The Right of Every Cleveland Student to a Comprehensive and

The Right of Every Cleveland Student to a Comprehensive and
The Right of Every Cleveland
Student to a Comprehensive
and Authentic Arts
Education: A Systemic Plan
of Equitable Arts Education
for the Cleveland
Metropolitan School
District
MAY 2014
Contributors: Mitchell Korn, Dr. Robert Horowitz,
Yolande Spears, Dr. Dan Serig, Susan Stauter, and Dr.
Rekha Rajan.
Table of contents
Forward and Executive Summary
1
Inventory and Findings
5
Recommendations
25
Implementation Plan
32
Budget
47
Appendix
49
A. Arts Education Programs
B. Music and Visual Arts Standards for Curriculum Development
C. An Analysis of the Scope and Sequence document, State Standards for Fine
Arts and the Department of Arts Education Strategic Plan
D. All-City Arts
E. An Overview of Arts-Integrated Education
F. Report on Arts Organization Partnerships with Urban and Metropolitan Arts
Education Systems
G. Project-Based Learning
H. Out-of-School Time report
I. AAC&U VALUE Rubrics
J. Data Collection Instruments
K. Interview list
L. Bios
Forward and Executive Summary
This study was contracted by a consortium of funders including The George Gund
Foundation, The Cleveland Foundation, Foundation Management Services and
others. This was a stakeholder-driven research process with a single agenda of
discovery: to identify the actual state of arts education in Cleveland and determine
the most direct and sustainable means to ensure arts education for all CMSD
students, while furthering The Cleveland Plan for Transforming Schools.
The methodology included a review of best practices focused on model school arts
education plans, particularly those implementing arts-integrated education; an
examination of district documents, including both forward-looking strategic plans
and others detailing arts education facilities and budgets over the past five years;
hundreds of researcher-conducted interviews with experts and stakeholders (see
Appendix K for details); and surveys with arts and cultural organizations (48), arts
specialist teachers (42), classroom and subject teachers (325), school principals
(73) and teaching artists (8).
For the last year, (April 2013-April 2014) a team of researchers interviewed and
surveyed hundreds of Cleveland Metropolitan School District (CMSD) teachers,
students, school officials, parents and alumni, as well as Cleveland area arts
organizations, philanthropies, higher education leaders, civic leaders and citizens.
This has been a stakeholder process by which hundreds of Clevelanders have shared
their insights, experiences and hopes.
This was a process of listening, observing, creating primary data, studying recent
and relevant secondary research, sharing ideas and soliciting feedback from
numerous community members.
This process is one of abundant research that has undeniable findings,
common sense recommendations to rectify the failure of CMSD arts education,
and capacity-building and accountabilities to sustain the recommendations:
• Most schools, classrooms and students of CMSD do not benefit whatsoever
from the presence of full-time arts educators nor the remarkable cultural
treasures and resources of Cleveland.
1
• There is a consistent dysfunction between the Cleveland Metropolitan
School District (CMSD) and arts education; arts teachers; and arts, cultural
and higher education institutions. Considering that Cleveland has one of the
world’s most significant arts and cultural infrastructures, it is particularly
jarring that it is out of sync with its schools because of a lack of systems and
CMSD commitment.
• The CMSD arts education system has suffered increasing and precipitous
decline over the last five years — after decades of incremental decline
already. Over these five years, the number of full-time arts educators and
CMSD funds supporting the arts has significantly been reduced to levels that
bring it close to extinction. Most schools struggle without adequate musical
instruments, art supplies and dedicated arts teachers and instructional space.
Yet, arts institutions, arts educators and arts leaders have long pledged and acted
upon their dedication to providing their resources to assisting CMSD:
• Most arts and cultural institutions receive little to no compensation for
their school services from CMSD.
• Principals and classroom teachers both strongly desire the arts for their
students, both from full-time arts educators and from arts, cultural and
higher-education institutions.
• Most classroom teachers request professional development (PD) in order
to use the arts and cultural resources of arts institutions in their classrooms
to improve instruction, student academic and arts experience, and
performances.
• Most arts teachers, too, desire professional development to improve their
skill sets and further student progress.
• Parents and students strongly believe that arts education improves schools,
student motivation and enjoyment of learning.
• Philanthropy and civic leaders believe arts education is a necessity for
CMSD students.
• Most of the hundreds of people involved in this yearlong discussion
recognize that the arts improve student motivation, literacy and academic
performance and create pathways to higher education and/or careers. As
CMSD struggles with performance, a significant resource that could readily
assist student outcomes has yet to be utilized in an organized and effective
manner.
2
There is a lack of CMSD systems and sustainable actions that would allow
students to benefit from full-time arts teachers in every school as well as take
advantage of the vast resources in the arts and higher-education communities.
The recommendations in this plan call for CMSD and partners to install a detailed
and systemic policy and financial commitment to every student’s right to an arts
education. The recommendations include:
• A minimum of one arts and one music teacher for every CMSD school, and
adequate resources, supplies and dedicated instructional space.
• A heightened “Arts Plus” program that encourages interested schools to
expand basic offerings and/or add theatre, dance, and media arts.
• An after-school academy system geographically accessible to all CMSD
students, where motivated young artists can pursue small group and private
lessons, projects and productions, and work with artists and arts institutions.
• A partnership system in which arts and higher education organizations can
work effectively with CMSD’s central office and schools to create
partnerships around specific art forms; multidisciplinary arts; arts
integration focused upon literacy, science and other central school
objectives; project-based curriculum; and more.
• A visible and working system of school arts education accountability using
authentic assessment, school arts report cards and the public embrace of this
plan by the CMSD school board.
• Capacity-building by CMSD, arts and higher education partners,
philanthropies and civic leaders to work together to guarantee every CMSD
student’s right to a robust and rigorous education that includes authentic
arts education.
• An essential component of capacity-building is professional development
for participating faculty and arts partners. Particular focus on integrated
curriculum, arts trends, project-based curriculum and using arts to best
serve the learning styles, developmental needs and core conceptual
educational outcomes of CMSD students will be emphasized.
The recommendations contained herein are systematic and systemic. A piecemeal
or cherry-picked approach to the recommendations will ensure the continuing
mediocrity — and impending extinction — of CMSD arts education. “Pushing the
pause button” will disserve CMSD schools, further academic decline, and deprive
Cleveland youth of the everyday presence of the arts in their education.
3
There may never be another moment where equitable arts education in CMSD is
possible. The community’s educational, cultural and political will to provide every
CMSD student with an arts education that creates authentic pathways to careers
and/or higher education, empowers CMSD academic performance, heightens appeal
to parents and increases student enrollment will likely pass unless this moment is
seized and a sustainable arts education ecosystem is created for the present and
foreseeable future.
“The Right of Every Cleveland Student to a Comprehensive and Authentic Arts
Education: A Systemic Plan of Equitable Arts Education for the Cleveland
Metropolitan School District” includes an inventory of and findings related to the
current state of CMSD arts education; recommendations; an implementation plan;
timeline and budget estimates; and an appendix of numerous pieces of background
reporting. There is some redundancy between this plan and our simultaneous
Cleveland School of the Arts (CSA) Redesign Plan. This is both necessary and also a
reminder that this is one ecosystem of arts education. The plans rely on each other
to create a complete system of arts education equity for all, as well as a model school
for those with particular interest, motivation and talents in the arts.
Acknowledgments: The contributors to this report want to thank the numerous
respondents and interviewees during the yearlong process for their exceptional
thinking, commitment, expressions and ideas. We appreciate the intelligent and
passionate guidance of numerous stakeholders, particularly philanthropic, school, arts
organization and arts education leaders. We would also like to express our gratitude
to Katia Schwarz and Lori Joffe for successfully implementing the herculean task of
creating meeting schedules and bringing order to this complex process. And particular
thanks goes to The Gund Foundation’s Deena Epstein and Ann Mullin; The Cleveland
Foundation’s Paul Putman and Helen Williams; CMSD CEO Eric Gordon and the
district’s senior staff; and the resilient and faithful arts and arts education community
of Cleveland.
4
CMSD Inventory and Findings
April 10, 2014
Inventory of CMSD Arts Education
In 2008, CMSD released A Premier Future, its strategic plan for arts education, 2008-2013. The plan had
four strategic goals:




Enhance student learning and teaching effectiveness in all CMSD schools by supporting and
delivering high quality arts programs and services.
Develop innovative curriculum by creating a Premier Arts Specialty System (PASS) and increasing
the number of arts-focused schools.
Measure and document program outcomes and showcase student arts achievement.
Secure significant new funding to upgrade, diversify, and innovate arts programming.
It is clear, in 2014, that this plan has not succeeded, and that most goals have not been met. This is
certainly despite the best efforts of many committed people, schools and organizations who have
greatly contributed to individual successes in arts education. But overall, CMSD arts education has
declined over the last several years, due to budget losses, cuts in arts positions and lack of systemic
commitment to providing high-quality arts education for all CMSD students, through systemic fidelity to
the strategic plan’s goals.
CMSD strives to provide arts education programs consistent with the State of Ohio Fine Arts Standards.
Students are expected to develop:




an understanding of the role the arts have in people’s lives, so that students can develop and
demonstrate a lifelong appreciation of the historical, cultural and social context of the arts.
the ability to effectively express themselves through the arts.
the skills to describe, analyze, interpret, and evaluate works of art.
the knowledge to develop informed personal opinions that empower them to become patrons
of the arts, and to contribute to a strong cultural community.
A comprehensive CMSD arts curriculum provides a valid sequence for achieving standards in dance,
drama, music and visual arts. But the curriculum is the intended curriculum, not the operational
curriculum that one would hope to see in CMSD schools. Unfortunately, access to the programming
necessary to achieve these state and district standards is inequitably distributed throughout CMSD. And
improvement is hampered by cuts to funding and arts positions:
I think the greatest need for our school is to provide a full-time teacher in arts education.
– Principal
5
As the following table shows, CMSD arts specialist teaching positions have declined dramatically over
the last several years:
6
The decline in teaching positions has been accompanied by a similar decline in funding for arts
education:
7
These declines in arts teaching positions and arts education funding took place during a period of
declining student enrollment in CMSD. However, the rate of decline in support of arts education
exceeded the decline in enrollment. The following table shows declines in arts positions and
compensation relative to overall CMSD declines in enrollment, teaching positions and instructional
budget. As can be seen, the arts teacher compensation and teaching positions have declined at a faster
rate than the overall CMSD enrollment, budget and teaching positions.
Enrollment
Instruction Budget
Teacher Counts FTE
Arts Teacher Compensation
Arts Teaching Positions
2009-2010
2010-2011
2011-2012
2012-2013
Decline
46,697
43,202
40,871
38,725
17.1%
$381,711,533 $362,427,959 $341,053,942 $324,761,404
14.9%
3,553.5
3,186.8
3,516.9
2,852.6
19.7%
$23,104,926
$23,030,214
$19,219,658
$15,646,697
32.3%
354
351
280
229
35.3%
Sources: Overall CMSD enrollment, instructional budget and teacher counts FTE – Ohio Department of
Education; Arts teacher compensation and teaching positions – Cleveland Municipal School District
8
We surveyed CMSD school principals in winter 2014. We asked the principals to provide the number of full-time and part-time art teachers in
their schools. The following tables show data from the responding principals. The student-teacher ratios in the last column reveal the wide
differences in numbers of available arts teachers per student. Whether a CMSD student receives a sequential arts education is partially
dependent on the school that they attend:
Arts Teaching Positions (Winter 2014) – Principal Surveys
Drama
fulltime
Music
fulltime
Visual
arts
fulltime
Fulltime
teachers
Parttime
teachers
Overall
total
studentteacher
ratio
Grade
Enrollment
Adlai Stevenson
PreK8
380
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
K-8
343
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
2
343
9-12
307
0
0
0
3
0
0
0
0
3
0
102
500
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
1
1
2
250
600
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
1
2
1
240
300
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
2
300
1
1
2
0
115
Benjamin Franklin
Bolton
Buckeye
Woodland
Buhrer
Case
Clara E Westropp
PreK8
PreK8
PreK8
PreK8
PreK8
PreK8
PreK8
230
Drama
parttime
Visual
arts
parttime
School
Almira K-8
Academy
Architecture &
Design School @
John Hay Campus
Artemus Ward
Dance
parttime
Music
parttime
Dance
fulltime
385
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
373
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
1
1
249
1
2
1
3
1
127
445
9
School
Clark K-8
Cleveland Early
College High
School
Cleveland School
of Science &
Medicine
Cleveland School
of the Arts @
Harry E. Davis
Cleveland School
of the Arts Lower
Campus
Collinwood High
School
Daniel E. Morgan
Denison
Design Lab Early
College High
School
Douglas
MacArthur Girls
Leadership
Academy
East Clark
Drama
fulltime
Music
fulltime
Visual
arts
fulltime
Dance
parttime
Drama
parttime
Music
parttime
Visual
arts
parttime
Fulltime
teachers
Parttime
teachers
Overall
total
studentteacher
ratio
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
2
0
310
1
0
236
Grade
Enrollment
Dance
fulltime
K-8
620
0
9-12
236
9-12
370
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
2
0
185
6-12
585
1
1
3
1
2
3
2
2
6
9
56
K-5
319
0
0
0
9-12
600
0
2
0
300
2
0
160
PreK8
K-8
1
0
0
320
0
1
1
1
1
500
0
0
1
1
9-12
180
0
0
0
1
PreK8
330
Prek8
340
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
2
2
167
0
0
1
0
180
1
1
1
2
165
1
1
0
2
340
10
Drama
fulltime
Music
fulltime
Visual
arts
fulltime
Dance
parttime
Drama
parttime
Music
parttime
Visual
arts
parttime
Fulltime
teachers
Parttime
teachers
Overall
total
studentteacher
ratio
250
School
Grade
Enrollment
Dance
fulltime
East Technical
High School
Facing History
New Tech High
School
Franklin D.
Roosevelt
Academy
Fullerton
Garrett Morgan
School
George
Washington
Carver
Glenville High
School
H. Barbara Booker
9-12
500
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
2
0
9-10
150
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
PreK8
440
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
440
K-8
300
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
2
300
9-12
310
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
310
K-8
390
0
0
1
1
0
2
390
9-12
700
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
1
467
400
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
2
400
270
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
1
1
180
480
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
2
480
PreK12
412
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
412
PreK8
340
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
2
340
Hannah Gibbons
Harvey Rice
International
Newcomers
[email protected]
Thomas Jefferson
Iowa Maple
PreK8
PreK8
PreK8
11
School
John Adams High
School
John Marshall
High School
John Marshall 9th
Grade Academy
Joseph Gallagher
School
Kenneth W.
Clement Boys
Leadership
Academy
Lincoln West
Louis Agassiz
Louisa May Alcott
Luis Munoz Marin
Marion C Seltzer
School
Marion-Sterling
Mary B. Martin
PreK-8 School
Mary M. Bethune
Max S. Hayes High
School
Drama
fulltime
Music
fulltime
Visual
arts
fulltime
Dance
parttime
Drama
parttime
Music
parttime
Visual
arts
parttime
Fulltime
teachers
Parttime
teachers
Overall
total
studentteacher
ratio
Grade
Enrollment
Dance
fulltime
9-12
1000
0
0
1
2
0
0
0
0
3
0
333
1012
752
0
0
1
2
0
0
0
0
3
0
251
9
331
1
1
0
0
0
0
2
0
166
PreK8
715
0
0
0
1
1
1
477
PreK8
175
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
2
0
88
9-12
PreK8
K-5
PreK8
1200
0
0
1
2
0
0
0
0
3
0
400
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
2
315
K-8
PreK8
PreK8
PreK8
9-12
315
1
230
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
1
1
153
650
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
1
1
433
430
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
2
0
215
360
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
360
410
0
0
1
1
0
0
2
0
205
1
1
1
0
2
1
140
0
1
0
0
1
0
600
350
600
0
0
0
0
0
0
12
Drama
fulltime
Music
fulltime
Visual
arts
fulltime
Dance
parttime
Drama
parttime
Music
parttime
Visual
arts
parttime
Fulltime
teachers
Parttime
teachers
Overall
total
studentteacher
ratio
School
Grade
Enrollment
Dance
fulltime
Memorial
PreK8
480
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
2
0
240
K-8
350
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
2
350
300
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
600
589
0
0
0
0
425
0
0
0
0
1
290
0
0
0
2
0
360
0
0
1
1
320
0
0
1
0
0
544
475
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
Michael R. White
STEM
Miles
Miles Park
Mound STEM
School
New Tech West
Newton D. Baker
School of Arts
Orchard STEM
School
Promise Academy
Riverside
Robert H Jamison
Robinson G Jones
Scranton
Sunbeam
Tremont
Montessori
PreK8
K-8
PreK8
9-12
PreK8
PreK8
9-12
K-8
PreK8
Prek8
PreK8
Prek8
Prek8
1
1
0
2
589
0
1
1
0
3
283
0
0
0
2
0
145
1
1
2
2
120
0
1
1
1
2
160
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
2
238
1
0
1
800
0
1
1
1
300
1
1
1
2
205
1
1
0
2
260
1
3
1
166
400
450
0
0
1
0
410
0
0
1
0
260
0
0
0
0
2
1
580
0
0
0
0
13
School
Valley View Boys
Leadership
Academy
Wade Park
Warner
Washington Park
Environmental
Studies
Waverly
Wilbur Wright
Willow
Total
Enrollment
Dance
fulltime
Drama
fulltime
Music
fulltime
Visual
arts
fulltime
Dance
parttime
Drama
parttime
Music
parttime
Visual
arts
parttime
Fulltime
teachers
Parttime
teachers
Overall
total
studentteacher
ratio
PreK8
PreK8
PreK8
200
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
2
0
100
372
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
372
396
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
2
396
9-12
195
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
310
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
2
310
400
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
800
280
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
2
280
28859
1
1
34
42
3
4
33
30
78
70
Grade
PreK8
PreK8
PreK8
14
We also examined data provided by CMSD in summer 2013. The numbers of arts teachers per school is
somewhat larger than the results from our winter 2014 survey. This probably reflects the continued
decline in positions, as well as differences in definitions of arts positions:
CMSD Data on Arts Teaching Positions – July 2013
School
ADLAI E STEVENSON
ALMIRA @ BROOKLAWN
ANDREW J RICKOFF
ANTON GRDINA
ARTEMUS WARD @ HALLE
MEMORIAL
DESIGN LAB
MC2 STEM ACADEMY GLSC
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN
NEW TECH @ EAST TECH
BOLTON
NEW TECH @ MAX S HAYES
CASE
ALFRED A. BENESCH
CHAS DICKENS
CHAS W ELIOT
CHAS A MOONEY
CLARK
CLARA E WESTROPP
COLLINWOOD
INTERNTL BACC PRG @CSU
DANIEL E MORGAN
DENISON
JOHN MARSHALL 9TH
@CARL S
CLEVE. SCH OF ARTS @
DIKE
DOUGLAS MACARTHUR
EAST CLARK
EARLY COLLEGE @ JOHN
HAY
EAST TECH
Music
Full-Time
Music PartTime
1
1
1
1
1
Visual Arts
Full-Time
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
Visual Arts
Part-Time
1
1
1
1
2
Drama FullTime
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
5
School
EUCLID PARK
F D ROOSEVELT
FACING [email protected]
MOONEY
FULLERTON
GARFIELD
GEO WASHINGTON
CARVER
GLENVILLE
H. BARBARA BOOKER
HANNAH GIBBONSNOTTINGHAM
HARVEY RICE
IOWA MAPLE
JAMES F RHODES
JOHN ADAMS HIGH
JOSEPH M. GALLAGHER
JOHN F KENNEDY
JOHN MARSHALL
KENNETH CLEMENT
LUIS MUNOZ MARIN
MIDDLE
LINCOLN WEST
LOUIS AGASSIZ
LOUISA M. ALCOTT
MARY B MARTIN
MAX S HAYES
MARY M BETHUNE
MCKINLEY
MARION CHAMPLIN
SELTZER
MARION-STERLING
MILES @ CRANWOOD
MILES PARK @ MOSES
CLEAVE
MICHAEL R. WHITE
MOUND
NATHAN HALE
NEWTON D BAKER
O H PERRY
ORCHARD @ HALLE
Music
Full-Time
Music PartTime
1
1
Visual Arts
Full-Time
Visual Arts
Part-Time
1
1
Drama FullTime
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
6
School
PATRICK HENRY
PAUL DUNBAR @
KENTUCKY
PAUL REVERE
R. H. JAMISON
RIVERSIDE
ROBINSON JONES
SCRANTON
SUCCESSTECH ACADEMY
SUNBEAM
NEWCOMERS PRG
@TJEFFERSON
TREMONT
COMPUTECH-VALLEY VIEW
WADE PARK
WALTON
WARNER
WATTERSON-LAKE
WAVERLY
WILLOW
WHITNEY YOUNG
WILBUR WRIGHT
WM C BRYANT
WILLSON
BUCKEYE WOODLAND
JHAY- SCHOOL OF MED
JHAY - SCHOOL OF ARCHIT
SCHOOL OF [email protected] H E
DAVIS
GARRETT MORGAN SCH OF
SCI
HEALTH CAREERS @ M.L.K.
GINN [email protected]
SPELLACY
TOTAL:
197 Total Full-Time and
Part-Time Arts Teachers
Music
Full-Time
1
1
1
Music PartTime
1
1
Visual Arts
Full-Time
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
Visual Arts
Part-Time
1
1
Drama FullTime
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
2
1
1
1
1
43
49
51
53
1
7
This final table presents data on arts education experiences provided by arts and cultural organizations.
The Cleveland Arts Education Consortium (CAEC) conducted a survey of 34 members in 2012. The
organizations provided data on the number of arts experiences they provided in CMSD from 2006 to
2013 (shown in the column “Arts Experiences CAEC”). To give another view on the relative provision of
arts education, we added a ratio of enrollment/average experiences over 7 years. For consistency, we
used the current enrollment of the schools, even though the survey looked at experiences from 2006 to
2013. As before, a glance at the last column of ratios reveals large differences in arts education
opportunities for CMSD students:
CAEC Arts Experiences
School
Grades
Enrollment
Arts
Experiences
CAEC
Average
(over 7 years)
Arts
Experiences
Adlai Stevenson
Almira K-8 Academy
Architecture & Design School @ John Hay Campus
Artemus Ward
Benjamin Franklin
Bolton
Buckeye Woodland
Buhrer
Case
Clara E Westropp
Clark K-8
Cleveland Early College High School
Cleveland School of Science & Medicine
Cleveland School of the Arts @ Harry E. Davis
Cleveland School of the Arts Lower Campus
Collinwood High School
Daniel E. Morgan
Denison
Design Lab Early College High School
Douglas MacArthur Girls Leadership Academy
East Clark
East Technical High School
Facing History New Tech High School
Franklin D. Roosevelt Academy
Fullerton
Garrett Morgan School
George Washington Carver
Glenville High School
PreK-8
K-8
9-12
PreK-8
PreK-8
PreK-8
PreK-8
PreK-8
PreK-8
PreK-8
K-8
9-12
9-12
6-12
K-5
9-12
PreK-8
K-8
9-12
PreK-8
Prek-8
9-12
9-10
PreK-8
K-8
9-12
K-8
9-12
380
343
307
500
600
300
230
385
373
445
620
236
370
585
319
600
320
500
180
330
340
500
150
440
300
310
390
700
27
26
2.0
1.9
28
37
43
36
17
41
2.6
2.3
1.0
0.9
3.2
1.3
30
3.0
58
74
21
38
32
14
25
33
24
4
35
21
19
14
35
1.4
0.6
4.1
1.2
2.2
1.8
1.9
1.5
3.0
5.4
1.8
2.0
2.3
4.0
2.9
8
School
Grades
Enrollment
Arts
Experiences
CAEC
Average
(over 7 years)
Arts
Experiences
H. Barbara Booker
Hannah Gibbons
Harvey Rice
International Newcomers [email protected] Thomas
Jefferson
Iowa Maple
John Adams High School
John Marshall High School
John Marshall 9th Grade Academy
Joseph Gallagher School
Kenneth W. Clement Boys Leadership Academy
Lincoln West
Louis Agassiz
Louisa May Alcott
Luis Munoz Marin
Marion C Seltzer School
Marion-Sterling
Mary B. Martin PreK-8 School
Mary M. Bethune
Max S. Hayes High School
Memorial
Michael R. White STEM
Miles
Miles Park
Mound STEM School
New Tech West
Newton D. Baker School of Arts
Orchard STEM School
Promise Academy
Riverside
Robert H Jamison
Robinson G Jones
Scranton
Sunbeam
Tremont Montessori
Valley View Boys Leadership Academy
Wade Park
Warner
PreK-8
PreK-8
PreK-8
400
270
480
41
14
38
1.4
2.8
1.8
PreK-12
412
PreK-8
9-12
10-12
9
PreK-8
PreK-8
9-12
PreK-8
K-5
PreK-8
K-8
PreK-8
PreK-8
PreK-8
9-12
PreK-8
K-8
PreK-8
K-8
PreK-8
9-12
PreK-8
PreK-8
9-12
K-8
PreK-8
Prek-8
PreK-8
Prek-8
Prek-8
PreK-8
PreK-8
PreK-8
340
1000
752
331
715
175
1200
315
230
650
430
360
410
350
600
480
350
300
589
425
290
360
320
544
475
400
450
410
260
580
200
372
396
24
31
28
15
21
19
30
35
25
42
25
33
33
39
31
20
44
21
27
28
6
43
29
18
36
24
2.0
4.6
3.8
3.2
4.9
1.3
5.7
1.3
1.3
2.2
2.5
1.6
1.8
1.3
2.8
3.4
1.1
2.0
3.1
2.2
6.9
1.2
1.6
4.3
1.9
2.4
17
46
29
15
45
20
3.4
0.8
2.9
1.9
1.2
2.8
9
School
Grades
Enrollment
Arts
Experiences
CAEC
Average
(over 7 years)
Arts
Experiences
Washington Park Environmental Studies
Waverly
Wilbur Wright
Willow
9-12
PreK-8
PreK-8
PreK-8
195
310
400
280
14
29
32
15
2.0
1.5
1.8
2.7
Total
28859
Leadership
There are many individual leaders committed to supporting and improving arts education in the
Cleveland Metropolitan School District (CMSD). However, there is an evident lack of systemic leadership
with the authority to improve and sustain arts education. There is a need for an infrastructure of
leadership that includes faculty experienced in the arts, principals committed to sustaining the arts,
district staff that can coordinate the arts, and CMSD leadership that emphasizes the core value of arts
education for all of Cleveland’s children. The pressure of funding cuts and competing educational
priorities has led principals to de-emphasize arts programs in favor of testable subjects:
[CMSD is] like so many school districts that just have so much to grapple with that the arts tend
to fall off the plate pretty fast. And when they come under pressure — which frankly is deserved
— to improve their [academic] results, what ends up happening is everything [else] gets shoved
away. You’re going to need some systematic support to put arts programs in place … and there
has to be commitment to it by the CMSD. They have to agree that this is important and we’re not
going to cut it next week.
— Higher education administrator
All my evaluations, every single one, are based on academics, not on the arts. My job security is
based on whether or not the kids score high enough, not if they sing or perform well.
— Principal
CMSD lacks sufficient supervisory and coordinating staff to ensure quality arts education; support arts
partnerships; and provide adequate educational guidelines, assessment structure and professional
development:
It would be wonderful if we had someone whose job it was to sort of have the vision and the
responsibility for developing the programs district-wide. You need somebody who’s physically
there and who can be reached and whose support for the program is consistent.
— Higher education administrator
10
[CMSD's capacity can be improved by] a team of people who have administrative and
management skills to work with the cultural arts community. The district has to make a
commitment to some manpower and support because without it we could stop this
conversation. The district has to own — and own really does translate into systems and budget
— an internal team of ... content experts to help support instruction in the classroom and
specialized programming. Solid management and administrative skills are key as well. And, in
some of these roles and responsibilities, it’s not so much about content experts. It’s about being
a solid administrator. It’s the district saying, “We’re putting some skin in the game.”
— CSMD administrator
The arts faculty perceives little support for arts education at the district level:
ARTS SPECIALIST TEACHERS PERCEPTION OF
LEADERSHIP IN THE ARTS
POSITIVE
RESPONSES
My school administration strongly supports arts education
65.9%
CMSD strongly supports arts education
14.6%
Guidelines for school leadership can ensure that funds are dedicated to the arts:
Administrators need to be made aware that they cannot "fudge the budget" by borrowing the
allocated arts funds and diverting them into other academic programs. There needs to be some
level of accountability for how arts teachers are supported within the buildings.
— Arts teacher
Faculty
There is a significant lack of qualified arts faculty in CMSD, due to systemic funding cuts. According to
principal surveys, about half of schools have one full-time music teacher and one full-time art teacher.
There are few full-time dance or theater teachers:
NUMBER OF FULL-TIME ARTS SPECIALISTS IN 2013-14
0
1
2
3
Dance
100%
0%
0%
0%
Drama/Theatre
98.4%
1.6%
0%
0%
Music
52.1%
46.5%
1.4%
0%
Visual Arts
45.7%
44.3%
8.6%
1.4%
11
NUMBER OF FULL-TIME ARTS SPECIALIST TEACHERS IN 2013-14 MEAN
Dance
SD
0
0
Drama/Theater
.02
.128
Music
.49
.531
Visual Arts
.66
.7
SD=standard deviation
Slightly less than half of the schools have one part-time music teacher and one part-time art teacher:
0
1
2
3
Dance
NUMBER OF PART-TIME ARTS SPECIALISTS IN 2013-14
98.1%
1.9%
0%
0%
Drama/Theatre
98.2%
1.8%
0%
0%
Music
51.6%
48.4%
0%
0%
Visual Arts
56.7%
43.3%
0%
0%
NUMBER OF PART-TIME ARTS SPECIALIST TEACHERS IN 2013-14 MEAN
SD
Dance
Drama/Theater
Music
Visual Arts
.136
.135
.504
.499
.02
.02
.48
.43
SD=standard deviation
The available arts teachers are inequitably distributed throughout the system:
Let’s start with getting the right teacher in the right building, providing the right instruction to
the right group of students. So the district has to ... really reevaluate arts specialists to find out
where their strengths are, where their skill sets are, and position them in the right classroom.
— CMSD administrator
Morale among arts teachers and arts consultants is low, due to their perception that their area of
expertise is not considered as important as other subjects:
Our arts teachers, many of whom I dialogue with, don’t feel valued. … Even a host of our
consultants — based on the blood, sweat, and tears; what they’re contracted for; and what they
invest — don’t feel valued.
— CMSD administrator
The arts were not important in the lower grades. You were looked upon as a planning period for
the other teachers, and the teachers treated us that way often. Don’t get sick, because they
don’t get their planning period then, and then they don’t like you anymore.
— Arts teacher
12
Budget and policy issues make it difficult for principals to retain arts teachers:
[One of the pressing needs in CMSD schools’ arts education is] consistency, so students don’t
have a “wait and see whether you get a dance teacher” or “wait and see whether you get a
drama teacher” [situation]. It’s just the inconsistency. … You plan, but things don’t follow
through.
— Principal
Professional Development
Our school's greatest need in arts education is providing on-going PD that is implemented in the
classroom on a daily basis.
— Principal
CMSD classroom and subject area teachers have a very strong interest in professional development (PD)
in using the arts to teach classroom, state and core objectives. However, there has been little
professional development available. About half of the arts organizations responding to our surveys
report providing professional development in the arts:
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT — ARTS ORGANIZATIONS
YES
NO
Our organization provides professional development for classroom or subject teachers
53.5%
46.5%
Our organization provides professional development for arts specialist teachers
44.2%
55.8%
Our organization provides professional development for teaching artists
45.2%
54.8%
However, few of the teachers responding to our surveys have benefited from professional development
in the arts:
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND PERFORMANCE
POSITIVE
RESPONSES
I have received excellent pre-service or college/university education to
prepare me for teaching arts integrated instruction in CMSD schools
36.3%
I have participated in excellent professional development to prepare me for
teaching arts integrated instruction in CMSD schools
29.6%
13
Principals concurred that their teachers had little professional development in the arts:
YES
NO
NOT
SURE
Our arts specialist teachers participate in ongoing professional
development in providing arts instruction.
36.2%
37.7%
26.1%
Our classroom or subject teachers participate in ongoing professional
development in arts integration.
11.4%
75.7%
12.9%
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
Arts specialist teachers also have a strong interest in professional development that could help them be
more effective in the classroom. Here are some of their comments:





I need help with autistic students, teaching differentiated learning in classes that are 40
percent special education, and achieving the new state standards with no resources.
Would love to have PD concerning middle school general music activities.
I would like to have a means to speak with more art teachers in the district. PD with all art
teachers (this used to be done.) It would also be nice if these were positive, such as sharing
our best lesson plans, collaborations, community connections, etc.
Just having professional development for the arts. It’s been years. Apparently, the arts
teachers are not worth the money it would cost; or so we have been told.
At one point we all met together and did professional development. … We created lesson
plans, we did assessment, and I left there all the time feeling really inspired to get back and
try some of the stuff with my classes. And now there’s almost nothing. There’s just not the
support anymore.
Curriculum and Studies
Due to the shortage of arts teachers, professional development, systemic partnerships and teachers
with training in arts integration, there is a profound lack of applied arts fundamentals and history being
taught across CMSD schools. The arts specialist teachers that are in place reported they are taking a
comprehensive approach to teaching arts education that includes skills, aesthetics and collaboration:
INSTRUCTION
POSITIVE
RESPONSES
My instruction includes teaching skills in the arts
100%
My instruction includes teaching aesthetic education
90%
My instruction includes interdisciplinary or arts integrated instruction, or
collaboration with non-arts teachers
87.8%
14
Arts programming in the schools is most likely to include music and visual arts. Few schools reported
including dance or theater:
SCHOOL PROGRAMMING - PRINCIPALS
YES
NO
Our programming includes teaching skills in visual arts
82.9%
17.1%
Our programming includes teaching skills in music
79.2%
20.8%
Our programming includes arts integrated instruction
46.3%
53.7%
Our programming includes teaching academic subjects through the arts
42.9%
57.1%
Our programming includes teaching skills in media arts
39.4%
60.6%
Our programming includes teaching skills in theater or drama
16.1%
83.9%
Our programming includes teaching skills in dance
14.5%
85.5%
Our programming includes teaching aesthetic education
12.7%
87.3%
Most principals report that less than 20 percent of their teachers do arts integration:
ARTS INTEGRATION
Approximately how many classroom or nonarts subject teachers integrate the arts with
their curriculum?
0%-20%
21%-40%
41% -60%
61%-80%
81%-100%
63%
12.3%
8.2%
8.2%
8.2%
According to classroom teachers, arts integration is most likely to include visual arts and music:
ARTS DISCIPLINES INCLUDED IN ARTS INTEGRATION
YES
NO
Dance
38.5%
61.5%
Drama/Theater
53.9%
46.1%
Music
72.3%
27.7%
Visual Arts
83.8%
16.2%
ARTS INTEGRATION
POSITIVE
RESPONSES
I regularly make connections between the arts and academic subjects in
my classroom
69.2%
I am confident in integrating the arts into my instruction
64.7%
My arts integrated instruction includes teaching skills in the arts
40.8%
My arts integrated instruction includes teaching aesthetic education
42.2%
My instruction includes teaching academic subjects through the arts
61.3%
15
When we asked teachers to describe the greatest challenges to providing arts integrated instruction,
they cited time restraints, funding, supplies, lack of expertise, and lack of support from administrators.
Here are some of their specific responses:






Time.
Supplies.
I have no training.
I have no idea how.
Administrators seem to think you aren't teaching when the students are engaged in
something artistic.
My greatest challenges are the funding issues. It seems as though some children in our
schools are getting blessed with more education than others in the arts, and I would like to
see the distribution of arts education funding be more equitable, particularly in reference to
public urban schools.
When we asked teachers what kind of support they would need to provide arts integrated instruction,
they cited the need for more professional development, staffing, and visible school leadership. Here are
some of their specific responses:







More professional development.
I would like professional development as relates to the inclusion of art instruction for [English
Language Arts]. Also, I would like resources which support instruction of art education, art
history and art in literature for ELA instruction.
I teach students with multiple disabilities and would love to teach them more artistic ways to
express themselves!
I would need professionals trained in this area to come into my school and demonstrate
some of the curriculum. I would need to be trained in this area. I would also need resources,
i.e., books, materials and equipment.
I would like someone to show me how to integrate the arts in classroom.
We need an art teacher.
Administrative belief in and support for the process. District understanding the powerful role
arts can play in social emotional learning and changing school culture.
Arts specialist teachers would like more opportunity to collaborate with classroom and subject teachers
to integrate the arts:
[I would like to see more] connecting the arts with math and science and social studies. As a
teacher, I would love to collaborate more with the other teachers. But we are kind of second
class, in a way, because we’re not part of the tests.
— Arts teacher
16
Resources and Facilities
Few arts teachers have adequate resources and materials. About half of the schools have adequate
space and facilities:
FACILITIES AND RESOURCES — ARTS TEACHERS
POSITIVE
RESPONSES
I have adequate space and facilities to teach my arts subject
51.5%
I have adequate resources and materials to teach my arts subject
19.5%
Arts teachers often lack minimal resources and supplies:
I have no space, no facilities. I push a two-by-three-foot cart. I have two floors and two buildings
at the same school. I have no district-provided music player, no computer, no classroom
instruments.
— Music teacher
I do not have a sink. I do not have enough room at the tables for the kids to work.
— Art teacher
Everything that we come up with is completely from us. There’s no text that we use, there’s no
teacher’s edition, there’s no technology resources. I have one computer in my room that works.
— Art teacher
Premier Arts Specialty System (PASS) Schools
PASS is not working. While the individual PASS schools do many things very well, collectively they are
not exemplars of quality arts education, an effective feeder system for the CMSD’s arts-focused high
schools, or a replacement for a systemic approach to comprehensive arts education for young students.
Overall, PASS schools do not have adequate arts staffing, funding and systemic support. With some
exceptions, students are not developing the foundational skills needed to succeed at the CMSD’s artsfocused high schools or continue to study the arts at other high schools:
It’s a hard pill to swallow when you’re being considered as a PASS school, as an arts program
school, and you don’t have the human resources in your building that are aligned to introduce
the students to arts.
— Principal
17
The PASS model has not been fleshed out to its fruition. In theory, it’s a great thing. It hasn’t
really worked. The resources have not been there. … It hasn’t worked to its best because there
are still gaps. We have maintained our presence as an arts [school] through clever budgeting,
clever programming, but probably not through the PASS model. … We keep on trying to fill in the
gaps, creatively.
— PASS facilitator
Partnerships
Arts organizations and colleges/universities have stated their strong commitment to improving arts
education in Cleveland:
All kids need arts in their lives. They need that connection to the arts to give them hope and
permission to express themselves. CMSD must really value this beyond lip service.
— Arts organization staff
Cleveland has a very dynamic and stable arts and cultural community that has felt left out of the
decision-making on the provision of arts education in Cleveland schools. The business community
can help to connect the more successful cultural organizations to the Cleveland schools.
— Arts organization staff
18
Arts and cultural organizations bring in a significant amount of additional funding and services for arts
education. According to results of a survey of 34 Cleveland Arts Education Consortium (CAEC) members,
71 percent of the participating organizations receive grant support for programs in CMSD schools. Many
organizations provide programming free of charge or at substantially reduced rates. For instance, 68
percent of surveyed organizations did not receive any fees for the arts programming that they provided:
According to data provided through the CAEC surveys, arts and cultural organizations are making
substantial contributions to CMSD in programming costs, transportation and facilities costs. Most of the
programming expenses are provided by the organizations, through general funds or grants. Tickets to
performances are typically provided to CMSD schools at 50 percent less than those provided to other
districts. Some programs provide free tickets to CMSD students.
19
Arts organizations are committed to supporting and improving arts education in CMSD:
ARTS ORGANIZATIONS AND CMSD
POSITIVE
RESPONSES
Education is central to our organization’s mission
100%
Collaborating with CMSD is central to our organization’s mission
82.6%
Our organization would like a stronger relationship with CMSD
93.6%
Cleveland’s arts and cultural community is strongly committed to
supporting arts education in Cleveland schools
Cleveland’s philanthropic community is strongly committed to supporting
arts education in Cleveland schools
87.2%
87%
Arts organization programming often includes arts integration, aesthetic education and teaching skills in
the various arts disciplines. Music and dance are most commonly taught, followed by theater/drama
and visual arts:
STUDENT PROGRAMMING — ARTS ORGANIZATIONS
YES
Our programs for CMSD students include arts integrated instruction
78.6%
Our programs for CMSD students include teaching skills in music
67.4%
Our programs for CMSD students include teaching academic subjects through the arts
65.9%
Our programs for CMSD students include teaching skills in dance
60.5%
Our programs for CMSD students include teaching aesthetic education
56.8%
Our programs for CMSD students include teaching skills in theater or drama
50%
Our programs for CMSD students include teaching skills in visual arts
46.3%
Our programs for CMSD students include teaching skills in media arts
41%
Arts organization programming is provided in classrooms, at other school locations and off-site:
INSTRUCTION
Our CMSD instruction takes place in school classrooms
Our CMSD instruction takes place in other school locations (such as auditoriums, gyms,
or performance spaces)
Our CMSD instruction takes place at our site
YES
NO
69.8%
30.2%
55%
45%
61.5%
38.5%
20
Classroom and subject teachers expressed their desire for more collaboration with arts and cultural
organizations. However, they pointed out that most of their current partnerships had inadequate
planning and collaboration:
POSITIVE
RESPONSES
COLLABORATION AND PARTNERSHIP
Our collaborating arts organization is a well-organized and effective
partner for our school
48.0%
The visiting artists met and planned their residencies with me
37.2%
Planning sessions went beyond logistics/scheduling and into curriculum
and teaching
I was able to regularly discuss the progress of residencies with the visiting
artists
I would like to collaborate more with Cleveland’s arts and cultural
community
42.5%
37.6%
79%
There are currently no clear or consistent guidelines for how arts and higher education organizations
can collaborate with CMSD schools:
There is no mechanism in the district for the arts organizations to make the connections to plan
or implement a program. CMSD makes it difficult to collaborate.
— Arts organization staff
There is inadequate staffing at CMSD to support effective partnerships:
[It's] challenging to work with the current infrastructure and very difficult to maintain a
relationship that is consistent.
— Arts organization staff
Getting access to people at CMSD to form a partnership, as well as poor communication once a
partnership is created, [is challenging]. [It is] very difficult to get consistent follow-up from the
district when one is trying to serve schools with in-school programming.
— Arts organization staff
Getting access [is challenging]. When phone calls are made to CMSD to inquire about a
partnership [you] get little to no response.
— Arts organization staff
21
In the past, we tried working with CMSD to pilot an extended-day program. It was very difficult
to make it happen. The school system is overwhelmed with so many other goals. We were
competing with the system for time, building space, and the school schedule. So the program did
not succeed.
— Arts organization staff
Initiating and sustaining partnerships is hampered by inadequate staffing at the district level, and the
lack of consistent staff at the schools dedicated to making partnerships work:
A challenge is the transient staff and administrators due to restructuring and layoffs.
— Arts organization staff
[A problem] is not knowing who to communicate with because of the constant changes from
year to year, and often from semester to semester. [Other problems are] the bizarre and
undecipherable job titles and the lack of clarity of how the schools function.
— Arts organization staff
There is an ever-shifting cast of characters at the other end [and] no clear, constant contact
points. Things seem to get done only if a single administrator or teacher decides to take a
project.
— Arts organization staff
The constant turnover of principals and teachers [is challenging]. The district shortened the
school day, making scheduling a challenge when you are trying to service five to six classrooms
in a day.
— Arts organization staff
Organizations often lack the capacity and funding to provide transportation for partnership
implementation:
One of our greatest difficulties working with CMSD is the lack of transportation support for our
outreach programming. We have grant-generated programs that we can't get schools to
participate in because of little or no transportation monies.
— Arts organization staff
We do not have any capacity for educational transportation and rely upon bus transportation
provided by the school districts.
— Arts organization staff
22
CMSD must increase its capacity and infrastructure in order to initiate and sustain true partnerships
between organizations and schools:
[T]he real issue is that [while] our environment is arts- and cultural-rich … our staffing capacity
[at CMSD] only allows for a drive-by relationship [between organizations and schools]. … We
don’t have the capacity to really drive external engagement. We have an arts- and culturally rich
environment. We don’t have the capacity to really shape it.
— CMSD administrator
All-City Arts*
This program is conducted as an after-school and weekend program for CMSD students in grades K-12.
The goal of the program is to offer artistic instruction, performance opportunities and visual art
exhibition experiences for students, as well as student showcase events for families and the broader
community. The program has two distinctive levels:
• The All-City Arts intensive level runs for 30 weeks, six hours a week, for grades nine to 12. It is
housed at the John Hay Campus.
• The K-8 All-City program takes place at elementary and middle school building sites. Teachers can
self-select to participate.
The high school program participants perform in the annual winter and spring concerts/festivals, but the
K-8 schools select whether to participate in the winter event, spring event, or both. The budget ranges
somewhere around $625,000 to $700,000 within the larger Department of Arts Education budget.
All-City provides excellent arts and education opportunities for many CMSD students. According to our
interview data:

Eighty-five percent of All-City students come from CMSD and half of them are Cleveland School
of the Arts (CSA) students. There has been a drop-off of students from other schools.
Participation is discouraged at some schools. There is a need to extend the opportunities that
All-City provides to more students.

Students come to All-City with a wide range of skill sets and those who are not from CSA are
more likely to lack basic skills. There is a need to broaden and deepen the development of arts
skills in younger grades so that students can take advantage of upper-grade and after-school
opportunities.

All-City helps with college readiness through developing time management skills and recognition
of accountability for choices and behavior.

All-City does not track individual students once they leave, so there are no data on the
program’s impact on students’ academic work, college or career.
23
Given the profound lack of arts resources for the school district, the costs of All-City are severely out of
balance with the district’s commitment to equitable arts education. There is no question that All-City
provides those students involved with a valuable experience. Yet, these kinds of productions are often
used by school districts as a crowd-pleasing event that allows a district to provide a public relations
cover for the lack of comprehensive and equitable arts education provided to all schools. If All-City
continues, it should be integrated within an arts education system that provides all students with
fundamentals in music and arts.
Performances such as All-City’s are necessary extensions that allow for the real-life application of
fundamentals, but should not be sustained if they are stand-alone, community-relations performance
shows. All-City is a supplemental program, at best, to an arts education system, not an arts education
system in and of itself. All-City should be viewed as an opportunity for children to demonstrate what
they have learned from a fully staffed, equitable and integrated arts education system.
* Please see Appendix D for a more in-depth analysis of All-City Arts.
24
25
OVERVIEW
The Cleveland Plan seeks “to ensure every child in Cleveland attends a high-quality school and every
neighborhood has a multitude of schools from which families can choose.” Arts education — highquality, consistent, sequential, properly resourced arts education — is an essential component of
excellent schools. While Cleveland hosts some of the world’s best arts institutions and a multitude of
wonderful small- and mid-sized arts organizations, Cleveland students lack access to high-quality arts
experiences in schools. And while arts organizations can play an important role in supplementing arts
instruction, there is no substitute for classroom-based instruction by certified arts teachers in every
school, every day. Equity in arts education has long been a goal in Cleveland schools; this plan proposes
a way forward to ensure that goal is met.
A full-scale commitment to arts education is best viewed through two lenses. Arts education is primarily
applied learning that is sequential, comprehensive and taught by trained, pedagogically-prepared,
experienced and full-time (FTE) teachers. It significantly furthers the development of cognitive, sensory,
literacy and thinking skills. Pre-professional and professional standards serve as a baseline for applied
arts studies.
Arts education is secondarily based in aesthetics, motivation-centered project experiences and Ohio and
Common Core standards. It integrates arts content and processes with reading, math, science, social
studies, computer science, etc., with the goal of significantly furthering cognitive, sensory, literacy and
thinking skills development. Arts education’s proven benefits of critical thinking and problem solving;
oral communication and teamwork; literacy and language development; creating comfort and familiarity
with global diversity; and leadership and entrepreneurial development lead to essential skills for our
students.
1. MISSION AND OBJECTIVES
CMSD’s mission and objectives for arts education should reflect a desire that every Cleveland student
receive arts education as part of their school day and be offered additional opportunities as part of an
extended day. Arts education instruction and resource allocation must be a high budget priority, and not
subject to “first cuts” in the event of financial difficulties. The inherent tension between school
autonomy (budget, staffing, curricular, etc.) and the CMSD’s obligation to ensuring quality arts
education for all students merits recognition and attention. The CMSD must set standards for arts
education and then allow schools to deliver those standards in a way that fits their particular model and
philosophy. But at no time must a student be disadvantaged in the arts. An outcome of this plan is to
make comprehensive arts education necessary and compelling to principals as a strategy for meeting
school goals and to parents hoping to choose the best schools for their children.
2. LEADERSHIP
In alignment with the Cleveland Plan’s call to drive resources to the school building, the CMSD should
shift from its traditional strategy of centralized management of the arts to decentralized network
support and coordination of the arts. This approach does not devalue the arts; in fact, it aligns with the
direction of the other academic areas and reinforces the position that the arts are on equal footing with
CMSD Arts Education Plan Executive Summary
May 2014  Page 26
other subject areas. A few highly targeted central office staff positions are necessary to implement this
plan: a coordinator of the arts education marketplace and a coordinator of arts resources.
Principals are the main conduits of arts instruction in schools, so great care must be taken in the
principal hiring process to ensure appropriate arts valuation and orientation. Additionally, arts education
must be reflected in school and principal evaluations to ensure efficacy. Human resources must play a
critical role in identifying arts teachers appropriate for particular school openings. HR should put
systems in place that clearly inventory teacher qualifications within particular arts mediums (vocal
music, instrumental, photography, theater, etc.) and recruit for gaps accordingly. Principals should
receive candidates’ resumes for interviews.
3. GOVERNANCE
The sustainability of urban arts education initiatives is rooted in the commitment of the district and its
leadership. The CMSD CEO will be responsible for the implementation of this plan and ensuring its place
in the district’s portfolio strategy. The commitment needs to be “personality-proof” to provide
continuity through eventual leadership change and evolution. The combination of equity goals, portfolio
school choice, modeling and replicating successes, partnerships, accountability and a stakeholder
advisory council to the CEO, will create sustaining services and the promise of arts education for all. The
School Board needs to vote their approval of the plan to add commitment and accountability to the
system.
4. FACULTY
All staff members should be interviewed at the school level to determine if they have the skills,
knowledge, attributes and values to fulfill the school’s mission, with an explicit understanding of and
commitment to the requirements, expectations, supports, demands and rewards of the job as a precondition of employment. FTEs need to be passionate, committed to students and have up-to-date
knowledge about their art forms. Because of the historical lack of commitment to the arts, the district
needs to provide significant PD and new hires are necessary to meet these high standards.
CMSD should make a primary commitment to hire licensed arts faculty sufficient to provide a minimum
of two FTEs (full-time music and arts teachers) in every K-8 school. This staffing is essential to
guaranteeing minimally sufficient instruction in these two disciplines (60-80 minutes per week of music
and 60-80 minutes per week of art). For larger schools (over 500 students), the ratios will need to
increase. CMSD should also consider hiring dance and theatre teachers who are shared by K-8 schools.
High schools will require a different approach that recognizes arts as electives. This plan recommends a
minimum of two music teachers at the high school level who are specialists in choral and instrumental
music, in addition to arts instructors. The small high schools (around 400 students) likely will require
more creative staffing models.
Arts faculty members should serve as resources to other faculty members in collaborate on artsintegrated projects to more fully engage students in the core curriculum, literacy, STEM (science,
technology, engineering and mathematics) subjects, numeracy and non-binary critical, creative and
CMSD Arts Education Plan Executive Summary
May 2014  Page 27
problem-solving thinking. Arts teachers need to be treated as an essential component of school success.
They need opportunities to convene, so they can share and hear what others are doing. Such gatherings
serve to as a means to set common expectations and to motivate those who are less engaged. Licensed
arts educators are the most desired, effective and appropriate options for staffing. This plan also
recognizes the value of and need for flexible and adaptable faculties of professional teaching artists.
Appropriate compensation for teaching artists is essential to the sustainability and quality of instruction.
5. PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT (PD)
Effective, ongoing and comprehensive PD for arts specialists should be provided by external arts
partners, emphasizing enhanced standards and outcomes. Educator PD should be comprehensive,
participatory and modeled. It should emphasize both how to utilize the interpretation of art objects and
repertoire, and also arts-making processes and production, in an authentic intersection with Common
Core and Ohio standards. PD must be an engaging, motivational and a practical course of study where
initiative teachers recognize the value of modeled strategies and the immediate and long-term
application of them to their work with students. When PD strategies require resources, these resources
should be budgeted and provided to participating teachers and partnerships.
Mandatory, comprehensive and compensated PD for partnership and initiative teaching artists also
should be participatory and modeled. Teaching artists should receive firsthand experiences in Ohio and
Common Core standards and together workshop art processes, objects, repertoire, art-making,
problem-solving, interpretation, criticism and arts technologies as direct means of successfully teaching
priority learning concepts across the curriculum.
6. ARTS EVERY DAY
“Arts Every Day” emphasizes the engagement of children and youth directly with the applied skills of
learning how to produce, create, and present in a given art form; the use of arts as a basis of hands-on
inquiry and interpretation of core subject concepts; and the arts as a pathway to careers and/or
higher education preparedness. The concept and realization of Arts Every Day lies in the intertwining of
arts in all subjects as a sensory and cognitive framework for learning as well as weekly formal art and
music instruction. The equitable opportunity for students to attend after-school/extended-day
opportunities for applied studies furthers the depth of Arts Every Day.
7. CURRICULUM AND STUDIES
Integrated, applied, aesthetic and project-/service-based arts education comprise the four-legged
stool of learning in and through the arts. Integrated studies emphasizing key concepts in Ohio and
Common Core standards should be developed through planning and collaboration between school
faculty and arts and higher education partnerships. This co-stakeholder approach to curricular
development puts the teacher at the center of defining classroom and student need, and the artist and
partner organizations at the heart of using their resources to meet student need. The approach builds
authentic support for success because all stakeholders have been at the table of design, implementation
and adaption.
CMSD Arts Education Plan Executive Summary
May 2014  Page 28
Applied studies should be offered through classroom instruction, Arts Every Day and extendedday/after-school academies. The opportunity for students to learn an art form (e.g., every CMSD student
will learn to read music as a result of choral and/or instrumental programs) is dependent upon
continued and regular studies with that art form provided by passionate and qualified teachers.
Aesthetic learning should be interwoven throughout an integrated, applied and project-/service-based
curriculum, providing context and understanding of contemporary and historic music, design,
architecture and more. Project-/service-based arts learning connects schools to neighborhoods and
furthers schools as community centers. Projects that involve arts partners improve neighborhood quality
of life, aesthetics, and relationships with neighbors in need, and instill in students a lifelong spirit of
service.
The instructional approach includes recognition of learning styles and modalities. Special needs students
must be included in integrated, applied, aesthetic and project-/service-based arts education. In fact,
the arts are a proven tool for encouraging inclusion. Special needs teachers should receive unique PD,
designed to best fit the potential for arts in their students’ lives.
8. ASSESSMENT AND ACCOUNTABILITY
A stakeholder advocacy campaign directed at parents, citizens, communities, school leadership and
faculty about the importance and impact of arts education is recommended. Every school’s portfolio
evaluation should include arts metrics that include the number of arts teachers teaching in a given
school and their part in the school’s daily curriculum; arts skills learned and developed by that school’s
students; participation in arts partnerships; arts PD; academies; principal PD; and additional arts
experiences for students, families and faculty. Authentic, cognitive-based testing/assessment in the
arts, focusing upon portfolios, interpretation, thinking, reflection and creating should be instituted for
grades five, eight and 10. Self-assessment by students should be central in their arts and academic
performance.
9. AFTER-SCHOOL/EXTENDED-DAY ACADEMIES
Academies should be created in a variety of schools and provide neighborhood access to all district
students. Academies should be placed in schools that desire and choose the significant resources,
teachers, partnerships and benefits of extended-day arts academies. Academy curricula should be
provided by discipline-specific and multidisciplinary partnerships offering private and small group
lessons, project-/service-based learning, and the preparation and production of shows and concerts.
Students will create original works, and perform/show these works at partner arts institutions.
10. SCHOOL CULTURE/RESOURCES
CMSD schools require adequate arts resources to become more lively and passionate places for
learning. CMSD must commit to a realistic, basic supply of arts resources/materials for every school in
consultation with arts partners, including art supplies (paper, paints, brushes, markers, rhythm kits,
music, scripts, dance shoes/clothes, etc.). Music instruments and arts supplies should be provided in a
CMSD Arts Education Plan Executive Summary
May 2014  Page 29
manner that allows art teachers to create authentic projects without compromising or using their own
funds to create authentic experiences. The opportunity for every child to work with arts materials of
every kind opens up motivation, curiosity and pathways that may last a lifetime.
11. PARTNERSHIPS
Partnerships should include arts organizations, institutions of higher education and other
organizations working together with schools and their faculty. They exist within schools and are the
result of intense collaborations with teachers. Partners develop programs and provide resources in
direct response to what teachers need. The essential purpose of various partnerships is to provide
collaborators to help CMSD build arts education capacity, infrastructure and district support. Effective
partnerships are those that invest in significant and compensated planning, develop mutually
articulated services and responsibilities, have facilitation in their formulation and design, and are
carefully evaluated for alteration and adaptability. Ideal partnerships will have a diversity of players:
small and large organizations that are global in resource and perspective, higher education and arts
institutions, after-school service providers and social organizations.
The providing of services by arts organizations and higher education to the CMSD Arts Education Plan
should be based upon a planning process of responding to and being accountable for helping the CMSD
schools meet their most important pre-professional and professional academic and arts needs, in and
through the arts. Through a variety of partnerships and co-consultation with CMSD leadership, arts and
higher education participants will offer applied arts instruction; teaching artists; integrated and projectbased hands-on learning that use the repertoire, collections and artistic processes as means of inquiry
and interpretation; neighborhood project-based curriculum; and “Cleveland as campus.” Arts providers
will be accountable to mutually agreed upon outcomes and goals, using multiple forms of authentic
assessment and evaluation. Participating schools will be held equally accountable to the same
outcomes.
We recommend a number of different kinds of partnerships:
1. Separate and coordinated arts-specific partnerships for music, visual arts, dance, theater,
media arts, technology, literary arts and the business of arts that are built to create
“pipelines” to skill sets, artistic development and higher education/career opportunities.
2. Multidisciplinary partnerships that comparatively use their repertoire/collections/artistic
practices as a means of study. Ethnographic approaches, interpretation, history, criticism,
thinking and creating are all possible components.
3. Extended-day/after-school arts academy partnership where institutions with high-level
artistic practice, curatorial expertise and established pathways to higher education and
careers establish after-school services of skill-level differentiated lessons (introductory to
advanced), projects, performances/shows and mentorships.
4. Professional development partnerships built around higher education institutions in
collaboration with CMSD, arts organizations and artists that provide professional
development to CMSD teachers, principals, arts administrators and artists working in both
initiatives.
5. Arts project-based partnerships built upon neighborhood or community needs, creation of
productions, serving community constituents, and other worthy service-learning goals
CMSD Arts Education Plan Executive Summary
May 2014  Page 30
6. Special needs partnerships bring together arts, social, medical and community resources to
assist special needs learners in and through the arts.
7. All-City Arts Program partnerships between the new School of the Arts and other high
schools and organizations with particular interest in participating in the preparation, casting,
production and performance of a major work. Utilizing a collaboration of expertise,
resources, facilities, professionalism and media will create a superior experience. Within this
partnership or separately, there should be a yearly festival for student arts, an opportunity
for the community to share in the creativity of Cleveland’s children.
8. Medical community partnerships with the Cleveland Clinic and University Hospitals, which
have significant arts resource programs and devotion to the community. The hospitals are
very unique in that they have art collections, shows, performances and arts staff. There are
no other school arts programs that have such partnerships with the medical community, so
this presents a unique opportunity to learn from their expertise in the arts, commitment to
arts in healing and to involve their resources in an effort to incorporate arts into STEM
education, creating “STEAM.”
13. ENCOURAGING, SUPPORTING AND SUSTAINING CHANGE
Accountabilities and assessment should be structured for every component and reviewed at regular
intervals, with yearly reporting and adaptions. It is critically important to reach out to parents and
educate them about the value of arts education for their children. Parents should be pressuring
principals and other CMSD officials to provide comprehensive arts education. An Advocacy campaign
that uses student works and accomplishments; independent assessment results; multimedia; web; and
corporate partners and their communication vehicles, will all help maintain momentum and interest.
The CMSD should consider the creation of endowment funds for both resource maintenance and
operating costs for economic hard times. Effective communications between the wide array of
partners and authorities of governance will, in the end, be elemental to sustainability. Leadership,
compassion, stakeholder transparency and the willingness to continue to adapt and change will make
for a City that Creates and an arts education system that Cleveland and its youth so justly deserve.
CMSD Arts Education Plan Executive Summary
May 2014  Page 31
32
OVERVIEW
The Cleveland Plan seeks “to ensure every child in Cleveland attends a high-quality school
and every neighborhood has a multitude of schools from which families can choose.” Arts
education — high-quality, consistent, sequential, properly resourced arts education — is an
essential component of excellent schools. While Cleveland hosts some of the world’s best arts
institutions and a multitude of wonderful small- and mid-sized arts organizations, Cleveland
students lack access to high-quality arts experiences in schools. And while arts organizations
can play an important role in supplementing arts instruction, there is no substitute for
classroom-based instruction by certified arts teachers in every school, every day. Equity in
arts education has long been a goal in Cleveland schools; this plan proposes a way forward to
ensure that goal is met.
A full-scale commitment to arts education is best viewed through two lenses. Arts education
is primarily applied learning that is sequential, comprehensive and taught by trained,
pedagogically-prepared, experienced and full-time (FTE) teachers. It significantly furthers the
development of cognitive, sensory, literacy and thinking skills. Pre-professional and
professional standards serve as a baseline for applied arts studies.
Arts education is secondarily based in aesthetics, motivation-centered project experiences
and Ohio and Common Core standards. It integrates arts content and processes with reading,
math, science, social studies, computer science, etc., with the goal of significantly furthering
cognitive, sensory, literacy and thinking skills development. Arts education’s proven benefits
of critical thinking and problem solving; oral communication and teamwork; literacy and
language development; creating comfort and familiarity with global diversity; and leadership
and entrepreneurial development lead to essential skills for our students.
1. MISSION AND OBJECTIVES
•
•
•
Every Cleveland student will receive arts education as part of their school day and be
offered additional opportunities as part of an extended day.
In elementary schools, it is essential that students have regular, full-time
instruction in art and music, every week, as part of their core academic studies.
The growing number of arts specialty high schools—Cleveland School of the Arts,
Cleveland School of Architecture and Design and Cleveland High School for
Digital Arts, to name a few — demand better exposure to and preparation in the
arts at the elementary school level so students have the chance to learn the
skills they need to apply for, and succeed in, the specialty schools.
In high schools, arts offerings must be more tailored to the individual school
model. However, arts instruction remains critical for high school students, and
efforts must be made to integrate arts education in all high schools. Arts
education offers skill sets and motivation to students proven to build pipelines
to careers and/or higher education.
Arts education instruction and resource allocation must be a high budget priority, and
not subject to “first cuts” in the event of financial difficulties.
The inherent tension between school autonomy (budget, staffing, curricular, etc.)
and the CMSD’s obligation to ensuring quality arts education for all students merits
recognition and attention. The CMSD must set standards for arts education and then
allow schools to deliver those standards in a way that fits their particular model and
philosophy. But at no time must a student be disadvantaged in the arts.
CMSD Arts Education Implementation Plan
May 2014 ◆ Page 33
•
•
•
An outcome of this plan is to make comprehensive arts education necessary and
compelling to principals as a strategy for meeting school goals and to parents hoping
to choose the best schools for their children.
Cleveland’s rich cultural assets, from University Circle to Gordon Square to downtown
to Collinwood, provide a city campus and support a “blended learning” model where
students experience arts beyond their classroom-centered learning experiences.
The arts are a most effective means of learning cultural diversity and global skills.
2. LEADERSHIP
•
•
•
In alignment with the Cleveland Plan’s call to drive resources to the school building,
the CMSD will shift from its traditional strategy of centralized management of the arts
to decentralized network support and coordination of the arts. This approach does not
devalue the arts; in fact, it aligns with the direction of the other academic areas and
reinforces the position that the arts are on equal footing with other subject areas. A
few highly targeted central office staff positions are necessary to implement this plan:
- Coordinator of the Arts Education Marketplace: This position requires highly
effective interpersonal and administrative skills and the ability to build
confidence with schools, arts organizations, higher education, and business and
philanthropic stakeholders. This position will fall within the Academic
department of the CMSD as part of the network structure. The coordinator will
focus on the development of the Arts Education Marketplace, on online
resource for principals, arts educators, arts organizations and higher education
that “matches” high-quality professional development, arts partnerships,
curriculum, teaching strategies and more with schools.
- Option: Coordinator of the Arts Education Marketplace is housed and managed
at an independent, representative arts education advocate. Cleveland Arts
Education Consortium (CAEC) would be an excellent choice. Here, CAEC would
work closely with CMSD academic leadership and an Arts Partnership
Coordinator at each school appointed by its principal. (see School Arts
Education Coordinator below).
- Coordinator of arts resources: This position requires a highly effective and
creative organizer, recruiter, and in-kind supply/resource raiser who can
coordinate school arts resource needs and catalogue and make available for
schools needed arts supplies, scripts, technology software, music, instruments,
dance clothes and more.
- School Arts Education Coordinator is selected at every school by its principal.
The School Arts Education Coordinator is responsible for working with
Coordinator of the Arts Education Marketplace and Coordinator of Arts
Resources to ensure fidelity to this plan at the school level, reporting on the
school’s arts education progress, creating successful logistical space,
scheduling and staffing, and ensuring effective integration of arts partnerships
into the school’s planning, classrooms and culture.
Principals are the main conduits of arts instruction in schools, so great care must be
taken in the selection and ongoing evaluation of principals to ensure appropriate arts
valuation and orientation. Additionally, arts education must be reflected in school and
principal evaluations to ensure efficacy.
Human resources must play a critical role in identifying arts teachers appropriate for
particular school openings. HR should put systems in place that clearly inventory
teacher qualifications within particular arts mediums (vocal music, instrumental,
CMSD Arts Education Implementation Plan
May 2014 ◆ Page 34
photography, theater, etc.) and recruit for gaps accordingly. Principals should receive
candidates’ resumes for interviews.
•
Other urban district leadership models vary from the CSMD but include:
- Boston: The administration is allocated roles specifically delineated to each arts
area. This includes an arts department head, arts partnership manager, program
directors for performing arts and the visual arts, an instrument repair technician,
and a scripts and scores librarian.
- Dallas: The arts education administration includes the executive director,
director of elementary music and art, director of instrumental music,
coordinators for general music, theatre and dance, and support staff.
- Los Angeles: The Los Angeles Unified School District has an arts education
branch that includes a deputy superintendent of instruction, executive director,
director and K-12 arts coordinator.
-
Oakland: Oakland’s MILE (Music Integrated Learning Environment) project has a
strong administration focus with directors, coordinators and teaching artists.
3. GOVERNANCE
•
•
•
•
The sustainability of urban arts education initiatives is rooted in the commitment of
the district and its leadership. The CMSD CEO will be responsible for the
implementation of this plan and ensuring its place in the district’s portfolio strategy.
The commitment needs to be “personality-proof” to provide continuity through
eventual leadership change and evolution. The combination of equity goals, portfolio
school choice, modeling and replicating successes, partnerships, accountability and a
stakeholder advisory council to the CEO, will create sustaining services and the
promise of arts education for all.
The School Board needs to vote their approval of the plan to add commitment and
accountability to the system.
A singular and central Arts Education Advisory Council — consisting of arts education,
philanthropy and CMSD leaders and built upon feedback, mutual respect, and
articulated and planned mutual goals and accountability — is a necessary component
of this plan. After years of consistent dysfunction, there must be a means of repairing
and building trust and a creating a culture of mutual benefits. We recommend the
Cleveland Arts Education Consortium nominate three of its member organizations;
philanthropies provide three foundation representatives; CMSD provide senior
academic, operations, principal leadership and student/parent representation; and
three corporate/business leaders be recruited to comprise this body. This council
should meet quarterly, establish a procedure for rotating the chairmanship, and create
subcommittees to tackle ongoing resource, equity and implementation challenges.
Urban district arts education advisory models (See Appendix F for “Report of Arts
Organization Partnerships with Urban and Metro Arts Education Systems”) also
necessitate a significant reliance upon co-planning and collaboration between schools
and arts providers. There must be dedicated and comprehensive commitment to
ongoing planning and articulation of outcomes; communications; program evaluation
and learner assessment; mutual feedback; close alignment of arts organization
services to articulated school needs; and mutual planning of professional
development, productions, refinement and program adaptability based upon
evaluation and assessment.
CMSD Arts Education Implementation Plan
May 2014 ◆ Page 35
Options not recommended: Independent governance is not likely to build the requisite longterm commitment of the district and its leadership to arts education, and thus also
undermines arts and higher education partners’ dedication to Cleveland’s Plan, core learning
needs, and career and higher education preparedness.
4. FACULTY
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
All staff members are interviewed at the school level to determine if they have the
skills, knowledge, attributes and values to fulfill the school’s mission, with an explicit
understanding of and commitment to the requirements, expectations, supports,
demands and rewards of the job as a pre-condition of employment.
FTEs need to be passionate, committed and have up-to-date knowledge about their art
forms. Because of a historical lack of commitment to the arts, the district needs to
provide significant PD and new hires are necessary to meet these standards.
CMSD makes a primary commitment to hire licensed arts faculty sufficient to provide a
minimum of two FTEs (full-time music and arts teachers) in every K-8 school. This
staffing is essential to guaranteeing minimally sufficient instruction in these two
disciplines (60-80 minutes per week of music and 60-80 minutes per week of art). For
larger schools (over 500 students), the ratios will need to increase.
CMSD should consider hiring dance and theatre teachers shared by K-8 schools. A less
desirable option would be to have these disciplines procured through the Arts
Education Marketplace by schools that opt to spend their resources in these areas.
High schools will require a different approach that recognizes arts as electives. This
plan recommends a minimum of two music teachers at the high school level who are
specialists in choral and instrumental music, in addition to arts instructors. The small
high schools (around 400 students) likely will require more creative staffing models.
Arts faculty members serve as resources to other faculty members in collaborate on
arts-integrated projects to more fully engage students in the core curriculum, literacy,
STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) subjects, numeracy and
non-binary critical, creative and problem-solving thinking.
Arts teachers need to be treated as an essential component of school success. They
need opportunities to convene, so they can share and hear what others are doing.
Such gatherings serve to as a means to set common expectations and to motivate
those who are less engaged.
Licensed arts educators are the most desired, effective and appropriate options for
staffing. This plan also recognizes the value of and need for flexible and adaptable
faculties of professional teaching artists.
CMSD waives licensure requirements and hires pedagogically-trained and experienced
teaching artists to serve in partnerships and after-school/extended-day academies.
- These arts educators and teaching artists will require specially created
credentials in their arts field as part of the initiative’s capacity-building goals.
Appropriate compensation for teaching artists is essential to the sustainability and
quality of instruction.
Options: Recognize that capacity-building and resource reallocation, as a primary strategy,
may require a tiered approach. “Basic Arts” for every school encompasses two teachers,
necessary arts resources, integrated curriculum and partnership collaborations. Some schools
might be interested in becoming “Arts Plus” schools, a designation awarded when a school
meets some established, externally validated criteria around arts education. Schools would
use their per-pupil funds and external fundraising efforts to prioritize additional arts
CMSD Arts Education Implementation Plan
May 2014 ◆ Page 36
teachers, resources, partnerships, professional development, field trips and more. “Arts Plus”
schools could use this designation (which could be won and lost) to differentiate its offerings
and attract students and families.
5. PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
•
•
•
•
•
Effective, ongoing and comprehensive PD for arts specialists is provided by external
arts partners, emphasizing enhanced standards and outcomes.
Educator PD is comprehensive, participatory and modeled. It emphasizes both how to
utilize the interpretation of art objects and repertoire, and also arts-making processes
and production, in an authentic intersection with Common Core and Ohio standards.
Teachers receive firsthand experiences in designing/creating, interpreting, and
problem-solving art; its processes of adaption, production and criticism; and its direct
relationship to literacy, science, technology, history and math concepts.
- PD must be an engaging, motivational and a practical course of study where
initiative teachers recognize the value of modeled strategies and the immediate
and long-term application of them to their work with students.
- When PD strategies require resources, these resources should be budgeted and
provided to participating teachers and partnerships.
- The world-class archives and resources (artistic and historic objects and artists)
that are at hand within Cleveland institutions make this initiative like no other.
- Educators’ potential to educate within a strategized curriculum and PD process
has never been realized in another community.
Mandatory, comprehensive and compensated PD for partnership and initiative teaching
artists is also participatory and modeled. Teaching artists receive firsthand
experiences in Ohio and Common Core standards and together workshop art processes,
objects, repertoire, art-making, problem-solving, interpretation, criticism and arts
technologies as direct means of successfully teaching priority learning concepts across
the curriculum.
- There are arts education leaders from arts organizations, professors from higher
education and CMSD instructional mentors that can effectively plan and lead this
initiative component.
Principals should participate in a PD session based on participating with arts, arts
partnerships and arts content, as well as on the academic, social, and career and/or
higher education benefits of arts education.
- Principals’ support and knowledge of externally delivered and mutually planned
services is a critical success factor.
PD will be credentialed and award credits consistent with higher education and
CMSD/Ohio standards.
6. ARTS EVERY DAY
•
Arts Every Day emphasizes the engagement of children and youth directly with the
applied skills of learning how to produce, create, and present in a given art form;
the use of arts as a basis of hands-on inquiry and interpretation of core subject
concepts; and the arts as a pathway to careers and/or higher education
preparedness.
CMSD Arts Education Implementation Plan
May 2014 ◆ Page 37
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
The concept and realization of Arts Every Day lies in the intertwining of arts in all
subjects as a sensory and cognitive framework for learning as well as weekly formal
art and music instruction.
The equitable opportunity for students to attend after-school/extended-day
opportunities for applied studies furthers the depth of Arts Every Day.
A primary content area of Arts Every Day is career and/or college preparedness.
Arts learning outcomes and goals are built upon and exceed Ohio, Core and National
standards. CMSD Arts Education “scope and sequence” outcomes are revised to best
realize learning of arts fundamentals, their practical and creative expressions,
interpretation and integrated learning/cross-curricular opportunities.
Every K-8 student is afforded experiences with working artists, who help students
understand arts as viable careers and in some cases motivate students to develop skills
for entry into high school, particularly those schools with specialized art programs.
Technology is infused throughout Arts Every Day.
Arts Partnerships play a significant role in providing arts integration, project-based
learning, after-school academies and working-artist experiences.
7. CURRICULUM AND STUDIES
•
•
•
•
•
Integrated, applied, aesthetic and project-/service-based arts education comprise
the four-legged stool of learning in and through the arts.
Integrated studies emphasizing key concepts in Ohio and Common Core standards are
developed through planning and collaboration between school faculty and arts and
higher education partnerships.
- This co-stakeholder approach to curricular development puts the teacher at the
center of defining classroom and student need, and the artist and partner
organizations at the heart of using their resources to meet student need.
- The approach builds authentic support for success because all stakeholders have
been at the table of design, implementation and adaption.
Applied studies are offered through classroom instruction, Arts Every Day and
extended-day/after-school academies.
- The opportunity for students to learn an art form (for example, every CMSD
student will learn to read music as a result of choral and/or instrumental
programs) is dependent upon continued and regular studies with that art form
provided by passionate and qualified teachers.
- Multiple times a week of dedicated study can include instruction during school,
two after-school days and a Saturday, or other configurations.
Aesthetic learning is interwoven throughout an integrated, applied and project/service-based curriculum, providing context and understanding of contemporary and
historic music, design, architecture and more.
- This learning approach uses the identical co-stakeholder process identified above
in the development of integrated studies.
- The approach builds authentic support for success because all stakeholders have
been at the table of design, implementation and adaption.
Project-/service-based arts learning connects schools to neighborhoods and furthers
schools as community centers. Projects that involve arts partners improve
neighborhood quality of life, aesthetics, and relationships with neighbors in need, and
instill in students a lifelong spirit of service.
CMSD Arts Education Implementation Plan
May 2014 ◆ Page 38
-
•
•
•
•
Building/creating community gardens, murals, farmers markets, design ideas at
community sites, and concert/gallery venues with community organizations are
some examples.
- This learning approach uses the identical co-stakeholder collaborative process
identified above in the development of integrated studies.
- The approach builds authentic support for success because all stakeholders have
been at the table of design, implementation and adaption.
The instructional approach includes recognition of learning styles and modalities.
Special needs students must be included in integrated, applied, aesthetic and
project-/service-based arts education. In fact, the arts are a proven tool for
encouraging inclusion. Special needs teachers will receive unique PD, designed to best
fit the potential for arts in their students’ lives.
Specific curriculum outcomes for arts disciplines will be incorporated in final plan.
The process for developing articulated arts outcomes should use, as a baseline, Ohio
and Common Core standards. The opportunity for arts professionals, through the
interaction of arts partnerships, to collaborate with school arts and academic faculty
and CMSD leadership on the development of these outcomes will allow them to
address the specific developmental needs of students and prepare them for career and
higher education. A focus on skills development, creativity, hands-on learning, arts
process and production, and the benefits of failure and success (aided by the
knowledge and experience of partner arts professionals) will create a motivating and
authentic arts education and rigorous curriculum.
8. ASSESSMENT AND ACCOUNTABILITY
•
•
A stakeholder advocacy campaign is initiated and directed at parents, citizens,
communities, school leadership and faculty about the importance of arts education.
- A noteworthy spokesperson is often an effective advocacy component.
- The data and research about arts education effectiveness and ties to career
and/or higher-education pathways is presented through CMSD websites, bus
advertisements, corporate communications, PSAs and other media.
- Cleveland’s own children, alumni, and specialty arts schools can play major roles
in presenting the promise of arts education.
Every school’s portfolio evaluation should include arts metrics that include the number
of arts teachers teaching in a given school and their part in the school’s daily
curriculum; arts skills learned and developed by that school’s students; participation
in arts partnerships; arts PD; academies; principal PD; and additional arts experiences
for students, families and faculty.
- For “Arts Plus” schools, arts education above and beyond district minimum
standards should be based on a transparent rubric and checklist jointly
administered by CMSD and external arts organizations.
- The arts teachers and content/classroom teachers must work as partners and
understand that their success is based on one another. This will force an initial
collaboration, but over time it should foster a mutual respect for each other’s
skills and build a partnership of shared outcomes. It becomes a relationship that
is beneficial to both of their beneficiaries: students.
- Each school’s Arts Education Coordinator will be a primary collector and
distributor of a school’s arts portfolio. Throughout each academic year, the
coordinator at each school will develop a system for collecting student art work,
observations of student process and product, teacher participation, arts
CMSD Arts Education Implementation Plan
May 2014 ◆ Page 39
•
•
•
partnership activities and collaborations with faculty/students and be the
primary advocate for needed resources and assistance. School Arts Coordinators
will convene twice yearly and receive PD from partner arts organizations —
organized through CAEC membership — in portfolio management and arts
education advocacy.
Authentic, cognitive-based testing/assessment in the arts, focusing upon portfolios,
interpretation, thinking, reflection and creating should be instituted for grades five,
eight and 10. Self-assessment by students should be central to their performance.
Model schools and partnerships should be independently evaluated and assessed to
improve and document programmatic quality and delivery of services.
American Association of Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) VALUE Rubrics are woven
into all courses’ class work, assignments and outcomes. The VALUE Rubrics include
written communication, civic engagement, creative thinking, critical thinking, ethical
reasoning, global learning, information literacy, inquiry and analysis, integrative
learning, intercultural knowledge, lifelong learning, oral communication, problemsolving, quantitative literacy, reading, and teamwork. (See Appendix I for a graphic
illustration of the AAC&U VALUE Rubrics.)
Options not recommended: Typical forms of standardized student assessment (e.g.,
multiple choice, grading on curves, and papers without use of other media) are counterproductive in an arts-centered school. Certainly, high standards are expected but the means
by which their outcomes are assessed should reflect arts making and pedagogy, as well as the
career/higher-education AAC&U VALUE Rubrics.
9. AFTER-SCHOOL/EXTENDED-DAY ACADEMIES
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•
•
•
•
•
•
Academies are created in a variety of schools and provide neighborhood access to all
district students. Academies are placed in schools that desire and choose the
significant resources, teachers, partnerships and benefits of extended-day arts
academies. Geographically, academies should be selected by CMSD leadership, to
maximize the number of students served and principal and faculty support. They will
serve as models that will increase demand from other schools for similar services.
Schools as community centers and safe places for daylong and weekend arts learning
opportunities build community and quality education.
Model: An effective strategy that fosters learning, arts enrichment, safety, and
support for working families is the Coalition of Community Schools model that serves
numerous urban areas. This may be an alternative for low-performing schools as CMSD
continues to explore new district and charter schools.
An academy should be built upon the All-City Arts Program to further student
motivation, participation and preparation.
Janitorial, supervisory, liability and transportation challenges must be resolved
with dedication from CMSD leadership and partners.
Academy curricula is provided by discipline-specific and multidisciplinary partnerships
offering private and small group lessons, project-/service-based learning, and the
preparation and production of shows and concerts.
Students create original works, and perform/show these works at partner institutions.
- This should become a standard part of partnership programming as students
advance in fundamental skill sets.
CMSD Arts Education Implementation Plan
May 2014 ◆ Page 40
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The development of original work and the process of learning to become
composers, choreographers, directors, writers, designers, producers and more is
a necessary element of a robust academy curriculum.
10. SCHOOL CULTURE/RESOURCES
•
•
•
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•
•
CMSD schools require adequate arts resources to become more lively and passionate
places for learning.
CMSD commits to a realistic, basic supply of arts resources/materials for every school
in consultation with arts partners, including art supplies (paper, paints, brushes,
markers, rhythm kits, music, scripts, dance shoes/clothes, etc.)
Music instruments and arts supplies are provided in a manner that allows art teachers
to create authentic projects without compromising or using their own funds to create
authentic experiences.
The opportunity for every child to work with arts materials of every kind opens up
motivation, curiosity and pathways that may last a lifetime.
The coordinator of arts resources will work with every CMSD school to identify
critical needs and be responsible for equitable distribution.
The addition of 50 minutes to the school day is a resource for creativity/arts
education, and can serve as a basis for segues to academies and/or equity arts
experiences for every school.
11. PARTNERSHIPS
Note: Partnership include arts organizations, institutions of higher education and other
organizations working together with schools and their faculty. They exist within schools and
are the result of intense collaborations with teachers. Partners develop programs and
provide resources in direct response to what teachers need.
• Forging new partnerships and strengthening existing partnerships, not pushing
existing partnerships to the side and solely creating new ones.
• Establishing the Arts Education Marketplace, an online resource for principals, arts
educators, arts organizations and higher education that “matches” high-quality
professional development, arts partnerships, curriculum, teaching strategies and more
with schools. Model: CAPE in Chicago.
• The varying partnerships’ (options discussed below) essential purpose is to provide
collaborators to help CMSD build arts education capacity, infrastructure and
district support.
• Effective partnerships are those that invest in significant and compensated
planning, develop mutually articulated services and responsibilities, have
facilitation in their formulation and design, and are carefully evaluated for
alteration and adaptability. Ideal partnerships will have a diversity of players: small
and large organizations that are global in resource and perspective, higher education
and arts institutions, after-school service providers and social organizations.
• The providing of services by arts organizations and higher education to the CMSD Arts
Education Plan is based upon a planning process of responding to and being
accountable for helping the CMSD schools meet their most important pre-professional
and professional academic and arts needs, in and through the arts.
• Through a variety of partnerships and co-consultation with CMSD leadership, arts and
higher education participants will offer applied arts instruction; teaching artists;
CMSD Arts Education Implementation Plan
May 2014 ◆ Page 41
•
•
•
•
integrated and project-based hands-on learning that use the repertoire, collections
and artistic processes as means of inquiry and interpretation; neighborhood projectbased curriculum; and “Cleveland as campus.”
Arts providers will participate in PD concerning arts pedagogy, varying learning styles
and the developmental needs of CMSD students; best practices in inquiry; and
interpretation-based interaction of CMSD students with arts and arts processes.
“Exposure” and “transactional programs” will be discouraged and instead long-term,
needs-responsive and co-consultative relationships with schools will be encouraged
and supported.
Arts providers will be accountable to mutually agreed upon outcomes and goals, using
multiple forms of authentic assessment and evaluation. Participating schools will be
held equally accountable to the same outcomes.
Models: San Francisco (SFUSD), Chicago (CAPE), Boston Public Schools (Arts Partner
Manager and Arts Guide to Effective Partnerships, http://www.bpsarts.org/partnersartists/bps-arts-guide-to-effective-partnerships.html), Washington D.C, and Baltimore
schools have deep and committed partnerships with arts organizations.
We recommend a number of different kinds of partnerships:
1. Separate and coordinated arts-specific partnerships for music, visual arts,
dance, theater, media arts, technology, literary arts and the business of arts that
are built to create “pipelines” to skill sets, artistic development and higher
education/career opportunities.
2. Multidisciplinary partnerships that use their repertoire/collections/artistic
practices as a means of study. Ethnographic approaches, interpretation, history,
criticism, thinking and creating are all possible components.
3. Extended-day/after-school arts academy partnership where institutions with
high-level artistic practice, curatorial expertise and established pathways to higher
education and careers establish after-school services of skill-level differentiated
lessons, projects, performances/shows and mentorships.
4. Professional development partnerships built around higher education institutions
in collaboration with CMSD, arts organizations and artists that provide PD to CMSD
teachers, principals, arts administrators and artists working in both initiatives.
5. Arts project-based partnerships built upon neighborhood or community needs,
creation of productions, serving community constituents, and other worthy goals.
6. Special needs partnerships bring together arts, social, medical and community
resources to assist special needs learners in and through the arts.
7. All-City Arts Program partnerships between the new School of the Arts and other
high schools and organizations with particular interest in participating in the
preparation, casting, production and performance of a major work. Utilizing a
collaboration of expertise, resources, facilities, professionalism and media will
create a superior experience. Within this partnership or separately, there should
be a yearly festival for student arts, an opportunity for the community to share in
the creativity of Cleveland’s children.
CMSD Arts Education Implementation Plan
May 2014 ◆ Page 42
8. Medical community partnerships with the Cleveland Clinic and University
Hospitals, which have significant arts resource programs and devotion to the
community. The hospitals are very unique in that they have art collections, shows,
performances and arts staff. There are no other school arts programs that have
such partnerships with the medical community, so this presents a unique
opportunity to learn from their expertise in the arts, commitment to arts in
healing and to involve their resources in an effort to incorporate arts into STEM
education, creating “STEAM.”
SUGGESTED PARTNERSHIP IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY
• Designated CMSD leadership, Arts Education Advisory Council and Cleveland Arts
Education Consortium (CAEC) hold a series of meetings to set partnership policies.
We strongly recommend that the Boston Public Schools Arts Guide to Effective
Partnerships be used as a model.
• Once policies have been developed, a partnership subcommittee begins
recruitment of potential partners driven by the developed policy and the “free
market” culture of the Arts Education Marketplace.
• Two arts partnership “application” formats are drafted and created.
• An arts partnership application form is created by the subcommittee (with the
assistance of CAEC and guidance from the Arts Education Advisory Council). The
application enumerates: the prioritization and kinds of partnerships an arts
education provider is most interested in; specific arts partners and schools they
may be interested in working with; the listing of relevant resources they may be
able to provide; the staffing and expertise that will be most relevant to potential
partnership success; the kinds of time and allocation of resources that are possible;
and the interests the organization has in providing administrative and fiscal
leadership to partnerships they may participate in.
• A school’s application format is drafted and created that details: a school’s
current arts programs, faculty and resources; desired art forms; desired arts
partners; areas of academic and arts needs; a listing of potential partnership
categories and preferred interests/choices; a scale in which school leadership
express their level of interest in participation; and a clear introduction of how the
partnerships will be designed to serve the school’s most important needs and will
be planned collaboratively with school leadership and faculty.
• Suitable time is planned in order to distribute and receive completed
applications. This application data is then used by the Coordinator of the Arts
Education Marketplace and subcommittee to most effectively plan and convene the
first Arts Education Marketplace meeting. Preliminary “matchmaking” of arts
partners and schools is “triangulated” and applied at first Marketplace Meeting.
• Planning the first Arts Education Marketplace: This is planned around modeling
authentic collaborations between schools and arts partners that is focused upon
articulated and individualized school and student needs and desired outcomes.
Some existing programs already in place in Cleveland as well as proven models from
San Francisco, Boston, Chicago and Washington, D.C., are used as active and handson foundations for partnership methodologies, problem-solving and partnership
components. The actual kinds of conversations and problem-solving that have
resulted in success are planned for modeling as a central focus of the meeting and
CMSD Arts Education Implementation Plan
May 2014 ◆ Page 43
guided to create questions and discussions. Adequate time is then planned to provide for
facilitating conversations between potential partners and schools. Also, thorny discussion
issues of scheduling, compensation, expectations and articulated outcomes are planned.
Potential partnerships are then planned to be gathered as a concluding part of the day
with assigned facilitators recruited with strategic consideration from CAEC and others.
• An Arts Partnership Fair is convened where interested arts, higher education, and afterschool program providers, with school representatives (School Arts Coordinators and school
leadership) are attendees. The Fair introduces the modeling, matchmaking and facilitated
conversation as described in the above bullet.
• Once partnerships have some preliminary development, the Coordinator of the Arts
Education Marketplace and CAEC meet with individual potential partnerships (arts, higher
education, after-school and school partners) to advance their discussions. Next step
architectures are explored including: selection of potential fiscal and administrative
agents for each partnership (compensated partners who are responsible for planning,
scheduling, coordinating, managing and distributing funds, etc.); specific educational
outcomes and the means of assessing them; organizational, personnel and material
resources to meet those outcomes; deadlines for implementing initial student experiences;
and the implementation of initial experiences.
• Interested philanthropies create a fund to support partnership activities. Granting
criteria is developed transparently and potential partners have opportunities to explore
how they can best shape their educational goals, resources, budgets and timelines.
• Based upon available funds, partnerships apply using simple proposals that include
partners, letters of partnership commitment, roles and responsibilities, program activities
and expected outcomes, budgets and timelines.
• Partners make commitments to work together. Letters of mutual understanding of
partner responsibilities are developed and agreed upon.
• Initial partnerships’ program experiences are carefully assessed, discussed and adapted
based upon collaborative discussions. Partnership activities are expanded exponentially
based upon proven success and adaptability to challenges.
ALL-CITY ARTS RECOMMENDATIONS
As noted in our review of All-City Arts (see Appendix D), it cannot serve as a substitute for
an equitable, comprehensive and sequential arts education. However, it has had many
positive benefits for the children and youth involved. Linked to the systemic approach
articulated in this plan and a dynamic partnership of expert creative and production
resources from arts and higher education collaborators, All-City Arts would grow in both
quality and equitable opportunity. We believe it should continue, based upon the faithful,
talented and hard-working construct that has been created over the years.
We recommend that the planning of All-City Arts commences as a partnership program as
outlined above, furthering its current leadership, staffing and experience. It must be
planned as a culminating event of skills and learning development participating children
are studying in arts classes during school time, at after-school academies and through the
above articulated partnership initiatives. We strongly suggest that the yearly repertoire be
selected with such strategic thinking in mind. The piece or pieces should have projectbased and integrated curriculum value so they help advance outcomes in literacy,
numeracy, social studies and sciences. All-City can become an enhanced STEAM event that
shows off the dynamic impact arts has as a standalone area of rigor and study, as well as
its benefits to building learning capacity in multiple curricular areas.
CMSD Arts Education Implementation Plan
May 2014 ◆ Page 44
12. FUNDING
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Federal, state and local funds are designated in accordance with the CMSD’s per-pupil
funding formula based on student characteristics and model requirements to
adequately fund operating expenses of the school.
Local and regional funders with a noteworthy, world-class, multigenerational
commitment to providing arts education to all children should be encouraged to
provide sustained funding for projects and capacity-building initiatives with proven
outcomes and efficiencies.
This plan is based on leveraging partnerships and systems that create equity in arts
education access. This can attract additional and new funders and funding to these
partnerships of dedicated outcomes, planning and results.
Currently, there is a profound lack of working arts education models at both the state
and national level. The ability of these initiatives to garner “new monies” as a
realistic laboratory for other urban and regional centers is both possible and
strategically purposeful.
13. ENCOURAGING, SUPPORTING AND SUSTAINING CHANGE
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Accountabilities and assessment are structured for every component and reviewed at
regular intervals, with yearly reporting and adaptions.
It is critically important to reach out to parents and educate them about the value of
arts education for their children. Parents should be pressuring principals and other
CMSD officials to provide comprehensive arts education.
Plan implementation facilitator/facilitation independent of stakeholders will help
create strong architectures in initial years. Independent assessment will have parallel
purpose and success.
An Advocacy campaign that uses student works and accomplishments; independent
assessment results; multimedia; web; and corporate partners and their communication
vehicles, will all help maintain momentum and interest.
The CMSD should consider the creation of endowment funds for both resource
maintenance and operating costs for economic hard times.
Effective communications between the wide array of partners and authorities of
governance will, in the end, be elemental to sustainability. Leadership, compassion,
stakeholder transparency and the willingness to continue to adapt and change will
make for a City that Creates and an arts education system that Cleveland and its youth
so justly deserve.
15. TIMELINE (YEARS ONE TO FIVE)
YEAR ONE — The Planning Year (June 2014 - May 2015):
•
•
•
Create a one- or two-day Arts, Creativity and Integrated Education conference to
announce findings and plan.
Mission for CMSD arts education is developed, advocated, and adopted by board.
Advocacy campaign is planned with stakeholders and corporate supporters.
- The campaign can be managed by existing arts education organizations and a
single corporate supporter may be identified for its sponsorship.
CMSD Arts Education Implementation Plan
May 2014 ◆ Page 45
•
Recruit advisory council. Create responsibilities, accountabilities and best means of
supporting CEO and Cleveland’s Plan.
•
•
•
Hire a coordinator of the Arts Marketplace and the coordinator of arts resources.
CMSD Arts Education Plan PD planning and partnership facilitation is initiated.
- Specific partnerships deemed to be the most essential to PD, curricular goals and
outcomes are prioritized for planning and facilitation.
- These partnerships should align with CSA Redesign collaborations for efficiencies
and more timely development.
- These partnerships, over time, will likely become larger or more complex as a
result of systemic growth.
Assessment, evaluation and documentation is continued and addressed in program
revisions and advancements.
YEAR TWO (June 2015-May 2016):
•
•
•
•
•
•
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First advocacy campaign components are launched.
CMSD Arts Education Plan advisory council is in place and advising on budgets, policies
and guidance of initiative components.
PD is provided to all CMSD arts and classroom teachers, their arts and higher education
partners, and other CMSD faculty.
Arts Every Day begins year-round services on a pilot basis.
Partnerships that have been successful in formation and responsive to needs initiate
services on a pilot basis.
- Schools continue planning with partners, and services begin.
- Assessment, evaluation and documentation continues.
Arts testing is discussed further and decisions are made about whether to move
forward with it and potential timelines.
Assessment, evaluation and documentation are continued and addressed in program
revisions and advancements.
YEAR THREE (June 2015-May 2016):
•
•
•
•
•
PD is expanded to scale of demand/needs.
Advocacy campaign is expanded using evidence of model schools and CSA Redesign.
Arts report card is established system-wide as means of furthering and advocating for
arts education equity.
CMSD, Arts Every Day models and CSA Redesign are presented as national models.
Assessment, evaluation and documentation is continued and addressed in program
revisions and advancements.
YEAR FOUR:
•
•
•
PD is provided system-wide.
Assessment, evaluation and documentation is continued and addressed in program
revisions and advancements.
Advocacy campaign is expanded using evidence of model schools and CSA Redesign.
YEAR FIVE:
•
•
•
All program components have developed to scale of resources and funds for
sustainability and further replication.
Advocacy campaign is expanded using evidence of CMSD schools and CSA Redesign.
Campaign is launched for expanded visibility and funds for system-wide replication.
CMSD Arts Education Implementation Plan
May 2014 ◆ Page 46
CMSD ARTS EDUCATION PLAN BUDGET PARAMETERS*
Year One
14-15
Year Two
15-16
Year Three
16-17
Year Four
17-18
Year Five
18-19
Staffing /Resources1 for CMSD
Coordinator of Arts Education Marketplace
Coordinator of Arts Resources
School Arts Education Coordinators per school
Arts Plus Schools Arts Coordinators per school
TOTAL SCHOOL ARTS COORDINATOR COSTS2
Arts Every Day Increased Arts Faculty 2 per school3
Non-CMSD Costs Raised Independently4
Advocacy Campaign
Governance and Advisory Council
Development
Documentation and Assessment
PD Training /Program Facilitators
PD for Artists, Partners
ARTS RESOURCES5 Music Instruments, Music
Music Instrument and Music
Maintenance/Insurance
Arts Supplies
Dance, Theatre and Media Supplies
Perishable Arts Supplies6
Partnership Model Development
Fees for Artists, Arts Organizations, Partners7
Design/Implementation PD Partnership
Design/Implementation Discipline Specific
Design/Implementation Academy
Design/ Implementation Integrated/Project-Based
Design/Implementation Special Needs
Design/Implementation Integrated and All-City
Design/Implementation Medical Community Partnerships
Planning Honorariums for Teachers
Hospitality
Public Relations/Media Launching
Total for CMSD
Total for Independently Raised Fund
Total Combined CMSD and Raised
47
Budget Key
*
This is a template with footnotes for consideration. A specific, monetized budget will have to be
developed by the district in consultation with the principal parties.
1
Salaries are estimates and growth is reflective of increased job load and capacity.
2
Estimates based upon serving 50-75 schools.
3
This broad estimate is based on comparative data from other school systems and current faculty.
Necessary union and pension information may change totals.
4
In the past 30 years, where philanthropy have supported direct school supply costs as well as
partnership, assessment and resource expenses, it has been hoped that school systems would pick
up these expenses as they proved their value. However, this has proven to not be true. School
systems have consistently reneged on such arrangements because of leadership changes, lack of
commitment, economic challenges and other reasoning.
5
Admittedly, school supplies are normative costs in school budgets. Combining the significant
capital expenditures of hiring and maintaining a system-wide arts faculty and staffing for
partnerships, these budget items have been placed in the “raised money” category to better
balance responsibilities.
6
Perishable art supplies refer to the normative requirements of children working in various arts
mediums. This number expends approximately $1,000/per school.
7
These partnership estimates are based upon numerous partnerships models and the flexibility
that will be required to mount and implement them. Also, the total number of funds for
partnerships should be viewed as adaptable, as some partnerships will grow and be more
expansive than others.
48
APPENDICES
Editor’s note: What follows is a collection of various documents created or used over the
course of developing the preceding plan. These supplements are intended as a reference
for readers who desire to dig deeper into the research that informed our final product.
They are not intended to be considered a continuation of the plan itself or its
recommendations. They are presented “as is” and, while they were edited along the way,
no attempt was made to make them uniform in presentation or format, either with each
other or the preceding formal document itself.
49
ARTS EDUCATION PROGRAMS
Dr. Rekha S. Rajan
December 1, 2013
“Cleveland is very culturally rich with so many world-class organizations. This is a new
opportunity for us all to provide more access and culturally relevant programming for the
broader community.” — Arts organization representative
This report summarizes surveys and interviews with representatives of arts organizations
throughout the Cleveland metropolitan area. Individuals at each arts organization shared
feedback on their perceptions of successful collaborations with the Cleveland Metropolitan
School District (CMSD), their specific mission and goals, the challenges of collaboration, and
recommendations for what they need to build and sustain meaningful arts experiences for
students.
The first part of the report presents responses to survey and interview questions. The responses
are organized into three sections: Collaboration with Schools, Professional Development, and
Artistic Experiences. The second part presents a concise summary of recommendations and the
researcher’s reflections on the overall findings.
Education is a core part of arts organizations’ visions and missions, but they also want to know
that they will further their own mission when working with CMSD and Cleveland School of the
Arts (CSA). In their responses to surveys, over 85 percent shared that they would want to build a
stronger relationship with the CSA. Some of their comments include that the audiences at each
organization enjoy watching the “incredibly talented students perform,” and that “the students
have been very attentive, engaged, and excited.”
However, the majority of feedback shared in both surveys and interviews highlighted the
challenges and struggles organizations faced when partnering with schools. The arts
organizations described how there was a lack of support within the schools and the district; how
teachers did not have professional development or a commitment to their programs; and that the
majority of artistic experiences for students were short residencies, workshops, or after-school
programs.
The final section of this report presents a detailed list of recommendations that were gleaned
from the surveys and interviews.
Appendix A, Page 1
PART 1
COLLABORATION WITH SCHOOLS
Each arts organization presented various reasons why it was challenging and difficult to
collaborate with schools. One of the main concerns was building and sustaining a strong
partnership within a school. Each setting often had high turnover rates for leadership and staff,
minimal resources for the arts, and a lack of general support from the district. Teachers also often
leave classrooms when teaching artists visit, making it a challenge for artists to manage the
classroom and maintain discipline. These challenges have led to the implementation of afterschool programs or seminars for students rather than longer collaborations or residencies.
Specific comments, ideas and concerns from survey and interview responses included:
 Getting access to people at CMSD to form a partnership as well as poor communication
once a partnership is created. Very difficult to get consistent follow-up from the district
when one is trying to serve schools within school programming.
 We are only serving the same population with their after-school programs.
 When we are working with CSA students on a production there is a lack of
teacher/parental resources and support.
 Staff change. Scheduled field trips get cancelled because a driver is out or a bus is needed
for a “more important event.”
 760 classrooms is a lot to work with without coordination. Some schools were on top of it
and some were not. Some academic superintendents were not on top of it.
 Fund the school district that becomes accountable to hire the arts organizations to meet
specific needs. Make the district accountable for arts education in this way. The school
district must drive the initiative and be accountable.
 We tried working with CMSD to pilot an extended-day program. It was very difficult to
make it happen. School system is overwhelmed with so many other goals. We were
competing with the system for time, building space, and the school schedule.
 Teachers’ lack of support during the residency program is the biggest challenge —
oftentimes leaving the classroom whereby in other school districts teachers are present
and participating. This can be problematic for the teaching artists when discipline issues
arise, as they often do in CMSD schools.
 Would like to have a centralized office that works with outside parties to help coordinate
and communicate with the schools, teachers and classrooms.
Appendix A, Page 2
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
Arts organizations did not have strong professional development opportunities in place for the
classroom teachers or the teaching artists. Teachers were often invited to the organizations to see
performances or were presented with study guide and curriculum materials. However, in-depth
professional development was not a part of the organizations’ mission or planning.
Specific comments, ideas and concerns from survey and interview responses included:
 Educators’ night for teachers to collaborate and see performances — hope is that teachers
will return to the theater with their schools.
 We provide work-study type experiences for artists where they learn on the job.
 In the past, we would host a session for teachers modeling the residency and would
occasionally provide a speaker. Will also provide free planning meetings for teachers
prior to going to a school. Teachers are also provided with study guides and lesson plans
about the show.
 Teachers have the opportunity to attend lectures, if they are interested, but there is no
other professional development.
 Teachers are provided with study guides for their performances and Dancing Wheels
created the first training manual for physically disabled, arts-integrated dance.
 We offer planning sessions with the teachers but no professional development. We have
also provided program outlines and implementation schedules.
 We do the necessary planning, logistics, and review of material with teachers if
requested, but there is no specific professional development. There are also study guides
for teachers before the classroom visits.
Appendix A, Page 3
ARTISTIC EXPERIENCES
The arts organizations all had existing programs that they present in collaboration with CSA and
other CMSD schools. However, the majority of these programs were either after-school
programs or summer workshops/seminars for students. The experiences in general were minimal,
focused on applied experiences within a discipline, and limited to short visits to schools.
The organizations often spoke of an interest in having more integrated curriculum and activities
with the schools, but found several challenges with working with schools that had block
scheduling, or no interest in integrated arts activities. Particularly challenging was how they felt
schools were unprepared for the visits that they did make, as students would not have read the
plays or been familiar with the curriculum material prior to their visits.
Specific comments, ideas and concerns from survey and interview responses included:
 We do not do much work with CSA, so they often bring artists from outside the
community. We have always wanted to do more with them, but they have not done much
because of their not being very interested in integrated curriculum.
 The educational outreach programs use theatre techniques to educate its audiences
through school assembly programs, workshops and residencies. Currently serve students
in grades four and five and seven and eight, one day a week [one-year residency].
 We provided a one-week residency program for 12 CMSD schools this year. CMSD paid
$500 for all 12 residencies. … Teachers are asked what students are reading in order to
plan which show will be developed for the residency.
 We tried to create an after-school program. Need to create simple partnerships with arts
organizations who clearly want to partner with the CMSD or CSA. It seems there is a
need for more involvement because there are so many kids that are not engaged in afterschool programs.
 In-classroom residency models are often a challenge because the students are not prepped
before the artists arrive and they have not read the play or materials.
 The summer arts program runs for 10 weeks, with eight weeks of classes and two weeks
of rehearsal to prepare for the culminating event/show for the community. It is more of an
enrichment model, not arts integration, at this point.
 We have two-day residencies — includes four to six classrooms per day, and community
concerts for students.
 Programming consists of music, dance, visual arts, sewing, theater, vocal ensembles,
Kindermusic, Kinderdance, math and reading tutoring, and performance opportunities as
well as outdoor and indoor concerts. After-school runs for two to three hours and
Saturdays four to six hours.
 A two-week multimedia summer camp is conducted and students perform for their
parents and the general public during a closing event.
 We offer two- to four-week residencies with a focus on introduction to theater, theater
games, etc., for schools.
Appendix A, Page 4
PART II
Summary of Recommendations
The arts organizations have described what they need to have successful collaborations with
schools. The artistic experiences are primarily transactional, concise, and minimal. Overall, the
arts organizations believe that collaborating with CSA provides small organizations opportunities
to grow.
Logistics
 Need a liaison or centralized office to coordinate partnerships and visits
 Need a system in place to provide buses for CSA students to visit organizations
 Need follow-through after visits and collaboration with CSA
 Need less turnover in leadership and teaching staff
 Need better management of financial resources within schools
 Need someone to lead outreach efforts with CSA and CMSD
Academics
 Need stronger writing and academic support for students at CSA
 Need more flexibility at CSA and other schools to find time for the arts within the
academic schedule
 Need to find ways to give CSA students real-world preparation for higher education and
careers
Professional Development
 Need professional development for principals
 Need professional development for teachers and teaching artists
 Need clear expectations for teachers during the teaching artist visits (e.g., assisting with
discipline and curriculum)
Resources
 Need to encourage CSA to use community resources effectively
 Need professional, functioning arts spaces at CSA (and other schools)
 Need workshops for arts organizations to learn how to work with urban schools
Appendix A, Page 5
Reflections
The programs presented by the arts organizations are all short and very concise. Each residency
or workshop is limited to a couple of weeks, or a performance or presentation for students. There
is no apparent depth to the arts integration or artistic experiences; students are presented with an
activity (often with no pre-planning from teachers), and then left without any follow-up or
extensions to their artistic learning. While some activities are focused on applied learning in the
arts, the majority are focused on what the teachers might need in relation to their curriculum.
There is minimal evidence of deep, integrated arts learning.
Some challenges can be attributed to high turnover rates in staffing at schools, minimal support
for collaborating with organizations, rigid schedules that do not allow for arts-integrated
learning, financial constraints within schools, a lack of transportation for students to visit
organizations, and a need for better management overall within schools.
The Young Audiences Program seems to be the “default” outlet for arts organizations to work
with CMSD schools. The outcomes of this program seem to be general in nature, rather than
focused experiences provided by each organization. This is particularly troubling since the arts
organizations all, unanimously, shared that education is a central and vital component of their
mission and work. However, this is not reflected in their programs or collaborations.
The teachers are provided with minimal professional development from their schools and the arts
organizations. The extent of collaboration with teachers is a short pre-planning session or the
distribution of curriculum guides and planning materials. Arts organizations are frustrated that
teachers often do not use the materials they are provided with and/or leave the classroom when
teaching artists visit. There needs to be a clear set of expectations for both the teachers and the
teaching artists — before, during, and after each residency, workshop, or session.
Overall, the collaborations, programs, and artistic experiences with CMSD and CSA seem
shallow, concise, and brief. The activities are primarily needs-based — with some applied
workshops or sessions for students — but there is minimal evidence of rich, detailed, preplanned arts-integrated experiences. The teachers are in great need of professional development
and the arts organizations are struggling to convey their expectations for their collaborations with
schools. High turnover in staff, rigid schedules, and lack of management within schools has
made it challenging for arts organizations to build and sustain transformational artistic
experiences.
Appendix A, Page 6
Visual Arts and Music Standards
for Curriculum Development
The purpose of this report is to create a baseline of standards for music and the visual arts within the
Cleveland Metropolitan School District (CMSD) and its Cleveland School of the Arts (CSA).
These standards result from identifying consistencies in national, state and higher education music
curriculum outcomes, as well as identification of professional skill sets. CMSD and CSA music and visual
arts curricula must use national and career/professional standards that provide students the
preparation and rigor necessary to win admittance to and succeed in the highest quality conservatories
and programs at colleges and universities. To accomplish this, students should participate in a “realworld curriculum” inside Cleveland area institutions where professional-level practice, rehearsal,
performance and production become essential to the student vocabulary and experience. This includes
the opportunity to study with studio teachers, as well as the opportunity to gain college credits and
learning where possible. These efforts must be part of a directed and differentiated course of instruction
where the learner’s expected outcomes are systematic, transparent and carefully assessed.
These standards also result from an analysis and synthesis of the following documents:
-
-
Cleveland’s Plan for Transforming Schools: Reinventing public education in our city and serving
as a model of innovation for the state of Ohio (2012)
A Premier Future: Unifying Students, Teachers and the Community for Success In and Through
the Arts – CMSD Department of Arts Education 2008-2013 Strategic Plan
CMSD Scope and Sequence for the Visual Arts (2012)
CMSD Scope and Sequence for Music (2012)
The Ohio Department of Education’s visual arts standards (2012)
The Ohio Department of Education’s music standards (2012)
Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) frameworks:
o PARCC Model Content Frameworks for ELA/Literacy for Grade 9, Version 2.0—August
2012
National Association for Music Education’s “National Standards for Music Education”
“Principles of Possibility: Considerations for a 21st Century Art & Culture Curriculum” by Olivia
Gude
“Studio Thinking 2: The Real Benefits of Visual Arts Education” by Lois Hetland, Ellen Winner,
Shirley Veenema, and Kimberly M. Sheridan
Context
CMSD must draw upon the high-quality resources available for designing and implementing music and
visual arts and design curricula in a district and nationally renowned school of the arts. Fortunately, as
stated in the CMSD Department of Arts Education 2008-2013 Strategic Plan:
Appendix I, Page 1
The Cleveland Metropolitan School District is very fortunate to have many nationally known,
arts and cultural organizations that actively support CMSD arts education in the schools and at
their locations. These organizations design and deliver arts instruction and programs that
support student academic success, arts skill development and link to State of Ohio curriculum
standards and literacy instruction. (p. 7)
Ohio also has a contemporary set of rigorous music and visual arts standards that should be employed
as part of the CMSD/CSA programming and curriculum design. These visual arts and music standards
align well with and can be further adapted for the focus on college and career readiness described in
Cleveland’s Plan for Transforming Schools:
Through its commitment to the Higher Education Compact of Greater Cleveland, the district and
its charter partners will invest in college readiness, access and persistence for all its students,
with the goal of improving Cleveland college enrollment and graduation rates. This will include
increasing the number of high school students enrolled in post-secondary coursework and
partnering with local employers to train and connect students with open positions that will
provide immediate and longterm employment opportunities. (p. 10)
CMSD/CSA music and visual arts and design programming must use curriculum standards to develop the
skills and understandings students need to succeed in colleges of the arts at the highest level. To
accomplish this, CMSD/CSA visual arts and design students should take part in internships in the creative
industries and cultural institutions of greater Cleveland and participate in college-level courses when
appropriate. Both internships and college-level courses must be part of a systematic, purposeful
curriculum that is acutely aware of the high standards and pathways to meeting them, as well as
ongoing, critical feedback, and assessment that tracks student progress and achievement.
Related Initiatives
Integral to college and career readiness is the achievement of the Common Core State Standards in
English and math. Ohio is one of 20 states helping to develop the PARCC assessments to determine
student readiness to take entry-level, college courses in those areas. In particular, the Ohio visual arts
standards emphasize many of the Common Core standards in English Language Arts/Literacy. For
example, one of the strands in ELA is the Speaking and Listening Standards. In ninth and 10th grade the
standards are characterized as follows:
Students speak (both in formal presentations and in informal discussions) with growing maturity
to convey ideas and information both clearly and persuasively. Students are simultaneously
developing listening skills that allow them to participate effectively and contribute to groups.
(p.9)
While in the Ohio visual arts standards, two “Progress Points” for high school students that directly
relate to the Common Core description above are the following:
Students will apply reasoning skills to communicate key ideas expressed in their artworks and
the works of others and use appropriate criteria and language to critique the works. [And]
Appendix I, Page 2
students will demonstrate respect for, and effectively work with, socially and culturally diverse
teams or content to increase innovation and quality.
Many other instances exist of overlap among the Common Core ELA standards and the Ohio visual arts
standards. Using the Ohio visual arts standards would mean additional emphasis and attention to the
Common Core standards, which are the basis for the PARCC assessments.
Visual Arts Standards
The CMSD standards for the visual arts recapitulate verbatim the Ohio visual arts standards. The only
difference being that the CMSD visual arts standards divide the state standards into quarters. They also
provide two additional categories for each quarter: Activities, Resources and Field Experiences and
Children’s Literature. Breaking the state standards into quarters seems counter to the school autonomy
and performance-based assessment characteristics highlighted in Cleveland’s Plan for Transforming
Schools. Visual arts and design teachers and departments should be allowed to develop their own
strategies for meeting the standards based on their specific contexts. The quarterly expectations are too
narrowly prescribed. Likewise, the Children’s Literature section, while valuable in its resourcefulness,
seems limiting. The listing of literature to consider connecting with the standards could easily exist as an
appendix, as could the Activities, Resources and Field Experiences, which are mostly redundant over
several quarters.
Another important difference in the CMSD and Ohio visual arts standards is the page layout of the
information. This may seem less significant than the content, but there is a crucial visual preference.
People raised in Western cultures read a page of text starting in the upper left-hand corner. On the
CMSD visual arts standards pages, this is where the heading and first quarter standards begin. The Ohio
state standards page locates the “Enduring Understandings” in this corner. These understandings are
the overarching, ongoing focal points for the entire visual arts programming. These ‘mission statements’
ground all of the subsequent standards on the page. The CMSD pages have these understandings in the
lower right-hand corner. Layout matters. It is part of the visual designing of information.
The Enduring Understandings set the stage for a dynamic, contextualized, relevant, and rigorous
education in the visual arts:




Personal Choice and Vision: Students construct and solve problems of personal relevance and
interest when expressing themselves through visual art.
Critical and Creative Thinking: Students combine and apply artistic and reasoning skills to
imagine, create, realize and refine artworks in conventional and innovative ways.
Authentic Application and Collaboration: Students work individually and in groups to focus
ideas and create artworks that address genuine local and global community needs.
Literacy: As consumers, critics and creators, students evaluate and understand artworks and
other texts produced in the media forms of the day.
These are further characterized within each grade grouping (K-2, 3-5, 6-8, and high school) into Progress
Points. These developmentally appropriate markers identify aims, from historical and cultural contexts
Appendix I, Page 3
to skills and tools; career awareness and readiness to communication and collaboration; and more. They
are a model framework from which to build a high-quality visual arts curriculum at CSA.
Given these considerations and differences between the CMSD and Ohio visual arts standards,
CMSD/CSA should adopt the Ohio visual arts standards as their model for curriculum development. In
doing so, they include all recapitulated standards in the CMSD version but with additional flexibility and
emphasis on the Enduring Understandings. The Ohio visual arts standards also compliment and help
achieve the Common Core ELA standards and provide additional opportunities for students to prepare
for the PARCC assessments presently in development.
Frameworks for Curriculum Development
Implicated in the Ohio visual arts standards are Olivia Gude’s “Principles of Possibility: Considerations for
a 21st Century Art & Culture Curriculum” (2007).1 This seminal text in art education describes an
alternative to the modernist, formalist conception of visual arts education being anchored to elements
of art and principles of design. She argues that art educators focusing on contemporary art practices,
critical theory, and student empowerment do view the elements and principles as necessary or
sufficient for a high-quality art curriculum. Gude argues:
Contemplating the main topics of a curriculum ought to stimulate students' and teachers'
anticipation and participation. Modernist elements and principles, a menu of media, or lists of
domains, modes, and rationales are neither sufficient nor necessary to inspire a quality art
curriculum through which students come to see the arts as a significant contribution to their
lives. (p. 6)
Instead, Gude continues, visual arts curricula should be based upon new “Principles of Possibility”:










Playing
Forming self
Investigating community themes
Encountering difference
Attentive living
Empowered experiencing
Empowered making
Deconstructing culture
Reconstructing social spaces
Not knowing
These are not meant to be themes or units of instruction. Rather, they are a framework from which art
educators can create experiences and curricula that engage students and teachers in meaningful art
1
Gude derived the Principle of Possibility from her “understanding of the research and practice of colleagues in
the fields of art, media studies, art education, and community arts as well as from best practices of the Spiral
Workshop, the University of Illinois at Chicago's Saturday youth artist program for 13-19-year-olds and the
Contemporary Community Curriculum Initiative, UIC's programs with in-service art teachers. (p. 7)
Appendix I, Page 4
making. The CSA visual arts instructors should include Gude’s framework in their development of the
curriculum and programs.
Another curriculum framework focuses on the habits employed by successful art educators who are also
practicing artists. “Studio Thinking 2: The Real Benefits of Visual Arts Education” by Lois Hetland, Ellen
Winner, Shirley Veenema, and Kimberly M. Sheridan offers categories of practice from which engaging,
rigorous, relevant, and thorough visual arts education may be framed.2 The studio habits observed in
high-quality, high school arts education were:
Develop Craft: Learning to use tools, materials, artistic conventions; and learning to care for
tools, materials, and space.
Engage & Persist: Learning to embrace problems of relevance within the art world and/or of
personal importance, to develop focus conducive to working and persevering at tasks.
Envision: Learning to picture mentally what cannot be directly observed and imagine possible
next steps in making a piece.
Express: Learning to create works that convey an idea, a feeling, or a personal meaning.
Observe: Learning to attend to visual contexts more closely than ordinary “looking” requires,
and thereby to see things that otherwise might not be seen.
Reflect: Learning to think and talk with others about an aspect of one’s work or working process,
and, learning to judge one’s own work and working process and the work of others.
Stretch & Explore: Learning to reach beyond one’s capacities, to explore playfully without a
preconceived plan, and to embrace the opportunity to learn from mistakes.
Understand Arts Community: Learning to interact as an artist with other artists, i.e., in
classrooms, in local arts organizations, and across the art field and within the broader society.
These “Studio Habits of Mind,” as with the Principles of Possibility, are reflected in the Ohio visual arts
standards. Taken as a union of standards and frameworks, these three, key texts hold potential for a
visual arts curriculum at CSA that is on the leading edge of high school programming in the nation.
Music Standards
The CMSD standards for music are restatements, like the visual arts, of Ohio and National standards.
The framework of these standards is based upon the following National Standards for Music outcomes:
1. Singing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.
2
Lois Hetland is professor and chair of art education at Massachusetts College of Art and Design and senior
research affiliate at Project Zero, Harvard Graduate School of Education. Ellen Winner is professor and chair of
psychology at Boston College and a senior research associate at Project Zero. Shirley Veenema is an instructor in
visual arts at Phillips Academy in Andover, Mass. Kimberly M. Sheridan is an assistant professor in the College of
Education and Human Development and the College of Visual and Performing Arts at George Mason University.
Appendix I, Page 5
2. Performing on instruments, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.
3. Improvising melodies, variations, and accompaniments.
4. Composing and arranging music within specified guidelines.
5. Reading and notating music.
6. Listening to, analyzing, and describing music.
7. Evaluating music and music performances.
8. Understanding relationships between music, the other arts, and disciplines outside the arts.
9. Understanding music in relation to history and culture.
The revised CMSD Music Scope and Sequence (2013-14) restate Ohio categorical outcomes in “Progress
Points,” “Enduring Understandings,” “Social Emotional Learning,” and “Academic Connections (Multiple
Areas).” “Enduring Understandings” are the actual central focus of Ohio and CMSD music curriculum
learning. These frameworks for assessing student progress are helpful in measuring student music
success through the differing lenses of learning style and special needs. These additions are thoughtful
in that they reflect the challenges that music teachers face.
However, dividing the state music standards into quarters, like the visual arts standards, is contrary to
the nature of Cleveland’s Plan for Transforming Schools and reduces school autonomy to best reflect
their student needs and the appropriate assessment of their learning. Music teachers should be
supported to develop the timing and articulation of these expectations based upon their student’s
actual skill sets, learning abilities and special needs, and in partnership with music and higher education
professional organizations.
Like the visual arts standards, the CMSD music standards graphic presentation fails to help the reader
identify the central “Enduring Understandings” section.
The Enduring Understandings in music are identical to the visual arts standards and help ground music
with other curricular areas and the creative and expressive outcomes of music studies:
Personal Choice and Vision: Students construct and solve problems of personal relevance and
interest when expressing themselves through visual art.
Critical and Creative Thinking: Students combine and apply artistic and reasoning skills to
imagine, create, realize and refine artworks in conventional and innovative ways.
Authentic Application and Collaboration: Students work individually and in groups to focus
ideas and create artworks that address genuine local and global community needs.
Literacy: As consumers, critics and creators, students evaluate and understand artworks and
other texts produced in the media forms of the day.
Appendix I, Page 6
These, like the visual arts, are further articulated through grade and developmentally targeted groupings
(K-2, 3-5, 6-8, and high school) into Progress Points. These groupings provide the kind of flexibility
central to Cleveland’s Plan for Transforming Schools. Like the visual arts, the music standards should be
based upon the Enduring Understandings of The Ohio Music Standards.
Additional Context for Music Curriculum
Music pedagogy has several hundreds of years of development and refinement. Over the last 100 years,
the contribution of music educators and composers has more closely paralleled the actual ways children
learn. Methods derived from the work of Carl Orff and Zoltán Kodály emphasized inspiration,
storytelling, play, movement and increased time for children to participate in making music. Emile
Jaques-Dalcroze’s work and the Dalcroze Eurhythmics approach, is based upon expressiveness,
movement (to “internalize” rhythm) and musical improvisation. Shinichi Suzuki and his Suzuki Method
stress parental co-learning and encouragement, as well as “constant repetition,” listening, and learning
together with other children.
Cleveland and its treasure trove of music educators, performers and institutions have the resources and
willingness to assist CSA and CMSD with these methods as well as the highly regarded studio and
pedagogic practices of Cleveland’s musicians.
Music curriculum is a “living and breathing” practice shaped from these many years of experience,
methods and pedagogic advancement. The progress of music education has followed the advances in
child development and the neurosciences.
The partnership of Cleveland music and medical resources with the ongoing music curriculum
development of CSA (and the preparation and inspiration of all CMSD students) to assist students in
reaching “The Enduring Understandings” is a significant success factor.
Appendix I, Page 7
References
A Premier Future: Unifying Students, Teachers and the Community for Success In and Through the Arts –
CMSD Department of Arts Education 2008-2013 Strategic Plan.
Cleveland’s Plan for Transforming Schools: Reinventing public education in our city and serving as a
model of innovation for the state of Ohio (2012).
CMSD Scope and Sequence for the Visual Arts (2012).
CMSD Scope and Sequence for Music (2012).
Gude, O. (January, 2007). Principles of Possibility: Considerations for a 21st Century Art & Culture
Curriculum. Art Education: the Journal of the National Art Education Association. 60(1), 6-17.
Hetland, L., Winner, L., Veenema, S., and Sheridan, K. M. (2013). Studio Thinking 2: The Real Benefits of
Visual Arts Education. NY: Teachers College Press.
Ohio Visual Arts Standards (2012).
Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) frameworks: PARCC Model
Content Frameworks for ELA/Literacy for Grade 9, Version 2.0—August 2012
(http://www.parcconline.org/sites/parcc/files/PARCCMCFforELALiteracyGRADE9_FINALAug2012.pdf)
Dalcroze Society of America (http://www.dalcrozeusa.org/about-us/history)
American Orff-Schulwerk Association (http://aosa.org/about/what-is-orff-schulwerk/)
Suzuki Association of the Americas (https://suzukiassociation.org/teachers/twinkler/suzuki/)
Appendix I, Page 8
An Analysis of the Scope and Sequence document, State Standards for Fine Arts and the
Department of Arts Education Strategic Plan
Dr. Rekha S. Rajan
June, 2013
Introduction
This is an analysis of the relationship between the Scope and Sequence (S&S) document
developed by the Cleveland Metropolitan School District (CMSD) and standards for fine arts
instruction developed by the Cleveland School of the Arts (CSA) and the Ohio Department of
Education. The analysis identified areas of strength and areas for growth within the S&S
document. The subjects of music (grades K-5), drama (grades K-12) and dance (grades K-12)
were the focus of the analysis.
Comparison to and analysis of the Department of Arts Education (DAE) Strategic Plan
Many of the statements in the S&S document mirrored what was listed in the Ohio
standards for fine arts. However, a focus on providing students with experiences that both
prepared and motivated them for pre-professional arts programs was notably absent from the
S&S document. Such language is included in the DAE strategic plan. For example, Strategic
Goal #2 states, “Cleveland School of the Arts, with the support from Friends of Cleveland
School of the Arts, has focused on educating students in the arts combining both a college
preparatory academic program and a pre-professional arts program.”
Due to the general statements listed in the S&S document, there was little to no
attention given to assessments or how students would be evaluated on their progress. It seems
that this would be an important component to assist teachers and guide professional development
within and outside of the classroom.
Appendix C, Page 1
The DAE’s Strategic Goal #3 states, “This initiative will provide research-based student
outcomes to support additional funding for arts programming, equipment, materials and teacher
professional development. In addition to measuring student achievement, it will be digitally
documented and showcased in the community.” Digital documentation, while mentioned within
the third strategic goal, is not a central component of students’ arts experiences. Interactions and
engagement with the latest technology in all artistic disciplines is a necessary component of
high-quality experiences in the arts within each grade level, in the community, and for college
preparatory programs.
Under “Roles and Responsibilities,” the DAE strategic plan states, “DAE staff provides
ongoing resources, materials and teacher professional development to support arts instruction in
the classrooms of over 100 CMSD schools and programs district wide.” The DAE does not
specifically list the amount of time spent on each of the individual art forms during a day or
week (i.e. per student, per classroom). This specificity will help to ensure that students are
actually receiving the arts experiences that are the focus and goal of the strategic plan.
Summary and Recommendations
Overall, the S&S document strongly aligned with the Ohio standards for fine arts (i.e.,
music, drama, and dance). This was specifically accomplished through the inclusion of near
verbatim statements taken directly from the standards.
Students should be allowed to move through the natural stages of understanding material,
reviewing their new knowledge, and applying and analyzing the material they have learned. The
goals for drama and dance are clear and straightforward, but often simply restate what is listed in
the standards for these art forms.
Appendix C, Page 2
The section on music, however, moves beyond the standards by including discussion of
activities, field experiences, areas for social-emotional learning and academic connections. This
allows teachers to see music as more than just an artistic area of learning, and find ways to
connect with other teachers, specialists and community members.
Overall, the S&S document for music showed an understanding of how children should
meet goals within each quarter and within each grade level. This allowed for growth in multiple
areas. The document also encourages field experiences that relate to the standards and are
appropriate for each grade level. Additional strengths are the sections that have progress points
for teachers to follow growth and learning, and enduring understandings that explore personal
choice, creative thinking, and collaboration.
The most significant components of this revised document are the inclusion of areas for
social-emotional learning and academic connections. This allows for teachers to think beyond
music as an isolated subject area, and find ways to connect with other teachers in the school (i.e.
social studies, language arts), or other specialists in the school and community.
While there were strengths and areas for growth within each arts subject and each grade
level, many key components were absent throughout the document that are central to providing
students with high-quality arts experiences. The following are suggestions for improving the
S&S document:
1. Note that attending live performances is critical for young children’s understanding of an
artist’s role in society and the knowledge that one can pursue a career in the arts.
2. Note that, from a young age, it is critical children have the opportunity to experience
being an audience member. This invaluable setting teaches children of all ages both the
value of live performance and the etiquette required for attending different types of
performances.
3. Many of the activities or components noted that students should gather an understanding
of connections between the arts and between the arts and other subject areas. However,
Appendix C, Page 3
there were few examples included in the general statements, making the actual
components very challenging to translate into an actual classroom.
4. Rather than repeating and re-stating all of the standards listed for each grade level, the
S&S document could include general criteria and provide specific examples for teachers
to implement in their classroom.
5. There could be more opportunities for students to take ownership of their arts experiences
from a young age; many of the opportunities for improvising, creating, and collaborating
in music, drama, and dance began only after fifth grade.
6. Using and creating works of art with the latest technology relevant to each artistic
discipline is a critical component for successful and meaningful engagement in the arts.
There were few examples or statements that encouraged these types of experiences.
7. Students should have the opportunity to build immensely on the components they learn
about in the beginning of the school year. There continues to be an absence of building
on previously learned skills and prior knowledge, since much of the language used is
identical to what is listed in the standards.
8. There should be more opportunities for students to experience and understand the arts
beyond their classroom and to explore world instruments, the orchestra, and the human
voice. Continuing to have students identify basic music forms and basic musical
vocabulary is not challenging or age-appropriate.
9. Terminology used in the S&S document should show this opportunity for growth. After
the first and second quarter, students should move from “identifying and describing” to
“analyzing, creating, representing, comparing and explaining” their artistic experiences.
This would also strengthen the actual “sequence” of learning.
10. By high school, the focus should be on career preparation, understanding art’s role in
society today, and having students continue to analyze bodies of work and defend their
opinions. Additionally, continuing to build on individual portfolios and sharing this work
with their peers (not just revising one’s own work without feedback), is a vital
component of self-evaluation and reflection. This level of critical analysis is central to
having students prepared for college-level theatre and providing them opportunities for
being advocates in their community.
In summary, and amongst all three subject areas, the document created for music was the
most coherent and well-aligned with the standards. Not only did the document for music show
growth amongst the standards within each grade level, but the additional sections that built on
Appendix C, Page 4
social-emotional learning, academic connections, field experiences, and progress points, provide
teachers with a variety of ways to use music meaningfully in their classrooms.
The components for dance were also well-organized and showed a logical trajectory
toward mastering skills in dance as a performer and observer. Contributing to this was, perhaps,
the fact that the Ohio standards for high school were grouped into beginning, intermediate, and
advanced benchmarks, whereas the high school standards for drama and music specified
expectations for each level of high school. There also were specific examples of what the
components should look like within a classroom, rather than general statements.
Appendix C, Page 5
CMSD’S ALL-CITY ARTS PROGRAM
By Yolande Spears
Author’s note: The information for this document was acquired from a September 2013 one-hour
telephone interview with Tony Sias, director of the Cleveland Metropolitan School District
(CMSD) Department of Arts Education (DAE), and the department’s website (www.cmsdartseducation.com).
What is the All-City Arts Program? When and where does the program occur?
This program is conducted as an after-school and weekend program for CMSD students in
grades K-12. The goal of the program is to offer artistic instruction, performance opportunities
and visual art exhibition experiences for students, as well as student showcase events for families
and the broader community. The program has two distinctive levels:
• The All-City Arts intensive level runs for 30 weeks, six hours a week, for grades nine to
12. It is housed at the John Hay Campus.
• The K-8 All-City program takes place at elementary and middle school building sites.
Teachers can self-select to participate.
The high school program participants perform in the annual winter and spring concerts/festivals,
but the K-8 schools select whether to participate in the winter event, spring event, or both.
CMSD’s Department of Arts Education Strategic Plan, 2008-2013 states that:
The All-City Arts Program strives to:
• teach students the value of discipline, commitment, focus, and the joy and
success derived from hard work.
• prepare students for post-secondary education and/or professional training in
their arts discipline.
• share student talents and achievements with the Greater Cleveland community.
Students interested in All-City self-select to study and perform in one of the specialized
ensembles including dance, drama/theater, creative writing and spoken word, or Visual
Arts. Musical ensembles include vocal/choral, orchestra, band/jazz band and drum line.
Students selected for ensembles must agree to actively participate in the Intensive
Training Program (ITP). ITP is an after-school integrated, standards-based preparatory
curriculum for All-City students encompassing performance techniques, script analysis,
healthy choices/nutrition and music/theatrical direction. (Information taken verbatim
from the master plan, found at www.cmsd-artseducation.com.)
Appendix D, Page 1
How is the school system involved?
The All-City program is not aligned with any one school but exists to serve the entire district,
although the official program is managed and implemented at John Hay High School. According
to Sias, All-City was reinstated in 1991 after 20 years of suspended activity because it lacked the
necessary coordination and staffing. Sias was given the All-City program in 2004 while he also
was the artistic director of the annual All-City Musical. Classroom teachers and arts specialists
self-select to be a part of the program — it is not a required district program.
How do students apply/audition for the program?
High school students grades nine to 12 are recruited from the east and west neighborhoods of
Cleveland for the Intensive Training Program at John Hay. The program does not hold official
auditions and students are admitted from the novice to advanced levels. For a listing of schools
and participants, see the All-City Appendix below.
How do music and arts teachers system-wide participate?
Art teachers at the elementary and middle school levels work with students to create visual art
for the art exhibition and music teachers prepare and rehearse their students to be in a chorus or
instrumental ensemble. The quality of performances ranges (from school to school or ensemble
to ensemble) based on the level of students and their background in the visual or performing arts.
Based on the interview with Sias, K-8 classroom teachers can receive additional support from
teaching artists who are contracted by the DAE. At any given time there could be three teaching
artists hired to work in classrooms to assist with various activities to prepare for the All-City
concerts/showcases/exhibitions.
What is the calendar for the creation of final production?
Teachers who decide to participate and work with an art specialist generally will have from five
to seven weeks to prepare for the winter and spring productions. The winter concert is on the first
Wednesday in December at John Hay with a heavy emphasis on music, dance and a photography
exhibition. Teachers receive information about the spring festival in mid-March and early April.
The All-City spring event “Rock Your World” is always the third Saturday in May at the Rock
and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum and Great Lakes Science Center.
How are students prepared if they have less or limited fundamentals in the various art
forms than demanded of them by the program?
The K-8 classroom teachers are responsible for getting students up to speed and can ask for
assistance from the Department of Arts Education, if needed. Teachers are not required to bring
Appendix D, Page 2
their entire ensemble. Teachers may elect to bring only those students who have met some
criteria in the classroom and are ready to perform.
For high school, it is solely the responsibility of the certified art and music specialist and or
teaching artists to get students prepared for the best performance possible at the winter and
spring All-City events. Also, there are times when a teaching artist may be brought in as a
contractor for the All-City ensembles at John Hay at the beginning of the year to help prepare
students and give them more specialized instruction in different performing arts genres.
And, according to Sias, “All-City strengthens the social and emotional development for many of
their students. In fact, those high-school students who attend the 30-week Intensive, at least 95
percent of them graduate and apply to college.”
How are teachers prepared? Are there professional development (PD) opportunities for
them to prepare?
There is no system-wide approach to prepare or assist teachers with the All-City program at the
elementary, middle, or high school level, although the CMSD website and DAE imply
differently.
The information in the DAE strategic plan includes an objective that is solely focused on PD for
arts teachers:
Objective 1.2: To support arts teacher development of technical skills, use of
technology and curriculum development by designing and delivering Arts Teacher
Professional Development programs.
Action: Design, deliver and/or recommend professional development (PD) for arts
teachers and teaching artists including, safety & security, arts specific technical skills
and technology, aesthetics, criticism, art history, culture and context, as well as
integration with the tested content subjects.
Sias’ response to this question was, “No, all teachers are not prepared. Let me reflect on
something we had about six to eight years ago when I was the theater administrator. We had
monthly PD for all dance and theater teachers, and other arts administrators had PD for music
and arts specialists for classroom instruction and or performance techniques. Under the
Department of Arts Education we no longer provide that type of frequency. It has become very
limited, if at all, in some instances over the past several years.
“The other PD challenge is pulling art and music specialists out of their buildings because there
is so much going on within the buildings that is content-specific, so providing PD that meets all
their needs is challenging.”
CMSD implemented a project-based learning unit that is used by All-City Arts and based on the
“Cleveland Sustainability Initiative.” Each year the city hosts a large conference that sets the
strategic agenda for Cleveland’s green movement. City employees conduct a form of PD for
teachers, so they can connect their academic content with the city’s goals and participate in
Appendix D, Page 3
showing their understanding of the initiative by using the arts with students. As a result of this
citywide initiative, the Great Lakes Science Center was added as the exhibit location where
students show their work from the PBL unit. The music teachers are asked to select music by an
inductee to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum as a part of their musical selection for
any PD that they may participate in with other teachers. These selected pieces also are used for
the spring concert/festival that is at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum.
What is the annual budget and how is it spent?
The budget ranges somewhere around $625,000 to $700,000 within the larger DAE budget, and
includes the following budgeted expenditures:
• “Aida” performance: about $170,000
• “Rock Your World” spring festival: about $190,000
• Food for students during spring musical rehearsal: $5,000 (10 academic days)
• Transportation: about $6,000-$7,000
• All-City teaching artists: $200,000 (full school year for over 3,000 students)
• Part-time staff member who does some coordination and data collection: $15,000
• Managing Director (as a consultant): $50,000
• Portion of Tony Sias’ time: difference from the total budget
How does the All-City spring musical production compare to other city schools’
productions?
“All-City productions will rival or rise to the top of all other surrounding schools’ productions
including the suburbs in Cuyahoga County,” Sias said. “We are on par and meet the standards of
excellence. Within the district, even if schools … have their own end-of-the-year productions, it
is not comparing apples to apples. All-City’s May musical is artistically better and has a higher
level of production value.”
How many students are impacted by All-City Arts?
There are approximately 2,200-2,500 students who are participating in a performance or
exhibition during the spring festival at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum and Great
Lakes Science Center. An additional 2,500-3,000 students attend the spring musical as audience
members. It was surprising that All-City chose “Aida” because the music, from a vocal
perspective, can be challenging for students if they don’t have strong vocal training. This
challenge was exacerbated by a technical microphone issue that kept “popping” throughout the
Appendix D, Page 4
production. Because this show depends on the music to tell the story, it was hard to enjoy this
poor level of production.
What are the successes of the program?
• The K-8 choirs are an example of how the classroom teachers embrace the program even
though they have other academic pressures.
• The middle school jazz and tap ensembles are well received and attended by the
community.
• Over 18 schools participated in the visual art exhibition at Great Lakes Science Center as
a part of the district’s PBL unit.
What are the challenges of the program?
• Trying to engage the entire CMSD with limited resources and time
• Constantly trying to keep the arts in front of the community and to keep them interested.
The program had approximately 4,500 attendees in 2012 whereas the number of attendees
was over 6,000 in prior years.
• The arts are viewed as non-academic coursework like physical education. “I feel like we
are stepchildren,” Sias said.
Observation and review of “Aida,” All-City’s 2013 production
The author attended All-City’s June 2 performance of “Aida,” produced and directed by Sias in
collaboration with Cleveland Playhouse. Overall, the performance was entertaining and
illustrative of the program’s quality of talent and production. Nonetheless, the audience was
packed, loved the performance and gave it a standing ovation. The author rates the performance
as a 3.5/5:
• Staging/scenery: 4/5
• Lighting design and execution: 3.8/5
• Costuming: 2.5/5 (pieces did not fit; not enough variety and changes; use of leotards with
sashes around waists “was anachronistic”)
• Acting: 3.8/5
• Vocals: 3.8/5
Sias should be commended for attempting “Aida.” He admitted that when the show was selected
he did not realize what a challenge it would be to produce. He and his staff simply liked the
Appendix D, Page 5
story. They did not have any prior experience with the production or do any prior research to
determine if it was a good fit for students.
Sias feels that all the work he and his managing director put in to All-City is underappreciated,
and that he is expected to produce high-quality performances with very limited resources. The
show cost over $100,000 to produce and is a cash cow for his “so-called” collaborators who
often get more praise and recognition than him.
Conclusion
Given the profound lack of arts resources for the school district, the costs of All-City are
severely out of balance with the district’s commitment to equitable arts education. There is no
question that All-City provides those students involved with a valuable experience. Yet, these
kinds of productions are often used by school districts as a crowd-pleasing event that allows a
district to provide a public relations cover for the lack of comprehensive and equitable arts
education provided to all schools. If All-City continues, it should be integrated within an arts
education system that provides all students with fundamentals in music and arts. Performances
such as All-City’s are necessary extensions that allow for the real-life application of
fundamentals, but should not be sustained if they are stand-alone, community-relations
performance shows. All-City is a supplemental program, at best, to an arts education system, not
an arts education system in and of itself. All-City should be viewed as an opportunity for
children to demonstrate what they have learned from a fully staffed, equitable and integrated arts
education system.
Appendix D, Page 6
APPENDIX
The following information was provided by Tony Sias in response to a request for information
about the schools served by All-City over the past three years:
All-City Arts Schools:
Pre-K-8 schools are a combination of schools/teachers that participate in either performancebased ensembles that are featured at All-City signature events (Ensembles learn common
repertoire and participate in three to four joint rehearsals prior to performances.), or as individual
schools in the All-City Arts “Rock Your World with STEAM Festival,” a showcase of
excellence in arts and STEM education produced by the Department of Arts Education.
High Schools: Students self-select to participate in the after-school/weekend college readiness
program, housed at John Hay, in one of the following ensembles: choir, dance, poetry, jazz band,
drum line, theatre, or photography and technical theatre.
Schools served, 2013-14
Pre-K-8 schools:
1. A.J Rickoff
2. Benjamin Franklin
3. Charles Dickens
4. Cleveland School of the Arts @ Dike
5. Charles Mooney
6. Clara Westropp
7. Daniel Morgan
8. Euclid Park
9. Franklin Roosevelt
10. Garfiled
11. George Washington Carver
12. Hannah Gibbons
13. Kenneth Clements
14. Louis Agassiz
15. Louissa May Alcott
16. Marion Sterling
17. Nathan Hale
18. Mary M. Bethune
19. Michael R. White
20. Miles
21. Mound
22. Newton D. Baker
23. O.H.Perry
Appendix D, Page 7
24. Orchard
25. Riverside
26. Tremont Montessori
27. Valley View
28. Village Prep
29. Wade Park
30. Walton
31. Watterson Lake
32. Willson
33. William Cullen Bryant
34. Waterson Lake
35. Whitney Young
36. Wibur Wright
37. Wilson
High schools:
1. Cleveland School of the Arts @ Harry E. Davis
2. Collinwood
3. Design Lab Early College
4. Glenville Academic Campus,
5. Ginn Academy
6. Jane Addams
7. John F. Kennedy
8. John Hay- Science and Medicine,
9. John Hay- Architecture and Design
10. John Hay- Early College
11. John Adams
12. James F. Rhodes
13. John Marshall
14. Success Tech
15. Martin Luther King Jr
16. Max Hayes
17. MC2 STEM
18. New Tech East.
19. Whitney Young
Schools served, 2012-13
Pre-K-8 schools:
1. Bolton
2. Cleveland School of the Arts @ Dike Elementary
3. Douglas MacArthur Girls' Leadership Academy
4. East Clark
5. Euclid Park
6. Kenneth Clement Boys' Leadership Academy
Appendix D, Page 8
7. Louis Agassiz
8. Mary B. Martin
9. McKinley
10. Memorial
11. Michael R. White
12. Miles
13. Mound
14. Orchard
15. Robert Jamison
16. Valley View Boys' Leadership Academy
17. Warner Girls' Leadership Academy
18. Willow
High schools:
1. Cleveland School of the Arts @ Harry E. Davis
2. Collinwood
3. Design Lab Early College
4. Glenville
5. Health Careers @ MLK
6. John Adams
7. John F. Kennedy
8. John Hay Early College
9. John Hay School of Architecture and Design
10. John Hay School of Science and Medicine
11. John Marshall
12. Lincoln West
13. MLK Law & Public Service
14. New Tech @ East Tech
15. SuccessTech
16. Whitney Young
Schools served, 2011-12
Pre-K-8 schools:
1. Buhrer Dual Language
2. Case
3. Cleveland School of the Arts @ Dike
4. Douglas MacArthur Girls Leadership Academy
5. East Clark
6. Euclid Park
7. Harvey Rice
8. Louis Agassiz
9. Mary B. Martin
10. Michael R. White
11. Miles Park
Appendix D, Page 9
12. Mound
13. Newton D. Baker
14. RG Jones
15. Riverside
16. Valley View Boys' Leadership Academy
17. Warner Girls' Leadership Academy
18. Whitney Young
19. Willson
High schools:
1. Carl F. Shuler
2. Cleveland School of the Arts @ Harry E. Davis
3. Collinwood
4. Design Lab Early College
5. East Tech
6. Ginn Academy
7. Glenville
8. Jane Addams
9. John Adams
10. John F. Kennedy
11. John Hay - Architecture & Design
12. John Hay - Early College
13. John Hay - Science & Medicine
14. John Marshall
15. MC2STEM
16. Rhodes
17. SuccessTech
18. Whitney Young
Appendix D, Page 10
An Overview of Arts-Integrated Education
Introduction
In this era of high-stakes testing, the arts too often are placed in an adversarial
relationship with those subjects that lend themselves to standardized testing. Educators
and administrators are increasingly held accountable for test scores. As a result, the lack
of instructional time and concomitant priority on tested subjects are forcing the arts out of
the school day. Yet, many educators know that the influence and presence of arts will
benefit most students. Arts-integrated education holds the promise of eradicating this
unnecessary conflict by using the fine and performing arts to teach general subject areas.
Arts education models
Arts integration differs from other common models of arts education. Experienced
organizational development consultant Vicki Rosenberg, formerly of the Council of
Michigan Foundations and the J. Paul Getty Trust, has articulated the most common arts
education models used within classroom settings. The four models, according to
Rosenberg, are:
Appendix E, Page 1

the “creative, self-expressive model,” whereby students “express themselves
through the arts” and “develop the skills needed to make or perform works of art.”

the “comprehensive model,” which “is intended to help students understand and
appreciate the arts from four perspectives: aesthetics, criticism, history, and
production and performance.”

the “community resources model,” which “exposes students to visual and
performing artists at work in their communities, to expand their understanding
and appreciation of the arts and develop future audiences for the arts.”

and the “arts across the curriculum model,” which “is an interdisciplinary or
integrated curriculum model” that “responds to many needs, including deepening
learning within time constraints, addressing the different ways students learn, and
making learning more relevant to students by making real-world connections.”
The final model is preferred and is now more commonly referred to as “arts
integration” or “arts-integrated education.” As defined by the John F. Kennedy Center,
arts integration is “an approach to teaching in which students construct and demonstrate
understanding through an art form. Students engage in a creative process which connects
an art form and another subject and meets evolving objectives in both.” Aligning arts
learning with state standards, and testing concepts through an arts-integrated curriculum
not only helps to preserve the arts in contemporary classroom instruction, but also fosters
a greater understanding and appreciation of the fine and performing arts. Augmenting this
instruction with materials, artists, experiences and technologies provides teachers with a
critical need: imaginative learning tools that inspire and motivate students.
Appendix E, Page 2
Collaborative partnerships
Partnerships help augment arts-integrated education, and collaboration is the most
important requirement for successful implementation. It is important to recognize the
difference between a mere partnership and true collaboration, and to strive for the latter.
For example, partner artists should not merely come into the classroom on one-off
occasions to provide an arts-integrated lesson while the regular classroom teacher checks
out. Rather, artists should work directly with teachers to identify the most important
curriculum needs and challenges. Based on that listening process, artists can develop
materials, lessons, experiences and pieces of art for interpretation/study that are rooted in
the very specific needs articulated by teachers.
This co-consultant process of professional development (PD) will produce
modeled lessons that teachers can quickly implement in their classes. This practical, nontheoretical approach has produced notable, sustained model arts-integrated education
programs across the country. It’s collaborative, needs-based and tested, and materials
easily can be adapted as curriculum standards evolve.
Teaching artists
Teaching artists have a strong and growing place within the field of arts
education, particularly arts integration. The role of the teaching artist is an inherently
collaborative one, where the teaching artist is charged with taking his or her own
expertise in an arts subject and working with arts organizations, schools, administrators
and teachers to develop a meaningful artistic experience for students. The term “teaching
Appendix E, Page 3
artist,” though, lacks a precise definition, and there are various schools of thought on
what a teaching artist’s competencies and roles in the classroom should be.
Artist and author Eric Booth defines a teaching artist as “a practicing professional
artist with the complementary skills and sensibilities of an educator, who engages people
in learning experiences in, through, and about the arts.” Teaching artist expert Karen
Erickson has written that teaching artists not only need to be proficient artists and
teachers, but also “be able to operate with business acumen” so that they are organized,
prepared, good communicators and effective self-marketers and fundraisers. This is
especially true since teaching artists most frequently are contract employees.
Teaching artists were explored in great depth through a report authored by Nick
Rabkin (2011) at the University of Chicago. The authors examined the roles of teaching
artists at 11 cities across the nation and found that teaching artists were primarily focused
and experienced in the visual arts, with a small majority focusing in music. The report
concluded that in schools, teaching artists are primarily required to:

Teach how to work in an art form

Develop original curriculum

Integrate arts instruction with other subjects

Engage hard-to-reach students

Make content meaningful to students

Run a well-managed experience

Help students create original work –find own voice
Four models for the role of the teaching artist within a school an organizational
setting were developed by Dr. Rob Horowitz in a publication for the Arts Education
Appendix E, Page 4
Partnership (2002). Those models include a residency model, an elaborated residency
model, a capacity building model, and a co-teaching model. A fifth model, the concepts
across the curriculum model, was developed through collaboration with the University of
Minnesota. Each model is presented here with its descriptions:
Residency Model
The “residency model” involves the school or teacher bringing in one or more
Teaching Artists for a period of time to engage students in the Teaching Artist’s program.
The purpose is usually to give students a wider range of arts experiences than the school
staff can provide. The experience does not directly support the curricular goals of other
non-arts disciplines.
Elaborated Residency Model
An “elaborated residency” is fundamentally an arts experience, but this residency
is intentionally tied to developing non-arts skills identified by the teachers. The Teaching
Artist is the primary teacher and it is his/her program, but the teacher is available to assist
with carrying out the experience.
Capacity Building Model
The “capacity building” model prepares teachers to use an art form in his/her own
teaching. The Teaching Artist’s role is to instruct teachers, while the teacher participates
with the intention of learning the process and products of the art form. Teachers may
work alone, directly with the Teaching Artists, or with colleagues to identify ways to
infuse the art form’s skills and concepts with non-arts disciplines.
Co-Teaching Model
Appendix E, Page 5
The “co-teaching” model involves teacher-Teaching Artist pairs integrating
concepts from the arts and non-arts disciplines that reinforce each other. At different
points, students’ experiences may focus more on the art form or on the non-arts subject,
while at other times the arts and non-arts instruction appear seamless. The teacher and
Teaching Artist create lessons that guide the Teaching Artist during sessions that focus
on the arts, and clarify what the teacher will do when the Teaching Artist is not present.
Concepts Across the Curriculum Model
The “concepts across the curriculum” model involves three or more people who
select a unit of study in which their disciplines have common concepts. Though teachers
and Teaching Artists plan together, each discipline instructs students separately using the
common concepts. The projects that fit this model involved arts and non-arts teachers
employed in the school selecting an art form that would further reinforce the concepts in
the unit of study.
Outstanding models, common characteristics
Dr. Rekha S. Rajan selected eight exemplary models of arts-integrated education
and, through detailed analysis and comparison of these and other programs, identified the
common characteristics of arts integration models of excellence. Rajan’s eight best
models — selected because of the sustainability of their programs; the depth of their
partnerships and collaborations; the variety of resources offered to students; and the
availability of PD for classroom teachers — are:

A+ Schools Program (North Carolina Arts Council)

Montgomery County Public Schools (Maryland)
Appendix E, Page 6

Whole Schools Initiative (Mississippi Arts Commission)

Value Plus Schools (Tennessee Arts Commission)

Arts for Academic Achievement (Minneapolis Public Schools)

Musical Explorers (Carnegie Hall)

Learning Through Music (Cleveland Orchestra)

Adventures in Music (San Francisco Symphony)
Rajan organizes the common characteristics of these and other admirable arts
integration models in four categories: organization (specific components of the program’s
structure including its mission, funding, research and committee members); schools
(activities K-12 students are engaged in to create rich, artistic experiences); professional
development (the variety of resources, opportunities and support given to classroom
teachers during the partnerships and after they conclude); and community (network
development, partnership building and sustainability of presence):
Organization

Diverse steering committees that include members from various
educational and arts-based institutions

Strong research and evaluation agenda

Support from national or government funders

Vision and mission for sustaining arts-integrated experiences

Strong website presence with mission statement, resources, sample
lessons, links and descriptions of classroom and PD activities
Schools

Arts-integrated lessons and curriculum
Appendix E, Page 7

Specially designed curriculum

In- and after-school settings

High-quality arts experiences

Inclusion of fine and performing arts

K-12 residencies and resources

Collaboration with teaching artists

Highlighting, displaying and presenting student work

Cross-disciplinary learning

Teaching 21st century skills
Professional development

Ongoing support for classroom teachers (during and beyond the time of
program implementation)

Variety of PD opportunities for teachers

Support in- and after-school settings

Workshops and conferences presented by experienced educators and
artists

Summer institutes and intensives

Numerous contacts and resources for classroom teachers

Materials specially designed for classroom teachers
Community

Strong presence and continued impact within the community (i.e., more
than five years)
Appendix E, Page 8

Partnerships with arts organizations, community centers, schools and
universities

Building and sustaining a network (working within one or many school
districts)

Familial involvement and engagement

Real-world experiences (e.g., live performances, museum visits and
interactions with professional artists)
Arts integration in action
One hypothetical example of arts-integrated education is literacy learning through
music and the arts. Pre-literacy skills are vital to K-3 childhood development and
ultimately academic and life success. But most children do not learn through rote
instruction. They do learn through direct participation designed to illustrate concepts.
Here, music and arts are used to create engaged understanding of literacy concepts that
are fundamental to learning. Children love music. Lasting skills can be built by teaching
listening, steady beat, call-and-response, visual learning and singing rhymes and storybased songs. Common Core concepts such as story beginning, middle and end; author’s
point of view; inference; summarizing and retelling; comprehension; retention; and
transference of content are learned in lasting ways. Most importantly, reading,
storytelling and listening become anticipated and enjoyed by all students.
Appendix E, Page 9
Professional development (PD)
Effective and ongoing PD is a critical success factor for arts-integrated education
initiatives. Educators often are inundated with impractical training sessions. Successful
PD is marked by enjoyable, hands-on experiential training during which teachers become
students and see for themselves how what they’re learning works, and how they can
implement it with their students the very next day. PD should focus on creating
familiarity and comfort with the arts; direct participation with art forms and their
materials; and artistic expression where participants actively create art in various forms,
styles and periods. Ongoing PD strategies engage teachers in aesthetic studies; and, most
importantly, reveal the relationship between arts processes, content and materials and
classroom instructional priorities.
Artist training provides PD for artists working in schools and communities.
Artists learn how to present their art forms within the context of childhood developmental
needs and multiple learning styles. Artists learn skills in repertoire selection, classroom
management and participatory and presentational approaches. Artists also learn about the
relationship between their art form and its elements and the most important instructional
needs of students and teachers.
In her analysis of arts integration models, Rajan also identified the common
characteristics of excellent professional development programs focused on teaching and
implementing strategies of arts integration. The professional development models
included state- and citywide programs, those found within arts partnerships, and models
present in university settings. The common characteristics of professional development
models of excellence included both in- and after-school support, ongoing training,
Appendix E, Page 10
multiple resources, and a variety of professional development opportunities. The list is
organized in two categories: teaching strategies and collaboration. Amongst various
models examined, Rajan found the professional development offered by the Kennedy
Center’s Changing Education through the Arts program to be the strongest and most
diverse.
Teaching strategies

Multiple resources and strategies for teachers to integrate the arts

Resources for integrating fine and performing arts at various grade levels

Detailed materials for use in the classroom

Examples of exemplary student work

Availability of both hard copy and electronic materials and links

Hands-on activities and materials in workshops

Opportunities to develop and implement action research and inquiry
projects
Collaboration

Variety of professional development opportunities (i.e. course, workshops,
summer institutes)

Opportunities to share and disseminate understandings of arts integration

Individual, small group, and community gatherings to discuss teaching
strategies

On-going support and guidance (i.e. beyond an academic year)

In-school and after school training

Professional development for administrators and school coordinators
Appendix E, Page 11

Assistance in securing funding for individual schools or classroom
projects

Webinars, recorded workshops or lectures, or interactive media on the
website
— MitchellKornArts
Appendix E, Page 12
Report on Arts Organization Partnerships with
Urban and Metropolitan Arts Education Systems
Every urban or metropolitan K-12 education system that we reviewed — whether
its community features small or large theatre, art, music, media and dance cultural
institutions — has working partnerships with those organizations.
The most common characteristics of these partnerships include:
• The provision of services by arts organization to schools, classrooms,
students and teachers is a collaboration, where content, goals and outcomes
are mutually determined.
• Services are offered at both schools and cultural organization sites, in and
out of school time.
• Commitment to ongoing communication, planning, respectful relationships,
honest feedback and adaptability are consistencies of effective partnership
relations.
• School systems and/or cultural organizations coordinate these services and
events. Most often the school system and arts organizations have liaisons or
facilitators responsible for successful implementation. In some cases, an
independent organization acts as the facilitating agent. In other cases, the
school system provides this staffing. Under any model, the parties have
identified the staff responsible for the successful program planning,
implementation and evaluation.
• An Arts Coordinator at each school site (faculty, staff or community
member) supports the coordination of services, logistics, advocacy,
assessment and information about arts education from each school.
• The content of program services is usually specifically directed at stated
educational outcomes, mutually determined by both parties. Assessment is
then built upon these collaboratively articulated goals.
• In many cases, arts organizations work together as a unit with their local
school system to provide these services.
• Service components of these partnerships include professional
development for participating teachers and artists; adequate and monetarily
supported planning time; evaluation; and classroom, auditorium and field
trip activities.
Appendix F, Page 1
• The most highly regarded of these partnership models are sustainable;
widely supported by local schools, funders and arts leadership; and clearly
perceived and experienced as mutually beneficial.
Below, three arts/schools partnership models are described in greater detail:
1.) In Chicago, the Chicago Arts Partnerships in Education (CAPE) was
established 20 years ago through a funding initiative of the Chicago Community
Trust, MacArthur Foundation, Polk Brothers Foundation, Marshall Field’s and
others.
An independent organizational provider was created (CAPE) whose board was
initially formed with philanthropic representatives. A professional staff was hired
and a facilitator was retained by CAPE to create arts partnership “matchmaking”
services and events. Schools and their representatives (principals, parents and
faculty) identified critical educational needs and were “matched” with arts
organizations that had complementary services, resources and missions. Multiple
schools, based in neighborhoods or close proximity, were organized together with a
group of arts organization to form neighborhood-based partnerships.
“Ideal” arts partnerships were identified, through a rubric, as those where both
small and large organizations, representing diverse arts and cultural forms, served
schools with resources, artists and experiences that met critical literacy, arts skills,
social and curricular needs.
Approximately 10 partnerships were initially funded through a grant-making
process that included a review of the partnerships’ expected outcomes, the
identification of mutual accountability, and interviews by the CAPE board of
applicant representatives. Evaluation was central to program improvement and
adaptability. Funders made multiple-year grants to these partnerships and the first
year of these partnerships were largely spent on collaborative planning and piloting
of ideas and services.
The partnerships have been long-lasting, highly evaluated by external and
independent assessment, and successfully funded by numerous foundations with
ongoing support. CAPE (an independent nonprofit) and its staff continue to serve as
a liaison between arts/cultural organizations and schools. CAPE provides
facilitation, professional development, evaluation, and convening services.
2.) The San Francisco Unified School District (SFUSD) Arts Education Master
Plan, according to the district’s website, “details why and how the district will
provide an education in which students accrue quality knowledge of the arts and
creative experiences from day one of preschool through their senior year in high
school. … Driven by a spirit of collaboration, it commits SFUSD to making dance,
drama, music, visual and literary arts an important part of each student’s academic
career. It calls for a sequential, comprehensive arts education program that reflects
Appendix F, Page 2
the high quality of San Francisco’s artistic landscape. The guiding principle of this
plan is that all students deserve both access and equity in arts education.”
Partnerships between SFUSD and San Francisco arts and cultural organizations are
the backbone of this plan. Based upon a commitment to full-time and licensed arts
teachers, arts organizations plan and collaborate services directly with schools
through a district office that includes an Arts Education Plan Implementation
Manager and Artistic Director responsible for ensuring equitable arts education
access to all SFUSD schools, and effective partnership services by Bay Area arts and
cultural organizations.
According to the district’s website, “all SFUSD Elementary Schools are allocated an
elementary music teacher to teach violin, flute, trumpet and clarinet once a week.
The students are taken out of their regular classroom time for a group lesson.
Students rent or purchase an instrument to use for this program. … All SFUSD
Elementary Schools have an itinerant arts teacher in Drama, Music, Visual Arts, or
Dance that comes to their school one day a week. Funded by the Public Education
Enrichment Fund (PEEF/Prop H), this program was created to serve K-3; however
school sites may request that their assigned Visual and Performing Arts (VAPA)
teacher serve grads K-5 depending on school need. Schools choose the arts
discipline that best complements their arts programming.”
According to the district’s website, every SFUSD school appoints an Arts Coordinator
“from either the staff or school community. School Arts Coordinators are the
primary liaisons to the Arts Education Master Plan Implementation Manager and
VAPA office and provide leadership for the Master Plan's implementation under the
direction of principals. Arts Coordinators meet for professional development,
collaborate with their school’s leadership, PTA and Arts Education Committee if one
exists to design and implement arts education programming and disseminate
information concerning arts education to the schools district-wide.” The VAPA
Office also “provides professional development in arts education to school staffs,
teachers and principals,” often in partnership with Bay Area arts organizations.
They also hold numerous events at San Francisco cultural facilities that emphasize
student performances, productions and creative experiences.
In numerous cases, major arts institutions have taken a lead role in organizing a
partnership and working closely with SFUSD arts leadership on the effective
meeting of school need through arts and cultural experiences. These partnerships
work with both the VAPA office and individual schools’ Arts Coordinators.
Among the partnerships most cited by SFUSD is Adventures in Music (AIM), which
was initiated by the San Francisco Symphony (SFS) nearly 30 years ago. It has
successfully recruited many dozens of partners that represent numerous art forms
and cultures. The SFS Education Office acts as the organizing facilitator of the
project.
Appendix F, Page 3
AIM serves every SFUSD school year-round with numerous and diverse ensemble
performances at each school site; curriculum directed at important school needs
mutually planned and collaborated between schools and arts providers; classroom
resources; professional development for teachers and artists; concerts at SFS Davies
Hall; and additional services in music and arts instruction. VAPA staff told us “that
AIM is so well established, comprehensive and attuned to school need that most
teachers and schools see it as the official curriculum of SFUSD.”
Numerous Bay Area arts and cultural organizations in museum, theatre, media, jazz
and dance also provide successful, comprehensive partnership services in
coordination with the VAPA Office and school Arts Coordinators.
3.) Boston Public Schools (BPS) has significantly expanded arts education access
throughout its system over the last five years. Today, according to BPS officials, “90
percent of Boston elementary and middle school students are receiving weekly arts
education, up from 67 percent in 2009, and the number of high school students
accessing arts education has doubled in three years.”
BPS, according to its website, has initiated its Arts Expansion Initiative, with a stated
goal of “working to ensure that every student in grades K-8 has weekly arts
instruction in school. Each school offers unique programs, from visual arts and
music to dance and theatre.”
BPS’s Arts Partnership Manager has established effective guidelines in its “BPS Arts
Guide to Effective Partnerships.” This guide aligns arts partners with BPS education
goals within the arts and throughout the curriculum. It recruits and facilitates arts
partners to support its Arts Expansion Initiative and district arts education policies.
BPS teachers and staff leaders serve as Arts Liaisons who “coordinate, advocate for,
document, and create curriculum for the arts in their buildings and across the
district. These BPS Arts Liaisons and Collaborating Arts teachers (CATs) will
support arts partnerships ‘on the ground,’ and will be available to discuss successes
and challenges, to offer resources, and to assess the quality of arts teaching and
learning happening in the classroom,” the BPS Guide to Effective Partnerships
states. “Arts liaisons are responsible for strengthening communication and
collaboration among school administration, classroom teachers, arts specialists,
parents, teaching artists and partnering arts/cultural organizations.” The guide also
states that arts liaisons “gather and organize information about the school’s arts
programming to inform the district’s Arts Expansion Initiative strategic planning,
recommendations, and decision making for insuring equity, access, and quality inschool arts programs.”
The BPS Guide to Effective partnerships identifies six areas for effective
partnerships and collaboration with arts and cultural organizations:
Appendix F, Page 4
• Common Goals: “Partnerships are most lasting and beneficial when all
members involved share a sense of ownership over the work towards these
goals.”
• A Strong Foundation is based upon collaborative planning from the start,
“establishing trust, clarifying goals and objectives, and preparing to face
challenges.” This foundation creates a “shared vision and sequential plan for
project implementation.”
• Transparent Structure helps creates a collaborative culture in
partnerships that “clearly defines roles, responsibilities, logistics (such as
space, scheduling, payment, etc.), outcomes and assessment.” This creates an
architecture that “must be agreed upon by all involved in the collaboration in
order to effectively reach common goals.”
• Mutual Trust, Respect and Support encourages collaborators learning
from each other and complementing and serving school and student needs
by “bringing something different to each partnership.” This approach
encourages each partner to help each other “when challenges arise.”
• Open, Ongoing Communication supports effective and constant interface
as the means of creating the strongest collaborations. “Communication
should consist of honest but gracious feedback, given in a safe and supportive
manner. This type of open, ongoing communication develops trusting
relationships, promotes the exchange of ideas, and keeps projects on track.”
• Assessment is the means of establishing clear outcomes “in advance how
success will be measured towards reaching common goals. Ongoing
documentation and formative assessment should be integrated throughout
the project, as well as a pre-determined summative assessment and/or final
products. At the conclusion of the project, members should take the
opportunity to reflect on the experience, and share lessons learned.”
Conclusion
Our research found that Cleveland’s arts and cultural organizations are a significant
resource dedicated to providing such services in a collaborative and ongoing
manner. We have found equal determination by CMSD teachers and principals that
strongly desire these services. These models, guiding principles and operational
features offer excellent strategies and encouragement to CMSD as it seeks to
establish such partnerships and collaborate with the treasures of Cleveland’s arts
and cultural sector.
Appendix F, Page 5
PROJECT-BASED LEARNING SUMMARY REPORT
Project Based Learning (PBL), is a product/methodology of the Buck Institute for
Education (BIE). BIE describes itself on its website accordingly:
The Buck Institute for Education (BIE) was founded in 1987 as a not-forprofit 501(c)3 organization that receives partial funding from the Leonard
and Beryl Buck Trust, the same trust that supports the Marin Community
Foundation, the Marin Institute and the Buck Institute for Age Research. In
its first ten years, BIE provided a variety of services to local schools and
districts and also received funding from outside sources for program
evaluation and other research.
In the late 1990s, some school districts began to focus on educational
reform efforts to improve their curriculum and instruction that was based on
credible research that could make their course work more relevant and
meaningful for students, primarily at the high school level. In 2002 at the
annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, held in
New Orleans, the topic of authentic learning activities was presented and
discussed.
A few distinctive “characteristics of authentic learning activities” are:




Real world relevance: activities that mirror real world tasks done by
professionals
Complex, sustained tasks: activities that require a longer time frame to
complete using more in-depth intellectual study
Collaborative: students must work with others as team members
Authentic products: finished products are of a higher quality and are seen
as valuable and personalized extensions of the student’s learning experience
The PBL approach is built upon several of the authentic learning activities above
and is based on youth development research that is in alignment with 21st century
Appendix G, Page 1
skills students must have in order to be successful in the current workforce and the
world in general.
So, in effect, PBL is designed to teach students 21st century skills using academic
content and in-depth inquiry that leads to a completed and relevant project.
These same skills are referred to as “competencies” in the workforce. Some of the
most necessary competencies are:






Leadership
Teamwork (group participation for students)
Management of resources/research and inquiry
Mastery of oral and written communication
Organization and time management
Organization and industry knowledge
And like the characteristics of authentic learning as well as these workforce
competencies, PBL focuses on academic content and 21st century skills as its core
and is complemented by six distinctive components as its methodology to ensure
learning.
As described by BIE, “in Project Based Learning (PBL), students go through an
extended process of inquiry in response to a complex question, problem, or
challenge. While allowing for some degree of student "voice and choice," rigorous
projects are carefully planned, managed, and assessed to help students learn key
academic content, practice 21st Century Skills and create high-quality, authentic
products & presentations.”
Appendix G, Page 2
The following information was taken verbatim from the BIE website:
Rigorous, meaningful and effective Project Based Learning:

is intended to teach significant content. Goals for student learning are
explicitly derived from content standards and key concepts at the heart of
academic disciplines.

requires critical thinking, problem solving, collaboration, and various
forms of communication. To answer a Driving Question and create
high-quality work, students need to do much more than remember
information. They need to use higher-order thinking skills and learn to
work as a team. They must listen to others and make their own ideas
clear when speaking, be able to read a variety of material, write or
otherwise express themselves in various modes, and make effective
presentations. These skills, competencies and habits of mind are often
known as “21st century skills,” because they are prerequisite for success
in the 21st century workplace.

requires inquiry as part of the process of learning and creating
something new. Students ask questions, search for answers, and arrive at
conclusions, leading them to construct something new: an idea, an
interpretation, or a product.

is organized around an open-ended Driving Question. This focuses
students’ work and deepens their learning by framing important issues,
debates, challenges or problems. A good driving question captures the
heart of the project in clear, compelling language, which gives students a
sense of purpose and challenge. The question should be provocative,
open-ended, complex, and linked to the core of what you want students to
learn. It could be abstract (When is war justified?); concrete (Is our
water safe to drink?); or focused on solving a problem (How can we
improve this website so that more young people will use it?).

creates a need to know essential content and skills. Project Based
Learning reverses the order in which information and concepts are
traditionally presented. A typical unit with a “project” add-on begins by
Appendix G, Page 3
presenting students with knowledge and concepts and then, once gained,
giving students the opportunity to apply them. Project Based Learning
begins with the vision of an end product or presentation. This creates a
context and reason to learn and understand the information and
concepts.

allows some degree of student voice and choice. Students learn to work
independently and take responsibility when they are asked to make
choices. The opportunity to make choices, and to express their learning
in their own voice, also helps to increase students’ educational
engagement.

includes processes for revision and reflection. Students learn to give and
receive feedback in order to improve the quality of the products they
create, and are asked to think about what and how they are learning.

involves a public audience. Students present their work to other people,
beyond their classmates and teacher – in person or online. This “ups the
stakes,” increasing students’ motivation to do high-quality work, and
adds to the authenticity of the project.
And, as reported by Edutopia in 2008 (http://www.edutopia.org/project-learningintroduction):
Because project-based learning is filled with active and engaged learning, it
inspires students to obtain a deeper knowledge of the subjects they're
studying. Research also indicates that students are more likely to retain the
knowledge gained through this approach far more readily than through
traditional textbook-centered learning. In addition, students develop
confidence and self-direction as they move through both team-based and
independent work.
In the process of completing their projects, students also hone their
organizational and research skills, develop better communication with their
peers and adults, and often work within their community while seeing the
positive effect of their work.
Appendix G, Page 4
Because students are evaluated on the basis of their projects, rather than on
the comparatively narrow rubrics defined by exams, essays, and written
reports, assessment of project-based work is often more meaningful to them.
They quickly see how academic work can connect to real-life issues -- and
may even be inspired to pursue a career or engage in activism that relates to
the project they developed.
Many educators think if we are serious about reaching 21st century educational
goals, PBL must be at the center of 21st century instruction. They contend this
methodology contains and frames the curriculum, which differs from the short
“project” or activity added onto traditional instruction.
Information and graphics included in this report were acquired from the following
sources:
 Center for Arts in Education Conference, Boston, MA, June 28, 2013, PBL
101a, b, c Workshop, presented by John Larmer, Buck Institute for
Education
 “Project Based Learning” by Buck Institute for Education,
www.bie.org/about/the_bie_story is licensed under CC BY-NC 3.0
 “Project Based Learning” by Buck Institute for Education,
www.bie.org/about/what_is_pbl is licensed under CC BY-NC 3.0
 “Why Teach with Project-Based Learning?: Providing Students With a
Well-Rounded Classroom Experience” by the staff of Edutopia,
http://www.edutopia.org/project-learning-introduction
Appendix G, Page 5
5/18/14&
Appendix H
1
Appendix H
2
This report was created to provide an overview
of out-of-school time programming in the
United States.
!  As
defined by the National Institute on
Out-of-School Time (NIOST), OST
programming “encompasses a wide range
of program offerings for young people that
take place before school, after school, on
weekends, and during the summer and
other school breaks.”
Each region was chosen to highlight
programming that is innovative and unique,
award-winning, or the only fixture of afterschool programming in its respective
community.
Much of the information provided was taken
directly from each organization’s website,
sometimes verbatim, unless otherwise
noted.
Appendix H
! 
! 
! 
3
Appendix H
! 
To keep young people safe
More than 15 million school-age children (26 percent)
are on their own after school. Among them, more
than 1 million are in grades K-5. (Afterschool Alliance,
2009)
! 
To provide opportunities for positive and consistent adult and peer
relationships
! 
To help shape the immediate and long-term mental, physical,
and/or artistic growth of the young people they serve
More than 28 million parents of school-age children
are employed, including 23 million who work fulltime. (U.S. Department of Labor, 2010)
More specifically they:
! 
Improve grades
Only 8.4 million K-12 children (15 percent) participate
in after-school programs. An additional 18.5 million
would participate if a quality program were available
in their community. (Afterschool Alliance, 2009)
! 
Increase school attendance
! 
Improve behavior
! 
Reduce drop-out rates
Appendix H
Appendix&H&
5
Appendix H
4
6
1&
5/18/14&
! 
A Northeastern University study found a
sharp increase in homicides involving African
American youth, both as victims and
perpetrators, between 2000 and 2007.
! 
The same study found that risk spiked during
after-school hours.
! 
This indicates that juvenile crime is most
prevalent during out-of-school-time for those
youth who do not have access to after-school
programs.
(Fox and Swatt, Northeastern University,
Appendix H December 2008) 7
Appendix H
9
Appendix H
8
Appendix H
10
21st Century Community Learning Centers
Appendix H
Appendix&H&
11
! 
The 21st CCLC program is authorized under Title IV, Part B
of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA).
! 
The program provides before and after-school, weekend,
and summer school academic enrichment opportunities for
children attending low-performing schools to help them
meet local and state academic standards in subjects such
as reading, mathematics, and science.
! 
Agencies and organizations eligible under the 21st CCLC
grant program include, but are not limited to, local
education agencies (LEAs), non-profit agencies, city or
county government agencies, faith-based organizations,
institutions of higher education, and for-profit corporations.
(U.S. Department of Education)
Appendix H
12
2&
5/18/14&
Overview
National Programming
Appendix H
! 
ASAS is the largest national organization
specifically focused on serving middle school
children.
! 
ASAS programs are completely free to students.
! 
ASAS is highly collaborative and willing to work
with other reputable non-profit organizations.
13
After-School All-Stars: One of the
nation’s leading OST providers
Appendix H
Mission
! 
Appendix H
15
Programming
Focus
! 
! 
! 
! 
! 
! 
! 
! 
! 
! 
! 
! 
! 
Health & Fitness
Academics
Arts Enrichment
Appendix H
Appendix&H&
Vision
! 
For all ASAS students
to achieve what we
hope for our own
children: to be safe and
healthy, to graduate
high school and go on
to college, to find
careers they love and
then give back to their
communities.
Appendix H
16
Appendix H
18
Funding
Common program
components revolve
around three core OST
goals:
! 
ASAS provides
comprehensive afterschool programs that
keep children safe and
help them succeed in
school and life.
14
17
Fox
Metro PCS
Windsong
C.S. Mott Foundation
New York Life Foundation
Westime
Sensa
Target
American Honda Foundation
Costco
Chicago Bulls Charities
3&
5/18/14&
Mission:
Midwest Programming
To provide Chicago public
high school teens
opportunities to explore
and develop their talents
while gaining critical
skills for work, college
and beyond
Appendix H
19
Appendix H
20
Programming Focus:
Appendix H
! 
Gallery: Our flagship content area offers teens opportunities in
visual, culinary and performing arts.
! 
Words: These programs allow teens to explore creative writing,
poetry, public speaking and journalism.
! 
Tech: These programs offer teens opportunities in robotics, Web
development, video production and software development.
! 
Science: These programs give teens hands-on experience in lab
science, environmental science, engineering and math.
! 
Sports: These programs focus on athletics, health and fitness
while training teens as lifeguards, coaches, officials and
recreation leaders.
21
Appendix H
22
Appendix H
24
Funding:
Summer
Initiative
Chicago Summer of Learning…
… is a choose-as-you-go program run by local organizations like parks,
libraries and museums. It also uses online learning in conjunction with
Citywide activities.
This program utilizes a badge-earning system that allows the student to
collect and progress through a series of citywide and online activities that
they choose themselves, or follow in the categories of STEAM, Words,
Sports or Gallery.
Appendix H
Appendix&H&
23
4&
5/18/14&
Overview
Midwest Programming
Appendix H
! 
South Dakota Voices for Children was founded in 1993 by
concerned parents, nonprofit executives, business leaders and
youth-care professionals following two years of statewide
organizing conferences.
! 
They are the only nonprofit, statewide organization that has as its
sole purpose improving the lives of all South Dakota children
through program and policy advocacy.
! 
South Dakota Voices for Children conducts research focused on
specific problems facing children and youth, develops solutions
and then mobilizes the community to support and implement
these solutions.
! 
The core mission of Voices for Children is funded by corporate,
nonprofit, foundation and individual gifts. These donors become
the "voices" for South Dakota children.
25
Appendix H
26
Programming Focus
Vision
There are different types of programs including drop-in/intermittent,
licensed and accredited. Licensed programs are those that provide
regular care to children. Drop-in or intermittent programs are not
required to be licensed. National accreditation, which is optional,
assures a program has met more rigorous standards.
!  Their
vision helps make sure that the
needs of all South Dakota children are
met, including food, clothing, shelter,
health care, nurturing, education and
safety within the family and the
community.
Appendix H
Most programs offer a variety of activities including arts, career
preparation, character education, community service, cultural
enrichment, family activities, health and wellness, homework help
and tutoring, mentoring, physical activity, reading, science and
technology.
Some programs offer state and nationally recognized programs and
curriculum such as: Destination Imagination, First Lego League, SD
Cooperative Extension Service, SD Discovery Center GEMS Kits,
State Historical Society Education Kits, SD Department of Health
Curriculum, and SD Game Fish and Parks Education Kits
27
Who They Serve
Appendix H
28
Appendix H
30
Funding
Programs serve South Dakota students of
all ages before school, after school and
during summer vacation. Some offer
weekend programming.
Appendix H
Appendix&H&
29
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5/18/14&
The South
Appendix H
Overview
Big Thought serves as managing partner of the Thriving
Minds After-School (TMAS) program. The partnership
includes the City of Dallas, the Dallas Independent School
District (Dallas ISD) and more than 100 arts, cultural and
community organizations committed to making creative
learning a part of the education of every Dallas student —
in- and out-of-school.
! 
Nearly half of all TMAS participants show improved grades
in both English and math from fall to spring semesters as a
result of their participation in the program.*
31
Appendix H
32
Overview
Overview
! 
Thriving Minds After-School program
! 
Children need opportunities to test their curiosity,
express their feelings and discover their
potential. In the TMAS program, they find a safe,
creative environment to explore enriching
activities that support their academic and
personal growth. The program is open to
elementary and middle school students.
Appendix H
Students receive a daily snack and
homework help from trained after-school
staff. Students spend the remainder of their
time with professional teaching artists who
provide classes such as dance, theater,
visual art, music, etc. Students have
opportunities to showcase their work and
perform throughout the school year.
33
Programming Focus
Appendix H
34
Big Thought also offers…
The Thriving Minds After-School program offers:
… Thriving Minds summer camp programs
in schools, cultural centers and other
neighborhood facilities across the city.
They support existing programs run by
their partners and implement new
programs to bring learning opportunities to
underserved communities.
A safe environment and caring staff
Daily creative activities and arts enrichment
Activities designed to support what kids learn in school
Homework help from trained staff
College prep and career readiness resources for parents
and youth
!  Parent education workshops that help support learning at
home
! 
! 
! 
! 
! 
Appendix H
Appendix&H&
! 
35
Appendix H
36
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Funding-Donors
! 
! 
! 
! 
! 
! 
! 
! 
! 
! 
Southwest Programming
The Wallace Foundation
Bank of America
Chase
Harold Simmons Foundation
Target
Prudential
The Eugene McDermott Foundation
The Meadows Foundation
W.W. Caruth, Jr. Foundation
The United Way
Appendix H
37
Overview
! 
Appendix H
38
Vision
Phoenix Day is the oldest, continuously operating
early education and youth development center in
the State of Arizona. Since 1915, they have
provided high-quality education to children from
a range of socio-economic backgrounds. Today
they offer one of the highest regarded earlyeducation programs in the state for children
ranging in age from 6 weeks to 5 years. They
also provide an excellent after-school program
for neighborhood school-aged children, as well as
a number of preventative health programs
throughout the Valley of the Sun.
Appendix H
!  Our
vision is to help youth create a
positive future by graduating high school
and being prepared for success in life.
Learning extends beyond the classroom.
Youth learn important life skills in both
formal and informal educational
environments.
39
Programming:
Appendix H
40
Southeast Programming
!  Daily homework support
!  Snacks and hot meals
!  Sports and recreational activities
!  Fun and informative workshops
!  We-Cycle USA bicycle repair
!  Breakdancing workshop
!  Art projects
!  Boys and girls leadership classes
Appendix H
Appendix&H&
41
Appendix H
42
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5/18/14&
Who They Serve
Overview
! 
In the past 14 years, Project Discovery has:
!  Served 33,338 students, fourth to 12th grade
!  Had 8,191 participants graduate from high school
!  Had 7,045 graduates go on to college (Over 85% attended
Virginia colleges.)
For nearly three decades, Project Discovery
has impacted thousands of students in the
Commonwealth of Virginia. Currently offered
through 23 local programs, Project Discovery
works predominantly with students from lowto moderate-income households and/or those
who are potential first generation postsecondary education attendees.
Appendix H
Project Discovery's students:
!  68% female; 32% male
!  70% Black; 20% White; 6% Hispanic; 4% Other
!  92% come from low- to moderate-income homes, would be firstgeneration college students, or both
!  93% of graduating seniors in the Class of 2009 enrolled in
post-secondary education after graduation.
43
Southeast Programming
Appendix H
44
Overview
Baltimore School for the Arts (BSA) is proud to
serve as an arts resource for the greater Baltimore
community by offering TWIGS, an extensive afterschool and Saturday arts instruction program; free
matinees and gallery tours for city schools; and
performances for families and children throughout
the year. Through these programs and other
community outreach initiatives, BSA reaches
thousands of children and their families each year
with opportunities in the arts.
Appendix H
45
Mission
46
Who They Serve
TWIGS was established in 1982 with a two-fold mission: to
make arts accessible to under-served city students and to
identify and train students with potential to audition
successfully for BSA and enter the pipeline to college
admission and careers in the arts. Students who wish to
pursue careers in the arts have a critical advantage if they
begin their training at an early age. While participation in the
TWIGS program is not a guarantee for BSA admission, each
year between 30-35 percent of the incoming BSA ninth
graders have been trained through TWIGS. The continued
growth, success and permanence of TWIGS are major
priorities at Baltimore School for the Arts.
Appendix H
Appendix&H&
Appendix H
The TWIGS program offers free classes to
students in the second through eighth
grades who reside in the city of Baltimore
and who qualify by audition.
47
Appendix H
48
8&
5/18/14&
Funding
Programming Focus
Each year, the Baltimore City Public School
System covers about 70 percent of the BSA’s
operating budget. The other 30 percent, more
than a $1 million a year, is raised through the
BSA Foundation’s annual fund drive, grants,
and event sponsorships from private sources
including individuals, corporations, and
foundations. The BSA Foundation also raises
about 80 percent of the funding for TWIGS.
Classes are offered in:
!  Music
!  Dance
!  Visual arts
!  Theatre
!  Stage production
Appendix H
49
West Coast Programming
Appendix H
50
Mission:
!  The
mission of LA’s BEST is to provide a
safe and supervised after-school
education, enrichment and recreation
program for elementary school children
ages 5 to 12 in the City of Los Angeles.
Appendix H
51
Programming Focus:
! 
52
Who They Serve?
After School Arts Program (ASAP) features
artists/educators-in-residence teaching
classes in:
!  At
◦  Visual art
◦  Music
◦  Dance
◦  Drama
◦  Poetry
Each 10-week residency concludes with a special
culmination event which brings the community
together to celebrate the talent and accomplishments
of the children.
Appendix H
Appendix&H&
Appendix H
53
LA’s BEST, children go straight into the
program after the last bell rings, without
ever leaving school grounds. From Sun
Valley to San Pedro, El Sereno to Venice,
students at 194 elementary schools
across the Los Angeles Unified School
District (LAUSD) are greeted after their
last class of the day with a nutritious
snack, help with their homework, and
exciting things to do and learn.
Appendix H
54
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Funding:
Outcomes:
(UCLA Center for Research on Evaluations, Standards, and Student Testing)
Appendix H
55
Appendix H
Mission
Pacific Northwest Programming
! 
Appendix H
School’s Out Washington provides services
and guidance for organizations to ensure all
young people have safe places to learn and
grow when not in school. School’s Out
Washington is dedicated to building
community systems to support quality out-ofschool time programs for Washington’s 5- to
18-year-olds through training, advocacy and
leadership.
57
Appendix H
58
Program Focus:
Overview
! 
56
School's Out achieves its mission through
playing an intermediary role in the out-ofschool time system. The main components of
an intermediary organization’s role are:
! 
School’s Out Washington aims to …
◦  Increase affordable and quality out-of-school time programs accessible to all of
Washington’s 5- to 18-year-olds, particularly children from low-income families,
children of color and children with special needs.
◦  Create community systems to support out-of-school time programs.
◦  Improve the knowledge and skills of out-of-school time professionals.
◦  Engaging, convening, and supporting critical
constituencies
◦  Promoting quality standards and accountability
◦  Brokering and leveraging resources
◦  Promoting effective policies
◦  Strengthen partnerships between out-of-school time programs and schools.
◦  Promote policy development for out-of-school time programs through national,
state and local advocacy efforts.
◦  Increase comprehensive funding for all out-of-school time programs.
◦  Educate communities about the importance and benefits of out-of-school time
programs.
◦  Develop leaders who create a stronger voice for out-of-school time.
Appendix H
Appendix&H&
59
Appendix H
60
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Northeast Programming
Who They Serve:
After-school and youth development
agencies; schools and school district
administration; and municipal and state
agency leadership throughout Washington
state.
Appendix H
61
Appendix H
62
Programming Focus
Mission
Residencies
!  LeAp
is a nonprofit organization
committed to improving the quality of
public education through a hands-on,
arts-based approach to teaching the
academic curriculum. LeAp empowers
students to reach their full potential
Appendix H
Funding
2010
! 
! 
Met Life Foundation and the Afterschool Alliance:
LeAp’s after-school program for JHS 22 was
awarded one of six Afterschool Innovator Awards, a
national award for innovation and excellence. It
recognized the program’s success in providing
multiple benefits and services to middle school
students through a hands-on, arts-based approach
to teaching the academic curriculum.
LeAp was awarded two prestigious and highly
competitive grants from the U.S. Department of
Education (USDOE). The first for LeAp’s American
History Comes Alive Program, which was created in
collaboration with Columbia University and helps
Manhattan teachers improve their teaching of
American history. The second was awarded to
expand LeAp’s model Active Learning Leads to
Literacy Program for grades six to eight.
63
Partners
! 
! 
! 
! 
! 
! 
! 
! 
NYC Department of Cultural
Affairs
US Dept. of Education
NYC Department of Public
Education
New York State Council on
the Arts
HSBC
The After School Corporation
NYC Dept. of Parks and
Recreation
NY Dept. of Youth and
Community Development
! 
Residencies range from 10 to 30 weeks and take place one to five
days a week. Most programs occur one to three times a week.
! 
All residencies begin with a one-on-one planning session with the
LeAp teaching artist and each classroom teacher. Three additional
planning sessions occur during the residency.
! 
LeAp teaching artists work with up to 35 students during the
school day.
! 
LeAp teaching artists can work alone with up to 20 students after
school with a member of the school personnel on site.
! 
All LeAp residencies use hands-on, project-based learning
and culminate in an exhibition or performance.
Appendix H
64
Northeast Programming
2009
! 
LeAp received a grant to conduct two after-school
arts-based programs in Brooklyn at PS 84 and PS 19
from the 21st Century Community Learning Centers
Program, funded by the USDOE.
Appendix H
Appendix&H&
65
Appendix H
66
11&
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Overview
Mission
PHASE 4 has maintained a 98 percent graduation rate since inception, with 10
percent of graduates enlisting in the U.S. Armed Forces, 40 percent securing
employment, and 50 percent enrolling in higher education.
PHASE 4 Learning Center’s mission is to
provide an exceptional education for at-risk
youth that focuses on their academic, social,
behavioral and future needs, enabling them to
graduate from high school prepared to become
caring and contributing members of the
community.
Appendix H
2004: Chosen by the Pennsylvania Department of Education as one of 10 best
model alternative education programs in the commonwealth
2006 – Acknowledged by President and Mrs. Bush who commended founder Terrie
Suica-Reed for “commitment to alternative education in Pennsylvania”
In 2009, PHASE 4 was identified as an Exemplary Program by the Hanover
Research Council.
2010 – Named a Model Program for the National Dropout Prevention Center/
Network
67
Appendix H
Connecticut
Program Components:
! 
! 
! 
! 
! 
! 
! 
! 
68
Certified educators
Certified behavioral staff
A structured counseling and mentorship program
Teacher-led project-based learning that leads to
differentiated instruction
Technology-based curriculum aligned to Pennsylvania State
Standards with direct instruction
One-on-one instructional support
Career exploration for future preparation in post-secondary
education, employment and military service
Outreach services for students and their families through
strong community partnerships
Appendix H
69
The State of Connecticut’s OST
Programming
Appendix H
Appendix&H&
71
Appendix H
70
! 
28% (172,417) of Connecticut’s K-12 children
are responsible for taking care of themselves
after school.
! 
18% (112,663) of Connecticut’s K-12 children
participate in afterschool programs.
! 
90% of adults surveyed in Connecticut agree that
there should be “some type of organized activity
or place for children and teens to go after school
every day that provides opportunities to learn.”
! 
87% support public funding for afterschool
programs.
Appendix H
72
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Notable Connecticut OST
Programs
From a sample size of nearly 30,000, 497 households were
surveyed for this study. Among those households, 26 percent
qualified for free or reduced price lunch, 10 percent were
Hispanic and 8 percent were African-American.
Appendix H
73
Appendix H
74
Overview:
Mission
! 
COMPASS raises the
expectations of
youth, inspires
families, and builds
peace in the
community.
Vision
! 
In pursuing our mission,
COMPASS Youth
Collaborative’s efforts
focus on helping young
people navigate through
and around challenging
social and economic
obstacles to educational
achievement so that they
can realize their fullest
potential—in school and
beyond.
Appendix H
! 
COMPASS Youth Collaborative, Inc. offers positive youth development
programs five days a week throughout the school year to support, extend and
enhance students’ academic success in a seamless transition. We serve more
than 600 youth between the ages of 10 and 17, and provide educational,
cultural, community service learning and recreational programming at each
site.
! 
Complementing our school year program is our highly regarded summer
program that works with the school to prevent summer learning loss and
expose students to fun and innovative programs.
! 
Now in its fifth year, COMPASS continues to partner with the City of Hartford to
implement Peacebuilders, a violence-prevention initiative. The Peacebuilders
Initiative’s mission is to increase peace on the Hartford streets by mediating
individual and group conflicts and linking youth who are immersed in violence
to resources and support that leads them toward more positive lifestyles.
75
Programming Focus:
Appendix H
76
Who They Serve:
! 
! 
Academics
! 
Enrichment
! 
Recreation
! 
Fun Fridays: These end-of-the week activities allow for
students to engage in social discussions with their peers
and have been developed to build team spirit and
cohesiveness. Field trips are sometimes part of this
program, as are the activities encompassed in “Recreation.”
Through a grant from the Hartford Foundation for
Public Giving in 2004, Compass implemented
programming in:
◦  Dwight-Bellizzi Asian Studies Academy
◦  Hartford Magnet Trinity College Academy
•  In 2008 they expanded in partnership with the
acclaimed violence prevention initiative,
Peacebuilders in:
◦  Latino Studies Academy at Burns
Appendix H
Appendix&H&
77
Appendix H
78
13&
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Programming Focus:
Mission:
! 
The program serves grades K through eight from dismissal time to 6 p.m.,
from the first day of school in August to the last day of school in June.
! 
After-school activities are offered in six areas, five days a week during the
school year:
◦ 
◦ 
◦ 
◦ 
◦ 
◦ 
!  To
empower and unite parents citywide, to
meet the academic, social, cultural,
creative and physical needs of children
through parent-driven, extended-day
programs that nurture and encourage
responsible citizens.
Appendix H
Academics
Life skills
Cultural/arts
Recreation
Sports
Technology
! 
The summer program runs for five weeks. Service-learning opportunities are
available to help middle-school and high-school students experience the
rewards of volunteering in a real work setting and to earn the community
service hours they need to graduate.
! 
Programs take place at the school site. Parent education and family activities
are offered throughout the year.
79
Appendix H
80
Who They Serve:
!  Batchelder
Mission:
Elementary School
! 
!  Kennelly
Elementary School
!  Environmental
Hooker School
Magnet School @ Mary
Appendix H
Arts For Learning Connecticut engages learners of all ages and
abilities in the 21st century learning skills of creativity,
collaboration, and communication through:
Arts integration in school residencies, after-school programs, and
sequential learning opportunities in the arts
Workshops that provide direct experiences in the arts
! 
Performances that provide an understanding of cultures and art
forms that connect to various aspects of the curriculum
! 
Professional development workshops for teachers and artists in
arts integration, positive behavior development, and in providing
arts experiences to people of different abilities
Appendix H
Appendix&H&
! 
We envision people of all ages
and abilities in Connecticut
actively participating in the arts.
Arts For Learning CT serves as
an essential resource for arts
engagement in the state. This
engagement flows from a roster
of professional teaching and
performing artists who spread
their artistic expertise and
inquiry into multiple disciplines
to stimulate lifelong learning
and creativity. Our work
transforms the public’s
understanding of the value of
the arts as an active and natural
part of everyone’s life.
Appendix H
Funding
! 
Vision:
81
Programming Focus:
! 
Through Arts For
Learning CT’s diverse
roster of artists, our
mission is to engage
participants of all
ages and abilities in
learning creatively
through the arts.
83
! 
Hamden Community Block Fund
! 
Lego Children’s Fund
! 
Carolyn Foundation
! 
Linford & Mildred White Foundation
! 
Chester Kitchings Foundation
! 
Marjorie Moore Foundation
! 
Coffee Pond Photography
! 
Marzahl Charitable Trust
! 
Community Foundation for Greater New
Haven
! 
McCullough Foundation
! 
Department of Economic & Community
Development State Office of the Arts
! 
New Haven Mayors Grant
! 
Quinnipiac Bank & Trust
! 
Variety The Childrens Fund
! 
VSA
! 
Waddell & Reed of Hamden
! 
William Caspar Graustein Memorial Fund
! 
Young Audiences Inc.
! 
Evelyn W. Preston Memorial Trust Fund
! 
First Niagara
! 
Foulds Family Foundation
! 
Frederick A DeLuca Foundation
! 
Frank Loomis Palmer Foundation
! 
George C. Ensworth Foundation
! 
82
George and Grace Long Foundation
Appendix H
84
14&
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This is a list of the top 10 states in the U.S. for afterschool programming.
National statistics prove that crime committed by and involving youth is
dramatically increased during the peak after-school hours of 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.
Statistics also show that if more OST programming was provided in most urban
areas, many more families and youth would become involved, provided the
opportunity.
OST programming has proved its ability to decrease criminal activity during peak
after-school times, based on their availability and in combination with their
engaging Arts Enrichment and STEAM programming.
OST programming also has proved integral in decreasing dropouts, increasing
standardized testing scores, increasing graduation rates, and increasing continued
education at the university level.
Given that most of these programs do contain components of arts enrichment as
a catalyst for physical, emotional, and psychological growth, it is in the best
interest of schools and community organizations to create OST programming that
can serve students during the school year, summer and holiday breaks.
(America After 3PM Top Ten States for Afterschool Report, 2009)
Appendix H
85
Appendix&H&
Appendix H
86
15&
As referenced within the plan, below is a graphic illustration of the Association of
American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) VALUE Rubrics:
Visit http://www.aacu.org/VALUE/rubrics for more information.
Appendix I, Page 1
CMSD Data Collection Instruments
Arts and Cultural Organizations Interview Protocol
1. Organization
2. Name
3. Title
4. What is the overall mission of the organization? What is the educational mission?
5. What is your role in educational programming or collaboration?
6. Does your organization have collaborations with Cleveland schools?
7. Describe your collaborations. (Probe according to their responses and the nature of the organization)
Probe: What are your educational goals? (or organizational goals, for leaders) Which grades do
you serve? How long are your programs? Do you co-plan with schools/teachers/the district?
Probe: Do your programs primarily consist of students creating art, skills in the arts, learning
academics through the arts, arts integration, students as part of an audience, aesthetic
education, other areas of student learning?
Probe: Do you provide professional development for teachers? How comprehensive? What are
the goals of PD?
Probe: Do you provide professional development for teaching artists? How are they trained?
How comprehensive? What are the goals of PD for teaching artists?
Probe: Do you provide curriculum to teachers, other materials?
Probe: For museums and performing venues – About how many Cleveland students visit teacher
year? Are there sustained educational components to your exhibits/performances, such as
professional development or teaching artist visits to schools?
8. How important is education to your organization? To your leadership? To your Board? Is it part of
your mission statement?
9. What is most challenging about collaborating with the Cleveland schools?
10. What are the greatest needs in the Cleveland schools?
Probe: How are those needs being addressed?
11. What is the biggest impediment to change in the schools?
12. How can arts and cultural help support the Cleveland schools? Is there a need and opportunity for
more involvement by the arts and cultural community?
Probe: How do these collaborations benefit your organization? How do they benefit the arts and
cultural community?
13. What is your vision for arts education in Cleveland?
14. How important is education to your organization? To your leadership? To your Board? Is it part of
your mission statement?
Appendix J, Page 1
15. (If applicable) Do you collaborate with the current Cleveland School of the Arts? Describe your
relationship and programming (if different than above)?
16. (If applicable) What has been most successful in your collaboration with CSA?
17. (If applicable) What has been most challenging in your collaboration with CSA?
18. Ideally, how could a redesigned Cleveland School of the Arts collaborate with arts and cultural
organizations? What are the unique opportunities?
Arts and Cultural Organization Survey
Please answer the following questions about your organization’s educational programs. Leave blank any
questions that aren’t applicable to your organization.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Name (optional)
Organization
Job Title or Role
Does your organization have a collaboration or partnership with Cleveland School of the Arts?
 Yes
 No
Describe the collaboration, including approximate number of students served, grades, location
of instruction (such as the school or your site), and instructional content. [text box]
Does your organization have a collaboration or partnership with the Cleveland Municipal School
District (CMSD)?
 Yes
 No
Describe the collaboration [text box]
Approximately how many CMSD students do you serve each year?
Student Programming
Our programs for CMSD students include teaching skills in music
Our programs for CMSD students include teaching skills in dance
Our programs for CMSD students include teaching skills in theater or drama
Our programs for CMSD students include teaching skills in visual arts
Our programs for CMSD students include teaching skills in media arts
Our programs for CMSD students include teaching aesthetic education
Our programs for CMSD students include arts integrated instruction
Our programs for CMSD students include teaching academic subjects through the arts
Other areas of arts instruction [text box]
Professional Development
Our organization provides professional development for classroom or subject teachers
Our organization provides professional development for arts specialist teachers
Our organization provides professional development for teaching artists
Describe the content of professional development, including typical number of hours/days,
instructional content, and location [text box]
Appendix J, Page 2
9. Instruction
Our CMSD instruction takes place in school classrooms
Our CMSD instruction takes place in other school locations (such as auditoriums, gyms, or
performance spaces)
Our CMSD instruction takes place at our site
Other locations: [text box]
10. Full-time education staff
11. Part-time education staff
12. Freelance or contracted education staff
13. Describe physical spaces available for education at your organization
14. Describe your educational transportation capacity and/or needs
[Items 15-20 use 5-point Likert scale, “strongly disagree” to “strongly agree”]
15. Education is central to our organization’s mission
16. Collaborating with CMSD is central to our organization’s mission
17. Our organization would like a stronger relationship with CMSD
18. Cleveland’s arts and cultural community is strongly committed to supporting arts education in
Cleveland schools
19. Cleveland’s political leaders is strongly committed to supporting arts education in Cleveland schools
20. Cleveland’s philanthropic community is strongly committed to supporting arts education in
Cleveland schools
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
What are the greatest needs in the Cleveland schools?
What is most challenging about collaborating with the Cleveland schools?
What is the biggest impediment to change in the schools?
How can arts and cultural organizations support the Cleveland schools?
What is your vision for arts education in the Cleveland schools?
CMSD Arts Specialist Teacher Survey
We are conducting research on the education programs in the CMSD. We will use the data to make
recommendations for improving CMSD arts education.
Please answer the following questions about your arts instruction. All responses will be confidential.
Data will be aggregated in a report, but individuals and schools will not be identified, and responses
from different schools will not be compared. Our final report may include quotes from surveys, but they
will only be attributed by type of respondent (such as “arts teacher”). We are providing the opportunity
for you to enter your school name, but please feel free to leave that question blank.
1. School(s) (optional)
2. Arts subject(s) taught [checkbox: yes, no]
 Dance
 Drama/Theater
Appendix J, Page 3
 Music
 Visual Arts
 Other ___
3. Grades taught (arts classes only – check all that apply)
 Pre-K
 Kindergarten
 First Grade
 Second Grade
 Third Grade
 Fourth Grade
 Fifth Grade
 Sixth Grade
 Seventh Grade
 Eighth Grade
 Ninth Grade
 Tenth Grade
 Eleventh Grade
 Twelfth Grade
4. Estimated total number of arts students taught in entire school year.
5. Number of arts students taught in a typical week. (Please provide an interpretation if you see
different numbers of students in different weeks during the school year.)
[Items 7-16 use 5-point Likert scale, “strongly disagree” to “strongly agree”]
6. My instruction includes teaching skills in the arts
7. My instruction includes teaching aesthetic education
8. My instruction includes interdisciplinary or arts integrated instruction, or collaboration with non-arts
teachers
9. My students have opportunities to perform or exhibit for the school community
10. I have adequate space and facilities to teach my arts subject
11. I have adequate resources and materials to teach my arts subject
12. I have received excellent pre-service or college/university education to prepare me for teaching in
CMSD schools
13. I have participated in excellent professional development to prepare me for teaching in CMSD
schools
14. My school administration strongly supports arts education
15. CMSD strongly supports arts education
16. I would like to collaborate more with Cleveland’s arts and cultural community
17. Describe more fully the instructional content of your arts teaching.
18. Describe the most effective professional development or pre-service/college/university education
you have received.
19. What are your greatest space and facilities needs?
20. What are your greatest resources and materials needs?
21. What are your greatest professional development needs?
22. What are your greatest challenges in providing arts instruction to your students?
23. Specifically, what kind of support, and what level of support, would you need to improve arts
education in your school?
Appendix J, Page 4
CMSD Classroom and Subject Teacher Survey
We are conducting research on arts education programs in the CMSD. We will use the data to make
recommendations for improving CMSD arts education.
Please answer the following questions if you participate in arts integrated instruction. All responses will
be confidential. Data will be aggregated in a report, but individuals and schools will not be identified,
and responses from different schools will not be compared. Our final report may include quotes from
surveys, but they will only be attributed by type of respondent (such as “classroom teacher”). We are
providing the opportunity for you to enter your school name, but please feel free to leave that question
blank.
1. School (optional)
2. Subjects taught
3. Grades taught (check all that apply)
 Pre-K
 Kindergarten
 First Grade
 Second Grade
 Third Grade
 Fourth Grade
 Fifth Grade
 Sixth Grade
 Seventh Grade
 Eighth Grade
 Ninth Grade
 Tenth Grade
 Eleventh Grade
 Twelfth Grade
4. Grades where you incorporate arts integrated instruction (check all that apply)
 Pre-K
 Kindergarten
 First Grade
 Second Grade
 Third Grade
 Fourth Grade
 Fifth Grade
 Sixth Grade
 Seventh Grade
 Eighth Grade
 Ninth Grade
 Tenth Grade
Appendix J, Page 5
 Eleventh Grade
 Twelfth Grade
5. Arts subject(s) included in arts integration [checkbox: yes, no]
 Dance
 Drama/Theater
 Music
 Visual Arts
 Other ___
6. Describe more fully your participation in arts integration, including instructional objectives, content
and duration.
7. Do you assess learning in arts integration? If so, please describe.
[Items 8-16 use 5-point Likert scale, “strongly disagree” to “strongly agree”]
8. I regularly make connections between the arts and academic subjects in my classroom
9. I am confident in integrating the arts into my instruction
10. My arts integrated instruction includes teaching skills in the arts
11. My arts integrated instruction includes teaching aesthetic education
12. My instruction includes teaching academic subjects through the arts
13. My students have opportunities to perform or exhibit for the school community
14. I have received excellent pre-service or college/university education to prepare me for teaching arts
integrated instruction in CMSD schools
15. I have participated in excellent professional development to prepare me for teaching arts integrated
instruction in CMSD schools
16. I would like to collaborate more with Cleveland’s arts and cultural community
Answer the following 4 questions if you participate in a partnership with an arts or cultural organization,
or if you have a teaching artist visit your classroom. [5-point Likert scale]
17. Our collaborating arts organization is a well-organized and effective partner for our school
18. The visiting artists met and planned their residencies with me.
19. Planning sessions went beyond logistics/scheduling and into curriculum and teaching
20. I was able to regularly discuss the progress of residencies with the visiting artists.
21. Do you assess student learning for your arts integrated instruction or arts partnership? If so, please
describe.
22. Describe more fully your professional development or pre-service training in arts integration.
23. What are your greatest challenges in providing arts integrated instruction to your students?
24. Specifically, what kind of support, and what level of support, would you need to improve arts
integration in your school?
CMSD Teaching Artist Survey
We are conducting research on arts education programs in the CMSD. We will use the data to make
recommendations for improving CMSD arts education.
Appendix J, Page 6
Please answer the following questions about your experiences working with CMSD schools and teachers.
All responses will be confidential. Data will be aggregated in a report, but individuals and schools will not
be identified, and responses from different schools will not be compared. Our final report may include
quotes from surveys, but they will only be attributed by type of respondent (such as “teaching artist”).
We are providing the opportunity for you to enter school names, but please feel free to leave that
question blank.
1. School(s) in which you work as a teaching artist (optional)
2. Arts disciplines that you teach (check all that apply)
 Dance
 Drama/Theater
 Music
 Visual Arts
 Other ___
3. Grades taught (check all that apply)
 Pre-K
 Kindergarten
 First Grade
 Second Grade
 Third Grade
 Fourth Grade
 Fifth Grade
 Sixth Grade
 Seventh Grade
 Eighth Grade
 Ninth Grade
 Tenth Grade
 Eleventh Grade
 Twelfth Grade
[Items 4-14 use 5-point Likert scale, “strongly disagree” to “strongly agree”]
4. My instruction includes teaching skills in the arts
5. My instruction includes teaching aesthetic education
6. My instruction includes interdisciplinary or arts integrated instruction
7. My instruction includes collaboration with classroom or non-arts subject teachers
8. My instruction includes collaboration with arts specialist teachers
9. Partner schools have been responsive to my needs and concerns regarding scheduling and space
10. The school administration where I work was supportive and encouraged full participation by
teachers
11. I met and planned my residencies with the school teachers
12. Planning meetings got beyond logistics and scheduling, and into curriculum and instruction
13. Collaborating school teachers were able to integrate and extend arts learning into their overall
curriculum
14. I was able to regularly discuss the progress of residencies with school teachers
Appendix J, Page 7
15. Describe more fully the instructional content of your arts teaching in CMSD.
16. Have you received professional development for working as a teaching artist in CMSD? If so, please
describe.
17. What are your greatest challenges in providing arts instruction in CMSD schools?
18. Specifically, what kind of support, and what level of support, would you need to improve your
collaboration and instruction in CMSD schools?
CMSD Student Alumni Survey
We are conducting research on arts education programs in the Cleveland Municipal School District
(CMSD). We will use the data to make recommendations for improving CMSD arts education.
Please answer the following questions about your arts education experiences in CMSD schools. All
responses will be confidential. Our final report may include quotes from surveys, but they will only be
attributed by type of respondent (such as “former student”).
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Current age
Year graduated from CMSD
CMSD schools attended
Please list all arts classes taken in CMSD elementary schools.
Please list all arts classes taken in CMSD middle schools.
Please list all arts classes taken in CMSD high schools.
Please list all arts classes taken in CMSD after school programs.
Please describe other arts programs or instruction that you received that was not part of CMSD.
[Items 9-15 use 5-point Likert scale, “strongly disagree” to “strongly agree”]
9. Through attending CMSD schools, I developed skills in dance
10. Through attending CMSD schools, I developed skills in drama/theater
11. Through attending CMSD schools, I developed skills in music
12. Through attending CMSD schools, I developed skills in visual arts
13. Through attending CMSD schools, I developed a better understanding of art and culture
14. Through attending CMSD schools, I learned about connections between the arts and other school
subjects
15. I was very interested in learning more about the arts when I was a student
16. Were you interested in attending a high school with a strong arts program? If so, did your
elementary and middle school arts classes prepare you for high school?
17. Were you interested becoming an arts major in college? If so, did your CMSD classes prepare you for
college? For an audition or portfolio for college admission?
18. Did your arts classes help prepare you for college? Please explain.
19. Did your arts classes help prepare you for the workplace? Please explain.
20. In what other ways have your arts classes affected you?
21. Are you pursuing a career in the arts? If so, what are you interested in doing, or what have you
accomplished so far? Did your CMSD classes prepare you for your artistic career?
22. What recommendations do you have for improving arts education in Cleveland schools?
Appendix J, Page 8
CMSD School Principal Survey
We are conducting research on arts education programs in the CMSD. We will use the data to make
recommendations for improving CMSD arts education.
Please answer the following questions about your school’s educational programs. Leave blank any
questions that aren’t applicable to your school. All responses to open-ended questions are confidential
and respondents will not be identified in our reports.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Name
School
Grades served
Approximate student population this year
Number of full-time arts specialist teachers this year
 Dance
 Drama/Theater
 Music
 Visual Arts
 Other
Number of part-time arts specialist teachers this year
 Dance
 Drama/Theater
 Music
 Visual Arts
 Other
Approximately how many classroom or non-arts subject teachers integrate the arts with their
curriculum?
 0%-20%
 21%-40%
 41% -60%
 61%-80%
 81%-100%
If teachers integrate the arts, please provide an example, including grades served and instructional
content. ________
Student Programming [matrix]
 Our programming includes teaching skills in music [checkbox: yes, no]
 Our programming includes teaching skills in dance
 Our programming includes teaching skills in theater or drama
 Our programming includes teaching skills in visual arts
 Our programming includes teaching skills in media arts
 Our programming includes teaching aesthetic education
 Our programming includes arts integrated instruction
 Our programming includes teaching academic subjects through the arts
Appendix J, Page 9
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
 Other areas of arts instruction
Do you have partnerships with arts or cultural organizations, or visiting teaching artists? If so, briefly
describe the partnership, grades served and instructional content.
How effective is the collaborating arts or cultural organization in working with your school? (You
may reference scheduling/logistics, curriculum, artist participation, professional development,
engaging teachers, or other areas.)
Professional Development [matrix: yes, no, not sure]
 Our arts specialist teachers participate in ongoing professional development in providing arts
instruction.
 Our classroom or subject teachers participate in ongoing professional development in arts
integration.
 Our visiting teaching artists participate in ongoing professional development.
What are your school’s greatest needs in arts education?
What are your school’s greatest challenges in providing arts education for your students?
Specifically, what kind of support, and what level of support, would you need to improve arts
education in your school?
Appendix J, Page 10
MitchellKornArts Interviews
Date
Time
4/25/13 3-5:00p
4/26/13 9:00a
4/26/13 10:15-10:50a
4/26/13 12-1:30p
4/26/13 1:30-2:00p
5/15/13 2-3:30p
5/31/13 2:00p
5/31/13 3:30p
6/10/13
6/11/13
6/11/13
6/11/13
6/11/13
6/12/13
6/12/13
6/12/13
3:00p
9:30a
12p
3p
3p
10a
11a
2p
6/12/13 4:30p
6/13/13 9a
6/13/13 10:30
Name
Title
CSA Internal Team - Katia Schwarz,
Christine Bluso, Andrew Koonce and Tony
Sias
Christine Bluso, Katia Schwarz, Andrew
Koonce and Tony Sias
Tour of CSA and classroom visits
Meeting with CMSD, CSA, FCA and Gund,
Cleveland and Abington Foundations
CSA Internal Team - Katia Schwarz,
Christine Bluso, Andrew Koonce and Tony
Sias
Andrew Koonce and Faculty of CSA
Susan Stauter
Artistic Director
Antigone Trimis
Arts Education Master Plan
Implementation Manager
Christine Bluso
Executive Director
Katia Schwarz
Project Manager
Judith Ryder - Lunch
Deena Epstein
Ann Mullin
Cristen Slesh
Paul Putman
Diana Robbins
Director of Community
Education
Andrew Koonce
Principal
Tony Sias
Artistic Director, CSA/Director of
Arts Education, CMSD
Lynn Johnson
Director of Admissions and
Enrollment
Org
San Francisco Unified School District
San Francisco Unified School District
Friends of Cleveland School of the Arts (CSA)
Grants-Plus
Cleveland Arts Consortium
The George Gund Foundation
The George Gund Foundation
Foundation Management Services
The Cleveland Foundation
University Circle, Inc.
CSA
CSA / CMSD
Cleveland Institute of Music (CIM)
Appendix K, Page 1
6/13/13 12:30p
Caroline Goeser
6/13/13 2:30p
6/13/13 4p
Greg Howe
Cyrus Taylor
6/13/13 4p
Ron Wilson
6/13/13 4p
Karen Potter
6/13/13 4p
Tim Shuckerow
6/14/13 9a
6/14/13 10:30a
6/14/13 1p
Richard Dickinson
Nathan Motta
Karen Shaheen-Thompson
6/14/13 2:30p
Jill Rembrandt
6/20/13 11a
6/24/13 4p
6/25/13 11a
Leslie Shepard - phone conference
Jill Woda
Christine Haff-Paluck
6/25/13 2p
6/25/13 4p
6/26/13 11a
6/26/13 2p
6/26/13 3:30p
Rich Fried
David Shimotakahara
Mark Otloski
Marsha Dobrzynski
David Schiopota
Chris Eppley
Pamela Young
Kevin Richards
Chris Ludwa
6/26/13 4:30p
Nancy Pistone
6/26/13 10a
Director of Education and
Interpretation
CIM Distance Learning
Dean of the School of Arts and
Sciences
Director of Graduate
Programming in Acting
Associate Prof. of Dance,
Pedagogy & Choreography
Director of Art Education and Art
Studio
Education Director
Artistic Director
Interim Executive Director
Director of Education & Public
Programs
Principal (retired)
Director,
Performance/Community
Programs
President
Executive Artistic Director
Education Outreach Coordinator
Executive Director
Assc. Dir. of Education
Education Associate
Executive Director
Executive Director
Executive Director, Performing
Arts and Music Programs
Cleveland Museum of Art (CMA)*
Cleveland Institute of Music (CIM)
Case Western Reserve University (CWRU)
Case Western Reserve University (CWRU)
Case Western Reserve University (CWRU)
Case Western Reserve University (CWRU)
Verb Ballet
Dobama Theatre
NewBridge, Cleveland Center for Arts and
Technology
Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage
Baltimore School of the Arts
Cleveland Institute of Music
Cleveland Chamber Music
GroundWorks DanceTheater
Young Audiences
Dance Cleveland
Nighttown Restaurant
Tri-C Performing Arts Academy
Ohio State Department of Ed.
Appendix K, Page 2
6/27/13 11a
6/27/13 1:30-3:30p
Deborah McHamm
Focus Group
Susan Van Vorst, Director of
Conservatory, Baldwin Wallace College
Kay Schames, Director of Community
Music Enrichment Program (CMEP) at
Cleveland State University
Martha Loughridge, Development
Director, SPACES Gallery
Paula Grooms, Executive Director,
Ingenuity Cleveland
6/27/13 4:15-5:45p
Focus Group
Caroline Goesser & CMA Staff
Dale Hilton
Hajnal Eppley
Seema Rao
6/28/13 10a
Treva Offutt
6/28/13
6/4/13
7/11/13
7/12/13
Dr. Michelle Pierre-Farid
Terrence Spivey
Linda Nathan
Donn Harris - phone conference
Ruth Azawa - phone conference
Focus Group
Marcie Bergman, Cleveland Arts Prize
Kim Parry, Apollo’s Fire
Christine Lobas, Studio Think
1:30p
11a
2:30-3:45p
4p
7/15/13 2:30-4:30p
President and CEO
A Cultural Exchange
Director of Education and
Interpretation
Director of Teaching and
Learning
Assistant Director of School and
Teacher Engagement
Director of Intergenerational
Learning
Admissions Associates/Primary
Division Middle School
Performing Arts
Chief Academic Officer
Artistic Director
Founder
Executive Director
Former Principal
CMA
CMA
CMA
CMA
Laurel School
CMSD
Karamu House
Boston Arts Academy
Oakland School of the Arts, Oakland CA
Oakland School of the Arts
Appendix K, Page 3
Nancy Schramm, Chagrin Valley Little
Theatre
Charles Eversole, Singing Angels
Mary Helen Hammer, American Institute
of Architects Cleveland
Rachel Bernstein, Heights Arts
Renee Whiteside, Consortium of African
American Organizations
Pamela Fine, Heights Youth Theatre
5p
7/16/13 8a
7/16/13 9a
7/16/13 10a
7/16/13 1:30p
Celeste Cosentino
Martin Cosentino
Christine Slesh
Susan Althans
Tom Schorgl
Raymond Kent
7/16/13 3p
Carl Topilow
Shirley Morgenstern
Jason Hanley, Ph.D.
7/17/13 8:30a
7/17/13 10:15a
7/17/13 11:15a
Stephanie Heriger
Charlie Lawrence
Gary Hanson
Joan Katz Napoli
7/17/13 2p
7/17/13 3:30p
Jenny Brown
Dick Bogomolny
Isabel Trautwein
Liz Maugans
Mary Glauser
Artistic Director
Managing Director
President
Senior Associate
Executive Director
Architect - Director of Innovative
Technology Design
Co-Founder
Co-Founder
Director of Education and
Interpretation
Education Programs Manager
President & CEO
Executive Director
Director of Education and
Community Programs
Ensemble Theatre
Founder
Director of Communications &
Zygote Press
Cleveland Jazz Orchestra
Foundation Management Svcs.
The Community Partnership for Arts and Culture
Westlakd reed Leskosky
Cleveland POPS Orchestra
Rock & Roll Hall of Fame & Musem
The Cleveland Music School Settlement
The Cleveland Orchestra*
The Cleveland Orchestra*
Appendix K, Page 4
7/18/13 9a
Jill Rembrandt
7/18/13
7/18/13
7/18/13
7/19/13
7/22/13
7/23/13
Felton Thomas
Christine Bulso
Debbie McHamm President
Joe Weagraff - phone conference
Dr. Margaret Carlson
Lynn Johnson
12:30p
2p
3p
9a
3p
9a
7/23/13 10:30a
Deena Epstein
Ann Mullin
7/24/13 7a
7/24/13 9a
Helen Williams
Paul Putman
Tom Sych
Carol Tizzano
7/24/13 11a
7/24/13 2p
4:00p
4:00p
7/25/13 Lunch meeting
Cleveland Orchestra Senior Staff
John Mullaney
Monyka Price - phone conference
Lisa Stofan
Augie Napoli
7/25/13 9a
Eric Gordon CANCELLED Rebooked for
9/16 at 1pm
Shirrell R. Greene
Mark Schirmer
Shannon Thorsen
7/25/13 10:30a
Jodi Van der Wiel
Hollie Dellisanti
Community Outreach
Director of Education and Public Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage
Programs
Director
Cleveland Public Library
Director
Director of Admissions and
Enrollment Management
Senior Program Officer for Arts
Senior Program Officer for
Education
Program Director for Education
Program Officer
Board President
Media Literacy and Art Educator
& Independent Producer
Chief of Education
Consultant
Deputy Director and Chief
Advancement Officer
CEO
Deputy to the CEO
Architect
Senior Associate Business
Development
Senior Associate Architect
Manager II Capital Projects
Contemporary Youth Orchestra
Verb Ballets
Cleveland Institute of Music
The Gund Foundation
The Gund Foundation
The Cleveland Foundation
The Cleveland Foundation
Friends of CSA
PicturePerfect Productions
Nord Foundation
City of Cleveland
Grants Plus
Cleveland Musem of Art*
CMSD
Moody Nolan
Moody Nolan
Moody Nolan
CMSD
Appendix K, Page 5
7/25/13 11:30am
7/26/13 3p
Paul Putman - brief stop-in meeting to
TCF
pick up materials
Karen Gahl-Mills
Executive Director
Paul Hill and Shannon Murtaugh - phone
conference
Ralph Opacic - phone conference
President & CEO
7/29/13
7/29/13
7/29/13
7/30/13
12 Noon
1p
3p
1:30p
Kristy Callaway - phone conference
Roy Fluhrer - phone conference
Terri Milsap - phone confeence
Sharyn Mahoney
10a
11:30p
1p
2p
4p
5p
10:30a
8/7/13 10a
Judy Ryder - phone conference
Erikc Mann - phone conference
Dava A. Cansler - phone conference
Amy Craft - phone conference
Marsha ? - phone conference
Nancy Pistone - phone conference
Christine Fowler-Mack - phone
conference
Gita Gulati-Partim - phone conference
8/7/13 2p
Dr. L. Scott Allen
Center for Reinventining Public
Education (Arts in Porfolio
Schools)
Principal
9/15/13
9/16/13
9/17/13 10a
Amy Craft
Karen Gahl-Mills
David Quolke
President
7/25/13 2:00p
7/26/13 11a
8/2/13
8/2/13
8/2/13
8/2/13
8/5/13
8/5/13
8/6/13
9/30/13 12-1:30p
10/13/13 9-10a
10-11a
Executive Director
Principal
Principal
Head of School
Executive Director
Founder/Executive Director
Executive Director
State Arts Consultant
Cuyahoga Arts & Culture
Center for Reinventing Education, University of
WA
Orange County (CA) School of the Arts and
Orange County School of the Arts Foundation
Arts Schools Network
Greenville, SC Schools of the Arts
Chicago High School for the Arts
Nashville Ballet
Arts Education Consortium, CSU
Cleveland Classical Guitar Society
Foluke Cultural Arts Center. Inc.
Art House, Inc.
Young Audiences
Office of Curriculum & Assessment
High School of the Performing and Visual Arts,
Houston, TX
Art House, Inc.
Teachers Local 279
Lunch with FCSA Executive Committee
Dianna Richardson
Scott Miller
Appendix K, Page 6
11a-12p
12-1p
2-3p
10/15/13 9-10:30a
11a-12p
2:15-3:15p
3:30-5:00p
10/28/13 Morning
10/28/13 3:30p
10/29/13 Morning
10/29/13 2-3p
11/11/13
11/17/13
11/18/13
11/18/13
11/18/13
11/19/13
9:30-11:00 a
7:30-9:30 p
9:40-11:10a
11:45a-1:00p
6-7:00p
8-9:30a
Daiel Gray-Kontar
Dr. Woods
Dr. Michelle Pierre Farid
Charlie Lawrence
Ronna Kaplan
Thea Wilson
Megan Constantine
Dean Amy Parks
Daniel Hahn
CAO
President & CEO
Chair, Center for Music Therapy
Chair, Center for Early Childhood
Chair, Center for Music Therapy
Associate Dean
Vice President, Community
Engagement & Education
CMSD
The Music Settlement
The Music Settlement
The Music Settlement
The Music Settlement
Creative Arts, CCC
Playhouse Square
Cleveland Arts Consortium Speaking
Engagement
Cleveland Orchestra
Deena Epstein, Ann Mullin, Helen
Williams, Paul Putman, Cristen Slesh, Bill
Hiller, Daniel Hahn, Marsha Dobryzinski,
Ed Gallagher, Joan Katz Napoli, Michelle
Pierre-Farid, Tony Sias and Karen
Thompson
Cleveland Orchestra
Meeting with Case Western Reserve
Faculty: David Ake, Chair, Department of
Music; Sandra Noble and Tim Shuckuron,
Art Studio Program; Stephen
Haynesworth, Arthur Evenchik, Emerging
Scholars Program; Denise Davis, Director,
Teacher Licensure Program and C
Meeting with Funders
Lauren Oakley
Rock & Roll Hall of Fame
11th Grade Student Focus Group
9th Grade Student Focus Group
Parents Focus Group with Anthony Brown
10th Grade Student Focus Group
Appendix K, Page 7
11/19/13 9:40-11:10a
11/19/13 11:40a-1:00p
11/20/13 9-11:00 a
12/3/13 2-3:00p
12th Grade Student Focus Group
Arts Faculty Focus Group
Nashville Ballet Dance Pedagogy
Discussion
Leo Serrano
12/9/13 8:30-9:30a
10-11a
11-11:45a
Jeffrey Stresn
Birch Browning, Ph.D.
John Mullaney
1p
Daniel Hahn
3-4p
Irwin M. Lowenstein, RA, LEED AP BD+C
Lillian Kuri
6p
12/10/13 8:30-9:30a
10:30-11:30a
2:30-4p
12/11/13 8:30-9:30a
10:30a-12p
2-3p
12/12/13 9:30-10:30a
12:00-1:30p
3-5p
Ex. Dir. of Institutional
Advancemet
Direct of Design and Architecture
Associate Professor of Musid Ed.
Ex. Dir. The Nord Family
Foundation
VP Community Engagement &
Ed.
President
Program Director for
Architecture
CEO
Associate Head of School
Head of School
Eric Gordon
Doris Korda
Ann Klotz
Academic Faculty Focus Group
Alisha Evans
Principal
Amy Parks, Chris Ludwa, Emanuela
Friscioni
Megan Constantine
Director of the Dept. of Music
Lillian Kuri, Steve Standley and Tom Huck
Paul Putman
Deena Epstein
Ann Mullin
Helen Williams
Design Team Meeting
CMSD
Cleveland Museum of Art
Cleveland State University
Playhouse Square
Re-think Advisors, Inc.
Urban Design and Sustainable Development
CMSD
Hawken School
Laurel School
CSA Lower Campus
Creative Arts Academy, Tri C
The Music Settlement
University Hospitals Management Services
Center
The Cleveland Foundation
The Gund Foundation
The Gund Foundation
The Cleveland Foundation
BBB
Appendix K, Page 8
12/15/13 9-11:00 a
1/15/14
1/21/14
1/27/14
2/24/14
3:30p
4-5:00p
9-11:00a
8:30-9:30a
10-11a
3-5p
3/11/14 8-10a
Susan Stauter - phone conference
Eric Gordon - phone conference
Meeting with Gund Foundation Funders
Ann Mullin/Dr. Farid
Christine Bluso Kane
Marci Elegant
AAA Design Team
Eric Gordon and Staff
San Francisco Unified School
District Ruth Azaw School of the
Arts
Exec. Dir.
ICAN Schools Music Director
FCSA
CEO
CMSD
Key: * Denotes multiple visits to
institution/meetings with multiple
executives/team leadership
Appendix K, Page 9
Yolande Spears Interviews
Date
6/3/13
6/3/13
6/3/13
6/3/13
6/4/13
6/4/13
6/4/13
7/11/13
7/15/13
7/15/13
7/15/13
Time
9:30a
11:30a
4p
4p
9a
9a
11a
2:30-3:45p
10a
Name
Lee Lazar
Christine Seibert
Kevin Moore
Joe Martin
Lisa Ortenzi
Kelly Schaffer-Florian
Terrence Spivey
Linda Nathan
Rev. Dr. Todd C.
Davidson
12p Rose K. Kimosh
2:30-4:30p Marcie Bergman,
Cleveland Arts Prize
Kim Parry, Apollo’s Fire
Christine Lobas, Studio
Think
Nancy
Schramm, Chagrin
Valley Little Theatre
Charles Eversole, Singing
Angels
Mary Helen
Hammer, American
Institute of Architects
Cleveland
Rachel
Bernstein, Heights Arts
Renee Whiteside,
Consortium of African
American Organizations
Title
Org
Executive Director
Director of Education
Managing Director
Director of Production
Associate Director of Education
Education Associate
Artistic Director
Founder
Senior Pastor
The Rainey Institute
Cleveland Public Theatre (CPT)
Cleveland Playhouse
Cleveland Playhouse
Great Lakes Theatre Company
Great Lakes Theatre Company
Karamu House
Boston Arts Academy
Antioch Baptist Church
Program Assistant
Shore Cultural Centre
Appendix K, Page 10
7/16/13
9/11/13
9/23/13
11/18/13
11/19/13
11/19/13
Pamela Fine, Heights
Youth Theatre
8:30a Barbara Bachtell
10a Ed Gallagher
11a Mary Verdi-Fletcher
1:30p Bill Morgan
11:30-12:30p Tony Sias
Executive Director
Director of Education & Creative Arts
Therapies
President/Founding Artistic Director
Artistic Director
Broadway School of Music and the Arts
Beck Center for the Arts
Dancing Wheels Company & School
Sign Stage
NYC Arts Scool Network
Conference
9a-12P Observations of multiple
arts/academics classes
9a-11a Observation of Mr.
Green's Dance class
12:15p-2p Observations of multiple
arts/academics classes
Appendix K, Page 11
Dan Serig Interviews
Date
6/3/13
6/3/13
6/3/13
6/4/13
6/4/13
6/4/13
6/27/13
6/27/13
6/27/13
6/27/13
Time
1p
3p
4:30p
1p
3p
4p
9a
10a
1:30-3:30p
4:15-5:30p
6/28/13
6/28/13
11/21/13
10a
12:30P
9a-11a
11/21/13
12:15-2p
11/22/13
9-11a
11/22/13
12:15-2p
Name
Ann Albano
Paul Voinovich
Ivan Schwarz
Nicole Ledinek
John Ewing
Grafton Nunes
Jill Paulson
Santina Protopapa
Focus Group
Focus Group - Caroline
Goesser & CMA Staff
Dale Hilton
Hajnal Eppley
Seema Rao
Meri Ruble
Matt Bott
Observation of Mr.
Carver's Visual Arts
Class
Observations of
multiple
arts/academics classes
Observations of
multiple
arts/academics classes
Observations of
multiple
arts/academics classes
Title
Executive Director and Chief Curator
President
President
Curator of Education
Director of Cinématique of CIA
President
Director of Grant Programs
Executive Director
Org
The Sculpture Center
VOCON
Greater Cleveland Film Commission
Museum of Contemporary Art, MOCA
Cleveland Institute of Art
Cleveland Institute of Art
Cuyahoga Arts and Culture
Progressive Arts Alliance
Director of Education and Interpretation
CMA
Director of Teaching and Learning
Assistant Director of School and Teacher
Engagement
Director of Intergenerational Learning
Education Director
Director
CMA
CMA
CMA
ArtHouse, Inc.
Boys and Girls Club
Appendix K, Page 12
Appendix K, Page 13
Dr. Robert Horowitz Interviews
Date
Time
10/20/2013 9:30-10:30a
11a-12p
1:30-2:30p
3:30-4:30p
10/30/2013 11a-12p
1-2p
3:30p
11/13/2016 3-4p
11/14/2013 3-4p
11/15/2013 3:15p
12/10/2013 8:15-9a
12/10/2013 9:10-9:55a
12/10/2013 9:55-10:48a
12/10/2013 10:48-11:44a
12/10/2013 11:44a12:28p
Name
Cristin Slesh
Dean Amy Parks
Dr. Michelle Pierre Farid
Desiree M. Powell
Tony sias
Deena Epstein Ann Mullin,
Paul Putman, Helen
Williams
Karen H. Thompson
Title
Foundation Management Services
Associate Dean
CAO
Educator, Flexible Content Expert
Director of Arts Ed.
CMSD
CMSD
CMSD
Deputy Chief Curriculum & Instruction
CMSD
Leo Serrano - Phone
conference
Lynn M. Johnson-Phone
conference
Kimberly Brown
Educator: Institutional Advancement
CMSD
Director of Admissions and Enrollment
Management
All-City managing Director
Cleveland Institute of Music
Juliane Fouse-Shepard and Principal
Christine Campion
PASS Facilitator
Beginning Woodwinds Instrumental music teacher
Chris Cummings
1st Grade Integrated Arts Gloria Doering
8th Grade Integated Arts Creative Writing - Christine
Champion
7th Grade Visual ArtsSherri Pittard
Organization
Cleveland School of the Arts Program Manager,
CMSD 216.702.6803
Newton D. Baker PASS School
Newton D. Baker PASS School
Newton D. Baker PASS School
Newton D. Baker PASS School
Newton D. Baker PASS School
Newton D. Baker PASS School
Appendix K, Page 14
12/10/2013
12/10/2013
12/11/2013
12/11/2013
12/11/2013
12/11/2013
12:28-1:16p
3p
9:30a
10:20a
11:15a
12:50a
12/11/2013
12/12/2013
12/12/2013
12/12/2013
4p
9:10a-10:25a
9:30a
12-1:30p
12/12/2013 3-5p
Lunch and talk to children
Focus Groups for Principals
Observe Visual Arts Class
Observe Music Class
Interview Charles Byrd
Principal
Lunch with Visual Arts
Teacher Diane Goll and
Music Teacher Rebecca
Jerric
Focus Groups for Teachers
Observe 3 and 4th majors
Assistant Principal
Paul Putman
Deena Epstein
Ann Mullin
Helen Williams
Design Team Meeting
Newton D. Baker PASS School
John Adams High School
Riverside Elementary School PASS
Riverside Elementary School PASS
Riverside Elementary School PASS
Riverside Elementary School PASS
Lincoln West High School
Cleveland School of the Arts Lower Campus
James A. Garfield Elementary School
The Cleveland Foundation
The Gund Foundation
The Gund Foundation
The Cleveland Foundation
Barbara Byrd Bennett (BBB)
Appendix K, Page 15
MITCHELL KORN is one of our nation's most important
leaders in arts and arts education strategic planning, advocacy
and interdisciplinary education. He is the founder and
president of MitchellKornArts, the Vanderbilt University, Blair
School of Music Adjunct Professor for Music and Community, a
Bard College Senior Fellow for arts policy and planning, and a
former Harvard University Graduate School of Education and
Yale School of Music lecturer.
Korn currently advises, as mentor, the artistic and executive
director of the Nashville Ballet on artistic, communication,
advocacy, education and fundraising issues. He continues in his
17th consecutive year as advisor to the Cleveland Orchestra
Learning Through Music Program — which he created —
training musicians and teachers and advising staff. The Wall
Street Journal has called him a “one man arts education
industry.” Symphony magazine called him a “music education
guru.” He is the former vice president for education and
community engagement at the Nashville Symphony and
Schermerhorn Symphony Center.
Korn is credited with creating, designing and implementing the
nation’s most important and sustainable arts education
initiatives including San Francisco Symphony’s Adventures in
Music (celebrating its 25th anniversary), New York’s
Annenberg Initiative (16th year), Chicago Arts Partnerships in
Education (18th year), The Cleveland Orchestra’s Learning
Through Music (17th year), The Milwaukee Symphony’s Arts in
Community Education (19th year), and many more.
Korn’s extensive philanthropic work includes projects for the
Appendix L, Page 1
Heinz Endowment, MacArthur Foundation, Annenberg
Foundation, GE Fund, and Dayton Hudson Foundation. He also
has developed the arts education and organizational strategic
plans for dozens of arts, cultural and educational organizations
including the San Francisco Ballet, Hart School of Music,
Carnegie Hall, North Carolina Blumenthal Performing Arts
Center, The Bushnell Center for the Performing Arts, The
Baltimore Symphony, Orange County Performing Arts Center,
San Francisco Jazz, and more.
Korn is the recipient of numerous awards and tributes
including Parents magazine’s “As They Grow” award, honoring
his efforts in “making the world a safer, healthier, and happier
place for children.”
Dr. Robert Horowitz is associate director of the Center for
Arts Education Research at Teachers College, Columbia
University and consultant to arts organizations, schools, school
districts, and foundations. As part of a group of researchers
supported by The GE Fund and The John D. and Catherine T.
MacArthur Foundation, Dr. Horowitz investigated the impact of
arts learning on several cognitive and social dimensions, such
as creativity, personal expression, and school climate. The
collective research, Champions of Change: The Impact of the
Arts on Learning, was published by the President’s Committee
on the Arts and Humanities and the Arts Education
Partnership. He is a recipient of the NAEA 2001 Manuel Barkan
Memorial Award for the article based on this work, “Learning
In and Through the Arts: The Question of Transfer” in Studies
in Art Education. Dr. Horowitz contributed to Critical Links:
Learning in the Arts and Student Academic and Social
Development, a compendium of 62 studies of arts learning and
its connections to broader human development. As a
consultant for Jazz at Lincoln Center, he authored the
instructional content of Jazz in the Schools, a National
Appendix L, Page 2
Endowment for the Arts curriculum that “explores jazz as an
indigenous American art form and a means to understand
American history.”
Dr. Horowitz has helped develop numerous educational
partnerships throughout the country. He has conducted over
100 program evaluations for organizations such as the
Kennedy Center, National Endowment for the Arts, Jazz at
Lincoln Center, Carnegie Hall, Young Audiences of Northeast
Ohio, and the Arts Education Partnership, and has served as
researcher for numerous federal, state and private grants. He
has written, lectured and conducted workshops on program
evaluation, musical creativity, jazz improvisation, curriculum
development, student assessment, partnership development
and arts education policy issues.
After performing and recording widely as a guitarist, Rob
Horowitz taught for five years at an alternative high school for
at-risk students in New York City. Subsequently, he taught
guitar at Teachers College, Columbia University, where he
received his doctorate in 1994. Current projects include
evaluation of arts partnerships, teacher professional
development, program design, and research on the impact of
arts learning on cognitive and social development.
Dr. Dan Serig is an associate professor of art education at
Massachusetts College of Art and Design. Research interests
include curriculum design, metaphor, material culture, and
artistic research. Since 2002, Serig has conducted dozens of
arts program evaluations throughout the nation. Clients have
included the National Endowment for the Arts (Education
Leaders Institute), COCA St. Louis, the Woodruff Arts Center
and Young Audiences of Northeast Ohio. In collaboration with
Rob Horowitz, Dan Serig has conducted professional
development and assessment workshops, designed curriculum,
Appendix L, Page 3
and consulted on strategic planning with arts and cultural
organizations. Published works are in several art and design
education journals. He served as the Research Review section
editor of Teaching Artist Journal for three years and is a current
editorial board member of the new journal, Visual Inquiry:
Teaching and Learning in Art. Serig presents nationally and
internationally.
Serig received his doctorate from Teachers College, Columbia
University in 2005. He also has taught visual arts to children
and adults in public and private schools in the U.S. and China.
At MassArt he created a Master of Arts in Teaching program
and redesigned the Masters of Science in Art Education
program. Each summer Serig takes a group of teaching artists
to Ecuador to experience the cultural diversity and biodiversity
through a hybrid studio and pedagogical course. He is now
involved in developing art education degree programs in
Ecuador.
Dr. Rekha S. Rajan is a visiting assistant professor in
education at Columbia College Chicago, where she develops
and teaches courses related to arts integration and education.
She holds a doctorate in music education from Teachers
College, Columbia University, where she also received an EdM
in music education. She also holds an MA in early childhood
professions from Roosevelt University.
Dr. Rajan is a senior research associate with the Center for Arts
Education Research at Teachers College, Columbia University,
where she is part of ArtsResearch, a team of consultants led by
Dr. Robert Horowitz, who evaluate arts-based partnerships
around the United States. Through these partnerships, she has
interviewed and observed hundreds of public school teachers
regarding the strengths and challenges they face with
integrating the arts, and has co-authored over 30 assessment
Appendix L, Page 4
reports.
Dr. Rajan is the author of Integrating the Performing Arts in
Grades K-5 (SAGE/Corwin Press), a comprehensive analysis of
over 60 lessons that demonstrate how to connect music,
theater, dance, and musical theater with math, science, social
studies and language arts in the elementary curriculum. Her
research interests focus on the impact of the performing arts in
the lives of young children and on teachers’ use of the
performing arts in the classroom. She has published articles in
General Music Today, Focus on Pre-K and Focus on Elementary,
publications of the Association of Childhood Education
International, and is also the author of the forthcoming book,
Children’s Experiences in Musical Theater (Rowman & Littlefield
Education, 2014).
She is the principal investigator on two grant proposals that
include the development of a music curriculum. They are titled
Basic BEAT: Exploring the impact of brain-based activities on
teacher and student learning through the implementation of a
music education curriculum and Soul Sisters: Exploring Audience
Response and Community Involvement through Musical Theater
Performance. Dr. Rajan also recently applied for a FulbrightNehru Teaching/Research Scholarship Award with a project
entitled: Defining and Designing Teacher Education in India.
The aim of the project is to examine the coursework of teacher
preparation programs in India, through the impact of a projectbased, arts-enriched curriculum.
Dr. Rajan has held faculty positions at National-Louis
University, where she coordinated the graduate programs in
early childhood teacher education and led curriculum
development in all of the teacher education programs, and
Roosevelt University, where she taught courses in elementary
education and supervised student teachers. She has been
Appendix L, Page 5
working with teachers and teacher candidates for more than
10 years, and sits on various Illinois state councils and
advisory committees for early childhood assessment.
Dr. Rajan is also the president and founder of the Greater
Chicago Area Chapter of the Early Childhood Music and
Movement Association, which was recently awarded a chapter
grant for recognition and support of annual workshops. Prior
to teaching in higher education, Dr. Rajan taught music,
theater, and dance in studio and classroom settings. Rekha has
performed professionally in numerous operas, operettas, and
musicals including lead roles in “The Magic Flute” (Papagena),
“Pirates of Penzance” (Mabel), and the Chicago premiere of
“CARNIVAL!” (Lili), for which she was nominated for a Chicago
Stage Talk Equity Theatre Award for Best Lead Actress in a
Musical. She also has performed as a guest vocalist performing
“The Marv’lous Work” from Haydn's The Creation, and “Rejoice
Greatly” from Handel's The Messiah, and has appeared as a
concert soloist at Carnegie Hall and the John F. Kennedy Center
for the Performing Arts.
Yolande Spears is vice president of education and community
relations at The Bushnell Center for the Performing Arts,
Connecticut’s premiere venue for Broadway, theatre, music,
dance, children’s theatre and special events.
Alongside her administrative leadership, which includes 20
years in corporate human organization and strategy, Yolande
regularly speaks and teaches at organizations throughout the
United States, Canada, and in China, advocating the importance
of arts education. For over 20 years, she has led the PARTNERS
program, an award-winning arts education initiative serving
hundreds of schools, teachers and communities.
Spears provides expertise in arts organizational programming
Appendix L, Page 6
for schools, partnership development, program
implementation and replication.
Her latest publication, “The Gift,” chronicles her childhood in
urban St. Louis and the role the arts played in her life’s path.
Susan Stauter is an arts educator and advocate. Stauter is
currently the artistic director for the San Francisco Unified
School District. She served on the Steering Committee and was
instrumental in the creation and ongoing work of SFUSD's
internationally acclaimed Arts Education Master Plan,
promising equity and access in arts education to all students in
every SFUSD school during the curricular day. An awardwinning credentialed teacher in theatre and English, she taught
and directed at Esperanza High School in Placentia, Calif., and
was founding chairwoman of the Department of Theatre at the
Los Angeles County High School of the Arts. Stauter went on to
serve as conservatory director for the Tony Award-winning
American Conservatory Theater of San Francisco, where she
oversaw all education programs including the M.F.A. in acting.
She has worked as a writer/director for Disneyland and was
one of the readers for the audio version of Richard Florida's
best-selling Rise of the Creative Class. She currently works as a
master trainer with the Leonard Bernstein Artful Learning
program, presenting workshops and creating new arts-based
curriculum with teachers and principals in schools across the
nation. Continuing her work as a teacher, workshop leader,
keynote speaker and writer on all areas of arts education,
Stauter has consulted with and presented for numerous
organizations, including the Grammy Foundation, the
Milwaukee Idea, the Ten Chimneys Foundation, the U.C.
Berkeley Principal's Institute, the Great River Shakespeare
Festival, the St. Louis Symphony, the New World Symphony
and the Vienna Concerthaus. She has presented keynotes for
the Small Schools of New Zealand, (where she was named
Appendix L, Page 7
visiting scholar in creativity), The National League of
Symphony Orchestras Education, Youth and Outreach
Managers, the Theatre Educators of America and the
International Thespian Organization. She has worked in
colleges and universities across the nation, most recently with
U.C. Berkeley's Bravo Project, which she was instrumental in
creating and implementing for the Principal's Leadership
Institute. In 2009 Stauter was public reader for the K-12
Drama Standards for the State of Colorado, and in April of 2011
she presented a TEDxSF talk on the importance of the arts in
education before returning for the sixth consecutive year to
speak on the importance of the arts and culture to
communities at the Eugene O’Neill Tao House in Danville, Calif.,
as part of Leadership San Ramon Valley. She sits on numerous
boards and committees, including the Engineers Alliance for
the Arts and the San Francisco Symphony Education
Committee, and is the recipient of numerous awards for her
ongoing work as a passionate leader in arts education,
including the International Network of Arts Schools Founder's
Award, the LEAP Imagination in Learning Award, the San
Francisco Ballet's Choose to Move Award, the Ruth Asawa Arts
Advocacy Award and the San Francisco PTA Continuing Service
Award.
Pre-College Pedagogy Team: A group of leading professors
and instructors from Blair School of Music, Vanderbilt
University Pre-Collegiate Division, Nashville Ballet and
Nashville Ballet School assisted in the analysis of CMSD arts
curriculum and the development of curriculum innovations
and guidelines.
Melanie Gober Grand, MitchellKornArts program
coordinator, assists the program team in all aspects of
initiative scheduling and communications. Grand has over 30
years of experience as a paralegal, has managed several nonAppendix L, Page 8
profit professional organizations, and is currently the
executive director of the Lawyers’ Association for Women. She
provides a variety of services in a virtual capacity to law firms
and small businesses, including the development and
implementation of office organizational systems and
procedures.
Appendix L, Page 9
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