SharePoint 2007 User`s Guide

SharePoint 2007 User`s Guide
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BOOKS FOR PROFESSIONALS BY PROFESSIONALS ®
THE EXPERT’S VOICE ® IN SHAREPOINT
Companion
eBook Available
Author of
SharePoint 2007 User’s Guide:
Learning Microsoft’s Collaboration and Productivity Platform
Dear Reader,
Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 and Windows SharePoint Services 3.0
provide a collection of tools and services you can use to improve user and team
productivity, make information sharing more effective, and facilitate business
decision-making processes. In order to get the most out of SharePoint 2007, you
need to understand how to best use the capabilities to support your information
management, collaboration, and business process management needs.
The SharePoint 2007 User's Guide is designed to provide you with the information you need to effectively use these tools. Whether you are using SharePoint
as an intranet or business solution platform, you will learn how to use the
resources (such as lists, libraries, and sites) and services (such as publishing,
workflow, and policies) that make up these environments. Information and
process owners will be given the knowledge they need to build and manage
solutions, while information and process consumers will be given the knowledge
they need to effectively use SharePoint resources.
In this book, we walk you through the components and capabilities that make
up a SharePoint 2007 environment. We provide step-by-step instructions for
using and managing these elements, as well as recommendations for how to best
leverage them. We then take two common SharePoint uses, document management and project information management, and walk you through creating
samples of these solutions. We describe the challenges these solutions are
designed to address and the benefits you will receive.
We have brought together this information based on our experience working with these tools and with business users who effectively leverage these
technologies within their organizations. Incorporating these experiences into
the writing of this book makes it easy for you to gain the knowledge you need to
make the most of the product.
Seth Bates and Tony Smith
Companion eBook
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ISBN-13: 978-1-59059-829-0
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Bates,
Smith
www.apress.com
SharePoint 2007 User’s Guide
SharePoint 2003
User’s Guide
SharePoint 2007
User’s Guide
Learning Microsoft’s Collaboration
and Productivity Platform
A comprehensive guidebook for users
of Microsoft SharePoint 2007
Seth Bates and Tony Smith
Shelve in
Microsoft Office
User level:
Beginner–Intermediate
9 781590 598290
this print for content only—size & color not accurate
spine = 0.82" 432 page count
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SharePoint 2007
User’s Guide
Learning Microsoft’s Collaboration
and Productivity Platform
Seth Bates and Tony Smith
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SharePoint 2007 User’s Guide: Learning Microsoft’s Collaboration and Productivity Platform
Copyright © 2007 by Seth Bates and Tony Smith
All rights reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means,
electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage or retrieval
system, without the prior written permission of the copyright owner and the publisher.
ISBN-13 (pbk): 978-1-59059-829-0
ISBN-10 (pbk): 1-59059-829-6
Printed and bound in the United States of America 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
Trademarked names may appear in this book. Rather than use a trademark symbol with every occurrence
of a trademarked name, we use the names only in an editorial fashion and to the benefit of the trademark
owner, with no intention of infringement of the trademark.
Lead Editor: Jonathan Hassell
Technical Reviewer: Aaron Bates
Editorial Board: Steve Anglin, Ewan Buckingham, Gary Cornell, Jason Gilmore, Jonathan Gennick,
Jonathan Hassell, James Huddleston, Chris Mills, Matthew Moodie, Dominic Shakeshaft, Jim Sumser,
Matt Wade
Project Manager: Kylie Johnston
Copy Edit Manager: Nicole Flores
Copy Editor: Heather Lang
Assistant Production Director: Kari Brooks-Copony
Production Editor: Katie Stence
Compositor: Lynn L’Heureux
Proofreader: Lori Bring
Indexer: Becky Hornyak
Cover Designer: Kurt Krames
Manufacturing Director: Tom Debolski
Distributed to the book trade worldwide by Springer-Verlag New York, Inc., 233 Spring Street, 6th Floor,
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The information in this book is distributed on an “as is” basis, without warranty. Although every precaution
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any person or entity with respect to any loss or damage caused or alleged to be caused directly or indirectly
by the information contained in this work.
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Contents at a Glance
About the Authors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii
Acknowledgments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii
nCHAPTER 1
nCHAPTER 2
nCHAPTER 3
nCHAPTER 4
nCHAPTER 5
nCHAPTER 6
nCHAPTER 7
nCHAPTER 8
nCHAPTER 9
nCHAPTER 10
nCHAPTER 11
Introduction to SharePoint Technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
SharePoint Server 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
List Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
Libraries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211
Workflow and Information Management Policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271
Pages and Web Parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 297
Personalization Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 323
Document Management Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 349
Project Collaboration Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 373
nINDEX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 389
iii
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Contents
About the Authors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii
Acknowledgments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii
nCHAPTER 1
Introduction to SharePoint Technologies
.....................1
What Is Microsoft SharePoint 2007? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Evolution of SharePoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Why Is It Valuable? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
What Are the Building Blocks? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
nCHAPTER 2
Sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Sites Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Site Layouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Team Sites, Document Workspaces, and Wiki Sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Meeting Workspaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Blog Sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Site Navigation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Navigation Through Sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Navigating Within Team Sites, Document Workspaces,
and Wiki Sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Navigating Within Meeting Workspaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Navigating Within Blog Sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Navigating Through Sites Using Mobile Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Creating Sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Creating Subsites in MOSS Sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Creating Subsites in WSS Sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Create a New Document Workspace from a Document in a Site . . . . . . . 29
Advanced Site Creation Using Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Managing Site Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Managing SharePoint Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Changing Permission Inheritance for a Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Managing Permission Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Managing Site Collection Administrators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
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Changing Site Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Updating the Site Title, Description, URL, and Logo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Customizing Navigation Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Updating Site Themes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Resetting Site Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Configuring Regional Settings for a Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Deleting Sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Managing Site Templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Creating Site Templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Editing Site Templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Deleting Site Templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
WSS Site Search . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Working with Search Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Managing Site Search Visibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Using Site Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Site Usage Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Using Site Collection Usage Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Viewing Site Hierarchy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Managing Site and Site Collection Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Recycle Bin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Viewing Items in the Recycle Bin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Restoring Items from the Recycle Bin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Deleting Items from the Recycle Bin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
nCHAPTER 3
SharePoint Server 2007
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
MOSS Portals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Collaboration Portal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Publishing Portal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
MOSS Navigation Enhancements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Navigation Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Site Actions Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Quick Launch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Navigation Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
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MOSS Search . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Performing Simple Searches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Performing Advanced Searches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Working with Search Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Search Scopes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Search Keywords and Best Bets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Searchable Columns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Search Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Managing Site Look and Feel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Defining the Welcome Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Page Layouts and Site Templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Master Pages and Style Sheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
MOSS Site Templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Document Center Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Records Center Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Personalization Site Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Site Directory Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Report Center Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Search Center Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Search Center with Tabs Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Publishing Site Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Publishing Site with Workflow Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
News Site Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Site Creation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Site Content and Structure Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Usage Reports and Auditing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Site Usage Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Site Collection Usage Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Site Collection Auditing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Site and Site Collection Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Content Variations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Variation Labels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Translatable Columns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Variation Logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
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nCHAPTER 4
List Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Creating Lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Working with Lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Adding, Editing, and Deleting Items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Filtering and Sorting the List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
Using Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Faster Data Manipulation Using the Datasheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Versions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Managing Lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
General Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Content Approval . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Managing Columns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
Managing Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
Creating a List Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
Deleting the List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152
Advanced List Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152
Site Columns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152
Content Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
RSS Feed Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161
Advanced Office Integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
Exporting SharePoint Lists to Excel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
Creating Custom Lists Using Excel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
Advanced Datasheet Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
nCHAPTER 5
Lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
Announcements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170
Contacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172
Discussion Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175
Tracking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
Links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
Tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
Project Tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
Issue Tracking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
Survey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192
Agenda . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195
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Custom Lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196
Decisions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196
Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
Text Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
Things to Bring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198
Additional Meeting Workspace List Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
Lists for Meetings in Series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
Attendees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
Additional Lists with SharePoint Server 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
KPI List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
Languages and Translators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206
Advanced Office Integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207
Exporting SharePoint Lists to Excel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207
Advanced Datasheet Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
nCHAPTER 6
Libraries
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211
Document Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212
Creating Document Libraries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212
Working with Document Libraries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213
Managing Document Libraries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223
Form Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 232
Creating Form Libraries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 232
Working with Form Libraries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 232
Managing Form Libraries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 236
Picture Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237
Creating Picture Libraries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 238
Working with Picture Libraries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 238
Managing Picture Libraries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246
Wiki Page Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249
Creating Wiki Page Libraries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249
Working with Wiki Page Libraries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249
Managing Wiki Page Libraries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253
Translation Management Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254
Working with Translation Management Libraries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254
Report Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255
Data Connection Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255
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Slide Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256
Creating Slide Libraries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256
Working with Slide Libraries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256
Managing Slide Libraries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 260
Advanced Library Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 261
Advanced Office Integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 261
Open and Save As Integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262
Shared Workspace and Document Management Task Panes . . . . . . . . . 263
Accessing Offline Documents by Connecting Libraries with Outlook . . . 265
Creating Form Libraries Through InfoPath Form Publishing . . . . . . . . . . . 266
Exporting Library Metadata to Excel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 268
Advanced Datasheet Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 269
nCHAPTER 7
Workflow and Information Management Policies . . . . . . . . . . 271
Workflow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271
Managing Workflows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 278
SharePoint Server 2007 Workflows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282
Workflow with SharePoint Designer 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 285
Information Management Policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 286
Policy Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 287
Site Collection Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 290
Site Content Type Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 292
List and Library Policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293
Policy Columns in Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 296
nCHAPTER 8
Pages and Web Parts
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 297
Pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 297
Basic Pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 297
Web Part Pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300
Publishing Pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305
Web Parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310
Adding Web Parts to Pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310
Managing Web Part Pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 312
Exporting and Importing Web Parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 316
Standard Galleries and Web Parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 318
Further Customization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 321
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nCHAPTER 9
Personalization Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 323
Alerts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 323
Subscribing to an Alert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 324
Receiving an Alert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 330
Managing Your Alerts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 330
Removing Alerts for Other Users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 332
My Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 332
The My Home Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 334
The My Profile Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 335
My Links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 339
Adding My Links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 340
Editing My Links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 340
Deleting My Links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 341
Personalization Sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 341
Personalizing Content . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 341
Integration with My Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 344
Personalizing Pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 344
Logon Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 346
Signing Out of the Portal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 346
Signing In As a Different User . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 346
nCHAPTER 10
Document Management Solutions
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 349
Document Management Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 349
Document Creation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 350
Document Creation Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 350
Document Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 351
Challenges of Document Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 351
Needs for Document Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 353
SharePoint Document Management Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 354
RFP Response Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 354
SharePoint Solution Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 355
RFP Response Process Definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 355
SharePoint Environment Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 356
RFP Response Process Walk-Through . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 364
Benefits of SharePoint Document Management Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 370
Tips for Creating Effective Document Management Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 371
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nCHAPTER 11
Project Collaboration Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 373
Project Collaboration Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 373
Challenges of Project Collaboration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 374
Needs for Project Collaboration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 375
SharePoint Project Collaboration Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 376
Service Plan Project Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 376
Service Plan Project Process Definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 376
SharePoint Environment Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 377
Service Plan Project Process Walk-Through . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 384
Benefits of SharePoint Project Collaboration Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 387
Tips for Creating Effective Project Collaboration Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 388
nINDEX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 389
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About the Authors
nSETH BATES is a solutions architect and senior consultant for DataLan Corporation, a 2005 Microsoft Eastern Region Partner of the Year located in White
Plains, New York. Bates coauthored the SharePoint 2003 User’s Guide and performed the technical editing for Microsoft SharePoint: Building Office 2003
Solutions and Advanced SharePoint Services Solutions. He also published an
article titled “SharePoint Web Part Development” in the April 2005 edition of
Dr. Dobb’s Journal. Bates has over nine years’ experience engineering business
solutions, primarily using Microsoft technologies. With experience in all
phases of the software engineering life cycle, he brings a broad mix of analysis,
design, and implementation expertise to his work.
nTONY SMITH is a product manager for DataLan Corporation, a Microsoft Gold
Certified partner located in White Plains, New York. Tony coauthored the
SharePoint 2003 User’s Guide and has been working with SharePoint 2007 since
its first beta release. He also has experience designing and deploying SharePoint solutions in a wide range of organizations, including Fortune 500 and
Fortune 50 companies. With a background that includes business analysis,
network engineering, and application development, Tony has over 15 years’
experience engineering business solutions and regularly presents to engineers,
analysts, and business decision makers. You can find additional information
about Tony and topics discussed in this book at www.sharepointextras.com.
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Acknowledgments
W
riting this book has been yet another positive experience working with Apress. The people at
Apress have been great to work with, and we would like to specifically thank several of them. We
would like to thank Kylie Johnston for managing this effort and coordinating all of the tasks that
went into creating this book. We would also like to thank Heather Lang for copy editing, Katie
Stence for production editing, and editor Jonathan Hassel: all were instrumental in ensuring the
quality of this book. We are also appreciative to everyone else at Apress involved in this process that
we were not fortunate enough to work with directly.
Along with the coordination and help provided by Apress, we would also like to thank the technical editor, Aaron Bates, who did a great job reviewing this book. His thoroughness and content
suggestions helped to ensure that this book would be technically accurate and beneficial for readers. We also would like to thank our colleagues at DataLan who work to successfully market, sell,
and deliver information worker solutions. Our real-world experiences there have contributed to our
ability to organize and create this book.
—Seth Bates and Tony Smith
I would like to thank Tony, who convinced me that the effort needed to write another book would
be worthwhile.
And I would like to convey my love and appreciation for my wife Jennifer, my son Dylan, and
my daughter Kyra. You provided the loving support I needed to complete this book.
—Seth Bates
I would also like to thank Seth. This book has been yet another effort we have jointly worked on that
has been a positive experience.
Finally, I would like to thank my wife Lynn, who has provided encouragement and support
throughout this process.
—Tony Smith
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Introduction
S
harePoint 2007 is the centerpiece of the Microsoft Office system and the next stage in the evolution of the SharePoint technology platform. SharePoint 2007 significantly expands on previously
existing SharePoint capabilities providing a comprehensive set of tools that can be used as the foundation to create business solutions. We have seen many situations where SharePoint is introduced
and individuals struggle to leverage these resources without a good enough understanding of the
capabilities to gain the most value possible. This book was an outcome of this need and can serve as
a reference for people working within a SharePoint environment.
The goal of this book is to deliver a tool to all levels of SharePoint users. Beginners will be provided with the information they need to most effectively use the capabilities provided. Intermediate
users will be given the information they need to manage their SharePoint resources. Advanced users
will be provided the foundation needed for building business solutions using SharePoint’s capabilities. We have incorporated our experiences working with a variety of organizations and knowledge
of the product into an easily understood format for learning about SharePoint 2007, which we hope
will enable you to gain the in-depth knowledge you need to effectively use and manage these tools.
Further reading about the topics provided in this book can be found at http://www.
sharepointextras.com where we provide additional information around SharePoint including
references to other resources.
Who This Book Is For
The goal of this book is to provide the knowledge necessary for anyone to effectively use Microsoft’s
SharePoint 2007 platform. Whether you have not yet used SharePoint, have used previous versions,
just started using the basic features, or have been using it for a long of time, this book provides the
skills you need to work efficiently with the capabilities SharePoint 2007 provides.
If you want to learn about these capabilities in a detailed yet understandable format, this book is
for you. Being a user guide, this book does not require you to have any programming knowledge. It
does assume the reader has a basic understanding of navigating web sites. Some of the more advanced
topics require prior working knowledge of Microsoft Office applications like Word and Excel.
How This Book Is Structured
The chapters in this book are organized into two groups. Chapters 1 through 9 offer the fundamental knowledge of SharePoint 2007 that users need to successfully utilize the capabilities provided by
the technology. This group can be used as an end-to-end reference guide, allowing you to easily
look up specific SharePoint topics, and it includes step-by-step instructions, figures, tables, and
examples. The capabilities described in these chapters are important and act as the building blocks
for the solutions described in the second group of chapters.
The second group, Chapters 10 and 11, presents business solutions commonly deployed through
SharePoint. Each of these chapters contains an example scenario that will help you understand the
potential challenges of the situation along with the benefits that SharePoint provides. The scenarios
also include the necessary steps for creating these solutions within a SharePoint environment.
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nINTRODUCTION
Chapter 1: Introduction to SharePoint Technologies
This chapter introduces you to the world of Microsoft SharePoint. It contains an explanation of the
technology, its uses, and related terminology.
Chapter 2: Sites
This chapter contains the details you need to understand the capabilities of sites and workspaces.
We will focus on those capabilities making up the core of Windows SharePoint Services 3.0, which is
the foundation of all SharePoint 2007 solutions. Security, content, structure, personalization, and
search capabilities are all covered using detailed examples.
Chapter 3: SharePoint Server 2007
This chapter focuses on additional core components and capabilities introduced into sites as part
of SharePoint Server 2007. It contains the details you need to understand how to use these additional capabilities and describes how they are incorporated into the SharePoint environment. Here
we will discuss the additional templates introduced with SharePoint Server 2007, enterprise searching, layout and navigation management, and reporting and auditing.
Chapter 4: List Concepts
This chapter provides the knowledge needed to work with lists within SharePoint. The use and
management of custom lists is described in detail. You will also learn about the advanced integration with Office applications that SharePoint’s custom lists provide.
Chapter 5: Lists
This chapter contains a detailed look at the lists that are provided by SharePoint for you to use as
templates when creating your own lists. The use and management of each list is provided in detail,
along with any advanced integration with Office applications that they provide.
Chapter 6: Libraries
This chapter teaches the use and management of libraries within SharePoint. Capable of managing a
variety of files from Office documents and forms to images and presentation slides, these SharePoint
libraries provide many collaborative features, which are also covered in this chapter. Advanced integration between these libraries and Office applications, which can enhance your experience with
SharePoint, is also discussed.
Chapter 7: Workflow and Information Management Policies
The new capabilities found in the 2007 version of SharePoint include workflow processing and
information management policies. The steps needed to define and execute business processes
using workflows within the SharePoint environment are detailed in this chapter. This chapter also
describes how to configure auditing, expiration, and other policies on the documents and information contained in your SharePoint sites.
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nINTRODUCTION
Chapter 8: Pages and Web Parts
Pages and web parts allow for the customization of sites. This chapter uses detailed steps to show
you how to customize SharePoint using the various types of pages and the functional components
known as web parts.
Chapter 9: Personalization Features
In this chapter, we discuss the personalization features provided by SharePoint. We will discuss
alerts, My Site, My Links, content filters, and targeting content, as well as how to use these capabilities to provide personalized user experiences.
Chapter 10: Document Management Solutions
One of the most common uses for SharePoint is to create document management solutions. This
chapter describes the challenges SharePoint document management solutions can address, the
benefits you can receive by creating these solutions, and tips to be mindful of when creating these
solutions. We will construct a sample document management solution and describe how the solution would be used.
Chapter 11: Project Collaboration Solutions
Project collaboration is another common use for SharePoint. In this chapter, we will describe how
to create project collaboration solutions through SharePoint. We will construct a sample solution
and describe the benefits that can be received by creating these solutions.
Contacting the Authors
Additional information about the authors can be found at www.sharepointextras.com. Seth Bates
can be contacted by e-mail at [email protected], and Tony Smith can be contacted by e-mail at
[email protected]
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Introduction to SharePoint
Technologies
M
icrosoft SharePoint 2007 is the next stage in the evolution of the Microsoft SharePoint technology platform. This platform acts as the foundation of the 2007 Microsoft Office system. The 2007
Microsoft Office system is comprised of a collection of applications, servers, and services that work
together to improve user and team productivity, make information sharing more effective, and
facilitate business decision-making processes.
The 2007 Microsoft Office system includes many of Microsoft’s products such as SharePoint
Server 2007, Windows SharePoint Services 3.0, Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Project Server, Forms
Server, Live Communications Server, and many others. These applications and servers are designed
to work together to meet the following goals:
• Provide business users with faster, comprehensive access to information. This includes not
only making more information available but also making it possible to more easily locate
available information that is most relevant to a business user’s needs.
• Enable individuals to work together effectively and allow them to easily share information;
this includes all individuals regardless of location.
• Improve individual and team productivity by making it easy to create and manage information and allowing this information to be available as part of related business processes.
The 2007 Microsoft Office system technologies are combined to create information worker solutions. Information workers are individuals that use information to support business processes or
make business decisions. This information may exist as documents, e-mail messages, system data,
reports, analytics, or any other format. Information worker solutions are business solutions, including both systems and processes, that enhance collaboration, make information more available, and
improve productivity. These solutions enable rapid and informed business decisions to be made.
Microsoft SharePoint 2007 technologies are core components of the 2007 Microsoft Office system framework and provide the foundation on which information worker solutions are built.
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What Is Microsoft SharePoint 2007?
Microsoft SharePoint 2007 is the central information sharing and collaboration platform for the
2007 Microsoft Office system. SharePoint 2007 is made up of two main products: Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 and SharePoint Server 2007. Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 (WSS) is a set of
add-on services for the Microsoft Windows Server platform (Windows 2003 and later). WSS includes
the resources necessary to build information management and collaboration solutions. WSS also
provides the foundation of SharePoint 2007, including web-based document management, team
collaboration, and information sharing capabilities, and is the platform used for developing information worker solutions.
Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 (MOSS) extends the capabilities provided by WSS
through the introduction of an integrated set of services that allow organizations to create enterprise business solutions. These solutions are used to bring together people, information, systems,
and business processes. MOSS provides enterprise-level document and records management,
extended workflow capabilities, extranet and Internet portal templates, enterprise-wide search
capabilities, personalized content and alerting, and extended application integration.
Evolution of SharePoint
Microsoft’s SharePoint technology was first introduced in 2001 with the release of SharePoint Portal
Server 2001. This product provided some basic tools designed to allow users to publish and find
documents. It allowed for the creation and management of document taxonomies and represented
the first step in providing a way to catalog and search for documents across the enterprise.
Microsoft next released SharePoint Team Services, which extended the document and publishing
capabilities of SharePoint Portal Server 2001 by providing information collaboration. This allowed
groups of individuals to work together to manage documents and lists of information, such as contact lists, event lists, and link lists.
In 2003, Microsoft completely rearchitected SharePoint and released Windows SharePoint Services 2.0 and SharePoint Portal Server 2003 as part of the introduction of the first Microsoft Office
system. The focus of these technologies was to provide a foundation for the collection of applications, servers, and services that work together to improve user and team productivity. These products
allowed organizations to introduce a variety of business solutions that would have previously been
very difficult and costly to create and maintain.
With the release of the 2007 Microsoft Office system, which includes SharePoint Server 2007
and Windows SharePoint Services 3.0, Microsoft has extended the Office System vision by including
capabilities to support the creation of business solutions for the extended enterprise. These solutions are designed to maximize employee efficiency, enable decision making, and incorporate
customers and partners into business processes. SharePoint 2007 includes all of the capabilities
previously provided in SharePoint 2003 and the content management capabilities previously provided by Microsoft Content Management Server 2002. It also includes additional capabilities that
add full business information management, workflow, extranet/Internet support, and business
integration services.
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Why Is It Valuable?
SharePoint 2007, including both SharePoint Server 2007 and Windows SharePoint Services 3.0,
provides an information sharing platform, document management platform, workflow platform,
business process management framework, and development foundation on which information
worker solutions can be created. The building blocks needed to create comprehensive business
solutions are available and can be easily assembled to support organizations’ information management needs and business processes.
In today’s work environment, information management and business processes are often very
“people centric.” Organizations rely on individuals’ knowledge of available information and on
manual business processes to address many needs. This causes organizations to become reliant on
specific individuals to complete certain tasks and makes it difficult to allow others to participate in
these areas. In this model, finding information is challenging. Individuals without knowledge of
information that is available will often require a significant amount of time to find necessary information or will, in some cases, re-create materials already available. Trying to build solutions to
simplify and automate business processes and the information management environment can be
costly and difficult to create and maintain.
With the introduction of SharePoint 2007, Microsoft has provided tools to help simplify information management, collaboration, and business process automation. By leveraging Office system
technologies, including SharePoint 2007, organizations are able to create business solutions in a
more timely and cost-effective manner.
What Are the Building Blocks?
Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 and SharePoint Server 2007 include many tools that can be combined to create a variety of business solutions:
• Sites and workspaces provide a central location to securely consolidate related information of
various types and to organize this information to conform to the business needs it supports.
• Libraries and lists allow users to manage documents and other types of information.
• Workflows allow for managed information to be incorporated into business processes.
• Records management capabilities allow you to manage the full life cycles of documents.
• Alerts give users the ability to be notified when information has been added or changed.
• Web parts allow for existing information to be organized and presented appropriately and
provide additional business logic and applications that can be incorporated into solutions.
• Navigation and search capabilities provide the resources necessary to find relevant information when it is needed.
• My Site and My Links allow you to create and manage your own personalized information
and provide web spaces to share this information with others.
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In this book, we will discuss these tools in depth, describe how they are used and describe how
they can be combined into information worker solutions. In the first part of this book, Chapters 2
through 9, we will discuss the components that make up a SharePoint 2007 environment and provide
you with the information necessary to effectively work with these components. In the second part of
this book, Chapters 10 and 11, we will discuss some of the common solutions created within the
SharePoint environment. The solutions we will focus our discussions around include the following:
• Document management: Often, the goal of a group of information workers is to create and
manage documents. Whether these documents are business plans, budgets, sales presentations, or some other type of business materials, managing the creation and publishing of
these items is critical to the success of the business processes they support. Individuals
working on materials are often geographically disbursed with each needing the same level of
access to the materials being created. This creation process also often includes an approval
process before the items are considered final, and the final materials often need to be properly categorized and placed in a location where they can be easily referenced in the future.
• Project management: When teams are brought together to work on a project, the management of the project significantly impacts its success. All aspects of the project, including the
process, communications, deliverables, timelines, and tasks, need to be properly managed to
ensure the success of the project. All interested parties, including team members, stakeholders, and managers, need visibility into the progress of the project and all associated resources.
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Sites
W
indows SharePoint Services 3.0 provides the core document management, list management,
collaboration, and application platform capabilities for a SharePoint environment. WSS sites are the
foundation on which Office system solutions store and manage information. They provide locations
where groups of people can work together and share information. These sites can also be used to
collect team and enterprise knowledge and enable individuals to effectively work with this knowledge. WSS sites are also the entry point into many information worker solutions and workflow
processes.
As an application development platform, WSS provides many of the building blocks needed to
construct information worker solutions. As part of the Office system, WSS is also tightly integrated
with the other Office system products, enabling WSS-based solutions to be easily extended to include
a wide range of capabilities.
Several different types of components are available within WSS to store and manage information,
facilitate collaboration, and provide workflow, reporting, and other application-centric capabilities.
These components include the following:
• Lists: WSS includes a variety of standard lists and the ability to create custom lists. Lists are
available to facilitate communication and track information. Several of the available lists
have extended capabilities that help support their primary purposes. For example, contact
lists integrate with Microsoft Outlook to allow them to be used in the same way as contact
lists created within Outlook. Lists can also be modified to meet specific information management needs. We will discuss lists in detail in Chapters 4 and 5.
• Libraries: Libraries are available in WSS to manage documents, InfoPath forms, wiki pages,
and pictures. The available library types are extended when SharePoint Server 2007 is
installed in conjunction with WSS to include Translation Management, Data Connection,
and Report Libraries. These additional libraries are used to incorporate additional business
solution capabilities. We will discuss libraries in more detail in Chapter 6.
• Workflow: Workflow capabilities are available within WSS to allow WSS-based information to
be easily incorporated into business processes. We will discuss workflow in more detail in
Chapter 7.
• Web parts: A web part is an application component that can be displayed and managed
through web part pages in WSS sites. Web parts can also be introduced that provide application functionality within SharePoint. We will discuss web parts in more detail in Chapter 8.
In this chapter, we will familiarize you with the general layout and structure of WSS sites. We
will describe how to navigate through sites and locate information within sites. We will also describe
how to create and maintain sites and manage various aspects of WSS sites, including site security
and navigation options.
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Sites Overview
WSS sites provide the information management capabilities, the collaboration services, and the application platform that make up the foundation of a SharePoint environment. Sites include a variety of
components and services that make up the core elements of information worker solutions. Five different categories of sites are available within WSS for managing and hosting information:
• Team sites are designed to facilitate team collaboration. These sites provide the capabilities
necessary to allow for information management, sharing, and team collaboration.
• Document workspaces are used to facilitate the creation of documents. These sites include
capabilities needed to allow multiple people to collaborate in the development and management of documents.
• Wiki sites allow for the creation of pages used to easily capture thoughts and discussions
when doing concept collaboration. Concept collaboration includes the collection of thoughts
and ideas related to a topic where the goal is to record creative details shared about the topic.
• Meeting workspaces facilitate the management of meetings. These sites include the capabilities necessary to help plan meetings, share information among meeting attendees, organize
materials presented during meetings, and track postmeeting action items.
• Blog sites are used to post information for comment and discussion. Blog sites allow for the
capture and management of discussions around specific topics and the capture of materials
related to the topic being discussed.
Additional categories of sites are made available through the introduction of Microsoft Office
SharePoint Server 2007 (MOSS). We will discuss these additional site types and their capabilities in
Chapter 3.
SharePoint includes several site templates for use when creating any of the types of sites listed
previously. A template is a starting point or default set of capabilities organized to meet a specific
need. You create a site based on a template in order to automatically provide a starting set of capabilities for the site. You can then, if necessary, customize the created site to better meet specific
needs. The default set of site templates available through WSS for creating team sites, document
workspaces, wiki sites, meeting workspaces, and blog sites are designed to provide the most common set of capabilities needed when creating sites for the associated purpose.
As we mentioned previously, several types of components are available in WSS that provide the core
capabilities of WSS sites. These components act as the building blocks for most WSS-based solutions.
Table 2-1 lists the components available in each of the WSS site categories we discussed in this section.
Table 2-1. Site Component Options
Libraries
Document Libraries
Form Libraries
Wiki Libraries
Picture Libraries
Communications Lists
Announcements
Contacts
Discussion Board
Team Sites
Document
Workspaces
Wiki Sites
Meeting
Workspaces
Blog Sites
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
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Tracking Lists
Agenda
Links
Calendar
Tasks
Project Tasks
Issue Tracking
Survey
Custom Lists
Custom
Decisions
Objectives
Text Box
Things to Bring
Web Pages
Basic Page
Web Part Pages
Sites and Workspaces
Team Sites
Document
Workspaces
Wiki Sites
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
Meeting
Workspaces
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
Blog Sites
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
Configuring and using each of these components will be discussed in subsequent chapters.
Also, the additional library and list templates provided with the introduction of SharePoint Server
2007 will be outlined in Chapter 3 and discussed in detail in subsequent chapters.
Site Layouts
To help you better understand the five types of WSS sites, we will discuss their layouts and structures.
We will also discuss the standard site templates that are available when creating these sites and the
components included in these templates. This will give you the information you need to determine
the sites best suited to your needs and allow you to decide which site template to choose when creating a new site.
Our discussion of the site types and the associated site templates will be broken into three parts.
In the first part, we will discuss team sites, document workspaces, and wiki sites. We can group these
three types of WSS sites together, because the layout and capabilities provided are very similar. In the
second part of our discussion, we will explore meeting workspaces. Meeting workspace layouts and
capabilities significantly differ from those provided by team sites, document workspaces, and wiki
sites. In the third part of our discussion, we will explain blog sites. Blog site layouts and capabilities
also differ from all other types of sites and workspaces.
Team Sites, Document Workspaces, and Wiki Sites
Team sites, document workspaces, and wiki sites are very similar in form and function. These site
types are all designed to allow groups of people to work together. Team sites, as shown in Figure 2-1,
provide project-centric work spaces where people can work together on either short-term projects or
long-standing, ongoing initiatives. Because of this function, team sites are the most general-purpose
sites available in WSS and can be used to meet a variety of information management and collaboration needs.
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Figure 2-1. A team site
Document workspaces are designed to provide the tools necessary for people to work together
when creating documents. These workspaces include resources to support the management of the
document creation process and the materials that go into the development of these documents.
Wiki sites consist of web pages that can be easily edited. These pages are designed to allow
knowledge to be recorded that does not exist in documents or systems. Information usually shared
via word of mouth or e-mail can be recorded in wiki sites. These sites are typically organized to
group together information on a related topic.
Team sites, document workspaces, and wiki sites have the following structure:
• Global links bar: Located at the very top of a SharePoint page, the global links bar provides
links to be made available regardless of the location of the user in the site hierarchy. The links
provided in the global links bar are the following:
• Top site links: A top site link is a link at the top of the page that is named for the topmost
site in the site hierarchy. Clicking this link will take you to the portal home page. The top
site links may also include a link to an associated portal. Clicking this link will take you
to the identified portal.
• Welcome menu: This menu displays the name of the current user as it appears in the associated Active Directory environment. The Welcome menu provides you with the list of
personalization capabilities available to you. The list of available options is based on the
current user’s rights within SharePoint but can include My Site, which is used to update
your general profile information and allows for the management of regional settings and
alerts if MOSS is in place; “Sign in as Different User”, which allows you to enter different
logon credentials in order to be reauthenticated within SharePoint with the entered credentials; Sign Out, which allows you to log out of the SharePoint environment;
“Personalize this Page”, which enables you to tailor information on the page by managing
personal views of pages and web parts; and Reset Page Content, which allows you to reset
a page you have previously personalized back to the default view seen by all users.
• Help link: The Help link provides online, context-sensitive assistance for SharePoint
capabilities.
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• Title area: Located just below the global links bar, the title area lists the title of the site you
are currently viewing. The title area also includes the search tools that allow you to search for
information located in the current site or, with MOSS available, across the portal or entire
organization. We will cover searching in more detail later in this chapter.
• Navigation bar: The navigation bar lists the sites available to the user. This navigation list can
be configured to inherit its listed options from the site’s parent site or to list the sites available to the user located directly beneath the current site. We will discuss customizing
navigation later in this chapter. The navigation bar also includes the Site Action menu that
lists the site management options available to the current user.
• Quick Launch area: Located in the left-hand section of a site, the Quick Launch area provides
easy access to elements that are available within the site including libraries, lists, sites, and
people. Only elements that have been configured to be displayed in the Quick Launch area
will appear here. The Quick Launch area also includes a link to the site’s Recycle Bin where
deleted items can be managed.
• Content section: Located to the right of the Quick Launch area, the content section is the main
body of the site page. This section contains the elements you want to make available through
the site. This may include documents, lists, web parts, and so on. For team sites, the content
section is divided into left and right zones where content elements can be placed, which
allows content on the site to be organized into a two-column structure. Figure 2-2 shows the
content section structure for a team site. For document workspaces, the content section is
divided into a top zone, a left zone, and a right zone. This allows content in the top zone to
span the entire content section, and below this zone, content can be organized into a twocolumn structure. Figure 2-3 shows the content section structure for a document workspace.
Finally, for wiki sites, there is only a single zone at the bottom of the page for adding content
below the wiki page text. Figure 2-4 shows the content section structure for a wiki site.
Figure 2-2. The team site content section
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Figure 2-3. The document workspace content section
Figure 2-4. The wiki site content section
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The content that will be made available in these types of sites varies based on the template you
select and the changes you make to the created site. Two default site templates, team site and blank
site, are available for creating new team sites; one default template is available for creating document
workspaces; and one for wiki sites. These templates are all located on the Collaboration tab under
the Site Template selection when creating sites. Before we discuss navigating through sites or creating sites, we need to show you the set of default templates that are available, the layout of those
templates, and the capabilities that they provide.
Team Site Template
The first team site template available is called Team Site. This template is designed to provide the
most common set of capabilities used when creating a site that will be used to facilitate general
team collaboration or information sharing. The site created when using this template is depicted in
Figure 2-1. The Team Site template includes the components listed in Table 2-2.
Table 2-2. Team Site Template Components
Item
Type
In Quick Launch
In Content Area
Announcements
Announcements list
No
Yes (left zone)
Calendar
Calendar list
Yes
Yes (left zone)
Links
Links list
No
Yes (right zone)
Libraries and Lists
Shared Documents
Document library
Yes
No
Tasks
Tasks List
Yes
No
Team Discussion
Discussion board
Yes
No
Image web part
N/A
Yes (right zone)
Web Parts
Site Image
Blank Site Template
The second team site template available is called Blank Site. This template is used to create an
empty team site that only contains the Site Image web part. Figure 2-5 depicts a default blank site.
Figure 2-5. A blank site
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A blank site is designed to provide you with an empty site that you can tailor to meet your specific needs. The blank site should be used when most of the items in the Team Site template are not
applicable to your situation. This allows you to create a site to meet your needs without having to
remove unnecessary components.
Document Workspace Template
There is only one default document workspace template, shown in Figure 2-6.
Figure 2-6. A document workspace
This template provides the most common set of capabilities needed when creating a site to
manage the collaborative effort of creating a document. Document workspaces created from the
Document Workspace template include the components listed in Table 2-3.
Table 2-3. Document Workspace Template Components
Item
Type
In Quick Launch
In Content Area
Libraries and Lists
Announcements
Calendar
Links
Shared Documents
Tasks
Team Discussion
Announcements list
Calendar list
Links list
Document library
Tasks list
Discussion board
No
Yes
No
No
No
Yes
Yes (top zone)
No
Yes (right zone)
Yes (left zone)
Yes (left zone)
No
Web Parts
Members
Site Users web part
N/A
Yes (right zone)
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Wiki Site Template
There is only one default wiki site template called Wiki Site, which appears in Figure 2-7. This template provides the base configuration for creating a wiki site used to allow easy page creation and
management. The content area’s structure of the wiki site differs from team sites and document
workspaces in that it includes a text editing area that exists outside of the available web part zone.
This text area initially contains standard “welcome” text for the wiki site. The content in this text
area is managed through the use of the Edit button located at the top of the text area. You also have
options to allow you to review the history of editing done to the text area content and to view
incoming links. Incoming links are pages in the wiki site with links in their text areas that reference
the currently displayed page. The Wiki Site template includes a single web part zone located at the
bottom of the page. This web part zone is initially empty.
Figure 2-7. A wiki site
Meeting Workspaces
Meeting workspaces are WSS sites designed to organize meeting materials and facilitate meeting
planning and follow-up. Prior to a meeting, a meeting workspace can be used to collect and organize needed documents, create the agenda, and track and manage attendee lists and responses.
During a meeting, the site can be used to gain access to materials being presented, track identified
action items, and log decisions made. Finally, after a meeting the site can be used to publish meeting minutes, post any follow-up materials, and track the progress of assigned action items.
Meeting workspaces have a different layout than other types of sites. Figure 2-8 depicts the
default layout of a meeting workspace.
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Figure 2-8. A basic meeting workspace
Meeting workspaces have the following structure:
• Global links bar: We discussed the global links bar in the “Team Sites, Document Workspaces,
and Wiki Sites” section.
• Title area: The title area for meeting workspaces is the same as that discussed in the “Team
Sites, Document Workspaces, and Wiki Sites” section.
• Navigation bar: We also discussed the navigation bar in the “Team Sites, Document Workspaces,
and Wiki Sites” section.
• Page list: Located below the navigation bar, the page list is a tabbed list of all pages available
within the current site. The first page listed in the page list is the home page, which references
the default page of the site.
• Content section: Located below the page list, the content section is the main body of the site
page. This section contains the elements being made available through the site page. This
may include documents, lists, web parts, and so forth. For meeting workspaces, the content
section is divided into a left zone, a center zone, and a right zone. This allows content to be
organized into a one-, two- or three-column structure. Figure 2-9 shows the content section
layout for a meeting workspace.
There are five different templates for creating meeting workspaces. These templates are designed
to provide the components typically used to support a variety of types of meetings. These templates
are located under the Meetings tab under site template selection when creating new sites. The sites
created from these templates can then be tailored by adding and removing components, rearranging
components, and adding and removing pages.
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Figure 2-9. The meeting workspace content section
Basic Meeting Workspace Template
The Basic Meeting Workspace template is used to create general-use meeting workspaces. Sites created from this template contain the most commonly used resources for facilitating a meeting. The
basic meeting workspace is the most general-purpose meeting site in WSS. Figure 2-8 depicts a workspace created from the Basic Meeting Workspace template. This template includes the components
listed in Table 2-4.
Table 2-4. Basic Meeting Workspace Template Components
Item
Type
Page
Location on Page
Agenda
Agenda list
Home
Center zone
Attendees
Attendees list
Home
Left zone
Document Library
Document library
Home
Center zone
Objectives
Objectives list
Home
Left zone
Libraries and Lists
Blank Meeting Workspace Template
The Blank Meeting Workspace template provides an empty meeting workspace site. Sites created
using the Blank Meeting Workspace template will not contain any components. The Blank Meeting
Workspace template is provided for when you need to create a new meeting workspace that is not
similar to any other available meeting workspace templates. This template allows you to add the
components necessary to support your specific needs without having to remove unnecessary items.
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Decision Meeting Workspace Template
The Decision Meeting Workspace template is provided to support meetings being held to make a set
of decisions. Sites created from this template contain the most common resources necessary to support the decision-making process. The decisions made are then tracked within the site. Figure 2-10
depicts the default layout of a workspace created from the Decision Meeting Workspace template.
The default decision meeting workspace contains the components listed in Table 2-5.
Figure 2-10. A decision meeting workspace
Table 2-5. Decision Meeting Workspace Template Components
Item
Type
Page
Location on Page
Agenda
Agenda list
Home
Center zone
Attendees
Attendees list
Home
Left zone
Decisions
Decisions list
Home
Center zone
Document Library
Document library
Home
Center zone
Objectives
Objectives list
Home
Left zone
Tasks
Task list
Home
Center zone
Libraries and Lists
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Social Meeting Workspace Template
The Social Meeting Workspace template provides the resources typically needed to facilitate meetings
related to social gatherings. This might include anything from a company holiday party or picnic to a
baby shower. Figure 2-11 depicts the default layout of a meeting workspace created from the Social
Meeting Workspace template. This default social meeting workspace contains the components listed
in Table 2-6.
Figure 2-11. A social meeting workspace
Table 2-6. Social Meeting Workspace Template Components
Item
Type
Page
Location on Page
Attendees
Attendees list
Home
Left zone
Directions
Text box list
Home
Center zone
Discussion Board
Discussion board
Discussion
Left zone
Picture Library
Picture library
Photos
Left zone
Things to Bring
Things to bring list
Home
Right zone
Image web part
Home
Right zone
Libraries and Lists
Web Part
Image
Multipage Meeting Workspace
The Multipage Meeting Workspace template is used as a starting point for creating meeting workspaces that will contain more than one page. While you can always add pages to a site created from
any of the other meeting workspace templates, the Multipage Meeting Workspace template creates
a site with two additional pages already included. The structure and default components available
as part of the Multipage Meeting Workspace template are identical to those provided in the Basic
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Meeting Workspace template; the only difference in this template is the inclusion of the two additional, initially empty pages. Figure 2-12 depicts the default layout of a workspace created using the
Multipage Meeting Workspace template. The default multipage meeting workspace contains the
components listed in Table 2-7.
Figure 2-12. A multipage meeting workspace
Table 2-7. Multipage Meeting Workspace Template Components
Item
Type
Page
Location on Page
Libraries and Lists
Agenda
Agenda list
Home
Center zone
Attendees
Attendees list
Home
Left zone
Objectives
Objectives list
Home
Left zone
Recurring Meeting Workspace
The Recurring Meeting Workspace template provides a meeting workspace that contains separate
sites for the individual meetings held as part of a recurring meeting event. These workspaces are only
available when meetings are created using the Calendar list (see Chapter 5) or through Microsoft
Outlook 2003 or 2007 as part of setting up a new recurring Outlook meeting. The recurring meeting
workspace can be based on any of the meeting workspace templates we have already discussed or
any custom meeting workspace templates that you create. When these workspaces are created, they
have a left-hand bar similar to the bar on team sites and document workspaces. This left-hand bar
lists the dates of each meeting included in the recurring meeting schedule. By clicking one of these
listed dates, you can access the workspace for that date. Figure 2-13 depicts the default layout of a
recurring meeting workspace. We will describe creating these workspaces in the “Creating Sites”
section later in this chapter.
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Figure 2-13. A recurring meeting workspace
Blog Sites
Blog sites are designed to allow you to provide a chronicle around a specific topic. This allows for
discussion surrounding a process or topic to be captured over time, so the progress can be followed.
In business, blog sites are often used as team communication tools allowing people to publish
news, responses to questions, and so forth. The blog site provided in SharePoint 2007 also permits
site visitors to post comments in response to blog postings and to e-mail the posting to others.
The layout of blog sites, while similar to team sites and document workspaces, differs enough
to be discussed separately. Figure 2-14 depicts the default layout of a blog site.
Figure 2-14. A blog site
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Blog sites have the following structure:
• Global links bar: We discussed the global links bar in the “Team Sites, Document Workspaces,
and Wiki Sites” section.
• Title area: The title area for meeting workspaces is the same as that discussed in the “Team
Sites, Document Workspaces, and Wiki Sites” section.
• Navigation bar: We also discussed the navigation bar in the “Team Sites, Document Workspaces, and Wiki Sites” section.
• Blog navigator: Located in the left-hand section of a site, the blog navigator provides access
to several blog site elements including categories, blog lists, and links. The blog navigator is
an additional web part zone where you can add other content or remove or rearrange existing items.
• Content section: Located to the right of the blog navigator, the content section is the main
body of the site page where the blog postings are listed. This section also initially contains
administrative links for the blog providing options to facilitate the creation and management
of the overall blog site, site postings, and categories. The content section is divided into a
two-column structure containing a left zone and a right zone where content elements can be
placed. Figure 2-15 shows the blog navigator and content section structures for a blog site.
Figure 2-15. The blog site navigator and content sections
Blog Site Template
There is only one default Blog Site template. This template is located under the Collaboration tab,
which is located under the Site Template selection when you’re creating new sites. This template
provides the basic structure necessary for managing blog resources. The Blog Site template can be
seen in Figure 2-14. Blog sites created from the Blog Site template include the components listed in
Table 2-8.
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Table 2-8. Blog Site Template Components
Item
Type
In Content Area or Blog Navigator
Libraries and Lists
Other Blogs
Links list
Yes (blog navigator)
Categories
Categories list
Yes (blog navigator)
Comments
Comments list
No
Links
Links list
Yes (blog navigator)
Photos
Picture library
No
Posts
Posts list
Yes (left zone)
Admin Links web part
Yes (right zone)
Web Parts
Admin Links
All of the team site, document workspace, wiki site, meeting workspace, and blog site templates
provide starting-point structures for a variety of collaboration, workflow, and information management
needs. You can tailor sites created from any of these templates to meet your specific requirements. You
can also create your own templates that can be used when creating new sites. We will discuss customizing sites in Chapter 8.
When creating sites, you should pick the template that will best meet your needs. For example,
if you are creating a new site that will contain information about your company’s lines of business,
you may decide to use the Multipage Meeting Workspace template. This type of template would
allow you to dedicate a separate page to the materials for each line of business; this is just one
example of how a meeting workspace could be used for something other than a meeting. All of the
templates we discussed have this potential. The key to selecting the right template is identifying the
one with the layout and structure that best suits your specific needs.
nNote
When creating sites from any template, it is always a good practice to remove any components from the
site that you do not want used. This will not only eliminate the possibility of people using components that are not
intended for use but also help keep the site layout and structure as organized and easy to use as possible.
Site Navigation
There are several methods that can be used to navigate among sites within a WSS hierarchy and
among site elements within a site.
Navigation Through Sites
The first method used to navigate among sites leverages the navigation bar. This bar contains the
list of subsites under the current site or inherits its navigation options from the site’s parent site.
The SharePoint navigation inheritance options are used to determine which options are available
on the navigation bar. The site owner selects which options to use when creating the site and can
change these options later. When you click on a site listed in the site navigation bar, you are taken to
the associated site. The highlighted tab on the navigation bar represents the site you are currently
accessing. We will discuss the added capabilities provided to the navigation bar when MOSS is also
in place in Chapter 3. We will also discuss managing site navigation options later in this chapter.
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Along with using the navigation bar to navigate between sites, SharePoint also includes a link
to the topmost site in the global link bar, available on all site pages. This link, named for the title of
the top site, can be clicked to navigate directly to the top-level site from any location within the site
hierarchy.
A third navigation option available across all sites is to use site breadcrumbs. “Breadcrumbs” is
a term used to define the nested list of sites under which the site being accessed is located. The
breadcrumbs links, as shown in Figure 2-16, include all parent sites for the current site. These sites
are listed as links allowing for one-click navigation to any of the listed sites. Breadcrumbs are also
valuable, since they provide you with the location of the current site in the SharePoint site hierarchy.
These breadcrumbs are located in the global links bar.
Figure 2-16. Site breadcrumbs
There are some additional methods available to navigate among sites that are available based
on the site template selected. These options allow for easy access to sites located directly beneath
the current site. We will explain these options as part of our discussion around navigating to site
elements in the next section.
Navigating Within Team Sites, Document Workspaces, and Wiki
Sites
Along with navigating between sites, it is important to understand how to navigate among the elements contained within a site. Team sites, document workspaces, and wiki sites are very similar in
layout and structure. The navigation among components within these types of sites is handled in
the same way.
From a team site, document workspace, or wiki site home page, you can navigate to components
contained within the site in one of three ways. First, for any elements listed in the content area of the
site, you can click the header of the item, such as clicking the Announcements header in a team site.
This will take you to the selected item’s detail page. The second method to navigate to site items is to
click the name of the item in the Quick Launch list. This will also take you to the selected item’s detail
page, or for sites, to the listed site’s home page. Items listed in the Quick Launch list are limited to
those that are configured to be displayed in Quick Launch. The third method available for navigating
to site elements is to click the View All Site Content link at the top of the Quick Launch list. This link
takes you to the All Site Content page, which lists all libraries, lists, and sites currently available in the
site. You can then click the name of the listed item to view the detail page for that item. We will discuss
working with each of the different types of components available in sites in Chapters 4 though 9.
After navigating to a specific list or library detail page, a second set of breadcrumbs is added to
the page. These breadcumbs are located at the top of the content area and provide links back to the
home page for the site and other site references mapping the path from the navigation menu items
to the current list or library page.
Additional web pages in a team site, document workspace, or wiki site are stored as documents
in a document library. To navigate to these additional web pages, you must navigate to the document
library containing the pages and then click the page listed in the document library. One exception to
this rule is the wiki pages library on a wiki site: these pages are listed under the Wiki Pages header of
the Quick Launch area, as you can see in Figure 2-7. An alternative method of navigating to site pages
would be to place a Document Library View web part on the site homepage. We will discuss document libraries in more detail in Chapter 6. Given that web pages are handled in this way, they are not
often used. Instead, content is more frequently broken out into a nested site hierarchy.
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It is very common for team sites and document workspaces to have additional team sites,
document workspaces, wiki sites, meeting workspaces, or blog sites created underneath them. For
example, a human resources site may have a subsite dedicated to providing HR benefit details.
Another example would be a client site that contains individual project sites for the client. As we
have mentioned previously, when sites are created underneath other sites, they are called subsites.
There are four main ways to navigate to subsites contained within a site. The first is to click the subsite name from the navigation bar or from Quick Launch, if listed. A second method would be to
select the View All Site Content link and then select the desired site from the Sites and Workspaces
section of the All Site Content page. The third method used to navigate to subsites is only available
for individuals having access to the Site Actions menu. These individuals can navigate to a subsite
by doing the following:
1. Navigate to the site containing the subsite.
2. Click the Site Actions link to present the Site Actions menu.
3. Select the Site Settings option from the Site Actions menu, shown in Figure 2-17.
Figure 2-17. The Site Actions menu
4. On the Site Settings page, click the Sites and Workspaces link in the Site Administration section.
5. On the Sites and Workspaces page, click the name of the subsite you wish to view. This will
present the selected subsite’s home page.
The fourth method used to navigate to a subsite is through the use of a web part that lists subsites. WSS on its own does not include a web part that lists sites under the current site. When you
include MOSS, web parts are made available that can be used to list subsites, such as the Table of
Contents web part. There are also many third-party components available that provide this capability. We will discuss adding web parts to site pages in Chapter 8.
nNote
A SharePoint technical administrator would need to install third-party components for use in your SharePoint sites.
Navigating Within Meeting Workspaces
The layout of meeting workspaces is different from the layout of team sites, document workspaces,
and wiki sites. Subsequently, navigating within meeting workspaces works differently as well. The
Quick Launch and the View All Site Content options are not available in meeting workspaces, so the
primary method for navigating among components in a meeting workspace is by clicking the title of
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the component in the content section of the workspace. Since almost all items making up a meeting
workspace will reside on one of the workspace pages, this method works well.
When additional pages are available in a meeting workspace, these pages are referenced in the
workspace’s page list. To navigate to these pages, simply click the page name in the page list. Given
that pages are handled in this manner, it is more common for additional pages to be used in meeting workspaces than in team sites or document workspaces.
Meeting workspaces can also have subsites. However, this typically does not occur as frequently
as in team sites or document workspaces. Navigating to subsites in meeting workspaces is similar to
navigating to them from team sites, document workspaces, and wiki sites.
There are four main ways to navigate to subsites within a meeting workspace. The first way is
to click on the subsite name from the navigation bar, if it is listed.
The second method used to navigate to components within the site is to click on the name of
the item in the Quick Launch list. The Quick Launch list is not available on the site home page but is
available when viewing other pages, such as an element’s detail page. Clicking these links will take
you to the selected item’s detail page or, for sites, to the listed site’s home page. As with team sites,
items listed in Quick Launch are limited to those that are configured to be displayed in the Quick
Launch list.
The third method used to navigate to a subsite is available to individuals having access to the
Site Actions menu. To navigate to a subsite using the Site Actions menu, use the following steps:
1. Navigate to the meeting workspace containing the subsite.
2. On the site’s home page, click the Site Settings link in the Site Actions menu.
3. On the Site Settings page, click the Sites and Workspaces link in the Site Administration section.
4. On the Sites and Workspaces page, click the name of the subsite you wish to view. This will
present the selected subsite’s home page.
The fourth method used to navigate to a subsite is through the use of a web part that lists subsites. WSS alone does not provide a web part that lists sites under the current site. When MOSS is in
place, web parts, such as the Table of Contents web part, are available that can be used to list sites
under the current site. There are also many third-party components available that provide this
capability. We will discuss adding web parts to WSS site pages in Chapter 9.
nNote
As discussed previously, a SharePoint technical administrator would need to install third-party
components for use in your SharePoint sites.
Navigating Within Blog Sites
Blog site layouts are considerably different from any other WSS site layouts. However, navigating
through blog sites has some similarities to navigating through team sites. In blog sites, you can navigate to components contained within the site in one of three ways. First, elements can be placed in
the content area or in the blog navigator section of the home page. For items listed in these areas
you can click the header of the item, for example, click the Categories header listed by default in the
blog navigator. This will take you to the detail page for the item selected.
The second method used to navigate to components within the site is to click on the name of
the item in the Quick Launch list. The Quick Launch list is not available on the site home page. The
home page contains the blog navigator section in the place of the Quick Launch list. While the
Quick Launch list is not available on the site’s home page, it is available when viewing other pages,
such as an elements detail page. Clicking these links will take you to the selected item’s detail page
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or, for sites, to the listed site’s home page. As with team sites, items listed in Quick Launch are limited to those that are configured to be displayed in the Quick Launch area.
The third method available for navigating to site elements is to click the View All Site Content
link at the top of the blog navigator or Quick Launch. This will take you to the All Site Content page
that lists all components within the site. You can click any of the components to be taken to that
item’s detail page or, for sites, the home page for the selected site.
Additional web pages within a blog site are stored as documents in a document library. To navigate to additional pages, you must navigate to the document library containing the pages and click
the page listed in the document library.
There are additional navigation capabilities provided as part of blog sites that are specifically
designed to help manage the blog. These options are located in the Admin Links web part on the
blog’s home page. This web part includes the following links:
• Create a Post: Takes you to the “Posts: New Item” page where you can create a new item in
the Post list
• Manage Posts: Navigates you to the default view of the Posts list
• Manage Comments: Takes you to the default view of the Comments list
• All Content: Works the same as the View All Site Content link, taking you to the All Site
Content page
• Set Blog Permissions: Opens the Help pages showing the Configure Permissions for a blog
topic
• Launch Blog Program to Post: Launches a compatible blog editing program, such as
Microsoft Office Word 2007
While subsites are not typically used within blog sites, the ability to have subsites is available.
Navigating to subsites under a blog site is the same as navigating to subsites within a team site, document workspace, or wiki site. We discussed navigating to subsites in the “Navigating Within Team
Sites, Document Workspaces, and Wiki Sites” section previously.
Navigating Through Sites Using Mobile Devices
Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 provides the ability for users with mobile devices, such as PDAs
and smart phones, to access SharePoint lists and libraries from these devices. This is done by providing an entry point into a site that presents the lists and libraries in a form factor conducive to
these devices, as seen in Figure 2-18.
Figure 2-18. A mobile access site default page
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When accessing a site through the mobile link, you are presented with the lists and libraries
available within the site. You can then click the list or library name to access the information in the
associated list or library. You are able to browse through the information and select from any of the
available views. You can also click the Details link for any item listed to be presented with all of the
information for that item. For documents, you can also click the name of the document to open it.
nNote
Accessing sites through the mobile access site link requires that your mobile device be configured with
connectivity compatible with that used by your organization to provide access to the SharePoint environment. Also,
to open documents on the mobile device, you must have a program on the device that can open the file.
Creating Sites
When we talk about creating and managing sites, we need to break our discussion down into two
topics: top-level sites and subsites. A top-level site is a WSS site created as a separate site hierarchy.
Creating top-level sites requires the assistance of a SharePoint technical administrator. A subsite is a
WSS site that is created within another WSS site. Sites can be nested to create any desired SharePoint
structure. The method used to create subsites is dependant on the template from which the site was
created and the site features currently active in the site.
Creating Subsites in MOSS Sites
When MOSS is in place in the SharePoint environment and the current site was created using a MOSS
site template or has been updated so that the Office SharePoint Server Publishing features is enabled
you create new sites using the Create Site option from the Site Actions menu. To create new subsites
in MOSS sites follow these steps:
1. Navigate to the site under which the new subsite should be created.
2. On the site’s home page, click the Site Actions link to present the Site Actions menu, as
shown in Figure 2-19.
3. Select the Create Site option from the Site Actions Menu.
4. On the New SharePoint Site page, perform the following steps:
a. In the Title and Description section, enter the title for the site. This is the site name that
will be displayed in any site reference. You can also add a description, which, if entered,
is displayed at the top of the content section of the site.
b. In the Web Site Address section, enter the URL Name for the site. It is often good practice to make this the same as the site title. However, it is also good practice to not
include spaces in the URL name, so if a site title is Business Planning, the URL name
would be BusinessPlanning.
c. In the Template Selection section, pick the template on which the site should be based.
The template identifies the default format and components included in the site. We discussed the format and components of the default templates earlier in this chapter. For
information on any additional custom templates listed, you will need to refer to the site
administrator.
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Figure 2-19. A MOSS site’s Site Actions menu
d. In the Permissions section, specify whether the user access permissions for the site
being created should be the same as the permissions of the parent site or whether
unique permissions should be used. When you opt to use the same permissions, security will be based on the permissions of the parent site. We will discuss changing site
permissions in the “Managing Site Security” section later in this chapter.
e. In the Navigation Inheritance section, select if the navigation bar should inherit the
options listed in the parent site’s top link bar or if the navigation bar should list the subsites under the current site.
f. In the Site Categories section, select the site categories under which the site should be
listed in the site directory. We will discuss managing site categories in Chapter 3.
g. Once all of the necessary information has been entered or selected, click the Create
button.
The site is created, and you are taken to the home page of the new subsite.
Creating Subsites in WSS Sites
As we discussed earlier, any existing team site, document workspace, wiki site, meeting workspace,
or blog site can contain subsites. While it is not common to need subsites under wiki sites, meeting
workspaces, or blog sites, the capability to create them is available. You can create any type of subsite under an existing site by following these steps:
1. Navigate to the site under which the new subsite should be created.
2. On the site’s home page, click the Create link from the Site Actions menu.
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3. On the Create page, in the Web Pages section, click the Sites and Workspaces link.
4. On the New SharePoint Site page, select the following options:
a. In the Title and Description section, enter the title for the site. This is the site name that
will be displayed in any site reference. You can also add a description, which, if entered,
is displayed at the top of the content section of the site.
b. In the Web Site Address section, enter the URL Name for the site. It is often good practice
to make this the same as the site title. However, it is also good practice to not include
spaces in the URL name, so if a site title is Business Planning, the URL name would be
BusinessPlanning.
c. In the Template Selection section, pick the template on which the site should be based.
The template identifies the default format and components included in the site. We discussed the format and components of the default templates earlier in this chapter. For
information on any additional custom templates listed, you will need to refer to the site
administrator.
d. In the Permissions section, specify whether the user access permissions for the site
being created should be the same as the permissions of the parent site or whether
unique permissions should be used. When you opt to use the same permissions, security will be based on the permissions of the parent site. We will discuss changing site
permissions in the “Managing Site Security” section later in this chapter.
e. In the Navigation section, select if the site should be made available in the Quick
Launch area and if the site should be listed in the top link bar of the parent site.
f. In the Navigation Inheritance section, select if the navigation bar should inherit the
options listed in the parent site’s top link bar or if the navigation bar should list the
subsites under the current site.
g. If MOSS is in place, in the Site Categories section, select the site categories under which
the site should be listed in the site directory. We will discuss managing site categories in
Chapter 3.
h. Once all of the necessary information has been entered or selected, click the Create button.
5. If the unique permissions option was selected, you are taken to the “Set Up Groups for this
Site” page. On this page enter the following information:
a. In the “Visitors to this Site” section, you can select to create a new site group or use an
existing site group to assign the Read permission level. If you choose to create a new site
group, enter the name of the group, and enter or select the users to be included in the
group.
b. In the “Members of this Site” section, you can select to create a new site group or use an
existing site group to assign the Contribute permission level. If you choose to create a
new site group, enter the name of the group, and enter or select the users to be included
in the group.
c. In the “Owners of this Site” section, you can select to create a new site group or use an
existing site group to assign the Full Control permission level. If you choose to create a
new site group, enter the name of the group, and enter or select the users to be included
in the group.
d. Once all of the information has been appropriately updated, click the OK button.
The site is created, and you are taken to the site home page.
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Create a New Document Workspace from a Document in a Site
Document workspaces can also be easily created for documents that already exist in sites. At times,
a document that exists within a site will need to be updated, and the update process will involve
multiple people working on the document. While updates are being made to the document, you
may wish to leave the current version available for site users. In this situation, you can create a new
document workspace for this document. When the workspace is created a copy of the document
will be placed in the workspace. Within the workspace, you will be given the ability to post the document back to the original location once all the necessary updates have been made.
To create a new document workspace from an existing document, use the following steps:
1. Navigate to the location where the document resides.
2. Hover over the document, and select the Send To ä Create Document Workspace option
from the document’s context menu.
3. On the Create Document Workspace page, click the OK button.
The new document workspace is created, and a copy of the selected document is placed in the
workspace.
Once the version of the document in the workspace is finalized, you can publish it back to the
original source document by selecting the Send To ä Publish to Source Location option from the
document’s drop-down menu. We will discuss managing documents in more detail in Chapter 6.
nNote
When you create a document workspace in this way and are planning to edit the document in the new document workspace, it is important to not edit the original source document. Publishing the document from the created
document workspace back to the source document will overwrite any changes made to the source document.
Advanced Site Creation Using Office
SharePoint sites can also be created through Microsoft Office 2003 or 2007. There are a couple of
methods you can use to create different types of sites in Office.
Creating Meeting Workspaces with Outlook
As we mentioned earlier, meeting workspaces can be created as part of creating a new Outlook
meeting request. This capability is available as part of Outlook 2003 and 2007. It allows Outlook
meetings and SharePoint meeting workspaces to be linked, so that meeting details in the meeting
workspace reflect the information in the Outlook meeting and so that the meeting request in Outlook references the associated meeting workspace.
To create a new meeting workspace as part of creating a new Outlook meeting request, follow
these steps:
1. In Outlook, begin creating a new meeting request by right-clicking a calendar time and
selecting New Meeting Request or New Recurring Meeting by clicking the down arrow on
the New button in the Outlook button bar and selecting Meeting Request or by selecting File
ä New ä Meeting Request from the Outlook menu.
2. Enter the details about the meeting on the New Meeting form.
3. Click the Meeting Workspace button on the New Meeting form. This will present the Meeting Workspace task pane. For Office 2007, this button is on the Meeting tab. For Office 2003,
this button is directly on the form.
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4. On the Meeting Workspace task pane, click the Change Settings link in the Create a Workspace section.
5. On the Create Meeting Workspace task pane, shown in Figure 2-20, follow these steps:
a. Select the location where the meeting workspace will be created. If the desired location
is not in the Select a Location drop-down list, choose Other, enter the URL to the
required location in the Other Workspaces window, and click OK.
b. Select a workspace template by choosing the Create a New Workspace option and
selecting the desired meeting workspace template.
c. Click OK.
6. On the Meeting Workspace task pane, click the Create button. The meeting workspace is
created, and a link to the meeting workspace is added to the meeting request. If the Outlook
meeting is a recurring meeting, a recurring meeting workspace will be created.
7. Click the Send button on the Outlook message to send this Outlook request to attendees.
Figure 2-20. An Outlook 2007 meeting request with a meeting workspace task pane
When meeting requests are created in this way, the attendee list in the Meeting site is linked to
the Outlook meeting attendee list.
You can also link a new Outlook meeting to an existing meeting workspace. To do this, follow
the same steps as earlier, except instead of selecting the Create a New Workspace option in the
Meeting Workspace task pane, as in step 5b, select the Link to an Existing Workspace option, and
select the workspace from the Workspace drop-down list. Keep in mind that the workspace dropdown list will contain the list of meeting workspaces that exist under the location selected in the
Select a Location drop-down list. If there are no meeting workspaces under this location, the Select
a Workspace drop-down list will not contain any values.
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Creating a New Document Workspace with Office
Document workspaces can be created within the Microsoft Office Word, Excel, and PowerPoint programs. This capability is available when using Office 2003 or 2007. Creating document workspaces
from Office is extremely helpful when the creator of a document decides that a document workspace
is needed to further develop the document and, if necessary, collaborate with others during this
update process. The document workspace can be created without leaving the program the creator is
using. This minimizes work interruptions and makes creating document workspaces much more convenient for people who spend a significant amount of time working in Word, Excel, or PowerPoint.
To create a document workspace from Office, use the following procedure:
1. In Word, Excel, or PowerPoint, select to create the document workspace.
a. In Office 2007, click the file options to present the File Options menu, and from the File
Options menu, select Publish ä Create Document Workspace.
b. In Office 2003, select the Shared Workspace option from the Task Pane drop-down
header. If the Task Pane is not open, you can open it by selecting View ä Task Pane from
the program menu.
2. In the Shared Workspace task pane, as shown in Figure 2-21, do the following:
a. Enter the name for the workspace in the “Document Workspace name” field.
b. Select the location where the workspace will be created from the “Location for new
workspace” drop-down list. If the location where you want to create this workspace is
not listed choose the “(Type New URL)” option, and enter the location under which the
new workspace will be created.
c. Click the Create button.
3. If the document has not yet been saved, you will be asked to save the document.
The workspace is created, and the document is placed in the workspace.
Figure 2-21. Microsoft Word 2007 with a Shared Workspace task pane
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Managing Site Security
Management of the security for a site is the responsibility of the site owner. The site owner is responsible
for assigning rights to users within their site. Rights can be assigned directly to an Active Directory user or
group, or they can be assigned through a SharePoint group containing Active Directory users or groups.
Security must be configured for all top-level WSS sites. By default, when a new top-level site is
created, the user who created it is the only person who has access to the site. If security for a subsite
is configured to be inherited from the parent site, then security is not managed for the subsite;
instead, the security is based on the rights assigned in the parent site. If security for the subsite is
defined to be unique, then the user will be required to assign the appropriate rights to individuals
needing access to the site.
When creating your WSS sites, it is important to understand the security needs of the individuals who will be using the sites and to assign users the appropriate security to allow them to work
with the materials within the site.
Managing SharePoint Groups
SharePoint groups contain Active Directory user and group accounts and are used to assign rights
within SharePoint. SharePoint groups can be used throughout a site hierarchy to assign rights to
sites, lists, and libraries as needed. By default, when a new top-level site is created, three default site
groups are also created. These site groups are listed along with their default permission levels in
Table 2-9. Permission levels are a set of permissions granted to a SharePoint group or Active Directory user or group that provide a specific class or level of access within a site. We will discuss
permission levels in more detail later in this chapter.
Table 2-9. Default Site Groups and Their Permission Levels
Site Group
Default Permission Level
Site Name Owners
Full Control
Site Name Members
Contribute
Site Name Visitors
Read
SharePoint site groups can be created and customized to meet the security needs within the
SharePoint environment.
Creating SharePoint Groups
Create a new SharePoint group as follows:
1. Navigate to a site where the group will be used.
2. On the site’s home page, click the Site Settings option from the Site Actions menu.
3. On the Site Settings page, in the Users and Permissions section, click the People and Groups
link.
4. On the People and Groups page, click the arrow next to the New link to present the New
menu.
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5. Select the New Group option from the New menu.
6. On the New Group page, enter the following:
a. In the Name and About Me Description section, enter the name for the new SharePoint
group. You can also enter an optional About Me description. The About Me information
is presented next to the name when the SharePoint group is presented.
b. In the Owner section, you can update the SharePoint group owner information. The
owner has the right to update the site’s group information. By default, the owner is
listed as the user creating the SharePoint group.
c. In the Group Settings section, you can specify if only group members or if everyone has
the ability to view group membership information. You can also define if only the group
owner or if all group members have the ability to edit the group membership.
d. In the Membership Requests section, you can specify if requests can be made by users
to join or leave the group and if requests should be automatically accepted. The e-mail
address that requests should be sent to is also listed. By default, the e-mail address will
be set to the e-mail address of the user creating the group.
e. If the site in which the group is being created has unique permissions, the Give Group
Permissions to this Site section is presented. In this section, select the permission levels
to grant to the new group in the current site.
f. Once all of the necessary information has been entered, click the Create button.
The new SharePoint group is created, and you are returned to the People and Groups page.
Editing SharePoint Groups
To edit an existing SharePoint group, use the following steps:
1. Navigate to a site where the group is used.
2. On the site’s home page, click the Site Settings option from the Site Actions menu.
3. On the Site Settings page, in the Users and Permissions section, click the People and Groups
link.
4. On the People and Groups page, do one of the following:
a. Click the name of the group to edit in the Groups list located in the right-hand navigation area, click the Settings link, and select the Group Settings option.
b. Alternatively, on this page, click the Groups header in the Groups list to present all
groups, and click the Edit link next to the desired group name.
5. On the Change Group Settings page, you can update the following:
a. In the Name and About Me Description section, you can update the group name or
About Me details.
b. In the Owner section, you can update the group owner.
c. In the Group Settings section, you can update who can view the membership of the
group, so that either group members or everyone has the right to view the group membership information. You can also update who can edit the membership of the group, so
that either only the group owner or all group members have the ability to update the
group membership.
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d. In the Membership Requests section, you can update if people can request to join or
leave the group and if the requests should be automatically accepted. You can also
update the e-mail address that requests are sent to.
e. If the site in which the group is being edited has unique permissions, the “Give Group
Permissions to this Site” section is presented. In this section, select the permission levels to grant to the new group in the current site.
f. Once all information has been appropriately updated, click the OK button.
The SharePoint group is appropriately updated, and you are returned to the People and Groups
page.
Deleting SharePoint Groups
Follow these steps to delete an existing SharePoint group:
1. Navigate to a site.
2. On the site’s home page, click the Site Settings option from the Site Actions menu.
3. On the Site Settings page, in the Users and Permissions section, click the People and Groups
link.
4. On the People and Groups page, do one of the following: Click the name of the group to edit
in the Groups list located in the right-hand navigation area, click the Settings link, and
select the Group Settings option. Alternatively, on this page, click the Groups header in the
Groups list to present all groups, and click the Edit link next to the desired group name.
5. On the Change Group Settings page, click the Delete button.
6. On the deletion confirmation screen, click the OK button.
The SharePoint group is deleted, and you are returned to the People and Groups page.
Adding Users to SharePoint Groups
Add users to a SharePoint group as follows:
1. Navigate to a site where the group is used.
2. On the site’s home page, click the Site Settings option from the Site Actions menu.
3. On the Site Settings page, in the Users and Permissions section, click the People and Groups
link.
4. On the People and Groups page, do one of the following: click the name of the group from
the Groups list, or click the Groups header and then the name of the group.
5. On the People and Groups page, the group membership will be displayed for the selected
group. You can click the arrow next to the New link to present the New menu.
6. Select the Add Users option from the New menu.
7. On the Add Users page, enter the following:
a. In the Add Users section, enter the Active Directory users and groups to be added to the
SharePoint group. You can then click the check name icon next to the entry field to confirm that the entered information corresponds to a valid user or group account.
Alternatively, you can click the address book icon to select the users from the Active
Directory address book search screen.
b. In the Give Permissions section, select the group to which the users will be added.
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c. In the Send E-mail section, identify if a welcome e-mail should be sent, and update the
subject and personal message text.
d. Once all of the information has been appropriately entered, click the OK button.
The users and groups are added to the SharePoint group, and you are returned to the People
and Groups page.
Removing Users from a SharePoint Group
Use these steps to remove users from a SharePoint group:
1. Navigate to a site where the group is used.
2. On the site’s home page, click the Site Settings option from the Site Actions menu.
3. On the Site Settings page, in the Users and Permissions section, click the People and Groups
link.
4. On the People and Groups page, do one of the following: click the name of the group from
the Groups list, or click the Groups header and then the name of the group.
5. On the People and Groups page, the group membership will be displayed for the selected
group. You can check the boxes in front of the users you wish to remove from the group and
click the Actions link to present the Actions menu.
6. Select the Remove Users from Groups option from the Actions menu.
7. Confirm the removal of the users from the SharePoint group by clicking the OK button.
The users are removed from the SharePoint group, and the People and Groups page is updated
to reflect the change.
Viewing SharePoint Group Permissions
Since SharePoint groups can be used across sites, having the ability to see all sites where a group
has been assigned permissions can be very valuable. To view a group’s permissions assignments,
use the following procedure:
1. Navigate to a site.
2. On the site’s home page, click the Site Settings option from the Site Actions menu.
3. On the Site Settings page, in the Users and Permissions section, click the People and Groups
link.
4. On the People and Groups page, click the name of the group in the Groups list located in the
right-hand navigation.
5. On the People and Groups page, the group membership will be displayed for the selected
group. Select the Settings link to view the Settings menu options.
6. Select the View Group Permissions option from the Settings menu.
The View Site Collection Permissions window is presented; it displays the sites, lists, and
libraries where the group has been assigned permissions and the permission levels assigned. You
can click any of the listed object names to go to the default page of an item.
Changing Permission Inheritance for a Site
As we have discussed, when you create a subsite, you have the ability to identify whether the subsite
should have its own unique permissions defined or whether it should inherit permissions from its
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parent site. After the site has been created, you have the ability to change this setting if security
requirements for the subsite change. Change the permission inheritance settings for a subsite as
follows:
1. Navigate to the site in which you need to change permission inheritance.
2. On the site’s home page, click the Site Settings option from the Site Actions menu.
3. On the Site Settings page, in the Users and Permissions section, click the Advanced Permissions link.
4. On the Permissions page, click the Action link to display the Actions menu.
5. Update the permission inheritance:
a. If the site is currently inheriting permissions, select the Edit Permissions option, and
click OK on the confirmation message box.
b. If the site currently has unique permissions, select the Inherit Permissions link, and
click OK on the confirmation message box.
The site permission inheritance settings are updated, and the Permissions screen is refreshed
to reflect the change.
Managing Permission Levels
As we discussed previously, SharePoint groups and individual users can be assigned permissions
within SharePoint sites. When users are added, they are either assigned to a SharePoint group or
granted rights through direct permission level assignments. We discussed how to manage permission level assignments to SharePoint groups as part of the “Managing SharePoint Groups” section.
Permission levels are sets of permissions that are grouped together to provide a specific level or
class of rights within a site. There are five default permission levels available within WSS:
• Full Control: This permission level includes all available permissions and grants the assigned
users administrative-level access to the site and all of the site’s resources. This permission
level cannot be changed or deleted from SharePoint.
• Design: The Design permission level provides the ability to manage lists, libraries, and pages
within a SharePoint site.
• Contribute: This permission level provides the ability to manage content in a site’s lists and
libraries.
• Read: The Read permission level provides read-only access to site resources.
• Limited Access: This permission level is designed to be combined with list or library permissions to provide access to only specific lists or libraries within a site without granting rights
to any other resources within the site. This permission level cannot be changed or deleted
from SharePoint.
Permission levels can also be assigned directly to an Active Directory user or group as follows:
1. Navigate to the site where the permissions need to be assigned. This should be a site where
permissions are not being inherited from the site’s parent.
2. On the site’s home page, click the Site Settings option from the Site Actions menu.
3. On the Site Settings page, in the Users and Permissions section, click the Advanced Permissions link.
4. On the Permissions page, click the arrow next to the New link to open the New menu.
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5. Click the Add User option from the New menu.
6. On the Add User page, enter the following:
a. In the Add Users section, enter the Active Directory users and groups to be added to the
permission level, and click the check name icon to confirm that the entered information
corresponds to valid users or groups. Alternatively, you can click the address book icon
to select users from the Active Directory address book search.
b. In the Give Permission section, select the Give Users Permissions Directly option, and
select the permission levels to assign to the user.
c. In the Send E-Mail section, identify if a welcome e-mail should be sent, and update the
subject and personal message as appropriate.
d. Once the information has been entered, click the OK button.
The users are assigned the selected permissions levels in the site, and you are returned to the
Permissions page.
Adding Permission Levels
To create your own combination of permissions to meet specific site management needs, you can
create your own permission level sets as follows:
1. Navigate to a site having unique permission where you are the administrator.
2. From the site’s home page, click the Site Settings option from the Site Actions menu.
3. On the Site Settings page, in the Users and Permissions section, click the Advanced Permissions link.
4. On the Permissions page, click the Settings link to view the Settings menu.
5. Select the Permission Levels option from the Settings menu.
6. If the current site is not the top-most site, a link will be available under See Also in the left
navigation area called Manage Permission Levels on Parent Web Site. Click this link.
7. On the Permission Levels page, click the Add a Permission Level link.
8. On the Add a Permission Level page, enter the following:
a. In the Name and Description section, enter the name for the new permission level. You
can also enter an optional description. The description is presented next to the name
when the permission level is listed for selection.
b. In the Permissions section, check the check boxes in front of all permissions that the
permission level should include.
c. Once all of the necessary information has been entered, click the Create button.
The new permission level is created, and you are returned to the Permission Levels page.
Creating a New Permission Level as a Copy of an Existing Permission Level
When there is the need for a new permission level that closely mirrors an existing permission level,
you can make a copy of the existing item to use as a starting point when creating the new permission level. Create a new permission level as a copy of an existing permission level as follows:
1. Navigate to a site having unique permission where you are the administrator.
2. From the site’s home page, click the Site Settings option from the Site Actions menu.
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3. On the Site Settings page, in the Users and Permissions section, click the Advanced Permissions link.
4. On the Permissions page, click the Settings link to view the Settings menu.
5. Select the Permission Level option from the Settings menu.
6. If the current site is not the top-most site, a link will be available under See Also in the left
navigation area called Manage Permission Levels on Parent Web Site. Click this link.
7. On the Permission Levels page, click the name of the permission level to copy.
8. On the Edit Permission Level page, click the Copy Permission Level button.
9. On the Copy Permission Level page, enter the following:
a. In the Name and Description section, enter the name for the new permission level.
You can also enter an optional description.
b. In the Permissions section, update the permissions set for the permission level as
appropriate.
c. Once all of the necessary information has been entered and updated, click the Create
button.
The new permission level is created, and you are returned to the Permission Level page.
Editing Existing Permission Levels
You can also edit an existing permission level as follows:
1. Navigate to a site having unique permission where you are the administrator.
2. From the site’s home page, click the Site Settings option from the Site Actions menu.
3. On the Site Settings page, in the Users and Permissions section, click the Advanced Permissions link.
4. On the Permissions page, click the Settings link to view the Settings menu.
5. Select the Permission Level option from the Settings menu.
6. If the current site is not the top-most site, a link will be available under See Also in the left
navigation area called Manage Permission Levels on Parent Web Site. Click this link.
7. On the Permission Levels page, click the name of the permission level to update.
8. On the Edit Permission Level page, update the following:
a. In the Name and Description section, you can edit the permission level name and
optional description text.
b. In the Permissions section, update the permissions set for the permission level as
appropriate
c. Once all of the necessary updates have been made, click the Submit button.
The permission level is updated, and you are returned to the Permission Level page.
Deleting Existing Permission Levels
To delete an existing permission level, use these steps:
1. Navigate to a site having unique permission where you are the administrator.
2. From the site’s home page, click the Site Settings option from the Site Actions menu.
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3. On the Site Settings page, in the Users and Permissions section, click the Advanced Permissions link.
4. On the Permissions page, click the Settings link to view the Settings menu.
5. Select the Permission Level option from the Settings menu.
6. If the current site is not the top-most site, a link will be available under See Also in the left
navigation area called Manage Permission Levels on Parent Web Site. Click this link.
7. On the Permission Level page, check the check box in front of the permission levels you
want to delete, and click the Delete Selected Permission Levels link.
8. On the delete confirmation screen, click the OK button.
The permission level is deleted, and the Permission Level page is updated to reflect the change.
Breaking Permission Level Inheritance
In the same way that security can be inherited from a site’s parent, the available permission levels
within a site can be inherited. By default, all sites inherit their permission levels from the top site. This
permission level inheritance, however, can be broken in order to independently manage permission
levels within a site. For example, permission level inheritance would need to be broken when users
and groups assigned to the Design permission level should not have the right to update web parts on
pages within a specific site, but the Design permission level should allow for this for all other sites.
Permission level inheritance can only be broken in sites where security rights are not inherited
from the parent site. You can use the following steps to break permission level inheritance within a site:
1. Navigate to the site inheriting permissions.
2. From the site’s home page, click the Site Settings option from the Site Actions menu.
3. On the Site Settings page, in the Users and Permissions section, click the Advanced Permissions link.
4. On the Permissions page, click the Settings link to view the Settings menu.
5. Select the Permission Level option from the Settings menu.
6. On the Permission Level page, click the Edit Permission Levels link.
7. Click the OK button on the confirmation window.
The permission level inheritance is broken, and the Permission Level page is updated to reflect
the change.
Resetting Permission Level Inheritance
You can reset the permission level inheritance for a site where the inheritance was previously broken as follows:
1. Navigate to the site where permission inheritance has been broken.
2. From the site’s home page, click the Site Settings option from the Site Actions menu.
3. On the Site Settings page, in the Users and Permissions section, click the Advanced Permissions link.
4. On the Permissions page, click the Settings link to view the Settings menu.
5. Select the Permission Levels option from the Settings menu.
6. On the Permission Levels page, click the Inherit Permission Levels from Parent Web Site link.
7. Click the OK button on the confirmation window.
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The permission levels are set to inherit from the parent, and the permission level page is
updated to reflect the change.
Managing Site Collection Administrators
So far, we have discussed how you manage SharePoint groups and permission levels in order to manage the rights individuals have in the SharePoint environment. Defining site collection administrators
extends security management by allowing you to identify the individuals that are responsible for managing the overall environment. These individuals are automatically given administrative rights across
the entire site hierarchy.
Follow these steps to manage site collection administrators:
1. Navigate to the top-level site.
2. From the site’s home page, click the Site Settings option in the Site Actions menu.
3. On the Site Settings page, in the Users and Permissions section, click the Site Collection
Administrators link.
4. On the Site Collection Administrators page, enter and remove Active Directory users and
groups, and click the check name icon to confirm the entered information corresponds to
valid users and groups. Alternatively, you can click the address book icon to select the users
from the Active Directory address book search. Once the list of users is correct, click the OK
button.
The site collection administrators are updated, and you are returned to the Site Settings page.
Changing Site Details
There are several aspects of a SharePoint site that the site administrator has the ability to update as
the need arises. One example of information that can be updated includes the title and description
information that was entered when the site was created. Changing site details allows you to update
the site over time as needs change.
Updating the Site Title, Description, URL, and Logo
The site title and description that were entered when the site was created can be updated. Also, the
site logo that appears at the top of the created site can be replaced with a different image. This
allows the site to be properly branded for the organization or group it is being created to support.
Update the site title and description information that was entered when the site was created and
the logo available at the top of the site using these steps:
1. Navigate to the site that needs to be updated.
2. On the site’s home page, click the Site Settings option on the Site Actions menu.
3. On the Site Settings page, in the Look and Feel section, click on the Title, Description, and
Icon link.
4. On the Title, Description, and Icon page, update the following information:
a. In the Title and Description section, make any updates to the site title and description
information.
b. In the Logo URL and Description section, enter a URL to a logo that will be placed next
to the site title in the title bar on the site. You can also enter a description for use as
alternate text for the logo, which is displayed when the mouse hovers over the logo.
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c. When MOSS is in place, in the Web Site Address section, you can update the URL for the
site that was entered when the site was created.
d. Once all updates have been made, click the OK button.
The changes made are applied to the site, and you are returned to the Site Settings page.
Customizing Navigation Options
There are several navigation settings that can be updated to tailor the user experience provided by
the site. This includes updates to the Quick Launch area as well as the navigation bar. These customizations are available to allow you to tailor the site navigation capabilities to meet your
navigational needs.
Configuring Tree View Options
Tree View options allow you to determine Quick Launch display settings and identify if the site navigation tree view tool should be made available in the Quick Launch area. By default, Quick Launch is
enabled, displaying items identified for display in Quick Launch. If this is disabled, all Quick Launch
links are removed from this area, leaving only the View All Site Content link and the Recycle Bin.
The Tree View is initially disabled for sites. When the Tree View option is enabled, the tree view
tool is placed in the Quick Launch area and lists all libraries, lists, and sites within the current site.
You are provided the ability to expand listed subsites to view their lists, libraries, and sites as well.
The Tree View can be seen in Figure 2-22.
Figure 2-22. A site tree view
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Update the Tree View options as follows:
1. Navigate to the site that needs to be updated.
2. On the site’s home page, click the Site Settings option on the Site Actions menu.
3. On the Site Settings page, in the Look and Feel section, click the Tree View link.
4. On the Tree View page, update the following:
a. In the Enable Quick Launch section, check or uncheck the Enable Quick Launch option
to enable or disable Quick Launch.
b. In the Enable Tree View section, check or uncheck the Enable Tree View option to
enable or disable the Tree View.
c. Once all options are properly set, click the OK button.
The updates to the site are applied, and you are returned to the Site Settings page.
Configuring Quick Launch Options
While you can use the Tree View options discussed previously to determine if the Quick Launch
menu should be displayed, the Quick Launch options allow you to customize the items presented
as part of Quick Launch. This includes reordering items as well as adding, updating, and removing
listed headings and links. This enables you to tailor Quick Launch to help meet the navigational
needs of your site.
Changing the Order of Quick Launch Items
You have the ability to reorder Quick Launch links and headings to meet your specific needs. Follow
these steps to reorder Quick Launch items:
1. Navigate to the site that needs to be updated.
2. On the site’s home page, click the Site Settings option on the Site Actions menu.
3. On the Site Settings page, in the Look and Feel section, click on the Quick Launch link.
4. On the Quick Launch page, click the Change Order link to show ordering details.
5. On the Quick Launch page, update the ordering numbers to rearrange the items on the
Quick Launch area, and click the OK button once done.
The Quick Launch items are reordered, and you are returned to the default Quick Launch page.
Adding New Headings to Quick Launch
Add a new heading to the Quick Launch as follows:
1. Navigate to the site that needs to be updated.
2. On the site’s home page, click the Site Settings option on the Site Actions menu.
3. On the Site Settings page, in the Look and Feel section, click on the Quick Launch link.
4. On the Quick Launch page, click the New Heading link.
5. On the New Heading page, enter the URL for the heading link, which is the link users will be
navigated to if they click on the heading in the Quick Launch, and enter the description,
which will act as the name for the heading. Then click the OK button.
Quick Launch is updated, and you are returned to the Quick Launch page.
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Adding New Links to Quick Launch
You can add a new link to the Quick Launch area using these steps:
1. Navigate to the site that needs to be updated.
2. On the site home page, click the Site Settings option on the Site Actions menu.
3. On the Site Settings page, in the Look and Feel section, click on the Quick Launch link.
4. On the Quick Launch page, click the New Link option.
5. On the New Link page, enter the following:
a. In the URL section, enter the URL for the new link and the description, which acts as
the name of the link.
b. In the Heading section, select the Quick Launch heading under which the link should
be placed.
c. Once all the information has been entered, click the OK button.
Quick Launch is updated, and you are returned to the Quick Launch page.
Editing Existing Quick Launch Headers and Links
Edit existing Quick Launch headers and links as follows:
1. Navigate to the site that needs to be updated.
2. On the site’s home page, click the Site Settings option on the Site Actions menu.
3. On the Site Settings page, in the Look and Feel section, click on the Quick Launch link.
4. On the Quick Launch page, click the edit icon in front of the heading or link you wish to
update.
5. On the Edit page, update the listed information, and click the OK button.
The Quick Launch is updated, and you are returned to the Quick Launch page.
Deleting Existing Quick Launch Headings and Links
You can also delete existing Quick Launch headings or links:
1. Navigate to the site that needs to be updated.
2. On the site’s home page, click the Site Settings option on the Site Actions menu.
3. On the Site Settings page, in the Look and Feel section, click on the Quick Launch link.
4. On the Quick Launch page, click the edit icon in front of the heading or link you wish to
delete.
5. On the Edit page, click the Delete button.
6. Click the OK button on the delete confirmation window.
Quick Launch is updated, and you are returned to the Quick Launch page.
nCaution
If you delete a Quick Launch heading that contains links, the links under the heading will also be
removed from Quick Launch. If you wish to delete a header with links without removing the links, you must move
the links under a different heading prior to deleting the heading.
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Customizing the Navigation Bar
When we talked about creating sites, we discussed how you can select if the navigation bar should
inherit its options from the parent site or if it should list the subsites under the current site. These
settings can be updated and the navigation bar can be further customized through the site management tools.
Updating Navigation Bar Inheritance Settings
To change the navigation bar’s inheritance settings:
1. Navigate to the site that needs to be updated.
2. On the site home page, click the Site Settings option on the Site Actions menu.
3. On the Site Settings page, in the Look and Feel section, click on the Top Link Bar link.
4. On the Top Link Bar page:
a. If the navigation bar is currently inheriting options from the parent site, click the Stop
Inheriting Links option.
b. If the navigation bar is currently not inheriting options from the parent site, click the
Use Links from Parent option.
The navigation bar is appropriately updated, and the Top Link Bar page is refreshed to reflect
the changes made.
Adding Links to the Navigation Bar
When the navigation bar is not being inherited from the parent site, you can customize the bar in
order to tailor the options to meet your site’s navigation needs. Add a new link to the navigation bar
as follows:
1. Navigate to the site that needs to be updated.
2. On the site’s home page, click the Site Settings option on the Site Actions menu.
3. On the Site Settings page, in the Look and Feel section, click on the Top Link Bar link.
4. On the Top Link Bar page, click the New Link option.
5. On the New Link page, enter the URL and description for the new link being added, and
click the OK button.
The link is added to the navigation bar, and you are returned to the Top Link Bar page.
Editing Links in the Navigation Bar
You can edit links in the navigation bar using these steps:
1. Navigate to the site that needs to be updated.
2. On the site’s home page, click the Site Settings option on the Site Actions menu.
3. On the Site Settings page, in the Look and Feel section, click on the Top Link Bar link.
4. On the Top Link Bar page, click the edit icon in front of the link to update.
5. On the Edit Link page, update the web address and description information appropriately,
and click the OK button.
The link is updated, and you are returned to the Top Link Bar page.
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Deleting Links in the Navigation Bar
Use the following steps to delete links in the navigation bar:
1. Navigate to the site that needs to be updated.
2. On the site’s home page, click the Site Settings option on the Site Actions menu.
3. On the Site Settings page, in the Look and Feel section, click on the Top Link Bar link.
4. On the Top Link Bar page, click the edit icon in front of the link to delete.
5. On the Edit Link page, click the Delete button.
6. Click the OK button on the delete confirmation screen.
The link is deleted, and you are returned to the Top Link Bar page.
Update Link Order in the Navigation Bar
You can update the order links appear in the navigation bar as well:
1. Navigate to the site that needs to be updated.
2. On the site’s home page, click the Site Settings option on the Site Actions menu.
3. On the Site Settings page, in the Look and Feel section, click on the Top Link Bar link.
4. On the Top Link Bar page, click the Change Order link to present the ordering options.
5. On the Top Link Bar page, update the link order values to reflect the desired order of the
links, and click the OK button.
The navigation bar is updated, and you are returned to the default view of the Top Link Bar page.
Setting the Portal Site Connection
Along with managing the other navigation features we have discussed, managers of a site collection
can also define a portal that the collection should be connected to. Linking your site collection to a
portal places a link to the portal in the global links bar on the sites in the collection. This provides
an easy way to navigate to the identified portal. This connection does not need to be made to a
SharePoint portal or site. You can specify any URL as the linked portal. For example, linking the site
to a portal would be valuable when the SharePoint environment is used to manage collaboration for
groups within the organization but a separate intranet or portal also exists. You can set that intranet
as the linked portal to provide users an easy way to navigate to the intranet from anywhere in the
SharePoint site hierarchy. Setting a link to a portal is also valuable in organizations having more
than one SharePoint environment; it will allow you to link the navigation between these environments together.
Set the portal site connection using this procedure:
1. Navigate to the top-level site.
2. From the site’s home page, click the Site Settings option in the Site Actions menu.
3. On the Site Settings page, in the Site Collection Administration section, click the Portal Site
Connection link.
4. On the Portal Site Connection page, select to connect to a portal site, enter the address of
the portal, and provide a name for the portal. The name is used as the display name in the
global links bar. Once all information is entered, click the OK button.
The portal site connection is added, and you are returned to the Site Settings page.
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Updating Site Themes
A site theme defines the font and color schemes for a site. Themes allow complete color and font
configurations to be stored together and applied through a single step. This ensures aesthetic consistency within the site. By default, individuals granted the Design or Full Control permission levels
have the ability to change site themes.
Change the theme on a site as follows:
1. Navigate to the site in which you need to change the theme.
2. On the site’s home page, click the Site Settings option in the Site Actions menu.
3. On the Site Settings page, in the Look and Feel section, click the Site Theme link.
4. On the Site Theme page, select the theme to be applied from the list, and click the Apply
button.
The selected theme is applied to the site, and you are returned to the Site Settings page.
Resetting Site Definitions
Over time, many customizations may be made to a site and the pages within the site. Some of these
customizations are made to the site’s look and feel to meet specific needs for the site. There are tools
available to make these types of changes, such as Microsoft SharePoint Designer 2007. When these
tools are used to make changes directly to the site pages, the pages can become unghosted. This
means that the edited pages are no longer based on the site definition that defines the page’s standard configuration and layout. Resetting the site definition allows you to reset the pages to leverage
the site definition. This will allow the site pages to again conform to the standard configuration and
layout of the environment.
Use the following steps to reset, or reghost, a page or site previously customized:
1. Navigate to the site containing the pages to be reset.
2. On the site’s home page, click the Site Settings option in the Site Actions menu.
3. On the Site Settings page, in the Look and Feel section, click the Reset to Site Definition link.
4. On the Reset Page to Site Definition page:
a. To reset a specific site page, select Reset Specific Page to Site Definition Version, and
type the URL of the page to reset.
b. To reset all pages in the site, select Reset All Pages in This Site to Site Definition Version.
c. Once the appropriate options are selected, click the Reset button.
The site page or entire site are reset, or reghosted, and you are returned to the Site Settings
page.
Configuring Regional Settings for a Site
SharePoint sites are designed to be used throughout an organization. As a result, there are times
when a site created within SharePoint is primarily used by individuals in time zones other than
where the SharePoint server is located. An example of this is a team located in California using a
SharePoint site to manage the resources for a project, but the SharePoint servers are located in the
company’s New York office. When this is the case, site managers may wish to update the regional
settings on the site, so that details, such as date and time, are displayed based on the users’ locale
instead of the location of the server. Change a site’s regional settings as follows:
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1. Navigate to the site where the settings need to be changed.
2. On the site’s home page, click the Site Settings option in the Site Actions menu.
3. On the Site Settings page, in the Site Administration section, click the Regional Settings link.
4. On the Regional Settings page, update the following as appropriate:
a. In the Locale section, set the world region where dates, numbers, and sort orders
should be based.
b. In the Sort Order section, specify the sort order to be used within the site.
c. In the Time Zone section, specify the standard time zone for the site.
d. In the Set Your Calendar section, specify the calendar format to be used within the site,
and identify if week numbers should be shown in the Date Navigator.
e. In the Enable An Alternate Calendar section, a secondary calendar can be specified,
allowing for the additional information provided in this calendar to be available in the
site.
f. In the Define Your Work Week section, specify the days making up the work week, and
identify the first day of the week, first week of the year, and the standard workday start
and end times.
g. In the Time Format section, specify if time should be displayed in 12-hour or 24-hour
format.
h. Once information has been appropriately updated, click the OK button.
The regional settings are updated, and you are returned to the Site Settings page.
Deleting Sites
There are two ways to delete existing sites. The first is to delete the site from within that site’s Site
Settings page:
1. Navigate to the site you wish to delete.
2. On the site’s home page, click the Site Settings option in the Site Actions menu.
3. On the Site Settings page, in the Site Administration section, click the Delete This Site link.
4. On the Delete This Site page, click the Delete button.
5. On the deletion confirmation window, click the OK button.
The site is deleted, and you are taken to the Your Web Site Has Been Deleted page.
The second way to delete a site is from the Sites and Workspaces page of the site’s parent; given
that you delete the site from within its parent, this method only works for deleting subsites, and it
cannot be used to delete a top-level site:
1. Navigate to the parent of the subsite you wish to delete.
2. On the site’s home page, click the Site Settings option in the Site Actions menu.
3. On the Site Settings page, in the Site Administration section, click the Sites and Workspaces
link.
4. On the Sites and Workspaces page, click the delete icon for the subsite to be deleted.
5. On the Delete This Site page, click the Delete button.
6. On the deletion confirmation window, click the OK button.
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The site is deleted, and you are returned to the Sites and Workspaces page. Sites can only be
deleted when they do not contain subsites. If there are subsites nested under the site being deleted,
you will be prompted with an error message when you try to delete the site.
nCaution
Deleting a site permanently removes the site and all of its content.
Managing Site Templates
As we discussed earlier in this chapter, when you create a new site or subsite, you select a template
as part of the creation process. The site template defines the initial set of components to include in
the site being created and defines the layout of the components in the new site. The template also
defines the structure and configuration of the components within the site and whether any content,
such as list values and documents, should be added as part of the new site being created.
Creating Site Templates
The templates we discussed earlier are default templates provided with WSS to create team sites,
document workspaces, wiki sites, meeting workspaces, and blog sites. Once you create a new site
based on one of the available templates and tailor the site to meet your specific needs, you can save
the updated site as a new template that can be used when additional sites are created. Templates
created in this way are available under the Custom tab in the Template Selection section when creating a new site. Any user assigned the Full Control permission level in a site can create and manage
site templates.
The templates that you create will be available for selection when sites are being created within
the same site collection where the site template was created. As we mentioned previously, the group
of sites nested within a single top-level site is a site collection.
An example of how site templates are used can be seen when you have a site called Budget
Planning that contains a subsite called 2007 Budget. You can update the 2007 Budget site to reflect
the layout needed to support yearly budget planning. We will discuss creating components and
editing page layouts in Chapters 4 through 9. Once the 2007 Budget site includes the desired structure and content, you can save it as a template. This template will then be available when other new
sites are created under the Budget Planning site. By saving the 2007 Budget site as a template, you
save yourself and others the future effort of having to perform the same customizations you made
to the 2007 Budget site when additional yearly budget sites are required. It also allows you to provide others with a starting point for creating yearly budget sites that include the layout and
components they will need within these sites. This helps to ensure that all of the yearly budget sites
have a consistent structure and that the structure contains the resources needed to properly support the budget planning process.
nNote
If your SharePoint environment contains multiple top-level sites, templates created within a site collection
will only be available within that same site collection unless a SharePoint technical administrator registers the
template for use across site collections or unless the template is copied into each site collection’s template gallery.
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To create a site template for use in the current site collection, follow these steps:
1. Navigate to the site you wish to save as a site template.
2. On the site’s home page, click the Site Settings option on the Site Actions menu.
3. On the Site Settings page, in the Look and Feel section, click the Save Site as Template link.
4. On the Save Site as Template page, enter the following:
a. In the File Name section, enter the name that will be used to save the template.
b. In the Name and Description section, enter the name for the template. This is the template name that will appear during the site creation process. You can also enter an
optional description for the template.
c. In the Include Content section, you can specify whether the content within the selected
site should be included in the site template. Content includes any documents and list
data that exist in the selected site. To include the content in the template, check the
Include Content check box. This option is not available for sites based on meeting
workspaces or wiki site templates.
d. Once all necessary information is entered, click the OK button.
nNote
When you choose to include content, only content within the current site is included. Subsites of the current site and content within these subsites are not included.
5. On the Operation Completed Successfully page, click the OK button.
A copy of the site is saved as a template, and you are returned to the Site Settings page. The new
site template is now available in the Template Selection section when people create new sites within
the same site collection.
Editing Site Templates
To edit a site template, you simply edit the site you originally used to create the site template or
create a new site from the existing template and make the edits to that site. Once the changes have
been made to the site, you create the new template by following the steps described previously. You
can then delete the old template from the Site Template Gallery. We will discuss deleting templates
in the “Deleting Site Templates” section later in this chapter.
Even though you cannot edit existing template files, you can edit the properties of these files.
The properties that can be edited include the file name, title, and description. Edit this information
for an existing site template as follows:
1. Navigate to the top-level site.
2. On the site’s home page, click the Site Settings option on the Site Actions menu.
3. On the Site Settings page, in the Galleries section, click the Site Templates link.
4. On the Site Template Gallery page, click the edit icon next to the name of the template you
wish to edit.
5. On the Site Template Gallery edit page, make any necessary updates to the template’s file
name, title, and description, and click the OK button.
The changes to the template are saved, and you are returned to the Site Template Gallery page.
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Deleting Site Templates
While you cannot remove the default site templates provided, you can delete any custom site templates created:
1. Navigate to the top-level site.
2. On the site’s home page, click the Site Settings option on the Site Actions menu.
3. On the Site Settings page, in the Galleries section, click the Site Templates link.
4. On the Site Template Gallery page, click the edit icon next to the name of the template you
wish to delete.
5. On the Site Template Gallery edit page, click the Delete Item link.
6. On the delete confirmation window, click the OK button.
The template is deleted, and you are returned to the Site Template Gallery page.
WSS Site Search
Sites include searching capabilities provided to help you easily find needed information. The search
tools are located in the title area of sites. The capabilities provided by the search tools are dependant
on whether only Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 is installed or whether both Windows SharePoint
Services 3.0 and SharePoint Server 2007 are in place.
When only WSS is installed, searching capabilities are limited to searching for information only
in the current site. This search allows for simple searching where text entered into the search box
will be used to perform a context-sensitive search locating documents, list items, libraries, and lists
having information that satisfies the search criteria. These searches will not span across sites or to
subsites within the current site.
WSS searches can be context sensitive, allowing you to select if you wish to search across the
entire site or in only the list or library currently being viewed. This is done by selecting between the
This Site or This List sources in the search area. The This List source is only available when you are
viewing list or list item details.
To perform a search, you select the This Site or This List option, enter the search text, and press
Enter or click the search icon. Documents, list items, libraries, and lists meeting the search criteria
will then be presented in the search results page.
When text is entered into the search box, the identified sources are scanned for inclusion of
the entered words. For example, if vacation schedule is entered into the search box, the identified
source will be scanned for the word “vacation” and the word “schedule” anywhere in the content,
title, and attributes. Any items located containing either word are returned. If you wish to search
for a phrase instead of just words, place the phrase in quotes in the search box. Continuing our
example, if “vacation schedule” is entered into the search box, content containing the phrase, not
just the individual words will be returned.
Working with Search Results
When you perform a search, the results that meet the search criteria are listed in the search results
page. Search results are listed with the name of the item returned along with the individual to last
edit the item. You can click any of the listed results to access the associated item.
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Managing Site Search Visibility
Site managers have the ability to determine the level of visibility search and indexing have within a
site. Managers can determine if materials within the site should be included in searches performed.
They also have the ability to determine if the site’s web pages (ASPX pages) should be included in
results. These pages can be omitted when the focus of the site is to manage documents, so only
managed documents should appear in the search results.
Manage search visibility for a site as follows:
1. Navigate to the site where you wish to manage the search visibility.
2. On the site’s home page, click the Site Settings option from the Site Actions menu.
3. On the Site Settings page, in the Site Administration section, click the Search Visibility link.
4. On the Search Visibility page, select the following:
a. In the Indexing Site Content section, select if the site should appear in the search
results.
b. In the Indexing ASPX Page Content section, select if the ASPX pages of the site should
be indexed. You can select to always have them indexed, never have them indexed, or to
not index ASPX pages when fine-grained permissions (list-or library-level permissions)
are used in the site.
c. Once the appropriate selections have been made, click the OK button.
The site visibility options are updated, and you are returned to the Site Settings page.
Using Site Statistics
Site statistics are provided for sites to allow you to review how your site is being used by site users
and to monitor the resources that your site is using. Statistical information about user access and
resource consumption is available to users assigned the Full Control permission level in the site.
nNote
For site statistic options to be available, a technical administrator of the SharePoint environment must
have enabled them for use in the SharePoint environment.
Site Usage Reports
Site usage data is available to allow you to evaluate how people are using your site. The types of
reports that are available for review are:
• Number of Hits per Page (Page Report): Includes details about how many times pages and
documents within your site have been accessed
• User Access Statistics (User Report): Includes information about how often each user is
accessing the site
• Operating System Access Statistics (OS Report): Includes information about the operating systems being used to access the site
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• Browser Access Statistics (Browser Report): Includes information about the browser being
used to access the site
• Referrer URL Statistics (Referrer URL Report): Includes the list of URLs from which users
accessing the site navigated
For each of these types of information, you can look at monthly statistics or daily statistics.
Monthly statistics will provide the following information:
• The total number of times the page has been accessed
• The number of times the page was accessed in the most-recent month it was accessed
• The date the page was last accessed
• The number of times the page was accessed on the last day it was accessed
Figure 2-23 shows a standard monthly site usage report showing the number of hits per page.
Figure 2-23. A monthly site usage report showing the number of hits per page
Daily statistics provide a daily breakdown of access volumes. Figure 2-24 shows a daily site
usage report detailing the number of hits per page.
Figure 2-24. A daily site usage report detailing the number of hits per page
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nNote
More detailed and comprehensive site usage reporting is available when MOSS is also in place. We will
discuss these additional reporting capabilities in Chapter 3.
Viewing Site Usage Statistics
View usage statistics for a site by following these steps:
1. Navigate to the site in which you want to view site usage information.
2. On the site’s home page, click the Site Settings option on the Site Actions menu.
3. On the Site Settings page, in the Site Administration section, click the Site Usage Report link.
4. On the Site Usage Report page, select the type of report from the Select Report drop-down
list, select either Monthly Summary or Daily, and click the Go button.
The selected report statistics are displayed.
Using Site Collection Usage Statistics
Site collection usage information provides some basic statistics about a site collection. As we mentioned earlier, a site collection is made up of all sites contained within the same top-level site. Site
collection usage statistics allow you to understand, at a high level, how your site collection is used
and how many resources the site collection is using within the SharePoint environment. The statistics that can be viewed are as follows:
• Storage information: Provides basic information about the storage space used by the site collection including the current space used, percentage of space used by web discussions, and
maximum storage allowed for the site
nNote
Site storage allocation limits can be configured to define the maximum amount of space a site or site collection can use. These settings must be configured by a technical administrator of the SharePoint environment.
• User information: Lists the number of users who have been added to the site collection and
provides any user account restriction details
• Activity information: Provides basic access statistics for the site collection including the total
number of times information within the site collection has been accessed and the bandwidth used on the last day the site was accessed
An example of how site collection usage statistics and the site usage statistics could be used
together would be when site administrators want to understand how effective their sites are and
where work should be spent to increase site effectiveness. Administrators can look at the site collection usage statistics to see how many hits their site collections are receiving. If administrators notice
a specific site collection is not being accessed as much as others, they can review the site usage statistics for the sites within the site collection to determine the sites not being used. This will help
them identify areas where work within the environment may be needed.
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Viewing Site Collection Usage Statistics
Use these steps to view site collection usage statistics:
1. Navigate to the top-level site in which you want to view site collection usage information.
2. On the site’s home page, click the Site Settings link on the Site Actions menu.
3. On the Site Settings page, in the Site Collection Administration section, click the Usage
Summary link.
The Site Collection Usage Summary page is presented listing the site collection usage information
as seen in Figure 2-25.
Figure 2-25. A site collection usage summary
Viewing Site Hierarchy
From a top-level site, you can view the entire hierarchy within a site collection; this allows you to
view the entire structure of a site collection without having to manually traverse the sites in the site
collection. You can view the site hierarchy as follows:
1. Navigate to the top-level site in which you want to view site collection usage information.
2. On the site’s home page, click the Site Settings link on the Site Actions menu.
3. On the Site Settings page, in the Site Collection Administration section, click the Site Hierarchy link.
The Site Hierarchy page is presented listing the URLs and titles for all sites in the current site
collection. You can go directly to any of the listed sites by clicking the site’s URL. Figure 2-26 depicts
a site hierarchy.
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Figure 2-26. The site hierarchy
Managing Site and Site Collection Features
Along with all of the site capabilities we have been discussing, you also have the ability to enable and
disable specific site features within the SharePoint sites, and you have the ability to enable and disable specific site collection features in the overall site collection. Many site features are introduced
with MOSS that can be managed in this way, which we will discuss in Chapter 3. WSS provides only a
single site feature and a single site collection feature that can be activated or deactivated. Activate or
deactivate site features as follows:
1. Navigate to the site where the feature needs to be managed.
2. On the site’s home page, click the Site Settings link on the Site Actions menu.
3. On the Site Settings page, in the Site Administration section, click the Site Features link.
4. On the Site Features page, click the Activate/Deactivate button to activate or deactivate the
feature.
The feature status is changed.
The Team Collaboration Lists site feature, active by default, can be managed. This feature determines if document libraries and lists should be made available within the site. For site collections,
the Three-State Workflow feature, disabled by default, is available to be managed; it can be used to
enhance the tracking and management of items in a list. Use the following procedure to activate or
deactivate site collection features:
1. Navigate to the top-level site for the site collection where the feature needs to be managed.
2. On the site’s home page, click the Site Settings link on the Site Actions menu.
3. On the Site Settings page, in the Site Collection Administration section, click the Site Collection Features link.
4. On the Site Collection Features page, click the Activate/Deactivate button to activate or
deactivate the feature.
The feature status is changed.
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Recycle Bin
SharePoint 2007 includes Recycle Bin capabilities that can be used to review and, if necessary, restore
items previously deleted from SharePoint. Items that can be restored include documents, list entries,
document libraries, and lists. Deleted items are placed in the Recycle Bin until they are manually
purged from the Recycle Bin or until they have been in the Recycle Bin for a set number of days,
defined by a technical SharePoint administrator. Figure 2-27 depicts the Recycle Bin.
Figure 2-27. The Recycle Bin
The SharePoint Recycle Bin provides another level of protection as well. When a user within a
site deletes an item from the Recycle Bin, the item is placed in the site collection’s Recycle Bin where
it is listed for the set number of days defined by the technical SharePoint administrator or until it is
manually deleted from the site collection’s Recycle Bin. This allows site collection administrators a
higher level of control over managing deleted items and helps ensure information is properly protected from inappropriate deletions.
Viewing Items in the Recycle Bin
Site users can view items placed in a site’s Recycle Bin by clicking the Recycle Bin link in the Quick
Launch bar of team sites, document workspaces, and wiki sites. Clicking this link takes you to the
Recycle Bin page that lists all of the items in the Recycle Bin. Meeting workspaces and blog sites do
not include the Recycle Bin link on their home pages. To access the Recycle Bin from within these
sites, you must navigate to a list or library details page and click the Recycle Bin link from Quick
Launch within these pages.
Site collection administrators have the added ability to view a complete list of items in all sites’
Recycle Bins in a site collection through the site collection administration tools on the top-level site.
The site collection Recycle Bin tools provide a single view of all elements in site Recycle Bins within
the site collection. Access this consolidated Recycle Bin view as follows:
1. Navigate to the top-level site.
2. On the site’s home page, click the Site Settings option in the Site Actions menu.
3. On the Site Settings page, in the Site Collection Administration section, click the Recycle Bin
link.
The Site Collection Recycle Bin page is presented; it lists all items located in all of the sites’ Recycle Bins. This allows site collection administrators to manage deleted items from within a single view.
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Site collection administrators are also provided the ability to view the items removed from the
sites’ Recycle Bins. This is also done through the Site Collection Recycle Bin page by selecting the
Deleted from End User Recycle Bin view. This allows administrators to restore items previously
purged from the sites’ Recycle Bins.
Restoring Items from the Recycle Bin
To restore items from the site Recycle Bin or the site collection Recycle Bin, follow these steps:
1. Navigate to the Recycle Bin page or the Site Collection Recycle Bin page as described
previously.
2. Check the check boxes in front of the items to restore, and click the Restore Selection link.
3. On the restoration confirmation window, click the OK button.
The items selected are restored, and the Recycle Bin page is updated to reflect the change.
Deleting Items from the Recycle Bin
Use these steps to delete items from the site Recycle Bin or the site collection Recycle Bin:
1. Navigate to the Recycle Bin page or the Site Collection Recycle Bin page as described
previously.
2. Delete items:
a. To delete select items in the Recycle Bin or site collection Recycle Bin, check the check
boxes in front of the items to delete, and click the Delete Selection link.
b. To delete all items in the site collection Recycle Bin, click the Empty Recycle Bin link.
3. On the deletion confirmation window, click the OK button.
The selected items are deleted from the Recycle Bin, and the Recycle Bin page is updated to
reflect the changes.
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SharePoint Server 2007
M
icrosoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 (MOSS) builds on the foundation provided by Windows
SharePoint Services 3.0. MOSS consists of a set of applications and shared services that extend the
WSS capabilities and introduce the following additional functionality:
• Provide comprehensive enterprise information management
• Incorporate information and applications into business processes
• Enable employees, partners, and/or customers to effectively work together
• Provide the platform services necessary to support creating information worker business
solutions
The capabilities provided by MOSS are melded directly into the Windows SharePoint Services 3.0
platform, which seamlessly integrates them with the existing services provided by WSS.
In this chapter, we will build on our discussions from Chapter 2 by detailing the enhancements
and additional capabilities introduced by MOSS. We will discuss how to effectively use these capabilities and how to configure and manage them to meet your specific needs.
MOSS Portals
When SharePoint Server 2007 is included as part of your SharePoint environment a SharePoint technical administrator can select to create a new portal not only from the site templates we discussed in
Chapter 2 but from several additional MOSS site templates and two portal templates as well. MOSS
site templates are available when creating additional sites in an existing SharePoint environment,
and we will discuss these later in this chapter. The portal templates, however, are only available to
the technical administrator when creating a new site collection.
There are two portal templates available to the technical administrator, and discussing and
understanding their capabilities are important, as they determine the overall look of the environment and govern the capabilities initially provided to site users. These two portal templates are the
Collaboration Portal and the Publishing Portal templates.
Collaboration Portal
A collaboration portal is a portal created using the Collaboration Portal template. This portal includes
an initial site structure designed to be the starting point for a company intranet. Figure 3-1 depicts the
collaboration portal home page.
When a new portal is created using the Collaboration Portal template, several sites are included
in the new site hierarchy; these sites provide various capabilities to support a corporate intranet. We
will discuss each of these sites, describing its purpose and structure, starting with the collaboration
portal home site, which acts as the home page, or entry point, into the SharePoint environment.
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Figure 3-1. The default collaboration portal
nNote
If a site administrator has made any major alterations to these sites, the information provided here may
differ slightly from your environment.
Collaboration Portal Home Site
When you first access a collaboration portal you go to its home page. This page is located in the
home site, which is the top-level site in the portal site hierarchy. This site is designed to be your
gateway into the SharePoint environment. When a collaboration portal is created, the home site
contains the following information:
• Welcome and getting started material references
• Sample news links (we will discuss news in the “News” section later in this chapter.)
• “I need to” task selections to help you get started
• Employee Lookup search (we will discuss searching for people in the “MOSS Search” section
later in this chapter.)
• Top Sites listing (we will discuss top sites in the “Site Directory” section later in this chapter.)
Figure 3-1 shows the standard collaboration portal home page.
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Document Center
The document center is a prebuilt site based on the MOSS Document Center site template. We will
discuss MOSS site templates later in this chapter. The Document Center site is designed to support
enterprise-wide document storage and management. The site includes the components needed to
support a high volume of documents being managed. Figure 3-2 shows the default document center site.
Figure 3-2. The document center site
The components included in a document center follow:
• Documents: This is a document library meant to store the documents that will be added to
the site. This library is preconfigured with versioning enabled and document checkout being
required before the documents can be edited.
• Announcements: This announcements list is included to allow for the management of newsworthy information related to the documents being managed within the document center site.
• Tasks: This task list is used to track tasks related to the management of the included documents.
The documents, announcements, and tasks lists are all managed through the standard SharePoint list and library management tools. We will discuss these tools in detail in Chapters 4 through 6.
News
The News site is a prebuilt MOSS site based on the News site template. This site is designed as a
central place to manage company news. Figure 3-3 depicts the default News site.
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Figure 3-3. The default News site
The News site includes components that allow for the tracking and presentation of several
types of news. This site includes the following items:
• News Articles: Libraries and pages allowing for the creation and management of news articles.
These libraries are also configured as RSS sources allowing the items to be made available to
RSS news readers.
• RSS Viewer: An RSS viewer allowing for the presentation of syndicated news located within
the SharePoint environment or in external sources.
• Contact Details: A web part allowing for the identification of contacts responsible for the
news information.
• News Links: Web links provided to reference news related materials in other locations.
• This Week in Pictures: A picture library and web parts allowing you to store and present a visual
record of important events. You can create graphical slide shows that site users can view.
All of these news tools are brought together to allow the central management and display of all
classifications of news. This provides users with a single location where they can gain access to any
company or industry news regardless of the news format.
News Articles
News items created within the News site are stored and managed in the Pages library. This library is
designed to manage all site pages (web pages) being created for use in the News site. To access the
Pages library, click the View All Site Content link in the Quick Launch area, and click the Pages link
in the Document Libraries section of the All Site Content page.
When viewing the Pages library, you can select to create a new article and then select from a list
of several page layouts to use as the template for creating the new article. These pages can include
content, images, and web parts organized into several different types of layouts. Items added to this
library must be published and approved prior to being made available to site users. You can configure this publishing process to meet your organization’s news publishing requirements. Once an
item is published, it will be listed in the Quick Launch area of the News site, and the most recently
published article will be presented on the News site home page. We will discuss publishing and
approving documents in document libraries in Chapter 6.
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This Week in Pictures
This Week in Pictures allows you to present a slide show of images capturing events in picture form.
To manage This Week in Pictures, you add pictures to the Image Library picture library located in
the News site or create a new picture library to store pictures to be included in the slide show. You
then edit the This Week in Pictures web part, selecting the appropriate library containing the images
to include in the slide show. Site users will be able to walk through the slide show to view all pictures
contained in the associated library. We will discuss managing web parts in more detail in Chapter 8.
News Links
The News web part listed in the News site is used to present links to news-related items. By default,
this web part includes a reference to the News Archive page. You can add additional news links that
can reference any available URL. This could include references to documents or News sites within
your organization or references to news information on the Internet. To add a new link to the News
web part, follow these steps:
1. On the News home page, select the Edit Page option from the Site Actions menu.
2. In the News web part, click the New Link option, as shown in Figure 3-4.
Figure 3-4. Editing the News web part
3. In the News Link window, provide the following information:
a. Select either the “Create a Link to an Item” or the “Create a Link to a Person” option.
b. If creating a link to a person, also enter the ID for the desired person. You can either enter
the ID and click the check name icon to verify the information entered corresponds to a
valid Active Directory user or select the browse icon to browse through the Active Directory for the desired person.
c. Enter the title and description for the link.
d. Enter the URL to the item, and select if the URL should open in a new window.
e. Enter an optional tooltip, image reference, and image description.
f. Select the group for the link, if any groups are available, and the link style.
g. Once all of the necessary information has been entered, click the OK button.
The news link is created, and you are returned to the News page.
You can also create groups, which appear as headers in the News web part. Links are placed
under these headers when they are created, as we described previously, or by editing existing links.
To create a new group, follow these steps:
1. On the News home page, select the Edit Page option from the Site Actions menu.
2. In the News web part, click the New Group link, as shown in Figure 3-4.
3. In the New Group window, enter the name for the new group, and click the OK button.
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The group is created and added to the News web part.
To edit existing news items or categories while the page is in edit mode, you can click the edit
link in front of the item to edit and update any necessary information. You can also reorder the links
and headers by clicking the Reorder link and using the reordering tool shown in Figure 3-5.
Figure 3-5. The Reorder Links window
Finally, with the News links, you can select the style and layout for the listed items. The style
and layout determines how the items will be displayed on the page. The layout options available to
edit are the style of new and existing links, the style of group headers, and the number of columns
to use for listing groups. Follow these steps to configure the News links style and layout:
1. On the News home page, select the Edit Page option from the Site Action menu.
2. In the News web part, click the Configure Styles and Layout link.
3. On the Configure Styles and Layout window, make the following selections:
a. Select the style for new links.
b. Select if you wish to change the style of existing links, and if so, select the desired style.
c. Select the group headers style.
d. Select the number of columns to present groups in.
e. Once all options have been appropriately updated, click the OK button.
The Configure Styles and Layouts window is closed, and the News web part is updated to
reflect the changes you made.
RSS News
The RSS News Viewer on the News site is used to present syndicated news feeds. This viewer can be
used to show information from SharePoint lists configured as RSS sources or any external RSS news
source. We will discuss configuring lists as RSS sources in Chapter 4. The RSS News Viewer web part
is a standard web part available in MOSS for use in any site. We will discuss MOSS web parts in
more detail in Chapter 8.
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Publishing News Page Changes
By default, the News home page is stored in the News site’s Pages library. This library is configured
with document versioning and content approval enabled. When changes are made to the News
home page, they must be published before they will take effect in the site. We will discuss page
publishing and approval in Chapter 8. For the purposes of our discussion here, as a site manager,
you can publish the News home page changes by clicking the Publish button at the top of the
content area.
Reports
The Reports site is a prebuilt report center site. This site is designed to provide the tools necessary
to present analytical information to site users. The Reports site is configured to present the following information:
• Key Performance Indicators (KPIs): Analytics used to track performance progress against
identified goals
• Dashboards: Provide report summaries for quick review
• Reports: Physical documents that provide detailed reporting information
Figure 3-6 depicts the default Reports site.
Figure 3-6. The Reports site
The setup and configuration of a report center site require the initial assistance of a SharePoint
technical administrator who can configure necessary connections to data sources that KPIs, dashboards, and reports will leverage. The report center site contains all of the lists and libraries needed
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to configure these items once the data connections have been created. This site also includes a
Sample KPIs list, which can be updated to meet your KPI needs or used as an example when creating your own KPI lists.
Search Site
The Search site supports the enterprise searching capabilities provided by MOSS. This site contains
the pages used when searches are performed and results are presented. You can tailor these sites to
meet your organization’s searching needs. Figure 3-7 depicts the default Search page.
Figure 3-7. The Search site
The Search site contains the following pages used to support MOSS enterprise searching:
• Advanced: This is the default Advanced Search page for SharePoint, which is presented when
the Advanced Search link is clicked in the title bar of site pages.
• Default: This is the default page for the Search site, shown in Figure 3-7.
• People: This is the default People Search page for the Search site presented when you click
the People link in the default Search page or the Advanced Search page.
• People Results: This is the page that presents search results after a people search has been
performed.
• Results: This is the page that presents search results after a standard or advanced search is
performed.
We will discuss performing searches and working with search results later in this chapter.
Site Directory
The Site Directory site is presented when you click on the Sites link on the navigation bar. This site
is used to organize and reference subsites created in the SharePoint environment. Figure 3-8 shows
the Site Directory default view.
There are three default views of sites available within the Site Directory: Categories (shown in
Figure 3-8), Top Sites, and the Site Map. These views reside on separate pages within the site and are
provided to list available sites in different ways in order to help users locate sites that they may need.
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Figure 3-8. The Site Directory Categories page
Categories Page
When sites are created in a MOSS environment, they can be assigned to site categories. These category assignments can be used to group sites by the assigned category values. By selecting a listed
value, you can view the sites assigned the value for the corresponding category. These site category
assignments can be updated through the Site Directory if needed. This is done by changing the site
references saved in the Sites list in the Site Directory. We will discuss the Sites list in more detail later
in this chapter. Figure 3-8 depicts the default Site Directory Categories page.
The Categories page lists the available categories and allows you to click a category value in
order to view the associated sites. Site managers have the ability to manage these site categories to
modify the listed categories and category values. Site categories and the sites associated with the
categories are managed within the Sites list in the Site Directory site. Site Categories are columns in
the Sites list. By adding new columns to the list or by editing the existing columns, you can tailor the
site categories available when creating sites. To update existing site category assignments, you
would change the associated details in the Sites list entries. The changes to the information in this
list will be reflected in the Categories page and in the Category section of the site creation process.
Top Sites Page
The Top Sites page provides the second Site Directory view. This page lists sites flagged as Top Sites. You
might want to mark a site as a Top Site when it is frequently needed or if it is new to the environment.
Site Map Page
The third Site Directory page is the Site Map. This page lists all of the sites referenced in the Sites list.
The purpose of this map is to present the entire site structure as it is defined in the Sites list. This can
provide site users with a blueprint of the overall environment. The Sites list should be configured to
contain all relevant links to site resources, so that the map is as accurate as possible.
On the Site Map page, links are also available to create a new site or to create a new entry in the
Sites list.
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nNote
By default, when you create a new site using the Create Site link in the Site Directory, the site will be created as a subsite under the Site Directory site. This is often not where you would want to create subsites. Technical
administrators have the ability to change this setting.
Publishing Portal
The Publishing Portal is the second type of portal template available to technical administrators
when they are creating a new SharePoint portal. This portal includes a structure designed to support Internet or intranet sites focused on information publishing and consumption. This portal has
site and site collection features enabled to support an information publishing–centric solution and
is designed to allow for easy creation of web-based content.
The publishing portal, shown in Figure 3-9, has a very different look than the collaboration
portal we discussed previously. The publishing portal is also different in that, by default, users are
only able to create subsites within it based on the Publishing Site with Workflow template. All other
templates are disabled.
When a publishing portal is created, it includes only two default subsites: a press release site and
a search site. In this section, we will discuss these sites as well as the publishing portal home site.
Figure 3-9. The default publishing portal
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Publishing Portal Home Site
When you go to the home page of a publishing portal you are presented with the site shown in
Figure 3-9. The only element initially visible on the home page is text listing the key management
tasks necessary to configure your publishing site. However this site page also includes several components on the home page that support the publishing of web content. These items initially do not
contain any data, so they are not initially visible. These components allow you to add content to the
site home page and add links to other available information. These linking capabilities are provided
through the use of two Summary Links web parts included on the page. The components included
on the publishing home page can be seen in Figure 3-10.
Figure 3-10. The publishing portal content area
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The publishing portal home page also includes a press releases viewing web part that presents
these items located in the Press Release subsite. You can manage this information and add additional
content as necessary. We will discuss updating site pages and managing web parts in Chapter 8.
Press Release Site
The Press Releases site in a publishing portal is provided to allow you to manage press releases and
make them available to site users. The Press Release site includes a content area where press release
text can be entered, and like the home page, it includes two places where you can add summary
links that can be used to navigate to additional items. Figure 3-11 depicts the Press Release site.
Figure 3-11. The Press Release site
Search Site
The Search site within a publishing portal is only made accessible by performing a search using the
search tools at the top of the publishing portal home page. There is no link to this site in the navigation menu the way there is in the collaboration portal we discussed earlier. You access this site by
performing a search. Figure 3-12 depicts the Search site default page.
Figure 3-12. The Search site
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The Search site in the publishing portal provides similar capabilities as the Search site in the
collaboration portal in that you can view search results and perform either a simple or advanced
content search. The main difference between these two search sites is that the publishing portal
Search site does not include the ability to perform a people search.
MOSS Navigation Enhancements
In Chapter 2, we discussed the various elements available in WSS sites that can be used to support
users navigating within and between sites. As part of that discussion, we explained how to use and
manage both the site navigation bar and the Quick Launch area. When MOSS is part of your SharePoint environment, these tools are enhanced, providing additional usage capabilities as well as
additional customization options. In this section, we will discuss each of these navigation enhancements in detail.
Navigation Bar
Without MOSS in your environment, the navigation bar lists only the subsites contained within an
existing site, as we described in Chapter 2. You have the ability to inherit the options from the parent
site or list the subsites under the site currently being viewed. Beyond that, your customization of the
navigation bar without MOSS is limited to adding, editing, and removing the links that are listed.
When your SharePoint environment includes MOSS, the navigation bar is enhanced to provide
drop-down menu capabilities. The navigation bar drop-down menus are available by default when
you create your SharePoint environment based on the Collaboration Portal template and allow you
to hover over a menu option in the navigation bar to present a list of items contained within the
highlighted site. This can be seen in Figure 3-13. Listing nested items in this way provides quicker
access to these resources.
Figure 3-13. MOSS navigation bar
The navigation bar drop-down menu can be configured to show any combination of lists,
libraries, and subsites located within a listed site. You can specify if only subsites should be displayed or if other types of site content items should be included, and you can tailor the listed items
individually as well. We will discuss managing these navigation elements later in this chapter.
Site Actions Menu
We discussed the Site Actions menu in Chapter 2; this menu is different for sites created from the
MOSS site templates, as shown in Figure 3-14.
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Figure 3-14. The MOSS Site Actions menu
The MOSS Site Actions menu provides you with more direct access to several of the available
site management features than the WSS Site Actions menu does. These alterations are designed to
provide faster access to some of the most frequently needed site management functions. This menu
also exposes some additional capabilities introduced as part of MOSS. The additional options available in the MOSS Site Actions bar follow:
• Edit Page: This option places the page in edit mode, allowing you to update the information
made available.
• Create Page: A link is available enabling you to create a new page within the current site.
Selecting this link will take you to the Create Page screen, where you can enter the necessary
information to create a new site page. This page will be created in the Pages document
library. We will discuss managing pages in detail in Chapter 8.
• Create Site: A link is available to initiate the process of creating a new site within the current
site. Selecting this option will navigate you to the New SharePoint Site page, where you can
enter the information necessary to create a new site under the current site.
• Show Page Editing Toolbar: This option is used to present the page editing bar that includes
the options necessary to manage the current page. This bar is available for any page that
requires content management and approval for publishing. We will discuss managing pages
and the page editing toolbar in Chapter 8.
• View All Site Content: This option can be used to navigate to the All Site Content page, similar
to clicking the View All Site Content link in the Quick Launch area.
• View Reports: This option includes a submenu of options that enable you to view content
information related to you:
• Checked Out to Me: Presents documents and pages checked out to the current user in
the current site and all subsites.
• Last Modified by Me: Presents documents and pages that the current user last modified
in the current site and all subsites.
• Pending Approval: Includes documents and pages that the current user has submitted
for approval but that are still pending final approval in the current site and all subsites.
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• My Tasks: Lists all tasks assigned to the current user in this site and its subsites.
• All Draft Documents: Lists all of the documents and pages in this site and its subsites
that are pending approval before being published for use by site users.
• Going Live Within Next Seven Days: Lists all documents and pages in this site and its subsites
that have been approved and are scheduled to be published within the next seven days.
• Expiring Within Next Seven Days: Lists all documents and pages in this site and all subsites that are scheduled to expire within the next seven days.
• Site Settings: While this option is available in the WSS Site Action menu, on MOSS pages, this
option includes a submenu allowing for one-click access to several of the site management
options. The options available in the submenu follow:
• Modify All Site Settings: Navigates you to the Site Settings page.
• People and Groups: Takes you directly to the People and Groups page.
• Modify Navigation: Takes you directly to the Site Navigation Settings page. We will discuss this page and modifying navigation options in more detail later in this chapter.
• Modify Pages Library Settings: Takes you directly to the Customization screen for managing the Pages library in the current site. This is the library created to hold site pages.
• Manage Content and Structure: Navigates you to the Site Content and Structure page, where
you can manage your overall SharePoint site structure. We will discuss the Site Content and
Structure page in more detail later in this chapter.
nNote The Site Actions menu for sites created from the WSS site templates we discussed in Chapter 2 will initially appear as we described in Chapter 2. Activating the Office SharePoint Server Publishing site feature will
change the Site Actions menu so that it includes the options we have described here.
Quick Launch
With MOSS in place, items listed in the Quick Launch area are more customizable than they are with
just WSS. You still have the ability to add, edit, and remove items from Quick Launch as we discussed
in Chapter 2, but site administrators are also given the ability to determine if the Quick Launch area
should do the following:
• Display the same navigation items as the parent site: The Quick Launch area will list the same
items as its parent’s Quick Launch area.
• Display the current site, the navigation items below the current site, and the current site’s siblings: The Quick Launch area will list sites that are children of the same parent site as the
current site.
• Display only the navigation items below the current site: Quick Launch items for the current
site should be listed as they are in WSS-only SharePoint environments.
These options allow you to tailor the Quick Launch area based on the needs of the site. We will
describe how to make this update in the “Navigation Management” section of this chapter.
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Navigation Management
The customizations that can be made to the navigation bar and the Quick Launch area that we have
been discussing are all made through a single Navigation Settings management screen in your
MOSS environment. The options that can be updated through the Navigation Settings page include:
• Subsite and Page Display Options: Allows you to select if links to subsites and pages available in
the site should be automatically placed in the navigation bar. When this option is set, the navigation bar selections will include drop-down menus listing the subsites under the listed sites.
• Sort Method: Used to determine if navigation headers and links within the site should be
automatically sorted alphabetically or if sorting should be done manually.
• Global Navigation Display: Identifies if the navigation bar displayed in the site should be
inherited from the site’s parent or if it should list the subsites under the current site.
• Current Navigation Display: Used to determine if Quick Launch should inherit its listed
items from the parent site, list the current site’s siblings, or list the items contained within
the current site.
• Navigation Item Editing and Sorting: Allows you to edit the navigation headers and links that
will be made available in the navigation bar and the Quick Launch area. This includes the
ability to add, edit, and delete links and headers from these locations. The navigation bar
editing options will only be available for editing when the site is not inheriting its navigation
bar from its parent site.
Use the following steps to update these navigation options:
1. Navigate to the site where you wish to manage the navigation.
2. Navigate to the Site Settings page.
3. On the Site Settings page, in the Look and Feel section, click the Navigation link.
4. On the Site Navigation Settings page, update the following items as necessary:
a. In the Subsites and Pages section, identify if subsites and pages should be displayed in
the navigation bar.
b. In the Sorting section, identify if the navigation options in the site should be automatically sorted or manually sorted.
c. If sorting is set to automatic, in the Automatic Sorting section, select the item attribute
to sort by and the desired sort order.
d. For non-top-level sites, in the Global Navigation section, identify if the global navigation
should be inherited from the parent site or if it should list items under the current site.
e. For non-top-level sites, in the Current Navigation section, identify if the Quick Launch
area should be inherited from the parent site, if it should list the current site and its siblings, or if it should list items within the current site.
f. In the Navigation Editing and Sorting section, use the options provided in the Global
Navigation section, if included, and the Current Navigation section to manage the listed
navigation items. This can include reordering available options if manual sorting is
enabled and adding, editing, or deleting headers or links.
g. Once all options have been appropriately updated, click the OK button.
The navigation updates are saved.
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nCaution
Deleting a header in the Navigation Editing and Sorting section will also remove all items contained
within the header. If you wish to keep the items listed under a header that will be deleted, you need to move the
items under a different header before deleting the header.
MOSS Search
MOSS provides extensive content indexing and searching capabilities to a SharePoint environment.
These capabilities allow users to search for and find sites, documents, people, and site content
(such as lists, libraries, list items, and documents) and any other indexed enterprise content (such
as public folders or network file shares) that are pertinent to their needs. Users can perform simple
searches and advanced searches.
Performing Simple Searches
MOSS simple searches work similarly to WSS only searches in that you select the content across
which to search, called a content source, and enter the search criteria into the search box on the
page. A content source is a defined set of information sources.
The main difference between the WSS search and the MOSS simple search is that the MOSS
search allows for searching across all SharePoint indexed content, not just the information in the
current site. This indexed content can include information stored in SharePoint as well as any other
information in the enterprise being indexed by SharePoint. SharePoint can index content in SharePoint, Exchange, file server shares, databases, and web sites. By default, a simple search will search
across all available content sources.
Performing Advanced Searches
Clicking the Advanced Search link in the search area of a site page takes you to the Advanced Search
page. The advanced search allows you to find content using more refined search options and criteria. The Advanced Search page allows you to perform two types of advanced searches: site searches
and people searches. The site search allows you to locate content within your environment based
on a refined set of searching options. The people search allows you to search for people based on a
refined set of searching options.
The advanced search also allows you to the select specific types of items (such as specifying that
the author is Tony Smith or the title contains the words “Yearly Budget” for site searches or that the
department is Human Resources for people searches). Figure 3-15 shows the Advanced Search page.
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Figure 3-15. The Advanced Search page
To perform an advanced search, follow these steps:
1. Navigate to the Advanced Search page by clicking the Advanced Search link on a site’s page.
2. For site searches, on the Advanced Search page, enter the appropriate search criteria
information:
a. Enter text in the appropriate search box, depending on if the search should be across all
words entered, exact phrasing, any word entered, or none of the words entered.
b. Select the search scopes over which to search.
c. Select the types of objects over which to search.
d. Enter the search property restrictions. This is used to identify the attributes of the items
to search across and the values to search for. When specifying search properties, you
must select the type of constraint to use. For example, if you are looking for all materials
authored by Tim, you would select the Author property, choose the Contains constraint,
and type Tim into the search box.
e. If you want to search across more than one property, select And or Or after the entered
search property, and enter an additional property into the next property line. The And
option identifies that content should be returned only if both constraints are met, while
the Or option specifies that content should be returned if any constraint is met.
3. For People searches, click the People tab, and either enter the details to search in the general
search box or click the Search Options link and enter the appropriate search criteria information including any combination of First Name, Last Name, Department, Title, Responsibilities,
Skills, and Memberships.
4. Once all search requirements have been entered, click the Search button to perform the
search.
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The search results page will be presented containing references to all items satisfying the
search criteria.
Working with Search Results
Whether you perform a simple or advanced MOSS search, the results that meet the search criteria are
listed on the search results page. Search results are listed with the name of the item returned along
with the author, the date the item was last modified, and a view of sections in the item containing the
entered text. You can click any of the listed results to access the associated item. You can also click the
Alert Me link to configure an alert for the search that was performed. We will discuss alerts in more
detail in Chapter 9.
Search Scopes
Search scopes define a subset of indexed content to search across. They are used to limit the content
across which a search is performed. For example, search scopes would be useful if a company’s legal
department frequently searches for contracts and contract amendments and these items are stored
within a specific set of locations either in SharePoint or some other indexed locations. To help the
legal group, so that when they perform a search they do not get back items in locations other than
the contract and amendment stores, you can configure a search scope that only includes the locations where these items are known to be saved. This will allow the legal staff to select this scope when
performing a search, automatically limiting the returned items to items in the defined locations.
Search scopes can be selected for simple or advanced searches, as we discussed previously.
They are managed by site collection administrators from the Site Settings page of the top-level site.
Creating Search Scopes
To create a new search scope, follow these steps:
1. Navigate to the Site Settings page for the top-level site in the portal.
2. On the Site Settings page, in the Site Collection Administration section, click the Search
Scopes link.
3. On the View Scopes page, click the New Scope link.
4. On the Create Scope page, provide the following information:
a. In the Title and Description section, enter the title for the new search scope. This title is
the name used to list the search scope in the simple and advanced search screens. You
can also enter an optional search scope description.
b. In the Display Groups section, select the display groups in which the search scope
should be displayed. By default, you can select to present the search scope in the Search
drop-down, and you can select to present the search scope in the Advanced Search.
c. In the Target Results Page section, you can select the search results page to use when
searching against the search scope. You have the option to either use the default search
results page or enter the path to a separate search results page.
d. Once all information has been entered, click the OK button.
5. On the View Scope page, click the Edit Properties and Rules link for the newly listed search
scope.
6. On the Scope Properties and Rules page, in the Rules section, click the New Rule link.
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7. On the Add Scope Rule page, provide the following information:
a. In the Scope Rule Type, select the type of rule to add. Rules are used to identify the content across which an associated search should be performed.
b. For Web Address Rules, in the Web Address section, select the type of web address to
enter, and enter the address. You can use the Web Address section to define a network,
web, or exchange public folder source. These items can be entered as a folder path, a
host name, or a domain name.
c. For Property Query Rules, in the Property Query section, select the property to use to
determine the scope and the value for the property to search across.
d. For Web Address and Property Query Rules, in the Behavior section, select the rule conditions as results being included that match unless excluded by another rule, all items
included must match the rule, or that items matching this rule should be excluded.
e. Once all information has been appropriately entered, click the OK button.
You are returned to the Scope Properties and Rules page, and a search scope update is initiated.
After the next content indexing cycle, the search scope will be made available as defined when you
created it.
You can also create a new search scope by making a copy of an existing search scope. This is
done by hovering over a listed search scope on the View Scope page and clicking the Make Copy
option from the drop-down item’s list. You can then edit the copy of the scope created.
Editing Search Scopes
Follow these steps to edit a search scope:
1. Navigate to the Site Settings page for the top-level site in the portal.
2. On the Site Settings page, in the Site Collection Administration section, click the Search
Scopes link.
3. On the View Scopes page, hover over the search scope to edit, and click the Edit Properties
and Rules link.
4. On the Scope Properties and Rules page, do as follows:
a. To update Scope Settings, click the Change Scope Settings link in the Scope Settings
section. In the Edit Scope section, update the listed information as appropriate, and
click the OK button.
b. To update rules, you can click an existing rule to update the rule. You can click the New
Rule link to create a new rule. Click the Delete All rules link to remove all existing rules.
The search scope is updated, and you are returned to the Scope Properties and Rules section.
Deleting Search Scopes
To delete a search scope, follow these steps:
1. Navigate to the Site Settings page for the top-level site in the portal.
2. On the Site Settings page, in the Site Collection Administration section, click the Search
Scopes link.
3. On the View Scopes page, hover over the rule to delete, and select the Delete option.
4. On the deletion confirmation screen, click the OK button.
The Search Scope is deleted, and the View Scopes page is updated to reflect the change.
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Search Keywords and Best Bets
Search keywords enable site collection administrators to create definitions for specific words or
phrases. These definitions are displayed when a site user performs a search including the keywords
in the search criteria. Keywords enable an organization to present important details about specific
topics.
Created keywords can be enhanced by associating Best Bet links. Best Bets are references to
specific materials that are related to keywords. Best Bet links are listed on the search results page
when a search’s criteria include the associated keywords. Best Bets allow an organization to assign
important relevant materials to specific possible search phrases to make sure important items are
prominently displayed.
For example, keywords and Best Bets would be valuable when you know people will perform
searches for travel expense policies. You can create a keyword called “travel expenses” and associate
Best Bet links that reference the travel expenses policy site and a the travel reimbursement system.
By doing this, you are guaranteeing that searches containing the phrase “travel expenses” will
prominently list links to the travel expense policy site and the travel reimbursement system.
Adding Search Keywords
To add a search keyword, follow these steps:
1. Navigate to the Site Settings page for the top-level site in the portal.
2. On the Site Settings page, in the Site Collection Administration section, click the Search Keywords link.
3. On the Manage Keywords page, click the Add Keyword link.
4. On the Add Keywords page, enter the following information:
a. In the Keyword Information section, enter the keyword phrase and any synonyms for
the entered phrase.
b. In the Best Bets section, to add Best Bets, click the Add Best Bet link; enter the Best Bet
URL, title, and description into the Add Best Bet window, and click the OK button. You
can then order the Best Bet options that you have added.
c. In the Keyword Definition section, you can enter optional text to display along with
keywords on the search results page.
d. In the Contact section, enter the name of the contact person for the keywords. This is
the individual to contact if the review date is passed.
e. In the Publishing section, enter the Start Date, the optional End Date identifying when
the keywords should be available in the search results, and the Review Date when the
keywords should be reviewed by the contact.
f. Once all information has been entered, click the OK button.
The keyword is entered, and you are returned to the Manage Keywords page.
Editing Search Keywords
Edit an existing search keyword as follows:
1. Navigate to the Site Settings page for the top-level site in the portal.
2. On the Site Settings page, in the Site Collection Administration section, click the Search Keywords link.
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3. On the Manage Keywords page, hover over the keyword to edit, and click the Edit option.
4. On the Edit Keyword page, update the following information as necessary:
a. In the Keyword Information section, update the keyword phrase and any synonyms for
the entered phrase.
b. In the Best Bets section, to add Best Bets, click the Add Best Bet link; enter the Best Bet
URL, title, and description into the Add Best Bet window; and click the OK button. To
remove a Best Bet, click the Remove link next to the Best Bet that you want to remove.
To reorder Best Bets, change the Order value.
c. In the Keyword Definition section, you can update the optional text to display along
with keywords on the search results page.
d. In the Contact section, update the name of the contact person for the keywords.
e. In the Publishing section, update the Start Date, the optional End Date identifying
when the keywords should be available in the search results, and the Review Date when
the keywords should be reviewed by the contact.
f. Once all information has been updated appropriately, click the OK button.
The keyword is updated, and you are returned to the Manage Keywords page.
Deleting Search Keywords
To delete a search keyword, follow these steps:
1. Navigate to the Site Settings page for the top-level site in the portal.
2. On the Site Settings page, in the Site Collection Administration section, click the Search Keywords link.
3. On the Manage Keywords page, hover over the keyword to delete, and click the Delete option.
4. On the deletion confirmation screen, click the OK button.
The keyword is deleted, and the Manage Keywords page is refreshed to reflect the change.
Searchable Columns
By default in a SharePoint environment, all list and library columns are searched across when a
search is performed. Site administrators can select list and library columns within specific sites that
should not be included in searches. This allows you to track information in a list or library column
but not have that information used when searches are performed. As an example, this would be
useful when a list or library has a general comment field expected to contain information that, if
searched within, would result in inappropriate items returned. By removing this field from the
searchable columns, you ensure the information it contains will not contaminate search results.
Use the following steps to update searchable columns:
1. Navigate to the Site Settings page for the site where you wish to update column searching.
2. On the Site Settings page, in the Look and Feel section, click the Searchable Columns link.
3. On the Search Settings for Fields page, check or uncheck the NoCrawl box in front of the
appropriate listed columns, and click the OK button.
The searchable columns are updated, and you are returned to the Site Settings page.
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Search Settings
Site collection administrators also have the ability to change general search settings within the
SharePoint environment. This includes identifying if custom scopes and Search Center features
should be made available and identifying what page to use as the search results page. By default,
custom scopes and the Search Center are enabled in a SharePoint environment.
To modify the search settings, follow these steps:
1. Navigate to the Site Settings page for the top-level site.
2. On the Site Settings page, in the Site Collection Administration section, click the Search
Settings link.
3. On the Search Settings page, you can select to use Search Center or the standard search
results page. Next, click the OK button.
The search settings changes are saved, and you are returned to the Site Settings page.
Managing Site Look and Feel
In Chapter 2, we discussed how you can tailor the look and feel of your SharePoint environment by
leveraging site templates, updating the site logo, and changing site themes. MOSS provides additional look and feel management tools that give you more control over the layout of your SharePoint
environment. These tools allow you to perform the following actions:
• Define a custom welcome page: The welcome page is the page presented as the portal home
page when you navigate to a site.
• Restrict site and page templates that can be used within a site: You can force users to use only
a subset of the available site templates when creating sites or page layouts when adding
pages within a site.
• Select from additional site templates provided as part of MOSS: Several new site templates
that provide varied looks are introduced with MOSS.
• Set master pages used by sites: Master pages are the core site and page definitions used to
determine pages’ overall layout and design.
Defining the Welcome Page
The welcome page is the initial page displayed when you navigate to a site. MOSS provides capabilities to SharePoint that allow you to select the site’s welcome page. Instead of the initial page being
the site’s default.aspx page, you can have the entry page be any other page created within the site.
In fact, the initial welcome pages for many of the MOSS sites we mentioned earlier are not the standard default.aspx pages, instead they are pages located in the Pages library within the site. Being
able to change the welcome page for a site to be a page within a site library allows you to apply content approval and management rules to this page as you would other site content.
To update the default welcome page for a site, follow these steps:
1. Navigate to the Site Settings page for the site where you wish to update the welcome page.
2. On the Site Settings page, in the Look and Feel section, click the Welcome Page link.
3. On the Site Welcome Page screen, enter the URL for the welcome page for the site, or click
the Browse button to select the appropriate page. Next, click the OK button.
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The site welcome page is updated, and you are returned to the Site Settings page.
nNote
Updating the welcome page within a site is only available when the Office SharePoint Server Publishing
feature is active. We discussed managing site features in Chapter 2 and will discuss the additional site features
provided with MOSS later in this chapter.
Page Layouts and Site Templates
MOSS gives site owners the ability to control page layouts and site templates used within a site
when creating pages and subsites. For page layouts, you can choose if people creating new pages
can select from any available layout or if only specific page layouts should be made available for
use. You can also determine if subsites under the current site should be limited to using the specified page layouts. This capability is useful in situations where the site should only contain a specific
type of content, such as press release sites. For press release sites, you can restrict the available page
templates to include only those meeting your organization’s press release formatting requirements.
With site templates, you have a similar ability as with page layouts in that you can select if subsites created under the current site can leverage any of the available site templates or if only specific
site templates should be made available for use. You can also determine if these settings should be
inherited by subsites under the current site. These capabilities are useful when you need to delegate
site creation rights to users but want to restrict their options. An example where this would be the
case is when you have an Enterprise Projects site under which users will create a site to manage
each project. You can create a template for project sites that includes the resources that should be
included as part of a project site. You can then restrict the list of available site templates in the
Enterprise Projects site to only the project site template you created. This ensures all project sites
will be created based on the appropriate template.
Follow these steps to update page layout and site template settings:
1. Navigate to the Site Settings page for the site where you wish to update the page layouts and
site templates settings.
2. On the Site Settings page, in the Look and Feel section, click the Page Layouts and Site Templates link.
3. On the Page Layout and Site Template Settings page, do the following:
a. In the Subsite Templates section, select “Subsites can use any site template” or “Subsites
can only use the following site templates”, and choose the templates that should be
made available. You can also indicate if you want to reset all subsites to inherit these
preferred subsite template settings.
b. In the Page Layouts section, select “Pages in this site can use any layout” or “Pages in
this site can only use the following layouts”, and choose the layouts that should be
made available. You can also indicate if you want to reset all subsites to inherit these
preferred page layout settings.
c. Once all of the options are appropriately updated, click the OK button.
The page layout and site template settings are saved, and you are returned to the Site Settings
page.
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nNote
The page layout and site template options are only available when the Office SharePoint Server Publishing Infrastructure site collection feature is enabled. We discussed managing site collection features in Chapter 2.
We will discuss the site collection features introduced with MOSS later in this chapter.
Master Pages and Style Sheets
Master pages define the general structure and layout of SharePoint site pages. SharePoint pages are
designed to leverage master pages, so that sets of pages can have the same structure and layout and
so that any changes to this structure and layout can be made in a central place. The changes made
will apply to all of the associated pages. When you make a change to a master page, such as adding a
logo or changing the page format, that change is reflected across all of the site pages that are associated with that master page.
Style sheets are used in conjunction with master pages to define the specific color schemes,
fonts, and backgrounds used in the site pages. Site managers have the ability to change the style
sheet used by a site to change the colors, fonts, and backgrounds within the site. This allows site
managers to easily update SharePoint to conform to their organization’s corporate identity.
Update master pages and the style sheet for a site as follows:
1. Navigate to the Site Settings page for the site where you wish to update the master page and
style sheet settings.
2. On the Site Settings page, in the Look and Feel section, click the Master Page link.
3. On the Site Master Page Settings page, make the following selections:
a. In the Site Master Page section, select the master page to use in this site, and select if all
subsites should inherit this Site Master Page setting.
b. In the System Master Page section, select the master page to use for form and view
pages within the site, and select if all subsites should inherit this System Master Page
setting.
c. In the Alternate CSS URL section, specify if the default style sheet should be used for the
site or if an alternative style sheet should be used. If you specify to use an alternative
style sheet, you must specify the file to reference and select if you want to reset all subsites within this site to use the defined alternate style sheet.
d. Once all of the necessary changes have been made, click the OK button.
The changes you made are saved, and you are returned to the Site Settings page.
MOSS Site Templates
In Chapter 2, we discussed the standard Team Site, Document Workspace, Wiki Site, Meeting Workspace, and Blog Site templates. When MOSS is introduced, additional site templates are also made
available. These MOSS templates are provided to assist in the creation of sites that combine various
SharePoint capabilities to meet specific purposes. In this section, we will discuss these MOSS templates, their purposes, and their layouts. In some cases, we have already seen sites based on MOSS
site templates. These sites were included as the standard sites created as part of the collaboration
and publishing portals.
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Document Center Template
Earlier in this chapter, we discussed the Document Center site that is created as part of the collaboration portal; Figure 3-2 shows the Document Center site. The Document Center template allows
you to create sites designed to be central locations to manage documents. These sites include
resources and configurations that support managing large volumes of content.
The content area of a site created from the Document Center template is broken down into a
left and right zone where the content elements are placed. Figure 3-16 shows the content area structure of a document center site.
Figure 3-16. A Document Center site content area
The Document Center site template includes the components listed in Table 3-1.
Table 3-1. Document Center Template Components
Item
Type
In Quick Launch
In Content Area
Documents
Document library
Yes
No
Announcements
Announcements list
No
Yes (left zone)
Tasks
Tasks list
Yes
Yes (left zone)
Relevant Documents web part
N/A
Yes (left zone)
Libraries and Lists
Web Parts
Relevant Documents
Records Center Template
The Records Center site template is used to create sites designed to track and store all types of company records. These records may be in the form of documents or e-mail correspondence. This site is
configured to receive e-mail messages or have documents directly uploaded.
Records center sites contain the resources necessary and are structured to enable you to configure rules that will allow items added either via e-mail or directly posted to be properly
categorized and routed to the appropriate storage locations. This is handled using the SharePoint
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document workflow capabilities. A record center site includes a Records Routing list that can is used
to identify the types of records that will be tracked and the routing rules content should follow. This
site also contains several libraries where the content can be routed based on its status:
Hold Reports: Location for items that should be held before final processing. Reports may need
to be held for a variety of business reasons, such as waiting for a date to be reached or for some
final, required business approval before it can be released.
Missing Properties: Location for items that are missing attributes. These items require a review
by individuals who have the information needed to populate the missing attributes before the
item continues through its routing process.
Records Pending Submission: Location for routing records that are waiting on final submission.
Unclassified Reports: Location for storing items that do not meet any record routing rules. These
are items that fall outside of the expected records or that cannot be automatically classified.
These libraries, in conjunction with their supporting lists within the site, are used to categorize
and route records. Their information is verified to make sure it is accurate and complete prior to
being placed in a final storage location. To configure proper routing of information into these various libraries or other libraries you might create within a Record site, you would use the SharePoint
workflow capabilities to create the appropriate routing rules. We will discuss the SharePoint workflow capabilities in detail in Chapter 7.
Figure 3-17 shows the default Record Center site, and the components that make up this site
are listed in Table 3-2.
Figure 3-17. A Record Center site
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Table 3-2. Record Center Template Components
Item
Type
In Quick Launch
In Content Area
Hold Reports
Document library
No
No
Missing Properties
Document library
No
No
Records Pending
Submission
Document library
No
No
Unclassified Reports
Document library
Yes
No
Holds
Custom list
Yes
No
Links
Links list
No
Yes (right zone)
Record Routing
Custom list
Yes
Yes (left zone)
Records Center
Announcements list
No
Yes (left zone)
Submitted E-mail
Records
Announcements list
No
No
Tasks
Tasks list
Yes
No
Libraries and Lists
The Record Center site template includes a two-zone content area (with a left and a right zone),
similar to that of the Document Center template. This area contains the items needed to get you
started working with a record center. Figure 3-18 depicts the content area of a Record Center site.
Figure 3-18. A Record Center site content area
Personalization Site Template
The Personalization Site template is used to create a site that presents information specific to the
user accessing the site. You can configure a personalization site to target information to specific sets
of users. This is done by creating personalized views of available information. Personalization sites
provide easy access to the current user’s My Site by placing a link to their My Site in the site’s navigation bar. Personalization sites can also be pinned to your My Site making them available in the My
Site’s menu bar. We will discuss My Site and personalization features in more detail in Chapter 9.
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The creation of the personalized views of information in the personalization site is handled
through filters you apply within the site. The initial configuration of these sites includes an initial
set of filters. Figure 3-19 depicts the default layout of a personalization site, and Table 3-3 describes
the elements making up a personalization site.
Figure 3-19. A personalization site
Table 3-3. Personalization Site Template Components
Item
Type
In Quick Launch
In Content Area
Documents
Document library
No
No
Images
Document library
No
No
Pages
Document library
No
No
Workflow Tasks
Tasks list
No
No
Current User Filter
N/A
Yes (top zone, hidden)
Libraries and Lists
Web Parts
Current User Filter
Profile Property Filter
Current User Filter
N/A
Yes (top zone, hidden)
What are
Personalization Sites
Content Editor
N/A
Yes (left zone)
Contact Details
Contact Details
N/A
Yes (right zone)
A personalization site’s content area is made up of a four-zone structure used to store and manage information. This structure includes a top zone, left and right zones below the top zone, and a
bottom zone located below all of the other zones. This structure allows for significant flexibility when
organizing information within the site. Figure 3-20 depicts the content area for a personalization site.
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Figure 3-20. A personalization site content area
Site Directory Template
The Site Directory template can be used to create a site used to list and categorize sites within the
SharePoint environment. We discussed the site directory created as part of the default collaboration
portal earlier in this chapter. In that section, we described the general breakdown of the site directory and the following three default views of sites provided in the site directory:
• Categories: Lists the categories and category values to which sites have been assigned and
allows for the selection of a category value to view the associated sites
• Top Sites: Lists the sites that have been flagged as Top Sites or sites that are of note
• Site Map: Used to view a list of all available sites within the environment
Figure 3-8 depicts the default layout of the site directory, and Table 3-4 lists the components
making up the site directory.
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Table 3-4. Site Directory Tempate Components
Item
Type
In Quick Launch
In Content Area
Libraries and Lists
Documents
Document library
No
No
Images
Document library
No
No
Pages
Document library
No
No
Sites
Sites list
No
No
Tabs
Tabs list
No
No
Workflow Tasks
Tasks list
No
No
Yes (header zone)
Web Parts
Contact Details
Contact Details
N/A
Categories
Categories Tool Part
N/A
Yes (left zone, Categories tab)
Top Sites
Content Query
Tool Part
N/A
Yes (left zone, Top Sites tab)
Site Map
Table of Contents
N/A
Yes (left zone, Site Map tab)
A site directory site is designed to show different pages based on the tab selected. The tab bar,
the site description, and the page name information all fall outside of web part zones in the content
area. This means that these items cannot be moved or removed from the page. However, web part
zones are also available that allow these pages to be customized. Figure 3-21 shows the content area
for the site directory.
Figure 3-21. A site directory content area
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Site links are managed through the Sites list, which is updated through the normal site creation
process or by adding or editing entries in the Sites list directly. We discussed updating this list in the
Collaboration Portal section earlier in this chapter.
Report Center Template
The Report Center template is designed to allow you to create sites focused on presenting reports and
other analytics to site users. Report center sites provide the tools to accomplish the following tasks:
• Manage and present key performance indicators
• Create dashboards to present important analytics and information
• Store and present static reports that exist as saved files
Report center sites include samples of dashboards and KPIs to assist you in configuring these
sites to present relevant reporting information. We discussed the report center created as part of the
collaboration portal earlier in this chapter. Figure 3-6 depicts the default report center site, and
Table 3-5 lists the components making up a report center site.
Table 3-5. Report Center Components
Item
Type
In Quick Launch
In Content Area
Data Connections
Data Connections Library
Yes
No
Documents
Document library
No
No
Images
Document library
No
No
Pages
Document library
No
No
Libraries and Lists
Reference Library
Document library
Yes
No
Reports Library
Document library
No
No
Announcements
Announcements list
No
Yes (top-left zone)
Report Calendar
Calendar list
Yes
Yes (right zone)
Sample Dashboard
KPI Definitions
Custom list
No
No
Sample KPIs
KPIs list
No
Yes (right zone)
Workflow Tasks
Tasks list
No
No
Content Editor
N/A
Yes (top-left zone)
Contact Details
Contact Details
N/A
Yes (right zone)
Highlights
Summary Link Tool Part
N/A
Yes (right zone)
Web Parts
Using the Report Center
The Report Center template provides a high degree of customization by including several different web part zones where content can be placed on the page. Figure 3-22 depicts the report
center content area and its web part zone breakdown.
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Figure 3-22. A report center site content area
Search Center Template
The Search Center site template is used to create sites that enable users to perform SharePoint
searches. The Search Center template creates a site that allows basic searches to be performed. We
discussed the search center when we discussed the Search site that is part of the default publishing
portal earlier in this chapter. Figure 3-12 shows the default search center site.
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The search center does not include any lists or libraries; it simply includes the search web part
allowing users to perform basic SharePoint searches and to review search results. You can, however,
customize the search center site. It contains two web part zones in which content can be placed.
Figure 3-23 depicts the search site content area.
Figure 3-23. A search center site content area
Search Center with Tabs Template
Similar to the Search Center site template, the Search Center with Tabs site template allows for the
creation of sites used to perform SharePoint searches. This template, however, also includes a tab
set that allows for not only performing a SharePoint site search but also provides the ability to perform a people search. This capability is provided through the People tab available on a search
center with tabs site.
We discussed the search center with tabs site when we described the Search site that is part of
the default collaboration portal earlier in this chapter. The search capabilities provided by this portal are based on the Search Center with Tabs site template. Figure 3-7 shows the default layout of a
search center with tabs site, and Table 3-6 lists the components included in a search center with
tabs site.
Table 3-6. Search Center with Tabs Site Content
Item
Type
In Quick Launch
In Content Area
Documents
Document library
No
No
Images
Document library
No
No
Pages
Document library
No
No
Tabs in Search Page
Tabs list
No
No
Libraries and Lists
Tabs in Search Results
Tabs list
No
No
Workflow Tasks
Tasks list
No
No
Search Box
N/A
Yes (top zone)
Web Parts
Search Box
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A search center with tabs site can be customized by adding web parts to one of the two available web part zones. Figure 3-24 depicts the search center with tabs site content area.
Figure 3-24. A search center with tabs site content area
Publishing Site Template
The Publishing Site template is designed to allow you to create web pages that contain web content.
They enable site owners to easily enter information to be presented as normal web pages within the
site. Figure 3-25 depicts the default layout of a publishing site.
Figure 3-25. A publishing site
While this site appears to have no content in the content area, there are, in fact, several elements
located on the page that facilitate the creation of web-centric content. These items include a location
to enter text that should be presented on the site and two summary link items that allow you to create
and manage links used to reference other materials. Figure 3-26 depicts the content area configuration of a publishing site.
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Figure 3-26. A publishing site’s content area
Publishing sites also contain several components that can be used to assist in the creation of
web content pages. Table 3-7 lists the components making up a publishing site.
Table 3-7. Publishing Site Content
Item
Type
In Quick Launch
In Content Area
Documents
Document library
No
No
Images
Document library
No
No
Pages
Document library
No
No
Workflow Tasks
Tasks list
No
No
Page Image
Page Image
N/A
Yes (not in zone)
Page Content
Content Editor
N/A
Yes (not in zone)
Summary Links
Summary Links Tool Part
N/A
Yes (not in zone)
Summary Links 2
Summary Links Tool Part
N/A
Yes (not in zone)
Libraries and Lists
Web Parts
As you can see in Figure 3-26, there are several web parts available on the publishing site that
are not in web part zones, as listed in Table 3-7. Since these items exist outside of the web part zones,
they cannot be moved or removed from the page. These items allow you to add images to the page,
enter the content to be presented on the page, and create links to other resources.
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Publishing Site with Workflow Template
The Publishing Site with Workflow template is used similarly to the Publishing Site template to create
sites designed to present web-based content. However, the Publishing Site with Workflow template
extends these capabilities by providing the resources needed when content must be approved before
it is made available. This includes requiring content to be approved and published before it is made
available to site users. Once you create a site from this template, you can configure the appropriate
approval workflow to manage the content approval process. We will discuss workflow management
in more detail in Chapter 7.
While this template provides additional capabilities beyond the Publishing Site template, the
site layout and components included as part of this template are the same as those created as part
of the Publishing Site template.
News Site Template
The News site template is used to create a site for managing news. This template provides items to
manage all types of news including RSS feeds, entered news articles, links to news, and news photos. We discussed the News site and the capabilities it provides in the collaboration portal section
earlier in this chapter, and Figure 3-3 depicts the default layout of a News site.
The News site includes the components listed in Table 3-8 to support the entry and management of these various types of news elements.
Table 3-8. News Site Components
Item
Type
In Quick Launch
In Content Area
Document library
No
No
Libraries and Lists
Documents
Images
Document library
No
No
Pages
Document library
No
No
This Week in
Pictures Library
Picture library
No
Yes (right zone)
Workflow Tasks
Tasks list
No
No
Recent News
Content Query Tool Part
N/A
Yes (top zone)
News Roll Up
Content Query Tool Part
N/A
Yes (middle-left zone)
RSS Viewer
RSS Viewer
N/A
Yes (middle-left zone)
Contact Details
Contact Details
N/A
Yes (right zone)
News
Summary Links Tool Part
N/A
Yes (right zone)
Web Parts
A News site is designed to allow you to organize news items in a way that makes sense within
your organization. To facilitate this, the site contains several web part zones where content can be
placed, allowing for information to be arranged in many different formats. Figure 3-27 depicts the
content area structure for the News site.
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Figure 3-27. A News site’s content area
Site Creation
We discussed the site creation process in Chapter 2. However, when MOSS is in place, there are several alterations made to SharePoint to extend the capabilities of the site creation process to support
some of the additional features provided by MOSS.
The first alteration to the site creation process is that, when MOSS site templates are in use,
sites created from these templates include the MOSS Site Actions menu that includes the Create
Site option allowing for one-click access to the New SharePoint Site creation page. We discussed the
MOSS Site Action menu earlier in this chapter.
Additionally, when MOSS is in place, the site creation process includes the assignment of Site
Categories to the site being created. As we discussed earlier, Site Category assignments allow sites to
be logically grouped within the site directory. When sites are created, the site details along with
these site category assignments are stored within the Sites list in the site directory site.
Earlier in this chapter, we discussed the site directory site, which is created as part of a collaboration portal. You can also create a site directory site using the Site Directory template, as we discussed
previously. Changing the structure of the Sites list located in the site directory by adding or removing
columns will update the site category selection options available when creating new sites. For example, if you do not want a Region value to be assigned to sites when they are created, you can delete this
column or rename it something more appropriate. When you create a new site after this change, the
Region column will no longer be listed. We will discuss editing list structures in detail in Chapter 4.
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Site collection administrators have the ability to configure the following site directory capabilities within the portal:
• Identify the site containing the site directory and Sites list for the portal.
• Specify if site category assignments are mandatory.
• Configure site creation rules for sites created within the site directory. This includes determining if the sites created in this location are subsites in the current site structure or new site
collections.
To update these site directory details, follow these steps:
1. Navigate to the Site Settings page for the top-level site.
2. On the Site Settings page, in the Site Collection Administration section, click the Site Directory Settings link.
3. On the Site Directory Settings page, do the following:
a. In the Site Directory Location section, enter the site directory path.
b. In the Site Creation Metadata section, select if listing new sites in the Site Directory
should be enforced. Also select if site categories are not mandatory, if only one site category is mandatory, or if all site categories are mandatory.
c. In the Site Collection Creation section, select if sites created in the Site Directory should
be new site collections.
d. Once all the information has been appropriately updated, click the OK button.
The updates to the Site Directory are saved.
nNote
To select site collections to be created in the site directory, a SharePoint technical administrator must
have enabled self-service site creation capabilities in Central Administration. If these capabilities are not enabled,
the Site Collection Creation option is disabled and cannot be changed.
Site Content and Structure Management
MOSS introduces administrative tools that allow sites owners to view their SharePoint site, list, and
library resources in a single tree structure. These resources can also be managed directly from this
same location. This is done through the use of the Site Content and Structure management screen
shown in Figure 3-28.
Access the Site Content and Structure page as follows:
1. Navigate to the Site Settings page for the site you wish to manage.
2. On the Site Settings page, in the Site Administration section, click the Content and Structure
link.
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Figure 3-28. The Site Content and Structure page
You are taken to the Site Content and Structure page. This page provides a comprehensive tree
view of the site collection hierarchy listing all sites, lists, and libraries within the environment. From
here, you can manage the site, list and library resources as follows:
• Navigate to any of the listed sites.
• Select to create new sites, lists, or libraries within a specific site.
• Delete a listed site.
• Make a copy of a listed site to a specified location.
• Move a listed site to a specified location.
• View the site’s Recycle Bin.
• Access the site’s management resources, including Site Settings, People and Groups,
Advanced Permissions, and General Settings.
All of these options are available as selections on the listed site’s drop-down menu, as shown in
Figure 3-29.
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Figure 3-29. The site’s drop-down menu on the Site Content and Structure page
From the Site Content and Structure page, you also have several management options available
for managing lists and libraries:
• Navigate to the default view of a list or library.
• Create a new entry in a list, upload a new document in a library, or create a new folder in a
library.
• Delete a list or library.
• Access a list’s or library’s properties page.
All of these options are available as selections on the list’s or library’s drop-down menu, as
shown in Figure 3-30.
Figure 3-30. The list’s drop-down menu on the Site Content and Structure page
Usage Reports and Auditing
MOSS extends the site and site collection usage reporting capabilities we discussed in Chapter 2
by introducing more comprehensive and graphical reports. MOSS also introduces SharePoint auditing capabilities allowing you to track and report on a wide variety of actions within the SharePoint
environment.
nNote
For site or site collection usage reports to be available, a technical SharePoint administrator must have
enabled usage logging in the SharePoint Central Administration tools, and at least one report compilation cycle
must have been executed.
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Site Usage Reports
MOSS site usage reporting provides extensive statistics and graphical analytics. These reports are
designed to provide you with an understanding of how your SharePoint site is being used and who
is using it. There are several site usage reports available. We will discuss each of these reports and
the statistics they provide. To access the site usage reports, follow these steps:
1. Navigate to the Site Settings page in the site you wish to view usage information.
2. On the Site Settings page, in the Site Administration section, click the Site Usage Reports link.
You are navigated to the Site Usage Summary Report page.
Many of the reports that list access details, such as the Top Requests (per 30 days) section of the
Site Requests report page, allow you to export the listed information to either Excel or PDF format.
This is done using the report options bar shown in Figure 3-31.
Figure 3-31. The report options bar
To export the listed information, you simply select the format, Excel or “Acrobat (PDF) file”,
from the “Select a format” drop-down list and click the Export option. The report will be packaged
into the selected format, and you will be prompted to save the report file.
The report options bar also allows you to do a quick search in the associated details for specific
text. This search finds the first occurrence of the entered text and highlights it.
Site Usage Summary Report
The site usage summary report, shown in Figure 3-32, includes statistics designed to provide usage
access volume statistics and a high-level summary of how your site is being used. This report
includes the following information:
• Site summary: Lists the average number of requests per day for the last 30 days, the number
of distinct users to visit the site over the last 30 days, the number of distinct users to visit in
the last day, and the number of requests in the past day
• Requests per day (past 30 days): Graphically depicts request volumes per day for the last 30 days
• Top Pages (Average requests per day over past 30 days): Lists the pages most frequently
accessed over the last 30 days
• Top Users (Average requests per day over past 30 days): Lists the users who have most frequently accessed the site in the past 30 days
• Top referring hosts (past 30 days): Graphically charts the top hosts from which users navigated when accessing the site over the past 30 days
• Top referring pages (past 30 days): Graphically charts the top URLs from which users navigated when accessing the site over the past 30 days
• Top destination sites (past 30 days): Graphically charts the top URLs to which users navigated
from the current site over the past 30 days
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Figure 3-32. The site usage summary report
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Site Requests Report
The site requests report is presented when you click the Requests link from the Site Usage Reports
list in the Quick Launch area when viewing any of the site usage reports. This report, shown in Figure 3-33, provides details about the access requests made for information in the site and includes
the following information:
• Requests per day (past 30 days): Graphically charts the site access request volume per day for
the last 30 days
• Average requests per day by month: Graphically charts the average daily request volume per
month for the past year
• Top pages (Average requests per day over past 30 days): Lists the pages in the site most frequently requested over the past 30 days
Figure 3-33. The site requests report
Site Collection Users Report
The site collection users report is made available by clicking the Users link from the Site Usage
Reports list. This report, shown in Figure 3-34, is provided to present details about the users accessing the environment and includes the following statistics:
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• Unique users (past 30 days): Graphically charts the number of unique users to access the site
per day over the last 30 days
• Average unique users per day by month: Graphically charts the average daily number of
unique users to access the site for each month over the last year
• User activity (past 30 days): Lists the users that have accessed the site in the last 30 days,
ordered by frequency of access
Figure 3-34. The site collection users report
Site Referrers Report
The site referrers report is presented by clicking the Referrers link in the Site Usage Reports list. This
report presents details about the sites from which users navigated when accessing this site. Figure 3-35
depicts the Site Referrers report. This report includes the following statistics:
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• Top referring hosts (past 30 days): Graphically charts the top hosts from which users have
navigated when accessing the site. The hosts are listed in frequency order.
• Top referring pages (past 30 days): Graphically charts the top URLs from which users navigated when accessing the site. These items are also listed in frequency order.
Figure 3-35. The site referrers report
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Site Destination Pages Report
The site destination pages report is accessed by clicking the Destination Pages link in the Site Usage
Reports list. This report, shown in Figure 3-36, provides details about the sites to which users have
navigated from this site and includes the following statistics:
• Top destination sites (past 30 days): Graphically charts the sites to which users most frequently navigated from the current site in the last 30 days
• Top destination pages (past 30 days): Graphically charts the pages to which users most frequently navigated from the current site in the last 30 days
Figure 3-36. The Site destination pages report
Site Home Page Report
The site home page report, shown in Figure 3-37, is viewed by clicking the Home Page link in the
Site Usage Reports list. This report provides site home page access statistics. The report includes the
following statistics:
• Site home page requests (past 30 days): Graphically depicts the number of visits to the site
home page per day for the last 30 days.
• Average daily home page requests (past 365 days): Graphically depicts the average number of
daily home page accesses by month for the last 12 months.
• Site home page unique users (past 30 days): Graphically depicts the number of unique individuals that have accessed the site home page each day for the last 30 days.
• Average daily unique users on home page (past 365 days): Graphically depicts the average
daily number of unique visitors to the home page by month for the last 12 months.
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• Referrers to home page (past 30 days): Lists the pages from which users have navigated when
accessing the site home page for the last 30 days. Items are ordered based on frequency.
• Destination pages from home page (past 30 days): Lists the pages to which users navigated
from the site home page for the last 30 days. Items are ordered based on frequency.
Figure 3-37. The site home page report
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Site Collection Usage Reports
In the same way that site usage reports allow you to view statistics about the usage of a specific site,
the site collection usage reports allow you to view usage statistics for an entire site collection. This
enables you to analyze the overall environment’s usage. The report statistics provided by the site
collection usage reports are, in many cases, the same as those provided at the site level. In this section, we will describe the available site collection usage reports.
To access the site collection usage reports, follow these steps:
1. Navigate to the Site Settings page for the top-level site in the site collection.
2. On the Site Settings page, in the Site Collection Administration section, click the Site Collection Usage Reports link.
The site collection usage summary report is presented.
Site Collection Usage Summary Report
The site collection usage summary report is very similar to the site usage summary report we discussed earlier. This report provides overall site collection usage statistics. The following statistics are
contained within this report:
• Site collection summary: Lists the following overall analytics about the usage of the site
collection:
• Average requests per day over the past 30 days
• Distinct users over the past 30 days
• Distinct users yesterday
• Requests yesterday
• Queries yesterday
• Queries over the past 30 days
• Top pages (Average requests per day over past 30 days): Lists the most frequently requested
pages accessed each day for the last 30 days
• Top users (Average requests per day over past 30 days): Lists the users with the highest average
access volumes per day for the last 30 days
• Requests per day (past 30 days): Graphically depicts the daily access request volume for the
last 30 days
• Top referring hosts (past 30 days): Graphically charts the hosts from which users navigated
when accessing the site collection over the last 30 days
• Top referring pages (past 30 days): Graphically charts the pages from which users navigated
when accessing the site collection over the last 30 days
• Top destination pages (past 30 days): Graphically charts the pages to which users navigated
from within the site collection over the last 30 days
• Top queries over previous 30 days: Depicts the top search queries executed over the last 30
days
• Search results top destination pages: Depicts the top pages to which users navigated from the
search results set
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Site Collection Requests Report
The site collection requests report is accessed by clicking the Requests link in the Site Collection
Usage Reports list in the Quick Launch area. This report includes details about requests made for
information in the site collection. This report includes the following statistics:
• Requests per day (past 30 days): Graphically depicts the site collection requests made per day
for the last 30 days
• Average requests per day by month: Graphically depicts the average number of requests made
per day for each month for the past 12 months
• Top requests: Lists the top requested pages within the site collection ordered by access volume.
Site Collection Users Report
The site collection users report is accessed by clicking the Users link in the Site Collection Usage
Reports list in the Quick Launch area from any of the report pages. This report includes details about
users that have accessed information in the site collection and includes the following statistics:
• Unique users (past 30 days): Graphically depicts the number of unique users to access information in the site collection per day for the last 30 days
• Average unique users per day by month: Graphically depicts the average daily number of
unique users to visit the site collection for each month for the past year
• User Activity (past 30 days): Lists users that have accessed information in the site collection
over the past 30 days ordered by access volume
Site Collection Referrers Report
To access the site collection referrers report, click the Referrers link in the Site Collection Usage
Reports list. This report includes details about the locations from which users have navigated to the
site collection. This report includes the following statistics:
• Top referring hosts (past 30 days): Graphically charts the hosts from which users have most
frequently navigated to the site collection over the last 30 days and lists the referrer hosts
ordered by frequency
• Top referring pages (past 30 days): Graphically charts the pages from which users have most
frequently navigated to the site collection over the last 30 days and lists the referrer pages
ordered by frequency
Site Collection Destination Pages Report
To access the site collection destination pages report, click the Destination Pages link in the Site
Collection Usage Reports list. This report includes details about the locations to which users navigated from the site collection. This report includes the following statistics:
• Top destination sites (past 30 days): Graphically charts the destination sites to which users
have most frequently navigated from the site collection
• Top destination sites (Average requests per day over past 30 days): Lists the sites to which users
navigated from the site collection ordered by the daily volume average
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• Top destination pages (past 30 days): Graphically charts the pages to which users most frequently navigated from the site collection
• Top destination pages (Average requests per day over past 30 days): Lists the pages to which
users navigated ordered by the daily average
Home Page Report
To access the home page report, click the Home Page link in the Site Collection Usage Reports list. This
report includes access details for the home page of the site collection presenting the following statistics:
• Home page requests per day (past 30 days): Graphically depicts the home page requests per
day for the past 30 days
• Average home page requests per day by month: Graphically depicts the daily average number
of home page requests for each month over the last year
• Home page unique users (past 30 days): Graphically depicts the number of unique users to
access the home page per day for the last 30 days
• Average home page unique users per day by month: Graphically depicts the daily average
number of unique users to access the home page for each month over the last year
• Top referring pages to home page (Average requests per day over past 30 days): Lists the pages
from which users navigated to the home page ordered by the daily average number of referrals for the last 30 days
• Top destination pages from home page (Average requests per day over past 30 days): Lists the pages
to which users navigated from the home page ordered by daily average for the last 30 days
Search Queries Report
The search queries report is accessed by clicking the Search Queries link in the Site Collection Usage
Reports list. This report is used to present details about search queries executed in the site collection.
This report includes the following statistics:
• Queries over the previous 30 days: Depicts the query volumes executed by day over the past
30 days
• Queries over the previous 12 months: Depicts the query volumes executed by month for the
past 12 months
• Top queries over previous 30 days: Lists the top queries executed over the past 30 days
• Queries per scope over previous 30 days: Depicts the average number of queries executed over
the past 30 days
Search Results Report
The search results report is accessed by clicking the Search Results link in the Site Collection Usage
Reports list. This report is used to present details about the results returned by searches performed
within the site collection. This report includes the following statistics:
• Search results top destination pages: Depicts the pages most frequently navigated to from the
search results.
• Queries with zero results: Depicts the number of queries resulting in no results being returned.
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Site Collection Auditing
MOSS enables you to audit the usage of your SharePoint environment. The MOSS auditing capabilities allow you to track all activities that occur within the environment. The site collection
administrator has the ability to set auditing requirements within the environment that determine
the types of actions that should be tracked. Reports are then available that can be used to review the
logged events. These reports could also be used to create any needed audit reporting or statistics.
To manage audit settings for a site collection, follow these steps:
1. Navigate to the Site Settings page for the top-level site in the site collection.
2. On the Site Settings page, in the Site Collection Administration section, click the Site Collection Audit Settings link.
3. On the Configure Audit Settings page, select the items to audit:
a. In the Documents and Items section, check the boxes in front of the events to audit
which can include the following:
• Opening or downloading documents, viewing items in lists, or viewing item properties
• Editing items
• Checking out or checking in items
• Moving or copying items to another location in the site
• Deleting or restoring items
b. In the Lists, Libraries, and Sites section, check the boxes in front of the items to audit
which can include the following:
• Editing content types and columns
• Searching site content
• Editing users and permissions
c. Once all of the appropriate audit options have been set, click the OK button.
The auditing options are set, and you are returned to the Site Settings page.
The information about audited actions will be tracked as the associated actions occur in the
environment. You can then run the audit reports to view the audit history for captured events. To
view the auditing reports, follow these steps:
1. Navigate to the Site Settings page for the top-level site in the site collection.
2. On the Site Settings page, in the Site Collection Administration section, click the Audit Log
Reports link.
3. On the View Auditing Reports page, click the name of the report you want to execute.
4. For the Run a Custom Report option, the Run a Custom Report Page is presented. On this
page, follow these steps:
a. In the Location section, check if the report should be restricted to a specific list and, if
so, select the web site where the list is located and select the list.
b. In the Date Range section, specify the optional Start Date and/or End Date to which the
report should be restricted.
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c. In the Users section, specify which users the report should be restricted to.
d. In the Events section, specify the events the report should be restricted to. This list can
include the following events:
• Opening or downloading documents, viewing items in lists, or viewing item properties
• Editing items
• Checking out or checking in items
• Moving or copying items to another location in the site
• Deleting or restoring items
• Editing content types and columns
• Searching site content
• Editing users and permissions
• Editing auditing settings and deleting audit log events
• Workflow events
• Custom events
e. Once all of the appropriate report settings have been entered, click the OK button.
5. The report is generated, and the file download window is displayed.
6. On the file download window, click the Save button.
The generated XML file is saved to the location you specify, and you are returned to the View
Auditing Reports page. You can select to download any of the listed auditing reports. These reports
are as follows:
• Content Activity Reports
• Content modifications: Lists logged events for changes to site content including documents, list items, and pages
• Content type and list modifications: Lists logged events for modifications to content
types, lists, and libraries
• Content viewing: Lists logged events for viewing content within the site
• Deletion: Lists logged events for content deletions and restorations
• Custom Reports
• Run a custom report: Enables you to create a custom report to retrieve logged events for
specific actions
• Information Management Policy Reports
• Expiration and Disposition: Lists logged events related to the expiration and disposition
of content
• Policy modifications: Lists logged events related to the creation and use of content
information management policies
• Security and Site Settings Reports
• Auditing settings: Lists logged events related to changes made to the auditing settings
• Security settings: Lists logged events related to SharePoint security configuration settings
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Site and Site Collection Features
As we discussed in Chapter 2, site and site collection features provide added capabilities to your
SharePoint environment. While Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 only provided a couple of site and
site collection features, MOSS introduces many additional features. Some of these features support
the capabilities provided through the MOSS site templates while others introduce a variety of new
capabilities.
In Chapter 2, we described how to activate and deactivate site features. This process will sometimes also require you to enter some additional feature configuration details before they can be
activated. The site features available in MOSS follow:
• Office SharePoint Server Enterprise Site features: For enterprise license deployments of MOSS,
this feature activates the MOSS enterprise services, such as the business data catalog, forms
services, and Excel services.
• Office SharePoint Server Publishing: Includes resources like web page libraries needed to create and publish web pages within a site.
• Office SharePoint Server Standard Site features: Enables the standard MOSS portal features,
such as user profiles and MOSS searching.
• Team Collaboration List: Enables team collaboration services in a site that allows for the use
of lists and libraries.
• Translation Management Library: Makes available Translation Management Libraries, which
are used to create documents or pages in multiple languages. We will discuss translations
and page variations later in this chapter.
The following site collection features are available in MOSS:
• Collect Signatures Workflow: Makes available a standard workflow that is designed to allow
for needed signatures to be gathered for a document before it is published.
• Disposition Approval Workflow: Makes available a standard workflow that is used to manage
the expiration of documents.
• Office SharePoint Server Enterprise Site Collection features: Enables enterprise site features
that are available with the enterprise license of MOSS, such as business data catalog, forms
services, and Excel services.
• Office SharePoint Server Publishing Infrastructure: Enables publishing-related functionality,
such as content types, master pages, and page layouts.
• Office SharePoint Server Search Web Parts: Makes available web parts that are needed by
Search Center sites.
• Office SharePoint Server Standard Site Collection features: Enables standard features introduced by MOSS, such as user profiles and enterprise searches.
• Reporting: Enables WSS report creation capabilities.
• Routing Workflows: Makes available standard workflows that support document routing for
feedback or approval.
• Three-state workflow: Makes available a standard workflow that is used to track items in a list.
• Translation Management Workflow: Makes available standard workflows to manage document translations and page variations.
Any of the listed site and site collection features can be enabled or disabled to control the capabilities made available in the SharePoint environment.
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nCaution
Some site and site collection features work together to provide sets of capabilities. It is important to
understand the complete impact of disabling a site or site collection feature before making changes.
Content Variations
Organizations that operate globally often need to publish resources in several languages to properly
support all users. The process of creating the various translations, or variations, of the content can
be time consuming and difficult to manage.
MOSS provides site owners the ability to define site variations and define primary and variation locations for content needing to be translated. Changes made to the primary location can be
automatically or manually propagated to the associated variations. The variation capabilities can be
integrated with SharePoint workflows that drive the updating process for variations. These workflows can also be integrated with third-party translation services to automate the actual creation of
the translated versions.
When users access a site that participates in a variation set, they will be automatically taken to
the variation supporting their language. MOSS makes this determination based on the web
browser’s language preferences. If no variation exists that supports the user’s browser language
preferences, they are taken to the primary site for the variation set.
To use the MOSS variation capabilities, you must configure the variation settings within the
site collection. These settings include the identification of the source location where variations will
be created and the configuration of variation creation management and notification settings. To
configure the variation settings for the site collection, follow these steps:
1. Navigate to the Site Settings page for the top-level site in the site collection.
2. On the Site Settings page, in the Site Collection Administration section, click the Variations
link.
3. On the Variation Settings page, follow these steps:
a. In the Variation Home section, enter the site that will act as the starting point for creating variations. This site must be a publishing site based on the Publishing Site template
or the Publishing Site with Workflow template.
b. In the Automatic Creation section, select if site and page variations should be automatically created.
c. In the Recreate Deleted Target Page section, select if new target pages should be recreated when source pages are republished.
d. In the Update Target Page Web Part section, select if changes to web parts should be
propagated to target pages.
e. In the Notification section, identify if e-mail notifications should be sent to the site
owner when the variation system creates or updates a site page.
f. In the Resources section, select if the variation page should use the same resources as
the source or if copies of the resources should be created for use by the variation.
g. Once all information has been appropriately updated, click the OK button.
The variation details are updated and you are returned to the Site Settings page.
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Variation Labels
You can create multiple variations of information in SharePoint. Variation labels are the names
given to the variants of an item so that they can be uniquely identified. For example, if you have a
site that contains information that needs variants created in Spanish and French, each of these
alternative versions would be provided a label uniquely identifying them. Follow these steps to create a new variation label:
1. Navigate to the Site Settings page for the top-level site in the site collection.
2. On the Site Settings page, in the Site Collection Administration section, click the Variation
Labels link.
3. On the Variation Labels page, shown in Figure 3-38, click the New Label link.
4. On the Create Variation Label page, follow these steps:
a. In the Label and Description section, enter the Name for the label. You can also enter an
optional Description.
b. In the Display Name section, enter the Display Name for the label. The display name is
the friendly name used for displaying the label.
c. In the Locale section, select the locale for the variation.
d. In the Hierarchy Creation section, select the parts of the source hierarchy to include as
part of the variation. This can include publishing sites and all pages, publishing sites
only, or the root site only.
e. In the Source Variation section, identify if this variation is the source variation. If it is
the source you must also select the publishing site template to use when provisioning
the source variation site. This setting cannot be modified after the variation hierarchy
has been created.
f. Once all information has been appropriately entered, click the OK button.
The variation label is created, and you are returned to the Variation Labels page.
Figure 3-38. The Variation Labels page
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You can edit the variation labels by hovering over a listed label and selecting the Edit option
from the drop-down menu. You can also delete variation labels by hovering over a label and selecting the Delete option.
After the variation settings are configured and variation labels have been created, you need to
create the variation hierarchy. The variation hierarchy is the tree structure needed under the identified root variation site to store and manage the site variations. You create the variation hierarchy by
clicking the Create Hierarchies link on the Variation Labels page, as shown in Figure 3-38. Clicking
this link will cause SharePoint to create the necessary site hierarchy to support the variant configuration under the root variation site.
Translatable Columns
Site collection administrators have the ability to identify list and library columns that need to be
translated when they appear in a variant site. This is used to help identify elements to translate during the variation management workflow. To update the translatable column settings:
1. Navigate to the Site Settings page for the top-level site in the site collection.
2. On the Site Settings page, in the Site Collection Administration section, click the Translatable Columns link.
3. On the Translatable Column Settings page, check the boxes in front of the column names
that must be translated, and click the OK button.
The translatable column settings are saved, and you are returned to the Site Settings page.
Variation Logs
The variation log presents an operational log listing the variation process details. This log can be
used to review the status and health of the variation process. To view the variation logs:
1. Navigate to the Site Settings page for the top-level site in the site collection.
2. On the Site Settings page, in the Site Collection Administration section, click the Variation
Logs link.
The Variation Logs page is presented listing the logged events for the variation process.
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nnn
List Concepts
S
harePoint’s basic means of information storage is accomplished using the concept of a list. Much
of the data that you create or consume within SharePoint sites is contained in a list of similar information. Each of the lists in SharePoint can have its own unique set of attributes that describe an item
in the list. WSS comes with many standard list templates and the capability to create your own custom lists based on the structure that best describes the information you are trying to capture.
The most frequently used way of tracking any information in SharePoint is through the use of a
custom list. Using a list allows you to store information in a structure that can be tailored to the
needs of the users who will generate and consume the data within the list. Lists in SharePoint allow
you to control how the information is displayed, who has the ability to alter or view the information,
and whether new content must be approved before it appears in the list. The ability to customize
lists within SharePoint allows the structure and data to be maintained by business users rather than
having to rely on your IT staff.
Creating Lists
A custom list is the most basic type of list in SharePoint and provides a good introduction to using
and managing SharePoint lists. There are multiple ways to create a custom list in SharePoint. The
quickest way is to choose the Custom List option on your site’s Create page. You will also notice an
option on the Create page that will enable you to create a custom list using the Datasheet view
rather than the standard view that the Custom List option uses. The Datasheet view will be
described in the “Managing Views” section later in this chapter.
To create a new custom list, follow these steps:
1. On the site’s home page, click the Create link in the Site Actions menu.
2. On the Create page, click the Custom List link in the Custom Lists section.
3. On the New page, enter a name and description for the list.
4. Select Yes under the Navigation options if you want to show a link to this list on the Quick
Launch area of the site.
5. Click the Create button.
You have now created a custom list that contains a single data column called Title. Figure 4-1
shows a list like the one you have just created. Later in this chapter, in the “Managing Custom Lists”
section, we will describe how to customize this list by configuring additional columns and discuss
ways of managing information in the list.
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Figure 4-1. A new custom list
Working with Lists
Now that you have a list to work with, you need to provide content in that list. In addition to adding,
editing, and deleting items, it is important to know how to find the information in a list so that you
can locate the items in an efficient manner.
A quick way to find items is to use the search bar near the top of the list page. On the home
page of a site, this search bar finds information throughout the site, but when used on the list page,
it can show only the results found in the current list. The list page is displayed in a site that displays
the Quick Launch menu by clicking the name of the list on the Quick Launch menu of the site’s
home page or from the All Site Content page by clicking the View All Site Content link on the Quick
Launch menu. For sites that do not display a Quick Launch menu, you can access the list page by
clicking the name of the list if it is displayed on the site’s Content area.
Adding, Editing, and Deleting Items
Before you can explore the many features of a list, you must first know how to add items.
To add items to a list, follow these steps:
1. On the list page, click the New link on the toolbar.
2. On the New Item page, enter a title. Title is the only user-editable column of data in a custom list when it is initially created. Later we will add more columns to the list, and there will
be more than just a title to enter on the New Item page.
3. Click the OK button.
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Editing and deleting items is performed by first displaying the item’s context menu. Displaying
a context menu in SharePoint is not performed by right-clicking the mouse as it is in many other
programs but rather by hovering the mouse over the item in the list so that the item becomes highlighted and a small inverted triangle appears on the right-hand side of the item. Once this triangle
appears, click it to display the list item’s context menu, as shown in Figure 4-2.
This context menu gives you the View Item option, which shows a read-only display of all of the
information about this item. Not all information about an item is necessarily displayed on the list
page, whereas the View Item page ensures that you see all of the data related to an item.
The item’s context menu also gives you the ability to edit the item by performing the following
steps:
1. On the list page, activate the item’s context menu by hovering over the item with your
mouse and clicking the inverted triangle.
2. Click the Edit Item link in the context menu.
3. On the Edit Item page, change the title.
4. Click the OK button.
Figure 4-2. A list item’s context menu
You may have noticed many places so far that allow you to delete a list item. The context menu,
the View Item page, and the Edit Item page all have links allowing you to delete the item. After clicking these links, you are requested to confirm that you wish to send this item to the site’s Recycle Bin.
nCaution
Once you select OK on the confirmation for deleting the list, the information it contains will be sent to
the site’s Recycle Bin. After a configurable number of days (the standard is 30) in the Recycle Bin, the item will be
permanently deleted, and it will not be possible to recover the item without assistance from your IT staff.
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Attachments
Lists can be configured to allow users to store files with the list items. Including attachments allows
users to access documents and files that are related to the list item from one location. Enabling this
ability for a list is described in the “Managing Custom Lists” section later in this chapter. To attach a
file to an existing item in a list with attachments enabled, follow these steps:
1. On the list page, activate the item’s context menu by hovering over the item with your
mouse and clicking the inverted triangle.
2. Click the Edit Item link in the context menu.
3. On the Edit Item page, click the Attach File link in the toolbar.
4. Click the Browse button.
5. In the Choose File window, select a file, and click the Open button.
6. On the Edit Item page, click the OK button. Repeat steps 3 through 6 to attach multiple files
to the list item.
7. Click the OK button.
After step 6, the file you chose will be shown under the Attachments heading on the Edit Item
page. It is important to note that the file is not actually attached to the list item until you click the
OK button, which saves any changes to the data. You can remove attachments from a list item by
selecting the Delete link that is displayed next to the attachment on the Edit Item page. This also
requires you to click the OK button before the attachment is actually removed from the list item.
Filtering and Sorting the List
Lists can contain hundreds or even thousands of items, which can make it difficult to quickly find
the information that you are looking for when browsing the list. SharePoint lists provide ways of filtering and sorting information that you are probably already familiar with from other applications.
Sorting the items can prove to be a valuable asset when visually scanning a list for a particular
item. The heading of each data column that supports sorting will appear as a link on the list page.
To sort by a specific column, simply click that link. The list will redisplay with the column you
selected sorted in ascending order (for example, A to Z and 1 to 10). Clicking another column name
will re-sort the list with that new column’s information in ascending order. If you click a column
name that is already sorting in ascending order, the list will redisplay with that column sorted in
descending order (for example, Z to A and 10 to 1). You can tell which column is being sorted in the
list by the small arrow that will appear directly beside the column name in the column headings, as
shown in Figure 4-3. This arrow points up when the list is sorted in ascending order, and it points
down when the list is sorted in descending order.
Another feature of SharePoint lists is the ability to filter the list items based on selected column
values. This powerful feature allows you to take a list containing hundreds of items and reduce the
items shown to only those that meet the criteria you are looking for. Filtering and sorting are both
available in the context menu of the column headings.
To filter a list, perform the following steps:
1. On the list page, activate the Title column heading’s context menu, shown in Figure 4-3, by
hovering over the column heading with your mouse and clicking the inverted triangle.
2. Click a value in the Title column’s set of unique values that are displayed in the context menu.
3. The list will refresh and only show you items that contain your selected value for the column.
4. Activate the Title column heading’s context menu again to modify the filtering.
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5. Select a new value from the column’s set of values, or select Clear Filter From Title to remove
the filter from the Title column.
6. The list will refresh with the new filter you have selected.
7. Steps 4 and 5 can be repeated using different columns in the list in order to apply multiple
filters simultaneously.
A funnel-shaped icon will be displayed next to the column name of any column that currently
has a filter applied to it. This can be seen in Figure 4-3. Filtering is not supported for every type of
column. For example, columns based on “Multiple lines of text” and Hyperlink types, which are
described in the “Managing Columns” section later in this chapter, do not support filtering.
Figure 4-3. Filtering and sorting list items
Filtering a list can let you quickly condense list information to only the items you are looking
for. Imagine a list of product sales with columns containing the product, sales amount, date, and
salesperson. If you have hundreds or thousands of sales, the list becomes too long to look through
for sales by a specific salesperson, but with filtering, you can quickly limit the items you see to those
for a specific salesperson by selecting that salesperson’s name as the filter value for the salesperson
column. The sales list will refresh, showing you only the sales by that person.
Even more powerful is the ability to use these views, or combinations of sorting, filtering, and
other criteria, by simply selecting them rather than entering the criteria every time you look at the
list.
Using Views
List views are important, because they allow list items to be presented in the way that users can best
work with the information. Views determine the information displayed on the screen, including
columns shown, the order that items are displayed, and the style used to present the items. On the
list page, the view can be selected from the View drop-down menu on the toolbar. From the examples earlier, you can see that by creating a new list, a view called All Items was also created, and since
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it is the only view available, it is the currently selected view. This can also be seen in Figure 4-3. Other
types of lists will have their own default views available when the list is created.
Users with the appropriate permissions in SharePoint can create additional views for a list that
display the list information with different filtering, sorting, grouping, or summations. When the list
has multiple views, they will each be available in the View drop-down menu on the toolbar, allowing
you to easily switch between them. Once you have selected a view that most closely represents the
information you want to see, you can further filter and sort the list items displayed by using the filtering and sorting functionality we have already discussed. The creation of these views will be
discussed in the “Managing Views” section later in this chapter.
Faster Data Manipulation Using the Datasheet
A more-advanced way to edit the items in a list is to use the Datasheet view. SharePoint integrates
with Microsoft Office 2003 or later to provide an easy way for you to edit multiple items in a list
quickly without having to go to each individual item’s Edit Item page separately. In order for the
Datasheet view to work, you need Office 2003 or later installed on the computer you are using to
access the list. Your browser security settings must also allow ActiveX components to run in order
for the Datasheet view to operate properly.
To edit items in the Datasheet view, click the Edit in Datasheet link in the Actions menu on the
toolbar of the list page. The list will change to an Excel-like display, as shown in Figure 4-4. This display will allow you to easily manipulate multiple items in the list quickly by utilizing familiar
productivity features such as copy/paste.
Figure 4-4. The Datasheet view
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The Datasheet view provides rudimentary spreadsheet abilities such as showing Totals via the
Actions menu on the toolbar. A context menu, available via by right-clicking the Datasheet view,
provides you easy access to options for adding and deleting rows or columns. The context menu
also provides the ability to autofill cells or for you to pick cell values from a list of previously entered
values in the column. When you need to modify multiple list items, the Datasheet view proves
much more valuable than individually selecting and updating list items.
Folders
You have the ability to create folders in SharePoint lists to further organize how list items are stored
within the list. The structure of folders is a hierarchy similar to that of other familiar file systems like
local and shared network drives. When initially created, lists do not allow folders to be created.
Before folders can be used in a list, they must be enabled in the Advanced Settings of the list as
described in the “Managing Lists” section later in this chapter.
To create a new folder in a list with folders enabled, follow these steps:
1. On the List page, click the New Folder link in the New menu on the toolbar.
2. On the New Folder page, enter a name for the folder.
3. Click the OK button.
The folder will appear in the library just like a list item but will have an icon that looks like a
tabbed manila file folder, similar to the Windows Explorer folder icon. Navigating through folders in
a list is quite simple. To view the items in a folder, simply click the name of the folder in the list. The
currently displayed folder is shown in the breadcrumb trail above the list’s name near the top of the
page. Use the links in the breadcrumb trail to navigate from the current folder up through the folder
hierarchy within the list.
nTip Instead of using folders to organize a list, have the manager of the list create custom columns you can use
to categorize the list items. This is generally seen as the more appropriate way to organize information in SharePoint and supports more robust display options and searching.
Folders have the same set of options available in their context menus as list items. These
options include editing and deleting the folder as shown in Figure 4-5. Edit a folder as follows:
1. Click the Edit Item link in the context menu of the folder.
2. On the Edit Item page, change the Name. This is the only editable folder information.
3. Click the OK button.
To delete a folder, select Delete Item from the folder’s context menu, and click OK when
prompted for confirmation. The Edit Item page also contains a link on the toolbar to delete the
folder.
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Figure 4-5. Editing folders in a list
nCaution
Once you click OK on the confirmation for deleting the folder, the folder and all of the list items within
it will be sent to the site’s Recycle Bin. After a configurable number of days (the standard is 30) in the Recycle Bin,
the folder will be permanently deleted, and it will not be possible to recover the contents without assistance from
your IT staff.
Versions
Lists in SharePoint 2007 have the ability to store each instance of a saved item as a separate version.
Enabling item versioning is done through the management features of the list. This setting is available on the Versioning Settings page of the list as explained in the “Managing Lists” section later in
this chapter.
A list that has versioning enabled allows you to view previous versions of a list item from the
Versions Saved page. Follow these steps to view a previous version of an item in a list with versioning enabled:
1. On the list page, activate the item’s context menu by hovering over the item with your
mouse and clicking the inverted triangle.
2. Click the Version History link in the context menu.
3. On the Versions Saved page, shown in Figure 4-6, click the Modified link that represents the
version you wish to view.
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Figure 4-6. Item version history
The Versions Saved page provides the ability to restore an older version of the list item, thereby
making it the current version. You may need to do this if you discover that newer versions had
incorrect information added to them and you wish to revert to a version with more accurate information. Restore a version as follows:
1. Navigate to the Versions Saved screen for the desired list item.
2. Activate the context menu for the version you wish to restore, and click the Restore link.
3. When prompted for confirmation, click the OK button.
4. A new version of the list item will be created with data from the restored version.
Deleting versions can be done in two ways. If you want to delete all historical versions of the
list items, click the Delete All Versions link on the toolbar of the Versions Saved screen. If you want
to delete a single version, use the Delete link in the context menu of the version you wish to remove.
In either case, the deleted versions will be sent to the site’s Recycle Bin.
Managing Lists
The power of using lists to store information in a site is the ability to customize the list to meet any
structured information sharing need. Lists allow you to determine not only what data is stored in
the list but also how it is stored, how it is displayed, when it is displayed, and who has the ability to
view, create, or edit that information.
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nNote
Creating and managing a list requires that you have the proper permissions. By default, you must be
assigned the Full Control or Design permission level to create and customize lists.
All management of a list begins by selecting the List Settings link from the Settings menu on
the toolbar of the list page. Clicking this link takes you to the Customize List screen where the
options are categorized into multiple sections: General Settings, Permissions, and Management,
where you configure security; Communications, where you can configure advanced information
integration; Columns, where you determine how the information is stored; and Views, where you
customize the ways in which users can see the information.
General Settings
The General Settings options allow you to change basic aspects of the list that make it easier for
other users to understand the purpose of the list as well as provide navigation, versioning, approval,
and advanced features. The General Settings are divided into separate settings pages for different
groups of functionality.
To edit settings of a list, follow these steps:
1. On the list’s page, click the List Settings link in the Settings menu of the toolbar.
2. On the Customize List screen, click any of the links under the General Settings section.
These links correspond with the settings groups explained in the following sections.
Title, Description, and Navigation
This group of settings provides you with the basic abilities to provide the list with a title and
description to let users know what the purpose of the list is. It also includes a setting for displaying a
link to the list in the site’s Quick Launch navigation. Table 4-1 describes the title, description, and
navigation settings you can edit to customize the list.
Table 4-1. Title, Description, and Navigation Settings for SharePoint Lists
Setting
Description
Name
The name used to identify the list through your SharePoint site. This
should be short but descriptive enough so that users know the purpose of
the list from the name alone.
Description
A more elaborate explanation of the lists’ purpose. This is displayed on the
Documents and Lists screen to help users find the information they are
looking for as well as on the list screen to communicate the purpose of the
list to users.
Navigation
Determines whether a link for the list is displayed on the Quick Launch
area on the left side of the site’s home page. Selecting Yes allows users to
easily see that your list exists and quickly navigate to it.
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Versioning Settings
The versioning settings control whether list items require approval before users can view them, if
prior data is maintained for version control, and who can see historical versions. Table 4-2 describes
the Versioning settings you can edit to customize the list.
Table 4-2. Versioning Settings for SharePoint Lists
Setting
Description
Content Approval
Selecting Yes to enable the Content Approval option means that new
items remain in a draft state until a user with Approve Items permission
(Full Control or Design permission level by default) approves the item.
See the “Content Approval” section for more information on approving
items for entry in a list.
Item Version History
Choosing Yes makes SharePoint maintain a version history of the list
items. Each time a user edits the list item, the new data is saved with a
new version number, and the old data is maintained in the previous
version. You can optionally specify how many versions to keep for each
item in the list.
Draft Item Security
Determines who can see draft items that are waiting for approval in the
list. This can be set to all users, users with Edit Item permissions, or
only users with Approve Item permission.
Advanced Settings
This group of settings includes more complex SharePoint 2007 features such as Content Types (see
the “Content Types” section) along with other list settings like enabling attachments, folders, and
searching. Table 4-3 describes the advanced settings you can edit to customize the list.
Table 4-3. Advanced Settings for SharePoint Lists
Setting
Description
Content Types
Enables the management of content types for this list. See the “Content
Types” section later in this chapter for a detailed explanation of the
usage and management of content types.
Item-Level Permissions
Provides the ability to limit the items that users can view or edit. Readaccess options allow you to specify whether users can view all items in
the list or only the items they have created. Edit-access options allow
you to specify whether users can edit all items or the items they have
created or to restrict edit access entirely. Users that have the Manage
List permission can see and edit all items and are unaffected by ItemLevel permissions.
Attachments
Determines whether users can add files as an attachment to the list
item. Select Enable Attachments to allow users to attach one or more
files to items in the list.
Folders
Determines whether users can create new folders in the list. Disabling
this setting does not impact folders that already exist.
Search
Enables the list and list items to be displayed in search results to those
users that have the appropriate permissions to view the items.
Selecting No for this setting will keep all contents of this list from
displaying in user searches.
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Audience Targeting Settings
This link only appears if you have SharePoint Server 2007, since audiences are a feature of SharePoint
that is available only when MOSS is installed. This section contains a single setting to Enable Audience Targeting.
Enabling this setting adds a new column to the list called Target Audiences. This column is a
special Audience Targeting column type that gives you the option to allow targeting to audiences,
distribution lists, and SharePoint groups.
When adding or editing items in the list with audience targeting enabled, users can select one
or more audiences, distribution lists, or SharePoint groups. If they make any selections in this Target
Audiences column, web parts and personalization capabilities of SharePoint will be able to filter or
display the list items based on the audiences and groups selected. Web parts are described more in
Chapter 8, and personalization is discussed in Chapter 9.
Content Approval
Approving items for entry in a list does not occur in the Customize List screen; nevertheless, it is an
important part of managing list content when it is enabled. Once content approval is enabled in the
versioning settings for a list, the actual approval and rejection occurs on the list screen. Enable content approval when you do not want users seeing information until an approver has had the
opportunity to verify its use for other users.
Items in a list with content approval enabled will contain an Approve/Reject option in their
context menus, as you can see in Figure 4-7. Items that have not been approved by a user with the
Approve Item permission will not appear in the list to other users of the site based on the draft item
security option selected in the versioning settings.
Enabling content approval also creates two new views for the list to help users work with the
list items. The first is called Approve/Reject Items and is intended for users with the Approve Item
permission to use in order to quickly display the list items categorized by the approval status. This
view is displayed in Figure 4-7. In this manner, approvers can easily see pending items and take the
appropriate approval action. Users without this permission do not see the Approve/Reject Items
view in the View drop-down on the toolbar of the list page.
Figure 4-7. Item approval
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Use these steps to approve or reject list items if you have the Approve Item permission:
1. On the list’s page, select the Approve/Reject Items view in the View drop-down on the toolbar.
2. Click the Approve/Reject link in the context menu of the desired list item.
3. On the Approve/Reject page, select the appropriate approval status for the item. Pending
leaves the item in the current, draft, state. The Approved option makes the item visible to
all users of the list. Rejected causes the item to remain hidden from other users of the list,
so the creator can make additional modifications to the item.
4. Enter a comment explaining the content approval decision, especially when rejecting an
item so that the creator can understand why the item was rejected.
5. Click the OK button.
Users who have added items to the list should select the My Submissions view to see whether
any of their items have been rejected. This view displays to users all items they have created and
categorizes them based on their approval statuses. If an item is rejected by the content approver,
any comments entered by the approver are displayed in the My Submissions view, so that the submitter can make corrections or add another item. Each time an item is edited, its status is set to
Pending, and it must be approved again before it is displayed to all users.
Security
An important decision when managing your list is who will have access to the content and how
much control over the content they will be given. Lists leverage the permission levels of the site they
live in to determine the security of the user. When first created, a list inherits the security settings of
the site it is in. All users, and their associated permission levels, are managed in the site as described
in Chapter 2.
You can decide to break this inheritance and give unique permissions to the list. This is most
common when working with lists that contain sensitive information that not all site users should
see. Another example is a list that all users should have the ability to update, even those site users
who normally have only a Read permission level.
To break permission inheritance for a list, perform the following steps:
1. On the list page, click the List Settings link in the Settings menu of the toolbar.
2. On the Customize List screen, click the “Permissions for this List” link under the Permissions and Management section.
3. On the Permissions screen, click the Edit Permissions link in the Actions menu on the
toolbar.
4. On the confirmation message, click the OK button.
Once these steps are completed, you will be able to manage the permissions levels for users
within the list. At any time, you can revert to the site’s users and permission level security by selecting the Inherit Permissions link in the Actions menu of the toolbar on the Permissions page.
As an administrator, you have many options for changing list permissions. Access can be
granted based on SharePoint groups or domain users and groups.
To add users to the list security, perform the following steps:
1. On the list page, click the List Settings link in the Settings menu of the toolbar.
2. On the Customize List screen, click the Permissions for this List link under the Permissions
and Management section.
3. On the Permissions screen, click the New link on the toolbar.
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4. On the Add Users screen, enter the e-mail address or account name of one or more users or
groups you wish to add in the Users/Groups box. You can verify that the information you
entered is correct by clicking the Check Names icon.
5. If you do not know the exact e-mail addresses or account names of the people or groups you
want to give access to, you can click the Browse icon. This icon will open a window that will
allow you to search for accounts within your organization. When you have found a user you
wish to grant list access to, select that user in the list, and click the Add button. After you
have done this for all of the users and groups you wish to add, click the OK button.
6. Select the permission level that you want to use to determine your new users’ abilities in the
list. These permission levels are managed in the site.
nNote
When you add multiple users at the same time, they can only have the same permissions. If you need to
give different permissions to each user or group, you must perform these steps for each distinct set of users and
permissions you need to create, or update individual permission levels after you add users in a batch.
7. Click the OK button.
You will now notice that the users you have added show up in the list of users on the Permissions page. You can edit the permissions of a user or group by checking the box next to the name
and clicking the Edit User Permissions link in the Actions menu on the toolbar. Likewise, you can
revoke a user’s access to the list by checking the box next to the name and clicking the Remove
User Permissions link in the Actions menu on the toolbar.
Item-Level Permissions
In addition to managing security for the list as a whole, you can set security on an individual list
item to further refine who can access the information stored in the list. List item security is managed similarly to list security, using the same concept of inheritance and permission levels.
To edit permissions on a specific list item, perform the following steps:
1. On the list page, click the Manage Permissions link in the context menu of the desired list
item.
2. On the Permissions screen, click the Edit Permissions link in the Actions menu on the
toolbar.
3. On the confirmation message, click the OK button.
4. On the Permissions screen, check the box next to a user’s name, and click the Edit User
Permissions link in the Actions menu on the toolbar.
5. On the Edit Permissions screen, select the appropriate permission levels for this user.
6. Click the OK button.
The Permissions page will refresh and display the updated user permissions. Giving users Read
access to a specific list item will cause them to not see the Edit Item link in that list item’s context
menu or anywhere else where it would otherwise be displayed.
Just like list security, you can grant a user access to a specific list item by clicking the New link in
the toolbar of the Permissions page and performing the same actions described previously to add
users to a list. You can also revoke users’ access to the list item completely by checking the box next to
their names and clicking the Remove User Permissions link in the Actions menu on the toolbar.
Revoking a user’s access completely will cause the list item to never be displayed in the list to that user.
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nTip List item security can be applied to folders within the list by following the same steps needed for list items
after selecting the Manage Permissions link in a folder’s context menu. Use this to control user permissions to
groups of related list items or to hide entire folders of content from specific users or groups.
Managing Columns
The power of lists resides in the ability to design the structure determining how your information
will be stored and presented. SharePoint refers to the individual data fields in your list as columns.
Each column has a specific type of data associated with it. These types include text, numbers, currency, and many others that allow SharePoint to enforce formatting and allow for other business
rules on the data such as minimum and maximum values for number entry.
The complete list of column types in a Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 site can be seen in
Figure 4-8.
Figure 4-8. Column types on the Add Column screen
Creating, Editing, and Deleting Columns
SharePoint provides you with an easy way to determine the number, type, order, and settings for
each column in your list. To add a column to a list, perform the following steps:
1. On the list page, click the Create Column link in the Settings menu of the toolbar.
2. On the Create Column screen, enter a short descriptive name for the column.
3. Choose the column type for the information that will be entered into this column.
4. Specify any settings under the Additional Column Settings section. The settings that appear
in this section are dependent on the column type and will dynamically change if you select
a different column type. These settings are described in detail later in this chapter.
5. Check the box next to “Add to default view”. This makes the information visible on the default
view when users are displaying this list. Views are covered in detail later in this chapter.
6. Click the OK button.
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When these steps are completed, you are taken back to the list page. To see all of the columns
that have been created for a list, click the List Settings link in the Settings toolbar on the list page.
Here, the Columns section will display all of the columns that are part of this list along with their
column types. The column name will be displayed as a link that, when clicked, takes you to the
Change Column page, so you can modify its settings.
nCaution
When changing the column type, SharePoint will warn you that you could experience data loss. For
example, changing a “Single line of text column” to a Number will result in SharePoint dropping any values that
contain character data (for example, “abc123”), since it does not know how to interpret them strictly as numbers.
SharePoint takes it a step further, permitting certain column types to be changed only to certain other column
types. For example, you cannot change a “Single line of text” column to a Lookup column, since it cannot reconcile
the data between the two types. Be sure to plan out the design of your list well to avoid having to make these
changes when users have already populated the list with data.
To delete a column, perform the following steps:
1. On the Customize List screen, click the name of the column under the Columns section.
2. On the Change Column screen, click the Delete button at the bottom of the page.
3. Click OK when prompted for confirmation that you wish to remove the column and all of
the data it contains.
nCaution
Once you click the Delete button, the column is physically deleted from SharePoint. All of the data in
that column is deleted from SharePoint as well. It is not possible to recover the data without assistance from your
IT staff, so be absolutely sure that the information in that column is no longer needed before deleting it.
Column Order and Indexing
Once you have created many columns to hold all of the information for a list, you may find that you
want to modify the order in which they are displayed to the user. More important columns may
need to be placed earlier in the order or related items placed in close proximity. Modifying the order
of the columns affects how they appear when a user adds, edits, or views a list item.
To modify the order of the columns, perform these steps:
1. On the Customize List screen, click the Column Ordering link under the Columns section.
2. On the Change Field Order screen, change the position of a column by selecting a number
under the Position from Top heading. A smaller number moves the column closer to the top
of the display, while a larger number moves it farther down. Once you change the position
number for a column, the columns will automatically rearrange to display all columns in
the new position order.
3. Repeat step 2 until the columns’ position numbers are in the sequence that you want them
displayed to the user.
4. Click the OK button.
Lists can contain thousands of items, and as the number of items in the list increases, the time
it takes to filter or display the list increases. The 2007 version of SharePoint gives you the ability to
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index list columns. Indexing a column causes SharePoint to store the column’s data in the SharePoint database in such a way that increases performance when filtering or displaying the list items.
To index columns, perform the following steps:
1. On the Customize List screen, click the Indexed Columns link under the Columns section.
2. On the Indexed Columns screen, check the Indexed box for columns that will be used often
for filtering and display.
3. Click the OK button.
As you have most likely already seen, there are many different column types, and each has its
own settings and functionality. We will now take you through each type in detail, so you can make
the most productive use of this SharePoint functionality when creating the structures for your lists.
Single line of text
Use the “Single line of text” type when the column should contain any textual information, including numbers, punctuation, and symbols, without carriage returns. Examples include names, phone
numbers, and titles. This column type will display to the user as a text box, allowing entry of text on
one line. Table 4-4 lists the additional settings for a “Single line of text” column.
Table 4-4. Additional Settings for “Single line of text” Columns
Setting
Description
Description
Displayed on the Add and Edit Item screens to help users understand
what information they should enter.
Required Information
Specifies whether users must enter information in this column in order
to add or edit an item.
Maximum Characters
The largest number of characters that users can enter. This value can be
from 1 to 255 (the default).
Default Value
The initial value for the column when users create a new list item. This can
be specific text or a value calculated from a formula. For more information
on using calculations and formulas, see the calculated column type and
formula discussion in the “Calculated” section later in this chapter.
Multiple lines of text
Use the “Multiple lines of text” type when the column should contain any long textual information
that can span more than a single line of entry with no maximum length. It should also be used if
you need rich text editing capabilities. Examples include addresses, comments, and directions. This
column type will display to the user as a text area, allowing entry of text on more than one line.
Table 4-5 lists the additional settings for a “Multiple lines of text” column.
Table 4-5. Additional Settings for “Multiple lines of text” Columns
Setting
Description
Description
Displayed on the Add and Edit List Item screens to help users
understand what information they should enter.
Required Information
Specifies whether users must enter information in this column in order
to add or edit an item.
continued
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Table 4-5. Continued
Setting
Description
Number of Lines for
Editing
The height of the text area, in lines, that is displayed when users add or
edit an item.
Type of Text to Allow
Determines the level of rich text capabilities available to the user for
formatting text in this column. Options are plain text (no formatting
capabilities), rich text (basic features such as text size, alignment, and
color), and enhanced rich text (advanced features such as tables,
hyperlinks, and images).
Append Changes to
Existing Text
When enabled, an empty text area is displayed each time the user edits
the list item. Each time the user enters information and saves the list
item, the text is saved along with the user and date. Previously entered
text is maintained, so that viewing the list item shows the user all of the
individually entered values. This setting requires that versioning be
enabled for the list.
Choice
Use the Choice type when you want to present a list of predetermined values to the user. Examples
could include state, status, and department. You can determine how the choices are displayed to
the user by selecting a display type from the optional settings. Table 4-6 lists the additional settings
for a Choice column.
Table 4-6. Additional Settings for Choice Columns
Setting
Description
Description
Displayed on the Add and Edit List Item screens to help users
understand what information they should enter.
Required Information
Specifies whether users must enter information in this column in order
to add or edit an item.
Choices
Type the predetermined list of choices here, making sure each choice is
on a separate line.
Display Type
Determines how the choices will be displayed to users. Possible types
are drop-down lists, radio buttons, and check boxes. Choosing check
boxes allows users to select multiple values for this column.
Allow Fill-in Choices
If you choose Yes for this option, users can type in a value that is not in
the predetermined choice list.
Default Value
The initial value for the column when users create a new list item. This
can be a specific choice or a value calculated from a formula.
Number
Use the Number type when the column should contain only numerical data, including percentages,
and SharePoint will not allow character information in this column type. This type allows you to
perform mathematical operations on the information in this column when using views. Views and
how to do these mathematical operations are discussed in detail later in this chapter. Examples
include quantity, discount, and age. Table 4-7 lists the additional settings for a Number column.
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Table 4-7. Additional Settings for Number Columns
Setting
Description
Description
Displayed on the Add and Edit List Item screens to help users
understand what information they should enter.
Required Information
Specifies whether users must enter information in this column in order
to add or edit an item.
Limits
Allows you to specify the minimum and maximum value that users can
enter. If users enter a value outside of this range, they are shown a
message with the limits displayed, so they can correct the information.
Decimals
Determines how many decimal places to display. If set to Automatic,
the decimal is displayed differently for each value entered. If set to a
specific number, the decimal is displayed at that position for every
value, thus a Decimal setting of 2 displays the value 5 as 5.00.
Default Value
The initial value for the column when users create a new list item. This
can be a specific value or a value calculated from a formula.
Percentage
If you check this option, all values are displayed as, and behave like,
percentages.
nCaution
When changing a Number column that contains data to a percentage, SharePoint determines the percentage value using decimals, so the value 0.5 becomes 50%. As a result, the value 50, which users could have
entered intending 50%, becomes 5000% when you change a nonpercentage Number column to a percentage.
Currency
Use the Currency type when the column should contain only monetary values. Examples include
cost, salary, and payment. This column type behaves very similarly to the Number column by allowing mathematical operations in views. Table 4-8 lists the additional settings for a Currency column.
Table 4-8. Additional Settings for Currency Columns
Setting
Description
Description
Displayed on the Add and Edit List Item screens to help users
understand what information they should enter.
Required Information
Specifies whether users must enter information in this column in order
to add or edit an item.
Limits
Allows you to specify the minimum and maximum value that users can
enter. If users enter a value outside of this range, they are shown a
message with the limits displayed, so they can correct the information.
Decimals
Determines how many decimal places to display. If set to Automatic,
the decimal is displayed differently for each value entered. If set to a
specific number, the decimal is displayed at that position for every
value, thus a Decimal setting of 2 displays the value 5 as 5.00.
Default Value
The initial value for the column when users create a new list item. This
can be a specific value or a value calculated from a formula.
Currency Format
Allows you to choose a country to determine the currency type and
how the values are displayed with currency symbols.
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Date and Time
Use the Date and Time type when the column should contain either date values or both date and
time values. Examples include paid date, due date, and start time. Unfortunately, SharePoint does
not provide the ability to enter a time value without a date. Table 4-9 lists the additional settings for
a Date and Time column.
Table 4-9. Additional Settings for Date and Time Columns
Setting
Description
Description
Displayed on the Add and Edit List Item screens to help users
understand what information they should enter.
Required Information
Specifies whether users must enter information in this column in order
to add or edit an item.
Format
Determines whether the values for this column contain only a date or
both a date and time.
Default Value
The initial value for the column when users create a new list item. This
can be the current date and time when the item is added, a specific
date and time, or a value calculated from a formula.
nCaution
SharePoint does not provide the ability to enter only time values. If you select only a time for a Date
and Time column without entering a date and save the changes, the time value you chose will not be saved.
Lookup
Use the Lookup type when the column should contain a list of choices for the user to select from. The
difference between this type and the Choice type is that the Lookup type determines the choices
dynamically by presenting the values from another list on the same site. The values are presented as
links on the list page, allowing you to quickly see the list item associated with the given lookup value.
Table 4-10 lists the additional settings for a Lookup column.
Table 4-10. Additional Settings for Lookup Columns
Setting
Description
Description
Displayed on the Add and Edit List Item screens to help users
understand what information they should enter.
Required Information
Specifies whether users must enter information in this column in order
to add or edit an item.
Source List
The list or library whose items will be used as choices in this column.
Options include all other lists and libraries.
Source Column
The column in the source list that will contain the values to be used as
choices in this list.
Allow Multiple Values
Determines how the choices will be displayed to users. Selecting to
allow multiple values displays the choices in a selection wizard. Not
allowing multiple values presents the choices to the user in a dropdown box that contains all choices and a ‘None’ option.
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Yes/No
Use the Yes/No type when the column should contain a simple true or false value. Examples include
active, to signify if an item is active, and reviewed, to show that an item has been reviewed. This column
type will display to the user as a check box. Table 4-11 lists the additional settings for a Yes/No column.
Table 4-11. Additional Settings for Yes/No Columns
Setting
Description
Description
Displayed on the Add and Edit List Item screens to help users
understand what information they should enter
Default Value
The initial value for the column when users create a new list item
Person or Group
Use the Person or Group type when the column should contain a user or group within your organization. Examples include team leader and owner. When editing the value of this type of column,
users can enter the account name of a user or group and click a Check Name icon to verify the existence of the account. Alternatively, users can click a Browse icon that allows them to perform a
search to find the desired person or group in the organization. Table 4-12 lists the additional settings for a Person or Group column.
Table 4-12. Additional Settings for Person or Group Columns
Setting
Description
Description
Displayed on the Add and Edit List Item screens to help users understand
what information they should enter.
Required
Information
Specifies whether users must enter information in this column in order
to add or edit an item.
Allows Multiple
Selections
Gives users the ability to select more than one person or group for the
column.
Selection Type
Allowed
Determines if users can select from people or both people and groups
when setting the value of the column.
Source Group
Specifies the people and groups that are valid selections for this column.
This can be set to allow for all users in your organization, or you can select
a specific SharePoint group to narrow the available people and groups to
only those in that SharePoint group.
Display Field
Controls what information associated with the person or group is displayed
in the list and View Item screens. Options include name with presence (the
default), name with picture, account, e-mail address, and more.
nNote Presence information requires that your technical IT administrator has installed Microsoft’s Live Communications Server and Windows Messenger in your organization. These products are not part of a standard SharePoint
deployment.
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Hyperlink or Picture
Use the Hyperlink or Picture type when the column should contain either a link to another URL or
an image that should be displayed with the list item. Examples include logos and web site links.
Table 4-13 lists the additional settings for a Hyperlink or Picture column.
Table 4-13. Additional Settings for Hyperlink or Picture Columns
Setting
Description
Description
Displayed on the Add and Edit List Item screens to help users understand
what information they should enter.
Required Information
Specifies whether users must enter information in this column in order
to add or edit an item.
Format
Used to determine whether the value should be displayed as a link that
users can click or an image that gets displayed on the list or View Item
screens. When entering an image, users cannot upload a file; instead,
they must enter a URL to the image.
Calculated
Use the Calculated type when the column should not allow users to determine the value; rather, it
should calculate the value based on a formula that can include other list item column data. Examples include discount amount, current date period, and net sale price. This column type will not
display to users in the Add Item screen, but the calculated value will display in the list and View
Item screens. Table 4-14 lists the additional settings for a Calculated column.
Table 4-14. Additional Settings for Calculated Columns
Setting
Description
Description
Displayed on the Add and Edit List Item screens to help users understand
what information they should enter.
Formula
The calculation used to determine the value for the column.
Data Type
The type of data that the Calculated column will create. Available data types
are text, number, currency, date and time, and yes/no. Other Additional
Settings are available according to the data type selected, similar to additional
settings for the corresponding column types; for instance, the number data
type allows you to select decimals and percentage.
The ability to create list columns that display the results of logical, mathematical, and other
operations on list data makes SharePoint lists extremely customizable. In addition to the Calculated
column type, calculations can also be used to determine the default values for other column types.
The formula is what determines the resulting value for the Calculated column. A formula is
made up of functions, operators, constants, and references to other columns. Functions are predefined calculations that require you to specify parameters and return a result. SharePoint categorizes
the available functions into the categories discussed in Table 4-15. A complete list of functions, and
how to use them, can be found in the “Formulas and Functions” section of the SharePoint help files.
To access the SharePoint help files, click the Help icon, which is normally displayed on the top-right
side of any SharePoint screen.
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Table 4-15. Types of Functions in SharePoint
Category
Description
Date and Time
Works with dates and date columns. An example is DATEDIF(), which
calculates the amount of a specified time unit between two dates.
Financial
Performs calculations for loans, investments, and other financial data. An
example is FV(), which calculates a future value of an investment given a
period, payments, and interest rate.
Information
Functions in this category return True or False if a value matches the
information type requested. Examples include ISNUMBER(), ISTEXT(), and
ISBLANK().
Logical
Applies logic to parameters. An example is IF(), which conditionally
returns separate results based on the logical truth of a given value. Other
examples include AND(), OR(), and NOT().
Lookup and
Reference
The only function in this category is CHOOSE(), which allows the calculation to select a value from different choices based on a specified parameter.
Math and
Trigonometry
A large group of functions that perform mathematical calculations. An
example is SUM(), which returns the result from adding all of its parameters.
Statistical
Another large group of functions that perform statistics-based
calculations. An example is STDEV(), which returns the standard deviation
from the parameters passed to it.
Text and Data
This group of functions perform string manipulation and other dataspecific calculations. An example is LEN(), which returns the number of
characters that the text parameter contains. These functions also let you
combine or compare values from different columns.
In addition to functions, SharePoint provides the ability to use calculation operators in your
formulas. Calculation operators come in three types: arithmetic, comparison, and text. Arithmetic
operators provide addition (+), subtraction (-), multiplication (*), division (/), and other operations
that produce numeric results. Comparison operators include less than (<), greater than (>), equals
(=), and other operators that produce a logical Yes/No result. The only text operator available is for
concatenation (&), which results in the combination of two text values.
A very important aspect to creating powerful calculated columns is the ability to include references to other columns. You reference other columns by entering the column name in the formula. If
SharePoint uses the column name for its own internal use, you may have to enclose the reference in
brackets like this: [LastName]. When a calculation uses a column reference, it is referring to the value
in the referenced column for the same list item on which the calculation is being performed. This
allows you to perform functions on the columns or manipulate them with operators. Formulas can
also include constants. Specific numbers, text, or dates that are entered into a formula are considered
constants, since their value for the formula is not dependent on another function or column data.
nNote
You cannot use column references in column default values. It is also not possible for calculations to use
column values in rows other than the current row.
Figure 4-9 shows where a formula and return type are specified for a calculated column. Table 4-16
provides examples of formulas that will help you to better understand how functions, operators, constants, and columns can be combined to create beneficial calculated columns.
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Figure 4-9. Optional Calculated column settings
Table 4-16. Example Formulas
Formula
Description
=SUM(Num1, Num2, Num3)
Uses the SUM() function to add three columns that are referenced
=SUM(Num1, Num2)/ Num3
Uses the SUM() function to add two columns and then divides
that number by the value in a third column using the / operator
=LastName&","&FirstName
Uses the concatenation operator to create a full name column
from separate LastName and FirstName columns
=IF(Cost>10, "High", "Low")
Uses the IF() function to return a constant text value of High if
the Cost column is greater than 10 and a constant text value of
Low if it is not
=TEXT(WEEKDAY(DueDate),
"ddd")
Shows how to nest functions by using both the WEEKDAY()
function to determine the day of the week as a number and the
TEXT() function to convert that number to its three-letter
abbreviation
SharePoint provides many more functions and operators for calculated columns than we have
the space to cover in this chapter. For more information on calculated columns, see the SharePoint
help files by clicking the Help icon displayed on the top-right side of the Create Column or Change
Column screens.
Business Data
The Business Data column type allows you to add data from external business applications to your
list. It will only be available if SharePoint Server 2007 is installed in your environment. When adding
this column type to your list, you will need to select from the Business Data Types that have been
added to SharePoint by an administrator. Each of these Business Data Types will expose its own set
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of columns that can be added to the list as shown in Figure 4-10. Table 4-17 lists the additional settings for a Business Data column.
Figure 4-10. Business Data Type column settings
Table 4-17. Additional Settings for Business Data Columns
Setting
Description
Description
Displayed on the Add and Edit List Item screens to help users understand
what information they should enter.
Required Information
Specifies whether users must enter information in this column in order
to add or edit an item.
Type
The Business Data Type that will be the source of the information in
this column.
Display Field
Determines which field exposed by the selected Business Data Type will
be displayed in this column.
Display Actions Menu
Enables a context menu on the Display field.
Link to Profile Page
Determine if the Display field is shown as a link that will take the user
to the Profile page of the Business Data entity.
Additional Fields
Controls which fields exposed by the selected Business Data Type will
be displayed in the list. These fields are in addition to the Display field
and are not editable. The information associated with the Business
Data entity selected using the Display field is shown in these columns.
To add information to a Business Data Type column, on the Add Item or Edit Item pages, click
the Browse icon associated with the column. In the Choose window, select the field you want to
search, enter information to search for, and click the magnifying glass icon. When the results are
displayed, select the appropriate result, and click the OK button. Once you save the changes to the
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list item, the list page will display the data retrieved from the external business application, including all of the Additional Fields that were selected on the column’s Change Column page.
Audience Targeting
Available only with SharePoint Server 2007 installed, the Audience Targeting column type gives you
the ability to select from various SharePoint user collections to determine which users should see a list
item when viewing a list. This ability is provided by giving you a search window that can be selected
on the Add Item or Edit Item pages for finding user collections in your environment. Table 4-18 lists
the additional settings for an Audience Targeting column.
Table 4-18. Additional Settings for Audience Targeting Columns
Setting
Description
Description
Displayed on the Add and Edit List Item screens to help users
understand what information they should enter
Required Information
Specifies whether users must enter information in this column in
order to add or edit an item
Allows Global Audience
Determines if the column will accept MOSS audiences for targeting
the list item
Allow Distribution List
Determines if the column will accept distribution lists for targeting
the list item
Allow SharePoint Group
Determines if the column will accept SharePoint groups for
targeting the list item
nNote
The Audience Targeting column type cannot be added to a list by using the Create Column ability. A single
Audience Targeting column, called Target Audience by default, is added to a list when the Enable Audience Targeting list setting is on.
Managing Views
Earlier in this chapter we mentioned the use of views, which are an integral part of creating and using
a list. Views are a persisted definition for the display of the data in a list, and they are created to provide a quick way for your users to find the data they need in a way that is most meaningful to them.
Views provide the filtering and sorting abilities that you can achieve normally through a list; they also
add grouping, mathematical operations on columns, the ability to show or hide certain columns, and
more. As you will see later, views can be public, so that all users of the list see the option to display the
view, or private, so that only the user creating the view sees it in the View drop-down on the toolbar of
the list page.
There are four types of views in SharePoint, each with their own abilities and settings that
determine how the view displays data. The standard type is the most commonly used view. It displays items in a tabular display that contains grouping and style settings not found in the other view
formats. The datasheet type uses the Datasheet view discussed earlier to display the data in an
Excel-like editable grid. The calendar type displays the list items in a calendar format based on date
fields from the list item that you specify. The Gantt type displays the list items in a tabular format
similar to the standard type, but also displays a schedule in bar-graph format above the list items
using date columns from the list. See Table 4-19 for the best uses for each view format.
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Table 4-19. The View Formats
Type
Purpose
Standard
Use the Standard view when you want list items displayed in a line-item or
tabular format. The Standard view allows grouping to provide an expandable
and collapsible display of the list items. It also allows a style setting that you
can use to present your list items as line items, tables, business cards, and
other variations.
Datasheet
The Datasheet view is best used when the data changes frequently and time
spent updating items should be minimized. The user can switch to a
Datasheet view while in a Standard view, so the standard type is the better
option for most of your views. Users must have Office 2003 installed to use
the datasheet type.
Calendar
Use the Calendar when the data is best suited to representation by dates. The
calendar can be shown in a month, week, or daily view. Good examples for a
Calendar view are lists of events, tasks, and milestones where displaying by
date allows users to interpret important or recent list items the same way they
would look at an Outlook calendar.
Gantt
The Gantt type will allow users to better visualize data that includes dates
where duration is important. Good examples for a Gantt type are lists for
maintaining project plans, schedules, and tasks where displaying by
percentage complete, start date, and due date allows users to interpret
scheduling information similar to Gantt chart displays found in project
management software like Microsoft Project.
nTip The All Items view created with a new custom list is determined by the link you choose on the Create page.
Choosing the Custom List link generates the All Items view as a standard view, while the Custom List in Datasheet
View link creates the All Items view as a Datasheet view.
Standard and Datasheet Views
One of the primary selections when managing a view is deciding what data should be displayed.
The view allows you to select a number of columns, from one to as many as all of them, to be displayed. You are also given the ability to determine the order in which the columns are displayed in
the view. The columns you have created for the list are not the only columns available for the view
to display. The view can actually expose some columns that SharePoint uses to manage the list as
well as columns related to item approval. Table 4-20 further describes the special columns that can
be used in a view.
nCaution
Modifying the order of the columns in the list settings does not change the order of columns in any
views. You must edit the view and change the “Position from Left” value of each column to change how the view
displays them.
Just like you can sort the list items on the list page, a view allows you to determine what the
default sort will be for users displaying the view. These settings only determine what the initial sort
will be when the view is first displayed. Users can still sort the items even further via the standard
functionality on the list page. Compared to the list page’s sorting, the view’s sort functionality is
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more complex. In the list page, you can only sort by a single column, but a view can be sorted by up
to two columns. The view also allows you to sort on columns that are not actually being displayed,
including the special columns described in Table 4-20.
nTip
The column used to sort the view does not need to be one of the columns being displayed.
Filtering in views is also similar to filtering in the list screen but provides enhanced functionality. One difference is the ability to combine multiple filters using the AND and OR logical operators.
The list screen provides only the ability to create a filter where the column value exactly matches
the specified value. The view’s filtering makes it easy to create filters that use other operators such
as greater than, less than, is not equal to, begins with, and contains. By creating a combination of up
to ten of these filters, you are able to create powerful filters that can simplify a large list to only the
items meeting strict criteria.
There are also two special values that you can use when creating filters: Entering [Today] as the
value for the filter uses the current date as the filter’s criteria. Typing [Me] as the value for the filter
causes SharePoint to use the current user as the criteria for the filter. These special values allow you
to create views such as My Items or Items Submitted Today. In addition to the columns you have
created for the list, you can specify filter criteria for the special columns described in Table 4-20.
nTip
Using an indexed column in the first filter clause greatly increases the performance of the view and thereby
improves the user experience.
Another feature of a standard view is the ability to display the list items in a group-by-group
fashion. Grouping only applies to Standard views and not Datasheet views. You can select which
column controls the grouping, and all list items with the same value in that column will be displayed together in expandable and collapsible groups. SharePoint allows up to two levels of
grouping. You are able to specify the sort order of the groups, their default behavior of being collapsed or expanded, as well as put a limit to the number of groups displayed per page. All columns
including the special columns in Table 4-20 can be part of a view’s grouping criteria.
SharePoint views allow you to perform mathematical functions on the data in a given column.
These are specified in the Totals section of the Create View or Edit View screen. The functions available to perform on a column depend on the column’s type. Many column types allow you to generate
a count of the number of list items that contain a value in that column. Date columns allow you display the average, minimum, or maximum values that the column contains for all list items in the
view. Number columns allow you to perform all of these functions as well as display the sum, standard deviation, and variance of the values. Totals can be generated from all columns including the
special columns described in Table 4-20.
Table 4-20. Special List Columns for Use in Views
Column
Description
Attachments
Used to determine whether the list item contains attachments. When
displayed in a view, this column will contain a paper clip icon if there
are attachments associated with the list item. Setting the filter criteria
to Yes or No allows you to filter based on this column.
Content Type
The name of the content type for the list item. See the Advanced List
Concepts section for more information about content types.
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Column
Description
Created
The date and time that the list item was created.
Created By
The user who created the list item.
Edit (link to edit item)
Displays a column containing an edit icon as a link that takes the user
to the Edit Item screen.
ID
Contains a number that uniquely identities a list item within a list.
Modified
The date and time that the list item was last edited. If the item was
never edited, it contains the date and time the list item was created.
Modified By
The last user to modify the list item.
Title (linked to item
with edit menu)
Displays the Title column as a link that takes the user to the View Item
screen. This column is identical to the normal Title column when used
for sorting and filtering.
Title (linked to item
with edit menu)
Displays the Title column as a link that takes the user to the Edit Item
screen. This column is identical to the normal Title column when used
for sorting and filtering.
Type (icon linked
to document)
Displays an icon linked to the list item’s View Item screen.
Version
The version number of the list item. If the list does not have versioning
enabled, this column will always display a version of 1.0.
Approval Status
The status of the list item in the approval process. Possible values are
Pending, Rejected, and Approved. This column is only available in lists
that require approval.
Approver Comments
The comments entered by the approver during the approval process.
This column is only available in lists that require approval.
The view format is the most important option in determining how the list looks when displayed.
The standard view format lets you choose from a list of styles that control exactly the manner in
which the columns are shown on the list screen. The view style is not available for a Datasheet view.
Table 4-21 describes the different options available to you when choosing the style of your view.
Table 4-21. View Styles
Style
Description
Basic Table
Displays each list item in a single row with each column in the view
being displayed from left to right.
Boxed
List items are displayed in individual boxes, shown with two boxes
side-by-side on each row of the view. Inside each box, the column
information is displayed vertically alongside the column labels. This
style gives the appearance of business cards when the list contains
contact information.
Boxed (no labels)
Identical to the boxed style but without the column labels.
Newsletter
Displays the list items in rows, but in each row, the “Single line of text”
columns that are early in the view’s column order are displayed
horizontally like headlines. All additional columns in the view are
displayed vertically underneath the headline columns without column
labels.
Newsletter (no lines)
Identical to the newsletter style but without horizontal lines separating
the individual list items.
continued
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Table 4-21. Continued
Style
Description
Shaded
Identical to the basic table except that alternating items are displayed
with a background color, making it easier to follow the columns from
left to right for a particular list item.
Preview Pane
The titles of the list items are displayed vertically on the left side of the
view. Hovering over each of these titles dynamically displays the values
of the list item’s other columns on the right side of the view. Figure 4-11
shows the Preview Pane view style.
Figure 4-11. The Preview Pane view style
Views allow you to customize how the list items are displayed in relation to folders in the list.
You can choose to have the view show items inside of folders or display all list items regardless of
the folder structure. SharePoint also allows you to determine where the view is available for the
user. Options include having the view available within all folders or only at the top-most folder of
the list.
Long lists of data that are not filtered down in views will reduce performance when viewed or
make the list extremely long. Many users balk at the idea of scrolling down page after page in their
browser to find the item they need to work with. In addition to the previously discussed features
that reduce these situations, views also impose limits on the number of list items being displayed in
the view. You are given the option of changing SharePoint’s default of displaying batches of 100
items at a time. You can set the count of items in these batches to a different number, or set a hard
limit to the number of items a view shows to users. Choosing the batch option displays the number
of the list items they are currently viewing as well as Next and Previous links to see the next or prior
page of list items, as appropriate.
nTip
When filtering a paged view the filter is applied to the entire list, not just the items on the currently displayed page.
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To create a public standard view, follow these steps:
1. On the list’s page, click the Create View link in the Settings menu of the toolbar.
2. On the Create View screen, click the Standard View link.
3. In the Name section, enter a name for the view, and check the box to make this view the
default view that others will use to access this list.
4. In the Audience section, select Create a Public View, so that other users will be shown a link
to this view.
5. In the Columns section, check the box next to each column that you wish to appear in the
view. You can also specify the order in which the columns will be displayed in the view by
modifying the numbers under the Position from Left heading.
6. In the Sort section, use the drop-down to select the column that will be used to sort the list.
Select whether the sorting should be performed in an ascending (A to Z, 1 to 10) or descending (Z to A, 10 to 1) manner. You can choose an additional sorting column that will be used if
the initial sorting column contains duplicate values.
7. In the Filter section, you can choose to display only the list items that match given criteria.
Use the drop-downs to select a column and an operation, and then type in a value in the
text box. To create more than two filters, click the Show More Columns link.
8. In the Group By section, select a column to display the list items in groups determined by
the values in the column. This section also allows you to determine how the groups are
sorted and whether they are expanded or collapsed by default.
9. In the Totals section, choose any mathematical calculations you wish to perform on the list
items and have displayed in the view. Count is the most common calculation and is a nice
way to let users know how many list items are in the view they are displaying.
10. In the Style section, choose the style for the view, as described in Table 4-17.
11. In the Folders section, determine how items contained within folders should be displayed
and the availability of the view on the list page when navigating folders.
12. In the Item Limit section, select the number of list items that should be displayed and
whether that should be a hard limit or the size of batches that the user can page through.
13. In the Mobile section, determine if the view should be accessible from mobile devices.
Mobile device access to SharePoint sites was discussed in Chapter 2.
14. Click the OK button.
After following these steps, the list page will be displayed using the newly created view. To see
what views have been created for a list and to edit these views, click the List Settings link in the Settings menu of the toolbar on the list page. The Views section at the bottom of the Customize List page
will show you what views exist, which is the default, and in what folders of the list they are available.
Calendar View
What we have discussed so far regarding views pertains mostly to the standard or datasheet types.
The Calendar view format contains different settings to generate its display, which is based primarily on beginning and ending dates from list columns that you specify.
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In addition to determining the columns to use for beginning and ending dates, you must select
which columns are used to display the text in the calendar entry. The view settings call these the
Title and Location of the calendar entry, but you are able to choose any of the list columns to show
in the list page.
Another option for the Calendar view format allows you to choose from three different calendar scopes. These scopes determine the time frame shown in the calendar and are month, week, or
day displays. The option you choose in the view is only the initial display when a user selects the
view. Once displaying the view, the user is able to change the display by clicking links in the calendar’s header or by clicking specific dates in the calendar.
The only other option that is available when creating a Calendar view is a filter. The filter in a
Calendar view works identically to the filter in the Standard and Datasheet view settings. No sorting,
totals, groups, styles, or limits are available in a Calendar view.
To create a public Calendar view, follow these steps:
1. On the list page, click the Create View link in the Settings menu of the toolbar.
2. On the Create View screen, click the Calendar View link.
3. In the Name section, enter a name for the view, and check the box if you want to make this
view the default view that others will use to access this list.
4. In the Audience section, select Create a Public View, so that other users will be shown a link
to this view.
5. In the Time Interval section, select which date columns to base the calendar display on for
beginning and ending dates.
6. In the Calendar Columns section, select the columns that contain the Title and Location
data that should be displayed in the various Calendar views.
7. In the Default Scope section, select the Month View to have the calendar initially display the
current month to the user.
8. In the Filter section, you can choose to display only the list items that match a given criteria.
Use the drop-downs to select a column and an operation, and then type in a value in the
text box. To create more than two filters, click the Show More Columns link.
9. Click the OK button.
After following these steps, the list page will be displayed using the newly created Calendar
view. When shown on the list page, the Calendar view gives the user the ability to navigate time
periods, switch scopes, click specific days or events to see additional detail, or use Quick Launch
navigation to change the selected time period in the current scope. For instance, Quick Launch
navigation shows a list of months when the calendar is displaying the month view, and it shows a
month view when the calendar is displaying the week or day view. Figure 4-12 shows a Calendar
view displayed by week for the previously mentioned Sales example.
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Figure 4-12. A Calendar view
Gantt View
The Gantt view is a combination of the Standard view and a customized Calendar view. The Gantt
view displays list items just like the Standard view, and has the same settings including: Sort, Filter,
Group By, Total, Style, Folder, and Item Limits. The unique aspect of the Gantt view is that, in addition to this standard list item display, it also shows a Gantt chart of the list items.
A Gantt chart is a horizontal bar chart showing a schedule of events including a start date, a
finish date, and milestones. It is usually used to visualize a project plan and schedule of tasks. The
Gantt chart is configured in the view using an additional set of options called Gantt columns available on the Create View and Edit View pages. The columns needed to properly create the Gantt
chart follows:
• Title: Required text column
• Start Date: Required date column
• Due Date: Required date column
• Percent Complete: Optional number column
Remember, you do not need columns with these exact names in your list. You only need to be
able to specify in the view which of your list columns will contain the data to use for this information. Figure 4-13 shows a Gantt view of project tasks.
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Figure 4-13. A Gantt view
Start From Existing
When creating views, instead of selecting the view format on the Create View page, you can select to
create a new view using the view settings of an existing view. This will display the Columns, Sort, Filter, Totals, and other sections prepopulated with the settings from the existing view, allowing you to
quickly create a similar view without entering all of the information again. To do this, on the Create
View page, click the desired existing view in the Start From an Existing View section.
Creating a List Template
Often you need to create multiple lists with the same or similar columns, views, and settings.
Whether you need to create these lists in the same site or create a similar list in multiple sites, it is
extremely inefficient to repeatedly go through the process of creating the list, adding columns, creating views, and all of the other steps that go into making a useful list.
As an example, you may be tracking sales on a SharePoint site. International sales may include
the same column and views that domestic sales would use, but also include additional columns or
views that are not associated with domestic sales. It would be inefficient to create the domestic
sales list with all of its columns and views and then duplicate the effort in order to create the international sales list.
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To make it easier to quickly create lists that are similar in structure, SharePoint allows you to
take any list and make a list template from it. You can even choose to have it maintain the content,
or list items, in the template. Then, when you create a new list in the same site collection, you are
able to select the list template you have created, as shown in Figure 4-14. When the new list is created, it will contain the same columns, views, and settings as the original list and can also contain
the same information.
Figure 4-14. The Create screen with a Clients list template
To create a list template, follow these steps:
1. On the list page, click the List Settings link in the Settings menu of the toolbar.
2. On the Customize List page, click the Save List as Template link in the Permissions and
Management section.
3. Specify a file name, a simple title, and a more elaborate description for the template.
4. If you want the template to contain all of the data and attachments currently in the list,
check the Include Content checkbox. Item-level security is not maintained in a list template, so including content will cause any restricted security on list items to be lost when
creating another list from the template.
5. Click the OK button.
At this point, the template is available for use when creating new lists, as shown in Figure 4-14.
After the template is created, a link that takes you to the list template gallery will be displayed. The
list template gallery allows you to manage all of the list templates that have been created in the site
collection.
To get to the list template gallery from a site, follow these steps:
1. On the site’s home page, click the Site Settings link in the Site Actions menu.
2. If the site you are on is a subsite rather than a top-level site, click the Go to Top Level Site
Settings link under the Site Collection Administration section; otherwise, skip to step 3.
3. On the Site Settings screen, click the List Templates link under the Galleries section.
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Changing the file name, title, and description can be accomplished by clicking the edit icon for
the appropriate template. Clicking the file name link allows you to download the template file from
the SharePoint site. If you have previously created list templates and downloaded the files, you can
upload them into the list template gallery by clicking the Upload link in the toolbar and selecting
the .stp file you want to add to the gallery.
nTip
Template files (.stp files) can be downloaded from SharePoint and uploaded into a different SharePoint site
collection or even a different installation of SharePoint. This can be beneficial when creating a list structure that
can be used in multiple SharePoint environments within your organization.
Deleting the List
You may want to delete a list if the data is no longer needed or if the list was created on the wrong
site. The Customize List page allows you to quickly delete a list from a site.
To delete a list, follow these steps:
1. On the list page, click the List Settings link in the Settings menu of the toolbar.
2. On the Customize List page, click the Delete this List link in the Permissions and Management section.
3. Click OK when prompted for confirmation that you wish to send this list to the site’s
Recycle Bin.
nCaution
Once you click OK on the confirmation for deleting the list, the list and all of the information it contains
will be sent to the site’s Recycle Bin. After a configurable number of days (the standard is 30) in the Recycle Bin, the
list will be permanently deleted, and it will not be possible to recover the list without assistance from your IT staff.
Advanced List Concepts
The SharePoint 2007 platform provides additional, more advanced, features that allow you to manage the structure of your lists and provide alternative methods for users to consume the information
in the list. These features, while requiring more understanding of the product to manage, provide
greater reusability of list structure and accessibility of information.
Site Columns
As you create lists in your sites, you may find that many of these lists contain similar columns. Each
time you create a new list and specify the column structure, you are entering the same column
information anew. The column title, description, and additional settings are being configured each
time you create a column in a list. Columns such as Start Date, End Date, Last Name, First Name,
Email, and Phone end up being used in numerous lists in a SharePoint environment.
The better way to manage columns that are used throughout your sites and lists is to leverage
site columns. Site columns are template column settings that can be created once and used repeatedly each time a column with those settings is needed in a list. For instance, a Department site
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column using the Choice type can be created and include all departments in your company. Any
time a list needs to associate items with a department, this site column can be leveraged.
Newly created sites contain predefined site columns for contact, calendar, document, task, and
issue information.
Creating, Editing, and Deleting Site Columns
Site columns are created and managed in the Site Column Gallery of any site. This allows them to be
available for use in the site where they were created as well as all subsites of that site. If you want a
site column to be available for an entire site collection, it must be created at the top-level site of the
site collection. Site columns use the same data types and are configured using the same additional
settings available with regular columns.
To create a new site column, perform the following steps:
1. On the site’s home page, click the Site Settings link in the Site Actions menu.
2. On the Site Settings screen, click the Site Columns link in the Galleries section.
3. On the Site Column Gallery screen, click the Create link on the toolbar.
4. On the New Site Column screen, enter a short descriptive name for the column.
5. Choose the column type for the information that will be entered into this column.
6. In the Group section, select an existing group to help organize your site columns for easy
management.
7. Specify any settings under the Additional Column Settings section. The settings that appear
in this section are dependent on the column type and will dynamically change if you select
a different column type.
8. Click the OK button.
nTip
To customize the organization of your site columns, select the New Group option, and enter a group name
when creating a new site column.
After these steps are complete, the Site Column Gallery will be displayed, as shown in Figure 4-15,
and it will include your newly created site column under the site column group you specified when
creating the column. The Site Column Gallery also shows you each column’s type and the site where it
was created under the Source heading. All sites under that site have access to the site column.
If the column was created in the currently viewed site, the name will be a link that takes you to
the Change Site Column page, allowing you to edit its settings. If the column was created on the
parent site or another ancestor site, the name will not be displayed as a link, but the Source site will
be a link to the Site Column Gallery of the site where the column was created. To edit the site column settings in this scenario, you must first click the Source site link and then the site column
name.
When editing a site column, there will be an additional “Update All List Columns Based on this
Site Column” option located in an Update Lists section. Selecting No to this and clicking the OK
button will save only the changes for the site column and newly created list columns from that
point on. Selecting Yes to this and clicking the OK button will additionally change the settings for all
of the list columns that have been added to lists based on this site column. Using site columns and
editing them with this option selected allow you to make modifications or corrections to your list
structures in a more controlled and efficient manner.
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Figure 4-15. The Site Column Gallery
To delete a site column, perform the following steps:
1. On the site’s home page, click the Site Settings link in the Site Actions menu.
2. On the Site Settings screen, click the Site Columns link in the Galleries section.
3. On the Site Column Gallery screen, click the Site Column link for the column you want to
delete.
4. On the Change Site Column screen, click the Delete button.
5. When prompted to confirm that you wish to delete the site column and orphan the list
columns associated with it, click the OK button.
nCaution
Once you select OK on the confirmation for deleting the site column, it is permanently deleted from
the site. All list columns that were added using this site column become normal columns in their respective lists,
no longer managed centrally. Ensure that the site column is no longer needed at the site level before confirming
that it should be deleted.
Adding Site Columns to Lists
Whether you use the site columns that are available in a standard SharePoint installation or you
have created custom site columns, they must be added to lists within your site in order to leverage
their benefits. To improve the maintenance and standardization of your SharePoint environment,
instead of creating list columns for information that has a standard format and column settings,
add the column to your list using a site column.
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To add a site column to a list, perform the following steps:
1. On the list’s page, click the List Settings link in the Settings menu of the toolbar.
2. On the Customize List screen, click the Add from Existing Site Columns link under the
Columns section.
3. On the Add Columns from Site Columns screen, shown in Figure 4-16, select each column
you want to add to the list in the Available Site Columns box, and click the Add button.
Change the Select Site Columns From selection to filter the list of available columns, allowing you to more easily find the desired site columns.
4. In the Options section, check the Add to Default View box if you want these site columns to
be displayed in the list’s default view.
5. Click the OK button.
nTip
You can only add a site column once to each list.
Figure 4-16. Adding site columns to a list
Once the column has been added to your list, it will be available to manage, view, edit and
delete exactly like a regular list column. If, however, the site column is edited and the option to
update all lists is selected, any changes in settings you make at the list level will be lost.
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Content Types
SharePoint takes the concept of site columns a step further, allowing you to create groups of site
columns called Content Types. Content Types are defined for a site and can then be applied to lists.
This allows for an even more manageable and reusable structure than leveraging site columns alone.
Multiple content types can be associated with a single list to store items with multiple formats in a
single list. For instance, Domestic Contact and Foreign Contact content types can be created with
slightly different columns needed for address information. Both can be associated with a single list to
store and manage your corporate contacts.
Newly created sites contain predefined site content types for contact, event, document, task,
issue, and other information.
Creating Site Content Types
Site content types are managed in the Site Content Type Gallery found in the site settings of a site.
Like site columns, content types are available on the site where they are created and all of its subsites. If you want a content type to be available for an entire site collection it must be created at the
top-level site of the site collection.
To create a site content type, perform the following steps:
1. On the site’s home page, click the Site Settings link in the Site Actions menu.
2. On the Site Settings screen, click the Site Content Types link in the Galleries section.
3. On the Site Content Type Gallery screen, click the Create link on the toolbar.
4. On the New Site Content Type screen, enter a short descriptive name and an optional longer
description for the column.
5. Choose the parent content type using the Group and Content Type selections. Your new content type will be initially created using the columns and settings of the parent content type.
6. In the Group section, select an existing group to help organize your site content type for
easy management.
7. Click the OK button.
nTip
To customize the organization of your site content types, select the New Group option, and enter a group
name when creating a new site content type.
After you perform the previous steps, the Site Content Type page is displayed allowing you to
further manage your newly created content type.
Managing Site Content Types
Site content types are managed within the Site Content Type Gallery. The gallery is available from
the Site Content Type Gallery link on the Site Settings page. The Site Content Type Gallery screen
displays the content types available in the current site along with their parent type and the site
where they were created. The names of content types created on the current site will be links that
take you to Site Content Type management screen.
The Site Content Type management screen, shown in Figure 4-17, enables you to manage the
settings and columns of the selected site content type as well as delete the content type from its site.
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To delete a site content type, perform the following steps:
1. On the site’s home page, click the Site Settings link in the Site Actions menu.
2. On the Site Settings screen, click the Site Content Types link in the Galleries section.
3. On the Site Content Type Gallery screen, click the Site Content Type link for the Site Content
Type you want to delete.
4. On the Site Content Type screen, click the Delete this Site Content Type link in the Settings
section.
5. When prompted to confirm that you wish to delete the site content type, click the OK button.
nTip
A site content type that has been added to a list cannot be deleted. Clicking the OK button on the deletion
confirmation window will result in a message stating that the content type is in use. To delete the content type, it
must first be removed from every list that it has been added to.
Figure 4-17. The Contact site content type
Settings
The settings for a site content type are divided into two main groups. The first group contains basic
information about the content type and is accessed via the Name, Description, and Group link on
the Site Content Type page. Table 4-22 lists the basic settings for site content types.
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Table 4-22. Basic Settings for Site Content Types
Setting
Description
Name
The name used to identify the site content type through your SharePoint site
collection.
Description
A more elaborate explanation of the list’s purpose. This is displayed to the
user when adding the content type to a list. See the Managing List Content
Types section later in this chapter for adding content types to lists.
Group
The group used for organizing the site content type in the Site Content Type
Gallery and other places where it is displayed. A new group can be created by
selecting the New Group option and entering a name.
The second group contains a setting for making the content type read-only. If the content type
is based on the document content type, a Document Template setting is also available. Table 4-23
lists the advanced settings for site content types.
Table 4-23. Advanced Settings for Site Content Types
Setting
Description
Document Template
Specifies which file to use as the template when users create new
documents from the content type. This setting only appears in content
types related to the document content type. Documents, templates,
and libraries are discussed in more detail in Chapter 6.
Read Only
Prevents modifications to the site content type, including editing the
content type after it has been added to a list.
Update Sites and Lists
Determines if a change to the Read Only setting affects all existing lists.
Columns
The columns of a site content type are managed in a similar fashion to the columns of a list. The
most significant difference is that all of the columns in a site content type must be site columns.
The Site Content Type page displays a list of the columns currently associated with the content
type, along with the type, status, and source. The types are the familiar data types that you have
used when creating columns in lists. The status is a choice of three options: Required, Optional, or
Hidden. A hidden column will not be displayed to the user, yet remains a member of the column
type. The source is the site content type that the column is directly associated with. Since site content types inherit their columns from their parents, and those parents inherit their columns from
their parents, the source can be any ancestor content type of the currently displayed one.
To add an existing site column to a content type, perform the following steps:
1. On the Site Content Type screen, click the Add from Existing Site Columns link in the Columns
section.
2. On the Add Columns to Existing Site Content Type screen, select each column you want to
add to the list in the Available Site Columns box, and click the Add button. Change the
Select Columns From selection to filter the list of available columns, allowing you more to
more easily find the desired site columns.
3. In the Update List and Site Content Types section, select Yes to update existing lists that use
this site content type.
4. Click the OK button.
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You also have the ability to create a new site column and add it to the content type in a single
process. Rather than clicking the Add from Existing Site Columns link on the Site Content Type
page, click the Add from New Site Column link and proceed in the manner described earlier in the
“Managing Site Columns” section.
Changing the column order is available by clicking the Column Order link on the Site Content
Type screen and modifying the Position from Top values for each column.
To delete a column from a content type, click the name of the column, and click the Remove
button at the bottom of the page. You will be requested for confirmation that you wish to permanently delete this column from all instances of this content type.
Workflows can be defined for content types. To begin creating a workflow for a content type,
click the Workflow Settings link on the Site Content Type screen. Workflows are discussed in detail
throughout Chapter 7.
Managing List Content Types
Once you have created your site content types, or if you are using the default content types available in SharePoint, you need to add them to a list to leverage their structure and capabilities. Since
content types are an advanced feature meant for power users, a list must first have content type
management enabled before it can use them. Enable the Allow Management of Content Types list
setting, available in the Advanced Settings screen of a list as described in the Managing Lists section
of this chapter.
Adding Content Types to a List
When content type management is enabled for a list, the Customize List screen will contain an additional section labeled Content Types. This section will display all of the content types associated with
the list, each showing if they are available in the New menu of the toolbar on the list page and which
content type is the default.
To add a site content type to a list, perform the following steps:
1. On the Customize List screen, click the Add from Existing Site Content Types link in the
Content Types section.
2. On the Add Content Types screen, select each content type you want to add to the list in the
Available Site Content Types box, and click the Add button. Change the Select Site Content
Types From selection to filter the list of available choice, allowing you more to more easily
find the desired site content types.
3. Click the OK button.
Once these steps have been completed, the content type will be available to users in the New
menu on the toolbar of the list page as shown in Figure 4-18. By using this menu to select what type
of new item they want to create, they can add items with different structures to the same list.
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Figure 4-18. Multiple content types in a list
Editing and Deleting the List Content Type
Clicking the name of a content type in the Content Types section of the Customize List screen
brings you to the List Content Type page used for managing a content type that has been added to
the list. From this page you can change the settings of the content type or manage the columns
associated with it. Editing the content type on the List Content Type page will only affect the content type for the current list, not the Site Content Type.
The Name and Description link brings you to a screen that allows you to modify the name and
description of the content type for this list. This is important, as this information is what is displayed to users when they are creating new items in the list. It is best to be as informative and
specific as possible, so that the users pick the correct content type for their needs. The Advanced
Settings link brings you to a screen that allows you to determine if the content type should be
editable at the list level. This will help prevent other users from mistakenly making changes that
could affect the integrity of the list and its data.
The Columns section of the List Content Type page contains everything you need to manage
the columns associated with the content type for the list. Similar to the way you manage columns in
Site Content Types, you can add a column to the content type from existing site content types. The
Add Columns to List Content Type page will also let you add custom list columns that have been
created for the list to the content type.
Clicking the name of a column in the Columns section presents the List Content Type Column
screen. This screen gives you the ability to make the column Required, Optional, or Hidden. The column can be removed from the content type by clicking the Remove button at the bottom of the page.
The Delete this Content Type on the List Content Type page lets you remove the content type
from the list. You cannot remove a content type if there are items in the list that currently use it.
These items must first be deleted before the link will allow you to successfully delete the content
type from the list.
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nNote
Restoring a list item whose content type has been deleted out of the Recycle Bin will cause the item to
use the default content type.
The list allows you to configure which content types are visible to the user, the order that they
appear, and which is the default content type that is used with the New link in the toolbar of the list
page is clicked. Clicking the Change New Button Order and Default Content Type link on the Customize List page displays a list of all content types associated with the list, along with boxes that
determine if a content type is available to the user, and a Position from Top selection to determine
the order of the content types when displayed to the user.
nTip
The content type in position 1 is always the default content type.
RSS Feed Settings
Really Simple Syndication (RSS) is a technology standard for allowing applications, also known as
readers, to subscribe to information from other web sites. RSS feeds provide updated data in a standard format that can be interpreted and processed by feed-reading applications. The SharePoint
2007 technologies allow you to expose lists as RSS feeds that other users can subscribe to in order to
consume the list data. A common use for this is to enable lists containing corporate news or
announcements to be accessible on mobile devices and other enterprise applications that read RSS
data.
Before a list can be exposed as an RSS feed, RSS must be enabled on both the site and site collection. Feeds are enabled by default when a site collection and sites are created.
To enable RSS feeds at a site collection level, perform the following steps:
1. On the site’s home page, click the Site Settings link in the Site Actions menu.
2. If the site you are on is a subsite rather than a top-level site, click the Go to Top Level Site
Settings link under the Site Collection Administration section; otherwise, skip to step 3.
3. On the Site Settings screen, click the RSS link in the Site Administration section.
4. On the RSS screen, check the “Allow RSS feeds in this site collection” box in the Site Collection RSS section.
5. Check the “Allow RSS feeds in this site” box in the Enable RSS section.
6. Enter any additional settings for the RSS feed in the Advanced Settings section. These settings apply to all RSS feeds created in the site collection.
7. Click the OK button.
Once RSS is enabled at the site collection level, it must be enabled on the site that contains
your list. To enable RSS on a site, perform the previous steps skipping steps 2 and 4. Now that RSS is
enabled at the parent-site and site collection levels, the appropriate link to the RSS settings will
appear in the Communication section on the Customize List page. Table 4-24 describes the RSS settings you can edit to customize the feed.
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Table 4-24. RSS Settings for SharePoint Lists
Setting
Description
Allow RSS
Enables or disables RSS for the list.
Truncate Multi-line Text
Determines if the RSS feed only contains the first 256 characters for all
Multiple lines of text fields in the list. For lists with large amounts of
text stored in “Multiple lines of text” columns, selecting Yes to truncate
these fields to 256 characters will improve performance of SharePoint
and the RSS reader.
Title
May be used by RSS readers when displaying the feed to users to show
the purpose of the feed.
Description
May be used by RSS readers when displaying the feed to users to
convey a longer explanation of the feed’s contents.
Image URL
May be used by RSS readers when displaying the feed.
Columns
Determines which list columns have their data included in the feed and
in what order.
Maximum Items
The maximum number of items to include in the feed’s contents of
recently changed list items.
Maximum Days
The furthest amount of time back that RSS will go when looking for
recently changed list items to include in the feed.
To enable RSS feeds for a list, perform the following steps:
1. On the list’s page, click the List Settings link in the Settings menu on the toolbar.
2. On the Customize List screen, click the RSS Settings link in the Communications section.
3. On the Modify List RSS Settings screen, select the Yes option for the “Allow RSS for this List”
setting.
4. In the RSS Channel Information section, modify the Title, Description, and Image URL for
this list’s feed.
5. In the Columns section, check the box next to each column that you want included in the
RSS feed, and determine their positions by modifying their associated Display Order numbers, the same way you select columns to include in a view.
6. In the Item Limit section, enter the maximum number of items to include in the feed and
how old those items can be.
7. Click the OK button.
When these steps are completed, users are able to read the list using RSS. Each view in the list
has its own URL that users will need when configuring their RSS readers. A view’s RSS URL can be
obtained from the list page. On the list page, click the View RSS Feed link in the Actions menu. This
will take you to the view’s RSS feed, which is shown using Internet Explorer 6 in Figure 4-19. When
this is displayed, copy the URL from your browser’s address bar for use in RSS readers.
nNote
To subscribe to your list via RSS with an RSS-compliant reader, either search the Internet for the many
available RSS feed reader applications or use the RSS Viewer web part that is available when SharePoint Server
2007 is installed in your environment. For more information on this web part, see Chapter 8.
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Figure 4-19. A list RSS feed displayed in a browser
Advanced Office Integration
There are many advanced features when using the Office desktop products that allow you to manage list information. Most of these enhanced abilities are provided through Excel 2003 or later and
allow you to view, edit, and manipulate list data from within an Excel spreadsheet instead of
through the SharePoint site. We will describe some of the more useful features including exporting
SharePoint list information into Excel, importing Excel data into a SharePoint list, and synchronizing data changes between the two.
Exporting SharePoint Lists to Excel
The ability to take existing lists and export the list items into a spreadsheet is fairly straightforward.
This can be beneficial when providing the information to someone without access to the list or
when you need to test what-if scenarios on the data without making permanent changes to the list.
To export a list to Excel, follow these steps:
1. Navigate to a SharePoint list you want to export.
2. On the list’s page, click the Export to Spreadsheet link in the Actions menu on the toolbar.
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3. If you are prompted about opening or saving the Microsoft Office Excel Web Query File,
click the Open button.
a. On the Opening Query dialog box in Excel 2003, click the Open button to confirm that
you want to run the query to export the information into the Excel spreadsheet.
b. On the Microsoft Office Excel Security Notice dialog box in Excel 2007, click the Enable
button to confirm that you want Excel to read a data connection to the SharePoint list.
4. If you already have Excel open, the Import Data dialog box will appear. Choose where to put
the list. Options include a region on the current worksheet, a new worksheet, or a new
workbook. If you did not have Excel running, the data will be put into a new workbook.
nNote
When exporting list information to Excel, all list items displayed by the current view are exported. Items
removed from the view by its filter setting are not included, but setting the temporary filter on the list screen has
no affect on the data exported.
The Excel List
The new data that appears after performing the preceding steps is actually more than just values in
a spreadsheet format. This information is treated as a list within Excel 2003. You can tell that a
region of cells in Excel is a list by the colored box surrounding the cells, the column headings that
act as filters using drop-down menus, and the additional list actions available in the Excel 2003
menu under the Data option, as shown in Figure 4-20, or the Design menu displayed in Excel 2007
when the list is selected. These list actions are also available by right-clicking the list in the spreadsheet or by displaying the List toolbar within Excel 2003.
Figure 4-20. An Excel List in Excel 2003 after exporting from SharePoint
The power of the Excel List is that it is linked to the list in SharePoint that was used to create the
spreadsheet. This allows you to make changes to the data in Excel 2003 and have those changes
applied to the list in SharePoint, or vice versa. Of the available Excel List actions, the following are
the most important to the integration with SharePoint (shown with 2003/2007 labels):
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• View List on Server/Open in Browser
• Unlink List/Unlink
• Synchronize List/(Not available in Excel 2007)
• Discard Changes and Refresh/Refresh
The View List on Server/Open in Browser action launches your browser and displays the
default view of the linked SharePoint list.
The Unlink List/Unlink action removes the link between the Excel List and the SharePoint list.
After unlinking the lists, data changes can no longer be synchronized between them. You may do
this when you have completed your what-if scenarios or data editing and no longer want the Excel
sheet used as an interface for changing the SharePoint list information. Once this unlinking is performed, the Excel List cannot be relinked to the same SharePoint list; you would have to export the
SharePoint list again using the steps provided earlier.
The Synchronize List action is the most important of the advanced actions when using linked
lists. This action sends any changes made to the Excel List to SharePoint and updates the Excel List
with any changes that users have made to the SharePoint list. Synchronizing the lists often ensures
that everyone is viewing the latest information whether they are using SharePoint or the Excel
sheet.
Sometimes a conflict occurs when you have edited a value in Excel and, before synchronizing,
a user has edited the same value in the SharePoint list. The next time you choose to synchronize the
lists, Excel will display the Resolve Conflicts and Errors dialog box. This dialog box displays each list
item that has had conflicting changes made to it, highlights the conflict, and allows you to choose
how to resolve it. For each conflict, you can discard or apply your change. You can also choose to
have Excel discard or apply your changes for all conflicts at once.
nNote
Excel 2007 does not allow you to synchronize modifications to the data back to the SharePoint list.
The Discard Changes and Refresh/Refresh action retrieves the list information from the SharePoint list and uses it to repopulate the Excel List. Any changes you have made in the Excel List are
overwritten by the list data from SharePoint.
Creating Custom Lists Using Excel
In the “Exporting SharePoint Lists to Excel” section, we described how to take an existing SharePoint
list and manage the data in Excel. The integration between Office 2003 or later and Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 also allows you to use an existing Excel sheet as the basis for creating a SharePoint
list. There are two ways of doing this: by importing the spreadsheet and publishing the list.
Importing the Spreadsheet
If you have followed the steps to create a custom list earlier in this chapter, you may have noticed an
Import Spreadsheet link on the site’s Create page under the Custom Lists section. This Import Spreadsheet link provides the starting point when creating a custom list based on existing Excel data.
To create a custom list from existing Excel data, follow these steps:
1. On the site’s home page, click the Create link in the Site Actions menu.
2. On the Create page, click the Import Spreadsheet link in the Custom Lists section.
3. On the New page, enter a name and description for the list.
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4. In the Import from Spreadsheet section, click the Browse button.
5. On the Choose File dialog box, locate and select the Excel file that contains your source
data; then click the Open button.
6. On the New page, click the Import button. The spreadsheet will open in Excel, and the
Import to Windows SharePoint Services List dialog box will be displayed.
7. In the Import to Windows SharePoint Services List dialog box, select the range type. Range
of Cells allows you to select the cells from the spreadsheet, while List Range and Named
Range allow you to select an existing range using the Select Range drop-down.
8. Click the Import button.
nNote
The Import to Windows SharePoint Services list dialog box will not allow you to import cells that already
are linked to another SharePoint list.
Publishing the List
The second way to create a custom list using existing Excel data is by publishing the list from within
Excel. Before you can publish the list, your Excel data must be converted to an Excel List in Excel
2003 or a Table in Excel 2007. To convert your values to an Excel List, follow these steps:
1. Highlight the range of values by clicking the top-left value and dragging the mouse to the
bottom-right value.
2. Under the Data menu, choose the List submenu, and click the Create List action.
3. On the Create List dialog box, click the “My List has Headers” check box if your values
include column headers.
4. Click the OK button.
Once your values are formatted as an Excel List, you are able to publish them as a custom list to
a SharePoint site. To publish the list using Excel 2003, follow these steps:
1. Select the Excel List.
2. Under the Data menu, choose the List submenu, and click the Publish List action.
3. On the Publish List to SharePoint Site dialog box, enter the URL of the SharePoint site where
the list should be created.
4. Select the check box labeled Link to the New SharePoint List. This makes the Excel List and
SharePoint list linked as described earlier.
5. Enter a name and description for the list.
6. Click the Next button.
7. On the Publish List to SharePoint Site dialog box, verify the columns and data types that will
be created. If there is a problem, cancel the publishing, and make changes to the spreadsheet.
8. Click the Finish button.
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After performing the preceding steps, a dialog box will display giving you a link to the new custom list in SharePoint. If you checked the “Link to the New SharePoint List” box, the lists will be linked
allowing you to perform the actions described in the Excel List discussion earlier. This includes synchronizing changes between the Excel List and the new SharePoint list.
To convert your values to a Table in Excel 2007, highlight the range of values, and click the
Format As Table button in the Styles section of the Home menu. Select a table style and additional
options for the table on subsequent windows.
To export the list in Excel 2007, use the Export button in the External Table Data section of the
Design menu. Clicking the Export Table to SharePoint List option will display a window allowing
you to specify the URL of the site along with a title and description for the new list.
Advanced Datasheet Features
Earlier in this chapter, we discussed the use of the Datasheet view for enhanced editing of list data.
The Datasheet view contains numerous features that allow for integration with Office desktop products. These features, described in Table 4-25, can be found by clicking the Task Pane link in the
Actions menu on the Datasheet view’s toolbar. The task pane will appear on the right side of the
Datasheet view and consists of a toolbar and Office Links section, as shown in Figure 4-21.
Table 4-25. Office 2007 Datasheet Task Pane Links
Feature
Description
Track this List in Access
Creates a new Access-linked table in either a new or an existing
Access database. The linked table is synchronized with the SharePoint
list. Any changes made in Access are also visible in the SharePoint list
and vice-versa. This link does not appear if you have Office 2003
installed.
Export to Access
Exports the list information into a new Access table in either a new or
an existing Access database. When doing this, the list and Access
database are not linked, and the two cannot be synchronized.
Report with Access
Creates a new Access-linked table in either a new or an existing
Access database and then generates an Access report based on the
information in the linked table.
Query list with Excel
Exports the list information in the same manner as the Export to
Spreadsheet link on the Actions menu. If you have Office 2003
installed, this feature will still exist in the task pane but will be called
Export and Link to Excel.
Print with Excel
Exports the list information to Excel and displays the Print dialog box,
allowing you to quickly print out the list items.
Chart with Excel
Exports the list information to Excel and displays the Chart Wizard
dialog box, allowing you to create graphs and charts based on the list
items.
Create Excel
PivotTable Report
Exports the list information to Excel and displays the PivotTable Field
List dialog box and toolbar. The PivotTable allows you to select from
the columns in the SharePoint list and create PivotTable reports with
the capability to alter rows and columns interactively to display data
detail in different ways.
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Figure 4-21. The Datasheet view’s task pane
nNote
For more information on Office desktop application features like PivotTables and Access reporting, please
see the product documentation.
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Lists
W
indows SharePoint Services 3.0 and SharePoint Server 2007 include list templates you can use
when creating the lists you will need for your sites and meeting workspaces. Lists created from
these templates use the same concepts, such as settings, columns, and views, that were described in
Chapter 4. Many of these templates also include additional capabilities and enhanced integration
with Office products that is not available when leveraging custom lists. By understanding these
unique features, you can choose the right list and customize it further to make the best use of
SharePoint technologies.
Creating custom lists (used for the examples in Chapter 4) for all of your information needs,
while powerful and flexible, can become time consuming. Using the provided list templates within
the many varieties of team sites and meeting workspaces greatly reduces the amount of time it
takes to design and build all of the facilities you will use to manage data. In addition to an existing
structure of list columns, these list templates come with a number of views appropriate to the list
template’s purpose and intended to make the list items more manageable for your users. These lists
still allow you to modify the structure by adding, modifying, or removing columns, site columns, or
content types as you deem appropriate. Managing the views and settings of a list created from a
template is performed in the manner described in Chapter 4.
We will describe each of these lists and their unique capabilities in this chapter; the descriptions are organized by the list sections that best articulate their main functions on the Create page:
Communications, Tracking, and Custom Lists. To create a new list, perform the following steps:
1. On the site’s home page, click the Create link in the Site Actions menu.
2. On the Create screen, click the link of your desired template under the Communications,
Tracking, or Custom Lists sections.
3. On the New screen, enter a name and description for the list.
4. Under the Navigation section, select Yes if you want a link to the list displayed on the Quick
Launch menu of the site.
5. Click the Create button.
This chapter will also refer to lists that have been added to a web part page on a site. Instructions for doing this are discussed in detail in Chapter 8.
Communications
The first grouping of list templates provided by SharePoint and displayed on the Create page is the
communications group. This group of lists provides you with templates to facilitate communication
with other users of the site. The communications group consists of the following list templates:
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• Announcements
• Contacts
• Discussion Board
Announcements
The Announcements list template allows you to easily create a list of items intended to inform site
users of important messages or news. The list contains a single view called All Items, which displays
the title of the announcement as well as the last time it was modified. The columns in the
Announcements list template are shown in Table 5-1.
Table 5-1. Announcements List Columns
Column
Type
Notes
Title
Single line of text
Short text that is used as a heading for the
announcement.
Body
Multiple lines of text
Longer text message of the announcement.
Expires
Date and Time
The date when the list item is no longer relevant. This
allows views to filter out older items to display only the
most recent announcements.
The announcements list is often added to the home web part page of a site (adding web parts
to a page is discussed in Chapter 8). Having the announcements list, shown in Figure 5-1, as one of
the first lists displayed on a site allows you to increase your ability to keep users up-to-date on the
latest relevant news.
Figure 5-1. The announcements list displayed on a site
nNote
The default view used when the announcements list is added to a web part page filters on the Expires
column with an expression of Expires is greater than or equal to [Today]. This helps keep the list of
announcements displayed short, as list items are not displayed once the Expires date passes.
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Incoming E-mail Capabilities
The Announcements list is one of a few list templates that have the capability to process incoming
e-mail messages. Each announcements list can be configured with an e-mail address that users can
send messages to. When a user sends a message to this e-mail address, the content of the message is
saved as a new announcement in the list.
nNote
Before incoming e-mail capabilities become accessible, your SharePoint technical administrator will need
to configure your SharePoint environment to correctly process incoming e-mail.
If incoming e-mail capabilities are available, the announcement list’s Create page will contain
an Incoming E-Mail section. This section lets you enable incoming e-mail for the list and determine
what e-mail address users will need to send messages to for the content to be saved in the SharePoint list.
You can add and further define incoming e-mail capabilities for existing lists using the Incoming E-Mail Settings link in the Communications section of the Customize List page. To add
incoming e-mail handling to an Announcements list, perform the following steps:
1. On the list’s page, click the List Settings link in the Settings menu of the toolbar.
2. On the Customize List screen, click the Incoming E-Mail Settings link under the Communications section.
3. On the Incoming E-Mail Settings screen, make the following selections:
a. In the Incoming E-Mail section, select Yes to allow the list to receive e-mail, and enter
the address that users will send messages to for this list.
b. In the E-Mail Attachments section, select Yes if you want file attachments on incoming
messages saved as attachments to the list items.
c. In the E-Mail Message section, select Yes if you want the original e-mail message saved
as an attachment to the list items.
d. In the E-Mail Meeting Invitations section, select Yes if you want meeting invitation messages to be saved as list items.
e. In the E-Mail Security section, determine if you want all users to be able to send messages to the list or only those users with access based on SharePoint security.
nCaution
Allowing anyone to send e-mail messages to your list bypasses the list security that has been configured and allows potentially malicious activity such as spamming the list with new items. It is best to limit e-mail
security to those with access to the list or enable content approval to restrict the items that are publicly displayed.
4. Click the OK button.
Once the list has been configured to allow incoming e-mail messages, users can send e-mail to
the corresponding address to create new items in the list. For an announcements list, the Title column uses the e-mail’s subject and the Body column is determined by the e-mail’s body. Items added
using an incoming e-mail contain a Created From E-Mail link on their View Item page. Clicking this
link takes you to the E-Mail Details page, which displays information about the original e-mail
including Sender, From, To, CC, and Subject.
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Contacts
The Contacts list template is helpful in maintaining contact information for people that your site
users may need to reach. This could include other team members’ clients’, or vendors’ information.
The contacts list, shown in Figure 5-2, contains a single view called All Contacts, which by default
displays the last name, first name, company, business phone, home phone, and e-mail address of
each contact. The columns in the Contacts list template are shown in Table 5-2.
Figure 5-2. The contacts list screen
Table 5-2. Contacts List Columns
Column
Type
Notes
Last Name
Single line of text
First Name
Single line of text
Full Name
Single line of text
Full Name is a stand-alone text column and is not
calculated from the Last Name and First Name
columns.
E-mail Address
Single line of text
Accepts any text, as no validation is done on the
value entered to ensure that it is a proper e-mail
address format. If the value is a proper e-mail
address, it is displayed as an e-mail link.
Company
Single line of text
Job Title
Single line of text
Business Phone
Single line of text
Accepts any text, as no validation is done on the
value entered to ensure that it adheres to a
proper phone number format.
Home Phone
Single line of text
Accepts any text, as no validation is done on the
value entered to ensure that it adheres to a
proper phone number format.
Mobile Phone
Single line of text
Accepts any text, as no validation is done on the
value entered to ensure that it adheres to a
proper phone number format.
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Column
Type
Notes
Fax Number
Single line of text
Accepts any text, as no validation is done on the
value entered to ensure that it adheres to a
proper phone number format.
Address
Multiple lines of text
City
Single line of text
State/Province
Single line of text
ZIP/Postal Code
Single line of text
Country/Region
Single line of text
Web Page
Hyperlink
Notes
Multiple lines of text
Accepts any text, as no validation is done on the
value entered to ensure that it adheres to a
proper postal code format.
Link to corporate or personal web page.
Exporting Contacts
The Contacts list template provides many ways in which to integrate your contact information with
other applications that use contacts. SharePoint allows you to both import and export contact information from your Windows Address Book. Exporting allows the contacts in your list to be available
in such applications as Outlook. Contacts must be exported individually from SharePoint. To export
a contact, use the following steps:
1. On the contacts list’s page, activate the contact item’s context menu by hovering over the
item with your mouse and clicking the inverted triangle.
2. Click the Export Contact link in the context menu.
3. When you are prompted that you are downloading a file, click the Open button.
a. If you have Outlook installed, a New Contact window will appear with information populated from the SharePoint contact. Click the Save and Close buttons on the toolbar.
b. If you do not have Outlook installed, a Contact Properties window will appear. Click the
Add to Address Book button, and the properties will become editable. Click the OK button to add the contact to your Address Book.
4. The contact will now appear in your Address Book.
Connecting Contacts Lists with Outlook
In addition to exporting contacts to your Windows Address Book, SharePoint allows you to link the
contacts list with Outlook 2003 or later. Linking a SharePoint contacts list with Outlook creates a
contacts folder in Outlook that displays contact information retrieved from SharePoint.
The list of contacts is read-only if you are using Outlook 2003, so all modifications must be
performed in the SharePoint contacts list. However, if you are using Outlook 2007 or later, the list
of contacts is editable, and all changes are synchronized back to the SharePoint contacts list. This
ensures that the information is centrally managed yet still available for use by everyone within
Outlook.
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Link a contacts list with Outlook using the following steps:
1. On the contacts list page, click the Connect to Outlook link in the Actions menu on the toolbar.
2. On the Outlook confirmation window, click the Yes button to confirm the connection
between the list and Outlook.
3. The linked list will display as a new folder in the Other Contacts section of your Outlook
contacts as shown in Figure 5-3.
Figure 5-3. A linked contacts list in Outlook
nTip
Outlook caches a local copy of the contacts list so that, even if you are not able to connect to SharePoint,
you can still see the contact information as of the last time you viewed the list from Outlook.
If you edit a contact in Outlook 2003 that has been linked from SharePoint, you are told that the
item is read-only. Outlook 2003 allows you to save a copy of the contact in your default contacts list
where you can make changes, but the items are not linked to SharePoint. The best place to make
changes to the contact information is in the SharePoint contacts list, as the new information will be
presented each time you open the list in Outlook 2003.
If you edit a contact in Outlook 2007 that has been linked with SharePoint and save the changes,
your modifications are saved back to the contacts list in SharePoint. You can also copy contacts
between your Outlook contact folders and the newly linked contacts list folder by performing the following steps:
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1. In Outlook 2007, open your Outlook contacts display.
2. In the contacts folder, select the contact, and press Ctrl+C to copy it.
3. Select the SharePoint contacts list folder, and press Ctrl+V to paste the contact into the
SharePoint contacts list.
4. When presented with the message that any fields that are not compatible between the two
folders will be ignored, click Yes to confirm that you want to continue.
a. If a contact with the same name and e-mail address exists, a window is displayed
explaining that a duplicate contact was found. Select the appropriate option, and click
the Update button.
5. Open the SharePoint contact list in your browser. A new contact list item will be displayed
with the information from the Outlook contact.
nCaution
If you have Office 2003 or later installed and still cannot import/export or link contact information,
your installation may not be complete. Have an administrator ensure that the Windows SharePoint Services Support component of Office 2003 or later has been installed and that Outlook is your default e-mail client.
Discussion Board
If you have ever used an Internet news group or web site discussion forum, then SharePoint’s Discussion Board list template will be familiar to you. The purpose of a discussion board is to organize
messages around similar topics and to facilitate an online exchange of ideas. New messages can be
created as well as replies to existing messages recorded. The columns of a discussion board list
include the user-editable columns shown in Table 5-3 as well as some special columns that SharePoint uses to manage how the list items are related and displayed.
Table 5-3. Discussion Board List Columns
Column
Type
Body
Multiple lines of text
Subject
Single line of text
A Last Updated column displays the date and time of the last reply or modification in the thread.
There is also a Reply column that can be used in a user-created view to display an icon that, when
clicked, allows a user to reply to the current discussion thread. The Post column displays both the
Subject and Body data while the Posted By column displays the user that created the post along with
the image associated with that user.
The initial view for a discussion board is the Subject view, which displays a list of all of the topics that have been created in the board including the creator, the number of replies, and the Last
Updated column for the topic. Once you click a topic within the Subject view, the discussion board
presents two views that show the discussion messages for a topic in distinct ways, Threaded or Flat.
Users often have their own preferences for viewing discussion forums in one of the two views
described in Table 5-4.
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Table 5-4. Discussion Board List Views
View
Description
Subject
This is the default view; it displays the subject, creator, number of replies, and the
time of the last update for each topic in the discussion board.
Threaded
This view displays the posted date, posted by information, and post message for
the initial message and all of the replies within the topic in a hierarchical order,
as shown in Figure 5-4.
Flat
Displays the posted date, posted by information, and post message for the initial
message and all of the replies in the order that they were created.
Figure 5-4. The discussion board displaying the threaded view
Using the Discussion Board
Aside from reading the message in a discussion board, you will want to do two things: create new
discussion threads and reply to existing threads. To create a new discussion thread, click the New
link on the toolbar of the discussion board screen. Enter a subject and text, and click the OK button
just as you would when creating new list items in other list types.
To reply to an existing thread, click the Reply link in the context menu of a list item in the Subject view. To reply to another post in a thread, click the Reply link on the appropriate message
header shown in the Threaded or Flat view. Both methods take you to a New Item screen. Enter a
message, and click the OK button to create a new post within the thread.
When using SharePoint Server 2007’s incoming e-mail capabilities as described in Chapter 4,
the discussion board maintains the thread’s hierarchy of replies for e-mails that are sent to the list.
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Incoming E-mail Capabilities
The Discussion Board list template is another template that has the capability to process incoming
e-mail messages. Each discussion board can be configured with an e-mail address that users can
send messages to. When a user sends a message to this e-mail address, the content of the message is
saved as a new topic in the list. When users reply to the e-mail message, their messages are saved as
replies in the relevant topic of the discussion board.
nNote
Before incoming e-mail capabilities become accessible, your SharePoint technical administrator will need
to configure your SharePoint environment to correctly process incoming e-mail.
If incoming e-mail capabilities are available, the discussion board’s Create page will contain an
Incoming E-Mail section. This section lets you enable incoming e-mail for the list and determine what
e-mail address users will need to send messages to for the content to be saved in the SharePoint list.
You can add and further define incoming e-mail capabilities for existing lists using the Incoming
E-Mail Settings link in the Communications section of the Customize List page. To add incoming e-mail
handling to a discussion board, use the steps outlined in the Incoming E-Mail Capabilities section of
the Announcements list earlier in this chapter.
Once the list has been configured to allow incoming e-mail messages, users can send e-mail to
the corresponding address to create new items in the list. For a discussion board, the Subject column
uses the e-mail’s subject, and the Body column is determined by the e-mail’s body. Items added
using an incoming e-mail contain a Created From E-Mail link on their View Item page. Clicking this
link takes you to the E-Mail Details page, which displays information about the original e-mail
including Sender, From, To, CC, and Subject.
Tracking
The second grouping of list templates provided by SharePoint and displayed on the Create page is
the tracking group. This group of lists provides you with templates to track the information other
users of the site will collaborate on or consume. The tracking group consists of the following list
templates:
• Links
• Calendar
• Tasks
• Project Tasks
• Issue Tracking
• Survey
• Agenda (available only in meeting workspaces)
Links
The Links list template creates a list you should use when you want to provide a collection of links
to both external and internal web pages. The list contains a single view, called All Links, which displays all list items along with an Edit column for editing a list item. The columns in the Links list
template are shown in Table 5-5.
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Table 5-5. Links List Columns
Column
Type
Notes
URL
Hyperlink or Picture
The web address for the link along with
the text that should be shown as the
name
Notes
Multiple lines of text
Long description of the link
Links lists prove most useful when you add them to the home web part page of the site. Displaying your links list on the home page of the site provides users with an easy way to find other web sites
relevant to the information in the team site. For example, a site for the company sales team could
benefit from links to the corporate web site and your sales entry system. Figure 5-5 shows the links
list displayed on the home page of a team site.
Figure 5-5. A links list displayed on a site
Changing the List Item Order
There is no means for changing the order of the list items in a custom list. However, this feature is
part of many list templates, and the Links template is one of these. This feature is controlled by a
setting that can be configured for each view created for the list. When managing a view in the Links
list, there will be an additional option under the Sort section that lets you turn on and off this feature, allowing users to manually order the items in the list. When this is enabled, an additional link
for changing the item order is displayed in the Actions menu on the list page.
Change the order of the links in a links list that has manual ordering enabled as follows:
1. Navigate to the links list’s screen.
2. On the Links screen, click the Change Order link in the Actions menu on the toolbar.
3. On the Change Item Order screen, change the position of an item by selecting a number
under the Position from Top heading. A smaller number moves the item closer to the top of
the list, while a larger number moves it farther down. Once you change the position number
for an item, the items will automatically rearrange to be displayed in the new position order.
4. Click the OK button.
nNote
When you click a link in the links list, the link opens in the current instance of the browser; therefore, you
leave the context of your portal. Without technical customization, you cannot launch the links in a new window
unless you right-click the link and choose the Open in New Window option in your browser.
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Calendar
The Calendar list template is one of the most feature-rich list templates available, allowing you to
maintain lists of events within a team site or meeting workspace. Some common uses for the Calendar list template include tracking meetings, deadlines, or milestones. The Calendar list template is
further enhanced by features such as recurring events and integration with SharePoint workspaces
and Outlook 2003 or later, all of which are discussed in this section. Calendar list items are based on
dates and include the columns shown in Table 5-6.
Table 5-6. Calendar List Columns
Column
Type
Notes
Title
Single line of text
The name of the event.
Location
Single line of text
Where the event will take place.
Start Time
Date and Time
The date and time for the beginning of the
event.
End Time
Date and Time
The date and time for the completion of
the event.
Description
Multiple lines of text
Long text description of the event.
All Day Event
Special
Determines if the event does not have
specific start and end times that should
be set.
Recurrence
Special
Controls whether the event occurs
multiple times and when. See the
“Recurrence” section.
Workspace
Special
Associates either a new or existing meeting
workspace with the event.
The Calendar list template contains several default views, allowing the users to display the list
items in various ways. These views are listed in Table 5-7. Remember that, just like all lists, you can
still customize the calendar list, shown in Figure 5-6, by adding or editing fields (except those that
are used for Office integration or calendar formatting) and by creating additional views to display
the events in more meaningful ways to your users.
Table 5-7. Calendar List Views
View
Description
Calendar
This is the default view; it displays all events in a calendar view type,
allowing the user to graphically see the events in the list.
All Events
This view shows all items in the list. Recurring events are displayed as a
single list item.
Current Events
This view displays all events that occur on the current date and any
dates in the future. Each instance of a recurring event is shown
separately.
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Figure 5-6. The Calendar list
Recurrence
A unique aspect of items in the calendar list is the ability to mark them as recurring events. A recurring event is one that happens more than once over a time period, like a weekly sales meeting.
When creating a new list item in the calendar list or editing an existing item, you are given the ability to determine its recurrence.
The event’s recurrence is determined by a time period, a pattern, and a date range. Each time
period is associated with its own available pattern settings that let you precisely determine how
often the event occurs. These time periods and patterns are shown in Table 5-8. The date range consists of a start date and an ending type. Available ending types for a recurring event are a specific
date, a number of occurrences, or an option for no end date to the recurrence.
Table 5-8. Recurrence Time Periods and Patterns
Time Period
Pattern
Daily
Every X days (example: every 2 days) or
Every weekday
Weekly
Every X weeks and on given days of the week the event occurs (example:
every 1 week on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday)
Monthly
Day X of every Y months (example: day 1 of every 3 months) or
The ordered weekday of every X month (example: the second Monday of
every 2 months)
Yearly
A specific date (example: every April 15) or
The ordered weekday of a month (example: the first Friday of July)
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Recurring Events in Views
When an event is recurring, the first column in the All Events view will contain an icon with two circular arrows. You can see an example of this in Figure 5-7. The special column used for this is the
Recurrence column, which is available when managing views.
A recurring event is displayed as a single list item in the All Events view, but the Current Events
view displays each occurrence of a recurring event as a separate list item. You can display each
occurrence of a recurring event separately in your custom views using a new view type, Standard
View with Expanded Recurring Events, inherent only to calendar lists.
As discussed in Chapter 4, creating a new view takes you to a screen displaying the available
view types. When you create a new view in a calendar list, there will be a link for the Standard View
with Expanded Recurring Events view type. This view type only allows you to specify column, filter,
style, folder, mobile, and item limit settings but displays each occurrence of a recurring event separately in the list. This can be seen in Figure 5-7, which displays the same list shown in Figure 5-5 but
using the Current Events view.
Figure 5-7. The Current Events view displays each event occurance.
When you choose to view a recurring event from the Calendar view, the Current Events view, or
any other view that displays expanded recurring events, you are looking at an individual occurrence of
that event. You can see the difference by the links on the toolbar of the View Item or Edit Item screens.
When you are viewing an occurrence, there will be an additional link in the toolbar called Edit Series. In
this case, the Edit Item link allows you to edit the specific occurrence of an event that you are currently
viewing, while the Edit Series link allows you to make modifications to the recurring event that the item
is an instance of. Clicking the Edit Series link takes you to the same screen that you go to when choosing the Edit Item link from the context menu of a list item in a standard view like the All Events view.
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nNote Editing a single occurrence of a recurring event will cause a new recurring calendar list item to be created
based on the updated information. The new event is still associated with the original series but will be presented
separately in views based on the standard view type such as All Events and will be shown with an icon denoting an
Exception to Recurring Event.
Exporting Events
Like the contacts list, the calendar list allows you to export list items from SharePoint. The calendar
list exports events list item information in a calendar information file that Outlook can then import.
Events must be exported individually from SharePoint, and recurring events can only be exported
one occurrence at a time. To export an event, use the following steps:
1. On the calendar list’s page, find and click the event you wish to export.
2. On the View Item screen, click the Export Event link in the toolbar.
3. When you are prompted that you are downloading a file, click the Open button.
4. A new Outlook appointment window will appear with information populated from the
SharePoint event. Make any changes to the information that you want displayed on your
Outlook calendar, and then click the Save and Close button on the toolbar.
5. The event will now appear in your default calendar.
nCaution
There is no synchronization between exported events and SharePoint events lists. If you make modifications to the event in SharePoint, it will not be modified in your Outlook calendar and vice versa.
Connecting Calendar Lists with Outlook
Another feature of the Calendar list template that is not available from custom lists is the ability to
view the events information through Outlook 2003 or later. Similar to the connect feature in a contacts list, linking a SharePoint calendar list with Outlook creates a new calendar in Outlook.
The list of events is read-only if you are using Outlook 2003, so all modifications must be performed in the SharePoint calendar list. However, if you are using Outlook 2007, the list of events is
editable, and all changes are synchronized with the SharePoint calendar list. This ensures that the
information is centrally managed yet still available for use by everyone within Outlook. Linking calendar lists with Outlook can allow you to easily view and manage a calendar of events, such as your
company’s training schedule or scheduled client visits.
To link a calendar list with Outlook, perform the following steps:
1. On the calendar list’s page, click the Connect to Outlook link in the Actions menu on the
toolbar.
2. On the Outlook confirmation window, click the Yes button to confirm the connection
between the list and Outlook.
3. The linked list will display as a new entry in the Other Calendars section of your Outlook
calendars as shown in Figure 5-8.
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Figure 5-8. A linked calendar list in Outlook
nTip
Outlook caches a local copy of the calendar list, so that even if you are not able to connect to SharePoint,
you can still see the event information as of the last time you viewed the calendar from Outlook.
If you edit a calendar event in Outlook 2003 that has been linked from SharePoint, you are told
that the item is read-only. Outlook 2003 allows you to save a copy of the event in your default calendar where you can make changes, but the items are not linked to SharePoint. The only place to make
global changes to the event information is in the SharePoint calendar list, since the new information
will be displayed each time you view the calendar in Outlook. Other users of the calendar list will also
see the most up-to-date information, ensuring that the latest changes are available to every user.
If you edit a calendar event in Outlook 2007 that has been linked with SharePoint and save the
changes, your modifications are saved back to the calendar list in SharePoint. In addition to editing
calendar list items within Outlook 2007, you can create new events using the calendar displayed in
the Outlook 2007 interface using standard Outlook features, and those events are saved back to the
calendar list in SharePoint too. To create a new appointment in the SharePoint calendar list using
Outlook 2007, perform the following steps:
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1. In Outlook 2007, open your Outlook calendar display.
2. Select the SharePoint calendar list entry in the Other Calendars section.
3. In the calendar display, click the date and approximate time for the new event.
4. In Outlook 2007, click the Appointment option in the New menu of the toolbar.
5. In the Appointment window, enter the subject, location start date, end date, and description
of the event.
6. Click the Save & Close button on the toolbar.
After these steps, the new appointment will be displayed in the calendar within Outlook. Opening the calendar list in your browser will show you that the event has been created within
SharePoint and is now available for all users of the list.
nCaution
If you have Office 2003 or later installed and still cannot access calendar list information, your installation may not be complete. Have an administrator ensure that the Windows SharePoint Services Support component
of Office 2003 or later has been installed.
Workspaces
A useful feature of the calendar list is the ability to integrate directly into meeting workspaces from
the calendar list items. The meeting workspaces you read about in Chapter 2 can be created from
events in the calendar list, resulting in additional navigation and information available in both the
meeting workspace and calendar list item.
When adding or editing an event, you will see a workspace check box near the bottom of the
screen. Checking this box will create a meeting workspace and associate the workspace with your
event. You are able to create a new meeting workspace or associate the event with an already existing workspace under the current site if a workspace was already created without the use of the
calendar list.
Follow these steps to create a meeting workspace for an existing calendar list item:
1. Navigate to the calendar list’s screen, and change the view to the All Events view.
2. On the Calendar screen, activate the context menu for an event, and click the Edit Item link.
3. On the Edit Item screen, check the Workspace check box.
4. Click the OK button.
5. On the New or Existing Meeting Workspace screen, if a meeting workspace already exists
under the current site, a Create or Link section will be displayed. Make sure the Create a
New Meeting Workspace option is selected. Selecting the Link to an Existing Meeting Workspace option allows you to associate the event with a meeting workspace you have already
created by selecting it from the list.
6. The title and web address are already populated using the name of the event. Enter a
description.
7. Click the OK button.
8. On the Template Selection page, select the Meeting Workspace template to use for this
event. These templates are described in Chapter 2.
9. Click the OK button.
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After following these steps, you are brought to the newly created meeting workspace. The meeting workspace’s integration with the calendar list can be seen underneath the title of the workspace.
The location, date, and time of the event are retrieved from the events list, and a Go to Calendar link
is displayed, allowing you to quickly navigate back to the list. Also, you are automatically added to
the attendees list, discussed later in this chapter, as the organizer of the meeting.
If you click the Go to Calendar link so that the calendar list is displayed, you will see that the list
item now displays an icon of a meeting in the All Events view. This icon can be seen in Figure 5-7. A
link is also displayed in the View Item screen for the event. Clicking on either the icon or link takes
you to the meeting workspace shown in Figure 5-9.
Workspaces in Series
Creating a meeting workspace for a recurring event adds an additional level of functionality to the
meeting workspace. The workspace is created using the same steps given in the previous section,
except the Edit Series page is where the Workspace check box will be displayed, rather than the Edit
Item page. When the workspace is displayed you will notice a new navigation menu on the left. This
navigation menu, shown in Figure 5-9, allows you to navigate to different displays of the workspace
based on each occurrence of the event.
Figure 5-9. A meeting workspace created from a recurring event
These instances of the workspace are said to be “in series,” as they are all related to the same
event. Content added to one instance of the series does not necessarily display in other instances.
This is determined by a setting in the workspace lists.
nTip You can specify that lists share content between series by changing an option in their Customize List
screen. Instructions for doing this in detail are shown later in the “Additional Meeting Workspace List Concepts”
section of this chapter.
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Incoming E-mail Capabilities
The Calendar list template also has the capability to process incoming e-mail messages. Each
calendar list can be configured with an e-mail address that users can send messages to. When a
user sends a meeting request to this e-mail address, the content of the meeting request is saved
as a new event in the list.
nNote
Before incoming e-mail capabilities become accessible, your SharePoint technical administrator will need
to configure your SharePoint environment to correctly process incoming e-mail.
If incoming e-mail capabilities are available, the calendar list’s Create page will contain an
Incoming E-Mail section. This section lets you enable incoming e-mail for the list and determine
what e-mail address users will need to send meeting requests to for their content to be saved in the
SharePoint list.
You can add and further define incoming e-mail capabilities for existing lists using the Incoming E-Mail Settings link in the Communications section of the Customize List page. To add
incoming e-mail handling to a calendar list, perform the following steps:
1. On the list’s page, click the List Settings link in the Settings menu of the toolbar.
2. On the Customize List screen, click the Incoming E-Mail Settings link under the Communications section.
3. On the Incoming E-Mail Settings screen, make the following selections:
a. In the Incoming E-Mail section, select Yes to allow the list to receive e-mail, and enter
the address that users will send meeting requests to for this list.
b. In the E-Mail Attachments section, select Yes if you want file attachments on incoming
messages saved as attachments to the list items.
c. In the E-Mail Security section, determine if you want all users to be able to send messages to the list or only those users with access based on SharePoint security.
nCaution
Allowing anyone to send e-mail messages to your list bypasses the list security that has been configured and allows potentially malicious activity such as spamming the list with new items. It is best to limit e-mail
security to those with access to the list or enable content approval to restrict the items that are publicly displayed.
4. Click the OK button.
Once the list has been configured to allow incoming e-mail messages, users can send meeting
requests to the corresponding address in order to create new events in the list. For a calendar list,
the Title column uses the e-mail’s subject; the Location column is determined by the e-mail’s location; and the Description column is derived from the e-mail’s body. Other columns in the calendar
list such as Start Time, End Time, All Day Event, and Recurrence are all populated using the corresponding information from the meeting request e-mail.
Items added using an incoming e-mail contain a Created From E-Mail link on their View Item
page. Clicking this link takes you to the E-Mail Details page, which displays information about the
original e-mail including Sender, From, To, CC, and Subject.
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Tasks
The Tasks list template is one of the most commonly used templates in team collaboration sites and
meeting workspaces. The tasks list is used to assign and manage tasks for site users. The columns in the
Tasks list template are shown in Table 5-9. Remember that you can customize the columns, including
the available options for Choice columns, to tailor your list to your current business terminology.
Table 5-9. Tasks List Columns
Column
Type
Title
Single line of text
Notes
Priority
Choice
Default options include High, Normal, and Low.
Status
Choice
Default options include Not Started, In
Progress, Completed, Deferred, and Waiting
on someone else.
% Complete
Number
Only allows numbers from 0 to 100 and
displays the value as a percentage.
Assigned To
Person or Group
Determines who is responsible for the task by
allowing users to select from users and groups
in the SharePoint environment.
Task Group
Person or Group
This column is not displayed to users, rather it
is used for system purposes when a group is
used in the Assigned To column of the item.
Description
Multiple lines of text
Start Date
Date and Time
Due Date
Date and Time
The Tasks list template contains many different default views designed to provide users with
easy ways in which to display the tasks they are interested in. These views are listed in Table 5-10.
Table 5-10. Tasks List Views
View
Description
All Tasks
The default view; it displays all items in the list.
My Tasks
Displays title, status, priority, due date, and percent complete
information for all of the current user’s tasks. This is accomplished by
using a filter of Assigned To is equal to [Me].
Due Today
Displays title, assigned to, status, priority, and percent complete
information for all of the tasks due on the current date. This view uses a
filter of Due Date is equal to [Today].
Active Tasks
Displays title, assigned to, status, priority, due date, and percent
complete information for all active tasks. Active tasks are determined
by a filter of Status is not equal to Completed.
By Assigned To
Similar to the All Tasks view, except that it sorts the list items based on
the Assigned To and Status columns.
By My Groups
Similar to the By Assigned To view, except that it shows only items that
are assigned to groups that the current user is a member of. The view
organizes the task items based on these SharePoint or Active Directory
groups by leveraging the Task Group column internally.
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Tasks that are assigned to a group will have a Claim Task link displayed on the toolbar of the
View Item and Edit Item pages. This link allows users to easily change the Assigned To user or group
to themselves. You must be a member of the group that is assigned the task in order for you to have
access to the Claim Task link.
The item-level security described in Chapter 4 is particularly useful to ensure that users cannot
modify tasks that are not their responsibilities. SharePoint does not provide the ability to link a tasks
list to your tasks in Outlook. Aside from the extra views that the template gives you and the By My
Groups view, there is no functionality on the tasks list screen, shown in Figure 5-10, which is not
available when using custom lists. You could build a list identical to the tasks list by using the features available for custom lists, but it is provided to make creating this common list type easier.
Figure 5-10. The tasks list
nNote
A drawback of storing your tasks in multiple tasks lists on SharePoint sites is that there is no built-in way
to see all of your tasks from all sites in a single list. There are third-party products that address this issue by providing roll-up functionality of all of your tasks in SharePoint.
E-mail Notification
If SharePoint Server 2007 is installed in your environment, task lists will contain an additional, useful capability. They have the ability to send e-mail notifications to the user or group selected in the
Assigned To column whenever the item is updated. This can help keep users informed of any
changes to the tasks that they are responsible for.
To enable e-mail notification, select the Yes option for the E-Mail Notification setting on the
Create page when creating a new tasks list or the Advanced Settings page when configuring an
existing tasks list. When notification is enabled, the New Item, View Item, and Edit Item screens will
display a message to users stating, “The content of this item will be sent as an e-mail message to the
person or group assigned to the item.”
Project Tasks
The Project Tasks list template takes the structure and views found in the Tasks list template and
then expands on them to provide rudimentary project planning aspects. The project tasks list is
used to assign and manage tasks for a given project. The columns in the Project Tasks list template
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are shown in Table 5-11. Remember that you can customize the columns, especially the available
options for Choice columns, to make your list more appropriate for the project.
Table 5-11. Project Tasks List Columns
Column
Type
Notes
Title
Single line of text
Priority
Choice
Default options include High, Normal, and Low.
Task Status
Choice
Default options include Not Started, In Progress,
Completed, Deferred, and Waiting on someone else.
% Complete
Number
Only allows numbers from 0 to 100 and displays the
value as a percentage.
Assigned To
Person or Group
Determines who is responsible for the task by
allowing users to select from users and groups in the
SharePoint environment.
Description
Multiple lines of text
Start Date
Date and Time
Due Date
Date and Time
The Project Tasks list template contains many of the same views found in the Tasks list template
with one additional view that sets it apart. The Project Tasks view utilizes the Gantt view format
described in Chapter 4 to display a graphical representation of the project tasks in the list, as shown
in Figure 4-13. These views are listed in Table 5-12.
Table 5-12. Project Tasks List Views
View
Description
All Tasks
Displays all items in the list.
My Tasks
Displays title, task status, priority, due date, and percent complete
information for all of the current user’s project tasks. This is accomplished
by using a filter of Assigned To is equal to [Me].
Due Today
Displays title, assigned to, task status, priority, and percent complete
information for all of the project tasks due on the current date. This view
uses a filter of Due Date is equal to [Today].
Active Tasks
Displays title, assigned to, task status, priority, due date, and percent
complete information for all active project tasks. Active project tasks are
determined by a filter of Task Status is not equal to Completed.
By Assigned To
Similar to the All Tasks view, except that it sorts the list items based on the
Assigned To and Status columns.
Project Tasks
The default view, displays project task items using the Gantt view format.
This shows the list items in a Gantt chart, as described in Chapter 4. In
addition to the Gantt chart, a tabular listing of the title, assigned to, task
status, priority, due date, and percent complete information for all of the
project tasks is shown.
nTip
With Microsoft Project Server 2007 installed in your environment, you have the ability to turn your project
tasks list into a Project Server 2007 project. For more details, see the Project Server 2007 documentation.
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E-mail Notification
As is the case with the tasks list, if SharePoint Server 2007 is installed in your environment, project
tasks lists contain the ability to send e-mail notifications to the user or group selected in the Assigned
To column whenever the item is updated. These e-mails allow users to easily stay informed of any
changes to the issues that they are responsible for.
To enable e-mail notification, select the Yes option for the E-Mail Notification setting on the
Create page when creating a new project tasks list or the Advanced Settings page when configuring
an existing project tasks list. When notification is enabled, the New Item, View Item, and Edit Item
screens will display a message to users stating, “The content of this item will be sent as an e-mail
message to the person or group assigned to the item.”
Issue Tracking
Similar to the Tasks list template, the Issue Tracking list template is useful for creating a list of items
where a user must take action. The issues list is best suited to a list of problems that must be
addressed, risks that must be mitigated, or business opportunities that must be managed. The
columns in the Issue Tracking list template are shown in Table 5-13.
Table 5-13. Issue Tracking List Columns
Column
Type
Title
Single line of text
Assigned To
Person or Group
Determines who is responsible for addressing the
issue by allowing users to select from users and
groups in the SharePoint environment.
Issue Status
Choice
Default options include Active, Resolved, and
Closed.
Priority
Choice
Default options include High, Normal, and Low.
Description
Multiple lines of text
Category
Choice
Due Date
Date and Time
Related Issues
Lookup
Comments
Multiple lines of text
Notes
Default options include Category1, Category2,
and Category3. Make sure to edit these options
when creating your issue tracking list.
Allows users to select from other items in the
issue tracking list to signify similar or related
items. Allowing multiple values is enabled by
default.
Item version history is enabled when a new issue tracking list is created. The result is that the
list has the ability to display to users the list data that has changed, when it was changed, and by
whom, as described in the “Versions” section of Chapter 4. Versioning also allows the Comments
field to be configured to enable the Append Changes to Existing Text option, allowing for a new
comments value each time the list item is edited as described in the “Multiple Lines of Text” section
of Chapter 4 and shown in Figure 5-11.
Like some other list templates, the Issue Tracking list template contains default views designed
to provide users with easy ways in which to display the issues most relevant to them. These views
are listed in Table 5-14.
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Figure 5-11. An issue tracking list item
Table 5-14. Issue Tracking List Views
View
Description
All Issues
The default view; it displays all items in the list.
My Issues
Displays the issue ID, title, issue status, priority, and due date for all of the
current user’s tasks. This is accomplished by using a filter of Assigned To is
equal to [Me].
Active Issues
Displays the issue ID, title, assigned to, priority, and due date for all active
tasks. Active tasks are determined by a filter of Issue Status is equal to
Active.
E-mail Notification
Like the tasks and project tasks lists, if SharePoint Server 2007 is installed in your environment,
issue tracking lists will contain the ability to send e-mail notifications to the user or group selected
in the Assigned To column whenever the item is updated. This helps users stay informed of any
changes to the issues that they are responsible for.
To enable e-mail notification, select the Yes option for the E-Mail Notification setting on the
Create page when creating a new issue tracking list or the on Advanced Settings page when configuring an existing issue tracking list. When notification is enabled, the New Item, View Item, and
Edit Item screens will display a message to users stating, “The content of this item will be sent as
an e-mail message to the person or group assigned to the item.”
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Survey
The Survey list template allows you to create lists that are presented to users as a questionnaire.
Although the underlying technology is the same as with other lists, the survey list is highly customized to make managing, responding to, and reporting results match what you would expect
when working with a survey. Surveys are an easy way to gain feedback from users. For example, a
survey added to a human resources site could poll employees about medical benefits satisfaction
or preferences for a holiday party location.
To create a new survey on a team site, perform the following steps:
1. On the site’s home page, click the Create link in the Site Actions menu.
2. On the Create screen, click the Survey link under the Tracking section.
3. On the New screen, enter a name and description for the survey.
4. Under the Survey Options section, specify whether users’ names should be displayed with
their responses and if a user should be able to respond to the survey more than once.
5. Click the Next button.
6. On the New Question screen, enter the text for the question, and choose an answer type.
The answer types are almost identical to the column types available when adding columns
to a list as described in Chapter 4.
7. Specify the optional settings for the current question. The settings available are determined
based on the answer type you selected.
8. If you want to add another question, click the Next Question button, and repeat steps 6 and 7.
9. If you do not wish to add any more questions to the survey, click the Finish button.
Instead of managing columns, in a survey you manage questions. Managing questions is
extremely similar to managing columns in other list templates. Clicking the Survey Settings link in
the Settings menu on the survey screen will take you to the Customize Survey screen, allowing you
to manage the survey. Here, under the Questions section, you can add, edit, and rearrange survey
questions in the same manner that you manage columns in other lists.
Surveys come with standard views as shown in Table 5-15. You do not have the ability to edit
these views or add new views.
Table 5-15. Survey Views
View
Description
Overview
This is the default view; it displays the name, description, time created,
and the number of responses for the survey.
All Responses
This view is similar to the All Items view found in other lists. It shows a
list item for each user who has responded to the survey. It contains the
familiar context menu, allowing you to view, edit, or delete a list item.
Graphical Summary
For each question, this displays the percentage of respondents giving
each distinct answer.
nTip If you want users assigned the Read permission level to respond to a survey, you must configure the security
on the survey. The default settings do not allow these users to add items, thus prohibiting them from responding to
the survey.
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Rating Scale
Instead of having column types like the other lists we have discussed, survey questions have answer
types, which are managed in the same way as column types in other lists. Along with the types provided for columns, answer types include a new type called Rating Scale. Rating Scale, which can be
seen in Figure 5-13, is displayed as a grid in which the user selects a value from a range for each row.
Optional settings for the Rating Scale type are shown in Table 5-16.
Table 5-16. Optional Settings for Rating Scale Answer Types
Setting
Description
Required
Specifies whether users must answer this question in order to submit their
responses for the survey.
Sub-questions
Indicates the labels for the grid rows. These choices determine the number
of rows displayed.
Number Range
Determines the number of columns in the grid or the number of options
the user can select from to answer each row.
Range Text
Specifies the column heading. There are three range text entries: one for
the left side, one for the right side, and one for the middle of the grid.
Show N/A Option
Specifies whether an option of N/A is available for users to answer with a
“not applicable” response.
N/A Option Text
Specifies the heading for the N/A option column.
Branching and Separators
You are able to create branching logic within the survey, so that users are presented with a different
sequence of questions based on previous responses. Branching is configured by selecting a question in the survey that should be the next question displayed if the user selects a given answer to the
current question.
Branching is valuable when subsequent questions are not applicable depending on the specific
response a user selects. An example would be when a user is asked a Yes/No question to determine
if they have used Office 2007. If they answer No, then additional questions asking what they have
used in Office 2007 are inefficient and confusing to the user.
Only two question types support robust branching. The Choice type allows you to specify
branching for each Choice option available for the question. The Yes/No question type gives you the
ability to choose one branch for a Yes response and one branch for the No response. All other question types only allow you to specify branching logic that is applied regardless of the user’s response.
Branching cannot be configured when creating a new question, only when editing existing
questions. To select branching logic for a question, perform the following steps:
1. On the survey’s page, click the Survey Settings link in the Settings menu on the toolbar.
2. On the Customize Survey screen, click a question link for an existing question in the Questions section.
3. On the Edit Question screen’s Branching Logic section, for the desired responses, choose
a question in the Jump To selection box under the Possible Choice heading, as shown in
Figure 5-12. The survey will skip to this question if the user answers the current question
with the corresponding answer.
4. Click the OK button.
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Figure 5-12. Editing a question using branching logic
After performing these steps, the Customize Survey page is displayed, and you will notice that
any questions that contain branching logic are denoted as such in the Questions section.
nNote
A response can only branch forward to a later question in the survey.
In addition to the answer types described previously, a Page Separator option is available when
creating a question in a survey. Creating a question with the Page Separator type instructs the survey to display subsequent questions on a new page for the respondents. This allows you to break a
long survey into manageable chunks, improving its usability.
Responding to a Survey
For the survey to be useful, you will need other users to respond to the survey questions. Responding to a survey is similar to the experience of creating a new list item in other lists.
To respond to a survey:
1. Navigate to the survey’s screen.
2. On the Survey screen, click the Respond to This Survey link on the toolbar. If you have
already responded and the survey does not allow multiple responses per user, you will be
presented with an error message.
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3. On the Respond to This Survey screen, shown in Figure 5-13, enter answers for each question
marked with an asterisk, as these questions are required to save your response.
4. Enter answers for any nonrequired questions you want.
5. If there are page separators or branching in the survey, click the Next button to proceed to
the next page of questions; otherwise, click the Finish button.
If you decide to stop taking the survey when you’re partially through it, clicking the Cancel button will allow you to exit the survey. If you have already responded to previous pages in the survey,
you will be prompted to either save the answers you have entered for completing at a later time or
clean up the list by deleting the answers that have been saved when you clicked the Next button on
previous pages.
After responding to the survey, you are taken to the Survey Overview view, where you can see
how many responses there are so far. You can now use the views created by the list to see a breakdown of the responses to each question or to see who has responded to the survey if respondent
names have been allowed using the setting in the Survey Options section when creating the survey.
This setting is also available for configuring on the General Settings screen of the survey list.
Figure 5-13. Responding to a survey
Agenda
The Agenda list template is available only in a meeting workspace and creates a list that should be
used to manage the topics to be discussed and when they will be the focal point during the meeting.
The columns in the Agenda list template are all text columns rather than being more specific column
types, such as Date and Time. The columns in the Agenda list template are shown in Table 5-17.
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Table 5-17. Agenda List Columns
Column
Type
Notes
Subject
Single line of text
Owner
Single line of text
Text column type allows any text entry rather than selection of users and groups found in other list templates.
Time
Single line of text
Text column type allows any text entry rather than specific
date and time values.
Notes
Multiple lines of text
The agenda list contains two views to allow users to best review and manage the meeting
agenda. As with many other templates, the agenda list provides the ability for the user to manually
change the display order of the list items if the “Allow Users to Order Items in this View” option is
enabled in the Sort section of the View settings. These views are described in Table 5-18.
Table 5-18. Agenda List Views
View
Description
All Items
This is the default view; it displays all items in the list. Items are displayed with a
custom style that shows the Notes column underneath the other three columns
in the list.
My Items
This view displays items that the current user has created. This is accomplished
by using a filter of Created By is equal to [Me].
Custom Lists
The last grouping of list templates provided by SharePoint and displayed on the Create page is the
custom lists group. This group of lists provides you with templates that do not fall easily into the
other groups and often need to be significantly customized to be useful. The custom lists group
consists of the following list templates:
• Decisions: Available only in meeting workspaces
• Objectives: Available only in meeting workspaces
• Text Box: Available only in meeting workspaces
• Things to Bring: Available only in meeting workspaces
• Custom List: Described in Chapter 4
• Custom List in Datasheet View: Described in Chapter 4
• Import Spreadsheet: Described in Chapter 4
Decisions
The Decisions list template is available only in a meeting workspace and creates a list that can be
used to record important decisions made during a meeting. The availability of such a list enables
you to record decisions as they are made and makes these decisions available for review on the
meeting workspaces during the meeting and after it has ended. The columns in the Decisions list
template are shown in Table 5-19.
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Table 5-19. Decisions List Columns
Column
Type
Notes
Decision
Single line of text
Contact
Single line of text
Text column type allows any text entry rather than
selection of users and groups.
Status
Choice
Default options include Final, Pending Approval,
and Proposed.
The decisions list contains two different views in which users can display decisions list items.
As with many other templates, the decisions list provides the ability for the user to manually change
the display order of the list items if the “Allow Users to Order Items in this View” option is enabled in
the Sort section of the View settings. These views are described in Table 5-20.
Table 5-20. Decisions List Views
View
Description
All Items
This is the default view; it displays all items in the list.
My Items
This view displays items that the current user has created. This is accomplished
by using a filter of Created By is equal to [Me].
Objectives
The Objectives list template is available only in a meeting workspace and is used to create a list of
goals for the meeting. Most meeting workspace templates contain an objectives list built from the
Objectives list template. The objectives list is an extremely simple list with only a single column,
shown in Table 5-21, and a single view that displays all list items. As with many other templates, the
objectives list provides the ability for the user to manually change the display order of the list items if
the “Allow Users to Order Items in this View” option is enabled in the Sort section of the View settings.
Table 5-21. Objectives List Column
Column
Type
Objective
Multiple lines of text
Text Box
The Text Box list template is available only in a meeting workspace and creates a highly specialized yet
very simple list. A list item for the text box list consists of a single text field, as shown in Table 5-22.
Table 5-22. Text Box List Column
Column
Type
Text
Multiple lines of text
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The list also contains a single view called All Items that displays every item in the list. The
uniqueness of this list, though, is that only a single list item exists in the list. After adding a list item
using the New link on the toolbar of the list page, the list no longer allows the addition of new items.
Instead, the link on the toolbar changes to an Edit link that allows the user to alter the text of the only
list item in the list. Since the list contains only a single list item, there are far fewer options available
when managing the list. The Customize List screen does not allow you to add or edit columns or
views, and the Versioning Settings screen does not display settings for approval of list items.
The purpose of the text box list is to allow the user to insert text onto the meeting workspace
page. Since the text column is a “Multiple lines of text” type with Rich Text enabled, the text that the
user enters can be decorated with colors, alignment, bolding, font size, and other rich text aspects
as shown in Figure 5-14.
You can also see the Text Box list in use by creating a site using the social meeting workspace
template, as shown in Chapter 2. The social meeting workspace contains a directions list that is created from the Text Box list template.
Figure 5-14. The text box list used to customize a meeting workspace
Things to Bring
The Things to Bring list template is available only in a meeting workspace and creates a list of items
necessary for the meeting and who is responsible for them. This list can be beneficial in both corporate and social meeting workspaces to manage who is responsible for meeting necessities. The
columns in the Things to Bring list template are shown in Table 5-23.
Table 5-23. Things to Bring List Columns
Column
Type
Item
Single line of text
Comment
Single line of text
Owner
Single line of text
Notes
Text column type allows any text entry rather than
selection of users and groups.
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The Things to Bring list template contains the two views most commonly seen in lists available
in meeting workspaces, allowing users to see all of the list items or the list items they created. These
views are described in Table 5-24. As with many other templates, the things to bring list provides the
ability for the user to manually change the display order of the list items if the “Allow Users to Order
Items in this View” option is enabled in the Sort section of the View settings.
Table 5-24. Things to Bring List Views
View
Description
All Items
This is the default view; it displays all items in the list.
My Items
This view displays items that the current user has created. This is accomplished
by using a filter of Created By is equal to [Me].
Additional Meeting Workspace List Concepts
The meeting workspace site templates provide additional capabilities for creating and managing
lists. These capabilities include managing list contents across meeting workspaces for recurring
events and the unique Attendees list template.
Lists for Meetings in Series
When creating a list in a meeting workspace, you may have noticed a new setting as well as a setting
that is shown in team site lists that is missing in workspaces. Since there is no Quick Launch menu
for a meeting workspace like there is in a team site, there is no Navigation section on the New page
when creating new lists.
Instead of the Navigation section, a section titled “Share List Items Across All Meetings (Series
Items)” is displayed. Selecting Yes for this setting makes the list and its contents shared among workspaces in the same series. Workspaces created for recurring events, as described in the “Calendar”
section earlier in this chapter, are able to use this setting. Each workspace created for the recurring
event is said to be in the same series.
When you select to share the item, any item added to a list in one workspace in the series will
be displayed to users in all workspaces of the series. This setting is available for all lists created in a
meeting workspace.
If you do not select Yes for Sharing List Items Across Meetings in a recurring meeting workspace, lists will have an additional link in Actions menu on the toolbar. This All Meetings link will
allow you to toggle the display between list items for the current meeting occurrence and a consolidated view of list items from all occurrences of the meeting workspace.
Attendees
The Attendees list template allows users with the Full Control permission level to manage people
that will be involved in a meeting. The attendees list is created automatically when you create a site
using any of the meeting workspace site templates. The list maintains a record of people who are
invited to the meeting, along with an attendance type and response. The columns in the Attendees
list template are shown in Table 5-25.
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Table 5-25. Attendees List Columns
Column
Type
Notes
Name
Single line of text
Comment
Multiple lines of text
Response
Choice
Options include None, Accepted, Tentative, and Declined.
The Attendees list does not allow you to change these
options.
Attendance
Choice
Options include Required, Optional, and Organizer. The
Attendees list does not allow you to change these options.
nNote
There can only be one attendees list in a meeting workspace. The attendees list is created automatically
when you create a meeting workspace, and it does not appear as an available list template on the Create page
when creating a new list in a meeting workspace
Managing the Attendees List
The attendees list’s default Attendees view does not display an Add Item link on the list screen like
most other lists. There also is no context menu for any columns, preventing you from editing any of
the attendees. To add, edit, or delete attendees, you must first select the Manage Attendees view
from the View options on the toolbar, as shown in Figure 5-15. The list will then display a view that
includes a New link on the toolbar and a context menu on the Name column. This context menu
provides the View Item, Edit Item, and Delete Item options found in all other lists.
Figure 5-15. The attendees list screen
nCaution
Adding people directly to the attendees list does not automatically give them access to the meeting
workspace. Make sure you add them as users of the workspace to provide them with the proper access.
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To add an attendee directly to the attendees list:
1. Navigate to the meeting workspace.
2. On the meeting workspace’s screen, click the Manage Attendees link on the Attendees list.
3. On the Attendees screen, click the New link on the toolbar.
4. On the New Item screen, enter the e-mail address or user name for the new attendee.
5. If you do not know the exact e-mail address or user name of the person you want to add,
you can click the Browse icon. This icon will open the people search window where you can
search for the desired user account in your environment. When you have found a user you
wish to grant access to for the list, select that user in the list and click the OK button.
6. Set the attendance type of required, optional, or organizer for the new attendee.
7. Click the OK button.
nTip
You cannot delete the attendees list from a meeting workspace. If you do not want the attendees list to display, you can hide the web part on the workspace’s web part page. See Chapter 8 for further information on
managing web parts and web part pages.
Additional Lists with SharePoint Server 2007
When SharePoint Server 2007 is installed in your environment, there are two additional list templates that appear on the Create page. They are displayed in the Custom Lists section:
• KPI List
• Languages and Translators
KPI List
Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) are quantifiable measurements that determine the success in
achieving business goals. Maintaining and displaying KPIs to users in terms of a KPI allows them to
be informed of current business conditions when making key decisions in the organization. An
example of a KPI is a monthly sales amount. Graphically showing the current monthly sales amount
with respect to the monthly sales amount goal gives sales managers information they need to make
strategic business decisions.
nNote
The Office SharePoint Server Enterprise Site Features site feature must be activated for the KPI List template to be available.
KPI lists are often displayed on the home page of a site using the Key Performance Indicators
and KPI Details web parts. These, and other web parts, will be explained in Chapter 8.
The KPI List template is different from other list templates, as it comes with the management
of content types enabled. Content types were discussed in Chapter 4 and allow the list to store multiple list items with different column structures in the same list. The KPI List contains the following
four content types:
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• Indicator using data in SharePoint list
• Indicator using data in Excel workbook
• Indicator using data in SQL Server 2005 Analysis Services
• Indicator using manually entered information
Data in a SharePoint List
The KPI list can retrieve KPI values from other lists in your SharePoint environment. This allows you to
display KPIs based on data you are already managing and using elsewhere, rather than recreating that
data in the KPI list. This is the first of three ways that a KPI list can consume data from an external source.
To create a KPI list by retrieving data from another SharePoint list, perform the following steps:
1. On the KPI list’s page, click the “Indicator using data in SharePoint list” link in the New
menu on the toolbar.
2. On the New Item screen, enter the following information:
a. In the Name and Description section, enter a name for the KPI. You can also add a
description to help explain the purpose of the KPI to users.
b. In the Comments section, you can enter an explanation for the KPI’s current value.
c. In the Indicator Value section, enter the URL of the list containing the data for consumption by the KPI list and tab away from the field.
d. Select the desired view from the drop-down containing the views from the source list.
e. Determine the calculation by selecting from the available options.
f. In the Status Icon section, select whether a higher or lower number signifies a better
value. Enter the goal value in the box next to the OK icon, which is a green circle, and
the warning value in the box next to the warning icon, which is an orange triangle.
g. In the Details Link section, you can enter the URL that will be used as the View Properties
link when displaying the KPI in the list. Leave this blank to use the default View Item page.
h. In the Update Rules section, determine if the calculations should be updated each time
a user views the list or if the user needs to manually refresh the data by clicking an
Update link on the item’s context menu.
3. Click the OK button.
There are three calculations that can be used to determine the KPI value when consuming the
data from a SharePoint list. These calculations are shown in Table 5-26.
Table 5-26. SharePoint list KPI calculation options
Option
Description
Total Number of List Items
Calculates the value as the total number of list items in the list
view.
Percentage of List Items
Calculates the percentage of list items in the list that meet the
specified condition. To create the condition, select one or more
sets of columns, operators, and values similar to the way you
create filters in views.
List Item Calculation
Calculates the value by using a mathematical operation on a
column for all list items in the view. Available operations include
sum, average, maximum and minimum.
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nNote
Only lists that exist in the same SharePoint environment as the KPI list can be used to retrieve KPI information. The KPI list cannot retrieve the data for lists on other SharePoint servers.
Data in an Excel Workbook
The KPI list can also retrieve Key Performance Indicator values from Excel 2007 workbooks that
have been uploaded into SharePoint document libraries (libraries are discussed in Chapter 6). This
allows you to display KPIs based on the data that has been compiled into spreadsheets rather than
recreating that data in the KPI list. For this type of KPI to be used, SharePoint Server 2007’s Excel
Services must be properly configured by your SharePoint technical administrator.
The ability to retrieve not only the KPI value but also the goal and warning values from the
Excel workbook makes this a powerful tool for displaying data that exists in a format commonly
used in many organizations. To create a KPI by retrieving data from an Excel 2007 workbook, perform the following steps:
1. On the KPI list’s page, click the “Indicator using data in Excel workbook” link in the New
menu on the toolbar.
2. On the New Item screen, enter the following information:
a. In the Name and Description section, enter a name for the KPI. You can also add a
description to help explain the purpose of the KPI to users.
b. In the Comments section, you can enter an explanation for the KPI’s current value.
c. In the Indicator Value section, enter the URL of the workbook file in SharePoint and tab
away from the field. Clicking the icon allows you to browse for Excel files in the site.
d. Enter a cell address from which the KPI data should be retrieved. This can include sheet
names with specific cell coordinates or names of specific cells. Clicking the Cell Picker
icon allows you to visually select cells from the file.
e. In the Status Icon section, select whether a higher number or lower number signifies a better value. Enter the goal value in the box next to the OK icon, which is a green circle, and
the warning value in the box next to the warning icon, which is an orange triangle. These
values can either be numbers or cell addresses for a specific cell within the workbook.
f. In the Details Link section, you can enter the URL that will be used as the View Properties link when displaying the KPI in the list. Leave this blank to use the default View
Item page.
g. In the Update Rules section, determine if the calculations should be updated each time
a user views the list or if the user needs to manually refresh the data by clicking an
Update link on the item’s context menu.
3. Click the OK button.
Data in SQL Server 2005 Analysis Services
A more advanced method for retrieving KPI data, and the last KPI list content type that retrieves
data from an external source, is the SQL Server 2005 Analysis Services content type. This KPI uses a
data connection stored in a data connection library, described in Chapter 6, to connect to a SQL
Server 2005 instance to display data in the KPI list. SharePoint is tightly integrated with SQL Server
2005, allowing for KPI data defined in Analysis Services to be displayed to the users of the list.
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To create a KPI by retrieving data from SQL Server 2005 Analysis Services, perform the following steps:
1. On the KPI list’s page, click the “Indicator using data in SQL Server 2005 Analysis Services”
link in the New menu on the toolbar.
2. On the New Item screen, enter the following information:
a. In the Data Connection section, enter the URL of the data connection file stored within
a data connection library in SharePoint, and tab away from the field.
b. In the SQL Server 2005 Analysis Services KPI section, select the folder that contains the
KPI you want to display.
c. Select the KPI from the list of KPIs that are displayed.
d. Check the Include Child Indicators if you want the child KPIs that exist in Analysis Services to be displayed.
e. In the Name section, enter a name for the KPI.
f. In the Comments section, you can enter an explanation for the KPI’s current value.
g. In the Details Link section, you can enter the URL that will be used as the View Properties link when displaying the KPI in the list. Leave this blank to use the default View
Item page.
h. In the Update Rules section, determine if the calculations should be updated each time
a user views the list or if the user needs to manually refresh the data by clicking an
Update link on the item’s context menu.
3. Click the OK button.
Manually Entered Information
The last way to enter KPIs into the KPI list is to manually enter the information instead of retrieving
it from an external data source, like in the previous methods.
To create a KPI by manually entering the information, perform the following steps:
1. On the KPI list’s page, click the “Indicator using manually entered information” link in the
New menu on the toolbar.
2. On the New Item screen, shown in Figure 5-16, enter the following information:
a. In the Name and Description section, enter a name for the KPI. You can also add a
description, to help explain the purpose of the KPI to users.
b. In the Comments section, you can enter an explanation for the KPI’s current value.
c. In the Indicator Value section, enter a number for the current value of the KPI. This
number can include decimals if necessary.
d. In the Status Icon section, select whether a higher number or lower number signifies a
better value. Enter the goal value in the box next to the OK icon, which is a green circle,
and the warning value in the box next to the warning icon, which is an orange triangle.
e. In the Details Link section, you can enter the URL that will be used as the View Properties link when displaying the KPI in the list. Leave this blank to use the default View
Item page.
3. Click the OK button.
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Figure 5-16. A manually entered KPI
KPI List Views
The KPI List template contains two views including the standard All Items view that most list templates use
to display all list items to the user. The other view is the KPI List view, which shows a graphical display of
measures against goals to easily communicate KPI status to users. These views are described in Table 5-27.
Table 5-27. KPI List Views
View
Description
All Items
This view displays the title, KPI description, KPI value, KPI goal threshold, KPI
warning threshold, and content type for all items in the list.
KPI List
This is the default view; it displays the title, KPI goal threshold, KPI value, and
status icon for all items in the list as shown in Figure 5-17.
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Figure 5-17. The KPI List view
Languages and Translators
Available only when SharePoint Server 2007 is installed in your environment, the Languages and
Translators list template creates a list that is used to manage language translation responsibilities
within a site.
nNote
The Translation Management Library site feature must be activated for the Languages and Translators list
template to be available.
The main purpose of a languages and translators list is to be used by the Translation Management workflow when creating tasks for users. When this workflow determines to whom to assign
tasks for performing translation, this list determines the users who will perform the translations
and which languages they will be using. The Translation Management workflow is described in
more detail in Chapter 7. The columns in the Languages and Translators list template are shown in
Table 5-28.
Table 5-28. Languages and Translators List Columns
Column
Type
Note
Translating From
Choice
The current language of the document needing
translation. There are dozens of options
including Arabic, Chinese, Dutch, English,
French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Italian,
Japanese, and Spanish. Users can enter their own
values if they do not exist in the list.
Translating To
Choice
The language of the document that is created as a
result of the translation. There are dozens of
options, including those mentioned for the
Translating From column. Users can enter their
own values if they do not exist in the list.
Translator
Person or Group
Determines who is responsible for performing
the translation. This person is assigned the task
that is generated by the Translation Management
workflow.
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The languages and translators list contains two different views in which users can display
translation list items, including one that displays the items in groups. These views are described in
Table 5-29.
Table 5-29. Languages and Translators List Views
View
Description
All Items
This is the default view; it displays all items in the list.
Languages
This view displays the translated from, translated to, and translator information
for all items in the list. The view groups the items based on the Translated From
column.
Advanced Office Integration
Throughout this chapter, we have discussed various ways in which template SharePoint lists integrate
with Office applications. In addition to importing contacts, exporting events, and linking contacts and
calendar lists with Outlook, lists created from SharePoint list templates provide some additional integration with Office 2003 or later that we explored in our discussion of list concepts in Chapter 4.
Exporting SharePoint Lists to Excel
The exporting of list information into Excel discussed in Chapter 4 also applies to template SharePoint lists. Exporting lists provides you with an easier interface with which to modify large amounts
of data in the list. Once in Excel, you can make numerous changes to the information and then commit all of the changes to the SharePoint list at the same time. This allows you to make updates while
ensuring that SharePoint users are viewing a complete list of updated information rather than a partially completed list that would be shown if you were editing items individually within SharePoint.
To export a list to Excel, follow these steps:
1. Navigate to the SharePoint list you want to export.
2. On the list page, click the Export to Spreadsheet link in the Actions menu on the toolbar.
3. If you are prompted about opening or saving the Microsoft Office Excel Web Query File,
click the Open button.
a. On the Opening Query dialog box in Excel 2003, click the Open button to confirm that
you want to run the query to export the information into the Excel spreadsheet.
b. On the Microsoft Office Excel Security Notice dialog box in Excel 2007, click the Enable
button to confirm that you want Excel to read a data connection to the SharePoint list.
4. If you already have Excel open, the Import Data dialog box will appear. Choose where to put
the list. Options include a region on the current worksheet, a new worksheet, or a new
workbook. If you did not have Excel running, the data will be put into a new workbook.
nNote
When exporting list information to Excel, all list items displayed by the current view are exported. Items
removed from the view by its filter setting are not included, but setting the temporary filter on the list screen has
no effect on the data exported.
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The Excel List
After performing the preceding steps to export a list to Excel, the data that appears in the Excel
spreadsheet is formatted as an Excel List. The cells of an Excel List are denoted by the colored box
surrounding the cells, the column headings that act as filters using drop-down menus, and the
additional list actions available in the Excel 2003 menu under the Data option or the Design menu
displayed in Excel 2007 when the list is selected. The context menu, available by right-clicking the
list in the spreadsheet, and the List toolbar also provide these actions.
The Excel List is what gives you the ability to make changes to the data within Excel 2003 and
apply those changes to the SharePoint list. The Excel List can also receive changes that SharePoint
users have made to the SharePoint list. The Excel List provides the following actions (shown with
2003/2007 labels) for you to manage the connection between the SharePoint list and Excel List:
• View List on Server/Open in Browser: Opens the SharePoint list in your browser
• Unlink List/Unlink: Severs the connection between the Excel List and the SharePoint list
• Synchronize List/(Not available in Excel 2007): Sends information updates to and from the
SharePoint list and provides the ability to resolve data conflicts
• Discard Changes and Refresh/Refresh: Cancels data updates made within Excel and retrieves
the list information from SharePoint
Advanced Datasheet Features
In Chapter 4, we described the use of the Datasheet view for editing list data, using custom lists as an
example. The Datasheet view is also available for use with lists created from the list templates discussed in this chapter. The Datasheet view contains numerous features that allow for integration with
Office 2003 or later applications. Clicking the Task Pane link in the Actions menu on the Datasheet
view’s toolbar will display a list of Office integration features that are described in Table 5-30.
Table 5-30. Datasheet Task Pane Office 2007 Links
Feature
Description
Track this List in Access
Creates a new Access-linked table in either a new or an existing
Access database. The linked table is synchronized with the
SharePoint list. Any changes made in Access are also visible in the
SharePoint list and vice versa. This link does not appear if you have
Office 2003 installed.
Export to Access
Exports the list information into a new Access table in either a new
or an existing Access database. When doing this, the list and Access
database are not linked, and the two cannot be synchronized.
Report with Access
Creates a new Access-linked table in either a new or an existing
Access database and then generates an Access report based on the
information in the linked table as shown in Figure 5-18.
Query list with Excel
Exports the list information in the same manner as the Export to
Spreadsheet link on the Actions menu. The lists are linked, allowing
you to synchronize data between Excel and SharePoint. If you have
Office 2003 installed, this feature will still exist in the task pane, but
it will be called Export and Link to Excel.
Print with Excel
Exports the list information to Excel and displays the Print dialog
box, allowing you to quickly print out the list items.
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Feature
Description
Chart with Excel
Exports the list information to Excel and displays the Chart Wizard
dialog box, allowing you to create graphs and charts based on the
list items.
Create Excel
PivotTable Report
Exports the list information to Excel and displays the PivotTable
Field List dialog box and toolbar. The PivotTable allows you to select
from the columns in the SharePoint list and create PivotTable
reports with the capability to alter rows and columns interactively to
display data detail in different ways.
Figure 5-18. Using the Report with Access feature to create a contacts list report
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Libraries
I
n the previous two chapters, we discussed lists, which are the main constructs that SharePoint
uses to store information. As you saw, SharePoint provides a great deal of flexibility in storing and
managing raw data using custom and template lists. In addition to raw data management, an information worker solution often needs to store and manage documents, images, and other files.
Information workers spend countless hours creating, locating, approving, and publishing various documents that are used to directly impact business processes and decisions. SharePoint
provides most traditional document management capabilities including version control, content
approval, searching, and document metadata.
SharePoint’s document management is based on libraries. Using a library is very similar to
using a list, as many of the display and management features are the same. Columns, views, and
other familiar SharePoint list concepts can also be found in a library. Libraries expand on list capabilities by providing the necessary document management features mentioned previously.
Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 libraries are categorized into these types:
• Document Library: Stores most file types and provides integration into Office products such
as Word and Excel
• Form Library: Specialized library for storing XML-based forms like those created by the
Microsoft Office InfoPath
• Picture Library: Contains additional features around the storage and management of many
image file types such as JPG and GIF
• Wiki Page Library: Specialized library for storing collaboratively created and interconnected
content pages known as wiki pages
SharePoint Server 2007 provides these additional specialized library templates:
• Translation Management Library: Used by the translation management workflow to manage
documents in multiple languages
• Report Library: Contains Excel Services report and dashboard files for communicating
business intelligence information to users
• Data Connection Library: Contains Office data connection files to allow various Office
programs, such as InfoPath and Excel, to share centrally managed connections
• Slide Library: Contains additional features supporting the storage and management of
PowerPoint slides
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Document Library
Of the different types of libraries that SharePoint provides, the document library is the general-purpose
library for managing files. You can think of a document library as a SharePoint list, with columns, views,
settings, and permissions—except that each of the list items has a file associated with it. The document
library also includes document management capabilities like check-in, check-out, versioning, and
folder structures needed to manage the file creation process. Features of a library that are identical to a
list will only be briefly described in this chapter; for more details, please refer to Chapter 4.
Creating Document Libraries
The Document Library template, like all library templates, is available on your site’s Create page.
The library is created through the same process that you used to create lists in Chapters 4 and 5. The
Create page contains a Libraries section with links for all library templates including the Document
Library link. To create a new document library in a collaboration site, follow these steps:
1. On the site’s home page, click the Create link in the Site Actions menu.
2. On the Create page, click the Document Library link in the Libraries section.
3. On the New screen, enter a name and description for the document library.
4. Under the Navigation section, select Yes if you want a link to the library displayed on the
Quick Launch menu of the site.
5. In the Document Version History section, select Yes if you want the library to provide
version-control features for the documents in the library. This is discussed in the
“Managing Document Libraries” section later in this chapter.
6. In the Document Template section, select the template file type for the library. Document templates are also discussed in the “Managing Document Libraries” section later in this chapter.
7. Click the Create button.
You have now created a document library that contains a single data column called Title. Viewing the library provides the file name, type, and modification information for each document.
Figure 6-1 shows a library like the one you have just created.
Figure 6-1. A new document library
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Working with Document Libraries
As we have said, libraries contain many of the same features found in lists, because SharePoint
libraries are built on the same underlying concepts as lists. Although working with the libraries will
seem very similar to working with lists, there are many new ways of adding and maintaining information in a document library, which we will describe.
Adding Documents
There are two main ways to put documents into a SharePoint document library. The first is to use
the New link on the toolbar of the library screen to create a new file from the document library’s
document template. Setting the library’s document template, the default being a Microsoft Word
document, is discussed in the “Managing Document Libraries” section later in this chapter. Follow
these steps to create a new document in a document library:
1. Click the New link or the New Document link in the New menu on the toolbar of the library
page.
2. If a warning message is displayed regarding opening documents, click the OK button.
3. In the application that opens, create your document.
4. Select to save the document. If the application is an Office application, you will be shown
the Save As dialog box, allowing you to save the document directly into the document
library.
5. Close the application.
nCaution
The New link for Office documents requires that you have Microsoft Office 2003 or later installed.
Using the New link is a good way to add new documents to the document library. For documents that already exist, the document library provides a way to upload the document from your
local computer or network into the document library. This is accomplished from the Upload link in
the library using these steps:
1. Click the Upload link on the toolbar of the library page.
2. On the Upload Document screen, shown in Figure 6-2, click the Browse button.
3. On the Choose File dialog box, select the file you want to upload by navigating to the drive
and folders on your local computer or network, and click the Open button.
4. On the Upload Document screen, click the OK button.
5. On the Edit Item screen, edit the file name, title, and any additional column information
that is available for the library. If the library does not contain additional columns, the Edit
Item screen will not be shown; instead, you will be taken back to the library page.
6. Click the OK button.
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Figure 6-2. Uploading a document
nCaution There are restrictions on the file types that can be uploaded into a SharePoint document library. For
example, EXE files are not permitted by default. Uploading one of these files will result in an error being displayed.
The list of disallowed types is managed by your technical SharePoint administrator.
If you have Office 2003 or later installed on your computer, another link will be presented to
you on the Upload Document screen. This link, Upload Multiple Files, allows you to select and
upload more than a single file at a time. This ability can also be accessed using the Upload Multiple
Documents link in the Upload menu on the toolbar of the library screen. A restriction when uploading multiple files is that you are unable to set any metadata information on the files as they are
uploaded like you can when uploading a single file. The metadata information can be entered after
the documents are uploaded as described in the “Editing Document Properties” section later in this
chapter.
Clicking the Upload Multiple Files link displays your file system view as shown in Figure 6-3.
Local drives, network shares, and networked computers and their folders are shown on the left. The
right side of the screen lists the files in the currently selected drive or folder. Each file is displayed
with a check box, allowing you to select multiple files. Check all of the files you want to upload, and
click the OK button to upload all of these files into your document library.
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Figure 6-3. Uploading multiple files
Editing Documents
The context menu displayed for a document, just like context menus for list items, provides the
entry point into working with your documents. This includes editing a document’s content. If the
file type is a recognized type, like from an Office application, the context menu will include an Edit
in <Application> choice. For instance, a Word document will have an option to Edit in Microsoft
Office Word in its context menu. Selecting this choice will open the document in its native application. After making any changes to the file, saving the file will save the updated document back to
the document library.
Checking Out and Checking In
After opening a document for editing from a document library and saving your changes, other users
can immediately view the modifications by opening the document themselves. There may be times
when you will want to make changes that are not seen by others until you are ready. There are also
times when you want to save some modifications to the document but have not completed all of
the editing you need to make before others may begin making their own changes. The way to solve
these situations is through a control mechanism like the check-in and check-out capabilities of
SharePoint.
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To edit a document by checking it out, follow these steps:
1. Activate the document’s context menu by hovering over the file name with your mouse and
clicking the inverted triangle.
2. Click the Check Out link in the context menu. The document is now checked out to you as
indicated by the document icon.
3. Activate the document’s context menu again, and click the Edit in <Application> link.
4. In the document’s native application, change the content of the file, and save the document
back into the library.
5. When you are ready for other users to see your changes, activate the document’s context
menu, and click the Check In link.
6. On the Check In screen, shown in Figure 6-4, add comments describing the changes that
were made to the document.
7. Click the OK button.
Figure 6-4. The Check In screen with versioning enabled
Until you check the document in, other users will not see the latest content while viewing the
document library. If they choose to view the document, they will see it as it looked before you
checked it out, even if you have saved the document back to the document library. This allows you
to make incremental updates, saving the document each time, and then check it in when you have
completed all of your changes. When the document is checked out to you, other users are unable to
make edits to it until you have checked the document back in.
Users with the Administrator permission level have the ability to check in documents that
other users have checked out. This is important in the event that urgent modifications must be
made to the document, the user who has the document checked out leaves your company, or
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another, similar situation occurs. If you are the administrator, you will be able to select Check In
from the context menu of the checked-out document. After clicking the OK button, a confirmation
warning will be displayed, stating the user who has the document checked out along with the date
and time it was checked out. Clicking Yes on the warning checks in the document, allowing other
users to gain access to the most recent version.
Another option for dealing with these documents is the Discard Check Out link in the context
menu of a checked out document. Selecting this link causes the document to revert to the content it
had before it was checked out. Once you confirm this, any changes that have been made to the document while it was checked out are lost.
Editing Document Properties
In addition to the actual file content, you may also need to edit the document properties in the library.
The document properties include the document file name, title, and any additional columns that the
document library designer has created to help organize the documents in the library.
The context menu for each document contains two links to allow you to work with the document properties, also called metadata. Click View Properties in the context menu to display a screen
of document properties including the creator of the document and when it was created, along with
who edited the document last and when it was edited. From this screen, you can edit the properties
by clicking the Edit Item link on the toolbar. Another way to edit the item properties is the Edit
Properties selection in the document’s context menu. Either of these two options displays a screen
that allows you to change the document’s file name, title, and other custom metadata. To edit a document’s properties from the document library screen, follow these steps:
1. Activate the document’s context menu by hovering over the file name with your mouse and
clicking the inverted triangle.
2. Click the Edit Properties link in the context menu.
3. On the Edit Item page, change the file name, title, or other properties.
4. Click the OK button.
Filtering and Sorting Documents
Since libraries are built on the same concepts as lists, you are able to manipulate the documents as
you would list items. This includes filtering and sorting the documents being displayed on the
library screen using the context menus shown when you hover over the column headers.
Filtering is accomplished using the context menus of the column headers on the library screen.
The menus display the values used in the selected column. Clicking on a value refreshes the library
so that only documents with that value in the selected column are displayed. A funnel icon next to a
column heading indicates that a filter is currently being applied to documents based on that column. To remove a filter, select the Clear Filter option in the context menu.
Sorting the documents in a library is accomplished by clicking the column heading. Initially, a
column will sort in ascending order. Clicking that same column heading again will resort the library
based on a descending order for that column, while clicking a different heading will sort the library
based on the newly selected column. A small icon of an arrow next to the column heading indicates
which column the library is sorting on and the direction of the sort.
Using Views
Views function the same way in a library as they do in a list. They determine what information is
presented to the user and in what format. On the library screen, the view is selected from the View
menu on the toolbar.
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By default, two views are created for a document library. The first is called All Documents and
displays the file name, type, and modification information for all documents in the library.
The second view, called the Explorer view, provides an interface similar to Windows Explorer,
which is used to view and manage files on your computer. Documents and folders are shown as
icons in this view. Many of the options for working with documents are exactly like the options
available in Windows Explorer, such as presenting the documents in list, detail, and icon displays.
Right-clicking the Explorer view area presents the same functionality as right-clicking in Windows
Explorer. Creating new folders and documents, cut/copy/paste, renaming, and other file system
features are all available through this special document library view, shown in Figure 6-5.
Figure 6-5. The Explorer view
nCaution
The Explorer view requires that a technology called WebDAV be properly configured on your computer. If the Explorer view does not display properly, your IT administrator will need to ensure that you have
WebDAV properly installed and configured.
Users with permission to manage a library can create new views, each with its own way of presenting the document information. Each of these views will be available in the View menu on the
toolbar after being created. Remember that you can apply filters and sorting after choosing an
appropriate view, as described in Chapter 4.
Faster Data Manipulation Using the Datasheet
The datasheet capabilities found in a list are also provided for document libraries. This integration
with Office allows an easy way for you to edit the metadata of multiple documents in a library without having to go to each document’s Edit Item page separately and can be especially useful for
updating metadata after performing a multiple-file upload. In order for the Datasheet view to work,
you need Office 2003 or later installed on the computer you are using to access the library. Your
browser security settings must also allow ActiveX components to run for the Datasheet view to
operate properly.
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To edit document information in datasheet mode, click the Edit in Datasheet link in the Actions
menu on the toolbar of the library page. The library changes to a spreadsheet display, which allows
you to quickly change multiple data values. Spreadsheet abilities, such as creating summations, are
available via the toolbar. A context menu, available with a right-click in the Datasheet view, provides
you with the ability to add and delete documents or columns. The context menu also provides the
ability to autofill cells or for you to pick cell values from a list of previously entered values in the column. When you need to modify the metadata of multiple documents in the same library, the
Datasheet view is significantly more efficient than navigating to each individual Edit Item page.
Folders
As with lists, you have the ability to create folders in SharePoint libraries for organizing how the
documents are stored. The structure of folders is a hierarchy similar to that of other familiar file systems like local and shared network drives.
Follow these steps to create a new folder in a document library:
1. On the library page, click the New Folder link in the New menu on the toolbar.
2. On the New Folder page, enter a name for the folder.
3. Click the OK button.
nTip Although a link to it does not exist in the Actions menu of a library, there is a View Folders screen that displays a hierarchical view of all folders in the library and lets you quickly navigate to any of them. You can get to
this screen by entering the URL yourself or creating your own link to the following page:
http://<Site URL>/_layouts/folders.aspx?List=<List Identifier>
Replace <Site URL> with the URL to the site containing your library and <List Identifier> with the unique
ID associated with the library. An easy way to find the unique ID for the library is to copy it from the URL of the
Customize Library screen if you have the proper permissions. After navigating to the Customize Library screen,
everything directly after List= in the URL is the unique ID.
The folder will appear in the library just like a list item but will have an icon that looks like a
tabbed, manila file folder, similar to the Windows Explorer folder icon. Navigating through folders
in a library is quite simple. To view the documents in a folder, simply click the name of the folder in
the list. The currently displayed folder is shown in the breadcrumb trail above the library’s name
near the top of the page. Use the links in the breadcrumb trail to navigate from the current folder up
through the folder hierarchy within the library.
nTip Instead of using folders to organize a document library, have the manager of the library create custom
columns you can use to categorize the documents. This is generally seen as the more appropriate way to organize
information in SharePoint and supports more robust display options and searching.
The context menu for folders has many of the same options as documents, including editing
and deleting folders. To edit a folder, click the Edit Item link in the context menu of the folder. The
Edit Item page will be displayed and allow you to change the folder’s name. To delete a folder, select
Delete Item from the folder’s context menu, and click OK when prompted for confirmation. The
Edit Item page also contains a link on the toolbar to delete the folder.
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nCaution
Once you click OK on the confirmation for deleting the folder, the folder and all of the documents
within it will be sent to the site’s Recycle Bin. After a configurable number of days (the standard is 30) in the
Recycle Bin, the folder will be permanently deleted, and it will not be possible to recover the documents without
assistance from your IT staff.
Versions
Like many other document management platforms, SharePoint document libraries have the ability
to store each instance of a saved document as a separate version. Document versioning is enabled
through the management features of the document library.
A document library that has document versioning enabled allows you to view previous versions
of a document from the Version History screen. To view a previous version of a document in a library
with versioning enabled, follow these steps:
1. Activate the document’s context menu by hovering over the file name with your mouse and
clicking the inverted triangle.
2. Click the Version History link in the context menu.
3. On the Version History page, shown in Figure 6-6, click the Modified link that represents the
version you wish to view.
Figure 6-6. A document’s version history
The Versions Saved screen provides the ability to restore an older version of the document,
thereby making it the current version. You may need to do this if you discover that newer versions
had incorrect information added to them, and you wish to revert to a version with accurate information. Restore a version as follows:
1. Navigate to the Version History screen for the document.
2. Activate the context menu for the version you wish to restore, and click the Restore link.
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3. When prompted for confirmation, click the OK button.
4. A new version of the document will be created from the selected version and set as the current version.
Deleting versions can be done in two ways. If you want to delete all historical versions of the
document, without deleting the document itself, click the Delete All Versions link on the toolbar of
the Version History screen. If you want to delete a single version, use the Delete link in the context
menu of the version you wish to remove.
nTip If a document is checked out, a new version is not created every time you save the document. A new version will only be created once the document is checked in. Conversely, if you do not check out the document, each
time the document is saved a new version is created.
Document Workspaces
Creating and using document workspaces was discussed in Chapter 2. Document libraries provide
an additional way to create document workspaces that integrates them with a document in the
library. You can use this to easily create a separate workspace devoted to the collaborative creation
of a specific document. This can prove useful when many people are collectively contributing to
the production of a complex document such as a contract, a proposal response, or a company
policy file.
Use the following steps to create a document workspace for a document from the library screen:
1. Activate the document’s context menu by hovering over the file name with your mouse and
clicking the inverted triangle.
2. Click the Create Document Workspace link in the Send To submenu.
3. On the Create Document Workspace page, click the OK button.
Once you have completed the preceding steps, your new document workspace will be displayed, as shown in Figure 6-7. Notice that the Shared Documents document library contains the
document from which you created the workspace. You will be automatically added to the site users
and displayed in the Members web part. The workspace is created with unique permissions, so you
can modify security to allow other users to work collaboratively with you; you will need to add new
users to the site as described in Chapter 2. While a large group of users may be able to view the original document library, you may only want a small subset of those users to have access to the
workspace to edit the document. You are able to create lists, add other supporting documents, and
use other SharePoint features to collaborate on the document modifications.
Once you have made the necessary changes to the document, you can publish it back to the
initial document library from which you created the workspace. To do this, perform the following
steps:
1. In the document workspace, activate the document’s context menu by hovering over the file
name with your mouse and clicking the inverted triangle.
2. Click the Publish to Source Location link in the Send To submenu.
3. On the Publish to Source Location page, click the OK button.
4. On the Operation Completed Successfully page, click the OK button to return to the document workspace.
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Figure 6-7. A document workspace created from a document library
Copying Documents with Send To
The Send To submenu of the document context menu contains a number of options in addition to
the Create Document Workspace feature. These options allow for enhanced management of the
documents in a document library.
The main purpose of the Send To submenu is to allow you to copy the document to another
document library on the same server and manage these document copies. A document copy is initiated using the Other Location link in the Send To submenu. The Copy page, shown in Figure 6-8,
lets you specify the location of the library and gives you the option to rename the file. An advanced
feature of the copied document is the ability to update all of the copies whenever the original is
checked in. The Copy screen also allows you to configure an alert, described in Chapter 8, on the
original document when creating the copy.
Once you have created a copy of the document using the Other Location link, an Existing
Copies link will be available in the submenu that lets you update copies with the latest version of
the original document. The document copy will contain a Go To Source link in its context menu that
takes you to the View Properties page of the original document. You can still edit the copy of the
document in its new location.
The Email a Link option of the submenu will open a new e-mail message in your default e-mail
application. A link to the document will be included in the body of the message. Fill out the rest of the
e-mail, including the To and Subject, and send the e-mail to people who need to access the document.
The Download a Copy link in the Send To submenu gives users an easy way to obtain a copy of
the document and place it on their local hard drives or networks. While saving the document locally
was always available by right-clicking the file name in the browser and choosing Save Target As, the
Download a Copy link provides users with this capability directly from SharePoint.
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Figure 6-8. Copying a document to another library
Managing Document Libraries
Since libraries are built on the same underlying capabilities as lists, they also give you the power to
customize the way they store and present information to the user. Many of the management features
of a library are identical to those found in custom lists.
nNote
Creating and managing a library requires that you have the proper permissions. By default, you must be
assigned the Full Control or Design permission levels to have access to create and customize libraries.
All management of a library begins by selecting the Document Library Settings link from the
Settings menu on the toolbar of the library screen. Clicking this link takes you to the Customize
Library screen where the options are categorized into multiple sections: the General Settings, Permissions, and Management sections, where you configure security; Communications, where you
can configure advanced information integration; Columns, where you determine how the information is stored; and Views, where you customize the ways in which users can see the information.
General Settings
Exactly like the general settings of lists, the General Settings options allow you to change basic
aspects of the library that make it easier for other users to understand its purpose as well as provide
navigation, versioning, approval, and advanced features. The General Settings section is divided
into the settings pages for different groups of functionality described in the following sections.
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Title, Description, and Navigation
This group of settings provides you with the basic abilities to provide the library with a title and
description to let the users know the purpose of the library. It also includes a setting for displaying a
link to the library in the site’s Quick Launch navigation. These settings are the same Name, Description, and Navigation settings described in Chapter 4.
Versioning Settings
Library versioning settings contain two key differences to the settings described in the list concepts
of Chapter 4. Whereas item version history was a Yes or No option for lists, libraries distinguish
between minor and major versions. The library settings allow you to select from the following versioning options:
• Create Major Versions: Each time the document is saved, the major version is incremented
(i.e., 1.0, 2.0, 3.0).
• Create Major and Minor Versions: Each time the document is saved, the minor version is
incremented (i.e., 1.0, 1.1, 1.2). A Publish Major Version link is displayed in the document’s
context menu that allows you to turn a minor version into the next major version (e.g.,
making version 1.2 the major version 2.0).
The document library’s Versioning Settings page contains a Require Check Out section. This
section contains a single setting that determines if users must Check Out the document before saving any modifications. This prevents multiple users from having the document open for editing
simultaneously and overwriting each other’s changes.
Advanced Settings
The Advanced Settings page of a document library shares many of the settings found in lists’ advanced
settings. Item-level permissions and Attachment settings found in lists do not exist for libraries, but
taking their place on the Advanced Settings screen are the three new configuration options described
in Table 6-1.
Table 6-1. Additional Advanced Settings for SharePoint Libraries
Setting
Description
Document Template
Specifies the URL of the document that is used as the template file for
the library. When the user clicks the New link or the New Document
link in the New menu, this file is opened to create a new document. If
content types are enabled for the library, the content type determines
the template file instead of this setting.
Browser-enabled
Documents
Determines how to open document formats that can be displayed in
both client applications and browsers, such as InfoPath 2007 forms.
Custom Send To
Gives you the ability to add a link to the Send To submenu of the
document context menu allowing the user to easily copy the
document to this location. The URL of the location, along with a
friendly name for display in the Send To submenu, must be entered.
Audience Targeting Settings
The audience targeting ability, available only if you have SharePoint Server 2007 installed, is controlled by the same setting that appears in lists. Enabling this setting adds a new column to the
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library called Target Audiences that is a special Audience Targeting column type giving you the
option to allow targeting to audiences, distribution lists, and SharePoint groups. When adding or
editing documents in a library with audience targeting enabled, the user can select one or more
audiences, distribution lists, or SharePoint groups, and the document will only appear in the library
to users that are members of the selected collection of users.
Document Template
Every document library uses a template to determine what type of file is created when the user
clicks the New link or the New Document link in the New menu on the toolbar of the library screen.
Initially, the document template is selected when the document library is created.
Available document templates include the following Microsoft Office documents and other
options:
• None: No template is used; if this is selected, the New link in the toolbar will not open a new
document, and the New Document link in the New menu will not appear.
• Microsoft Office Word 97–2003 document: Uses the pre-2007 document format.
• Microsoft Office Excel 97–2003 spreadsheet: Uses the pre-2007 document format.
• Microsoft Office PowerPoint 97–2003 presentation: Uses the pre-2007 document format.
• Microsoft Office Word document
• Microsoft Office Excel spreadsheet
• Microsoft Office PowerPoint presentation
• Microsoft Office OneNote section
• Microsoft Office SharePoint Designer web page
• Basic page: A SharePoint Basic page (see Chapter 8) is created in the library when the user
clicks the New link or the New Document link.
• Web Part page: A SharePoint Web Part page (see Chapter 8) is created in the library when the
user clicks the New link or the New Document link.
Once the document library has been created, you can customize the document template using
the appropriate Office 2003 or 2007 application. Since the document template is initially a blank
new document of the type specified as the document library template option, you may want to add
content to standardize the look of the documents created in the library. For instance, you may want
to add headers and footers with the company logo to a Word document template in a document
library for contracts, or a corporate About Us slide to a PowerPoint document template in a library
for corporate presentations. To edit the document template using Office 2003 or 2007, follow these
steps:
1. On the library page, click the Document Library Settings link in the Settings menu of the
toolbar.
2. On the Customize Library page, click the Advanced Settings link in the General Settings section.
3. On the Advanced Settings page, click the Edit Template link in the Document Template section.
4. If a warning message is displayed regarding opening documents, click the OK button.
5. When the document template opens in its native Office application, make the changes you
desire.
6. Save the document template from the application menu or toolbar, and then close the
application.
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A document library also allows you to use an existing document as the document template.
Follow these steps to set the document template for a library to a specific document in the library:
1. On the Customize Library page, click the Advanced Settings link in the General Settings section.
2. On the Advanced Settings page, enter the URL to the document in the Document Template
section. This should be in the following format: <Document Library>/Forms/<File Name>. An
example would be Policies/Forms/VacationTime.doc, where Policies is the name of the
document library and VacationTime.doc is the file name. To use a document as a template,
it must exist in the Forms directory of that document library. Adding a document into the
Forms directory of the document library is easiest by using the Explorer view described in
the “Using Views” section of this chapter.
3. Click the OK button.
nNote
Document libraries with content types enabled do not allow you to specify a document template. When
this setting is enabled, a template must be specified for each content type, as described in the “Content Types”
section later in this chapter.
Content Approval
When content approval is enabled for a document library, a newly added document is not displayed
to all users, even in the All Documents view, until someone with the Approve Item permission has
approved the document. The process, which begins on the library screen, is identical to the content
approval process in lists.
Libraries with content approval enabled will contain two new views intended to help content
approvers work with the documents. The first is called “Approve/reject items.” It is intended for users
with the Approve Item permission and displays the documents categorized by status. In this manner,
approvers can easily see pending documents and take the appropriate approval action. Users without this permission will not see this view in the View menu.
Users who have added documents to the library can use the My Submissions view to see the
current state of their documents. This view displays all documents the user has created, categorized
by their approval status. When approving or rejecting a submission, the content approver can enter
comments explaining the approval action. These comments can be seen in the My Submissions
view, so that the submitter can make corrections or take other appropriate steps.
Security
As we have seen, libraries are based on many of the same concepts as lists. Among those concepts
are security and item-level permissions. Security for a library is managed identically to the way you
would manage the security of a list, as described in Chapter 4. When first created, a library inherits
the security settings of the site it is in. You can decide to break this inheritance and give unique permissions to the library. This is most common when working with libraries that contain sensitive
documents that not all site users should see, such as financial information.
To break permission inheritance for a list, click the Edit Permissions link in the Actions menu
on the toolbar of the Permissions page. Once this has been done, you will be able to manage the
Permissions Levels for users within the library based on SharePoint groups or domain users and
groups. At any time, you can revert to the site’s users and permission-level security by selecting the
Inherit Permission link in the Actions menu of the toolbar on the Permissions page. For detailed
steps on editing security, see Chapter 4.
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Item-Level Permissions
Another concept that libraries share with lists is the ability to set security on an individual document to further refine who can access the information stored in the library. Item-level security is
managed similarly to library security, using the same concept of inheritance and permission levels.
To edit permissions on a specific document, perform the following steps:
1. On the library page, click the Manage Permissions link in the context menu of the desired
document.
2. On the Permissions screen, click the Edit Permissions link in the Actions menu on the toolbar.
3. On the confirmation message, click the OK button to create unique permissions for the
document.
4. On the Permissions screen, check the box next to a user’s name, and click the Edit User
Permissions link in the Actions menu on the toolbar.
5. On the Edit Permissions screen, select the appropriate permission levels for this user.
6. Click the OK button.
The permissions page will refresh and display the updated user permissions. Giving a user
Read access to a specific document will cause them to not see the Edit Properties link or Edit in
<Application> link in that document’s context menu or anywhere else where it would otherwise
be displayed.
Just like library security, you can grant a user access to a specific document by clicking the New
link in the toolbar of the Permissions page, or you can revoke users’ access to the document completely by checking the box next to their names and clicking the Delete User Permission link in the
Actions menu on the toolbar. Revoking users’ access completely will cause them to not see the document when viewing the library.
nTip Item-level security can be applied to folders within the library by following the same steps needed for documents after selecting the Manage Permissions link in a folder’s context menu. Use this to control user permissions
to groups of related documents or to hide entire folders of files from specific users or groups.
Managing Checked Out Files
A document library that has the Require Check Out setting enabled on the Versioning Settings page
will require additional management of checked out files. With this configuration, any document
that is created in the library using the New link or uploaded via the Upload link remains checked
out until someone with the proper permissions has checked in the document. If there is no checked
in version of the document, it will not appear to users in the library.
You are provided with a page where you can manage all of the files in the library that do not
have a version that is checked in. The Checked Out Files page allows you to see all files in the library
that have no checked in version, organized by who has the document checked out. You are able to
take ownership of documents checked out to other users by selecting the associated box and clicking the Take Ownership of Selection link on the toolbar. This makes you the user who has checked
out the document.
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Incoming E-mail Capabilities
The document library, like some list templates described in Chapter 5, has the capability to process
incoming e-mail messages and their attachments. Each library can be configured with an e-mail
address that users can send messages to. When a user sends a message to this e-mail address, the
attachments of the message are saved as new documents in the library.
nNote
Before incoming e-mail capabilities become accessible, your SharePoint technical administrator will need
to configure your SharePoint environment to correctly process incoming e-mail.
If incoming e-mail capabilities are available, the document library’s Create page will contain an
Incoming E-Mail section. This section lets you enable incoming e-mail for the library and determine what e-mail address users will need to send messages to in order for the attachments to be
saved in the SharePoint library.
You can add and further define incoming e-mail capabilities for existing libraries using the
Incoming E-Mail Settings link in the Communications section of the Customize Library page. To
add incoming e-mail handling to a document library, perform the following steps:
1. On the library page, click the Document Library Settings link in the Settings menu of the
toolbar.
2. On the Customize Library screen, click the Incoming E-Mail Settings link under the Communications section.
3. On the Incoming E-Mail Settings screen, enter the following information:
a. In the Incoming E-Mail section, select Yes to allow the library to receive e-mail, and
enter the address that users will send messages to for this library.
b. In the E-Mail Attachments section, choose how you want attachments saved in the
library. The attachments can be saved in the library’s root folder, saved into a folder
named using the e-mail’s subject, or saved into a folder named using the sender of the
e-mail. You also must decide if attachments will overwrite files with the same file name.
c. In the E-Mail Message section, select Yes if you want the original e-mail message saved
as a document in the library.
d. In the E-Mail Meeting Invitations section, select Yes if you want meeting invitation messages to be saved as documents in the library.
e. In the E-Mail Security section, determine if you want all users to be able to send messages to the library or only those users with access based on SharePoint security.
nCaution
Allowing anyone to send e-mail messages to your library bypasses the library security that has been
configured and allows potentially malicious activity such as spamming the library with new documents. It is best to
limit e-mail security to those with access to the library or enable content approval to restrict the documents that
are publicly displayed.
4. Click the OK button.
Once the library has been configured to allow incoming e-mail messages, users can send e-mail
to the corresponding address to add documents to the library. All e-mail attachments will be saved
in library folders, as specified in the E-Mail Attachments section of the Incoming E-Mail Settings
page. Documents added using an incoming e-mail contain a Created From E-Mail link on their View
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Properties pages. Clicking this link takes you to the E-Mail Details page, which displays information
about the original e-mail including Sender, From, To, CC, and Subject.
Manage Copies
The ability to copy documents from one library to another using the Send To submenu introduces
the need to see and manage where these copies exist. The abilities to create new copies, update
copies with new versions of the source document, and update copy settings are provided by the
Manage Copies screen, shown in Figure 6-9.
To find the Manage Copies screen for a document, follow these steps:
1. On the library screen, activate the document’s context menu by hovering over the file name
with your mouse and clicking the inverted triangle.
2. Click the View Properties link in the context menu.
3. On the View Properties page, click the Manage Copies link on the toolbar.
Figure 6-9. Managing document copies
The Manage Copies screen allows you to create a new copy of the document using the New
Copy link on the toolbar. You can update document copies with the current version of the source
document by clicking the Update Copies link on the toolbar and selecting which copies to push the
updated source document to.
To edit the copy information, click the Edit icon on the Manage Copies screen for the desired
document. The Edit Copy screen will be displayed and allow you to change library, file name, and
update prompt settings. This screen also allows you to remove the association between the source
document and the copy by clicking the Remove Link button. Doing so will cause SharePoint to no
longer see the documents as copies of each other, rather the files will become completely separate
entities in their respective libraries.
Managing Columns
The ability to design your own structure to provide users with information about your documents is
often a key to the efficient use of your document library. SharePoint provides you with the ability to
add library metadata, called columns, of various data types including formatting rules about the
information that can be stored in these columns.
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Adding and managing columns in a library is done exactly like it is for lists. The data types,
optional settings, and management process are identical. Refer to “Managing Columns” in Chapter 4
for more details on the available column types and how to add or edit columns. Adding columns to
document libraries and maintaining the information makes it easier for users to locate documents
relevant to their needs.
Managing Views
We have already discussed some document library views earlier in this chapter. One such view is
the All Documents view, which is available by default when a document library is created. Once the
library is created, you are able to create your own custom views to configure the way that the documents are displayed to users. The same types of views available for lists are also available in
libraries: Standard, Datasheet, Calendar, and Gantt.
The sorting, filtering, grouping, totals, styles, and folders settings for list views apply to libraries as
well. These options and how to add, edit, and configure views are described in detail in the “Managing
Views” section of Chapter 4. The Styles section has an additional style available called Document
Details, which displays each document in a separate box with its name and modification information
shown.
Libraries also have a set of special columns that are available for use in views. These columns,
shown in Table 6-2, are valuable when creating custom views.
Table 6-2. Special Document Library Columns for Use in Views
Column
Description
Check In Comment
The comment entered by the last user to check in the document.
Checked Out To
Indicates the user who currently has the document checked out.
Content Type
The name of the content type for the document. See the
“Advanced List Concepts” section of Chapter 4 for more
information about content types.
Copy Source
Shows a link to the source document for documents that are
copies created using the Send To functionality.
Created
Specifies the date and time that the document was added to the
library.
Created By
Indicates the user who added the document to the library.
Edit (link to edit item)
Displays a column containing an icon that takes the user to the
Edit Item screen.
File Size
Specifies the size of the document (in kilobytes).
ID
Contains a number that uniquely identities a document within a
library.
Modified
Indicates the date and time that the document or its metadata
was last edited. If the document was never edited, it contains the
date and time the document was created.
Modified By
Indicates the last user to modify the document.
Name (linked to document)
Displays the file name as a link that opens the document.
Name (linked to document
with edit menu)
Displays the file name as a link that opens the document and
provides the context menu for editing and managing a
document.
Type
Determines the file type of the document. When used in views,
the type is displayed as an icon representing the file type.
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Column
Description
Version
The version number in Major.Minor format, useful when
versioning is enabled on the library.
Approval Status
Specifies the status of the document in the approval process.
Possible values are Pending, Rejected, and Approved. This
column is only available in libraries that require approval.
Approver Comments
Displays the comments entered by the approver during the
approval process. This column is only available in libraries that
require approval.
Creating a Library Template
As was described in the “Creating a List Template” section of Chapter 4, you often find yourself needing to use the same library structure for multiple libraries. Also, you may want to use the same library
structure in multiple sites. Imagine having separate sites for each department in your company. Each
department has policy and procedure documents they want stored in document libraries within
their sites. The columns and views for each document library are similar, so it is a good practice to
create a single document library and save this library as a template.
To create a library template, perform the following steps:
1. On the library page, click the Document Library Settings link in the Settings menu of the
toolbar.
2. On the Customize Library page, click the Save Document Library as Template link in the
Permissions and Management section.
3. Specify a file name, a simple title, and more elaborate description for the template.
4. If you want the template to contain all of the data documents currently in the library, check
the Include Content check box. Item-level security is not maintained in a library template,
so including content will cause any restricted security on documents to be lost when creating another library from the template.
5. Click the OK button.
A library template for this site collection is now created based on the document library. This
template will be available in the Libraries section of the Create page. When you want to create a
document library that is based on the template, choose the template’s link on the Create page rather
than choosing the Document Library link.
Deleting the Library
There may be times when deleting a library is necessary. This is accomplished on the Customize
Library screen.
To delete a library, follow these steps:
1. On the library page, click the Document Library Settings link in the Settings menu of the
toolbar.
2. On the Customize Library page, click the Delete this Document Library link in the Permissions and Management section.
3. Click OK when prompted for confirmation that you wish to send this library to the site’s
Recycle Bin.
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nCaution
Once you select OK on the confirmation for deleting the library, all of the documents it contains will be
sent to the site’s Recycle Bin. After a configurable number of days (the standard is 30) in the Recycle Bin, the library
will be permanently deleted, and it will not be possible to recover the library without assistance from your IT staff.
Form Library
SharePoint includes integration for XML-based forms, such as those created by Microsoft Office
InfoPath, through the use of form libraries. A form library is based on the same concepts used in
document libraries except that the template used in the library is an InfoPath form. Instead of
uploading documents, the library’s responsibility is to provide a repository for completed forms and
give users the ability to review the responses.
InfoPath is a form creation and submission tool that lets a designer create a form for data entry
that users can then fill out. After a user fills out the form, the data can be saved to XML files, databases, or other data management tools, where it can be analyzed and incorporated into related
business processes. An example is a purchase order, in which employees enter information regarding items they wish to buy including quantity, cost, and purchasing reason for review and approval
by their manager or purchasing coordinator.
nNote
For additional information on how to use Microsoft Office InfoPath, please see the application’s help files
or visit http://office.microsoft.com.
Creating Form Libraries
Creating a new form library is done using the same steps described in the “Creating Document
Libraries” section earlier in this chapter. The only difference in the available settings of the library
during creation is that a form library’s document template must be the Microsoft Office InfoPath
Form. When the library is created, a blank InfoPath form is used as the template, and it will need to
be edited to provide users with the appropriate information-gathering functionality. Until the form
template is edited, users will be shown an error message when trying to add forms in the library.
Working with Form Libraries
To work with form libraries, you need to have a working knowledge of using Microsoft Office
InfoPath. From a user’s perspective, opening an InfoPath form, entering appropriate information in
the fields presented, and then saving the form is all that is necessary. Form libraries allow you to
save and organize related forms in one place, while being able to view data from the forms without
opening each individual form.
Using Views
By now, you are familiar with the concept of views and their use in determining the way in which
the items are displayed to the users of the list or library. When a form library is created, it comes
with the default views shown in Table 6-3.
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Table 6-3. Form Library Views
View
Description
All Documents
The default view; it displays the type, file name, and modification
information for all items in the library.
Explorer View
Displays an interface that allows you to view and manage forms similar
to the way files are managed with Windows Explorer. This view is also
used in document libraries.
Merge Documents
Allows you to combine the data from multiple forms into a single form.
This view is only available with InfoPath form templates that allow data
merging.
My Documents
Displays the type, file name, and modification information for all of the
current user’s forms. This is accomplished by using a filter of Created By
is equal to [Me].
Relink Documents
Displays the type, file name, modification information, and URL of the
currently linked template for all forms in the library. This view allows you
to link documents to the library’s current form template.
As is the case with other views in lists and libraries, the view’s settings contain filtering and
sorting information. In addition to the view’s filtering and sorting, you are able to apply additional
filtering and sorting on the library screen as described in the “Using Views” section for document
libraries earlier in this chapter.
Adding Forms
Adding forms to a forms library can be accomplished in two ways. The first and most common way
is to create a new form by using the form library’s template. This provides a quick way to fill out
form information and lets you make the most out of the form library’s integration with InfoPath. To
create a new form, follow these steps:
1. On the form library screen, click the New link on the toolbar.
nNote
If a form library does not have a valid form template, InfoPath 2003 will display an error message, and
InfoPath 2007 will explain that a template must first be published to the library before it can be used.
2. When InfoPath opens, as shown in Figure 6-10, enter the appropriate data in the fields on
the InfoPath form.
3. Select to save the document from the menu or toolbar of InfoPath.
4. On the Save As dialog box, which will display the form library as the destination, edit the file
name appropriately.
5. Click the Save button, and close InfoPath.
You are also able to upload a form into the form library. Uploading a form that was not created
based on the library’s template is allowed, but you will not receive the complete integration with the
library that is otherwise provided. To upload forms, simply click the Upload link on the toolbar of
the library screen. The Upload Document screen will appear and function as it does in document
libraries. Follow the same process used there by clicking the Browse button, selecting a file, and
then clicking the OK button to upload the form.
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Figure 6-10. Filling out a form with InfoPath
Editing Forms
After you either create a new form or upload an existing form to the library, you are able to edit the
form’s data. To edit the information in the form, the context menu available in the library includes
an Edit in Microsoft Office InfoPath option. Selecting this option will open the form in InfoPath,
allowing you to make modifications and save it back to the library.
The check out and check in features of document libraries also apply to form libraries. To prevent others from working on the same form that you are editing, it is best to check out the form first.
After making all of your changes using InfoPath, save the form back to the library, and check it in so
that other users see that changes have taken place. Until you check in the form, other users of the
library will not see the updates you made, even if you have saved the form back to the library. This
allows you to keep the form checked out until you are ready for others to see your modifications.
Editing Form Properties
In addition to editing the InfoPath forms themselves, you can edit the custom properties created for
the form library to further describe each form. This is accomplished from the Edit Properties link in
the context menu of each form in the library. Changing the file name of the form is accomplished
on the Edit Properties screen.
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nTip If the form template was created with InfoPath 2007, any columns that were added to the library with the
Allow Users to Edit Data in this Field option can be edited on the Edit Properties screen, and the data in the associated InfoPath form will be updated as well.
Merging Forms
Libraries created from InfoPath form templates that allow form merging provide an additional view
called Merge Documents. This Merge Documents view allows you to combine the data from separate forms into a single form. This can be useful to consolidate such things as purchase orders, time
sheets, and sales reports. Follow these steps to merge forms in a form library:
1. On the library screen, select the Merge Documents view in the View menu on the toolbar.
2. On the Merge Documents view, select the check box in the Merge column for each form you
want to combine.
3. Click the Merge Selected Documents link on the toolbar.
4. InfoPath will open and combine the data from the forms selected. Make any additional
updates to the information.
5. Select to save the document from the menu or toolbar of InfoPath.
6. On the Save As dialog box, which will display the form library as the destination, edit the file
name appropriately.
7. Click the Save button, and close InfoPath.
nNote
Merging forms does not delete the original forms; it creates a new form with the combined data from the
multiple source forms.
Relinking Forms
When InfoPath forms are filled out, they contain a link to the template that was used to create them.
If there are forms in a form library that are not linked to the form library’s template, the library
allows you to relink these forms with the template.
A form that has been uploaded, as opposed to created using the New link on the toolbar, will
not be linked to the template. If a new template has been created for the library, existing forms will
need to be linked to that template in order to open properly. To relink forms in a form library, follow
these steps:
1. On the library screen, select the Relink Documents view from the View menu on the toolbar.
2. On the Relink Documents view, select the check box in the Relink column for each form you
want to link to the current form template.
3. Click the Relink Selected Documents link on the toolbar.
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Other Library Usage
Remaining features of SharePoint form libraries are used exactly like their counterparts in document
libraries or lists. The following capabilities can all be accomplished using the descriptions and steps
found earlier in this chapter or in the “Managing Lists” section of Chapter 4:
• Using the datasheet to edit items
• Check-in and check-out capabilities
• Folders
• Versions
• Copying files with Send To
Managing Form Libraries
Many settings and options used when managing form libraries are identical to those of lists and
document libraries. Please refer to the “Managing Document Libraries” section in this chapter or
the “Managing Custom Lists” section in Chapter 4 for detailed instructions for managing library
metadata, views, settings, and templates.
Form Templates
After a form library has been created through the SharePoint Create page, you will need to customize
the form template, because the default template is a blank InfoPath form and is not usable until it
has been customized. Edit the form template using InfoPath as follows:
1. On the library screen, click the Form Library Settings link in the Settings menu on the toolbar.
2. On the Customize Library screen, click the Advanced Settings link in the General Settings
section.
3. On the Advanced Settings screen, click the Edit Template link in the Document Template
section.
4. When the document template opens in InfoPath, make the changes you desire in design
mode. Refer to InfoPath documentation for instructions on using the InfoPath application
to design a form.
5. Save the document template from the application menu or toolbar.
a. If you are using InfoPath 2003, you will be asked if you want to publish to a new library,
as described in the “Advanced Office Integration” section later in this chapter, or overwrite. Choose to overwrite to update the existing form template.
b. If you are using InfoPath 2007, you must republish the template to the form library, as
described in the “Advanced Office Integration” section later in this chapter.
6. Close InfoPath.
Managing Columns and Views
At first glance, it seems that only a Name column is available when a form library is created. This is
true in a sense, but the form library is tightly integrated with the form template you chose when
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creating the form library. This allows the library to display the data fields from the form as columns
in the library’s views. As users fill out forms and save them to the library, the data they entered into
the forms can be displayed in the library screen. This allows you to see their responses without
opening each individual form.
InfoPath’s publishing process, described in the “Advanced Office Integration” section later in
this chapter, determines which fields in the InfoPath form are available as columns in the library. It
also allows you to enable editing of columns, so that changing the values on the Edit Properties
page saves the changes into the form.
When creating custom views, the form library contains the same special columns available in
document libraries. The creation information, modification information, and file size of the form
are present. As a result of the integration between the form library and the InfoPath forms, views
can also use the form’s data fields to perform sort, filter, group, and totaling functionality.
nTip
Displaying, filtering, grouping, and totaling InfoPath form fields in form library views is a simple yet
extremely effective way for users to arrange and display the completed InfoPath forms.
Other Library Management
Remaining management features of SharePoint form libraries are performed exactly like their counterparts in document libraries or lists. The following management tasks can all be accomplished
using the descriptions and steps found earlier in this chapter or in the “Managing Lists” section of
Chapter 4:
• General settings, versioning settings, advanced settings
• Content approval
• Library security
• Managing checked out files
• Incoming e-mail capabilities
• Managing copies
• Library template management
• Deleting libraries
Picture Library
Picture libraries build on the file management features introduced earlier by the document library.
They have the same mechanisms for displaying the file information including views, folders, filtering, and sorting. Picture libraries then add many image-specific features and integration into other
applications not available with a document library. These added features make picture libraries the
ideal place to store your image files in SharePoint. Appropriate uses of picture libraries include storage of corporate marketing graphics, presentation diagrams, product photographs, and company
event slideshows. Features of a picture library that are identical to a list or document library will be
briefly mentioned here and then referenced to the appropriate chapter for more details.
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Creating Picture Libraries
Creating a new picture library is done using the same steps described in the “Creating Document
Libraries” section earlier in this chapter. The Picture Library link can be found in the Libraries section of the site’s Create page. The only difference with the available settings of the library during
creation is that a picture library does not contain a document template.
Working with Picture Libraries
Now that you are familiar with both lists and document libraries, it should be easy to learn the
basics of using a picture library. There are some unique features that provide added value to picture
libraries that we will discuss.
Using Views
One of the first things you may notice about a picture library is the unique ways in which the library
can display the files. Views for picture libraries provide some image-specific functionality that
makes looking for images easier.
When a picture library is created, it comes with three default views. One of these views is the
Explorer view, which we discussed with document libraries, and it works the same way here. The
other two default views—All Pictures and Selected Pictures—actually contain three different display
formats for showing the image files. You can select the display format in the View menu on the toolbar of the picture library’s screen. The display formats are described in Table 6-4.
Table 6-4. Display Formats for Picture Library Views
Display
Description
Details
Displays the images in a manner similar to the standard view type, in which
each item is displayed on a row-by-row basis showing data about the item.
Default data displayed in this view are type, name, picture size, and file size.
A thumbnail version of the selected image is displayed on the left side of the
page under the Picture Preview heading.
Thumbnails
Displays small versions of all images in the view with the file name below
the picture as shown in Figure 6-11. Clicking the image takes you to the View
Properties screen for the picture.
Filmstrip
Displays tiny versions of all images in the view horizontally along the top
and a large version of the selected image below. The name and description
of the selected image are also shown. Changing which image is selected
displays the newly selected image in the large display. Clicking the large
image takes you to the View Properties screen for the picture.
The All Pictures view uses the display styles in Table 6-4 and shows all pictures in the library.
The Selected Pictures view displays a subset of the pictures in All Pictures. Each file in All Pictures
has a check box next to it. Selecting the check box for one or more of the images and then switching
to the Selected Pictures view shows only those pictures you had selected in the All Pictures view.
These selections are remembered when you leave the library or site and return. Selecting pictures
will be needed later in this chapter for the downloading and editing functionality. If you have no
pictures selected before choosing the Selected Pictures view, a message will be displayed stating
that there is nothing for it to display.
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Figure 6-11. The thumbnails display in a picture library
Filtering and Sorting Pictures
Use the filtering and sorting features of a picture library almost identically to the same features in
other lists and libraries. The only difference is that column headings used for sorting and displaying
filters are not shown on all of the different display formats for the views. The only display format
that contains these headings is the Details format. In order to sort or filter the pictures being displayed, you must first change to the Details format. Once you are using the Details format, use the
column headings to sort or filter the list of pictures as you would any other library or list. Now you
can switch to the Thumbnails or Filmstrip display format, and they will use the sorting and filtering
you specified earlier.
Adding Pictures
Adding pictures to the library is similar to uploading documents in a document library. Unlike a
document library, there is no link allowing you to create new pictures; you are only able to upload
previously existing picture files using these steps:
1. On the library screen, click the Upload link on the toolbar.
2. On the Add Picture screen, click the Browse button.
3. On the Choose File dialog box, select the image file you want to upload by navigating the
drive and folders on your local computer or network.
4. Click the Open button.
5. On the Add Picture screen, click the OK button.
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If you have Office 2003 or later installed on your computer, another link will be presented to
you on the Add Picture screen and in the Upload menu of the toolbar on the library screen. This
link, Upload Multiple Files, starts the Microsoft Office Picture Manager application, which comes
with Office 2003 or later. The Picture Manager provides you with the ability to organize and edit
image files. Use the following steps to upload using the Picture Manager:
1. On the library screen, click the Upload Multiple Pictures link in the Upload menu on the
toolbar.
2. When Microsoft Office Picture Manager opens, as shown in Figure 6-12, use the Picture
Shortcuts area on the left to locate and select the folder containing the image files you want
to upload.
3. In the Thumbnail area in the middle of the application, select the images you want to
upload. Select multiple images by pressing and holding the Ctrl key while selecting the files.
4. In the Upload Settings area, select to send either the original pictures or to optimize the
images for viewing on the web. Optimizing the images reduces the size of the file but also
decreases the quality of the image.
5. Click the Upload and Close button.
6. On the Uploading Pictures screen, click the Go Back To link to return to the picture library.
Figure 6-12. Uploading multiple pictures with Microsoft Office Picture Manager
Editing Pictures
Editing pictures in a picture library is another feature that utilizes the integration with Microsoft
Office Picture Manager. If you do not have Office 2003 or later installed, specifically Picture Manager, you will not be able to edit the files in a picture library without using another application
outside of SharePoint and uploading them again.
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There are many ways to begin the process of editing pictures. The context menu on the Details
display contains an Edit Picture option that allows you to edit that specific picture. The Action menu
on the toolbar of the picture library contains an Edit link that allows you to edit all of the selected
pictures at once. To edit multiple pictures, follow these steps:
1. On the picture library screen, with the Details format of the All Pictures view displayed,
select at least one picture by checking the corresponding check box.
2. Click the Edit link in the Actions menu on the toolbar.
3. When Microsoft Office Picture Manager opens, as shown in Figure 6-13, use the features it
provides to modify your images. These features are mostly found under the Picture menu.
4. Click the Save and Close button.
5. On the Editing Pictures screen, click the Go Back To link to return to the picture library.
Figure 6-13. Editing pictures with Microsoft Office Picture Manager
nNote
For further information on how to use Microsoft Office Picture Manager, please see the help files that
come with the product or visit http://office.microsoft.com.
Editing Picture Properties
Picture properties allow users to more easily find and maintain relevant images. Therefore, it is
important to make sure these properties accurately describe the associated picture. These properties can be displayed in the library views to assist users in finding and organizing the images.
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The Edit Properties screen contains the ability to change this information. There are several
ways to access the Edit Properties screen. The Details display format of library views provides a context menu for each picture, and this context menu presents links to both the View Properties screen
and the Edit Properties screen. The View Properties screen, shown in Figure 6-14, contains a link to
the Edit Properties screen on the toolbar.
The Edit Properties screen for a picture library displays a preview image of the picture along
with editable data for the default and custom properties that are maintained for each picture in the
picture library. After editing any of this information, click the OK button to commit your changes to
the library.
Figure 6-14. The View Properties screen
Download
The picture library comes with additional functionality to easily allow users to download images
from the library. SharePoint provides multiple ways to accomplish this. The simpler means of using
the download feature lets you obtain a single picture at a time. No integration with Office is necessary for this feature to work. You will find the download feature available in the context menus
displayed in the Details display style. To download a single picture file, perform the following steps:
1. On the picture library screen, with the Details format displayed, activate the picture’s context menu by hovering over the file name with your mouse and clicking the inverted
triangle.
2. Click the Download Picture link in the context menu.
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3. On the File Download dialog box, click the Save button.
4. On the Save As dialog box, navigate to the local hard drive or network directory in which to
save the file and click the Save button.
The more advanced approach to downloading the picture files allows you to download multiple
files at the same time. This is accomplished using integration with the Microsoft Office Picture Manager application installed with Office 2003 or later. While downloading via this method, you are able
to choose from multiple image sizes that the downloaded pictures can be saved as. This allows you to
easily create thumbnails of the images. Access to this feature is provided through the Download link
in the Actions menu on the toolbar of the picture library. To download multiple pictures from a picture library, follow these steps:
1. On the picture library screen, select at least one picture by checking the corresponding
check box.
2. Click the Download link in the Actions menu on the toolbar.
3. On the Download Pictures screen, shown in Figure 6-15, select the size that you want the
image files to be saved as.
4. Click the Download button.
5. On the Download Pictures dialog box, click the Browse button.
6. Navigate to the local hard drive or network directory in which to save the file, and click the
OK button.
7. Click the Save button.
Figure 6-15. Downloading images from a picture library
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Downloading picture files in this manner provides you with many options. You may have
noticed the Set Advanced Download Options link on the Download Pictures screen. Clicking that
link presents you with the options shown in Table 6-5.
Table 6-5. Download Advanced Options
Option
Notes
File Format
Allows you to determine the file format of the image when it is saved. Available
options are JPG, TIF, BMP, GIF, and PNG formats.
Picture Size
Allows you to resize the image that is saved. You are able to choose from a list of
predefined dimensions, specify custom dimensions, or specify a percentage of
the original size.
The Download Pictures dialog box contains three options including the directory where the
files will be saved. The second is the ability to rename the files with a standard prefix and incrementing number like August1, August2, August3, and so on. The last option allows you to open the
downloaded pictures in Microsoft Office Picture Manager where you can continue to work with
them.
Send To
Another unique and valuable feature of picture libraries is the ability to send selected pictures to an
Office application. This includes the useful capability to send the image in an e-mail message via
Outlook. In addition to being available as a link in the Actions menu on the toolbar of the picture
library page, the Send To feature can be accessed through a link on the Download Pictures screen
shown in Figure 6-15. SharePoint once again uses its integration with the Microsoft Office Picture
Manager application to accomplish this useful task. You are able to send the pictures to either a currently open or new document for the applications shown in Table 6-6, each with their own available
options.
Table 6-6. Send To Application Options
Application
Options
Outlook
Allows you to include the pictures as attachments or inline previews as well as
specify an image size and layout style
Word
Allows you to resize the image before sending it
PowerPoint
Allows you to resize the image before sending it
Excel
Allows you to resize the image before sending it
E-mail pictures to another user as follows:
1. On the picture library screen, select at least one picture by checking the corresponding
check box.
2. Click the Send To link in the Actions menu on the toolbar.
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3. On the Send Pictures dialog box, shown in Figure 6-16, select “Microsoft Office Outlook
message”.
4. Click the Send button.
Figure 6-16. Sending pictures to another application
After performing the preceding steps, a new Outlook message window will appear that
includes the pictures you selected from the picture library. The Send Pictures dialog box also allows
you to insert the picture into an open Office document by presenting you with a list of the currently
open files. This can save you time when adding images to Office documents that you are preparing.
nCaution
The Send To, multiple-file download, and other useful features require you to have Microsoft Office
Picture Manager installed and ActiveX controls supported. This application is part of the Office 2003 or later
installation.
Slide Show
Another unique way to work with picture libraries is to display a slide show, which is useful for presentations or leisurely browsing of the images in the library. Available in the Actions menu on the
toolbar of the picture library screen is the View Slide Show link. Clicking this launches a pop-up
window, shown in Figure 6-17, with a large rendition of the first image in the library along with a set
of media controls on the right. These controls let you start, pause, and stop the slide show along
with moving to the previous or next image in the library.
The slide show is not started until you press the play link, at which time the page will begin displaying pictures from the library on a five-second interval. Along with each image, the file name,
description, and date the picture was taken are also presented.
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Figure 6-17. A picture library slide show
Other Library Usage
Remaining features of SharePoint picture libraries are used exactly like their counterparts in document libraries or lists. The following capabilities can all be accomplished using the descriptions and
steps found earlier in this chapter or in the “Managing Lists” section of Chapter 4:
• Check-in and check-out capabilities
• Folders
• Versions
• Copying files with Send To
Managing Picture Libraries
Most tasks and options used when managing picture libraries are so similar to those of lists and
document libraries that we will not go into detail about them here. Please refer to the “Managing
Document Libraries” section in this chapter or the “Managing Lists” section in Chapter 4 for
detailed instructions for managing library columns, views, settings, and templates.
Managing Columns
Adding and managing the columns used to define the library’s information structure is accomplished the same way in a picture library as in other libraries and lists. The same column types
found in other libraries exist for use in collecting information about each picture, so you can refer
to the detailed descriptions of these in Chapter 4. The default picture library columns are shown
in Table 6-7.
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Table 6-7. Default Picture Library Columns
Column
Type
Title
Single line of text
Date Picture Taken
Date and Time
Description
Multiple lines of text
Keywords
Multiple lines of text
Managing Views
As mentioned earlier, views have additional features in picture libraries. They also are missing some
of the features of other library and list types. Upon creating a view in a picture library, you will see
that the Create View screen does not have an option for creating a Datasheet view as the Datasheet
view features are not available in picture libraries.
Unique to a picture library is the view style called Picture Library Details. This view style is what
allows a user to choose from the display formats described earlier. These display formats provide for
viewing thumbnails and previews of selected images while in the picture library.
Picture libraries also have their own set of special columns that are available for displaying, filtering, sorting, and grouping in views. These columns are shown in Table 6-8 and provide additional
detail about the images when users are navigating the picture library.
Table 6-8. Special Picture Library Columns for Use in Views
Column
Description
Check In Comment
The comment entered by the last user to check in the picture.
Checked Out To (link
to username to user
details page)
Indicates the user who currently has the picture checked out.
Content Type
The name of the content type for the picture. See the “Advanced
List Concepts” section of Chapter 4 for more information about
content types.
Copy Source
Shows a link to the source picture for images that are copies
created using the Send To functionality.
Created
Specifies the date and time that the picture was added to the
library.
Created By
Indicates the user who added the picture to the library.
Edit (link to edit item)
Displays a column containing an icon as a link that takes the user
to the Edit Item screen.
File Size
Specifies the size of the picture (in kilobytes).
File Type
Displays the file extension.
ID
Contains a number that uniquely identities a picture within a
library.
Modified
Specifies the date and time that the picture or its metadata was
last edited.
Modified By
Indicates the last user to modify the picture.
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Table 6-8. Continued
Column
Description
Name (linked to display items)
Displays the file name as a link that displays the picture properties.
Name (linked to document)
Displays the file name as a link that opens the picture.
Name (linked to document
with edit menu)
Displays the file name as a link that opens the picture. Also
provides the context menu for editing and managing a picture.
Picture Height
Specifies height dimension of the image (in pixels).
Picture Size
Indicates dimensions of the image.
Picture Width
Specifies width dimension of the image (in pixels).
Selection Checkbox
(select a picture)
Allows for picture selection in library views by displaying a
check box corresponding to the picture. This is necessary to
perform actions such as Download and Send To.
Thumbnail
Displays the thumbnail version of the image that SharePoint
creates when a picture is uploaded.
Type (icon linked to
document)
Determines the file type of the picture. When used in views, the
type is displayed as a familiar icon representing the file type.
Version
The version number in Major.Minor format, useful when
versioning is enabled on the library.
Web Preview
Displays the preview version of the image that SharePoint creates
when a picture is uploaded.
Other Library Management
Remaining management features of SharePoint picture libraries are performed exactly like their
counterparts in document libraries or lists. The following management tasks can all be accomplished using the descriptions and steps found earlier in this chapter or in the “Managing Lists”
section of Chapter 4:
• General settings, versioning settings, advanced settings
• Library security
• Managing checked out files
• Incoming e-mail capabilities
• Managing copies
• Library template management
• Deleting libraries
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Wiki Page Library
Wiki page libraries are customized and specialized document libraries that allow users to collaboratively contribute interconnected information. They do not contain documents, forms or picture
files, rather they store wiki pages. A wiki page is made up of a large content area that allows for the
editing of rich text, including formatting, tables, and most importantly, linking to other wiki pages.
Creating Wiki Page Libraries
Creating a new wiki page library is done using the same steps described in the “Creating Document
Libraries” section earlier in this chapter. The Wiki Page Library link can be found in the Libraries
section of the site’s Create page. Differences between wiki page library settings and document
library settings during creation are that a wiki page library does not contain a document template
and does not allow you to specify versioning settings at that time.
Working with Wiki Page Libraries
The way you work with the contents of wiki page libraries differs significantly from other library
types. Wiki page libraries do not contain individual files, documents, images or forms; rather, they
contain pages of interconnected textual information. Users of the library can edit this information,
thereby easily collaborating with each other on the content.
Using Views and Navigating Pages
When you navigate to the wiki page library, as shown in Figure 6-18, the first page displayed is the
home page. From there, users have many ways to find additional wiki pages. The most common is
to follow links within the page itself. Wiki pages are meant to link to each other to allow you to easily
click through them to find the information you are looking for.
The wiki page library also displays an additional navigation area on the left side of the page, as
seen in Figure 6-18. This navigation area displays links to recently modified pages. At the bottom of
this navigation is a View All Pages link. This link takes you to the All Pages view that functions like
the standard All Documents view found in document libraries. It displays the name and modification information of every page in the wiki page library. Use this view if you cannot find the
appropriate links to your desired page from the wiki pages’ content.
While looking at the All Pages view, you have access to the View menu on the toolbar of the
library. From there, you can select to view the items by another view in the library such as By Author
or By Editor. You can also perform the sorting and filtering that is common to all lists and libraries
with SharePoint.
While viewing wiki pages, an additional navigation option is displayed in the toolbar on the
top-right side of the wiki page. The Incoming Links link displays a list of wiki pages that contain
links to the current page, thereby providing an additional means to find information related to the
current wiki page. These navigation options can be seen in Figure 6-18.
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Figure 6-18. The default display of a wiki page library
Editing Pages
Editing a wiki page is how users collaboratively create information for dissemination in the wiki
page library. SharePoint provides an easy interface for editing the pages. To edit a wiki page, perform the following steps:
1. On the wiki page library screen, navigate to the wiki page you want to edit using one of the
methods discussed in the “Using Views and Navigating Pages” section earlier in this chapter.
2. On the wiki page, click the Edit link on the toolbar.
3. On the Edit Item page, modify the text in the Wiki Content area.
a. The Wiki Content’s toolbar allows you to change the display style and formatting of the
information.
b. Insert a link to another wiki page by entering the name of the page surrounded by double brackets like this: [[Invoicing System]]. This is highly recommended to allow users
to easily navigate the wiki content.
4. Click the OK button.
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Adding Pages
Adding new wiki pages can be done in two ways. The first is to edit an existing page that will connect
to the new page and insert a link using a nonexistent page name. Add a page in this manner by following these steps:
1. On the wiki page that will contain the link, click the Edit link on the toolbar.
2. On the Edit Item page, shown in Figure 6-19, insert a link to a new wiki page by entering the
name of the page surrounded by double brackets like this: [[Marketing Ideas]].
3. Click the OK button.
4. On the wiki page, the new link will be displayed and shown with a dashed underline signifying that the page does not yet exist.
5. Click the link for the new page.
6. On the New Wiki Page screen, edit the content as described in the “Editing Pages” section
earlier in this chapter.
7. Click the Create button.
Figure 6-19. Editing a wiki page
nTip
Adding a new wiki page by adding a link in an existing page is recommended, as it ensures that all pages
are connected, and users will benefit the most from interconnected content.
The second way to create a new page does not require a link from an existing page, although it
is best practice to create a link to the page at some point for users to easily find and edit the content.
To create a new stand-alone wiki page, perform these steps:
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1. On the wiki page library screen, click the View All Pages link in the navigation area on the
left side of the screen.
2. On the wiki page library screen’s All Pages view, click the New link on the toolbar.
3. On the New Wiki Page screen, enter a name for the new page, and edit the content as
described in the “Editing Pages” section earlier in this chapter.
4. Click the Create button.
Page History
Wiki page libraries maintain the historical content of each page. Since the main purpose for a wiki
page is for users to edit the information collaboratively, there arises the need for some control over
the content that is published in the library. The history of each page can be displayed by clicking the
History link on the toolbar of the desired wiki page.
The Page History screen, displayed in Figure 6-20, shows you a link to each version of the wiki
page along with the date and time it was created. Content that was added or deleted in this version
is shown with a background color to easily distinguish it from the other information.
If you are viewing an older version of the wiki page, there are additional capabilities available
in the toolbar. You can delete the version of the wiki page being displayed using the Delete This Version link. You can also restore the wiki page to that version using the Restore This Version link. This
is very valuable if you determine that recent edits are not desirable, allowing you to easily roll back
the wiki page to prior content.
Figure 6-20. The Page History screen
Other Library Usage
Remaining features of SharePoint wiki page libraries are used exactly like their counterparts in document libraries or lists. The following capabilities can all be accomplished using the descriptions
and steps found earlier in this chapter or in the “Managing Lists” section of Chapter 4:
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• Using the datasheet to edit items
• Check-in and check-out capabilities
• Versions
• Send To
Managing Wiki Page Libraries
Little additional management of wiki page libraries is necessary, as their purpose is to allow users to
manage the content of the libraries and their connections themselves. As with other libraries, wiki
page libraries do allow you to add custom columns and create new views.
Managing Columns
Since the standard view that users see when viewing wiki pages only shows them the wiki content
column, the benefits of adding custom columns to a wiki page library is limited. Adding columns to
a wiki page library does still allow you to organize your pages by creating custom views that can be
seen by users when they click the library’s View All Pages link.
The columns that exist in a newly created wiki page library are the standard modification and
creation information, as well as the page name and wiki content column. This wiki content column
is a “Multiple lines of text” column, which allows for rich text formatting to support the collaborative editing of content for the wiki page.
Managing Views
When a wiki page library is created, it comes with the default views shown in Table 6-9. As with
other libraries and lists, you can create custom views to organize the way in which the pages will be
shown in the library; however, the normal way users navigate through the wiki pages in a library will
be unaffected by custom views.
Table 6-9. Wiki Page Library Views
View
Description
All Pages
The default view; it displays the type, file name, modification information
and creation information for all items in the library.
Recent Changes
Displays the type, file name, modification information, and creation
information for all recently edited items in the library, sorted by the
modification date.
Created By Me
Displays the type, file name, modification information, and creation
information for all of the current user’s pages. This is accomplished by using
a filter of Created By is equal to [Me].
By Author
Displays the type, file name, modification information, and creation
information for all items in the library. The items are grouped by the user
who created them.
By Editor
Displays the type, file name, modification information, and creation
information for all items in the library. The items are grouped by the user
who most recently modified them.
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Other Library Management
Remaining management features of SharePoint wiki page libraries are performed exactly like their
counterparts in document libraries or lists. The following management tasks can all be accomplished
using the descriptions and steps found earlier in this chapter or in the “Managing Lists” section of
Chapter 4:
• General settings, versioning settings, advanced settings
• Content approval
• Library security
• Managing checked out files
• Library template management
• Deleting libraries
Translation Management Library
Using the Translation Management Library requires SharePoint Server 2007 to be installed in your
environment and that the Translation Management Library site feature is activated in a site and its
site collection. The library is used for the Translation Management workflow.
A Translation Management library is created using the Translation Management Library link in
the Libraries section of the site’s Create page. The New page that is displayed looks similar to the
New page for a document library but contains an additional setting that allows you to begin configuration of a Translation Management workflow for this library. This workflow and other workflow
capabilities of SharePoint 2007 are discussed in Chapter 7.
Working with Translation Management Libraries
Since Translation Management Libraries are just customized document libraries, the concepts for
using them are identical.
Using Views
By now, you are familiar with the concept of views and their use in determining the way in which
the items are displayed to the users of the list or library. When a Translation Management Library is
created, it comes with default views shown in Table 6-10.
Table 6-10. Translation Management Views
View
Description
Source Documents
The default view; it displays the type, file name, language, modification
information, and translation status for all items in the library. The files
are grouped by the source document.
All Documents
Displays the type, file name, language, and modification information
for all items in the library.
Explorer View
Displays an interface that allows you to view and manage forms similar
to the way files are managed with Windows Explorer. This view is also
used in document libraries.
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As is the case with other views in lists and libraries, the view contains filtering and sorting
information. In addition to the view’s filtering and sorting, you are able to apply additional filtering
and sorting on the library screen, as described in the “Using Views” section for document libraries
earlier in this chapter.
Managing Columns and Content Types
A Translation Management Library’s structure is determined by the Translation Document content
type that is configured for the library when it is created. This content type includes the columns
shown in Table 6-11.
Table 6-11. Translation Document Content Type Columns
Column
Type
Notes
Language
Single line of text
The language of the document. There
are dozens of options including Arabic,
Chinese, Dutch, English, French,
German, Greek, Hebrew, Italian,
Japanese, and Spanish. Users can enter
their own values, if necessary values do
not exist in the list.
Source Document
Single line of text
Source Document Version
Single line of text
Title
Single line of text
Translation Status
Choice
Used to indicate the version of the source
document that was used to create this
translation.
Default options include Not Started, In
Progress, Completed, Canceled, and
Required Update.
Report Library
The Report Library requires SharePoint Server 2007 to be installed in your environment. The library is
used for storing and maintaining Excel Services reports and dashboard files to integrate business
intelligence functionality into SharePoint 2007 sites. Management capabilities of a Report Library are
the same as those found in other types of libraries. For more information regarding Excel Services and
report libraries, please see the application’s documentation or visit http://office.microsoft.com.
Data Connection Library
The Data Connection Library requires SharePoint Server 2007 to be installed in your environment.
The library is used for storing and maintaining Office data connection files to allow various Office
documents, such as InfoPath and Excel, to share centrally managed connections to their underlying
data sources.
Data connections should be configured by a technical administrator with knowledge of the
underlying data sources and your network infrastructure. For more information regarding Office
Data Connection (ODC) files and data connection libraries, please see the application’s documentation or visit http://office.microsoft.com.
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Slide Library
Slide libraries require SharePoint Server 2007 to be installed in your environment before they can be
created, and you must have PowerPoint 2007 to make proper use of them. They build on the file
management features of the document library, explained previously, to store and manage individual PowerPoint slides. They have the same mechanisms for displaying information including views,
folders, filtering, and sorting.
Creating Slide Libraries
Create a new slide library using the same steps described in the “Creating Document Libraries” section earlier in this chapter. The Slide Library link can be found in the Libraries section of the site’s
Create page when SharePoint Server 2007 is installed. The only difference with the available settings
of the library during creation is that a slide library does not contain a document template.
nCaution
The slide library capabilities are accomplished through its integration with PowerPoint 2007; however,
these capabilities are not available in all versions. You must have Office Ultimate 2007, Office Professional Plus
2007, or Office Enterprise 2007 to take advantage of slide library features.
Working with Slide Libraries
Now that you are familiar with both lists and document libraries, it should be easy to learn the
basics of using a slide library. We will discuss some unique features that provide added value to the
management of presentation slides.
Publishing Slides
Unlike adding new documents in a document library by using a document template or uploading
existing files, slides are not created in a library. Rather, they are published to the library from existing PowerPoint 2007 files.
To publish slides to a slide library, perform the following steps:
1. On the library screen, click the Publish Slides link in the Upload menu on the toolbar.
2. PowerPoint 2007 will open and display a Browse dialog.
3. On the Browse dialog box, select the PowerPoint 2007 file you want to publish slides from by
navigating the drive and folders on your local computer or network.
4. Click the Open button.
5. On the Publish Slides window, select the slides you want to publish by checking the appropriate boxes, or use the Select All and Clear All buttons.
a. If desired, edit the File Name or Description for each slide in the appropriate columns.
b. Change the Publish To setting to configure which slide library should receive the slides
by entering the URL or using the Browse button.
6. Click the Publish button.
After refreshing your browser, the slides will appear in the slide library, as shown in Figure 6-21.
The library will show a thumbnail version of the slide along with the name and modification information using the All Slides view.
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Figure 6-21. The slide library
nTip
You can also publish slides directly from PowerPoint by using the Publish Slides option in the context menu
of the Slides area within the PowerPoint 2007 application.
Editing Slides
The slide library also integrates with PowerPoint 2007 to allow you to edit the content for individual
slides. When viewing the slide library, users can select the Edit in Microsoft Office PowerPoint link
from the context menu of a slide. This opens the individual slide in PowerPoint 2007 allowing you to
edit the contents and save the changes back to the library.
Editing Slide Properties
Slide properties allow users to more easily find and manage the slides they will need for creating
presentations. Therefore, it is important to make sure these properties accurately describe the associated slide. These properties can be displayed in the library views to assist users in finding and
organizing the slides.
The Edit Properties screen contains the ability to change this information. There are several
ways to access the Edit Properties screen. The All Slides view provides a context menu for each slide,
and this context menu presents links to both the View Properties screen and the Edit Properties
screen. The View Properties screen also contains a link to the Edit Properties screen on the toolbar.
The Edit Properties screen for a slide library displays the custom properties that are maintained for each slide in the library. After editing any of this information, click the OK button to
commit your changes back to the library.
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Creating a Presentation
The most valuable capability provided by the slide library that is not found in other libraries is the
ability to create a new PowerPoint presentation or add to an existing presentation directly from the
library screen. This is accomplished using the check boxes displayed on the All Slides view, a unique
link shown in the toolbar of the library, and the library’s built-in integration with PowerPoint 2007.
To create a presentation from slides in a slide library, perform the following steps:
1. On the library screen, select one or more slides to add to a presentation by checking the
boxes for the desired slides.
2. Click the Copy Slide to Presentation link on the toolbar.
3. PowerPoint 2007 will open.
4. On the Copy Slides to PowerPoint dialog, shown in Figure 6-22, ensure that the Copy to a New
Presentation option is selected. If you had a presentation open in PowerPoint before clicking
the Copy Slide to Presentation link on the toolbar of the library, the Copy to an Open Presentation option will be available, and you can select from any open presentations to add the
selected slides to.
5. If you want the slides to maintain the theme and other formatting options that they were
created with, select the Keep the Source Presentation Format option. If you leave this unselected, slides added to an existing presentation will have their formatting changed to match
the theme and styles used in the presentation.
6. Select the Tell Me When This Slide Changes option to tell PowerPoint to check the library for
updates to the slides whenever the presentation is opened.
7. Click the OK button.
The slides will be added at the end of the new or existing presentation in the order they are
displayed in the slide library. Rearranging the slides within the presentation may be necessary to
achieve the desired order.
nTip
Using the Library view’s sorting and filtering capabilities can help you customize the order in which the
slides are added to the presentation.
Figure 6-22. Adding slides to a presentation
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Linked Slides
When creating a presentation from the slide library or adding slides to an existing presentation, the
Tell Me When This Slide Changes option gives you another powerful integration capability for PowerPoint found only in this type of library. When opening a presentation in PowerPoint 2007 that includes
slides with this option enabled, PowerPoint retrieves any updated slides from the SharePoint library
and asks you if you want to use the new version in your presentation. This allows you to ensure that
common slides like a corporate “About Us” or frequently updated slides like a “Weekly Sales Status”
are kept current in your presentations without needing to manually check each one.
To allow PowerPoint 2007 to update slides in a linked presentation, perform the following
steps:
1. Open the presentation in PowerPoint.
2. On the Check for Slide Updates dialog, click the Check button. You can click the link on the
Check for Slide Updates dialog to see a list of the slide libraries that will be checked for
updates, since you can have different slides in a presentation added from different slide
libraries.
3. The Confirm Slide Update window, shown in Figure 6-23, will be displayed if any slides have
been updated in a slide library. This window will display the contents of the existing and
new slides along with their modification information.
4. Select the Replace option to update the slide in your presentation or the Append option to
add the new slide to the end of the presentation.
5. Click the Yes button to update your presentation with your selected option. Click the No
button to leave the slide as it currently exists in the presentation.
6. Repeat steps 3 through 5 for every slide that has been updated in its slide library.
You can tell PowerPoint to stop checking the slide library for updates by using the Check For
Updates submenu in the context menu of the Slides area within the PowerPoint 2007 application.
The Stop Checking this Slide for Changes option and the Stop Checking All Slides for Changes
option allow you to sever the link between your presentation and the slide library.
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Figure 6-23. Updating PowerPoint 2007 slides from the slide library
Other Library Usage
Remaining features of SharePoint Server 2007 slide libraries are used exactly like their counterparts
in document libraries or lists. The following capabilities can all be accomplished using the descriptions and steps found earlier in this chapter or in the “Managing Lists” section of Chapter 4:
• Check-in and check-out capabilities
• Folders
• Versions
• Copying files with Send To
Managing Slide Libraries
Most tasks and options used when managing slide libraries are so similar to those of lists and document libraries that we will not go into detail about them here. Please refer to the “Managing Document
Libraries” section in this chapter or the “Managing Lists” section in Chapter 4 for detailed instructions
for managing library columns, views, settings, and templates.
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Managing Columns
Adding and managing the columns used to define the library’s information structure is accomplished
the same way in a slide library as in other libraries and lists. The default columns found in a new slide
library are shown in Table 6-12.
Table 6-12. Slide Library Columns
Column
Type
Presentation
Single line of text
Description
Single line of text
Title
Single line of text
Other Library Management
Remaining management features of SharePoint Server 2007 slide libraries are performed exactly like
their counterparts in document libraries or lists. The following management tasks can all be accomplished using the descriptions and steps found earlier in this chapter or in the “Managing Lists”
section of Chapter 4:
• General settings, versioning settings, advanced settings
• Managing views
• Library security
• Managing checked out files
• Managing copies
• Library template management
• Deleting libraries
Advanced Library Concepts
Many of the same advanced concepts found with SharePoint lists are also available when working
with libraries. Site columns and content types can be used in many of the different libraries to assist
with the structure management. RSS feeds are available for library views to expose information to
external applications. Please refer to the “Advanced List Concepts” section in Chapter 4 for details
on using and managing these SharePoint capabilities.
Advanced Office Integration
The Office suite of products is focused mainly on document creation, and thus contains many
enhanced integration points with SharePoint libraries. Integration points between Office and picture libraries like editing, downloading, and sending pictures were discussed earlier in this chapter.
While we will only briefly describe features that also exist for SharePoint lists, we will discuss in
detail the additional library integration, such as the ability to save directly into a library from Office
applications. We will also show you how to use the feature-rich Shared Workspace task pane to work
with many aspects of a SharePoint site without using your browser.
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Open and Save As Integration
Earlier in this chapter, we discussed various methods for uploading to and opening files from
libraries. These methods require the use of a browser to navigate to the site and perform the desired
actions. Office 2003 and later versions provide enhanced integration between the Save As functionality and SharePoint libraries. This integration allows you to save to a library directly from the Save
As dialog box in any of the following Office applications: Word, Excel, FrontPage, InfoPath, Project,
OneNote, Outlook, PowerPoint, Publisher, and Visio. Entering the URL of the document’s site into
the Save As dialog box displays the list of libraries in that site. Once you select the library in which to
save the document and specify a file name, Office prompts you for custom column information that
exists for the library. If the library includes columns of the same name as Office document properties, the document’s metadata will be set based on the values specified in the Office document.
To save a file to a document library from within an Office application, follow these steps:
1. Select the Save As option from the File menu in the Office 2003 application or the Office
Button in the Office 2007 application.
2. On the Save As dialog box, enter the URL to the site in the File Name box, and press Enter.
The URL can be copied from the address bar of a browser window that is open to the site
and should contain everything up to the last backslash.
3. In the list of libraries, double-click the desired library.
4. When the contents of the selected library are displayed, shown in Figure 6-24, enter a file
name for your new document in the File Name box.
5. Click the Save button.
6. If there are custom columns for the selected document library, Office 2003 applications will
display the Web File Properties dialog box, and Office 2007 applications will show the Document Information panel if there are any required custom columns. Enter the appropriate
information about the document, and click the OK button for Office 2003 or the Save button
for Office 2007.
Figure 6-24. Saving to a document library from Word 2007
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In addition to SharePoint’s integration with the Save As action of Office products, libraries also
can be accessed using the Open action in the File menu. The process is very similar to the steps discussed earlier using Save As. Selecting the Open action and entering the URL to the site in the File
Name box will display the libraries that exist on that site. Selecting a library will display the files of
the proper type for the Office application you are using. You are then able to select one of these files
to open within the application.
nTip You can make it easier to access a SharePoint site or library within the Save As or Open dialog boxes of
Office by adding it to the My Places list. For Office 2003, when the site or library contents are displayed in the dialog box, select the Add to My Places action from the Tools button on the dialog box’s toolbar. In Office 2007,
right-click in the left area of the dialog box and select Add. This will add an icon to the left area of the dialog box
that you can use in the future as a shortcut to access the site or library.
Shared Workspace and Document Management Task Panes
One of the most lavish integration aspects between Office 2003 and SharePoint is the Shared Workspace task pane. In Office 2007, the same task pane is available but is called the Document
Management task pane. These task panes allow you to access and modify content in a SharePoint
site from within Office without having to navigate to the site using your browser. The Shared Workspace task pane, shown in Figure 6-25, is available in the following Office 2003 applications: Word,
Excel, Microsoft Project, OneNote, PowerPoint, and Visio. The Document Management Task Pane is
available in the following Office 2007 applications: Word, Excel, Microsoft Project, OneNote, PowerPoint, and Visio.
Figure 6-25. The Shared Workspace task pane
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The default behavior of Office 2003 applications is to display the Shared Workspace task pane
whenever opening a document from a SharePoint document library. You can also display the Shared
Workspace task pane using the Task Pane option in the application’s View menu. Once the task pane
is displayed, select Shared Workspace from the list of task panes available when clicking the task
pane’s title.
The Document Management task pane can be displayed in Office 2007 applications using the
Office Button menu. In this menu, select the Document Management Information option in the
Server submenu, and the task pane will be displayed as shown in Figure 6-26.
When the open document in Office is contained within a SharePoint document library, the
Shared Workspace or Document Management task pane provides a link that will open the site in a
browser window and an Update button to refresh the site contents and displays the following tabs
of information:
• Status: Displays the checked-out status of the document and to whom the document is checked
out. It also displays a link that allows you to check in the document if it is checked out.
• Members: Displays the users of the site. Also provides links to add new users or create a new
e-mail message to the users of the site to facilitate collaboration.
• Tasks: Displays tasks from the tasks list on the site. You are also able to add, edit, and delete
tasks; mark tasks as completed; and create alerts for the tasks list. Alerts are discussed in
Chapter 9.
• Documents: Shown in Figure 6-26, this tab displays the documents within the library where
the currently open document is stored. This tab provides the ability to add, delete, and open
documents as well as create folders and alerts for the library. Alerts are discussed in Chapter 9.
• Links: Displays links from the Links list on the site. You are also able to add, edit, and delete
links, and create alerts for the links list. Alerts are discussed in Chapter 7.
• Document Information: Available only in the Shared Workspace of Office 2003, this tab displays creation and modification information for the document. This tab also includes the
custom columns for the library, allowing you to set the document’s metadata values. Checkin, check-out, and complete version history management are included on this tab, allowing
you to completely manage a document from within Office without needing to open the site
in a browser.
All of these tabs include a Get Updates button that retrieves the latest information from SharePoint and refreshes the task pane. These tabs also contain an Options link where you can configure
task pane behavior, including automating updates to the information displayed in the task pane.
nNote The Documents tab of the task pane only displays documents within the same library as the currently
open document, not all documents stored in the site. The Tasks and Links tabs only display information from the
tasks and links lists created from default SharePoint site templates.
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Figure 6-26. The Document Management task pane
Accessing Offline Documents by Connecting Libraries with
Outlook
Outlook 2007 allows you to connect to libraries similarly to its ability to connect to calendar lists
described in Chapter 5. When you connect a library to Outlook, the contents of the library, such as
documents, forms, images, or slides, are made available in Outlook’s offline mode. This lets you
read and edit a document, form, or image file even when the SharePoint library is not accessible by
your computer.
Connect a document library with Outlook 2007 as follows:
1. On the document library screen, click the Connect to Outlook link in the Actions menu on
the toolbar.
2. On the Outlook confirmation window, click the Yes button to confirm the connection
between the library and Outlook.
3. The linked library will display as a new entry in the SharePoint Lists section of your Mail
Folders, as shown in Figure 6-27.
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After performing the previous steps, Outlook 2007 will display the contents of the library. A list
of documents from the library will be displayed and the selected document will be shown in the
preview pane if it is a supported Office document type. Outlook will display the document list and
preview, just like it displays mail messages from your e-mail inbox.
Figure 6-27. Connecting libraries with Outlook 2007
nTip Opening an Office 2007 document from this display will open the file using the Office application’s Offline
editing. Changes to the document will be saved to your local computer and must be synchronized with the server
when the SharePoint library is accessible. For more information on Office 2007’s Offline editing capabilities, please
see the application’s help files or visit http://office.microsoft.com.
Creating Form Libraries Through InfoPath Form Publishing
Earlier in this chapter, we described how to create form libraries from SharePoint. When following
this method and choosing the form template, you are limited to those installed on the SharePoint
environment with the default being only a blank template. Creating custom InfoPath forms is a
powerful way to capture and store information in SharePoint.
To facilitate the use of custom InfoPath forms in form libraries, InfoPath 2003 and later versions provide a Publishing Wizard, which lets you create a new form library based on a custom
form. This allows you to integrate the library and InfoPath by specifying which InfoPath fields are
displayed as columns in the library. Displaying these fields as form library columns allows users to
easily view InfoPath data in the library without opening each individual form.
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A setting in the InfoPath 2007 publishing process also allows you to specify if a field is editable
within the Edit Properties page of the library. Modifying this column information on the Edit Properties page changes the data within the InfoPath form, letting users edit form data without having to
open the form in the InfoPath application.
An option is also available to publish a form to an existing library, thereby making it the template.
The steps needed to publish an InfoPath from are dependant on the version of InfoPath you are
using. To publish an InfoPath 2003 form to a new SharePoint form library, follow these steps:
1. Select the Publish option from the File menu in InfoPath.
2. On the Publishing Wizard dialog box, click the Next button.
3. Select to publish the form to a SharePoint form library, and click the Next button.
4. Select the Create a New Form Library option, and click the Next button.
5. Enter the URL of the site where you want your InfoPath form to reside, and click the Next
button.
6. Enter a name and description for the new form library, and click the Next button.
7. Now you can specify which InfoPath fields should be displayed as columns within the form
library:
a. Click the Add button.
b. On the Select a Field or Group dialog box, select a field whose data you want displayed
in the library.
c. For the Column Name, you can rename the field to a more user-friendly value.
d. Click the OK button.
e. Repeat step 7 until you have all of the desired fields listed.
8. Click the Finish button.
9. Click the Close button.
To publish an InfoPath 2007 form to a new SharePoint form library, follow these steps:
1. Select the Publish option from the File menu in InfoPath.
2. On the Publishing Wizard dialog box, ensure that the To a SharePoint Server option is
selected, and click the Next button.
3. Enter the URL of the site where you want your InfoPath form to reside, and click the Next
button.
4. Select to publish the form to a Document Library, and click the Next button.
5. Select the Create a New Document Library option, and click the Next button.
6. Enter a name and description for the new form library, and click the Next button.
7. Now you can specify which InfoPath fields should be displayed as columns within the form
library:
a. Click the Add button.
b. On the Select a Field or Group dialog box, shown in Figure 6-28, select a field whose
data you want available as a column in the library.
c. For the Column Name, you can rename the field to a more user-friendly value.
d. If you want users to be able to edit the field’s data outside of InfoPath, select the “Allow
Users to Edit Data in this Field” option. This allows them to use the Datasheet view or
Edit Properties page to modify the column data.
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e. Click the OK button.
f. Repeat step 7 until you have all of the desired fields listed.
8. Click the Next button.
9. Click the Publish button.
10. Click the Close button.
After completing either of the preceding sets of steps, the new form library will exist on the site.
When a user clicks the library’s New link, your custom InfoPath form will be displayed, and the
appropriate information can be entered and saved to the form library.
Figure 6-28. Adding form library columns in the Publishing wizard
nTip InfoPath 2007 provides many additional capabilities for integration with SharePoint, including publishing the
form as a site content type to be reused in multiple form libraries and providing a web-based version of a form template. For more information on InfoPath 2007 features, please see the application’s help files or visit http://
office.microsoft.com.
Exporting Library Metadata to Excel
In Chapters 4 and 5, we discussed how exporting list information to Excel can provide an easier
interface for making multiple changes to the list data. This integration with Office is also available
when working with document, form, or wiki page libraries. Picture libraries and slide libraries do
not allow exporting to Excel.
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To export document library data to Excel, follow these steps:
1. On the document library screen, click the Export to Spreadsheet link in the Actions menu
on the toolbar.
2. If you are prompted about opening or saving the Microsoft Office Excel Web Query File,
click the Open button.
3. On the Opening Query dialog box in Excel, click the Open button to confirm that you want
to run the query to export the information into the Excel spreadsheet. If you are using Excel
2007, this dialog will not appear, but you will be given an Excel Security Notice warning. To
export the library information, you must click the Enable button on this warning.
4. If you already have Excel open, the Import Data dialog box will appear. Choose where to put
the list. Options include a region on the current worksheet, a new worksheet, or a new
workbook. If you did not have Excel running, the data will be put into a new workbook.
nNote
When exporting library information to Excel, all documents displayed by the current view are exported.
Data removed from the view by its filter setting are not included, but setting the temporary filter on the library
screen has no affect on the data exported.
After performing the preceding steps to export library information to Excel, the data is formatted as an Excel List just like exporting a SharePoint list formats the data. Many library columns are
read-only when working with the Excel List. You cannot edit file names, creation information, modification information, file sizes, or the ID column when working with the linked library in Excel. As
described in more detail in Chapters 4 and 5, the Excel List provides the following actions for you to
manage the connection between the SharePoint library and Excel List (shown with 2003/2007
labels):
• View List on Server/Open in Browser: Opens the SharePoint library in your browser.
• Unlink List/Unlink: Severs the connection between the Excel List and the SharePoint library.
• Synchronize List/(not available): Sends information updates to and receives updates from the
SharePoint library and provides the ability to resolve data conflicts. This action is not available in Excel 2007.
• Discard Changes and Refresh/Refresh: Cancels data updates made within Excel and retrieves
the library information from SharePoint.
Advanced Datasheet Features
In Chapter 4, we described the use of the Datasheet view for editing list data. The Datasheet view is
also available when working with document, form, and slide libraries. The Datasheet view contains
numerous features that allow for integration with Office applications such as Excel and Access.
Clicking the Task Pane link in the Actions menu on the datasheet’s toolbar will display a list of Office
integration features, including various export capabilities. For more detailed information about
these capabilities, please refer to Chapter 4.
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7
nnn
Workflow and Information
Management Policies
W
hile earlier chapters described the many ways that information can be stored, managed and
accessed in SharePoint 2007, what enhances it as a platform for business process collaboration
and document management are its powerful workflow and information management capabilities.
These features allow you to manage business processes within the collaborative SharePoint environment while enforcing enterprise data handling that can assist you with compliance and
corporate regulatory policy.
Both the workflow and information management policy capabilities of SharePoint 2007 are
customizable, allowing your organization to add additional features to those that are available in a
standard SharePoint installation. This chapter will focus on the common usability and management
aspects within each while describing the default SharePoint 2007 workflow and information management policy components.
Workflow
In general terms, as it relates to SharePoint, workflow is the execution of a defined business process
incorporating the corresponding responsibilities, actions, tasks, and documents into the process.
SharePoint provides many benefits to implementing a business process as a workflow, since tasks,
documentation, and data are maintained in a central location. Workflows use many of the same
SharePoint capabilities users have become familiar with. Workflow management, reporting, auditing, security, and execution are all handled within the existing SharePoint infrastructure and often
integrate with Office 2007 applications.
nCaution
The workflow integration with Office 2007 applications is not available in all versions. You must have
Office Ultimate 2007, Office Professional Plus 2007, or Office Enterprise 2007 to take advantage of workflow integration features.
While workflow capabilities are present in both Windows SharePoint Service 3.0 and SharePoint
Server 2007, and many workflow types exist, only one is available in both products: the Three-state
workflow, which lets you determine actions that are taken when a list item progresses through three
distinct statuses. This is commonly used on issues lists to manage tasks and notifications as an
issue’s status moves from Active through Resolved to Closed. However, the Three-state workflow is
not limited to only issues lists and can be quite valuable when managing any type of status progression for list items or documents.
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nNote
The Three-state Workflow site collection feature must be activated in order to create Three-state workflows
on lists and libraries within your site.
Since it is available in both Windows SharePoint Service 3.0 and SharePoint Server 2007, we will
use the Three-state workflow as the example throughout the “Workflow” section of this chapter.
Workflow Lists
Before we delve into the creation and management of workflows in SharePoint 2007, it is a good idea
to understand the underlying list structure required to support workflows. Each workflow requires
two SharePoint lists to maintain state and history information.
The first list needed by workflows is a task list to store task information for the workflow process.
The list uses the Workflow Task content type to display task information related to the workflow. This
content type belongs to the special _Hidden content type group, causing it to not be displayed on the
Content Type pages or in selection boxes for users to add content types to lists. If the workflow is a
SharePoint Server 2007 workflow, as described later in this chapter, the task list will use the Office
SharePoint Server Workflow Task content type, which inherits from the Workflow Task content type.
The structure of the Workflow Task content type is shown in Table 7-1.
Table 7-1. Workflow Task Columns
Column
Type
Title
Single line of text
Priority
Choice
Task Status
Choice
% Complete
Number
Assigned To
Person or Group
Body
Multiple lines of text
Start Date
Date and Time
Due Date
Date and Time
Workflow Name
Single line of text
The second list required by workflows is a workflow history list. This list uses the Workflow History
content type to maintain a record of the steps a workflow has gone through. The information recorded
includes who was responsible, when an action was taken and what the outcome was. This content type
belongs to the special _Hidden content type group, causing it to not be displayed on the Content Type
pages or in selection boxes for users to add content types to lists. The structure of the Workflow History
content type is shown in Table 7-2. It includes many columns of supporting data stored as unique identifiers that represent list and workflow information that do not mean much to an end user.
Table 7-2. Workflow History Columns
Column
Type
Title
Single line of text
Workflow History Parent Instance
Guid
Workflow Association ID
Guid
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Column
Type
Workflow Template ID
Guid
List ID
Guid
Primary Item ID
User ID
Date Occurred
Group Type
Outcome
Description
Data
Integer
Integer
Date and Time
Integer
Single line of text
Single line of text
Multiple lines of text
nTip Although workflow history lists are not displayed in the Quick Launch area or on the All Site Content page
by default, you can view the list by going to the URL directly using the following page:
http://<Site URL>/Lists/<History List Name>/AllItems.aspx
Replace <Site URL> with the URL to the site containing your list and <History List Name> with the name of
the workflow history list. From the workflow history list page, you can modify the navigation settings to display the
list in the site’s Quick Launch area.
Creating a Workflow
Workflows can be created on any list or library in a SharePoint 2007 site. When creating workflows,
there are common configuration settings needed for all workflow template types. These common
settings include the workflow template, name, task list, history list, and start options.
The start options that you select determine when each execution of the workflow, also known
as a workflow instance, will begin on the associated items or documents. Each workflow template
allows for various starting options. For instance, the Three-state workflow can be started manually
by a user or automatically when an item is created. The Approval workflow, described in the “SharePoint Server 2007 Workflow” section later in this chapter, can also be automatically started
whenever an item is edited. The various starting options follow:
• Manually started by a user with Edit Items permissions
• Manually started by a user with Manage Lists permissions
• Automatically started to approve publishing a major version of an item
• Automatically started when an item is created
• Automatically started when an item is changed
Each workflow template also contains a set of unique configuration settings. For instance, the
Three-state workflow is configured by setting the Choice column in the list or library that will determine the state, along with which options in the column correspond to each of the three states.
Additional settings determine the actions of the workflow at each of these states, including creating
tasks for users and sending e-mail notifications.
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To create a new Three-state workflow on an Issues list, perform the following steps:
1. On the list page, click the List Settings link in the Settings menu of the toolbar.
2. On the Customize List page, click the Workflow Settings link in the Permissions and Management section.
3. On the Workflow Settings page, click the Add a Workflow link. If the list does not currently
have any workflows, the Workflow Settings page will not be displayed.
4. On the Add a Workflow page, as shown in Figure 7-1, follow these steps:
a. In the Workflow section, select the Three-state workflow template.
b. In the Name section, specify the name of your new workflow.
c. In the Task List section, select the Tasks (new) or the New Task List option. If you want to
use an existing task list, select the appropriate option.
d. In the History List section, select the Workflow History (new) or the New History List
option. If you want to use an existing history list, select the appropriate option.
e. In the Start Options section, select the Start this Workflow When a New Item is Created
option. If you want your workflow to be started manually for a list item, select the
appropriate option.
Figure 7-1. The Add a Workflow page
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5. Click the Next button.
6. On the Customize the Workflow page, as shown in Figure 7-2, follow these steps:
a. In the Workflow States section, select the Choice column that will contain the states,
along with the three options that correspond to the workflow states.
b. In the Workflow Initiated section, enter the information needed to create a task item for
this stage of the workflow, including Title, Description, Due Date, and Assigned To settings. You can also specify that an e-mail notification should be sent and configure the
To, Subject, and Body text.
c. In the Workflow Middle State, enter the information needed to create a task item for this
stage of the workflow, including Title, Description, Due Date, and Assigned To settings.
You can also specify that an e-mail notification should be sent and configure the To,
Subject, and Body text.
7. Click the OK button.
Figure 7-2. The Customize the Workflow page
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Workflows can also be created on site content types so that the workflow is available to all lists
or libraries in the site collection associated with the content type. This allows you to ensure that
every issue tracking list item in the site collection has a corresponding Three-state workflow that
controls the issue tracking process. Since this is assigned on the site content type, you will not need
to re-create the workflow for each individual list or library in the site collection. For this example,
each Issue Tracking list in the site collection will automatically have an associated Three-state
workflow.
Workflows associated to a site content type are created with the same steps listed previously for
creating a workflow. An additional setting on the Add a Workflow page allows you to determine if all
lists, libraries, and child content types inherit this new workflow. Select the Yes option for this Update
List and Site Content Types setting so that the workflow is made available on all related items.
Creating a workflow for a list content type is also supported. This lets you create a workflow for
a one content type within lists and libraries that allow multiple content types. For more information
on list and site content types, refer to the “Content Types” section in Chapter 4.
Using a Workflow
Workflows can either be started manually by a user or automatically after an item is created or
changed. Automatically started workflows do not require user intervention to begin processing.
Users will need to initiate manually started workflows by using the Workflows page for a list item or
document. The Workflows page is accessed by clicking the Workflows option in a list item’s context
menu. It displays a list of available workflows that the user can start. A workflow can only have one
running instance at a time for a particular item or document.
To start a new instance of a workflow on a list item, perform the following steps:
1. On the list page, activate the item’s context menu by hovering over the item with your
mouse and clicking the inverted triangle.
2. Click the Workflows link in the context menu.
3. On the Workflows page shown in Figure 7-3, in the Start a New Workflow section, click the
name of the workflow you want to start for the current list item or document.
4. If the workflow requires input from the user to begin, the Start Workflow page is displayed.
a. Enter the information required by the workflow to properly start.
b. Click the Start button.
nNote
Starting a workflow requires that you have the Edit Item permission for the list/library. This allows every
default permission level to start workflows except the Read level. Workflows can be configured to additionally
secure initiation by requiring the Manage Lists permission, limiting the ability to those users with Full Control or
Design default permission levels.
The Workflows page also contains a Workflow section that lists the currently running and completed workflow instances for the selected list item or document. The Workflow section displays
the start and end times as well as the current status of each workflow instance. This can be seen in
Figure 7-3.
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Figure 7-3. The Workflows page
Workflow Status
There are many times when you need to know the details of a running or completed workflow
instance. When users are unsure where in the process a workflow currently is, a workflow instance
seems stuck, or you need to report on the information used throughout the workflow steps, the
Workflow Status page provides the capabilities users need to proceed.
To view the status and manage an instance of a workflow for a list item, perform the following
steps:
1. On the list page, activate the item’s context menu by hovering over the item with your
mouse and clicking the inverted triangle.
2. Click the Workflows link in the context menu.
3. On the Workflows page, in the Workflows section, click the name of the desired workflow.
The Workflow Status page, shown in Figure 7-4, contains all the information needed for
inspecting and maintaining a workflow instance.
The Workflow Status page is comprised of three sections. The Workflow Information section
displays the basic information about an instance including when it was started, who started it, and
what the current status is. Actions that can be taken on the workflow instance also appear as links in
this section. Each type of workflow has its own set of actions that can be taken. The termination
action is available for all workflow types.
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Figure 7-4. The Workflow Status page
Terminating a workflow may be necessary if, for any reason, the instance has encountered an
error. You may also want to terminate a workflow if it was created incorrectly and users have initiated
the workflow before the problems were found. To terminate a workflow instance, follow these steps:
1. On the list page, activate the item’s context menu by hovering over the item with your
mouse and clicking the inverted triangle.
2. Click the Workflows link in the context menu.
3. On the Workflows page, in the Workflows section, click the name of the desired running
workflow.
4. On the Workflow Status page, click the Terminate this Workflow Now link in the Workflow
Information section.
5. On the Confirmation dialog, click the OK button.
The Tasks section of the Workflow Status page displays all of the tasks that have been assigned
to users as part of the workflow process. The basic task information such as Assigned To, Due Date,
and Status are displayed along with a link to the list item in the task list.
The Workflow History section shows the data stored in the workflow’s history list, allowing you
to see an audit trail of the workflow process. The history information presented includes the date
the event occurred, the type of event, the user responsible for that event, a description, and the outcome of the workflow step. If SharePoint Server 2007 is installed in your environment, this section
will also contain a View Workflow Reports link that will take you to the workflow reporting capabilities described in the “Workflow Reports” section later in this chapter.
Managing Workflows
To keep workflow processes running efficiently and to monitor their progress, SharePoint 2007 provides various management capabilities. Editing workflow steps, reporting on workflow progress,
and cleaning up both workflow instances and the workflow definitions themselves are included in
the management features.
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nNote
Creating and managing workflows requires that you have the proper permissions. By default, you must be
assigned the Full Control or Design permission levels in order to have access to creating and customizing workflows.
Much of the workflow management begins by selecting the Workflow Settings link in the Permissions and Management section of the appropriate Customize List/Library page. Clicking this
link takes you to the Change Workflow Settings screen that displays the list of workflows for the list,
library, or content type.
Workflow Settings
It is inevitable that after creating a workflow, and even more so after using it, you will need to change
its settings to improve efficiency, correct information, or alter responsibilities. Whether your workflow is associated with a list, library, list content type, or site content type, the workflow configuration
can be edited after navigating to the corresponding Workflow Settings page.
To edit the configuration of a workflow on a list, perform the following steps:
1. On the list page, click the List Settings link in the Settings menu of the toolbar.
2. On the Customize List page, click the Workflow Settings link in the Permissions and Management section.
3. On the Workflow Settings page, click the name of the workflow in the Workflows section that
you want to modify.
4. On the Change a Workflow page:
a. In the Name section, edit the name of your new workflow.
b. In the Task List section, select the New Task List option. If you want to use an existing
task list, select the appropriate option.
c. In the History List section, select the New History List option. If you want to use an
existing history list, select the appropriate option.
d. In the Start Options section, select the Allow this Workflow to be Manually Started
option. If you want your workflow to be automatically started for a list item, select the
appropriate option.
5. Click the Next button.
6. On the Customize the Workflow page, make the desired modifications to the workflow settings.
7. Click the OK button.
Workflow Reports
When SharePoint Server 2007 is installed in your environment, workflow management capabilities
are greatly enhanced by the availability of workflow reporting. The reports use the information in
the history lists to help you monitor the efficiency of your business processes. The workflow reports
that are available with the standard installation of SharePoint Server 2007 follow:
• Activity Duration Report: Includes the time it has taken for each workflow instance and individual activities to complete
• Cancellation and Error Report: Includes the list workflow instances that have been canceled
or encountered errors during execution
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Each report is displayed in Excel as two worksheets. The first worksheet contains a PivotTable
that allows you to organize and filter the data to a more manageable and meaningful representation. The second worksheet contains the raw information used to build the PivotTable.
To view workflow reports for a workflow in a SharePoint Server 2007 environment, perform
these steps:
1. On the list page, click the List Settings link in the Settings menu of the toolbar.
2. On the Customize List page, click the Workflow Settings link in the Permissions and Management section.
3. On the Workflow Settings page, click the View Workflow Reports link.
4. On the View Workflow Reports page shown in Figure 7-5, click the name of the desired
report.
If you are using Excel 2003, the reports may open within the browser window. To return to the
SharePoint environment, be sure to click the browser’s Back button.
Figure 7-5. The View Workflow Reports page
nTip If you are not familiar with Excel PivotTable behavior, or for a more detailed look at the report data, viewing
the Report Data spreadsheet in the workflow reports reveals additional information about the workflow instances
that could be critical to successfully monitoring the process.
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Removing Workflows
SharePoint 2007 provides multiple ways to prevent users from being able to start a workflow that
has been previously defined. The more permanent removal method is to delete the workflow from
the list. Deleting a workflow cancels all of its currently running instances and removes the defined
workflow from the list. Data pertaining to canceled workflow instances is deleted from the corresponding lists, but the workflow history and task items of completed instances are maintained. To
delete a workflow from a list, perform the following steps:
1. On the list page, click the List Settings link in the Settings menu of the toolbar.
2. On the Customize List page, click the Workflow Settings link in the Permissions and Management section.
3. On the Workflow Settings page, click the Remove a Workflow link.
4. On the Remove Workflows page shown in Figure 7-6, select the Remove option for the desired
workflow.
5. Click the OK button.
Figure 7-6. The Remove Workflows page
nCaution
Removing a workflow permanently deletes the workflow configuration from the list. Ensure that the
workflow is no longer desired before deleting it.
SharePoint 2007 provides you with an alternative to the permanent deletion of a workflow that
prevents users from creating new instances but allows currently running workflow instances the
ability to complete. This is accomplished by selecting the No New Instances option on the Remove
Workflows page. When removing a workflow, consider setting this option until all existing instances
have completed, then permanently deleting the workflow from the list.
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SharePoint Server 2007 Workflows
When SharePoint Server 2007 is installed in your environment, additional workflow types not present in Windows SharePoint Service 3.0 are available for use with content types, lists, and libraries.
Each of these workflow types contains unique configuration, actions, and integration with the 2007
Microsoft Office suite of applications.
Approval Workflow
The Approval workflow is used to route items or documents to various users for approval. Approvers
are able to accept, reject, reassign, or request changes to the document during the process. SharePoint document libraries always contain an Approval workflow that can be started manually by a
user. The configuration settings of an Approval workflow are shown in Table 7-3 and Figure 7-7.
Table 7-3. Approval Workflow Settings
Setting
Description
Workflow Tasks
Determines if the approval tasks are distributed to all
approvers at once (Parallel) or one approver at a time (Serial).
Options also allow you to let a user reassign his or her
approval task or request changes to the document before
continuing.
Approvers
The list of users or groups included in the approval process.
You can send a single task to a group or assign a task to each
member of an included group. An additional option allows
you to let the user who starts the workflow make changes to
the list of approvers for that workflow instance.
Due Date
The date that the approver tasks are due if you’re using a
parallel approval, or the number of day or weeks each user
has to complete their task if the approval is done serially.
CC
The list of users or groups who are included on e-mail
notifications but not part of the approval process.
Workflow Completion
Determines when the workflow is completed. Options include
when the document is rejected or changed, when a specified
number of tasks are finished, or the default, when all tasks are
finished.
Post-Completion Activity
Enables the workflow to set the approval status value of the
item or document upon completion of the workflow.
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Figure 7-7. Configuring an Approval workflow
Collect Feedback Workflow
The Collect Feedback workflow routes list items or documents to various users for review. Reviewers
provide feedback regarding the document or list item, which is organized and provided to the item
owner. SharePoint document libraries always contain a Collect Feedback workflow that can be
started manually by a user. The Collect Feedback workflow uses the same workflow settings found
in Table 7-3 with Reviewers instead of Approvers.
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Collect Signatures Workflow
The Collect Signatures workflow routes an Office 2007 document to various users for collection of
digital signatures. Digital signatures can be added to Office documents to certify that a document
has been opened by a user and has not been subsequently altered. This workflow does not have any
additional settings aside from those that are common to all workflow and shown on the Add a Workflow page. It cannot be configured to automatically start.
nTip
The Collect Signatures workflow can only be started within a 2007 Microsoft Office application for a document that contains digital signature information.
Disposition Approval Workflow
The Disposition Approval workflow creates a task item that determines what action to take on an
item or document that is a candidate for disposition. This workflow does not have any additional
settings aside from those that are common to all workflows and shown on the Add a Workflow page.
The task gives users the option to delete or retain the item. If deletion is selected, they can optionally maintain the item’s metadata in an audit log.
Translation Management Workflow
The Translation Management workflow is available only within Translation Management libraries,
which were described in Chapter 6. This workflow manages copies and tasks for translating a document between languages. It uses a Languages and Translators list, described in Chapter 5, to create
copies of the document for each user that is responsible for translating it to another language. The
configuration settings of a Translation Management workflow are shown in Table 7-4.
Table 7-4. Translation Management Workflow Settings
Setting
Description
Languages and Translators List
Determines the list that contains the languages that are to be
used and the users responsible for the translation to those
languages.
Due Date
The number of days each user has to complete their
translation. This setting is only configurable if the workflow is
automatically started; otherwise, the user enters a specific
date when they manually start the workflow.
Workflow Completion
Determines when the workflow is completed. Options include
when the source document is changed or, the default, when
all tasks are finished.
nNote
The Translation Management library and workflow are only available when the Translation Management
Library site feature is activated.
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Workflow with SharePoint Designer 2007
SharePoint Designer 2007 is a SharePoint customization and management product that is part of
the 2007 Microsoft Office suite of applications. One of its capabilities is the creation of more flexible
and customizable workflows than those available using the predefined workflow types found in
Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 or SharePoint Server 2007.
Workflows built with SharePoint Designer 2007 are based on the concept of steps, with each
step containing one or more actions. Optional conditions allow you to execute actions only if list
item or document metadata meet predetermined requirements.
There are dozens of actions available by default with SharePoint Designer 2007, including the
following ones:
• Send an E-Mail
• Create List Item
• Copy List Item
• Assign a To-Do Item (creates a task)
• Collect Data from a User (creates a task)
• Pause for Duration
Additional actions can be developed or purchased from third-party vendors and installed in
your SharePoint environment to enhance your workflow capabilities.
To create a simple workflow in SharePoint Designer 2007, follow these steps:
1. Run the SharePoint Designer 2007 application on your computer.
2. On the File menu, choose Open Site.
3. In the Open Site dialog box, enter the URL to the site, but not a specific page of the site, in
the site name box. An example is http://sharepointserver/sites/Sales.
4. Click the OK button.
5. When the site opens in SharePoint Designer 2007, select the New option in the application’s
File menu.
6. In the New submenu, select the Workflow option.
7. On the Workflow Designer dialog, shown in Figure 7-8, enter a name for your workflow,
select the list or library it should be associated with, and determine the appropriate start
options.
8. Click the Next button.
9. Click the Actions button, and select the Send an Email action.
10. In the Actions section of the step, click the Message link.
11. On the Define an E-Mail dialog, enter the To, CC, Subject, and Body for the e-mail, and click
the OK button.
12. Click the Finish button.
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Figure 7-8. Creating a workflow with SharePoint Designer 2007
Once the preceding steps are complete, your new workflow will be available in the selected list
or library and will start based on the starting options you configure. Manually started workflows
built with SharePoint Designer 2007 will appear on the Workflows page of an item or document just
like workflows created within SharePoint Server 2007.
The workflows created using SharePoint Designer 2007 are highly customizable; you can configure initiation parameters, workflow variables, multiple steps, and conditional branching. For
more detailed information on leveraging these powerful workflow capabilities, see the SharePoint
Designer 2007 help.
Information Management Policies
SharePoint Server 2007 provides the capability to create and manage information policies to
enforce data management rules on list items and documents. Auditing, records retention, and print
labeling are included within policy configurations that can be applied to the data you maintain in
SharePoint. Records management and compliance officers are among the many roles that can benefit from the enforcement of policies on items within SharePoint, since the information they need is
accessible within the SharePoint environment containing the corresponding documents and other
data. Most policy features are transparent to the end users, allowing the information to be managed
according to your business’s information management practices without interfering in the users’
interaction with SharePoint.
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An information management policy can be defined at the following levels:
• Site collection: Policies defined here can be reused by content types, lists, and libraries within
the site collection.
• Site content type: Policies defined at this level apply to any items or documents in a site collection that are created from this content type.
• List/library: Policies defined directly on a specific list/library only apply to items in that
list/library.
Policy Features
Information management policies contain a number of features that can be configured to determine the handling of information within SharePoint. There are four features that come with
SharePoint Server 2007 to support document labeling, information auditing, and data retention.
Labels and Barcodes
These two features both provide you with the ability to assign organization information to documents to allow for easier records management. The Labels feature lets you specify a metadata-based
label for each document. The label’s text is automatically generated using the format and metadata
specified in the policy’s configuration, as described in Table 7-5 and shown in Figure 7-9.
The label can be inserted into the file when using Office 2007 applications. Within the appropriate Office 2007 application, click the Label option in the Barcode section of the Insert menu to add
the label to your document. The Label option will only appear for documents that are associated
with policies including the Label feature.
nCaution
The label and barcode integration with Office 2007 applications is not available in all versions. You
must have Office Ultimate 2007, Office Professional Plus 2007, or Office Enterprise 2007 to take advantage of
labels and barcodes within Office documents.
Table 7-5. Label Policy Feature Configuration
Setting
Description
Prompt User
Causes the user to be prompted to insert the label into the Office 2007
document before it is saved or printed.
Prevent Changes
Locks the label so that a change to the document’s metadata does not
change the text of the label.
Label Format
The combination of text and metadata fields that make up the label. Fields
are denoted by braces, and a new line can be specified using \n. An example
is: Prepared for {Client Name} by {Author}.
Appearance
The font, font size, style (bold, italic, or normal), and justification of the text.
Size
The height and width of the label in inches.
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Figure 7-9. Label policy configuration
The Barcodes feature is similar to the Labels feature, as it can be used to automatically generate organizational traits of the document for records management purposes. Instead of generating
text from metadata, the Barcodes feature creates a unique barcode identifier for each document
that is associated with the policy. The barcode symbology used by the default Barcode feature of
Office SharePoint Server is Code 39.
The barcode graphic and number is displayed on the document’s View Properties page in the
library. Documents can be found by searching for their barcode value. This barcode can be inserted
into the Office 2007 file as a graphic. Within the appropriate Office 2007 application, click the Barcode
option in the Barcode section of the Insert menu to add the label to your document. The Barcode
option will only appear for documents that are associated with policies including the Barcode feature.
The Barcode feature contains only a single setting, Prompt User, which causes the user to be
prompted to insert the barcode into the Office 2007 document before it is saved or printed.
nNote
The Label and Barcode features only apply to documents within SharePoint. List items such as task or
issues will not generate labels or barcodes even if their associated policy has them configured.
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Auditing
The auditing feature provides you with reporting information detailing when documents and list
items have been manipulated and by whom. Knowing this can be crucial to organizations that must
follow compliance regulations and provide audit trails to prove what has happened during the life
cycle of a document.
Auditing capabilities are similar to the auditing for site collections discussed in the “Site Collection Auditing” section of Chapter 3, only at a more granular level. An information management policy
can be configured for auditing using the following events for documents and list items, as shown in
Figure 7-10:
• Opening or downloading documents, viewing items in lists, or viewing item properties
• Editing items
• Checking out or checking in items
• Moving or copying items to another location in the site
• Deleting or restoring items
Figure 7-10. Auditing and Expiration policy configuration
A list or library with a policy that includes the Auditing feature will have the selected events
recorded and available in an XML-based report that is viewable in Excel. Each report gives you an
Excel worksheet that contains the raw data as well as a worksheet that displays a PivotTable allowing you to slice and dice the data to meet your needs. Only site collection administrators have
access to the reports generated from the audited events.
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For more information about the available reports and how to view them, please see the “Site
Collection Auditing” section of Chapter 3.
Expiration
The expiration policy feature provides you with the means for determining the automated disposition
of documents and list items. Expiration could be used to start time-based disposition workflows or to
automatically delete the data associated with unused content.
Configuring the information management policy’s expiration feature requires setting two components, shown in Figure 7-10. The first component of the expiration feature is the retention period,
which determines when the disposition will occur. The first option for the retention period is a
property-based time period. This allows you to choose from any of the date columns associated
with the list/library/content type that the policy is associated with. You then specify an amount and
unit of time (day, month, or year) after the selected date column’s value to perform the disposition.
An example is Created Date + 14 Days. The second option for the retention period is to use a disposition date that has been set programmatically by a workflow on the site.
The second component of the expiration feature is what to do when disposition occurs. The first
option is to perform an action from those available for the policy. The Delete action is the default
available with MOSS. However, additional actions can be developed and incorporated into your
SharePoint environment. The second option for what to do when the disposition occurs is to start a
workflow that has been created for the list/library/content type that is associated with the policy.
This lets you automatically start critical records management functionality, such as a Disposition
Approval workflow or custom archiving workflow.
Site Collection Policy
The broadest and most flexible policy is one created within a site collection. Site collection policies
allow you to manage which policies are available for users to associate with lists and libraries. These
policies can be created once and then associated with multiple lists and libraries throughout the site
collection. You can also export and import policy files to manage them across site collections. To manage site collection policies, you must be a Site Collection Administrator as described in Chapter 2.
Creating a Site Collection Policy
Defining a new site collection policy is performed from the Site Collection Policies page found
within the Site Settings of a site collection. To create a new Information Management Policy for a
site collection, follow these steps:
1. On the site collection’s home page, click the Site Settings link in the Site Actions menu.
2. On the Site Settings page, click the Site Collection Policies link in the Site Collection Administration section.
3. On the Site Collection Policies page, click the Create link on the toolbar.
4. On the Edit Policy page, enter a name and description in the Name and Administrative
Description section.
5. Enter a policy statement in the Policy Statement section. Users will see this statement when
viewing documents that the policy affects within the appropriate Office 2007 application.
6. Select each of the Policy Features that you want the policy to cover and configure them
accordingly.
7. Click the OK button.
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After performing the preceding steps, you are taken to the Site Collection Policies page, and
your newly created policy will be displayed in the list. This page allows you to edit an existing site
collection policy by clicking its name in the Policy column of the list. After clicking the name, you
are taken to the same Edit Policy page used for creating policies, allowing you to modify the policy’s
features configuration.
Exporting and Importing Policies
Site collection policies can be copied among site collections and SharePoint environments by exporting an existing policy and importing the policy file in the new site collection or environment. This
allows you to easily reuse common policies throughout your organization without needing to completely re-create them in each site collection.
Exporting the site collection policy let’s you save an XML file that contains all of the policy’s
feature configuration information. To export a site collection policy, perform the following steps:
1. On the site collection’s home page, click the Site Settings link in the Site Actions menu.
2. On the Site Settings page, click the Site Collection Policies link in the Site Collection Administration section.
3. On the Site Collection Policies page, click the name of the policy you want to export.
4. On the Edit Policy page, click the Export button.
5. On the File Download dialog, click the Save button.
6. On the Save As dialog, locate a directory on your computer or network where you want to
save the policy file, and click the Save button.
After exporting the file, the Export a Site Collection Policy page is displayed. Use the breadcrumb or other navigation features to return to the Site Collection Policies page.
Once you have site collection policies stored as XML files on your computer or network, you
can import them into site collections on any MOSS environment in your organization. To import a
site collection policy file, perform the following steps:
1. On the site collection’s home page, click the Site Settings link in the Site Actions menu.
2. On the Site Settings page, click the Site Collection Policies link in the Site Collection Administration section.
3. On the Site Collection Policies page, click the Import link on the toolbar.
4. On the Import a Site Collection Policy page, click the Browse button.
5. On the Choose File dialog, locate the XML file on your computer or network, and click the
Open button.
6. On the Import a Site Collection Policy page, click the Import button.
After performing the preceding steps, you are taken to the Site Collection Policies page, and
your newly imported policy will be displayed in the list.
Deleting Policies
If you do not want users to utilize an existing policy, it must be deleted from the site collection. A
policy which is in use by a content type or list can be deleted, but SharePoint will not let you delete
the default policy configured in the Site Collection Policy Settings screen.
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To delete a site collection policy, follow these steps:
1. On the site collection’s home page, click the Site Settings link in the Site Actions menu.
2. On the Site Settings page, click the Site Collection Policies link in the Site Collection Administration section.
3. On the Site Collection Policies page, click the name of the policy you want to delete.
4. On the Edit Policy page, click the Delete button.
After performing the preceding steps, you are taken to the Site Collection Policies page, and
your deleted policy will no longer be present in the list.
Site Content Type Policy
Information management policies can be assigned to a content type so that the policy will apply to
all the related information within the site collection. This allows you to ensure that every news item
in the site collection is deleted after one month or that every user task item in the collection maintains an audit record of who has viewed the item. Since this is assigned on the site content type, you
will not need to re-create the policy for each individual list in the site collection.
nNote
Policies can only be applied to custom content types. Core content types cannot be configured to use an
information management policy.
Managing a Site Content Type Policy
There are two ways to assign an information management policy to a site content type. You are able
to select from the site collection policies on the content type’s Information Management Policies
page or choose to define a policy specifically for the content type.
To define a new information management policy for a custom site content type, follow these
steps:
1. On the site collection’s home page, click the Site Settings link in the Site Actions menu.
2. On the Site Settings page, click the Site Content Types link in the Galleries section.
3. On the Site Content Type Gallery page, click the name of the custom site content type that
you want to define a policy for.
4. On the Site Content Type page, click the Information Management Policy Settings link in the
Settings section.
5. On the Information Management Policy Settings page, shown in Figure 7-11, select the
Define a Policy option, and click the OK button.
6. On the Edit Policy page, enter a description in the Name and Administrative Description section and a policy statement in the Policy Statement section. Users will see this statement when
viewing documents that the policy affects within the appropriate Office 2007 application.
7. Select each of the Policy Features that you want the policy to cover, and configure them
accordingly.
8. Click the OK button.
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After performing the preceding steps, you will be returned to the Site Content Type page. To modify the settings chosen for the site content type’s policy, perform the same steps, ensuring that the
Define a Policy option is selected on the Information Management Policy Settings page. The existing
configuration will be displayed, allowing you to make changes to the site content type’s policy.
To remove a policy completely from a site content type, navigate to the Edit Policy page as described in the preceding steps. Click the Delete button on this page to remove the entire policy from
the content type and, thereby, all lists or libraries in the site collection that use the content type.
Figure 7-11. Defining an information management policy
List and Library Policies
Information management policies can also be assigned to a list/library. If a list contains multiple
content types, as discussed in Chapter 4, a separate policy can be assigned to each. Assigning a policy at the list/library level affects only the items of associated content type within that specific list or
library.
nNote
You cannot edit the policy of a list content type that is already assigned a policy at the site content type
level. This ensures that the site content type’s policy is enforced throughout the site collection. The list’s Information Management Policy Settings page will display a message notifying you of this behavior.
Managing a List/Library Policy
There are two ways to assign an information management policy to a list content type. You are able
to select from the site collection policies on the list’s Information Management Policies page or
choose to define a policy specifically for the list content type.
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To define a new information management policy for a list content type, follow these steps:
1. On the list page, click the List Settings link in the Settings menu of the toolbar.
2. On the List Settings page, click the Information Management Policy Settings link in the
Permission and Management section.
3. On the Information Management Policy Settings page, click the name of the list content
type that you want to define a policy for. If the list does not have Manage Content Types
enabled, you will not be shown this page but taken directly to step 4.
4. On the Information Management Policy Settings page, select the Define a Policy option, and
click the OK button.
5. On the Edit Policy page, enter a description in the Name and Administrative Description section and a policy statement in the Policy Statement section. Users will see this statement when
viewing documents that the policy affects within the appropriate Office 2007 application.
6. Select each of the Policy Features that you want the policy to cover, and configure them
accordingly.
7. Click the OK button.
To modify the settings chosen for the list content type’s policy, perform the same steps, ensuring that the Define a Policy option is selected on the Information Management Policy Settings page.
The existing configuration will be displayed, allowing you to make changes to the list content type’s
policy.
To remove a policy completely from a list or library, navigate to the Edit Policy page as
described in the preceding steps. Click the Delete button on this page to remove the entire policy
from the content type.
Policy Exemptions
Even though a policy is defined for a list, whether using a site collection policy, site content type, or
list-specific policy, an item or document can be excluded from the information management policy.
Making an item or document exempt from the associated policy affects only the Expiration feature.
This can prove critical when a policy determines that a document expires soon, but someone with
the authority determines that a specific document should remain without expiration.
nNote
A user needs the Manage List permission for the list or library in order to exempt an item from its information management policy. Using default SharePoint security, this would restrict exemptions to the users assigned
the Full Control or Design permission levels.
Exempting an item from the associated policy is done via the list or library’s View Item/View
Properties page. To exempt a document from the library’s information management policy, follow
these steps:
1. On the library page, activate the document’s context menu by hovering over the title with
your mouse and clicking the inverted triangle.
2. Click the View Properties link in the context menu.
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3. On the View Properties page, click the Exempt from Policy link in the Exempt from Policy
section, as shown in Figure 7-12.
4. On the Policy Exemption page, click the Exempt button.
Figure 7-12. Exempting a list item from a policy
It may be determined that an item or document that is currently exempt from the policy should
once again be subject to the policy’s Expiration feature configuration. To remove an information
management policy exemption from a document, follow these steps:
1. On the library page, activate the document’s context menu by hovering over the title with
your mouse and clicking the inverted triangle.
2. Click the View Properties link in the context menu.
3. On the View Properties page, click the Remove Exemption link in the Exempt from Policy
section.
4. On the Policy Exemption page, click the Remove button.
The preceding steps for exempting and removing an exemption use a library as an example,
but the same steps apply for lists using the View Item page.
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Policy Columns in Views
Many of the policy features we have discussed give you the ability to add policy-based information
to list and library views. When modifying a list or library that has had an information management
policy applied, the applicable columns shown in Table 7-7 are available in the Columns section of
the Edit View page. These columns are also displayed on the document’s View Properties page,
shown in Figure 7-12.
Table 7-7. Additional Columns for Policy Information
Setting
Description
Exempt from Policy
Displays Yes if the document has been exempted from the
information management policy as described in the “Policy
Exemptions” section of this chapter.
Barcode
Shows the barcode graphic that was generated for the
document.
Barcode Value
Contains the numerical barcode value that was generated for
the document.
Expiration Date
Displays the date and time that the document will expire
according to the Expiration feature of the policy.
Original Expiration Date
Stores the Expiration Date for documents that have been
exempted from the policy. This is maintained in order to set
the Expiration Date for a document whose exemption is
removed.
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8
nnn
Pages and Web Parts
U
p to this point, we have discussed the organization and storage mediums for information in
SharePoint. This discussion included the basic organization and management of both Windows
SharePoint Services 3.0 and SharePoint Server 2007 sites. We also described the means for structuring and storing data in SharePoint lists and libraries. In considering these topics, we have touched
on basic presentation aspects of information like site templates and views.
You will need to further customize the ways in which information is presented to allow others to
effectively utilize portals and sites. SharePoint allows you to create pages within portals and sites in
addition to those created by default, like the home page in a team site. Both default pages and additionally created pages can be customized with the provided rich text entry tools, by using web parts
or the SharePoint Designer 2007 application. All of these methods will be discussed in this chapter.
Web parts are configurable components that provide a set of functionality similar to a small
application. In this chapter, we will show you how to customize pages to include these and discuss
what web parts are provided by Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 and SharePoint Server 2007.
Pages
Most sites created from the WSS site templates initially contain a single presentation page, the
home page. For example, when creating a site from the Team Site template, the home page of the
site is created with various web parts that display the announcements list, calendar list, and links
list. Except for navigating to the list screens themselves, there is no other page created that can be
customized to display lists, libraries, or web parts. An exception to this rule is the Multipage Meeting Workspace site template, which contains three pages upon creation. Sites created from the
SharePoint Server 2007 site templates, however, usually contain multiple pages upon creation.
SharePoint allows you to expand the sites by creating additional pages. These pages can then
be customized to display information. The three types of pages that are available to add to your
sites are:
• Basic page
• Web Part page
• Publishing page
Basic Pages
The simplest page type is the Basic page. The Basic page is available for use in collaboration site
templates, such as team sites and document workspaces. You are also able to create them in the
publishing and enterprise templates that are available when SharePoint Server 2007 is installed.
You cannot create this type of page in sites created from the various meeting workspace templates.
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This page is customized by using a Rich Text Editor, presented as a dialog box, to create a static display
of decorated text and images. The Basic page is useful for creating pages made completely from static
content without needing any HTML knowledge. Uses include newsletters and user instructions.
Creating Basic Pages
When Basic pages are created, they are stored in a document library. This means that before creating any new pages for a site, you must make sure that there is a document library that can be used
to store the pages. To create a basic page in a collaboration site, follow these steps:
1. Navigate to a collaboration site or create a new site as described in Chapter 2.
2. Ensure that a document library exists that the new page can be created in. If not, follow the
process described in Chapter 6 for creating a document library.
3. On the site’s home page, click the Create link in the Site Actions menu.
4. On the Create page, click the Basic Page link in the Web Pages section.
5. On the New Basic Page screen, type a name for the page.
6. Under the Save Location section, select the document library where you want the page to reside.
7. Click the Create button.
nNote
Since SharePoint treats the creation of new basic pages similarly to creating a new document in a library, you
only need to be assigned a permission level that allows you to add new documents to a library in order to have the
proper permissions for creating new pages. Using the default security, this is any permission level except for Read.
To create a basic page in a MOSS site template that has the Office SharePoint Server Publishing
feature enabled, you need to follow slightly different steps than the previous ones to get to the New
Basic Page screen. This is because of the change in the Site Actions menu performed when this feature is activated. To access the New Basic Page screen on a MOSS site with the Office SharePoint
Server Publishing feature enabled, follow these steps:
1. On the site’s home page, click the View All Site Content link in the Site Actions menu.
2. On the All Site Content page, click the Create link on the toolbar.
3. On the Create page, click the Basic Page link in the Web Pages section.
You can also create a new basic page using the New link of a document library that is configured with a document template of Basic page. Using the New link will display the same New Basic
Page described in the previous steps—except that the document library selection will not be shown,
since the page will automatically be created in this library.
Once the page is created, it will be shown, and a dialog window will be displayed, as shown in
Figure 8-1. This dialog window is the Rich Text Editor, which is what you use to create the content to
be displayed on your new basic page. The Rich Text Editor is made up of two toolbars that provide
enhanced text along with the design area. Using the text editor may be familiar to you, as most of
the toolbar buttons are identical to those found in Microsoft Office applications such as Word.
Some of the features available in the Rich Text Editor follow:
• Font options including style, size, and color
• Text decorations like bold, italics, and underline
• Alignment and indentation
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• Tables
• Images and hyperlinks
Figure 8-1. A new basic page showing the Rich Text Editor
After creating and formatting the information to be included in the page, click the Save button.
This will set the page’s content to what was created in the editor. The dialog window will disappear,
and the page will refresh to show the content you have created.
Viewing and Editing Basic Pages
Once additional pages have been created for your site, you will want other users to be able to view
them. Since the pages are actually stored as documents within a library, users can simply navigate
to the library using the Quick Launch menu. The drawback to this is that users need to know that
they should look in a particular document library for pages.
Adding links to the site navigation for your pages is perhaps the most obvious way to provide
users with an easy means of navigating to your basic pages. Both the Quick Launch area and the
top link bar make good places for links to important basic pages. These custom navigation links are
shown in Figure 8-2. Changing the headings and links in the site navigation was discussed in
Chapters 2 and 3.
An additional way to make it easier for users of your site to navigate to a basic page is by using
the links list. Create a links list as described in Chapter 5 and display this list on the site’s home
page. (The Team Site template has a links list created and displayed by default.) Then add links to
the links list that point to your added pages. When users view your site, they will see a list of links on
the home page, as shown in Figure 8-2, which can take them to the additional pages of content.
If you have SharePoint Server 2007 installed, you can use the Summary Links web part
described later in this chapter. This web part lets you manage the links that are displayed without
needing to use a links list. It also lets you customize how the links are displayed using images, custom groupings, multiple columns, and various display styles.
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Another option for displaying the pages is by displaying the List View web part for the document
library on the home page of the site. This results in the pages contained in the document library
being shown on the home page as links, as shown in Figure 8-2. See the “Web Parts” section later in
this chapter for information on using the List View web part.
Figure 8-2. Multiple basic page navigation options
Editing the content of a basic page is just as simple as creating one since SharePoint provides
an additional hyperlink on the page that enables you to edit the content. This hyperlink is only displayed to users who have been assigned the necessary permission level to edit documents in a
library. By default, these levels are Contribute, Design, and Full Control. To edit the page content:
1. Navigate to the Basic Page screen.
2. On the Basic Page screen, click the Edit Content link on the top-right corner.
3. In the Rich Text Editor dialog box, modify the information displayed using the dialog box’s
toolbar buttons.
4. Click the Save button.
The page will refresh, displaying the new content you created using the Rich Text Editor. In
addition to the navigation options previously mentioned, you can enter the URLs of other pages in
the site into the Rich Text Editor. These URLs will then be displayed as links, allowing site users to
easily navigate between content pages.
Web Part Pages
Another page type is the Web Part page. This page type is much more complex than the Basic page
and requires additional explanation to use and customize. It is available in all site templates, including meeting workspaces. In fact, the home pages of sites are customized Web Part pages. In MOSS
sites, these web part pages may be stored in the Pages library yet still act as the home page for the
site, as described in Chapter 3.
Before we continue with web part pages, we must first define the term for the components
that are used to customize a web part page, the web part. A web part is a modular component of
functionality that provides additional features to the user when added to a web part page. Some
examples of this functionality are showing list items from a SharePoint list, allowing you to search a
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database, showing a user’s Outlook Inbox, or displaying the users of a site. We will discuss web parts
in more detail later in this chapter.
Creating Web Part Pages
Creating Web Part pages is handled differently depending on the type of site you are creating them
in. Creating a web part page in a collaboration template, like a team site, or a MOSS site with the
Office SharePoint Server Publishing feature enabled is very similar to the way you create a Basic page.
Just like the Basic page, a web part page must be created within a document library in the same site.
An important configuration of the Web Part page that you must select during the creation
process is the layout of the web part zones. Web part zones are regions where web parts can be
added to the page. Different layouts can be used in order to allow users to arrange web parts in different variations of columns and rows on the screen.
To create a Web Part page in a collaboration site as shown in Figure 8-3, follow these steps:
1. Navigate to a collaboration site or create a new site as described in Chapter 2.
2. Ensure a document library exists that the new page can be created in. If not, follow the
process described in Chapter 6 for creating a document library.
3. On the site’s home page, click the Create link in the Site Actions menu.
4. On the Create page, click the Web Part Page link in the Web Pages section.
5. On the New Web Part Page screen, type a name for the page.
6. Under the Layout section, select the layout of Web Part Zones for the page. This cannot be
changed through the SharePoint site once the page is created.
7. Under the Save Location section, select the document library where you want the page to reside.
8. Click the Create button.
Figure 8-3. A new web part page with the Header, Footer, three-columns layout
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nNote
Since SharePoint treats the creation of new web part pages similarly to creating a new document in a
library, you need to be assigned only a permission level that allows you to add new documents to a library in order
to have the proper permissions for creating new pages. Using the default security, this is any permission level
except for Read.
To create a web part page in a MOSS site template that has the Office SharePoint Server Publishing feature enabled, you need to follow slightly different steps to get to the New Web Part Page screen
from the previous ones. This is because of the change in the Site Actions menu that activating this
feature causes. To access the New Web Part Page screen on a MOSS site with the Office SharePoint
Server Publishing feature enabled, follow these steps:
1. On the site’s home page, click the View All Site Content link in the Site Actions menu.
2. On the All Site Content page, click the Create link on the toolbar.
3. On the Create page, click the Web Part Page link in the Web Pages section.
You can also create a new web part page using the New link of a document library that is configured with a document template of Web Part page. Using the New link will display the same New
Web Part Page described in the previous steps, except that the document library selection will not
be shown, since the page will automatically be created in this library.
Within a meeting workspace, Web Part pages are created a little differently. The pages are not
stored in a document library like they are on collaboration, enterprise, or publishing sites. You also
cannot select the layout of the web part zones for pages added to a meeting workspace, as they are
always created with a three-column layout. Web Part pages appear as tabs on the meeting workspace, shown in Figure 8-4, which allow users to quickly change from page to page while within the
workspace.
To create a web part page in a meeting workspace, follow these steps:
1. Navigate to a meeting workspace or create a new meeting workspace as described in
Chapter 2.
2. On the site’s home page, click the Add Pages link in the Site Actions menu.
3. On the Pages pane, enter a name for the page. This name will appear on the tab within the
meeting workspace.
4. Click the Add button.
nNote
Creating new web part pages for a meeting workspace is restricted to users assigned the Design and Full
Control permission levels. If you are not assigned one of these levels, the Add Pages link will not appear.
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Figure 8-4. A new workspace web part page
Viewing Web Part Pages
Users of a site (other than a meeting workspace) may initially be unaware that there are additional
web part pages for a site, since like basic pages, they reside in a document library with no navigation
to them provided by the site. Adding links to the web part pages using the site navigation features
discussed in Chapters 2 and 3 is often the best way to expose your pages to users. You can also use
the same links list idea described under “Basic Pages” to present links for the web part pages to other
users of your site. Simply add a links list to the site, and add links to it that point to your pages inside
the document library. You can also use the Summary Links web part or the List View web part idea
described in the “Basic Pages” section.
When using Web Part pages in a meeting workspace, the pages are displayed as tabs on the
home page of the workspace, so no additional navigational aid should be needed.
There are actually two types of display for any Web Part page in a collaboration site. The first is
the Shared Version, which is available to all users of the site. Users assigned the Design and Full
Control default permission levels manage it. For the second version, SharePoint allows you to create
a customized view of Web Part pages called a Personal view. In order to create the Personal view, the
user’s permission levels must allow the Add/Remove Personal Web Parts and Update Personal Web
Parts permissions. Using the default permission levels, only the Read permission level does not
allow users to maintain their own Personal views of a page. You can customize what is displayed on
your Personal view using the steps described in the “Managing the Web Part Page” section later in
this chapter. Only you can see and manage your Personal view. Using a Personal view allows you to
further increase the efficiency with which you use SharePoint by configuring the information displayed to best reflect how you work with it. The Personal view and other personalization capabilities
of SharePoint are discussed more in Chapter 9.
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Editing Web Part Pages
There are a few aspects of a Web Part page that you can edit in a SharePoint site. The layout cannot
be changed through SharePoint, although the name of the page can be, by navigating to the document library where it resides. Once there, edit the properties of the page just like editing properties
of other documents in a library. There are a number properties for the title bar displayed on the Web
Part page that can be customized. To edit the properties of a web part page’s title bar, perform the
following steps:
1. On the web part page, click the Edit Page link in the Site Actions menu.
2. On the Shared Version of the Web Part page, click the Edit Title Bar Properties link in the
top-right corner.
3. On the web part page Title Bar pane, enter the following information:
a. Title: The main title of the page displayed as the largest text
b. Caption: Smaller text displayed above the Title
c. Description: Information displayed as a pop-up tooltip if the user hovers over the Title
or Caption
d. Image Link: A URL to the image file to be displayed to the left of the Title, which can be
left blank to display no image
4. Click the OK button.
5. Click the Exit Edit Mode link on the Version bar.
You may be wondering how to change the content of the page. This is accomplished by modifying the web parts displayed on the page, the discussion of which we have separated and described
in the “Web Parts” section later in this chapter.
Web Part pages in meeting workspaces provide uniquely editable settings compared to Web
Part pages in collaboration or MOSS sites. Renaming, reordering, and deleting can all be done with
these pages using the Page pane, which is accessed by clicking the Manage Pages link in the Site
Actions menu.
To rename a web part page in a meeting workspace from the Pages pane, follow these steps:
1. On the Pages pane, shown in Figure 8-5, click the Action bar, which initially displays Order,
and select the Settings option.
2. If the page you want to rename is not the currently displayed page, click the link on the tab
for it, so that it becomes the currently active page.
3. On the Pages pane, modify the Page Name value.
4. Click the OK button.
The screen will refresh to display the new name for the web part page on the appropriate tab.
Follow these steps to change the order that pages are displayed on the meeting workspace from
the Pages pane:
1. On the Pages pane, shown in Figure 8-5, click the name of a page you wish to rearrange
under the Pages for This Meeting heading.
2. Click the Up or Down buttons to change the order of the selected page.
3. Repeat steps 2 and 3 until the pages are listed in the desired order.
4. Click the OK button.
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The screen will refresh to display the page tabs for the web part pages in the new order specified.
To delete a page in a meeting workspace from the Pages pane, follow these steps:
1. On the Pages pane, shown in Figure 8-5, click the Action bar, which initially displays Order,
and select the Delete option.
2. Select the name of the page you wish to delete in the Pages for This Meeting list.
3. Click the Delete button.
4. When prompted for confirmation, click the OK button.
The screen will refresh, displaying the meeting workspace without the recently deleted web
part page.
nNote
You are unable to delete, rename, or reorder the home page of a meeting workspace.
Figure 8-5. The Pages pane for a meeting workspace
Publishing Pages
The last page type is a Publishing page. This page type allows you to create new pages with various
display formats that contain published information, like news articles and other managed content.
Publishing pages consist of three content types, each with multiple formats:
• Article page: Includes areas for published article information, such as a byline, date, and
content
• Redirect page: Automatically redirects users to a configurable web page
• Welcome page: Displays a mix of information including images, links, and web parts
These pages include numerous features not found with Basic or Web Part pages. Editing drafts,
an approval process, spelling tools, and publishing workflows combine to create a complex contentpublishing platform. For the Publishing pages capability to be used, your SharePoint environment
must include SharePoint Server 2007 and the Office SharePoint Server Publishing site feature to be
activated.
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Creating Publishing Pages
When Publishing pages are created, they are stored in the Pages document library on the site. To
create a Publishing page in a site, as shown in Figure 8-6, follow these steps:
1. Navigate to a site or create a new site with the Office SharePoint Server Publishing site
feature activated.
2. On the site’s home page, click the Create Page link in the Site Actions menu.
3. On the Create Page screen, enter a title, description, and name for the page.
4. Under the Page Layout section, select the layout of the page’s display. The three types of
page layouts are Article, Redirect, and Welcome pages.
5. Click the Create button.
As is the case with Basic and Web Part pages, you will need to expose users to your newly created
pages by adding a navigational aid. Adding links to the Quick Launch area, using a links list displayed
on the home page, or using a web part such as the Summary Links web part or a List View web part of
the Pages library will allow users to find and view your publishing pages.
Figure 8-6. A new publishing page using the Article content type
Editing and Managing Publishing Pages
Publishing pages contain numerous capabilities for editing and managing the content that is displayed to users. These capabilities are accessed using the Page Editing toolbar, shown in Figure 8-6,
which is unique to publishing pages.
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The Page Editing toolbar provides access to the following aspects of the Publishing page:
• Page status information: Page status displayed on the toolbar with a link to additional page
information details
• Page Editing menu: Provides basic save, check in, check out, delete capabilities
• Workflow menu: Allows for publishing, approval, and other workflows
• Tools menu: Contains editing tools such as spell check and version history
• Page Editing buttons: Initiates commonly needed actions for the page’s current status
Page Status Information
The toolbar displays the version number of the page or signifies that the page is checked out. It also
shows the status of the page and who can see it. This information is stored as a link that displays the
Page Status Information window, as shown in Figure 8-7.
Figure 8-7. The Page Status Information window
Page Editing Menu
The Page Editing menu gives you the basic capabilities needed to control changes to the page, such
as save and delete. This also includes check in and check out functionality to manage who has editing control of the page during the time it is being modified. This menu also contains an Add Web
Parts submenu that is enabled if the publishing page’s layout contains web part zones.
Workflow Menu
This menu contains the important Publish link, which is needed when you are finished editing and
want all site users to see the latest version of the publishing page. The Workflow menu also gives you
access to any workflows that have been defined for the Pages library. To start a workflow for the
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publishing page, click the Workflows link in the Workflow menu, and begin the workflow as
described in Chapter 7. Workflows can be used in the Pages library to ensure that the pages pass an
approval process before being published for all users to view.
Tools Menu
The Tools menu provides you with capabilities to assist with your content creation and publishing. A
spell checker is available by clicking the Spelling link in the menu. You can also preview your changes
before saving using the Preview in New Window link. Version History and Page History, both features
found in libraries, are available via the Tools menu for helping you determine the content changes
that have been made to the publishing pages.
Modifying Publishing Page Settings
Many aspects of the Publishing page can be configured even after it has been created. The title and
description seem like obvious potential settings changes, but even the URL and layout can be
changed from the Publishing Page Settings window.
To modify the Publishing Page Settings, follow these steps:
1. On the publishing page, click the Page Settings link in the Page menu on the Page Editing
toolbar.
2. On the Page Settings screen, enter a title, description, and URL for the page.
3. Under the Page Layout section, select the layout of the page’s display. You cannot change the
content type of the page (for instance, you cannot change a Welcome page to an Article
page); you can only select from different formats of the existing content type. This allows
you to change an Article Page with Body Only to an Article Page with Image on Left.
4. Under the Page Contact section, select a SharePoint user or enter contact information for
the person that other users should contact regarding this page.
5. Click the OK button.
Editing the Content of a Publishing Page
Modifying the content of a publishing page is an involved process that requires you to control the
changes to the page, using check out and check in, as well as finally publishing the page to allow
other users to see the new content.
To edit the publishing page content, follow these steps:
1. On the publishing page, click the Edit Page link in the Site Actions menu. This will check
out the page to you and allow you to begin editing.
2. Change the information on the page.
a. To modify picture content, click the Edit Picture link in the image area. The Edit Image
Properties window, shown in Figure 8-8, is displayed; it allows you to select an image
from those in the current site or enter a URL. Layout and size properties of the image
can also be set to customize the behavior of the image in your publishing page.
b. To modify text content, click the Edit Content link in the content area. The content area
will become editable, and a set of Rich Text Editing toolbars will be displayed. This
allows you to enter the information into the content area and to format it using colors,
styles, tables, links, alignment, and other rich text capabilities.
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Figure 8-8. The Edit Image Properties window
c. To modify links lists, use the New Link link on the toolbar of the links area to add a link
to the list. This will display a New Link window to enter information about the new link.
The New Group link gives you the ability to create groups to organize how the links are
displayed. The Reorder link lets you change the order that the links are displayed in. The
Configure Styles and Layouts link displays a window, shown in Figure 8-9, to determine
the display formatting of the links list.
d. Some other information on Publishing pages, such as Byline, Article Date, or Redirection URL, can be edited directly in the page.
3. Save the changes to the page.
a. If you want to resume editing this version at a later time, click the Save link in the Page
menu on the Page Editing toolbar.
b. If you want to check in your changes so that other editors can modify the page, click the
Check In to Share Draft button on the Page Editing toolbar.
c. If you want your changes to be immediately available to all users, click the Publish button on the Page Editing toolbar.
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Figure 8-9. The Configure Styles and Layout window
Editing the content, images, links, and web parts of your publishing pages while using the versioning and approval workflow features available enables you to incorporate a complex yet powerful
information publishing process into your SharePoint site.
Web Parts
Web parts are an important factor in determining how information is presented to SharePoint users.
These reusable components can be placed on Web Part pages and configured to present SharePoint
content in the most beneficial way for your site.
Web parts are not limited to displaying SharePoint information. They can also provide you with
the ability to search and manage data in external databases and file systems. Custom web parts can
be developed to provide much of the functionality found in other applications, thereby integrating
your SharePoint environment with your other existing systems.
Adding Web Parts to Pages
Once you have created a site or have added either a Web Part page or Publishing page to an existing
site, you will want to customize the display of the page by adding web parts. This is accomplished
directly on the page using links provided by SharePoint. SharePoint 2007 provides you with both a
basic and advanced method for adding web parts to a web part page.
Add a web part to the Shared Version of a web part page in a collaboration site using the basic
method as follows:
1. On the web part page, click the Edit Page link in the Site Actions menu.
2. On the Shared Version of the web part page, click the Add a Web Part link in the web part
zone where you want the new web part placed.
3. On the Add Web Parts dialog, select one or more web parts from the list of those available by
checking the corresponding boxes.
4. Click the Add button.
5. Click the Exit Edit Mode link on the Version bar.
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The advanced method presents a different way to add web parts to the page by grouping them
into separate galleries. The galleries are displayed via a window pane embedded within the web part
page, rather than in a dialog like the basic method uses. Add a web part to the Shared Version of a
web part page in a collaboration site using the advanced method as follows:
1. On the web part page, click the Edit Page link in the Site Actions menu.
2. On the Shared Version of the web part page, click the Add a Web Part link in any web part
zone.
3. On the Add Web Parts dialog, click the Advanced Web Part Gallery and Options link.
4. On the Add Web Parts pane, filter the list by clicking the Filter link and selecting the appropriate group of web parts from the filter options.
5. Click the Next or Previous links under the Web Part List until the web part you want to add
to the page is listed. The web part galleries, used to organize the available web parts, are
described later in this chapter.
6. Click the name of the web part, and while holding down your mouse button, drag it to a web
part zone on the page to the left. A bar will appear, like in Figure 8-10, showing you where
the web part can be placed.
7. When the line is in the desired zone and in the correct order in that zone, release the mouse
button.
8. Click the Exit Edit Mode link on the Version bar.
Figure 8-10. Dragging a web part onto the page using the advanced method
nNote
Modifying the web parts on the Shared Version of a web part page requires that you be assigned either
the Design or Full Control default permission levels.
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Managing Web Part Pages
After adding web parts to a page, you may need to do many other tasks to create a useful web part
page. Rearranging, closing, deleting, and connecting web parts are all done after placing the page in
Edit mode. Edit mode provides you with the capabilities to modify the presentation of the Web Part
page without needing any programming knowledge.
Organizing the Page
After placing web parts on the page, you may determine that the page would function better if the
web parts were presented in a different order or in different web part zones. SharePoint allows you
to easily rearrange the web part on the page once the page is in Edit mode. Edit mode displays the
current page, making the management features available to you. To set the page to Edit mode and
rearrange web parts, follow these steps:
1. On the web part page, click the Edit Page link in the Site Actions menu.
2. The page will be refreshed, and the web part zones will be visible. The page is now in Edit
mode.
3. Click the title bar of a web part you want to move, and while holding down the mouse button, drag the web part to another web part zone on the page. A bar will appear in a zone
when you are near where the web part can be placed.
4. When the bar is in the desired zone and in the correct order in that zone, release the mouse
button.
You may also want to remove web parts that you have determined should no longer appear on
the page. There are three ways to keep a web part’s content from displaying on the page. The first is to
minimize it. Minimizing a web part keeps the title bar displayed but does not display the contents of
the web part to the user. To minimize a web part on a page, follow these steps:
1. On the web part page, click the Edit Page link in the Site Actions menu.
2. On the title bar of the web part you wish to close, open the Web Part menu by clicking the
drop-down arrow on the right.
3. On the Web Part menu, click the Minimize option.
The second method of removing a web part is to close it. Closing the web part keeps it from being
displayed, but the web part will still be available in the Closed Web Parts gallery discussed later in this
chapter. This enables you to quickly add the web part back to the page at a later time. Also, the web
part properties that determine behavior or appearance will be retained when the web part is closed
and readded from the Closed Web Parts gallery. Modifying web part properties is described later in
this chapter. To close a web part on a page, follow the preceding steps for minimizing, but choose the
Close option from the Web Part menu.
The last way to remove a web part is to delete it from the page. Deleting the web part keeps it
from being displayed in the page and, unlike closing, does not make it available in the Closed Web
Parts gallery. Once a web part is deleted, adding it again must be done from the Add Web Parts dialog or the gallery where it was initially contained, and any modified properties must be reconfigured. To delete a web part on a page, follow the preceding steps for minimizing, but choose the
Delete option from the Web Part menu.
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nTip
Do not be overly concerned about deleting a web part from a web part page. You are not deleting the web
part from the SharePoint environment, only the specific instance of it on the page you are currently viewing.
Editing Web Part Properties
Each web part has its own collection of settings that determine how it functions and displays information. Editing these properties allows you to make potentially drastic changes in the behavior of
the web part, further meeting the needs of your site’s users. Follow these steps to edit the properties
of a web part:
1. On the title bar of the web part you wish to edit, open the Web Part menu by clicking the
drop-down arrow on the right.
2. On the Web Part menu, click the Modify Shared Web Part option.
3. On the Web Part Properties pane, shown in Figure 8-11, change the properties of the web part.
4. Click the OK button.
Figure 8-11. Editing web part properties
The various web parts have different settings available for you to use when customizing their
behavior. A certain set of properties is used by most web parts, usually under the Appearance, Layout,
and Advanced sections of the Web Part Properties pane. These common properties are described in
Table 8-1.
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Table 8-1. Common Web Part Properties
Property
Description
Appearance
Title
Specifies the text displayed in the title bar.
Height
Specifies a fixed height or allows the web part to adjust to the zone’s
height.
Width
Specifies a fixed width or allows the web part to adjust to the zone’s
width.
Chrome State
Determines whether the web part appears minimized.
Chrome Type
Determines whether the title bar and/or a border are displayed with
the web part.
Layout
Hidden
Allows you to hide web parts from users while still leaving them on
the page, which is useful when making web part connections for
which you do not necessarily want the web part displayed.
Direction
Allows you to control the direction that text is displayed in the web
part.
Zone
Determines which zone the web part is in.
Zone Index
Determines in what order the web part is displayed in the zone with
relation to other web parts in that zone.
Advanced
Allow Minimize/Close/
Hide/Zone Change/
Connections
Determines whether other users are able to rearrange
this web part.
Allow Editing In
Personal View
Determines whether other users are able to modify the properties of
this web part on their Personal views.
Export Mode
Determines whether certain properties are included in a web part
export; see “Exporting and Importing Web Parts” later in this chapter.
Title URL
Causes the title bar to be displayed as a link to this URL.
Description
Displays specified text as a tooltip when the mouse is over the title
bar.
Help URL
Indicates the URL that users are taken to if they click the Help option
in the web part’s context menu.
Help Mode
Specifies how the help pages are displayed to the user. Options
include a new modal or modeless window and navigating the current
browser window to the help page.
Catalog Icon Image URL
Allows you to display an image for the web part in catalogs such as the
Add Web Parts pane’s Closed Web Parts gallery.
Title Icon Image URL
Allows you to display an image in the title bar of the web part.
Import Error Message
Specifies the message to display to users if there is a problem when
SharePoint tries to display the web part.
The previously mentioned List View web part, the most commonly used of all of the web parts,
contains two additional properties that are very important to its behavior. The Selected View property lets you select which of the list’s views will be used to determine how the items are displayed.
An Edit the Current View link is available, which allows you to create a custom view specific to the
display of the web part.
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The other important property specific to a List View web part is the Toolbar Type. This property
determines what functional links are displayed in the web part. The Full Toolbar option shows the
same toolbar you would see on the list screen, while the Summary Toolbar shows only an Add
Item/New Document link. The No Toolbar option keeps the web part from displaying any of these
links to the users.
nCaution
Changes made to a list or library view are not propagated to the List View web part. For example, if
the filter for a view was changed and you wanted that change to apply to a List View web part displaying the list,
you would need to edit the web part properties and reselect the view that was modified.
Web Part Connections
One of the more advanced ways in which you can customize the behavior of the web parts on a
page is by using connections. Each connection is made between a provider web part and a consumer web part. Web part connections pass information from one web part to another in order to
manipulate the contents of the consumer web part. Not all web parts provide connection functionality. The different types of information that can be passed in connections follow:
• List
• Row
• Cell
• Filter/parameter values
These connections can be created between web parts in order to create various relationships in
the information displayed in them. This includes creating parent/child, search/results, and summary/detail relationships. For example, imagine your site has a clients list and a sales list that are
both displayed using web parts on the site’s home page. You can create a web part connection that
provides a row from the clients list to the sales list so that, by selecting a client from the list, the sales
list is updated to show only the sales to that specific client. In this example, the connection would
cause the clients list web part to display radio buttons next to the rows that you use to select a specific client. This behavior is shown in Figure 8-12.
To create a web part connection between task list web parts, perform the following steps:
1. On the web part page, click the Edit Page link in the Site Actions menu.
2. On the title bar of the first task list web part, open the Web Part Menu by clicking the dropdown arrow on the right.
3. Move the mouse over the Connections option.
4. On the Connection submenu, move the mouse over the appropriate connection type. The
available connection types will vary depending on the capabilities of the web part.
5. On the Connection Type submenu that lists the other web parts that can accept this type of
connection, click the desired web part.
6. If the connection requires further input to know how to associate the two web parts using
the connection, the Configure Connection dialog box will appear.
a. On the Configure Connection dialog box, select the column that should provide the
data, and click the Next button.
b. On the Configure Connection dialog box, select the column that should use the provided
data, and click the Finish button.
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The screen will refresh, showing you the newly connected web parts whose content is now
impacted by the specified connection.
Figure 8-12. Two List View web parts using a connection to display a summary/detail relationship
for task information
To remove a connection, perform the following steps:
1. On the web part page, click the Edit Page link in the Site Actions menu.
2. On the title bar of the first task list web part, open the Web Part Menu by clicking the dropdown arrow on the right.
3. Move the mouse over the Connections option.
4. On the Connection submenu, move the mouse over the connection type you want to
remove. Currently enabled connections will be marked with a checkmark in the menu.
5. On the Connection Type submenu that lists the other web parts that can accept this type of
connection, click the desired web part. Currently enabled connections will be marked with
a checkmark in the menu.
6. On the Configure Connection dialog box, click the Remove Connection link on the toolbar.
Exporting and Importing Web Parts
After you have properly configured a web part, including both common and unique properties, you
may want to reuse the web part with the same settings in other sites or pages. SharePoint provides
you with this capability by allowing you to export the web part and import it into another site. Not
all web parts contain this export feature.
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Exporting the web part creates an XML file with a .dwp extension that contains the properties of
the web part and the information SharePoint needs to execute its functionality. If the Export Mode
property is set to the Non-sensitive Data Only option, the export will not include certain properties
marked as sensitive information. To export a web part, follow these steps:
1. On the web part page, click the Edit Page link in the Site Actions menu.
2. On the title bar of the web part you wish to export, open the Web Part Menu by clicking the
drop-down arrow on the right.
3. On the Web Part Menu, click the Export option.
4. On the File Download dialog box, click the Save button.
5. On the Save As dialog box, browse to the directory where you want the DWP file placed, and
click the Save button.
In order to use this exported web part, or any other DWP provided to you by other users, you
must import it into the site as a user with the Full Control permission level where you want to use
the web part. You can import a web part in one of two ways. The first way to import the DWP file
prevents others from using the web part but must be done each time you want to add it to a page.
To import a web part using this method, follow these steps:
1. On the web part page, click the Edit Page link in the Site Actions menu.
2. On the Shared Version of the web part page, click the Add a Web Part link any web part zone.
3. On the Add Web Parts dialog, click the Advanced Web Part Gallery and Options link.
4. On the Add Web Parts pane, click the Find Web Parts menu bar, which defaults to Browse,
and select the Import option.
5. Click the Browse button.
6. On the Choose File dialog box, browse to the DWP file, select it, and click the Open button.
7. On the Add Web Parts pane, click the Upload button.
8. Under the Uploaded Web Part section, drag the web part onto the page in the same manner
used to add web parts for the advanced method described earlier.
The other process used to import a web part file causes the web part to appear in the Site Collection gallery described later in this chapter. This is beneficial, because other users can easily add
instances of this imported web part by using the gallery, whereas the previous import method was a
one-time-use scenario. To import a web part using this method, follow these steps:
1. On the site’s home page, click the Site Settings link in the Site Actions menu.
2. If the site is not a top-level site, click the Go to Top Level Site Settings link under the Site
Collection Administration section.
3. On the Site Settings screen, click the Web Parts link under the Galleries section.
4. On the Web Part Gallery screen, click the Upload link on the toolbar.
5. On the Upload Web Part screen, click the Browse button.
6. On the Choose File dialog box, browse to the DWP file, select it, and click the Open button.
7. On the Upload Web Part screen, click the OK button.
8. On the Edit Item screen, edit the name, title, and description that were loaded from the DWP
file. Select a Group and, optionally, any of the Quick Add Groups to determine how the web
part is organized and presented to users on the Add Web Part dialog.
9. Click the OK button.
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The Web Part Gallery screen will refresh and contain your newly uploaded web part in the list.
The Web Part Gallery screen also lets you edit, delete, and manage security for web parts using the
same familiar capabilities found in lists and libraries. The View Item page for a web part in the Web
Part gallery displays an Export link in the toolbar allowing you to export the web parts as DWP files
for importing elsewhere.
Standard Galleries and Web Parts
Both Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 and SharePoint Server 2007 come with a number of web parts
that are available for you to add to your web part pages. These web parts, and any additional web
parts added to your SharePoint environment, are organized into galleries.
In a default installation of Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 or SharePoint Server 2007, there are
three galleries, each with their own purposes:
• Closed Web Parts
• Site Collection gallery
• Server gallery
Closed Web Parts
This gallery contains web parts that have been closed on the current web part page. This allows you
to add these web parts back onto the page and continue using them. When added to the page, the
web parts retain the properties and behavior that they had when they were closed.
Site Collection Gallery
This gallery contains web parts that have been imported into your site collection along with the
built-in web parts that come with SharePoint. One of these built-in web parts is the List View web
part that is used to display the contents of a site’s list or library on a web part page. An instance of
the List View web part will be displayed in the gallery for each list or library that exists on the site.
These instances will be displayed using the name of the list or library.
The web parts available via the Site Collection gallery in a Windows SharePoint Services 3.0
environment are listed in Table 8-2.
Table 8-2. WSS Site Collection Gallery Web Parts
Web Part
Description
List View web part
An instance of this web part will be displayed in Lists and Libraries
section of the Add Web Parts dialog and in the Site Collection gallery
for each list or library on the site. This web part allows you to display
list information on the web part page using one of the list’s views
specified by the Selected View property of the List View web part.
You can also create a custom view used only for displaying the list
information on the web part page by using the Edit the Current View
link on the Web Part Properties pane. Users can be allowed to view,
add, or edit list items from the web part page based on the Toolbar
Type property of the List View web part. This web part was shown
previously in Figure 8-12 to illustrate web part connections.
Content Editor web part
Allows you to add custom HTML or rich text to a page. The
Properties pane for this web part provides you with tools to create
rich text, enter HTML, or specify an external file to use when
generating the contents.
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Web Part
Description
Form web part
Allows you to create HTML forms that can then be connected to
other web parts to control their content. An example would be to
create a simple search that filters the displayed contents of the
target web part.
Image web part
Displays an image on the web part page, allowing you to control
alignment and background color.
Page Viewer web part
Allows you to display another web page, file, or folder within your
web part page.
Relevant Documents
Displays all of the documents on the current site that were created
by, modified by, or are checked out to the current user. This web part
contains properties to customize which of these document aspects
to use when determining the documents to show.
Site Users
Displays a list of the users who have access to the site and allows
you to easily view their user information by clicking their names in
the web part.
User Tasks
Shows list items in task lists on the current site that are assigned to
the user.
XML web part
Displays an XML document on the web part page. You can optionally
specify an XSLT that should be applied to the XML to determine how
the XML is rendered. Using this web part requires XML/XSLT
development knowledge.
When Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 is installed, the Site Gallery contains about 10 web
parts, but that number jumps to over 75 web parts when your environment includes SharePoint
Server 2007. With large collections of web parts like this, it is beneficial to use the groups in the Add
Web Parts dialog or the filtering ability in the Add Web Parts pane to organize and find web parts
more easily.
Business Data
These web parts allow you to display and interact with data in SharePoint Server 2007’s Business
Data Catalog. The Business Data Catalog allows SharePoint to integrate with external data sources.
Examples of web parts in the Business Data group follow:
• Business Data Item: Displays a single item from a source in the Business Data Catalog
• Business Data List: Displays a list of items from a source in the Business Data Catalog
• Business Data Related List: Displays a list of items related to a parent item from a source in
the Business Data Catalog
• Excel Web Access: Displays an Excel 2007 workbook in a web page format
Content Rollup
These web parts allow you to aggregate information from multiple locations in SharePoint and display them in a single web part. Most of these web parts will only function in your My Site. Examples
of web parts in the Content Rollup group include:
• My Workspaces: Displays the sites that have been created under your My Site
• Site Aggregator: Allows you to create a tab for each site you choose that displays documents
that you have authored
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Dashboard
These web parts allow you to display and interact with key performance indicator (KPI) data
retrieved from KPI lists. See Chapter 5 for more information regarding KPI lists. Examples of web
parts in the Dashboard group follow:
• Key Performance Indicators: Displays a multiple KPIs from a KPI list
• KPI Details: Displays a single KPI from a KPI list
Default
The web parts shown in this group are dependant on the type of site and the zone you are adding
web parts to. An example of a web part commonly in the Default group follows:
• RSS Viewer: Displays the results of an RSS feed, either an external feed or from a SharePoint list
Filters
These web parts allow you to filter information in other web parts using web part connections
described earlier in this chapter. Examples of web parts in the Filter group follow:
• Choice Filter: Filters the contents of a web part by allowing the user to pick an option from a
list of values
• Date Filter: Filters the contents of a web part by allowing the user to pick a date
• Query String Filter: Filters the contents of a web part by using data in the query string (URL)
of the page
Miscellaneous
The miscellaneous group is where the web parts from Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 are organized in the Add Web Part dialog. These web parts were described in Table 8-2. One additional web
part in the Miscellaneous group is
• Contact Details: Displays information about a SharePoint user
Outlook Web Access
These web parts connect to Outlook Web Access to incorporate your Outlook information into the
web part page. Each of these web parts requires a specific version of Exchange server. Examples of
web parts in the Outlook Web Access group follow:
• My Calendar: Displays your calendar using Exchange Server 2003 or later
• My Contacts: Displays your contacts using Exchange Server 2007
• My Inbox: Displays your inbox using Exchange Server 2003 or later
Search
These web parts provide the functionality needed for searching within SharePoint. Most of these
web parts are used in the Search Center site template and within the standard search and search
results pages. Examples of web parts in the Search group follow:
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• Search Box: The standard search entry
• Search Core Results: Displays search results
Site Directory
These web parts display site collections in various formats. They are most often used in the Site
Directory site template. Examples of web parts in the Site Directory group follow:
• Sites in Category: Displays the sites within the Site Directory
• Top Sites: Displays sites signified as top sites within the site collection
Server Gallery
This gallery contains web parts that have been installed on the SharePoint server, usually by a
SharePoint technical administrator. This is where you will most often find custom web parts added
to your SharePoint environment by your organization.
Further Customization
You are not limited to using only the web parts that come with SharePoint. Web parts can be developed using Microsoft development tools like Visual Studio .NET. Many software vendors have
created custom web parts that can be used with your sites to add new functionality to the SharePoint environment. From navigational displays to enterprise data access and reporting, these web
parts can enhance the user experience and productivity when using SharePoint. Your SharePoint
technical administrator and IT staff members may be able to provide you with the added functionality you desire for your sites and workspaces by either writing their own web parts or obtaining
them from outside vendors.
Another way to customize your web part pages, although somewhat more advanced than modifying them through SharePoint alone, is by using SharePoint Designer 2007. SharePoint Designer
2007 is a SharePoint customization and management product that is part of the 2007 Microsoft
Office suite of applications. It includes integration with SharePoint sites that allows you to alter the
look and feel of the pages. This includes making numerous changes not available via SharePoint
itself.
nCaution
Editing SharePoint pages using SharePoint Designer 2007 is restricted to users assigned the Design
and Full Control default permission levels. In order to successfully use SharePoint Designer 2007 to modify SharePoint, some knowledge of web development is important, as it is possible to severely damage the SharePoint site
or workspace pages.
You may remember that we stated that once a layout of web part zones is chosen for a web part
page, it cannot be modified through SharePoint. One of the features SharePoint Designer 2007 provides is the ability to add or edit the web part zones on a page. Adding HTML, spreadsheets, charts,
and the Data view also are enhancements to Web Part pages provided by FrontPage. To open a Web
Part page for editing in SharePoint Designer 2007, follow these steps:
1. Run the SharePoint Designer 2007 application on your computer.
2. On the File menu, choose Open Site.
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3. In the Open Site dialog box, enter the URL to the site, but not a specific page of the site, in
the site name box. An example is http://sharepointserver/sites/Sales.
4. Click the OK button.
5. When the site opens in SharePoint Designer 2007, the pages are displayed in the Folder List
on the left.
6. Double-click the page you want to open for editing, and it will be displayed, as shown in
Figure 8-13.
Figure 8-13. Editing a web part page using SharePoint Designer 2007
Editing a page using SharePoint Designer 2007 causes the page to no longer use the default look
and feel defined by SharePoint. This aspect of SharePoint Designer 2007, called unghosting, is important, as many organizations modify the default look and feel definitions to customize SharePoint to
better reflect their corporate standards. Any unghosted pages will not incorporate those site definition customizations. You can reset an edited page so that it reflects the site definition customizations
by using the Reset to Site Definition option in the context menu of the page in SharePoint Designer
2007. You can also do this directly in the site by clicking the Reset to Site Definition link in the Look
and Feel section of the Site Settings page and specifying the page to reset.
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9
nnn
Personalization Features
S
o far we have discussed how to configure and use the various components that make up a SharePoint environment. As part of these discussions, we reviewed a variety of capabilities that allow you
to organize information within the environment. There are times, however, when the way the information should be organized is dependant on the type of people accessing the information.
SharePoint provides several capabilities that enable you to personalize the environment in
order to provide role-based views into information. These personalization capabilities enable users
to accomplish the following:
• Configure notifications for specific events of interest
• Tailor information presented based on the user accessing the information
• Store and share private information
In this chapter, we will discuss the various personalization capabilities provided in SharePoint
and describe how to configure these capabilities.
Alerts
As your SharePoint environment grows and the amount of content it contains increases, it quickly
becomes apparent that you cannot possibly be aware of changes to all of the information that is relevant to you. In fact, it is not uncommon for the primary goal for introducing SharePoint to be
providing users with quicker and easier access to relevant information. Organizations are often
challenged by apprising people of information they might need, and individuals often have difficulty staying aware of changes to information they care about. Manually scanning information
sources for new or changed materials would be extremely time consuming.
To allow users to be kept aware of changes to available information, SharePoint provides the
ability for users to configure notifications to be sent to them when important documents or data in
the environment changes. Alerts are available in both WSS-only and MOSS environments. However,
with MOSS installed, managers of a site (individuals with Full Control permissions) have the ability
to not only configure alerts for themselves but can also create alerts for other site users.
You can configure alerts so that you are notified about changes to the following types of items:
• Search: Notifies you about changes made to items satisfying a specific set of search criteria.
For example, searching for “Health Insurance” and then subscribing to the search results
notifies you of changes to health insurance information within SharePoint. This type of alert
is only available when MOSS is in place.
• Lists or libraries: Notifies you regarding changes made to information within a specific list or
library.
• Document or list item: Notifies you when a specific document or list item is altered.
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Subscribing to an Alert
If you have been granted the Create Alerts permission in SharePoint, you will be able to subscribe to
the various types of alerts we described previously. By default, all permission levels are provided this
right except for the Limited Access and Restricted Read levels.
Search Alerts
Alerts created for a MOSS search are used to notify you when items satisfying the search criteria are
changed or new items are introduced. These alerts are created from the Search Results page by
clicking the Alert Me link at the top of the returned results. Figure 9-1 depicts the Search Results
page containing the Alert Me link.
Figure 9-1. The Search Results page
To subscribe to an alert for a search, follow these steps:
1. Perform a MOSS search, either from the search box at the top of a site page or from within a
search site.
2. On the Search Results page, shown in Figure 9-1, click the Alert Me link.
3. On the New Alert page, shown in Figure 9-2, do the following:
a. In the Alert Title section, enter a title for the alert. The title is used in the subject of email notifications sent for this alert and is the name used then you view your list of
alerts within a site.
b. For Site Managers, in the Send Alerts To section, enter the users to whom the alert
should be sent. By default, the current user is listed in this section.
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c. In the Change Type section, select the type of changes to be alerted to. You can select to
send alerts when new items are added to the search’s results, when existing items are
changed, or for all changes.
d. In the When to Send Alerts section, select the frequency in which alerts should be sent.
You can select to have alerts sent on a daily summary or on a weekly summary.
e. Once all information has been entered, click the OK button.
The alert is saved, and you returned to the search results page.
Figure 9-2. The New Alert page for search alerts
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List and Library Alerts
Alerts created for a list or library are used to notify you when changes are made to items in that list
or library or when new information is added. To create this type of alert, you must have access to
the list or library screen. To subscribe to an alert for a list or library, follow these steps:
1. Navigate to the list or library view page for the list or library you wish to create the alert.
2. On the list or library page, select Alert Me from the list view Actions menu, as shown in
Figure 9-3.
Figure 9-3. List view Actions menu
3. On the New Alert page, shown in Figure 9-4, do the following:
a. In the Alert Title section, enter a title for the alert. This title is used in the subject of email notifications sent for this alert and as the name of the alert when viewing your
alerts in the site.
b. For the Site Managers, in the Send Alerts To section, enter the users to whom the alert
should be sent. By default, the current user is listed in this section.
c. In the Change Type section, select the type of changes to be alerted to. The available
change types include:
• All changes
• New items are added
• Existing items are modified
• Items are deleted
• Web discussion updates (available for document library alerts only)
d. In the Send Alerts for These Changes section, select the filtering criteria for the alert.
There are many filter options available. These options are determined by the type of list
for which the alert is being created.
e. In the When to Send Alerts section, select the frequency with which alerts should be
sent. You can select to send an e-mail immediately, send a daily summary, or send a
weekly summary and specify when the summary should be sent.
f. Once all the information has been entered, click the OK button.
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The alert is saved, and you are returned to the page where you selected to create the alert.
Figure 9-4. The New Alert page for library alerts
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Document and List Item Alerts
The most granular alert available is one based on a single document or list item. From the document
or list item’s context menu, you can select to create an alert for that item. To subscribe to an alert for
a specific library or list item, follow these steps:
1. Navigate to a page containing the list or library items with the item’s context menu available.
2. Select the Alert Me option from the item’s context menu.
3. On the New Alert page, as shown in Figure 9-5, do the following:
a. In the Alert Title section, enter a title for the alert. This title is used in the subject of
e-mail notifications sent for this alert and as the name of the alert when viewing your
alerts in the site.
b. For the Site Managers, in the Send Alerts To section, enter the users to whom the alert
should be sent. By default, the current user is listed in this section.
c. In the Send Alerts for These Changes section, select the filtering criteria for the alert.
There are many filter options available. These options are determined by the type of list
for which the alert is being created.
d. In the When to Send Alerts section, select the frequency with which alerts should be
sent. You can select to send an e-mail immediately, send a daily summary, or send a
weekly summary and specify when the summary should be sent.
e. Once all the information has been entered, click the OK button.
The alert is saved, and you are to the page where you selected to create the alert.
When you create any of the alerts we have described, you will receive an e-mail notifying you
that the specified alert was successfully created; see Figure 9-6. The e-mail includes a link to the
item the alert was created for and a link to the My Alerts on This Site page. We will discuss the My
Alerts on This Site page in the “Managing Your Alerts” section later in this chapter.
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Figure 9-5. The New Alert page for document alerts
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Figure 9-6. The new alert creation message
Receiving an Alert
Alerts are received via e-mail messages based on the frequency selected when the alerts were created.
An e-mail is sent with the specified frequency when one or more actions are completed satisfying the
alert’s criteria. The e-mail sent for an alert contains the text from the content that triggered the alert
along with links to the following:
• Modify My Alert Settings: Takes you to the My Alerts on This Site page for the site containing
the alert
• View Item: Takes you to the Item Details view for the item triggering the alert
• View List/Library: Takes you to the list or library containing the item triggering the alert
• Mobile View (if mobile access for the list or library is enabled): Takes you to the mobile view
page for the list or library item triggering the alert
Managing Your Alerts
Managing alerts created for you within a site is done from the My Alerts on This Site page. You can
access this page using the View My Existing Alerts on This Site link at the top of any of the new alert
pages or by following these steps:
1. Navigate to the site in which you wish to update alerts.
2. Select the Welcome menu in the page header, shown in Figure 9-7, and selecting the My Settings option.
3. On the User Information page, click the My Alerts link.
You are taken to the My Alerts on This Site page. On this page, you have the ability to add, edit,
and delete your alerts in the current site.
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Figure 9-7. The Welcome menu
nNote
Search alerts that you create are listed in the Search site where the search and search results pages are
located.
Adding Alerts
To add a new alert from the My Alerts on This Site page, follow these steps:
1. Navigate to the My Alerts on This Site page for the site in which you want to create a new
alert.
2. On the My Alerts on This Site page, click the Add Alert link.
3. On the New Alert item selection page, select the list or library within the site for which the
alert should be created.
4. On the New Alert page, enter the information as you did in the Create Alert section previously
for list or library alerts.
The alert is created, and you are taken to the My Alerts on This Site page.
Editing Alerts
Use the following steps to edit alerts listed on the My Alerts on This Site page:
1. Navigate to the My Alerts on This Site page for the site containing the alert to be edited.
2. On the My Alerts on This Site page, click the name of the alert to edit.
3. On the Edit Alert page, do the following:
a. In the Alert Title section, update the name of the alert.
b. In the Send Alert To section, you can view the e-mail address to which the alert is being
sent. This information cannot be edited.
c. In the Change Type section, update the type of changes for which alerts should be sent.
d. In the Send Alerts for These Changes section, update the alert filter criteria.
e. In the When to Send Alert section, update the frequency for the e-mail alert.
f. Once all appropriate changes have been made, click the OK button.
The alert is updated, and you are returned to the My Alerts on This Site page.
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Deleting Alerts
You can delete existing alerts in one of two ways. The first method is to click the Delete button on the
Edit Alert page. This will delete the displayed alert and return you to the My Alerts on This Site page.
The second method for deleting alerts is to click the boxes in front of the names of the alerts to delete
on the My Alerts on This Site page and then click the Delete Selected Alerts link. You will be prompted
to confirm your wish to delete the alerts. Once you click OK on the deletion confirmation prompt, the
selected alerts are deleted, and the My Alerts on This Site page is updated to reflect the change.
Removing Alerts for Other Users
As we discussed earlier, site managers have the ability to create alerts for other users of the site. The
user the alert is created for can then manage the alert, making changes as needed. Administrators of
a site can also delete alerts created for users within this site. To delete alerts set within a site you
manage, follow these steps:
1. Navigate to the Site Settings page for the site containing the alerts to be deleted.
2. On the Site Settings page, in the Site Administration section, click the User Alerts link.
3. On the User Alerts page, do the following:
a. Select the user in the Display Alerts For drop-down list, and click the Update button.
The Alerts section will be updated to show the alerts in this site for the selected user.
b. In the Alerts section, check the boxes in front of the alerts to delete, and click the Delete
Selected Alerts link.
4. On the deletion confirmation window, click the OK button to delete the selected alerts.
The alerts are deleted, and the User Alerts page is refreshed returning you to the default view.
My Site
My Site is your personal SharePoint web site. It provides a location where you can organize and
manage your work. You can also use it to share your own information and your own views of information with others. This site allows other users to obtain information about you, such as your
general demographics, your skills, and your interests.
My Site also acts as a consolidation point where you can manage all of the documents and
tasks you own anywhere in your SharePoint environment. Figure 9-8 depicts the default My Site.
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Figure 9-8. The My Home page
To access your My Site, click the My Site link in the site title bar. The first time you access My
Site, it will be created and configured for you. Your My Site includes two default pages. The first page
is the My Home page. This page is your default entry point into My Site, as shown in Figure 9-8. It is
only available to the My Site owner. The second page is the My Profile page. This page is the default
entry point for others into your My Site. This page provides other users with information about you
and views of information you want to provide to others. Figure 9-9 depicts the default Everyone
view of your My Profile page.
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Figure 9-9. The My Profile page
The My Home Page
As we mentioned previously, the My Home page of My Site, shown in Figure 9-8, is your entry point
into your My Site resources. When you first access My Site, the My Home page is presented and is
composed of the following options:
• Get Started with My Site: Provides links to resources used to start configuring My Site for use:
• Describe yourself: Navigates you to the profile editing page where you can manage
information about yourself to share with others.
• Identify the people you know: Navigates you to the My Colleagues list where you can
enter and manage key contacts.
• Upload your picture: Navigates you to the profile editing page where, along with updating your demographic information, you can upload a picture of yourself for display to
others when viewing your profile information.
• Customize this page: Opens the My Home page in edit mode, so you can tailor the page
to meet your needs.
• Learn more about My Site: Opens the help page containing the introduction to My Site
details.
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• RSS Viewer: Allows you to configure RSS feeds for viewing in My Site.
• SharePoint Sites: Lists sites in the SharePoint environment showing documents you own and
tasks assigned to you. You can add additional sites using the New Site tab option under the
Sites menu header.
• My Calendar: Links to your Microsoft Exchange calendar through Outlook Web Access (OWA)
allowing for events listed on your calendar to be viewed in My Site.
• Colleague Tracker: Allows you to track the people you work with. Colleague assignments are
used to assign rights to your My Profile page.
• Set as Default My Site: This page header option sets this site as the default My Site page for
the user.
• Create Blog: This page header option initiates the creation of a new blog site to be made
available through My Site to share information with others.
• Recent Blog Posts: Available once the Create Blog option has been used, this option lists
recent posts to the created blog site.
You can arrange, add, and remove items from your My Home page in order to organize materials in the way that maps to how you work. My Site also includes the following libraries for storing
content within My Site:
• Form Templates: This document library is used to store form templates that have been
approved by administrators for use.
• Personal Documents: This document library is used to store documents to be kept private, so
that only you can access them.
• Shared Documents: This document library is meant to store documents that will be located
in your My Site that will be shared with others.
• Shared Pictures: This picture library is meant to store images that you wish to share with others.
You can create additional lists, libraries, and content; add web parts; and rearrange the information to create an environment to manage and share your information. To create and manage
pages, documents, and lists refer to Chapters 4 through 8.
The My Profile Page
As discussed previously, the My Profile page is used to share your information with others. This can
include information about you as well as views of information available across the environment.
This page is the only page available when others access your My Site. People can navigate to your
My Site through any reference to your name in the SharePoint environment. This includes places
where you are listed as the owner of content, as the last person to modify materials, or as a contact.
You can configure the My Profile page to present information to others based on who they are and
their relationships to you. By default, you have separate views of the My Profile page for different
types of users based on their relationships with you. These relationships include the following ones:
• My Manager: This is the individual listed as your manager in your profile. By default, your
manager information is pulled from Active Directory.
• My Workgroup: These are individuals understood to be the people you regularly work with.
Often, these are people within your department or functional area. You define who these
people are through your Colleague list, identifying those colleagues that you consider part of
your work group.
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• My Colleagues: These are individuals you have listed in your My Colleagues list in My Site.
• Everyone: These are all users that access your My Site but do not fall within any of the other
groupings listed here.
The view of the My Profile page presented to users accessing your My Site is determined by
their membership in the preceding groups. The page presented is based on the highest relationship
for a user, with My Manager being the highest and Everyone being the lowest. By default, all four of
the initial My Site views are the same and include the following:
• Contact Information: Contains the contact details within your profile that the user accessing
the site has rights to see.
• Organization Hierarchy: Lists you in context within your organization’s hierarchy.
• Latest Blog Post: Lists the most recent post made to your My Site’s blog site. This is only available if a blog site has been created for use in My Site, as we described previously.
• Documents: Lists the documents that you own.
• Colleagues: Lists your colleagues who you have authorized users of your My Site to see. You
can set these rights based on the users’ roles.
• In Common with You: Lists details that the user accessing your My Site has in common with
you. This includes common managers, colleagues, and memberships.
• Memberships: Lists distribution lists and other memberships you share with the person
viewing your My Site.
• Links: Lists your My Links that the person visiting your My Site is authorized to see. You can
define the roles to make a link available to when creating a link. We will discuss My Links in
the “My Links” section later in this chapter.
Managing Colleagues
The information presented to others when they access your My Site is based on their relationships
to you. Some relationships, such as managers, are defined in Active Directory. Other relationships
are managed by you within My Site using the Colleagues capabilities. You define colleagues by
adding them to the My Colleagues list in My Site. This list tracks information about your colleagues
and defines if these individuals are part of your workgroup.
To add a colleague, follow these steps:
1. Navigate to the My Home page of your My Site.
2. On the My Home page, in the My Profile list in the Quick Launch area, click the Colleagues
link.
3. On the My Colleagues page, click the Add Colleagues link.
4. On the Add Colleagues page, do the following:
a. In the Identify Colleagues section, select the individuals to add as colleagues. You can
enter an individual’s ID and click the check names icon, or you can click the browse icon
to locate the individuals. You can also select names from the list of suggested colleagues.
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b. In the Privacy and Groupings section, select the My Site roles for which the colleague
details will be displayed when others access your My Site. After you select a role, all
users accessing your site in that role or a higher role (as we described previously in the
section “The My Profile Page”) will be able to see the information for the entered colleagues. In this section, you can also select if the colleagues being entered should be
added to your workgroup. Finally, you will specify a new or existing grouping in which
to place the added colleagues.
c. Once all the information has been entered, click the OK button.
The entered colleagues are saved, and you are returned to the My Colleagues page.
You can also edit information about your existing colleagues. To edit information about colleagues you have already identified, follow these steps:
1. Navigate to the My Home page of My Site.
2. On the My Home page, in the My Profile list in the Quick Launch area, click the Colleagues
link.
3. On the My Colleagues page, for the colleague you wish to edit, select the edit option from
the items drop-down menu.
4. On the Edit Colleagues page, do the following:
a. In the Privacy and Groupings section, update the My Site roles for which the colleague
details will be displayed when others access your My Site. Identify if the person is part
of My Workgroup, and update the colleague’s grouping.
b. Once all the information has been appropriately, updated click the OK button.
The colleague is updated, and you are returned to the My Colleagues page. You can also delete an
existing colleague. This is done by checking the box in front of listed colleagues on the My Colleagues
page and clicking the delete link or by selecting the Delete option from a colleague’s drop-down
menu. In either case, you will be prompted to confirm the deletion. Once the deletion is confirmed,
the colleague will be deleted and the My Colleagues page will be updated to reflect the change.
Managing Your Profile
As we mentioned earlier in this section, the colleague details are used to determine the users that
can see your various profile details. Your profile lists details about you. Some of the information is
managed through Active Directory, while other information is available for you to update as
needed. You can also select the roles that are able to see the various profile details. You can configure the details to be available to the following people:
• Only Me
• My Manager
• My Workgroup
• My Colleagues
• Everyone
There are several details in your profile that are always available to everyone and cannot be
filtered by role. These are considered general details about you that all users should be able to
reference. These items are as follows:
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• Name: Your name as it appears in Active Directory.
• About Me: A description about yourself that you can enter.
• Picture: A picture of you that you can upload.
• Responsibilities: A list of your current responsibilities.
• Assistant: A reference to your assistant that you can configure.
• Active Directory Attributes: Active Directory details include several attributes that are stored
in Active Directory and included in the user’s profile, such as Account Name, Work E-mail,
Department, Office, Work Phone, and so on. These items can not be edited.
For any of these items that you manage, if you do not want the information to be available to
others, you can leave the associated details blank.
All of the other profile details can be configured to be displayed to only those roles to which
you want the information to be available. Some of the information is pulled from Active Directory,
while other information must be entered by you. To view your profile information, select the My
Settings link from the Welcome drop-down menu in the global links bar. This will present your profile details, as shown in Figure 9-10.
Figure 9-10. The User Information page
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To update your profile information, follow these steps:
1. Navigate to your My Site.
2. On the My Home page, in the My Profile list in the Quick Launch area, click the Details link.
3. On the Edit Details page, you can update the following items:
a. In the About Me section, enter text that describes you.
b. In the Picture section, click the Choose Picture button to browse to a picture to upload.
This makes a picture of you available to site users.
c. In the Responsibilities section, enter your job responsibilities, separated by commas, or
select available responsibilities by clicking the Browse Responsibilities button and
selecting from the listed responsibilities.
d. In the Skills section, enter the skills you have, separated by commas, or select available
skills by clicking the Browse skills button and selecting from the listed skills. You can
also select the type of user that can view the information.
e. In the Past Projects section, enter previous projects you have worked on, and select the
type of users that can view the information.
f. In the Interests section, enter your interests to note, and select the type of user that can
view the information.
g. In the Schools section, list the schools you have attended. You can also select the type of
user that can view the information.
h. In the Birthday section, enter your birthday, and select the type of user that can view
the information.
i. In the Assistant section, select your assistant by entering his or her ID and clicking the
check names button or by using the browse button to locate the name.
j. In the Mobile Phone section, enter your mobile telephone number, and select the type
of user that can view the information.
k. In the Fax section, enter your fax number, and select the type of user that can view the
information.
l. In the Home Phone section, enter your home telephone number, and select the type of
user that can view the information.
m. Once all of the information has been appropriately updated, click the Save and Close link.
The profile information is updated, and you are returned to the My Home page.
My Links
MOSS allows you to maintain a list of links that are important to you. These links may include references to existing sites in the SharePoint environment, references to other resources in your
corporate network, or links to resources available across the Internet. You can create and organize
these links to make it easy for you to reference the associated information. You can also determine if
any of the links should be made available to others when they visit your My Site and identify the
roles that can view them. We discussed My Site in the “My Site” section earlier in this chapter.
Links included in your My Links are listed in the My Links drop-down list located in the global
links bar of the portal, as shown in Figure 9-11.
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Figure 9-11. My Links
Adding My Links
You can add links to My Links list in two ways. First, you can select to add the current SharePoint
site being viewed to My Links. This is done as follows:
1. Navigate to the site you wish to add to My Links.
2. On the page to add, select the Add to My Links option from the My Links menu, as shown in
Figure 9-11.
3. In the Add to My Links window, do the following:
a. Verify the Title and Address being added. You can make changes to these values as
needed.
b. Select the type of My Site visitors that can view the links.
c. Select a group under which to organize the link.
d. Once all the information has been entered, click the OK button.
The link is added, and the Add to My Links window is closed.
The second method available to add items to your My Links is used to create links that reference any SharePoint, internal network or Internet-based resource. To create a new My Link item,
follow these steps:
1. From any location in the SharePoint environment, select the Manage Links option from the
My Links menu in the global links bar, as shown in Figure 9-11.
2. On the My Links page, click the Add Links option.
3. On the Add Link page, do the following:
a. In the Link Information section, enter the title and address for the link to be added.
b. In the Privacy and Grouping section, select the type of My Site users who can view the
link when accessing your My Site, and select the group under which the link should be
organized.
c. Once all of the information has been entered, click the OK button.
The link is added, and you are returned to the My Links page.
Editing My Links
There are two methods you can use to edit your My Links. The first method is used when you want
to change the privacy and grouping details for multiple links at the same time, so that they all reference the same information. To update the privacy and grouping details in this way, follow these
steps:
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1. From any location in the SharePoint environment, select the Manage Links option from the
My Links menu in the global links bar, as shown in Figure 9-11.
2. On the My Links page, check the box in front of all the links to edit, and click the Edit Links
option.
3. On the Edit My Link page, do the following:
a. In the Privacy and Grouping section, update the type of My Site users who can view the
links when accessing your My Site, and update the group under which the links should
be organized.
b. Once all updates have been made, click the OK button.
The links are updated, and you are returned to the My Links page.
The second method available for editing links is used when you want to edit any of the details
for a specific link. This includes editing the title, address, privacy or grouping details. Follow these
steps to edit a single link:
1. From any location in the SharePoint environment, select the Manage Links option from the
My Links menu in the global links bar, as shown in Figure 9-11.
2. On the My Links page, select the Edit option from a listed link’s drop-down menu.
3. On the Edit My Link Page, do the following:
a. In the Link Information section, update the title and address information.
b. In the Privacy and Grouping section, update the type of My Site users who can view the
link when accessing your My Site, and update the group under which the link should be
organized.
c. Once all updates have been made, click the OK button.
The link is updated, and you are returned to the My Links page.
Deleting My Links
You can delete links from My Links by checking the box in front of the links to delete on the My
Links page and clicking the Delete link or by selecting the Delete option from a listed link’s dropdown menu on the My Links page. When using either approach, you will be prompted to confirm
that the items should be deleted. Once you confirm the deletion, the items will be deleted, and the
My Links page will be refreshed to reflect the change.
Personalization Sites
In Chapter 3, we discussed the various MOSS site templates available when creating new sites in
your SharePoint environment. One of the templates we discussed was the Personalization Site template that is used to create sites where the content displayed is based on the person accessing the
site. These sites enable you to target information to specific individuals or groups of users. These
sites also act as a bridge between your SharePoint portal and users’ My Sites.
Personalizing Content
When you first create a personalization site, it contains no presented content beyond the standard
personalization site welcome text, as shown in Figure 9-12.
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Figure 9-12. A personalization site
There are several methods that can be used to personalize content within sites. Personalization
sites are configured to help you leverage these capabilities. However, many of these capabilities can
be used in any type of SharePoint site, not just in personalization sites.
Targeting Web Parts
One method available to personalize content is to identify the audiences who are able to see the
content listed on a page. Web parts can be targeted to specific individuals or groups of individuals,
so that they are only displayed when these selected individuals access the page. When users not in
the defined audience access the page, the web part will not appear. To target a web part to a specific
group of users, follow these steps:
1. Navigate to the page containing the web part to be personalized.
2. On the page containing the web part, select the Edit Page option from the Site Actions menu.
3. In the web part banner, select the Modify Shared Web Part option from the Edit drop-down
menu, as shown in Figure 9-13.
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Figure 9-13. A web part Edit drop-down menu
4. In the Modify Web Part pane, in the Advanced section, enter the target audiences. These are
the people to whom the web part will be available. You can enter the information manually
and click the check names link to verify the entered information, or you can use the browse
option to search for the appropriate groups of individuals. You can select from Global Audiences, Active Directory Distribution Lists and Security Groups, or SharePoint Groups.
5. Once audiences have been identified, click the OK button in the Modify Web Part pane.
The web part is updated, and the Modify Web Part pane is closed. Now when a user who is not
part of a defined audience accesses the site, the web part will not be presented.
Filtering Content
A second method made available in SharePoint to provide personalized content to users is to filter
content. Personalization sites are created with two default Content Filter web parts on the home
page: the Current User Filter and the Profile Property Filter. Filter web parts enable you to pass specific values into web parts available on the page that can consume this type of information. These
consumer web parts then use the passed-in filter information to customize the content that they
present. Filters can either be hidden on the page passing in a specific known value, such as the current user ID, or filters can be visible, requiring the user to enter or select some type of information
to pass into consumer web parts.
The Current User Filter and the Profile Property Filter are both hidden on the personalization
site page. The Current User Filter is configured to pass the user ID for the currently logged on user
to consumer web parts. By default, there are no web parts on the personalization site home page to
pass the user details into. You can add a web part to the page, such as a document library view web
part and then configure the Current User Filter web part to pass the user information to the document library web part. Doing this will allow the web part to automatically filter the information
displayed based on the current user. You would use this if you wanted to only present documents to
a user that they have created or edited.
Follow these steps to connect the Current User Filter web part to a consumer web part on the
page:
1. Navigate to the page containing the web part.
2. Select the Edit page option from the page’s Site Action menu.
3. On the Current User Filter web part, select the Connections ä Send Filter Values To ä Web
Part option from the Edit drop-down menu.
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The filter is connected to the selected web part. The selected web part then uses this value to
filter content based on the currently logged on user’s details
The Profile Property Filter is configured to pass the user’s name to connected web parts. You
can then connect this web part to a consumer web part in the same way as we described previously
for the Current User Filter web part. When this is finished, the consumer web part will be able to use
the user’s name information when presenting content.
Integration with My Site
As we mentioned earlier, personalization sites can act as a bridge between your SharePoint portal
and users’ My Sites. When you navigate to a personalization site the navigation bar of the site
includes links for the user’s My Site pages. These will include a link to the My Home and a link to the
My Profile page, along with a link to the personalization site currently being viewed. By clicking the
My Home or My Profile options, you are navigated to the corresponding My Site page. We discussed
these pages in the “My Site” section earlier in this chapter.
From the navigation bar of the personalization site, you also have the ability to pin the current
personalization site to your My Site. When you pin a personalization site to your My Site, you configure the My Site to include the personalization site reference in the My Site navigation bar. When
this is finished, the personalization site will be available on the My Site menu any time you navigate
to your My Site. To pin a personalization site to your My Site, follow these steps:
1. Navigate to the personalization site to pin.
2. Hover over the personalization site name in the navigation bar, and click the Pin This Site
option.
The current site is pinned to your My Site. You can later unpin the site. This removes the reference to the pinned personalization site from the My Site navigation. Follow these steps to unpin a
personalization site:
1. Navigate to your My Site or the pinned personalization site.
2. Hover over the personalization site name in the navigation bar, and click the Unpin This Site
option.
The personalization site is unpinned from your My Site.
Personalizing Pages
So far we have discussed places in SharePoint designed to provide personalized content to users. In
a SharePoint environment, you can also select to create personalized views of any available page
when you have the Manage Personalized Views right assigned. When this is the case, you can customize site pages by rearranging, adding, and removing web parts from these pages. These
customizations will only be seen by the user making them.
To create a personal view of a page, navigate to the page where you wish to create the view, and
select the Personalize This Page option from the Welcome menu in the global navigation bar. When
you select this option, the page is placed in design mode, as shown in Figure 9-14, and you can edit
the page, as we discussed in Chapter 8.
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Figure 9-14. The Personal View design mode
The only difference between editing a personal view of a page and the shared view of a page is
that the edits made to a personal view are only seen by you. When you are editing a personal view of
a page, the version statement just below the navigation bar on the page will state, “You are editing
the Personal View of this page.” Once you finish making changes to your personal view of the page,
you can click the Exit Edit Mode option to view the modified page.
After you have created a personal view of a page, two additional options are made available in
the Welcome menu, as shown in Figure 9-15. These options allow you to toggle between the shared
and personal views of the page and give you the ability to remove your personal view.
Figure 9-15. The Welcome menu with the Personal View options
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Selecting the Show Shared View option from the Welcome menu will switch the view of the current
page to the shared view. This is the standard view of the page created by the page owner. You can later
switch back to the personal view by clicking the Show Personal View option from the Welcome menu.
Selecting the Reset Page Content option will remove your personal view from the page, returning you to the shared view. When you select this option, the personal view previously created is
deleted, leaving only the standard shared view.
Logon Management
When working in SharePoint, you can manage your logon credentials, enabling you to logon to
SharePoint as a different user or simply log out of the environment. These options are made available through the Welcome menu.
Signing Out of the Portal
When you are finished using the SharePoint environment, you can disconnect from it. This will close
your browser session. By clicking the Sign Out option from the Welcome menu, you will be asked if
you wish to close your web browser. If you click the Yes button, your web browser will close.
nCaution
If you select No when prompted to close your web browser, you will not leave the portal environment.
Signing In as a Different User
There are situations when you may want to log in to your SharePoint environment as a different
user. An example might be when you want to verify the rights and available views for a specific class
of user for a site that you own. To log on to the SharePoint environment using different user credentials, select the Sign In as Different User option from the Welcome menu. When you do this, you are
shown the Windows authentication logon prompt; see Figure 9-16.
Figure 9-16. The Windows logon prompt
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On this screen, you can enter the credentials for the account you wish to use to log on to the
SharePoint environment. Once you enter these credentials, you are returned to the portal and
authenticated based on the credentials you entered.
nCaution
When you use sign in as a different user and then open a document, the document will be opened
using your original credentials (the credentials under which you are logged on to your network), not the credentials
entered into the Sign In as a Different User logon window. For example, assume I am logged on to my network as
TSMITH, and I access my SharePoint environment initially as TSMITH. Then, I use the Sign In as a Different User
option to log on to SharePoint as SBATES. When I open a document, it will open under my TSMITH credentials.
Office programs, like Word and Excel, are not impacted by the logging on as a different user.
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10
nnn
Document Management Solutions
S
ome of the most common solutions provided through SharePoint focus on the creation and
management of documents. Whether you are creating press releases, compiling an annual report,
or writing employee performance reviews, the creation of these materials typically requires the
involvement of several people constructing the items, an approval process for finalizing the materials, a structure to manage the completed items so that they can be made available on an ongoing
basis, and finally, a mechanism to support the archival or deletion of the materials once the information they contain is no longer pertinent.
Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 (MOSS) and Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 (WSS)
provide the tools necessary to manage materials through their entire life cycle, which includes the
following:
• Managing the creation of new items
• Facilitating the approval process for items to be finalized
• Providing the structure in which final items are published and made available to others
• Managing documents’ archival and/or disposition once they are no longer pertinent
In this chapter, we will discuss document management solutions and describe how a SharePoint environment can be configured to support the needs of document creation and management
processes. We will discuss a sample document management situation and walk through how a
SharePoint-based solution would address the needs of the situation.
Document Management Overview
Document management needs can take many forms. In some situations, individuals need to work
together on initiatives where the end result is the creation of one or more documents. These documents, once completed, are often made available to others. Some examples include the following:
• Annual reports created for a company’s stakeholders
• Client statements created for distribution to clients and staff working with those clients
• Request for proposals (RFPs) or RFP responses created for distribution to vendors, partners,
and customers and archived for future internal reference
• Policy and procedure documents published for employees
These are just a few examples of materials that require two or more people working together to create, are published for access by a larger audience, and would be removed or refreshed over time.
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While these materials are being created, there is typically a set of deadlines. These materials
also often require the participation of multiple individuals from more than one department. The
work that these individuals need to complete when creating the document is often interdependent.
These dependencies result in a series of tasks that require the participants to monitor the progress
of the initiative in order to know when they are able to perform their specific tasks.
Document Creation
The approaches used to create materials vary based on the business processes these materials support and the structure of the teams responsible for creating them. In some cases, the same team of
individuals will always work together on document management projects, with each person performing a consistent set of tasks for each project. However, more frequently, the individuals needed
to participate in a document creation effort will be decided when the project is started.
The team members are often selected based on a combination of factors including their knowledge in the project topic, their skill sets, and their availability. The people having the right combination
of these factors may be located in different physical locations and, in some cases, work for different
organizations. The end result is that organizations need tools that support dynamic and distributed
teams, allowing these teams to effectively work together.
Document Creation Resources
There are many resources that are typically brought together when creating documents. These
resources can be categorized as follows:
• Existing information: Often information that already exists within your organization can be
leveraged during the creation process. This information may be in the form of existing documents, data stored in other applications, information available only in hard copy, knowledge
existing in someone’s head, or online resources available from third-party sources. These
materials may provide details required for reference during a current initiative or may contain information to be directly added to the materials being created. This information must
be easy to locate and organize.
• Document creation process: The processes defined within the organization for creating various types of materials can range from following simple steps that facilitate basic information
collection to following a structured workflow process that includes defined document development stages and approval steps. Regardless of the complexity, the process must be defined
and properly managed.
• Document creation tools: Tools are required that enable the document creation process. The
tools include items such as the applications used to create and edit the materials and the
systems used to facilitate and manage the effort. These tools must provide the services necessary to support the process regardless of its complexity.
• Document creation team: The individuals participating in the document creation effort are
the most important aspect of the initiative. The people involved need the information necessary to complete their assigned tasks and the tools that allow them to work as efficiently and
accurately as possible.
• Process management: Team members participating in the initiative, management staff responsible for the team members, and other individuals having an interest in the materials being
generated must all be kept up-to-date on the overall objectives, deadlines, and progress of the
process. Management resources are required that allow the process to be monitored and managed without having a negative impact on deadlines or participants’ efficiencies.
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Document Consumption
Often once documents have been created, they are made available for access by defined groups of
individuals. Whether documents are being made available to relay key information, to support a
specific business initiative, or simply as reference, the items need to have the proper level of exposure, so that relevant individuals can appropriately leverage them. Documents can be made
available for consumption through the following methods:
• Browsing: Items are placed in an easy-to-use structure with other related or similar resources.
• Searching: Materials have been appropriately categorized and have necessary metadata
assigned for individuals to find them when performing related searches.
• Alerting/Targeting: Alerts can be configured so that individuals are notified when appropriate
content is added or changed.
The content being consumed also needs to be properly refreshed or expired, so that it is only available while it is relevant. In some cases, like for policy and procedure documents, this means having
scheduled reviews to refresh the materials to keep the information current over time. In other cases,
items should be expired and removed from being generally available once the information they
include is no longer relevant.
Challenges of Document Management
Organizations are becoming increasingly interested in optimizing document management efforts
for many reasons. Your organization may want to reduce the time it takes to generate needed materials, expand the volume of materials being created, audit information access, or make available
information easier to leverage and more broadly available.
SharePoint includes capabilities designed to address many factors that can negatively impact
document management efforts, in order to help organizations optimize these processes. Some of
these factors include the following:
Information that is needed to support document creation efforts is often spread across many
sources. This information may be in the form of existing materials scattered throughout your
organization, Internet-based resources available from third parties, data in applications, documents only available in hard-copy format, or even knowledge stored in someone’s head. Very
rarely do all the participants know about all of the information that is available and could be
leveraged when creating materials. This often results in duplication of effort, since team members will need to re-create information that they are not aware exists. Having information that
is spread across multiple sources and in multiple formats results in the team spending a significant amount of time searching for relevant information. This searching will often impact other
people as well, since in many cases, the only way to find information is to contact the person
who created it or manages it.
Multiple versions of the same information exist. Common methods used to distribute important materials are through e-mail or as hard copies. When previously distributed information is
later updated, the updates will also be distributed through e-mail or as hard copies. These distribution approaches result in multiple versions of the same information circulating through
the organization. When this occurs, it becomes difficult to identify the most recent and most
accurate versions. People will need to request the most up-to-date copy of the item from the
owner when they need it, which impacts their progress and impacts the people from whom
they are requesting the information. In some cases, people will simply use the version they feel
is the most recent, which can result in outdated materials being used.
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Staff members who need to participate in the creation process are spread across multiple locations. In many cases, collaborative efforts involving the creation of documents will require the
involvement of people having a variety of skills or knowledge. It is not uncommon for the people best suited to participate in a collaboration effort to be based in different locations. When
this is the case, information sharing is commonly done through e-mail, making it very difficult
to track progress of the process and to manage the materials being shared. This will also result
in many of the issues we discussed in the preceding two bullet points. In some situations, it is
not possible to share the information through e-mail. This might be because of the size of the
documents being worked on or other limiting factors. Also, in some cases, it is simply too difficult to coordinate efforts when people are not in the same location, often because of communication challenges. When information cannot be easily shared or when communications
between team members cannot be managed for distributed teams, participants of the process
will be selected based on their proximity to each other instead of their knowledge, skills, or
availability. This can result in more time being required to complete the effort, and it can negatively impact the quality of the materials created.
Managing the effort requires a significant time investment. Management of collaborative document creation efforts is often handled by periodically polling participants to obtain status
information. These efforts typically require frequent meetings and discussions to communicate
changing goals and deadlines. This results in interruptions of the work being done and can also
result in team members having different understandings of goals, responsibilities, and deadlines.
Information sharing among team members is inefficient. In many collaborative document creation efforts, information is shared via e-mail, printed documents, and word of mouth. As we
discussed earlier, this can result in version control issues as these materials are passed around,
collected, and assembled into a final document. This can also result in breakdowns in communication. When information is shared in this way, it is difficult to maintain a unified understanding of the goals, deadlines, and responsibilities of the project. It also makes introducing
new people into the process after it is underway more difficult, since a significant amount of
time would be required to acclimate the new people to the goals, status, location of materials,
and overall understanding of the progress to date.
Staff members do not have access to all the materials they need. After documents are created in
organizations, they are then often made available to a broader audience. These individuals
may be members of a department, the entire company, partners, customers, and so on. The
documents created cannot be effectively used unless they are in a location where they can be
accessed by all of the appropriate people. Also, people need to be made aware of the documents’ existence, so they know about the materials available to them. It is not uncommon in
organizations for information to be placed in network shares or stored locally on a single individual’s computer. When this is the case, all of the people needing the information may not be
able to access the items. When the information is located on a network share, it is available to
individuals on the network. However, access to the information may be slow from remote locations, and the information may not be in a location where people would know to look. People
may also not know the information exists, so they may not look for it at all. When the materials
are stored on a single individual’s computer, the only way for others to gain access to these
items is to be aware they exist and to request them from that person.
Large volumes of outdated information make finding current materials difficult. As new materials
are made available, they are often added to information repositories containing a large number
of outdated materials. These old items were valuable when they were created, but over time, their
information became no longer pertinent. The people that created these items may no longer
remember they exist, may no longer work for the company, or may just have no way to archive
them so that they are saved for historical record but no longer actively available. When new and
old information are intermixed, this results in users having to sift through a large volume of
materials to find information they need, and in some cases, outdated information may be used.
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Needs for Document Management
As we discussed earlier, there are many challenges that can negatively impact the effectiveness of the
teams creating materials, the accuracy of the created materials, and the availability of the materials.
Any of the challenges we discussed previously can have a significant impact on the effectiveness of
document creation efforts and document consumption. SharePoint provides capabilities to help
address these challenges, which include the following:
A single location for document collaboration resources: SharePoint sites are designed to act as a
central repository for all collaboration materials. This repository would contain the following:
• All materials for the effort
• References to other related internal, external, and third-party information
• Communications about the project
• Project and process management information, such as tasks, issues, and status materials
• Content created during the initiative
• Workflow capabilities allowing for the integration of approval processes
This location would also act as the focal point for the management of the associated business
process and be available to all team members regardless of location. It would provide a central
place where any person can go to get information on the status of the project, review the work
done to date, and understand the objectives and goals. Having a central location for all materials also ensures that team members are working on the same and most up-to-date version of
these materials.
The flexibility to support simple and complex document creation processes: SharePoint includes
several standard workflow solutions that can be configured to support business processes, as
we discussed in Chapter 7. Additional workflows can also be created by leveraging the workflow development capabilities found in SharePoint Designer 2007 and Windows Workflow
Foundation. The workflow capabilities can be configured so as not to burden simple document
creation processes with overly complex technical requirements. Conversely, the tools are flexible enough to support complex processes requiring more sophisticated business logic and
technical requirements. These tools can be made to support the defined business process
instead of adjusting the process to support the requirements and limitations of the tools.
The ability to easily locate available information: Being able to quickly and easily locate available
information on a specific topic can significantly increase individual and team effectiveness.
Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 (MOSS) search tools allow you to search across all
enterprise information based on keywords or specific criteria. This can save people time when
researching a specific topic. It can also significantly reduce duplication of effort, since locating
available information will not require any foreknowledge of the information. Locating information will also be done without the need to invest time in querying people or manually sifting
through existing information repositories.
The ability to refresh or retire existing information over time: New information is made available
in organizations every day. As new information is introduced, the volume of available information that needs to be looked through also increases. MOSS includes the capabilities necessary
to define processes and rules to refresh content that should be updated over time, such as policy and procedure materials, or to remove expired content once it is no longer pertinent.
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SharePoint Document Management Solutions
The capabilities of SharePoint Server 2007 and Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 that we discussed in
Chapters 2 through 9 can be brought together to create solutions that can overcome the challenges
and address the document management needs we have been discussing. These capabilities can be
used to create an environment in which teams can work together to create the materials they need
and to make materials available to others.
In order to determine how a SharePoint environment can address document management
needs, we will use the request for proposal (RFP) response example that we mentioned earlier in this
chapter. We will describe the organization of a SharePoint solution that can address the creation and
ongoing management of these materials. We will describe the situation in which the solution will be
used and then outline the components making up the solution. Finally, we will walk through a typical RFP response creation and management process to demonstrate how the environment would be
used.
nNote The solutions described in this chapter leverage only those capabilities native to SharePoint and configurable through the standard SharePoint interface. There are many ways to extend the existing capabilities, using
products like SharePoint Designer, and to introduce additional capabilities through the use of other Microsoft and
third-party tools. We will make note of some of the areas that can be enhanced through the use of additional tools
as we discuss the RFP response example.
RFP Response Requirements
In our document management example, we will assume our organization frequently responds to
requests for proposals (RFPs) to obtain business. We will also assume that our organization has
several distributed offices. Our goal will be to provide an RFP response solution that allows our
organization to quickly respond to RFPs while making sure our responses meet the quality standards of our organization. Additionally, we need to allow distributed RFP response teams to work
together as effectively as teams having all members based in the same location. We will also assume
that previously completed RFP responses will be made available for future reference. However, after
one year from the time they are created, it is assumed that the RFP responses are no longer current
enough to be useful, so they should be removed.
To meet the listed goals, we are assuming that our RFP response solution must allow for the
following:
• People from any location must be able to participate in the RFP response creation process.
• Team members must be able to easily locate information available within the organization
that could be used during the creation of the RFP response, including previously created RFP
responses.
• Materials and communications related to the RFP response development process must be
centrally managed.
• Process management tools such as objectives, task assignments, schedules, and status information must be available to all team members and management staff during the RFP
creation process.
• Completed RFP responses must be made available for use by others.
• One year after an RFP response has been completed, it must expire, so that it is no longer
available for reference.
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SharePoint Solution Components
Our SharePoint RFP response solution will leverage many of the SharePoint capabilities that we discussed in Chapters 2 through 9. Our sample solution will use the following components:
• Sites: Sites will provide the primary storage and access point for all of the resources that we
will be creating and using during the RFP response development process and to make completed RFP responses available. (We discussed sites in Chapter 2.)
• MOSS search capabilities: The MOSS search capabilities will allow us to locate information
we can use when developing a response to an RFP. (We discussed MOSS search capabilities
in Chapter 3.)
• Lists: We will use several types of lists to track information and manage communication for
the development of RFP responses. (We discussed lists in Chapters 4 and 5.)
• Libraries: Documents and images needed during the development of RFP responses will be
stored in document and picture libraries. Final RFP responses will also be stored in a document library. (We discussed libraries in Chapter 6.)
• Workflow: We will use the workflows that come with WSS and MOSS to support the RFP creation and approval process. (We discussed workflow in Chapter 7.)
• Web parts: We will use several of the web parts that come with WSS and MOSS to support our
RFP response process. (We discussed web parts in Chapter 8.)
• Alerts: Alerts will be used to notify individuals when information within their RFP response
sites has changed. (We discussed alerts in Chapter 9.)
RFP Response Process Definition
The types of components that we discussed earlier will be combined to create the RFP response
solution to support our organization’s RFP response process. The following steps outline the highlevel flow of events that make up our organization’s RFP response process:
1. The team of people responsible for the creation of the RFP response is identified. This team
will include the following members:
a. Sales representative: Responsible for the overall RFP response creation and for communicating with the company that sent the RFP. The sales representative is the conduit
between the company sending the RFP and the individuals responsible for creating the
response. The sales representative will be responsible for adding the pricing information to the RFP response based on the products and services outlined by the analyst
and designer. This person will also be the one to deliver the RFP response back to the
company that sent the RFP.
b. Analyst: Responsible for determining the products and services needed to address the
requirements outlined in the RFP. The analyst is also responsible for completing the
offerings section of the RFP response.
c. Designer: Responsible for creating estimates for services, detailing licensing requirements, and providing any solution design details required based on the products and
services identified by the analyst.
2. The sales representative will initiate the process by creating the site for the RFP response. As
part of this step, the sales representative will populate objectives, tasks, timelines, and any
relevant documents. This includes finding related, previously created RFP responses to use
as examples.
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3. The analyst will identify the products and services that are needed to address the requirements listed in the RFP. If any additional information must be requested from the issuer of
the RFP to determine these needs, the analyst will work through the sales representative to
get this information.
4. The designer will create service estimates and add any design-related information to the
products and services listed by the analyst. The designer will request additional information
from the analyst if any clarification is needed on the products and services information created by the analyst.
5. The analyst will write the offering’s description in the RFP response document based on the
information compiled by the designer.
6. The sales representative will review the information added by the analyst and add the necessary product cost information. The sales representative will also add any additional
references or background information required.
7. The sales representative will initiate the final review process for the document. This review
is performed by the sales manager that the sales representative reports to.
8. The sales representative will update the status of the RFP response document when it is
submitted to the client and then when the business is won or lost.
9. One year after the posting of the RFP response document, the document will be deleted.
SharePoint Environment Layout
We will need to configure several components in our SharePoint environment to address the needs
of our RFP response process. To help determine the configuration of these components, we need to
make certain assumptions about our SharePoint environment. The assumptions we will be making
include the following:
• We have a SharePoint environment that includes both Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 and
SharePoint Server 2007.
• MOSS searching and indexing have been configured for our environment. For the purposes
of this sample, there will not need to be any specific content included in the search results.
However, to deploy a similar solution into a production environment, you would need
searching and indexing configured so that all relevant materials within SharePoint and in
other repositories within your organization could be searched using the MOSS search. A
technical administrator of the environment would need to configure this.
• The top-level portal for the environment is based on the collaboration portal template.
The layout that we will be using in our RFP response process sample includes the following
components:
• Resources site: This site will be created under the portal home to contain general resources
that are being made available to the organization. These resources may include phone directories, access to enterprise applications, references to enterprise materials, and so on. For
our RFP response environment, we will use the Resources site to reference a Presentation
Materials site that contains graphics, logos, and other resources approved by the organization for use when creating new materials, such as RFP responses.
• Sales site: This site is created under the portal home to contain all resources that are relevant to
the company’s sales group. This would include all references to sites, external content, materials,
and so on that sales personnel would find valuable. For our RFP response environment, this site
will include a reference to an RFP Responses site where RFP response resources will be managed.
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• Presentation Materials site: Referenced from the Resources site, this site contains the
resources provided by the organization for use when creating new materials. This can
include graphics, logos, company description information, templates, general references,
and the like. For the purposes of our example, we will be using the Presentation Materials
site to manage graphics, such as company logos and charts, and standard text items, such as
a company description and product descriptions. In our example, this site will contain the
following components:
• Presentation Materials library: This document library will be used to store and organize
standard materials for use when creating new documents. This will include company
details, product descriptions, references, testimonials, templates, and so on.
• Presentation Graphics library: This picture library will be used to store and organize
standard company graphics, including company logos, charts, and other graphics.
• Contacts list: This contacts list references the individuals responsible for the materials
stored in this site. This information makes it easy for people to identify and contact the
owners of presentation materials when they have a question about an item or notice
errors in available materials.
• How To list: This custom list will be used to store basic instructions on how to incorporate the presentation materials or presentation graphics into documents and how to
perform other tasks related to using these materials.
• RFP Response site: Referenced from the Sales site, this site contains all RFP responses created by
the company. It will also contain the document workspaces that were used to facilitate the creation of these RFP responses. In our example, this site will contain the following components:
• Document workspaces: Created as part of the RFP response process, these workspaces
are based on the Document Workspace template we discussed in Chapter 2.
• RFP Responses library: This document library contains the completed RFP response
documents created in response to previous RFPs.
• Document Workspace template: The default Document Workspace template will be used to
create workspaces that will be located within the RFP Response site. These workspaces will
be used to manage the resources needed to support the creation of specific RFP responses.
In our example, this site will contain the following resources:
• Shared Documents library: This document library will contain materials being collected
or created for an RFP response. For our example, this library will include estimate
sheets, presentations, the original RFP, and the RFP response being created.
• Announcements lists: This announcements list will contain any news around the RFP
response of which the RFP response team should be aware. This may include
announcements concerning extensions to deadlines, updates to available resources, or
notifications of team assignment changes.
• Contacts list: This contacts list will contain relevant contact information related to the
RFP response. This would include the RFP issuer’s information as well as any additional
contacts provided by the issuer. It would also include contact information for members
of the RFP response team.
• Events list: This events list will contain information about any events related to the RFP
response. This would include any meetings being held to review RFP content, the RFP
due date, meetings to present the RFP response to the customer, and so on.
• Links list: This links list will contain references to any web sites related to the RFP
response. This list would include references to the RFP issuer’s Internet site and references to any third-party Internet resources relevant to the response creation process.
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• Tasks list: This tasks list will contain all the tasks assignments for the creation of the RFP
response.
• General Discussion discussion board: This discussion board will be used to manage
communications between the team members concerning the RFP response.
Figure 10-1 depicts the layout of these resources.
Figure 10-1. RFP Response resource layout
In order for you to walk through the RFP response process as we describe it, these resources
must be configured within your SharePoint environment. The following steps outline how to configure these resources. For details around the specifics of how to perform any of the described
configuration tasks, you can refer to the chapter that discusses the specific item.
Create and Configure the Resources Site
The Resources site will contain materials used by people across the organization. For our example,
this site will reference the Presentation Materials site that contains the graphics and documents
to be used when creating corporate materials such as presentations or client documentation.
Figure 10-2 depicts the desired layout of the Resources site.
The following steps describe how to create and configure the Resources site:
1. Create the Resources site.
a. Create the site under the Portal home site.
b. Base the site on the Blank Site template.
c. Display this site on the top link bar of the parent site.
d. Use the top link bar from the parent site.
2. Configure the Resources site by selecting to show subsites in the site’s navigation settings.
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Figure 10-2. The Resources site
Creating and Configuring the Presentation Materials Site
The Presentation Materials site contains all standard documents and graphics for use when creating
new corporate materials. Figure 10-3 depicts the desired layout of the Presentation Materials site.
Figure 10-3. The Presentation Materials site
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The following steps describe how to create and configure the Presentation Materials site:
1. Create the Presentation Materials site.
a. Create the site under the Resources site.
b. Base the site on the Blank Site template.
c. Display this site on the Quick Launch area of the parent site.
d. Use the top link bar of the parent site.
2. Create the Presentation Materials document library.
a. Base the Presentation Materials document library on the Document Library type.
b. Select to display the library on the Quick Launch area.
3. Configure the Presentation Materials document library.
a. Create a column called Category that is a Choice type, and make it required. The choices
for Category should be set to Company Details, General Inserts, Product Description,
and References and Testimonials. This column should be saved with no default value.
nNote
Notice we listed the Choice values in alphabetical order. This is done so that the options will be listed
alphabetically when they appear in solution lists.
b. Create a column called Owner that is a Person or Group type, and make it required.
c. Update the All Documents view by placing the Category column in Position 3 and placing the Owner column in Position 4.
d. Create a new standard view called By Category, make it the default view and include the
following columns: Type, Name (linked to document), Owner, Modified, and Modified
By. Sort by Name (linked to document), and group by Category with the group
expanded.
e. Create a new standard view called By Category Collapsed, and include the following
columns: Type, Name (linked to document), Owner, Modified, and Modified By. Sort by
Name (linked to document), and group by Category with the group collapsed.
4. Create the Presentation Graphics library.
a. Base the Presentation Graphics library on the Picture Library type.
b. Select to display the library in the Quick Launch area.
5. Configure the Presentation Graphics library.
a. Create a column called Category that is a Choice type, and make it required. The
choices for Category should be set to Company Details, General Inserts, Product
Descriptions, and References and Testimonials. This column should be saved with no
default value.
b. Create a column called Owner that is a Person or Group type, and make it required.
Only allow for the selection of people, allow for the selection from all users, and show
the name with presence information.
c. Update the All Pictures view by placing the Category column in Position 9 and placing
the Owner column in Position 10.
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d. Create a new standard view called By Category, make it the default view, and include the
following columns: Selection Checkbox (select a picture), Type (icon linked to document),
Name (linked to display items), Owner, Picture Size, File Size, and Required Field (must be
selected for picture library details view). Sort by Name (linked to display items), and
group by Category with the group expanded.
e. Create a new standard view called By Category Collapsed, and include the following
columns: Selection Checkbox (select a picture), Type (icon linked to document), Name
(linked to display items), Owner, Picture Size, File Size, and Required Field (must be
selected for picture library details view). Sort by Name (linked to display items), and
group by Category with the group collapsed.
6. Create the Contacts list.
a. Base the Contacts list on the Contacts list template.
b. Select to display the list in Quick Launch.
7. Create the How To list.
a. Base the How To list on the Custom list template.
b. Select to display the list in Quick Launch.
8. Configure the How To list.
a. Create a column called Details that is a “Multiple lines of text” type, and make it
required. This column should allow rich text.
b. Update the All Items view, so that it displays Attachments, Title (linked to item), and
Details. Select to sort by Title (linked to item).
c. Create a new standard view called Titles Only, and include Attachments and Title
(linked to item). Sort by Title (linked to item).
9. Update the Presentation Materials site page.
a. Remove the Site Image web part from the page.
b. Place the Presentation Materials library web part in the left zone, and choose to display
the By Category Collapsed view and to use the summary toolbar.
c. Place the Presentation Graphics library web part in the left zone below the Presentation
Materials library web part, and choose to display the By Category Collapsed view and to
use the summary toolbar.
d. Place the How To list web part in the right zone, and choose to display the Titles Only
view and to use the summary toolbar.
e. Place the Summary Links web part in the right zone below the How To list web part, and
set the title to Links.
f. Place the Contacts list web part in the right zone below the summary links web part.
10. Add the following content to the Presentation Materials library; this content will be used in
the RFP response process walk-through that follows.
a. A company background Word document named Company Background. Set the Category to Company Details, and pick an owner.
b. A company value-add proposition Word document named Company Value-Add. Set the
Category to Company Details, and pick an owner.
c. One or more reference Word and Excel documents. Set the Category to References and
Testimonials.
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11. Add the following content to the Presentation Graphics library. This content will be used in
the RFP response process walk-through that follows.
a. A company offerings JPG or GIF image named Offerings. Set the Category value to Company Details, and pick an owner.
b. A company logo JPG or GIF image named Company Logo. Set the Category value to
Company Details, and pick an owner.
12. Add any additional relevant documents, pictures, contact information, how-to instructions,
and links to the site resources.
Creating and Configuring the Sales Site
The Sales site will contain sales-related resources and is the entry point into the RFP response
process for our example. Figure 10-4 depicts the desired layout of the Sales site.
Figure 10-4. The Sales site
The following steps describe how to create and configure the Sales site:
1. Create the Sales site.
a. Create the site under the Portal home site.
b. Base the site on the Blank Site template.
c. Display this site on the top link bar of the parent site.
d. Use the top link bar from the parent site.
2. Configure the Sales site by selecting to show subsites in the site navigation settings.
Creating and Configuring the RFP Responses Site
The RFP Responses site will contain all workspaces created to manage specific RFP responses. This
site will also contain documentation related to the RFP response policies and procedures. Figure 10-5
depicts the desired layout of the RFP Responses site.
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Figure 10-5. The RFP Responses site
The following steps describe how to create and configure the RFP Responses site:
1. Create the RFP Responses site.
a. Create the site under the Sales site.
b. Base the site on the Blank Site template.
c. Display the site in the Quick Launch area of the parent site.
d. Use the top link bar of the parent site.
2. Create the RFP Responses document library.
a. Base the RFP Responses document library on the Document Library type.
b. Select to display the library in the Quick Launch area.
3. Configure the RFP Responses document library.
a. Create a column called Status that is a Choice type, and make it required. The choices
for Status should be set to In Development, Submitted, Won, and Lost. Set the default
value to In Development.
b. Create a column called Client that is a “Single line of text” type, and make it required.
c. Create a column called Project that is a “Single line of text” type, and make it required.
d. Create a column called Sales Representative that is a Person or Group type, and make it
required. Allow for only the selection of people, allow for the selection from all users,
and show the name with the presence information.
e. Create a column called Response Due that is a Date and Time type, and make it
required. This column should be set to Date Only.
f. Update the All Documents view by placing the Status column in Position 3, placing the
Client column in Position 4, placing the Project column in Position 5, placing the Sales
Representative column in Position 6, and placing the Response Due column in Position 7.
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g. Create a new standard view called By Client, make it the default view, and include the
following columns: Type, Name (linked to document), Status, Project, Sales Representative, and Response Due. Select to sort by Status and Project and group by Client with the
group expanded.
h. Create a new standard view called By Status, and include the following columns: Type,
Name (linked to document), Client, Project, Sales Representative, and Response Due.
Select to sort by Client and Project and group by Status with the group expanded.
i. Edit the library’s document template. The template is a Word document. It should be
edited so that it represents a document template for a new RFP response. This template
should include the sections that make up an RFP response organized into the layout of
a standard response. It should also include any standard text that should be part of any
RFP response.
j. Update the versioning settings of the library, so that content approval is required and
versioning is enabled, allowing for major and minor versions to be created.
k. Create an approval workflow in the library called Manager Approval, allowing the workflow to be manually started. This should be a serial workflow with the department’s
sales manager assigned as the approver. On completion, this workflow should set the
document’s approval status.
l. Create a disposition workflow in the library called RFP Expiration, allowing the workflow to be manually started.
m. Create an information management policy with a statement of Remove Old RFP Responses,
and select Enable Expiration. Set the retention period to one year after the response due
date. Set the policy to start the RFP Expiration workflow when the item expires.
nCaution
Setting the information management policy to delete documents will remove the item from the
environment when the time interval is reached. In your production environment, you may wish to create a more
sophisticated policy that moves a document to an archive location instead of simply deleting it.
4. Update the RFP Response site page by placing the RFP Response library web part in the left
zone, and selecting to display the By Client view and to use the full toolbar.
The resources needed for the RFP response process are now configured.
RFP Response Process Walk-Through
Now that we have configured the resources needed for the RFP response process, we can discuss
the steps to follow when creating a new RFP response. During this discussion, we will describe how
each of the sites that you configured previously is used during the RFP response process. We will
describe how people in each of the roles listed earlier (sales representative, analyst, and designer)
will work together to create the RFP response.
When we walk through the RFP response process we will assume the following:
• An RFP has been received from a client or potential client. For the purposes of our example,
we will call this company DataLan Corporation.
• The team of people that will be involved in the process has been identified.
• The entire organization is authorized to view the materials in an RFP response site, but only
the individuals defined as the response creation team can edit information within the site.
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The following steps describe the process that we will walk through to develop the response for
the RFP received from DataLan Corporation:
1. Assuming the role of the sales representative, create a new RFP response document for the
received RFP.
a. Create a new document in the RFP Responses document library of the RFP Responses
site called DataLan Ideation using the New Document option in the library’s menu.
b. Add general information to the document, such as client names, headers, and any necessary details.
c. Save the new document, and during the save, add appropriate values to the document
properties presented. Table 10-1 shows the values to set for each listed property.
Table 10-1. DataLan Ideation Attributes
Column
Value
Status
In Development
Client
DataLan Corporation
Project
Enterprise Ideation
Sales Representative
Name of the sales representative responsible for the RFP response
Response Due
1/01/08
2. The sales representative creates a new document workspace to facilitate the creation of the
RFP response. The new workspace will be created using the Create Document Workspace
option from the DataLan Ideation document context menu.
3. The sales representative adds all initial information to the DataLan Ideation document
workspace:
a. Grant the analyst and the designer Contribute permission within the site using the
Members web part. When adding these individuals, select to send them an e-mail about
the new site, and in the e-mail body, describe that they have been selected to be part of
the team for creating the DataLan Ideation RFP response. The team members will then
go to the site to review the information about the received RFP.
b. Grant Domain Users Read permission within the site using the Members web part.
c. Configure versioning on the library. This should include the ability to create both major
and minor versions.
d. Add the received RFP from DataLan Corporation to the site.
e. Add a link to the Links list that references the Presentation Materials site. If you do not
know the URL for the Presentation Materials site, you can navigate to the site and copy
the URL from the web browser’s address bar.
f. Add a link to the Links list that references the issuer’s web site, http://www.datalan.com,
and call this link DataLan Internet Site.
g. Add the tasks that must be done to create the RFP response to the Tasks list. Table 10-2
lists the tasks that should be created.
h. The sales representative updates the General Discussion board to accept incoming
e-mails and sets the e-mail address as DatalanRFP.
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Table 10-2. Task List Values
Title
Assigned To
Start Date
Due Date
Add company background, value proposition
information, and references.
Sales representative
12/01/2007
12/04/2007
Determine products and services needed to
address RFP needs.
Analyst
12/05/2007
12/08/2007
Compile service time estimates and product
licensing requirements needed to support
the defined products and services.
Designer
12/09/2007
12/14/2007
Enter products’ and services’ detailed
descriptions into the RFP response.
Analyst
12/15/2007
12/18/2007
Add costs for products and services.
Sales representative
12/19/2007
12/21/2007
Post response for approval.
Sales representative
12/22/2007
12/23/2007
nNote
The creation and configuration of the site where the RFP is managed can be automated, eliminating these
setup steps. This would require assistance from technical staff equipped to create more complex SharePoint solutions leveraging SharePoint Designer 2007 or Visual Studio development tools.
4. The sales representative checks out the RFP response document and adds the background,
value proposition information, and references.
a. Click the presentation materials link to go to the Presentation Materials site, and insert
any necessary text from company background, value proposition, and references into
the RFP response.
b. Add any other information you require to the introduction of the RFP response document. Information needed may be found in similar, past RFP responses. You can do a
search to locate these items or browse through them in the RFP Responses site.
c. Once all of the necessary information has been added, check in the document as a
minor version.
5. The sales representative updates the Percent Complete column to 100% and sets the status
to Completed for the “Add company background, value proposition information and references” task.
6. The analyst goes to the site to define the products and services that are needed to respond
to the RFP. As part of this process, the analyst will have to request additional information
needed to complete the product and service needs defined.
a. The analyst sends an e-mail to the General Discussion board, DataLanRFP, and the sales
representative with a subject of “Additional Information Needed” and a body listing several pieces of information required to determine the product and service requirements.
b. The sales representative receives the e-mail, and obtains the required information from
the client. The sales representative will then reply to all on the e-mail including the
requested information in the body of the message.
c. The analyst receives the e-mail and will review the information provided in the
response from the sales representative.
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nNote
This discussion is sent to the e-mail address of the General Discussion board, so that the conversation
between the sales representative and the analyst is recorded for future reference and is made available to all team
members.
7. Now, acting as the analyst, create a document that lists the products and services to be
included in the RFP response.
a. Create a new document called Products and Services, and place this document in the
Shared Documents library on the DataLan Ideation RFP response workspace.
b. Check out the Products and Services document, and update it so that it contains the
products and services needed to respond to the RFP request.
c. Once all updates have been made to the Products and Services document, check it back
into the library.
8. The analyst updates the percent complete column to 100% and sets the Status to Completed for the “Determine products and services needed to address RFP needs” task.
9. The designer goes to the site to review the products and services information created by the
analyst. The designer determines the service time estimates and the product licensing necessary to support this information.
a. The designer checks out the Products and Services document, and adds service time
estimates and product license details.
b. Once finished, the designer checks in the document. We check out the document and
then check it back in instead of just editing it, so that everyone will know who is currently
working on the document and to make sure that no one else uses the document while the
designer is making edits. With the document checked out, the designer can save and close
the document while keeping it checked out so that others cannot make changes.
10. The designer updates the percent complete column to 100% and sets the Status to Completed for the “Compile service time estimates and product licensing requirements needed
to support the defined products and services” task.
11. The analyst goes to the site to update the RFP Response document with information from
the Products and Services document.
a. Check out and update the RFP Response document, adding information that was created
as part of the Product and Services document. Organize this information to fit within the
RFP response structure.
b. Insert the Offerings images into the RFP response from the Presentation Graphics
library in the Presentation Materials site. This is done by having the DataLan Ideation
RFP response document open, selecting the Offerings images from the Presentation
Graphics library, and using the Send To option to insert the image into the document.
c. Once finished making edits, check in the RFP response document.
12. The analyst updates the percent complete column to 100% and sets the Status to Completed
for the “Enter products and services detailed descriptions into the RFP response” task.
13. The sales representative opens the RFP response document and adds the product and services costs.
14. The sales representative updates the percent complete column to 100% and sets the Status
column to Completed for the “Add costs for products and services” task.
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nNote
Real-time communication capabilities can be incorporated into the SharePoint environment by configuring Microsoft Live Communications Server. This would enable the team to ask questions and discuss the process
through real-time communication, or chat, using MSN Messenger or Communicator. This would also add team
member presence information to the environment, allowing team members to see the availability of other team
members.
15. The sales representative publishes the DataLan Ideation RFP response document back to
the source document.
16. The sales representative updates the percent complete column to 100% and sets the Status
column to Completed for the “Post response for approval” task.
17. The sales representative initiates the approval workflow for the RFP response document
posted back to the RFP Responses library.
18. The sales manager receives an e-mail stating that there is an RFP response requiring his or
her review and approval.
19. The sales manager reviews the RFP response and approves it.
20. The sales representative is notified of the document’s final approval, sends the document to
the client, and sets the document’s status to Submitted.
21. After the business is won or lost, the sales representative updates the status of the DataLan
Ideation document in the RFP Responses library to Won or Lost depending on the outcome.
22. One year after the completion of the RFP response, SharePoint will automatically delete the
DataLan Ideation document from the RFP Responses library.
nNote
The workflow processes discussed could be enhanced by creating custom workflows, enabling the entire
process to be automated including the creation, configuration, and clean-up of the response workspace. These
workflows can also be configured to send notifications to individuals when they are required to start a task as part
of the RFP process.
Figure 10-6 shows the final RFP Responses site after the RFP response has been created.
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Figure 10-6. The final RFP Responses site
Figure 10-7 shows the final DataLan Ideation RFP response workspace.
Figure 10-7. The final DataLan Ideation RFP Response workspace
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Benefits of SharePoint Document Management
Solutions
There are several benefits that your organization can gain by using a SharePoint environment to
support document management processes. These benefits range from saving time and improving
staff efficiency to providing more accurate materials and giving all stakeholders, managers, and
team members exposure into processes and materials.
The benefits that your organization will receive from using your SharePoint environment for
document management solutions will depend on how well the document management capabilities
you include map to business needs. As with any solution, document management capabilities must
map to the business processes that they support, and these solutions must provide value to the
people who are expected to use them. Our RFP response process example describes a simple
process. The configuration of an RFP response process within your organization would need to
leverage the tools necessary to support your specific document management requirements.
Some of the most common benefits that organizations receive by providing document management solutions through their SharePoint environment follow:
• Reduction of document creation life cycle: This is accomplished through the increased effectiveness of the team. Team members are given the following tools:
• A structure in which work can be consolidated and where all materials related to a project, regardless of type (documents, images, tasks, links, and so on) can be stored.
• The ability to create workflows that incorporate the information into their associated
business processes.
• Tools that allow members to be notified of events that occur related to the project,
enabling people to be kept aware of information changes and project status.
• The ability to review and manage the tasks assigned to team members.
• With the use of the portal searching capabilities, the ability to quickly locate needed
materials.
• Improvement of individuals’ effectiveness: This is provided through the following:
• Document management solutions allow individuals to easily participate in document
creation and management efforts at any point in these processes.
• These solutions reduce the need for frequent meetings on document creation initiatives, which optimizes the use of individuals’ time.
• Since these solutions are web-based, individuals participating in processes may be
selected based on their skill sets and availability instead of their physical proximity to
the other team members.
• Having all materials centrally located allows for much easier information management
and retrieval.
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• Inclusion of external individuals in business processes: Facilitating your document management efforts through your SharePoint environment allows for the following.
• It not only allows you to include distributed individuals within your company in the
process but also allows you to include individuals who are external to your organization, such as third-party partners, consultants, customers, and staff at subsidiaries.
These individuals can directly participate in the process, leveraging the same tools as
those used by internal staff.
• It allows all participants to share a common experience when working on a project
regardless of their physical location.
• Track and manage processes: Team members and managers in the organization can go to the
SharePoint sites being used to manage a collaborative effort to review the current status and
all current materials related to the effort. This reduces the need to make telephone calls or
send e-mails requesting status information to the various team members. Managers and
team members can view the current status of the effort without negatively impacting its
progress.
• Automate the long-term management of materials: Processes and workflows can be put in
place to handle the renewal or disposition of materials in the organization based on the
long-term management requirements for these items.
• Address auditing and compliance requirements: The auditing capabilities can be configured
to track any aspect of document management and information access allowing for information auditing to be configured so that it is in alignment with any compliance requirements.
Tips for Creating Effective Document Management
Solutions
When building any solution, it is important to make sure that it meets the business needs and provides value to the people using it and the company overall. When deploying document management
solutions within your SharePoint environment, there are several points to keep in mind that can help
ensure that the document management solution meets the desired requirements:
• Leverage the integration points with Microsoft Office applications. This will allow people to
work with materials located in the SharePoint environment using the tools that they are
familiar with, like Word and Excel.
• Automate tasks where possible. Automating document management tasks makes the process
easier for people to use and allows you to provide a higher degree of process efficiency. This
is done by using features such as workflows, and it allows information to be incorporated
directly into the business processes it supports.
• Create a portal and site structure that maps to the way people use the information. It is important to make the navigation structure as intuitive as possible to help facilitate the use of the
environment.
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• Create templates that provide a consistent structure. These templates should be used across
initiatives and include all of the key components needed to support the process. It is important to keep these templates up-to-date as needs change and as better ways of supporting
the initiatives are identified.
• Include all of the resources necessary to support associated processes. As we noted in our walkthrough, it is important to make the process and resources as easy to use as possible to ensure
that they are not perceived by users as being too complicated or as unnecessary burdens.
• Make sure the process provides value to all the people involved. The solutions you create
should provide value to the team members as well as the overall company. This value needs
to be understood by everyone involved.
• Train individuals on the use of the solution and on the overall process. It should not be
assumed that all people involved will know how to use the tools or that they have a full
understanding of the business processes being supported. Regardless of the length of time
the overall process has been in place, it is important to provide training on the process and
on how the tools support the process. Materials should also be provided that people can use
as reference after the training. This will help ensure that everyone involved has the same
understanding of the process and the tools that support the process. Plans should also be
put in place to handle the training of new staff that will join the company and participate in
the process later.
• Monitor the solution’s effectiveness, and make incremental changes where appropriate. It is
rarely the case that a newly deployed process will take into account all potential scenarios
that the process will end up supporting. It is important to monitor the process and the use of
the tools to make any optimizations necessary to address challenges that will be identified
after the solution is deployed.
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Project Collaboration Solutions
M
any information workers spend a significant amount of time working on projects ranging from
small teams being tasked with completing a specific job, such as creating a simple presentation or
updating standard company materials, to multiple individuals working on a complex, long-term
project, like introducing a new product line into the company or creating a five-year corporate plan.
Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 and Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 provide the capabilities necessary to facilitate and manage team-based projects.
In this chapter, we will discuss project collaboration solutions and describe how you can use
SharePoint to support the needs of team-based projects. We will describe a sample project scenario
and step through how a SharePoint-based solution can address the needs of our scenario.
Project Collaboration Overview
It is often very challenging to complete a project so that it meets all desired business objectives, is
finished within the desired time frame, and meets its budget expectations. Projects require the coordination of many types of resources, including people, processes, and information, to meet these
objectives and to be successful. The efficient management, organization, and execution of projects
can have a significant positive impact on an organization’s overall effectiveness and profitability.
Many factors impact, either positively or negatively, the overall success of a project. SharePoint
provides capabilities that enhance and support the project management process to help overcome
common factors that could have a negative impact. These capabilities are designed to support all
aspects of a project including the following:
• Project planning
• Defining the business justification and objectives
• Defining the measures of success
• Organizing the project team
• Assigning tasks
• Creating schedules and milestones
• Providing cost estimates
• Defining deliverables
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• Project execution
• Creating project materials, including deliverables and reference materials
• Managing issues and risks
• Managing tasks
• Managing the scope
• Managing procurement and vendors
• Communicating project-related decisions, status, news, and key metrics
• Releasing final deliverables
• Project closeout
• Archiving project materials for future reference
• Evaluating project successes and failures
From a regulatory compliance assessment to a new product development introduction process,
most projects include these steps. However, the degree to which they are addressed and the formality
around each step will vary based on the needs of the project and the project management approach
used by the organization.
Challenges of Project Collaboration
When people spend a significant portion of their time working on projects, effective project management is needed to ensure the success of active initiatives. Participants must be able to effectively
contribute to the project and their time must be used as efficiently as possible.
SharePoint can help address many challenges that can arise during a project. Some of these
challenges follow:
Difficulty managing project-related information: Project-related information may be scattered
throughout an organization, with all participants having their own copies of the project documents to work from. Other documentation may be stored in shared locations, such as network
drives, and e-mail is often used as the method of disseminating information. All of this leads to
challenges when people need to find materials for the project. A significant amount of time can
be spent looking for information. This can also negatively impact other individuals’ time, since
assistance is often required from other team members to locate items.
Lack of communication: Projects can suffer from a lack of communication among participants.
Whether it is the fault of the participants or the system in place to facilitate the project, communication breakdowns lead to unproductive time and additional risk. Participants may not
know what responsibilities they have. Decisions, scope changes, and updates to objectives are
not broadcast to the people who are impacted. This lack of communication can lead to redundant work, missed deadlines, and frustrated employees. Also, managers and stakeholders may
not have the necessary exposure to the project, which can result in management frustrations.
Coordination of geographically dispersed teams: Ideally, everyone involved in a project would be
in close proximity with each other. However, more frequently this is becoming the exception
rather than the rule. Project teams are increasingly composed of participants in different locations. Organizations want to create project teams based on individuals’ skill sets and availability
instead of their geographic proximity. Time zone differences become an issue when people in
different locations need to work together on the same project. Also, all project materials need to
be accessible by all team members regardless of their locations.
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Lack of visibility into the project: Project sponsors, managers, stakeholders, and team members
all need the ability to review project materials, understand the project status, and be made
aware of changes to the scope and objectives. Key metrics, however, are often not readily available. Instead, the project manager must compile this information on demand, impacting their
time and often impacting the time of others when status information needs to be collected.
Managing changing resources: Ideally, projects would contain a complete and consistent set of
participants who are all available from the start of the project and contribute through to the end.
However, many projects, especially long-term initiatives, often have teams that are more
dynamic, changing over time based on people’s availability and the skills needed at each point of
the project. New participants must be educated on project goals and notified of previous project
decisions, and responsibilities must be reassigned to them. Members leaving the project will
often take the knowledge they have gained with them, which in some cases is not documented,
so it is lost to the rest of the team. They also may be removed in the middle of their tasks, which
then need to be reallocated to other team members. Knowledge transfer during changes in project teams is critical in order to avoid these changes having a negative impact on the project.
Needs for Project Collaboration
Because of the large amount of time spent by employees on projects, the efficiency with which these
projects are run can have a significant impact on your entire organization. The challenges discussed
previously can have detrimental effects on the success of such projects and the overall productivity
of the organization.
SharePoint provides many capabilities that can be used during projects to help mitigate the
affects of the challenges discussed earlier. These include the following abilities:
Providing a central repository for all project materials: Rather than having project information
scattered throughout an organization, SharePoint provides you with a central storage area for
all documents, data, communications, and project management–related information. Storing
project resources in a central repository also provides participants access to tasks, objectives,
decisions, deadlines, and any changes to these items. This offers the following benefits:
• Easier education of new members.
• Reduced time for participants to find information.
• Easier management of the project by the project manager.
• Project oversight information provided to management staff.
Allowing access to project resources from any location: The project resources stored in SharePoint
are available to all involved individuals regardless of their locations. This allows project members
who are in different locations, including those who are traveling and who are not part of your
organization, to effectively participate in the project.
Providing notification of project changes to participants: Project members need to be made
aware of changes to relevant information. This includes changes to their responsibilities, documents, deadlines, objectives, or scope. SharePoint allows for the creation of alerts, so that
participants can be notified of changes.
Providing project exposure to managers and stakeholders: When managers and stakeholders
have a great deal of interest in the outcome of a project, providing them with access to project
materials, including project metrics, can help manage their expectations as the project progresses. These individuals need access to these items without having to request them from the
project manager. SharePoint capabilities allow the introduction of a process to provide these
metrics to stakeholders with little or no work from the project manager, which can reduce extra
demands on the team while ensuring the stakeholders are kept well informed.
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SharePoint Project Collaboration Solutions
Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 and Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 provide many benefits to the management of projects. The components that we have discussed in Chapters 2 through 9
can be combined to enhance the productivity and efficiency of projects in your organization.
In this section, we will walk through the creation of a sample project using the tools available in
SharePoint. The focus will be on addressing the challenges described earlier in an effort to allow for
easier project collaboration and management. This will include the creation and customization of a
team site used to facilitate the project. We will then look at the high-level usage of the solution for
participants in the various project roles.
nNote
The solution described in this chapter leverages only those capabilities configurable through the standard
MOSS and WSS interface. There are many ways to extend these capabilities through the use of SharePoint Designer
2007 and third-party tools. We will make note of some of the places where additional capabilities could be used to
enhance the described solution.
Service Plan Project Requirements
In our example, we will use SharePoint features to facilitate the management of a new project
within our organization. This project will be focused around introducing a service plan offering for
our organization’s products. The project team is performing all of the tasks necessary to design the
makeup of this offering, create the offering, and prepare the organization to deliver the offering.
In our example, we will assume that our organization has several offices and that the project
team members are located across these offices. Our goal is to provide a solution that will allow us to
increase the productivity of the project members to help ensure that the project is successfully
completed on time and within budget. To meet this goal, we must allow for the following needs:
• People from any location must have access to the project information and be able to contribute to the project.
• All project resources must be stored in a single location to ease the burden of searching for
needed materials and to help with project team member transitions. This includes tracking
communications related to the project.
• Project members must have the ability to receive notifications when important documents
are modified or added to the project site. A place for important announcements to be broadcast to the project team must also be provided and allow team members to receive these
announcements.
• All managers and stakeholders must have access to project materials, including key metrics
that allow them to understand the health of the project.
• The project manager must be able to control security of sensitive information.
Service Plan Project Process Definition
Our project sample solution will leverage many of the SharePoint capabilities that we discussed in
Chapters 2 through 9.
The following steps describe the high-level flow of events that will make up our project collaboration process:
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1. A business sponsor approves the initiation of a project to introduce a new service plan offering.
2. The project team is identified, with the following participants:
a. Business sponsor or executive stakeholder: The individual or group who has overall
responsibility for the introduction of the new service plan offering.
b. Project manager: The individual responsible for the day-to-day management of the
project. This person tracks resources, tasks, and budget in an effort to drive the project
towards a successful completion.
c. Project team members: The participants of the project responsible for executing the
tasks that make up the project.
3. The project manager will initiate the project by creating the project site.
4. The project manager will customize the project site to include the SharePoint lists, libraries,
and web parts that will help to facilitate the project.
5. The project manager will grant permissions to the other participants of the project, set up
needed alerts for the project team, and update workflow task assignments.
6. Team members will visit the site to manage materials and communications related to the
introduction of the service plan, including the creation and management of tasks, schedules, documents, contacts, project metrics, and project communications.
7. The site will be used to facilitate the collection of data and information important to the
organization’s decision-making process. Projected costs, expected revenue, and nonmonetary benefits will all be incorporated into the project’s decisions.
8. Business sponsors and other stakeholders will be able to access the site and have access to key
performance indicators and other project metrics, including project costs and hours spent.
9. Deliverables will be finalized and approved. In this example, the deliverable is the completed service plan.
10. After the project is complete, the project site will remain available for historical purposes.
This will allow future projects to reuse any materials created during this project.
SharePoint Environment Layout
There are several SharePoint components we will configure to allow our environment to support the
needs of our service plan creation process.
The layout of the components that we will use in our project collaboration process example
includes the following:
• Projects site: This site will be created under the portal home to contain all sites created to
manage company projects. This site will contain our service plan creation project site as well
as general project resources including document templates for use across projects.
• Project Templates library: This document library will store template documents for use
during projects. This library can include a variety of standard materials that can be
incorporated into projects where appropriate.
• Reference Links list: This links list will contain references to resources outside of the
environment that can be valuable during project initiatives. This may include links to
project management standards or sites containing project resources for use as reference during new projects.
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• Project Template site: Referenced from the Projects site, this site is created to contain the
resources needed to manage projects. This site will later be saved as a site template for use
when creating sites to manage individual projects. We will use the created site template
when creating the Service Plan Offering Introduction site. The Project Template site will
contain the following components:
• Shared Documents library: This document library will store and organize most documents
collected and created during the project. This includes both deliverable documents that
are ultimately sent to executive stakeholders as well as intermediary documents created
during the project to facilitate collaboration.
• Financial Documents library: This document library will store and organize documents
containing sensitive financial information that should only be viewable by project managers and business sponsors. Only the project manager and business sponsors will have
access to this library.
• Announcements list: This announcements list is used to convey important messages to
the project team.
• Contacts list: This contacts list is used to maintain a list of all important project contact
information. In addition to project team members, this list may include vendors, consultants, and customer contacts.
• Calendar list: This calendar list is used to track key events for the project including
meetings and milestones for the project.
• Issues list: This issues tracking list is used to monitor and mitigate issues or potential
risks to the successful completion of the project. These issues must be dealt with by the
project team to ensure the project progresses effectively.
• Links list: This links list will contain references to any related web sites that contain
information relevant to the project.
• Project Details list: This custom list allows project participants to quickly see an
overview of the project status and who to contact for more information.
• Project Metrics list: This custom list contains key metrics for the project, allowing business sponsors an easy way to monitor the progress of the project.
• Tasks list: This project tasks list will be used to maintain the tasks to be completed as
part of the project. This will initially include the high-level tasks and grow as the project
progresses and additional work is identified.
Figure 11-1 depicts the layout of these resources.
Figure 11-1. Service plan offering introduction resources
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In order for us to step through the use of our project collaboration site, we must configure the
resources we have described within our SharePoint environment. The following steps outline how
to configure these resources. For details of the specifics of how to perform any of the described
tasks, you can refer to the earlier chapter that discusses the specific component.
Create and Configure the Projects Site
The Projects site will contain general project templates and reference the sites created to manage
specific projects. Figure 11-2 depicts the desired layout of the Projects site.
Figure 11-2. The Projects site
The following steps describe how to create and configure the Projects site:
1. Create the Projects site.
a. Create the site under the Portal home site.
b. Base the site on the Blank Site template.
c. Display this site on the top link bar of the parent site.
d. Use the top link bar from the parent site.
2. Configure the Projects site.
a. Select to show subsites in the site’s navigation settings.
b. Enable the Office SharePoint Server Publishing site feature.
3. Create the Project Templates library.
a. Base the Project Templates library on the Document Library type.
b. Select to display the library in the Quick Launch area.
4. Configure the Project Templates document library.
a. Create a column called Category that is a Choice type, and make it required. The
choices for Category should be set to Project Management, Requirements, Training
Tools, and User Documentation. This column should be saved with no default value.
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nNote
Notice we listed the Choice values in alphabetical order. This is done so that the options will be listed
alphabetically when they appear in solution lists.
b. Update the All Documents view by placing the Category column in Position 3.
c. Create a new standard view called By Category, make it the default view, and include the
following columns: Type (icon linked to document), Name (linked to document), Modified, and Modified By. Sort the view by Name (linked to document), and group it by
Category with the group expanded.
5. Create the Reference Links list.
a. Base the Reference Links list on the Links list type.
b. Select not to display the list on the Quick Launch area.
6. Update the Projects site page.
a. Remove the Site Image web part.
b. Place the Project Templates library web part in the left zone, and choose to display the
By Category view and use the summary toolbar.
c. Place the Reference Links web part in the right zone.
d. Update the Quick Launch navigation by deleting the Documents, Lists, Discussions and
People, and Groups headers, and rename the Sites header Projects.
7. Add the following content to the Project Templates library:
a. A project plan template Microsoft Project document named Project Plan Template with
Category set to Project Management.
b. A status report template Word document named Status Report Template with Category
set to Project Management.
c. A training plan template Word document named Training Plan with Category set to
Training Tools.
d. A user reference guide template Word document named User Reference Guide with
Category set to User Documentation.
Creating and Configuring the Project Template Site
The Project Template site will contain the resources necessary to manage a project within our environment. This site will be used as the template for creating sites to manage projects. Figure 11-3
depicts the desired layout of the Project Template site.
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Figure 11-3. The Project Template site
The following steps describe how to create and configure the Project Template site:
1. Create the Project Template site.
a. Create the site under the Projects site.
b. Base the site on the Team Site template.
c. Display this site on the Quick Launch area of the parent site.
d. Use the top link bar of the parent site.
2. Configure the Shared Documents library.
a. Enable versioning to allow the creation of major and minor versions.
b. Create a column called Category that is of the Choice type, and make it required. The
choices for the Category column should be set to Deliverables, Project Management,
References, and Status Reports. This column should be saved with no default value.
c. Update the All Documents view by placing the Category column in Position 3.
d. Create a new standard view called By Category, make it the default view, and include the
following columns: Type (icon linked to document), Name (linked to document with
edit menu), Modified, Modified By, and Checked Out To. Sort the view by Name (linked
to document with edit menu), and group it by Category using the expanded view.
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3. Create the Financial Documents library.
a. Base the Financial Documents library on the Document Library type.
b. Select to display the library in the Quick Launch area.
4. Configure the Financial Documents library.
a. Enable versioning to allow the creation of major and minor versions.
b. Change the security to remove all rights to this library except for those of the Hierarchy
Managers, Home Owners, and project manager. Then add only those users requiring
access to this library; grant them the Contribute right.
c. Create a column called Category that is of the Choice type, and make it required. The
choices for the Category column should be set to Invoices, Purchase Orders, Financial
Reports, and Expense Reports. This column should be saved with no default value.
d. Update the All Documents view by placing the Category column in Position 3.
e. Create a new standard view called By Category, make it the default view, and include the
following columns: Type (icon linked to document), Name (linked to document with
edit menu), Modified, Modified By, and Checked Out To. Sort the view by Name (linked
to document with edit menu), and group it by Category using the expanded view.
5. Create the Issues list.
a. Base the Issues list on the Issue Tracking type.
b. Select to display the library in the Quick Launch area.
c. Select to send e-mails when ownership is assigned.
6. Configure the Issues list by updating the choices for the Category column to Business Decision, Project Risk, and Requirements Change. Allow fill-in choices. This column should be
saved with no default value.
7. Create the Project Metrics list.
a. Base the Project Metrics list on the KPI list template.
b. Select to display the list in Quick Launch.
8. Configure the Project Metrics list.
a. Create a new indicator called Project Hours using manually entered information. This
item should have an indicator value of 0. It should have better values set to lower, the
goal value set to 175, and the warning value set to 200.
b. Create a new indicator called Project Cost using manually entered information. This
item should have an indicator value of 0. It should have better values set to lower, the
goal value set to 150,000, and the warning value set to 200,000.
nNote While we are configuring the KPI list to maintain the Project Metrics list information manually, this
information management could be automated, so that it pulls the information directly from existing information
sources.
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9. Create the Project Details list.
a. Base the Project Details list on the Custom list template.
b. Select not to display the list in Quick Launch.
10. Configure the Project Details list.
a. Change the Title column so that it is not required.
b. Create a column called Status that is a Choice type, and make it required. The choices
for the Status column should be Active, Completed, Cancelled, and On Hold, with a
default of Active.
c. Create a column called Project Manager that is a Person or Group type showing People
only and allowing the choice from all users. The Name (with presence) information
should be selected for display.
d. Create a column called Business Sponsor that is a Person or Group type showing People
only and allowing the choice from all users. The Name (with presence) information
should be selected for display.
e. Change the order of the list columns, so that Title is last.
f. Update the All Items view removing the Title and Attachments columns and adding the
Edit (link to edit item) column as the first column in the view.
11. Enter initial data in the Project Details List by adding the records listed in Table 11-1.
Table 11-1. Initial Project Details Values
Column
Value
Status
Active
Project Manager
(None)
Business Sponsor
(None)
12. Update the Tasks list.
a. Configure the list so that e-mails are sent when task ownership is assigned.
b. Create a Gantt view called Gantt View, and make it the default view. This view will
include Title (linked to item with edit menu), Assigned To, Status, Priority, Due Date,
and % Complete. Set the Gantt columns to the correspondingly named columns in the
list. Sort the view by Start Date and Due Date.
13. Update the Project Template site page.
a. Remove the Site Image web part.
b. Place the Project Details list view web part in the right zone at the top. Set Toolbar Type
to No Toolbar and Selected View to All Items.
c. Place the Key Performance Indicators web part in the right zone below the Project
Details web part. Set the web part to use the Project Metrics list as the indicator list.
d. Place the Tasks list view web part in the left zone under the Calendar web part. Change
the title to My Tasks, and set the selected view to the My Tasks view.
e. Delete the default list item from the Announcements list.
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14. Prepare the site as the site template used under the Projects site.
a. Save the Project Template site as a site template including content with the name set to
Project Site Template and the file name as ProjectSiteTemplate.
b. Update the Projects site Page Layouts and Site Templates settings, so that sites can only
be created under this site using the Project Site Template site template.
nCaution
In the initial release of SharePoint 2007, changes made to list viewing web parts on web part pages are
not retained after saving the site as a template. This includes changing the views presented, updating the Toolbar
Type, and changing the Chrome Type. For more information refer to http://support.microsoft.com/
default.aspx/kb/926284.
The resources needed for the project collaboration process are now configured.
Service Plan Project Process Walk-Through
Having created and configured the SharePoint environment described previously, we will now
describe the project flow that would be followed to create the service plan offering. We will discuss
how each of the SharePoint components mentioned previously can assist you during the project
collaboration process.
When we walk through the project process, we will assume the following:
• Our organization is a product-based company.
• At the current time, our company does not offer a service plan for its products, but it has
been decided that we should pursue this as an offering.
• The executive team has designated one of their members as the business sponsor, and the
project manager and project team members have been identified.
• The project manager and business sponsors have defined the initial schedule and budget for
the project.
The following steps describe the process that we will walk through to develop the service plan
offering based on the preceding assumptions:
1. The project manager will create the Service Plan Offering Introduction project site.
a. The site will be created under the Projects site.
b. The site will be created based on the Project Site template.
c. The site will leverage unique permissions.
2. The project manager will perform initial site configuration tasks.
a. Configure the Team Discussion list to receive e-mails, and give it an e-mail address of
ServicePlanOfferings.
b. Create alerts for all team members to be notified immediately of new items added to
the Announcements list.
c. Create daily summary alerts for all team members for Shared Documents library updates.
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3. The project manager will add all initial information to the project site.
a. The Project Metrics list details are updated as the project progresses. This will be done
by editing the Project Hours and Project Cost indicators. You can update these indicators as described in Table 11-2.
Table 11-2. Project Metrics Values
Indicator
Value
Project Hours
180
Project Cost
110,000
b. The Project Details list details are updated as described in Table 11-3.
Table 11-3. Project Details Values
Column
Value
Status
Active
Project Manager
Seth Bates
Business Sponsor
Tony Smith
c. Add the Project Plan document to the Shared Documents library. Specify the Category
as Project Management.
d. Add a link to the Links list that references the corporate web site page containing the
company’s products.
4. The project manager sets the security for the site.
a. Project manager has Full Control to the site.
b. Project team members have Contribute permissions in the site.
c. Business sponsor and executive stakeholders have Contribute permissions in the site.
5. The project manager adds the tasks to the Tasks list as defined in Table 11-4.
Table 11-4. Tasks List Values
Title
Assigned To
Start Date
Due Date
Create initial service plan document
Project manager
11/01/2007
11/02/2007
Determine services needed as part of
the service plan offering
Team member
11/03/2007
11/05/2007
Construct service plan offering
Team member
11/05/2007
11/15/2007
Create cost structure for service plan offering
Team members
11/15/2007
11/17/2007
11/21/2007
Train staff on service plan offering services
Team member
11/18/2007
Create marketing materials for service plan
Team member
11/22/2007
11/25/2007
Project closeout
Project manager
11/26/2007
11/27/2007
385
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6. The team members receive notifications that tasks have been added and go to the site to
view the new tasks.
7. The process of creating the service plan offering will proceed as participants on the project
accomplish their tasks and collaborate with other individuals.
a. As tasks are worked on, the user to whom the task is assigned will use the Shared Documents library to store draft documents. This includes a draft document outlining the
service and products needed to support the service plan. These documents are categorized using the columns created earlier to allow users to more easily find and manage
the documents.
b. When tasks are completed, their Status and % Complete information is updated,
thereby notifying other participants through the SharePoint alerts.
c. The project manager will add announcements and events to the appropriate lists during
the course of the project, as well as keep the Project Metrics list details current to reflect
the progress of the project team.
d. All team members will contribute to the Contacts list in an effort to ensure that all
project-related contacts are captured.
e. Team members will create issues in the issues list as risks and challenges arise that
could negatively impact the project.
f. As topics around the project need to be discussed, the team members will e-mail the
information to the people participating in the discussion as well as to the Team Discussion list.
g. During this process, the business sponsors are able to access the site to view the progress
of the project via the Project Metrics list on the site’s home page. The business sponsor is
also able to see the progress of the team by reviewing the draft service plan documents.
nNote
Real-time communication capabilities can be incorporated into the SharePoint environment by configuring
Microsoft Live Communications Server. This would enable the team to ask questions and discuss the process through
real-time communication, or chat, using MSN Messenger or Communicator. This would also add team member presence information to the environment, allowing team members to see the availability of other team members.
8. After the project is complete the project manager will close out the project by updating the
Status column of the Project Details list item to Completed.
nNote
This example uses standard SharePoint components for project collaboration and management. For more
enhanced project management capabilities, you can leverage Project Server 2007, which is also part of the 2007
Microsoft Office System. Project Server 2007 integrates with SharePoint 2007 in order to provide more advanced
project management capabilities, such as enterprise resource management and business intelligence reporting
and analysis.
Figure 11-4 shows the Service Plan Offering Introduction site as it would appear during the
project described previously.
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Figure 11-4. The Service Plan Offering Introduction site
Benefits of SharePoint Project Collaboration
Solutions
There are many benefits that can be gained from introducing SharePoint-based project collaboration and management solutions into an organization. The benefits that an organization will receive
depend on the process and solution introduced.
The following are some of the most common benefits organizations receive from introducing
SharePoint project management solutions:
Increase collaboration efficiency and information reliability: Centrally storing project-related
materials and correspondence reduces the amount of time people spend looking for project
information and ensures they are all working with the same materials. This allows people to be
able to review all correspondence that has occurred around the project.
• New team members have a single point of reference for information related to the project in order to quickly acclimate themselves to an active project.
• The team members leaving the project do not take all of their knowledge with them,
since this information is maintained in a central location.
• Visibility into the project allows managers and stakeholders to better gauge the status
and overall health of the project.
• Providing access to information through SharePoint sites alleviates the need for project
managers to compile and disperse project metrics to business sponsors and executives,
freeing up their time to focus on the management of the project effort.
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Provide project notifications: As project members are working on a project, it is important to
keep these individuals informed of changes that could impact their work. Having the ability for
individuals to be notified of key project information changes is important and allows all participants to be kept aware of changes in project status.
Allow remote individuals to participate more actively: Managing a project through SharePoint
allows for the inclusion of external individuals like partners or customers in the process. Allowing partners or customers to access the project repository and contribute to the information
allows these individuals to have the same level of participation in the project as those located
within your organization. This reduces the potential for miscommunications or transition
delays.
Improve communications: Keeping team members informed of decisions, changes, and projects status reduces the chances of inefficiencies in the project. The chances of redundant or
extraneous effort are diminished when this information is continually available to all interested parties.
Use existing productivity tools: If you already use Microsoft Office applications to create documents and perform personal productivity tasks, SharePoint technologies allow you to continue
to use these tools while expanding their capabilities to include the project and team collaboration capabilities described in this chapter.
Tips for Creating Effective Project Collaboration
Solutions
When creating project collaboration solutions, it is important that the solution maps to the project
management process and facilitates the successful completion of the project. Keep in mind the following points when creating project collaboration solutions:
Incorporate change management: New solutions intended to improve processes within an
organization require change management to succeed. When people are comfortable performing their tasks the current way, they may be uncomfortable or resistant to changing how they
work. For the introduction of the solution to be successful, a change management plan should
be incorporated. This plan should not only provide training but also ensure that all types of
users have the proper level of representation in defining the process and verifying that the
process benefits all those involved. If the change management around a new solution is not
properly managed, those involved are likely to resist adopting it, thereby not receiving the
potential benefits.
Provide managers and stakeholders with visibility into the project: It is extremely important that
everyone involved in the project, from the business sponsor to the team members, have access
to the information they need when they need it. Allowing executives to access the project
materials and to review project status information and other key metrics allows these individuals to keep informed. It also ensures that everyone has a shared vision of project objectives,
timelines, issues, and status.
Ensure remote access is available: Allowing project team members to contribute to the project
regardless of location can reduce the duration of tasks and allow project members to continually be involved in the collaboration processes. In addition to providing access to remote team
members, you have the ability to grant partners and customers access allowing them to
directly participate in the project.
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Index
nA
accessing
list page, 118
My Site, 333
New Basic Page screen, 298
Pages library, 62
Site Content and Structure page, 97
site usage reports (MOSS), 100
sites through mobile links, 26
Workflows page, 276
Active Directory user or group, assigning
permission levels to, 36–37
Activity Duration Report, 279
Add a Workflow page, 274
Add Column screen, 131
Add Web Parts dialog, 319
adding
alerts, 331
attendees to attendees lists, 201
colleagues, 336
columns to lists, 131
documents to document library, 213–214
forms to form library, 233
heading to Quick Launch, 42
incoming e-mail handling to document
library, 228
items to lists, 118
links
to My Links, 340
to navigation bar, 44
to Quick Launch, 43
permission levels, 37
pictures to picture library, 239
search keywords, 79
site columns
to content types, 158
to lists, 154–155
site content types to lists, 159
users
to groups, 34–35
to list security, 129–130
web parts to pages, 310–311
wiki pages to wiki page library, 251
Admin Links web part (blog home page), 25
Advanced Search page, 75
advanced search, performing, 75–76
Agenda list template, 195–196
Alert Me link (Search Results page), 324
alerts
adding, 331
for changes in documents, 351
deleting, 332
editing, 331
managing, 330
receiving, 330
removing, for other users, 332
subscribing to
document and list item, 328
list and library, 326–327
MOSS search, 324–325
types of, 323
All Documents view, 218
All Pictures view, 238
Allow Management of Content Types list
setting (Advanced Settings screen), 159
analyst, 355
Announcements list, 357, 378
Announcements list template, 170–171
Approval workflow, 282
Article pages, 305–306
assigning
permission levels to Active Directory user or
group, 36–37
rights, 32
attaching files to items in lists, 120
Attendees list template
managing, 200–201
overview of, 199
Audience Targeting columns, 142
auditing feature of information management
policy, 289
auditing for site collection (MOSS), 110–111
auditing requirements, 371
automating document management tasks, 371
availability of documents for consumption, 351
nB
Barcodes feature of information management
policy, 287–288
Basic Meeting Workspace template, 15
Basic pages
creating, 298–299
overview of, 297
viewing and editing, 299–300
benefits of document management solutions,
370–371
Best Bet links, 79
389
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nINDEX
Blank Meeting Workspace template, 15
Blank Site template, 11
blog navigator, 20
Blog Site template, 20
blog sites
layout of, 19–20
navigation within, 24–25
overview of, 6
branching and Survey list template, 193–194
breadcrumbs, using, 22
breaking permission inheritance, 39, 129
Browser Report, 52
browsing documents, 351
Business Data columns, 140–141
Business Data group of web parts, 319
Business Data Item, 319
Business Data List, 319
Business Data Related List, 319
business sponsor, 377
nC
Calculated columns, 138–140
calculation operators, 139
Calendar list, 378
Calendar list template
connecting with Outlook, 182–184
creating meeting workspaces, 184–185
exporting events, 182
incoming e-mail capabilities and, 186
overview of, 179
recurrence, 180
recurring events in views, 181
Calendar view (lists), 147–148
Cancellation and Error Report, 279
Categories page, collaboration portal, 67
central repository for project materials, 375
challenges of document management, 351–352
change management, 388
Change Site Column page, 153
changing
list item order, 178
navigation bar inheritance settings, 44
order
of Quick Launch items, 42
of Web Part pages in meeting workspaces,
304
Check In screen with versioning enabled, 216
checking in document to document library, 216
checking out document from document
library, 215
Choice columns, 134
Choice Filter, 320
Closed Web Parts gallery, 318
closing web parts, 312
collaboration portal
Categories page, 67
document center, 61
home page, 60
news items, 62
news links, 63–64
News site, 61
overview of, 59
Reports site, 65–66
RSS News Viewer, 64
Search site, 66
Site Directory site, 66
Site Map page, 67
This Week in Pictures, 63
Top Sites page, 67
collaboration sites
creating Basic page in, 298
Web Part pages
creating in, 301
types of display for, 303
Colleague Tracker option (My Home page), 335
colleagues
adding, 336
editing and deleting, 337
Colleagues view (My Profile page), 336
Collect Feedback workflow, 283
Collect Signatures workflow, 284
collection administrators, managing, 40
collection usage reports, 53–54, 107–109
column options
lists
Audience Targeting, 142
Business Data, 140–141
Calculated, 138–140
Choice, 134
creating, editing, and deleting, 131–132
Currency, 135
Date and Time, 136
Hyperlink or Picture, 138
indexing, 133
Lookup, 136
modifying order, 132
“Multiple lines of text”, 133
Number, 134–135
overview of, 131
Person or Group, 137
“Single line of text”, 133
Yes/No, 137
site content types, 158–159
columns
See also column options
document library and, 229
form library and, 236
for list or library policy, 296
picture library and, 246
searchable, 80
slide library and, 261
translatable, 115
Translation Management Library and, 255
wiki page library and, 253
communication and project collaboration,
374–375, 386–388
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content variations (MOSS), 113–115
context menu
document, 215
for list item, displaying, 119
Send To submenu, 222
Contribute permission level, 36
Copy page, 222
Copy Slides to PowerPoint dialog, 258
copying
contacts between Outlook and contacts list
folder, 174
documents in document library, 222, 229
permission level to create new permission
level, 37–38
Create Alerts permission, 324
Create Blog option (My Home page), 335
Create Meeting Workspace task pane (Outlook),
30
Create page, Custom List option, 117
Create Page option (Site Actions menu), 72
Create Site option (Site Actions menu), 72
Create View page, Start From an Existing View
section, 150
Currency columns, 135
Current Events view, 181
Current User Filter web part, 343
Custom List option (Create page), 117
custom lists group of list templates
Decisions, 196
KPI, 201–205
Languages and Translators, 206–207
Objectives, 197
Text Box, 197–198
Things to Bring, 198–199
custom web parts, 321
Customize Library screen
Delete this Document Library link, 231
General Settings, 223–224
overview of, 223
Customize List screen
General Settings options
advanced settings, 127
audience targeting, 128
overview of, 126
title, description, and navigation, 126
versioning, 127
Incoming E-Mail Settings link, 171, 177
Customize the Workflow page, 275
customizing
Web Part pages, 321–322
web parts using connections, 315–316
nD
daily site usage reports, 52
Dashboard group of web parts, 320
Data Connection Library, 255
DataLan Ideation RFP response workspace, 369
datasheet mode, editing document
information in, 218
Find it faster at http://superindex.apress.com/
communications group of list templates
Announcements, 170–171
Contacts, 172–174
Discussion Board, 175–177
overview of, 169
compliance requirements, 371
configuration settings and workflows, 273
Configure Styles and Layout window, 309
configuring
Presentation Materials site, 359–362
Project Template site, 380–384
Projects site, 379–380
Quick Launch options, 43–43
regional settings for sites, 46–47
Resources site, 358
RFP Responses site, 362–364
Sales site, 362
Tree View options, 41–42
variation settings for site collection, 113
Confirm Slide Update window, 259
connecting document library with Outlook, 265
connections and web parts, 315–316
consumer web part, connecting Current User
Filter web part to, 343
consumption of documents, 351
Contact Details, 320
Contact Information view (My Profile page),
336
Contacts list, 357, 361, 378
Contacts list template, 172–174
content
of documents, refreshing or expiring, 351
editing with Page Editing toolbar, 308–310
for personalization sites
filtering, 343–344
targeting web parts, 342–343
Content and Structure page (MOSS), 97–99
content approval
document library, 226
enabling on list screen, 128–129
content area
blog sites, 20
meeting workspace, 14
News site, 95
Personalization site, 87
Publishing site, 93
Records Center site, 86
Report Center site, 90
Search Center site, 92
Search Center with Tabs site, 93
Site Directory site, 89
team sites, document workspaces, and wiki
sites, 9–11
Content Filter web parts, 343
Content Rollup group of web parts, 319
content section. See content area
content types
overview of, 156
Translation Management Library and, 255
391
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Datasheet view
libraries and, 269
list templates and, 208–209
overview of, 122–123, 143–147
task pane links, 167–168
Date and Time columns, 136
Date Filter, 320
Decision Meeting Workspace template, 16
Decisions list template, 196
Default group of web parts, 320
defining
list policy, 293
site content type policy, 292
definitions (site), resetting, 46
deleting
See also removing
alerts, 332
colleagues, 337
columns
from content types, 159
from lists, 132
document libraries, 231
folders
from document library, 219
from lists, 123
groups, 34
headings or links in Quick Launch, 43
items
from lists, 119
from Recycle Bin, 57, 119
links in navigation bar, 45
list or library policies, 294
lists, 152
My Links, 341
permission levels, 38–39
search keywords, 80
search scopes, 78
site collection policies, 291
site columns, 154
site content type policies, 293
site content types, 157, 160
site templates, 50
sites, 47–48
versions from document library, 221
versions of lists, 125
Web Part pages from meeting workspaces,
305
web parts from pages, 312
workflow from list, 281
description
of document library, 224
of site, updating, 40–41
Design permission level, 36
designer, 355
disabling site and site collection features, 55
Discard Changes and Refresh/Refresh action
(Excel), 165
Discard Check Out link, 217
Discussion Board list template, 175–177
displaying
columns in lists, 132
context menu for list items, 119
list items in group-by-group fashion, 144
recurring events, 181
Disposition Approval workflow, 284
document
See also document library; document
management; document workspace
opening when signed on as different user,
347
searching, 351
using as document template, 226
document alerts, subscribing to, 328
document center of collaboration portal, 61
Document Center site template, 84
document library
adding document to, 213–214
copying with Send To submenu, 222
creating, 212
datasheet mode, 218
deleting, 231
document workspaces, 221
editing document
checking out and checking in, 215–216
properties, 217
filtering and sorting documents, 217
folders, 219
managing
columns, 229
content approval, 226
document templates, 225–226
General Settings, 223–224
incoming e-mail capabilities, 228
item-level permissions, 227
Manage Copies screen, 229
Require Check Out setting, 227
security, 226
views, 230
navigating in, 25
navigating to, 22
New link
Basic pages, creating, 298
Web Part pages, creating, 302
overview of, 212
template, creating, 231
versions, 220
views, 217–218, 230
working with, 213
Document Library Settings link, 223
document management
See also document management solutions;
libraries
challenges of, 351–352
creation of documents, 350
life cycle of, 349, 370
making documents available for
consumption, 351
needs for, 353
overview of, 211, 349
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nE
e-mail capabilities
Announcements list template and, 171
Calendar list template and, 186
Discussion Board list template and, 177
document library, 228
e-mail notification
Issue Tracking list template and, 191
Project Tasks list template and, 190
Tasks list template and, 188
Edit drop-down menu, Modify Shared Web Part
option, 342
Edit Image Properties window, 308
Edit Item link, 217
Edit Item page, 219, 251
Edit Mode, 312
Edit Page option (Site Actions menu), 72
Edit Properties screen
picture library, 241
slide library, 257
editing
alerts, 331
Basic pages, 300
calendar events in Outlook, 183
colleagues, 337
documents in document library, 215–217
document templates, 225
folders
in document library, 219
in lists, 123
form templates, 236
forms in form library, 234–235
groups, 33–34
headings or links in Quick Launch, 43
items in lists
Datasheet view and, 122–123
overview of, 119
linked contacts in Outlook, 174
links in navigation bar, 44
My Links, 340–341
News web parts, 63
permission levels, 38
permissions
on documents in document library, 227
on list items, 130
pictures in picture library, 240–241
recurring events, 181
search keywords, 79
search scopes, 78
SharePoint Designer 2007 and, 321
site columns, 153
site content types, 160
site templates, 49
slides in slide library, 257
Web Part pages, 304–305, 321
web part properties, 313–314
wiki pages in wiki page library, 250
workflow settings, 279
effectiveness
of individual, improving, 370
of solutions, monitoring, 372
efficiency of project collaboration, 387
Email a Link option, 222
enabling
Allow Management of Content Types list
setting, 159
content approval on list screen, 128–129
e-mail notification
Issue Tracking list template and, 191
Project Tasks list template and, 190
Tasks list template and, 188
item versioning, 124–125
RSS feeds, 161–162
site and site collection features, 55
Events list, 357
Everyone view (My Profile page), 333, 336
Excel (Microsoft)
creating KPI lists by retrieving data from, 203
custom lists, creating using, 165–167
exporting
Find it faster at http://superindex.apress.com/
resources for creation of documents, 350
SharePoint capabilities for, 353
document management solutions
benefits of, 370–371
overview of, 4, 354
RFP response example
Presentation Materials site, creating and
configuring, 359–362
process definition, 355
process walk-through, 364–368
requirements, 354
resource layout, 358
Resources site, creating and configuring,
358
RFP Responses site, creating and
configuring, 362–364
Sales site, creating and configuring, 362
SharePoint components, 355
SharePoint environment layout, 356–357
tips for, 371–372
Document Management task pane, 264
Document Workspace template, 12, 357–358
document workspace
creating
for document library, 221
from document in site, 29
with Office, 31
layout of, 7–13
navigation within, 22–23
overview of, 6
Documents view (My Profile page), 336
Download a Copy link, 222
Download Pictures screen, 243
downloading
auditing reports, 111
pictures from picture library, 242–244
dragging web parts onto pages, 311
.dwp file extension, 316
393
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library metadata to, 268–269
list templates to, 207
lists to, 163
working with lists in, 164–165
Excel List and list templates, 208
Excel Web Access, 319
executive stakeholder, 377
Exempt from Policy link (View Properties
page), 295
exempting item from list or library policy,
294–295
Existing Copies link, 222
expiration feature of information management
policy, 290
Explorer view, 218
exporting
See also importing
contacts to Windows Address Book, 173
events to Outlook, 182
library metadata to Excel, 268–269
list templates to Excel, 207
lists to Excel, 163
site collection policies, 291
web parts, 316
external individual, including in business
processes, 371
nF
file system view, 214
Filter group of web parts, 320
filter web parts, 343
filtering
content for personalization sites, 343–344
documents in document library, 217
lists, 120–121
lists in views, 144
pictures in picture library, 239
Financial Documents library, 378, 382
folders
creating
in document library, 219
in lists, 123
deleting from lists, 123
editing in lists, 123
list item security, applying to, 131
form library
adding forms to, 233
creating, 232
creating through InfoPath form publishing,
266–268
editing forms, 234–235
managing, 236–237
views, 232
working with, 232
Form Templates library (My Home page), 335
formulas for Calculated columns in lists, 139
Full Control permission level, 36
functions, types of, 138
nG
Gantt view (lists), 149
General Discussion board, 358
Get Started with My Site options (My Home
page), 334
global links bar
blog sites, 20
breadcrumbs, using, 22
meeting workspaces, 14
team sites, document workspaces, and wiki
sites, 8
Go To Source link, 222
groups
adding users to, 34–35
creating, 32
creating for collaboration portal news links, 63
deleting, 34
editing, 33–34
managing security of, 32
removing users from, 35
viewing permissions, 35
nH
headings, in Quick Launch, 42–43
Help link, team sites, document workspaces,
and wiki sites, 8
hierarchy of site collections, viewing, 54
history list, workflows, 272
Hold Reports library, 85
home page
of collaboration portal, 60
of publishing portal, 69–70
How To list, 357, 361
Hyperlink or Picture columns, 138
nI
Import Spreadsheet link (Excel), 165
importing
See also exporting
site collection policy, 291
web parts, 316–318
In Common with You view (My Profile page),
336
incoming e-mail capabilities
Announcements list template and, 171
Calendar list template and, 186
Discussion Board list template and, 177
document library, 228
indexing columns in lists, 133
InfoPath (Microsoft Office)
creating form library through form
publishing, 266–268
form library and, 232–233
publishing process, 237
information
access to, 352–353
document creation and, 350–351
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nK
Key Performance Indicators (KPI), 201, 320
keywords (search)
adding, 79, 81
deleting, 80
editing, 79
KPI Details, 320
KPI list template
calculation options, 202
creating by manually entering data, 204
creating by retrieving data
from Excel workbooks, 203
from other lists, 202
from SQL Server 2005 Analysis Services,
203–204
overview of, 201
views, 205
nL
Labels feature of information management
policy, 287–288
Languages and Translators list template,
206–207
Latest Blog Post view (My Profile page), 336
layouts of sites
blog sites, 19–20
meeting workspaces, 13–18
overview of, 7
team sites, document workspaces, and wiki
sites, 7–13
libraries
advanced concepts, 261
Data Connection, 255
document
adding document to, 213–214
columns, managing, 229
content approval, 226
copying with Send To submenu, 222
creating, 212
datasheet mode, 218
deleting, 231
editing document, 215–217
filtering and sorting documents, 217
folders, 219
incoming e-mail capabilities, 228
item-level permissions, 227
Manage Copies screen, 229
managing, 223–224
navigating in, 25
navigating to, 22
News link, 298, 302
overview of, 212
Require Check Out setting, 227
security, 226
templates, 225–226, 231
versions, 220
views, 217–218, 230
working with, 213
workspaces, 221
form
adding forms to, 233
creating, 232
creating through InfoPath form
publishing, 266–268
editing forms, 234–235
managing, 236–237
templates, 236
views, 232
working with, 232
Office integration
connecting document library with
Outlook, 265
creating form library through InfoPath
form publishing, 266–268
Datasheet view, 269
Document Management task pane, 264
exporting metadata to Excel, 268–269
Open and Save As, 262–263
overview of, 261
Shared Workspace task pane, 263
overview of, 5, 211
Find it faster at http://superindex.apress.com/
multiple versions of, 351
outdated, 352
refreshing or expiring, 353
reliability of, and project collaboration, 387
single location for, 353
information management and project
collaboration, 374
information management policy
description of, 286
features of
auditing, 289
expiration, 290
Labels and Barcodes, 287–288
list or library
columns for, 296
deleting, 294
exempting item from, 294–295
managing, 293
site collection, 290–291
site content type
deleting, 293
managing, 292
Information Management Policy Settings page,
292
information workers, 1
inheritance settings, of navigation bar,
changing, 44
integrating personalization site and My Site, 344
Issue Tracking list template, 190–191
Issues list, 274–275, 378, 382
item version history
document library and, 220, 224
enabling, 124–125
Issue Tracking list template and, 190
item-level permissions, document library, 227
395
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picture
adding pictures to, 239
creating, 238
downloading pictures, 242–244
editing pictures, 240–241
filtering and sorting, 239
managing, 246–248
overview of, 237
Send To feature, 244–245
slide show feature, 245
views, 238, 247
working with, 238
Report, 255
slide
columns, managing, 261
creating, 256
editing slides, 257
managing, 260–261
presentation, creating, 258
publishing slides, 256
updating slides in linked presentation,
259
working with, 256
templates, 211
Translation Management, 254–255
types of, 211
wiki page
adding wiki page, 251
creating, 249
default display of, 249
editing wiki page, 250
managing, 252–254
navigating pages, 249
Page History screen, 252
views, 249, 253
working with, 249
library alerts, subscribing to, 326–327
library policy. See list or library policy
Limited Access permission level, 36
linked slides, 259
linking
Calendar lists to Outlook, 182–184
contacts list with Outlook, 173–174
new Outlook meeting to existing meeting
workspace, 30
links
adding
to My Links, 340
to navigation bar, 44
to Quick Launch, 43
collaboration portal, 63–64
deleting
in navigation bar, 45
in Quick Launch, 43
editing
in navigation bar, 44
in Quick Launch, 43
updating order of in navigation bar, 45
Links list, 299, 357, 378
Links list template, 177–178
Links view (My Profile page), 336
list alerts, subscribing to, 326–327
List Content Type Column screen, 160
List Content Type page, 160
list content types, creating workflow on, 276
list item
starting workflow instance on, 276
viewing status and managing workflow
instance on, 277
list item alerts, subscribing to, 328
list or library policy
columns for, 296
deleting, 294
exempting item from, 294–295
managing, 293
list page
accessing, 118
content approval, enabling, 128–129
list structure underlying workflow, 272
list template
advantages of, 169
Attendees
managing, 200–201
overview of, 199
communications group
Announcements, 170–171
Contacts, 172–174
Discussion Board, 175–177
overview of, 169
creating, 150–151
custom lists group
Decisions, 196
KPI, 201–205
Languages and Translators, 206–207
Objectives, 197
Text Box, 197–198
Things to Bring, 198–199
Datasheet view and, 208–209
Excel List and, 208
exporting to Excel, 207
getting from list template gallery, 151–152
tracking group
Agenda, 195–196
Calendar, 179–186
Issue Tracking, 190–191
Links, 177–178
Project Tasks, 188–190
Survey, 192–195
Tasks, 187–188
list view Actions menu, 326
List View web part
Basic pages and, 300
description of, 318
properties of, 314
saving site as template and, 384
Toolbar Type property, 314
lists
See also list item; list template
adding items to, 118
attachments to items in, 120
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nM
Manage Content and Structure option (Site
Actions menu), 73
Manage Copies screen, document library, 229
Manage Personalized Views right, 344, 346
management of workflows
deleting workflows from list, 281
overview of, 278
reports, 279–280
settings, editing, 279
managing
alerts, 330
Attendees list, 200–201
audit settings for site collection, 110–111
collaborative document creation, 352
colleagues, 336–337
details in My Profile page, 337–339
document libraries
columns, 229
content approval, 226
General Settings, 223–224
incoming e-mail capabilities, 228
item-level permissions, 227
Manage Copies screen, 229
Require Check Out setting, 227
security, 226
templates, 225–226
views, 230
form library, 236–237
lists
column options, 131–142
content approval options, 128–129
General Settings options, 126–128
overview of, 125
security options, 129–130
views, 142–149
logon, 346–347
picture library
columns, 246
overview of, 246, 248
views, 247
search site visibility, 51
site content types, 156, 159
site templates, 48
slide library, 260–261
wiki page library, 252–254
workflow instance on list item, 277
managing site security
collection administrators, 40
permission inheritance, changing, 35–36
permission levels, 36–39
SharePoint groups, 32–35
master page (MOSS), updating, 83
meeting workspace
changing order of Web Part pages in, 304
creating
for items in Calendar lists, 184–185
with Outlook, 29–30
for recurring events in Calendar lists, 185
creating lists in, 199
creating Web Part pages in, 303
deleting Web Part pages from, 305
layout of, 13–18
linking new Outlook meeting to, 30
navigation within, 23–24
overview of, 6
renaming Web Part pages in, 304
Memberships view (My Profile page), 336
merging forms in form library, 235
Find it faster at http://superindex.apress.com/
Content Types, 156
creating, 169, 199
custom, creating, 117, 165–167
Datasheet view, task pane links, 167–168
deleting, 152
deleting item from, 119
editing, 119, 122–123
exporting to Excel, 163
filtering, 120–121
finding information in, 118
folders, creating in and deleting from, 123
item versioning, enabling, 124–125
managing
column options, 131–142
content approval options, 128–129
General Settings options, 126–128
overview of, 125
security options, 129–130
views, 142–149
organizing, 123
overview of, 5, 117
RSS feed settings, 161–162
site columns
adding, 154–155
creating, 153
deleting, 154
editing, 153
overview of, 152
site content types
adding, 159
advanced settings, 158
columns, 158–159
creating, 156
deleting, 157, 160
editing, 160
managing, 156, 159
settings, 157
sorting, 120
viewing, 121
working with in Excel, 164–165
logo of site, updating, 40–41
logon, managing, 346–347
look and feel management features (MOSS)
master pages and style sheets, 83
page layouts and site templates, 82
welcome page, 81
Lookup columns, 136
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Microsoft Excel
creating KPI lists by retrieving data from, 203
custom lists, creating using, 165–167
exporting
library metadata to, 268–269
list templates to, 207
lists to, 163
working with lists in, 164–165
Microsoft Live Communications Server, 368,
386
Microsoft Office
creating document workspaces with, 31
libraries and
connecting document library with
Outlook, 265
creating form library through InfoPath
form publishing, 266–268
Datasheet view, 269
Document Management task pane, 264
exporting metadata to Excel, 268–269
Open and Save As, 262–263
overview of, 261
Shared Workspace task pane, 263
Microsoft Office InfoPath
creating form library through form
publishing, 266–268
form library and, 232–233
publishing process, 237
Microsoft Office Picture Manager
downloading and, 243–244
editing and, 240
Send To feature, 244–245
uploading and, 240
Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 (MOSS)
advantages of, 3
collection usage reports, 107–109
content variations, 113–115
features of, 59
look and feel management features
master pages and style sheets, 83
page layouts and site templates, 82
welcome page, 81
navigation features
navigation bar, 71
Navigation Settings page, 74
Quick Launch area, 73
Site Actions menu, 71–73
overview of, 2
portals
collaboration, 59–67
publishing, 68–71
search features
advanced search, 75–76
alerts, subscribing to, 324–325
keywords, 79–80
results, working with, 77
scopes, 77–78
searchable columns, 80
settings, modifying, 81
simple search, 75
site and site collection features, 112
site collection auditing, 110–111
site template
creating pages in, 298, 302
Document Center, 84
News, 95
overview of, 83
Personalization, 86–87
Publishing, 93–94
Publishing Site with Workflow, 95
Records Center, 84–86
Report Center, 90
Search Center, 91
Search Center with Tabs, 92–93
Site Directory, 88–90
sites
Content and Structure page, 97–99
creating, 96–97
solutions created, 4
usage reports
accessing, 100
overview of, 99
site collection users, 102
site destination pages, 105
site home page, 105
site referrers, 103
site requests, 102
site usage summary, 100
workflows
Approval, 282
Collect Feedback, 283
Collect Signatures, 284
Disposition Approval, 284
Translation Management, 284
Microsoft Outlook
connecting document library with, 265
copying contacts between contacts list
folder and, 174
creating meeting workspaces with, 29–30
exporting events to, 182
linking
Calendar lists to, 182–184
contacts list with, 173–174
new meeting to existing meeting
workspace, 30
Microsoft SharePoint 2007 technology, 2–3. See
also Microsoft Office SharePoint Server
2007 (MOSS); Windows SharePoint
Services 3.0 (WSS)
minimizing web parts, 312
Miscellaneous group of web parts, 320
Missing Properties library, 85
mobile devices, navigating through sites using,
25
Modify Shared Web Part option (Edit drop-down
menu), 342
modifying
order of columns in lists, 132
Publishing Page Settings window and, 308
search settings, 81
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navigating sites, customizing options for
navigation bar, 44–45
portal site connection, 45
Quick Launch options, configuring, 42–43
Tree View options, configuring, 41–42
navigation
of document library, 224
MOSS
navigation bar, 71
Navigation Settings page, 74
Quick Launch area, 73
Site Actions menu, 71–73
through sites, 21–22, 25
wiki page library, 249
within blog sites, 24–25
within meeting workspaces, 23–24
within team sites, document workspaces,
and wiki sites, 22–23
navigation bar
blog sites, 20
customizing, 44–45
meeting workspaces, 14
MOSS, 71
team sites, document workspaces, and wiki
sites, 9
using, 21
navigation links for Basic pages, 299
Navigation Settings page (MOSS), 74
needs for document management, 353
new alert creation message, 328
New Alert page
document alerts, 328
library alerts, 327
search alerts, 325
New Basic Page screen, accessing, 298
New link (document library)
Basic pages, creating, 298
Office documents and, 213
Web Part pages, creating, 302
news items of collaboration portal, 62
news links collaboration portal, 63–64
News site of collaboration portal, 61
News site template, 95
notifications. See alerts
Number columns, 134–135
nO
Objectives list template, 197
Office (Microsoft)
creating document workspaces with, 31
libraries and
connecting document library with
Outlook, 265
creating form library through InfoPath
form publishing, 266–268
Datasheet view, 269
Document Management task pane, 264
exporting metadata to Excel, 268–269
Open and Save As, 262–263
overview of, 261
Shared Workspace task pane, 263
Open action (File menu) and libraries, 263
opening document when signed on as different
user, 347
operators, calculation, 139
order, changing
of columns in list, 132
of items in list, 178
of Quick Launch items, 42
Organization Hierarchy view (My Profile page),
336
organizing
lists, 123
web parts on pages, 312
Find it faster at http://superindex.apress.com/
monitoring effectiveness of solutions, 372
monthly site usage reports, 52
MOSS. See Microsoft Office SharePoint Server
2007
MOSS search alerts, subscribing to, 324–325
MOSS site template, creating pages in
Basic, 298
Web Part, 302
“Multiple lines of text” columns, 133
Multipage Meeting Workspace template, 17, 297
My Alerts on This Site page, 328, 330
My Calendar option (My Home page), 335
My Calendar web part (Outlook Web Access),
320
My Colleagues (My Profile page), 336
My Contacts, 320
My Home page
default view, 332
libraries, 335
options, 334
My Index, 320
My Links
adding links to, 340
deleting, 341
editing, 340–341
overview of, 339
My Manager (My Profile page), 335
My Profile page
colleagues, managing, 336–337
details, managing, 337–339
Everyone view, 333
overview of, 335–336
My Site
accessing, 333
My Home page, 334–335
My Profile page
colleagues, managing, 336–337
details, managing, 337–339
overview of, 335–336
overview of, 332
personalization sites and, 344
My Workgroup (My Profile page), 335
My Workspaces, 319
399
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OS Report, 51
Other Location link, 222
Outlook
connecting document library with, 265
copying contacts between contacts list
folder and, 174
creating meeting workspaces with, 29–30
exporting events to, 182
linking
Calendar lists to, 182–184
contacts list with, 173–174
new meeting to existing meeting
workspace, 30
Outlook Web Access group of web parts, 320
nP
Page Editing menu, 307
Page Editing toolbar
content, editing, 308–310
overview of, 306
Page Status Information window, 307
Settings window, 308
Tools menu, 308
Workflow menu, 307
Page History screen, 252
page layouts (MOSS), settings options, 82
Page List and meeting workspaces, 14, 24
Page Report, 51
Page Separator option (Survey list template), 194
Page Status Information window, 307
pages
Basic type
creating, 298–299
overview of, 297
viewing and editing, 299–300
overview of, 297
Publishing type
creating, 306
overview of, 305
Page Editing menu, 307
Page Editing toolbar, 306–310
types of, 297
Web Part type
creating, 301–303
editing, 304–305
overview of, 300
viewing, 303
Pages library, 62, 65
permission inheritance
breaking, 39, 129
changing, 35–36
permission levels
adding, 37
creating as copy of existing permission level,
37–38
deleting, 38–39
editing, 38
managing, 36–37
resetting inheritance, 39
permissions
Create Alerts, 324
on list items, editing, 130
SharePoint group, viewing, 35
Person or Group columns, 137
Personal Documents library (My Home page),
335
Personal view, Web Part pages, 303
Personal View design mode, 344
Personal View options (Welcome menu), 345
personalization features
alerts
adding, 331
deleting, 332
editing, 331
managing, 330
receiving, 330
removing, for other users, 332
subscribing to, 324–328
types of, 323
logon
signing in as different user, 346–347
signing out, 346
Manage Personalized Views, 344–346
My Links
adding links to, 340
deleting, 341
editing, 340–341
overview of, 339
My Site
accessing, 333
My Home page, 334–335
My Profile page, 335–339
overview of, 332
overview of, 323
personalization site
content for
filtering, 343–344
targeting web parts, 342–343
creating, 341
integration with My Site, 344
template for, 341
Personalization site template, 86–87
Personalize This Page option (Welcome menu),
344
picture library
adding pictures to, 239
creating, 238
downloading pictures from picture library,
242–244
editing pictures, 240–241
filtering and sorting, 239
managing
columns, 246
overview of, 246, 248
views, 247
overview of, 237
Send To feature, 244–245
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Project Template site, creating and
configuring, 380–384
Projects site, creating and configuring,
379–380
SharePoint environment layout, 377–379
tips for creating, 388
Project Details list, 378, 383, 385
project management solutions, 4
project manager, 377
Project Metrics list, 378, 382, 385
Project Server 2007, 386
Project Tasks list template, 188–190
Project Template site
components of, 378
creating and configuring, 380–384
Project Templates library, 377–379
Projects site
creating and configuring, 379–380
overview of, 377
properties of document, editing, 217
public Calendar view, creating, 148
public standard view, creating, 147
public view, 142
publishing
documents back to initial document library,
221
InfoPath forms to form library, 266–268
lists from within Excel, 166–167
News page changes, 65
slides to slide library, 256
Publishing pages
adding web parts to, 310–311
creating, 306
overview of, 305
Page Editing menu, 307
Page Editing toolbar
content, editing, 308–310
overview of, 306
Page Status Information window, 307
Settings window, 308
Tools menu, 308
Workflow menu, 307
publishing portal
home page, 69–70
overview of, 68
Press Release site, 70
Search site, 70–71
Publishing site template, 93–94
Publishing Site with Workflow site template, 95
nQ
Query String Filter, 320
Quick Launch area (MOSS), 9, 73
Quick Launch list, navigating using
blog sites, 24
team sites, document workspaces, and wiki
sites, 22
Quick Launch options, configuring, 42–43
Find it faster at http://superindex.apress.com/
slide show feature, 245
views, 238
working with, 238
Picture Library Details view, 247
Picture Manager (Microsoft Office)
downloading and, 243–244
editing and, 240
Send To feature, 244–245
uploading and, 240
pinning personalization site to My Site, 344
portal home page, creating sites under, 27
portal site connection, setting, 45
portals (MOSS)
collaboration
Categories page, 67
document center, 61
home page, 60
news items, 62
news links, 63–64
News site, 61
overview of, 59
Reports site, 65–66
RSS News Viewer, 64
Search site, 66
Site Directory site, 66
Site Map page, 67
This Week in Pictures, 63
Top Sites page, 67
overview of, 59
publishing
home page, 69–70
overview of, 68
Press Release site, 70
Search site, 70–71
presentation
creating from slides in slide library, 258
updating slides in linked presentation, 259
Presentation Graphics library, 357, 360
Presentation Materials document library, 357,
360
Presentation Materials site
creating and configuring, 359–362
description of, 357
Press Release site, publishing portal, 70
Preview Pane view style, 146
private view, 142
process of document creation, 350, 353
productivity tools, 388
Profile Property Filter web part, 343–344
project collaboration
challenges of, 374–375
needs for, 375
overview of, 373
solutions for
benefits of, 387–388
process definition, 376–377
process walk-through, 384–386
project requirements, 376
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nR
Rating Scale answer type (Survey list template),
193
Read permission level, 36
real-time communication, 368, 386
Really Simple Syndication (RSS), lists and,
161–162
rearranging web parts on page, 312
receiving alert, 330
Recent Blog Posts option (My Home page), 335
Records Center site template, 84–86
Records Pending Submission library, 85
recurring event
creating meeting workspaces for, 185
displaying, 181
time periods and patterns, 180
Recurring Meeting Workspace template, 18
Recycle Bin
deleting items from, 57
permanent deletions from, 119
restoring items in, 57
viewing items in, 56–57
Redirect page, 305
Reference Links list, 377, 380
references to column, 139
Referrer URL Report, 52
regional settings for site, configuring, 46–47
relinking forms in form library, 235. See also
linking
remote access and project collaboration, 388
Remove Workflows page, 281
removing
See also deleting
alerts for other users, 332
users from groups, 35
web part connections, 316
web parts from pages, 312
renaming Web Part pages in meeting
workspaces, 304
Reorder Links window, 64
replying to discussion thread, 176
Report Center site template, 90
Report Library, 255
report options bar (MOSS), 100
Reports site of collaboration portal, 65–66
reports, workflow, viewing, 279–280
Require Check Out setting, document library,
227
Reset Page Content option (Welcome menu),
346
Reset to Site Definition option (SharePoint
Designer 2007), 322
resetting
permission level inheritance, 39
site definitions, 46
resources
for creation of documents, 350
project collaboration and, 375
Resources site
creating and configuring, 358
description of, 356
responding to survey, 194–195
restoring items in Recycle Bin, 57
results of search, working with, 77
RFP response solution
ideation attributes, 365
Presentation Materials site, creating and
configuring, 359–362
process definition, 355
process walk-through, 364–368
requirements, 354
resource layout, 358
Resources site, creating and configuring, 358
RFP Responses site, creating and
configuring, 362–364
Sales site, creating and configuring, 362
SharePoint components, 355
SharePoint environment layout, 356–357
RFP Responses document library, 363–364
RFP Responses site
creating and configuring, 362–364
description of, 357
final, 368
RFT Responses library, 357
Rich Text Editor and Basic pages, 298–299
rights, assigning, 32
RSS (Really Simple Syndication), lists and,
161–162
RSS News Viewer, collaboration portal, 64
RSS Viewer, 320
RSS Viewer option (My Home page), 335
nS
sales representative, 355–356
Sales site
creating and configuring, 362
description of, 356
Save As option, libraries and, 262
saving site as template, 384
scopes (search), 77–78
search alerts, subscribing to, 324–325
search bar, finding items in list using, 118
Search Box, 321
Search Center site template, 91
Search Center with Tabs site template, 92–93
Search Core Results, 321
search features (MOSS)
advanced search, 75–76
keywords
adding, 79
deleting, 80
editing, 79
results, working with, 77
scopes, 77–78
searchable columns, 80
settings, modifying, 81
simple search, 75
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SharePoint Sites option (My Home page), 335
Show Page Editing Toolbar option (Site Actions
menu), 72
Show Shared View option (Welcome menu), 346
Sign In as Different User option (Welcome
menu), 346–347
Sign Out option (Welcome menu), 346
simple search, performing, 75
“Single line of text” columns, 133
Site Actions menu
navigating subsites and, 23
portal home page, 26
Site Actions menu (MOSS), 71–73
Site Aggregator, 319
site and site collection features (MOSS), 112
site collection destination pages reports
(MOSS), 108
Site Collection gallery, 317–319
site collection home page reports (MOSS), 109
site collection policy, 290–291
site collection referrers reports (MOSS), 108
site collection requests reports (MOSS), 108
site collection search queries reports (MOSS),
109
site collection search results reports (MOSS),
109
site collection usage summary reports (MOSS),
107
site collection users reports (MOSS), 102, 108
Site Column Gallery, 153
site columns for list
adding, 154–155
creating, 153
deleting, 154
editing, 153
overview of, 152
Site Content Type Gallery, 156
Site Content Type management screen, 156
Site Content Type page, 156
site content type policy, 292–293
site content types
adding, 159
advanced settings, 158
columns, 158–159
creating, 156
creating workflow on, 276
deleting, 157, 160
editing, 160
KPI list template, 201
managing, 156, 159
settings, 157
site destination pages reports (MOSS), 105
Site Directory group of web parts, 321
Site Directory site, 66, 97
Site Directory site template, 88–90
site home page (MOSS), 105
Site Map page, collaboration portal, 67
site owner, responsibility of, 32
site referrers reports (MOSS), 103
site requests reports (MOSS), 102
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Search group of web parts, 320
Search Results page, 324
search results, working with, 50
Search site
collaboration portal, 66
publishing portal, 70–71
search tools for sites, 50
search visibility, managing, 51
searching document, 351
security
document library, 226–227
managing
collection administrators, 40
permission inheritance, changing, 35–36
permission levels, 36–39
SharePoint groups, 32–35
security options, list, 129–130
Select Field or Group dialog, 267
Selected Pictures view, 238
Selected View property (List View web part), 314
Send Pictures dialog, 245
Send To feature, picture library, 244–245
Send To submenu (context menu), document
library and, 222
Server gallery, 321
service plan example
process definition, 376–377
process walk-through, 384–386
project requirements, 376
Project Template site, creating and
configuring, 380–384
Projects site, creating and configuring,
379–380
SharePoint environment layout, 377–379
Service Plan Offering Introduction site, 384–386
Set as Default My Site option (My Home page),
335
setting portal site connection, 45
settings, site content types, 157–158
Settings window (Page Editing toolbar), 308
Share List Items Across All Meetings (Series
Items) option, 199
Shared Documents library
Document Workspace template, 357
My Home page, 335
Project Template site, 378–381
Shared Pictures library (My Home page), 335
Shared Version of Web Part page
adding web parts to, 310
description of, 303
Shared Workspace task pane, 31, 263
SharePoint Designer 2007, 285–286, 321–322
SharePoint Server 2007 workflows
See also Microsoft Office SharePoint Server
2007 (MOSS)
Approval, 282
Collect Feedback, 283
Collect Signatures, 284
Disposition Approval, 284
Translation Management, 284
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Site Settings option (Site Actions menu), 73
Site Settings page, deleting site from within, 47
site template (MOSS)
Document Center, 61, 84
News, 95
overview of, 83
Personalization, 86–87
Publishing, 93–94
Publishing Site with Workflow, 95
Records Center, 84–86
Report Center, 90
Search Center, 91
Search Center with Tabs, 92–93
settings options, 82
Site Directory, 88–90
site usage summary reports (MOSS), 100
sites
categories of, 6–7
collection usage data, 53–54
components of, 6–7
creating
document workspace with Office, 31
meeting workspace with Outlook, 29–30
new document workspace from
document in site, 29
subsites, 27–28
top-level, 27
definitions, resetting, 46
deleting, 47–48
enabling and disabling features of, 55
hierarchy, viewing, 54
layouts of
blog sites, 19–20
meeting workspaces, 13–18
overview of, 7
team sites, document workspaces, and
wiki sites, 7–13
linking new Outlook meeting to existing
meeting workspace, 30
managing security of
collection administrators, 40
permission inheritance, changing, 35–36
permission levels, 36–39
SharePoint groups, 32–35
MOSS
Content and Structure page, 97–99
creating, 96–97
navigation options
customizing, 41
navigation bar, customizing, 44–45
Quick Launch options, configuring, 42–43
Tree View options, configuring, 41–42
navigation
through, 21–22, 25
within blog sites, 24–25
within meeting workspaces, 23–24
within team sites, document workspaces,
and wiki sites, 22–23
overview of, 5–6
Recycle Bin, 56–57
regional settings, configuring, 46–47
search results, working with, 50
search tools, 50
search visibility, managing, 51
templates
availability of, 48
creating, 48–49
deleting, 50
editing, 49
managing, 48
overview of, 6
themes, updating, 46
updating title, description URL and logo,
40–41
usage data, 51–53
Sites and Workspaces page, deleting site from
within, 47–48
Sites in Category, 321
slide library
creating, 256
editing slides, 257
managing, 260–261
presentation, creating, 258
publishing slides, 256
updating slides in linked presentation, 259
working with, 256
slide show feature, picture library, 245
Social Meeting Workspace template, 17
solutions for document management
benefits of, 370–371
overview of, 354
RFP response example
Presentation Materials site, creating and
configuring, 359–362
process definition, 355
process walk-through, 364–368
requirements, 354
resource layout, 358
Resources site, creating and configuring,
358
RFP Responses site, creating and
configuring, 362–364
Sales site, creating and configuring, 362
SharePoint components, 355
SharePoint environment layout, 356–357
tips for, 371–372
sorting
documents in document library, 217
lists, 120
pictures in picture library, 239
SQL Server 2005 Analysis Services, creating KPI
lists by retrieving data from, 203–204
Standard view (lists), 143–147
Start From an Existing View section (Create
View page), 150
start options and workflow, 273
starting workflow instance on list item, 276
statistics on site
collection usage data, 53–54
usage data, 51–53
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targeting web parts, 342–343
task list and workflow, 272
task list web parts, creating web part
connection between, 315–316
task pane links (Datasheet view), 167–168
Tasks list, 358, 365, 378, 383, 385
Tasks list template, 187–188
team coordination and project collaboration,
374
Team Site template, 11–12
team site
layout of, 7–13
navigation within, 22–23
overview of, 6
teams
access to information by, 352
dynamic and distributed, 350, 352
for document creation, 350
RFP response solution, 355
templates
See also list template; site template
availability of, 48
Basic Meeting Workspace, 15
Blank Meeting Workspace, 15
Blank Site, 11
Blog Site, 20
Collaboration Portal, 59
creating, 48–49
Decision Meeting Workspace, 16
deleting, 50
Document Library, 212, 225–226, 231
Document Workspace, 12, 357–358
editing, 49
form library and, 236
libraries, 211
managing, 48
Multipage Meeting Workspace, 17, 297
overview of, 6
Personalization Site, 341
Recurring Meeting Workspace, 18
saving site as, 384
Social Meeting Workspace, 17
Team Site, 11–12
use of, 21
Wiki Site, 13
terminating workflow, 278
Text Box list template, 197–198
theme of site, updating, 46
Things to Bring list template, 198–199
This Week in Pictures, collaboration portal, 63
thread, 176
Three-state workflow
creating on Issues list, 274–275
description of, 271
Thumbnails view, 238
title
of document library, 224
of site, updating, 40–41
title area
blog sites, 20
meeting workspaces, 14
team sites, document workspaces, and wiki
sites, 9
title bar for Web Part pages, editing, 304
Toolbar Type property (List View web part), 314
toolbars. See Page Editing toolbar
tools for document creation, 350
Tools menu (Page Editing toolbar), 308
top site link
team sites, document workspaces, and wiki
sites, 8
using, 22
Top Sites page, 67, 321
top-level site
creating, 27
security for, 32
tracking group of list templates
Agenda, 195–196
Calendar, 179–186
Issue Tracking, 190–191
Links, 177–178
Project Tasks, 188–190
Survey, 192–195
Tasks, 187–188
tracking processes, 371
training, 372
translatable columns (MOSS), 115
Translation Management Library, 254–255
Translation Management workflow, 206, 284
Tree View options, configuring, 41–42
2007 Microsoft Office system, 1–2
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storage for project materials, 375
.stp file, 152
style of views, 145
style sheets (MOSS), updating, 83
subscribing
to alerts
document and list item, 328
list and library, 326–327
MOSS search, 324–325
to lists via RSS, 162
subsite
creating, 27–28
navigating
within meeting workspaces, 24
within team sites, document workspaces,
and wiki sites, 23
Summary Links web part and Basic pages, 299
Survey list template
branching and separators, 193–194
overview of, 192
Rating Scale answer type, 193
responding to surveys, 194–195
Synchronize List action (Excel), 165
405
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Unclassified Reports library, 85
unghosting, 322
Unlink List/Unlink action (Excel), 165
unpinning personalization site from My Site,
344
updating
default welcome page for sites, 81
link order in navigation bar, 45
master pages and style sheets, 83
navigation options (MOSS), 74
page layout and site template settings, 82
Presentation Materials site, 361
profile information, 339
searchable columns, 80
Site Directory site, 97
site theme, 46
site title, description, URL, and logo, 40–41
slides in linked presentation, 259
Upload Document screen, 213–214
Upload link, 213
Upload Multiple Files link, 214
uploading
documents to document library, 213
forms to form library, 233
multiple files to document library, 214
pictures to picture library, 240
URL of site, updating, 40–41
usage reports (MOSS)
accessing, 100
overview of, 51–52, 99
site collection users, 102
site destination pages, 105
site home page, 105
site referrers, 103
site requests, 102
site usage summary, 100
viewing, 53
User Information page, 338
User Report, 51
users
adding
to list security, 129–130
to SharePoint groups, 34–35
removing from SharePoint groups, 35
nV
variation labels (MOSS), 114–115
Variation Labels page, 114
variation logs (MOSS), 115
Version History page, 220
versioning
document library and, 220, 224
enabling, 124–125
Issue Tracking list template and, 190
Versioning Settings page, Require Check Out
setting, 227
Versions Saved page, 124, 220
View All Site Content link, 22, 25
View All Site content option (Site Actions
menu), 72
View List on Server/Open in Browser action
(Excel), 165
View My Existing Alerts on This Site link, 330
View Properties link, 217
View Properties page, 241, 295
View Reports option (Site Actions menu), 72
View Workflow Reports page, 280
viewing
auditing reports, 110–111
Basic pages, 299
collection usage reports for sites, 54
hierarchy of site collections, 54
items in Recycle Bin, 56–57
lists, 121
previous version of document in document
library, 220
SharePoint group permissions, 35
usage reports for sites, 53
variation logs, 115
Web Part pages, 303
workflow instance on list item, 277
workflow reports, 279–280
views
creating, 150
document library and, 217–218, 230
form library and, 232, 236
lists
Calendar, 147–148
formats, 142
Gantt, 149
Standard and Datasheet, 143–147
picture library and, 238, 247
Translation Management Library and, 254
wiki page library and, 249, 253
visibility and project collaboration, 375, 388
nW
Web Part Gallery screen, 318
Web Part pages
adding web parts to, 310–311
creating, 301–303
editing, 304–305, 321
overview of, 300
viewing, 303
web parts
adding to pages, 310–311
Business Data group, 319
Closed Web Parts gallery, 318
connections, 315–316
Content Rollup group, 319
custom, 321
Dashboard group, 320
Default group, 320
description of, 5, 297, 300, 310
editing properties, 313–314
exporting and importing, 316–318
Filter group, 320
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workflow
Approval, 282
Collect Feedback, 283
Collect Signatures, 284
creating
on Issues list, 274–275
on list content types, 276
on site content types, 276
overview of, 273
custom, 368
definition of, 271
Disposition Approval, 284
integration with Office 2007, 271
list structure underlying, 272
management of
deleting workflows from list, 281
overview of, 278
reports, 279–280
settings, editing, 279
SharePoint Designer 2007 and, 285–286
starting new instance of on list item, 276
terminating, 278
Three-state, 271, 274–275
Translation Management, 284
viewing status and managing instance of on
list item, 277
workflow capabilities, 5
Workflow menu (Page Editing toolbar), 307
Workflow Status page, 277–278
Workflows page, 276
workspace. See document workspace; meeting
workspace
WSS. See Windows SharePoint Services
3.0 (WSS)
nY
Yes/No columns, 137
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Miscellaneous group, 320
organizing on pages, 312
Outlook Web Access group, 320
Search group, 320
Server gallery, 321
SharePoint Designer 2007 and, 321–322
Site Collection gallery, 317–319
Site Directory group, 321
targeting, 342–343
Welcome menu
My Settings option, 330
Personal View options, 345
Personalize This Page option, 344
Reset Page Content option, 346
Show Shared View option, 346
Sign In as Different User option, 346–347
Sign Out option, 346
team sites, document workspaces, and wiki
sites, 8
welcome page (MOSS), defining, 81
Welcome pages, 305
wiki page library
adding wiki page, 251
creating, 249
default display of, 249
editing wiki page, 250
managing, 252–254
navigating pages, 249
Page History screen, 252
views, 249, 253
working with, 249
wiki site
layout of, 7–13
navigation within, 22–23
overview of, 6
Wiki Site template, 13
Windows Address Book, exporting contacts to,
173
Windows authentication logon prompt, 346
Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 (WSS)
advantages of, 3
components of, 5
overview of, 2
solutions created, 4
407
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