Missouri Pre-K Social and Emotional Development Standards and

Missouri Pre-K Social and Emotional Development Standards and
Missouri Pre-K
Social and Emotional
Development Standards
and Approaches to Learning
Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education • Early Childhood Section
Introduction
T
he standards are broad descriptions of what most children should know and be able to do by the time they
enter kindergarten. They are not a curriculum but a framework for communicating a shared set of
expectations for preschool children in the field of social and emotional development.
We realize some children will far exceed these standards; others will not enter kindergarten with the
knowledge and experiences suggested in this document. Just as we recognize that different people bring different
things to our society, we also recognize that variability in children is normal. The standards are not intended to be
used to determine whether a child “is ready” to enter kindergarten. The standards are, however, goals for adults to
use in supporting the social and emotional development and approaches to learning of preschool children. Available
evidence indicates that the standards are appropriate for most children.
The standards were developed by a broad-based group of individuals whose backgrounds are
representative of many facets of the early childhood community in Missouri. The standards are intended to be
used in a variety of early childhood settings by a variety of people — parents, parent educators, child-care
providers, Head Start and public/private school teachers, etc. They are consistent with current research and
recommendations from other state and national initiatives.
It is our hope that the ultimate beneficiaries of this work will be our children, resulting in all children
entering school ready to succeed.
Missouri Pre-K
Guiding Principles
1. All children actively seek to comprehend the world in which they live. Given the opportunity to make
choices concerning their activities, they acquire knowledge, skills and the ability to solve problems.
2. Children construct knowledge and values through interactions with peers, parents and other adults and
through active exploration of the physical and social environment.
3. Young children’s thinking contains predictable errors.
4. Early learning and areas of development interact and influence each other.
5. Families (parents) are the child’s first and most important teachers.
6. Children exhibit individual differences in their development of competencies.
Missouri Pre-K
Social and Emotional
Development Standards
Content Component
Process Standards
Knowledge of self
Exhibits self awareness
Develops self control
Develops personal responsibility
Knowledge of others
Builds relationships of mutual trust and respect with others
Works cooperatively with children and adults
Process Standards .............. Competencies in the process of social and emotional development.
Indicators .......................... Milestones toward the development of competencies.
Examples ........................... Observable behaviors children may exhibit in their social and emotional
development.
Guiding Principles ............. Principles of child development that guide Missouri early childhood practices.
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Missouri Pre-K Social and Emotional Development Standards
Knowledge of self
Exhibits self-awareness.
Examples
Indicator
1. Shows respect for self.
The child
• stands up for his or her own rights and needs.
• acknowledges accomplishments (e.g., says, “I can hit the ball.”).
• uses self-help skills (e.g., washing hands with soap and water,
brushing teeth with assistance, trying new foods).
2. Develops personal
preferences.
The child
3. Knows personal information.
The child
• makes choices.
• expresses likes and dislikes.
• chooses a favorite color, food, song, friend, etc.
• describes self using several basic characteristics (e.g., gender, age,
hair color, eye color).
• refers to self by first and last name.
• knows parents’/guardians’ names.
• may know address and telephone number.
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Missouri Pre-K Social and Emotional Development Standards
Knowledge of self
Develops self-control.
Examples
Indicator
The child
1. Follows simple rules.
• follows a few clear and consistent home or classroom rules.
• follows rules made with adults and/or peers in a game or in play.
• follows safety rules.
2. Accepts transitions and
follows daily routines.
The child
3. Expresses feelings through
appropriate gestures, actions
and language.
The child
4. Adapts to different
environments.
The child
• understands and follows schedules and routines at home or school.
• manages smooth transitions from one activity to the next (e.g.,
comes indoors to wash hands for lunch or to listen to a story).
• separates from parents easily.
• identifies emotions (e.g., says, “I’m really mad,” or “The story made
me sad.”).
• shares happiness or success of another.
• offers help to someone who is hurt.
• uses pretend play to understand and respond to feelings.
• controls an impulse to take an object away from another child (e.g.,
uses appropriate words instead of hitting).
• adjusts behavior in different settings (e.g., at the library, church,
home, playground or school).
• follows rules in different settings.
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Missouri Pre-K Social and Emotional Development Standards
Knowledge of self
Develops personal responsibility.
Examples
Indicator
1. Cares for personal and group
possessions.
The child
2. Begins to accept the
consequences of his or her
own actions.
The child
• carefully handles books and other objects.
• takes care of toys.
• puts away belongings and materials (e.g., clothing, toys, art
supplies).
• brings a damaged object to parent or teacher for repair after
breaking it.
• admits wrongdoing (e.g., says, “I hit her because she took my toy.”).
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Missouri Pre-K Social and Emotional Development Standards
Knowledge of others
Builds relationships of mutual trust
and respect with others.
Examples
Indicator
1. Respects the rights of others.
The child
• listens while others are speaking.
• takes turns and follows rules.
• respects the personal space of others (e.g., keeps hands to self).
2. Respects adult leadership.
The child
•
•
•
•
uses an adult as a resource (e.g., seeks information, assistance or advice).
follows adults’ guidelines for safety in the home or classroom.
follows adults’ rules for appropriate behavior in different environments.
shows interest in community workers (e.g., firefighters, police officers,
dentists, doctors) and understands their roles in the community.
3. Seeks comfort and security
from significant adults.
The child
4. Develops friendships.
The child
• shows an attachment or bond to an adult.
• goes to an adult if he or she has a problem.
• feels safe with significant adults.
• offers help and resources to others.
• has a special friendship with one or two peers (e.g., misses them if
they are apart or frequently chooses them in play).
• is named as a friend or play partner by others.
5. Uses courteous words and
actions.
The child
6. Respects similarities and
differences among people.
The child
• says “please,” “thank you,” “hello” and “goodbye” at appropriate times.
• shares toys; passes items at mealtime.
• waits for a turn during conversation.
• notices the similarities and differences in others.
• includes children with differences (e.g., gender, race, special needs,
culture and language) in play.
• explores real-life situations through pretend play.
• recognizes that different individuals have different kinds of skills
and information.
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Missouri Pre-K Social and Emotional Development Standards
Knowledge of others
Works cooperatively
with children and adults.
Examples
Indicator
1. Participates successfully as a
member of a group.
The child
2. Shares experiences and
ideas with others.
The child
3. Begins to examine a situation
from another person’s
perspective.
The child
4. Resolves conflicts with
others.
The child
• allows others to join play and activities.
• participates cooperatively in large and small group activities (e.g., is
sometimes a leader and sometimes a follower).
• plays cooperatively with others (e.g., takes turns when playing a
game).
• identifies self as a member of a group (e.g., refers to our family, our
school, our team).
• engages in conversations to express his or her own ideas.
• expresses self through pretend play, art, music, dance, written work
and spoken language.
• shares personal information.
• adopts various roles during pretend play.
• expresses empathy (e.g., consoles the child who lost a game or a
child who is unhappy).
• adjusts plans in consideration of others’ wants and needs (e.g., asks
a friend if he or she would like to go first).
•
•
•
•
shows an interest in fairness and established rules.
attempts to make amends (e.g., says, “I’m sorry” or offers a toy).
participates in resolving conflict with adult assistance.
attempts to solve problems without adult help (e.g., negotiates or
compromises).
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Missouri Pre-K Social and Emotional Development Standards
Missouri Pre-K
Approaches to Learning
Content Component
Process Standards
Approaches to learning
Shows curiosity
Takes initiative
Exhibits creativity
Shows confidence
Displays persistence
Uses problem-solving skills
Process Standards .............. Competencies in the process of approaches to learning.
Indicators .......................... Milestones toward the development of competencies.
Examples ........................... Observable behaviors children may exhibit in their approaches to learning.
Guiding Principles ............. Principles of child development that guide Missouri early childhood practices.
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Missouri Pre-K Social and Emotional Development Standards
Approaches to Learning
Shows curiosity.
Examples
Indicator
1. Expresses interest in people.
The child
• asks about people in his or her environment.
• takes interest in others’ activities.
• asks others for personal information (e.g., asks, “What’s your name?”
or “Why do you have a Band-Aid?”).
2. Shows interest in learning
new things and trying new
experiences.
The child
3. Asks questions.
The child
•
•
•
•
explores on his or her own.
develops personal interest (e.g., likes trains, dinosaurs, dolls).
investigates and experiments with materials.
shows interest in how others do things.
• uses questions to find answers.
• wonders why something is the way it is.
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Missouri Pre-K Social and Emotional Development Standards
Approaches to Learning
Takes initiative.
Examples
Indicator
1. Initiates interaction with
others.
The child
2. Makes decisions
independently.
The child
3. Develops independence
during activities, routines
and play.
The child
•
•
•
•
asks a friend to join in play.
joins a play activity already in progress.
participates in group activities.
suggests play activities.
• selects materials for a project.
• offers to help others.
• does the correct thing when others do not.
• hangs up his or her coat when coming indoors.
• enjoys playing alone at times.
• completes a task.
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Missouri Pre-K Social and Emotional Development Standards
Approaches to Learning
Exhibits creativity.
Examples
Indicator
1. Tries new ways of doing
things.
The child
2. Uses imagination to
generate a variety of ideas.
The child
3. Exhibits a sense of humor.
The child
• completes projects differently than others (e.g., uses a novel
approach in block structures, paintings, clay structures).
• uses materials in a new way (e.g., blanket becomes a tent).
• invents new activities or game or suggests new rules for a familiar
game.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
makes up words, songs or stories.
engages in pretend play.
makes changes to a familiar story by adding actions or characters.
expresses ideas through art, construction, movement or music.
laughs when someone tells a funny story.
exaggerates a movement or statement to be funny.
makes up silly words; plays with sounds.
makes up jokes (e.g., tells simple jokes over and over).
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Missouri Pre-K Social and Emotional Development Standards
Approaches to Learning
Shows confidence.
Examples
Indicator
1. Expresses his or her own
ideas and opinions.
The child
2. Views self as competent
and has a positive selfimage.
The child
• communicates likes and dislikes.
• suggests a solution for a conflict or problem.
• shares ideas in a group situation (e.g., shares with family or peers or
in a classroom).
• expresses mastery of a skill (e.g., says, “Now I can swing myself.”).
• asks others to view his or her creation (e.g., says, “Look at my
picture.”).
• contributes to family/classroom discussions.
• takes pride in accomplishments.
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Missouri Pre-K Social and Emotional Development Standards
Approaches to Learning
Displays persistence.
Examples
Indicator
1. Sustains attention to a task
or activity appropriate for
his age.
The child
2. Pursues challenges.
The child
• remains engaged in an activity (e.g., builds an extensive block
structure or completes playing a game).
• attends to a task regardless of distractions.
• works on a task over a period of time, leaving and returning to
complete it (e.g., Lego structure, picture).
• makes plans for an activity.
• completes a project.
• continues to try a difficult task (e.g., builds a complex block
structure).
3. Copes with frustration.
The child
• shows understanding when a peer accidentally knocks down his or
her block structure.
• can lose a game without getting upset.
• persists in trying to complete a task after many attempts have failed
(e.g., tie shoes, ride a bike).
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Missouri Pre-K Social and Emotional Development Standards
Approaches to Learning
Uses problem-solving skills.
Examples
Indicator
The child
1. Recognizes problems.
• states a personal problem (e.g., says, “I can’t get my jacket zipped,”
or “I can’t find the purple marker.”).
• anticipates potential for problems (e.g., says, “If I climb too high, I
won’t be able to get down.”).
• recalls a previous problem (e.g., says, “I remember the last time we built
the house, we had to put another block in here to hold it up.”).
2. Tries to solve problems.
The child
• modifies actions based on new information and experiences (e.g.,
changes block structure when the tower continues to fall or moves
during story time to see the book or puts on a sweater when cold).
• changes behavior in response to another child or adult (e.g.,
comforts another child who is crying).
• asks for help from another child or an adult.
3. Works with others to solve
problems.
The child
• cooperates in making decisions with another child (e.g., plans with
a peer to build a castle out of blocks or plans with a peer what
game to play or how to share materials such as toys or markers).
• offers solutions to conflict with another child.
• takes turns (e.g., says, “Let’s decide who goes first, second ... .”).
Page 15
Missouri Pre-K Social and Emotional Development Standards
Social and Emotional Development
and Approaches to Learning Committee
Dee Beck, DESE
Becky Beckner, Columbia Public Schools
Gretchen Berhorst, DESE
Lana Brooks, DESE
Diane Buatte, Springfield Public Schools
Jenny Buehler, CMCHDC Head Start
Kerry Caverly, Parents as Teachers National Center
Delores Christian, Community Services Head Start
Julie Cowell, DESE
Anne Davies-Speers, Community Services Head Start
Jeannie Edwards, St. Louis Community College at Florissant Valley
Ruth Flynn, DESE
Sara Gable, University of Missouri–Columbia
Lori Garrison, Clearwater School District
Chris Groccia, Head Start State Collaboration Office
Linda Hillen, Hickman Mills School District
James Hunter, Department of Health and Senior Services
Angie Koetting, DESE
Jeri LeVesque, Webster University
Freda Markley, Consultant
Judy McClure, Warrensburg School District
Lockie McMurry, Clearwater School District
Judy Noland, Lee’s Summit School District
Susan Prichard-Green, Department of Mental Health
Kellie Quinn, LIFT
JoAnne Ralston, Department of Health and Senior Services
Cindy Reese, Department of Social Services
Carolyn Rybicki, St. Louis Community College at Florissant Valley
Micca Ruffin, Jefferson City School District
Sharon Shattgen, DESE
Sharon Schneeberger, Project Construct National Center
Margaret Strecker, DESE
Barbara Veasley, Veasley’s Tender Loving Care Childcare Center
Theresa Villmer, DESE
Patty Wilde, Rockwood School District
Connie Wilkinson, Wilkinson Preschool
Pat Willis, Department of Health and Senior Services
Mildred Winter, Consultant
Marcia Wilson, Department of Mental Health
Maureen Zupanec, Lee’s Summit School District
Special thanks to:
Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE)
Department of Health and Senior Services
Department of Social Services
Missouri Head Start Collaboration Office
Parents as Teachers National Center
Project Construct National Center
Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Early Childhood Section
P.O. Box 480
Jefferson City, MO 65101
(573) 751-2095
www.dese.state.mo.us
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