high fidelity magazine june 1956
ify.
I Ai
1i Ijj
1.
AGAZINE FOR MUSIC LIST ENERS
1
A
DISCOGRAPHY BY
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for connoisseurs.
Authentic High Fidelity by Jensen
The man who owns a Jensen Imperial takes it for granted that his loudspeaker has all of the
acoustical perfection possible to achieve with the latest science and engineering. Seeking all of
the finer things of life, he has a natural appreciation for the complete authenticity and blending
of sound ... the subtle separation of instruments ... the sheer realism that uniquely characterizes
the Imperial. He is the man who has bought a loudspeaker for the utmost exhilaration and delight
that great music can give when it is a truly great repeat performance with authentic high fidelity
by Jensen.
A Jensen Imperial is an indulgence in excitement. Do you dare to contemplate this luxury?
In selected Mahogany $525.00. Satin Korina blonde $535oo.
JENSEN MANUFACTURING COMPANY
6801 S.
Laramie, Chicago 38, Illinois
JUNE 1955
IN
Division of The Muter Company
CANADA: Copper Wire Products, Ltd., Licensee
I
PICKER IN G
.e
cartridges
models
ie .AsLf//Gezh#
,96l...
WUPhYiVdtee
240
they are sold separately for all standard arms or
mounted back -to -back to make up the famous
PICKERIíNG 260 TURNOVER PICKUP.
The 220 and 240 are engineered to
maximize performance. By comparison they
are without equal ...
MODEL 220 -for 78 rpm records
diamond or sapphire stylus
The
Lighter- 5'/2 grams
Smaller-5/a by 3/4 by
MODEL 240-for 331
and 45 rpm records
diamond stylus only
The
-
inches
220 and 240
haue
characteristics have real meaning to those who understand that
maximum performance depends upon components which meet professional
standards. If you want the best that high fidelity can offer, ask your dealer
to demonstrate the 220, 210 end 260 Pickering cartridges .. .
7 hese
Já/r/A cceglo
glom, r[dl/lJo ger.y/VddeCti
/[C /rto-
PICKERING and corapatng incorporated
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..
----
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--
Ocearrt8ide, L. I., Nero York
-.
PICKERING COMPONENTS ARE PROFESSIONAL QUALITY
dG
fG ado-
.. Demonstrated and sold by Leading Radio Parts Distsibufrets
2
3/8
Highest Output -30 millivolts/10cm /sec.
More Compliance with Less Tracking Force
Lower Overall Distortion
Less Moving Mass
Wider Frequency Response
Mu -Metal Shielding for Less Hum
MODEL 260 -turnover
cartridge for 78 or 331/2
and 45 rpm records
(the MO and 240
back -to -bock)
0
220 and 240 are
CCG'lZ
tea
everywhere. For the one nearest you and for detailed literature; write Dept. H -7
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
P
High 3idelity
T H E
M A G A Z I N E
The Cover. To nearly every one of us, no
doubt, has come the experience of dreaming, while asleep, the solution of a great
problem, or the creation of a splendid
poem, or some kindred achievement. When
we awake, in most cases, if we recall the
dream- accomplishment at all, it seems nonsense by the light of day. But get this:
Art Director Roy Lindstrom, at home in
bed, dreamt he was in his office, indulging
in witty banwr with his associates. Turning
from thorn (in his dream) he saw lying on
his drawing -board a Chopin cover, which
he had just finished. In case you want to
see exactly the same cover
.. well, your
left hand is touching ir. All he had to do
was copy from memory. He swears this is
.
true.
FOR
Volume
M U
S
I C
L I S
T
E
Number 4
5
N E R
S
June 1955
AUTHORitatively Speaking
4
Noted With Interest
9
Letters
22
As The Editors See It
33
The Triple Life of Dr. Hermann Scherchen,
by Robert Charles Marsh
34
Why should
a
conductor- decorate bis acreage with three recording
studios?
The Day They Almost Got My Number,
This Issue. If you want to get attention.
beat a drum. This expression usually is
used metaphorically, but in the case of
Hermann Scherchen it applies almost
literally. Five years ago he passed out
scores, gave instructions to a pair of drummers and conducted a recording session.
The results were to give some thousands
of listeners a new view of "Papa" Haydn,
to put the naine Westminster ors all collectors' lips, and hugely to increase the fidelity- consciousness of the whole recording
industry. Scherchen became (perhaps along
with Ernest Ansermet) the musician most
beloved of audio-enthusiasts, and his version of the "Military" Symphony a staple
at all audio shows. It wasn't accident, as
Robert Marsh makes clear in the lead
article this time.
by Herbert Kupferberg
A short
37
(but heart -rending) story.
"Baha, Betofen, and Bramsu,"
by George E. Posner and Robert Fink
The fi
is
high
as
38
Fujiya,ua in Old Nippon
The Well- Adjusted Watt, by Irving M. Fried
40
A critical look at amplifiers and amplifier- standards.
Custom Installations
You Meet the Nicest People, But
42
..., by Albert J. Franck
A former record -dealer reveals some of the weirder aspects
44
of the
trade.
Music Makers, by Roland Gelatt
49
Record Section
51 -89
Dialing Your Disks; Building Your Record
Library; Frédéric Chopin: A Discography by Harold Schonberg
Records in Review;
CHARLES FOWLER,
Publisher
JOHN M. CONLY, Editor
ROY H. HOOPES, JR., Managing Editor
ROY
F.
Associate Editors
ALLISON
FRANK R. WRIGHT
Art Director
Editorial Assistants
Miriam D Manning, Cora R. Hoopes
ROLAND GELATT, Nein York Editor
Contributing Editors
ROY LINDSTROM,
C. G. BURKE
JAMES G. DEANE
JAMES HINTON, JR.
MANSFIELD E. PICKETT, Director of
Advertising Sales
WARREN B. SYER, BUSU,ejS Manager
CHRISTINE KORTE, Circulation Manager
New York:
Telephone:
Room 600, 6 East 39th Street.
Murray Hill 5-6332. Fred C. Michalove, Eastern
Manager.- Chicago: John R. Rutherford and Assoc ates, 230 East Ohio SI, Chicago, III Telephone:
Whitehall 4 -6715: Loa Angeles: 1052 West 8th
Street. Telephone: Madison 6 -1371. Edward Brand.
Branch Offices
(Advertising only):
West Coast Manager.
FM Antenna Installation, by L. B. F. Carini
.
Tested in the Home
Scott are -C Amplifier; V -M Model 700 Tape Recorder; Sonotone IP
Cartridges; Browning FM Tuner; Quiet; Lang 151V Speaker System;
The Regency Radio; Collard RC -54 Changer; Pyramid Symphonette
Player.
90
95
The Listeners' Bookshelf, by R. D. Darrell ......
Io6
Audio Forum
I18
Traders' Marketplace
I16
Professional Directory
124
Advertising Index
127
Iligh Fidelity Magazine is published monthly by Audiocom. Inc., at Great Barrington, Mass. Telephone:
Groot Barrington 130o. Editorial, publication, and circulation e1lices t: The Publishing House, Great
Barrington, Mass. Subscriptions: 36.00 per year in the United States rad Canada. Single copies: 50 cents
each. Editorial contributions will he welcomed by the editor. Payment for articles accepted will he arranged
prior to publication. Unsolicited manuscripts should be accompanied by return postage. Entered as
second -class matter April 27, 1951, at the post office at. Great Barrington, Maas., under the act of March 3,
1879. Additional entry at the post office, Pittsfield, Mass. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation. Printed
in the I1. S. A. by the Ben Franklin Press. Pittsfield, Mass. Copyright 1955 by Audiocon,, Inc. The cover
design and contents of High Fidelity magazine arc fully protected by copyrights and must not be reproduced in airy manner.
TUNE 1955
3
www.americanradiohistory.com
THE SOUND OF GENIUS...
AUTHORitatively Speaking
This issue we begin a regular books column, by a man whose name nearly every
record collector knows. He supplies it thus:
Robert) D(onaldson) Darrell acceat
on the first syllable, as in "Roll out the
Darrell." With pride, we roll out the Darrell column: 'Listener's Bookshelf," page
ro6. Born in Newton, Mass., he studied
music at the New England Conservatory
and has been reviewing records and music
books since he was 23. He edited the first
American record magazine (The Phonograph Monthly Review) and compiled the
first discographie volume, the 1936 Gramophone Shop Encyclopedia of Recorded
Music, es well as Schirmer's Guide to
Books on Music and Musicians. He is author of Good Listening (Knopf, 1953;
Mentor, 1955) and of innumerable articles
-
.
-
Harold C. Schonberg, who contributes
our Chopin discography, is a native of
New York, which he calls "my city."
Appropriately, be is a music and record
critic on the New York Times. He is, also,
almost certainly, the only music critic who
has made nine parachute jumps (he was a
paratroop officer during World War II)
and has batted against (and been struck
out by) a Major League pitcher. Schonberg can remember, he says, when the
Astaric B -xo arm and the Cinaudagrapb
woofer-tweeter were the last word in hi -fi.
He owned both. He seriously studied
piano; a great help when he turns his type.
writer on Chopin -interpreters. He is author
of Chamber and Solo Instrument Music,
one of the three volumes of Knopf's Guide
to Long Playing Records (53.5o per
volume), just published.
Two blocks south of Harold Schonberg
works Herbert Kupferberg, who is record reviewer, as well as editorial writer, for the
New York Herald Tribune. He is likewise
a New Yorker "by birth, upbringing, and
inclination." He worked his way into musical writing while a reporter, covering
such events as the Salzburg and Edinburgh
festivals. Kupferberg is married and has a
five- year -old son who, his father reports
sadly, is "supremely indifferent to all forms
of music except the modern music he emits
himself." This pore of pathos is evident
also in our first short story, Kupferberg's
"The Day They Almost Got My Number."
The world's greatest living composer,
Igor Stravinsky, is known to millions for his
breathtaking; compositions. But as brilliant as
Stravinsky the composer, is Stravinsky the
conductor. To hear his music interpreted by the
master is to hear the sound of genius. This unique
experience is offered on many Columbia "Lp"
Records whose quality has been carefully
approved by Stravinsky himself. Igor Stravinsky
has chosen to record exclusively for Columb'.a
Masterworks Records.
COLTIIfIBIA
Recent Columbia Masterworks
"I.p" Records by Igor Stravinsky
include:
Stravinsky:
ML
'histoi re du Soldat$5.95
4964.
Stravinsky
ML
I
:
Symphony
in
we will
C
--
$5.95
4899.
he pleased to send yam
cop) nt the above phot oc raph.
suitable for framing. \frite Colwnbin Records, Room -H, 799 7th
Avenue, N. l'. C.
a
.1
RECO1tDt.S
-. ... rater,
..r _,,,.,rr, t.lr.
Third native New Yorker of the month:
Albert J. Franck, author of "You Meet
the Nicest People, But ...," who was born
in the Yorkville sector and never spoke
English till he went to school
Yorkville
was strictly German then. He got his first
phonograph in 1902, and has been listen-
-
ing to records ever since, not always
happily. He went to work in t921 for the
Edison Diamond Disc Shop in Brooklyn.
On the sly, he made amateur recordings
after hours at the Polonia studios, and projected a method of photographic tape recording, never realized. In 1929 he
organized the International Records Agency,
which he finally disbanded in 1953. IRA,
he is pteuy sure, handled more labels than
any other dealer in the United States, perhaps in the world. Now what he does
mostly, and enjoys best, is traveling, by
rail and air.
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
4
www.americanradiohistory.com
Stephens Patio Enclosures
let you enjoy your Music Out- of -Doors
Seasoned to your taste by Stephens Tru -Sonic quality
speakers, these patio enclosures serve up your high fidelity
in grand style. Imagine relaxing amid the cool breezes of
your terrace or fragrance of your garden -all this and your
favorite music, too, faithfully brought to you by Stephens.
Patio enclosures may be installed under the eaves or
against existing walls.
Model 660 Bass- reflex enclosure with Stephens 12" full range
speaker, 112 FR. 16" wide, 18" high, 10" deep. Shipping Weight
28 lbs.
Net. Complete S67.50
Model 662 Rear horn -loaded enclosure, 291/.2" wide, 201/2" high,
171/2" deep at top. 61/4" deep at bottom.
Complete with 122AX 12" coaxial Stephens speaker. Shipping
Weight 49 lbs.
Net S112.50
Complete with 112FR 12" full range Stephens speaker. Shipping
Net S90.00
Weight 48 lbs.
Model 663 Similar to Model 662 but for larger speakers. 331/4"
wide, 201/4" high, 171/2" deep at top, 61/4" deep at bottom.
Complete with 206AXA 15" coaxial Stephens speaker. Shipping
Net S192.00
Weight 72 lbs.
Complete with I52AX 15" coaxial Stephens speaker. Shipping
Net S147.00
Weight 67 lbs.
Complete with 1021.11 15" full range Stephens speaker. Shipping
Net 5129.00
Weight 68 lbs.
Complete with 101FR 15" full range Stephens speaker. Shipping
Net S117.00
Weight 641/2 lbs.
STEPHENS
RU
STEPI-LENS MANUFACTURING CORPORATION
Culver City, California
8538 Warner Drive
Cable Address: "Morhanex ", Export Address: 458 Broadway, New York 13, N. Y
www.americanradiohistory.com
lII4nfesh
C -8
PROFESSIONAL AUDIO COMPENSATOR and PRE -AMPLIFIER
The beautiful new McIntosh C-8 puts at your fingertips complete
and precise audio control. The ultimate in playback performance is
achieved with five Bass (turnover) and five Treble (de- emphasis) switches
wihch operate independently and cumulatively. Innumerable compensation
settings create fine degrees of sound shading. (Bass switches provide
progressive turnover from 1200 to 280 cycles per second. Treble switches
provide progressive roll -off from 0 to -25 db in 1 or 2 db steps!)
Additional features: separate wide -range bass and treble FINE controls,
a five -program- source selector, a rumble filter, an aural compensator to
preserve correct tone balance at low listening levels. Hear the flawless
reproduction possible with McIntosh uncompromising audio control at
your dealer's.
/,¡0o
Q 50
-
for C -8 less cabinet; C -8M in cabinet illus.
traled, $96.50 (for use w th McIntosh ampli.
fiers); self -powered model C -BP (tens cabinet)
$99.50;
C-PM (with cabinet)
$107.50.
Here's o miracle in music
unbelievable realism and clarity without
listening fatigue. The incomparable McIntosh MC -30 main power
amplifier sets a new standard of performance
GUARANTEES full
30 watts (60 watts peok) of all frequencies 20 to 20,000 cycles. Full
reproduction of the highest and lowest frequencies is assured with
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t/3 % of 30 watts, 1/10% at 15 watts; IM distortion below t/2 %
even at full 60 watts! Inaudible hum level, highest efficiency,
longest life
more plus volues from the exclusive patented McIntosh
Circuit with Unity Coupling'. At your dealer's. $143.50. ,patented
-
-
6
1949.
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
www.americanradiohistory.com
Why
has
litclittosh QUALITY
GREATER
LISTENING
The McIntosh C -8 is the most flexible audio compensator ever devised. It is fundamental to High Fidelity sound reproduction principles, which ore reviewed below.
v4
`i/tt'y
is
compensation, or equalization, for the recording process necessary?
The recording process requires that the loudness of the music over
portions of the sound spectrum be artificially roised or lowered to
get the most on the record. To obtain realism in ploybock results we
must exactly reverse this curve, thus equalizing its effect.
is so
much flexibility necessary?
There ore over 1000 recording companies using various and changing recording
curves. The McIntosh can reproduce any recording curve, present or future. More
important even, is its obility to adjust precisely to vorying room conditions, eor
preferences and speaker characteristics. The vast tonal possibilities of the McIntosh
let you be your own conductor. Weathers, or constant amplitude cartridges can be
switched into the equalizer, if desired, for full compensotion control.
%d the McIntosh easy to operate?
Your ear will quickly get you acquainted with the tonal effects of this flexible instrument.
The switches are large and easily seen. Operation is surprisingly easy and sotisfying.
.q10(4.1 do
ì
know how to set the controls for
a
particular record?
Recommended playback characteristics are often given on the record jacket.
McIntosh supplies o convenient Record Compensation Chart covering 55 record
manufacturers, and giving 32 progressive boss turnover and treble roll -off settings.
elit control settings be
relocated accurately?
The finest degree con be re- located quickly and exactly. Your own
preference, once selected, can be permanently indicated on a McIntosh
label and applied to the record or locket for ready reference.
ea4t
I
connect the McIntosh to my present equipment?
Any system con now be easily altered to professional
standards with the self- powered C -8P. Separate power
supply, 51/2" x 43/4" x 23/a ", allows smaller moin control
unit and prevents any possible induced hum problem.
r1
MORE EASE
IN
INSTALLATION
Versatile back panel features five inputs (can include two
phonograph cartridges), three outputs, equalization
switch for magnetic or amplitude cartridges. Variable load
resistor (1,000 to 100,000 ohms) adjusts for optimum
magnetic cartridge performance. Three AC outlets for
master system on-off feature. Great stability, adequate frequency response and typical McIntosh lowest
distortion
less than .3% at full 4 volts,
20- 20,000 cycles. All controls silently operated.
-
t;
;
rJ
Pioncer Specialists in High Fidelity Amplification
III4ntosh
LABORATORY,
INC.
Send today for details and McIntosh Master
Compensation Chart for fries? playback results.
Binghamton, N. Y.
New York 7, N. Y.
St.,
25
Warren
Division.
Export
322 Water Street
Cable: SIMONTRICt N.
Y.
7
JUNE 1955
www.americanradiohistory.com
Especially...
where
What can be said for the Axiette among high
quality loudspeakers generally, is one thing. But, more
significant is the fact that the Axiette has become the
and who
ideal solution to the limited space problem
hasn't such a problem!
Many would -be high fidelity enthusiasts have
been discouraged by the lack of available space. While
there are smaller tuners and amplifiers, little has been
done to relieve the speaker situation. Most smaller
speakers and enclosures don't quite have `what it takes'
for good high fidelity systems.
The little Axiette has changed this. Used in a
suitable enclosure and operating at normal living room
volume, it is doubtful whether a group of critical listeners
could consistently distinguish between the 8 -inch Axiette
and a costlier, larger system. This listening quality has
never before been achieved in a loudspeaker of such
small proportions.
If you are being denied the enjoyment of high
fidelity because of space limitations, you have the answer
in the Goodmans Axiette ... the good little speaker
...
that was designed to be heard
SPACE
ÍS
L
I
M
I
T
E D
- not seen.
Complete Service Facilities maintained for your convenience
A N S
G O O D
$2320
Slightly Higher
M A D E
I
N
E N G
Sold by Leading Sound Dealers
For Complete Literature write to
ROCKBAR
CORPORATION
LA N D
on West Coast
Dept. GF -2
215 East 37th Street, New York 16, N.Y.
8
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
www.americanradiohistory.com
gee/á
Imodtleit
KNIGHT HIGH FIDELITY COMPONENTS
designed and built to
ALLIED'S specifications
High Fidelity components give
you the most for your money in performing quality, appearance and dependability. These units are designed and built
to ALLIED'S own high specifications by
outstanding makers of hi -fi equipment.
Because these components are offered as
ALLIED'S own private -brand products,
large savings are passed onto you. KNIGHT
quality is backed by an unconditional
guarantee for one full year, and a 15 -day
trial offer with money-back guarantee.
KNIGHT gives you the best Hi -Fi for less.
KNIGHT
Knight "Bantam" Hi -Fi Amplifier
Compect-no cabinet required. Full
The Answer's in the Bristles
We know that many of our readers are
also interested in photography, but we
don't know how many of them read
Modern Photography or of those who
do how many saw the Nuclear Products ad in the February 1955 issue.
One reader read both that ad and our
TITH report on the Nuclear Products
Staticmaster Record Brush and was
puzzled over the difference in prices
quoted in the two places: the ad in
MP gave the price of $12.50 for the
3 -inch brush (advertised for use in
cleaning negatives and slides), while
we said that it costs S 17.85. Our reader was no more puzzled than we, so
we asked for and got what seems to be
a most satisfactory explanation of the
discrepancy in prices: while the two
brushes look alike, the hair in the hi -fi
model is packed more tightly in the
ferrule and is trimmed shorter in order
to reach the bottom of the micro grooves. Also, and more important,
die radioactive element is four times
as powerful as that used in the photographic model.
Run a Loan Library?
Jokes about book borrowers are legion.
It probably won't be long
before there are as many about
record borrowers and, with that in
mind, the far -sighted McKean -Colwell
Co., 400 Madison Avenue, New York
17, N. Y., has announced "record
plates"
little stickers reading "From
." which
the record collection of
can be attached in a jiffy to record
jackets. Size is 4 by r in.: cost, 50
for Si.
Nice idea. we think.
-
.
.
-
Hi -Fi Openings
Ozarkians and their neighbors, please
note: Frank Peters has opened a hi -fi
store at It04 North Jefferson in
Springfield, Mo., offering service as
well as sales.
In Pittsburgh, ar 633 Liberty Ave.,
Lomakin Music is the name of the new
hi -fi shop.
Continued on page
12
12
watts output; response, . .5 db, 2020,000 cps; 3- position record compensation; loudness -volume control; tape
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output impedance. Rich satin gold finish,
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custom panel mount.
93 SX 321. Net only
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Measures only 5'4 x 13iá x 7'F-.
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$32.95
RA//DIO_.,,
(/isNuúL!
a Hi -Fi
music system at lowest
o
auz,
ALLIED RADIO CORP., Dept. 49 -F -5
100 N. Western Ave., Chicago 80, III.
Send FREE 68 -Poge HiH Catalog.
Ship the
following
enclosed
s
Name
Send for FREE
Hi -Fi Catalog
Address
City
zone
State
,
9
www.americanradiohistory.com
Ask Your
Authorized
Fleetwood Dealer
for Free Booklet of
Installation Ideas
or write
CONRAC, INC., Glendora, California
.9
ARIZONA
Camelback Rd., Phoenix
Phone: AMherst 5 -0447
333 E.
ELECTRICAL COMMUNICATION CO.
202 E, Fillmore, Phoenix
2
(Continued)
JULIUS WEIKERS & CO.
NEW YORK
PHIL WOODBURY SOUND
103 Com'I, Emporio
307 Audubon Ave., New York 33
Phone: TOmpkins 7 -2971
1
Phone: 20
MASSACHUSETTS
JERRY FINK CO.
644 Clinton Ave., South, Rochester
LAFAYETTE RADIO
Federal SE, Boston 10
Phone: HUbbard 2 -7850
MICHIGAN
110
SEGEN ELECTRONICS
118 Glen Cove Rd.. Roslyn Heights, L.I.
Phone: ROslyn 3 -4950
5151 Adams, Birmingham
WESTLAB
4 -8494
Commercial Center St., Beverly Hills
Phone: CRestview -4548
TURNTABLE HI -FI
I6 Wes+ Wilshire. Fullerton
Phone: LAmbert S-0811
1
I
HOLLYWOOD ELECTRONICS
7460 Melrose Ave., Hollywood 46
Phone: WEbs+er 3 -8208
FI HOUSE
1320 Cahuenga Blvd., Hollywood 28
Phone: HO 2 -6767
PACIFIC HI
DACKNEY ELECTRONICS
343 E. Marke+ Street, Long Beach 5
Phone: 206 -491
FIGART'S SOUND UN -LTD.
6320 Commodore Sleet Dr., Los Angeles 48
Phone: YO. 6218
HENRY RADIO
W. Olympic Blvd., Los Angeles 64
Phone: BRadshow 2 -1440. ARisona 30518
11240
CUSTOM AUDIO
"STAIRWAY TO SOUND"
4166 Broadway, Oakland
Phone: OLympic 3 -7138
I
HIGH -FIDELITY HOUSE
Phone: ADams 3158
#22, Mountainside
Phone: WEstfield 2 -0310
1021 U.S. Rt.
CUSTOM CLASSICS
13421 Euclid Ave., E. Cleveland
Phone: GL. -4868
LAFAYETTE RADIO CORP.
COUNTERPOINT
Fairview Pork 26
Somerset St., New Brunswick
Phone: CHorter 9 -1900
104
Phone: ED.
BREMY ELECTRONICS
R.S.T. LABS
14511 Granger Rd.. Maple Heights
Phone: MOntrose 2 -3213
394 E. 18th St., Paterson
Phone: LAmber+5 -1191
139
D. HEATER MUSIC CO.
S.W. Morrison, Portland 5
Phone: ATwater 8455
1001
Phone: Plainfield 6-4718
JOHN J. CASEY CO.
PENNSYLVANIA
856 Lincoln Place, Teaneck
Phone: TE. 6-7761
NEW YORK
HI FIDELITY ELECTRONIC SOUND CORP.
368 Montgomery Ave., Morion
Phone: WE. 4- 3404
GR. 3 -6767
-
COMMERCIAL SOUND SYSTEMS, INC.
N. Pearl St., Albany 7
DANBY RADIO CORP.
I
19 South 2I st St., Philadelphia
Phone: Rittenhouse 6 -5686
RADIO ELECTRIC SERVICE CO.
MILAU ELECTRONICS
709 Arch Street, Philadelphia 6
HIGH FIDELITY SOUND STUDIO
412 Fulton Ave., Hempstead, L.I.
Phone: IVanhoe -8160
CONNECTICUT
DAVID DEAN SMITH
METTLER PIANO SHOWROOM
Wesifoir Center, Pos+ Rd., Westport
Phone: Fairfield CLeorwater 9 -8391
GEORGIA
BAKER FIDELITY CORP.
1140 Peachtree St., NE, Atlanta
Phone: EMerson 2156
ILLINOIS
-08 Greenpoint Ave., Long Island City
Phone: Stillwell 6-2730
Western Ave.. Chicago 80
HAymarket -6800
I
ELECTRONIC EXPEDITERS
4
2
TEXAS
CRABTREE'S
2608 Ross Avenue. Dallas
HARVEY RADIO COMPANY, INC.
103
West 43rd St., New York
Phone: JUdson
2
36
-1500
LAFAYETTE RADIO CORP.
100 Sixth Ave., New York
Phone: REctor 2-8600
St., New York
7
hone: CO. 7-0315
SUN RADIO & ELECTRONICS CORP.
650 Sixth Avenue, New York
Phone: ORegon 5 -8600
TERMINAL RADIO CORPORATION
970 First Avenue, New York 22
Phone: PL. 3-7224
Cortlandt St.. New York
Phone: WOrth 4 -331
85
5328 W. Lovers Lane, Dallas
Phone: ELmhurst6477
9
CLIFFORD HERRING SOUND EDUIPT. CO.
W. Lancaster at Burnet Sis., Fart Worth 3
Phone: FO. 4877
GULF COAST ELECTRONICS
LEONARD RADIO, INC.
"AUDIO MART"
Cortlandt
Phone: STerling 5361
TOWN NORTH MUSIC CORP.
VOICE & VISION, INC.
I
234 East St., Memphis
Phone: 36-4501
FEDERATED PURCHASER
SUTTON AUDIO SYSTEMS
I
BLUFF CITY DISTRIBUTING CO.
Phone: Dlgby 9 -4714
THE HI -FI CENTER
2909 W. Devon Ave., Chicago 30
Phone: RO. 4-8640
Walton Place, Chicago
Phone: WHi+eholl 3-1166
44
-5448
TENNESSEE
ARROW AUDIO CENTER
69
ALLIED RADIO CORPORATION
8
1
66 Dey St., New York
Phone: Dlgby 9 -3050
262 Elm Street, New Haven
Phone: UNivesity 5 -1101
Phone: LOmbord 3 -7390
TEN CATE ASSOCIATES
6128 Morton St., Philadelphia
Phone: GErmantown
65 Cortland+ St., New York
83 -6101
3
2128 Caton Ave., Brooklyn
Phone: BUckminster 2 -5300
41
Street, San Bernardino
-6448
L.
West 2nd St., Plainfield
1910 16th St., Sacramento 14
Gllberi 3 -6660
HOLLYWOOD HI -Fl SHOP
I
OREGON
LAFAYETTE RADIO CORP.
ELECTRONIC SUPPLY CORP.
Phone:
Westgate Shopping Center,
20971
THE JABBERWOCK
ISLAND RADIO DISTRIBUTORS, INC.
I
12
1
24 Central Ave., Newark
Phone: MArket 2 -1661
SOUND SHOPPE
53 E.
S
1000 So. Main Street, Dayton 9
FEDERATED PURCHASER
7854 79t11 St., Glendale, L.I.
Phone: EVergreen 6 -1690
I
536 S. Fair Oaks Ave., Pasadena
Phone: RYan I -8171
Phone:
I
CUSTOM ELECTRONICS, INC.
BROOKLYN HI -Fl CENTER
COAST ELECTRONIC SUPPLY CO.
100 N.
2915 Prospect Ave.. Cleveland
Phone: CHerry -5560
Central Ave., E. Orange
Phone: ORange 5 -1927
I
413 29th St., Newport Beach
Phone: HArbor 1444 -W
E
AUDIO CRAFT CO.
I
407 -J
1839
OHIO
185
TALK -O COMMUNICATION
Phone:
2475 Central Ave., Yonxers
Phone: SPencer 9 -6400
WEST MICHIGAN SOUND COMPANY
1932 Peck St.. Muskegon
Phone: 2 -5910
NEW JERSEY
INTERNATIONAL DISTR.
-8248
20
Phone: BRowning 3503
MODERN SOUND
Phone: Midwest
AUDIO SPECIALISTS
Phone: ALpine
CALIFORNIA
KANSAS
7
I
IO
110 Winbern St., Houston 4
Phone: JUstin 1551
1
WASHINGTON
OLYMPIC ENGINEERING CO.
2008 Westlake Ave., Seattle
Phone: ELiot 4650
-
I
UNIVERSITY HI -FI SHOP
41
I
I
University Way, Seattle
5
Phone: ME. 6000
WISCONSIN
THE HI -Fl CENTER, INC.
2630 No. Downer Ave., Milwaukee II
Phone: WOodruff 4 -3344
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
www.americanradiohistory.com
C U S T
O M
T
E
L E
V
I S I
O N
WITH
.
.
.
easy installation tL
-
Whenever you want your television set built
in
in Grandma's old breakfront, a room
divider, the wall or custom installed in any
manner
Fleetwood's the television system
for you. It's designed for custom installation,
designed for convenience, too. Full electronic
remote tuning control lets you tune your set
without ever leaving your chair.
-
The picture's extraordinary, too. It's the sharp.
clear picture usually seen only on TV station
monitors (also built by Fleetwood). Supplies
audio power for your speaker and has high
fidelity output to connect to your sound
system.
Fleetwood readily adapts to U.H.F. Both remote (2 chassis) and non - remote Fleetwood
units are available for 21 ", 24" and 27" picture tubes.
Fine Fleetwood performance is available in
units starting at $199.50. Write for complete
information and name of dealer nearest you.
,3
,.-
91E£LUTOOCL
CUSTOM
TELEVISION
Manufactured by CONRAC, INC., Dept. A, Glendora, California
aud;a -,dee
Export Division: Frazar & Hansen, Ltd., 301 Clay St., San Francisco 11, Calif.
iuNE 1955
II
NOTED WITH INTEREST
Continued from page 9
Edisons At Work
hitolila
THE NEW
HIGH -QUALITY
LOW -COST
FAIRCHILD 255
25 WATT
POWER
AMPLIFIER
As though in direct response to
our "Edison" article, February issue,
British Industries informs us that their
Garrard changers are now equipped
with a spring mounting assembly
which allows the user easily co adjust
the level of the changer (each spring
mounting) from the cop of the unit
plate with an ordinary screwdriver.
And Browning Laboratories has a
new AM shortwave tuner ( See their
ad p. 115) which seems to be just
what the doctor ordered.
Columbia Records, 1954
Here's a mighty twin to Fairchild's
big -power 260 Professional Amplifier.
The new 255 delivers a full 25 watts
of undistorted power for the finest
sound, best reproduction!
This is the ideal power amplifier for
the average home or apartment. The
Fairchild 255 gives you full power
from deepest bass to highest treble,
and an instrument especially designed
for minimum transient distortion as
wel: as lowest IM and harmonic distortion, resulting in exceptionally true
natural sound. Superbly engineered,
the 255 has a controlled frequency
response of +0 to -IA db, from 20
to 20,000 cps.
You can always restore "new amplifier" performance to the Fairchild 255,
even if tubes age unequally, by Fairchild's simple, exclusive distortion cancelling balance control.
COMPACT: Only 6" x 9'h" base and 61/2" high
INPUT IMPEDANCE: 100K
POWER GAIN: 42db
NIGH SENSITIVITY: Less than one volt input required for full output
and it's only teq so
FAIRCHILD 260
50 WATT
When you need full 50 watts of
power, get the Fairchild 260!
This high -power instrument offers
complete stability under all loading
won't ring with most
conditions
-
severe transients! And, thanks to
Fairchild's exclusive distortion-cancelling balance control, you can always
restore "new- amplifier" performance.
only $144.50
/PMENT
Th'CHllß°EQV
10th AVENUE AND 154th STREET, WHITESTONE, NEW YORK
We just received CBS's 1954 Annual
Report, and in the 9 -page chapter devoted to Columbia Records we ran
across a few items which might interest you.
Their single LP "best-sellers" were
orchestral, overwhelmingly: 1st place,
Kostelanetz' Carmen for Orchestra,
and 4th place, his La Traviata for Orchestra. Micropolous and the New
York Philharmonic-Symphony took
znd place with Caucasian Sketches.
3rd, 6th, 7th, 8th, and loth places went
ro Ormandy and The Philadelphia Orchestra for recordings of Capriccio
Espagnol, a Wagner program, Gaité
Parisienne, Les Sylphides, Scheherazade, and Ein Heldenleben, in that
order.
E. Power Biggs' recording of works
by Liszt and Reubke, recorded at
Methuen, Mass., was the only solo
work in the list and it rook 5th place.
Ninth- ranking best- seller was the
Prades Festival (1953) recording of
the Schumann Concerto in A minor
for Cello and Orchestra.
Brubeck topped jazz record sales.
News from Remington Records
As though $2.99 weren't a pretty
darned decent price for a record, Remington announces a reduction to $1.95
for their 12- inchers. In addition, all
their records are now factory- sealed in
polyethylene envelopes.
Apologia
The fine photograph of Wilhelm Furtwängler used in our April issue was by
Continued
12
ont
page 14
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
/
l/ /V74?lZÇti
/
mid dialtata div`!
!.
r
LL
"Which
e
- i
-Kut
urntabl
.i
i
y
e
the RONDINE, the RONDINE Deluxe or the RONDINE Jr. ?"
ln previous years, the question was: "Shall I buy a turntable
or a record changer ?" And about eight months ago we released
an advertised statement in answer to this question. Thus far,
more than 40,000 people have requested reprint copies of
this statement.*
This year, we presented the Rondine
line in Chicago. At the very first showing we knew that we bad passed the
severest test. The acclaim was overwhelming. It exceeded our wildest
hopes and expectations. And the pattern has since been the same ... New
York ... Boston
everywhere. Now
the one question that stands out is:
"Which shall I choose: the Rondine
at $69.95, the Rondine Deluxe at
S119.95 or the Rondine Jr. at $49.95 ?"
...
The RONDINE Deluxe (3- speed)
priced at $119.95 is powered by a hysteresis motor. The speed of a hysteresis
motor is synchronous with the frequency of the line current. Like the
motor of an electric clock (which it resembles in principle only) the speed is
constant and accurate to the split
second. It has the least vibration of any
motor, and therefore, the least rumble.
The Rondine Deluxe represents the very
finest equipment available. It is the indicated choice where the system and
speaker with which it is to be used are
capable of reproducing low frequencies
to below 40 cycles.
:*You may obtain a reprini of: "Shall
I Buy a Turntable or Record
Changer ? ", plus complete Rondine
specifications, by writing Dept, VF -2
The RONDINE 13- speed) priced at
$69.95 is driven by a specially built
4 -pole induction motor. Vibration and
noise have been effectively reduced
through the use of selected motor bearings, dynamically balanced rotors and
perfectly concentric drive pulleys. Each
motor is individually tested for speed
under load conditions, and permanent
compensations arc introduced for accurate timing. Rumble content is so low
that in a system capable of reproducing
40 cycles, it can be detected only with
appreciable bass boost. The Rondine
meets the requirements of most high
quality home systems.
The RONDINE Jr. f2- speed) priced at
$49.95 is driven by the same type of
motor as the Rondine, and what has
been said for the Rondine is equally
applicable here. Where the user can dispense with the 78 rpm record speed, the
Rondine Jr. represents true economy
without the slightest sacrifice in quality
over the Rondine. It is the ideal home
system turntable where there is no accumulated 78 rpm library, and where
future record purchases will be limited
to the modern 331/4 and 45 rpm types.
-
Select the Rek -O -Kut turntable suitable
for your particular needs. For, whether
you choose the Rondine, the Rondine
Deluxe or Rondine Jr., you can expect
rugged, reliable construction and precision performance. You can expect constant, steady motion
freedom from
wow. and flutter and you can be sure
of smooth, quiet operation.
-
-
So certain are we that the speeds, once
set, are critically accurate that we make
no provision for external adjustments
by you
except for occasional maintenance. And we include a built -in strobe
disc capable of revealing as little as
3iotli of 1% speed discrepancy. We
know of no manufacturer who places
greater reliance upon the dependability
of his product.
-
Basically, this is all the result of specialized experience gained over many years
in the service of recording and broadcast studios. It is this store of engineering 'know -how' which bas enabled us
a completely simplified
mechanics in turntable design; to
to develop
streamline every operation with no more
parts than are absolutely essential for
efficient, functional performance. These
efforts have been repaid in enabling us
to achieve greater noise reduction, easier
maintenance and added years of useful
service.
No matter what turntable or record
changer you now use, a Rek -O -Kut
Rondine any one of the three will
make a marked improvement in the performance of your high fidelity system.
-
-
REK -O -KUT COMPANY
Makers of Pine Recording and Playback E4yuipment
Engineered for the Studio
Designed for the Home
38 -01 Queens Boulevard, Long Island City 1, N. Y.
JUNE r955
13
www.americanradiohistory.com
THE EXCEPTION
TO THE RULE
Weathers'
NOTED WITH INTEREST
Continued from page r2
Roger Hauert, of Paris. We deeply
regret chat credit to that artist was inadvertently omitted.
Tape (r)
Three- year -old World Tape Pals is due
a brisk pat on the back for their
achievements in providing a means for
people throughout the world to exchange rapes. They scarred with a
form letter to newspapers in the
main cities in every country which
resulted in obtaining twenty members in six countries. Their roster
now lists nearly one thousand members in forty -six countries. If you're
interested in knowing more about chis
club write ro them at Box 9211.
Dallas, Tex.
Tape (a)
N
OT JL(S/
anther SPEAKER
!
Il
is an integrated acoustical system capable of astounding performance.
.
A Decorator's delight and an Audiophile's
dream come true.
Solid mahogany under all finished surfaces
by master craftsmen.
Full range natural reproduction of sound
"lows" which you feel.
All engineered to produce extraordinary
presence, clean dynamics and transients,
voice reproduction with startling real-
-
;
ism.
All clone by the same technical magic
which produced the world's finest phonograph pickup, the famous WEATHERS
FM 1 -gram pickup.
Try it in your home. It weighs only 45 lbs. and
this package of sound realism is packed into a
space of 8 3/4" deep, 32" long and 26" high!
The price -Audiophile Net $135.00
Ever have a hankering co sit back and
have music without having to listen to
it? .. for hours on end without even
25- minute plops and crashes as records
drop? Background music on cape is
the answer, and Electrosonic Specialties, 723o Clinton Road, Upper Darby
in the form of FideliI, Pa., has it
vox Tapes, which feature pipe organ
music played by Robert Elmore. In 2,
4, 6, and 8 -hour sections, dual crack.
Drop them a line for more information.
Write for full information
Tape (3)
Everyone heard about the Recorded
Tape -of- the -Month Club? Half-hour,
7 -inch reel, recorded ac 71/2 ¡Ps single
track, for $5.95? You pay a $2.co
membership fee which brings you six
monthly preview tapes; you have co
order a minimum of two regular reels
per six -month period; if you order
three, you get a bonus reel free. Or, as
an introduction, send Soc for one Preview tape; no obligation. Write them
at Radio City Station Box 195, New
York City.
Tape (4)
66
E.
Gloucester Pike, Barrington, N. J.
401 Broadway, New York
13,
N. Y.
Anyone interested in a rape-recorded
"Story of Jujitsu "? It has just been
made available by the Institute of Integration (Pyramid, Nev.), which is
something we don't understand since
we thought jujirsu was an orderly
(sometimes disorderly) method of
physical disintegration. Anyway, the
Continued on page 16
14
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
www.americanradiohistory.com
ISince 1935
the Garrard has been
sold and serviced
throughout the United States.
It is recognizod every where
for superior
performance, ruggedness
and reliability.
I
_,
III'fII
J
p11RÙll,,'
,`Ilt
i
.
C
IIIIII IIIi II
CRpFZSMA
?RICE
AND
t on
you wá
s No
wod
SERVICEEAZURES.
Ihts `
It
ñgC1y
h'a{
chan7t
tcotd
éNhY
l
"RIGHTS" and "WRONGS"
of record changer design
(Important In protectleg your records).
RIGHT:
Garrard Precision Pusher Platform...
only record changing device that Insures
positive, gentle handling of records with standard
center toles.
be
WRONG:
"Overhead Bridges"
(es on ordinary changers)
which may damage or dislodge records
ccidentally.
a.
RIGHT:
:Gafford removable and Interchangeable
spindles ... Emily Inserted, accommodate WWI
records, *II sues, as they wore made to be
played; pull out mstantty to facilitate removal or
Records from turntable
WRONG:
ged Spindles (as on ordinary changers)...
ich require ripping records upwards over
talc spindle aroleetior.s after playing
ther Garrard features include: 4 per water
eo rumble, no Induced hum heavy drive daft
ato wows, oo waves
',sighted turntable-
eel action, constant spend
meting switch
silence between scolds
silent eatowatk
top -shuts off after last record; no disturbing
plop"
easy styles weight adJustssaot -proKts Ion.Piaying records
balanced-000atad
tae arm -true tangent tracking
universal shell
fits all popular high fidelity cartridges
Finest Record Chai ger
A Quality Endorsed Product of the BRITISH INDUSTRIES GROUP,
which also includes
WHARFEDALE LOUDSPEAKERS ... designed and built under the personal supervision of G. A. Briggs...world renowned authority on sound. Whorfeaola Loudspeakers
offer the unique construction feature of cloth suspension -a felt buffer between speaker
Dome and cone -and cast chassis.
LEAK TL /10 -High fidelity AMPLIFIER complete with "Point One" REMOTE CONTROL PREAMPLIFIER. Most economical
onom cal amplifier combination ever built by Look.
Harmonic distortion only one tenth of ona percent. Insures flawless reproduction.
EXCLUSIVE FEATURE) Convenient rope recorder jacks (input and output) on front panel
for instantaneous usel
1
R -J
"s
LOUDSPEAKER ENCLOSURES- "Monimum Bass- Minimum Space" Hearing
R -1 Speaker Enclosures have established an entirely new trend in audio
thrilling performance from any loudspeoker. Bookshelf and Floor Models.
WRITE FOR A COPY OF
I"SOUND CRAFTSMANSHIP"
Mail coupon today for a complimentary
copy of "Sound Craftsmanship" 16
pages illustrating and detcribing all
products of the British Industries Group.
BRITISH INDUSTRIES CORP., Dept. HF6 -5
164 Duane Street
New York 13, N. Y.
Please send "Sound Craftsmanship" te:
believing)
design with
-
THE R -J WHARFEDALE... First and only complete R 1 unit) Two great products
the R1 single shell ENCLOSURE and o 'ocelot WHARFEDALE SPEAKER have been
brilliantly matched in this
the definitive combination among compact high
performance speaker,.
...
Name
Address
City.
Zane
State__,
NOTED WITH INTEREST
Continued from page 14
Institute has put a whole bunch of lectures onto tape. If you get the one on
jujitsu (No. 4), you'd better follow up
with No. ro, "The Parts of Man,"
then No. 34, "The Four Degrees of
Integration," thence quickly to No. 6,
"The Fully Integrated Man," and wind
up catching your breath with No. 37,
"The Second Silence."
Thais just five of the forty taped
lectures available from the Institute.
If you're interested, write for their list
and price information.
CANADA'S FIRST HIGH- FIDELITY RADIO,
PHONOGRAPH, RECORD AND TELEVISION CENTRE
stock of Stromberg- Carlson, Fisher, Hatlicrafters,
Concertone, Brociner, Scott, Freed -Eisemann, Sonotone, Electro- Voice,
RCA Victor and General Electric Hi -Fi equipment.
ImmEComplete
-
Prompt attention to mail orders We ship from coast to coast
in Canada, aircargo, express or freight.
Custom Sound and Vision Ltd.
390
Eglinton West
HERE IS
Telephone Hudson
9-21.17
Jazz from Belcourt
Once again the good word is in from
Newport, R. I., that plans are underway for a summer jazz festival.
Naturally, it will be bigger and better
than last year's wbich, according to
one of our men who attended,
was pretty good. This year's festivities
will cake place July r5, t6, and 17, on
Toronto, Ontario
TELEVISION
Belcourt
FOR YOUR
HIGH FIDELITY
SOUND SYSTEM
Designed and custom -built to operate
through your high fidelity amplifier
and speaker system (or independently,
if you wish).
In this way, you enjoy
the VIDEO quality of Tech -Master's
advanced 630 -type design and the
AUDIO quality of your own high
fidelity system.
TECH.MASTER
Designed
GOLD MEDAL
TV
CHASSIS
for use with Home High Fidelity Systems
Illustrated Brothure Upon Request
TECH- MASTER CORPORATION
75 Front Street, Brooklyn 1, N. Y.
16
the grounds of "Be.'court," one of the
largest of Newport's renowned mansions, large enough, in fact, to accommodate io,000 people. Some 150 jazzmen will be on hand including Louis
Armstrong, Count Basie, Duke Ellington, Woody Herman, The Modern
Jazz Quartet, Chet Baker, Louis Bell son, Errol Garner, Coleman Hawkins,
Gerry Mulligan, and Lester Young.
Tickets are being sold now for reserved seats only. If anyone wants
more information, a letter addressed
to The Newport Jazz Festiva], Belcourt, Newport, R. I., should bring the
answers.
Hi -Fi Concert
If Emory Cook will kindly allow us
the use of his trade name we would
like ro report on what is definitely a
"Sound of Our Time." Down in Owing Mills, Md., the Chestnut Ridge
Fire Protection Assn., in an attempt to
raise funds for community fue fighting
Continued cn page r8
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
4''
HARVEY
the House of Audio
The NEW
MAGNECORD
REK -O -KUT
M81 Series
Portable
3- Speed, 12 -inch
TAPE RECORDER
PRECISION TURNTABLES
Represented to be the result of more thon 5 years study, these new record
playback units a
offered as the closest approach to perfection in turntable
performance. like oll Rek -O -Kul units, the turntable it cost Aluminum and
arts no pull on magnetic corlridges.
The following new features have been included:
single selector knob for
setting speed: 331/2, .15 and 78 rpm.
built-in retractable hub for 45 rpm
records-requires no external adopter
permanently affixed 3 -speed strobe
discs for instantaneous speed checking neon pilot light at 'on /off' indicator
special corkneoprene mot material to eliminate retard slippage
re[
tongulor deck to fil conventional record changer boards.
Iwo identical Rondine models are available which differ only in the type
of motor employed.
Rondine Deluee Model 11.12H hysteresis synchronen motor_
Rondine Medal 8 -12 with ¿pole induction motor....
$11 995
79.95
91X1552
M81 -C
M81 -CX
81050
M81 -AC
Concert Series
Electro Dynamic
PHONO CARTRIDGE
j
moll
n.: 1
r,ca<,r 2,
_..
ESL
201M- consists
chassis with
input jack
of an ESl
end output
11.00
Deluxe 3 -Way
Speaker System
WHARFEDALE
Loudspeakers
PILOT
An unusual reproducer system employ
ing recognized high quality components. Consists of Wharfedale WI 5/CS
15" 20 watt woofer, Wharfedale Super
8 /CS /Al 8" mid -ronge loud,pooker,
and the Wharfedale Super 5 cone
tweeter, eleclricolly' isolated and balanced by means of o Wharfedole 3speaker Crossover Network.
The enclosure is built in accordance with acoustical specuficolionc of Briggs,
lomous British designer. Entire front is sand filled for added stiffness and
to eliminate spurious resonances.
The pettormonce of this system will be o distinct revelation. Efficient loading gives clean fundamentals to below 35 cycles Use of similar material
provides smooth response up to the 20,000
all three speakers
(cones)
cycle limlit of the tweeter. Finishes available: Mohogany, Walnut, Fruit
Wood, Blonde on Birch and Maple veneers.
Deluxe 3 -Way Speaker System complete with speakers,
525950
crossover, enclosure and soeciolly treated Bond
'103 W.
Model AF -850
Section employs Armstrong dual cascade,
limiter discriminator circuit. Sensitivity it
better than 1,5 us for 20db quieting. Micro -Meter tuning indicator o
ploys o laboratory-sensitive m
meter, AFC h continuously variable
(to
(torn
complete cutoff to maximum.
Section employs twostege IF
amplifier with selector for either mAM
sharp or broadband AM, plus a 1O1rc
cutoff filler. Tuner hos dual cathode follower output permitting up to 100
feet of interconnecting cable. Power supply is self -contained.
Comploto with tubes_. ........
.........._...._._ .....___...__......_..._..-.._.
The New
GRAY
Viscous -Damped
High Fidelity ARM
Model 108C
Viscous fluid suspension provides outomatic regulation of both the verticol
es groove
and lateral movements of the arm. Improves tracking and minimizes
jumping and skidding. Protects records because arm will not drop suddenly.
Mechoncol resonance is virtually eliminated. Simple stidein feature permits inslont interchange of cartridges. Handles record, up to 16" diameter.
Has adju,rments for viscosity and stylus pressure.
Model 108C .. .................__..-......._......------ - °_..__..--- -..__.... - - - - -$3995
--
HARVEY SHIPS EVERYWHERE. Use this handy coupon
HARVEY RADIO CO.,
Dep, HF -6, 103 W.43rd 5t., Now York 36, N.Y.
Please ship the following
money order for $--- ._._ .....
enclose
check
shipping charges. Unused surplus will be refunded.
New FREE High Fidelity Catalog
Send:
Details of your TIME PAYMENT PLAN
I
Sublect to change without notice
ESTABLISHED 1927
RADIO COMPANY, INC.
43rd Street, New York 36
newly designed broadcast tuner feoing the illuminated Micro -Meter for
greater ease and accuracy in tuning. FM
A
PILOTUNER
RIVEREDGE
HARVEY
for recorder mechonism
(with blower assembly..................-..... .............................__ .._.... _... 62.50
Record /Playback Amplifier in portable cote ....
.... 2465.00
Same os above but leu rose, for rack mounting
.... 225.00
Case only for Record /Playback Amplifies__...
__..
28.00
Recorder Mechanism and Amplifier combination In
portable parrying cos ¿.
870.00
Cose only
AM -FM TUNER
'Briggs' Corner Enclosure
NOTE: Prices Net, F.O.B.. N.Y.0
563500
Recorder Mechanism in portable case
Some os above but leu ran, for rack mounting_._..._... 575.00
New
Designed for use only in high quality pickup arms, the Concert Series Cartridge provides performance in home systems equolled only by the Professional
unit. As with other ESL cortridges, the Concert Series is built
and
D'Arsonvol moving coil. Dynamic moss has been kept to .001 grams , with
unusually high compliance. Frequency response extends from 16 to beyond
30,1000 cycles. Inrermodulption distortion is immeasurably small. Because
of the low output voltage and impedance, a matching step -up transformer
may be required. The output of this transformer feeds directly into the
magnetic phono input of any conventional preampequolizer.
ESL Concert Series diamond stylus only
.53595
Specify .007" or .003 ".
201 transformer mounted on
shielded cable with pin plug
M8 -A
M81 -AX
1
New
ELECTRO-SON IC
Matching Transformer Assembly Model
basic lope Transport mechanism
operates or 15 and 7y," /sec. A switch
is used for speed selection. Other controls are push -button operated. Accommodoles reels up to 101/, ". Frequency
response of 15" /sec. extends from ¿015,000 cycles -2:24b. Employs 3 heads: erase, record and playback. In
'record' position ployback hood serves as monitor.
Separate record and playback amplifiers are available thus permitting simul'
sandout monitoring from lope. Record amplifier has high impedance, unbolced microphone input and unbalanced bridge input. Balanced 50 ohm
mike input and bolancod bridge input available through use of optional
plug'in transformer. Meter is provided for bias, record and playback. Has
cathode follower output. Optional plug -in transformer provides balanced
600 ohm output.
The
NAME. -
JU 2 -1500
- -_..
_.
........
......._.
including estlmated
....,...........,.. _..
ADDRESS
L
JUNE 1955
17
www.americanradiohistory.com
NOTED WITH INTEREST
Continued from page 76
CORNER HORN
LOUDSPEAKER SYSTEM
... the finest creation of Paul W. Klipsch,
fabricated individually under
lais personal supervision.
equipment, sponsored a High Fidelity
Symphony Concert. Tickets were sold
(a dollar per) and programs were
printed saine as for a live concert performance. They used no super-duper
dozen- loud -speaker array wich professional rape machinery, but a simple.
conventional, home -type system -amplifier, turntable, and speaker-system.
all housed in cabinets pleasing co the
eye (so as to "show that hi -fi can have
eye as well as ear appeal ").
This seems to us to be a very practical, well -thought -out program and possibly a precedent for similar groups in
small communities faced with an age
old problem
raising money.
-
-
Hi -Fi Clubs
Write for the trame of your
Klipschorn distributor arra our
latest literature on the Klipscllorn
and Shorthorn speaker systems.
Some of you readers who have success fully organized local audio clubs could
do us a considerable favor if you would
give a helping hand to others who
want to starr clubs in their respective
cities. Just recently we've received
letters from three would -be club starters asking for such information as
how to contact people who might be
interested, what types of programs
should be arranged so as to interest
the greatest number, ecc. True, their
problems would be of local nature co
some degree, but if you could outline
your original plans for getting started
and how you overcame particular obstacles, it would be of great help to
them.
The three people we have in mind
at present are: L. P. Resweber, 300
West Walnut, Bastrop, La. (wants to
organize in Monroe, Li.); Joe
Schwartz, 794o Temple Rd., Philadelphia 33, Pa.; and C. H. Marino, 2299
Rochester Rd., Pittsburgh 37, Pa. As
well as hearing from those who might
have suggestions or workable outlines
for scarring a new club (and we'd like
co have a carbon copy), these gentlemen would also appreciate hearing
from those in their respective communities, or from nearby, who would
be interested in participating in an
audio club.
Schwann Has Moved
KLIPSCH AND ASSOCIATES
HOPE, ARKANSAS
rEtEPttONCS
PRospotl 7.3305
PRospect
PRo.pcct
7,53b
%i575
PRospect 7.55t4
Those of you who get your Schwann
Long Playing Record Catalogues direct
Continued on page 20
-.4
for greatest enjoyment... biggest dollar value!
Let the thrill of true, life -like reproduction of your favorite records
be the guide to selecting your high fidelity equipment. For supreme
listening pleasure, your REGENCY dealer has assembled a special
collection of finest individual components
custom mounted in
beautiful REGENCY cabinets.
Ask to hear this ensemble. You'll understand better why true
fidelity of tone depends upon these two important points:
1. High fidelity requires the finest possible components, suitably
matched.
2. High fidelity must have the speaker separate. Any system with
amplifier, changer and speaker in the same cabinet cannot produce
true fidelity of tone over the full audible range, because of necessary compromise in amplifier design.
At any price you wish to pay- beginning around $185.00
-you can get a REGENCY customized system. Compare
any "all -in- one -cabinet" set with a comparably priced
RECENCY customized system. You'll agree that- dollarfor-dollar -REGENCY customized high fidelity is your best
CUSTOMIZED SYSTEM
...
i
TYPICAL
Components Illustrated here, for example, can be selected for installation in REGENCY -designed custom xobl
net. Cost given is approximate retail price.
REGENCY -designed Cabinet
$
REGENCY Amplifier HFBO
High Fidelity 3 -Speed Record Changer
Two -way Speaker with Enclosure
Approximate Retail price of complete
.
Customised High Fidelity System
.
.
.
.
.
55.95
69.95
51.75
62.50
$240.15
investment.
Write for name of nearest dealer.
REGENCY DIVISION, I.D.E.A., Inc.
7900 PENDLETON PIKE. INDIANAPOLIS 26, INDIANA
Makers of World's Finf All.Tronsirlor Radio
HEATHKIT
NOTED WITH INTEREST
-U,Q'
JI
"BUILD IT YOURSELF"
'
amplifier
kits
HIGH FIDELITY
PREAMPLIFIER
has a frequency response
within L db from l0 em in 100,000 cps. Harmonic di/tordnn
and iutermodulatiott distortion are leas than .5.. nt 5 watts,
and maximum power output is well over 20 watts. A truly outstanding performer. SV-3M tvuùlts of main amtJifer -and
power supply- Shim. Wt.
20
lbs..
Exprene$49.75
Model W -3 consists of W -3M plue WA-P2 Preamplifier lietthis page. Shpg. Wt. 37 lbs., F:xprets$69.50
enlon
l
leaelrl¢!.t
WILLIAMSON
Here is the
complete
preamplifier. Designed
specifically for use with
the Williamson Ty po circuit, it provides equalisation for 1.P. 1t1AA, Are,
and early 79 records, 5
switch- selected inputs
witb individually preset
level controls, separate
Last and treble tone cnnfroh. apecial hula control,
MODEL WA- P2
eta Outstanding in perfor mar a and most attractive in appearance. Fulfills every
requirement for true high fidelity perfornnnte.
$19.75
Snug. Wt. 716%.
TYPE
TRANSFORMER)
YOURSELF
ieettltteit
By now I suppose that any of you who
This dual -chassis high
fidelity graphiter kit provides installation flexibility. It features the
Acroeotntd "ultra-linear"
output Ounsfortner, and
Gtr
(CHICAGO
TYPE
TRANSFORMER)
This hi -fi amplifier is eun-
strneted
on a single
ehuats, thereby affecting
a redue :ion in cwt. Uses
new Ch.eago high
fidelity
output transformer and
provides the Name high performance as Model W -3 lifted above.
An unbeatable dollar value. The lowest price ever quoted for a
convicts. Williamson Type Amplifier circuit.
Model W-1M consists of main amplifier and power supply on
single chassis. Mpg. Wt. 2S ibn., Faprese$39.75
Motel F-1 consists of W-1M plus WA-P2 Pm
amplifier. Shpg. IVt. 35 the., Express only
ea.tl'iezt
WILLIAMSON TYPE
25 WATT AMPLIFIER
COMBINATION
(PEERLESS TRANSFORMER)
W'SM and WA -P2
This latest and most advanced lieenhkit hi -ft
amplifier has all the extras so imMKta t to the
super-critical listener. Featuring ICT -66 tubes,
special Peerless output transformer, unit new circuit desiggn, it offers brilliant performance by any
standard.
Bass response is extended more than a full
octave below other Heelhkit Williamson circuits,
along with higher power output. reduced intermod elation and harmonic distortion. Mt ter phase
aloft characteristics and extended high frequency
response. A new type !silencing circuit makes
balancing easier, and at the some time permits a
closer "dynamic" balance between tubes.
Aside fom these outstanding engineering features, the \V -5 manifests new physical design as well A protective cover fits over
all above-chassis components, forminga moat attractive assembly -suitable for mounting m or out of a rsbùict, ,111 connectors are
brought out to the front chassis apron for convenience of conncetion.
Model W-551 consists of twin Amplifier and power supply on single chassis with prnhective cover. Shpg. Wt. 31 the
Express only..,
Model W-5 consists of W -LM. plus WA-P2 Preamplifier shown ou this page. Shpg. Wt. 39 lbs.
Express only
$ 59.75
$79.50
P,QZGii t
HIGH FIDELITY
20 WATT AMPLIFIER
This pxuticuhr 20 watt Amplifier coinLines high fidelity with economy. Single
chassis construction provider preamplifier,
°'
main amplifier and tower supply function. MODEL A -96
True hi-fi performance ± 1 db, 20 cps to
24000 tie. Preamplifier affords .1 swmteb-selectel compensated inputs.l'ushpull 61.6 tubes used for'surpruingly clean output signal with excellent response characteristics and adequate power reserve. Full tone content actino.
Extremely low cost for roil high fidelity performance. Shpg.
We. 19
A
SUBSIDIARY OF MYSTR0IA, trlC.
lfx.
20114.H7FOR
from the publisher will be interested
to know that they've moved co a new,
and from the size of their catalogue
we would guess larger, location: 137
Newbury St, Boston, Mass.
McIntosh's (same, old) Contest
'featliiCt
WILIIAMSON
{A CROSOUND
Continued from page t 8
_" -
FREE CATALOG AND SCHEMATICS
20
entered the "Name the McIntosh Circuit" contest have either heard that
you won one of their six grand prizes,
or you've decided that the whole thing
was a big hoax, or you're still waiting
very, very patiently for the list of winners to appear. To you in the last two
pcaregories we now bring you the
(bad) word:
tsc Prize: A. B. Kilburn, Chicago;
2nd: John Barberie, Caldwell, N. J.;
3rd: Frank Groeneveld, Jr., Lansing,
Mich.; 4th: William C. Shultz, Milwaukee, Wis.; 5th: O. R. Seidner, Alhambra, Calif.; 6th: John F. Cummins,
Worcester, Mass.
We still don't know what the winning names for the circuit are!
Back Copies
Pat Neels, 1722 Second Ave., New
York 28, will sell his set, complete ro
dare, for $4o prepaid postage.
D. E. McVitrie, 647 Academy Rd.,
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, has
complete set for sale.
Charles Conrard, 418 Four Mile Rd.,
Racine, Wis., will trade copies Nos. 1
through 23 for a magnetic LP cartridge.
S. F. Salerno, 2212 Hudson Blvd.,
Jersey City, N. J., has complete set
through February 1955 for sale.
William A. Murphy, 1227 Cedar
Rd., Ambler, Pa., will ship his complete sec express collect to highest
bidder.
Ralph Libbey, 1222 33rd St., N. W.,
Washington 7, D. C., has a complete
minus "Records in Review"
Set
for highest bidder.
Jack Katzen, rc3o E. Phil -Ellena
Sr., Philadelphia 19, Pa., complete sec
to trade for a piece of hi -fi equipment
of comparable value, preferably amplifier or speaker.
Robert Couchman, Jr., 8r Pesante
Canyon Rd., Salinas, Calif., copies 1
through 8, and to, for sale.
Lloyd C. McGowan, Jr., Box 3732,
Route 1, Imperial, Mo., copies 1 -15.
-
-
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
www.americanradiohistory.com
of a series on what makes one magnetic recording tape
better than another
One
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Full Depth Oxide Coating
Extra Strength
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NO
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PLUS 50
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famous Soundcraft line
brings you a combination of
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cording
SOUNOCRAfI CORPORATION
Tape- newest
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The tape that has EVERYTHING!
in all of its varied subtleties.
Plus 50's uniform output,
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time, added strength and flexibility ... its dimensional stability in any climate. These are
the special qualities that make
it the choice of professionals
and amateurs, alike, wherever
tape perfection is required.
And Soundcraft Plus 50 adds
this special bonus Its "Mylar"
base assures virtually a lifetime
of smooth, trouble -free service
at no more cost per foot than
other quality tapes. Like all
Soundcraft products, Plus 50
is engineered and made by
tape recording specialists. Get
some Soundcraft Plus 50 Tape
at your dealer's today.
:
FOR EVERY SOUND REASON
REEVES
Trade -Mark Tor DuPont Polyester Film
_JUNE
SOUNDCRAFT
CORP.
Dept. F -6, 10 East 52nd Street, New York 22, N. Y.
1955
21
www.americanradiohistory.com
SIR:
correspondent of your magazine,
Mr. G. Fred, scolds you for giving a
forename to a pianist [April x955]. I
do not think chat the magazine does
this: as a contributor I have done it
and am still awaiting Mr. Solomon's
thanks for giving him status.
This pianist has existed for some
years in public as Solomon tout court.
Since a surname alone, in AngloA
American
SYSTEMATIC
&POWTH
-
Start with Quality
add Power and Realism
as
you wish.
With
Bozaks you will enjoy, at every step,
the greatest listening ease your dollar can buy.
Build with Bozak.
The three matched drivers
-Bass, Mid -Range and Treble
combine smoothly into two -way and three -way
speaker systems from the modest B -207A to the
supreme B -310, each peerless in its class.
-
You can build Power and Realism with Bozak Quality,
without the heartaches of scrapping "outgrown"
speakers. the tedious matching and balancing of
incompatible units, and the fruitless tuning of a
resonant enclosure to reduce bass deficiency.
The recommended infinite baffling of Bozak Speakers
preserves their vanishingly-low level of distortion,
perfecticn of transient response and unequalled
balance -over the widest usable frequency and
dynamic ranges available today.
The Very Best in Sound,
THE R. T. BOZAK COMPANY
PLANT
AT:
(fit
WEST
distinguishes
i
el5(.4.:4
POST. ROAD
NORWALK, CONN.
Export Office: Elctranics Monurocturre Export Co., Hid:1,6D, N.V.
MAIL ADDRESS: P.O. BOX 966
with identification among the five
thousand musicians with the same last
name, who might have thought the
pianist presumptuous, almost as if he
called himself The Solomon.
Ar first I dubbed him Thersites, because no one outside of Troilus and
Cressida seemed to use it, but after
someone had told rte that Cumer was
his surname I restored those syllables
CO him.
I put them before the Solomon because no one has ever heard of
a pianist named Clutter.
Now Solomon is a tremendous name
pre -erupted by history for a King who
wrote Proverbs and a fine erotic poem.
The name belongs to that king. I
should feel like a fool and a thief if I
stole it from the unique king to hand
over to a piano player with a publicity
man.
In transactions involving legal paper
the poor devil will need a specific
identity
if he marries, or inherits,
or appears before a Bow Street magistrace for speeding an automobile or an
arpeggio. I have made his identity
specific for such emergencies, and it
n'iusc serve until he himself supplies
something grander, and something
-
Bozak Speaker Systems stand unchallenged for
BOZAK
tradition,
either the uniquely eminent (Washington, Cromwell), a mountebank, or
a clown, I grieved for Mr. Solomon,
who is none of those, and supplied him
DARIEN, CONN.
appropriate.
C. G.
Burke
Sm:
I would like to reply to some of the
letters and queries which have come to
Continued on page 25
22
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
supreme fidelity
NOW
costs 1/9 as much
:
-
'
.
Ì.
1
46 N
AMPEX
600 PORTABLE MAGNETIC TAPE RECORDER
40 to 15,000 cycles response at 71/2 in /sec.
Today the Ampex 600 is a tape recorder in a class by itself.
At $545 it provides a degree of fidelity that is beyond reproach
and it is a modest machine that weighs only 28 pounds.
It is a professional recorder priced within reach of thousands
of critical music listeners and tape recording enthusiasts.
-
this same class of fidelity could only be had by buying
an Ampex 200 for $5200. It was worth its price because it
was the only thing of its kind. It was the first commercial recorder that made radio transcriptions sound like live broadcasts. But the Ampex 200 weighed 250 pounds. Few, if any,
were bought for home use.
The man who has
seen it all
Over 55 db. signal -to -noise rotio
Flutter and wow under 0.25% rms.
Separate record and playback heads to permit
monitoring while recording
Built -in mixing between microphone and line
Prices
AMPEX
-
$498 unmounted, $545 in portable case
620
PORTARLE AMPLIFIE
ÍEAKEI
A companion unit that not only matches the 600 in
portability and appearance, but also in quality as
well. Price is 5149.50 in portable cose.
has this to say:
When
bought the first Ampex Model 200, folks thought
was a goner, springing for $5200.00. But it was a bargain
transcribing my radio program without losing any of the freshness of a live appearance. Some of my records came off the
same tape. could be three places at once. But now here's an
Ampex
can carry with one hand. Records and reproduces
perfectly, but costs little compared with the first one. So hove
-
I
I
I
I
I
a
commercial recording studio wherever
For full information, write today fo Dept.
AMPEX
CORPORATION
F
I
roam."
-18
dgnatu,e of ge,ectto,T ;n U' ou,id
REDWOOD CITY, CALIFORNIA
934 CHARTER STREET
Distributors in principal cities (see your local telephone directory under "Recording
Canadian distribution by Canadian General Electric Company.
Equipment-).
23
JUNI: 1955
www.americanradiohistory.com
It
Has Everythin g t..
Beauty
- Operating Convenience - Quiet Performance
constant -speed operation is obtained with a precision helical gear drive.
This was developed for H. H. SCOTT by
international authority Professor Earle
Buckingham of M. I. T., designer of the
drive mechanism for the Mt. Palomar 200
Quiet,
inch telescope.
FREE
TECHNICAL
BULLETIN
THE NEW
HF 655
STROBOSCOPIC TURNTABLE
The 710 -A incorporates major new contributions to turntable
engineering. These include: dual-stage mechanical and torsional filtering. expanded -scale optical stroboscope. Dynacone vernier speed drive,
integral connection of pickup mounting-board to turntable bearings.
Revolutionary NEW design
Expanded scale optical stroboscope, with electronic peak pulsing
for greatest clarity, is visible even with record in place for exact speed
control at all times.
1.
Precision helical drive gears, of hardened steel and nylon, fut
smooth silent flow of power to turntable. Gears housed in an oil -filled
transmission for quiet trouble -free operation.
2.
High- compliance torsional filtering reduces annoying speed variations, such as wow and flutter, to less than 0.1 %, far below audibility.
3.
4. Dual -stage mechanical filtering between motor and turntable reduces motor rumble to more than 60 db below recording ]cvcl, an outstanding engineering accomplishment.
Integral pickup -arm mounting board, accomodating all
leading pickup arms. is rigidly connected to turntable bearings
by a heavy aluminum casting. This eliminates acoustic feedback and other undesirable vibration differences between pickup arm and turntable.
5.
Prices
b. " Dynacone" speed drive with special long -life neoprene
idlers permits separate adjustments of 331/2, 45, and 78 rpm
speeds by ±5% to match the pitch of accompanying musical
instruments. Convenient push -button selection of each speed
and OFF position.
7. Heavy -duty induction motor, with dynamically balanced rotor and extremely low external hum field, designed specially
for this turntable.
710.A Turntable, finished in stainless steel with mahogany pickuparm mounting board. $702.00'Net
710 -X1 Hand- fnished modern mahogany base for convenient, attractive installation: $14.95' Nef
H. H. SCOTT inc.
`West Coast Prices: 710 -A $107.70
710 -X1 $75.70
385 PUTNAM AVENUE, CAMBRIDGE 39, MASSACHUSETTS
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
LETTERS
Continued from page 22
me after the publication of " Toscanini
on Records" [Dec. 1944, Jan., Feb.
1955).
There was one (and I am happy to
say only one) slip in the dates: the
Rhine Journey recording on LM 1157
is the 1949 version also found in LM
7020, and the 1941 recording released
in M 853 was never transferred. The
reason for this faux pas is that on my
earlier machine the I.M 1 157 recording
sounded rather unpleasant and the
"shire' reprinted the notes from the
old M 853 album liner. I was thus
prepared to succumb to the ambiguity
in Victor's correspondence on the subject. (Usually I caught such slips in
my cross -checking.) To top it off, LM
1157 and LM 6020, although the same
recording, have different timings: LM
t 157 being eight seconds slower than
LM 6020. This clinched the argument
for me, and not until after publication,
and exchanges of letters with Richard
Mohr of Victor and Igor Kipnis of
New York (who pursued this issue
in an admirable fashion) did I realize
that the two recordings were the same.
The mystery now is, how can the same
recording time out ar to:59 (I.M
1157) and 10:51 (LM 6020)? Mohr
doesn't know. I attribute is to the
difference in grooving (but am unconvinced), and I trust you will award
some handsome prize CO the chap who
comes up with the answer.
As for the other letters, nice and
otherwise, I can only repeat that the
dares given are correct, and in the
IValdteu f el (say, on LRY 9000 what
you are hearing is 1945 sound miraculously updated. Similarly, excepting
the 1939 version never released in the
States, there is one and only one
Leonore No. 3 and the differences between the three versions (which are
not inconsiderable) are all due to
fancy Victor laboratory work.
Mr. Rosenthal [March 19551 asks
for a coupling for an LCT 1939 Beethoven Fourth. Easily done. The
Brahms Tragic Overture from the
1937 BBC series, the Rossini Silken
Ladder from 1938, and the thrilling
Italian Woman in Algiers from the
1936 Philharmonic series. All are
wonderful and unobtainable, and as
far as f am concerned, Victor can go
into production post haste. I agree
with Mr. Miller that in every instance
the composer is more important than
Coruinued on next page
JUNr-.
r955
brim:
new features... ne
e
for 1955
Ier1911111Wei.v.,t,ur
CRESTWOOD new model 404 offers high fidelity response.
(30 to 15,000 cycles at 71/2" per second tape speed.) Gives
you crystal clear performance
free from wow. hum and
distortion ... combined with model 402 power amplifier and
speaker makes a two -case portable package
fits nicely
into your hi -fi system and your budget, too!
-
...
Exceptional fidelity (50 to 10,000 cycles at
per second tape speed) is featured in
the new CRESTWOOD 304. New tape transport mechanism and professional type recording heads make the 304 one of the best
values ever offered in a tape recorder
includes internal speaker, microphone, radio and TV connection cable.
71/2"
...
The new CRESTWOOD consoles
move tape recording enjoyment into
a permanent and prominent position
in your living room. den or recreation
room ... instantly ready to record or
reproduce. Extended range dynamic
speakers
fully baffled 'for complete
give you truly
range reproduction
outstanding sound quality ... Choice
-
-
of 300 or 400 Model Series in hand
rubbed cabinets.
B Y
D A Y S T
R
O M
t-
Doyslrom Electric Corp.
Dept.
F -20
753 Main Street, Poughkeepsie, N. Y.
Please send me information and specification
sheets on the new CRESTWOOD models.
Ask for, and insist upon, a
Crestwood demonstration at
your dealer's store -or write
for the address of your nearest Crestwood dealer.
Name
Street.
Town
L
State
J
25
LETTERS
YOU ASKED FOR IT
P
Q`
We took a hint from the automobile people
and based our new tuner design on the
results of a consumer survey. Here's what
you said you wanted, PDQ *.
First, a fine tuner with a fully flexible preamp.
We had the preamp, and built the Pageant around it.
Second, a compact attractive appearance.
We designed a 4 "x141/2" package, so good -looking
it begs to be left in the living room (in or
out of a cabinet).
Third, specifications? Look at the Pageant,
then ask your dealer
or write to us
for full details
PAGEANT
by PEDERSEN
Continued from preceding page
the conductor, Toscanini agrees co that
too, but Victor promotion is another
matter. I suggest he buy his Toscaninis on the "La Voix de Son Maitre'
label, where NBC Symphony comes at
first, in large caps, and below, in rather
small type " direction: Arturo Toscanini.. Mr. J. H. Christiansen of
Dominicana, has asked about my remarks on the Brahms Fourth. I confess
I was talking more of Toscanini's concept of the work as I have experienced
it in a series of performances than a
specific disk, although I still feel that
the recording is distinguished, even
though it preserves a performance that
is now overrefined, and a little too
brilliant and slick ro get to the heart
of the matter. As for my remarks on
"Viennese" style, let me say that it was
a style, nor a place, or an orchestra,
or a given conductor that I was
talking about. I have heard good
"Viennese" performances in Chicago
( under Fritz Busch) , and 1 am sure
that Artur Rodzinski is capable of delivering most un- Viennese readings in
Vienna.
My thanks go to all who wrote, and
I am sorry that my obligations to the
University of Cambridge prevented
me from sending personal letters to
everyone, but I have been hard pressed
for time this term.
Robert Charles Marsh,
Trinity College
Cambridge, England
SIR:
Very nice of you to print my letter
-3
Sensitivity: 3 microvolts for 30 db on FM
microvolts
on AM.
Frequency Response: AM
2 db 20 cps to 7 KC. FM
1/2 db 20 cps to 20 KC. AM whistle filter. Tape,
multiplexing, cathode follower outputs. 17 tubes.
P.O. BOX 572
L
A
F
A
Y
E
T T
E
CALIFORNIA
Pedersen Denotes Quality
soliciting co- operation with Francis F.
Clough [Noted With Interest, April
19551, but I don't think I gave his
address as "England." Denbighshire
is in \Vales and the proud people of
char wonderful country prefer "Great
Britain" on mail addressed to them
from abroad
not "England."
Albert Franck
Richmond Hill, N. Y.
-
SIR:
It seems to me that there is a place for
someone [who can supply] technical
information ro your readers for a fee
the $roo per day kind but
rather somebody who can answer questions on individual problems that are
nor necessarily of general interest.
The problem is this: the practice of
-not
Continued on page 28
26
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
THE NEW PRESTO T -18 TURNTABLE
%ftiL
introducing PRESTO's exclusive flick shift
one sideway flick of the single control
lever...
selects 3 speeds -33'6, 45, 78 rpm
engages and disengages idler wheels
turns motor off and on
PRESTO'S
PRESTO
new streamlined T -18 surpasses even the famous
T -15 in ease of operation
... and
fully matches it in
quality of performance.
The heart of PRESTO'S T-18 is an exclusive 3 -speed shift with
3 idlers mounted on a single movable plate. A sideway flick
of the control lever automatically engages the proper idler for
the desired speed. T -18 eliminates trouble -making arms and
shift cams -assures trouble -free operation indefinitely.
More advantages! Extra heavy weight, wide-bevel, cast aluminum turntable; precision deep -well bearing; center spindle
with built -in adapter for 45 rpm; smart telephone black and
brushed chrome finish.
Your hest huy in hi -fi -only $53.50; with hysteresis motor $108.
Mail this coupon today
gm
rtummummimt
I
I
RECORDING CORPORATION
.
PARAMUS, NEW JERSEY
HIGH FIDELITY SALES DIV
PARAMUS, NEW JERSEY
Please send me illustrative data and specifications on the
new PRESTO T-I8 turntable.
NAME..
ADDRESS
CITY
Export Division:
25 Warren St., New York 7, N. Y.
Instantaneous Recording Service,
42 Lombard St., Toronto
Canadian Division:
WOtLD'S LARGEST MANUFACTURER
PRESTO RECORDING CORPORATION,
OF
PRECISION RECORDING EQUIPMENT AND
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I
ZONESTATE..........._........._..._........._.._.._........_......_..._....._._.._
DISCS
I
www.americanradiohistory.com
_...
LETTERS
r
Continued from page 26
"Superb Performance!"
HIGH FIDELITY Magazine
"planned obsolescence" brings our new
features that we all wish we had. But
no one can afford to keep buying the
stuff as fast as every new feature
high
sensitivity, current feedback, etc.
is
added. They're all interesting, and
many of rltetn could be added to present equipment by the owner if he just
knew how ro do it
Now I wish my sec had better FM
sensitivity so I could pick up some of
Chicago's good music stations but I
simply don't know if it can be done.
I would welcome an opportunity to
present my problem to some sharpie
who could say, "For five dollars I'll tell
you how to get 3 MV sensitivity," or
even say, "Ir can't be done." Then at
least I could stop wondering how to
do it and make plans to get a new
tuner.
Wouldn't some college, for instance,
be glad to direct this stork to some
deserving student? ..
C. C. Fraser
Milwaukee, Wis
--
....
THE
FISHER
SERIES SEVENTY
QUALITY results at an attractive price," says High
Fidelity IWagazine. The. SERIES SEVENTY tuner and amplifier
have established themselves firmly as the outstanding buy in
the professional quality field. The performance of this equipment
is limited only by the calibre of the phonograph pickup, turntable and loudspeaker system used in conjunction with it.
"TICFI
THE FISHIER
FM -AM Tuner
Model 70 -RT
Features txlremt xeuxilimily (1.5 Env for 211 dh of quieting); works where
others fail. Armstrong system, ndjuxiable AFC on :witch, ndjuslablt A \1
selectivity, separate FM and AM front ends. Shielded and shock -mounted main
and subcharsis. Distortion below 0.04%
for I volt output. Hum level: better
than 90 db below 2 volts no radin, better than 62 db below 10 ow input on
phono. 2 inputs. 2 cathode -follower
outputs. Self- powered. Exceptional
phono preamplifier with full equali2atiou facilities. IS tubes. Six control;:
Bass, Treble, Volume, Channel/Phono
Equalization, Tuning and Loudness
Balance. Beautiful control panel. SIZE:
144<i" wide, 3%" high, 9%" deep.
THE FISHER
25 -Watt Amplifier
5184.50
Model 70 -AZ
Offers more titan watts per dollar at its price than any amplifier made.
The 70 -AZ has 2% limes the power of 'basic' 10 -watt units, OUTSTANDING
FEATURES: High output (less than %% distortion at 2S watts;
0.05% at IC
watts.) IM distortion less than 0.5%
at 20 watts; 0.2% at 10 watts. Uniform response ±0.1 db, 20-20,000
cycles; I lh, 10- 50,000 cycles. Power
output constant within I db at 25
watts, 15- 35,000 cycles. Hunt and noise
virtually non -measurable (hotter than
95 db below full output!) Includes
FIST-HER Z -MATIC at no additional
cost, str.E: 4V" X 1434" x 6%" high.
$99.50
Pricey Slightly Higher West of the Rockies
WRITE TODAY FOR COMPLETE SPECIFICATIONS
FISHER RADIO CORP.
28
-
21
-25 44th DRIVE
L. I.
CITY 1, N. Y.
.
Snt:
I rake great pleasure in pointing out
to J. F. I. char be "goofed" in his recent
[April 1955] review of the London
recording of the four Mendelssohn
Overtures (LL 1048).
He erroneously stated that the Fair
rl4elntina Overture, Op. 32, was not
previously recorded. on LP. It was
recorded by both Vox (7440) and
Vanguard (425 ) under the name Die
Schöne lbfelusina Overture.
Daniel Sue-hymn
New York, N. Y.
.
-
"My eagle eye was blinking."
J. F. I.
Silt:
1 am advised that there is an outfit in
New York known as Record Collectors' Exchange, but I don't have their
address. Can you steer me to this or
perhaps better connections?
John C. Peterson
Barstow, Calif.
In the Manhattan Telephone Directory we find listed a Record Collectors' Shop, at 113 West 47th Street;
also we have been informed of the
International Audio & Record Exchange, trou Lexington Avenue,
New York 21. The latter states its
policy as follows: "Three of yours
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
(r2 -inch classicals) for one record
of your choice, in guaranteed mint
condition, cello sealed." Ed.
-
SIR:
would like to announce the organization of the Recordist Society, a club
with the purpose of exchanging tape
recordings of things of music and
I
national interest. We expect to contact
members in Great Britain and France,
so in time our catalogue should be of
international interest.
We are a group of hi -fi enthusiasts
wishing to trade copies of our best
quality capes for the same of others
who have also been bitten by the recording bug. As our plans are now,
the organization will have no membership fees, etc. The only requirement
for membership and the receipt of
items from our listing is the trade of
tape recordings of interest to us.
We will have a regular system of
notifying each member from time to
time as to which tapes are available
for exchange and the methods used in
recording them. For a copy of our
listing, inquiries can be addressed
"Dream Set!"
LIFE Magazine
THE
FISHER
SF,RIES FIF'T'Y
THE FISHER
FM -AM Tuner
Model 50 -R
"This tuner is among the most
sensitive of all in 'fringe' areas
and conjoins beautifully with the
ro mc.
FISHER Amplifier." -Life Magazine. The truest index to the quality of the Model 50 -R is its selection even by FM stations, after
competitive trials, for pickup of
distant programs for rebroadcast
to their own communities. In town.
Robert McHaffey
71 -19 (7th Place
Glendale 27, N. Y.
Sut:
...
Why doesn't someone start a campaign to get London Records to record
at least one or two Gilbert and Sullivan's complete with dialogue? They
should be best sellers among G & S
enthusiasts. With the present fine
quality coming from "ffrr," it would
be just fine to recapture the whole
spirit of these largely satirical operettas, rather than the spate of melodious songs that are the present offering.
There is no sense of plot or continuity.
Surely they would sell as readily as
some of the other truly complete recordings that have been issued, many
with dialogue incomprehensible to
most of us Yankees.
Leslie F. Garrett
Derry, N. H.
or even in the extreme suburbs, the
50 -R is unexcelled.
S 1 61.50
THE FISHER
Master Audio Control
Series 50 -C
-
"The finest unit yet offered."
Radio and 'I'l' A'ee:s 25 choices of
record equalization, outstanding
phono preamplifier, separate bass
and treble tone controls, loudness
balance control, S inputs and 5 input level controls, cathode follower
outputs. Hum and noise inaudible.
Chassis
H'ith rnbisr:
THE FISHER
50 -Watt Amplifier
S89.50
S97.50
Model 50 -AZ
"of the very best! " -Iligh Fidelity Magazine. Will handle 100
watts peak. \5'orld's finest all -triode amplifier. Uniform response
within t db from 5 to 100,000
cycles. Less than i% distortion at
SIR:
50
I'd like to congratulate Paul Sampson
on his article "Hi -Fi Oversimplified-
96 db below
( April 1954).
On glancing through
some back issues, I ventured to read
this masterpiece of expository writing.
Being that am only fourteen years
old, 1 have run up against the problem
of finding somebody of approximately
Continued on next page
every detail. Includes FISHER
Z- MATIC, at no additional cost.
1
watts. Hum and noise content
full output- virtually
non -measurable! Oversize components and quality workmanship in
S159.50
Prirc' Slightly lliaher nest of the Rockies
WRITE TODAY FOR CO>II'I.I'l'li SPECIFICATIONS
FISHER RADIO CORP. 21 -25 44th DRIVE L. I. CITY 1, N. Y.
29
JUNE 1955
www.americanradiohistory.com
LETTERS
irte
Continued from preceding page
ccPí.4o4le4
FOR THE FULLEST ENJOYMENT
OF YOUR HOME MUSIC SYSTEM
FISHER
Model 50 -M
NEW! Electronic mixing or fading of any two signal
sources (such as microphone, phono, radio, etc.) No
insertion loss. Extremely low hum and noise level. High
impedance input; cathode follower output. 12AX7 tube.
Self -powered. Beautiful plastic cabinet.
Only
$19.95
50 -PR
PREAMPLIFIER -EQUALIZER
Professional phono equalization. Separate switches for
HF roll -off and LP turnover; 16 combinations. Handles
any magnetic cartridge. Extremely low hum. Uniform
response, 20 to 20,C00 cycles. Two triode stages. Fully
shielded. Beautiful cabinet. Self- powered.
$22.95
50 -PR -C
PREAMPLIFIER -EQUALIZER
WITH VOLUME CONTROL
50 -PR -C. This unit is identical to the 50-P1t but is
equipped with a volume control to eliminate the need
for a separate audio control chassis. h can be connected
directly to a basic power amplifier and is perfect for a
high quality phonograph at the lowest possible cost.
$23.95
HI -LO FILTER SYSTEM
Model 50 -F
Electronic, sharp cut -of filter system for suppression of
turntable rumble, record scratch and high frequency
with abrolure minimum loss of tonal range.
distortion
Independent switches for high and low frequency cut -off.
Use with any tuner, amplifier, etc.
$29.95
-
PREAMPLIFIER
Model
PR -5
A self -powered unit of excellent quality, yet
t
I`_. r
moderate
cost. Can be used with any low-level magnetic cartridge,
or as a microphone preamplifier. Two triode stages.
'-
High gain. Exclusive feedback circuir permits long output leads. Fully shielded. Uniform response, 20 to 20,000
cycles. The best unit of its type available.
$1 2.57
QUALITY IS NO ACCIDENT
I consider myself quite fortunate in
having my system. I'm running a
Bogen DB -i5, backed by a Pilot AFg24, a Lenco (Bogen) turntable (B53X), etc. My latest pride and joy, a
Pentron PMD -r, 'is receiving almost
constant use by yours truly. It may not
be super fidelity, but I call it mine.
As I have stated, anybody interesred
in hi -fi especially cape, not especially
in California, that can be considered a
teen ager (young-at-hearts excluded)
please contact me via tape at 136 Annandale Road, Pasadena 2, Calif.
David Berkut
ACCESSORIES
MIXER -FADER
my age and interests. If any of your
readers are in the same boar, I'd appreciate hearing from them via tape if
they possibly could.
. . .
At Fisher Radio Corporation we never take ehancee with quality. All materials go first
to the incoming inspection Department And any that du not meet our rigid requirements
Are returned to their manufacturer. In addition. inspection occurs at ninny pnintx
during pradartion
from the original. blank anemia to the final. sasembled unit.
naauring correct Assembly and wiring. Our Tesi Department la staffed with a highly trained group of technicians
Finally, equipment already packed far shipment
is selected nl random and given a complete inspection and electrical test in nu
Enginecring7,aboralories io keep Quality Control at a constant, high level.
-
WRITE TODAY FOR COMPLETE SPECIFICATIONS
FISHER RADIO CORP.
21 -25 44th DRIVE
L. I. CITY 1, N. Y.
..............................,ttuturlunrttnlutuwuurtllulJlllltlUWlllllllllltllllll]Inllltll
SIR:
[Regarding Robert Kotlowitz's review
of Marlene Dietrich at the Café de
. Miss Dietrich
Paris, April 1955}
did record "Lola" (from the Blue
Angel) earlier, I think around 19278, 10 -inch, old speed. "Ich bin die
Fesche Lola," HMV EG 18oz.
Eric Larrabee
New York, N. Y.
.
,
Sir:
Reviewing Early Medieval Music (February 1955), Mr. Grunfeld implies
this music was not created in a vacuum.
I disagree.
Gregorian chant is related to the
rhythms of the Latin language. As
Latin became understood only by the
priesthood, Gregorian became a music
removed from everyday living. If the
average man did not clearly understand
Latin how could he perform a music
derived from Latin?
Perhaps, if the church had allowed
its liturgy to be sung in the vulgar, we
would now have a European music
homophonic like Gregorian deriving
its rhythms from the language of each
European country.
Since the content, style, and manner
of performance could not change by
Church edict there was only one other
modification possible, and it rook five
centuries for this vacuum to spring a
leak -until the interval of a 4th was
discovered.
But music still was in a vacuum of
laws and artificial devices until it received new vitality and meaning in
medieval songs.
Art Faner
Denver, Colo.
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE.
30
www.americanradiohistory.com
SIR:
I have been wondering how many
other readers who have their TV sets
integrated with high fidelity as I do
(Craftsmen & Electro- Voice) have
noted the vast differences in the audio
fidelity of today's live TV programs.
It would seem that CBS has a distinct lead in this department; two
shows which I find outstanding as regards really high fidelity audio are the
Perry Como and Jo Stafford shows received here over WBNS -TV, Columbus, Ohio. Other shows broadcasting
quality audio to a lesser degree are
"Toast of the Town" and "Studio
One," all originating from CBS. Being far from an expert in such matters,
I can only guess that such superb
sound is a result of using as nearly as
possible acoustically perfect studios
and careful attention CO microphone
placement, among other things.
By contrast, most other TV programs vary from just average down to
poor in this respect. It would seem to
me that a worth -while project for all
program producers would be co try to
emulate the Como program in respect
ro audio quality as a companion to
their generally excellent video quality.
James L. Campbell
Lancaster, Ohio
America's TOP Tuner!
THE,
FISH :FLK
FM TUNER F°M
SIR:
Nowadays the record companies are
very thoughtfully printing the name
of the work, artists, etc., on the outer
edge of the jacket so that a person can
find a record without pulling the
jacket out to look at the front
However
. why don't the cornpanics offer new jackets to replace the
older ones that are still in their catalogues? They could offer these at cost
as a service to many who must be in
my position. It would be an invaluable
service and one no one else could offer.
Wouldn't there be a very interested
response to such an offer? They could
offer this service through the dealers
instead of direct to the consumer.
R. M. Allen
Indianola, Miss.
...
.
Sm:
-
.
-
Do you know of anyone who makes
record container
something like
a
a
suitcase, small enough ro be carried
and with a capacity of, say, fifty LPs
which would help me transport my
LPs personally and provide the neces-
-
sary protection they require?
could you help me find one?
... If not,
Antonio Mortena, M.D.
Cincinnati, Ohio
World's Best by LAB Standards
almost two decades we have been producing audio equipment
outstanding quality for the connoisseur and professional
user. In the cavalcade of FISHER products, some have proved to
be years ahead of the industry. THE FISHER FM -80 is just such
a product. Equipped with TWO meters, it will outperform any
existing FM Tuner regardless of price! The FM -80 combines extreme sensitivity, flexibility and micro-accurate tuning. Despite its
full complement of tubes and components, the FM -80 features an
FORof
unusually compact chassis of fine design.
Outstanding Features of
Only $139.50
THE FISHER FM -80
TWO meters: one to indicate sensitivity, one to indicate center-of-channel
Armstrong system, with two IF stages, dual
for micro-accurate tuning.
Full limiting even on signals as weak
limiters and a cascode RF stage.
inputs: 72 ohms and 300 ohms balDual
antenna
as one miuovolt.
Sensitivity: 11/2 microvolts for 20 db of quieting on
anced (exclusive!)
72 -ohm input: 3 microvolts for 20 db of quieting on 300 -ohm input.
Chassis completely shielded and shock -mounted, including tuning condenser, to eliminate microphones, and noise from otherwise accumulated
Variable AFC /Line-Switch, Sensitivity, and
Three controls
dust.
Two bridged
Station Selector PLUS an exclusive Output Level Control.
outputs. Low-impedance, cathode -follower type, permitting output leads
11 tubes.
Dipole antenna supplied. Beautiful,
up to 200 feu.
we1GHr: 15 pounds.
Self-powered.
brushed-brass front panel.
SIZE: 123/4" wide, 4" high, 5W' deep including control knobs.
-
Price Slightly Higher Wort al the Rockte:
WRITE TODAY FOR COMPLETE SPECIFICATIONS
FISHER RADIO CORP.
21 -25
44th
DRIVE
L. I. CITY T,
N. Y.
111I1111W11111111111111111111111111111I111111111111111111111111111111111111111l111111Illllllllllllllll11111.
JUNE 1955
www.americanradiohistory.com
NOW YOURS TO ENJOY
THIS EASY
STEP
STEP
1
2
STEPS
1
AND
2
Model 103C Package of Patrician IV
4 -way Driver Components
Model 115 Klipsch "K" Type
Basic LF Folded Horn
Model 103C -115 Patrician IV
4 -way Utility Speaker System
Use !his simplified way to reach the
ultimate in high fidelity reproduction.
Permits you to build the interior horn
assemblies yourself or add the Model
115 "K" horn, for a complete 4 -way
system. Model 103C includes:
Add this scaled -up "K" type low frequency driver horn to the Model
103C components and you have a
complete new Patrician IV 4 -way
speaker System ready to operate.
4
1
-18WK VLF Driver
2 -A8419 LF Phenolic
2-828HF Drivers
Hornsl
-T25A Treble Driver
1-6H0 Diffraction Horn
-T35 VHF Driver
1
1
-X2635 4 -way Crossover
1-8675 Cable Harness and
-AT37 Level Controls
Total, Audiophile Net
Shipping wt.: 103 lb.
1
3
590.00
60.00
57.00
21.00
33.00
72.00
15.00
$348.00
Components also available individually
Utilizes the Klipsch principle of
folded- corner -horn loading with extended taper rate down to 35 cps for
augmented bass reproduction. Includes integral mid -bass exponential
horn bell drilled to accept E -V Model
A8419 low -frequency horn sections.
Black matte slain. Can be color
painted by user, but will not take
furniture finish. Size 57'/, in. high,
37`/, in. wide, 26'/, in. deep. Shipping
wt.: approx. 150 lb.
Audiophile Net $180.00
All the flawless performance
of the incomparable new
Patrician IV is now available to music lovers in this Utility
-way System. Every engineering advantage of multiple crossovers. specialized driver components and intricate interior
acoustic design is utilized to achieve the utmost in cleanliness.
range and realism.
Frequencies up to 200 cps are handled by the largest. most
highly developed low -bass folded horn driving section ever
designed for a home audio system. Newly created separate
mid -bass section takes over to 600 cps. Specialized treble
driver and diffraction horn reproduces the "presence" range
from 600 to 3500 cps. E -V Super -Sonar lakes over from 3500 cps
to beyond the range of audibility. Level controls provide proper
balance to room acoustics.
Includes Model 103C Driver Components and Model 115 "K"
Type Corner Folded Horn -ready to assemble and operate.
Gives you all parts of the new Patrician IV 4 -way speaker
system, except the outer decorative housing. Size 57% in. high,
37% in. wide, 26' in. deep. Shipping wt.: 256 Ib.
Audiophile Net: $528.00
Write for Bulletin No. 220
o iner Cl
e«e 7htif1
gleerrokze
ELECTRO- VOICE, INC. BUCHANAN, MICHIGAN
Export:
13
East 40th St., New York 16, U.S.A. Cables: Arlab
HIGH FIDELITY SPEAKER SYSTEMS. AMPLIFIERS, MICROPHONES, PHONO- CARTRIDGES, AND OTHER ELECTRO- ACOUSTIC PRODUCTS
AS THE
EDITORS
SINCE APRIL we have been subjected to a gentle but
incessant shower of pages torn from Time, Life, and several
other large -circulation publications. These tearsheets all
have had the same content: a full -page advertisement entitled "Facts and Fiction About High Fidelity." Invariably
the copies of the advertisement have been accompanied by
letters from our readers, urging us to "answer" it, or at least
do something about it.
The advertisement was put forth by the Magnavox Company
sometime advertiser in our own pages, incidentally -and ir embodied, as promised, both fact and fiction.
but a good deal inure of the latter than of the former. In
essence, it amounted to a tirade against custom home music
components, the people who sell them, and the people who
buy them. The public was being gulled, the ad implied, by
"pseudo experts" peddling the theory that custom components represented better dollar- values than ready-made
phonographs and that they delivered better sound. Behind
the sinister growth of this noxious notion, according to the
Magnavox copywriter, were a clique of people not interested ar all in music, but only in "creating sounds that are
often mechanical
noises, incidental to music, which the
musical artist strives ro suppress." For true musical pleasure,
it was made clear, the only proper recourse was to ready made, single -package phonographs. And, in case anyone
couldn't think offhand of a manufacturer producing such
treasurable items, there was a little recapitulation of Magnavox phonograph features, coyly listed under the heading:
"The Facts." Among the facts relevant to Magnavox
phonographs ($99.5o and $198.50) was this one, stated
wich winning modesty: "Nothing finer is ,made, regardless
of price."
We commend the loyal ire of the readers who clipped
this sheet of nonsense and sent it in for our "answer" But
how can we answer, to any practical effect, an advertisement
that ran two months earlier in several multi- million circulation magazines? It takes six weeks -from typewriter to
a monthly like HIGH FIDELITY to deliver
newsstand
itself of an editorial comment. And when it has done so,
the comment reaches -whom? No millions. Just the
55,E or so who buy and read us because they already believe the audio -doctrine we preach. It is probably significant that Magnavox stopped advertising its 5198.50 phonograph in our pages some months ago. There is ground for
the suspicion that our readers were not responding
claim that very few other advertisers can make.
We could, of course, rebut the statements in the offending advertisement point by point. A separate loudspeakerenclosure would perhaps lessen the likelihood of acoustic
feedback, especially if there is any bass reproduction beneath Go cycles per second. Sundry engineering laboratories
have worked their way to the conclusion that the ulthnate
-a
-
SEE IT
in transduction may involve more than a pair of coaxial
cones in a small semi- enclosure. A precisely- machined,
individually adjusted twelve -inch turntable sometimes
rumbles a little less than an economy-priced record -changer.
Diamond styli have been known to outlast sapphires. And
so forth. But you, blessed reader, can enumerate these
points as well and readily as we, so why should we remind
you of them? The people who need to be apprised of
what's what are chose who do not subscribe to HIGH FIDELITY nor its worthy companion publications in the field.
They can be reached, but it would cost money. Magnavox
can reach them, by spending money. We know of no single
maker or proponent of custom componentry likely co be
able to devote comparable sums of money to the task.
In 1812 the young United States undercook a naval war
against Great Britain, employing as the main part of its sea forces private shipowners, authorized ro do battle by letters
of marque. There were some prodigies of valor, and some
privateers made money, but the sea -war was lost. Since
then the nation has relied on a professional Navy, paid for
our of taxes levied on all citizens, with gratifying results.
It seems to us that an industry should prepare its defenses
in the same way. The staff of HIGH FIDELITY might feel
very noble about buying a page in Life to argue with Magnavox on behalf of the components industry, but their
Board of Directors ought properly to fire them if they tried
ir. The same thing applies to most of the member businesses of the industry, which in general are profitable but
small.
On the other hand, we would very willingly indeed pay
membership fees to an organization of businesses in the
the organization -might in a case of this
field, so that it
kind enter the publicity-arena to make the needed rebuttal.
In other words, an effective high fidelity trade association,
of nationwide membership, is overdue.
-
-for
-a
JUNE 1955
IF THE high fidelity components industry is ill -organized
collectively, the American summer music festival business
is even worse organized, festival by festival. In April, introducing a roundup of European musical events, we promised for June a kindred survey of summer music in Amerihe
ca. We hired a capable young man CO compile it
four
do
At
least
top
-ranking
summer
was not able to
so.
music series could not furnish programs and schedules by
mid- April, so we abandoned our plan. We do not complain
out of editorial pique. Summer vacation plans, in many
American homes, are fairly firm by May. If music festival
managements cannot have publicity ready to be used then,
they deserve all the empty seats they will get when summer
J. M. C.
comes. The Old World does it better.
-but
33
f
The triple l i e of ..
HAYDN ON RECORDS
.
Dr. Hermann Scherchen
MODERNS
IN
CONCERT
by Robert Charles Marsh
E LEC T R O ACO UST ICS
IN
THE EUROPEAN concert -goer is likely to think of
Hermann Scherchen primarily as the sponsor of new music,
recalling the many contemporary scores he has introduced
and the manner in which his programs are frequently built
about an enthusiastic performance of one or more fine
works of this century.
The American record collector, on the other hand, may
regard him as the guiding hand behind some of the finer
disks of the older classics in the catalogues. For him, Scherchen may suggest Handel, Haydn, and Beethoven more than
Prokofiev, Ravel, and Berg.
I first encountered Scherchen in the role of the champion
of the contemporary composer. "Selbstverrtdndlich können
Sie meinen Probers beiwohnen," he had written me.* The
concert he was preparing with the London Symphony contained the first performance here of Humphrey Searle's
The Riverrun, a lyric, atmospheric work set to the final
pages of James Joyce's Finnegan's Wake, in which Miss
Jean Sr. Clair delivered with a fine brogue the monologue
of the river Liffey as it merged with the sea. The score includes a thunder machine which the percussionist played
with gusto and sound fanciers might well find irresistible.
British orchestra players are friendly, matey types, accustomed to sight- reading and under -rehearsed concerts, and
generally equal to whatever comes along. Several members
of the ISO had toured the United States with Sir Thomas
Beecham as members of the Royal Philharmonic. (There
is a constant interchange of players among the five symphony orchestras in London.) In the tea breaks I heard all
about it. "Do you know the Carnegie Hall bar? We had
some jolly times in the Carnegie Hall bar. I'd like to go
back, I would."
Like Hindemith, Scherchen is largely self- taught. His
fresh appearance and apparently unlimited vitality suggest
a man many years younger than sixty-four. After rehearsing
the LSO six hours, until it was blue and puffing, he was
equal to prolonged and vigorous conversation, and then
went off to dinner with his wife with a smile and a sense
of undiminished energy, as if the day had been spent quietly
reading scores. He learned conducting the very best way,
as a string player in the Berlin Philharmonic, and was
launched on his career before the 1914 -18 war: indeed, he
was director of the Riga Symphony Orchestra in 1914 at
the age of Twenty -three and spent the war interned in Russia as an enemy alien. He took no chances of having that
*As e matter of course you may attend my rehearsals.
34
SWITZERLAND
sort of thing happen again, and since he had little use for
the Nazis he left Germany in 1932 and assumed direction
of broadcast music for the Swiss radio.
Scherchen's rehearsals are models of efficiency and quiet
mastery of the situation. He is invariably polite nowadays:
( "Would you gentlemen have the kindness ro play that
note louder? Ir must be heard. The music makes no sense
if it is not heard."); he knows the score thoroughly and is
absolutely certain of what he wants ( "Would you have the
kindness ro take the E string of the violin down to D, as is
required by Stravinsky? Please, all the time this is not
done, and it is necessary. You hear? That way it sounds
different. "); although when required he can be forceful:
( "Why do you make a crescendo there? A crescendo there
makes no sense! Always it must be pianissimo nor creeping
up to mezzo- forte. ").
He was not always so polite. Indeed, for many years he
was considered one of the hardest conductors in Europe to
get along with. His reformation seems to have been a
family affair. Not long after the birch of the youngest
Scherchen, his wife, Pia, was bathing the baby. The child
splashed her. Pia laughed. Hermann (who would have
blown his cop) asked why she didn't get annoyed. Because
the little girl didn't know what she was doing, explained
smiling Pia. The lesson percolated. A couple of days later,
at orchestra rehearsal, only three horn- players showed up.
Nothing from Scherchen. Midway in movement one, in
tiptoed Horn No. 4, and sat down. At the first break,
Scherchen said to him: "I'm sorry you were detained."
Nothing more. The orchestra didn't understand, but Scherchen had it all worked our. If the man weren't stupid he'd
know he had co be there on rime, and would have made
arrangements to get there. Since he didn't-why make
him miserable because he was stupid? Scherchen has held
to this moderation ever since, with impressive results.
Although nor one of those conductors who lectures to his
men, Scherchen talks to them a great deal. Some of his remarks are quite illuminating. "Let Ellis be, gentlemen, for
one time entirely right," he said as they began work on
Stravinsky's 1919 suite (he does not like the 1945 version
as well) from the Firebird. "This is so often played, and
yet so often not right. It should be fresh, like the first day
it was played
" Again he returned to the point. "This
must not be so heavy. It must be light and fine, like chamber music." The contrabass solo in the second parr of Pro kofiev's Lieutenant Kije brought a laugh at first. Scherchen
....
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
broke off. "No," he said, it is not a joke. It is a simple
man singing to his girl. He has not much of a voice, but
he is singing as best he can."
Always one is aware of Scherchen's concentration in the
musk. He is no showman and is interested in guiding the
orchestra rather than emoting to impress an audience. As
one would expect from the author of a celebrated treatise
on conducting, his beat is simple, clear, and functional ro
the exclusion of everything else. He uses no baton, but the
point formed by the tips of his thumb and index finger is
easy ro see and gives the men all they need.
Scherchen the conductor is able to ger orchestras to give
him their best even in limited rehearsals, and Scherchen the
musicologist knows exactly what points must be made.
(His analysis of the Beethoven symphonies in The Nature
of M #[tik, London, 1950, is exceptionally interesting.) Thus
in two rehearsals with the choir and orchestra of the Liverpool Philharmonic Society he was able ro achieve a performance of the Beethoven Ninth that brought his series of
guest appearances in that city ro a brilliant conclusion. lc
was the finest reading of the score I had heard in concert
from a European orchestra, and others said that they had
never heard their Philharmonic play so well before.
One would chink from this char afterward Scherchen
would be pleased with his achievement, but he greeted me
with: "The third mov'ement is so difficult. It never goes
right." He knew how he wanted it to be. The next time
would be better.
Normally a successful conductor is happy simply being
a successful conductor, but Scherchen's primary interest
now is audio -research, and he would rather be at work in
his studio than concertizing around Europe. Similarly it is
the technical side of recording that he finds more stimulating than preparing the performance. When I am the
sound engineer," he remarks, "then it is interesting for me.
1 would rather make the tapes than direct the orchestra."
His sound studios at his home at Gravesano in the southern portion of Switzerland, not far from Toscanini's haunts
near Lago Maggiore, are a symbol of his conviction that
only in doing those things which one feels to be important
can the value of life be found. From the time he first began
to direct radio concerts, some twenty-five years ago, Scher chen has thought that the traditional method of searing an
orchestra on a level within the six parallel surfaces formed
by the walls, floor, and ceiling of the room led to a transformation and deformation of the sound of their playing.
A studio designed for the electronic reproduction of sound
should add nothing which it itself produced. His first objective, then, was "liberation from the room," in ocher words,
a studio that was acoustically dead and allowed the engineer
to create with related equipment continuously variable
acoustical conditions so that one could place a recording or
broadcast in a setting appropriate ro the music ro be played.
His first opportunity to work along these lines came in
Palestine in 1938, but the major project in which he is now
engaged had to wait until the end of the war. He moved to
Gravesano in 1953, and his first construction there was a
swimming pool. ( "The neighbors thought I was crazy! ")
After chat the house, a remodeled monastery of impressive
vintage with twelve large rooms and solid stone walls two
JUNE 1955
feet thick was made habitable. Ir now echoes to the sounds
produced by a trio of little Scherchens, ages one, two, and
three, all of whom were born in London. His oldest child,
by a previous marriage, is 35.
Doing his best to ignore the flood of advice from those
who thought he should construct a "classic" studio rather
than experiment with the unconventional, he pur up, near
the house, a building with five walls, no two of them the
same length. Construction was of solid stone blocks nearly
twenty inches thick ( "still the best sound insulating
material of all "). There are no windows, and the interior
space, which is shaped roughly like a small grand piano.
amounts to 500 cubic meters. The ceiling slants downward
from six meters at one end to four at the other, and there
are no parallel surfaces.
The acoustical insulation was designed in co- operation
with Dr. Hans Joachin von Braunmiihl and Professor Willy
Furrer of Bern, who are responsible for the 25o sound
absorbers which line the walls and ceiling. Of two sizes
( 12 and 20 cm. diameter), they are roughly the shape of an
orchestral gong, the open side of which (made of Fiberglas) faces the wall, while the flat side (made of pavatex)
faces our. Those on the ceiling are fixed, but those on the
walls can be removed co alter the characteristics of the
studio at will. Further variation is provided by an acoustical wall which can be erected in the studio to a maximum
length of nine feet. Built up of paravanes of a Swiss composition board, it is designed to reinforce the lower frequencies.
The floors presented a problem. Scherchen wanted acoustical treatment that could be altered as he wished. "I tried
a lot of things," he said, "and didn't like any of them.
Finally I tried the finest Persian carpets. They are perfect!
Now people come into the studio and see the sound absorbers and the fluorescent lights and all over the floor heavy
carpets, and they say 'Is this a new art form?' but it is only
sound insulation!"
The large studio was completed last July and served as
the scene of the International Congress on Music and
Electroacousrics reported in the "London Newsletter" in
HIGH FIDELITY for November 1954. Since then Scherchen
has continued work with his architect, Hoeschule of nearby
Lugano, and put up a second studio of 250 cubic meters
is aware of Scherchen's concentration its she msic.
his heal is simple, clear, ami functional."
He is no showman .
"Always one
n. C. MARSH
35
"About 8o96 of what is played on the air is light music, and
which is acoustically identical with the larger one. A third,
and
the
it is not often well played or wisely selected," he says.
with different characteristics, is under construction,
with
six
Scherchen's concept of light music is slightly unconvenZurich radio has now built a "Scherchen studio"
tional. He means to include all music which is easily underwalls, but without the acoustical treatment of the Gravesano
installation.
stood, employing themes and forms which reveal their
reverberation
In addition to the studios there are four
content at once. Thus, without suggesting that they are not
chambers, each of which contains sound boxes which can
serious and important, he would classify such works as
be opened and closed to increase reverberation or supress
Rossini overtures, the four Bach suites for orchestra, the
normal
factor
is
inof o.8)
it. The first of these (with a
Mozart serenades and divertimentos, etc., as light music, and
(1.5)
for
orchestral
tended for chamber music, the second
items such as Romberg operettas and "symphonic" treatmusic, a third (2.2) for "cathedral effects," and a fourth
ment of popular songs he would dismiss on the grounds
reinforces only the high frequencies. Ac present, tests are
that there was better light music to be heard. Radio music
about
the
the
characteristics
of
of
15o
being made so that
must pay attention to the listening conditions in most
will
available
in
possible
acoustical
combinations
be
many
honkies, the hour at which a given work is to be played, and
table
form.
a convenient
the manner in which it is presented, he feels. For instance,
recordings
made
in
Toscanini
RCA's
Ironically, certain
"The working man comes home at night. He is tired, and
Studio 8 -H have been found the nearest thing available on
when he gets into the house, before he can sic down with
disks to the sound of an orchestra playing in a totally dead
his paper his wife says the child has been bad, and he must
room and are thus ideas for experimentation with the addismack him. He does that, and then sits down to eat and the
tion of resonance. (It must be noted that 8 -H, like many
soup is not good, so he turns on the radio and hopes to find
American studios, did not have parallel walls and was
some pleasure there. In such a mood what music does he
heavily treated acoustically.) In a completely dead studio
want to hear, a Serenata for Oboe and Harp or the Walkürone may have as many musicians as one wishes, since there
renritt?
is no possibility of "saturation" with sound, and theoretical"Obviously the ll!alkiirrenritt. Besides, it would dampen
used,
each
can
line
addas
fifty
microphones
be
ly as many
the sound of the child's crying.
ing a specific amount of resonance to the voice it picks up.
"And when a symphony is announced, how is it done?
Sdherchen's idea is combining music with the technical
We shall now play Mozart's Symphony No. 36 in C major,
the
engineer
to
produce
something
"finer
than
what
of
skill
the "Linz" Symphony, Köchel Verzeichnis 425, the four
was played," music heard with a clarity and brilliance immovements are Adagio e allegro, and so forth. What does
possible in any concert hall. This summer Scherchen plans
any of chis mean ro the ordinary man? The music he can
to record chamber music experimentally with friends. "We
understand, but this type of announcement is without
will be under no pressure," he says. "If we feel like workmeaning. It frightens him and repels him needlessly from
ing, we will work. If we feel like gosomething he is able ro appreciate and
ing swimming, we will go swimming.
enjoy. Instead tell him that for Mozart
his father was next to God, and then
If we want to record at night, then is
when he desired to marry Constanze
when \ve will record." Eventually he
they quarreled, so he took her to Salzwill make orchestral recordings as
well.
burg in hope that he could parch it up,
"I pay for everything myself," he
and, when it came rime to leave, the
adds, "and then I can do as I wish."
breach had only widened. On the way
Those who buy Scherchen recordings
back to Vienna they stopped in Linz,
where Mozart was welcomed as if he
can have the satisfaction of knowing
were a prince and a concert was arthat the royalties go to audio research
rather than Cadillacs. There are three
ranged. Since there was no symphony
objectives in view: (r) to increase
he wrote one with incredible speed. It
our knowledge of acoustics, (2) to
begins slowly, full of all the suffering
gain mastery over the special electrohe felt, and then out bursts all the pure
acoustical problems involved in sound
spiritual joy that nothing could overreproduction, (3) to carry the techcome. Tell him that, and it is all crue,
ERICA. LONDON
nique of recordings, radio, television,
it is nothing that has been made up,
Photogenic
Scherchens:
Mama
Pia with
and film music beyond their present
and he will be ready to listen and unson Nerpi, daughters Manna and Piber
levels into entirely new concepts of
derstand. But Michel Verzeichnis,
realism. The possibilities of the electrical reproduction
adagio, these he does nor need.
of sound have only recently been given the attention they
"And after the concert, tell him, please come back at ten
deserve, Scherchen feels. "This must all be explored. I
o'clock and we shall play you some fine modern music
which you will also enjoy. That too muse be something
write and study like the devil to keep up with it."
which he can understand. If we hear Caruso's high B flac
UNESCO is sponsoring two lecture conferences at
we are thrilled whether the text is obscenity or the Missa
Gravesano in July. The first is on the structure of sound,
while the second is on light music, another of Scherchen's
Solemnis. On the radio we must see it is always something
interests that goes back to his first broadcast concerts.
good.
Continued on page 128
36
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
www.americanradiohistory.com
The day they atmott got my
number
A tragic tale by HERBERT KUPFERBERG
BEFORE 1 tell you the soory of die great failure of my
life, I think you should know a little about me. My naine
is Number Eighteen
No. 18, as I am known most
commonly throughout the record industry. You have, I am
sure, often seen my modest insignia stamped in the back of
record albums. "Inspected by No. c8," it says in a little
circle, indicating that my stamp of approval has been given
to the album and all its contents.
Those of us in the business are very proud of our little
stamps and what they signify. Number Sixteen, who works
at the next bench to me (Seventeen left some years ago for
a job inscribing the day of the week on milk -bottle caps,
and has never been replaced) says he would rather die than
lose his scamp. Poor Number Four actually took his with
him, for he had his tombstone decorated with a circle engraved "Inspected by No. 4."
Some of the newer inspectors, I am sorry to say, have not
yet developed this deep respect for their calling. Number
Sixty -Four, a brash young fellow near the end of the line,
actually sneers at those of us who affix our insignia with
pride, and says he would just as soon be inspecting animal
-or
crackers as records.
I mention these incidents nor co depress you but merely
to show you that our business, too, has its vexations and its
tragedies. As a matter of fact, it has become more difficult
chan ever these last few years because of the advent of the
long-playing record. I could weep when I think of those
carefree, relaxed days of the 78 -rpm records, when all we
had to do before affixing our sramp was to count the disks
in the album. I was only a young inspector then, far back
in the line-Fifty-Three was my number
but well I
remember what a joy is was to make certain there were
four records in Beethoven's Fifth, and that the album cover
was the proper shade of brown, and call it a day.
Nowadays, with the LP records, we have much more co
contend wich. And lately our work has become even more
strenuous, for the newest records, as you know, include not
only a disk and printed material, but also a reproduction of
a work of arc. Ah, my friends, if you only knew how many
weary hours of my own rime I have been forced co spend
at arc museums reading about Vermeer, El Greco, Breughel,
Crivelli, Miro, Dufy, and many others in order co prevent
any errors about them from appearing in albums bearing
the stamp "Inspected by No. 1S"
Yet in spice of my most strenuous efforts, it was the art
works that led co my catastrophe. I had no inkling of what
was coming, because for several weeks my work had progressed particularly smoothly. I had carefully made sure
-
chat all the Van Goghs were included with the recording of
the Bartók Violin Concerto and the Dufys with the Brahms
Violin Concerto, though what difference it would have
made if the two had been reversed I am sure I don't know.
So when I was summoned ro the office of the Chief,
Number One, I thought it was perhaps because he had ar
last decided ro move me up to Number Seventeen's old
spot, or even to shift me co the Cellophane Department,
where I would pass on the sleekness of the outer envelopes
point upon which the Company had lately been putting
great stress.
But alas, is was to be neither of these things. The Chief
was courteous, but he had a slight edge in his voice as he
opened the conversation.
"Eighteen," he said, "how long have you been with us
now ?"
"Forty-three years, sir," I said respectfully. "I was here in
die old hand- winder clays and can well remember when a
stylus was called a needle."
"Quite so, quite so," said the Chief, and his face softened
a bit as he, too, recalled the Old Days. But not for long.
"Eighteen," he said, "serious charges have come up
against you. They involve Biedrich -Dierrich's album of
Phoenician songs. Biedrich -Dietrich himself was just up
here raising the devil about it. Says he is the world's greatest lieder singer and chat he's going to leave us if he's subjected ro this kind of humiliation. Now, Eighteen, I want
you to think carefully and cry to remember just what it was
you put into that album."
The Chief leaned back in his chair while I gathered my
thoughts.
"Actually, Chief," I said, trembling a little, "it's not so
hard to remember as you might think. I know the great
pride the Company takes in Biedrich -Dietrich and in the
Phoenician songs, so I was especially careful."
-a
The Chief nodded noncommittally.
"All right so far, Eighteen," he said. "Go on"
"Well, first of all, I put in the thirty-two page booklet
tracing the history of the Phoenicians and their music. I
knew it was the only brochure of its kind, representing the
results of twelve years' scholarship and research and worth
the price of the set by itself, so I made doubly certain it was
included. Then I saw co it that a strip of cardboard three sixteenths of an inch chick was inserted as backing to prevent the album sides from being crushed. I then rested the
gold lettering on the spine to make sure it was fourteen carat. After that I checked on the translucent plastic enContinued on page 124
velope, scaled at the factory and
JUNE 1955
37
www.americanradiohistory.com
"Baha, Betofen, and Bramsu"
by Cant. George E. Posner and Robert Fink
MOSTLY
Atelancholy, music- lowers (backed by Brubeck album)
suffer soulfully in Tokyo bi -lii and coffee shop.
Nipponese enthusiasts crowd around new turntables
and pickups, some of familiar American appearance.
as a result of reading American magazines and
publications, high fidelity has swept over Japan like one of the
country's seasonal typhoons. A very conservative Tokyo estimate indicates there are several dozen audiophiles in Nippon
to every one in the United States. This may not be true at all,
but it is certainly true that "Hi -Fi" long ago assumed the
aspects of a very busy cult.
Reflections of the current enthusiasm in Japan can best be
phenomeseen in the numerous high fidelity coffee shops
non unique to Tokyo. The names are colorful, such as "Ella
Vaughan," (derived from Ella Fitzgerald and Sarah Vaughan,
both of whom are popular vocalists in Japan) "Le Villon,"
"L'Erude," or "Confectionery West." In general the atmosphere is than of a warm living room. The coffee is rich and the
music is played at the proper loudness. Volume is nor used for
the purpose of drowning our idle chatter. It isn't necessary
since the Japanese are very polite and wouldn't dream of disturbing the music while other listeners are lost in reverie.
Japanese taste in music is broad and varied. The universally
beloved three "B's'- "Baba, Betofen, and Bramsu" rank first
in popularity. " Bramsu" can be stretched to include Mozart,
Bartók, Mendelssohn, Debussy, Schubert, Haydn, Ravel, Prokofiev, Verdi, Puccini, Berlioz, Bernstein, and the rest records put
our by Capitol, RCA, Westminster, et alga, as well as nearly all
the classics.
Jazz is extremely popular. There is a trend toward Dixieland, and Louis Armstrong is as well liked in Japan as he is in
the United Starts. Brubeck, Parker, Gillespie, Braff, Thompson, Krupa, Kenton, and nearly all the modern jazzmen have
their followings among the purple beret and pony -tail ser.
Of the electronic equipment sold in shops, over half is
bought by amateurs with only rudimentary electronic knowledge but possessing a profound appreciation for good music.
The rest of the equipment goes into commercial installations
or is bought as parrs by high- school and college students building installations for privare sale.
Window displays along "electronics row" in Japan present
the appearance of unkempt hock-shops. A .helter-skelter
jumble of equipment in a shop window to the true hobbyist
simply suggests good bargains to be obtained. In Japan this is
important since all buying is on a strictly cash basis. There is
no easy- payment system in Japan. However, in the end a
Japanese buyer like his American counterpart spends just a
little more than he feels he should have spent.
-a
Pi- emporium is heucall, Ella Vaughan coffee -shop,
Goth owned by audio wholesaler Maruyama Kinjiro.
1 ofl li[
.ui
,
,
}lilt<
Tw
T"'"
Refreshment and music counter in the Ella
(Vaughan. .Serving girls, not completely
"hai Jai' oriented, sometimes stealthily turn
down volume at crescendi. At right: No
reverential obeisance, just a close look
al u do-it-yourself television receiver kit.
..IIII
_.. ».
Photographs by
CAPT. GEORGE E. POSNER
U. S. Army Signal Corps.
In Kaada -ku shop, audio and video sets
are piled up to form a veritable maze.
audio - radio - video
Sidewalk
viari seems lo extend very
nearly a whole city block.
www.americanradiohistory.com
No whistle while they work
.
.
.
The VtTell-Atici Watt,
by IRVING M. FRIED
THE job of an amplifier probably is known to everyone.
By high fidelity neophyte or design engineer, more is
known and appreciated about is than about any other part
of the high fidelity system. Speakers will be a terrible
mystery for a long time to come; cartridges are a precarious
subject, tuner "sensitivity" is variable. But as for amplifiers
everyone knows that his amplifier's function is to make
from a tiny, unequalized signal a large electrical jolt, enough
to drive a speaker to distraction, and himself into ecstasy
(or despair ). And everyone knows that amplifier- ratings
are generally concise, and more or less believable. Most
people have at least a talking acquaintance with frequency
response, "power" response, output, stability, distortion, and
price. In other words, there are things one can say about an
amplifier (as opposed to the descriptive material concerning speakers), which are good enough co be reported
honestly by most manufacturers, and which should rather
reliably predict a given amplifier's performance.
However, the interpretation of this information is not,
strictly speaking, an easy matter. The writer, who daily
faces a public eager to buy amplifiers for home use, finds
terrible confusions the rule. For instance, he will be told
by one enthusiast that ro warts are more than enough for
any home, and be assured by the next enthusiast that one
"must" have at least 3o watts. In each case, the writer feels
that there is a basic misunderstanding of the "facts" concerning amplifiers. These "facts" should be of interest to
every home user of an amplifier, since they bear directly on
the question of what kind of amplifier will meet his needs;
and since they may help him keep his treasured amplifier in
a good scare of repair.
How many watts of output power are sufficient for an
amplifier in the typical home? Many articles in technical
journals have indicated that the "power" used in a living
room for music reproduction is measured in thousandths or
hundredths of a watt The articles take their respective
figure, talk about something mysterious called "to db," or
"20 db," or some such number, and arrive at the conclusion
that the home listener will never need more than X number
of warts. By some strange coincidence, the X watt value is
always well below the maximum power output of that
author's favorite circuit -which is invariably a low -output
amplifier. Ocher literature (notably that from the makers
-
kof expensive, plush amplifiers) promises the "full dynamic
range of the orchestra in your living room," if you get
3'0
40
6o
8o watts- (whatever that author
owns or sells). Who is right?
Unhappily, no one is quire sure just how enormous are
the power requirements in the home. Certain "facts" are
known As long ago as 1925, Bell Telephone Laboratories
conducted some basic research on the nature of sound and
its intensity. Certain common sounds were selected from
the myriads that infest the world. These were each investigated and charted on a "profile." The "profile" is a graphical representation of the power (in acoustical, or sound
watts) fluctuation during production of a single characteristic sound, from the lowest part to the "peak" (loudest
requirement) of the sound. It was found, for an example,
that during the production of the letter "h" by a male voice,
there is a very rapid alternation from much sound to very
little sound, in a definite rhythmic pattern
and down
several times. The "average" amount of power used was
very Little, but in some cases the "peak" power was tremendous as compared co the average. A few of the ratios are
given below:
"Average" "Peak"
Male voice
r
40
Snare Drum
r
27
Pipe Organ
r
65o
In other words, to reproduce the full dynamic range of a
pipe organ, the reproducer had to go from one level to one
over 600 times as great, in a very short period of time!
Bell Laboratories concluded, on the basis of 1925 standards, that a respectable reproducing system should have a
dynamic range of 200 -to -I. Today, it is conceivable that
the range would be nearer the 600-to-x figure.
What does this mean to you as prospective amplifier purchaser? First, this is as good a rime as any to talk about
"peak" power ratings as given in amplifier advertisements.
You are familiar with the phrasing: "3o watts, 6o warts
peak." The "peak" power of amplifier ratings is, strictly
speaking, only a different method of racing the amplifier
(instead of using one kind of meter to measure the output
voltage, the manufacturer suddenly shifts to a meter that
reads higher). If you have a 3o -watt amplifier, it stays tbat
it will not suddenly become a 6o -watter on peaks
...
.
...
-up
-
-if
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
40
www.americanradiohistory.com
sane kind of warts. Since the
not advertising, but is trying to clarify, your 30watt amplifier, for purposes of this discussion, is never
more than a 3o- wafter.
Therefore, if we accept the 200 -ro -I power ratio of 1925,
your 3o -watt amplifier can average only 15o milliwarts (.15
watts) of amplifier power (30 divided by 2oo). And, on
the sanie scale, a to -watt amplifier will produce only .o5o
warts' average of power into your speaker.
Since speakers are far from efficient, and since you are
interested in speaker efficiency over the entire audio band
of 20- 20,000 cycles, and since few speakers short of the
S600 full horn -loaded varieties are actually more than 2Çí
of the above
efficient over that range, you can, raking 2
ligures, find that your 3o -watt amplifier will give you
3í 1,000 of a watt in your living room; and your to- wafter
will actually deliver only 1 /I,000 watt of sound!
These figures, beside being stupefying, show the truth in
both of the schools- the low power and the high power.
For these small fractions of a watt are still tolerable in a
you do need a high powered amplifier
living room
to get .003 warts!
Conclusion: If your io -watt amplifier is perfect, giving
to full watts of power over the entire audio spectrum, and
if it stays perfect, you will have just enough undistorted
sound for a typical living (no longer than 15 or 20 feet)
room. But even if your to -watt amplifier is perfect
your living room is a trifle bigger, or if heavily furnished,
or if you have two people listening, or if you want more
than- just a moderate volume level at some rime; your towatt amplifier, frankly, just isn't enough, even by standards
of 1925! Certainly, under no conditions will you have
enough power to reproduce realistically, and without amplifier distortion, "live" FM orchestra broadcasts; also, since
modern LP records have a dynamic range of
I,00o-to -I, you won't be able to play them
much above whisper volume, if you want
realism without substantial distortion.
The writer pointed our in an earlier
article ( "Time for a Check -up," July 1954)
that he had never heard a reproducing system in an average living room which had
what he called "listening ease," unless the
amplifier used was substantially larger than
to warts actual (let us ignore that misleading "peak" power in the ads). For a to -watt
amplifier cannot satisfy the "average" levels
that most audio enthusiasts want, and also
properly reproduce the crescendos. Where an
amplifier ignores the "peak" requirements of
musical instruments, the whole sound becomes strained; the timbre of musical instruments is
changed. This is constantly being reiterated in the writer's
studio- novices characterize the sound of a high- powered
amplifier as contrasted ro a to- watrer in perfect condition
as being "clearer" or "more natural."
The other arguments for higher power in home amplifiers are summarized below. People interested in additional
derails are invited to write to me:
r. This macrer of the "power" curve. Properly speaking,
you keep talking about the
writer
is
-but
-if
JUNE 1955
manufacturer's power-curve on an amplifier should represent the power available all over the frequency range at a
given percent of distortion, say 10). It is no secret in the
profession that the typical "ro -watt amplifier" of moderate
price has no more than a very few watts of low -distortion
power below loo cycles and over 5,000 cycles
very
regions that require boost with most speakers. Many more
expensive and higher powered amplifiers are almost as bad.
Thus, when it was pointed out that a to -watt amplifier
could just squeak through, the writer was discussing the
"perfect" to-watt amplifier, none of which has ever existed,
so far as he knows. A great many 3o -wart amplifiers are
actually to -wart amplifiers at the edges of the audio spec trum.
2. Most amplifiers tend to become erratic in behavior at
or near their power limits. Some become generally unstable; others can he "triggered" into "muddiness" on the
bass end. If you use a larger amplifier, you are generally
assured of being farther away from the "ragged edge"
a
-the
region.
Amplifier output measurements are made into "load"
resistors, of fixed value. A loudspeaker, particularly one
with sharp crossover networks, is a constantly shifting load.
Where the "load" varies, the power delivered must be less
than the rated power (attempts to equalize the power with
variable impedances, ahem, then, must lead to great distortion at certain frequencies). Therefore, your to-wart
amplifier may deliver substantially varying amounts of undistorted power over the audio band.
4. Several laboratories have begun to suspect
though
they don't as yet know the proper way to corroborate
that a higher powered amplifier accelerates the cones of a
speaker system faster than a lower powered one, and decelerates them faster when the electrical impulse is finished
just as a bigger engine gives a car more getaway, and larger brakes faster stopping. If so,
high power is justified as a means of improving what we call "transient response" to
music- just as we know that larger magnets
on the speaker do.
Whichever of these arguments you believe
or disbelieve, the writer has on scores of
occasions noted (along with fellow- listeners) chat, when the to- watrer is replaced by
a 30 -watt amplifier, and when the 3o -watt
amplifier is replaced by a well designed 50or 6o -wart amplifier, the total effect is ro
clean up the sound, making it crisper, better
defined, smoother, more pleasant, and more
natural. To be brutally clear and frank, the
pattern is invariable, even when the speaker
involved is one of the highest quality, highest efficiency,
S600 kind. The contrue exponential horn design
clusion can only be -you "need" the amount of power for
which you cat either afford or are willing to pay.
How important is frequency response? All amplifiers
claim 2o- ro -2,000 cycle response. Some calk about too,000
cycles, and 5 cycles. For purposes of this discussion let us
assume that all amplifiers are actually more or less flat from
Continued on page 3-24
20 -t0- 20,000 cycles. Why do
3.
- -
-
-the
41
iTA STALLßTI:!U!'ll
Since they illustrate a Canadian approach to custom high fidelity,
the installations shown on this page should be of particular interest to our neighbors north of the border. Pictured below is a
complete system designed and installed by Electro -Voice Sound
Systems, of Toronto, Ontario. Television chassis atop speaker
enclosure is swivel -mounted for convenience of restless viewers.
_ ...'aR
The attractively horned turntable at the
right is in the home of William. Doherty
of North Vancouver, British Columbia.
At upper right is Mr. Doherty's amplifier remote control unit (under the
radio). Installation is by "Homecrafts."
1
>
.`::.
.:.;4)..
Shown above is part of an installation made
recently in a Seattle, Washington, home by
the Olympic Engineering Company. Seen
at the left is the corner-table speaker enclosure (speaker is aimed skyward) of
Donald H. Perry of Kansas City, Missouri.
II
II
The installation at right is the work of Dr. 6.
R. Loomis of Lexington, Kentucky. Cabinet is
of cherry wood. The unit was home constructed, as was a matching speaker enclosure.
An
ex -record dealer speaks
You meek th
.
.
nicest people, BUT.
by ALBERT J. FRANCK
WHEN I FIRST consented to write on the subject of
what a record dealer has to endure at the hands of his customers and his suppliers I thought I had the material for a
good humorous discourse. As I went on with the writing,
however, the memory of a chonaand mischances experienced
and impositions suffered reasserted itself, and to write about
only a few of them turned our co be reliving all the bitterness and disgust which attended the original incidents. So,
I write this now for the instruction of those who think,
even for a moment, that they would enjoy participating in
the record business.
It rakes a toughness of fiber with which very few of us
softies essentially worshipers of musical beauty-are
endowed. One has to be able to adjust with equanimity to
despoilment by those who axe stupid, incompetent, indifferent, and dishonest, and ro unindernnifiable losses as, for instance, in my own experience, water damages. I have no
count of the number of times floods descended upon me
(torn floors above, never twice from the same point, and,
once, a plumbing defect brought an inundation up through
the shop floor. It is possible to survive such exasperations,
but the psychological beating one has to take in his daily
dealings with cynically indifferent suppliers, with the screwball fringe of his customers, and with the hirelings of public
and private agencies of all sorts, reduce all but the very
toughest of us to the mental plasticity of beaten beasts of
burden.
So, if you still think you want to go into the record business, read this
and forged it! Believe me, if to err is
human and co forgive divine, wholesalers are the humanest
people and retailers the saintliest.
Being a record dealer is like being the middle man of
three in a bed. One has to keep his suppliers off his neck
on one side and to put up wich customers who range downward from passably normal all the way to plain wacky, on
the ocher. If I were still in business, I would have to keep
all this to myself, but I am nor, largely because I could not
compete successfully against other concerns which, by
means I can only suspect, were able to retail records profitably at prices less than what I had to pay my wholesale
suppliers for the same lines. A babe in the woods! That's
what I was, I guess.
Now, in my rime as a record retailer I had cause, at one
time or another, to cake up arms against the record manufacturers, the record distributors, the Post Office, the Customs Service, the Railway Express, truckmen, landlords,
and, once in a while, the customers, too. The truth of the
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44
matter is, the customer is not always right. lc must not be
assumed, from all this, that I am an extraordinarily bellicose
or irascible character, but there is a limit, and when one
has had to contend with continually recurrent misf&acanres,
malfeasances, and nonfeasances and with perpetually recrudescent outbreaks of sabotage, the milk of human kindness
tends ro coagulate and turn acid. It is indeed a wonder that
a good many more record dealers have not gone screaming,
gibbering mad or have availed themselves of the gas pipe.
Some have.
The young hopeful who has digested the contents of a
few catalogues and has more nerve, and maybe money, than
good sense, usually starts out to be a Record Dealer by importuning a few wholesalers to provide him with token
stocks, a dash of credit, and, of course, "service." He doesn't
know it, but char is, constructively, equivalent to soliciting
permission to blow one's brains, if any, out! The truth of
the matter is that the prime requisites for participation in
the retail record business are (r) a capacity for unlimited
correspondence, (2) patience beyond anything ever recorded in Holy Writ, (3) limitless concurrence with the
opinions of all who harangue one interminably on the telephone, over the counter, or in the sanctuary of one's private
office, and (q) a forty -hour day to ger things half-done
in. That will get the prospective dealer off to a start, of
sorts.
So he is in business, and from there on he becomes a
stranger to his friends. His wife, on those rare occasions
when she gets to see hire by daylight, observes, "Dear, are
you lure you are quite well?" in that tone of voice which
suggests mare concern with one's mental soundness than
his physical health That ìs, at the beginning. later on,
one's ever -loving just looks him over as he shuffles in,
bleary-eyed, haggard and bewhiskered, puts down the
pamphlet on divorce law through which she has been
thumbing, and observes, slighdy acidly, "I imagine you
haven't eaten since you went out the night before last," and
adds, "or was that last week ?"
You chink, maybe, that I'm exaggerating? Ha!
You think you can keep your business life and your home
life insulated from each other? Do justice to both? Don't
you wish it! The records follow you home. So does everything else connected with the business, including the customers who get in by telephone if not by the door. The
stuff is in your living room. It's in the dining room. It's
piled on the piano, on the buffet, in the closets, in cartons
under your bed. Even the cellarecte is not immune to in-
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
vasion. But do you ever ger rime to play records for yourwere available and not restricted, the foreign firm forwarded
self? Hell, beh.
them to the domestic manufacturer who broke bulk and
Maybe, you think, if you hired yourself some help, you
sent the records co your wholesaler who, finally, sent them
might be able ro relax a little. Ah, me! Right about there
on to you. In that way, everybody along the line made a
is where you find out that Uncle Sam, your scare, and the
few pennies and the customer had to pay $2.64 for a record
local authorities have a few jobs for you. Now you have to
he might have imported directly for himself from a foreign
compile statistical data and fill in forms, all in accordance
retailer at a total cost ro himself of only $1.55. What kept
with gobbledygook instructions which have you tearing
him from doing that, however, was Sec. 526 of the Tariff
your hair out in handfuls. Oh, sure, your help relieve you
Act of 1930.
of some of your former burdens. Now you use the rime to
But let's get back to that order for ten records of foreign
do the paper work which comes from having help. So the
manufacture. Four, five, maybe six months have gone by.
help go home at closing time while you stay in the back
( Not unusual! )
Finally, you drop your supplier a card to
room and scribble, far into the night.
ask what's up. You get no answer. Another month or two.
Sure, you're tired, but do you sleep? What's bed for?
No records. You write once more. After all, the customers
You lie awake while your poor brain surveys all the things
are beginning to needle you. Again, no answer. Another
month or two, and you are on the point of writing one last,
you will have to get under way, come morning. In mind,
pleading inquiry when you hit the jackpot. You get
you go over all the problems of short shipments, wrong
thirty copies of the record you wanted only ten of
shipments, damaged shipments, no shipments, bad accounts,
ten for the original order, ten for the first inquiry, and ten
missing stuff, wrong records in the right sleeves or albums,
promotional ideas. Your biggest headaches are the orders
more for the second follow -up.
you gave this, chat, and the other distributor weeks, maybe
Or like this:
months ago. No action! Why?
Like buying a pair of shoes in a box and when you open
it at home you find both shoes are for the left foot, comes
That worry over back orders, by the way, is one of the
a two- record album. It should contain record No. 12345
things which, in the long run, lay the groundwork for
and record No. 12346. You find two No. 123455; no No.
apoplexy. Here is an example:
let's
12346. You negotiate for adjustment. You get, after a
The ABC Record Distributing Corporation,
say.
couple of weeks, a return authorization for one (1) No.
handles N records, O records, and P records. You need
12345. Comes a replacement. It's another No. 12345!
some of each brand. You make up an order. You mail it
All right' Scream your head off about how they are
in. The N records come. The O records are there coo. No
P! Oh, well, you figure, they are on back order. So you
spending your money for you. See what it gars you. Do
wait. The weeks go by, on leaden feet. You drop ABC a
they say send the extras back? Do they give you a credit?
Do they say or do anything? You should live so long! A
card to find out what gives. No answer. In the meantime,
you see P records in other stores. You begin to check,
successful record jobber is one who is totally deaf CO
ABC
to
light.
Record
Distributand the facts come
complaints, protests, expostulations, and remonstrances.
ing Corporation had ceased to carry the P record line.
One cost me the sale of perhaps 20,000 records by
More exactly, the producer of P records had found ABC's
failing to supply me while I objected for over a year
representation less effective than he had expected. He had
co the recurrent appearance on my statement of a
made only half-a- million in the first two weeks; so he took
substantial balance I did not owe. There is absothe line back and put it into DEF Distributing Corporalutely no worse evil in America's distributive systion's hands. DEF handles K records, L records, and M
tems than the establishment of exclusive regional disrecords. Does ABC's sense of dealer-service transcend the
tributorships. The arrangement confers on distriburecords?
A
with
of
P
likely
even
the
producer
tors thus established the power of economic life or death
to
impulse get
no
records
as
P
As
far
as
ABC
is
concerned
such
over the retail dealers, who are left without any alternative
theory!
records ever existed. Interestingly, by the time you have
but to submit to their coercive powers, and these arc absolutely enormous. In ever so many instances the dealer leas
found out that DEF handles them, the impatient producer
only little freedom of choice. Often he is compelled to
may have turned them over to GHI Records, Inc., and so on.
accept the clucks along with the clicks, whether he likes
Now that is nor a special case. That sort of thing goes on
the idea or nor.
all the time. It is just a specimen irritation. One of the
Well, anyway
very largest distributors in this country
Few businesses have ever been so
practically never replies to any dealer
that
Mr.
The
reader
is
reminded
liberally
booby-trapped as the imported
a
parhad
He
inquiries or complaints.
Franck is writing as a forme:
record
In general, the leading
business.
to
with
respect
ticularly cute routine
record dealer, not as a dispassionforeign
lines
could
be imported only
orders for imported records. Say you
ate outside observer of the indusdoubr
try.
We
have
no
reason
to
with
the
through
or
consent of their
wanted ten copies of a certain number.
his word on abuses generated
in
this
country. Sec.
affiliated
houses
He had to pass your order on to the
within the industry, but call to
above,
in
effect, made
526, mentioned
domestic manufacturer who had the
your attention that there may be
exclusive.
rational
the
aspects
to
the
guardian
the U. S. Customs Service
contractual tie -in with the foreign prodistributorship system, for inof certain American monopolies. Whoducer of the brand you wanted. That
stance, that he does not discuss.
ever undertook to import records of the
domestic manufacturer, in turn, routed
-The Editors.
brands under protection of this statute
the order abroad. Then, if the records
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JUNE 1955
45
www.americanradiohistory.com
ran the risk of having his shipment intercepted, impounded
and possibly confiscated, and there was a risk of civil and
criminal penalties. If such an importer managed to obtain
the consent of the firm whose privileges he had violated, he
could obtain the release of his consignment, bur that was
always an embarrassment. There might have been ninetynine records in such a case against which no restriction
might have existed, but if the hundredth record was of one
of the makes under the protection of Sec- 526, the entire
shipment was deemed to be contaminated by it and in danger of seizure. It did you no good to instruct the customs
to destroy it and release the remainder. Therefore, the importing dealer who wished to avoid distressing contingencies was careful to do his importing of such brands strictly
in accordance wich the prescribed routines. Rugged individualism was not countenanced. And, naturally, costs ( and
prices) were outlandish.
Obstacles to trade in imported records, erected by American companies, were numerous. One such company argued
that the more imported records they had to obtain for their
dealers, the fewer of their domestic records would be sold.
However, whatever the considerations that influenced their
attitudes, there were great numbers of foreign records they
absolutely would not obtain for their dealers and mould
not permit the dealers to import for themselves. Desirable
items from Australia, Argentina, Brazil, Japan, and Mexico
were made absolutely inaccessible ro American collectors
by reason of this dog -in- the-manger policy. Collectors could
not even buy them abroad and bring them home as personal
possessions.
Nothing was spared to make life tough for the importing
dealer. It was quire the usual thing, for years, for the
domestic companies to accept and execute their dealers'
orders for records from abroad while they were actually
engaged in preparing the identical recordings for release in
domestic pressings. Consequently, the dealers often just
barely got the imported pressings into their stocks at a cost
to them of $1.63 per record, when the American counterparts were proclaimed available at $ I.25, retail.' The domestic companies contended that CO have warned their dealers would have disclosed to their competitors their plans for
forthcoming releases.
The almost quarter- century I spent as a dealer in my own
right was a continual struggle to keep my clients informed
about the devious ways of the record trade. I wanted them
CO comprehend in what ways selfish, stupid, greedy, or conniving interests were placing impediments in the way of
their ready access CO fine recordings of culturally valuable
material from all over the earth. I endeavored co show
them how the effective cartelizacion of the industry inflated
costs needlessly. I undertook to enlist the aid of members
of Congress and the appropriate Federal agencies towards
terminating some of the more objectionable practices, as
being "monopolistic and in restraint of trade." My appeals
might as well have been addressed to institutions for blind
deaf-mutes.
I alluded above to the "exclusive regional distributor"
racket. I tried
in vain also- to attract the attention of
government agencies ro that utterly disreputable mechanism of monopoly. Under that arrangement the dealer is
-
46
without any alternative but to obtain his supplies of any
given line from a single source. If his trade policies do nor
happen to conform to the jobber's idea of his own business
interests, he may lind himself subjected to myriad annoyances, impositions, deprivations, and delays. If he attempts
to circumvent the situation by addressing his orders to a
distributor in another area, he is coldly referred back to the
jobber who enjoys the regional monopoly to which he is
subservient. 1 have heard this referred to as "free enterprise."
Even when a dealer is in good standing with his distributor- supplier, this arrangement may operate co his
injury. For instance, if his own supplier is our of stock on
an urgently needed number, the jobber in another monopoly area who may have a good stock of it cannot- or will not
supply him. That would be "invasion." The dealer simply
has to wait until his own jobber has the item again.
In parts of the Southwest, during the war years, record
retailers who hoped to obtain any records at all from their
suppliers often were required to buy supplies of needles
guaranteed to last them to 1984. Had they been in any
position to cell their regular jobbers ro go jump in the lake,
that they would ger their stuff elsewhere, the standards of
service to all concerned would surely have been at least
slightly better.
As I view it, the wholesale distributor of records is an
excrescence. The correct and legitimate function of jobbing
is to provide wide representation for manufacturers who
are individually too small or too weak ro establish effective
large -scale sales-organizations or to finance advertising programs by themselves. Where such small producers can
realize a collective advantage through the use of a common
distributor, the jobber's function is fully justified.
There is much more that might be said about relations
within the trade, but much space has been devoted to that
phase of record dealership already. Let us now turn our
attention to the record customer. Without him, there would
be no record business. Therefore, it behooves the record
retailer to handle him with kid gloves, to cherish his goodwill and, now and then, ro submit to abuses for which (so
help him!) he would clip anybody else in the jaw.
YOU CAN START in the mail order department. Here
letter. It is on rough, blue -lined, grayish -white paper,
torn from a cheap notebook. The edges are yellowed and
crumbly. The writing, made with a chick, soft pencil, is
jerky, irregular, and difficult to decipher. Large and childish
at the very start, it quickly becomes tiny and even harder
to read as it descends to the bottom of the page and finally
trails off into microscopic illegibility up one side and
upside -down across the top. There is no signature, no return- address on either the letter or the envelope. You put
it into the "pending matters" file, figuring that sooner or
later the writer will follow up on ic. He does, with some
trace of acerbity. He seems to think less well of you chan
before, but again he leaves you in the dark as co his name
or place of residence. Now and then one comes in with a
complete address but no hint of the writer's name, and you
Continued on page 113
feel cheered: the world is
is a
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
COLLINS
-
One of the nation's foremost makers of tuners
- our only business!
there IS something
NEW IN TUNERS:
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HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
music makers
by
NEW YORK'S MUSIC SEASON
ended this spring on a nore of high
artistic achievement with the recital
early in May of Dietrich Fischer Dieskau, baritone, and Gerald Moore,
accompanist. Unlike most Town Hall
debutants, Fischer-Dieskau was greeted
by a full house and the kind of rapturous applause that betokens an audience composed of the already converted. Phonograph records had obviously accomplished some impressive
missionary work. Mr. F -D turned out
to be call, baby- faced, and thirtyish,
with a dignified, fairly immobile platform manner, a well -controlled though
not especially distinctive voice, and a
sober, refined sense of musical values.
Ocher singers have come to New
York preceded by wonderful recordSuzanne
ings, and some of them
Danco and Ferruccio Tagliavini, to
did not quite live up to
name two
expectations. Happily, no illusions
were shattered by the appearance of
Fischer -Dieskau in the flesh. If anything, his program (devoted entirely
to Schuberr's Whrterreise cycle) showed
him CO be a more interesting singer
chan his recordings would have led
one to suspect.,..
For me, however, the real musical
stimulus of the evening carne from the
playing of Gerald Moore, a squat,
-
-
ROLAND GELATT
imagery. He sees subtleties in a piano
accompaniment that no one else,
seemingly, can; and, seeing them, he
is able to realize their execution through
his extraordinary command of both
tone and rhythm. In the few opening
measures of Die Post he re- creates with
remarkable definition the cantering of
horses and the fruity braying of a postman's horn. And in Der Leiermann, as
Alec Robertson points out in the April
Gramophone, he suggests by his astute
timing of a rest and weighting of a
chord "the pathos of the old man, with
frozen fingers and worn out hurdygurdy, churning our his disregarded
tune."
The day before the concert, I met
Mr. Moore and asked him the inevitable question: how did he decide to
become an accompanist? The shaping
of his career, he told me, came about
through the death of his piano reacher,
Michael Hambourg, father of a well known pianist (Mark) and cellist
(Boris). Although English -born, Gerald Moore was raised in Toronto, and
beefy man in his mid -fifties, with a
ruddy complexion and a twinkling
mien. This was not his New York
debut: he had played in Town Hall
back in 1926 as accompanist for the
English tenor John Coates and had
returned in October 1954 to give a
lecture- recital of his own; but for many
of us in the audience this was the first
opportunity to hear in person a musician whose work on records has become practically legendary. Ir would
not be accurate to say that he surpassed bis records on this occasion,
since there comes a point when excellence cannot be surpassed; but it
was as winning a demonstration as any
Moore has given on records of his
rare ability to project through the
piano the essence of a song's poetic
DOUOLAS
Guss
GeraU Moore
there he became a scholarship pupil of
Michael Hambourg's, with the understanding that he would repay his
teacher in part from the proceeds of
When
any forthcoming concerts.
Hambourg père died in 1916, Moore
had not repaid his debt; and as an
expression of gratitude toward the
family, he offered his services as accompanist to cellist Boris at a fee of
S1.00 per concert. The offer was accepted and the career of accompanist
begun, though Moore still had his
sights set on a solo career. A few
years later he returned to England,
and to earn his keep continued to play
accompaniments. Sir Landon Ronald,
who heard him at this juncture, advised him ro concentrare on accomThe world is overstocked
panying.
with brilliant solo pianists," Sir Landon asserted, "but there are precious
few good accompanists in the field."
Moore saw the light, and began then
and there to learn as much about accompanying as he could.
He has learned a great deal. And
now he is putting some of that knowledge at the disposal of us all in an engaging little book entitled Singer and
Accompanist (Macmillan, $3.75). In
it Mr. Moore writes perceptively and
wittily about fifty songs he is fond of.
I heartily recommend his book to
anyone with a love of songs and a
sense of fun.
EVEN THE MOST LRUD,,ITE collector of musical oddments may nor be
able to name the famous composer
who met an untimely end because of
an invitation to the White House. Ir
was Enrique Granados. He came to
the United States in the midst of
World War I to attend the world
premiere of his opera Goyescas at the
Metropolitan Opera House and had
planned to return directly to Spain
thereafter. But an invitation to play
at a White House reception given by
President Wilson made him postpone
his departure and cancel his steamship
passage CO Spain. Instead he chose to
sail by way of England. Midway in
the English Channel his ship was
torpedoed by a German submarine
and Granados perished, in his fiftieth
year.
At that time Granados was working
on a symphony. the unfinished manuscript of which survived him and has
49
JUNE 1955
www.americanradiohistory.com
remained the property of his children
in Barcelona. Recently the Granados
family attended a concert in Barcelona's
Palada de la Mdsica to hear a young
Spanish conductor and composer,
Rafael Ferrer, conduct his own orchestration of a Granados piano suite.
Ferrel s rapport with the idiom of this
music so impressed the heirs and musical executors of Granados that they
gave him the unfinished symphony
and authorized him to complete the
work interrupted so tragically in 1916.
Doubtless the Granados- Ferrer symphony will be recorded in due course.
THE NAME OF GRANADOS keeps
recurring in a recent French book
entitled Conversations avec Pablo Casals,
published by Editions Albin Michel,
in which an interlocutor draws out the
cellist on his remembrances of things
past and his opinions on music and
musicians. Casals considers Granados
the most creative composer of the
modero Spanish school and believes
that music sustained a severe loss because of his premature death. The
news of the torpedoing reached Casals
while he was on a concert tour in the
United Stares. Soon after, he joined
Paderewski and Kreisler in a joint concert at the Metropolitan Opera House
for the benefit of the Granados children. Among the works played ro a
capacity audience was the Beethoven
Archduke Trio. Too bad no microphone was on hand to capture this
evening of music making for posterity,
or to immortalize some informal chamber music sessions at the home of
Eugène Ysaye when piano quintets
were performed far into the night by
Kreisler, Thibaud, Ysaye, Casals, and
Busoni!
On the question of recordings,
Casals holds some rather startling
opinions. He begins by acknowledging the tremendous progress made in
recording technique, but then goes
on co say:
"Yet I still prefer the
records that dare back thirty or forty
years. The sound is less brilliant but
more faithful."
He further states:
"In general. I derive greater pleasure
from hearing recorded music when the
records are turning faster. As far as
my recordings of the Bach suites are
concerned, I feel the need of hearing
them a tone and even a tone and a
half higher. The changes of tonality
do not dismay me at all." Casals is
definitely nor the man to endorse a
hysteresis turntable.
BENNO MOISEIWITSCH, the Russian- British pianist, shares this nos ralgia for the records of yesteryear,
though for a different reason. He believes that Ehe conditions of record
making in the days of 78 rpm were
more likely to bring out the best in a
musical performer.
"The nervous
strain," he concedes, "was terrible.
You waited in the studio until the
sound of a buzzer and the blink of a
red light gave you the signal to start.
Then you had to begin without a
moment's delay and play right through
for the duration of a side. If it didn't
go right, you made the side over and
over again. This kind of tension was
hard on the nerves of the performer,
but it produced excellent musical results. Ir keyed you up ro a high pitch
of musical concentration, and eventually you produced a four -minute side
that was really good. Today, with
magnetic tape, the job of making
records is far easier on the performer,
but I find it musically less satisfactory.
There is much less tension in the recording studio now. You start and stop
when you want to. You make several
rakes. Some are good, some not so
good. The engineers tell you that they
will patch together a final recording
using the best portions from each rake.
They do, and it sounds all right. But,
frankly, I don't find the results as
satisfactory as they used ro be, when
record making was less relaxed and
easygoing."
IN CELEBRATION of Giovanni Mar tinelli's seventieth birthday this fall,
RCA plans to reissue on LP a selection
of the many recordings he made for
Victor during the 192os and 193os.
This birthday tribute will appear in
the $1.98 Camden catalogue, which
grows increasingly valuable as a repository of some inimitable musical
performances. A few Martinelli items
have already been tapped for the $3.98
Collectors series, but there are still
about forty uncommitted sides to
choose from, and the Camden impresarios have decided to put the
choice co a vote. Will those of you
who have been yearning for a Martinelli
recital please express your preferences
to Frank O'Donnell, Camden Records,
630 Fifth Avenue, New York 20, N. Y.
This is to be a "By Request" recital,
and your vote is needed.
On the subjecr of Martinelli I am
apt ro get delirious. I was brought up
on his Radames, Manrico, Ocello, and
Canio, and they remain for me the
50
quintessential embodiments of chose
roles. Certainly I have heard no Italian
tenor of the younger generation whose
musical insights or dramatic address
are of like stature: and the more I
listen to his records, the more am
prepared to agree with Desmond
Shawe -Taylor's description of him as
"one of the great stylists of the century."
By and large, Martinelli's records
do him justice; however the votes fall,
I shall be happy with the Camden reissue. But I shall be particularly happy
if vox popali singles out the 1927 recording of "No, Pagliaccio non toll,"
which contains one of the most thrilling moments on records as Martinelli
spins out a miraculously sustained
phrase to the words beginning "I3 fidate
credeva" --- a prime example of this
singer's ability to inflect music with
dramatic impact and maintain at the
same time a legato line. Commentators
are continually remarking on morsels
like this from Martinelli's recorded
legacy. For Shawe-Taylor, the Martinelli recording of "Di que/la pira"
would be worth buying if only for one
1
phrase of recitative:
"Amor, sublime
Ii favelli al core."
"Martinelli," he writes, "invests this
simple line with such purity, such nobility and intensity of feeling, that it
could well stand as a model for the
vocal student." For another British
critic, J. B. Richards, the "cry of real
anguish" on the words "io non selaivo
Ail Lao corpo divin the n'innamora," in
the Martinelli- Tibbert-Jepson album of
Ocello excerpts, haunts the memory.
If all this has started opera lovers
thinking about their favorite Martinelli
record, it will have served its purpose.
At Camden they are waiting to hear
from you.
amore, in tale istantt
THE FOLLOWING INDICATION
of Sir Leonard Bernstein's newly acquired baronetcy appears on the inner
jackets of all current Columbia records:
IN
CONDUCTORS
SIR THOMAS BEECHAM. Bart.
LEONARD BERNSTEIN, Bart.
AARON COPLAND
LEHIMAN ENGEL.
MORTON GOULD
HOWARD HANSON
HERBERT VON KARA.1AN4
ANDRE KOSTELANS"
F :FRF.M KURTZ
Doubtless this information will be incorporated in the next edition of Lie herson ;r Peerage.
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
www.americanradiohistory.com
RECORDS
Records in licHé
Reviewed by
PAUL AFFELDER
RAY ERICSON
NATHAN BRODER
ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN
JAMES HINTON, JR.
ROY H. HOOPES, JR.
J. F.
ROLAND GELATT
INDCOX
Classical Music Listed by Composer
51
Advertising Index
Recitals and Miscellany
Dialing Your Disks ... .. ..
Building Your Record Library
52
67
68
.
JOHN
71
Folk Music
The Best of Jazz .. ..._
The Music Between
The Spoken Word
Chopin: A Discography
Arno Babajanian, piano; State Radio Orchestra, Nathan Rachlin, cond.
tTchaikovsky: Concert Fantasy, Op.
CLASSICAL
ARNOLD, MALCOLM
English Dances
The London Philharmonic Orchestra, Sir
Adrian Boult, cond.
LONDON LD 9178. ro -in. $2.98.
of six
like a
original
material from the pen of Malcolm Arnold,
a young English composer and onetime
trumpet player with the London Philharmonk. They get a lovely performance
from Boult and his men, and the sound is
A most cunningly contrived set
dances, which though sounding
reworking of old folk tunes are all
1.
AUBER
Overtures: Masa,tiello (La Muette de
Portici); The Bronze Horse; Fra Diavolo; The Crown Diamonds
Paris Conservatory Orchestra, Albert Wolff,
cond.
LONDON LL 1157. 12 -in. $3.98.
A truly great conductor is needed ro lift
these overtures out of the routine groove
into which they are too likely to fall.
Seventy- one- year-old Albert Wolff is such
a conductor. He revitalizes them as Toscanini has revitalized the Rossini overtures,
and the results on this disk are spectacular.
P.
AUBERT
A.
La Hahn/,:era -Sec Carpentier: Impressions d'Italie Suite.
BABAJANIAN, ARNO
Heroic Ballad
56
Tatiana Nikolayeva, piano; State Orchestra
of the USSR, Kiril Kondrashin, cond.
CLASSIC CE 3007. 12 -in. $5.95.
J. F.
ROBERT KOTLOWITZ
GONZALO SEGURA, JR.
HOWARD LAFAY
faultless.
JOHN M. CONLY
C. G. BURKE
variations for
Babajanian's
symphonic
piano and orchestra, entitled Heroic Ballad.
constitute twenty -one minutes pf pleasant
but hardly distinguished musical interplay.
The piece is most remarkable for the composer's flair for writing in the style of his
great Russian predecessors than for any
originality of musical thought on his part.
Reminiscences of Tchaikovsky, RimskyKorsakov, and particularly Rachmaninoff
are well in evidence, with occasional
whispers of Ravel and even Gershwin. The
performance appears to be well managed
by soloist and orchestra alike, though the
recorded sound is not overbright.
Tatiana Nikolayeva gives a very fluent
and persuasive performance of the Concert
Fantasy, one of Tchaikovskys most slighted
works, despite its undoubted challenge to
the virtuoso pianist. Her playing is beautifully relaxed in the quieter passages; however. she does not dispose of the bravura
sections with quite the brilliance of Noel
Mewton -Wood, whose recording (CONCERT HALL CIIS 1126) is still the preferred version.
J. F. 1.
BACH
Cantata No. it, Praise Our God; Cantata
No. 67, Hold in AJJection Jesus Christ;
Jest:, Joy of Man's Desiring, from Cantata No. 147
soprano; Kathleen Ferrier,
contralto; William Herbert, tenor; William
Parsons, bass; Cantata Singers and Jacques
Orchestra, Reginald Jacques, cond.
$3.98.
12-in.
LONDON LL 845.
Eva Mitchell,
These works were previously listed in the
London catalogue on two separate ten -inch
JUNE 1955
www.americanradiohistory.com
.
S. WILSON
72
73
.
..76
76
78
..
disks. Except for the late Kathleen Fer rier's warm singing of the wonderfully
poignant alto aria in No.
(used by
Bach later in the Agnus Dei of the B minor
Mass), the performances have little to
recommend them. Elsewhere stodginess
reigns. The chorus is weak and blurred.
the important woodwind parts are often
barely audible. The ethereal character of
the lovely soprano aria of No. 11 is spoiled
by the addition of an uncalled -for continuo,
played on the harpsichord; to complete the
damage, the aria is cut, long before the
da capo. In the final movement of No. 67
the sound of the chorus twice fades unaccountably. This is the sole recording of
No. 67, but Ferrier has only a few measures
of recitative in it. No texts are supplied,
possibly because the works are sung in
English.
N. B.
u
BACH
Concertos for Harpsichord and String
Orchestra, i,t F minor and D major
Isabelle Nef, harpsichord; L'Ensemble Orchestral de L'Oiseau -Lyre, Pierre Colombo.
cond.
L'OISEAU -LYRE OL 500.42. 12 -in. $4.98.
Colombo conducts these works with a
rather heavy hand.
Tutti chords ate
punched out, there is a feeling of ponderousness in other tutti passages, and the
slow movement of the F minor Concerto
ends with a retard from here to over
yonder. The solo part is nicely played.
The golden tone of Isabelle Nefs harpsichord sounds particularly charming when
combined with the pizzicato strings in the
Largo of the F minor. Recording is
resonant and clear.
N. B.
BEETHOVEN
Concerto for Piano and Orrhe.ctra, No.
3,intC minor, op. 57
Variations i,, C minor, G 19r
tMozart: Sonata for Piano, No. r6, its
B -flat. K. 570
R EC. UitI)S,
Emil Gilds, piano' Moscow Philharmonic
Orchestra, Alexander Gaul, coud.
COLOSSEUM CRLP 177. 12-in. $3.98.
Record Advertising
Index
Swollen sides lasting three minutes beyond
an hour, with the Coocerto side vying with
the Toscanini record of the Beethoven
Septet io an approach to thirty-five minutes.
So much the longer ro endure the macabre
sonic here, the emaciated bass and skeletal
treble of an orchestra made toneless by
electronics. The solos are becter but far
from good. There 'u some gold in the
playing, and its transmutation into zinc is
a realization in reverse of the old dream of
C. G. B.
the alchemists.
65
Angel Records
Beyland Engineering Ca
77
89
Calex Co.. ..
61
Columbia Records, Inc
77
Cook Laboratories, Inc
89
Dublin's
89
Gene Bruck Enterprises
87
High Fidelity Recordings
89
Leslie Creations
London International
81, 83, 85
London Records
59
62, 63
Mercury Records Corp.
Missouri National Corp.
.89
BEETHOVEN
Minuets (6), G 167
tDvolák: Gavotte
88
89
Music Box
Music Room
London Baroque Ensemble, Karl Haas,
cond.
DRCCA DL 4096. 10-ia. 13, 3 min. $2.98.
Nuclear Products Co.
Record Index
Record Market..
Telefunken Records
Vox Productions, Inc
Westminster Recording Co
.
Competent playing, no more -and perhaps no more is necessary for this kind of
The
thing -and pleasant recording,
Dvofák, a good piece, does not belong here
84
86
89
8r
73
75
where fifteen minutes of other Beethoven
or Pleyel or Haydn or Boccherini would
have been germane. Decca asks an inordinate reward for her lazy editing, and discophiles would be unfair to themselves
and to die industry to offer ir. The container is only half filled with music.
C. G. B.
BEETHOVEN
Sonatas for Piano: No. 29, in B-flat,
" Hammerklavier," Op. ro6; No. 30, in
E, Op. ro9
István Midas.
PERIOD SPL 718. 12-in. $4.98.
The world can provide competent pianists
in any quantity required, and Messrs.
Period have reached into Venezuela for this
one in asylum from his native Hungary.
Offering him the Hammerklavier as an
instrument for debut was not an act of
recklessness but a testimony of confidence,
which a hearing reveals not to have been
misdirected. In this huge sooam lavish
with huge difficulties the player has
achieved above all clarity and sense, foregoing the pianistic ecstasy of a hot bath in
Chapi and the Musical Spirit of Madrid 1900
AMONG THE MANY
successful zarzaela composers of the lase hundred
years, two stand out for the beauty and
expressiveness of their music: Bretón and
Chapi. Curiously enough, they were born
just a few months apart, in 185o and 185t
respectively. Of the two, Chapl would
probably have more of an immediate appeal
to American ears both because of his own
melodic style and because of the richness
of his orchestrations.
Of the three Chapi zarzuelas listed below,
La Revoltosa is probably the most popular.
Ir is a work that breathes of the Madrid of
1900 much as Fledermaus breaches of the
except that we
Vienna of Franz Josef
Americans feel emotionally dose to the
Satter and know nothing ar all of the former. The story revolves about Mari Pepa, a
girl who simply can't resist indulging in a
bit of coquetry from time to cime. Not
unreasonably
least for a Spaniard
hex fiancé objects strenuously, but our Mari
Pepa stands by her inalienable rights and
proceeds to flirt openly on every occasion
with all the men in the neighborhood.
Naturally enough, all the corresponding
wives, sweethearts, etc, resent this violently.
Finally the women get together to pur
stop to all this. They send a child to tell
each man that Mari Pepa expects him in
her room that night. Of course, Mari Pepa
never intended to go that far
virtue
is indeed above reproach and she truly
loves her Felipe. While she is most ably
defending herself (words have sufficed so
far), the women turn on the lights in the
courtyard by Mari Pepa's room -and find
that every man in the neighborhood has
accepted what he thought was an invitation
from Mari Pepa- The resulting scandal can
be imagined, for none of the revengeful
women expected to find her man there.
Mari Pepa manages to dear herself and is
finally, if grudgingly, forgiven by all
.provided she and her Felipe get married
soon and move to another neighborhood.
-
-
-at
-her
-
have gone into some detail explaining
the plot because I feel that, in spite of its
intensely Spanish atmosphere, this is work
that may well appeal to that enormous mass
of the American public that enjoys Strauss,
Léhar, Rodgers and Hammerstein, etc.
Perhaps one of these days an enterprising
Broadway producer, looking for something
decidedly different and yet highly likely to
succeed, will investigate the Spanish cheater.
I would not be at all surprised if, when
the day comes, La Ravoltosa is chosen and,
with perhaps a few minor modifications,
becomes the hit of the season. Incidentally,
the London translation of the tide, The
Lady Joker, is roost inept. Columbia did
better with The Trouble- Maker, although
a more faithful version would be The Live
Wire: Both of these versions are well performed and recorded. The Columbia version has been cut to fit one side (the other
side is given to an abbreviated version of
another superb zarzuela, Gigantes y Cabe zudos), while the London is presumably
complete. It is this marrer of variety versus
completeness that must decide the choice.
Altogether different is La Tempertad
a deadly serious work for all of its including several amusing scenes. The plot itself
is not very compelling, it moves toward a
false accusation of murder that is finally
cleared up in a rather contrived fashion.
However, there is a wealth of magnificent
music and some very dramatic scenes. The
atmosphere of a fishing village, the storms
and the sea that take the lives of its men,
are all painted in vivid colors. To mention
just one specific item: the great baritone
aria at the end of the first side is almost
worth the price of the entire two-record set.,
particularly when performed by an artist
of the caliber of Manuel Ausetal.
The third Chap; work, El Barquillero
(The Wafer Seller or, completely translated
into American terms, The Ice -Cream Alan),
is difficult ro judge. The music is still by
Chap(, which means that it is absolutely
I
-
-in
-
particular, Socorro's aria is
beautiful
but I' simply
could not make out the plot, if any, and
that disturbed me somewhat- Furthermore,
the singing is barely acceptable, and the
set lacks any artist of stature.
None of the zarzuelar that I have seen
on records ever carry an English libretto.
Montilla includes a Spanish libretto and a
brief summary of each scene in English.
Columbia has dispensed with the Spanish
part and abbreviated the English summary.
London includes Interesting analyses of
each work in both Languages
often
not even a bare outline of the plot itself.
However, I understand that London is now
intending to prepare some line -by -line
translations. Maybe this will provide the
impetus needed to popularize the zarzuela
in this country.
GONZALO SEGURA, JR.
first - rare
extraordinarily
-but
CHAPI
La Revoltosa
Ana Marla Iriarte, Inés Rivadeneyra, Patrocinio Rico, Mari Carmen del Rio, López
Roldán, Manuel Ausensi, Enrique Povedano,
Julio Nadal, Antonio López, Joaquín Roda;
Cantores de Madrid, Orquesta de Cámara
de Madrid, Atasílfo Argenta, cond.
LONDON IN-NL rW
910I4.
12-in.
$3.98,
La Tempestad
Rosado, Pilar Lorengar, Manuel
Ausensi, Carlos Mungufa, Gregorio Gil,
Antonio Díaz Marcos; Cantores de Madrid,
Orquesta de Cámara de Madrid, Atatilfo
Argenta, cond.
Toffy
LONDON INT'L rev
r2 -in.
91029/9103o.
Two
$7.96.
El Barquillero
Toy Rosado, Carlos Mungula, Juan de
Andia; Cantores de Madrid, Orquesta Sinfónica, Anrúlfo Argenta, cond.
LONDON INT'L W 91025.
10in. 82.98.
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
52
www.americanradiohistory.com
RECORDS
lug time of each version is reasonably close:
Ansermet 27 min., 34 sec.; Cluyrens 28
min., 5 r sec. Cluytens is faster in the first
and third movements, slower in the second
and fourth. Listening closely, I do not find
his slow pacing of the second movement at
all objectionable; the lovely melody of the
oboe, indeed, seems to improve as the
conductor lingers over it, as if reluctant to
let it pass. For this and other reasons 1
continue to prefer the Angel version.
J. F. 1.
BORODIN
Prince Igor: Polovision Dances
1-Mussorgsky: A Night on Bald Mountain
.fTchaikovsky: Romeo and Juliet
Markevitch: Borodin moves along smartly
billowing noise. The distinctness of the
voices in the fugue is a triumph of
abnegation. Op. sop, without the pitfalls
of its mighty predecessor, has been realized
with the same modesty and with the addition of a becoming lyricism.
Placing the two sonatas on one disk
with a duration of more than an hour has
been accomplished without apparent detriment to the sound of the piano, close and
natural throughout, like a piano played at
C G. B.
home.
BEETHOVEN
Symphony No. 6, in F ("Pastoral"),
Op. 68
Detroit Symphony Orchestra, Paul Patay,
cond.
MERCURY 50045. 12-in. $3.98.
Beethoven gave subtitles to the movements.
We may alter the first two, in this running
projection, to "Soccer at Heiligensrdt- and
"Prix des Drags d Auteuil," the brook being
that which we would call the water -jump
and the French call the rivière des tribunes.
This athleticism in contradiction of the musing, devotional relaxation prescribed by the
composing pantheist, testimony to the conductor's animal spirits, is unfortunately
uninteresting. Some good sound has been
wasted. This is the first time on LP that
Mr. Patay has seen fit to show character in
this way; his other Mercury records are
C. G. B.
accomplishments of high order.
BERLIOZ
Symphonie Fantastique, Op. 14
von
Philharmonia Orchestra, Herbert
Karajan, cond.
ANGEL 35202. 12 -in. $4.98 of $3.48.
The Fantastique is not Von Karajan's dish.
He treats it far too broadly and too gently,
rounding off the intentionally rough edges
and, in the last two movements, taking the
music at far too slow a pace. This symphony requires lean, taut, brilliant treatment, none of which it receives here. In
addition, the first side ends at a bad spot in
the middle of the third movement. My
favorite Fantastique remains Ormandÿ s on
P. A.
Columbia.
BIZET
Symphony in C major; Patrie, Overture
L'Orchestre de la Suisse Romande, Ernest
Ansermet, cond.
LONDON LL 1186. r2 -in. $3.98.
The coupling is identical to the Angel issue
conducted by Cluytens. The over -all play-
JUN13 1955
Orchestre National de la Radiodiffusion
Française, Igor Markevitch, cond.
ANGEL 35144. 12 -in. S4.98 or S3.48.
This conductor has a predilection for
smartly paced readings, directed with
energy and dynamic strength. Occasionally
these qualities may have been misdirected,
but they are surely apropos in these Russian
scores. The Borodin is neat and well
turned, the balance is good, the singing
(the language used is French) appropriately
lusty. The diablerie of Mussorgsky's sym-
phonic poem is well realized, the changes
of pace in Tchaikovsky's fantasy- overture
nicely controlled. In fact, this Romeo and
Juliet is one of the best now in the catalogue. Orchestral playing throughout is
alert and distinguished, and Angel's sound
is exceptionally good, except for a moment
at the end of the Polortsian Dances, where
some hazy notes in the bass are a little too
obvious.
J. F. I.
BRUCKNER
Mass No. 2 in E minor
Choir and Orchestra of the Hamburg State
Opera, Max Thurn, cond.
TELEFUNKEN LGX 66033.
12 -in.
$4.98.
If one did not know that this Mass was by
Bruckner, it is likely that not a single
listener would identify him as its composer.
Both harmonically and thematically, it is
much simpler and more straightforward
than any of his instrumental works; the
scoring, too, is very simple. But there is
no denying the deep religious devotion in
its pages.
The present disk is a dubbing from 7Srpm masters (it was once available on
both 78 and 331/4 from Capitol) and the
tone quality suffers from age and distortion;
Moderns on the Louisville Label
AS EVERYONE knows by now, the Louisville Orchestra has for some years been
commissioning new works from composers
all over the world, performing them for its
own audience and making them available
For a season or two these
on records.
records were issued by Columbia in its
regular course of business; then these disks
began to appear singly under the Louisville
Orchestra's own label. Not long ago the
Kentucky institution received a grant of
$400.000 from the Rockefeller Foundation
to step up its commissioning progrzm,
and as a result of this it has recently issued
two boxed albums. each containing pockets
for six twelve-inch records. Only two of
these pockets have been filled so far; obviously the others are to be used for forthcoming releases in the series.
Each of the two records provided to date
with the albums contains three compositions. Peter Men,ìin's Sixth Symphony, the
Variations for Pismo and Orchestra by Wallingford Riegger, and a Notturno by Ernst Toch
can be found on one; Alan Hovhaness'
Concerto for Or-chasm No. 7, CastelnuovoTedesco's Overture to Much Ado About Nothing, and Carlos Surinach's Sinfonieaa Flanetted are on the other. All the performances, of course, are by the Louisville Orchestra under its conductor and idea -man,
Robert Whitney; the piano soloist in the
Ricgger work is Benjamin Owen, of the
University of Louisville.
The most rewarding of these six pieces
are those by Mennin, Rieggcr, and Hovhaness. The Mennin is a beautiful example of
work
the twentieth -century symphony
of great energy and propulsion in its two
fast movements, with an exquisitely lyrical
Its orchestral
slow movement between.
sonorities combine utmost clarity with the
big, heroic sound that defines the symphony and distinguishes it from other
genres. Rieggei s Variations are immensely
dynamic, exciting. and ingenious; they are
composed in the twelve-tone system. The
Hovhaness Concerto for Orchestra No. 7 makes
a totally convincing amalgam of Oriental
effects and Western forms and ends with
a magnificent "Hymn to Louisville" that
should give the blue grass country an alto gether new picture of itself. The other pieces
the Notturno, the Shakespearian comedy
overture, and the short symphony on
sound exactly as
Spanish folk material
their titles would lead one to expect: pleasant and tuneful but not especially remarkable. Recordings throughout are very good.
Inquiries regarding these subscription
records should be sent to the Louisville
Philharmonic Society, 83o South Fourth
Street, Louisville 3, Kentucky.
-
-
ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN
-a
MILLER. GRAPHIC ARTS
Robert Whitney
53
RECORDS
neither the voices nor the instruments come
P. A.
through clearly.
seems safe to say, accomplished more than
CANTELOUBE (arr.)
Chants de la France
Fourteen French traditional songs, harmonized by Joseph Canteloube: La belle est an
jardin d'amour (Picardy); Quon you n'ero
pitchounelo ( Rouergue- Spinning Song);
Y a rien de si charmant (Savoy); La fermo
diets paure orné (Languedoc); Ma douce
amie (Brittany); Petite Claudinette (Savoy); Au perduré (Béarn); De bon matin
je me suis levé (Auvergne); Sont -ran
(Languedoc); L'hiver sera bientót passé
(Dauphiny); O ciucciarella! (Corsica);
Sé lo voy (Haut -Quercy); Bon mati me
llevi (Roussillon); Sur la montagne (Gascony).
Lucie Daullene, soprano; Joseph Canteloube, piano.
L'OISEAU-LYRE OL 50047. Iz -i n. $4.98.
As a
that has continued to rule his life. In the
first fifty years of this century he bas, it
pupil of Vincent d'Indy s and
a
student at the Conservatoire when J. B.
Weckerlin was improving his librarianship
by making the first significant modern
investigations of French folk music, Joseph
Canteloube was touched by the enthusiasm
anyone before him in the work of noting
down the songs that have been known to
his countrymen since the days of the troubadours. Yet, as he points out in his note
to this recording, songs simply noted down
might as well be dead. They are flowers
pressed and dried. To be brought alive
they must be sung, and sung so that the
countryside, the air, even the time, will be
evoked for the hearer.
-
To this end he made arrangements
for piano and for instrumental groups and
voice; and he found, in Madeleine Grey, a
singer who seemed the perfect interpreter.
Some day, scholars may niggle at the harmonizations. Meanwhile, what matters is
that the songs are very lovely
and that
in this recording there are more of them
of comparable quality to the celebrated
Chants d'Auvergne. Lucie Daullene's voice
does not give the same impression of varied
color that Miss Grey's does in the older,
fainter recording of the Auvergne songs,
but she sings with the same precision of
style and with much the same kind of
never -never impersonality that communi-
-
so very personally across the spaces
and the years. And Canteloube himself is
at the piano. The sound is actually that of
a not -large room; but when the music begins, the walls melt into field and hills, the
ceiling becomes sky. No texts, and sketchy
notes, but very highly recommended.
J. H.. Jr.
cates
CHARPENTIER
Impressions d'Italie- Suite
-fAubert: La Habanera
Paris
Opera Orchestra, Louis
ANGEL 351x0.
12-in.
-but
ciated, enjoyed, thought admirable
not ever without reservations. This is
implicit in the richness of materials that
are considered worthy of being gathered
and sifted and, finally, anthologized. The
most the compiler can do is look to his
criteria, make his choices. and go to rest
with an easy conscience. For even the most
voluminous and best -planned of anthologies is open ro the question that can be
asked of them all: if Z is included, why
should X be left out?
The answer, if there is one at all, may
or may not remove the question. Even the
most rigidly stated criteria can be budged
by taste; and tastes vary. The real point is
that even though X may have a very valid
claim to inclusion, may have been slighted,
Z may have at least as valid a claim, and,
at the very least. be worth attention on its
merits. To borrow a line from Tennessee
Williams, it all depends on who's driving
the bus.
And this applies to RCA Victor's Fifty
Years of Great Operatic Singing, in which
Irving Kolodin, Music Editor of The
Satmr-
Review, has made a personal, sometimes arguable, but always interesting
decade -by- decade selection of performances
from the master archives of both RCA
Victor and its European affiliates -beginning early in the century, with Francesco
Tamagnós famous Di quella pira 0902.from Verdi's Il Trovatore. and just
touching the present decade, with a 1951
recording by Risë Stevens of Non so più,
from Mozart's Le Nozze di Figaro.
Not everyone will agree with his selections, to say nothing of his exclusions.
Disagreements of varying violence are
quite possible, both on grounds of taste and
on grounds of historical imbalances. Yet,
weighing all objections double, this is by
day
54
all odds the most serious and systematic
and rewarding exploration to date of the
art of singing as related to the art of
recording, and the set will more than repay
its cost
will repay it many times over,
in fact
to anyone whose interest in opera
or singing or recordings, or all three, is
more than casual.
The quality of the sound, as well as
inclusions and exclusions, is certain to stir
up controversy among collectors of vocal
recordings-especially collectors of acoustical disks. But some of the performances
reissued here are now so extremely hard to
come by in any form that it is almost
impossible to imagine even the most dedicated fanciers of records that turn at (or
about) 78 rpm snubbing them in LP form;
and the average standard of the group is so
astronomically high that to refuse to listen
because the reproduction does not follow
the New Orthophonie curve would be
perfectly ridiculous.
As described by Roland Gelau, three
issues ago, the transfer to LP has been done
with great care and skill, and the various
--
arcane techniques of removing pops and
sputters have left most bands remarkably
free from any very obtrusive inherited
surface noises. On direct comparison with
78 rpm originals in good condition, the
advantage gained is naturally not great;
and, in at least some cases, the perspective
has been altered, not necessarily for the
better. The commonest change in this
regard is
in Nellie Melba's Hamlet
"Mad Scene" (191o) and Frieda Hempel's
"Qui la voce" (1914) , from Bellini's 1
-as
Puritan
-
apparent bringing forward
that brilliance and immediacy seem increased, but the sense of a
particular voice heard in a particular space
is rather decreased. The Melba, in particular, acquires a sharpness of edge that it
does not have on the 78. Somewhat similarly, the 78 of Tamagn0's "Di que /la pira'
an
of the voice,
so
$4.98.
Italy
has inspired several musical travelogues; this particular one was composed
in 1887 by the now venerable Gustave
Charpentier when he was in Italy as a
winner of the Prix de Rome. I found the
first movement, with its numerous viola
a vivacious tarantella.
especially appealing. Louis Aubert, another
veteran French composer, has cast his little
symphonic poem in the Spanish mold. It
turns out to be a pleasantly atmospheric
piece of no great consequence- just a nice
filler for the Charpentier suite.
Both of these works herewith make their
solos, and the last.
[ruin; Kolodin Explores RCA Victor's Old Masters
By what appears to be common disagreement, there is no such thing in the world
as a perfect anthology. One may be appre-
Fourestier.
cond.
-
..
perhaps not altogether independently of foreknowledge and imagination
the illusion of a huge voice, and a very
individual one, resonating freely in a room
and recorded at a little distance. On I.P.
the same performance gives the subjective
feel of a voice no less individual but of
indeterminate size, recorded rather close -to.
However, the operative word here is "subjective.' and everyone will have to decide
for himself whether character has been lost
or verisimilitude sacrificed to mere closeness. No dubbing has been done so as to
falsify essential quality, though, and from
early to late the performances and the
performers retain their integrity -and
that, after all, is the main thing. All told.
these seem to be the best and most basically
honest transfers to LP of historic vocal
recordings. They may not be all equally
good, but all seem to have been done with
respect and, certainly, with much more
taste than certain transfers and updatings of
gives
-
the past.
In an anthology of this scope and pretension, it is no wonder that there are at least
some X- versus -Z question marks. But it
is, by the same token, a little surprising
that there should be so many, and so disposed. From Tamagno onward, each decade
is allotted a twelve -inch disk, the performances all together adding up to what Mr.
Kolodin describes in his introduction to the
album as "as representative a range of fine
operatic performances as my taste can
devise," that is. from the files of the issuing
company and affiliates. He limits this by
explaining omissions of the "most well worn" examples of the work of famous
singers, on grounds of their being sufficiently available, mostly in earlier LCTseries releases; other omissions on other
grounds.
It is the omissions that are likely to give
the greatest cause for debate. In the first
decade, 1900 -io, there are many such
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
lt
initial appearance on microgroove. Resplendent orchestral coloring has been
lavished on them by their respective composers, as this brilliantly conducted and
P. A.
recorded disk well attests.
CHUECA
Ague, Az,caril/as, y Aguardiente
Torty Rosado, Ana Maria Iriarte, Maria
Teresa Berganza, Maria Angeles Carchena,
Antonio Pérez, Juan Encabo, Manuel Ortega; Cantores de Madrid, Orquesta de
Camara de Madrid, Ataúlfo Argenta, cond.
LONDON W
91016
io-in.
$z.9S.
Bright tunes and sharp rhythms combine
with a very clever libretto to give us this
delightful little gem that has been tickling
audiences since it was first produced almost
sixty years ago. The plot itself is of the
slightest; it is more like a series of candid
shots of Spanish life, and the results are
irresistible. I did not have the opportunity
to make a side-by -side comparison with the
Montilla recording which appeared some
time ago, but if memory serves me correctly, neither is noticeably superior to the
they are both better than just
other
G. S., Jr.
good.
-
... to
tets for flute, Oboe. Clarinet, Bas soon, and Horn, Op. 56: No. r, in
B -flat; No. 2, in G minor
Jean-Pierre Rampal, Pierre Pierlot, Jacques
Lancelot, Paul Hongne, Gilbert Coursier.
I.'OISEAU -LYRE DI. 53005. to -in. $2.95.
'
Routine music of the late eighteenth century, animated clarity, the kind of thing
that Haydn, Mozart, and Boccherini transfigured. Nevertheless, each of the four movement works has one movement truly
inventive, while the others are lisrenable
if one does not listen hard. The French
players are by now familiar to most discophiles, and their casual skill in this pair of
quintets seems right for the music. The
instruments have been recorded accurately
enough, but an effect of five men playing in
an empty room emanates from the disk, a
little chilling to the beguilement expected
from such a combination.
C. G. B.
DEBUSSY
Pelléas et. Mélisande
Janine Micheal' (s), Mélisande; Rira Gorr
(s), Geneviève; Annik Simon (s), Yniold;
Camille Maurane (t), Pelléas; Michel
Roux (b), Golaud; Xavier Depraz (bs),
Arkël; Elizabeth Brasseur Choir and Orchestre des Concerts Lamoureux, Jean
Fournet, cond.
EPic se 6003. Three 12 -in. $11.94.
Debussy's first and only opera has been
eulogized and censured ever since its first
performances more than fifty years ago,
when the Opéra -Comique reverberated to
the fervent cheering and booing of partisans
and detractors. Today the fever has subsided, but Bellies remains controversial.
Many people would agree with Louis
Untermeyer that it is "a long and lugubrious bore"; others become transfigured ar
the mere mention of its name and hold the
opera as an article of aesthetic faith. I find
myself teetering between the rwo camps.
If 1 hear it in a properly crepuscular mood,
I
surrender completely to its mezzotinted
magic and recognize it for the creative
masterpiece that it is; but 1er me hear it in
another -more impatient- humor, and
Pelléas can seem just as tiresome as unfriendly critics depict ir.
Pelléas has been recorded in its entirety
three times. The eldest version-made in
Paris in 1942 under Roger Desormière's
direction
superior interpretatively to
-is
Illustrate a Half-Century of Operatic Singing
omissions, and a correspondingly very full
dose of Sembrich and Enrico Caruso and
Melba, Pol Plançon and Antonio Scotti.
the fabulous Gloria
Mattia Battistini
d'Italia, who did not sing here because the
is represented by the
sea made him sick
Act I aria of Renato from Verdi's Un Bello
Maschera; Adelina Patri by her sixtyish
Zerlina; Maurice Renaud by his Hérodiade
dream aria; Geraldine Farrar by her
Manor, "Gavotte," and so on. Bur no Victor Maurel or Fernando de Lucia; no
Schumann- Heink; no Louise Homer; no
Gerville- Réache. The list could be extended, but the point is clear: This, like
any other anthology at all, is inescapably a
very personal choice, and some collectors
will not find their favorites represented.
However, in this as in later decades,
although there can still be disagreement
about the excerpts chosen to represent certain singers, there is so much fine singing
to be heard that the best answer to objections is simply another such anthology, and
another, and another, with all companies
that have such materials entering the competition with the best they have in their
files -and doing as gored a job of engineering as RCA has done.
The five disks hold a total of 68 excerpts
far too many to list in even the most
Among the real
economical fashion.
treasures are Plançon's Dort Carlo soliloquy,
in the French text that Verdi set; Caruso's
tremendous "No! Pagliaccio non son";
Edmond Clément's exquisitely phrased "La
Rive"; Emmy Destinn's "O patria mia,"
with an incredible pianissimo at the end;
Caruso's arias from Macbeth and L'Africana
(not the usual); John McCormick's aria
from Méhul's Joseph; Frieda Hempel's aria
robbed of its cabaletta, from I Puri :mtt;
Leo Slezak's fine -spun Goldmark aria;
Beniamino Gigli's Andrea Chénier; Giovanni Marrinelli's Guillaume Tell; Tito
Schipa's Almaviva; Ezin Pinza's Dolt Gin-
-
DANZI
Q
-and
style and
for being more familiar.
Relative to this best, there are some
disappointments, some matters of taste on
which it is not necessary to agree. Farrar's
Mann aria is not her best singing, and
Emma Calvé's Carmen "Habanera" nor her
best performance of it. Surely Margarete
Marzenauer deserved better than a snippet in-duet from the same opera, and the main
claim to inclusion of a very immature
(19t t ) Claudia Muzio recording is that it
was made before she was signed by Columbia. The historic Mary Garden Carmen
"Card Scene' only just balances Senta sung
in not half -clear English by Florence
Austral, and it seems a bit of a waste to
have the whole last scene of Massenet's
sleazy Don Quichotte sung in aura -duet
Lemnitz?
Fermi; Lauritz Melchior's Siegmund
so on down the years, the crop of great
names thinning out, still what seem some
odd omissions, yet the best no less good
-
abominable French by Feodor
Chaliapin, when he made better recordings
by far. Sigrid Onegin's "O don fatale" is
from a cold climate; Kirsten Flagstad was
hardly known here as a Weber specialist,
nor Helen Traube! as a Gluck stylist. And
where are Boni and De Luca? Where is
Friedrich Schorr? It is explained that Lotte
Lehmann is best represented elsewhere; but
so are others who are are here, and how
can a survey of great singing afford to leave
her out, especially when criteria are set
aside for a Nina Koshetz and a Tiana
The final disk, 1940.50, scrapes almost
embarrassingly deep and wide in the RCA
barrel, with over half the performances for
the microphone alone, so far as this country is concerned. Dorothy Maynor's Louise
aria has quality, but not that of any opera
house, and Maggie Teytés Grétry ( "Vous
etiez ce que noas n'étes plus") is very much
like a self-reproach. In fact, the critical
judgments in Mr. Kolodin's book come
closer to cold truth than some inclusions
here might indicare.
Yet however much an individual may
regret the intrusion of un- favorites, the
anthologist can hardly be blamed that the
early years of the century had too many
fine singers to admit in such a time- divided
anthology -nor that neither the world nor
RCA is as rich in vocal art as it once was
and may come to be again. The most
apposite reaction, really, is one of deepest
envy of Mr. Kolndin. After all, not everyone is invited to take his pick of such a
treasure-trove as that of the RCA hoard.
and if some gold has been left, silver will
do until the next visit. All told, very, very
highly recommended. JAMES HINTON, JR.
5o
YEARS
OF GREAT
OPERATIC
SINGING
Mary Garden sings in the "Card Scene"
from Carmen. At left: Rnsario Bourdon.
RCA VICTOR LCT 67O I .Five I z -in. $29.95.
55
JUNE .1955
www.americanradiohistory.com
Cc
f)I(DL,
RïCORDS
the others, but it has been deleted (tempo.
rarily at least) from the RCA Victor
catalogue. Between the Swiss recording
presided over by Ernest Ansermet (London
and the Fournet version noted
LLA
above, there is little to choose. Both are
eminently praiseworthy: both can be heard
with satisfaction; neither projects the
fragile quality of Debussys score quite as
successfully as the earlier recording conducted by Désormiere. Ansermet s is a
more refined interpretation than Fournet's;
he pays closer heed to umbre and balance,
and is helped by somewhat more luminous
reproduction. The singers in the two sets
arc about equally capable. i could wish for
a younger and more innocent conception of
Malisande than Janine Micheau gives, just
as I would prefer an Arkël who is more
believably an aged man than Xavier
Depraz, but these are both intelligent,
well- schooled vocalists whose shortcomings
are not viral. Michel Roux is a dramatic,
sympathetic Golaud, and Camille Maurane
a winningly ardent Pelleas; in fact, his is
the finest interpretation of this role on
records.
Although the artistic merits of the two
sets are about evenly divided (with a slight
tipping of the scales in favor of Ansermet),
the cost of acquiring them is decidedly
unequal. The London.Ansermet, on four
records, comes to $19.92 ( with libretto);
the Epic- Fournet, on three records, to
of 78s conducted by the composer with
fifteen- year-old Ychudi Menuhin as soloist
was interpretatively on a higher plane than
either of these LPs. Victor should earmark
R. G.
it for reissue.
II)
511.94 (without libretto).
R. G.
FALLA
Nights in the Gardens of Spain -Sec
Rodrigo: Concierte de Aranjuez.
FAURE
Nocturne No. a, in E mirror, Op. 107;
Barcarolle No. 4, in A -flat major, Op.
44; Valse caprice No. 3, in G-lia!
major, Op. 59; Impromptu No. 3. in
A -flat major, Op. 34
l-Ravel: Prelude; Minnie! on the Name
of Haydn; Valses nobles et sentimentales; Toccata from Le Tombeau
de Couperin
Debussy: the problem is one of dryness.
faint anticipatory chords is
simply intolerable. Columbia has also seen
fit here to dispense with bands separating
the sections of a long work, so chat it is
impossible
instance-to pick out
any one of the twenty -four preludes or any
one of the six Epigrapher antiques. This
may have been done in the interests of
"economical editing;' but at 55.95 a record
marred
by
-for
these are no bargains, however much has
been crammed onto them. Not recommended.
R. G.
DUKAS
The Sorcerer's Apprentice-See Ravel:
Bolero; La Valse.
DEBUSSY
Piano Music
Includes: Préludes, Books I and II; Deux
Arabesques; Children's Corner; Images,
Books I and II; Estampes; Masquer; L'Isle
joyeuse; Six Épigraphes antiques; En blanc
et noir.
Robert Casadesus, piano (with Gaby Casadesus in Six Épigraphes antiques and En
blanc el noir).
COLUMBIA SL 222. Three 12 -in. $14.95.
(Records available singly at $5.95 each.)
As an accomplished,
intelligent, thoroughly
professional artist, Robert Casadesus must
have reasons for playing Debussy as be
does in these records; but I must confess
that I cannot fathom them. His interpretations of this sumptuously evocative music
are literal, painstaking, and severely dry.
Is he insensitive to its shifting, kaleidoscopic coloration, its ebb and flow of
rhythmic tension, its transmutation of
poetic imagery into subtle sonorities
all
the qualities that Walter Gieseking has
taught us to appreciate and that arc captured so beautifully in his recent Angel
recordings? Or was Casadesus merely in a
prosaic frame of mind when he undertook
to play Debussy in the recording studio?
Either way, the results are not memorable.
The listener has only to hear the opening
measures of 'Les sons es !cis paitrnns tournent dans l'air de soir" as played by Gieseking and Casadesus to recognize the
difference between imaginative and pedestrian interpretation of Debussy.
To make matters worse, Columbia's
engineering and packaging are poor. These
records are woefully afflicted with pre -echo.
This is an annoying phenomenon at any
time, but in music of such diaphanous
nature it is catastrophic; ro hear the rests
at the opening of Les Collines d'Anacapri
-
DVORAK
Gavotte
-See
Beethoven:
Minuets, G.
167.
ELGAR
Concerto for Violin and Orchestra, in B
minor, Opus Gr
Alfredo Campoli; London Philharmonic
Orchestra, Sir Adrian Bouir, cond.
LONDON LL 1168. 12 -in. $3.98
Elgar's was the last of the big Romantic
violin concertos
work in the Brahmsian mold, conceived in symphonic terms,
robust in utterance, and compounded of
-a
meltingly beautiful themes. It is
probably a bit too long, but then so is a lot
of other music that is still very much
worth our attention. Elgar was not remiss
in providing his soloist with difficult
some
the concerto is strewn with
of double stopping and rapid
chromatic figurations, and in an earlier
recording of is with the London Symphony
under Sir Malcolm Sargent's direction
(RCA Victor LM ro9o) Jascha Heifetz
cleared these hurdles with his cuscomary
savoir faire. His was a brilliantly exciting
interpretation- perhaps a trifle too assured
and muscular, for some of the soft- spoken
sweetness and intangible Englishry of the
music seemed to escape his notice. Alfredo
Campoli, Italian -born but long resident in
England, projects these subjective attributes
more persuasively though he does not flick
off the violinistic glitter with Hei(etì s cool
abandon. You pays your money and takes
your choice. There is little ro choose
between Boult and Sargent or their respective orchestras, and the superiority of Lon-
acrobatics:
sequences
don's newer recording is nor decisive.
If memory is to be trusted, the old set
56
Jean -Michel Damase, piano.
LONDON INTERNATIONAL TW 91035.
in. $4.98.
1
A newcomer to records, Mr. Damase brings
a precise, delicate touch and an array of
muted colors to the Ravel works, a slightly
richer tone to those of Fauré. He approaches the music romantically; the Ravel
waltzes in particular have some excessive
rubatos, though there are compensatingly
fine passages filled with nostalgia and wistfulness. One senses a pervasive lack of
vitality, but this could be an illusion
fostered by the extremely intimate, airless
recording. Still, Mr. Damase is a pianist
with provocative ideas.
FURTWAENGLER
2, in
Symphony No.
E
R.
E.
minor
Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra, Wilhelm
Furtwängler, cond.
DEUTSCHE GRAMMOPHON LPM
Two
12 -in.
t
hr. 12 min.
181 14-5.
$16.80.
Most conductors compose a symphony or
two, and their creations are usually received
with polite contempt: "Conductor's music
he knows how to score, but not what."
This is a superior example of the creation,
but the mockery is at least half true. The
late Wilhelm Purtw'änglcr knew how to
score, and parts of this Of course it is
much too long) his Second Sympony are
undeniably effective and unique in their
orchestration, the decisive and declarative
colors of Richard Strauss laid over the
mottled shades that cup the character of
Johannes Brahms's peculiar genius. But the
ideas are not pointed and are generally
somber. The good ones recall someone
else -Cesar Franck, amusingly; wistfully,
Franz Schubert; inevitably Richard Wagner, and Richard Strauss of course.
The formal pattern, two sonata movements enclosing an andante in the sequence
of a three-part song and a scherzo, is very
apparent, and it seems cruel, after listening
carefully thrice to the painstaking craftsmanship of a man dead after fifty years of
service in music, to praise his long, gloomy
tapestry as "well made." But that is what
it is, although happily it may be added that
the short central movements maintain
enough interest to warrant performance.
Presumably the performance on these
records is definitive. Certainly the orchestra
is at its darkly glowing best; and if the
conductor misinterpreted anywhere, the
composer had no right to reproach him.
-
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
www.americanradiohistory.com
RECORDS
-
Sonically the disks are similar to many
of the Berlin Philharmonic
smooth, well adjusted mass with a feeling of expansiveness, no insistence on detail and no
dramatic timbre, but no excesses at the
extremes of the frequency range either.
Their four skins, on the samples received
here, are almost encrely free of the blemishes we expect on LPs. if they are truly
representative of standard Deutsche Grarnmophon production, it would be good to
see and hear more of them. The well -made
limp jackets are lined with soft plastic, and
there are notes on the music and a brief
sketch of Furtwängler's career, in German.
C. G. B.
GANNE, LOUIS
Les Saltimbanques
Janine Micheau (s), Suzanne; Génévièvc
Moizan (ms), Marion; Robert Massard
(t), André; Raymond Amade (t), Paillasse; Michel Roux (b), Grand Pingouin;
Marcel Carpentier (buffo), Malicorne;
Valli Valdy (buffo), Le Vicomte; Rivers
Cadet (bs), L'Aubergiste; Claude Aray
(speaking), Rigobert; "et les clowns Alex
et Rhum." Orchestra and chorus, Pierre
Dervaux, cond.
LONDON INTERNATIONAL
Two 12 -in. $9.96.
TV/
91044.5.
Louis Ganne (1862 -1923)
became, as a
matter of choice, a popular composer rather
than a serious one
composer of
marches (of which old -time 78 fanciers
may recall Le Père de la Victoire from
Iíon Rothier's singing of it) and operettas
rather than of suites and operas- His Les
Saltimbanques (read "tumblers, "acrobats,"
or something like), first given in 1899, is
a sort of unsentimentalized Mignon- story,
minus the unpleasantness of Philine
all
about how Suzanne, a temporarily mislaid
noble child, lives adventurously among
circus people with hearts of gold, always
being rescued from admirers who mean no
good by the arrival of André, her tenor
lieutenant-admirer. Edited down to four
sides by Max de Rieux's réalisation, it is a
gay, bouncy, uncomplicated score, with
tunes that are very ingratiating but not
easy to remember an hour or so after
hearing. Full spoken text is provided but
only partial text for the musical numbers,
some of which are cut -and no English
translation at all of text or notes. J. H., jr.
-a
-
-
an obvious "effective' theater- piece, barely
worth listening to once.
A. F.
Ned String Orchestra,
LONDON LL 7128.
GRANADOS
Spanish Dances
Alicia do Larrocha, piano.
DECCA DL 9762. 12 -in. $3.98.
Alicia de Larrocha is a pianist of nimble
fingers, with a keen sense of rhythm and
refined musical sensitivity
short, an
ideal interpreter for these compositions.
Unfortunately, my copy of this record was
not only a hit off -center, but also full of
hiss, clicks, and sometimes downright
peculiar sound. I hope that mine was the
only defective copy and that, mechanically
speaking, the pressing as a whole is worthy
of the wonderful music and the exciting
performances of it.
G. S., Jr.
-in
HANDEL
Concerti Grossi, Op. 6: No, r, in G; No.
2, in F; No. 6, in G minor; No. 7, in
B -flat.
Vienna Symphony Orchestra, John Pritchard, cond.
EPIC LC 3097. 12 -in, $3.98.
Granted that the presentation of an arbitrary four out of twelve is faintly obnoxious,
it must be granted too that these are lively
and luminous statements in decided clarification of the contrived oppositions of these
grand things. Perhaps majesty, in the conductor's firm grip, is less compelling than
the contrasting legerity which in the same
grip bubbles convincingly; but in the contest between the substantial body of strings
devoted to the ripieno and the four instruments of the concertino we have the nicest
delineation yet on records of how the
concerto grosso should be. Hearty recording and a string tone bright and smooth
earn commendation for the disk while we
denounce the distribution of its contents.
The notes by Klaus George Roy are helpful, and the provision of one cardboard
jacket inside another is certainly the easiest
way vet, of a hundred ways, to protect
vinyl against disfigurement and dust. May
C. G. B.
the idea have imitators!
HANDEL
Vater: rllusic
Boyd Necl,
$3.98.
12 -in.
The brio of this fourth version is inspiriting, no doubt of it: it never flags. It may
pall after a time, for the slow movements
have been infected by the urgency of the
others, granting no relief from a din of
triumphant celebration. Aside from these
fast slow sections Dr. Neel has done well,
insisting alone among the conductors who
have recorded the Water Music upon that
predominance of the winds essential to its
gusto. (This "string orchestra" includes
piccolos, flutes, oboes, bassoons, horns, and
trumpets.) The forward winds risk and
obtain sonic coarsening of tone in the very
bright recording, but this is preferable to
their repression. Perhaps it is fair to call
this the best version of what in the score
is animated, and the worst of what is contemplative, the amalgam being of perplexing value.
C. G. B.
HAYDN
Symphony No 44, in
ing"
E
minor, "Mourn-
Symphony No 85, in B -flat, "La Reine"
Vienna Symphony Orchestra, Paul Sachet,
coot.
EPiC LC 3059. 12 -in. $3.98.
The small handful of records made under
the stick of this Swiss conductor are of a
quality to excite surprise that he has not
been used more often. The Queen here,
infinitely the best of four on records, moves
smartly with the conviction of a man versed
and practiced in Haydn, whereas so many
of the master's interpreters play a mere
cautious apery of standard eighteenth -cen
tury mannerisms. The harder stuff of the
Mourning Symphony is manipulated with
an equivalent if different agility, and the
Vienna Symphony Orchestra, subjected to
more conductors these last few years than
any orchestra that ever was, follow the
Swiss with alacrity and ability. Bright and
broad registration of high class after the
treble has been attenuated.
C. G. B.
HONEGGER
Pacific
231
-See Ravel:
Bolero;
La
Valse.
IRELAND, JOHN
Minuet -See Warlock: Capriol
.Suite.
KABALEVSKY
Concerto for Piano and Orchestra, No.
2, in G minor
-
GLAZUNOV
Sonata for Piano, No. 2, in E minor
See Saint- Saëns: Concerto for Piano
Gregory Ginsburg, piano; National Philharmonic Orchestra, Dmitri Kabalevsky,
cond.
and Orchestra, No. 2.
GOULD, MORTON
Dance Variations
Arthur Whittemore and Jack Lowe, duo -
1'Prokofiev: Concerto for Piano and Orchestra, No. r, in D -flat major, Op. ro
Sviatoslav Richter, piano; National Philharmonic Orchestra, Kiril Kondrashin, coud.
pianists; Sao Francisco Symphony Orchestra,
Leopold Stokowski, cond.
-
tProkofiev: Sonata for Piano, No.
Ballet Suite
Members of the NBC Symphony Orchestra,
tMenotti: Sebastian
Boyd
cond.
a,
in
Leopold Stokowski, cond.
RCA VICTOR LM 1858. r2 -in. $3.98.
D minor, Op. 14
Emil Gilds, piano.
COLOSSEUM CRLP t86.
program editor for the San Francisco
Symphony, the writer of these lines ought
to be enthusiastic about the reappearance
of that orchestra on the LP lists. Unfortunately, however, the ingenious trivialities
These three works are all relatively youthful
efforts. Prokofiev was twenty when he
of Gould's Dance Variations do not inspire
much enthusiasm from this typewriter.
Menotti's ballet score or. the other side is
As
Hadyn's Queen's honors to Paul Sacber.
JUNE '1955
72 -in. 53.98.
57
www.americanradiohistory.com
It E(
.ORUS
wrote his First Piano Concerto, twenty -one
when he completed the Second Sonata;
Kabalevsky composed his Second Piano
recorded here for the first rime
Concerto
at the age of thirty-two. These works
contain echoes of Rachmaninoff, but all of
this music is pleasing, generously melodic,
and soundly conceived. Certainly, Prokoliev's professors at the St. Petersburg Conservatory and the music critics of 1912
would think much less harsh thoughts of
this music were they to pass on it today.
Altogether this might have been a most
attractive disk had the performances been
decently reproduced. The word "decently"
is used advisedly here, for Colosseum has
reached a new low in recorded quality. The
sound is so dreadfully distorted that it
would be unfair to attempt to pass judgment on the merits of the playing.
P. A.
- -
Elemental? 'That, roo. It can be
figured as a kind of expanded contemporary
Russian verismo, built around familiar
motifs, and liberally spiced with chances to
let all kinds of emotions come out in the
open. It may not be great art, but I fail to
see that it is either ridiculous or despicable
however strongly one may feel about the
totalitarian context in which it came into
being.
Musically, it is extremely competent
fabric of big, broad, sweeping tunes, always
effectively (and sometimes quite strikingly)
harmonized and scored, with everything
shaped and built up in unexceptionally
Yes.
-
-a
These excellent, idiomatic performances can
he safely recommended, even if they do not
possess the ultimate in nuance, such as can
be found in Claudio Arrau's version of the
Fantasia. The sound is presentable. though
again not the ultimate, as the orchestra is
mildly clouded by too much resonance and
the solidly round piano tone is wanting in
brightness.
R. E.
B. K. Kalyada (s); S. A. Kashevarova (s);
S. P. Preubazhcnskaya (ms), V. G. Ulianov
I. A. Nechaev
I. Alexeyev (b);
V. M. Luganin (bs -b); I. Yashugin (bs):
(t):
Orchestra and Chorus of the Kirov Theatre
of Opera and Ballet, Leningrad, B. E.
Khalkin, cond.
St 1.90.
CLASSIC CE 30004. Two 12 -in.
LUENING, OTTO
USSACHEVSKY, VLADIMIR
Tape Recorder Music
So much has been
-
government theaters.
Born in 1904, Dimitri Kabalevsky grew
to maturity after the revolution. His father
was a government employee, and he had to
overcome family objections before being
allowed to rake up music as a field of study
and then as a career. Brilliant as a conservatory student. he has had a very successful
career in Soviet terms, and though (aside
from works like the ballet The Comedians,
from which the galop familiar to jukebox
players is taken) he has tended in instrumental music to work within limits that
might possibly be called "formalistic." he
is both a popular composer and an officially
approved one.
His postwar opera Taras' Fami/y looks
in synopsis almost like a parodistic spoof
of a "people's arr work." It deals with an
old man whose sons go off to join the army
and the partisans and help repel the Nazi
invasion, and the plot keeps jumping back
and forth from home to battleground. to
the town factory in the midst of the German occupation, and back again. There arc
all kinds of opportunities for the unleashing of patriotic sentiments. all kinds of
opportunities for spectacle
in the big
scene where the underground -youth boys
blow up the village schoolhouse with the
Germans (drunken, of course) inside ir
and so on. In other words, it is the kind of
Soviet work that is very easy to make fun
of. When you think, though, that many
members of its audience have actually lived
through similar experiences, it may not
seem quite so funny any more. Naive?
-as
-
Hungarian Fantasia for Piano and Orchestra; Hungarian Rhapsody No. 2
harmonic. Edmund Nick, cond.
DrccA or. 4084. Io -in. $2.98.
Taras' Family (excerpts)
written about the sad
state of Soviet music, and the Babylonian
captivity of Soviet creative artists in general, that rather special interest attaches to
the first appearance on recordings easily
obtainable in the \Vest of substantial excerpts from a contemporary opera by a
Soviet composer
and one of established
status- in a very decently reproduced performance by the forces of one of the big
LISZT
Julian von Karolyi, piano; Munich Phil-
KA BALE VSKY
(t);
included in this record provide the right
amount of contrast and should appeal to
the enormous American public who enjoys
Latin American music for dancing or listening. Jose Echiniz is a fine pianist of
nimble fingers, a keen sense of rhythm, and
a definire feel for this sort of music. In
addition, the recording is quite good, so
Westminster should have little trouble disposing of a million or two copies of this
record.
G. S., Jr.
INNOVATIONS GB I.
HAROLD STEIN
Reel composers Ussachevsky and Luening
professional style. It is not at all a mere
string of easy -to-hum folk songs and dances,
and though it certainly leaves no major
points unempharically stated, neither does
it really condescend. Like Shostakovich's
A Song of the Forests. it may be propagandistic, and it may not be Beethoven, but it
is most certainly a sound, strong, expert
piece of craftsmanship.
The performance is quite strong orchestrally and the casting is good all the way
down to the smallest roles; by all the evidence that can be heard, the Leningrad
opera house is a theater with high standards
and all the means of implementing them.
Helpful notes by James Lyons; but only a
detailed synopsis
text in any language. Engineering: better than the average for Soviet opera recordings. Very,
very special as a thing to buy. but worth
while and interesting to hear.
1. H., Jr.
-no
-
LALO
Symphonie Espagtrole See Prokofiev:
Concerto for Violin and Orchestra,
No.
1.
LECUONA
Andalucía, Danzas Afro-Cnlianas. Danzas Cubanas
Jose Edhiniz, piano
WESTMINSTER WI- 5343.
12-in.
$5.95.
Nothing I could say could possibly add to
nr subtract from Lecuona's tremendous
popularity
his Afalagnefia surely must be
as well -known as The Star Spangled Banner,
and there is no reason why the rest of the
Andalucia suite should not be just as popular. The Cuban and the Afro-Cuban Dances
-
58
to -in. S4.95.
Otto Luening and Vladimir Ussachevsky
are two members of the music faculty of
Columbia University who have been ex.
perimenting extensively with the creative
possibilities of the tape recorder. This disk
is devoted to a group of their compositions.
The potentialities of the medium are infinite:
tape recording can extend the timbre of any
instrument into any range, high or low; it
can alter timbres in countless ways; it can
capture the audible overtones of inaudible
fundamentals; it provides all manner of
echoes,
reverberations,
and
dimensional
levels of sound; by means of it, any melody,
once recorded, can be stepped up or down
in pitch or speed or reversed on any of these
planes; and, by means of montage. any or all
of these things (and many more) can be
assembled on a single rape in any desired
order or to any desired extent.
Luening and Ussachevsky have entered
this vast new realm with a sense of high adventure but also with a sense of responsi.
bility. Their music. which goes into the
microphone as the sounds of the flute, the
piano, and human voices, is invariably fas.
cinating as aural experiment and is frequently
very moving and meaningful from a strictly
musical point of view. There are five corn.
positions on the record
Sonic Contours, for
piano and voices, by Ussachevsky; Fantasl
in Space, Invention, and Low Speed, all for
flute and all by Luening; and Incantation.
for voices and some unidentifiable instru.
ment or instruments, by both composers.
The names of the performers are not given.
but as Lucning is an excellent flutist one
suspects he is his own interpreter here, and
Ussachevsky is probably the pianist. A. F.
-
MAHLER
.Symphony No. 8 in E minor
Cartiruad
on page 6o
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
www.americanradiohistory.com
r
..
ttie ft4fItt2 4L4t Co'tuvt.,.
Full frequency rame recording ensures the faithful reproduction
of eue?), interpretive and tonal nuance of a performance, whether
by soloist or full orchestra and chorus. Thus the reputations of the world's greatest
artists are i» 1/se safest possible hands with LONDON.
London can rely on the quality of their performances;
they cou rely on the technical quality of the records.
The "NAMES THAT COUNT" are on the LONDON label.
There are many of these grec: names; a fera of the most illustrious are
the artists whose new recordings are featured below.
ERNEST ANSERMET
DEBUSSY
Le
ROUSSEL
Martyre de Saint Sebastien
Incidental Music
Le Festin de
l'Araignée "The Spider's Feast"
Ballet
Petite Suite pour Orchestre
Suzanne Danco (soprano); Nancy Waugh (contralto); Lise de Gontmollin (contralto) with Union
Chorale de la Tour -de -Peils and L'Orchestre de la
Suisse Romande. Conductor: Ernest Ansermet
LL -1061
-
L'Orchestre de la Suisse Romande
Conductor: Ernest Ansermet
LL-1
S3.98
S3.98
179
RAVEL
BORODIN
Shéhérazade -Song Cycle
Symphony No. 2 in B Minor
Symphony No. 3 in A Minor "Unfinished"
Prince Igor -Overture
Trois Poèmes de Stéphane Mallarmé
Deux Mélodies Hébraïques
Suzanne Danco (soprano) with L'Orchestre de la
Suisse Romande. Conductor: Ernest Ansermet
L'Orchestre de la Suisse Romande
Conductor: Ernest Ansermet
LL 1178
LL -1196
S3.98
S3.98
Suzanne
Danco
SIR ADRIAN BOULT
HOLST
BAX
BUTTERWORTH
The Perfect Fool -Ballet Suite
Tintagel
A
Shropshire Lad
The Banks of Green Willow
The London Philharmonic Orchestra
LL -1169
Conductor: Sir Adrian Boult
S3.98
CESARE SIEPI
GOMES
VERDI
MEYERBEER
Salvator Rosa -Di sposo di padre le gioie serene
Simon Boccanegra -II lacerato spirito
Les Huguenots- Seigneur, rampart et seul Soutien
Les Huguenots -Piff, Paff
Robert le Diable- Nonnes, qui reposez
HALEVY
La Juive
-Si
la
rigeur
Cesare Siepi (bass) with Orchestra of Accademia di Santa Cecilia, Rome.
Conductor: Alberto Erede
LD-916!)
For full remits of other
uses,)
S2.98
London ffrr. releases consul: supplemenl -now nt your dealer.
JUNE '1955
59
www.americanradiohistory.com
RECORDS
Soloists, Combined Rotterdam Choirs, Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra, Eduard
Flipse, cond.
EPIC SC 6004. Two 12 -in. $9.96.
Galileo proved years ago that when size
increases arithmetically, problems grow
geometrically. The "Symphony of a Thou and" is a case in point. It cannot be dealt
with simply as a choral symphony on a
larger scale; a successful performance depends on such a concaotenation of factors
that it seems highly unlikely that conditions
would ever be altogether favorable. Mahler
made it difficult for everybody. The size of
his apparatus puts the acoustics of any hall
to the acid test (to say nothing of its
backstage facilities). Three choirs and
auxiliary bands and players have not merely
to be drilled, but trained in an unfamiliar,
personal style; eight solo parts have to be
filled with singers who have big voices and
considerable cranial capacity
and where
can you find a well -matched cast of first-rare
artists who will consent to take roles in a
-
quasi-oratorio? The whole has to be stage managed as well as conducted, distributed
so that the tonal forces remain in equilibrium, and handled so that light can penetrate through successive layers of sound to
the deepest stratum. After that, problems
of interpretation can be considered: what
were Mahler's dramatic and philosophical
intentions? If you discount the emotional
and intellectual content of the score, there
is nothing left, the thousand notwithstanding. Lastly, a conductor has only to worry
about keeping everybody together. The
recording engineers can take it from there,
but they, too, have their difficulties multiplied.
Mr. Flipse copes with the Eighth in
admirable fashion. His reading has sweep,
meaning and sensuousness. He exploits the
dramatic possibilities inherent in these
masses and their juxtaposition. He is inclined to be weighty, but never lapses into
that laggard state which is the thief of
tempo. The soloists are not identified but
Rich Promise from the Promised Land
THE
ISRAEL Philharmonic Orchestra is
said to be embarrassed by a superfluity of
concertmasters. Four string- players alternate in assuming responsibility for this function. Or so the printed publicity claims.
To begin with, I was a little incredulous, but
I am not, after hearing the orchestra's first
records. A string -section like this is not
met with frequently these days; its suavity,
flexibility, and dynamic -range at once put
the orchestra into the top rank of today's
symphonic organizations. And the ensemble's assets do not stop there. There is in its
playing, throughout, a disciplined verve
that perks the attention and repays intentness. This is an orchestra to keep an eye
on
or an ear bent to.
EMI obviously was aware of this. When
Lawrence Collingwood was sent to make the
initial Israel Philharmonic recordings, the
good offices of the British Ambassador were
invoked, and Israeli officials respooded by
detouring all traffic away from the recording
auditorium. The results are felicitous. The
recordings are beautiful.
In only one
of three initial issues
are efforts possibly wasted (and this is rare
in today's crowded LP field). The Mahler
First Symphony from Klerzki and the IPO
I should have to give second raring on two
important scores. Bruno Walter interprets
it better in a Columbia performance just
barely inferior in recorded sound; Rafael
-
-
Mahler's Ninth Symphony always has
seemed to me, heretofore. too long. It's
still long, but this way I can take it, and
with pleasure, even if benumbed.
The
interpretation closely resembles that by
Bruno Walter, Mahler's acolyte, in an elderly
RCA Victor transcription from 78s. (Kletzki
might not like this comment, but its true.)
But the dynamics and tone -color furnished
by the Israelis give it a vitality hardly
imaginable from the older recording. It
may be that Walter and his New Yorkers
will come along later and dislodge this version from its top rating, but it will nor be
easy, and no one else in sight need even try.
JOHN M. CONLY
-
Kubelik and the London engineers just
barely ourpoint it sonically in a performance
slightly less telling. This is, like losing to
the Yankees or the Dodgers, not bad at all.
And from there on, all is triumph.
Kletzki has previously proved his powers
in Mendelssohn with a splendid Midsummer
Nights Dream Suite; he does it again here
with a "Scotch" Symphony that brooks no
current competition at all. His interpretation is broadly Romantic, but upon its completion you do not want co try a competitive record, you want to play his again.
And the last portions of the "filler,"
the overture "A Calm Sea and A Prosperous
Voyage," never have been recorded before
with such joyous thunder.
-
HANS KAUFMAN
Collingwood and Kleizki go over a score
MAHLER:
Symphony No. r,
"Titan."
ANGEL 35180. 12 -in. Factory -sealed: $4.98;
Standard -pack: $3.48.
MAHLER: Symphony No. 9, with Schönberg: Verklärte Nacht.
ANGEL 3526B. Two 12 -in. Factory -sealed:
$9.96; Standard -pack: $6.96.
MENDELSSOHN:
Sympbomy No. 3,
"Scotch," with Overture: "Calm Sea and
Prosperous Voyage."
ANGEL 35183.
12-in. Factory- sealed: $4.98;
Standard -pack: S3.48.
All wich Israel Philharmonic Orchestra, Paul
Kletzki, cond.
6o
-
they deserve to be, for on the whole, their
voices are of remarkably high calibre
and far more responsive than those of the
old, fuzzy Scherchen version on Columbia.
Perfectionists will find spots to complain
about, particularly in the closing portion
of Parc Il, but there is little point in caviling at the Eighth: tell it to city hall. The
contributing forces are well placed in the
recording, and the sonics are spacious, as
clear as a thousand can be when stuffed
down the throat of a single loudspeaker.
Philosophically, the Eighth calls for Redemption; technically its only real salvation
lies in trinaural recording. All told, however, matters have come out far better than
one has a right to expect.
FRED GRUNFELD
MENDELSSOHN
Elijah
Jacqueline Delman (s), Norma Proctor
(c), George Maran (t), Bruce Boyce (b);
London Philharmonic Choir, Hampstead
Parish Church Boy's Choir, and London
Philharmonic Orchestra, Josef Krips, cond.
LONDON LLA 27. Three 12 -in. $11.94.
Messiah may rightly be called the king
of oratorios, then Mendelssohn's fine Elijah
may safely be cast in the role of heir apparent. This bas beeo so since the work was
first performed at Birmingham in 1846. In
the intervening years much of Mendelssohn's other music has been subject to
fluctuating popular esteem, but Elijah has
always maintained its original popularity.
Yet this acceptance is hardly reflected in
the representation accorded Elijah on records, for this is only the second version to
appear in the LP catalogue, against the
eight currently available recordings of
Handel's masterpiece.
The earlier Columbia set (SL 155),
issued in 1947 (the centenary of the com11
poser's death), offers a well -balanced,
highly musical performance under the skillful direction of Sir Malcolm Sargent. It
boasts some superb oratorio singing by a
quartet of soloists well schooled in the
field, together with choral singing by the
Huddersfield Choral Society that is impressive but would have been more so had the
technical facilities of that day been better
able to capture the impact of such a solid
mass of vocal sound. Even with this deficiency, the set is a considerable achievement
for all concerned.
The new London issue is mainly notable
for its exploitation of a wonderful, open,
and well -extended sound, remarkable for
the truth of its perspective. It is particularly imposing in the large dramatic choruses,
the strongest feature of this work, which
roll out with thunderous power, yet manage
at the same rime to be clearly defined. It is
thrilling to hear the appeal of the pagans
to their god, "Baal, we cry to thee," emerge
from the speaker in such spine -chilling
sound. Equally remarkable, both for the
intensity of the singing and the beauty of
the sound, is the famous passage for chorus,
"Behold, God the Lord passed by," for
which Mendelssohn supplied such a wonderfully pictorial orchestral accompaniment,
making it the dramatic high point of the
scoreW.
hen we come to the soloists, it is
apparent that Krips has not been as (ortuContinued on page 62
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
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(,,i 1.11..Y1 1
0
4: AIL PE
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SL
RALPH
1
22I
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SIXTY SONATAS
KIRKPATRICK:
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SIXTY BEST
SONATAS OF
DOMENICO
SCARLATTI
of Scarlatti's delightful sonatas for
harpsichord are to be found on 4 new
Columbia "Lp" records -brilliantly.
immaculately performed by Ralph
Kirkpatrick. Columbia Sound Laboratory techniques have reproduced Mr.
Kirkpatrick's superb playing with highest fidelity.
60
Deluxe
ix
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SL
set
J.ß.
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$15.92
\wocw,.i::x..a.tttYaa:w,..
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ON COLUMBIA
COLUMBIA NUSfFR)CpRÁ$
ROBERT CASADESUS CD
CASADESUS: PIANO
MUSIC OF DEBUSSY
A combined tribute to
a master of keyboard composition and to one of the great artists of our time
on the occasion of his 20th concert season in
America: Columbia Records proudly presents, on
3 "Lp" records, the major portion of Debussy's
works for the piano, performed by his foremost
interpreter, Robert Casadesus.
.trbnunr
r
2alA
INCLUDES: Preludes, Books I & 11
Estampes
Masques Lisle Joyeuse Images. Books & II Deux
Ir.,.
o..4u
1
C<aun
. nm<o
DEBUSSY
PIANO
MUSIC
IMAGES, Book
IMAGES, Book II
I
ESTAMPES MASQUES
LISLE JOYEUSE
3,<t:";..... ....
..
,.
?:ï
-
Arabesques
Antiques
Available
Children's Corner Suite Six Epigraphcs
En Blanc et Noir (with Gaby Casadesus)
as 3
single
"Lp"
or in a deluxe
special price ofS14.95.
S5.95 each
records
set
(ML
4977 -79), at
with notes (SL 222) at
.m'<^,c
..W
Y.
:::%
>;..
^a
..<.°M::::ñ:''. SMk::
......,.:'sv%`"
,, a.a:w.m4
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New Needle! New Sound! Change to a
Columbia needle and hear the difference.
COLUMBIA
RECORDS
..!...vrY Ú i..L:1.1,r....a..,u..e
JuNr: 1955
i.e
.,.
61
RL'(.()ItD;
nate as was Sargent. The powerful baritone
of Bruce Boyce is impressive enough, but
there are times when he finds the tessitura
of his part quite troublesome; his attacks
are coo tentative to be satisfying. His conception of the part, too, is on the earthy
side, and as such less than convincing. In
the few arias allotted to the tenor, George
Maran sounds as if he might be more at
home in a Sullivan operetta than in oratorio. The soprano voice of Jacqueline
Delman
light, clear, but hardly weighty
enough for the music-is carefully used,
but her work never begins to approach the
artistic level of Isobel Baillie in the Colum-
lw
HIGH FIDELITY
-
f
-
1.1
_«.,._
t".
^n
J
bia set. Only Norma Proctor, the contralto,
is completely satisfactory. Her rich, firm
tones have the proper ring for oratorio, and
her style is in the best British manner.
Krips entertains a slightly brisker view of
the score than Sargent, and the orchestra,
responding to his incisive beat, gives a
handsome performance. equally handsomely
recorded.
J. F. I.
MENOTTI
Sebastian-Ballet Suite-See Gould:
Dance Variations
MILHAUD
La Cheminée du Roi René; Suite d'apres
Correcte
P04010
.ANSILI.
HOWARD HANSON
conducting the
EASTMAN -ROCHESTER
ORCHESTRA
GRIFFES The Pleasure Dome of Kubla Khan;
The White Peacock; Clouds; Bacchanale.
LOEFFLER Memories of My Childhood; Poem
for Orchestra. MG 40012
PORTER Poem and Dance; DONOVAN New
England
(
Chronicle; HIVELY Tres Himnos
"Three Hymns "). MG 40013
other new releases
OSLO PHILHARMONIC
ORCHESTRA
SVENDSEN Norwegian Rhapsodies Nos. 2
and 3; Symphony No. 2. Oivin Fjeldstad and
Odd Gruner -Hegge conducting. MG 90004
for Chorus and Orchestra;
Piano Concerto No. 2 (Robert Melling,
GROVEN Ballad
EGGE
pianist). Hugo Kramm and Oivin Fjeldstad
conducting. MG 90003
BRAEIN Concert Overture; OLSEN 2 Edda
Songs; JENSEN Partita Sinfonica; JOHANSEN Pan, Symphonic Music; EGGEN Olav
Liljekrans. Odd Gruner -Hegge conducting.
MG
90002
,
HALVORSEN Suite Ancienne;
Fossegrimen
Suite: Oivin Fjeldstad conducting; Alfred
Maurstad, hardanger fiddle. MG 90001
TIVOLI CONCERT
HALL ORCHESTRA
FROM TIVOLI by Hans ChrisLumbye. Tippe Lumbye conducting.
MG 90000
DANCES
tian
62
French Wind Quintet
LONDON DL 53002.
lo -in.
views have often noted, woodwinds record
better than anything else. This record is
no exception to that rule,
A. F.
i,1
B -flat,
MOZART
for Violin and Orchestra, No.
in 4, K. 219
Symphony No. 32, in G, K. 318
David Oistrakh, violin; National Saxon OrConcerto
5,
chestra. Dresden, Franz Konwitschny, cond.
(in the concerto). Bamberg Symphony
Orchestra. Fritz Lehmann. cond. (in the
.
DECCA DL 9766.
12 -in.
(s), Bettina; Angela Vercelli
(s), Clarice; Tatiana Bulgaron (s), Vio-
Eva dc Luca
letta; Vittoria Mascropaolo (ms), Fortunata; Alfredo Nobile (t), Leandro; Iwo
Vinco (bs), Don Policronio; Teodoro Ruvetto (bs), Topo; Gino Viziano (bs), Don
Simone; Chamber Orchestra of L'lnscituto
Fonografico Italiano, Ugo Rapalo, cond.
HAYDN SOCIETY I-15L 130. 12 -in. $5.95.
The jacket notes for the Haydn Society recording of Il Duello (more usually called,
in full, 1/ Duello Comico), put Giovanni
Paisiello forward as a kind of missing link
between Mozart and Rossini. Since this is
the first complete Paisiello opera to be
made available on LP, this conceit
it
is little more -seems particularly unfortunate. It would have been more accurate.
if perhaps less piquant, to note that, as an
opera composer, Paisiello was roughly contemporary with Mozart. Born in 1740, he
was older than Mozart, and he lived on
until 18r6 -the year in which Rossini's
It Barbiere di Siviglia made its start towards
displacing his own charming opera on the
same text. But Paisiello began relatively
-for
as
a stage composer, and
$4.98.
Foc the first rime to the knowledge
of this
reviewer the great Russian violinist utilizes
the prerogative of great celebrity to apply
extrinsic fanciness to the defacement of
music. This fattening-up and slowing -down
of a concerto that needs only candor from
its exponent is not comely. The orchestra
is large for this music, but the sound is
thick and sluggish. The pleasant performance of little Symphony No. 32 is lifted
from old Decca 4045: it is fair in sonics.
C. G. B.
his really
significant work for the theater trailed off
by 1794, only three years after the death
of Mozart and only two years after the
birth of Rossini.
As for 1/ Duello, it dates from 1774.
when Mozart had advanced no further
operatically than the relatively conventional
La Pinta Giardiniera. It bridges no Mozart- Rossini gap whatever. It is simply, and
more or less purely, a good example of
middling -late eighteenth -century opera buffo, in which standard post- Pergolesi usages
are modified only by the composer's characteristically mild, gracious musical personality. Its closest affinities could very
likely be found in the musics of Piccinni or
Cimarosa. As a type and as a work, though,
It Duello is most surely worth hearing for
the grace and
1b,
K. 570-See Beethoven: Concerto
for Piano and Orchestra. No. 3.
symphony)
PAISIELLO
11 Duello
late
$2.98.
Milhaud at his most Frenchily classical.
Michel Correcte was an obscure eighteenth century Parisian composer some of whose
tuneful dances are presented here in an
artful, polytonal arrangement for oboe,
clarinet, and bassoon. The work on the
other side has more substance. It is a suite
for wind quintet in seven movements delightfully recalling the gallant, peaceful
days of the fifteenth- century King René of
Provence, whose habit of sitting in the sun
gave the French their proverb, Se chao/Jer
d la cbenrinie du Roi René. As these re-
MOZART
Sonata for Piano, No.
-
MUSSORGSKY
fl Night on Bald Mountain
See Borodin: Prince Igor: Polot'tsian Dances.
charm-occasionally
sweet
wistful -and purity of its music.
though it does not have long stretches of
and
recitative conversation that may seem tedious to listeners whose Italian and French
are not sturdy enough to allow them to dig
the fun out of the somewhat intricate bilingual farce of manners that is the libretto.
The supplied translation (apart from
occasional lapses into the "golly" school of
Englishing colloquially) is fair enough.
but it is really not much help, for the whole
story turns on the addiction of the charming but witless heroine for everything
French
including French phrases and an
even more witless admirer who is similarly
addicted. This, quite naturally, exasperates
the hero
who confines his excesses to
sorne moderately apocopated Italian
and
a duel is arranged. Through the machinations (just as in French comedies of the
period) of a reliably venal servant, everything comes out bloodlessly and as it should
to the surprise of no one at all.
The performance, under the direction of
Ugo Rapalo
who conducts opera at the
Teatro San Carlo, in Naples, and apparently makes a hobby of Paisiello
well
-
-
-
-
-
-is
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
"stunning performances. incomparable reproduction..."
BARTOK
Concerto
ANTAL DORATI
Roman Carnival
BORODIN
Symphony No.
Minor
2 in B
MG
- Egmont, Coriolan,
Leonore No.3
50005- Symphonie
Fantastique, MG 50034
DEBUSSY
Three Nocturnes, MG 50005-MG 50025
GERSHWIN -BENNETT
RAVEL
OVERTURES,
MG 50017
Minor, MG 50004
Symphony No. 3, MG 50018
Porgy and Bess, MG 50016
Spirituals, MG 50016
MENDELSSOHN
Symohony No. 4 in A Major 'ITALIAN", MG 50010
Symphony No. 40 in
G
Minor, MG 50010
- Alborada del gracioso,
- The Fountains of Rome, 50011
Pavane pour .me Infante defunte
The Pines of Rome
RESPIGHI
RIMSKY- KORSAKOV
RICHARD STRAUSS
JOHANN STRAUSS
STRAVINSKY
TCHAIKOVSKY
ORCHESTRA
5 in C
OVERTURE,
COPLAND
MOZART
SYMPHONY
Orchestra, MG 50030
BERLIOZ
GOULD
MINNEAPOLIS
fo
Symphony No.
BEETHOVEN
MG 50005
MG
Scheherazade, MG 50009
Ein Heldenleben, MG 50012
Wiener Blut
The Firebird,
- Tales from the Vienna Woods- Wine, Women and Song -
BAUET
Symphony No.
sum,
5 in E
MG 50004 -MG 50025
Le Sacre du
The Nutcracker
Minor, MG 50008
The Emperor Waltz, MG 50019
Printemps, MG 50030
BALLET
(complete), OL-2-101
NEW RELEASES
Vetrate di Chiesa
RESPIGHI
TCHAIKOVSKY
BRITTEN
- Feste Romane,
BALLET
(complete),
MG 50046
OL -3102
The Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra, MG 50047; (with
DEEMS TAYLOR,
narrtor),
MG 50055
Concertantes Variaciones, MG 50047
GINASTERA
RAVEL
Swan Lake
Daphnis and Chloe (complete), MG 50048
ANTAL DORATI conducting the CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
TCHAIKOVSKY
BARTOK
Romeo and Juliet
OVERTUREFANTASIA
The Miraculous Mandarin
SUITE
-
-
KODALY
SCHUBERT
Symphony No. 8 °uNrrNisHEO
,
MG 5003?
Peacock Variations, MG 50038
63
JUNE 1:955
www.americanradiohistory.com
RECORDS
prepared and rather well sung by a cast
that is competent and musicianly but hardly virmosic enough to go very far in ornamenting- traditionally or otherwise
duaste vocal outlines left by Paisiello. The
sound is quite full and resonant all the way
up and down, if without much theater
illusion. Off the beaten track, but recommended freely.
J. H., Jr.
-the
PROKOFIEV
Concerto for Piano and Orchestra, No.
r, in D -flat major, Op. ro -See
Kabalevsky: Concerto for Piano and
Orchestra, No. 2.
PROKOFIEV
Concerto for Violin and Orchestra, No.
r
l-Lalo: Symphonie Espagnole
Nathan Milstein, violin; St. Louis Symphony Orchestra, Vladimir Golschmann,
cond.
CAPITOL P 8303. 12 -in. $3.98.
Magnificent performances and excellent
recordings of two standard violin concertos
which scarcely demand discussion as such.
The omission of the third movement of the
Lalo, however, is inexcusable in a recording, even if it is sanctioned by one of the
idiotic "traditions" of the concert hall.
A_ F
PROKOFIEV
Sonata for Piano, No 2, in D minor, Op.
rq
See Kabalevsky: Concerto for
-
Piano and Orchestra, No. 2.
PUCCINI
La Rondine
(s), Magda; Ornello Rover()
Lisette; Tatiana Bulgaron (s), Yvette;
Angiola Vercelli (s), Bianca; Vittoria Mastropaolo (ms), Suzy; Giacinto Prandelli
(t), Ruggero; Luciano della Pergola (t),
Prunier; Alfredo Nobile (t), Gobin;
Vladimiro Pagano (b), Rambaldo; Teo doro Rovetta (bs), Pétichaud, Crebillon.
Antonio Guarnieri Orchestra and Chorus
(Milan), Frederico del Cupolo, cond.
Eva de Luca
(s),
COLUMBIA- F.NTRE
EL
12.
Two
12 -in.
55.96.
With the release by Columbia of La Ron dine, on the budget Entrt label, the Est of
Puccini operas that can he heard on LP is
as nearly complete as it seems likely ever co
be. The two very earliest
Le Villi
(1884) and Edgar ('889)
are still missing, but both of them have been so long
out of mind, and stand so low in repute,
that not even the coming Puccini centennial, which will be celebrated in 1958,
gives them much prospect of being recorded commercially. In fact, few composers in any medium have less to offer
in the way of surprise favors for rile guests
at their birthday parties. La Rondine is no
rough, self-sustaining theater piece like La
Bobèn,e. But it is an interesting and, needless to say, highly polished score. Puccini
admirers ought not to pass up hearing it
bur also ought not to judge it finally on the
basis of this recording, which is of a per-
--
64
formance no better than fair, no better than
passably engineered.
As a totality, the work seems quite uncharacteristic and yet unmistakably Puccini
in the genetic sense, a sport. Just before
the war of 19t4, an Austrian publisher
urged on Puccini the idea of composing a
sort of Viennese operetta. He agreed. Long
before he had finished, though, he decided
that spoken lines and sec pieces were not
for him, and La Rondine was completed as
an opera, which had its premiere at Monte
Carlo in 1917. It went the usual rounds
in Italy, and was done at the Metropolitan
in 1928 and 1936
both times for Lucteria Bori, both times with mild success,
and a mild, occasional success it has
remained.
The plot revolves around Magda, a girl
of easy virtue who is kept in luxury by a
rich man in Paris but loves to theorize and
grow nostalgic about real, true love. Prunier, a part -time poet and full -time sophisticare, tells her that her talk is all very well,
but that she doesn't mean it -that she
will always fly back, like the swallow (the
rondine of the title), to her true home.
Almost at once, she meets young Ruggero,
and they elope -like Violetta and Alfredo
make a new life. As long as the
arrangement is irregular, all goes well
enough; but when Rugger() gets serious
about making it legal, she parades her
scarlet past, proclaims her unworthiness,
and with great nobility goes back to her
jeweled nest and her rich lover, leaving
the boy in tears. For Puccini's purpose, she
would have done better to die in Ruggerós
arms. For, world -wise man though he was,
Puccini was not one to sneer at true love.
The music has a great deal of sparkle, and
much of it is very lovely
most especially
when Magda is in a sentimental vein, as in
her idealistic addition to Prunier's poem,
"Il bel sogno." the best -known excerption
from the score and one of the most grateful
soprano arias in the Puccini literature. But
all the waltz tunes, all the banter, even the
sky -and -countryside music of the last act,
cannot disguise the fact that in the end
Magda is going back to live in sin with a
baritone.
The Entré set, unlike others in the list,
which are reissues of prewar 78s, is a new
recording, apparently taken from Italian
tapes of recent date. While the earlier
Entré operas are first-class productions of
the past, good as far as they go, this is a
second or third -rate production of today,
and not good by any standards. The performance, decently paced, has no positive
distinctions and many flaws. Eva do Luca,
American by background, sounds like any
one of a hundred Italian sopranos and is
none too sure musically, while Giacinto
Prandelli is colorless in his reading and so
constricted above E that he hardly sounds
himself at all. The others are variable, at
best, and the ensemble is not good when
it most needs to he. The sound is squeezed
and unpleasant, with an edge at the top
and gumminess at the bottom, and wavering perspective. Only the surfaces are good.
J. H., Jr.
-
-
-ro
-
RAVEL
Bolero; La Valse
tHooegger: Pacific 23r
tDukas: The Sorcerer's Apprentice
L'Orchestre de la Société des Concerts du
Conservatoire de Paris, Ernest Ansermet,
tond.
LONDON LL 1156.
12 -in. $3.98.
Capable rather than inspired performances.
The Honegger musical pictorialization of a
locomotive trip, dedicated to Ansermet, is
impressively recorded, but the performance
lacks the galvanism of the Willis Page version on Cook ro68. La Valse, which appears to be the same performance found
on LONDON LL 956, is rather erratic in
tempo and too explosive in sound, while
the reverse applies to the Bolero, which is
surprisingly mild, particularly in its final
moments. The Dukas symphonic poem
comes off quite well, being expertly played
and beautifully recorded; however, the Toscanini version on RCA VICTOR LM 1118
is not
easily displaced, even though its
sound lacks the luster provided by London's
engineers.
J. F. I.
RAVEL
Miscellaneous Piano Music-See Fauré:
Nocturne No. 2, etc.
RAVEL
-
See Tchaikovsky:
for Violin and Orchestra,
Tzigane
Concerto
RODRIGO
Concierto de Aranjuez
Narciso Yepes, guitar; Orquesta de Cámara,
Ataulfo Argenta, coud.
tFalla: Nights in the Gardens of
Gonzalo Soriano, piano; Orquesta
mara, Ataulfo Argenta, cond.
LONDON T\n 9t019. 12 -in. $4.98.
Spain
de Cá-
Falla's magical work is, of course, deservedly well known and needs no further mention here except to say that performance
and recording are both flawless. The Rodrigo guitar concerto, however, is practically
unknown in the United States, a situation
that this beautiful recording should remedy.
It is a work written along traditional lines,
in three movements, for guitar and chamber
orchestra. The first movement, fresh and
charming, leads into a slow movement that
can only be described as exquisitely evocative, a movement that
for all of its
impressionistic garb-is essentially and
satisfying romantic. It is here in particular
that the listener becomes aware of the
amazing expressive powers of the guitar
at least in the hands of a Narciso Yepes.
The last movement, graceful, light, and
billiant, provides a sitting close to a minor
(or maybe not so minor!) masterpiece.
Careful engineering has provided a welcome balance of sound between guitar and
orchestra.
G. S., Jr.
-
-
SAINT -SA ENS
Concerto for Piano and Orchestra, \'o.
.
in G minor
tGlazunov: Sonata for Piano, No.
E minor, Op. 75
2,
Emil Gilels, piano; National Philharmonic,
Alexander Gauk, cond.
COLOSSEUM CR LP 178. 12 -in. $3.98.
There are now three LP versions of the
Saint -Sacns Second Piano Concerto by Mr.
Gilels. This particular one is flawed, somewhat nervous in style, with missed notes
here and there. Could it have been made
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
Creators of the
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e°
new, handsome y
ealed "Perfectionist Package
esigned, practica
at the amazingly low price of
The color -banded gold lab
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Dallo Soria, President
38 West 48 Streut. Now Yorti
14ulcI Inundr /n lid. Nyes. Mlddle... radiant,
S
JUNE 1955
www.americanradiohistory.com
RECORDS
radio performance or a rejected
In any case, it is inferior to the
splendid Vanguard performance, which is
Presumably the
also superior sonically.
best Gilds version is on Angel, which I
have not heard but which has been favor
ably reported on by C. G. B. This recording of the Glazunov sonata sounds identical
ro the version put out by Concert Hall
Society. Again, Colosseum fails to qualify
from
a
rape?
R. E.
acoustically.
SAINT-SAINS
Symphony No.
in
3,
C
minor, Op. 78
NBC Symphony Orchestra, Arturo Toscanini, cond.
RCA VICTOR LM 1874. 12-in. $3.98.
Hague
Philharmonic
Orchestra,
Willem
van Otterloo, cond.
EPIC LC 3077. 12 -In. $3.98.
Because
it calls for
a
fairly large orchestra,
plus organ and piano, this massive but very
attractive symphony is not performed as
often as it deserves. Fortunately, it has
now been recorded three rimes on LP,
counting an earlier version by Charles
Munch and the New York Philharmonic Though the
Symphony on Columbia.
latter recording was made in 1947, it still
stands up extremely well against the new
competition; in fact, Munch gives what is
still the most dramatically exciting and
incisive account of the music. My second
choice is Van Otterlon, who makes the
work move along in fine style and who
enjoys the warmest, fullest reproduction.
Toscanini is somewhat more deliberate in
the opening movement, though he manages
to work up quite a lot of steam in the
Finale, and the recording (made from an
NBC broadcast of November 15, 1952) is
more than acceptable, if not quite as rich in
bass sonorities as Epic's.
P. A.
die Ruh'; Geheimnis; Der Atlas; Das
Rosenband; Der Musensohn; Standchen;
Horch, horch, die Lerch; Litanei; Gruppe
aus dem Tartarus; Seligkeit; Nachtviolen;
Abschied.
"Warwick Symphony Orchestra- (Emanuel
Feuermann, cello; Alexander Hilsberg,
lin; Samuel Lifschey, viola; Philadelphia
Orchestra, Eugene Ormandy, cond.).
Gérard Souzay, baritone; Dalton Baldwin,
piano.
LONDON LI. 1148. 12 -in. S3.98.
Again Camden is pretty persuasive with
Richard Strauss, although as in the recently
issued Heldenleben the conductor has ex.
pressed himself better as a mechanic of the
orchestra than as an exponent of the corn poser. Perhaps the quality of this orchestra.
with its glowing string tone, and the cloqucnce of the soloists suffice. The resurrect
don of the old 785 will not draw sneers.
for though the solo cello is too close and
some of the climaxes are weak, the new
conics give good timbre to the Philaded
phians, a grand soar to the strings beyond
hope, and a fair effect of mass. By no
means the best Don Quixote, but worth
A sympathetic voice in a natural delivery,
an assured understanding of text and music,
and a disinclination to act the songs he
sings are the agreeable assimilable attributes of this Frenchman. He is neither
the man to overlook an implication nor
one ro brandish one. It is possible that this
calculated restraint has militated against
the breadth of a repute he ought to have,
since it counters an influential tenet of
criticism that declares that Germans alone
can sing a lied with the vocal signals
necessary to prove that they understand it,
a
proof of subtlety established by its
absence.
This department, which favors
poise perhaps too much, thinks the baritone
admirable in the regretful simplicity of the
Litanei, the thudding horror of C;ruppe aus
dent Tartans, the lyric anthem to love
called Du bust die Ruh', and most of the
rest as well, in spite of the reliance on pure
and unaffected singing. The accompaniment is competent, with some of the
singer's ease of expression imitated on the
keyboard. The reproduction is of a matter of -fact
realism
highly
commendable
through
a
broad extent of volume.
C. G. B.
SCHUMANN
Symphony No.
3,
in E -flat, "Rhenish,"
OP. 97
Concertgebouw
Orchestra,
Carlo Zecchi, cond.
EPIC LC 3092. 12 -in. 53.93.
Amsterdam,
solemnly uncertain performance by a
conductor with line forces at his disposal
but diffident about sending them off freely.
The first two movements are held to a
parade -step not enlivened by thickened
harmonics, and the air pumped into the
last three comes roo lace. 'Ilhe sound has a
strong orchestral sweep, and with more
polish would have been worth special
praise.
C. G. B.
A
SCHUBERT
Sonata for Piano, in A minor.
O.
42
Webster Aitken.
EMS 107. 12 -in. S5.95.
A cameo has restricted uses. So coo has the
neat, small piano -sound on this record.
Reduced like this, its purity becomes primness, hardly beneficial to the constrasting
substances of the sonata. The player's sympathy and love for Schubert are both
applauded and apparent, but he can no
more transcend the limitations of weak
reproduction than could the Kempff of the
Beethoven sonatas on Decca or the Giese-
king of the Mozart series for Angel. Ton
bad.
C. G. B.
SCHUBERT
Songs
An die Leier; Der Schmeterling; DI! bist
Perhaps surprisingly, during the late
period of record price shifts, we have
been called ro account for very few
erroneous price-listings:
In April and
May we listed certain Vox 12 -inch records as selling for 53.98; their real
price was (and still is, at the time of
this writing) 55.95. We hope that this
error has spoiled no beautiful friendships between dealers and customers.
-
66
SINDING
Saite in A minor, Op. ro -Sec Tchaikovsky: Concerto for Violin and Orchestra.
STAMITZ, CARL
Concertos for Flute and Orchestra in D
major and G major
Kurt Redel, flute; L'Ensemble Orchestral de
L'Oiseau -Lyre, Kurt Redel, cond.
L'OISEAU -LYRE OL 50035. 12in. $4.98.
Two works by the son of the more important and original Johann Stamitz. In
the fast movements the music jogs along
pleasantly and unimpressively; the slow
movements are rather bull.
Nothing
happens ro disturb the eventenor of elegant mediocrity in this mixture of Haydn
and water. Both performance and recording are unexceptionable.
N. B.
STRAUSS
Don Quixote
CAMDEN CAL 202.
12-in.
51.98.
more than the price requested.
C. G. B
STRAVINSKY
Suite from Pulcinella
Divertimento from Le Baiser de la
Fée
Orchestre National de la Radiodiffusion
Française, Igor Markevitch, cond.
ANGEL 35143. 12in. $4.98.
Pulcinella and Le Baiser de la Fée derive
their thematic material from the works of
older composers, Pergolesi and Tchaikovrespectively. Pergolesi- Stravinsky is 2
magnificent combination, and the resulting
score is one of the wittiest, deftest, and
liveliest in the literature. The combination
of Stravinsky and Tchaikovsky seems, to
this writer at least. forced and artificial, and
Le Baiser must be accounted one of Stravinsky's least convincing efforts. Markevitch's
performances of both works are excellent
and the recordings are superb. In no previ
ous recording of the Pulcinella suite is the
chamherlike character of the orchestration
so well set forth.
A. F.
sky
TARTINI
Violin Concertos in
minor
F
major and A
Walter Schneiderhan, violin; Vienna Orchestra. F. Charles Adler, cond.
SPA 46. 12 -in- $5.95.
Schneiderhan's technique is more than adequate for this music, including the rather
fancy cadenzas. but whether his style is
suitable for Tartini is questionable- He indulges in a type of vibrant "expression"
that would be line for Glazunov, and in tht
first movement of the F major Concerto
sometimes slides from one tone to another
on the same string,. The works themselves,
edited by Gilbert Ross of the University of
Michigan from a manuscript collection in
n ^toa, contain much of interest- The
main
theme of the finale of the F major has the
character of a Slavic folk song, and the A
minor is full of good ideas expressed with
unwonted intensity. The balance between
soloist and orchestra is satisfactory but the
basses sound rather tubby and there is
some surface noise.
N. B.
TCHAIKOVSKY
Concert Fantasy.
Op.
janian: Heroic Ballad.
56-Sec
Baba -
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
RECORDS
Boyd Neel String Orchestra, Boyd Neel,
cond.
LONDON LD 9170. ro -in. $2.98.
TCHAIKOVSKY
Concerto for Violin and Orchestra, in
D, Op. 35
tRavel: Tzigane
tSinding: Suite in A minor, Op. ro.
Warlock's Capriol Suite has long been one
of the gems of recorded music and it is
charmingly played by the Boyd Neel group.
The rich harmonies of Delius were studiously copied in Warlock's serenade to the
blind composer, a short work that must
have pleased Delius, as it will his admirers.
Ireland's minuet is light and innocuous.
Excellent string cone throughout.
J. F. I.
Jascha Heifetz, violin; Philharmonia Orchestra, Walter Süsskind, cond. (in the
Tchaikovsky); Los Angeles Philharmonic
Orchestra, Alfred Wallenstein, cond.
the Ravel and Sinding).
RCA VICTOR LM 1832. 12 -in. $3.98.
(in
A reissue of the polished, showy, and
glacial Heifetz performance of the Tchaikovsky, previously issued on VICTOR LM
t r r r.
The three movements have now
been compressed onto one side of this
twelve -inch disk, and its 1991 sound has
received some ministration from Victor's
engineers. The result is more tonally per-
suasive, both as to orchestra and violin
sound, and the record is much preferable
to the original issue.
The little Sinding suite, never before
recorded, is a real charmer, and is ideally
suited to display the fabulous technique of
Heifetz plays it with great
this artist.
affection, and offers in the first movement
some of the most dazzling spiccaro playing
to be heard on records. I am not much
attracted to Ravel's Tzigane, though I hardly expect ro hear it better played than in
this expert performance. In the last two
works, both newly recorded, the violin
sound is of extreme brilliance, but that of
the orchestra inclines co muddiness. Both
would have benefited from a more equable
J. F. I.
balance.
TCHAIKOVSKY
and Juliet -See Borodin:
Romeo
Prince Igor: Polovtsian Dances.
TCHAIKOVSKY
The Sleeping Beauty (excerpts)
Andre Kostelanetz and his Orchestra
COLUMBIA ML 496o. 12 -in. $3.98.
Twenty excerpts are included on this record, the most of the best, but not necessarily the best of the most, since it does not
displace, in my estimation, the fine Stokowski version on RCA VICTOR LM iota,
which it so closely approximates. Yet this
recording must take a fairly high place
among competitive versions, if only for the
beauty of Columbia's recorded sound. Artistically, the performance bears less of the
Kostelanetz imprint than did the earlier
Swan Lake. Here he exhibits fewer of his
musical eccentricities and shows a closer
regard than is sometimes the case for the
composer's markings in matters of tempos
and rhythm.
J. F. I.
RECITALS AND
MISCELLANY
SEnMANN ARCHIVE
Vivaldi: only the dog's bark lacked bite.
DtiCCA DL 8093. 12 -in. $3.98.
ing does not prevent Vivaldi from achieving solid, integrated form- here the
pattern of a structure that is partly concerto
grosso and partly violin concerto. It is only
in the fourth concerto, Winter, that the
exigencies of the "program.' prove roo
much for Vivaldi and result in a piece that
does not hang together very well.
The performance is musical and sensitive.
Soloist and ensemble play with agreeable
tone. The delicate balances of this carefully
orchestrated work are faithfully reproduced
most of the time. In the second movement
of Spring the dog of the sleeping goatherd
might bark a little louder, and in the finale
of Summer the violas are a bit too far back
in spots. The performers seem to have used
an edition that differs in some respects
from that in the Collected Works. This is
especially noticeable in the last movement
of Sumpter, where an important figure in
the second violins is omitted. The recording is excellent, but the surfaces of the
N. B
review disk were crackly.
VIVES
Bohemios
Toriy Rosado, Teresa Berganza, Ana Maria
Fernández, Adela Cano, Manuel Ausensi,
Carlos Munguía, Arturo Diaz Martos,
Gregorio Gil; Coros Cantores de Madrid
and
Gran Orquesta Sinfónica, Ataulfa
Argenta, cond.
LONDON Tw 91038. 12 -in. S4.98.
A prolific and successful zarzuela composer,
Amadeo Vives belongs to the select company that includes Bretón, Chaps, Serrano,
and Moreno Tórroba. While perhaps not
as
popular
as
his unforgettable
Maruxa,
has held the stage for fifty years,
and there is no reason why it should not
continue doing so for another half century.
The plot is a straightforward, romantic
tale of a young composer and an opera singer -ro -be in the Pari, of a hundred years
Bohemios
VIVALDI
The Four Seasons, Op. 8
George
nietta.
BOSTON
Zazofsky, violin;
13
40o. 12 -in. S4.98.
Bird songs,
and
Zimbler Sinfo-
a
lightning,
murmuring brook, thunder
a
sleeping drunk, hunters
cornering their quarry, chattering teeth, a
this and
stroller slipping on the ice
more is depicted charmingly and in what
seems today quite naïve fashion in these
fine works. Yet, as in Beethoven's Panora/
Symphony, the literalness of the tone paint-
-all
JUNE 1955
THE NORTH AND
OF
SOUTI -1
Frank Luther and Zora Layman, with
the Century Quarter.
SONGS
Naturally, it is a perfect match, leading to an inevitable love duet at the end.
The music is delightful, the performance
satisfactory, the recording superb.
ago.
G. S., Jr.
WARLOCK
Capriol Suite, Serenade for Frederick
Delius
[Ireland: Minuet
This recording by Decca of the songs of
the North and South in the War Between
the States must be a pretty complete compilation. With eighteen songs representing
the North and seventeen the South
thirty-five in all; count them
too many
couldn't have been left out. And this is my
-
-
chief objection. The singing is straight.
forward and quite good, but the very fact
there are so many songs of unvarying
length and style makes for monotony. I
feel this could have been a ten -incher.
The recorded sound is excellent.
ROY LiNDSTROM
ELIZABETHAN AND JACOBEAN
MUSIC
John Dowland: Can She Excuse My iVrongr ?;
If My Complaints Could Passions More; My
Lady ilrnudon's Pine (for lute solo); From
Silent Night. Thomas Morley: Ai,- (for three
viols). John Bartlett: Of all the Birth That i
Do Know. Robert Johnson: Alma,' (set for
harpsichord by Giles Farnahyl. John Jenkins: Pavan (for four viols); Fantasia in C
(fur four viols). Robert Parsons: Pam/nip/Jo.
Giles Farnahy: Variations on Up Tails All
(for harpsichord).
Alfred Deller, counter- tenor; Desmond
Duprs, lute; Gustav Leonhardt, harpsichord;
consort of viols.
VANGUARD BG 539,
t2 -in- $4.98.
However discouraged a view may be taken
of the creative state of English music since
Purcell, there was a time, from deep in the
Middle Ages to the end of the Renaissance,
when the composers of England were as
brilliant as any. So, when the first Elizabeth
carne ro the throne, in 1998, and her reign
turned out to be a golden age of poetry,
there were other pens ready to set the
words most elegantly to music. It was a
cosmopolitan time, and under Italian influence a school of English madrigalists grew
More significant, however, and cerup.
tainly more definably English, were the
strophic songs in which
writers of gyres
the voice melody was supported by other
voices or by instruments, the point of interest shifting more and more surely to
the marriage of words and music and away
from the complex interweavings of several
parrs. Ar the same time, there was a grow-
-
67
RECORDS
Dialing Your Disks
reduced and bass increased to restore the
Control positions on
original balance.
equalizers are identified in different ways,
but equivalent markings are listed at the
top of each column in the table below. This
table covers most of the records sold in
America during the past few years, with the
emphasis on LP. Some older LPs and 78s
Records are made with the treble range
boosted to mask surface noise, and the bass
range reduced in volume to conserve groove
space and reduce distortion. 'When the
records are played, therefore, treble must be
TURNOVER
400
500
500 (etoD.)
ORTHO
NAB
NARTB
RECORD LABEL
ARS
(old)
AES
(new)
ROLLOFF AT roKC.
ro.5 -13.5 db
i6 eb
AES
RIAA
RCA
COL
NARTB
RCA
ORTHO
ORIG. LP
LON
RIAA
LON
LP
required Boo -cycle turnover; some foreign
78s are recorded with Soo -cycle turnover
and zero or 5 -db treble boost. One -knob
equalizers should be ser for proper turnover,
and the treble tone control used for further
correction if required. In all cases, the proper settings of controls arc those that
sound best.
NAB(Old)
COL
LP
ORIG. LP
Allied
Angel
Atlantic *'
Amer. Rec. Soc.*
Bartok
Blue Note Jazz*
Boston*
Caedmon
Canyon*
Capitol*
Capitol -Cetra
Cetra -Soria
Colosseum*
Columbia*
Concert Hall*
Contemporary*
Cook (SOOT)'
Decca*
EMS*
Elektra
Epic*
Esoteric
Folkways (most)
Good -Time Jazz*
Haydn Soc.*
L'Oiseau -Lyre*
London*
Lyrichord, new*2
Mercury*
Continued from Page 67
ing interest in music for keyboard and for
combinations of instruments without voices,
and in the dance pieces and fantasias of
Elizabethan days and on into die first decades
of the seventeenth century, England could
claim a real chamber -music literature more
advanced than any on the Continent.
Historicity is one thing, however, and
continuing worth another. It is only through
performances such as these that Dowland,
Farnaby, Morley, and Campian can become
more than shadowy names; only through
them that it is possible to know what the
songs were like (fiat Elizabeth heard and
applauded and sang to her lute. Until fairly
recently, there have been disadvantages to
seeking our music of this period on records.
First, most of the few recorded examples
have been bound up in one historical series
or another. Second (with all respect to the
pioneering of the Dolmetsch family), performances of musics involving obsolete
instruments have dankness and dedication
rather than freshness and re- creative élan.
The performances here are not entirely free
from ritual seriousness. but they are basically musical rather than simply musicological and have enough flow, enough light
and shade, to keep them engaging as well
interesting.
This is by no means the first appearance on
records of the British counter -tenor (or, as
he would have been called before the lowvoiced ladies misappropriated the title,
"alto ") Alfred Deller, who is one of the few
remaining exemplars of the falsettist art
that was until well into the iE8os the distinctive feature of English cathedral choirs.
Falsettists are not supposed to last much
beyond middle age, but Mr. Deller, at
forty -three, has still the same even, pure
scale as ever, the same free high tones that
float without effort past his cavalry moustache, the same scrupulous artistry. Desmond Dupre s lute accompaniments are
very fine, and so is Gustav Leonhardt's
playing, both at the keyboard and in his
consort of viols. The sound is clean, delicately balanced, and intimate, the surfaces
excellent. Full texts, and helpful notes by
Sydney Beck. Highly recommended.
J. H.. Jr.
as
MGM
Oceanic*
Pacific Jazz
Philharmonia*
Polymusic *I
RCA Victor
Remington*
Riverside
Romany
Savoy
Tempo
Urania, most*
Urania, some
Vanguard*
Bach Guild*
Vox*
Walden
Westminster
EVENINGS AT THE BALLET
*Beginning sometime in 1954, records made from new mutera require RIAA equalization for both
bass and treble.
(Binaural records produced on this label are recorded to WARTS standards on the outside band.
On the inside band, WARTS is used for low frequencies but the treble is recorded Bat without pre.
emphasis
'Some older releases used the old Columbia curve, others old ARS.
68
Tchaikovsky:
Nutrrarker Suite; Aurora's
Wedding. Richard Strauss: Till Eslenspiegel's
Merry Pranks. Ravel: Lu Valse; Daphnis and
Chloe Suite No. 2. Grétry: Céphale es Proeris.
Delibes: Cappélia Ballet Suite. Verdi: Aida
Ballet Suite.
Bizet:
Symphony in C.
Schumann- Glazunov: Carnaval. Rossini Respighi: La Boutique Fantasque. Weber:
Invitation to the Dante. SainrSaent: Rae chanale from Samson and Delilah. Bernstein:
On the Town. Prokofiev: Classical Symphony.
Khachaturian: Gays Ballet Suite. Stravinsky: Petronthka. Borodin: Prince Igor: Dances
of the Polortsian Maidens.
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
www.americanradiohistory.com
12EA.
"Warwick;' "Centennial," "World Wide,"
Die Tänzerin Penny Elssler: Draussen in
"Century," "Festival," "Stratford," "On the
Town,' "Schuyler" Symphony Orchestras,
Sievering (arr. Stalla). Wiener Blur: introduction and title waltz (arr. Schönherr).
various conductors.
CAMDEN CV L 102. Six 12 -in. $x0.98.
In this Baedeker of the ballet, Camden offers
the listener a tour through the ballet repertoire from Grétry to Bernstein, using eighteen scores by sixteen different composers
(Ravel and Tchaikovsky are doubly represented). played by eight well -known orchestras. The exclusion of Les Sylphides
may seem as surprising as the inclusion of
the operatic ballet excerpts from Aida and
Samson and Delilah, but this is probably
due ro the exigencies of space. The recordings date from the late Thirties and early
Forties; the sound has been, in general, successfully enhanced over that found on the
original
issues.
The performantes are not all shining
examples of conductorial arr, but it should
be said that a few real gems appear on these
disks: Koussevitzky's fine performance of
Ravel's Daphnis and Chloe Suite No. z and
good Till from the same source; Mon teux's reading of La Valse; an excellent
Petronchka by Stokowski; and a charming
performance of the ballet music from
Grérry's Céphale et Procris by Defauw. In
all, a most attractive offering of more than
three hours of ballet music ar a most reasonable price, but definitely nor for those bedazzled by the latest in hi -fi.
J. F. L
a
FLAMENCO AND CLASSIC SPANISH
DANCES
Inesita, heels, fingers, and castanets; Juan
Martinez, guitar; Pablo Miguel, piano.
PERIOD RL r905. 12 -in. $4.98.
This is undoubtedly one of the most exciting records of popular Spanish music
ever released. If the guitar and the piano
as recorded here seem a trifle on the discreet side -well, it simply doesn't matter,
for fiery Inesita overwhelms and takes the
breath away with the sharp, intricate
rhythms of her heels, her snapping fingers,
and her castanets. Recommended unhesitatingly to all interested, however slightly, in
Spanish dancing.
G. S., Jr.
HILDE GUEDEN
Memories of the Vienna Theater
Vol r.
Johann Strauss, Jr.: Wiener Biut:
title waltz; Grüss dich Gott, du liebes Nester).
Die Fledermaus: Entr'acte. Frirz Kreisler:
-
Hilde Gueden, soprano; Vienna State Opera
Orchestra and chorus, Max Schönherr, cond.
LONDON LD 9157/9x58. Two lo -in. $2.98
each.
Disposed potpourri -fashion, without spacing bands between excerpts (which sometimes take in the whole of a number, more
often stop short at one stanza, sometimes
give no more than a fragment) these records
may frustrate some people by jumping so
readily from tune to tune and by making
particular favorites so hard to find. Bu: even
more people- those whose fondness for
Viennese operetta is real but not hyperinwill probably find themselves comtense
pletely beguiled by the lilting charm of
Hilde Gueden's singing and the gensütlich
feel of the performances in sum. The reproduction is very good.
The volume numbering given above corresponds with that on the record jackets; the
labels, however. show Vol. r as Vol. a and
Vol. 2 as Vol. 3
possibly thus including
them in a three-disk set with an earlier
Gueden record (LS 68o) called "This is My
Vienna." However that may be, these are
practically ideal casual- listening or party
J. H., Jr.
records for operetta enthusiasts.
-
-
MARGOT GUILLEAUME
Operatic Recital
Mozart: Le Nozze di Figaro: O saüme
länger mich ( i. e., Deh vieni non tardar) ;
Die Zauberflöte: Ach, ich fühlt. Flotow:
Martha: Die letzte Rose (i. e.. The Last
Thomas: Mignon:
Rose of Summer).
Kennst du das Land? (i. e., Connais -tu le
pays).
Margot Guilleaume, soprano; Orchestra of
the Berlin Städtische Oper, Walter Lutze,
cond.
TELEFUNKEN TM 68052.
to -in. $2.98.
There may just possibly be a big rumorstimulated market in this country for recordings by Margot Guilleaume; if so, here
she is
not singing a great deal of music
for the money, but singing what there is
on a. nice clean disk that comes in (a) an
inner envelope of soft paper, (b) a heavier
envelope, (c) an album box, and (d) a
cellophane outer wrapping. With all this,
she must surely be somebody very special.
But who? On the basis of this record, she
seems to be a lyric soprano with a pretty
-
Sioy: Ich wirr
50 gern einmal verliebt. Emerich
Kalman: Gräfin Maritza: introduction and
chorus. Oskar Straus: Der Tapfere Soldat:
Konen' Held meiner Tritume. Leo Fall: Madame Pompadour:
Heal könnt' einer sei,,
Glick bei mir mrtclsee. Die Dollarprinzessin:
Automobilmarsch. Franz Lehar: Zigeanerliebes: Hör ich Cymbalklinge.
-
Vol. 2
Leo Ascher: Hoheit Tanzt Walzer:
Man nennt mich nur dar Leeched von Neinar.
Carl Ziehrer: Der Schatzmeister: waltz -motive. Franz Lehar: DerTsarewitsch: introduction and Kosende Wellen. Schön it die Welt:
introduction and Ich bin verleibt. Oskar
Franz Lehar:
Straus: Rend sun die Liebe.
Die Lustige Witwe: Lippen schweigen; waltz motive. Oskar Straus: Ein Wabzertra,,m:
Leise, ganz leise. Johann Strauss, Jr.: Wiener
Blur: excerpt from overture (arr. Schönherr).
Hilde Gueden:
getniitlicbkeit
galore
middle voice, quite undeveloped low tones,
and a top that floats at piano but sounds a
shade anxious when used forte. Her singing is neat, well schooled, and sweet, but
rather lacking in substance and quite lacking in any sort of strong conviction. All
in all: nice but pale. Accompaniments:
gentle and well suited to the singer. ReJ. H., Jr.
cording: good.
INVITATION TO THE DANCE
Weber:
Rumanian
Invitation
to the Dance,
No.
Enesco:
in A major.
Wedding Suite, Op. 126 (from
Rhapsody,
1,
Prokofiev:
the ballet Stone Flower).
New York Philharmonic. Symphony, Andre
Kostelanetz, cond.
COLUMBIA ML 4957. 12 -in. $3.98.
Kostelanetz is completely at home in the
Lisztian- inspired rhapsody by the late
Georges Enesco, giving it an exceptionally
good reading, with its rhythms always firm
and strong. The Weber is taken at a rather
fast clip; dancers would surely have trouble
following this tempo, and the performance
in general lacks the proper airiness. The
pike de résistance of this record is the lovely
little five-movement suite of Prokofiev,
which Kostelanetz first introduced to American audiences; frolicsome, gay music, with
an abundance of melodies and witty orchestration. The men of the Philharmonic
play all three works wirh wonderful verve,
and Columbia has obliged with luscious
J. F. I.
sound.
THE KING OF INSTRUMENTS,
VOL. IV
Hilliar at
St.
Mark's
Pachelbel: Chorale and Variations on Was
Loeillet: Air
Gott sir, das ist wohlgetan.
Tendre. Bach: Trio Sonata, No. 4, m E
minor; Chorale Prelude, O Mensch, beweis,'
dein' Sintle gross. Couperin -le- Grand: Offertoire sur les Grande jeux. DuprE: Cortege el
Litanie. Arne: Fluir Tune.
Edgar Hilliar, organ.
AEOLIAN- SKINNER.
12 -in.
$5.95.
Edgar Hilliar plays the instrument of St.
Mark's Episcopal Church, Mount Kisco,
N. Y., where he is organist. It is another
example of Aeolian- Skinner's American
Classic Organ, and a particularly persuasive
one, with some highly individual stops and a
transparent texture for the eighteenth -century scores, together with a massed tone of
considerable solidity for the contemporary
French piece by Dupré.
This version of the Pachelbel variations
and the recent one by E. Power Biggs for
Columbia make a fascinating study in opHilliar's is more
posing interpretations.
varied and lively, depending for its effects
on contrasts between astringently colored
stops; Biggs plays more soberly, using
massively brilliant registrations. The performance here of the Bach sonata is almost
as good as Robert Noehren's on Allegro,
but the tempos in the Bich chorale prelude,
slower even than Schweitzer's, positively
funereal, are really too slow to give the work
cohesion. That the organist keeps the work
inching forward as well as he does amounts
to a tour de force of phrasing. Superbly
recorded with lifelike tone and impeccable
clarity.
R. E.
69
JUNE 1955
www.americanradiohistory.com
OR DS
RC(.(lRI)S
ERICA MORINI RECITAL
Brahms: Hungarian Dances, Nos. r, 5, 6, 7,
8, and 17. Vivaldi: Violin Sonata in D
major (arr. Respighi). Wieniawski: Capriccio -Valse, Op. 7 (arr. Auer). Sarasare: Faust
Fantaisie. Ravel: Pièce en forme de habanera.
Erica
Morini, violin; Artur Balsam and
Max Lanner, piano.
CAMDEN CAL 207.
12 -in.
Sr.98.
Erica Morini is inclined to be a trifle too
mannered in the Hungarian Dances, where
she uses too many slides from one note ro
the next. There is nice style and proportion, however, in the Vivaldi Sonata and
particularly in the Wieniawski Capriccio The other two encore -type pieces
Valse.
are also ably handled, as are the piano accompaniments. Reproduction is adequate.
P. A.
NEW DIRECTIONS
IN MUSIC AND
SOUND
Blacher: Orchestral Variations on a Theme of
Paganini, Op. 26. Von Einem: Capriccio for
Orchestra, Op. 2.
Former:
Symphony
(fourth movement only). Hartmann: Symphony No. 4 (finale, Adagio Appassionata,
only). Liebermanr: Furioso for Orchestra.
RIAS Symphony Orchestra, Ferenc Fricsay,
cond.
DECCA DL 9769. 12 -in. $3.98.
An anthology of five short orchestral pieces
by German composers who have come to
prominence since World War I1:
Boris
Blacher's enchantingly witty and ingenious
Variations on a Theme by Paganini; a tuneful,
vivacious Capriccio by Gottfried von Einem;
the very vigorous; slightly Hindemirhian
finale to a symphony by Wolfgang Fortner;
a highly chromatic, rich, and broadly lyrical
Adagio Appassionato from a symphony for
strings by Karl Amadeus Hartmann; and a
piece called Furiorn by Rolf Liebermann,
which is clamorous and noisy but not much
more. Except for Liebermann's contribution, rhis selection makes an extremely eloquent case for the younger Germans. Performance and recording are both elegant.
A. F.
PIAF OF PARIS
Sous le ciel de Paris; Avec le soleil; Retour;
Meo Culpa; Les croix; L'homme au piano;
Enfin le printemps; Ca ira.
Edith Piaf; M. Mercier Chorus; orchestra,
E. Chauvigny, cond.
ANGEL 64015.
ro -in. $2.98.
creer and tasteful, and
superbly clear.
Angel's sound is
J. F. I.
ROSA PONSELLE SINGS TODAY
Lully: Amadis: Bois épais. Persico: Rosemonde. Saint -Saëns: Guitares et Mandolines.
Chausson: Les Temps des Lilu. Brahms:
Von ewiger Liebe. Trunk: Mir treiunste von
enter,: Königskind. Schubert: Erlkönig. Beethoven: In questa tomba osarra. Wolf-Ferrari:
Rispetto. Donaudy: 0 del mio amino ben.
Tosti: Aprile. Sadero: Anuri, anuri; I
battitori di gram.
English, traditional:
Drink to Me Only With Thine Eyes. Farley:
The Night Wind. Del Riego: Homing.
Ponselle, soprano; Igor Chicagov,
piano (except in Antral, anneri, in which the
singer plays for herself).
RCA VICTOR LM 1889. 12 -in. $3.98.
Rosa
-
-
From the very hour it began
actually
the career of Rosa
even before it began
Ponselle has had a legendary quality quite
unlike any ocher. it still has. Probably it
always will have. This has to do partly with
its background, partly with its spectacular
beginning, partly with the successes that
made it up, but even more with the abruptness of its end
still more with the ran talizing emanations that have floated in the
air ever since. She has not sung in public,
nor in the usual meaning, since 1937; but
she has sung freely enough in private, at
home, to keep the operatic world well supplied with up -to -date status reports and
with rumors, counter -rumors, and cross rumors of all kinds. Close onto twenty years
have passed since her retirement, and scarcely one
if one has passed without the
news being passed breathlessly about, always on the best authority, that Rosa Ponselle is about to emerge from retirement and
resume her place as the most splendid of
operatic sopranos.
She never has, of course. and she has always denied any such intention. But the
rumors have never stopped. Let someone
play a Ponselle recording in a group of
more than two, and at least one is sure to
bring the subject up. He knows someone
who knows someone who has just come Sack
from her Baltimore home, where he heard
the voice, glorious as ever. And next season
And so on.
In such circumstances, the Ponselle
career has been cold over and over: how she
sang with her sister in cafés and in vaude-
-
-
-
.
ville; how she auditioned for Giulio Gatti Casazza and was given her debut in the
Metropolitan premiere of La Forza del Destine: how triumph followed triumph; how
she sang chis role and that; and, finally,
how she suddenly married and as suddenly
well, birth statistics
retired at the age of
in Meriden, Conn., would put it at forty.
Why did she retire?
Then speculations:
Because she got married? Because her top
tones were becoming less and less sure?
Because singing in opera was coo great a
strain on her nerves? Or all three? Then,
again, the word char she will return.
The fact seems ro be that all the rumors
down the years have had some basis, but
not enough to make them come true. Rosa
Ponselle certainly never stopped singing
completely, and she may very well have let
the idea ar leasr of returning to opera pass
through her mind
she could hardly have
avoided it. But she never did return, and it
seems absolutely certain now that she never
wil I.
Until now, the closest she has come to
making her at -home singing public has been
a semi -privare affair co help raise funds for
the Baltimore Symphony. But now, with
the release of Rosa Powclle Sings Today, all
who are interested can hear and draw their
own conclusions. The recording, made at
her home in October of 1954, is extremely
full in surrounding resonance
almost as
if the room in which it was made had echochamber characteristics
and it is, of course,
impossible to tell the size of the voice. But
the quality is basically the same as in recordings made thirty years ago, at the peak
of her career the same rich, dark middle
voice, the same full low notes; and, though
nothing is sung that goes beyond mezzosoprano capabilities, the attack on the highest tones is characteristically precipitate sounding.
None of the songs requires
-
-
-
-
-
really difficult skips, and none requires fast,
florid articulation; the point would seem to
be implied, but perhaps not. The singing is
always interesting and communicative, the
phrasing broad and sweeping, even when the
style is questionable, even when the enunciscion, in languages other than Italian and
English, is not for young singers to copy.
Even in the most trivial music, the effect is
that of a magnificent voice and a strong,
individual personality given free play in relaxed circumstances.
Excellent notes by
Francis Robinson.
J.H., Jr.
PORTS OF CALL
Ravel:
Bolero; La Valse, Pavane pour une
infante dl/une, Ibert. Escales. Debussy Caille[: Clair de loue Chabrier: España.
The most satisfying part of this very agreeable Piaf concert is the discovery that the
singer is just as much at home in light,
lilting Parisian songs as in those melan-
Philadelphia Orchestra, Eugene Ormandy,
cond.
COLUMBIA ML 4983. 12 -in. $4.95.
choly ditties of frustration with which she
is more usually associated. While only two
of her numbers, Sous le ciel de Paris and
Enfin le printemps, are in this gayer mood,
she handles them both with rare artistry
and engaging verve. Five of the remainder
are typical Piaf plaints; one, L'homme au
piano, is given a rather piquant touch, as
a tinny barroom piano is used as background support. The climax of this recital
is Piaf's electrifying and spine -tingling
chanting of the French Revolution song
Ca ira, a performance of demoniacal fury.
The orchestral support throughout is dis-
Ormandy and his Philadelphians are least
engaging when they try to outdo Kostelanerz, and that seems to be the direction in
which they are striving here. It is true that
this kind of music rhrives well in the hothouse, but there comes a point when an excess of refulgence and shimmer begins to
yield diminishing returns.
My patience
began to grow thin by the time I got to
Escales and it quite ran out in the Pavane
a simple, muted piece of music made infinitely more poignant in the restrained in-
-
Lady of legend: Rosa Ponselle at honte.
70
Continued on page 72
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
www.americanradiohistory.com
RECORDS
building your record library
.,q_,
number twenty -one
JOHN M. CONLY SUGGESTS
TEN BASIC CONCERTO RECORDINGS
HISTORY is a great help, in a quest like this. If we do nur
choosing on a historical basis, you are assured of considerable
variety, and there will be some significance to your concerto- shelf.
Within this framework, my choices will be aimed at making your
collection as nearly bombproof as possible.
Let us begin with Bach, and let us forget nonsensical notions to
the effect that he was unaware of the uses of virtuosity or the
possibilities of the concerto as a medium of emotional communication. To this end I'd like to recommend the Fifth Keyboard
Concerto, but no current recording of it satisfies me. So try the
absolutely beautiful rendition of the two Concertos for Violin by
Jascha Heifetz, Alfred Wallenstein and the Los Angeles Philharmonic (RCA Victor Lot ISIS.).
Bach overshadows everyone who followed him in this field until
we get ro Haydn and Mozart, and the former treated the concerto
lightly (though his Trumpet Concerto, on Vanguard 454, is very
exciting listening). With Mozart we must cleave to his own
instrument, the piano and, oddly, few Mozart piano-concerto
records are satisfactory. One that is, however, is the combination
of Concertos No. 9 and No. 15, played by Wilhelm Kempff,
with Karl Münchinger conducting the Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
(London LL 998), in almost faultless performances and marvelously proportioned sound. These are middle -early Mozart, but there is
depth under the grace.
It is with Beethoven that the concerto achieves its highest
dramatic content, and the voices of the solo instrument and the
orchestra begin pleading, singing, shouting one against the other.
And here the choice is easy: one of the best recorded performances
I've ever heard is that of the Fourth Piano Concerto by Clifford
Curzon, with Hans Knappertsbusch leading the Vienna Philharmonic (London LL 1045). The recording actually was made in
one continuous take, when the musicians played the work through
for fun after two days of a routine, make- and -remake session. It's
a spellbinder.
It is a pity to have had to pass up Luigi Boccherini in moving
from the eighteenth to the nineteenth century, his famous cello
concerto is beautifully handled by Pierre Fournier and Müchinger's
Stuttgart men on London LL 1036. And now we must sin again,
in skipping Niccolo Paganini and one of the great showpieces of
the violin literature, his Concerto No. I (splendidly played by
Francescatti on Columbia 4ML 4315 ) But we arrive at a greater,
the ubiquitous Violin Concerto of Felix Mendelssohn, wherein
flashing instrumental virtuosity is first put to full communicative
use.
Its sunny Romanticism is handsomely aired by Zino Francesconi, with Dimitri Mitropoulos conducting the New York Philharmonic- Symphony Orchestra ( Columbia MI. 1965;. And this
selection allows me to cheat, since on the reverse you get the same
artists playing the Tchaikovsky Concerto in D, a later, Slavic,
hair -down kind of Romanticism, much freer in form, darker
in hue.
Buc ler us get back to an earlier parr of the century, and the first
major exponent of piano virtuosity for its own sake (but not its
own sake alone)
Frédéric Chopin. For my taste, Artur Rubinstein is more truly Chopin's man than any of the other contenders
in the two great concertos, and I like best his performance in the
Concerto No. r, assisted by Alfred Wallenstein and the Los
Angeles Philharmonic (RCA Victor LM IS to). There is nothing
ultimate about the recorded sound, but it isn't bad either.
Franz Liszt is popularly thought of, rightly or wrongly, as
having picked up where Chopin left off in the development of the
piano concerto as a vehicle for virtuosity. Certainly he proceeded
to explore, probably mote fully than anyone else, the technical and
tonal possibilities of the instrument. And he established a sort of
picture of the piano virtuoso which the public has accepted ever
.
-
since. There are numerous good performances of his two concertos.
Perhaps strangely, my choice is made on grounds of
reproduced sound; I pick the performances of the First and Second Concertos by Edith Farnadi and the Vienna State Opera
Orchestra, Hermann Scherchen conducting (Westminster WL
3168 ) . The sonic perspective in this is engrossing, almost uncanny,
and the playing impressive too.
Now back to the main line of classical tradition -drama within
disciplined form, no effects wasted, a philosophical continuity from
movement to movement. Johannes Brahms's First Piano Concerto
has been treated in recording just a little better than his more
famous Second. So let us savor the loving firmness with which its
eloquence is tempered in the performance by Wilhelm Backhaus
and the Vienna Philharmonic conducted by Karl Böhm (London
IL 91 ). This is purveyed in very fine "ffrr" reproduction.
Staying within the count of ten, we have skipped Schumann (a
1
pity, when Guiomar Novaes plays his piano concerto so beautifully
on Vox Pt. 8540), and now we will do the same for Greig
(another slight to Mme. Novaes, and to Vox PL 8520) and
Dvoiák, whose cello concerto (as played by Pierre Fournier on
London LL
to6, with Rafael Kubelik conducting the Vienna
Philharmonic) deserves Feuer treatment. This we come to the
turn of another century, and to the last of the virtuoso pianist composers, Sergei Rachmaninoff. His Second Piano Concerto is
one of his two or three greatest works, and faces us with a choice problem. His own performance of this work, with Leopold Stokowski and the Philadelphia Orchestra, still exists in a reprint record (RCA Victor LC7 1014). It steals the thunder from all
others, but has none of its own -the sound is old and thin. The
next best performance, to my mind, is that of Julius Katchen, with
Anatole Fistoulari conducting the New Symphony Orchestra (London LL 184), and the sound of this is highly adequate. Even better
but the St.
is that given Leonard Pennario, (Capitol P SO2),
3
Louis Symphony, despite Vladimir Golschmann, plays a little
sloppily. I'd take the Katchen. (But I already have the Rachmaninoff.)
Not every great composer voluntarily concerned himself with
his times and their tensions. Beethoven did. Brahms did. Bela
Bartók did. He went back to folk- materials, he went forward into
experimentation; he tried to build a bridge. Its form stands forth
well in his Viola Concerto, which is accessible without being
mockingly accessible, as his Concerto for Orchestra seems to me
to be. There is only one recording of the concerto, but it features
the wonderful William Primrose, with the New Symphony Orches1
tra led by Tibor Serly, and was produced by the composer's own
son Peter (Rarrák Records 309), a noted snood -perfectionist.
There arises now a temptation to include the second violin
concerto of Prokofiev (tellingly performed on Columbia 3ML 4648
by Francesconi) but I hold back. It is beautiful but it seems to me
to aim nowhere in particular, by comparison with, say, the same
composer's Fifth Symphony. And I never have been able to get
worked up about the Sibelius violin concerto. So I will offer as
last entry another demonstration of the encouraging theme that
the old forms still can enchant and compel, when they are
brightened with new content, and when the new content is musical
idiom the composer really loves and wants to make yield up the
folk-spirit that generated it. All this is embodied in the only
recording of Virgil Thomson's Cello Concerto, in which the cellist
is Luigi Silva and Werner Janssen conducts an orchestra designated
simply as the "Janssen Symphony" (Columbia 3-L 4468). There
is not a dead spot from beginning to end. At one point you may
recognize, as themes juxtaposed, "Yes, Jesus Loves Me' and a
phrase from a Beethoven sonata, but they sound as if they were
meant by nature to go together.
71
JUNE 1955
www.americanradiohistory.com
RECORDS
Continued from page 7o
cerpretarion of André Cluytens and the OrR. G.
chestre National (ANGEL 35102).
(7TH AND 18TH CENTURY
ITALIAN MUSIC
Vivaldi: Concerto in E for Violin and Strings
La Follia,
(1/ Riposo); Corelli -Geminiani:
Galuppi: Concerto a quattro, in D, No. 2;
Bonporti: Concerto in D, Op. 11, No. 8.
Socict3 Corelli.
RCA VICTOR LM í880.
12 -in.
$3.98.
The concerto by Bonporti, the oldest of the
composers represented on this disk (except
for Corelli) and probably the least known,
is an eye -opener. It consists of two vigorous
movements framing a Largo that is one
long, expressive, and moving melody. Bon porti seems to have been fond of deceptive
cadences, which are rather rare in the music
Corelli's interesting and
of his time.
imaginative variations, written for violin
and figured bass, are here presented in his
pupil's arrangement for string orchestra. The
Vivaldi work is unusual in that there is no
continuo and all the strings are muted. All
of these pieces are well played and cleanly
N. B.
recorded.
FOLK MUSIC
by Howard LaFay
SONGS OF THE HEBRIDES
Mary MaKower, alto; Franz Jellinek; harp.
SPA 65. 12 -in. $5.95.
The Cockle Gatherer; An Eriskay Love
Lilt; The Dou'erless Maiden; Dance to
FOLKWAYS PP 62. 12 -in. $6.45.
Tony Schwartz and his tape recorder are
familiar sights around New York as he
unobstrusively goes about recording the
sonic life of the metropolis. His New York
Y9 (PP 703), containing children's street
games and songs taped entirely within
Manhattan's 19th Postal Zone, was a minor
masterpiece.
Now he is back with two additional
Folkways releases, both more elaborate than
his earlier effort, but neither quite as
charming. In Millions of Afusiciars, Mr.
Schwartz apparently aims to prove that the
world is filled with unwitting musicians.
However, his results will breed no unrest
in the headquarters of the ever-vigilant
James Caesar Petrillo.
A taxi driver, a pitchman, a shoe shine
boy, an Italian flower hawker cause the
record
and Schwartz's thesis
to flare
into brilliant but fleeting life. However,
too many of his examples never really get
off the ground. Anyone who dotes on the
sounds of New York will find ample
divertissement here; others will find only
a bit of curiosa that wears none too well.
Exchange is the product of some long
distance tapeawapping between Schwartz
and amateur rape enthusiasts all over the
world. This record has unity and warmth,
plus some excellent off -beat folk music.
The listener also shares vicariously in a
richly rewarding international camaraderie
something our empoisoned world could
do with more of. Exchange is interesting,
unusual, satisfying.
The accompanying booklet, while hand.
-
-
-
ROSALIND OPPENHEIM
Your Shadow; A Fairy's Love Song; Water
Kelpie's Song; The Fairy Loom; A
Wandering Shade; Milking Croon; Milking
Song; The Mull Fisher's Song; The Islay
Reaper; The Land of Heart's Desire; The
Skua - Gulls; An Eriskay Lullaby; The Coolin
of Rum; To People Who Have Gardens;
The Sea Gull of the Land Under Waves;
Caristone; An Island Shelling Song; To the
Cradle Lord of the Isles; The Old Crone's
Lilt; The Bens of Jura; Kish,nul's Galley
Lonely, lovely songs of the far islands to
the notch and west of Scotland. Love songs,
work songs, and lullabys
as soft and
lyric as the summer clouds above the Isle
of Skye, all with the sparkling surface and
hidden depths of the Sound of Barra.
Miss MaKower's rich alto imparts a full
Gaelic flavor to the songs, although she
sings them in English. Franz Jellinek
accompanies on the harp. Both artists
bring a high degree of sensitivity and
intelligence to this undertaking, which is
fully reflected in the end product. SPA's
sound is quite satisfactory.
Recommended.
everyday life conceived, recorded and narrated by Tony Schwartz.
FOLKWAYS FP 6o. 12 -in. $6.45.
EXCHANGE
Friendship Around the World Thru Tape
Exchange by Tony Schwartz
72
-
-a
THE FAULSE LADYE
Andrew Rowan Summers, with dulcimer.
FOLKWAYS FP 44.
to -in. $4.75.
The Ballad of Mary Hamilton; The Faulte
Lady: Willie of Hazel Green; O Waly,
Ilvaly: Billy Boy; The Two Sisters
Many a purist disapproves of Andrew
Rowan Summers' delicate way with folk
songs. But his light voice surrounds these
ballads with a fragile aura harking back to
the days of the troubadors. His dulcimer
accompaniments add to the illusion.
With the exception of the lovely Ballad
of Mary Hamilton, none of Mr. Summers
selections is an exact stranger to the catalogue. In the final analysis, the desirability
of this record probably hinges upon
whether or not one likes the Summers
approach.
The engineers acquit themselves well and
Folkways supplies its usual excellent booklet containing texts and notes.
JACK OF DIAMONDS and other folk
songs and blues
Brother John Sellers, folk singer; Sonny
Terry, harmonica; Johnny Johns, guitar.
VANGUARD VRS 7022.
to -in 53.95.
Jack of Diamonds; I Love You. Baby; Sally
Go Round the Sunshine; Nobody Knorvs
the Trouble I've Seen; I've Been Lonesome,
l''ve Been Worried; Every Day I Hare the
Blues; IC"hen I've Been Drinking: Lonesome
Road; Let Us Run: Great Day
-all
MILLIONS OF MUSICIANS
A documentary of musical expression in
Last year the Department of Anthropology
of the University of Washington offered
as parr of a course in Non -Western
lecture-demonstration on HinMusics
dustani classical music by Nazir Ali
Jairazbboy. The present Folkways release
is based upon that lecture-demonstration.
This record is intended for people who:
(1 ) have a working knowledge of musical
theory; (2) are interestd in having the
fundamentals of Hindustani music explained in Western frames of reference.
Nazir's presentation is lucid and masterful.
His beautifully played demonstrations on
the sitar offer ready insights into difficult
concepts.
The sound, save for a sometimes surface
hiss, is better than average. The illustrated
booklet that accompanies the record contains an introduction to Hindustani music
by Richard Waterman that is an invaluable
aid ro understanding.
Recordist Schwartz, friend to friendship.
some and thick, devotes a lot of space to
Schwartz's methods of exchanging tape but
precious little to the music contained on
the record.
In the case of both disks, the sound
quality varies. This is inevitable in field
particularly where tapes were
recording
macle by different people, using different
machines, and under different conditions.
Schwartz provides the narration for both
records.
-
CLASSICAL MUSIC OF INDIA
Nazir Ali Jairazbhoy; introduction by Rich
and Waterman.
FOLKWAYS pP 66. 12 -in. $6.45.
Brother John Sellers is out of the South by
way of Chicago, where he came under the
influence of the great Mahalia Jackson.
This influence is more manifest in what he
sings rather than in how he sings ir. For
Sellers' way with a song is more relaxed
than Mahalia's.
With this record, his debut on LP,
Sellers enter a field where the competition
is tough. But he is more than capable of
holding his own. Witness his touching
version of Nobody Knows the Trouble I've
Seen.
-
Perhaps the outstanding characteristic of
which is
this disk is the accompaniment
really no accompaniment at all but rather
a
full -fledged collaboration by Sonny
Terry's inspired harmonica and Johnny
Johns' subtle guitar.
Engineering: excellent.
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
RECORDS
MAHALIA JACKSON: The World's
Greatest Gospel Singer.
With the Falls-Jones Ensemble.
COLUMBIA CL 644.
12 -in.
S3.95.
Em Going to Live the Life 1 Sing About in
My Song; When I Wake Up in Glory;
Jesus Met the Woman at the We
Oh
Lord. is it I ?; I Will Move on Up a Little
Higher; When the Saints Go Marching let
Jesus; Out of the Depths: Walk Over God's
Heaven; Keep Your Hand on the Plow;
Didn't it Rain.
Mahalia Jackson's big, unfettered voice and
emotional intensity make her just what this
album title calls her -The World's
Greatest Gospel Singer.
Gospel singing traces its origin back to
the early negro spirituals, but structurally
it has been shaped into a near -jazz style.
Nothing can convey this more vividly than
Mahalia's rocking rendition of When The
Saints Go Marching 1n.
Like the old spirituals, today's Gospel
songs are religion felt rather than cerebrated; raw, naked religion crying our
man's eternal desolation and his eternal
hope.
The emotion of these songs is communicated immediately through Mahalia's free swinging vocalization and burning sincerity
of purpose. In fact, there is a kind of
incandescence about the way she sings
them.
The accompaniments of the Falls -Jones
Ensemble are superb. George Avakian's
album notes are literate and informative
model of what record annotation
should be, but so rarely is. Columbia's
sound, equal to the best it has produced,
is a worthy complement to the general
excellence.
This is an outstanding release.
-a
THE BEST OF JAZZ
by
John
S.
Wilson
CHARLIE BARNET
Town Hall Jazz Concert
Rocki,' in Rhythm; Tell Me. Tell Me,
Dream Face; My Old Flame; Caravan;
Andy's Boogie; Pompton Turnpike: Cherokee; Redskin Rhumba; Skyliner; East Side,
(rest Side; Terry Tune; Things Ain't What
They Used to Be: Hello Baby Blues: The
Gal from Joe's; Barnetology; Cornet
Confab.
COLUMBIA CL 639.
r2 -in. S3.95.
Charlie Barnet's bands have always had a
kind of disheveled charm. They have frequently been bands of some distinction but
almost invariably they have had undisciplined qualities. But even though the
trumpets may have screamed at times and
the reeds (particularly those operated by
Barnet) may have squawked, the bands
have always swung. In 1947, when this
Town Hall concert was taped, Barnet had
one of his best bands and this is a reasonably comprehensive summary of its work.
There are numerous evidences of Barnet's
fondness for Ellington; there are Barnet's
own best known specialties (Pompton
Turnpike, Cherokee and Redskin Rhumba,
Skyline.); there is Bunny Briggs, the
JUNE 1955
dancer who has been used by Barnet for
years as a vocalist; and there is the aural
vaudeville that is apparently dear to Barnet's heart
the conversation between his
soprano saxophone and the trumpet on
Pompton Turnpike and the long instrumental dialogue called Cornet Confab. It
is swinging big band jazz, played with zest,
feeling, and some humor. The recording
suffers somewhat from that diffuseness and
variance of levels which is common to
unplanned concert taping.
-
CHARLIE CHRISTIAN
With the Benny Goodman Sextet and
Orchestra
Blues in B; Wholly Cats, Ti/I Tom
Special; Gone with "What" Wind; Breakfast Feud; Air Mail Special; Waitin' for
Benny; A Smo- o -o -oth One; Seven Conte
Eleven; Six Appeal; Gone with What
Draft; Solo Flight.
COLUMBIA CL 652. 12 -in. $3.95.
Although this disk is largely made up of
reissues, it is worth special attention both
because it contains at least two new selections and because of the special nature of
Charlie Christian. Christian is a guitarist
whose total career on the bigtime jazz
scene covered less than two years (1939 -41)
yet in that time he established the electric
guitar as a jazz instrument and laid the
groundwork on which post -swing jazz has
been built. Christian's two influential
years were spent with Benny Goodman's
orchestra and, though he had ample opportunity to show his ability in Goodman's
small groups, he found them confining, an
inadequate means of expression for the
music he wanted to play. His most typical
work was done in the relaxed atmosphere
of after hours joints where he was heard
by other musicians but rarely by recording
equipment. Some of this playing ar-as
taken clown on a portable machine and has
been issued by Esoteric Records (Esoteric
I and 4) but the recording is discouragingly poor.
On chis disk, two more of these rare
instances of Christian unfettered are made
available. They were made in a recording
studio while members of Goodman's sextet
were waiting for a session to start. The
musicians were warming up and, fortunately, the record of that warmup session was
kept. There is nothing that could be
formally called balance. Christian starts
playing and as he develops ideas other
musicians, who have been noodling around
in the far background, move in. The
section of this ad lib session which is called
Waitin' for Benny develops a theme which
provided the basis for A Smo-o -o -otb One,
which follows on the succeeding band. The
limitations against which Christian chafed
in the Goodman sextet arc illustrated
vividly by the comparison of the stiff,
formal, and rather flat performance of A
Srno- o -o -oth One with Christian's original
expression of the theme in the impromptu
session. It must be assumed that this selection by the Goodman Sextet was included
simply to make this point for it is the least
interesting of the reissued selections. Most
of the rest are recognized small group
classics.
is-
satisfying and
This was -and still
exciting jazz, made none the less so by the
/
i
--"
jcp
(what ... no headline ?)
Here are two Vox De Luxe
albums rare in content,
rare in form. We would no
more try to tell their story
in some neat little headline
than we would define music
or high fidelity in four words.
These albums are not for
everybody...but they will be
the most important additions to the collections of
certain cognoscenti.
-
VIVALDI:
CIMENTO DELL'
E DELL'
INVENZIONE, OP. 8
IL
ARMONIA
(including the FOUR SEASONS)
12 VIOLIN CONCERTOS.
Illustrated booklet by Dr. J.
Braunstein, Music Div., N. Y.
Public Library.
-
Reinhold Barchet, violin
Pro
Musica String Orchestra, Stutt-
gart -Rolf Reinhardt, conductor
3 -12"
DL 173
THIS IS HIGH
FIDELITY
(A Guide To Sound Listening)
Written and produced by Tyler
Turner. Lucidly narrated by Art
Hannes. See HI -FI illustrated
read a deand diagrammed
tailed analysis hear it demonstrated with effects that will
astonish you.
DL 130
-
-
jor,,GawtdAtaeox.l
Yfft
'')Ultra High Fidelity
236 WEST 55TH
ST.
NEW YORK 19, N. Y.
73
REC<)RU
bass; Ted Paskert, drums; Suzanne Lovell,
voice.
Those That Live by the Swordfish Die by
the Swordfish; A Foggy Day; Ode to a
Mode: When Your Lover Has Gone; Take
Ale Out to the Ball Game; Newton the
Fig; Song of the Bayou; Three Speeds Forward; You're Just a Cucumber; Fagotte
Garotte: Aren't You Glad You Cante:
What a Way to Run a Railroad.
current realization, that it is jazz of high
historic significance.
KENNY CLARKE
Walter Benton. tenor saxophone; Frank
Morgan, alto saxophone; Gerald Wiggins,
piano; Milt Jackson, vibes; Percy Heath,
bass; Kenny Clarke, drums.
Strollin'; Sonor; Blues Mood; Skoot.
SAVOY MG
15o51. to-in. $3.85.
VICTOR LJM 1021. 12 -in. 53.98.
Don't be thrown off by the more unfortu-
MILES DAVIS ALL STARS, VOL. t
Miles Davis. trumpet; Thelonious Monk,
piano; Milt Jackson, vibes; Percy Heath,
bass; Kenny Clarke. drums.
Bags' Groove; Swing Spring.
PRESTIGE LP 196.
to -in. $3.85.
These two disks are of interest largely
because they are built around three-quarters
of the eminent Modern Jazz Quartet
Jackson, Heath, and Clarke. The performances are, on the whole, pleasant and
unpretentious but lacking in any cornpelting interest. The additional associates
brought along by the MJQ threesome for
these recordings are of little help, except
for Thelonious Monk whose curiously detached manner of playing
though he
were contemplatively flipping over the
piano keys to see if there were any bugs
under them
has an amusing enchantment. What there is of interest here is
provided by the three core men, with
Jackson in consistently good form on his
solo appearances. The absence of John
Lewis, fourth man in the MJQ, and the
absence here of the kind of provocative
originality which is usually found in the
Quartet's work, suggests that the connection
between that originality and Lewis is extremely close. The recording on both disks
is good although there is some surface
noise on the Savoy which is also atrociously
short: its overall total of seventeen minutes
might have been placed on a single ten inch LP side.
-
-as
-
BILLIE HOLIDAY
At Jazz at the Philharmonic
Billie Holiday, vocals; Joe Guy, trumpet;
Willie Smith, alto saxophone; Milt Raskin,
piano; Red Callender, bass; Dave Coleman,
drums.
Body and Soul: Strange Fruit; Travelin'
Light; He's Funny That Way: The Man I
Love; Gee Baby Ain't I Good to You; All
of Me; Billie's Bluer.
CLEF MG
C -169.
Io -in. $3.98.
These numbers, recorded at a concert in
1946, are of special interest because you
seldom get Billie Holiday records like this
anymore. At that time she still had much
of her youthful voice at her command along
with the knowing wiles which she picked
up along the way in a decade of singing.
It was, as one might judge from these performances, the beginning of her transition
period for she sings- really sings
most of the numbers but on the occasions
when she voice doesn't quite make it the
wiles come into play to carry her through,
as they do still. The tunes are from the
top drawer of her repertoire and her execution of them, particularly the last four, are
in her best tradition. Considering the date
of the recording and the circumstances
-on
74
WILLIAM CLAXTON
Gerry Mulligan:
a case
of quiet growth.
under which it was done, this is a very
gocd job. The rather unbalanced accompaniment sounds thin and there are occasional echoes, but Miss Holiday is recorded
in general with depth and reasonable range
although now and then she is made unbecomingly shrill.
LONDON BROIL
Johnny Dankworth and his
'S
orchestra;
Wonderful; Younger Every Day.
Jack Parnell and his orchestra:
Paris; Sure Thing.
April in
Freddy Randall and his band: Carolina in
the Morning: At the Jazz Band Ball.
Kenny Baker Quartet:
Siompin' at the Savoy.
ANGEL 60004.
Peg o' My
Heart;
to-in. $2.98.
The subtitle on the liner is more apt than
the title: "Mixed Grill." In essence, this
is a British sampler. Big bands, small
groups, dixie, swing, and modern are all
represented and adherents of none can have
much ground for complaint. Capable is
the word in general with the higher
reaches of capability being demonstrated
by Jack Parnell's April in Paris, a subdued
production number which achieves a particularly rich, lush tonal coloring and
Freddy Randall's Dixieland group which
gets a lot of lighthearted spirit into Carolina in the Morning. This number, incidentally, contains one of the few really
good tenor saxophone solos recorded by a
girl
Betty Smith. Kenny Bakers rough
trumpet tone and Johnny Dankworth's
highly skilled alto are shown off to their
own advantage but the material surrounding them is on another level. The recording is strikingly good and is quite consistent, a remarkable feat in view of the fact
that at least four different sessions are
involved.
-
STVART McKAY AND HIS WOODS
Reap the Wild Winds
Stuart McKay, Ernest Victor Mauro, Jerry
Sanfine, Tom Mace, saxophones, bassoon,
oboe, English horn. flute; Albert Richman,
John Burrows, French horn, John Saunders,
piano; John Porcello, guitar; Bill Halfacre,
nate titles in the listing above. These are
delightfully swinging performances by a
woodwind group which has, in its small
group way, some of the characteristics of
the Saucer- Finegan band. There is a light
touch about everything McKay's group
tackles and there is the constant promise
of the unexpected in its approach. The
voicing, of course, provides a fresh sound
but this sound is used in a variety of ways
blended with Suzanne Lovell's wordless
voice on When Your Lover Has Gone and
the wonderfully swampy Song of the
Bayou. in brisk ensemble work on Take
Me Out to the Ball Game (which achieves
what must be the highest and driest ending
ever recorded) and What a. Way to Run a
Railroad and as background for McKay's
virtuoso bassooning on Fagotte Gavotte
and Ode to o Mode. The ensembles are
easy, graceful, and propulsive and the playing is consistently clean and crisp. The
group has been retorted excellently, with
wide range and precise definition.
-
GERRY MULLIGAN
California Concerts
Gerry Mulligan, baritone saxophone and
piano; Jon Eardlcy, trumpet; Red Mitchell,
bass; Chico Hamilton, drums.
Blues Going Up: Little Girl Blue; Piano
Blues; Yardbird Suite.
Add Zoot Sims, tenor saxophone; Bob
Brookmeyer, valve trombone and piano;
Larry Bunker, drums, in place of Hamilton.
Western Reunion; I Know, Don't You
Knott: The Red Door.
PACIFIC JAZZ Pi 1201. 12 -in. 54.85.
Gerry Mulligan is continuing to grow as
a jazz musician. His playing at the two
concerts recorded on this disk (Stockton,
Calif., Nov. 12, 1954, and San Diego, Dec.
15, 1954) has, on one hand, the assurance
and polish that one expects of a mature
musician plus the exciting creativity that
is one of the hallmarks of the great jazzman. In his quiet, insinuating way (and
using an instrument that is by nature
neither quiet nor insinuating) he is far
and away the dominant figure in both the
Quartet and Sextet heard on this disk.
Even when he takes ro the piano, on Piano
Blues, he doesn't fall into a stereotype of
either a modern pianist or a blues pianist.
His piano blues style is rugged, leavened
with a sprinkling of more highly developed
ideas than a blues pianist would be apt to
undertake.
The quartet he uses on this occasion, one
which has never been recorded before,
produces the most consistently satisfying
group of numbers that Mulligan has put
on a single disk, despite some uncertainty
on the part of Jon Eardley, the trumpet
man. When Zoot Sims and Bob Brook-
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
RECORDS
meyer join the ensemble, they add solo
variety but dispel much of the generic
Mulligan feeling. For a concert performance, this disk has a great deal of presence.
The balance indicates considerable care in
setting up for both audience and rape.
highly effective help of Sam Prices piano.
The last four numbers lack the impact of
the others and there are times on them
when the accompanying band pushes
Rushing's voice into the background. The
disk stands, and stands firmly, on the first
three numbers.
TURK MURPHY'S JAZZ BAND
Dancing Jazz
Turk Murphy, trombone; Everett Farey,
cornet; Bob Helm, clarinet; Wally Rose,
piano; Bob Short, tuba; Al Lyons, washboard; Bob Thompson, washboard.
South; Hard Hearted Hannah; Doctor Jazz;
Jazzin' Babies Bluet; Hula Loa; Sunset
Cafe Stomp; Charleston; Red Het Mama;
See See Rider; Oriental Strut; Sadie Green,
the Vamp of New Orleans; Coney Island
Washboard,
COLUMBIA CL 65o. 12 -in. $3.95.
When Turk Murphy's band really gets
rolling on a spirited tune, it is capable of
producing delightful jazz. Murphy has
found the right material in several of the
numbers on this disk
Charleston, Red
Hot Mama and Sunset Cafe Stomp. But
-
he's even better this time when he broods
down into the blues-Jazzin' Babies Blues
and especially See See Rider are moving
performances. Unlike some of his recent
records, Murphy
uses
a
cornet lead
throughout this disk (he had been doing
without cornet or trumpet quite often in
the past). Everett Farey's well- played lead
provides a focal point which the Murphy
band has sometimes lacked on other occasions and fills our ensembles that are otherwise too thin or too dependent on the
grotesque tone of Murphy's trombone. The
vocals by Murphy and Bob Helm are still
on the parlor performance level but when
the blend of vocal and instrumental spirits
is right, it all seems perfectly becoming.
The band has been admirably recorded
with a balance that is exceptional for a
group of this type.
JIMMY RUSHING SINGS THE BLUES
Jimmy Rushing, vocals; Pat Jenkins, autoper; Henderson Chambers, trombone; Buddy Tate, tenor saxophone; Ben Richardson,
alto saxophone and clarinet; Sam Price,
piano; Walter Page, bass; Jo Jones, drums.
Horn Long.- Boogie Woogie; Horn You
Watt Your Levin' Done; Gain' to Chicago;
I Want a Little Girl: Leave Ale; Sent for
You Yesterday.
VANGUARD VRS 801
1..
Tony Scott, clarinet; Jimmy Nottingham,
trumpet; Eddie Wasserman, renor saxophone; Danny Bank, baritone saxophone;
Billy Bycrs, trombone; Milt Hinton, bass;
Osie Johnson, drums.
Forty -Second Street; But Not for Me; Sunday Scene; Requiem /or "Lips "; Lucky to
Be Me; Fingerpoppin' Blues; Abstraction
No. r: Autumn Nocturne: Three Short
Dances for Solo Clarinet; Glad to Be Unhappy; Our Love Is Here to Stay; Let My
Fingers Go!
VICTOR t__IM 1022.
t2 -in, $3,98.
-
modern. Jimmy Rushing's parlay of How
Long. Boogie lvoogie and Hote YOB Want
Your Lovin' Done marks a peak in his
recording career
has scope and variety
such as he was rarely permitted during his
many years with Count Basics band, he
has some remarkably sensitive accompaniment and he is given better recording
than he has ever had before. Rushing's
voice is aging and it grows a little hoarse
when he vies to push it too hard but it
still has that wonderful surge that has
always characterized his reading of a blues
lyric. On How Long he gives what might
be considered a definitive performance of
relaxed yet potent blues shouting with the
THE CREATIVE TEDDY WILSON
Teddy Wilson, piano; Milt Hinton, bass;
Jo Jones, drums.
-
Tony Scott, who has been on his way for
many years, finally arrives
on records
with this disk. During these years, Scott
has been evolving a personal style which
often eluded him, leaving him hung between safe, known ground for the clarinet
and the higher reaches for which he was
aiming. He has been recorded in the past
during some of these moments in Limbo
and he has often sounded as though he
were squirming his way through some
vague torture chamber.
But here, one gathers, is what he was
after. It is, almost inevitably, a form of
fulfilled simplicity, a rich, firm tone which
spreads so shapelessly in any direction that
it might be an arm without bones. His
playing throughout this disk is utterly
engrossing and completely unique. A good
thing, too, for the other frontline men,
with the exception of Danny Bank, are nor
overly inspired and many of the arrangements are slightly earthbound. Scott, how.
ever, is nor. He brightens an otherwise
drab Forts' -Second Street, plays a touching
and melodic Requiem for "Lips" (Hot
Lips Page) and creates a beautifully, soft
and delicate conception of Autumn Nocturne. He also allows himself two un-
-
Blues for the Oldest Profession; It Had to
Be You; You Took Advantage of Me;
Three Little Words; If I Had You; Who's
Sorry Note; The Birth of the Blues; When
Your Lover Has Gone; Moonlight on the
Gauges; April in Paris; Hallelujah; Get
Our of Town.
NORGRAN MG N -1019. 12-in. $4.98.
Teddy Wilson's piano playing is one of
the most consistent elements in jazz; yet he
can, as he has lately, go through fairly
long periods without recording anything
that seems to be properly representative of
him. On this disk, for a change, he is
.._...
;
i
r ,
recotded
high
1ulet1tY
accompanied and essentially, non -jazz solos
Abstraction No, r and Three Short
Dances for Solo Clarinet-which are fascinating little exercises. The recording is
polished but at times a little over bright.
to -in. $3.95.
One side of this release, at least, is lust
about the best display of vocal blues put
on a disk since recording equipment got
-he
'PONY SCOTT SEPTET
Scott's Fling
Together, these two men have a
strong, brash, moving quality. Their individual solos remain a matter of chacun à
son gout-as a rule, f find their mannered
puttering tedious. But when they are working within the restraints required for a
joint effort, their playing takes on a
completely different texture and they produce a very basic and very genuine jazz
feeling. On these numbers they are helped
by some especially fine piano spots by Dick
Katz. Johnson arranged the selections on
one side of this disk, Winding did those
on the other. Winding's ideas seem the
most varied. They include It's All Right
with Me, a ruggedly swinging thing, an
inventive ballad approach to Mad About
the Boy, humor (no less) on Yes Sir,
That's My Baby and some amusing excursions on Gong Rock.
duets.
KAI WINDING AND
J. J.
JOHNSON
Kai Winding, J. J. Johnson, trombones;
Dick Katz, piano; Milt Hinton, Wendell
Marshall, bass; AI Harewood, drums.
Out of This World; Thou Swell; Lover;
Lope City; Stolen Bass: It's All Right with
Me; AIad About the Boy; Yes Sir, Thai's
My Baby; That's How 1 Feel About You:
Gong Rock.
BErtILlauEM BCP t3.
t
2-in. S4.85.
This is the third LP by Winding and
Johnson, all released within a couple of
months, and their third label. Just as their
second disk showed improvement over their
first, this offering is still better. The
recording in this case is also the best they
have received so far, giving depth and fullness to the rich sound of their swinging
WHAT IS HI -FI?
A journey behind the
scenes with Kurt List, Westmin
ster's musical director, describes
high fidelity and the making of
high fidelity records. Informative, interesting, of permanent
value to every record buyer. For
your free copy. send a card to:
WESTMINSTER RECORDS
DEPT. HF
275 Seventh Ave.. New York 1. N.Y.
75
JUNE 1955
www.americanradiohistory.com
RECOR[)ti
quite his usual ingratiating self. His playing is intelligent, well considered and
warm. He swings in that casual, effortless
way he has, skirting the edges of cocktail
piano yet always playing with strength
and perception. These tunes are well fitted
to him and so is his accompaniment, particularly bassist Hinton. The recording is
good.
THE MUSIC BETWEEN
by Robert
Kotlowitz
CRAZY OTTO
Glad Rag Doll; Beautiful Ohio; My Melancholy Baby; Red Sails in the Sunset; In the Mood;
Smiles; Rose of Washington Square; S- b- i-n -e;
Paddlin' Madelin' Home; Lights Out.
DECCA DL 8113.
12 -in.
Banana Tree; One Man Ain't Quite Enough;
I Never Has Seen Snow; What Is a Friend For?;
A Sleepier' Bee; Mardi Grat Waltz; Smellier
of Vanilla.
Percy Faith and His Orchestra.
COLUMBIA CL 640. 12 -in. $3.95
There are lovely things in Harold Arlen's
score for House of Flowers, among them
several languid and nostalgic ballads. The
good things have an attractive musical
character of their own, as all of Arlen's
best creations have; the lesser will pass
muster if they're nor examined too closely.
Percy Faith has got them all together in
this new Columbia album and given them
equal attention, regardless of quality. The
orchestrations are remarkably lush, even by
Mr. Faith's celebrated standards, and they
rend after a while to make almost all the
tunes sound alike. Columbia has provided
big, resounding engineering.
$3.98.
Crazy Otto's real name is Fritz Schulz Reichel and under that impressive title he
is known in Germany as a serious composer pianist. As Crazy Otto, he made a few experiments with unusual sounds several years
ago and came up with the "Tipsy Wire
Box," the instrument he plays on this record. The T. W. B., which is not much of a
revelation, duplicates exactly the tinny, offpitch quality of an ill -kept player-piano;
it's been heard before under other names.
Crazy Otto's playing is pretty much beer hall oom -pa at its least attractive and it
doesn't vary a jot from one tune to the next.
His novelties, accompanied by a rhythm
group and occasional vocal horseplay, were
recorded by Deutsche Grammophon-Polydor. There are times when Crazy Otto
seems to be playing smack in the middle of
your living -room.
CYMBALOM MELODIES
Two Guitars; Romans and Kok; Two C.ardas;
Two Dancer; Rakoczy March; Lavora Szerelme
Hatllamzo Balaton; Third Man Theme;
Doing; Rotes from the South; Levelem fort a
Palubol.
-
LOMBARDOLAND, U.
S. A.
in the Heart of Texas; Poor Little Rhode
Island' Give Me the Moon Over Brooklyn;
Start Fell on Alabama; Carolina Moon; Beautiful Ohio; Chicago; Tennessee Waltz; Somewhere in Old Wyoming; Florida; 'Way Down
Yonder in New Orlean; California, Here I
Come; St. Ludt Blum; Moonlight on the
Deep
Colorado.
Guy Lombardo and his Royal Canadians.
t2 -in. $3.98.
DECCA DL 8097.
-
-
Governments crumble, stock marken crash,
slowly
as we all know
the whole world
goes to pot, but Guy Lombardo and his
Canadians continue to play, if not the sweetest music this side of heaven, surely the
squarest. The outfit opened at the Hotel
Roosevelt back in 1929 and it's still there
today, sounding exactly as it did at its debut.
Surely no popular musical organization with
less propensity for change has ever kept
its audience for so long.
and kept right
Fcr that audience (which is enormous) Lombardoland offers a rich treasure in the form
of a musical tour around the United States,
and it's accompanied every step of the way
by big, well -balanced sound.
-
-
Lojzi Balogh, cymbalom.
PERIOD SPL 1014. I O -in. $3.98.
-
The cymbalom
to risk offering some elementary information you're probably familiar with already
is an active member of
the dulcimer -string family, and it is used
mainly by Hungarian gypsies, who depend
upon it for a great deal of their music and
play it with great expressiveness. Unlike the
zither, which it resembles in many other
respects, the cymbalom is struck when
played. It produces far more satisfying and
interesting sounds than most instruments in
its family. Lojzi Balogh, who is a Hungarian gypsy himself, plays the cymbalom
with amazing virtuosity and can range between such disparate items as Two Guitars,
the Rakoczy March, and Roses from the South
with admirable ease. His instrument, of
course, is limited both in range and appeal,
but Mr. Balogh gets everything out of it
he can.
HOUSE OF FLOWERS
Houle of Flowers; I'm Gonna
Leave Off Wearing My Shoe.; Waitin'; Slide, Boy, Slide; Don't
Like Goodbyes; Two Ladies in De Shade of De
THE SPOKEN WORD
MARIVAUX
Les Fausser Confidences
Madeleine Rénaud, Araminte; Simone
Valère, Marthon; Marie- Hélène Dasté,
Mme. Argante; Jean -Louis Barrault, Dubois; Pierre Bertin, M. Remi; J. P. Granval,
Arléquin; Jean Deshailly, Dorante; Régis
Outin, Le Comte; J. F. Calvé, Un Garçon;
Jacques Galland, Un Domestique.
LONDON
INTERNATIONAL 7CV 91042.
Two 12 -in. 59.96.
Although he was born in 1688, Pierre
Marivaux carne to full prominence relatively well along in life; it was 1737, and
Louis XV ( the one whose Pompadour gets
credit for having said, quite presciently,
"April Hour, le déluge") was well settled on
the throne when the Comédiens Italien
gave the first performance of his most
famous comedy, Les Fausset Confulencet.
Beth the comedy and the literary reputation
of its author were too much of their own
76
time to stand up very well in the times that
followed, and it has actually been only in
the few years since Jean -Louis Barrault and
his wife, Madeleine Rénaud, broke away
from the Com/dir to form their own company that Marivaux has core back into the
best odor. it is not too hard to see why,
because, for all its charm, Les Parities Confidences is not a play that would stand much
inconsiderate treatment on either side of
the footlights. Not a commedia in spite of
its first auspices (although Arléquin is in
and about), it is a kind of play that has no
an elaborately
real parallel in English
and delicately contrived comedy of sentiment and situation, with situation providing the framework. and the excuse, for
everyone to analyse the sentiment in
speeches as graceful and elegant and artificial as the age in which they were written.
Samuel Richardson has been called, not
quite rightly, the English Marivaux; the
closest anyone has come to capturing Mari vaux himself and binding him to an
analogy has been to speak of his writing
in terms of the paintings of Watteau. The
world of Let Fatale Confidences is not a
real one, but the viewpoint is so consistent
that
given a performance of great style
--' it can charm us into believing (almost)
that it is. The performance, "retlized"
without too much damage from the acting
version given a couple of years ago in New
York by the same company, is magnificent
in all regards; there can be no more
beautiful language than French when it is
spoken with such style. Engineering: Very
good. No text at all, and notes that are
appreciative rather than useful. However.
very highly recommended.
J. H., Jr.
-
-
VICTOR BORGE
Caught in The Act
COLUMBIA Cr. 646.
12-in. $3.95.
On October 2, 1953, pianist, comedian and
fariner (he raises Rock Cornish pullets on
his Connecticut farm) Victor Borge opened
at the John Golden Theater in New York
for what he announced to be a "limited engagement." As far as I know he is still
there and it is beginning to look as if
he will go right on until (t) someone
(mentioning no names) drops an A -, H -,
or C -bomb on Manhattan (a) the John
Golden burns down or (3) they carry Mr.
Borge off the stage in a stretcher
probably still spitting out commas and periods.
According to a lengthy profile by Geoffrey Hellman in the New Yorker last
month, Borges show, "Comedy in Music,"
has broken all records for one- man -stands.
lc has grossed over Si. S million. Alongside that kind of money, what Mr. Borge
stands to make off this record is peanuts -Borge is as businesslike as he is funnylikc
and he will certainly nor object.
"Caught in the Act." like the preceding
but don't let that deter you from buying it.
Borge record. is made up of a series of
typical Borge skits such as A Mozart
Opera; Family Background; and the usual
indignant exchange with the audience over
request numbers.
Personally, I do not
believe it is quire as funny as the first
except for one thing: his phorecord
netic system of punctuation which is included in "Caught in the Act." That, of
course, is Borges classic
a system of
punctuation using phonetic sounds for
-
-
-
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
www.americanradiohistory.com
R ECORDS
commas, periods, question marks, exclamation points, etc. it is worth the price of the
record swisssh, puppt (vertically)
a phonetic exclamation point(!)
R. H. H., Jr.
-
L'ESPRIT DE PARIS
Peusies de Sacha Guitry et des Mutres
Sacha Guitry.
LONDON
LI.
899.
12-in. 53.98.
On the jacket, this record is described as
being "indispensible ro those interested in
the French Theater and to the collector in
search of a truly unique souvenir of this
amazing man." The statement is rather
misleading:
the record, while certainly
unique is not quire "indispensible "; its
interest. on the other hand is not as limited
as is implied. More people than just students of the French Theater and collectors
of Guitryana should find it of sufficient
interest ro be included in their record
libraries.
On side one, Sacha Guirry combines wit
with philosophy to give his impressions
(in French) of a number of things, among
which are included the theater, Paris,
women, and love. These impressions are
dispensed with such grace and charm, and
in such a civilized manner, that the listener.
is not always in complete agreement with
the sentiments expressed, is usually delighted by them. Side two of the record is
not quite such an unalloyed success despite
a very convincing introduction by Guitry.
Entitled "Potties des Attires," the second
side is devoted to one -line quotations from
the works of authors of such diverse talents
as Montaigne, Oscar Wilde, la Rochefoucauld, Goethe, Carlyle, Mark Twain, and
Voltaire. Each of these quotations taken
individually is a miniature gern of literary
facility: taken all together, some of the
effect is lost through one's not being able
to see the trees for the forest.
FRANK WRIGHT
MAURICE EVANS READS SHAKESPEARE
-six
Hamlet
Riehatd II
-
excerpts.
three excerpts.
Boner on Henry
in our review of the new
Riverside record, HERE'S MORGAN,
we gave the price as $5.95- The correct
S2.00
Last issue
price
is
$3.98.
COLUMBIA -ENTRE RL
3107.
I2 -in.
$2.98.
Hamlet and Richard II that
Maurice Evans established himself in the
eyes of many critics as the finest Shakespearian actor since Edwin Booth. It is not
surprising that the dramatic mantles of the
Prince Denmark and the Second King
Richard should fit well one man. They are
both sensitive, poetic and tragic characters,
noble but lacking the power of decisive
action. These essential qualities ate beautifully unfolded by Maurice Evans in nine
well recorded excerpts.
The excerpts are, from Hamlet:
I, ii: soliloquy "O chat this too solid flesh
would melt."
I, v: scene with father and soliloquy "O all
you host of heaven."
11, ii: soliloquy,
"O what a rogue and
peasant slave am I."
III, i: soliloquy, "To be, or not to be."
Ill, ii: Instructions to players, "Speak the
speech I pray you."
IV, iv: soliloquy, "How all occasions do
inform against me."
From Richard II:
III, i: "Landing Scene"
III, iii: "In Wales"
V, v: "In Prison"
R. H. H., Jr.
181111ors-....
was in
It
ROMEO AND JULIET
William Shakespeare
Scenes From the J. Arthur Rank Film.
Eric LC 3126. 12 -in. $3.98.
This is an altogether unsatisfactory and
annoying record. Most annoying is the fact
that in order to reduce Romeo to one disk size, it has been horribly truncated.
Not only are many scenes omitted (included
are: I, i; t, v; II, ii; II, v; II, vi;
III, v; IV, iii; IV, iv; IV, v; V, i; V, iii)
but the scenes themselves have been
stripped to hare essentials. The result is a
performance that is neither satisfactory as
a sense -making story (although it can be
followed by paying close attention to the
jacket notes) or valuable as a dramatic
study as are the customary "Excerpts
From ..."
The sound is poor, even by film -track
standards. The individual performers are
quite good, but restricted as they are here
they do little more than act out "Coming
Attractions" for the J. Arthur Rank film
on which the record is based and which
incidentally, won the 1954 Grand Prize a
R. H. H., Jr
the Venice Film Festival.
QUIET prevents static.
QUIET lubricates and protects the
HEAR the actual sounds of
EARTHOUAK E
TREMORS'
A first recording
-
on LP
Shock waves of
major
& minor quakes from
Madagascar, Hawaii,
California, Mexico
as received by
tape -recording seismometer
with cooperation of Dr. Hugo Benioff,
CalTech Seismology Laboratory
IONOSPH ERIC
swishes, whistlers,
tweeks;
the dawn chorus
Unexplained audio disturbances
50 to over 7,000 miles
above the earth.
From recorded data collected & narrated by
Prof, Millets Morgan, Dartmouth College
First Recording Ever Available
Provocative Listening from recent research
12" High Fidelity LP (#5012)
33-1/3 rpm only
At your dealer or
send $4.80 to
grooves.
QUIET retards needle wear.
FOR
PHONOGRAPH
RECORDS
PREPARE NOW FOR SUMMER MILDEW
Prevent mildew on your records
during the Summer months by applying QUIET to them now!
FOR COMPLETE RECORD CARE
QUIET
is a special liquid preparation for the complete care and preservation of phonograph records.
JUNE 1955
CONTAINS NO SOLVENTS
QUIET
harmless to records, skin
and furniture.
QUIET provides complete record
is
care.
COOK
I
Laboratories
Y 101 Second St.,
Stamford, Conn.
Please send free information on "OUT OF
THIS WORLD" to:
na. Massie container of liquid QUIET,
sponge applicator, applicator case, instnsetinnII, information on record care,
and complete laboratory test data
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77
RECORDS
HIGH FIDELITY DISCOGRAPHY
No.
17
Frédéric Chopin
by Harold Schonberg
AN ESSAY about Chopin and his place in music is not
needed. Some remarks about Chopin -playing are more in
order. Chopin has nor slipped from his high position on
the concert stage; his music is very much with us and shows
no signs of fading. At the saine time, there is no doubt that
a certain tradition of Chopin -playing is disappearing. Our
younger virtuosos, a hardy breed with steel fingers (and,
one often suspects, souls), can spatter the notes of Prokofiev's Third Concerto with the force and fluency of raindrops from an industrious tornado. When they come to a
simple Chopin mazurka they seem nonplused. In a way
their difficulty is understandable. It is hard to do precision
work when you wear boxing gloves.
Now, the older school of Romantic pianists, from Chopin
himself on to Artur Rubinstein and Guiomar Novaes of
our own day, was as pigged a group of individualists as
existed anywhere. There was De Pachmann, with his exquisite traceries (and mannered eccentricity); and Anton
Rubinstein, with his thunderous volleys of tone; and in
between there was every conceivable shade of musical
approach and philosophy.
But at least three things all these pianists had in common
singing tone, a flowing legato, and a natural rubato.
Hofmann could rear up and smite the keyboard, sometimes
actually with the flat of his hand. Yer he never lost tone.
And he, like all the great pianists of his day, could take a
phrase and connect its individual noces so that they flowed
together in a melting, logical sequence. Fingers, pedals,
heart, and brain
all worked together.
The deficiency in legato playing of many of today's
younger players strongly militates against their success as
Chopinzees (so Huneker once described the species). Nor
do they seem to be interested in experimenting with the
tonal resources of the piano, its potentialities for color.
Some of them seem afraid of the pedals, touching them
gingerly as if a healthy charge of electricity were surging
through the appendages. One wonders how they practice.
It was evident, when a great Romantic pianist played
Chopin, that he had spent hours upon endless hours studying nor only the notes but -much more important -what
was beyond the notes. He experimented with inner voices,
-a
-
with accentuations, with varying finger weights, with contrasts of dynamics. It was all very personal; and yet what
came out was always (well, nearly always) implicit in the
music, free for all to discover.
Perhaps our present -day musical stringency is an inhibiting factor against the young pianist. He has been taught to
respect the wishes of the composer. Well and good; but
only too often that respect manifests itself in a cold, tooliteral exposition of the notes. Accuracy is a wonderful
thing; but lei's make sure we are aiming at the right target
The only musical target worth shooting for is a re- creation,
not a blueprint. Anyway, there never was a composer who
did not expect the performer ro add something of his own.
What co add? That, of course, depends upon the caste of
the performer and his identification with a specific style.
(Listen to Landowska's Bach for a concrete example.)
Some have said that our younger pianists lack identification
with the Romantic school because they are children of a
neurotic age and reflect that age. Perhaps there is some
truth in the statement, though it seems too easy and pat
Anything, these days, can be explained away in psychiatric
jargon. I myself put most of the blame on the teaching.
Young recitalists, many of them from some of the most
respected conservatories in the world, come before the
public with appalling notions about music, and with an
equally appalling lack of intellectual curiosity about ir. And
how seldom does one come across a young pianist who
communicates any real joy in making music!
It also is very rare that one hears a convincing rubato
from a young pianist; and rubato is the essence of Chopin.
Much misleading nonsense has been written about the term.
In some early editions of Grove's, Fuller- Mailand stated
that rubato "is allowed in the works of all the modern
Romantic masters, from Weber downwards, with the single
exception of Mendelssohn
In the case of the older
masters it is entirely and unconditionally inadmissible, and
it may be doubted whether it should be introduced in
...
Beethoven.
Fuller -Maitland could not have been more in error.
Obviously he was unacquainted with the letter that Mozart
wrote to his family, in which he describes the tempo rubato
78
HIGH FIDELITI MAGAZINE
www.americanradiohistory.com
RECO}tDS
and how he employed it. Even before Mozart was born,
C. P. E. Bach was writing about rubato; and he aiso had the
final word to say about it: "... Practice alone will nor be
of help here, for without a fitting sensitivity, no amount of
pains will succeed in contriving a correct rubato
Most
keyboard works contain rubato passages."
Rubato is a variation in tempo or rhythm that adds tension to a melodic line without distorting it. It should not
ever involve actual alteration of note values (though that is
what so often happens when bad taste goes to work on
Chopin). Nor should it involve metrical shifts. The basic
meter must always be present; it is the rhythm that may
fluctuate. "Do you see those trees ?" said Liszt. "The wind
plays in the leaves, life unfolds and develops beneath them,
but the tree remains the same. That is the Chopin rubato."
No composer, from Bach to Poulenc, wants his music
played in a rigid, metronomic manner. He wants delicate
shifts and adjustments, always expressed in proportional
relationships. Thus, in a waltz, the second bear may be held
a trifle longer, but the idea of waltz meter should never be
lost. Or you can bend a measure so that it rakes off ac a
slightly different rangent from the preceding ones, but the
individual notes in char measure continue to bear the same
relationship ro each other. An eighth note will remain an
eighth note, not turn into a dotted eighth.
Old C. P. E. Bach was right. Rubato cannot be taught.
It musc be felt. A calculated rubato, one that proceeds from
superimposed instruction, will either be eccentric or will
develop into positive musical anarchy.
Next comes the consideration of technique; and technique is a sine qua Iron of Chopin playing. Name any great
Chopin pianist, and you name a great technician. For, after
all, Chopin composed some of the most difficult music in
the repertoire, and you can no more play it without technique to burn than you can tear down the Empire State
Building with a toothpick. You may have the greatest
musical instinct since Orpheus
what good is it if you
can't play the notes? If I seem to be belaboring the point,
it is because the old cliché that " technique is merely a
means to an end, not the end itself" is a half truth that has
done considerable harm.
Of course there are additional prerequisites to great
Chopin-playing
poetry, color, flexibility, spontaneity,
force, and passion when needed. Chopin, though he may
have worked in small forms, was a major musical thinker
and innovator
revolutionary in his days; a seminal
force of the nineteenth century from whom (as Gerald
Abraham points out in Chopin's Musical Style) most of his
successors were not ashamed to borrow. Chopin, more than
Liszt, more than anybody, was the piano, and in addition
he was a genius who altered the entire musical vocabulary
...
-but
-
-a
ANDANTE SPIANATO AND POLONAISE,
FOR PIANO AND ORCHESTRA, OP. 22
(2 Editions)
frequent concert -hall visitor in its solo
piano form, this brilliant and effective
work is seldom heard in its original scoring
as a composition for piano and orchestra.
The only version of the two available disks
worth much consideration is the Frugoni.
Vox never should have released the inept
A
-a
of his age. He himself was a paradox
weak, tubercular
man, precious, something of a dandy, with a precise mind
but a narrow frame of aesthetic reference. He knew next
to nothing about the other arts and was mostly out of sympathy with the Romantic movement of his day ( he disliked
the music of Berlioz and Schumann; showed no liking for
the paintings of his good friend, Delacroix). Yet within
him was a seething rebellion chat often expressed itself in
outbursts of explosive force and made him one of the great
Romantics, willy -nilly. "Cannon buried in flowers," said
Schumann of the music of this composer.
THE FOLLOWING Chopin discography is the most comprehensive attempted since the introduction of the long playing record. It is substantially, though not too- percent,
complete. Some disks are not worth consideration, such as
the (you should pardon the expression) Liberace excursus
into Chopin, or the multi- digited work of the First Piano
Quartet. A few peripheral pianists of the peripheral companies have been omitted.
For the most part the discography follows the form previously established in these pages. Some bibliographical
problems have come up. The two major catalogues
Schwann and The Long Player
not pretend co break
down the Chopin recordings. Schwann lists but two of the
six versions of the F minor Fantasy. The Long Player lists
three versions of the Barcarolle; Schwann, two. Yet there
are at least seven. When it comes to individual études,
waltzes, mazurkas, nocturnes, both catalogues give up. So
does this discography
to a point. It would be impossible to attempt a breakdown, work by work, of every
individual Chopin recording; he composed too many short
pieces. The only feasible solution was to deal individually
with major Chopin recordings, and to lump together (in
their respective categories) disks that contain Chopin excerpts. Thus an LP containing, say, three waltzes, two
preludes, and a nocturne, will be mentioned under Waltzes
(Individual), Preludes (Individual), and Nocturnes (Individual). Some disks contain a large number of mazurkas;
for these, there is an entry named Mazurkas (Collections).
It would be a waste of space to list fifty -odd mazurkas
individually. On the ocher hand, categories like the ballades
and scherzos (only four each in number) can be so
handled.
Reference will be found below to a Columbia disk played
by Josef Hofmann. This disk is not yet available but it
should be, in a few months. I have listened to the rest pressings and, since they contain magnificent examples of Chopin
playing ( they were recorded at Hofmann's fiftieth anniversary concert, ar the Metropolitan Opera House, November
28, 1937), I have included them in the discography.
Reinhardt performance, which bumbles
along without style or sparkle. Frugoni's
has more of an appropriate glitter, even if
the orchestra hovers so discreetly in the
background that it often hardly can be
heard. Frugoni plays nimbly enough, but
not very subtly; it's all pretty much one dimensional. His disk, however, includes
several rarely heard concerted pieces by
Chopin, and collectors will want to investi-
JUNE 1955
-do
-
-up
gate it. Clear recording, perhaps a bit too
close -up. If it's the solo version of the
Andante Spianato and Polonaise in which
you are interested, consult the following
entry.
-Orazio Frugoni; Pro Musica Orchestra,
Hans Swarowsky, cond. Vox PL 903o.
12 -in. $5.95 (with Krakoviak; Variations
on "L2 ci darem la mana "; Liszt: Toter.
ran).
79
www.americanradiohistory.com
RECORDS
-Rolf
Reinhardt; Pro Musica Orchestra,
conducted by the pianist. Vox PL 7530.
12-in. 55.95 (with Variations, Op. 2, 12).
ANDANTE
SPIANATO
AND
POLONAISE,
Soco PIANO, Op. 22 (3 Editions)
Two tremendous interpretations and one
Hofrnann's is the
transcendental one.
latter. His ideas arc entirely original; and
yet the more one hears the performance,
the more it strikes 5re. Somehow he makes
the competing versions sound thick. In the
Andante Spianato his tempo is considerably
faster than that of Rubinstein or Horowitz,
and the melodic line sings in almost a disembodied manner. His treatment of the
bass, too, gives a more solid underpinning
than elsewhere can be heard. Curiously his
tempo in the Polonaise is slower than in
the other versions. Hofmann takes "polonaise" literally as a dance form. Details
come out in his playing chat are missing
in the more orthodox work of Messrs.
Horowitz and Rubinstein. Hofmann is incomparably aristocratic. His recording is
on a primitive level, but that should not
deter lovers of good Chopin playing or
anybody who thinks that content is more
important than sound. Both of the Victor
recordings are excellent examples of high fidelity piano tone. Both, too, are splendid
performances. Horowitz's is a little more
FOR
tense, exceptionally brilliant, sharply outlined. Rubinstein's is broadly conceived,
massive in conception, colorful in attack.
You can't go wrong on either of these; but
don't miss the pleasure of hearing Hofmann. It remains to be noted that the
Rubinstein disk ends a half tone flat
(though it is correctly pitched in its transfer
as a filler in the three -disk Mazurkas sec).
Horowitz's performance also is available on
RCA VICTOR LRM 7051 (to -in.), with the
Scherzo in B minor and Nocturne in F
minor. Before the price curs it was a good
bargain; now, no. The same applies to all
others in the LRM series.
-Josef Hofmann. COLUMBIA ML 4929.
12-in. $5.95 (with Chopin miscellany).
-Vladimir Horowitz. RCA VICTOR LM
1137. 12 -in. $3.98 (with Chopin miscellany).
-Artur Rubinstein. RCA VICTOR LM
152.
10 -in.
$2.98 (with Polonaise-Fantasy).
is close to a stall. His disk, like the Westminster played by Doyen, is not very
attractive economically, as the other versions give extra music in addition tc the
Ballades. In any case, Doyen's playing is
impossibly affected. This is a model of
swooning adolescence. Arrau's performance I find excessively mannered and unnatural. He sounds calculated; his effects
do not come off; he favors drawn -out ritards
that start measures before Chopin indicated,
he consistently changes the metrical pulse,
and his rubato creaks. Technique he has.
The recorded sound is full, clear, and not
very colorful.
-Robert
Casadesus. COLUMBIA ML 4.798.
r2 -in. $3.98 (with Sonata in B -/fat minor).
-Cor de Groot. EPIC LC 3037.
S3.98 (with Chopin miscellany).
-Friedrich Guida. LONDON LD 9577. loin. $2.98.
-Earl Wild. CONCERT HALL CHS r40t.
r2 -in. $4.98.
-Grimm Doyen. WESTMINSTER WL
5169. 12 -in. $5.95.
-Claudio Arrau. DECCA DX 53o. Two
12 -in. $11.70 (with 4 Impromptus; 4
Scherzos; Barcarolle).
No. a, IN G MINOR, OP. 23 (4 Editions)
Hofmann, easily. Again the recording is
inferior, but who cares? Hofmann is
heroic, lyric, delicate by turns. He has
more color and authority than anybody who
has attempted the work on disks, and there
is a degree of imagination to the playing
that vanished when Hofmann retired. In
the Barere recording the piano tone is not
bad, but the recording is low -level and has
prominent surfaces. Barere brings a mannered quality to his reading. He tinkers
around with the opening phrases, altering
the note values, and in general has some
arbitrary notions that do not always come
off. Yet there never is any doubt that a
grea: pianist is at work, and there are some
ravishing details, including a degree of
nuance and suppleness that none but Hofmann can suggest. The Horowitz is a
transfer to LP of the /948 shellac disks:
dated sound, boomy bass. His performance
is finicky, frequently tight and nervous,
sometimes actually disconnected. One exciting and extremely effective moment: the
crash in the bass in the measure preceding
BALLADES
4 BALLADES
(COMPLETE)
(6 Editions)
am not happy about any of these. The
Casadesus version. which was originally
released in 195o, is probably the best. But
Casadesus, a superlative technician, stands
a little away from the music, refusing to
get involved too strongly. Fire and passion
are missing; and not all of Casadesus' elegance can compensate. Clear, rather thin
I
recorded sound, but quite serviceable. Cor
de Groot plays steadily and methodically.
No errors of commission; but, then again,
not much in the way of imagination. His
recording has, like many Epics, a thudding
bass. Guida plays the notes with vigor;
nothing small-scaled here. But nothing
very poetic either. Good recording, with
an occasional pre -echo. On his Concert
Hall disk, Earl Wild often supplies a
degree of musical excitement not apparent
in the other versions. His playing does not
have consistency, however. Sometimes he
roars along, all jets out; at other times he
the beginning of the coda. Backhaus is unconvincing and his playing is alien to the
improvisatory nature of the music.
-Josef Hofmann. COLUMBIA ML Z.929.
12 -in. $5.95 (with Chopin miscellany).
-Simon Barere. REM7NGTON 599 -17. r2in. 51.95 (with Chopin -Liszt miscellany).
-Vladimir Horowitz. RCA VICTOR LM
1235. 12 -in. $3.98 (with Sonata in B -fiat
minor and Liszt miscellany).
-Wilhelm Backhaus. LONDON LPS 317.
to -in. $2.98 (with Chopin miscellany).
No.
3, IN A -FLAT, OP. 47 (3 Editions)
None of these is successful. Katchen is
8o
brash and immature, and all on the surface.
The Horowitz pressings I played had a
prominent scratch throughout. Otherwise
the recorded sound is bell -like. This is a
big performance that somehow fails to conHorowitz misses the grace and
vince.
elegance of the music, and there are some
odd sections involving detached linger
weights. Nearly everything sounds too big.
The Arrau disk is a transfer from a prewar
shellac.
Inferior recorded sound; heavy
surfaces; occasional tonal shatter. But the
playing has a more relaxed quality than the
version in the integral set Arrau made for
Decca two years ago. This is the best performance of the A -flat Ballade on LP
and the worst recorded sound.
-Claudio Arrau. DECCA DL. 8517. 12 -in.
$3.98 (with Chopin miscellany).
-Vladimir Horowitz. RCA VICTOR LM
£707. 12 -ìn. $3.98 (with Chopin miscellany).
-Julius Katchen. LONDON LS 554. to -in.
$2.98 (with F minor Fantasy and Scherzo
-
No. 3).
No. 4, IN P MINOR, OP. 52 (1 Edition)
Horowitz starts with a beautiful, singing
line. Then he becomes capricious. He
can't leave well enough alone: he adds little
crescendi and diminuendi that testify to his
pianistic control rather than to his musical
instincts. Withal, some driving, energetic
pianism, including a thrilling coda (one of
the most difficult in the repertoire). Superb
recorded sound. This identical performance
is also available on RCA VICTOR I.RAM
7018. (to -in., $2.98).
-Vladimir Horowitz. RCA VICTOR LM
1707. 12 -in. $3.98 (with Chopin miscel-
lany).
(7 Editions)
Despite the presence of seven versions, a
choice is easy to make. Lipatti takes the
phrases between his hands and carefully
shapes them. A masterful performance, one
with nobility, passion, and tremendous
The 1948 -ish recording has a
control.
thick sound. Try the Columbia 78 equalization with reduced bass. Balogh is delicate
and small-scaled; Sandor is steely and colorless.
Cortot's performance is technically
sloppy; some of the slips are actually embarrassing. He never should have let them
release this disk. The Yves Nat interpretation is powerful but crude. Pennario's has
power, too, of a brittle sort. The Arrau is
impossible to recommend.
-Dinu Lipatti. COLUMBIA ML 4721. 12in. $4.98 (with Sonata is B minor, etc.).
-Erna Balogh. LYRICHoRD LL 20. 12 -in.
$5.95 (with Chopin miscellany).
-Yves Nat. HAYDN SOCIETY HSL. 97. 12in. $5.95 (with Sonata in B flat mirror and
Fantasy in F minor).
-Leonard Pennario. CAPITOL H 8246.
to -in. $2.98 (with Liszt: Mephisto Waltz).
-Claudio Arrau. DECCA DX 130. Two
12in.
$17.70 (with 4 Ballades; 4 ImBARCAROLLE, OP. 6o
promptus; 4 Scherzos).
-Alfred Cortot.
1032.
RCA
VICTOR
LHMV
12ín. $4.98 (with Chopin miscel-
lany).
-Gyorgy Sandor.
COLUMBIA ML 4193.
$3.98 (with Chopin miscellany and
Beethoven: Sonata No. IS in D).
12 -in.
Editions)
"Berceuse" means "Cradle Song."
BERCEUSE, OP. 57 (6
To
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
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RECÒRDS
Novaes goes the honors for a shimmering,
poetic reading. Her technique is a little
rougher than one normally hears from her,
but the quality of interpretation is lovely.
Hofmann's ideas are strange; this is the one
piece on his disk that fails to convince.
The tempo is fast, and the accented A -flats
toward the end sound arbitrary. De Groot
is as always, dependable, sensible, and not
very imaginative. Cortot's disk, a very early
electric (1926), is not one of his best
records. It has its aristocratic moments, but
also in evidence are some jerky hold- backs,
a capricious speed -up of some sections, and
a lack of steady pulse. Jonas goes about it
with much too slow a tempo, and the long
ritard at the end is painful. Balogh's performance neither adds much ro the music
nor takes anything away. One could do
much worse.
-Guiomar Novaes. Vox PL 7810. 12 -in.
$5.95 (with Chopin miscellany).
-Josef Hofmann.
COLUMBIA ML 4929.
$5.95 (with Chopin miscellany).
-Cor de Groot. EPIC LC 3037. r2 -in.
$3.98 (with 4 Ballades and 2 Waltzer).
-Erno Balogh. LYRICHORD LL 20. 12 -in.
$5.95 (with Chopin miscellany).
-Alfred Cortos RCA VICTOR LCT 1038.
12 -in. $3.98 (with Chopin miscellany).
-Maryla Jonas. COLUMUTA ML 4476. 12in. $3.98 (with Chopin miscellany).
12 -in.
BOLERO, OP. 19 (I Edition)
A fluffy, pianistic work that seldom turns
up in concert. Minor Chopin, energetically
played by Balogh. Fair recorded sound.
-Erno Balogh. LYRICHORD LL 20. 12 -in.
55.95 (with Chopin miscellany).
CONCERTOS FOR PIANO
No. I, IN E MINOR, OP. t l (Io Editions)
Rubinstein remains the old master here.
Despite the presence of a labored quality
Dot normally associated with his playing,
Rubinstein brings to the music more color,
strength, and flexibility than any of his
competitors. Beautiful recorded sound,
though the balance between piano and orchestra leaves something to be desired.
Brief comments about the other versions:
forthright, vigorous
Uninsky
strong,
rather than poetic; tinny sound to the
recording. Brailowsky -originally recorded in 1949, but splendid recorded sound.
Methodical, routine, dynamically monotonous. Mewton -Wood
powerful; some interesting ideas; often thick and over-deliberare; misses the rhapsodic quality. Good
sound.
I-Iorszowski
slender,
recorded
tasteful, rather innocuous; more care than
spontaneity; not the strongest of technicians; fair recorded sound that is a little
thick in the bass. Kilenyi -over ten
years old, with consequent dated sound.
Not much character to the playing; even
at the disk's low price it cannot compete
percuswith the other versions. Sandor
sive, rhythmic, lacking in charm and flexibility. Good recorded sound. Guide
exact playing that sounds noncommiral.
This young man definitely is not a Chopinist
not here, anyway. Badura-Skoda
has the virtue of both concertos on one
disk. Frequently sensitive playing, but
without much authority. I would not
not a big techrecommend ir. Musulin
nician (she has trouble with the nasty E
major section of the first movement). This
-
-
-
-
-
-
JUNE 1955
-
disk, like the Westminster, contains both
concertos, and the recorded sound is excellent, with an especially vibrant piano tone.
Honest, not inspired, but musical perform ançes. Of all the versions, Rubinstein's
tops the list. For a cheaper version, in that
both concertos are present on one disk, the
Musulin is suggested.
-Artur Rubinstein; Los Angeles Philharmonic, Alfred Wallenstein, cond
RCA
VICTOR LM 18ío. 12 -in. $3.98.
-Branka Musulin; Suddeutsche Rundfunk
Orchestra,
Karl
Mueller.Kray,
cond.
PERIOD 574. t2 -in. $4.98 (with Concerto
No. 2) .
-Alexander Uninsky; Hague Philharmonic, Willem van Otterloo, cond. Eric
LC 3012. 12 -in. $3.95.
-Paul Badura-Skoda; Orchestra of the
Vienna State Opera, Artur Rodzinski, cond.
WESTMINSTER \Y/L 53o8. 12 -in. $5.95
(with Concerto No. 2).
-Alexander Brailowsky; Victor Symphony,
William Steinberg, cond. RCA VICTOR
LM 1020. 12 -in. $3.98.
-Friedrich Guida; London Philharmonic,
Sir Adrian Boult, cond. LONDON LL toot.
12 -in. $3.98.
-Mieczyslaw Horszowski; Vienna State
Philharmonia, Hans Swarowsky, cond.
VOX PL 7870. 12 -in. $5.95 (with 4 1m-
prowptru)
(Dreigroschenoper)
Selections by
original 1929 cast
I0"
16M -6502e
$2.98
.
-Gyorgy Sandor; Philadelphia Orchestra,
Eugene Ormandy, cond. COLUMBIA ML
4651. 12in. $3.98.
-Edward Kilenyi; Minneapolis Symphony,
Dmitri Mitropoulos, cond. COLUMBIA
ENTRE 3028. 12-in. $ 2.98.
-Noel Mewton -Wood; Netherlands Philharmonic, Walter Goehr, cond. CONCERT
HALL CHS 1153. 12 -in. 54.98.
No.
THE
THREE
PENNY
OPERA
2, IN F MINOR, OP. 21 (7 Editions)
Three excellent versions are available. The
Rubinstein is a transfer of the 1947 shellac
disks: a fine-sounding recording with only
a slight surface to mark its source. Rubin stein's is the brightest, healthiest performance, large -scaled and full of vitality.
Novaes is more personal, playing with her
usual poetry, freedom, and instinct for just
the right degree of shading. the 1951
recording is clear but rather thin. One has
the feeling that Novaes and Klemperer do
not always see eye to eye on essential details. Nevertheless, by virtue of some exquisite details, this is a performance to
treasure. Of the two Malcuzynski versions
I prefer
the Columbia, a transfer from
1948 shellacs (good sound, prominent
surfaces). This is a virtuoso treatment of
the score; and. with a conductor to pace
him, Malcuzynski is held to a steady pace.
Ir is one of his best records, as good as
some of his other Chopin playing is bad.
His Angel disk contains a more mannered
performance, and the eccentric interpretation of the F minor Fantasy that accompanies it is no recommendation. BaduraSkoda lacks Clan. Was there ever a Teutonic pianist who achieved success with
Chopin?
Musulin is more convincing
stylistically. I have heard much worse
playing from pianists of much greater
reputation. Her resources do not match
those of Rubinstein, Novaes, or Malcuzynski; but if you insist on a version with both
concertos on one disk, this is preferable to
the Badura. Skoda. As for the Ellen Ballon
version, it is a disgrace. The Brailowsky-
Our first shipload of this historic recording
received such an overwhelming response that
it was sold out immediately.
...
new shipments are being made.
to reserve your copy at your dealer
However
Be sure
now.
THE CRITICS ACCLAIM
Brahms: SYMPHONY No. 1 IN C MINOR, op. 68.
Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra conducted
by Joseph
Keilberth.
12"
-
LGX -66003
- $4.98
smoothness of Its melodic flow and
the orchestra's response to the majestic grandeur
of the last movement make a document of dis
tinction and tonal vitality."
-Cleveland Plain Dealer
The mellow
Rossini: BARBER
OF SEVILLE- Overture
Rossini: TANCREDI- Overture
L'Orchestre Symphonique
de la Radiodiffusion Nationale Belge
conducted by Franz André
TM 68024
10"
$2.98
The
p lays with an ap proach
s
perfection intonatorcheion -wtra ise rarely heard these daysto.
The unanimity of opinion in the strings is a toy
-
to
hear."
-
-Dallas Times Herold
Chabrier: ESPANA RHAPSODY
Massenet: PHEDRE- Overture
L'Orchestre Symphonique
de la Radiodiffusion Nationale Belge
conducted by Franz André
$2.98
10" TM 68016
.. excellent recording, full of colar and sumptuous string tone, lithe in rhythms and generous in
its evocation of mood and atmosphere."
-The Gramophone
-
-
TELEFUNKEN
LONG PLAYING RECORDS
539 W. 25th St.
New York I, N. Y.
8r
RECORDS
Munch collaboration features routine playing, with the pianist methodically hitting
the notes and the conductor hurrying along
as though he were eager to get it over wich.
Everything is accurate enough, but the
flavor of the music scarcely comes through.
-Artur Rubinstein; NBC Symphony, William Steinberg, cond. RCA VICTOR LM
1046. r2 -in. $3.98.
-Guiomar Novaes; Vienna Symphony,
Otto Klemperer, cond. Vox PL 7100. 12in. $5.95.
Witold Malcuzynski; Philharmonia Or.
chestra, Paul Kleczki, cond. COLUMBIA
ML 4135. 12 -in. $3.98.
-Branka Musulin; Stuttgart Suddeutscher
Rundfunk Orchestra, Karl Mueller -Kray,
cond. PERIOD 574. 12 -in. $4.98 (with
Concerto No. r).
-Paul Badura-Skoda; Orchestra of Vienna
State
Opera,
Artur Rodzinski, cond.
WESTMINSTER WL 5308. 12 -in. $5.95
(with Concerto No. r).
-Alexander Brailowsky; Boston Symphony,
Charles Munch, cond. RCA VICTOR LM
1871.
12 -In. $3.98 (with Saint-Saëns:
Concerto No. 4).
-Witold Malcuzynski; Philharmonia Orchestra, Paul Klerzki, cond. ANGEL 35030.
12 41. $4.98 or S3.48 (with Fantasy in F
-
Novaes' great moments but is steadier all around. His tempos, a trifle deliberate,
suggest that he approached the music with
the determination not to take any chances.
As a result, we get disciplined readings
that never let themselves go. Excitement is
lacking; but better this than anarchy.
Superb recorded sound.
However, the études as yet have to
achieve a really satisfactory LP performance.
Why doesn't Victor release the fine prewar
Cortot performances, instead of lesser efforts
that do little credit to his reputation as a
great pianist?
-Robert Goldsand. CONCERT HALL CHS
1132. 12 -in. $4.98 (with Trois Nouvelles
Etudes).
-Guiomar
OP. 25, COMPLETE
into these little sketches.
-Robert
1133.
(t
(2 Editions)
remarks above. Novaes is below her
usual form, and the steadier Goldsand is
preferred. Keep on the watch for a new
version of the études. None of the current
ones is really satisfactory, and the catalogue
can well stand a performance that more
closely approximates the brilliance, color,
subtlety, and bravura that Chopin poured
Ballon; London Symphony, Ernest Ansermet, cond. LONDON LPS 275. 10in. $2.98.
ECOSSA ISuS, OP. 72
r).
See
Minor).
-Ellen
Novaes. VOX PL 9070. 12 -in.
(with Chopin: Scherzo No.
$5.95
tions)
Goldsand. CONCERT HALL CHS
$4.98 (with Hérold Varia-
12 -in.
.
-Guiomar Novaes. Vox
PL 7560. 12 -in.
$5.95 (with Trois Nouvelle, Etudes).
Edition)
Lightweight music, through which Dorf
mann prettily tinkles her way. The re-
-
corded sound is as clear and resonant as
one can get anywhere on I.P.
Dorfmann. RCA VICTOR LM
1758. 12 -in. $3.93 (with Ravel: Sonatine,
-Aria
etc.) .
ETUDES
OP. Io AND OP. 25, COMPLETE (2 Editions)
Uninsky is preferable; but neither he nor
Brailowsky exactly throws himself into the
music. Nevertheless, Uninsky's regularity
is to be pteferred to Brailowsky's percussive
attack. The latter, on two disks, also plays
the three Nouvelles Etudes and Schumann's
Symphonic Etudes. Uninsky does not play
the Nouvelles Etudes, which have no opus
number and were composed separately from
the two books of twelve each. There is
something essentially earthbound in Uninsky's playing here. He has a competent
grasp of the notes but does little to vitalize
them. And in some cases his ideas are
debatable, to say the least, especially the
affectations he brings ro the more lyric of
the etudes. His recording has a thin sound,
and the bass is tubby.
-Alexander Uninsky. EPIC LC 3065. t tin. $3.98.
-Alexander Brailowsky. RCA VICTOR
LM 6000. Two 12 -in. $7.96 (with Schit-
niarat: Symphonic Etudes).
OP. IO, COMPLETE (2 Editions)
Here, and in Op. 25, Novaes is responsible
for some of her strangest playing on LP.
My guess is that she had not looked at
some of these études for many years before
whipping them into shape for the recording session. In any case, her work is
erratic and often not up to par technically.
I prefer Goldsand, who does not rise to
(Collections and Individual)
Two pianists have devoted complete disks
to a miscellany of Chopin études. The
largest noncomplete collection is played by
David Saperton on COMMAND PERFORMANCE 1023 (12 -in.). Fifteen études are
present. Saperton's performances are not
very imaginative or colorful, and in several
cases he is downright sentimental. An example is the A -flat Etude of Op. Ito, with
its slow-ups, acceleranti, and constant "exETUDES
pression." Whatever the expressive deficiencies of the playing, it must be said that
Saperton is no tyro, and he often turps a
neat phrase. In view of the lack of real
competition in the field of Chopin études,
this disk can well be considered a legitimate
entry.
On
COMMAND
PERFORMANCE
1201/02 (nvo 12 -in.) Saperton plays
Godowsky's paraphrases on the Chopin
études. These arc perhaps the most fan tastically difficult things ever composed for
solo piano. Saperton presents Chopin's
original étude, in each case, followed by
Godowsky's paraphrase (on these two disks
are contained the twelve études missing
from COMMAND PERFORMANCE 1203).
This is not the place to discuss the merits
and demerits of Godowsky's work. Some
circles deride the paraphrases. I have
always found them among the most ingenious piano pieces in the literature, and a
legitimate extension of Liszt's pioneering
work. The mere fact that Saperton gets
through without breaking down is in itself
remarkable feat. Each of these three
disks has been recorded with exceptional
a
Next
Aaron Copland
discography by Arthur Berger.
issue, an
82
clarity, and collectors looking for something unusual should investigate the pair
containing the paraphrases. One of these
days they will be collectors' items.
On LONDON LS 704 ( to -in.) Wilhelm
Backhaus presents a miscellany of études
from Op. 10 and Op. 25. These are stiff,
rhythmically monotonous performances,
virtually devoid of color. Technical security
is always present, of course, but Chopin is
not, and never was, Backhaus' cup of tea.
(Not long ago I went back to his early
electric set of the études; the playing is
just as unconvincing.) Backhaus also has
the E major Etude (Op. 1o, No. 3) on his
Chopin Recital disk, LONDON LS 317 (r0in.). The same étude is played with more
sensitivity by Novaes on her Chopin Recital
disk, Vox PL 78ío (12 -in.). Still another
version of this most popular of Chopin
études (the composer once said it was the
loveliest melody he ever wrote) is contributed by Vladimir Horowitz on RCA
VICTOR LM 1707 (12 -in.). He handles it
in a rather mannered fashion and then
whizzes through the following Etude in
C -sharp minor (Op. to, No. 4) with grand
virtuosity. Josef Hofmann's brilliant performance of the Butterfly Etude (Op. 25,
No. 9) can be heard on COLUMBIA ML
4929 (12 -in.). The F minor Etude (Op.
25, No. 2) is played by Alfred Cortot on
RCA VICTOR LHMV 1032 (12 -in.):
plenty of musical style, plenty of technical
mishaps. James Maclnnes offers near and
unperceptive interpretations of the Trout
Nouvelles Etudes on MCINTOSH MM 104
(12 -in.). The recording is clear and a
little glassy in sound. On COLUMBIA ML
4476, Maryla Jonas plays the Etude in
E -fiat minor (Op. ro, No. 6) with restraint
and poetry; and then she plays the F minor
(Op. 25, No. 2) in a leisurely way, with o
nonlegaro touch that does not sound
natural.
FANTASY IN F MINOR; OP. 49
(6 Edi-
tions)
Many specialists call this Chopin's greatest
work. It has everything
spacious design, amazingly rich harmonies. melodic
content of a varied nature, variety in unity.
Heading the cop of the LP list are Cherkassky and Novaes. My preference is Novaes.
Despite a few awkward moments, she
brings to the music a typical combination
of personality, color, and poetry. Cherkassky, who presents an orthodox conception,
does not convey equivalent personality, and
he drags the chorale -like B major section
inexcusably. Novaes never lags. neither
does she strain to achieve heroic flights.
She presents the music in a modest framework; but within that framework she is all
nuance. The recorded sound is faithful
enough to convey the subtlety of her tone.
Not much can be said of the other versions.
Sandor's recording has dry, unresonant
sound. He plays the music in a methodical
manner, an absence of poetry, and a literal mindedness that would classify Helen of
Troy as just so many ounces of protoplasm,
calcium, and hemoglobin. Katchen's performance is a glib collection of pianistic
effects rather than a unified musical conception. Yves Nat has a big style, but his
technique is not commensurate with his
ideas, and he has co work much too hard
over certain sections. A clangorous type of
-a
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
www.americanradiohistory.com
RECORDS
recorded piano is present here. Malcuzynski's ideas I find merely eccentric. Right at
the opening measures he goes his own way,
ignoring Chopin's indications; and his
rubato is of a type never seen or heard
before.
-Guinmar Nnvaes. Vox PL 781 n. 12 -in.
$5.95 (with Chopin miscellany).
--Shura Chcrkassky. RCA VrcroR LDC
ro66. r2 -in. $2.98 (with Nocturne in E
minor; Mazurka No. 23 in D; Rachmaninoff: Rhapsody on a Theme by Paganini).
-Yves Nat. HAYDN SOCIETY HSL 97. 12in. $5.95 (with Sonata in B -fiat minor;
-
Barcarolle).
Julius Katchen. LONDON LPS 554. 10in. $2.98 (with Scherzo No. 3; Ballade
No.3).
-Gyorgy Sandor.
:
COLUMBIA ML 4193.
r2 -in. $3.98 (with Chopin miscellany;
Beethoven: Sonata No. 1.5 in D).
-Witold Malcuzynski. ANGEL 35030. I2in. $4.98 or $3.48 (with Concerto No. 2).
FANTASY -IMPROMPTU, OP.
66
(See Im-
promptus)
(3
Editions)
Chopin composed four impromptus. The
first three are those in A -flat (Op. 29),
F -sharp major (Op. 36) and G -flat major
(Op. 51). The fourth, and most popular
indeed, one of Chopin's all -time
favorites, along with the Waltz in C.sharp
minor and the Paneral March-is the soFantasy -Impromptu
(Op. 66).
called
Chopin called it an impromptu; the "fantasy" part was tacked on by a publisher.
The popularity of the Fantasy -Impromptu
has obscured the others; but surely Chopin
never composed a more lyrical work than
the F- sharp. And the seldom -played G-flat
has moments of extreme introspection and
beauty. No really satisfactory LP version
of the complete set exists. Balogh's is
probably the best of the three available.
It is neat, accurate, and tasteful. What it
lacks is any degree of musical personality.
Yet surely it is preferable to Arrau's sigh ings and intellectualized emotionalism.
Arran pulls the F.sharp Impromptu to
pieces. His recording is clear and a little
glassy. Balogh's, though thin, is satisfactory. Horszowski is conscientious, and that
is not enough. These pieces are above all
improvisatory. Horszowski's sober process
of presenting the notes without commenting on them leaves an important element
out. His recording has fine sound in the
treble, a soggy thump in the bass.
3 IMPROMPTUS; FANTASY -IMPROMPTU
-
-Erno
Balogh. LYRICHORD LL 20. 12 -in.
$5.95 (with Chopin miscellany).
-Mieczyslaw Horszowski. VOX PL 787o.
12 -in. $5.95 (with Concerto No. r).
-Claudio Arrau. DECCA DX 13o. Two
Ballades;
r2-in. $11.70 (with 4 Scherzos
:.
Barcarolle).
IMPROMPTUS
romantic playing in good technical order.
All of her work on this disk is worth
having, and it is a shame that Victor decided to couple her Chopin with an indifferent performance of Beethoven's Appassionara Sonata, played by Nicholas
Meirner. By comparicnn to Rnhinctein
and Stefanska, Gyorgy Sandor sounds
steely in his version of the Fantasy-Impromptu on COLUMBIA ML 4193 (12 -in.).
Robert Goldsand once recorded the Fantasy- Impromptu on CONCERT HALL CH
SPEC 52, in that company's Limited Edition
series, It probably is out of print. Gold sand played the work in a deliberate,
rather languishing manner. The A -flat Impromptu is played by Vladimir Horowitz
on RCA VICTOR LM 1707 (12 -in.) a
carefully shaped performance, articulated
with all of Horowitz's infernal magic. Nobody before the public today has more
accurate fingers. Maryla Jonas also has the
A -liar Impromptu, on COLUMBIA ML 4476
(1z -in.). This is a pleasant example of
piano playing, but it is not in Horowitz's
class. The most beautiful of all the Impromptus, No. 2 in F-sharp major, receives
the most lyric of interpretations from
Guiomar Novaes on Vox PL 7810 (12in.). The great lady is in superb form
here. Another version of the F -sharp is
played by Lili Kraus on DECCA DL 8517
(12 -in.). Her playing is more straightforward than that of Novaes, without the
latter's glints and shadings. The Kraus
disk is a transfer from an old 78 -rpm recording, and it shows its age.
(Individual)
Two mighty fine performances of the FanOne is
tasy- Impromptu are available.
played by Artur Rubinstein on RCA VICTOR LM 1153 (12 -in.), a disk devoted to
short encore pieces. Rubinstein turns in
the kind of singing, masculine, athletic (in
the best sense of the word) interpretation
that is expected of him. Halina Stefanska,
on RCA VICTOR LDC 1031 (12 -in.), a
low -priced Bluebird disk, offers warm,
KRAKOVIAK, OP. 14 (I Edition)
Some of us, early in 195o, came to admire
the Vox disk of the Krakoviak as played
by one Rosl Schmid and an orchestra conducted by Alfons Dressel. It was a cut
version, however, and not very lively in
sound. For some time it has been discontinued from. the Vox catalogue. The
present replacement naturally enjoys the
benefit of up-tn -dare recording technieres.
One wonders why this attractive score has
been so neglected. In general layout and
feeling it resembles the finales of the two
piano
concertos- objective, glittering,
strongly nationalistic (a krakoviak is a
Polish dance in duple time), immensely
effective. The orchestration is no better or
no worse than the orchestration in the
concertos (which is not as inferior as many
would think). As a purist I blush to say it,
but the two cuts that were adopted in the
earlier recording help the work. Schmid
excised two lengthy sections of empty display passages. Frugoni presents the work
in its entirety. He plays competently
much better than in the "La ci darem"
Variations on the same disk. The performance sounds better rehearsed, for one thing.
But this is not my idea of aristocratic
Chopin playing. Frugoni seems too intent
on emphasizing the surface glitter, and his
tone does not seem capable of much shad.
ing. Nevertheless, as I say, the playing is
competent, and those who investigate the
disk will come up with an extremely
charming novelty that may not be encountered in a lifetime of concert ;going.
-Orazio Frugoni; Pro Musica Orchestra.
Hans Swarowsky, cond. VOx PL 9030.
12 -in. $5.95 (with Andante Spianato and
Polonaise; Variations on "Ld ci darem la
mato "; Liszt: Tore ntanz).
-
r
Spain's
foremost
conductor
AIiCEIVTA
conducts
the best loved
ZABZIIEEAS
Acclaimed by the critics!
DOÑA FRANCISQUITA
2-12"
..
(Vives)
TW 91005/6 -$9.96
The London recording is
so far as
a
very plush job
sound, performance and atmosphere
are concerned. The singers are first rate and, being
Spanish, know their way around the music, lending a degree of authenticity to the proceedings
that is very convincing."
The New Records
-
LAS GOLONDRINAS (Usandizaga)
3-12" TW 91031/3 -$14.94
..
'A Spanish Pagliacci'
here is most convincing."
... the performance
- The
Gramophone
"This album will no doubt restore Usandizaga to
his rightful place in opera's hall of fame."
Pittsburgh Press
-
AGUA, AZUCARILLOS Y
AGUARDIENTE (Chueca)
10" W- 91016 -$2.98
.. most
captivating
of Johann Strauss."
... the
-
Prelude is worthy
The Gramophone
MOLINOS DE VIENTO (Luna)
12" TW 91036 -$4.98
"The performance is a very good one all around
and boasts, besides, the services of Pilar
Lorengar, the best Zarzuela soprano I have ever
heard."
Dallas Times Herald
-
PRELUDES AND INTERMEZZI
FROM ZARZUELAS -Vol. 1
12" TW 91020 -$4.98
...
"Vivid, interesting music beautifully played
this is seductive music of Patrician line and
- Chicago Tribune
detail."
jONDOÁ( INTERNATIONAL
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1, N
Y
83
JUNE 1955
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RECORDS
MAZURKA S
COLLECTIONS OP MAZURKAS
Five pianists have contributed disks devoted
entirely or in large part to Chopin mazurkas. Here is a breakdown. Horowitz plays
seven: Nos. 20, 21, 26, 32, 38, 40, and 41.
Kapell plays nine: Nos. 9, 14, 24, 25, 35,
44, 45, 48, and 49. Novaes is heard in
twelve: Nos. 13, 15, 17, 23, 24, 25, 26,
34, 36, 37, 39, and 51. On to-in. COLUMBIA ML 2101, Jonas plays nine: Nos. 9, a1,
12, 13, 14, 22, 36, 41, and 45. On ML
2036 she plays an additional trine: Nos.
16, 18, 21, 27, 29, 35, 48, 5o, and the
posthumous G major. There is something
to be said for each of these disks. Horowitz
plays with a carefully turned line, with
simplicity, sensitivity, and his usual remarkable control. He is heard to very good
advantage here, and the delicacy of his
(1 Edition)
Chopin composed over fifty of these little
dances (little in size; sonic of them are
epic in emotional scope). In prewar days,
only one pianist was brave enough -and,
from Victor's standpoint, popular enough
take them on. That was Artur Rubinstein; and his three -album set, issued
around 194o, was one of the glories of the
prewar repertoire. The current three -disk
issue on LP is nor a transfer but a new
recording. I can't think of a living pianist
to whom the mazurkas could be more
safely entrusted. As Rubinstein plays the
music it emerges with all of its nostalgia,
essential health, and bouncing rhythm. No
affectations, no gilding the lily, no calculated superimpositions mar the work.
More than any pianist, Rubinstein expresses a joie de vivre in his playing. Here
it is captured for posterity. I could go on,
in great detail. Suffice it to say that this is
great Chopin, played by a great pianist at
the height of his resource. The Victor
engineers were most co-operative in this
release, giving Rubinstein clear, undistorted recording. What results is a basic
essential for any collection of Chopin. The
first twelve mazurkas from the complete
COMPLETE
-to
work, plus a thorough identification with
the style, makes this disk one of his great
ones (the Schumann Kinderscenen on the
reverse is also beautifully delivered).
Novaes is more personal, more fragrant
and scented. Many listeners do not like
this disk. It has been described as wayward. All I can say is that I continue to
listen to it with delight. Kapell is a little
tight, but he too plays with taste and
understanding. With Jonas, we come to a
style that infuriates many specialists. She
goes her own sweet way, changing rhythms
and tempos to suit herself, simpering, acting coy, using a wild rubato. And yet
through it all often comes something very
attractive
gracious quality, considerable
feeling. If you like your mazurkas swaying
and sentimental, try these. The two Victor
recordings are clear and sparkling. Vox has
given Novaes clear recording but high
surfaces. The two Columbia disks are
transfers from shellac, with here and there
a trace of "wow" but with fairly realistic
piano tone.
Since the above paragraph was written,
Victor has released another disk of mazurkas played by William Kapell. Seventeen
are presented- Nos. 2, 6, 11, 12, 20, 22,
26, 27, 31, 32, 36, 37. 40, 41, 43, 47, and
5o. These were recorded in 1952. The
performances are clear and direct, with a
singing line and considerable musical now.
As in his previous disk of mazurkas, there
is a suggestion that Kapell is holding himself back just a shade roo strongly, but the
playing is nevertheless that of an artist, and
the disk is highly recommended. One flight
defect: in the A -flat Mazurka (Op. 17, No.
3). there is a faulty tape snip.
-Seven Mazurkas. Vladimir Horowitz.
RCA VICTOR LM 1109. 12 -in. $3.98
(with Schanrana: Kiuderscenen).
-Nine Mazurkas. William Kapell. RCA
VICTOR LM 1715.
12 -in. $3.98 (with
set have been placed on RCA VICTOR LRM
7001 (ro -in.). This little disk is a good
introduction for those who cannot afford
to invest in the three -disk set.
-Artur Rubinstein. RCA VICTOR LM
6109. Three 12in. S11.94 (with Andante
Spianato and Polonaise; PolonairePantaty).
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-Seventeen Mazurkas.
William Kapell.
RCA VICTOR LM 1365. 12 -in. 53.98.
-Twelve Mazurkas. Guiomar Novaes.
Vox 7920. 12 -in. S5.95.
-Nine
Mazurkas. Maryla Jonas. COLUM2101. t0 -i11. $2.98.
-Nine Mazurkas. Maryla Jonas. COLUMBIA ML 2036. to -in. $2.98.
BIA ML
'
INDIVIDUAL MAZURKAS
Many pianists have recorded individual
mazurkas on disks devoted to a miscellany
of other music. Let's take them alphabetically. Wilhelm Bad-haus plays three (Bflat minor, Op. 24, No. 4; E -Flat, Op. 3o,
No. 3; C, Op. 33, No. 3) in an unyielding,
Germanic manner on LONDON LPS 317
(to -in.). The same three mazurkas are
also on LD 9047 (to -in.). Same pianist,
same performance. On COLUMBIA ML
2004 ( I0 -in.), Maryla Jonas plays Nos. 19
(13 minor. Op. 30, No. 2), 43 (G minor.
Op. 67, No. 2), 49 (F minor, Op. 68, No.
4) and the posthumous 13-flat, handling
them in typically mannered style, yet with
a peculiar affinity for the music. One of
: 4A11'A/
1VY
Uvuu
C
the curiosities of the catalogue is contained
on RCA VICTOR LM 1186, where Wanda
Landowska plays the Mazurka in C (Op.
56, No. 2) on the harpsichord. A novel
idea and, in this case, an adorable one. The
great Mazurka in C -sharp minor (Op. 5o,
No. 3) is magnificently played by Dinu
Lipatti on COLUMBIA ML 472 (12 -in),
and the entire Op. 5o set (consisting of
three mazurkas) is nicely performed by
Nikita Magaloff on LONDON LS 532 (loin.). Ignace Jan Paderewski is heard in the
Mazurka in C -sharp minor (Op. 63, No.
3) on RCA VICTOR I.CT 1038 (12 -in.).
This was recorded in 193o, when the
pianist was far past his prime. Buoyant,
rhythmic performances of three mazurkas
B -flat (Op. 7, No. r), C -sharp minor
(Op. 6, No. 2) , C (Op. 68, No. t)
come from Halina Stefanska on RCA Vic TOR LIIC 1031 (12 -in.). Plenty of spirit
is here, plus a subtle and idiomatic turn of
Abrase. Stefanska sounds like a fine artist.
-
-
NOCTURNES
COMPLETE (1 Edition)
Not much can here be said that wasn't said
in reference to Rubinstein's performance
of the mazurkas (see above). In these
nocturnes he brings an equivalent degree
of strength, poetry, and technical 6nesse.
He achieves the sentiment of the music
without ever becoming sentimental, and
the way he sings out the melodic consent
is an object lesson for all pianists. Rubinstein remains the romantic pianist par
excellence. Superb recorded sound.
-Artur Rubinstein. RCA VICTOR LM
6005. Two 12 -in. $7.70.
INDIVIDUAL NOCTURNES
Again
let's rake an alphabetical look at
the pianists who have recorded individual
nocturnes. Alfred Corrot, on RCA VICTOR
LI-1MV /032 (12 -in.), is heard in the P
major (Op. 15. No. 1 ), E -fiat (Op. 9, No.
2) and Csharp minor (Op. 27, No. r).
All of these are lateviurage Cortot, which
will please his admirers and, unfortunately,
make the younger generation ask upon
what his reputation was founded. Cor de
Groot has recorded the popular F -sharp
Nocturne (Op. 15, No. 2) on EPIC LC
(t 2 -in.) , playing carefully and
3037
steadily. Vladimir de Pachmann's curious,
wistful treatment of the E minor Nocturne
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
RECORDS
contained on RCA VICTOR L(T r038
(12 -in.). He was nearly eighty when lie
made this recording in 1927. Josef Hof is
mann's incomparable performances of the
Nocturnes in E -flar (Op. 9, No 2) and Fsharp (Op. 15, No. z) can be heard on
COLUMBIA ML 4929 (12 -in.). Vladimir
Horowitz has scattered nocturnes through
several of his disks. On RCA VICTOR LM
1235 (12 -in.) he offers a handsome performance of the Nocturne in F- sharp; on
LM 1707 (12 -in.) he is at his worst in
the F minor (Op. 55, No. 1) and E minor
(Op. 72, No. 1); :he former is impossibly
mannered. A better version of the E minor
is contained in his twenty -fifth Anniversary
Album, RCA VICTOR LM 6014 (two I2in.). The same E minor is also played by
Maryla Jonas on COLUMBIA ML 2004 ( roin.), along with the posthumous Nocturne
in C -sharp minor. And on COLUMBIA ML
2743 (10 -in.), she plays five: B -flat minor
and E -flat (Op. 9, Nos- r and 2), G minor
(Op. t5, No. 3), B major (Op. 32, No. I
mislabelled B minor), and F minor
(Op. 55, No. t). All of these are plcycd
in a drawing -room manner- inrimate,
sentimental, full of holds and pauses, many
changes in the rhythmic pulse. The results
are not without charm, though none bur
Jonas could get away with it. And even she
cannot get away w:rh the dirge -like tempo
in the chorale section of the G minor; and
the F minor is positively weird. Eileen
Joyce gives the E -flat (Op. 9, No. 2) and
B major
(Op. 32, No. r) Nocturnes
schoolgirlish performances on DECCA DL
8517 (12 -in.). A beautiful, spun -out performance of the popular D -flat Nocturne
(Op. 27, No. 2) is played by Dinu Lipatti
on COLUMBIA ML 4721 (12 -in.). Guiomar Novaes' poised interpretation of the
F -sharp Nocturne, on Vox PL 7810 (12in.) is very much worth owning. RCA
VICTOR LRM 7or5 (ro -in.) contains Artur
Rubinstein's mastery in the B major (Op.
9, No. 3) and G major (Op. 37, No. 2)
Nocturnes. These were taken from the
complete sec. A fine performance of the
Nocturne in C -sharp minor (Op. 27, No.
2) is played by Halina Stefanska on RCA
VICTOR LBC 1031 (12 -in.).
-
POLISH SONGS, OP. 74
(2 Editions)
Both singers use the original Polish words.
There the resemblance stops. The Conrad
disk, with its wavery singing and lugubrious tone, should never have been released.
Kurenko uses her hard, clear voice with
consistent artistry, and she has received
sparkling recorded sound. The music is
worth knowing. Chopin, who adored the
voice and singing, composed some extraordinarily attractive songs here. One wonders why he didn't write more. The music
is not only nationalistic; it is exotic, with
modal turns of phrase and a permeating
nostalgia. Liszt transcribed a couple of
these songs.
-Maria Kurenko, soprano; Hufsiader.
LYRICHORD LL 23. 12-ín. $5.95.
-Dods Conrad, bass. VOX PL 8310. 12in.
$5.95
POLONAISES
(2 Editions )
Rubinstein's "complete" version is not so
complete. He plays the first seven and the
COMPLETE
Andante Spianato and Polonaise. Chopin,
however, composed three early polonaises
that were posthumously published as Op.
71, and there are two more polonaises, also
posthumous, that have dropped from the
repertoire (not that they really were ever in
it). Johannesen plays all of these, though
his two-disk set omits the Andante Spianato
and Polonaise. Thus his version is of real
value. It also is played right well, with
clear articulation and plenty of rhythmic
spirit. Ir is unfortunate that such fine
playing has to buck the gigantic playing of
Rubinstein. For, expertly as Johannesen
plays, he cannot measure up to the fire,
breadth, and virtuosity of King Arrur. I
have solved the dilemma by retaining both
versions (which, incidentally, are very well
recorded). Rubinstein's must be called
the preferable version, but don't sell
Johannesen short; and if you want the
minor polonaises, only he can give all of
them to you.
-Artur Rubinstein. RCA Vieron LM
1205 (Polonaises Nos. 1 -6). 12 -in. S3.98.
RCA VICTOR LM 152 (Polonaise -Fantasy;
Andante Spianato and Polonaise). io -in.
$2.93.
-Grant Johannesen. Vox PL 684o. Two
12 -in. $11.90.
No. t, IN C- StIARP MINOR, OP. 26, No. i
(I Edition)
This transfer from a 78 -rpm disk has
acceptable sound, though some bass boom
and some xylophone characteristics in the
upper treble betray its age. Jonas plays
with considerable flavor. She is not as
affected as she sometimes can be, and her
work has a gracious flow, also a rubato
that here "works." Unforced lyricism
prevails.
-Maryla Jonas. COLUMBIA ML 4476. 12in. $3 -98 (with Chopin miscellany).
NO. 3, IN A, OP. 4o, No. I (r Edition)
The so- called Polonaise Afiliiaíre. Magaloff
gives a neat, sure-handed performance that
never becomes overemotional. Nor does it
ever become heroic. All of the notes are
there, hut they could have added up ro a
bit more. Mellow -sounding recording, with
some background noise.
-Nikita Magaloff. LONDON LS 532. Loin. $2.98 (with Chopin miscellany).
NO. 4, IN C MINOR, OP. 40, NO.
2
(
t
Edition)
See remarks directly, above. Magalcff is
pianistically accurate, but the brooding
quality of the introduction goes along in a
metronomic way that scarcely conveys what
Chopin intended.
-Nikita
Magaloff. LONDON LS 532.
in. $2.98 (with Chopin miscellany).
10-
NO. 6, IN A -FLAT, OP. 53 (3 Editions)
Also to be considered is the magnificent
performance by Artur Rubinstein, disc.lssed
above. Horowitz' performance is on a
comparable level, suits mighty hammer
strokes, unlimited virtuosity, and incomparable sweep. Recording to match. The
Llicvinne is something you shouldn't miss.
It was one of his big specialities; it was not
for nothing that Lhcvinnés octaves were
admired wherever he played. He made this
recording in 1936, and it illustrates his
combination of strength and delicacy.
IfND
PaI7
DU
DISQUE
PURCELL
COME YE
SONS
or ART
Counter -Tenors*
ALFRED DELLER
JOHN WHITWORTH
Soprano
Baritone
MARGARET RITCHIE
BRUCE BOYCE
with The St. Anthony Singers and
L'Ensemble Orchestral De L'Oiseau
Lyre conducted by Anthony Lewis.
10 " -DL 53004 -$2.98
*in the 17th century mole voices
(counter- tenors) often sang the high
register ports nowadays assigned to
women. Over the years this delicate
ors has been unjustly neglected. Here
it is once again in all its original beauty.
"There could be no better introduction to Purcell's music ... than
this grand work."
-The Gramophone
The critics acclaim
.
.
.
RUGGERO GERLIN
harpsichordist
in his firs/ two releases
keyboard music of 17íh
of authentic
century
& 181h
vol.
SPANISH AND PORTUGUESE MASTERS
1
12 " -OL 50032 -$4.98
performer of fine lightness and
style ...there are some charming discoveries
in the compositions."
-Houston Post
"Gerlin
is a
Val. 2
GERMAN AND ITALIAN MASTERS
12 " -OL 50043 -$4.98
"Here is an intelligently planned recital of
early keyboard music which has enough
contrast and variety to give pleasure to the
beginner as well as to the connoisseur."
-The Gramophone
Watch for future Gerlin releases to
follow soon, including the complete
harpsichord works of François
Couperin-le- Grand.
,C"'
Pat.
EDITIONS DE
L'OISEAULYRE
539 West 25 Street, New York,
N. Y.
85
JUNE 1955
www.americanradiohistory.com
RECORDS
Pennario's impetuous performance has little
to commend it.
-Vladimir Horowitz. RCA VICTOR LM
1137. 12-in. $3.98 (with Chopin miscellany)
-Josef Lhcvinnc. RCA VICTOR Lur 1035.
t 2-in.
$3.98 (with Chopin miscellany).
-Leonard Pennario. CAPITOL H 8156.
to -in. $2.98 (with Chopin miscellany).
.
RECORD
No. 7, IN A- FLAT, OP. 61 (1 Edition)
This is the Polonaise- Fantasy, a low -keyed
work, not often played, that is a supreme
masterpiece. Madones is not the man for
it. His approach is immature. his technique
not of the unlimited kind that would
INDEX
enable him ro deal freely with the problems. Fortunately we have the Rubinstein
version on LM 152 (te -in.), discussed
above in the complete edition of the polonaises.
-James Madones. MCINTOSH MM 104.
12 -in. 54.98 (with Trois Nouvelles Etudes;
pieces by Mozart).
of all
High fidelity
RECORD REVIEWS
1951 -1953
available
NOW
A
complete index, alphabetical
by composer or collection-title,
of all the classical and semiclassical, jazz and spoken word
record reviews contained in
HIGH
FIDELITY Magazine
from 1951 through 1953. Discographies included. A "must"
reference.
ONLY 50Ç
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114
Enclosed find Soo. Please send
me a copy of the Record Index.
NAME
ADDRESS
..
No. 8, IN D
Edition)
MINOR, OP. 71, NO.
I
-
No. 9, IN
Edition)
B -FLAT, OP.
.
1
Despite, the late opus number this is a very
a little charmer, lightweight,
early work
and aristocratic. Stefanska's performance is
all that could be asked (or. She has the
notes well under control, phrases with delicacy, builds a climax with authority. Fair
recording, clear on top, somewhat tubby in
the bass.
-Halina Stefanska. RCA VICTOR LBC
1031. 12-in. $2.98 (with Chopin miscellany and Beethoven: Appassionata Sondra,
played by Nicholas Medrner).
71, No.
2
(r
An early, relatively unimportant Chopin
piece, this polonaise can stand the salon
tream)ent that Jonas gives it. It was originally recorded on shellac. The transfer
poses a few problems. I had best results on
the NAB equalization, at which point the
sound was nor bad at all.
-Maryla Jonas. COLUMBIA ML 2004to -in. $2.98.
Editions)
Although the Novaes is an early LP (1950)
the sound is quite tolerable if the bass is
drastically reduced. To my taste this is the
best modern LP interpretation of the
evanescent, magical little sketches that
Chopin assembled under the title of Preludes. Examined pedantically, some of
Novaes' playing might not stand up too
well, but through it all shine her flexibility,
her instinct for a telling phrase, and, _bove
all, a spontaneity that is exactly apposite
to the nature of the music. I have grown
to think more of the Petri disk than I used
PRELUDES, OP. 28 (7
Agree with his ideas or not, they
nevertheless arc the ideas of a master.
What disturbs me is the lack of color and
an occasional flurried feeling (as in the Gsharp minor Prelude). Perri is playing
more with his brain than with his heart.
The harsh- sounding recording is typical of
940 Columbia piano reproduction. No
distortion is present, however, and at its
price it is a fine buy, all the more in that
it is accompanied with Petri's stupendous
performance of the Liszt- Busoni Spanish
Rhapsody. Rubinstein is not in his best
form here, and one hesitates to recommend
a disk with so many capricious moments.
to.
1
Na C.O.D.'r, please
(r
Of course, the pianist being Artus Rubinstein, there are moments of magnificence.
Cor de Groot is steady, as always, playing
with a maximum of musicianship and a
minimum of poetry. Gulda's disk is a fine
effort. His Chopin lacks flexibility, but
everything is laid out in a competent manner. Nevertheless he is a long way from
the inspiration of Novaes. Both Arrau and
Brailowsky bring a methodical approach
and a lack of emotional warmth. Of the
two, Arrau is the superior technician.
Neither, however, even begins to suggest
the romanticism of the music.
-Guiomar Novaes. VOX PL 6170. 12 -in.
5595
-Egon Petri. COLUMBIA ENTRE 3040.
I 2-in.
$2.98 ( with Liszt- Busoni: Spanish
Rhapsody)
-Artur Rubinstein. RCA VICTOR 1.51
1 163.
12 -in. 53.98.
-Friedrich Gulda. LONDON LL 755. I2in. $3.98.
-Cor de Groot. EPIC LC 3017. 12 -in.
53.98.
-Alexander Brailowsky. RCA VICTOR LM
I
50. I 2-in. $3.98.
-Claudio Arrau. COLUMBIA ML 4420.
I2 -in. $3.98.
86
PRELUDES
(Individual)
Over half the preludes are played by Benno
Moiseiwitsch on RCA VICTOR LBC 1038
(I2 -in.). For some inexplicable reason,
Victor chose to represent him on a Bluebird
disk with Nos. tr -24 (taken from the
complete set that Moiseiwitsch made in
England) and three of the scherzos. The
Russian -English master plays beautifully.
He has slipped technically since prewar
days and a few slight errors are present, but
these are unimportant in view of his secure
tradition. Good recording. A delightful
memento of a great pianist is Moriz Rosen thal's performance of Nos. 3, 6, and 7 on
RCA VICTOR LC-1 1038 (12 -in.). These
were recorded in the Thirties. On MERCURY MG 10113, Constance Keene is heard
in Nos. 3, 8, and 16
three of the most
difficult in the series. She handles them
with apparently unlimited virtuosity, and
in the process also manages to extract the
musical essence.
-
SCHERZOS
(3 Editions)
Only one of the three available versions
neecl concern us. Rubinstein, whose prewar ser of the scherzos remained unique in
the catalogues, has re- recorded them with
just as much insight and technical expertise.
For
large- scale, yet
well- proportioned
Chopin, he leaves all competition far
behind. Next to this kind of playing, Bolet
is ineffectual. No mean technician himself,
Bolet is line when his agile lingers are in
motion. When lie has to pause for reflection. he obviously is not certain what to do.
Arrau is a masterly technician too, but he
is excessively mannered. Take the B minor
Scherzo, where he lets the middle section
die on the vine while he strings out an
interminable ritard. This kind of thing
occurs too often.
-Artur Rubinstein. RCA VICTOR LM
132. 2 -in. 53.98.
-Jorge Bolet. RI1MINGTON r99.16í. raCOMPLETE
1
1
ít.95.
-Claudio Arrau.
in.
DECCA DX 130. Two
I2 -in. $11.70 (with Chopin miscellany).
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
www.americanradiohistory.com
RECORI)S
NO. 1, IN B MINOR, OP. 20 (5 Editions)
Rubinstein's performance is a transfer to
Victor's "Concert Cameo" series of two
scherzos taken from the complete set of
four. Since, for an extra dollar, the complete set can be purchased, this is not too
good a buy. Moiseiwitsch plays with sweep
and assurance; a brilliant performance,
stylistically secure, slightly muffled in
sound. Novaes is quite different. She is
the deftest of the pianists who have undertaken the B minor Scherzo, and her performance is light and sure -fingered.
Unfortunately it is on a disk containing an
indifferent interpretation of the Op. ro
Etudes. Of the two Horowitz attempts I
prefer the one on LM 6014, which is somewhat slower than its companion, but which
is also more carefully shaped and more
natural -sounding. Rubinstein remains my
first choice, in any event.
-Artur Rubinstein. RCA VICTOR LRM
7015. 10-4(1. $2.98 (with Scherzo No. 2;
Nocturnes in B and G).
-Benno Moiseiwitsch. RCA VICTOR LBC
(038. 12 -in. $2.98 (with Preludes Nos.
tr -24; Scherzos 3 and
-Guiomar Novaes. VOX PL 9070. 12 -in.
$5.95 (with Btude,, Op. ro).
4)
-Vladimir Horowitz. RCA
VICTOR LM
6014. Two 12 -in. $7.96 (in 25th Anniversary Album).
-Vladimir Horowitz. RCA VICTOR LM
¡707. 12 -in. $3.98 (with Chopin miscel-
lany).
NO.
2, IN B-FLAT MINOR,
OP. 31
(i
Edition)
Like the Scherzo No. r, this version is
identical with the one Rubinstein plays in
his integral ser. If, for some reasoo, you
are interested only in the B -flat minor
Scherzo, get this by all means. Otherwise
the four scherzos on LM 1132 are the better
1038. 12 -ia. $2.98 (with Preludes rr -24;
Scherzos r and 4)
-Simon Barere. REMINGTON 199.17 12in. $1.95 (with G minor Ballade and Liszt
pieces).
-Mischa Levitzki. RCA VICTOR LCT
1o38. 12 -in. $3.98 (with Chopin miscellany)
-Claudio Arrau. DECCA DL 8517. 12 -in.
$3.98 (with Chopin miscellany).
-Juiius Karchen. LONDON LS 554. iD -in.
$2.98 (with F minor Fantasy; Ballade
No. 3).
.
NO. 4, IN E, OP. S4 (r Edition)
I can imagine a different type of performance than that which Moiseiwitsch brings
to the Fourth Scherzo, but I cannot think
of a better one. This is a model of controlled, glittering piano playing. The recorded sound is a little thick in the bass,
like that of so many piano recordings, but
is otherwise clear and well detailed.
-Benno Moiseiwitsch. RCA VICTOR LBC
ro38. r2 -in. $2.98 (with Preludes rr -24;
Scherzos r and 3) .
SONATA FOR CELLO AND PIANO IN G
MINOR, OP. 65 (1 Edition)
Now that the Kurtz -Balsam version has
been discontinued, Piatigorsky and Berkowitz have the field to themselves. They
combine for a fluent reading, one that contains the necessary Romanticism. Originally
released in 1949 to commemorate the centenary of Chopin's death, the recording
features the cello over the piano, which is
too far in the background and poorly
reproduced to boot. The music is not as
bad as its neglect would lead one to
NO. 1, IN C MINOR, OP. 4 (1 Edition)
So far as I know, no other pianist since
the invention of the phonograph has made
a recording of the C minor Sonata. In all
truth, it is not a very interesting work,
though there are some novel touches in the
live -four movement; and in several places
in the first movement the Chopin -to -come
almost takes wing. Goldsand's performance
is faithful and accurate. Excellent recorded
sound.
-Robert Goldsand. CONCERT HALL CHS
1r 5o. 12 -in. $4.98 (with Variations on
"Ld ci darem la wane; Variations on a
German Theme)
.
(12
Editions)
Novaes, to this taste. She has the three
Technique, Tone, and Temperament.
In the mysterious and ecigmatic last movement she finds things in the way of inner
voices that I have not heard since Hofmann
was in his prime. Altogether, a superb
achievement. Rubinstein's forceful statement of the music also is worth owning,
though the recorded sound is beginning to
show its age. Novaes receives much better
recorded quality. The Casadesus performNO. 2, IN B -FLAT MINOR, OP. 35
T's-
ance I find neat, polite, and small- scaled.
Uninsky plays the notes and little more.
GEORGE WRIGHT plays the MIGHTY WURLITZER PIPE ORGAN
NEW RELEASE
-Artur
Rubinstein. RCA VICTOR LRM
7015. 10 -in. $2.98 (with Scherzo No. r;
Nocturnes in B and G).
already been discussed above. Barere's fleet
performance is tremendously effective. He
could be very elegant when he wanted ro.
Here the notes roll deliciously off his
lingers, and in the coda he is sensational.
Low -level recording, prominent surfaces.
Novaes plays with her expected imagination
and flair, and with utmost beauty of tone.
Moiseiwitsch is stronger and fuller, and
equally poetic. When in practice he is one
of today's great Chopinists, and here he is
in admirable fettle. The Levirzki is a collector's reissue, originally recorded in the
early 193os. The C -sharp minor Scherzo
was one of this fine pianist's specialties; I
must have heard him play it at least five
times. He presents a well -turned job that
builds to an exciting climax. Arran's recording also was taken from shellac and is
inferior in sound. His strong playing is
more convincing than in the recent Decca
set. Even here, however, he refuses to let
the line flow naturally. Katchen does not
belong in this company of giants.
-Guiomar Novaes. Vox PL 7810. 12 -i0.
$5.95 (with Chopin miscellany).
-Benno Moiseiwitsch. RCA VICTOR LBC
SONATAS FOR PIANO
.
buy.
No. 3, IN C-SHARP MINOR, OP. 39 (6
Editions)
Several excellent versions are available,
including of course Rubinsteins, which has
assume, and there are some remarkably
imaginative touches to the writing. I have
found that the work stands up very well.
-Gregor Piatigorsky; Ralph Berkowitz.
COLUMBIA ML 4215. r2 -in. $3.98 (with
Schumann, Schubert, Fauré).
available on both "HIFItape" pre -recorded tapes
and "HIFIrecord" long playing 12" records
George Wright is best known as Organist of the New York Paramount Theatre
where for several years his artistry entertained throngs of New York theatregoers. More recently he's doing Radio and TV work in Hollywood. The organ
recorded is among the largest theatre pipe organs ever built by Wurlitzer with
five manuals. Has tremendous dynamic range to show off your own "Hi Fi"
equipment. An 8 -in. x 10 -in. photograph of both Mr. Wright and the Organ
will be included with each order.
MR. UPRIGHT PLAYS
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Roller Coaster
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Love for Sale
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YOUR LOCAL DEALER, OR ORDER BY MAIL
12-in. long playing Hifirecord
15 i.P.S. full track Hifitape
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5.
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address
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87
JUNE 1955
www.americanradiohistory.com
RECORDS
Horowitz strives for big effects but merely
manages to sound petulant. This is one of
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his least successful records. The veteran
Yves Nat also strives for a big frame but is
handicapped by lack of finger response.
Backhaus is miscast here, and misses the
passion of the music. His Teutonic muse
strokes a lyre of a sort other than Chopin
intended. I would avoid the Katcheo disk,
which is glib, superficial, and in several
spots actually annoying. Malcuzynski, both
on Entré and Angel, I find incomprehensible. If this is good Chopin playing, then
the great exponents of the past, like Hofmann and Rosenthal, were off on the
wrong track. I find this paying spasmodic
and intellectually unsettling. And yet Mal cuzynski has temperament :.nd the fingers
of a great pianist. Too Lai they don't fuse
into something of greater artistic consequence. As for the Cortot version, one can
only blush. The playing is a combination
of anachronism and anarchism. While one
is willing to pay respects to the memory of
a great artist, there comes a point where a
line must firmly be drawn. The Goldsand
disk is mentioned here merely for the sake
of completeness. It is one of Concert Ball's
Limited Editions and probably will he hard
to locate. The performance is not one that
should spur you on to great endeavor.
-Guiomar Novaes. Vox PL 736o. 12 -in.
$5.95 (with Sonora No. 3).
-Artur Rubinstein. RCA VICTOR LM
90G3. 12 -in. $3.93 (with Debussy piano
music)
.
-Robert
Casadesus. COLUMBIA ML 4798.
I2 -in. 53.93 (with 4 Balla.dcr).
-Vladimir Horowitz. RCA VICTOR LM
1235.
12 -in.
$3.98 (with Liszt piano
music)
.
-Alexander Uninsky.
EPIC LC 3056. 1tin. 53.98 (with Sonata No. 3).
-Yves Nat:. HAYDN SOCIETY HSL 97-
r2-in. S5.95
Barcarolle)
(with
F
minor
Pallidly;
.
Fast, prompt and courteous service.
The Music Box is not a regular retail store, but is devoted to mail
order business exclusively. From
picking to packing, all orders are
handled with the greatest care, by
one person only.
Inquiries, questions or what have
you on any matter pertaining to
records cordially invited.
Ail records sold at the manufacturers suggested list prices only.
When ordering simply list records
wanted (to avoid delay, list substitutes also) with your check or
money order to cover. We regret
we no longer will accept C.O.D.
orders.
New record prices are in operation
as quickly as they are announced
by the Record companies.
MAIN
STREET
GREAT BARRINGTON, MASS.
-Wilhelm
Backhaus.
LONDON LLP 266.
I2 -in. $3.98 (with Beethoven: Sonata No.
3o in E).
-Julius
Katchen.
LONDON LL 1163.
12-
in. $3.98 (with Sonata No. 3).
-Witold Malcuzynski. ANGEL 35032. rein. $4.98 or $3.43 (with Sondra No 3).
-Witold Malcuzynski. COLUMBIA ENTRE
3031. 12 -in. $2.98 (with Franck: Prelude,
Chorale and Fugue).
-Alfred Cortot. RCA VICTOR LI-IMV 18.
I 2-in. $4.98 (with Schumann: Carnival).
-Robert Goldsand. CONCERT HALL CI-I
to -in. (with Fantasy- Impromptu).
Limited Edition.
SPEC -52.
No.
3, IN B MINOR, OP. 58 (7 Editions)
Three admirable versions are on the marker.
Novaes makes the most personal thing of
the music, taking, in all truth, a good
many liberties. But she has enough genius
to make her own rules. The fine recorded
sound does justice to her tone. Kapell
here is represented by what I think is the
greatest disk he ever made. This is a
perfectly proportioned reading, brilliantly
executed, sharply defined. What a master
he would have developed into! Lipatti is
the most sober of the trio. He plays the
music "straight," with taste and polished
execution. I find it a shade noncommital
and lacking in inner glow. The music
would have grown on him had he lived.
Nevertheless it is a tremendous achieve-
ment, and its only because its Lipatti that
one automatically measures his disk against
the highest of standards. The recording,
British Columbia vintage 1947, lacks
Try 7S -rpm equalization with a
highly reduced bass. Firkusny's performance is well- groomed, lacking excitement
and, indeed, a sense of musical urgency.
Uninsky is disappointing. He too does not
seem ro be able to bring the music to life.
Everything is correct: nothing happens. Of
clarity.
the Malcuzynski and Karchen versions, see
remarks in the discussion of the B -fiat
minor Sonata.
-Guiomar Novaes. Vox PL 7360. 12 -in.
$5.95 (with Sonata No. 2).
-William Kapell. RCA VICTOR LM 1715
r2-in. $3.93 (with 9 Mazurkas).
-Dinu Lipatti. COLUMBIA ML 4721. 12in. $4.9S (with Chopin miscellany).
-Rudolf Firkusny. COLUMBIA ML 2201
to -in. $2.9S.
-Alexander Uninsky. EPIC LC 3056. 12in. $3.98 (with Sonata No, 2).
-Witold Malcuzynski. ANGEL 35032.
r 2-in. $4.98 or $3.48 (with Sonata No. 2).
-Julius Katchen. LONDON LL 1163. 12in. $3.98 (with Sonata No. 2).
TARANTELLE, OP. 43 (t Edition)
A rather charming work, minor Chopin,
that here needs a slightly faster tempo and
more sparkling finger work. Some of
Balogh's attack sounds flurried. Good recorded sound.
-Erno Balogh. LYRICHORD LL 20. 12 -in
(with Chopin miscellany).
S5.95
TRIO FOR PIANO AND STRINGS, IN G
MINOR, OP. 3 ( t Edition)
In effect, this work is a baby piano concerto
with the piano getting the lion's share of
the work and the most interesting figura
rions. The last movement, in Chopins
-
nationalistic vein, is quite charming. The
trio seldom turns up in concert, and one is
glad to have it on records. At the same
time, one could wish for a superior performance. The polish of the writing
scarcely comes through the determined
playing of the ')'rio di Bolzano, nor is the
tone of the violinist an adornment to con.
temporary fiddle playing. Keep your eye
out for an eventual replacement.
-Trio
$5.95
di Bolzano. Vox PL 8480.
(with Schumann: Trio in F).
52 -in
VARIATIONS FOR PIANO
ON "LA CI DAREM
(3 Editions)
LA
MANO," OP.
2
is the work which introduced Chopin
to the excited Robert Schumann, with the
resultant famous "Hats off, gentlemen, a
genius!" It was originally scored for piano
and orchestra, and is thus played by Frugoni and Reinhardt. Goldsand plays the
This
solo version, which orce in a while Turns
up in concert, and I find his playing preferable. He gets more nuance and flexibiliry
than Frugoni (the Reinhardt is an aberration that never should have been released).
Goldsand takes a sizable cur in the introduction. Frugoni is complete, but his
pianism has little charm, while some of
the s'atiations, such as the third, are almost
a
The supporting orchestra
scramble.
sounds thin. There is room for a version
of the score in its concerted form, but this
does not fill the bill.
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
88
www.americanradiohistory.com
RECORDS
-Robert
Goldsand. CONCERT HALL CHS
rr50. t2-in. $4.9S (with Sonata No.
and Variations on a German Theme).
r
-Orazio Prugoni; Pro Musica Orchestra,
Hans Swarowsky, cond. Vox PL 9030. 12 -in.
$5.95 (with Krakoviak; Andante Spianalo
and Polonaise; Liszt, Totentanz).
-Rolf Reinhardt; Pro Musica Orchestra
conducted by the pians[. VOX PL 753o.
t2 -in. $5.95 (with Andante Spianato and
Polonaise; Variations, Op. 72).
ON
A
GERMAN THEME
(r Edition)
Chopin composed this in 1824, at the age
of [4. No opus number attaches to this
youthful effort, and the work is of mainly
historical interest. The composer based his
variations on a German song named Der
Schweizerbub ("The Swiss Boy"), a naïve
melody with yodel -like characteristics.
Goldsand plays conscientiously. Excellent
recorded sound.
-Robert Goldsand. CONCERT HALL CHS
1150. 12 -in. 54.98 (with Sonata No. r;
"Li ci darer»" Variations).
BY HEROLD, OP. 12
(2 Editions)
The air is Je vends des scapulaires from
Hérold's Ludovic. Hérold was a very successful opera composer of the day. Gold sand plays neatly but with a singular lack
of tension. Granted that the music is no
heavyweight; but there is more to it than
Goldsand conveys. Ar that his performance
takes precedence over Reinhardt's heavy
fumbling.
-Robert Goldsand. CONCERT HALL CI-IS
[x33. 12 -in. $4.98 (with Etudes, Op.
ON AN AIR
25)
-Rolf
Reinhardt. Vox PL 7530. [2 -in.
$5.95 (with Andante Spianato and Polonaise; "14 ci dorent" Variations).
contained on RCA VICTOR LHMV 1032
(12 -in.), played by Alfred Cortot
minor (Op. 34, No. 2), D -fiat (Minute,
Op. 64, No. 1) C -sharp minor (Op. 64,
No. 2), A -flat (Op. 69, No. r). G -flat
(Op. 7o, No. I), and F minor (Op. 7o.
No. 2). These are leisurely, scented performances, with many mannerisms and
false notes unique to pianists of Cortot's
generation. The recorded sound is not very
good. The greatest single performance i
have ever heard of a Chopin waltz is
played by Josef Hofmann on COLUMBIA
ML 4929
the A -flat Waltz
( I 2-in.)
(Op. 42); and he also plays the Minute
Waltz deliciously. Cor de Groot also has
a ttlinute Waltz, soberly played, on EPIC
LC 3037 (t2-in.), along with the popular
C -sharp minor.
Still another Minnie is
played with obvious relish by Novaes on
Vox PL 7S to (12 -in.). And one more
,lfiani.'e -that played by Nikita Magaloff
on LONDON LS 532 (to -in.) in a thoroughly competent manner. Magaloff, on this
disk, also is heard in the C -sharp minor and
the A -flat (Op. 64, No. 3). In addition to
the above C -sharp minors, there are the
following to consider: Horowitz on F.CA
VICTOR LM 1137 (12 -in.), Rachmaninoff
on RCA VICTOR LCT 1038 (12 -in.), and
Jonas on COLUMBIA ML 4476 (12 -in.).
Rachmaninoff is lyric, Horowitz severely
lyric, Jonas sentimentally lyric. On her
disk Jonas also plays the B minor Waltz
(Op. 69, No. 2). And on COLUMBIA ML
2004 ( io -in.) she plays the Waltzes in Gflat (Op. 7o, No. t) and D -flat (Op. 7o,
No. 3). Plenty of style is present if you
can accept her eccentric ideas.
,
-
Breaking the Sound Barrier
in Music!
WA LTZES
(5 Editions)
Several highly contrasting pianists, several
highly contrasting views of the waltzes.
Novaes achieves the most swinging and
gracious quality, using plenty of rubato,
-
Ussachevsky
A
large grouping of Chopin waltzes is
Guaranteed
or
ea cm
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sounding entirely relaxed, bringing a highly
personal quality to her playing. Liparti is
much more strict. He takes very few liberties, and, while his playing is to be admired
for its clarity and straightforward rhythm,
he does not fully rapture the sponuneity
of the music. Dorfmann receives admirable
recorded sound
the best of all the versions under consideration-and offers
lyric, tasteful interpretations. Her low
priced disk is hard to ignore. is the Novaes
disk worth twice as much? I wouldn't think
so, much as I admire the performance. To
my taste, neither Brailowsky nor Pcnnario
can compete. Both are stiff and uninteresting, and both hit the piano in a percussive
manner.
-Guiomar Novaes. VOX PL 8170. 12 -in.
$5.95.
-Ania Dorfmann. RCA VICTOR LOC
1050. 12 -in. $2.98.
-Dinu Lipatti. COLUMBIA ML 4522. I2in. $3.98.
-Alexander Brailowsky. RCA VICTOR LM
to82. 12 -in. $3.95.
-Leonard Pennario. CAPITOL P 8r72. 12in. $4.9S.
Record Market
-A
l
d
$1.00. 10% discount with 55 orders.
Dealer rnquirir± fnoi Rd
EX
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4215 Trees, Ave., Dap!.
No. Hollywood, Colifornio
"THE STORY OF JAZZ"
A New FOLKWAYS Records Release
I
4.
"TOPS"
High-Fidelity Mag.,
Downbeat, N. Y. Times
Narrated by Langston Hughes
with Documentary Recordings, Text.
1
THE
LP FILER
Keeps 24 of your favorite LP's handy. Completely
portable. Albums individuaay suspend and index.
plus 35c for postage. handling
$2.50
Dept -H
P.O. Pox 1974, Mereo ae Station, St. Louis 18. Mo.
(Filer for '45'n' also available at $2.25 Post Paid)
MISSOURI NATIONAL CORPORATION
-10" longplay FP712 ($4.25 list)
write for complete catalog
The MUSIC ROOM
129 West 44th St., New York 36, N.Y.
1
89
JUNE 1955
www.americanradiohistory.com
FM Antenna Installation
Questions and Answers
byJ L. F. B. CARINI
Mr. Carini, Director of Research for LaPointe Electronics, Inc., is possibly the
only antenna engineer extant having a Jaguar, a 16- speaker music system, and a
wife who knows (and cares) as much about hi-fi sound as be does. As if all this
weren't enough, he can write with clarity on technical subjects; he answers
here several reader's questions concerning FM antenna installations.
Q. r:
Ans.:
Q. 2:
Ans.:
90
When listening to FM, I am conscious of an annoying "frying" noise which is very aggravating because it is audible in the background. I am cold that
chis may be interference radiated by a power line
that passes a short distance from my home. However, the noise seems to be present only in dry
weather and disappears whenever it is wet or raining. Will stacking two Yagis sufficiently increase
the signal strength ro overcome the interference?
Considering the observations noted, the interference is undoubtedly to be attributed to leakage in
a high voltage power line. An electrostatic or
corona discharge would necessarily occur in dry
weather only because it is effectively damped out
whenever it is raining. Usually this kind of trouble
will be caused by a loose rie wire at the insulator
which supports the line in suspension.
The problem is one that can only be corrected by
the utility company and, of course, unless formal
complaints are registered, the condition may otherwise escape notice and continue to radiate interference to the annoyance of many unsuspecting
listeners. Because it is possible for a high voltage
line to radiate this noise for many miles, enquiries
made of others in the neighborhood will help to
establish such suspicions. Invariably, the power
company when so informed will make a co-operative effort to track down the source of trouble and
rake necessary measures to correct the situation.
Background noises that sound like "frying" may
also be caused by the normal operation of heating
pads, fluorescent lights, electric blankets, and other
appliances. This annoyance can be suppressed by
attaching small "interference eliminators" which
provide a ground return circuit ro bypass the noise
component in the AC line.
1 have found that both tubular and open wire line
are difficult CO work with in the home. Is there a
special knack of handling it that will simplify installation indoors?
Where the lead -in is brought into the home for a
Q. 3.
Ans.:
Q. 4:
Ans.:
considerable distance, several methods may be used
to facilitate its distribution. The rigid line may be
terminated at the lightning arrestor mounted on the
window sill. A length of flat ribbon line is then
attached as the continuing lead -in into the house
and to the tuner. The most important requirement
is to make certain that correct impedance matching
is maintained.
Also, there are wall feed - through tubes available
that are made especially for the purpose of conveying the line through a wall or partition.
What should I use for a mast for stacking BBFMs
and how high above the roof top should the lower
antenna be located?
While aluminum, steel, and magnesium are all
used, the preferred mast is one made of drawn
aluminum tubing. Magnesium is subject CO oxidation and is especially vulnerable to rapid deterioration when employed in a saline atmosphere. Steel
tubing or conduit imposes an additional weight
factor and, because it is usually painted or plated,
will eventually rust.
Use a seamless aluminum tube having at least a
t /r6 -inch wall and a r 1/4-inch diameter and of
sufficient height ro provide support for the antennas
when spaced according to the manufacturer's direcrions. FM Yagis are usually spaced 5 -ft. apart when
stacked. Allow 2 fr. at least, preferably more, between the lower antenna and the roof top.
Some months ago I obtained a ten -element Yagi
for my FM. I notice that a number of stations come
in better on the side and the back than on the front.
Could it be that irs efficiency is impaired because
the two driven elements are nor properly linked
together?
The efficiency of an antenna is not necessarily determined by the number of elements that arc employed. A well- designed antenna utilizes only the
minimum number of elements necessary to yield
optimum performance. For example, an eight -eleContjmred on /gage 92
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by artists of renown is your
ANDRES SEGOVIA
foromod guiforid
ZINO FRANCESCATTI
6rJGanl violinid
ROBERT CASADESUS
LAURITZ MELCHIOR
piano virtuoso
proof Wagnerian tenor
91
FM ANTENNA INSTALLATION
Continued from page 90
Q.
5:
Ans.:
Q. 6:
Ans.:
Q. 7:
ment Yagi (such as the BBFM) may easily outperform a ten -element Yagi by virtue of its better
design. Because of the number of director elements
used, a ten- element Yagi necessarily has but to
percent spacing between them, whereas much better
gain is achieved in an antenna that has only eight
elements but employs 20 percent spacing. Likewise the number and placement of directors in
relation to the overall design also influences the
front -co-back ratio (discrimination between station
pick -up from the front ro that at the rear) so that
a poorly designed antenna may not provide adequate rejection effectively to eliminate station pickup from the sides and the back. In other variations,
an incorrectly linked coupling harness interconnecting the two driven elements will introduce a phase
error and reduce the overall efficiency of the antenna.
How far apart should an FM antenna be separated
from a TV antenna when both are to be mounted
upon the same mast?
It is generally safe to allow at least 2 fc. of space
between the antennas. Impaired reception would
result from antennas char are operated roo close together. Sufficient space should therefore be allowed
to prevent interaction between bays. Also, avoid
running the lead -in lines close together, try to keep
them as far apart as possible when attaching standoff insulators to the mast.
To what particular advantage may I use a rotator
with my FM antenna?
A rotator is not recommended for use with either
an omni -directional antenna or one that is specifically cut to the exact frequency of a given station.
However, depending upon your receiving location, the FM stations within your range of reception, as well as the type of antenna that is employed,
a rotator may prove of indispensible aid in solving
difficult interference. The most prevalent form of
interference is that experienced when two stations
cannot be separated despite careful tuning. It is
essential in this case to use a uni- directional antenna.
Such an antenna is the Yagi, whose narrow forward
lobe can selectively "spot" the desired station by a
sense of direction and frequency. By analogy, this
selectivity may be compared ro a spotlight whose
narrow beam of light is easily focused and concentrated upon one particular object to the complete
exclusion of all others. By "searching," or moving
the beam, different objects may be brought into
focus. In like manner, a Yagi antenna operated and
made maneuverable by a rotator can be turned
about to discriminate between one station and
another.
I have a built -in cabinet housing both an FM tuner
and TV, the latter capable of receiving UHF stations as well. We now have a UHF station which
I would like to pick up. However, as this will re-
Ans.:
Q. 8.
Ans.:
Q.
9-
Ans.:
quire another antenna, can you suggest a solution
that will not entail cluttering up my house roof
with a maze of antennas?
There have recently become available very efficient
all -channel VHF UHF antennas, such as the VEED-X Super Chief, which was designed especially for
situations of that sort. The antennas employ a
single lead -in, are compact enough ro give a neat
appearance, and are actually capable of top performance on all TV channels from 2 through 83.
For FM, the broadband Yagi is unsurpassed and
should be employed in addition to the TV antenna.
Both antennas may be mounted on one mast provided
that they are at least 24 inches apart (see Q. 5).
My problem lies in the fact that I am getting much
local interference from the electrical apparatus of a
nearby hospital. Do you think that a shielded cable
would be of any value in reducing this interference?
Most electro- medical hospital equipment causes
serious interference to radio and TV reception,
often worse than that produced by large industrial
plants. It is a form of interference that is noticed
throughout an entire neighborhood; it is particularly difficult to suppress because it can only be corrected at the source.
Unless is is possible to locate the antenna outside
the noise zone, no significant benefit is to be gained
from the use of a shielded lead -in. This type of
lead -in is commonly employed in cities for apartment installations where the antenna is erected high
above the building, at which location there is relatively little or no noise. A shielded lead -in will then
prevent noise inducements into the line (as generated by electrical equipment within the building)
as it passes down to the tuner. A great disadvantage
of chis type of line is the large insertion loss (due
to capacity effect) that results in an attenuation of
the signal strength. It is permissible in large cities
for apartment installations because the stations are
usually nearby and there exists a very strong signal
which readily overcomes this loss.
If the antenna is already grounded, why should a
lightning arrestor also be attached to the lead -in?
The antenna is separately grounded as protection
against lightning which may strike the antenna during an electrical storm just as it does a lightning rod
on a chimney stack. The lightning arrestor (this is
a misnomer ) is attached to the lead -in to dissipate
the accumulating static charges that build up on
the antenna. It serves as a high resistance path to
ground and by- passes the potential by neutralization
with the earth. This averts damage to the tuner
components but does not affect the passage of the
FM signals carrying the program.
To protect the security of both lives and property
(and your hi -fi equipment, too) make certain that
the antenna is properly grounded and that a good
lightning arrestor is attached to the lead -in line.
The lightning arrestor, of course, musc also be provided with a ground connection.
92
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
www.americanradiohistory.com
I
I
I
-at
a Down -to -Earth PRICE*
Your finest records will sound unbelievably life-like as they
are played with authentic high fidelity on the new V -M 1200.
See this outstanding new model, the first high fidelity changer
ever offered at such a low cost! V-M Model 1200 features numerous Voice of Music exclusives too!
New 4 -speed direct drive
mechanism
Easy -Lift support arm for
front -loading convenience
All- weather ceramic *, two needle cartridge
minimum
.
wow .
constant speed
performance
Rumble-free
.
.
.
.
and many, many morel
Available on matching base
pan as Model 1225.
* GE variable reluctance cartridge available.
The 1200 must be auditioned to fully appreciate its true value. Then you
a "why -paywill realize it can bring complete, lasting pleasure
more" price!
-at
V
-M
CORPORATION
BENTON
HARBOR
1,
MICHIGAN
WORLD'S LARGEST MANUFACTURER OF PHONOGRAPHS AND RECORD CHANGERS
LUNE 1955
93
Only he didn't buy a seat. He tan hear the same music anytime in its fullest quality
from his easy chai-r at home with his new Concertone 20/20 Stereo -monaural
Recorder, Model
MORE THAN EVER
LIKE BEING 'THERE."
STW -4.
Aside from giving music lovers and sound enthusiasts an unsurpassed engineering achievement in the reproduction of sound, the new Concertone 20/20
Stereo -monaural Recorder offers UNMATCHED VERSATILITY IN THE RECORDER
FIELD. By using a combination of four heads and two amplifier units. this
machine acts as two independent recorders using a common reel of tape with
the two channels capable of being operated separately or in conjunction with
each other. Rs list of functions, both the ordinary and extraordinary, include:
Stereo -binaural recording ( "stacked" heads)
Recording on channel
1
only
Recording on channel
2
only
Recording two different signals simultaneously
Dual track recording (one track in each direction)
$695 IS THE USER'S NET FAIR TRADED PRICE.
Single track recording (identical signals on bots channels)
Playing back single, dual track or binaural recorded tapes
"Sound -on- sound" recording (Previously recorded tracks are not erased
when new signal is added, so mistakes do not necessitate starting over.
Particularly valuable for those who practice with recorded accompaniment)
Hear it at your nearest dealer or write for brochure 4MY.
4917 West Jefferson Blvd., Los Angeles, California
Audio division of American Electronics, Inc.
Manufacturers of Berlant studio recorders
and accessories.
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
94
www.americanradiohistory.com
These reports may not be quoted or reproduced, in part or in whole, in anyJom whatsoever, without written permission from the publisher.
Because of space limitations we normally attempt to report only on products of wide general interest. Thus, omission does not, per se, signify condemnation, although reports are seldom made on equipment that is obviously not reasonably high in fidelity.
Each report is sent
to the manufacturer before publication; he is free to correct the specification paragraph, to acid a comment at the end, or to request that
the repon be deferred (pending changes in his product) or mi published at all 1-le is not permitted, however, to amend or alter the report.
-
Scott 210 -C Amplifier
(furnished by manufacturer): a compact 23watt amplifier with preamp -equalizer and control sections in
same case. Inputs: one equalized channel for pbono cartridges,
with input jacks for magnetic and constant -amplitude types;
three high -level inputs marked for tuner, tape, and TV. Monitor
input direct to power amplifier section. Controls: combined
selector switch and variable record compensator, with eight
equalization positions for phono channel; Dynaural noise suppressor control; noise suppressor and filter switch (Range);
Bass
15 db, 50 cycles); Treble ( +15 to -17-' db, 10,000 cycles);
Loudness (or volume); loudness compensation on -off switch;
AC power on -off switch. Hum and tube balance adjustment at
back of chassis; pickup level adjustment for Dynaural noise
suppressor under chassis. Outputs: 2, 4, 8, or 16 ohms to speaker;
low -impedance output to tape recorder, unaffected by noise
suppressor, tone and volume controls; high- impedance output
to tape recorder, affected by noise suppressor and tone Controls
but not volume control. Power output: 29 watts long -time continuous; 23 watts short -time continuous on music; 46 watts peak
instantaneous. Distortion: less than 0.5% harmonic at full
power; less than 0.1% first -order difference tone IM. Noise;
better than 80 db below full output. Tubes: 3- 12AU7, 3- I2AX7,
6AL5, 2 -6L6G, 5V4. Dimensions: 14.4 in. wide by 4 high by
13 deep. Price: $172.50. Manufacturer: H. H. Scott, Inc., 385
Putnam Avenue, Cambridge, Mass.
SPECIFICATIONS
(t
The 210 -C Dynaural amplifier combines a good 23 -watt
amplifier with what is probably the most elaborate preamplifier- control setup ever offered in this form. In many
ways, the 210 -C's front end is even more versatile chan
Scott's super equalizer -preamp, the 121 -A, and is very lirrle
larger.
There is still only one phono channel, to be sure, and
three high -level channels rather than five. These will be
enough for all but unusual installations. The selector
switch has eight positions for the phono channel; in three
are furnished curves particularly suitable for 78 -rpm records, marked European, RCA -London, and Columbia. Five
Special
curves are furnished for microgroove records:
(has RIAA turnover and very little rolloff), London, Old
AES, RIAA- NARTB -Orrho, and Original Columbia. This
is certainly a wide and well -considered selection. Incidentally, there is a difference in gain between the 78 and
microgroove positions so as to compensate for the difference in pickup output levels -- a clever idea, and a practical
one. A comprehensive table of record labels and recommended equalization curves is given in the instruction book.
Dynaural noise suppressor and filter circuits are effective on all input channels. These are the same controls
and circuits described in the recent (November 1954,
page 93) report on the Scott 121-A. Properly operated,
they can be used to good advantage in eliminating radio
interference and rape noises, as well as record pops and
scratch. Bass and treble tone controls can be called normal
except that they provide for perfectly flat response in their
zero settings; they are then effectively nor in the circuit at
all. Most standard tone controls balance the boost circuit
against the attenuation circuit in the middle position,
which often results in a response peak or dip. As in the
I21-A, these controls do not cause ringing on transients.
Loudness compensation, which can be switched in or
out by a front -panel control, is less drastic than called for
by Fletcher- Munson curves; to our ear, it is much morepleasant than full compensation.
The 2Io -C is out in front in the matter of facilities for
operation with a rape recorder. There are two signal
takeoffs for feed to a recorder; one, of low impedance,
is ahead of noise suppressor, tone and volume controls.
A flat signal can be fed the recorder in this way, while
the rest of the amplifier is used to drive a monitor speaker,
and the settings of these controls will not disturb the
recorder's signal. But if you want to dub some old records to rape you'll want to use the noise suppressor and
possibly the cone controls. Very well, there's another
output jack that is connected just ahead of the volume
control
the signal at that point is affected by the NS
and tone controls, and you can use that to feed a recorder. Now, suppose you have a three -head recorder
from which you can monitor instantaneously the signal
that's going on the tape. Connect a lead from the monitor
or output jack on the recorder to the pin -jack receptacle
on the 210 -C that is marked "Monitor" and you plug into
-
The Scott pro- C
-
JUNE 1955
Jlexib /e and capable, powerful but compact.
95
www.americanradiohistory.com
the power amplifier section directly; the connection from
the 210 -C's preamp- control section to the power amplifier
section is broken automatically. Neat'. You are then
using the front end to handle one signal and the amplifier for another (you needn't plug the monitor signal from
the recorder into that connection if you don't want to
you could, of course, dub records while listening ro something eke, by plugging the audio from a tuner into the
Monitor jack). The instruction book shows several possibilities for using these connections to keep a recorder
permanently hooked into the system.
With flexibility such as this, and a powerful, clean, and
capable amplifier to boot, the 210 -C is quite a package.
Ir is designed so that it can be used our in the open; the
A panel- mounting
metal case is perfectly presentable.
escutcheon is available too, if you want ro enclose the
unit. That $172.50 trice tag, which looms large when
you get a first glance at it, seems like a bargain after closer
examination. Scott has reason to be proud of this ampli-
-
fier.
-
R. A.
V -M Model
700 Tape Recorder
(furnished by manufacturer): Tape -O -Matic
portable self -contained recorder with built -in
playback amplifier and speakers. Twin track, 71/2 and 3% ips,
handles up to 7 -in. reels. Inputs: one for microphone, radio, high level phono and TV; one for magnetic phono. Outputs: normal
output goes to internal speaker system (5 by 7 -in. woofer and
3 % -in. tweeter); also two external speaker jacks, one of which
disconnects internal speakers. Noise level: better than 45 db
below signal level. Accessories: one 7 -in. reel of tape; one empty
7 -in. reel; microphone (60 to 10,000 cycles,
5 db); adaptor plug
for high -level inputs. Controls: described in text. Dimensions:
9 ¡¿ in. high by 16 wide by 11,/ deep. Weight: 30 lb. Tubes:
5879, 12AX7, 2 -6V6, 5Y3GT. Price: $179.95, list. Manufacturer:
V -M Corporation, Benton Harbor, Mich.
SPECIFICATIONS
model 700 is a
The V -M 700 recorder appears ro be well made and is designed for easy, foolproof operation; it has several convenience features unusual at its price. Sound is fair co good,
about what you'd expect in a competitive package recorder.
It would appear, accordingly, to be an excellent buy for
anyone whose primary interest is not high fidelity sound as
such, but who wants a dependable portable unit for miscellaneous recording.
Main operational controls are of the mechanical pushbutton type. From left to right, below the head shield,
they are labeled Rewind, Record, Stop, Play, and Forward.
We found the Forward (fast wind) time on our test unit
to be 2 min. for a r,2oo -ft- reel; Rewind time was r min.
45 sec. These push -buttons are not interlocked. You can
go directly from Rewind to Forward or vice versa, and
from Play or Record to Forward or Rewind without pushing the Stop buron first. On our unit we couldn't make the
tape break by doing any of these things, which is good; we
don't know whether or nor this is true of all production
units. In any case, it's always safer to push the Stop button
before changing tape motion or speed. In the Stop position,
incidentally, the drive mechanism is disconnec_ed; the Stop
button should be depressed whenever the machine is nor
being used. The cover cannot be dosed unless the Stop
button is down; good feature.
Just to the left of the push -button bank is the record
safety lever, which must be deflected before the Record
push -button can be operated. This is to prevent unintentional erasure of recorded material, which might occur if it
were possible to push the Record button accidentally. The
safety lever and the Record button can be operated simultaneously, if necessary, with one hand. To the right of the
push -button bank is the recording indicator, consisting of
two neon lights. One light goes on when the Record button is pushed down, serving as a warning that the erase
oscillator is activated. The other light flashes whenever the
recording level is high enough to cause distortion. Next to
the indicator, logically, is the volume level control. And
just above that is a control which, when pushed up, stops
rape motion momentarily or permanently
can be
locked in the upper position by pushing it to the right also.
This permits proper setting of recording level before actually recording: you lock the Pause button in its upper position, depress the Record button, and set the volume control
to the point at which the distortion indicator just blinks on
the loudest peaks of sound. Then, when you're ready to
record, push the Pause button to the left and release it. The
tape starts and you're recording. You can skip anything you
don't want CO record (such as a commercial in a radio
broadcast) by pushing the Pause button again. A handy
button.
The speed change knob is on the head shield. It's relatively hard to turn, so that you can't do it accidentally, but
is has a slot large enough so that you can use a coin to turn
it CO 33/ or 71/2 ups.
There's a timer index to the left of the push- button
group, and a chart is furnished to translate the timer readings to minutes of recording. Farther on the left are concentric bass and treble controls; they are in the circuit on
playback only, and have maximum boosts (relative to their
counterclockwise positions) of to db ar 5o cycles and 6 db
at 8,000 cycles. The AC power switch for the recorder is
combined with the treble control. Concealed controls, for
use if you know what you're about technically, are furnished
for hum null, bass boost limit, and distort -light sensitivity.
On the right side of the machine are two phone -jack inputs. One is for a magnetic phono cartridge, and is properly equalized for that purpose. The other is for a micro-
-it
Continued on page 98
The V -M 700
96
-not
quite hi-fi, but a good bay nevertheless.
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
www.americanradiohistory.com
HERE'S the
all NEW
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HORAN
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began a revolution in the design of AM -FM tuners
which is now brought to a rich fulfillment of perfection. Only a company with National's more than
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For the cleanest sound and appearance, for the
greatest in sensitivity, for the finest in performance,
the NEW Criterion AM -FM tuner can be your only
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Compare these features combined in the NEW Criterion
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Binaural or simultaneous
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Drift free reception
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Mutamatic tuning
Flexibility -the
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Greatest sensitivity of any
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NATIONAL COMPANY, INC.
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SHERMAN
97
www.americanradiohistory.com
TESTED IN THE HOME
Continued from page 96
phone; inserting a plug in this jack opens ncc magnetic
phono channel automatically. An adaptor input plug (supplied) permits use of the microphone input for any high level source such as a radio or TV tuner. There are two
similar jacks on the left side of the recorder; these are for
connection of external speakers. Plugging the lead from an
external speaker into one of the jacks disconnects the internal speaker system and replaces it with the external one.
This jack, therefore, is affected by the speaker on -off
(Monitor) switch, above the treble and bass controls, just
as the internal speakers are. The other jack is connected
directly to the amplifier output, bypassing the switch, and
when it is used the internal speakers are not disconnected.
Among ocher good points arc a pilot light on the front
of the case that can be seen across a room; an automatic
shutoff switch that operates if 'the tape should break or become fully wound on one reel; and the utility of the amplifier circuits and speaker system apart from the recorder
mechanism (they can be used as a PA system, for example). As we said at the beginning, we like the mechanical design and convenience features of this unit, and consider the electrical performance adequate at the price. If
better heads, an output jack for playback through a high
fidelity system, and more refined circuitry were used -add-M might lose its
ing, say, another $5o to the price
mass marker, but would make a lot of friends in the hi -fi
field. It would then be an excellent recorder, offering competition to present units selling for 5o to t00% more.
A.
How about a hi -fi model, V -M?
-V
-R.
Sono tone 1P Cartridges
(furnished by manufacturer): ceramic phono
pickup cartridges available with 1 or 3 -mil sapphire or diamond
stylus. No preamplifier needed; self-equalized to RIAA curve
db, 30 to 15,000 cycles. Output: I volt on microgroove
within
to 10 megohms; 2 to 4 megohms
record. Load impedance:
recommended. Compliance: 1 x 104 cm per dyne. Stylus force:
1P-IS and 1P -3S (1 and 3 -mil sapphire),
9 grams. List prices:
$8.50; 1P -1D and 1P -3D (1 and 3 -mil diamond), $30.00. Manufacturer: Sonotone Corporation, Elrnsford, N. Y.
SPECIFICATIONS
t3
1
Ceramic phono cartridges can be made so as to have even
response over the useful audio range; they can be made
with high compliance and low distortion. They are inherently self-equalizing to a constant -amplitude record and can
be made to match just about any equalization curve, including RIAA; they have relatively high electrical output, so
that a preamplifier is nor required with them. They arc
substantially insensitive to abnormal heat and humidity.
They are less expensive by far chan most magnetic cartridges that do require preamplifiers and equalizers, and are
probably less delicate mechanically. In short, good ceramic
cartridges "measure" as well or better than magnetics and
have important economic advantages. Why aren't they used
exclusively, then?
The answer may be partly prejudice: they are similar in
appearance and operating principle co crystals, and most
Sonotosre cartridge combines low distortion with high output.
crystals a few years ago were pretty poor (some were pretty
good, roo, although delicate). Magnetic cartridges in general were obviously superior ro crystals, and this was one of
the first things a hi -fi tyro learned. Even so, this superiority
could then be demonstrated by laboratory tests, and it can't
be now. Nonetheless, most critical listeners seem still to
prefer magnetic cartridges; we do also, but find it difficult
ro say exactly why. Perhaps that over- worked word "definition" is best suited ro describe the difference. Individual
elements of a complex sound appear to us to stand our more
cleanly with a good magnetic cartridge; this is so even
though that property is supposed to be determined by the
amount oí inrermodulacion distortion present, and fine
ceramic cartridges have no more IM than magnetics.
It should be made clear that the difference in sound is
not great. The better ceramics should be ranked among
true high fidelity cartridges, and the Sonorone is as good as
( possibly better than) any we've heard so far, on a sub jecrive basis. It certainly seems logical ro recommend them
as replacements for standard cartridges, as the first step in
bringing a lo-fi record- playing system up ro hi -fi status
gradually. They cost very little more in themselves than
the original cartridge, and require no changes or additions
to existing circuits. And if you're considering the purchase
of a complete system, and don't own already a magnetic
cartridge with its preamplifier- equalizer, you may be able CO
save some money by listening comparatively to a magnetic
and the Sonorone ceramic. You may very well prefer the
ceramic. -R. A.
Browning FM Tuner
SPECIFICATIONS
(furnished by manufacturer):
A compact,
FM -only tuner. Sensitivity: 3.5 my for 20 db quieting. Output:
cathode follower; extra output connection for tape recorder,
etc. Controls: tuning and volume. Size: 9 in. wide by 4 7/8 high
and 8 in. deep. Price: $87.50. Address: Browning Laboratories,
Inc.. Winchester, Mass.
This tuner is excellent all around: compactly built, simple
to install, sensitivity comparable to that obtained with
much more expensive units, no unnecessary accessories.
It is intended for use with control units which provide
tone and other controls, but it can be used with a straight
power amplifier for an utterly -simple installation since a
Continued on page zoo
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
98
www.americanradiohistory.com
NI-Fl
I
rCCXMIar
r,
111.11
fefAffe
r[CXMIieA:
¡,14emifts.
I[CXMICAL eeY1Cf felLfrlM
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Pictorial Assembly Plans
for Better Listening...
12
Now -for every high fidelity enthusiast -12 "Do -ityourself" booklets, called Technigrams, which cover every
one of the 36 different speaker systems featured in the
original University PROGRESSIVE SPEAKER EXPANSION chart. These Technigrams contain all of the
essential information, in words and pictures, required to
assemble and install the speaker system of your choice.
Even baffle board layout diagrams are included. All of
this is available to help you to plan your listening the
PSE way...to develop your speaker system in successive,
relatively inexpensive stages... with no fear of obsoles-
*
until what you have meets your listening tastes.
With vacations and long summer days upon us, the
time is ideal for building that high fidelity system which
will give so much listening enjoyment on the colder Fall
and Winter evenings ahead. Take advantage now of extra
leisure hours ... and take pleasure in leisurely listening
later. See your UNIVERSITY HI -FI distributor today
and ask for the free Technigram that features the
University speaker system of your choice. If you haven't
cence,
.
.
.
seen the
original University descriptive folder on the
PSE
Plan,
mail this coupon immediately for your copy.
Progressive Speaker Expansion
-the plan that makes
it possible to buy
today in terms of the
system you want tomorrow.
a speaker
University Loudspeakers, Inc., Desk 83
80 South Kensico Avenue, White Plains, N.
r
Y.
Please send me my free copy of "Progressive Speaker
Expansion."
Nome
!lKbsrs7y
Address
South Kensico Ave., White Plains, New York
City
Stole
78N32
99
JUNE 1955
www.americanradiohistory.com
and then pressed on the case grilles until it (the sponge)
is not excessively wer. Quiet has a fatty base, so that it does
furnish lubrication while being played. But the record also
TESTED IN THE HOME
Continued from page 98
front -of -panel volume control is provided. Automatic
frequency control, which cannot be defeated, is incorporated. No tuning eye is provided; this is not a must
when AFC is used.
within a very short time after
being sponged; you can visualize groove dirt being gripped
by this tacky film. When the record is played this film
peels our of the groove, carrying dirt with it, and the mess
is accumulated on the stylus. It brushes off readily, however; that's what the little brush is for. The effect is less
noticeable the next time you play the record, and after three
or four plays only an insignificant grayish deposit can be
becomes tacky to the touch
seen.
How much stylus and record wear is reduced because of
the lubrication may be debatable, but it is certainly true
that clean records wear less, and wear the stylus less, because of the absence of dirt. Moreover, clean records are
quiet. \Ve should say, then, that Quiet fulfills all its important claims. This is certainly worth while, and you get 5
ounces of Quiet for $2, enough to treat both sides of 15o
twelve -inch records.
R. A.
-
No expensive accessories on the Brownie basic FAI moor.
Output
is
of cathode follower design,
MANUFACTURE'S COMMENT: We advocate the application of Quiet to the
record before each play because our experience and test work has shown us
that dirt and dry surfaces are the primary cause of record and stylus wear and
surface noises . . The sponge is affixed to a plastic holder so that Quiet can be
applied to the record without coming in contact with the fingers.
so the tuner can
amplifier or control unir by a considerable distance without loss of high frequencies.
A
second output is furnished for connection ro a tape recorder; this output, as well as the regular one, is affected
by the volume control. An AC outlet is on the back apron
of the chassis; it's controlled by the front -panel switch.
Very nice job, all around
and at a good price, too.
(Incidentally, cabinets are available; our sample came in
an attractive mahogany case which measured 55/4 high,
I I wide, and 9 in. deep including knobs.)
C. F.
be separated from the
-
-
MANUFACTURER'S COMMENT: The Brownie is just the beginning of a whole
series of new hi -6 products and accessories. Cabinets are of either blonde or
mahogany and, with the cathode follower output, can be remotely located
at your favorite easy chair. From there you can control both tuning and
volume. Clock -timer cabinets are available which can be preset so as not to
miss your favorite program.
Lang 15W Speaker System
(furnished by manufacturer): a medium sized
three -way speaker system. Size: 23 in. by 25 by 16 deep. Speakers:
12 -in. woofer, 8 -in. mid -range cone, single cone tweeter. Crossovers: 200 and 5,000 cycles. Response: 25 to 17,000 cycles. Power
rating: 10 watts continuous; 15 watts integrated. Impedance: 4
ohms. Finishes: mahogany or blonde. Price: $119.95. Manufacturer: Lang 86 Taylor, Inc., 100 Felton Street, Waltham, Mass.
SPECIFICATIONS
As speaker systems go now, this would have to be pur in
the middle -size category; a few years ago it would have
been considered a small system. Even now it is in the
low -price range. But its performance must be considered
good against any standard, and for its size and price it
is
truly remarkable.
Quiet
(furnished by manufacturer): a liquid preparation for treatment of phonograph records. Includes 5 -oz. container of Quiet, sponge applicator and applicator case, stylus
brush, instructions, and text data. Harmless to records, humans,
and furniture. Price: $2.00 postpaid. Manufacturer: Beyland
Engineering Company, Yalesville, Conn.
SPECIFICATIONS
In addition to the usual de- staticizing properties, which are
important enough in themselves, a number of ocher virtues
are claimed for Quiet. It is said to "clean the record surface
and remove noise -producing groove debris," to lubricate the
grooves, and to retard needle wear.
We can affirm that it is a good de- sraticizer
that is, it
prevents build -up of static charges on the record while it is
being played, so that it doesn't attract dust from the air and
from the turntable mat. The effect appears to be long -lasting; we have records treated two months ago which retain
the anti- staric condition.
Prescribed method of treatment involves wiping the
record before each play with a sponge dipped in the liquid
-
This speaker system is
good by any standards.
Because it uses cone speakers throughout, the middles
and highs are not of the brilliant type given by most
horn -loaded tweeters for these ranges. They have a sweeter.
more transparent quality that I happen to like
though
many will not agree. There is no lack of highs: response
extends as far out as anyone can use and, in a small room.
a level control might be useful to cur down the middles
and highs.
Continued on page 102
Ioo
-
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
www.americanradiohistory.com
Even the walls have ears ...for Bogen
An un-
NEW BOGEN DB110(6) 12 WATT AMPLIFIER.
NEW ISO SERIES RECORD PLAYER.
An exclusive Bogen circuit makes
possible "luxury" performance in this
economy amplifier. 0.65% distortion
usual value. Operates manually. to
play any disc up to 16 ", at any speed
from 29 to 86 rpm. (This includes,
of course, 78, 45, and 33'41 rpm.)
"Wow ", "Hum" and "Rumble" are
minimal. Stylus pressure is adjustable
for minimum record wear. Arm is
equipped with plug-in head for simple
interchange. B50 -4LC (with one head,
you -pick -your -cartridge) ; $40.40. Attractive wooden base; $4.80.
at full output; ±
0.5 db response Irani
cps; infinite damping.
Four separate controls for gain, bass,
15 to 50,000
treble and
4
inputs and
3
record
equalization positions. DB110
(chassis) $59.95. In gold- finished
cage; $61.50. (See "Tested in the
;
Home ", April High Fidelity.)
Bogen
HIGH
IDELITY
BECAUSE IT SOUNDS BETTER
Send 250 for 56 -page book, "Understanding High Fidelity", to Dept.. 14'F
David Bogen Co., Inc., 29 Ninth Avenue, New York City 14, New York
www.americanradiohistory.com
TESTED IN THE HOME
-
Continued from page zoo
The most impressive feature of this system, however,
Bass is very clean; not
thumping or breath - taking, but quite even and (to my
ear) fiat down to 55 or 6o cycles. Contrary to what might
be expected from the usual advertising claims, this is an
accomplishment (in a system of such size) that deserves
coagratulations for its designer. Furthermore and perhaps mote important it is resistant to doubling. If you
feed 40 cycles into the system, you get out 40 cycles. It
is diminished in volume, to be sure, but that is a lot better
than getting 8o cycles out. And you can use amplifier
bass boost which will compensate to a large extent for the
volume diminution.
There is a slightly larger version of this system, the
3oW, which bas twice the speaker complement of the 15W
and twice the power -handling ability. It sells for $r99.95.
We haven't heard it, but if its twice as good as this one
it must be very good indeed.
R. A.
is its low- frequency performance.
-
-
-
Pyramid Symphanette Player
(furnished by manufacturer): a portable tablemodel record player with built -in amplifier and speaker. Utilizes
Collaro model 3/544 three-speed record playa (manual) with
Ronette TO- 284-0V turnover cartridge; modified Grommes L3-3
amplifier; 8 -in. speaker (with or without separate tweeter) in
case designed to act as enclosure. Dimensions! 13 3/8 in. deep
by 15 1/8 wide by 123,4 high overall. Controlss turntable speed
SPECIFICATIONS
-
TESTED IN THE POCKET:
This portable record player was designed specïfirrlly for
school music departments, as a compact, inexpensive unit
that would furnish acceptable fidelity in itself and, with a
good external speaker system, highly realistic sound. The
Symphonetce meets these requirements, and it is certainly
desirable that such a unit be made available to schools. But
we are so pleased with its performance and price that we
think it should be brought to the attention of all HIGH
FIDELITY readers; it would make an ideal auxiliary record playing assembly, portable enough to bring along on vacations, and merits serious consideration as the initial element
of a low -cost, expandable primary system
The turntable is a standard Collaro three-speed manual
player, a hi -fi standard unit. Only visible controls are the
speed -change lever, the cartridge turnover lever, and the
weight adjustment lever on the tone arm (which increases
stylus force slightly for playing 78s). A spring clip holds
the arm to its rest; release the dip, lift the arm and move
it to the right, and the turntable starts; sec the arm down on
the record, and when the record is finished the motor shuts
Continued on page 104
-
The Regency Radio
Not long ago we had a day at The Publishing House
which was considerably more frantic than usual; everyone
was under severe pressure. It was last- minute deadline . . .
and printing schedules are made to be made, not broken!
During the course of the afternoon, it seemed as if the
strain had really become too great; several members of the
staff reponed that they were hearing very soft music
from time to time. Now, music is seldom if ever heard
around the HIGH FIDELITY offices; we reserve that for
our homes. So this was an unusual phenomenon. Roy
Lindstrom left bis drawing board ro explore the office
next door; refreshed by this interruption to the grind, he
beard no more music when he returned. Warren Syer, talking to an equipment salesman, was positive that he heard
music (and not from the salesman, either); that it faded
in and out, and was very faint; the salesman
ears attuned
only to the jingling of a cash register
did not hear it
at all. Roy Allison suspected that the comings and goings
of the Publisher had some correlation but was uncertain
how the music could come and go when the Publisher was
in the room all the time.
The Publisher, not able to keep his face straight any
and lec his imagination wander to the
longer, told all
--
...
control on turntable base; volume, treble, AC power on -off and
bass control on aide of case; phono-external input switch (opOutputs: 4, 8, and 16 ohms
tional) on back of case. AMPLIFIER
to external speaker; switched AC power outlet. Response: *I
db, 20 to 20,000 cycles. Rated power 10 watts; 18 watts peak.
Distortion! 2%harmonic, 3% IM at 10 watts. Noise: 80 db below
full output. Tubes, 12AX7, 2- 6V6GT, SY3GT. Prices: standard
model, $89.95; with switched auxiliary input channel and internal speaker on -off switch., $94.95. Cone tweeter, $10.00
extra. Manufacturer! Pyramid Enterprises, 3815 Trimble Road,
Nashville, Term.
-
local movie theatre
or most anyplace else, for that
matter where, with a confederate, the show could be
stopped in no time at all. Soft music (nor from the screen!)
would be heard in one parr of the theater. When the usher,
supported by the manager, was on the verge of evicting
bodily a suspected but unproven culprit, the music would
cease
and soon whisper forth again from a different
part of the theater, from a different culprit. You can let
your imagination carry this happy scene to its conclusion;
you can also conjure up many another practical joke par
excellence: the Regency Radio slips into a man's trouser
pocket with ease. Its tiny built-in antenna is (in fringe
areas, at least) moderately directional so that a twist of the
body will silence a station, if the volume isn't turned up too
loud and, even io the daytime, you can get quite a selection
of stations.
You can also let your imagination wander over the practical uses for this ultra -compact, transistor radio
the
first one, as far as we know, to utilize transistors (four) for
commercial, broadcast receivers.
Since transistors are
still expensive, and the Regency quite a marvel of compactness, the receiver is expensive
$49.95
and of
course, it makes no claim to being hi -fi. It's a lot of fun,
and also a useful accessory; it operates from a single 22/volt battery (which is said to last for zo hours) so you
can take it with you wherever you go. Hats off to Regency!
...
-
-
-- C.
-
F.
102
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
www.americanradiohistory.com
Now... record the whole performance...
without a break
Got a favorite concert or opera program you'd like to preserve
on tape? Symphony or dramatic production? Now, record ii all using
new "Scotch" Brand Extra Play Magnetic Tape. With 50% more tape
wound on each reel, Extra Play Tape gives you as much recording
time as 1 'A reels of standard tape, plus strength to spare. This means
annoying interruptions for reel change are sharply reduced to offer
more perfect recording results.
You'll notice a crisper tone and higher fidelity, too -the result of
"Scotch" Brand's exclusive oxide dispersion process. By packing
minute, fine -grain oxide particles into a neater, thinner pattern,
"Scotch" Brand has been able to produce a super -sensitive, high potency magnetic recording surface. Hear the difference yourself.
Try new "Scotch" Brand Extra Play Tape on your own machine.
Electron Photo Microscope Shows the Difference!
At left, artist's conception of magnified view of
old- fashioned oxide coating still used by most
ordinary long play tapes. At right, "Scotch"
Brand's new dispersion method lays fine -grain
particles in an orderly pattern to give a supersensitive recording surface that contains as much
oxide as conventional tapes, yet is 5O% thinner.
RTC. U. S. PAT. OTT.
w COTCH
BRAND
r
Magnetic Tape 190
The term "SCOTCH° and the plaid design are registered trademarks for Magnetic. Tape made in U.S.A. by MINNESOTA MINING AND MFG. CO., St. Paul 6. Minn.
Export Sales Odic: 99 Park Avenue, Ness York 16, N.Y. In Canada: Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Co. of Canada, Ltd.. P.O. Box 757. London. Ontario.
.JUNE 1955
f' -.
t..
T03
Collaro RC-54 Changer
TESTED IN THE HOME
Continued on page roe
(furnished by manufacturer):
a three -speed
record changer that will play 7. 10, and 12 -in. records intermixed, of the same speed. Mater: 4 -pole, with integral 3 -speed
drive mechanism. Change cycle: consumes 7 sec. regardless of
record speed. Controls:
two; speed selector and on -off reject
knob. Dimensions: 12 by 13,4 in. Price: $48.75. Distributor:
Rockbar Corporation, 215 East 37th Street. New York 16, N. Y.
SPECIFICATIONS
off and the drive mechanism disengages. The cartridge is
-
the turnover Ronecte TO-284-0V, one of the best crystals
and very good it is, coo.
Incorporated in the Symphonetre is a push -pull co-wart
amplifier of quite unusual quality for a portable. Ir is,
essentially, the Grommes LJ -3 and is installed in a separate
aluminized and screened compartment at the back. Controls project through the side; there are three of them. Ar
the bottom is the AC power switch combined with the bass
control, which gives a flat response in its counterclockwise
The
Symphonelie
player
offers exceptional performance at au even more exceptional price. Very good.
position and increasing bass boost as it is turned clockwise
(up to 15 db). Above it is the treble control, with flat
response when turned all the way to the left and high -frequency cut increasing to 18 db when turned fully clockwise.
At the top is the volume control. It should be explained,
incidentally, that some treble rolloff will be needed when
playing records ( about 6 db at to,000 cycles for the RIAA
curve, according co our checks).
External speaker terminals ar 4, 8, and 16 ohms impedance are furnished on the amplifier chassis at the rear. An
auxiliary high -level input and a phono- auxiliary switch,
when these are supplied, are mounted also on the amplifier
chassis. This option includes an internal speaker on -off
switch, which is installed in the record player compartment.
There is also a switched AC power outlet at the back.
The standard speaker supplied is treated with Geon,
which softens the cone suspension and lowers the cone
resonance frequency. This is particularly important in a
small enclosure. With the cover down the sound is full bodied and quite liscenable, with better bass than might be
expected. We believe that the optional tweeter would be
well worth while if the built -in speaker were to be used
extensively. With a larger external speaker system, of
course, the sound is improved quire noticeably; it can be
labeled truthfully "high fidelity."
The case is of plywood covered with a fiber -like paint; it
can easily be repainted as desired. There is a sturdy, comfortable carrying handle. Altogether, it appears to be well designed and strongly built, offering exceptional performR. A.
ance at an even more exceptional price.
-
The new Collard model RC -54 is relatively simple in operation and is smaller than its predecessor, the 3 /532. Furthermore, it is more versatile
it will intermix 7 -in. records
with los and 12s. Finally, the price has been reduced without sacrificing performance one whit ( judging by our test
unit). This adds up ro an important release for Ili- fiers,
who know the Collard as one of the finer changers.
Several of the noteworthy features have been retained.
Plug-in cartridge shells arc supplied; the surprisingly quiet
motor and turntable are quieter chan ever; the new changer
shuts itself off and disengages the drive mechanism after
the last record is played, as did the old one; a muting switch
still silences the pickup during the change cycle; retained
also is the lever on the tone arm that changes stylus pressure
according to whether you're playing 78s or microgroove
records.
But now you can stack 7, lo, and 12 -in. records on the
changer at the same time. The record "feeler" in the base
post is more sensitive; a 7 -in. record misses it entirely and
the arm sets down at the proper place. A to -in. record
pushes the feeler down half -way, and the arm set -down
radius changes accordingly. But a 12 -in. record pushes the
feeler all the way down as it drops, and again the arm adjusts itself to hit the right spot. A record balancing arm
keeps the stack from wobbling as records are dropped, and
signals the mechanism ro shut off after the last record.
-
Smoothly working versatility in the Collas-o RC-54 changer.
Everything seems to work smoothly in the RC -54, and
very fast. No sooner do you push the on -off reject knob to
Reject, for example, than the tone arm lifts and in five or
six seconds another record is being played. The speed change knob moves easily and clicks into place. Each speed
was very close to exactly right on our trial changer. We
like the rubber turntable mat better than flocking or composition mars; in fact, we like just about everything on this
changer, including the price. Only complaint: there's a
popping noise in the loudspeaker when the motor shuts off.
It should really have a built -in condenser.
A.
-R.
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
104
www.americanradiohistory.com
"Well worth careful consideration"
-HIGH
FIDELITY TITH REPORT
flthM
..
STENTORIANS
RtonxLACoz
12" Duplex (twin concentric)
The superb, British made Stentorian line of High
Fidelity Loudspeakers provides types and sizes to fit
every audio purpose. Whether you select full range
coaxial speakers or extended wide range direct radiators, tweeters or woofers you'll find a Stentorian to suit
you perfectly. All models feature the revolutionary
patented Stentorian cambric cones and suspension;
Sizes 8 inches and up feature non- resonant die -cast
chassis. Stentorians are unmatched in performance,
craftsmanship and value. Hear Beam Stentorians the
Sound that "stands alone" for yourself and be
convinced.
$99.50
Response, 20 to 20,000 cps; boss resonance, 35 cps; built-in crossover;
15 watts; gross weight, 16% lbs. Series Alcomax magnet system; net
weight, 111/2 lbs.; 31,000 Gauss; two 11/4" voice coils.
12" Extended Range Direct Radiator
$42.50
Response, 25-14,000 cps; boss resonance, 39 cps; 15 watts; gross
weight, 10 lbs.; Alcomox magnet, Sys lbs., 14,000 Gauss; 1'h " V /C.
10" Duplex
-
$44.50
(twin concentric)
Response, 30 to 16,000 cps; 10 watts; gross weight, 614 lbs.; 3 lb. 9 oz.
Alcomox series magnet system; 25,000 Gauss; two 1" V /C.
fijyJ
3 way variable impedance DIRECT RADIATORS
i-8 -15 Ohms
You select the perfect impedance match
1012 U-10"
912 U-9"
HF 812 U-8"
HF
$15.95
HF
12.55
11.95
for your system!
Extended Range Response, 30 to 14,000
cps; bass resonance, 35 cps. 10 watts.
These models also available with 15
ohms V/C only. All have 12,000 Gauss, 2
lb.
oz. Alcomox Magnets.
1
QUALITY
without Compromise
BEAM
QUAD
AMPLIFIERS
"Should Satisfy the Most Critical"
Response, 10- 60,000 cps; 0.5 db
20-20,000 cps level at full 15 wafts
-Audio
Total Distortion, at 700 cpt, less than 0.1%
Max. Intermod. Distortion less than 0.4%
3 position Filter Slope Control; Level to
50 db/ octave
Charter Member: Institute el High iidenly Mmmtoclu.e,s.
Equipment Report
Quad Il Amplifier
Q.C. Il Control Uni
System Complete
Send for literature and detailed specifications on the
Beam Products described above, and on Slenlorian
Speakers from 5" to 12" sizes,5 and 15 watt pressure
horn tweeters, matching crossovers, the Stentorian 18"
woofer and Beam enclosures.
JUN1=.
-
$130.00
$120.00
$237.50
The Beans QUAD is a truly superior audio
instrument, providing uncompromising quality plus unparalleled flexibility of control. Its
scarcely traceable distortion is inaudible at
any volume. Acid high efficiency harmonic
filtering, push -button equalization and channel selection, plug -in pickup matching, balanced feedback throughout, 13 section output
transformer, superb British craftsmanship,
and the most functional styling in high
fidelity today and you can see why QUAD
is the recognized world leader in high quality
audio reproduction. Hear it at your earliest
opportunity.
-
BEAM INSTRUMENTS CORPORATION
350 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y.
Inc
Ios
T955
www.americanradiohistory.com
QUALITY SPEAKS,
TEL
The Telefunken products shown
on the opposite page are sold at
leading dealers throughout the
country. Below is a partial listing:
Ashland, N. Y.
Phoenix, Axis.
Minthorne Music Co.
Ashland Radio
Supply Co.
E
Beverly Hills, Calif.
Minthorne Music Co.
Bronxvitle, N.
Y.
Ferris Radio
Bridgeport, Conn.
Borneÿ s Rodio
& TV
Greenwich, Conn.
Craig. Greenwich
Electric Co.
Brooklyn Camera
Exchange
Garden City, L.I., N.Y.
Gorden City Music
Hartford, Conn.
The Record Shop
New Haven, Conn.
Loomis Temple of
Music
Stamford, Conn.
Atlantic Electric Co.
Waterbury, Conn.
Mottofock Music
Wilmington, Del.
Wilmington Electrical
Specialty Co.. Inc.
Washington,
Brooklyn, N. Y.
D. C.
Campbell Music
Miami, Fla.
Hagler Rodio Co.
Atlanta, Ga.
Glen Cove, L.1., N.Y.
N. Lowres TV
Great Neck,
L.1.,
N.Y,
Vernon Shop
Woodmere, L.I., N.Y.
Long Island Radio
New York City, N.Y.
Abercrombie 8 Filch
G. Schirmer & Co.
Gimbel, Deist. Store
Harvey Rodio
Haynes -Griffin
Henry Mielke
Liberty Music
Canton, Ohio
Burroughs Radio
Cleveland, Ohio
Edelmuth Co.
Baker
Communications
Thompson Rodio
Chicago, Ill
Voice & Vision
von Lengerke
&
Antoine
New Orleans,
A.
B.
Columbus, Ohio
La
Dayton, Ohio
Stotts Freedman Co.
Lima, Ohio
Lima Rodio Co.
Denny
Radio Co.
Allentown, Pa.
Boston, Mass.
Baker
Boston Music Co.
The Listening Post
Harrisburg, Po.
Brookline, Mass.
Smith
&
Communications
The Music Box
Hosen
Lexington, Mass.
Pate's Music
&
Appliances Co.
Detroit, Mich.
Crandall Wholesale
Co.
Philadelphia, Pa.
Bailey. Banks and
Biddle
Witte Radio TV Co.
Pittsburgh, Po.
Superior Distributing
Co.
Kansas City, Mo.
David Beatty
Reading, Po.
Rodar fosiq, Inc.
Englewood, N.
Providence,
J.
Haddonfield, N.
The Music Box
R.
t.
Axelrod Music
Music Mona,
.1.
Greenville,
S. C.
Balk Simpson
OUT of my spectacularly rechnicolored, stenrorianly sterephonic,
Walter Mitryish dream life, the
wraith- recollections of one recurring
episode often haunt my waking mind.
In them I am transformed into an
omnipotent and omnipresent researcher conducting a country -wide home -rohome canvass in search of data for a
monumental Darrell Report on the
Love -Life of Music Lovers.
II will shake the world when it appears. And only one annoying minor
detail holds it up: although my nocturnal polls have covered thousands of
listeners, each of whom responded
freely and fully to my long lis: of
I just can't researching questions
member, awake, a single answer!
Some bright morning, perhaps, VII
find all my dream memories miraculously preserved, or my imaginary
questionnaires actually piled up on my
desk, filled out in other than invisible
ink. Meanwhile, the tantalizing lack
of this precious information remains
not only the most grievous handicap
under which I and every other writer
on music, audio, and records must
labor, but a crippling burden on the
whole sound art and industry.
Think what ir would mean if we
could know in what proportions musical experience is derived from disks,
rapes, broadcasts, "live" concerts, and
personal music- making
the exact
number and nature of home sound systems (and their operating condition)
the contents of every home record
collection (and the bases on which
new additions are selected)
the
precise amount of technical knowledge
commanded (or desired) by every hifi fan
which pertinent magazines
and books are read, why they are
chosen, and just what materials and
authors are found to be most provocarive, instructive, and illuminating
Now I'm sure that the rewards, in
both entertainment and education, of
visual aids to aural experience are well
enough realized
in rheory, if not in
practice
most listeners.
Bur
-
...
.
.
.
...
...
-by
Toi)
.
-
!
among the faithful subscribers to this
and other journals devoted ro music
and audio, how many boast collections
of music books that compare even remotely in size, cost, and use with their
record libraries and magazine files?
Nor long ago James Hinton. Jr., made
an admirably cogent plea in these very
pages for the case of books on music
and musicians, and succinctly surveyed
the outstanding general and reference
works (HIGH FIDELITY. October 1954)
and biographies and autobiographies
(December 1954 issue). I don't
imagine that many of you skipped his
articles or read them without a mental
resolution to look into at least some of
the books he discussed. But how many
( if any ) volumes did you actually buy,
or even draw our of your local public
library?
From disheartening experience, I've
lost all optimistic illusions char any
general music -book propaganda, however persuasive, can bring about substantial or permanent changes in the
currently pervading climate- if not
of opinion
ar least of habitual inaction. I fully agree it's a lamentable
state of affairs; indeed as a writer myself I have the liveliest personal concern (nor co say financial incentive) in
its betrerrnent. Bur while I'd love to
think that my colleagues and I have an
incalculably valuable message which
the public fails to appreciate out of
sheer, obtuseness, laziness, or niggardliness, I reluctantly have ro assign such
wishful thinking ro my alter ego's
Mitryish dreams. The hard daylight
fact is that, while many things well
may be wrong wich the potential reading public, the basic troubles lie elsewhere. This is the age of a "new
illiteracy ": the climate of our times is
unfavorable to all kinds of books and
no one- writer, publisher, or nonreader- knows what ro do about ir.
I certainly haven't any solution to
this problem. My bes: guess (and ir is
only a guess) is that the right answer,
if it exists at all, will somehow involve
-
Continued on page JôÑ
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
QUALITY SPEAKS..
TELEFUNKEN
Moderately Priced High Fidelity Radios...
With great pride, the manufacturers of the world famous TELEFUNKEN Microphones present thei
latest engineering triumphs. Never before bave you heard such unbelievably perfect sound from tabl
model radios. Actually, these fine sets are more than just radios, they are complete high fidelity audi,
systems incorporating superb FM-AM -Short Wave tuners. There are inputs for your turntable or recors
changer, and your tape recorder as well as outputs for additional speakers or the recorder. The hand finishe,
solid French walnut cabinets are truly masterpieces of design and craftsmanship.
2
50
SPEAKERS
TO 15,000 CYCLES
FREQUENCY
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An amazing value unit. Built -in FM
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Cabinet distensions:
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3
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FREQUENCY
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Approximately 5 walls
output. Armstrong FM
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those who seek QUALITY find TELEFUNKE
A
partial list of dealers vtill
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Write for free literature and terhniral data on this and other TELEFUNKEN products.
Products of
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Imported and distributed
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MERICAN
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www.americanradiohistory.com
eSPT. H
7
PARK AVENUE
NEW YORK IS. H. Y,
LISTENER'S BOOKSHELF
Continuedfrom page toó
-or
-
the formation
re- establishment
of reading habits, which less than a
century ago were the rule among music
lovers, bur which in the present generation of listeners are sadly exceptional.
doubt whether book costs are any
great handicap: they're higher than
they once were, but they're still not
prohibitive, nor far out of line with
the prices of records and audio equipment -which do sell vigorously today.
The current demands on time and
energy probably are more to blame
but where do so many people find the
time and energy co pursue other, nonreading hobbies? Book distribution
and promotion methods surely bear a
heavier load of responsibility-but,
even so, the whole high fidelity movement got its starr and made its most
sensational progress at a time when it
took an international spymaster's training to track down wide -range components and when audio advertising
and criticism ( inside as well as outside
professional technical circles) was pitifully skimpy in quantity and chaotically contradictory in quality.
No. Any satisfactory explanations
must be sought elsewhere: in some
realm involving more strictly "human"
values. The characteristic psychology,
or psychologies, of listeners have yet
ro be explored in any depth, but even
by the fragmentary insight we command so far it seems ro me that the
significant reasons for the present
failure of popular support for music
and audio books will prove to include
two viral deficiencies: 1) a lack of infectiously communicable enthusiasm
( nor
merely in writers' attitudes
cowards their materials and their audiences, but also in reviewers' and readers' responses) : and 2) a lack of
larger perspective (again both in
writers' and publishers' tactical compromises between specialization and
comprehensiveness, and in reviewers'
and readers' capacities for distinguishing ephemeral and lasting values).
Of course I can't fairly expect that
any such notions as these, still amorphous, will impress you any more than
they do me. But let us see how much
they can help us in appraising some
currently pertinent publications-al ways remembering that the natural
first questions of any prospective reader are sure ro be: "Is this a book T'll
e
1
N E NA/ GOMB
cez.,c 2500R
LABORATORY STANDARD
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Here is the product of perfectionists, for the perfectionist in
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less than four inches high and
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NEWCOMB, Dept. W-6
6024 Lexington Ave., Hollywood 36, Calif.
Here's 25e for new book, "Hi -Fi Is For Everybody"
Please send free information on the Newcomb
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Address
L
State
ty
TO$
-
Continued on pager ro
MI RACORD
XA -100
hkaltt
The superb craftsmanship of the
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AVAILABLE
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If you
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The Miracord XA -100 comes
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Pl44.4 ALL
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No Wow,
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Interchangeable plug -in heads.
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Adjustments without tools.
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Pausamatic
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Shipped complete with leads and
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HfGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
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Full beauty of the original performance is yours
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New easy low -cost way to record any sound,
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Quickly capture every sound with a flick of your
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Monomaric is so simple to operate even youngsters
can share in the fun of making and playing recordings. Monomaric Control gives you instant selection
fast forward and rewind.
of record or play
Easiest ro operate, lowest in cost.
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Service in Music
Since 1872
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Everything in
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Tape Recorder
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FOR. DETAILED LITERATURE WRITE
A-
THE PENTRON CORPORATION
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Figart's Sound Un -Ltd.
6320 Commodore
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Specialists in Hi -Fi
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Henry Radio
11240 W. Olympic
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Moil Orders Welcomed. Easy Terms
Kierulff Sound Corp.
820.830 W. Olympic
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Pemron's In Stock!
Immediate Delivery!
Morion,
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368 Montgomery Ave.
Serving Philadelphia
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Miami, Fla.
Electronic Supply
61
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The Nome to Know
In
Audio
Milwaukee, Wis.
Hollywood, Calif.
5606
Buy
Los Angeles, Calif.
Steffen Electro
Art Co.
318 E. Norwich Ave.
Specialists in
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Minneapolis, Minn.
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69 So. 121h SI.
Hi-Fi-IntercomsRecorders
New Jersey
Paris Unlimited. Inc.
Stores throughout
N. J. Consult Local
Phone Directory
New York, N. Y.
Arrow Electronics, Inc.
Cortlondt St.
Always on Audio Fair!
65
m
786
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Federated Purchasers
Los Angeles, Calif.
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New York's Largest
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Pasadena, Calif.
Dow Radio, Inc.
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Magnetic Recording
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344
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Philadelphia, Penna.
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Reproducer Corp.
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Seattle, Wash.
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Recorders Tape
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TAPE RECORD
_JUNG
139
19S5
www.americanradiohistory.com
r
LISTENER'S BOOKSHELF
unprecedented
FM
Continued from page rot(
and AM
enjoy ?" "Has it got information I
need or can use and, if so, is ir presented so I can grasp it without the
benefits of a bachelor's degree in music
or engineering, or both ?" And finally,
"If I do want to read ir, either for fun
or enlightenment, will it be enough
worth re- reading or frequent reference
to warrant the cost of owning a permanent home- bookshelf copy?"
reception
at
the
a sensible price
custom quality in a
perfect package 4" high
Here is the tuner that offers you more
for your money in every way: extraordinary
high fidelity tone, exceptional
selectivity and sensitivity, more gain and
high output, beautiful "space- saver" design.
The KAULAND 'GULDEN GATE ' brings
you a revelation in FM enjoyment,
a new experience in AM listening.
...
FM response, ± .5 db, 20 to 20,000
cycles; AM, ± 3 db, 20 to 5,000 cycles.
Sensitivity: FM -5 microvolts for 30
db of quieting; AM -5 microvolts for 1.5
volts output. Separate RF stage on
both FM and AM;
discriminator with dual
limiters; Cathode follower
with 2 outputs; AFC; flywheel
tuning; FM di -pole antenna, etc.
The problems of contemporary audiophiles, anxious to get into the hi -fi
swim, but not as high as their necks,
still remain CO be sensationalized in
book form (probably because so many
magazine articles and audio -show
demonstrations have taken care of that
job in other ways). But they continue
ro hypnotize publishers and writers
with the golden delusion of mass sales
to the most gullible specialized market
available today. Or is it as gullible as
it appears-at least to verbal rather
than sonal titillation? Maybe. I'll suspect so if many listeners actually fall
for all the enticing lures displayed in
the ads for William R. Wellman's
High Fidelity Home Music Systems
( Van Nostrand, 53.95 ) and William
J. Kendall's Hi -Fi Handbook (Crowell. S2.95).
That isn't to say that ( duly discounting the blurbs) either book is impossibly bad, or nor worth its cost to a
completely naïve audio neophyte. But
nor only are the title -adjectives misnomers ( unless you're willing to grant
a serious writer and publisher the saine
Lastex leeway you tacitly concede to
the advertising copy- writer for $29.95
"high fidelity" phonographs) there's
nothing here that hasn't been written
better and more fully elsewhere. Wellman is an instructor in a vocational
high school and his elementary descriptions of system principles and
components are laboriously scaled
down to the presumed mentalities of
his students. If you want derailed,
properly primerish instructions for
constructing simple speaker enclosures
in your home workshop, or connecting
an RCA -type plug to a single- conductor shielded cable, Wellman's your
man
build his suggested "widerange" (no feedback) amplifier and
zero -bias pre -amps at your own risk!
Kendall, apparently a pro engineering writer if not engineer, is animated
by at least a modicum of enthusiasm,
:
"space- saver" design
Only 4- high -fits anywhere.
Beautiful charcoal black
marbleized finish with brass
control escutcheons. Also
easily mountable behind any
custom panel. Tuner may be used
up to 200 feet from amplifier.
-but
Hear the
RAULAND
"Golden Gate" Tuner
at your Hi -Fi dealer,
or write for details
RAULAND -BORG CORPORATION
3515 W. Addison St.. Dept.
F,
Chicago 18, III.
,
Tins encyclopedic volume
by Hi -Fi experts shows
you bow to get the best
and most for your money.
It tells and shows everything you need lo know!
How to make equipment
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Fi
at
Audio- Baedeckers for the Layman
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115%ÑWUK
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Compensators,
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How to choose the components that sound best
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Saving Home Hi -Fi Re.
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and diagrams make every-
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lover. List of recommended dealen and manufacGuaranteed
turers. There's no book
to answer all your like it, and you can't lose
questions -or
with this no -risk, moneyyour money back. back offer!
208 pages,
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NEW HIGH FIDELITY HANDBOOK
By Irving Or
d James Radcliffe
sreo
No SIONCV, unless this book proves Its
value to you within 10 days. Order from Csoww
P5.C11313M.. Dept. An. 419 4 h Ave.- N. Y. 16.
If not delighted, return book and pay nothing.
Otherwise pay only 64.95 plus few cents Post(Same
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oued
EXCELLENCE
Always at the head of its
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. designed
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all the lows and highs you've
come to expect in fine high
fidelity recording, but the
full dynamic range of sound
well, from a low throaty
whisper to full Wagnerian
as
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Sensitive, of course, but
rugged enough to withstand
shock. This is an expensive
microphone, but the proven
results indicate its value.
ST
S
Stephens Manufacturing Corp.
8538 Warner Drive
Culver City, California
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
CO
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FIRST TRUE
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It's another first for FrazierMay ... an amazingly true exponential corner horn utiliz-
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percussive nature with amazing trueness. Two 90 in. 32
cycle air columns. Tweeter
horn: 250 cycle rate of taper.
Cross over at 600 cycles.
but he is neither persuasive enough to
convert doubting audio Thomases nor
authoritative enough ro impress the
faithful.
On a comparable ( the reader's
probably a dope, anyway) level,
there's far more useful information in the Fawcett paperback Hi -Fi
Adarsaal, which you can get at your
newsstand or supermarket for 75 cents.
Bur, in larger perspective, if you're
anxious to get a little easy -to -take
technical grounding in sound- reproduction principles, you still can't do
better than with Weiler's High Fidelity Simplified (Rider, t952).
Edward Tarnell Canby, the spryer than -ever grandpappy (42) of all
evangelist -mentors for the audio layman, has just brought out a revised
edition of his Home Music Systems
How to Build and Enjoy Them
(Harper's, $3.95 ), which retains all
the best features and eliminates most
of the poor ones in his original version. It still may be a bit too colloquial
and "of-course-Fin-no-engineer-but" in
style for some tastes (e. g., mine), but
it bubbles over with irresistibly infectious gusto: here is a born tinkerer and
musician who finds tremendous unprofessional delight in audio and knows
just how to convince others that they
roo can lind
and relish
the same
fun. He covers all the basic points of
the orthodox system -manual "formula,"
but far transcends it by prodigally adding diverting extras, including perhaps
most notably an invaluable layman's
introduction to the notion of "geometric progression" and
in this edition
fine new chapter on current
and prospective developments.
As before, the most striking attraction of the book is Canby's uncanny
ability to anticipate (and answer satisfactorily) almost every question the
bewildered audiophile- novice is likely
to ask, plus many that probably won't
occur ro him until he's emerging from
his apprenticeship. And while there
still is cause for complaint that Canby
fails to set his hi -fi standards high
enough ro suit fanatical purists like
myself, either I've become more tolerant in the last couple of years (which
is unlikely), or he makes a more effective case for the practicable "relatively
best for a moderate price" versus the
costly absolute "best." Anyway, I'm
now completely convinced that this is
a well -nigh ideal, certainly an indispensable, guidebook for the average
non -fanatical potential or actual audiophile. You can't afford ro pass this by.
$297
$375
Size: 33 inches high, 46 in. wide,
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Incorporates latest features. RF stage on FM for high
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Hum adjustment to balance
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Input: Magnetic phonograph. Controls: off-on -Tone, Volume,
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MOHAWK
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Simple to operate
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records and
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Unfinished 12"
BASS REFLEX CABINET
M I D G E TA P E
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THE NICEST PEOPLE
Continued from page 46
getting better and bcuer all the time.
The number of people who will
THE WORLD
Royal
FAMOUS
popular Royal
The
8-
your best value in o
hi-fi speaker. Outper-
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ro nge.
Royal 8, Model
8" Speaker.
8T -8 -1
NET
$ 1 3.50
..
ROYAL 12, MODEL 12UP -8 -1. 12"
version of Royal 8, above. Use with
32KTR -C Ki:, below, for coaxial perform-
$21.00
ance at low cost. NET
'7¿ew 32KTR -C Coaxial
Tweeter Mounting Kit
NOW
-mount the
32KTR Tweeter cooxially on your present
12" speaker, or the
Royal 12 described
above.
Consists of
32KTR Tweeter, arms,
hi -pass filter, hdwe.,
instructions.
Easy to
instoll
NET
-no soldering.
...$1t 2.60
32KTR SUPER TWEETER ONLY. Provides true-to -life highs; uses paper cone
-same cone material used in woofers.
Crossover range, 20006000 cps.
$9.45
NET
NK -60 6000 -CYCLE CROSSOVER
NETWORK. Ideal for use with 32KTR -C
Coax Kit, or 3íKTR Tweeter and any
good woofer. Provides complete separa.
tion of lows and highs. NET
fall/YYLC4
$9.00
CORPORATION
Dept. F, 4916 Grand Ave., Chicago 39, III.
4101 Son Fernando Rd.
Glendale 4, Calif.
Canadian Licensee: Campbell Mfg. Co., Ltd.
break the news to a dealer char they
are interested in all the records ever
made by, say, Mischa Q. McMonagle,
the dean of tin -whistle virtuosos, and
will the dealer please send a complete
list of all the records ever made by
char nonpareil artist, is very much
larger chan one might suspect. That
particular problem child is quite unconcerned that McMonagle did his
snuff for umpteen companies here and
abroad over a space of thirry-three
years, eight months, and two days. He
wants that complete list! So the dealer,
being a compassionate soul and somewhat soft in the head, accedes to this
demand. I-Ie works through stacks of
catalogues and circulars for a couple
of days, and compiles it. Whac follows? Does he get an order? Does he
get thanks or any acknowledgment at
all
As a rule, he gets nothing or, at
best, word that the collector already
has all of those listed, and merely
wanted to be certain he had missed
none. Well, such is the sucker's recompense.
Again, one encounters collectors of
-cut-outs," who harbor the notion that
asking the record merchant to run
down a particular discontinued disk is
equivalent almost to having it in their
hoc little hands. Actually, the serious
tracking -down of cut -ours is a major
project, time- consuming and costly.
The percentage of success is small.
Frequently, when a desired cut -out
has been located, the party who had
wanted it has lost interest, obtained it
elsewhere, cries murder at the price,
or disclaims ever having asked for it.
In ever so many ways the conscientious dealer is at a perpetual disadvantage. Not only is he the victim of
countless impositions, but he feels
obliged to guard the interests of his
customers against unscrupulous producers and distributors, too, even when
the customers seem to be hell -bent
upon getting themselves fleeced. One
thing is certain, and that is that if anything is advertised with sufficient
flamboyance and the copy is liberally
larded with pseudo- scientific poppycock, the job of guiding the public
back to the paths of common sense is
so formidable as ro verge upon utter
impossibility. One record producer of
unimpeachable integrity put it thus:
Continued on next page
Hi -Fi Accessories
with Your
Tape Recorder
Diminuette Speaker System
Popular 2 -way
Hi -Fi Speaker
System.
For
wide-ronge tope
playback. Ultra
compact. Uses 2 Royal
6 inch speakers, 32KTR Super tweeter
and hiposs filter. Response: 50 to 16,000 cycles. Size: 23W' W x 111/2" H x
12" D. In Korino Blonde er Mahogany
veneers.
$49.50
NETch
High- Fidelity Headphones
Ideal for monitoring
tape recordings
.
.
.
assure professional results. Perfect for every
hifi listening
application
.
use with the
Permoflux Maestro.
(See below.) impedance: 8 ohms. (Plug -in transformers
for other impedances available.)
HD -1.
Model
Deluxe Model. HD -100.
$27.90
$45.00
NET
Maestro Speaker- Headset
Control Box
For connecting Hi-Fi headphones (or extension speaker) to tape recorder or
amplifier. With volume control. Distinctive styling. Mahoçony -finish cabinet;
gold-finish raised front panel. Sire: 5"
10' /." W x 63:" D.
NET
$10.50
M -53A Telephone Pickup
For recording both sides of
telephone conversation on
tape with crisp, clean re-
sponse.
Fits any type of
phone. Plugs into mike jock
6
of recorder. Complete with
feet of shielded cable.
NET
Oe50
7
CORPORATION
Dept. C, 4916 Grand Ave., Chicago 39, III,
Glendale 4, Calif.
4101 Son Fernando Rd.
Canadian Licensee: Campbell Mfg. Co., Ltd.
113
JUNE 1955
www.americanradiohistory.com
THE NICEST PEOPLE
Continued from preceding page
Exciting High Fidelity Firsts!
In these superb motched instruments-enjoy
the foremost advances in High- Fidelity- start-
ling realism
Novelty
in Speakers
Among the ill- founded ideas one
encounters so often from High
Fidelity enthusiasts with little
know -how is that results are
directly proportionate to complexity
equipment.
Yet the finest audio amplifiers
in the world are remarkable for
their lack of complexity! Their
excellence springs from careful
design and the use of top grade
components.
When one comes to the Loudinevitably the weakest
speaker
the idea that
link in the chain
a complex unit is necessarily
the best, is even less logical. For
it must be remembered that the
object of the Loudspeaker designer is to achieve accuracy
of reproduction and naturalness, not
novelty. This is work for the experienced engineer who concerns
himself with precision.
The finest Speakers in the world
like the finest Amplifiers are
simple in conception but built to the
precision standards of fine instruments.
Such a Speaker is the Tannoy
Dual Concentric, which looks like
many other speakers (outside the
novelty class) but is so often
described by High Fidelity enthusiasts with 'know -how' as the RollsRoyce of them all.
of
-
-
SPECIFICATION
t
or -3d13
Frequency response 30- 20.000 c.p.s.
Polar Distribution for 60. inc. angle -4dt1
et 10,000 c.p.e.
Inter-modulation ProdueM less Than 2%.
\TANNOY/
TANNOY
(America) Ltd..
38 Pearl Street,
New York 1,
N. Y., U.
S.
A.
TANNOY
(Canada) Ltd.,
36, Wellington St. East,
Toronto I,
Ontario,
Canada.
"Sometimes is is difficult to give the
public an improved piece of merchandise far in advance of the field, We
shall now conform to the regular commercial patterns." The concern had
begun offering records made of darn age- resistant, vinyl- styrene compound,
but could not get acceptance of them
because the surfaces were slightly less
silent than those of the easily damaged
and less durable saponified vinyls. It is
my understanding that the Czechoslovak record trust had to withdraw its
entire original catalogue of LPs for
this reason.
Every record dealer is victimized
regularly by thieves who are ingenious
in the extreme. The balinacaan type of
overcoat with a huge pocket sewn inside the lower back panel has served
ro spirit even 12 -inch albums our and
into the night! The side pockets take
7 -inch records beautifully.
In the
acoustic days the soundboxes or reproducers had to be wired or soldered
on to the machines in the listening
booths. The switch -racket, whereby a
beat -up record was left with the dealer
in place of his factory-fresh stock
number, is as old as die disk record
business itself. Bad credit and bad
checks occur as in any other commercial area, but it is a real thrill when a
check for one dollar bounces back,
ragged "Insufficient funds"!
For a brief period in the earliest
days of wire and rape recording there
was a rash of rejections of records
based upon the most tenuous of considerations. There was good reason to
believe that some of the early birds
were making their own wire or tape
dubbings and then returning the records they had ordered for the purpose
to the dealers.
The nut fringe, distinguished for
vehemence, intemperance, and intolerance, arc perennially on hand. Saturated with opinions, they not only can
tell the dealer how to run his business,
but they are red -hot for or against this
or tbs.: composer, this or that artist,
this or that record company, and this
or that apparatus for sound reproducdon. There are the lads ro whom
anything antedating the day after
tomorrow is obsolete, disreputable, and
utterly unworthy of notice or mention.
It stuns them to learn that amplification and reproduction of the full range
of audible sound, today's `hi -fi,' was
"old hat" circa 1930; that good electro-
-
lowest distortion
- precision
craftsmanship-gleoming polished chromium
chassis.
Coronation 400
40
AALTIFIER
Greatest amplifier buy today! COMPLETELY
NEW, NON-RINGING NEGATIVE FEEDBACK
CIRCUITRY -over 50 DB feedback. CUSTOM
sealed transformers, encapsulated
CRAFTED
networks, finest molded components on Bakeless
lite terminal board. DISTORTION -FREE
than 0.05% at 30 watts. POWER RESPONSE
Sur±0.1 DB 16 to 35,000 cycles at 30 watts.
passes FCC requirements for FM broadcasting.
5 to 200,000 cycle responso. 40 WATT WIDE RANGE OUTPUT TRANSFORMER, sealed multiple section windings, thin strip coro.. FOOLDAMPING CONTROL for startling
PROOF
speaker performance. BUILT -IN POWER for
preamplifiers and newest electrostatic tweeters.
-
-
Coronation 90
CONSOLETTE PREAMPLIFIER
EQUALIZER
-
oël
$8950
Incomparable companion to the "CORONATION 400 ". EXCLUSIVE NEGATIVE FEEDBACK
CIRCUITRY. Over 50 DB- virtually eliminates
distortion. Surpasses FCC requirements for FM
Broadcasting. 5 to 200,000 cycle response.
CUSTOM CRAFTED -polished chromium chassis,
satin gold front panel. Encapsulated precision
networks, molded components on Bakelite
panel. EXCLUSIVE PRESENCE and LOUDNESS
CONTROL, continuously variable. Rumble and
Scratch Filter positions. FIVE INPUT SELECTIONS,
PLAYBACK CURVES.
and Treble
compensation. Phenomenal lowest noise Z -729
input tube HUM INAUDIBLE with all controls
on full. Highest gain. Built -in power for motion
picture photocells, FM phono cartridges, condenser ms rophones. Ultra compact, easy front
25
PRECISION
FULL 20 DB DISTORTION -FREE Bass
mounting
Now at your focal dealer!
INTERELECTRONICS
2432 Grand Concourse
New York 58, New York
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
114
www.americanradiohistory.com
stoic speakers were
Do you know
you can own
SPEAKER
for only $49.50
Jepemeitj
"the little speaker with the big voice"
You won't believe it, but
Audio Response -55 to 16,000 cps.
Speaker Components -8 inch bass
driver in 36 inch exponential horn.
3'.2 inch tweeter and specially designed crossover network. Impedance:
8
ohms.
Construction
-
Korina veneers finished in Blonde, Walnut, Mahogany
or
Ebony hand
rubbed lacquer.
Wrought iron legs.
Unique Features -Curled, not fold.
ed, exponential horn (1% of formulo).
Multiple flore formula (patent applied
for). Passive phasing chambers. 24db/
octave acoustical crossover. Distributed
throat characteristic (not found elsewhere).
Sise -19
x
12 x 9 inches.
Other Stan White Cabinet Speakers
LeSabre -24" x 15" x 12 ", Frequency
Response: 40 to 16,000 cycles
79.50
Esquire -30" x 24" x 16 ", Frequency
Response: 30 to 16,000 cycles..194.00
x 30" x 20 ", Frequency ReHi -Fi
sponse: 20 to 16,000 cycles
645.00
x
4-D
3' x 2', Frequency Re994.00
sponse: 15 to 16,000 cycles
-4'
-5'
See
your high fidelity distributor or
INC.
LaSalle
727 S.
Dept- 4.b,
Illinois
Chicago 5,
¡I Division
of
St.
Enrerpnrer
Eddie Bracken
in limited use
almost as long ago, and that the low speed, long- playing record goes back
three decades. Featherweight pickups
and records playing up to an hour on
a side were laboratory items nearly
twenty years ago, too. That does not
mean, of course, that the years since
have been barren of progress, but that
progress has been mostly in the direction of achieving the results desired
with greater certainty, with much
more compact facilities, and at prices
not so fantastically our of reach as in
those early days. The eight- hundredpound amplifier, for instance, has
passed into history along with the
high- wheeled bicycle. But what was
called "auditory perspective" in those
long -gone decades now goes by the
name of "binaural" or "stereophonic"
sound!
A more recent gag, born in this
era of if -you- don't -like -it- for -any-reason- return -it, is the widespread practice of unloading LPs on dealers, ocher
than the concerns from which they
were obtained, for credit or exchange.
To return to the nut fringe -we
have to consider the numerous ecstatically impatient souls who, upon receiving parcels of records, do not rake the
rime to ascertain how they may be
opened with a minimum of effort, but,
instead, tear at them in maniac frenzy
or virtually blast them open, and then
denounce the mails and the dealers for
the debris they uncover. In passing,
breakages almost always seemed to
occur among the records comprised in
sers; rarely among singles. Replacing
parts of secs has always been cne of
the most frustrating, frequently futile
obligations of record dealership. The
gradual disappearance of shellac is the
happiest development of the era, from
the retailer's standpoint.
The record merchant who has never
had ro serve a Johnny -one -note character does not exist. He drops in and
proclaims, "I - wanna - getta - reccud it - goes - like - this - but - I - don't know - the - name - of - it ", and then
begins to whistle, "tweet -a- tweet -tweettweet, tweet -a- tweet," all on practically
the same note. Once in a while, the
rhythm supplies the clue. Or one experiences a visitation from the sad
soul who wants a record of the "tune
that goes like 'Mickey'," which turns
out to be "The Sweetest Story Ever
Told." Again, he "heard it on the
radio and the composer's name was
'Josef Waldo'." Ir took time, bat the
selection was by Gesualdo, the uxoriContinued
nn next
the world
is
your oyster
-
Here's a new delicacy to satisfy the
taste of the audiophile
the entire
world. Famous European music
festivals, outstanding foreign symphony
orchestras, quaint folk music or news
from the capitols of the world are
yours at the flip of a switch.
THE `BROWNIE"
AM- Shortwave tuner (Model L -500)
adds a new dimension to your hi -fi
system. The shortwave reception is
equal to that of a professional
communications receiver, and the AM
is of the highest quality. It's the first
designed principally
tuner of its kind
for your hi -fi system.
Price $8750
-
Sensitivity 1 to 2 microvolts.
IF amplifier for broad and sharp bandwidth
10 Mc whistle filter.
High gain RF stage.
Covers complete broadcast band.
Tape recorder output.
17 meters through
International shortwave band
49 meters.
Built -in high gain ferrite antenna.
outr ut level control with ON-OFF
Three controls
switch; 3- position selector switch, AM broad, AM
sharp, shortwave control: and velvet tuning control.
Sell contained power supply.
Cathode follower output for remote location.
-
-
rownr n 9
LABORATORIES, INC.
750 Main Street, Winchester, Mass.
Export Div., 25 Warren St., New York, N.Y., U.S. A.
CABLE: SIMONTRICE
page
T15
JUNE 1955
www.americanradiohistory.com
THE NICEST PEOPLE
Hi
.
.
.
Mr. Hi Fi
it
This is
.
.
Continued from preceding page
.
The BRADFORD
Perfect BAFFLE'
Radically new idea In loudspeaker enclosures. Not a bass reflex or folded horn.
The
primary purpose of
a
loudspeaker enclos-
ure is to prevent destructive sound cancellation
that Jokes place at low frequencies, when the
front and rear waves, emanating from both sides
of the speaker cone, merge.
It is obvious that no rear waves con escape
through a totally enclosed cabinet, and it would
be the perfect baffle. except for one reason. The
air pressure within the cabinet acts as a cushion
upon, and therefore restricts. cone movement.
This causes loss of life and color.
The BRADFORD Perfect BAFFLE Is totally
enclosed, yet it relieves cone pressure by
an ingenious device that operates in unison
with cone movement.
Since this ochon conforms fa on ultimate
scientific principle, the BRADFORD Perfect
BAFFLE is the only enclosure that con give you
the utmost in sound reproduction.
And that, specifically, Is .
ALL THE BASS, full, rich, clean boss. clearly
distinguishing each contributing instrument, down
tide. Always, too, there are the embryo Carusos who take records into
the listening booths, practice singing
in unison with them for an hour, more
or less, and then walk out. No sale
and no thanks.
Among the most disastrous of the
innumerable mistakes a dealer can
make is CO lend our a catalogue of
which he has only a solitary copy for
his own use. The would -be borrower
of catalogues is the most earnest and
persuasive pleader and the most effusive promisor the world has ever
known, and for tenacity the leech is a
weakling in comparison. His promises
are worthless. Compared ro the caralogue- borrower, Ananias was a paragon
of punctilious rectitude. Catalogues
never come back!
There are other kinds of borrowers.
One besieged me for months. He
wanted to borrow a rare Telefunken
record from my private collection to
have it dubbed. He was big stuff in
the silk business; had a gaudy residence on Long Island, too. I capitulated when he promised me enough
fine silk for a fancy gown for my wife.
that bring you great music
to the lowest speaker frequency.
TRADER'S
MARKETPLACE
BOOM. Absolutely no boom. Boom, or
one note" boss, is not high fidelity.
NO FALSE PEAKS. Does not "augment" boss by
false peaks that are really distortions.
NO
...
ANY SPEAKER. Accommodates any speaker
any size, weight, shape or make.
NO TUNING. No port turning or speaker matching.
ANY POSITION. Operates in any room position.
NO RESONANCES.
No false
cabinet or air
resonances.
20" h z 15" d for 12s & 15s
12"
@ $49.50.
@ 69.50. Unfinished birch
@ $39.50.
w r 12" h s 10" d for 8s, 91/2s & IOs
Unfinished birch .
@ $34.50.
REAL HARDWOODS. In all popular finishes .. .
mahogany, blond, ebony, walnut, red.
COMPACT.
20" w
z
...
...
INCOMPARABLE CONSTRUCTION. Hand mode,
by master craftsmen. All walls
hand finished
sk thick.
...
GUARANTEED. Unconditionally guaranteed to
out- perform any other enclosure now available
regardless of size, weight or price.
If you want the very best speaker
enclosure, and will not be misled as to
real performance by deceptive size or
price, see your audio dealer at once.
A demonstration wit convince you. Or
write for literature.
Prices slightly higher \Vest of Rockies.
Here's the place to buy, swap, or sel
audio equipment. Rates are only 30¢ a
word (including address) and your advertisement will reach 50,000 to 100.000
music listeners. Remittance must accompany copy and insertion instructions.
WANTED: USED HOLT'S Italian Language sot. Erskine
Carter, Box 1500, Albany, Georgia.
HIGH FIDELITY SPEAKERS REPAIRED. Amprlte Speaker
Service, 70 Vosey St., New York 7, N. Y,
HAVE GOOD RECORD with tracking defects? Can
repair, $1.75. Moll to Willord Brinegar, 1200 W.
Cedar, Chemise., Iowa.
-
-
SALES
SWAP
SERVICE
ON ALL TYPES OF NEW AND USED AUDIO EQUIPMENT.
ARGUS SERVICE COMPANY
235 LYONS AVENUE
WAVERLY 3 -3025
NEWARK, N. J.
Patent pending.
TAPE RECORDERS, Tape, Accessories, unusual values.
Dresaner, Box 66K, Peter Sluyvesanl Mallon, N. Y. 9-
BRADFORD
Pmt
6 ELEMENT
aluminum,
315 East 6th Street
broad band FM antennas. All seamless
Wholesale Supply Co.,
$10.95 ppd.
Lunenburg, Mass.
BAFFLE
BRADFORD & COMPANY
NEW YORK, N.
Great dykes
the land where engineering skills
equal the force of the mighty seo, the
Duotone Cornpony brings you Norelco
Sound Equipment. High fidelity equipment that holds bock the mighty force of
mechanical interference in your listening
as the greol dykes of Holland stand slob
wort against every destructive trickle of
From
the seo,
A genius peculiarly Dutch, this meticu
lout otlenlion to every minute detail,
Thot allows no weakness onywhere. Thai
insists on orderliness in everything they
do. That trusts nothing less thon perlec
lion. The kind of perfection in sound
equipment, monufoctured in Holland by
Philips and brought to you by the
Duotone Company. Consummate perler.
lion in high fidelity. Great dykes that
hold bock every trickle of interference in
your listening. Great dykes that bring
you great music!
Model ß9750M -8"
Audio response 35 to 20,000
cycler. 6 Watts, Flu. density
3,000. Magnetic flu. 58.300.
10% efficiency m 4000 tit.
Inpedance at 1000 c/s
8
ohms_ Resonance
frequency
60 cycle,, List 536.95 sub.
ject to regular audiophile
discount,
1
-
Inlormotion on other Noteleo models from
THE
TAPE RECORDER SPECIALISTS! Ask for queletiens on
HI -FI Components also.
Bottom Prices! Got details,
Boynton Studio, 10H Pennsylvania, Tuckahoo, N. Y.
I16
Supplier
DUOTONE COMPANY, INC.
KEYPORT, N. J.
6
Manufacturer of Destano Needles
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
www.americanradiohistory.com
GOLDEN
l.iJ
\\11j0°
COMPONENTS
Vi
ap
li1Mt2j
TURNTABLE
-70
Rumble
db. Speed, 0.25%
25 lb. Cast Steel Turntable
Wow and Flutter less than 0.05%
Users coast to coast acclaim the beautiful
silence of the Components Professional Turn.
table. Flawlessly smooth, unerringly stable, "you
think you're hearing tape," owners say. The
reasons are few and simple: Superior design;
superior engineering. The Components sets an
entirely new standard of turntable performance,
regardless of price. Hear it and be convinced!
User's net $99.50. Slight additional charge for
matching skirt.
WRITE FOR VITAL TURNTABLE FACTS
COMPONENTS
D
E
N V
I
L L E
CSC
N E
W
J
E
R
S
E
Y
Now! For Ni -Fi and Phonograph Systems
Automatic Shnt-Off of ENTIRE
SYSTEM at End of Last Record.,
"SLUMBER SWITCH"
No more worry or bother about "remembering"
to shut off power after Isst record plays.
SLUMBER SWITCH remembers for you!
Shuts off entire system automatically!
USE IT with any phonograph that shuts
To restore
off itself at end of last record
ordinary operation at any time. simply
flick defeat switch
Foolproof! No moving parts. nothing to wear or burn out
Easy installation. Just 3 simple connections. 3' Cables to permit convenient placement Pop -filter lessens speaker -pop, when
motor shuts off
No hum or magnetic
fields. Use with ANY cartridge!
Money -beck Guarantee. Sent
$7.95
Postpaid (No C.O.D.)
Mirabile diem! I got the record back,
but, after all these years, no silk.'
Well, those are types. The unreasonable ones include chose who, having bought a certain record any length
of time back, order the same number
a second time and then berate the
dealer for duplicating! They also include those who order the same number from half a dozen dealers at the
same time, accept it from the first one
who manages co deliver it, and do not
notify the ocher dealers from whom
they ordered it that it has arrived.
They just let them send and, upon
arrival, refuse it. The experienced
dealer soon learns to beware of the Big
Order Brotherhood. So often the
dealer stocks up on their account, only
to find our that all they ever acquire is
a catalogue -collection. They are the
breed who denounce the recording
companies because of the "shameful
neglect" of some virtually unheard -of
composer or opus, make a great noise
over the matter, and when the thing
finally shows up on disks and they are
apprised of the fact, become singularly
silent. They don't buy it!
The fact is, the dealer who specializes in records of culturally respectable
material renders a peculiarly personal,
almost intimate service to those who
patronize him. With the exception of
the eccentric characters described
above, chis is a distinctly above -average public. Because of that fact, the
communications which pass between
such a dealer and his customers are
usually on a plane of frank friendliness quite outside the experience of
most ocher businesses. In any number
of instances a lively and exceptionally
instructive exchange of views ensues,
and the narration of personal experiences is particularly free. Sometimes
the letters which come in impose upon
the dealer the responsibility of becoming confidante, counsellor, comforter,
and guide to those who wrote them.
If he accepts this as a privilege and
gives of himself accordingly, he may
not become the world's largest record
dealer, but he will attach to himself a
host of the finest friends anyone ever
could hope for. And that is the pay -off
which alone makes it all worth while.
Because, I must admit, it is.
Choose from the line
that's most complete
and most versatile . . .
STROMBERG -CARLSON
so
100
el
Matched High Fidelity
When your dealer suggests "Custom 400"
equipment, lies hacking his recommendation with knowledge that no other HiFi line so completely meets your needs.
Stromberg- Carlson launched this
equipment in 1952, but our experience in
audio goes back more than 60 years! Our
record is star -studded with many "firsts"
which have become industry standards
-like the coaxial speaker, the Acoustical
Labyrinth® and the first FM receivers.
"Custom 400" is complete -and every
component is perfectly matched to every
other. "Custom 400" is versatile -your
installation can be as tailored as your
clothes! And whatever standard of "How
high is Hi -Fi" you use, we'll guarantee to
meet and exceed it!
Test that claim! See your StrombergCarlson "Custom 4(10" specialist for a
demonstration -or send the coupon below for literature and his name.
Stromberg -Carlson'
Sound Equipment Division
1222 Clifford Avenue. Rorbr,trr 21, N. Y.
Please send Inc your lli -Pi literature
and the name of ray nearest dealer.
NANIr.
ADDRESS
The HI -FI CENTER, Inc. Dept. H6
2630 N. [owner Ave.,
Milwaukee
Il,
WIs.
I 17
JUNE 1955
www.americanradiohistory.com
COMPARE
this performance!
Itt,
FAIRCHILD
220
DIAMOND
CARTRIDGE
-)
I$37S0
Fairchild's 220 Series cartridge guarantees this distortion -free reproduction in
the entire audible range!
Just look at these frequency response
curves of the Fairchild 220 and two other
leading cartridges. See how Fairchild
alone gives smooth, even reproduction
completely uniform to 17,000 cycles
with only slow roll .off beyond. This
means no unnatural harshness, no distorted
sound! With Fairchild, you have only
-
the sound you were meant to hear!
+,e
FREQUENCY IN CYCLES PER SECOND
I.._>..-....-.
r
to
Oe
FAIRCHILD 220
llll
t.,..
':i1
11111
11u11
I1Iri>s
IIo111m.
11111111111
CARTRIDGE A
CARTRIDGE B
SIR:
am presently in the process of extending my music system ro encompass
binaural recordings and die binaural
broadcasts of WQXR. I am trying to
do this as economically as possible,
I
which eliminates the outlay of $t 50
or more for a binaural amplifier. Actually, this shouldn't be necessary, for
I already possess two excellent amplifiers in good working condition. As
each has a complete sec of conuols, I
cannot see any justification for buying
a binaural preamp, either, because this
too would duplicate most of the controls I already have.
For playing binaural records I have
all that is necessary, almost!
It is
that "almost" that spoils the whole
thing. No true audiophile can ever
find real happiness knowing that his
rig is deficient, even if only in a minor
derail. The minor detail is the controls
which are available on all binaural amplifiers and preamps, but not obtainable elsewhere, that do three things:
focus, reverse, and feed monaural signals to both circuits. These are all very
handy little items to have if you plan
to do much binaural listening.
I can assure you that ir isn't as easy
as it seems ro get a perfect balance
FROM
PHONO A'
And, a
PIN
JACK
Continued on page 120
13-BINAURAL
M- MONAURAL
R-REV. BIN..
STANDARD
PHONO
perfect mate...
between speakers and yet keep the
overall volume at a proper level when
you are fiddling with two volume controls.
And suppose you find that
you've got the orchestra backwards!
It is a nuisance to pull the leads out
from behind borh amplifiers and re.
verse them by hand. But even mort
important than both is that switch
that permits a single source to be fed
ro both circuits. Obviously, one does
a great deal more monaural listening
than binaural at the present time, and
it takes a strong man to be able to sit
there with two speaker systems and
two amplifiers and actually use only
one of each. Besides, I've heard many
monaural sources made to sound
binaural by leaning one amplifier
toward the treble and the other towards
the bass. There are many more reasons
why ir would be advantageous to feed
a single source into both systems. The
point is, how do we do ir?
On the enclosed sheet is my visual.
ization of what this might look like
For some reason, no manufacturer pre.
sently features such an item. There.
fore, I would have to make it myself.
I know how to use a soldering iron and
BALANCE
CONTROL
25K
B
IRC
P011.í33
OR SIM.
TO PHONO
IN PUT. AMRI
FROM
rM TUNER
OR TAPE A
MI
TO TUNER
OR TAPE
4 POLE
3 POS.WAFER
280 Serles
SWITCH
Transcription
I
Arm
ORS M.
Match your cartridge to the finest arm! Low mass and resonance -free, Fairchild's 280
Transcription Arm allows the cartridge
alone to lift all the none color from your
recordings. Superb precision balance and
engineering assure perfect mid- groove tracking, always. And, any standard cartridge
plugs in easily- performs better -with this
versatile Fairchild 280!
$2150
N P U T,
J
AM P.1
MALLORY
I
RC
M11-133
OR SIM.
FROM
PHO NO B'
TO PHONO
I
NPUTAMP.2
IRC
M11 -120
OR SIM.
FROM
AM TUNER
TO TUNER
OR TAPE
NPUT. AM P.2
OR TAPE B
I
NOTE
MAKE GROUND
CONNECTIONS TO
CHASSIS AT ONLY
ONE POINT
Suggested binaural control unit for use with two external phe:erup- egtmlizer- amplifier,
IIó
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
Photograph Is by Irvin Kershner of 17th or 18th century Colascione
In the Erich Lachmann Collection of Historical Stringed Musical
Instruments reproduced through the courtesy of the Allan Hancock
Foundation and the University of Southern California. Printed
reproductions of four of the photographs used in this series are
available for one dollar. Send remittance to lames B. Lansing
Sound. Inc. Be sure to print your name and address clearly.
labor of love
?he skilled 7talian hands which fashioned
this seventeenth century colascione were
alive with delight. The elegance with
Ile
which they inlaid the engraved mother-of-
ers and Einclosures.
pearl in the straight -grained spruce table
through his meticulous labors, the finely
suggests a vision of
courtly singers and
attuned ear which
works to please,
is able to
perceive and
noble ladies. The Jim Lansing craftsman
appreciate today's closest approach to
carries in his mind another vision while
perfection
he
forms and assembles Signature Speak-
- the verbatim reproduction of
loudspeakers by Jim Lansing.
Only Jim Lansing 15" and 12" General Purpose Speakers are made with four -inch voice coils...for
crisp, clean bass
JAMES
R.
... for
smooth, extended highs.
LANSING SOUND, INC.
www.americanradiohistory.com
2439
Ilelcher Drive,
Los Angeles 19, California
AUDIO FORUM
Continued from page 118
ORDER NOW!
am sure I can follow simple instructions if they are complete enough. I
am hoping char you can figure our
what parts should be used in this gadget and how it should be wired.
I
PERSPECTIVES
FOR
LOWEST PRICES!
DIAM
NEEDLEOND
S
P
1
0*
Martin L. Borirh, O.D.
ELECTRONIC
East Main Street
Freehold, N. J.
81
ENGINEERS
One possible reason why no manufacturer
offers a binaural switching and control
system such as you desire may have to do
with the fact that it would have to accom-
modate provisions for phonograph binaural
reproduction. Unless tubes were used, it is
quite possible that the hum problem would
be very difficult to overcome. Nevertheless,
if you would like to try it, we have attached a schematic diagram of as simple a
switching system as seems practical. As
you can see, we have combined the mon-
*Our skilled diamond
craftsmen convert your
present needle to
a
genuine,
unconditionally guaranteed
diamond- tipped needle! Send or
bring your replaceable needle,
check or money order for Sto.
Specify either 33 Or 78 rpm.
If desired, new shaft supplied, Sa.75 additional.
,
ti thy
aural-binaural and
reverse binaural twitThe single switch now has three
positions: monaural, binaural, and reverse binaural. In the monaural position,
ches.
either the radio or phono input from
channel A is split and goes to both
channel outputs. This switch can be a
simple 4 -pole triple -throw wafer type.
Westinghouse
AIR ARM
*
ELECTRONICS DIVISION
FOR
`>>
DIAMOND STYLUS CO.
DEPT. HFM
47 STREET
N. Y.36, N. Y.
31 WEST
t'.
FUTURE * INCOME f/,
PROFESSIONAL
r
RECOGNITION
S
j,
-
ar
s
control preamplifier -equalizer
OPENINGS EXIST
IN THE
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FIELDS OF:
COMMUNICATIONS
*
CONTROL
* RADAR
* TECHNICAL WRITING
* COMPUTERS
* BOMBER
* MISSILE GUIDANCE
*
ENGINEERING
FIRE
Quality I)csldned by
marantz
DEFENSE
Owners of the Marantz Audio Consolette invariably
comment on the immediate improvement in sound
quality of their systems. Such a fine instrument cannot
he produced by the thousands, hut only through careful assembly and thorough testing of each unit.
FIELD
TO APPLY
Naturally, its components are uncompromisingly
chosen for superior quality. This and the character of
its workmanship makes it the obvious choice for those
who wish to improve their present installations. Chassis
suitable for installation S142.50, with cabinet $155.00.
send letter outlining education
and experience fo:
Employment Supervisor
Dept. 154
Westinghouse Electric Corp.
2519 Wilkens Avenue
C.,,,,t,lrl,
s. b.
marantz
44 -15
Vernon Blvd., L.I.C., New York
Baltimore 3, Maryland
I20
HIGH FIDELITY D1,AGAZINE
www.americanradiohistory.com
Wit Sae
The JOcus control varies the output on
both sets of channels, increasing that of
one pair of channels as it decreases that of
the other group. You would still need to
use the selector switches in both amplifiers
when you
. .
.
select Hi -Fi's Best
craftsmen
LOOK
FOR THE
LARGE
SILVER
CENTER
to switch between radio and phono
channels, and you'd have to set the
The. NEW
á
ow,.a®.-.ì
/i
_.wtt,
r
amplifiers' equalization controls properly for binaural phono sources. Low noise resistors should be used in the
phono channels of your switching box.
The entire circuit should be well
shielded. As was explained, this is
offered with no guarantee; we haven't
actually built One of these.
,
watt power amplifier,
d
on exclusive
restive
not
cobinet.
e
a
filter
preamplifier
Il
Sirnply add
anger and speaker
1%11 Porno
Price was S113.50.
for
a
in
one
record
professional
8 Ó5 Ó
NOW ONLY .._._...._....................
F.O.B. Chicago. Send check or M.O.
Send
box New Brochure
low prices on Tuners,
Amplifiers, Preamplifiers.
See
the new
One year factory warrantee.
15 Day Home Trial -you must
-
be
if not, return equipment
satisfied
for refund of purchase price.
In the March 1955 issue, on pages 120
and 122, there is a letter by Paul A.
Alter regarding "play- through" or
"pre -echo."
I would
like to suggest that Mr.
Alter's analysis of his problem is more
accurate than he realizes, and also that
he was not referring to needle talk.
Pre and post -echo on microgroove records can be caused by a combination
of a worn stylus whose assembly has
poor or low compliance (stiffness)
Dept. R5, 4403 N. Ravenswood Ave.
mounted in a tone arm with either
tracking error or too high a pressure.
Chicago 40, Illinois
Continued on page 122
The Radio Craftsmen Inc.
In your audio dealer's demonstration room where
loudspeakers are lined up all in a military row
...look for the speaker with the large, silvery
ducal dome in the center. Ear -test it with special
care. This is the Jim Lansing Signature 0130
the 15" Extended Range Speaker with 4" voice
coil of edge -wound aluminum ribbon. The coil is
attached directly to the 4" dural dome. Together
they give the piston assembly exceptional rigidity. This is one reason why bass Iones sound so
why the highs so smooth
crisp and clean
the mid -range so well -defined. You will find the
D130 to be as distinguished to your ear as it is
-
...
...
to your eye.
THE SIGNATURE
C2-100
Net price. $4.50
D130 (shown above)
IS YOUR BASIC SPEAKER
Use it alone when you first begin your high
fidelity system. Perfectly balanced with other
Signature units, it later serves as a low frequency unit in your divided network system.
The highest
overtones of
the piccolo
Additional Signature Precision Transducers
wills large domes and volte coils:
SIGNATURE
0131...
the finest 12" speaker made
0.0.- 12W'
4" voice coil of edge -wound
aluminum ribbon
Depth -5"
Power input -20 watts
Impedance- 16 ohms
SIGNATURE
lets you hear
the full range
an
0123...
Innovation in speaker design
Depth -only 35Ae"
O.D.- 124
3" voice coil of edge -wound
aluminum ribbon
Power input - 20 watts
Impedance 16 ohms
-
The deepest tones
0208...
SIGNATURE
of the bass tuba
8" precision transducer
an
Senior Compentrol -with special
Printed Electronic Circuit*is no ordinary compensated
control. There's nothing else
like it, for improving the tone
performance of hi -fi amplifiers or
pre -amplifiers! Level -set lets
you control compensation to
suit yourself. Ask your Centralab
or service man.
distributor
Write Centralab, Dept. 928F,
Milwaukee 1, Wisconsin for
....,,
Compentrol booklet.
-
JUNE 1955
0.D.-
81/a"
2" voice coil of edge -wound
aluminum ribbon
Power input 12 watts
-
Impedance
- D208-8
D216
ohms
ohms
-16
See your aucio dealer for complete catalog
prtti.ion that
JIM
L ANSI
NG
epcake for itself
O
JAMES
B.
2439 Fletcher Drive
/rJt0Za,u/GV
LANSING SOUND, INC.
Los Angeles 39, Calif.
121
www.americanradiohistory.com
AUDIO FORUM
Continued from page 121
H
Z
bi
D
bi
-
Docwrs
Physicians are increasingly enthusiastic
about the faithful reproduction of music.
The doctor's dilemma is often whether to purchase
an ordinary tuner, with its fanciful claims,
or insist upon the pace -setting PRECEDENT.
1 This problem, which
may be also yours,
can be resolved by: 1) writing to
U
W
In earlier LPs the recording levels
were often too high to be retained
within groove walls. Wich a worn and
stiff stylus combination these walls
could be broken down sufficiently ro
carry modulation over into either the
previous or subsequent groove. The
walls were literally pushed over by the
stylus into the next groove. The condition was particularly noticeable in
sudden changes of dynamic range
for instance, from a solo instrument to
full orchestral sound.
Since the advent of "variable margin technique' in record making, it is
now possible to widen the margin berween grooves a couple of revolutions
before high modulation occurs, thus
eliminating any possibility of pre or
post -echo.
Unfortunately, variable
margin technique is neither industrywide nor consistent on a given disk:
cf., Columbia ML 4467, Berlioz' Symphonie Fantastique, one side of which
is fixed margin technique and the
ocher side variable margin.
I venture to guess that Mr. Alter is
using a record changer with inadequate tone arm, cartridge, and stylus
Therefore, the echo can be due co his
system, and his question, "Can it be a
source of damage ro the records ?"
should be answered, "Yes." The records on which he hears the pre -echo
are already damaged. He can prove
this fact by playing them on a friend's
transcription turntable and arm combination in comparison wich new
copies of the same records.
I would be interested in hearing the
opinions of your "experts" on all of
the above.
William C. Bohn
Bohn Music Systems Co
55o Fifth Ave.
REL for a free
copy of the interesting, informative brochure,
FM AT ITS FINEST;
2) speaking to a PRECEDENT
-
owner; or best yet, 3) actual listening to a
PRECEDENT preferably on high quality, live FM.
1 That's why more and more doctors'
orders are for PRECEDENT: a prescription
without equal for every music lover.
New York 36, N. Y.
RADIO ENGINEERING LABORATORIES
36 -40 Thirty- seventh Street
CC.
o-
Long Island City 1, N.Y.
INC.
From the complete text of the letters
referred to by Mr. Bohn, and from
previous correspondence with Mr.
Alter, we knew that he had excellent
record -playing equipment (Rek -O -Knt
turntable, Audax cartridge and arm)
and, more important, that he kept it in
good condition. Our reply wat, there.
fore, the only reasonable one we could
give under the circumstances.
We have done some more careful
listening since receiving Mr. Bohn's
letter. We find that it is a rare record
indeed that having a wide dynamic
range, does not also have pre or post
echo to some extent. The amount
-
r22
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINF
/hi
Ci11iNG
VRoTCTt ow
for your
xI.sI
-
DISCS!
/'pIu/ar
SIR:
WALCO
When you home -tested the
FM -AM tuner, you mentioned the fact
that it would accommodate 72 -ohm
coaxial cable, and that you liked coax.
However, you did not state why. You
did refer ro an article one issue earlier
which mentioned coax, it is true, but
dismissed it quickly.
Now the interesting thing about
coax to me is that
claims
twice the sensitivity for 72 ohms that
they do for Soo!
So, will you please tell me if chis
sensitivity can be put ro use; what
antenna to use; and what the disadvantages of coax may be. The lead for the
antenna will not be over forty feet.
Charles V. Thayer
Breezy Hill Road
Springfield, Vt.
/
PROTECTIVE POLYETHYLENE
SLEEVES FOR RECORDS
with
EXCLUSIVE
CONTOURED
BOTTOM!
Protects Records from
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Because good hi -fi sound begins with a
clean record \Nalco- famous for phonograph needles and STATI-CLEAN
Anti- Static Record Spray -has developed the new DISCOVER protective
sleeve for records. Made of soft, Warresistant, pliable polyethylene with an
exclusive, neat contoured bottom, DISCOVERS are 'fitting protection" in
more ways than onel Thousands of
users agree, all your hi -fi records deserve this deluxe, low -cost protection.
AY THE MAKERS OF THESE OTHER
FAMOUS RECORD PRODUCTS
L
WALCO
STATI CLEAN
REPLACEMENT
NEEDLES
Anti.Stotic
SPRAY
4
l
for all
cartridges
and players
Write for
Free sample DISCOVER,
plus free $1 book on record care,
indexing, etc. Enclose 25c to cower
postage and handling.
O
At Leading Dealers
60 -F Franklin St.,
East Orange, N. J.
/
PRECISION
that speaks for itself !
/
\
Precision construction throughout! This Is the reason
why Jim Lansing Signature Hlgh Frequency Units
"speak" with unequaled fidelity. Diaphragms are
made of aluminum, hydraulically-formed for complete
uniformity and homogeneity of grain structure. Phasing plugs are machined to micrometric dimensions
from solid billets of absolutely pure iron. Exponential
horns are machined from aluminum castings. Koustfcai Lenses are cut, formed and assembled to optical
tolerances. The greatly superior reproduction... the
ease with which transients are handled... which result from this detailed precision are Immediately
apparent to your ear. You hear a complete, flat,
smooth high end free from disturbing dips and star-
tling peaks.
SIGNATURE 1750111
PRECISION NIGH FREQUENCY TRANSDUCER
Pictured above, the 1750111 Is the first assembly ever
placed on the high fidelity market to incorporate a
true acoustic lens. With 14 separate elements, the
lens distributes sound smoothly over a 90' solid
angle. Index of refraction 1.3. Designed for 1200
cycle crossover. 16 ohms impedance. 25 watts power
input above 1200 c.o.s.
SIGNATURE 375
PRECISION HIGH FREQUENCY TRANSDUCER
This driver, alone, weighs 31
pounds! With a 4" voice coil and
diaphragm it is unquestionably the
largest and most capable high frequency unit manufactured. Designed for theater systems; used
in The Hartsfield. Low crossover
500 c.o.s.- is the secret of the
impressive illusion of presence It
creates. Power input -60 watts
above 300 c.o.s. Impedance-16
ohms. Flux density -over 20,000
Coaxial cable's only advantages for a
home system are that it sometimes does
help to reduce ignition interference,
and it may be more durable than 300 ohm twin lead. However, it has a far
WALCO
P1' RECORD
!1 :`
varies widely; on some records it is so
apparent as to be startling, and on
many it is easily audible if you listen
for it. On most, of course, it is low
enough in level as to be insignificant
but detectable. This is corroborated
by other staff members.
Nevertheless, Mr. Bohn has made a
good point
one that all seriously interested in records should take to heart.
For a comprehensive discussion of
compliance and its effect on records,
see the article beginning on page 38 of
HIGH FIDELITY for April 1955.
greater attenuation than standard twin
lead. and therefore it should not be
used on long runs between the antenna
and the receiver if it is possible to
avoid doing so. Furthermore, most FM
tuners and antennas are now set up for
a Soo -ohm impedance, corresponding
to the twin lead. If the antenna is of
300 ohms impedance you should use
a matching transformer between it and
the 72 -ohm cable; another transformer
should be used if the tuner has only a
Soo -ohm input.
A 72 -ohm antenna will deliver to
the tuner, if all impedances are
matched, exactly half the voltage that
a 3oo-ohm antenna will. So it makes
no practical difference, insofar as sensitivity is concerned, whether you use
a 30o-ohm antenna and 300 -ohm twin
lead connected to the 3Oo -ohm terminals of the tuner, or whether an all 72ohm setup is used.
-
r^
gauss.
"SIGNATURE
537 -500
HORN -LENS ASSEMBLY
I
1
This is a round exponential horn
and lens for use with the 375 Signature Driver. Lens composed of 19
separate elements for smooth distribution of highs. Diameter, 13'/2-.
SIGNATURE 537.509
HORN -LENS ASSEMBLY
Consisting
of
a
rectangular
exponential horn and serpentine
Keustical Lens (as used In The
Hartsfield), this assembly provides
wide horizontal and narrow vertical
coverage In order to minimize cell.
Ing and floor reflections. Use with
the 375 Driver, Lens is 20" wide.
precision transducers for
verbatim reproduction
,{/
e
JIM LANSING
/O
1(iZr.a-e.-
JAMES B. LANSING SOUND, INC.
2439 Fletcher Drive
Los Angeles 39, Calif.
I2j
JUNG 1955
www.americanradiohistory.com
PROFESSIONAL
DIRECTORY
WELL -ADJUSTED WATT
Continued from page 4r
NEW YORK
CALIFORNIA
WHY EXPERIMENT?
HIGH -FIDELITY HOUSE
Most complete stock of
audio components in the West
536
S.
CONSULT A SPECIALIST IN
CUSTOM HIGH FIDELITY
IN THE NEW YORK CITY AREA.
Phone RY 1.8171
Fair Oaks, Pasadena 1, Calif.
Hear
a
typical home inslallation-
BOHN MUSIC SYSTEMS CO.
7 -8569
550 Fifth Ave., N. Y. 36
PL
no finer choice than
...
E TLAB
IN LOS ANGELES
OftllllL
it's
In Il'estchester
gZe.e.
OO1CG r
high -fidelity components
for high fidelity
CONSULTATIONS
(.fiG7uL.
SERVICE
6230 COMMODORE STOAT DRIVE
(opprlta csrthsy cads thmtrs)
48. CALIF.
Phone WE 6.6718
LOS ANGELES
COMPONENTS
CUSTOM INSTALLATIONS
Yonkers, N. Y.
2475 Centro! Avenue
Spencer 9 -6400
PENNSYLVANIA
IT. YOURSELF
HI FI DO
_
INC
In spare time, Mon., Wed., and Fri.
Ample parking. Use our
workshop, tools, expert supervision.
Assemble and compare leading
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Tape Recorders, speakers, Cabinets, kits, etc. at low net prices.
Trade-in.,
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eves.
LECTRARTEONNIC
\2_,BORATORIES
e.
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WEbster 55405
YOrk 3872
The ultimate in High Fidelity
at net prices.
SHRYOCK
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THE HI -FI CENTER
complete demonstration facilities
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WEST DEVON AVE.
CHICAGO 45
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65 Kent St., Brookline 46, Mass.
nt
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o
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PITTSBURGH and the
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nn
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WOLK'S HIGH FIDELITY CENTER
right next to IVolk's Kamera Exchange
306 Diamond Street
Express
MASSACHUSETTS
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Stromberg- Carlson "Custom 400"
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Fisher Radio
Coocertone Tape Recorders
An Makes of HighFidelity Records
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390 EGLINTON WEST
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t.ra.
TORONTO, ONT.
9 -2117
r24
others actually intimate that too,000
cycles is a desirable reproducing area
The writer has summarized the arguments:
1. Unless the amplifier is substantially flat beyond supposedly audible
limits, the response will start to roll off
within the audible limits, with detriment co the sound.
2. A properly designed, stable amplifier with a good "power- curve" (cf.
the explanation above) must be flat in
frequency far outside audio limits.
3. For laboratory use, the response
must be extremely wide.
Between complete amplifiers and
preamplifiers which are actually "flat"
over extreme ranges, and those which
are nor, there is an interesting listening difference. The proponents of
limited response argue that a home
amplifier, intended for playing records,
on turntables, with cartridges, and
with loudspeakers
of which
are not laboratory- perfect devices
sounds better on most material if it is
limited in response. Filters of all sorts
are obviously designed by this school.
Frankly, the writer, an admitted perfectionist, prefers the "flat" amplifier,
with suitable controls to limit the
response when necessary ( it is ever
less necessary as program -material and
-all
-
associated equipment improve).
The interested purchaser should
listen carefully to at least one amplifier
from each "school" of design, using
the kind of program -material he will
use at home, with the projected associated equipment, before he decides.
(Editor's Note
:ypographical error on page 41 described 20 40-2,000
cps as a common frequency-range
claim. Ir should, of course, have been
-A
20-00-20,000.)
An article next issue will discuss the
relationship between power and distor.
tion in audio -amplifier performance.
ALMOST GOT MY NUMBER
Continued from page 37
openable only by main force, to
demonstrate that the record had not
been touched or even breathed upon
since leaving the stamper. Finally, I
inserted the specially -executed painting, suitable for framing, by Tequila,
the celebrated Mexican artist."
"You remember the painting'" interrupted the Chief.
"Indeed I do, sir," I replied. "Ir was
of a jellyfish, symbolizing the basic,
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elemental nature of the Phoenician
songs. The brochure carried an explanation of it on the back page."
The Chief sighed.
"Eighteen," he said softly, "can't
you remember anything else you put
into that album before you stamped it
'Inspected by No. x8 ?'"
"No, sir, I can't," I said, paling. "I'm
sure that with the painting, the brochure, the plastic envelope, the cardboard backing, the picture window and
the outer wrapping, there wasn't room
for anything else."
"That's just it," thundered the Chief.
"Eighteen, you left out the record!"
I must have fainted then, for when
I opened my eyes my face was moist
and the Chief was standing over me
with an empty flower vase. After
making sure that I had recovered, he
returned to his side of the desk and
gloomily resumed his seat.
"Eighteen," he said, "we don't mind
it so much when you fellows slip the
wrong record into an envelope, or when
you ger the labels switched, or when
you omit the translation of the original
text. That's all part of the luck of the
game, and record- buyers have to take
their chances same as anybody else.
But to leave out the record altogether
isn't quite cricket."
"But, Chief," I cried hoarsely, "I
swear there wasn't room for ir."
"I know, I know," said the Chief.
"It's not really your fault. The Corn pany operates on the principle that the
reco :d proper is only a minor component of the record album. Just between us, Eighteen, you might well
have got away with it, if BiedrichDietrich himself hadn't been in town
and wanted to hear the thing. Imagine!
Not to look at the art masterpiece, not
just co play
to read the brochure
the record. These singers are simply
incredible."
He paused while I awaited his pronouncement.
"Eighteen," he said at last, "you've
been with us a long time, but now
that a fuss has been raised over this
thing I'm afraid I shall have to make
an example of you. I'm not asking you
to turn in your scamp. But you won't
have much use for it any more. I am
transferring you ro the Zipper Department."
"The Zipper Department ?"
"Yes, Eighteen. From now on. all
our records are going co be encased in
plastic cases fastened with a zipper.
Do you know why we are doing this ?"
Continued on page 128
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The functions of the microphone and the phono pickup are
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The task of the pickup, however,
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HiGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE.
126
www.americanradiohistory.com
ADVERTISING INDEX
Allied Radio Corp.
Aleec Lansing Corp
American Elite, Inc.
Ampex Corp.
Angel Records
Klipsch Associates
9 124
125
106, 107
23
Indexed on 52
Audak Company
Lansing, James B., Sound, Inc.
Lectronics
Leslie Creations
London International
London Records
Lowe Associatos
126
Audio Devices
Audio Exchange
Audiogersh Corp.
Inside Front Cover
127
108
Beam Instrument Corp.
Bell Sound Systems, Inc.
R. T., Co.
Music Box
Music Room, The
22
116
Bradford 8, Company
British Industries Corp.
Browning Laboratories, Inc.
15
National Company
Newcomb Audio Products Co.
115
Nuclear Products Co.
Coles Co.
Indexed on 52
121
Centrolab
Collaro
Inside Bock Cover
47
Collins Audio Products Co
Columbia Records, Inc...4, Indexed on 52
117
Components Corp.
Contortone Recorders, Bodoni
Associates
94
Conroe, Inc.
Cook Laboratories, Inc.
Crestwood Recorder Division
Crown Publishers.
Custom Sound
O
8.
Vision, Ltd
Daystrom Electric Corp.
Diamond Stylus Co.
Dublin's
Indexed
Duotone, Inc
Professional
125
25
120
on 52
116
32
124
Electra- Voice, Inc.
Electronic Expediters
FM Station Directory
Fisher Radio Corp.
28, 29, 30,
Fleetwood Television (Conroe, Inc.)... 10,
31
11
Indexed on 52
Goodmans Loudspeakers
Harvey Radio Co., Inc.
Harwil Electronics Co.
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26
109
113
2
128
27
124
121
Radio Craftsmen, Inc.
122
Radio Engineering Labs., Inc.
110
Rauland -Borg Corp.
Record Index
Indexed on 52
Indexed on 52
Record Market
21
Reeves Soundcraft Corp.
19
Regency
13
Rek -o -Kut Co.
91
Revere Camera Co.
B, Inside Back Cover
Rockbar Corp.
Scott, Hormon Hosmer, Inc
Shryock Radio and TV Co
Sound Unlimited
Stephens Mfg. Corp
Stromberg- Carlson
24
124
124
5, 110
117
Tannoy, Ltd.
Tech -Master Corp.
Telefunken
Terminal Radio Corp.
Thorens Co
Trader's Marketplace
Interelectronics Corp.
International Electronics Corp.
106,
114
16
107
112
111
116
8
99
17
125
20
Heath Co.
117
Hi -Fi Center, Inc.
124
High-Fidelity House
125
Hi- Fidelity, Inc.
High Fidelity Recordings....lndexed on 52
JUNE 1955
97
108
Indexed on 52
Directory
University Loudspeakers, Inc.
Jensen Mfg. Co
TRADE IN
No.260
Amplifier -$)49.50
UNSURPASSED PERFORMANCE
UNSURPASSED STABILITY
KNOWN AS THE MANUFACTURER
OF
114
111
1
V -M Corp.
Vox Productions, Inc.
WWRL
93
Indexed on 52
126
123
Wolco (Electrovox Co., Inc.)
14
Weathers Industries
124
Weingarten Electronic Laboratories
120
Westinghouse Electric Corp
124
Westlab
Westminster Recording Co...Indexed on 52
115
White, Stan, Inc.
124
Wolk's Kamera Exchange
HIGHEST QUALITY
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128
Foirchild Recording 8, Eqpt. Corp... 12, 118
128
Federal Mfg. 8 Engineering Corp.
Gene Bruck Enterprises
Indexed on 52
Indexed on 52
Pedersen Electronics
Pentron Corp.
Permoflux Corp.
Pickering 8 Co., Inc.
Pilot Radio Corp
Presto Recording Corp.
10, 11
Indexed on 52
25
110
16, 124
8 R, Ltd.
119, 121, 123
124
Indexed on 52
Indexed on 52
Indexed on 52
124
120
Marontz, S. B
6, 7
McIntosh Laboratory, Inc.
Mercury Records Corp.
Indexed on 52
103
Minnesota Mining 8 Mfg. Co.
Indexed on 52
Missouri National Corp.
105
48
on 52
Beyland Engineering Co... -Indexed
101
Bogen, David, Co., Inc.
124
Bohn Music Systems Co,
Book -of- the -Month Club, Inc.... Back Cover
Bozak,
18
Write Dept. HF6 For Trading Information
the
audio
exchange
THE TRADING ORGANIZATION
OF THE HI -FI FIELD
159 -19 Hillside Avenue
Jamaica 32, N.Y.
Phone: Olympia 8 -0445
WRITE DEPT.
116 FOR
FREE CATALOG OF
USED EQUIPMENT
FREE
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NEAR SUBWAY
the audio exchange exchanges audio
I27
ALMOST GOT MY NUMBER
Continued from page 125
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"Is it to give added protection ro the
priceless art, literature, and music contained in the albums, and to prove that
the outer packaging, as well as the
inner contents, has been factorysealed?"
"Right, Eighteen," snapped the
Chief. "I'm glad co see that your error
hasn't clouded your insight."
"One more thing," he said as I rose
to leave. "Eighteen, ['1n going co let
you in on a secret. A month from
now, a mistake like yours will be impossible, or at least impossible ro
detect. Our engineers are working
right now on a solution to the basic
problem- the bulky, unaesthetic disk
that balks all our packaging dreams.
What we're going to have, Eighteen,
is a disk which is absolutely invisible
and takes up no room at all!"
Now I zip and seal all day long. It
isn't like stamping, but progress requires sacrifices. And now I can skip
that night-course in Spanish. I really
felt sorry for poor Sixteen last night,
seeing him go home with those zarzuela scores under his arm. Twentytwo of them this week, I think he said.
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Continued from page 38
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"Oh, to be back at Gravesano," he
sighed. "I left December 31, and so
far fifteen concerts. From London I go
to Frankfurt, February 21."
That was an average of better than
two concerts a week, and rarely were
they in the same place. From Liverpool
we had both come down on the night
train, and at ten on the morning following the Ninth, here he was with
the LSO in the Royal Festival Hall.
"What I need tonight," he remarked,
"is to see a really funny British film.
Have you seen Mad About Men? It's
about a Yorkshire mermaid who becomes a woman for fourteen days. It
is very good."
And then his thoughts went back ro
music.
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ANY ON E of these hgh f delity
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LA MER
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Herbert von Karajan,
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CONCERTO
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Please send me at once, without charge, the
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