FactoryTalk® Batch Getting Results Guide

FactoryTalk® Batch Getting Results Guide
Getting Results Guide
FactoryTalk® Batch
Important User Information
Solid-state equipment has operational characteristics differing from those of electromechanical equipment. Safety Guidelines for the Application,
Installation, and Maintenance of Solid State Controls (publication SGI-1.1 available from your local Rockwell Automation sales office or online at
http://www.rockwellautomation.com/literature/) describes some important differences between solid-state equipment and hard-wired
electromechanical devices. Because of this difference, and also because of the wide variety of uses for solid-state equipment, all persons responsible for
applying this equipment must satisfy themselves that each intended application of this equipment is acceptable.
In no event will Rockwell Automation, Inc. be responsible or liable for indirect or consequential damages resulting from the use or application of this
equipment.
The examples and diagrams in this manual are included solely for illustrative purposes. Because of the many variables and requirements associated
with any particular installation, Rockwell Automation, Inc. cannot assume responsibility or liability for actual use based on the examples and
diagrams.
No patent liability is assumed by Rockwell Automation, Inc. with respect to use of information, circuits, equipment, or software described in this
manual.
Reproduction of the contents of this manual, in whole or in part, without written permission of Rockwell Automation, Inc., is prohibited.
Throughout this manual, when necessary, we use notes to make you aware of safety considerations.
WARNING: Identifies information about practices or circumstances that can cause an explosion in
a hazardous environment, which may lead to personal injury or death, property damage, or
economic loss.
ATTENTION: Identifies information about practices or circumstances that can lead to personal
injury or death, property damage, or economic loss. Attentions help you identify a hazard, avoid a
hazard, and recognize the consequence
SHOCK HAZARD: Labels may be on or inside the equipment, for example, a drive or motor, to
alert people that dangerous voltage may be present.
BURN HAZARD: Labels may be on or inside the equipment, for example, a drive or motor, to alert
people that surfaces may reach dangerous temperatures.
Important:
Identifies information that is critical for successful application and understanding of the product.
Allen-Bradley, Rockwell Software, and Rockwell Automation ControlLogix, eProcedure, FactoryTalk, RSBizWare, RSBizWare BatchHistorian, RSBizWare Historian, RSBizWare MaterialTrack, and RSLinx are
trademarks of Rockwell Automation, Inc.
Trademarks not belonging to Rockwell Automation are property of their respective companies.
Table of contents
Chapter 1
Document organization .......................................................................................................7
Document set conventions..................................................................................................7
Documentation set ...............................................................................................................8
FactoryTalk Batch Components Upgrade and Installation Guide.....................9
FactoryTalk Batch Getting Results Guide (this book) ..........................................9
FactoryTalk Batch user documentation ...................................................................9
FactoryTalk Batch technical reference guides ...................................................... 10
Welcome
Chapter 2
FactoryTalk Batch
introduction
What is FactoryTalk Batch?............................................................................................. 12
Modular Batch Automation .................................................................................... 12
FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor example ........................................... 13
FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor example .................................................... 13
Who uses FactoryTalk Batch? ................................................................................. 14
Additional resources .......................................................................................................... 15
FactoryTalk Batch Components .................................................................................... 16
FactoryTalk Batch Server ......................................................................................... 16
FactoryTalk Batch View ........................................................................................... 16
FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor............................................................................ 18
FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor ................................................................... 18
FactoryTalk Event Archiver ..................................................................................... 19
FactoryTalk Batch Network Editor ....................................................................... 19
FactoryTalk eProcedure Client ............................................................................... 20
FactoryTalk eProcedure Server ............................................................................... 20
FactoryTalk Batch Material Manager .................................................................... 20
Chapter 3
FactoryTalk Batch
Server introduction
FactoryTalk Batch Server overview ................................................................................ 21
Sample demonstration setup............................................................................................ 22
Add sample FactoryTalk Security users ................................................................. 23
Configure sample permissions for FactoryTalk Security users ......................... 25
Configure the sample FactoryTalk Batch Server ................................................. 27
Rebuild the recipe directory ..................................................................................... 29
Start the FactoryTalk Batch Server service ................................................................... 30
Batch Service Manager dialog box - Server options ............................................. 32
Start the sample FactoryTalk Batch Phase Simulator ................................................. 32
Verify PCD communications .......................................................................................... 33
Learn about FactoryTalk Batch....................................................................................... 34
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Table of contents
Chapter 4
FactoryTalk Batch
Equipment Editor
introduction
Open the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor with a sample user....................... 36
Open a sample area model ................................................................................................ 36
The FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor window ................................................... 37
Navigate within the area model ....................................................................................... 37
Create and configure a phase class .................................................................................. 39
View a sample phase class configuration ................................................................ 39
Create a sample phase class ....................................................................................... 40
Create and configure phases............................................................................................. 41
View a sample phase configuration ......................................................................... 41
View a sample FactoryTalk Batch tags ................................................................... 42
Create a sample phase ................................................................................................ 43
Create a sample signature template ................................................................................ 44
Use signature templates............................................................................................. 45
Use signature templates with recipe approvals ..................................................... 46
Enable recipe version control ........................................................................................... 48
Enable recipe and area model security............................................................................ 49
Share equipment ................................................................................................................. 49
Exit the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor............................................................ 50
FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor summary ......................................................... 50
Chapter 5
FactoryTalk Batch
Recipe Editor
introduction
4
Open the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor ................................................................. 52
FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor window .................................................................... 52
Open a recipe ...................................................................................................................... 53
Review the recipe structure .............................................................................................. 54
View hidden information ......................................................................................... 55
Change the recipe view.............................................................................................. 55
Move down through SFC levels .............................................................................. 55
Move up through SFC levels .................................................................................... 57
Add steps .............................................................................................................................. 57
Add a sequential step in the sample operation level ............................................ 57
Add a parallel step in the sample operation level ................................................. 58
Assign step formula values to the sample operation level ........................................... 59
Add recipe comments to the sample operation ............................................................ 60
Remove steps ....................................................................................................................... 61
Add a continuous loop to the sample unit procedure................................................. 61
Verify the recipe .................................................................................................................. 63
Remove a sequential step from the sample operation ................................................. 63
Remove a parallel step from the sample operation ...................................................... 63
FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor summary .................................................................. 64
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Table of contents
Chapter 6
FactoryTalk Batch
View introduction
Open FactoryTalk Batch View ........................................................................................ 66
Run a sample batch ............................................................................................................ 67
Examine the batch .............................................................................................................. 69
Navigate the SFC ............................................................................................................... 70
Remove the sample batch from the Batch List ............................................................. 72
Bind a unit manually.......................................................................................................... 73
Add a comment to a sample batch .................................................................................. 74
Respond to unacknowledged sample prompts ............................................................. 75
View the sample batch event journal .............................................................................. 77
Control a phase manually ................................................................................................. 78
Resolve arbitration issues .......................................................................................... 81
Phase Control window .............................................................................................. 84
Configure the FactoryTalk Batch View......................................................................... 84
Exit the FactoryTalk Batch View .................................................................................... 85
FactoryTalk Batch View summary ................................................................................. 86
Chapter 7
FactoryTalk Event
Archiver introduction
System Architecture........................................................................................................... 88
Run the FactoryTalk Event Archiver to insert batch record data ............................ 88
FactoryTalk Event Archiver summary ........................................................................... 89
Chapter 8
FactoryTalk Batch
ActiveX controls
introduction
FactoryTalk Batch ActiveX Controls ............................................................................ 92
The ControlRecipeList control ...................................................................................... 92
ControlRecipeList interface..................................................................................... 93
ControlRecipeList shortcut menu .......................................................................... 93
Open the ControlRecipeList control ..................................................................... 93
The PromptsList control .................................................................................................. 94
PromptsList interface ................................................................................................ 94
PromptsList shortcut menu ..................................................................................... 94
Open the PromptsList control ................................................................................ 95
The SignatureList control ................................................................................................ 95
SignatureList interface............................................................................................... 95
SignatureList shortcut menu.................................................................................... 96
Open the SignatureList control............................................................................... 96
The ProcedureView control ............................................................................................. 96
Table view interface ................................................................................................... 97
SFC view interface ..................................................................................................... 97
ProcedureView shortcut menu ................................................................................ 98
Open the ProcedureView control ........................................................................... 98
The TimerView control .................................................................................................... 99
TimerView shortcut menu ....................................................................................... 99
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Table of contents
Open the TimerView control .................................................................................. 99
FactoryTalk Batch ActiveX controls summary .......................................................... 100
Chapter 9
PC-based phases
introduction
PC-based phases ............................................................................................................... 101
Execution of a PC-based phase example ...................................................................... 102
PC-based phases summary.............................................................................................. 103
Appendix A
Glossary
Legal Notices
Legal Notices ..................................................................................................................... 129
Index
6
Rockwell Automation Publication BATCH-GR011D-EN-P - February 2017
Chapter 1
Welcome
This information was developed to introduce you to the basics of automated batch
manufacturing and the FactoryTalk® Batch product components.
The information in this document is presented in an order that should minimize
the effort required to obtain a basic overview of Batch.
Document
organization
The following subjects are presented in this document:
Document set
conventions
•
FactoryTalk Batch Documentation
•
Modular Batch Automation
•
FactoryTalk Batch Components
•
FactoryTalk Batch Server
•
FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor
•
FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor
•
FactoryTalk Batch View
•
FactoryTalk Event Archiver
•
ActiveX Controls
•
PC-Based Phases
•
Glossary of Terms
Rockwell Automation has established documentation conventions to help you get
the most out of your documentation set and software. These conventions
correspond to Microsoft’s conventions as much as possible.
•
References to keys on the keyboard that you press are presented in small
caps, such as the delete key.
•
Text that you type in response to a prompt is presented in bold font, such as
User_1.
•
Text that displays is presented in bold type.
•
References to buttons and commands on menus are presented in bold text,
such as the Clear button.
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Chapter 1
Welcome
•
Examples of source code, computer files or reports are presented in courier
new font. The conventions used to discuss the syntax are defined in the
individual documents.
•
The titles of dialog boxes are presented in bold Title Caps, such as the
Protect Document dialog box.
•
Dialog box options are presented in bold type with capitalization following
what is seen on the interface, such as Find Entire Cells Only.
•
File names, extensions, paths and directories are presented in bold type,
such as C:\Winnt\Win.ini.
•
Menu names are presented in bold Title Caps, such as Insert menu.
•
Windows security items are in bold font, such as batchsvr_group.
Tip:
Text set off like this provides additional information to
help you most effectively use the software.
Text set off like this provides a warning message about a
potentially hazardous situation.
Important:
Documentation set
Text set off like this provides required configuration
parameters or important information about the
software.
The following list of documents are available for FactoryTalk Batch.
See also
FactoryTalk Batch Components Upgrade and Installation Guide on page 8
FactoryTalk Batch Getting Results Guide (this book) on page 9
FactoryTalk Batch user documentation on page 9
FactoryTalk Batch technical reference guides on page 10
8
Rockwell Automation Publication BATCH-GR011D-EN-P - February 2017
Chapter 1
Welcome
FactoryTalk Batch
Components Upgrade
and Installation Guide
Describes the tasks associated with upgrading and installing a FactoryTalk Batch
system. It includes information on hardware and software requirements, checklists
for installing your new system, and activation.
See also
Documentation set on page 8
FactoryTalk Batch
Getting Results Guide
(this book)
Provides an overview of how to use FactoryTalk Batch. This document steps you
through the process of creating an area model, creating a recipe, and then creating
and running a control recipe.
See also
Documentation set on page 8
FactoryTalk Batch user
documentation
•
FactoryTalk Batch View User Guide
Describes the tasks associated with using FactoryTalk Batch View and each
of the FactoryTalk Batch View windows.
•
FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor User Guide
Describes the tasks associated with building recipes.
•
FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor User Guide
Describes the tasks associated with configuring resources, phases, units, and
communications data to build an area model.
•
FactoryTalk Batch PhaseManager™ User Guide
Describes the tasks associated with configuring your area model to use
FactoryTalk Batch PhaseManager features in conjunction with Logix5000
controllers and RSLogix 5000.
•
FactoryTalk Event Archiver User Guide
Describes the tasks associated with configuring and using the data
FactoryTalk Event Archiver application.
•
FactoryTalk Batch Administrator Guide
Describes the tasks associated with configuring the FactoryTalk Batch
Server, configuring security, and using other non-standard FactoryTalk
Batch features.
•
ActiveX Controls Library User Guide
Describes the tasks associated with using the FactoryTalk Batch ActiveX®
Controls.
See also
Documentation set on page 8
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Chapter 1
Welcome
FactoryTalk Batch
technical reference
guides
•
FactoryTalk Batch Server API Communication Language Reference
Guide
Describes the tasks associated with retrieving execution information and
commanding FactoryTalk Batch.
•
System Files Reference Guide
Describes the electronic files created and/or used by FactoryTalk Batch, as
well as the structure and contents of initialization files, exported area model
files, and other FactoryTalk Batch-related files.
•
PCD Programmer Technical Reference Guide
Describes the tasks associated with programming phases, including
project-specific and state transition logic.
•
ActiveX Controls Library Reference Guide
Describes the properties, methods, and events associated with the
FactoryTalk Batch ActiveX Controls. An example application is also
included.
•
PC-Based Phase Programmer Technical Reference Guide
Describes the process of implementing PC-Based Phases. Also includes
information on the properties, methods, and events that are part of the
ActiveX Control used to create PC-based phases.
See also
Documentation set on page 8
10
Rockwell Automation Publication BATCH-GR011D-EN-P - February 2017
Chapter 2
FactoryTalk Batch introduction
As part of the FactoryTalk family, the FactoryTalk Batch components increase
overall plant efficiency by delivering the visibility, control, and reporting you need
to optimize manufacturing. With coordinated execution, you can reduce scrap and
rework and improve product quality and consistency. Through real-time
management of equipment utilization, you can maximize your return on assets. By
implementing optimized recipes and procedures, you can increase your plant
capacity. By using electronic, paperless operations, you can improve your
productivity. You also reduce compliance costs by using electronic batch record
implementation, paperless manufacturing, and quality sign-offs. By lifting the
compliance burden from manufacturing, you reduce inventory levels and cycle
times, which greatly improves customer service.
The FactoryTalk Batch components ensure that plant floor operations are
optimized, giving you quick return on your net assets. New product definitions are
deployed quickly into manufacturing. Production order information is accurate.
Business and plant-level control systems are tightly coordinated and multiple sites
operate as a team. Our completely open, configurable set of products helps you
define, manage, monitor, and control manufacturing at local, remote, or
contractor plants. Best of all, you can deploy any of the FactoryTalk Batch
components wherever you need them — one at a time or all at once — to improve
productivity and plant control. The FactoryTalk Batch components include:
•
FactoryTalk® Batch
•
FactoryTalk eProcedure®
•
FactoryTalk Batch Material Manager
See also
What is FactoryTalk Batch? on page 11
Additional resources on page 15
FactoryTalk Batch Components on page 16
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Chapter 2
FactoryTalk Batch introduction
What is FactoryTalk
Batch?
To see the true value of a FactoryTalk Batch solution, become familiar with
Modular Batch Automation and how it relates to the ISA S88.01 International
Batch Control Standard. The next section is a brief overview of modular batch
automation.
Modular Batch
Automation
In the late 1980s, the Instrument Society of America (ISA) started the SP88
committee to establish a set of standards for batch control. One of the most
important terms that has been associated with this standard is Modular Batch
Automation (MBA). Using the modular approach, a batch process is defined by a
sequence of small modules rather than by a large, cumbersome, monolithic
program. The initial step in implementing MBA is to separate the batch process
into two models: Equipment and Procedural. This separation provides for a more
efficient means of developing and modifying an automated batch process.
Modularizing your equipment and procedures allows you to create re-usable
components.
This diagram shows the relationship between the S88.01 models and the
FactoryTalk Batch Editors. The FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor and
FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor are tied together at the Phase level.
See also
FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor example on page 12
FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor example on page 13
12
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Chapter 2
FactoryTalk Batch introduction
FactoryTalk Batch
As an example, you create a reactor unit in the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment
Equipment Editor example Editor. The reactor unit, which is displayed here, contains six phases that are used
to perform individual actions (adding various ingredients,
mixing-heating-transferring the contents of the reactor, etc.). Once the unit and
its associated phases are defined in the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor, you
are ready to use the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor to create operations for this
reactor to execute.
See also
FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor example on page 13
FactoryTalk Batch Recipe
Editor example
To continue the example in the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor, you create two
operations, Reaction_1 and Clean_In_Place, which are shown below. The
Reaction_1 operation transfers Material A into the reactor, agitates the contents
for 15 minutes at 5 RPM, and then dumps the contents into Storage Unit A. The
Clean_in_Place operation transfers water into the reactor, agitates the contents
for 60 minutes at 7 RPM, and then dumps the contents as Waste Water.
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Chapter 2
FactoryTalk Batch introduction
Both operations use the same phases but in a different way. You control how the
phase operates through the use of parameters, such as speed and time as shown in
the AGITATE:1 phase.
For more information regarding how FactoryTalk Batch applies the ISA S88.01
concepts, contact your Rockwell Sales Representative. For a copy of the S88.01
document, write to: ISA, 67 Alexander Drive, P.O. Box 12277, Research Triangle
Park, NC 27709
See also
Start the sample FactoryTalk Batch Phase Simulator on page 32
Who uses FactoryTalk
Batch?
14
FactoryTalk Batch organizes information for a number of different occupational
roles:
•
Process Engineer: Uses the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor to create
an area model that captures all capabilities of the specific plant.
•
Control Systems Engineer: Understands the specific control system being
used and links the control system with FactoryTalk Batch.
•
Formulator: Uses the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor to create master
recipes that run against the area model of the plant.
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Chapter 2
FactoryTalk Batch introduction
Important:
•
•
Separation of the Equipment and Procedural
models allows for greater protection of a
company’s intellectual property. When
implementing a project with FactoryTalk Batch,
engineers responsible for configuring the
equipment in the plant don’t need access to the
recipes. They are only responsible for designing
equipment-specific phases (optimizing the physical
capabilities of the plant). The recipes remain in the
hands of the formulators (usually company
employees).
Operator: Uses the FactoryTalk Batch View and/or ActiveX controls to
schedule, start, and stop batches. Also uses a third-party Human-Machine
Interface (HMI) software package to view the physical plant (pumps, valves,
etc.). Can also review past batches and make parameter adjustments on-line.
•
The facility operator is the user of the designated equipment.
•
The operator is the recipient of requests for parameter data deferred to
the operator.
•
The operator is the default owner of a resource if the facility operator is
manually arbitrating between resources.
MIS Administrator: Interacts with the uploaded event journals to create
batch reports and monitor material usage. The FactoryTalk Event Archiver
can upload batch data to a Microsoft SQL database.
See also
What is FactoryTalk Batch? on page 11
Additional
resources
The following is a list of resources that may be consulted for more complete
information.
•
NAMUR Guidelines "Normen Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Mess-ûnd
Regeltechnik in der Chemischen Industrie"
Standard that defines the terminology used to describe modular batch
automation’s component parts.
•
IEC 61131-3 "Programmable Controllers, Programming Languages"
Standard that describes sequential function charts.
•
ISA’s S88.01 "Batch Control, Models and Terminology"
Standard which describes the standard terminology used to describe
modular batch automation's component parts.
•
ISA’s ANSI/ISA–95.00.01–2000 "Enterprise-Control System
Integration Part 1: Models and Terminology"
Standard that describes the relevant functions in the enterprise and the
control domain and which objects are normally exchanged between these
domains.
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Chapter 2
FactoryTalk Batch introduction
•
ISA’s ANSI/ISA–95.00.02–2001 "Enterprise-Control System
Integration Part 2: Object Model Attributes"
Standard that defines the details of the interface content between
manufacturing control functions and other enterprise functions.
See also
FactoryTalk Batch introduction on page 11
FactoryTalk Batch
Components
FactoryTalk Batch comes with several components that interact with each other
to design, create, configure and run batch recipes.
See also
FactoryTalk Batch Server on page 16
FactoryTalk Batch View on page 16
FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor on page 17
FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor on page 18
FactoryTalk Event Archiver on page 19
FactoryTalk Batch
Server
The FactoryTalk Batch Server is the engine that runs FactoryTalk Batch. It is the
component that controls system information, phases and recipes. The server
allows integration with process-connected devices (PCDs) and third-party
software packages. Prior to opening FactoryTalk Batch View, the FactoryTalk
Batch Server must be running and remain active during all batch functions.
The FactoryTalk Batch Server operates as a Windows service, which means that
the FactoryTalk Batch Server can be configured to start automatically and that
control of the FactoryTalk Batch Server can be given to the Windows Service
Manager. Because the FactoryTalk Batch Server runs as a service, it does not
require an operator to log on to run. Therefore, logging on or off Windows during
operation does not disrupt the performance of the FactoryTalk Batch Server.
See also
FactoryTalk Batch Components on page 16
FactoryTalk Batch
View
16
FactoryTalk Batch View is the batch recipe initiation and execution program used
by the operator of the FactoryTalk Batch automation solution system to.
•
Initiate and control the batch process
•
Display a graphical representation of a running batch and its associated data
Rockwell Automation Publication BATCH-GR011D-EN-P - February 2017
Chapter 2
FactoryTalk Batch introduction
Typically, FactoryTalk Batch View is intended to be used in conjunction with an
HMI.
Each FactoryTalk Batch View window can be customized to suit the needs of a
specific station:
•
Specify the columns to display
•
Specify the size of columns and rows
•
Sort and filter on one field in certain windows
•
Set the font for each FactoryTalk Batch View window
If the security is enabled for FactoryTalk Batch View, a system administrator can
use the password protection option to:
•
Limit the information that is displayed
•
Specify the commands that are allowed at a particular station
Using FactoryTalk Batch View, an operator can respond to electronic signature
requests that have been generated by report and recipe parameter deviations or by
a command execute request.
See also
FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor introduction on page 51
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Chapter 2
FactoryTalk Batch introduction
FactoryTalk Batch
Recipe Editor
The FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor is used to graphically create and configure
recipes.
•
The interface is based on IEC 61131-3 sequential function charts (SFC)
that graphically organizes recipes into procedures, unit procedures,
operations and phases along with any applicable comments.
•
In addition to the SFC view, the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor offers a
table view. Table-based recipes provide a mechanism for creating simple
recipes that do not require a complex recipe structure or elaborate transition
expressions. Additionally, you can view table-based recipes and edit all
recipe parameters without having to navigate between steps.
•
The FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor allows you to specify sequences of
phases. The actual phase logic must be configured in the process-connected
device (PCD) while the interface to the PCD must be configured in the
FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor.
•
Recipe reports can be generated in SFC and/or descriptive format.
•
If Recipe Approvals are enabled in the underlying area model, approval
signoffs are executed in the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor.
•
When Recipe Version Control is enabled, a version of a recipe (a read-only,
numbered snapshot of a recipe) can be saved and protected from further
editing. New work-in-progress (WIP) copies of a version allow the recipe
author to continue to make changes and updates to a recipe. When a
versioned recipe no longer matches the underlying area model, or references
a deleted or non-existent sub-recipe, it is marked as obsolete.
See also
FactoryTalk Batch Components on page 16
FactoryTalk Batch
Equipment Editor
18
The FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor is a graphical interface through which a
database of process equipment is defined and maintained (an area model).
•
Components defined in the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor are used
to interface with process-connected devices (PCDs) in the facility. During
recipe configuration, the area model provides a list of available units and
phase classes.
•
Configure phases and commands to trigger an electronic signature request
when a report or recipe parameter is out of range (parameter deviation), or
when specific commands are executed on a batch (such as Abort Batch or
Active Step Change).
•
During recipe verification, the area model ensures that the designated
equipment is capable of executing the procedures.
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Chapter 2
FactoryTalk Batch introduction
•
During recipe execution, resource arbitration functions use the area model
to allocate equipment based on recipe and operator requests.
•
The area model is available to all other FactoryTalk Batch applications.
In addition to the area model, the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor allows
configuration of the following:
•
Communication functions
•
Electronic signatures
•
Enumeration sets
•
Data servers
•
Recipe approvals
•
Recipe version control
•
FactoryTalk Event Archiver functions
See also
FactoryTalk Event Archiver on page 19
FactoryTalk Event
Archiver
The purpose of the FactoryTalk Event Archiver is to translate the FactoryTalk
Batch tab-delimited ASCII electronic batch record files to a user-specified file
type. These electronic batch record files are maintained separately for each batch
created and can be viewed with a word processor or spreadsheet. However, many
plants will have standardized on one of the many commercially available
Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) software packages. We
recommend using a high-performance database, such as SQL Server, due to their
superior robustness and performance. The FactoryTalk Event Archiver collects
data from each electronic batch record file and stores it in the specified RDBMS
database format.
FactoryTalk Batch
Network Editor
The FactoryTalk Batch Network Editor is a utility that indicates where other
FactoryTalk Batch and FactoryTalk Batch Material servers are located on the
network. This network configuration allows for ease of integration with other
FactoryTalk Batch components and simplifies the process of reconfiguring a
multi-computer system. If FactoryTalk Batch Material Manager is also installed
the FactoryTalk Batch Network Editor is also used to indicate the location of the
material database.
See also
FactoryTalk Batch Components on page 16
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Chapter 2
FactoryTalk Batch introduction
FactoryTalk
eProcedure Client
The FactoryTalk eProcedure Client computer uses Internet Explorer to enable
operators to run batch recipes.
See also
FactoryTalk Batch Components on page 16
FactoryTalk
eProcedure Server
The FactoryTalk eProcedure Server provides the services to the FactoryTalk Batch
Server to enable the use of HTML instruction files. Prior to opening FactoryTalk
eProcedure Client, FactoryTalk eProcedure Server must be running and remain
active during all batch functions.
See also
FactoryTalk Batch Components on page 16
FactoryTalk Batch
Material Manager
FactoryTalk Batch Material Manager is used to track material consumption in
batch recipes. It consists of two components: Material Server and Material Editor.
The Material Editor provides an interface to help you create the material database,
which consists of material, lot, sublot, container, and storage location data. The
Material Server provides the communication between the material database and
the FactoryTalk Batch Server. During a batch run, information about available
containers is presented to the operator for binding decisions. Binding is the
process of mapping steps within a control recipe to actual equipment in a plant.
After a batch is run, quantities consumed or distributed are updated in the
material database for use in inventory tracking.
The Material Server consists of a group of components that work together to
service various applications. The primary applications that the Material Server
services are the Material Editor, FactoryTalk Batch Server, FactoryTalk Batch
Recipe Editor, FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor, and the Storage Container
ActiveX control. Any third-party application can also use custom solutions based
on the exposed Material Object Model (MOM).
See also
FactoryTalk Batch Components on page 16
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introduction
For ease of understanding, and for tutorial purposes, this guide refers to
configuring and using the sample files that are installed with FactoryTalk Batch.
The SampleDemo folders contain complete area models and recipes for a
simulated plant. Before running the demonstrations, you must add a FactoryTalk
Security user, configure the FactoryTalk Batch Server to recognize the required
project directories, select the initialization path and file name, and then start the
FactoryTalk Batch Server and the FactoryTalk Batch Phase Simulator.
Tip:
This guide outlines the configuration and use of the
SampleDemo1 demonstration files. Because these files
are used as an example throughout the guide, it is
recommended that you follow the directions for using this
demonstration step by step.
See also
FactoryTalk Batch Server overview on page 21
Sample demonstration setup on page 22
Start the Batch Server service on page 30
FactoryTalk Batch
Server overview
The FactoryTalk Batch Server is the engine that runs FactoryTalk Batch. It is this
component that allows integration with the process-connected devices (PCDs)
and third-party software packages.
The FactoryTalk Batch Server operates as a Windows Service, which means you
can configure the Server to start automatically and give control of the Server
service to the Windows Service Manager. Because the FactoryTalk Batch Server
runs as a service, logging on or off Windows during operation does not disrupt the
operation of the Server.
Using the FactoryTalk Batch Service Manager, you can control the FactoryTalk
Batch Server manually, select the boot method for the Server, and configure the
Server to run in Demo mode. Use the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor to
configure the FactoryTalk Batch Server.
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The FactoryTalk Batch Server coordinates the following functions:
•
Creating a Batch: Transforms the configured recipe into an executable
working recipe.
•
Executing a Recipe: Communicates with the process-connected devices to
execute phases.
•
Arbitrating Equipment: Allocates resources based on recipe and operator
requirements.
•
Collecting Data: Gathers and stores production information for reporting
and archiving.
•
Performing Client Communications: Transfers data between the
process-connected devices (PCDs), operator displays, Human Machine
Interfaces (HMIs), databases, and various other software packages.
See the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor User Guide and the FactoryTalk
Batch Administrator Guide for more detailed information about the FactoryTalk
Batch Server.
See also
Sample demonstration setup on page 22
Sample
demonstration
setup
The installation process placed the SampleDemo1 and SampleDemo2 folders in
the BATCHCTL share on your hard drive. Within each of these SampleDemo
folders are four subfolders that contain the files for the area model. To run the
sample demonstrations, add a FactoryTalk Security user, configure the
FactoryTalk Batch Server to locate the area model, and then verify the recipes in
the area model.
See also
Add sample FactoryTalk Security users on page 22
Configure sample permissions for FactoryTalk Security users on page 25
Configure the sample Batch Server on page 27
Rebuild the recipe directory on page 29
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Add sample
FactoryTalk Security
users
For the sample demonstrations file, create FactoryTalk user accounts for an
operator and an engineer. Create these user accounts in the FactoryTalk
Directory.
To add sample FactoryTalk Security users:
1. Select Start, point to All Programs > Rockwell Software, and then select
FactoryTalk Administration Console. The Select FactoryTalk
Directory dialog box opens.
Important:
On Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008,
right-click FactoryTalk Administration Console
and select Run as administrator.
2. Select Network to add this user account to the FactoryTalk Network
Directory, and select OK.
3. If not already logged on to the FactoryTalk Network Directory, the Log On
to FactoryTalk dialog box opens. In User name, type the user name for the
Administrator that was configured when the FactoryTalk Services Platform
was installed.
4. In Password, type the password for the Administrator.
5. Verify the Directory and select OK. The FactoryTalk Administration
Console window opens and displays the specified FactoryTalk Directory.
6. Expand Users and Groups.
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7. Right-click the Users folder, and select New > User to create a new
FactoryTalk Security user account in FactoryTalk Directory.
8. The New User dialog box opens and displays the General tab. In the User
name box, type OPER.
9. In Full name, type Operator.
10. In Password, type password, and confirm it by re-entering password in the
Confirm Password box.
11. Select Create.
12. Repeat steps 7-11, but this time in the User Name field, enter ENG and in
the Full Name field, enter Engineer.
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13. Keep the FactoryTalk Administration Console open to configure
permissions for these FactoryTalk Security users in the next exercise.
See also
Configure sample permissions for FactoryTalk Security users on page 25
Configure sample
permissions for
FactoryTalk Security
users
After creating the FactoryTalk security users, set up access modes for each
FactoryTalk Batch component to specify which users are permitted to view or
perform actions. Configure security settings in the FactoryTalk Administration
Console. To tighten security in the eProcedure Client, remove the All Users
group from the Full Edit policy setting.
To configure sample permissions for FactoryTalk Security users:
1. In the FactoryTalk Administration Console Explorer pane, navigate to
System > Policies > Product Policies > Batch > Equipment Editor >
Access Modes.
2. Right-click Access Modes, and then select Properties. The Access Modes
Properties dialog box opens.
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3. In the Full Edit row, select the Configure Security browse button. The
Configure Securable Action dialog box opens.
4. Select Add. The Select User and Computer dialog box opens.
5. In the Filter Users box, select Show All.
6. In Users, select ENG.
7. Select OK. The Configure Securable Action dialog box is updated,
showing ENG in the list of Users with the Allow check box selected.
8. Select OK to close the Configure Securable Action dialog box.
9. In the Access Modes Properties dialog box, select View Only.
10. In the View Only row, select the Configure Security browse button. The
Configure Securable Action dialog box opens.
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11. Select Add. The Select User and Computer dialog box opens.
12. In the Filter Users box, select Show All.
13. In Users, select OPER.
14. Select OK. The Configure Securable Action dialog box is updated,
showing OPER in the list of Users with the Allow check box selected.
15. Select OK to close the Configure Securable Action dialog box.
16. Select OK to close the Access Modes Properties dialog box.
See the FactoryTalk Batch Administrator Guide for more information on security.
See also
Configure the sample Batch Server on page 27
Configure the sample
FactoryTalk Batch
Server
To set up the sample demonstrations, configure the FactoryTalk Batch Server to
locate the folders that contain the demonstration files and to the \Restart and bin
folders where the FactoryTalk Batch Server writes data upon system failure.
Configure the FactoryTalk Batch Server in the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment
Editor.
To configure the sample FactoryTalk Batch Server:
1. Select Start, point to All Programs > Rockwell Software > FactoryTalk
Batch Suite > FactoryTalk Batch, and then select Equipment Editor. The
FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor opens (log on to FactoryTalk if
prompted).
Important:
If running on Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008,
right-click Equipment Editor and select Run as
administrator.
2. Select Options > Server Options. The Server Options dialog box opens to
the Project Settings tab.
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3. In the Project Directories area, select the Primary Journal browse button.
The Select Directory dialog box opens.
4. From the Look in list, select the SampleDemo1\Journals folder, and then
select Open.
5. Select the Error Logging browse button. The Select Directory dialog box
opens.
6. From the Look in list, select the SampleDemo1\Logs folder, and then
select Open.
7. Click the Instructions browse button. The Select Directory dialog box
opens.
Important:
In order for the eProcedure Server to start, you must define the
instruction path and an instruction file for each instruction-based
phase in the area model. (See the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment
Editor User Guide for instructions on defining instruction-based
phases.)
8. Select the Equipment Database browse button. The Select Equipment
Database dialog box opens.
9. From the Look in list, open the SampleDemo1\ Recipes folder, select the
ice_cream1.cfg file, and then select Open.
10. In the Store Recipes Using area, select Binary Files, and then select the
Recipe Directory browse button. The Select Directory dialog box opens.
11. From the Look in list, select the SampleDemo1\Recipes folder, and then
select Open.
12. Select the Restart Control tab.
13. Select the Primary Path browse button. The Select Directory dialog box
opens.
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14. From the Look in list, select the SampleDemo1\Restart folder, and then
select Open.
15. Select the Secondary Path browse button. The Select Directory dialog box
opens.
16. From the Look in list, select the Bin folder.
17. Select the Batch Reporting tab. Leave Never (No Queue) as the default
reporting application.
18. Select OK to close the Server Options dialog box.
19. From the File menu, select Exit to exit the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment
Editor.
Tip:
Rebuild the recipe
directory
These steps set up the FactoryTalk Batch Server to run
the tutorial steps in this manual. There are many other
settings to consider when setting up the FactoryTalk
Batch system. (See the FactoryTalk Batch Administrator
Guide for more information on the Server Options
dialog box.)
To run the demonstration recipes, you must rebuild the recipe directory and
verify the recipes in the area model using the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor.
Important:
If running on Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008, right-click
Recipe Editor and select Run as administrator.
To rebuild the recipe directory:
1. Select Start, select All Programs > Rockwell Software > FactoryTalk
Batch Suite > FactoryTalk Batch, and then select Recipe Editor. The
FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor reads the area model.
2. If prompted, log on to FactoryTalk. If you a message displays asking you to
verify the recipes, select Cancel.
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3. From the File menu, select Rebuild Recipe Directory. When the rebuild is
complete, select OK, and then select Yes to verify the recipes.
4. When the recipe verification is complete, select Accept to save the recipes,
and then select Close.
5. From the File menu, select Exit to exit the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe
Editor.
See also
Start the FactoryTalk Batch Server service on page 30
Start the
FactoryTalk Batch
Server service
The FactoryTalk Batch Service Manager communicates with the Windows
Services of the selected computer to determine available services. There may be a
noticeable delay as communications are established, marked by the cursor
displayed as an hourglass. If the FactoryTalk Batch Service Manager cannot
communicate with the selected computer’s Windows Services, a message box is
displayed stating that the FactoryTalk Batch Service Manager failed to connect to
the specified computer.
The FactoryTalk Batch Phase Simulator must be running to test FactoryTalk
Batch in a demo environment. For more information, see The FactoryTalk Batch
Phase Simulator in the FactoryTalk Batch Administrator Guide.
Important:
The FactoryTalk Batch Server cannot start if
Security Authority is enabled and there is a
mismatch between the Security Authority Identifiers
(SAIs) in the area model and the FactoryTalk
Network Directory. For information on your
recovery options, see Troubleshooting in the
FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor User Guide.
To start the FactoryTalk Batch Server service:
1. Select the Start button, point to All Programs > Rockwell Software >
FactoryTalk Batch Suite > FactoryTalk Batch, and then select Batch
Service Manager. The Batch Service Manager opens.
2. Select Select Computer. The Select Computer dialog box opens.
Tip:
If running on Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008, run
the FactoryTalk Batch Service Manager as an
administrator.
3. In the Enter the object name to select area, enter the name of the
computer where the FactoryTalk Batch Server is installed (or select the
Advanced button to search for a computer).
4. Select OK to close the Select Computer dialog box.
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5. From the Service list, select FactoryTalk Batch Server.
6. (optional) Select Allow Demo Mode if you want to run FactoryTalk Batch
in demo mode. If you run FactoryTalk Batch in the demo mode, be aware
that the Server stops after two hours of operation.
7. Select the method to use for restarting the server after a service halt.
•
Cold Boot: Restarts the server in a cold state. All journal data or recipe
content is erased upon startup. If Security Authority is enabled, SAIs in
a secured area model and any secured recipes must match the current
Network FactoryTalk Directory SAI.
•
Warm Boot: Restarts the server, restoring the set of batches that were
on the batch list when the server previously terminated. No validation
for Security Authority is performed.
•
Warm All Boot: Restarts the server only if it is able to restore all of the
batches to the batch list. No validation for Security Authority is
performed.
8. Select the Start/Continue button to start the service. Wait for the status to
change to RUNNING and the light is green.
9. Select the Server Statistics button. The Batch Server Statistics dialog box
opens.
10. Select the PCD Communications tab. The Data Server Status box
displays the status of the conversation. Make sure that conversation is
GOOD.
11. Select Start. The tag verification process begins. When tag verification is
COMPLETED, select OK, or select Stop to end the verification process
and then select OK.
Tip:
If the number of COM servers exceeds the viewable area
within the Data Server Status box, a scroll bar displays,
enabling you to scroll through the list.
12. Select Close. The Batch Service Manager dialog box closes.
Tip:
If software component conversation becomes LOST
while running in Demo mode, make sure that the
simulator is running and try starting the server(s) again.
For more information, see Start the FactoryTalk Batch
phase simulator.
See also
Batch Service Manager dialog box - Server options on page 32
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Batch Service Manager
dialog box - Server
options
The following methods are available for restarting the FactoryTalk Batch Server
after a service halt:
Cold Boot
Restarts the FactoryTalk Batch Server in a cold state. All
journal data or recipe content is erased upon startup. If
Security Authority is enabled, SAIs in a secured area model
and any secured recipes must match the current Network
FactoryTalk Directory SAI.
Warm Boot
Restarts the FactoryTalk Batch Server, restoring the set of
batches that were on the batch list when the FactoryTalk
Batch Server previously terminated. No validation for
Security Authority is performed.
Warm All Boot
Restarts the FactoryTalk Batch Server only if it is able to
restore all of the batches to the batch list. No validation for
Security Authority is performed.
See also
Start the Batch Server service on page 30
Start the sample
FactoryTalk Batch
Phase Simulator
FactoryTalk Batch comes with a phase logic simulation program, referred to as the
FactoryTalk Batch Phase Simulator used to simulate the batch process without
connecting to a PCD. The Phase Simulator imitates the functionality of a data
server and can communicate with the FactoryTalk Batch Server using OPC
communication protocol. The Phase Simulator is a powerful tool for testing,
experimentation and demonstration purposes. In this guide, run the sample
demonstration using the Phase Simulator.
Tip:
If the Phase Simulator is required and OPC protocol is used
for communications, the FactoryTalk Batch Server
automatically starts the Phase Simulator. Check the Windows
taskbar to see if the Phase Simulator is started.
To run the sample demonstration correctly, open the ice_cream1.sim file in the
Phase Simulator.
To start the sample FactoryTalk Batch Phase Simulator:
1. If the Phase Simulator is already running, maximize it from the Windows
taskbar. If the Phase Simulator is not running, select the Start button, point
to All Programs > Rockwell Software > FactoryTalk Batch Suite >
FactoryTalk Batch, and then select Simulator. The FactoryTalk Batch
Phase Simulator opens.
Important:
If running on Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008, right-click
Simulator and select Run as administrator.
2. Select File > Open. The Open Simulator Configuration File dialog box
opens.
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3. From the Look in list, open the Program Files > Rockwell Software >
Batch > SampleDemo1 > Recipes folder. Select the ice_cream1.sim file,
and then select Open.
4. Minimize the FactoryTalk Batch Phase Simulator window.
Verify PCD
communications
Use the following instructions to verify PCD communications.
Important:
If running on Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008, right-click
Batch Service Manager and select Run as administrator.
To verify PCD communications:
1. Select Start, point to All Programs > Rockwell Software > FactoryTalk
Batch Suite > FactoryTalk Batch, and then select Batch Service Manager.
The FactoryTalk Batch Service Manager opens.
2. Make sure FactoryTalk Batch Server is selected in the Service box.
3. Select the Server Statistics button. The FactoryTalk Batch Server
Statistics dialog box opens.
4. Select the PCD Communications tab. The Data Server Status area displays
the status of the conversation with the OPC_SIM data server (Phase
Simulator), which should be PHASES GOOD.
5. In the Tag Verify area, select the Start button to begin the verify process.
The tag verification process takes several minutes.
6. When the Status box shows COMPLETED, select OK to close the
FactoryTalk Batch Server Statistics dialog box.
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Learn about
FactoryTalk Batch
The rest of this document is designed to give you a tour through the FactoryTalk
Batch components using the sample demo. Proceed through the next chapters to
learn about:
•
FactoryTalk Batch View
•
FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor
•
FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor
•
FactoryTalk Event Archiver
•
FactoryTalk Batch ActiveX Controls
•
PC-Based Phases
See also
FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor introduction on page 35
FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor introduction on page 51
FactoryTalk Batch View introduction on page 65
FactoryTalk Event Archiver introduction on page 87
FactoryTalk Batch ActiveX controls introduction on page 91
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Editor introduction
The FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor is the component to configure the
equipment and associated functions to produce your facility’s area model. The
components defined in the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor interface with
the process-connected devices (PCDs) in the facility.
As outlined in the ISA S88.01 Batch Control Standard, the area model of a plant
is separated into the following physical components:
•
Process Cell
•
Unit
•
Phase
•
Control Module
To build the area model, configure each of these components. In addition to the
area model, the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor allows specification of
communication functions, enumeration sets, data servers, FactoryTalk Event
Archiver functions, and configuration of FactoryTalk Batch Server options.
In this section, open a sample file to examine a configured area model for an ice
cream plant.
See also
Open the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor with a sample user on page
36
Open a sample area model on page 36
The FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor window on page 36
Navigate within the area model on page 37
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Open the
FactoryTalk Batch
Equipment Editor
with a sample user
Use the following instructions to open the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor
with the sample user, ENG.
To open the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor with a sample user:
1. Select the Start button, point to All Programs > Rockwell Software >
FactoryTalk Batch Suite > FactoryTalk Batch, and then select
Equipment Editor. A blank FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor window
opens. The Equipment Editor Login dialog box also opens if FactoryTalk
Security is configured.
2. In the User Name field, enter ENG. (This is the FactoryTalk Security user
with Full Edit permissions you created in the FactoryTalk Batch Server
introduction section.)
3. In the Password field, enter password and select OK. (This is the password
you created for the ENG user in the FactoryTalk Batch Server
introduction section.)
See also
FactoryTalk Batch Server introduction on page 21
Open a sample area
model
The definition for an area model is contained in a configuration file (.cfg) that
you build using the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor. In this exercise, you
will look at a configuration file, ice_cream.cfg, which was installed with
FactoryTalk Batch.
To open a sample area model:
1. From the File menu, select Open, or select the Open toolbar button. The
Open dialog box opens.
2. Select ice_cream.cfg, and then select Open to open the file. The Classes
View area displays the icon that represents the PARLOR process cell class,
which is used to create the process cells shown in the Design View area.
The WEST_PARLOR process cell displays in the Design View area.
See also
The FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor window on page 36
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The FactoryTalk
Batch Equipment
Editor window
Chapter 4
The FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor window is divided into two main areas:
Classes View and Design View.
•
The Classes View displays the existing cell classes, unit classes, phase classes,
or operation sequence classes in the active area model. The column heading
reflects the active level. Double-click or right-click an icon to open the Edit
dialog box for the item.
•
The Design View is used to construct the area model and display the layout
of the active level. In the select mode, double-click an item to display the
layout of the next lower level. Right-click the item to open the Edit dialog
box.
The FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor also has a menu bar and toolbar. Take a
moment to examine the menus and the tooltips for each toolbar icon. (See the
FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor User Guide for more information on the
menus and toolbar icons.)
See also
Navigate within the area model on page 37
Navigate within the
area model
To navigate within the area model, use the Go Down and Go Up toolbar buttons.
Double-clicking an icon in the Design View takes you down through the area
model.
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To navigate within the area model:
1. Double-click the WEST_PARLOR icon in the Design View. The Design
View displays the units that make up the selected process cell. The Classes
View displays all the unit classes defined in the area model that you can add
to the process cell structure.
2. Double-click the WP_MIXER1 unit icon in the Design View. The
Design View displays the phases that make up the selected unit. The
Classes View area displays all the phase classes defined in the area model
that you can add to the unit structure.
The Location Bar displays the unit and process cell in which you are
working, which currently is the WP_MIXER1 unit within the
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WEST_PARLOR process cell. If the Location Bar is not displayed in your
window, select Location Bar from the View menu.
See also
Create and configure a phase class on page 39
Create and
configure a phase
class
A phase class is a reusable process-oriented function, such as Heat, Mix, or Add. A
phase instance occurs when a phase class is added to the Design View.
A phase class describes what is to occur in the recipe, but not how to do it. When a
phase class is added to the Design View, the resultant phase serves as a link to the
engineered logic in the phase logic that contains the instructions for how to do it.
Tip:
Control modules (the logic for pumps, valves, etc.) are
configured in the process-connected device (PCD).
See also
View a sample phase class configuration on page 39
Create a sample phase class on page 40
View a sample phase
class configuration
Use the following instructions to view the sample phase class configuration.
To view a sample phase class configuration:
1. Right-click the ADD_SUGAR phase class icon in the Classes View. The
Edit Phase Class dialog box opens to the General tab.
2. Select each tab and examine the settings that were defined for the
ADD_SUGAR phase class.
•
The General tab configures the general attributes of the phase class,
such as the phase class name, phase class type, the number of phase class
message partners, and the number of tags associated with the phase
class. Select an icon to graphically represent all phases based on the
phase class throughout the area model. Additionally, enable or disable
the use of control strategies and material-based recipes for the phase
class.
Tip:
The use of material-based recipes requires the
installation of FactoryTalk Batch Material Manager.
•
The Arbitration tab contains a list of the equipment for which
ownership is required by this phase in order for any procedural element
linked to the phase to begin execution.
•
The Parameters tab contains a list of parameters associated with the
phase class. Create, edit and delete phase class parameters, as well as
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configure verification methods for parameter values. The parameters
allow FactoryTalk Batch to send data to a PCD.
•
The Reports tab contains a list of report parameters associated with the
phase class. Additionally, add new reports, edit, and delete reports from
the list, as well as configure verification methods for report values. The
report parameters allow the PCD to send data to FactoryTalk Batch.
•
The Messages tab contains a list of messages associated with the phase
class. Phase class messages are typically used for journal entry purposes
and for troubleshooting phase logic problems. In some instances, the
message may be displayed to the operator. A phase class message has two
pieces of data associated with it: name and message ID.
•
The Control Strategies tab, which is only available if Control
Strategies is enabled on the General tab, is used to add, edit, or delete
control strategies.
3. Select Cancel to close the dialog box.
See also
Create a sample phase class on page 40
Create a sample phase
class
Phase classes are created and configured using the Create Phase Class dialog box.
To create a sample phase class:
1. From the Class menu, select New Phase Class. The Create Phase Class
dialog box opens to the General tab.
2. In the Name box, type ADD_WATER.
3. In the Icon list, select an icon to represent the ADD_WATER phase class.
4. Select Parameter/Tag Locking, if necessary. Select Apply.
5. Select the Parameters tab, and then select the Add Parameter button. A
new parameter is added to the list.
a.
In the Name box, type ADD_AMOUNT.
b. In the Default box, type 50.
c.
In the Enum/E.U. box, type KG.
d. Select Apply.
6. Select the Reports tab, and then select the Add Report button. A new
report parameter is added to the list.
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a.
In the Name box, type AMOUNT_ADDED.
b. In the Enum/E.U. box, type KG.
c.
Select Apply.
7. Select OK. The new phase class displays in Classes at the bottom of the list.
See also
View a sample phase class configuration on page 39
Create and
configure phases
When a phase class is added to a unit it becomes a phase. Only one instance of a
specific phase class to each unit, with the exception of material-enabled phase
classes. When a phase is required in multiple units, share it between the units or
add another instance of a phase class with a different name.
There are many options for configuring phases. As a minimum, modify each tag in
the phase to indicate the tag’s addressable location in the process-connected device
(PCD).
When using material-enabled phase classes, you can have multiple phases based on
the same phase class within a single unit. For each phase, define the material
containers with which the phase is associated. Phases mapping to the same phase
class have independent resource IDs.
See also
View a sample phase configuration on page 41
View a sample FactoryTalk Batch tags on page 42
Create a sample phase on page 43
View a sample phase
configuration
Use the following instructions to view a sample phase configuration.
To view a sample phase configuration:
1. Right-click the WP_ADD_CREAM_M1 icon in the Design View. The
Edit Phase dialog box opens to the General tab.
2. Select each tab and examine the settings defined for the
WP_ADDCREAM_M1 phase.
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•
The General tab allows you to configure general attributes of the phase,
such as the name, equipment ID, and automatic upload/download.
•
The Arbitration tab displays a list of the equipment for which
ownership is required by this phase in order to begin execution.
•
The Cross Invocation tab configures the cross invocation strings,
which indicate the addition of an item to the FactoryTalk Batch View
and ActiveX controls’ shortcut menus, including the caption for each
menu item and what data is passed to the specified automation server
when the menu item is selected.
•
The Tags tab displays a list of all tags to define for the phase. You can
set a server for each tag and the scan rate.
•
The Parameter Limit Tags tab is used to enable the FactoryTalk Batch
Equipment Editor to determine and build the tags required to
download the parameter limits and verification configuration details to
the phase logic if Parameter/Tag Locking is enabled. Or, if
Parameter/Tag Locking is disabled, you can select the appropriate set
of parameter limit tags for each parameter.
•
The Report Limit Tags tab is used to enable the FactoryTalk Batch
Equipment Editor to determine and build the tags required to
download the report limits and verification configuration details to the
phase logic, if Parameter/Tag Locking is enabled. Or, if
Parameter/Tag Locking is disabled, you can select the appropriate set
of report limit tags for each parameter.
•
The Containers tab is used to configure which containers the phase
can select material from, and which containers it can distribute material
into. The Containers tab is visible with material-enabled phases only,
which requires the installation of FactoryTalk Batch Material Manager.
3. Select Cancel to close the dialog box.
See also
View a sample FactoryTalk Batch tags on page 42
View a sample
FactoryTalk Batch tags
FactoryTalk Batch uses phase tags to connect and talk to the phase logic in the
PCD. Phase logic is code that issues real-time commands to actual devices in the
plant. These tags also determine the size of the FactoryTalk Batch Server needed
for a particular process.
To view a sample FactoryTalk Batch tags:
1. Double-click the WP_AGITATE_M1 icon. The Edit Phase dialog box
opens.
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2. Select the Tags tab. The Phase Tags list shows the various tags associated
with the WP_AGITATE_M1 phase.
3. Double-click the COMMAND tag. The Edit Phase Tag dialog box opens.
The Item Name box contains the tag address defined in the PCD. Notice
that the COMMAND tag is associated with the Phase Simulator
(OPC_SIM).
4. Click Cancel twice to close the dialog boxes.
See Also
Create a sample phase on page 43
Create a sample phase
To create a phase, place a phase class icon in the Design View, assign it to a data
server, and then configure the phase.
To create a sample phase:
1. Select the ADD_WATER phase class icon in the Classes View, place the
cursor in the Design View where you want to place the phase, and then
left-click. The Edit Phase dialog box opens to the General tab.
2. From the Data Server list, select the OPC_SIM data server and then select
Apply.
The FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor assigns a name and an
equipment ID to the phase. Since automatic upload and download is
enabled in the phase class, automatic upload and download is also enabled
in the phase, but you can selectively disable this feature.
3. In the Name box, type WP_ADD_WATER_M1 to match the other phase
names in the unit.
In normal use, you would now configure tags for this phase, but since you
are using the Phase Simulator for this example, it is not necessary.
4. Select OK. A default phase is created and it is assigned to the Phase
Simulator (OPC_SIM). While the icon is selected, drag it around the
Design View.
See also
View a sample phase configuration on page 41
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Create a sample
signature template
Before you can set up your phases and recipes to require electronic signatures, you
must establish a set of signature templates. Each signature template defines the
number of signoffs required, the meaning of those signoffs, whether comments are
included with the signoff, and which security permissions an operator must have
to complete the signoff.
Important:
The following exercises require you to save the
area model. If you want to preserve the original
area model, exit the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment
Editor without saving the changes, and copy the
SampleDemo1.cfg file to a different location
before proceeding with the following steps.
To create a sample signature template:
1. If you closed the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor, open it and then
open the SampleDemo1.cfg area model.
2. From the Edit menu, select Signature Templates. The Edit Signature
Templates dialog box opens.
3. Select the New Template button. The Create Signature Template dialog
box opens.
4. In the Template Name field, type CommandsTemplate and select OK
(the Template Index is optional). The Create Signature Template dialog
box closes and the new template is listed in the Signature Templates list on
the Edit Signature Templates dialog box.
5. In the Signoffs Required drop-down, select 1 (this is the number of
signatures that must be obtained for this signature template).
6. Select the Signoffs tab.
7. In the Template Name field, make sure CommandsTemplate is selected.
8. From the Signoff dropdown, select 1 (this represents the Signoff you are
going to configure.)
9. In the Meaning field, type Authorizes commands.
10. From the Comment drop-down, select Optional.
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11. In the Security Permissions area, select the Add button. The Select User
or Group dialog box opens.
12. In the Filter box, select Show all.
13. Select OPER and select OK. (See the FactoryTalk Batch Administrator
Guide for more information on security.)
14. Select OK to save the Create Signature Template dialog box. (See the
FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor User Guide for more information on
creating and configuring Signature Templates.)
See also
Use signature templates on page 45
Use signature templates with recipe approvals on page 46
Use signature
templates
Signature templates can be used to request signoffs for reports and parameters,
and can be configured to request a signoff when specified commands are generated
from within the FactoryTalk Batch View.
The template you created in the previous section, CommandsTemplate, will be
used to generate a signature request when the START command is issued from the
FactoryTalk Batch View application. This requires that you enable Command
Verification Policies.
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To use signature templates:
1. Select Command Policies from the Edit menu. The Edit Command
Verification Policies dialog box opens.
2. Select the Start check box to select it. The Select Signature Template
dialog box opens.
3. Since CommandsTemplate is the only template currently defined, it is
selected by default. Select OK. CommandsTemplate should display in the
Signature Template box next to the Start command.
4. Select OK to close the dialog box.
5. Select Save from the File menu to save the area model. This is required
because you will be using the Signature feature later in this guide.
See also
Use signature templates with recipe approvals on page 46
Use signature
templates with recipe
approvals
46
Signature templates are used to provide signoffs for the Recipe Approvals process.
The Recipe Approvals process:
•
Validates the development and maintenance of batch recipes.
•
Safeguards design workflow in a formalized manner.
•
Ensures each recipe is validated by authorized personnel before being
released to production.
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Additional signature templates may be required for the recipe approval
process--configuration for these is the same as for other signature templates.
Assigning signature templates to recipe approval steps is handled in the
FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor Recipe Approvals Configuration dialog
box. Approval signoffs are executed in the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor.
To use signature templates with recipe approvals:
1. In the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor, select Recipe Approvals
Configuration from the Edit menu to open the Recipe Approvals
Configuration dialog box.
Tip:
If you are configured with View Only access rights under
FactoryTalk Policies, the dialog box opens but the OK
button is disabled--any changes you make are not saved.
2. Select from available signature templates using the
button to the
right of each Approval and Revert field for the step you want to configure.
You may need to configure additional signature templates for the approval
roles in your process.
Configure Approval and Revert signoffs for at least these three steps:
•
The first listed step (labeled Begin Approval by default).
•
Release Recipe as Step (for both the Approval Process and the
Expedited Process steps).
•
Release Recipe to Production (for both the Approval Process and the
Expedited Process steps).
Once valid signoffs are configured for these steps, the Enable Recipe
Approvals checkbox is no longer grayed out.
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3. (optional) Check the box
to the left of one or more of the three
optional steps to enable and configure more approval steps if needed. These
step labels are user-modifiable.
4. Check the Enable Recipe Approvals box. Once you have enabled recipe
approvals, either the formal process of three to six steps, or the expedited
approval process of two steps, is available for execution in the FactoryTalk
Batch Recipe Editor. Either approval process must be completed for the
recipe to be marked as Release Recipe to Production, at which point it is
added the FactoryTalk Batch Server to the Batch List in FactoryTalk Batch
View, ActiveX Controls, and/or eProcedure.
See Configure recipe approval steps in the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor
User Guide for more information on recipe approvals configuration.
See Approve a recipe in the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor User Guide for more
information on recipe approval.
See also
Use signature templates on page 45
Enable recipe
version control
A versioned recipe is a saved, read-only snapshot of the recipe taken at a particular
point in time. Recipe version control is useful when you, or a team of authors,
need to store and protect revisions of a recipe during its development.
Recipe version control is enabled in the Options > Server Options menu in the
FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor. Enforcement of version naming is handled
by the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor. To enable versioning, follow the
instructions given in Enable recipe version control in the FactoryTalk Batch
Administrator Guide.
For information on using recipe versioning, see Work with recipe versions in the
FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor User Guide.
See also
Enable recipe and area model security on page 48
Share equipment on page 49
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Enable recipe and
area model security
Chapter 4
A recipe or an area model can be secured to a Security Authority Identifier (SAI)
in the FactoryTalk Network Directory. When secured, a recipe or an area model
cannot be viewed, modified, or used under a different FactoryTalk security
authority identifier.
Recipes are secured using the Recipe > Security Authority command in the
FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor. For more information on using recipe security,
see Security authority overview in the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor User
Guide.
Area models are secured to a SAI using the Edit > Security Authority command
in the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor. For more information on using area
model security, see Security authority overview in the FactoryTalk Batch
Equipment Editor User Guide.
See also
Enable recipe version control on page 48
Share equipment
Both the WP_MIXER1 and WP_MIXER2 units require the ADD_WATER
phase. Rather than create two identical phases, you can share the phase between
the units.
To share equipment:
1. Select the Go Up button to return to the Unit level.
2. Double-click the WP_MIXER2 icon.
3. Select the Share Unit button. The Share Phase Between Units dialog box
opens.
4. Expand WP_MIXER1, and then select WP_ADD_WATER_M1.
5. Select OK.
See also
Exit the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor on page 49
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Exit the FactoryTalk
Batch Equipment
Editor
Use the following instructions to exit the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor.
To exit the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor:
1. From the File menu, select Exit.
2. Select No to discard any changes you made to the .cfg file. This does not
discard any previously saved changes.
See also
Open the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor with a sample user on page
36
FactoryTalk Batch
Equipment Editor
summary
In this section, you:
•
Opened the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor.
•
Examined the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor window.
•
Opened an area model.
•
Created a phase class.
•
Created a signature template.
•
Enabled a command verification policy.
•
Examined phase tags.
•
Created a phase.
(See the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor User Guide for more information
about the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor.)
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introduction
The FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor is used to create and configure master
recipes. The FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor lets you use tables, sequential
function charts, or both, to graphically organize procedural information into unit
procedures, operations, and phases. This FactoryTalk Batch component is used
primarily by recipe formulators to create or edit recipes (sequences of steps) and
formula values (parameters, set point values, etc.).
All recipes are configured and displayed using the ISA S88.01 Batch Control
Standards, which define the Procedure, Unit Procedure, and Operation (Phase)
layers for the procedural model.
In this section, you open a sample file to examine and edit a recipe for French
Vanilla ice cream.
Tip:
This chapter provides a brief glance at the
recipe-building capabilities of the FactoryTalk Batch
Recipe Editor. See the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor
User Guide for more information on completing,
importing, approving, versioning, exporting, and
maintaining recipes.
See also
Open the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor on page 52
FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor window on page 52
Open a recipe on page 53
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Open the
FactoryTalk Batch
Recipe Editor
Use the following instructions to open the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor.
To open the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor:
1. Select the Start button, point to All Programs > Rockwell Software >
FactoryTalk Batch Suite > FactoryTalk Batch and then select Recipe
Editor. A blank FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor window displays. The
Recipe Editor Login dialog box also opens if security is configured.
2. Enter a FactoryTalk Security user name and password and select OK. If a
recipe verification box displays, select Yes to verify all the recipes in the Area
Model’s recipe directory.
3. When this is complete, select Close.
See also
FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor window on page 52
FactoryTalk Batch
Recipe Editor
window
The FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor component allows you to construct recipes
by sequencing phases graphically. The actual phase logic resides in the process
control device and is configured separately using controller-specific programming
software. The phases are configured in the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor.
The FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor window consists of the following
components:
•
52
The Procedure View pane occupies the left side of the FactoryTalk Batch
Recipe Editor window and contains a hierarchical list of the current recipe
components. Selecting a component from the list displays the
corresponding step(s) in the Recipe Construction pane.
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•
The Recipe Construction pane occupies the right side of the FactoryTalk
Batch Recipe Editor window and is used to construct master recipes. The
Recipe Construction pane allows you to construct and view recipe
structures using a sequential function chart (SFC) or a table. Both the SFC
View and the Table View can be displayed exclusively, or the Recipe
Construction pane can be tiled to display both views at the same time.
Selecting a component within either view will highlight the corresponding
item in the Procedure View pane.
The FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor also has a menu bar, toolbar, and a Recipe
Construction toolbox. Take a moment to examine the menus and the tooltips for
each toolbar icon and toolbox tool. See the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor User
Guide for more information on the menus, toolbar icons, and toolbox tools.
See also
Open a recipe on page 53
Open a recipe
In this section, you will edit an existing recipe. Step-by-step instructions for
building a recipe are located in the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor User Guide.
To open a recipe:
1. From the File menu, select Open Top Level. The Open [Type] Recipe
dialog box opens. In this case [Type] is BINARY. (Other recipe storage
types are XML and RDB.)
2. From the Select the recipe to open list, select CLS_FRENCHVANILLA.
In the right column, notice the information about the recipe and the
Release Recipe as Step and Release Recipe To Production check boxes.
3. Select Open.
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Tip:
When Recipe Approvals are disabled, the Release
Recipe as Step and Release Recipe to Production
check boxes display the state of these properties, but are
inactive. These properties are set in the Recipe >
Header Data dialog box.
When Recipe Approvals are enabled, these properties
are treated as two steps in the approval process, and are
set as part of the approval signoff process.
When Release Recipe as Step is true (box is checked),
the recipe can be used by other recipes. When Release
Recipe to Production is true, the recipe is shown in the
Recipe List in FactoryTalk Batch View, eProcedure, and
ActiveX Controls. This allows batches to be created from
the recipe.
See also
Review the recipe structure on page 54
Review the recipe
structure
54
The ISA S88.01 recipe structure of CLS_FRENCHVANILLA is displayed on the
left side in the Procedure View pane. The SFC version of the
CLS_FRENCHVANILLA recipe structure is displayed on the right side in the
Recipe Construction pane.
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Some of the information displayed within the Procedure View pane is too large
for the window, resulting in the information being hidden.
View hidden
information
There are two ways to view the hidden information:
•
Hover over the item to view the entire name in a tooltip.
•
Move the cursor over the split bar between the Procedure View pane and
the Recipe Construction pane. When the pointer changes into a
horizontal double-headed arrow, select and drag the split bar to the right or
left.
See also
Review the recipe structure on page 54
Change the recipe view
By default, the SFC version of the recipe structure displays in the Recipe
Construction pane.
To change the recipe view:
1. Select the Table button to view the table version of the recipe structure.
Size the columns if necessary to view the contents.
2. Select the Tile button to view both the SFC and table views simultaneously.
See also
Move down through SFC levels on page 55
Move down through
SFC levels
Like the FactoryTalk Batch View, the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor allows you
to view all of the SFC levels by double-clicking the SFC step or selecting the step
from the Procedure View area.
To move down through SFC levels:
1. Select the SFC button to view the SFC.
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Notice the letters BPC in the right corner of the status bar. These letters
signify that you are currently viewing the Batch Procedure (BPC) level of
the recipe.
2. Double-click the CLS_SWEETCREAM_UP:1 step in the SFC to move
to the Unit Procedure (UPC) level.
Notice that the blue highlight in the Procedure View indicates the selected
level and that the letters UPC display in the lower right corner of the
window.
3. Double-click the CLS_SWEETCREAM_OP:1 step in the SFC to move
to the Unit Operation (UOP) level. All of the phases within the
CLS_SWEETCREAM_OP:1 unit operation display.
See also
Move up through SFC levels on page 57
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Move up through SFC
levels
Selecting the initial step sends you up through the SFC levels. You also can select a
level in the Procedure View pane.
To move up through SFC levels:
1. Double-click the initial step of the CLS_SWEETCREAM_OP:1
Operation at the top of the SFC to return to the Unit Procedure level.
2. Double-click the initial step of the CLS_SWEETCREAM_UP:1 Unit
Procedure at the top of the SFC to return to the Batch Procedure level.
See also
Move down through SFC levels on page 55
You build a recipe by adding steps. The FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor
automatically adds and configures the transitions between the steps.
Add steps
See also
Add a sequential step in the sample operation level on page 57
Add a parallel step in the sample operation level on page 58
Add a sequential step
in the sample
operation level
Use the following instructions to add a sequential step in the operation level.
To add a sequential step in the sample operation level:
1. With the Selection Tool selected, double-click the
CLS_SWEETCREAM_UP:1 unit procedure in the Procedure View.
The CLS_SWEETCREAM_OP:1 operation displays.
2. Double-click the CLS_SWEETCREAM_OP:1 operation. The recipe
steps within the operation display.
3. Select the ADD_MILK:1 STATE = COMPLETE transition at the
bottom of the operation.
4. Select the Add Step button in the Recipe Construction Toolbox. A new
step and transition are added below the selected transition and the Select
Phase dialog box opens.
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5. Select XFR_OUT, and then select OK. The new step is defined as
XFR_OUT:1 and the transition below the step is defined as
XFR_OUT:1.STATE = COMPLETE.
The recipe elements in CLS_SWEETCREAM_OP:1 automatically
rearrange to make room for the new step and transition. This auto-arrange
functionality of the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor greatly simplifies both
the recipe creation and modification processes and
also increases the overall readability of the recipe.
Add a parallel step in
the sample operation
level
Use the following instructions to add a parallel step in the operation level.
To add a parallel step in the sample operation level:
1. While still in the CLS_SWEETCREAM_OP:1 operation, select the
TEMP_CTL:1 step.
2. Select the Add Parallel button. A new step is added in parallel to the
selected step and the Select Phase dialog box opens.
3. Select ADD_EGG, and then select OK. The new step is now defined as
ADD_EGG:2 and the transition below the step is automatically re-defined
as ADD_EGG:2.STATE = COMPLETE AND TEMP_CTL:1.STATE =
COMPLETE AND ADD_CREAM:1.STATE = COMPLETE to reflect
the new parallel structure.
See also
Assign step formula values to sample operation level on page 59
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Assign step formula
values to the
sample operation
level
Once a step is added to an operation, you can assign formula values, which
involves specifying the values and selecting the parameter to display for the
selected step.
To assign step formula values to the sample operation level:
1. While still in the CLS_SWEETCREAM_OP:1 operation, select the
ADD_EGG:2 step.
2. Select the Value Entry button. The Parameter Value Entry/Report Limit
Entry dialog box opens listing the parameters associated with the step. The
only parameter is ADD_AMOUNT.
3. Type 100 in the Value box, and then select Display so the value displays on
the SFC.
4. Select OK to return to the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor window.
Next, you decide to change the parameter for TEMP_CTL:1 so that the
operator can enter the amount when the batch is run.
5. Select the TEMP_CTL:1 step, and then select the Value Entry button.
The Parameter Value Entry/Report Limits Entry dialog box opens listing
the parameters associated with the step. There are two parameters:
HOLD_TIME and TEMP_SP. You want the operator to decide how long
to hold the mixture.
6. From the Origin list for the HOLD_TIME parameter, select Operator to
indicate that the operator enters the amount when the recipe is run.
7. Select OK to return to the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor window.
See also
Add recipe comments to sample operation on page 60
Add a continuous loop to the sample unit procedure on page 61
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Add recipe
comments to the
sample operation
Recipe commenting provides you with a tool to create and edit comments for
viewing at design and run time. With this feature, important information can be
inserted into the recipe and associated with a step, transition, or entire recipe.
To add recipe comments to the sample operation:
1. While still in the CLS_SWEETCREAM_OP:1 operation, select the Text
Box Tool button. The cursor changes to a text tool.
2. Move the cursor to the right of the AGITATE:1 step and select. A text box
labeled C1 is placed in the SFC.
3. Select the Link button, and move the cursor (now a +) back to the C1 text
box.
4. Select anywhere in the box, hold the mouse button, and drag the cursor to
the AGITATE:1 step. AGITATE:1 now appears in the bottom half of the
text box indicating the C1 text box is associated with the AGITATE:1 step.
5. Choose the Selection Tool and double-click inside the text box. Type
Reduce the agitation speed to 20 RPM if the mixture begins to separate.
6. Select outside the text box when the comment is complete.
See also
Remove steps on page 60
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Remove steps
When you remove a step from the recipe, the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor
will reconfigure the links and transitions accordingly. However, sometimes the
links and transitions are complex and you may have to redo the links and
reconfigure the transitions manually.
See also
Add steps on page 57
Add a continuous
loop to the sample
unit procedure
FactoryTalk Batch is capable of performing looping at all levels of the procedural
model. Not only is this a powerful recipe management tool, it is a simple task to
complete.
To add a continuous loop to the sample unit procedure:
1. Select the Go Up button on the toolbar twice to move to the
CLS_SWEETCREAM_UP:1 unit procedure.
2. Select the Transition Tool button. Place the pointer to the right of the
existing transition labeled CLS_SWEETCREAM_UP:1.STATE =
COMPLETE, and then select to add an undefined transition.
3. Select the Link Tool button.
4. Select and drag the pointer from the step labeled
CLS_SWEETCREAM_UP:1 to the new TRUE transition. Release the
mouse button to add the link.
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Important:
All loops and transitions must branch to the right
side of the sequential function chart as shown.
5. Select and drag the pointer from the TRUE transition to the last step of the
unit procedure (CLS_FRENCHVANILLA_UP:1). This completes the
loop structure.
6. Select the Selection Tool button, and then double-click the new TRUE
transition.
7. Select the Common Expressions folder.
8. Double-click Step.State = Complete.
9. In the upper part of the dialog box, highlight = (equal sign) in the
expression, and then select the GREATER THAN OR LESS THAN
button.
The transition should now read CLS_SWEETCREAM_UP:1.STATE <>
COMPLETE. This transition ensures that the
CLS_SWEETCREAM_UP:1 operation will continue to run until it
reaches a COMPLETE state.
10. Select OK.
See also
Verify the recipe on page 62
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Verify the recipe
After a recipe is created or edited, it needs to be verified to make sure it was
configured properly and that it will run against a particular set of equipment (the
area model).
To verify the recipe:
1. Select the Verify button. The Verification Process Results dialog box
opens. The result should be: CLS_FRENCHVANILLA >> Verification
of recipes has completed.
2. Select Close.
See also
Assign step formula values to sample operation level on page 59
Add recipe comments to sample operation on page 60
Remove steps on page 60
Add a continuous loop to the sample unit procedure on page 61
Remove a
sequential step
from the sample
operation
Use the following instructions to remove a sequential step.
To remove a sequential step from the sample operation:
1. While still in the CLS_SWEETCREAM_OP:1 operation, select the
XFR_OUT:1 step.
2. Select the Remove Step button. The XFR_OUT:1 step is removed,
including its links and the following transition. The SFC automatically
rearranges to adjust for the removed step.
See also
Remove a parallel step from the sample operation on page 63
Remove a parallel
step from the
sample operation
Use the following to remove a parallel step from the sample operation.
To remove a parallel step from the sample operation:
1. While still in the CLS_SWEETCREAM_OP:1 operation, select the
ADD_EGG:2 parallel step.
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2. Select the Remove Step tool. The ADD_EGG:2 parallel step is removed,
including its links, and the following transition is re-configured. The SFC
automatically rearranges to adjust for the removed step.
Tip:
Because transitions that follow parallel structures can be
complex, the transition may not reconfigure
automatically. If the transition following the removed
parallel step requires reconfiguration, you must configure
the transition manually.
See also
Remove a sequential step from sample operation on page 63
FactoryTalk Batch
Recipe Editor
summary
In this section, you:
•
Opened the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor.
•
Examined the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor window.
•
Opened a recipe.
•
Resized the Procedure View pane.
•
Navigated through the SFC and Procedure View hierarchy.
•
Added a sequential step to a recipe.
•
Added a parallel step to a recipe.
•
Assigned formula values.
•
Added a comment.
•
Removed steps.
•
Built step transitions.
•
Added a continuous loop.
•
Verified the recipe.
•
Exited the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor.
This chapter provided a brief overview of the capabilities of the FactoryTalk Batch
Recipe Editor module. (See the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor User Guide for
more information on the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor.)
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FactoryTalk Batch View
introduction
The FactoryTalk Batch View is used to initiate and control the batch process and
to view running batches. It has a graphical user interface with easy to use windows
and buttons and, like most of the FactoryTalk Batch components, is based
primarily on input from ISA’s S88.01 Batch Control Standard.
Using the sample demo files installed with FactoryTalk Batch, this chapter takes
you through the steps involved in running a batch, demonstrating the powerful
simplicity and functionality of the FactoryTalk Batch solution.
Tip:
This chapter provides a brief glance at the capabilities of
the FactoryTalk Batch View module. For more in-depth
information, see the FactoryTalk Batch View User Guide.
See also
Open FactoryTalk Batch View on page 65
Run a sample batch on page 67
Examine the batch on page 69
Navigate the SFC on page 70
Remove sample batch from the batch list on page 72
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Open FactoryTalk
Batch View
Use the following instructions to open FactoryTalk Batch View.
To open FactoryTalk Batch View:
1. Select the Start button, point to All Programs > Rockwell Software >
FactoryTalk Batch Suite > FactoryTalk Batch, and then select View. The
FactoryTalk Batch View window opens to the Batch List view, which is one
of the ten views accessible using the toolbar buttons.
•
The Toolbar contains buttons for changing views, configuring the
views, accessing online help, going to an HMI, logging on to and exiting
from the FactoryTalk Batch View.
•
The Command buttons represent actions that the operator performs,
such as adding, removing, starting, stopping, holding, or aborting a
batch. The Command buttons dynamically change according to the
current view and selected batch.
•
The Status bar displays information regarding the current user, the
selected batch and the data server. A green G in the lower right corner
indicates good communication between the FactoryTalk Batch Server
and the data server(s). If communication is lost, a red L displays and
you must restart the FactoryTalk Batch Server.
2. Take a moment to examine the tooltips for the toolbar icons and command
buttons.
Tip:
If none of the toolbar or command buttons are enabled,
except the Login button, select the Login button and
enter a FactoryTalk Security user name and password.
See also
Run a sample batch on page 67
Examine the batch on page 69
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Remove sample batch from the batch list on page 72
Bind a unit manually on page 73
Add a comment to a sample batch on page 74
Run a sample batch
In this exercise, add a batch of French Vanilla ice cream to the Batch list and start
the batch.
To run a sample batch:
1. Select the Add Batch command button. The Recipe List dialog box opens,
listing the recipes that are released to production, which constitute the
master recipe list for a facility.
2. Select the CLS_FRENCHVANILLA recipe, and then select OK. The
Batch Creation dialog box opens. The Formula Values area displays the
materials and amounts that are used in the recipe. The Unit Binding area
indicates the units that you can choose to bind to the recipe.
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This recipe takes advantage of the powerful Dynamic Unit Allocation
feature, which allows you to select which units in the area model to bind to
the recipe and when that binding occurs. In this batch, you choose to bind
the units as you create the batch. Later in this section you see how to bind
units to a batch after the batch is created.
3. Type TEST_1 in the Batch ID box.
4. From the Bound Unit list in the Unit Binding area, select
WP_FREEZER2 as the FREEZER unit and WP_MIXER2 as the MIXER
unit to bind to the recipe. When the batch is run, the recipe will bind to the
units that you selected.
5. Select Create. The batch is added to the Batch List.
6. Select the TEST_1 batch, select the Start Batch command button, and
then select Yes to confirm.
7. If you configured a verification policy on the START command (see Create
a sample signature template), the Command Signature dialog box opens.
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Tip:
If you are not prompted to confirm the Start command,
you must open the Batch Service Manager, stop the
FactoryTalk Batch Server, and then restart it. Wait for the
data server status to change to G (Good).
8. Type OPER in the User ID box. This is the user you created in Chapter 3,
FactoryTalk Batch Server introduction.
9. Type password in the Password box. The Sign button is enabled.
10. Select the Sign button. The Signoff State changes to Complete.
11. Select the Close button. The batch starts.
12. The State column shows that the batch is RUNNING.
See also
Create a sample signature template on page 44
FactoryTalk Batch Server introduction on page 21
Examine the batch
Use the following instructions to examine the batch.
To examine the batch:
1. Select the Procedure as SFC button to examine the batch as it is running.
The Procedure as SFC view displays the sequential function charts (SFCs)
of the currently selected batch, where you can watch the batch execute its
steps and transitions. An operator can command a batch using the
command buttons.
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Tip:
You need to move the horizontal and vertical split bars
separating the four sections to view the contents as
shown in the example.
The Procedure as SFC window consists of four sections:
•
The Procedural Hierarchy displays the details of the entire batch.
Dragging the split bar to the right reveals more of the batch details, such
as State, Mode, Unit, and Key Parameters.
•
The Sequential Function Chart (SFC) displays for the step that is
selected in the Procedural Hierarchy. You can view a different level of
the SFC by double-clicking a step.
There are three sizing buttons that you can use to change the size of the
SFC.
Decreases display size
Increases display size
Fits display to window size
•
The Recipe Table displays the components of the procedural elements
in the currently selected batch. You also can access the recipe table by
clicking the Procedure as Table button.
•
The Auxiliary Index contains five tabs that display information
regarding the recipe, prompts, parameters, reports and arbitration for
the step that is selected in the Procedural Hierarchy or the SFC.
2. Spend a few moments adjusting the split bars to view the State column in
the Procedural Hierarchy area and to maximize the SFC.
See also
Navigating the SFC on page 70
Navigate the SFC
As the batch runs, the steps listed in the Procedural Hierarchy that are being
executed display in green and the State column indicates RUNNING. In the
SFC, the steps being executed also display in green. Notice also that
WP_MIXER2 and WP_FREEZER2 are indicated in the SFC as the phases being
used in the batch.
You can navigate the batch by selecting on the unit procedure, operation, or phase
either in the Procedure Hierarchy or the SFC.
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To navigate the SFC:
1. Double-click the CLS_SWEETCREAM_UP:1 box in the SFC to go to
the Unit Procedure (UP) level. There is one operation within the unit
procedure: CLS_SWEETCREAM_OP:1.
Notice the green arrow in the Procedural Hierarchy points to the Unit
(UP) level. The green color in the SFC indicates that the operation is
running.
2. Double-click the CLS_SWEETCREAM_OP:1 box in the SFC to go to
the Operation (OP) level.
There are six phases within this operation: ADD_EGG:1,
ADD_SUGAR:1, AGITATE:1, ADD_CREAM:1, TEMP_CTL:1, and
ADD_MILK:1.
3. Reduce the size of the SFC so you can see more of the structure.
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4. Double-click the initial step of the CLS_SWEETCREAM_OP:1
operation at the top of the SFC to return to the Unit Procedure level.
5. Double-click the initial step of the CLS_SWEETCREAM_UP:1 unit
procedure at the top of the SFC to return to the Procedure level.
There are four unit procedures within this procedure:
CLS_SWEETCREAM_UP:1, CLS_TRANSFER_IN_UP:1,
CLS_TRANSFER_OUT_UP:1, and CLS_FRENCHVANILLA_UP:1.
See also
Remove sample batch from the batch list on page 72
Remove the sample
batch from the
Batch List
The state of a batch becomes COMPLETE once the batch has finished running.
If a batch is in a COMPLETE state and in either AUTO (O_AUTO) or
SEMI_AUTO (S_AUTO) mode, you can remove it from the Batch List. The
TEST_1 batch is in O_AUTO mode, so you can remove it from the Batch List
when it is COMPLETE.
To remove the sample batch from the Batch List:
1. Select the Batch List button to return to the Batch List view.
2. Select the TEST_1 batch.
3. Select the Remove Batch command button, and then select Yes to confirm
the removal.
The batch is removed from the Batch List view.
See also
Bind a unit manually on page 73
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Bind a unit
manually
When you create a batch, you can select units to bind to the recipe (which we did
earlier in this chapter). You also have the ability to change the binding after the
batch is created, which is helpful if a unit becomes unavailable between the time
you create the batch and when you are ready to run the batch.
In this exercise, you manually bind a unit after the batch is created, add a comment
to indicate the binding was changed, and respond to unacknowledged prompts
during the batch run.
To bind a unit manually:
1. In the Batch List view, create a batch of French Vanilla named TEST_2
and bind to the WP_MIXER1 and WP_FREEZER1 units.
2. Select the TEST_2 batch, and then select the Procedure as SFC button.
Notice that WP_MIXER1 and WP_FREEZER1 appear in the SFC to
indicate that those phases will be used in the recipe.
3. Select CLS_SWEETCREAM_UP:1 in the Procedural Hierarchy or SFC.
4. Select the Bind command button, and then Yes to confirm the binding.
The Manual Bind of Step dialog box opens listing the options you can
select for binding the unit.
WP_MIXER2 does not appear in the list because the other unit procedures
in the batch are bound to WP_FREEZER1, which is linked to
WP_MIXER1. You want the FactoryTalk Batch Server to prompt the
operator to select the unit to bind to the unit procedure as the batch runs. If
you select First Available, the FactoryTalk Batch Server selects the unit to
bind based on availability at the time equipment is needed.
5. From the Select Unit to bind to Unit Requirement list, select PROMPT,
and then select OK.
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Notice that the SFC changes to MIXER. When the batch runs, the
operator is prompted to select the mixer unit to bind to the recipe.
6. Select CLS_TRANSFER_IN_UP:1 in the Procedural Hierarchy or SFC.
7. Select the Bind command button, and then select Yes to confirm the
binding. The Manual Bind of Step dialog box opens listing the options you
can select for binding the unit.
Notice that WP_FREEZER1 and WP_FREEZER2 both appear in the list
because the MIXER binding process was changed to Prompt.
8. Select PROMPT from the Select Unit to bind to Unit Requirement list,
and then select OK.
Notice that the SFC changes to FREEZER. When the batch is run, the
operator is prompted to select the freezer unit to bind to the recipe.
See also
Add a comment to a sample batch on page 74
Add a comment to a
sample batch
Before you run the batch, you add a comment to add to the Batch Event Journal.
To add a comment to a sample batch:
1. Select the Batch List button to return to the Batch List view.
2. Select the TEST_2 batch, and then select the Comment command button.
The Batch Comment dialog box opens.
3. Type This batch was altered to allow the operator to bind units
manually.
4. Select OK to return to the Batch List window.
See also
Respond to unacknowledged sample prompts on page 75
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Respond to
unacknowledged
sample prompts
Because you selected Prompt binding, the batch stops running when binding is to
occur and you must use the Unacknowledged Prompts list to select the units to
bind.
To respond to unacknowledged sample prompts:
1. Select the Start Batch command button, and then select Yes to start the
batch.
Tip:
If the Command Signature dialog box opens, refer to
Run a sample batch for instructions.
The Unacknowledged Prompts button begins to flash yellow. You could
address this request from the Batch List view but switch to the SFC view to
see how the binding changes.
2. Select the Procedure as SFC button. Notice that the first transition
indicates BINDING, which means the FactoryTalk Batch Server is trying to
acquire an equipment phase to run the CLS_SWEETCREAM unit
procedure.
3. Select the flashing Unacknowledged Prompts button. The
Unacknowledged Prompts List opens indicating that the operator must
select the unit to use as the MIXER.
4. Double-click the TEST_2 batch. The Prompt to Bind Unit Requirement
dialog box opens indicating that WP_MIXER1 and WP_MIXER2 are the
mixers available to bind to the recipe.
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5. Select WP_MIXER2 from the Select Unit to bind to Unit Requirement
list, and then select OK.
6. Select the Procedure as SFC button and notice that the batch continues to
run using WP_MIXER2. When the batch reaches the transition following
the CLS_SWEETCREAM unit procedure, the Unacknowledged
Prompts button starts to flash again.
7. Select the flashing Unacknowledged Prompts button. The Batch List
opens indicating that the operator must select the unit to use as the
FREEZER.
8. Double-click the TEST_2 batch. The Prompt to Bind Unit Requirement
dialog box opens indicating that WP_FREEZER2 is the only freezer
available to bind to the recipe. Because you selected WP_MIXER2, which is
linked to WP_FREEZER2, that is the only option available to you.
9. Select WP_FREEZER2 from the Select Unit to bind to Unit
Requirement list, and then select OK. The batch should run to
completion.
See also
Run a sample batch on page 67
View the sample batch event journal on page 76
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View the sample
batch event journal
The FactoryTalk Batch Server gathers detailed data for every action that takes
place during the execution of all batches and places the data within an electronic
batch record. You can filter and view this data in the Event Journal window.
To view the sample batch event journal:
1. Select the Event Journal button. The Event Journal view opens.
Tip:
If the Filtering area does not display, select the left split
bar and drag to the right.
2. Select the Journal button. The Event Data Files dialog box opens.
3. In the Event Data Files list, select the TEST_2 batch, and then select OK.
The event data displays on the right side of the window.
4. In the Filtering area, select Event Type from the Column 1 list.
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5. In the Filter 1 box, type COMMENT, and then select the Refresh button.
The data is filtered to show the comment that you added to the TEST_2
batch. You must adjust the column headings to view the entire message as
shown in this figure.
See also
Examine the batch on page 69
Control a phase
manually
When you are testing your recipe, you may want to test only one phase at a time.
In this exercise you acquire control of a specific phase and run it manually.
Tip:
If the Filtering area does not display, select the left split
bar and drag to the right.
To control a phase manually:
1. Select the Phase Control button. The Phase Control view opens and
displays the process cell.
2. Double-click the WEST_PARLOR icon to view the units within the
WEST_PARLOR process cell.
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3. Select the WP_MIXER1 icon. A list of the phases in WP_MIXER1
displays in the Phases section. You may need to move the vertical split bars
to the right or left so your window appears as shown.
4. Select the WP_ADD_EGG_M1 icon, and then select the Acquire
command button. Select Yes to confirm the acquisition of the phase.
Notice the green operator (Opr) light, which indicates that the
WP_ADD_EGG_M1 phase is now owned by the operator.
5. Select the Start command button, and then select Yes to start the
WP_ADD_EGG_M1 phase. The Phase Control dialog box opens.
Tip:
If the Command Signature dialog box opens, refer to Run a sample
batch for instructions.
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6. Type TEST_3 in the Batch ID box, and then select OK. After running for
a few seconds, the Unacknowledged Prompts button on the toolbar starts
flashing yellow and ADD_AMOUNT displays in the Unacknowledged
Prompts list.
7. Select the Acknowledge button. The Acknowledge dialog box opens
showing the default value as 0. The allowable range of values is 0 to 5000.
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8. Type 40, and then select the Acknowledge button. The phase continues to
run.
As the phase runs, you can use the command buttons to Hold, Restart,
Abort, Stop, Pause, Resume the phase.
9. When the phase completes, select the Reset command button, and then
select Yes to confirm the reset.
You can run this phase as many times as necessary to test it. When you are
done testing, release control back to FactoryTalk Batch so the phase can run
as part of a recipe.
10. Select the Release command button, and then select Yes to confirm the
release.
See also
Run a sample batch on page 67
Phase Control window on page 84
Resolve arbitration issues on page 81
Resolve arbitration
issues
A procedure stops running if a phase is unable to acquire the needed equipment.
The FactoryTalk Batch Server displays ACQUIRING1 on the SFC at the
transition above that phase and that is where you begin your investigation to
determine the cause of the arbitration issue.
In this exercise you manually acquire a phase, run a procedure to view an
arbitration situation, and then resolve the arbitration issue.
To resolve arbitration issues:
1. Select the Phase Control button. The Phase Control view opens and
displays the process cell.
2. Double-click the WEST_PARLOR icon, and then select the
WP_MIXER1 icon. A list of the phases within WP_MIXER1 are
displayed in the Phases section.
3. Select the WP_XFR_OUT icon, and then select the Acquire command
button. Select Yes to confirm the acquisition of the phase.
4. Select the Batch List button to go to the Batch List view.
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5. Select the Add Batch command button, and then add a batch of
CLS_FRENCHVANILLA, binding to WP_MIXER1 and
WP_FREEZER1 with a batch ID of TEST_5.
6. Start the batch, and then select the Procedure as SFC button. The batch
stops processing when it reaches the XFR_OUT:1 phase.
Tip:
If the Command Signature dialog box opens, refer to
Run a sample batch for instructions.
7. Select the XFR_OUT:1 phase in the Procedural Hierarchy view. In the
SFC view, notice that the transition is stalled in ACQUIRING. In the
Auxiliary Index view, select the Arbitration tab and notice that the phase
needs WP_XFR_OUT_M1 and is owned by WP_XFR_OUT_M1.
8. Select the Phase Summary button. The Phase Summary window opens
and displays all the equipment phases and their associated status
information. This window is useful when trying to determine the state of an
equipment phase.
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9. Scroll down and notice that the WP_XFR_OUT_M1 phase is owned by
the Operator.
10. Select the Arbitration button. The Arbitration window opens to the phase
that you selected in the SFC view. The operator uses this window to view
current resource allocation information, acquire available resources, and
release operator-owned resources. Notice again that this phase is owned by
the operator.
In this window the operator can acquire an equipment phase and then
release it to resolve an arbitration issue.
11. Select the Release command button to release the equipment phase. The
batch runs to completion.
12. Select the Batch List button to return to the Batch List view. Remove all
batches from the batch list.
See also
Run a sample batch on page 67
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Phase Control window
The Phase Control window consists of three areas:
•
The Unit Display area displays unit icons and flow path lines. There are
three view sizing buttons you can use to change the display. Selecting the
Display Process Cells button returns the display to the process cell.
•
The Phase List Display area displays a button for each of the phases that
belong to the selected unit. Each button displays the phase name, phase
state, step index (when running) and phase mode. The possible modes are:
A (Operator Controlled Auto), PA (Program Controlled Auto), and S
(Operator Controlled Semi-Auto). The State text and Step Index box are
color-coded to match the state of the active phase.
•
To the right of each phase button is a series of three lights that indicates the
current owner of the phase. If the phase is owned, the appropriate light is
illuminated (Pr for Procedure, Opr for Operator, or Ext for External).
Should a phase fail, FAILURE!!! displays in red text below the lights for the
failed phase.
•
The Next button is enabled if the unit contains more phases than can
display in the area. The Previous button is enabled after selecting the Next
button. Below these buttons is an area where messages and failures related to
the selected phase display.
•
The Phase Specific Information Display provides information regarding
the selected phase, including the phase name, phase state, batch ID and the
batch state. There is also an Unacknowledged Prompts area, where the
prompts for the selected phase display. Requests for the selected phase
display below the prompts. The Mode options are used to specify the mode
for the selected phase and are disabled until the phase is started or on any
subsequent executions of this phase.
See also
Control a phase manually on page 78
Configure the
FactoryTalk Batch
View
You can customize each of the ten views in the FactoryTalk Batch View window.
For example, you can change the default MS Sans Serif font to any installed font
on your computer.
To configure the FactoryTalk Batch View:
1. Select the Configuration and Defaults button. If the Log on to Confirm
User dialog box opens, enter a user name and password and select OK.
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2. The System Configuration and Defaults dialog box opens to the Batch
List tab.
The System Configuration and Defaults dialog box opens to the tab that
corresponds to the view that is open, which in this case is the Batch List
view.
3. Take a moment to examine all the tabs to see the variety of changes you can
make to the views in the FactoryTalk Batch View window.
4. Select Cancel to close the System Configuration and Defaults dialog box
without saving any changes.
See also
Exit the FactoryTalk Batch view on page 85
Exit the FactoryTalk
Batch View
Use the following instructions to exit FactoryTalk Batch View.
To exit the FactoryTalk Batch View:
1. Select the Exit button.
2. Select Yes to confirm the exit.
See also
Open FactoryTalk Batch View on page 65
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FactoryTalk Batch
View summary
In this section you:
•
Opened the FactoryTalk Batch View.
•
Examined the FactoryTalk Batch View window.
•
Added a batch to the Batch List.
•
Started a batch.
•
Responded to a signature request.
•
Navigated through the SFC and Procedural Hierarchy views.
•
Removed a batch from the Batch List.
•
Bound units to a batch.
•
Added a comment to a batch.
•
Handled unacknowledged prompts.
•
Viewed and sorted an event journal.
•
Controlled a phase manually.
•
Resolved an arbitration issue.
•
Viewed the system configuration for the FactoryTalk Batch View.
This chapter provided a brief overview of the capabilities of the FactoryTalk Batch
View module. (See the FactoryTalk Batch View User Guide for more information.)
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introduction
The FactoryTalk Event Archiver translates FactoryTalk Batch tab-delimited
ASCII electronic batch record files (.evt files) to a file type that you specify. These
electronic batch record files are maintained separately for each batch created and
can be viewed with a word processor or as a spreadsheet. You can also use
Microsoft SQL Server. Default scripts for using SQL Server are included with the
software. The FactoryTalk Event Archiver collects data from each electronic batch
record file and stores it in the specified database format.
You can configure the FactoryTalk Event Archiver to perform incremental
near-time archiving of Batch data to your database. While the batch is running,
the FactoryTalk Event Archiver inserts records according to a pre-defined
schedule (incremental archiving). Alternatively, you can configure the
FactoryTalk Event Archiver for non-incremental (end-of-batch) archiving so that
it inserts records only when a batch is removed from the batch list.
When a control recipe is created, the FactoryTalk Batch Server adds the electronic
batch record file name to the FactoryTalk Event Archiver’s work queue
(archque.txt). After the FactoryTalk Event Archiver successfully inserts all of the
event journal (.evt) file’s records into the SQL database, it removes the .evt file
name from the work queue in FactoryTalk Event Archiver. However, the
FactoryTalk Event Archiver does not delete the electronic batch record file unless
it is configured to do so. If the FactoryTalk Event Archiver is not able to
successfully insert each of the .evt file’s records into the database, it does not
remove the .evt file name from the work queue file. This takes into account
possible failures, such as the database being unavailable due to lost network
connections.
Upon a system failure, the .evt file name is not removed from the work queue. The
next time the FactoryTalk Event Archiver runs, it will attempt to insert the
records from each file listed in the queue into the database.
See also
System Architecture on page 88
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System Architecture
The FactoryTalk Event Archiver can be run as an application (for end-of-batch
archiving) or as a Windows service (for incremental archiving) and is external to
the FactoryTalk Batch Server. The FactoryTalk Event Archiver uses Open
Database Connectivity (ODBC) technology to communicate with Microsoft SQL
Server.
This diagram illustrates the sequence of events that occur when the FactoryTalk
Batch Server runs the FactoryTalk Event Archiver to insert batch record data into
your database.
See also
Run the FactoryTalk Event Archiver to insert batch record data on page 88
Run the FactoryTalk
Event Archiver to
insert batch record
data
Use the following instructions to run the FactoryTalk Event Archiver to insert
batch record data.
To run the FactoryTalk Event Archiver to insert batch record data:
1. The operator or Manufacturing Execution System (MES) starts a batch. If
it is to run in the incremental mode, the FactoryTalk Event Archiver must
be enabled as a Windows service.
2. An electronic batch record file (.evt) is created.
3. The electronic batch record file's name is added to the electronic batch
record directory file, EventDir.txt.
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4. The FactoryTalk Batch Server incrementally writes to the work queue file
in FactoryTalk Event Archiver, ArchQue.txt. The data in this file consists
of the path to the electronic batch record file and, if the batch has been
removed from the batch list, a tab and the word REMOVED follows the file
name.
•
End-of-Batch Archiving: When a batch is removed from the batch
list, the FactoryTalk Batch Server sends a message to the FactoryTalk
Event Archiver to start running. The FactoryTalk Event Archiver must
be enabled.
•
Incremental Archiving: The FactoryTalk Event Archiver runs on a
pre-defined schedule. The FactoryTalk Event Archiver must be active
at all times during batch processing.
5. The FactoryTalk Event Archiver reads the ArchQue.txt file for the name of
the electronic batch record file and the status of the batch.
6. The FactoryTalk Event Archiver reads the electronic batch record file.
7. The FactoryTalk Event Archiver inserts records into the database.
8. If electronic batch record data is successfully inserted into the database, the
file’s name is removed from the ArchQue.txt file.
Steps 4 through 7 are repeated until the FactoryTalk Event Archiver has
attempted to insert each electronic batch record file listed in the ArchQue.txt file
into the database.
See also
System Architecture on page 88
FactoryTalk Event
Archiver summary
In this section you:
•
Learned about the system architecture of the FactoryTalk Event Archiver.
This chapter provided a brief overview of the capabilities of the FactoryTalk Event
Archiver. (See the FactoryTalk Event Archiver User Guide for more information.)
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FactoryTalk Batch ActiveX controls
introduction
The FactoryTalk Batch ActiveX® Controls Library is a set of ActiveX custom
controls that allows you to create a dynamic picture of batch automation system
data. Use the controls in the library to communicate with the FactoryTalk Batch
Server and to monitor and interact with a control recipe without having to run the
FactoryTalk Batch View application. These controls can be placed within any
ActiveX Control/OLE container, such as your Human-Machine Interface (HMI)
software, Microsoft Visual Basic or web browsers, allowing for easy integration
with existing manufacturing execution software. ActiveX Controls can be used to
create a custom look for your interface or to create a custom application specific to
your needs. The FactoryTalk Batch ActiveX Controls Library is designed
especially for FactoryTalk Batch.
Tip:
To use the FactoryTalk Batch ActiveX Controls Library,
you must install Microsoft Visual Basic. (See Tested
Third-Party Software in the FactoryTalk Batch release
notes for the currently supported version.)
Use the ActiveX Controls to create, command and remove control recipes from
the Batch List, acknowledge operator prompts, view running control recipes,
change step formula values, perform active step changes, reset Timer steps, and
change Timer setpoints.
You can vary the appearance of the ActiveX Controls through the use of the
properties and methods that the controls support. Though the appearance can
vary, the controls allow you to perform the same functions as their corresponding
FactoryTalk Batch View windows.
(See the FactoryTalk Batch ActiveX Controls Library Reference Guide and the
FactoryTalk Batch ActiveX Controls User Guide for more information on designing
and working with ActiveX Controls.)
See also
FactoryTalk Batch ActiveX Controls on page 91
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FactoryTalk Batch
ActiveX Controls
The FactoryTalk Batch ActiveX Controls Library is distributed within the
batchv01.ocx, batchv02.ocx, SignatureListOCX.ocx, and TimerStepOCX.ocx
files. These files contain five controls:
•
ControlRecipeList control, which performs the functions of the Batch List
window in the FactoryTalk Batch View application
•
PromptsList control, which performs the functions of the
Unacknowledged Prompts window in the FactoryTalk Batch View
application
•
SignatureList control, which performs the functions of the Batch Signature
List window in the FactoryTalk Batch View application
•
ProcedureView control, which performs the functions of both the
Procedure as Table and Procedure as SFC windows in the FactoryTalk
Batch View application
•
TimerView control, provides an interface to view all the Timer steps in
batches currently on the batch list
See also
The ControlRecipeList control on page 92
The PromptsList control on page 94
The SignatureList control on page 95
The ProcedureView control on page 96
The TimerView control on page 98
The
ControlRecipeList
control
The ControlRecipeList control is used to create control recipes, view current
control recipes, and command a control recipe outside of the FactoryTalk Batch
View. The control recipe displays in the ControlRecipeList until it is removed by
the operator (even if the control itself is closed) or the FactoryTalk Batch Server is
restarted with a cold restart.
See also
ControlRecipeList interface on page 93
ControlRecipeList shortcut menu on page 93
Open the ControlRecipeList control on page 93
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ControlRecipeList
interface
The format of the ControlRecipeList interface varies depending on the container
in which the control is placed and how the control is formatted within that
container. However, the generic ControlRecipeList interface functions in the
same way, regardless of the container in which it is placed, and can be used to
perform all of the standard Batch List view functions without any custom
modifications. The information displayed in the ControlRecipeList window is
user-configurable.
See also
ControlRecipeList shortcut menu on page 93
Open the ControlRecipeList control on page 93
ControlRecipeList
shortcut menu
The ControlRecipeList control includes a shortcut menu that can be accessed by
right-clicking anywhere within the control. The availability of the commands on
the shortcut menu is determined by where the right-click occurred; that is,
whether or not a control recipe in the list was right-clicked, and if so, which one.
The menu allows you to add and command control recipes, as well as to remove a
control recipe from the ControlRecipeList control. All of the ControlRecipeList
commands can be accessed using the shortcut menu, but only valid commands are
enabled.
See also
ControlRecipeList interface on page 93
Open the
ControlRecipeList
control
Like the Batch List window within the View, the ControlRecipeList is used to
create and command a batch. The ControlRecipeList ActiveX control can be
opened in several different ways.
•
Use Windows Explorer to open the control.
•
Create a shortcut for the control on the Windows Desktop.
•
Add the control to the Batch folder in the Start menu.
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The PromptsList
control
The PromptsList control enables you to display all Unacknowledged Prompts for
currently running batches. Prompts are requests for phase parameter values and
are acknowledged by providing the parameter value. A batch will not complete its
execution until all prompts are acknowledged. The PromptsList control displays a
list of batches that have a prompt(s) waiting to be acknowledged.
See also
PromptsList interface on page 94
PromptsList shortcut menu on page 94
Open the PromptsList control on page 95
PromptsList interface
The format of the PromptsList interface varies, depending on the container in
which the control is placed and how the control is formatted within that
container. However, the generic control functions in the same way regardless of
the container in which it is placed, and still allows an operator to recognize and
respond to any unacknowledged prompts.
See also
Promptslist shortcut menu on page 94
Open the PromptsList control on page 95
PromptsList shortcut
menu
The PromptsList control includes a shortcut menu that can be accessed by
right-clicking anywhere within the control. The shortcut menu allows you to log
in to the View Security and to acknowledge prompts. The Acknowledge option
on the shortcut menu is specific to the prompt that was right-clicked, and is
disabled if a prompt was not clicked.
See also
PromptsList interface on page 94
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Open the PromptsList
control
The SignatureList
control
Like the Unacknowledged Prompts window within the FactoryTalk Batch View,
the PromptsList control is used to acknowledge any prompts generated while
running a batch. Unacknowledged prompts remain in the PromptsList window
until the prompt is acknowledged or until the batch is STOPPED or ABORTED.
The PromptsList control can be accessed in several different ways:
•
Placing the control within a web browser
•
Using Windows Explorer to open an executable (.exe)
•
Creating a shortcut for the control on the Windows Desktop
•
Adding the control to the Batch folder in the Start menu
The SignatureList control displays a list of pending Signatures waiting to be
acknowledged. Signatures are requests for an operator to provide one, two or three
signoffs. Each signoff consists of a user name, password and optionally a comment.
The SignatureList control is part of the Electronic Signatures feature, which
enables signatures to be electronically recorded. There are several steps that must
be performed prior to using this control. See the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment
Editor User Guide for information on configuring electronic signatures.
See also
SignatureList interface on page 95
SignatureList shortcut menu on page 96
Open the SignatureList control on page 96
SignatureList interface
The format of the SignatureList interface varies, depending on the container in
which the control is placed and how the control is formatted within that
container. However, the generic control functions in the same way regardless of
the container in which it is placed, and still allows an operator to recognize and
respond to any pending Signatures in the SignatureList.
See also
Use the SignatureList shortcut menu on page 96
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SignatureList shortcut
menu
The SignatureList control includes a shortcut menu that can be accessed by
right-clicking anywhere within the control. The shortcut menu allows you to log
in to the View security.
See also
Open the SignatureList control on page 96
Open the SignatureList
control
The ProcedureView
control
Like the Signature List View window within the FactoryTalk Batch View, the
SignatureList control is used to recognize and sign off any signatures generated
while running a batch. Incomplete signatures remain in the SignatureList window
until the signature is completed or until the batch is STOPPED or ABORTED.
The SignatureList control can be accessed in several different ways:
•
Placing the control within a web browser
•
Using Windows Explorer to open an executable (.exe)
•
Creating a shortcut for the control on the Windows Desktop
•
Adding the control to the Batch folder in the Start menu
The ProcedureView control provides the user with a graphical representation of a
control recipe on the Batch List. Control recipes can be viewed in table format or
as a sequential function chart (SFC). All procedural levels of a recipe can be
navigated using the ProcedureView control. In addition to viewing a current
control recipe, the control also allows operators to command control recipes,
perform manual binding, perform active step changes and change recipe step
parameter values. The appearance of the ProcedureView varies depending on the
container in which it is placed, and how it is configured within that container.
However, the control functions in the same way, regardless of the container in
which it is placed.
See also
Table view interface on page 96
SFC view interface on page 97
ProcedureView shortcut menu on page 97
Open the ProcedureView control on page 98
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Table view interface
The ProcedureView control’s table view provides a list-based representation of
recipe logic flow. Steps are executed in order, starting with the top row, and
proceeding downward through the table. Each row consists of an individual phase
and its associated information.
See also
SFC view interface on page 97
SFC view interface
The ProcedureView control’s SFC view provides a graphic representation of
recipe logic flow. Steps are executed in order from top to bottom through the
SFC. The SFC structure is navigated by double-clicking a recipe step to navigate
downward through the recipe hierarchy, or by double-clicking an initial step to
navigate upward through the recipe hierarchy.
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The ProcedureView ActiveX Control includes a shortcut menu that can be
accessed by right-clicking anywhere within the control. The shortcut menu allows
you to log in the View Security, and to command and view control recipes that
have been added to the Batch List. The available items on the shortcut menu are
specific to the recipe step or step transition that was right-clicked, and is disabled if
the menu item is not valid for the selected element. If the right-click does not
occur on a recipe step or step transition, the shortcut menu items are applicable to
the recipe level currently being displayed.
ProcedureView
shortcut menu
See also
SFC view interface on page 97
Table view interface on page 96
Open the
ProcedureView control
Like the Procedure as Table and Procedure as SFC windows located within the
FactoryTalk Batch View, the operator uses the ProcedureView to command and
view control recipes that have been added to the Batch List.
To use the ProcedureView ActiveX Control:
•
Place the control within a web browser or other ActiveX container
•
Place the control on a Visual Basic form and open it as an executable
Consult your System Administrator for information on setting up and executing
any of these options.
Tip:
The appearance of the ProcedureView varies depending
on the container in which it is placed, and how it is
configured within that container. However, the control
functions in the same way regardless of the container in
which it is placed.
See also
Use the ProcedureView shortcut menu on page 97
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The TimerView
control
The TimerView control provides an interface to view all the Timer steps in
batches currently on the batch list. You can configure filter criteria for the
TimerView control. You can also configure the behavior of the TimerView
control through the control’s property pages during design time. During run time
you will have the ability to change the setpoint value for COUNT_DOWN
timers. If enabled, you can also change the filtering of the TimerView ActiveX
control.
See also
TimerView shortcut menu on page 99
Open the TimerView control on page 99
TimerView shortcut
menu
The TimerView ActiveX control provides a shortcut menu that can be accessed by
right-clicking anywhere within the control. The shortcut menu allows you to log
on to the FactoryTalk Batch View Security, and to filter Timers contained in
control recipes that have been added to the Batch List.
See also
Open the TimerView control on page 99
Open the TimerView
control
Use the following instructions to open the TimerView control.
To open the TimerView control:
•
Place the control within a web browser or other ActiveX container
•
Place the control on a Visual Basic form and open it as an executable
Consult your System Administrator for information on setting up and executing
any of these options.
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Tip:
The appearance of the TimerView varies depending on
the container in which it is placed, and how it is
configured within that container. However, the control
functions in the same way regardless of the container in
which it is placed.
See also
Use the TimerView shortcut menu on page 99
FactoryTalk Batch
ActiveX controls
summary
In this section you learned about the following ActiveX Controls:
•
ControlRecipeList Control
•
PromptsList Control
•
SignatureList Control
•
ProcedureView Control
•
TimerView Control
This chapter provided a brief overview of the capabilities of the FactoryTalk Batch
ActiveX Controls. (See the FactoryTalk Batch ActiveX Controls Library User
Guide for more information.)
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PC-based phases introduction
The PC-Based Phase option is an ActiveX control that allows you to design phases
for use in FactoryTalk Batch recipes. These phases can be used for a variety of
tasks, such as operator prompts, timers and calculations. A PC-based phase
communicates with the FactoryTalk Batch Server and does not require a
process-connected device. It can be used in place of phase logic, allowing you to
decrease the amount of memory required within your process-connected device.
PC-based phases use the Batch Phase Execution control, which encapsulates the
FactoryTalk Batch phase logic interface and the OPC interface. The Batch Phase
Execution control functions as a data server for PC-based phases and supports the
full functionality of a FactoryTalk Batch phase. It is an SP-88-aware component
and is used to provide Level 2 control of the FactoryTalk Batch Control system.
The Batch Phase Execution control is a persistent component that supports
automatic checkpointing. It can be accessed directly from within Visual Basic,
Access, or any other Microsoft-compatible control container.
(See the FactoryTalk Batch PC-Based Phase Programmer’s Technical Reference for
more information.)
See also
PC-based phases on page 101
Execution of a PC-based phase example on page 102
PC-based phases
A PC-based phase allows you to program a phase outside a process-connected
device (PCD). You can program the phase to meet your own unique requirements
from within your Microsoft-compatible control container. The PC-based phase
works the same as any phase defined in a PCD, communicating with the
FactoryTalk Batch Server through the Batch Phase Execution control. This
allows you to save your system’s valuable memory for processes that require
interaction with hardware.
After a PC-based phase is created, the FactoryTalk Batch area model must be
updated to include the new phase and the appropriate phase(s). Because the Batch
Phase Execution control behaves as a data server, a new data server definition
must be created. The data server definition is created using the FactoryTalk Batch
Equipment Editor and defined using the Batch Phase Execution control’s
communication parameters. The FactoryTalk Batch phase can then be added to
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your recipes. The PC-based phase must remain active during recipe execution,
allowing the phase to communicate with the FactoryTalk Batch Server through
the Batch Phase Execution control.
See also
Execution of a PC-based phase example on page 102
PC-based phases summary on page 103
Execution of a
PC-based phase
example
An example of a PC-based phase executing within a recipe is shown. The
PC-based phase is created to prompt the operator to take a sample to Quality
control (QC) and then enter the results. The phase communicates with the
FactoryTalk Batch Server by way of the Batch Phase Execution control. The
phase can direct the server to prompt the operator, wait for results and have the
FactoryTalk Batch Server store the result in the electronic batch record. The
recipe will only proceed if the result is within the appropriate range.
In Step 1, as the batch is processed, the QC_Chk phase is executed. In Step 2, the
QC_Chk phase displays a screen to the operator, requesting that the operator
have QC take an in-process sample. The QC_Chk phase will not continue
processing until the operator enters the QC result. In Step 3, When the operator
enters the result, the QC_Chk phase sends the report value to the FactoryTalk
Batch Server, using the Batch Phase Execution control, which stores the value in
the electronic batch record. While the phase is executing, an activity log file is
updated with process events. In Step 4, control is returned to the recipe, and it
continues processing the balance of the transitions and steps.
See also
PC-based phases on page 101
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PC-based phases
summary
In this section you:
•
Learned about the execution of PC-based phases.
This chapter provided a brief overview of the capabilities of PC-based phases. (See
the FactoryTalk Batch PC-Based Phase Programmer Technical Reference Guide for
more information.)
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Glossary
acquire
To gain ownership of a resource. Resources can be acquired automatically
when a batch runs. Resources can also be acquired manually in the
Arbitration and Phase Control processes.
acquiring
Acquiring is a possible state of the Firing attribute of a transition. When
the transition is in the Acquiring state, it has made non-binding related
arbitration requests for resources needed by one or more steps following the
transition.
action
An Action is a queued Execute command to the FactoryTalk Batch Server
that is pending one or more Signature completions prior to being
performed.
action ID
A 32-bit unsigned integer that uniquely identifies an action.
activation file
A text file that contains all of the activation information that is required to
license a software product and allow it to properly function. While the file is
simply plain text, the contents of the file are protected by a signature.
ActiveX controls library
The ActiveX Controls Library is a set of ActiveX Custom Controls that
allows you to create and control batches without using the FactoryTalk
Batch View, and also provides the ActiveX tools needed to create a custom
user interface.
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Glossary
allocation
A form of coordination control that assigns a resource. An allocation can be
for the entire resource or for portions of a resource.
AND (Divergence)
A structure in the sequential function chart (SFC) <if we take this out it
can apply more broadly if necessary in the future that indicates steps are
activated concurrently.
approval process (for a recipe)
An umbrella term for the Primary approval and Expedited approval
processes that are used to validate the development and maintenance of
batch recipes. (Only one process can be used at a time.) Using signature
certification, the approvals process for a recipe safeguards design workflow
in a formalized manner. This ensures each recipe is validated by authorized
personnel before being released to production.
arbitration
A form of coordination control that determines how a resource should be
allocated when there are more requests for the resource than can be
accommodated at one time.
area
A component of a batch manufacturing site that is identified by physical,
geographical or logical segmentation within the site.
area model
The physical component of a batch facility. A database that consists of all
equipment in the facility and all of the tasks that it is capable of performing.
assigning
The act of issuing a value to a parameter.
automation server
A software application that contains objects that can be used easily by other
applications through the encapsulation and reuse of code.
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batch
An entity that represents the production at any point in the process. A
batch is a running control recipe. The material that is being produced or
that has been produced by a single execution of a recipe is also considered a
batch.
batch control
Consists of a sequence of one or more steps (phases) that must be
performed in a defined order for a finite period of time to process finite
quantities of input material to produce finished product.
batch process
A process that leads to the production of finite quantities of material by
subjecting quantities of input materials to a defined order of discontinuous
processing actions using one or more pieces of equipment.
binding
Binding is the process of mapping steps within a control recipe to actual
equipment in a plant.
binding (in transitions)
Binding is a possible state of the Firing attribute of a transition. When the
transition is in the Binding state, it is in the process of attempting to bind
one or more of the steps following the transition. The binding process may
involve the generation of binding prompts and/or the generation of
arbitration requests.
binding preference
A Binding Preference is an object that can be evaluated against instance of a
unit class in order to sort the legal bind targets for a unit requirement into a
most preferred order.
binding requirement
A Binding Requirement is an object that can be evaluated against instances
of a unit class to determine which instances of the class are legal bind
candidates for a unit requirement. When attempting to bind a unit
requirement during recipe execution, the entire set of binding requirements
defined on the unit requirement is evaluated against each potential binding
candidate. Units that are unable to meet every binding requirement defined
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Glossary
on the unit requirement are eliminated as potential binding candidates for
the unit requirement.
binding requirement expression
A Binding Requirement Expression, as defined within the Equipment
Editor, evaluates to either a TRUE or FALSE value. An example would be
"TEMPERATURE < 20.3".
check in
Check in creates a new version of a recipe, which is read-only and designated
with a ~Vn suffix (where n is the version number). Example: Checking in
Make_sauce results in the creation of the Make_sauce~V1 version.
check out
Check out creates an editable WIP (work-in-progress) recipe, designated
with a ~Vn_WIP suffix (where n is incremented by one). Example:
Checking out Make_sauce~V1 results in the creation of
Make_sauce~V2_WIP. Subsequently, when Make_sauce~V2_WIP is
checked in, it will result in the read-only Make_sauce~V2 version.
class-based recipe
A recipe that specifies one or more unit classes for equipment requirements.
The operator will then be required to specify a particular unit at the time
the batch is created.
client
A component or subsystem that uses data or functionality provided by some
other component or subsystem (the server). The term can also refer to the
computer that executes this software, connecting to a server computer
across a communication network.
command buttons
The buttons used to initiate functions.
comm err
Comm Err is a possible state of the Firing attribute of a transition. When
the transition is in the Comm Err state, a communications error with phase
logic has been detected while the transition was in the
Stopping/Resetting/Pending states of the firing process. The transition has
rolled back to the beginning of the Stopping/Resetting/Pending process
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and is awaiting good communications and a RESTART command before
re-initiating the firing process.
committed
Committed is a possible state of the Firing attribute of a transition. When
the transition is in the Committed state, it has committed to the firing
process, but is not in the process of firing because either the transition is in
the HELD state or the parent procedure is in MANUAL mode.
common resource
A service that is provided to more than one requester. Common resources
are identified as either exclusive-use resources or shared-use resources.
control module
A regulating device, a state-oriented device, or a combination of regulating
and state-oriented devices that are controlled as a single device. This term
applies to both physical equipment and the equipment entity.
control recipe
A type of recipe, which through its execution, defines the manufacture of a
single batch of a specific product.
control strategy
A user-defined grouping of phase and report parameters associated with a
single phase. Organizing parameters into separate control strategies allows
phases to assume multiple roles without generating unnecessary phase I/O.
container recipe
A recipe that contains one or more steps assigned to a specified
operation-level recipe or unit procedure-level recipe retrieved when using
the Find Recipe References option.
coordination control
A type of control that directs, initiates, or modifies the execution of the
procedural control and the utilization of equipment entities.
data server
A data server provides runtime information to the FactoryTalk Batch
Client or the HMI software. This information comes from the PLC or
PCD.
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Glossary
DCS (Distributed Control System)
A Distributed Control System (DCS) is a control device. Logic (programs)
contained in the DCS read or write to the inputs or outputs of the field
devices. A DCS is sometimes referred to as the process-connected device
(PCD).
dedicated resource
A resource used by only one step at a time inside a recipe structure.
deferred parameter
Step formula value that is put off and takes on the value of another
parameter at a higher level within the recipe. This function has the effect of
passing Recipe formula parameter data from one level of a recipe down to
another.
display parameter
The step formula value specified as being the one to be displayed as part of
the SFC in the Procedure as SFC View window.
download
A request from a phase to the FactoryTalk Batch Server to send it data.
downstream unit requirements
If dynamic unit allocation is enabled, downstream unit requirements may be
defined for class-based and instance-based unit procedures. Downstream
unit requirements are used to control batch flow and to make sure that the
appropriate unit is selected during unit-binding.
dynamic unit allocation
The process of binding a specific unit to a class-based unit procedure or
operation. Dynamic unit allocation can be defined only at the procedural
level.
electronic signature
An electronic representation of a signature, including all associated data.
Can consist of one or two signoffs. Associated data includes meanings for
the signoffs, comments, security requirements, and timestamps.
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enterprise
An organization that coordinates the operation of one or more sites.
end of batch archiving
The FactoryTalk Batch Server automatically runs the Archiver when a
batch is removed from the Batch list.
equipment editor
The equipment configuration module of the FactoryTalk Batch
components. The FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Configure resources,
phases, units, and communications data.
equipment phase
An equipment phase is the S88 terminology for the equipment phase and
equipment phase interface. In FactoryTalk Batch, equipment phases are
configured in the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor as instances of the
recipe phases. Equipment phases are bound to the recipe at runtime.
exception handling
Those functions that deal with facility or process contingencies and other
exception conditions.
exclusive-use resource
A common resource that can only be used by one user at any given time.
execution token
A "marker" indicating a currently active step of an SFC. By definition, an
SFC begins execution with a single Execution Token present in its Initial
Step. When SFC execution reaches an "AND Divergence", a single
Execution Token is split into two or more tokens, and when SFC execution
passes through an "AND Convergence", two or more Execution Tokens are
combined into a single token.
expedited approval process
An Expedited Approval Process can be used when you do not want to
perform the Primary Approval Process, for example in the early stages of
recipe design. A recipe can go through initial review using the expedited
process. After the recipe is deemed ready, the approval process can be
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reverted to its starting point, and then the primary approval process is used
to validate it for release to production.
FactoryTalk Asset Centre
Formerly RSMACC (Rockwell Software Maintenance Automation
Control Center).
final (terminal) step
The logical end of a sequential function chart (SFC).
firing attribute
The Firing Attribute (formerly the Acquiring attribute) has nine legal states,
defined as follows:
"0": Not Firing - The transition is not in the firing process.
"1": Acquiring - The transition is in the process of acquiring resources for the
following steps.
"2": Binding - The transition is in the process of binding one or more of the
following steps.
"3": Committed - The transition is committed to the firing process, but is not
proceeding due to either a HELD state, or the parent procedure being in
MANUAL mode.
"4": Stopping - The transition is waiting for one or more prior steps to achieve a
terminal state after having been issued STOP commands.
"5": Resetting - The transition is waiting for one or more prior steps to transition
to IDLE after having been issued RESET commands.
"6": Pending - The transition is waiting for one or more prior steps to transition
into a legal state for a Transfer of Control operation.
"7": Paused - The transition is waiting for a RESUME command or a
return of the parent procedure to AUTO mode.
first available binding
•
112
This is one of the ways that units are selected for binding. This is called late
unit binding or dynamic unit allocation. When automatically selecting a
unit for binding, the FactoryTalk Batch Server tries to use the unit that the
recipe can acquire first. The acquired unit must belong to the unit class of
the unit procedure step. Recipes can configure upstream and/or
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Glossary
downstream dependencies defining a series of unit classes that a recipe
requires as a recipe executes. The acquired unit supports the flow path to
other units.
formula
A category of recipe information that includes process inputs, process
parameters and process outputs.
formula value
A value that is assigned to a parameter defined for a specific step of a phase,
operation or unit procedure. A formula value may have a literal value
assigned to it or it may receive a value from the next higher recipe level when
the batch is run.
global binding requirement
A Global Binding Requirement is defined within the Equipment Editor for
an area model, and is automatically applied to every unit requirement
within a recipe. This saves the effort of having to manually add the binding
requirement to every unit requirement in every recipe.
global unit attribute
A Global Unit Attribute is a unit attribute that has been configured to be
automatically applied to all unit classes defined within the area model. This
saves the area model author the effort of having to manually assign the unit
attribute to every unit class.
header
General information about the recipe that includes the procedure identifier,
version number, version date and the author.
Human-Machine Interface (HMI)
An application used in conjunction with the FactoryTalk Batch View to
control the manufacturing equipment within a plant. The HMI software
allows the operator to view actual process values and equipment states, such
as Valve 101 = Open or TempCtrl 202 = 90° F.
incremental archiving
The Archiver, running as a Windows service, inserts records from the
electronic batch record file into the specified database at a pre-defined
interval. The Archiver is controlled from the FactoryTalk Batch Service
Manager dialog box or the Windows Control Panel Services window.
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Glossary
initial step
The logical start of a sequential function chart (SFC).
input parameter
A parameter holding a value designed to specify how a sequence or
procedure is to execute.
instance-based recipe
Recipe that uses unit instances for the equipment requirements.
key parameter
The step parameter specified as being the one to display as part of the SFC
in the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor SFC view window.
late binding
This is a binding method where a step is bound to equipment just before it
is used. For unit procedure steps, this is also called dynamic unit allocation.
linear segment
The collective set of steps and transitions bounded by a Divergence and a
Convergence.
manual mode
The mode of a control recipe when the procedure does not sequence
automatically. Transitions are not checked, therefore the step performs its
assigned functions and no further action is taken without operator
intervention.
master recipe
A type of recipe that accounts for equipment capabilities and may include
process cell-specific information.
mode
The manner in which the transition of sequential functions are carried out
within a procedural element and the accessibility for manipulating the states
(manually or by other control functions) of equipment.
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not firing
Not Firing is a possible state of the Firing attribute of a transition. When
the transition is in the Not Firing state, it is not in the process of firing and
not committed to the firing process.
null procedure
A non-expandable procedure that does not refer to any logical definition in
the area model nor any lower level recipe procedure. A null procedure
executes automatically and plays a role in material loops where it is used for
rebinding purposes.
O-Auto mode
The mode of a control recipe when the operator initiates all commands and
functions.
obsolete recipe
An Obsolete recipe is a versioned recipe that has failed verification due to a
change in the recipe's underlying area model. A versioned recipe is a
read-only snapshot of a recipe that uses strict, system-enforced naming
conventions.
ODBC (Open Database Connectivity)
A database connectivity standard written by Microsoft.
OLE (Object Linking & Embedding)
Method used to allow two different applications to share live information,
which makes HMI connectivity much more robust.
OPC (OLE for Process Control)
A communications protocol that provides a defined set of COM interfaces
that in turn provide data access functions. OPC can be used by the
FactoryTalk Batch Server as a more flexible and powerful alternative to the
Dynamic Data Exchange (DDE) communications protocol when
communicating with process-connected devices (PCDs).
operation/operation level
The operation segment of a recipe. A procedural element defining an
independent processing activity consisting of the algorithm necessary for
the initiation, organization and control of phases.
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Glossary
OR (Divergence)
A structure within an SFC that represents a decision where recipe control is
passed to only one of the subsequent steps.
owned list
When the perspective in the Arbitration Focus window is designated
owner, the owned list consists of all running recipes, resources and operators
that are displayed in the Owned By portion of the Arbitration window.
owner list
List of all running recipes, resources and operators that displays in the
Arbitration Focus window when the perspective is owner.
owner’s perspective
Function of the arbitration focus in which a resource or running recipe
owns, or is requesting to own, other resources.
owner’s list
When the perspective is resource, the owner’s list is the roster of owners for
all running recipes, resources and operators.
P-Auto mode
The mode of a control recipe when the procedure is sequencing
automatically.
PCD (Process-connected Device)
Hardware that allows the FactoryTalk Batch Server to communicate with
the equipment in a facility.
PLC (Programmable Logic Controller)
A control device. Logic (programs) contained in the PLC read or write to
the inputs or outputs of the field devices. Referred to as the
process-connected device in FactoryTalk Batch documentation.
parameter
Used to allow for flexibility in the recipe creation process. Parameter values
are used in transition conditions or for substitution of phase parameters. A
parameter is created for these recipe levels: operation, unit procedure or
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procedure. Values are assigned when a unit procedure or operation step is
added to a recipe.
parameter deviation
A parameter deviation exists when a parameter value is not within the limits
defined in the recipe.
parameter expression
An arithmetic expression that may be assigned to an input parameter or
output parameter of a phase, operation, or unit procedure step that can
reference other parameters and recipe header data within a recipe. The
expression is evaluated and the result stored as the value of the parameter.
path (stream)
The order of equipment within a process cell that is used, or is expected to
be used, in the production of a specific batch.
paused
Paused is a possible state of the Firing attribute of a transition. When the
transition is in the Paused state, it’s expression has evaluated to TRUE and
it is ready to fire. It is suspended the firing process due to the parent
procedure being in SEMI-AUTO mode. It is awaiting either a RESUME
command or a transition of the parent procedure to AUTO mode before
continuing with the firing process.
pending
Pending is a possible state of the Firing attribute of a transition. When the
transition is in the Pending state, it is waiting for one or more prior steps to
transition into a legal state for a Transfer of Control operation.
phase
The lowest level procedural element in the procedural control model. The
phase provides an interface to basic control.
phase link group
Group that identifies phases that may communicate and work together.
phase state
Term that appears inside the State Frame declaring the phase’s current
condition: IDLE, READY, RUNNING, ARMING, ARMED, FIRING,
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Glossary
CONNECTING, DOWNLOADING, UPLOADING,
UPLOADHELD, STARTING, COMPLETE, HOLDING, HELD,
RESTARTING, STOPPING, STOPPED, ABORTING, ABORTED or
UNKNOWN.
primary approval process
A full and formal approval process to validate the development and
maintenance of batch recipes. In addition to the Primary Approval process
with up to six approval steps (three optional), a two-step Expedited
Approval process is available.
procedure/procedure level
The procedure segment of a recipe, such as the strategy for accomplishing a
process. Procedure level is a general term for the three segments of a recipe:
operation, unit procedure, and procedure.
procedural control
Control that directs equipment-oriented actions to take place in an ordered
sequence to carry out a process-oriented task.
procedure file
The saved file of a completed recipe.
procedural element
A building block for procedural control that is defined by the procedure
model.
process
A sequence of chemical, physical or biological activities for the conversion,
transport or storage of material or energy.
process cell
A logical grouping of equipment, which includes the equipment required
for the production of one or more batches. The process cell defines the span
of logical control of one set of process equipment within an area.
process control
The regulation or manipulation of variables (output) influencing the
conduct of a process (or part of a process) in such a way as to obtain a
product of desired quality and quantity (set point) in an efficient manner.
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process management
The activities necessary to manage batch production within a process cell.
process operation
A major processing activity that usually results in a chemical or physical
change in the material being processed and that is defined without
consideration of the actual target equipment configuration.
providers
System components that provide diagnostic information to the FactoryTalk
Diagnostics system. Providers can be FactoryTalk system elements or
applications such as the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor and
FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor.
recipe approvals process
An umbrella term for the Primary approval and Expedited approval
processes that are used to validate the development and maintenance of
batch recipes. (Only one process can be used at a time.) Using signature
certification, the recipe approvals process safeguards design workflow in a
formalized manner. This ensures each recipe is validated by authorized
personnel before being released to production.
recipe directory
Directory of saved recipes.
Recipe Editor
The master recipe building application of the FactoryTalk Batch system.
The FactoryTalk Batch Recipe allows the user to perform recipe
management.
recipe formula parameter
A parameter specific to a recipe. A parameter can be used to pass values from
one level of a recipe to the next lower level. A recipe formula parameter is
configured in the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor on a procedure or
operation step. Recipe parameters can be deferred to recipe formula
parameters.
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Glossary
recipe management
The control activity that includes creating, editing, storing and retrieving
general, site and master recipes.
recipe parameter
A parameter specific to a recipe. A parameter can be used to pass values from
one level of a recipe to the next lower level. A recipe parameter is configured
on the recipe phase and downloaded to the equipment phase at runtime.
recipe phase
A Recipe Phase is the S88 terminology for the lowest level of procedural
element in the procedural control model, which is in a master or control
recipe. In FactoryTalk Batch, recipe phases are configured in the
FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor and used to build recipes in the
FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor.
recipe verification
A function of the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor, recipe verification
performs a set of error checks on a recipe.
recipe version control
When Recipe Version Control is enabled in an area model, a versioned
recipe is created with the File > Check in command in the FactoryTalk
Batch Recipe Editor. A versioned recipe is a read-only snapshot of a recipe
that uses strict, system-enforced naming conventions. Editable copies of
versioned recipes are created using the File > Check out command in the
FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor--these are called WIP (work-in-progress)
recipes. If the area model that underlies a versioned recipe changes, the
recipe becomes an Obsolete recipe.
reference list
The list of all container recipes with steps that reference a specified recipe
retrieved when using the Find Recipe References option.
reference recipe
The operation or unit procedure referenced in container recipes searched
when using the Find Recipe References option.
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release
Function in the arbitration process that allows the operator to release a
resource that is currently owned by the operator.
release recipe as step
A property of a recipe that signifies it is approved for release as a step,
procedure, or operation to be used in a larger, more complex recipe. A recipe
can only be added to the Batch list if all its children recipes have their
Release Recipe as Step properties checked (set to true).
release recipe to production
A property of a recipe that signifies it is approved for release to production.
When this property is true, the recipe is shown on the Recipe List in
FactoryTalk Batch View, eProcedure, or ActiveX controls. When all aspects
of the recipe are verified and all steps are marked as Release Recipe as Step,
batches can be created against the recipe.
report aggregation - batch
In the Recipe Editor, a report parameter (output) that is defined to add
each uploaded value to the report to its current value and store that value
for the duration of the batch.
report aggregation - none
In the Recipe Editor, a report parameter (output) that is defined to store an
uploaded value, overwriting any value previously there. This is the behavior
of report parameters in versions before FactoryTalk Batch 11.0 and is still
the default behavior.
report aggregation - phase
In the Recipe Editor, a report parameter (output) that is defined to add
each uploaded value to the report to its current value and store that value
until the phase is reset.
report parameter
A value specific to a phase. It is a value that is passed from the
process-connected device (PCD) to the FactoryTalk Batch Server where it
can be used in reports. Typically, the report parameter is a process value.
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Appendix A
Glossary
requested list
When the arbitration focus is in the owner perspective, this list displays the
roster of resources requested by the resource or recipe that is identified in
the Name box.
resetting
Resetting is a possible state of the Firing attribute of a transition. When the
transition is in the Resetting state, it has issued RESET commands to the
preceding steps and is waiting for them to transition to IDLE states in
response to the command.
resource
A general term for equipment including process cells, units, phases, and
shared control modules.
resource’s perspective
Function in the Arbitration Focus window that allows the viewing,
acquiring or releasing of resources or running recipes that currently own or
are requesting to own a selected resource.
resource list
When the perspective is resource in the Arbitration Focus window, the
roster of resources is the resource list.
resource user
An object that either owns or is requesting to own a resource. Can be the
operator, a running recipe or another resource.
resource
A general term for equipment including process cells, units, phases, and
shared control modules.
scalable
Located in the Recipe formula parameter list, this field indicates if the
parameter is scalable with the scale of the recipe.
semi-Auto mode
The mode of a recipe level or phase that allows the operator to manually
step through the recipe level or each line of the phase’s program. This mode
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Glossary
requires that the transitions be programmed to check the phase’s paused bit.
Each time the Resume button is pressed, the paused bit is reset.
sequential function chart
Sequential Function Chart is a graphical programming language that
defines the logical flow of the recipe’s procedure.
sequential function chart step
The structure in the SFC that references a subordinate phase or procedure.
server
A software application that communicates with another software
application (the client). The server normally supplies data or functions to
the client. The FactoryTalk Batch Server is both a client and a server. When
communicating with the FactoryTalk Batch View component, the
FactoryTalk Batch Server acts as the server; when communicating with a
data server, it acts as the client.
service
A process that performs a specific system function, but that does not
include a graphic user interface. Services often include an application
programming interface that can be called by other processes and remotely
from other computer nodes.
service manager
A software application that allows a user to remotely monitor and/or
control Windows services. The FactoryTalk Batch Service Manager allows
an operator to control all batch-related services, as well as access the Server
Statistics dialog box.
SFC
Sequential Function Chart.
SFC validation
A function of the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor, this error check looks
for "logic" errors in the SFC structure defined within a recipe.
shared resource
A resource used in parallel by an unlimited number of steps at a time inside
a recipe structure.
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Appendix A
Glossary
shared-use resource
A common resource that can be used by more than one user at a time.
simulator
The FactoryTalk Batch phase logic simulation program allows you to run
the FactoryTalk Batch components and simulate your batch process
without being connected to a PCD. The simulator can be used for testing,
experimentation and demonstration purposes.
site
A component of a batch manufacturing enterprise that is identified by
physical, geographical or logical segmentation within the enterprise.
state
The condition of equipment or a procedural element at a given time.
static binding
A binding method where a step or set of steps is bound to equipment when
the recipe is built in the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor (equipment
bindings are specified in the master recipe). Material phase steps are never
statically bound.
step reference
A step within a container recipe that is configured to reference an operation
or unit procedure specified when using the Find Recipe References option.
stopping
Stopping is a possible state of the Firing attribute of a transition. When the
transition is in the Stopping state, it has issued STOP commands to one or
more of the preceding steps and is waiting for them to transition to terminal
states.
subarbitration
The process of arbitrating the use of a dedicated resource required by phases
operating in parallel within a control recipe.
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Glossary
tag
A named area of the process-connected device or controller’s memory where
data is stored. It is the basic mechanism for allocating memory, referencing
data from logic, and monitoring data.
terminal (final) step
The logical end of an SFC.
transition
Defines how recipe control moves from step to step. When a step is
complete, the transition designates the criteria that must be met before the
recipe continues to its next logical step.
unacknowledged prompt parameter
A step parameter directed to prompt the operator for data when a phase
requests a download.
unit
A collection of associated control modules and/or equipment modules that
can carry out one or more major processing activities such as react,
crystallize, make a solution, etc.
unit-based recipe
A recipe that specifies a specific unit for equipment requirements.
unit class
A means of categorizing units into groups of similar or identical sets of
equipment. Recipes can be written specifying a unit class (class-based), or a
specific unit (unit-based).
unit procedure/unit procedure level
A production sequence (consisting of contiguous operations and algorithms
necessary for the initiation, organization, and control of those operations)
executed within a unit. The unit procedure level is a general term for the
level that contains unit procedures in a recipe.
upload
A request from a phase to send data to a batch server.
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Appendix A
Glossary
verification limits
Verification limits are the values against which a recipe parameter or report
value are checked. Three types have been identified: Absolute, Percentage,
and Value.
verification method
An algorithm specified in the equipment editor associated with each
parameter or report parameter. The algorithm specifies what set of limits are
used for each parameter. For example: High-High-High/ Low-Low-Low,
High-High / Low-Low, High / Low or None.
verification policies
The verification policies specify the actions that are taken if an entered
parameter or report parameter is outside the specified verification limits.
The current options are: none, require confirm, single signature, dual
signature and not allowed.
verification signature
A new type of prompt that is used to display the deviation information and
request the confirmation or signatures required according to the configured
verification policies.
verify recipe
Process in which a recipe is checked for completion and accuracy.
versioned recipe
A read-only snapshot of a recipe that uses strict, system-enforced naming
conventions. When Recipe Version Control is enabled in an area model, a
versioned recipe is created with the File>Check in command in the
FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor. See also WIP (work-in-progress) recipe
and Obsolete recipe.
view
The recipe execution application of the FactoryTalk Batch components.
The FactoryTalk Batch View allows the operator to create and run a batch,
control phases, arbitrate resources, and view event data.
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WIP (work-in-progress) recipe
An editable copy of a versioned recipe. When Recipe Version Control is
enabled, a WIP copy is created.
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Index
A
acquire 82
control of a phase 78
ActiveX Controls Library
ControlRecipeList 94
overview 93
ProcedureView 98
PromptsList 96
SignatureList 97
TimerView 100
add
batch to Batch List 67
arbitration 82
archive
end-of-batch 90
incremental 90
non-incremental 89
Archiver 19
system architecture 90
area model 35
build 35
open 36
B
batch
add to Batch List 67
electronic record file 89
remove from Batch List 72
run 67
Batch Event Journal
view 76
Batch Server 21
configure sample demonstrations 27
status 65
Batch View 16, 65
exit 86
start 65
BATCHCTL 22
binding
at batch creation 67
manually 73
preference 107
requirement 107
unit 73
binding requirement
expression 107
global 107
BPC (batch procedure level) 56
build
area model 35
C
communication
Batch Server 65
data server 65
configure
equipment module 41
phase 39
sample demonstrations 22
View 85
control
a phase 78
control strategy 39
ControlRecipeList
interface 94
open 95
shortcut menu 95
create
equipment module 43
phase 40
D
data server 65
database 89
document conventions 7
documentation set 8
dynamic unit allocation 67
E
electronic signature template, add 43
end-of-batch archive 90
Equipment Editor 18, 35
exit 49
interface 35
start 36
equipment, share 49
exit
Batch View 86
Equipment Editor 49
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131
Index
F
FactoryTalk Batch components 11
P
G
global
binding requirement 107
unit attribute 107
glossary 107
I
icon
phase 43
incremental archive 90
Instrument Society of America (ISA) 12
interface
Batch View 65
Equipment Editor 35
Recipe Editor 52
ISA (Instrument Society of America) 12
M
MBA (modular batch automation) 12
mode
phase 84
modular batch automation (MBA) 12
N
non-incremental archive 90
O
ODBC (Open Database Connectivity)
Archiver 90
OPC (OLE for Process Control)
communication protocol 32
open
area model 36
recipe 53
simulator demonstration file 32
132
parallel step
remove 64
PC-based phase
definition 103
execution 104
phase 38
configure 39, 41
control manually 78
create 40, 43
modes 84
phase configuration
view 39
Phase Execution Control 103
phase icon 43
phase logic 42
phase logic simulation 32
Phase Simulator 32
start 32
phase summary 82
preference
binding 107
ProcedureView
interface 98
open 100
table view interface 98
process-connected device (PCD) 35
prompts 96
unacknowledged 75
PromptsList
interface 96
open 96
shortcut menu 96
R
rebuild
recipe directory 29
recipe
open 53
structure 55
verify 63
view as table 55
view table 69
Rockwell Automation Publication BATCH-GR011D-EN-P - February 2017
Index
recipe directory
rebuild 29
Recipe Editor 51
interface 52
procedure view 52
recipe construction 52
resize Procedure View 55
start 52
Relational Database Management System (RDBMS)
19
remove
batch from Batch List 72
parallel steps 64
sequential steps 63
requirement
binding 107
resize
Procedure View 55
run a batch 67
S
S88.01 model 12
S88.01 Standard 11, 35, 51
sample demonstrations 22
configure Batch Server 27
Sequential Function Chart (SFC) 69
navigate 56, 70
size 69
sequential step
remove 63
server
Batch Server 21
SFC (sequential function chart) 69
share
equipment 49
signature template, add 43
SignatureList
interface 97
open 98
shortcut menu 98
simulator 32
open sample demonstration files 32
size
SFC area 69
SQL Server 89
start
Batch View 65
Equipment Editor 36
Phase Simulator 32
Recipe Editor 52
step formula values 59
system
architecture 90
system failure
Archiver 89
T
tag
view 42
template, add 43
TimerView
open 101
TimerView control 100
U
unacknowledged prompts 75, 96
acknowledge 78
unit
binding 73
unit attribute
global 107
UOP (unit operation level) 56
UPC (unit procedure level) 56
V
verify
recipes 63
view
Batch Event Journal 76
equipment module configuration 41
phase configuration 39
Recipe Table 69
tags 42
View 16, 65
configure 85
W
Windows Service Manager 21
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Rockwell Automation support
Rockwell Automation provides technical information on the web to assist you in using its products. At
http://www.rockwellautomation.com/support you can find technical and application notes, sample code, and links to software service packs. You
can also visit our Support Center at https://rockwellautomation.custhelp.com for software updates, support chats and forums, technical
information, FAQs, and to sign up for product notification updates.
In addition, we offer multiple support programs for installation, configuration, and troubleshooting. For more information, contact your local
distributor or Rockwell Automation representative, or visit http://www.rockwellautomation.com/services/online-phone.
Installation assistance
If you experience a problem within the first 24 hours of installation, review the information that is contained in this manual. You can contact
Customer Support for initial help in getting your product up and running.
United States or Canada
1.440.646.3434
Outside United States or Canada
Use the Worldwide Locator available at http://www.rockwellautomation.com/locations,
or contact your local Rockwell Automation representative.
New product satisfaction return
Rockwell Automation tests all of its products to ensure that they are fully operational when shipped from the manufacturing facility. However, if
your product is not functioning and needs to be returned, follow these procedures.
United States
Contact your distributor. You must provide a Customer Support case number (call the
phone number above to obtain one) to your distributor to complete the return process.
Outside United States
Please contact your local Rockwell Automation representative for the return procedure.
Documentation feedback
Your comments will help us serve your documentation needs better. If you have any suggestions on how to improve this document, complete the
feedback form, publication RA-DU002.
Rockwell Automation Publication BATCH-GR011D-EN-P - February 2017
Supersedes Publication BATCH-GR011C-EN-P - November 2014
Copyright © 2017 Rockwell Automation Technologies, Inc. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A.
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