ae, oteepe*atiotafree - American Radio History

ae, oteepe*atiotafree - American Radio History
DECEMBER, 1963
60(
ae, oteepe*atiotafree
EXTRAVAGANCE?
Is it an extravagance to silver -plate the critical
Radio Frequency circuit (front -end) of an FM tuner?
and neither do the edScott doesn't think so
itors of the leading hi -fi magazines.
For example ... Audio reporting on the Scott
4310, said, "Without question, this tuner is one of
the finest extant. It pulled in more stations, loud
and clear, than any other tuner we have tested. The
record now stands at 40 stations.'x
What makes Scott tuners pull in more stations,
loud and clear, than any other tuners? Is it the ex-
...
clusive Scott Time -Switching multiplex circuitry...
the Scott Wide -Band design? Partly.
It is also the fact that Scott, and only Scott, goes
to the extra expense and trouble of silver plating
Radio Frequency circuits. Silver is a far better conductor of electricity than steel or
aluminum, the materials commonly
used by most tuner manufacturers.
With this greater conductivity the
tiny signal received by the tuner
(often just
a few microvolts), is not subject to signal losses or the addition of noise. As a result, Scott
tuners can receive many more stations, cleanly,
and without distortion.
Scott tuners are used in the most critical professional applications. It was a Scott tuner that was
selected by Bell Laboratories for the famous Telstar
Tests. Mcst broadcasting stations use Scott tuners
for monitoring their own broadcasts and for relay
applicaticns. These professionals recognize the ad-
vantages of Scott's scrupulous attention to details
like the silver -plated front end ... details that make
Scott the ideal choice for enjoying FM stereo in
your home as well.
Scott tuners are available in all price ranges, in factoryassermbled or in kit form. Prices startat$119.95.
Write today for complete details.
-
SCOTT
H. H. SCOTT, INC., 111 POWDERMILL RD., MAYNARD, MASS.
C FM Stereo Tuner $224.95
Prices slightly higher west of Rockies
Broadway, New York, N. Y.
Canada: Atlas Radio Corp., 50 Wingold Avenue, Toronto.
350
Export: Morhan Exporting Corp., 458
*Audio, September 1963.
Circle Coy
2
on Reader Service Card
DECEMBER, 1963 VOL. 47, No. 12
Successor to
RADIO
,
Est. 1911
C. G. MCPROUD Publisher
AU Io
Editor
DAVID SASLAW
4 in a series of discussions
by Electro -Voice engineers
Number
LOUDSPEAKER
LOUDNESS
LIMITS
JANET M. DURGIN
Production Manager
JACK BURCHFIELD
Chief Engineer
Loudspeakers
Representatives
HENRY A. SCHOBER
Bill Pattie
Business Manager
&
Contributing Editors
Associates,
4161 West Touhy Ave.,
Lincolnwood 46, Ili.
SANFORD L. CAHN
James C. Galloway.
Wilshire Blvd.,
Los Angeles 48, Calif.
Warren Birkenhead, Inc.,
No. 25, 2- chome, Shiba Hamamatsu -cho,
Altnato-ku, Tokyo. Japan
6555
Advertising Director
EDGAR E. NEWMAN
Circulation Director
JOSEPH GIOVANELLI
HAROLD LAWRENCE
CHESTER SANTON
HERMAN BURSTEIN
AUDIO
Controlling Sound -Reinforcement
Systems
19
The Auditioneer
24
30
An Open Baffle Parallel- Series Array
EDWARD TATNALL CANBY
Articles
David L. Klepper
John Whitacre
R. S. Oakley, Jr.
AUDIO Reviews
Light Listening
Jazz and all that
Record Revue
6
36
46
Chester Santon
Bert Stanleigh
Edward Tatnall Canby
Heathkit Transistor Tester
Korting "Mozart" Tape Recorder
Fisher FM- Stereo Receiver
Sherwood FM- Stereo Tuner
38
38
44
44
59
lfode1IM-30
AUDIO
Shure Stereo Studio Dynetic
Audioclinic
Letters
Audio ETC
Editor's Review
Tape Guide
About Music
New Products
Cover Story
Annual Index
Advertising Index
,,
2
8
Profiles
Model 3000
Model 500 -C
Model S -3000V
ilfodel M222
AUDIO in General
Joseph Gioranelli
10
16
Edward Tainall Canby
34
50
Hernian Burstein
Harold Lawrence
56
60
66
68
(title registered U. S. Pat. Off.) is published monthly by Radio Mega zinn, Inc., henry A. Schober, President: C. O. McProud, Secretary. Executive
AUDIO
a et$C
and Editorial Offices, 204 Front St., Mineola, N. Y. Subscription rates -U. S.,
Possessions, Canada, and Mexico, $5.00 for one year, $9.00 for two years; all
aher countries $6.00 per year. Single copies 604. Printed in U.S.A. at 10 ot.
vlc0overn Ave., Lancaster, Pa. All rights reserved. Entire contente copyrighted
963 by Radio Magazines, Inc. Second Class postage paid at Lancaster, Pa.
1
RADIO MAGAZINES, INC., P. O. Box 629, MINEOLA, N. Y.
Postmaster: Send Form 3579 to AUDIO, P. O. Box 629, Mineola, N. Y.
AUDIO
DECEMBER, 1963
We are frequently asked how loudly a specific loudspeaker can be played without distortion or danger
of destruction. This question is not easily answered
when asked in regard to home or studio music
reproduction.
If the material to he reproduced is a simple sine
wave, voice coil heating is the normal controlling
factor, and the point where excessive heat (or excessive voice coil travel) is reached can be simply
determined. However, steady -state sine waves are
not typical of most program material, and this
power limit is unrealistic when appli. d to musical
reproduction.
One outstanding characteristic of musical energy is
its transient nature. Even when an orchestra plays
a sustained high level chord with no audible variation, the combined waveform shows markedly fluctuating peak energies. These peaks are formed
when each constantly changing waveform adds to
the energy of other waveforms.
Typically. energy peaks in music will reach a level
up to ten times the average or R.M.S. value. The
relatively low average level tends to protect the
speaker from high heat build -up even at extremely
high listening levels.
In laboratory studies, we have applied up to 100
watts of musical program material to E -V high
fidelity speakers with no apparent distortion and
no signs of immediate failure due to heat or fatigue. One fact became quickly evident. The absolute loudness limit for most high fidelity systems
lies not with the speaker, but rather with the
amplifier.
Careful oscilloscope analysis revealed that waveform distortion appeared first at the amplifier
output, usually in the form of clipping. The loudspeaker faithfully reproduced this distorted waveform, giving rise to the subjective analysis that the
speaker was being "overdriven." Substitution of
a more powerful amplifier, with greater reserve
power at the same acoustic output, eliminated the
"speaker distortion" completely!
The problem of maximum loudness in any system
is further complicated by the growing trend toward
speaker systems of medium or low efficiency. If a
speaker system, by design, trades six or eight db
of efficiency for other benefits (wider range or
smoother response), it necessarily places a heavier
burden on the amplifier to provide a clean signal
at high levels.
The absolute limitations of any speaker system
based on peak performance requirements are very
difficult to objectively state. Listening tests have
proved to have the greatest validity to date, yet
results vary from listener to listener, and with the
frequency and duration of the peaks.
A realistic rating for most small speaker systems
would be in the order of eighty to one hundred
watts peak handling power. To realize this potential requires an amplifier of forty to fifty watts
rating (based on peak performance twice that of
the steady -state rating).
For technical data on any E -V product, write:
ELECTRO- VOICE, INC., Dept. 1233A
Buchanan, Michigan
o aa"
SETTING NEW STANDARDS IN SOUND
1
Coming
AUDIO CLINIC
NEXT
Joseph Giovanelli
Month
Send questions to
:
Joseph Giovanelli
Construction . . .
A Ton -and -a quarter of
Sound. Walter Wysoczanski
describes a curved -mouth
concrete horn stereo speaker
system he built in his home,
each side of the stereo pair
weighing over 1200 pounds
without drivers.
Very Low Voltage Relay
Operation. Ronald L. Ives.
A way of using the 5 -volt
filament tap on a power
transformer, made available
by replacing the rectifier
tube by a solid -state rectifier,
to power a low- voltage relay.
General
.. .
The Transient Performance of Loudspeaker Dividing Networks. Robert M.
Mitchell describes the classical solution for dividing
networks and demonstrates
the inadequacies of that solution. Instead he proposes
a method whereby one network will do what two do
now -and better.
and
Equipment Profiles
...
Stanton Model 800B Stereo table
H. H. Scott 340B FM -stereo
tuner- amplifier
In the January Issue
On the newsstands, at
your favorite audio
dealer's, or in your
own mailbox.
2819 Newkirk Ave.
Brooklyn 26. N. Y.
Include stamped. self-addresses
envelope.
Lower Amplifier Output
I
Q. Recently I noticed a marked loss of
volume in my left speaker. I suspe ted my
output tubes might be weak. I replced all
four. I still do not have equal vo ¿me in
each channel.
Do I need to replace the remainin tubes
in my amplifier? Name withheld, Bronx,
New York.
A. If your preamplifier is separa e from
the amplifier, do not assume that e difficulty will be found in the amplifi r. Any
check suggested later in this answer should
also be applied to the preamplifier.
If you have two separate amplifiers in
the stereo system, it is possible that the
rectifier in one of them has gone b4I, thus
causing the drop in volume. (I know that
you mentioned that your particularIlsystem
was an integrated amplifier, meaning that
two amplifiers were mounted on al single
chassis, and perhaps the preampl fier is
included as well. However, in order t make
this material fit the many ampli er -preamplifier possibilities, I am bein
more
general than your particular
problem called
If you are using an integrated system,
first check the remainder of the tubes. If
all tubes check normal on a dynam tube
checker, you will then have to wor from
the voltage and resistance chart s 'pplied
with most amplifiers. If no such eh 4rt has
been provided, work from the se l matic
and do some guessing. The causes f this
condition are multitudinous. If yo have
a signal tracer, work back from the output
stage. Another trick which you can try is
to pull the tubes out, starting fr
the
output stage. Compare the sound when
doing this against that produced y an
equivalent tube pulled out of the w rking
channel. This is a primitive metho , but
the results are often obtained more uickly
than with more scientific checking.
You will finally come upon a stage where
pulling out a tube in the defective channel
does not sound the same as a tube removed
from the operating channel. You will then
know that the trouble you are having is in
this area of the amplifier. Now when I refer
to the sound made with a tube removed, I
refer to the "thump" or "bang" which is
produced when the tube is in the process
of being removed.
Once you have pinpointed the area where
trouble is present, you then can use the
more conventional methods for determining
the exact nature of the trouble. Check such
things as lack of plate or cathode voltage.
As a further check in this same regard,
ll
make your checks from plate to cathode
rather than from plate to ground.
I referred earlier to the use of a signal
tracer. There are two types and I use them
both at one time or another. One type of
tracer is nothing more than amplifier which
is fitted with test leads at its input. These
test leads can be placed in the various grid,
plate, and cathode circuits of an amplifier.
As this device is moved from the input to
the output, there should be an increase in
signal output from this tracer amplifier at
each successive stage. If one stage does not
provide its share of gain or perhaps introduces a loss, then you will know that this
stage is the one which is defective and must
be further investigated to determine the
cause of the malfunction. Remember that a
cathode follower ; possesses approximately
unity gain, so if you connect your tracer
to the output of such a stage, no gain will
be produced over that provided by the preceding stage. Further, connecting your
tracer to the plate circuit of such a stage
will provide no signal because of the intentional bypassing of this circuit with
large capacitors.
The other type of tracer is one which is
actually a source of signal. Such devices
are very often self- contained units employing transistors or miniature buzzers. They
are often shaped like a pen. Connecting the
tip of this kind of tracer to the various
points in the amplifier or preamplifier will
produce a signal in the output, and the
amount of signal obtained will he dependent upon the gain of the amplifier at the
point where the signal is introduced. When
using this probe. note that moving the device from input toward the output will result in less and less gain with each stage.
I prefer, when using this instrument, to
work from output to input.
Remember that the tools you use will not
solve your problems -they are only aids.
When properly used, they are useful diagnostic aids. Do not use any test instrument
until you understand its operation. Do not
connect it into a circuit until you are
certain of its probable action and the results you should expect. In other words,
do not use a tool haphazardly with the idea
that you "may turn up something."
By thinking and observing, you, the experimenter, will learn far more about the
subject of sound reproduction. Further, you
will be able to bring about the results you
seek in a more scientific manner and will
usually bring them about more quickly.
To illustrate this point, recall my simple
process whereby a tube is removed from a
channel, one at a time to listen to the
"bang" produced. How many of you took
me at face value and did not question what
might happen in certain instances. You
should have asked me some of the following questions or at least have asked yourself these questions:
1.
Will my speaker be damaged by the
transient clicks produced by the removal
of a tube?
AUDIO
2
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
DECEMBER, 1963
"my daddy bought us
a Garrard Automatic
Turntable...he says
it's worth a million!"
r
"my daddy
bought us a boat...
he says it's worth
$ 20,000"
What makes a Garrard worth a million? Pleasure .. the
pleasure of an incomparable experience in sound. Why? Because the Garrard Automatic Turntable integrates a dynamically balanced tone arm, counter -weight adjusted ... a
full size turntable, cast heavy and balanced ... correct
torque stemming from the Garrard Laboratory Series
motor. The Garrard arm takes your choice of cartridge
... even the ultra- sensitive, high -compliance types
labeled "professional ". This arm brings out
the best in any cartridge ... tracking and
tripping at the lowest pressure specified
by the cartridge manufacturer. The unit
:s quiet ... speed even ... sound pure,
-.undefiled by rumble or resonance.
.
Garrard offers the convenience of automatic play and automatic shut -off even after single records. And, should your
Garrard ever need maintenance, you will find that it is supported by the industry's best stocked, best trained, authorized service network. There is a Garrard for every
high.- fidelity system. Type A, $79.50; AT6, $54.50;
Autoslim, $39.50. For literature, write Department GX -13, Garrard, Port Washington, N.Y.
WORLD'S FINEST
2.
set?
NEW! ENGINEERING BREAKTHROUGH
Where should the volume control be
3. Are there any direct -coupled stages in
the circuit which might be adversely affected by this procedure?
The answer to Question 1, depends upon
the wattage of your amplifier and the
wattage of the speakers connected across it.
If there is likely to be damage as a result
of this procedure, pad down the speaker so
it will not receive sufficient power to ruin
ROBERTS CROSS FIELD ®
"770"
it.
The answer to Question 2, is that the
volume control will have to be set at its
fully advanced position or you will not obtain much output from the phono stage
being removed. Further, if you are comparing one channel against the other, the balance control must be set at the same points
on each channel.
Question 3, cannot be answered for you.
You will have to consult the schematic of
the amplifier you are working on.
records automatically-
Equipment Performance
and Line Frequency
15 high fidelity
stereo albums
for the price of one
Now, 8 hours of full- range, true, high fidelity stereophonic music, or 16 monaural hours, can b yours
on one 7" reel, with the revolutionary new Roberts Cross Field "770" Tape Recorder. The avera e tape
cost per album: only 33¢. The "770" has an exclusive patented third head, the Cross Field Head,
which separates recording and biasing functions. The result: the "770" records 40 to 22,010 cps,
ips and preserving the high frequency harmonics that breathe li e into
producing true fidelity at
music playback. The Cross Field playback head has a gap width of only 40 micro -inches, the s allest,
most responsive head ever engineered. For this head, Roberts employs NC -88, a new alloy, hat is
practically wear -proof. Other features: 2- speed, electrically- switched, heavy -duty hysteresis s chronous motor, miniscule wow and flutter at slow speeds; special ventilation system keeps the '770"
cool even after 8 hours; two 5" x 7" self- contained elliptical, extended -range, heavy -duty Alnico
V- magnet speakers; new automatic total shut -off switch.
IN
"770"
Today, see the Roberts Cross Field
Tape Recorder at better music and camera centers. $499.95.
Specifications: 71/2, 33/4, IN ips. Power Amplifier Output: 12 watts Frequency response: at 7 2 ips,
to 22,000 cps -t2 db; at 33/4 ips, 40 to 18,000 cps ±2 db; at 1N ips, 40 to 13,000 cps -. 3 db
below 0 recorded level
Wow and flutter: at P/2 ips, less than C .12%
signal to noise ratio:
2 large
Blower vent system
rms; at 33/4 ips, less than 0.20 %; at 17/8 ips, less than 0.30%
stereo 5" x 7" elliptical, extended range, heavy duty Alnico V magnet speakers Hysteresis sy chroOp !rates
Automatic total shutoff
nous instantaneous electrically controlled 2 speed motor
Horizontally or Vertically.
-55
New Model 330: Another
achievement of Roberts' electronic engineering. Sound -onsound multiple recording, 3
heads for separate record,
New Professional Mode 455:
Has three electrically swi ched,
dual-speed motors, se
bass controls, 4 simult
mixing inputs, playback
ness controls, track se
two full range 5" z 7"
playback, erase; two 7"
full -range
speakers.
Special
arate
eons
loud-
ctor,
peak -
ers. 71, 334 ips. $5 9.95;
Remote control, $49.95,
biasing for FM Multiplex Recording Systems. Speeds: 71/2,
3% ips, 27 lbs. $349.95.
See the entire line of Roberts professional and home tape recorders
from $269.95 at better music and photo centers.
a
Ill
1
I
I
Roberts Electronics, Inc.
5978 Bowcroft, Dept. Al2, Los Angeles 16, Calif,
n,
Please send free
®
FREE BOOKLET! "40 AND MORE WAYS TO USE
A ROBERTS TAPE RECORDER"
booklet
Please send me complete information
about Roberts Tape Recorder
i
I
1
Name
Address
City
State
I
1
IN CANADA: J. M. Nelson Electronics Ltd., 7725 Adera St., Vancouver 14, B.C. (Prices slightly higher in
Canada
Q. I am assembling a high fidelity system
consisting of preamplifier, amplifier, turntable, tape recorder, and two speaker systems. All of this equipment is rated at 60cps 110-120 volts. The turntable can be
used at 50 -cps. The tape recorder can be
converted to 50 -cps. In the future I will be
living in areas where power line ratings are
220 volts at 50 -cps.
These are my questions: 1. Can this system be utilized at both 60 -cps 120 volts and
50 -cps 220 volts? 2. What changes, if any.
should be made and in what pieces of equipment to cope with these requirements? J.
Schiller, Midland, Mich.
A. Whenever operation of a particular
piece of equipment is to be changed from
one line frequency and voltage to another,
it is well to check with its manufacturer to
obtain his views on the matter before buying the equipment.
In the case of the amplifier and preamplifier, you have no real worry about
frequency as long as the equipment has
been conservatively rated and designedespecially the power transformers. No
changes will be required. No detrimental
effects should be expected.
However, in the ease of the turntable
and the tape recorder, line frequency is a
problem. Not only must the motor be capable of operating at reduced frequency, but
also there must be a means provided to
allow the turntable to run at proper speed.
The speed of the motor varies with applied
frequency. The lower the frequency applied
to the input of the motor, the lower will be
the speed of rotation of the motor shaft.
You need some kind of separate or variable
pulley arrangement if the line frequency is
to be changed during the time you own the
equipment.
Similarly, the tape recorder drive mechanism must be provided with suitable
pulleys if correct tape speed is to be maintained when the supply line frequency is
changed.
Because most equipment will not be provided with tapped transformers and motors,
you will need a transformer which will
convert the 220 volts found in Europe to
the 120 volts required by American -made
equipment. This transformer must have a
power -handling capacity somewhat greater
than the total amount of power required
by the equipment it feeds. In addition, the
transformer must be capable of operating
at 50 cps.
Æ
AUDIO
4
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
DECEMBER, 1963
No Larger Than A Record Changer .
The New Empire 488
equipment cabinets. It
... tailor made for console or
is well known that acoustic feed-
back has been harassing playback equipment in console
cabinets for years. This is due in large measure to the close
proximity of turntable to speaker. Not too long ago, Audio
Magazine tested the Empire Troubador
they reported:
"We tried to induce acoustic feedback by placing the turntable on top of our large speaker system and turning up the
gain -use were unsuccessful "Other factors important to cabinet owners are stability and level surfaces, the jars and jolts
of heavy footsteps or accidental bumps can jump some arms
even in the most stable cabinets. Stability under virtually
...
..
E.
.
Every Inch A Troubador
any conceivable situation is now assured by Empire's sensational "Dyna- Mount" (vibration- absorbing multiple floating
suspension system) found only in the new Empire 488. The
Famous Empire 398
professionals' turntable -too per fecdy engineered for even a whisper of distortion
too
handsome to hide behind cabinet doors. Hi Fidelity reports:
"The Troubador represents a precision -engineered product
of the highest quality ...wow, flutter and rumble completely
speed accuracy very good
maximum tracknegligible
ing error of the arm judged to be negligibly small
very
low needle talk, minimum hum pick-up
clean response
. one of the finest, handsomest record players available."
...
...
...
...
...
...
EMPI RE
"World's Most Perfect Record Flayback System."
Empire 980 dynamically
balanced playback arm with
with the sensational Dyna-
Empire 3 -speed 'filent"
turntable, only 2 cloviig
Lift*
pars.
Empire 880p mono -stereo
cartridge featuring the virtually indestructible DynaLife* stylus
Dimensions: Minimum space requirements 15"a" wide x 131/4"
'eight required above
deep
mounting hoard 23/a "; depth required below turntable ease plate
.
walnut
mounting hoard: SI92 Walnut
base optional (5151.
398 complete u ith handsome walnut base: 5210.
Prices: 488 complete with
Fytent
Per ding
Empie Scientifr Corp.
AUDIO
845 Stews t Ave.. Garden City. L. t., N. Y.
DECEMBER, 1963
/
Export: EMEC. Plainview,
L
I.. N. Y.
Canada. Empire Scientific Corp., Ltd
,
1476 Eglingtcn West, Toronto
5
LIGHT LISTENING
Chester Santon
Dick Leibert: The Happy Hits of
Christmas
RCA Victor LSP 2771
Ordinarily, Christmas releases very seldom
arrive in time to make Light Listening's December column. This gloomy fact has tended
to cast this corner In a light that has been far
from flattering, indicating to some a Scrooge like nature on the part of your reviewer that
is thoroughly unjustified. This year, luckily,
RCA Victor has come to the rescue with an
earlier- than -usual release of a Christmas
album worthy of gracing any sound fancier's
stocking. This stereo recording featuring Dick
Leibert at the console of the Radio City Music
Hall Wurlitzer organ is the sort of item that,
in former years, would have been mentioned
a month later in the January issue because it
definitely rates recognition as a seasonal release, even on a delayed basis.
The encouraging thing in this stereo release
is the way in which the organ at Radio City
manages to override the slight limitations still
present in the RCA Dynagroove process. The
frequency ranee of this album almost reaches
that of the conventional RCA Victor stereo
record. Despite the closer-than -average position of the mikes, the very lowest pedal notes
do not extend to the region where they would
be felt rather than heard. There is some cone
pushing below 80 cycles or so but it is not
the best bass response you can get these days
with today's stereo cutters. What saves the
day is the close position of the mike (or
mikes) at the particular loft containing the
organ's largest pipes. Located on each side of
the giant Music Hall stage, the Wurlitzer's
pipes range in size from a tiny tube no larger
than an ordinary lead pencil to the largest
member of the family extending some thirty two feet in length. The same mikes, however,
deliver a treble range of gratifying energy,
giving the illusion of total response in the
high end. Dick Leibert, Chief Organist at the
Music Hall for the past thirty years, is probably the only man alive with a total command
of all the tricky combinations possible on the
world's largest theatre organ. He uses a good
percentage of them in creating the busload of
effects that are part of Jingle Bells, I Heard
the Bells on Christmas Day and Leroy Anderson's Sleigh Ride. For all his generosity in
novel effects, Leibert still manages to save the
best goodies in his bag for the scintillating
arrangement of the Parade of the Wooden
Soldiers that closes the album.
Peter Sellers: Fool Britannia
Acappella
AC
-
1
Presenting Jerry Stiller and Anne Meara
Verve
V -15038
In recent months the record industry has
been discovering that it's far easier to release
a comedy record than it is to get someone to
laugh at it. To be even moderately successful
these days, humor on records requires a personality capable of projecting to full advantage the bright material that has always been
needed to draw laughs in any medium of show
business. These two comedy releases should
prove diverting to a fairly wide audience of
record buyers. In view of the fact that Peter
Sellers fans have had to be content so far
with only two albums in the catalog, this third
release may stir interest that exceeds the actual merit of the disc itself. Unlike his earlier
records on the Angel label, "Fool Britannia"
is not an exclusive Peter Sellers production
throughout its length. The script for these
sketches on England's Profumo vice scandal
6
was written by Anthony Newley and Leslie
Bricusse of "Stop the World" fame. Along with
Joan Collins (Mrs. Newley), Daniel Massey
and Michael Lipton, they assist Se lers in a
collection of vignettes calculated ti further
unnerve an already shaking establishment
back in the home country. Much of the material reflects the speed with which Newley
and Bricusse threw it together since there was
no way of knowing whether the ProfumoKeeler case would still be in the news by the
time the record came on the market! Some of
the blows struck in the cause of satire only
glance the subject yet the cast applies more
venom to its task than any non -British crew
would dare. Sellers spearheads the attack with
a blistering five minute impersonation of
Prime Minister Macmillan. As the record continues, however, the gibes at Macmi lan take
on an air of warm geniality once the cast
takes on the British scandal press lid other
institutions trying to turn a profit over the
Profumo affair. Sellers does his b st character work in skits dealing with a n wspaper
tycoon and a shady film producer. It s hardly
necessary to remind anyone familiar ith this
comedian's work that even a li tweight
Sellers effort can be substantially m re amusing than that of many of his compet tors.
The Verve comedy record starri g Jerry
Stiller and Anne Meara would pons ly have
attracted more attention during a month that
didn't see the release of a Peter Sellers disc.
This new comedy team, recorded beefore an
audience at the hungry i in San Francisco, is
already on its way to a very promising career
on the basis of this diverting disc. Their material is original and delivered in atkey low
enough to hold the attention of to ay's sophisticated audience. The New York accent, in
all its rich forms, is their specialty and they
use it with cutting effect in most of their skits.
Miss Meara is particularly versatile, equally
at home in a Greenwich Village coffeehouse,
lampooning TV commercials, arguing ;with her
husband or ribbing the life out of commentator
Pauline Frederick in a delicious sketch called
"The Whale." Good husband and wife teams
are still a comparative rarity in they comedy
field. Stiller and Meara should have no difficulty going to the top-if they keep up the
pace they have set in this recording.
Miltinho: Rhythm and Sound of Bossa
Nova
Audio Fidelity AFSD 5984
Mariachi Nacional: El Hombre Mexicano
Audio Fidelity AFSD 6116
Audio Fidelity's latest excursion below the
border covers just about the whole gamut of
Latin American music in the very latest
sound. The predictable nature of AF's sound
quality is not the least of the engaging features in these releases. At a time when just
about any established label is apt t: spring
a sound gimmik aimed at the very wi.d st mass
market, it is a genuine pleasure to place a
compliant stylus assembly into the lead -in
groove of these well made, no-nonsense stereo
discs.
Taking the newer material first -the Bossa
Nova album stars the subtle talents of the
great Brazilian drummer Antonio Dá Souza,
internationally known as simply "Miltinho."
Following several seasons as a featured member of Joao Gilberto's famous group, Miltinho
bears unquestioned credentials for his own
starring album. Working here with the Oscat
Castro -Neves orchestra, he never overshadows
the smooth efforts of the solo instrume talists.
The result is a Bossa Nova album with a
Piaf and Sarapo at the Bobino
Capitol ST 10348
There is mild irony in the fact that
Edith Piaf's first record in which she
talks to an audience in the introduction
of her songs appeared a day or so after
her death in Paris early in October.
Capitol Records may have other recordings by France's unique song stylist still
in the vaults but this release will draw
exceptional attention while stories of her
almost incredible career are carried in
newspapers and magazines. Side One of
this release, recorded before a very appreciative audience at the Bobino in
Paris, finds the great Piaf still in full
voice while Side Two introduces Theo
Sarapo in his North American disc debut.
He is the young Greek singer who became Piafs husband in 1962. His is a
light voice, employed in a half dozen
songs that betray considerable evidence
of Piaf coaching.
musical quality fully as satisfying as the impeccable sound.
The Mariachi album is by no means the first
of its kind produced by Audio Fidelity's far ranging Latin department. Unlike many of
the previous releases by the ubiquitous street
musicians of Mexico, this one offers a good
deal of vocal as well as instrumental fare.
The four guitarists, three violinists and two
trumpeters of the Mariachi Nacional are directed by Arcadio Elias in a typical program
of South American favorites. The selections
most familiar to our ears include Adios Mari quita Linda, Guadalajara and the specialty of
bull fight bands, La Virgen de la Macarena.
Morton Gould: Spirituals for Strings
RCA Victor LSC 2686
If you value magnificent string playing by
an orchestra of experts as heard in just about
the hest string sound available today, don't
miss this truly outstanding release. Any string
fan whose record budget for the year is at the
point of depletion should make this recording
the first order of business in the year ahead.
Stirring spirituals such as Deep River, Go
Down Moses and Sometimes I Feel Like a
Motherless Child have never sounded better.
Morton Gould is fortunate that his string
orchestra has not been subjected to the Dynagroove process in this recording. Despite the
fact that the Dynagroove system has been
watered down and is now relatively innocuous in some releases, even in its mildest form
it still introduces top end distortion that this
Gould recording does not have. Appraised on
decent equipment, this recording is the most
convincing argument RCA has produced to
date for the total abandonment of the whole
Dynagroove concept.
Anna Moffo /Sergio Franchi: The Dream
Duet
RCA Victor LSC 2675
It should be obvious to anyone that this
joint venture with soprano Anna Moffo is the
nicest thing that has happened to Sergio
Franchi since he arrived here from Italy in
September 1962. Miss Moffo, one of the most
appealing young stars of the Metropolitan
Opera Company, has the voice and talent to
provide more than fifty percent of the dream
in any Dream Duet. She is an unfailing delight in the highly thought of operetta duets
that Jeannette MacDonald and Nelson Eddy
used to do in the Thirties. With the exception
of some of the repertory, there is nothing
whatever in the work of these present -day
artists to remind one of the bygone MacDonald -Eddy team. Anna Moffo is a sophisticated woman of the world with precious little
of the older-girlish charm that was Miss Mac Donald's hallmark. As for Sergio Franchi, it
will take you a while to get used to his Italian
accent in the lyrics of a Herbert or Friml
tune. Miss Moffo, a native of this country, has
no such difficulty. If you can accept the touch
of incongruity in the Franchi accent, you'll
find much to admire in the smooth blend of
voices backed by the stylish arrangements of
Henri René's orchestra.
Æ
AUDIO
DECEMBER, 1963
"Without question, the
SA -1000 is one of the
finest amplifiers
it reproduces music
we have ever tested. In addition,
as well as
it tests ...this
is due to the unusually excellent transient response
in conjunction with its unusually excellent everything else."
-AUDIO / September, 1963
Type 8417 output
pentodes with cavity
anode design.
Triode-connected
dual power -pentode
driver stage.
Totally resonance -free
ultra -wide-band
output transformers.
Oscilloscope -type cathode
follower input stage with
compensated attenuator.
Hinged cover for
rarely used controls
(bias and balance).
-
150 -watts of power!
THE SA -1000 represents Fisher's first entry
in the highly specialized class of extremely
high -powered dual -channel basic amplifiers.
There has been no scarcity of advanced
equipment in this heavy -weight category;
excellent high- wattage stereo power amplifiers of well -known makes have been available at prices starting in the $230 -to -$270
range (for factory -wired kits) and rising all
the way up to $764 (for a pair of single channel models of very de luxe construction). What does it mean, then, when Fisher
finally decides to match its own contender
against such formidable competition and
sets the price at $329.50?
To those who know Fisher, it can mean
only one thing: Fisher has exhaustively
tested, measured and evaluated all these
other power amplifiers in its own laboratories and finds the SA -1000 to be distinctly
superior to all of them, regardless of price.
As for the price tag, it happens to be in the
low 300's rather than the 400's or 500's
solely as a result of Fisher's unusually large
and technically unmatched manufacturing
facilities, geared for heavy initial production in anticipation of demand.
Frequency Response (0 db = 4 watts)
Subsonic Filter: Dolled Line
ì:!
II\IIIIII
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ia
II lIR IltlI RI
1111111111111111.1111111111e
11111111111111111.1111111111e
1111111111111111111111
»4
The Fisher SA -1000 is a challenge to the
severest critics and most discriminating
judges of professional sound reproducing
equipment, both as to specifications and
listening quality. Its music power rating is
150 watts IHF Standard, with both channels driven. The RMS power rating, again
with both channels driven, is 130 watts (65
watts per channel). However, as a glance
at the intermodulation curve will show, each
channel will deliver 80 watts at 0.5% IM
distortion, thus indicating the extreme conservativeness of the official rating.
The output stage of the SA -1000 is engineered around the newly developed 8417
beam power pentodes, never before used in
any electronic device. Designed specifically
for use in this amplifier, the 8417 offers extreme linearity, resulting in greatly reduced
distortion, and has unusually low drivevoltage requirements, permitting the previous stages to 'coast' at their lowest possible
distortion levels.
of the most elaborate ever used in a stereo
power amplifier. Regulation and filtering
are of the highest order and all silicon diodes as well as filter capacitors are most
conservatively operated.
Bias and balance are readily adjustable
on each channel by means of the built -in
laboratory -type calibration meter, but the
controls for these rarely needed adjustments
are ingeniously concealed behind an attractive hinged cover- another Fisher exclusive.
These are the most important facts and
Total Harmonic Distortion at 1 kc: Solid Line
lntermodulation Distortion 160 cps /9 kc, 4:1):
Dotted Line
Fisher SA-1000, however, simply by reading about it. A comparative listening test
at your dealer is an absolute must in this
case. Then you will know that, even in this
exalted category, not all power amplifiers
sound exactly alike and that the most
flawless of them all costs only $329.50.*
It is also available in StrataKit form as the
K-1000, priced at only $279.50.* Both carry
the famous Fisher Warranty for all tubes,
diodes and parts for one year from date
of purchase. Industry wide standard: 90 days.
.3
3
DECEMBER, 1963
-
Y
:_
o
-
E0
10
SO
.O
- ---
SO
POWER 01.31113
RESIDUAL
SO
10
CO
SO
100
1.1TTS.RISI
Each pair of 8417's in the SA -1000 drives
giant output transformer via plate cathode coupling -a modified and improved
`ultra -linear' configuration that provides 12
db of the most desirable and stable type of
negative feedback in the output stage.
The driver stage, too, is entirely novel. A
triode -connected 6HU8 /ELL80 dual power
pentode circuit developed by Fisher engineers is capable of delivering 40% more
drive to the output stage than is required
and at a remarkably low impedance. The
result is very low distortion, the fastest
possible recovery time, great stability and
hence outstanding transient response.
The input stage of the SA-1000 is of a
type widely used in laboratory oscilloscopes
but never before in high -fidelity amplifiers.
A compensated input attenuator in conjunction with a cathode -follower circuit permits
adjustment of the input signal from 0 db to
-12 db in closely calibrated 3 db steps without the slightest effect on input impedance
and frequency response.
The power supply of the SA-1000 is one
a
SLIOHTLV HIGHER
AUDIO
figures. You cannot fully evaluate the
-
IN TAIE FAN
Vit
ST, EXPORT. FISHER RA010 INTERNATIONAL, INO.. LONG ISLAND
$1.00 VALUE! ONLY 25c!
The new 1964 edition of The
Fisher Handbook, a comprehensively illustrated 52 -page
reference guide, component
catalogue, and idea book for
custom stereo, plus detailed
information on the Fisher
SA -1000 Stereo Power Amplifier. I enclose 25t', double- wrapped, to cover cost
of handling and mailing.
FISHER RADIO CORPORATION
21-29 44th Drive, Long Island City 1, N.1
Name
-
Address
City
Zone
State
0311,
The Fisher
CV, I. n.
,NApn
TRi TEL
ASSOCIATES, ITO., WILLOWDA L, ON!..
7
LETTERS
Electron Flow Revisited
Sm
If you're willing
!
to pay anything for
professional quality
but would rather not
The Concertone 605 is for the one man in several who can't s nd
less than perfection ... but can't see why professional quality sh uld
cost so much. Never before have so many features and so much rofessional quality been available at this price. Read ahead care ully
and see: Precision plug-in head assembly...includes four prec ion
heads ; Separate microphone and line controls (input can be mix d) ;
Delay memory control circuit (never spill or break tape) ; Auto atic
glass tape lifters, including electric cue feature; Sound on sound and
add sound; Solenoid operated brakes; Three motors, including
2 -speed hysteresis synchronous drive Automatic rewind; Excl sive
Reverse- O- Matic®. Learn all about the 605 in complete detail. Ask
your dealer for a demonstration or send for free literature today.
;
CONCERTONE 607
Broadcast version
The Concertone 607 with higher
impedance is for the true profess onal
or broadcaster. Remote control
optional. This superb tape recor
is constructed to 19" x 14" dimen ons,
permitting it to be used as
an exact replacement for old or
outdated tape recorders.
CONCERTONE 400 COSMOPOLITAN
For people on the go... it's the Cosmopolitan
-
Combination Tape Recorder with AM
Radio. A versatile companion and co- worker
for business or pleasure travels. 5" reel
capacity. Push -button operation. Amazing
fidelity. Remote mike. Foot -pedal control.
This all- transistorized recorder has big
recorder features in miniature form.
-
f or further
inf ormation
write :
e
Export: J.
8
:
Going over some back issues of AUDIO,
I came across a most inane controversy,
concerning electric current and the movement of charge. It began in the April 1960
issue and appears to have petered out
unresolved with a rather vituperative letter
against engineers in the July 1961 issue.
First off, I think we should deal with
some of the factual errors in Mr. Tonelli's
July 1961 letter. I examined a few physics
textbooks (most engineers I know got their
basics from elementary physics courses)
as well as a number of engineering
texts, and the only definitions I could find
of an ampere were in terms of the forces
existing between two wires when they were
carrying said ampere (defining something
called an Absolute Ampere) or in terms of
the amount of metal moved across an electrolyte in a given period of time (defining
something called an International AmAnd
pere). Nothing about electrons!
those who computed the equivalent of the
Absolute Ampere in terms of the number
of electrons passing a given point in a
given time came out with a value of 6.2421
+ .0013 x 10'B electrons. He should not marvel that it comes out "exactly 2.7% x 10" electrons" since this came out of his head.
Mr. Nissen does have a point though.
However, I find if I follow his suggestions,
I get some rather ludicrous results. For
example, a pound of copper contains 43 x
1029 atoms. The nuclei of these atoms carry
a charge of 2x 10' coulombs. If I walk
down the street at 4 miles an hour, carrying a pound of copper, I generate 3.6 x 107
amperes because I'm moving this mass of
charged nuclei. In addition, I generate another 3.6 x 10' amperes from moving the
electrons associated with these nuclei. I
assume that currents are still capable of
being added in Mr. Nissen's world, so
merely by walking with a pound of copper,
I generate 72 million amperes. The magnetic field surrounding me sucks in automobiles and topples the steel framework of
buildings. Or rather, because my walking
is the source of power, I find that the
pound of copper is frozen in place in
space. Every time it moves, it generates
terrific magnetic fields that, acting on the
objects around it, oppose its movement, or
hastens it, who knows.
Also, since Mr. Nissen cannot conceive
of a current without something moving (an
electron, an ion, and so forth), we'll have
to do away with Mr. Goeller's "displacement current," which is a movement of
nothing, even though it creates and carries
with it (Mr. Goeller might claim) a magnetic field. And with the elimination of the
displacement current, poor J. C. Maxwell
is left out in the cold; he can no longer
rely on his "conceptually based" current to
see him through to the development of his
wave equations and the fiction -based hypothesis of electomagnetic radiation. But
D.
AMERICAN CONCERTONE, INC.
A
DIVISION OF ASTRO- SCIENCE CORP.
JEFFERSON BLVD. CULVER CITY CALIF.
Marshall International, 170 W. Washington, Chicago, Il inois
9449 W.
wait!! Without electromagnetic radiation,
Mr. Nissen is out of work! The power
KQED pumps into its antenna serves to
heat the transmission line and nothing
more. Worse, the sun can only deliver energy to the earth in the form of charged
particles. I can't see!
there's no light!
And no growing things, no me! I What
has existence become???
LouIs L. SEMPREBON
5 South Park St.
Hanover, N. H. 03755
!
!
!
AUDIO
DECEMBER, 1963
SIGMA"
NEW
SERIES
By
JENSEN
7 SUPERB HIGH FIDELITY LOUDSPEAKERS
The brilliant new Jensen SIGMA Series incorporates the newest advances in electro- acoustic
design, plus performance and reliability that
set new standards for high fidelity unitary loudspeakers. Note these outstanding features:
FLEXAIR® suspensions permit improved bass
response even in compact enclosures.
High- energy SYNTOX -6® magnetic structures
for high power capacity and low distortion.
Exclusive design low- crossover tweeters (2,000 cycle) provide excellent m -f and h -f response.
Separate HF control with all coaxials permits
custom -balancing of frequency response.
Carefully formulated cones retain strength
and shape even after long service.
Heavy -duty die -cast frames give rigidity, perma-
nently accurate alignment
REFLEX HORN COAXIAL 12"
SPEAKER. Jensen's finest unitary. A
true 2 -way speaker with our unique
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$69.50
woofer. Net
SG -223
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SG -80
8-INCH
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$16.50
5G -84 33 -INCH
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524.50
SG-88 COMPRESSION-HORN 8-INCH
FLEXAIR® COAXIAL. Net. .$36.50
o=
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Jensen's full -time research and development program
has consistently produced significant advances in loudspeaker design. Recent developments have dictated
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to take advantage of new performance possibilities. The
7 speakers in the new SIGMA Series incorporate all of
those refinements and changes which have been proven
effective. The SIGMA Series represents the first completely new loudspeaker group redesign in the industry
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SG -210
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$59.50
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SION-HORN 12INCH FLEXAIR®
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JENSEN
For complete information
on SIGMA Series speakers
write for Catalog C -165,
LOUDSPEAKERS
JENSEN MANUFACTURING COMPANY
/ DIVISION
Canada: Radio Speakers cf Canada, Ltd., Toronto
AUDIO
DECEMBER, 1963
COMPANY /6601 SOUTH LARAMIE AVENUE, CHICAGO 38, ILLINOIS
Argentina: Ucoa Radio, S.A., Buenos Aires Mexico: Fapartell, S.A., Naucalpan, Mex.
OF THE MUTER
9
AUDIO ETC.
Edward Tatnall Canby
BEST SEAT IN THE ORCHESTRA
My first, this month, is going to be, for
a change, in pictures rather than words.
Well
few words. Just to pin down the
pictures.
You see, so many people are blabbing
around about hi fi and stereo offering the
best seat in the concert hall and all that, I
wonder sometimes how many of our less
technical readers know what those "concert
hall" recordings look alike.
I assure you (and them), they don't look
like what they sound like. Not a wee little
bit. Unless, of course, you're a recording
engineer or an A & R man yourself and thus
are able to take a look at a particular recording set -up and instantly "audualize"
the sound that might result.
(Hey -what is the word I want? If we
have "visible" and "audible," then why not
"visual" and "audual " ?)
Many of our readers are entirely familiar
with the looks of a recording date. But
then, again, most home listeners -and probably some of our friends here- aren't at all.
A recording made in, say, Carnegie Hall, is
to them, as far as they can imagine it, like
a concert in Carnegie Hall. Or, say, a "live"
broadcast. Rows of seats out front, maybe
empty for the recording. Orchestra on
stage, soloists up front, with conductor.
Chorus, if any, ranked back of the orchestra, banked up against the rear.
Well, it ain't necessarily so. In fact it is
very seldom so. Many a "concert hall" for
recording is actually a shabby hotel ballroom, an ancient town hall, brewery, gymnasium or what have you. And many are extheatres or auditoria which have given up
the living ghost in favor of the canned.
Yet real concert halls are often enough
-a
i
volved too. What is astounding
not the
hall but the lay -out within the hall
Talk of the best seat in the cone t hall
I beg you to examine these ph tos and
decide for yourself who sits there if anybody. Who, but the orchestra itself Where,
then, do you, the enthralled stereo listener,
consider your own ears to be? Whe e do you
place your living room throne?
-
!
Fig. 3.
It should quickly be evident that "you"
are everywhere, all over. You are cocking
an ear, in triplicate mikes, from the sides,
from in front, from on-stage and on the
floor, from above and below, inside soundproof boxes, cornered by sound-trap panels
like big telephone booths; and not a one of
these many locations is "it"-the best seat
in the house! There ain't no sech thing.
Figure 1 shows the famed Concertgebouw
Orchestra of Amsterdam recording for
London in a relatively conservative set-up.
I.e., the orchestra is seated en masse
roughly in the way it plays for a concert.
But look where it sits. In the area normally
occupied by seats and listening people
which, oddly enough, we often call the orchestra. For once, the term is apt, literal
and accurate. As for the stage, they didn't
even bother to pull open the curtain.
You can't see them, but there are in addition to the mikes up front on booms, at
least two other sets of mikes in the middle
of the orchestra, one low pair directly in
front of the tympani, the other, high, just
"Greenwillow" being rec rded at Webster Hall
in New York. (Photo courtesy
RCA Victor.)
i
Fig. 1. Concertgebouw Orchestra during recording session. (Photo courtesy London Records.) Fig. 2. (right) Session with Charles
Munch conducting the Berlioz "Requiem" in Symphony Hall, Boston. (Photo courtesy RCA Victor.)
10
AUDIO
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
DECEMBER, 1963
Here's what you get for under $270
with the new Eico 2400 tape deck
($199.95 as a kit)
Three extra -powered 4 -pole, shaded pole motors: two reel motors, and
capstan motor with enclosed fan to stabilize winding temperature
and torque.
a
Built -in heavy gauge spring steel structural panel for permanent accuracy of mechanical alignment. Provides the structural strength which,
together with proper balance of all the transport parts, permits either
vertical or horizontal operation of the recorder.
Hardened stainless steel capstan shaft, ground within ±.00015 inch
drives tape on uncoated side to eliminate wear. Non -magnetic stainless
steel tape guide.
Huge, steel bar stock capstan flywheel turned and bored in one operation for perfect concentricity and dynamic balance to reduce wow and
flutter to inaudibility.
Seamless Neoprene capstan drive belt provided an elastic coupling
between the capstan motor dual-speed pulley and the capstan flywheel
to filter out motor vibration and provide the correct speed transformation. Optimum belt size and composition for inaudible wow.
Jam -proof
belt shift mechanism selects
71/2
the reels are electrically braked and the capstan turns at the selected
tape speed (the amplifiers are set for playback to permit cueing). At
either PLAY or RECORD, the pinch -roller presses the tape against the
capstan and the felt disc presses the tape against the guide post to provide
instantaneous, slur -free, smooth tape drive. A relay provides momentary
extra -power to the tape -up reel motor to avoid slack forming between it
and the capstan. Even when starting with a practically full tape -up reel,
there is no risk of spillage or tape bounce that can mar the first moments
of recording or playback. A mechanical release button must be pressed
to turn to RECORD, thus preventing accidental erasure. This control
system prevents direct transition from one transport mode to another,
thus eliminating the most common cause of tape spillage.
Automatic end -of -tape stop switch turns off take -up reel motor when
tape runs out during recording or playback.
Digital turns counter permits easy indexing of selections on
a
Provides 4-track stereo erase, record, and playback, plus 2
mono playback.
Stacked narrow gap (100 micro -inch) laminated
or 33/4 ips tape speed.
tape.
track
record -playback head
Smooth, fast electro-dynamic braking (DC applied to reel motors) eliminates the problems of mechanical brake deterioration.
(mu -metal shielded), combined with double gap (double erasure) stacked
erase head, Professional, 4 -point head mount permits adjustment in
Constant hold-back tension and mechanical filtering of supply reel
motor "poling" is obtained by passing the tape between a felt disc
pressing against a guide post located between the supply reel and the
combination head. AC voltage applied to the supply reel motor provides
hold -back of the supply reel itself. Precise control of tape tension and
lowest flutter are achieved by careful proportioning of these two sources
of hold -back tension.
all planes.
The curved tape path around the combination head, plus precisely
controlled tape tension, eliminates need for troublesome pressure pads.
Four position function snitch: FAST WINDING, STOP (STANDBY), PLAY,
RECORD. At FAST WINDING, a separate control normally at neutral, is
used to select rewind or fast forward (1200 feet in 30 seconds). At STOP,
Dual electron -ray indicator tubes
for stereo recording.
Separate line and microphone mixing level controls in each channel.
Recording levels may be pre-set while the function switch is set at
STOP (stand -by).
Push -pull 70 kc oscillator.
Correct record and playback equalization at both the
71/2 and 33/4
ips.
kit -Tape transport supplied assembled & tested -only electrical
controls & amplifier need be wired.
Hand -rubbed walnut base included in the price of both kit and wired
unit. Eico 2400, semi -kit $199.95, wired $269.95.
In
Errmi
1
If these aren't enough performance features, then you're ready for the studio quality EICO RP -100 Transistor
4 Track Stereo /Mono Tape Recorder. 3 motors include hysteresis synchronous capstan motor and electro- dynamic
(d -c) braking; 71/2 & 33/4 ips tape speeds; 3 heads, hyperbolic ground for superior tape contact, adjustable in all planes;
all- electric push- button operation with 2 solenoids; automatic tape lifters, end -of -tape switch; independent transistor record and play amps for off -the -tape monitoring and sound -on -sound recording; mixing mic & line level controls; dual
recording level meters. Semi -kit (transport assembled & tested) $299.95; wired $450. Both the 2400 and RP -100 are
made in the U.S.A. Ask your dealer to demonstrate the new EICO 2400 or the professional quality RP -100 today.
(E/COEICO ELECTRONIC INSTRUMENT CO., INC., 131 -01 39TH AVENUE, FLUSHING, N. Y.
EMPORT: ROBURN AGENCIES
AUDIO
DECEMBER, 1963
INC.. 431 GREENWICH
STREET. NEW YORK 13. N.
11352
Y.
11
beyond the keyboard of the celesta, near
the orchestra's right rear.
The main stereo "ears," up front, are
mounted on high booms, gracefully dipping
downward to right and left like tall, bowing artists. The rear mikes undoubtedly act
as accent mikes, sharpening up color and
presence via careful admixture of near -to
sounds into the over -all pickup from the
front.
Figure
2 is American classical recording,
in Symphony Hall, Boston. It makes use of
the radically different American approach,
three-track throughout, with wide separa-
achieve
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A FINCO FM antenna will deliver a clean, undistorted signal
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Guarantee yourself the best seat in the house for tonight's FM
concert ... install a fidelity -phased FINCO FM antenna.
Illustrated
FM 4
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tion of the musical components into spaced out groupings, each with its own set of
microphones. Again, the audience seats are
gone and the orchestra sits in the audience's
usual spot. But here the spacing is much
freer, almost surrounding the conductor,
Charles Munch, who is recording the Berlioz
"Requiem" for RCA Victor. The chorus,
you'll note, is far removed, occupying the
normal concert stage. High -rise microphones tower everywhere, like antenna
masts in some zany indoor transmitting
station. There is a dual set -up, one array
for the stereo recording and another for the
mono version. Mikes clutter the stage, and
the floor too ; chorus and orchestra each
have their own. The powerful percussion
instruments, you'll note, are grouped along
the left side in front of heavy sound dampening screens. (But what happens to
their low tones?) (Or are they reflecting
screens ?)
Opposed groups of trombones are seen
high at the sides in the second balcony.
Berlioz calls for four groups at the four
corners of the hall but here two are placed
high on each side. The fourth group is off camera to the left.
There is a lone tenor solo in the work; at
press time I still hadn't been able to find
him.
Yes -there's an organ, in operating condition. Console and player to the left on
stage, organ in its usual place. That's one
thing they couldn't change.
Figure 3 is a "Pops" recording which
has traditionally been far out and technically ahead of "classical" in the use of new
means for picking up sound. This is RCA
Victor's Webster Hall recording spot in
New York and the show is "Greenwillow"
with Tony Perkins ; the song being recorded is He Died Good, in case you have
the dise.
This is a more radical instance of the
type of recording used by RCA Victor in
Symphony Hall with the Boston Symphony
Orchestra, Fig. 2. Again, the instruments
are spread out in groups, with multiple
mikes, but you will notice that here the
microphones are placed near to individuals
or small clumps of players, clearly for a
more selective close -up effect. More of
those upright sound panels, to isolate individual blocks of sound. The harp is off
by itself, apparently with a private mike,
and next to it the double -bass plays towards what looks like a huge open book
and is probably, if my eyes aren't too dim,
a specialized reflector.
The vocal soloists, of course, are 'way off
up there on the stage, with their own set of
mikes right in front of them. They live,
acoustically, in their own semi- private
sound -environment, hemmed in by the stage
dimensions.
Don't overlook
you can see them
those tall, thin white lines ascending from
the two side balconies. They could very well
be topped with more mikes, intended to
pick up the over -all room -sound and fuse
all the disparate elements into one.
RCA notes that the conductor, Abba
Bogin, is seen at lower right "directing all
the musical activity." Well, I never thought
-if
AUDIO
12
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-
DECEMBER, 1963
FROM THE DIMINUTIVE TO THE GIGANTIC...
PIONEER MAKES IT!!
Typical of Japan's world -renowned electronic industry is the Pioneer
Electronic Corporation. During the quarter of a century that has elapsed
since it came into being, Pioneer has built up an enviable reputation
in the production of quality loudspeakers, a reputation based upon relentless research and the latest production methods.
In particular, Pioneer has in recent years become the undisputed
leader in the production of the miniature loudspeakers used in the tiny
transistorized radio or television sets that are the star performers in
Japan's current export trade.
Pioneer produces loudspeakers of every size, ranging from tiny l'
models to gigantic 32" models. It has the largest production capacity
Uniformly outstanding in
in the world -- 1,200,000 units per month.
performance, and sturdy and reliable in durability, these speakers are
also used by weil over a 100 top manufacturers of electronic appliances around the world, including such world- famous names as Hitachi,
Toshiba, or Sony.
Yet Pioneer's comprehensive line of loudspeakers is but one of its
highly diversified activities in the audio world. Pioneer -made high fidelity amplifiers and other quality audio components are equally well known
among both professional and enthusiast alike.
So whatever the requirement is, be it commercial, professional or
help bring to the discerning better sound.
home, Pioneer can help
/"
-
PlONlEER®
PIONEER ELECTRONIC CORPORATION
5 Otowacho 6- chorne, Bunkyo -ku, Tokyo. Japan
Cable Address: PIONEER TOKYO
Distributors: Canada - Importhouse of Canada, 2939 Eglinton Ave.
AUDIO
DECEMBER, 1963
E.,
Scarboro, Ont.
13
I'd see the day when it had to be explained
that the conductor of a piece of music di-
rected "all" the musical activity going on!
That's recording for you.
Some time before this recording session,
I attended a strikingly similar one in the
same place at which a "classical" opera was
taken down. Classical or no, the lay -out
was the same, with the orchestra clumped
here and there about the floor (the harpsichord off by itself) and the opera soloists
standing on the same stage with their own
mikes. In that case, too, there were separate
systems for mono and stereo, with even a
separate recording and control booth for
each system. Only one conductor -the present conductor of the Boston Symphony
(Leinsdorf). But lots and lots of people
had their fingers and voices in the musical
pie, via talk -back loudspeakers all over the
place.
All in all, a recording session is not very
much like a concert.
THE SOUND OF CONFUSION
Some mouths ago I tore a hunk of clip-
ping out of the \ is York Times. It was an
ad several feet high from the famous emporium that rivals Macy's, down in New
York's Herald Square. For reasons of
delicacy I'll call them Thimble's. "Thimble's
has the Stereo ", it began somewhat crypti!
cally.
Well, Thimble's was full of enthusiasm
for "the stereo." Its adman was surely
aimiable, friendly, set upon his virtuous job
of selling. And yet
heard in his genial
words the tell -tale beginnings of devastating confusion. There's entirely too much
confusion going around these days.
I accidentally ripped off a couple of
words-the lead line on my clipping reads
"Nobody has
exactly
yours."
Easy to interpolate: the motto was "Nobody has ears exactly like yours" and Thimble's goes on to explain, "From that fascinating fact (electronics discovered it) you
get your clue to choosing stereo: it must
sound right for you."
Well, so it must, I suppose. If this last
gambit sounds like a number of other ads
that shout "Designed for YOU!" and "We
asked you what you wanted-here it is,"
we still must admit that any stereo we buy
must be right for us. For particular ears.
But Thimble's isn't ready to stop there, and
perhaps that is why I find myself writing
here.
You see, an ad that is merely innocuous
and noninformative doesn't bother anybody.
It's when an advertisement begins to suggest a concrete idea in a liquid sort of way
that we begin to get agitated. Nobody bats
an eye at total newness and richer, fuller
everything, nor do we jump when we are
asked to "Hear the Difference," or to "Find
Out," or "Judge for Ourselves." Water off
a duck's back for all of us. But when an ad
well, look further at Thimble's:
"To choose the proper stereo, listen. But
you need to listen to several sets to know
which fits you. Thimble's has great names,
and scores of models
Your ear may get
concert fullness from a set at $149-then
that's your buy. You may have ears so
sensitive that only the delicate mechanism
in a $1200 set gives you full musical pleasure. Thimble's has sets so fine that what
the electronics people call distortion runs as
low as 2 per cent-that's below what most
people can possibly hear."
Whoa, there-just a moment. Not so
fast! Now you and I know that this is
merely the purplish prose of an inoffensive
and well- meaning ad writer and we can
guess that he's not exactly a hi fi expert,
(Continued on page 61)
-I
-
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a
True 360° spherical propagation is but one of the unique principles built into this quality
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"CG's" spherical principle and compact design encourage complete flexibility
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even under or behind furnishings
without distortion of performance
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The use of a single driver in Murray -Tone "CG" systems produces balanced,
sound with a new dimension of timbre, presence and response.
Inrrndurine
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SEND FOR LITERATURE AND
DEALER INFORMATION
14
...
...
AUDIO
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-lie
DECEMBER, 1963
Condenser Microphone with
Transistorized
RF
Circuitry
...INNOVATION by
1
ENNHEI1EB
Actual size of
Sennheiser
This response curve is not a theoretical projection. It was individually plotted
for a random -picked Sennheiser Model .MKH 104 Condenser Microphone, and it
is virtually identical in shape and output level to the separately plotted, signed
curves provided with all Sennheiser Transistorized RF Condenser Microphones
in this series. (All Sennheiser professional microphones are packaged with individually plotted curves.) Note the broad frequency response, exceptional flatness
and the controlled peak at the upper- frequency extreme. Also note the absence
of peaks and dips in the critical portions of the spectrum. Need we say more?
Condenser
Microphone
Model MKH
104.
Professional
Net
$195.
The actual size photographs on this page are not simply of the microphone
itself; they depict the entire system, including the compact, low- voltage, power
supply. The microphone barrel contains a transistorized, 10 me RF push-pull oscillator feeding a bridge circuit. The output of the bridge circuit is then amplified
by an additional stage before being applied to the microphone terminals. This
Sennheiser configuration guarantees stability, noise suppression, and smooth
extended response at good output levels.
Actual size of
Battery Adapter
Low -impedance circuit design renders the system insensitive to interference
from magnetic fields. The rugged, meticulously designed structure assures insensitivity to mechanical noise, air -pressure shock waves, and high humidity.
Model MZA 6.
Professional
Net $18.
Versatile mounting of the MKH 104, with
or without the Battery Adapter connected, adapts the microphone to any
conventional arrangement. The lightweight, collapsible desk tripod shown
here is an optional accessory.
Power for the MKH 104 Transistorized RF Condenser Microphone is readily furnished by
Battery Adapter MZA 6. The adapter may be plugged directly into the microphone base
or anywhere along the microphone cable. It holds 6 miniature mercury cells of the
hearing -aid type, Mallory RM -625 or equivalent. One set provides 50 to 60 hours of
continuous operation.
If you have worked with quality microphone systems, you
are familiar with Sennheiser products. Established in 1945, Sennheiser Electronic
has become Europe's largest manufacturer of quality microphones, supplying
them to world renowned manufacturers who have been marketing these products
under their own brand names for use in professional recording and broadcasting,
high fidelity systems, tape recorders, dictating machines, hearing aids, and many
other applications. "Sennheiser" is synonymous with leadership in microphone
engineering.
WHO IS SENNHEISER?
TECHNICAL DATA
Acoustic system:
Directional characteristic:
Frequency range:
No -load
spherical (omnidirectional)
20 to 20,000 cps
transmission
coefficient at
1000 cps
(Sensitivity measured in
anechoic chamber):
Impedance:
Noise voltage:
Distortion at sound
pressures to 100 dynes/cm2:
Overload level:
Power- supply voltage:
Operating current:
Temperature range:
Dimensions:
For complete technical specifications,
call or write Sennheiser Electronic Corporation (N.Y.).
pressure responsive
Weight:
approx. 2mv /dyne /emz
approx. 800 ohms, unbalanced, ungrounded
(accessory cable -transformer matches to 200 ohms)
approx. IOµw
approx. 300 dynes/ems
8 V
±1
approx.
V
5 ma
+140 to 1-158 °F1
-100 to+700C
(
34 in.
3 oz.
5
diameter;
in
long
SE
CORPORATION (N. Y.)
25 West 43rd Street, New York 36, N.Y. (212) LOngacre 4 -0433
.
AUDIO
DECEMBER, 1963
Plant: Bissendorf /Hannover, West Germany
15
EDITOR'S REVIEW
WHY DOESN'T SOMEONE
.
.
.
... make a vi: meter with a built -in "eye tube "?
Over the years there has been much argument about
the relative virtues of both these devices. Frankly,
both have virtues and defects, although on balance,
if we had to choose one or the other we would prefer
the VU meter. But why need it be a choice between
the two? Why not combine them so that we can read
peaks quickly (eye tube) and at the same time have a
damped meter which provides reproducible readings?
In our opinion there is every reason for combining
these two indicating devices in one housing. Certainly
the cost would not be great, and the added information would more than offset a slight increase in cost.
design a tuning device for FM tuners similar
to the signal -seeking devices used on some car radios?
Considering the increased need for accurate tuning,
and the existing devices for automatically setting
tuners to the stereo or mono modes, it would seem to
be a logical next step for FM tuners. The design problem is certainly not too difficult. For example, one
could use a detector nulling scheme, such as used by
Sherwood, and drive the tuning dial by means of a
small motor until it reached a null point. In concept
this is similar to a servo system. It might be too costly
to be practical, or it might not. We hope someone tries
it anyhow.
join us in asking manufacturers to color code
input and output connectors. For years audiofans
have been struggling with a maze of sockets which
invite disaster when one has to work in cramped or
poorly-lit quarters. It is about time that manufacturers agreed on a standard color code, and it is up to
audiofans to insist that they do. Don't wait, insist!
... make a logging scale for the bass and treble controls of audio amplifiers? Since it is sometimes necessary to adjust bass and treble with different recordings, it might be worthwhile to log the values for a
particular record so that the next time it is played we
need not repeat ourselves. This is definitely not a
major problem, but it is one we have all experienced
from time to time.
...
...
SHELLS FOR CONCERT HALLS
In this issue we present an article by Harold Lawrence wherein a system is described for improving
sound projection in concert halls. This system employs
Fiberglas shells erected at the rear and sides of the
stage to provide a "properly balanced" projection.
(Of course the question comes to mind as to what is
meant by "properly balanced," but that is another
line of t sought.) We wish to make it clear that this
article is presented in order to inform readers as to
what is t ping done in concert hall acoustics currently,
rather t] an to suggest a method. Hopefully, in the
future, A e will present other views as to the proper
way to a thieve excellent acoustics in concert halls.
THAT CENT WITH THE WHITE BEARD
ITHER: REALLY A GENT WITH A WHITE BEARD ? Every
year a out this time that question is raised anew by
count' ss little children and audiofans all over the
i
world. It's traditional and expected. But what about
those wh I assert that the idea was conceived by an
advertisi g man to unload bulging warehouses? In a
way the have a point there. Just read a few of the
ads you ' e around White Beard time and you will be
convince that the copy writer pictured that luxurious whit: beard as a cover -up for some dark thoughts.
But that doesn't mean White Beard was invented for
that pur ose ; it just works out that way.
Anyho , as purveyors of truth and enlightenment,
we will a tempt to answer some of the questions which
are impli it in the doubts of children and cynics. You
see, at ' UDIO we know that there is a man with a
white be rd.
Quests n 1. Where does he get those millions and
millions f toys?
Answ- . Discarded audio projects.
Quest'. 2. How does he get into houses without
chimney ?
Answ . FM. (The bag is multiplexed.)
Questi n 3. Will he come to my house this year?
Answ . If you have an FM receiver. (Multiplex
if you w nt goodies.)
Quest 4. How does he get about so quickly?
Answ- . Credit cards.
Quest n 5. Will he say anything?
Answe . Certainly, and the staff of AUDIO joins him :
i
s
?I:
16
erri Cntgistmtts
ttnh
ttppJ deut War
AUDIO
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
DECEMBER, 1963
what makes
an automatic sound
like a turntable?
The U38!
expressly designed
for automatic
turntables
The new generation of automatic turntables tracking and tripping at lower
and lower forces demands this new kind of cartridge. Demands a "floating
stylus" that protects your diamond and record as it plays...demands complementary electrical characteristics which maximize the use of forward -looking
circuitry whether vacuum tube or solid state. The U -38 meets these demands
and makes your automatic sound like a turntable. With Pickering's famous
plug -in replaceable stylus assembly you get a cartridge with a life -time of trouble free performance.
Pickering and Company, Inc., Plainview, New York.
Pickering
U38 cartridge with
AT
Stylus...2 -5 grams tracking force
ATG...1 -3 grams
AUDIO
DECEMBER, 1963
Plug -in head assembly for
Garrard Type A and Model AT6
17
should Sherwood increase its prices by 20%
the superlative new 5-8000
I
FM stereo receiver priced at $319.50
-.
.
L
Years ago, Sherwood high -fidelity tuners and amplifiers we;re evaluated by highly- respected,
totally -impartial research companies as either the finest de igned or the best valued on the
market. Although we were pleased by such endorsements f pure quality in design and performance, the really significant fact was that other leading co ponents carried higher price tags.
Subsequent Sherwood components have received ratings indicating features and performance equal
or superior to brands carrying price tags at least 20% higher.
A current example of Sherwood
design superiority is our new S-8000111 receiver. Sensitivity is rated at 1.8 microvolts. Capture
effect is an outstanding 2.4 db. No other FM receiver can clairr the 80 -watt music -power rating of
the S- 8000W, and only one other (priced $50 higher) offers the professional D'Arsonval zero center tuning meter that's standard with Sherwood.
We still believe that our old -fashioned
policy of superior engineering and realistic prices is best for b.th you and Sherwood.
SOME OF THE
S -8000E1
FEATURES THAT MAKE THE DIFFERENCE
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
Zero -center tuning
80-watt music power
Complete stereo control center
1.8 pv. (IHF) sensitivity
Wide -band 3 -mc. gated beam
limiter
1 -mc. band pass balanced ratio
detector
2.4db. capture effect
1/3% distortion at 100%
modulation
Interchannel hush
Long -life Novar output tubes
8 -inch professional -type tuning
For your free copy of our complete
Dept. A -12
catalog, write
SHERWOOD ELECTRONIC LABORATORIES,
INC.
4300 North California Ave. Chicago 1H, Illinois
scale
12. Silk- smooth flywheel tuning
13. Positive stereo broadcast
HIGH FIDELITY
identification
STEREO RECEIVERS
TUNERS
AMPLIFIERS
STEREO INDICATOR LIGHTS
SPEAKER SYSTEMS
CONTEMPORARY CABINETRY
AUDIO
18
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
DECEMBER, 1963
Controlling SoundReinforcement Systems
DAVID
L. KLEPPER
Control equipment for sound -reinforcement systems is often selected on the basis of
"line" of equipment and price rather than an engineering analysis of the problems. This article reviews the functional requirements of control systems and the
application of some basic principles in meeting these requirements. Manual systems are described in this article. Future articles will discuss automatic equipment.
a
The control equipment for sound -reinforcement systems usually accomplishes
one or more of the following functions:
selection of the signal input
"gain" of rein forcement
e. control of level for auxiliary systems, broadcast lines, and /or tape recorder feeds
ci. remote operation of tape recorders
or reproducers
e. deliberate distortion of the signal:
frequency response, limiting, compression or expansion.
a..
PREAMP -AMP
MICROPHONE
b. control of level
Hg.
2.
LOUDSPEAKER
Simplest sound -reinforcement
system.
In planning controls to accomplish
these functions, there are four points
v;hich are extremely important:
I. correct location of the control con-
Bolt, Bf rana. anri ;A'r rin an, Inc., 50
Moulton ,SI., l'anatrirlpr, Mass.
sole
90
NC CURVES
orm
\lft1!
-p.!v0
BO
a
m
o
ft
2
70
ó
o
o
ó
¢
60
7p
Nroftwiamft
m
w 50
a
w 40
D
4.0
co
w 30
¢
a
o
z
0
20
ALI
11111ranlft
.
1.111111
N
APPROXIMATE THRESHOLD
OF HEARING FOR
CONTINUOUS NOISE
lo
75
75
150
150
300
300
600
FREQUENCY BAND
AUDIO
600
1200
IN
1200
2400
2400
4800
CYCLES PER SECOND
DECEMBER, 1963
4800
1Opoo
Control Location
Most sound -reinforcement systems provide reinforcement for speakers with
both weak and strong voices who stand
varying distances from the microphone.
Obviously, an adjustable level control is
necessary. Unfortunately, many sound reinforcement systems do not locate this
level control in a really satisfactory position. A typical church sound- amplification system may have the controls in the
sacristy, the basement, or a similar location, while the most common control
locations for a school auditorium sound
system are the side -stage area or the
principal's office. These locations are
analogous to placing drivers of automobiles in the trunk.
This point cannot be emphasized too
often sound -amplification- system controls should be placed in a location where
the operator can hear the sound lie controls and see the individuals producing
the live sound that is being amplified.
While a properly adjusted monitor
loudspeaker can provide an indication
of the sound -system performance, it does
not continuously alert the operator to
room acoustics and noise conditions.
Correctly located controls allow the operator to hear the "mix" of live and
amplified sound heard by the audience.
The usefulness of an operator's listening position in the audience area is
demonstrated every time an audience
takes a few minutes "to get settled" at
the start of a show. The operator, hearing the noise, live sound, and amplified
sound, will automatically raise the level
of amplified sound to provide high in:
Fig. 1. Noise criteria curves show
allowable
noise
level in each oc-
tave band for a
variety of spaces.
should
meet NC -25 or
NC -30, concert
halls NC -20.
Churches
>
K
satisfactory electronic performance
standards
3. proper signal flow through the control system
4. location of the individual controls
for the operator's convenience
Even the simplest systems require attention to the first and second points.
2.
19
LOUDSPEAKER
e
POWER AMP
LOW-LEVEL
INPUTS
Fig. 3.
CONTROL AMP
Simple multi -input sound
forcement system.
rein-
telligibility ; yet later, when the audience
is quiet and attentive, the high levels
will sound unnatural, and the operator
will reduce gain. Similarly, in large
coliseum and exhibition spaces, crowd
noise may require a sudden increase in
amplified signal. Or. a weak -voiced guest
minister may require more amplification,
which must be matched to reverberant
acoustics of a church. As a last example,
a singer's voice will invariably require
more amplification with louder orchestral accompaniment; judging this balance requires, obviously, a well -trained
operator, but also one who hears both
the live sound aad the amplified sound
he controls.
The level control for any reinforcement system belongs, therefore, within
or adjacent to the audience area. Assuming that an auditorium sound -reinforcement system is well designed and
provides reasonably even coverage, this
may be an inconspicuous location along
the side or rear wall. Likewise, the level
controls for a church sound-reinforcement system may be located in the back
of a pew, in a balcony railing or in the
side or rear walls of the church.
e
The correct location of level cl ntrols
may involve : a. locating pream lifters
and power amplifiers (either inte rated
or separate), with level controls, t the
control position; b. locating th pre amplifier at the control location, ith a
600 -ohm line to a separate power mplifier; c. employing a 600 -ohm lin: from
the preamplifier to the remote level control position, a 600 -ohm L- r Tattenuator pad at the control p ition,
and another 600 -ohm line from t con trol position back to the power am lifier;
or d. use of control wiring betwe n the
preamplifier-power amplifier and pecial
remote level -control equipment.1
Electronic Performance
We have often heard that th performance of electronic sound -rei force ment equipment need not be as ex ellent
as home high -fidelity equipment or roadcast audio equipment. Our experi nce is
that high -quality installations require
electronic equipment meeting hig performance standards, and typica performance specifications for a ontrol
console might be as follows:
a. Gain 90 db
b. Power Output : + 18 dbm t less
than 1/2 percent thd, 100-15,000 cps.
c. Frequency Response ± 1.5 i b, 30s
s
:
.
:
15,000 cps
d. Source Impedance : 30/50,1
250/300 ohms mic. inputs
/150,
1 The
most satisfactory of the emote
level -control equipment now being manu-
factored uses a photocell as the re
element with the remote level contr
ally controlling the amount of d.
light bulb which varies the inten
light and thus the resistance of the
cell. Two examples of this type of
ment are Fairchild's "Lumiten" an
Lansing's "Revocon."
stance
actu.
to a
ity of
photoequipAltec
1
EQUALIZER
SPEECH REINFORCEMENT
CHANNEL
SPEECH INPUTS
Fig.
CHOIR
ypical
ment, ov= rflow
ORGAN
e
MUSIC INPUTS
4.
church sou d amplification system
with chann Is for
speech rei force-
coverage,
nd re
cord in
OVERFLOW COVERAGE CHANNEL
RECORDING
ISOLATION
Load Impedance 600 ohms
f. Noise Level : 70 db below + 18 dbm
output (mixer and master controls adjusted for 68 -db net gain).
The performance characteristic where
less expensive mixer units, or units
custom -built by contractors, often falls
down is signal -to -noise ratio. A speech reinforcement system should be able to
deliver approvimately 85 db (when the
lecturer or actor shouts) to the seating
area. If the system is employed for music
reinforcement, then 95 or 100 db without noticeable distortion would be a good
level. To predict the permissible background noise level, we may refer to
criteria already established for air handling system noise for spaces of different types.
The noise level of a good concert hall,
lecture room, theater, or church rarely
exceeds the NC -25 curve (see Fig. 1),
and often is as low as NC -20. These noise
criteria curves correspond in most cases
to "A" scale (weighted broad band)
sound level meter readings of 30 -35 db
and 25-30 db, respectively. Considering
that tube noise (high-frequency noise) is
the main component in control equipment background noise, the requirement
of a 70 -db signal -to -noise ratio does not
appear excessive. The realism of even
the best acoustically designed sound -reinforcement system can be spoiled by a
constant hiss emerging from the loudspeakers.
e.
:
Which Signal Goes Where
A line diagram of the simplest possible sound -reinforcement system is shown
in Fig. 2. A microphone is connected to
the input of a combined preamplifierpower amplifier, which is connected to a
loudspeaker. Only one microphone is
employed, so the "selection" function is
eliminated. It might be a simple church
reinforcement system where amplification is provided for the pulpit position
only, or it may be a reinforcement system in a small school auditorium, where
only weak- voiced lecturers (or the principal) require reinforcement.
The first step in the expansion of a
simple system would be the addition of
several microphone inputs (Fig. 3). Now
the system controls must select the
proper input as well as control level.
The most straightforward approach to
providing such controls is the use of
separate mixer-amplifiers which generally provide four low -level microphone
inputs and usually include four input
gain controls and one master gain control.
Use of a separate control amplifier or
mixer unit has several advantages over
the use of an integrated mixer -power
amplifier. Heat from power output tubes
does not affect critical resistors in tube type low -level stages or the transistors
AUDIO
20
www.americanradiohistory.com
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DECEMBER, 1963
e
e
"MUSIC"
"SPEECH'
MUSIC PLAYBACK
INPUTS
SYSTEM EQUALIZER
>
SWITCHED EQUALIZER
SPEECH REINFORCEMENT &
MUSIC PLAYBACK CHANNEL
MUSIC INPUTS
e
OVERFLOW COVERAGE CHANNEL
e
RECORDING
Fig. 5. Sound reinforcement system for church or multi -purpose auditorium such as a
theater or concert hall.
becoming more prominent in these devices. LT addition, the separate mixers
are usually somewhat smaller than integrated mixer-power amplifiers with
the same number of inputs; consequently, they may be more easily located
in the ideal position acoustically, without creating an undue architectural
problem. Finally, over-all system equalization may be easily installed between
the mixer output and the preamplifier
input.
If the availability of conduit for
microphone lines is Iimited, as would
(often) be the case for new systems in
existing construction, then control wiring
and the special control devices discussed
earlier may be useful.
When the sound -system controls are
required to provide an auxiliary output
for broadcasting or recording purposes,
then principles of signal flow must be
considered. The author has run into a
considerable number of sound-amplification systems having seriously compromised performance, because the same
control and amplification system was expected to deliver a signal to a reinforcement loudspeaker system in a church
MINT, overflow loudspeakers in surrounding vestibules, chapels, or classrooms, and
finally a feed for tape recording or
broadcasting. Often, each of these outputs demanded different microphone
pickup requirements, different level requirements, and different over -all equalization.
Straightforward control of "which
AUDIO
DECEMBER, 1963
signal goes where" to such systems may
be seen in Fig. 4. The output of the
speech- reinforcement mixer provides a
speech signal for broadcasting and/or
recording. However, the equalization
applied to the sound-reinforcement system does not affect recording or broadcasting. Music (choir, organ, and con-.
gregational singing), is picked up for
transmission to the overflow coverage
loudspeakers in the narthex and chapel,
but these signals are not amplified in
the nave. Finally, mixing of the speech
and music signals is accomplished by the
broadcast and recording operator, who
hears the signals via a monitor loudspeaker in a separate control room, isolated from the nave, and somewhat
duplicating the acoustical conditions
found in the narthex and chapel (complete isolation from the live sound in
the nave). Finally, this operator can also
double as the radio -broadcast system announcer, and his announcements will
not be amplified within the church. One
integrated mixer -power amplifier unit
could not satisfy the control functions
that this set of engineered components
provides!
We may note that such a system can
grow in logical fashion. Perhaps the
broadcast and recording functions would
be installed first; the overflow coverage
and reinforcement added later, or vice
versa.
The same functional diagram, with no
change, might also apply for a typical
small civic or college auditorium. Reinforcement would be provided for lee tures. Loudspeaker coverage in lobbies
would be provided for dramatic events
and symphony concerts, but reinforce nient within the auditorium would not
be provided for these activities. Finally,
any activity, whether reinforced or not,
could be recorded or sent out over a
broadcasting line.
A further addition to such a system
might be provisions for playback of recorded music. In that case, switched
equalization might be desirable to optimize the performance of the system for
voice reinforcement and music playback,
again without affecting the signal fed
for overflow coverage or recording and
broadcasting. A functional diagram for
such a system may be seen in Fig. 5.
PULPIT
LEFT -STALL
LEFT ALTAR
LEFT
LOUDSPEAKER
SYSTEM
SPARE
LEFT MIXER
TO RECORDING
OR OVERFLOW
SPARE
RIGHT ALTAR
RIGHT-STALL
LECTERN
RIGHT LOUDSPEAKER
SYSTEM
O
RIGHT MIXER
Fig. 6. Simple two -channel reinforcement system.
21
STEREO (BRIDGED CENTER)
MONO ALL ON
MONO ALL ON
MONO ALLQN
LEFT SKEPTICS
2
1
FEEDBACK
-RIGHT
2
_H
1
SKEPTICS
1
-ENTER
-H
2
--
PROSCENIUM
ON
p
O
O
2
I
II
MIC
MIC
13
ü
p
c03
ab
MIC
14
MIC
vu
VU
OFF
CONSOLE
OUTPUT
15
O
SEL.
p
1
p
p
*2
MIC
21
-t
MIC 22
MIC 23
MIC4
CH
cOo
MIC 25
(MIC. LEVEL)
MASTER
.
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®
JACKS
REMOTE
CH 4
MASTER
GAIN
Stereo Systems
The simplest stereophonic sound -reinforcement systems are merely two
single- channel systems, side -by-side (Fig.
6). One microphone picks up speech at
2 Dr. Paul S. Venklasen calls
these "geographical" consoles.
.
II
I
1567A
mixer-
SWITCHESJ
ent system.
speaker over the pulpit; another picks
up speech at the lectern and trans its it
to a loudspeaker above the lect
Is
this a stereo system? Let the eader
supply his own definition. In an case,
it is obvious the controls merely ouble
those usual to the simplest single -c annel
system.
At the opposite extreme are th con trol panels for some large music halls.
There pan -potentiometers allow a grad ual transition of any sound soure from
one loudspeaker system to an a jasent
system. The controls are laid ut to
simplify operation as much as po sible;
yet there is no question but that very
skilled operator is required.
Somewhat intermediate is the 's ntrol
console shown in Fig. 7. In the stereo
mode of operation, the system is ba ically
two channel, but with both ch nnels
feeding a bridged center -channel mplifier and loudspeaker system. The i I nsole
is not much more difficult to o erate
under these circumstances than as a
single -channel system. Nevertheles , both
to simplify operation and also due to the
satisfactory hall acoustics wher this
system is installed, the system i most
frequently operated as a single -c annel
system, with the stereo side ch nnels
"patched" for sound effects.
In all these examples, equalizers compressors, and patch panels are d liber ately left off the console operating anel.
The author feels very strongly th only
the controls operated during a pr rgram
should be located on the operating anel.
In other words, it should be k pt as
simple and straightforward as p sible.
Accessory devices are best locate in a
sound -equipment rack, located ehind
the operator ; and all patchin and
switching that can be accom ished
before a program begins may b performed conveniently, assuming th t the
rack is intelligently laid out. Th good
procedure is to locate rack -mounte con-
Lansing
CH 5
-1OUTPUTI- TA'E¡SOUND EFFECTSi- LOUDSPEAKER
A well- trained or experienced sound system operator can usually control an
auditorium or church system with the
neatly located rotary controls of the
standard "broadcast" control console.
However, best results can be obtained
when the principle of "proper location
of controls" is followed fully and the
microphone positions on the stage can
be seen to correspond with the location
of the gain controls at the console. This
calls for custom -built consoles, and it
is often advisable to take one more step
towards efficient operation by the use of
slide -type attenuators rather than rotating knobs. Figure 6 shows such a control console and the corresponding microphone positions for a typical Broad way show.
A "map of the chancel"2 control console is one approach for a church sound reinforcement system. Only one speech
microphone is "live" at any one time, and
pushbuttons can control the selection of
each microphone, with one master gain
control. Here the push- buttons are arranged to form a map of the microphone
locations in the chancel.
More complicated sound- reinforcement systems require more careful layout of console operating panels to insure
easy and straightforward operation.
amplifier.
mumm
I
BLANKS
the pulpit and transmits it to th loud -
Altec
®m®
TAIE
Fig. 7. Bridged center channel reinforce
8.
RIGHT
o
Layout
Fig.
RIGHT
LEFT
GAIN
EQUAL.
CH 2
MASTER
CENTER
TER
EFFECTS
O
CH1CL2
ED
I
LEFT
i
22
trols, including patch fields, at a convenient height, between three and six
feet off the floor, with extreme upper and
lower spaces reserved for unattended
equipment, such as power amplifiers,
power supplies, and fans.
The author's experience is that limiter
amplifiers and equalizers are best located
in the equipment rack, not on the control
console where they are all- too -often adjusted when unnecessary. There are exceptions, such as portable sound system
consoles that must be used in a variety
of acoustical environments. However, the
broadcast and recording practice of one
Fig. 9. RCA BN -6B mixer -amplifier.
equalizer for each microphone input is
usually unnecessary in a sound- reinforcement system with microphones having
approximately the same frequency response when employed for their proper
functions.
Intelligent planning is, obviously, only
a part of good sound -system controls.
Great credit must go to the electronic
engineers and designers who have
created today's highly reliable equipment
and to the better sound- system contractors whose installations are truly works
of art. The lines on paper that represent the planning discussed here are,
perhaps, a small part of the total effort,
but an important part.
Equipment
Manufactured input mixer assemblies
often represent an economical way of
obtaining high quality control units. On
the other hand, use of individual preamplifier, line amplifier, and powersupply units usually will result in a
AUDIO
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DECEMBER, 1963
Fig. 10. Altec Lansing 250SU stereo console.
more expensive control unit, if the additional labor costs necessitated by high quality workmanship are included. However, too often the placement of controls
on manufactured mixer units and control consoles complicates operation of
the sound -reinforcement system.
The performance characteristics discussed earlier are achieved by different
techniques in the mixer- preamplifiers
shown in Fig. S and 1. The Altec Lansing unit employs vacuum tubes, with
high -level mixing following the input
pre -amplifier stages. The RCA unit employs transistors in advanced amplification circuits that result in extremely
low distortion.
Either of these mixers can provide excellent results when used properly. To
feed more than one power amplifier, or
tape recorder, isolation amplifiers, and
so on, the best practice is to match impedances employing isolating (or "buildout") resistors, but using the balanced
output connected for :150 or 600 ohms.
Larger sound- reinforcement systems
may require mixer preamplifiers capable
of controlling. gain on more than four
or five inputs simultaaeously. Such requirements are sometimes met by using
two or more of the small mixer- preamplifiers discussed above, with the outputs
wired together through isolation networks. This can only be considered a
compromise solution, because the advantage of a single master gain control
built into the unit is lost with such an
arrangement, and the presence of two
or more master gain controls adds an unnecessary complexity to the operation of
the sound -reinforcement system. The
best approach, where the layout of the
controls is suitable, is to use one of the
control consoles manufactured for both
radio broadcasting and sound- amplification system use. The best of such units
employ plug -in preamplifiers and line
amplifiers. Figure 10 and 11 show typical
control consoles. The plug -in construction
of such control consoh's allows them to
be tailored with reasonable ease to particular signal -flow requirements. The
two -channel versions can usually handle
the simultaneous functions of sound reAUDIO
DECEMBER, 1963
inforcement within a ball or church, and
amplification to exterior spaces or recording and broadcasting simultaneously,
and without interference.
The plug -in units themselves have been
subject to miniaturization over the past
few years. At the saine time, their reliability and performance has increased
markedly. Through the use of specially designed transformers, the Altec Lansing
preamplifier employs only two tubes, and
a few resistors, yet provides a complete
push -pull input -to- output preamplifier
that does not permit failure of a single
tube to interrupt a program. These
appear to currently represent the ultimate in tube -type plug -in amplifier design, and the Langevin "Nova" line is
somewhat similar. The RCA plug -in preamplifier employs transistors in advanced, low- distortion circuits similar to
those employed in the four -input mixer
discussed earlier.
Theater Systems
There are two different (and opposed)
schools of theater sound -system design
and operation : the touring system
school and the permanent system school.
The Touring Sound System (Old School)
Most "Broadway" touring shows rent
all equipment for voice reinforcement
and for sound- effects playback; this
equipment remains with the show for
the duration of its run, both on Broad-
way and on tour. Low cost seems a prime
requirement for this rental equipment,
and this factor is an automatic limit on
the quality of the equipment. The most
important limitation of such rental systems is the lack of an "acoustical match"
between the entire sound system, particularly the loudspeakers, and most of
the auditoriums where the shows play,
but that is not a subject for this particular article. In any case, these touring
systems generally contain rack -mounted
control facilities which are positioned
at the right or left wings of the stage
where the sound -system operator can
follow the saine cues as the lighting control operator. For some shows, these are
the same person
The members of the stage -hands union
who are called upon to act as soundsystem operators for such shows usually
have considerable experience in this activity. Therefore, they are able to get
unusually satisfactory results, considering equipment and conditions with which
they have to work. Rather than depending
upon what they hear during a particular
performance of the show in a particular
auditorium, they work from a cue sheet
usually first established during initial
rehearsals of the show, and then modified
according to the experience of the producer and director who listen from the
audience area. While such a control system allows no modification for varying
auditorium acoustics, it does have the advantage of placing sound control directly under the direction of the producer
and director.
The results of such sound- system control are not completely evident to listeners of plays in New York City. However,
when shows which have played to 18002200 seat theaters in New York are taken
to auditoriums either much larger or
having very different acoustical conditions, the results can be disastrous and
even ludicrous.
!
The Permanent Reinforcement System
(New School)
A well- designed "house" reinforcement
(Continued on page 60)
Fig. 11. RCA BC -7 stereo console.
23
The Auditioneer
JOHN WHITACRE
A record and tape playback unit which permits copywriters and others
interested in integrating words and music to audition at their desks.
many
sound effects, music bridges, background music, and other attention getting devices to produce commercials
and programs.
The copy writing department is
charged with the responsibility of putting the right words with the various
sound effects or music.
For many years the copy department
at WILS needed only a phonograph to
play agency commercials and sound effects. Gradually some of the commercials
and other programming material began
arriving on recording tape. Finally, late
in 1959 our engineers built the "Fidelimatie Tape Recording System."1 Now
all the commercials, music bridges, and
station identifications are recorded on
tape cartridges before being played on
the air.
The copy department was being forced
to audition most of their material in the
auxiliary control room. This not only
took them away from their telephone
and typewriter. but many times they
had to wait their turn to use the equipment. Needless to say, a great deal of
valuable time was lost.
THE MODERN RADIO STATION uses
2609 Devonshire, Lansing 10, Mich.
John Whitacre, "The Fidelimatic Tape
Recording System," AUDIO, October 1961.
*
1
Fig. 2. The wood may be ordered cut to size
if you wish to assemble it yourself.
The Auditioneer you see pictured here
(Fig. 1) carne to fruition as a result of
this problem. No longer do they waste
time "going to" the equipment. We have
brought the equipment "to them."
Conceived and built by the WILS engineering department, the Auditioneer
not only does a good job for the copy
department, but it pleases the eyes and
ears of all who use it.
The Cabinet
Fig.
1
The
com-
pleted Auditioneer
(on the left).
The cabinet was difficult to design. It
was built so that the user doesn't have to
bend over too far when threading tapes
on the recorder. At the same time, if the
top was made too high it would be
troublesome cuing-up records or playing
tape cartridges.
Although we were fortunate in having
our engineer, Francis Schafer, design
and build the cabinet, I believe you could
order the wood cut to exact size by a
local lumber company and assemble it
yourself. If you observe Fig. 1 and 2
AUDIO
24
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DECEMBER, 1963
The sound from this new Shure cartridge
is awesome in its vitality & clarity
A NIGHT - AND -DAY DIFFERENCE
From the very first prototype, the sound from the new
Shure Series Mii Sterco 15° Dynetic Cartridge was
incredible. Evca skeptical high fidelity critics have
expressed uncon_caled surprise at the audible increase
in brilliance, clarity, transparency, presence, fullness and
snxlothncss of this amazing new Shure development. A
close analysis of its performance reveals startling differ ences in this ca-tridge- although not extraordinarily
improved in the "usual" areas of frequency response
(still a virtually flat 20- 20,0110 cps) or in compliance
(25 x 10-6 cm /dyne)- rather it is in the distortion measurements where. Shure engineers have achieved a highly
significant and dramatic reduction of 75% to 90% in
I NI and harmonic distortion from even such admirably
distortion -free cartridges as earlier versions of the Shure
Stereo Dynetic. Further, cross -talk between channels
has been effectively negated in the critical low frequency
and mid ranges ... providing superior channel separation throughout the audible spectrum.
SCRATCH -PROOF RETRACTILE STYLUS
And, as if that were not enough, the new 15° cartridge
incorporates
a
totally efficient retractile stylus that
momentarily retracts whenever excessive forces are applied to the tone arm. it cannot scratch records -even
if bounced onto -he record or dragged across the grooves.
PERFECTION IS A MATTER OF DEGREE
it has been known for some years that a difference between the angle used to cut stereo records and the angle
of the stylus of the cartridge used to play them would
result in an increase in I \1 and harmonic distortion
audible on certain records. With widely different cutting
angles employed by the record companies, the effective
angle of the playback cartridge stylus had of necessity to
be a compromise so as to provide the best possible results
from records of all makes.
Recently, industry attention was focused on this problem by a series of technical articles ascribing the difference in eficc-.ive vertical angles between the cutter
stylus and the playback cartridge stylus as a cause of
distortion and urging the adoption of a standard effective angle to which records would be cut.
Major record companies have now begun to use an
effective cutting angle of 151 which is the proposed
standard of the RIAA (Record Industry Association of
America) and EIA (Electronic Industries Association.)
With the emergence of the single standard effective
vertical tracking angle for cutting records, Shure engineers immediately began what seemed on the surface
the seemingly simple but in actuality the arduous and
exacting task of converting their formidable Stereo
Dynetic cartridge to the 15° effective tracking angle. It
couldn't be done. So Shure designed this radically new
moving- magnet cartridge that will track at an effective
angle of 15 °. Graphically, this is the kind of cartridge
geometry involved in the new Shure Series \I.1.1 15°
Sterco Dynetic Cartridge:
-.,
t
.i 1. -TRUE
---tl
tt
ANGLE OF DEFLECTION
VERTICAL
r
PIVOT BEARING
RECORD SuV'-
VOV!NG MAGNET
J
THE ULTIMATE TEST
You must hear this cartridge to appreciate the totality
It will be instantly recognizable to the car without the necessity for elaborate
test instruments or A -B listening tests- although we
assure you, instruments and A-B tests will more than
substantiate our claims.
of the sound improvement.
M44 SERIES SPECIFICATIONS
M44-7
M44-5
20- 20.000 cps
Frequency Response:
20- 20,000 cps
Output Voltage at 1000 cps
(Per Channel, at 5 cm /sec
6 millivolts
9 millivolts
peak velocity):
Channel Separation (at 1000 cps): Greater than 25 db Greater than 25 db
47,000 Ohms
47,000 Ohms
Recommended Load Impedance:
25 x 10 -6 cm 'dyne 20 x 10-6 cm 'dyne
Compliance:
Tracking Range:
Inductance (Per Channel):
D.C. Resistance (Per Channel):
Stylus:
Stylus Replacement:
Cartridge Price, Net
(Including stylus):
Replacement Stylus Price, Net:
to 11/2 Grams
680 millihenrie5
3/4
ly4 to
3
Grams
650 Ohms
680 millihenries
650 Ohms
.0005' diamond
.0007' diamond
N44 -5
N44 -7
$49.50
$44.50
$21.75
$16.75
Monophonic Styli:
Model N44-1-For monophonic LP records, with .001' diamond $16.75 net
Model N44 -3-For 78 rpm records, with .0025" diamond
$14.25 net
SERIES M44 SCRATCH -PROOF CARTRIDGE
WITH RETRACTILE STYLUS
the new standard
in distortion -free
hi -fi cartridges
LITERATURE: Shure Brothers, Inc. 222 Hartrey Avenue, Evanston, Illinois
PAanutactured under U.S. Patents 3,055,988:3,077,521 and 3.077,522. Other Patents Pending
AUDIO
DECEMBER, 1963
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26
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
DECEMBER, 1963
Now...a new
aE_IM1
Take
a
Sound Recording Tape!
piece of the new Eastman tape. See how tough it
Look! No stretch ...when it breaks
NEW! Support material for EASTMAN Sound Recording Tapes is DUROL Base. A specially prepared form of
cellulose triacetate- smooth, tough, durable, highly
flexible
provides high strength with low elongation.
When equipment accidents happen, it breaks clean.
Splices are made easily, quickly -with minimum pro-
-
gram loss.
is... how clean
it breaks under stress.
-it breaks clean!
New "R- type" binder.This gives a smoother, tougher surface, thereby reducing tape noise and distortion. In
addition, it provides extreme abrasion resistance, preventing oxide build -up at the head. Even more important, however, are the amazing magnetic properties
of coatings of "R- type" binder which make possible
two superlative tapes -both available now
.
Another important feature: "Lifetime Coding,"
your assurance of highest quality. Printed on the back of
all EASTMAN Sound Recording Tapes is a continuously
repeated, permanent legend. This identifies Eastman
Kodak Company as the manufacturer and provides a
convenient means of indexing these tapes.
.
.
At leading electronic supply houses: Type A303,
a
vastly superior low -print tape with output comparable to
a fine general -purpose tape ... also Type A304, a high
output tape with remarkably low print- through.
-
© E.,stman Kodak Company, MCMLXI
For information, see your electronic supplier or write
Magnetic Products Sales
EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY
Rochester 4, N.Y.
AUDIO
DECEMBER, 1963
Unique ultra -handyThread -Easy Reel with
indexing scale and built -in splicing jig.
27
The Amperite thermal relay, RL2, is
used to delay application of voltage to
the collector of Q4, the triggering or cue tripping circuit. If this were not done, it
would be necessary to hold down on the
"Run" switch until all the cue burst had
been pulled past the cue -sensing head.
Power for the cue -sensing amplifier
and the relay control circuit is taken
from the existing power transformer in
the power amplifier. This was done by
adding one diode,
and two capacitors, C10 and
The speaker grill shown in Fig. 1 and
the two speakers you see in Fig. 3 were
removed from a used Ampro tape recorder. The small speaker is electrically
coupled across the large one through an
electrolytic capacitor. It sounded well
this way so it was not changed.
A black anodized aluminum panel
was engraved with the various controls
nomenclature. On this panel are the
VOLUME control, TONE control, INPUT
switch, ON -OFF indicator, and STOP START switches for the cartridge mechanism.
Fig. 4. Back view
of the completed
unit.
D
C.
closely you won't have too much difficulty.
American black walnut was selected
for the cabinet material. Except for the
bottom plate, legs, leg braces, speaker
trim, and pegboard, it is constructed of
3/4 -in. walnut plywood. Clamps, wood
blocks, screws, and glue were used to
guarantee solid, square, corners. Triangular- shaped wooden blocks are glued
firmly against the legs to give them maximum strength. To make the cabinet more
sturdy, the legs were joined near the
bottom with a solid walnut brace. The
two braces are joined together by a
piece of walnut plywood. This not only
makes the cabinet more rigid, but forms
a useful storage shelf. The legs were
mitered to accept the braces and the
braces were mitered for the shelf. All
Mitering was done with a wood bit and
chisel. The joints so formed were glued
in place.
The fine walnut grain is enhanced and
protected by two coats of Vitrolene.
Vitrolene is a varnish -like wood finish
distributed by Minnesota Paints, Inc.,
of Minneapolis, Minnesota. Although
they recommend it for a durable gymnasium floor finish, we have used it
quite successfully for some time now to
finish cabinets that are likely to be
abused.
In a home you probably wouldn't need
leg levelers, but in a radio station experience has taught us to put levelers
under mobile cabinets. The Auditioneer
has been so equipped.
Cartridge Playback deck. Unlilee the
Model 35 Cartridge deck, it uses a solenoid to hold the pressure roller against
the capstan instead of a mechanical
latching system. The solenoid f tature
would make it easy for us to re-cu tape
cartridges on this deck. We certainly
don't want any cartridges appearing in
the control room unless they are cued -up
and ready for use on the air!
Viking built the power amplifi r we
are using in the Auditioneer. It wit; part
of a Viking Model 36. An NAB tape
playback equilization network is already
incorporated in the amplifier circuit. To
get a better bass response from the amplifier when being fed from the three
sources, we changed capacitor C,5 from
0.01 µf to 0.025 pf and bridged the tone
control, R77 with an 18,000 -ohm resistor
(R6).
The General Electric VR -II car ;ridge
initially used with the Gray trap tcription arm would over -drive the first stage
in the Viking amplifier. A voltage d. vider
consisting of R4, and R48 dropped the
signal appearing at the grid of V, to a
value equal to that being generated by
the tape heads.
Viking of Minneapolis designed the
first three stages in our cue-sensing amplifier circuit. We modified it to fi ; this
application. For instance, the uned
feedback loop from the collector of Q2 to
the emitter of Q, is designed to roll off
most of the higher frequencies.
The Equipment
When it was decided to build a complete auditioning unit, one of the very
first items salvaged from the old phonograph was the Rek -O -Kut Model LP743 turntable. It was taken apart,
cleaned, lubricated, and reassembled. A
new motor starting switch and capacitor
were installed.
A Viking Model 75 Tape Deck was
taken out of service by a nearby radio
station. I purchased it for $20 without
even inspecting it. It was disassembled,
cleaned, lubricated, and some worn parts
replaced. It works very well.
Left over from our earlier experiments with "The Fidelimatic Tape Recording System" was a Viking Model 36
I..- 1/2"
3/4"
1
3/4"
-+If
1
Performance
Now, about the fidelity of the AUDIFirst let me point out it was
not designed for use as a high -fidelity
mechanism. It was designed as a "work
horse" for the copy department. However, measurements have been made using an Ampex alignment tape on the
tape deck and cartridge deck. The speakers were disconnected from the amplifier output and a 5-ohm wirewound resistor was placed across the amplifier
output terminals. A number of measurements with a Barker & Williamson distortion meter across the 5 -ohm resistor
indicated a frequency response of plus
or minus 2 db from 50 cps to 10,000
cps. Since an RIAA network is not incorporated in the amplifier, it is unfair
to expect a good response from the General Electric cartridge. But a slight adjustment of the tone control yields a
(Continued on page 54
TIONEER.
11
F".
i
1
1/2
1/16'
3/16"
1/4"
3/16"
-44-1 3/4"-++f
3/4"
7
3/4"
1/2"
+
3/4"
5/8"
1
VOLUME
-
POWER
=
I/2"
3/8"
3/8"
11/16"
3/8"
1
3/16'
TONE
T
=C_ STOP
P
RUN
/
30°
Fig. 5. Lettering and dial calibration marks were engraved in the
1
/16 -in. thick
black- anodized aluminum panel.
28
AUDIO
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
DECEMBER, 1963
F
4
.
°, I,
,
-
" by combining this unit, Citation A,
with a solid state basic amplifier of comparable quality,
a sound path could be set up that approaches the classic
goal of amplifier design -a straight wire with gain."
-HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
THE NEW CITATION B
PROFESSIONAL 80 WATT SOLID STATE STEREO BASIC AMPLIFIER
CITATION
Computer-grade silicon output transistors: heavy -duty,
solid state devices, virtually
impervious to abuse. Will
take 100% more power than
Handsome front panel: facilitates custom installation. Features include
Current -adjustment meter, on off switch with pilo: light and low -cut filter. Removable bottom panel conceals idling adjustment controls.
...
their use in Citation
B
will
ever demand.
...r.._.
Driver stage: Wideband silicon driver transistors are mounted on rugged, militarytype epoxy glass board. Board pivots for
easy accessibility or removal.
The "classic goal of amplifier design" is now reality. The big "B" is
here.The Citation B. A power -packed
"brute" loaded with 80 watts of flawless performance
true product of
the computer age. The "B" has the
widest frequency response of any
basic amplifier
to 100,000 cps.
The "B" has the best square wave
response -less than one microsec
ond rise time. The "B" has the high.
est damping factor -50 to 1 at lO cps.
(No other power amplifier is even
close.) The big "B" is the only power amplifier completely free of hangover or clipping at full power output.
The Citation B reflects Harman Kardon's solid state leadership in
every way -performance. design and
-a
-1
Electrolytic capacitors: engineered to computer -grade
specifications for unlimited
shelf life and consistent,
long -term performance.
construction. "A straight wire with
gain" when matched with Citation A,
the big "B" will also enhance the
performance of any other high quality stereo preamplifier. For more information
write Citation Division,
Harman Kardon, Inc., Plainview, N.Y.,
-
Dept. A-12.
"Heat sink ": heavy -duty
finned aluminum device
Top view of chassis: computer construction throughout. Five sub -assemblies
ass.ire easy accessibility and minimum operating temperature through effi-
cient heat dissipation; laced mi itary wiring harness couples each stage.
AUDIO
DECEMBER, 1963
harman kardon
which rapidly draws heat
away from output transistors
1
-insuring long life, fail-safe
performance.
A
subsidiary of THE JERROLD CORPORATION
29
An Open Baffle ParallelSeries Array
Taking advantage of the excellent midrange of multiple speaker arrays,
and the space saving of an open- backed infinite baffle, an economical
(money and space) and good sounding speaker system can be constructed.
OAKLEY, JR.''
R. S.
consists
of a number of small speakers in
a single enclosure or baffle. Since
AMULTIPLE SPEAKER ARRAY
multiple speaker arrays appeared on
the scene several years ago their stock
has risen and fallen severely as different
authors voiced opinions on them and
presented fact about them.1-8 Much has
been clarified during this time, and more
and more designers are developing arrays. Still, there are some areas where
theory and practice differ, and some
questions which have not yet been settled.
It is generally agreed that multiple
speaker arrays do perform well in the
midrange frequencies. Particularly low
transient distortion in the midrange
has been noted. Increased radiating area
decreases cone excursion and voice coil
velocity, resulting in lower distortion.
Low -frequency response, however, is
still limited by array fundamental resonance. In addition, low- frequency distortion can be minimized only by using
high quality speakers. Similarly, high frequency response suffers to a degree
from interference effects, but is also
limited by voice coil quality.
Almost all multiple speaker array designs use inexpensive 6 -in. speakers and
have tweeters to extend their response
on the high end. Different approaches
*
1
2
3
4
101 Montclair Ave., Waltham, Mass.
Norman H. Crowhurst, "Pillar of
Sound," Hi -Fi Systems, Autumn, 1959.
C. F. Mahler, Jr., "Hi -Fi Performance
from Small Speakers," AUDIO, December, 1959.
Norman H. Crowhurst, "Acoustic Mat rixing-A Basis for New Loudspeaker
Developments," Aunio, November, 1960.
C. F. Mahler, Jr., "The Series- Parallel
Speaker Array," Ammo, November,
1960.
5
6
î
8
Jim Kyle, "Sweet Sixteen," Popular
Electronics, January, 1961.
Jim Kyle, "Sweeter with a Tweeter,"
Popular Electronics, April, 1961.
James F. Novak, "Performance of
Series- Parallel Speaker Arrays," AUDIO,
September, 1961.
John W. Ward, "Another Word on Multiple Speakers," AUDIO, December, 1962,
3.2 OHM
INPUT
Sl IN CLOSED POSITION SPEA
PARALLEL, AND CURVE SMOOT
HEADPHONES
BRIDGE OUTPUT
sired nominal impedance, and enclosure
or baffle design. Three factors, however,
are basically related only to the number
of speakers used in an array : power handling capacity, cone excursion; and, increase of efficiency in the midrange.
In an array of N speakers, power
handling capacity is N times that of the
individual speaker. This is accomplished
without any loss of speaker efficiency,
and allows an added margin of 10 log
N db between the power required to
drive the array and the power the array
can handle. Cone excursion, at the same
time, is reduced by a factor of VN. A
proportionate reduction of distortion
over most of the range of the array is
thus made possible because suspension
non-linearity is a major cause of distortion.
Actual increase of efficiency is restricted to the midrange. This results
from mutual coupling between speakers
at midrange frequencies Maximum theoretical boost varies as power handling
capacity margin, and is expressed as 10
log N db. Increase of N, therefore, is
good for increasing power handling and
reducing distortion, but it is bad in the
middle frequencies where mutual coupling boosts efficiency and produces a
hump in the response curve. Table 1
gives values of 10 log N db and -VN for
various array complements.
Electrical Connection of Speakers
Fig. 1.
Parallel- series test setup.
have been used, however, in the foZowing aspects of array design : number of
speakers employed; electrical connection
of speakers; enclosure or baffle design;
orientation of speakers; and, placement
and control of fundamental resommnce.
Number of Speakers Employed
Arrays to date have employed as few
as three and as many as 32 small speakers. The number chosen depends on de-
30
One factor in the choice of the number of speakers in an array is the electrical connection of the speakers. In an
array of N speakers, the nominal impedance could be as high as N times the
single speaker impedance, or as low as
1/N times single speaker impedance.
Practical values of array nominal impedance do not allow straight parallel
or series connection because most amplifiers are designed to operate best with 4,
3, or 16 -ohm nominal impedance loads.
Since most arrays use speakers with 3.2ohm voice coils, practical means of con-
AUDIO
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
DECEMBER, 1963
If
not for University's Classic Mark II...
this would be the finest speaker system of them
all-
the new Classic Dua
the three -way system with two 12" speakers -plus!
From the first moment of its appearance, the Classic Mark II
won instant and unanimous acclaim as the most exciting
new instrument in the world of music reproduction. Its
range, its presence, its spaciousness and dimension are
truly outstanding, even when compared with the so- called
"world's bests." Its reputation, however, posed this immediate challenge: Could University now create a speaker system with the essential qualities of the Mark II, but in a
more compact size... and at a more moderate price? Could
University now bring the pleasure of uncompromising big
system high fidelity to a broader range of music lovers?
The challenge has been answered with the new Classic
Dual -12, created by a totally new approach to the design
of speaker systems. Instead of the conventional 3- speaker
arrangement, University's Dual -12 incorporates two 12"
speakers...plus the Sphericon Super Tweeter! One 12"
speaker is a woofer specifically designed for optimum reproduction of the ultra -low frequencies (down to 25 cps);
the other, a woofer /mid- range, reinforces the woofer, removes the peaks and valleys that cause harsh, strident
sounds in ordinary systems and provides flawless mid -range
performance. The renowned Sphericon is included to assure silky, transparent highs soaring effortlessly up to
40,000 cps! Power Requirements: 10 watts. Size: 233/4 "x
311/4 "x 151/2 ". Oiled walnut finish. $229.95 Hear it at your
hi -fi dealer, or write Desk R -12.
/UNIVERSITY
,,-
LOUDSPEAKERS
OKLAHOMA CITY, OKLAHOMA
A Division of ling -Temco- Voughf, Inc.
Table
1
VARIOUS ARRAY COMPLEMENTS
No.
10 log N
4.8
6.0
7.0
7.8
9.0
10.0
3
4
ti
5
6
8
10
12
16
10.8db
12.0db
13.0db
20
24
32
GRILLE CLOTH
2
X4
FRAME
3/8" PLYWOOD PANEL
db
db
db
db
db
db
13.8 db
15.0 db
VN
2.0
2.2
2.4
2.8
3.2
:
:
9.6 (3.2:2x6)
3.2 (3.2: 4x4)
4.0 (3.2=4x5)
4.8 (3.2 _ 4 x 6)
6.4 (3.2 4 x 8)
3.4
4.0
4.5
4.9
5.6
:
rrays
ch is
maple
ss re-
3plest
most
enclosure design. It can be of
any proportions as long as its er losed
volume is such that the resonar f requency of the system remains relatively
unchanged. Too small an enclosure will
add stiffness to the mechanical system
of the loudspeakers and raise the resonant frequency. The "infinite baffle" has
three disadvantages : its relatively large
size, its waste of the backwave of the
speakers, and its lack of control over
the resonance of the speakers.
The bass reflex overcomes these disadvantages to an extent. The ideali proportions of a bass reflex enclosu4e are
around 3 2 :1.5, and its enclosed lume
is determined by the radiating area and
the resonant frequency of the speakers
enclosed. In general the bass reflex is a
large enclosure, but not as large as the
"infinite baffle." The bass reflex utilizes
speaker backwave at low frequencies,
and is designed to reduce and distribute
the system resonance. Using a ducted
port makes the bass reflex still smaller,
but requires better damped speakers
than the simple bass reflex. Both the bass
reflex and the "infinite baffle" are of
limited value for use with large arrays
because of their size, but with small arrays (of three to six speakers) thty are
quite practical.
For larger arrays a baffle is the only
answer. The true infinite baffle usually
consists of a wall of the listening room,
with the speakers' backwave radiating
into another room or large closet. Its
permanent nature makes it rather impractical for most audiofans, and it has
;
SPEAKERS
O
2"
BASE
:
GRILLE CLOTH
Fig. 2. Cutaway of "Sonic Screen."
nection are fairly limited. In addition,
it has been found desirable to connect
arrays in parallel- series rather than in
series -parallel, so that the parallel connection will smooth the impedance curve
of the array.
In the simple test setup shown in Fig.
1, consisting of four identical 3.2 -ohm
speakers wired in series -parallel, the array impedance is 3.2 ohms. Assuming
that the four speakers are truly identical,
there should be no current through the
wire which converts the array from series- parallel to parallel- series, because the
circuit is a balanced bridge. A sensitive
pair of earphones connected across the
bridge, however, indicate that there is a
considerable amount of current, and
that therefore parallel- series connection
is more desirable for the array. Table
1 gives preferred and alternate values
of array impedance.
Enclosure or Baffle Design
The terms "enclosure" and "baffle"
have been used interchangeably by many
writers on sound reproduction. Here a
distinction is made between the two
terms. Enclosures which are suitable
(3.2=2x2)
4.8 (3.2 2 x 3)
6.4 (3.2 2 x 4)
8.0 (3.2=2x5)
3.1
for use with multiple speaker
include the "infinite baffle" (w1
neither infinite nor a baffle), the
bass reflex, and the ducted port b
flex. The "infinite baffle" is the si
Alternate Z
Preferred Z tNom.i
1.7
9.6
12.8
16.0
19.2
(3.2 x
(3.2 x
(3.2 x
(3.2 x
12.8
16.0
19.2
(3.2:2x8)
3)
4)
5)
6)
(3.2=2x 10)
(3.2=2x12)
no control over speaker resonance. The
open baffle allows the backwave to radi-
ate into the listening area, essentially
doubling speaker efficiency, however it
too has no control over resonance. Considerable ingenuity is required to disguise the basically poor appearance of
the open baffle.
An open backed enclosure can be designed to at least partially overcome
the disadvantages of the open baffle.
Sides need only be extended back far
enough so that the speakers are hidden.
Also backwave radiation can be controlled to some extent. The open- backed
enclosure, then, is basically an improved
open baffle-suitable for home use. The
major disadvantage of this design is
that considerable care must be exercised
in placing the system in the listening
room because of the backwave radiation.
Orientation of Speakers
Speaker orientation in an array consists of center -to- center spacing and the
number of speakers placed in a line.
The center -to- center spacing determines
at what frequency maximum midrange
boost will occur, and at what frequency
destructive interference will begin. The
number of speakers in a line determines
how much of the theoretical maximum
boost will be encountered in practice,
and the polar response of the array.
Speaker orientation for small arrays
is not nearly as important as with large
arrays because the theoretical maximum
boost in the midrange is not as great,
and because destructive interference will
not be so severe.
Mutual coupling between speakers occurs at frequencies for which speaker
(Continued on page 53)
Table 2
CENTER-TO-CENTER SPACING
6.5"
7.0"
7.5"
Midrange boost frequencies
217.2
256.1
232.7
655.0
553.9
593.4
1086.0
1280.5
1163.3
High- frequency interference
1737.6
1861.7
2004.9
4009.8
8019.6
3723.4
7446.8
3475.2
6950.4
203.6
519.2
1018.0
191.5
488.3
957.5
171.3
436.7
856.4
1629.0
3258.0
6516.0
1532.0
3064.0
6128.0
1370.2
2740.4
5480.8
AUDIO
32
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
1/8th
max
5/8th
1
wave
2
4
DECEMBER, 1963
plays your precious records with
Whether you use your Miracord as a manual turntable, an automatic turntable or an automatic changer; whether you play
stereo or mono; you enjoy the same gentle quality, the sane
flawless performance that has made Miracord fist choice in the
finest consoles and component systems.
It is the only unit of its type obtainable with self -regulated,
constant-speed hysteresis motor, the only one with a one- piece,
12 -inch turntable and mass -balanced tone arm employing no
springs, and the only one with feather -touch pushbutton controls.
a
light, gentle touch
Incredibly quiet, smooth and gentle, the Miracord brings out the
best in your records with every play, and preserves that quality
for long -lasting enjoyment.
Before you choose a record player for your system, be sure
to see and hear the Miracord at your high fidelity dealer. Model
10H with hysteresis motor, $99.50; model 10 with 4 -pole induction motor, $89.50 (less r
cartridge and base). For
complete details, write to:
1
BEN)AIVIIN
L
M RACORCO
BENJAMIN ELECTRONIC SOUND CORP., 80 SWALM ST., WESTBURY. N.Y. SOLE U.5. DI'.TRIBJTOI' FOR MIPACORD TURNTABLES,
ELAC CARTRIDGES AND OTHER ELECTROACUSTIC®
RECORD PLAYING COMPONENTS.
J
dicates the extent to which flat response is
maintained, using 1000 cps as a reference
frequency. To illustrate, assume that the
manufacturer specifies record -playback response at 7.5 ips as ± 2 db between 40 and
14,000 cps. This means that if signals of
equal magnitude are fed into the tape
recorder at all audio frequencies, those
between 40 and 14,000 cps coming out of
the recorder are within 2 db (above or
below) of the magnitude of the 1000-eps
frequency reproduced by the machine. If
the 1000 -cps signal is amplified 10 times
by the machine, then all frequencies between 40 and 14,000 eps are also amplified
within 2 db of 10 times; that is, between
8 and 12 times.
HERMAN BURSTEIN*
(Note: To facilitate a prompt reply,
please enclose a stamped, self- addressed
envelope with your question.)
Changing to a VU Meter
I
am building a stereo recording
amplifier utilizing printed circuit boards
made available by Tandberg as replacement
parts for their Model 6 tape deck. Would
it be possible to substitute an inexpensive
1717 meter for the magic eye indicator? If
so, where should the meter connections be
made? Would additional circuitry be necessary to obtain reasonably accurate readings?
A. A VU meter has to be driven by a
low- impedente source, such as a cathode
follower. The signal to the magic eye tube
in the Tandberg is provided by a high impedance source, that is the plate of a
12AX7 amplifier. The signal is taken from
the arm of a 0.5- megohm pot connected via
a capacitor to the plate. This arm should
be connected to the input grid of a cathode
follower, and the output of the cathode
follower should be connected to the VU
meter via a series 3600 -ohm resistor.
You will of course have to calibrate the
meter, which means adjusting the arm of
the pot so that the meter reads 0 -VU when
a 400 cps tone is recorded at a level 6 -db
below that which produces 3 per cent harmonic distortion on the tape. Identify the
recording level, at 400 cps, which causes
the magic eye to barely close. At 6 -db
below this recording level, the VU meter
should read O.
Q.
Recording from One Tape Machine
to Another
Q. I recently purchased an EMI recorder, model L2B, and would like to build a
battery eliminator so that the machine may
also be used for playback taping with a
second recorder which I own. I would also
like to eliminate the playback electronics
when taping with the second machine.
Would it be all right to take the output
directly from the playback head of the
EMI, and if so what impedance should it
work into?
A. Your question concerning a battery
eliminator is outside my scope, but you
can try writing to the companies that make
silicon and germanium rectifiers; some of
them publish schematics for power supplies. Also write to the manufacturer of
your tape recorder.
As for your second question, the playback head in a typical home machine
should work into an impedance of about
500,000 ohms. You cannot feed the signal
from the playback head of one machine
*
280 Twin Lane E., Wantagh, N. Y.
directly into the input jack of a second
machine because the signal must i rat be
amplified and equalized; equalizat on involves a large amount of bass b ost in
order to provide flat response.
u
Hummy Tape Machine
Q. Recently I purchased a used *'* tape
recorder at a very reasonable prit . The
machine works superbly as a self -contained
unit but has defied all efforts to in grate
it into my audio system in a satis'ictory
way. The only external outputs are t rough
the audio output stage, and thes have
higher distortion and some hum.
tried
tapping off the plates of the drive stage
and again got too much hum. The ca hodes
are bypassed so that I cannot ob ain a
signal off them. As a last resort I to the
signal from the playback head and ed it
into the tape head input of my eternal
preamp. Even this results in hum. TI hum
ceases when the power switch of th tape
recorder is turned off. From all o this
it appears that the main cause of am is
the power transformed. Is there an way
to correct this?
A. The first models of your tape m chine
had considerably more hum than later
models. Quite possibly you are ri t in
stating that the power transformer n the
machine is responsible. Replacement with
An
a better shielded unit might hel
alternative is to remove the power ransformer completely from the machin and
reconnect it via long leads. If hum i your
principal objection to deriving the ignal
after the audio output transforme , try
loading this transformer with a -ohm
resistor; I have been informed b the
manufacturer's representative that there
is no load on the output transformer when
you switch off the internal speaker and
that the hum level may drop if you ut in
a load resistor.
Frequency Response Specifications
Q. In tape recorder specification
published by manufacturers, it occu
me that there are three possible mea
that may be attached to the figure
frequency response. 1. If a signal
corded and played back through the
contained preamps, the signal out
down from the original signal b
number of decibels specified by the
facturer. 2. With a recorded tape, th
put of the playback preamp is down
the signal originally impressed on the
2. The response of the heads only, wi
the preamps. Which of these systems
use; and is it governed by an tied
code of some sort?
A. The frequency response specific
of a tape recorder has nothing to do
the decrease or increase of over -all s
level as the signal passes through the
recorder or any part of it. It simpl
,
as
s to
ings
for
re-
self t is
the
anuoutrom
ape.
bout
s in
stry
tion
ith
nal
tape
in-
Varying Volume with Tape Grade
Q. For some time I have been transferring my record collection to tape. The other
day I read in a book on tape recording:
"The correct setting of the volume control varies according to the grade of
magnetic tape you are using, and the recorder may have been set for a different
grade." Is the quoted statement true, and
to what degree?
A. In the early days of tape recording
there were substantial differences among
the magnetic exides used for coating the
tape, especially between the black and red
oxides. Accordingly, the recording level
for a given amount of distortion on the
tape varied a good deal. Today, however,
if you use the conventional tape of virtually any reputable manufacturer, you
will find that the maximum recording level
-resulting in 3 per cent tape distortion
at 400 cps cycles -is about the same (that
is, within 1 or 2 db). The single exception
I know about concerns high output tape,
made by one or two companies, which permits a maximum recording level several
db higher than does conventional tape.
Unwanted Bass Boost
Q. I own a tape player which is fed into
a preamplifier. Unfortunately, this combination produces a noticeable but not
serious boost of the bass frequencies and
a lesser dip in the extreme highs. Recently,
however, when using this setup in conjunction with a friend's tape recorder for
copying tapes, I noticed that this effect
becomes worse when I play a copied tape
on my machine. Now the tapes are noticeably "bassy" and unnatural. Since I feel
that my tape player is one of the best, I
would rather try to modify its equalization
than buy a different player-unless absolutely necessary. Now, if at all possible,
would you recommend going about changing the equalization? My limited knowledge of this field requires a very specific
and scaled down explanation in great de-
tail.
A. What you describe as " bassy" reproduction may really be loss of highs rather
than emphasis of bass. Such loss could be
due to widening of the gap in the playback head or to azimuth misalignment.
When you play a tape on your machine,
copy it on your friend's tape recorder, and
play it back on your machine, you are repeating the original frequency imbalance,
so that the effect is worse than before.
Hence the first step is to have a competent technician check for head misalignment and head wear. However, if equalization is indeed at fault, which may well
be, this must be remedied by a technician
and not by you. Changing equalization is a
technical business requiring an accurate
audio oscillator, a good VTVM, and an
understanding of tape machines and their
equalization circuits.
AUDIO
34
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
DECEMBER, 1963
The commanding presence of Sony sound
Now enter the world of the professional. With the Sony Sterecorder 600,
superbly engineered instrument with 3 -head design, you are master of the
a
most exacting stereophonic tape recording techniques.
Professional in every detail, from its modular circuitry to its 3 -head design,
this superb 4 -track stereophonic and monophonic recording and playback unit
provides such versatile features as
vertical and horizontal operating positions
sound on sound
tape and source monitor switch
full 7" reel capacity
microphone and line mixing magnetic phono and FM stereo inputs 2 V.U.
meters hysteresis- synchronous drive motors dynamically balanced
capstan flywheel automatic shut off pause control and digital tape counter
all indispensable to the discriminating recording enthusiast. Less than $450,
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-
SONY
SUPERSCOPE
no
Topewq to Stereo
Yes, less
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Sony tape recorders, the most complete line of quality recording
equipment in the world, start at less than $79.50.
For literature or name of nearest dealer, write Superscope, Inc., Dept. 7
Sun Valley, Calif. In New York, visit the Sony Salon, 585 Fifth Avenue.
AUDIO
DECEMBER, 1963
35
ployaient as musical director of New York's
Playboy Club Playboy's Theme and I'm
Your Bunny. Always an expressive musician,
he makes full use of the opportunity this
album provides for extended expression. Some
of his former impetuosity is missing, replaced
by a more relaxed, free swinging manner and
an uncomplicated directness that makes this
set an appealing portrait of this modern
master.
:
JAZZ AND ALL THAT
BERT STANLEIGH
each of these men as pianist, a rar ty and
pleasant surprise. Both musicians acqu
selves well on their new instrumen
Mint Mulligan
terry Mulligan, one of the most popular and widely recorded of modern jazzmen, is well known for his approach to
small hand writing and arranging. Unquestionably he has greatly influenced all
modern groups since the late forties.
Equally, his mastery of the baritone sax
rank hint at the very top of his profes-
sion.
Recently we had the rare pleasure of
attending the final recording session for
his latest LP, a sextet featuring Mulligan
on baritone and piano, Bob Brookmeyer,
valve trombone, Art Farmer, flugelhorn,
Jim Hall, electric guitar, Bill Crow, bass,
and Dave Bailey, drums. The session was
at the Nola Penthouse Studio in New
York ; Hal Mooney was recording director, and Tom Nola was the engineer.
The stereo master tapes were recorded
in a conventional manner conforming to
current studio technique ; the musicians
were deployed in a circular arrangement
with the guitar in the center and the
other instruments placed about a circle
with a 6 -foot radius. A U47 microphone
was placed about a foot from each of the
three wind instruments, and a fourth was
suspended just above the drummer's head,
over the cymbals and snare drum BK448 were used for the bass and the output of the guitar's sound system ; one 666
picked up the bass drum, and a second
in the center of the circle at a height of
about nine feet, was used to catch overall sound, fed through an EMT reverberation unit, and then split equally between
the two channels of the master tape.
Trombone, flugelhorn, and drums were
fed from the mixing console into the left
channel of the two Ampex 300s, while
the right channel received the baritone,
bass, and guitar. The resulting sound was
close up with a solid center. Once levels
had been set, Tom Nola made no attempt
to keep his V1 meters at the zero mark.
He did ride the gain a bit on solos, but
.lust to make sure they didn't run into
the red. As a result, these recordings have
a broader soft to loud dynamic range
than is generally encountered on jazz
discs, and this wide range is of particular
benefit because of the exceptionally sensitive performances achieved on this release.
None of the tension, so often present
at record sessions, was evident. A happy,
easy going atmosphere prevailed in both
(1,.. control room and the studio, and the
musicians were clearly so pleased with
the results they were getting that the
session ran an extra two hours, continually- building with no letdown at the
end. The resulting recording is not only
one of the best of Mulligan's many, but
one of the best examples of modern jazz
on discs. Rarely has a studio recording
conveyed so much excitement and successful collaboration.
The recording has just been released
I,A Philips and is entitled "Night Lights"
;
ell.
600 -1OS.
Gerry Mulligan Quartet: Spring Is Sprung
Philips Mono PHM 200 -077
.Mulligan's first contribution to the Philips
label is a quartet waxing that pairs Mulligan
and Bob Brookmeyer in highly polished baritone, valve trombone duets and also features
Gerry winning top honors for a fine,
chorus in Spring is Sprung.
them-
,
su
with
utting
Paul Desmond: Take Ten
RCA Victor Stereo LSP -2569
Full programs of jazz solos by leadi.g sidemen are an innovation recently pop ar on
discs hut rarely encountered in live p rformances. Such recordings have a great 'eal to
recommend them, particularly if the tunes
selected offer sufficient contrast to pr: sent a
cross section of the soloists' ideas, an most
importantly, if the soloists have the ne essary
inventiveness to sustain an entire p ogram
without resorting to repetition of the same
devices.
Paul Desmond makes it abundant] clear
on his new Dynagroove release that e has
more than enough thoughts to fill
LP.
With the assistance of Jim Hall, guita Gene
Cherico. bass, and Connie Kay, drum Desmond plies his tenor sax in eloquent, d licate,
and soul searching variations on such heroes
as Black Orpheus, Samba de Orfeu, Alo e Together, and his own Take Ten. Throughout the
record he maintains a simple, straightforward
manner of speaking from the heart tha helps
to build the selections into a unified suite
that demands full listening attention from
beginning to end. The end, incidentall_, provides this set's sole disappointment. T e One
I Love, which closes side B, is faded out instead of ending as a complete stat ment.
Surely this was unnecessary on a 20- inute
side. Sound on this splendid record is uperbly matched to the performance. The f. it instruments are well spread out, solos a e not
too far forward, and the wide dynamic range
is particularly appealing in its soft pa ages.
One more feature. too pleasant to orni mentioning. is the witty set of liner note that
Desmond contributes to this project. c rticulate writing is a rarity among jazzmen.
,
Martial Solal: at Newport '63
RCA Victor Stereo LSP
777
A pleasant solo recital by a French p nist,
this album is the first American record tg of
a musician whose work has received high
acclaim from Duke Ellington and Dizz, Gil lespie. Like a number of his compa riots,
Solai favors his right hand over his lef and
his playing is rich in decorative emb llishment but somewhat lacking in strong rhy hm is
bass. His inventions are misty and i u pre sionistic, and the rather distant sound i ckup
helps to make this an enjoyable dis for
background listening. The only hitch is that
since it was recorded at the 1963 Ne port
Festival, applause follows each nu u ben
Monsieur Solal's voice is heard annou oing
each selection. and an MC chimes in w th a
closing announcement at the end of si e B.
Since Solal's appearance at the Festiva was
not long enough for a full LP, addi onal
numbers were recorded at reherasal, and
audience cheers were dubbed in after ea h of
the added selections.
,
Kai Winding: Solo Kai Winding
Verve V -8525
Another set of solos is offered by Kai
Winding. One of the most frequently rece rded
of modern jazz trombonists, Winding has
previously been waxed playing with ther
horns. Now he can be heard with just a r fano
and rhythm background as he impro ises
freely on familiar tunes like Hey The , I
Believe in You, How are Things in GI cca
:l/orra, and a couple of unfamiliar nun ers
whose titles give a clue to Kai's present emc
Cal Tjader: Several Shades of Jade
Verve Stereo V -8507
This album is a distinct departure from
jazz vibraphonist Cal Tinder's other representations on discs, and on first hearing I was
keenly disappointed by arrangements whose
Orientalisms are reminiscent of Ketelby's In
a Chinese Temple Garden-only at first, however. We had been playing the disc in mono,
since there was no stereo marking on either
the jacket or label ; happily, it was given a
second try in stereo. What a difference The
tight, constricted quality disappeared and
was replaced by a delicate, spread -out pattern
of shimmering sound. And the music itself
sounded quite different with the voices emerging from individual locations instead of overlapping each other. In addition to Tjader,
personnel includes Lalo Schifrin, conductor
and piano, Phil Kraus, reeds and woodwinds,
George Berg, bassoon and bass clarinet, Don
Butterfield, tuba, Jack Del Rio, tamborine
and conga, George Duvivier, bass, Urbie Green,
trombone, Irving Horowitz and Leon Cohen,
oboe, \\'alter Levinsky, flute, Robert Northern,
French horn, Johnny Rae, timbales and percussion, Jimmy Raney, guitar, Ernie Royal
and Clark Terry, trumpet, Stan Webb, woodwind, Arnold Eidus, Leo Kruczek and Emanuel
Verdi, violin, Charles McCraken, cello, and
Robert Maxwell, harp. Not all of these men
appear on each selection, but the wide variety
of instrumental timbre is an important contribution to this collection of Asiatic- sounding jazz whose varying moods and rhythms
are linked together by the deft and sensitive
playing of Tjader.
!
Kimio Eto: Koto Master
World Pacific 1428
From oriental- flavored jazz to Japanese koto
music is less of a leap than you might suspect.
particularly if you start with Kensetsu No
lübiki (The Sound of Construction and Progress), a composition by Mr. Eto, on this fascinating new record. Although the piece is
essentially Eastern in color, Mr. Eto has
clearly been influenced by European musicians,
and the result is a work that blends Oriental
and Occidental so successfully that it provides
and excellent bridge to the somewhat more
obscure compositions that follow. While their
style may be unfamiliar to most listeners, it
is by no means forbidding, and the rich,
plucked sound of the koto is fascinating in
Kimio Eto's virtuoso performances. Of the
five pieces represented on this release, four
are duets. Presumably they are sound -onsound recordings by Eto, since no mention is
made on either the label or liner of another
musician. Recording is excellent with lots of
presence but none of those irksome. rasping
sounds that usually occur when plucked
strings are too closely ntiked.
Eric Weissberg, Marshall Brickman:
Banjo & Bluegrass
Elektra EKL -238
The plucked strings of the native American
banjo offer a fascinating contrast to those of
the koto. These two quite different recordings
have much more in common than plucked
notes, however. Each is a remarkable virtuoso
experience, and the wise selection on this
record of banjo solos, duets, and numbers
with fiddle, guitar, or mandolin accompaniment, makes its program a bright. merry listening delight. Unabashedly country music,
these performances are so direct and appealing that they manage to avoid all of the arch,
cornball mannerisms that make so much music
of this variety insufferable. Weissberg and
Brickman have turned out a disc that serves
both as a practical demonstration of traditional Scruggs style banjo playing and as
an example of how pleasing and genuine
Bluegrass music can sound.
AUDIO
36
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
DECEMBER, 1963
welcomes highest compliance cartridges for
flawless tracking even at 1/2 gram or under
precise tonearm balance with rubber cushioned
fine -thread rotating counterweight
stylus force applied directly at pivot preserves
perfect mass balance of tonearm
perfect pitch for the most critical ears with
6% variable range for all four speeds
superb over-all engineering permits tilt to
almost 90 without spilling a note
"warped.' and eccentric tracking dramatizes
frictionless bearings, low tonearm mass
No wonder the new Dual 1009 Auto /Professional obsoletes
every turntable and changer ever made...at any price!
Standards of performance once associated with professional turntables and separate tonearms have now been
matched or surpassed by a remarkable new record playing instrument ... the Dual 1009 Auto /Professional by
United Audio. Consider this achievement: A dynamically
balanced automatic tonearm that tracks and trips below
1/2 gram ... resonance below 8 cps, tracking error below
.5° /inch. A solid non -ferrous platter machined to electronically controlled tolerances, then dynamically bal-
...
anced
final weight 71/2 lbs. A powerful high -torque
motor that maintains speed accuracy with one record or
ten
and acts like a hysteresis in resisting voltage
variations (even beyond ± 10%.) For a convincing
demonstration of flawless automatic tonearm tracking
with the finest high compliance cartridges, visit your
United Audio dealer today. At $94.75, you'll find the
strikingly handsome Auto /Professional a value thât
welcomes comparison with equipment at $100 more!
...
f
famous
UNITED AUDIO
DUAL
12 West 18th St.
N.Y.11
'
elevator- action
changer spindle
15
QUI PM
µa to 1.5 amps in decade steps for leak
15 amps for
current, and from 150 tia to
collector current.
Along the lower left of the panel are
four spring- return lever switches which set
up the measuring circuits for the various
tests and apply the element voltages -in no
case are any voltages applied to the transistor or diode unless one of these four
switches is operated. The first switch on the
left is pushed upward to measure base
current and pulled downward to measure
gain -about which more will be said. The
second switch measures collector voltage or
collector current; the third measures leak
voltage and short -test current
precaution taken before making any other measurements. The fourth switch is used for
diode testing or for measurement of collector to emitter leakage (Ices) and for collector to base leakage (Iebo) Just above the
lever switches is a socket for small transistors.
The large knob at the lower right is the
gain indicator, calibrated in two ranges() to 150, and 150 to 300, the desired range
being selected by a slide switch at the right.
To make a gain measurement, the element
voltages are set up and the GAIN lever
pulled; the gain knob is then adjusted to
obtain a null indication on the meter, and
the Beta (or Alpha) read directly off the
scale. The alpha ranges are from 0 to 0.993,
and from 0.993 to 0.9966, thus covering
practically any possible condition.
For ease in connecting transistors to the
binding posts along the top, two alligator
clips with banana plug ends are provided
for the collector and emitter posts, and a
third clip is provided on a short connecting
wire for the base.
The batteries used to power the instrument are carried in a compartment at the
rear and accessible by simply removing a
cover plate.
-a
PROFI
HEATHKIT MODEL IM -30
TRANSISTOR TESTER
While the use of tube testers has been
commonplace for many years, there has
been so far a dearth of transistor test instruments that were capable of providing
the same sort of information that a comprehensive tube analyzer does. True, there
have been simple units which gave the most
elementary information, and even many
tube testers are equipped with transistor
sockets and terminals so that it is possible
to make some sort of comparative test on
the solid -state devices.
The Heathkit IM -30 transistor tester actually gives much more information than a
quality check on transistor gain and a
means of measuring element currents, and
should probably have been called an analyzer. Actually it does nothing that an experimenter cannot set up using a few connecting wires, batteries, and a meter, but
it does simplify the measurement of transistor characteristics so that it is only necessary to operate a few switches to set up
practically any d.c. measurement desired.
And while the measurements are all in
terms of d.c. values, the a.c. characteristics
can be determined quite readily by making
a few measurements and putting the values
into simple equations.
In the words of the manual accompanying the unit, the instrument "tests transistors and diodes under conditions that correspond to actual d.c. operating conditions,"
and "a.c. operating conditions can be read-
ily found by testing the transistor
t two
different bias points and calculati g the
desired a.c. operating condition."
Description
The IM-30 tester is a neat and attractive
unit measuring 10% in. wide, 10% in deep,
and 51/2 in. high, and weighing 8 lbs complete with its seven "D" cells which power
all of the measurements. Along the tep are
nine binding posts-three for connections to
the transistor or diode under test, a d two
coleach for external bias supply, extern
lector- voltage supply, and external le 'kagevoltage supply, with maximum value of 5,
50, and 150 volts respectively. A 115 -sa
zero -center meter indicates all of the measured currents and voltages, as well as the
null point for gain measurements. The top
three knobs, from left to right, control polarity, collector voltage, and leak voltage.
The polarity switch has three positions
NPN Or DIODE FWD, OFF, and PNP or DIODE
REV. The collector -voltage switch selects internal batteries in 1.5 -volt increments up to
9 volts or switches in the externally supplied voltage up to 50 volts, and at the same
time selects the proper meter multiplier for
measuring the actual voltage. The leak voltage switch performs the same function
for leak voltage. The second row of knobs
are the bias control, collector -current
ias
switch, and leak- current switch.
control adjusts collector current td any
desired value from 0 to 15 amps. ThIe two
current switches select meter ranges from
1
-
Fig. 5.
Heathkit
Model IM -30 Transistor Tester.
Construction
Those who enjoy building kits
we do
-will find this one simple, and not even
much of a challenge. It builds quite easily,
and aside from the final connections to the
battery -case section is neat and businesslike in appearance. In view of the heavy
currents which must be accommodated for
power transistor tests, the major part of
the wiring is with fairly heavy wire, which
naturally stays in place well. We added
some lacing to the panel wiring just because we enjoy making a "profesisonal"
appearing unit, but it is not at all necessary. The over -all time required should be
less than six hours, and both construction
and checkout instructions are exceptionally
clear and accurate throughout. The information on the use of the instrument is
equally clear and concise, and amounts to a
treatise on transistor testing. The IM -30
transistor tester is an instrument which
should be in the test equipment array of
every serious experimenter- particularly
since the list of transistors is growing so
rapidly that it is difficult to keep an up -todate file of transistor characteristics. With
this unit it is possible to obtain the characteristics of any transistor in just a few
minutes, without the need for knowing any-
-as
thing further than the maximum collector
voltage and current which should be applied, and these parameters usually appear
in any catalog listing, even though the
others do not. For diode testing alone it is
well worth its cost.
M-1
KORTING "MOZART"
MODEL 3000
The Korting "Mozart" 3000 is a 2-speed,
quarter -track stereo tape recorder that is
neat in appearance, gives the impression
AUDIO
38
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
DECEMBER, 1963
ROM
BOZAK
...
FOR THE DISCRIMINATING
superior cabinetwork /sound beyond words
Supplementing the estaolished French Proviicials and Urbans, here are Bozak's new Italian Provincial and Early American Ensembles
of Equipment and Speaker Cabinets. For details, write for catalog or see and hear them at your Franchised Bozak Dealer.
DARIEN
AUDIO
DECEMBER, 1963
/ CONNECTICUT
39
of a sturdily -built, serviceable machine,
and performs well on the whole. It is fully
self-contained, having two single -ended
power amplifiers, built -in speakers facing
left and right, and two dynamic microphones. A readily accessible compartment
provides roomy space for microphones,
power cord, cables, and so on. It has the
most easily removable yet secure lid the
reviewer has seen, and though the machine
is somewhat on the bulky side because of
all it contains, nevertheless it still weighs
in at less than 30 pounds and therefore is
readily portable. Priced at approximately
$300, it offers commensurate value to the
person who is interested in good quality.
Functions and Features
Operating speeds are 7.5 and 3.75 ips.
The speed selector is coupled with the
power switch so that speed can be changed
only when power is off, thereby protecting
the mechanism. A single record -playback
head is used, which is still the rule for
machines in this price category. A threedigit counter is provided. The record -level
indicator is a single magic -eye tube connected to both channels. The eye is
strongly damped in order to maintain the
reading at signal peaks and facilitate
proper setting of record level. Use of one
rather than two record -level indicators in
a stereo machine is something one might
quarrel with.
Although the 3000 is self- contained,
abundant provision exists for connecting
its output to external playback equipment.
Through jacks located on the top or rear
panel one can derive the output signal at
the tape head, after voltage amplifier, or
at the output transformer of the power
amplifier. Output after the voltage amplifier is across 33k impedance, so that a
cable of about 5 to 6 -feet long can be used
between the 3000 and an external amplifier.
An input jack marked Tuner -Phono accommodates high -level signal sources. An
input jack marked Radio has extremely
high sensitivity and apparently is designed
to accommodate European tuners that have
very low signal output. The input impedance of the jack is rather low, but apparently could work satisfactorily with a
high -impedance dynamic microphone. The
microphone jacks are intended for low impedance mikes and feed into 200 -ohm
step -up transformers, which is a very unusual arrangement for non -professional
tape recorders.
All the input and output jacks are of the
European (Hirschmann) type, which presents something of a problem in making
connections to American home equipment
that ordinarily uses phone and phone jacks
and plugs. The European jacks, however,
are of rugged construction and have the
advantage that one jack can accommodate
two (stereo) channels. The 3000 comes
with one double cable having a European
plug at one end and two phono plugs at
the other. To permit simultaneous input
and output connections to external equipment, the manufacturer should have provided two double cables.
The mechanical and electrical functions
are principally and intelligently controlled
by nine pushbuttons neatly arranged in
horizontal rows of three or two. Tape motion is controlled by a group of three
marked Rewind, Start, and Forward, which
should he self -explanatory. Underneath is
a Stop button, and alongside the latter
a Record button. When the tape is moving
at operating speed (Start button down) it
can he stopped either by the Stop button
or by slightly depressing either the Rewind
or Forward button. When the tape is
moving at high speed (Rewind or Forward button down) it can be stopped
either by the Stop button or by slightly
depressing the Start button. Hence the
Stop button seems almost superfluous.
However, it has a second and vital function: It must be held down in order to
depress the Record button and thereby put
the machine into the record mode. When
the Record button is up, the machine returns to the playback mode. As an extra
safeguard against accidentally going into
the record mode and thereby erasing a
tape, substantially more pressure is needed
on the Record button than on any of the
others. Furthermore, if the machine is
stopped by the Stop, Rewind, or Forward
button, it is automatically disengaged
from the record mode. However, if the
operator wants to halt the tape but remain
in the record mode, he can push a Pause
lever.
When recording, two track selector pushbuttons, marked L and R, determine which
incoming signal goes on which tape track.
If only button L is depressed (for mono
recording), both the left and right inputs
are fed to the upper section of the tape
head (which records track 1 or 4). If only
button R is depressed, inputs L and R
both go to the lower section of the head
(track 3 or 2). If both buttons are depressed (for stereo recording), input L
goes to the upper section of the head, and
input R to the lower section.
The converse takes place in playback.
If only button L or only button II is depressed, the signal from either the upper
section of the tape head or from the lower
section goes to both the L and R outputs.
If both track selector buttons are down,
the signals of the upper and lower sections respectively go to the L and R outputs.
A single gain control governs all inputs
and outputs and both channels in the record and playback modes. Concentrically
mounted is a balance control for varying
the relative levels of the left and right ininternal speakers in playback. The balance
control affects the signal only at the power
amplifier stage.
To monitor the incoming signal when recording or to permit the machine to be
Fig. 2. Korting
as a public address system, incoming
L and R signals are both fed into the right
speaker. The balance control can be used
to vary the level of the right speaker without affecting recording level.
The 3000 does not permit recording on
one channel while playing the other, so
that true sound -on -sound recording, which
involves exact synchronization between
successive signals, is not feasible. However, it is possible to superimpose any number of recordings on one track, albeit withused
out synchronization, by means of a Trick
lever, which simply pushes the erase head
away from the tape.
A substantial amount of treble cut can
be introduced at the power amplifier stage
by means of a two-position switch.
Electrical Performance
Frequency response is rated at "30 to
18,000 cycles at 7.5 ips" and "40 to 14,000
cycles at 3.75 ips," but nothing is said in
the specifications about flatness of response. The reviewer's measurements, although confined to the range of 50 to
15,000 cps, leave no doubt of substantially
extended response at both speeds; they
also show more than the ± 3 -db deviation
from flat response which is usually considered the maximum consistent with quality reproduction.
Following are the measurements of playback response at 7.5 ips, using Ampex test
tape 31321 -01 and based on response at
1000 cps as 0 db:
Frequency
(cps)
50
100
250
500
700
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
Right
Channel
-2.5db
-0.5db
- 0.5
- 1.0
2.0
0
- 0.5
- 0.5
- 0.5
- 0,5
0
0
1.5
2.5
3.0
1.5
3.5
3.5
3.0
4.0
6.5
4.0
5.0
8.0
1000
2500
5000
7500
10,000
12,000
15,000
"Mozart," Model 3000.
AUDIO
40
Left
Channel
DECEMBER, 1963
The AR
turntable
g>Gtiact.
SPEED ACCURACY
high fidelity
... showed
WOW AND
the lowest speed error that has been encountered in {fixed speed) turntables"
FLUTTER
/Stereo
review
1111'1
The wow and
(Julian D. Hirsch)
flutter were the lowest
I
have ever measured on
a
turntable."
RUMBLE
AUDIO
The AR turntable introduces as
little 'signal' of its own
as any
turntable we have had
occasion to test."
ACOUSTIC FEEDBACK
HI-FI
(John Milder)
.. the best answer so far to the interrelated problems of rumble and acoustic feedback in
stereo -record playing"
SAFETY
Ü:
turntable is listed under Reexamination Service of Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc.
of any other current non -automatic separate turntable or record player
listed.
The AR
We do not know
so
The AR turntable is guaranteed for one year; the guarantee covers both repairs and reimbursement of any
freight costs.
Literature, including a list of dealers in your area, is available on request. The AR turntable and AR speakers are on
continuous demonstration at AR Music Rooms, on the west balcony of Grand Central Terminal, N.Y.C., and at
52 Brattle Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts. No sales are made or initiated at these showrooms.
$6800
complete with arm, oiled walnut base, and dust
cover, but less cartridge, 331/3 and 45 rpm
(331/3 only, $66)
turntable has been increased from the original $58. This price
increase, made necessary by manufacturing costs, is the first in AR's nine -year history.
The price of the one -speed
5% higher in the West and Deep South
ACOUSTIC RESEARCH, INC., 24 Thorndike Street, Cambridge 41, Massachusetts
AUDIO
DECEMBER, 1963
41
Ou a record playback basis, substantially less high frequency peaking was measured at 7.5 ips. In fact, the 50- 15,000
cycle record -playback response at 7.5 ips
may be described as close to excellent. Following are the measurements, made 20 -db
below peak recording level (corresponding
to magic -eye closure at 400 cps) and using
Audio 1861 tape (1 -mil Mylar)
-
2.0
0.5
Mechanical Performance
The Korting 3000 handles tape a nicely
as any home machine this reviewer as yet
seen. It starts without appreciable - urring
or bounce, and it stops promptly ithout
spilling or jerking tape. One can a ernate
immediately among the three transport
modes- rewind, forward, and n.rmalwithout spilling or jerking tape. he reviewer couldn't spill or break t pe no
matter what he tried. The machi e even
withstood the most difficult test rf all:
yanking the power cord with the ape in
motion; whether in the rewind, f rward,
or normal mode, the reels smoothly oasted
to a stop with the tape intact. Th main
thing one might wish for with resrect to
tape handling would be the inclu-ion of
an automatic stop in case the tape breaks
or runs out.
When the tape is in the rewind rr forward mode it is spaced slightly awa, from
the record -playback head, thereb minimizing head wear. However, it does emain
in contact with the erase head, wh re the
consequences of head wear are
important. If desired, one can space t tape
away from the tape during rew nd or
forward wind by pushing the Trie lever,
but then he must remember to rest re the
erase head to operating position before
recording again.
Wow and flutter were judged by listening to a 3000 -eps tone recorded and played
0
hack
:
Frequency
(eps)
50
100
250
500
700
1000
2500
5000
7500
10,000
12,000
15,000
Left
Right
Channel
- 0.5 db
Channel
0 db
2.5
- 0.5
0
0
0
0.5
1.0
1.0
2.0
2.5
4.0
-
1.5
0.5
0.5
0
0
0
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.5
4.0
At 3.75 ips, record -playback response
extended substantially to 15,000 cps, but
at the cost of appreciable peaking in the
range of about 8,000 to 12,000 cps, where
it is quite noticeable. Following are the
measurements of record -playback response
at 3.75 ips using Audio 1861 tape:
Frequency
(cps)
50
100
250
500
700
1000
2500
5000
7500
10,000
12,000
15,000
Left
Right
Channel
Channel
3.5 db
3.0 db
1.5
0.5
0
0
0
0.5
'2.5
4.5
Ii.S
7.0
- 2.0
channel. The machine's balance control
does not correct this unless the o tput is
taken after the power amplifier st ge.
0
0
0
1.5
2.5
4.0
4.0
- 4.0
Signal-to -noise ratio in home tape recorders is customarily measured (by such
as Ampex, Tandberg, and others) on the
basis of a 400 -cps tone recorded at a level
that produces 3 per cent harmonic distortion on the tape. When a magic -eye is the
record -level indicator, the eye should close
at the 3 per cent harmonic distortion point
for a 400 -cps signal. In the case of the
Korting 3000, eye closure corresponded to
distortion between 3.2 and 3.4 per cent, depending upon which speed and which recording channel was used. The deviation
from 3 per cent distortion is probably
negligible. Signal -to -noise ratio, measured
at 400 cps on the basis of eye closure, varied from 46 to 48 db, depending on tape
speed and channel. This checks well with
the manufacturer's specification of 40 db
based upon 1 per cent harmonic distortion, which represents a recording level
about 6 to 8 -db below that which produces
3 per cent distortion. A signal -to -noise
ratio of 46 -48 db is between fair and good.
Crosstalk, evaluated by recording a 400 cps signal at peak level (eye closure) on
one channel and listening for it in playback on the other channel, was virtually
inaudible. Crosstalk couldn't be measured
because it was well below the noise level.
Input sensitivity measured about 65 my
on the Tuner -Phono input. It is slightly
over 1 my on the Radio input. Microphone
input sensitivity (for a low- impedance
dynamic mike) is rated at 0.1 mv. Peak
output is roughly 1 volt. Using a full-track
test tape, output on the left channel measured about 1.5 db more than on the right
What's new
from Ampex?
r
i
I
on
the
3000.
It sounded
Collector's
Library
good.
Strangely, it sounded slightly better .n 3.75
ips than at 7.5 ips, although the re rse is
ordinarily true.
The principal mechanical fault o e can
find concerns speed accuracy. At .5 ips
the 3000 measured 3 per cent fast. While
this is of no consequence when recording
and playing on the same machine, a speed
error of this magnitude will probabl jar a
musical ear when playing recorded ape.
Circuitry
The chief item of interest here i. that
the Korting 3000 is a hybrid, usin both
transistors and tubes. In each chan r el one
set of electronics is used for both cording and playback, with switching tr meet
the different equalization requireme is of
the two modes. When speed is ch nged,
equalization is automatically Chang d.
In each channel the first four am lification stages are transistorized, with feedback equalization between stages 4 nd 1.
The fifth stage is a tube that drivs the
tape head when recording and is a :ingleended power output tube when p aying
back. When recording, the left eh nnel's
power output tube is converted into hghfrequency oscillator that supplies bi, a current to the record head and erase errrent
to the erase head. The right ch nnel's
power output tube continues to dri e the
right speaker in the record mode for monitoring of P.A. purposes.
Filament current for the tubes i; a.c.,
with each side of the power transfo mer's
filament winding grounded through a 47ohm resistor to reduce hum. A sing d.c.
power supply employing four diodes it eets
the varying d.c. requirements of bo III the
transistors and tubes.
Internal adjustments are provide; for
equalization and bias current. To p otect
the output transformers, load resisto s are
switched in when the internal speake s are
switched out.
M -2
;
Here's good news for people who care how
their sounds sound -and how their tape collection looks. It's Collector's Library-a new
tape from Ampex. It's ideal for all general
recording needs and for building an attractive tape library. Here's why: 1) An exclusive
Ferro -Sheen* oxide surface gives maximum
frequency response, clean operation and low
head wear. 2) The new book -like design on
the box gives your tapes a matched set appearance. Just five or six boxes look like a
collector's library. In addition to this each
box comes with famous "Signature Binding"
-the simulated leather binding and gold foil
strip for custom labeling of your tapes. 3) Collector's Library is economically priced. You'll
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Available on Mylar ** and acetate bases in all
popular sizes. Collector's Library is the latest
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tape. Ampex Corp., Redwood City, California.
*TM Ampex Corp.
AMPEX
AUDIO
42
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
* *TM for Dupont Polyester Film
DECEMBER, 1963
®AM
What new recorder is virtually custom- built?
The F -44 is
a brand new 4 -track stereo recorder from
Ampex. It's Ampex through and through. And there's this,
too: at every stage of marufacture Ampex tunes, adjusts
and aligns each F -44 to obtain its maximum performance
far beyond minimum specifications. Thus, no two F -44s
are quite alike. Each is virtually a custom -built recorder.
Each performs to the utmost of its capabilities. And each
gives you the best possible sounds today -and for many
years to come. As an F -44 owner, you'll receive from
Ampex a record of the individual performance specifications of your own F -44. This record shows the frequency
DECEMBER, 1963
AMPEX
CORP. 1963
F -44
response curve, the signal -to -noise ratio, the flutter and
wow, and the crosstalk rejection measurement. And it is
-
AUDIO
PE%
AMPEX
signed by the Ampex engineers who tuned and adjusted
your recorder. The new Ampex Fine Line F -44 also features
a new special design hysteresis motor for smooth, quiet,
accurate operation; an easy -to -read point -to -point record
level meter for each channel; multiple sound -on -sound
capability; new simplified controls; and the Ampex one year
warranty. See and hear the new F -44 at your local Ampex
dealer. Brochure? Write: Ampex Corporation, Redwood
City, California. Sales and service throughout the world.
43
For example consider the performance
of the amplifier section : Power output, 75
watts (IHF) or 60 watts nus (0.6 per cent
harmonic distortion, both channels driven) ;
harmonic distortion, 0.6 per cent (1000
cps, rated output) ; IM distortion, 0.7 per
cent; phono sensitivity, 3.5 mv; tape head
sensitivity, 2.3 mv; aux sensitivity, 210
mv; response 20- 20,000 cps ± 1 db; channel
separation 55 db at 1000 cps; hum and
noise (high level input) 82 -db below rated
output.
Or consider the FM section: FM harmonic distortion, (400 cps), 0.5 per cent;
signal -to -noise ratio, 70 db; capture ratio,
2.3 db; separation, 33 db at 1000 cps; sensitivity, 1.8 µv (IHF). In addition it pulled
in 36 stations, loud and clear, using our
standard antenna.
Fig. 3. Fisher 500 -C FM- Stereo Receiver.
FISHER 75 -WATT FM- STEREO
RECEIVER, MODEL 500 -C
The Fisher 500 -C is the latest in a series
-
of receivers that goes back many years
the first 500 was introduced in 1957 if our
memory serves us correctly. Then the 500
included an AM tuner (in effect the current model 800) and was mono.
The current 500 (-C) incorporates a 75watt (IHF) stereo amplifier, and FMstereo tuner, and an audio control center
all on one 36.5 -1b. chassis. The features offered by the 500 -C are rather interesting
since they are the measure of the 1963 -4
audiofan; a surprisingly far cry from his
1957 predecessor. In a way, the 500 -C is a
catalog of conveniences since most of the
"features" are in that category
The most convenient feature is automatic
switching between stereo and mono FM
reception; all one does is tune in an FM
station and the 500 -C does the rest: If the
broadcast is monophonic, the receiver sets
itself for monophonic playback; if the
broadcast is stereo, the receiver automatically switches to stereo playback, and turns
on a light to tell you about it. No, the 500 -C
doesn't turn itself on and off, but once it's
on....
In addition to the usual complement of
audio controls the 500 -C provides a method
of prime and auxiliary speaker control
which permits two pairs of speakers to be
operated simultaneously, or either pair separately. (We found this arrangement ideal
for AB'ing speaker systems.) Combining
this ability to operate four individual
speaker systems with the center -channel
output of the 500 -C enables the user to
operate, and control, five speaker systems
at the same time; truly an exciting prospect
for audiofans who like to surround themselves with sound. (And don't forget the
reverberation facilities.) For those who
prefer headphone listening, the jack is conveniently located on the front panel. The
headphone circuitry is arranged so that it
can be used for direct monitoring during
tape recording.
Circuit Description
FM: The antenna input connections provide two options: local or normal. The local
connection reduces signal level by means of
a 270 -ohm series resistor, the normal connection feeds directly to the tuned antenna
coil. The signal then goes to an r.f. circuit
Fisher calls "Golden Synehrode" (neutrode
in engineerese). This circuit is unusual in
the sense that it is not commonly used,
although not new. The neutrode configuration is theoretically lower in noise than the
usual cascode since it uses one triode instead of two. Of course, to take advantage
of theory it is necessary to use a tube with
a very Ylow noise figure and sufficiently
high Gm. The tube used is a new type, the
6HA5, which seems to have the required
attributes.
The oscillator and mixer stages are
6CW4 Nuvistors. The rigid mechanical
structure of the Nuvistor should help to
make the oscillator more stable, ind ted we
found that the tuner drifted less thin 0.01
per cent. Next comes the four i.f. stages,
the last two providing limiting. The ratio
detector also limits. The signal, upon leaving the detector, goes through the multi-
plex circuitry (time division) if the signal
is stereo and bypasses this section if it is
mono. From there, on to the amplifier!
Amplifier: The amplifier has six pairs of
inputs and two pairs of outputs, not counting the speaker connections. (Tuner inputs
are internally connected.) One set of inputs
and outputs are for a reverberation e evice;
three sets of inputs are low level (tape
head and two phono) and the remaincer are
high level (aux, monitor in). The remaining
set of outputs are for recording.
The amplifier circuitry is standar1, utilizing 12AX7's for the various preamhs and
tone drivers, as well as for the phase inverter. Each output stage uses a pair of
7591 pentodes with fixed bias. The output
transformers are quite husky (we have a
strained back to document that), and the
4 -ohm taps are grounded, rather than the
common, in order to derive the center channel.
Performance
By implication, and sometimes overtly,
we have been led to believe
that separate
components are inherently better than integrated components. Well, 'taint necessarily so. In fact, it is our opinion that one
would have to pay considerably more to
get performance equal to the 500 -C in separate components.
Considering the performance, and the
many features, and the quality of the
parts, we doubt that you could do better
in separate components at anywhere near
the price of the 500 -C. Don't misunderstand
us now, we firmly believe that it is the
component design approach that makes
such an excellent value possible. On the
other hand it should be clear from the
performance statistics that the Fisher
500 -C is an excellent instrument by any
standards.
One thing more: the Fisher 500 -C is an
unusually fine sounding unit, a fact not
necessarily revealed by statistics. We must
admit we took an instant liking to it.
In sum, we suggest that the Fisher 500 -C
may well fill the needs of those audiofans
who want their FM and audio system electronics in one neat package. Look into it.
SHERWOOD FM- STEREO TUNER,
MODEL S -3000V
Sherwood is well known as a manufac-
turer of high quality tuners and amplifiers.
Indeed, over the years they have achieved
an exceptional reputation amongst audiofans for producing fine products and at
reasonable prices. The Sherwood S -3000V
is no exception to this rule; it is an FM
tuner which performs exceedingly well in
receiving mono and stereo broadcasts. In
addition it is put together in such manner
that it may be expected to retain its performance level for a long time.
The S- 3000V, in common with other new
Sherwood models, features a zero -center
tuning meter. This tuning meter operates
to indicate the point at which the detector
is nulled so that it is possible to tune very
accurately. In fact, we found this tuning
system to be one of the most accurate and
convenient we have encountered for achieving minimum distortion.
The Sherwood S -3000V also provides a
stereo indicator light which automatically
glows when a stereo broadcast is being
(Continued on page 58)
Fig. 4. Sherwood FM- Stereo Tuner, Model
AUDIO
44
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
S- 3000V.
DECEMBER, 1963
-at
with exactly the right amount of damping
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James B. Lansing Sound, Inc., L.A.
AUDIO
DECEMBER, 1963
39.0
45
RECORD REVUE
Edward Tatnall Canby *
For Xmas: Gr -reat!
Bach's Greatest Hits. The Creative
Swingle Singers, Ward Swingle.
Philips PHS 600 -097 stereo
This is the recording of the century
or a lot of people think so. Johann
Sebastian Bach's keyboard works, sung,
note for note, by the most extraordinary
ensemble of wild young people you'll ever
hear. We are not shown their pictures
but the album says they're French and
they sound like les Beatnik for sure,
probably with beards, berets and black
stockings.
No matter Such an immediately dramatic, intensely felt, enormously skillful
sort of jazz (If it really is jazz) has
seldom been heard and the composing
credit is purely to Bach himself. Only
the addition of a roving plucked double
bass and a mild accompanying rhythm
section augment the actual notes of
numerous items from the Preludes and
Fugues from the famed "Well Tempered
Clavier," the organ works and various
harpsichord pieces, not to mention one
of the most complex and rapid fugues
from Bach's last great work, the "Art of
-
!
the Fugue !" Astonishing.
Erergthing is sung, even including the
correct ornaments. The jazzy feel to the
lines of eighth notes is, oddly, quite
proper Baroque-period practice and more
authentic than the solemn, literal playing of generations of classical pianists
and organists. The " doppa-doppa" and
"boopy -do" syllables the singers use to
help themselves (and give a jazz effect)
are entirely reasonable, adding instrumental ictus (transient attack). But best
of all is the sheer musicianship- the
superb musical phrasing, the perfect harmony chords, beating any barbership
ensemble, the impeccable stylistic sense
of color and planes, good enough to out Bach many a highly professional Bach
keyboard artist.
You can call it jazz, but for me it is
Bach -about as splendid as it comes.
(And a quick P.S. -this disc was at
press deadline 98th on the 100 best selling LP records.)
Solo Recital
Gina Bachauer Queen of the Keyboard.
Mercury SR 90349 stereo
I should say she is! This lady is a one woman orchestra all on her own. The piano
transcription of scenes from "Petrouchka"
which opens this record is absolutely startling
in its dimension, as though the huge orchestra
were playing in all its hundreds straight
through her fingers. You can hear the trumpets, clarinets, strings-and of course, the
piano. An astonishing illusion if you know
the Petrouchka music in its original orchestral
sound.
She is a big. hearty, utterly musical pianist
(see cover) of fabulous powers, one of those
great souls who seem to use the piano merely
as a means to bigger things -music
Paradoxically, thus, her technique is
traordinary that you will quite for
piano itstlf in favor of what it says ;
itself.
so ex-
et the
it is a
"transparent" medium. A stunning llusion
and only the greatest musicians can pu. it off.
After the immense sounds of Petro jchka's
orchestra comes big Chopin, the Polor aise in
A Flat, joyous and free -swinging as an 8 -year1
old -prodigy performance. yet impeccahl mu sical too. And on the obverse, a Liszt Rl apsody
and Book Two of the youthful irahms
'aganini Variations." What a w nman !I
what a record.
I
Schumann: Cello Concerto. Lalo: Cello
Concerto. Janos Starker; London Symphony, Skrowaczewski.
Mercury SR 90347 stereo
-and here's another in this really splendid
Mercury series of solo discs, each wit a big
black- and -white portrait of the artist
the
cover under the 35 mm. banner-spread across
the top. Too many solo recordings a e just
specialist- recitals, or sleazy would -b pops
offerings, full of insipidity. Especially, must
emphasize, cello solo records Not this ne.
For here you have good music, goo cello
music, an intelligent, musical, commun cative
cellist and a superbly understanding ore estra,
Just as important-there's Mercury, which
puts the cello back from you, in its r htful
place where it can sound human and blend
into the rest of the musical fabric were it
should, or sing out at a distance in the ello's
finest manner.
If only the hardened big -outfit reco dmen
would learn to treat cello music this ' ayinstead of smearing such as that grea ham
Piatigorsky all over the mikes, gia t -size,
breathing down your neck, against a fai t and
distant accompaniment somewhere off n the
background Only seasoned cello -worsh ppers
love that stuff. There are millions of them,
ala s.
So -buy this one with confidence, and learn
what this wonderfully expressive old i strument can do in good company, for you.
n
!
m
!
Bach: The Goldberg Variations.
Malcolm, harpsichord.
Gorge
L'Oiseau -Lyre SOL 261/2 s ereo
The great Bach show -piece is playe here
by Britain's phenomenally brilliant h'rpsichordist; yet in a curious way the recording
isn't very impressive where by rights it aught
to be devastating, as have been earlier M.lcolm
records over the years.
First, poor recording. The sound is no only
somewhat strident and peaky but there is an
intermittent form of flutter -actually, I hink,
an electrical distortion rather than etual
mechanical flutter-which appears in the more
wiry passages to rob the sound of its m sical
authenticity. And there is an unple sant
clattery sound to the upper notes i the
louder registrations ; one has the sense that
all is not well whenever the intensity e eeps
above a certain level. The soft portion are
lovely.
Second, it becomes more clear here than
previously that Malcolm is what mig.t he
called an extrovert performer- superb a the
big showy sort of Bach and especiall the
complex and high -speed music, but less usically impressive in the more introspe tive
46
slower music of the aria type, less interested
in the longer dramatic shapes than a Lan dowska -who built these Goldbergs into a
towering, almost Wagnerian emotional experience.
It's high -level playing, definitely. and splendid listening. sound -quality aside. But the
Goldbergs can be even better.
Bach: Chromatic Fantasy and Fugue; Fantasia in C mi.; Six Little Preludes; Toccata
in D; Prelude, Fugue and Allegro. Fernando Valenti, harpsichord.
Columbia MS 6516 stereo
Evidently Columbia has been looking around
for a house harpsichordist. Here's an aimable,
accomodating one who has been taken over
from Westminster, where he genially set out
to record all five million or so Scarlatti
harpischord sonatas and managed to get
dozens of LPs out before looking the other way
and forgetting the whole business (Columbia's
"ex," the famed Ralph Kirkpatrick. edited all
of them but managed to produce only one
splendid recorded set for the company. He's
been working for DG since then.)
Valenti is one of those wholly gracious and
pleasing musicians whose product one somehow feels the urge to praise, even when it
doesn't merit superlatives. I hate to have to
say it, therefore, but I find the Valenti performances as they have been in the past
skillful, highly professional. utterly competent, yet on the whole musically colorless and
lacking in real inner drama. íf he seems to
borrow considerably from such as Wanda
Landowska, it is merely that his own concept
isn't strong enough to outweigh the great
lady whom every harpsichordist emulates in
spite of himself.
Nor is the recorded harpsichord sound
pleasing. Is it the instrument itself? Or is it
more likely Columbia's famed piano recording technique, hard as nails. newly applied to
this much more wiry instrument?
I can tell Columbia that if you want a
harpsichord to sound mellow, rather than
tinny, you first place it in a fine space -dead
or live -and then get those mikes back, away
from the innards. At close range. the instrument is ugly as all getout. Its brilliant sound
is at peak flavor when heard at a mellowing
distance, so to speak in musical focus.
-
Lieder von Schubert, Schumann, Brahms.
Irmgard Seefried, soprano; Erik Werba,
pf.
Deutsche Gramm. 136.372 stereo
She is one of the great German sopranos,
with a uniquely expressive little -boy voice and
an impeccable ear ; she has sung countless
concerts and made many distinguished recordings. Something was wrong for this one. The
music is as lovely as ever, her long-time accompanist as fine as ever ; but she wavers,
sounds tired, strains, makes near -flubs. Tragic
to hear a great artist in such moments of
struggle.
Some of the Seefried dises have been "live"
concert performances. Might this be one of
those, issued in spite of momentary troubles
because of its content? Or is there really
something wrong? Seefried is far from elderly, so we can hope it was the former and
that her next will be as radiant as ever.
AUDIO
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
DECEMBER, 1963
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DECEMBER, 1963
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47
John Hammond accompanying
on guitar and mouth -harp.
himself
Vanguard VSD 2148 stereo
Count singers like this in the solo recital
category. That's what this is, folk or no.
An astonishing amount of sheer emotion is
going into what passes superficially as folk
singing these days. Its significance is far
deeper-for, whether good music or punk,
this sort of thing is genuine expression via
musical means. In the past, all "great" music
has come from such an urge. That it should
find the peculiar outlets we have in America
today, from negro jazz, from gospel hymns, to
city blues and college bluegrass, is a thing
that sets us off from other parts of the world
in very important ways.
Just listen to this 20 year old. He almost
weeps with earnestness. He moans. He shouts.
He shakes with the passion of his expression.
It is for real, and no two ways about it. His
music is a bit raw still, his emoting too literal
for the best emotional economy, as every
older musician of importance learns in the
end. Yet his personal style, still ranging over
the folk world, is already pretty subtle and
more sophisticated than he knows, I think.
He speaks for the wide-open places and the
poor and down -trodden -and where does he
come from? Well, he went to college, anyhow,
like so many of the most eloquent "folk" performers.
It isn't directly what he says (and sings)
here that is important, nor his excellent
guitar, nor the harmonica that he plays
simultaneously, via that thing that holds it in
the air in front of his face. It's the sheer
emotion that goes into musical sound-raw
or no. For there you have a glimpse of what
music really is, whatever sort, wherever.
Its significant to me that if it weren't for
the accompanying printed texts, you wouldn't
be able to understand one word in fifty this
boy sings. They are dead in earnest, those
words. But it is the music which expresses
them.
Sir Winston Churchill, First Honorary Citizen of the United States. Narr. David
Perry.
Colpix
PS
2000 (2 mono
rehill's
on his
Maybe this was to cash in on Ch
recent honor while it was hot (and u
likely death at any moment) -but
man himself out -manoeuvres any possi
mercial taint and makes of this a
and astonishingly revealing documen
contains 4 entire LP sides of Churchill
making, with continuity provided by
he old
e com-
lendid
ry. It
speechquite
straightforward commentary ; there i much
"symphonic" music, as bridge and a background, not important but -thank the orcinot intrusive or pompous either. In act it
adds to the ease of listening and mana_es not
to interfere a bit with Churchill's words. (It
neatly masks the background noise.)
The recordings carry from his first ays as
Prime Minister through to the war s end,
ranging about in time with some fredom ;
many quotations are spoken briefly .y the
commentator, to supplement the actu voice
e iron
of Churchill. Famous words abound
curtain, blood, sweat and tears, and t like
-but much of the material will be unf miliar
and new to most listeners.
I think what strikes most significantl, here,
so long after, is the revelation of Chu chill's
utterly canny political sense-on an international scale-his extraordinary wa. with
words that hit the weaknesses of his e.emies,
wheedled his would -be friends, rallied those
who faltered (of course) but even more attled
those who were undecided. His wooing of the
Italian people over Mussolini's head wa downright shameless yet utterly inspire
his
honeyed speeches towards France in the war's
crucial days, seem now almost calculat:., and
yet they were not, in the highest sens:. Just
superb politics.
Most assuredly you'll get a full -size portrait of this extraordinary old fello ' here,
a lot broader than any you may have im gined
before.
:
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Magazine Music Appreciation
Library: A Young People's Introduction
to Haydn. A Young People's Introduction
to Schumann (Also many others). Written
by Joseph Machlis; Norman Rose, narrator.
Wonderland 1489; 14 mono
Parents
Special
This Appreciation of Music series for children, sponsored by the well known massmedium journal, combines a safe and entirely
conventional approach to the tine -worn subject with some modest but useful virtues,
notably a large quantity of well- performed
music (some of it manhandled) and a
reasonably informative if wholly innocuous
text featuring the composers' life histories.
A lot more
very great deal more -could
be done for inculcating a love of music in
children via the LP record. But within their
own strict limitations these discs do profit
from the availability of so much more music
(and LP space) now than in the past.
Oddly, the treatment is far from uniform
in detail though the discs feature the same
reader and the same technique of musical examples frequently faded under the speaking
voice. The Schumann disc is quite exemplary
in its respect for the dignity of the music.
The fades are dune deftly and the fade -outs
or cut-offs are made at reasonable points in
the music, without commiting undue mayhem.
The Haydn disc, though, must have been put
together by a less skillful hand (or the same
hand on a bad day
Time after time the
music is faded just as it reaches climactic interest and the fades are cut, after the voice
begins, in very clumsy fashion right in the
middle of a phrase or a note or two beyond
the obviously intended point. One outrageous
example from Haydn's late masterpiece "The
Creation" allows a soprano to gulp out only
a few phrases of one of the most famous
Haydn arias before she is rudely squelched,
practically in the middle of a note. Is this an
example to set for our children?
If we show such casual disrespect for the
very monuments of culture that we are sup-
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48
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
DECEMBER, 1963
posedly "teaching," how can we expect children to learn to understand music for itself?
The background -music technique is indeed
useful, but never when musicirl values are
ignored, or when the text is irrelevant to the
music being heard.
I suggest that every parent who has a
mind to try these make a point of pre- auditioning them with an ear for musical treatment.
If you don't know the difference, then ask
some who does to help you.
The mostly excellent recordings are anonymous- probably good mono tapes from the
huge number made obsolete by stereo and now
available for licencing.
Beethoven: Fifth Symphony. "How a
Great Symphony Was Written" (from
Bernstein TV). N. Y. Philharmonic, Bernstein.
Columbia MS 6468 stereo
plus 7" bonus disc.
I didn't get to play the main record here.
I was too much interested in the bonus supplement.
This excerpt from Bernstein's TV program,
where a group of abortive sketches for the
"Fifth." out of Beethoven's sketch books, are
put bodily into their presumed places in the
work itself, orchestrated to match (the orignals are in piano -like format), is designed to
show what Beethoven might have done -and
didn't.
The project was a brilliant one and particularly with the Pliilhnrmonte on hand to
do the honors in full -orchestra sound If it
is a wee bit oversimplified, it does make a
couple of good hammered-in points: that (a)
composers often sweat and fume over their
work en route (like engineers) and (h) there
are innumerable possible ways towards elusive
perfection ; only the top guys pick the right
one out of the rest even if it may take them
years to do it. It did Beethoven. And he considerately wrote out and left behind all the
duds, for us to see. Most of us over up our
en -route sketches to salve our pride.
Bernstein's "Fifth," you can be sure, is a
big, sincere, slightly erratic version, warm,
on the clumsy side but penetrating right to
the Romantic core of the Beethoven expression. I can say that without hearing it
For instance, though one of these, the Boston -Munch disc, offers entirely adequate sound
quality, the other, featuring two widely sepa-
rated orchestras, has a uniformly unpleasant,
nasally distorted sound on both sides, evidently a common product of the reprocessing
jolt. It's hard to believe the original tapes had
this sound in common.
More unpleasant for my ears is the "dynagrooving" of both discs, which evens the loud
and soft parts so drastically that at times
you can even hear the tape hiss and auditorium background noise coming tip with the
fainter music. Of course, the label "Dynagroove" is reserved for RCA's first -line product. But does that mean RCA is going to turn
off the system when it comes to fixing up its
other lines for popular appeal on "average"
home equipment? Common sense says if the
equipment is there it might as well be put to
work Only don't use the name.
My experience to date suggests that the
more "popular" a record is, from RCA, the
!
more blatant is
the
dynagrooving.
Oddly
enough, this means that the really top RCA
recordings get a soft -pedalled dynagrooving
which is entirely unobjectionable.
So -take a long look at the Victrola label,
You won't have to worry about the music. It'll
be good, of its type, you can be sure.
Schoenberg: Serenade for Septet and
Bass Voice, Op. 24 (1923). Melos Ensemble of London, Bruno Maderna.
L'Oiseau -Lyre SOL 250 stereo
This tootling, twittery, waltzy little Serenade is not only important in the "12- tone"
composer's development but it happens to be
one of his most easily listenahle works and
one that is likely to please almost any hi fi
home listener who likes rhythms and tone
colors and sharp sounds galore-whether it
be Schoenberg or Scheherezade. Don't be worried about the bass solo (John Carol Case);
he sings in only one movement, as one of the
instruments rather than as a featured solo,
Æ
and he's good, anyhow.
reproduction so good
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Ravel -The Complete Orchestral Works.
Paris Cons. Orch., Cluytens.
Angel S3636D (4) stereo
For people with passionate musical cars
there is something elemental in Ravel that
carries his impact beyond that of the relatively intellectual Debussy. It takes a fairly
sophisticated ear, to be sure, for Ravel's harmonies are enormously complex, his orchestrations extraordinarily subtle. Even so, Ravel
had "it" In musical terms.
This is a splendid, a gorgeous stereo album
for the Ravel -gorger. It had me thoroughly
titillated to the depths of my being, even
though not every piece seemed to me exactly
to my liking. The disquietingly urbane "Mother
Goose" music, for instance, didn't seem right
me, though perhaps not to you.
at all
Again, Ravel is a deeply personal composer
and interpretations vary in highly personal
ways.
It is a great thing, any way you look at
ii, to be able to hear such a wide span of
one composer, all under one musical roof,
straight out of the home territory of France
itself. Some of it is bound to send you through
the ceiling. Especially if you go straight
through the album.
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Debussy: La Mer. Ravel: Rapsodie Espagnole. Boston Symphony, Munch.
RCA Victrola VICS 1041 stereo
Stravinsky: Firebird Suite. Debussy: Three
Nocturnes. Paris Cons. Orch., Boston
Symph., Monteux.
RCA Victrola VICS 1027 stereo
A new reissue label from RCA with a
pleasantly nostalgic name and a useful function in the age of stereo. The execution,
judging from these two, is something else
again.
AUDIO
DECEMBER, 1963
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Dept. X, Genoa, Illinois
49
Paray on the basis of what he had just
ABOUT MUSIC
Harold Lawrence
A New Approach To Acoustical Shell Design
the New York
Philharmonic performed a concert at
the Monterey Fair site in California.
Ordinarily, the activities of a major
orchestra on tour receive only local news
coverage, but the circumstances surrounding this event were unusual. The New York
Times reported that the Philharmonic had
ordered an acoustical shell to be flown from
Norwalk, Connecticut, especially for the
concert.
Having in mind the weight and dimensions of most acoustical shells, I conjured
up a picture of the loading operation:
bulky segments being inserted into the
mouth of a huge U. S. Air Force cargo
plane of the type used to transport trucks,
troops, and light artillery. Could this be the
first time an acoustical symphonic shell had
been airborne?
The brief Times item engaged in no such
speculation. The shell, it stated simply, had
been designed and built by the Stagecraf t
Corporation, whose president, Christopher
Jaffe, had flown to Monterey to supervise
its installation. Anxious to learn more
about the "flying shell," I arranged to meet
with Mr. Jaffe on his return home.
An energetic, articulate man with a
background in music, chemistry and engineering, Jaffe is a late starter in the business of acoustics, having founded Stagecraft in 1960. Since then, he has been very
busy. To his credit are some 18 acoustical
shells built for symphony orchestras, as
well as more than a score of other shells
designed for universities, hotels, and auditoriums.
The rapid emergence of Stagecraft on
the acoustical scene grows out of a new
awareness on the part of critics and public
alike of the importance of acoustics in our
DURING THE PAST SUMMER,
Fig.
1.
concert life. Stimulated by the controversies surrounding Royal Festival Ha 1 and
Philharmonic Hall, and by the attention
paid to acoustics in high fidelity sound
reproduction, people no longer are rilling
to accept inferior sound in their e)ncert
halls, most of which suffer from multiple
sonic illnesses. The question keeps c 3ming
up : What can we do about these acoustical
invalids?
There are two alternatives. First demolish the old hall and start fresh, utilizing
the latest concepts of acoustical design.
Second, treat the hall to an acoustical facelifting.
Obviously, financial reasons dictate the
latter course for most communities, although several new concert halls have
sprung up in Seattle, New York, Detroit,
and Indianapolis during the past decade.
But, as everyone knows, newborn halls often
emerge with natal defects as serious as
those afflicting their predecessors.
Take the ease of Detroit's Henry` and
Edsel Ford Auditorium. Built in 1936 as
part of the Motor City's new riverside
civic center, the hall seats nearly 3000, has
a low ceiling, smooth walls, and at the time
of its completion, a shallow plywood and
canvas shell. The reverberation period was
extremely short, recalling the notorious
sound characteristics of N.B.C.'s Studio
8H, and there was virtually no bleed of
orchestral choirs.
The full impact of the hall's shortcomings hit Detroit's music lovers a couple of
years later when the city played host to a
convention of music critics. After attending a concert as the Ford Auditorium,
critic Harold C. Schonberg deplored the
hall's acoustics, saying it was impossible to
form an opinion of the performance of the
Detroit Symphony under the baton of Paul
Leonard Bernstein conducts New York Philharmonic at Monterey Fair site,
August 31, 1963.
beard.
The critics departed, leaving Detroiters
in the throes of an agonizing reappraisal.
An acoustician's firm was commissioned to
design a shell which, it was hoped would
lengthen the reverberation time and improve the over -all sound. The shell was installed at a cost of $110,000 in 1959, and
was introduced in time for the new symphonic season. As it turned out, Ford's
malady was incurable. True, the strings
now produced a slightly brighter if somewhat glassy tone, but the hall's character
remained unchanged. All the familiar problems were still there: dryness, slapback,
acoustical overload, frequency selectivity
and a generally coarse orchestral texture.
To make matters worse, the shell caused
the overhead organ grille to ring audibly
at 580 cps.
For the musicians, too, the Ford Audi-
torium was no more successful. To overcome the lack of reverberation, the players
increased their volume of tone. Had they
played at normal dynamic levels, they
would have been unable to hear themselves,
not to mention their colleagues, at all times.
The inevitable result was a narrowing of
the dynamic spectrum, with rough, grating
string sound, clamorous brass, and the entire sonority robbed of the luster of upper
partials.
As musical director of Mercury Records,
I supervised several recording sessions in
the newly- shelled hall. The hall's acoustical
obstacles proved insurmountable, and we
moved our operations to the former home
of the Detroit Symphony, the Paradise
Theatre, now a shabby derelict located on
the once -fashionable Woodward Avenue.
The hall had been used successively as a
movie house, a temple, and finally abandoned to the elements, its proscenium shot
through with gaping holes. Acoustically,
however, it was still very much alive. In
fact, it took the orchestral players a full
session to adjust their touch and embouchure to the liveness of the hall.
A parallel situation existed in the Cyrus
Northrop Memorial Hall in Minneapolis,
the home of the Minneapolis Symphony.
For years, concert goers had complained
about the uneven sound diffusion and lack
of "resonance" in the sprawling 4700 seat
auditorium. The orchestral management
commissioned Bolt, Beranek & Newman
and Theatre Consultant George C. Izenour
to design and construct a massive demountable shell. It was a solid piece of work:
skins of sheet steel 3 /32-ineh thick formed
the shell, coated on the back with IA inch
of damping compound ; diagonally intersecting trusses constituted the modulated
surface ; and Plexiglas sheets (acoustical
clouds) were placed out over the audience
to help the diffusion of the string sound.
The new Northrop shell was an improvement over the flimsy sponge -like enclosure
that had "served" the orchestra in the past.
But, like its Detroit counterpart, it fell
short of the mark.
More successful was the acoustic renovation of Severance Hall in 1958. For the
revamping of the home of the Cleveland
Orchestra, the management engaged Heinrich Keilholz as its acoustical consultant.
Keilholz, who is one of the four acousticians brought in by Lincoln Center to improve the acoustics of Philharmonie Hall,
literally tore Severance Hall apart. Tile
replaced carpets, textured non-absorbent
fabrics displaced drapery, a light transverse curtain superseded the old velour
curtain, and a host of other sound -soakers
were banished from the hall. The stage shell was constructed of convex plywood
panels designed to blend orchestral timbres
AUDIO
50
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
DECEMBER, 1963
on stage. The outcome was an increase in
reverberation time of no less than one second, a warm and rich sonority, and a good
balance of instrumental choirs. In short,
wrote Irving Kolodin, "Severance Hall
shows . . results that appear to be a 'resounding' success."
Most critics agree that the renovation of
Severance Hall was a hit. However, against
the costly misses ; d near -misses of Ford
Auditorium, Northrop Auditorium, and
Philharmonic Hall, it stands out as a
dramatic exception. What of the homes of
other U.S. orchestras? Not ninny communities can afford to spend the large sums
of money necessary to construct bulk-density shells -much less build new auditoriums. And even those cities capable of
supporting extensive renovations should be
reluctant to wade into the murky waters
What is wrong with the bulk- density
shell?
"The principle of bulk density is valid
when applied to the walls and ceilings of
an auditorium, but there is no evidence
to justify also applying it to the shell design itself."
Specifically, what do you mean by the
"bulk- density principle "?
"The bulk -density principle has its origin
in auditorium architectural acoustics. It
stresses the importance of equal reflection
throughout the frequency range of sound
energy from the wall and ceiling surfaces
of the hall. In its application to stage -shell
design, the aim is to keep all sound energy
within the shell confine. This is why bulk density shells must be designed so large.
With equal reflection, the timpani and
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This photo
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R A
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Fig. 2. The Fiberglas acoustical shell used to back up the New York Philharmonic
in Monterey.
of acoustical experimentation. (The "tuning" of Philharmonic Hall goes on.) Surely
there must be other ways of treating ailing
halls.
Chris Jaffe believes he has found a better approach. Through a bold concept that
cuts through most of the costs and complexities of traditional methods, he has
conio up with acoustical shells that are
lighter, cheaper, smaller and more versatile
than most `permanent' installations. A case
in point is the acoustical shell Stagecraft
designed and built for the Cincinnati Symphony. Installed in October 1961 at a cost
of $15,000, the new unit is 33 ft. deep and
58 ft. wide; the wing bailles are 24 ft.
high and the rear baffles are 18 ft. high.
The shell weighs one and a half tons. That
same year, the Minneapolis Symphony installed its new shell. The Northrop unit
costs more than $110,000, weighs 30 tons,
and is 30 ft. high. (The width and depth
of both shells are approximately the same.)
Botti shells were designed for full symphony orchestras. Yet the differences in
cost and weight are striking, even after
one has taken into account the varying
dimensions of Northrop and Music Hall. I
asked Jaffe whether these figures represented a sacrifice in quality in the case of
the Cincinnati shell. "Don't be misled by
the price and specifications," Jaffe warned.
"No acoustical compromises were made in
Cincinnati. These figures are an outgrowth
of years of work in the design, fabrication,
and installation of lightweight enclosures,
which we feel are actually superior to the
heavy bulk- density shell."
AUDIO
DECEMBER, 1963
brass would predominate in a small shell.
The acousticians then cope with the distribution of sound throughout the hall . . .
this is where the acoustical clouds come
into the picture.. After the shell has been
installed, there follow the inevitable problems of blend and balance of instrumental
sections."
How do your shells differ from the bulk density shells?
"Bulk -density shell designers attempt to
improve the acoustics of a hall by treating
the entire area around both the orchestra
and the audience in a similar fashion. We
attack the orchestral area separately. In
most cases, narrow -band sounds tend to be
soaked up, while broad -band sounds are
hard to get rid of. Our first job is therefore to achieve a correct blend and balance
of orchestral instruments on the stage. We
have found, after several years of experimentation, that the best way to achieve
this is by designing a shell that would
absorb the sound energy of certain sections
of the orchestra- on a selective basis, utilizing materials with a higher -percentage re-
flection of the mid- and high -frequency
sounds."
In other words, you pre -mix the sound
of the orchestra before it reaches the audience, like a sort of acoustical pre -amp.
"Exactly. Now, take the case of a hall in
which timpani and brass mask the sounds
of violins and woodwinds. To obtain more
narrow -band sound, we design our shell
material to pass frequencies between 60100 cps. This does not mean that this range
of those high fidelity components which, according to
a
panel of experts, provide the best
sound possible today.
The
panel carefully considered return- for -the-
money, but "where there was
component that produced
a
a
more expensive
detectable improve-
ment in sound, it was chosen."
These components are recognizable to hi -fi en-
thusiasts as the AR two -speed turntable, the
Dynakit PAS -2 preamplifier, the Dynakit Stereo
70 dual
power amplifier, and the AR -3 loud-
speakers.*
*They have been on demonstration as
several years at the
AR
a
system for
Music Rooms, on the west
balcony of Grand Central Terminal in New York City,
and at 52 Brattle St., Cambridge, Mass. No sales are
made there; you may ask questions
if you like, but
most people just come and listen.
ACOUSTIC RESEARCH, INC.
24 Thorndike St., Cambridge, Mass. 02141
Please send me
literature
on
Dynakit and
AR
high
fidelity components.
NAME
ADDRESS
A
51
will be lost; such attenuation does not exceed two decibels. And let's not forget that
much of this sound energy is being projected directly at the audience. What matters is that the winds and strings will now
be heard in proper relationship with the
rest of the orchestra."
That's all well and good but how would
you cope with halls suffering from a lack
of broad -band sound, such as Philharmonic
Hall, where acousticians have noted that,
at one time, frequencies below 250 eps
were attenuated 10 to 15 decibels?
"Our selective-absorption shells are extremely versatile. We are able to balance
orchestral sections not only by means of
the choice of shell material, but by angling
the floor and ceiling baffles and making
effective use of openings as well. Some
double bass energy will be attenuated, it
is true, but only in order to achi ve an
over -all balance."
Assuming that your selective -abs rption
shells are in a class with, or supe for to,
bulk-density shells, what advantages do
they offer to theatre and orchestr managers, beyond price and weight?
"A typical Stagecraft shell cons sts of
polyester resin- reinforced interlock ng fiberglas segments weighing only fro 40 to
80 pounds. The number of musical forces
naturally dictates the size of each shell. A
symphonic shell for example, incor orates
28 segments, with ceiling baffles. Niw the
advantages involve portability, s orage,
ease of installation and durability.'
"An average Stagecraft unit can ie efficiently moved from one location to nother
in a small pickup truck, and can be stored
in a cubic space of 4 -feet by 5 -feet 'y 18.
in sound?
"The openings take care of that. Besides,
I'd like to point out that, although our
shells are lightweight, the material (fiberglas) is actually denser than plywood."
Since he founded Stagecraft three years
ago, Jaffe has designed, built, and tuned
a large number of acoustical shells. Among
his customers are the Atlanta Symphony,
the Cincinnati Symphony, the Corning Philharmonic, the Fresno Symphony, the Louisville Symphony, the Oakland Symphony,
the South Bend Symphony, and the Wheeling Symphony. In addition, he has designed
shells for multi- purpose auditoriums and
for outdoor events.
A man of average height with clear blue
eyes, a cleft chin, and hands constantly in
motion, Jaffe came to the field of acoustical
design through theatre design. A graduate
of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, he had
designed an off -Broadway theatre- in -theround in 1949, called the Circle Theatre.
The idea of an arena theatre was new at the
time and, as it turned out, shortlived. The
place (35th Street) and the play (William
Saroyan's The Son) spelled commercial
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feet. The full-sized acoustical shell we built
for the Oakland Symphony can be erected
by a two -man crew in about two hours. I
know of one auditorium where a bulk-density shell required an expenditure of $1200
each time it was erected. Extremely costly
special rigging was installed to reduce the
high setup expenses. But it still costs $400
to erect the shell for each concert. The
ease of installation and demounting of our
acoustical shells also makes structural remodelling totally unnecessary in multipurpose halls."
A comparison of the specifications of
your symphonic shells with those of the
bulk- density type reveals that yours are
lower and closer to the orchestra.
"Selective absorption makes this possible.
The 40- foot -high downstage wing panels
normally required in bulk -density shells
can be cut in half."
With the shell "hugging" the orchestra,
isn't there a danger of producing a boxed -
NEW YORK 14, N. Y.
212 WA 9-8364
52
failure.
"After my theatrical adventure, I quit
show business and turned to engineering.
For the next nine years, I worked on new
applications of aluminum and magnesium.
Light -metal extrusions, you know, represent
one of the largest industries to develop
after World War II. Extrusions eliminate
the need for extensive tooling and make
possible the most intricate shapes without
heavy industrial dies. Typical of the applications of light-metal extrusions are storm
windows, truck -bodies, and aluminum-glass
facades for skyscrapers."
During these years, Jaffe never lost his
interest in music and theatre design. When
N.B.C. took over the Ziegfield Theatre in
the early Fifties, he was called on to design a floor that would not require structural alteration in the theatre. Jaffe drew
on his experience with light metals to build
a panel -floor made of standard truck -body
extrusions, with a magnesium decking, and
topped with smooth masonite.
Aware of the need for effective, lowcost acoustical shells, Jaffe applied his engineering and acoustical knowledge to this
problem. His work suggests that we are
witnessing a new trend in the design of
acoustical shells. Whether or not it will
outmode the bulk -density shell, just as the
aluminum and Fiberglas rowboats have
outclassed the wooden ones, remains to be
seen. But it is interesting to note that
Heinrich Keilholz, the designer of the
Severance Hall's acoustical shell, has fabricated a Fiberglas acoustical shell for the
San Francisco Symphony.
Æ
AUDIO
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
DECEMBER, 1963
SPEAKER ARRAY
(Jrvm page 32)
sistance can be added in the case of
the open backed enclosure by hanging
a Fiberglas curtain behind the speaker
array.
The "Sonic Screen "
spacing is front 1/8 wavelength to 5/s
wavelength. For instance in an array
of 6 -in. speakers with center -to- center
spacing of 7.5 -in., coupling occurs between 217 cps and 1086 cps, with maximum boost at 553 cps. Destructive interference effects are more difficult to measure, but appear to occur in the range
ul' frequencies for which speaker spacing is 1 to 4 wavelengths. Table 2 gives
the frequencies affected by various
center -to- center spacings.
If a 32- speaker array is arranged in
four lines of eight speakers, it is essential that the lines of eight be oriented
vertically instead of horizontally if
any dispersion of high frequencies in
the horizontal plane is desired. Such
an arrangement comes within 2 db of
the maximum theoretical boost of 15 db.
An array of 16 speakers, four in a line,
-A
Practical Array
One quite satisfactory version of the
multiple speaker array is shown in Fig.
2. It is a result (far from an end result) of the author's interest in arrays
over the last few years. Although not
providing the ultimate in sound reproduction, the "Sonic Screen" does an
extremely creditable job for its very
low cost. This array consists of ten 5 x
7 -in. oval cone speakers with 1.0 -oz.
magnets mounted on a 3/8-in. grille cloth- covered plywood panel which is in
turn attached to a 2 x 4 -in. frame. The
finished system stands 51 -in. high, 18 -in.
wide, and is slightly less than 5 -in. deep.
Its back panel is identical to the front
panel to allow backwave radiation, and
in between is placed a Fiberglas curtain.
The speakers are wired in parallel series so that the amplifiers sees a nominal 8 -ohm load, and no tweeter is used
(a more expensive version not shown
here uses a tweeter and better quality
6 -in. speakers to extend high- and low frequency response). Because this array
is quite efficient and because its midrange transient response is excellent, it
is well suited for use with moderate
power direct -coupled transistor ampliÆ
fiers.
realizes even more of the maximum
theoretical boost, and lias identical polar
response in both planes -which is the
worst possible case.
Control of Fundamental Resonance
The ma jority of inexpensive 6 -in.
speakers have a fundamental resonant
frequency of around 120 cps. This high
a resonance will give poor bass response.
In addition, the damping of such speakers is usually poor, so that the array
will exhibit a peak in response of as
much as 10 db. This makes for "single
note" bass which is unmusical at best,
and at 120 cps tends to accentuate any
hum problems which may exist in the
sound system. Using such speakers in
a bass reflex enclosure will extend reponse by half an octave and will damp
out the peak at 120 cps.
In an untuned enclosure or baffle,
however, it is desirable to have resonance occur half an octave away from
troublesome hum frequencies. For an
inexpensive speaker system, then, 85
cps would be ideal, and for a more expensive unit 42 cps-falling halfway
between 30 -cps turntable rumble and
60 -cps hum- should be chosen.
In a multiple speaker array the added
mass of the air load tends to lower
speaker resonance somewhat. In general, however, damping remains the
same unless some measure is taken to
smooth the impedance curve or add
acoustic resistance to the mechanical
circuit of the system. One way to smooth
impedance is to use speakers with resonances staggered at least a half an octave apart. At 85 cps this would mean
71 and 101 cps which are definitely outside the normal t 10 per cent tolerances
of a single speaker unit. Acoustic re-
AUDIO
DECEMBER, 1963
Audio Magazine couldn't describe it in less
than 1,457 words.
...practically any use that can be imagined
is possible with the Uher 8000."
11
Here are some excerpts on the most revolutionary tope recorder
by Martel.
Uher 8000
to hit the Hi Fi industry in years
...
"There are seven position -four speeds with three OFF positions between. Selecting the speed
also adjusts equalization for each. A second switch together with an interlocked RECORD
button, controls all of the electronic functions in its eleven positions, which are marked: -4mono record or play on upper track; 2 -3 -mono record or play on lower track; STEREO
permits recording on the upper track from microphone and
record or play; MULTIPLAY
permits recording on lower track and
mixing with material from lower track; MULTIPLAY
mixing material already recorded on upper track; DIA-PILOT I -used for recording from microphone and /or from phono record or another tape machine on upper track as commentary
for slides; DIA -PILOT Il -after making recorded commentary on upper track, this position is
used to record sub -sonic tone on lower track at points where a slide is to be changed and for
playback with slide projector thereafter, with the slide changing at each point when the
tone button was depressed in the second run -through; ECHO -4- permits adding delayed
sound to an original recording on upper track, the amount of delay depending on the speed
of the tape; ECHO 2 -3 -same operation for lower track; SYN -PLAY -used for recording on
one track for later recording another signal in synchroni.m with the first but on a second
track when the switch is turned to the SYN -PLAY II position. Thus, practically any trick type
of recording can be made with no external interconnecting or switching.
Akustomat makes it possible to use sound as a controlling medium for the recording operation. The machine can be used as a dictating machine, for example, without the need for a
start -stop button -one simply speaks and the machine starts recording, and when the dictator
pauses, the machine stops. Thus it may be used to monitor and record sounds of an intermittent nature over a long period of time without actually running except in the presence of
some sound. We know no other machine which has this feature.
1
I-
-
Il-
1
I
At the slowest speed and in the echo mode, the machine can be used to check pronunciation
in the study of languages. One simply says a word, and then hears it back a fraction of time
later. Th? various features of the machine provide a wide range of facilities useful in the
study of music or languages. In short, practically any use that can be imagined is possible
with the Uher 8000.
If you're interested in the complete review of the Uher 8000, Write for nearest dealer and
reprint of complete review.
MARTEL ELECTRONICS
HOLLYWOOD
CHICAGO
645 N. Martel Avenue
Phone (213) 938-2803
1141 Merchandise
Mart Plaza
Phone (312) 644 -0430
NEW YORK CITY
1199 Broadway
Phone (212) 684 -0943
53
Only DYNAMIC
DIMENSION
Control
Equipment
by FAIRCHILD
Can Radically
Improve
Your Broadcast
and Recording
Sound!
FAIRCHILD DYNALIZER
Model 673
The newest approach for
the creation of "apparent
loudness" -the Dynalizer
is an automatic dynamic
audio spectrum equalizer which redistributes frequency response of
the channel to compensate for listening response
curves as developed by Fletcher- Munson. Adds
fullness and body to program material. Completely
automatic with flexible controls. Easily integrated
into existing equipment.
FAIRCHILD CONAX
Model 602
The world- acknowl-
edged device that
eliminates distortion
problems caused by
pre- emphasis curves. Allows
higher average program levels through
inaudible control of high frequencies. Invaluable
in FM broadcast and disc recording. Eliminates
stereo splatter problems in multiplex channels.
FAIRCHILD LIMITER
Model 670
Fast attack stereo
limiter (50 microseconds) with low
distortion and ab-
d4U
AUDITIONEER
SPEAKER
(from page 28)
very pleasant listening response. N
ally if you were building the Auditi
for high fidelity, you would want t
stall the RIAA network along wi
switch to put it in the circuit when
ing records.
This is what the girls in the
writing department think of the
tioneer :
We that copy write
No longer have to fight
With the boys who like to light
Out of sight . . .
in auxiliary control
Thanks to the transmitter boys
We have a brand new toy
Life is just pure joy
Since the boys we don't annoy
in auxiliary control
tureer
inh a
layopy
udi-
3or the eoirwotsseur
at last...
An English Import With
All the Fine Qualities
and Crafts -manship
of Today's Most
Expensive Speakers!
...
Our feet no longer ache
The earth no longer quakes
No more do we tremble and shake
For temper will never again break
in auxiliary control
Magnet type - Ferroba
Flux Density - 14,000 lines
CG12T
$55.99
Size
12 inches
I I
Response
Hail to the engineers, one and all
Hail to the men who answered our call
In our esteem, you're ten feet tall
May the boys have a ball
in auxiliary control
...
PARTS LIST
R RY7
e
Total Flux
Nat. Cone Resonance
Richard Allan
ise
R2, R18, R20, R30,
R37
R3
221 k (deposited ear -
THE BRONZE
R,
eliminates floating
stereo image, despite amount of limiting used in
one of the two channels. Also includes regular
channel A and B limiting. Dual controls and dual
meters provided. Now used throughout the world
in recording studios. (Mono model available).
- the pacemaker in profes-
sional audio products
-for
complete details.
FAIRCHILD
RECORDING EQUIPMENT CORPORATION
10 -40 45th Ave., Long Island City 1, N.Y.
CIRCLE 54
10"
"....
...
THE 1214
12" (30.5 cm)
Magnificent construction. Exceptionally smooth
frequency
response.
$51.99
on-
trol)
R8
limiting position
and
Robust die -cast
chassis. Wide
frequency ronge.
Low priced at
8
$19.99
10"
$31.99
bon)
680 ohms
100 ohms
18 k
200 k pot (tone
R4
R,
sence of thumps.
- 30 cycles
...
8"
2200 ohms
470 k
Roo
--
per sq. cm.
25 to 15,000 cps.
82,000 Maxwells
HIGH PERFORMANCE SPEAKERS IDEALLY
SUITED FOR "SLIMLINE" CABINETS. OFFERING HEAVY CAST FRAME AND CAMBRIC SURROUND. INCORPORATING THE
LATEST ADVANCES IN MAGNET DESIGN
AND MORE.
Resistors
All resistors I watt unless othe
noted
R6
Sum and difference
Write to Fairchild
PRESENTING THE
R9, R13, Res
R10
control)
R
R14, R34, R39
R,s
R,i,
R28
GOLDEN ERA
"860"
8" most popular "workhorse"
in
3900 ohms
R,2, R33, R38, R45
R16,
R19
R21
R22
R23
2.2 Meg.
220 k
100 k pot (vo me
the
Richard
Allan
line.
$5.49
10
1000 ohms
1 Meg.
47 k, 1 watt
125 ohms, 5 wat
22 k
1000 ohms, 1 wa t
100 ohms pot (I. um
Rittarde4161
SALES CORPORATION
P. O. BOX 95
JERICHO, L. I., N. Y.
Dealer and Manufacturers
Representatives Inquiries Invited
balance)
R24, R25
100 ohms, 5 wat
CIRCLE 69
i
54
AUDIO
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
DECEMBER, 1963
50 ohms, 5
150 k
47 k
10 ohms
4700 ohms
39 k
3300 ohms
22 ohms
47 ohms
100 k
27 k
2.2 Men
R26
R31
R3Y, R36
R3s
R41
R42
R4 3
R44
R46
R47
R48
R49
watt
Capacitors
50 pf disc ceramic
0.01 pf /400 volt,
C,
CY, C7
tubular
0.01 µf disc ceramic
0.1 f /400 volt,
C3
C4, C8, C9
INSTRUMENTS
for AUDIO
MEASUREMENTS
Measures audio distortion, noise level and AC
Also a versatile vacuum tube voltmeter.
voltages
Distortion levels as low as .1 % can be measured
on fundamental frequencies from 20 to 20,000 cps,
Distortion
indicates harmonics up to 100,000 cps
measurements can be made on signal levels of .1
The vacuum tube voltmeter
volt to 30 volts rms
provides an accuracy of ±-5% over a frequency range
from 20 cps to 200 KC. For noise and db measurements, the instrument is calibrated in 1 db steps
db, the built -in attenuator profrom 0 db to
db to +50 db
vides additional ranges from
in 10 db steps.
-15
Provides a sine wave signal from 10 cps to
100 kc
Output level within ±1 db when working
Power output,
into 600 ohms (reference 5 kc)
Hum and noise, -70
variable to above 150 mw
Distortion is less than .2%
5 volts output
volts output from 50 to 20,000 cps, slightly
higher at higher output and frequency extremes.
db at
CIO
tubular
0.025 µf /400 volt,
tubular
25 pf disc ceramic
100 pf /50 volt,
C
0.1
BARKER & WILLIAMSON, Inc.
CI:J C,3' CI8
tubular
30 µf /250 volt,
BRISTOL, PENNSYLVANIA
C,C ,5
30
£6
,6 t
electrolytic
,,f /600 volt
,-
\
/
CAN
electrolytic
µf /450 volt,
electrolytic
20 pf /450 volt,
electrolytic
25 4/25 V. subminiature electrolytic
10 pf /25 V. subminiature electrolytic
100 ,f/25 V. subminiature electrolytic
0.1 ,.f /600 volt,
tubular
D,
Da, D3
1)4, D;,.
7)6
Sw,
Sro_
Su'3
Sw,
F,
F'z
S,
SZ
P,
P,
Rl,
Rl3
Rl3
V,
Ve
Vs, V4
Q1, Q2, n.,
Q4
T,
T
AUDIO
Jones S -306
Jones S -302
Jones P -306
Jones P -302
PCB XA11AI
Sigma 4F -5000
Amperite 115N O5T
12AX7
6ANS
6BQ5
2N50S
2N44
PA22SS
í'A227
DECEMBER, 1963
5
92adio Communication $quipment Since 1932
STILwsll 8-5581
CIRCLE 55
HERE IS A
CHECKLIST Of
MEAN/NOFUL
FEATURES
LOOK FOR
1N91
IR 5A4
1N34
(on volume control)
Grayhill 4002
Grayhill 4001
Centralab PA 1000
Buss AGC 3
Buss AGC 1.5
at
These instruments are supplied with many B.C. station installations
for FCC Proof -of Performance tests.
YOU SHOULD
Ìt1 iSCE'lla NCr, ll..
-60
MODEL 210 AU DIO OSCILLATOR
.
C
Model 410
MODEL 410 DISTORTION METER
IN A TINE
OVAL /TY
HEADSET
RECE/VER
CONSTRUCTION The headset should be lightweight,
yet substantially constructed to withstand continued use.
Adjustment on the head should be almost automatic. Cables
should be in a plastic jacket and reinforced at junction
points to withstand wear. Ideally, it should have an 8 -foot
cable and a two circuit stereo plug.
COMFORT Extreme comfort is essential for many hours
of continuous listening pleasure. Ear cushions should be
highly compliant to conform to the contours of the head,
even if the listener is wearing glasses. Pressure of the ear
domes must be precisely set to avoid fatigue.
COUPLING Joining of the receiver to the ear is an
important characteristic. Close, direct coupling is necessary
to assure maximum abatement of external sounds and the
reinforcement of bass and treble frequencies.
-
PERFORMANCE Sound quality frequency and transient response with negligible distortion must be equal
without
to that of the best high quality speaker system
the problems of room acoustics.
-
...
MORE IMPORTANT try the DAVID CLARK /100 at the
-
for a true quality standard, a reference for judging
the performance quality of all headset receivers.
start
Only the DAVID CLARK/100 features
exclusive Direct Acoustical Coupling for
truly private listening-provides a rich,
natural quality of music only you can hear.
For stereo or mono
DAVID CLARK /100
$39.50
Supplied with 8 -foot cable, 2 circuit stereo plug.
At DAVID CLARK franchised dealers.
FREE! Send for the David Clark Story of
Personal Listening. Write Department A-3.
Zeováca
I
Clark
N C O R P O
COMPANY
R A T E D
WORCESTER. MASSACHUSETTS
CIRCLE 70
55
NEW PRODUCTS
New Line of Speaker Systems. ElectroVoice has developed a new line of compact
loudspeaker systems comprised of three
units, the E -V "Two," a wide range, two way system; the E -V "Four," a three -way
unit; and the E -V "Six" (shown), a four way system utilizing separate drivers. The
E -V Two is a two -way high-efficiency unit
for use with any amplifier. Componentquality loudspeakers and etched circuit
board construction are employed for maximum power -handling capacity and crossover freqcency accuracy. A diffraction horn
is used for the high frequencies. The E -V
matit shutoff; pushbutton mode con rols;
individual volume and tone control for
each channel; illuminated VU meters and
two built -in 4 x 6 speakers. Power o atput
of the Sorrento is rated at 7 watt
3.5
watts per channel. User net price o the
Sorrento is $399.95. The remote cont of is
$34.95, dynamic microphones, $19.95 each.
Allied Impex Corporation, 300 Park Ave ;
nue South, New York 10, N. Y.
Professional Tape Recorder.
M-7
G
Audio Corp. announces the availabil
the new EMT Studer C -37 series
tape recorder. The machine, manufa
in Switzerland, has been well trie
proven with over 300 units operati
ham
y of
aster
tured
and
g in
boadcasting and recording install tions
throughout the world. Extreme att ntion
has been paid to achieve top perfor ance
specifications, operating and mainte ance
ease, and editing functions. For ex pie,
wow and flutter content is ± 0.04 pe cent
rms, signal -to -noise ratio is 66 -d unweighted at 15 ips, full track. A u ique
tape tensioning device allows extr mely
smooth and uniform tape handling. Electronic and electro- magnetic element are
completely plug -in. Editing featur
inelude built -in tape marker, motor - iven
cutting scissors, editing indexing, sp icing
block, and precision tape timer readi g diracily in minutes and seconds at any
speed. The recorder is available as 4 -in.
full or two track; 4 -in. three or four
track; 1 -in. four track; as well a film
Four uses three separate drivers. The
cabinets for the E -V Two and E-V Four
are constructed of 34 -in. hardwood and are
finished on four sides to allow use of
either vertical or horizontal position. A
compression VHF driver and diffraction
horn is used in the E -V Six, and a four way electrical crossover, with crossover
frequencies at 250, 800, and 3500 cps. The
E -V Six uses an 18 -in. low- frequency
driver. The E -V Six system, in traditional
styling, is available in mahogany or hand rubbed oiled walnut finish. Electro- Voice,
Inc., Buchanan, Michigan.
M-6
Tape Recorder in Teak Cabinet. A new,
completely self -contained stereo tape recorder, the Miranda 'Sorrento," completely
enclosed in teak cabinetry, marks the
entry of Allied Impex into the high -fidelity field. There are no handles or other external hardware to indicate that the cabinet houses a tape recorder. This unique
concept makes it possible for the Miranda
to become part of the living room decor,
rather than having to be concealed behind
doors. The Sorrento features solid -state
circuitry with 21 transistors and 19 diodes
in an OTL circuit and an all- electronic
matrix type pushbutton switching system.
Tape movement of the Sorrento is controlled by three separate motors, for capstan drive (71.= and 33¿ ips), rewind and
synchronous and preview head m
Four -track machines have complete
monitoring amplifier and swit
Gotham Audio Corp., 2 West 46
deis.
sync
hing.
reet,
PM- Stereo Booster. A new, indoo
booster offering an eight -fold mere
signal strength for FM radio receive
been introduced by Blonder- Tongue
ratories, Inc. Called the Stereobo
model FMB, it has a power gain of
and an unusually low noise figure.
price of the amplifier is $21.00. A
gain booster, such as the FMB, ca
FM
se in
New York 36, N. Y.
100 -Watt OTL Stereo Power Amplifier.
The Futterman Model H -3 amplifier has
been in development for 10 years and uses
advanced vacuum tube circuitry (patent
pending). No driver or output transformers are used. The loudspeakers are coupled
to the amplifier by large computer -grade
electrolytic capacitors. Conservatively
rated at 50 watts rms per channel (16 -ohm
load) the amplifier has more than adequate
power for any loudspeaker system. Its
square -wave response is claimed to be
unequalled by any other amplifier. The H -3
amplifier has a damping factor of 200 and
is ultra- stable with all loads, even when
driven into heavy overload. Both the harmonic and intermodulation distortion of
the H-3 amplifier is so low that it is difficult to measure with even the best of laboratory test instruments. The model H -3
stereo power amnlifier is a quality con-
strutted instrument. All of its components
are of the highest grade and of U. S. manufacture. Extreme care is taken in its construction and tests. Tech Instruments
Corp., 58 -17 37 Ave., Woodside, N. Y. M-10
High- Compliance Ceramic Cartridge. The
Electronic Applications Division of Sono tone has just made available a new high compliance version of its series of "Vetccitone" phono cartridges. Designated the
"Mark IV," the cartridge offers compliance
of 15 x 10 -e cm /dyne in all directions, separation of 30 db between channels, and
tracking force of 1.5 to 3 grams for professional arms and 3 to 4 grams for
changers. The "Mark TV" features Sono-
M -8
has
abo-
ster,
8
db
List
ighim-
tune's latest advance in record playing,
the Sono-Flex. A unique method of gripping the needle shank in a resilient butyl
rubber mount allows the needle to be flexed
in any motion, without damage. The "Mark
IV" is available in two needle combinations: Diamond with sapphire and a double
diamond model. Electronic Applications
Division, Sonotone Corporation, Elmsford,
New York.
M-11
Transistor 100 -Watt Stereo Amplifier. The Knight KN -999 transistor 100 watt stereo amplifier uses 19 transistors, 8
diodes and temperature control convectors.
Controls include pushbuttons to select the
program source desired. Other highlights:
stereo headphone jack; two-position record monitor switch; two phase switches; five
pairs of stereo Inputs (two with level control,-.): and n massive power transformer.
fast forward.
A servo motor is also incorporated in the circuitry for use with the
remote control unit. This optional accessory includes individual channel volume
controls as well as the full complement of
tape transport controls. Other features
are: tape lifters and tension bars; auto-
prove the over -all signal -to -noise ra 'o by
increasing receiver limiter action, o ring
an ideal solution to the problem of tereo
(multiplex) reception. The Stereob Oster
claims to be especially effective with
older tuners that do not have sen itive
front ends. The unit can be ins alled
indoors near a receiver by means f its
patented stripless screws. Blonder -Tongue
Laboratories, Inc., 9 Ailing Street, N:wark
2, N. J.
M -9
56
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
Price of the KN -999 is $199.95, less case.
Allied Radio Corp., 100 N. Western Ave..
Ill.
M -12
AUDIO
DECEMBER, 1963
Chicago
80,
`41
.,.,...,.
wr...
III
i11-0
tit
McIntosh
00 Ná11,-C
t1111111
Plt fAPIC
1
=
IER
your search is over
You'll never be satisfied with anything less than McIntosh quality once you've heard
it. You'll put an end to stepping up to something better in your search for the ultimate, because McIntosh is the best. There are good reasons: Exclusive, patented circuits
set new standards in performance. Careful engineering and conservative design practices ensure long term dependability. Consider amplifier output stages, for example,
that need no bias or balance adjustment, no tube selection or matching, to deliver
rated performance. McIntosh components are devised to fulfill every present need,
anticipate your future ones. Like the classics, they endure.
ILLUSTRATED ABOVE:
Model MX110 Stereo Tuner -Preamplifier and Model MC -240 Dual 40 -Watt Power
Amplifier. You need only add speakers.
Model MX110: A single chassis comb.nes the quality and flexibility of a separate
multiplex tuner in the broadcast-monitor class with a professional stereo control
center
$399.00
MC -240: Superb, distortion -free, two channel model, conservatively rated at 40 watts
per channel. Flat frequency response well beyond the limits of the audio spectrum
with neglible phase shift.
$288.00
Illt I nt V J h
2 CHAMBERS STREET,
LABORATORY INC.
BINGHAM'ON, N.
Y.
Phoro -arca Codo 607.723.5491
AUDIO
DECEMBER, 1963
57
SHERWOOD
Newest from Telex
(from page 44)
INTEGRAL CHANNEL CONTRO
with HEADPHONE STEREO
received (stereo -mono switch in stereo position). A stereo -mono switch permits bypassing the multiplex circuitry if monoonly reception is desired (slight reduction
in noise level that way).
The remaining controls on the front
panel include an interchannel -hush defeat
switch plus the power -level control.
The front panel is quite handsome, combining a glossy white -enamel finish with
gold borders and knob -fronts plus a rather
large slide -rule dial. At night, the green lighted dial is quite attractive and easy to
read.
Circuit Description
The famous StereoTwin® performance is
now linked with the most advanced engineering development in the headset field
-INTEGRAL CHANNEL CONTROL.
This newest wonder of miniaturization
from Telex Stereo Laboratories has
moved the stereo controls into the headset itself. No longer is a separate control
center required.
With Telex INTEGRAL CHANNEL CONTROL, each channel is controlled individually by convenient, smoothly styled
volume control knobs on each earpiece.
Nothing to build, solder or hook up. Just
plug into your stereo set and adjust each
channel separately to the ideal listening
level. It's better, more convenien and
costs less because no separate s ereo
r
control center is required.
Audiophiles look to Telex for the best
in high fidelity performance. Now St-reoTwin with INTEGRAL CHANNEL
ONTROL adds to the list of Telex "firs r_" in
listening pleasure. $29.15
A
Product of Sound Research
TELEX / Acoustic Prod cts
COMMUNICATIONS ACCESSORIES
3054 Excelsior Blvd. Minneapolis16,
inn.
CIRCLE 58
The circuit is straightforward. We would
judge that the S -3000V achieves its excellent performance by means of quality components and conservative practice rather
than unusual circuitry.
The 300 -ohm antenna input terminals are
connected to a balun which in turn feeds
the signal to a tuned circuit and then to
the cascode r.f. amplifier (a 6BS8). A
6GH8 triode -pentode is used as the oscillator- mixer. The next two stages are 6AU6
i.f. amplifiers which are followed by a
613N6 limiter. The pentode section of a
6G1I8 is used as an FM driver and is followed by a pair of germanium diodes in
a ratio detector configuration. If the stereo mono switch is in the mono position, the
signal then goes through the usual de-em phasis network and out. In the stereo position of the switch, the signal goes through
the multiplex circuitry which consists of a
19 kc amplifier, a 38 ke oscillator- doubler,
a balanced demodulator containing four
diodes, de-emphasis and 38 kc filter network, and an audio amplifier. The stereo
indicator is a neon bulb which is ignited
when a 19 ke signal is present and amplified by means of a 12AT7. The indicator
action seems to be relatively insensitive to
noise and, since it does not use a relay,
very quiet.
Performance
THE
ers
THE
FM tuners are extremely difficult to report about simply. It is quite possible to
provide lengthy technical reports which
would only be understood by an engineer
familiar with this field. Obviously we can't
do that. Equally we can't say that the
product is good, or fine, or excellent and
let it go at that. Instead we are constrained to do a little of each.
Thus we can report that the distortion
of the S -3000V is extremely low-IM 0.25
per cent and harmonic 0.22 per cent at
400 cps. The capture ratio is 2.1 and the
stereo separation is 35 db at 100 cps. Sensitivity, IHF, is 1.8 uv. Disregarding
measurements, we were able to receive 35
stations loud and clear with our standard
antenna system. Also the S -3000V is quite
insensitive to impulse noise and other disturbances.
To us the significant factors are that the
S -3000V is able to receive a large number
of stations easily and with low distortion.
That means it is a very fine tuner, up
amongst the best. At its relatively modest
price ($165) it is an interesting prospect
for anyone needing a tuner.
15
19" H x 237/a" W x 5%" D
Thin line styled for wall mounting.
Floor stand available.
S
7- 3/16"
Hx15/e" Wx91/2"
THE
D
limited space or as aux.
iliary unit.
For
101/2"
H x
23N"
W x
117/s"
D
Unique design for bookshelf
mounting.
FOR
r
261"
W
,Sound
0.7/
THE
x
H
11
truly
is
%"
From the lowest rumblings of the organ pedal
notes to the whispering overtones of the flutes
.. FRAZIER offers a complete series of full
range, two -way. and three-way wide range
speaker systems employing both the modified
Helmholtz principle, and the exponential horn
14"
D
remarkable speaker.
A
58
THE LOVE OF
R
ORPORATED
.. Assuring the ultimate in smoothness, balance,
and cleanliness from as low as 28 cycles. to
22,000 cycles in the larger. systems. Oil Walnut
hand crafted calbinetry. Some models available
unfinished. Complete Music Wall "Playmate"
Systems available in Oil Walnut and Burma Teak
Price Range $26.95 to $310.00.
Write for complete details on all models.r
Over 350 Dealers in U. S. Alone.
2649 BRENNER DR.
DALLAS 20, TEXAS
Ij
CIRCLE 85
SHURE STEREO STUDIO DYNETIC, MODEL M222
The Shure Studio Dvnetic was first introduced in the year 1957, and we profiled
it in May of that year. The present Studio
AUDIO
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
DECEMBER, 1963
Dynetic differs from the earlier model
mainly in that the cartridge is stereo; the
arm itself is virtually identical.
For those who are not familiar with this
arm, it can be described as a balance beam
mounted on a tapered U -beam. Confused?
Let us try to clarify that a bit. The cartridge is mounted on one end of a round
shaft several inches long. At the other end
of the shaft is a counterweight consisting
of an internally threaded sleeve which
screws onto the shaft, in or out to balance
the cartridge (or unbalance). Toward the
center of the shaft there is a cross -shaft
which rides in jewel bearings (the cross shaft is that bump to the rear of the cartridge). Thus we have a balance beam, which
unbalanced by the counterweight to
apply the desired tracking force.
But balance beams move vertically only,
what about horizontal motion? The remainder of the arm supplies horizontal motion, pivoting about the shaft seen toward
the rear of the arm. That bearing is a
jewel too.
Thus the major portion of the arm moves
horizontally only, and a balance beam
a few inches long does all the vertical movement.
Flow is the cartridge raised and lowered?
Simple, press the plastic button on top
of the arm and it raises the cartridge as
long as it is pressed (it pushes down on the
counterweight). Cute.
The main arm is also counterweighted,
for obvious reasons, and this counterweight is dynamically damped to roll off
response below 20 cps.
By the way, that shaft toward the center
and on the outer side is the arm rest. The
arm is magnetically attracted to it.
The cartridge employs the moving -magis
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Lowest p-iced modern,
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stop -start
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-
SPECIFICATIONS:
Records 2 full hours
Power supply: rechargable battery, or 6/12 V car battery, or AC converter
Push buttons enable easy operation
while in carrying case
Safety record lock
Microphone and Radio Phono inputs Headphones /external speaker connections
Pause
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3
and 17g ips.
Frequency response: 100 -12,000 cycles at3
ips.
Recording level indicator
4" x 6" heavy duty
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Transistorized speed regulator.
;
BUTOBA
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BUTOBA is
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UNEQUALLED FEATURES:
6 hrs. recording
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electronic speed
pull amplifier
Tape counter
light batteries
on 5 inch
reels
Fast formotors with transistorized
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tone control
push 5" x 7" heavy -duty speaker
40 hrs. on 8 ordinary flashTransistorized, battery or AC.
2
net principle (Shure holds the patent for
that principle) with an easily -replaceable
stylus. Its balanced design makes it rather
impervious to hum pickup. The stylus -tip
radius is 0.5 -mil for the M22D cartridge
supplied. An advantage of this system is
that the arm will accept the M1 (monophonic) cartridge for those who prefer
to use a mono cartridge to play mono
records. Compliance of the cartridge is
quite high, being ill the order of 20 x 10-"
cm per dyne.
We found that the M222 tracks quite well
at a force of 1.2 grams. Output at 1000
cps and at 5 cm /sec. was 4.2 Irv. Frequency response, using the CBS Labs STR100 test record and a 47k load, was within
2 db from 20- 20,000 cps. The resopnse
curve was relatively flat out to 6000 cps
where it took a 1.5 -db dip which started
to rise again at 10,000 cps and continued
up to a 2.5 -db bump. at 15,000 cps. Channel separation was 24 db at 1000 cps, closing up to 6 db at 15,000 cps.
In use, the Shure Stereo Studio D,ynetie
provided good sound quality, especially in
the bass frequencies. Its handling of transients is quite good. An excellent arm cartridge combination.
M -5
SPECIFICATIONS:
Response: 50-13,000 cps. 0 3`
6,000 cps. c_r 17g ips.
Half track
Lightweight With dynamic mike
of
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ips., 60Compact
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the asking. Write...
5
STANFORD INTERNATIONAL
569 Laurel Street
Sam Carlos, Calif.
Telephone: 591.0339
CIRCLE 59
AUDIO
DECEMBER, 1963
COUGH TOO MUCH?
SHORT OF BREATH?
You may have a Respiratory Disease. Don't take chances. See
your doctor, says your local
Christmas Seal organization.
ALTEC
SOUND TALK
WHY ALTEC DROPPED "HI Fl"
IN FAVOR OF " PLAYBACK "
There was a time when the term "hi fi"
commanded an awed respect; but today
its application can he virtually meaningless. So misleading, in fact, that the
Federal Trade Commission is attempting to establish a binding definition of
"high fidelity" -one on which the FTC
can issue a ruling that will protect the
buying public against the increasing
horde of inferior products that are
being advertised as "hi fi:'
But a simple, workable definition that
would adequately classify truly dedicated high fidelity components is not
easy to come by. On request, the EIA
composed a definition which was so
loose that we understand the FTC found
it entirely unacceptable and have now
turned to other industry bodies for suggestions in the hopes that someone can
come up with an industry solution that
can be used to clearly identify those
products that are capable of music
reproduction above the ordinary.
WHAT'S THE ANSWER?
For Altec, the solution was so obvious
we're rather embarrassed that we hadn't
thought of it before. We simply dropped
"hi fi" and replaced it with the original
generic term for all Altec recording
studio equipment ... PLAYBACK .
PLAYBACK is the one definition that
cannot be compromised or falsely exploited. For PLAYBACK is the term used
in the recording industry to designate
the studio sound reproducing equipment relied on by conductors. performing artists and recording engineers to
accurately compare the realism of a
recording with the live rendition.
Only genuine
PLAYBACK
compo-
nents have been able to meet or surpass
these critical demands.
THE ASSURANCE OF
PROFESSIONAL ACCEPTANCE
Since the beginning of modern sound
reproduction,
PLAYBACK
has been
directly associated with Altec Lansing.
For Altec, and only Altec, sells 80% of
its products to the professional usage
market. This is your assurance that any
Altec component you choose for your
home is of genuine studio PLAYBACK
quality. You need only ask yourself
this Who should be better judge of
audio components than the user whose
living depends on them?
The more you think about it, the
more you'll appreciate why Altec
dropped the term "high fidelity" and
has returned to its original genre. "Hi
fi" is a matter of personal interpreta:
tion.
C
1963
Al,
PLAYBACK is a
matter of fact.
Altec Lansing Corporation
Anaheim, California
CIRCLE 71
59
S T A R T L
major
step
SOUND SYSTEMS
(from page 23)
,tem must obviously provide n excellent match between the sound ystem
and the auditorium. However, if .uch a
system is to be used properly, . near
perfect match is also required b tween
the sound system and the operator.
Touring shows will come into a auditorium such as the Fisher The re in
Detroit, the Bushnell Auditori m in
Hartford, or the Jacksonville Mu icipal
Auditorium and remain for varying
periods, from one day to several 'peeks.
There will hardly ever be a re earsal
before opening night, and the .oundsystem operator must solve any 'problems" on the spot. Also the revie "s obtained by the show will be entirely .n the
basis of the first night performan e, and
everything must be right that first night.
When shows appear at theat rs or
auditoriums which have sound s stems
relatively well matched to their a oustical properties, the management o these
theaters usually require, as a m
that the house reinforcement loud.peakers be used, and not the touring sound
system loudspeakers. The output .f the
touring show's control "rack" i then
patched via microphone lines o the
sound- system's power amplifiers, . d the
results can be quite satisfactory
Even better, and with inc asing
frequency, shows appearing at Louses
with really fine sound systems
e the
complete house sound -reinforceme t t system, sometimes even for sound -eff: is reproduction.
A control console for a well d:.igned
house reinforcement system shou d follow the guides in this article. E. her a
standard broadcast-type console cr one
employing slide-type attenuators would
Æ
be applicable.
:
forward"
c
c
i
ACOUSTECH SOLID
STATE AMPLIFYING
SYSTEM
.
better than the best **
.
.
.
seems to 'grab hold of' and
control a speaker to a degree that
led
has
many listeners to remark
that the speaker itself 'never sounded
the finest square wave
better.*'"
response I have ever observed **
.
.
"...
..
These
are examples of the acclaim
accorded the Acoustech Solid State
Stereo Power Amplifier since its introduction at the 1962 New York High
Fidelity Show. Now the first "all -out"
solid state amplifying system is made
possible with the new Acoustech II
Stereo Decade Control Center. These
two units afford the listener a new
standard in music reproduction and
I
reliability possible only with solid
state circuitry throughout.
For
full information
instruments,
Acoustech
send coupon below.
I
$395,
Acoustech
II $348
ACOUSTECH, Inc., 139 Main St.
Cambridge, Mass. 02142
Dept. A -12.
Name
Address
City_
-
THIS MONTH'S
on these remarkable
(slightly higher west of Rockies)
*High Fidelity Magazine, August, 1962
* *HiFi /Stereo Review, February, 1963
State
N.
CIRCLE 60
I N G
PERFORMANCE
COVER
Hit of the
New York
Hi -Fi Show
The
New
KSC
Speaker
System
"The KSC -1 is easily the finest speaker in
its price class I have heard "... Larry tide,
American Record Guide, Sept. 1963.
music lovers who already own these
speaker systems are unanimous in their
Overwhelming!" They're referstartling realistic reproduction- smooth
20,000 cps, absence of distortion, superb
quality, and the surprising low price
Compares with
Three magthe best you've ever heard anywhere
nificent speaker units from SEAS of Norway, skillfully
blended, plus ingenious cabinet design produce extraordinary sound quality that is a delight to hear
Perfect for use in finest monaural or stereo installations. We invite your comparison Size: 12 "Wx121h"
fit any standard cabinet. Oiled walnut,
Dx20 "H
Listen at these fine studios or
many other finishes
write for literature and name of nearest distributor.
Hundreds
of
remarkable
comment
ring to the
from 30 to
... "Simply
-
AIREX, N.Y.C.
all stores
RESCO,
HARVEY RADIO, N.Y.C.
SAM GOODY,
INT'L. HOME FURNISHINGS, N.Y.C.
HI -Fl SHOP, Balt.
Phila.
Also Compare Our Sensational New
KSC -55 Low Cost Hi -Fi System
KSC SYSTEMS, INC.
P.O. Box 303A,
Knickerbocker Sta., N.Y. 2, N.Y.
CIRCLE 72
PURCHASING
A HI -FI
SYSTEM?
TRADE -INS OK-TIME PAYMENTS
Up to 2 years to pay!
Jim Lansing`
Altec Lansing
Send Us
Your List Of
Components
For A
Package
Quotation
Eleetrovoice
Jensen
Hartley*
University
Acoustic Research
Janszen
Leak*
Wharfedale
USI. Citizen Band
Hallicrafter
Gonset
Texas Crystals
Concertons
Bell
Viking
G.E.
Weathers
Harman -Kardon
Eico
Pilot
Sherwood`
Frazier
ESL
Su per scope
This month we have a cover installation which was supplied to s by
Dick Levy of Seneca Audio -Vi al in
Buffalo, N. Y. This installation is in
the home of A. Frank Cowen, r., 83
Woodbury Drive, Eggertsville, N. Y.
The equipment installed in Mr Cowens' system includes a Fisher 0-watt
stereo amplifier and AM -FM tun r. The
speakers include a pair of Electr. -Voice
SP -12 low- frequency reproducers plus a
pair of electrostatics for the hi-_ h frequencies. The turntable and a u are
stomWeathers. The cabinetry was
made by a local firm, Auburn- Tr atson,
AIREX
WON'T
BE
UNDERSOLD
All merchandise
is
brand new, factory
fresh & guaranteed.
Visit our N.Y. Showroom
Free cabinet brochure
8 hi fi catalog
AIREX
RADIO
CORPORATION
Dual Changer
Bogen
Leak
Dynakit
Fisher
H. H. Scott
Finco
ECI
DeWald
Roberts
Sony
KSC Sp Sys
Challenger
Browning
Garrard
Norelco
Miracord
General Radio
Rek -O -Kut
Components
Tandberg
Fairchild
Pickering
Gray
Audio Tape
Magnecord
Rockford Cabinets
Artizon Cabinets
Fair Traded
85-AM CortlandtSt., N.Y. 7, W04 -1820
Co.
CIRCLE 73
AUDIO
60
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
DECEMBER, 1963
AUDIO
ETC
(front page 14)
either. But with the best will in the world
you can't start tossing off atom- smashers
like that with impunity. Somebody's likely
to get confused. Millions of people.
There's a sure -fire term for this sort of
thing, invented long ago. Half -truths. As
somebody said, too, a little bit of knowledge is a dangerous thing, or words to that
effect. Nonsense is just fine -but half
truths are worse than nonsense any day.
Half truths, addled semi -sense, the sort of
writing that Thimble's uses multiplied
everywhere every day, is the bane of hi fi
sense and the instigator of really dangerous
confusion concerning the true values of our
noble stereo.
Look back at Thimble's genial ad. So we
all hear differently? Of course (and electronics did discover how to measure the
same). From person to person, our response
to sound waves varies within the normal
spectrum, quite aside from the more extreme kinds of hearing losses and distortions that rank as abnormal. But does this
imply that, like glasses and hearing aids,
our stereo machines should be tailored to
fit our individual pairs of ears, matched to
our hearing characteristics?
Well, that's what Thimble's has practically said. It's right there, in so many unintended words.
Don't laugh too hard. It could be serious.
What about the great Dynagroove controversy (and many an earlier one of similar purport) ? Do wo tailor our phonograph
records for maximum effect on cheap machines? Or do we shoot for the one- and -only
standard, true high fidelity? Do we match
varying ears -or reproduce sound faithfully?
Thimble's has an idea there, if perhaps
by sheer accident. Let's all take audition
tests and then go out and build equalizers
to match our personal hi fi equipment to our
ears. Better than tone controls and much
more expensive.
But what of Thimble's own stereos?
There's more. Thimble's observes that some
of us have $149 ears and others have such
"sensitive" members protruding from the
sides of our heads that no less than a $1200
stereo can possibly fill our bill. Now just
what is Thimble's saying here?
Is a $149 pair of ears, maybe, immune to
distorted highs and bumpy pseudo-bass'?
Well, maybe so. And do those $1200 ears
possess Extended Range and superior distortion-analyzers, built right in? Seems that
way. Of course there's no mention whatever
of musical taste, background, experience,
preference, nor of our education or lack of
the same in respect to good reproduced
sound. These things do count -they count
enormously. But let it pass: I fear that
what Thimble's really meant by all this
was a bit less inspiring. Some people have
$149 wallets, and to heck with their ears.
Others, Thimble's optimistically hopes (and
with reason), go around bulging with $1200
bundles of green stuff, or equivalent in
credit cards.
In which case, what Thimble's is really
saying is that the poorer your wallet, the
dopier are your ears, and the guy who carries all that lettuce is obviously equipped
with "sensitive" listeners to match. After
all, don't sensitive people buy Cadillacs?
(Or Lincolns or Imperials-let's be fair,
now.) Thus do we move from the preposterous to the ridiculous. And so, I say,
come on now, Thimble's, are you trying to
confuse the great American public? You
sure are helping to.
What about that happy little 2 per cent
figure'? I'm wondering where that came
from, and how Thimble's really might have
pushed it around to make some better sense.
If I'm right, the sleaziest $19.95 hi fi can
be made to measure as low as" 2 per cent
distortion, somewhere in its innards, if
you turn down the volume to minimum perceptible power output and discount the
loudspeaker and the phono cartridge. "As
low as," my eye (and ear) Nor is there any
word from Thimble's man about the other
and equally interesting extreme -"as high
as." As high as 10 per cent'? Very possible,
!
at $149.
And yet, you know, what I'm thinking is
(Continued on page 63)
portable
perfection
for
hi -fi fans
From Denmark comes this
aristocrat of portables. Su-
perb AM- FM- Shortwave performance with all the features you can imagine in
a high quality portable: one
full watt push -pull output
and a 5" x 7" speaker,
flywheel tuning with slide rule dial, full range inde-
pendent tone controls,
NEW! LANG COMPACT MIXER
WITH EXCLUSIVE
tio
ECHO FEED
AND
RETURN
.4110
14,P
pushbutton band selection,
tuning meter and battery
indicator, loudspeaker-ear
phone output and separate
tuner output, plus plug-in
connection for an auto antenna and accessory
mounting bracket for over -
the -road hi -fi.
to
,.
_
40
Write for detailed specifi
cations and test reports.
THE economical
approach to
most portable and console
requirements, the new Lang
Compact Mixer is ideal for use
in any recording or broadcasting facility. The high gain, low
noise Lang Compact Mixer has
four low -level inputs and one
high -level input with echo feed
on each. In addition the Lang
Compact Mixer has exclusive
master gain control and echo
return. More and more the new
Lang Compact Mixer is becoming the standard of quality for
quality- conscious studios. Use
BO
Price less accessories: $395.00
By appointment
to the Royal Danish Court
one, two, or more units for
multi -channel application.
ACCESSORIES: Matching meter
panel.
1, 2 or 3 Weston meters. Plug in microphone and line transformer.
Hammon reverb unit..
For complete details write
LANG ELECTRONICS
CIRCLE 74
AUDIO
DECEMBER, 1963
N
C.
507 FIFTH AVENUE
DYNACO, INC.
New York 17, N. Y.
3912 Powelton Ave., Phila. 4, Pa.
CIRCLE 61
61
córivëénfiérvce Lòs AUDIO Freaders.
ItHE
nll
s
á
..
-
!Fil
til
lessltlz
Order your books leisurely
by mail
save time and travel,
we pay the postage.
AUDIO
OOKSHELF
Designing and Building Hi -Fi Furniture
Jeff Markel
Written by a professional
mans 1011M(:
hi -fi furniture designer
who has taught furniture
design at leading coliIll'Fl
leges, this book is an au¡FtîRNITIiRE
thentic reference of value
to the hi -fi fan and professional custom builder.
Covers everything from
types of woods to furniture finishing for the
Maintaining Hi -Fi Equipment
Joseph Marshall
A valuable reference for
anyone whose living or
hobby is servicing hi -fi
equipment. Outlines the
professional approach for
servicing all types of hi-
fi components. Covers
trouble- shooting of electronic, mechanical and
acoustic problems. 224
pages.
No. 58 Paperback $2.90*
1280 pages
1600 topics
1600 illustrations
"The AUDIO Cyclopedia"
Howard M. Tremaine
Here is one single volume
with the most comprehensive coverage of every
phase of audio. Concise,
accurate explanations of
all audio and hi -fi subjects. More than 7 years
in preparation -the most
authoritative encyclopedic work with a unique
quick reference system for
instant answers to any
question. A vital complete reference book for
mechanically adept; de,
sign principles, styles and
arrangements for the
decor minded. 224 pages.
No. 79 Paperback 52.90*
every audio engineer,
technician, and serious
Contains
a
Right up to date, a complete course on sound reproduction. Covers everything from the basic
elements to individual
chapters of each of the
important components of
a high fidelity system.
No. 110 53.75'
wealth of
ideas, how to's, what
to's, and when to's, written so plainly that both
engineer and layman can
appreciate its valuable
context. Covers planning,
problems with decoration,
cabinets and building hifi furniture. A perfect
guide.
No.115 52.50*
"the best of AUDIO"
edited by
Tape Recorders and Tape Recording'
Harold
D.
C. G.
No. 123 $19.95*
of High Fidelity Simplified. Easy to read and
learn the techniques required for professional
results with home re-
-
McProud
AUDIOGUIDE
techniques, sound effects,
editing and splicing, etc.
Invaluable to recording
enthusiasts.
Paper Cover 52.95*
MONTHLY SPECIAL! SAVE $5.25
45% with this collection of AUDIO Books.
Handbook of Sound Reproduction ($3.75) "best of AUDIO" ($2.00)
McProud High Fidelity Omnibook ($2.50)
Tape Recorders Cv Tape Recording ($2.95)
TOTAL VALUE OF ALL FOUR BOOKS $11.20
Save over
Your cost ONLY $5.95 POSTPAID
This offer expires December 31, 1963. Good only on direct order to Publisher
CIRCLE 05300
P.
-
Please send me the books
I
'962'41
RADIO MAGAZINES, INC.
have circled below.
I
^rxxir
netmw
-
,
$1.00
No. 127
All
U.S.A. and CANADIAN
orders shipped postpaid.
Harold
79
110
112
115
123
125
127
142
251
05300
-
-
.
TAPE RECORDER
......,...,
;i"
--I
AUDIO
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
1
Written
-' i
.,
R'
/
J^^" 3,
x,,
<,6,....
¡¡
(0
V
in
"plain talk" for
the man who has, or wishes
to buy, a tape recorder. It
answers the myriad cluesLions raised by tape recording enthusiasts. Its chapters
cover every phase of operaLion and maintenance -from
adding
a
tope recorder
to
the hi -fi system, to a thoron micro -
ough dissertation
Phones. Lots of practical
information on how to buy.
176 pages.
No. 251
STATE
62
.
EIIY,
Getting The Most Out Of Your Tape Recorder
Herman Burstein
------
ZONE
,I-
HICK
$3.30
-.
CITY
3rd Edition
record players, etc. Lots of
ideas for custom installations. Tells how to achieve
concert hall reception in
your home. 216 pages.
`
ADDRESS
1
-
{ `T4!`' -sue
' -1\
t...ó1\
-
NAME
about
magazine
high fidelity. A 1962-1963
product review of stereo high
fidelity components. Valuable
reference for the high fi istity enthusiast and hobbyist.
Part
contains a thorough
discussion of the Problems of
a Stereo Installation; Part II
is a complete treatise
on
Selecting a Tape Recorder.
Indispensable to the prospecLive buyer of stereo camponents and tape recorders.
Includes a section on where
to buy various stereo hi -fi
components and accessories.
156 pages.
complete hi -fi story
answers all questions about
tuners, changers, amplifiers,
tape recorders, speakers,
The
(No C.O.D. or billing.)
S
$3.50
editors of AUDIO, the
original
Weiler
D.
0.0,...."/
am enclosing the
By the
High Fidelity Simplified
tour
58
124
-µ---
No. 142
0. Box 629, Mineola, New York 11502
full remittance of
'((('¡¡¡
AUDIUGUIDE':
-
corders. Covers room
acoustics, microphone
AUDIO Bookshelf
}
-
A complete book on home
recording by the author
No. 112
._..
No. 125
A new compendium of
AUDIO knowledge. Here
is a
collection of the
best of AUDIO
The
AUDIO Clinic by Joseph
Giovanelli . . . noted
audio engineer and the
original high fidelity answer -man
EQUIPMENT
PROFILES edited by C. G.
McProud . . . Editor of
AUDIO. Here is a wealth
of hi -fi and audio information. Answers to the
most important issues in
high fidelity and a valuable reference.
No. 124 Volume I $2.00*
Weiler
.,,,
c-s-°
The 5th AUDIO Anthology
Edited by C. G. McProud,
publisher of AUDIO. An anthology of the most significant articles covering: stereo
recording and reproduction;
,,
stereo multiplex; measurements; stereo technology,
constriction and theory
which appeared in AUDIO
't'°
during 1958 and 1959. The
5th is truly a collectors' item
and a valuable reference for
y ntl ,,t, '.
the professional engineer,
teacher, student, hobbyist and
hi -fi fan. 144 pages.
Handbook of
Sound Reproduction
Edgar M. Vilichur
Prepared and edited by
C. G. McProud, publisher
of Audio and noted authority and pioneer in
the field of high fidelity.
a
`ti
audiophile.
McProud High Fidelity Omnibook
j' p j 0
;etc.
$4.25
DECEMBER, 1963
(from page 61)
build your own bozak
that Thimble's may actually be trying to
say the right tiring, honestly -for that
the most
noise -free
recordings
$1200 machine surely can measure up to
some respectable distortion figures. Now
why not give legitimate specs, and reap
some legitimate credit?
Along with all this, Thimble's has tossed
in some additional blockbusters about
stereo itself -they had to tell what stereo
is, after all. "The basic idea of stereo, of
course," said the ad, "is to reproduce in
your own hone the kind of sound you hear
in a concert 11ä11." OK, UK- that's a safe and -sound observation that we have heard
before, even if I do, myself, happen to
disagree heartily tvith it. (See above.)
"That full, rounded living sound is
created because 0(1111111 comes to you from
left and right-and what your left ear
hears is different from what vour right ear
hears. Stereo separates these left and right
sounds for you in your own hone."
ll:ilf-truth again! Ftop! Sound comes to
you from left and right, all right, and also
from above and behind and sometimes
down below, not to mention from straight
ahead. And what your right ear hears is,
indeed, different from what the other one
hears. BUT please, Thimble's, stereo reproduction doesn't separate these sounds in
brings them together. Look,
your home
Mr. Thimble's man, do you realize what
you're getting us into here?
"Concert hall sounds" are partially, and
significantly, separated by the mikes and
you have
ever
heard
-it
URBAN OR EARLY AMERICAN
INFINITE-BAFFLE SPEAKER CABINETS
Complete kits ready for assembly, and
finishing to your taste. For the Bozak
2 -way B -300 and 3 -way B -302A Systems.
See your Bozak Dealer, or write Bozak.
CARIEN
CONN.
06821
CIRCLE 75
recording machines at the sound- source.
l-es. And this (partial separation is, indeed,
maintained all the way into the home living
room, if with some degradation in the two way stereo record groove and probably some
more in the stereo cartridge. But there, I
remind you, the separation ends. The home
1oudo11eakers briny together the separated
sounds for us, to create the over -all and
single stereo sound.
Dear me, if a few more people (including
SEE
YOUR
COSTS
SHRINK
WITH KEY
DISCOUNTS
Prove it for yourself! Rush us your
list of stereo hi -fi components for an
immediate price -busting quotation.
Enjoy these advantages:
LOWEST PRICES
SPEEDY DELIVERY
FACTORY WARRANTY
EASY PAYMENT PLAN
For a real eye- opener, send for our
valuable money- saving audio discount
catalog A -17, featuring the latest in
stereo equipment.
KEY ELECTRONICS CO.
120 Liberty st., N. Y. 6, N. Y.
CIRCLE 76
AUDIO
DECEMBER, 1963
Thimble's) could get that idea through
their heads, we might have less of all this
preposterous ping -gong stuff.
Things like this are insidious. Multiply
Thimble's inoffensive little explanation by
the inevitable million and you get a sea of
confusion, among people who ought by this
time to have learned at least the simple
sense about stereo's values. Instead, they
get more devastatingly confused every day.
It's ball, and nu':ul it. A few million more
half- truths, bun-went or no, and we'll reach
such an impasse that stereo -and hi fi too
-will be talked straight out of existence.
If you're going to Make any dollars at all
in this business, you'll have to make $en$e
1
first.
Stereo, or Hi -Fi?
\canna see what I mean? Well, now that
I've quoted you a sample of the output, one
source out of millions for public confusion,
let me toss at you a piece of the end -product, right from a befuddled consumer.
This is a genuine, unrehearsed letter, and
don't, think it isn't typical of many more
that all of its supposed "experts" get, not
to mention phone calls and aimiable conversations at dinner parties, hi fi shows and all
over the place.
This correspondent has been reading
all sorts of publicity, that's for sure. Especially, the optimistic publicity that, because
advertising can never say a negative thing,
has avoided the objectionable yet reasonably accurate "mono" in favor of a happy
but dangerously meaningless superlative,
"hi fi." Oh no-of course, nobody meant to
suggest that a stereo disc isn't a hi fi dise,
though it has to be admitted that a hi fi
disc isn't always stereo. But because of the
implied confusion in these two overlapping
terms, the general consumer is now so
utterly mixed up about the difference "be-
will
be made on the new all- transistorized Norelco
Continental '401' Stereo Tape Recorder, the only
recorder using the newly developed AC107 transistors in its two preamplifiers. The AC107 is the
only transistor specifically designed for magnetic
tape head preamplifiers utilizing specially purified
germanium to achieve the extraordinary low noise
figure of 3 db, measured over the entire audio
band (rather than the usual single frequency). This
noise figure remains stable over large collector emitter voltage swings and despite large variations in source resistance.
Hear the new transistorized Norelco Continental
'401' 4 -track stereo /mono record and playback
4 speeds: 7''/t, 3A, 1% and the new 4th speed
of '3f6 ips which provides 32 hours of recording
on a single 7" reel
fully self- contained with
dynamic stereo microphone, two speakers (one in
the removable cover for stereo separation), dual
preamps and dual recording and playback amplifiers self-contained PA system mixing facilities
can also play through external hi -fi system
multiplay facilities.
Specifications: Frequency response: 60- 16,000 cps
at 71/2 ips. Head gap: 0.00012 ". Signal -to -noise
ratio: better than -48 db. Wow and flutter: less
than 0.14% at 71/2 ips. Recording level indicator:
one -meter type. Program indicator: built -in, 4-digit
adjustable. Inputs: for stereo microphone (1 twochannel); for phono, radio or tuner (2). Foot pedal
facilities (1). Outputs: for external speakers (2),
for external amplifiers (1 two -channel); headphone
Recording
complement:
AC 107(4),O75 (6),0C 74(2), 0C44 (2),
N1314
(2), 0079 (1). Line voltage: 117 volts AC at 60
cycles. Power consumption: 65 watts. Dimensions:
181/2" x 15" x 10 ". Weight: 38 lbs. Accessories:
Monitoring headset and dual microphone adapter.
For a pleasant demonstration, visit your favorite hi -fi dealer or camera shop. Write for Brochure
Al2. North American Philips Company, Inc., High
Fidelity Products Division, 100 East 42nd Street,
New York 17, New York.
CIRCLE 63
63
tween" hi fi and stereo
books et al
HIGH FIDELITY SYSTEMS
A User's Guide by Roy F.
-
Allison
that it's
g to
go
take years-or the final abolition o the
mono recording -to untangle the
ess.
Just look at it and weep. So silly.
Here's a perfectly sane, intelligent man,
listening to a "highbrow" musical adio
program (my own) and writing me to sk"In your opinion which is the better recording, high fidelity or stereo?
"I personally am not sold on ster:o. It
seems to me stereo gives off a sq, eaky
sound, not a true sound, whereas high
fidelity is snore true. I may be wro g. I
would like your opinion.
"My player is Stereo -High Fidelit so I
can play both types, but for the life f me
I can't reconcile myself to pay one ollar
more for stereo records when I ca get
better sound -so it seems to me-in high
e
!
AR Library Vol.
1
70 pp., illus., paper $1.00
A layman's practical guide to high fidelity installation. We think that it will become a
classic work for novices (and perhaps be consulted secretly by professionals). From the
Bergen Evening Record: "completely basic . . .
If this doesn't give
you a
roadmap into the
fidelity.
"I would appreciate a reply. Thank , ou."
Now I ask you, how would you ' e to
untangle this dismally confused cust ea ert
Don't go telling me, well, he's just ore of
those nuts. He is not. He's just one of hose
guys that reads the advertisements.
.
.
field of hi-fi, nothing will." From The American Record Guide: "really expert guidance . . .
I would strongly urge this book as prerequisite
reading for anyone contempalting hi -fi purchases." From High Fidelity: "welcome addition
to the small but growing body of serious litera-
ture on home music systems." From Electronics
Illustrated: "To my mind, this is the best basic
book now available on high fidelity."
From braces
to wheelchair
to bed . .
that is the
tragic life story
of a child with
the
93 pp., illus., paper $2.00
Vol. 2 explains how components work rather
than how to use them, but it presupposes no
ADVANCE ORDERS
technical or mathematical background. Martin
Mayer writes in Esquire: "far and away the
best introduction to the subject ever written
BOUND VOLUMES
literate, intelligent and, of course, immensely
1963 Issues
Audio Magazine
Order Now
LIMITED NUMBER
RADIO MAGAZINES, INC.
P. O. Box 629, Mineola, N. Y.
Please send me the
following:
Roy Allison's "High Fidelity Systems
A User's Guide" at $1
AVAILABLE
-
Edgar Villchur's "Reproduction of
Sound" at $2
enclose $
in bills, money order,
or check only. (All prices postpaid.)
I
NAME
ADDRESS
quotes.
MILITARY DISCOUNT-name brands. Free
recording tape and stereo handbook. Include
rank, serial number. Electronics International, Inc., Box 3066, Charlottesville, Virginia.
WRITE FOR lowest quotations, components.
recorders. No catalogs. HI- FIDELITY SUPPLY, 2817 -BC Third, New York 55, N. Y.
RENNWALD FULL -RANGE
ELECTROSTATIC
by Edgar Villchur
knowledgeable." From HiFi /Stereo Review:
"just the books to satisfy that intellectual itch
for deeper understanding."
SALE
ITEMS -tapes- package
Bayla, Box 1131-0, Wantagh, N. Y.
28, N. Y.
MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY
-
CH 3 -4812
ENJOY PLEASANT SURPRISES? Then
write us before you purchase any hi -fi. You'll
be glad you did. Unusual savings. Key Electronics, 120 Liberty St., New York 6, N. Y.
CLoverdale 8 -4288.
muscular dystrophy.
Please contribute t
AR Library Vol. 2
HIGH FIDELITY SPEAKERS REPAIRED
AMPRITE SPEAKER SERVICE
168 W. 23rd St. New York 11, N. Y.
HI -FI COMPONENTS, tape recorders at
guaranteed "We Will Not Be Undersold"
prices. All brands in stock. 15 -day money-back
guarantee. 2 -year warranty. Write your requirements for quotation. No catalog. HiFidelity Center, 1797 -V 1st Ave., New York
MARCH FOR
REPRODUCTION OF SOUND
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 100 per word per Insertion for noncommercial
advertisements; 250 per word for commercial advertisements. Rates are net, and no discounts will be
allowed. Copy most be accompanied by remittance In
full, and must reach the New York ofilee by the
first of the month preceding the date of Issue.
$10.00 EACH POSTPAID
U. S. DELIVERY ONLY
Send Order
Perforated electrode 45" by 5a/í ", $5.68 ; Set
of 8 spacers (one speaker), $1.35 ; Special
membrane for speaker, $1.95 per yard ; Complete speaker element ready to connect (less
enel"snre), 837.85. Write for improved constructional data and hints. Rolf Rennwald,
Anlage 11, Heidelberg, Germany.
MAY WE GIVE YOU our quote on your
HI -FI requirements? You'll be pleasantly surprised that what you had in mind won't cost
as much as you thought. We carry all brands
in stock. Components are new and fully guaranteed. Ask to be put on our mailing list for
special bargains. Crown Electronics Corp., 64
Cortlandt St., New York 7, N. Y. (212) WO
4 -0790.
HARPSICHORD. Same as owned by Philadelphia Orchestra and RCA Victor. In kit form
for home workshop assembly, $150. Clavichord
kit, $100. Free brochure. Write : Zuckermann
Harpsichords, Dept. R, 115 Christopher St.,
New York 14, N. Y.
WANTED : Blonder-Tongue Audio Baton.
any condition. State price. Benjamin Hall.
Box 934, Edgartown, Mass.
STEREO TAPES. 50% off. Send for free
literature. P. 0. Box 3603, Wichita, Kansas.
AUDIO CABLE, 3 ft, with phono plug
each end. 2 for $1, pp. Surplus Sy, 71 Corbin
Pl., Brooklyn 35, N.
Y.
WANTED: Used condenser microphones in
good condition. John J. McBride, 1204 Ipswich Dr., Wilmington, Delaware 19808.
and Remittance Today
QUAD FULL -RANGE ELECTROSTATIC.
Excellent condition, $175. G. W. Olsen, HS -11,
FPO, New York, New York.
Book Division
1961 Ampex 601 -2 stereo recorder with
accessories. Charles Goodman, 10 Woolson St.,
Mattapan, Mass. 02126.
Radio Magazines, Inc.
P.O. Box 629
Mineola, N. Y.
*Delivery January 15, 1964
NEW IN SOUND FOR "64" : Full fidelity
loudspeaker systems. Brochure. Island Associated Industries, 1261 Staley Rd., Grand Island, N. Y.
DELTA STUDIO MONITORS. Demonstration pair, $130. Box 64, Laguna Beach, Calif.
WANTED Marantz Model 3 electronic
crossover. G. W. Riley, P. O. Box 775, DeBary,
Fla.
:
64
AUDIO
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
DECEMBER, 1963
SAVE OVER 40 %ON HI -FI
USE OUR EASY
-PAY -PLAN UP TO 24 MONTHS TO PAY
Don't Buy Hi -Fi- Components
until you
friend in
Tape Recorders or Electronic Equipment
get return mail quotation from your
the business."
Trade -Ins -Highest Allowance -Send us
15 day money -back guarantee.
Full 2 year- warranty -parts & labor.
We are factory franchised all Lines. We
stock.
18th year of dependable
&
your hut.
ship from
reliable service through-
out the world.
We guarantee "We Will Not Be Undersold."
Call us at (212) EN -9 -3700 from any part of USA.
You may deduct 3 minute toll charge if your order
is
in excess of $100.00.
BEST BUY HI -FI LIST FREE
Send 10( for stereo
tape
catalog -All labels. Save
up to 33 -1/3%.
1797 -U First Ave.
N. Y. 28, N. Y.
CIRCLE 77
YOU MONEY
Specializes in SAVING
IV
COMPONENTS
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WRITE FORMBARGA
LIST.
N
715A 2nd Ave., Mr. 38th
New York 16, New Yor
Visit Our Warehouse
Notte....
90141444y
University's New One -Million Dollar
Plant Dedicated. Haskel A. Blair, president
of University Loudspeakers, received the
keys to University's new manufacturing
plant in Oklahoma City. The dedication
CIRCLE 78
COMPONENTS
BEST -BY-
VISIT
OUR
STORE
of
M+
HEALTH
FACTORY SEALED CARTONS
SEND FOR "QUOI)' ON PACKAGE
DEALS AND SAVEtMORE
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eLE
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on
ch's
World
haPPles
CIRCLE 79
hobby.
-
LONDON CALLING THE WORLD . . .
KEEP HI -FI COSTS LOW
buy
BRITISH EQUIPMENT from the United
Kingdom Mail Order Specialists!
AMPLIFIERS
TUNERS
MOTORS
PICK -UPS
SPEAKERS
Packed, Insured and Shipped promptly at
minimum cost. Send $1 bill for catalogue (refundable
against first purchase)
goods
C. C. GOODWIN (Soles) Ltd. (Dept. A)
7, The Broadway, Wood Green, London N.22. ENG.
tor home, school, church, clubs.
The Original 'Build-it- Yourself'. Organ
sounds like a ,glorious pipe organ
SAVE
up to
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r
-
and Accessories
E;LECOO1cs
SOUND SYSTEMS
126 DUNDAS ST. WEST TORONTO. CANADA
CIRCLE 81
AUDIO
DECEMBER, 1963
yj¡¡full
wIH/grlrl
numueln\
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Anyone Can Do It! Here's What You Get
elanoais
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ELECTRONIC ORGAN KITS
CIRCLE 80
High Fidelity Equipment
Complete Service
Complete Lines
Hi -Fi Records
Components
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t
Couplers. Tone Generator, Tone Changers, Pedal It 'boards. Consoles
Mail coupon below. and receive
...
...
absolutely FREE
complete information on Artisan's new 1963 Organ- Building Kit! Illustrated instructions lead you through every step
of this happy hobby. as you assembleat -home a magnifb
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the best in tone
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to 70' of comparable ready -built organ Costs by skipping
dealer profits and factory labor! You can play as you build
and pay as you build. From $1750 to $7500. Write today!
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COMPARISON PRICES.
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SWEDISH
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eye
%A.e
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MENTAL
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recordings
pSSOC,4T
YOUR
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close to
MICROMINIATURE CONDENSER
SUPPORT
RECORDERS
you're this
ceremonies culminated three years of planning and a 1500 mile move from White
Plains, New York. Mayor Jack S. Wilkes,
of Oklahoma City, presented the national
and state colors to Mr. Robert McCulloch,
Chairman of the Board of Ling-TemcoVought, (University is a division of Ling Temco- Vought). The keys were presented
to Mr. Blair by Paul Strasbaugh, Secretary
of the Oklahoma City Chamber of Commerce. After the ceremonies, over 150
guests were given tours of the new facility. Proluction was shut down in New
York on June 30th and resumed on July
5th in Oklahoma City. The move was so
well planned and executed, virtually no
shipping delays were encountered. The
precision of the move was made possible
with the aid of the PERT computerized
scheduling services, made available by
University's parent company.
Roof Raised at Scott. The recently announced addition to the H. H. Scott plant
in Maynard, Mass. has reached the stage
of construction wherein the roof has been
placed over the steel structure. When last
seen, the construction resembled a huge
swimming pool with a roof. An important
construction official (wheelbarrow foreman) opined that the structure would be
complete within three months if it didn't
get too cold, or rain, or snow. Mr. Scott
noted that the new structure would more
than double existing plant space.
Aoe.,Altadena,Calif.
It is an accepted fact that practically every sound
studio employs condenser microphones. Expensive?
definitely
but optimum results are
important!
NOW THERE'S PML! ... condenser microphones
studio quality
COST?
about 1/3 that
...
...
of comparable condenser microphones.
If you are a professional or serious recordist,
listen to the amazing difference a PML can make
in your recordings. PML microminiature condenser
microphones are precision engineered to give you
smooth, sensitive, natural response -essentially
linear from below 30 c/s to above 18 kc /s. They're
available in cardioid or omni -directional patterns
with AC or Battery Operated Power Supplies. Four
impedances to selection is offered with both types.
A Leading Sound Studio states:
"Even though they are miniature microphones
they feature a frequency response from 20- 20,000
c/s and have proven themselves as a valuable
asset. They most definitely compare quite favorably with their "big brother" imports on the
market today costing over 3x as much."
Professional Net Prices:
PML Microphone Model EK61
(omni -directional)
$
PML Microphone Model EC61 (cardiod)
PML Power Supply Model #4315 (AC only)
PML Power Supply Model #4316
99.50
109.50
(Battery operated)
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ERCONA CORPORATION
INIMMIIIIMMMMMMM'Mr
CIRCLE 87
432 PARK AVE. SO., NEW YORK 16, N. Y.
CIRCLE 65
65
SUBJECT INDEX
1963
AMPLIFIERS
Class D amplifiers; George Fletcher
Cooper. June 24.
Class D amplifiers
closer look George
Fletcher Cooper. I, July 24 II, Aug 23.
Design of solid -state stereo power amplifier with silicon transistors; Marshall
R. Myers, Jr. and Morley D. Kahn. Jan
-a
21.
High -quality transistorized stereo preamplifier; Erhard Aschinger. III, Jan 35;
IV, Feb 39; V, Mar 34. (Began Nov.
1963)
High -quality transistorized tape recorder
amplifier; Lee Beeder. May 17.
The matched load; George Fletcher
Cooper. Nov 30.
Remote control with light; William G.
Dilley. Nov 24.
This business of heat sinks; Ronald L.
Ives. Mar 26.
Transistorized stereo microphone mixer;
Peter A. Stark. Oct 19.
AUDIO CLUBS
Blueprint for an audio club; Charles R.
Doty, Sr. Mar 40.
42.
Freeman model 660 portable tap recorder; Nov 52.
Garrard automatic turntables -Mo. el A,
AT -6, Autoslim /P; May 40.
Harman -Kardon "Citation A" tran storized stereo preamp kit; Apr 48.
Heathkit transistorized stereo am.lifier,
model AA -21; June 44.
Heathkit transistor tester, model I -30;
Dec 38.
Heathkit (Thomas) transistorized elec-
tronic organ, model GD -232; Oct 4.
Kenwood AM, FM, and FM- stere receiver, model KW -40; Apr 46.
Knight -Kit d.c. to 5 -mc laboratory .scilloscope, model KG2000; Sept 60.
Knight -Kit stereo record /play tap recorder model KP -70; May 38.
Korting stereo tape recorder, model 3000;
Dec 38.
Lafayette 200 -watt transistorized tereo
power amplifier, model LA -250; N v 54.
Leak "Stereo 60" power amplifier; J n 42.
Neat stereo tonearm model GA -17 Jan
46.
Neat stereo cartridge, model VS1i00D;
BOOK REVIEW
Music, Acoustics, and Architecture; Leo
L. Beranek. Jan 4.
BROADCAST EQUIPMENT
The Auditioneer; John Whitacre. Dec 24.
COLOR ORGANS
Wall- projection color organ; Morris Dol lens. I, Mar 19; II Apr 23.
CROSSOVERS
Crossover design; Norman H. Crowhurst.
I, Sept 26; II, Oct 26.
DISTORTION
Harmonic distortion-tests and measurements; Mannie Horowitz. Oct 38.
EQUIPMENT PROFILES
Acoustic Research needle force gauge;
Jan
Fisher XP4A loudspeaker system; May
46.
Acoustic Research 2 -speed turntable;
Apr 48.
Antronics electronic FM antenna, model
MA -44; Nov 56.
Audio Dynamics Model ADC-18 speaker
system; June 46.
Benjamin /Elac model 322 stereo car-
tridge; July 42.
Dual automatic turntable, model 1009;
Nov 73.
Dynaco "Stereo 35" basic power amplifier;
Nov 52.
EICO Model ST97 FM -stero tuner, ST70
stereo amplifier, ST84 stereo preamp;
Jan
44.
Norelco "Continental 100" tape recce der;
Feb 50.
Pickering stereo cartridges U38AT and
U38ATG with "Safe V- Guard" .tyli;
Mar 54.
Pilot FM- stereo tuner model 780; M y 42.
Revere /3M stereo tape cartridge s stem,
model M -2; July 30.
H. H. Scott FM- stereo tuner, model 50B;
July 30.
H. H. Scott FM- stereo broadcast m nitor
tuner, model 4310; Sept 55.
Sennheiser condenser microphone, odel
MKH -104; Oct 50.
Sherwood FM- stereo tuner, model S3 00V;
Dec 44.
Shure Model M/99 series "Gard -A- atic"
stereo cartridges; June 51.
Shure Model M222 Studio Dynetic arm
and cartridge; Dec 59.
Sony "Newscaster" tape recorder . ortable, model EM -1; Feb 48.
Tandberg tape recorder, model 64; Mar
50; recheck, May 43.
Tannoy 10" Dual Concentric "Mo itor"
loudspeaker; Sept 56.
Uher "8000 Royal" stereo tape reco der;
Sept 58.
Weathers Universal tonearm, model MT-
June
66;
45.
FANTASY
Knobs -the shame of it all; Don
Aug 24.
ort.
FM- STEREO
Alignment and adjustment of FM ereo
tuners and adapters; C. G. McP oud.
Jan
26.
Oct 48.
FM- stereo reception; Jack Beever. Jan
Oct 46.
FM -tuner characteristics and their relative importance; Daniel R. von ecklinghausen. I, Aug 19; II, Sept 44.
Mobile FM- stereo reception; Nort
C.
Empire record playing system, model 498;
Fisher stereo receiver, model 500C; Dec
44.
Fisher model SA1000
150 -watt
power amplifier; Sept 54.
stereo
Fisher model K1000 150 -watt power amplifier kit; Sept 64.
19.
Ham. Sept 21.
Receivers with transistors plus t bes;
William Cornell. Feb 21.
66
GENERAL
The definition hassle-an approach to
high fidelity standards; C. G. McProud.
Aug 25.
Hi -Fi and Electronics in Japan; C. G.
McProud. Mar 41.
LAW
Knowledge and skills available upon reemployment; Albert Woodruff Gray.
May 34.
LOUDSPEAKERS
Crossover design; Norman H. Crowhurst.
I, Sept 26; II, Oct 26.
Fresh approach to compact speakers;
William Hecht. Mar 30.
Full -range electrostatic speaker; Rolf
Rennwald. June 17.
Open baffle parallel- series array; R. S.
Oakley, Jr. Dec. 30.
MEASUREMENTS
Checking frequency- compensating circuits; Mannie Horowitz. May 26.
Harmonic distortion -tests and measurements; Mannie Horowitz. Oct 38.
Testing amplifier response with an oscilloscope; Herbert Malamud. June 34.
MICROPHONES
Professional condenser microphone; R.
Williamson. July 17.
Transistorized stereo microphone mixer;
Peter A. Stark. Oct 19.
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
All- electronic method for tuning organs
and pianos; A. M. Seybold. I, Feb 28;
II, May 20.
Electronic simulation of organ sounds;
Norman C. Pickering. June 21.
Organs and organ music; Winthrop
Pike. I, Oct 23; II, Nov 40.
NOISE
Suppressing noise in audio systems; Herman Burstein. Nov 46.
PRODUCT PREVIEW SECTION
August issue.
RECORDING, DISC
15 -deg. vertical angle
key to better
stereo sound; B. B. Bauer. Nov 21.
78 -rpm stereo test record; Allan R. Keskinen. Apr 32.
Vertical tracking distortion in practice;
Duane H. Cooper. Sept 40.
Vertical tracking improvements in stereo
recording; B. B. Bauer. Feb 19.
-a
RECORDING, MAGNETIC
High -quality transistorized tape recorder
amplifier; Lee Beeder. May 17.
REMOTE CONTROL
Remote control with light; William G.
Dilley. Nov 24.
AUDIO
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
S.
DECEMBER, 1963
SOUND (REINFORCEMENT
Controlling sound -reinforcement systems;
David L. Klepper. Dec 19.
Sound reinforcement at Philharmonic
Hall; David Saslaw. Apr 38.
Sound reinforcement at the Ziegfeld;
George Schimmel. July 21.
TEST EQUIPMENT
Alignment and adjustment of FM- stereo
tuners and adapters; C. G. McProud.
Jan
26.
Transistorized audio voltmeter; Alex M.
Schott. Apr 19.
Another
transistorized
voltmeter -and
how to use it. C. G. McProud. Apr 42.
TRANSISTORS
Class D amplifiers;
George Fletcher
Cooper. June 24.
closer look; George
Class D. amplifiers
Fletcher Cooper. I, July 24; II, Aug 23.
Design or solid -state stereo amplifier with
silicon transistors; Marshall R. Myers,
Jr. and Morley D. Kahn. Jan 21.
This business of heat sinks; Ronald L.
Ives. Mar 26.
-a
High -quality transistorized stereo preamplifier; Erhard Aschinger. III, Jan 35;
IV, Feb 39; V, Mar 34. (Began Nov.
1963)
High-quality transistorized tape recorder
amplifier; Lee Beeder. May 17.
Receiver with transistors plus tubes;
William Cornell. Feb 21.
Transistorized stereo microphone mixer;
Peter A. Stark. Oct 19.
Transistorized audio voltmeter; Alex M.
Schotz. Apr 19.
Another
transistorized
voltmeter -and
how to use it. C. G. McProud. Apr 42.
AliTIIOR INDLX
1963
Aschinger, Erhard
High -quality transistorized stereo preamplifier. III, .Ian 35; IV Feb 39; V, Mar
34.
Bauer, Benjamin B.
key to better
15 -deg. vertical angle
stereo sound. Nov. 21.
Vertical tracking improvements in
stereo recording. Feb. 19.
Beeder, Lee
High -quality transistorized tape recorder amplifier. May 17.
Beever, Jack
FM- stereo reception. Jan 19.
Burstein, Herman
Suppressing noise in audio systems.
-a
Nov 46.
Cooper, Duane H.
Vertical tracking distortion in practice.
Sept 40.
Cooper, George Fletcher
Class D amplifiers. June 24.
closer look I, July
Class D amplifiers
24; II, Aug 23.
The matched load. Nov 30.
Cornell, William
Receiver with transistors plus tubes.
Feb 21.
Crowhurst, Norman H.
Crossover design. I, Sept 26; II, Oct 26.
Dllley, William G.
Remote control with light. Nov 24.
Dollens, Morris
Wall- projection color organ. I, Mar 19;
II, Apr 23.
Doty, Charles R., Sr.
Blueprint for an audio club. Mar 40.
-a
AUDIO
DECEMBER, 1963
Gray, Albert Woodruff
Knowledge and skills available upon reemployment. May 34.
Hain, North C.
Mobile FM- stereo reception. Sept 21.
Hecht, William
Fresh approach to compact speakers.
Mar 30.
Horowitz, Mannle
Checking frequency -compensating circuits. May 26.
Harmonic distortion -tests and measurements. Oct 38.
Ives, Ronald L.
This business of heat sinks. Mar 26.
Kahn, Morley D. and Marshall R. Myers,
Jr.
Design of solid -state stereo power amplifier with silicon transistors. Jan 21.
Keskinen, Allan R.
78 -rpm stereo test record. Apr 32.
Klepper, David L.
Controlling sound- reinforcement systems. Dec 19.
Malamud, Herbert
Testing amplifier response with an oscilloscope. June 34.
McProud, C. G.
Alignment and adjustment of FMstereo tuners and adapters. Jan 26.
Another transistorized voltmeter-and
how to use it. Apr 42.
Hi -Fi and Electronics in Japan. Mar 41.
The definition hassle -an approach to
high fidelity standards. Aug 25.
Myers, Marshall R., Jr. and Morley D.
Kahn
Design of solid -state stereo power amplifier with silicon transistors. Jan 21.
Nort, Don
Knobs -the shame of it all. Aug 24.
Oakley, R. S., Jr.
Open baffle parallel- series array. Dec 30.
l'lekering, Norman C.
Electronic simulation of organ sounds.
June
21.
Pike, Winthrop
Organs and organ music. I, Oct 23; II,
Nov 40.
Rennwald, Rolf
Full -range electrostatic speaker. June
17.
Saslaw, David
Sound reinforcement at Philharmonic
Hall. Apr 38.
Schimmel, George
Sound reinforcement at the Ziegfeld.
July 21.
Schotz, Alex M.
Transistorized audio voltmeter. Apr 19.
Seybold, A. M.
All- electronic method for tuning organs
and pianos. I, Feb 28; II, May 20.
Stark, Peter A.
Transistorized stereo microphone mixer.
Oct 19.
von Recklinghausen, Daniel R.
FM tuner characteristics and their relative importance. I, Aug 19; II, Sept 44.
Williamson, R.
Professional condenser
July 17.
Whitacre, John.
The Auditioneer. Dec 24.
microphone.
67
ADVERTISING
INDEX
True
High
Dynamic
"w"-.61whift,,,,011/'
Fidelity
Speaker
System
of the 4- way
horn - loaded
type. Gives clean, true sound
reproduction unobtainable by
any speaker of
the cone
type. Further information is
,-
érssof/ux
ifIT'Th+i-
available on request.
U. S. and Canadian represen-
tatives (importers and distributors) are wanted.
directly to
Apply
:
41,
CIRCLE 68
60
54
59
8
Barker & Williamson, Inc.
Benjamin Electronic Sound Corp.
Bozak
British industries Corporation
..
55
..
3
33
39, 63
THE ONLY HEADPHONES WITH A
Carston Studios
Classified
Clark, David, Company
CTS Corporation
Coy.
Electro- Voice, Inc.
Electro -Voice Sound Systems
Empire Scientific Corp.
Ercona Corporation
LIFETIME GUARANTEE
55
Permoflux presents
Absolutely the
.
finest sound in stereo high fidelity today.
Professional quality sound with exciting
features that add up to the greatest value
in stereo listening.
TONAL STABILITY
COMPARATIVE FREEDOM FROM
HARMONIC DISTORTION
WIDEST FREQUENCY RESPONSE
I 1
Dynaco, Inc.
Eastman Kodak Company, Inc.
EICO Electronic Instr. Co., Inc.
65
64
27
.
Ccv. IV,
..
65
54
12
7
58
Garrard Sales Corp.
Goodwin, C. C. (Sales) Ltd
Gotham Audio Corporation
International Electroacoustics, Inc.
11
I
65
3
65
48
..
.
.
65
.
.
52
Jensen Manufacturing Company
Mikes and Case
OPTIONAL
9950
$5
Monthly
LAFAYETTE PROFESSIONAL
4 -TRACK STEREO RECORD
and PLAYBACK TAPE DECK
Complete with Built -in Transistorized
Record /Playback Preamps
Records Sound -with -Sound
2 Recording Level Meters
Records 4 -Track Stereo
& Mono
Plays 4 & 2 Track Stereo, 4, 2
and Full Track Mono
With Connecting
Cables and 7" Take -up Reel
LAFAYETTE Radio ELECTRONICS
Dept. AL -3, P.O. Box 10,
Syosset, L.1., N.Y. 11791
Feature for feature your best headphone buy
is Permoflux-with a lifetime warranty. Write
for free details.
PERMOFLUX CORPORATION
P. 0. Box 1945, Glendale, Calif.
CIRCLE 83
Key Electronics Company
KSC Systems, Inc.
63
60
Lafayette Radio
68
61
45
Martel Electronics
McIntosh Laboratory, Inc.
Murray Carson Corporation
.
North American Philips Co., Inc.
53
57
14
SPHERICAL
MAGNET
STERt,? CARTRIDGE
63
Permoflux Corporation
Pickering G Company, Inc
68
.
Pioneer
PML
17
13
65
Roberts Electronics, Inc.
Scott, H. H., Inc.
C
Sennheiser Electronic Corp. (N. Y.) ..
Sherwood Electronic Laboratories, Inc.
Shure Brothers, Inc.
Scnovox Co., Ltd.
Stanford International
Superscope, Inc.
IT'S NEW...
9
Lang Electronics, Inc.
Lansing, James B., Sound, Inc
ONLY
BEST POWER HANDLING
LONGEST LIFE
29
Harman -Kardon
Hi Fidelity Center
Imported
1
61
Finney Company
Fisher Radio Corporation
Frazier, Inc.
ACOUSTIC CO.,LTD.
,s -Cho, Minato-kn, Tokyo, JAPAN
51
42, 43
49
65
62
47
65
Fairchild Recording Equipment Corp.
YL
HEADPHONES
60
Acoustech, Inc.
Acoustic Research, Inc.
Airex Radio Corporation
Allan, Richard, Speakers
Altec Lansing Corporation
American Concertone, Inc.
Ampex Corporation
Argos Products Company
Artisan Organs
Audio Bookshelf
Audio Fidelity Records
Audio Unlimited
4
Dv.
,
.
.
I
I
15
18
25
68
59
35
TYIt t
RRSPONSSt
_
OUTPUT OALANCI
±C1.561114 IOOOCS.
STYLUS*
0.7mí1 RADIUS DIAMOND
Rush me FREE Giant 422 Page 1964
Cat. 640
RK -140 tape deck $
_
Enclosed.
Shipping Charges Collect
Name
Telex Acoustic Products
58
United Audio -Dual
University Loudspeakers
37
31
Address
L City
Zone
State
YL Acoustic Co., Ltd.
.
68
soH
SONOVOX CO..LTD.
101
Tcklwomatsu -cho. Shibuya. Tokyo.
CInCL[ 84
CIRCLE 82
AUDIO
68
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
DECEMBER, 1963
`Oj' CI
ftY f W47
e
e
G"G
f0M :.
...
one more interested in performance than price.Yet, in quantity, this new 15 -inch loudspeaker is priced
surprisingly low for what you get. In fact, half the price of equivalent models.
Power handling capacity is conservatively set at 60 watts and has been tested, without breakdown, at
90 watts. Cone resonance varies from 25 to beyond 100 cps, depending on your requirements. Electronic
organ, electronic guitar, bass amplifier, deluxe stereo, and other prestige sound system manufacturers will
find this new CTS loudspeaker a welcome component.
CTS devotes an entire automated manufacturing facility (106,000 sq. ft.)to volume loudspeaker production.
All sizes. All types. Just specify or write for catalog P -102. CTS of Paducah, Inc., 1500 North 8th Street,
Paducah, Kentucky,
a
subsidiary of CTS Corporation, Elkhart, Indiana.
6o7-4e
New 15 -inch speaker, 60 watt capacity, CTS model 15F35760
NEW
ELECTRO -VOICE
MODEL
676
CARDIOID
MICROPHONE
Outperforms them all ... or your money back!
In the last 36 cars, Electro -Voice
engineers have developed many important microphone firsts *, but their latest
achievement, the new E -V Model 676, may
well be their most significant contribution.
y.
The goal of 676 design was to overcome
some of the most basic problems in PA, hi -fi
recording, and communications. The result of
this engineering effort is a uniquely versatile
dynamic cardioid microphone with the best
field performance of any we have tested. In
short, the 676 does everything a little better.
For instance, response is wide, uniform,
and smooth in the E -V tradition of natural
sound. But the 676 also allows you to change
response. Now you can "neutralize" room
reverberation and rumble ( usually encountered
in larger rooms). A built -in three -position
switch allows selection of flat response (for
small rooms or recording), or bass attenuation "tilted off" from about 800 cps, with
response down either 5 db or 10 db at 100 cps.
This means you get higher average sound
levels, better intelligibility, and less likelihood
of feedback. Yet there is no "missing bass"
effect, common with most tone controls or
filters, because of the flat-slope characteristic
of the 676 bass tilt -off.
The cardioid pattern and response superiority of the 676 results from a creative variation of the famed E -V Variable-D® principle,
called Continuously Variable-D (CV -D). It
reduces size and weight without compromising quality. and it's responsible for reducing
wind noise and shock noise pickup far below
that of any other small cardioid. Bass- boosting "proximity effect" is gone, too, to gi c you
well- balanced sound, even when performers
work ultra- close.
Basis of the CV -DT design is a slotted tube,
-
coupled to the back of the 676 diaphragm.
The CV -D tube appears to vary in length
acoustically (and automatically) -so that low
tones "see" a long tube, while high tones
"see" a short tube. The apparent length of the
tube is always just right to phase out sound
arriving at the back -for maximum front -toback cancellation.
Modern styling by noted designed Lute
Wassman adds grace and beauty to 676 practicality. The one-inch case fits all present E -V
slip -on stand mounts, and its balanced weight
'Some of the E-V microphone firsts include: The Differential, Mechenophase, Varieble-D'r, Cardiline and Sound
Spots, plus slim dynamic and lavalier microphone designs, Acoustalloy and Acoustifoam. And the E -V Model 642
has earned the first Academy Award microphone citation in 22 years, for its contribution to motion picture sound.
www.americanradiohistory.com
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
distribution
is
just right for hand -held use.
But there's more to the 676 than just new
features -built into it are the many characteristics that make E -V the choice of more
professional sound engineers than any other
brand: high output level, exclusive E -V
Acoustalloy` diaphragm, dual impedance
-
selection, efficient dust and magnetic filters,
and the most important ingredients of all
fine materials and quality workmanship.
Accept our imitation to try the 676 soon
and the more difficult the job, the better. We
guarantee you'll find the 676 will outperform
any other PA cardioid microphone you are
now using
or your money back!
...
Model 676 -$100.00 list (less normal trade
discounts). Complete specifications available
at your E -V sound specialist's or write to:
ELECTRO- VOICE, INC., Dept. 1232A,
Buchanan, Michigan.
Ci1I!01""
SETTING NEW STANDARDS IN SOUND
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