home economics syllabus forms 4 and 5

home economics syllabus forms 4 and 5
HOME ECONOMICS SYLLABUS
FORMS 4 AND 5
Kindly refer to this syllabus ONLY
for Forms 4 and 5.
For Form 3
as from scholastic year 2013/2014
please refer to the recently updated syllabus.
The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
Introduction
Home Economics focuses on the inter-relationships between diet, health, family, resources
and home, and man’s physical, economic, social and aesthetic needs.
Hence, the central concern is the optimal quality of life of individuals and family; it
recognises the family as the most important influence in the nurture, care and education of
its members.
Through the goal-setting of empowering individuals, strengthening families and enabling
communities, Home Economics aims to help students to lead effective lives, not only as
individuals, but also, as members of a family and the community, within the context of a
culturally, socially and economically diverse society.
Overall, Home Economics encompasses the learning and mastery of knowledge and skills
which enable students to develop and maintain lifelong healthful behaviours, become
productive citizens and adapt to a rapidly changing world.
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The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
Rationale
The Home Economics syllabus is designed to equip students with a useful range of
relevant and transferable skills to include knowledge, comprehension and application,
investigation, evaluation and expression (communication).
The integrated approach adopted by this syllabus provides the opportunity to deliver the
course of study in Home Economics where the inter-relationships between diet, health,
family, resources and home are addressed in both practical and theoretical contexts. The
practical nature derives from the need to manage resources such as aptitudes, energy, effort,
interest, money, time, space, foods, textiles, materials and equipment in practical situations.
Emphasis is placed on active learning through problem-solving and decision-making
exercises. The assessment objectives in the syllabus reflect this emphasis on problemsolving.
Students develop practical ability through direct experiences. As they make and do things,
and see the effects of their actions, students are developing knowledge and attitudes about
the use of their resources.
This approach through practical experience offers opportunities for students to think about
problems that need to be solved, to seek information, investigate a range of choices,
manage their resources, express themselves with confidence, make judgements and
decisions and evaluate their results.
Emphasis is therefore on experiential learning through a design process. It should draw
upon students’ experiences motivating them to strive towards and attain their full potential.
The syllabus will support good practice in teaching and learning through effective
assessment procedures which will allow students to demonstrate what they know,
understand and can do.
The active participation of students assists with the acquisition and application of
knowledge and skills through the process and content of learning.
A coursework element is included to form an integral part of the teaching strategy for the
syllabus. The coursework is structured to assessment areas to which the students will
respond by completing the tasks. It will include a portfolio of organised records of
performance to enable students to provide evidence of achievement arising out of a range
of classroom activities and processes, including practical and written work.
Over the duration of the course, it is anticipated that, students will become increasingly
competent in a wide range of practical/investigational skills.
A memorandum containing notes for guidance on coursework activities and details of
assessment criteria accompanies the syllabus.
The scheme of assessment is thus designed to enable students to demonstrate the
attainment they have achieved in relation to each component by combining evidence from
the portfolio work with that produced by the annual examination. In developing the
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The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
schemes of work for, and in the delivery of a course based on this syllabus, teachers must
fulfill the essential requirements to promote the objectives of the educational (crosscurricular) themes.
The syllabus aims to prepare young people for life in a consumer-oriented society and
provides a basis for those seeking employment in a range of careers, such as education,
industry and the health, social and hospitality services. In addition, it provides a coherent
progression to more advanced courses in further and higher education.
The syllabus has been designed to be as free as possible from any form of bias.
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The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
General Aims
The aims set out below describe the educational purposes of following the course in Home
Economics. Some of the aims are reflected in the assessment objectives whilst others are not
because they cannot be readily assessed.
•
to enjoy the experience of learning and develop a sense of pride in their achievement and selfworth.
•
to develop students’ awareness of the inter-relationships within Home Economics.
•
to increase students’ knowledge and understanding of the changing physical, social, emotional,
intellectual and aesthetic needs of people throughout their life cycle.
•
to develop the ability to communicate, share, take responsibility and help one another in
practical ways as family members.
•
to understand the value of positive human relations, good manners and equality from the point
of the individual and his family.
•
to foster a sensitive caring attitude and concern for the general environment by helping
students to learn to evaluate options and practices in the home which exploit nature as little as
possible and are in harmony with the environment.
•
to respect national heritage and become aware of international influences in the household
management and care of human relations.
•
to foster a critical and analytical approach to decision-making and problem-solving.
•
to instill a critical assessment of consumer goods, an awareness of advertising pressures and a
knowledge of consumer rights and responsibilities.
•
to increase students’ awareness of the implications for Home Economics of rapid
technological changes, the use of Information Technology (I.T.) and the growth of scientific
knowledge and understanding.
to develop their ability to respond effectively to such change.
•
•
to develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes required for the effective and safe organization
and management of relevant resources.
•
to develop the knowledge, understanding, skills and attitudes necessary to meet nutritional
recommendations and provide healthy diets.
•
to learn to acknowledge their own resources and to use them in planning their activities and
managing everyday life.
to stimulate and sustain an interest in and enjoyment of Home Economics.
•
•
to support the aims of the whole curriculum by fostering creativity, originality, efficiency and
intellectual stimulation.
It is to be noted that the above aims are not in a hierarchical order of importance.
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The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
Main Assessment Objectives.
Students should be able to:
•
demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of appropriate terminology, procedures,
principles (main concepts), and practices in relation to the syllabus content;
•
demonstrate an understanding of the influences of cultural, economic, industrial, social and
technological factors in relation to the syllabus content;
•
analyse situations in the field of Home Economics by identifying the various human needs
and material factors involved, and to recognise the inter-relationships of these needs and
factors.
•
recall, seek out, select, record and show skill in applying theoretical knowledge relevant to the
needs and factors identified.
•
use investigative procedures:
test and compare methods, materials, and equipment,
observe, measure and record observations accurately and systematically,
interpret evidence in its various forms as a basis for making judgements and choices.
justify judgements and choices in the light of evidence.
decide upon and plan a course of action which takes into account the priorities identified,
carry out the planned course of action by applying the required skills,
assess and evaluate the strengths and weaknesses, i.e. the effectiveness of the course of
action.
display the relevant manipulative, organizational, managerial and communication skills.
The assessment objectives outlined above reflect the emphasis placed on active learning
through problem-solving and decision-making exercises.
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The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
Scheme of Assessment.
The scheme of assessment for each form is as follows:
(i)
Form 3
a) a coursework component which carries 30% of the total mark weighting;
b) an annual written examination paper which carries 70% of the mark weighting.
For coursework, students are expected to complete:
• one investigation work which tackles a focused aspect on the topic area of Child
Care and Development; this carries half of the marking weighting of the 30%;
• two practical assignments which should form part of the normal teaching time
assigned to practical work; these two assignments together carry the remaining half
of the mark weighting of the 30%.
Guidance re the developmental process of both the investigation work and the practical
assignments as well as the distribution of marks for each criteria is given in the Appendixes.
(ii)
Form 4
a) a coursework component which carries 30% of the total mark weighting;
b) an annual written examination paper which carries 70% of the mark weighting.
For coursework, students are expected to complete:
• The introductory assessment areas of one investigation work which include the
Choice and Analysis of Title; the Identification of Factors involved; the Aims; the
Plan of Action and the Background Research. The remaining assessment areas of
the same investigation work will be tackled in the following year. The choice of
the focused topic area can arise from any aspect related to Food Preparation and
Technology, Hospitality Services, Child Development and the Elderly. This work
carries half of the mark weighting of the 30%;
• one practical assignment which should form part of the normal teaching time
assigned to practical work; this assignment carries the remaining half of the mark
weighting of the 30%.
Guidance re the developmental process of the introductory assessment areas of the investigation
work and the practical assignments as well as the distribution of marks for each criteria is given in
the Appendixes.
(iii)
Form 5
a) a coursework component which carries 30% of the total mark weighting;
b) an annual written examination paper which carries 70% of the mark weighting
For coursework, students are expected to complete:
• The remaining assessment areas of the investigation work chosen in Form 4 and
which include the Use of Technique 1, the Use of Technique 2, the Discussion of
Results and the Evaluation. Special allowance is made for the allocation of marks
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The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
•
for the Language used and the level of Accuracy. The total mark gained in Form 4
is also added to help students gain an overall rating and marking of the whole work.
This work carries half of the mark weighting of the 30%;
one practical assignment which should form part of the normal teaching time
assigned to practical work; this assignment carries the remaining half of the mark
weighting of the 30%.
Guidance re the developmental process of the introductory assessment areas of the investigation
work and the practical assignments as well as the distribution of marks for each criteria is given in
the Appendixes.
*** The following include guidelines re the practical assignments:
Each practical assignment will consist of the preparation of a one-course meal/dish and a simple non-alcoholic,
home-made beverage. The meal/dish should include one of the proposed culinary skills: sauce-making, short-crust
pastry making, yeast dough, stewing, casseroling, cooking rice and pasta, use of healthy cooking methods such as
grilling, steaming, stir-frying and cooking using appliances/equipment that save energy and retain nutrients. Each
practical assignment should include evidence of a different culinary skill. Salads should only be used as
accompaniments.
The practical assignment set needs to include any one of the following situations:
• different family members such as children, adolescents, adults, pregnant or breastfeeding mothers, elderly,
athletes
• specific diets such as: high fibre, low fat, low sugar, reduced salt, vegetarian, slimming diets as well as
packed lunches
• persons suffering from diet related disorders such as: cardiovascular disease, diabetes, coeliac disease,
hypertension, constipation
• dishes where appliances such as: microwave oven; blenders, processors etc. are used.
It is essential that the following are taken in strict consideration:
- current dietary recommendations are to be followed
- recipe books only are to be used during this session
- traditional Maltese foods and dishes are to be included whenever possible; where appropriate, these are to be
modified to be in line with dietary recommendations
- the sensible use of convenience foods is permitted
- the use of energy-saving devices and the practice of energy-saving procedures are to be encouraged
Each practical assignment includes:
• the planning / preparation session
• the realisation session
• the evaluation session
Each session is carried out during normal school activity with the following time limits:
• one hour for the planning / preparation session
• one and a half hours for the realisation session
• half an hour for the evaluation session.
Sufficient time should be allowed between the planning of the assignment and the practical realisation of the
assignment.
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The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
Differentiation
In coursework, differentiation will be by task and by outcome. Students will undertake focused
tasks which enable them to display positive achievement.
In the examination papers, differentiation will be achieved by setting examination papers with
questions which are designed to assess students at their appropriate levels of ability.
A Coursework Memorandum containing notes for guidance and details of assessment criteria
accompanies the syllabus.
Learning Outcomes
The Home Economics syllabus which is conceived in terms of learning outcomes and specific
skills, provides opportunities for students to develop skills and competencies associated with:
• Communication
• Numerical and Measurement
• Management and Organisational
•
•
•
•
•
Investigational
Psychomotor
Aesthetics
Technological
Caring and Interpersonal
Each of the above will involve:
Communication
reading and interpreting marks and symbols
following verbal instructions
following written and pictorial instructions
explaining and describing by writing/drawing
speaking to individuals/groups
using technical terms and words
talking to other people
listening to other people
Numerical and Measurement
measuring
calculating
handling money, material, equipment
weighing
transferring data to tables and charts
Management and Organisational
organising self and others
organising own work
keeping to time and meeting deadlines
clearing up thoroughly
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The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
planning work
ordering, sequencing and categorizing
using own initiative
managing resources
understanding health and safety
Investigational
problem solving to complete a task
researching for information
selecting and recording information
storing and retrieving information
reading instructions
testing and comparing
observing
modifying
describing/illustrating findings
discriminating
analysing information
making and justifying choices
interpreting results
evaluating own work and the work of others
Psychomotor
manipulating tools and equipment
manipulating hands and materials, shapes, form
Aesthetics
using imagination
developing and showing creativity
showing appreciation - derived from the perception of the worth of an object
or situation or experience
presenting work attractively
Technological
using specialised tools
using modern technology
using computerised facilities
using computer aid design
Caring and Interpersonal
working with others as part of a team
responding (actively) positively
reorganizing strengths and weaknesses in yourself/others
being flexible and adaptable
understanding other people’s point of view
reaching an agreement
showing the correct attitude towards self, family, environment, etc.
coping with changing situations
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The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
The Common Themes
The whole course in Home Economics studies is designed to include common themes which
permeate and unify the syllabus.
Recommendation is to be made for the common themes to be amplified over the whole course to
develop awareness and understanding to the inter-relationships of all the major aspects in Home
Economics. (Food, Health, Family, Home and Textiles).
These themes include:
•
Human Development including mainly physical, social and emotional development;
•
Health including well-being and satisfaction of physical and psychological needs,
•
Safety, protection, as from accidents and ill-health, damage to materials and property and
financial loss.
•
Efficiency, as of methods of working, performance of materials, tools, equipment and in the
management of money, time and value for money,
•
Values including personal and communal values, priorities for choice.
•
Aesthetics, as related to the quality of life through the enhancement and enjoyment of food,
textiles and the home,
•
Interaction with environment, including consumer rights and responsibilities.
Syllabus Content
This syllabus will focus on three key content areas and a coursework component:
•
Food, Nutrition and Health - Module 1
•
Family Well-being - Module 2
•
Choice and Management of Resources - Module 3
•
The Coursework Component – Module 4
These key areas will be explored, where appropriate, by a process which will involve students in:
identifying issues,
assembling and considering relevant information,
analysing viewpoints,
arriving at and justifying a personal viewpoint,
making decisions, planning and, if appropriate, taking a course of action,
evaluating the application of the process and outcomes.
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The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
Specific Theme Aims for each of the three Key Areas
•
Food, Nutrition and Health – Module 1
To understand the importance and purpose of nutritional recommendations and to be able to
choose food and methods of preparing food which promote health and well-being.
To develop the knowledge, understanding and skills necessary to provide healthy diets.
To recognise that family members have different dietary needs and that food choice is
affected by social, economic, environmental, technological, physiological and psychological
needs,
To recognise the relationships between nutritional needs and health,
To develop the ability to apply relevant scientific principles related to food and nutrition.
To promote an understanding of the main technological developments on food and in the
food industry.
•
Family Well-being – Module 2
To develop knowledge and understanding of the family as a social institution and the
contribution of family life to the personal and social development of its members.
To recognise the importance of developing and strengthening family relationships and the
interdependence and interaction among individuals and families.
To consider and acknowledge the different and changing needs of family members and how
these needs could be met throughout the life-cycle.
To increase the awareness of the emotional, physical, social and environmental factors that
affect the development of the child.
To encourage students to develop responsible and caring attitudes to others, particularly
towards children, the elderly and people with special needs.
To understand that the quality of relationships in the home is affected by the ways family
members communicate, share, take responsibility and help one another.
•
Choice and Management of Resources – Module 3
To develop knowledge, understanding and skills necessary to enable students to become
discerning consumers and effective managers of resources in relation to the home and family.
To develop competence for safe and healthy living.
To foster aesthetic appreciation of product design and understand the implications of rapid
technological change and marketing techniques on the consumers.
To develop an awareness of relevant statutory and voluntary provisions available, to foster
positive attitudes and appreciate their effect on the family and households within the
community.
To learn to control basic skills pertaining to food selection, preparation and presentation,
home management , clothing and textile care.
To investigate the implications and applications of technology and to develop competence in
their use.
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The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
Distribution of lessons for each module over the three-year course
Module
Module 1
Module 2
Breakdown of Module
Food, Nutrition and
Health
Theoretical Component
(66.5 double lessons)
Practical Component
24
The Family Unit
4
Child Care and Development
3
Senior Citizens in Society
2
Safety and First Aid
2
Family Well-Being
(11 double lessons)
10%
6.5
6
Fabric Care
2
Appearance Management (Good Grooming)
1
Consumer Issues and Education
7
Environmental Awareness
4
The Coursework
Component
The Investigative Tasks
6
(12 double lessons)
Practical Component (for Form V)
6
(26.5 double lessons)
Module 4
42.5
Choosing, Financing and Planning a Home
Choice and
Management of
Resources
Percentage
of Lessons
58%
Critical Choice and Use of Kitchen
Equipment
Module 3
Number of
lessons
22%
10%
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The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
Course Outline
Module 1: Food, Nutrition and Health
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
Introduction to Home Economics
The Concept of Health
Functions of Food, The Food Groups and the Dietary Guidelines
The Food Guide Pyramid
Introduction to the Nutrients
Proteins
Carbohydrates
Non-Starch Polysaccharides
Fats and Oils
Vitamins
Minerals
The Process of Digestion
The Importance of Breakfast
Water
Food Commodities - Nuts, Cereals and Pulses
Food Commodities - Milk and Dairy Products
Food Commodities – Eggs
Food Commodities - Meat and Meat Products
Food Commodities – Fish
Food Commodities - Fruit and Vegetables
Factors Affecting Food Choice
Meal Planning for the Different Dietary Requirements
Recipe Engineering
Methods of Cooking
Safety and Hygiene in the Kitchen
Food Spoilage, Contamination and Poisoning
Hygienic Practices in the Handling and Preparation of Food
The Use of Convenience Food
Preservation of Food
Home Freezing
Food Packaging
Food Labelling
Food Additives
Organic Farming and Genetically Modified Organisms
The Preparation Sheet
Weighing and Measuring
Preparation of meals with emphasis on the basic skills, the nutrients, meal planning,
food commodities and cooking methods
1 single lesson
1 single lesson
1 double lesson
1 double lesson
1 single lesson
1 dble+1 single lsn
1 dble+1 single lsn
1 double lesson
2 double lessons
2 double lessons
1 double lesson
1 double lesson
1 double lesson
1 single lesson
1 double lesson
2 double lessons
1 double lesson
1 double lesson
1 double lesson
1 double lesson
1 double lesson
3 double lessons
1 double lesson
2 double lessons
1 dble+1 single lsn
2 double lessons
1 double lesson
1 double lesson
2 double lessons
1 double lesson
1 double lesson
2 double lessons
1 double lesson
1 double lesson
1 double lesson
1 double lesson
10 double lessons
14
The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
38
39
40
41
42
The Rubbing-in Method of Cake Making (2 practical sessions)
The Shortcrust Pastry (1 demonstration session and 2 practical sessions)
The All-in-one method of Cake Making (1 demonstration session or 1 practical session)
The Whisking Method of Cake Making (1 demonstration and 2 practical sessions)
Yeast as a Raising Agent (1 demonstration session and 2 practical sessions)
2 double lessons
3 double lessons
1 double lesson
3 double lessons
3 double lessons
Module 2: Family Well-being
43 The Family Unit
1 double lesson
44 Child Care and Development
3 double lessons
45 First Aid and the First Aid Box
1 double lesson
46 Senior Citizens in Society
2 double lessons
47 Safety in and outside the Home
1 double lesson
48 The Person with Special Needs in the Family and the Community
1 double lesson
49 Sources of Stress on Family Units and Strategies for Managing Stress
1 double lesson
50 The Identification of the Key Sources of Information and Support Provided for Families
1 double lesson
Module 3: The Choice and Management of Resources
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
The Selection, Safe Use and Care of Kitchen Equipment
The Critical Choice of Labour Saving Devices
The Selection, Safe Use and Care of Hobs, Grills and Ovens
The Selection, Safe Use and Care of Refrigerators and Freezers
Laundry and Fabric Care
Appearance Management (Good Grooming)
Environmental Awareness
Waste Separation at Source
The Choice of Goods and Services with the Minimal Impact on the Environment
Saving Energy and Water in the Home
Consumer Awareness
Shops and Shopping Practices
Methods of Payment
Budgeting and Ways of Saving Money
Consumer Rights and Responsibilities
Factors Influencing Choice of Home
Steps to Follow when Acquiring a Home
Assurances and Insurances
Kitchen Planning
1 double lesson
1 dble+1 single lsn
1 double lesson
2 double lessons
2 double lessons
1 double lesson
1 double lesson
1 double lesson
1 double lesson
1 double lesson
1 single lesson
2 dble+1 single lsn
1 double lesson
2 double lessons
1 double lesson
1 double lesson
1 dble+1 single lsn
1 single lesson
3 double lessons
Module 4: The Coursework Component
70 Introduction to the Investigative Component: Topic - Child Development
71 Investigation
72 The Practical Assignments
3 double lessons
3 double lessons
6 double lessons
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The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
Distribution of lessons for each module in Form III (44 double lessons)
Module
Module 1
Module 2
Module 3
Breakdown of Module
Food, Nutrition and
Health
Theoretical Component
21
(66.5 double lessons)
Practical Component
12
The Family Unit
1
Child Care and Development
3
Senior Citizens in Society
0
Safety and First Aid
1
Critical Choice and Use of Kitchen
Equipment
3
Choosing, Financing and Planning a Home
0
Fabric Care
0
Appearance Management (Good Grooming)
0
Consumer Issues and Education
0
Environmental Awareness
0
The Coursework
Component
The Investigative Tasks
3
(12 double lessons)
Practical Component (for Form V)
0
Family Well-Being
(11 double lessons)
Choice and
Management of
Resources
(26.5 double lessons)
Module 4
Number of
lessons
Percentage
of Lessons
75%
11%
7%
7%
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The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
Form III
22 weeks
44 Double Lessons
Module
1
Description of Topic
Number of Lessons
Introduction to Home Economics
1 single lesson
Food, Nutrition and Health
The Concept of Health
1 single lesson
(Theoretical Component)
Functions of Food, The Food Groups and the Dietary Guidelines
1 double lesson
Safety and Hygiene in the Kitchen
1 double + 1 single lesson
The Food Guide Pyramid
1 double lesson
Introduction to the Nutrients
1 single lesson
Proteins
1 double + 1 single lesson
Carbohydrates
1 double + 1 single lesson
Non-Starch Polysaccharides
1 double lesson
Fats and Oils
2 double lessons
Vitamins
2 double lessons
Minerals
1 double + 1 single lesson
Water
1 double lesson
Food Commodities - Nuts, Cereals and Pulses
1 double lesson
Food Commodities - Milk and Dairy Products
2 double lessons
17
The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
Food Commodities – Eggs
1 double lesson
The Importance of Breakfast
1 double lesson
Recipe Engineering
1 double lesson
The Preparation Sheet
1 double lesson
Weighing and Measuring
Preparation of Meals with Emphasis on basic skills, the nutrients and food
commodities
1 double lesson
The Rubbing-in Method of Cake Making (2 practical sessions)
2 double lessons
The Shortcrust Pastry (1 demonstration session and 2 practical sessions)
The All-in-one method of Cake Making (1 demonstration session or 1 practical
session)
3 double lessons
1 double lesson
The Family Unit
1 double lesson
Child Care and Development
3 double lessons
First Aid and the First Aid Box
1 double lesson
The Choice and
Management
The Selection, Safe Use and Care of Kitchen Equipment
1 double lesson
of Resources
The Critical Choice of Labour Saving Devices
1 double + 1 single lesson
The Coursework
Component
Introduction to the Investigative Component: Topic - Child Development
3 double lessons
(Practical Component)
2
3
4
Family Well-Being
4 double lessons
18
The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
Distribution of lessons for each module in Form IV (44 double lessons)
Module
Module 1
Module 2
Module 3
Breakdown of Module
Food, Nutrition and
Health
Theoretical Component
11
(66.5 double lessons)
Practical Component
10
The Family Unit
1
Child Care and Development
0
Family Well-Being
(11 double lessons)
Choice and
Management of
Resources
Percentage
of Lessons
48%
9%
Senior Citizens in Society
2
Safety and First Aid
1
Critical Choice and Use of Kitchen
Equipment
3
Choosing, Financing and Planning a Home
0
Fabric Care
0
32%
Appearance Management (Good Grooming)
0
Consumer Issues and Education
7
Environmental Awareness
4
The Coursework
Component
Investigation – Part 1
2
(12 double lessons)
Practical Component
3
(26.5 double lessons)
Module 4
Number of
lessons
11%
19
The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
Form IV
22 weeks
44 Double Lessons
Module
Description of Topic
Number of Lessons
Food, Nutrition and Health
Factors Affecting Food Choice
1 double lesson
(Theoretical Component)
Meal Planning for the Different Dietary Requirements
3 double lessons
Methods of Cooking
2 double lessons
The Process of Digestion
1 double lesson
Food Commodities - Meat and Meat Products
1 double lesson
Food Commodities – Fish
1 double lesson
Food Commodities - Fruit and Vegetables
1 double lesson
Organic Framing and Genetically Modified Foods
1 double lesson
Preparation of meals with emphasis on the basic skills, the nutrients, meal planning,
4 double lessons
1
(Practical Component)
food commodities and cooking methods
The Whisking Method of Cake Making (1 demonstration and 2 practical sessions)
3 double lessons
Yeast as a Raising Agent (1 demonstration session and 2 practical sessions)
3 double lessons
20
The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
2
Senior Citizens in Society
2 double lessons
Safety in and outside the Home
1 double lesson
The Person with Special Needs in the Family and the Community
1 double lesson
The Choice and Management
The Selection, Safe Use and Care of Hobs, Grills and Ovens
1 double lesson
of Resources
The Selection, Safe Use and Care of Refrigerators and Freezers
2 double lessons
Environmental Awareness
1 double lesson
Waste Separation at Source
1 double lesson
The Choice of Goods and Services with the Minimal Impact on the Environment
1 double lesson
Saving Energy and Water in the Home
1 double lesson
(Consumer Issues and
Consumer Awareness
Education)
Shops and Shopping Practices
1 single lesson
2 double + 1 single
lesson
Methods of Payment
1 double lesson
Budgeting and Ways of Saving Money
2 double lessons
Consumer Rights and Responsibilities
1 double lesson
Investigation - Part 1
2 double lessons
Practical Assignments
3 double lessons
Family Well-Being
(Environmental Awareness)
3
4
The Coursework Component
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The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
Distribution of lessons for each module in Form V (28 double lessons)
Module
Module 1
Module 2
Module 3
Breakdown of Module
Food, Nutrition and
Health
Theoretical Component
11
(66.5 double lessons)
Practical Component
2
The Family Unit
2
Child Care and Development
0
Senior Citizens in Society
0
Safety and First Aid
0
Critical Choice and Use of Kitchen
Equipment
0
Choosing, Financing and Planning a Home
6
Fabric Care
2
Appearance Management (Good Grooming)
1
Consumer Issues and Education
0
Environmental Awareness
0
The Coursework
Component
Investigation – Part 2
1
(12 double lessons)
Practical Component (for Form V)
3
Family Well-Being
(11 double lessons)
Choice and
Management of
Resources
(26.5 double lessons)
Module 4
Number of
lessons
Percentage
of Lessons
47%
7%
32%
14%
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The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
Form V
14 weeks
28 Double Lessons
Module
Food, Nutrition and Health
(Theoretical Component)
1
(Practical Component)
2
Family Well-Being
Description of Topic
Number of Lessons
Food Spoilage, Contamination and Poisoning
Hygienic Practices in the Handling and Preparation of Food
The Use of Convenience Food
Preservation of Food
Home Freezing
Food Packaging
Food Labelling
Food Additives
Preparation of meals with emphasis on the basic skills, the nutrients, meal planning,
food commodities and cooking methods
2 double lessons
1 double lesson
1 double lesson
2 double lessons
1 double lesson
1 double lesson
2 double lessons
1 double lesson
2 double lessons
The Identification of the Key Sources of Information and Support Provided for
Families
Sources of Stress on Family Units and Strategies for Managing Stress
Factors Influencing Choice of Home
3
4
The Choice and Management Steps to Follow when Acquiring a Home
Assurances and Insurances
Of Resources
Laundry and Fabric Care
Appearance Management (Good Grooming)
Kitchen Planning
The Coursework Component
Investigation - Part 2
Practical Assignments
1 double lesson
1 double lesson
1 double lesson
1 double + 1 single
lesson
1 single lesson
2 double lessons
1 double lesson
3 double lessons
1 double lesson
3 double lessons
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The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
Learning Objectives: Theoretical Component
MODULE 1: Food, Nutrition and Health
The students will be able to:
The Concept of Health
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define health: as the state of well-being in body and mind; freedom from disease and a
sound mind
identify the main factors that contribute to good health and well-being, namely diet,
exercise and recreational activities
identify the basic health needs, namely physical needs, intellectual needs, emotional needs
and social needs; and give 1 example of how each of these needs can be met
Functions of Food and the Food Groups
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list the 3 main functions of food
explain how dietary needs change according to age, gender, level of activity, occupation
and state of health
divide foods according to the CINDI the food pyramid groups
The Dietary Guidelines
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list eight of the CINDI dietary guidelines and suggest ways of putting them into practice
define the terms diet, malnutrition, under-nutrition, balanced diet
The Food Guide Pyramid
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acknowledge the CINDI food guide pyramid as a guide for a healthy diet
Draw and label the food guide pyramid
Identify what should be eaten most, moderately, least and what to avoid
Use the food guide pyramid to plan healthy meals
The Nutrients
Introduction to the Nutrients
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list the 5 nutrients
distinguish between macro and micro nutrients
explain the main functions of each nutrient
list rich sources for each
Protein
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list the functions of protein
classify proteins into animal and vegetable protein
distinguish between L.B.V and H.B.V. protein
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The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
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explain the difference between essential and non-essential amino acids
identify sources of L.B.V. and H.B.V. protein
explain the term complimentary proteins and give 2 examples
identify novel sources of protein, namely textured vegetable protein, tofu and Quorn
explain the term T.V.P.
suggest uses for textured vegetable protein, tofu and Quorn in meals
identify groups of people with higher need for protein, mainly children, teenagers,
pregnant women, elderly persons, vegetarians
explain the effect of dry and wet heat on protein
state the daily percentage energy intake for protein (15%)
state the calorific value of 1g of protein
outline dangers of high protein slimming diets on health
Carbohydrates
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classify carbohydrates into sugars, starch and non-starch polysaccharides
state the function of carbohydrates in the diet
state the daily percentage energy intake to be supplied by total carbohydrates (55%) and
of which sugars (less than 10%)
state the calorific value of 1g of carbohydrates
justify the importance of combining vitamin B rich foods with carbohydrates
explain why carbohydrate intake acts as a ‘protein sparer’
Sugars
classify sugars into monosaccharides and disaccharides
identify glucose and fructose as two of the monosaccharides and list sources
identify maltose, sucrose and lactose as disaccharides and list sources
distinguish between intrinsic and extrinsic sugars
list sources of sugar in the diet
identify the relationship between sugar intake and health including dental caries, obesity
and the prevalence of diabetes mellitus
explain the effects of dry and wet heat on sugars
Starch
name sources of starch in the diet
explain the importance of starch in the diet
identify groups of people with higher requirements of starch in the diet, mainly athletes
and or people doing heavy work
explain the effects of dry and wet heat on starch
Non-Starch Polysaccharides
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define the term NSP
identify sources of NSP
list the function of soluble fibre in the diet
list the functions of insoluble fibre in the diet
list disorders associated with a low-fibre intake, constipation, diverticulitis and
haemorrhoids
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The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
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explain the importance of drinking liquids when consuming fibre rich foods
suggest ways how to include fibre in sweet and savoury dishes
justify the relationship between insoluble fibre intake and the prevention of intestinal
disorders, with particular reference to constipation, haemorrhoids and diverticulitis
justify the relationship between soluble fibre intake and circulatory / heart health
Fats and Oils
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classify fats into saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids
identify animal and vegetable sources for each type (where applicable)
list 4 functions of fat in the body
state the daily percentage energy intake to be supplied by total fats (30%) and saturated
fats (less than 10%)
state the calorific value of 1g of fat
comment on the relationship between fat intake and health including high serum
cholesterol levels, heart disease and obesity.
explain the link between high levels of blood cholesterol and CHD
comment on the availability of margarines and low-fat spreads
suggest their uses in food preparation
suggest ways how to reduce fat while preparing meals
Vitamins
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distinguish between fat soluble and water soluble vitamins
refer to each vitamin with its scientific name
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identify the fat soluble vitamins A, D, E and K
distinguish between beta carotene and retinol
state the functions of each vitamin
identify sources of each vitamin
identify effects of excess intake and deficiency for each of the vitamins
explain the link between Vitamin D intake and the absorption of Calcium
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Fat-soluble Vitamins
Water-soluble Vitamins
identify the water-soluble vitamins B-complex and C
state the functions of each vitamin
identify sources of each vitamin
identify effects of deficiency for each of the vitamins
explain the importance of folic acid for pregnant woman
explain the effects of cooking/heat, storage and time on Vitamin B-complex (especially
thiamin) and Vitamin C
suggest ways how to preserve water-soluble vitamins during the preparation, cooking and
serving of food
explain the link between Vitamin C intake and the absorption of Iron
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The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
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explain the link between Vitamin B-complex intake and the release of energy from
Carbohydrates
Minerals
Calcium, Sodium, Iron, Phosphorus, Iodine, Flouride
For each of the above:
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identify sources of each
state the functions of each
identify effects of deficiency or excess, as applicable
identify groups of people with special ( high / low ) requirements, namely children,
teenagers, breastfeeding women and the elderly
suggest ways of increasing / reducing as applicable
The Process of Digestion
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label the digestive tract – mouth, tongue and salivary glands, oesophagus, stomach, liver,
pancreas, small intestine, large intestine, anus
identify the main processes of digestion in the mouth, oesophagus, stomach, small
intestine and large intestine: (in brief)
In the mouth
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identify chewing as the mechanical process involved in the breaking down of food
explain the importance of saliva to start chemical breakdown of starch
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explain how chewed food is pushed down to the oesophagus
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In the stomach
state the function of acid present in the stomach is to break down the food
explain the functions of enzymes in the process of digestion
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In the oesophagus
In the small and large intestine
explain that digestion is completed in the small intestine by the absorption of nutrients
into the bloodstream; the undigested food passes on to the large intestine; where it absorbs
water
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The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
Water
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list 4 functions of water
list sources of water in the diet
state daily requirements
identify ways how water is lost from the body
name dehydration as an effect of water deficiency
identify groups of people requiring higher intakes, mainly active persons, people living in
a hot climate, people working in hot environments
The Importance of Breakfast
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define the term breakfast
explain the importance of breakfast
choose healthy breakfast cereals
list different food that can be eaten for breakfast
plan a healthy breakfast
Food Commodities
Cereals, milk, dairy products, meat, fish, poultry, eggs, fruit, vegetables, pulses, nuts,
herbs and spices
General
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outline the nutritional value
list different types available on the market
explain their use and versatility in cooking
suggest suitable methods of cooking
identify food products and derivatives
list points to keep in mind when choosing, buying and storing food
explain the effect of heat and changes during cooking
suggest recipes to increase use of fresh, wholesome food commodities
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Cereals
draw and label the structure of the wheat grain
distinguish between refined and unrefined foods
comment on the importance of choosing unrefined products
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Milk and Dairy Products
list different types of milk
give 1 reason why milk is heat treated
comment on the shelf-life of different types of milk
suggest the type of milk suitable for different groups of people and situations
explain why homogenised milk is suitable for freezing
explain how heat affects the nutritional value of milk
explain the term bio-yoghurts / milk drinks and comment on their increase in popularity
suggest alternatives to cow’s milk for people who are lactose intolerant
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The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
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Eggs
draw and label the egg namely the shell, thin white, thick white, yolk and air space
explain the difference between free-range and battery eggs, with reference to the
environmental impact and quality of eggs
explain why eggs should not be washed before storage
explain how to test an egg for freshness
discuss the use of eggs in food preparation
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Fruit and Vegetables
explain the effects of heat on the nutritional value of vegetables
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Pulses and Nuts
outline the importance of including pulses and nuts when preparing meals for vegans and
vegetarians
explain why it is important to cook red kidney beans thoroughly
explain why pulses should be soaked in water for eight hours
Menu Planning
Factors Affecting Food Choice
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list factors which affect food choice
suggest meals that could be prepared, keeping in mind the various factors / situations
Different Dietary Recommendations
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recognise risk factors and suggest ways of preventing the following diet-related disorders:
diabetes and dental caries, CHD and high levels of cholesterol, hypertension,
overweight/obesity, constipation and diverticular disease, osteoporosis, food allergies,
coeliac disease, anorexia/bulimia
Recipe Engineering
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outline factors to keep in mind when modifying recipes
adapt recipes to make them suitable for high-fibre diets, high iron diets, high calcium diets,
low-fat diets, low-sugar diets and low-salt diets
suggest two-course meals consisting of a main course and dessert for the afore-mentioned
diets
suggest two-course meals, consisting of a main course and dessert for: pregnant women,
toddlers, invalids and convalescents, athletes, senior citizens, vegetarians, school packed
lunches, lactose intolerants, coeliacs
compare original to modified recipes in terms of colour, texture, flavour, keeping qualities,
volume and appearance of the dishes
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The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
Methods of Cooking
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list at least 5 reasons why we cook food
explain the difference between moist and dry methods of cooking
explain the difference between conduction, convection and radiation as methods of heat
transfer
list possible cooking methods: grilling, poaching, steaming, boiling, microwave cooking,
barbeques, baking, deep, shallow and stir frying, stewing
Suggest suitable food that can be cooked using each method of cooking
Compare and contrast methods of cooking according to affect on health, efficiency in
relation to time, use of fuel, changes in energy values and nutrient loss
Identify equipment necessary for each method of cooking
List rules when using each of the cooking methods, with particular reference to
microwave cooking
Safety and Hygiene in the Kitchen
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define hygiene
explain the importance of personal and kitchen hygiene in the context of food preparation
list 6 rules for personal hygiene
list 6 rules for cleaning, especially in the kitchen
list 10 types of accidents that may happen in the kitchen
identify 10 causes of accidents in the kitchen
state the importance of safety practices in the kitchen
state 10 safety practices that can prevent accidents in the kitchen
demonstrate safety practices during food preparation
Foods Spoilage, Contamination and Poisoning
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list causes of food spoilage namely by natural decay and microscopic forms of life (to
include bacteria, moulds and yeasts), and chemicals
define the term perishable foods
give examples of perishable foods
explain why certain foods are considered as high-risk foods and give examples
explain the conditions required for micro-organisms to grow
explain how food could be contaminated due to cross-contamination and suggest ways to
avoid this during the preparation of meals
Hygienic Practices in the Handling and Preparation of Food
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explain the importance of following hygienic practices when handling food
define HACCP
comment on the importance of setting standards from ‘farm to fork’
list 5 personal hygiene rules
list 3 hygienic practices when purchasing food
list 3 hygienic practices when storing food
list 6 kitchen hygiene rules
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The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
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list 4 hygiene rules for waste disposal
explain the importance of following these rules and comment on the possible
consequences
The Use of Convenience Foods
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define the term convenience foods
list advantages and disadvantages of convenience foods
outline the importance of sensible use of convenience foods
explain why it is important to choose fresh foods rather than convenience foods whenever
possible
justify the increase in availability and choice of convenience foods with reference to
today’s lifestyle
Preservation of Food
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list the aims for preserving food
identify different methods of preservation
identify the methods of preservation in relation to the prevention of food decay namely
heat preservation, removal of moisture, removal of air, reduction of temperature, addition
of a chemical preservative and irradiation
comment on the advantages and disadvantages of the different methods of preservation
with reference to the nutritional value, changes in colour, texture, flavour and food
structure, shelf-life and value for money
comment on the popularity of cook-chill foods and ready prepared meals and their health
implications
Home Freezing
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outline the importance of home freezing
identify home freezing as a cost-effective method of preservation
name foods and dishes that can be suitable for freezing
set basic rules to be followed when storing food in a freezer
list packaging materials suitable for use in a freezer
explain how food is prepared for freezing to include the blanching process
Food Packaging
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explain the importance of packaging
list materials used for packaging
suggest suitability of packaging materials for different food products
comment on the environmental impact of packaging material
suggest ways how to choose products with minimal packaging or packaging that has
minimal impact on the environment
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The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
Food Labelling
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explain the importance of food labelling as a source of information for consumers and a
method of advertising a product
list the information that should be found on a food label by law
comment on the importance of the information given
name other information which is often found on the food label
identify and explain the symbols often found on a food label to include: ‘microwavable’
symbol, ‘litterman’ symbol, ‘recyclable’ symbol, freezing instructions, cooking symbols,
‘suitable for vegetarians’ symbol, irradiation symbol, gluten-free symbol and the bar-code
list health claims found on food labels
explain the difference between wording found on food labelling such as no sugar added
and no added sugar, strawberry yoghurt, strawberry-flavour yoghurt and strawberry
flavoured yoghurt
Food Additives
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list the types of additives – preservatives, colourings, flavour enhancers, emulsifiers,
stabilizers and thickeners, anti-oxidants and addition of nutrients
explain the function of each with reference to food manufacture
explain the importance of the E symbol found in front of additives listed in the ingredients
list
give at least 5 examples of natural additives / herbs / spices found in food
give at least 2 examples of synthetic additives found in food
comment on the possible health implications of excessive use of additives in processed
food
comment on the use of sweeteners instead of sugar to reduce calorific value of products
while still giving a sweet flavour to foods
Organic Farming and Genetically Modified Organisms
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explain the term organic farming
state two benefits and two disadvantages of organic farming
outline the importance of organic farming
list three ways how it differs to conventional methods of farming
explain the term genetically modified organisms
give three reasons why people are showing more awareness regarding GMO’s
The Practical Component
The Preparation Sheet
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comment on the importance of planning a practical session in detail and following the
order of work during the realisation, with reference to the prevention of accidents,
following hygienic practices, being organised and finishing on time
analyse the assignment given
choose dishes which are conducive to health and that meet requirements according to the
assignment given
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The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
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list ingredients required, including the weight
list the utensils needed
outline reasons for choice with reference to the assignment given, colour, texture and
flavour of dishes chosen, time constraints, cost of meal and other limitations such as fruit
and vegetables in season, lack of certain equipment in Home Economics Room
organise work and allocate time for each step
evaluate planning and realisation of assignment
Weighing and Measuring
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list equipment used for weighing and measuring
follow rules when weighing and measuring to achieve correct readings
convert from g to kg and vice versa
convert from ml to l and vice versa
identify other units of measuring solids and liquids namely oz and lb; fl.oz and pints; cups
Preparation of Meals with emphasis on the Basic Skills, the Nutrients, Meal
Planning, Food Commodities and Cooking Methods
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The Basic Skills
peeling, chopping, cutting, slicing, dicing, grating, weighing and measuring, beating,
whisking, mixing, sieving, greasing, lining of tins, liquidising, blending, mashing,
rubbing-in, kneading, folding-in, creaming, rolling out, binding of mixtures, using pastry
to line dishes, simple healthy cake decoration, laying of tables, serving food
The Nutrients
reduce fat, salt and sugar
balance proteins and carbohydrates
increase fibre, calcium, iron and vitamins
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Meal Planning
pregnant women, toddlers, invalids and convalescents, athletes, senior citizens,
vegetarians, school packed lunches, lactose intolerants, coeliacs
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Food Commodities
meat, fish, poultry, milk, dairy products, fruit, vegetables, cereals, herbs, spices, pulses,
nuts and eggs
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Methods of Cooking
grilling, poaching, steaming, baking, roasting, stewing, microwave cooking, stir-frying,
boiling
Cake-Making Methods
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General
list the three main types of cake-making methods
give the basic recipe for each of the methods
describe each of the processes in detail
identify the main rules to follow when preparing each of the following methods of cakemaking; suggest two faults that may occur when rules are not followed
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The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
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identify the all-in-one creaming method as the least healthy, whereas the rubbing-in
method as the healthiest
comment on the shelf-life when preparing cakes using the different methods
suggest ways of increasing fibre, reducing sugar and margarine when preparing cakes
describe the properties of the ingredients used for each method of cake-making
decorate cakes using healthy ingredients such as ricotta, nuts, fresh and dried fruits and
yoghurt
The Rubbing-in Method
define the terms sieving, rubbing-in, binding, dry ingredients and liquid ingredients
The Creaming Method
explain how creaming sugar and eggs helps in improving texture as it acts as a raising
agent
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The All-in-one Method
compare this method to the traditional creaming method of cake-making
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The Whisking Method
make sponge mixtures to prepare flans and Swiss rolls and other healthy desserts
suggest suitable fillings when making sponge cakes and Swiss rolls
define the terms whisking, ribbon-texture and folding-in
The Shortcrust pastry
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describe basic steps in the process of making shortcrust pastry
identify the main rules to follow and suggest possible faults if rules are not followed
modify recipes for dishes using shortcrust pastry
explain why the shortcrust pastry is the healthiest choice when using pastry to make pastry
dishes
decorate pastry dishes in a simple way
suggest healthy, sweet and savoury recipes that could be prepared
define the terms kneading and rolling out
Yeast as a Raising Agent
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describe the function of raising agents in cake making and yeast cookery
distinguish between mechanical and chemical raising agents, giving examples of each
describe the conditions yeast needs to grow in
list the ingredients needed to make a yeast dough
describe the process of making yeast dough
identify the main rules to follow and suggest two faults that may occur
suggest sweet and savoury dishes that could be prepared using a yeast dough
define the terms fermentation, proofing and kneading
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The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
MODULE 2: Family Well-Being
The Family Unit
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define the term family
list the types of families (nuclear, extended, single parents, foster parents, adoptive parents,
step parents)
state the roles and responsibilities of the different family members
identify the basic needs of families and how these change throughout life (physical, social,
psychological, intellectual)
suggest positive family relationships
Suggest 3 ways how the individual and the family can interact within the community
Child Care and Development
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explain the importance of showing respect for self and partner
list the factors that can harm the unborn child
identify the basic needs of children at the different stages of life – baby, infant, toddler,
pre-school child
suggest ways how parents can help for the development of physical, emotional,
intellectual and social needs of children
explain how to create an environment which introduces the child to healthy eating habits
explain that the vaccine programme issued by the health department is a means of
preventing the spread of contagious disease
list four of the diseases children are immunised against
First Aid and the First Aid Box
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list items found in a First Aid Box
explain how to give first aid if faced with the following injuries: cuts and grazes; burns
and scalds; nose bleed; poisoning; fractures, bruises, swellings and sprains
Senior Citizens in Society
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define the term senior citizens
identify emotional, social, intellectual and physical needs
identify ways of how and where they can get help
list effects of the changing lifestyle on the elderly person
identify the positive and negative aspects of an elderly person living alone, living within
the family and living in a residential home
list 5 services available for senior citizens and discuss their benefits
suggest how a home could be adapted according to the changing needs of a senior citizen
list 5 gadgets available to help senior citizens live a more independent life
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The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
Safety In and Outside the Home
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explain why children and the elderly are most prone to accidents inside and outside the
home
list possible accidents inside and outside the home, with particular emphasis on the
kitchen, the bathroom, playing fields and on the road and identify safety precautions for
each
The Person with Special Needs in the Family and the Community
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identify 3 difficulties faced by people with mobility impairment
identify 3 difficulties faced by people with mental impairment
comment on the effect a person with special needs has on the family
suggest ways how to integrate the person with a disability in the community
Sources of Stress on Family Units and Strategies for Managing Stress
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identify sources of stress on the family
differentiate between social, cultural and economic sources of stress on family units
list 5 effects which show that a person is under stress
suggest 6 practical ways how teenagers can manage stress
The Identification of the Key Sources of Information and Support Provided
for Families
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identify 10 social protection and support provided by welfare services and organisations in
relation to children and elderly
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The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
MODULE 3: The Choice and Management of Resources
The Selection, Safe Use and Care of Kitchen Equipment
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identify equipment needed for different tasks taking place in the kitchen: chopping,
peeling, cutting, grating, baking, mixing, mashing, liquidizing, serving
explain how to care for utensils and equipment made of wood, glass, plastic and metal
The Critical Choice of Labour Saving Devices
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list the following labour saving devices found in the kitchen (food processor, electric
whisk, food mixer, liquidizer, blender, electric kettle, steamer, electric toaster, microwave
oven, cooker, refrigerator and freezer, dishwasher)
identify factors to consider and questions to ask when buying an appliance in order to
make a critical choice
The Selection, Safe Use and Care of Hobs, Grills and Ovens
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identify types of cookers available (built-in or free-standing; gas, electric or ceramic)
explain how to use a cooker safely
list the parts of a cooker
list special features to be considered when choosing the hob, grill and oven
The Selection, Safe Use and Care of Refrigerators
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identify the different types of refrigerators – top, bottom, larder and side-by-side
discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the different types of refrigerators
decide on the suitability of the refrigerator which suits best the needs of different set-ups
and factors
set basic rules to be followed when storing food in the refrigerator
list basic features to look out for when choosing a refrigerator
list packaging materials suitable for use in a refrigerator
identify 2 environmental factors when choosing a refrigerator
and Freezers
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identify the different types of freezers – chest and upright
discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the different types of freezers
comment on the importance of owning a home freezer considering today’s family
lifestyles
list basic features to look out for when choosing a freezer
decide on the suitability of the freezer which suits best the needs of different family setups and factors
identify 2 environmental factors when choosing a freezer
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The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
Laundry and Fabric Care
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classify 4 fabrics under each of the two headings – natural and synthetic
explain and list types of detergents available
select a suitable laundry detergent considering the environmental impact of the various
detergents
name and comment about the features to look out for when choosing a washing machine
explain symbols within the international textile care labelling code
explain how to prepare clothes for washing
list general rules for removing stains
Appearance Management (Good Grooming)
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•
•
define self-image
describe how clothing affects a person’s self-image
explain the importance of choosing clothing that enhances self-image
determine the social factors that affect clothing choices
describe a well-dressed person
Environmental Issues and Awareness
Environmental Awareness
•
•
•
define the term environment
explain the importance of taking care of our environment
comment on the local environmental situation
Waste Separation at Source
•
•
•
•
•
distinguish between organic, inorganic waste, liquid and solid waste
list benefits of separating waste at source
explain the steps to follow when organizing waste to be taken to bring-in sites
suggest ways how we can Reuse, Reduce, Recycle, Return and Refill
name bi-products such as compost and bio-diesel that are being made from generated
waste
The Choice of Goods and Services with the Minimal Impact on the Environment
•
•
•
•
•
•
define the term green consumer
list symbols to look out for to choose products with minimal impact on the environment
suggest changes in habits and daily routines to help us become more green consumers
when choosing goods and using various services
describe ways how to choose products with minimal impact on the environment
explain what the consumer can do to put pressure on manufacturers to produce products
and offer services with minimal impact on the environment
list products that
o should not be tested on animals,
o should be CFC free,
o should be biodegradable,
o should not contain a lot of packaging,
38
The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
o could be made out of recycled material
Saving Energy and Water in the Home
•
•
•
•
explain the importance of saving energy and water in the home
identify daily habits and routines that one could adopt to reduce the consumption of
electricity and water in the home
list ways of how to save energy and water in the home when designing and decorating the
home
suggest new technologies and alternative sources of energy that are helping in reducing
electricity and water consumption
Consumer Issues and Education
Consumer Awareness
•
•
•
define the term consumer
explain the importance of becoming an informed consumer
identify factors which influence consumer choice with reference to: personal, social,
economic, psychological and environmental factors.
Shops and Shopping Practices
•
•
•
•
•
compare and contrast the advantages and disadvantages of the following shopping
practices:
o buying from specialist shops, supermarkets, discount stores, open markets,
door-to-door sellers
o buying over the internet, over the phone
o using mail-order and catalogue shopping
identify marketing strategies used and comment on their influence on the consumer
make a list of different forms of advertising
discuss the store layout and in-store promotions as an effective form of advertising
set 10 rules for wise shopping
Methods of Payment
•
•
•
explain how one can pay for products using the following methods: cash, plastic money,
cheque, hire purchase, interest free credit, bank-loan or overdraft facilities
compare the advantages and disadvantages when using the above methods
explain the difference between debit and credit card and comment on the advantages and
disadvantages of using these cards
Budgeting and Ways of Saving Money
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
explain the importance of budgeting one’s income
list sources of income
explain the difference between gross and net income
list priorities to be considered when planning the family budget
analyse possible consequences of mismanagement
explain possible bank services and explain the functions of current, savings and fixed
accounts
list 3 types of possible investments for future needs
39
The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
Consumer Rights and Responsibilities
•
•
•
•
list the 8 consumer rights
name 4 consumer responsibilities
explain the procedure of how to redress
list 2 sources of information and advice
Housing and Interiors
Factors influencing a Choice of Home
•
•
name a person’s basic needs namely physical, social and emotional
identify factors which influence the choice of home
Steps to follow when acquiring a Home
•
•
•
•
•
list the advantages and disadvantages of renting, buying and building a house
identify the different ways of financing a home
list the steps to follow when buying a house
explain who is the estate agent and what services they offer
list the advantages and disadvantages of using the services of an estate agent from the
buyer’s and seller’s point of view
Assurances and Insurances
•
•
explain the difference between assurances and insurances
list the benefits of having a household insurance policy and a life assurance policy when
taking a loan from the bank
Kitchen Planning
•
•
•
•
•
identify the different uses of a kitchen
Define the term ergonomics in terms of kitchen planning (efficiency, safety, easy to work
in)
Plan the work triangle as a means of maximizing efficiency, safety and saving energy
Outline the importance of organizing storage space in the kitchen
Suggest points to be kept in mind when planning lighting, ventilation, work surfaces and
wall and floor coverings
o Lighting: Acknowledge the importance of natural lighting, central light
together with lighting on work tops
o Ventilation: Identify ways of ventilating the kitchen namely: windows, wall
ventilation outlets, cooker hoods and extractor fans
o Wall and Floor Coverings: List the characteristics of a suitable work surfaces
and floor coverings
40
The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
MODULE 4: The Coursework Component
Refer to Appendices
41
The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
APPENDIX 1
Assessment Criteria for the Practical Assignments for Forms III, IV and V
Practical
Assignment
Choice of dishes
Criteria for allocation of marks
This should be suitable for the particular requirements of the assignment chosen. A
broad judgement of the whole assignment should be considered.
Pupils are expected to:
- apply knowledge relevant to the assignment;
- present evidence on which judgements of choice are made.
Marks
Marks
Incorrect choice of dishes
Poor choice of dishes
Good choice of dishes
Reasons for
choice
Planning of order
of work
Shopping/
Equipment/
Materials/
Requirements
List
0
1-2
3-5
Pupils are expected to suggest factors that could be identified to validate choice.
These could include reference to health, nutritional value, economy, colour, texture,
balance, taste, presentation, etc.
No reasons given
Poor understanding of the assignment
Limited interpretation with simple justification
Adequate understanding of the assignment
A basic interpretation with simple but accurate justification.
Recognition of limits of assignment, good analysis of assignment and showing
realistic choices in relation to time available.
Marks
Full credit must be given for a logical order of work which should include:
preparation of self, hygiene and safety, timing, important points relating to particular
dishes, dovetailing, clearing and washing up, serving of food at the right
temperature, presentation of work.
Pupils are expected to plan a course of action appropriate to the assignment set.
Little evidence of accuracy, health and safety awareness, planning or sequencing of
work.
Some evidence of ability to plan and use resources but with a poor sequence of
work. Limited awareness of health and safety, time and energy.
A logical sequence of work with due regard to resources, preparation and
completion of assignment, a considerable degree of accuracy indicating awareness
of health and safety and time factors.
A logical sequence of work reflecting efficient use of time, methodical thinking and
dovetailing tasks in a sensible order, showing accuracy and due regard to
preparation and completion of assignment.
Marks
Full credit must be given to pupils who make a comprehensive list of ingredients and
appliances needed. List of ingredients should be accompanied by quantities which
are reasonable.
Marks
List not presented.
Incomplete list / quantities not always reasonable.
Complete list, with reasonable quantities
0
1
2
0
1-3
4-6
7-10
1-2
3-4
5-6
7-8
42
The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
Practical
realisation
Pupils are expected to carry out their plan of action with proficiency and competence
using management, organisational and psychomotor skills.
The following sections will be assessed - Preparation, Production, Proficiency, Hygienic
Practices and Outcome.
The mark awarded is based on four graded levels:
Level 1 - pupil has achieved a restricted level of competence and
performed tasks with difficulty
Level 2 - pupil has performed most tasks to a satisfactory level of
competence
Level 3 - pupil has reached a good level of competence
Level 4 - pupil has achieved a high level of competence and
performed tasks effectively.
Note: - there is a different distribution of marks for each section.
Levels
Marks
level 1
level 2
level 3
level 4
1-2
3-5
6-7
8-10
level 1
level 2
level 3
level 4
1-2
3-5
6-7
8-10
level 1
level 2
level 3
level 4
1-3
4-7
8-11
12-15
level 1
level 2
level 3
level 4
1-2
3-5
6-8
9-10
level 1
level 2
level 3
level 4
1-2
3-5
6-8
9-10
level 1
level 2
level 3
level 4
1-2
3-5
6-8
9-10
Preparation.
Pupil’s appearance
Selection of correct equipment and tools.
Preparation of tins and appropriate equipment.
Correct oven temperature and oven shelves.
Preparation of fruit and vegetables as required.
Performance in chosen skill
Restricted performance.
Fairly satisfactory to satisfactory.
Good performance.
Excellent performance.
Production
Good manipulative skills and good handling of tools and equipment.
Correct methods of preparation and cooking.
Proficiency
Efficient organisation of work and time. Safe and economic management of cooker.
Sensible use of refrigerator.
Procedures
Adherence to rules concerning hygiene and safety: self, equipment/appliances, working
area clean and tidy, washing up done as necessary, all equipment returned to correct
place.
Correct disposal of waste.
Outcome
The following should be considered in the presentation of the finished results:
- finished appearance, garnishing, decoration
- texture, flavour, seasoning, colour
- temperature, serving dishes
- appropriate presentation with a flair for creativity and an aesthetically
pleasing outcome.
43
The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
Evaluation
Marks
Pupils should evaluate the completed assignment by identifying strengths and
weaknesses and making reference to results, cost, use of time, nutritional value and
suggestions for improvement.
Very few comments on cost, flavour, texture.
Few comments confirming or criticising choice of dishes. Superficial reference to
nutritional value of dishes.
1-2
Reasonable evaluation with comments on the assignment involved, planning, selection of
dishes, organisation of work and full comments on outcome. Basic reference to
nutritional value of food included.
3-5
A fair appreciation of the strengths and weaknesses of assignment.
Some suggestions for improvements. Reference made to cost, organisation, finished
results. Sensible consideration of nutritional value of dishes.
6-8
Reasoned judgement on assignment in relation to flavour, texture and appearance.
Comment relating to cost of dishes in relation to task set. A good appreciation of
strengths and weaknesses with sensible suggestions for improvement. Detailed
consideration of nutritional value of food included.
9-10
It is suggested that teachers use one of the mark sheets available in Appendices 1.2, 1.3 or 1.4
44
The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
APPENDIX 1.1
PREPARATION SHEET – page 1
Name: _____________________________
Class:_________________
Assignment: _____________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________
DISHES/BEVERAGES CHOSEN (5 marks) _________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________
CHOICE OF WORK (List of Ingredients, including Quantities)
REASONS FOR CHOICE OF WORK (10 marks)
45
The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
PREPARATION SHEET – page 2
TIME
ORDER OF WORK WITH OVEN MANAGEMENT (8 marks)
46
The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
PREPARATION SHEET – page 3
SHOPPING/ EQUIPMENT/ MATERIALS REQUIREMENTS LIST (2 marks)
MEAT OR FISH
GROCERIES
FRUIT & VEGETABLES
SPECIAL EQUIPMENT/
APPLIANCES
EVALUATION (10 marks)
47
The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
APPENDIX 1.2
ASSESSMENT MARK SHEET FOR THE PRACTICAL ASSIGNMENTS
Name: _______________________________________
Practical number:
__________
Total marks awarded (out of 100 marks): __________
Total mark as 7.5%:
__________
Instructions: Next to each criterion in each section, tick in the column which best indicates the level of
performance reached by the pupil. The column with the highest amount of indicates the average level reached
by the pupil in each section. Award marks as indicated at the bottom of the column in each section. Add total of
each section to obtain the final score achieved by the pupil.
Choice of dishes
Recognizes limits of test
Realistic choices
Time kept in mind
Use of local and seasonal food
Reasons for choice
Suggests factors to validate
choice
Reference to health and
nutritional value
Reference to economy
Reference to colour, texture,
balance, taste and presentation.
Order of work
Logical sequence
Identifies basic steps of recipes
Includes preparation of self
Dovetailing
Effective use of time
Hygiene and safety
Clearing and washing up
Serving at right temperature
Presentation of work
Incorrect
Good
0 marks
1-2 marks
3-5 marks
Not noticed
Poor
Adequate
Good
0 marks
1-3 marks
4-6 marks
7-10 marks
Poor
Some
Adequate
Good
1-2 marks
3-4 marks
5-6 marks
7-8 marks
Not
noticed
Limited
Good
0 marks
1 mark
2 marks
Limited
Fair
Good
Excellent
1-2 marks
3-5 marks
6-8 marks
9-10 marks
Shopping/ Equipment/Materials
Requirements List
Lists ingredients and quantities
Lists appliances and other materials needed
Evaluation
Reference to flavour, texture,
appearance
Cost of dishes
Reference to use of time
Identifies weaknesses
Identifies strengths
Suggestions for improvement
Considers nutritive value
Recipe engineering and its
effectiveness
Comments about outcome
Poor
Marks
Marks
Marks
Marks
Marks
48
The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
Preparation
Appearance
Selection of
tools/equipment
Preparation of items needed
Correct oven temp. &
shelves
Preparation of fruits and
vegetables
Restricted level
Satisfactory
Good
Very good
1-2 marks
3-5 marks
6-7 marks
8-10 marks
Restricted
Satisfactory
Good
Excellent
1-2 marks
3-5 marks
6-7 marks
8-10 marks
Marks
Marks
Chosen skill
Performance in chosen skill
Production
Restricted
level
Satisfactory
Good
Excellent
1-3 marks
4-7 marks
8-11 marks
12-15 marks
Restricted
Satisfactory
Good
Excellent
1-2 marks
3-5 marks
6-8 marks
9-10 marks
Restricted
Satisfactory
Good
Excellent
1-2 marks
3-5 marks
6-8 marks
9-10 marks
Restricted
Satisfactory
Good
Excellent
1-2 marks
3-5 marks
6-8 marks
9-10 marks
Marks
Manipulation of other
culinary skills
Handling of tools/ equipment
Methods of preparation
Correct methods of cooking
Proficiency
Organization of work
Organization of time
Safe use of cooker
Economic use of cooker
Sensible use of refrigerator
Procedures
Clean & tidy working area
Washing up
Equipment returned to correct
place
Pupil’s safety
Safe use of
equipment/appliances
Correct disposal of waste
Outcome
Appearance
Garnish/decoration
Texture
Flavour/seasoning
Colour
Temperature
Serving dishes
Aesthetically pleasing
Creativity
Marks
Marks
Marks
General comment:
______________________________________________________________________________________
49
The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
APPENDIX 1.3
Assessment Mark Sheet for Practical Assignment 1 & 2
Pupil’s Name ______________________________
Pr. Ass. 1
Mark
_________
%
Choice of
Dishes
Distribution
of Marks
Pupil’s Mark –
Ass. 1
Pupil’s Mark –
Ass. 2
5
Reasons for
Choice
10
Planning of
Order of
Work
8
Requirements
List
2
Pr. Ass. 2
Mark
_________
%
15% of
Total Marks
Evaluation of
Work
10
Practical Realisation
Preparation Chosen Skill
Distribution
of Marks
Pupil’s Mark –
Ass. 1
Pupil’s Mark –
Ass. 2
10
10
Production
15
Proficiency
10
Total
Procedures
10
Outcome
10
100
Comment:_________________________________________________________________________________________________
50
The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
APPENDIX 1.4
Assessment Mark Sheet for Practical Assignment 1 (Pr1) & 2 (Pr2)
* Marks are allotted per Practical Assignment
Pupil’s Name
Choice of
Dishes
Reasons
for choice
Planning
of Order
of Work
*5 marks
Pr1 Pr2
10 marks
Pr1 Pr2
8 marks
Pr1 Pr2
School:
Subject teacher:
Class:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Practical Realisation
Preparation Chosen skill Production Proficiency Procedures Outcome
10 marks
10 marks
15 marks
10 marks
10 marks
10 marks
Pr1 Pr2 Pr1 Pr2 Pr1 Pr2 Pr1 Pr2 Pr1 Pr2 Pr1 Pr2
Requirements List
Evaluation
of Work
2 marks
Pr1
Pr2
10 marks
Pr1 Pr2
Total
100 marks
Pr1 Pr2
51
The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
APPENDIX 2
Assessment Criteria for the Investigation
Name:_______________________________________
Class: ____________________________
Total marks awarded (out of 120): ________Total mark as 15 % (Total marks awarded ÷8): ________
Criteria for Investigation
1. Choice and analysis of investigation title.
i. Chooses a relevant and focused title for the investigation………….….
Chooses a somehow relevant and focused title for the investigation…..
Chooses a non-specific/vague title for the investigation……………….
……………………………………………………………………………
ii. Carries out an accurate, brief analysis of the investigation title………
Carries out a brief analysis which is not necessarily accurate…...……
Brief analysis not presented or completely inaccurate………...............
Maximum marks
( 8 marks)
4-3 marks
2-1 marks
0 marks
……………….
4-3 marks
2-1 marks
0 marks
2. Identification of factors involved in carrying out the
investigation.
i. Identifies all factors involved as appropriate…………………………..
Identifies most factors involved………………………………………..
Identifies a limited amount of factors …………………………………
No identification of factors / Totally inaccurate……………………….
(10 marks)
Marks awarded
10-9 marks
8-5 marks
4-1 marks
0 marks
3. Aims.
i. Draws up a comprehensive and relevant list of aims…………………..
Draws up a relevant but not comprehensive list of aims………………
Draws up a relevant but restricted list of aims………………………...
No evidence of aims / Aims presented not relevant for investigation…
……………………………………………………………………………
ii. Complete reference made to which part of investigation will help
pupil reach each aim………………………………………………
Some reference made to which part of investigation will help
pupil reach most aims……………………………………………..
No reference made……………………………………………………
(14 marks)
10-8 marks
7-4 marks
1-3 marks
0 marks
……………….
4. Plan of Action.
i. Presents a plan of action which is well organized and methodical ……
Presents a plan of action which is not necessarily always accurate
and practical……………………………………………………………
No evidence of a plan of action ………………………………………..
……………………………………………………………………………
ii. Indicates reasonable time frames and identifies suitable resources
needed……………….............................................................................
Indicates somewhat reasonable time frames and identifies some of the
resources needed ………………………………………….................
No evidence or incorrect time frames. No reference to resources
needed made…………………………………………………………...
(8 marks)
4-3 marks
5. Background research.
i. Collates background research, using a reasonable selection of
sources. ………….…………………………………………………….
Collates background research using limited sources; information given
not always relevant…………….……………………………………….
Carries out research in a restricted manner and which is not
necessarily relevant.…………………………………….
No research carried out………………………………………………...
(10 marks)
4-3 marks
2-1 marks
0 marks
2-1 marks
0 marks
……………….
4-3 marks
2-1 marks
0 marks
5-4 marks
3-2 marks
1 mark
0 marks
52
The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
……………………………………………………………………………
ii. Relevant conclusions drawn…………………………………………...
Some conclusions drawn, but not necessarily always relevant………..
No conclusions drawn………………………………............................
6. Use of technique I.
i. Introduces the technique, giving reasons for carrying out the
technique……………………………....................................................
Identifies technique and gives insufficient reasons for carrying out the
technique……………………………………………………………….
Technique is not identified and no reasons are given……………….. ..
……………………………………………………………………………
ii. Carries out the technique in an effective manner……………………...
Carries out technique in a satisfactory manner…………......................
Carries out technique in a restricted manner………………………….
Technique is not carried out …………………………………………..
……………………………………………………………….
iii. Draws detailed conclusions to the result of the technique……………
Draws general conclusions to the result of the technique…………….
Draws poor conclusions to the result of the technique..........................
Does not draw conclusions to the result of the technique…………….
……………….
5-4 marks
3-1 marks
0 marks
(12 marks)
2 marks
1 mark
0 marks
……………….
6-5 marks
4-3 marks
2-1 marks
0 marks
……………….
4-3 marks
2 marks
1 mark
0 marks
7. Use of technique II.
i. Introduces the technique, giving reasons for carrying out the
technique………………………………………………………………
Identifies technique and gives insufficient reasons for carrying out the
technique……………………………………………………………….
Technique is not identified and no reasons are given………………….
……………………………………………………………………………
ii. Carries out the technique in an effective manner……….......................
Carries out technique in a satisfactory manner…………......................
Carries out technique in a restricted manner……………......................
Technique is not carried out…………………………………………...
……………………………………………………………………………
iii. Draws detailed conclusions to the result of the technique……………
Draws general conclusions to the result of the technique…………….
Draws poor conclusions to the result of the technique………………..
Does not draw conclusions to the result of the technique…………….
(12 marks)
1 mark
0 marks
……………….
6-5 marks
4-3 marks
2-1 mark/s
0 marks
……………….
4-3 marks
2 marks
1 mark
0 marks
8. Discussion of results.
i. Discusses in detail the outcomes of the results obtained……………..
Discusses briefly the outcomes of the results obtained…………...........
Reviews poorly the outcomes of the results obtained …………………
No discussion of results………………………………………………...
(16 marks)
16-11 marks
10-5 marks
4-1 mark/s
0 marks
9. Evaluation.
i. Carries out ongoing evaluation ………………………………………..
Carries out evaluation in parts of the investigation……………………
No evidence of ongoing evaluation…………………............................
……………………………………………………………………………
ii.Evaluates comprehensively the effectiveness of the planning
decisions, methods and results obtained; makes a good appreciation
of the strengths and weaknesses of the investigation with sensible
suggestions for further work…………………………………………...
Makes a reasonable attempt at analysing and justifying the planning,
methods and results obtained, drawing on relevant evidence; shows
some understanding of the limitations of the investigation with a few
suggestions for further work…………………………………………...
Makes a limited analysis with superficial comments on the planning,
methods and results obtained; draws basic conclusions and makes
(24 marks)
6-4 marks
3-1 marks
0 marks
……………….
18-16 marks
2 marks
15-11 marks
10-6 marks
53
The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
limited suggestions for improvement of work and minor suggestions
for further development………………………………………………
Makes very poor analysis, with few comments on the planning,
methods and results obtained; draws poor conclusions and makes very
limited suggestions for improvement of work; makes no reference for
further development and shows very limited appreciation of the
strengths and weaknesses of the investigation…………………………
No evidence or vague attempts at evaluation of the planning methods
and results obtained…………………………………………………..
10. Language used and accuracy.
i Submits an original and self-designed investigation which indicates
precise nature of contents in sequential order and with a clear index;
writes with considerable accuracy and uses a wide range of specialist
terms adeptly and with precision.…….. ………….…………………...
Submits an adequately designed investigation with a layout in
sequential order and which gives some indication of contents; writes
with reasonable accuracy and uses a good range of specialist terms
with facility………………………………..…….…..………………...
Submits a poorly designed investigation which has most its contents
inserted in random order and not secured; writes with limits accuracy
and uses a limited range of specialist terms appropriately...…………..
5-1 mark/s
0 marks
(6 marks)
6-5 marks
4-3 marks
2-1 mark/s
Comments: __________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
54
The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
APPENDIX 2.1
Assessment Sheet for Investigation Work - FORM III
Students`
Name
Choice &
Analysis of
Title
Identification
of Factors
Involved
8
10
Aims Plan of
Action
14
8
Background
Research
Use of
Technique
Discussion
of Results
Evaluation
10
12
16
16
15%
Language Total
of Total
Used and
Accuracy
6
100
15%
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
55
The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
APPENDIX 2.2
Assessment Sheet for Investigation Work - FORM IV
Students` Name
Choice and
Analysis of
Title
8
Identification
of Factors
Involved
10
Aims
Plan of
Action
Background
Research
Total
15% of Total
14
8
10
50
15%
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
56
The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
APPENDIX 2.3
Assessment Sheet for Investigation Work - FORM V
Students` Name
Use of
Use of
Discussion Evaluation
Technique 1 Technique 2 of Results
12
12
16
24
Language
Used and
Accuracy
6
Total
Total Mark
in Form IV
70
50
Total
100%
(/120 x 100)
120
15% of
Total Mark
15
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
57
The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
APPENDIX 3
Annual Final Mark - FORM III
Student`s Name
Prac. Ass. 1
Prac. Ass. 2
Investigation Work
Total Coursework
5%
10%
15%
30%
Annual Exam
Mark
70%
Annual
Final Mark
100%
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
58
The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
APPENDIX 4
Annual Final Mark - FORM IV & V
Student`s Name
Prac. Ass.
15%
Investigation Work
15%
Total
Coursework
30%
Annual Exam
Mark
70%
Annual Exam
FINAL Mark
100%
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
59
The Home Economics Programme of Study – Forms 3, 4, 5
APPENDIX 1.3.1
Assessment Mark Sheet for Practical Assignment 1 – Form 5
______________________________
Pupil’s Name
Pr. Ass. 1
Mark
_________
%
Choice of
Dishes
Distribution
of Marks
Pupil’s Mark –
Ass. 1
5
Reasons for
Choice
10
Planning of
Order of
Work
8
15% of
Total
Marks
Requirements
List
Evaluation of
Work
2
10
Practical Realisation
Preparation Chosen Production Proficiency Procedures Outcome
Skill
Distribution
10
10
15
10
10
10
Total
100
of Marks
Pupil’s Mark –
Ass. 1
Comment:_____________________________________________________________________
____________________________
60
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