kpma safety manual - Klondike Placer Miners` Association

kpma safety manual - Klondike Placer Miners` Association
KPMA SAFETY MANUAL
Prepared by:
Developed by the Klondike Placer Miners’ Association
with support from the Yukon Worker’s Compensation Health and Safety Board and MBS Yukon Inc.
Working Version May 2017
Table of Contents
KPMA SAFETY MANUAL ................................................................................................................... 1
Introduction ..................................................................................................................................... 5
SAFETY AND RESPONSIBILITIES POLICY ............................................................................................. 6
Duties and Responsibilities of all Personnel ....................................................................................................... 7
HAZARD ASSESSMENT ...................................................................................................................... 8
Basics of Hazard Assessment and Control ....................................................................................................8
Critical Task Hazard List ...................................................................................................................................... 9
SAFE WORK PRACTICES .................................................................................................................. 10
SWP01 Basic Back Safety .................................................................................................................................. 11
SWP02 Battery Charging and Servicing ............................................................................................................ 12
SWP03 Chainsaw Use ....................................................................................................................................... 13
SWP04 Compressed Air .................................................................................................................................... 14
SWP05 Lock Out Tag Out (LOTO) ...................................................................................................................... 15
SWP06 Driving .................................................................................................................................................. 16
SWP07 Fall Protection ...................................................................................................................................... 17
SWP08 Fire Extinguisher Use ............................................................................................................................ 18
SWP09 Fueling Equipment ............................................................................................................................... 19
SWP10 Hearing Protection ............................................................................................................................... 20
SWP11 Mobile Equipment Operation .............................................................................................................. 21
SWP12 Manual Lifting and Carrying ................................................................................................................. 22
SWP13 Camp Management .............................................................................................................................. 23
SWP14 Portable Grinder Use ............................................................................................................................ 24
SWP15 Working in Extreme Cold ..................................................................................................................... 25
SWP17 Portable Ladders .................................................................................................................................. 26
SWP18 Cleaning Solvents ................................................................................................................................. 27
SWP21 Working Alone ...................................................................................................................................... 28
SWP22 Snow Removal ...................................................................................................................................... 29
SWP23 Gas Cylinders ........................................................................................................................................ 30
SWP24 ATV and Snowmobile Operation .......................................................................................................... 31
SWP25 Working Around Aircraft ...................................................................................................................... 32
SWP26 Welding ................................................................................................................................................ 33
SWP27 Loading, Unloading and Hauling Heavy Equipment ............................................................................. 34
SWP28 Pre-Start Information ........................................................................................................................... 35
SWP29 Mobile Equipment Operation .............................................................................................................. 36
SWP30 Confined Space Entry ........................................................................................................................... 37
SWP31 Tiger Torches ........................................................................................................................................ 38
SWP32 Equipment Getting Stuck in Soft Ground Conditions........................................................................... 39
SWP33 Transportation, Storage and Handling of Explosives ........................................................................... 40
RULES ............................................................................................................................................ 41
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WRITTEN WARNING .................................................................................................................................42
PPE ................................................................................................................................................ 43
SAFETY FOOTWEAR (Steel Toe Boots) .............................................................................................................. 44
EYE PROTECTION .............................................................................................................................................. 44
HEARING PROTECTION ..................................................................................................................................... 44
PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE AND LOCKOUT ............................................................................... 46
Preventative Maintenance System ............................................................................................................ 47
Hand Tools ........................................................................................................................................................ 47
Mobile Equipment ............................................................................................................................................ 47
Operator Training ............................................................................................................................................. 47
Operator Responsibility .................................................................................................................................... 47
Lockout ............................................................................................................................................................. 47
TRAINING AND ORIENTATION ........................................................................................................ 48
Workplace Violence Policy ........................................................................................................................ 48
Drug and Alcohol ......................................................................................................................................48
INSPECTIONS POLICY ...................................................................................................................... 49
Workplace Inspection Procedure .............................................................................................................. 49
Inspection Form .......................................................................................................................................50
INVESTIGATIONS ............................................................................................................................ 51
Reporting Accidents, Incidents and Near Misses ............................................................................................. 51
Investigations .................................................................................................................................................... 52
INVESTIGATION REPORT FORM................................................................................................................. 53
EMERGENCY RESPONSE .................................................................................................................. 56
Emergency Preparedness and Response ....................................................................................................56
FIRE PROTECTION REQUIREMENTS .................................................................................................................. 56
FIRST AID REQUIRMENTS.................................................................................................................................. 57
DRILLS ............................................................................................................................................................... 59
EMERGENCY RESPONSE POSTING - GENERAL............................................................................................. 60
In case of a MEDICAL emergency:.............................................................................................................. 61
In case of a FIRE emergency: ..................................................................................................................... 61
In case of a SPILL: .....................................................................................................................................61
Emergency Contacts Posting ............................................................................................................................ 62
Outdoor Preparedness ................................................................................................................... 63
Bears........................................................................................................................................................ 63
Bear Deterrents ................................................................................................................................................ 63
Encountering a Bear ......................................................................................................................................... 64
Wolves ..................................................................................................................................................... 65
Moose...................................................................................................................................................... 65
Weather ................................................................................................................................................... 65
Frostbite ............................................................................................................................................................ 65
Hypothermia ............................................................................................................................................ 66
Sunburn............................................................................................................................................................. 67
Heat Stroke ....................................................................................................................................................... 68
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WASTE MANAGEMENT AND ENVIRONMENT POLICY ...................................................................... 69
Water Licenses.................................................................................................................................................. 69
WHMIS (Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System 2015).......................................................... 70
SDS OR Safety Data Sheets........................................................................................................................ 70
RETURN TO WORK (RTW) ............................................................................................................... 71
RTW Administration Procedure ........................................................................................................................ 71
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Introduction
The Klondike Placer Miners’ Association (KPMA), with support from individual members, industry, the Yukon Workers’
Compensation Health and Safety Board (YWCHSB), and MBS Yukon Inc., have created this safety manual to be an
informative tool that is intended to guide all Yukon placer miners in working as safely as possible.
Workers in the placer mining industry are responsible for completing many different types of jobs throughout the
operating season. Owing to the family nature of most operations, and the small number of placer miners across the
Yukon, any injury at any mine site affects all Yukon operations. In addition to the obvious physical and mental harm
that can accompany an injury, the guilt and ethical responsibility an owner feels, and any legal liabilities, there is also a
potentially large financial toll.
Every operating mine pays premiums to WCB every year, and any significant injury to one of our workers not only
increases the amount we pay, but the premiums everyone pays. Therefore, KPMA member operators, along with the
entire placer mining industry, are committed to operating as safely as possible.
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SAFETY AND RESPONSIBILITIES POLICY
KPMA members are committed to a safety program that protects their staff, property, the environment, and the public
from all incidents.
Workers at every level, including management, are responsible and accountable for the overall safety initiatives.
Complete and active participation by everyone, every day, in every job is necessary to achieve the safety excellence
that all businesses strive for. Our membership supports the coordination and cooperation of all workers concerning
safety, both on the mine site and off.
KPMA member operations encourage all workers to participate in the safety program and provides proper equipment,
training and procedures. Workers are responsible for working safely and for the safety of everybody around them by
following all procedures, and wherever possible, improving safety measures.
Everyone has the right to a safe work place, to know the hazards on their workplace, to participate in the safety
program, and, the right to refuse unsafe work. An injury and accident-free workplace is our goal.
Legislations, which all workers must be aware of, are available online and in the office.
The safety information in this manual does not take precedence over applicable Territorial, Provincial and Federal
legislations, which all workers have access to in the camp office and online; and should be familiar with.
Signed:
Dated:
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Duties and Responsibilities of all Personnel
Employer/Supervisors shall:
• Provide a safe workplace and promote safety awareness
• Ensure proper training of workers and establish/follow safe work practices
• Ensure appropriate PPE is available
• Ensure regular inspections are done
• Ensure proper maintenance of equipment
• Correct unsafe conditions
• Provide or supply first aid
• Report injuries and serious accidents to YWCB
• Enforce safety rules
• Ensure compliance with legislation
• Set a good example
Workers shall:
• Become familiar with the company safety policy and manual
• Follow guidance of supervisor and ask about known or potential hazards
• Follow safe work procedures
• Report unsafe conditions or acts
• Correct unsafe conditions
• Report any injury or accident
• Comply with rules and legislation
• Become familiar with emergency response procedures
• Maintain good housekeeping
• Have the right to refuse unsafe work
• Participate in training, instruction, equipment and safety information provided by employer
• Feel encouraged to actively participate in the development and implementation of the safety program
First Aid Personnel shall:
• Administer first aid at the workplace, as required
• Maintain a first aid log in accordance with first aid regulations
• Ensure the minimum required first aid supplies and equipment are available
• Ensure first aid supplies are maintained in clean, dry and serviceable condition
• Coordinate the transportation of injured workers to a physician’s office, hospital or aid station
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HAZARD ASSESSMENT
The success of hazard control and elimination depends on the cooperation of all workers reporting known hazards. It is
company policy that informal (verbal) Hazard Assessments are performed constantly during work, and that formal
(written) Hazard Assessments are performed at the start of the season or more often as needed.
Eliminating, reducing and controlling hazards is our number one way to prevent injury and damage to workers, and
property loss. All workers must communicate any known hazards to those around them and to their supervisor so
these hazards can be mitigated – no disciplinary action will occur for reporting a hazard. Failure to report hazards is an
offence to the Occupational Health and Safety Act.
Basics of Hazard Assessment and Control
The recognition and control of hazards is one of the most important parts of a successful safety management program.
A hazard can be a practice, behavior, condition or situation that can cause injury, illness or damage. One of the best
ways to help control hazards is to communicate with coworkers and supervisors so the rest of the system can work
effectively – a good safety program documents this communication but telling your supervisor and coworkers is the
first step. Three effects of successfully controlling hazards are reduced amount and severity of accidents, reduced time
loss injuries or property damage, and reduced suffering.
There are several different ways we assess hazards in the workplace. The main way is t is done constantly with verbal
communication. We also use formal hazard assessments as documented proof the safety management system is being
used.
INFORMAL hazard assessment = VERBAL communication and mitigation of daily hazards
FORMAL hazard assessment = DOCUMENTED hazard assessment
When completing a Hazard Assessment form (HA) or Job Hazard Analysis (JHA):
A. More than one person should be involved in the assessment
B. Hazards are identified and ranked so we can start controlling the hazards worst first.
Probability + Consequence = Risk Evaluation
Consequence – how severe is the possible outcome?
A = CATASTROPHIC
B = CRITICAL
C = TRIVIAL
Probability – how likely will this happen?
1 = LIKELY
2 = PROBABLE
3 = UNLIKELY
Remember, WORST FIRST. Focus on hazards that fall in the 1A, 1B, 2A, 2B rating. If time permits, all potential hazards
should have controls identified and implemented.
Hazards are controlled by one of the “five approaches”:
1. Elimination (get rid of it! ex, hose is laying on the loading ramp – move it)
2. Substitution (switch it up! ex, pump isn’t working fast – use a bigger pump)
3. Engineered (change it! ex, plant is freezing up – set up frost fighter)
4. Administrative (fix it! ex, hose is leaking water – patch it)
5. PPE (wear it! ex, welding – wear eye protection and welders mask)
You will find that you’re always doing hazard assessments in your mind and with coworkers – bring these things up
with your coworkers so everyone is aware, and make note of what you discussed in the Supervisor Handbook.
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Critical Task Hazard List
This form is meant to provide a master list of reoccurring or high risk hazards that exist in the workplace. Records of
hazard assessments will be updated on this form. When performing the initial season Hazard Assessment, staple notes
to the back of this form.
Identified Hazard
Slips, Trips and Falls
Wildlife
Working Outdoors
Equipment Operation
Fire
Remote Location
Control
Wear appropriate PPE (steel-toe boots when on
site), and review the safe work practice for
Housekeeping.
Keep good communication with your
coworkers, and review outdoor preparedness
section on wildlife.
Wear appropriate clothing for the weather.
Drink water to stay hydrated. Review outdoor
preparedness section on weather.
Only trained operators shall run machinery. See
safe work practices related to operation of
heavy equipment; and verbally review your
work plan at the start of each shift.
Signed Off By
Date
All workers shall receive orientation on fire
extinguisher use and understanding what to do
if there is a fire started on site. Supervisors shall
watch for any forest fires nearby and maintain
communication with Forest Fire Yukon as
needed.
Effective hazard identification and control, as
well as maintaining good communication with
other workers, is key to mitigating the risks
associated with working in remote locations.
Review the emergency response protocols with
all workers.
To be posted and reviewed annually.
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SAFE WORK PRACTICES
Safe Work Practices, or SWP’s, are guidelines - DO’S AND DON’TS - on how to perform a task that has known hazards.
The Workers Compensation Act states that all workers “follow established safe work procedures”, which means all
workers should perform a task in the same safe way that reduces the risk to people and property.
SWP’s outline the scope of the company’s work in general terms for jobs considered to be hazardous. These SWP’s
must meet four criteria:
1. They are in writing
2. They are related to the scope of work
3. All workers understand the SWP’s that relate to them
4. Supervisors and Workers follow ALL Safe Work Practices
Safe Work Practices have been developed to meet or exceed Territorial legislation and industry standards. If you work
within the SWP’s, you reduce your risk of hazards, you work in accordance to the Act, and you actively promote the use
of the company’s Health and Safety Management System.
Always remember that before starting a task, you should feel comfortable and have all the required training necessary.
Should you require clarification about the requirements of a certain task, inform your supervisor so it may be
incorporated into the SWPs.
If workers are not following the Safe Work Practice, review the practice to see if the SWP needs to be updated, or if
workers need to be re-trained. It is very important that work is being performed in accordance with the SWP’s –
please speak with your Supervisor or the KPMA Executive Director if you have any suggestions in the development or
review of our Safe Work Practices.
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SWP01 Basic Back Safety
Purpose:
This safe work practice has been developed to help protect workers from back injuries by establishing requirements for
back safety.
Guidelines:
Workers must always be aware of how they move their bodies while carrying out different work activities.
1. Maintain Good Posture
• Balance weight evenly on both feet;
• Tuck in your behind to help straighten your spine;
• Pull in your stomach muscles;
• Hold your head straight and tall; and,
• Relax arms at your sides, with shoulders lowered.
• If standing, keep knees bent and avoid slouching.
2. See safe work practice for Manual Lifting and Carrying, specifically:
• If lifting heavy loads, use equipment or another worker to help evenly and safely distribute weight.
3. If possible, adjust workspace so no undue strain is put you’re your back. Move and stretch regularly
throughout the day.
For further information, please see SWP on Manual Lifting and Carrying; and section 8.03, “Materials and Storage”, of
the OH&S Regulations – available from your supervisor, with the company safety information, and free from YWCB.
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SWP02 Battery Charging and Servicing
Purpose:
This safe work practice has been developed to help protect workers from injuries associated with working with
batteries. Batteries contain sulphuric acid, which is highly corrosive! Use extreme caution when dealing with electrolyte
fluid in batteries.
Guidelines:
• Wear PPE including acid resistant eye protection or face shield, gloves, and clothing or apron to protect your
face, hands and body.
• Make sure work area is well ventilated.
• Never lean over a battery when performing maintenance.
• Keep all ignition sources away from battery, including high temperatures.
• Inspect for damaged or defective connections, cables or any deformities.
• Use proper tools on and around the terminals, and check for the correct polarity (+/+ and -/-).
• Clean batteries with a baking soda solution when necessary.
• Store fully charged batteries in a cool, dry, safe place.
For further information, please see SDS for battery acid; and, section 8.19, “Battery Charging”, in the OH&S Regulations
– available from your supervisor, with the company safety information, and free from YWCB.
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SWP03 Chainsaw Use
Purpose:
This safe work practice has been developed to help protect workers from injuries associated with chainsaw use.
PPE Required: Eye protection or face shield, hearing protection, gloves, chaps/apron, hard hat, high visibility clothing if
working around others, and a chainsaw.
Guidelines:
• Wear PPE including eye protection or face shield, gloves, and clothing/apron/chaps to protect your face,
hands, body and legs. Check manufacturers standards prior to using chaps/aprons.
• Use the correct saw. The weight, power, and bar length should all be suitable for the job.
• Perform a visual inspection of the machine prior to starting. Check the chain brake works (use gloves when
handling the chain) and that the chain is sharp, has the correct tension and is well lubricated. Ensure a bar
guard is available for transporting the saw.
• Do not "drop start" (starting a saw in hands) or when a chain saw is touching your body. This method leaves
only one hand to control a running saw and can result in leg cuts. Do not start a chain saw when it is resting
against any part of your body.
• Carry the chain saw by its front handle, with the muffler away from your body and the guard bar pointing
behind you. Chainsaws must not be used above shoulder height. Do not make adjustments to the chain, or
guide bar, when the motor is running.
• Fueling must be done in a well-ventilated area and never while saw is running or hot. Fuel must be in an
approved container with proper spout or funnel for pouring.
• Review manufacturers specifications on starting, use, storage, and maintenance of the chainsaw.
• Keep your saw clean - free of sawdust, dirt and oil.
Fueling a Chainsaw:
• Do not refuel a chain saw within 3 m (10 ft) of a fuel storage container.
• Follow manufacturer's directions for oil/gas mixture to be used.
• Do not refuel a running or hot saw.
• Use funnel or spout for pouring. Wipe off any spills.
• Mix fuel in a well-ventilated area. Keep a well-maintained fire extinguisher nearby.
• Do not smoke or allow any ignition sources while refueling.
Steps:
1. Know how to use the controls before starting a chainsaw.
2. Perform visual inspection for saw and machine. Remove chain guard and look for loose or missing parts, signs
of wear, or leaks around engine. Check guide bar and chain tension. Check air filter. Lubricate chain if
necessary.
3. Inspect chain catcher – it helps reduce the risk of injury when a chain breaks or comes off the guide bar.
4. Start the saw with chain brake engaged, on the ground or where it is supported firmly with the nose of the saw
over a stump or a log. Make sure the saw’s bar and chain do not contact anything. If cold starting, feather the
throttle trigger. Avoid engaging the throttle lock or fast idle position on the on/off switch.
5. Operate the chain saw in a firm two-handed grip with fingers and thumb surrounding the handles. Keep both
feet firmly positioned when operating a chain saw.
6. Maintain full power throughout each cut. Ensure that the chain does not move when the chain saw is idling.
For further information, please see section 1.08 to 1.15 on “PPE”; and, section 12 on “Forestry Operations and Wood
Products” in the OH&S Regulations – available from your supervisor, with the company safety information, and free from
YWCB.
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SWP04 Compressed Air
Purpose:
This safe work practice has been developed to help protect workers from injuries associated with compressed air and
it’s use in air powered tooling.
Guidelines:
• Compressed air must not be used to blow debris from workers’ clothing.
• Ensure air pressure has been turned off and the line pressure relieved before disconnecting the hose or
changing tools.
• All hose connectors must be of the quick disconnect pressure release type.
• Workers must wear the appropriate PPE including eye protection and face shields. Keep loose fitting clothing
or hair tied up and away from rotating equipment or air intake areas.
• Hoses must be checked on a regular basis for cuts, nicks, bulges and other damage. Ensure these hoses are
repaired or replaced, and that all fittings are in good repair.
• A proper pressure regulator and relief device must be in the system to ensure that correct desired pressures
can be maintained.
• The correct air supply hoses must be used for the tool/equipment being used.
• The equipment must be properly maintained according to the manufacturer’s requirements. Manufacturer’s
general instructions must be followed, and comply with legislated safety requirements.
• Do not use the air tools for any purpose other than its intended use.
For further information, please see sections 1.54, 8.20 and 8.21 on compressed air in the OH&S Regulations – available
from your supervisor, with the company safety information, and free from YWCB.
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SWP05 Lock Out Tag Out (LOTO)
Purpose:
This safe work practice has been developed to help protect workers from injuries associated with tools and equipment
being tagged or locked out.
Supervisors are responsible to facilitate and/or provide proper instruction to their workers on protection requirements
and ensure defective tools are removed and replaced with tools that are in good working repair. Workers are
responsible for checking their tools and to ensure that defective and broken tools are never used. All defective tools
must be removed from service immediately using lock out/tag out system.
Guidelines:
The following rules apply when working with equipment that needs to be locked out, or has been locked out:
• Keys are to be removed from ignition and tagged out, or power source to be disengaged/removed and tagged
out. Keys and power source to be stored away from equipment or in an inconspicuous location.
• Blockade or separate equipment where necessary.
• If maintenance has been performed and is completed, perform a walk around check of equipment and
communicate with supervisors and any affected worker that the equipment is ready to be used or engaged.
• When equipment must be engaged to complete maintenance or repair, a lockout tag must still be present on
or near the equipment during maintenance, and clear communication between affected workers and
maintenance workers must take place.
• DO NOT USE Tags will be completed and placed on all equipment that is not fit to use
Hand Tools:
Look for chisels and wedges with mushroomed heads; split or cracked handles; chipped or broken drill bits; wrenches
with worn out jaws; and incomplete tools, such as files without handles. Workers must remember to:
• Never use a defective tool;
• Double check all tools prior to use;
• Do not use tools other than for their intended purpose; and,
• Ensure defective tools are repaired or replaced.
Power Tools:
Air, gasoline and electric powered tools require skill and complete attention on the part of the user even when they are
in good condition. Workers must not use power tools when they are defective in any way, for example:
• Broken, disabled or inoperative guards;
• Insufficient or improper grounding due to damage on double insulated tools;
• No ground wire on plug or cords of standard tools;
• The on/off switch is not in good working order;
• Cracked tool blade;
• The wrong grinder wheel is being used; and,
• Defective cords, plug-ins and fuel reservoirs.
For further information see section 3, “Lockout”, of the OH&S Regulations – available from your supervisor, with the
company safety information, and free from YWCB.
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SWP06 Driving
Purpose:
This safe work practice has been developed to help protect workers from injuries associated with driving mobile
equipment (vehicles).
Guidelines:
• Have a valid operator’s license with the appropriate classification to operate a motorized vehicle.
• Understand and comply with all traffic laws and regulations.
• Exercise safe and defensive driving habits and must use good judgment and understand the basic recovery
skills appropriate to the vehicle being driven.
• Take time to become familiar with the vehicle they are driving and be aware of its capabilities.
• Perform a walk around inspection (circle check) prior to travelling.
• Driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs is strictly forbidden.
• Be alert and well rested when operating motorized vehicles.
• Seatbelts must be worn at all times while driving a vehicle.
• Travelling speeds will be reduced to compensate for winter driving conditions.
• Ensure winter clothing does not interfere with or restrict movement, vision or hearing while driving.
For further information, please see part 6 on “Mobile Equipment” in the OH&S Regulations – available from your
supervisor, with the company safety information, and free from YWCB.
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SWP07 Fall Protection
Purpose:
This safe work practice has been developed to help protect workers from injuries associated with working at heights
with fall protection equipment. No persons shall use personal Fall Protection Equipment unless they have adequate
training.
Guidelines:
• “Where work is performed at a location not protected by permanent guardrails and from which a fall of 7.5 m
(25 ft.) or more may occur, a written fall protection plan shall be in place and communicated to workers with
adequate consideration and description of
a. fall protection system of systems to be used,
b. the procedure to assemble, maintain, inspect, use and disassemble the fall protection system or systems,
and
c. methods to rescue a fallen worker or one who is suspended by a personal fall protection system or safety
net and is unable to effect self-rescue.” (YOHS 1.38)
• Workers must know the capabilities of the Fall Protection equipment employed.
• Barricades, ribbons and signage must identify restricted areas.
• In the event of rescue operations, workers must be trained in rescue procedures before attempt.
• Anchor points must be know to workers and adequate for use.
• Use a buddy system and check each others’ harness for fitness, especially the dorsal D ring and lanyards.
For further information, please see sections 1.38, 1.62, 10.11, 10.14, 10.55, 10.73, and 10.75, as they relate to Fall
Protection in the OH&S Regulations – available from your supervisor, with the company safety information, and free from
YWCB.
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SWP08 Fire Extinguisher Use
Purpose:
This safe work practice has been developed to help protect workers from injuries associated with fire extinguisher use.
Fires can very quickly progress beyond the capacity of a hand-held extinguisher. Assess the risk prior to attempting to
extinguish the fire. If there is any question of your safety or the safety of others, contact the Supervisor immediately to
initiate further emergency response protocol for fires.
Guidelines:
• Fire extinguishers must be stored where they will be visible and easy to access. Fire extinguishers must be
properly maintained to work well.
• Fires consisting of wood, paper, rags, rubbish and ordinary combustible materials should be fought with type A
extinguishers; or, water from a hose, pump-type water can, pressurized extinguisher or soda acid
extinguishers. Soak the fire completely including the smoking embers.
• Fires consisting of flammable liquids, oil and grease should be fought with type ABC extinguishers; or, dry
chemical, foam and carbon dioxide extinguishers.
• Electrical fires can be fought with type ABC extinguishers, carbon dioxide and dry chemical extinguishers.
Never use water on an electrical fire. When the electrical current is shut off on a Class C fire, it can become a
Class A fire if the materials around the electrical fire are ignited.
Fire Extinguisher Use:
1. Assess fire to see if it is safe to attempt to extinguish. Locate the fire extinguisher. Remain calm.
2. Remove extinguisher from wall by grabbing securely with two hands.
3. Safely proceed to the fire. Be aware of path to fire and of any obstacles that may inhibit progress.
4. Re-assess the fire, if there is a risk of smoke inhalation, or if visibility is poor evacuate immediately.
5. Extinguish the fire using the P.A.S.S. method:
Pull the pin
Aim at the base of the fire
Squeeze the lever slowly
Sweep from side to side
6. Keep at least 3 meters back from the fire at all times, and never turn your back to the fire. Always ensure that
you have a clear exit path. If the fire cannot be put out in 10 seconds, do not continue to fight – EVACUATE.
7. Assess the scene to ensure that the fire does not reignite.
8. Inform supervisor or management that the extinguisher needs to be replaced immediately.
9. Tag-out extinguisher and place where it will not be confused for a fully charged extinguisher.
For further information, please see section 1.70 on Fire Extinguishers in the OH&S Regulations – available from your
supervisor, with the company safety information, and free from YWCB.
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SWP09 Fueling Equipment
Purpose:
This safe work practice has been developed to mitigate hazards and help protect workers from injuries associated with
fueling equipment.
Guidelines:
Flammable materials are a class of chemicals which present fire or explosion hazards. For a fire or explosion to occur
there must be fuel (chemical), oxygen (air or other sources) and heat (source of flame or spark). The amount of heat
input required to ignite a fuel/air mixture varies greatly. For some chemicals, it may be as small as an internal spark
generated within a mobile phone. Oxygen to support an explosion or fire can be sourced from oxygen rich compounds
such as nitrates or other similar chemicals. Some chemicals have auto-ignition temperatures. This is defined as the
temperature at which the flammable gas/oxygen mixture will ignite from its own internal energy or contact with a
heated surface.
• NO SMOKING or open flames are allowed in the vehicle, near or on the vehicle or within the vicinity while
refueling occurs.
• Because gas vapors are highly explosive, workers must exercise extreme caution when refueling.
• Workers must be aware of the type of fuel the vehicle uses and ensure the proper fuel has been selected.
• Ensure the equipment or vehicle engine is shut off prior to refueling. No refueling can occur while there is any
source of ignition in the immediate vicinity.
• To avoid spillage on equipment, the ground, and on themselves, workers must pay close attention to the
refueling exercise and not become distracted by conversation or other matters which would reduce their
focus on the one task of refueling.
• The refueling area must be well ventilated.
• When refueling equipment or vehicles, workers responsible for operating the unit must never leave the unit
unattended while the vehicle is being refueled and must pay close attention to avoid overfilling.
• To avoid creating static electricity which can cause sparks and quickly lead to fires, workers must hold onto the
gas nozzle from the start of refueling to the end when the gas nozzle is properly replaced on the fuel pump,
and turn the pump off.
• When refueling is complete and the gas nozzle has been returned to the gas pump, workers must remember
to replace the gas cap on the vehicle and to secure it properly.
• When filling up a gas canister, the proper attachment or funnel must be used in order to prevent fuel spills.
Gas canisters are not to be filled in the back of vehicles but must be placed on level ground.
Steps:
Specialized PPE Required: Oil absorbent pads and/or a spill kit, splash guards, gloves.
• Mechanized equipment must be shut down prior to and during fueling operations.
• NO SMOKING or cell phone usage around fueling equipment.
• All fueling operations must be performed in the appropriate manner.
• Dispensing systems must be electrically bonded and grounded.
• Be extra careful fueling equipment in hot weather.
• Shipment, storage and handling of all flammable liquids shall be in appropriate, well labelled containers.
• Storage tanks must be equipped with relief valves.
• Workers must take precautions to prevent any part of their clothing from becoming contaminated with
flammable or combustible liquids. If clothing becomes contaminated workers must immediately cease
handling flammable or combustible liquids and contaminated clothing removed and replaced.
For further information see the SDS sheets for diesel and gasoline fuel products available from your supervisor, with
the company safety information, or free from the fuel supplier.
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SWP10 Hearing Protection
Purpose:
This safe work practice has been developed to state requirements to reduce the amount of noise workers are exposed
to in the workplace to minimize health risks linked to hearing loss.
Guidelines:
Engineering controls reduce excessive noise levels. These types of controls include:
• proper design of new machines
• modify present machines
• proper repair and maintenance of equipment
• sound treatment of walls and ceilings
• use of mufflers
• use of vibration dampeners
• reduce the noise transmission
• increase the distance from the noise
• construct barriers
Administrative controls are used when engineering controls are not possible. These types of controls include:
• worker rotation
• job schedule changes
• personal protective devices
• ear plugs
• must be properly fitted
• only approved plugs are to be used
• cleaned and/or disposed of everyday
• can be worn under earmuffs
• earmuffs
A preventative health program educates workers in the safe levels of noise, exposure, effects of noise on their health,
and use of personal protection. Hearing protective equipment is available to every employee, especially when working
in areas where continuous noise levels exceed regulated levels. Ear protectors must be properly fitted and workers will
be instructed in their use and care.
For further information see sections 1.08 through 1.12, and 1.25 on PPE and Hearing Protection in the OH&S
Regulations – available from your supervisor, with the company safety information, and free from YWCB.
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SWP11 Mobile Equipment Operation
Purpose:
This safe work practice has been developed to help protect workers and property from injuries or damage associated
with heavy equipment operation. Only qualified workers may operate equipment.
Guidelines:
The following rules apply when working on or around heavy equipment (ex. loaders, fork lifts, trucks):
• Perform a walk around inspection prior to operation.
• Do a mental Hazard Analysis before beginning work – if operating in a new or changed work area perform a
written Job Hazard Analysis.
• Follow manufacturer’s instructions on the use and care of equipment.
• Wear seat belts and be familiar with other safety equipment in the unit (fire extinguishers, back-up alarms,
etc).
• Use 3-point-contact when mounting or dismounting a machine, particularly in wet or frozen conditions.
• Ensure correct parking procedures are taken at the end of shift or when the machine is being stopped.
• Report all problems or potential problems to the Operations Manager.
For further information on general mobile equipment usage see sections 6.02 through 6.10 in “Mobile Equipment” of
the OH&S Regulations – available from your supervisor, with the company safety information, and free from Yukon
WCB.
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SWP12 Manual Lifting and Carrying
Purpose:
This SWP is to provide information to enable workers to plan a manual lift. All lifting should be planned and proper
lifting practices followed. Speak to your supervisor if you need assistance from a mechanical lifting tool, like a forklift
or other device.
Guidelines:
The following procedures should apply when manual lifting and carrying is taking place:
• Plan your lift. If possible, divide the load into more manageable loads and get help.
• Treated wood requires gloves that are impervious to chemicals – like vinyl-coated ones.
• Gloves must be worn when carrying metal pieces to avoid cuts and scrapes. When possible, guard sharp
edges before lift.
• Know your physical limitations. If something is too difficult to carry alone, speak with your supervisor and use
another method.
• Ensure a clear path to carry to load, before lifting.
• Use your knees, not your back, to lift.
• Place your feet next to the object, center yourself over the lift and ensure good grip. Stand slowly.
• Do not twist while lifting. Push and don’t pull a load.
• Pipes, conduit, reinforcing rods and other materials should not be carried on the shoulder near exposed live
electrical equipment or conductors.
• Be aware of hazardous and unsafe conditions.
For further information see section 8.03 on Materials and Storage in the OH&S Regulations – available from your
supervisor, with the company safety information, and free from YWCB.
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SWP13 Camp Management
Purpose:
This safe work practice has been developed to mitigate hazards in the camp environment.
Guidelines:
Workers are responsible for bringing safety concerns and problems to the attention of their Supervisor.
• Ensure waste materials (household waste, food waste and human waste) are dealt with in accordance to your
land-use permit and the Environment Act and Regulations.
• Ensure that emergency evacuation procedures are posted and understood.
• Ensure the proper types of fire extinguishers and gas/smoke detectors are installed and in good working order.
Remember – fire extinguishers must be inspected monthly and recharged monthly.
• Ensure that all electrical cords are in good condition and are not overloaded.
• Ensure that floors and aisles are kept clear and free of clutter.
• Ensure spills are quickly mopped up and floors are kept clean and dry to prevent slippery floor conditions.
• When transporting heavy or awkward materials get help.
• Ensure that all appliances and equipment (kitchen appliances, printers, laundry facilities, etc) are maintained
and operated according to manufacturer’s instructions.
• Ensure water supplied to camp has been tested and show to be fit for drinking, or treated appropriately.
• Ensure there is reliable means of communication to initiate emergency response, and that all persons on site
know how to use the communication methods.
• Keep SDS forms for hazardous (previously called “controlled”) products available to all workers. Store and label
them according to WHMIS 2015 regulations.
• If firearms are on site, ensure they are stored, carried and used in accordance to the Criminal Code of Canada,
Wildlife Act and the Occupational Health and Safety Act.
For further information see the YOHS Act and Regulations and Environment Act and Regulations – available from your
supervisor, with the company safety information, and free from YWCB.
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SWP14 Portable Grinder Use
Purpose:
This safe work practice has been developed to protect workers from injuries associated with the use of portable
grinders. Equipment Maintenance is key - workers must take care to ensure that the proper storage of new wheels, the
proper use of wheels and the proper maintenance of wheels are all exercised. Workers must be aware of the potential
and existing hazards while using Portable Grinders
Guidelines:
• Abrasive wheels can cause severe injury. Workers must be familiar with the grinder operation prior to
commencing work.
• Workers must ensure the appropriate personal protective equipment is worn including safety glasses, face
shields, gloves and safety boots.
• Ensure the proper guards are in place on the grinder.
• Do not stand directly in front of the grinding wheel when it is first started, and maintain stable body position at
all times.
• Never exceed the maximum wheel speed (every wheel is marked). The speed marked on the wheel must
match the speed of the grinder.
• When mounting the wheels check them for cracks and defects.
• Ensure that the mounting flanges are clean and mounting blotters are used. Do not over tighten the mounting
bolt.
• Before grinding, run newly mounted wheels at operating speed to check for vibrations.
• Do not use grinders near flammable materials.
• Never use the grinder for jobs for which it is not designed, such as cutting.
For further information see sections 7.10 and 7.19 on Grinding Wheels in the OH&S Regulations – available from your
supervisor, with the company safety information, and free from YWCB.
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SWP15 Working in Extreme Cold
Purpose:
To assist workers who are required to work and operate equipment during periods of extreme cold and adverse
weather conditions. Extreme cold refers to actual temperatures of –40 or colder or temperatures combined with wind
chill factors that make it feel like –40 or colder. Temperatures that read –40 are the same on both the Celsius and
Fahrenheit scales. Whenever possible, work that is scheduled to occur during periods of adverse winter weather
conditions will be rescheduled. Jobs that could result in damage to equipment due to extreme cold must also be
rescheduled if possible.
Supervisors must evaluate the reasons that workers need to work or to operate equipment in adverse winter
conditions. The priority of the job must be closely evaluated and balanced against the weather conditions. When
evaluating the necessity of operating equipment in temperatures at or below –40, supervisors must keep in mind that
there can be many types of equipment failures due to metal fatigue and technical problems. When these types of
mechanical problems occur, they can create more complications by compromising the safety of workers. However,
supervisors also recognize that there will be times when rescheduling work is out of the question and are responsible
for ensuring workers are well trained and protected with the proper cold weather gear. Supervisors are responsible for
locating workers if the employee has not been in contact for longer than a one-hour period when temperatures fall
below –30.
Guidelines:
Workers required to travel during periods of adverse weather conditions are trained and responsible for periodically
checking in via radio, GPS or telephone system.
• Check the weather conditions and advise your supervisor.
• Dress appropriately for weather conditions.
• If required to travel, ensure you are properly dressed for the trip and take extra clothing and gear in case of
emergency. Include insulated coveralls, warm boots, extra gloves, extra socks, extra food, and a sleeping bag
or warm blanket.
• Test communication system to ensure it is working properly;
• Arrange for periodic call-ins via 2 way radio or cell phone to report on their location.
• Take adequate breaks to warm up regularly.
Carbon monoxide can kill. Ensure the tailpipe on the vehicle is not blocked (ex. snow or ice) and that the vehicle
window remains open about one-half inch wide.
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SWP17 Portable Ladders
Purpose:
This safe work practice has been developed to protect workers from injuries associated with the use of portable
ladders.
Guidelines:
• All ladders shall be inspected prior to performing a task.
• Wooden ladders shall not be painted.
• Conductive metal ladders or wire or wire reinforced wooden ladders shall not be permitted in energized areas.
• Ensure surface is level and firm, when required ask for assistance to hold base of ladder or tie off.
• Ensure ladder is tied off and set at the proper angle.
• Ladders should not be climbed higher than the third step from the top.
• Three points of contact should always be maintained when climbing up or down.
• Ladders should not be erected on boxes, tables, scaffold platforms, man lift platforms, or on vehicles.
• A ladder shall not be placed against an unsafe support.
For further information see sections 10.21, and 10.25 through 10.29 on Ladders in the OH&S Regulations – available
from your supervisor, with the company safety information, and free from YWCB.
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SWP18 Cleaning Solvents
Purpose:
This safe work practice has been developed to protect workers from injuries associated with the use of cleaning
solvents. Wherever possible, solvents should be non-flammable and nontoxic. Workers must refer to training (WHMISif necessary) and use all PPE as recommended on the label.
Guidelines:
• Use non-flammable solvents for general cleaning.
• When flammable liquids are used, no hot work is permitted in the area.
• Store flammables and solvents in special storage areas.
• Check the toxic hazards of all solvents before use. Refer to Safety Data Sheets (SDS).
• Provide adequate ventilation where all solvents and flammables are being used.
• Use goggles or face shields to protect the face and eyes from splashes or sprays.
• Use rubber gloves to protect hands.
• Wear protective clothing to prevent contamination of clothes.
• When breathing hazards exist, use the appropriate respiratory protection.
• Never leave solvents in open tubs or vats — return them to tightly sealed storage drums or containers
• Ensure that proper containers are used for transportation, storage, and the field use of solvents/flammables.
• If solvents being used are controlled products, ensure that all workers using, or in the vicinity of use or
storage, are trained and certified in the Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS). Ensure
that all WHMIS requirements are met ie: all solvents and cleaners that are not in their original container must
be labeled.
For further information see the product SDS, and section 1.51 in the OH&S Regulations – available from your supervisor,
with the company safety information, and free from YWCB.
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SWP21 Working Alone
Purpose:
This safe work practice has been developed to help protect workers from hazards associated with working alone.
Guidelines:
Employers and Supervisors shall ensure that workers that must work independently are provided with adequate
support in the event of an accident/incident. If the supervisor is not available to provide this support directly, ensure
that there is a process in place to ensure that each worker can still receive this support in a timely manner if needed;
including, and are not limited to:
• Ensure workers have effective communication between worker and persons able to respond to worker’s
needs in case of emergency.
• Implement safety measures to reduce the risk to workers of identified hazards.
• Regularly contact the worker at intervals appropriate to the nature of the hazards present at the workplace.
• Ensure you have appropriate first aid and fire protection is available and that worker is trained in how to use it.
• Ensure the worker is physically and mentally prepared to perform the job alone.
• Ensure worker has access to and uses as required all basic and specialized PPE to perform the job.
• If the situation warrants, develop a written emergency response plan with the worker.
Workers will check in with their supervisor before beginning any task that requires them work alone and away from their
typical work zone. Workers will provide a description of the work they will be performing, the location and the time they
will return. Workers will report their return to their supervisor. In certain high risk situations, it may be necessary for
workers to check in at predetermined intervals. These situations will be assessed on a case by case basis. A worker may
check in/out in person, via radio, or cell phone. If a worker’s supervisor is not on site, another staff member will be
informed of the situation and shall remain on call until the other worker returns. This staff member will contact the
worker’s supervisor if they fail to check in at the time specified.
For further information, please see section 28 “Working Alone”, in the 2009 Occupational Health and Safety Code of
Alberta, BC, Manitoba, Saskatchewan and New Brunswick for more detailed information on the legislation behind
working alone. This document can be found online or by contacting the YWCB. In the Yukon OH&S Regulations see part
4.3 regarding working alone with chainsaws, or General regarding employer and worker responsibilities. Also see
sections 4.20 through 4.23 “Working Alone or in Isolation” of the WorkSafe BC OHS Regulations.
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SWP22 Snow Removal
Purpose:
This safe work practice has been developed to help protect workers and property from injuries or damage associated
with snow removal. Only qualified workers may perform snow removal using mechanized equipment.
Guidelines:
The following rules apply when working on or around heavy equipment (ex. loaders, fork lifts, trucks) to perform snow
removal:
• Perform a walk around inspection prior to operation.
• Do a mental Hazard Analysis before beginning work
• Be very aware of your work environment – items could be buried under the snow and not visible, know where
any power sources are, if there are any tanks or drums around, what equipment will be working around the
snow removal area and when.
• Follow safe work practice on equipment operation.
• Ensure correct parking procedures are taken at the end of shift or when the machine is being stopped.
For further information on general mobile equipment usage see section 1, “General”, in the OH&S Regulations –
available from your supervisor, with the company safety information, and free from YWCB.
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SWP23 Gas Cylinders
Purpose:
This safe work practice has been developed to help protect workers and property from injuries or damage associated
with propane, oxygen (O2) and acetylene cylinders.
Guidelines:
The following rules apply when handling or storing oxygen, acetylene or propane gas cylinders:
• Ensure WHMIS and TDG labels are attached and visible.
• Cylinders to be transported in upright, secured and well ventilated area.
• Cylinders should not be stored inside a building or carried inside canopies, vehicles or vans.
• Regulator should be installed on cylinder prior to use.
• When checking for leaks, use soapy water solution and watch for bubbles. NEVER use a lighter and flame.
• Cylinders should not be used if shoulder label is expired or damaged.
• When not in use, a plug or cap should seal the opening valve.
• O2 and acetylene tanks should be stored at least 20 feet from flammable materials.
• Secure acetylene tanks in an upright position – empty or full.
For further information on general mobile equipment usage see section 8, “Materials and Storage” Compressed Gas
Containers, in the OH&S Regulations – available from your supervisor, with the company safety information, and free
from YWCB.
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SWP24 ATV and Snowmobile Operation
Purpose:
This safe work practice has been developed to help protect workers and property from injuries or damage associated
with all terrain vehicle (ATV) and snowmobile operations.
Guidelines:
The following rules apply when operating a snowmobile or ATV:
• Perform visual walk around inspection of unit. Check fluid levels (including fuel), and travel plans.
• Riders MUST wear an appropriate helmet, at all times.
• Follow manufacturers’ specification for operations and maintenance.
• Travel at safe speeds and notify camp/office personnel about the trip plans (including route) and return times.
For further information on general mobile equipment usage see section 6, “Mobile Equipment” All-terrain vehicles and
snowmobiles, in the OH&S Regulations – available from your supervisor, with the company safety information, and free
from YWCB.
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SWP25 Working Around Aircraft
Purpose:
This safe work practice has been developed to help protect workers and property from injuries or damage associated
with fixed wing and rotary aircraft.
Guidelines:
At times, aircrafts are used in terrain and weather conditions that may make flying difficult or dangerous. The following
rules apply when working near an aircraft:
•
•
•
•
•
Check that no flags, tags or tie downs are attached to the machine.
Ensure all aircraft are equipped with adequate first aid kits, mobilization equipment and basic fire-fighting
equipment.
Check emergency exits, SAR plan, seat belts, life jackets, radio operations, fire extinguishers, emergency
locator transmitter (ELT) and first aid survival kits are in order.
Do not remain on an that is being refueled and do not smoke within 155 meters of refueling operations .
Do not approach, enter, exit, or refuel a fixed-wing aircraft with the propeller turning.
Although similar hazards are present in the operation of all helicopters, including the lighter models, the helicopters of
greater size and lifting capabilities are accompanied by more noise and rotor downwash, and possibly more confusion
in the landing or loading area.
• Use extreme caution if you approach and leave a helicopter with the rotors turning. The rotors are flexible and
generally 22.5 meters above the skids of the helicopter.
• Clearance can be greatly reduced if the ground is uneven, in gusty or windy conditions, or if the engine is
running down or idling.
For further information on aviation equipment, see section 13, “Trades and Miscellaneous” in the OH&S Regulations –
available from your supervisor, with the company safety information, and free from YWCB.
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SWP26 Welding
Purpose:
Only qualified workers may use the arc welders, but all employees working near a welder should be aware of this SWP.
Before use, ensure work area is tidy and free from any flammable or other hazardous materials. Ensure good
ventilation.
Guidelines:
The following rules apply when welding is taking place:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Ensure good ventilation is used. Make sure appropriate fire extinguishers are available.
Perform walk around before use. Keep any flammable materials away from welding site.
Never use products on or around an area to be welded without carefully checking the MSDS sheets for the
product (cleaner/paint/lubricant), the item being welded and the gas used in welding. POISON GASSES CAN BE
CREATED FROM CLEANERS/PAINT BY THE WELDING HEAT!
Always wear appropriate PPE including welding mask.
Ensure flashback and reverse gas flow safety mechanisms are in place.
Avoid welding in the late afternoon as hot debris can lay unnoticed and cause a fire after work is complete.
Repairs must be performed by qualified technicians.
Consider your fellow workers – advise them of arc flashes and other hazards, use screens as required.
Guard welded areas or mark as HOT after work is complete.
Clean your work area when done. Ensure any debris has been properly disposed of – away from flammable
items.
For further information see Part 13 of the OH&S Regulations – “Trades and Miscellaneous” booklet in the black Yukon
OHS Regulations binder – available from your supervisor, with the company safety information, or free from YWCB.
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SWP27 Loading, Unloading and Hauling Heavy Equipment
Purpose:
This safe work practice has been developed to mitigate hazards and help protect workers from injuries associated with
loading, unloading and hauling heavy equipment. Only licensed class 1 drivers with air brakes endorsements may
operate large trucks off the mine site, and are responsible for adequately tying down their haul loads.
Guidelines:
The following rules apply when loading heavy equipment:
• Ensure the space where equipment is being loaded is flat and will allow for the truck and trailer to drive out
after loading.
• Only qualified operators may load the equipment onto the trailer.
• Workers must maintain visual contact during loading, and keep a safe distance away from the unit being
loaded.
• It is the truck driver’s responsibility to check chains are secured and that boomers are wired.
• Flags must be attached to widest part of the load.
• Driver is to ensure all air bags are properly inflating before leaving loading area.
• Truck Driver must ensure all permits are in place prior to hauling equipment.
The following rules apply when unloading heavy equipment:
• Ensure the space where equipment is being unloaded is flat and will allow for the truck and trailer to drive out
if necessary.
• Only qualified operators may unload the equipment off the trailer.
• All tie downs are to be removed before starting to unload.
• If weather is very cold, unit to be unloaded may be started in advance.
• Workers must maintain visual contact during unloading, and keep a safe distance away from the unit being
unloaded.
For further information see Sections 6.31 and 6.40 of the OH&S Regulations – “Mobile Equipment” booklet in the black
Yukon OHS Regulations binder – available from your supervisor, with the company safety information, or free from
YWCB.
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SWP28 Pre-Start Information
Prepared September 2010
Written & Reviewed by: Brooke McLean
Purpose:
This safe work practice has been developed to help inform workers about general pre-start instructions for mechanized
equipment. This SWP is meant to add to the pre-start procedures outlined by the manufacturer or in other company
documentation.
Guidelines:
The following guidelines apply when doing a pre-start inspection:
• Equipment should be parked on level ground with brake set, attachments on the ground (where available),
and chocks in place if required.
• Check for lockout tags.
• Check fluid levels, belts, leaks, tire quality and any attachments if available (hitch, bucket, etc).
• Before starting check to see if equipment requires preheating.
• Check lights, mirrors, gauges, horn, seat belt, glass, fire extinguisher, radio and any other equipment is fit for
use.
• Report any deficiencies to your manager.
For further information see section 6, “Mobile Equipment”, in the Yukon OH&S Regulations, or section 16 in the
WorkSafe BC OHS Regulations – available from your supervisor, with the company safety information, and free from
YWCB.
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SWP29 Mobile Equipment Operation
Purpose:
This safe work practice has been developed to help protect workers and property from injuries or damage associated with
heavy equipment operation. Only qualified employees may operate equipment.
Guidelines:
The following rules apply when working on or around heavy equipment:
• Perform a walk around inspection prior to operation.
• Do a mental Hazard Analysis before beginning work.
• Follow manufacturer’s instructions on the use and care of equipment.
• Wear seat belts and be familiar with other safety equipment in the unit (fire extinguishers, back-up alarms,
etc).
• Use 3-point-contact when mounting or dismounting a machine, particularly in wet or frozen conditions.
• Ensure correct parking procedures are taken at the end of shift or when the machine is being stopped.
For further information on general mobile equipment usage see sections 6.02 through 6.10 in “Mobile Equipment” of
the OH&S Regulations (or sections 16.1 through 16.55 of the WorkSafe BC OHS Regulations) – available from your
supervisor, with the company safety information, and free from Yukon WCB.
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SWP30 Confined Space Entry
Purpose:
This safe work practice has been developed to help inform workers about confined space entry. Only qualified and trained
workers may enter tanks or other confined spaces!
Guidelines:
The following rules apply when entering a confined space:
• There must be DOCUMENTED Job Hazard Analysis, Responsibilities Assignment, Emergency Response Plan, and
clear communication with supervisors while planning, executing and completing confined space entry.
• Workers must be trained in confined space entry.
• Permits may be required for confined space entry – check with your supervisor and the legislation.
• Ensure ventilation and purging is established and allows acceptable air levels to be maintained and achieved.
• Establish a method of communication to allow immediate contact with necessary personnel if rescue or
assistance is required.
• Before entry, area must be tested by a competent worker wearing a breathing apparatus for oxygen content,
combustible gas and hydrogen sulphide.
• Continuous monitoring of air quality may be required as work progresses or changes.
• All workers must be familiar with rescue procedures and implementation of the emergency response plan.
Contact your supervisor before entering ANY confined space!
For further information see section 2, “Confined Spaces”; specifically 2.04 re: confined space entry program and 2.08 re:
hazard assessment and work procedures in the Yukon OH&S Regulations; or section 9 “Confined Spaces” in the WorkSafe
BC OHS Regulations – available from your supervisor, with the company safety information, and free from YWCB.
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SWP31 Tiger Torches
Purpose:
This safe work practice has been developed to help protect workers from injuries associated with using tiger torches.
Guidelines:
The following guidelines apply when working with a tiger torch:
• Only qualified workers may use a tiger torch.
• Check for lockout tags.
• Wear eye protection or a face shield along with other PPE.
• Ensure fuel lines, regulator and tank are fit for work.
• Never heat or thaw lines with known hydrocarbons.
• Use an elbow or pipe if preheating equipment.
• Don’t allow flame to come into direct contact with anything.
• Ensure there is no risk of fire or explosion caused by oil or fuel leaks.
• NEVER LEAVE TORCH UNATTENDED!
• Never heat a propane cylinder with flame.
• Never use an open flame to check for leaks.
For further information see part 8.20, “Compressed Gas Containers”; and section 4, “Hand Tools and Power Driven
Portable Tools” in the OH&S Regulations – available from your supervisor, with the company safety information, and
free from YWCB.
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SWP32 Equipment Getting Stuck in Soft Ground Conditions
Purpose:
This safe work practice has been developed to mitigate hazards and help protect workers from injuries associated with
getting a piece of equipment unstuck.
Guidelines:
The following rules apply if your equipment gets stuck in soft ground conditions:
• Once equipment is stuck, stay inside the machine, STOP and call for assistance. This SWP assumes “you” are the
stuck unit.
• Your Supervisor will determine the best strategy to get unstuck – do not decide on your own.
o Tow Method:
▪ Ensure tow slings/chains are rated for load and inspected to be in good working condition (no
frays, not stretched, etc) and fit for the job.
▪ Hook up the tow sling/chain to the front bumper of the unit that is stuck.
▪ Hook the other end of the tow sling/chain up to the ripper on a dozer, or, onto the back of an
excavator bucket.
▪ Get in your machine and follow directions of tow equipment and/or Supervisor.
▪ NO WORKERS are to be between the two units when tow is in progress. If either unit has an open
cab in the direction of the sling/chain, close the cab for the purposes of the tow.
▪ Tow equipment (dozer or excavator) will begin to tow you to a hard level surface.
▪ Sling/chain may be removed from both units once tow is complete and there is some slack in the
sling/chain.
o Push Method:
▪ Dozer will approach the back of your machine.
▪ Dozer operator will adjust the blade of the dozer to the height of the box on your machine then
radio that they are ready to initiate the push when you give them the “ok”.
▪ Ensure area is all clear and give the “ok” when ready. Ensure unit is in drive and that both your
hands are on the wheel.
▪ Dozer operator will then begin to push.
▪ You will attempt to safely drive away as you are being pushed. Radio the dozer operator once you
are free and clear.
• Assess the area where you were stuck to ensure this doesn’t happen again to you or another piece of equipment.
For further information see section 6, and specifically 6.35 on “Mobile Equipment” of the OH&S Regulations – available
from your supervisor, with the company safety information, and free from YWCB.
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SWP33 Transportation, Storage and Handling of Explosives
Purpose:
This safe work practice has been developed to mitigate hazards and help protect workers from injuries associated with
transporting and handling of Explosives. ONLY CERTIFIED BLASTERS OR AUTHORIZED WORKERS MAY HANDLE ANY
EXPLOSIVES.
A contracted explosives supplier will be responsible for all transportation, storage and handling of explosives. This Safe
Work Practice has been developed for workers that are not authorized to handle explosives, as extensive training and
certification is required to deal with explosives and is not required for most workers.
Guidelines:
The following rules apply when handling and transporting explosives:
•
•
•
•
All explosives will be transferred to site by an explosives supplier. No explosives will be stored on site. The
explosives supplier will deliver explosives on blast days. They will stay on site until all holes have been loaded. A
quantity check will be performed to ensure all explosives are accounted for. Once the holes are loaded the
explosives supplier will leave site with any extra explosives.
No smoking will be allowed within 250m of the blasting pad.
No ignition devices (lighters, matches, welding strikers, etc.) will be allowed within 250m of the blast pad.
All explosives will be handled under the supervision of the certified blaster.
For further information on blasting see Part 14 “Blasting” of the OH&S Regulations – the black Yukon OHS Regulations
binder – available from your supervisor, with the company safety information, or free from YWCB.
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RULES
KPMA is committed to the health and safety of its miners and encourages all operations to work towards an injury and
accident free workplace. All workers are to abide by the regulations, safety rules, and safe work practices and
procedures, at all times.
Each worker is expected to behave in an acceptable manner for the good of the company and the safety of those
involved. The worker is also expected to exercise common sense and consideration for the personal well-being and
privacy of fellow workers. Failure to behave responsibly may result in disciplinary action as deemed appropriate by
your supervisor. The enforcement progression follows the following however management has the right to skip any
step in this progression depending on the severity of events:
1. Verbal Warning
2. Written Warning
3. Dismissal
RULES
• Appropriate PPE to be worn at all times when working.
• Operate all company vehicles and equipment in accordance with applicable rules, regulations and any federal
or territorial legislation.
• Report to your supervisor all unsafe acts, unsafe conditions and near miss incidents.
• Report all injury or damage accidents immediately.
• Perform all work using Safe Work Practices in accordance with your supervisor's direction and documented
practices.
• Maintain good housekeeping in your work and living areas.
• Show up “fit for work”.
GROUND FOR DISMISSAL
The following are prohibited at all times on all company property and all company work sites:
• Possession or consumption of illegal drugs.
• Consumption of drugs or alcohol at an active work site.
• Theft and vandalism.
• Damaging, disabling or interfering with safety, fire-fighting or first aid equipment; including removing
equipment guarding.
• Disregard for posted safety warnings.
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WRITTEN WARNING
Employee Name:
Date of Warning:
Warning Issued By:
Company Statement (by Supervisor) or reason for warning:
Employee Statement (check one):

I agree with the Company Statement.

I disagree with the Company Statement for the following reasons (state below):
Action:
•
•
•
This report will be kept in a confidential file
The worker may have a copy of this warning upon request
The issues raised in this warning may be reviewed at a company safety meeting
Supervisor signature:
Date:
Worker signature:
Date:
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PPE
PPE, or Personal Protective Equipment, is the last method of safety defense on the job (eliminating hazards is the first
method). All workers are required to wear appropriate PPE while on the job site. Inspect and maintain PPE before and
after each use. Basic PPE that you may be required to wear include:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
CSA (green triangular tag) certified footwear
Safety glasses
Hearing protection (ear plugs)
Gloves suitable for the assigned work
Additional specialized PPE (welding masks etc)
Appropriate clothing for the workplace and the elements
All workers are required to keep their PPE in good condition, according to visual inspection and manufacturer’s
specifications. Replace and remove from service any damaged PPE, as required. If removed from service PPE must be
tagged out, repaired and inspected by a qualified person, or discarded completely.
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT = PPE
There are different ways to decide what PPE is required.
1. Requirements can be found in the Occupational Health and Safety Act and Regulations.
2. Safe Work Practices and recognized industry standards can dictate what PPE to use.
3. SDS sheets, or manufacturers’ specifications for various products and pieces of equipment also states what
PPE is required.
4. Knowledge of experienced workers – your supervisors, management, co-workers – can help you decide what
PPE you need.
5. The last way to decide what PPE is required or should be worn is by performing a Job Hazard Analysis.
When performing a JHA to determine what PPE is required, watch for these points:
• IMPACT – movement of tools or machines, potential for falling objects, force of moving objects.
• HEAT/COLD – Temperature extremes are common in the Yukon.
• PENETRATION – sharp objects with the potential to pierce boots or cut clothing or more.
• DUST – Check for sources of HARMFUL dust, including aerosol materials.
• ROLL OVER – of objects, machines or a source of pinching (ex. potential to crush feet)
• LIGHT RADIATION – welding, furnaces or other intense lights.
• CHEMICAL – chemical exposures, check the SDS if unsure of the hazards.
Workers may be required to use specialized PPE, depending on the work being performed. Some examples of
specialized PPE include:
• Welding Mask and Gloves
• Face shields
• Fire retardant coveralls
• Respiratory Equipment
• Leg Protection
• Chain Saw head protection
• Cold weather gear
Remember, PPE = Personal Protective Equipment. It is our LAST line of defense for incidents and accidents.
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WHAT YOUR PPE CAN DO FOR YOU, AND HOW TO LOOK AFTER IT
Your PPE is the last stand as far as personal safety goes. The goal of KPMA’s safety program is to remove all hazards by
elimination, substitution, administration or engineering the hazard out of the jobsite. Once these approaches have
been applied and looked at, we use PPE as the last layer of protection for workers.
Its important to know how your PPE works and how to look after it – if your PPE has to be used you’re going to want it
to do its job.
SAFETY FOOTWEAR (Steel Toe Boots)
When you’re picking out your boots, make sure they are CSA (Canadian Standards Association) approved with the
green triangle on the tag. Some other tips:
• There should be about 1¼ cm of space at the toes.
• Keep in mind any arch support or thick socks you might wear.
• Lace boots up, they should fit snug around heel and ankle.
• A 6” high boot can help protect ankles from injury.
Look after your boots. Use a weather coating periodically to help keep them water resistant. Repair or replace worn
footwear. Inspect for damage regularly.
EYE PROTECTION
There are different kinds of eye protection rated for different jobs. CSA safety glasses are made with a polycarbonate
plastic, which makes them stronger than regular lenses; and safety frames are stronger than ‘street’ frames, usually
heat resistant, and should have the supplier logo etched into the frames.
Wear your eye protection properly. Ensure they fit properly around your temples, that they provide full eye
coverage, and that the lenses are clean with no scratches.
HEARING PROTECTION
Engineering controls reduce excessive noise levels. These types of controls include:
• proper design of new machines
• modify present machines
• proper repair and maintenance of equipment
• sound treatment of walls and ceilings
• use of mufflers or vibration dampeners
• reduce the noise transmission
• increase the distance from the noise
• construct barriers
Administrative controls are used when engineering controls are not possible. These types of controls include:
• worker rotation
• job schedule changes
• personal protective devices
• ear plugs (must be properly fitted, only approved plugs are to be used, cleaned and/or disposed of everyday,
can be worn under earmuffs)
• earmuffs
The first way to protect your hearing is by eliminating or reducing noise by engineering methods. But there are times
where personal hearing protection is required. Select hearing protection that will give you the best protection for
sound levels – check manufacturer’s descriptions for hearing protection limitations. Sealing the ear canal is more
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effective for noise protection than sealing the entire ear – when properly used earplugs can be more effective than
earmuffs.
Plugs can be disposable or personalized and molded to the ear. They are comfortable to wear in the damp or heat, less
expensive than muffs, and less bulky to wear and transport. Earplugs or other devices must fit properly to do their job:
insert them with clean hands, gently pull the ear upwards and outwards to enlarge and straighten the ear canal. Most
plugs offer about 24 decibels of protection. Check plugs for wear and tear – replace them if they are damaged or if a
seal cannot be made in the ear canal.
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PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE AND LOCKOUT
Preventative Maintenance systems at KPMA operations are specific to the type of work being performed and
equipment used. All tools, vehicles, and equipment shall be properly maintained so as to reduce the risk of injuries to
workers and damage to property.
All workers shall regularly check all tools, vehicles, and equipment that they are working with, and shall take out of
service any tools, vehicles, or equipment that pose a hazard due to a need for repair.
All maintenance is carried out by qualified personnel, according to established schedules, and records are maintained
in the office. Preventative Maintenance programs include the following components:
•
•
•
•
Adherence to applicable regulations, standards, and manufacturers' specifications
Services of appropriately qualified maintenance personnel
Scheduling and documentation of maintenance work
Defective tools and equipment will be removed from service and repaired as per the Lockout SWP (found in
the Safe Work Practices section of the manual).
In order to protect workers from injury defective tools must not ever be used. To ensure that defective tools are
identified, removed from service and either replaced or repaired workers must:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Adhere to applicable regulations, standards, and manufacturers' specifications.
Inspect each tool before use, and/or as per maintenance schedule.
Clearly identify a defective or broken tool immediately to prevent other workers from using that tool.
Verbally communicate with other workers that a tool is broken or defective.
Inform the Operations Manager that a tool is broken or defective.
The SWP on Lockout is followed by all workers.
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Preventative Maintenance System
Equipment and tool maintenance is essential to workplace safety. All the equipment and tools that will be provided to
you should be in good working condition and of adequate quality to ensure they will not cause danger or harm to you if
you are using them properly.
Once the tools and equipment are in your hands ensure they are in proper working order and maintained accordingly.
If you notice something is wrong with a tool or piece of equipment you are using stop and inform the Supervisor.
Hand Tools
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Carry, handle and use all tools in a safe manner
Maintain tools in proper working condition
Inspect a tool before use and report any defects to your Supervisor
All defective tools should be tagged out and identified as damaged
Store tools in a safe and appropriate manner
Keep guards in place when using a tool
Use a tool for its’ designed purpose
Mobile Equipment
•
•
•
•
•
Maintain in a safe operating condition
Have records maintained on-site
Records for any service, repair or modification shall be maintained on site
If equipment is found to be unsafe it must be locked out to ensure it will not be used until repaired
Ensure that all equipment is inspected, maintained, repaired and modified according to manufacturers’
instruction or in accordance with good engineering practice
Operator Training
Workers shall operate equipment only after they have received adequate on the job training and have demonstrated
competency to a qualified person.
Operator Responsibility
Operators shall operate the equipment safely and in control at all times. Before operating, inspect and record the
inspection in a log book. Any defects discovered during the inspection shall be reported to the Supervisor or employer
for correction.
Lockout
The following rules apply when working with equipment that needs to be locked out, or has been locked out:
• Keys are to be removed from ignition and tagged out, or power source to be removed and locked out. Keys and
power source to be stored away from equipment or in an inconspicuous location.
• Blockade or separate equipment where necessary.
• Once maintenance has been completed, perform a walk around check of equipment and communicate with
supervisors and any affected worker that the equipment is ready to be engaged.
• When equipment must be engaged to complete maintenance or repair, a lockout tag must still be present on
or near the equipment during maintenance, and clear communication between affected workers and
maintenance workers MUST take place.
• Ask your supervisor for assistance as needed.
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TRAINING AND ORIENTATION
Orientation and training programs are for all workers in all levels of organization. The company will provide
management, workers, and contractors with the resources and information needed to participate in the company
safety program. Employer provided safety training can include:
• Safety orientations for newly hired personnel
• Job-specific training
• Task and trade-specific training and certification
• Specialized safety and related training
• Refresher and update training
Depending on the worker’s job description, training can include WHMIS (Workplace Hazardous Materials Identification
System), First Aid, or other externally offered courses and programs. Internally, all workers will be trained in how to
perform their jobs as safely and efficiently as possible. The SWP’s (Safe Work Practices) found in this manual are a key
element of on the job training at the KPMA.
Workplace Violence Policy
Management is committed to the prevention of workplace violence and is ultimately responsible for worker health and
safety. We will take whatever steps are reasonable to protect our workers from violence in the workplace.
Violent behavior is unacceptable from anyone. This policy applies to workers, visitors, clients, delivery persons and any
other person working in or around company property. Everyone is expected to uphold this policy and work together to
prevent workplace violence.
Depending on the severity of the situation, if a worker should have any concern about violence in the workplace, they
must inform their supervisor of the concern verbally or in writing so the concerns can be addressed through internal
channels. If the situation is severe, the worker can call for assistance in the workplace from other workers, or call for
police assistance.
Supervisors are responsible for ensuring measures and workers follow procedures and that workers have the
information they need to protect themselves. Every worker is responsible to work in compliance with this policy and is
encouraged to raise any concerns about workplace violence and to report and violent incidents or threats either
verbally or in writing to any supervisor.
Drug and Alcohol
Management has a commitment to maintain a high standard of health and safety for all workers and onsite personnel,
and will not tolerate use of, or impairment by, illegal drugs at any time. The purpose of this policy is to eliminate the
possibility of work related accidents, injuries and property damage associated with drug impairment. Similarly, it is
intended to ensure high levels of productivity are achieved and sustained.
The following conduct will not be tolerated, and may result in discipline, up to and including dismissal;
• The possession of a controlled substance or drug paraphernalia on or in company-owned property (including
vehicles).
• Reporting to work and/or working under the influence of illegal drugs or a controlled substance that is
unauthorized.
• Failing to notify your supervisor before starting work that you are taking medications or drugs that may
interfere with the safe and effective performance of your duties.
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INSPECTIONS POLICY
Regular and informal inspections are carried out to record, identify and correct workplace hazards. Different aspects
of the workplace may require unique inspection procedures but the two main factors are what to look at, and what to
look for. Examples may be inspecting a piece of equipment – look for leaks or cracks; or, while inspecting a work area,
look at the floor, look for trip or fall hazards. Inspections are NOT a substitute for immediately correcting hazards.
WORKPLACE INSPECTIONS
Inspections shall be conducted by the safety representative or a supervisor, with help and input from workers.
VEHICLE/EQUIPMENT INSPECTIONS
Vehicle and equipment inspections take place regularly through the Preventative Maintenance System. The schedule
of these inspections varies on use of equipment and manufacturer’s specifications, and should take place annually.
WALK AROUND INSPECTIONS
Workers must perform visual walk around inspections before using mobile equipment. Workers shall become familiar
with the site, equipment and the surroundings, while assessing any hazard or risk posed by equipment worksite or
process. Such informal inspections need not be documented but should be conducted by all workers, operators,
supervisors and mechanical staff. If a piece of equipment has a walk around inspection form, it must be completed by
the operator for each day the unit is operated.
Workplace Inspection Procedure
When performing a workplace inspection, consider your objectives:
• To identify and record potential or actual hazards in the work or workplace
• To identify any hazards which require immediate attention and correction
• To ensure that existing procedures are adequate
• To recommend corrective action where necessary
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Inspection Form
Location:
Date:
Inspection Team (please include coworkers):
1 = Imminent Danger
Priority
2 = Serious
Inspected Items
Site Access
(lighting/footing/emergency
response)
Priority
PRIORITY INDEX
3 = Minor
4 = Acceptable
Inspected Items
Fire extinguishers (*sign
the tags when you
inspect!)
N/A = Not Applicable
Priority
Inspected Items
Fall Protection Gear
Basic PPE – available and
being used by all workers?
Specialized PPE – ex.
Welding shields
First Aid (Trained first
aiders on site, kits are
stocked and clean)
Appropriate clothing for
work being done?
Electrical wiring
Gas cylinders (stored and
secured ok? Hoses and
regulators)
Lockout (tags available?
System being used?)
Conveyors
Materials storage and
handling (WHMIS)
Tools – Use, storage or
maintenance
Guarding
Spill kits
Vehicles (fire extinguisher,
log books, oil absorbent rags,
communication,
maintenance)
Emergency Response
postings (info up to date)
Housekeeping
Heavy Equipment (fire
extinguisher, log book, oil
absorbent rags,
communication)
Extension cords (good
condition, stored properly,
proper rating)
Use additional forms or pages if you need more room.
Action: ☐ Supervisor to Review ☐ Posted ☐ Discuss at Next Safety Meeting
Supervisor Signature and Date:
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INVESTIGATIONS
Accident, incident and near miss investigations are conducted to prevent recurrence, not fix blame. Report your
involvement in, or witnessing of, an accident, incident or near miss as soon as possible to your supervisor for
investigation and documentation with the aim of identifying what went wrong and determining how to prevent a
reoccurrence.
Reporting Accidents, Incidents and Near Misses
A near miss is considered an incident with no loss or injury. An incident is considered an accident resulting in no injury
and little or no disruption to the work process. An accident results in the disruption of work or an injury. Organize and
begin investigations after emergency response procedures are complete, injuries are cared for and the scene is
secured and safe.
Reporting and Recording Injury
If you are injured at work immediately seek first aid treatment. Report all injuries, first aid or medical treatment to your
supervisor as soon as possible.
If you receive first aid at work the first aid provider must document the injury in the “First Aid Record Book” and include
the following information:
• Injured worker’s name
• Date and time of injury
• Date and time of reporting
• Description of how injury occurred
• Name of witnesses
• Description of nature of injury
• Description of first aid treatment rendered
• Signature of injured worker if possible
• Signature of first aid attendant
If you receive medical treatment outside of work (that could be considered work related), you MUST report this to your
supervisor as soon as possible. Reporting workplace injuries is a legal requirement – the company could be fined for
late reporting so please tell your supervisor about any injury. The worker and first aid or medical provider must fill out
the “Workers Report of Injury / Illness” even if you do not expect to miss time from work. This record may protect you
later if any complications arise from your injury. If an injury goes unreported the worker still has one year to complete
and submit the “Workers Report of Injury / Illness” to the YWCHSB.
• The “Workers Report of Injury / Illness” and “Employers Report of Injury / Illness” forms are online at
www.wcb.yk.ca and in this safety manual.
Supervisors must report serious accidents and injuries to the OH&S office at 867-667-5450 (24 hr) immediately after the
appropriate emergency responses are complete. The supervisor will provide accident / incident investigation report
documentation and assist in any further investigation required by YWCHSB.
Serious accidents include: uncontrolled explosion, collapse of any load bearing structure, flood, fire or explosion,
accidental release of controlled products, any accident that likely would have caused serious injury but for safety
precautions, rescue measures or luck did not. Serious injuries include; an injury causing death, paralysis, amputation,
fracture of major bone, loss of sight, internal bleeding, third degree burns, unconsciousness due to electrical contact,
lack of oxygen or poisoning.
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Investigations
There are several reasons why we investigate accidents incidents and near misses, but the overall reason is to try to
prevent reoccurrences. There is a connection between near-misses and losses: according to F. Bird (1969), for every
600 near-misses there is 1 serious or major injury, 10 minor injuries and 30 damage incidents. If we can investigate
near-misses and CORRECT the underlying causes, we can prevent these serious and major injuries for occurring.
The investigation team should include someone trained or experienced in investigation procedures (like your Safety
Rep or a consultant), the work area supervisor, and a worker who was a witness at the site or performs a similar job.
The basic steps to performing an investigation are:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Secure the scene.
Collect the evidence.
Analyze the causes.
Write the report.
Use this list when filling out the Investigation Report Form.
1. SECURE THE SCENE
• Do a mini Hazard Assessment when you arrive at the scene. Make sure it is safe for you to investigate. You may
need to lock out power sources, control traffic or take lots of pictures if you’re working outside and it’s
snowing, or other forms of hazard control. Remember – we investigate to PREVENT REOCCURANCE.
2. COLLECT THE EVIDENCE
• Look for the 4 P’s: Position, People, Parts and Paper. Position and People are the most time sensitive so be
sure to take pictures and write down information about the scene when you arrive. Parts and Paper can be
examined after the immediate evidence has been gathered.
• Preserve, collect and safeguard any physical evidence at the scene, if practical leave the scene untouched
except to accomplish rescue or prevent further loss or injury until investigations are complete.
• Look around until you have “the big picture”.
• Ask questions of yourself and others of what events occurred and in what order.
• Examine the equipment, material site and ask what procedure was done, and what should not have been
done.
• Check the operators training, qualification and experience.
• Take photos of the scene, machinery and material.
• Take pertinent notes from witnesses.
• Gather relevant paperwork like walk around inspection books, lockout tag information etc.
3. ANALYZE THE CAUSES
• Analyze information to determine the causes and contributing factors.
• The “Immediate Cause” can be different from the “Underlying Cause”. Immediate causes can be things like
snow on the road, or no seatbelt used. Underlying causes can be things like the driver had no training or
experience driving in the snow, or the seatbelt was broken.
• Determine what corrective actions could prevent a reoccurrence.
4. WRITE THE REPORT
• Complete the report and ensure all injury records are complete too.
• Follow up to ensure corrective actions are completed and effective.
• Copy completed investigation report and forward to the office.
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INVESTIGATION REPORT FORM
Location:
Date of event:
Investigation Team:
First Aider:
Check those that apply
☐ Accident
☐ Incident
☐ Injury
☐ Near Miss
Who was involved:
Any documented injuries? Property damage?
What happened? (use more pages if necessary)
Direct (Immediate) Causes?
Indirect (Underlying) Causes?
Witness Reports? (use more pages if necessary)
Corrective Action to prevent recurrence, with date to be complete:
Use additional forms or pages if you need more room.
Action: ☐ Supervisor to Review ☐ Posted ☐ Discuss at Safety Meeting
Investigator Signature and Date:
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Supervisor Signature and Date:
53
YUKON WORKERS’
COMPENSATION
HEALTH AND
SAFETY BOARD
COMMISSION DE LA
SANTÉ ET DE LA SÉ CURITÉ
AU TRAVAIL
DU YUKON
EMPLOYER’S REPORT OF INJURY/ILLNESS
401 Strickland Street, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 5N8, Telephone: (867) 667-5645: Toll free: 1-800-661-0443, Fax: (867) 456-6125, Website: www.wcb.yk.ca
TELL US ABOUT YOUR WORKER
Worker’s last name
Initial
Worker’s first name
Home telephone # (
Worker’s mailing address
Male
Female
)
Work telephone # (
)
E-mail address
Yes
During your busy periods, do you
regularly employ 20 or more workers?
Date of birth (d/m/y)
No
Employer’s name and address (include government department if applicable)
Social insurance #
Worker’s occupation
Name of supervisor
Employer’s telephone # (
Employer’s cell # (
)
)
TELL US ABOUT THE WORKER’S INJURY/ILLNESS
Date of injury/illness. If injury occurred over time, indicate
date worker first reported problems to the employer (d/m/y)
AM
Time
What equipment
was being used?
PM
Part of body injured
(indicate left or right)
What happened?
Do you have any reason to believe
this claim should be denied?
Yes
Has the worker sent in a Worker’s
Report of Injury/Illness
Yes
Was first aid given
at the work site?
When was the injury/illness
reported to supervisor?
No
City, town or place
of injury/illness
No
Yes If Yes, please attach a
No copy of the first aid report
Did the worker seek medical
attention beyond the work site?
Yes
No
Did the injury/illness happen
on the employer ’s premises?
Did the worker miss work after
the date of injury/illness?
Yes
No
Yes
No
Was the worker doing work for
employer when the injury occurred?
Yes
No
If Yes, this is a Time Loss Claim.
Please complete the box below.
TIME LOSS CLAIM
Has the worker
returned to work?
Yes
If Yes, when (d/m/y)?
Yes
If No, have you created a
Return-to-Work Plan?
No
No
Please provide the worker's gross income for the 2 full pay periods immediately prior to the injury/illness
From (date)
to (date)
$
and (date)
to (date)
$
OR: Who would we contact for this information?
*If this is a time loss claim, you may be cont acted for further information
Telephone
This report must be submitted to the Yukon Workers' Compensation Health and Safety Board ASAP. Employers will be fined if this report is not received within
3 days of when you become aware of the injury. It can be faxed, mailed or dropped off at our office.
Major injuries (including fractures, loss of consciousness, etc.) must be reported to the Yukon Workers' Compensation Health and Safety Board IMMEDIATELY:
Call (867) 667-5450 or 1-800-661-0443.
ABOUT YOUR INFORMATION
I declare that the above information is true and correct to the best of my knowledge, and I am authorized to sign this report on behalf of the employer.
Signature
Date (d/m/y)
Print Name
Telephone Number
This information is being collected under the authority of the Workers' Compensation Act for the purpose of determining eligibility for benefits. For further
information, contact (867) 667-5645 or 1-800-661-0443.
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54
401 Strickland Street
Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 5N8
Telephone: (867) 667-5645
Toll free: 1-800-661-0443
Fax: (867) 456-6125
Website: www.wcb.yk.ca
WORKER’S REPORT OF INJURY/ILLNESS
401 Strickland Street, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 5N8, Telephone: (867) 667-5645: Toll free: 1-800-661-0443, Fax: (867) 456-6125, Website: www.wcb.yk.ca
TELL US ABOUT YOU
Worker’s last name
Initial
Worker’s first name
Male
Female
Home telephone # (
Worker’s mailing address
)
Work telephone # (
Cell number # (
)
)
E-mail address
Date of birth (d/m/y)
Social insurance #
Employer’s name and address (include government department if applicable)
Worker’s occupation
Name of supervisor
Supervisor’s telephone # (
Cell number # (
)
)
TELL US ABOUT YOUR INJURY/ILLNESS
In your own words, what happened?
Have you hurt this part
of your body before?
Part of body injured (indicate left or right)
Date of injury/
illness (d/m/y)
No
If your injury/illness occurred over time,
when did you first experience symptoms?
Who did you report
the injury/illness to?
When did you report the
injury/illness (d/m/y)?
What equipment
was being used?
What were your hours of work on
the day of injury/illness? (from/to)
Was first aid given
at the work site?
Yes
Yes
No
Were you doing work for your employer
when the injury/illness occurred?
Did you seek medical attention
beyond first aid at the work site?
Yes
No
Did the injury/illness happen on
the employer’s premises?
Yes
No
If so, where?
No
When?
Did you miss work after the
date of injury/illness?
Yes
Who treated you?
Yes
No
Have you returned
to work?
Yes
If Yes, when (d/m/y)?
No
If you have not already done so, you need to report your injury/illness to your employer right away. You can give them a copy of this form.
ABOUT YOUR INFORMATION
I declare that the above information is true and correct, and I am filing a claim under the Workers’ Compensation Act. I authorize the release from any
source to the Yukon Workers' Compensation Health and Safety Board of medical and/or employment information relevant to my claim.
Signature
Date (d/m/y)
This information is being collected under the authority of the Workers' Compensation Act for the purpose of determining eligibility for benefits. YWCHSB
may obtain and disclose information from this claim, to the employer for the purpose of appeal, or may disclose such information to others in accordance
with the law, including the Workers’ Compensation Act.
For further information regarding completing this form, contact (867) 667-5645 or 1-800-661-0443.
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EMERGENCY RESPONSE
Emergency plans are developed to ensure all workers have knowledge of the physical resources and procedures that
have been developed to ensure everyone at the KPMA can respond in a prompt and organized manner should an
emergency occur.
Emergency Response plan must include at a minimum:
• Procedures to follow as a result of: fire, accident or serious injury, and spill
• Physical resources such as emergency response personnel, first aid kits, fire and spill resources
• Field work specific emergency plans
• How to summon appropriate assistance for each work site
• Contact information for emergency resources and staff (with posted guidelines to access site)
• List of the First Aiders and Supervisors for each job location
• Local authorities contact so they can be prepared for the situation
It is the responsibility of Supervisors, safety personnel and first aiders to ensure the emergency preparedness system at
the mine is in working order at all times.
Emergency Preparedness and Response
A complete and accurate Emergency Response Form shall be posted and reviewed or updated at least annually. All
workers will be made aware of emergency response resources and what actions to take in the case of a workplace
emergency, during their orientation.
When dealing with an emergency, it’s prudent for workers to have a good understanding of the resources available for
emergency response prior to dealing with the situation. The following resources should be made known to all workers:
• Muster location and procedure in an emergency
• First aid kits and personnel
• Fire suppression equipment
• Telephone or radio communication equipment to summons help
• Spill kit near fuel sites
• Emergency response information posted prominently in work areas to advise workers of established responses
and resources including instruction for records of hazardous material on site and WHMIS documentation
FIRE PROTECTION REQUIREMENTS
In accordance with the Fire Protection Act, appropriate fire suppression equipment must be maintained at all
workshops, welding and cutting areas, combustible storage sites and other fire risk areas including fuel powered
vehicles and equipment.
Portable extinguishers shall be appropriate for the potential type of fire and be professionally maintained, certified
annually and inspected monthly by a designated worker.
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FIRST AID REQUIRMENTS
In accordance with YOHS standards, first aid resources vary by hazard exposure, size of workforce and travel time to
medical facilities. The following minimum requirements must be provided at the work sites. Placer mining operations
are considered class “A” hazard exposure area. An “ISOLATED” workplace is 40 minutes or longer travel time on a yearround, government-maintained road. See www.yukonregs.ca Part 18 for more information.
TWO (2) TO FOUR (4) WORKERS
2-4 workers, up to 20 minutes from a nursing station:
• One first aid provider with St. John’s Standard certification
• One #1 first aid kit
• Emergency response information posted in the work area
2-4 workers, more than 20 minutes from a nursing station:
• One first aid provider with St. John’s Standard certification
• One #2 first aid kit
• 3 blankets, stretcher and splints
• Suitable transportation for injured workers to medical facilities
• Emergency response information posted in the work area
2-4 workers, ISOLATED from a nursing station:
• One first aid provider with St. John’s Standard certification
• One #2 first aid kit
• 3 blankets
• Emergency response information posted in the work area
FIVE (5) TO NINE (9) WORKERS
5-9 workers, up to 20 minutes from a nursing station:
• One first aid provider with St. John’s Standard certification
• One #2 first aid kit
• Emergency response information posted in the work area
5-9 workers, more than 20 minutes from a nursing station:
• One first aid provider with St. John’s Standard certification
• One #2 first aid kit
• 3 blankets, stretcher and splints
• Suitable transportation for injured workers to medical facilities
• Emergency response information posted in the work area
5-9 workers, ISOLATED from a nursing station:
• Two first aid providers with St. John’s Standard certification
• One #2 first aid kit
• 3 blankets, stretcher and splints
• Emergency response information posted in the work area
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TEN (10) TO NINETEEN (19) WORKERS
10-19 workers, up to 20 minutes from a nursing station:
• Two first aid providers with St. John’s Standard certification
• One #2 first aid kit
• 3 blankets, stretcher and splints
• Suitable transportation for injured workers to medical facilities
• Emergency response information posted in the work area
10-19 workers, more than 20 minutes from a nursing station:
• One first aid provider with St. John’s Advanced certification
• One #3 first aid kit
• 3 blankets, stretcher and splints
• Suitable transportation for injured workers to medical facilities
• Emergency response information posted in the work area
10-19 workers, ISOLATED from a nursing station:
• One first aid provider with St. John’s Advanced certification
• One #3 first aid kit
• Dressing Station
• Suitable transportation for injured workers to medical facilities
• Emergency response information posted in the work area
TWENTY (20) TO FORTYNINE (49) WORKERS
With 20 - 49 workers, more than 20 minutes from a nursing station:
• One first aid provider with St. John’s Advanced certification
• One first aid provider with St. John’s Standard certification
• One #3 first aid kit
• Dressing Station with O2 therapy
• Suitable transportation for injured workers to medical facilities
• Emergency response information posted in the work area
With 20 - 49 workers, ISOLATED from a nursing station:
• One first aid provider with St. John’s Advanced certification
• One first aid provider with St. John’s Standard certification
• One #3 first aid kit
• First Aid Room
• Emergency response information posted in the work area
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First Aid Kit Contents
A Level 2 first-aid kit must include:
✓ antiseptic cleansing towelettes, individually packaged, 10
✓ sterile adhesive dressings, individually packaged, 50
✓ 10 cm x 10 cm sterile gauze pads individually packaged, 20
✓ 10 cm x 10 cm sterile compress dressings, with ties, individually packaged, 3
✓ 15 cm x 15 cm sterile compress dressings, with ties, individually packaged, 3
✓ 20 cm x 25 cm sterile abdominal dressing, 1
✓ conform gauze bandages, 75 mm wide, 2
✓ cotton triangular bandages, 4
✓ safety pins, assorted sizes, 8
✓ scissors, 1
✓ tweezers, 1
✓ adhesive tape, 25 mm x 4.5 m
✓ crepe tension bandages, 75 mm wide, 2
✓ resuscitation barrier device with a one-way valve, 1
✓ disposable surgical gloves, 6 pairs
✓ 1 dry eye dressing, sterile, 1
✓ first-aid instruction manual (condensed), 1
✓ inventory of kit contents, 1
✓ waterproof waste bag, 1
A Level 3 first-aid kit must include:
✓ antiseptic cleansing towelettes, individually packaged, 24
✓ sterile adhesive dressings, individually packaged, 100
✓ 10 cm x 10 cm sterile gauze pads individually packaged, 50
✓ 10 cm x 10 cm sterile compress dressings, with ties, individually packaged, 6
✓ 15 cm x 15 cm sterile compress dressings, with ties, individually packaged, 6
✓ 20 cm x 25 cm sterile abdominal dressings, individually packaged, 4
✓ conform gauze bandages, 75 mm wide, 6
✓ cotton triangular bandages, 12
✓ safety pins, assorted sizes, 12
✓ scissors,
✓ tweezers,
✓ adhesive tape, 25 mm x 4.5 m, 2
✓ crepe tension bandages, 75 mm wide, 4
✓ resuscitation barrier device, with one-way valve, 1
✓ disposable surgical gloves, 12 pairs
✓ dry eye dressings, sterile, individually packaged, 2
✓ tubular finger bandage, with applicator, 1
✓ first aid instruction manual (condensed), 1
✓ inventory of kit contents, 1
✓ waterproof waste bags, 2.
DRILLS
Emergency Response drills should take place annually and they can be acted out or discussed in detail at a meeting.
Different scenarios should be drilled or discussed and must include all workers so each knows his or her role in an
emergency. This element of preparedness is easily overlooked but is invaluable for everyone involved if an accident were
to occur. When doing a drill, fill out all safety forms that may be used in a real emergency and keep a record of the
drill.
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EMERGENCY RESPONSE POSTING - GENERAL
FIRST PERSON ON SCENE
1. Do not endanger yourself or others at an unsafe accident site.
2. Ensure that the scene is a secured and safe for rescue worker.
3. Contact first aid attendant and confirm estimated time of arrival.
4. If you have first aid training, begin administering it.
FIRST AID ATTENDANT
1. Obtain enough details to determine if ambulance is required and if so,
contact the nearest worker to call for an ambulance.
2. Proceed to the scene immediately in a quick and safe manner.
3. Ask another worker (if available) or call 911 or the closest Hospital or
Nurses Station.
4. When the appropriate services and people have been advised and the
site is secure and safe, begin administering first aid.
OTHER WORKERS
1. Nearest worker to first aider’s post, proceed there promptly and wait
for instructions.
2. Others at scene, follow instructions of first aid attendant to assist.
3. All persons at scene to preserve the accident site as much as possible
for accident investigation.
4. Supervisor or worker to notify the head office.
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In case of a MEDICAL emergency:
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Call for help and get the first aid attendant.
Remove any objects that can cause further injury.
Stay with the person until first aid arrives.
Assist the first aider and call for additional support as needed.
In case of a FIRE emergency:
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Alert those working around you. If the fire is small and just started, put out the fire with an extinguisher (nonelectrical). Have a coworker turn power off if necessary.
If you cannot put the fire out – Stay calm. Notify all staff of the emergency on the radio.
Leave the building or area quickly without running. Ensure other workers or guests are leaving/have left the
immediate area. If it is a building, close doors firmly behind you.
Maintain radio silence unless addressed, and meet at the front parking lot.
Inform people working nearby
In case of a SPILL:
1. Control danger to human life, and without undue risk, the danger to wildlife
2. Cut off source of spill and attempt to contain if possible
3. Supervisor to report spill to authorities
If any of the above responses are beyond the capabilities of the person on site, the spill should be reported and
assistance requested immediately.
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Emergency Notification Information
Location
Material/substance spilled
Time of spill
Any human injury involved
Estimated amount/quantity spilled
Danger present
Probably source and cause
Actions initiated
Status containment (secured or mobile)
Description of spill site (spill on land, water, air; potential contamination of surface/ground water supplies)
Providing the most accurate and complete information available is vital to facilitate an effective response to
the spill.
NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS
YUKON 24 hour spill report hotline: 867-667-7244
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Emergency Contacts Posting
Supervisor:
First Aider:
Muster Point:
First Aid Kit location:
Mechanical Staff:
Camp Cook:
Camp GPS Coordinates (or Emergency Directions):
Dawson Nurses Station
867-993-4444 or
993-5744 (Clinic)
Dawson RCMP
867-993-5555
Carmacks Nurses Station
867-863-4444
Haines Junction Nurses Station
867-634-4444
Mayo Nurses Station
867-996-4444
Pelly Nurses Station
867-537-4444
Fireweed Helicopters
867-993-5700 or
867-668-5888
Trans North Dawson
867-993-5494 or
867-335-2294
Fuel and Oil Spill
867-667-7244
WCB
867-668-8450
Heritage Resources
867-667-5983
Dawson Conservation Officer
867-993-5492
Fish and Wildlife Branch
867-667-5715
Fire Reporting
1-888-789-3473
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Outdoor Preparedness
Yukon placer miners work in the outdoors in often remote areas, the natural environment presents many hazards and
potential dangers typical businesses aren’t exposed to. Whether it's encountering wild animals or working in extreme
weather, there are precautions that can be made to reduce the potential for injury.
Bears
Problems can occur whenever bears and people occupy the same area as people. Bears are curious, and often
investigate strange objects, smells, or noises. They have a tremendous and constant drive to find as much nutritious
food as they can during their time out of the den. These two traits, coupled with a bear’s remarkable sense of smell,
often lead bears to areas of human activity. The outcome of a bear’s visit to a camp will influence its future behavior. If
it does not find food, it may not return once its curiosity has been satisfied. If it successfully obtains food from a human
source it will likely be back for more. These bears will gradually lose their tendency to avoid people as they learn to
associate humans with food, and may become bold and aggressive. Once started, the habits of problem bears are
difficult to break. It is your responsibility to ensure that your actions do not encourage those habits.
The following are general guidelines to follow to reduce your chances of encountering problems with a bear in camp:
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Avoid areas heavily used by bears or where there have been bear problems.
Food storage should conceal odours, and if possible, be in bear-proof containers, preferably distant from
quarters and general activity area.
Minimize food waste.
Completely dispose of and incinerate all garbage and food wastes daily.
Under no circumstances should bears be fed.
Keep wildlife officials informed; they may wish to deter or relocate curious bears that enter the camp area
before they become conditioned to garbage or terrorize the camp.
A Yukon conservation officer in your area can be reached in each community.
The following are general guidelines to follow to reduce your chances of encountering problems when travelling on
trails:
• Make sure that you are adequately trained and equipped to meet a bear.
• Carry a can of active bear repellent or bear bangers, making plenty of noise to alert bears of your presence
while travelling– yell several times before entering heavy brush or talk to the bears.
• Be alert to wind direction – expect to see bears upwind.
• Be alert to strange smells – bears do smell quite strongly, particularly when excited.
• Be alert for unusual actions and behaviours of other animals.
• Be alert to signs, e.g. droppings, tracks, uprooted logs, dug holes, scratch or bite marks on trees, carrion, etc.
• Never approach a bear cub even if it appears to be alone. If you come across a cub, retreat in the same
direction from which you came.
Bear Deterrents
Every person who works or travels in bear country should have ready access to some means of deterring or chasing
away a bear. But remember, no deterrent is completely effective against every bear in every situation. Use deterrents
with caution, as many are potentially dangerous.
Bear Spray
Tests have shown these will stop a charging bear if sprayed into the bear’s eyes, nose and mouth. Chemical repellents
have limitations – short range, difficulty of accurate delivery if a person is excited, and their potential for abuse. Practice
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with your type of spray BEFORE you rely on it so that you are familiar with it characteristics. Always be aware of the
prevailing wind direction before using your bear spray or you may decrease your own ability to deal with the situation.
Noise
Noisemakers are commonly used deterrents. However, they are not always effective. They scare some bears, but other
bears ignore them. Noisemakers include: cracker shells (fired from a 12-guage shotgun); Thunderflashes (hand thrown);
and air horns. Never fire a warning shot or cracker shell directly at a bear but rather in the air to the side of the animal.
Place cracker shells or thunderflashes between you and the bear as explosions behind the animal may scare it towards
you. Bird scaring/flare cartridges are fired from a flare pistol, and explode with a bright flash as well as a loud noise.
They are inexpensive, portable, and generally more reliable than other noisemakers.
Vehicles
Trucks, snowmobiles, ATV’s, and helicopters have been used to chase away bears. Sometimes, starting and revving the
engine is enough. Do not chase a bear with a vehicle for any reason other than personal protection, and do not overdo
it. Allow the bear to maintain a steady trot. If the bear is stumbling or crashing through bushes, you are too close.
Firearms
Firearms should only be used by licensed and trained personnel. All applicable firearms laws and regulations must be
complied with. Safe storage of firearms and ammunition is critical. As with the noise makers above, be careful not to
scare the bear towards you.
Encountering a Bear
The thought of facing a bear can be frightening. However, bears rarely attack a person on sight, and only a very small
percentage of charges result in serious injury or death. You are more likely to be injured in a car accident than by a
bear.
There is always a possibility you may surprise a bear at close range, or encounter a problem bear which is not afraid of
people. There is no guaranteed formula for reacting to a bear encounter because every encounter is unique. There are,
however, guidelines which may help. Most are based on good judgement, common sense, and familiarity with bear
behaviour:
• Stop, stand still, and stay calm. Assess the situation.
• If the bear is aware of you, help it identify you as a person. It may leave. Staying upwind will help it smell you.
Talk in low tones and slowly wave your arms.
• Do not run from a bear unless you are sure you can reach a safe place before the bear catches up. Running may
cause the bear to chase you, and a bear is faster than you are.
• Always leave the bear an open avenue of escape.
• If you see a bear at a distance, alert the bear of your presence. Quietly walk back the way you came or make a
wide detour around the bear. Do not come between a bear and its cubs.
• If time, distance and circumstances permit, try to scare the bear away by firing flare cartridges or noisemakers.
• Back away slowly. Only leave behind an article of clothing or gear if the bear is still trying to identify you. This
will not work if the bear is following you. Leave food or an article of clothing only as a last resort.
• Climb a tree if one is available. You will have to climb higher than four meters – grizzlies can reach that high.
Remember that black bears can also climb trees.
• If the bear is very close (30m), it is usually best to stand your ground. Be prepared to shoot if you are carrying a
firearm.
• A bear may charge at you at high speeds on all four legs, however these are often bluffs as the animal will often
stop or veer to the side at the last minute.
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If contact is unavoidable, you have 3 options:
1. Shoot to kill, if you have a gun.
2. Play dead, if you are attacked by a grizzly.
3. Fight back, if you are attacked by a black bear.
Playing dead may prevent serious injury if you are attacked by a grizzly bear. Do not play dead during a black bear
attack or if a grizzly bear is treating you as prey. To play dead, 2 options can be used:
• Lie on your side, curled into a ball, legs drawn tightly to your chest, hands clasped behind your neck
• Lie flat on the ground, face down, fingers intertwined behind your neck
Wolves
The likelihood of being attacked and killed by a wolf is less than being hit by lightning. Wolves are generally frightened
by adult humans and tend to hunt large slow animals such as moose. The chance of encountering a wolf is minimal. In a
standard situation, the highest risk of being attacked is if the wolf is infected with the rabies virus or has no escape
route. If a wolf feels threatened and is acting aggressively, it will hold its tail high, raise its hackles, and bark and gro wl.
Should an encounter occur or an attack is inevitable, the following guidelines should be used for personal protection:
• Never turn your back and run away – walk away from the animal slowly
• Try to appear larger then you actually are – show the wolf you are too dangerous to attack
• Act aggressively and make aggressive noises – yell at the animal, stomp your feet, throw objects at it, etc.
• Don’t make direct eye contact with the animal
• Should the wolf charge towards you for an attack, fight back using whatever means available: firearms (if
available – only trained and qualified personnel should carry firearms), knives, rocks, branches, etc.
• Always leave room for the animal to leave – don’t corner it
Moose
Most the time, moose are calm and relaxed and will likely carry on their way if encountered. However, during certain
times of the year, adult females and males can be extremely dangerous. During the fall mating (rut) season, males may
be aggressive towards humans; and, during the late spring and early summer, females with young calves are very
protective and will attack humans who come too close.
Should a moose be preparing for an attack, the hairs on its back may raise, its ears will be laid back (similar to a dog),
and it may lick its lips. If the animal is aware of you and begins walking towards you, it is not being curious – it is warning
you to keep away. Should the animal begin to charge towards you, the following protective measures should be taken:
• Run away from the animal – it will not usually chase you very far
• Find dense trees or solid object to hide behind
• Should the animal knock you over and begin stomping on you,
• Curl into a ball and protect your head
Remain still until the animal leaves or it may return for another attack.
Weather
Frostbite
The following precautions should be made when working in extreme cold:
• Avoid prolonged exposure to the cold
• Wear several thin layers of clothing – they hold body heat more efficiently than one bulky layer
• Natural fibers such as wool hold heat better
• Wear a weatherproof outer layer to stay dry
• Wear gloves, scarves, insulated waterproof boots, and a warm hat
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Ensure clothes and boots are not too tight – restricting blood circulation increases the chances of suffering
frostbite
Shield exposed skin from any strong gusts of wind
Drink plenty of fluids and eat regularly
Change out of wet clothes immediately
Avoid smoking cigarettes and drinking alcohol and caffeine – these can prevent proper blood circulation
There are three stages of Frostbite:
1. FROSTNIP is characterized by the sensation of pins and needles with the affected areas of skin turning soft and
white. If caught at this stage, permanent damage will not occur – affected areas should be soaked in warm
water or breathed upon with warm breath.
2. SUPERFICIAL FROSTBITE has the affected skin feeling numb, waxy and frozen to the touch. Blistering may occur
and ice crystals can form in your skin cell. Permanent damage can occur.
3. DEEP FROSTBITE indicators are that all tissue including blood vessels, muscles, nerves, and bone may be
frozen. You won’t be able to feel anything in the affected areas. Permanent damage has occurred.
Treating Frostbite
If possible, the frostbitten person should seek professional medical attention. However, due to the often remote
locations of the job site and the inaccessibility of professionals, the following first aid steps should be taken:
• Bring the person into a warm area to rest as quickly as possible
• Elevate the frostbitten areas – should the feet be frostbitten avoid walking on them
• Remove any wet or restrictive clothing that prevents circulation
• Warm the affected area by soaking it in warm (not hot) water for 45 minutes or until feeling returns
• Do not rub the affected area
• During the warming process, the victim may complain of severe pain and the affected area may swell – this is
normal
• After the warming process, cover the area with a clean bandage or cloth
• Do not begin the warming process if the person will be exposed to the cold again
• Do not use dry heat such as a heating pad, fire, or heater to warm the affected area – because the victim has
lost feeling in the affected area, he/she may not feel the heat and could get burned
Hypothermia
Preventing Hypothermia
The same steps taken for frostbite can be utilized to prevent the risk of hypothermia.
The Warning Signs
Hypothermia progresses in stages and should be recognized at the earliest point to prevent serious damage. The
following are symptoms of hypothermia in the general order they occur.
1. Shivering
2. Grogginess
3. Unorganized thinking
4. Violent or diminishing shivering
5. Inability to think properly
6. Inability to maintain focus and attention
7. Slow, shallow breathing
8. Weak pulse
9. No longer shivering
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10. Unconsciousness
11. Light or no breathing
12. Irregular or no pulse
A victim of hypothermia should seek immediate professional medical attention. However, due to the often remote
locations of the job site and the inaccessibility of immediate professionals, the following initial first aid steps should be
taken while waiting for help:
• Keep the victim still and do not attempt to heat the body through rubbing or massaging – muscular activity will
pump cold blood to the heart causing the body temperature to fall even more
• Seek shelter to remove the victim from the cold – if this is not possible use your body to shelter the victim from
the wind and try to insulate them from the cold ground
• Remove all wet clothing and cover the victim’s head
• Warm the person using indirect heat – apply a warm compress to the groin, chest and neck and avoid trying to
warm the arms and legs as this will send cold blood to the heart (see above)
• Using skin-to-skin body heat will help considerably – wrap yourself and the victim in an insulating blanket to
retain heat
• Never leave the victim – breathing may stop at any point
• Should the victim stop breathing perform CPR – do not assume the victim is dead even if he/she has stopped
breathing and has no pulse. They may still be alive.
Sunburn
Sunburn may appear to be simply an irritant; however prolonged exposure can lead to skin cancer. The following are
general guidelines to avoid sunburns:
• When possible, avoid direct exposure to sunlight – this is especially important during mid-day when the sun’s
UV rays are the strongest.
• Wear clothing that reduces the amount of exposed skin
• Wear brimmed hats that reduce direct exposure of the face and neck
• Apply high-quality sunscreen generously and often throughout the day
Signs of sunburn may not appear until several hours after the exposure to the sun. The full effects of the burn may not
become apparent for 24 hours or more. Signs that you have suffered sunburn include:
• Areas of red, tender skin
• Skin is warm to touch
• Blisters may appear depending upon the severity of the burn
• Fever, chills, nausea, or a rash may develop should the victim suffer a severe reaction
• Skin in the affected areas may being to peel
Treating Sunburn
In most cases, sunburns will generally heal themselves over time. To treat the discomfort, victims can use various
products such as a cold compress, aloevera gels, and other skin products. Taking a cold bath will also help with the
discomfort, although soap should not be applied to affected areas as this removes natural oils essential in the healing
process.
Should the affected area begin to peel, do not scratch (this can cause further damage) – apply calamine lotion to reduce
itching and moisturizers to re- hydrate the skin. The following steps should be taken to prevent the risk of heat stroke.
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•
Drink large amounts of water prior to starting work and continuously throughout the day – if you do not have
pale urine, you are probably not drinking enough
Avoid drinking tea, coffee, and alcohol – these actually increase the loss of body fluid
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•
Protect your face and neck by wearing a brimmed hat
Heat Stroke
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Headache
Lack of sweat – dry skin
Fatigue or sluggishness
Dizziness and light- headedness
Confusion
Dry mouth
Increased heart rate and breathing
Hallucinations
Disorientation
Agitation
Seizure
Loss of consciousness
Treating Heat Stroke
A victim of heat stroke should seek immediate professional medical attention as permanent damage or death can result.
However, due to the often remote locations of the job site and the inaccessibility of immediate professionals, the
following initial first aid steps should be taken while waiting for help:
• Bring the victim to a cool area out of the direct heat of the sun
• Remove the victims clothing and apply water to the skin
• Fan the wet skin to stimulate sweating
• Place ice packs under the armpits and in the groin area
• Slightly elevate the victims feet
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WASTE MANAGEMENT AND ENVIRONMENT POLICY
The proper safeguard of our environment is important to the success of the placer mining community. While doing our
work, we shall not only consider the health and safety of workers and property; but the appropriate protection of wild
animals, plant life, air, water, and soil.
Make accident prevention your intention. Prevention is the key to contingency planning. An effective accident
prevention plan will dramatically reduce our vulnerability to hazardous substance spills and therefore also lessen the
probability of having to respond to such disaster.
We expect all persons to do their best to prevent spills or any kind of harm to the environment. Where possible, we
will recycle, compost and promote the use of recycled products. We shall use, store, and dispose of products in such a
manner that will provide appropriate protection to the environment, and act according to Territorial and Federal
legislations.
Water Licenses
Active, non-exploratory mines work under water licenses that include strict guidelines and regulations for
environmental compliance. Further information on environmental plans and procedures can be provided upon
request.
Evaluation of a fuel spill
A spill defined as “Major” and requires assistance if any of the following conditions are present:
• There is fire, or potential for a fire or explosion;
• Spill is entering water courses;
• Spill involves a toxic chemical;
• Spill involves injury or risk to human life;
• Spill is along the roadway or developed public area;
• Volume of spill is substantial: more than 45 gallons of any petroleum product or flammable liquid.
Initial Response
1. Control danger to human life
2. Cut off source of spill
3. Attempt to contain spill
4. Report spill
If any of the above responses are beyond the capabilities of the crew, the spill should be reported and assistance
requested immediately. 24 hour spill report hotline: 867-667-7244.
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WHMIS (Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System 2015)
This information has been developed using the Health Canada and WorkSafe BC websites.
The Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS) is Canada's hazard communication standard. The
key elements of the system are cautionary labeling of containers of WHMIS "hazardous products", the provision of
safety data sheets (SDS) and worker education programs. Workers have a right-to-know about the hazardous materials
(WHMIS "hazardous products") with which they work. You can use this information to help make sure you go home alive
and well at the end of every workday. The four key elements of WHMIS 2015 include classification, labels, SDSs, and
worker education and training.
WHMIS first came into effect in 1988 across Canada, and was updated in 2015 to reflect a new set of rules called the
Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS). GHS introduces some important
changes to WHMIS, including new rules for classifying and labelling hazardous products, and, safety data sheets or SDS
(previously known as material safety data sheets or MSDS). WHMIS is a shared responsibility between suppliers,
employers and workers. Although workers do not have explicit legal responsibilities under WHMIS legislation, workers
do have an obligation to participate in training programs and to take the necessary steps to protect their health and
safety, to protect the health and safety of co-workers and to participate in identifying and eliminating risks in the
workplace.
In conjunction with federal and provincial governing bodies, the Yukon Workers Compensation Board has established
WHMIS employer requirements in Yukon. In general, employers must ensure that controlled products stored, used or
handled in the workplace are properly labeled; SDS are made readily available to workers; and, that workers receive
generic and site-specific training to ensure the safe storage, handling and use of controlled products in the workplace.
Your site specific WHMIS requirements will be reviewed at orientation with your supervisor or safety representative. If
you have any questions about WHMIS or are interested in further training, ask your supervisor for more information.
SDS OR Safety Data Sheets
Safety data sheets SDS (used to be called MSDS) are documents that provide information about hazardous products
and advice about safety precautions. A SDS tells you:
• The hazards of a product
• How to use the product safely
• What to expect if you don’t follow the advice
• How to recognize symptoms of exposure
• What to do if emergencies occur
SDS provide more information about products than labels do. SDS are important resources that help you learn more
about the products you use. Use this information to find out the following:
• The hazards of the products you use
• How to protect yourself from those hazards
• Safe handling and emergency procedures
The suppliers of products usually obtain or prepare the SDSs. In some cases, an employer may need to prepare an SDS
(for example, when the product is produced and used only in that workplace). Your employer must make sure that upto-date SDS are easily available to you. In general, your employer needs to make sure that no SDS is more than three
years old. However, there are some exceptions to this rule. For example, if an up-to- date SDS is unavailable, your
employer may need to get written confirmation from the supplier that the SDS hasn’t changed. Under WHMIS 2015,
every hazardous product that is used, handled, or stored in a workplace must have an SDS.
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RETURN TO WORK (RTW)
Return to work (RTW) is a proactive approach to help injured workers return safe and productive work activities as
soon as it is functionally appropriate. It is a partnership involving company management, an injured worker, health care
providers, and the Yukon Workers’ Compensation Health and Safety Board (YWCHSB). The early and safe return to
work is an important part of the rehabilitation plan for injured workers. If a worker is able to remain at work or return
to the workplace during their recovery period, the social and financial costs associated with workplace injury are
significantly reduced.
Principals for Successful Return to Work
• Prevention: A strong workplace commitment to Health and Safety
• Communication: Early and considerate contact with the injured worker
• Timeliness: Responsibility to Coordinate RTW
• Accommodate: Offer of modified work as soon as possible
• Cooperate: Ensure RTW plan is good for all parties and is a collaboration between worker, KPMA and YWCHSB
• Educate: Outline Rights and Responsibilities of all parties and the importance of early and safe RTW
RTW Administration Procedure
Any personal information received or collected must be held in the strictest confidence – information can only be
released with a warrant or the permission of the employee.
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Injuries are reported to the Supervisor
Worker is treated as needed (emergency room, clinic, on site, etc).
The incident is investigated and an Investigation Report is developed.
Both Workers’ and Employer’s Report of Injury are filled out and submitted, with Investigation Report, to
YWCHSB.
Have worker obtain a Functional Abilities Form and Doctor’s First Report from doctor.
Supervisor (or contracted RTW Administrator) outlines worker pre-injury job description and duties.
Determine if the injury is occupational or non-occupational (who is paying).
Worker and Supervisor (or contracted RTW Administrator) fills out the RTW Plan and share with WCB case
manager.
Any personal information received or collected must be held in the strictest confidence – information can only
be released with a warrant or the permission of the employee.
The goal is of a successful and efficient return to full duties for the worker.
Roles and Responsibilities
Worker’s Duties:
It is critical that workers try as much as possible to continually reduce the financial and physical impacts of their
disability, as required by section 14 of the Workers’ Compensation Act. The Act sets out that a worker has a duty to:
• Co-operate without delay in seeking and attending health care treatment appropriate for the work-related
injury;
• Refrain from any activity or condition which is likely to impede recovery and/or the ability to work following a
work-related injury;
• Attempt to eliminate or reduce negative personal health care factors likely to impede recovery; and
• Refrain from treatments that YWCHSB considers inappropriate for the worker, or which may cause increased
impairment or prolonged loss of earning capacity.
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Employer’s Duties:
Yukon employers recognize their duty – to the point of undue hardship – to accommodate disabled workers. The Duty
to Accommodate is a legal obligation to prevent discrimination of mental or physical disability in an employee. The
limit to this duty is that is does not cause undue hardship: the employer is required to offer an injured worker suitable
employment unless the viability of the business enterprise would be substantially affected.
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