Silver and Gold criteria and guidance

Silver and Gold criteria and guidance
FOOD FOR LIFE
SILVER & GOLD AWARD
Criteria and Guidance
APPLYING FOR YOUR AWARD THROUGH YOUR SCHOOL PORTAL.
www.foodforlife.org.uk/signin
Your School Portal is your
personalised information hub
and the place where you provide
us with your award submissions.
You’ll be able to see what schools
in your area are up to, search our
wide range of resources, blog
about your FFL activities, and most
importantly, update your award
progress.
A quick guide to what you’ll find in the ‘Update Award Progress’ area
In this area, you’re able to select a criteria category and see all criteria in that section for the Bronze, Silver and
Gold awards. We ask you to provide information on how you’re meeting each criteria and we’ll give lots of useful
examples and guidance to help you along the way. Here’s what you’ll find as you click through the tabs:
Overview:
Getting Started:
Resources:
A full description of each
criteria, including why it’s
been included.
Handy hints and tips for putting each
criteria into action.
Quick links to a host of FFL
and external resources which
support that criteria.
B 1.0
You may wish to keep a note of your
username and password here:
My username:
Our menus
demonstrate their
compliance with
national standards
or guidelines on
food and nutrition.
Overview
Getting Started
Resources
Submission
Food and nutrition standards help to ensure that pupils have the best chance of
getting all of the goodness they need from the food they eat.
You will need to show that your school lunch menu complies with the new School
Food Standards. You can do this through a self-evaluation checklist available from
the School Food Plan website, see the ‘Getting Started’ tab for more information.
Submission:
My password:
This is where you log your activities and evidence for submission to the FFL team. You can either save and/
or submit for feedback on an ongoing basis depending on your package subscription*.
If you are an Awards Package subscriber, we’ll either approve or provide feedback and you’ll be able to see
both your submission and our comments every time you log in. You’ll also be able to see which criteria
have information saved, submitted or approved at a glance.
* You can only submit criteria for approval if you have an Awards Package subscription. Member Package subscribers can log and save information but it will not be submitted for assessment.
1
BRONZE CHECKLIST
The Food for Life Schools Awards are cumulative – so to achieve Silver and Gold you must
still be implementing all the Bronze criteria. Here’s a useful reminder:
1. Food Quality
2. Food Leadership
and Food Culture
3. Food Education
B1.0
Our menus demonstrate their
compliance with national standards
or guidelines on food and nutrition.
B2.0
Our School Nutrition Action Group
has led a review of food culture in our
school, and actions have been agreed.
B3.0
We use the topic of healthy
and sustainable food as a
theme for assemblies.
B1.1
At least 75% of dishes on the menu are
freshly prepared (on site or at a local hub
kitchen) from unprocessed ingredients.
B2.1
We monitor school meal take up and
we are taking action to maximise
the take up of free school meals.
B3.1
B1.2
All meat is from farms which satisfy
UK animal welfare standards.
B2.2
We consult with our pupils and parents
on school meal improvements.
Our pupils take part in regular cooking
activities that meet the Cooking and
Nutrition of the Design and Technology
programme of study and this is linked
to our whole school approach to food.
B1.3
No fish are served from the Marine
Conservation Society ‘fish to avoid’ list.
B2.3
B3.2
Eggs are from free range hens.
Our pupils have the opportunity to grow
and harvest food and make compost
and this is linked to wider learning.
B1.4
We keep parents informed of lunch
menus and Food for Life activity and invite
them to attend our school lunches.
B3.3
B1.5
No undesirable additives or
artificial trans fats are used.
We organise an annual farm visit,
and this is linked to wider learning.
B1.6
No genetically modified
ingredients are used.
B1.7
Free drinking water is
prominently available.
B1.8
Menus are seasonal and in-season
produce is highlighted for pupils.
B1.9
Information is on display
about food provenance.
B1.10 Menus provide for all dietary
and cultural needs.
B1.11 All suppliers have been verified
to ensure they apply appropriate
food safety standards.
B2.4 We encourage our pupils to suggest
improvements to the dining experience
and we implement the best ideas.
B2.5
Our lunchtime supervisors promote a
calm and positive dining experience
and help our pupils with food choices.
B2.6
We have made a commitment
to phase out flight trays.
4. Community and
Partnerships
B4.0 We hold an annual event on a
food theme for our pupils, parents
and the wider community.
B4.1 We make efforts to actively engage
parents and/or the wider community in
our growing and cooking activities.
B4.2 We share Food for Life learning
with local schools, the wider
community and other partners.
B1.12 Catering staff are supported
with skills training and are
engaged in food education.
2
SILVER CHECKLIST
1. Food Quality
S1.0
Our school food meets the
Silver standards of the Food
for Life Served Here, which
means we take care that
our food is healthy, ethical,
and uses local ingredients.
We use a minimum of 5%
organic ingredients in our
menus.
2. Food Leadership
and Food Culture
S2.0
Our governors have signed
off a school food policy
with a timetable for action.
S2.1
We give lunchtime a clear
priority in our school day,
and timetabling clashes are
avoided.
S2.2
Using the Food for Life
Served Here Points
Calculator, our menus
achieve at least
150 points:
40 points for sourcing
ethical and environmentally
friendly food
20 points for championing
local food producers
S2.3
20 points for making
healthy eating easier
70 points from any of
these categories.
3
S2.4
We ensure take up of
school meals by pupils
registered for free school
meals is 90% or higher,
and we are taking action to
raise general school meal
take up and encourage
pupils towards a variety of
hot meal options, where
appropriate.
We have made sure that
key teachers or others
have skills needed to lead
gardening and cooking
activities and ensure basic
food hygiene.
We work with parents
to discourage unhealthy
snacks or lunch box
contents.
S2.5
We invite parents and/or
community groups into
school to eat with our
pupils.
S2.6
We don’t use flight trays.
3. Food Education
S3.0
S3.1
Our cooking activities
aim to build skills and
knowledge progressively
over key stages 1-3 and
incorporate seasonal, local
and organic ingredients.
We ensure pupils in our
garden group and/or a
class are growing fruit,
vegetables and herbs
organically.
S3.2
We have produce from
our school growing area at
least once a term for pupils
to use in cooking activities.
S3.3
Our pupils explore the
ethical and environmental
issues around food
choices and this is linked
to changes in our school
meals.
S3.4
One or more of our year
groups keep in touch with
a local farm throughout
the year.
S3.5
We organise at least one
annual visit to or from small
local food businesses.
4. Community and
Partnerships
S4.0
We hold events to involve
parents and/or the wider
community in growing and
cooking activities.
S4.1
We actively encourage our
pupils and their parents to
grow and cook their own
produce at home.
S4.2
Our pupils share Food
for Life learning with
local schools, the wider
community and other
partners.
GOLD CHECKLIST
1. Food Quality
G1.0 Our school food meets the
Gold standards of the Food
for Life Served Here, which
means we take great care
that our food is healthy,
ethical, uses lots of local
ingredients and is animal
and climate friendly. We
use a minimum of 15%
organic and 5% free range
ingredients in our menus.
Using the Food for Life
Served Here Points
Calculator our menus
achieve at least
300 points:
100 points for sourcing
ethical and environmentally
friendly food
50 points for championing
local food producers
50 points for making
healthy eating easier
100 points from any of
these categories.
2. Food Leadership
and Food Culture
G2.0 Our pupils all have the
opportunity to sit down to
lunch every day.
G2.1 School meals are the norm
in our school.
G2.2 We are working with our
caterer to reduce and
manage food waste.
3. Food Education
G3.0 We take a skills-based
approach to cooking
education that builds
on learning year to year.
Pupils throughout key
stages 1-3 prepare a wide
range of foods. We place
emphasis on making
healthy, nutritious dishes
using school-grown, local,
seasonal and organic
produce.
G3.1 All our pupils have the
opportunity to participate
in organic food growing
during their time at school.
G3.2 We actively involve our
pupils in planning the
food growing calendar
and maintaining the
growing area using organic
practices.
4. Community and
Partnerships
G4.0 Our parents and/or
the wider community
are actively involved in
growing and cooking
activities in our school.
G4.1 Our parents can buy or
collect organic and/or local
produce at our school,
or we direct them to
alternative local outlets.
G4.2 Food and cooking
education is available in
our school to parents and
community members out
of school hours.
G4.3 We host regular visits about
Food for Life from other
schools and stakeholders.
G3.3 Our pupils have the
opportunity to take part in a
programme of farm-based
activities throughout the
farming year.
4
FOOD QUALITY
Criteria overview
FOOD QUALITY: SILVER & GOLD
IMPORTANT NOTE:
If your school uses an external (Private or Local Authority) caterer:
In order to achieve the FFL Schools Award your caterer will need to hold the FFL Served
Here Award at the equivalent level. The FFL Served Here is assurance that your schools’,
meals are already meeting the standards so all you need to do is confirm with the FFL
Awards Team who your caterer is and you will have achieved that section of the award.
In order to achieve the FFL Silver and Gold Award, food served
throughout the school day is assessed using a points based system.
Points are achieved at Silver and Gold for sourcing environmentally friendly and ethical
food, steps taken towards making healthy eating easy and championing local food
producers.
We calculate your points based on your ingredients’ spend over a defined period of
time. This period is set by you, but should cover at least a 3 week menu cycle. You must
be able to provide evidence of your ingredient spend over this period via invoices,
along with evidence of welfare certification.
If your school’s caterer does not currently hold a FFL Served Here Award we can help
you approach your caterer about going for the FFL Served Here Award or help find a
caterer who is already a holder.
If your caterer holds a FFL Served Here Award at a level lower than the award you are
aiming for, they may be able to upgrade for your school without having to apply for a
new licence. Please get in touch with us to find out more.
If your school caters for itself ‘in-house’ (i.e. does not use a private or local
authority caterer):
You need to complete the Food Quality section by submitting evidence through your
online school portal. We provide further support, advice and guidance for our in-house
schools, please contact us or visit your school portal for further details.
You will find more detailed guidance in your FFL
School Portal or in the Soil Association’s Food for
Life Served Here Award Handbook for Schools.
5
FOOD QUALITY: SILVER & GOLD
S1.0
G1.0
Our school food meets the Silver
standards of the Food for Life Catering
Served Here Award, which means we
take care that our food is healthy,
ethical, and uses local ingredients.
We use a minimum of 5% organic
ingredients in our menus.
Our school food meets the Gold
standards of the Food for Life Served
Here Award, which means we take
great care that our food is healthy,
ethical, uses lots of local ingredients
and is animal and climate friendly. We
use a minimum of 15% organic and 5%
free range ingredients in our menus.
Using the Food for Life Served Here
Points Calculator, our menus achieve
at least 150 points, including:
i.
40 points for sourcing ethical and
environmentally friendly food
ii. 20 points for championing local
food producers
iii. 20 points for making healthy
eating easier
iv. 70 points from any of these
categories.
Using the Food for Life FFL Served
Here Points Calculator our menus
achieve at least 300 points, including:
i.
100 points for sourcing ethical and
environmentally friendly food
ii. 50 points for championing local
food producers
iii. 50 points for making healthy
eating easier
GOT A QUESTION?
Give us a call on 0117 314 5180
email [email protected]
or contact your local programme manager*
(you’ll find their details in your school portal)
* Local programme managers are in areas where FFL is commissioned only.
BEEN A WHILE SINCE YOUR BRONZE AWARD?
We may ask to see your menus again and check a few of
the Bronze Food Quality criteria too as part of your Silver
assessment.
iv. 100 points from any of these
categories
6
FOOD QUALITY: SILVER & GOLD
What is Ethical and
Environmentally
Friendly Food?
Ethical and environmentally
friendly food is food that
has been independently
verified as meeting a higher
level of welfare standards.
You can identify the welfare
standards of the produce you
buy using symbols displayed
on the packaging, or from
the product descriptions
given on your invoices
(e.g. ‘Organic Yogurt’, ‘Free
Range Pork Chops’).
The list below gives details of how many points you will
receive per % used on the following certified items.
Organic: You’ll
receive 5 points
for every %
spent on organic
produce.
Organic food is
produced using
environmentally
and animal friendly
farming methods
on organic farms. Organic produce
and ingredients must be certified
organic to gain points in this section.
Many organic products carry the Soil
Association logo and those from the
EU must display the EU organic logo.
RSPCA Assured:
You’ll receive 3
points for every %
spent on RSPCA
Assured pig meat,
fish and poultry.
Points are awarded for RSPCA Assured
(formerly Freedom Food) fish, pigs
and poultry. Improving welfare for
chickens and pigs is a priority because
of the prevalence of more intensive
systems in those two sectors.
7
Marine Stewardship Council
(MSC) or Marine Conservation
Society (MCS) certified ‘fish to
eat’: You’ll receive 4 points for
every % spent on ‘fish to eat’
certified by MSC or MCS.
Marine Stewardship
Council - you can buy
MSC certified sustainable
seafood from most UK
suppliers. It has the
added benefit of being
fully traceable.
Marine Conservation Society - the
MCS ‘fish to eat’ list can be accessed
online. This list is regularly updated
according to the latest research on the
sustainability of fish stocks. You will
need to demonstrate how much ‘fish
to eat’ you purchase.
Fairtrade: You’ll
receive 3 points for
every % spent on
Fairtrade.
Fairtrade standards, as guaranteed
by the FAIRTRADE Mark, ensure that
producers in the developing world are
getting a fair deal.
Free Range: You’ll receive 4
points for every % spent on free
range produce.
Animals reared in free range systems
have opportunities to enjoy fresh air,
exercise and express their natural
behaviours.
You can collect points by using free
range poultry and free range, outdoorreared and outdoor-bred pig meat.
These systems must also be farm
assured, which is a Bronze requirement
(B1.2) If using organic poultry
or pig meat you will collect double
points (for organic and for free range
meat).
LEAF (Linking
Environment and
Farming): You’ll
receive 2 points for
every % spent on
LEAF certified food.
LEAF is an assurance system
recognising sustainably farmed
products. It is based on LEAF’s
Integrated Farm Management
principles.
FOOD QUALITY: SILVER & GOLD
How to champion local food
producers?
How to make healthy eating
easier?
Sourcing food locally is not just important for
tackling global emissions; it also enables people to
build relationships with their local food system and
supports the local economy.
Points are awarded for taking active steps to making
healthy eating an easy choice at school.
As local food champions you’ll receive:
• 3 points for every % spent on raw ingredients
sourced from your region, or adjacent county. Raw
ingredients means food produced (grown) in that
region, which includes meat, fish, dairy products,
eggs, fruit and vegetables, sugar, flour and cereals.
• 2 points for every % spent over 59% on raw
ingredients from the UK (59% is the UK national
average).
You can also achieve
points in this section for
using produce grown on
your school grounds or
allotments!
Work this into your total spend using the market
value price for each product, or ask your supplier
how much they charge for each item.
You’ll receive 3 points for every % that would
have been spent on raw ingredients, when using
your school grown produce.
• 20 points per meat-free day or equivalent
(maximum of 60 points)*
• 20 points for other steps to serve meat in
moderation
USEFUL LINKS
Soil Association Certification:
www.sacert.org
EU Organic:
www.organic-farming.europa.eu
Marine Conservation Society:
www.mcsuk.org
• 20 points for taking steps to minimise salt
intake
Marine Stewardship Council:
www.msc.org
• 20 points for taking actions to cut plate
waste
RSPA Assured:
www.rspcaassured.org.uk
• 20 points for taking actions to support
eating well
Fairtrade:
www.fairtrade.org.uk
• 20 points for taking actions to promote
meal uptake
LEAF:
www.leafuk.org
• 10 points if more than 50% of bread on
offer is wholemeal
Meat Free Monday:
www.meatfreemondays.co.uk
• 10 points for serving ‘Real Bread’
• 10 points if fruit is cheaper than desserts.
*Points are gained for having one or more meat-free
days each week where meat is replaced with eggs,
pulses, nuts, quorn, tofu or other meat alternatives
(not fish or cheese). Or, alternatively, have a non-meat
dish as the main option for 20% or more of the menu,
excluding desserts.
8
FOOD LEADERSHIP AND FOOD CULTURE
Criteria overview
Progressing from
Bronze to Silver
Progressing from Bronze to
Silver is all about building
on the groundwork you
developed as part of your
Bronze award. Topics
discussed by your School
Nutrition Action Group will
now form a whole school
food policy and should
include more time dedicated
to cooking, growing, farm
visits and sharing learning and
celebrations with parents and
the community.
Completing this section also
shows your commitment
to improving your school’s
lunchtime offer; through
ensuring maximum take up
of free school meals, healthy
lunch boxes and completely
removing flight trays.
9
FOOD LEADERSHIP AND FOOD CULTURE: SILVER
SILVER CRITERIA
S2.0
S2.1
S2.2
Our governors have signed off a
school food policy with a timetable for
action.
We give lunchtime a clear priority
in our school day, and timetabling
clashes are avoided.
A whole school food policy is a
shared, evolving document that
ensures healthy and sustainable eating
messages are consistently championed
through the example set by your
school and the wider community.
In order to make healthy eating a
priority you make sure that lunch
timetabling encourages pupils to
sit down for long enough to enjoy
social interaction and facilitate good
digestion. Pupils involved in extracurricular activities should have an
alternative eating time.
We ensure take up of school meals by
pupils eligible for free school meals
is 90% or higher, and we are taking
action to raise general school meal
take up and encourage pupils towards
a variety of hot meal options, where
appropriate.
In developing a food policy that
engages the whole school community;
pupils, parents, carers and catering
staff, you are more likely to embed a
long-lasting approach to improving
school food culture.
TOP TIP
For schools with infant pupils:
Following the introduction of Universal Infant Free School Meals (UIFSM)
in September 2014, we would expect your school to be doing what it can
throughout the year to increase take up of UIFSM and your free school
meals, to get up to and beyond 90% take up. You will need to combine
your UIFSM and FSM figures to get an overall figure to meet this criteria.
It is important for all your pupils to
have a fresh, healthy meal at lunchtime
to enable them to concentrate on
learning in afternoon lessons. You
should raise awareness of entitlement
to free school meals among parents
and make sure it is easy to apply.
Addressing under-registration for
free school meals should be a priority
for the school’s leadership and
governing body.
FOOD LEADERSHIP AND FOOD CULTURE: SILVER
S2.3
S2.4
S2.5
S2.6
We have made sure that key teachers
or others have skills needed to lead
gardening and cooking activities and
ensure basic food hygiene.
We work with parents to discourage
unhealthy snacks or lunch box
contents.
We invite parents and/or community
groups into our school to eat with our
pupils.
We don’t use flight trays.
A study by Leeds University (2010),
commissioned by the Food Standards
Agency, revealed that if the nutritional
standards for school meals were
applied to packed lunches, only 1%
would meet the requirements. Only
one in five packed lunches contained
any vegetables or salad and about half
included an item of fruit.
As part of your work in championing
good food culture within your
community, you should aim to invite
parents or community groups in
to have lunch at least once a term.
This promotes social interaction at
mealtimes, allows them to be inspired
by the great food you serve, as well as
find out about any food related events
or activities you are planning.
Training and resources will give your
teaching staff and others confidence
in their roles when engaging in food
education with young people. With
cooking in particular, it is important
to consider whether teachers or other
volunteers possess the skills and
knowledge to teach skills safely.
Careful precautions and simple
techniques can ensure that all cooking
activities, including knife skills, can be
conducted safely.
Actively seek the support of parents for
a healthy snack or lunch box campaign
in your school. Unhealthy lunch boxes
or brought-in snacks undermine
what you are trying to achieve in
transforming your school food culture.
Although plastic flight trays may be
practical and efficient for caterers, they
do not encourage children and young
people to develop social skills or good
eating habits.
Use melamine, plastic or china plates
and bowls instead of flight trays. The
use of disposable plates does not meet
our criteria.
Note: Exemptions to this rule may
apply in the case of pupils with special
needs or very young pupils (i.e. aged
four and under).
TOP TIP
Breakfast Clubs
If it’s a struggle to invite parents in to have lunch on a regular basis, why
not start up a Breakfast Club which provides free or subsidised breakfasts
for pupils. Providing children with a breakfast is a useful way of lending
support to less advantaged families and can help to bridge the health and
attainment gap. See the resources section on your online school portal for
advice on how to set up a Breakfast Club.
10
FOOD LEADERSHIP AND FOOD CULTURE: GOLD
Progressing from
Silver to Gold
At Gold we want to see that
food is truly embedded into
everyday life at the school.
Across the whole school
community, healthy eating is
the norm and is given the time
it deserves. All children can sit
down in a relaxed atmosphere
with enough time to eat and
digest their food, and most of
the pupils regularly eat a hot
school meal.
As a school you are also
working with your caterer
to keep your food waste to
a minimum and recycling
everything you can.
Your Gold award builds on the work that you are already doing to meet Bronze and Silver criteria. Children should
still be empowered to make decisions over the lunch service and lunchtime staff should continue to help with
healthy choices and creating a calm atmosphere. Packed lunches should be minimal and you will still be actively
working to promote the delicious healthy school meals that are being served.
G2.0
G2.1
G2.2
Our pupils all have the opportunity to
sit down to lunch every day.
School meals are the norm in our
school.
We are working with our caterer to
reduce and manage food waste.
Lunchtimes should be treated as an
important part of the school day, acting
as an opportunity for pupils to learn
social skills, and develop good eating
habits that will last a lifetime.
At Gold we are looking for a school meal
take up figure significantly higher than
average. For most schools this would be
around 60%, but you can use the school
census and national survey data to
determine national averages for varying
school demographics. Significantly
higher take up would be 15% points or
more above the average.
Approximately one-third of food grown
for human consumption in the UK ends
up in the rubbish bin. At least half of this
is edible, and much of the other half
could be more usefully composted.
Schools should be aiming to provide
pupils with at least 30 minutes where
they can sit down and eat their lunch
together.
We would also want schools to show
that their FSM take up figure is still over
the 90% stipulated in Silver, and that paid
for take up is over 50%.
By limiting food waste, you also have
the potential to save money that could
instead be invested in better quality
ingredients or enhancing the lunchtime
experience.
Food for Life Gold schools can
demonstrate that they have measures in
place to actively limit food waste.
For handy hints, resources and to submit
your application, go to your school portal
www.foodforlife.org.uk/signin
11
FOOD EDUCATION
Criteria overview
Progressing from
Bronze to Silver
This section of the Silver
award is all about developing
the skills and knowledge that
have been gained through
your Bronze award.
Cooking and growing
activities should be structured
through lunchtime and/
or after-school clubs and
knowledge of the importance
of local, organic and seasonal
food is embedded both
practically and through
assemblies; highlighting the
links between the garden,
kitchen and dining room.
Children also have the
opportunity to experience
the different stages of farm
life, the ins and outs of a small
local food business as well
as ethical and environmental
concerns.
FOOD EDUCATION: SILVER
SILVER CRITERIA
S3.0
S3.1
S3.2
Our cooking activities aim to build
skills and knowledge progressively
over key stages 1-3 and incorporate
seasonal, local and organic
ingredients.
We ensure pupils in our garden group
and/or a class are growing fruit,
vegetables and herbs organically.
We have produce from our school
growing area at least once a term for
pupils to use in cooking activities.
Having one or more areas of space
dedicated to food growing, on your
schools grounds or nearby, is a fantastic
interactive classroom that can support
all curriculum areas.
Eating fruit and vegetables that pupils
have grown themselves is a wholly
different experience to eating those
served up by others.
All of your pupils should have the
chance to participate in a cooking club
that meets regularly and use recipes that
highlight seasonal produce, as well as
using local and organic ingredients at
least once a term.
Outdoor activities such as food growing
not only serve to develop social skills
and facilitate different learning styles,
but also provides pupils with a sense of
accomplishment and an appreciation of
how to undertake practical work with
delicate care.
Through your regular garden group
make school garden produce available
for your pupils to taste and cook with
at least once a term. This is a great way
to give them more of an appetite for
healthy fresh produce.
The wider the range of produce grown
by your pupils, the more likely it is
that they will find a range of fruit and
vegetables that they feel motivated to
prepare, cook and eat.
12
FOOD EDUCATION: SILVER
S3.3
S3.4
S3.5
Our pupils explore the ethical and
environmental issues around food
choices and this is linked to changes in
our school meals.
One or more of our year groups keep
in touch with a local farm throughout
the year.
We organise at least one annual visit
to or from a small local food business.
According to the Food and Agriculture
Organisation, agriculture alone is
responsible for around 30% of our manmade greenhouse gasses. As consumers
we can aim to lessen this impact by
choosing foods that are local, ethically
sourced and unprocessed.
Forming a year round link with a
local farm (or farms) allows pupils to
understand the different stages involved
in farm life and provides an invaluable
connection to your local community
that can be developed in many ways,
e.g. through a School Farmers’ Market or
links to your school meals.
Farm visits should form part of this link,
along with regular updates and/or visits
from the farmer.
Many children and young people feel
little connection with the food they
eat, or with the people who work to
produce, process and cook it.
Giving them the opportunity to
experience the creation of everyday
foods such as flour, pasta, bread,
cheese or pressed fruit juice will be a
memorable experience that will enable
them to appreciate the hard work
involved in everyday food production.
TOP TIP
By using school grown
produce to create dishes
at cooking club you will
be meeting the local,
seasonal, and organic
criteria in S3.0! Use the
Term Time Planner you
received in your Awards
Package resources for
guidance on what to
grow and when to sow!
GOT A QUESTION?
Give us a call on 0117 314 5180
email [email protected]
or contact your local programme manager*
(you’ll find their details in your school portal)
* Local programme managers are in areas where FFL is commissioned only.
13
FOOD EDUCATION: GOLD
Progressing from
Silver to Gold
To meet our Gold criteria,
cooking, growing and
farming-linked education
should be widely available
across the school year
and should support the
development of a variety of
skills. Pupils will be involved
in planning what food is
grown and the progression
of cookery skills should be
clearly mapped out in a set
timetable of practical cooking
lessons, which include making
savoury dishes.
All pupils will have either the
opportunity to visit a farm
themselves, or learn directly
from others who have done so
throughout the year.
GOLD CRITERIA
G3.0
G3.1
G3.3
We take a skills-based approach
to cooking education that builds
on learning year to year. Pupils
throughout key stage 1-3 prepare
a wide range of foods. We place
emphasis on making healthy,
nutritious dishes using school-grown,
local, seasonal and organic produce.
All our pupils have the opportunity to
participate in organic food growing
during their time at our school.
Our pupils have the opportunity to
take part in a programme of farmbased activities throughout the
farming year.
According to the Royal Society for Public
Health young people have a strong
desire to learn cookery skills. However,
they often lack the knowledge and
experience to prepare the nutritious
meals from fresh, unprocessed
ingredients.
Consider introducing a range of familiar
and less familiar ingredients and teach
your pupils to make simple nutritious
dishes that can form part of healthy
meals. Best practice is to teach your
pupils basic cooking skills, including safe
techniques for the use of sharp knives.
TOP TIP
Using the school garden as a basis for Science, Maths or English classes,
or enlisting year groups to help prepare garden produce for a soup sale or
cooking class are just a few ways in which you can involve larger numbers.
While it may not be feasible for all your
pupils to be actively involved in organic
food growing activity at any one time, all
pupils should be given the opportunity
to participate at some point during their
school lives.
G3.2
We actively involve our pupils in
planning the food growing calendar
and maintaining the growing area
using organic practices.
Putting new skills into practice is
empowering and rewarding. Utilising
pupils’ knowledge of food growing and
organic principles in planning the food
growing calendar will create a strong
sense of pride and ownership.
Pupils often benefit from doing physical
work and learning new practical skills.
If this work is linked to the farming
calendar, getting involved will enable
your pupils to become more connected
with the farm and its annual cycle.
Ensure that pupils involved in your farm
links programme are actively carrying
out a range of tasks around the farm.
Hands-on participation is not only
rewarding but maximises learning,
and in secondary schools this provides
an amazing opportunity to introduce
students to farming as a career option.
safe techniques for the use of sharp
knives.
TOP TIP
Have you thought about organising a residential farm stay?
Residential trips are an amazing tool for really immersing children in
farm life and understanding whole food processes.
14
COMMUNITY AND PARTNERSHIPS
Criteria overview
Progressing from
Bronze to Silver
Progressing from Bronze to
Silver takes the step from
inviting parents and the
community to help out in
the classroom to actively
holding events which involve
them in growing and cooking
activities, and encouraging
learning at home.
School Farmers’ Markets,
‘Grandparent Gardening’
events and celebratory theme
days are just some of the ways
that FFL schools successfully
engage with the wider
community.
At Silver, pupils should be
involved in the sharing of FFL
knowledge, through giving
school tours, presentations,
writing blogs, or even visiting
community groups.
15
COMMUNITY AND PARTNERSHIPS: SILVER
SILVER CRITERIA
S4.0
S4.1
S4.2
We hold events to involve parents
and/or the wider community in
growing and cooking activities.
We actively encourage our pupils and
their parents to grow and cook their
own produce at home.
Our pupils share Food for Life
learning with local schools, the wider
community and other partners.
In addition to holding an annual food
themed event, create at least two
occasions where parents and/or your
wider community can get involved with
cooking and growing activities at your
school.
Encouraging your pupils to get their
families cooking and growing at home is
rewarding for all involved and is a great
way to ensure that FFL learning about
fresh and sustainable food procurement
is shared even wider.
Support and encourage your pupils to
share their learning around cooking,
growing, farming and food choices. It
is a very powerful experience and helps
develop important leadership skills.
This will give your pupils the opportunity
to celebrate what they have learnt, along
with developing your schools’ status as a
transformer of food culture beyond the
school gates.
It is also an affordable way for families
to have a variety of fresh fruit and
vegetables available to them to count
towards their five-a-day.
Work achieved in S4.0 and S4.1 may be relevant for this
criterion if pupils have been involved in demonstrating their FFL
knowledge of cooking and growing to others.
COMMUNITY AND PARTNERSHIPS: GOLD
Progressing from
Silver to Gold
As a Gold school you are
pioneers of best practice
around good food, both in
your local area and nationally.
You set the standard for
serving fresh, healthy meals,
with high quality and local
ingredients, and you provide
cooking, growing, and food
education to all pupils as
well as others in your school
community. Parents are able
to source organic produce
through your school and you
regularly host visits about your
fantastic Food for Life work.
GOLD CRITERIA
G4.0
G4.1
Our parents and/or the wider
community are actively involved in
growing and cooking activities in our
school.
Our parents can buy or collect organic
and/or local produce at our school,
or we direct them to alternative local
outlets.
Your Food for Life work is a great way
to support strong school-home and
school-community links which can
enrich and enhance the curriculum.
Pupils’ achievements have been shown
to be greater where parents and the
wider community are actively involved
in school life.
Gold schools are food hubs for their
local community, and can play an
important role in making it as easy
as possible for parents to buy local,
seasonal and organic food.
At Gold, you should encourage good
levels of involvement from parents
and/or community members to help
organise, contribute to and attend
growing and cooking activities.
Box schemes are a great way to learn
about what’s in season and are often
more affordable than buying organic –
or even non-organic produce – at the
supermarket.
Selling produce from your organic
school garden is a useful way of
reinforcing messages about seasonal
food, as well as making a little extra
money which can be reinvested into
growing equipment and seeds.
Getting local food businesses to sell
their produce in school supports
the local economy and strengthens
community links.
16
COMMUNITY AND PARTNERSHIPS: GOLD
G4.2
G4.3
Food and cooking education is
available in our school to parents and
community members out of school
hours.
We host regular visits about Food
for Life from other schools and
stakeholders.
Offer classes in practical food education,
including cooking, for parents and the
wider community at least once a term.
You can have a positive influence
on your pupils’ diets outside school,
and influence the health of the wider
community, by offering opportunities
for parents and community groups to
develop cooking or growing skills using
your school facilities out of school
hours.
17
These fact-finding visits should involve
your pupils, teaching and catering staff
and enable local schools and other
stakeholders to understand how you
have transformed your school food
culture using the Food for Life approach
and what the benefits have been.
Sharing your learning with our schools
and stakeholders helps other schools
learn the best way to do things from
people they trust, it also really empowers
and establishes your school as a pioneer
of addressing school food culture.
For handy hints,
resources and to
submit your application,
go to your school portal
www.foodforlife.org.uk/signin
SOME USEFUL WEBSITES
Food for Life Served Here
Handbook for Schools: www.sacert.org/catering/standards
Information on how to develop a whole
school approach and school food policies:
www.healtheducationtrust.org.uk
For resources and information on
the School Food Standards: www.schoolfoodplan.com/standards
Best practice case studies and real
life school food solutions:
www.whatworkswell.schoolfoodplan.com
Growing information and resources: www.gardenorganic.org.uk/schools
18
ABOUT FOOD FOR LIFE
Food for Life is a Soil Association initiative which began life in 2003
and developed into an award-winning national programme thanks to
funding from the Big Lottery Fund.
Food for Life is about making good food the easy choice for everyone
– making healthy, tasty and sustainable meals the norm for all to enjoy,
reconnecting people with where their food comes from, teaching them
how it’s grown and cooked, and championing the importance of wellsourced ingredients.
We work with schools, nurseries, hospitals and care homes, helping
them build knowledge and skills through a ‘whole setting approach’.
This engages children and parents, staff, patients and visitors, caterers,
carers and the wider community to create a powerful voice for longterm change.
The Soil Association was formed in 1946 to pioneer a better world – one where
we can all eat, farm and live healthily, and with the environment in balance.
Today we’re still dedicated to making positive change happen. We’re farming
and growing, buying, cooking and eating. We’re campaigning and researching.
We’re running innovative programmes that prove the case for change. And we’re
inspiring millions of people to take their own step towards a better world.
Soil Association
Food for Life
South Plaza
Marlborough Street
Bristol, BS1 3NX
©Food for Life 2017, all rights reserved.
T 0117 314 5180
E [email protected]
www.foodforlife.org.uk
@SAfoodforlife
‘If we truly want the next generation to understand how
food is grown and produced then we have to put food
education within the curriculum for their health and the
health of the nation.’
Jeanette Orrey MBE,
Co-founder, Food for Life
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement