WBS Laser - Circuit Specialists
WBS Laser
Operator's Manual
Model Numbers:
IF-UL08
IF-UL30
I NDUSTRIAL F IBER O PTICS
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Copyright © 2001
Previous printings 1999
by Industrial Fiber Optics
Revision Printed in the United States of America
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All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced,
stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any
means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise)
without prior written permission from Industrial Fiber Optics.
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Introduction
This manual provides information about Industrial Fiber Optics lasers model
numbers IF-UL08-635, and IF-UL30-635. It contains all the information you need to
operate these lasers safely and knowledgeably, even if you are a novice to laser
technology. Please read the manual carefully before operating the laser.
As soon as you receive this laser, inspect it and the shipping container for
damage. If any damage is found, immediately refer to the section of this manual
entitled Shipment Damage Claims.
Industrial Fiber Optics makes every effort to incorporate state-of-the-art
technology, highest quality, and dependability in its products. We constantly
explore new ideas and products to best serve the rapidly expanding needs of
industry and education. We encourage comments that you may have about our
products, and we welcome the opportunity to discuss new ideas that may better
serve your needs. For more information about our company and products refer to
http//www.i-fiberoptics.com on the Worldwide Web.
Thank you for selecting this Industrial Fiber Optics product. We hope it meets
your expectations and provides many hours of productive activity.
Sincerely,
Industrial Fiber Optics
-i-
- ii -
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Introduction ...................................................................
i
GENERAL ...........................................................................
1
OPERATIONAL INFORMATION
..........................................
2
Electrical..............................................................................................................
Beam Contols.....................................................................................................
Specifications......................................................................................................
2
5
6
SAFETY ..............................................................................
7
LASER REGULATIONS ........................................................
8
OPERATING PROCEDURES
.................................................
10
Initial Setup.........................................................................................................
Audio Modulation .............................................................................................
Video RF Modulation........................................................................................
Video Baseband Modulation............................................................................
10
11
12
13
TROUBLESHOOTING
........................................................
SERVICE AND MAINTENANCE
14
...........................................
15
WARRANTY ........................................................................
16
SHIPMENT DAMAGE CLAIMS
17
............................................
- iii -
LASER CLASSIFICATIONS
All manufacturers of lasers used in the United States, must conform to regulations
administered by the Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH), a branch of the
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. CDRH categorizes lasers as follows:
Class Description
I
A laser or laser system which does not present a hazard to skin or eyes for
any wavelength or exposure time. Exposure varies with wavelength. For
ultraviolet, .2 to .4 µm exposure is less than from .8 nW to .8 µW. Visible
light exposure varies from .4 µW to 200 µW, and for near IR, the
exposure is < 200 µw. Consult CDRH regulations for specific
information.
II
Any visible laser with an output less than 1 mW of power. Warning label
requirements — yellow caution label stating maximum output of 1 mW.
Generally used as classroom lab lasers, supermarket scanners and laser
pointers.
IIIa
Any visible laser with an output over 1 mW of power with a maximum
output of 5 mW of power. Warning label requirements — red danger
label stating maximum output of 5 mW. Also used as classroom lab lasers,
in holography, laser pointers, leveling instruments, measuring devices and
alignment equipment.
IIIb
Any laser with an output over 5 mW of power with a maximum output of
500 mW of power and all invisible lasers with an output up to 400 mW.
Warning label requirements — red danger label stating maximum output.
These lasers also require a key switch for operation and a 3.5-second delay
when the laser is turned on. Used in many of the same applications as the
Class IIIa when more power is required.
IV
Any laser with an output over 500 mW of power. Warning label
requirements — red danger label stating maximum output. These lasers
are primarily used in industrial applications such as tooling, machining,
cutting and welding. Most medical laser applications also require these
high-powered lasers.
- iv -
GENERAL
Industrial Fiber Optics’ family of diode lasers utilize the latest technology in miniature
electronics and laser science. Applications of this technology include long-distance fiber
optic communication networks, CD players and bar code scanners. A key element is the
semiconductor diode laser, a tiny electronic microchip that operates as a laser.
Semiconductor diode lasers offer an important alternative to widely known and used
helium-neon-gas (HeNe) lasers. Diode lasers are smaller, more efficient, and offer direct
digital and analog modulation capabilities previously unavailable. Exceptional versatility
makes this semiconductor technology an essential component of modern science, physics
and industrial technology curriculums.
The Industrial Fiber Optics family of lasers vary primarily in their output power ,
wavelength, and modulation capability. They offer particular education value in their
ability to increase and reinforce learning via fascination by being able to see all the internal
elements. With these lasers, students will readily and enthusiastically learn about physical
optics, fiber optics, light propagation, speed of light theory and measurement, laser
communications, and much more!
Table 1. Metric Prefixes and Their Meanings.
Prefix
Symbol
Multiple
tera
T
1012 (trillion)
giga
G
109 (billion)
mega
M
106 (million)
kilo
k
103 (thousand
hecto
h
102 (hundred
deca
da
101 (ten)
deci
d
10-1 (tenth)
centi
c
10-2 (hundredth)
milli
m
10-3 (thousandth)
micro
µ
10-6 (millionth)
nano
n
10-9 (billionth)
pico
p
10-12(trillionth)
femto
f
10-15 (quadrillionth)
- 1-
OPERATIONAL INFORMATION
Electrical
All electrical controls are located at the rear of the laser chassis. A diagram of the rear
view of the laser appears in Figure 1. Following are descriptions of each item identified in
Figure 1 :
Figure 1. Rear view of laser showing electrical inputs and controls.
1. Power Jack (PWR)
All Industrial Fiber Optics lasers use a standard 2.1 mm DC power input jack to
provide power to the laser. (An ON/OFF switch controls power from the jack to the
electronic circuitry and lasing element.)
Power input to the laser must be applied from a low-voltage DC power source in the
range of 10 to 15 volts, such as supplied with the laser. See Item 9 in this section for
more information about the power adapter.
- 2-
2. Switch (SW)
A push-button switch is located above and to the left of the 2.1 mm power jack. It
controls power from the 2.1 mm power jack to the electronic circuitry and lasing
element. When the switch is closed (ON) it will be slightly depressed, and fully
extended when is open (OFF).
3. Pilot light (PILOT)
Just below the Switch is the pilot light. It emits a green light when the switch is
turned on and power is applied to the electronic circuitry and lasing element.
4. Analog input (VID)
The Video jack is located in the upper right portion of the control panel. and accepts
analog signals to utilize this laser's analog modulation capabilities. This white jack is
an industry-standard "RCA" type as is the digital (DIG) input.
The inner portion of the RCA jack is the signal connection and the outer chromelike portion establishes the common ground required between the analog source
and the laser. The maximum analog voltage input that the laser can handle
without distortion is 50 millivolts peak-to-peak. This input is AC coupled and has
an internal impedance of 75 ohms.
The analog input accommodates a wide range of signals from low frequency audio
to high frequency RF (radio frequency). Examples of compatible signal sources
include dynamic microphones, video outputs from television or VCR’s (when used
with an attenuator), and modulated RF signals from VCR’s or cable converter
boxes.
5. Digital Modulation Input (DIG)
The red RCA jack is the input used to digitally modulate the laser optical beam.
Applications include a computer-to-printer through-the-air link, a digitally coded security
system or a long-distance remote TV control.
The digital input to this laser is compatible with standard LSTTL logic powered by +5
volts. Do not connect the input to any logic with voltage levels greater than +5 volts,
or below ground (0 volts). Table 2 describes laser output in response to digital
inputs.
-3-
Table 2. Laser Output versus Digital Input.
Digital Signal
Laser Output
>3.4 volts
High*
<0.7 volts
Low**
Unconnected
High*
* Output power will equal the laser power rating.
** The laser will still produce a small amount of optical power, less than 20% of high level.
6. Power adapter (not shown)
All Industrial Fiber Optics lasers sold in the United States come complete with a
power adapter suitable for 60 Hz 110 VAC-to-VDC conversion. Most others come
with 50 Hz 220 VAC-to-VDC power adapters. It is strongly recommended that the
power adapter furnished with the laser be the only supply used.
If you must use another power supply, it must be one with voltage output between
10 to 15 volts DC and minimum current capability of 150 milliamperes. Do not use a
power supply which may generate spikes exceeding 36 volts.
-4-
Beam Controls
1. Optics Mount
The optics mount is a nickel-plated aluminum cylinder with internal diameter of 3/4
inches and with 32 threads per inch. The threads facilitate the use of this laser in
many optical experiments using mounted lenses, polarizers and spatial filters.
2. Beam Stop
The beam stop (also known as a beam attenuator) is required on lasers by federal
regulations. When viewed from the rear of the laser, its handle protrudes from the
right side of the optics mount. Its function is to mechanically block the laser beam
when the handle is pushed downward. When the handle is pushed upward, the
beam stop rotates and allows the laser beam to exit the lasing apparatus.
Figure 2. Front View of Laser with Beam Stop Blocking the Laser Beam.
-5-
Specifications
Specifications for laser model numbers IF-UL08-635, and IF-UL30-635.
Table 3. Laser Specifications.
Parameter
Value
Operating
Input voltage
10 to 15 volts
Input current
60 to 125 milliamperes
Temperature
0 to 40° C
Optical
Polarization
Linear
Wavelength
635
Output power
See label on laser underside
Beam diameter
3.2 millimeters
Beam divergence, maximum
2 milliradians
Electrical
Analog modulation2
100 Hz - 70 MHz
Analog input, max.
Digital modulation2
50 mV peak-to-peak
Digital input, max.
5 volts
0 to 20 MHz
Storage
Dimensions
5.6 ¥
Weight
400 grams
7.5 ¥ 22 cm
Temperature
-20 to 50° C
2 Refer to the section on electrical controls in this manual for more information.
Table 4. CDRH Classifications for laser models.
Laser Model
Classification
IF-UL08-635
CLASS II
IF-UL30-635
CLASS IIIa
-6-
SAFETY
Optical
All lasers addressed by this manual emit a visible beam of red light. No infrared, ultraviolet, x-ray or other non-visible radiation is emitted from these products.
This low-power laser cannot be used to burn, cut or drill. Even so you should use
caution because the beam is concentrated. It could become focused to a pinpoint within
the human eye. Never look directly into the laser beam or stare at its bright
reflections—just as you should avoid staring at the sun or other very bright light
sources.
If this is your first experience using a laser, review the Rules for Laser Safety on the
back cover of this booklet.
Electrical
Included with this laser is a UL-approved VAC-to-VDC adapter for VAC operation.
The adapter converts common lab/household voltage to low DC voltage suitable for laser
use. Always plug the adapter into a grounded circuit.
This laser is particularly safe because it operates at low wattage and low current levels.
However, as when using any electrical device, you must take certain safety precautions:
•
Do not touch (or short-circuit) the connection point at which incoming power from
the adapter enters the laser housing, as this could damage the power supply.
•
Do not open the laser housing under any circumstances, as this will expose you to
unshielded electrical connections, violating federal government regulations and
voiding the product warranty.
-7-
LASER REGULATIONS
The U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare regulates and classifies all
laser products sold in the United States. Industrial Fiber Optics lasers comply fully with
laser performance standards established by Center for Devices and Radiological Health
(CDRH) Regulation 21, parts 1040.10 and 1040.11, Code of Federal Regulations.
Specific labeling is required by Federal Regulations on all laser products. For your
safety and that of others, do not remove any of the labels.
Certification/ Identification
Laser certification
and identification labeling required by federal
regulations have been
combined in a single
label located on the
underside of the laser. A
graphic representation of
that label is shown in
Figure 3 . It certifies that
this laser complies with
federal regulations;
identifies the
manufacturer; and lists
the model number and
date of manufacture.
Figure 3. Laser certification and identification
label.
Classifications
All lasers described by this manual fall within the limitations of Class II and Class IIIa
of CDRH standards. All lasers covered by this manual will exhibit a label located on the
top, rear of the laser chassis as shown
in Figure 7 .
Class II lasers may not exceed 1
milliwatt (1 mW) of output power,
must contain a pilot light and a beam
attenuator. An example of the
"warning logotype" label used for
Class II lasers is shown in Figure 4 .
Figure 4. Warning logotype label for
Class II lasers.
-8-
Class IIIa lasers have an output
power limitation between 1 and 5
milliwatts, and require a pilot light
and a beam attenuator. The "warning
logotype" label required for this
classification of laser is shown in
Figure 5 .
Figure 5. Warning logotype label for
Class IIIa lasers.
Aperture Labels
Federal regulations also require that the laser emission aperture/port be labeled. A
graphic representation of that label is
shown in Figure 6 . Location of this
label is shown in Figure 2 .
Additional References
For more information about lasers Figure 6. Beam aperture label.
and laser standards, contact your local
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, or write to the agency's headquarters at
1390 Piccard Dr., Rockville, MD 20850.
For U.S. guidelines on laser classifications and health standards, refer to the American
National Standards Institute (ANSI) specifications governing lasers and laser safety. The
guidelines are published by the Laser Institute of America, 12424 Research Parkway, Suite
130, Orlando, FL 32826.
Figure 7. Top view of laser showing the location of the "Warning
logotype" label for a Class IIIa laser.
-9-
OPERATING PROCEDURES
Initial and Unmodulated Operation
1.
Review the laser safety steps on the back cover of this manual if this is your first
time operating a laser.
2.
Point the laser toward a wall or other dull non-reflecting surface.
3.
Push the beam stop's handle downward to its closed position.
4.
Make sure the laser's ON/OFF switch (SW) is in its OFF position. (The push button
should be in its extended position.)
5.
Plug the 110* VAC-to-DC power adapter (provided with the laser) into an AC wall
outlet.
Important!
If you must use a power adapter other than the one supplied with this laser,
check the section entitled Operational Information in this manual to ensure the
power adapter's voltage and current levels are within recommended
specifications.
6.
Plug the cord from the power adapter into the power jack (PWR) located on the
rear of the laser.
7.
Depress the ON/OFF switch (SW) on the control panel of the laser until it clicks
into the ON position. (The switch should be slightly depressed.)
8.
The pilot light (green LED) just to left and below the ON/OFF switch should now
be lit, showing that the laser is on.
9.
Push the beam stop's handle upward, to its open position.
10.
Observe the red beam striking the wall, or other surface, in the direction which the
laser is pointed.
* 220 VAC for customers outside of North America
- 10 -
Audio Modulation of the Laser Beam
We will outline the steps for modulating the Industrial Fiber Optics’ laser with audio
signals. Because we do not know what receiver you will be using to convert the optical
signal on the laser beam, please refer to that receiver's instruction manual as directed in
the procedure below.
1.
Check to ensure that the audio signal inputs you plan to use do not exceed the
specifications given in the Operational Information section of this manual.
2.
Turn off all power to the source which will provide the modulation input to the
laser.
3.
Push the beam stop to its closed position, and make sure the laser's ON/OFF
switch is OFF. (The button should be extended and the pilot light no longer
illuminated.)
4.
Plug a microphone, or other audio source into the analog input labeled “VID” on
the rear of the laser. If necessary, use an electrical adapter to convert the audio
plug of the signal source to the phono or RCA style input jack on the laser. If your
signal input is coming from a banana jack, make sure to connect a "ground"
between your signal source and the laser.
5.
Point the laser toward a wall or other non-reflecting dull surface.
6.
Set up your laser receiver, referring to its manual for operating procedure.
7.
Press the ON/OFF switch (SW) on the control panel of the laser. The laser now
should be on, as indicated by the pilot light.
8.
Turn on the power to the signal source.
9.
The amplitude of the exiting laser light should now be modulated by the input
signals.
10.
Rotate the beam stop's handle upward to its open position.
11.
Target the laser beam on the light detector found on the laser receiver.
12.
Position the receiver or laser as needed, so the laser light beam strikes the center of
the receiver detector.
13.
Adjust the audio level applied to the laser or the gain on the laser receiver as
required to receive signals.
Your laser and receiver should now be functioning as a free-space optical
communications link. If you are using a microphone input and an audio laser receiver
you should now be hearing voice or music from the audio receiver.
- 11 -
TV RF Modulation of the Laser Beam
We will outline the steps for modulating the Industrial Fiber Optic laser with RF signals.
Because we do not know what receiver you will be using to convert the optical signal on
the laser beam, please refer to that receiver's instruction manual as directed in the
procedure below.
1.
Check to ensure that the RF signal inputs you plan to use do not exceed the
specifications given in the Operational Information section of this manual.
2.
Turn off all power to the source which will provide the modulation input to the
laser.
3.
Push the beam stop to its closed position, and make sure the laser's ON/OFF
switch is OFF. (The button should be extended and the pilot light no longer
illuminated.)
4.
Insert one end of a 75 ohm RF coax cable into the 75 ohm “Output” connector of a
VCR or cable converter box. Attach the remaining end to a type “F” to RCA
electrical adapter and connect to the analog input labeled “VID” on the rear of the
laser. Set the VCR or cable box to channel 3 or 4 as appropriate.
5.
Point the laser toward a wall or other non-reflecting dull surface.
6.
Set up your laser receiver, referring to its manual for operating procedure. If you are
using a IF-VRII receiver from Industrial Fiber Optics it will contain all the necissary
hardare and instruction information.
7.
Press the ON/OFF switch (SW) on the control panel of the laser. The laser now
should be on, as indicated by the pilot light.
8.
Turn on the power to the VCR or cable converter.
9.
The amplitude of the exiting laser light should now be modulated by the RF input
signals.
10.
Rotate the beam stop's handle upward to its open position.
11.
Target the laser beam on the light detector found on the laser receiver.
12.
Position the receiver or laser as needed, so the laser light beam strikes the center of
the receiver detector.
Your laser and receiver should now be functioning as a free-space optical
communications link. If you are using a VCR as the electrical modulation source, and a
video receiver connected to a television, you should now see a picture and hear sound
from the television.
- 12 -
TV Video Modulation of the Laser Beam
We will outline the steps for modulating the Industrial Fiber Optic laser with video
signals. Because we do not know what receiver you will be using to convert the optical
signal on the laser beam, please refer to that receiver's instruction manual as directed in
the procedure below.
1.
The standard video output of a VCR or television is approximately 1 volt peak to
peak and exceeds the input specifications of the WBS Laser. To insure proper
operation you must us a 20 X attenuator to perform this experiment. (Contact
Industrial Fiber Optics if you have trouble locating an attenuator.)
2.
Turn off all power to the source which will provide the modulation input to the
laser.
3.
Push the beam stop to its closed position, and make sure the laser's ON/OFF
switch is OFF. (The button should be extended and the pilot light no longer
illuminated.)
4.
Insert one end of a video cable into the “Video Output” jack of the VCR, and the
remaining end into the 20 X attenuator. Plug the attenuator into the analog input
label “VID” on the rear of the laser.
5.
Point the laser toward a wall or other non-reflecting dull surface.
6.
Set up your video laser receiver, referring to its manual for operating procedure.
7.
Press the ON/OFF switch (SW) on the control panel of the laser. The laser now
should be on, as indicated by the pilot light.
8.
Turn on the power to the television or VCR.
9.
The amplitude of the exiting laser light should now be modulated by the video
input signal.
10.
Rotate the beam stop's handle upward to its open position.
11.
Target the laser beam on the light detector found on the laser receiver.
12.
Position the receiver or laser as needed, so the laser light beam strikes the center of
the receiver detector.
Your laser and receiver should now be functioning as a free-space optical
communications link. If you are using a VCR as the electrical modulation source, and a
video receiver connected to a television, you should now see a picture on the television.
- 13 -
TROUBLESHOOTING
No Laser Light Output
•
Is the ON/OFF switch in the ON position?
•
Is the 110 (220) VAC-to-VDC power adapter plugged into the laser and an
appropriate wall outlet or extension cord?
•
Is there power to the wall outlet?
•
Is the pilot light on?
•
Is the mechanical beam stop in its open position?
No Modulation from Receiver
•
Is the laser beam positioned properly so its beam hits the receiver detector?
•
If you are using an analog or digital input jack, is it properly connected, including a
"ground" connection?
•
Are input signals to the laser of sufficient amplitude? (See analog and digital
portions in the Electrical section of this manual.)
•
Slowly move the receiver detector out of the path of the laser beam while
continuously monitoring receiver operation. This would desensitize the receiver in
case the receiver is too sensitive for this laser [saturating the receiver element].)
•
Check the troubleshooting section in your laser receiver manual.
Do not attempt to troubleshoot the laser beyond the steps listed above. If all your
connections are correct, and you are confident that power is being supplied to the laser and
any input devices, please return the laser for appropriate inspection/servicing to Industrial
Fiber Optics, as described in the section entitled SERVICE AND MAINTENANCE .
- 14 -
SERVICE AND MAINTENANCE
Periodic maintenance and service of this laser are not required. The warranty will be
voided if entry has been made to the laser housing and/or have been removed.
In the unlikely event this laser malfunctions and you wish to have it repaired, please
do the following:
•
In writing, describe the problem, person to contact, phone number, and return
address.
•
Carefully pack the laser, power adapter, manual, and written description in a stout
box with sufficient packing material to prevent damage in shipment.
•
Ship the package to:
I NDUSTRIAL F IBER O PTICS
627 South 48th Street, Suite 100
Tempe, AZ 85281
USA
- 15 -
WARRANTY
Industrial Fiber Optics lasers are warranted against defects in materials and
workmanship for 4 years. The warranty will be voided if the laser components have been
damaged or mishandled by the buyer, including entry to the laser housing and / or removal
of screws.
Industrial Fiber Optics' warranty liability is limited to repair or replacement of any
defective unit at the company's facilities, and does not include attendant or consequential
damages. Repair or replacement may be made only after failure analysis at the factory.
Authorized warranty repairs are made at no charge, and are guaranteed for the balance of
the original warranty.
Industrial Fiber Optics will pay the return freight and insurance charges for warranty
repair within the continental United States by United Parcel Service or Parcel Post. Any
other delivery means must be paid for by the customer.
The costs of return shipments for lasers no longer under warranty must be paid by the
customer. If an item is not under warranty, repairs will not be undertaken until the cost of
such repairs has been approved, in writing, by the customer. Typical repair costs range
from $25 - $125 and usually take two to three weeks to complete.
When returning items for analysis and possible repair, please do the following:
•
In a letter, describe the problem, person to contact, phone number, and return
address.
•
Pack the laser, power adapter, manual, and letter carefully in a strong box with
adequate packing material, to prevent damage in shipment.
•
Ship the package to:
I NDUSTRIAL F IBER O PTICS
627 South 48th Street, Suite 100
Tempe, AZ 85281
USA
- 16 -
SHIPMENT DAMAGE CLAIMS
If damage to an Industrial Fiber Optics product should occur during shipping, it is
imperative that it be reported immediately, both to the carrier and the distributor or
salesperson from whom the item was purchased. DO NOT CONTACT INDUSTRIAL
FIBER OPTICS.
Time is of the essence because damage claims submitted more than five days after
delivery may not be honored. If damage has occurred during shipment, please do the
following:
•
Make a note of the carrier company; the name of the carrier employee; the date;
and the time of the delivery.
•
Keep all packing material.
•
In writing, describe the nature of damage to the product.
•
In cases of severe damage, do not attempt to use the product (including attaching it
to a power source).
•
Notify the carrier immediately of any damaged product.
•
Notify the distributor from whom the purchase was made.
------------------------------
- 17 -
120205
•
Lasers produce a very intense beam of light. Treat them with respect. Most
educational lasers have an output of less than 3 milliwatts, and will not harm the
skin.
•
Never look into the laser aperture while the laser is turned on! PERMANENT
EYE DAMAGE COULD RESULT .
•
Never stare into the oncoming beam. Never use magnifiers (such as binoculars or
telescopes) to look at the beam as it travels—or when it strikes a surface.
•
Never point a laser at anyone's eyes or face, no matter how far away they are.
•
When using a laser in the classroom or laboratory, always use a beam stop, or
project the beam to areas which people won't enter or pass through.
•
Never leave a laser unattended while it is turned on—and always unplug it when
it's not actually being used.
•
Remove all shiny objects from the area in which you will be working. This
includes rings, watches, metal bands, tools, and glass. Reflections from the beam
can be nearly as intense as the beam itself.
•
Never disassemble or try to adjust the laser's internal components. Electric shock
could result.
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