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USO05461664A
United States Patent [19]
[11]
Patent Number:
Cappadona
[45]
Date of Patent:
[54]
EMERGENCY WIRELESS TELEPHONE
5,148,473
5,159,317
Inventor:
Elmwood,
Steven cappadona’
N__]_ 0740']
Tuena Ave“
5,461,664
Oct. 24, 1995
9/1992 Freeland etal. ........................ .. 379/59
10/1992 Brav ............. ..
5,203,009
4/1993
340/574
Cl’l?VOllS
Bogusz et. . a1.
. . . ..........................
. . . . .... 379/37
FOREIGN PATENT DOCUMENTS
[21] Appl. No.: 43,862
0274128
[22]
Filed:
Apr. 7, 1993
_
[51]
Int. Cl.6 ..................................................... .. H04Q 7/32
[52]
[58]
US. Cl. ........... ..
379/58; 379/37; 455/127
Field Of Search ................................ .. 379/37, 58,59,
11/1990
Japan ................................... .. 455/127
'
Przmary Exammer—-Dwayne D. Bost
Attorney, Agent, or Firm—E_ Vassiliou
[57]
ABSTRACT
379/424—427, 433; 455/89, 90, 127; 439/426,
Aportable telephone, whichis used for emergency purposes.
500
_
Referemes Clted
It is powered by a battery, which has a short life counter
balanced by higher power, thus improving ef?ciency and
eifectiveness of the emergency portable telephone. The
US_ PATENT DOCUMENTS
battery may be sealed in a container for prolonging the life
[56]
of the battery during the period of time that the telephone 1s
4,237,344 12/1930 M009? 4,686,697 8/1987 Shapiro et a1. ......................... .. 379/38
4,724,538
4,845,772
2/1988 Farrell ............ ..
7/1989 Metroka et a1. ..
5,148,470
9/1952 Kobayashi et a1. ..................... .. 379/58
inactive. In an emergency situation, the container may be
pierced, and the battery freed to perform its duty
379/59
.. 379/433
T !.
14 Claims, 1 Drawing Sheet
9
THANCEIVER -—I—4ll | N11
’
C
TIMER
128
124
f
/
125 _/--
12B’
_/~ 126
122 ~\_ __
130
__/"122
123 /f*-/
130'
\\120
11s -/
m
(\9\\
\ 123
BATTERY
115
"\
“114
US. Patent
0a. 24, 1995
5,461,664
FIG. 1
10
/
THANCEIVER
i *lll'l'i
FIG. 2
124
128
/
.-
128,
/_—"'
,x/
'
123
115 /-/ m
130
BATTERY
‘
F\q\\ 123
115'
“~114
FIG. 3
234
212
232
5,461,664
1
2
EMERGENCY WIRELESS TELEPHONE
tion, in a remote place, for example.
First of all, the emergency telephone should have to be
light and portable, so that it could be carried by the owner
in his or her pocket or purse without a problem. This type of
FIELD OF THE INVENTION
This invention relates to wireless telephones, and more
particularly to battery operated portable emergency tele
phones.
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
l0
telephone, however, happens to be the most expensive one.
In addition to this, the small batteries of portable phones for
regular and conventional use, may happen to go low and
render the portable phone insufficient in power just the time
the emergency may occur, and the phone is needed the most.
One of the reasons that this is very probable is that the
regular portable phones are usually maintained at a stand-by
This invention relates to wireless telephones, and more
status, which consumes power of the battery. Furthermore,
particularly battery operated portable emergency telephones.
the owner of the phone, like a holder of a credit card, does
Wireless telephones, also named cellular telephones due
not resist to use it, even for nonemergency situations. Even
to the system used for their operation, may be classi?ed in 15 worse, the cellular phone owner pays as much for a call that
three major categories; mobile, transportable, and portable.
he or she answers for air-time as for one he or she makes,
All these types of telephones contain a transmitter and a
while the caller, calling from a traditional telephone pays the
nominal non-cellular charge; and all this is added to the
monthly service charge, which is non-affordable to many
receiver, the combination of the two commonly being called
a transceiver. Of course, in order to operate, they need a
power source, which usually comes in the form of a
people,~as aforementioned.
rechargeable battery.
The mobile telephones are mostly installed in automobiles
or other vehicles, and they are considerably more powerful
than the rest, because they are powered by the battery of the
vehicle, which for all practical purposes provides an unlim
Therefore, there is a strong need for an inexpensive
system, affordable for a higher portion of the population,
which system is also much more effective and e?icient.
Although a number of attempts have been made in the past
25 to create communications systems for cases of emergency
ited power source as far as the needs of the mobile telephone
are concerned. They are usually permanently installed in the
vehicle, and they have antennas, which are mostly mounted
outside the vehicle, but sometimes they may also be
mounted inside. There is no doubt then that they ful?l their
purpose of providing good communications from a vehicle
to the outside world, but they cannot provide the same type
30
which is rather powerful, and since they are not permanently
installed in the vehicle, they may be used inside the vehicle
provided to allow outpatients to communicate from outside
the facility with the health care coordinator to assist the
35
be used outside the vehicle. Due to the rather high weight of
the battery, however, which is in the vicinity of 4-6 pounds,
they are mainly used as telephones which may be in more
ment connected to a line seizing arrangement and an olf
hook detector so as to activate the line seizing arrangement
and send a bad line signal in the event that the off the hook
detector does not provide an oiT-hook signal when the line
than one cars, or when not in use, they may be stored out of
sight, in the trunk of the car, to decrease the probability of
somebody attempting to break into the car for stealing the
The portable telephones use a much smaller rechargeable
battery within the handset, and an antenna on the handset,
45
has been seized. A preferred embodiment also utilizes the
o?-hook detector for the additional purpose of resetting an
inactivity timer, which, on expiration of a predetermined
thus resembling very much the handset of a common cord
less telephone. They may be carried in the pocket of a
person, but they are more expensive than the other two types
since they have the most stringent power requirements, due
to the small size of the battery.
The above types of wireless telephones are a small part of
outpatients in rapidly and efficiently receiving appropriate
advice and health care as indicated by the by the patient
medical pro?le and for responding to emergency situations.
US. Pat. No. 4,686,697 (Shapiro et al.) discloses a
telephone care system, which has a line-checking arrange
in a similar manner as the mobile phones, or they may also
telephone.
reliable health care services for patients located within or
outside a health care facility. Furthermore, an out-of-hospital
communications network using auto-dialing telephones is
of communications to a person away from the vehicle.
The transportable telephones have their own battery,
situations, none of them resolves the problems recognized
and resolved by the instant invention.
US. Pat. No. 4,237,344 (Moore) discloses a system for
rapid response communications system in order to provide
50
interval of time, triggers an alarm call over the telephone
wires.
US. Pat. No. 4,724,538 (Farrell) discloses a roadside
emergency system, which includes a roadside station which
has a telephone unit similar to a mobile telephone set for a
cellular mobil telephone system. When the unit is activated,
it automatically generates radio signals which cause a
a very complicated cellular network, which combines an
elaborate relay of towers, as well as interconnected wireless 55 mobile telephone switching o?ice to dial up an emergency
and regular phone lines. This renders the cellular service
station, such as a highway police station. The office also
automatically establishes a channel for voice communica
very expensive and often inadequate. The operation of
tion between the roadside station and the emergency station.
cellular networks is very well known to the artisans.
Despite the apparent popularity of cellular phones, there
is a large portion of population, who would like to have a
less expensive and more powerful means of communica
tions, just for emergency situations. Many people, indeed,
The roadside station is further provided with a back-up
battery and an alarm to prevent tampering.
U.S. Pat. No. 5,148,470 (Kobayashi et al) discloses a
radio telephone apparatus including a base unit connected to
a wire line and a radio telephone unit connected to the base
buy the full service of a cellular carrier, and attempt to use
unit via a radio communication link. The apparatus has an
it for emergency purposes only, in order to pay only the
service fee, even though the service fee itself is very steep. 65 instantaneous conversation function for establishing a con
Others, cannot alTord it at all, with catastrophic results,
versation state by detecting that the radio telephone unit has
because of lack of communications in an emergency situa
been lifted up in a standby state, and also has a talk
5,461,664
3
4
commencing/terminating key allowing a command for com
switch is in the on-position and deactivate the trans
ceiver when the ?rst switch is in the off-position, the
normal status of the ?rst switch being in the off
mencing a conversation and a commend for terminating the
conversation to be imputed alternately. A time guard con~
trolling circuit is also provided for invalidating an input
position, resulting in preventing the telephone from
receiving phone calls;
operation of the talk commencing/terminating key if the talk
commencing/terminating key is operated during a period set
a battery connected with the transceiver through said ?rst
switch, the battery being adaptable to power the trans
ceiver when the ?rst switch is in the on position, the life
of the battery being adequate to last for a predetermined
duration of emergency phone calls made within a
predetermined period of time, after the ?rst switch has
been turned to the on-position; and
a timer activated by the ?rst switch for interrupting the
power of the battery from the transceiver at said
time. Simultaneously as the conversation state is established
by lifting the radio telephone unit in the standby state, the
preset timer is started, and even if the talk commencing/
terminating key is pressed during the preset time of the
timer, the input operation is invalidated and the conversation
state is maintained.
U.S. Pat. No. 5,148,473 (Freeland et al.) discloses a pager
and a radio-telephone apparatus having a radio pager section
and a cellular radiotelephone section into one unit. This
predetermined period of time.
apparatus may automatically receive a plurality of pages
while the cellular radiotelephone section is on, communi
cating a cellular telephone call, or off and unattended. The
Preferably, the battery is in a sealed form from the
atmosphere, so that the useful life of the battery is consid
received pages are stored in the pager section until the
apparatus user acknowledges their receipt by a keystroke.
20
The pages are then transferred to the radiotelephone section
The present invention is also directed to an emergency
and stored in a non-volatile memory for later use.
portable telephone, comprising
U.S. Pat. No. 5,159,317 (Brav) discloses a home com
a transceiver,
a ?rst switch having an on-position and an off-position,
the ?rst switch connected to the transceiver in a manner
to be capable to activate the transceiver when the ?rst
municator, which includes aid request circuitry capable of
establishing communications with a central monitoring sta
tion in response to a ?rst predetermined activation step
performed by a subscriber and test circuitry capable of
switch is in the on-position and deactivate the trans
ceiver when the ?rst switch is in the off-position, the
normal status of the ?rst switch being in the off
self-testing the home corrnnunicator in response to a second
predetermined activation step formed by the subscriber. The
home communicator further includes enable/disable cir
position, resulting in preventing the telephone from
receiving phone calls; and
cuitry capable of transmitting an identi?cation number to a
central monitoring station in response to a third predeter
a battery in a sealed form from the atmosphere, the battery
mined activation step with the aid request circuitry and the
test circuitry being unresponsive prior to the functioning of
the enable/disable circuitry.
35
electrically connecting the ?rst switch with the battery
911 emergency system, the number and location of a tele
sion telephone, from which such a 911 call originates. A ?rst
device is installed between PBX’s and the extensions
thereof, with the number and location of each extension
stored in the device‘s electronic memory. A second such
device is installed at a Public Safety Answering Point
(PASP). When 911 is dialed from an extension telephone of
being connected with the transceiver through said ?rst
switch, the battery being adaptable to power the trans
ceiver when the ?rst switch is in the on position;
means for freeing the battery from its sealed form and
U.S. Pat. No. 5,161,180 (Chavous) discloses a device for
responsively providing, in cooperative association with the
phone, especially a Private Branch Exchange (PBX) exten
erably prolonged for the period of time the telephone is not
in use, and the portable telephone further comprises means
for freeing the battery from the sealed form.
40
so that when the ?rst switch is turned on, the battery
powers the transceiver.
In other preferred embodiments of the invention
the means for freeing the battery are part of the ?rst
switch;
45
a PBX equipped with a device of Chavous’ invention, even
if the extension receiver is still on hook, the extension is
connected over telephone lines to the second device installed
at the PASP. The device at the PASP then interrogates the 50
the means for freeing the battery involve a piercing
mechanism; and
the telephone further comprises a closure containing the
?rst switch, which closure has to be withdrawn before
the ?rst switch becomes operable.
device at the PBX which responsively transmits the location
of the extension telephone from which the call originated.
The device installed at the PASP relays the location infor
DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
mation to at least one computer which informs an operator
The reader's understanding of the present invention will
be enhanced by reference to the following detailed descrip
tion taken in conjunction with the drawing ?gures, wherein:
of the location of the calling phone. The PASP operator is
then able to dispatch assistance to the person placing the
emergency call. Provision is made for automatically select
55
FIG. 1 is a schematic diagram showing a transceiver
ing an alternate route if no interrogating signal is detected.
SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
The instant invention is directed to an emergency portable
telephone, comprising
a transceiver,
connected to a battery, a ?rst switch and a timer contained
60
in an emergency portable telephone according to a preferred
embodiment of the present invention.
FIG. 2 illustrates schematically a battery sealed from the
atmosphere, and piercing means for freeing the battery
according to another embodiment of the present invention.
FIG. 3 is a fractional view of an emergency portable
a ?rst switch having an on-position and an off-position, 65 telephone, wherein the on-off ?rst switch is covered by a
the ?rst switch connected to the transceiver in a manner
seal according to a different embodiment of the instant
to be capable to activate the transceiver when the ?rst
invention.
5,461,664
5
6
DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE
INVENTION
the telephone during the emergency call period. Since the
goal in this case is to use the telephone at the most for only
a small number of relatively short emergency calls, the
duration of the life of the battery may be sacri?ced for
power. It is very well known to a person of ordinary skill in
the art that a battery, storing a given amount of energy, may
This invention relates to wireless telephones, and more
particularly to battery operated portable emergency tele
phones.
As aforementioned, wireless telephones, also named cel
lular telephones due to the system used for their operation,
may be classi?ed in three major categories; mobile, trans
portable, and portable. All these types of telephones contain
be arranged to release it fast (high power) or slowly (low
power). Thus, the fact that the power is inversely propor
tional to the life of a battery for a constant amount of energy
stored in the battery, is utilized according to this invention,
to achieve a portable emergency telephone of high e?iciency
a transmitter and a receiver, the combination of the two
commonly being called a transceiver. Of course, in order to
operate, they need a power source, which usually comes in
the form of a rechargeable battery.
Due to the small size and convenience of carrying in one’s
pocket or purse, the portable cellular telephones, as earlier
and effectiveness for its purpose.
It is preferable that the life of the is between 3 and 10
minutes, and more preferable between 4 an 7 minutes,
giving preferably a power of not less than 2 watts. The
battery may be in a package form of one piece, or a
combination of cells may be used in series or in parallel or
indicated, are the most suitable for one to have and use in
emergency situations. However, due to a plurality of rea
a combination of both in order to achieve the desired
sons, already discussed, even the portable telephones cannot
eifectively and ef?ciently ful?ll the purpose of being used as
communications means in the case of an emergency.
20
Some important parameters and factors favoring the trans
formation of a general purpose portable telephone to an
emergency portable telephone, according to this invention,
are those of
(a) minimizing the size of the portable telephone by
minimizing the size of the battery, without sacri?cing
25
characteristics of life and power of the battery 10. The
battery may be rechargeable or usable once only.
There is also provided a timer 16, which interrupts the
power of the battery to the transmitter at a predetermined
period of time after the ?rst switch 12 has been turned on.
This period of time is preferably in the range of 10 to 60
minutes, and more preferably in the range of 25 to 35
minutes. The timer is powered by the battery. In order to
draw the least amount of power it is preferably a solid state
timer, very well known to the art. This timer is used as a
further deterrent for the owner of the phone to use it in a
the power that the battery may provide to the transmit
ter,
(b) maximizing the distance that the telephone may com
municate with, and
inside the telephohe casing (not shown), so that the casing
(c) maximizing the time that the battery may stay in the
portable telephone without the battery having to be
changed or recharged.
has to be removed for resetting the timer, which makes the
resetting operation cumbersome, and therefore a deterrent.
The timer, may also be such that only a quali?ed technician,
non-emergency situation. The timer 16 is preferably located
In addition to the above, since the emergency phone does 35 or even the cellular carrier company may only reset, ren
dering this process a considerably stronger deterrent for the
not have to be assigned a particular number for outsiders to
person to use the telephone in other than real emergency
call in, and since there is no regular use of the phone, it may
situations. The cellular carrier company, for example, might
be arranged with the carrier company not to charge monthly
service fees, but charge a somewhat higher fee when an
emergency phone call is made. An individual, at the same
time, would be willing to pay even a considerably steeper
fee to the cellular carrier company for this emergency phone
call.
use a combination of a microswitching mechanism (not
40
mechanisms are very well known to the art.
The timer should preferably be of a latching type, so that
.
These and other advantages are realized from the teach~
ings of the present invention.
45
Referring now to FIG. 1, there is depicted a transceiver 10
according to the present invention, which is part of a
after the aforementioned predetermined period of time it
latches a second switch 18 open (being normally closed),
which interrupts the electrical continuity of the battery with
the transceiver, even when the ?rst switch 12 is in the
on-position, and without needing further power to maintain
said second switch 18 open. Electrical circuitry of this type
portable telephone, the totality of which is not shown for
purposes of clarity, but which is very well known to a person
of ordinary skill in the art. The transceiver 10 is connected
to a ?rst switch 12, having an on-position and an oil"
position. In FIG. 1, the ?rst switch 12 is shown in the
off-position. As it can be seen in the diagram of FIG. 1, the
?rst switch 12 may activate the transceiver 10 when it is in
the on-position, and de-activate the transceiver 10 when it is
in the olf position. The normal status of the ?rst switch 12
is to be in the off-position (normally open), so that the
transceiver cannot receive any phone calls from the outside.
There is also shown a battery 14, which is in a series
con?guration or connection with the ?rst switch 12 and the
transceiver 10. The battery 14 is adaptable to activate or
power the transceiver 10, when the ?rst switch 12 is in the
on-position. The life of the battery 14 is adequate to activate
the transceiver 10 with high enough power to reach even
remote cellular towers, when compared to general-use por
table phones. This is because the whole life of the battery 14
is substantially devoted to nothing else but the operation of
shown) on the relay to reset the relay, which combination
only the carrier company knows. Such microswitching
is common knowledge to a person of ordinary skill in the art,
and needs no further explanation.
It should be noted that when the timer 16 is reset, the
55
battery 14 should also be either changed or re-charged,
depending on its type.
As aforementioned, FIG. 1 does not show the handset and
easing of the handset of the portable emergency telephone,
for purposes of clarity, and because they also are common
knowledge to a person of ordinary skill in the art, and
therefore need no particular explanations, as far as the
60 present invention is concerned.
In operation, the ?rst switch 12 is in the oif-position
(open), and the second switch 18 of the timer 16 is in the
on-position (closed). Under these circumstances, the trans
65
ceiver 10 remains idle (not powered). In case of an emer
gency, the operator turns the ?rst switch 12 in the on»
position which gives power to the transceiver, and
simultaneously starts the timer 16. In sequence, the operator
5,461,664
7
8
dials the number he or she wants to notify regarding the
emergency, and then he or she turns the ?rst switch 12 in the
In a diiferent embodiment, the plunger 124 may be part of
the ?rst switch 12 of FIG. 1. For example, the switch 12 may
off-position. The operator may repeatedly turn the ?rst
switch 12 in the on-position for making additional emer
gency phone calls, as long as the total time that the trans
mitter is powered by the battery does not exceed the life of
be absent altogether, and replaced by a continuity conductor.
Then the plunger 124 may play the role of the switch.
In still another embodiment, offering a further deterrent,
so that the portable telephone is used only in cases of
emergency, is illustrated in FIG. 3. The ?rst switch 212
extending away from casing 202 of the emergency portable
telephone of this invention, is covered by a sealing cap 232,
having a ?ap 234. In the operation of this embodiment the
operator has to remove the sealing cap 232 by pulling the
5
the battery, and as long as the additional calls are made
before the timer 16 interrupts the power from the battery to
the transceiver. It should be noted that additional openings
or closings of ?rst switch 12 have no in?uence on the timer 10
16. Suppose for example, for purposes of illustration only,
that the life of the battery 10 is 10 minutes, and that the timer
16 is set to open the circuit in 30 minutes through the second
?ap 234, in order to be able to turn the switch 212 in the on
position, and make an emergency call. The rest of the
operation is the same as described above.
switch 18. The operator has only 30 minutes to make one or
more emergency phone calls, after he turns for the ?rst time
the switch 12 in the on-position, as long as all phone calls
together do not last more than 10 minutes.
After the emergency phone calls have been made, and the
Examples demonstrating the operation of the instant
invention have been given for illustration purposes only, and
should not be construed as restricting the scope or limits of
this invention in any way.
In the various embodiments illustrated in FIGS. 1 to 3,
emergency has passed, the operator changes or recharges the
numerals differing by multiples of 100 represent the same or
battery 14, and causes the resetting of the timer 16, by 20 similar elements performing the same or similar functions,
himself or herself or a third party.
In a different embodiment of this invention, the battery is
sealed from the atmosphere, so that its duration, even in
humid environments is increased considerably. One
example, of such an arrangement is illustrated in FIG. 2. The
battery 114 is sealed in a box 120, which is substantially
according to the present invention.
What is claimed is:
1. An emergency portable telephone, comprising:
25
a transceiver;
a switch having an on-position and an 01T~p0sition, the
switch is connected to the transceiver in a manner
impervious to gases, and especially moisture. Packaging
materials of this sort are very well known to the art, and they
which activates the transceiver when the switch is in
usually include laminates, preferably comprising a metal
' the on-position and deactivates the transceiver when
layer, such as aluminum, for example. The battery 114 is
secured at the bottom of the box 120, and has poles 115 and
115'. The box 120 has two cavities 122 and 122', preferably
30
switch being in the off position, resulting in preventing
the telephone from receiving phone calls;
a battery connected with the transceiver through said
switch, the battery supplies power to the transceiver
having a cylindrical shape, and bottoms 123 and 123',
respectively, located over the poles, 115 and 115', respec
tively. On top of the box 120, there is positioned a plunger
124, made out of electrically insulating material, which has
two plugs 126 and 126', snugly ?tting in the cavities 122 and
122', respectively. The plugs 126 and 126‘, surround con
the switch is in the off-position, the normal status of the
ductors 128, and 128', respectively, which have piercing
when the switch is in the on position, the life of the
battery being limited to last for a predetermined dura
tion of emergency phone calls made within a predeter
mined period of time, after the switch has been turned
to the on-position; and
ends 130 and 130', respectively. In this embodiment the
a timer activated by a ?rst occurence of the switch being
conductors 128 and 128' are connected in a manner to
set in the on~position for interrupting power supplied to
the transceiver at the conclusion of said predetermined
substitute the battery 14 of FIG. 1.
The operation of this embodiment is similar to the opera
tion of the previous embodiment, except that before the
operator turns the ?rst switch 12 (FIG. 1) to the on-position,
35
period of time; wherein subsequent openings or clos
45
ings of the switch has no in?uence on interrupting the
activated timer.
the operator pushes the plunger 124 toward the battery 114,
2. The portable telephone of claim 1, further comprising
in a manner that the piercing ends 130 and 130' pierce the
bottoms 123 and 123' respectively, and connect the conduc
a box, in which the battery is enclosed in a sealed form in
order to be protected from the atmosphere, so that the useful
tors 128, and 128' with the poles 115 and 115, respectively.
The plunger 124 is an example of means for freeing the
battery 114 from the sealed form. From this point on, the
un-sealed battery arrangement of FIG. 2 operates exactly as
the battery 14 of FIG. 1, for the purposes of this invention.
The snuggle ?tting of the plugs 126 and 126' in the cavities
122 and 122' respectively holds the ends 130 and 130' in
good contact with the poles 115 and 115' respectively, after
50
means for piercing the box.
4. The portable telephone of claim 1, wherein the tele
phone further comprises a closure containing the switch,
55
which closure has to be withdrawn before the switch
becomes operable.
the piercing operation. Also, the poles 130 and 130' may be
spring loaded for better contact. Care should be taken to
ensure that in case the packaging material is a laminate
containing a layer of metal, the layer of metal does not
short-circuit the battery. This is easy to avoid by keeping the
distance of the bottoms 123 and 123' from the poles 115 and
115' long, and the exposed surfaces of the ends 130 and 130'
life of the battery is considerably prolonged for as long as
the telephone is inactive.
3. The portable telephone of claim 2, further comprising
60
5. The portable telephone of claim 1, wherein the life of
the battery is between 3 and 10 minutes.
6. The portable telephone of claim 5, wherein the life of
the battery is between 4 and 7 minutes.
7. The portable telephone of claim 5, wherein the power
given by the battery is not less than 2 watts.
8. The portable telephone of claim 1, further comprising
small.
a box, in which the battery is enclosed in a sealed form in
In another embodiment, only one pole of the battery may 65 order to be protected from the atmosphere, so that the useful
be sealed, the operation being substantially the same as
above.
life of the battery is considerably prolonged for as long as
the telephone is inactive.
5,461,664
10
9. The portable telephone of claim 8, further comprising
activates the transceiver when the switch is in the
on-position and deactivates the transceiver when the
?rst switch is in the olT-position, the normal status of
means for piercing the box.
10. The portable telephone of claim 9, wherein the means
for piercing the box are part of the switch.
11. An emergency portable telephone, comprising: a
switch having an on-position and an off-position, the switch
the switch being in the 011C position, resulting in pre
5
a battery connected with the transceiver through said
switch, the battery supplies power to the transceiver
is connected to the transceiver in a manner activates the
transceiver when the switch is in the on-position and deac
tivates the transceiver when the switch is in the olf-position,
the normal status of the switch being in the off position,
when the switch is in the on position, the life of the
resulting in preventing the telephone from receiving phone
calls;
a box;
a battery disposed in the box in a sealed form from the
atmosphere; and
piercing means for piercing the box and establishing
15
predetermined’period of time;
useful life of the battery is considerably prolonged for
-20
the piercing means being part of the switch.
12. The portable telephone of claim 11, wherein the
telephone further comprises a closure containing the switch,
which closure has to be withdrawn before the switch
becomes operable.
13. An emergency portable telephone, comprising:
a transceiver,
battery being limited to last for a predetermined dura
tion of emergency phone calls made within a predeter
mined period of time, after the switch has been turned
to the on-position;
a timer activated by the switch for interrupting power
supplied from the battery to the transceiver at said
a box, in which the battery is enclosed in a sealed form in
order to be protected from the atmosphere, so that the
contact between the switch and the battery, so that
when the switch is turned on, the battery powers the
transceiver;
venting the telephone from receiving phone calls;
25
as long as the telephone is inactive; and
means for piercing the box and establishing electrical
contact between the battery and the switch, the piercing
means being part of the switch.
14. An emergency portable telephone as de?ned in claim
13, wherein the timer interrupts the electrical continuity of
the battery with the transceiver after the predetermined
period of time, even when the switch is in the on-position.
a switch having an on-position and an off-position, the
switch is connected to the transceiver in a manner
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