestamp that contains the
time when the document was indexed. The field is named VERTICA_INDEXER_TIMESTAMP and the
timestamp is in the format YYYY-MM-DD HH:NN:SS.
When a document in a data repository is modified, HPE HTTP Connector adds a new record to the
database with a new timestamp. All of the fields are populated with the latest data. The record
describing the older version of the document is not deleted. You can create a projection to make sure
your queries only return the latest record for a document.
When HPE HTTP Connector detects that a document has been deleted from a repository, the
connector inserts a new record into the database. The record contains only the DREREFERENCE and the
field VERTICA_INDEXER_DELETED set to TRUE.
Fields, Sub-Fields, and Field Attributes
Documents that are created by connectors can have multiple levels of fields, and field attributes. A
database table has a flat structure, so this information is indexed into Vertica as follows:
l
l
l
Document fields become columns in the flex table. An IDOL document field and the corresponding
database column have the same name.
Sub-fields become columns in the flex table. A document field named my_field with a sub-field
named subfield results in two columns, my_field and my_field.subfield.
Field attributes become columns in the flex table. A document field named my_field, with an
attribute named my_attribute results in two columns, my_field holding the field value and my_
field.my_attribute holding the attribute value.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 64 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 8: Ingestion
Prepare the Vertica Database
Indexing documents into a standard database is problematic, because documents do not have a fixed
schema. A document that represents an image has different metadata fields to a document that
represents an e-mail message. Vertica databases solve this problem with flex tables. You can create a
flex table without any column definitions, and you can insert a record regardless of whether a
referenced column exists.
You must create a flex table before you index data into Vertica.
When creating the table, consider the following:
l
l
Flex tables store entire records in a single column named __raw__. The default maximum size of the
__raw__ column is 128K. You might need to increase the maximum size if you are indexing
documents with large amounts of metadata.
Documents are identified by their DREREFERENCE. HPE recommends that you do not restrict the size
of any column that holds this value, because this could result in values being truncated. As a result,
rows that represent different documents might appear to represent the same document. If you do
restrict the size of the DREREFERENCE column, ensure that the length is sufficient to hold the longest
DREREFERENCE that might be indexed.
To create a flex table without any column definitions, run the following query:
create flex table my_table();
To improve query performance, create real columns for the fields that you query frequently. For
documents indexed by a connector, this is likely to include the DREREFERENCE:
create flex table my_table(DREREFERENCE varchar NOT NULL);
You can add new column definitions to a flex table at any time. Vertica automatically populates new
columns with values for existing records. The values for existing records are extracted from the __raw_
_ column.
For more information about creating and using flex tables, refer to the HPE Vertica Documentation or
contact HPE Vertica technical support.
Send Data to Vertica
To send documents to a Vertica database, follow these steps.
To send data to Vertica
1. Stop the connector.
2. Open the connector’s configuration file in a text editor.
3. In the [Ingestion] section, set the following parameters:
EnableIngestion To enable ingestion, set this parameter to true.
IngesterType
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
To send data to a Vertica database, set this parameter to Indexer.
Page 65 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 8: Ingestion
For example:
[Ingestion]
EnableIngestion=TRUE
IngesterType=Indexer
4. In the [Indexing] section, set the following parameters:
IndexerType
To send data to a Vertica database, set this parameter to Library.
LibraryDirectory The directory that contains the library to use to index data.
LibraryName
The name of the library to use to index data. You can omit the .dll or .so
file extension. Set this parameter to verticaIndexer.
ConnectionString The connection string to use to connect to the Vertica database.
TableName
The name of the table in the Vertica database to index the documents into.
The table must be a flex table and must exist before you start indexing
documents. For more information, see Prepare the Vertica Database, on
the previous page.
For example:
[Indexing]
IndexerType=Library
LibraryDirectory=indexerdlls
LibraryName=verticaIndexer
ConnectionString=DSN=VERTICA
TableName=my_flex_table
5. Save and close the configuration file.
Send Data to a MetaStore
You can configure a connector to send documents to a MetaStore. When you send data to a Metastore,
any files associated with documents are ignored.
Tip: In most cases, HPE recommends sending documents to a Connector Framework Server
(CFS). CFS extracts metadata and content from any files that the connector has retrieved, and can
manipulate and enrich documents before they are indexed. CFS also has the capability to insert
documents into more than one index, for example IDOL Server and a MetaStore. For information
about sending documents to CFS, see Send Data to Connector Framework Server, on page 59
To send data to a MetaStore
1. Stop the connector.
2. Open the connector’s configuration file in a text editor.
3. In the [Ingestion] section, set the following parameters:
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 66 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 8: Ingestion
EnableIngestion To enable ingestion, set this parameter to true.
To send data to a MetaStore, set this parameter to Indexer.
IngesterType
For example:
[Ingestion]
EnableIngestion=True
IngesterType=Indexer
4. In the [Indexing] section, set the following parameters:
IndexerType To send data to a MetaStore, set this parameter to MetaStore.
Host
The host name of the machine hosting the MetaStore.
Port
The port of the MetaStore.
For example:
[Indexing]
IndexerType=Metastore
Host=MyMetaStore
Port=8000
5. Save and close the configuration file.
Run a Lua Script after Ingestion
You can configure the connector to run a Lua script after batches of documents are successfully sent to
the ingestion server. This can be useful if you need to log information about documents that were
processed, for monitoring and reporting purposes.
To configure the file name of the Lua script to run, set the IngestBatchActions configuration
parameter in the connector's configuration file.
l
l
To run the script for all batches of documents that are ingested, set the parameter in the
[Ingestion] section.
To run the script for batches of documents retrieved by a specific task, set the parameter in the
[TaskName] section.
Note: If you set the parameter in a [TaskName] section, the connector does not run any scripts
specified in the [Ingestion] section for that task.
For example:
[Ingestion]
IngestBatchActions0=LUA:./scripts/myScript.lua
For more information about this parameter, refer to the HPE HTTP Connector Reference.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 67 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 8: Ingestion
The Lua script must have the following structure:
function batchhandler(documents, ingesttype)
...
end
The batchhandler function is called after each batch of documents is sent to the ingestion server. The
function is passed the following arguments:
Argument
Description
documents
A table of document objects, where each object represents a document that was sent
to the ingestion server.
A document object is an internal representation of a document. You can modify the
document object and this changes the document. However, as the script runs after
the documents are sent to the ingestion server, any changes you make are not sent to
CFS or IDOL.
ingesttype A string that contains the ingest type for the documents. The batchhandler function
is called multiple times if different document types are sent.
For example, the following script prints the ingest type (ADD, DELETE, or UPDATE) and the reference for
all successfully processed documents to stdout:
function batchhandler(documents, ingesttype)
for i,document in ipairs(documents) do
local ref = document:getReference()
print(ingesttype..": "..ref)
end
end
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 68 of 156
Chapter 9: Monitor the Connector
This section describes how to monitor the connector.
•
•
•
•
•
IDOL Admin
69
Use the Connector Logs
71
Set Up Event Handlers
72
Set Up Performance Monitoring
74
Set Up Document Tracking
76
IDOL Admin
IDOL Admin is an administration interface for performing ACI server administration tasks, such as gathering
status information, monitoring performance, and controlling the service. IDOL Admin provides an alternative
to constructing actions and sending them from your web browser.
Prerequisites
By default, the latest version of HPE HTTP Connector should include the admin.dat file that is required to
run IDOL Admin. If you do not have this file, you must download it separately.
Supported Browsers
IDOL Admin supports the following browsers:
l
Internet Explorer 11 and later
l
Edge
l
Chrome (latest version)
l
Firefox (latest version)
Install IDOL Admin
You must install IDOL Admin on the same host that the ACI server or component is installed on. To set up a
component to use IDOL Admin, you must configure the location of the admin.dat file and enable Cross Origin
Resource Sharing.
To install IDOL Admin
1. Stop the ACI server.
2. Save the admin.dat file to any directory on the host.
3. Using a text editor, open the ACI server or component configuration file. For the location of the
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 69 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 9: Monitor the Connector
configuration file, see the ACI server documentation.
4. In the [Paths] section of the configuration file, set the AdminFile parameter to the location of the
admin.dat file. If you do not set this parameter, the ACI server attempts to find the admin.dat file
in its working directory when you call the IDOL Admin interface.
5. Enable Cross Origin Resource Sharing.
6. In the [Service] section, add the Access-Control-Allow-Origin parameter and set its value to
the URLs that you want to use to access the interface.
Each URL must include:
l
the http:// or https:// prefix
Note: URLs can contain the https:// prefix if the ACI server or component has SSL
enabled.
l
The host that IDOL Admin is installed on
l
The ACI port of the component that you are using IDOL Admin for
Separate multiple URLs with spaces.
For example, you could specify different URLs for the local host and remote hosts:
Access-Control-Allow-Origin=http://localhost:9010
http://Computer1.Company.com:9010
Alternatively, you can set Access-Control-Allow-Origin=*, which allows you to access IDOL
Admin using any valid URL (for example, localhost, direct IP address, or the host name). The
wildcard character (*) is supported only if no other entries are specified.
If you do not set the Access-Control-Allow-Origin parameter, IDOL Admin can communicate
only with the server’s ACI port, and not the index or service ports.
7. Start the ACI server.
You can now access IDOL Admin (see Access IDOL Admin, below).
Access IDOL Admin
You access IDOL Admin from a web browser. You can access the interface only through URLs that are
set in the Access-Control-Allow-Origin parameter in the ACI server or component configuration file.
For more information about configuring URL access, see Install IDOL Admin, on the previous page.
To access IDOL Admin from the host that it is installed on
l
Type the following URL into the address bar of your web browser:
http://localhost:port/action=admin
where port is the ACI server or component ACI port.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 70 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 9: Monitor the Connector
To access IDOL Admin from a different host
l
Type the following URL into the address bar of your web browser:
http://host:port/action=admin
where:
host
is the name or IP address of the host that IDOL Admin is installed on.
port
is the ACI server or component ACI port of the IDOL Admin host.
Use the Connector Logs
As the HPE HTTP Connector runs, it outputs messages to its logs. Most log messages occur due to
normal operation, for example when the connector starts, receives actions, or sends documents for
ingestion. If the connector encounters an error, the logs are the first place to look for information to help
troubleshoot the problem.
The connector separates messages into the following message types, each of which relates to specific
features:
Log Message Type
Description
Action
Logs actions that are received by the connector, and related messages.
Application
Logs application-related occurrences, such as when the connector starts.
Synchronize
Messages related to the Synchronize fetch action.
Customize Logging
You can customize logging by setting up your own log streams. Each log stream creates a separate log
file in which specific log message types (for example, action, index, application, or import) are logged.
To set up log streams
1. Open the HPE HTTP Connector configuration file in a text editor.
2. Find the [Logging] section. If the configuration file does not contain a [Logging] section, add
one.
3. In the [Logging] section, create a list of the log streams that you want to set up, in the format
N=LogStreamName. List the log streams in consecutive order, starting from 0 (zero). For example:
[Logging]
LogLevel=FULL
LogDirectory=logs
0=ApplicationLogStream
1=ActionLogStream
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 71 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 9: Monitor the Connector
You can also use the [Logging] section to configure any default values for logging configuration
parameters, such as LogLevel. For more information, see the HPE HTTP Connector Reference.
4. Create a new section for each of the log streams. Each section must have the same name as the
log stream. For example:
[ApplicationLogStream]
[ActionLogStream]
5. Specify the settings for each log stream in the appropriate section. You can specify the type of
logging to perform (for example, full logging), whether to display log messages on the console, the
maximum size of log files, and so on. For example:
[ApplicationLogStream]
LogTypeCSVs=application
LogFile=application.log
LogHistorySize=50
LogTime=True
LogEcho=False
LogMaxSizeKBs=1024
[ActionLogStream]
LogTypeCSVs=action
LogFile=logs/action.log
LogHistorySize=50
LogTime=True
LogEcho=False
LogMaxSizeKBs=1024
6. Save and close the configuration file. Restart the service for your changes to take effect.
Set Up Event Handlers
The fetch actions sent to a connector are asynchronous. Asynchronous actions do not run
immediately, but are added to a queue. This means that the person or application that sends the action
does not receive an immediate response. However, you can configure the connector to call an event
handler when an asynchronous action starts, finishes, or encounters an error.
You can use an event handler to:
l
return data about an event back to the application that sent the action.
l
write event data to a text file, to log any errors that occur.
The connector can call an event handler for the following events:
OnStart
The OnStart event is called when the connector starts processing an asynchronous
action.
OnFinish The OnFinish event is called when the connector successfully finishes processing an
asynchronous action.
OnError
The OnError event is called when an asynchronous action fails and cannot continue.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 72 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 9: Monitor the Connector
Event Handlers
You can configure the connector to call an internal event handler, or write your own event handler.
Connectors include the following internal event handlers.
TextFileHandler
The TextFileHandler writes event data to a text file.
HttpHandler
The HttpHandler sends event data to a URL.
LuaHandler
The LuaHandler runs a Lua script. The event data is passed into the script. The script must have the
following form:
function handler(request, xml)
...
end
l
request is a table holding the request parameters.
l
xml is a string holding the response to the request.
Configure an Event Handler
To configure an event handler, follow these steps.
To configure an event handler
1. Stop the connector.
2. Open the connector’s configuration file in a text editor.
3. Use the OnStart, OnFinish, or OnError parameter to specify the name of a section in the
configuration file that contains event handler settings for the corresponding event.
l
To run an event handler for all actions, set these parameters in the [Actions] section. For
example:
[Actions]
OnStart=NormalEvents
OnFinish=NormalEvents
OnError=ErrorEvents
l
To run an event handler for specific actions, use the action name as a section in the
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 73 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 9: Monitor the Connector
configuration file. The following example runs an event handler when the Fetch action starts
and finishes successfully:
[Fetch]
OnStart=NormalEvents
OnFinish=NormalEvents
4. Create a new section in the configuration file to contain the settings for your event handler. You
must name the section using the name you specified with the OnStart, OnFinish, or OnError
parameter.
5. In the new section, set the following parameters.
LibraryName (Required) The name of the library to use as the event handler. You can write
your own event handler, or use one of the internal event handlers:
l
l
l
To write event data to a text file, set this parameter to TextFileHandler, and
then set the FilePath parameter to specify the path of the file.
To send event data to a URL, set this parameter to HttpHandler, and then
use the HTTP event handler parameters to specify the URL, proxy server
settings, credentials and so on.
To run a Lua script, set this parameter to LuaHandler, and then set the
LuaScript parameter to specify the path to the Lua script.
For example:
[NormalEvents]
LibraryName=TextFileHandler
FilePath=./events.txt
[ErrorEvents]
LibraryName=LuaHandler
LuaScript=./error.lua
6. Save and close the configuration file.
Set Up Performance Monitoring
You can configure a connector to pause tasks temporarily if performance indicators on the local
machine or a remote machine breach certain limits. For example, if there is a high load on the CPU or
memory of the repository from which you are retrieving information, you might want the connector to
pause until the machine recovers.
Note: Performance monitoring is available on Windows platforms only. To monitor a remote
machine, both the connector machine and remote machine must be running Windows.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 74 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 9: Monitor the Connector
Configure the Connector to Pause
To configure the connector to pause
1. Open the configuration file in a text editor.
2. Find the [FetchTasks] section, or a [TaskName] section.
l
To pause all tasks, use the [FetchTasks] section.
l
To specify settings for a single task, find the [TaskName] section for the task.
3. Set the following configuration parameters:
PerfMonCounterNameN
The names of the performance counters that you want the
connector to monitor. You can use any counter that is available in
the Windows perfmon utility.
PerfMonCounterMinN
The minimum value permitted for the specified performance
counter. If the counter falls below this value, the connector pauses
until the counter meets the limits again.
PerfMonCounterMaxN
The maximum value permitted for the specified performance
counter. If the counter exceeds this value, the connector pauses
until the counter meets the limits again.
PerfMonAvgOverReadings (Optional) The number of readings that the connector averages
before checking a performance counter against the specified
limits. For example, if you set this parameter to 5, the connector
averages the last five readings and pauses only if the average
breaches the limits. Increasing this value makes the connector
less likely to pause if the limits are breached for a short time.
Decreasing this value allows the connector to continue working
faster following a pause.
PerfMonQueryFrequency
(Optional) The amount of time, in seconds, that the connector
waits between taking readings from a performance counter.
For example:
[FetchTasks]
PerfMonCounterName0=\\machine-hostname\Memory\Available MBytes
PerfMonCounterMin0=1024
PerfMonCounterMax0=1024000
PerfMonCounterName1=\\machine-hostname\Processor(_Total)\% Processor Time
PerfMonCounterMin1=0
PerfMonCounterMax1=70
PerfMonAvgOverReadings=5
PerfMonQueryFrequency=10
Note: You must set both a minimum and maximum value for each performance counter. You
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 75 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 9: Monitor the Connector
can not set only a minimum or only a maximum.
4. Save and close the configuration file.
Determine if an Action is Paused
To determine whether an action has been paused for performance reasons, use the QueueInfo action:
/action=queueInfo&queueAction=getStatus&queueName=fetch
You can also include the optional token parameter to return information about a single action:
/action=queueInfo&queueAction=getStatus&queueName=fetch&token=...
The connector returns the status, for example:
<autnresponse>
<action>QUEUEINFO</action>
<response>SUCCESS</response>
<responsedata>
<actions>
<action owner="2266112570">
<status>Processing</status>
<queued_time>2016-Jul-27 14:49:40</queued_time>
<time_in_queue>1</time_in_queue>
<process_start_time>2016-Jul-27 14:49:41</process_start_time>
<time_processing>219</time_processing>
<documentcounts>
<documentcount errors="0" task="MYTASK"/>
</documentcounts>
<fetchaction>SYNCHRONIZE</fetchaction>
<pausedforperformance>true</pausedforperformance>
<token>...</token>
</action>
</actions>
</responsedata>
</autnresponse>
When the element pausedforperformance has a value of true, the connector has paused the task for
performance reasons. If the pausedforperformance element is not present in the response, the
connector has not paused the task.
Set Up Document Tracking
Document tracking reports metadata about documents when they pass through various stages in the
indexing process. For example, when a connector finds a new document and sends it for ingestion, a
document tracking event is created that shows the document has been added. Document tracking can
help you detect problems with the indexing process.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 76 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 9: Monitor the Connector
You can write document tracking events to a database, log file, or IDOL Server. For information about
how to set up a database to store document tracking events, refer to the IDOL Server Administration
Guide.
To enable Document Tracking
1. Open the connector's configuration file.
2. Create a new section in the configuration file, named [DocumentTracking].
3. In the new section, specify where the document tracking events are sent.
l
To send document tracking events to a database through ODBC, set the following parameters:
Backend
To send document tracking events to a database, set this parameter to
Library.
LibraryPath
Specify the location of the ODBC document tracking library. This is
included with IDOL Server.
ConnectionString The ODBC connection string for the database.
For example:
[DocumentTracking]
Backend=Library
LibraryPath=C:\Autonomy\IDOLServer\IDOL\modules\dt_odbc.dll
ConnectionString=DSN=MyDatabase
l
To send document tracking events to the connector's synchronize log, set the following
parameters:
To send document tracking events to the connector's logs, set this
parameter to Log.
Backend
DatabaseName The name of the log stream to send the document tracking events to. Set
this parameter to synchronize.
For example:
[DocumentTracking]
Backend=Log
DatabaseName=synchronize
l
To send document tracking events to an IDOL Server, set the following parameters:
Backend
To send document tracking events to an IDOL Server, set this parameter to
IDOL.
TargetHost The host name or IP address of the IDOL Server.
TargetPort The index port of the IDOL Server.
For example:
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 77 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 9: Monitor the Connector
[DocumentTracking]
Backend=IDOL
TargetHost=idol
TargetPort=9001
For more information about the parameters you can use to configure document tracking, refer to
the HPE HTTP Connector Reference.
4. Save and close the configuration file.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 78 of 156
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods
Reference
This section describes the functions and methods that you can use in your Lua scripts.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
General Functions
79
LuaConfig Methods
106
LuaDocument Methods
109
LuaField Methods
127
LuaLog Methods
139
LuaXmlDocument Methods
140
LuaXmlNodeSet Methods
143
LuaXmlNode Methods
144
LuaXmlAttribute Methods
148
LuaRegexMatch Methods
150
General Functions
Function
Description
abs_path
Returns the supplied path as an absolute path.
base64_decode
Decodes a base64-encoded string.
base64_encode
Base64-encodes a string.
convert_date_
time
Converts date and time formats using standard IDOL date formats.
convert_
encoding
Converts the encoding of a string from one character encoding to another.
copy_file
Copies a file.
create_path
Creates the specified directory tree.
create_uuid
Creates a universally unique identifier.
delete_file
Deletes a file.
delete_path
Deletes a specified directory, but only if it is empty.
doc_tracking
Raises a document tracking event for a document.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 79 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Function
Description
encrypt
Encrypts a string.
encrypt_
security_field
Encrypts the ACL.
extract_date
Searches a string for a date and returns the date.
file_setdates
Modifies the properties of a file (for example created date, last modified date).
get_config
Loads a configuration file.
get_log
Returns a LuaLog object that provides the capability to use a log stream configured in
the connector's configuration file.
get_task_config
Returns a LuaConfig object that contains the configuration of the fetch task that called
the script.
get_task_name
Returns the name of the fetch task that called the script.
getcwd
Returns the current working directory of the application.
gobble_
whitespace
Reduces multiple adjacent while spaces.
hash_file
Hashes a file using the SHA1 or MD5 algorithm.
hash_string
Hashes a string.
is_dir
Checks if the supplied path is a directory.
log
Appends log messages to a file.
move_file
Moves a file.
parse_csv
Parse comma-separated values into individual strings.
parse_xml
Parse XML string to a LuaXmlDocument.
regex_match
Performs a regular expression match on a string.
regex_replace_all Searches a string for matches to a regular expression, and replaces the matches.
regex_search
Performs a regular expression search on a string.
script_path
Returns the path and file name of the script that is running.
send_aci_action
Sends a query to an ACI server.
send_aci_
command
Sends a query to an ACI server.
send_and_wait_
for_async_aci_
action
Sends a query to an ACI server and then waits for the action to finish. Use this method
for sending asynchronous actions so that the action response is returned instead of a
token.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 80 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Function
Description
sleep
Pauses the running thread.
string_uint_less
Compares the length of two strings.
unzip_file
Extracts the contents of a zip file.
url_escape
Percent-encode a string.
url_unescape
Replaces URL escaped characters and returns a standard string.
xml_encode
Takes a string and encodes it using XML escaping.
zip_file
Zips the supplied path (file or directory).
abs_path
The abs_path method returns the supplied path as an absolute path.
Syntax
abs_path( path )
Arguments
Argument Description
path
(string) A relative path.
Returns
(String). A string containing the supplied path as an absolute path.
base64_decode
The base64_decode method decodes a base64-encoded string.
Syntax
base64_decode( input )
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 81 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Arguments
Argument Description
input
(string) The string to decode.
Returns
(String). The decoded string.
If the input is not a valid base64-encoded string, the function returns nil.
base64_encode
The base64_encode method base64-encodes a string.
Syntax
base64_encode( input )
Arguments
Argument Description
input
(string) The string to base64-encode.
Returns
(String). A base64-encoded string.
convert_date_time
The convert_date_time method converts date and time formats using standard IDOL formats. All
date and time input is treated as local time unless it contains explicit time zone information.
The InputFormatCSV and OutputFormat arguments specify date and time formats, and accept the
following values:
l
l
AUTNDATE. The HPE date format (1 to a maximum of 10 digits). This format covers the epoch range
(1 January 1970 to 19 January 2038) to a resolution of one second, and dates between 30 October
1093 BC and 26 October 3058 to a resolution of one minute.
date formats that you specify using one or more of the following:
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 82 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
YY
Year (2 digits). For example, 99, 00, 01 and so on.
YYYY
Year (4 digits). For example, 1999, 2000, 2001 and so on.
#YY+
Year (2 or 4 digits). If you provide 2 digits, then it uses the YY format. If you provide
4 digits, it uses the YYYY format.
For example, it interprets 07 as 2007 AD and 1007 as 1007 AD.
#Y
Year (1 to a maximum of 16 digits) and can be followed by AD or BC. An apostrophe
(') immediately before the year denotes a truncated year. For example, 2008, '97
(interpreted as 1997), 97 (interpreted as 97 AD), '08 (interpreted as 2008), 2008 AD
and 200 BC. A truncated year with a BC identifier is invalid ('08 BC).
#FULLYEAR
Year (1 to a maximum of 16 digits). For example 8, 98, 108, 2008, each of which is
taken literally. The year is taken relative to the common EPOCH (0AD).
#ADBC
Time Period. For example, AD, CE, BC, BCE or any predefined list of EPOCH
indicators. Typically, the year specified using the above Year formats is interpreted
as un-truncated and relative to the EPOCH. For example, 84 AD is interpreted as
1984 AD and 84 BC is interpreted as 84 BC.
The only exception to this is when you use both #YY+ and #ADBC. In this case, the
format is interpreted as un-truncated even if the year was set to truncated by #YY+.
For example, 99 AD is interpreted as the year 99 AD.
HPE recommends you use only YY, YYYY or #FULLYEAR with #ADBC.
LONGMONTH
A long month, for example, January, February and so on.
SHORTMONTH A short month, for example, Jan, Feb and so on.
MM
Month (2 digits). For example, 01, 10, 12 and so on.
M+
Month (1 or 2 digits). For example, 1,2,3,10 and so on.
DD
Day (2 digits). For example, 01, 02, 03, 12, 23 and so on.
D+
Day (1 or 2 digits). For example, 1, 2, 12, 13, 31 and so on.
LONGDAY
2 digits with a postfix. For example, 1st, 2nd and so on.
HH
Hour (2 digits). For example, 01, 12, 13 and so on.
H+
Hour (1 or 2 digits).
NN
Minute (2 digits).
N+
Minute (1 or 2 digits).
SS
Second (2 digits).
S+
Second (1 or 2 digits).
ZZZ
Time Zone, for example, GMT, EST, PST, and so on.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 83 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
ZZZZZ
Time Difference (1 to 9 digits). For example, +04 denotes 4 hours ahead of UTC.
Other examples include +4, +04, +0400, +0400 MSD (the string MSD is ignored). A
further example is +030, in this case the time differences is interpreted as 30
minutes.
#PM
AM or PM indicator (2 characters). For example, 2001/09/09 02:46:40 pm
#S
A space
The following table shows some example date and time formats:
Date and time format string
Example date
DD/MM/YYYY
09/05/2013
D+ SHORTMONTH YYYY
2 Jan 2001
D+ LONGMONTH YYYY HH:NN:SS ZZZZZ 17 August 2003 10:41:07 -0400
Syntax
convert_date_time( Input, InputFormatCSV, OutputFormat )
Arguments
Argument
Description
Input
(string) The date and time to convert.
InputFormatCSV (string) A comma-separated list of the possible date and time formats of the
input.
OutputFormat
(string) The format of the date and time to output.
Returns
(String). A string containing the date and time in the desired format.
convert_encoding
The convert_encoding method converts the encoding of a string from one character encoding to
another.
Syntax
convert_encoding( input, encodingTo, encodingTables [, encodingFrom])
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 84 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Arguments
Argument
Description
input
(string) The string to convert.
encodingTo
(string) The character encoding to convert to (same as IDOL encoding names).
encodingTables (string) The path to the conversion tables.
encodingFrom
(string) The character encoding to convert from. The default is “UTF8”.
Returns
(String). A string, using the specified character encoding.
copy_file
The copy_file method copies a file.
Syntax
copy_file( src, dest [, overwrite] )
Arguments
Argument
Description
src
(string) The source file.
dest
(string) The destination path and file name.
overwrite (boolean) A boolean that specifies whether to copy the file if the destination file already
exists. If this argument is false and the file already exists, the copy operation fails.
The default is true, which means that the existing file is overwritten.
Returns
(Boolean). A Boolean, true to indicate success or false for failure.
create_path
The create_path method creates the specified directory tree.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 85 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Syntax
create_path( path )
Arguments
Argument Description
path
(string) The path to create.
create_uuid
The create_uuid method creates a universally unique identifier.
Syntax
create_uuid()
Returns
(String). A string containing the universally unique identifier.
delete_file
The delete_file method deletes a file.
Syntax
delete_file( path )
Arguments
Argument Description
path
(string) The path and filename of the file to delete.
Returns
(Boolean). A boolean, true to indicate success or false for failure.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 86 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
delete_path
The delete_path function deletes the specified directory, but only if it is empty.
Syntax
delete_path( path )
Arguments
Argument Description
path
(string) The empty directory to delete.
Returns
Nothing.
Example
delete_path( "C:\MyFolder\AnotherFolder\" )
doc_tracking
The doc_tracking function raises a document tracking event for a document.
Syntax
doc_tracking( document , eventName [, eventMetadata] [, reference] )
Arguments
Argument
Description
document
(LuaDocument) The document to track.
eventName
(string) The event name. You can type a description of the event.
eventMetadata (table) A table of key-value pairs that contain metadata for the document tracking
event.
reference
(string) The document reference. You can set this parameter to override the
document reference used.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 87 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Returns
(Boolean). A Boolean that indicates whether the event was raised successfully.
Example
local ref=document:getReference()
doc_tracking(document, "The document has been processed",
{myfield="myvalue", anotherfield="anothervalue"}, ref )
encrypt
The encrypt method encrypts a string and returns the encrypted string. It uses the same encryption
method as ACL encryption.
Syntax
encrypt( content )
Arguments
Argument Description
content
(string) The string to encrypt.
Returns
(String). The encrypted string.
encrypt_security_field
The encrypt_security_field method returns the encrypted form of the supplied field.
Syntax
encrypt_security_field( field )
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 88 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Arguments
Argument Description
field
(string) An Access Control List string.
Returns
(String). An encrypted string.
extract_date
The extract_date function searches a string for a date and returns the date. This function uses
standard IDOL date formats. All date and time input is treated as local time unless it contains explicit
time zone information.
The following table describes the standard IDOL date formats:
YY
Year (2 digits). For example, 99, 00, 01 and so on.
YYYY
Year (4 digits). For example, 1999, 2000, 2001 and so on.
#YY+
Year (2 or 4 digits). If you provide 2 digits, then it uses the YY format. If you provide 4
digits, it uses the YYYY format.
For example, it interprets 07 as 2007 AD and 1007 as 1007 AD.
#Y
Year (1 to a maximum of 16 digits) and can be followed by AD or BC. An apostrophe (')
immediately before the year denotes a truncated year. For example, 2008, '97
(interpreted as 1997), 97 (interpreted as 97 AD), '08 (interpreted as 2008), 2008 AD
and 200 BC. A truncated year with a BC identifier is invalid ('08 BC).
#FULLYEAR
Year (1 to a maximum of 16 digits). For example 8, 98, 108, 2008, each of which is
taken literally. The year is taken relative to the common EPOCH (0AD).
#ADBC
Time Period. For example, AD, CE, BC, BCE or any predefined list of EPOCH indicators.
Typically, the year specified using the above Year formats is interpreted as untruncated and relative to the EPOCH. For example, 84 AD is interpreted as 1984 AD
and 84 BC is interpreted as 84 BC.
The only exception to this is when you use both #YY+ and #ADBC. In this case, the
format is interpreted as un-truncated even if the year was set to truncated by #YY+. For
example, 99 AD is interpreted as the year 99 AD.
HPE recommends you use only YY, YYYY or #FULLYEAR with #ADBC.
LONGMONTH
A long month, for example, January, February and so on.
SHORTMONTH A short month, for example, Jan, Feb and so on.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 89 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
MM
Month (2 digits). For example, 01, 10, 12 and so on.
M+
Month (1 or 2 digits). For example, 1,2,3,10 and so on.
DD
Day (2 digits). For example, 01, 02, 03, 12, 23 and so on.
D+
Day (1 or 2 digits). For example, 1, 2, 12, 13, 31 and so on.
LONGDAY
2 digits with a postfix. For example, 1st, 2nd and so on.
HH
Hour (2 digits). For example, 01, 12, 13 and so on.
H+
Hour (1 or 2 digits).
NN
Minute (2 digits).
N+
Minute (1 or 2 digits).
SS
Second (2 digits).
S+
Second (1 or 2 digits).
ZZZ
Time Zone, for example, GMT, EST, PST, and so on.
ZZZZZ
Time Difference (1 to 9 digits). For example, +04 denotes 4 hours ahead of UTC.
Other examples include +4, +04, +0400, +0400 MSD (the string MSD is ignored). A
further example is +030, in this case the time differences is interpreted as 30 minutes.
#PM
AM or PM indicator (2 characters). For example, 2001/09/09 02:46:40 pm
#S
A space
The following table shows some example date and time formats:
Date and time format string
Example date
DD/MM/YYYY
09/05/2013
D+ SHORTMONTH YYYY
2 Jan 2001
D+ LONGMONTH YYYY HH:NN:SS ZZZZZ 17 August 2003 10:41:07 -0400
Syntax
extract_date( input, formatCSV, outputFormat )
Arguments
Argument
Description
input
(string) The string that you want to search for a date.
formatCSV
(string) A comma-separated list of the possible date and time formats for dates
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 90 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Argument
Description
contained in the input.
outputFormat (string) The format for the output.
Returns
(String). A string containing the date and time in the desired format.
Example
The following example would return the value "1989/01/14":
extract_date("This string contains a date 14/01/1989 somewhere",
"DD/YYYY/MM,DD/MM/YYYY", "YYYY/MM/DD")
file_setdates
The file_setdates method sets the metadata for the file specified by path. If the format argument is
not specified, the dates must be specified in seconds since the epoch (1st January 1970).
Syntax
file_setdates( path, created, modified, accessed [, format] )
Arguments
Argument Description
path
(string) The path or filename of the file.
created
(string) The date created (Windows only).
modified
(string) The date modified.
accessed
(string) The date last accessed.
format
(string) The format of the dates supplied. The format parameter uses the same values
as other IDOL components. The default is "EPOCHSECONDS"
Returns
(Boolean). A Boolean indicating whether the operation was successful.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 91 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
get_config
The get_config function loads a configuration file.
Configuration files are cached after the first call to get_config, to avoid unnecessary disk I/O in the
likely event that the same configuration is accessed frequently by subsequent invocations of the Lua
script. One cache is maintained per Lua state, so the maximum number of reads for a configuration file
is equal to the number of threads that run Lua scripts.
If you do not specify a path, the function returns the configuration file with the same name as the
ACI server executable file.
Syntax
get_config( [path] )
Arguments
Argument Description
path
(string) The path of the configuration file to load.
Returns
(LuaConfig). A LuaConfig object.
get_log
The get_log method reads a configuration file and returns a LuaLog object that provides the capability
to use the specified log stream.
Syntax
get_log( config, logstream )
Arguments
Argument
Description
config
(LuaConfig) A LuaConfig object that represents the configuration file which contains the
log stream. You can obtain a LuaConfig object using the function get_config.
logstream (string) The name of the section in the configuration file that contains the settings for
the log stream.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 92 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Returns
(LuaLog). A LuaLog object that provides the capability to use the log stream.
Example
local config = get_config("connector.cfg")
local log = get_log(config, "SynchronizeLogStream")
get_task_config
The get_task_config function returns a LuaConfig object that contains the configuration of the fetch
task that called the script.
For information about the methods you can use to read information from the LuaConfig object, see
LuaConfig Methods, on page 106.
Syntax
get_task_config()
Returns
(LuaConfig). A LuaConfig object.
get_task_name
The get_task_name function returns a string that contains the name of the fetch task that called the
script.
Syntax
get_task_name()
Returns
(String). A string that contains the task name.
getcwd
The getcwd method returns the current working directory of the application.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 93 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Syntax
getcwd()
Returns
(String). Returns a string containing the absolute path of the current working directory.
gobble_whitespace
The gobble_whitespace method reduces multiple adjacent white spaces (tabs, carriage returns,
spaces, and so on) in the specified string to a single space.
Syntax
gobble_whitespace( input )
Arguments
Argument Description
input
(string) An input string.
Returns
(String). A string without adjacent white spaces.
hash_file
The hash_file method hashes the contents of the specified file using the SHA1 or MD5 algorithm.
Syntax
hash_file( FileName, Algorithm )
Arguments
Argument
Description
FileName
(string) The name of the file.
Algorithm (string) The type of algorithm to use. Must be either SHA1 or MD5.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 94 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Returns
(String). A hash of the file contents.
hash_string
The hash_string method hashes the specified string using the SHA1 or MD5 algorithm.
Syntax
hash_string( StringToHash, Algorithm )
Arguments
Argument
Description
StringToHash (string) The string to hash.
(string) The algorithm to use. Must be either SHA1 or MD5.
Algorithm
Returns
(String). The hashed input string.
is_dir
The is_dir method checks if the supplied path is a directory.
Syntax
is_dir( path )
Arguments
Argument Description
path
(string) The path to check.
Returns
(Boolean). Returns true if the supplied path is a directory, false otherwise.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 95 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
log
The log method appends log messages to the specified file.
Syntax
log( file, message )
Arguments
Argument Description
file
(string) The file to append log messages to.
message
(string) The message to print to the file.
move_file
The move_file method moves a file.
Syntax
move_file( src, dest [, overwrite] )
Arguments
Argument
Description
src
(string) The source file.
dest
(string) The destination file.
overwrite (boolean) A boolean that specifies whether to move the file if the destination file already
exists. If this argument is false, and the destination file already exists, the move
operation fails. The default is true, which means that the destination file is overwritten.
Returns
(Boolean). Returns true to indicate success, false otherwise.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 96 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
parse_csv
The parse_csv method parses a string of comma-separated values into individual strings. The method
understands quoted values (such that parsing 'foot, "leg, torso", elbow' produces three values) and
ignores white space around delimiters.
Syntax
parse_csv( input [, delimiter ] )
Arguments
Argument
Description
input
(string) The string to parse.
delimiter (string) The delimiter to use (the default delimiter is ",").
Returns
(Strings). You can put them in a table like this:
local results = { parse_csv("cat,tree,house", ",") };
parse_xml
The parse_xml method parses an XML string to a LuaXmlDocument.
Syntax
parse_xml( xml )
Arguments
Argument Description
xml
(string) XML data as a string.
Returns
(LuaXmlDocument). A LuaXmlDocument containing the parsed data, or nil if the string could not be
parsed.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 97 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
regex_match
The regex_match method performs a regular expression match on a string.
Syntax
regex_match( input, regex [, case] )
Arguments
Argument Description
input
(string) The string to match.
regex
(string) The regular expression to match against.
case
(boolean) A boolean that specifies whether the match is case-sensitive. The match is
case sensitive by default (true).
Returns
One or more strings, or nil.
If the string matches the regular expression, and the regular expression has no sub-matches, the full
string is returned.
If the string matches the regular expression, and the regular expression has sub-matches, then only the
sub-matches are returned.
If the string does not match the regular expression, there are no return values (any results are nil).
You can assign multiple strings to a table. To assign the return values to a table, surround the function
call with braces. For example:
matches = { regex_match( input, regex ) }
Examples
local r1, r2, r3 = regex_match( "abracadabra", "(a.r)((?:a.)*ra)" )
Results: r1="abr", r2="acadabra", r3=nil
local r1, r2, r3 = regex_match( "abracadabra", "a.r(?:a.)*ra" )
Results: r1="abracadabra", r2=nil, r3=nil
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 98 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
regex_replace_all
The regex_replace_all method searches a string for matches to a regular expression, and replaces
the matches according to the value specified by the replacement argument.
Syntax
regex_replace_all( input, regex, replacement )
Arguments
Argument
Description
input
(string) The string in which you want to replace values.
regex
(string) The regular expression to use to find values to be replaced.
replacement (string) A string that specifies how to replace the matches of the regular expression.
Returns
(String). The modified string.
Examples
regex_replace_all("ABC ABC ABC", "AB", "A")
-- returns "AC AC AC"
regex_replace_all("One Two Three", "\\w{3}", "_")
-- returns "_ _ _ee"
regex_replace_all("One Two Three", "(\\w+) (\\w+)", "\\2 \\1")
-- returns "Two One Three"
regex_search
The regex_search method performs a regular expression search on a string. This method returns a
LuaRegexMatch object, rather than strings.
Syntax
regex_search ( input, regex [, case])
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 99 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Arguments
Argument Description
input
(string) The string in which to search.
regex
(string) The regular expression with which to search.
case
(boolean) A boolean that specifies whether the match is case-sensitive. The match is
case sensitive by default (true).
Returns
(LuaRegexMatch).
script_path
The script_path function returns the path and file name of the script that is running.
Syntax
script_path()
Returns
(String, String) Returns the path of the folder that contains the script and the file name of the script, as
separate strings.
Example
local script_directory, script_filename = script_path()
You can use this function to load scripts using their location relative to the current script. In the
following example only the first return value from script_path() - the directory - is concatenated with
"more_scripts/another_script.lua".
dofile(script_path().."more_scripts/another_script.lua")
send_aci_action
The send_aci_action method sends a query to an ACI server. This method takes the action
parameters as a table instead of the full action as a string, as with send_aci_command. This avoids
issues with parameter values containing an ampersand (&).
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 100 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Syntax
send_aci_action( host, port, action [, parameters] [, timeout] [, retries] [,
sslParameters] )
Arguments
Argument
Description
host
(string) The ACI host to send the query to.
port
(number) The port to send the query to.
action
(string) The action to perform (for example, query).
parameters
(table) A Lua table containing the action parameters, for example, {
param1="value1", param2="value2" }
timeout
(number) The number of milliseconds to wait before timing out. The default is
3000.
retries
(number) The number of times to retry if the request fails. The default is 3.
sslParameters (table) A Lua table containing the SSL settings.
Returns
(String). Returns the XML response as a string. If required, you can call parse_xml on the string to
return a LuaXmlDocument. If the request fails, it returns nil.
Example
send_aci_action( "localhost", 9000, "query" ,
{text = "*", print = "all"} );
See Also
l
send_aci_command, below
send_aci_command
The send_aci_command method sends a query to an ACI server.
Syntax
send_aci_command( host, port, query [, timeout] [, retries] [, sslParameters] )
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 101 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Arguments
Argument
Description
host
(string) The ACI host to send the query to.
port
(number) The port to send the query to.
query
(string) The query to send (for example, action=getstatus)
timeout
(number) The number of milliseconds to wait before timing out. The default is
3000.
retries
(number) The number of times to retry if the request fails. The default is 3.
sslParameters (table) A Lua table containing the SSL settings.
Returns
(String). Returns the XML response as a string. If required, you can call parse_xml on the string to
return a LuaXmlDocument. If the request fails, it returns nil.
See Also
l
send_aci_action, on page 100
send_and_wait_for_async_aci_action
The send_and_wait_for_async_aci_action method sends a query to an ACI server. The method
does not return until the action has completed.
You might use this method when you want to use an asynchronous action. The send_aci_action
method returns as soon as it receives a response, which for an asynchronous action means that it
returns a token. The method send_and_wait_for_async_aci_action sends an action and then waits.
It polls the server until the action is complete and then returns the response.
Argument
Description
host
(string) The ACI host to send the query to.
port
(number) The ACI port to send the query to.
action
(string) The name of the action to perform.
parameters
(table) A Lua table containing the action parameters, for example, {
param1="value1", param2="value2" }
timeout
(number) The number of milliseconds to wait before timing out. The default is
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 102 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Argument
Description
60000 (1 minute).
retries
(number) The number of times to retry if the connection fails. The default is 3.
sslParameters (table) A Lua table containing the SSL settings.
Returns
(String). Returns the XML response as a string. If required, you can call parse_xml on the string to
return a LuaXmlDocument. If the request fails, it returns nil.
See Also
l
send_aci_action, on page 100
sleep
The sleep method pauses the thread.
Syntax
sleep( milliseconds )
Arguments
Argument
Description
milliseconds (number) The number of milliseconds for which to pause the current thread.
string_uint_less
The string_uint_less method takes two strings and returns True if the second is longer than the
first. It returns False otherwise.
Syntax
string_uint_less( input1, input2 )
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 103 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Arguments
Argument Description
input1
(string) The string that acts as the standard for comparison.
input2
(string) The string to compare against the first string.
Returns
(Boolean).
unzip_file
The unzip_file method extracts the contents of a zip file.
Syntax
unzip_file( path, dest )
Arguments
Argument Description
path
(string) The path and filename of the file to unzip.
dest
(string) The destination path where files are extracted.
Returns
(Boolean). Returns a Boolean indicating success or failure.
url_escape
The url_escape method percent-encodes a string.
Syntax
url_escape( input )
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 104 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Arguments
Argument Description
input
(string) The string to percent-encode.
Returns
(String). The percent-encoded string.
url_unescape
The url_unescape method replaces URL escaped characters and returns a standard string.
Syntax
url_unescape( input )
Arguments
Argument Description
input
(string) The string to process.
Returns
(String). The modified string.
xml_encode
The xml_encode method takes a string and encodes it using XML escaping.
Syntax
xml_encode ( content )
Arguments
Argument Description
content
(string) The string to encode.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 105 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Returns
(String).
zip_file
The zip_file method zips the supplied path (file or directory). It overwrites the output file only if you
set the optional overwrite argument to true.
Syntax
zip_file( path [, overwrite] )
Arguments
Argument
Description
path
(string) The path or filename of the file or folder to zip.
overwrite (boolean) A boolean that specifies whether to force the creation of the zip file if an
output file already exists. The default is false.
Returns
(Boolean). Returns a Boolean indicating success or failure. On success writes a file called path.zip.
LuaConfig Methods
A LuaConfig object provides access to configuration information. You can retrieve a LuaConfig for a
given configuration file using the get_config function.
If you have a LuaConfig object called config you can call its methods using the ':' operator. For
example:
config:getValue(sectionName, parameterName)
Constructor
Description
LuaConfig:new
The constructor for a LuaConfig object (creates a new LuaConfig object).
Method
Description
getEncryptedValue Returns the unencrypted value from the config of an encrypted value.
getValue
Returns the value of the configuration parameter key in a given section.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 106 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Method
Description
getValues
Returns all the values of a configuration parameter if you have multiple values
for a key (for example, a comma-separated list or numbered list like keyN).
getEncryptedValue
The getEncryptedValue method returns the unencrypted value from the configuration file of an
encrypted value.
Syntax
getEncryptedValue( section, parameter )
Arguments
Argument
Description
section
(string) The section in the configuration file.
parameter (string) The parameter in the configuration file to get the value for.
Returns
(String). The unencrypted value.
getValue
The getValue method returns the value of the configuration parameter key in a given section. If the key
does not exist in the section, then it returns the default value.
Syntax
getValue( section, key [, default] )
Arguments
Argument Description
section
(string) The section name in the configuration file.
key
(string) The name of the key from which to read.
default
(string/boolean/number) The default value to use if no key is found.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 107 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Returns
A string, boolean, or integer containing the value read from the configuration file.
getValues
The getValues method returns multiple values for a parameter (for example, a comma-separated list or
numbered list like keyN).
Syntax
getValues( section, parameter )
Arguments
Argument
Description
section
(string) The section in the configuration file.
parameter (string) The parameter to find in the configuration file.
Returns
(Strings). The strings can be assigned to a table. To map the return values to a table, surround the
function call with braces. For example:
values = { config:getValues( section, parameter ) }
LuaConfig:new
The constructor for a LuaConfig object (creates a new LuaConfig object).
Syntax
LuaConfig:new( config_buffer )
Arguments
Argument
Description
config_buffer (string) The configuration to use to create the LuaConfig object.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 108 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Returns
(LuaConfig). The new LuaConfig object.
Example
local config_buffer = "[default]\nparameter=value"
local config = LuaConfig:new(config_buffer)
LuaDocument Methods
This section describes the methods provided by the LuaDocument object. A LuaDocument allows you to
access and modify the reference, metadata and content of a document.
If you have a LuaDocument object called document you can call its methods using the ':' operator. For
example:
document:addField(name, value)
Constructor
Description
LuaDocument:new
The constructor for a LuaDocument object (creates a new LuaDocument object
that only contains a reference).
Method
Description
addField
Creates a new field.
addSection
Add an empty section to the end of the document.
appendContent
Appends content to the existing content of the document.
copyField
Creates a new named field with the same value as an existing named field.
copyFieldNoOverwrite Copies a field to a certain name but does not overwrite the existing value.
countField
Returns the number of fields with the name specified.
deleteField
Removes a field from the document.
getContent
Returns the document content.
getField
Returns the first field with a specified name.
getFieldNames
Returns all the field names for the document.
getFields
Returns all fields with the specified name.
getFieldValue
Gets a field value.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 109 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Method
Description
getFieldValues
Gets all values of a multi-valued field.
getNextSection
Gets the next section in a document, allowing you to perform find or add
operations on every section.
getReference
Returns the document reference.
getSection
Returns a LuaDocument object with the specified section as the active
section.
getSectionCount
Returns the number of sections in the document.
getValueByPath
Gets the value of the document field or sub field with the specified path.
getValuesByPath
Gets all values of a multi-value document field or sub field, with the
specified path.
hasField
Checks whether the document has a named field.
insertXml
Inserts XML metadata into a document.
insertXmlWithoutRoot
Inserts XML metadata into a document.
removeSection
Removes a section from a document.
renameField
Renames a field.
setContent
Sets the content for a document.
setFieldValue
Sets a field value.
setReference
Sets the document reference.
to_idx
Returns a string containing the document in IDX format.
to_json
Returns a string containing the document in JSON format.
to_xml
Returns a string containing the document in XML format.
writeStubIdx
Writes out a stub IDX document.
writeStubXml
Writes out a stub XML document.
addField
The addField method adds a new field to the document.
Syntax
addField ( fieldname, fieldvalue )
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 110 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Arguments
Argument
Description
fieldname
(string) The name of the field to add.
fieldvalue (string) The value to set for the field.
addSection
The addSection method adds an empty section to the end of the document.
Syntax
addSection()
Returns
(LuaDocument). Returns a LuaDocument object representing the document, with the new section as
the active section.
Example
local newSection = document:addSection()
newSection:setContent("content")
-- Add a new section to the document
-- Set content for the new section
appendContent
The appendContent method appends content to the existing content (the DRECONTENT field) of a
document or document section.
Syntax
appendContent ( content [, number])
Arguments
Argument Description
content
(string) The content to append.
number
(number) The document section to modify. If you do not specify this argument, content
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 111 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Argument Description
is appended to the last section. If you specify a number greater than the number of
existing sections, additional empty sections are created.
Examples
-- Append content to the last section
document:appendContent("content")
-- Append content to section 7, empty sections are created before this section if
necessary
document:appendContent("content", 7)
copyField
The copyField method copies a field value to a new field. If the target field already exists it is
overwritten.
Syntax
copyField ( sourcename, targetname [, case] )
Arguments
Argument
Description
sourcename (string) The name of the field to copy.
targetname (string) The destination field name.
case
(boolean) A boolean that specifies whether sourcename is case-sensitive. The field
name is case sensitive by default (true).
copyFieldNoOverwrite
The copyFieldNoOverwrite method copies a field value to a new field but does not overwrite the
existing value. After calling this function the target field will contain all values of the source field in
addition to any values it already had.
Syntax
copyFieldNoOverwrite( sourcename, targetname [, case])
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 112 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Arguments
Argument
Description
sourcename (string) The name of the field to copy.
targetname (string) The destination field name.
case
(boolean) A boolean that specifies whether sourcename is case-sensitive. The name
is case sensitive by default (true).
countField
The countField method returns the number of fields with the specified name.
Syntax
countField( fieldname [, case] )
Arguments
Argument
Description
fieldname (string) The name of the field to count.
case
(boolean) A boolean that specifies whether fieldname is case sensitive. The field
name is case sensitive by default (true).
Returns
(Number) The number of fields with the specified name.
deleteField
The deleteField method deletes a field from a document. If you specify the optional value argument,
the field is deleted only if has the specified value.
Syntax
deleteField( fieldName [, case] )
deleteField( fieldName, value [, case] )
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 113 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Arguments
Argument
Description
fieldname (string) The name of the field to delete.
value
(string) The value of the field. If this is specified only fields with matching names and
values are deleted. If this is not specified, all fields that match fieldname are deleted.
case
(boolean) A boolean that specifies whether fieldname is case sensitive. The field
name is case sensitive by default (true).
getContent
The getContent method gets the content (the value of the DRECONTENT field) for a document or
document section.
Syntax
getContent([number])
Arguments
Argument Description
number
(number) The document section for which you want to return the content. If you do not
specify this argument, the method returns the content of the active section. For the
document object passed to the script's handler function, the active section is the first
section (section 0).
Returns
(String). The document content as a string.
Examples
local
local
local
local
content7 = document:getContent(7)
section = document:getSection(3)
content3 = section:getContent()
content0 = document:getContent()
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
-----
Get
Get
Get
Get
content for section 7
document for section 3
content for section 3
content for section 0
Page 114 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
getField
The getField method returns a LuaField object representing the field with the specified name.
Syntax
getField( name [, case])
Arguments
Argument Description
name
(string) The name of the field.
case
(boolean) A boolean that specifies whether the name argument is case-sensitive. The
name is case sensitive by default (true).
Returns
(LuaField). A LuaField object.
getFieldNames
The getFieldNames method returns all of the field names for the document.
Syntax
getFieldNames()
Returns
(Strings) The names of the fields. To map the return values to a table, surround the function call with
braces. For example:
names = { document:getFieldNames() }
getFields
The getFields method returns LuaField objects where each object represents a field that matches the
specified name.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 115 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Syntax
getFields( name [, case])
Arguments
Argument Description
name
(string) The name of the field.
case
(boolean) A boolean that specifies whether the name argument is case-sensitive. The
name is case sensitive by default (true).
Returns
(LuaFields) One LuaField for each matching field. To map the return values to a table, surround the
function call with braces. For example:
fields = { document:getFields( name ) }
getFieldValue
The getFieldValue method gets the value of a field in a document. To return the values of a multivalue field, see getFieldValues, on the next page.
Syntax
getFieldValue( fieldname [, case])
Arguments
Argument
Description
fieldname (string) The name of the field to be retrieved.
case
(boolean) A boolean that specifies whether fieldname is case-sensitive. The argument
is case sensitive by default (true).
Returns
(String). A string containing the value.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 116 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
getFieldValues
The getFieldValues method gets all values from all fields that have the same name.
Syntax
getFieldValues( fieldname [, case])
Arguments
Argument
Description
fieldname (string) The name of the field.
case
(boolean) A boolean that specifies whether fieldname is case-sensitive. The argument
is case sensitive by default (true).
Returns
(Strings). Strings that contain the values. To map the return values to a table, surround the function call
with braces. For example:
fieldvalues = { document:getFieldValues( fieldname ) }
getNextSection
The getNextSection method returns the next section of a document (if the document has been divided
into sections).
The document object passed to the script's handler function represents the first section of the
document. This means that the methods described in this section read and modify only the first
section.
Calling getNextSection on the LuaDocument passed to the handler function will always return the
second section. To perform operations on every section, see the example below.
When a document is divided into sections, each section has the same fields. The only difference
between each section is the document content (the value of the DRECONTENT field).
Syntax
getNextSection()
Returns
(LuaDocument) A LuaDocument object that contains the next DRE section.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 117 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Example
To perform operations on every section, use the following script.
local section = document
while section do
-- Manipulate section
section = section:getNextSection()
end
getReference
The getReference method returns a string containing the reference (the value of the DREREFERENCE
document field).
Syntax
getReference()
Returns
(String). A string containing the reference.
getSection
The getSection method returns a LuaDocument object with the specified section as the active
section.
Syntax
getSection(number)
Arguments
Argument Description
number
(number) The document section for which you want to return a LuaDocument object.
Returns
(LuaDocument). A LuaDocument object with the specified section as the active section.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 118 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Example
-- Get object for section 7 of document
local section = document:getSection(7)
-- Get the content from the section
local content = section:getContent()
getSectionCount
The getSectionCount method returns the number of sections in a document.
Syntax
getSectionCount()
Returns
(Number). The number of sections.
Example
local sectionCount = document:getSectionCount()
getValueByPath
The getValueByPath method gets the value of a document field. The field is specified by its path,
which means that you can get the value of a sub field. If you pass this method the path of a multi-value
field, only the first value is returned. To return all of the values from a multi-value field, see
getValuesByPath, on the next page.
Syntax
getValueByPath( path )
Arguments
Argument Description
path
(string) The path of the field.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 119 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Returns
(String). A string containing the value.
Example
local value = document:getValueByPath("myfield")
local subfieldvalue = document:getValueByPath("myfield/subfield")
getValuesByPath
The getValuesByPath method gets all values of a document field. The field is specified by its path,
which means that you can get values from a sub field.
Syntax
getValuesByPath( path )
Arguments
Argument Description
path
(string) The path of the field.
Returns
(Strings). Strings that contain the values. To map the return values to a table, surround the function call
with braces. For example:
fieldvalues = { document:getValuesByPath("myfield/subfield") }
hasField
The hasField method checks to see if a field exists in the current document.
Syntax
hasField ( fieldname [, case])
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 120 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Arguments
Argument
Description
fieldname (string) The name of the field.
case
(boolean) A boolean that specifies whether the fieldname is case-sensitive. The field
name is case-sensitive by default.
Returns
(Boolean). True if the field exists, false otherwise.
insertXml
The insertXml method inserts XML metadata into the document.
Syntax
insertXml ( node )
Arguments
Argument Description
node
(LuaXmlNode) The node to insert.
Returns
(LuaField). A LuaField object of the inserted data.
insertXmlWithoutRoot
The insertXmlWithoutRoot method inserts XML metadata into the document.
This method does not insert the top level node. All of the child nodes are inserted into the document.
insertXmlWithoutRoot(node) is therefore equivalent to calling insertXml() for each child node.
Syntax
insertXmlWithoutRoot ( node )
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 121 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Arguments
Argument Description
node
(LuaXmlNode) The node to insert.
LuaDocument:new
The constructor for a LuaDocument object (creates a new LuaDocument object that only contains a
reference).
Syntax
LuaDocument:new( reference )
Arguments
Argument
Description
reference (string) The reference to assign to the new document.
Returns
(LuaDocument). The new LuaDocument object.
Example
local reference = "my_reference"
local document = LuaDocument:new(reference)
removeSection
The removeSection method removes a section from a document.
Syntax
removeSection( sectionNumber )
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 122 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Arguments
Argument
Description
sectionNumber (number) A zero-based index that specifies the section to remove. For example, to
remove the second section, set this argument to 1.
Returns
Nothing.
Example
-- Example that removes the last section of a document
if document:getSectionCount() > 0 then
local lastSection = document:getSectionCount() - 1
document:removeSection( lastSection )
end
renameField
The renameField method changes the name of a field.
Syntax
renameField( currentname, newname [, case])
Arguments
Argument
Description
currentname (string) The name of the field to rename.
newname
(string) The new name of the field.
case
(boolean) A boolean that specifies whether the currentname argument is casesensitive. The argument is case sensitive by default (true).
setContent
The setContent method sets the content (the value of the DRECONTENT field) for a document or
document section.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 123 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Syntax
setContent( content [, number] )
Arguments
Argument Description
content
(string) The content to set for the document or document section.
number
(number) The document section to modify. If you do not specify a number, the method
modifies the active section. For the document object passed to the script's handler
function, the active section is the first section (section 0). If you specify a number
greater than the number of existing sections, additional empty sections are created.
Examples
-- Set content for section 0
document:setContent("content0")
-- Get document for section 1
local section = document:getNextSection()
-- Set content for section 1
section:setContent("content1")
-- Set content for section 7, and assign sections 2-6 to
-- empty string if non-existent
document:setContent("content7", 7)
setFieldValue
The setFieldValue method sets the value of a field in a document. If the field does not exist, it is
created. If the field already exists, the existing value is overwritten.
Syntax
setFieldValue( fieldname, newvalue )
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 124 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Arguments
Argument
Description
fieldname (string) The name of the field to set.
newvalue
(string) The value to set for the field.
setReference
The setReference method sets the reference (the value of the DREREFERENCE document field) to the
string passed in.
Syntax
setReference( reference )
Arguments
Argument
Description
reference (string) The reference to set.
to_idx
The to_idx method returns a string containing the document in IDX format.
Syntax
to_idx()
Returns
(String). Returns the document as a string.
to_json
The to_json method returns a string containing the document in JSON format.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 125 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Syntax
to_json()
Returns
(String). Returns the document as a string.
to_xml
The to_xml method returns a string containing the document in XML format.
Syntax
to_xml()
Returns
(String). Returns the document as a string.
writeStubIdx
The writeStubIdx method writes out a stub IDX document (a metadata file used by IDOL
applications). The file is created in the current folder, but you can specify a full path and file name if you
want to create the file in another folder.
Syntax
writeStubIdx( filename )
Arguments
Argument Description
filename
(string) The name of the file to create.
Returns
(Boolean). True if written, false otherwise.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 126 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
writeStubXml
The writeStubXml method writes out an XML file containing the metadata for the document. The file is
created in the current folder but you can specify a full path and file name if you want to create the file in
another folder.
Syntax
writeStubXml( filename )
Arguments
Argument Description
filename
(String) The name of the file to create.
Returns
(Boolean) True if successful, false otherwise.
LuaField Methods
This section describes the methods provided by LuaField objects. A LuaField represents a single
field in a document. You can retrieve LuaField objects for a document using the LuaDocument
getField and getFields methods. In its simplest form a field has just a name and a value, but it can
also contain sub-fields.
If you have a LuaField object called field you can call its methods using the ':' operator. For
example:
field:addField(name, value)
Method
Description
addField
Adds a sub field with the specified name and value.
copyField
Copies the sub field to another sub field.
copyFieldNoOverwrite Copies the sub field to another sub field but does not overwrite the
destination.
countField
Returns the number of sub fields that exist with the specified name.
deleteAttribute
Deletes the attribute with the specified name.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 127 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Method
Description
deleteField
Deletes the sub field with the specified name.
getAttributeValue
Gets the value of an attribute.
getField
Gets the sub field specified by the name.
getFieldNames
Returns the names of all sub fields of this field.
getFields
Gets all the sub fields specified by the name.
getFieldValues
Returns all the values of the sub field with the specified name.
getValueByPath
Returns the value of a sub field with the specified path.
getValuesByPath
Returns all the values of the sub field with the specified path.
hasAttribute
Returns a Boolean specifying if the field has the specified attribute passed
in by name.
hasField
Returns a Boolean specifying if the sub field exists or not.
insertXml
Inserts XML metadata into a document.
insertXmlWithoutRoot
Inserts XML metadata into a document.
name
Returns the name of the field object in a string.
renameField
Renames a sub field.
setAttributeValue
Sets the value for the specified attribute of the field.
setValue
Sets the value of the field.
value
Returns the value of the field object.
addField
The addField method adds a sub field with the specified name and value.
Syntax
addField( fieldname, fieldvalue )
Arguments
Argument
Description
fieldname
(string) The name of the field.
fieldvalue (string) The value of the field.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 128 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
copyField
The copyField method copies a sub field to another sub field. If the target sub field exists it is
overwritten.
Syntax
copyField ( from, to [, case])
Arguments
Argument Description
from
(string) The name of the field to copy.
to
(string) The name of the field to copy to.
case
(boolean) A boolean that specifies whether the from argument is case sensitive. The
argument is case sensitive by default (true).
copyFieldNoOverwrite
The copyFieldNoOverwrite method copies the sub field to another sub field but does not overwrite the
destination. After this operation the destination field contains all the values of the source field as well as
any values it already had.
Syntax
copyFieldNoOverwrite( from, to [, case])
Arguments
Argument Description
from
(string) The name of the field to copy.
to
(string) The name of the field to copy to.
case
(boolean) A boolean that specifies whether the from argument is case sensitive. The
argument is case sensitive by default (true).
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 129 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
countField
The countField method returns the number of sub fields that exist with the specified name.
Syntax
countField ( fieldname [, case])
Arguments
Argument
Description
fieldname (string) The name of the field.
case
(boolean) A boolean that specifies whether the fieldname argument is case sensitive.
The argument is case sensitive by default (true).
Returns
(Number). The number of sub fields that exist with the specified name.
deleteAttribute
The deleteAttribute method deletes the specified field attribute.
Syntax
deleteAttribute( name )
Arguments
Argument Description
name
(string) The name of the attribute to delete.
deleteField
The deleteField method deletes the sub field with the specified name.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 130 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Syntax
deleteField( name [, case] )
deleteField( name , value [, case] )
Arguments
Argument Description
name
(string) The name of the sub field to delete.
value
(string) The value of the sub field. If this is specified a field is deleted only if it has the
specified name and value. If this is not specified, all fields with the specified name are
deleted.
case
(boolean) A boolean that specifies whether the name argument is case sensitive. The
argument is case sensitive by default (true).
getAttributeValue
The getAttributeValue method gets the value of the specified attribute.
Syntax
getAttributeValue( name )
Arguments
Argument Description
name
(string) The name of the attribute.
Returns
(String). The attribute value.
getField
The getField method returns the specified sub field.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 131 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Syntax
getField ( name [, case])
Arguments
Argument Description
name
(string) The name of the field to return.
case
(boolean) A boolean that specifies whether the name argument is case sensitive. The
argument is case sensitive by default (true).
Returns
(LuaField) A LuaField object.
getFieldNames
The getFieldNames method returns the names of the sub fields in the LuaField object.
Syntax
getFieldNames()
Returns
(Strings). The names of the sub fields. The strings can be assigned to a table. To map the return values
to a table, surround the function call with braces. For example:
fieldnames = { field:getFieldNames() }
getFields
The getFields method returns all of the sub fields specified by the name argument.
Syntax
getFields( name [, case] )
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 132 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Arguments
Argument Description
name
(string) The name of the fields.
case
(boolean) A boolean that specifies whether the name argument is case sensitive. The
argument is case sensitive by default (true).
Returns
(LuaFields) One LuaField per matching field. The objects can be assigned to a table. To map the return
values to a table, surround the function call with braces. For example:
fields = { field:getFields( name [, case]) }
getFieldValues
The getFieldValues method returns the values of all of the sub fields with the specified name.
Syntax
getFieldValues( fieldname [, case] )
Arguments
Argument
Description
fieldname (string) The name of the field.
case
(boolean) A boolean that specifies whether the fieldname argument is case sensitive.
The argument is case sensitive by default (true).
Returns
(Strings) One string for each value. The strings can be assigned to a table. To map the return values to
a table, surround the function call with braces. For example:
fieldvalues = { field:getFieldValues( fieldname ) }
getValueByPath
The getValueByPath method gets the value of a sub-field, specified by path. If you pass this method
the path of a sub-field that has multiple values, only the first value is returned. To return all of the values
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 133 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
from a multi-value sub-field, see getValuesByPath, below.
Syntax
getValueByPath( path )
Arguments
Argument Description
path
(string) The path of the sub-field.
Returns
(String). A string containing the value.
Example
Consider the following document:
<DOCUMENT>
...
<A_FIELD>
<subfield>
<anothersubfield>the value to return</anothersubfield>
</subfield>
</A_FIELD>
...
</DOCUMENT>
The following example demonstrates how to retrieve the value "the value to return" from the sub-field
anothersubfield, using a LuaField object representing A_FIELD:
local field = document:getField("A_FIELD")
local value = field:getValueByPath("subfield/anothersubfield")
getValuesByPath
The getValuesByPath method gets the values of a sub-field, specified by path.
Syntax
getValuesByPath( path )
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 134 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Arguments
Argument Description
path
(string) The path of the sub-field.
Returns
(Strings). Strings that contain the values. To map the return values to a table, surround the function call
with braces. For example:
fieldvalues = { myfield:getValuesByPath("subfield/anothersubfield") }
Example
Consider the following document:
<DOCUMENT>
...
<A_FIELD>
<subfield>
<anothersubfield>one</anothersubfield>
<anothersubfield>two</anothersubfield>
<anothersubfield>three</anothersubfield>
</subfield>
</A_FIELD>
...
</DOCUMENT>
The following example demonstrates how to retrieve the values "one", "two", and "three" from the subfield anothersubfield, using a LuaField object representing A_FIELD:
local field = document:getField("A_FIELD")
local values = { field:getValuesByPath("subfield/anothersubfield") }
hasAttribute
The hasAttribute method returns a Boolean indicating whether the field has the specified attribute.
Syntax
hasAttribute( name )
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 135 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Arguments
Argument Description
name
(string) The name of the attribute.
Returns
(Boolean). A Boolean specifying if the field has the specified attribute.
hasField
The hasField method returns a Boolean specifying if the sub field exists.
Syntax
hasField( fieldname [, case])
Arguments
Argument
Description
fieldname (string) The name of the field.
case
(boolean) A boolean that specifies whether the fieldname argument is case sensitive.
The argument is case sensitive by default (true).
Returns
(Boolean). A Boolean specifying if the sub field exists or not.
insertXml
The insertXml method inserts XML metadata into the document. When called on a LuaField, the
insertXml method inserts the fields as children of the LuaField.
Syntax
insertXml ( node )
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 136 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Arguments
Argument Description
node
(LuaXmlNode) The node to insert.
Returns
(LuaField). A LuaField object of the inserted data.
insertXmlWithoutRoot
The insertXmlWithoutRoot method inserts XML metadata into the document.
This method does not insert the top level node. All of the child nodes are inserted into the document.
insertXmlWithoutRoot(node) is therefore equivalent to calling insertXml() for each child node.
Syntax
insertXmlWithoutRoot ( node )
Arguments
Argument Description
node
(LuaXmlNode) The node to insert.
name
The name method returns the name of the field object.
Syntax
name()
Returns
(String). The name of the field object.
renameField
The renameField method renames a sub field.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 137 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Syntax
renameField( oldname, newname [, case] )
Arguments
Argument Description
oldname
(string) The previous name of the field.
newname
(string) The new name of the field.
case
(boolean) A boolean that specifies whether the oldname argument is case sensitive.
The argument is case sensitive by default (true).
setAttributeValue
The setAttributeValue method sets the value for the specified attribute of the field.
Syntax
setAttributeValue( attribute, value )
Arguments
Argument
Description
attribute (string) The name of the attribute to set.
value
(string) The value to set.
setValue
The setValue method sets the value of the field.
Syntax
setValue( value )
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 138 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Arguments
Argument Description
value
(string) The value to set.
value
The value method returns the value of the field object.
Syntax
value()
Returns
(String). The value of the field object.
LuaLog Methods
A LuaLog object provides the capability to use a log stream defined in the connector's configuration file.
You can obtain a LuaLog object for a log stream by using the function get_log.
If you have a LuaLog object called log you can call its methods using the ':' operator. For example:
log:write_line(level, message)
Method
Description
write_line
Write a message to the log stream.
write_line
The write_line method writes a message to the log stream.
Syntax
write_line( level, message )
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 139 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Arguments
Argument Description
level
message
The log level for the message. The message only appears in the log if the log level
specified here is the same as, or higher than, the log level set for the log stream. To
obtain the correct value for the log level, use one of the following functions:
l
log_level_always()
l
log_level_error()
l
log_level_warning()
l
log_level_normal()
l
log_level_full()
(string) The message to write to the log stream.
Example
local config = get_config("connector.cfg")
local log = get_log(config, "SynchronizeLogStream")
log:write_line( log_level_error() , "This message is written to the synchronize
log")
LuaXmlDocument Methods
This section describes the methods provided by LuaXmlDocument objects. A LuaXmlDocument object
provides methods for accessing information stored in XML format. You can create a LuaXmlDocument
from a string containing XML using the parse_xml function.
If you have a LuaXmlDocument object called xml you can call its methods using the ':' operator. For
example:
xml:root()
Method
Description
root
Returns a LuaXmlNode that is the root node of the XML document.
XPathExecute
Returns a LuaXmlNodeSet that is the result of supplied XPath query.
XPathRegisterNs
Register a namespace with the XML parser. Returns an integer detailing the
error code.
XPathValue
Returns the first occurrence of the value matching the XPath query.
XPathValues
Returns the values according to the XPath query.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 140 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
root
The root method returns an LuaXmlNode, which is the root node of the XML document.
Syntax
root()
Returns
(LuaXmlNode). A LuaXmlNode object.
XPathExecute
The XPathExecute method returns a LuaXmlNodeSet, which is the result of the supplied XPath query.
Syntax
XPathExecute( xpathQuery )
Arguments
Argument
Description
xpathQuery (string) The xpath query to run.
Returns
(LuaXmlNodeSet). A LuaXmlNodeSet object.
XPathRegisterNs
The XPathRegisterNs method registers a namespace with the XML parser.
Syntax
XPathRegisterNs( prefix, location )
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 141 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Arguments
Argument Description
prefix
(string) The namespace prefix.
location
(string) The namespace location.
Returns
(Boolean). True if successful, False in case of error.
XPathValue
The XPathValue method returns the first occurrence of the value matching the XPath query.
Syntax
XPathValue( query )
Arguments
Argument Description
query
(string) The XPath query to use.
Returns
(String). A string of the value.
XPathValues
The XPathValues method returns the values according to the XPath query.
Syntax
XPathValues( query )
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 142 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Arguments
Argument Description
query
(string) The XPath query to use.
Returns
(Strings). The strings can be assigned to a table. To map the return values to a table, surround the
function call with braces. For example:
values = { xml:XPathValues(query) }
LuaXmlNodeSet Methods
A LuaXmlNodeSet object represents a set of XML nodes.
If you have a LuaXmlNodeSet object called nodes you can call its methods using the ':' operator. For
example:
nodes:size()
Method
Description
at
Returns the LuaXmlNode at position pos in the set.
size
Returns size of node set.
at
The at method returns the LuaXmlNode at position position in the set.
Syntax
at( position )
Arguments
Argument Description
position
(number) The index of the item in the array to get.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 143 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Returns
(LuaXmlNode).
size
The size method returns the size of the node set.
Syntax
size()
Returns
(Number) An integer, the size of the node set.
LuaXmlNode Methods
A LuaXmlNode object represents a single node in an XML document.
If you have a LuaXmlNode object called node you can call its methods using the ':' operator. For
example:
node:name()
Method
Description
attr
Returns the first LuaXmlAttribute attribute object for this element.
content
Returns the content (text element) of the XML node.
firstChild
Returns a LuaXmlNode that is the first child of this node.
lastChild
Returns a LuaXmlNode that is the last child of this node.
name
Returns the name of the XML node.
next
Returns a LuaXmlNode that is the next sibling of this node.
nodePath
Returns the XML path to the node that can be used in another XPath query.
parent
Returns the parent LuaXmlNode of the node.
prev
Returns a LuaXmlNode that is the previous sibling of this node.
type
Returns the type of the node as a string.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 144 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
attr
The attr method returns the first LuaXmlAttribute attribute object for the LuaXmlNode. If the name
argument is specified, the method returns the first LuaXmlAttribute object with the specified name.
Syntax
attr( [name] )
Arguments
Argument Description
name
(string) The name of the LuaXmlAttribute object.
Returns
(LuaXmlAttribute).
content
The content method returns the content (text element) of the XML node.
Syntax
content()
Returns
(String). A string containing the content.
firstChild
The firstChild method returns the LuaXmlNode that is the first child of this node.
Syntax
firstChild()
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 145 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Returns
(LuaXmlNode).
lastChild
The lastChild method returns the LuaXmlNode that is the last child of this node.
Syntax
lastChild()
Returns
(LuaXmlNode).
name
The name method returns the name of the XML node.
Syntax
name()
Returns
(String). A string containing the name.
next
The next method returns the LuaXmlNode that is the next sibling of this node.
Syntax
next()
Returns
(LuaXmlNode).
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 146 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
nodePath
The nodePath method returns the XML path to the node, which can be used in another XPath query.
Syntax
nodePath()
Returns
(String). A string containing the path.
parent
The parent method returns the parent LuaXmlNode of the node.
Syntax
parent()
Returns
(LuaXmlNode).
prev
The prev method returns a LuaXmlNode that is the previous sibling of this node.
Syntax
prev()
Returns
(LuaXmlNode).
type
The type method returns the type of the node as a string.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 147 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Syntax
type()
Returns
(String) A string containing the type. Possible values are:
element_node comment_node element_decl
attribute_node document_node attribute_decl
text_node document_type_node entity_decl
cdata_section_node document_frag_node namespace_decl
entity_ref_node notation_node xinclude_start
entity_node html_document_node xinclude_end
pi_node dtd_node docb_document_node
LuaXmlAttribute Methods
A LuaXmlAttribute object represents an attribute on an XML element.
If you have a LuaXmlAttribute object called attribute you can call its methods using the ':'
operator. For example:
attribute:name()
Method
Description
name
Returns the name of this attribute.
next
Returns a LuaXmlAttribute object for the next attribute in the parent element.
prev
Returns a LuaXmlAttribute object for the previous attribute in the parent element.
value
Returns the value of this attribute.
name
The name method returns the name of this attribute.
Syntax
name()
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 148 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Returns
(String). A string containing the name of the attribute.
next
The next method returns a LuaXmlAttribute object for the next attribute in the parent element.
Syntax
next()
Returns
(LuaXmlAttribute).
prev
The prev method returns a LuaXmlAttribute object for the previous attribute in the parent element.
Syntax
prev()
Returns
(LuaXmlAttribute).
value
The value method returns the value of this attribute.
Syntax
value()
Returns
(String). A string containing the value of the attribute.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 149 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
LuaRegexMatch Methods
A LuaRegexMatch object provides information about the matches for a regular expression found in a
string. For example, the regex_search function returns a LuaRegexMatch object.
If a match is found for a regular expression at multiple points in the string, you can use the next()
method to get a LuaRegexMatch object for the next match.
If the regular expression contained sub-expressions (surrounded by parentheses) the methods of
LuaRegexMatch objects can also be used to retrieve information about the sub-expression matches.
If you have a LuaRegexMatch object called match you can call its methods using the ":" operator. For
example:
match:length()
Method
Description
length
Returns the length of the sub match.
next
Returns a LuaRegexMatch for the next match.
position
Returns the position of the sub match as an index from 1.
size
Returns the number of sub matches for the current match.
str
Returns the string for the sub match.
length
The length method returns the length of the match. You can also retrieve the length of sub matches by
specifying the submatch parameter.
Syntax
length( [ submatch ] )
Arguments
Argument Description
submatch
(number) The sub match to return the length of, starting at 1 for the first sub match. With
the default value of 0 the length of the whole match is returned.
Returns
(Number). The length of the sub match.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 150 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
next
The next method returns a LuaRegexMatch object for the next match.
Syntax
next()
Returns
(LuaRegexMatch). A LuaRegexMatch object for the next match, or nil if there are no matches
following this one.
position
The position method returns the position of the match in the string searched, where 1 refers to the first
character in the string. You can also retrieve the position of sub matches by specifying the submatch
parameter.
Syntax
position( [ submatch ] )
Arguments
Argument
Description
submatch
(number) The sub match to return the position of, starting at 1 for the
first sub match. With the default value of 0 the position of the whole
match is returned.
Returns
(Number). The position of the submatch as an index from 1.
size
The size method returns the total number of sub matches made for the current match, including the
whole match (sub match 0).
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 151 of 156
Administration Guide
Chapter 10: Lua Functions and Methods Reference
Syntax
size()
Returns
(Number). The number of sub matches for the current match.
str
The str method returns the value of the substring that matched the regular expression. You can also
retrieve the values of sub matches by specifying the submatch parameter.
Syntax
str( [ submatch ] )
Arguments
Argument Description
submatch
(number) The sub match to return the value of, starting at 1 for the first sub match. With
the default value of 0 the value of the whole match is returned.
Returns
(String). The value of the sub match.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 152 of 156
Glossary
A
ACI (Autonomy Content Infrastructure)
A technology layer that automates operations
on unstructured information for crossenterprise applications. ACI enables an
automated and compatible business-tobusiness, peer-to-peer infrastructure. The
ACI allows enterprise applications to
understand and process content that exists
in unstructured formats, such as email, Web
pages, Microsoft Office documents, and IBM
Notes.
ACI Server
A server component that runs on the
Autonomy Content Infrastructure (ACI).
ACL (access control list)
An ACL is metadata associated with a
document that defines which users and
groups are permitted to access the
document.
action
A request sent to an ACI server.
active directory
A domain controller for the Microsoft
Windows operating system, which uses
LDAP to authenticate users and computers
on a network.
C
Category component
The IDOL Server component that manages
categorization and clustering.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Community component
The IDOL Server component that manages
users and communities.
connector
An IDOL component (for example File
System Connector) that retrieves information
from a local or remote repository (for
example, a file system, database, or Web
site).
Connector Framework Server (CFS)
Connector Framework Server processes the
information that is retrieved by connectors.
Connector Framework Server uses KeyView
to extract document content and metadata
from over 1,000 different file types. When the
information has been processed, it is sent to
an IDOL Server or Distributed Index Handler
(DIH).
Content component
The IDOL Server component that manages
the data index and performs most of the
search and retrieval operations from the
index.
D
DAH (Distributed Action Handler)
DAH distributes actions to multiple copies of
IDOL Server or a component. It allows you to
use failover, load balancing, or distributed
content.
DIH (Distributed Index Handler)
DIH allows you to efficiently split and index
extremely large quantities of data into
multiple copies of IDOL Server or the
Content component. DIH allows you to
create a scalable solution that delivers high
performance and high availability. It provides
a flexible way to batch, route, and categorize
the indexing of internal and external content
into IDOL Server.
Page 153 of 156
Administration Guide
Glossary: IDOL - OmniGroupServer (OGS)
that users are allowed to access the system
that contains the result data. At the back end,
entitlement checking and authentication
combine to ensure that query results contain
only documents that the user is allowed to
see, from repositories that the user has
permission to access.
I
IDOL
The Intelligent Data Operating Layer (IDOL)
Server, which integrates unstructured, semistructured and structured information from
multiple repositories through an
understanding of the content. It delivers a
real-time environment in which operations
across applications and content are
automated.
IDOL Proxy component
An IDOL Server component that accepts
incoming actions and distributes them to the
appropriate subcomponent. IDOL Proxy also
performs some maintenance operations to
make sure that the subcomponents are
running, and to start and stop them when
necessary.
Import
Importing is the process where CFS, using
KeyView, extracts metadata, content, and
sub-files from items retrieved by a connector.
CFS adds the information to documents so
that it is indexed into IDOL Server. Importing
allows IDOL server to use the information in
a repository, without needing to process the
information in its native format.
Ingest
Ingestion converts information that exists in
a repository into documents that can be
indexed into IDOL Server. Ingestion starts
when a connector finds new documents in a
repository, or documents that have been
updated or deleted, and sends this
information to CFS. Ingestion includes the
import process, and processing tasks that
can modify and enrich the information in a
document.
K
KeyView
The IDOL component that extracts data,
including text, metadata, and subfiles from
over 1,000 different file types. KeyView can
also convert documents to HTML format for
viewing in a Web browser.
L
LDAP
Lightweight Directory Access Protocol.
Applications can use LDAP to retrieve
information from a server. LDAP is used for
directory services (such as corporate email
and telephone directories) and user
authentication. See also: active directory,
primary domain controller.
License Server
License Server enables you to license and
run multiple IDOL solutions. You must have a
License Server on a machine with a known,
static IP address.
O
OmniGroupServer (OGS)
A server that manages access permissions
for your users. It communicates with your
repositories and IDOL Server to apply
access permissions to documents.
Intellectual Asset Protection System (IAS)
An integrated security solution to protect your
data. At the front end, authentication checks
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 154 of 156
Administration Guide
Glossary: primary domain controller - XML
P
primary domain controller
A server computer in a Microsoft Windows
domain that controls various computer
resources. See also: active directory, LDAP.
V
View
An IDOL component that converts files in a
repository to HTML formats for viewing in a
Web browser.
W
Wildcard
A character that stands in for any character
or group of characters in a query.
X
XML
Extensible Markup Language. XML is a
language that defines the different attributes
of document content in a format that can be
read by humans and machines. In IDOL
Server, you can index documents in XML
format. IDOL Server also returns action
responses in XML format.
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 155 of 156
Send Documentation Feedback
If you have comments about this document, you can contact the documentation team by email. If an email
client is configured on this system, click the link above and an email window opens with the following
information in the subject line:
Feedback on Administration Guide (HPE HTTP Connector 11.2)
Add your feedback to the email and click Send.
If no email client is available, copy the information above to a new message in a web mail client, and send
your feedback to [email protected]
We appreciate your feedback!
HPE HTTP Connector (11.2)
Page 156 of 156
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement