Norman Lady Cargo Operating Manual

Norman Lady Cargo Operating Manual
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
List of Contents
Issue and Update
Cargo Symbols and Colour Scheme
Electrical and Instrument Symbols
Introduction
Part 1: Design Concept of the Vessel
1.1
Rules and Regulations
1.3
Cargo System Technology
1.3.1 Cargo Containment System Principle
1.3.2 Kvaerner-Moss Cargo Containment
1.3.3 Failure of Containment
1.3.4 Void Spaces
1.4
2.1d
Relative Density of Methane and Air
2.2.1a Flammability of Methane, Oxygen and Nitrogen Mixtures
2.2.2a Structural Steel: Ductile to Brittle Transition Curve
Part 3: Distributed Control System (DCS)
3.1
Cargo Control Room (CCR) Arrangement
3.2
Vessel Control System
3.2.1 Damatic XD Distributed Control System (DCS) Overview
3.2.2 Operator Stations
3.2.3 Screen Displays
3.2.4 Operation
3.2.5 Mimics
3.2.6 Cargo and Ballast Operations
Principal Particulars
1.1.1 Ship Principal Particulars
1.1.2 Principal Particulars of Cargo Machinery
1.1.3 General Arrangement
1.1.4 Tanks and Capacity Plan
1.2
Hazardous Areas and Zones
Illustrations
1.1.3a
1.1.3b
1.1.4a
1.3.2a
1.3.2b
1.3.2c
1.3.2d
1.3.2e
1.3.4a
1.3.4b
1.4a
General Arrangement
Compressor Room Layout
Tank Capacity Plan
Construction of Containment System - Equatorial Ring and
Wedge Space
Construction of Containment System - Rupture Discs
Construction of Containment System - Dome and Tank Access
Construction of Containment System - Insulation
Construction of Containment System - Piping Insulation
Void Spaces and Ventilation
Relationship between Corrosion and Relative Humidity
Hazardous Areas and Gas Dangerous Zones
Illustrations
3.1a
3.1b
3.2.1a
3.2.2a
3.2.3a
3.2.3b
3.2.4a
3.2.5a
3.2.6a
Cargo Control Room Layout
Cargo Control Room Console
Distributed Control System Overview
Operator Station Keyboard
Screen Display
Operating Panel Display
Operation
Mimics
Ballast Operating Display Screens
Part 4: Cargo and Ballast Systems
4.1
Cargo Containment and Monitoring Systems
4.1.1 Liquid Leakage Detection
4.1.2 Temperature and Pressure Monitoring System
4.1.3 High Level and Overfill Alarm System
4.2
Cargo Piping System
4.2.1 Liquid Line
4.2.2 Vapour Line
4.2.3 Spray Line
4.2.4 Fuel Gas Line
4.2.5 Vent Masts
4.2.6 Inerting/Aeration Line
Part 2: Properties of LNG
2.1
Physical Properties and Composition of LNG
4.3
2.2
Characteristics of LNG
2.2.1 Flammability of Methane, Oxygen and Nitrogen Mixtures
2.2.2 Supplementary Characteristics
Cargo Pumps
4.3.1 Main Cargo Pumps
4.3.2 Stripping/Spray Pumps
4.4
Gas Compressors
4.4.1 High Duty Compressors
4.4.2 Low Duty Compressor
4.5
Cargo Heaters
4.6
LNG Vaporisers
4.7
Void Space Systems
2.3
Health Hazards
Illustrations
2.1a
2.1b
2.1c
Issue: 2
Vapour Pressure Diagram of Liquid Cargoes
Physical Properties of LNG
Composition of LNG from Major Export Terminals (Mol%)
Cargo Operating Manual
4.7.1
4.7.2
4.7.3
Inert Gas Generators
Nitrogen Generator
Void Space Dryers
4.8
Custody Transfer System
4.8.1 Custody Transfer System (CTS)
4.8.2 Float Level Gauges
4.8.3 Loading Computer
4.9
Gas Detection Systems
4.9.1 Fixed Gas Detection Systems
4.9.2 Portable Gas Detection Instruments
4.10
Valve Remote Control and Emergency Shutdown System
4.10.1 Cargo Valve Remote Control System
4.10.2 Emergency Shutdown System
4.10.3 Ship Shore Link
4.11
Relief Systems
4.11.1 Cargo Tank Relief Valves
4.11.2 Line Relief Valves
4.11.3 Void Space Relief Valves
4.12
Ballast System
4.12.1 Ballast Piping
4.12.2 Ballast Control and Indicating System
Illustrations
4.1.1a
4.1.2a
4.1.3a
4.2a
4.2b
4.2.3a
4.3.1a
4.3.1b
4.3.2a
4.4.1a
4.4.1b
4.4.2a
4.4.2b
4.5a
4.6a
4.7.1a
4.7.2a
4.7.2b
4.7.3a
4.8.1a
4.8.2a
4.8.3a
4.9.1a
4.9.1b
4.9.1c
4.9.2a
Leakage Pipes
Temperature and Pressure Monitoring System
High Level and Overfill Alarm System
Cargo Piping System
Manifold Arrangement
Spray Pipes in the Cargo Tanks
Main Cargo Pump
Pump Arrangement in Cargo Tank
Spray Pump
High Duty Compressor
High Duty Compressor Performance Curves
Low Duty Compressor
Low Duty Compressor Performance Curves
Cargo Heater
LNG Main Vaporiser
Inert Gas System
Nitrogen Generator
Nitrogen System
Void Space Dryers
CTS Printout
Whessoe Float Level Gauge
Loading Computer Screen
Ballast and Void Spaces Gas Sampling System
Boil Off Gas Pipe Vent Duct Gas Sampling System
Cargo Areas Gas Sampling System
Portable Gas Detectors
Front Matter - Page 1 of 9
Norman Lady
4.10.1a Cargo Valve Remote Control System
4.10.1b Cargo Gate Valve
4.10.2a Fibre Optic Ship-Shore Link System and Pneumatic ESD
Circuit
4.10.2b Emergency Shutdown Logic
4.11.1a Cargo Tank Relief Valves
4.11.3a Void Space Relief Valves
4.11.3b Monitoring of Pressure Relatives (Tank-Void Space-Atmosphere)
4.12.1a Ballast Piping System
5.5.2b
5.5.2c
5.5.2d
5.5.3a
5.5.3b
5.5.3c
5.5.3d
Fire Fighting Equipment Decks 3 and 4
Fire Fighting Equipment Decks 5 and 6
Fire Fighting Equipment Upper Deck and Engine Room
Lifesaving Equipment Decks 1 and 2
Lifesaving Equipment Decks 3 and 4
Lifesaving Equipment Decks 5 and 6
Lifesaving Equipment Upper Deck and Engine Room
6.1
Operating Procedures Overview
5.1
Fire Detection System
6.2
5.2
Fire Fighting Systems
5.2.1 Fire and Deck Wash System
5.2.2 Water Spray System
5.2.3 Forward Emergency Fire Pump System
5.2.4 Dry Powder Systems
5.2.5 CO2 System
5.2.6 Emergency Headquarters
Post Dry Dock Operation
6.2.1 Drying Cargo Tanks and Void Spaces
6.2.2 Inerting Cargo Tanks
6.2.3 Gassing Up Cargo Tanks
6.2.4 Cooling Down Cargo Tanks
5.4
5.5
Cargo Compressor Room Systems
5.3.1 Cooling Water System
5.3.2 Steam to Cargo Consumers
Deck Machinery and Systems
5.4.1 Mooring Winches Windlasses and Deck Steam System
5.4.2 Mooring Plan
5.4.3 Pilot and Accommodation Ladders
5.4.4 Deck Cranes
Safety Plan
Illustrations
5.1a
5.2.1a
5.2.2a
5.2.3a
5.2.4a
5.2.4b
5.2.5a
5.3.1a
5.3.2a
5.4.1a
5.4.1b
5.4.2a
5.4.3a
5.4.3b
5.4.4a
5.5.1a
5.5.1b
5.5.1c
5.5.1d
5.5.2a
Issue: 2
Fire Detection System
Fire and Deck Wash System
Water Spray System
Forward Fire Pump System
Dry Powder Systems
Dry Powder Systems: Hose Boxes and Units
CO2 System
Cargo Plant Water Cooling System
Steam to Deck Consumers
Mooring Winches and Deck Steam System
Winch/Windlass
Mooring Arrangement
Required Boarding Arrangement for Pilot
Pilot and Accommodation Ladders
Deck Cranes
Fire Detection and Alarms Decks 1 and 2
Fire Detection and Alarms Decks 3 and 4
Fire Detection and Alarms Decks 5 and 6
Fire Detection and Alarms Upper Deck and Engine Room
Fire Fighting Equipment Decks 1 and 2
6.4.3a Cargo Loading with Vapour Return to Shore via the High
Duty Compressors
6.4.3b Completing Loading
6.4.4a Deballasting
6.5.1a Loaded Voyage with Normal Boil-Off Gas Burning
6.6.1a Preparations for Discharging
6.6.2a Liquid Line Cooldown
6.6.3a Arm Cooldown Before Unloading
6.6.4a Discharging Cargo
6.6.4b Discharging
6.6.5a Ballasting
6.7.1a Stripping and Line Draining
6.7.2a Tank Warm Up
6.7.3a Inerting
6.7.4a Aerating
Part 6: Cargo Operations
Part 5: Cargo Auxiliary and Deck Systems
5.3
Cargo Operating Manual
6.3
Ballast Passage
6.3.1 Cooling Down Cargo Tanks Prior to Arrival
6.4
Loading
6.4.1 Preparations for Loading
6.4.2 Cargo Lines Cooldown
6.4.3 To Load Cargo with Vapour Return to Shore via the High
Duty Compressors
6.4.4 Deballasting
6.5
6.6
6.7
Loaded Voyage With Boil-Off Gas Burning
6.5.1 Loaded Voyage with Normal Boil-Off Gas Burning
Discharging with Gas Return to Shore
6.6.1 Preparations for Discharging
6.6.2 Liquid Line Cooldown
6.6.3 Arm Cooldown Before Unloading
6.6.4 Discharging Cargo
6.6.5 Ballasting
Pre Dry Dock Operations
6.7.1 Stripping and Line Draining
6.7.2 Tank Warm-Up
6.7.3 Inerting
6.7.4 Aerating
Illustrations
6.1a
6.2.1a
6.2.2a
6.2.3a
6.2.4a
6.2.4b
6.3.1a
6.4.1a
6.4.2a
Operating Procedures Schedule
Drying Cargo Tanks and Void Spaces
Inerting Cargo Tanks
Gassing Up Cargo Tanks
Cargo Tanks Cooldown Rates
Cooling Down Cargo Tanks During Loading
Cooling Down Cargo Tanks Prior to Arrival
Preparations for Loading
Cargo Lines Cool Down
Part 7: Emergency Procedures
7.1
LNG Vapour Leakage to Insulation Space
7.2
LNG Liquid Leakage to Insulation and Void Space
7.2.1 Use of Eductors for LNG removal
7.3
Water Leakage to Void Spaces
7.3.1 Use of Eductors for Water Removal
7.4
Failure of Cargo Pumps - Emergency Discharge
7.5
Fire and Emergency Breakaway
7.6
One Tank Operation
7.6.1 One Tank Warm Up
7.6.2 One Tank Gas Freeing
7.6.3 One Tank Aerating
7.7
Ship to Ship Transfer
7.7.1 General Safety
7.7.2 Pre-Mooring Preparations
7.7.3 Mooring
7.7.4 Transfer Operations
7.7.5 Unmooring
7.8
LNG Jettison
7.9
General Emergency Procedures
Illustrations
7.1a
7.2.1a
7.3.1a
7.4a
7.6.1a
7.6.2a
7.6.3a
Vapour Leakage to Insulation Space
Use of Eductors for LNG Removal
Use of Eductors for Water Removal
Emergency Discharge
One Tank Warm Up
One Tank Gas Freeing
One Tank Aerating
Front Matter - Page 2 of 9
Norman Lady
Issue and Update Control
This manual is provided with a system of issue and update
control. Controlling documents ensures that:
•
Documents conform to a standard format;
•
Amendments are carried out by relevant personnel;
•
Each document or update to a document is approved
before issue;
•
A history of updates is maintained;
•
Updates are issued to all registered holders of
documents;
•
Sections are removed from circulation when obsolete.
Cargo Operating Manual
This manual was produced by:
WORLDWIDE MARINE TECHNOLOGY LTD.
For any new issue or update contact:
The Technical Director
WMT Technical Office
The Court House
15 Glynne Way
Hawarden
Deeside, Flintshire
CH5 3NS, UK
E-Mail: [email protected]
Document control is achieved by the use of the footer
provided on every page and the issue and update table
below.
In the right hand corner of each footer are details of the
pages section number and title followed by the page
number of the section. In the left hand corner of each
footer is the issue number.
Details of each section are given in the first column of the
issue and update control table. The table thus forms a
matrix into which the dates of issue of the original
document and any subsequent updated sections are located.
The information and guidance contained herein is produced
for the assistance of certificated officers who by virtue of
such certification are deemed competent to operate the
vessel to which such information and guidance refers. Any
conflict arising between the information and guidance
provided herein and the professional judgement of such
competent officers must be immediately resolved by
reference to Höegh Fleet Shipping Co. Ltd Technical
Operations Office.
Issue: 2
Front Matter - Page 3 of 9
Norman Lady
List of Contents
Cargo Symbols and Colour Scheme
Electrical and Instrumentation Symbols
Introduction
Issue 1
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
Text
1.1
1.1.1
1.1.2
1.1.3
1.1.4
1.2
1.3
1.3.1
1.3.2
1.3.4
1.4
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
Illustrations
1.1.3a
1.1.3b
1.1.4a
1.3.2a
1.3.2b
1.3.2c
1.3.2d
1.3.2e
1.3.4a
1.3.4b
1.4a
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
Text
2.1
2.2
2.2.1
2.2.2
2.3
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
Illustrations
2.1a
2.1b
2.1c
2.1d
2.2.1a
2.2.2a
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
Issue: 2
Issue 2
April 2005
April 2005
April 2005
Sept. 2005
Sept. 2005
Sept. 2005
Issue 3
Issue 4
Cargo Operating Manual
Issue 1
Text
3.1
3.2
3.2.1
3.2.2
3.2.3
3.2.4
3.2.5
3.2.6
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
Illustrations
3.1a
3.1b
3.2.1a
3.2.2a
3.2.3a
3.2.3b
3.2.4a
3.2.5a
3.2.6a
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
Text
4.1
4.1.1
4.1.2
4.1.3
4.2
4.2.1
4.2.2
4.2.3
4.2.4
4.2.5
4.2.6
4.3
4.3.1
4.3.2
4.4
4.4.1
4.4.2
4.5
4.6
4.7
4.7.1
4.7.2
4.7.3
4.8
4.8.1
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
Issue 2
Issue 3
Issue 4
April 2005
Sept. 2005
Front Matter - Page 4 of 9
Norman Lady
4.8.2
4.8.3
4.9
4.9.1
4.9.2
4.10
4.10.1
4.10.2
4.10.3
4.11
4.11.1
4.11.2
4.11.3
4.12
4.12.1
4.12.2
Issue 1
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
Illustrations
4.1.1a
4.1.2a
4.1.3a
4.2a
4.2b
4.2.3a
4.3.1a
4.3.1b
4.3.2a
4.4.1a
4.4.1b
4.4.2a
4.4.2b
4.5a
4.6a
4.7.1a
4.7.2a
4.7.2b
4.7.3a
4.8.1a
4.8.2a
4.8.3a
4.9.1a
4.9.1b
4.9.1c
4.9.2a
4.10.1a
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
Issue: 2
Issue 2
Issue 3
Issue 4
Cargo Operating Manual
4.10.1b
4.10.2a
4.10.2b
4.11.1a
4.11.3a
4.11.3b
4.12.1a
Issue 1
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
Text
5.1
5.2
5.2.1
5.2.2
5.2.3
5.2.4
5.2.5
5.2.6
5.3
5.3.1
5.3.2
5.4
5.4.1
5.4.2
5.4.3
5.4.4
5.5
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
Illustrations
5.1a
5.2.1a
5.2.2a
5.2.3a
5.2.4a
5.2.4b
5.2.5a
5.3.1a
5.3.2a
5.4.1a
5.4.1b
5.4.2a
5.4.3a
5.4.3b
5.4.4a
5.5.1a
5.5.1b
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
Issue 2
Issue 3
Issue 4
Front Matter - Page 5 of 9
Norman Lady
5.5.1c
5.5.1d
5.5.2a
5.5.2b
5.5.2c
5.5.2d
5.5.3a
5.5.3b
5.5.3c
5.5.3d
Issue 1
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
Text
6.1
6.2
6.2.1
6.2.2
6.2.3
6.2.4
6.3
6.3.1
6.4
6.4.1
6.4.2
6.4.3
6.4.4
6.5
6.5.1
6.6
6.6.1
6.6.2
6.6.3
6.6.4
6.6.5
6.7
6.7.1
6.7.2
6.7.3
6.7.4
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
April 2005
Illustrations
6.1a
6.2.1a
6.2.2a
6.2.3a
6.2.4a
6.2.4b
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
April 2005
Issue: 2
Issue 2
April 2005
April 2005
April 2005
April 2005
April 2005
April 2005
April 2005
April 2005
April 2005
April 2005
April 2005
April 2005
April 2005
April 2005
April 2005
April 2005
April 2005
April 2005
Issue 3
Issue 4
6.3.1a
6.4.1a
6.4.2a
6.4.3a
6.4.3b
6.4.4a
6.5.1a
6.6.1a
6.6.2a
6.6.3a
6.6.4a
6.6.4b
6.6.5a
6.7.1a
6.7.2a
6.7.3a
6.7.4a
Text
7.1
7.2
7.2.1
7.3
7.3.1
7.4
7.5
7.6
7.6.1
7.6.2
7.6.3
7.7
7.7.1
7.7.2
7.7.3
7.7.4
7.7.5
7.8
7.9
Illustrations
7.1a
7.2.1a
7.3.1a
7.4a
7.6.1a
7.6.2a
Cargo Operating Manual
Issue 1
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
Issue 2
Issue 3
Issue 4
April 2005
April 2005
April 2005
April 2005
April 2005
April 2005
April 2005
April 2005
April 2005
September 2004 Sept. 2005
Sept. 2005
February 2004
Sept. 2005
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
February 2004
Front Matter - Page 6 of 9
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Cargo Symbols and Colour Scheme
Stop Valve
H
P
Gate Valve
Intermediate Position
Control
Mud Box
Thermostatic Temp.
Regulating Valve
Simplex Strainer
HB
Air Horn
Tank Penetration
Fire Hose Box
Air Regulating Valve
Colour Scheme
Butterfly Valve
Screw Down Non-Return
Valve
Lift Check Non-Return
Valve
P
H
S
P
H
Pneumatic
Quick-Closing Valve
Y-Type Strainer
Hydraulic
Quick-Closing Valve
Steam Trap With Strainer
and Drain Cock
Accumulator
Flame Arrester
Solenoid Actuator
Sounding Head with
Filling Cap
Not Connected
Crossing Pipe
Normally Open
or
Normally Closed
Cylinder Piston Actuator
Hopper Without Cover
Connected Crossing Pipe
FB
Foam Box
FM
Flow Meter
Steam
N.O or N.C
Condensate
Inert Gas
Dry Air
Moist Air
Swing Check Valve
Drain Trap
LNG Liquid
Spring
Vent Pipe
3-Way Valve
Weight
Vent Pipe with
Flame Screen
Blind (Blank) Flange
Self-Closing Valve
Float
Flow Meter
Spectacle Flange
( Open, Shut)
Hose Valve
LNG Vapour
T Pipe
LNG Vapour (Warm)
Wire Quick-Closing Valve
Centrifugal Type Pump
Observation Glass
Level Gauge
(Cylindrical Type)
Level Gauge
(Float Type)
Nitrogen
Fresh Water
Lubricating Oil
Orifice
Auto Filter
P1
P2
Safety / Relief Valve
Gear Type Pump
Pressure Reducing Valve
Screw Pump
Deck Stand (Manual)
Overboard Discharge
Deck Stand (Hydraulic)
Flexible Hose Joint
Ballast/Sea Water
Compressed Air
Bilge Water/Steam Exhaust
Fire Main/Wash/Spray Water
H
CO2 Smothering
2-Way Cock (S-Type)
Mono Pump
Angled Screw Down
Non-Return Valve
Diesel Oil
Storm Valve
3-Way Swing Valves
P
Issue: 1
3-Way Cock
(L-Type / T-Type)
Reciprocating Type Pump
Magnetic Valve
Spool Piece
4-Way Cock
Hand Pump
Flow Control, Diaphragm
Type Valve
Filter
Hand Operated
Eductor (Ejector)
Non-Return Ball Valve
Discharge/Drain
Hydraulic Operated
(Open/Shut)
Suction Bellmouth
Filter Regulating Valve
With Strainer
Relief Valve
Pneumatic Operated
(Open/Shut)
Rose Box
Surface Valve
Restrictor
Electrical Signal
Instrumentation
Front Matter - Page 7 of 9
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Electrical and Instrument Symbols
Transformer
I
P
Current to Press
Converter
I
Press to Current
Converter
P
Making Contact
Breaking
Disconnection Switch
Snap Switch
Earth
Shield Wire
Battery
GM
Governor Motor
DG
Diesel Generator
M
AC Induction Motor
CP
DPI
DPS
DPT
FD
FS
FT
IL
LAH
LAL
LI
LIC
LS
LT
PAH
PAL
PI
PIC
PIAH
PIAL
PIAHL
PS
PT
SAH
TAH
TAL
TI
TIC
TIAH
TIAL
TIAHL
TS
TT
VAH
VAL
VCA
VCI
VCT
VI
VT
XS
ZI
ZS
Compound Gauge
Differential Pressure Indicator
Differential Pressure Switch
Differential Pressure Transmitter
Flow Detector
Flow Switch
Flow Transmitter
Indication Lamp
Level Alarm High
Level Alarm Low
Level Indicator
Level Indicating Controller
Level Switch
Level Transmitter
Pressure Alarm High
Pressure Alarm Low
Pressure Indicator
Pressure Indicating Controller
Pressure Indicator Alarm High
Pressure Indicator Alarm Low
Pressure Indicator Alarm High Low
Pressure Switch
Pressure Transmitter
Salinity Alarm High
Temperature Alarm High
Temperature Alarm Low
Temperature Indicator
Temperature Indicating Controller
Temperature Indicator Alarm High
Temperature Indicator Alarm Low
Temperature Indicator Alarm High Low
Temperature Switch
Temperature Transmitter
Viscosity Alarm High
Viscosity Alarm Low
Vacuum Alarm
Vacuum Indicator
Vacuum Transmitter
Viscosity Indicator
Viscosity Transmitter
Auxiliary Unspecified Switch
Position Indicator
Limit Switch
Zener Diode
XXX
XXX
XXXX
Issue: 1
Locally Mounted
Instrument
Remotely Mounted
Instrument
Front Matter - Page 8 of 9
Norman Lady
Introduction
General
Although the ship is supplied with shipbuilder’s plans and manufacturer’s
instruction books, there is no single handbook which gives guidance on
operating complete systems, as distinct from individual items of machinery.
The purpose of this manual is to fill some of the gaps and to provide the ship’s
officers with additional information not otherwise available on board. It is
intended to be used in conjunction with the other plans and instruction books
already on board and in no way replaces or supersedes them.
In addition to containing detailed information of the cargo equipment and
related systems, the CARGO SYSTEM and OPERATING MANUAL contains
safety procedures and procedures to be observed in emergencies and after
accidents. Quick reference to the relevant information is assisted by division
of the manual into parts and sections, detailed in the general list of contents on
the preceding pages. Reference is made in this book to appropriate plans or
instruction books.
In many cases the best operating practice can only be learned by experience.
Where the information in this manual is found to be inadequate or incorrect,
details should be sent to the Hoegh Fleet Services AS LNG Operations Office
so that revisions may be made to the manuals.
Safe Operation
The safety of the ship depends on the care and attention of all on board. Most
safety precautions are a matter of common sense and good housekeeping and
are detailed in the various manuals available onboard. However, records show
that even experienced operators sometimes neglect safety precautions through
over-familiarity and the following basic rules must be remembered at all times.
1 Never continue to operate any machine or equipment which
appears to be potentially unsafe or dangerous and always report
such a condition immediately.
In the design of equipment and machinery, devices are included to ensure that,
as far as possible, in the event of a fault occurring, whether on the part of the
equipment or the operator, the equipment concerned will cease to function
without danger to personnel or damage to the machine. If these safety devices
are neglected, the operation of any machine is potentially dangerous.
Description
The concept of this Operating Manual is based on the presentation of operating
procedures in the form of one general sequential chart (algorithm) which gives
a step-by-step procedure for performing operations.
The manual consists of introductory sections which describe the systems and
equipment fitted and their method of operation related to a schematic diagram
where applicable. This is then followed where required by detailed operating
procedures for the system or equipment involved.
The overview of machinery operations, as detailed in Section 1, consists of a
basic operating algorithm which sets out the procedure for operations from preparing the plant for operation from dead ship condition, to shutting down the
plant in readiness for dry dock. The relevant illustration and operation section
number is located on the right hand side of each box.
Each machinery operation consists of a detailed introductory section which
describes the objectives and methods of performing the operation related to the
appropriate flow sheet which shows pipelines in use and directions of flow
within the pipelines.
Details of valves which are OPEN during the different operations are provided
in-text for reference.
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustrations
All illustrations are referred to in the text and are located either in-text where
sufficiently small or above the text, so that both the text and illustration are
accessible when the manual is laid face up. When text concerning an
illustration covers several pages the illustration is duplicated above each page
of text.
Where flows are detailed in an illustration these are shown in colour. A key of
all colours and line styles used in an illustration is provided on the illustration.
Details of colour coding used in the illustrations are given in the colour
scheme.
Symbols given in the manual adhere to international standards and keys to the
symbols used throughout the manual are given on the following pages.
Notices
The following notices occur throughout this manual:
WARNING
Warnings are given to draw reader’s attention to operation where
DANGER TO LIFE OR LIMB MAY OCCUR.
CAUTION
Cautions are given to draw reader’s attention to operations where
DAMAGE TO EQUIPMENT MAY OCCUR.
(Note: Notes are given to draw reader’s attention to points of interest or to
supply supplementary information.)
The valves and fittings identifications used in this manual are the same as those
used by Höegh Fleet Services AS.
2 Make a point of testing all safety equipment and devices regularly.
Always test safety trips before starting any equipment. In
particular, overspeed trips on auxiliary turbines must be tested
before putting the unit into operation.
3 Never ignore any unusual or suspicious circumstances, no matter
how trivial. Small symptoms often appear before a major failure
occurs.
4 Never underestimate the fire hazard of petroleum products,
whether fuel oil or cargo vapour.
Issue: 2
Front Matter - Page 9 of 9
Part 1
Design Concept of the Vessel
Norman Lady
Part 1 Design Concept of the Vessel
1.1 Principal Particulars
1.1.1 Ship Principal Particulars
Shipbuilder:
Yard number:
Ship name:
Year built:
Flag:
IMO number:
MMSI:
Port of registration:
Call sign:
Rosenberg Verft a.s.
Stavanger
Norway
196
Norman Lady
1973
Norwegian
7320344
259 903 000
Oslo
LAGX5
Type of ship:
Type of cargo:
Cargo tanks:
Stem:
Stern:
Steam driven LNG carrier
LNG/LPG
5 Moss type independent spherical
Bulbous bow and raked soft-nosed stem
Transom
Classification:
Det Norske Veritas
1A.1, Tanker for LNG,
(-163°C, 600 kg/m3, 0.25 bar) dat (-10ºC),
EO, ICE C
Regulation:
SOLAS 1974 and Protocol 1978, 1981 and 1983
Amendments to SOLAS
1974/Protocol 1978 as existing ship
MARPOL 1973 and Protocol 1978 IMO code for
existing ships carrying liquefied gases in bulk
USCG (foreign ship) Suez Canal
Deadweight at 10.64m draught:
Gross tonnage:
Net tonnage:
Issue: 1
50,746t
71,822t
21,546t
Length overall:
Length between perpendiculars:
Breadth moulded:
Depth moulded:
Service draught:
Summer draught:
Cargo tank capacity:
Fuel oil tank capacity:
Gas oil tank capacity:
Service speed:
Fuel oil consumption per day:
249.555m
237.0m
40.0m
23.0m
10.2m
10.641m
87,603m3
6,0677m3
194m3
17.5 knots
160 tonnes per day without boil-off
gas burning
Endurance/range at 17.5 knots:
13,200 nautical miles without
boil-off gas burning
Manning design complement:
Others:
Total:
30 ship personnel
10
40
Main Machinery
Heat cycle:
Regenerative cycle
Boilers
Maker:
Type:
Capacity:
Main Turbine
Maker:
Type:
Foster Wheeler
ESD III top fired water tube
44 tonnes/hour
(maximum 57 tonnes/hour)
513ºC 62.2 bar
Maximum continuous output:
General Electric
MST 141 cross compound
Impulse steam turbine
22,370kW
Main Electrical Power Generation
Maker:
Type:
Capacity:
No. of sets:
Stal Laval
VKI OF5HP turbine driven generator
1,690kW
1
Maker:
Type:
Capacity:
No. of sets:
Nohab
Polar SF 112 VS-F diesel-generators
1,500kW
2
Cargo Operating Manual
Cargo Tanks
Maker:
Type:
Material:
Design:
Tanks 1 and 5:
Tanks 2, 3 and 4:
Tanks 1 and 5 capacity:
Tanks 2, 3 and 4 capacity:
Safety valve setting:
Maximum specific gravity:
Maximum working pressure:
Maximum test pressure:
Minimum tank pressure:
Maximum specific weight LNG:
Kvaerner Brug AS
Spherical tank: equator suspension
by continuous skirt
9% nickel steel
Moss Rosenborg Verft
31.0 metres diameter
33.1 metres diameter
15,490m3
18,860m3
0.25kg/cm2
0.6 tonnes/m3
0.25 bar
2.15 bar
-0.05 bar
500kg/m3
Cargo Tank Safety Valves
Maker:
Type:
Capacity:
No. of sets:
Setting:
Luceat
R2101-HP
92,000Nm3/h
15 (3 sets each tank)
0.25 bar
Cargo Shore Connections:
2 x 16’ Liquid
Liquid crossover ND 400ASA 150
Raised face
1 x 12’ Gas
ND 350ASA 150
Raised face
Section 1.1.1 - Page 1 of 1
Norman Lady
1.1.2
Principal Particulars of Cargo Machinery
Main Cargo Pumps
Maker:
Type:
Capacity:
No. of sets:
JC Carter
60190-3450-32
Rated at 750m3/h x 120 mth
10 (2 per cargo tank)
Spray/Stripping Pumps
Maker:
Type:
Capacity:
No. of sets:
JC Carter
6337-2113-3
Rated at 20m3/h x 60 mth
2 (No.3 and 4 tanks)
High Duty Compressor
Maker:
Type:
Capacity:
No. of sets:
Airco Cryogenics
Steam turbine driven
10,750m3/h
2
Low Duty Compressor
Maker:
Type:
Capacity:
No. of sets:
Airco Cryogenics
Steam turbine driven
3,000m3/h
1
LNG Vaporiser
Maker:
Capacity:
Heating:
No. of sets:
Moss Verft
597,000m3/h
Steam at 10 bar
1
Gas Heater
Maker:
Type:
Capacity:
Heating:
No. of sets:
Moss Verft
Shell and tube
329,000kcal/h
Steam at 10 bar
2
Void Space Dryer
Maker:
Type:
Capacity:
No. of sets:
Rosenberg Verft
Contardo
75,000kcal/h
2
Void Space Vent Fan
Maker:
Capacity:
No. of sets:
Motor maker:
Type:
Output:
Nyborg
2,000m3/h
2
Newman
E250 MD
60kW
Vent Fan for Gas Double Pipe
Maker:
Nyborg
Capacity:
600m3/h
No. of sets:
2
Motor maker:
Newman
Type:
E100 LD/X
Output:
1kW
Nitrogen Generator
Maker:
Type:
Capacity:
Kvaerner Moss
‘Prism’ nitrogen system
21m3/h at 97% N2
Nitrogen Recirculating Fan
Maker:
Capacity:
No. of sets:
Motor maker:
Type:
Output:
Nyborg
2,000m3/h
2
Newman
E112 MD/X
2kW
Cargo Operating Manual
Inert Gas Generator
Maker:
Type:
Capacity:
Inert Gas
Dryer
No. of sets:
Moss Verft
LPU 2500-0.2
Gas oil burner: 2,500m3/h
1 x refrigeration/absorption
2
Ballast Pumps
Maker:
Type:
Capacity:
No. of sets:
Worthington
10-LNCV-12
1,200m3/h
2
LPG Reliquification Plant
Maker:
Type:
Kvaerner Brugs
Cascade
Nitrogen Generator Air Feed Compressor
Maker:
Kaeser
Type:
FW cooled screw compressor
Capacity:
50Nm3/h at 10 bar
No. of sets:
1
Nitrogen Storage Tanks
Maker:
Capacity:
No. of sets:
Linde
25m3 and 15m3
2
Nitrogen Dehumidifier
Maker;
Capacity:
Moss Verft
66,400Kcal/h
Inert Gas Dehumidifier Dryers
Maker:
Alfsen og Gunderson AS
Type:
AG-SR-122E and AG-SR-122S
Capacity:
2,500m3/h
Issue: 1
Section 1.1.2 - Page 1 of 1
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 1.1.3a General Arrangement
Elevation
Rope
Store
Cross Section
Fresh
Water
Chain
Locker
No.4
Cargo Tank
No.5
Cargo Tank
No.3
Cargo Tank
No.2
Cargo Tank
No.1
Cargo Tank
Deep
Tank
Fuel Oil
Steering
Compartment
No.5
Double
Bottom
Lower Cross
Tank Involved in No.3
Double Bottom
Tank Fuel Oil
No.4
Double
Bottom
No.3
Lower Cross
Water Ballast Tank
No.3
Double
Bottom
No.2
Lower Cross
Water Ballast Tank
No.2
Double
Bottom
No.1
Lower Cross
Water Ballast Tank
No.1
Double
Bottom
Fore Peak
Tank Dry
Side
Water Ballast
Pipe
Duct
Pipe
Duct
Double Bottom
Spare Water Ballast
Bottom
Water Ballast
Plan
Accommodation
Liquid
Nitrogen
LNG Compressor
Room
Manifold
Cargo Control
Room
Principal Dimensions
Liquid
Nitrogen
Issue: 1
Electric Motor
Room
LPG Compressor
Room
Length (Overall)
249.5m
Length (Between Perpendiculars)
237.0m
Breadth (Moulded)
40.0m
Depth (Moulded)
23.0m
Height from bottom/top of radio mast
48.4m
Section 1.1.3 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 1.1.3b Compressor Room Layout
Escape
Hatch
Vapour Heater
Vapour Heater
Entrance Door
Vaporiser
HD
Compressor
Vaporiser
Controllers
HD
Compressor
LD
Compressor
Cargo
Instrument
Air Receiver
Void Space Dryer/
Heat Exchangers
Issue: 1
Section 1.1.3 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
1.1.4 Tanks and Capacity Plan
CARGO TANKS
WATER BALLAST TANKS
( 100% Full, +20ºC)
Centres of Gravity
Forward of Ap
Ab Base
Centres of Gravity
Compartment
Frame
Side
Metres3
Feet3
Tonnes
19.75
No.1 Side Tank
88 - 95
Port/
Starboard
1,294
45,697
1,326
198.33
15.40
158.73
18.75
No.2 Side Tank
79 - 88
Port/
Starboard
1,704
60,176
1,747
167.76
16.51
5,013,946
123.27
18.75
No.3 Side Tank
66 - 79
Port/
Starboard
2,775
97,998
2,844
123.27
16.63
119,190.34
5,006,020
87.81
18.75
No.4 Side Tank
57 - 66
Port/
Starboard
1,762
62,225
1,806
78.41
16.31
549,320
97,837.20
4,109,163
53.34
19.75
No.5 Side Tank
39 - 57
Port/
Starboard
1,628
57,492
1,669
42.39
17.39
3,107,482
553,461.06
23,245,370
No.1 Lower Cross Tank
84 - 88
1141
40,294
1,170
176.28
4.92
No.2 Lower Cross Tank
75 - 79
1,499
52,937
1,537
141.00
4.37
No.3 Lower Cross Tank
66 - 70
1,499
52,937
1,537
109.54
4.37
No.1 Bottom Wing Tank
79 - 88
Port/
Starboard
1,733
61,200
1,776
164.74
3.56
Compartment
Metres3
Feet3
US Barrels
Cargo Tank No.1
15,556
543,355
97843.49
4,107,428
193.31
Cargo Tank No.2
18,953
669,320
119,209.80
5,006,813
Cargo Tank No.3
18,980
670,272
119,379.63
Cargo Tank No.4
18,950
669,214
Cargo Tank No.5
15,555
Total
87,994
US Gallons
NITROGEN BUFFER TANKS
Centres of Gravity
Forward of Ap
Ab Base
Compartment
Frame
Side
Metres3
Feet3
Tonnes
Nitrogen (N2)
59
Port
25
883
20.3
70.47
25.42
No.2 Bottom Wing Tank
70 - 79
Port/
Starboard
2,083
73,561
2,135
131.14
3.41
Nitrogen (N2)
59
Starboard
15
530
12.2
69.30
24.93
No.3 Bottom Wing Tank
57 - 70
Port/
Starboard
2,836
100,153
2,907
88.90
3.50
40
1413
32.5
Aft Peak
-7 - 17
262
9,253
269
5.49
12.41
No.2 D.B. Tank
61 - 88
3,187
112,548
3,262
134.32
1.07
39,218
1,384,972
40,200
Total
Forward of Ap
Ab Base
HEAVY FUEL OIL TANKS
Centres of Gravity
Metres3
Feet3
Tonnes
95 - 111
3382
119,434
3215
215.21
11.06
No.3 D.B. Tank
53 - 61
2522
89,063
2324
66.13
2.98
Compartment
Frame
Side
No.6 Side Tank
30 - 39
335
11,830
309
24.57
19.01
No.7 Side Tank
27 - 30
Starboard
6,574/6,534
232,157
6,057
No.8 D.B. Tank
18 - 30
Compartment
Frame
Deep Tank Forward
Total
Side
Port/
Starboard
Forward of Ap
Ab Base
GAS OIL TANKS
Total
Issue: 1
Metres3
Feet3
Tonnes
76
2,684
154
230
Centres of Gravity
Forward of Ap
Ab Base
64
19.42
20.08
5,438
130
16.63
1.66
8,122
194
Section 1.1.4 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 1.1.4a Tank Capacity Plan
No.6
H.F.O.
Tank
No.5 Ballast
Side Tank
No.4 Ballast
Side Tank
No.3 Ballast
Side Tank
No.2 Ballast
Side Tank
No.1 Ballast
Side Tank
Deep
Tank
Fuel Oil
Aft Peak
Tank
No.5 D.B.
Tank
No.7 D.B.
Tank
No.8 D.B.
Tank
0
5
10
15
20
25
No.6 D.B.
Tank
30
No.7
Lubricating
Oil Side Tank
I, II & III (Port)
No. 10
Feed Water
Tank
35
40
45
No.3 Bottom
Wing Tank
No.4 D.B.
Tank
No.2 Bottom
Wing Tank
No.3 Lower
Cross Tank
50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57
58
No.1 Bottom
Wing Tank
No.2 Lower
Cross Tank
No.3 D.B. Tank
No.1 Lower
Cross Tank
No.2 D.B. Tank
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
No.4 Ballast Side Tank (Port)
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
No.3 Ballast Side Tank (Port)
Fore Peak
Tank Dry
No.1 D.B. Tank
79 80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
No.2 Ballast Side Tank (Port)
No.5 Ballast Side
Tank (Port)
88
89 90 91 92
93
94
95 100 105 110 115 120 125 130135 140145 150
No.5 Ballast
Side Tank
No.1 Ballast Side Tank
(Port)
No.4 Double
Bottom Tank
No.6 Side Tank
Fuel Oil (Port)
No.3 Double
Bottom Tank
No.8 Fresh Water Tank (Port)
Deep
Tank
Fuel Oil
No.9 Distilled Water Tank (Port)
Aft Peak
Water Ballast
Tank
Fore Peak
Tank
Frame 53
No.6 Side Tank
Fuel Oil (Stbd)
No.7 Gas Oil
Side Tank
(Starboard)
No.5 Ballast Side
Tank (Stbd)
No.4 Ballast Side Tank (Stbd)
No.3 Ballast Side Tank (Stbd)
No.3 Bottom
Wing Ballast Tank (Port)
No.2 Ballast Side Tank (Stbd)
No.2 Bottom
Wing Ballast Tank (Port)
No.1 Ballast Side Tank
No.4 Ballast
Side Tank
(Stbd)
No.3 Double
Bottom Tank
No.1 Bottom
Wing Ballast Tank (Port)
No.3 Bottom
Wing Tank
Frame 60
No.4 D.B.
Dry Tank
No.3 Lower
Cross Tank
Water Ballast
No.3 Lower
Cross Tank
Fuel Oil
No.3 Bottom
Wing Ballast Tank (Stbd)
No.2 Lower
Cross Tank
Water Ballast
No.2 Bottom
Wing Ballast Tank (Stbd)
No.1 Lower
Cross Tank
Water Ballast
No.1 Double Bottom
Dry Tank
No.3 Ballast
Side Tank
No.1 Bottom
Wing Ballast Tank (Stbd)
Pipe
Duct
No.2 Lower
Cross Tank
No.2 Double
Bottom Tank
No.2 Bottom
Wing Tank
Frame 77
Gas
Oil Tank
No.1 Bottom
Wing Ballast Tank (Port)
No.1 Ballast
Side Tank
Pipe Duct
Atm.
Drain Tank
No.4 Double
Bottom
Dry Tank
No.2 Bottom
Wing Ballast Tank (Port)
No.3 Bottom
Wing Ballast Tank (Port)
No.5 D.B. Sea
Fuel Oil Chest
Tank
No.1 Double Bottom
Dry Tank
No.2 Double Bottom Spare
Water Ballast Tank
No.3 Double Bottom
Fuel Oil Tank
Fore Peak
Dry Tank
No.1 Double
Bottom Tank
Pipe Duct
Sea
Chest
Issue: 1
No.6 D.B. Sea
Storage Chest
Tank
No.3 Bottom
Wing Ballast Tank (Stbd)
No.2 Bottom
Wing Ballast Tank (Stbd)
No.1 Bottom
Wing Ballast Tank (Stbd)
Frame 94
Section 1.1.4 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
1.2 Rules and Regulations
Since the introduction of liquefied gas carriers into the shipping field, it was
recognised that there was a need for an international code for the carriage of
liquefied gases in bulk.
At the beginning of the 1970’s, the Marine Safety Committee (MSC) of the
International Maritime Organisation (IMO), known then as the International
Consultative Maritime Organisation (IMCO), started work on a gas carrier
code with the participation of the major country delegations representing gas
carrier owners, the International Association of Classification Societies, the
United States Coast Guard and several other international associations.
The result of this work was the ‘Code for the Construction and Equipment of
Ships Carrying Liquefied Gases in Bulk’ introduced under assembly resolution
A328 (IX) in November 1975.
This was the first code developed by IMO having direct applicability to gas
carriers.
The intention was to provide ‘a standard for the safe bulk carriage of liquefied
gases (and certain other substances) by sea by prescribing design and
constructional features of ships and their equipment, so as to minimise risks to
ships, their crew and the environment’.
The GC code has been adopted by most countries interested by the transport of
liquefied gases by sea, as well as all classification societies, and is now part of
SOLAS.
The USCG have added some extra requirements to the GC code for ships
trading in the USA’s waters.
The applicability of the code is as follows :
Gas carriers built after June 1986 (the IGC code)
The code which applies to new gas carriers (built after June 1986) is the
“International Code for the Construction and Equipment of Ships carrying
Liquefied Gases in Bulk” known as the IGC code.
The existing ship code was completed in 1976 and remains as an IMO
recommendation for all gas carriers in this fleet of ships.
The IGC code requires that a certificate (International Certificate of Fitness for
the Carriage of Liquefied Gases in Bulk) must be issued to all new gas carriers.
The certificate should comply to a pro-forma, as set out in ‘Model Form’
attached as an appendix to the code and should be available on board all new
gas carriers.
The basic philosophy behind the code is summarised in the International Code
for the Construction and Equipment of ships Carrying Liquefied Gases in Bulk
which is readily available on board in the ship’s library.
Preamble
Most of the provisions in the IMO code are covered by the Classification
Society’s rules and regulations, however, attention must be drawn to the fact
that it contains requirements that are not within the scope of classification as
defined in the society’s rules, for example, chapter II Ship Survival Capability,
chapter XIV Personnel Protection and chapter XVII Operating Requirements.
However, where the societies are authorised to issue the International
Certificate of fitness, these requirements, together with any amendments or
interpretations adopted by the appropriate national authority, will be applied
where applicable.
Since the IMO recommendations defer some matters to the discretion of each
administration, and in other matters are not specific enough for Coast Guard
regulatory purpose, several major changes have been introduced from the code
in the proposed Coast Guard rules. These changes are discussed in the
following paragraphs.
‘Liquefied gas’ is changed from the codes definition of ‘a product having a
vapour pressure of 2.8 bar abs at 37.8°C’ to the proposed definition of ‘a
product having a vapour pressure of 1.76 bar abs at 37.8°C’. This is a change
in the definition from a Reid vapour pressure of 40 psi abs. to 25 psi abs.
Cargo Operating Manual
The change in the Reid vapour pressure includes the ‘certain other substances’
referred to in paragraph 1.2 of the Code, but does not include any product in
IMO’s Chemical Code except ethylene, which is presently listed in the Code
and the Chemical Code. The change in the Reid vapour pressure was proposed
by the U.S. delegation to the IMO but the change was not adopted, although
there was apparently no objection to it. The change, however, does not affect
the list of regulated cargoes.
The rate of air change between the air lock door is not specified in the Code
(para 3.6.1) but is proposed at 12 changes per hour.
Chapter 4 of the Code includes a provision for the evaluation of the insulation
and hull steel assuming, for the purpose of design calculations, that the cargo
tanks are at the design temperature and the ambient outside air and sea design
temperatures as follows:
General Worldwide
Still Air:
Sea Water:
+5°C (41°F)
0°C (32°F)
Chapter 4 also provides that each administration may set higher or lower
ambient design temperatures. This document proposed the following
temperatures:
Any Waters in the World, Except Alaskan Waters
Air (at 5 knots):
Still sea water:
-18°C (0°F)
0°C (32°F)
Alaskan Waters
Air (at 5 knots):
Still sea water:
-29°C (–20°F)
- 2°C (28°F)
At a meeting of the MSC in 1983 approving the second set of amendments to
SOLAS, the requirements of the IGC Code become mandatory with almost
immediate effect.
Gas Carriers built before 1977 (the Existing Ship Code)
The regulations covering gas carriers built before 1977 are contained in the
‘Code for Existing Ships Carrying Liquefied Gases in Bulk’ first advertised
under assembly resolution A 329 (IX). Its content is similar to the GC code,
though less extensive.
Issue: 2
Section 1.2 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
The proposed regulations specify enhanced grades of steel for crack arresting
purposes in the deck stringer, sheer strake and bilge strake. The minimum
acceptable grade for the deck stringer and the sheer strake is Grade E or an
equivalent steel that is specially approved by the Commandant (G-MMT). The
minimum acceptable grades for the bilge strake are Grade D, or Grade E or an
equivalent steel that is specially approved by the Commandant (G-MMT).
The Code allows pressure and temperature control of cargoes by venting cargo
vapours to the atmosphere when the vessel is at sea and in port if accepted by
receiving administration. It is proposed to prohibit normal venting of cargo
into the atmosphere in many ports.
The Code requires the cargo system to be designed to withstand the full vapour
pressure of the cargo under conditions of the upper ambient design
temperature, or have other means to maintain the cargo tank pressure below the
maximum allowable relief valve setting (MARVS) of the tank. These
regulations propose that when the cargo carried is a liquefied gas, the cargo
tank pressure must be maintained below the design vapour pressure
indefinitely, the pressure on the LNG tank would be maintained below the
design pressure for a period of not less than 21 days. Cargo tank pressure may
be maintained below the design pressure by several methods including
refrigeration systems, burning boil-off in waste heat or catalytic furnaces,
using boil-off as fuel, or a combination of these methods. Using the boil-off as
a fuel for propulsion is limited to a vessel carrying LNG.
The latest version of the following regulations and recommendations
incorporating all subsequent additions and amendments currently in force, or
agreed between the owner and the builder, but awaiting ratification, enactment
or implementation at the time of signing of the contract shall be applied.
n) SOLAS 1994 Chapter V, Emergency Towing Arrangements for Tankers.
a) Maritime Rules and Regulations of Korea, Indonesia, Malaysia, Oman and
Qatar for entry into those ports.
p) OCIMF Recommendations on Equipment for the Towing of Disabled
Tankers, September 1981.
b) International Convention on Loadlines, 1966, amendments 1971,1975, 1979
and 1983 and Protocol of 1988 as amended by Resolution A513(XIII) /
A514(XIII).
q) OCIMF Standardisation of Manifold for Refrigerated Liquefied Gas
Carriers (LNG).
c) International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 with Protocol
of 1978 and Amendments of 1981, 1983, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992 and 1994 and
1988. GMDSS amendments including International Code for the Construction
and Equipment of Ships Carrying Liquefied Gases in Bulk (IGC-code) (herein
called ‘SOLAS’).
2) Loading requirements for methyl acetylene propadiene mixture.
5) Requirements for the initial and periodic inspections and tests of the cargo
containment system, cargo and process piping, and hull heating and cold spots.
The proposed Coast Guard regulations and the Classification Society’s rules
have cross references showing the corresponding IMO code numbers to allow
identification of the required paragraph.
r) OCIMF Guidelines and Recommendations for the Safe Mooring of Large
Ships’ at Piers and Sea Islands (except special conditions of the intended
terminal).
s) OCIMF Ship to Ship Transfer Guide (Liquefied Gases).
u) SIGTTO Recommendations for the Installation of Cargo Strainers.
v) IMO Resolution A708(17) Navigation Bridge Visibility and Function.
e) Convention on the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at
Sea, 1972 with Amendments of 1981, 1987 and 1989 as amended by resolution
A493(XII) and A494(XII).
f) International Convention on Tonnage Measurement of Ships, 1969, as
amended by IMO Resolution A493(XII) and A494(XII).
g) International Telecommunication Union (ITU) Radio Regulation A343 with
annex and revisions (1983 and 1987).
3) Additional operating requirements.
4) Requirements for inspection or re-inspection of US flag vessels at intervals
that are the same as for vessels inspected under Sub-chapter D. Inspection for
certification would be required every 2 years and re-inspection would be
required between the 10th and 14th month following the issue of a Certificate
of Inspection.
o) SOLAS Draft Resolution II-1/14-1, corrosion prevention of dedicated
ballast tanks.
t) SIGTTO Recommendations for Emergency Shut Down Systems.
d) International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, 1973
(Annex I, IV &V), as modified by the Protocol 1978 relating thereto (herein
called MARPOL 73/78) and amendment 1987, 1989, 1991 and 1992.
The proposed regulations also include the following:
1) Transfer requirements for vinyl chloride.
Cargo Operating Manual
h) IMO Resolution A468(IX) Recommendation on method of measuring noise
levels at listening posts.
w) International Electro-technical Commission (IEC).
x) IMO Publication No.978 Performance Standards for Navigational
Equipment (1988 edition).
y) ISO 8309-1991 Refrigeration Light Hydrocarbon Fluids. Measurement of
liquid levels in tanks containing liquefied gases electric capacitance gauges.
z) IMO Resolution A601(15) Provision and display of manoeuvring
information on board ships.
i) IMO Resolution A468(XII) Code on Noise Levels Onboard Ships.
j) USCG for foreign flag vessels operating in the navigable waters of the
United States except Alaskan waters (CFR Title 33-Navigation and Navigable
Waters, Part 155, 156, 159 and 164 and CFR Title 46-Shipping, Part 154) and
Public Law 95-474, 1978 ‘Port and Tanker Safety Act 1979’.
k) ISO draft proposal No.6954 ‘Guidelines for Overall Evaluation of Vibration
in Merchant Ships, 1984’.
l) ILO convention concerning crew accommodation on board ships, No.92 and
133.
m) ILO Guide to Safety and Health in Dock Work, 1977 and 1979.
Issue: 1
Section 1.2 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 1.3.2a Construction of Containment System - Equatorial Ring and Wedge Space
Tank Dome
Rubber Seal
Dome Shell
Upper Hemisphere
Void
Space
Equatorial
Forged Ring
Weld
Wedge
Space
Skirt
Wedge Space
Dome Shell
Lower Hemisphere
Skirt
Insulation
Issue: 1
Section 1.3 - Page 1 of 10
Norman Lady
1.3 Cargo System Technology
1.3.1 Cargo Containment System Principle
The cargo containment system consists of five insulated independent spherical
cargo tanks encased within void spaces and situated in-line from forward to aft
within the hull. The containment tank system is patented by the builders, Moss
Rosenberg Verft.
The containment system serves two purposes:
To contain LNG cargo at cryogenic temperatures (-160°C).
To insulate the cargo from the hull structure.
The materials used for the hull structure are designed to withstand varying
degrees of temperature. At temperatures below their specified limits, these
steels will crystallise and become brittle. The materials used for the
containment system are required to reduce the heat transfer from the hull
structure to minimise the boil-off gas from the cargo, as well as to protect the
hull structure from the effects of cryogenic temperature.
1.3.2 Kvaerner-Moss Cargo Containment
The five tanks carry LNG at cryogenic temperatures and at a pressure close to
atmospheric pressure. There is no secondary barrier as the tanks, primarily due
to their spherical construction, have a high degree of safety against fracture or
failure. The tanks are heavily insulated with approximately 215mm of
polystyrene foam to reduce natural boil-off to a minimum.
The tanks are constructed of 9% nickel steel. Each tank is covered by a
spherical steel tank cover which is mainly for tank and insulation protection.
The cover also permits control of the hold space atmosphere.The lower edge
of each cover is welded to the deck, forming a watertight seal. A flexible rubber
seal is used at the point where the tank dome protrudes out from the cover. The
tanks are each supported by a metal skirt from the equatorial ring, which
transmits the weight of the tank and the cargo to the lower hull. The skirt is
stiffened in the upper part by horizontal rings and the lower part by vertical
corrugated stiffeners.
A special casting joint is fitted between the skirt and the tank’s equatorial ring
to provide the necessary strength at this point and to reduce heat conduction
into the tank and a corresponding conduction of low temperature to the skirt
and hull.
The tanks contain a central pipe tower, fitted in the domes for the purpose of
access into the tank and for the support of pipes and cables running to and from
the cargo pumps, spray pump (if fitted), discharge and filling lines, CTS
(Custody Transfer System) capacitance level gauge, Whessoe float gauge
system, spray lines and a gas sampling pipe.
Issue: 1
The tower is fitted with guides at the lower end to restrict movement but allow
for expansion.
Cargo Operating Manual
These areas are all protected with stainless steel sheet covers.
Cargo Operations
The insulation thickness of 215mm means that the boil-off rate is
approximately 0.22% of cargo weight per day. This corresponds to a heat
leakage from the five tanks of 460kcal/h at 0.22%.
Before any cargo operation is started, the pipelines and equipment must be
cooled to avoid thermal shock and to reduce the rate of boil-off generated at
the start of the operation.
Leak Detection
The construction of gas carriers is currently governed by Volume III of the
SOLAS International Code for the Construction and Equipment of Ships
Carrying Liquefied Gases in Bulk; usually referred to as ‘The Gas Code’.
The cargo is loaded and discharged through the same manifold, located
between No.3 and 4 cargo tanks. The pressures are equalised between all the
cargo tanks by an interconnecting forward and aft vapour header. This header
is connected to the shore vapour lines via vapour crossover lines when loading
or unloading.
The basis of the ‘Type B’ philosophy is the ‘leak before failure’ concept. This
presumes that the primary barrier will fail progressively, not suddenly and
catastrophically. In order to meet these requirements certain conditions have to
be met. These include:
When the ship is on loaded and ballast voyages, the boil-off gas is normally
utilised as fuel for the boilers.
1) Stress levels, fatigue life and crack propagation characteristics of
the tanks must be determined using finite element model tests and
refined analysis methods.
2) A partial ‘secondary barrier’ must be fitted which must be capable
of containing any envisioned leakage from the ‘primary barrier’
(the tank plating itself) for a period of 15 days and must prevent
the temperature of the ship’s structure falling to an unsafe level.
The failure of the primary barrier must not cause the failure of the
secondary barrier and vice versa.
3) A ‘spray shield’ must be provided to deflect any leakage down
into the secondary barrier and away from the hull structure.
In the exceptional case of a crack occurring in the tank nickel-steel material, a
small leakage of LNG within the insulation will be detected at an early stage
by the gas detection system fitted at the equatorial ring area and at the drip pan.
The drip pan, installed directly below each cargo tank, is fitted with
temperature sensors to detect the presence of LNG and an eductor system to
allow for removal of the liquid.
The spray shield is formed by the aluminium foil surface of the tank insulation.
The foil also protects the insulation as well as directing any leakage away. Any
LNG liquid leakage drains by gravity from between the tank plating and the
insulation to the drip pan via a drain tube at the bottom. The drain at the bottom
of the insulation space is sealed in normal service by a bursting disc which is
designed to fail at cryogenic temperatures.
Liquid flow from the northern hemisphere collects in the drain channel which
is formed by the upper skirt ring stiffener and is directed to the leakage pipes
located forward, aft, port and starboard of the tank. These pipes direct the
liquid on to the void space deck and then to the drip pan.
The cargo handling operations are controlled from the Cargo Control Room
(CCR), located aft of the navigation bridge on Deck 6. This control centre
contains the DCS system control stations providing monitoring and control for
the cargo storage and handling system.
A local cargo control room is located centrally on the main deck between No.3
and 4 cargo tanks. This control room contains a control station for the DCS
system concerned primarily with cargo loading.
Cargo Equipment
The LNG compressor room, situated on the port side of the main deck between
No.4 and 5 cargo tanks contains the following major items of equipment:
The Low Duty (LD) gas compressor, used to:
Send boil-off gas to the ship’s boilers
The High Duty (HD) gas compressors, used to:
Return LNG vapour ashore during loading operations
Return gas/vapour ashore during gassing-up and
initial cooldown operations
Circulate heated cargo vapour through the cargo tank
system during warm-up operations.
The two steam heated horizontal shell and tube type gas heaters, used to:
Supply warm gas to the boilers for burning and to supply gas
to the cargo tanks during warm-up operations prior to inerting,
aeration and entry.
Section 1.3 - Page 2 of 10
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 1.3.2b Construction of Containment System - Rupture Discs
Rupture Disc
Cross Section
Pressure
Insulation
Nitrogen
Bleed
Blank Flange
Rupture Disc
Removed for
Gas Sampling
Rupture Disc
Rupture Disc
Skirt
Leakage Pipes
Rupture
Disc
Issue: 1
Catch Basin
Polystyrene Insulation with
Stainless Steel Cover
Section 1.3 - Page 3 of 10
Norman Lady
The two LNG steam heated horizontal shell and tube vaporisers, used to:
Produce gas to purge the inert gas from the cargo tanks prior
to cooldown
Produce gas to maintain tank pressure when unloading, if the
shore return gas is not available
In each cargo tank are two vertical, submerged, electric motor driven cargo
pumps. When all ten cargo pumps are in simultaneous operation, a full cargo
can be unloaded in approximately 15 hours.
A vertical, submerged, electric motor driven spray pump is fitted in tanks 3 and
4, discharging to a spray header. Branches are led from the header to spray
nozzles inside each tank. Liquid is sprayed into the tanks on the ballast voyage,
to maintain them at a temperature low enough to prevent excessive stress on
each tank structure, especially the equatorial ring, during loading.
An Inert Gas (IG) plant is provided for inerting cargo tanks before and after
aeration and entry, and for inerting the void spaces if required. Dry air is also
supplied from the plant for drying cargo tanks and hold spaces following any
inspections and maintenance.
Two nitrogen generators are located in the aft storage room on the starboard
side, to provide nitrogen for the following purposes:
Cargo compressor gland sealing
Cargo tank wedge and insulation space inerting/purging
Cargo line purging
Boiler gas line purging
A Custody Transfer System (CTS) is provided to enable accurate cargo
quantity measurement. The system includes the equipment to measure liquid
level, liquid and vapour temperatures and also the vapour pressure within each
cargo tank. This data, together with the tank calibration data tables, is used to
perform cargo quantity calculations. A secondary float actuated mechanical
system (the Whessoe system) is also provided. The calibration of all the CTS
and tank equipment, is carried out by an independent firm of sworn measurers
who act jointly for buyers, sellers and customs.
Cargo Operating Manual
Loaded Voyage
Operating Precautions
During normal operation, the boil-off gas from the tanks is compressed using
the LD compressor and used as fuel for the boilers. The boil-off gas fuel supply
system is controlled so that the tank pressure is maintained at its predetermined
value. Two methods are available to control the vapour pressure in the cargo
tank:
The LNG transfer system valves and pumps are normally operated from the
CCR. The local valve controls are only used if the normal controls fail or
emergency conditions arise.
1) Disposal of excess vapour via the boil-off gas system and
subsequently the steam dump system (if required).
2) The venting of excessive vapour through the remotely operated
vent valve at vent mast No.4, via the heater.
All the cargo pumps will be started in sequence and operated simultaneously
under bulk discharge conditions.
(Note: The ship must never start cargo pumps until asked to do so by the shore
terminal control room.)
Normally, as the cargo pumps in each tank pump out the cargo, cargo vapour
is returned from the shore and the pressure is monitored to ensure that the
pressure in the cargo tanks remains within the acceptable range. In the event of
the shore terminal being unable to return vapour, make-up vapour must be
generated by feeding LNG to the ship’s vaporiser.
All liquid valves, except those on spray lines, should be kept closed when the
transfer system is not in use. Under normal operational conditions, valves in
use should be fully open. However, loading valves are partially closed when
topping-off and pump discharge valves are automatically controlled within the
permissible range to prevent overload or cavitation and to control the flow to
the shore. Any cavitation is indicated by fluctuations in pump current and
discharge pressure. The vapour line valves at the tank domes are locked open
under normal circumstances. The blank flanges fitted to the manifolds must be
kept in place at all times except when connecting to either load or unload.
A small amount of cargo is left in all the tanks (called the heel), with an extra
reserve being left in tanks 3 and 4 (the tanks fitted with spray pumps) for
cooling the cargo tanks and for fuel during the ballast voyage. During the
ballast voyage, the cargo tanks are spray-cooled utilising the spray pumps and
the extra cargo left on board for this purpose.
Pipework expansion bellows and welded joints should be inspected regularly
where possible and manifold flange joints are to be checked under nitrogen
pressure with a soap solution prior to loading or unloading. Special care must
be taken to avoid LNG leaks, as the temperature of the liquid can cause steel
decks to fracture.
Unloading
The presence of water or other contaminants in the cargo system can be
eliminated by taking great care during refit and maintenance operations.
Inerting and purging procedures are to be strictly followed. Cargo manifold
strainers are fitted at the unloading port to prevent the possibility of shore
contamination. At the loading port, the ship is protected against contamination
by a strainer fitted in the shore liquid line in addition to the ship supply
manifold strainers fitted at each loading.
There is an Emergency Shutdown System (ESDS) which is provided to protect
the cargo systems on the ship and on the shore during loading and unloading
operations. The system incorporates ship/shore links so that a shutdown may
be initiated either manually or automatically from the ship or from the shore.
Issue: 1
Section 1.3 - Page 4 of 10
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 1.3.2c Construction of Containment System - Dome and Tank Access
Whessoe Gauge
Elevation
Level Alarm
8
9
Key
10
7
29
6
11
5
Cargo Tank Dome Arrangement
4
Plan
17
16
2
28
12
26
14
24
30
1
13
23
19
20
Discharge Pipe
15
Whessoe Level Indicator
2
Discharge Pipe
16
Omicron Level Alarm
3
Loading Pipe
17
DCS Connection
4
Spray Pipe
19
Access
5
Spray Pipe
20
Cable For Spray Pump
(Tanks 3 & 4 only)
6
Spray Pipe
21
Cable For Discharge Pump
7
Spray Pipe
(Tanks 3 & 4 only)
22
Cable For Discharge Pump
8
Ejector Pipe
23
Spare
9
Vapour Suction
24
Tank Safety Valve
10
Spray Pump Pipe
(Tanks 3 & 4 only)
25
Spray Line Safety Valve
11
Hot Gas Pipe
26
Pressure Gauge Connections
12
Tank Safety Valve
27
Tank Pressure Gauge Pipe
13
Tank Safety Valve
28
Safety Valve Between Throttle and Loading/Discharge Valve
14
Blank
29
Blank
30
Snap-On Connections
15
25
3
1
22
21
Cargo Tank Dome Arrangement
Issue: 2
Section 1.3 - Page 5 of 10
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 1.3.2d Construction of Containment System - Insulation
Stainless Steel
Support Straps
From Equator Skirt
Aluminium Foil
(Spray Shield)
Stainless Steel
Support Straps
Tank Wall
(Primary)
Void Space
Ventilation
Trunking
TANK
HOLD SPACE
Incremental
Contraction Slot
Cargo Tank Lower Hemisphere Showing Support Straps
Cold Side
Reinforcement
Spinning Weld
Crack
Barrier
Issue: 2
Section 1.3 - Page 6 of 10
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 1.3.2e Construction of Containment System - Piping Insulation
No Adhesives
Stainless Steel
Polystyrene
Fibreglass Reinforcement (1 Layer)
Bitumas (2 Layers)
Stainless Steel
Weld
Band
Polyurethane Glue
Elastified Polystyrene
Galvanised Steel
Polyurethane Foam
Fixed Clamp
Issue: 1
Section 1.3 - Page 7 of 10
Norman Lady
1.3.3 Failure of Containment
A failure of the cargo containment would most probably be due to a crack in a
tank weld. In order to discover any leakages, the ship is equipped with
comprehensive gas monitoring and leakage detection systems. The main
component in this system is the gas analyser which has four sample points in
each cargo tank hold. Gas and leakage detection is described in section 4.1.
In the case of a crack in the tank shell, the cargo is able to flow between the
tank and the insulation. From the top of the tank upper hemisphere, a pressure
equalising pipe leads to the insulated space between the tank and the skirt (the
wedge space). Gas leakage due to a crack in the lower hemisphere is led to the
wedge space. There is a suction point for the gas detection system located in
this wedge space. There are also suction points in one of the drain pipes from
the upper insulation space, the top of the void space and the bilge well
(sometimes called the drip pan or catch basin).
Cargo Operating Manual
A bilge ejector is installed in the catch basin to empty the area when required.
If the basin has to be emptied of water, water supplied from the ejector feed
pump has to be used as the driving force. The exhausted water is delivered
overboard. After use, the flexible hoses must be disconnected and the pipe ends
blind-flanged. A needle valve, V1429, is located at each flange. Pressurised air
from the working air system on deck is introduced to the ejector pipe through
these valves by means of quick connecting couplings and the air will empty the
ejector pipe of water through the drainpipe.
When cargo has to be removed, cargo is also used as the eductor driving force.
The procedure is fully explained in section 7.2.
The leak protection system also includes a method of collecting and
accumulating small leaks of liquid cargo. This liquid is collected in the catch
basin on the double bottom. The catch basin is lined with polystyrene which is
coated with a protective cover of stainless steel, as shown in illustration 7.2.1a.
The liquid cargo leakage collects in this basin, where the monitoring
equipment is installed. The equipment consists of a sample point for the gas
detector, a liquid indicator and a temperature indicator to raise alarms in the
CCR via the DCS system.
Any liquid flow from the upper hemisphere will be collected in the drain
channel formed by the upper ring stiffener of the skirt. There are four drain
pipes, port, starboard, forward and aft of the tanks, which lead any cargo
leakage to the catch basin. Any liquid flow in the lower hemisphere will be led
to the catch basin by a drain pipe at the south pole.
Any liquid collecting in the catch basin will raise a liquid alarm via the DCS
system. Whether the liquid is LNG cargo due to a tank leakage, or water due
to leakage from the water ballast tanks, can be determined by observing the gas
detector and the temperature indicators. A low temperature (-163ºC for LNG)
indicates cargo leakage, while temperatures above 0ºC indicate water leakage.
Issue: 1
Section 1.3 - Page 8 of 10
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 1.3.4a Void Spaces and Ventilation
Moist Air Drawn Off
to Recirculation Fans
V2306
Dried/Heated
Air
LNG
Compressor
Room
Nitrogen
Bleed
Cargo Tank
Cross-Section
LNG
Compressors
V2314
V2303
V2209
V2314
Void Space
Dryers
View of Void Space Showing
Leakage Pipe and Cargo Tank
Key
V2135
Nitrogen
V2313
V2313
Dry Air
Dried/Heated
Air Ducts
Moist Air
V2311
V2311
Recirculation
Fans 2000m3/h
No.5
Cargo Tank
No.4
Cargo Tank
V2306
V2306
V2216
Boiler Purging
/Compressor
Sealing
From
Nitrogen
Generator
System
Issue: 2
V2213
V2311 V2311
No.3
Cargo Tank
V2306
V2216
V2209
V2303
Starboard
Nitrogen
Buffer
Tank 15m3
V2303
No.2
Cargo Tank
V2306
V2306
V2216
V2209
V2209
IG Connection at Starboard Manifold
No.1
Cargo Tank
Purging
V2216 Outlets
at Dome
V2216
V2303
V2303
V2209
V2303
V2209
Port
Nitrogen
Buffer
Tank 25m3
Section 1.3 - Page 9 of 10
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
1.3.4 Void Spaces
Illustration 1.3.4b Relationship between Corrosion and Relative Humidity
The areas between the water ballast tanks, the double bottom tanks, underneath
the cargo tank weather covers and the cargo tank are called void spaces. This
space around the tank and inside the tank skirt area is kept as dry as possible.
The atmosphere in this space is controlled and monitored. It is especially
important that the void spaces are monitored during cargo operations.
The pressure in the void spaces over that of the cargo tanks should not rise over
0.05kg/cm2. This value has been determined by the builders to avoid any
possible chance of the tank buckling when empty. There are two void space
relief valves for each void space which will open to atmosphere if this value is
exceeded.
120
Before LNG is loaded into the tanks, the void spaces should be thoroughly dry
to avoid any moisture penetration into the tank insulation.
100
The void spaces must also be free of carbon dioxide as CO2 gas will solidify at
a temperature of -78.5ºC.
The operation to dry or inert the void spaces is dealt with in section 4.7. There
is a void space heating and drying system to dry out these spaces, thereby
removing moisture and preventing any dew forming. This also has the added
benefit of preventing corrosion. It can be seen from the graph in illustration
1.3.4b that if the relative humidity is kept below 50/60%, the corrosion rate is
kept extremely low.
80
RATE OF
CORROSION
60
The void spaces are fitted with gas detection and leakage detection. These
systems indicate/alarm in the CCR, via the DCS system.
The void spaces are accessed via air lock chambers to assist in maintaining the
atmosphere.
The air in the void spaces is continuously recirculated via the recirculation fans
which are fitted on the outside deck above the LNG compressor room. The fans
supply dried and heated air from the void space atmospheric steam heater and
void space dryers to the vent outlets situated at the bottom of each void space
directly underneath the cargo tank lowest point. The air is exhausted from an
outlet situated adjacent to the cargo tank dome. In this way, the air is drawn
from bottom to the top, across the entire void space.
The void spaces may be inerted, if required, using the IG connection located at
the starboard manifold. There is normally a spoon blank fitted at this
connection.
40
20
0
0
20
40
60
80
100%
RELATIVE HUMIDITY
Issue: 1
Section 1.3 - Page 10 of 10
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 1.4a Hazardous Areas and Gas Dangerous Zones
9m Radius
No.5
Cargo Tank
9m Radius
No.4
Cargo Tank
9m Radius
No.3
Cargo Tank
9m Radius
No.2
Cargo Tank
9m Radius
No.1
Cargo Tank
Cross Section
NORMAN LADY
Elevation
Plan
Issue: 1
Section 1.4 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
1.4 Hazardous Areas and Zones
(See illustration 1.4a)
Under the IMO code for the Construction and Equipment of Ships Carrying
Gases in Bulk, the following are regarded as hazardous areas:
Gas dangerous spaces or zones, are zones on the open deck within 3 metres of
any cargo tank outlet, gas or vapour outlet, cargo pipe flange, cargo valve and
entrances and ventilation openings to the LNG compressor house. They also
include the open deck over the cargo area and 3m forward and aft of the cargo
area on the open deck up to a height of 2.4m above the tank weather covers.
The entire cargo piping system and cargo tanks are also considered gasdangerous.
In addition to the above zones, the code defines other gas-dangerous spaces.
The area around the air swept trunking, in which the gas fuel line to the engine
room is situated, is not considered a gas dangerous zone under the above code.
All electrical equipment used in these zones, whether a fixed installation or
portable, is certified ‘safe type equipment’. This includes intrinsically safe
electrical equipment, flame-proof type equipment and pressurised enclosure
type equipment. Exceptions to this requirement apply when the zones have
been certified gas free, e.g. during refit.
Issue: 1
Section 1.4 - Page 2 of 2
Part 2
Properties of LNG
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 2.1a Vapour Pressure Diagram of Liquid Cargoes
TEMPERATURE (OC)
-165
-160
-155
-150
-145
-140
-135
-130
-125
-120
-115
-110
-105
-100
-95
-90
-85
-80 -75 -70 -65 -60 -55 -50
-40
-30
-20
-10
0
25
50
75
100
60
50
40
30
20
P
Propane
2mol % Ethane
10
9
8
7
Methane
Ethylene
Ethane
Propylene
Propane
6
Butadrene
1.3
bar
5
N. Butan
4
ata
3
2
1
0.9
0.8
0.7
0.6
-165
-160
-155
-150
-145
-140
-135
-130
-125
-120
-115
-110
-105
-100
-95
-90
-85
-80 -75 -70 -65 -60 -55 -50
-40
-30
-20
-10
0
25
50
75
100
TEMPERATURE (OC)
Issue: 1
Section 2.1 - Page 1 of 3
Norman Lady
Part 2 Properties of LNG
2.1 Physical Properties and Composition of LNG
Natural gas is a mixture of hydrocarbons which, when liquefied, form a clear
colourless and odourless liquid; this LNG is usually transported and stored at
a temperature very close to its boiling point at atmospheric pressure
(approximately –160°C).
The actual composition of Qatar, Oman, Indonesia or Malaysia LNG will vary
depending on its source and on the liquefaction process, but the main
constituent will always be methane; other constituents will be small
percentages of heavier hydrocarbons, e.g. ethane, propane, butane, pentane,
and possibly a small percentage of nitrogen. A typical composition of LNG is
given in Table 2.1b, and the physical properties of the major constituent gases
are given in Table 2.1a.
For most engineering calculations (e.g. piping pressure losses) it can be
assumed that the physical properties of pure methane represent those of LNG.
However, for custody transfer purposes when accurate calculation of the
heating value and density is required, the specific properties based on actual
component analysis must be used.
The flammability range of methane in air (21% oxygen) is approximately 5.3
to 14% (by volume). To reduce this range the oxygen content is reduced to 2%,
using inert gas from the inert gas generators, prior to loading after dry dock. In
theory, an explosion cannot occur if the O2 content of the mixture is below 13%
regardless of the percentage of methane, but for practical safety reasons,
purging is continued until the O2 content is below 2%. This safety aspect is
explained in detail later in this section.
The boil-off vapour from LNG is lighter than air at vapour temperatures above
-110°C or higher depending on LNG composition, therefore when vapour is
vented to atmosphere, the vapour will tend to rise above the vent outlet and
will be rapidly dispersed. When cold vapour is mixed with ambient air the
vapour-air mixture will appear as a readily visible white cloud due to the
condensation of the moisture in the air. It is normally safe to assume that the
flammable range of vapour-air mixture does not extend significantly beyond
the perimeter of the white cloud. The auto-ignition temperature of methane, i.e.
the lowest temperature to which the gas needs to be heated to cause selfsustained combustion without ignition by a spark or flame, is 595°C.
During a normal sea voyage, heat is transferred to the LNG cargo through the
cargo tank insulation, causing part of the cargo to vaporise, i.e. boil-off. The
composition of the LNG is changed by this boil-off because the lighter
components, having lower boiling points at atmospheric pressure, vaporise
first. Therefore, the discharged LNG has a lower percentage content of
nitrogen and methane than the LNG as loaded, and a slightly higher percentage
of ethane, propane and butane, due to methane and nitrogen boiling off in
preference to the heavier gases.
Table 2.1b
Cargo Operating Manual
Table 2.1c Composition of LNG from Major Export Terminals (Mol%)
Physical Properties of LNG
C5+
Density (kg/m3)
0.35
0.02
466
1.4
0.12
0
457
2.8
1.5
0.07
0.02
453
13.39
1.34
0.28
0.17
0
465
91.09
5.51
2.48
0.88
0.03
0
N/A
Methane CH4
Ethane C2H4
Propane C3H8
Butane C4H10
Arzew
87.4
8.6
2.4
0.05
Bintulu
91.23
4.3
2.95
Bonny
90.4
5.2
Das Is
84.83
Badak
Nitrogen N2
Methane CH4
Ethane C2H4
Molecular Weight
16.042
30.068
44.094
58.120
72.150
28.016
Boiling Point at 1 bar absolute (ºC)
-161.5
-88.6
-42.5
-5
36.1
-196
Arun
89.33
7.14
2.22
1.17
0.08
0.01
N/A
Liquid Density at Boiling Point (kg/m3)
426
544.1
580.7
601.8
610.2
808.6
Kenai
99.8
0.1
0
0.1
0.1
0
421
Vapour SG at 15ºC and 1 bar absolute
0.554
1.046
1.540
2.07
2.49
0.97
Lamut
89.4
6.3
2.8
1.3
0.05
0.05
463
619
413
311
311
205
649
Marsa el Braga
70
15
10
3.5
0.9
0.6
531
5.3 to 14
3 to 12.5
2.1 to 9.5
2 to 9.5
3 to 12.4
Nonflammable
Point Fortin
96.2
3.26
0.42
0.07
0.008
0.01
433
595
510
510/583
510/583
Ras Lafan
90.1
6.47
2.27
0.6
0.25
0.03
457
Normal:
Iso:
55559
51916
50367
49530
49404
49069
48944
Skikda
91.5
5.64
1.5
0.5
0.85
0.01
451
Vaporization Heat at Boiling Point (kJ/kg)
510.4
489.9
426.2
385.2
357.5
Withnell
89.02
7.33
2.56
1.03
0.06
0
460
Gas Volume/liquid Ratio at
Boiling Point and 1 bar absolute
Flammable Limits in AIr by Volume (%)
Auto-ignition Temperature (ºC)
Gross Heating
Value at 15ºC (kJ/kg)
Issue: 1
Propane C3H8
Butane C4H10
Pentane C5H12
Nitrogen N2
199.3
Section 2.1 - Page 2 of 3
Norman Lady
Variation of Boiling Point of Methane with Pressure
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 2.1d Relative Density of Methane and Air
See illustration 2.1a, vapour pressure diagram of liquid cargoes.
The boiling point of methane increases with pressure and this variation is
shown in the diagram for pure methane over the normal range of pressures on
board the vessel. The presence of the heavier components in LNG increases the
boiling point of the cargo for a given pressure.
+20
The relationship between boiling point and pressure of LNG will
approximately follow a line parallel to that shown for 100% methane.
- 20
0
Lighter than air
- 40
Methane Vapour
Temperature
°C
- 60
- 80
-100
-120
Heavier than air
-140
-160
1.5
1.4
1.3
Ratio =
1.2
1.1
1.0
0.9
0.8
0.7
0.6
0.5
Density of Methane Vapour
Density of Air
(Density of air assumed to be 1.27 kg/m3 at 15°C)
Issue: 1
Section 2.1 - Page 3 of 3
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 2.2.1a Flammability of Methane, Oxygen and Nitrogen Mixtures
21
Area EDFE
flammable
B
E
20
CAUTION
This diagram assumes complete mixing
which, in practice, may not occur.
19
F
18
17
Y
16
15
M
12
Mixtures of air and methane
cannot be produced above
line BEFC
N
14
G
13
X
D
11
%
O
x
y
g
e
n
10
9
8
7
6
5
Area HDFC
Capable of forming flammable
mixtures with air, but containing
too much methane to explode
4
3
2
1
Z
A0
10
H 20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
C
100
Methane %
Area ABEDH
Not capable of forming
flammable mixture with air
Issue: 1
Section 2.2.1 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
2.2 Characteristics of LNG
2.2.1 Flammability of Methane, Oxygen and Nitrogen Mixtures
The ship must be operated in such a way that a flammable mixture of methane
and air is avoided at all times. The relationship between gas/air composition
and flammability for all possible mixtures of methane, air and nitrogen is
shown on the diagram above.
The vertical axis A-B represents oxygen-nitrogen mixtures with no methane
present, ranging from 0% oxygen (100% nitrogen) at point A, to 21% oxygen
(79% nitrogen) at point B. The latter point represents the composition of
atmospheric air.
The horizontal axis A-C represents methane-nitrogen mixtures with no oxygen
present, ranging from 0% methane (100% nitrogen) at point A, to 100%
methane (0% nitrogen) at point C.
Any single point on the diagram within the triangle ABC represents a mixture
of all three components, methane, oxygen and nitrogen, each present in
specific proportion of the total volume. The proportions of the three
components represented by a single point can be read from the diagram.
For example, at point D:
Methane:
Oxygen :
Nitrogen:
6.0% (read on axis A-C)
12.2% (read on axis A-B)
81.8% (remainder)
The diagram consists of three major sectors:
1. The Flammable Zone Area EDF. Any mixture whose composition
is represented by a point which lies within this area is flammable.
2. Area HDFC. Any mixture whose composition is represented by a
point which lies within this area is capable of forming a
flammable mixture when mixed with air, but contains too much
methane to ignite.
Using the Diagram
Assume that point Y on the oxygen-nitrogen axis is joined by a straight line to
point Z on the methane-nitrogen axis. If an oxygen-nitrogen mixture of
composition Y is mixed with a methane-nitrogen mixture of composition Z, the
composition of the resulting mixture will, at all times, be represented by point
X, which will move from Y to Z as increasing quantities of mixture Z are
added.
(Note: In this example point X, representing changing composition, passes
through the flammable zone EDF, that is, when the methane content of the
mixture is between 5.5% at point M, and 9.0% at point N.)
Applying this to the process of inerting a cargo tank prior to cool down, assume
that the tank is initially full of air at point B. Nitrogen is added until the oxygen
content is reduced to 13% at point G. The addition of methane will cause the
mixture composition to change along the line GDC which, it will be noted,
does not pass through the flammable zone, but is tangential to it at point D. If
the oxygen content is reduced further, before the addition of methane, to any
point between 0% and 13%, that is, between points A and G, the change in
composition with the addition of methane will not pass through the flammable
zone.
Cargo Operating Manual
The procedures for avoiding flammable mixtures in cargo tanks and piping are
summarised as follows:
1. Tanks and piping containing air are to be inerted with nitrogen
before admitting methane until all sampling points indicate 5% or
less oxygen content.
2. Tanks and piping containing methane are to be inerted with
nitrogen before admitting air until all sampling points indicate 5%
methane.
It should be noted that some portable instruments for measuring methane
content are based on oxidising the sample over a heated platinum wire and
measuring the increased temperature from this combustion. This type of
analyser will not work with methane-nitrogen mixtures that do not contain
oxygen. For this reason, special portable instruments of the infrared type have
been developed and are supplied to the ship for this purpose.
Theoretically, therefore, it is only necessary to add nitrogen to air when
inerting until the oxygen content is reduced to 13%. However, the oxygen
content is reduced to 2% during inerting because, in practice, complete mixing
of air and nitrogen may not occur.
When a tank full of methane gas is to be inerted with nitrogen prior to aeration,
a similar procedure is followed. Assume that nitrogen is added to the tank
containing methane at point C until the methane content is reduced to about
14% at point H. As air is added, the mixture composition will change along line
HDB, which, as before, is tangential at D to the flammable zone, but does not
pass through it. For the same reasons as when inerting from a tank containing
air, when inerting a tank full of methane it is necessary to go well below the
theoretical figure to a methane content of 5% because complete mixing of
methane and nitrogen may not occur in practice.
3. Area ABEDH. Any mixture whose composition is represented by
a point which lies within this area is not capable of forming a
flammable mixture when mixed with air.
Issue: 1
Section 2.2.1 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
2.2.2
Supplementary Characteristics
When Spilled on Water:
1) Boiling of LNG is rapid, due to the large temperature difference
between the product and water.
2) LNG continuously spreads over an indefinitely large area, it
results in a magnification of its rate of evaporation until
vaporisation is complete.
3) No coherent ice layer forms on the water.
2) When loaded in the cargo tanks, the pressure of the vapour phase
is maintained as substantially constant, slightly above
atmospheric pressure.
3) The external heat passing through the tank insulation generates
convection currents within the bulk cargo; heated LNG rises to
the surface and boils.
4) The heat necessary for the vaporisation comes from the LNG and,
as long as the vapour is continuously removed by maintaining the
pressure as substantially constant, the LNG remains at its boiling
temperature.
5) If the vapour pressure is reduced, by removing more vapour than
generated, the LNG temperature will decrease. In order to make
up the equilibrium pressure corresponding to its temperature, the
vaporisation of LNG is accelerated, resulting in an increased heat
transfer from LNG to vapour.
4) Under particular circumstances, with a methane concentration
below 40%, flameless explosions are possible when the LNG
strikes the water. It results from an interfacial phenomenon in
which LNG becomes locally superheated at a maximum limit
until a rapid boiling occurs. However, commercial LNG is far
richer in methane than 40% and would require lengthy storage
before ageing to that concentration.
Reactivity
5) The flammable cloud of LNG and air may extend for large
distances downward (only methane when warmer than -100°C is
lighter than air) because of the absence of topographic features
which normally promote turbulent mixing.
Methane is an asphyxiant in high concentrations because it dilutes the amount of
oxygen in the air below that necessary to maintain life. Due to its inactivity,
methane is not a significant air pollutant and, due to its insolubility, inactivity,
and volatility, it is not considered a water pollutant.
Vapour Clouds
Cryogenic Temperatures
1) If there is no immediate ignition of an LNG spill, a vapour cloud
may form. The vapour cloud is long, thin, cigar shaped and, under
certain meteorological conditions, may travel a considerable
distance before its concentration falls below the lower flammable
limit. This concentration is important, for the cloud could ignite
and burn, with the flame travelling back towards the originating
pool. The cold vapour has a higher density than air and thus, at
least initially, hugs the surface. Weather conditions largely
determine the cloud dilution rate, with a thermal inversion greatly
lengthening the distance travelled before the cloud becomes nonflammable.
WARNING
The major danger from an LNG vapour cloud occurs when it is ignited.
The heat from such a fire is a major problem. A deflagrating (simple
burning) is probably fatal to those within the cloud and outside buildings
but is not a major threat to those beyond the cloud, though there will be
burns from thermal radiation.
WARNING
Contact with LNG or with materials that are chilled to its temperature of
about -160°C will damage living tissue.
Issue: 1
Cargo Operating Manual
Behaviour of LNG in the Cargo Tanks
When loaded in the cargo tanks, the pressure of the vapour phase is maintained
substantially constant, slightly above atmospheric pressure.
The external heat passing through the tank insulation generates convection
currents within the bulk cargo, causing heated LNG to rise to the surface and
is then boiled-off.
The heat necessary for vaporisation comes from the LNG. As long as the
vapour is continuously removed by maintaining the pressure as substantially
constant, the LNG remains at its boiling temperature.
If the vapour pressure is reduced by removing more vapour than is generated,
the LNG temperature will decrease. In order to make up the equilibrium
pressure corresponding to its temperature, the vaporisation of LNG is
accelerated, resulting in an increased heat transfer from LNG to vapour.
If the vapour pressure is increased by removing less vapour than is generated,
the LNG temperature will increase. In order to reduce the pressure to a level
corresponding to the equilibrium with its temperature, the vaporisation of LNG
is slowed down and the heat transfer from LNG to vapour is reduced.
LNG is a mixture of several components with different physical properties,
particularly the vaporisation rates; the more volatile fraction of the cargo
vaporises at a greater rate than the less volatile fraction. The vapour generated
by the boiling of the cargo contains a higher concentration of the more volatile
fraction than the LNG.
The properties of the LNG, i.e. the boiling point, density and heating value,
have a tendency to increase during the voyage.
CAUTION
Most metals lose their ductility at these temperatures; LNG may cause the
brittle fracture of many materials. In case of LNG spillage on the ship’s
deck, the high thermal stresses generated from the restricted possibilities
of contraction of the plating will result in the fracture of the steel.
Section 2.2.2 - Page 1 of 3
Norman Lady
Properties of Nitrogen and Inert Gas
Hazards
Nitrogen
WARNING
Due to the absence or to the very low content of oxygen, nitrogen is an
asphyxiant.
Nitrogen is used on board for the pressurisation of the cargo tank wedge and
insulation spaces, the purging of cargo pipelines and heaters, boiler gas lines
and Whessoe gauges and for the sealing of the LNG compressors. It is
produced by the nitrogen generators whose principle is based on hollow fibre
membranes to separate air into nitrogen and oxygen (see section 4.7.2. Nitrogen Generator).
Physical Properties of Nitrogen
Nitrogen is the most common gas in nature since it represents 79% in volume
of the atmospheric air.
At room temperature, nitrogen is a colourless and odourless gas. Its density is
near that of air, 1.25 kg/m3 under the standard conditions.
When liquefied, the temperature is -196°C under atmospheric pressure, density
of 810kg/m3 and a vapourization heat of 199kJ/kg.
Properties of Nitrogen
At liquid state, its low temperature will damage living tissue and any spillage
of liquid nitrogen on the ship’s deck will result in failure (as for LNG).
Inert Gas
Inert gas is used to reduce the oxygen content in the cargo system, tanks,
piping, void spaces and compressors. This is in order to prevent an air/CH4
mixture prior to aeration post warm-up, before refit or repairs and prior to the
gassing up operation post refit before cooling down.
Inert gas is produced on board using an inert gas generator supplied by Moss
Verft, which produces inert gas at 2,500m3/h with a -45°C dew point burning
low sulphur content gas oil. This plant can also produce dry-air at 2,500m3/h
and -45°C dew point (see section 4.7.1 for more details).
The inert gas composition is as follows:
Oxygen:
<2.5% in volume
Molecular weight:
28.016
Carbon dioxide:
<15% in volume
Boiling point at 1 bar absolute:
–196°C
Carbon monoxide:
<65 ppm by volume
Liquid SG at boiling point:
1.81
Sulphur oxides (SOx):
<1 ppm by volume
Vapour SG at 15°C and 1 bar absolute:
0.97
Nitrogen oxides (NOx):
<65 ppm by volume
Gas volume/liquid volume ratio at –196°C:
695
Nitrogen:
balance
Flammable limits:
Non
Dew point:
< -45°C
Dew point of 100% pure N2:
Below –80°C
Soot:
complete absence
Chemical Properties
Nitrogen is considered as an inert gas; it is non-flammable and without
chemical affinity. However, at high temperatures, it can be combined with
other gases and metals.
Issue: 1
Cargo Operating Manual
The inert gas is slightly denser than air: 1.3-kg/m3 abs at 0°C.
WARNING
Due to its low oxygen content, inert gas is an asphyxiant.
Section 2.2.2 - Page 2 of 3
Norman Lady
Avoidance of Cold Shock to Metal
Structural steels suffer brittle fracture at low temperatures. Such failures can be
catastrophic because, in a brittle steel, little energy is required to propagate a
fracture once it has been initiated. Conversely, in a tough material, the energy
necessary to propagate a crack will be insufficient to sustain it when it runs into
sufficiently tough material.
Plain carbon structural steels have a brittle to ductile behaviour transition
which occurs generally in the range -50°C to +30°C. This, unfortunately,
precludes their use as LNG materials (carriage temperature -162°C). The effect
is usually monitored by measuring the energy absorbed in breaking a notched
bar and a transition curve, as shown in Illustration 2.2.2b, is typical for plain
carbon steels.
For this reason, materials which do not show such sharp transition from ductile
to brittle fracture as the temperature is lowered, have found obvious
application for use in cryogenic situations in general and particularly in liquid
methane carriers, for example, invar (36% nickel-iron alloy), austenitic
stainless steel, 9% nickel steel and some aluminium alloys such as 5083 alloy.
All of these materials behave in a ductile manner at -162°C, so that the chance
of an unstable brittle fracture propagating, even if the materials were
overloaded, is negligible.
During any type of cargo transfer, and particularly whilst loading and
discharging, constant patrolling must be conducted on deck to ensure that no
leakages have developed.
In the event of a spillage or leakage, water spray should be directed at the
spillage to disperse and evaporate the liquid and to protect the steelwork. The
leak must be stopped, suspending cargo operations if necessary.
In the event of a major leakage or spillage, the cargo operations must be
stopped immediately, the general alarm sounded and the emergency deck water
spray system put into operation (refer to section 5.2.2).
Illustration 2.2.2a Structural Steel: Ductile to Brittle Transition Curve
Fracture transition
range (mixed fracture
appearance)
Brittle
fracture
In order to avoid brittle fracture occurring, measures must be taken to ensure
that LNG and liquid nitrogen do not come into contact with the steel structure
of the vessel. In addition, various equipment is provided to deal with any
leakages which may occur.
The manifold areas are equipped with a stainless steel drip tray, which collects
any spillage and drains it overboard. The ship, in way of the manifolds, is
provided with a water curtain from the deck driving water main which is
supplied from the bilge ejector pump. The deck fire main must always be
available and the manifold water curtain in operation when undertaking any
cargo operation. Additionally, fire hoses must be laid out to each liquid dome
to deal with any small leakages which may develop at valves and flanges.
Permanent drip trays are fitted underneath the items most likely to cause
problems and portable drip trays are available for any other requirements.
Ductile
fracture
For a typical mild steel:
T1 might be -30;
T2 might be +15.
Although this depends
on composition, heat
treatment etc. the curve
can shift to left or right.
Notched
bar test
energy
absorbed
T1
Issue: 1
Cargo Operating Manual
T2
Section 2.2.2 - Page 3 of 3
Norman Lady
2.3 Health Hazards
REACTIVITY DATA
METHANE
FORMULA
CH4
THE MAIN HAZARD
U.N. NUMBER
2043
FLAMMABLE.
FAMILY
Hydrocarbon
APPEARANCE
Colourless
ODOUR
Odourless
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
FIRE
Stop gas supply. Extinguish with dry powder, Halon or CO2. Cool surrounding area with water spray.
LIQUID
IN EYE
DO NOT DELAY. Flood eye gently with clean fresh/sea water. Force eye open if necessary.
Continue washing for 15 minutes. Obtain medical advice/assistance.
LIQUID
ON SKIN
DO NOT DELAY. Treat patient gently. Remove contaminated clothing. Immerse frostbitten area
in warm water until thawed (see Chapter 9). Obtain medical advice/assistance.
VAPOUR
INHALED
Remove victim to fresh air. If breathing has stopped, or is weak/irregular, give mouth-to-mouth/nose
resuscitation.
SPILLAGE
Stop the flow. Avoid contact with liquid or vapour. Flood with large amounts of water to disperse spill and
prevent brittle fracture. Inform Port Authorities of any major spill.
PHYSICAL DATA
BOILING POINT
@ ATMOSPHERIC
PRESSURE
VAPOUR
PRESSURE
kg/cm2 (A)
Cargo Operating Manual
-161.5°C
RELATIVE
VAPOUR DENSITY
0.554
See graphs
MOLECULAR
WEIGHT
16.04
SPECIFIC GRAVITY
0.42
ENTHALPY
(kcal/kg)
7.0
68.2
COEFFICIENT OF
CUBIC EXPANSION
0.0026 per °C @ -165°C
LATENT HEAT OF
VAPOURISATION
(kcal/kg)
See graphs
AIR
No reaction.
WATER
(Fresh/Salt)
No reaction. Insoluble. May freeze to form ice or hydrates.
OTHER
LIQUIDS/
GASES
Dangerous reaction possible with chlorine.
METHANE
CONDITIONS OF CARRIAGE
NORMAL
CARRIAGE
CONDITIONS
Fully refrigerated.
GAUGING
Closed, indirect.
SHIP TYPE
2G.
VAPOUR
DETECTION
Flammable.
MATERIALS OF CONSTRUCTION
UNSUITABLE
SUITABLE
Mild steel.
Stainless steel, aluminium, 9 or 36% nickel steel, copper.
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
Liquid
@ -165°C
@ -100°C
Vapour
130.2 @ -165°C
140.5 @ -100°C
FIRE AND EXPLOSION DATA
FLASH POINT -175°C (approx) FLAMMABLE LIMITS 5.3 -14% AUTO-IGNITION TEMPERATURE 595°C
HEALTH DATE
TVL
1000 ppm
ODOUR THRESHOLD
Odourless
EFFECT
OF
LIQUID
Frostbite to skin or eyes. Not absorbed through skin.
EFFECT
OF
VAPOUR
Asphyxiation - headache, dizziness, drowsiness. Possible low temperature damage to lungs, skin. No
chronic effect known.
Issue: 1
Section 2.3 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
NITROGEN
FORMULA
N2
U.N. NUMBER
2040
FAMILY
Noble Gas
APPEARANCE
Colourless
THE MAIN HAZARD
ODOUR
Odourless
FROSTBITE.
NITROGEN
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
REACTIVITY DATA
FIRE
Non-flammable. Cool area near cargo tanks with water spray in the event of fire near to them.
LIQUID
IN EYE
DO NOT DELAY. Flood eye gently with clean sea/fresh water. Force eye open if necessary.
Continue washing for 15 minutes. Seek medical advice/assistance.
LIQUID
ON SKIN
DO NOT DELAY. Handle patient gently. Remove contaminated clothing. Immerse frostbitten area
in warm water until thawed (see Chapter 9). Obtain medical advice/assistance.
VAPOUR
INHALED
Remove victim to fresh air. If breathing has stopped, or is weak/irregular, give mouth-to-mouth/nose
resuscitation.
SPILLAGE
Stop the flow. Avoid contact with liquid or vapour. Flood with large amounts of water to disperse spill and
prevent brittle fracture. Inform Port Authorities of any major spillage.
AIR
No reaction.
WATER
(Fresh/Salt)
No reaction. Insoluble.
OTHER
LIQUIDS/
GASES
No reactions.
CONDITIONS OF CARRIAGE
PHYSICAL DATA
BOILING POINT
@ ATMOSPHERIC
PRESSURE
VAPOUR
PRESSURE
kg/cm2 (A)
-195.8°C
2 @ -190°C
10 @ -170°C
RELATIVE
VAPOUR DENSITY
0.967
MOLECULAR
WEIGHT
28.01
SPECIFIC GRAVITY
0.9
ENTHALPY
(kcal/kg)
Liquid
7.33 @ -196°C
34.7 @ -150°C
COEFFICIENT OF
CUBIC EXPANSION
0.005 @ -198°C
LATENT HEAT OF
VAPOURISATION
(kcal/kg)
47.5 @ -196°C
17.3 @ -150°C
Vapour
54.7 @ -195°C
52.0 @ -150°C
FIRE AND EXPLOSION DATA
NORMAL
CARRIAGE
CONDITIONS
Fully refrigerated.
GAUGING
Closed, indirect.
SHIP TYPE
3G.
VAPOUR
DETECTION
Oxygen analyser required.
MATERIALS OF CONSTRUCTION
UNSUITABLE
SUITABLE
Mild steel.
Stainless steel, copper, aluminium.
FLASH POINT Non-flammable FLAMMABLE LIMITS Non-flammable AUTO-IGNITION TEMPERATURE Non-flammable
HEALTH DATE
TVL 1,000 ppm
Issue: 1
ODOUR THRESHOLD Odourless
EFFECT
OF
LIQUID
Frostbite to skin or eyes.
EFFECT
OF
VAPOUR
Asphyxiation. Cold vapour could cause damage.
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
High oxygen concentrations can be caused by condensation and enrichment of the atmosphere in way of equipment at the low
temperatures attained in parts of the liquid nitrogen system; materials of construction and ancillary equipment (e.g. insulation)
should be resistant tot he effects of this. Due consideration should be given to ventilation in areas where condensation might
occur to avoid the stratification of oxygen-enriched atmosphere.
Section 2.3 - Page 2 of 2
Part 3
Distributed Control System (DCS)
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 3.1a Cargo Control Room Layout
Emergency
Escape
Via
Access
Window
DCS Workstation
Work Bench
DCS Workstation
Emergency
Escape
Breathing
Device
Automatic
Exchange
Telephone
Load Master Workstation
Air
Conditioning
Unit Access
Intrinsically
Safe
Telephone
DCS Workstation
Fire Extinguishers
Desk
Air
Conditioning
Unit
VDU
Printer
Issue: 1
Hot
Line
Telephone
Ship/Shore
Link
Telephones
VDU
Fridge
Wash Basin
Air Lock
Section 3.1 - Page 1 of 3
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Part 3: Distributed Control System (DCS)
3.1
Cargo Control Room (CCR ) Arrangement
The CCR is located midships between cargo tanks 3 and 4. This room contains
the DCS process and input/output (I/O) and loading computer stations, as well
as the operating panels for the ballast remote control valves, cargo pumps, high
duty and low duty gas compressors, alarm and overfill alarms, cargo and void
space gas detection system and the ESD equipment.
Normal control of all cargo loading and discharging operations is carried out
from here.
The are telephones, including the shorelink ‘hotphone’ located on the aft
bulkhead and on the gas sampling section of the control console.
A workshop bench is situated on the starboard side.
The CCR is accessed via two doors which act as an air lock to prevent any
cargo gases entering the room.
The air lock contains four fire extinguishers, one CO2 type and two 12kg and
one 25kg dry powder type.
In an emergency, escape from the control room is possible via the escape
window on the port forward side. There is an emergency breathing device
positioned near the window.
Issue: 1
Section 3.1 - Page 2 of 3
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 3.1b Cargo Control Room Console
7
3
11
13
15
12
14
16
17
20
22
24
21
23
25
26
29
31
33
35
44
46
48
50
57
59
61
30
32
34
38
45
47
49
53
58
60
62
63
1
1
68
70 72 73 74 75
69
39
71
77
67
8
40
55
78
79
66
6
4
76
54
83 84
9
1
81
80
85
1
41
18
27
19
56
36
28
51
52
37
NEBB
64
65
5
43
10
42
2
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
-
Key
DCS Workstation
Ballast System Remote Control Valves Operating Levers
Port of Montoir Hotline Telephone
Water Spray Pump Start/Stop Pushbuttons
Port and Starboard Ballast Pump Start/Stop Switch
Gas Sampling Monitor for Ballast and Void Spaces
Ship/Shore Hotline Telephone for Japan Ports
Fire Alarm
Port of Trinidad Mooring Release Pushbutton
Ballast System Illustration and Standing Orders
No.1 Cargo Tank Pressure Gauge
No.1 Cargo Tank Void Space Pressure Gauge
No.1 Cargo Tank Port Cargo Pump Discharge Pressure Gauge
No.1 Cargo Tank Port Cargo Pump Motor Current
No.1 Cargo Tank Starboard Cargo Pump Discharge Pressure Gauge
No.1 Cargo Tank Starboard Cargo Pump Motor Current
No.1 Cargo Tank Spray Nozzles Pressure Gauge
No.1 Cargo Tank Port and Starboard Cargo Pump Start/Stop Pushbuttons
No.1 Cargo Tank Mimic Panel
20
21
22
23
24
25
25
-
No.2 Cargo Tank Pressure Gauge
No.2 Cargo Tank Void Space Pressure Gauge
No.2 Cargo Tank Port Cargo Pump Discharge Pressure Gauge
No.2 Cargo Tank Port Cargo Pump Motor Current
No.2 Cargo Tank Starboard Cargo Pump Discharge Pressure Gauge
No.2 Cargo Tank Starboard Cargo Pump Motor Current
No.2 Cargo Tank Spray Nozzles Pressure Gauge
Issue: 1
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
-
No.2 Cargo Tank Port and Starboard Cargo Pump Start/Stop Pushbuttons
No.2 Cargo Tank Mimic Panel
Ballast System Illustration and Standing Orders
No.3 Cargo Tank Pressure Gauge
No.3 Cargo Tank Void Space Pressure Gauge
No.3 Cargo Tank Port Cargo Pump Discharge Pressure Gauge
No.3 Cargo Tank Port Cargo Pump Motor Current
No.3 Cargo Tank Starboard Cargo Pump Discharge Pressure Gauge
No.3 Cargo Tank Starboard Cargo Pump Motor Current
No.3 Cargo Tank Spray Nozzles Pressure Gauge
No.3 Cargo Tank Port and Starboard Cargo Pump Start/Stop Pushbuttons
No.3 Cargo Tank Mimic Panel
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
-
No.3 Cargo Tank Spray Pump Discharge Pressure Gauge
No.3 Cargo Tank Spray Pump Motor Current
No.3 Cargo Tank Spray Pump Throttle Valve Control Dial
No.3 Cargo Tank Spray Pump Start/Stop Pushbuttons
ESD Pushbutton
Manifold Mimic
No.4 Cargo Tank Pressure Gauge
No.4 Cargo Void Space Pressure Gauge
No.4 Cargo Tank Port Cargo Pump Discharge Pressure Gauge
No.4 Cargo Tank Port Cargo Pump Motor Current
No.4 Cargo Tank Starboard Cargo Pump Discharge Pressure Gauge
No.4 Cargo Tank Starboard Cargo Pump Motor Current
No.4 Cargo Tank Spray Nozzles Pressure Gauge
No.4 Cargo Tank Port and Starboard Cargo Pump Start/Stop Pushbuttons
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
-
No.4 Cargo Tank Mimic Panel
No.4 Cargo Tank Spray Pump Discharge Pressure Gauge
No.4 Cargo Tank Spray Pump Motor Current
No.4 Cargo Tank Spray Pump Throttle Valve Control Dial
No.4 Cargo Tank Spray Pump Start/Stop Pushbuttons
No.5 Cargo Tank Pressure Gauge
No.5 Cargo Tank Void Space Pressure Gauge
No.5 Cargo Tank Port Cargo Pump Discharge Pressure Gauge
No.5 Cargo Tank Port Cargo Pump Motor Current
No.5 Cargo Tank Starboard Cargo Pump Discharge Pressure Gauge
No.5 Cargo Tank Starboard Cargo Pump Motor Current
No.5 Cargo Tank Spray Nozzle Pressure gauge
No.5 Cargo Tank Port and Starboard Cargo Pump Start/Stop Pushbuttons
No.5 Cargo Tank Mimic Panel
Insulation Barrier Nitrogen Gas Pressure Gauge
Cargo Tanks High Level Alarm Indicator
LD Compressor Speed Dial
LD Compressor Running Light and Start/Stop Switch
Inboard HD Compressor Surge Pressure Controller
Inboard HD Compressor Running Light and Start/Stop Switch
Inboard HD Compressor Pressure Controller
Inboard HD Compressor Speed Controller
Outboard HD Compressor Surge Pressure Controller
Outboard HD Compressor Speed Controller
Outboard HD Compressor Running Light and Start/Stop Switch
LD Compressor Speed Control Dial
78
79
-
80
-
81
-
82
-
83
84
-
LPG Compressor Motor Current
LPG Compressors Motor Current
Selector Switch
LPG/LNG Compressors Changeover
Switch and Key Lock
Cargo Tanks Ventilation Valve Control
Dial Switch and Gauge
Inert Gas Flow to Consumers
Indicating Light
Glycol Pump Running Indicator Light
Cargo Tanks Ventilation Valve Control
Dial Changeover Switch (CCR/ECR)
Section 3.1 - Page 3 of 3
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 3.2.1a Distributed Control System Overview
Engine Control Room
Cargo Control Room
Report Printer
Operator Stations
Report Printer
Wheelhouse
Operator Station
Alarm Printer
Alarm Printer
Report Server
Load
Computer
XOPS
A101
XOPS
A102
ALP
A1A1
ALP
A2A1
XOPS
A201
Ethernet
XES
A103
GTW:CIS
AC01
XOS
A202
Main
System Bus
Reserve
PCS
AP01
Fieldbus
0
1/0
1
1/0
R
PCS
AP02
M
Fieldbus
7R
PIC R
R
M
PCS
AP03M
R
6R
PIC R
Fieldbus
Issue: 1
PCS
AP03R
8R
PIC R
M
7M
PIC R
DGPS
Navigation
Equipment
8M
PIC R
1/0
0
1/0
0
1/0
3
1/0
1
1/0
1
1/0
4
1/0
2
1/0
2
1/0
5
1/0
3
1/0
3
1/0
4
1/0
5
1/0
System
Hard Disk
Whesso
Cargo Tank
Level
6M
PIC R
2
BU
AB01
GTW:LIS
AL01
Stb. Combustion Air
I
Port Combustion Air
VALMARINE
Ship Automation
25%
75%
0%
8-SLOT
1/0
8-SLOT
1/0
8-SLOT
1/0
8-SLOT
1/0
8-SLOT
1/0
8-SLOT
1/0
DG2 and
DG1 and
Wheelhouse MSB STBD
TG and
MSB Port
St
Co
25%
%
Stb. Superh
Temp. Co
ed Steam
l Valve
25%
75%
0%
St
Co
l
e
75%
%
Steam Dump
C t lV l
25%
s
e
75%
0%
%
Emergency Panel
Section 3.2.1 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
3.2
Vessel Control System
3.2.1 Damatic XD Distributed Control System (DCS) Overview
The DCS system is an alarm, monitoring and control system which covers all
the important plant on board the vessel, such as propulsion, power generation,
boilers, auxiliary machinery, cargo and ballast systems.
The DCS system on board is called a distributed control system, because the
process control functions are defined locally in the process stations and not in
the operator stations. The operator stations function independently, so they can
be located at the ship control centres. This also means that each station is
capable of controlling any process, provided it has control of the appropriate
command group and the user is logged on with the correct access.
There are two communication bus levels in the system:
System bus, connecting all types of stations
Field bus, connecting the input/output racks to the process stations
The basic functions include:
Process and system monitoring
Event logging and monitoring
Control functions (motor control, valve control, PID controllers etc)
The main applications to which these function are applied are:
Cargo and ballast control and monitoring
Cargo alarms
Machinery alarms
Power management system
Boiler control
Main turbine control
Watch call system
Main Components
The DCS system is made up of operator and history stations connected by a
dual bus to the Network Connection Units (NCUs) and the process stations.
Process Control Stations (PCS)
The process control stations connect the XD system to the controlled process
and provide the interface between the DCS system and the actual plant or
equipment. They are able to handle group starts, sequences, trend histories and
advanced calculations for supervisory level controls.
Issue: 1
Interface Stations
Gateway GWT:LIS connects the system to the DGPS navigation equipment
and the cargo tank level measuring system. The other gateway GTW:CIS
connects the main and reserve bus systems with the ethernet and report
printers.
Operator Stations (XOPS)
The operator stations are the main interface between the operator and the
processes under the operator’s control. The operator station has a colour
monitor, an operator panel with buttons and trackball and an operating display.
These are installed in the cargo control room and the engine control room.
Operator Server (XOS)
The operator server allows the operator to receive information on the process
and enter commands to control the process.
External Systems (XES)
It allows the operator to remotely open displays through servers running on
other systems.
Alarm Processors ALP
The alarm processors, one for machinery alarms and one for cargo alarms,
collect information on the process events and send the information to the
operator in the control room and to the long term alarm archive in the
information server. The cargo alarms are acknowledged from the cargo control
room and the wheelhouse and the machinery alarms can only be acknowledged
from the ECR.
Back-up Station (BU)
The back-up station is connected to the system bus. The back-up station’s disk
storage contains the configuration of each station connected to the bus. In a
failure situation, the automatic back-up function will load the configuration of
the affected station.
Communication Network
The network used is two communication bus levels connecting the operator
and process stations. The System Bus, connecting all the stations and the Field
Bus connecting the input/output racks to the process station.
Cargo Operating Manual
Displays and Views
The system is made up of the following types of views:
Process
Flow
Event
Trends
Equipment
The number of views in a system depends upon the equipment under system
control. The operator can select views with varying levels of detail.
When a view is selected showing an overall process, there may not be enough
room to display all the detail on a single view. To account for this, the system
will therefore have a number of views, accessed from the main view, that show
these details.
System Peripheral Equipment
Alarm Printers
The alarm printers are connected to the alarm processor, which record all the
alarms activated and the alarms which have returned to the normal condition
in the cargo control room and the ECR. A new alarm entering the list is given
the following priority symbols:
Critical alarm
**
Normal alarm
!
Redundant alarm
--
Report Printers
Two report printers are connected to the ethernet and are used for process
monitoring and reporting in the cargo control room and the ECR.
Emergency Panel
In the event of a serious breakdown of the DCS, the boilers can be controlled
using the emergency panel.
The Operator Interface
The graphic displays are shown on the monitor of the operator stations. These
displays show all or part of a system or process using standard symbols to
represent the actual plant/equipment (valves, motors etc). Events (alarms and
messages) are also shown on the displays.
The operator panel is used to interact with the monitor display and control the
process. This is achieved by the use of the trackball and buttons to point and
click on symbols and menus on the monitor display.
Section 3.2.1 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 3.2.2a Operator Station Keyboard
STORE
WND
DET
PICK
T
OVW
T
ACT
M
C
CE
EX
PICK
MR
7
8
9
DET
4
5
6
MOVE
DMON
1
2
3
CA
DISP
0
.
-
FLD
ACK
FLD
ALM
LIST
ACK
WND
ACT
Clears the Last Character
Scans the Event List
Towards Older Events
Scans Towards
Next Pictures
Scans Towards
Previous Pictures
OVW
Selects a More General Display and
Moves to a Higher Level in Hierarchy
DET
Selects a More Detailed Display. In
Configuration the Function of this Key
Must be Defined Separately for Each Display
PICK
For Picking a Related Operating Display Window
After Pointing it by Cursor
Scans the Event List
Towards Newer Events
Clears the
Entire Entry
C
CE
EX
7
8
9
4
5
6
1
2
3
Executes the
Entry
DMON
DISP
Selecting a Picture by Number to
Own Monitor
WND
Selecting a Related Monitor Window
After Pointing it by Cursor
MOVE
Selecting the Display and Loop
Related to the Event and Scanning
the Events in the Alarm Area of the
Header Towards Older Events
Selecting the Display and Loop
Related to the Event and Scanning
the Events in the Alarm Area of the
Header Towards Newer Events
M
0
.
ACK
FLD
ALM
LIST
ACK
Alarm Buzzer
Acknowledgement
Alarm Flashing
Acknowledgement
MR
Recalling a Stored Picture to the Monitor
ACT
CA
Moving a Monitor Window
STORE
FLD
Direct Access Key to Alarm List
Issue: 1
Storing a Displayed Picture in Memory
Selecting a Picture to Another Monitor
Activation Keys are Used to Start Monitor
Operation (Such as Starting a Pump or Entering
a Set Point)
Key to Cancel Activated Monitor Operation
Store Key
T
Scans Towards Pictures
Selected Earlier
T
Scans Towards Pictures
Selected Later
Section 3.2.2 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
3.2.2
Operator Stations
Operator Panel
9. Numeric entry keys 0 to 9, decimal point and minus sign and also includes:
C key for clearing the entire entry
CE key for clearing the last character
The system’s operator/user interface is the monitor screen, operating display
panel, trackball and keyboard. The monitor screen displays the system views
and the operating display panel is used to interact with those views. The
keyboard is used for set-up and configuration purposes. The operating display
panel is used to interact with the views on the monitor screen, display a new
view or to act upon an element within a view.
10. ACT key - used to open a dialogue box on the monitor screen, once the
cursor has been positioned on the operating area.
Operator Panel Keyboard
12. DMON key - selecting a screen display to another monitor.
The keyboard consists of the following keys:
1. PAGE SCANNING keys - viewing of previous and next screen displays and
older and newer events. Pressing the page scanning keys after the direct access
key allows the operator to view the screens in the current hierarchy branch.
2. DIRECT ACCESS keys and STORE key - short cuts to screen displays most
used and ability to store a new direct access screen display.
3. T keys - allows scanning towards screen displays selected earlier or later.
4. OVW key for selecting a more general overview - moves to a higher level
in the hierarchy and selects an overview display, which includes the buttons for
viewing the following systems:
Cargo
Main turbine
Boilers
Power management system
Machinery
Integrated cargo and machinery system ICMS
5. DET key - selects a more detailed display. Is used after the the cursor is
moved to the area on the monitor display where more detail is required.
6. PICK key - for opening the related operating display window after pointing
to it with the cursor.
7. M key - storing a displayed screen in memory.
8. MR key - recalling a stored screen to the monitor.
Issue: 1
EX key executes the entry
11. CA key - to cancel the activated monitor operation.
Cargo Operating Manual
Operating Display Text Keys
These keys are automatically displayed on the operating panel when the
operator is prompted to enter text. The text is entered on the top line which
allows for 50 characters.
The display also includes the following keys:
CPS key - changes letters to upper case and cancels the effect of the
ALT key
ALT key - selects characters on the top of some keys
BS key - deletes an entry
13. DISP key - selecting a screen display by number to own monitor.
14. FLD keys - used for selecting the display and loop related to the event,
scanning the events in the alarm area of the header towards older and newer
events.
15. ALM LIST key - allows direct access to the alarm list.
16. ACK keys - acknowledges the buzzer sound and blinking light.
EX key - sends the command from the operating display to the DCS.
Printing an Alarm List
Touching the MORE key will reveal the COPY, STOP and CONT keys to be
displayed. Pressing the COPY key will activate the hard copy unit to print and
a copy of the alarms on the alarm printer. The printing can be stopped using the
STOP key and restarted using the CONT key.
Trackball
The trackball is used to position the cursor on the screen display. The speed of
rotation will determine the distance the cursor will move on the screen display.
Monitor Screen Operations
To open a monitor display or window, move the cursor to the area required and
press the WND key. The monitor display or window can be closed by pressing
the CA key when the cursor is within the area.
A particular item on the screen can be operated by moving the cursor to within
the operating area and pressing the ACT key. A field for user operations is
displayed at the selected item on the monitor which shows the available
options for the current situation.
Inside the field the cursor is replaced by a pointer, which can only be moved
to the permissible positions by using the trackball. The operating fields include
keys, menus and/or entry fields for numerical values. Using the keys and
menus is performed by pointing at the desired option with the pointer and
pressing the ACT key.
Operations in an operating field can be stopped by moving the cursor off the
field and by pressing the CA key.
Section 3.2.2 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 3.2.3a Screen Display
1
Monitor Number
NORMAN LADY CARGO
Page Number
10.07.03
-110.4 C
-124.9 C
-125.2 C
Cargo Tank
Liquid
Temperatures
VAPOUR
Cargo Tank
Discharge
Pumps
FLOAT
35.65 m
0 m3 15491 m3
115.3 %
-153.6 C
0.0 bar
0A
CPP
LAHH
LAH
0.1 bar
0A
CPS
H
LNG MODE
Issue: 1
Date and Time
CARGO TANK 1
5.11
DRY AIR SUPPLY DEMAND
FOR VOID SPACE
Cargo Tank
Level Indicator
Reading
11:02.41
H
CARGO TK/ATM
VOID SPACE/ATM
CT/VOID SPACE
TANKDIFF PRESS
SPRAY HEAD.PRESS
0.161 bar
0.000 bar
-0.154 bar
PDAL
0.151 bar
EQUATOR RING:
FORE
AFTER
STBD
PORT
-110.7 C
-111.5 C
-111.7 C
-104.9 C
EQUATOR SKIRT PORT
STIFF. RING PORT
EQUATOR SKIRT STBD
STIFF. RING STBD
FOUNDATION DECK FWD
-62.7 C
-52.0 C
-65.8 C
-58.1 C
25.0 C
VOID SPACE:
SUMP LAH
FWD BULKH.
STBD BULKH.UPP
STBD BULKH.LOW
PORT BULKH.UPP
PORT BULKH.LOW
PRESSURE
20.3 C
27.1 C
27.9 C
26.4 C
29.5 C
26.5 C
PDAH
PDAL
Cargo Tank
Pressure Indicator
Reading
Cargo Tank
Temperature Indicator
Reading
Section 3.2.3 - Page 1 of 4
Norman Lady
3.2.3 Screen Displays
Monitor Screen
Header
The header is displayed at the top of each monitor display and shows the
general information on the system and the display picture.
The header also includes the following information:
1. Page number
2. Display continuation marker
3. Display number
4. Monitor number
5. Selected monitor indicator
6. Display title
In graphic display, any alarm will change the background colour of the affected
motor or pump to the alarm colour.
Group Display
This gives detailed information on the controlled items of a specific section of
the process. It consists of eight sections, each of which includes one or more
process tags, depending on the displayed item. In group display, any alarm will
change the background colour of the running status to the alarm colour.
Trend Display
It is possible to configure a process history trend in curve format, which is
continually updated in accordance with the process, so as to display the actual
state of the process. The displayed colours indicate process status with regard
to either normal, disturbance or failure conditions.
A trend may also be displayed in a split format containing up to four trends in
different colours. The time scale can be in minutes, hours or days.
Event List Display
An event list shows a list of the received alarms and messages. They are used
to monitor the running of the process, to find out the causes of the disturbances
and to access the different process situations later.
7. Date
8. Time
9. Event line in alarm area which displays the initial event.
The initial event is the first event requiring acknowledgement after all previous
events have been acknowledged.
10. Process zone fields in alarm area
A process zone field shows the zone identifier and event counter. The zone
identifier specifies the process zone and colour of the background indicates the
most urgent event in the process zone:
Red
= critical alarm
Orange = normal alarm
Grey
= message
Lilac
= fault
11. Event counter, which shows the number of events that have
occurred after the initial event in the process zone
12. Zone field continuation marker. The line has room for up to six
zone fields and when there are more the continuation marker will be
displayed
Graphic Display
This provides the user with an overview of the controlled process and displays
the process in an illustrated format. The process status is displayed by means
of motor, valve and pump symbols, status data in text form such as ON/OFF,
measured values in bar graph format and various numerical values.
Issue: 1
An event refers to a change in a particular state and is divided into critical
alarms, normal alarms and messages. An alarm is an exceptional event and
indicates an abnormal process status. A message is an event belonging to a
normal operation of the process.
One line in the event list represents a single event and the events are displayed
in chronological order in the list. One page of the event list can show 32 events
and there can be up to ten pages, with the latest event always on the first page.
A new alarm is displayed in red text, with the symbol blinking. When the alarm
is acknowledged, the blinking stops but the line will remain red until the alarm
becomes redundant (not active). Redundant alarms are coloured brown and are
eventually deleted from the event list automatically.
Cargo Operating Manual
The event list is selected by pressing the ALM LIST key. Scanning through the
pages is done by pressing the scanning keys and the ALM LIST key to return
to the first page.
If an event shows the letter D, a detailed display related to the event can be
selected by moving the cursor to the event line and pressing the DET key. If an
event shows the letter I at the right hand end of the line, an information display
related to the event can be selected by moving the cursor to the letter I and
pressing the DET key.
Operations on the Alarm Area
The event line in the alarm area shows the systems first alarm. The operating
display window related to the alarm can be accessed by pressing the
appropriate FLD key.
Displays related to the event in the alarm area can be shown on the monitor and
operating display screen by continually pressing the appropriate FLD key to
move up or down the display list.
In this way the operator can more easily determine the causes and effects and
access the displays to perform the required actions.
Using Two Monitors
If there are two monitors connected to one operator terminal, they can be
configured to be located adjacent to each other.
One of the monitors is defined as the first monitor and the other as the second
monitor. The monitor shows that the cursor is currently active and the other is
passive and all operations are addressed to the active monitor.
To activate the passive monitor, the cursor is moved beyond the border of the
active monitor.
It is possible to select a display to another monitor by pressing the DMON key,
followed by the number 2 key. The other monitor will show the same display
as the original monitor and it will be possible to scan displays on the new
monitor by pressing the right hand direction arrow scan key.
Redundant alarms and messages can be deleted from the list by activating the
COMPR compress key at the top right corner of the screen. The active and
unacknowledged alarms will remain in the list.
The alarm area shows the number of events for different process zones and the
colour of the zone field indicates the priority of the most urgent event. The
information related to the first alarm in an alarm sequence is shown on the
alarm area’s event line. The event line allows the operator to scan through the
events and the related displays at the same time.
Section 3.2.3 - Page 2 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 3.2.3b Operating Panel Display
Title and Tag Number
Present Temperature
Temperature Range
Hierarchy Path
Reveals the Related
Displays Available
For Boiler
System View
if Required
MAIN
INDEX
GRAPH
DISP
BLR
OVW
S BLR SUPERH. STEAM
643.210
TIAHL
MENU
Press for Access to
Other Controls
T
300.0-600.0
C
M
Keys for Displaying
Other Operating
Display Windows
510.1
T
CA
MORE
Issue: 1
Key for Clearing
the Present Operation
Display
Key for Displaying
the Next Set of
Standard Keys
Section 3.2.3 - Page 3 of 4
Norman Lady
Operating Display Screen
The operating display screen consists of a capacitive electro-luminescent
panel, displaying measured value bars, text, status data and soft keys in
accordance with the current situation.
(Note: Due to the nature of the matrix, only one finger should be used to touch
the display and touch only one key at a time.)
The operating display may have a screen saver in use which blanks the
operating display after a defined time if no operations have been made through
the operating terminal. Touching any key or moving the cursor will return the
operating display to operating mode.
The operating display keys detail the following:
MAIN INDEX = hierarchical path
T
= scanning operating display wndows
CA
= clear activation
MORE
= displaying the next set of standard keys
Cargo Operating Manual
When required, a more detailed view of an item displayed on the monitor can
be requested to the operating display, which provides detailed information on
a loop, for instance an interlock that has stopped a motor.
If text needs to be entered during operations, such as system login, creation of
a trend graph or a recorder connection, a text keyboard will be automatically
displayed. The keyboard is of the standard qwerty type with the following
additional keys:
CPS key = to enter upper case
ALT key = to select the characters at the top of some keys
BS key
= to remove the last entered character
EX key
= the text entered disappears and the function is executed
If text is being entered on the monitor, the text will not be sent to the monitor
until the EX key is pressed.
GRAPH DISP = reveal the related displays available
A hierarchical path shown at the left hand side of the operating screen display
indicates the current display and its selection path. The items at the centre of
the display are related to the operating tag and the standard, non-configuration,
keys are at the right hand side of the display. By touching the MORE key, the
next set of keys are displayed.
Operation in the operating display is started by picking the desired item to the
operating display. This is done by pointing at the item with the cursor and
pressing the PICK key. The display may include bar graphs, texts and
information on the items status. Actual operating keys are not yet displayed for
the item in this basic state, only the current information for the item is shown.
An item’s status is displayed inside rectangles in the operating display and
operations on a specific data are started by selecting the desired data. This is
done by touching the data with a finger, which will highlight the data.
Operating keys for an operated item are displayed with rectangles or squares
whose corners are cut.
The screens are arranged in a hierarchy tree which consists of branches and
levels, with the route leading from one level to another called the hierarchy
path. The hierarchy menu is accessed by touching the MAIN INDEX key,
which will reveal the keys for the lower level screens and related displays. The
required screen will be displayed on the monitor by touching the relevant key.
Issue: 1
Section 3.2.3 - Page 4 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 3.2.4a Operation
1
Monitor Number
NORMAN LADY CARGO
Page Number
10.07.03
SPRAY SYSTEM
5.31
LIQUID
11:02.41
Date and Time
LIQUID
VAPOUR
Command
Icon
SPRAY HEADER
0.15 bar
0.14 bar
0.15 bar
0.14 bar
0.01 bar
S
P
R
A
Y
STOP
TANK
1
TANK
2
TANK
3
SPRAY
0A
0.00
bar
C
R
O
S
S
O
V
E
R
22C
STOP
0.00
bar
SPRAY
0A
TANK
4
TANK
5
28C
Cursor
30C
SHORE CONNECTION
Issue: 1
Section 3.2.4 - Page 1 of 3
Norman Lady
3.2.4 Operation
Basic User Operations
User operations are performed either with a cursor directly through the
monitor, or through the operating display by pressing the relative key with a
finger.
User Authorities
The users of the operating station can be divided into three groups:
Display mode
The status symbols are displayed within squares and the operating keys are
displayed within squares with cut corners.
A valve is represented graphically by a status symbol containing a tag mark
character that indicates the current operational mode of the valve.
From the Monitor
The symbol may also contain a numerical value if the valve has a controllable
movement. This value indicates either the actual position of the valve or the set
point of the valve in percentage terms.
When the cursor is moved to the motor/pump symbol status locating area, the
ACT key is pressed to reveal a graphic display with the following information:
1. Title and/or tag number
2. Running status(stop or running)
3. Control mode selection status
Control mode
M = manual
Maintenance mode
A = automatic
Display Mode
In this mode it is possible to view the screens and pick the displays, but all
process operations are disabled.
Control Mode
In control mode most basic operations are enabled except for the following:
Controller parameter tuning
Changing of event limits
Masking of events
Maintenance Mode
All operations are enabled which allows for maintenance to be done on the
system and parameters tuned.
L = local
4. Text pointing area
Running Operations
Once the cursor is moved to the operating area, press the ACT key to reveal an
operating field showing the current status and a selection key.
I = start
O = stop
With the arrow pointing to the I or O symbol, press the ACT key to either start
or stop the motor.
Control Mode Change
Motor and Pump Control Modules
All motors and pumps covered in the DCS system are supported by modules
providing automatic, manual and local control, control status, operating status,
interlocking, power demand, standby start, restart after blackout and shutdown.
The operating menu for a motor or pump contains the event masking, operation
and trend commands available at that time.
All motor or pump control modules have control logic interlock functions to
prevent the motor or pump from being damaged. The interlocks prevent the
motor from being inadvertently started. Large motors (heavy consumers) have
a power interlock function that prevents the motor from being started if there
is insufficient generator power available on the electrical network.
Some control modules will be configured with a blackout restart function. This
function causes a motor to be automatically restarted, when power is reestablished after a blackout, provided the motor was running before the
blackout occurred. A configured start delay on each motor is provided to
prevent too many motors starting at the same time.
Issue: 1
Cargo Operating Manual
The control mode can be changed on the monitor screen by moving the cursor
over the control mode status symbol locating area and pressing the ACT key.
An operating display will be revealed, indicating the current status and
selection keys available, such as M, A or L. The current status will be indicated
by an arrow, which can be moved up or down to another control mode by using
the trackball.
Control of valves is similar to motors and pumps, ie, the operation menu will
show which commands are available for that specific valve.
Open or Close Operation
Running an actuator is possible when the actuator is in manual mode M and
the operations are enabled when the message NO OP is not on.
The valve is operated by moving the cursor to the status symbol locating area
and pressing the ACT key. An operating field is displayed, containing the
symbol for the current status and an open and/or close selection key, depending
on the application. The valve is opened or closed by moving the arrow to the
required selection key and pressing the ACT key. The moving actuator will
display a blinking status symbol.
Intermediate Position Operation
The method to start the operation is similar to an open/close type actuator. The
exception is that the ACT key is held down to run the valve to the required
position and released to stop the operation at the required position.
Changing the Position Set Point
Move the cursor to the measured value locating area and press the ACT key.
An operating field with the current measured value and set point is displayed.
The field also includes an entry field for the new set point, as well as arrow
keys for driving the se tpoint.
Enter the new set point using the numerical keys or adjust the set point with
the arrow keys.
Trend Graph Display
The trend graph display is revealed by moving the cursor to the system title on
the screen display and pressing the ACT key. On the resulting operating display
screen press the GRAPH DISP key to reveal the related displays available and
select the TREND DISP key to show a trend graph for the system.
Valve Actuator Control Modules
All valves in the DCS system are supported by modules that have either %
position or open/closed position feedback. The basic module functions cover
automatic and manual, automatic or local control.
Section 3.2.4 - Page 2 of 3
Norman Lady
From the Operating Display
The control can also be carried out via the operating display window by
pressing the PICK key when the cursor is moved to the motor/pump status
symbol locating area on the monitor. The operating display window will show
the following information:
1. Title and/or tag number.
2. Running status.
I
= running (ON)
O = stopped (OFF)
>O = stopping
3. Control mode selection status.
= failed start
FAIL OFF
= failed stop
DIST ON
= disturbance start
DIST OFF
= disturbance stop
ICONTFAULT
= ON control fault
OCONTFAULT
= OFF control fault
Intermediate Position Operation
The method to start the operation is similar to an open/close type actuator. The
second display contains two operating symbols showing the valve 50% closed
and fully closed and two operating symbols containing arrows. The valve can
either be 50% closed or adjusted to a desired position using the arrow keys and
noting the position on the indicator.
Changing the Position Setpoint
Press the rectangle symbol showing the valve position. The next display will
show the numerical keys and arrow keys. The set point can be reset by entering
the new value using either the numerical or arrow keys, followed by pressing
the EX key.
The motor is in manual mode M
The NO OP symbol is not on to prevent operations
The preventive delay for restarting is not on when starting the pump
Running Operations
M
= manual
A
= automatic
L
= local
4. Operability.
NO OP = operations prevented (masked)
5. Measured current output.
6. Fixed status data.
RI
= release ON
RO
= release OFF
FI
= forced control ON
FO
= forced control OFF
WD = watchdog failure
= overcurrent
7. Status description.
NO REL I
= no release ON
NO REL O
= no release OFF
FORCED ON = forced control ON
FORCED OFF = forced control OFF
WATCHDOG = watchdog failure
CUR H
= current over high limit
CUR HH
= current over higher high limit
Issue: 1
FAIL ON
Starting or stopping is possible when:
>I = starting
CU
8. Explanation of watchdog failures.
Cargo Operating Manual
To either start or stop a motor/pump, press the status symbol O or I. The
display will change to show the operating symbol I or O in a square with cut
corners. Press the operating symbol to start or stop the motor and the display
will then change to show a status symbol >I or >O, indicating that the
motor/pump is starting or stopping. The symbol will change to I or O when the
motor is at its final status.
Control Mode Change
The control mode can be changed on the operating display by pressing either
of the currently displayed M, A or L symbols. This will reveal an operating
display, confirming the current status and selection keys available, such as M,
A or L in squares with cut corners. The control mode can be changed by
pressing the necessary symbol and the display will change to indicate the new
control status within a square.
Valve Actuator Control
The valve control is transferred to the operating display by pressing the PICK
key when the cursor is in the status symbol locating area. The display will
show two square symbols, showing the position of the valve and the operating
mode and a rectangular symbol displaying the amount open or closed.
Running an actuator is possible when the actuator is in manual mode M and
the operations are enabled when the message NO OP is not on.
Open or Close Operation
To operate a valve, press the valve position symbol which will then display
square symbols with cut corners. Pressing the necessary square symbol will
start the actuator and either open or close the valve.
Section 3.2.4 - Page 3 of 3
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
3.2.5a Mimics
1
1
NORMAN LADY CARGO
5.18
10.07.03
PRESSURES
LIMIT
VALUE
CTK1
CTK3
CTK4
NORMAN LADY CARGO
CTK1
CTK2
CTK3
CTK4
CTK5
-110.7 C
-111.6 C
-104.9 C
-111.7 C
-110.3 C
-110.5 C
-109.1 C
-108.2 C
-108.1 C
-110.4 C
-109.2 C
-108.2 C
-114.5 C
-119.2 C
-118.8 C
-121.2 C
-116.1 C
-118.3 C
-117.2 C
-116.6 C
-62.7 C
-65.8 C
-52.0 C
-58.1 C
-58.9 C
-68.9 C
-27.7 C
-45.9 C
-71.5 C
-56.8 C
-62.9 C
-70.7 C
-42.7 C
-71.0 C
-55.6 C
-68.0 C
-83.8 C
-82.6 C
-87.2 C
-88.6 C
FOUNDATION DECK FWD
25.0 C
22.7 C
22.2 C
22.8 C
26.4 C
FWD BULKHEAD UPP
FWD BULKHEAD LOW
VOID SPACE AFT BULKHEAD
STBD BULKHEAD UPP
STBD BULKHEAD LOW
PORT BULKHEAD UPP
PORT BULKHEAD LOW
27.1 C
24.9 C
21.3 C
24.9 C
22.1 C
25.8 C
22.9 C
27.9 C
26.4 C
29.5 C
26.5 C
28.7 C
27.0 C
28.4 C
26.7 C
28.4 C
26.9 C
28.9 C
26.6 C
28.6 C
27.1 C
29.4 C
27.6 C
25.0 C
23.1 C
25.5 C
29.1 C
25.3 C
25.8 C
29.1 C
VOID SPACE SUMP
20.2 C
15.2 C
10.9 C
6.5 C
21.2 C
LIQUID CARGO CROSSOVER FWD
LIQUID CARGO CROSSOVER AFT
VAPOUR CARGO CROSSOVER
LIQUID CARGO HEADER FORE
LIQUID CARGO HEADER AFT
28.1 C
22.4 C
30.3 C
31.8 C
30.5 C
CTK5
0.22
0.01
0.00
0.161 bar
PAH
PAL
PCL
0.160 bar
PAH
PAL
PCL
0.160 bar
PAH
PAL
PCL
0.156 bar
PAH
PAL
PCL
0.157 bar
PAH
PAL
PCL
VOID SPACE / CTR
HIGH PRESS. OPEN RELIEF VOID SPACE
HIGH PRESS. STOP COMPR, PMPS, FANS
HIGH PRESS. ALARM
0.05
0.04
0.03
-0.154 bar
PCHH
PCH
PAH
-0.128 bar
PCHH
PCH
PAH
-0.128 bar
PCHH
PCH
PAH
-0.127 bar
PCHH
PCH
PAH
-0.129 bar
PCHH
PCH
PAH
EQUATOR SKIRT PORT
EQUATOR SKIRT STBD
STIFF. RING PORT
STIFF. RING STBD
VOID SPACE / ATM
HIGH PRESS. OPEN RELIEF VLV VOIDSP.
HIGH PRESS. ALARM
LOW PRESS. ALARM
LOW PRESS. N2 TO VOID
LOW PRESS. DRY AIR TO VOID
LOW PRESS. OPEN RELIEF VALVE VOIDSP
0.15
0.12
-0.02
-0.05
-0.07
-0.08
0.000 bar
PCH
PAH
PAL
PCL
PCLL
PCLLL
0.000 bar
PCH
PAH
PAL
PCL
PCLL
PCLLL
0.001 bar
PCH
PAH
PAL
PCL
PCLL
PCLLL
0.000 bar
PCH
PAH
PAL
PCL
PCLL
PCLLL
0.002 bar
PCH
PAH
PAL
PCL
PCLL
PCLLL
LIQUID CARGO FWD PRESSURE
LIQUID CARGO AFT PRESSURE
VAPOUR CARGO PRESSURE
0.00 bar
0.00 bar
0.03 bar
FUEL GAS TO ENG. ROOM PRESSURE
PAH
EMERGENCY RELEASE QUICK CLOSING LOOP
6.67 bar
Cargo Tank Pressures Screen
12.08.03
16:19.03
TEMPERATURES
5.19
EQUATOR RING FORE
EQUATOR RING AFTER
EQUATOR RING PORT
EQUATOR RING STBD
CTR / ATM
HIGH PRESS. ALARM
LOW PRESS. ALARM
LOW PRESS. STOP PMPS & COMPR
Issue: 1
CTK2
15:39.30
Cargo Tank Temperatures Screen
Section 3.2.5 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
3.2.5 Mimics
Cargo Operating Manual
Lines in views, representing pipes carrying fluids, are, where appropriate,
coloured to indicate contents:
Main gas valve control
Boiler safety
Mimics are available through the menus from the overview mimic or by
requesting a specific numeric identifier.
Pipe Colour
Fluid
Electric power monitoring
Blue
Fresh water or condensate
Generator control
Brown
Heavy fuel oil or crude oil
Diesel generator inboard
Cyan or Light Blue
Compressed air
Diesel generator outboard
Green
Sea water, ballast water or bilge water
Turbine generator
Red
Steam
White
Chemicals, inert gas or methanol
Yellow
Lubricating oil, hydraulic oil or diesel oil
Power management system
Equipment Views Available
The following equipment status views are available:
Cargo system
Cargo operation
Custody transfer
Main turbines
Cargo temperatures
Cargo pressures
Operating condition
Cargo tank levels
Gear and shafting
Cargo safety system
Lubricating oil
Cargo compressors
Operation
Nitrogen plant
Trips and interlocks
Void spaces
Main sea water cooling ystem
Ballast system
Main steam system
Distributed control and monitoring system
Condensate and feed water system
Machinery alarm list
Fuel oil tanks
Cargo alarm list
Fuel oil transfer systems
Port and starboard boilers
Bilge alarm system
Burner management
Master and steam dump control
Compressed air system
Fuel oil control
Bridge alarms
Fuel gas control
Mode Indication
Combustion air control
Water level control
Steam temperature control
LD compressor control
Cargo tank pressure control
Nitrogen purge
Symbol
White
Yellow
Green
Motor
Stopped
Transient/undefined
Running
Pump
Stopped
Transient/undefined
Running
Valve
Closed
Transient/undefined
Open
Generator
Stopped
Transient/undefined
Running
Transient/undefined
Closed
Circuit breaker Open
Issue: 1
Section 3.2.5 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 3.2.6a Ballast Operating Display Screen
2
Monitor Number
NORMAN LADY MACHINERY
Page Number
12.08.03
13:25.10
Date and Time
BALLAST SYSTEM
5.61
AFT
PEAK
6.21 m
199 m3
91 %
Tanks and
Levels
No.5 SIDE
TANK PORT
0.00 m
0 m3
0 %
0.42 bar
0 A
PORT
No.4 SIDE
TANK PORT
15.54 m
1592 m3
95 %
No.3 SIDE
TANK PORT
15.77 m
2624 m3
97 %
No.2 SIDE
TANK PORT
15.51 m
1567 m3
96 %
No.3 BOTTOM
WING TK P
9.88 m
2836 m3
100 %
No.2 BOTTOM
WING TK P
0.00 m
0 m3
0 %
No.1 BOTTOM
WING TK P
6.95 m
1725 m3
100 %
No.1 SIDE
TANK PORT
13.34 m
998 m3
82 %
TANK LEVEL
PARAMETERS
DETAIL
WATER DECK
PUMP
M
M
No.2 BOTTOM TANK
No.3 LOW
CROSS T
0.00 m
0 m3
0 %
8.24 m
3187 m3
100 %
No.2 LOW
CROSS TK
0.00 m
0 m3
0 %
No.1 LOW
CROSS TK
5.33 m
1141 m3
100 %
FORE
PEAK
0.00 m
0 m3
0 %
-0.24 bar
0 A
STB
M
Draught Aft
DRAFT AFT
8.74 m
AUTO
Issue: 1
No.5 SIDE
TANK STBD
0.00 m
0 m3
0 %
No.3 BOTTOM
WING TK S
9.89 m
2836 m3
100 %
No.2 BOTTOM
WING TK S
0.00 m
0 m3
0 %
No.1 BOTTOM
WING TK S
6.29 m
1733 m3
100 %
No.4 SIDE
TANK STBD
15.45 m
1610 m3
95 %
No.3 SIDE
TANK STBD
15.47 m
2517 m3
95 %
No.2 SIDE
TANK STBD
15.28 m
1521 m3
94 %
No.1 SIDE
TANK STBD
15.05 m
1173 m3
92 %
DRAFT FWD
8.06 m
Draught Forward
AUTO
Section 3.2.6 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
3.2.6 Cargo and Ballast Operations
This control application is a monitoring and control facility covering the on
board liquids such as ballast, cargo and the load and stability calculator.
Cargo control usually has two main process views, one for the tanks and the
other for the pumps. From the cargo tank process view, the operator will be
able to monitor the cargo fluid levels, temperatures and processes within each
tank, and control the valves for filling, emptying and stripping the tanks.
Draught Measurement
The draught is measured by pressure transmitters from sensors positioned on
the ship’s keel. In the case of a sensor fault, manual draught readings can be
viewed from mimic 5.61.
Load Computer Interface
Tank levels and draughts fore and aft are transferred to the load computer
located in the cargo control romm.
From the cargo pump process views, the operator will be able to monitor and
control the cargo and spray pumps together with the valves for routing fluids
to and from the cargo tanks. These views also allow the operator to monitor
and control the auxiliary equipment associated with the cargo pumps.
Gas Compressors
The LD compressor speed is controlled from either the ECR or CCR control
system. The LD compressor is started from the CCR and command is given to
the ECR. The DCS shutdown signal for the LD compressor is activated from
the fuel gas pressure transmitter to the engine room and the main fuel gas valve
closed signal.
Monitoring and Control Functions
The cargo tank levels are measured by the Whessoe float gauges and the DCS
receives the level data for each tank by a serial line communication.
Alarm suppression is activated for the LD and HD compressors when the
compressors are stopped.
The DCS calculates the correct cargo tank levels with reference to the specific
gravity of the cargo and the trim and list of the ship.
The corrected level is then used by the DCS for the volume calculation from
the cargo tank tables and the volume is finally corrected for the thermal
contraction factor of the tank shell.
User set parameters are available in mimic 5.2 Custody Transfer for LNG/LPG
mode and specific gravity.
Cargo Tank Temperature Monitoring
Each cargo tank is equipped with four PT100 probes for liquid and vapour
temperature measurement.
Ballast Tanks Monitoring
Each tank, except the fore peak tank, is equipped with one pressure transmitter
for the level measurement. Alarms are related to the levels.
Cargo Operating Manual
The unit field shows the units in use for the level values. Depending upon the
selection made, the text displayed in the unit field will be one of the following:
Vol%:
% height of the sounding pipe
Level:
Height of the fluid in the tank (in m)
Volume:
Content of the fluid in the tank (in m3)
Ballast Control - to be Fitted in the Near Future
This function has a primary view, visualising the entire ballast system. From
this view the tank levels of all vessel fluids used as ballast can be monitored
and the ballast system pumps and valves can be controlled. The primary view
also shows the vessel heel data.
Operator Interface
The cargo and ballast process views in the cargo control room show the fluid
control systems comprising tank, valve and pump symbols interconnected by
piping and manifolds. The operator monitors the status of each device by
displaying the views and operating the equipment as required. The starting and
stopping of pumps and the opening and closing of the valves is normally part
of the automatic cargo and ballast tank filling and emptying sequences, which
are initiated from the operator stations.
Alarm suppression is activated when both ballast pumps are stopped. The
suppression can be switched off via mimic 25.1.
Engine Room Tanks Monitoring
Each tank is equipped with one pressure transmitter for the level measurement
and there is no alarm suppression.
Level monitoring
Each cargo tank has a level transmitter used to indicate the level in the tank.
Issue: 1
Section 3.2.6 - Page 2 of 2
Part 4
Cargo and Ballast Systems
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 4.1.1a Leakage Pipes
Rupture Disc
Cross Section
Pressure
Insulation
Nitrogen
Bleed
Blank Flange
Rupture Disc
Removed
Rupture Disc
Rupture Disc
Skirt
Polystyrene
Insulation with
Stainless Steel
Cover
Leakage Pipes
Rupture
Disc
Issue: 1
Catch Basin
Section 4.1/4.1.1 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Part 4 Cargo and Ballast Systems
Insulation: The Spiral Generation Log System
4.1.1 Liquid Leakage Detection
4.1
The Norman Lady’s cargo tanks are insulated with expanded polystyrene
foam, fitted to the tanks by a spiral generating system. This system generates
polystyrene strakes (logs) as the machine moves spirally around the tank. The
equipment automatically fuses adjacent polystyrene logs as the machine
advances around the sphere.
A leakage of LNG within the tank insulation will be detected at an early stage
by the gas detection system fitted at the equatorial ring area and at the drip pan.
The drip pan, installed directly below each cargo tank is fitted with
temperature, gas and liquid sensors to detect the presence of LNG. These will
alarm via the gas detection and DCS systems. An eductor system allows the
removal of the liquid.
Cargo Containment and Monitoring Systems
General Description
The cargo containment system consists of five insulated cargo tanks encased
within the inner hull and situated in-line from forward to aft. The spaces
between the inner hull and outer hull are used for ballast and will also protect
the cargo tanks in the event of an emergency situation such as a collision or a
grounding.
The ballast spaces around the cargo tanks are divided into two double bottom
wing tanks, port and starboard for each cargo tank. The double bottom tanks
extend to the side of the cargo tanks as far up as the trunkways.
Cargo tanks No.1 and No.5 are slightly different in size due to their position in
the ship. The sizes and capacities are as follows:
Tanks 1 and 5:
31.0 metres diameter
Tanks 2, 3 and 4:
33.1 metres diameter
Tanks 1 and 5 capacity:
15,490m3
Tanks 2, 3 and 4 capacity:
18,860m3
There is no secondary barrier as the tanks, primarily due to their spherical
construction, have a high degree of safety against fracture or failure. The tanks
are heavily insulated with approximately 215mm of polystyrene foam to
reduce natural boil-off to a minimum.
The tanks are constructed of 9% nickel steel. Each tank is covered by a
spherical steel tank cover which is mainly for tank and insulation weather
protection. The cover also permits control of the hold space atmosphere. The
lower edge of each cover is welded to the deck, forming a watertight seal. A
flexible rubber seal is used at the point where the tank dome protrudes out from
the cover.
The tanks are each supported by a metal skirt from the equatorial ring, which
transmits the weight of the tank and the cargo to the lower hull. The skirt is
stiffened in the upper part by horizontal rings and the lower part by vertical
corrugated stiffeners.
A special casting joint is fitted between the skirt and the tank’s equatorial ring
to provide the necessary strength at this point and to reduce heat conduction
into the tank and a corresponding conduction of low temperature to the skirt
and hull.
Issue: 1
The insulation consists of two polystyrene layers separated by a crackarresting layer of glass fibre. The upper hemisphere insulation is coated with
square aluminium foil plates. The aluminium foil splash barrier on the lower
hemisphere is automatically bonded to the outer surface of the insulation
during the log welding process. This process butt welds the logs to form a
continuous insulation layer. The insulation is not actually bonded to the tank
surface and this allows the passage of nitrogen gas between the insulation and
the tank.
Containment
The LNG in the ship’s cargo tanks is carried at a pressure that is marginally
higher than atmospheric pressure. The cargo tanks are housed within holds and
each hold is separated by a watertight bulkhead. A positive pressure of inert gas
or dry air (depending on operational requirements) is maintained in the void
space surrounding each tank.
The boiling point of LNG at atmospheric pressure is extremely low (-163ºC)
and so special equipment and procedures must be used to handle LNG. The
piping system is designed to have the minimum number of bolted flanges.
The aluminium foil surface of the tank insulation protects the insulation as well
as directing any leakage away. Any LNG liquid leakage drains by gravity from
between the tank plating and the insulation to the drip pan via a drain tube at
the bottom. The drain at the bottom of the insulation space is sealed in normal
service by a rupture disc.
Liquid flow from the northern hemisphere collects in the drain channel which
is formed by the upper skirt ring stiffener and is directed to the leakage pipes
located forward, aft, port and starboard of the tank. These pipes direct the
liquid onto the void space deck and then to the drip pan. These areas are all
protected with stainless steel sheet covers.
All of the pipes except one are fitted with rupture discs. These discs are gas
tight but are designed to fail at cryogenic temperatures and will therefore
rupture when LNG comes into contact with them. The leakage pipe without a
disc has a gas detection sensor fitted to provide early warning of a possible
leakage.
From illustration 4.1.1a the layout of the leakage pipes can be seen.
Welding is used wherever practicable to reduce the possibility of joint leakage.
Any liquid leakage must be dealt with by spraying the area affected with water
by means of the spray system provided, or by the use of a fire hose. This
prevents any fractures of the affected local steelwork.
Monitoring
The DCS system provides monitoring of the cargo levels, pressures and
temperatures. Together with the cargo and void space gas detection system, the
DCS system monitors the cargo containment systems, the tanks and the void
spaces etc for any signs which may indicate a failure of this containment and
possible gas or liquid leakage.
In the case of a cargo leak, the gas detection analyses the void space via four
sampling points (see section 4.9, Fixed Gas Detection Systems) and raises an
alarm locally at the LCCR and via the DCS system.
If the leak is of a size where liquid is flowing, the leak would be directed via a
system of leakage pipes described in the next section, 4.1.1.
Section 4.1/4.1.1 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 4.1.2a Temperature and Pressure Monitoring System
Tank/Void
Differential
Pressure
Tank/Void
Differential
Pressure
Tank Top
Temperature
Void Space
Pressure
Equator Ring
Port
Temperature
Tank 95% Level
Temperature
Void Space
Bulkhead
Forward Lower
Temperature
Equator Ring
Aft
Temperature
Equator Ring
Forward
Temperature
Void Space
Bulkhead
Forward Upper
Temperature
Deck
Foundation
Forward
Temperature
Skirt
Equator Ring
Starboard
Temperature
Void Space
Bulkhead
Temperature
Port Upper
Void Space
Bulkhead
Temperature
Stbd Upper
Tank 50% Level
Temperature
Skirt Stiffener
Ring Port
Upper
Temperature
Skirt Stiffener
Ring Stbd
Upper
Temperature
Skirt Port
Temperature
Skirt Stbd
Temperature
Void Space
Bulkhead
Temperature
Port Lower
Tank Bottom
Temperature
Void Space
Bulkhead
Temperature
Stbd Lower
Drip Pan
Temperature
View from Top
Issue: 1
View looking Forward
Section 4.1.2 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
4.1.2 Temperature and Pressure Monitoring System
Displays
General Description
(See illustration 4.1.2a)
The relevant displays/mimics where tank and void space monitoring are
displayed are:
Monitoring equipment is provided in the CCR and the ECR via the DCS
system for the void spaces and inner hull temperatures and pressures to give
warning in the case of a failure of insulation or leakage of the containment
insulation barrier.
Cargo Operating Manual
The individual cargo tank measurement mimic
The cargo tank spraying mimic
Cargo tanks overview mimic
Each sensor is of the PT100 resistance type. The sensors are installed in the
secondary insulation barriers and alongside the inner hull associated with each
cargo tank. The temperature range of each sensor is : -200°C to +100°C.
During normal conditions, one thermocouple is in service whilst the other is on
standby. If the first sensor fails, the second sensor may be used.
For the inner hull temperature measurement, there are sensors in each tank.
One is located along the bottom of the tank in the pipe duct, one double
element type sensor in the liquid dome.
The temperature measurements are indicated for each sensor in service in the
CCR via the DCS system. Recording of these temperatures is also available via
the DCS system.
Temperature Measurement
The temperature measurement is obtained from the PT100 sensors whose
electrical resistance decreases with temperature. The sensors are calibrated and
certificated and therefore have their own individual identification number. The
sensors are positioned equally throughout the height of the tank and include
sensors at the top and bottom enabling the temperature of the liquid and the
vapour to be measured separately. Average and individual temperature
readings are available.
The sensors are wired with four conductors (four wire cable) and all
terminations are sealed. There are spare sensors mounted in the tanks to
provide a degree of redundancy.
Pressure Measurement
The pressure measurement is obtained from a capacitive pressure transmitter.
The transmitter consists of a movable ceramic diaphragm connected to a fixed
ceramic substrate. On each ceramic part is a gold plate which makes up a
capacitor whose capacitance will vary according to the distance between them.
The fixed part is mounted on the tank shell and the moveable part extends into
the tank space.The tank pressure imparts a force on the movable plate relative
to the tank pressure. This varying capacitance signal is converted to an output
signal which varies according to the pressure in the tank.
Issue: 1
Section 4.1.2 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 4.1.3a High Level and Overfill Alarm System
99.2% 29.36M
HIGH AND OVERALL ALARM SYSTEM
230V AC Supply
High Level System
Protective Cap
230V AC Supply
Overfill System
Test Lift Button
95%
99.2%
TANK NO.1
TANK NO.3
99.2%
99.2%
TANK NO.4
95%
95%
Connection
Box
TANK NO.2
95%
95% High
Level
Alarm
99.2% Overfill
Alarm
99.2%
99.2%
TANK NO.5
95%
Cargo Tank Dome Shell
ACCEPT
NORM
FLASH
ALARM
HOLD
LAMP
TEST
ON OFF
Audible Alarms on Deck
Float Switch Arrangement
TONSBERG
NORWAY
Float Guide
High High
Low Density Float
Sensor Switch
SAFE AREA
Level Sensor
Tank No.1
Level Sensor
Tank No.5
High
HAZARDOUS AREA
Level Sensors
Tank No.s 2, 3 and 4
Issue: 1
Section 4.1.3 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
4.1.3 High Level and Overfill Alarm System
Alarm Panel
Maker:
Type:
The alarm panel has ACCEPT ALARM, RESET ALARM, ALARM HOLD,
LAMP TEST and unit ON/OFF pushbuttons. There are LED indicators for all
tank alarms and also loop and power/system failure.
Omicron
OAS - 5
The vessel’s cargo tank high level alarm system is fitted to comply with the
IMO, DNV and USCG etc societies’ requirements. To comply with these
requirements the high level alarm and overfill alarms are completely separate.
The level switches are of the float type and can be tested independently from
the top of the tank.
All the inputs from the level switches are connected directly to the input sides
of intrinsically safe alarm units. These alarm units are bus wired to one
common output unit which interfaces with the SVC system. Separate outputs
for alarms and indication are available at the alarm/control panel mounted in
the Cargo Control Room.
In addition to tank alarms, the system also indicates and raises separate alarms
if a loop fails for the level switches and their associated wiring or if a processor
or a power failure occurs.
The level switch has two floats with built-in permanent magnets in each float.
As the float moves upwards, a reed switch inside the housing is deactivated
and an alarm is raised. When the float moves downward, the reed switch is
closed again. This is the non-alarm position so the alarm loop fails safe (ie,
alarms) in the event of any open circuits/wire-breaks.
Operation
(Note : Any loop/wiring or system faults must be rectified as soon as possible
as a sensor with a loop failure will not alarm.)
The alarm lamp and horn on deck as well as the buzzer on the alarm panel will
start. The corresponding alarm will also be raised via the DCS system.
Pressing the ACCEPT ALARM pushbutton will cause the common alarms
(horn and lamp) to stop. The LEDs on the intrinsically safe alarm unit and the
alarm panel will continue to flash. The operator should then press the RESET
ALARM pushbutton and the flashing LED(s) will illuminate steadily.
The common alarm unit is configured to raise different alarms for either the
95% HIGH LEVEL or 99.2% OVERFILL alarm. This unit pulses the exterior
horn and illuminates the yellow lamp for high level or sounds continuously and
illuminates the red lamp for the overfill alarm. The horn and lamps are situated
on a floodlight mast adjacent to No. 3 cargo tank dome.
The 99.2% OVERFILL alarm is also configured to automatically close the
filling valve for that tank.
The overfill alarm has a remote reset OVERFILL pushbutton on the port outer
operating station in the CCR.
Testing
Alarm Hold Facility
Each level switch is equipped with a mechanical testing device. The testing
device is located under a protective screw cap on top of the level switch’s
junction box. By lifting the testing device slowly, the HIGH LEVEL alarm
(95%) for that particular tank will be raised. Lifting the device further up will
cause the OVERFILL alarm (99.2%) to be raised.
In addition to the above normal alarm functions, there is also an ALARM
HOLD function. This function handles all tanks separately and independently
and is selected by pressing the ALARM HOLD button on the alarm panel. The
function remains in operation as long as the button is activated. The alarm hold
function operates as follows:
When testing is complete, the test device should be pressed back down and the
protective screw cap replaced.
If, prior to loading, the ALARM HOLD pushbutton is already
activated, it must be released and reactivated. This clears any
previous alarms.
Issue: 1
If one of the level switches, that is already in an alarm condition,
should be deactivated and then reactivated because of movement
on the cargo liquid surface, the alarm will not be repeated due to
the ALARM HOLD function.
When a cargo tank float moves upwards, the relevant red LED on the
intrinsically safe alarm module and the alarm panel will start to flash and the
ACCEPT ALARM pushbutton will illuminate.
Two resistors are connected to the reed switch inside the sensor. One is in
series and one is in parallel with the switch contacts. This enables the detection
of broken or shorted alarm circuits.
(Note: The high level and overfill alarm are to be tested prior to each loading.)
Cargo Operating Manual
If the ALARM HOLD button is on, the first alarm from each tank
activates the alarm horn and light on deck, the buzzer on the
control panel and the DCS alarm. The appropriate LEDs on the
control panel and the intrinsically safe alarm module will also
flash.
Section 4.1.3 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 4.2a Cargo Piping System
Liq
3
25
V21
V
d
Voi re
or
r F osphe
ate
He e Atm
39
V21
ac
Sp
V2026
Vent
Mast
A
016
A
V2
200
V2
V2055
V2004
V2
V2101
V2138
6
212
25
V21
39
V21
No.1
Cargo Tank
V2027
26
V21
e
pac
id S er
Vo r Dry
Ai
0
V2054
14
V23
15
Dome
V2054
14
V23
15
V23
003
V2
(S)
02
V2002 (P)
V2054
V2054
V23
11
V21
uid
n
20
V2
3A
20
4
.
mp
Co
LD
r
V2
23
G
LN iser
or
Vap
13
V21
ou
3
20
V2
V2
35
V22
V2051
061
V2
V
V2100
V2138
V2051
A
015
V2
1
206
201
V2
e
pac
id S er
Vo r Dry
Ai
39
V21
V2052
V2051
V2051
200
V2
35
V21
.A
mp
Co
D
H
28
V21
17
V21
p
Va
36
V21
015
V2
120
V2
016
V2
14
V21
35
V21
13
V21
uid
m
Co
HD
14A
V21
ge
15
V21
p.B
31
V21
r
ou
Vap ater
He
Liq
34
V21
14
V21
30
V21
30
V21
32
V21
u id
PI
V
1
213
Liq
r
ou
Vap ater
He
tro
32
V21
Ni
To No. 4
Vent Mast
To
s
iler
Bo
Vent
Mast
r
sso
pre oom
m
o
R
GC
LN
t
N
To 2
n
Pla
V2008
Vent
Mast
m
ans
Fro ing F ating
e
t
cula ace H
ir
c
p
Re id S
Vo
r
Fo
00
V2
V2
V2103
V2138
V2006 (P)
V2068
V2058
V2057
V2057
6
00
7
Dome
(S)
No.2
Cargo Tank
V2057
V2
22
19
V21
m
Fr o
G
LP t
n
Pla
G
LP
To nt
Pla
s
ace
Sp
Void
To
10
V21
2
01
V21
G
LP
To nt
Pla
V2068
V2064
V2063
V2063
Dome
011
V2
Vent
Mast
0
01
V2
V2108
18
V21
V2057
V2028
(S)
V2010 (P)
V2138
No.3
Cargo Tank
V2063
V2063
Spray
Pump
V2029
V2020
019
Vent
Mast
8
01
V2
V2109
V2066
V2018 (P)
V2138
V2065
V2065
Dome
V2
D
FW
(S)
No.4
Cargo Tank
015
V2065
V2
V2065
To
Emergency
Discharge
Astern
Spray
Pump
V2030
V2024
V2
2
00
V2
Dome
120
V2
A
200
V2
(S)
LAH
A
016
V2
061
V2
201
200
V2
016
V2
015
id
V2
V2
uid
Liq
Issue: 1
061
ur
po
n
Va
ge
tro
Ni
No.5
Cargo Tank
Overflow
Drain Tank
V2
u
Liq
V2002 (P)
023
From
Safety
Valves
A
Section 4.2 - Page 1 of 3
Norman Lady
4.2
Cargo Piping System
Description
The cargo piping system is shown in illustration 4.2a in a simplified
perspective showing only the principal features of the system.
Liquid cargo is loaded and discharged via the two crossover lines midships
between cargo tanks 3 and 4 and is delivered to and from each cargo tank liquid
dome via the liquid header which runs forward and aft. Each crossover line at
midships separates into two loading/discharging connections, port and
starboard, making a total of four loading/discharge connections.
The cargo tank vapour domes can be connected by the vapour header running
forward and aft along the trunk deck. The vapour main also has a crossconnection at the midship manifold for use in regulating tank pressures when
loading and discharging.
When loading, the vapour header and crossover, together with the HD
compressors, are used to return the displaced gas from the tanks back to the
shore installation. When discharging, the vapour header is used in conjunction
with either the vapour crossover, or a vaporiser, to supply gas to the tanks to
replace the outgoing liquid cargo.
The spray line can be connected to the liquid crossover lines and can be used
to drain or to cool down each cargo tank, and also to spray during discharging
if the return vapour is insufficient.
The vapour header and stripping/spray headers are both connected to the
vapour dome of each tank. The vapour domes also house the tank safety
valves, pressure pick-up and sample points. The spray line on each tank
consists of four spray lines inside the tank to distribute the incoming liquid into
the spray nozzles in order to assist in evaporation and thus achieve a better
cooldown rate.
The spray and vapour headers have branches to and from the LNG compressor
room with connections to the compressors, heaters and vaporiser for various
auxiliary functions. Removable bends are supplied for fitting where necessary
to allow cross-connection between the various pipework for infrequent uses
such as preparing for dry dock and recommissioning after dry dock.
The vapour header connects the vapour domes to each other for the venting of
boil-off gas, which discharges to atmosphere through vent mast riser No.4. The
vapour main also directs the boil-off gas to the engine room for gas burning,
via the LD compressor and gas heaters.
Issue: 1
The inert gas and dry-air system, located in the engine room, is used to supply
inert gas or dry air to the cargo tanks via piping which connects with the main
cargo system through a double, non-return valve to avoid gas returning to the
engine room.
All of the cargo piping is welded to reduce the possibility of joint leakage.
Flanged connections are electrically bonded by means of straps provided
between flanges to ensure that differences in potential, due to static electricity
between cargo and other deck piping, tanks, valves and other equipment, are
avoided.
Cargo Operating Manual
The LPG system is de-commissioned and all lines are blanked and the electric
motors disconnected.
When operational the system will take suction from the vapour header and
discharge liquid to the spray header.
There is also a pipeline from the the liquid line which can be used as a hot
vapour suction.
Both liquid and vapour systems have been designed in such a way that
expansion and contraction are absorbed in the piping configuration. This is
done by means of expansion loops and bellows on liquid and vapour piping
respectively.
Fixed and sliding pipe supports and guides are provided to ensure that pipe
stresses are kept within acceptable limits.
All sections of liquid piping that can be isolated, and thus possibly trapping
liquid between closed valves, are provided with safety valves set at 5 bar,
which relieve excess pressure to the collecting tank and on to No.4 vent mast.
This tank is situated on the deck above the cargo control room and has a level
alarm fitted to alert the operator to the situation. This is a safety measure,
although normal working practice is to allow any remaining liquid to warm up
and boil-off before closing any such valves.
All major valves such as the midships manifold (port and starboard) valves,
individual tank loading and discharge valves, are remotely power operated
from the DCS system, so that all normal cargo operations can be carried out
from the Cargo Control Room. The pipeline layout at the manifolds is shown
in illustration 4.2b.
When an emergency shutdown is activated, the manifold valves are closed,
discontinuing loading or unloading operations.
A non-return valve is fitted at the discharge flange of each cargo pump. A hole
is drilled in the valve disc to allow the tank discharge lines to drain down and
be gas freed. Non-return valves are also fitted at the discharge flange of the
compressors. A small diameter spray nozzle is also fitted at the top of each
cargo pump discharge line to cool down the pipework.
(Note: Electrical bonding by means of straps is provided between bolted
flanges. Whenever a section of pipe or piece of equipment is unbolted, the
bonding straps MUST be replaced when the flanged joint is remade.)
Collecting Tank: Situated Above Cargo Control Room
Section 4.2 - Page 2 of 3
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 4.2b Manifold Arrangement
Liquid
Cross
-over
Liquid
To
Collecting
Tank
Port Side
Spray
Cross
-over
Vapour Line
Liquid
Liquid
To
Collecting
Tank
To
Collecting
Tank
Starboard Side
Spray
Cross
-over
Liquid
Cross
-over
Vapour Line
To
Collecting
Tank
Liquid
To
Collecting
Tank
To
Vaporisers
V2015A
V2015A
V2046A
V2016A
V2061
V2061
V2061
V2061
V2034
V2410
V2410
V2211
V2061
V2015
A
V2120
V2016
V2015
V2016
B
C
E
D
Gauge Valve
Gauge Valve
Gauge Valve
Gauge Valve
Drain Valve
Side View
of Manifold A
Drain Valve
Side View
of Manifold B
Drain Valve
Drain Valve
Side View
of Manifold C
Side View
of Manifold D
V2120
F
Relief and
Gauge Valve
Issue: 1
V2410
V2410
Gauge Valve
Drain Valve
Side View
of Manifold E
Gauge Valve
Drain Valve
Side View
of Manifold F
Relief and
Gauge Valve
G
Gauge Valve
Drain Valve
Side View
of Manifold G
Section 4.2 - Page 3 of 3
Norman Lady
4.2.1 Liquid Line
4.2.2 Vapour Line
The system comprises a 550/500/450/350mm butt welded, cryogenic stainless
steel pipeline connecting each of the five cargo tanks to the loading/discharge
manifolds at the ship’s side by means of a common line.
The system comprises a 300/550/450/400/300mm cryogenic stainless steel
pipeline connecting each of the five cargo tanks by means of a common line to
the ship side vapour manifold, the LNG compressor room and No.4 vent mast.
At each tank liquid dome there is a manifold which connects to the loading and
discharge lines from the tank to allow for the loading and discharge of cargo.
The line to the LNG compressor room allows for the vapour to be used in the
following manner:
This manifold on the liquid dome connects to the tank discharge lines from the
port and starboard cargo pumps, the loading line and the spray line.
Sent ashore during cargo loading by means of the HD
compressors, in order to control pressure in the cargo tanks.
At certain points along the liquid line, blank flanges and sample points are
fitted to facilitate inerting and aeration of the system during dry dock/refit.
During ballast/loaded voyages, the boil-off gas is sent to the
engine room via the LD compressor and heater for use as fuel in
the boilers.
All sections of the liquid line outside the cargo tanks are insulated and covered
with a moulded cover to act as a tough water and vapour tight barrier.
Cargo Operating Manual
During repair periods the gas is vaporised and used to purge-dry
the cargo tanks if required.
At certain points along the vapour line, blank flanges and sample points are
fitted to facilitate inerting and aeration of the system during dry dock/refit.
All sections of the vapour line outside the cargo tanks are insulated and
covered with a moulded cover to act as a tough water and vapour tight barrier.
Issue: 1
Section 4.2.1/2 - Page 1 of 1
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 4.2.3a Spray Pipes In the Cargo Tanks
Key
Q = Capacity Of Each Nozzle (kg/h)
P = Pressure Drop Through The Nozzle (kp/cm2)
m = Mass Median Diameter Of Droplets (10-3mm)
Fwd
V2028
m
Q
Q
700
m
600
Spray Pipes
200
500
400
300
150
200
Spray Pipes
Nozzles
100
100
1
Column In
Cargo Tank
Issue: 1
2
3
4
P
Spray Nozzle Characteristics/Capacity
Section 4.2.3/4/5/6 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
4.2.3 Spray Line
4.2.4 Fuel Gas Line
4.2.5 Vent Masts
The spray system piping consists of a main header, running along the ship from
tank No.1 to tank No.5. This header is connected to the liquid crossovers for
LNG cargo supply from the shore and to the two spray pumps. One pump is
fitted in tank No.3 and the other in tank No.4, for the supply of LNG when the
ship is at sea.
During transportation of LNG at sea, gas vapour is produced due to the transfer
of heat from the outside sea and air, through the tank insulation; also energy is
absorbed from the cargo motion due to the vessel’s movement.
During normal operations, the pressure in the tanks is controlled by the use of
the boil-off gas in the boilers as fuel, or controlled via the vent mast (No.4
tank) and the common vapour line.
Under normal power conditions, the boil-off gas is used as a means of fuel in
the ship’s boilers.
Each cargo tank is also fitted with two independent safety valves, comprising
two 350mm lines exiting the tank top into their own pilot operated relief
valves.
The spray pipe header is connected to each tank dome by four spray pipes
supplying the spray nozzles with liquid. The LNG can be sprayed through up
to 20 nozzles in each tank to obtain a uniform distribution within the tank. The
operator decides how many pipes and nozzles to use by opening or closing the
nozzle inlet valves V2051, V2054, V2057, V2063 or V2065 to suit the speed
of cooling down required.
The nozzles connected to pipe No.1, 2 and 4, each have a spray rate capacity
of 500kg of LNG at 1.53kg/cm2 pressure drop across the nozzle. The nozzles
connected to pipe 3 each have a capacity of 1,000kg of LNG. The nozzle
characteristics/capacity diagram is shown in illustration 4.2.3a.
The gas vapour is taken from the vapour header and passed on into the LD
compressor. It then passes through the boil-off /warm up heater before going
to the ship’s boilers where it is burnt as fuel.
The pipe runs along the port side of the main deck. The main gas isolating
valve V2140 is located immediately forward of the accommodation. The
nitrogen purging connection is also located at this point. The pipe then enters
the machinery spaces and from that point the pipe runs inside a ventilated duct
pipe. This duct pipe has two exhaust fans situated on the open deck to draw the
surrounding air to the atmosphere. This vent duct is fitted with gas detection.
The system comprises a 80/50mm butt welded, cryogenic stainless steel
pipeline connecting the spray pump in tanks three and four to the
stripping/spray header and serves the following functions by supplying LNG
to:
Sections of the vent line outside the cargo tanks are insulated and covered with
a moulded cover to act as a tough water and vapour tight barrier.
4.2.6 Inerting/Aeration Line
The system comprises of a 300mm flanged line which supplies inert gas or dry
air to the cargo tanks and pipelines for inerting and drying during refit periods.
The inert gas/dry-air is supplied from the inert gas plant situated in the engine
room. The dry-air is supplied by the inert gas generator running in the dry-air
mode (see section 4.7.1, Inert Gas Generator).
The line is connected to the gas header and the liquid header by means of a
spool piece. By selective use of the spool pieces and flexible hoses it is
possible to inert or aerate all or a single cargo tank.
The spray rails in each tank, used for tank cooldown and gas
generation.
There is also a spoon blank fitted at the void space air recirculation line to the
IG main cross-connection, located at the starboard manifold. The removal of
this blank enables the supply of inert gas or dry-air to the void spaces, if
required.
The main liquid line, used for cooling down lines prior to cargo
operations.
Priming of discharge lines in the cargo tanks to prevent line surge
when starting main cargo pumps.
Supply of LNG or LN2 to the vaporisers for gas generation to the
compressors and heaters.
All sections of the spray line outside the cargo tanks are insulated and covered
with a moulded cover to act as a tough water and vapour tight barrier.
Gas Valve V2140 and Gas Duct Pipe Exhaust Fans
(Note: The pressure drop shown in illustration 4.2.3a, the spray nozzle
characteristic/capacity graph, will differ from the pressure drop indicated on
the spray pressure indicator PI-22, as the latter includes pressure drop in the
pipe from the control valve to the nozzles and also the static pressure from the
liquid in the pipe.)
Issue: 2
Section 4.2.3/4/5/6 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 4.3.1a Main Cargo Pump
Pump Discharge
140
Head Capacity
Upper
Bearing
Electrical
Terminal Box
130
120
2
Stator
Windings
110
Rotor and
Shaft
Stator
Key
1
Minimum Pump Down
METRES
HEAD
Min NPSH
METRES OF LIQUID
ABOVE INLET BELL
3
Liquid Flow
100
80
Lubrication Flow
0
70
60
80
Lower
Bearing
50
40
70
EFFCIENCY PERCENT
90
Pump Efficiency
30
Motor Rating
Horsepower to Pump
300
(275 BHP)
SP. GR. = 0.50
20
SP. GR. = 0.60
Impeller
HORSEPOWER 200
KILOWATTS
100
KW Input to Motor
SP. GR. = 0.50
0
Inducer
0
100
200
300
400
500
600
700
800
900
1000
1100
1200
CAPACITY (m3/h)
Issue: 1
Section 4.3.1 - Page 1 of 4
Norman Lady
4.3
Cargo Pumps
Before Starting a Cargo Pump
4.3.1 Main Cargo Pumps
Maker:
Type:
Capacity:
No. of sets:
Operating temperature:
Head capacity:
Power:
Speed:
JC Carter
60190-3450-32
Rated at 750m3/h x 120 mLc
10 (2 per cargo tank)
-163°C
155m
275hp
1,780 rpm
The cargo tanks are fitted with two main cargo discharge pumps. These pumps
are single stage centrifugal pumps with one inducer stage. The single stage
helps to obtain a very low NPSH (Net Positive Suction Head).
The pumps are of the submerged motor type, with the motor windings cooled
by the pumped LNG. The LNG also lubricates and cools the pump and motor
bearings. As the LNG serves as the lubricant and the coolant it is critically
important for the pump that the following operational procedure is strictly
adhered to.
There is an automatic starting sequence available via the DCS system. This
automatic start will check all the interlocks and open the throttle valve
accordingly before starting the pump.
a) Check the level of the liquid in the tank. The pumps must not be
started when the tank is dry. The cargo pump must be completely
submerged in LNG.
b) Before starting the pump, open the throttle valve to about 25%.
Starting the pump with the valve fully open when pumping liquid
which has a high specific gravity will overload the motor.
c) Start the cargo pump. The operator should keep a close watch on
the discharge pressure and the motor current. The current
consumption should steady after the motor has been running for 3
seconds. During starting, while the discharge pipe is being filled,
the current may be above the ammeter red line. The current should
not exceed the maximum rated current by more than 50% for more
than 2 or 3 seconds when the tank is full. If the running current
after this time is more than 150% of the maximum rated current,
stop the pump immediately and determine the cause of the high
current, (possible suction blockage).
d) When the pump discharge pipe is filled to the discharge valve, a
substantial increase in the discharge pressure and a corresponding
decrease in current should be observed.
e) Once the pump is operating normally, adjust the discharge valve
to obtain the required flow or pressure. The operator should
monitor the pump motor running current, taking care not to exceed
the maximum current level.
(Note: When the pump is operating correctly, closing the pump discharge valve
during operation will raise the head pressure and consequently reduce the
running current.)
The cargo pumps may be restarted concurrently a maximum of 3 times, after
the third time a 30 minute waiting period must be applied, after this time
another 3 starts may be made. This procedure must be adhered to as heat buildup from the high starting current may not be carried away during stripping
operations. This may be due to the lack of liquid flow when (and if) the pump
does not prime, due to the extremely low level of LNG during stripping
operations. The pumps are started and stopped from the CCR via the DCS
system. In an emergency all pumps will be stopped by activation of the
Emergency Shut Down System trip.
Issue: 1
Cargo Operating Manual
Discharge of Cargo
Operating a pump at, or close to, its design flow level is in the best interests of
the pump lifespan and operating performance. However, operating the pump at
flow rates which are less than this cannot be avoided. This is especially the case
when the shore receiving facility cannot accept the rated flow. However, it
should be remembered that it is better to operate one pump at the design flow
rather than two pumps running at 50% flow. The pump’s rated flow should only
be exceeded during the starting period while the discharge valve is adjusted.
Stripping or Low Liquid Level Operation
As the end of a discharge approaches, the pump suction head will approach the
NPSH for a given flow. From the above illustration (4.3.1a) the blue curve
displaying NPSH required as a function of flow rate can be seen. At
approximately 0.80 to 1 metre liquid level above the pump inlet bell, the NPSH
for the rated capacity will be reached. When the amount of liquid falls to this
level, the motor ammeter and the pump discharge pressure should be monitored
continuously by the operator.
The low level alarm is triggered when the liquid level is about 1 metre above
NPSH, the flow should be reduced by use of the throttling valve on the pump
discharge side. If any fluctuations are observed on the motor ammeter or on the
pump discharge pressure gauge during final pumping, the discharge flow rate
should be further reduced until the readings stabilise. When the flow is
throttled, it can be seen from the above graph that restricting the flow down to
about 230m3/h the required NPSH will be about 10cms. This level represents
the minimum level attainable by pumping.
CAUTION
It is of the utmost importance that the pumps are never allowed to run dry,
even for short periods, as this will result in motor failure. A momentary
loss of priming during cargo stripping should not be considered as running
a pump dry. Up to 30 seconds of operation with dry suction but with fluid
in the discharge pipe will not damage the pump or the motor.
When the liquid level reaches less than one metre above the pump inlet, avoid
stopping the pump if at all possible until the cargo has been fully discharged. If
the shore facility is unable to accept the liquid for intermittent periods, it is
preferable to keep the pump going and recirculate the liquid back into the tanks
until the cargo discharge can be resumed and completed.
Section 4.3.1 - Page 2 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 4.3.1b Pump Arrangement In Cargo Tank
Temp Sensors, Alcohol/N2 Tubes
& Fixed Tubes
Cables For
Cargo & Spray Pumps
Discharging Pipes
Loading Pipe
Fixed Clamp
For Level Indicator Pipe
Cargo Pump
Cargo Pump
Hot Vapour Pipe
Temperature Sensor
Issue: 1
Section 4.3.1 - Page 3 of 4
Norman Lady
Points to Remember
Pump Trips and Shutdowns
The operator should check the cargo liquid level before starting a pump and
maintain at least 2kg/cm2 discharge pressure. This is to ensure the lubrication
of the bearings on all pumps in cargo service.
As well as the shutdown via the ESD system, the following will trip the pumps:
The operator should always open the throttle valve to 25% open, before staring
a pump.
The operator should always monitor the motor ammeter and the discharge
pressure gauge.
The operator should always try to run the pump at the design flow rate
whenever possible.
Low current:
<126A for 5 seconds
High current:
100% current (motor starter setting)
Single phasing:
1 phase lost (motor starter setting)
Low low cargo pressure:
0.0 bar
High void/tank differential pressure:
0.04 bar
ESD low loop pressure:
>3.0 bar
Cargo Operating Manual
The operator should never run pumps dry.
The operator should never blow hot air through a discharge line. This may turn
the impeller and rotor at high speed in the wrong direction, damaging the
bearings.
The operator should never operate the pump above the motor ammeter red line.
The operator should never assume that all electrical interlocks and safety
relays will continuously function correctly. The operator should be ready at all
times for any eventuality.
The operator should not allow sea water, water, steam or any cleaning agent
containing water to come into contact with a pump or its cables and
connections.
(Note: An insulation test of all pumps is to be carried out after leaving the
loading port in order to establish that all pumps are operational and to allow
time for the implementation of emergency procedures, should it be necessary.)
Issue: 1
Section 4.3.1 - Page 4 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 4.3.2a Spray Pump
20
16
Upper
Bearing
VOLTAGE 440
PRESSURE v's FLOW
14
12
SP. GR. = 0.601
SP. GR. = 0.57
10
PRESSURE
(kg/cm2)
Stator
Windings
Electrical
Terminal Box
SP. GR. = 0.50
8
6
Rotor and
Shaft
4
2
Stator
Key
0
Liquid Flow
Lubrication Flow
OCR = 30 AMPS
Lower
Bearing
SP. GR. = 0.601
40
SP. GR. = 0.57
SP. GR. = 0.50
30
CURRENT 20
(Amperes)
10
Impeller
0
Inducer
0
4
8
12
16
20
CAPACITY (m3/h)
Issue: 1
Section 4.3.2 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
4.3.2 Stripping/Spray Pumps
Pump Trips and Shutdowns
Specification
The stripping/spray pumps will be stopped automatically should any of the
following occur:
Maker:
Type:
Capacity:
No. of sets:
Operating temperature:
JC Carter
6337-2113-3
Rated at 40m3/h x 60mLc
2
-163°C
Vapour header pressure below or equal to atmospheric pressure
plus 0.3kPa (ESDS: Stage 1)
Extreme high level in cargo tank (99.2% volume)
One spray pump is installed in each of the tanks No.3 and 4.
Activation of ship/shore pneumatic, fibre optic or electrical
shutdown (ESDS: Stage 1)
The pumps are in principle similar to the main cargo pumps and a similar
operating procedure should be used. Each spray pump has a capacity of 8m3/h
at a discharge head of 146mLc.
Motor single-phasing
The performance curve is shown in illustration 4.3.2a.
The spray pumps are intended for the cooldown of cargo tanks before loading
after a ballast voyage.
Low motor current
High motor current (electrical overload)
Low discharge pressure with time delay at starting
The pumps are started and stopped from the CCR via the DCS system. In an
emergency all pumps will be stopped by activation of the Emergency Shut
Down System trip.
Activation of ESDS stage 2
The instances when these pumps can be used are:
The end of a DCS cargo automatic sequence
Cargo tank level low low
To cool down the liquid header prior to discharging.
Spray Pump Safety System
To cool the cargo tank during ballast voyage prior to arrival at the
loading terminal by discharging LNG to the spray nozzles in the
tanks.
In addition to the above shutdowns, the spray pump safety system will stop the
pumps and close the discharge valves if any of the following conditions occur:
To pump LNG from the tanks to the vaporisers (emergency case)
when forced vaporisation of LNG to the boilers is required.
To enable the tanks to be stripped as dry as possible for reasons
such as a cargo tank entry.
Whenever possible, the stripping/spray pumps should be started early enough
to avoid any possible starting problems due to very low tank levels (about 0.5m
minimum).
Issue: 1
Cargo Operating Manual
Low current:
<10A for 5 seconds
Low low cargo tank pressure:
0.0 bar
High void/tank differential pressure:
0.04 bar
ESD low loop pressure:
3.0 bar
(Note: An insulation test of all pumps is to be carried out after leaving the
loading port in order to establish that all pumps are operational and to allow
time for the implementation of emergency procedures, should it be necessary.)
Section 4.3.2 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 4.4.1a High Duty Compressor
TI
66
PI
67
PI
67
To / From
Steam System
Other Compressors
PI
69
Seal Gas
From Nitrogen
System
System Shut Off
and Regulating Valve
Draw Off Line
Tanks/Ashore
PDCLA
Discharge
2
Governor
TI
L.O. Cooler
Cooling
Water
Steam Shut-off Valve
For Steam Driven Pump
TI
Control
Press.
Valve
Steam L.O.
Pump
Speed
Actuator
PI
68
PI
71
Shaft Driven
L.O Pump
Impulse
Connection
SVC Compressor
Suction Gas
Temp. Indic.
Discharge
Lubricating Oil Tank
PT
71
Compressor Low
Suction Pressure
Cut-out
Compressor
Suction
Pressure
PI
70
PI
79
TS
85
LSS
PI
84
SI
74
PS
84
SS
86
Pneumatic Indicators
LSS
HC
Compressor
Stop
Compressor
HC
Stop
LCCR
ZA
Surge Valve
Activated
XA
Compressor
Failure
SIC
Compressor
Speed
Local
Compressor Panel
Lubricating Oil
Cooling Water
Connections
Steam Connection
for Oil Heating
External View of High Duty Compressor
Issue: 1
TI
85
PC
77
Steam
PI
88
SVC
Speed
LNG Vapour
Oil Drainage
PI
90
PACL
72
Key
Exhaust
Steam
Drainage
ESD
System
SVC
Discharge
Gas Temp.
Indic.
PI
68
PDT
76
Speed
Governor
121
TIT
85
TE
73
Safety
Shutdown
Valve
PCLA
Diff. Press.
Tank/Void
Bypass
TI
Low LO
Shut
-down
Switch
TS
87
3
PDT
75
Inlet
Vane
Control
Suction
PS
88
PDIAL
TE
78
SVC
Discharge
Gas Press.
Indic.
Compressor
Turbine
L.O. Pressure
Valve
L.O. Temp.
/Pressure
PT
79
TI
TI
Compressor Shutdown
Relays LCCR
Compressor Discharge
Gas Temp.
Diff. Press.
Tank/Atmos
Instrumentation
Cargo Tanks
Electrical Signal
Nitrogen
Section 4.4.1 - Page 1 of 4
Norman Lady
4.4
Gas Compressors
The Norman Lady is equipped with three steam turbine driven gas
compressors (and heat exchangers) which are used for:
The compression and heating of boil-off gas used as fuel for the
boilers
The recirculation and heating of cargo vapour for heating the
cargo tanks
The compression of vapour to be returned to the shore station
when loading
The generation of cargo vapour
There is one low duty compressor, used for the gas supply to the boilers and
two high duty compressors, used for vapour return to the shore and for cargo
tank heating. The compressors utilise a single stage centrifugal compressor
which is directly driven by a single stage axial impulse steam turbine.
4.4.1 High Duty Compressors
Maker:
Type:
Capacity:
No. of sets:
Suction temperature:
Discharge temperature:
Specific weight:
Suction pressure:
Pressure increase:
Discharge pressure:
Speed:
Steam turbine output:
Airco Cryogenics
Steam driven
10,000m3/h
2
-120ºC
-75ºC
1.3kg/m3
1.05 bar
11,000mm WG (suction to discharge)
2.15 bar
14,700 rpm
480kW
The following conditions trip the HD compressors:
The ESDS system
High differential pressure: void/tanks 1 - 5
Low low pressure: tanks 1 - 5
Compressor high outlet temperature
Electrical power failure
Compressor suction pressure low
ESD close loop low pressure
Low or high temperature after heaters (aft or forward)
Compressor lubrication is provided by a gear driven oil pump which is housed
in the steam turbine bearing housing. The turbine and radial compressor have
a common lubricating oil supply system. This oil is drawn from the oil
reservoir tank by a pump and then fed to the bearing points via a filter and oilcooler unit. Excess oil is conveyed into the lubricating oil line by an overflow
valve which keeps pressure in the pipes at a constant level. Oil pressure will
not exceed 1.8 to 2.5 bar at an oil supply temperature of 20º to 50ºC.
Prelubrication and lubrication at the starting period is achieved by a small
turbine driven oil pump consisting of a vertical steam turbine and geared oil
pump directly coupled to the steam turbine. This geared oil pump provides the
oil supply for the turbine and compressor until the mechanically driven main
gear oil pump is feeding oil. The pressure of the lubricating oil is monitored
and there is also an oil pressure shutdown trip which will stop the machine and
start the turbine driven oil pump if the oil pressure drops below 1.2 bar.
Cargo Operating Manual
Local Compressor Start Up Procedure
The compressors are started locally and once the compressor is running, speed
control and monitoring is carried out from the CCR/ECR via the DCS system.
a) At the control panel, check the supply air pressure for the
governing and control air circuits. The air supplies should be 1.4
bar for the governor and 3.2 bar for the control. Ensure the LNG
cooling water system is in operation (see section 5.3.1).
b) Check the level of lubricating oil in the reservoir tank. The level
should be in the middle of the sight glass. Check the oil
temperature. If it is below 10ºC, the oil heaters should be switched
on. The oil temperature should have risen above 10ºC before
starting.
The LD and two of the HD compressor turbines are supplied with saturated
steam from the secondary LP steam system.
c) Close the steam control and emergency stop valve by turning the
handwheel to the right, all the way to the end stop.
Nitrogen is used as the seal gas for the compressors. Special shaft seals are
installed on the impeller side of the compressors. Labyrinth tips are cut into the
compressor shaft. Opposite the tips is a stuffing box, the tips cut into the
artificial carbon stuffing. The stuffing box can be accurately adjusted to give
an extremely tight clearance resulting in very low losses. Two annular grooves
are cut into the carbon sleeve and leakage gas is sucked off from the impeller
side annular groove and returned through a pipe connected to the suction side.
The sealing nitrogen is supplied into the second annular groove to provide a
seal against leakage gas from the impeller side. On the turbine, a combined
radial and axial labyrinth seal shuts off the shaft passage (at the turbine casing)
to the outside. Vapour and leakage steam is led away by corresponding
connections.
d) Open the shut-off valve in the exhaust steam line and drain off
any water which may have accumulated.
Each compressor has a local control panel with gauges fitted to show the
various pressures and temperatures relating to the machine operation. More
limited monitoring is available from the DCS system compressor mimics.
h) Adjust the suction pressure transmitter (for suction pressure
control) to the minimum value. This means the nominal value for
the turbine speed controller is set to a minimum level.
Control of the compressor is achieved by regulating the turbine steam flow rate
to maintain the cargo tank pressure at a preset value. The suction pressure of
the compressor is detected by a pressure transmitter and this signal, together
with a speed signal, is sent to the compressor controller. The required suction
pressure is set and the system then regulates the governor and guide vanes to
accurately control the compressor speed and output.
An anti-surge control system operates independently of the compressor
suction pressure control. This system monitors the pressure differential across
an orifice plate and the compressor pressure differential. According to the
measured value, the controller modulates a surge control valve returning gas
from the discharge side to the suction side of the compressor. This maintains
the compressor in the safe operating region.
e) Open the shut-off valve which is ahead of the steam control and
emergency stop valve in the main steam line and drain off any
water which may have accumulated.
f) The automatic trip actuator should now be engaged by pulling on
the trip handle.
g) Read the cargo tank pressure and adjust the compressor suction
pressure set point locally at the control panel.
i) Open the sealing gas supply valves. Ensure the sealing gas purge
valves are closed.
j) Open the main and exhaust steam shut-off valves and the
auxiliary oil pump will start. Drain off any water which may have
accumulated. Turn the handwheel of the steam control valve
slowly to the left until the end stop is reached.
k) The operator should keep the oil pump in operation until the
bearing temperatures have reached a minimum of 20ºC. The
impeller side compressor bearing temperature may fall below
20ºC at standstill and therefore require particular attention.
Monitor the oil pressure, it should be a minimum of 0.8 bar.
Overspeed (mechanical or electronic via DCS)
Issue: 1
Section 4.4.1 - Page 2 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 4.4.1b High Duty Compressor Performance Curves
P2
CH4 -40OC
P1
Had(m)
P2
CH4 -120OC
P1
2,2
1,691
6963
2,1
1,0n = 14 7000u/min
1,627
1,05n
6389
6214
2,0
1,55
5628
1,9
1,48
5130
1,8
1,44
4623
1,7
1,375
4083
1,6
1,31
3461
1,5
1,25
2883
1,4
1,19
2211
1,3
1,13
1528
1,2
804
1,1
0,9n
Surge Line
0,8n
0,7n
0,6n
0,5n
1,0
0
1000
2000
3000
4000
5000
6000
7000
8000
9000
10000
11000
12000
13000
14000
20000
INLET VOLUME FLOW m3/h
Issue: 1
Section 4.4.1 - Page 3 of 4
Norman Lady
l) Regulate the sealing gas valve to achieve a seal gas pressure of 0.2
bar. Close the vent valve.
m) Check the inlet vane position and the corresponding signal
pressure.
n) Open the bypass at the control panel, set the signal pressure to
3psi.
o) Set the minimum speed at the control panel, set the signal pressure
to 3psi. Press the RESET button.
During operation, the oil and bearing temperatures should be monitored and
should be as follows:
Oil at cooler outlet:
45 - 50ºC
Compressor bearing:
55 - 70ºC
Turbine bearing:
50 - 95ºC
The oil pressures should be monitored and should be as follows:
Lubricating oil:
1 - 2 bar (minimum 0.8 bar)
Governor oil:
9 - 11 bar
p) Open the stop valves on the suction and discharge side of the
compressor.
The oil filter flag should be monitored and the filter changed when the red
indicator appears.
q) After prelubrication has been achieved and the oil pressure has
reached 1.8 - 2.5 bar, the compressor may be started.
Local Compressor Stopping Procedure
r) Press the START pushbutton, the control air pressure closes a
control valve and full control oil pressure builds up for the turbine
control system, opening the steam valve. The compressor starts
running. Open the steam control and emergency stop valve by
turning the handwheel to the left, all the way to the end stop. The
machine now runs at its lowest speed.
s) Slowly close the bypass by manually regulating the signal
pressure to equal that of the anti-surge controller output pressure.
Set the signal pressure to 15 psi.
CAUTION
It is essential that enough gas is consumed on the discharge side for the
bypass valve to completely close.
t) Increase the pressure to the turbine speed controller with the
signal pressure actuator. When the signal pressure shown on the
indicator reaches the same level, the turbine speed controller is
actuated for constant suction pressure. The signal pressure
actuator is further opened to 15psig.
u) Switch off the oil heater, if originally on, by shutting off the steam
to the heater. Open the cooling water valves to supply the oil
cooler. The oil temperature at the cooler outlet should be 40 50ºC.
v) Close the drain valves when no further water is seen to be draining
off.
Issue: 1
a) Turn the handwheel of the steam control and emergency stop
valve to the right, all the way to the end position.
b) On the compressor, close the valves in the suction and discharge
lines.
c) Close the seal gas line and open the vent valve.
d) Stop the oil pump after a suitable delay of about 10 minutes by
turning the handwheel to the end position. Check the bearing
temperatures before stopping the oil pump to ensure the
recommended temperatures are not exceeded.
e) On the turbine, close the valves in the main steam and exhaust
steam lines and open the drain valves.
f) Turn off the cooling water supply.
Allow the steam valves to be open for approximately 30 minutes before
shutting down.
Compressor Lubrication System
Compressor lubrication is provided by a gear oil pump installed in the steam
turbine bearing housing. The steam turbine and radial compressor have a
common lubricating oil supply system. Oil is drawn from the reservoir tank by
a pump and fed to the bearing points via a filter and cooler. Excess oil is
conveyed into the lubricating oil line by an overflow valve, which keeps the
pressure in the piping at a constant level. The pressure of the lubricating oil is
monitored by an oil pressure switch which stops the machine and starts the
turbine driven oil pump (auxiliary LO pump) when the oil pressure drops
below l.2 bar. There is a dual oil filter to clean the oil and an oil cooler.
Cargo Operating Manual
Inlet Guide Vanes
There is a set of adjustable inlet guide vanes installed between the suction
branch and the suction pipe. The vanes’ positions alter the volumetric flow rate
of the compressor. They are housed in a split casing and project radially into
the flow space. The vanes are mounted in teflon coated bushings which require
no lubrication and little maintenance.
The guide vanes are adjusted by a gear rim with longitudinal slots with ball
pivots. The pivots engage with a lever to vary the position of the vanes. The
vanes may be moved by a handwheel or by the automatic positioner. The ‘0’
position on the controller corresponds to the capacity of the machine without
any effective control. The capacity is reduced by setting the vanes in various
positions from -20º, -40º, -60º and -80º. The capacity can be slightly increased
by positioning the vanes at +20º.
Compressor Maintenance
The oil filter must be cleaned once a month. The filter is reversed by turning
the filter cock and when the filter head is deaerated, the filter can be removed.
After every 10,000 operating hours, the compressor should be stripped and the
impeller and bearings inspected.
Compressor Shutdowns
Surge valve activated:
I/O
Overspeed:
17,000 rpm
Lubricating oil pressure low:
3.6 bar
Lubricating oil temperature high:
50ºC
Low seal gas pressure:
0.1 bar
In addition, the DCS system will shutdown the compressor if any of the
following values are exceeded:
High outlet temperature:
100ºC
Suction pressure low:
0.0 bar
Low low cargo tank pressure tanks 1 - 5:
0.0 bar
High differential pressure void space/tank:
0.04 bar
ESD loop pressure low:
3.0 bar
Low gas temperature after LNG heater:
-20ºC
High gas temperature after LNG heater:
70ºC (alarm at 60ºC)
Section 4.4.1 - Page 4 of 4
Norman Lady
Illustration 4.4.2a Low Duty Compressor
TI
66
PI
67
Cargo Operating Manual
PI
67
To / From
Steam System
From Engine Room
Other Compressors
PI
69
Seal Gas
From Nitrogen
System
System Shut Off
and Regulating Valve
Draw Off Line
PCLA
92
LNG
Valve Closed: LD
Comp. Shutdown
Heater
Boilers
TIALHC
99
Main Gas
Shut-Off
Valve
LNG
Discharge
Heater
Governor
Compressor Discharge
Gas Temp.
PT
79
TIALHC
99
TE
78
PDCLA
2
TI
TI
TI
Compressor
Turbine
TI
L.O. Cooler
Cooling
Water
Steam Shut-off Valve
For Steam Driven Pump
TI
Control
Press.
Valve
PI
68
PDT
76
Steam L.O.
Pump
SVC Compressor
Suction Gas
Temp. Indic.
Key
LNG Vapour
PI
68
PI
71
Shaft Driven
L.O Pump
Lubricating Oil Tank
PT
71
Compressor Low
Suction Pressure
Cut-out
PCLA
121
Diff. Press.
Tank/Void
ESD
System
TIT
85
TE
73
Safety
Shut Down
Valve
3
Bypass
L.O. Pressure
Valve
L.O. Temp.
/Pressure
Low LO
Shut
-down
Switch
TS
87
PDIAL
PDT
75
Inlet
Vane
Control
Suction
PS
88
Compressor Shutdown
Relays LCCR
SVC
Discharge
Gas Temp.
Indic.
SVC
Discharge
Gas Press.
Indic.
Diff. Press.
Tank/Atmos
Compressor
Suction
Pressure
PI
70
PI
90
PI
79
TI
85
PI
84
SI
74
SVC
Speed
TS
85
PS
84
SS
86
Pneumatic Indicators
PACL
72
PC
77
LSS
Steam
LSS
Lubricating Oil
PI
88
HC
Compressor
Stop
Compressor
HC
Stop
LCCR
ZA
Surge Valve
Activated
XA
Compressor
Failure
SIC
Compressor
Speed
Local
Compressor Panel
Instrumentation
LD Compressor Running
Electrical Signal
Cargo Tanks
Nitrogen
Issue: 1
Section 4.4.2 - Page 1 of 4
Norman Lady
4.4.2 Low Duty Compressor
Maker:
Type:
Capacity:
No. of sets:
Suction temperature:
Discharge temperature:
Specific weight:
Suction pressure:
Discharge pressure:
Speed:
Airco Cryogenics
Steam driven
3,000m3/h
1
-120ºC
-75ºC
1.3kg/m3
1.05 bar
1.95 bar
18,200 rpm
This compressor is essentially for the compression and heating of the boil-off
gas when used as fuel for the ship’s boilers. The compressor is started locally
and can be monitored via the DCS system. The LD compressor is similar to the
HD compressors, being basically a lower capacity model.
c) Move the cursor to the CCR icon and press the ACT pushbutton
on the DCS panel to take control of the compressor.
d) On the compressor panel on the CCR console, turn the
compressor speed controller back to 20%.
e) Crack open the steam to the vapour heater and set the steam
control valve to 33ºC gas outlet temperature.
(Note: It is important that the vapour heater is properly heated before gas is
allowed to pass through.)
f) Check the level of lubricating oil in the reservoir tank and for any
water present. The level should be in the middle of the sight glass.
Ensure that the oil temperature is above 10ºC before starting.
g) Open the steam chest drains on the turbine and drain off any water
which may have accumulated.
The following conditions trip the LD compressors:
The ESDS system
High differential pressure: void/tanks 1 - 5
Low low pressure: tanks 1 - 5
Compressor high outlet temperature
Electrical power failure
Compressor suction pressure low
ESD closed loop low pressure
Low or high temperature after heaters (aft or forward)
Gas firing shutdown on port and starboard boilers
Fire alarm
Local Start-Up Procedure
The compressor is started locally. Operation after starting is carried out from
the cargo or engine control rooms, depending on which location has control.
The start-up procedure described is for the operations where the low duty
compressor is required discharges vapour to the boilers, due to the pressure in
the cargo tanks reaching 18mbar.
a) Request the ECR to prepare for boil off gas burning/
b) At the DCS mimic screen 5.21 Cargo Compressors, move the
cursor over the Details area near the LD compressor and press the
ACT pushbutton on the DCS panel, to reveal which control room
has control.
Meanwhile the engine will be preparing for burning boil-off gas on free flow.
h) Open the turbine exhaust steam valve and the compressor
discharge valve.
i) Open the shut-off valve which is ahead of the steam control and
emergency stop valve in the main steam line and drain off any
water which may have accumulated.
j) Open the exhaust and steam inlet valves to the auxiliary oil pump,
which will cause it to start. Once prelubrication has been achieved
and the oil pressure has reached 4.0 bar, the compressor may be
started.
k) Open the SW cooling inlet and outlet valves to the LO cooler.
l) Adjust the control air pressure to the surge control valve to 4.5
bar, then crack open the steam valve to the turbine and allow the
turbine to warm through.
m) After 10 minutes close the turbine drains.
n) Open the surge control valve to the fully OPEN position.
o) Fully open the steam inlet valve to the turbine and observe the
turbine speed increase and the green running light come on.
p) The automatic trip actuator should now be engaged by pulling on
the trip handle.
Cargo Operating Manual
q) Once the LD compressor is running under steady conditions
confirm that the engine room is ready to receive cargo vapour and
transfer control to the ECR on the DCS screen.
r) Switch off the oil heaters if originally switched on. Open the
cooling water valves to supply the oil cooler. The oil temperature
at the cooler outlet should be 40 - 50ºC.
During operation, the oil and bearing temperatures should be monitored, the
values should be as follows:
Oil at cooler outlet:
60ºC
Compressor bearing:
60ºC
Turbine bearing:
60ºC
The turbine will trip at 65ºC.
The oil pressures should be monitored and should be as follows:
Lubricating oil:
4.0 bar
The turbine will trip at 65ºC.
The oil filter flag should be monitored and the filter changed when the
differential pressure is 1.5 bar.
Local Compressor Stopping Procedure
The operator must ensure that when the unit is stopped, the auxiliary LO pump
must start as soon as the oil pressure drops below 1.2 bar and keep running
until the compressor has come to a complete standstill.
a) Inform the engine room that the LD compressor is to be stopped.
The ECR will make arrangements for the boiler supply fuel to be
changed over.
When confirmation has been received from the engine room that the boilers are
now running on fuel oil transfer control to the CCR on the DCS mimic screen
5.21 Cargo Compressors.
b) Turn the handwheel of the steam control and emergency stop
valve to the right, all the way to the end position.
c) On the compressor, close the valves in the suction and discharge
lines.
d) On the turbine, close the valves in the main steam and exhaust
steam lines.
e) Close the seal gas line and open the vent valve.
Issue: 1
Section 4.4.2 - Page 2 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 4.4.2b Low Duty Compressor Performance Curves
P2
CH4 -40OC
P1
Had(m)
P2
CH4 -120OC
P1
2,2
2,1
2,0
1,582
5940
1,9
1,52
1,05n
5400
1,0n = 18 200Rpm
1,8
Surge Line
1,7
1,403
4375
0,9n
1,6
1,313
3455
1,5
0,8n
1,4
1,23
0,7n
2645
1,3
1,116
1945
1,114
1350
0,6n
1,2
0,5n
1,1
1,0
0
1000
2000
INLET VOLUME FLOW
Issue: 1
3000
4000
m3/h
Section 4.4.2 - Page 3 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
f) Open the drain valves.
g) Turn off the cooling water supply.
h) Stop the oil pump after a suitable delay of about 10 minutes by
turning the handwheel to the end position. Check the bearing
temperatures before stopping the oil pump to ensure the
recommended temperatures are not exceeded.
i) Close the main steam and exhaust steam valves, open the drain
valve.
Compressor Lubrication System
Compressor lubrication is provided by a gear oil pump installed in the steam
turbine bearing housing. The steam turbine and radial compressor have a
common lubricating oil supply system. Oil is drawn from the reservoir tank by
a pump and fed to the bearing points via a filter and cooler. Excess oil is
conveyed into the lubricating oil line by an overflow valve, this keeps the
pressure in the piping at a constant level.
The pressure of the lubricating oil is monitored by an oil pressure switch which
stops the machine and starts the auxiliary oil pump when the oil pressure drops
below l.2 bar. There is a dual oil filter to clean the oil and an oil cooler.
Compressor Shutdowns
Surge valve activated:
I/O
Overspeed:
15,000 rpm
Lubricating oil pressure low:
3.6 bar
Lubricating oil temperature high:
65ºC
Low seal gas pressure:
0.2 bar
In addition, the DCS system will shutdown the compressor if any of the
following values are exceeded:
High outlet temperature:
100ºC
Suction pressure low:
0.0 bar
Low low cargo tank pressure tanks 1 - 5:
0.0 bar
High differential pressure void space/tank:
0.04 bar
ESD loop pressure low:
3.0 bar
Low gas temperature after LNG heater:
-20ºC
High gas temperature after LNG heater:
70ºC (alarm at 60ºC)
Issue: 1
Section 4.4.2 - Page 4 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 4.5a Cargo Heater
Methane
Inlet
Steam Inlet
Air To
Open
Positioner
VP 96
Manometer
Air To
Open
Gas Inlet Control Valve
V2131
C1
S
Steam Control Valve
V911A
PI
98
C2
Forward Cargo Heater
LC 97
Gas Outlet Valve
V2132
Level
Controller
Air Pressure
Reducing
Valve: 20 psi
Control Air
8.8 bar
TIT96
Hand/
Auto HA96
Station
Remote Temperature
Indication DCS
Temperature
Transmitter
V3025
TC96
PCV 96
Air Set with
Filter: 30 psi
Temperature
Controller
/Computing
Relay
TIT
96
TIAL
HC99
TI
99
V1033A
To Vent Mast
/Boilers/Tanks
Key
Steam
Instrumentation
Panel
Condensate
Outlet
Compressed Air
Condensate
Instrumentation
/Control Air
Issue: 1
Section 4.5 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
4.5 Cargo Heaters
When cargo is being used as fuel, the set point should be set to +45ºC.
Gas Heater
Maker:
Type:
Capacity:
Heating:
No. of sets:
Vapour inlet temperature:
Vapour outlet temperature:
Steam operating pressure:
Methane operating pressure:
CAUTION
When using cargo as fuel for the boilers, the vapour heater to be used
must be properly heated before the compressor is started. If necessary, the
operator should use the bypass valve in the steam inlet pipe.
a) Slowly open up the steam inlet valve.
Heater Control
c) Set the controls for the heater to the ON position.
The control system uses compressed air from the receivers at 8.8 bar. The air
is then reduced via reducing valves. Gas control valve regulates an internal
bypass valve in the heat exchanger. The measured temperature set point is
compared to the hand/auto required value signal and a deviation signal is
applied to to keep the gas outlet temperature at the required value.
d) Open the control air supply to the controls for the heater.
Moss Verft
Shell and tube
329,000 kcal/h
Steam at 12 bar
2
-100°C
+45°C
9 bar
0.9 bar
General Description
There are two steam heated boil-off/warm up heaters located in the LNG
compressor room.
The heaters are used for the following functions:
Heating the LNG vapour which is delivered by the HD
compressors at the specified temperature for warming up the
cargo tanks before gas freeing.
Heating boil-off gas supplied to the main boilers via the LD
compressor.
CAUTION
When returning heated vapour to the cargo tanks, the temperature at the
heater outlet should not exceed +85°C, to avoid possible damage to the
cargo piping insulation and safety valves.
There is a pneumatic level switch mounted in the condensate receiver. If the
condensate level rises too high, steam valve is closed, shutting off steam to the
heater. This action halts any increases in water level which could lead to the
formation of ice.
If the gas outlet temperature reaches a high of +60ºC or a low of +5ºC, an
alarm is raised via the DCS system.
b) Set the LNG vapour lines as detailed for the operation and the
heater to be put in use.
e) Check the condensate level in the sight glass.
f) Set the temperature and level controller to the correct settings for
the operation being undertaken (first stage: 0°C, second stage:
+80°C).
g) Open the hydraulically operated gas inlet and manually operated
gas outlet valves.
h) Change over from MANUAL to AUTO at the hand/auto station.
i) Set the required temperature at the hand/auto station.
If the gas outlet temperature reaches a high of +70ºC or a low of -20ºC, the
steam supply to the heater is shut off.
Operating Procedures To Warm Up the Cargo Heater
a) Open the shell side vent valve.
j) Monitor the gas vapour outlet and condensate temperatures.
To Shut Down the Heater
a) Switch the automatic control from AUTO to MANUAL. Set the
manual signal to 50% at the hand/auto station.
b) Open the shell side condensate valves and check the drains.
b) Close the gas supply and outlet valves on the heater.
The vapour heaters are heat exchangers of the horizontal shell and tube type.
The heating surface consists of ‘U’ shaped tubes whose configuration is such
that cargo vapour flows through the tubes and steam condenses outside the
tubes. The tube bundle and end cover are bolted to the shell to permit
inspection or the plugging of damaged tubes, should this be required.
c) Crack open the manual steam supply valve. Ensure that the steam
to deck is available, ie the isolating valve is open.
CAUTION
The vapour heaters should be thoroughly preheated by steam before the
admission of methane vapour. This prevents ice formation.
e) When water has been drained from the shell, shut the drain valve.
When shutting down the heaters, the methane vapour supply to the heaters
should be shut off before the steam supply, preventing any ice formation at the
end of the operation.
To Start Up the Heater
d) When all the air has been expelled from the shell, shut the vent
valve.
c) Close the steam supply valve to the heater when the temperature
at the heater outlet is above 0°C.
d) Open the steam side vent, then open the drain when all the steam
has vented.
After venting and warming up the heater, pressures and temperatures should
stabilise in approximately 30 minutes. Operation of the heater can now be
initiated.
The heaters are pneumatically controlled. Methane supply to the vapour heater
is controlled by the cargo vapour temperature leaving the heater. This
temperature set point is adjustable.
Issue: 1
4.5 Boil-Off/Warm Up Heater Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
Illustration 4.6a LNG Main Vaporiser
Steam
Inlet
Methane
Inlet
Cargo Operating Manual
To Vaporiser No.2
Working Air
Receiver
LNG Compressor Room
Air to Open
Air to
Open
V2037A
V3025
Air Pressure
Reducing
Valve: 3 bar
Gas Supply
Control Valve
with Air Cylinder
From
Compressed Air
System (8.8 bar)
V2037
TI
V2040A
PI 104
PI
Gas
Manometer
V937A
Air to
Open
From
Vaporiser
B
Key
PI
V2122
PI 103
Steam
Manometer
LNG Liquid
LNG Vapour
Steam
V2135
Condensate
Cargo Void Spaces
System /Atmospheric
Heater
Control Air
/Instrumentation
LC 102
Level
Controller
Control Air
8.8 bar
Air Pressure
Reducing
Valve: 30 psi
Temperature
Transmitter
V3025
Air Pressure
Reducing
Valve: 50 psi
Hand/
Auto
Station
TT101
PCV100
Air Set with
Filter: 20 psi
Vaporiser
Compressed Air
V1035A
HA100
TT100
Direct/Reverse
Relays
D
Shuttle
Valve
R
To Deaerating Tank
In Engine Room
TC100
Manual Reset
Hand Valve
Computing
Relay
Vaporiser Instrumentation Panel
Instrumentation
Panel
Issue: 1
Section 4.6 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
4.6 LNG Vaporisers
Maker:
Capacity:
Heating:
No. of sets:
Steam inlet temperature:
Maximum gas flow:
Inlet LNG temperature:
Outlet gas temperature:
Steam operating pressure:
LNG operating pressure:
Vaporiser Control
Moss Verft
597,000 kcal/h
Steam at 12 bar
1
179°C
25,000kg/h
-163°C
-140°C to +20°C
9 bar
0.5 bar
The vaporiser’s main role is to vaporise liquid nitrogen and natural gas from
the shore station before purging the cargo tanks, piping and void spaces.
Each vaporiser is a shell and tube type heat exchanger. The heating surface
consists of straight tubes arranged so that cargo vapour flows through the tubes
and steam condenses outside the tubes. The shell has a bellows arrangement to
compensate for thermal contraction of the tubes in relation to the shell. The end
covers are welded to the tube sheets, but are flanged so that the tubes can be
inspected or plugged on board the ship if required.
The vaporiser is pneumatically controlled. The LNG supply to the vaporiser is
controlled by the cargo vapour temperature leaving the heater.
The set point is adjustable. When used for nitrogen purging, the set point
should be some degrees above the dew point of the tank atmosphere, the
suggested temperature is +20ºC.
CAUTION
The vaporisers should be thoroughly preheated with steam before the
introduction of liquid. This protects the vaporiser. The bypass valve in the
steam inlet pipe should be used, if required.
Personnel should always be present when the vaporiser is put into operation,
in order to locally monitor the temperature in the steam exhaust line and the
cargo vapour outlet. There are no monitoring facilities on the DCS mimic page
for the vaporisers, the page is purely a vaporiser system piping diagram.
The control system uses compressed air from the working air receiver at 8.8
bar. The air pressure is then reduced via reducing valves. Steam is supplied via
the pneumatic control valve. The measured temperature value from sensor
TT100 is compared to the hand/auto station required value set point and a
deviation signal is applied to the gas nozzle control valve, regulating the liquid
volume to the spray coils.
Cargo Operating Manual
CAUTION
Thorough checks around the LNG vaporiser and associated flange
connections must be conducted during the operation.
On completion of the operation.
a) Shut the liquid valve.
b) Shut the steam supply valve when no LNG remains.
The vaporiser liquid gas supply valve is controlled by an output of TT101
temperature controller via TC101 pneumatic valves. If the gas outlet
temperature reaches +60ºC or drops below +30ºC the supply valve closes.
There is a pneumatic level switch, LC102, mounted in the condensate receiver.
If the condensate level rises too high the steam valve is closed, shutting off
steam to the vaporiser. This action halts any increases in condensate water
level which could lead to the formation of ice.
Operating Procedures
Set the LNG pipelines as detailed for the operation about to be undertaken.
To prepare the LNG vaporiser for use:
a) Open the shell side vent valve.
b) Crack open the shell side drain valve. Check that the condensate
drain valves are open.
c) Crack open the manual steam supply valve.
c) Open the steam side vent and then open the drain when all steam
has been vented.
d) Keep the vapour side valve open to the system until the vaporiser
reaches ambient temperature.
Vaporiser Alarms and Trips
Low condensate temperature alarm set point:
+120°C
Low low condensate temperature trip set point:
+80°C
Gas outlet high temperature (supply valve shuts):
+30ºC
Gas outlet low temperature (supply valve shuts):
-60ºC
High condensate level alarm contact switch
High high condensate level trip
Local hand trip alarm
Common alarm trip alarm
d) When all air is expelled from the shell, shut the vent valve.
After approximately 30 minutes, when pressures and temperatures have
stabilised on the vaporiser:
e) Slowly open the steam inlet manual valve to the fully open
position.
f) Open the instrument air supply to the vaporiser controls.
g) Set the controls for the LNG vaporiser.
h) Fill up the vaporiser with liquid using manual control. Check all
flanges and joints for any signs of leakage.
i) When vapour is produced, switch the control for the liquid valve
to REMOTE and AUTOMATIC.
Issue: 1
Section 4.6 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 4.7.1a Inert Gas System
To
Funnel
Instrument Air
Supply
Gas Oil
Supply
Wet Air
To Funnel
O21
O2
Analyser
O2HA
O2LA
V633
S
FI
Fuel
Pump
PI
From
No.2 IG
Generator
FI
PI
Inert Gas Pipe
At Midship
Crossover
N2
S
S
V2354A
S
PI
V2350A
V2354B
To IG
Generator
No.2 Fuel
System
V2350
PI
V2354B
Note: One of Two Inert Gas Plants
Poop Front
Water
Separator
Air Inlet
V2355A
TI
PHA
PHCO
Air Cooler
THA
THCO
PLA
PLCO
V452
V451
THA
THCO
V344
TI
DPI
62
PI
LHA
LHCO
Fresh Water
Circulating Pump
V336
To No.2
IG Generator
Inert Gas Plant Cooling Water Pump
(340m3/h at 5kg/cm2)
PI
V335
Water
Seal
Inert
Gas
Generator
V336A
V340
From No.2
IG Generator
V330
V2352
LPG Plant Cooling Water Pump
(170m3/h at 5kg/cm2)
V407A
From Bilge System
To Aft Peak Tank
V2352A
Test
Point
Inert Gas
Cooler
Drain
Drain
V2353
To Central
FW Cooler
V407
PI
V2354
Electrically
Heated Dryer
Refrigerant
Outlet
V331
PI
Steam Heated
Dryer
V2352
V340
V344
V329
TI
64
Steam
Supply
Scrubber
PI
From
Bilge Eductor
System
V341
PI
63
TI
PLA
PLCO
Combustion Air
From/To
Fresh Water
Cooling
System
Sea
Chest
V2355
Stbd
FCOA
Air
Compressor
(Roots Type)
Issue: 1
Regenerated
Air From
Engine Room
Space
To Bilge System
To LPG Plant,
Cargo Compressor
LO Coolers and
Water Spray System
Refrigerant
Inlet
R22 Refrigeration
Compressor
Drain
Condenser/Receiver
Key
Inert Gas
Steam
Gaseous Nitrogen
Sea Water
Gas Oil
Fresh Water
Air
Instrument Air
Section 4.7.1 - Page 1 of 10
Norman Lady
4.7
Void Space Systems
4.7.1 Inert Gas Generators
Maker:
Type:
No. of sets:
Inert gas delivery rate:
Dry air delivery rate:
Delivery pressure:
Inert Gas Composition
Oxygen (O2):
Carbon dioxide (CO2):
Hydrogen (H2):
Nitrogen (N2):
Sea water consumption:
Fresh water consumption:
Fuel oil consumption:
Moss Verft
LPU 2500 - 0.2
2
2,500Nm3/h
2,500Nm3/h
0.2kg/cm2
The inert gas is then dehumidified to a dew point of about +5ºC in the inert gas
cooler where an R-22 refrigerant is used as the cooling medium. The gas is
further dried in one of two desiccant dehumidifiers, using steam or electrically
heated air in the regeneration process, before passing into the discharge line.
The generator consists of the following main items:
Each inert gas generator is manually started from the control panel mounted
locally but their operation can be monitored from the DCC system.
170m3/h
The connection to the cargo piping system is made through two non-return
valves and is normally blanked off. The connection to the cargo system is made
through a spool piece which is not normally connected.
Thune Eureka
1
CGD 200 centrifugal vertical
340m3/h at 5kg/cm2
1,750 rpm
LPG Sea Water Cooling Pump
Maker:
Thune Eureka
No. of sets:
1
Type:
CGB 100
Capacity:
170m3/h at 5kg/cm2
General
Inert gas is used for the inerting and gas freeing of cargo tanks, cargo pipes and
void spaces when required. The inert gas blowers may be used separately for
the supply of dried air to the cargo tanks and void spaces. The inert gas is
produced by removing oxygen from the air by a combustion process. This
process takes place in a combustion chamber where gas oil is used as the fuel.
The inert gas contains approximately 85% nitrogen (N2), 15% carbon dioxide
(CO2) and about 0.5% of oxygen (O2) and is at a temperature approximately
5ºC above the sea water temperature.
Issue: 1
As long as the dew point is correct after the processes of cooling and drying,
the dry-air is supplied to the cargo system.
Each inert gas generator contains an O2 analyser for the indication of oxygen
content in the inert gas. The analyser is fitted with maximum and minimum
setting alarms.
Inert Gas Sea Water Cooling Pump
Maker:
No. of sets:
Type:
Capacity:
Speed:
After combustion, the inert gas has a high water content due to the water
formation from the combustion process. Most of this water has to be removed.
The inert gas enters a sea water cooling tower and water separator where its
dew point is lowered to about 5ºC above sea water temperature.
0.5% (by vol)
15% (by vol)
0.1% (by vol)
Remainder
15m3/h
210kg/h
Cargo Operating Manual
Working Principle
Inert gas is produced by the combustion of gas oil supplied by the fuel oil
pump with air, provided by the blower, in the combustion chamber of the inert
gas generator. Good combustion is essential for the production of a good
quality, soot free, low oxygen inert gas.
The products of the combustion are mainly carbon dioxide, water and small
quantities of oxygen, carbon monoxide, sulphur oxides and hydrogen. The
nitrogen content is generally unchanged during the combustion process and the
inert gas produced consists mainly of 85% nitrogen and 15% carbon dioxide.
Initially, the hot combustion gases produced are cooled indirectly in the
combustion chamber by a sea water jacket. Thereafter, cooling of the gases
mainly occurs at the scrubber section in the cooling tower where the sulphur
oxides are washed out. The sea water for the inert gas generator is supplied by
one of two inert gas sea water cooling pumps.
A pressure control valve located at the dryer outlet maintains a constant
pressure throughout the system, thus ensuring a stable flame at the combustion
chamber.
Dry-Air Production
The generator can produce dry-air at the same rate. For the production of dryair there is no combustion, no oxygen content measurement and the oxygen
signal is overridden when the mode selector is set to dry-air (compressor only)
production.
Generator Description
Fuel system
Cooling tower
Combustion chamber
Turning chamber
Combustion air system
Gas system
Cooling water system
Control, monitoring and instrumentation systems
Fuel System
The fuel oil system comprises the oil pump, duplex filter and flow meter. The
oil gun and nozzle are of the bypass type whilst the oil burner is of the pressure
atomising type. A capacity regulating valve and a solenoid shut off valve are
mounted in the bypass line. There are are two solenoid shut off valves in the
oil supply line.
The burner has an ignition pilot burner. During the start-up period, the solenoid
valves open supplying fuel oil and air to the pilot burner. A glow plug at the
pilot burner ignites the fuel/air mixture and this flame then ignites the main
burner. With the bypass closed, the burner oil pressure is regulated by the
regulating valve on the fuel oil pump. This is the normal running condition for
the burner.
The fuel oil nozzle is fitted with tangential shaped outlet slots which impart a
rotating motion to the fuel. The combustion air is fed from a roots type air
compressor with silencer, air filter and valves for high and low air quantity.
The air is also supplied tangentially through ducts to the burner but in the other
direction to the atomised fuel oil. This ensures a thorough mix of fuel and air
to ensure good combustion.
Combustion Chamber
The combustion chamber is divided into a cylindrical upper part and a cone
shaped lower part. These two parts have an outer water jacket for cooling and
a stainless steel internal lining. These two parts are also of specific sizes so that
a recirculating ram-air effect takes place, forcing any colder air, not completely
burnt, back into the combustion area.
Section 4.7.1 - Page 2 of 10
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 4.7.1a Inert Gas System
To
Funnel
Instrument Air
Supply
Gas Oil
Supply
Wet Air
To Funnel
O21
O2
Analyser
O2HA
O2LA
V633
S
FI
Fuel
Pump
PI
From
No.2 IG
Generator
FI
PI
Inert Gas Pipe
At Midship
Crossover
N2
S
S
V2354A
S
PI
V2350A
V2354B
To IG
Generator
No.2 Fuel
System
V2350
PI
V2354B
Note: One of Two Inert Gas Plants
Poop Front
Water
Separator
Air Inlet
V2355A
TI
PHA
PHCO
Air Cooler
THA
THCO
PLA
PLCO
V452
V451
THA
THCO
V344
TI
DPI
62
PI
LHA
LHCO
Fresh Water
Circulating Pump
V336
To No.2
IG Generator
Inert Gas Plant Cooling Water Pump
(340m3/h at 5kg/cm2)
PI
V335
Water
Seal
Inert
Gas
Generator
V336A
V340
From No.2
IG Generator
V330
V340
LPG Plant Cooling Water Pump
(170m3/h at 5kg/cm2)
V407A
From Bilge System
To Aft Peak Tank
Test
Point
Inert Gas
Cooler
Drain
Drain
V2353
To Central
FW Cooler
V407
PI
V2354
V2352A
Electrically
Heated Dryer
Refrigerant
Outlet
V331
PI
Steam Heated
Dryer
V2352
V2352
V344
V329
TI
64
Steam
Supply
Scrubber
PI
From
Bilge Eductor
System
V341
PI
63
TI
PLA
PLCO
Combustion Air
From/To
Fresh Water
Cooling
System
Sea
Chest
V2355
Stbd
FCOA
Air
Compressor
(Roots Type)
Issue: 1
Regenerated
Air From
Engine Room
Space
To Bilge System
To LPG Plant,
Cargo Compressor
LO Coolers and
Water Spray System
Refrigerant
Inlet
R22 Refrigeration
Compressor
Drain
Condenser/Receiver
Key
Inert Gas
Steam
Gaseous Nitrogen
Sea Water
Gas Oil
Fresh Water
Air
Instrument Air
Section 4.7.1 - Page 3 of 10
Norman Lady
The water for the combustion chamber jacket and the cooling tower passes
through a fresh water cooler.
An oxygen analyser is installed and monitors the gas after the water separator.
HIGH SEA WATER LEVEL
High turning chamber water level
Local thermometers are installed to enable the following items to be measured:
HIGH TEMP/LOW PRESSURE
FRESH WATER
High water temperature or low water
pressure in the burner chamber
cooling jacket
HIGH INERT GAS TEMP/
LOW SEA WATER PRESSURE
High gas temperature after cooling
tower or low sea water pressure
before the water nozzle in the
cooling tower
HIGH/LOW OXYGEN CONTENT
High or low inert gas O2 content
Turning Chamber
Sea water inlet temperature
The turning chamber acts as a base for the burner and cooling tower, and also
connects these two parts.
Cooling tower sea water inlet temperature
Cooling Tower
Fresh water cooler outlet temperature
The cooling tower (scrubber) is where the gas is cleaned and cooled down. The
gas flows against the water sprayed from the nozzles at the top of the tower.
The inlet and outlets of the cooling tower are fitted with thermometers and
thermostats for temperature monitoring and alarms.
Cargo Operating Manual
Burner chamber cooling jacket water temperature
Inert gas after cooling tower temperature
Remote pressure gauges are installed at the control panel to enable the
following items to be measured:
Burner inlet air pressure
A further alarm panel is mounted at the right of the main control panel. The
alarms must also be accepted locally by pressing the HORN STOP pushbutton
to silence and accept the alarm. This panel houses the following alarms:
The drain and its water seal allow dirty water from the cooling tower to be
drained without inert gas escaping.
Gas pressure before constant pressure valve
Lamp
Indicates
Gas pressure after constant pressure valve
FUEL OIL PRESSURE LOW:
Fuel oil pressure is too low
Gas System
Oil pressure after oil pump
POWER FAILURE:
Electrical supply has failed
The gas system consists of the water separator, safety valve, constant pressure
valve, two electro-pneumatically operated shut-off valves, an oxygen analyser,
a refrigerated gas cooler and two desiccant dehumidifiers.
Sea water pressure before the cooling tower
CONTROL AIR PRESSURE LOW:
The control air pressure is too low
Fresh water pressure in the burner chamber cooling jacket.
Pilot and Main Burner Control
The water separator is of the centrifugal type, where the water droplets are
separated and collected in the bottom of the separator. The water is fed out
through the cooling tower water seal. There is a pressure gauge and a safety
lifting valve on the gas outlet manifold. The constant pressure valve is fitted to
avoid pressure fluctuations in the combustion chamber. From here the gas is
led by means of the shut-off valves to the atmosphere outlet or to the cargo
system, depending on the operator’s selection.
Plant Shutdowns
The following circumstances will cause an alarm and subsequent shutdown of
the inert gas generator:
Burner chamber cooling jacket high water temperature
High gas temperature after cooling tower
Sea water pressure low
The shut-off valve in the pipe to the cargo system is fitted with an interlocking
system. This interlock prevents the generator starting if the valve position is
incorrect ie, gas to consumer.
The main programming unit controls the start and shutdown sequences of the
burner and monitors all alarm and shutdown functions. The unit raises alarms
or stops the plant if any levels exceed the set parameters. Incorrect O2 content
of the combustion gas will cause an alarm to be raised and the gas will vent to
atmosphere, when operating in the consumer mode. The TEST PROGRAM
pushbutton starts a self-test sequence of the programming unit.
Fresh water pressure low
Air pressure high
Burner failure
Cooling Water System
Alarms
The cooling water system comprises both fresh water and sea water systems.
The fresh water used in the burner chamber cooling jacket is recirculated
through the fresh water cooler by the fresh water pump. Sea water is used to
cool the turning chamber walls and for cooling and cleaning the inert gas in the
cooling tower. The water flow regulation is carried out via hand operated
valves.
Monitoring
A flow meter is installed in the fuel oil system for the measurement of oil
consumption.
Issue: 1
The pilot burner is ignited from a glow plug which operates from a low voltage
transformer. The main flame is monitored by a photo-cell connected to an
electronic flame relay. This relay will shut down the main burner, via the main
programming unit, if the flame is too weak or has gone out. In the case of a
flame failure, the RESET FLAME FAIL RELAY switch on the control panel
must be activated to reset the flame relay and enable a new burner start
sequence.
The system has alarm outputs to the SVC system but the alarm must also be
accepted locally by pressing the STOP HORN pushbutton to silence the
audible alarm and the STOP FLASH pushbutton to cancel the flashing lamp on
the alarm panel at the centre of the control panel. As well as the alarms
mentioned previously in plant shutdowns, there are the following alarms:
Control Panel Description
The control panel contains the following equipment:
Switch
Function
Selection of manual or automatic
burner start
Lamp
Indicates
MANUAL/NORMAL
OPERATION
FLAME FAILURE:
Burner flame is out or weak
WATER CIRCULATION
Water pumps start/stop
HIGH AIR PRESSURE
High air pressure after compressor
AIR COMPRESSOR
Air blower start/stop
Section 4.7.1 - Page 4 of 10
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 4.7.1a Inert Gas System
To
Funnel
Instrument Air
Supply
Gas Oil
Supply
Wet Air
To Funnel
O21
O2
Analyser
O2HA
O2LA
V633
S
FI
Fuel
Pump
PI
From
No.2 IG
Generator
FI
PI
Inert Gas Pipe
At Midship
Crossover
N2
S
S
V2354A
S
PI
V2350A
V2354B
To IG
Generator
No.2 Fuel
System
V2350
PI
V2354B
Note: One of Two Inert Gas Plants
Poop Front
Water
Separator
Air Inlet
V2355A
TI
PHA
PHCO
Air Cooler
THA
THCO
PLA
PLCO
V452
V451
THA
THCO
V344
TI
DPI
62
PI
LHA
LHCO
Fresh Water
Circulating Pump
V336
To No.2
IG Generator
Inert Gas Plant Cooling Water Pump
(340m3/h at 5kg/cm2)
PI
V335
Water
Seal
Inert
Gas
Generator
V336A
V340
From No.2
IG Generator
V330
V340
LPG Plant Cooling Water Pump
(170m3/h at 5kg/cm2)
V407A
From Bilge System
To Aft Peak Tank
Test
Point
Inert Gas
Cooler
Drain
Drain
V2353
To Central
FW Cooler
V407
PI
V2354
V2352A
Electrically
Heated Dryer
Refrigerant
Outlet
V331
PI
Steam Heated
Dryer
V2352
V2352
V344
V329
TI
64
Steam
Supply
Scrubber
PI
From
Bilge Eductor
System
V341
PI
63
TI
PLA
PLCO
Combustion Air
From/To
Fresh Water
Cooling
System
Sea
Chest
V2355
Stbd
FCOA
Air
Compressor
(Roots Type)
Issue: 1
Regenerated
Air From
Engine Room
Space
To Bilge System
To LPG Plant,
Cargo Compressor
LO Coolers and
Water Spray System
Refrigerant
Inlet
R22 Refrigeration
Compressor
Drain
Condenser/Receiver
Key
Inert Gas
Steam
Gaseous Nitrogen
Sea Water
Gas Oil
Fresh Water
Air
Instrument Air
Section 4.7.1 - Page 5 of 10
Norman Lady
Operation: Normal Starting of the Plant
OIL PUMP
Oil pump start/stop
BURNER
Automatic burner sequence start/stop
ATMOSPHERE/CONSUMER
Inert gas to atmosphere or cargo
TEST PROGRAM
Self-test of program unit
RESET FLAME FAILURE RELAY
Reset after flame failure
b) Turn the MAIN SWITCH to position I, and the MAIN SWITCH
ON lamp illuminates.
AIR PURGING
The tanks can be purged with this
switch in position I and the air
compressor and water pumps running
with the cargo (consumer) valve open
c) Turn the MANUAL/NORMAL OPERATION switch to the
NORM position.
IGNITION
Ignition on/off (glow plug on/off)
AIR/OIL TO PILOT BURNER
Opens valves to supply air and fuel
oil to the pilot burner.
HIGH OIL/LOW OIL
Full (100%) fuel oil capacity (normal
running)/50% fuel oil capacity
(for start-up)
a) Check that all the switches on the control panel are switched off.
Ensure that the control air supply is on and that the IG cooling
water system is in operation (see section 5.3.1 for information).
d) Turn the TO ATMOSPHERE/TO CONSUMER switch to the TO
ATMOSPH. position. Valve V2350A will open to vent the gas to
atmosphere.
e) At the alarm panel, the LOW SEA WATER PRESSURE, HIGH
TEMPS/LOW PRESSURE FRESH WATER and HIGH/LOW
OXYGEN CONTENT alarms will be on and can be accepted.
f) Start the water pumps by turning the WATER CIRCULATION
switch ON. The sea water supply, fresh water and drain pumps
will start. The fresh and sea water pressure alarms are cancelled.
HIGH AIR/LOW AIR
Full (100%) air capacity (normal
running)/50% air capacity (start-up)
OIL TO BURNER
Opens valve to supply fuel oil to
the main oil nozzle.
MAIN SWITCH
Main electrical isolator
NORMAL/COMPRESSOR ONLY:
Selects dry-air or inert gas modes
Running Lamps
Indication Function
MAIN SWITCH ON
Main electrical isolator/power on
IGNITION
Glow plug on
AIR/OIL TO PILOT BURNER
Pilot burner air/fuel oil valves open
LOW OIL
Low fuel oil pressure
j) Check the gas pressure, the normal pressure should be
approximately 0.2kg/cm2.
LOW AIR
Low air pressure
k) Ensure that the water level in the cooling tower is normal.
OIL TO BURNER
Burner fuel oil valve open
FLAME ESTABLISHED
Flame is alight
Switches (local running lamps)
Function
WATER CIRCULATION
Start/stop water circulation pumps
AIR COMPRESSOR
Start/stop air compressor
OIL PUMP
Start/stop oil pump
g) Start the air blower by turning the AIR COMPRESSOR switch to
the I position.
h) Check the air pressure. Normal pressure should be approximately
0.5-0.7kg/cm2.
i) Check the water pressure to the cooling tower by observation of
the SEA WATER PRES. pressure gauge; the pressure should be
approximately 1-1.5kg/cm2. The inlet flow can be adjusted if
necessary by means of the inlet valve V336.
l) Check the fresh water pressure by observation of the FRESH
WATER PRES. pressure gauge; the pressure should be
approximately 1.5-2kg/cm2.
Cargo Operating Manual
o) At the engine room first platform, starboard side, start the
dehumidifier dryers and the refrigeration compressor and put the
inert gas cooler in line.
p) Turn the BURNER switch to position I, this will start the program
sequence. After an air purging period of approximately 45
seconds, the burner will start. The burner will initially fire at the
low air/oil level and after 10-20 seconds (adjustable) the change
to high air/oil level will take place. The flame can be monitored
through a sight glass.
q) Check the oil consumption via the flow meter, the normal
consumption is approximately 210kg/h.
r) Check that the O2 analyser is functioning and that the O2 content
of the gas is within limits for use in the cargo system. The O2
content can be adjusted using the valve adjacent to the pressure
gauges.
s) Turn the TO ATMOSPHERE/TO CONSUMER switch to the TO
CONSUMER position. As long as the O2 content of the gas is
within limits, valve V2350A will open and valve V2355A will
close.
t) Check the gas temperature and adjust if required.
Operation: Normal Stopping of the Plant
a) Turn the TO ATMOSPHERE/TO CONSUMER switch to the TO
ATMOSPHERE position. The valves will change over.
b) Turn the BURNER switch to position 0. The oil solenoid valve to
the burner will close and the program unit will reset, ready for a
new start if required.
c) Turn the OIL PUMP switch to position 0 and the oil pump will
stop. The operator should now wait approximately 1 minute for
the plant to cool down.
d) Turn the AIR COMPRESSOR switch to position 0 and the air
compressor will stop.
m) Start the oil pump by turning the OIL PUMP switch to the I
position.
e) Turn the WATER CIRCULATION switch to position 0 and the
water pumps will stop.
n) Check the oil pressure by observation of the OIL PRES. pressure
gauge; the pressure should be approximately 20-25kg/cm2.
f) Stop the inert gas cooler refrigeration compressor and isolate the
cooler.
g) Stop and isolate the dehumidifier dryers.
Issue: 1
Section 4.7.1 - Page 6 of 10
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 4.7.1a Inert Gas System
To
Funnel
Instrument Air
Supply
Gas Oil
Supply
Wet Air
To Funnel
O21
O2
Analyser
O2HA
O2LA
V633
S
FI
Fuel
Pump
PI
From
No.2 IG
Generator
FI
PI
Inert Gas Pipe
At Midship
Crossover
N2
S
S
V2354A
S
PI
V2350A
V2354B
To IG
Generator
No.2 Fuel
System
V2350
PI
V2354B
Note: One of Two Inert Gas Plants
Poop Front
Water
Separator
Air Inlet
V2355A
TI
PHA
PHCO
Air Cooler
THA
THCO
PLA
PLCO
V452
V451
THA
THCO
V344
TI
DPI
62
PI
LHA
LHCO
Fresh Water
Circulating Pump
V336
To No.2
IG Generator
Inert Gas Plant Cooling Water Pump
(340m3/h at 5kg/cm2)
PI
V335
Water
Seal
Inert
Gas
Generator
V336A
V340
From No.2
IG Generator
V330
V340
LPG Plant Cooling Water Pump
(170m3/h at 5kg/cm2)
V407A
From Bilge System
To Aft Peak Tank
Test
Point
Inert Gas
Cooler
Drain
Drain
V2353
To Central
FW Cooler
V407
PI
V2354
V2352A
Electrically
Heated Dryer
Refrigerant
Outlet
V331
PI
Steam Heated
Dryer
V2352
V2352
V344
V329
TI
64
Steam
Supply
Scrubber
PI
From
Bilge Eductor
System
V341
PI
63
TI
PLA
PLCO
Combustion Air
From/To
Fresh Water
Cooling
System
Sea
Chest
V2355
Stbd
FCOA
Air
Compressor
(Roots Type)
Issue: 1
Regenerated
Air From
Engine Room
Space
To Bilge System
To LPG Plant,
Cargo Compressor
LO Coolers and
Water Spray System
Refrigerant
Inlet
R22 Refrigeration
Compressor
Drain
Condenser/Receiver
Key
Inert Gas
Steam
Gaseous Nitrogen
Sea Water
Gas Oil
Fresh Water
Air
Instrument Air
Section 4.7.1 - Page 7 of 10
Norman Lady
h) Turn the MAIN SWITCH (power) OFF.
n) Check the oil pressure by observation of the OIL PRES. pressure
gauge; the pressure should be approximately 20-25kg/cm2.
Manual (Not Programmed) Start of the Plant
a) Check that all the switches on the control panel are switched off.
Ensure that the control air supply is on and that the IG cooling
water system is in operation (see section 5.3.1 for information).
b) Turn the MAIN SWITCH to position I, the MAIN SWITCH ON
lamp illuminates.
c) Turn the MANUAL/NORMAL OPERATION switch to the
MANUAL position.
d) Turn the TO ATMOSPHERE/TO CONSUMER switch to the TO
ATMOSPHERE position.
e) Check the alarm panel. The alarms LOW SEA WATER
PRESSURE, HIGH TEMPS/LOW PRESSURE FRESH WATER
and HIGH/LOW OXYGEN CONTENT will be on and can be
accepted.
f) Start the water pumps by turning the WATER CIRCULATION
switch ON. The sea water supply, fresh water and drain pumps
will start. The fresh and sea water pressure alarms are cancelled.
g) Start the air blower by turning the AIR COMPRESSOR switch to
the I position.
h) Check the air pressure at the gauge. Normal pressure should be
approximately 0.5-0.7kg/cm2.
i) Check the water pressure to the cooling tower by observation of
the SEA WATER PRES. pressure gauge, the pressure should be
approximately 1-1.5kg/cm2. The inlet flow can be adjusted if
necessary by means of the inlet valve V336.
j) Check the gas pressure; the normal pressure should be
approximately 0.2kg/cm2.
k) Ensure that the water level in the cooling tower is normal.
l) Check the fresh water pressure by observation of the FRESH
WATER PRES. pressure gauge; the pressure should be
approximately 1.5-2kg/cm2.
m) Start the oil pump by turning the OIL PUMP switch to the I
position.
Issue: 1
o) Start the dehumidifier dryers and the refrigeration compressor and
put the inert gas cooler in line.
p) The air compressor should run for approximately 45 seconds to
purge the plant before the next step is carried out.
q) Turn the IGNITION switch to position I. The operator should wait
approximately 45 seconds to allow the glow plug to heat up.
r) Turn the AIR/OIL TO PILOT BURNER switch to position I. The
pilot burner is now on.
s) Turn the HIGH OIL/LOW OIL switch to the LOW OIL position.
t) Turn the HIGH AIR/LOW AIR switch to the LOW AIR position.
u) Turn the OIL TO BURNER switch to position I. The burner
should start, check the flame through the sight glass on top of the
combustion chamber.
(Note: The previous steps, r), s), t) and u) should preferably be carried out
swiftly, ie, with only 1 or 2 seconds between each step.)
v) If burner ignition has not taken place within 4 seconds of the OIL
TO BURNER switch being turned on, the switch must be turned
back to position 0, in order to stop the oil supply. The operator
should investigate the cause of the burner not firing or try again
after waiting for approximately 1 minute for the chamber to
purge.
w) If normal ignition has taken place, the operator should wait for a
period of 10 seconds and then turn the HIGH AIR/LOW AIR
switch to the HIGH AIR position and the HIGH OIL/LOW OIL
switch to the HIGH OIL position.
x) Turn the AIR/OIL TO PILOT BURNER switch to position 0. The
pilot burner will be extinguished.
y) Check the oil consumption via the flow meter, the normal
consumption is approximately 210kg/h.
z) Check that the O2 analyser is functioning and that the O2 content
of the gas is within limits for use in the cargo system. The O2
content can be adjusted using the valve adjacent to the pressure
gauges.
Cargo Operating Manual
aa)Turn the TO ATMOSPHERE/TO CONSUMER switch to the TO
CONSUMER position. As long as the O2 content of the gas is
within limits, valve V2350A will open and valve V2355A will
close.
bb) Check the gas temperature and adjust if required.
CAUTION
During MANUAL operation, a watchman must be on hand to monitor the
burner flame once the system has been switched over to CONSUMER
mode, as the flame sensor is out of service in the MANUAL mode.
Manual Stopping of the Plant
a) Turn the TO ATMOSPHERE/TO CONSUMER switch to the TO
ATMOSPHERE position. The valves will change over.
b) Turn the OIL TO BURNER switch to position 0. The operator
should now wait approximately 1 minute for the plant to cool
down.
c) Stop the oil pump by turning the OIL PUMP switch to the 0
position.
d) Turn the AIR COMPRESSOR switch to position 0 and the air
compressor will stop.
e) Stop the inert gas cooler refrigeration compressor and isolate the
cooler.
f) Stop and isolate the dehumidifier dryers.
g) Turn the WATER CIRCULATION switch to position 0 and the
water pumps will stop.
h) Turn the MAIN SWITCH (power) OFF.
Changeover Between Atmosphere and Consumer
The inert gas can be led either to atmosphere or to the consumer (cargo system)
by this switch. The plant must be started with the switch in the TO
ATMOSPHERE position, due to an interlock on the consumer valve.
When the O2 content is within limits, the switch is turned to the TO
CONSUMER position and inert gas is led to the cargo tanks. The gas will
automatically be led to atmosphere if the O2 content is above or below the
limits. The changing over is delayed by a time delay relay in connection with
the O2 alarm.
Section 4.7.1 - Page 8 of 10
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 4.7.1a Inert Gas System
To
Funnel
Instrument Air
Supply
Gas Oil
Supply
Wet Air
To Funnel
O21
O2
Analyser
O2HA
O2LA
V633
S
FI
Fuel
Pump
PI
From
No.2 IG
Generator
FI
PI
Inert Gas Pipe
At Midship
Crossover
N2
S
S
V2354A
S
PI
V2350A
V2354B
To IG
Generator
No.2 Fuel
System
V2350
PI
V2354B
Note: One of Two Inert Gas Plants
Poop Front
Water
Separator
Air Inlet
V2355A
TI
PHA
PHCO
Air Cooler
THA
THCO
PLA
PLCO
V452
V451
THA
THCO
V344
TI
DPI
62
PI
LHA
LHCO
Fresh Water
Circulating Pump
V336
To No.2
IG Generator
Inert Gas Plant Cooling Water Pump
(340m3/h at 5kg/cm2)
PI
V335
Water
Seal
Inert
Gas
Generator
V336A
V340
From No.2
IG Generator
V330
V340
LPG Plant Cooling Water Pump
(170m3/h at 5kg/cm2)
V407A
From Bilge System
To Aft Peak Tank
Test
Point
Inert Gas
Cooler
Drain
Drain
V2353
To Central
FW Cooler
V407
PI
V2354
V2352A
Electrically
Heated Dryer
Refrigerant
Outlet
V331
PI
Steam Heated
Dryer
V2352
V2352
V344
V329
TI
64
Steam
Supply
Scrubber
PI
From
Bilge Eductor
System
V341
PI
63
TI
PLA
PLCO
Combustion Air
From/To
Fresh Water
Cooling
System
Sea
Chest
V2355
Stbd
FCOA
Air
Compressor
(Roots Type)
Issue: 1
Regenerated
Air From
Engine Room
Space
To Bilge System
To LPG Plant,
Cargo Compressor
LO Coolers and
Water Spray System
Refrigerant
Inlet
R22 Refrigeration
Compressor
Drain
Condenser/Receiver
Key
Inert Gas
Steam
Gaseous Nitrogen
Sea Water
Gas Oil
Fresh Water
Air
Instrument Air
Section 4.7.1 - Page 9 of 10
Norman Lady
Therefore if the O2 content during operation exceeds the normal set points, the
changeover is delayed for approximately 1 minute. During this time the plant
will not stop.
The changeover valves for gas to consumer and atmosphere are only operated
automatically when the switch is in the TO CONSUMER position.
The changeover valves can also be operated manually by pressing a red
pushbutton (located at the changeover valves) and leaving the button in that
position. The gas goes then to the consumer independent of the O2 analyser and
the selector switch. This pushbutton is for emergency use only.
Servomex
264A xendos 1800
0 - 25% oxygen
The analyser is a microprocessor-based electronics unit for the continuous
monitoring of the oxygen levels in the inert gas generator outlet.
The gas sample continuously flows through the analyser sensor because of the
higher pressure in the inert gas system. This ensures that the oxygen content is
continuously measured. The analyser has a 4-20mA output signal which is
proportional to the oxygen content and this signal is the input signal to the O2
indicator on the control panel. Adjustment of the alarm set points can be made
via the membrane keys on the unit front.
When the instrument is first switched on, the upper and lower displays are
illuminated for approximately three seconds and the sensor cell then warms up
and stabilises. The unit then gives the O2 reading.
Refrigeration Plant
Maker:
Type:
Speed:
The compressor is fitted with high and low pressure cut-outs and a lubricating
oil pressure cut-out. There is also a lubricating oil pressure differential cut-out
to stop the compressor in the event of the lubricating oil pressure dropping
below that of the crankcase.
The compressor is fitted with automatic capacity control. The compressor is
controlled by a ‘Unisab’ PLC. A regulator will unload cylinders one at a time
in accordance with the load demand. The minimum operating level is two
cylinders. There is also an automatic crankcase oil heater which is switched on
when the compressor stops and vice versa. A dryer/filter is also fitted. The
dryer part must be changed regularly while the filter part may be cleaned.
This compressor can supply refrigerant to the air conditioning system as well
as the inert gas cooler.
O2 Analyser
Maker:
Type:
Range:
Cargo Operating Manual
Sabroe
6 cylinder reciprocating
1,400 rpm
The inert gas is cooled by being passed through a finned gas cooler which is
divided into two parallel sections. The cooler is cooled by R-22 refrigerant
from a 6 cylinder reciprocating compressor. This is driven by an electric motor
which is directly driven by the compressor.
Dehumidifier Dryers
Funnel
Maker:
Flow rate:
Type:
Type:
No. of sets:
Alfsen og Gunderson AS
2,500m3/h
AG-SR-122E (electrically heated)
AG-SR-122S (steam heated)
2
There are two dehumidifier dryers fitted to the inert gas outlet. One is heated
with steam and the other with electrically powered heaters. The air dryers start
automatically when the inert gas generator is started.
The dehumidifiers consist of an inlet air filter, preheater, silica gel rotor, wet
air fan and steam or electrical heater.
Adjusting
Damper
Wet Air
2500m3/h
Rotor Unit
Wet Air
Fan
Regeneration
Heater
(Steam/Elec.)
Regenerated Air 5oC
2500m3/h
Bypass
Inert Gas
Cooler
From
Inert Gas
Generator
V2352
Dry Air
2500m3/h
Filter
Pre-heater
Rotor Drive Motor
Operation
The dehumidifiers operate continuously with wet air entering the dehumidifier.
This air stream is divided into two separate streams, process air and
regeneration air.
Inert Gas Dehumidifier Principle
The process air is dried as it passes through the silica rotor and then passes out
as dry-air. The rotor retains the removed moisture until it rotates into the
regeneration section. The regeneration air is used to heat the moisture-laden
silica rotor in the separate regeneration section of the dryer. The regeneration
air then leaves the dryer separately from the process air as wet air. Heat from
the regeneration section is transferred by the rotor and is used by the incoming
airflow to preheat the regeneration air.
The cooler tubes contain cooling R-22 and to prevent any water condensing
and turning into frost or ice, the evaporating temperature is kept at slightly
below zero so that the water drains away.
Issue: 1
Section 4.7.1 - Page 10 of 10
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 4.7.2a Nitrogen Generator
AI
140
Rich O2 Outlet
440V 60Hz
Electrical Supply
Tah
120
Tah
120
Common
Fault SVC
XA AAh/hh AS
140 140 140
TS
120
XA
PIC
120
FEED AIR COMPRESSOR
Control Panel
PdAH
104
PdAH
106
PdS
104
PdS
106
After Cooler
Oil Cooler
AE
140
PIC
130
AT
140
HC
131
157
PI
113
TI
120
147-1
148-1
N2
Membranes
142-1
PI
109
142-2
141
M
Cooler
Oil
Separator
LA
110
111
S
V9B
S
147-2
S
M
HC
130
FI
140
DCS
TT
120
AI
140
148-2
FCV
130
112
PAI
S
AD4B
PS
119
DCS
PI
150
PAI
150
From GS
Air System
PS
150
N2 To Atmosphere
Operating Panel
KVAERNER - MEDAL
NITROGEN GENERATOR
PT
150
DCS
142-3
165
3581104
Key
Gaseous Nitrogen
Compressed Air
Oxygen Enriched Air
Electrical Signal
Issue: 1
SELECT
REMOTE
START
LAMP
TEST
START
ALARM
ACCEPT
ALARM
RESET
POS 1:
CO2-CONTENT
SET POINT
2
CO2 CONTROL
AUTO/MANUAL
-
161
To Consumers
(See Illustration 4.7.2b)
h
Start/Stop
System
BUFFE
1
160
Nitrogen
Buffer Tank
Nitrogen
Buffer Tank
+
POS 2:
MANUAL
CO2-CONTENT
h
%
AAh/hh
XA
TAh
TAI
PAI
Pd/Ah
YA
HC
LAMP/LED
PUSH
BUTTON, SWITCH
OXYGEN
CONTENT HIGH,VERY HIGH
SENSOR
FAILURE
TEMPERATURE
ALARM HIGH
TEMPERATURE
ALARM LOW
PRESSURE
ALARM LOW
PRESSURE
DIFF.
ALARM HIGH
COMMON
ALARM
HAND OPERATED CONTROLLER
PS
Section 4.7.2 - Page 1 of 4
Norman Lady
4.7.2 Nitrogen Generator
Maker:
Type:
Capacity:
Kvaerner - Medal
Membrane
21Nm3/h at 5bar and 5% O2
Oxygen Meter
Maker:
Teledyne
Range:
0-10% O2
This vessel is arranged geometrically, in the same way as a shell and tube heat
exchanger. As the air flows along the bore of the fibres, O2, CO2 and H2O
(vapour) contained in the air permeate faster than N2 (Nitrogen) to the low
pressure side of the fibres. The air in the bore is gradually depleted of the fast
permeating gases and becomes nitrogen enriched.
The air flow rate through the membrane module can be adjusted to obtain
different levels of nitrogen purity.
Description of System Operation
Feed Compressor
Maker:
Kaeser
Type:
SM 11 Oil lubricated screw fresh water cooled
Capacity:
50Nm3/h at 8 bar
Motor:
7.5Kw
The compressed air from the air feed compressor is fed to the nitrogen
generator inlet and firstly passes through a series of three automatic filters.
These protect the membranes from any harmful solid particles and also from
any oil and water present in the air. These filters have automatic drains.
Nitrogen is used on the vessel for the following purposes:
The air then passes through a 1kW electric heater which will heat the air to
approximately 50ºC, which is the optimal temperature for the design capacity.
As a sealing gas for the cargo compressor glands
Purging the gas fuel line and boiler gas burner manifold
Inerting and gas freeing of the level indicators
Bleeding to the cargo tank wedge spaces
Nitrogen vapour is bled into the wedge space and into the upper insulation
space at the top of the tank via valve V2209, from the nitrogen generator. The
nitrogen vapour then flows down along the surface of the tank shell to a
drainpipe. The nitrogen vapour and any LNG leakage gas is exhausted into the
void space where it mixes with the dry air atmosphere in this space.
The generator is fitted in the starboard side of the aft store on the first platform
level of the engine room and the feed air compressor is fitted next to the GS
compressors, also on the first platform level.
Principle of Operation
The generator uses a membrane system to produce nitrogen. The principle of
the membrane’s operation is selective permeation. Each gas has a characteristic
permeation rate which is a function of its ability to dissolve and diffuse through
a membrane. This characteristic allows a gas like oxygen, which dissolves and
diffuses at a fast rate, to be separated from a gas like nitrogen which dissolves
and diffuses at a much slower rate.
Cargo Operating Manual
The heated air is now fed via a manifold to each individual membrane
separator. The permeated gases such as the O2, CO2 and H2O (vapour) are
vented off to atmosphere and the nitrogen leaves the membrane. The nitrogen
is then collected in a manifold and passes through a flow control valve. By
adjusting the flow with this valve the nitrogen purity will be adjusted, as the
longer the air is in the membrane system, the higher the purity (Refer to the
manufacturer’s manual for further in-depth information). If the nitrogen purity
is out of the set specification it will dump the product to atmosphere. The
variable area flow meter is installed at this point to allow the operator to
monitor the nitrogen flow.
The generator is equipped with an oxygen analyser to continuously monitor the
oxygen content in the product nitrogen. Should the oxygen content rise, an
alarm will be initiated. If the oxygen content continues to rise, a second alarm
(oxygen content high high) will be initiated and the delivery valve will close
and the dump valve will open. When the oxygen content has fallen to the limits
within the set parameters, the dump valve will close and the delivery valve will
open.
The nitrogen is then fed to the N2 buffer tanks on deck. The feed pipe to the
tanks is fitted with pressure switches which control the start and stop of the
generator.
Normal Operation
The key components of the generator are the membrane modules. Each module
contains many hollow fibre membranes to achieve the maximum membrane
surface per unit of volume. Compressed air is fed to the bore side of the hollow
fibre bundles enclosed in the pressure vessel.
The generator is completely automatic in its operation and once set up will
require little operator intervention.
The system is started from the main control panel, after setting the compressors
to standby mode.
Issue: 1
Section 4.7.2 - Page 2 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 4.7.2b Nitrogen System
Vent
Mast at Tank No.5
V2232
Double
Pipe
Vent
Mast at Tank No.4
V2233
V2132
Poop
Front
V2140A
V2140
S2140
Boil-Off Gas Supply
From LD Compressor
/Cargo Heaters
Cargo Heaters
V2226
LD Compressor
HD Compressor A
HD Compressor B
LNG Compressor Room
Boiler Gas Piping Purge Line
Purging
Vent Lines
V2228
V2141
V2141
V2141A
V2141A
V2227
Gas Burners
Port Boiler
To Port Side
Nitrogen Buffer
Tank
Nitrogen Generator
(Starboard Rope Store)
V2216
Cargo Tank
Insulation Space
and Wedge Space
Nitrogen Bleed
V2216
V2216
V2216
V2209
V2227
V2209
V2209
Gas Burners
Starboard Boiler
Insulation
Space
V2209
Wedge Space
Air Supply Compressor
(1st Platform Level)
V2228
V2216
Dome Nitrogen
Outlet for Whessoe
Purging etc
No.5
Cargo Tank
Wedge Space
No.4
Cargo Tank
Wedge Space
Wedge Space
No.3
Cargo Tank
No.2
Cargo Tank
Wedge Space
No.1
Cargo Tank
V2228
Key
Issue: 1
Section 4.7.2 - Page 3 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Procedure to Start and Stop the Nitrogen Generator
a) The power supply switch to the heater is on the starboard side of
the cabinet and the power supply for the instrumentation is inside
the cabinet.
b) If there are any alarms active, press the the following
pushbuttons:
Accept Alarm
Reset Alarm
Select Remote Start
If the GS compressor is required to supply the feed air, press the SELECT
SERVICE AIR pushbutton and the Service Air Inlet Valve indicator lamp will
light. Otherwise the nitrogen generator’s feed air compressor will supply the
necessary air.
c) Once the START pushbutton is pressed, the compressor indicator
lamp will light together with the Select Remote Start indicator
lamp.
Production will be vented to the atmosphere for 10 minutes before switching
to the buffer tanks.
Nitrogen Generator Operating Panel
When the buffer tanks reach 1.95 bar, production is vented to atmosphere for
10 minutes and then the generator will stop. The Select Consumer light will
start flashing. If during the 10 minutes the pressure in the buffer tank drops by
0.15 bar, the consumer valve will open and the vent valve will close.
The generator will start automatically when the buffer tank pressure falls to
1.49 bar.
During normal operation, the system and compressor will cut in and out under
the control of the line pressure switches. The compressor will run off load for
a certain time before it stops.
To stop the generator system, press the SYSTEM STOP pushbutton.
Alarms
Any alarm activates the alarm horn and a flashing red lamp on the panel. A
remote alarm is raised via the DCS system.
High O2:
Air temperature low:
Air temperature high:
Buffer tank pressure low:
Air filter differential pressure high:
Issue: 1
6.5%
40ºC
55ºC
1.3 bar - one minute delay
0.9 bar
Nitrogen Generator Air Feeder Compressor
Section 4.7.2 - Page 4 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 4.7.3a Void Space Dryers
From Tank 1
Void Space
V2306
From Tanks
2 - 5 Void
Spaces
To Tank 1
Void Space
Suction
Recirculation Fans: Top of LNG Compressor Room
V2310
V2310
V2303
To Tanks
2-5
Void Space
Void Space
Recirculation Fans
2,000m3/h
V2316
V2311
V2311
V2135
Void Space Dryer
LNG Vapour
to LD/HD
Compressors
V2114
V2113
V2124
V2314
V2313
Gas to
Boilers
Vapour
Header/
Crossover
Key
Steam
Condensate
Moist Air
V2313
Dry Air
V2314
LNG Vapour
V2114
V2113
Void Space Dryer
Issue: 1
V2124
Gas to
Boilers
Compressed Air
Instrumentation
Section 4.7.3 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
4.7.3 Void Space Dryers
Void Space Dryers
Maker:
Type:
No. of sets:
Moss Verft
Shell and tube
2
System Description
The available cold temperature in the boil-off vapour is used for drying the
void space atmosphere. Drying is carried out in two heat exchangers of the
shell and tube type in which cargo vapour flows through the tubes.
Moisture in the void space atmosphere will condense outside the tubes and
then freeze to ice. The ice formation will reduce the heat exchange within the
dryer. When the temperature of the void space atmosphere coming out from the
dryer is higher than -50ºC, regeneration is necessary.
The supply of void space atmosphere and cold cargo vapour is shut off and
heated cargo vapour is introduced through the tubes. The ice will now melt and
the water is drained off through a drain pipe.
The dryers are used one at a time. When one is in service, the other is
regenerated. After the flow has passed the dryer, it will be heated to
approximately 30ºC in the steam heater.
The outlet temperature of the atmospheric heater is controlled by the control
valve in the steam inlet. The variable position valve is controlled via a signal
from TC107, the temperature controller. The controller regulates the valve in
accordance with the temperature received from transmitter TT107, located in
the void space outlet.
Issue: 1
Section 4.7.3 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 4.8.1a CTS Printout
LNG/C ''NORMAN LADY''
HOEGH FLEET SERVICES A.S.
LNG/C ''NORMAN LADY''
CARGO CALCULATION REPORT
CARGO CALCULATION REPORT
CARGO MEASUREMENT BEFORE DISCHARGING
DATE:
July 16, 2003
CARGO MEASUREMENT AFTER DISCHARGING
DATE:
July 16, 2003
PLACE:
TIME:
18:02 UTC
PLACE:
TIME:
18:02 UTC
Lake Charles
VOYAGE NUMBER:
RY-0903
Product
Tank Vol. 100% in m3
Level Reading 1
in meter
Level Reading 2
in meter
Level Reading 3
in meter
Level Reading Average
in meter
Specific Gravity Correction in meter
Tape Correction
Trim Correction
List Correction
Corrected Liquid Level
Liquid Volume m3
in meter
in meter
in meter
in meter
Thermal Factor Liquid
Correction Volume m3
Tank 1
15556.275
27.928
27.928
27.928
27.928
0.009
-0.004
0.001
0.000
27.934
15148.087
0.99500
15072.347
Temperatures Vapor
Average Temp. Vapor All Tanks
-138.9
Temperature Liquid mid 1
Temperature Liquid mid 2
Temperature Liquid bottom
Temperature Liquid Av. Each Tank
Temperature Liquid Av. All Tanks
-159.2
-159.2
-159.2
-159.2
Tank Pressure
Tank Pressure x 980,662
0.150
0.150
Quantity on Board: ON ARRIVAL
Quantity on Board:
Survey Figure
Diff. Survey Fig. - Ships Fig.
Draft fwd
in meter
Draft aft
in meter
Draft average in meter
Surveyor
Issue: 1
HOEGH FLEET SERVICES A.S.
10.15
10.40
10.28
Ships Figure
Tank 2
18953.232
30.215
30.215
30.215
30.215
0.009
-0.004
0.001
0.000
30.221
18554.471
0.99500
18461.698
-137.0
-159.1
-159.2
-159.1
-159.1
0.150
146.7
Tank 3
LNG
18979.546
30.237
30.237
30.237
Tank 4
Tank 5
Lake Charles
VOYAGE NUMBER:
RY-0903
Product
Tank Vol. 100% in m3
Level Reading 1
in meter
Level Reading 2
in meter
Level Reading 3
in meter
Level Reading Average
in meter
Specific Gravity Correction in meter
Tank 1
Tank 4
Tank 5
18950.408
5.054
5.054
5.054
5.054
15555.498
0.335
0.335
0.335
0.335
0.009
-0.034
0.002
0.000
5.031
1181.784
0.009
-0.034
0.002
0.000
0.312
4.701
0.99499
1175.863
0.99499
4.677
-159.3
-159.5
-159.7
-159.5
-103.6
-148.8
-148.8
-133.7
-131.2
-112.3
-151.2
-151.3
-138.3
-90.6
-145.7
-145.8
-127.4
0.139
0.138
mmHG:
0.138
900.2
Corr. Volume
85692.827
1199.767
84493.060
84493.060
0.000
Ambient Temp
Density
Atm. Pressure
mmHG.
33.0 C
430.103 t/m3
1019
764.311
Trim / in mtr
List/degree
1.00
0
FWD TRIM/PORT LIST = NEGATIVE
Sag cm
Hog cm
Density water
18950.408
30.618
30.618
30.618
30.618
15555.498
28.145
28.145
28.145
28.145
0.009
-0.004
0.001
0.000
30.625
18653.215
0.009
-0.004
0.001
0.000
28.151
15188.909
0.99500
18559.949
0.99500
15112.964
-140.9
-140.2
-147.0
-137.4
Temperatures Vapor
Average Temp. Vapor All Tanks
-159.5
-159.2
-159.2
-159.2
-159.2
-159.2
-159.1
-159.1
-159.1
-159.1
-159.3
-159.2
-159.3
-159.3
Temperature Liquid mid 1
Temperature Liquid mid 2
Temperature Liquid bottom
Temperature Liquid Av. Each Tank
Temperature Liquid Av. All Tanks
-88.3
-144.5
-144.5
-125.8
0.151
0.148
mmHG:
0.149
909.5
Tank Pressure
Tank Pressure x 980,662
0.139
0.139
30.237
0.009
-0.004
0.001
0.000
30.243
18578.762
0.99500
18485.868
Corr. Volume
85692.827
85692.827
0.000
Trim / in mtr
List/degree
0.25
0
FWD TRIM/PORT LIST = NEGATIVE
Ambient Temp
29.0 C
Density
430.103 t/m3
Atm. Pressure
1017
mmHG.
762.811
(mb x 0.75006 = mmHG)
Sag cm
Hog cm
Density water
0
0
1.025 kg/m3
Chief Officer
Tape Correction
Trim Correction
List Correction
Corrected Liquid Level
Liquid Volume m3
in meter
in meter
in meter
in meter
Thermal Factor Liquid
Correction Volume m3
15556.275
0.303
0.303
0.303
0.303
0.009
-0.034
0.002
0.000
0.280
3.803
0.99499
3.784
Quantity on Board: ON ARRIVAL Ships Figure
Quantity on Board: ON DEPARTURE
Quantity:
DISCHARGED
Survey Figure
Diff. Survey and Ships Figure
Draft fwd
in meter
Draft aft
in meter
Draft average in meter
Surveyor
8.15
9.15
8.65
Tank 2
18953.232
0.387
0.387
0.387
0.387
0.009
-0.038
0.002
0.000
0.360
6.688
0.99499
6.654
-159.4
-97.0
-147.8
-147.8
-130.9
0.139
135.9
Tank 3
LNG
18979.546
0.441
0.441
0.441
0.441
0.009
-0.038
0.002
0.000
8.832
18578.762
0.99499
8.788
(mb x 0.75006 = mmHG)
0
0
1.025 kg/m3
Chief Officer
Section 4.8.1 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
4.8 Custody Transfer System
signal which varies according to the pressure in the tank.
4.8.1 Custody Transfer System (CTS)
Independent Very High Level Alarm System
Level Measurement
Two high level alarms per tank are provided by independent point sensing
elements. Float sensors inside the cargo tanks detect the cargo at predetermined
levels (see section 4.1.3, High Level and Overfill Alarm System).
The level measurement system consists of a microwave horn antenna and a
transmitter/receiver mounted inside a 50mm pipe mounted in the tank central
column which extends over the full depth in which the level is to be measured.
Cargo Operating Manual
The liquid level is determined by measuring the time taken for a transmitted
signal to travel to and from the liquid level surface. The time taken is measured
and converted into a distance measurement (the ullage). The values for the size
and shape of the tank are stored in the signal processing unit and so the system
can calculate the exact contents of the tank. The system also employs timeaveraging techniques to balance out the effects of liquid movement.
Cargo tank gauging is via the transmitter on the Whessoe gauge. The speed of
the radar signal travelling (propagating) within the tank is influenced by the
varying vapour densities and temperatures. To compensate for this the system
automatically compares results to previously measured pipe joint signatures
and calibrates the system accordingly. This ensures the accurate measurement
of contents independent of tank conditions. This automatic calibration means
that no separate mechanical operations are required to verify the accuracy of
the system.
Temperature Measurement
The temperature measurement is obtained from the PT100 sensors whose
electrical resistance decreases with temperature. The sensors are calibrated and
certificated and therefore have their own individual identification number. The
sensors are positioned equally throughout the height of the tank and include
sensors at the top and bottom enabling the temperature of the liquid and the
vapour to be measured separately. Average and individual temperature
readings are available.
The sensors are wired with four conductors (four wire cable) and all
terminations are sealed. There are spare sensors mounted in the tanks to
provide a degree of redundancy.
Pressure Measurement
The pressure measurement is obtained from a capacitive pressure transmitter.
The transmitter consists of a movable ceramic diaphragm connected to a fixed
ceramic substrate. On each ceramic part is a gold plate which makes up a
capacitor whose capacitance will vary according to the distance between them.
The fixed part is mounted on the tank shell and the movable part extends into
the tank space. The tank pressure imparts a force on the movable plate relative
to the tank pressure. This varying capacitance signal is converted to an output
Issue: 1
Section 4.8.1 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 4.8.2a Whessoe Float Level Gauge
Counter Window
Handle To Raise
The Float
Cushion Spring
Nitrogen Purge
Connection
Inspection Hatch
Spherical Float
10" Closure Valve
Issue: 1
Section 4.82 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
4.8.2 Float Level Gauges
Isolating Valve and Float Inspection Chamber
Maker:
Type:
A 300mm gate valve, bolted to the top of the float well, allows the gauge head
to be isolated for maintenance. A stainless steel inspection chamber is mounted
above the isolating valve to provide access to the float and for the connection
of special float recovery tools in the event of tape breakage. The inspection
chamber flange can be used for gas freeing of the tank, if required, during
maintenance periods, etc.
Whessoe
Whessmatic 50
The Whessoe float level measurement system is of the conventional tanker
type, but uses a stainless steel tape to compensate for temperature variations.
The system comprises a level gauge assembly for each cargo tank. The level
gauge is mounted on an assembly comprising a float well, isolating valve and
inspection chamber.
The gauge head contains a mechanical indicator, a stainless steel tape
tensioned by a tensator spring and a 12'' diameter PV float attached to the lower
end of the tape. One level gauge is fitted at each cargo tank dome.
The shrinkage of the float in LNG is 15mm and the minimum level which can
be read from the gauge is 145mm.
CAUTION
To reduce the risk of tape failure and wear on the gauging mechanism, the
floats should be fully stowed at all times, except when taking a sounding.
Care should be taken when stowing the float as excessive tension may
cause tape breakage. It is possible for a failed tape to foul the capacitance
column, resulting in the loss of gauging facilities for that tank.
To obtain the liquid level, the float is released from its stowage position using
the release lever and allowed to descend freely to the liquid surface. The tank
sounding may then be taken by observation of the local mechanical read-outs
to provide level indication. The Whessoe gauges should be checked against the
Custody Transfer System (CTS) during each alternate loading.
Each cargo tank is provided with a Whessoe gauge as an approved secondary
level measurement system. This secondary system provides an alternative
means of cargo level measurement in the event of the failure of the primary
radar gauges system.
Float Well
The float well comprises a 300mm diameter tube installed vertically within the
cargo pump tower. The upper end of the float well penetrates the top of the tank
dome where it terminates in a flange. The lower end extends to within 75mm
of the bottom of the tank where it is closed by a perforated plate. The lower
end of the float well is provided with a bolted inspection cover. Expansion is
allowed for by a sliding connection just below the dome penetration. To avoid
level errors caused by the ‘till well’ effect, there is a 25mm diameter hole
spaced every 300mm below the sliding connection.
Level Gauge Assembly
The level gauge assembly comprises the gauge head and float assembly. The
float is clamped to an accurately perforated tape manufactured from stainless
steel, a viscous damper to control the rate of descent of the float to the cargo
level, a crank for raising the float to the storage position and a mechanical read
out which is observed through the counter window. A float lock-up
arrangement provides isolation of the level gauge from the tank when in the
stored position. It also provides a gauge datum reference and a means of
locking the float in the storage position.
Operation: Gauging
a) Open the gauge isolating valve fully, (normally left open).
b) Put the crank handle in the STORED position, ie, with the handle
towards the gauge cover.
c) Put the spring-loaded automatic float lock-up and the datum
plunger up to release the float and allow it to descend at a
controlled rate to the liquid level.
To Return the Gauge to the Stored Position
a) Put the crank to the CRANKING position, ie, with the handle
outwards.
b) Carefully raise the float by turning the crank slowly in a counter
clockwise direction, as indicated by the arrow on the main cover
inspection plate.
c) Watch the read out counter, which will indicate when the float
nears the top. When resistance is felt by the float touching the
cushion spring, continue cranking until the plunger is seated,
sealing the gauge from the tank, and the automatic float lock-up
and datum plunger spring fully inward, securing the float.
Cargo Operating Manual
CAUTION
Do not attempt to turn the crank clockwise or to interfere with the free fall
of the float. To do so will severely damage the tape or the tensator spring.
Maintenance
The Whessoe system must be operated at regular intervals to ensure that the
system is available in the event of any failure of the primary tank contents
measuring system. The stored reading and error between the Whessoe system
and the custody transfer system should be recorded at each operation.
The float must not be left at liquid level after gauging because constant
movement of the tensator spring, which ensures tension on the tape, will lead
to premature failure.
An inspection hatch is provided in the float inspection chamber for access to
the float assembly and for retrieving the float in the event of tape breakage.
The gauge head is sealed with locking wire and lead seals by Class. It is
important to avoid damaging these seals. In the event of these seals being
broken, head office should be informed without delay in order that
arrangements can be made for the attendance of Class to check and re-seal the
gauges.
When the gauges are not in use, the float must be raised and secured.
An inspection housing is provided between the gauge head and the closure
valve on each unit. The closure valve is used to cut off vapour flow to the
inspection housing. The inspection housing is provided with a pipe connection
for inerting the space with nitrogen before inspection or renewal of the tape or
float. The nitrogen is supplied from the nitrogen line available at the tank dome
area and is introduced by means of a flexible pipe from outlet valve V2216 to
the Whessoe unit.
Tape Breakage
In the event of tape breakage, head office is to be informed, as any
maintenance requiring opening of the gauge will necessitate the attendance of
Class to recalibrate and seal the gauge to satisfy buyers, sellers and customs.
Instructions for the recovery and replacement of the float assembly or tape are
included in the manufacturer’s instruction book.
d) Check that the counter reads exactly the same before and after
use.
e) Move the crank handle to its STORAGE position.
Issue: 1
Section 4.82 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 4.8.3a Loading Computer Screen
Loadmaster LMC-6039 NORMAN LADY
: RY 0903
File View Tools Settings Window Help
Open
Save
Print
Stab
Cargo Compartment
Code
Stress
Comp
TP1 - TP2
D Surv
Crg Sat
Jul/16/03 12:15
L Sum
D Sum
X
Onl
Exit
Trim and List correction ON
Compartment name
X
X
Flow
(m3/h)
Cargo Type
Innage con.
(m)
Volume
(%)
Volume
(m3)
Temp.
( C)
Weight
(t air)
Obs. dens.
(t/m3 air)
FSM
(tm)
Max Volume
(m3)
LCG
(m)
TCG
(m)
C1
NO 1 CARGO TANK
Default Cargo
0.00
0.000
0.0
0.0
15.00
0.0
0.9989
0
15556.3
0.00
0.00
C2
NO 2 CARGO TANK
Default Cargo
0.00
0.000
0.0
0.0
15.00
0.0
0.9989
0
18953.2
0.00
0.00
C3
NO 3 CARGO TANK
Default Cargo
0.00
0.000
0.0
0.0
15.00
0.0
0.9989
0
18979.6
0.00
0.00
C4
NO 4 CARGO TANK
Default Cargo
0.00
0.000
0.0
0.0
15.00
0.0
0.9989
0
18950.4
0.00
0.00
C5
NO 5 CARGO TANK
Default Cargo
0.00
0.000
0.0
0.0
15.00
0.0
0.9989
0
15555.5
0.00
0.00
Cargo 0.0%
Ballast 0.0%
Fuel Oil 0.0%
Diesel Oil 0.0%
Lub. Oil 0.0%
Intact Stability
Fresh Water 0.0%
Dw
ton
0
Dry 0 ton
Longitudinal Strength - SEAGOING CONDITION
X
X
WARNING: Max GZ deq: IS OUT OF LIMIT
Misc. 0.0%
Max BM: 159703 tm at 99.54 m from AP
52616
X
X
Max SF: 2989 t at 36.60 m from AP
SF [Kton]
BM [Kton]
14.59 m
GM
18.78 m
8
dl wd
deq
1.97 m
3.68 m
4
100
daft
5.40 m
0
0
-4
-100
Trim
3.42 m aft
0.0 S.S
Heel
200
-200
-8
Visual
Intact
Displ.
Limits
Frame
GZ
Limits
50
59
63.5
68
Stress Curve
Displ
14.59 ton
DW
14.59 ton
Swd
Issue: 1
300
KG
14.59 ton/W
SEAGOING CONDITION
Max SF %
3
71
Max BM %
80
72.5
77
Stress Table
D fwd
1.97 m
Trim
3.42 m aft
KG
14.59 m
D mid
3.63 m
Heel
0.0 S.S
GM
18.78 m
D aft
5.43 m
81.5
86
-300
95
Stress curve %
Section 4.8.3 - Page 1 of 8
Norman Lady
4.8.3 Loading Computer
Maker:
Program:
Kockumation AB
Loadmaster
General
The Loadmaster program is computerised system for planning and evaluating
ship loading and discharge. It quickly calculates ship stability and stress
characteristics based on any loading condition specified by the user.
The program is developed from the technical information supplied by the
builders that reflects the physical characteristics of the ship. The information
includes the following data:
Principal particulars
Operating lightship
Load line data
During cargo operations the Loadmaster program constantly upgrades the
information. Prior to or during cargo operations the operator can check, using
manual inputs, that the sequence of loading or discharge will always remain
within the acceptable limits.
The Loadmaster program is run from Windows and as such is accessed via the
Windows menu bar at the top of the screen. In addition to the menu bar there
are two fixed display areas, the results bar and status bar (which cannot be
changed or hidden).
The results bar provides information on the current loading condition. This bar
is always visible on the far right hand side of the main window and is
continuously updated to reflect any changes in the loading condition.
The status bar is a single text line located at the bottom of the main window.
The program uses this space to display messages about the current status and
warnings about data entry.
Draught mark locations
In addition to the above there is the workspace, the area of the screen where
the different views of the load condition are displayed.
Visibility restriction data
General Program Operation
Cargo Operating Manual
Displaying accumulated weights for the subtotal categories
Use the horizontal scroll bar to see remaining field in the load types screen.
Definition of Load Types
Load type is a description of the current load based on information from the
trim and stability book. Several common load types are predefined. The
operator can define additional ones by using the load types codes A-D.
The following values are associated with each load type:
Upper Part of the Screen
Code:
The code is used in the cargo load that should be used in the
system to link a certain load type to each tank space
Name:
For the operator’s easy identification of the load type
Load category:
Predefined short name for load category
Hydrostatic tables
Cross curves of stability
Bonjean tables
Required GM curve
Capacity tables
Variable centre/free surface tables
Lightship weight distribution
Allowable bending moments and shear forces
The program allows for the loading condition information to be stored to disk.
These stored conditions can be recalled at any time for modification or reevaluation. In addition stored loading conditions can be sent ashore for review
on a shore based computer.
The Loadmaster system is an on-line stand alone computer with a direct
interface to the various tank and draught gauge systems and is linked to the
vessel’s DCS system. The Loadmaster system automatically reads the gauge
system data at specified intervals and calculates all the tank and vessel
characteristics. It is possible to vary the time of each update from 1 minute
intervals to 30 minutes.
Determination of load/discharge rates and projections of time to finish are
possible.
Issue: 1
LIQ for density input
Main Menu Bar
The layout of the main menu bar follows Windows conventions. The File,
Windows and Help items all provide selections consistent with other Windows
programs.
Procedure to Operate the Loadmaster
To Work with Load Types
In this part all the load types that should be used in the system are prepared.
Every tank, cargo compartment/position, store position etc. must have a load
type assigned to it. This assignment is done in the screens where its possible to
enter the weight, for example cargo tanks and Misc Tanks screens. For tanks,
density values are defined per load type.
OIL1 - OIL5 for density vac 15C/API 60ºF inputs
For load category LIQ
Density:
Current density value for the cargo
For load category OIL1 - OIL5
API 60F:
API value for liquid at 60ºF
Dens vac 15C: Density value for liquid in a vacuum at 15ºC
Lower Part of the Screen
Sub total:
Define to which subtotal category the weight shall be
summarised
Density:
Relevant only when the load load category has been set to
liquid
Weight:
Summary of the weight for the tanks and other cargo positions
with this load type
Volume:
Summary of the loaded volume for tanks with this load type
Max Volume:
Maximum available volume in tanks with this load type
Procedure to Access the Load Type Screen
a) Place the cursor on the load type key area and click the left mouse
button.
b) Press the F1 function key.
It is possible to work with following items in the load types screen.
Defining densities for the various loads
Section 4.8.3 - Page 2 of 8
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 4.8.3a Loading Computer Screen
Loadmaster LMC-6039 NORMAN LADY
: RY 0903
File View Tools Settings Window Help
Open
Save
Print
Stab
Cargo Compartment
Code
Stress
Comp
TP1 - TP2
D Surv
Crg Sat
Jul/16/03 12:15
L Sum
D Sum
X
Onl
Exit
Trim and List correction ON
Compartment name
X
X
Flow
(m3/h)
Cargo Type
Innage con.
(m)
Volume
(%)
Volume
(m3)
Temp.
( C)
Weight
(t air)
Obs. dens.
(t/m3 air)
FSM
(tm)
Max Volume
(m3)
LCG
(m)
TCG
(m)
C1
NO 1 CARGO TANK
Default Cargo
0.00
0.000
0.0
0.0
15.00
0.0
0.9989
0
15556.3
0.00
0.00
C2
NO 2 CARGO TANK
Default Cargo
0.00
0.000
0.0
0.0
15.00
0.0
0.9989
0
18953.2
0.00
0.00
C3
NO 3 CARGO TANK
Default Cargo
0.00
0.000
0.0
0.0
15.00
0.0
0.9989
0
18979.6
0.00
0.00
C4
NO 4 CARGO TANK
Default Cargo
0.00
0.000
0.0
0.0
15.00
0.0
0.9989
0
18950.4
0.00
0.00
C5
NO 5 CARGO TANK
Default Cargo
0.00
0.000
0.0
0.0
15.00
0.0
0.9989
0
15555.5
0.00
0.00
Cargo 0.0%
Ballast 0.0%
Fuel Oil 0.0%
Diesel Oil 0.0%
Lub. Oil 0.0%
Intact Stability
Fresh Water 0.0%
Dw
ton
0
Dry 0 ton
Longitudinal Strength - SEAGOING CONDITION
X
X
WARNING: Max GZ deq: IS OUT OF LIMIT
Misc. 0.0%
Max BM: 159703 tm at 99.54 m from AP
52616
X
X
Max SF: 2989 t at 36.60 m from AP
SF [Kton]
BM [Kton]
14.59 m
GM
18.78 m
8
dl wd
deq
1.97 m
3.68 m
4
100
daft
5.40 m
0
0
-4
-100
Trim
3.42 m aft
0.0 S.S
Heel
200
-200
-8
Visual
Intact
Displ.
Limits
Frame
GZ
Limits
50
59
63.5
68
Stress Curve
Displ
14.59 ton
DW
14.59 ton
Swd
Issue: 1
300
KG
14.59 ton/W
SEAGOING CONDITION
Max SF %
3
71
Max BM %
80
72.5
77
Stress Table
D fwd
1.97 m
Trim
3.42 m aft
KG
14.59 m
D mid
3.63 m
Heel
0.0 S.S
GM
18.78 m
D aft
5.43 m
81.5
86
-300
95
Stress curve %
Section 4.8.3 - Page 3 of 8
Norman Lady
Lmom:
Sum of the longitudinal moment for all compartments with
this load type
Vmom:
Sum of the vertical moment for all compartments with this
load type
Tmom:
Sum of the transversal moment for all compartments with this
load type
To Define the Subtotal Groups
A number of sub total groups are predefined, such as ballast, bunkers and
cargo.
Each subtotal group consists of one or many load types.
FS:
Sum of the free surface moment for all compartments with this
load type
a) Enter the name of a desired subtotal group in the subtotal field by
the load type.
Command Keys
Operating Procedure
Report:
To create a condition report
Enter the basic information such as the load category, density, temperature, etc
for all load types that are used in the system.
Print:
To print out different reports
To Alter the Load Category
a) Position the cursor in the highlighted load category field for the
desired load type.
b) Enter the value for the load category (Liq, OIL1-5).
Operator Defined Load Types
a) Position the cursor in highlighted name field for the load type
code A - D.
b) Enter the load type name.
c) Move the cursor to the next field.
d) Enter the relevant load category (Liq, OIL1-5).
(Note: In case of Liq, move the cursor to the right and define the density).
e) Select the tank that is to be used in the system and define for what
tank the new load type is relevant.
Issue: 1
API and Oil Categories
In order to obtain the unanimous results in the trade of petroleum products, it
is customary to refer to cargo density in vacuum at a fixed base temperature.
The tables prepared by the American Petroleum Institute (API) use for this
purpose 15ºC as the base temperature for density in a vacuum or 60ºF for its
equivalent the API gravity and cover the following oil categories:
Density at
15ºC
OIL1
Crude Oils
0.770 - 0.990
0 100
A
OIL2
Gasoline and naphthenes 0.657 - 0.770 50 - 85
B
Error messages are displayed in the bottom part of the screen. Press the ESC
key to confirm that the message has been read.
OIL3
Jet fuels and kerosines
0.785 - 0.825 37 - 50
B
OIL4
Diesel oil and fuel oils
0.812 - 1.075
0 - 37
B
Relationship Between Density Parameters
OIL5
Lubricating oils
0.861 - 0.940 12 - 22
D
To Define the Density of a Load Type
b) Enter the value for the density.
(Note: If the density value for a tank is online, the density input field is marked
with a * to indicate that the load type density is overruled by the online values.)
Load
Fluid Group
Category
Error Messages
a) Position the cursor in the high lighted density field for the desired
load type.
Cargo Operating Manual
Load Types Screen
The load category OIL1 - OIL5 determines which API formula is used and
calculates the current density at 0ºC (32ºF). This density will appear in the
cargo tanks screen at start up.
The density will, however, not appear in the load types screen because different
tanks labelled with the same load category may have different temperatures
and consequently, different densities.
If the load catagory LIQ is used, the fields for API, Tot vol 60ºF etc are
removed.
Cargo Tanks Screen
For the load category OIL1 - OIL5 the API value from the load types screen,
together with the temperature value for the tanks, is used to calculate the
current density.
For the load category LIQ the current density is not affected by the temperature
value.
In both cases the current density value may be changed directly for a
compartment by moving the cursor to the density column and pressing manual
key. This will lead to an asterisk (*) appearing at all values affected by the
density.
API at
60ºF
Corresponding
to Table
Method
The full range of petroleum measurement tables and the associated formulas
have been programmed into the Loadmaster program. The vacuum and
atmospheric pressure results can thus been reviewed instantly if the current
cargo temperature and any of the following are known:
Density in a vacuum at 15ºC
API at 60ºF
Density in air.
For each load type, a load category can be defined for different input/output
facilities for the compartment using that load type.
When defining load categories OIL1 to OIL5 enter API or density in a vacuum
values that, together with an entered compartment temperature, will produce
the actual density for the load.
To Work with On-Line Cargo Tanks
This section contains the current information for all on-line cargo tanks.
Concerning on-line and API, refer to ONLINE OPERATION (tab 3). The
complete condition is calculated after each entry.
Section 4.8.3 - Page 4 of 8
Norman Lady
The values displayed for each tank are:
Name:
Name of tank
Load Type Code:
Refer to the Load Type picture for finding the code on
the Load Type with the properties of the content in
tank.
Command Keys Available
Online:
To choose online work area as current mode and update from
the tank radar system every 30 seconds
Offline:
To choose off-line work area as current mode
Cargo Operating Manual
The tank levels and temperatures, as measured by the tank radar system, are
updated every 30 seconds in the online mode or at the operator’s request when
Onlupd is chosen in the command keys.
The current tank levels are used in the online load calculations.
The value for density associated to selected Load
Type Code will be displayed. This value may be
overwritten by the operator.
Onlupd:
To update on request all online values
A red letter is displayed in case of a sensor failure and the tank values will not
be updated by the tank radar system.
On-tk:
To connect a specified compartment to online environment
Online values may be entered manually in the event of a sensor failure.
The operator can choose to enter any of these values
and the others will be calculated with reference to
entered value.
Man-tk:
To disconnect a specified compartment from online
environment
Tanks changed to manual input will be indicated with M and not be updated by
tank radar system.
Defaul:
Reset to predefined value for KG, FS or TCG after a manual
modification
The online load condition may be copied to the offline mode via the store
condition in online and the fetch condition in offline. The copy procedure can
also be performed in the other direction from offline to online.
Repor:
To create a Condition Report
Operating Procedure
Print:
To print different Reports
Define the content in each tanks as follows.
Error Messages
Density:
Weight, Volume,
Ullage, Sounding,
Percent fill:
KG, TCG, LCG, FS: These values are displayed from predefined curves
(KG and FS) or as fix values(TCG and LCG), but can
manually be changed by the operator.
Online Gauging
a) Position the cursor in the highlighted field Weight, Volume,
Percent Fill or level (sounding or ullage).
Error messages are displayed in the bottom line of the screen. To confirm that
a message has been read, press the ESC key.
b) Enter the current value.The condition is calculated after each
entry.
Loadmaster Online to the Tank Radar
To modify the predefined values for KG, FS, TCG or LCG.
a) Position the cursor in the field which needs to be modified.
b) Enter desired value and press ENTER. The background colour
will change when the cursor is moved to a new position.
To change to the predefined value for KG, FS, TCG or LCG after a manual
modification.
a) Position the cursor in the field which needs to be predefined. This
field will have a coloured background.
b) Place the cursor on the Defaul key area and click on the mouse
left button or use SHIFT + F6.
Online values may be entered manually in the event of a sensor failure.
Sensor errors are indicated with a red letter :
The Loadmaster has two working modes, online and offline. They should be
seen as two separate working areas that are totally independent of one another.
In the ONLINE mode, all the online tanks are updated automatically or at the
operator’s request, but in the OFFLINE mode each input must be made
manually.
Data exchange between the two working modes is performed via the Stored
Condition screen. In the current mode the present condition is stored and it can
be accessed in the other mode.
(Note: When operating in OFFLINE, the program is still collecting data e.g.
levels in the background. If any warning limits are exceeded an alert message
will be issued to the operator even though the program is working in OFFLINE
mode.)
Working with inputs are described on the previous pages.
Online Supervision
Screens and commands are similar to those in the offline mode.
Issue: 1
The loadmaster online loading calculation program allows level, temperatures,
level rate and density values supplied by tank radar system to be collected.
L
=
Online level not available
D
=
Online density not available
T
=
Online temperature not available
A
=
More then one of the above mentioned error indications
No online updating is then performed.
From the measured levels and keyboard input, the Loadmaster program is
continuously calculating stresses and stability.
(Note: The levels collected from the tank radar system are corrected for trim
and list. Therefore it is of great importance that all items which are not gauged
are entered manually in a corrected way.)
(Note: The online temperatures displayed are used in the calculations. For
correct weight calculations it is important to make a correct keyboard input
into the LOADTYPE screen, to define a correct API/density for the tanks that
do not have density or/and temperature online.)
Section 4.8.3 - Page 5 of 8
Norman Lady
It is also important to define the correct sea water density in the observations
screen.
g) Place the cursor on the ON-TK key area to resume the automatic
online updating and press the mouse left button or press CTRL +
F4.
Cargo Operating Manual
a) Position the cursor in the field whose values are to be modified.
b) Enter the desired value and press the ENTER key.
Online Tank Screen
Some of the online screens include the following special commands.
This will disconnect the online input for the current item. The corresponding
yellow letter will disappear in the second column to indicate that the current
values are based on the online input.
1. To manual request to update the tank radar value:
Toggle between the manual or online input for each compartment.
2. Optional:
Online temperature information.
Procedure for a Manual Request to Update the Tank Radar Values
a) Place the cursor on the ONLUPD key area.
b) Press the mouse left button or press CTRL + F3 to update all
online values.
Procedure to Toggle Between the Manual or Online Input for each
Compartment.
a) Change to a MANUAL input.
b) Place the cursor into the level, weight, volume, density or
temperature field to prepare for a status change. The level, weight
and volume fields are the same tank radar input.
c) Place the cursor on the MAN-TK key area (manual input for the
above chosen tank value) and press the left mouse button or press
CTRL + F5.
This will disconnect the online input for the current item. A yellow letter will
appear in the second column to indicate that the current values are based on
manual input. L = level, weight or volume, D = density, T = temperature, M =
more than one of L, D or T are closed for a manual input.
d) Enter a suitable value.
e) Change to online input.
f) Place the cursor in the level, weight, volume, density or
temperature field to prepare for a status change. The level, weight
and volume fields are the same tank radar input.
To make a manual update ONLUPD, follow the instructions above or wait for
30 seconds to receive the latest online values.
Ballast and Miscellaneous Tanks
This screen displays the contents in all the tanks and the complete condition is
calculated after each entry.
Some of the values displayed for each tank are:
a) Position the cursor in the field whose value is to be set to
predefined. This field has a coloured background.
b) Place the cursor on the Defaul key area and click on the left
mouse button or use SHIFT + F6.
The following command keys are available.
To obtain a predefined (=default) value back for the selected
KG, FS or TCG, whichever is selected.
Refer to the Load Type picture for finding the code on
the Load Type with the properties of the content in
tank.
Repor:
To create a condition report.
Print:
To print different reports.
The value for density associated to the selected load
type code will be displayed. This value may be
overwritten by the operator.
Error Messages
Name of tank
Load Type Code:
Weight, Volume,
Ullage, Sounding,
Percent fill:
The operator can choose to enter any of these values
and the others will be calculated with reference to
entered value.
KG, TCG, LCG, FS:
These values are stored as curves (KG and FS) or as
fixed values(TCG and LCG), but may be overwritten
by the operator.
Operating Procedures
To define the contents in the tanks
For each tank
a) Position the cursor in the highlighted field, Weight or Volume or
Percent Fill or level (sounding or ullage).
b) Enter the value. The condition is calculated after each entry.
To modify the predefined values for KG, FS, TCG or LCG.
Issue: 1
To change to a predefined value for KG, FS, TCG or LCG back after a manual
modification.
Defaul:
Name:
Density:
The background colour will change when the cursor is moved to a new
position.
Error messages are displayed in the bottom line of the screen. To confirm that
a message has been read, press the ESC key.
Stability
This picture shows the GZ-curve, analysis of the curve and GZ-table.
No entries are possible in this picture.
Stress Bars
The calculated shear forces and bending moments are displayed in tabular
form. The shear forces and bending moments as a percentage of allowed limits
are also displayed as bars. The shear forces and bending moments as a
percentage are also displayed as curves in the stress curve screen.
(Note: There are different colours for shear forces and bending moments in the
bar graph, blue = bending moments, red = shear forces.)
The locations at which the stress is calculated are prescribed by the
classification society and the frame numbers are displayed both in the table and
on the x-axis of the bar graph.
Section 4.8.3 - Page 6 of 8
Norman Lady
Operating Procedures
a) Select the seagoing condition or the harbour condition.
b) Click the relevant button to select the set of limits not currently in
use.
Cargo Operating Manual
Observation of Current Condition
Error Messages
The discrepancy between current condition (left side of the screen) and manual
gauged draughts (right side of the screen) is displayed in the lower part of the
screen.
Error messages are displayed in the bottom line of the screen. Press the ESC
key to confirm that a message has been read.
Conditions
Operating Procedures
(Note: If the size of the bars and the values in the table change, the % values
for the limits for the shear forces and the bending moments will also change.)
To change the sea water density
Stress Curve
a) Position the cursor in the field for the sea water density.
The calculated shear forces and bending moments compared with the limits
defined by the classification society are displayed both in tabular form and as
curves. More information on absolute values and also on the limits are found
in the Stress Bars screen.
b) Enter the actual value for the sea water density and press the
ENTER key.
(Note: There are different colours for shear forces and bending moments in the
bar graph, blue = bending moments, red = shear forces.)
The locations at which the stress is calculated are prescribed by the
classification society and the frame numbers are displayed both in the table and
on the x-axis of the curves.
When the sea density is changed the program will make a new calculation of
the current condition.
To store the present load condition, to transfer an already stored condition or
to clear a stored condition.
The conditions stored in the end of the list are used for the classification
society’s reference. They may be transferred but they cannot be cleared by the
operator.
By using the functions in this screen the operator is able to obtain a start
condition very quickly.
Operating Procedure
Procedure to Compare the Calculated Draughts against the Gauged
Draughts
The draughts of the current condition are displayed on the left side of the
screen and are based on whatever entries have been made by the operator or
transferred from the tank gauging/automation system.
Operating Procedures
To store current the condition.
a) Position the cursor in the highlighted field Condition Name.
b) Enter an appropriate name for the later easy identification of the
condition.
a) Select the seagoing condition or the harbour condition.
a) Enter the actual sea water density in the list in the upper left
corner of the screen.
c) Position the cursor in the desired Condition Number.
b) Click the relevant button to select the set of limits not currently in
use.
b) Enter the gauged draughts and the corresponding locations in the
area of the screen called the manually gauged draughts.
d) Place the cursor on the store key area and click the mouse left
button.
(Note: If the size of the bars and the values in the table change, the % values
for the limits for the shear forces and the bending moments will also change.)
e) Press the function SHIFT key and the F2 key.
Result
Observations
The discrepancy (if any) between the current condition and the manually
gauged draughts will be displayed in the bottom of the screen.
This screen is used to define sea water density, warning limits for draughts
deadweight and to observe the condition of the ship.
If they are different it may be that an unknown weight or inaccurate sea water
density has been entered.
Warnings will be issued when any of the calculated results exceed the
corresponding limit value.
The following command keys are available.
To transfer an already stored condition
a) Position the cursor in the desired Condition Number.
b) Place the cursor on the store key area and click the mouse left
button.
c) Press the function SHIFT key and the F1 key.
Defaul:
To obtain a predefined (default) value back for the selected
KG, FS or TCG, whichever is selected.
Repor:
To create a condition report.
Print:
To print different reports.
(Note: The current condition in the Loadmaster will be replaced by transferred
condition.)
To clear a stored condition.
a) Position cursor in the desired Condition Number.
Issue: 1
Section 4.8.3 - Page 7 of 8
Norman Lady
b) Place the cursor on the store key area and click the mouse left
button.
Cargo Operating Manual
Procedure to View the File
a) Select FILE from the menu bar.
c) Press the function SHIFT key and the F3 key.
b) Select OPEN.
Quick Start
c) Enter the file name:C:\u\sml\XXXX\rep\rcndrep.txt
Define all weights considered as being permanent (small tanks in engine room,
stores, workshops etc.) and store the condition as described above. Give the
condition an appropriate name, eg Start Condition Summer Voyages. A number
of such conditions can be defined. Proceed using the start instructions.
Only cargo needs to be defined.
Command Keys
Fetch:
Store:
Condition marked by the cursor will be transferred and
replaces a previous condition in Loadmaster.
Present condition in the Loadmaster will be stored in
Condition Number marked by the cursor. Number 0-3 cannot
be used, since they are only used for the classification
society’s reference.
Repor:
To create a Condition Report.
Print:
To print different reports.
Error Messages
Error messages are displayed in the bottom part of the screen. Press the ESC
key to confirm that the message has been read.
Reports
There are two types of reports, an ullage report and a report on the vessel’s
condition.
XXXX is the identification number of the Loadmaster software.
a) Press the PRINT key if a printed copy is required.
To Generate an Ullage Report
This report can only be created from the UllAPI screen. The corresponding
function key is called REPOR.
The ships quantity reports will be stored in a predefined directory under the
name Ullrep.txt.
Procedure to View the File
a) Select FILE from the menu bar.
b) Select OPEN.
c) Enter the file name:C:\u\sml\XXXX\rep\rcndrep.txt
XXXX is the identification number of the Loadmaster software.
Procedure to Print a Report
a) Select the desired file.
b) Press the PRINT key.
The PRINT key can be used in several screens.
Procedure to Generate a Condition Report
From a large number of screens, the condition report can be created, using the
REPOR function key.
The report will be stored in a predefined directory under the name rcndrep.txt.
Issue: 1
Section 4.8.3 - Page 8 of 8
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 4.9.1a Ballast and Void Spaces Gas Sampling System
HC. GAS SAMPLING SYSTEM OGS 3.0/16
FOR BALLAST AND VOID SPACES
1
2
1. STEAM LNG HEATERS
2. UPPER FUNNEL
3. DOUBLE GAS PIPE
4. TOP OF LIFTSHAFT
5. 1ST PLATFORM PORT
6. 1ST PLATFORM STBD
7. LABORATORY
8. WORKSHOP
9. ENGINE CONTROL ROOM
10. INNER BOTTOM
11. BOILER CASING PS
12. BOILER CASING SS
13. CARGO CONTROL ROOM
14. SPARE
15. SPARE
16. SPARE
LOW GAS ALARM
3
HIGH GAS ALARM
Key
ACCEPTED
FLOW FAIL
ACCEPTED
DISCONNECTED
ACTIVE
DIS/RECONNECT
1. Type and Number of Sampling Points
2. Sample Points in Full Text
3. LED Colour and Function Legend
4. LCD Display 2 x 20 Characters
5. Dis/Reconnect Switch
6. Mode Selector
7. Manual Selector
8. Sample Point Selector
9. Accept Alarm Button
10. Reset Alarm Button
11. Buzzer
12. Power Reset
13. Lamp Test Button
14. On/Off Switch
5
4
AUTOMATIC
6
PURGE
(DIM)
UP
7
MANUAL
CALIBRATION
DOWN
SAMPLE
(DIM)
SAMPLE
POINT
8
SELECTOR
ACCEPT
ALARM
RESET
ALARM
BUZZER
GAS IN CAB.
PWR. RESET
LAMP
TEST
ON/OFF
9
10
11
12
13
14
OMICRON
TONSBERG - NORWAY
Issue: 1
Section 4.9.1 - Page 1 of 4
Norman Lady
4.9
Gas Detection Systems
4.9.1 Fixed Gas Detection Systems
Accommodation and Machinery Spaces Detection System
Maker:
Type:
Omicron
OGS 3.0/16
Introduction
The OGS 3 gas detector is based on the measurement of infrared radiation
passing through a volume of gas. The OGS 3 employs a dual beam, dual
wavelength measuring principle with separate optical detectors.
Different types of gas have unique absorption spectra and can be easily
identified by proper selection of the infrared wavelength at which absorption
is measured. Radiation at another wavelength measures the overall
transmission through the optical system and in the air volume.
By comparing the transmission of the two wavelengths, the gas concentration
in the air is determined. Selecting a wavelength with the unique characteristic
of a particular gas prevents other types of gas present in the sample activating
the detector and giving false alarms.
Radiation from two infrared sources passes through two narrow banded filters
selecting a measuring wavelength and a reference wavelength. Radiation is
divided by a beamsplitter into an external and internal path. The external path
is viewed by the measuring (main) detector which detects if the selected gas is
present. The internal path is viewed by the compensation detector, this
monitors and compensates for any drift in the infrared source or detectors.
The four signals, two from each of the detectors, are amplified, digitised and
fed into a microprocessor. The microprocessor calculates the gas concentration
and the results are presented as either a voltage, a current or a digital output
signal. Internal signals are compared with test limits to monitor the electronics
and optical parts and if values outside the test limits are detected specific error
messages are displayed.
The system is situated on the bridge and the sampling sequence is
automatically controlled by solenoid selection valves, with the sampled gas
being drawn into the panel by pumps, before passing over the infrared gas
analyser. The unit has a cycle time of 15 minutes.
If the methane concentration of any sample point reaches 30% lower explosive
limit LEL, an audible alarm is sounded and the corresponding indicator lamp
is lit on the panel.
Issue: 1
Sample Point
Cargo Operating Manual
Boil-Off Gas to the Boiler Pipe Vent Duct System
Location
1
Steam exhaust from steam/LNG heater
2
Upper funnel
3
Ventilating duct: gas pipe to boilers
4
Top of lift shaft
5
First platform: port side
6
First platform: starboard side
7
Laboratory on 3rd platform
8
Workshop on 2nd platform
9
Engine Control Room on 3rd platform
10
Inner bottom
11
Boiler casing: port
12
Boiler casing: starboard
13
Cargo control room
Maker:
Type:
Omicron
OGS 21/1 IR
This system panel is situated on the bridge and continiously monitors a sample
from the vent duct surrounding the boil-off gas pipe to the boilers.
If the methane concentration of any sample point reaches 30% LEL, an audible
alarm is sounded and the corresponding indicator lamp is lit on the panel.
If the methane concentration of any sample point reaches 50% LEL, an audible
alarm is sounded, the corresponding indicator lamp is lit on the panel and the
main gas valve V2140 is tripped.
Illustration 4.9.1b Boil-Off Gas Pipe Vent Duct Gas Sampling System
GAS
1
DETECTOR
3
4
RESET
ALARM
5
DOUBLE
% HC.
L.E.L.
HIGH GAS ALARM
2
SYSTEM FAILURE
LOW GAS ALARM
ALARM
ACCEPT
ALARM
IN
PIPE
HYDROCARBON
SENSOR
ACCEPTED
2
LAMP
TEST
BUZZER
6
Key
7
1. Sample Point in Full Text
2. LED Colour and Function Legend
3. LCD Display - % Hydrocarbon
4. Accept Alarm Button
5. Reset Alarm Button
6. Buzzer
7. Blank
8. Lamp Test Button
9. On/Off Switch
ON/OFF
8
9
OMICRON
TONSBERG - NORWAY
LOW GAS ALARM = 30 %
HIGH GAS ALARM AND GAS TO ENGINE TRIP = 50 %
Section 4.9.1 - Page 2 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 4.9.1c Cargo Areas Gas Sampling System
Key
HC. GAS SAMPLING SYSTEM OGS 3.0/32
FOR BALLAST AND VOID SPACES
1
2
1. TOP VOID 1
2. BILGEWELL VOID 1
3. UPPER INS. VOID 1
4. LOWER INS. VOID 1
5. TOP VOID 2
6. BILGEWELL VOID 2
7. UPPER INS. VOID 2
8. LOWER INS. VOID 2
9. TOP VOID 3
10. BILGEWELL VOID 3
11. UPPER INS. VOID 3
12. LOWER INS. VOID 3
13. TOP VOID 4
14. BILGEWELL VOID 4
15. UPPER INS. VOID 4
16. LOWER INS. VOID 4
17. TOP VOID 5
18. BILGEWELL VOID 5
19. UPPER INS. VOID 5
20. LOWER INS. VOID 5
21. FWD PUMP VOID T/B
22. STORE ROOM FCSL
23. DRYER VOID ATM
24. LNG COMPR. ROOM
25. CARGO CONTROL ROOM
26. LPG COMPR. ROOM
27. LPG EL. ROOM
28. LPG EL. RM AIRLOCK
29. CCR AIRLOCK
30. SPARE
31. SPARE
32. SPARE
LOW GAS ALARM
1. Type and Number of Sampling Points
2. Sample Points in Full Text
3. LED Colour and Function Legend
4. LCD Display 2 x 20 Characters
5. Dis/Reconnect Switch
6. Mode Selector
7. Manual Selector
8. Sample Point Selector
9. Accept Alarm Button
10. Reset Alarm Button
11. Buzzer
12. Power Reset
13. Lamp Test Button
14. On/Off Switch
Upper Void
Insulation
Upper
Insulation
Void
Nitrogen
Bleed
Rupture Disc
Removed
HIGH GAS ALARM
Lower
Insulation
Void
ACCEPTED
Rupture Disc
3
FLOW FAIL
ACCEPTED
DISCONNECTED
ACTIVE
DIS/RECONNECT
5
4
AUTOMATIC
6
PURGE
SAMPLE
POINT
Skirt
8
Polystyrene
Insulation with
Stainless Steel
Cover
Leakage Pipes
CALIBRATION
9
UP
7
MANUAL
ACCEPT
ALARM
(DIM)
DOWN
SAMPLE
RESET
ALARM
10
BUZZER
11
(DIM)
GAS IN CAB.
PWR. RESET
12
LAMP
TEST
13
SELECTOR
ON/OFF
Catch Basin
14
Rupture
Disc
Bilge Well
OMICRON
Location of Cargo Area Gas Detection Points: Cargo Tank No.1
Key
Gas Detection Point
TONSBERG - NORWAY
Issue: 1
Section 4.9.1 - Page 3 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Areas Gas Detection System
Maker:
Type:
Omicron
OGS 3.0/32
Cargo Operating Manual
(Note: Sample position No.21, the emergency fire pump room has a three way
valve on the forward deckhouse. The valve must be in the top position when
the cargo is LNG and in the bottom position when the cargo is LPG.)
A separate gas detection system is set to givean alarm at a 30% LEL in the
cargo hold and miscellaneous areas listed below. The control unit is similar in
operation to the accommodation and machinery spaces gas detection system.
The control unit is situated in the cargo control room. The unit has a cycle time
of 36 minutes.
Sample Point
Location
1
Top of void space above cargo tank No.1
2
Bilge well at bottom of cargo tank No.1 void space
3
Drain pipe from cargo tank No.1 insulation space
4
Nitrogen outlet from cargo tank No.1 wedge space
5
Top of void space above cargo tank No.2
6
Bilge well at bottom of cargo tank No.2 void space
7
Drain pipe from cargo tank No.2 insulation space
8
Nitrogen outlet from cargo tank No.2 wedge space
9
Top of void space above cargo tank No.3
10
Bilge well at bottom of cargo tank No.3 void space
11
Drain pipe from cargo tank No.3 insulation space
12
Nitrogen outlet from cargo tank No.3 wedge space
13
Top of void space above cargo tank No.4
14
Bilge well at bottom of cargo tank No.4 void space
15
Drain pipe from cargo tank No.4 insulation space
16
Nitrogen outlet from cargo tank No.4 wedge space
17
Top of void space above cargo tank No.5
18
Bilge well at bottom of cargo tank No.5 void space
19
Drain pipe from cargo tank No.5 insulation space
20
Nitrogen outlet from cargo tank No.5 wedge space
21
Top and bottom of forward fire pump room
22
Bosun’s store upper level
23
By atmospheric heater - LNG compressor room
24
LNG compressor room
26
Local cargo control room - air lock
Issue: 1
Section 4.9.1 - Page 4 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 4.9.2a Portable Gas Detectors
OX-226/227
For O2 in Air and Inert
Use: All Areas. O2 in Tanks
GX-7
For O2 and % LEL in Air
Use: All Areas Prior to Entry
NP-237M
For HC % VCL and % LEL
Use: Gas Freeing. HC in Inert
ALARM
COMB ALARM
OXYGEN MONITOR
OXYGEN ALARM
FLOW INDICATOR
VOL% ZERO %LEL
IN
ZERO
GX-2001B
For HC % LEL, O2, H2S
Personal Protection
RIKEN KEIKI
20
40
60
80
0
100
20
40
60
0
% O2
40
20
80
BATT.
OFF
CHG.
60
0
100
SPAN GAS INLET
80
100
%LEL
BATT
.
100
20
+
OXYGEN
CAL ADJ.
-
+
Issue: 1
O2
BATT
CHECK.
OFF
COMB O2
SPAN
CO2 PREP
CO2
MEAS
0
2
4
12
60
6
16
80
20
1
100
O2
B
BATT.
(PUSH)
8
BATT
.
10
% LEL
100
10
OUT
RIKEN KEIKI
%LEL
8
40
4
20
0
ALARM RESET
RIKEN KEIKI
O2
0
% LEL
METER LIGHT
COMB
ZERO ADJ.
-
TOXIC GAS
DETECT.
%LEL
RIKEN KEIKI
GX-7
%VOL %LEL
MODEL NP-237H
HC % LEL + O2 + H2S
Section 4.9.2 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
4.9.2 Portable Gas Detection Instruments
The portable gas detection equipment on board is both comprehensive and well
proven. Each instrument is certificated and comes with manufacturer’s
operating instructions and recommended spares and test kits. The certificates
are to be suitably filed and the monthly tests recorded.
Oxygen Meter/Analyser
Maker:
Model:
No. of sets:
Riken
OX-226
1
The instruments are stored in the ship’s computer room on the main deck
accommodation.
The ship carries two personal oxygen meters for the testing of the atmosphere
in tanks that have been gas freed before tank entry. An O2 detector head with
extension cable line can be fitted into the bayonet fitting on top of the unit for
testing of the cargo and ballast tank atmosphere prior to entry.
Hydrocarbon and LEL Detector
Operation and calibration instructions are printed on the rear of the unit.
Maker:
Model:
No. of sets:
The use of the equipment and any maintenance carried out should be logged in
the appropriate file in the ship’s computer room.
Riken
NP-237H
2
The ship carries two Riken portable combustible detectors designed for the
measurement of hydrocarbon gas/vapour % concentration and % LEL during
purging and gas freeing. Normal operating instructions are carried inside the
cover of each unit with additional instructions detailed in the manufacturer’s
handbook.
On a monthly basis, each unit should be tested for gas sensitivity with the span
gas test sampling bags which are stored in the ship’s computer room.
The use of the equipment and any maintenance carried out should be logged in
the appropriate file in the ship’s computer system.
Personal Multi-gas Analyser
Maker:
Model:
Type:
No. of sets:
Riken
GX-2001
H2S, O2 and HC LEL%
2
The ship carries two Riken GX-2001 personal H2S ppm and O2 % detectors
which are designed to be clipped to the clothing of the operator. Operation and
calibration instructions are printed on the inside of the stowage container.
The use of the equipment and any maintenance carried out should be logged in
the appropriate file in the ship’s computer room.
Issue: 1
Cargo Operating Manual
Oxygen Meter/Analyser
Maker:
Model:
No. of sets:
Riken
GX-7
1
The ship carries two oxygen meters for the testing of the atmosphere in tanks
that have been gas freed before tank entry. An O2 detector head with extension
cable line can be fitted into the bayonet fitting on top of the unit for testing of
the cargo and ballast tank atmosphere prior to entry.
Automatic Dew Point Meter/Analyser
Maker:
No. of sets:
Shaw
2
Dew Point Meter/Analyser
The ship carries two dew point meters to measure the moisture in air or gas
samples with positive pressure. The battery powered hygrometer indicates both
dew point temperatures and water vapour to less than one part per million, on
the large meter dial. As the reading is specific to water vapour, calibration is
accurate for different gases.
The dew point meters are sent ashore every twelve months for reconditioning
and recalibration.
Section 4.9.2 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
Illustration 4.10.1a Cargo Valve Remote Control System
Cargo Operating Manual
Remote Control Of Cargo Valves
I
SVC Closed
Signal/Indication
I
SVC Open
Signal/Indication
P
P
Actuator
To Engine Room
Instrument Air
System
Alumine Active
PI
Air Dryers
To
Quick Closing
Valves
Panel
To
CO2
Alarm
PI
PI
7psi
LNG Compressors/
Cargo Heaters/
Vaporizers Control Air
PI
V1438
ESD System
V3002
PI
AL
PI
To
Engine Room
Working Air
System
To Deck
Working Air
System
To
Working Air
Receiver
V1433
V3000
V3000
V3000
V3000
Power Air 8.8 bar
Cargo Instrument Air Receiver
LNG Compressor Room
(1.5m3)
PI
2
V1432
V3001
Power Air
8.8 bar
ESD Emergency Air Circuit
Air Receiver
(4m3)
Drain
Remote Control Of Throttling Valves
V1431
V1424
0 - 100%
P
I
SVC Position
Feedback/Indicator
XE111
V1424
ESD Shutdown
Signal
Drain
PC
3
PCV
3
HC
3
XC
3
SA
3
SI SI
3A 3B
Type
235
Automatic Drain
SA
5
Drain
Quincy
Instrument Air Compressors
Close
FCV126
To
Working Air
System
PC
3
SVC Order
Signal
PCAL
168
HC
5
XC
5
PC
5A
SI SI
5B 5A
PC
5B
Type
245
PCV
5
Open
Control Pneumatics, Solenoids,
Pressure Transducers and Converters
are located in Panels adjacent to the
Cargo Tank Domes
Power Air
For Cargo Valves
Key
Power Air 8.8 bar
Power Air 8.8 bar
Air
Electrical Signal
ESD Emergency Air Circuit
Instrumentation
Issue: 1
Section 4.10.1 - Page 1 of 4
Norman Lady
4.10
Valve Remote Control and Emergency Shutdown System
The Emergency Shutdown System (ESD) is designed to ensure a controlled
shutdown of cargo equipment both ashore and on the ship to avoid any unsafe
conditions arising. It is essential that the machinery is stopped and valves
closed in the correct order to avoid any pressure surges ashore or on board.
In the event that the ship accidentally moves away from the jetty, it is of the
utmost importance that all plant is stopped to allow emergency disconnection
without the risk of LNG spillage.
The valve remote control system and the ESD system are both operated by
pneumatic air fed from the cargo instrument air system. This system is itself
fed from the main instrument air system.
Compressed air is supplied to this system from whichever of the three
instrument compressors is/are selected for duty. The compressor(s) will cut in
and out automatically according to the air pressure in the instrument air
receiver. The instrument air receiver has an outlet valve, which feeds the cargo
instrument air system via a system of filters and dryers to ensure the quality of
the compressed air.
The instrument air receiver, filters and dryers are located in the engine room.
The cargo instrument air receiver is located in the LNG compressor room.
Cargo Tank High Level Shut-off System
Cargo Operating Manual
4.10.1 Cargo Valve Remote Control System
Cargo Valve Operation
Type:
The cargo valves are normally closed. To open a valve, the valve’s control
circuit is pressurised by the opening of the solenoid operated control valve in
the pneumatic valve panel. This action is initiated by the operator selecting the
open command via the DCS system. These valves are situated at the cargo tank
dome or at a convenient location close to the actual valve. The control air
pressure opens a pilot valve for the supply of working air to the actuator and
the cargo valve opens.
Pneumatic/electronic
The actuator air system supplies air to all cargo valve actuators. Air is supplied
from the instrument air compressors at 8.8 bar. The air is filtered, dried and
stored in a 1.5m3 receiver, located in the LNG compressor room. After this
receiver there is one pipe for the supply of power air for the actuators and one
pipe for the rest of the pneumatic control system. The last pipe is branched into
the emergency air, control air and instrument air circuits.
Actuator Air
The valves take approximately 10 seconds to open and 15 seconds to close.
The cargo valves are closed by releasing the control air circuit by the control
valve.
This air system supplies air to all the actuators. The air supply is controlled by
a 3-way valve, FCV 126. This valve will open for the power air supply when
the emergency air circuit is pressurised. If the emergency loop pressure is
released, this valve will open to atmosphere and the actuator air will vent off.
The valves in the cargo discharge and spray pump lines close automatically
when the pump motors stop. This arrangement contains a pneumatic time relay,
which after a delay time will enable these cargo valves to be operated again.
The remotely operated shut-off valves at the crossovers and the dome
connections are fitted with air return actuators. The actuators on the throttling
valves in the loading lines control the variable valve position, enabling remote
flow control of the loading rate.
A detailed description of the valve operation follows after the cargo gate valve
illustration (4.10.1b) overleaf.
The control air circuit for each actuator is pressurised with air by hand operated
3-way valves to the shut off cargo valves and spring loaded valves to the filling
pipe throttling valves.
The cargo tanks each have an independent high level alarm and shut-off
function which works independently. The shut-off function is connected to the
Omicron high level alarm system (see section 4.1.3 for further details). When
the liquid level in the tank reaches a position equal to 99.2% full by volume, a
signal is sent to the tank loading valve remote control system to close the valve
automatically. When this valve is activated, red warning lights will flash and
an alarm horn will sound on deck.
A prewarning alarm is sounded when the tank volume reaches 95%. This
activates an alarm in the CCR and an alarm horn with a different tone from
above will sound on deck, accompanied by an orange flashing warning light.
The reset for this system is at the DCS system control console in the cargo
control room. For further details, see section 4.1.3, high level alarm and
overfill system.
Issue: 1
Section 4.10.1 - Page 2 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 4.10.1b Cargo Gate Valve
Pneumatic Gate Valve Closed: Actuator Opening
Pneumatic Gate Valve Open: Actuator Closing
Open Stroke Limit Valve
Access for
Emergency
Jacking
Of Piston
Limit Valve
Open Stroke Limit Valve Seat
O Ring
O Ring
Accumulator
Chamber
Spindle
Piston Seals
Key
Compressed Air
Exhaust
Exhaust Port
to Atmosphere
Open Stroke Limit Valve
Non-Return Valves
From Control Valve
Spring
3 Way
Differential Valve
Exhaust
Spring
Opening Speed
Adjustment
Needle Valve
3 Way
Differential Valve
Closing Speed
Adjustment Needle Valve
Issue: 1
Section 4.10.1 - Page 3 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Gate Valve Pneumatic Actuator Operation
Closing
(See illustration 4.10.1b)
Opening
The operator selects the CLOSE command from the DCS system valve
operation menu. The system opens another solenoid operated control valve for
that valve and the compressed air in the control line is exhausted.
The operator selects the OPEN command from the DCS system valve
operation menu. The system opens the solenoid operated control valve for that
valve and compressed air fills the accumulator chamber via non-return valve
B. This valve prevents the air from being exhausted.
The three-way differential slide valve, located at the bottom left of the unit,
moves to the right via the action of the spring and the drop in air pressure. This
opens the port to supply air from the accumulator chamber to the top of the
piston chamber which forces the piston down, closing the gate valve.
The air also enters the piston chamber via non-return valve A, through the port
immediately above the valve. This lifts the piston when the air pressure reaches
a level high enough to overcome the friction of the piston seals.
The closing speed is regulated by the setting of the closing speed needle valve
and can be set from approximately 15 seconds to one minute.
The piston lifts the valve gate spindle at a speed which is regulated by the
setting of the opening needle valve.
As air is entering the piston chamber, air also flows to the three-way
differential slide valve, located at the bottom left of the unit. This is forced to
the left which opens the exhaust port and vents the air from the top part of the
piston chamber to atmosphere. The slide valve is held against a spring by the
control air pressure.
Cargo Operating Manual
When the piston moves to within 25mm of the bottom of the chamber it will
open the close stroke limit valve. This valve is similar in operation to the open
stroke limit valve, bleeding air from the signal line to cause a pressure switch
to register this loss and send a close signal to the control valve. This stops the
exhausting of control air.
The piston will then remain in the closed position.
When the piston moves to within 25mm of the top of the chamber it will open
the stroke limit valve. This valve will bleed air from the signal line which will
in turn cause a pressure switch to register this pressure loss and send a close
signal to the control valve, shutting off the supply of control air.
The control line remains pressurised therefore the piston will remain in this
position until a close cycle is initiated.
There is an emergency closing/opening facility for this type of valve. The top
cap is removed and a special threaded tool is inserted into the piston chamber
which is then screwed in to the piston crown. The valve piston can then be
jacked open or closed as required.
Issue: 1
Section 4.10.1 - Page 4 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 4.10.2a Fibre Optic Ship/Shore Link System and Pneumatic ESD Circuit
PCLA
220V / 60Hz Supply
From CCC
Key
4b
DUAL
4
PI
4
Compressed Air
Electric Cable
Fibre Optic
ESD Relay
Panel
SV2
7.0 Bar
Air Supply
SV1
From Air
Receiver
PS
3
Internal Telephone
Hotline
Fibre Optic and Pneumatic Telephone Cabinet Under Port Manifold
Converter
Room
Cargo Control Room
Automatic
Exchange
Telephone
Conference
Room
220V 60Hz
5
24V
DC
1
From / To
NEBB System
6
7
8
To Manifold
Valves
220V
60HZ
At C.C
Console
OPTICAL FIBRE
Junction
Box
SV1
Accommodation
SV2
ESD Relay
Panel
Optical Fibre
Transmission
Panel
Emergency Quarter
Head
Issue: 1
Manifold
Port
PS
Cut
Off
Relay
Box
PS
3
Junction
Box
Dome
Tank 5
Dome
Tank 4
Junction
Box
Dome
Tank 3
Dome
Tank 2
Dome
Tank 1
LNG Compressor
Room
PS
Manifold
Stbd
Section 4.10.2 - Page 1 of 4
Norman Lady
4.10.2 Emergency Shutdown System
The emergency shutdown (ESD) system is a safeguard provided in addition to
the individual safety devices for plant and equipment. The system may be
activated manually or automatically from on board or from ashore and has two
levels of priority, namely ESD1 and ESD2.
The ESD panel is fitted in the local cargo control room. It is interfaced to the
DCS system and has links to the Pyle and Miyaki systems.
ESD1 may be initiated from on board or from ashore and will result in a
shutdown of the cargo system both on board and ashore.
ESD2 can only be initiated manually from the terminal or automatically if the
ship drifts outside the working area of the loading/unloading arms. Activation
of an ESD2 will automatically initiate an ESD1 and, after stopping cargo
operations, cause the disconnection of the loading/unloading arms (in certain
terminals).
Initiation of ESD1 causes the following on board:
a) The low duty (LD) and high duty (HD) compressors stop.
b) All cargo and spray pumps stop.
c) ESD quick-closing manifold valves shut within 30 seconds. The
emergency air circuit ensures ESD valve operation in the event of
a loss of main air.
Each cargo tank dome
Port and starboard manifold platforms
2) High temperature (fire). Fusible plugs, designed to melt at
between 98ºC and 104ºC, are fitted at the following locations:
Catwalk aft of each cargo tank dome
Two at each port and starboard manifold platforms
3) Electrical power failure: In the event of a failure of the electrical
power supplies.
4) Low pneumatic control air pressure. A low-low control air
pressure of 3 bar will initiate an ESD1 trip. To prevent spurious
tripping, a time delay is incorporated which may be adjusted
between 0 and 30 seconds and is normally set at 10 seconds.
5) An ESD1 signal from the shore. A shutdown signal from the shore
link.
6) Low pressure in the pneumatic shore to ship link. After the
pneumatic link has been pressurised from the shore, the override
key switch at the ESD cabinet in the local cargo control room
console can be switched to normal. Loss of air pressure will
initiate an ESD1. The pneumatic hose link is not connected under
normal conditions, but it is tested by ship/shore on a routine basis
(following NWS requirements).
Low pressure in the loading arm hydraulics
e) An ESD shutdown signal is transmitted to the shore terminal via
the ship-to-shore link.
Low pressure in the hydraulic circuit of the emergency
release coupling of the individual loading/unloading arms
Stops the terminal loading pumps
Shuts the terminal ESD valves within 15 seconds
Immediately opens the terminal loading pumps’ kickback valves
ESD1 is initiated on board by the following actions:
1) Manual initiation: Switches are positioned at the following
locations:
Cargo control room
LNG compressor room
Emergency headquarters
Issue: 1
The arms will lift clear allowing the mooring arrangements to be released. The
sections of shore arms remaining bolted to the ship’s manifold flanges have to
be removed and returned when convenient.
ESD System Testing
The ship’s ESD1 system is to be tested prior to arrival at the loading or
unloading ports.
A different activation point, including manual pushbuttons or the removal of a
fusible plug, should be utilised at each test, to allow a complete check of the
system just prior to arrival in port. After arrival alongside and with arms
connected, operation of ESD1 will be checked by the ship and the shore while
the ship’s manifold is warm and then checked again after the cooldown is
completed.
The closure time of the shore valves will be checked by the terminal, but the
closing times of the ship’s manifold valves should be checked at every test by
the cargo engineer or chief officer. The closing time for the ship’s manifold
valves must be within 30 seconds. The shore valves for loading and unloading
terminals close within 15 seconds.
Automatic initiation is carried out in the event of:
d) The inert gas generator blower stops.
Initiation of ESD1 causes the following actions in the loading terminal:
Cargo Operating Manual
Power loss in the control system
Excess angle of the loading/unloading arm slewing or apex angle
High level in the surge drum
Fire alarm on the jetty
Loss of signal between the ship and shore ESD link
Activation of ESD2
The ESD2 system can only be activated from the shore terminal and
automatically activates ESD1. After the cargo operations have been stopped
there is a time delay and a warning before the terminal loading/unloading arms
emergency release couplers operate. A section of the emergency release
coupler incorporating a valve remains attached to the ship’s manifold flanges.
Section 4.10.2 - Page 2 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 4.10.2b Emergency Shutdown Logic
CLOSE MANIFOLD VALVES.
PUSH BUTTONS IN CARGO CONTROL
ROOM. EACH CARGO TANK DOME,
PORT AND STARBOARD MANIFOLD
AND EMERGENCY HEAD QUARTER.
THERMAL MELTING FUSES AT EACH
CARGO TANK DOME.
CLOSE CARGO TANK FILLING
VALVES.
CLOSE MAIN GAS VALVE TO
ENGINE ROOM.
OR
DELAY
90 SEC
OR
FLEXIBLE HOSE VENTED.
STOP CARGO PUMPS AND
SPRAY PUMPS.
CLOSE PUMP VALVES.
SIGNAL FROM FIBRE OPTIC TRANSMISSION PANEL.
SIGNAL TO FIBRE OPTIC
TRANSMISSION PANEL.
CONTROL AIR PRESSURE LOW.
STOP COMPRESSORS.
ELECTRIC POWER FAILURE.
ALARM.
Issue: 1
Section 4.10.2 - Page 3 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Emergency Loop System
4.10.3 Ship Shore Link
The ship-shore links are implemented on this ship as follows:
There is an emergency air loop system to quickly close all valves in the cargo
handling system in the case of a fire or pipe fracture.
Linked ship-shore emergency shutdown systems have been required by
SIGGTO since the early days of LNG loading and discharge installations. They
minimise the consequences of an accident or, if abnormal conditions arise, they
allow the process to be shut down with minimum spillage of liquid. Thus
consequent risk to jetty and ship’s structures and escape of flammable vapour
is avoided. Since both the ship and the shore terminal exchange liquid and
vapour, the shipside and shoreside emergency shutdown systems must be
linked. This is to avoid:
36-way Miyaki connectors designed for Zone 1, Div II, temp rise T4 are fitted
port and starboard. These are for use at P’yeong Taek, Inchon and Bintulu.
The emergency loop system consists of a special air circuit, pressurised from
the control panel. The circuit is fitted with fusible plugs, melting at 102.5ºC,
and manual releases (described in the ESD section), located at strategic points
around the cargo system.
The emergency circuit is supplied with air from the main control air circuit
header via spring loaded valve HCV-122 in the control panel. The pressure on
this valve keeps valve FCV-124 open. In the case of any small leakages, the
pressure will be maintained through restriction valve FO 125. The capacity of
this valve is so small that the emergency circuit pressure will blow off if a
fusible plug melts or a manual release is opened.
Excessive surge pressure on the loading arm connection causing
damage. The upstream valve is closed first.
Overfilling the ship or shore tanks.
Risk of damage or spillage due to excessive movement of the
ship with respect to the berth.
The emergency circuit controls the three-way valve FCV 126 in the power air
header. The pressure in the emergency circuit will open this three-way valve
to pressure from the air receiver. If the emergency circuit is released, the valve
will open to atmosphere and the pressure drop in the power circuit will close
the actuator controlled cargo valves.
In addition to the safety requirement for ESD, the ship to shore link has been
extended to handle communications by telephone. Each loading/unloading
terminal has the ship/shore communication and ESD system integrated and all
terminals have a common ship/shore interface connection.
The emergency air circuit can also be released from the control panel by
opening the hand control valve HCV 123.
The key switch which selects which ship/shore link method to be used
(dependent on the terminal) has an inhibit position to prevent spurious ESD
signals being transmitted to the shore before the ship’s systems are ready.
A 37-way Pyle national connector system for Oman is fitted port and starboard.
WARNING
Four way earth bonding connectors are provided but not used due to
ISGOTT regulations prohibiting their use.
A 13-way ITT Cannon MIL - Std connector is fitted port and starboard. These
are for use at Arun and Bontang.
Pneumatic Systems
Two quick-connect male umbilical pneumatic connectors are provided at the
manifolds for use with the similar systems used at Ras Laffan and other
terminals. These directly trip the loading valves on pressure loss and are sensed
by the ESD system.
ESD System - Shore Connection Box at Port Manifold
Pyle National Electrica Connection Box at Port Manifold
Issue: 1
Section 4.10.2 - Page 4 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 4.11.1a Cargo Tank Relief Valves
Flanged Pipe
to Vent Mast
View of Relief Valves on Cargo Tank Dome
High Pressure
Pilot Valve
Low Pressure
Pilot Valve
Tank Relief Valves: Whessoe
Tank Relief Valve on Cargo Tank Dome
Issue: 1
Section 4.11.1/2 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
4.11
Relief Systems
4.11.1 Cargo Tank Relief Valves
Maker:
Type:
No. of sets:
No. per tank:
Luceat
R2101-HP
15
3
Settings:
Overpressure:
Flow rate per valve:
0.25 bar
2,2811Nm3/h
Vacuum Relieving:
Flow rate per valve:
-1kPa gauge
4,302Nm3/h
Each cargo tank is fitted with two pressure/vacuum relief valves as required by
the IMO code.
The cargo tank relief valves are fitted at the vapour domes of each tank and
vent to their associated vent mast riser. The relief valves are of the PORV (pilot
operated relief valve) type. A cargo tank pressure sensing line relays the
pressure directly to the pilot operating valve. In this way, the accurate
operation required at the relatively low pressure inside the tank is assured.
Cargo Operating Manual
Valve Operation
4.11.2 Line Relief Valves
Operation Under Pressure Using the Main Pilot Valve
When the pressure in the tank is less than the opening pressure, the main pilot
valve allows the tank pressure to act on the larger upper area of the diaphragm
and pallet assembly, keeping the valve closed.
Each section of the cargo pipework, except the vapour line, that can be isolated
by two valves has an overpressure relief valve fitted.
When the pressure in the tank is more than the opening pressure, the main pilot
valve is forced to vent the pressure on the upper area to the atmosphere,
causing the valve to fully open.
Operation Under Vacuum Using the Auxiliary Pilot Valve
When the vacuum in the tank is lower than the opening vacuum, the auxiliary
pilot valve allows atmospheric pressure to act on the larger upper area of the
diaphragm and pallet assembly, keeping the valve closed.
The cargo manifold relief valves and the relief valves on the liquid header are
set to lift at 10 bar and relieve pressure back to a collecting tank above the
cargo control room. This tank vents to vent mast No.4.
The collecting tank is fitted with a level alarm which raises an alarm via the
DCS system.
Relief valves between the tank dome and the throttle valve release pressure
back to the nearest cargo tank dome.
When the vacuum in the tank is more than the opening vacuum, the auxiliary
pilot valve shuts off the port to the atmospheric and allows the tank vacuum to
act on the larger upper area of the diaphragm and pallet assembly, causing the
valve to open.
The valves consist of the following basic components:
Main pilot valve
Auxiliary pilot valve
Upper housing, containing diaphragm and pallet assembly
Exhaust manifold, which discharges the gas from the tank
The cargo relief valves are set up initially by the manufacturers for the
requirements on the ship. If an overhaul of the valves by ship’s staff is carried
out, the valves must be checked and reset to the original settings. (See
manufacturer’s instructions for details.)
It is extremely important that the vent mast is checked on a regular basis and
drained of any accumulation of water. This is to ensure that the relief valves
operate at their correct settings, which would otherwise be altered if water
were to accumulate in the vent mast and flow onto the valve assembly.
Issue: 1
Section 4.11.1/2 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 4.11.3a Void Space Relief Valves
Port
PDIAH
PDIALH
PDCLA
3
1
2
PDAH
PDAL
PDICA
4
4
5
Starboard
Aft
Location of Instrument Box
for Void Space and Tank
Relief Valve Pneumatics
View Inside Instrument Cabinet at Cargo Tank Dome Showing Pressure Transmitters
FCV
33
Cargo Power Air
Open Void Space
Relief Valves
SVC Signal From:
PDICA 5: -0,08 bar
PDICA 5: 0,015 bar
PDIAH 3: 0,05 bar d.p.
Vouid Space and Void/Tank Relief Valves
Atmosphere
FCV
34
Atmosphere
V-2245
Void Space
FCV
34
Key
Electrical Signal
V-2245
Instrumentation
Void Space
Issue: 1
Section 4.11.3 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
4.11.3 Void Space Relief Valves
Cargo Operating Manual
The cargo tanks and void spaces are also protected against differential pressure
between each other. Pressure switch 3PDIAH will initiate the above sequence
if the differential between the tank and void space exceeds 0.05 bar.
The void spaces are protected against an overpressure of 0.15 bar or an
underpressure of -0.08 bar. If void space pressure switch 5PDICA is activated
by either of these pressures, a signal is sent to the DCS system which will open
solenoid valve FCV33 and supply air to the pressure control valves FCV34.
These control valves will supply power air to the actuators of the butterfly
valves. These valves will open to vent the void space to atmosphere.
Illustration 4.11.3b Monitoring of Pressure Relatives (Tank - Void Space - Atmosphere)
ATM
bar
Atmosphere
0.2
VOID PRESSURE
TANK PRESSURE
Void
Tank
Void
Tank
Atmosphere
Open Mechanical Relief
Valve on Tank (Each Tank)
Position 1 ; One Sensor per Tank
Position 2 ; One Sensor per Tank
Position 3 ; One Sensor per Tank
High Pressure Alarm Position 1
(Each Tank)
Position 4 ; One Sensor per Tank
Position 5 ; One Sensor per Tank
Position 72 ; One Sensor per Tank (Common)
ATM
bar
0.2
Open Relief Valve Position 5
(Each Void)
High Pressure Alarm Position 4
(Each Void)
0.1
0.1
Low Pressure Alarm Position 1
(Each Tank)
High Pressure Alarm Position 3
(Each Tank)
Compressor:
Main Header Pressure
Adjustable.
Normal Setting 1060 mbar
0.0
0.0
Safety Stop LNG Compressor Position 72
(One Pressure Switch in Suction Line)
Low Pressure Alarm
Position 4 (Each Void)
Dry Air to Void
Requested Position
Open Relief Valve Position 5
(Each Void)
-0.1
Issue: 1
Stop LNG Compressor Tank Vent Fans
Pumps and Spray Valves Position 3
(Each Tank)
(Common Cutout)
Stop LNG Compressor
and Pumps Position 2 (Each Tank)
Open Relief Valve Void Position 3
(Each Tank)
-0.1
Section 4.11.3 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 4.12.1a Ballast Piping System
Sea Suction
Overboard
No.5 Side Tank
(Port)
V56
HC
1
No.3 Side Tank
(Port)
No.2 Side Tank
(Port)
No.1 Side Tank
(Port)
V60
HC
1A
SI
1
No.4 Side Tank
(Port)
V13
PI
1
801
20a
Emergency
Bilge Suction
V54A
V54
V52
Ballast
Pump
1,200 m3/h
Emergency
Connection For
Backflushing
Main Condenser
V52
V64
No.3 Bottom Wing
Tank (Port)
V59
V96
V94
V92
V57
V90
V23
No.1 Bottom Wing
Tank (Port)
No.2 Bottom Wing
Tank (Port)
V88
V86
V71
V84
V82
V80
V99
V78
V74
V72
V69
V70
V63
From
Bilge System
V33
From
Fire and Deck
Wash System
V58
No.2
Double Bottom
Spare Water
Ballast Tank
V59A
V33
No.3
Lower Cross
Tank
No.2
Lower Cross
Tank
No.1
Lower Cross
Tank
V98
V57
V95
V93
V91
V89
V87
V85
V83
V97
V81
V79
V77
V72
V73
V71
V64
V59
No.3 Bottom Wing
Tank (Starboard)
V55A
SI
2
V66
Overboard
V53
V55
HC
2
PI
2
HC
2A
Ballast
Pump
1,200 m3/h
No.2 Bottom Wing
Tank (Starboard)
No.1 Bottom Wing
Tank (Starboard)
V53
801
20b
Key
V61
Sea Suction
No.5 Side Tank
(Starboard)
No.4 Side Tank
(Starboard)
No.3 Side Tank
(Starboard)
No.2 Side Tank
(Starboard)
No.1 Side Tank
(Starboard)
Sea Water
Bilge
Electrical Signal
Issue: 1
Section 4.12.1 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
4.12
Ballast System
4.12.1 Ballast Piping
Ballast Pumps
Maker:
Type:
Capacity:
Speed:
No. of sets:
Worthington
10-LNCV-12 vertical centrifugal
1,200m3/h
1,750 rpm
2
Stripping Ejector
Maker:
Type:
Capacity:
No. of sets:
Golar
4” - 5” - 5”
120 m3/h at 3m suction lift
Driving water at 106m3/h
1
In the ballast system there are two ballast pumps with suction from all ballast
tanks. Each pump is of the electric vertical centrifugal type with a discharge
capacity of 1200m3/h. The pumps are primed from the stripping ejector. The
pumps are located at the forward end of the engine room, at tank top level. The
hydraulic unit which drives the remote operated ballast valves is located at this
level, centrally between the two ballast pumps.
In normal service, the port pump is connected to all port tanks and the
starboard pump to all the starboard tanks. However, it is possible to draw from
both sides with one pump. The ballast pumps can have suction simultaneously
from a number of tanks, this reduces the water velocity in the pipe branches
and valves.
From the cargo control room, all the ballast valves can be hydraulically
controlled. The same pipes and valves are used both for the filling and
emptying of all the ballast tanks.
Special drop valves (hydraulically operated) are installed for direct emptying
to the open sea. The bottom wing tanks can be filled directly through the drop
valves.
The ballast eductor works as a stripping pump for the ballast tanks and as a
priming unit for the ballast pumps. This is a water driven unit with a discharge
capacity of 100m3/h. The stripping ejector driving force comes from the ejector
pump (106m3/h).
Ballast operations from the DCS will be fitted in the near future.
Issue: 1
Cargo Operating Manual
Ballast Valves
4.12.2 Ballast Control and Indicating System
The hydraulic valves are all located in the duct keel, adjacent to the actual
ballast tank. The hydraulic pump unit is situated between the two ballast
pumps in the engine room. Commands from the DCS system are transmitted
to electrically operated solenoid valves located in a section of the local cargo
control room automation cabinet. The valves may be operated locally in the
event of a failure of the remote operation electrical/hydraulic systems. The
valves are designated as follows:
The ballast system is primarily controlled via the DCS system. Operation is
carried out from the ballast primary window which this visualises the entire
ballast system. From this view the tank levels of all vessel fluids used as ballast
can be monitored and the ballast system pumps and valves can be controlled.
The primary view also shows the vessel heel and trim data.
Ballast Tank
Side tank 5 port
Bottom wing 3 port aft
Bottom wing 3 port forward
Side tank 4 port
Side tank 3 port aft
Side tank 3 port forward
Bottom wing 2 port aft
Bottom wing 2 port forward
Side tank 2 port
Bottom wing 1 port aft
Bottom wing 1 port forward
Side tank 1 port
Double bottom 2 aft
Double bottom 2 forward
Lower cross 3
Lower cross 2
Lower cross 1
Side tank 5 starboard
Bottom wing 3 starboard aft
Bottom wing 3 starboard forward
Side tank 4 starboard
Side tank 3 starboard aft
Side tank 3 starboard forward
Bottom wing 2 starboard aft
Bottom wing 2 starboard forward
Side tank 2 starboard
Bottom wing 1 starboard aft
Bottom wing 1 starboard forward
Side tank 1 starboard
Valve No.
V96
V94
V88
V92
V90
V84
V86
V82
V78
V80
V74
V71
V65
V69
V99
V98
V97
V95
V93
V87
V91
V89
V83
V85
V81
V77
V79
V73
V70
Hydraulic Block
216
234
231
213
210
207
228
225
204
222
219
201
413
410
407
404
401
316
334
331
313
310
307
328
325
304
319
322
301
Ballast system and alarm status can be viewed in more detail by selecting the
second (lower) level ballast or status views. The cargo control function
comprises the following:
Manual control
Route guidance
Automatic routing
Heeling control
Operator Interface
The cargo and ballast process views show the fluid control systems comprising
tank, valve and pump symbols interconnected by piping and manifolds. The
operator monitors the status of each device by displaying the views and
operating the equipment as required. The starting and stopping of pumps and
the opening and closing of the valves is normally part of the automatic cargo
and ballast tank filling and emptying sequences, which are initiated from the
operator stations.
In the manual operating mode, the pumps and certain valves are controlled
from the module operating menu for each individual item of equipment. In
addition to tank, valve and pump symbols, some views contain a global control
module which makes it possible to control the operation of several tanks,
pumps and valves simultaneously. The cargo and ballast second (lower) level
process views are displayed via a hot spot on the process view, the navigator
function or the navigator button on the operator panel.
The global control module symbol comprises a box with text components that
show the current operational state of the module. The text varies depending on
the selections made via the commands on the global control module operation
menu. The text box at the left of the symbol shows the selected control mode
for the module, ie, ballast or stripping mode. The mode field shows the selected
operating mode, ie, manual or auto.
The ballast levels can be seen on the DCS system ballast primary window.
Each tank has a graphic representation of the level and a read out of the
contents in cubic metres. The tank level sensors are of the Autronica pressure
transmitter type.
At the bottom of the screen is a graphic representation of the ship’s trim and
heel, measured in metres forward and aft and degrees respectively.
Section 4.12.1 - Page 2 of 2
Part 5
Cargo Auxiliary and Deck Systems
Norman Lady
Illustration 5.1a Fire Detection System
Cargo Operating Manual
Operating Buttons:
More Alarms
This button allows the second line
of the text display to be scrolled.
Reveals additional alarms on the
system.
Indication Devices:
More Alarms
Red lamp illuminates when more
alarms are present.
Sounder Silence
When this red button is pressed,
all alarm devices and the internal
buzzer are muted.
Reset
When the green button is pressed,
all events in the system are reset.
Printer
Text display
(Information Window)
DYFI
Dynamic Filter Process
Fire
Red Lamp Sign illuminates for
an alarm condition.*
SOUNDER SILENCE
Detectors
RESET
MORE ALARMS
Loop
00 etc to
DEVICE(S) STILL
IN ALARM COND.
PREWARNING
FAULT
These lamps can be custom
assigned.
FUNCTIONS DISABLED
MAINS
BS100
AUTRONICA
Detectors
Device(s) Still in Alarm Condition.
Amber (yellow) lamp illuminates
when an address (detector)
is automatically disabled.
Loop
03
Disconnection and Test Mode Switches
Inside Cabinet
Buzzer and Battery Inside Cabinet
Prewarning
Amber (yellow) lamp illuminates
with a pulsating light when a
prewarning situation occurs.*
The five element keypad consists of four arrow keys
and one 'carry-out' (enter key). The keypad is used to access
and handle information on the system. The four arrow keys
control the cursor on the control panel text display.
Fault
Amber (yellow) lamp illuminates for
any fault. Pulsating light.*
These keys scroll the menu and move the cursor
up and down in the menu text on the text display.
These keys also scroll figures and letter values.
Function Disabled
Amber (yellow) lamp illuminates
when any part of the system
is disabled (isolated).
These arrow keys scroll the menu and move the cursor
left or right in the menu on the text display.
FIRE
MORE ALARMS
'Carry-out' (entry) key. Selects the menu part on which the
cursor is currently pointed.
Mains
Green lamp illuminates when the
power is on.
Common Fire Alarm Output 2 Minutes Delayed
Failure Output
Common Fire Alarm Output
Mains
(230 VAC)
PREWARNING
FAULT
POWER
SILENCE BUZZER
BU70
AUTRONICA
Repeater Panel
Engine Control Room
To Engine Room Monitoring System
(No Time Delay)
24V DC For Flame Detectors
Common Fire Alarm Output For Door Release System
Issue: 1
Section 5.1 - Page 1 of 4
Norman Lady
Part 5 Cargo Auxiliary and Deck Systems
Prewarning
5.1
In certain conditions, such as a rise in the detector ionisation level, a detector
may trigger a prewarning alarm. This may be a prelude to an actual fire alarm,
so the alarm should be thoroughly investigated.
Fire Detection System
Maker:
Type:
Autronica
BS-100/4
The BS-100/4 fire detection system is a computerised, fully addressable
analogue fire alarm system with analogue detectors. The central control unit
with back-up battery, operating panel and power supply is contained in a
central cabinet on the bridge. There is a repeater panel in the fire headquarters.
The system is interfaced to the Valmarine DCS system via a converter and
RS232 serial interface. The DCS system indicates loop status and can also
control the fire pumps. The operator can also access deck plans indicating the
exact location of individual detectors.
The system uses a wide range of detectors and sensors to suit different needs
and conditions. It includes detectors with different alarm parameters, for
example, ion and optical smoke detectors, heat and flame detectors, manual
call points, short circuit isolators and timers where required. The detectors are
wired in a loop configuration with 4 loops in total. A fault in the system or a
false alarm is detected immediately since the function of the detectors and
other installed loop units are automatically and continuously tested.
Operation
The operating panel consists of a text display information window, indication
lamps, operating buttons and a five button/arrow keypad. These control items
enable the entire fire detection and alarm system to be controlled.
The five arrow keypad consists of four arrow keys and one ‘carry-out’ (enter)
key. The keypad is used for accessing system information. The four arrow keys
control the cursor on the control panel text display.
The up and down arrow keys are used for scrolling in the menu and for moving
the cursor up or down in the menu text on the text display. The keys also scroll
figures and letter values when they are to be entered in the menu functions.
The left and right arrow keys are used for scrolling in the menu and for
moving the cursor to the left or right in the menu, on the text display.
The ‘carry-out’ (enter) key selects the menu part to which the cursor currently
points.
g) Close the panel door.
In the normal condition, the MAINS indication lamp will be the only indicator
illuminated when the door is closed.
Fire Alarm
The following indications appear on the control panel in the event of a
prewarning:
The text display indicates the address(es) of the detector(s)
which are in the in prewarning mode
The yellow prewarning lamp flashes and the internal
buzzer sounds
The display and printer will show text such as:
‘PV05 ADDRESS NO. 0605
INVESTIGATE PREWARNING LOCATION’
If more than one prewarning event is registered, the display will change to:
‘PV07 ADDRESS NO. 0607
2 PREWARNINGS REGISTERED’
All active prewarnings may be seen via the menu function; ‘SHOW STATUS’
‘PREWARNING’. Access to the menu is obtained by pressing the enter key on
the front panel.
Action to be Taken in the Event of a Prewarning
a) Follow all the precautions as described in the local fire
instructions.
b) Open the control panel door.
c) Press the SOUNDER SILENCE button. The buzzer will give a
short signal approximately every fourth minute as long as the
door remains open.
d) The PREWARNING indication lamp will now change to a steady
light.
e) Press the RESET button. The following text will shortly appear in
the display; ‘RESET PROCEDURE IN PROGRESS WAIT .....’.
This text will remain on the display for up to 60 seconds. The
reset procedure is executed within this 60 second period.
f) If the detectors have now returned to a normal condition, the
following text will appear in the display; ‘RESET OK’
‘NORMAL CONDITION’.
Issue: 1
Cargo Operating Manual
The following indications appear on the control panel in the event of a fire
alarm:
The red FIRE indication lamp flashes and the buzzer sounds
The text display indicates the address(es) of the detector(s)
which initiated the first fire alarm. The display will also show
any items which may be disabled, eg, bells, sounders etc
If the alarm was preceded by a prewarning alarm, the prewarning
lamp will illuminate steadily
The display and printer will show text such as:
‘AL 01 ADDRESS NO. 0605’
All sounders/fire doors/alarms/fan stops are activated
(as connected/programmed)
Action to be Taken in the Event of a FIRE Alarm
Follow all precautions described in the local fire instructions. When the scene
of the fire has been investigated and the necessary action carried out, the
sounders may be switched off.
a) Open the control panel door.
b) Press the SOUNDER SILENCE button.
c) All alarm devices (including the internal buzzer) will be muted.
The red FIRE indication lamp will switch to a steady light.
All alarm outputs from the control panel will be turned off when the
SOUNDER SILENCE button is pressed.
(Note: There are various silent alarm functions such as; day/night/master clock
time controlled functions and sounder activation time delays available, see the
manufacturer’s manual for further information on these functions.)
If the MORE ALARMS indication lamp illuminates, see the next section.
d) Press the RESET button. The following text will appear in the text
display; ‘RESET PROCEDURE IN PROGRESS WAIT.....’ This
text will remain on the display for up to 60 seconds. The reset
procedure is executed within this 60 second period.
Section 5.1 - Page 2 of 4
Norman Lady
Illustration 5.1a Fire Detection System
Cargo Operating Manual
Operating Buttons:
More Alarms
This button allows the second line
of the text display to be scrolled.
Reveals additional alarms on the
system.
Indication Devices:
More Alarms
Red lamp illuminates when more
alarms are present.
Sounder Silence
When this red button is pressed,
all alarm devices and the internal
buzzer are muted.
Reset
When the green button is pressed,
all events in the system are reset.
Printer
Text display
(Information Window)
DYFI
Dynamic Filter Process
Fire
Red Lamp Sign illuminates for
an alarm condition.*
SOUNDER SILENCE
Detectors
RESET
MORE ALARMS
Loop
00 etc to
DEVICE(S) STILL
IN ALARM COND.
PREWARNING
FAULT
These lamps can be custom
assigned.
FUNCTIONS DISABLED
MAINS
BS100
AUTRONICA
Detectors
Device(s) Still in Alarm Condition.
Amber (yellow) lamp illuminates
when an address (detector)
is automatically disabled.
Loop
03
Disconnection and Test Mode Switches
Inside Cabinet
Buzzer and Battery Inside Cabinet
Prewarning
Amber (yellow) lamp illuminates
with a pulsating light when a
prewarning situation occurs.*
The five element keypad consists of four arrow keys
and one 'carry-out' (enter key). The keypad is used to access
and handle information on the system. The four arrow keys
control the cursor on the control panel text display.
Fault
Amber (yellow) lamp illuminates for
any fault. Pulsating light.*
These keys scroll the menu and move the cursor
up and down in the menu text on the text display.
These keys also scroll figures and letter values.
Function Disabled
Amber (yellow) lamp illuminates
when any part of the system
is disabled (isolated).
These arrow keys scroll the menu and move the cursor
left or right in the menu on the text display.
FIRE
MORE ALARMS
'Carry-out' (entry) key. Selects the menu part on which the
cursor is currently pointed.
Mains
Green lamp illuminates when the
power is on.
Common Fire Alarm Output 2 Minutes Delayed
Failure Output
Common Fire Alarm Output
Mains
(230 VAC)
PREWARNING
FAULT
POWER
SILENCE BUZZER
BU70
AUTRONICA
Repeater Panel
Engine Control Room
To Engine Room Monitoring System
(No Time Delay)
24V DC For Flame Detectors
Common Fire Alarm Output For Door Release System
Issue: 1
Section 5.1 - Page 3 of 4
Norman Lady
e) If the detectors have now returned to a normal condition, the
following text will appear in the display; ‘RESET OK’
‘NORMAL CONDITION’.
f) Close the panel door.
After resetting, an address may still be in an alarm condition. This can be due
to mechanical damage, water damage, the presence of smoke still within the
chamber or an electrical fault. The address still in alarm will automatically be
disabled (isolated from the rest of the system). The yellow DEVICE(S) STILL
IN ALARM COND. indication lamp will illuminate and the following text will
appear in the display:
‘01 ALARM ADDRESS DISABLED’
‘CONTROL PANEL IN ABNORMAL CONDITION’.
In this case contact Autronica technical personnel.
a) Open the control panel door.
Menu Structure
b) Press the MORE ALARMS button. The first press will indicate
the second alarm address on the text display lower line. The
second press will indicate the third alarm address etc.
The main menu is accessed by pressing the MAIN MENU button. It consists
of the following sub-menus:
c) Press the SOUNDER SILENCE button. All alarm devices
including the internal buzzer will be turned off. The red FIRE
indication lamp will switch to a steady light.
d) Press the RESET button. The following text will appear in the text
display; ‘RESET PROCEDURE IN PROGRESS WAIT.....’ This
text will remain on the display for up to 60 seconds. The reset
procedure is executed within this 60 second period.
e) If the detectors have now returned to a normal condition, the
following text will appear in the display; ‘RESET OK’
‘NORMAL CONDITION’.
While an address is automatically disabled, the yellow DEVICES STILL IN
ALARM COND. indication lamp will be illuminated. If the alarm condition
disappears, the indication lamp will turn off and the address will be
automatically restored to the system.
Faults
More Alarms
The following indications appear on the control panel in the event of a fault.
The following indications appear on the control panel in the event of more
alarms:
The red FIRE indication lamp flashes and the internal
buzzer sounds
The red MORE ALARMS indication lamp illuminates
The text display upper line indicates the first address in alarm.
The lower text line will indicate the last address in alarm
The prewarning lamp flashes. If the alarm was preceded by a
pre-alarm, the prewarning lamp will illuminate steadily
f) Close the panel door.
Out/In control: Disable and restore addresses, zones etc
Show status:
Alarms, warnings etc
Test:
Test the panel facilities, sounders etc
System:
Sensitivity, configuration, data etc
Feed Paper:
Printer
Service:
Reports, disabling/restoring, address and data control
Within the sub-menus are sections that can only be accessed by technical or
service personnel who have the required passwords. The password protected
levels are divided into two levels:
Password Level 1: Operator Level
Disable - Controls
System - Data
The yellow FAULT indication lamp flashes and the internal
buzzer sounds
The text display upper line indicates the nature of the fault;
FA indicates a loop or detector fault, SF indicates a system fault
If more (multiple) faults are present on the system, the display will indicate the
latest extra fault and label it ‘FAULT 2’ etc.
Action to be Taken in the Event of a Fault
Disable - Sounders
Change display and printer text
Password Level 2: Service Level
System - Configuration
Service
Change control, alarm and disable group outputs
Further, more detailed information on facilities available within the sub-menus
can be found in the manufacturer’s manual.
a) Press the SOUNDER SILENCE button.
The display and printer will show text such as:
‘AL 01 ADDRESS NO. 0605
‘AL 03 ADDRESS NO. 0608
b) The internal buzzer is muted and the yellow FAULT indication
lamp will switch to a steady light.
All sounders/fire doors/alarms/fan stops are activated
(as connected/programmed)
c) Note the fault text indicated in the display and file the printout
from the printer.
Action to be Taken in the Event of a ‘More Alarms’ Situation
Cargo Operating Manual
d) Contact Autronica technical or service personnel.
Follow all precautions described in the local fire instructions. When the scene
of the fire has been investigated and the necessary action carried out, the
sounders may be switched off.
Issue: 1
Section 5.1 - Page 4 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 5.2.1a Fire and Deck Wash System
V520
V520
V520
V520
V520
V520
Port
Accommodation
Connection to Deck
Driving Water System
V513
V514
Isolating
Valve
V514
V514
V514
V514
V518
V514
Anchor
Chain Washing
V518
V505
V502
V526
Ejector
Chain Locker
Ejector
Fwd Pump Room
and Duct Keel
V525
Ejector Fore
Deep Tank
V502
V527
V521
V502
V502
V522
V515
V515
V502
V515
V502
V515
V515
V501A
V522
No.5 Cargo
Tank
Isolating
Valve
V523
No.4 Cargo
Tank
No.3 Cargo
Tank
V503
No.1 Cargo
Tank
V503
V503
V503
V506
Isolating
Valve
No.2 Cargo
Tank
V514
V514
V514
V517
V503
V514
V514
V513
Port
V511
Near
Boilers
V520
V511
V520
V520
V520
V520
Starboard
Accommodation
V520
V509
Diesel
Engine
V509
V509
V509
Stbd
Near
Boilers
Hydraulic
Oil Pump
and Tank
V528
V509
Aft
Near
Tube
V512
FW Cooler V509
V512
V531
V509
Engine Room
Hatch
Water Spray
Covering
FO Transfer
Pump
V509
PC
1
Emergency
Connection
to Fresh Water
Cooling System
V534
V501
SI
1A
SI
1B
V501
HC
1
Fire and
Deck Wash
Pump
Fire
Pump
Hydraulic Oil
Motor
V500
Sea
Chest
Issue: 1
Stores Deck
From
LPG
Pump
V33
V534
Key
Fire Water
Sea Water
V500
Sea
Chest
Emergency
Fire Pump
Driving Water
to Ballast
Ejector
Emergency
Connection for
Driving Water
to Bilge Ejectors
Emergency Fire Pump
and FO Transfer
Pump Space
V530
Hydraulic Oil
Sea
Chest
Instrumentation
Electrical Signal
Section 5.2.1 - Page 1 of 4
Norman Lady
5.2
Fire Fighting Systems
5.2.1 Fire and Deck Wash System
The following pumps can supply the fire and deck wash system:
Eureka
CGB 80 vertical, ventrifugal
100m3/h at 120 mwg
3,500 rpm
2
Engine
Maker:
Type:
Serial No:
Capacity:
Hydraulic starter:
Lister
HR4 MA
582HR4AM22
45kW
Bryce Berger
Hydraulic Pump
Maker:
Type:
Capacity:
Kracht
KP 42/71 CIZJZOO
140 litres/min at 160 bar
Pump
Maker:
Type:
Capacity:
Ritz
4408/3st
50m3/h at 113 mwg
Kracht
KM 22/50F 3 XALOO
120 bar
The fire main system is supplied from the two engine room fire pumps. They
are single speed centrifugal pumps, with a delivery capacity of 100m3/h. The
pumps can be started from their main switchboard starters in the ECR, the
emergency fire headquarters or locally.
The system can also be supplied from the emergency fire pump. This is located
in its own compartment aft of the fore peak. This pump is a self-priming
centrifugal pump with its own direct sea suction. The pump is rated at 50m3/h
and is powered by a hydraulic motor. The remote hydraulic pump to supply this
motor is driven by a diesel engine, located in the bosun’s store. This engine can
only be started locally.
Issue: 1
The ring main is fitted with further section isolator valves to allow any part of
the system to be supplied from either side of the ship.
The fire main also supplies the driving water for the bilge eductors in the chain
locker, the fore deep tank and duct keel and the forward pump room. The
system can also supply washing water for the anchor chains within the hawse
pipe.
There are fire hydrants strategically positioned throughout the decks, each with
its fire hose mounted adjacent.
Emergency Fire Pump
Hydraulic Motor
Maker:
Type:
Pressure:
The deck fire ring main has a main isolator valve V501A, fitted before the port
and starboard feeder.
This set up also allows a section of fire main to be isolated for maintenance
purposes whilst the rest of the fire main remains available.
Main Fire Pumps
Maker:
Type:
Capacity:
Speed:
No. of sets:
Cargo Operating Manual
Under normal operating conditions, the fire main will be under pressure during
cargo discharge or loading with hoses run out as a fire precaution.
b) Set up the main fire pumps:
Position
Description
Valve
Open
Sea chest suction valve
V500
Open
Main fire pump discharge valve
V501
c) Start/stop the required main fire pump.
d) Open fire main sections, hydrants or outlets as required.
Preparation for the Operation or Testing of the Emergency Fire Pump
and Engine
a) Start the duct keel fan to vent the forward pump room.
b) Open a hawse pipe valve one turn and the pump suction valve
V530 and discharge valve V531 fully.
c) Check the gas oil and hydraulic oil levels in the tanks.
Preparation for the Operation of the Fire Main
Assume all system valves are initially closed.
a) All deck, engine room, boiler room and accommodation hydrants
are closed. Set up the valves as shown in the table below.
Position
Description
Valve
Open
Isolating valve to deck main
V501
Open
Section isolating valve (port)
V502
Open
Section isolating valve (starboard)
V503
Open
Isolating valve to accommodation (port) and aft
V505
Open
Isolating valve to accommodation (starboard)
and aft
V506
Closed
Discharge valve to hawse pipes
V518
Closed
Discharge valve to chain locker eductor
V527
Closed
Discharge valve to forward pump room and
duct keel eductor
V526
Closed
Discharge valve to forward deep tank eductor
V525
Closed
Discharge valve to forward pump room spray
V528
Closed
Discharge valve to bilge/ballast ejectors
V534
d) Close the two engine exhaust pipe drains, pull out the engine cold
start lever and press the engine electric START pushbutton.
Alternatively, pressurise the start cylinder by pumping at least 60
strokes with the red lever before operating the hydraulic starter.
e) Allow 3 minutes for the engine to settle before moving the
hydraulic coupling lever to engage the fire pump hydraulic motor.
f) Enter the pump room to check the pump and note that the
discharge pressure should 10 bar.
To Stop the Engine/Pump
a) After approximately 10 minutes disengage the hydraulic pump
and stop the engine by moving the stop lever towards the air
intake, the engine will run down. When the engine has completely
stopped, reset the lever.
b) Close the suction and discharge valves and open the exhuast pipe
drains.
c) Check the tension on the engine water pump drive belt and mop
up any oil that may have dripped during the test run period.
Section 5.2.1 - Page 2 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 5.2.1a Fire and Deck Wash System
V520
V520
V520
V520
V520
V520
Port
Accommodation
Connection to Deck
Driving Water System
V513
V514
Isolating
Valve
V514
V514
V514
V514
V518
V514
Anchor
Chain Washing
V518
V505
V502
V526
Ejector
Chain Locker
Ejector
Fwd Pump Room
and Duct Keel
V525
Ejector Fore
Deep Tank
V502
V527
V521
V502
V502
V522
V515
V515
V502
V515
V502
V515
V515
V501A
V522
No.5 Cargo
Tank
Isolating
Valve
V523
No.4 Cargo
Tank
No.3 Cargo
Tank
V503
No.1 Cargo
Tank
V503
V503
V503
V506
Isolating
Valve
No.2 Cargo
Tank
V514
V514
V514
V517
V503
V514
V514
V513
Port
V511
Near
Boilers
V520
V511
V520
V520
V520
V520
Starboard
Accommodation
V520
V509
Diesel
Engine
V509
V509
V509
Stbd
Near
Boilers
Hydraulic
Oil Pump
and Tank
V528
V509
Aft
Near
Tube
V512
FW Cooler V509
V512
V531
V509
Engine Room
Hatch
Water Spray
Covering
FO Transfer
Pump
V509
PC
1
Emergency
Connection
to Fresh Water
Cooling System
V534
V501
SI
1A
SI
1B
V501
HC
1
Fire and
Deck Wash
Pump
Fire
Pump
Hydraulic Oil
Motor
V500
Sea
Chest
Issue: 1
Stores Deck
From
LPG
Pump
V33
V534
Key
Fire Water
Sea Water
V500
Sea
Chest
Emergency
Fire Pump
Driving Water
to Ballast
Ejector
Emergency
Connection for
Driving Water
to Bilge Ejectors
Emergency Fire Pump
and FO Transfer
Pump Space
V530
Hydraulic Oil
Sea
Chest
Instrumentation
Electrical Signal
Section 5.2.1 - Page 3 of 4
Norman Lady
Control and Alarm Settings
Setting
Description
5kg/cm2
Fire main pressure low
5kg/cm2
Fire main pressure low - start standby aft pump
4kg/cm2
Fire main pressure low - start standby forward pump
In the event of a fire on board, the locations listed below have the following
controls:
Cargo Operating Manual
Pipe duct fan
Port and starboard boiler steam stop valves
HFO transfer pump
Main gas valve
Engine Control Room
Emergency stops for engine room and accommodation supply and
exhaust fans
Start/stops for the engine room fire pumps - forward and aft
Bridge
Emergency stops for engine room and accommodation supply and
exhaust fans
Start/stops for the fuel oil pumps
Control (shutting) of the boiler superheated steam outlet valves
Fuel gas valve
Deck fans and pipe duct fans
Start/stop switches for the engine room fire pumps
Air Conditioning Rooms Port and Starboard on Accommodation Third
Deck
Stop buttons for engine room and accommodation supply and
exhaust fans
Emergency Headquarters on the Upper Deck, Starboard Side
Operation of the CO2 system release to:
LPG room
Cargo control room
Electric motor room
LNG room
Engine room
Vent masts
Operation of the quick-closing and remote operating fuel valves to:
Diesel oil tank
Port and starboard HFO settling tanks
Fuel gas vent flap valve
Emergency stops for:
Engine room vent fans
Accommodation vent fans
Deck fan
Issue: 1
Section 5.2.1 - Page 4 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 5.2.2a Water Spray System
LNG Compressor
Room
Water Curtain
Manifold Area
(Port)
From Bilge
Ejector Pump
Cargo
Control
Room
No.5 Cargo
Tank
No.3 Cargo
Tank
No.4 Cargo
Tank
No.2 Cargo
Tank
No.1 Cargo
Tank
To LPG Plant
Manifold Area
(Starboard)
LPG Compressor Room
To Cargo Hold Eductors/
Manifold Water Curtains
Water Curtain
Bilge Ejector
Pump System
To
IG Refrigeration
Plant Coolers
To
IG
Plant
To
Main
Condenser
Flushing
To
SW
Cooling
System
Inert Gas
Plant
Cooling
Water
Pump
To
Ballast
and Bilge
Eductors
PC
52
Bilge
Ejector
Pump
Engine Room
V331
PI
LPG
Plant
Cooling
Water
Pump
V331
Sea
Chest
PI
From
Bilge
Main
V330
V330
Key
Spray Water
Sea Water
Regulating Valve
Sea Chest
Issue: 1
Section 5.2.2 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
5.2.2
Water Spray System
Port manifold area
No.2 cargo tank
System Capacities and Rating
LPG Sea Water Pump
Maker:
No. of sets:
Type:
Capacity:
Thune Eureka
1
CGB 100
170m3/h at 5kg/cm2
Inert Gas Plant Sea Water Pump
Maker:
Thune Eureka
No. of sets:
1
Type:
CGD 200
Capacity:
340m3/h at 5kg/cm2
Bilge Ejector Pump
Maker:
Type:
Capacity:
Thune Eureka
CGB 100
132m3/h at 7mth
Spray Nozzles
Type:
Capacity:
11/4 H 16 W cap
100 litres/min at 1.5kg/cm2
The accommodation block front, LNG and LPG compressor rooms, cargo tank
liquid and vapour domes, main cargo valves and manifolds are protected by
water spray from the effects of fire, gas leakage, or liquid spill by a water spray
system.
Normally the the LPG SW pump is used to supply the water spray system and
the system. The inert gas plant cooling water pump can be used via a crossconnection valve. These pumps deliver water to a common distribution rail,
along which are fitted individual branches with isolating valves.
The branches are as follows:
Accommodation block
No.5 cargo tank
No.4 cargo tank
Cargo control room
No.1 cargo tank
Each main spray branch, except No.1 cargo tank, has a manually operated
isolating valve located at the distribution rail. The spray pumps can be started
locally, or from the ECR or CCR (via the DCS system) and the emergency
headquarters.
Cargo Operating Manual
c) Ensure the deck driving water line supply valve is open.
d) With the power off, ensure that the bilge ejector pump turns freely
by hand.
e) Vent off the pump casing and ensure that it is flooded.
f) Start the pump and slowly open the discharge valve to the system.
The manifold water curtain(s) will now be supplied.
Each branch sub-divides into smaller branches. The accommodation front is
covered by 3 sub-branches. The spray nozzles are fitted approximately 1.2
metres apart and 450 or 650mm from the surface they are protecting. There are
various drains provided throughout the system.
Procedure to Supply the Deck Spray System Using the LPG Sea Water
Pump
Assuming all valves in the system are closed.
a) Open the spray section supply valve(s) as required at the
distribution rail.
b) Open the pump suction valve V330 and ensure the discharge
valve V331 is slightly open.
c) Ensure the deck water spray line supply valve is open.
d) Vent off the pump casing and ensure that it is flooded and ensure
that the pump turns freely by hand.
e) Start the pump and slowly open the discharge valve V331.
f) Check the delivery pressure is approximately 5 bar.
Manifold Curtain
The water curtains that protect the vessel’s hull during cargo operations are fed
from the deck driving water system. This system is supplied with sea water
from the bilge ejector pump.
Procedure to Supply the Manifold Water Curtains
Assuming all valves in the system are closed.
No.3 cargo tank
LPG compressor room
Starboard manifold area
LNG compressor room
Issue: 1
a) Open the port or starboard manifold curtain supply valve(s) as
required at the manifold area.
b) Open the bilge ejector pump sea chest suction valve and ensure
the discharge valve is slightly open.
Section 5.2.2 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 5.2.3a Forward Fire Pump System
V518
V514
V518
V527
V502
V526
V525
No.1 Cargo
Tank
V503
V517
V503
View of Emergency Fire Pump Engine Inertia Start
V514
View of Emergency Fire Pump Engine and Hydraulic Tank
Fire Main
Diesel Oil Tank
Diesel
Engine
Hydraulic
Oil Tank
V528
V531
Hatch
Water Spray
Covering
FO Transfer
Pump
View of Battery Charger on Aft Bulkead
Emergency
Fire Pump
Hydraulic
Motor
V530
Sea
Chest
Emergency
Fire Pump
and FO Transfer
Pump Space
Key
Fire Water
Sea Water
Hydraulic Oil
Compressed Air
Diesel Oil
View of Engine Cold Start Lever and Local Electric Start Pushbutton
Issue: 1
Section 5.2.3 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
5.2.3 Forward Emergency Fire Pump System
Emergency Fire Pump
Cargo Operating Manual
Preparation for the Operation or Testing of the Emergency Fire Pump
and Engine
a) Start the duct keel fan to vent the forward pump room.
Engine
Maker:
Type:
Serial No:
Capacity:
Hydraulic starter:
Lister
HR4 MA
582HR4AM22
45kW
Bryce Berger
Hydraulic Pump
Maker:
Type:
Capacity:
Kracht
KP 42/71 CIZJZOO
140 litres/min at 160 bar
Pump
Maker:
Type:
Capacity:
Ritz
4408/3st
50m3/h at 113 mwg
Hydraulic Motor
Maker:
Type:
Pressure:
Kracht
KM 22/50F 3 XALOO
120 bar
b) Open a hawse pipe valve one turn and the pump suction valve
V530 and discharge valve V531 fully.
c) Check the gas oil and hydraulic oil levels in the tanks.
d) Close the two engine exhaust pipe drains, pull out the engine cold
start lever and press the engine electric START pushbutton.
Alternatively, pressurise the start cylinder by pumping at least 60
strokes with the red lever before operating the hydraulic starter.
e) Allow 3 minutes for the engine to settle before moving the
hydraulic coupling lever to engage the fire pump hydraulic motor.
f) Enter the pump room to check the pump and note that the
discharge pressure should 10 bar.
To Stop the Engine/Pump
The forward emergency fire pump system can supply the fire and deck wash
system.
The pump is located in its own compartment aft of the fore peak and is a selfpriming centrifugal pump with its own direct sea suction. It is rated at 50m3/h
and is powered by the hydraulic motor. The hydraulic motor is driven from the
remote hydraulic pump which is driven by the diesel engine. The diesel engine,
pump and hydraulic tank are fitted in the diesel motor room area on the
starboard side of the bosun’s store.
a) After approximately 10 minutes disengage the hydraulic pump
and stop the engine by moving the stop lever towards the air
intake, the engine will run down. When the engine has completely
stopped, reset the lever.
b) Close the suction and discharge valves and open the exhuast pipe
drains.
c) Check the tension on the engine water pump drive belt and mop
up any oil that may have dripped during the test run period.
The pump is mounted in a compartment shared with the fuel oil transfer pump
which is also hydraulically driven. This design enables a high degree of
waterproof integrity etc.
The hydraulic tank is also used to supply the adjacent FO transfer pump which
is electrically driven. The hydraulic tank capacity is 240 litres.
The diesel engine has an air start motor which is solenoid valve operated. The
engine starting air receiver is also fitted in the same area of the focsle store.
There is also a manually operated Bryce Berger hydraulic starter.
Issue: 1
Section 5.2.3 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 5.2.4a Dry Powder Systems
Key
48
3
2
50
51
47
49
52
Hose Box
40
4
7
6
PLO 1500 Unit
33
19
20
PLO 750 Unit
14 15
8
5
21
Blanked Flanges
26
Drain Connection
2
Non-Return Valve
27
Powder Container
3
Filter
28
Limit Valve
4
Relief Vent
29
Pneumatic Release Piston
5
Release Rods
30
Main Powder Cock
6
Relief Cock
31
Testing/Flushing Connection
7
Pneumatic Piston
32
Stop Cock
8
Release Lever
33
Relief Cock
9
Release Mechanism
34
Pneumatic Release Piston
10
Electric Switch
35
Direction Cock
11
Pressure Cylinder (Nitrogen)
36
Flushing Connection
12
Nitrogen Control Cylinder
40
LP Pressure Gauge
13
Non-Return Valve
46
Powder Piping
14
Pneumatic Piping Control
47
Pneumatic Control Piping
15
Stop Cock
48
Powder Piping
16
Relief Cock
49
Pistol Trigger Nozzle
17
Flushing Pipe
50
Powder Hose
18
Stop Cock
51
Hose Box
19
Safety Valve
52
Stop Cock
20
Filling Opening
53
Pressure Reducer
21
HP Pressure Gauge
54
Release Cylinder (Nitrogen)
22
LP Pressure Gauge
HA
High Pressure Stop Cock
23
Pressure Regulator
HL
High Pressure Piping
24
Stop Cock
25
Pressurising Valve
53 54
47
Hose Box
1
16 17
22
5
Fill Level
8
9
HA
34
1
10
36
HA
35
29
28
HL
11
11
11
HL
24
23
30
27
25
25
26
Issue: 1
18
32
32
11
11
750 kg
Container
31
1,500 kg
Container
Dry Powder Room: Main System
Section 5.2.4 - Page 1 of 4
Norman Lady
5.2.4 Dry Powder Systems
Cargo Operating Manual
At the main container, carry out the following:
Main Systems
In normal circumstances, stop cocks (15), (24), (32) and HA must be open.
Relief cocks (6), (16), (33), relief cock (18) and test connection (31) must be
closed. All pipes must be connected.
Aft System
Procedure to Operate a Hose Box Outlet
b) The relief cock (16) is to be opened.
If a fire occurs, requiring the use of the system, the procedure is as follows:
c) The main powder cock (30) is to be closed manually.
Maker:
Type:
Totalit
PLO 1,500/750
The system consists of a dual 1,500/750kg system situated in the powder room,
located in the starboard forward accommodation block on the upper deck.
The remote hose stations for the system is located along the cargo tank dome
catwalk. These stations are equipped with nitrogen release bottles enabling the
dry powder systems to be activated remotely.
The system has dry powder containers filled with 1,500 and 750kg of ‘Totalit’
dry powder. The main pressure nitrogen bottles are fitted adjacent to the main
containers. There is a main dry powder valve with automatic opening. This
feeds a distribution manifold with a number of outlets and each outlet has a
distribution valve. The distribution valve has a pneumatic piston for opening
as well as a manual control. Each of the outlets is connected via a pipe to a hose
station.
Each hose station has a 30 metre hose fitted with a pistol type trigger nozzle
with a stopcock. To initiate the release of the dry powder from the hose
stations, there is a 3 litre 150 bar nitrogen bottle fitted with a handwheel,
pressure reducing valve and pressure gauge.
Theory of Operation
a) Remove the hose and trigger pistol from the hose box.
d) The stop cock (18) in the flushing pipe (17) is to be opened.
b) Fully open the release cylinder valve.
e) The stop cock (18) is to be closed as soon as the powder container
has been relieved of pressure by operating the powder pistols.
Observe the low pressure gauge (22).
c) Check the pressure reducing valve (53) and open stop cock (52).
d) Open the hose connection cock and operate the hand trigger valve
as required.
(Note: If the fire is extinguished, the operator should stand by in case of any
re-ignition. During this time the pistol trigger should be operated at short
intervals to flush the lines to ensure they remain clear.)
In the event of a remote release failure, the powder can be released locally at
the main container using the following procedure:
g) The powder pipeline and powder hose should be thoroughly
cleaned through, preferably using a compressed air line and
reducer (lower than 12 bar) via the flushing connection (31). The
pipeline and hose should be blown through with the cocks open.
Afterwards, stow the hoses in the figure eight configuration.
h) The pressure in the release cylinder and the secondary pressure in
the reduction valve should be checked using the following
procedure:
a) Manually open the powder direction cock (34) for the pipeline
required.
1. Close the stop valve (52) on the secondary pressure side of the
reduction valve (53).
b) Manually pull down the release lever (8).
2. Open the release cylinder (54) by turning the valve counterclockwise. The pressure in the bottle must not be more than 150
bar and not less than 50 bar. The secondary pressure in the
reduction valve must not be more than 8 bar and not less than 5
bar.
If the PLO 1500 unit is not sufficient or has run down, the PLO 750 unit should
be used as follows:
The powder is then fluidised and pressurised to 14 bar by the nitrogen. When
this service pressure is reached, limit valve (28) opens and pressurised nitrogen
flows through the piping (14) to the pneumatic release piston (29) which then
opens the main cock (30) for the powder. The pressurised powder in the
container flows through the syphon tubes in the container and out into the
powder pipe line to the hose box powder pipe and pistol unit.
Post Operation Procedure for the Main Systems
Issue: 1
f) Close the stop cock ‘HA’ in the high pressure pipeline.
Remote Release Failure
When the hose box nitrogen release cylinder (54) and local stop cock (52) is
opened, nitrogen flows through the pneumatic piping (47) to the corresponding
outlet release piston (34) for the direction cock (35) on the manifold. Nitrogen
also flows to the main nitrogen bottles’ release lever pneumatic piston (7),
releasing nitrogen into the main container via the pressure regulator (23) and
then through the pressurising valves (25). The regulator ensures the nitrogen
pressure does not exceed 14 bar in the main container.
(Note: If the main powder container pressure reaches 16 bar, the safety valve
will open.)
a) Close the stop cock (15) in the pneumatic control piping.
a) Manually close the stop cock (32) for the PLO 1500 unit.
3. Close the release cylinder (54) by turning the valve clockwise.
b) Open the PLO 750 unit’s supply stop cock (32) and manually pull
down the release lever (8).
At the hose box:
4. Open the stop valve (52) again.
(Note: If the pressure in the release cylinder is lower than 50 bar, it must be
replaced. The nitrogen for the cylinders must be ‘high percentage nitrogen’ ie,
a nitrogen content of at least 99%.)
a) Close the cylinder valve.
i) Close any direction cocks (35) which are open.
b) Close the hose connection cock.
j) Open the main container filling orifice (20) and refill with ‘Totalit
Super Powder’ using the correct filling funnel.
c) Stow the hose in a figure of eight configuration and secure.
Section 5.2.4 - Page 2 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 5.2.4b Dry Powder Systems: Hose Boxes and Units
No.6
No.5
No.4
No.3
No.2
No.1
Dry Powder
Room
NORMAN LADY
Location of Main System Hose Boxes
View of Deck Dry Powder Station Port No.3
Port No.4
Port No.3
Port No.2
Port No.1
Starboard No.3
Starboard No.2
Starboard No.1
Location of PLA 250 Dry Powder Units
View of Deck Dry Powder Hose Box No.1
Key
Port No.1
No.1
Issue: 1
PLA 250 Dry Powder Unit
Hose Boxes
Section 5.2.4 - Page 3 of 4
Norman Lady
k) Fill the container with 750/1,500kgs of powder. Ensure the
container is not completely full. The filling limit line is the upper
welding seam of the container. Fasten the top cover closed,
ensuring that the base is clean to assure tightness.
l) Replace the empty nitrogen cylinders (11) with cylinders which
are at least 220 bar in pressure. Ensure that stop cock ‘HA’ is
closed (see cylinder manufacturer’s instructions).
m) Check the pressure of the nitrogen cylinders (see cylinder
manufacturer’s instructions).
Each system has a dry powder container filled with 250kg of ‘Totalit’ dry
powder. The main pressure nitrogen bottle is fitted in front of the main
container. There is a main dry powder valve with automatic opening. This
feeds a distribution manifold with a number of outlets and each outlet has a
distribution valve. The distribution valve has a pneumatic piston for opening
as well as a manual control. Each of the outlets is connected via a pipe to a hose
station.
The hose station has a 30 metre hose fitted with a pistol type trigger nozzle
with a stopcock. To initiate the release of the dry powder from the hose
stations, there is a 3 litre 150 bar nitrogen bottle fitted with a handwheel,
pressure reducing valve and pressure gauge.
Cargo Operating Manual
On Completion of Fire Fighting
a) Close the release cylinder valve.
b) Close the red-handled hose connection cocks.
c) Open the green-handled pressure relief cocks. Operate the pistol
trigger to relieve pressure in the lines and container.
d) Close the pressure relief cocks.
e) Stow the hose in a figure of eight configuration and secure.
n) All connections should be thoroughly checked.
To Operate the System
o) All cocks should be brought into the operational position.
f) The system must now be recharged with ‘Totalit’ dry powder
strictly according to the manufacturer’s instructions.
If a fire occurs, requiring the use of the system, the procedure is as follows:
For the correct operation of the container, the relevant valves and cocks should
be set up and sealed for correct operation as follows:
a) Remove the hose and trigger pistol from the hose box.
Position
Valve/Cock Description
b) Fully open the release cylinder valve.
Open
Monitor three-way cock
Open
High pressure stop valve ‘HA’
Open
Stop cock (15)
Open
Stop cock (32)
Open
Stop cock (24)
Open
Stop cock (52)
Open
Stop cock (1)
Closed
Main powder cock (30)
Closed
Direction cock (35)
Closed
Stop cocks (18), (31) and (45)
Closed
Relief cocks (6), (16) and (33)
g) The nitrogen bottles must be refilled according to the
manufacturer’s instructions or replaced. The replacement bottles
must be 20 litre capacity and charged to a maximum pressure of
150 bar.
c) Ensure that the manometer indicates a satisfactory operating
pressure, ie, the needle is within the green segment.
d) Open the red-handled hose connection cocks, the green-handled
pressure relief cocks should be closed.
e) After a short delay the hose will become charged and the trigger
pistol can be used as required to fight the fire.
CAUTION
The operator should be ready for considerable jet reaction from the pistol
when operated.
The system is now ready for operation.
Deck Systems
Maker:
Type:
Totalit
PLA 250
There are seven 250kg dry powder systems strategically located around the
upper deck. These independent systems are equipped with a nitrogen release
bottle enabling the dry powder systems to be activated locally.
Issue: 1
Section 5.2.4 - Page 4 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 5.2.5a CO2 System
Emergency
Headquarters
Paint
Room
CO2 Release Lockers
(LNG Compressor Room,
LPG Compressor Room,
Electric Motor Room,
Cargo Control Room,
Vent Masts)
9
Cargo Control Room
12
Paint Store and
Incinerator Room
CO2 Release
Locker
15
4
CO2
Room
4
13
No.5
Cargo Tank
No.4
Cargo Tank
C
No.3
Cargo Tank
D
Engine
Room
1
Cargo Tank
Ventilation
Mast
Main Central
Store
CO2 Release Lockers
(Paint Store and
Incinerator
Room)
CO2
Room
Engine Room and LNG Room
CO2 Operating Panel
Key
LNG Compressor
Room
Local Cargo
Control Room
CO2 Master Valves
B
-
CO2 Starting Valve
C
-
CO2 Release Wire Handle to CO2 Start Cylinders
9
-
2" CO2 to LNG Control, Motor and LPG Room
D
-
Compressed Air Valve for Alarm Siren
10
-
CO2 Pressure Switches for Cutting off Deck Fans
Automatically Opened by Release Locker Door
11
-
CO2 Pressure Switches for Cutting off Ventilation in
8
-
Cargo Control Room and LNG Compressor Room
Engine Room and Boiler Room
1
Boiler
Casing
s
s
-
5" CO2 from CO2 Cylinders
12
-
5" CO2 to Engine Room
-
1
13
-
CO2 Release Locker for Ventilation Masts
3
-
3
14
-
Wire Release for 6 x 45kg CO2 Cylinders to Vent
4
-
Wire Release from CO2 Start Cylinders in 3/8" Pipe
Masts
-
1
-
1
-
3
-
1
2
5
6
7
CO2 Release Lockers
(LNG Compressor Room,
LPG Compressor Room,
Electric Motor Room,
Cargo Control Room,
Vent Masts)
Issue: 1
Emergency
Headquarters
LPG
Room
/8" Air to Alarm Sirens in Electric Motor Room
-
s
CO2 Startt C
(2 x 45Kg))
3
A
/2" CO2 from CO2 Start Cylinders in Deck Workshop
/8" Air from Instrument Air Receiver in Engine Room
/2" CO2 to Gang Release Working Piston No.1 and No.2 15
/2" CO2 to Ventilation Masts
/8" Air to Alarm Sirens in Engine Room
/2" CO2 to Gang Release Working Piston No.3
Key
Electrical Motor
Room
CO2 Smothering
Section 5.2.5 - Page 1 of 4
Norman Lady
5.2.5 CO2 System
Maker:
Type:
Cylinder size:
No. of cylinders:
Total CO2:
Procedure in the Event of a Fire in the Engine Room
Heien-Larssen
Centralised storage, remote release
45 kgs
189
8,820 kgs
The central CO2 flooding system covers the engine room, LNG compressor
room, electric motor room, LPG compressor room, cargo control room, cargo
tank ventilation masts, incinerator room and paint store. The central system
cylinders are situated in the CO2 room, located extreme aft on the main deck
and the two starter cylinders are situated in the deck workshop on the starboard
side of the main deck.
The paint store is covered by two cylinders situated in a locker on the main
deck on the port side below the paint store.
The allocation of cylinders is as follows:
Engine room
189 cylinders
LNG compressor room
6 cylinders
Electric motor room
2 cylinders
LPG compressor room
4 cylinders
Cargo control room
2 cylinders
Cargo tank ventilation masts
6 cylinders
Incinerator room
3 cylinders
Paint store
2 cylinders
WARNING
Release of CO2 into any space must only be considered when all other
options have failed and then only on the direct instructions of the Master.
Flooding of the protected areas is achieved by the operation of the valves from
the control cabinet in the emergency headquarters on the starboard side of the
main deck.
Upon opening the control cabinet door, the CO2 alarm is activated and the
ventilation fans for that area are stopped. The pilot gas is directed by the
operation of the respective valve onto the gang release line for the selected
area.
a) Stop any machinery within the engine room, check that all doors,
hatches and fire flaps are shut and that all ventilation is stopped.
However, this should not delay the release of CO2.
b) Ensure all personnel have evacuated the engine room and have
been accounted for.
c) Go to the emergency headquarters on the starboard side of the
main deck. Unlock the control cabinet for the engine room area
and open the door.
d) The alarm sirens will activate due to the door releasing the spring
operated valve which directs compressed air from the engine
room to the piston operated trip switch, situated on the inboard
bulkead of the fire headquarters.
e) Pull all the valve levers outwards.
f) Pull the CO2 wire release handle to activate the starter cylinders.
The starter cylinders release CO2 gas to operate the gang release pistons on the
port side of the CO2 room.
g) CO2 will now fill the affected area.
h) Proceed directly to the CO2 room to ensure that the correct
number of cylinders have discharged for the particular area.
Cargo Operating Manual
Should any cylinder discharge accidentally, it will pressurise the main line up
to the stop valve. This line is monitored by a pressure switch and will activate
a ‘CO2 leakage’ alarm.
Overpressure of the main line is prevented by a safety valve, which will vent
the gas to atmosphere.
WARNING
CO2 gas will suffocate personnel in its vicinity. All personnel should be
instructed to evacuate rooms and spaces immediately when the alarm
sounds.
Procedure in the Event of a Fire in the Cargo Tank Ventilation Masts
a) Go to the emergency headquarters on the starboard side of the
main deck. Unlock the control cabinet for the ventilation masts
and open the door.
b) Pull the valve lever outwards to activate the six cylinders in the
central CO2 flooding system.
c) Proceed directly to the CO2 room to ensure that the correct
number of cylinders have discharged for the particular area.
d) If the starter system fails to operate the cylinders, the CO2 can be
released by operating the cylinder levers by hand.
e) CO2 will now fill the pipe to the ventilation masts.
Procedure in the Event of a Fire in the LNG Compressor Room
i) If the starter system fails to operate the cylinders, the CO2 can be
released by operating the cylinder levers by hand.
j) Do not re-enter the engine room for at least 24 hours and ensure
that all reasonable precautions have been taken, such as
maintaining boundary inspections, noting cooling down rates
and/or any hot spots which may have been found. After this
period, an assessment party using radio communication and
wearing breathing apparatus and lifelines can enter the space
quickly through a door, which is then shut behind them. Check
that the fire is extinguished and that all surfaces have cooled prior
to ventilating the engine room. Premature opening could cause reignition if oxygen contacts hot combustible material.
a) Go to the emergency headquarters on the starboard side of the
main deck. Unlock the control cabinet for the LNG compressor
room and open the door.
b) The alarm sirens will activated due to the door releasing the
spring operated valve which directs compressed air from the
engine room to the LNG compressor room alarm sirens.
c) Proceed directly to the CO2 room and manually release the six
cylinders marked LNG - COMPRESSOR ROOM.
For added safety, the master valve is interlocked with the release locker door
in the closed position.
Issue: 1
Section 5.2.5 - Page 2 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 5.2.5a CO2 System
Emergency
Headquarters
Paint
Room
CO2 Release Lockers
(LNG Compressor Room,
LPG Compressor Room,
Electric Motor Room,
Cargo Control Room,
Vent Masts)
9
Cargo Control Room
12
Paint Store and
Incinerator Room
CO2 Release
Locker
15
4
CO2
Room
4
13
No.5
Cargo Tank
No.4
Cargo Tank
C
No.3
Cargo Tank
D
Engine
Room
1
Cargo Tank
Ventilation
Mast
Main Central
Store
CO2 Release Lockers
(Paint Store and
Incinerator
Room)
CO2
Room
Engine Room and LNG Room
CO2 Operating Panel
Key
LNG Compressor
Room
Local Cargo
Control Room
CO2 Master Valves
B
-
CO2 Starting Valve
C
-
CO2 Release Wire Handle to CO2 Start Cylinders
9
-
2" CO2 to LNG Control, Motor and LPG Room
D
-
Compressed Air Valve for Alarm Siren
10
-
CO2 Pressure Switches for Cutting off Deck Fans
Automatically Opened by Release Locker Door
11
-
CO2 Pressure Switches for Cutting off Ventilation in
8
-
Cargo Control Room and LNG Compressor Room
Engine Room and Boiler Room
1
Boiler
Casing
s
s
-
5" CO2 from CO2 Cylinders
12
-
5" CO2 to Engine Room
-
1
13
-
CO2 Release Locker for Ventilation Masts
3
-
3
14
-
Wire Release for 6 x 45kg CO2 Cylinders to Vent
4
-
Wire Release from CO2 Start Cylinders in 3/8" Pipe
Masts
-
1
-
1
-
3
-
1
2
5
6
7
CO2 Release Lockers
(LNG Compressor Room,
LPG Compressor Room,
Electric Motor Room,
Cargo Control Room,
Vent Masts)
Issue: 1
Emergency
Headquarters
LPG
Room
/8" Air to Alarm Sirens in Electric Motor Room
-
s
CO2 Startt C
(2 x 45Kg))
3
A
/2" CO2 from CO2 Start Cylinders in Deck Workshop
/8" Air from Instrument Air Receiver in Engine Room
/2" CO2 to Gang Release Working Piston No.1 and No.2 15
/2" CO2 to Ventilation Masts
/8" Air to Alarm Sirens in Engine Room
/2" CO2 to Gang Release Working Piston No.3
Key
Electrical Motor
Room
CO2 Smothering
Section 5.2.5 - Page 3 of 4
Norman Lady
d) Do not re-enter the LNG compressor room for at least 24 hours
and ensure that all reasonable precautions have been taken, such
as maintaining boundary inspections, noting cooling down rates
and/or any hot spots which may have been found. After this
period, an assessment party using radio communication and
wearing breathing apparatus and lifelines can enter the space
quickly through a door, which is then shut behind them. Check
that the fire is extinguished and that all surfaces have cooled prior
to ventilating the LNG compressor room. Premature opening
could cause re-ignition if oxygen contacts hot combustible
material.
Procedure in the Event of a Fire in the Electric Motor Room
d) Do not re-enter the LPG compressor room for at least 24 hours
and ensure that all reasonable precautions have been taken, such
as maintaining boundary inspections, noting cooling down rates
and/or any hot spots which may have been found. After this
period, an assessment party using radio communication and
wearing breathing apparatus and lifelines can enter the space
quickly through a door, which is then shut behind them. Check
that the fire is extinguished and that all surfaces have cooled prior
to ventilating the LPG compressor room. Premature opening
could cause re-ignition if oxygen contacts hot combustible
material.
Procedure in the Event of a Fire in the Cargo Control Room
a) Go to the emergency headquarters on the starboard side of the
main deck. Unlock the control cabinet for the electric motor room
and open the door.
a) Go to the emergency headquarters on the starboard side of the
main deck. Unlock the control cabinet for the control room and
open the door.
b) The alarm sirens will activated due to the door releasing the
spring operated valve which directs compressed air from the
engine room to the electric motor room alarm sirens.
b) The alarm sirens will activated due to the door releasing the
spring operated valve which directs compressed air from the
engine room to the control room alarm sirens.
c) Proceed directly to the CO2 room and manually release the two
cylinders marked EL MOTOR ROOM.
c) Proceed directly to the CO2 room and manually release the two
cylinders marked CONTROL ROOM.
d) Do not re-enter the electric motor room for at least 24 hours and
ensure that all reasonable precautions have been taken, such as
maintaining boundary inspections, noting cooling down rates
and/or any hot spots which may have been found. After this
period, an assessment party using radio communication and
wearing breathing apparatus and lifelines can enter the space
quickly through a door, which is then shut behind them. Check
that the fire is extinguished and that all surfaces have cooled prior
to ventilating the electric motor room. Premature opening could
cause re-ignition if oxygen contacts hot combustible material.
d) Do not re-enter the control room for at least 24 hours and ensure
that all reasonable precautions have been taken, such as
maintaining boundary inspections, noting cooling down rates
and/or any hot spots which may have been found. After this
period, an assessment party using radio communication and
wearing breathing apparatus and lifelines can enter the space
quickly through a door, which is then shut behind them. Check
that the fire is extinguished and that all surfaces have cooled prior
to ventilating the control room. Premature opening could cause
re-ignition if oxygen contacts hot combustible material.
Procedure in the Event of a Fire in the LPG Compressor Room
a) Go to the emergency headquarters on the starboard side of the
main deck. Unlock the control cabinet for the LPG compressor
room and open the door.
b) The alarm sirens will activated due to the door releasing the
spring operated valve which directs compressed air from the
engine room to the LPG compressor room alarm sirens.
c) Proceed directly to the CO2 room and manually release the four
cylinders marked LPG - COMPRESSOR ROOM.
Issue: 1
Cargo Operating Manual
d) Ensure that all reasonable precautions are taken, such as the
cooling of the boundary and/or any hot spots which may be found.
Procedure in the Event of a Fire in the Incinerator Room
a) Close the incinerator room door and the ventilation flap, in order
to isolate the fire.
b) Isolate the incinerator by pressing the emergency stop pushbutton
on the bulkhead, aft of the incinerator door and closing the gas oil
tank outlet valve.
c) Go to the control cabinet on the starboard side of the central CO2
flooding system room on the main deck aft. Unlock the control
cabinet for the incinerator and open the door.
d) Pull the handle to activate the three cylinders in the central CO2
flooding system.
e) Proceed directly to the CO2 room to ensure that the correct
number of cylinders have discharged for the particular area.
f) Ensure that all reasonable precautions are taken, such as the
cooling of the boundary and/or any hot spots which may be found.
Procedure in the Event of a Fire in the Paint Store
a) Close the paint store door and the ventilation flap, in order to
isolate the fire.
b) Go to the control cabinet on the starboard side of the central CO2
flooding system room on the main deck aft. Unlock the control
cabinet for the paint store and open the door.
c) Pull the handle to activate the two cylinders in the locker on the
main deck on the port side below the paint store.
Section 5.2.5 - Page 4 of 4
Norman Lady
5.2.6 Emergency Headquarters
Cargo Operating Manual
Emergency stop pushbuttons for the following:
Engine room ventilation fans
The emergency headquarters is situated on the starboard side of the
accommodation block on the main deck. The room contains the following
safety equipment:
Start and stop pushbuttons for the engine room forward and aft fire and
deck wash pumps
Accommodation ventilation fans
Deck ventilation fans
Boil-off gas pipe duct ventilation fans
Port boiler steam stop valve
Cargo ESD activation lever
Starboard boiler steam stop valve
Three sets of fireman outfits
Boiler heavy fuel oil supply pumps
Recharging compressor for the self contained breathing apparatus
bottles
Automatic exchange telephone
Boil-off gas valve V2140
Breathing Apparatus Compressor
Spare fire hoses and fire axes
Maker:
Model:
Operating pressure:
Motor:
CO2 system release cabinets for the following areas:
Starting Procedure
Release valve to close engine room skylight hatch
Drager emergency escape breathing device
Engine room
LNG room
Electric motor room
Cargo control room
LPG room
Cargo tank ventilation masts
Quick-closing system for the following valves:
Diesel oil storage tank outlet valve
Port HFO storage tank outlet valve
Starboard HFO storage tank outlet valve
Gas ventilation flap valve
Bauer
U1H
200 bar
2.2kW
a) Check the oil level in the compressor sump and replenish it if
necessary.
b) Open the filling valve and the vent valve first, then the bottle
valve.
c) Turn the switch on the starter panel to the ON position and press
the START pushbutton.
d) Close the vent valve after the compressor has started producing
air.
e) When the pressure gauge indicates 200 bar, close the bottle valve,
followed by the filling valve.
f) Open the vent valve and stop the compressor by pressing the
STOP pushbutton on the starter panel.
Veiw of Breathing Apparatus Compressor
Issue: 1
Section 5.2.6 - Page 1 of 1
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 5.3.1a Cargo Plant Water Cooling System
To Outboard
Inert Gas
Generator
From/To
Fresh Water
Cooling
System
V335
Inboard
Inert Gas
Generator
To
LPG Plant
IG Refrigeration Plant
Condenser
V409
To
Water Spray
System
V452
V340
V407A
V341
HD
From
Auxiliary
Circulating
Pump
Tube and Shell Type
Fresh Water Cooler
V408
From/To
Auxiliary
Circulating
Pump
V331
Sea Water
Cooling
Pump
(650m3/h at 25mth)
PI
3a
HC
3b
PI
From
Bilge
Eductor
Sea Water
Electrical Signal
Instrumentation
V322
HC
3a
IG Plant
CW Pump
(340m3/h at 5kg/cm2)
From
Bilge Main
Emergency
Bilge
Suction
To
Aft Peak
Tank
PI
3c
HC
3c
LPG Plant
CW Pump
(170m3/h at 5kg/cm2)
V330
Starboard
Forward
Bilge
Well
V407A
Sea
Chest
Bilge
Issue: 1
Sea
Chest
V408
Connection From
Fire and Deck Wash
System
V323
PC
52
V408
V407A
V407
Fresh Water
HD/LD
Compressors
LO Coolers
HD
To/From
Engine Room
Fresh Water
Cooling
System
To/From Engine Room
Fresh Water Cooling System
PCV
52
V412
V479
V340
Plate Type
Fresh Water Cooler
Key
V409
Overboard
LD
V335
V451 PI
Inboard
From Outboard
Inert Gas Generator
Inert Gas
Fresh Water
Generator
Circulating Pump
V409
V329
Section 5.3.1 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
5.3
Cargo Compressor Room Systems
5.3.1 Cooling Water System
Inert Gas Sea WaterCooling Pump
Maker:
Thune Eureka
No. of sets:
1
Type:
CGD 200 centrifugal vertical
Capacity:
340m3/h at 5kg/cm2
Speed:
1,750 rpm
LPG Sea WaterPump
Maker:
No. of sets:
Type:
Capacity:
Thune Eureka
1
CGB 100 centrifugal vertical
170m3/h at 5kg/cm2
Sea water pump is used to cool the LNG high duty (HD) and low duty (LD)
compressors’ lubricating oil coolers, the inert gas refrigeration plant cooler and
the inert gas generator scrubber towers.
The compressor coolers are supplied with sea water circulated by the LPG
cooling water pump and may be cross-connected from the IG sea water system
or the engine room SW cooling system.
The IG refrigeration plant cooler and the IG generators are supplied with sea
water from the IG cooling water pump. This system may be cross-connected
from the LPG sea water cooling pump.
The auxiliary SW circulating pump can also be used to supply the cooling
water in an emergency.
Both the IG and LPG pumps are normally used together, with the crossconnection valve used when required if one pump is not available.
Operating Procedures
Inert Gas Cooling Water Pump System
a) Ensure that the engine room SW cooling system and LPG cooling
system cross-connection valves are closed.
Cargo Operating Manual
LPG Circulation Pump System
a) Ensure that the deck water spray line supply valve V479, the LPG
plant supply valve, the overboard and aft peak tank filling valves
are closed.
b) Ensure that the sea chest pump suction valve V329 is open.
b) Ensure that the IG cooling system stop valves V335 are closed.
c) Ensure that the sea chest suction valve V329 is open.
c) Ensure the discharge valve V407 is slightly open and suction
valve V407A is open.
d) Open the pump suction valve V330 and ensure the discharge
valve V331 is slightly open.
d) With the pump isolated, ensure that the pump turns freely by
hand.
e) With the power off, ensure that the pump turns freely by hand.
e) Vent off the pump casing and ensure that it is flooded.
f) Vent off the pump casing and ensure that it is flooded.
f) Ensure that the inlet valves V408 and outlet valves V409 on all
the compressor coolers to be used are open and that the drain
valves are shut.
g) Ensure that the inlet and outlet valves on all the IG plant and
coolers to be used are open and that the drain valves are shut.
g) Open the overboard valve V412 from the cooler discharge line.
h) Open the overboard valve V341 from the cooler and IG plant
discharge line.
h) Start the LNG circulation pump and slowly open the discharge
valve V407.
i) Start the IG pump and slowly open the discharge valve V331.
i) Check that the pump delivery pressure is at least 2 bar.
j) Check that the delivery pressure ia approximately 3.5 bar.
k) Check that all the in-use coolers are venting off at the outlet water
boxes to ensure that no air is entrained in the units. Ensure the
vent valves are tightly closed.
The IG plant can now be started as required. See section 4.7.1 for further
information.
j) Check that all the in-use coolers are venting off at the outlet water
boxes to ensure that no air is entrained in the units. Ensure the
vent valves are tightly closed.
The compressors can now be used as required. See section 4.4 for further
information.
The IG cooling water pumps also supply the water spray system.
Issue: 1
Section 5.3.1 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 5.3.2a Steam To Deck Consumers
LNG
Vaporiser
V937 V937A V937
HD
Compressor
HD
Compressor
Compressor
LD
Compressor
Compressor
V1035A V1035
V1035
Compressor
V1035
V937
Steam
Separator
V886 V886A
V909 V909A
Turbine
Turbine
V890
V921 V921A
V1279
V1039
Turbine
V1007
V1039
V1038
Cargo Heater
Turbine
Pre-Lub.
Pump
Turbine
Pre-Lub.
Pump
V888
Turbine
Pre-Lub.
Pump
V942
V941
V941
Drain to Deck
V1038
Drain to Deck
Cargo Heater
To
Atmospheric
Condenser
V911
V1032
V1032
Key
V1032
V1033
V1033
V911
V1032
Condensate
Exhaust
V1032
V908
V1032
V1032
To Contaminated
Steam Condenser
Issue: 1
V1033A V1033
V911A V911
V1032
Steam
V1032
Steam Supply From
LP Steam Generator
V1033
V941
V1038
Drain to Deck
V1033
V1040
V941
V1038
V1033A V1033
V911
V1040
V889
V911A V911
V942
V1040
V889
V911
V1002
Main Deck Steam Exhaust Line
From Forward Winches
To Deaerating Tank In Engine Room
Forward Winches
V902
Drain on Deck
V1042
V1035
Section 5.3.2 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
5.3.2 Steam to Cargo Consumers
Cargo Equipment Steam Supplies
All the steam requirements for the vessel are generated in the two main boilers.
In each boiler, steam from the steam drum is led to the primary superheater
section. Steam from the superheater outlet is led to the internal desuperheater,
situated in the steam drum, from where it is distributed to the various steam
services (for further information about the desuperheated steam system, see the
vessel’s Machinery Operating Manual, section 2.1.1).
Superheated steam from the outlet of each boiler is also led to two external
cooling/pressure control valve desuperheaters. The internal desuperheater
supplies the steam required during normal steaming conditions, with No.1
desuperheater ‘making up’ if the demand exceeds the output of the internal
desuperheater. These desuperheaters supply the ship’s services.
High duty compressors A and B, the low duty compressor, the cargo heaters
and the vaporisers are all fed with 10kg/cm2 steam from the low pressure steam
system.
Cargo Operating Manual
This is fitted to provide the oil supply for the turbine and compressor before
and during starting until the mechanically driven main gear oil pump is up to
speed and feeding oil.
The steam supply to the vaporisers is controlled by valve 937A. This valve is
regulated by the level controller according to the condensate level. If the level
rises too high, the steam valve is closed, shutting off steam to the vaporiser.
The steam supply to the cargo heaters is controlled by valve 911A. This valve
is regulated by the level controller according to the condensate level. If the
level rises too high, the steam valve is closed, shutting off steam to the heater.
This action halts any increases in water level which could lead to the formation
of ice.
The steam supply to the atmospheric heater is controlled by valve 946A. This
valve is regulated by the signal from the heater’s temperature controller. The
controller regulates the valve in accordance with the temperature received
from a temperature sensor located in the void space outlet.
There are various steam traps and drains fitted to the system to remove
condensate and therefore improve the efficiency of the heat exchangers.
The low pressure steam service system is supplied from the low pressure steam
generator at a pressure of 10 kg/cm2. In an emergency, the LP steam services
can be supplied from the desuperheated steam system. The low pressure steam
service system also feeds the winches and windlasses. For further information
about the low pressure steam system, see the vessel’s Machinery Operating
Manual, section 2.1.5.
Cargo Machinery
The steam is used as follows:
To drive the HD and LD compressors and their associated
lubricating oil pumps
To heat the compressor’s lubricating oil heaters
To heat the LNG cargo heaters
To heat the LNG vaporiser
The low pressure steam is supplied from the engine room to a steam header
located in the LNG compressor room. The desuperheated steam for HD
compressor C is supplied directly from the engine room to the compressor.
The steam supply to each compressor is regulated by their control valve
according to the compressor suction pressure. As well as driving the main
compressor turbine, steam is used to drive a small turbine which drives a
prelubricating oil pump.
Issue: 1
Section 5.3.2 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 5.4.1a Mooring Winches and Deck Steam System
V1001
V905
V905
V902
V1005
LNG
Compressor
Room
V1005
V1005
V905
V905
Air
Cond.
V1028
V905
V1005
Cargo
Control
Room
V905
V1005
V1028
V915
V905
V1005
V1005
V1005
V1028
V905
V1005
V1005
PCV
915A
V905
V905
V1005
V915A
Deaerating
Tank
V918C
Vent
Cooling
Water
Port and
Starboard
Overboard
De-icing
From Vaporiser
in LNG Room
V934
TCV
914A
V914
Hot
Water
Heater
V914A
Makeup from
Desuperheated
Steam System
V912A
PIC
53
V815
V901A
V914
To LP Steam
Generator
Heating Coils
Issue: 1
Contaminated
Condenser
Cont.
Condenser
V901
LP Steam
Generator
10 bar at 20 tonnes/h
Steam Exhaust
Steam
V1002
V900
PI
53
To Fire Pump
Sea Chest
De-icing
Key
To FO Tanks
and Boilers
V904
V814 V814A V814B
V1000
To FO Tanks
V913
V912
H.F.O Tank
V1011
V913A
V900A
PT
53
V1010
V1030
V917
PCV
013A
V1000
V1030
V914
1st Poop Dk Port
V913B
V1009
V934
Condensate
Instrumentation
V904 V904A V904
TI
PI
IG Dehumidifier
Dryer
To
Filter Tank
To
Filter Tank
Electrical Signal
Mooring Winch
Section 5.4.1 - Page 1 of 4
Norman Lady
5.4
Deck Machinery and Systems
5.4.1 Mooring Winches, Windlasses and Deck Steam System
AS Pusnes Mekaniske Verksted
WRW 14
M60 CU 14a0.14a
If the winches have been left unused for a long period of time, the following
procedure should be applied:
a) Check the oil level in the gear case by observation of the dipstick.
b) Check that the supply steam valves are closed (on all winches)
and check that all control levers are at the NEUTRAL position.
AS Pusnes Mekaniske Verksted
30/60 SM
2
Focsle Centre Winch
Maker:
AS Pusnes Mekaniske Verksted
Type :
30 SM
No. of sets:
1
Focsle Port and Starboard Outer (Spring) Winches
Maker:
AS Pusnes Mekaniske Verksted
Type:
30 SM
No. of sets:
2
Aft Port and Starboard Outer (Spring) Winches
Maker:
AS Pusnes Mekaniske Verksted
Type:
30 SM
No. of sets:
2
Aft Mooring Deck Port Starboard Outer Winches
Maker:
AS Pusnes Mekaniske Verksted
Type:
30 SM
No. of sets:
1
Aft Mooring Deck Midship Winches
Maker:
AS Pusnes Mekaniske Verksted
Type:
30 SM
No. of sets:
2
The deck winches and windlass are fed from the deck steam system. This
system is fed from the engine room low pressure steam generator. For further
information about the deck steam system, see the vessel’s Machinery
Operating Manual section 2.1.2 Desuperheated Steam System.
Issue: 1
The winches are ready for service, the steam system supply valves are open
and there is no condensate (eg, arriving in harbour):
a) Open the winch steam supply valve.
Mooring Winches
Windlass Winches
Maker:
Type:
No. of sets:
Operating Procedure - Normal
Operating Procedure for Winches Unused for a Long Period
Windlass
Maker:
Chain stopper type:
Cable lifter type:
Each winch uses a double acting 2 cylinder steam engine driving a single
reduction gear in an oil bath. The main gear case bearings and the crosshead
are force lubricated from a plunger type pump.
Cargo Operating Manual
b) Engage the drum or head coupling by moving the coupling lever,
if necessary, moving the control lever gently around the
NEUTRAL position. When engaged, lock the coupling lever with
the locking pin.
c) Control the winch by slowly moving the control lever in the
required direction.
c) Open the deck steam system supply valve.
d) Check that all the drums and heads have their drives disengaged
and that the brakes are on. Set the control lever to the LOWER
position.
e) Open the exhaust valve.
d) To hoist/heave in, push the control lever slowly in the HEAVE
direction. The speed increases proportionally with the lever
travel.
e) To lower/pay out, pull the control lever slowly in the LOWER
direction.
f) Open the bypass valve (between the supply and exhaust lines).
Sensitive Winch Handling Procedure
g) Open the drain cock.
When very slow or delicate winch handling is required, the procedure is as
follows:
h) Open the supply steam valve until the winch runs very slowly and
leave in this condition for approximately 2 minutes.
a) Before engaging or connecting up to the load, close the steam
supply valve.
i) Close the drain cock and the bypass valves. This will cause the
winch to accelerate. If any water shocks are observed, repeat the
draining sequence.
b) Set the control lever to the HEAVE position.
j) Slowly close the supply steam valve until the winch is idling
slowly. Lubricate all the bearings (for further in-depth lubricating
instructions refer to the manufacturer’s manual).
c) Connect up the load. The winch is now controlled by means of
adjusting the steam supply valve: Open the valve slowly to hoist
and close it slowly to lower the load. When lowering, the load will
run away in a controlled manner, opening the valve
(anticlockwise) will apply a braking effect.
k) Increase the speed to full slack-rope speed for approximately 3 or
4 seconds.
l) Move the control lever to the NEUTRAL position. The winch is
now ready for service. If the winch is not to be used immediately,
the steam supply valve should be closed.
Section 5.4.1 - Page 2 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 5.4.1b Winch/Windlass
Gear Wheel Cover
Live Steam
Valve
Exhaust Steam
Valve
Veiw of Winch/Windlass Steam and Exhaust Valves
Cylinder
Guide
Case
Crank
Case
Views of WInch/Windlass Drive Cylinders and Main Gear Wheel Showing Pistons etc
Issue: 1
Section 5.4.1 - Page 3 of 4
Norman Lady
Anchor/Windlass Operation - Dropping an Anchor
a) At the windlass drive winches, engage and disengage the
couplings to suit the anchor requirements, ie, one or two drive
engines.
b) Ensure the control levers are in the NEUTRAL position and open
the steam supply valve and the exhaust valve of the winches.
c) Engage the cable lifter.
Hydraulic Cable Lifter Brake
The hydraulically operated brake consists of the power pack, operating lever
and actuator cylinder. The power pack is situated at the forward bulkhead in
the focsle store. The hydraulic power pack consists of a 100 litre oil tank,
4.5kW electric motor and two tandem driven pumps. The brake cylinder is
energised by moving the respective port or starboard operating lever, situated
on a console on deck between the two windlass. The cable lifter brake may be
operated manually or hydraulically. To operate the brake manually, turn the
handle clockwise, the brake will engage gradually according to the turns
applied. To operate the brake hydraulically:
f) With the control lever in the HEAVE position, remove the
lashings.
g) With the control lever still in the HEAVE position, regulate the
the anchor lowering speed down to the water surface by gently
moving the control lever. The speed should not exceed
15metres/min.
The brake is failsafe in operation as a loss of hydraulic pressure will cause the
brake to be applied due to the fitting of spring discs in the piston.
Completion of Mooring Operations
When the vessel is safely tied up, the winch ballcocks can be set to
AUTOMATIC and the winches will automatically hold the lines under tension
independent of loading, discharging and tidal range. However, some harbours
have restrictions concerning the use of automatic winches when alongside and
the vessel’s winches are usually left in the HAND configuration.
After Use - Vessel Left Harbour
d) Set the control lever to HEAVE.
e) Release the cable lifter brake so that the chain is tightened enough
to disengage the chain stopper. Tighten the brake again.
Cargo Operating Manual
a) Tighten the brake manually until the two indicators cover each
other.
a) Lock the control levers in the NEUTRAL position.
b) Start the power pack in the focsle store.
b) Close the steam supply valves and the exhaust valves.
c) Move the operating lever to the BRAKE RELEASE position and
hold until the brake is released.
c) Close the main deck system steam valve for the winches, if the
weather conditions permit.
d) The released anchor speed can be controlled by moving the
operating lever toward the STOP position.
d) Open the drain cocks on the winches.
h) Stop the windlass when the anchor is just above the water. Tighten
the cable lifter brake.
e) Open draining cocks on the pipe lines. When the winches are cold
and all condensate has drained away, the drain cocks may be
closed.
f) The winches should be left with all the brakes tightened down and
the couplings disengaged.
i) Disengage the cable lifter. Gently moving the control lever will
maker the disengaging easier.
j) The anchor is ready to be dropped. This should be carried out in
steps in a controlled manner, using the brake as required.
k) When sufficient cable is payed out, the brake should be tightened
on and the stopper bar fitted, if required.
Anchor/Windlass Operation - Heaving/Stowing an Anchor
a) Heave in the anchor reducing speed accordingly as the anchor
reaches home.
b) When the anchor is fully home, the winch heave can then be
increased to ensure the anchor is seated correctly for lashing.
c) Secure the anchor correctly with lashings and make fast.
d) Close the steam supply valve and disengage the cable lifter.
View of the Windlass Hydraulic Brake
Issue: 1
Section 5.4.1 - Page 4 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 5.4.2a Mooring Arrangement
MD-5
MD-3
MD-4
2 Breast Lines
2 Breast Lines
MD-6
MD-2
MD-1
4 Stern Lines
2 Springs
BD-4
No.12
2 Springs
BD-3
No.13
No.11
BD-3
Loading Platform
BD-2
3 Head Lines
BD-1
No.1
No.2
No.3
No.10
No.4
No.9
No.8
No.6
No.5
No.7
Issue: 1
Section 5.4.2 - Page 1 of 1
Norman Lady
5.4.3 Pilot and Accommodation Ladders
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 5.4.3a Required Boarding Arrangement for Pilot
Pilot Ladders
There must not
be any shackles,
knots or splices
Two SOLAS compliant pilot ladders are available, for use in pilot embarkation
and disembarkation in cases where the accommodation ladder cannot be used
due to sea conditions for example.
The steps must
be equally spaced
The steps must
be horizontal
The pilot ladders are moved from their stowage position to a position in which
the pilot ladder can be used in conjunction with the accommodation ladder to
facilitate easier access for the pilot.
Spreaders must not be
lashed between steps
The side ropes must
be equally spaced
The loops are a tripping
hazard for the pilot and
can become fouled on
the pilot launch
Officer In Contact With The Bridge
Accommodation ladder should rest firmly against
ship's side and should lead aft.
Maximum 55° slope.
Lower platform horizontal.
Rigid handrail preferred.
Pilot ladder must
extend at least
2 metres above
lower platform
Rigging for Freeboards of 9 metre or Less
Ladders to rest
firmly against
ship's side
3 to 7 metres depending on
size of pilot launch and swell
TOLIP
PILOT
A Pilot Ladder Combined With An Accommodation Ladder Is Usually The Safer Method
Of Embarking Or Disembarking A Pilot On Ships With A Freeboard Of More Than 9 Metres
Man-ropes without
knots. Min. diameter
28mm (If required
by pilot)
Spreader
Min. 180cm long
Maximum 8 steps
between spreaders
30-38
cm
Steps must be against
ship's side
Very Dangerous
Ladder too long
5th step must
be a spreader
Side ropes
Min. diameter 18mm
PILOT
40cm
Min
PILOT
PILOT
Height required
by pilot
At night pilot ladder and ship's deck lit
by forward shining overside light
Issue: 1
Section 5.4.3 - Page 1 of 3
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 5.4.3b Pilot and Accommodation Ladders
Hoisting
Winch
Upper Deck
Hoisting Wires
Hoisting
Winch
Hoisting Wire
Plan
Rail For Upper
Platform
Rest's
Hoisting
Winch
Maximum
Angle 55°
Pilot Ladder
Turn
Table
Issue: 1
Section 5.4.3 - Page 2 of 3
Norman Lady
Accommodation Ladders
Maker:
Type:
Serial No.
No. of sets:
Capacity:
Speed:
Acta
16kNS-12A
99.32510.01
2
2 x 6kN
10m/minute
One aluminium alloy accommodation ladder is provided on each side of the
main deck. The ladders are traversed, lowered and hoisted by means of
compressed air motors operated from a control stand situated at the ship’s side.
(Note: The ladders are designed to reach the ballast water line with an angle
of inclination of not more than 55°. Always leave at least 2 layers of wire on
the lowering drum. Always check it is safe to lower or raise the ladder.)
Procedure for Lowering the Accommodation Ladder
The accommodation ladder on the port or starboard side is controlled from its
own control stand. Compressed air motors are used to hoist/lower and to swing
the ladder in and out.
WARNING
This procedure requires work to take place outside of the ship’s rails.
Appropriate personal protective equipment should be donned including
lifelines attached to a suitable strong point. At night there must be
adequate illumination to safely complete the task.
Cargo Operating Manual
f) The two lower lightweight platform stanchions are then fitted.
Roping of the lower platform is then carried out and when
complete, the ropes are led up each side of the ladder forming the
middle rail.
g) Fit the upper platform ropes. The ladder is now rigged and can be
lowered when required, keeping an eye on the tightness of the
ropes.
h) Check there is a lifebuoy available, that the deck is clear of
obstructions and a heaving line is ready. If using the ladder in
port, a safety net is to be rigged.
Securing
a) Hoist the ladder until the handrails are just below the davit.
b) One man wearing harness and an inflatable life jacket unlashes
the platform and ladder ropes.
c) Swivel and remove the stanchions from the upper and lower
platforms of the ladder.
d) The second man wearing harness and an inflatable life jacket
removes the pins securing the ladder handrails, one at a time. He
then lowers each handrail in turn, so that the handrails rest flat on
the ladder.
e) When the men are clear, hoist the ladder until it is vertical.
Rigging
f) Secure the ladder with all the lashings.
a) From the stowed position, un-ship all of the wire lashings.
b) Ensure the air supply valve is open, blow the air supply line free
of water and drain the water filter.
g) Close the main air supply valve. Apply the covers to the winch
and air motor. Remove the hose from the air motor and stow it to
ensure that the deck is kept clear.
c) Adjust the lower platform angle to a suitable position for the
intended use. Lower the ladder to clear it from its stowed position
and continue lowering until there is sufficient space underneath
the davit to erect the handrails.
d) Two men are required to don safety harnesses and inflatable
lifejackets and then rig the stanchions on the upper platform.
e) One man is to go down the ladder until he is just below the davit,
and raise each handrail in turn. The man at the ladder top secures
the handrails with the pins. In order to move up and down the
ladder safely, the safety harness can be attached to the wire
lashings.
Issue: 1
Section 5.4.3 - Page 3 of 3
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 5.4.4a Deck Cranes
Issue: 1
Hose Handling Cranes
SWL 2.67 T - 12M
Provisions Crane
SWL 4 T - 12M
QUARTER
LOWER
LEFT
WINCH
CYLINDER
SLEWING
WEAVE
LIFT
RIGHT
Section 5.4.4 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
5.4.4 Deck Cranes
The local start and stop pushbuttons for each crane are on the lower pedestal.
The wire rope is of 20mm nominal diameter and should be lubricated regularly
with an appropriate lubricant.
Hose Handling Crane
Maker:
No. of sets:
Type:
SWL:
Acta
2
HHC-30-26.7-12
2.67 tonnes at 12 metres radius
Provisions Crane
Maker:
No. of sets:
SWL:
Cargo Operating Manual
The wire sheaves are provided with roller bearings on steel axles. All bearings
have grease nipple lubrication.
Hoisting Machinery
The winch unit consists of:
Drum with bearing and brackets
Acta
1
4 tonnes at 12 metres radius
Description
Electro hydraulically driven deck cranes are provided for handling the cargo
hoses, fuel hoses and provisions and stores. The hose handling cranes are
positioned above the port and starboard manifolds and the provisions crane is
positioned on the main deck at the port aft end of the engine casing.
Crane Control
The crane is controlled from an open platform above the slewing ring.
Entrance to the platform is by ladder. All motions have stepless speed control
from 0 to maximum. Two motions can be operated at the same time with full
capacity, but with reduced speed.
Load Limiting System
Each hydraulic circuit is provided with equipment for limiting hydraulic
pressure to preset values corresponding to the crane capacity. These do not stop
the electric motor but divert the oil supply back to the holding tank.
Limit Switches
The crane is provided with an automatic hook stop when the hook reaches the
maximum top and bottom positions.
Electro-Hydraulic Power Pack
The crane is provided with a built in power pack. The electric pump/motor is
located in the centre of the pedestal with the output shaft pointing upwards and
driving the hydraulic pump through a flexible coupling and shaft. The resevoir
for the hydraulic oil is located in the upper rotating part of the crane pedestal.
The hydraulic oil circuit has a full flow suction filter with a changeable filter
insert.
Winch gear with spring operated/pressure release fail safe brake
Hydraulic motor with safety valve to freeze movement in case of
pressure drop
Starting Procedure
a) Check that the control levers are in NEUTRAL.
b) Check that the wire is run correctly in the sheaves and that the
wire rope ends are securely clamped.
c) Check the oil level and condition of the hoses and connections.
d) Start up the electric motor/hydraulic pump.
e) If the ambient temperature is less than 10ºC, let the crane run until
the oil temperature is a minimum of 10ºC.
f) Check that all movements (hoist-luffing-slewing) are operational
without load.
g) The crane is ready for use.
Parking the Hose Handling Crane
a) Park the crane with the jib in a horizontal position and resting on
the jib support cradle.
b) Stop the pump/motor.
c) Fit the jib securing bracket.
The starter panels for the hose handling cranes are situated in the LPG electric
motor room, aft of the LPG switchboard and the starter panel for the provisions
crane is situated on the distribution board on the No.1 deck cross alleyway.
Issue: 1
Section 5.4.4 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 5.5.1a Fire Detection and Alarms - Decks 1 and 2
Lifeboat
Deck - 1
Acet.
Store
Deck - 2
Cabin
135
Chem.
Store
Cabin
131
Cabin
125
Oil
Store
Cabin
112
Oxy.
Store
Bounded
Store
Acc
Vent
Pantry
Crew
Mess Room
Cabin
117
Vent
Cabin
113
Lift wc
Acc
Vent
Cabin
107
Engine
Casing
Boiler
Casing
P.O.
Mess Room
Galley
Swimming
Pool
Boiler
Casing
Vent
lift
wc
Crew
Day Room
Engine
Casing
Cabin
103
Cabin
104
Incinerator
Room
Cabin
208
Cabin
108
Acc
Vent
Vent
AB Seam
Change
Room
Drying
Room
Vent
Cabin
136
Linen
Cabin
214
Cabin
218
Cabin
120
Laundry
Cabin
140
Acc
Vent
Cabin
116
Cabin
132
Cabin
236
Cabin
222
Cabin
128
Cabin
230
Cabin
226
Lifeboat
Key
Alarm Horn
Alarm Bell
Alarm Pushbutton
Issue: 1
Section 5.5.1 - Page 1 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 5.5.1b Fire Detection and Alarms - Decks 3 and 4
Deck - 3
Deck - 4
wc
2nd
Engineer's
Bedroom
Officer's
Dining Room
Air
Conditioning
Engine
Vent
Acc
Vent
Boiler
Casing
Vent
lift
Luggage
Batt
Room
Officer's
Day Room
Alternator
Room
Engine
Vent
wc
Engine
Casing
lift
wc
2nd
Engineer's
Day Room
3rd
Engineer's
Day Room
3rd
Engineer's
Bedroom
Cargo
Engineer's
Bedroom
Conference
Room
Hatch
Cargo
Engineer's
Day Room
Cadet
Engine
Vent
Air
Conditioning
Acc
Vent
Vent
Store
Drying
Room
Engine
Vent
Officer TV Room
Changing
Room
Electrician's
Cabin
Laundry
Catering
Officer's
Bedroom
Cadet
Dispensary
wc
Hospital
wc
Catering Officer
Day Room
2nd Officer
Bath
3rd Officer's
Cabin
2nd Officer's
Cabin
Key
Alarm Bell
Alarm Pushbutton
Issue: 1
Section 5.5.1 - Page 2 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 5.5.1c Fire Detection and Alarms - Decks 5 and 6
Deck - 5
Deck - 6
wc
Accessories
Spare
Cabin
Pantry
wc
Chief Engineer's
Bedroom
lift
Chief
Engineer's
Office
wc
Chief Engineer's
Day Room
Hatch
Captain's
Day Room
wc
G
Captain's
Office
Chief
Officer's
Office
Captain's
Bedroom
wc
Chief
Officer's
Bedroom
wc
Chief
Officer's
Day Room
Key
Alarm Bell
Alarm Pushbutton
G
General Alarm Pushbutton
Gas Detector Points
Issue: 1
Section 5.5.1 - Page 3 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 5.5.1d Fire Detection and Alarm - Upper Deck and Engine Room
Key
CO2 Siren-Air Operated
Alarm Bell
Issue: 1
Alarm Horn
Gas Detector - Portable
Alarm Pushbutton
O2 Indicator
Gas Detector Points
Section 5.5.1 - Page 4 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 5.5.2a Fire Fighting Equipment - Decks 1and 2
Lifeboat
Deck - 1
Acet.
Store
Deck - 2
Cabin
135
Chem.
Store
Cabin
131
Cabin
125
Oil
Store
Cabin
112
Oxy.
Store
Bounded
Store
Acc
Vent
Pantry
Crew
Mess Room
Cabin
117
Vent
Cabin
113
Lift wc
Acc
Vent
Cabin
107
Engine
Casing
Boiler
Casing
P.O.
Mess Room
Galley
Swimming
Pool
Boiler
Casing
Vent
lift
wc
Crew
Day Room
Engine
Casing
Cabin
103
Cabin
104
Incinerator
Room
Cabin
208
Cabin
108
Acc
Vent
Vent
AB Seam
Change
Room
Drying
Room
Vent
Cabin
132
Cabin
136
Cabin
128
Linen
Cabin
214
Cabin
218
Cabin
120
Laundry
Cabin
140
Acc
Vent
Cabin
116
Key
Fire Hydrant 2 1.2"
Cabin
236
Cabin
222
Cabin
230
Cabin
226
Hose Boxes with 18m - 2"/20m 1½ Hose
and with Unifire V-16 Jet / Fog Nozzle
Lifeboat
CO2 Nozzle
9L Water/CO2
12kg Powder
6.8kg CO2
Fire Hydrant 2 1.2"
Stop Duct Keel Fans
Fire Flaps
Issue: 1
Section 5.5.2 - Page 1 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 5.5.2b Fire Fighting Equipment - Decks 3 and 4
Deck - 4
Deck - 3
wc
2nd
Engineer's
Bedroom
Officer's
Dining Room
Air
Conditioning
Engine
Vent
Acc
Vent
Boiler
Casing
Vent
lift
Luggage
Batt
Room
Officer's
Day Room
Engine
Vent
wc
Conference
Room
Engine
Casing
Alternator
Room
lift
wc
2nd
Engineer's
Day Room
3rd
Engineer's
Day Room
3rd
Engineer's
Bedroom
Cargo
Engineer's
Bedroom
Hatch
Cargo
Engineer's
Day Room
Cadet
Engine
Vent
Air
Conditioning
Acc
Vent
Vent
Store
Drying
Room
Engine
Vent
Officer TV Room
Changing
Room
Electrician's
Cabin
Laundry
Catering
Officer's
Bed Room
Cadet
Dispensary
wc
Hospital
wc
Catering Officer
Day Room
2nd Officer
Bath
3rd Officer's
Cabin
2nd Officer's
Cabin
Key
Fire Hydrant 2 1.2"
Hose Boxes with 18m - 2"/20m 1½ Hose
and with Unifire V-16 Jet / Fog Nozzle
9L Water/CO2
12kg Powder
6.8kg CO2
Fire Flaps
Issue: 1
Section 5.5.2 - Page 2 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 5.5.2c Fire Fighting Equipment - Decks 5 and 6
Deck - 5
Deck - 6
wc
Accessories
Spare
Cabin
Pantry
wc
Chief Engineer's
Bedroom
lift
Chief
Engineer's
Office
wc
Chief Engineer's
Day Room
Hatch
Captain's
Day Room
wc
Captain's
Office
Chief
Officer's
Office
Captain's
Bedroom
wc
Chief
Officer's
Bedroom
wc
Chief
Officer's
Day Room
Key
Fire Hydrant 2 1.2"
Hose Boxes with 18m - 2"/20m 1½ Hose
and with Unifire V-16 Jet / Fog Nozzle
9L Water/CO2
12kg Powder
6.8kg CO2
Release Quick Closing Valve
Emergency Stop Gas Valves
Stop Duct Keel Fans
Fire Flaps
Issue: 1
Section 5.5.2 - Page 3 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 5.5.2d Fire Fighting Equipment - Upper Deck and Engine Room
Fire Flaps in all Vent Ducts
A
250
250
250
250
250
250
250
750
Key
Dry Powder 750kg Container
Dry Powder Room
International Ship
Shore Connection
9L Water/CO2
12kg Dry Powder
Release Quick Closing Valve
Stop Deck Fans
Fire Spray Line
250
Dry Powder 250kg Container
Fire Hydrant 2 1.2"
Hold Eductors
12kg Powder
2.5kg Dry Powder
Emergency Stop Gas Valves
Stop Duct Keel Fans
Low Velocity Spray
Applicator
Dry Powder Hose Box
with Remote Control
Hose Boxes with 18m - 2"/20m 1½ Hose
and with Unifire V-16 Jet / Fog Nozzle
Hose Reel W/20m - 1½ Hose
and Unifire V-16 Jet / Fog Nozzle
CO2 Nozzle
6.8kg CO2
Fire Hydrant 2 1.2"
Emergency Stop Gas Valves
Fire Flaps
CO2 Remote Release
34kg/CO2
Stop Fuel Oil Pumps
and Gas Supply Boilers
Stop Accommodation Fans
Fire Pumps
2x100m3/h 120mwg
Dry Powder Room
Issue: 1
Emergency Fire Pump
50m3/h 113mwg
A
Fire Hydrant 2 1.2"
Section 5.5.2 - Page 4 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 5.5.3a Lifesaving Equipment - Decks 1 and 2
Lifeboat
Deck - 1
6
Deck - 2
20
20
Acet.
Store
Cabin
135
Chem.
Store
Cabin
131
Cabin
125
Oil
Store
Cabin
112
Oxy.
Store
Bounded
Store
Acc
Vent
Pantry
Crew
Mess Room
Cabin
117
Vent
Cabin
113
Lift wc
Acc
Vent
Cabin
107
Engine
Casing
Boiler
Casing
P.O.
Mess Room
Galley
Swimming
Pool
Boiler
Casing
Vent
lift
wc
Crew
Day Room
Engine
Casing
Cabin
103
Cabin
104
Incinerator
Room
Cabin
208
Cabin
108
Acc
Vent
Vent
AB Seam
Change
Room
Drying
Room
Vent
Cabin
136
Linen
Cabin
214
Cabin
218
Cabin
120
Laundry
Cabin
140
Acc
Vent
Cabin
116
Cabin
132
Cabin
236
Cabin
222
Cabin
128
Cabin
230
Cabin
226
6
20
20
Lifeboat
Key
Survival Suits
Life Jacket
6
Liferaft
Smoke Mask
Issue: 1
Section 5.5.3 - Page 1 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 5.5.3b Lifesaving Equipment - Decks 3 and 4
Deck - 4
Deck - 3
wc
2nd
Engineer's
Bed Room
Officer's
Dining Room
Air
Conditioning
Engine
Vent
Acc
Vent
Boiler
Casing
lift
Vent
Luggage
Batt
Room
Officer's
Day Room
Alternator
Room
Engine
Vent
wc
Engine
Casing
lift
wc
2nd
Engineer's
Day Room
3rd
Engineer's
Day Room
3rd
Engineer's
Bed Room
Cargo
Engineer's
Bed Room
Conference
Room
Hatch
Cargo
Engineer's
Day Room
Cadet
Engine
Vent
Air
Conditioning
Acc
Vent
Drying
Room
Vent
Store
Engine
Vent
Officer TV Room
Changing
Room
Electrician's
Cabin
Laundry
Catering
Officer's
Bed Room
Cadet
Dispensary
wc
Hospital
wc
Catering Officer
Day Room
2nd Officer
Bath
3rd Officer's
Cabin
2nd Officer's
Cabin
Key
Life Jacket
Smoke Mask
Issue: 1
Section 5.5.3 - Page 2 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 5.5.3c Lifesaving Equipment - Decks 5 and 6
MOB Lifebouy
Deck - 5
Deck - 6
wc
Accessories
Spare
Cabin
Pantry
wc
Chief Engineer's
Bedroom
lift
Chief
Engineer's
Office
wc
Chief Engineer's
Day Room
Hatch
Captain's
Day Room
wc
Captain's
Office
Chief
Officer's
Office
Captain's
Bedroom
wc
Chief
Officer's
Bedroom
wc
Chief
Officer's
Day Room
Key
Life Jacket
Survival Suits
Lifebuoys
Line Throwing Device
Parachute Distress Red Signal
MOB Lifebouy
GMDSS VHF
Issue: 1
Section 5.5.3 - Page 3 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 5.5.3d Lifesaving Equipment - Upper Deck and Engine Room
6
6
6
Key
Survival Suits
Lifebuoys
Issue: 1
6
Liferafts
Emergency Exit
Line Throwing Device
Emergency Headquarters
Smoke Mask
Section 5.5.3 - Page 4 of 4
Part 6
Cargo Operations
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 6.1a Operating Procedures Schedule
Recommence normal operations
Void Spaces
Cargo Tanks
Nitrogen bleeding
to wedge spaces.
Precooling of cargo tanks
before loading
Precooling of liquid lines (45 mins)
LOADING
(approximately 12 hours)
Evaporation of liquid residue
from cargo tanks.
(approximately 12 hours)
Warming of cargo tanks.
(approximately 72 hours)
Gas freeing of cargo tanks.
(approximately 24 hours)
Drainage of liquid lines (45 mins)
LOADED VOYAGE
(1-16 days)
LOADED VOYAGE
(1-16 days)
Aerating of void
spaces.
(approximately
12 hours)
Drying of void space
atmosphere.
Recirculation
Aerating of the
cargo tanks.
(approximately 24 hours)
Precooling of liquid lines (45 mins)
DRY DOCK
DISCHARGING
(approximately 12 hours)
Preparing To Leave Dry Dock
Drying of cargo tanks
with air
during entire
dry dock period
Drainage of liquid lines (45 mins)
Preparing for dry dock
BALLAST VOYAGE
(1-16 days)
Drying of void space
atmosphere.
BALLAST VOYAGE
(1-16 days)
Precooling of cargo tanks (10 hours)
Drying of void spaces
with air.
(approximately
30 hours)
Inerting of the cargo tanks
with inert gas.
(approximately 24 hours)
Cooling of cargo tanks (ongoing)
Precooling of cargo tanks
Precooling of liquid lines (45 mins)
Drying of the
void spaces
with air.
Purging and drying
of cargo tanks
with warm methane.
(approximately 20 hours)
Post/pre Dry Docking Operations
Normal Operational Cycle
Issue: 2
Section 6.1 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
Part 6 Cargo Operations
General Guidelines
6.1
Except in special circumstances (described in section 7) where a single tank or
void space may need to be isolated, the cargo tanks should be connected
together through the vapour line and the void spaces should be connected
together via the recirculation loop by keeping the valves in these lines open.
Operating Procedures Overview
The cargo control system is designed to be operated from the cargo control
room. However, some operations are required locally.
Equipment and plant such as compressors and pumps are protected by means
of tripping devices which will shut down the plant in the event of an abnormal
temperature, pressure or other condition which may be harmful to the plant or
equipment if left unattended. In most cases an alarm will be raised before the
shutdown, giving personnel time to attend to the problem before a shutdown
occurs.
It should be emphasised that personnel should conduct their own routine
inspections of running machinery in line with recommendations issued by the
individual equipment manufacturers.
There are certain cargo operating parameters that are worthy of special
mention, as follows:
Void Space Pressure
To avoid even a remote possibility that the cargo tank shell may buckle, the
pressure of the void spaces should never exceed 0.05 bar over that of the cargo
tanks. There are void space pressure relief valves fitted to avoid this possibility,
see section 4.11.3 Void Space Relief Valves for further information.
Cargo Operating Manual
When the ship returns to cargo duties after a dry docking or refit, the tanks and
lines will be full of ambient air. Before liquid cargo is reintroduced into the
system, the tanks and lines must be oxygen (O2) and carbon dioxide (CO2) free.
The tanks and lines should be oxygen free to avoid the formation of any
explosive mixture.
The tanks, lines and void spaces should be carbon dioxide free as this will
solidify at -78.5ºC.
There should be no humidity in the tanks and lines as this will lead to the
formation of ice.
The void spaces should be free from any moisture as this may penetrate the
tank insulation.
The methods of drying and inerting the tanks, void spaces and lines is
described in the appropriate following sections.
Cargo Tank Temperature
To avoid thermal stress on the cargo tank shell and piping, sudden cooling
down must be avoided. The cooling down rates shown in section 6.2.4 should
be strictly followed.
Overfilling of Cargo Tanks
The greatest care must be taken to ensure that the cargo tanks are never
overfilled.
Issue: 2
Section 6.1 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 6.2.1a Drying Cargo Tanks and Void Spaces
Moist Air Drawn Off
to Recirculation Fans
V2306
Dried/Heated
Air
LNG
Compressor
Room
Nitrogen
Bleed
LNG
Compressors
V2315
V2303
V2209
V2315
Void Space
Dryers
V2314
V2314
Dried/Heated
Air Ducts
Cargo Tank Cross-Section
V2311 V2311
Recirculation
Fans 2,000m3/h
V2310 V2310
No.5
Cargo Tank
No.4
Cargo Tank
V2306
V2306
V2216
Boiler Purging
/Compressor
Sealing
V2213
No.3
Cargo Tank
V2306
V2303
V2306
V2216
V2303
No.1
Cargo Tank
V2306
V2216
V2209
No.2
Cargo Tank
V2209
Purging
V2216 Outlets
at Dome
V2216
V2303
V2303
V2209
V2303
V2209
Key
From
Nitrogen
Generator
System
Issue: 2
Starboard
Nitrogen
Buffer
Tank
15m3
IG Connection at Starboard Manifold
From
Engine Room
IG Plant
IG Outlet
at Starboard Manifold
V2352
V2352 V2352A
Port
Nitrogen
Buffer
Tank
25m3
Nitrogen
Dry Air
Moist Air
Section 6.2.1 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
6.2
Post Dry Dock Operation
6.2.1 Drying Cargo Tanks and Void Spaces
During a dry docking or inspection, cargo tanks which have been opened and
contain wet air must be dried primarily to avoid the formation of ice when they
are cooled down and secondly, the formation of corrosive agents if the
humidity combines with the sulphur and nitrogen oxides, which might be
contained in the inert gas. The tanks are inerted in order to prevent the
possibility of any flammable air/LNG mixture. Normal humid air is displaced
by dry-air. Dry-air is displaced by inert gas produced from the dry-air/inert gas
plant.
Dry-air is introduced at the bottom of the tanks through the filling piping. The
air is displaced from the top of each tank through the dome and the vapour
header, and is discharged from the vent mast.
The operation, carried out from shore or at sea, and will take approximately 20
hours to reduce the dew point to between -25°C to -45°C.
During the time that the inert gas plant is in operation for drying and inerting
the tanks, the inert gas is also used to dry (between -25°C to -45°C) and to inert
all the other LNG and vapour pipework. Before the introduction of LNG or
vapour, any pipework not purged with inert gas must be purged with nitrogen.
Operating Procedure for Drying Tanks
Dry-air with a dew point of between -25°C to -45°C, is produced by the dryair/inert gas plant at a flow rate of 5000Nm3/h.
a) Prepare the dry-air/inert gas plant for use in the dry-air mode. See
section 4.7.1 Inert Gas Generator and illustration 6.2.2a Inerting
Cargo Tanks.
b) Install the flexible connection between the flange at the end of the
inert gas/dry-air feeder line and the liquid manifold or access to
the liquid header.
c) Install the flexible connection between the flange on the vapour
header line and the inlet flange at each tank’s vent mast.
d) Open valves V2016, V2016A, V2004, V2008, V2012, V2020 and
V2024 to supply dry-air to the liquid header.
e) Open tank filling valves V2003, V2007, V2012, V2019 and
V2003.
Issue: 2
f) Open tank vapour valves V2100, V2101 V2103, V2108 and
V2109, to vent through the vent mast on each tank.
g) Start the dry-air production. When the dew point is between 25°C to -45°C, open valve V2354 upstream of the two non-return
valves V2352 and valve V2352A to allow the dry-air to pass into
the liquid header.
Cargo Operating Manual
e) Start the inert gas generator and ensure the generator is running in
the dry-air mode (see section 4.7.1, Inert Gas Generator). When
the oxygen content is satisfactory (approximately 21%) and the
dew point is down to between -25°C to -45°C, open valve V2353
upstream of the two non-return valves V2352 and valve V2352A
to allow the inert gas to pass into the main aeration header. Ensure
the spoon blank at the IG outlet at the starboard manifold area is
in the correct position.
h) Monitor the dew point of each tank by taking a sample at the
vapour domes. When the dew point is between -25°C to -45°C or
less, close the filling and vapour valves of the tank. Disconnect
the flexible hose and return the blank to the vapour header flange.
(Note: No.1 tank should be the final tank to be dried to ensure the system is
always full of dry-air.)
i) Wet air which may be contained in the discharge lines from the
cargo pumps, float level piping and any associated pipework in
the cargo compressor room must be purged with dry-air. This is
normally carried out in conjunction with the drying of the cargo
tanks.
j) When all the tanks and pipework have been dried out, stop the
plant. Close the supply valves V2354, V2352, V2352A and valve
V2016 to the LNG header.
k) Disconnect the flexible hose at No.1 vent mast and replace the
blank flange on the vapour header.
(Note: It is necessary to lower the tank’s dew point by dry-air to between 25°C to -45°C before feeding the tanks with inert gas. This is in order to avoid
any formation of corrosive agents.)
Drying Void Spaces
The procedure for drying the void spaces is as follows:
a) Install the flexible connection between the flange at the end of the
dry-air feeder line and the main aeration header.
b) Prepare the inert gas plant for use in the dry-air mode.
c) Remove the blank flange in pipe 2305 at the top of the void space.
d) Open the inlet valve to the void space bottom, valve V2303.
View of Void Space IG Connection
Showing Spoon Blank in Place
f) Monitor the dew point of each void space by taking a sample at
the outlet pipe. When the dew point is between -25°C to -45°C,
close the filling valves and replace the blank flange at the top of
the void spaces.
(Note: It is possible to dry the void spaces at the same time as drying the tanks.
Dry-air is introduced to each tank via the vapour header and the moist air
discharged from the tank bottom through the filling pipe, led into the void
space aerating header through a flexible hose, and introduced to the void space
bottom. Exhaust air is discharged to atmosphere from the top of the void
space.)
Section 6.2.1 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 6.2.2a Inerting Cargo Tanks
V21
30
15
V21
14
V21
30
31
V21
r
ou
Vap ater
He
14A
V21
.B
mp
Co
HD
3
20
V2
3
20
V2
3A
20
V2
4
23
V2
35
V22
G
LN iser
or
Vap
13
V21
LD
.
mp
Co
25
V21
d
Voi re
or
r F osphe
ate
He e At m
39
V21
ac
Sp
25
V21
39
V21
061
V2
120
015
V2026
A
Vent
Mast
V2
V2055
A
200
V2138
Dome
V2002 (P)
No.1
Cargo Tank
V2054
V2054
V2054
14
V23
14
V23
V2054
V2027
26
V21
e
pac
id S er
Vo r Dry
i
A
003
V2
S)
2(
00
V2
V2004
V2101
A
016
26
V21
e
pac
id S er
Vo r Dry
Ai
15
V23
15
V23
11
V21
V2
061
V2
9
V2100
V2138
V2051
V
.A
mp
Co
HD
3
V21
17
V21
200
1
220
35
V21
28
V21
V2052
V2051
V2051
V2
016
V2
36
V21
13
V21
5
V2051
14
V21
35
V21
01
V2
V2
V2
Vent
Mast
uid
Liq
34
V21
V21
V
1
213
uid
Liq
32
V21
To
s
iler
Bo
32
V21
r
ou
Vap ater
He
PI
r
sso
pre oom
R
ur
po
Va
n
ge
tro
Ni
uid
Liq
om
GC
LN
N
To 2
nt
Pla
V2008
Vent
Mast
m
ans
Fro ing F ating
e
t
cula ace H
ir
c
p
Re id S
Vo
r
Fo
V2103
V2138
V2006 (P)
V2068
V2058
V2057
V2057
007
V2
S)
6(
00
V2
Dome
No.2
Cargo Tank
V2057
V2057
V2028
22
V21
01
V2
19
V21
2
s
ace
Sp
Void
To
Vent
Mast
10
V21
0
01
V2068
V2064
V2063
V2063
(S)
V2
V2108
18
V21
Dome
011
V2
V2010 (P)
V2138
No.3
Cargo Tank
V2063
V2063
Spray
Pump
V2029
01
V2
V2020
Vent
Mast
18
20
D
FW
(S)
V
V2109
V2066
Dome
9
V2018 (P)
V2138
No.4
Cargo Tank
V2065
V2065
V2065
A
015
V2
V2065
To
Emergency
Discharge
Astern
Spray
Pump
V2030
02
V2
V2024
0
V2
(
02
120
V2
Dome
A
016
S)
V2
061
2
35
V2
V2
2A
201
200
V2
V2
352
V2
Engine Room
IG Plant
016
V2
015
V2
uid
35
V2
ur
po
n
Va
ge
tro
Ni
No.5
Cargo Tank
061
V2
A
200
V2
Liq
V2002 (P)
3
Key
Inert Gas
Issue: 1
Section 6.2.2 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
6.2.2 Inerting Cargo Tanks
Inert gas, with an oxygen content of between 2% and 3% and a dew point of
between -25°C to -45°C, is produced by the dry-air/inert gas plant at a flow
rate of 2,500Nm3/h. The inert gas is primarily nitrogen and carbon dioxide,
containing between 2% and 3% oxygen with a dew point of between -25°C to
-45°C.
Inerting After Refit
Before introducing vapour or liquid cargo into the cargo system, it is essential
that all air is purged from the system to prevent the formation of flammable
mixtures. In this operation, the object is to replace all air in cargo tanks and
cargo pipework with inert gas.
Inert gas from the ship’s IG plant is connected to the LNG liquid header and
led to the bottom of each cargo tank. The displaced air escapes to atmosphere
via the LNG vapour header and vent riser. Oxygen measurement is carried out
using a portable analyser on samples drawn from each of the five sampling
points in each cargo tank. Venting continues until the oxygen concentration at
all points is consistently between 2% and 3% and the dew point between -25°C
to -45°C.
Cargo Operating Manual
Procedure to Inert after Refit
a) Prepare the dry-air/inert gas plant for operation in the inert gas
mode.
b) Install the flexible connection between the flange at the end of the
inert gas/dry-air feeder line and the liquid manifold or access to
the liquid header.
c) Install the flexible connection between the flange on the vapour
header line and the inlet flange at each tank’s vent mast.
d) Open the following valves:
Position
Description
Valve
Open
Aft liquid manifold valve
V2016
Open
Aft liquid ESD valve
V2016A
Open
Inert gas supply valve
V2352, V2352A
e) Open the following tank filling valves:
Position
Description
Valve
Open
No.5 cargo tank liquid header block valve
V2024
Open
No.5 cargo tank liquid filling valve
V2023
Open
No.4 cargo tank liquid header block valve
V2020
Open
No.4 cargo tank liquid filling valve
V2019
Open
No.3 cargo tank liquid header block valve
V2012
Open
No.3 cargo tank liquid filling valve
V2011
Open
No.2 cargo tank liquid header block valve
V2008
Purging/filling insulation spaces with nitrogen
Open
No.2 cargo tank liquid filling valve
V2007
Purging/filling hold spaces with dry-air.
Open
No.1 cargo tank liquid header block valve
V2004
Open
No.1 cargo tank liquid filling valve
V2003
The inerting of LNG liquid and spray lines, including manifold crossovers,
pump risers, vaporisers and relief valve lines, is carried out at the same time as
the inerting of the tanks. LNG vapour lines at the manifold crossover and in the
LNG compressor room are inerted on completion of the rest of the system.
When purging these pipelines, the volume of inert gas being discharged at deck
level can be minimised by routing the displaced gas, via the pressure build-up
line, to vent at the vent riser.
This operation would be carried out before the ship’s arrival at the loading port.
Other operations which will be carried out in preparation for first loading
would be:
As the IG plant is required for this latter operation, it would normally be
carried out either immediately before or immediately after inerting. Nitrogen
purging can be carried out at any time before arrival. The inerting operation
takes about 24 hours.
h) By sampling at the vapour dome, check the atmosphere of each
tank using a portable oxygen analyser. The oxygen content is to
be between 2% and 3% and the dew point is between -25°C to 45°C.
i) During tank inerting, purge the air contained in the lines and
equipment for about 5 minutes by using the valves and purge
sample points. It is important to ensure that all pipework and dead
ends are purged.
j) When the inerting of all the tanks and associated pipework and
equipment is completed, disconnect the flexible connection to the
vent pipes and replace the flange blanks on the vapour line.
k) Pressurise the tanks to 0.15 bar.
l) When all the tanks and pipework have been dried out, stop the
plant. Close the supply valves V2353, V2352, V2354A and
manifold valves V2016 and V2016A to the LNG header.
Disconnect the flexible hose and replace the flange on the inert
gas supply line.
(Note: Until the ship is ready to load LNG for gas filling, the tanks may be
maintained under inert gas for as long as is necessary. If required, pressurise
the tanks to 0.05 bar above atmospheric pressure.)
WARNING
Inert gas from this generator and pure nitrogen will not sustain life. Great
care must be exercised to ensure the safety of all personnel involved with
any operation using inert gas of any description in order to avoid
asphyxiation due to oxygen depletion.
f) Open the tank vapour valves V2109, V2108, V2103, V2101 and
V2100 to vent through the vent mast on each tank.
g) Start the inert gas production. When the oxygen content is 4%
(unless oxygen content percentage is specified by the terminal)
and the dew point is between -25°C to -45°C, open the valve
V2353, upstream of the two non-return valves V2352 on the dryair/inert gas discharge line. Also open valve V2354A to allow the
inert gas to pass into the liquid header.
Issue: 2
Section 6.2.2 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 6.2.3a Gassing Up Cargo Tanks
Vent
Mast
14
V21
30
15
V21
.B
mp
Co
HD
31
V21
r
ou
Vap ater
He
3
20
V2
3A
20
V2
4
23
V2
35
V22
G
LN iser
or
Vap
016
V2
V
35
13
V21
LD
m
Co
p.
V21
25
11
V21
d
Voi re
or
r F osphe
ate
He e At m
39
V21
ac
Sp
V2100
V2138
V2051
V2051
061
V2
061
V2
V2
2
016
V2
V2051
A
015
V2026
Vent
Mast
120
00A
A
V2055
Dome
003
V2
S)
2(
00
V2
V2004
V2101
V2138
V2002 (P)
No.1
Cargo Tank
V2054
V2054
26
V21
e
pac
id S er
Vo r Dry
Ai
9
200
1
220
.A
mp
Co
HD
3
V21
17
V21
V2
V21
28
V21
V
V2
V2
36
V21
13
V21
V2052
5
201
V2051
14A
V21
14
V21
35
V21
3
20
V2
old
anif e
m M Lin
Fro iquid
L
V21
0
uid
Liq
34
V21
3
V21
uid
32
V21
V
1
213
Liq
r
ou
Vap ater
He
PI
To
s
iler
Bo
32
V21
ur
po
n
Va
ge
tro
Ni
uid
Liq
r
sso
pre oom
m
o
R
GC
LN
15
V23
15
V23
25
V21
39
V21
V2054
14
V23
14
V23
V2054
V2027
26
V21
e
pac
id S er
Vo r Dry
i
A
G
LN
To
o
Vap
r
rise
Vent
Mast
m
ans
Fro ing F ating
e
t
ula
eH
circ Spac
e
R
Void
r
o
F
V2008
V2103
V2138
V2006 (P)
V2068
V2058
V2057
V2057
007
V2
S)
6(
00
V2
Dome
No.2
Cargo Tank
V2057
V2057
V2028
22
V21
s
ace
Sp
V2
0
01
10
V21
V2068
V2064
V2063
V2063
(S)
V2
V2108
18
V21
Dome
011
2
Vent
Mast
01
Void
To
V2
19
V21
V2010 (P)
V2138
No.3
Cargo Tank
V2063
V2063
Spray
Pump
V2029
Vent
Mast
V2
V2109
V2066
01
V2
V2020
8
01
V2018 (P)
V2138
V2065
V2065
9
Dome
D
FW
(S)
No.4
Cargo Tank
A
015
V2
V2065
V2065
To
Emergency
Discharge
Astern
Spray
Pump
V2030
02
V2
V2024
0
V2
(
02
061
A
016
S)
V2
V2
061
V2
201
200
V2
uid
No.5
Cargo Tank
V2
Liq
uid
ur
po
n
Va
ge
tro
Ni
016
V2
015
V2
Liq
V2002 (P)
3
120
V2
A
200
V2
Dome
Key
Inert Gas/Vapour
LNG Liquid
LNG Vapour
Inert Gas
Issue: 1
Section 6.2.3 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
6.2.3 Gassing Up Cargo Tanks
After a lay up or dry dock period, the cargo tanks are filled with inert gas or
nitrogen. If the purging has been done with inert gas, the cargo tanks have to
be purged and cooled down when the vessel arrives at the loading terminal.
This is because, unlike nitrogen, inert gas contains 15% carbon dioxide (CO2),
which will freeze at around -78°C and produces a white powder which can
block valves, filters and nozzles.
During purging, the inert gas in the cargo tanks is replaced with warm LNG
vapour. This is in order to remove any freezable gases such as carbon dioxide
and to complete the drying of the tanks.
Description
LNG liquid is supplied from the terminal to the liquid manifold where it passes
to the stripping/spray header via the appropriate ESDS liquid valve. It is then
fed to the LNG vaporiser and the LNG vapour produced is passed at +20°C to
the vapour header and into each tank via the vapour domes.
At the start of the operation to fill the cargo tanks, the piping system and LNG
vaporiser are vapour locked. The stripping/spray header can be purged into the
cargo tanks via the vapour dome through the arrangement of spray valves
containing the control valve until the liquid reaches the LNG vaporiser. The
LNG vapour is lighter than the inert gas, which allows the inert gases in the
cargo tanks to be exhausted up the tank filling line to the liquid header. The
inert gas then vents to the atmosphere via the vent masts.
Cargo Operating Manual
There are exceptional cases where it may be necessary to undertake the
purging of one or more tanks at sea using LNG liquid already on board. In this
case the liquid will be supplied to the LNG vaporiser via the stripping/spray
header using the stripping/spray pump of No.3 or No.4 cargo tank containing
LNG liquid.
Due to local regulations on venting methane gas to the atmosphere, some port
authorities may require the entire operation to be carried out with the exhaust
gases being returned to shore facilities.
Operating Procedures to Purge the Cargo Tanks with LNG Vapour
It is assumed, although unlikely, that all valves are closed prior to use.
a) Install the following spool pieces:
k) Using the DCS system mimic, open the following cargo tank
loading valves:
Position
Description
Valve
Open
No.1 tank loading valves
V2004, V2003
Open
No.2 tank loading valves
V2008, V2007
Open
No.3 tank loading valves
V2012, V2011
Open
No.4 tank loading valves
V2020, V2019
Open
No.5 tank loading valves
V2024, V2023
l) Open valve V2120, if using the port vapour manifold, and inform
the shore terminal to prepare for receiving gas to shore.
Liquid manifold header to vaporiser supply line
Liquid header to vapour line
b) Swing the liquid header to vaporiser supply line spectacle piece
into position.
c) Prepare the LNG vaporiser for use.
m) Open valve V2016, if using the aft port liquid manifold, and
request the shore terminal to commence the supply of LNG to the
ship at a constant pressure of 5 bar.
n) Adjust the tank pressure by decreasing/increasing the flow rate of
LNG from the shore. The pressure can also be released by
adjusting the pressure relief valve setting at No.4 vent mast,
however, most terminals prefer the gas to be returned to shore.
d) Adjust the set point of the temperature control valve to +20°C.
e) Adjust the set point of the pressure control valve V2203A to 6kPa
(or required value) by using the inching control (manual control).
When 5% methane (the percentage figure will be specified by the particular
port authority) is detected at the vent mast riser, the exhaust gas is directed
ashore via the HD compressors, or to the boilers through the gas burning line.
This operation can be done without the compressors, subject to existing back
pressure, or with one or more HD compressors in service. If possible, it is
better not to use the compressors to avoid creating turbulence inside the tanks.
f) Open valves V2201 and V2200A to enable the supply to reach the
LNG vaporiser.
The operation is considered complete when the methane content, as measured
at the top of the cargo filling pipe, exceeds 80% by volume.
i) Open valve V2118 to allow the supply to the vapour header.
o) Monitor the inert exhausting gas at each liquid dome. Use the mid
cargo tank sampling cock initially, followed by the sample cock at
the top of the loading line.
p) Purge all pipework and dead ends with warm LNG vapour or
nitrogen if available.
g) Open LNG vaporiser inlet valve(s) V2203.
h) Open LNG vaporiser outlet valve(s) V2235.
q) When 5% methane is detected at the sampling points at all tanks
inform the shore terminal so that they can divert the exhaust gases
to the terminal facilities.
j) Open the following valves to the vapour domes:
The target values for N2 gas and inert gas CO2 is equal or less than 1%. These
values should be matched with the LNG terminal requirements.This normally
entails approximately 2 complete changes of the volume of the atmosphere in
the cargo tank.
Position
Description
Valve
Open
No.1 tank header valve
V2100
On completion of purging, the cargo tanks will normally be cooled down.
Open
No.2 tank header valve
V2101
Open
No.3 tank header valve
V2103
Open
No.4 tank header valve
V2108
Open
No.5 tank header valve
V2109
Issue: 2
(Note: For safety reasons, ensure the water curtain on the connected side is in
operation.)
Section 6.2.3 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 6.2.4a Cargo Tanks Cooldown Rates
SPRAY RATES
TANK 1
5
TANK COOLDOWN RATES
Secondary Spray Rate
1 t/h
5 t/h Spray Rate
Level 1 m Below Equator
Tank No.1 & 5 (4.7 Hours)
40
Level 1 m Below Equator
Tank No.2,3 & 4 (5.7 Hours)
Tons
Spray Pipe
1&2
4
1
4
1
20
4
-0
Co
Spare Units
PI
1
2
3
ol
-20
do
wn
4
te
22
3
Ra
-40
Li
m
ita
tio
EQUATOR
TEMPERATURE
(OC)
-60
SPRAY
RATE
(kg/h 103)
Filling Rate
1,500 m3/h
Each Tank
n
9
Start
Loading
O
C/
h
15.9 Hours
-80
2
Loading
Finished
-100
Spray Pipe 1
Maximum Temperature at Equator Before Loading (-113 OC)
-120
1
Initial Spray Rate
Maximum Temperature at Equator When the Liquid Level is 1 m Below (-138 OC)
-140
-160
2
0
0.5
Issue: 1
Cargo Temperature (-163 OC)
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
3.0
PRESSURE AT PI-22 (kg/cm2)
3.5
4.0
4
6
8
10
12
TIME (h)
14
16
18
20
22
24
26
28
30
Section 6.2.4 - Page 1 of 4
Norman Lady
6.2.4 Cooling Down Cargo Tanks
Cargo Operating Manual
c) Open the following valves on the liquid lines connecting the spray
line header to the liquid manifold:
Initial Cooling Down and Loading
Position
Description
Open
Forward liquid manifold valve
V2015
Open
Liquid/spray header crossover valve
V2061
Open
No.1 cargo tank spray ring block valve
V2052
Open
No.2 cargo tank spray ring block valve
V2055
This cooldown must be carried out smoothly to avoid thermal stress on the tank
shell.
Open
No.3 cargo tank spray ring block valve
V2058
Open
No.4 cargo tank spray ring block valve
V2064
In normal service, the ship will arrive with the equatorial region of the tanks at
about, but not warmer than, -115ºC. Full rate loading should not commence
until this figure is attained.
Open
No.5 cargo tank spray ring block valve
V2066
The cargo tanks will be filled with inert gas on arrival. Prior to the first loading,
and after gassing-up with LNG vapour, the cargo tanks are gradually cooled
down by spraying LNG received from the loading terminal through the spray
nozzles located around the centre column. This operation, which produces cold
vapour to be returned ashore, must be carried out until the equatorial region of
the tank is at least -115ºC. The maximum rate of cooldown is 9ºC per hour.
LNG enters the cargo tanks through the filling line, while vapour is returned to
shore using the HD compressors, if necessary, to maintain tank pressures
within limits. During this time, continuous cooldown spraying may be
necessary until the cargo reaches the equatorial level (for initial loading after
dry docking). The initial cooling down operation will take approximately 20
hours.
Preparation for Tank Cooldown: Cooldown of Spray Pipes
a) The HD compressors and the valves in the compressor room
should be prepared for operation to such a level that only the
actual starting operation remains.
b) Cool down the spray pipes by firstly opening the following valves
on the vapour return lines from the tanks to the manifold:
Position
Description
Open
No.1 cargo tank vapour valve
V2000
Open
No.2 cargo tank vapour valve
V2101
Open
No.3 cargo tank vapour valve
V2103
Open
No.4 cargo tank vapour valve
V2108
Open
No.5 cargo tank vapour valve
V2109
Open
Vapour header to LNG compressor room valve
V2110
Open
LNG compressor room discharge valve
V2119
Open
Vapour manifold ESD valve
V2120
Issue: 2
Valve
Valve
d) Open the following shut-off valves to the spray rings at the tank
domes:
Position
Description
Valve
Open
No.1 cargo tank spray ring valves
V2051
Open
No.2 cargo tank spray ring valves
V2054
Open
No.3 cargo tank spray ring valves
V2057
Open
No.4 cargo tank spray ring valves
V2063
Open
No.5 cargo tank spray ring valves
V2065
e) The spray lines will now be cooled down by the cold LNG being
supplied from ashore at a limited flow rate.
Cooldown of Cargo Tanks
After the piping is precooled, LNG is introduced through the liquid crossover,
the spray main and the branch lines to the spray nozzles. The spraying proceeds
as follows:
a) The spray rate should be approximately 1,000kg/h per tank.
b) The pressure in the cargo tanks should be closely monitored as the
pressure will start to build up. When the pressure reaches 0.15 bar,
start an HD compressor.
c) After approximately two hours, the spray rate can be increased to
5,000kg/h per tank by opening further spray ring valves as
required.
d) The cargo tank is ready for loading when the temperature of the
tank shell at the equator (from sensor TI-10) has dropped to at
least -113ºC. This temperature represents a total cooling down
time of approximately 20 hours.
In order to protect the tank shell against thermal stress, a faster cooldown time
than this must be avoided. Correspondingly, loading must not be started if the
temperature of the tank shell at the equator is above -113ºC.
The cargo tank pressure and the tank shell temperatures must be closely
monitored. If the tank pressure decreases to 0.04 bar below the void space
pressure, the HD compressor(s) are automatically shut down. At the same time,
the shut-off valves at the domes are closed.
The two aft spray pipes in each tank dome are spare units. However, they may
be used if the other pipes are not providing sufficient capacity. A spray rate
higher than 5,000kg/h may be used, but the cooldown rate must not exceed a
rate faster than 9ºC per hour.
Whenever a cargo tank is cooled down completely from ambient temperature,
the tank shell temperature, measured at the equator (from sensor TI-10), should
be recorded on the relevant time/temperature graph form.
Section 6.2.4 - Page 2 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 6.2.4b Cooling Down Cargo Tanks Before Loading
uid
Liq
r
n
uid
016
V2
V2
1
20
V2
V2051
A
015
061
V2026
V2
120
Vent
Mast
V2
061
V2
20
V2
35
3
HD
V2
4
20
V2
3A
20
23
V2
3
13
V21
LD
.
mp
Co
25
V21
d
Voi re
or
r F osphe
ate
He e Atm
39
V21
ac
Sp
V2055
26
V21
S)
2(
00
V2
V2101
V2138
V2002 (P)
No.1
Cargo Tank
V2054
14
V2054
V23
V2027
14
V23
5
1
V23
15
V23
11
V21
A
0
220
Dome
003
V2
V2004
V2054
V2054
e
pac
id S er
Vo r Dry
i
A
39
A
V
.A
mp
Co
V21
G
LN iser
or
Vap
V2051
V2
016
V21
V2100
V2138
V2051
V2051
V2
36
V21
35
V22
V2052
ge
m
Co
14A
V21
14
V21
28
V21
17
V21
015
V2
200
p.B
35
V21
13
V21
Vent
Mast
ou
tro
uid
15
V21
HD
31
V21
r
ou
Vap ater
He
Liq
V21
Liq
34
V21
To
s
iler
Bo
14
V21
30
V21
30
32
V21
V21
V2
r
ou
Vap ater
He
Ni
31
132
PI
p
Va
G
LN
sor
res
mp Room
Co
25
V21
39
2
V 1
e
pac
id S er
Vo r Dry
i
A
26
V21
N
To 2
t
lan
P
Vent
Mast
m
ans
Fro ing F ating
e
t
cula ace H
ir
c
p
Re id S
Vo
r
Fo
V2006 (P)
V2068
Dome
S)
6(
00
V2
V2103
V2138
V2058
V2057
V2057
007
V2
V2008
No.2
Cargo Tank
V2057
V2057
V2028
2
212
V
V2
0
01
10
V21
V2
V2108
18
V21
V2068
V2064
V2063
V2063
Dome
011
2
s
ace
01
Vent
Mast
Sp
Void
To
V2
19
V21
(S)
V2010 (P)
V2138
No.3
Cargo Tank
V2063
V2063
Spray
Pump
V2029
Vent
Mast
019
V2
V2109
V2018 (P)
V2138
V2065
V2065
FW
S)
8(
01
V2066
Dome
V2
V2020
D
No.4
Cargo Tank
A
015
V2
V2065
V2065
To
Emergency
Discharge
Astern
Spray
Pump
V2030
3
202
V2024
V2
V
2
00
120
V2
A
200
Dome
061
V2
A
016
(S)
V2
V2
061
V2
201 00
2
V2
uid
No.5
Cargo Tank
Liq
V2002 (P)
V2
uid
Liq
ur
po
n
Va
ge
tro
Ni
016
V2
015
V2
Key
LNG Liquid
LNG Vapour
Issue: 2
Section 6.2.4 - Page 3 of 4
Norman Lady
Procedure to Cool Down the Liquid Pipes
Criteria and Additional Information
When the temperature of the tank shell at the equator (from sensor TI-10) has
dropped to at least -113ºC, cargo tank filling may be started.
Before liquid can be introduced into the cargo tanks, the temperature difference
between the cargo tank equator and the liquid must be less than 50°C. It is
therefore necessary to cool down all the cargo tanks until the equator
temperature average is -115°C before cooling down the aft loading arm and
loading lines.
The first step before actual loading is to cool down the cargo loading lines.
This process is usually carried out at the same time as the tanks are being
cooled down.
a) LNG is introduced into the liquid lines by slightly opening valve
V2061 to admit a limited flow rate into the aft liquid crossover
and liquid header.
b) The liquid will flash off immediately due to the high temperatures
as it enters the lines. The vapour generated by this will be
introduced into each tank through the filling pipe.
c) Open the liquid line from the crossovers to each cargo tank by
opening valves:
Position
Description
Valve
Open
ESD valve on the aft liquid header
V2016A
Open 10%
Spray crossover valve to the liquid header
V2016
Open
No.1 cargo tank filling and block valves
Open
No.2 cargo tank liquid line valves
V2008
Open
No.3 cargo tank liquid line valves
V2012
Open
No.4 cargo tank liquid line valves
V2020
Open
No.5 cargo tank filling and block valves
V2003, V2004
V2024, V2023
The precooling must be closely monitored by observation of the temperatures
and pressures. The temperatures and pressure in the connection between the
crossovers and liquid headers and the temperatures of the tanks are all
available on the DCS display. If a high pressure rise is observed, the flow rate
must be reduced by throttling in valve V2015 accordingly.
d) When the temperature in the liquid header at all the cargo tanks
has fallen to -120ºC, the gate valve V2015 may be fully opened
and the loading valves at No.2, 3 and 4 cargo tanks can be opened.
The vessel is now ready to load.
Cargo Operating Manual
e) Adjust the nozzle valves so that the spray pump load reads
approximately 27 amps.
In order to achieve effective spraying, the nozzle pressure should be
approximately 2.5 bar.
Log all relevant data during the entire operation.
The aft arm can be cooled down from shore. This is achieved by opening the
loading valve on all the tanks and adjusting each throttle valve to 25% open,
before agreeing with shore side and fully opening the ESD liquid valve and
opening the manual liquid valve 7 turns. The terminal will then supply a
minimum flow of liquid into the chicksan arm which will eventually flow into
the tanks. Both HD compressors are run at a maximum of 14,000 rpm in order
to stabilise the tank pressures at this stage.
It may be necessary to adjust/reduce the opening on the throttle valves and
reduce the number of spray nozzles in use for tanks with high pressure. If this
does not help, the flow rate from shore will have to be reduced.
(Note: Keep in mind the vapour back pressure from shore and if it exceeds
0.22 bar, ask the terminal to open more to the flare. Relief valves will open at
0.25 bar but try to keep the pressure below 0.17 bar, which is 70% of relief
valve setting, throughout the cooldown and loading operation.)
Before the liquid reaches the level of 1 metre below the equator, the
temperature difference between the liquid and the equator must not exceed
25°C (equator temperature -138C).
To achieve this:
1. The tanks are recommended to be further cooled down by
spraying, preferably from shore. This is achieved by adjusting the
manifold back pressure to 2.5 - 3.0 bar, by throttling the manual
liquid valve(s) on the manifold, provided the terminal accepts this
back pressure.
2. Or continue loading until there is approximately 3.5m in No.3 or
No.4 cargo tank.
Then start the spray pumps as follows:
a) Open the spray pump discharge valve V2068.
b) Open the 1 and 4 tonne nozzle valves on each tank.
c) Press the Stop pushbutton to reset the spray pump trips.
d) Press the Start pushbutton for the spray pump.
Issue: 2
Section 6.2.4 - Page 4 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 6.3.1a Cooling Down Cargo Tanks Prior To Arrival
34
V21
To
s
iler
Bo
V21
V21
30
14
V21
30
.B
mp
Co
HD
31
V21
r
ou
Vap ater
He
15
V21
V
35
V21
3
20
V2
3
20
V2
3A
20
V2
4
23
V2
G
LN iser
or
Vap
V2052
200
V2
V2
4
211
201
V2
5
061
V2
015
A
V2026
Vent
Mast
V
016
A
V2
200
A
V2055
.A
mp
Co
HD
13
V21
L
V21
25
11
V21
d
Voi
or here
rF
p
ate tmos
e
H eA
39
V21
ac
Sp
Dome
003
V2
(S)
2
00
V2
V2004
V2101
V2138
V2002 (P)
No.1
Cargo Tank
V2054
V2054
26
V21
e
pac
id S er
Vo r Dry
Ai
p.
om
DC
V2100
V2138
V2051
0
212
061
3
V21
39
V21
35
V22
015
V2051
V2051
016
6
28
V21
17
V21
V2
V2
V2051
V2
V2
3
V21
13
V21
14A
V21
uid
Liq
32
V21
uid
Liq
r
ou
Vap ater
He
PI
31
V21
32
V21
ur
po
Va
n
ge
tro
Ni
ui d
Li q
G
LN
Vent
Mast
sor
res
mp Room
o
C
15
V23
15
V23
25
V21
39
V21
V2054
14
V23
14
2
V 3
V2054
V2027
26
V21
e
pac
id S er
Vo r Dry
Ai
N
To 2
nt
Pla
Vent
Mast
m
ans
Fro ing F ating
e
t
ula
eH
circ Spac
e
R
id
o
V
For
Dome
0
V2
V2103
V2138
V2006 (P)
V2068
V2058
V2057
V2057
007
V2
(S)
06
V2008
No.2
Cargo Tank
V2057
V2057
V2028
22
V21
es
pac
V2
0
01
10
V21
V2
V2108
18
V21
V2068
V2064
V2063
V2063
Dome
011
2
Vent
Mast
01
S
Void
To
V2
19
V21
(S)
V2010 (P)
V2138
No.3
Cargo Tank
V2063
V2063
Spray
Pump
V2029
Vent
Mast
0
V2
V2109
V2066
01
V2
V2020
18
V2018 (P)
V2138
V2065
V2065
9
Dome
FW
(S)
No.4
Cargo Tank
V2065
A
015
V2
V2065
To
Emergency
Discharge
Astern
Spray
Pump
V2030
V2
V2024
V2
2
00
120
V2
Dome
A
061
V2
200
V2
(S)
16A
20
V
061
V2
No.5
Cargo Tank
201 0
20
V2
uid
Liq
ur
po
n
Va
ge
tro
Ni
016
015
id
V2
V2
V2
u
Liq
V2002 (P)
023
D
Key
LNG Liquid
LNG Vapour
Issue: 1
Section 6.3.1 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
6.3 Ballast Passage
6.3.1 Cooling Down Cargo Tanks Prior to Arrival
Cooling Down Cargo Tanks During a Ballast Voyage
When loading orders are received, the quantity of coolant (heel) has to be
decided, taking into consideration the length of ballast voyage and chartering
instructions.
The spray cooling system is fitted to cool down the cargo tanks before the
loading of cargo. This is in order to protect the tank shell against the thermal
stresses and shocks of sudden expansion.
The spray system consists of the piping and the spray pumps. The piping
consists of a main header, running along the ship from tank No.1 to tank No.5.
This header is connected to the liquid crossovers for LNG cargo supply from
the shore and to the two spray pumps. One pump is fitted in tank No.3 and the
other in tank No.4, for the supply of LNG when the ship is at sea.
The spray pipe header is connected to each tank dome by four spray pipes
supplying the spray nozzles with liquid. Two of the pipes serve as spare units.
The LNG is sprayed through the 10 spray nozzles in each tank to obtain a
uniform distribution within the tank. There are also 10 spray nozzles spare in
each tank. The spray nozzles are connected to the main system by four spray
pipes of which pipes No.1 and No.2 would normally be used. Pipe No.1
supplies two nozzles and pipe No.2 supplies eight nozzles. The spare units,
pipes 3 and 4 also supply the same number of nozzles.
The nozzles connected to pipe No. 1, 2 and 4, each have a spray rate capacity
of 500kg of LNG at 1.53kg/cm2 pressure drop across the nozzle. The nozzles
connected to pipe 3 each have a capacity of 1,000kg of LNG.
If severe flashing occurs, the remaining nozzles may be used in order to keep
the minimum cooldown time. The spray rates are remotely controlled from the
DCS system by operation of the shut-off valves. The cooling down rate must
not exceed 9ºC per hour measured at the equatorial ring.
f) Start the spray pump and circulate the LNG back to No.3 tank (or
No.4 tank) via the spray nozzles.
The coolant is taken in one (#3 or #4). Regarding the temperature restriction to
be kept in the equator profile during the voyage due to low filling-up ratio,
refer to the Appendix to Classification Certificate.
A spray programme has to be made in such a way that the cargo tanks’ equator
temperature, on arrival in port, is according to the charter’s instruction/order.
The use of BOG as fuel has to be optimised during the voyage.
The spray pump(s) have to be used at the designed flow when operated. Low
flow will give an unacceptably high down thrust load on the pump lower
bearing.
CAUTION
The pressure and ampere load for the pump(s) have to be watched
carefully to avoid a possible breakdown of the bearing.
Preparation for Cooling Down the Cargo Tanks
a) The LD compressor would normally be in operation supplying
BOG to the boilers.
b) Open the following vapour header tank valves:
Position
Description
Valve
Open
No.1 cargo tank vapour header valve
V2100
Open
No.2 cargo tank vapour header valve
V2101
Open
No.3 cargo tank vapour header valve
V2103
Open
No.4 cargo tank vapour header valve
V2108
Open
No.5 cargo tank vapour header valve
V2109
g) Open the following spray ring block and nozzle valves to allow a
flow to the tanks:
Position
Description
Valve
Open
No.1 cargo tank spray ring block valve
V2052
Open
No.1 cargo tank spray ring nozzle valves V2051A, V2051B
Open
No.2 cargo tank spray ring block valve
Open
No.2 cargo tank spray ring nozzle valves V2054A, V2054B
Open
No.4 cargo tank spray ring block valve
Open
No.4 cargo tank spray ring nozzle valves V2053A, V2053B
Open
No.5 cargo tank spray ring block valve
Open
No.5 cargo tank spray ring nozzle valves V2065A, V2065B
V2055
V2064
V2066
h) Once the pipelines are cooled down, the flow rate can be
increased by opening up the spray nozzles and shutting No.3’s
nozzles, ensuring that the pressure build up is controlled at all
times. In an emergency or critical situation, excess pressure can
be vented through the valve to No.4 vent mast.
i) The cooling down rate must not exceed 9°C per hour, measured at
the equatorial ring.
j) The cargo tank is ready for loading when the temperature of the
tank shell at the equator has dropped to at least -113°C. This
temperature represents a total cooling down time of
approximately 20 hours.
c) Cool down the spray pipes using the spray pump in No.3 or No.4
tank.
d) Open valve V2068, from the spray pump to the spray header.
e) Open valves V2058 and V2057 A and B if using No.3 spray pump
and tank.
Issue: 2
Section 6.3.1 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 6.4.1a Preparations for Loading
Prior To
Arrival
Ship
Terminal
Terminal advises ship of arm
configuration to be used
Ship advises terminal of tank
condition
A and C: LNG loading
B: Vapour return
Warm
Inerted
etc
OR
B and D: LNG loading
C: Vapour return
Arrival
Ship confirms ETA
Boil - Off
To Shore
Ship advises systems operational
Ship advises changes (if any)
Secure ship at jetty
Ship checks communications
Pilot/loading master advises
terminal on completion
Ship continuously monitors
loading frequency
Main propulsion on standby
Fire fighting equipment ready
Ship
Terminal
Test ESD
(Warm)
Witness and log ESD1 operation
Pilot/loading master advises
terminal control room
Witness and log ESD1 operation
before opening ship's manifold
valves
When ship's vapour return manifold
is open, open loading arm vapour
return valve
Fully open ship's vapour return
valve
If ship inerted, vapour return to
line - up with shore flare
Cool Down
Logic test of ESD operation
Ship's cargo tanks will balance with
shore tank at approximately 0.12 bar
Cool down loading arms and
ship's liquid lines as per
terminal's requirement
Ship advises terminal of readiness
To start cool down of loading arms
and ship's liquid lines.
Terminal advises ship when ready
CCR requests start
Fire main pressurised
Cool both arms simultaneously
until frosted over entire length
Operaton controlled by loading
master (approximately 45/60 minutes)
Secure gangway
Pilot/loading master advises
terminal staff
Preloading
Meeting
Loading master
Relevant terminal personnel
Check gangway
Hand over crew list
Display appropriate signage
OR
If ship is in inerted condition,
advise ship when ready to start
cool down of first loading arm
and liquid line
Relevant ship's personnel
Review loading schedule
OR
If ship is in inerted condition,
CCR advises terminal when ready
to start cool down of first loading
arm and liquid line
Ship's CCR specifies flow rate
Review loading schedule
Connecting
Up
Check
System
Line - Up
ESD Test
(Warm)
Vapour return arm connected first
Position safety locks
Pressure test with N2
Loading strainers in place
Manifold blanks removed
Monitor from CCR
If ship inerted, vapour return to
line - up with shore flare
Safety
Inspection
Carry out safety inspection
Complete and sign safety checklist
CTS
Carry out initial CTS gauging
Terminal confirms readiness to
gas up ship's lines and tanks
Carry Out
out initial
Carry
Initial CTS gauging
Gauging
before opening ship's manifold
valves
Cool Down
Tanks
Ship's CCR confirms readiness to
gas up lines and tanks
Ship's CCR specifies liquid flow rate
Vapour return lined up to shore
flare until CO2 content as
terminal's requirements then line
up for normal vapour return
recovery
Ship's CCR requests start
Terminal confirms readiness to cool
down ship's pipelines and tanks
Ship's CCR confirms readiness to
cool down tanks
Carry out safety inspection
Complete and sign safety checklist
Start side water curtain at manifold
Witness and log ESD1 operation
of all ship's valves
Witness and log ESD1 operation
of all shore hydraulic valves
Gas Up
(If Inerted)
Terminal control room checks
system line - Up
Initiate ESD1 signal from shore via
radio link
Initial cool down flow rates
in accordance to
vessel's requirement
When CO2 content is as per terminal's
requirement, inform terminal
Total Gas Up
Time
Approximately
20 Hours
Continue gassing up until a CO2
content is as per terminal's
requirement
Ship's CCR specifies liquid flow rate
Ship's CCR requests start
Ship's CCR informs terminal when
cool down complete
Total Gas Up
And
Cooldown
Time
Approximately
36 Hours
Ready For Loading
Issue: 2
Section 6.4.1 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
6.4 Loading
6.4.1 Preparations for Loading
l) All forms required by LHC or the charterer are to be filled in and
signed by the shipper, the terminal, the surveyor and the
authorities (customs).
Company Directives
Loading Rates
(Note: The maximum loading rate is 7,500m3/h with all five tanks open. See
the appendix to classification certificate.)
The loading rates are dependant on the capacity of the shore side pumps,
below is a guide to the rates which can be safely taken.
a) The chief officer is to prepare a detailed loading and deballasting
plan which includes the trim and stability conditions during
loading and the topping up procedures to be included.
b) The pre-arrival meeting is to be held within 72 hours and the prearrival checklists are to be completed.
c) A pre-loading meeting is to be held together with the terminal
representatives. The ship/shore safety list is to be filled in.
d) The CTM is to be carried out together with the terminal
representatives, surveyors and authorities.
Cargo Operating Manual
5 tanks open:
7,500m3/h
4 tanks open:
6,000m3/h
3 tanks open:
4,500m3/h
2 tanks open:
3,000m3/h
1 tanks open:
1,500m3/h
Compressor Vapour Return Capacity
1 HD compressor running:
12,000m3/h
2 HD compressors running:
36,000m3/h
(LD compressor:
3,000m3/h)
e) All connections (bonding wire, telephones, loading and bunkering
arms) at the manifold are to be carried out according to the
terminal’s cargo handling manual.
f) The HD compressors are to be made ready for use for sending
vapour to the shore.
g) The chief officer is to supervise all loading operations on board.
h) The sounding, temperature and pressure is to be checked and
noted on all cargo tanks according to the schedule during the
loading. The cargo monitoring record is to be filled in.
i) The pressure at the manifold is to be checked and noted according
to the schedule.
j) When the loading is completed, all valves at the manifold are to
be closed according to the terminal’s procedure. The manifolds
are to be blanked as soon as the loading arms are disconnected.
k) The CTM (custody transfer measurement) is to be carried out
together with the terminal representatives, surveyors and
authorities.
Issue: 2
Section 6.4.1 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 6.4.2a Cargo Lines Cool Down
4
15
V21
.B
mp
Co
HD
36
V21
3
20
V2
3
20
V2
3A
20
V2
4
23
V2
G
LN iser
or
Vap
13
V21
1
V2
061
V2
A
016
.
mp
Co
11
V21
d
Voi re
or
r F osphe
ate
He e At m
39
V21
ac
Sp
200
V2026
V
120
Vent
Mast
V2101
A
V2055
Dome
003
V2
S)
2(
00
V2
V2004
V2138
V2002 (P)
No.1
Cargo Tank
V2054
V2054
26
V21
e
pac
id S er
Vo r Dry
Ai
25
V21
V2
V2051
5A
201
V
20
V2
V2138
V2051
016
35
LD
V2052
200
V21
9
V2100
015
V2051
V2051
.A
mp
Co
HD
3
V21
35
V22
V2
V2
1
206
V2
28
V21
17
V21
V2
14
V21
35
V21
13
V21
14A
V21
uid
1
V21
31
V21
r
ou
Vap ater
He
Liq
0
Vent
Mast
ui d
3
V21
130
uid
34
V21
V2
31
Li q
32
V21
V21
Liq
r
ou
Vap ater
He
PI
To
s
iler
Bo
32
V21
ur
po
n
Va
ge
tro
Ni
G
LN
sor
res
mp Room
o
C
15
V23
15
V23
25
V21
39
V21
V2054
14
V23
14
V23
V2054
V2027
26
V21
e
pac
id S er
Vo r Dry
i
A
N
To 2
nt
Pla
Vent
Mast
m
ans
Fro ing F ating
e
t
ula
eH
circ Spac
e
R
Void
r
Fo
V2008
V2103
V2006 (P)
V2138
V2068
V2058
V2057
V2057
007
V2
S)
6(
00
V2
Dome
No.2
Cargo Tank
V2057
V2057
01
V2
22
V21
V2028
2
19
V21
s
ace
Sp
Void
To
Dome
011
Vent
Mast
V2
0
01
(S)
V2
10
V21
V2108
18
V21
V2068
V2064
V2063
V2063
V2010 (P)
V2138
No.3
Cargo Tank
V2063
V2063
Spray
Pump
V2029
Vent
Mast
V2020
01
V2
18
20
9
Dome
D
FW
(S)
V
V2018 (P)
V2138
V2066
V2109
V2065
V2065
No.4
Cargo Tank
V2065
A
015
V2
V2065
To
Emergency
Discharge
Astern
Spray
Pump
V2030
V2024
02
V2
0
V2
(
02
A
061
200
V2
S)
V2
6A
201
V
061
V2
V2
uid
Liq
ur
po
n
Va
ge
tro
Ni
016
V2
015
uid
201 00
2
V2
No.5
Cargo Tank
V2
Liq
V2002 (P)
3
120
V2
Dome
Key
LNG Liquid
LNG Vapour
Issue: 1
Section 6.4.2 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
6.4.2 Cargo Lines Cooldown
Inerting and Gassing Up
a) Shipboard management (ie, Master, chief officer and chief
engineer) and cargo engineer plan the operation.
b) All gas measuring equipment is to be tested and calibrated.
c) All relevant safety regulations are to be adhered to.
d) The Master will advise when the operation can commence.
e) The cargo engineer is to check the tanks for any leftovers and
secure all hatches in the tanks. The check list for closing down the
cargo tanks is to be filled in. The cargo engineer is to be the last
person to leave the tank.
f) The cargo lines are to be checked for any signs of water by
opening the drains, flanges etc.
g) The inert gas generator is to be tested and adjusted in due time
before the operation is commenced.
h) The dehumidifiers are to be reactivated and made ready for use.
i) The inert gas is to be checked at regular intervals for the correct
O2, dew point and CO2 content. The chief officer/cargo engineer
is to take the final readings.
j) The chief officer is to prepare a detailed purging, loading and
deballasting plan including trim and stability conditions during
loading.
k) A pre-loading meeting is to be held together with the terminal
representatives. The ship/shore safety list is to be filled in.
l) All connections (bonding wire, telephones. loading and bunkering
arm) at the manifolds are to be carried out according to the
terminal’s procedure.
m) When the cooldown of the loading arm is completed and the
vaporiser is made ready, the purging of the cargo tanks and lines
can commence. The outgoing temperature from the vaporiser is to
be set to approximately 10ºC.
n) The gas analyser is to be put into operation at the ship’s vent mast
to continuously check the inert gas for any sign of LNG vapour
concentration.
Issue: 2
o) When the gas analyser shows 50% Lower Explosion Limit (LEL),
the ship’s vent mast must be closed and the vapour must then be
sent to the boilers for use as fuel and/or to the shore for flaring (or
in accordance with terminal requirement).
p) The gasup (purging) is completed when the CO2 readings at all
outletsis <1% by volume (refer to the terminal requirement) at the
manifolds, vent mast connections, drains and gauge piping. Also
all outlets on compressors and adjacent piping must be measured
for any traces of O2 or CO2.
q) All additional equipment used during the process is to be rigged
down. Blind flanges are to be refitted and drains and test points
are to be closed before the cooldown is commenced.
r) The cargo engineer is to prepare the HD compressors for use
before the cooldown is commenced.
s) The cool down of the cargo tanks is to be carried out according to
the respective cargo handling manual and the temperature
requirements laid down in the appendix to the classification
certificate.
t) All temperatures, pressures and the cooldown rate are to be
recorded according to the cooldown report.
u) The shore terminal is to be advised in due time for cooling down
the remaining loading arm(s).
Pre-Cooling of Liquid Pipes Before Loading
Company Directives
Cargo Operating Manual
Position
Description
Valve
Open
No.1 cargo tank liquid line valves
V2003 V2004
Open
No.2 cargo tank liquid line valves
V2008 V2007
Open
No.3 cargo tank liquid line valves
V2012 V2011
Open
No.4 cargo tank liquid line valves
V2020 V2019
Open
No.5 cargo tank liquid line valves
V2024 V2023
c) Open the port aft ESD valve V2016A and starboard forward ESD
valve V2015A.
d) Open the manifold block valves V2015 and V2016 on the side
arms connected. Open the ESD valve V2015A and V2016A and
request the shore to supply LNG at a slow rate to cool down the
shore arms and liquid header.
e) Open the three gate valves V2061, connecting the spray crossover
to the liquid crossover, allowing a limited flow into the liquid
lines.
The pre-cooling must be thoroughly monitored by observation of the
temperatures and pressures. Temperature monitoring at the liquid header and
crossover connection and at each cargo tank is available at the DCS mimic.
The pressure at the header between the two crossovers is also available via the
DCS system mimics. If a high pressure is observed at this point, the HD
compressor(s) should be started and the flow rate reduced.
f) When the temperature at the liquid header at the tanks has fallen
to approximately -120°C, the gate valves may be opened slowly
and the last shut-off valve at the manifold/crossover can be
opened.
The cargo tanks will normally be maintained at -113ºC during a ballast voyage
by regular spraying. As long as the tanks are at this temperature, cooling down
of the cargo liquid pipes may now commence. The operation must be started
in due time before loading.
LNG is introduced into the liquid crossover and liquid header at a limited flow
rate. The liquid flashes off immediately due to the high temperature within the
pipes and the vapour that is generated is introduced to each tank via the filling
pipe. The pre-cooling is then carried out as follows:
a) Set up the HD compressors to discharge vapour ashore via the
vapour manifold and prepare for operation.
b) Open the liquid line from the crossovers to each cargo tank by
opening the following valves:
Section 6.4.2 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 6.4.3a Cargo Loading with Vapour Return to Shore via the High Duty Compressors
uid
Liq
V2052
r
ou
n
uid
V2051
V2
V
1
220
V2051
A
015
1
206
016
V2
V2026
120
V
Vent
Mast
V2
061
V2
A
016
36
20
V2
3
8
212
V2
V
4
20
V2
3A
20
23
V2
39
p.
3
m
Co
V2055
V
p.A
25
V21
6
212
d
Voi re
or
r F osphe
ate
He e Atm
39
V21
ac
Sp
S)
2(
00
V2
V2101
V2138
V2002 (P)
No.1
Cargo Tank
V2054
V
14
V2054
V23
V2027
14
V23
5
1
V23
15
V23
11
V21
Dome
003
V2
V2004
V2054
V2054
e
pac
id S er
Vo r Dry
Ai
V21
LD
A
0
220
om
C
HD
13
V21
V2
35
V21
V2100
V2138
V2051
V2051
V2
14
V21
V21
35
V22
ge
.B
mp
Co
35
13
V21
015
V2
200
14A
V21
V21
G
LN iser
or
Vap
Liq
15
V21
HD
31
V21
17
V21
tro
Ni
V21
r
ou
Vap ater
He
B
uid
34
V21
To
rs
oile
14
V21
30
V21
30
32
V21
Liq
r
ou
Vap ater
He
PI
31
V21
32
V21
Vent
Mast
p
Va
G
LN
sor
res
mp Room
o
C
25
V21
39
V21
e
pac
id S er
Vo r Dry
Ai
6
2
V21
N
To 2
t
lan
P
Vent
Mast
m
ans
Fro ing F ating
e
t
ula ce H
c
ir
a
c
Re id Sp
o
V
For
V2006 (P)
V2068
Dome
S)
6(
00
V2
V2103
V2138
V2058
V2057
V2057
007
V2
V2008
No.2
Cargo Tank
V2057
V2057
V2028
2
212
V
es
ac
Sp
Void
To
V2
0
01
10
V21
V2
V2108
18
V21
V2068
V2064
V2063
V2063
Dome
011
2
Vent
Mast
01
V2
19
V21
(S)
V2010 (P)
V2138
No.3
Cargo Tank
V2063
V2063
Spray
Pump
V2029
Vent
Mast
019
V2
(S)
18
V2020
Dome
FW
D
0
V2
V2109
V2066
V2018 (P)
V2138
V2065
V2065
No.4
Cargo Tank
V2065
To
Emergency
Discharge
Astern
A
015
V2
V2065
Spray
Pump
V2030
023
120
V2
Dome
V2
S)
2(
6A
201
0
20
V
V
V2
061
V2
uid
201 0
20
V2
No.5
Cargo Tank
V2
uid
Liq
ur
po
n
Va
ge
tro
Ni
016
V2
015
V2
Liq
V2002 (P)
061
A
200
V2
V2024
Key
LNG Liquid
LNG Vapour
Issue: 2
Section 6.4.3 - Page 1 of 4
Norman Lady
6.4.3 To Load Cargo with Vapour Return to Shore via the High
Duty Compressors
Request the shore terminal to start loading at a slow rate and check that all
systems are tight and that LNG cargo is entering the tanks via the spray header.
The procedure is as follows:
Confirm that the temperature of the tank shell at the equator for the first tank
to be loaded is at least -113°C.
a) Set up the HD compressors to discharge vapour ashore via the
vapour manifold and prepare for operation.
b) Open valve V2010, the vapour header to HD compressors vapour
supply.
c) Open the HD compressors inlet valves, V2113.
d) Open the HD compressors outlet valves, V2115 and V2114A.
e) Open valves V2117 and V2119, the discharge from the HD
compressor to the vapour header manifold.
f) Open valve V2120, the vapour manifold to shore.
f) On No.1 tank, crack open the tank loading valve V2003 and
confirm that LNG liquid is entering the tank.
g) Start loading slowly into the other four tanks by opening valves
V2007, V2011, V2019 and V2003, continuing spraying to
maintain the temperature and reduce gas generation. As the
pressure rises, the HD compressors may be started and gas sent
ashore.
h) Once loading into all tanks is confirmed and the gas pressure is
under control, the loading rate can be increased as required and
the flow rates to each tank adjusted to allow for the final topping
off.
i) As the tank temperature reaches -138°C, the spray crossover
valves V2061 can be closed and once the spray line is drained,
close the tank spray ring block valves V2052, V2055, V2058,
V2064 and V2066.
Set up the cargo tanks and the liquid header to load as follows:
a) Open the valves V2061, the liquid crossover to spray header.
b) Open the spray ring block valves to each tank V2052, V2055,
V2058, V2064 and V2066.
Topping Up Procedures
d) Open the cargo tank liquid header block valves V2004, V2008,
V2012, V2020 and V2024.
1. The Chief Officer is responsible for carrying out all the stages of LNG
loading, including topping of tanks. His attention shall be focused on cargo
operations only during the topping up period.
Position
Description
Open
No.1 cargo tank spray nozzle valve
V2051
Open
No.2 cargo tank spray nozzle valve
V2054
Open
No.3 cargo tank spray nozzle valve
V2057
Open
No.4 cargo tank spray nozzle valve
V2063
Open
No.5 cargo tank spray nozzle valve
Valve
V2065
In order to get liquid to the spray valves, open cross-connection valve V2961
and close in valve V2061A.
Any alarms sounding would then clearly be cargo alarms.
4. Notify the terminal one hour prior to the topping up of the first LNG cargo
tank. Reduce the loading rate to about 3,500m3/h.
5. At the passing of the 95% alarm (or corresponding level) of the first tank,
stop the BOG to the engine room (if used) and physically check that the main
gas valve is closed.
6. Topping up of the cargo tanks shall be carried out with no less than 10
minute intervals between each tank. At about 15 minutes before starting
topping up, the communication with the shore control room/loading master
shall be confirmed.
7. When two of the tanks have been completed, reduce the loading rate to about
2,500m3/h. Reduce the loading rate to about 1,000m3/h prior to topping up the
last cargo tank.
8. The tank filling valve of the last tank to be topped up must remain in the
OPEN position for liquid draining purposes. Stop the last loading pump when
the tank level reaches about 25-30cm from the finish level. When the draining
of the loading arm is completed, all liquid valves must be closed at the
manifold and confirmed closed.
9. The loading is not completed until all the valves at the manifold are closed.
j) The loading rate is reduced as the tanks near capacity, to allow for
a controlled topping off.
c) Open the manifold liquid valves V2016A, V2016, V2015 and
V2015A.
e) Open the following first spray nozzle valve on each tank:
Cargo Operating Manual
2. The cargo engineer shall assist the chief officer during the topping up of the
tanks.
10. If necessary, never hesitate to use the ESD.
11. If the Chief officer or his deputy at any time feels he needs assistance at
any time, he is free to call for it.
If at any time during the cargo transfer procedure, including the topping up
procedure, when reaching an alarm status without such an alarm being
activated, the cargo transfer should be stopped immediately until the reason(s)
for the failure has been identified.
(Note ! This topping up procedure is to be included in the loading plan.)
One qualified deck officer shall be stationed at the tank domes during topping
up of the cargo tanks, in order to monitor the actual level.
The deck officer has to report to the CCR when the level is about 30cm below
the finish level.
Closing of the loading valve(s) shall be visibly checked and confirmed.
3. Deballasting should be completed/interrupted one hour prior to the topping
up procedure. This is to avoid alarms being activated from the ballast panel
during during the topping up procedure.
k) When all the shore loading pumps have stopped, stop the HD
compressors and prepare for the draining of the liquid lines to the
final tank.
l) All LNG remaining in the downward leg of the loading arms and
the manifold connection is to be drained to the tanks through the
spray line assisted by nitrogen pressure from ashore. The LNG
and vapour manifolds are then purged with nitrogen until an
acceptable hydrocarbon content is reached.
m) Close vapour manifold valve V2120.
Issue: 2
Section 6.4.3 - Page 2 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 6.4.3b Completing Loading
Loading
Terminal
Terminal confirms readiness
Loading rate is running at
maximum rate approx. 7,500 m3/h
Ship
CCR giving hourly reports to
terminal of cargo received and
loading rate
CCR ready to give terminal
15 minutes notice of any changes
required
Terminal
Topping Off
CCR gives 15 minutes notice of
topping off and according to topping
off procedure
Final CTS
Gauging
Disconnect
Loading Arms
Stopping
Draining
CCR requests stop
Terminal shuts terminal liquid
loading valves
CCR shuts manifold liquid
loading valves
Terminal pressurises loading arm
using N2
Final CTS gauging by ship's
designated cargo officer
Complete documentation
Complete documentation
Disconnect and park arms
Fit blanks to ship's manifold
flanges
Fit blanks to liquid loading and
vapour return arm flanges
Terminal stops flow
Loading pumps shut down
Terminal drains shore line to
surge drum system using N2 to
displace liquid
Final CTS gauging by
loading master/surveyor
Engage storm locks
Terminal stops flow at ship's
request
Ship
Remove
Gangway
Terminal staff action
Ship's staff witness
Vapour return line to shore and
all spray nozzles on all tanks
to remain open during draining
Line up for draining through spray
line
Open spray/cool down valve to
displace liquid in shipside section
of loading arm
When pressure in loading arm
drops to 0.12 bar close manifiold
valve. Check for liquid and repeat
if required until outboard section
is free of liquid
Repeat for other loading arm
Inert
Loading Arms
Issue: 2
Purge and inert liquid loading
arms and vapour return arm:
Complete when hydrocarbon
content is less than 2%
Open Out
ship's
manifold
valve to
Carry
Initial
CTS Gauging
displace vapour
Close all manifold valves
Section 6.4.3 - Page 3 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
n) Close the liquid manifold ESD valves V2015a and V2016A.
o) Open the spray line crossover valves V2061.
p) Open the spray header block and spray inlet valves to No.4 tanks
V2064 and V2063A.
q) Request the shore terminal to pressurise the loading arms with
nitrogen gas and check that there is no liquid at the manifold drain
valves.
r) On completion of liquid drainage, carry out vapour purging. The
hydrocarbon content in the liquid and vapour manifold
connections at the purge valves should be confirmed as 2% or
below. Shut all manifold, tank loading and spray line valves.
s) Carry out the final custody transfer.
Issue: 2
Section 6.4.3 - Page 4 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 6.4.4a Deballasting
Sea Suction
Overboard
No.5 Side Tank
(Port)
V56
HC
1
No.3 Side Tank
(Port)
No.2 Side Tank
(Port)
No.1 Side Tank
(Port)
V60
HC
1A
SI
1
No.4 Side Tank
(Port)
V13
PI
1
801
20a
Emergency
Bilge Suction
V54A
V54
V52
Ballast
Pump
1,200 m3/h
Emergency
Connection For
Backflushing
Main Condenser
V52
V64
No.3 Bottom Wing
Tank (Port)
V59
V96
V94
V92
V57
V90
V23
No.1 Bottom Wing
Tank (Port)
No.2 Bottom Wing
Tank (Port)
V88
V86
V71
V84
V82
V80
V99
V78
V74
V72
V69
V70
V63
From
Bilge System
V33
From
Fire and Deck
Wash System
V58
No.2
Double Bottom
Spare Water
Ballast Tank
V59A
V33
No.3
Lower Cross
Tank
No.2
Lower Cross
Tank
No.1
Lower Cross
Tank
V98
V57
V95
V64
V93
V91
V89
SI
2
V66
Overboard
V53
V55
HC
2
PI
2
HC
2A
Ballast
Pump
1,200 m3/h
V85
V83
V81
V79
V77
V77
V72
V71
V59
No.3 Bottom Wing
Tank (Starboard)
V55A
V87
V97
No.2 Bottom Wing
Tank (Starboard)
No.1 Bottom Wing
Tank (Starboard)
V53
801
20b
Key
V61
Sea Suction
No.5 Side Tank
(Starboard)
No.4 Side Tank
(Starboard)
No.3 Side Tank
(Starboard)
No.2 Side Tank
(Starboard)
No.1 Side Tank
(Starboard)
Sea Water
Bilge
Electrical Signal
Issue: 1
Section 6.4.4 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
6.4.4 Deballasting
Ballast Operations
Company Directives
In the ballast system there are two ballast pumps with suction from all ballast
tanks. Each pump is of the electric vertical centrifugal type with a discharge
capacity of 1200m3/h.
a) Shut sea suction valves V60, V61 and sea crossover valve V58.
In normal service, the port pump is connected to all port tanks and the
starboard pump to all the starboard tanks. However, it is possible to draw from
both sides with one pump.
c) Open the pump discharge valves V54 and V55.
a) Carefully follow the instructions in the trim and stability
particulars booklet and the instruction book for the DCS system
as per the discharge/loading plan.
b) It should be remembered that free liquid surfaces seriously reduce
the stability of the vessel.
c) Ensure that all ballast operations are under full control, ie, there
should be no water in any empty spaces and ensure that tanks
which are supposed to be empty are in fact empty. The operator(s)
should make reference to the vessel’s trim and stability
particulars.
d) Local conditions such as mud etc, should be taken into
consideration when ballasting.
e) Gravity ballasting and deballasting should be used wherever
possible.
(Note: Ensure the maximum draught is regularly checked during
ballasting/deballasting, especially alongside during low tide.)
Ballast Pumps
Maker:
Type:
Capacity:
No. of sets:
Weir
Mark 3 UXL
1,200m3/h
2
From the cargo control room, all the ballast valves can be hydraulically
controlled. The same pipes and valves are used both for the filling and
emptying of all the ballast tanks.
The ballast eductor works as a stripping pump for the ballast tanks and as a
priming unit for the ballast pumps. This is a water driven unit with a discharge
capacity of 100m3/h, using drive water from the engine room bilge ejector
pump.
Procedure to Set Up for Deballasting: To Pump to Sea
b) Open the pump overboard valve V56.
d) Open the pump suction valves V52 and V53. Block valves V52
and V53 should be still open.
e) Open the tank suction valves. The tanks are taken down one pair
at a time, as required, to maintain draught, trim and stability. The
loading of the cargo tanks should counteract the amount of ballast
discharged.
a) Open sea suction valves V60, V61 and sea crossover valve V58.
f) Start the ballast pumps. Should the discharge rate require the use
of only one pump, the crossover line could be used by opening
valve(s) V59 and V59A, making the tank discharge lines
common. The main ballast pump is used to take as much as
possible out of the tanks, leaving the final draining to be
completed via the eductor.
b) Open block valves V52 and V53.
g) Open the eductor discharge valve V66.
c) Open the tank valve (e.g. for No.3 side tank port and starboard)
V90/V84 and V89/V83.
h) Open the eductor drive water supply valve V33 and start the
fire/bilge pump.
d) Run ballast to sea, keeping the vessel upright and ensure that the
vessel’s trim and stability is maintained at all times.
i) Stop the main ballast pumps and shut the suction, discharge
valves and overboard valves, V52, 53, 54, 55 and 56.
e) Once the level in the tanks has equalised with the sea level it will
be necessary to use the pumps to continue with the ballast
discharge.
j) Shut the block valves, V52 and V53.
Procedure to Set Up for Deballasting: To Run to Sea
k) Open the suction crossover valves V59 and V59A.
l) Open the tank valve(s) as required, one set at a time.
m) On completion of draining the tanks, ensure that the tank suctions
are closed before shutting off the drive water to avoid water going
back to the tank. Shut down the eductor system.
Issue: 2
Section 6.4.4 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 6.5.1a Loaded Voyage with Normal Boil-Off Gas Burning
3
20
V2
3A
20
V2
G
LN iser
or
Vap
.
mp
Co
LD
25
V21
061
V2
d
Voi
or here
rF
p
ate tmos
e
H eA
39
V21
ac
Sp
Vent
Mast
A
200
V2
V2055
V2
V2101
V2138
Dome
003
V2
(S)
02
V2004
0
V2002 (P)
No.1
Cargo Tank
V2054
V2054
26
V21
V2054
14
V2054
V23
V2027
14
V23
5
1
V23
15
V23
11
V21
V2026
120
V2
V
e
pac
id S er
Vo r Dry
i
A
39
13
V21
35
V22
uid
Liq
3
20
V2
4
23
V2
17
V21
1
220
V2051
A
015
V2
061
V2
016
V2
35
V21
.A
mp
Co
HD
28
V21
V2100
V2138
V2051
A
016
V2
36
V21
V2052
V2051
V2051
200
V2
14
V21
35
13
V21
V21
id
V21
14A
V21
015
V2
uid
.B
mp
Co
HD
31
V21
r
ou
Vap ater
He
15
V21
Liq
34
V21
14
V21
30
V21
30
V21
32
V21
V
1
213
u
Liq
r
ou
Vap ater
He
PI
To
s
iler
Bo
32
V21
ur
po
Va
n
ge
tro
Ni
G
LN
Vent
Mast
sor
res
mp Room
o
C
25
V21
39
V21
26
V21
N
To 2
e
pac
id S er
Vo r Dry
Ai
nt
Pla
Vent
Mast
m
ans
Fro ing F ating
lat e He
u
c
c
a
cir
Re id Sp
Vo
For
V2008
V2
V2103
V2138
V2006 (P)
V2068
V2058
V2057
V2057
0
007
V2
(S)
06
Dome
No.2
Cargo Tank
V2057
V2057
V2028
22
V21
s
ace
Sp
V2
V2
V2108
18
V21
V2068
V2064
V2063
V2063
S)
0(
01
10
V21
Dome
011
2
Vent
Mast
01
Void
To
V2
19
V21
V2010 (P)
V2138
No.3
Cargo Tank
V2063
V2063
Spray
Pump
V2029
Vent
Mast
Dome
FW
S)
8(
01
V2
V2109
V2066
019
V2
V2020
V2018 (P)
V2138
V2065
V2065
No.4
Cargo Tank
V2065
V2
V2065
To
Emergency
Discharge
Astern
Spray
Pump
V2030
V2
V2024
023
2(
00
V2
V2
Dome
061
2
V2
A
016
V2
061
V2
V2
uid
Liq
ur
po
n
Va
ge
tro
Ni
016
V2
015
V2
uid
201
200
V2
No.5
Cargo Tank
A
120
00A
V2
S)
015
Liq
V2002 (P)
D
Key
Dry Air
Moist Air
Cold LNG Vapour
Warm LNG Vapour
Issue: 1
Section 6.5.1 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
6.5 Loaded Voyage With Boil-Off Gas Burning
Void Spaces: Dry-air Circulation
6.5.1 Loaded Voyage With Normal Boil-Off Gas Burning
The dew point in the void spaces is to be kept as low as practicable to avoid
condensation and corrosion to the metal structure as well as providing a dry
barrier around the main insulation.
During the laden voyage, the movement of the vessel and the external heat
passing through the tank insulation generates convection currents within the
bulk cargo, causing the hot LNG to rise to the surface. This is then boiled off.
This natural boil-off amounts to 0.25% per day and is used as fuel in the ship’s
boilers.
The boil-off gas is drawn from the common vapour head with the LD
compressor and then passed through an LNG heater before being sent to the
engine room where it either supplements or replaces the fuel oil depending on
the ship’s requirements.
The procedure for sending gas to the boilers is as follows:
a) Set up the LD compressor to discharge to the boilers (as described
in section 4.4.2) and prepare for operation. Check the steam and
lubrication systems are set up correctly. The LD compressor
should be ready to start.
b) Open each of the vapour tank valve V2100, V2101, V2103,
V2108 and V2109 to make the vapour header common.
c) Open valve V2110, the vapour header to compressor inlet supply
line.
d) Open the LD compressor inlet valve V2128.
e) Open the LD compressor outlet valve V2130.
f) Set up the LNG cargo heater(s) to discharge to the boiler, set point
at +45°C and ready to start.
CAUTION
When using cargo as fuel for the boilers, the vapour heater used must be
thoroughly preheated by steam before the compressor is started and
methane vapour is admitted. This prevents ice forming. If necessary, the
operator should use the bypass valve in the steam inlet pipe.
g) Open the heater LNG outlet valve V2132.
h) Start the LD compressor; the amount of gas drawn off is regulated
via the DCS system to the ship’s requirements.
Issue: 2
Air is drawn by means of the recirculation fans, situated in the LNG
compressor room, from the void spaces to the void space dryer then through
the heater for the void space atmosphere, before being returned back to the
void spaces.
The available ‘cold’ in the boil-off vapour is used for drying the void space
atmosphere. Drying is carried out in two heat exchangers of the shell and tube
type, in which cargo vapour flows through the tubes. Any moisture in the void
space atmosphere will condense outside the tubes and freeze to ice. The ice
formation will reduce the heat exchange in the dryer. When the atmosphere
coming out from the dryer is higher than -50°C, regeneration is necessary. The
supply of void space atmosphere and cold cargo vapour is shut off and heated
cargo vapour is introduced through the tubes. The ice will now melt and the
water produced is drained off through a drain pipe.
Cargo Operating Manual
e) Open valves V2310 and V2311, the inlet and outlet to/from the
recirculation fans.
f) Open valves V2303 on all void spaces, the inlet to the void space
air supply duct.
g) Start the recirculation fan(s).
h) Monitor the dew point and the temperature of the air being
returned to the void space by means of the dew point detector
installed in the cargo control room. These are connected to sensor
elements situated in the top of the void spaces and the outlet dryer
for the void space atmosphere.
i) The pressure in the void spaces is controlled by the pneumatically
operated safety valves situated on each void space outlet pipe.
j) On completion of drying the void space atmosphere to the
required levels, shut down the system and continue to monitor.
Nitrogen Circulation in the Wedge Space
(Note: The dryers are used one at a time, when one is in service the other is
regenerated.)
After the flow has passed the dryer, it will be heated to about 30°C in a steam
heater before being introduced back to the void space.
Procedure to Circulate the Void Space Atmosphere
The LD compressor is set up to supply cold vapour to the void space dryer
from the vapour header.
Steam is supplied to the void space atmospheric heater to warm through before
use.
Refer to illustration 6.2.1a. The procedure is as follows:
a) Open valves V2125 and V2126, the supply of cold vapour to and
from the void space dryer in use.
b) Open valve V2314, the air supply to the void space dryers from
the recirculation fans.
Nitrogen is used as a seal gas in the cargo turbine compressor glands, for
purging the gas line to the ship’s boilers, the gas freeing of level indicators and
for bleeding to the wedge space of the cargo tank. This is the tank skirt
connection at the equator ring.
Nitrogen vapour is bled into the wedge space via valve V2209, from the
nitrogen generator, where it is introduced into the upper insulation space at the
top of the tank. The nitrogen vapour then flows down along the surface of the
tank shell to a drainpipe. The nitrogen vapour and any leaked LNG gas is
exhausted into the void space where it mixes with the dry-air atmosphere in
this space (see illustration 6.2.1a for information).
A gas detection sample point is situated in the vicinity of the drain pipe exit
which will give an early warning of any gas leakage from the shell into the
insulation space.
In the unlikely event of an LNG liquid leakage, this liquid will be drained
through additional drain pipes, which are protected by bursting discs. These
discs will burst when exposed to cold liquid, activating the gas detector
through the sample points located adjacent to these rupture disc outlets.
c) Open valve V2315, the air outlet from the void space dryer.
d) Open valves V2306 on all the void spaces, the outlet to the
recirculation fan supply line.
Section 6.5.1 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 6.6.1a Preparations for Discharging
Prior To
Arrival
Terminal
Terminal advises ship of arm
configuration to be used:
Cargo lines at -100ºC (as required by the
terminal).
LNG unloading
Vapour return
Ship checks communications.
Firefighting equipment ready
Check fender system
Check ship/shore communications
Position spotting line
Check speed of approach meter
Arrival
Ship
Secure ship at jetty
Pilot/loading master advises
terminal on completion
Ship continuously monitors
loading frequency.
Main propulsion on standby.
Firefighting equipment ready.
Fire main pressurised.
ESD system checked.
Gas/fire detection system checked.
Valve remote control system tested.
CTS activated.
Water in manifold spill trays.
Cargo pumps insulation tested.
Ship confirms ETA.
Ship advises systems operational.
Ship advises changes (if any).
Terminal
Check system
line - up
CTS
Test ESD
(warm)
Open Vapour
Manifold Valve
Main propulsion on standby.
Hand over crew list.
Display appropriate signage.
Rig
Gangway
Safety
Inspection
Terminal staff
Carry out safety inspection.
Complete and sign
safety checklist
Use of Main Communication
Equipment and Radars Prohibited
Hot Work Prohibited
Observe Port Regulations
VHF/AIS in low power mode
Cool Down
Connect
Arms
Terminal staffreview discharge
schedule and confirm safety checks.
Vapour return arm connected first.
Position safety locks.
Pressure test with N2.
Inert to <1% O2.
Connect pneumatic hose.
Issue: 2
Terminal staff.
Relevant ship's personnel.
Carry out initial CTS gauging.
Carry Out
out initial
Carry
Initial CTS gauging
Gauging
before opening ship's manifold
valves.
Initiate ESD1 signal from ship/shore.
Witness and log ESD1 operation of
all shore hydraulic valves.
Witness and log ESD1 operation
of all ship valves.
When shore vapour ESD valve is
open, open ship's vapour ESD valve.
Fully open shore vapour ESD valve.
Ship's cargo tanks will balance
with shore tank at approx. 0.12 bar.
Ship advises terminal of readiness
to start cool down of loading arms.
Cool down unloading arms.
Terminal advises ship when ready.
CCR advises terminal and sends
low flow of cargo by spray pump.
Cool both arms simultaneously
until frosted over entire length.
Operation controlled by loading
master (approx. 45/60 minutes).
Continuously check mooring
tension and fire wires approximately
2m above water line at all times
ESD Test
(cold)
Witness and check rigging of gangway.
Predischarge
Meeting
Ship
Terminal advises ship when ready.
Witness and log ESD1 operation
of all shore valves.
Initiate ESD1 signal from ship/shore.
Witness and log ESD1 operation
of all ship's valves.
Carry out safety inspection.
Complete and sign safety checklist.
Check O2 levels at sampling points.
Relevant ship's personnel
review discharge schedule and
confirm safety checks.
Safety
Checks
Carry out safety checks jointly
with ship.
Check through terminal safety
checks jointly with terminal staff.
Ready For Discharging
Start manifold water curtain.
Loading strainers in place.
Manifold blanks removed.
Section 6.6.1 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
6.6 Discharging with Gas Return to Shore
6.6.1 Preparations for Discharging
Company Directives
a) The chief officer is to prepare a detailed discharging and
ballasting plan which includes the trim and stability conditions
during discharging.
b) The pre-arrival meeting is to be held within 72 hours and the
ship/shore safety list is to be completed. The pre-arrival check
lists are to be completed.
c) A pre-loading meeting is to be held together with the terminal
representatives.
d) The CTM is to be carried out together with the terminal
representatives, surveyors and authorities.
e) All connections (bonding wire, telephones, loading and bunkering
arms) at the manifold are to be carried out according to the
terminal’s cargo handling manual.
f) The chief officer is to supervise all discharging operations on
board.
g) The start-up sequence of the cargo pumps is to take place
according to the terminal’s cargo handling manual.
h) Soundings are to be checked and noted on all the cargo tanks
during discharging. Whessoe gauge readings are to be checked
and noted on all the cargo tanks during discharging. The cargo
monitoring record is to be completed.
i) When discharging is completed, all valves at the manifold to be
closed according to the terminal’s cargo handling manual. The
disconnection must follow the terminal’s cargo handling manual.
The manifolds must be blanked as soon as the loading arms are
disconnected.
j) The CTM (custody transfer measurement) is to be carried out
together with the terminal representatives, surveyors and
authorities.
k) All forms required by LHC or the charterer are to be completed
and signed by the shipper, terminal, surveyor and the authorities
(customs).
Issue: 1
Section 6.6.1 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 6.6.2a Liquid Line Cooldown
Vent
Mast
13
V21
Co
LD
25
V21
d
Voi
or here
rF
p
ate tmos
e
H eA
39
V21
ac
Sp
V2051
A
015
V2
061
V2
V2026
120
V2
V
061
V2
A
016
V2
Vent
Mast
A
200
V2
V2055
V2004
V2
V2101
V2138
Dome
003
V2
S)
2(
00
V2002 (P)
No.1
Cargo Tank
V2054
V2054
V21
26
V2054
14
V2054
V23
14
V23
15
V23
15
V23
11
V21
uid
Liq
3
20
V2
3A
20
V2
G
LN iser
or
Vap
ur
po
Va
n
ge
tro
3
20
V2
4
23
V2
35
V22
.
mp
V2051
1
220
e
pac
id S er
Vo r Dry
i
A
39
V21
V2100
V2138
V2051
V2051
016
V2
35
V21
.A
mp
Co
HD
28
V21
17
V21
id
36
V21
V2052
200
V2
14
V21
35
V21
13
V21
14A
V21
015
V2
uid
15
V21
.B
mp
Co
HD
31
V21
r
ou
Vap ater
He
1
Liq
34
V21
14
V21
30
V21
30
V21
32
V21
3
V21
u
Liq
r
ou
Vap ater
He
PI
To
s
iler
Bo
32
V21
Ni
r
sso
pre
m
om Roo
C
G
LN
25
V21
39
V21
2
V21
e
pac
id S er
Vo r Dry
Ai
V2027
6
nt
N
To 2
Pla
Vent
Mast
m
ans
Fro ing F ating
t
e
ula e H
circ Spac
e
R id
o
V
r
Fo
V2008
V2
V2103
V2138
V2006 (P)
V2068
V2058
V2057
V2057
0
007
V2
(S)
06
Dome
No.2
Cargo Tank
V2057
V2057
V2028
22
V21
Vent
Mast
s
ace
Sp
Void
To
2
01
V2
19
V21
0
01
10
V21
V2
V2108
18
V21
V2068
V2064
V2063
V2063
Dome
011
V2
(S)
V2010 (P)
V2138
No.3
Cargo Tank
V2063
V2063
Spray
Pump
V2029
Vent
Mast
Dome
D
FW
S)
8(
01
V2
V2109
V2066
019
V2
V2020
V2018 (P)
V2138
V2065
V2065
No.4
Cargo Tank
V2065
V2
V2065
To
Emergency
Discharge
Astern
Spray
Pump
V2030
V2
V2024
023
A
200
V2
6A
201
V2
V
061
061
V2
uid
201 0
20
V2
No.5
Cargo Tank
V2
uid
Liq
ur
po
n
Va
ge
tro
Ni
016
V2
015
V2
Liq
V2002 (P)
120
V2
Dome
S)
2(
00
V2
A
015
Key
LNG Liquid
LNG Vapour
Issue: 1
Section 6.6.2 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
6.6.2 Liquid Line Cooldown
Cargo Operating Manual
manifold block valve.
e) At the non-discharge manifold, open valves V2061, the spray line
crossover.
Company Directives
The cargo lines are cooled down and the cargo plant is prepared to the highest
possible level before arrival at the loading/discharging port as per terminal
requirement. This is in order to commence the discharging as soon as the vessel
is moored and all procedures have been completed. At the same time as the
cargo lines are cooled down, the cargo lines are pressure tested for any leakage
by increasing the pressure to 5 bar. Spool pieces/reducers with their required
filters are to be mounted.
f) Open filling valve V2011 on the No.3 tank or filling valve V2019
on the No.4 tank.
Liquid line cool down is carried out using the spray pump in No.3 or No.4 tank
to pump LNG from No.3 or No.4 cargo tank through the spray header to the
liquid manifold pipework.
h) After the spray pump is started, slowly fully open valve V2068,
the spray pump discharge valve into the spray header and
commence spray line cooldown and then liquid line cooldown, in
turn.
Vapour displaced from the crossover pipework passes through the liquid
header and spray bypass and return valves of No.1, 2, 4 and 5 cargo tanks and
then back to No.3 or No.4 tank via the filling line.
g) Using No.3 or No.4 spray pump, LNG is passed via the spray
header to the spray line tank manifold, then through the crossover
valve into the liquid header, returning to No.3 or No 4 tank via the
loading line.
i) During line cooldown, monitor the following;
Cargo tank levels
Vapour from the tanks will be burned in the boilers using the LD compressor
and gas heaters.
Liquid crossover pressure
Although the text and illustration indicate No.4 tank spray pump being used,
No.3 pump could be used.
Liquid header temperature
Procedure to Cool Down the Liquid Lines
a) Open valve V2068, the discharge valve from No.4 spray pump,
approximately 15%.
b) At the manifold, open the liquid/spray header crossover valves
V2061 and the forward and aft liquid ESD valves V2016A and
V2015A.
c) Open the liquid line from the crossovers to each cargo tank by
opening following butterfly valves:
Position
Description
Valve
Partly open
No.1 cargo tank liquid line valves
V2004
Partly open
No.2 cargo tank liquid line valves
V2008
Partly open
No.3 cargo tank liquid line valves
V2012
Fully open
No.4 cargo tank liquid line valves
V2020
Partly open
No.5 cargo tank liquid line valves
V2024
Liquid crossover temperature
Vapour header pressure
j) Line cooldown will be complete when the liquid header
temperature falls below -100°C.
k) When the cooldown is completed, stop the spray pump. If the time
between cooldown completion and berthing is extensive, the
spray pump may be restarted.
(Note: Return of cooldown liquid to the bottom of the tank via the loading line
can give rise to localised temperature increase at the tank bottom sensor.
Sufficient time should be allowed for this to stabilise prior to gauging.)
d) At the discharge side manifold, open valve V2015A, the liquid
Issue: 2
Section 6.6.2 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 6.6.3a Arm Cooldown Before Unloading
Liq
uid
p
Va
r
ge
ou
tro
n
uid
V2
20
3
V2
20
V2
4
20
23
3A
V2
3
G
LN iser
or
Vap
.
mp
Co
LD
V2
d
Voi re
or
r F osphe
ate
He e Atm
39
V21
ac
Sp
V2051
016
V
V2026
120
V2
061
V2
Vent
Mast
A
200
V2
V2055
V2
V2101
V2138
Dome
003
V2
(S)
02
V2004
0
V2002 (P)
No.1
Cargo Tank
V2054
V2054
26
V21
V2054
4
V2054
1
V23
V2027
14
V23
15
V23
15
V23
11
V21
V2100
V2138
V2051
A
015
V2
1
206
201
V2
e
pac
id S er
Vo r Dry
Ai
25
V21
V2052
V2051
V2051
A
016
V2
39
13
V21
015
V2
35
V21
.A
mp
Co
D
H
28
V21
Vent
Mast
200
V2
14
V21
36
V21
35
V22
14A
V21
35
13
V21
V21
.B
mp
Co
Liq
V21
17
V21
15
V21
HD
31
V21
r
ou
Vap ater
He
uid
14
V21
1
213
Liq
34
V21
V
30
V21
30
V21
32
V21
To
s
iler
Bo
32
V21
r
ou
Vap ater
He
PI
Ni
G
LN
sor
res
mp Room
o
C
25
V21
39
V21
e
pac
id S er
Vo r Dry
i
A
26
V21
t
N
To 2
n
Pla
Vent
Mast
m
ans
Fro ing F ating
e
t
ula ce H
c
ir
a
c
Re id Sp
o
V
For
V2
V2103
V2138
6
00
V2006 (P)
V2068
V2058
V2057
V2057
00
V2
V2008
7
Dome
(S)
No.2
Cargo Tank
V2057
V
V2057
V2028
2
212
S
Void
To
es
pac
V2
V2
V2108
18
V21
V2068
V2064
V2063
V2063
S)
0(
01
10
V21
Dome
011
2
Vent
Mast
01
V2
19
V21
V2010 (P)
V2138
No.3
Cargo Tank
V2063
V2063
Spray
Pump
V2029
Vent
Mast
Dome
FW
S)
8(
01
V2
V2109
V2066
019
V2
V2020
V2018 (P)
V2138
V2065
V2065
No.4
Cargo Tank
V2065
A
015
V2
V2065
To
Emergency
Discharge
Astern
D
Spray
Pump
V2030
V2
V2024
023
120
061
A
200
V2
S)
2(
00
V2
V
6A
201
V2
061
V2
V2
uid
Liq
ur
po
n
Va
ge
tro
Ni
016
V2
015
uid
201
200
V2
No.5
Cargo Tank
V2
Liq
V2002 (P)
V2
Dome
Key
LNG Liquid
Issue: 1
Section 6.6.3 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
6.6.3 Arm Cooldown Before Unloading
Company Directives
After the discharging arms are connected to the ship’s manifold, the
discharging arms are pressurised with N2. This is delivered from the shore at
up to 3 bar. The connections are then tested for leaks using soapy water.
The cooldown procedure of the discharging arms follows the terminal’s
procedure and is carried out using the ship’s spray pumps in co-operation with
the shore terminal. Reference should be made to the terminal’s cargo operation
manual.
On completion of testing the discharge arm connections, the vessel uses its
spray pump(s) to cool down the shore arms.
The ship/shore safety checks will have been completed; the BOG burning shut
down, custody transfer completed and the ship/shore vapour line opened.
Procedure to Cool Down the Arms
a) Open the spray pumps discharge valve V2068 and V2108
approximately 15%.
b) Open the spray line to No.3 tank valves V2058 and V2057 and
establish a 3 bar recirculating pressure before discharging to the
arm.
c) Open the liquid/spray line crossover valves V2061.
d) Open the ship’s liquid manifold valves V2015 and V2016.
e) After starting the spray pumps, slowly open the spray pump
discharge valves V2068 and V2108, to cool down the spray
header back to No.3 or No.4 tank via the spray line.
f) Once the spray header has cooled down, increase the flow rate at
shore terminal request by opening valve V2068 and closing the
spray valve V2057.
g) Once the shore arms are cooled down and the shore terminal
request the spray pump to be stopped, close the spray header
crossover valves V2034.
h) Drain the spray line back to No.3 tank via valves V2058 and
V2057.
Issue: 2
Section 6.6.3 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 6.6.4a Discharging Cargo
V2
20
V2
3A
20
4
3
13
V21
.
mp
Co
LD
25
V21
d
Voi re
or
r F osphe
ate
He e Atm
39
V21
ac
Sp
V2026
120
V2
061
V2
A
016
V2
Vent
Mast
A
200
V2
V2055
V2
V2101
V2138
Dome
003
V2
(S)
02
V2004
0
V2002 (P)
No.1
Cargo Tank
V2054
V2054
V2
126
V2054
4
V2054
1
V23
V2027
14
V23
15
V23
V23
11
V21
V2051
A
015
V2
V
201
V2
V2100
V2138
V2051
1
206
01 6
V2
e
pac
id S er
Vo r Dry
Ai
39
uid
Liq
3
G
LN iser
or
Vap
n
20
23
35
V22
r
V2
V2
V21
V2052
V2051
V2051
200
V2
35
V21
.A
mp
Co
D
H
28
V21
17
V21
ge
36
015
V2
ou
14A
V21
14
V21
V21
Vent
Mast
uid
.B
mp
Co
35
V21
13
V21
p
Va
tro
uid
HD
31
V21
r
ou
Vap ater
He
15
V21
Liq
14
V21
1
213
Liq
34
V21
V
30
V21
30
V21
32
V21
To
s
iler
Bo
32
V21
r
ou
Vap ater
He
PI
Ni
G
LN
sor
res
mp Room
o
C
15
25
V21
39
V21
e
pac
id S er
Vo r Dry
i
A
26
V21
t
N
To 2
n
Pla
Vent
Mast
m
ans
Fro ing F ating
e
t
ula ce H
c
ir
a
c
Re id Sp
o
V
For
V2
V2103
V2138
6
00
V2006 (P)
V2068
V2058
V2057
V2057
7
00
V2
V2008
Dome
(S)
No.2
Cargo Tank
V2057
V
V2057
V2028
2
212
s
ace
Sp
Void
o
T
V2
V2
V2108
18
V21
V2068
V2064
V2063
V2063
S)
0(
01
10
V21
Dome
011
2
Vent
Mast
01
V2
19
V21
V2010 (P)
V2138
No.3
Cargo Tank
V2063
V2063
Spray
Pump
V2029
Vent
Mast
Dome
FW
S)
8(
01
V2
V2109
V2066
019
V2
V2020
V2018 (P)
V2138
V2065
V2065
No.4
Cargo Tank
V2065
V2065
To
Emergency
Discharge
Astern
V2
Spray
Pump
V2030
V2
V2024
023
120
061
A
200
V2
V
20
V2
16 A
061
V2
V2
uid
Liq
ur
po
n
Va
ge
tro
Ni
016
V2
015
uid
201 0
20
V2
No.5
Cargo Tank
V2
Liq
V2002 (P)
A
015
V2
Dome
S)
2(
00
V2
D
Key
LNG Liquid
LNG Vapour
Issue: 1
Section 6.6.4 - Page 1 of 4
Norman Lady
6.6.4 Discharging Cargo
Discharging Cargo with Vapour Return From Shore
Company Directives
Using No.1 tank as the first tank to commence discharging.
In co-operating LNG operations, the ship must be compatible with the
terminals and the ship and shore personnel must be familiar with each other’s
equipment and the division of all responsibilities.
Vapour Return
Each terminal has its own procedures, which have to be strictly followed,
regarding the following operations:
Approaching the terminal
Mooring
Connecting
Loading
Disconnecting
Departure
Cargo Operating Manual
a) Open the crossover valves between compressor supply line and
vapour header V2118 and V2119.
b) Open vapour manifold valve V2120.
Liquid Header
c) Open the cargo tank liquid header block valves V2004, V2008,
V2012, V2020 and V2024.
d) Open the discharge valve V2002 on the No.1 tank approximately
25%.
e) Open the liquid manifold block valves, V2016 and V2015.
CAUTION
It is of the utmost importance that the cargo pumps are never allowed to
run dry, even for short periods, as this will result in motor failure. A
momentary loss of priming during cargo stripping should not be
considered as running a pump dry. Up to 30 seconds of operation with dry
suction but with fluid in the discharge pipe will not damage the pump or
the motor.
f) Open the liquid manifold ESD valves, V2016A and V2015A.
g) When the shore terminal is ready to receive cargo, start the first
pump. With the pump running, open the discharge valve slowly
into the fully open position to obtain a discharge pressure of 2 bar.
h) Check the motor current at the ammeter, the current should be
steady after the motor has been running for 3 seconds. During
starting, while the discharge line is being filled, the current may
be over the ammeter red line. Do not exceed the maximum rated
current by 50% for more than 2 or 3 seconds when the tank is full.
If the running current after this time is more than 150% above the
maximum rated current, stop the pump immediately and
determine the cause of high current (possible blockage).
i) Before starting the remainder of the cargo pumps with 5 minute
intervals, or according to shore terminal instruction, ensure that
there three generators connected to the main switchboard. Once
all the pumps are in operation, adjust the discharge valves to
obtain the required flow or pressure.
j) Request the shore terminal to supply return gas to the ship.
Issue: 2
Section 6.6.4 - Page 2 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 6.6.4b Discharging
Terminal
Start
Discharge
Terminal confirms readiness.
Terminal supplies return gas
at ship's request.
Ship
Pre discharging meeting
Ship's staff work through terminal
safety check list jointly with
terminal staff
Terminal
Final CTS
Gauging
Ship's CCR must notify terminal of
all activities.
Ship
Final CTS gauging by
loading master.
Final CTS gauging by ship's
designated cargo officer.
Complete documentation.
Complete documentation.
Ship's CCR confirms readiness
and starts first cargo pump.
Progressively increase loading rate
to full rate by mutual agreement
with terminal, at about 5 minute
intervals between each pump.
Inert
Arms
Purge and inert liquid arms and
vapour return arm.
Complete when hydrocarbon
content reaches 1%.
Discharge rate, ramp up and
ramp. down in accordance
with the discharge plan
Ship's CCR makes hourly reports
of quantities discharged and
discharge rates.
Disconnect
Arms
Fit blanks to liquid loading and
vapour return arm flanges.
Stop Water Curtain
Ship must advise terminal at 1 hour
before reducing unloading rate.
Carry Out
Safety Checks
Close terminal liquid arm valves.
Drain shoreside section to surge
drum system using N2 to displace
liquid.
Pressurise liquid arm with N2.
Close ship's liquid manifold valves.
Open ship's manifold valves to
displace liquid in outboard (shipside)
section of arm.
Terminal staff jointly with ship's
staff.
Fit blanks to liquid loading and
vapour return arm flanges.
Ship stops cargo pumps:
Discharge complete.
Drain Arms
Remove strainers and fit blanks
to ship's manifold flanges.
Engage storm locks.
Reducing
Stopping
Disconnect and park arms.
Post Discharge
Meeting
Remove
Gangway
Terminal staff.
Terminal staff action.
Ship's staff disconnect
communications cables
Vapour Return Line To Shore
To Remain Open During Draining
Unmoor and Depart
When pressure in loading arm drops
to 0.12 bar close manifold valve.
Check for liquid and repeat if
required until outboard section is
free of liquid.
Repeat for other loading arm.
Issue: 2
Section 6.6.4 - Page 3 of 4
Norman Lady
Completion of Discharge
Towards the end of the discharge, the flow of the pumps will diminish. In order
to maintain the pressure differential over the pump, the discharge valve will
have to be throttled in. This should be done at the low level alarm, about 1
metre above the non pumpable level.
Cargo Operating Manual
Procedure to Drain the Loading Arms
a) Close vapour manifold valve V2120.
b) Close the liquid manifold block valves V2016 and V2015.
c) Open the liquid/spray line crossover valves V2061.
If any fluctuations are observed on the motor ammeter or the pump discharge
pressure gauge during final pumping, the discharge flow rate should be further
reduced until the readings stabilise. When the flow is throttled down to about
230m3/h the required non pumpable level will be about 10cms. This level
represents the minimum level attained by pumping.
(Note: When the liquid level reaches 1 metre or less, avoid stopping the pump
if at all possible until the cargo has been fully discharged. If the shore facility
is unable to accept the liquid for intermittent periods it is better to keep the
pump going and recirculate back into the tanks until discharge can be resumed
and completed.)
All LNG remaining in the downward leg of the loading arms and manifold
connection is to be drained to the tanks through the spray line assisted by
nitrogen pressure from ashore. The LNG and vapour manifolds are then purged
with nitrogen until an acceptable hydrocarbon content is reached.
d) Open the spray header valves to No.5 tank V2065.
e) Request the shore terminal to pressurise the loading arms with
nitrogen gas and check that the liquid manifold drain valves are
liquid-free.
f) On completion of liquid drainage, carry out vapour purging. The
hydrocarbon content in the liquid and vapour manifold
connections at the purge valves should be confirmed as 2% or
below.
g) Close all manifold, tank loading and open one cargo tank spray
line to reduce the pressure in the cargo lines.
h) Carry out the final custody transfer.
i) Start the LD compressor and resume BOG burning to the boilers.
Issue: 2
Section 6.6.4 - Page 4 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 6.6.5a Ballasting
Sea Suction
Overboard
No.5 Side Tank
(Port)
V56
HC
1
No.3 Side Tank
(Port)
No.2 Side Tank
(Port)
No.1 Side Tank
(Port)
V60
HC
1A
SI
1
No.4 Side Tank
(Port)
V13
PI
1
801
20a
Emergency
Bilge Suction
V54A
V54
V52
Ballast
Pump
1,200 m3/h
Emergency
Connection For
Backflushing
Main Condenser
V52
V64
No.3 Bottom Wing
Tank (Port)
V59
V96
V94
V92
V57
V90
V23
No.1 Bottom Wing
Tank (Port)
No.2 Bottom Wing
Tank (Port)
V88
V86
V71
V84
V82
V80
V99
V78
V74
V72
V69
V70
V63
From
Bilge System
V33
From
Fire and Deck
Wash System
V58
No.2
Double Bottom
Spare Water
Ballast Tank
V59A
V33
No.3
Lower Cross
Tank
No.2
Lower Cross
Tank
No.1
Lower Cross
Tank
V98
V57
V95
V93
V91
V89
V87
V85
V83
V97
V81
V79
V77
V73
V72
V71
V64
V59
No.3 Bottom Wing
Tank (Starboard)
V55A
SI
2
V66
Overboard
V53
V55
HC
2
PI
2
HC
2A
Ballast
Pump
1,200 m3/h
No.2 Bottom Wing
Tank (Starboard)
No.1 Bottom Wing
Tank (Starboard)
V53
801
20b
Key
V61
Sea Suction
No.5 Side Tank
(Starboard)
No.4 Side Tank
(Starboard)
No.3 Side Tank
(Starboard)
No.2 Side Tank
(Starboard)
No.1 Side Tank
(Starboard)
Sea Water
Bilge
Electrical Signal
Issue: 1
Section 6.6.5 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
6.6.5 Ballasting
Ballast Operations
Company Directives
Ballast operations can be carried out in the automatic mode via the DCS
system, the following is a manual procedure for deballasting.
a) Open the sea suction valves V60, V61 and sea crossover valve
V58.
In the ballast system there are two ballast pumps with suction from all ballast
tanks. Each pump is of the electric vertical centrifugal type with a discharge
capacity of 1200m3/h.
b) Open the pump suction valves V52 and V53.
In normal service, the port pump is connected to all port tanks and the
starboard pump to all the starboard tanks. However, it is possible to draw from
both sides with one pump.
d) Shut the block valves V52 and V53.
From the cargo control room, all the ballast valves can be hydraulically
controlled. The same pipes and valves are used both for the filling and
emptying of all the ballast tanks.
f) Open the tank suction valves. The tanks are filled one pair at a
time as required to maintain draught, trim and stability. The
loading of the ballast tanks counteracts the amount of LNG cargo
discharged.
a) Carefully follow the instructions in the trim and stability
particulars booklet and the instruction book for the DCS system.
b) It should be remembered that free liquid surfaces seriously reduce
the stability of the vessel.
c) Ensure that all ballast operations are under full control, ie, there
should be no water in any empty spaces and ensure that tanks
which are supposed to be empty are in fact empty. The operator(s)
should make reference to the vessel’s trim and stability
particulars.
d) Local conditions such as mud etc, should be taken into
consideration when ballasting.
e) Gravity ballasting and deballasting should be used wherever
possible.
(Note: Ensure the maximum draught is regularly checked during
ballasting/deballasting, especially alongside during low tide.)
Ballast Pumps
Maker:
Type:
Capacity:
No. of sets:
Weir
Mark 3 UXL
1,200m3/h
2
There is an automatic ballasting sequence available via the DCS system, refer
to section 3.2.6a DCS System: Cargo and Ballast Operations.
Issue: 1
Procedure to Set Up for Ballasting: To Pump From the Sea
c) Open the pump discharge valves V54 and V55.
e) Open the drop valve(s) V57.
The bottom wing tanks can be filled directly through the sea suction.
Procedure to Set Up for Ballasting: To Run From the Sea
a) Open the sea suction valves V60, V61 and sea crossover valve
V58.
g) Start the ballast pumps. Should the loading rate require the use of
only one pump, the crossover line could be opened via valve(s)
V59 and V59A, making the tank filling lines common.
On completion of loading ballast, shut down the ballast system.
b) Open the block valves V52 and V53.
c) Open the tank valve (eg, for No.3 bottom tank port and starboard)
V93 and V94.
d) Run ballast from the sea, keeping the vessel upright and ensuring
that the vessel’s trim and stability is maintained at all times.
e) Once the level in the tanks has equalised with the sea level it will
be necessary to use the pumps to continue with the ballast
loading.
Section 6.6.5 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 6.7.1a Stripping and Line Draining
uid
36
03
2
V2
2
V2
03
2
V2
A
03
34
2
V2
V21
17
V21
35
V22
G
LN iser
or
Vap
13
V21
.
mp
Co
LD
25
V21
d
Voi re
or
r F osphe
ate
He e Atm
39
V21
ac
Sp
V2026
120
V2
061
V2
A
016
V2
Vent
Mast
A
200
V2
V2055
V2
V2101
V2138
Dome
003
V2
(S)
02
V2004
0
V2002 (P)
No.1
Cargo Tank
V2054
V2054
26
V21
V2054
4
V2054
1
V23
V2027
14
V23
15
V23
V23
11
V21
V2051
201
V2
e
pac
id S er
Vo r Dry
Ai
39
V2100
V2138
V2051
A
015
V2
061
V2
016
V2
35
V21
.A
mp
Co
D
H
28
V21
V2052
V2051
V2051
200
V2
14
V21
V21
3
015
V2
u id
14A
V21
35
V21
1
V21
ur
po
Va
n
ge
tro
Ni
uid
15
V21
.B
mp
Co
HD
31
V21
r
ou
Vap ater
He
L iq
B
34
V21
14
V21
30
V21
30
V21
32
V21
V2
131
Liq
r
ou
Vap ater
He
PI
To
rs
oile
32
V21
Vent
Mast
Liq
r
sso
pre oom
m
o
R
GC
LN
15
25
V21
39
2
V 1
e
pac
id S er
Vo r Dry
i
A
26
V21
t
N
To 2
n
Pla
Vent
Mast
m
ans
Fro ing F ating
e
t
ula ce H
c
ir
a
c
Re id Sp
o
V
For
V2
V2103
V2138
6
00
V2006 (P)
V2068
V2058
V2057
V2057
7
00
V2
V2008
Dome
(S)
No.2
Cargo Tank
V2057
V2057
V2028
122
V2
s
ace
Sp
Void
o
T
V2
V2
V2108
18
V21
V2068
V2064
V2063
V2063
S)
0(
01
10
V21
Dome
011
2
Vent
Mast
01
V2
19
V21
V2010 (P)
V2138
No.3
Cargo Tank
V2063
V2063
Spray
Pump
V2029
Vent
Mast
Dome
FW
S)
8(
01
V2
V2109
V2066
019
V2
V2020
V2018 (P)
V2138
V2065
V2065
No.4
Cargo Tank
V2065
A
015
V2
V2065
To
Emergency
Discharge
Astern
D
Spray
Pump
V2030
V2
V2024
023
061
A
200
V2
S)
2(
00
V2
A
016
V2
V2
061
V2
V2
uid
Liq
ur
po
n
Va
ge
tro
Ni
016
V2
015
uid
201 00
2
V2
No.5
Cargo Tank
V2
Liq
V2002 (P)
120
V2
Dome
Key
LNG Liquid
Issue: 1
Section 6.7.1 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
6.7
Pre Dry Dock Operations
This section describes the operations for the period leading up to a dry dock.
Cargo Operating Manual
Position
Description
Valve
Open
Port and starboard manifold
spray/liquid header valves
V2061
6.7.1 Stripping and Line Draining
It is assumed that the cargo tanks have been discharged to their maximum
using the main cargo pumps which have been shut down. The stripping/spray
pumps are situated in No.3 and No.4 tanks and it will only be possible to
discharge these two tanks. Discharge is via the port side manifold and the
procedure is as follows:
a) At the manifold crossover:
Open valve V2015 on the forward manifold.
Close valves V2016A and V2015A on both manifolds and V2016
on the aft manifold.
b) At the stripping/spray header:
Open valve V2061, the spray header to the liquid forward
manifold.
c) At No.3 and No.4 tanks:
Open the stripping/spray discharge valves V2068 for No.3 and
No.4 tanks.
Start the stripping/spray pumps.
Whenever possible the spray pumps should be started early enough to avoid
any possible starting problems due to very low tank levels (about 0.5m
minimum).
On completion:
d) Stop the final pump.
Close valve V2015 on the forward manifold.
Open valves V2066 and V2065 to drain the spray header line
back to No.5 tank.
Closed
Port and starboard manifold liquid header
ESD valves
V2016A, V2015A
Open
No.1 cargo tank spray line valves
V2052, V2051
Open
No.2 cargo tank spray line valves
V2055, V2054
Open
No.3 cargo tank spray line valves
V2058, V2057
Open
No.4 cargo tank spray line valves
V2064, V2063
Open
No.5 cargo tank spray line valves
V2066, V2065
Confirm that the gas content at the drain valve is less than 1% volume of
methane.
j) Disconnect the vapour arm.
k) Open the following valves to allow the lines to warm up:
Position
Description
Valve
Open
Port and starboard manifold
spray/liquid header valves
V2061
Open
Port and starboard manifold liquid header
ESD valves
V2016A, V2015A
Open
No.1 cargo tank spray line valves
V2052, V2051
c) Open the forward manifold valve V2015.
Open
No.2 cargo tank spray line valves
V2055, V2054
d) Close the liquid/spray header crossover valve V2061 when the
manifold pressure drops to 0 bar. Repeat this operation a further
twice. On the last operation, shut the forward manifold liquid
valve V2015 at approximately 0.1 bar in order to eliminate the
risk of liquid flowing back from the ship’s liquid line.
Open
No.3 cargo tank spray line valves
V2058, V2057
Open
No.4 cargo tank spray line valves
V2064, V2063
Open
No.5 cargo tank spray line valves
V2066, V2065
Open
Liquid header block valves on all cargo tanks
V2004
V2008,V2012
V2020, V2024
Open
Liquid header block valves on all cargo tanks
V2003
V2007, V2011
V2019, V2003
e) Open the test drain valve on the loading arm to ensure that there
is no liquid present. Repeat the operation with the other liquid
arm.
f) Once the arms are empty of liquid, continue to purge with
nitrogen, checking the methane content at the drain valve. When
the required amount of methane (usually less than 1%) is
indicated at the drain valve, inform the shore terminal and they
will close the shore terminal ESD valves.
l) When the lines are warmed up, the valves should be closed again.
m) Prepare the cargo system for warming up the cargo tanks.
g) When purging is complete, proceed with the disconnection of the
liquid arms.
h) Complete the ballasting operations for final measurement and
sailing condition.
Purging and Draining of Loading Arms
Shortly before departure:
Purging is carried out one line at a time as follows:
i) Vapour line disconnection:
a) Open valve V2061, the spray header to the forward liquid
manifold.
b) Open the following spray line valves:
Close manifold vapour ESD valve V2120.
Open the vapour bypass valve.
Purge the vapour line with nitrogen at 0.2 bar.
Close the drain valve.
Issue: 2
Section 6.7.1 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 6.7.2a Tank Warm Up
uid
Liq
r
n
V2
1
20
V2
20
V2
35
V2026
V
Vent
Mast
V2
061
3
V2
20
V2
3A
20
4
23
V2
3
13
V21
C
LD
.
mp
25
V21
26
V21
d
Voi re
or
r F osphe
ate
He e Atm
39
V21
ac
Sp
V2002 (P)
No.1
Cargo Tank
V2054
14
V2054
V23
14
V23
15
V23
5
231
V
11
V21
V2138
V2054
V2054
o
V22
V2101
S)
2(
00
V2055
Dome
003
V2
V2
0A
220
V
.A
e
pac
id S er
Vo r Dry
i
A
39
V2004
A
mp
Co
HD
V2138
V2051
5A
201
120
016
V21
G
LN iser
or
Vap
016
V2
V2
28
V21
35
061
V2
V21
V2100
V2051
V2
14
V21
36
V21
7
ge
.B
mp
Co
35
1
V21
V2052
V2051
V2051
200
14A
V21
V21
13
V21
ou
HD
31
V21
r
ou
Vap ater
He
15
V21
015
V2
uid
3
V21
uid
Liq
34
V21
To
s
iler
Bo
14
V21
30
V21
0
32
V21
V21
Liq
PI
tro
Ni
31
32
V21
r
ou
Vap ater
He
p
Va
G
LN
Vent
Mast
sor
res
mp Room
o
C
25
V21
39
V21
V2027
26
V21
e
pac
id S er
Vo r Dry
i
A
nt
N
To 2
V2008
Pla
Vent
Mast
m
ans
Fro ing F ating
e
t
cula ace H
ir
c
p
Re id S
Vo
r
Fo
007
V2
00
V2006 (P)
V2138
V2068
V2103
V2058
V2057
V2057
Dome
V2
6
(S)
No.2
Cargo Tank
V2057
V2057
V2
22
01
V21
V2028
2
19
V21
Void
To
s
ace
Sp
V2
18
V21
V2068
V2064
V2063
V2063
S)
0(
01
V2
10
V21
Dome
011
Vent
Mast
V2010 (P)
V2138
No.3
Cargo Tank
V2108
V2063
V2063
Spray
Pump
V2029
V2020
019
Vent
Mast
V2018 (P)
V2138
V2066
V2109
D
FW
S)
8(
01
V2
V2065
V2065
Dome
V2
No.4
Cargo Tank
V2065
015
V2
V2065
To
Emergency
Discharge
Astern
Spray
Pump
V2030
V2024
023
120
V2
Dome
V
V2
S)
2(
A
016
V2
V2
061
V2
uid
201 0
20
V2
No.5
Cargo Tank
V2
uid
Liq
ur
po
n
Va
ge
tro
Ni
016
V2
015
V2
Liq
V2002 (P)
061
A
200
V2
0
20
A
Key
LNG Vapour (Cold)
LNG Vapour (Warm)
Issue: 2
Section 6.7.2 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
6.7.2 Tank Warm Up
Company Directives
When the cargo tanks are completely emptied of liquid residue, they can be
warmed up with warm cargo vapour.
The cargo vapour is sucked from the bottom of the cargo tanks through the
filling line by the HD compressors, heated by the vapour heaters and
introduced to the top of the tanks through the loading line. Excess vapour
generated during the evaporation process should be delivered to the ship’s
boilers as fuel.
As the filling line in the tank ends 1.5m above the bottom of the tank, a flexible
hose is fitted to the hot vapour line which will increase the warming effect.
This line directs the warm vapour down to the centre and bottom of the tank.
The flexible hose is fitted, with a reducer, from the blind flange situated
between the throttle valve and the filling valve on the liquid filling line, to the
hot vapour line valve blind flange.
The heating operation is continued until the equator profile and the tank bottom
shell temperature are at least +5ºC, ie, higher than the dew point of the inert
gas. This is to avoid the water content in the inert gas condensing at the tank
shell.
If not all tanks have to be warmed up, the same procedure as for all tanks has
to be followed. Tank(s) that are to be inspected have to be completely separated
from the other tank(s).
Warming Up the Cargo Tanks
The maximum amount of cargo should be discharged from all the tanks to
reduce the time necessary to vaporise the remaining liquid. The ship returns to
sea and the tanks are circulated with warm vapour supplied (through the
loading lines) by the HD compressor, via the gas heaters, at a maximum outlet
temperature of about 75ºC. The remaining LNG is vaporised and the excess
vapour generated will be vented via the vapour line and the vent mast. During
this time, insulation and hold space pressures must be carefully monitored, as
pressures will increase due to warming up. Warming up is considered complete
when the temperature of the tank bottom (internal) and equarorial ring
temperatures are +5ºC, i.e. well above the dew point of the inert gas. The
warming up operation should normally take about 72 hours.
Tank warm-up is part of the gas freeing operations carried out prior to a dry
docking or when preparing tanks for inspection purposes.
Cargo Operating Manual
The maximum amount of cargo will be discharged from all the tanks to reduce
the time necessary to vaporise the remaining liquid.
Position
Description
Open
No.1 cargo tank vapour valve
V2000
The warm up operation requires a period of time dependent on both the amount
and the composition of liquid remaining in the tanks and the temperature of the
tanks.
Open
No.2 cargo tank vapour valve
V2101
Open
No.3 cargo tank vapour valve
V2103
Open
No.4 cargo tank vapour valve
V2108
Open
No.5 cargo tank vapour valve
V2109
Open
No.1 cargo tank LPG valve
V2138
Open
No.2 cargo tank LPG valve
V2138
Gas burning should continue as long as possible, normally until all the liquid
has evaporated, venting has ceased and the tank pressures have started to fall.
Open
No.3 cargo tank LPG valve
V2138
Open
No.4 cargo tank LPG valve
V2138
Operating Procedure to warm Up the Tanks
Open
No.5 cargo tank LPG valve
V2138
During the tank warm up, gas burning may be used by directing some vapour
from the heater outlet to the boilers and by manually controlling the operation.
Open
No.1 cargo tank filling valves
V2003, V2004
Open
No.2 cargo tank filling valves
V2007, V2008
a) Install the spool piece and open valves V2121 and V2125 to
discharge heated vapour to the liquid header.
Open
No.3 cargo tank filling valves
V2011, V2012
Open
No.4 cargo tank filling valves
V2019, V2020
b) Install the flexible hose from the liquid filling line, to the LPG
line valve blind flange on each tank.
Open
No.5 cargo tank filling valves
V2024, V2023
Initially, the tank temperatures will rise slowly as evaporation of the LNG
proceeds, accompanied by high vapour generation and venting. On completion
of evaporation, tank temperatures will rise rapidly. Temperatures within the
tank are monitored via the DCS system.
c) Prepare gas heaters A and B for use.
CAUTION
The vapour heaters should be thoroughly preheated with steam before the
admission of methane vapour. This is to prevent ice formation.
d) Adjust the temperature set point for about +75°C.
CAUTION
When returning heated vapour to the cargo tanks, the temperature at the
heater outlet should not exceed +85°C. This is to avoid possible damage to
the cargo piping insulation and safety valves.
e) Prepare No.1 and No.2 HD compressors for use as required.
f) Open valve V2110, the compressor(s) suction from the vapour
header.
Valve
j) Start one or two HD compressors manually and gradually increase
the flow.
k) Send boil-off gas to the boilers. Carry out steam dump and vent
control in parallel to obtain stable boiler combustion.
l) Monitor the tank pressure and adjust the compressor(s) to
maintain tank pressure between 0.04 and 0.2 bar.
m) When the tank pressure starts to decrease, stop the BOG burning.
n) Monitor the temperatures in each tank. Warm up is completed
when the cargo tank equator temperature is higher than +5°C.
o) Stop the warm up. Shut off steam to the gas heaters and allow
circulation for 10 minutes.
p) Shut down the HD compressors and initiate the set up for inerting
the cargo tanks.
g) Open the compressor(s) inlet and outlet valve(s), V2113 and
V2114A.
h) Open the heater inlet and outlet valves V2131 and V2132.
i) Open the following valves on each tank:
Issue: 2
Section 6.7.2 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 6.7.3a Inerting
3
V21
1
1
V21
36
V21
3
8
V2
20
V2
4
23
3A
20
V2
3
13
V21
V2
G
LN iser
or
Vap
235
.
mp
Co
LD
2
V21
1
Void re
or
r F osphe
ate
He e Atm
39
V21
c
a
Sp
12
V2
061
V2
A
015
V2
V2026
0
Vent
Mast
003
Dome
V2
V2004
S)
016
A
V2
A
200
V2055
(
02
0
V2
V2101
V2138
V2002 (P)
No.1
Cargo Tank
V2054
V2054
5
e
pac
id S er
Vo Dry
Air
V2
11
V21
V2100
V2138
V2051
.A
39
V21
17
V21
20
V2
V2
35
mp
Co
HD
20
V2
V21
200
061
V2
4
13
V21
2
V21
V
V2052
V2051
V2051
6
201
1
V21
35
V21
uid
r
ou
Vap ater
He
V2
4A
.B
mp
Co
HD
5
V2051
1
V21
4
ile
Bo
15
V21
uid
3
V21
01
V2
id
3
V21
To
rs
4
0
3
V21
0
2
31
Liq
3
V21
V21
u
Liq
r
ou
Vap ater
He
PI
2
Liq
LN
3
V21
Vent
Mast
sor
res
mp Room
ur
po
Va
n
ge
tro
Ni
o
GC
V21
26
1
V23
V2054
4
V2054
14
V23
315
15
V23
25
V21
39
V21
V
e
pac
id S er
Vo Dry
Air
V2027
6
212
nt
N
To 2
Pla
Vent
Mast
m
ans
Fro ng F ating
e
ti
ula ce H
a
circ
Re id Sp
o
V
For
7
00
V2
V2103
V2138
V2006 (P)
V2068
V2058
V2057
V2057
00
V2
V2008
Dome
S)
6(
No.2
Cargo Tank
V2057
V21
V2057
V2028
22
9
01
V2
1
V21
S
Void
To
V2
S)
0
V2
10
V21
Dome
011
2
Vent
Mast
es
pac
(
10
V2108
18
V21
V2068
V2064
V2063
V2063
V2010 (P)
V2138
No.3
Cargo Tank
V2063
V2063
Spray
Pump
V2029
Vent
Mast
V2020
Dome
019
V2
(S)
D
FW
18
0
V2
V2109
V2066
V2018 (P)
V2138
No.4
Cargo Tank
V2065
V2065
V2065
A
015
V2065
To
Emergency
Discharge
Astern
V2
Spray
Pump
V2030
023
V2
V2024
0
12
V2
Dome
V2
015
V2
A
016
V2
352
V2
061
V2
A
352
201
200
V2
V2
V2
2
235
V
Engine Room
IG Plant
6
01
V2
ur
po
n
Va
ge
tro
Ni
No.5
Cargo Tank
uid
Liq
V2002 (P)
061
A
200
V2
S)
2(
00
V2
Key
Inert Gas
Issue: 1
Section 6.7.3 - Page 1 of 4
Norman Lady
6.7.3 Inerting
Inerting Before a Dry Dock Period
Before air is introduced into the cargo system, it is essential that all
hydrocarbons are purged from the system to prevent the formation of
flammable mixtures. The objective of this operation is to replace all the
methane gas in the cargo tanks and cargo pipework with inert gas. This is
carried out as an intermediate step between warming up and aeration.
This procedure is basically the same as for inerting after refit, but with the
following differences:
1) Completion of each step in purging has the object of achieving
a hydrocarbon concentration of 1% volume or less.
2) Before starting the operation, it should be verified that the tank
equator temperatures are above +5ºC.
Cargo Operating Manual
All cargo tanks are to be inerted in parallel if possible, to take advantage of the
piston effect due to the difference in specific gravity between the LNG vapour
and the inert gas.
Before the inert gas operation is stopped, it should be carefully checked that all
‘blind ends’ in the cargo system have been opened, such as cargo compressors,
heaters, vaporiser, manifolds not in use, Whessoe gauge heads etc.
The readings of the methane content in the cargo tanks and cargo lines, taken
by a portable gas detector, must be between 2% and 3% by volume at all
locations.
WARNING
If any piping or components are to be opened, the inert gas or nitrogen
must first be flushed out with dry-air. Take precautions to avoid
concentrations of inert gas or nitrogen in confined spaces which could be
hazardous to personnel.
At the end of the inerting process, aeration immediately follows. The inert gas
plant is not completely shut down, but is vented via the funnel while being
changed over to the air production mode. During the changeover to air
production, the valves will be lined up ready for aeration.
Company Directives
After heating the tanks, they are to be purged with inert gas to remove the cargo
vapour before air is admitted. This is to avoid the formation of an explosive
mixture. This gas freeing is to be accomplished by means of the inert gas plant,
the R22 cooler, with a dew point +5ºC, and an additional dehumidifier with a
dew point of -25ºC or lower.
Before the inert gas line is connected to the cargo system, the inert gas line
must be blown through with air using the inert gas blower to avoid any debris
entering the cargo system. The inert gas must not be introduced to the cargo
tanks before the tank shell temperature is above +5ºC, the inert gas system
containing between 2% - 3% O2 and the dew point is less than
-25ºC.
The O2 content of 2% normally ensures zero ppm CO, however the inert gas
must be checked for the presence of CO (carbon monoxide/soot) prior to
inerting the tanks.
The inert gas generator must not be forced to run in such a way that the
temperature after the R22 cooler increases to a temperature above 10ºC, +5ºC
is recommended. If the temperature of the inert gas is above 10ºC, some salt
from the sea water will be liberated (mostly chloride) and this will follow the
inert gas flow into the tanks.
Issue: 2
Section 6.7.3 - Page 2 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 6.7.3a Inerting
V21
31
V21
36
V21
3
20
V2
3A
4
23
V2
20
V2
V21
28
V21
3
17
V21
13
V21
G
LN iser
or
Vap
LD
p.
m
Co
V21
201
V2
V2026
120
V2
061
V2
25
e
pac
id S er
Vo Dry
Air
25
V21
Void re
or
r F osphe
ate
He e Atm
39
V21
ac
Sp
V2051
A
015
V2
0
16A
V2
Vent
Mast
A
200
V2055
003
V2
S)
2(
V2004
Dome
00
V2
V2101
V2138
V2002 (P)
No.1
Cargo Tank
V2054
V2054
15
V23
15
V23
11
V21
200
V2
39
35
V22
V2100
V2138
V2051
V2051
061
V2
35
V21
.A
mp
Co
HD
20
V2
13
V2 1
V2
14
V21
35
V2052
V2051
14A
016
V21
V2
m
Co
HD
uid
14
V21
30
p.B
r
ou
Vap ater
He
Bo
V21
30
Liq
V21
uid
32
15
V21
015
V2
uid
To
ilers
34
31
Liq
V2 1
V2 1
V21
Liq
r
ou
Vap ater
He
PI
32
ur
po
Va
n
ge
tro
Ni
G
LN
V21
Vent
Mast
sor
res
mp Room
Co
V21
V2
126
V23
V2054
14
V2054
14
V23
V21
e
pac
id S er
Vo Dry
Air
39
V2027
26
nt
N
To 2
Pla
Vent
Mast
m
ans
Fro ng F ating
e
ti
ula ce H
a
circ
Re id Sp
Vo
r
Fo
Dome
6
00
V2
V2103
V2138
V2006 (P)
V2068
V2058
V2057
V2057
007
V2
(S)
V2008
No.2
Cargo Tank
V2057
V21
V2057
V2028
22
2
01
V2
19
V21
Vent
Mast
s
ace
To
Sp
Void
10
V21
Dome
011
V2
0
V2
10
(S)
V2108
18
V21
V2068
V2064
V2063
V2063
V2010 (P)
V2138
No.3
Cargo Tank
V2063
V2063
Spray
Pump
V2029
Vent
Mast
V2
V2020
Dome
019
D
FW
S)
8(
01
V2
V2109
V2066
V2018 (P)
V2138
No.4
Cargo Tank
V2065
V2065
V2065
A
015
V2065
To
Emergency
Discharge
Astern
V2
Spray
Pump
V2030
0
212
V
V2
V2024
V
023
Dome
V2
015
V2
6A
01
V2
352
V2
061
V2
A
201
200
V2
V2
352
V2
6
201
V
Engine Room
IG Plant
uid
352
V2
ur
po
n
Va
ge
tro
Ni
No.5
Cargo Tank
Liq
V2002 (P)
061
A
200
V2
(S)
02
20
Key
Inert Gas
Issue: 1
Section 6.7.3 - Page 3 of 4
Norman Lady
Inerting After a Dry Dock Period: Tanks Returning to Service
Company Directives
LNG vapour must not be introduced into the cargo tanks, lines or equipment
before they are inerted with inert gas.
Before closing down the tanks, the cargo engineer must visually check the
tanks for any leftover items or debris. The cargo engineer must close and
secure all entry hatches and must be the last person to leave the tank. The
gasket on the tank hatch must be renewed every time the hatch is used to
ensure integrity and avoid leakages.
Cargo Operating Manual
Position
Description
Open
No.4 cargo tank liquid header block valve
V2020
Valve
Open
No.4 cargo tank filling valve
V2019
Open
No.5 cargo tank liquid header block valve
V2024
Open
No.5 cargo tank filling valve
V2023
d) Open the following tank vapour valves to vent through the vent
mast on each tank:
If the tanks are not to be inerted:
a) Close the following vapour header valves and pressurise the tanks
to 10.0kPa:
Position
Description
Position
Description
Valve
Before commencing purging, all cargo and spray lines are to be checked for
any water content in any traps, blind ends, U-bends etc. in the system.
Open
No.1 cargo tank vapour valve
V2100
Close
No.1 cargo tank vapour valve
V2100
Open
No.1 cargo tank vent mast valve
V2137
Close
No.1 cargo tank vent mast valve
V2137
The purging of cargo tanks and lines is to be carried out using the inert gas
plant, the R22 cooler (dew point +5ºC) and an additional de-humidifier (dew
point -25ºC or lower at the outlet).
Open
No.2 cargo tank vapour valve
V2101
Close
No.2 cargo tank vapour valve
V2101
Open
No.3 cargo tank vapour valve
V2103
Close
No.3 cargo tank vapour valve
V2103
Open
No.4 cargo tank vapour valve
V2108
Close
No.4 cargo tank vapour valve
V2108
Open
No.5 cargo tank vapour valve
V2109
Close
No.5 cargo tank vapour valve
V2109
The purging operation is complete when the measured O2 content is below 3%
by volume and dew point below -25ºC at all locations in the cargo system.
Operating Procedure to Inert the Cargo Tanks
a) Install the flexible connection between the flange at the end of the
inert/dry-air feeder line and the liquid manifold or access to the
liquid header.
b) Install the flexible connection between the flange on the vapour
header line and the flange at each tank vent mast.
c) Open the following valves to supply inert gas to the liquid header:
Position
Description
Open
Aft liquid ESD valve
Valve
V2016A
Open
Aft liquid manifold valve
V2016
Open
No.1 cargo tank liquid header block valve
V2004
Open
No.1 cargo tank filling valve
V2003
Open
No.2 cargo tank liquid header block valve
V2008
Open
No.2 cargo tank filling valve
V2007
Open
No.3 cargo tank liquid header block valve
V2012
Open
No.3 cargo tank filling valve
V2011
Issue: 2
Valve
j) When the hydrocarbon content sampled from a tank outlet falls
below 1.5%, closed in the tank. On completion of inerting of all
the tanks and associated pipework and equipment, stop the inert
gas supply and shut down the inert gas plant. Line up for aerating
the tanks.
e) Start the inert gas plant. When the oxygen content is between 2%
- 3% and the dew point is below -25°C, open the IG plant
discharge valve V2353 and open the deck valves V2352 and
V2352A to allow the inert gas to pass into the liquid header.
f) Monitor the tank pressures and adjust the opening of the fill
valves to maintain a uniform pressure in all tanks.
b) Close the IG supply valves V2353, V2352A and the manifold
valves V2016A and V2016 to the LNG header and shut down the
inert gas plant.
c) Close the following tank filling valves:
Position
Description
g) Approximately once an hour, take samples of the discharge from
the vapour dome at the top of each tank and test for hydrocarbon
content. Measurements to be taken at the sample point at the
manifold inlet. Verify that the O2 stays between 2% - 3% and the
dew point is better than -25°C.
Close
No.1 cargo tank liquid header block valve
V2004
Close
No.1 cargo tank filling valve
V2003
Close
No.2 cargo tank liquid header block valve
V2008
Close
No.2 cargo tank filling valve
V2007
h) By sampling at the domes (bottom - middle - top) for HC content,
check and record the process developments, i.e. monitoring the
‘layer’ of the HC and the inert gas mixture which is gradually
rising during the process..
Close
No.3 cargo tank liquid header block valve
V2012
Close
No.3 cargo tank filling valve
V2011
Close
No.4 cargo tank liquid header block valve
V2020
Close
No.4 cargo tank filling valve
V2019
Close
No.5 cargo tank liquid header block valve
V2024
Close
No.5 cargo tank filling valve
V2023
i) During tank inerting, the flow must be directed through the
sample points, gauge connections, compressor and vaporiser
together with adjacent piping. Safety valves on the cargo tanks
and pipelines, which may have ‘dead ends’ must also be purged.
Valve
d) Disconnect the flexible hose and replace the flange on the inert
gas supply line.
Section 6.7.3 - Page 4 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 6.7.4a Aerating
Vent
Mast
r
ou
Vap ater
He
Bo
V21
30
30
31
15
V21
14A
V21
.B
mp
Co
HD
31
V21
3
20
V2
V2
20
V2
4
23
3A
20
V2
3
13
V21
35
V22
.
mp
Co
LD
25
V21
V2051
061
V2
201
V2
2
V21
Void re
or
r F osphe
ate
He e Atm
39
V21
ac
Sp
A
015
V2
V2026
120
V2
061
V2
e
pac
id S er
Vo Dry
Air
15
V23
15
V23
11
V21
V2100
V2138
Vent
Mast
A
200
V2
V2055
Dome
3
00
V2
V2004
02
0
V2
V2101
V2138
(S)
V2002 (P)
No.1
Cargo Tank
V2054
V2054
39
V21
G
LN iser
or
Vap
200
V2
016
V2
35
V21
.A
mp
Co
HD
28
V21
V2052
V2051
V2051
A
016
V2
36
V21
17
V21
015
V2
V2051
14
V21
35
V21
13
V21
uid
Liq
V21
14
V21
ur
po
Va
n
ge
tro
uid
Liq
32
V21
34
V21
V21
uid
Liq
r
ou
Vap ater
He
PI
To
ilers
32
V21
Ni
r
sso
pre
m
om Roo
GC
N
L
5
V21
26
V23
V2054
14
V2054
14
V23
V21
e
pac
id S er
Vo Dry
Air
39
V21
V2027
V2006 (P)
26
nt
N
To 2
Pla
Vent
Mast
m
ans
Fro ng F ating
e
ti
ula ce H
a
circ
Re id Sp
Vo
For
V2008
V2103
V2138
007
S)
Dome
6(
No.2
Cargo Tank
V2068
V2058
V2057
V2057
V2
00
V2
V2057
V2057
V2028
22
V21
01
V2
19
V21
Void
To
V2
S)
0
V2
10
V21
Dome
011
2
Vent
Mast
s
ace
Sp
(
10
V2108
18
V21
V2068
V2064
V2063
V2063
V2010 (P)
V2138
No.3
Cargo Tank
V2063
V2063
Spray
Pump
V2029
Vent
Mast
0
V2
V2109
V2066
V2020
019
V2
(S)
D
FW
18
V2018 (P)
V2138
Dome
No.4
Cargo Tank
V2065
V2065
V2065
A
015
V2065
To
Emergency
Discharge
Astern
V2024
V2
Spray
Pump
V2030
023
V2
S)
2(
00
V2
061
A
200
V2
V2
A
016
V2
352
V2
A
352
V2
201
V2
V2
2
35
V2
Inert Gas Plant in
Dry-Air Mode
V2
016
015
V2
200
V2
uid
No.5
Cargo Tank
061
Liq
V2002 (P)
120
V2
Dome
Key
Inert Gas/Air Mixture
Dry Air
Issue: 1
Section 6.7.4 - Page 1 of 4
Norman Lady
6.7.4 Aerating
This is carried out immediately after inerting before dry dock. The objective is
to replace all the inert gas in the cargo tanks with air. The procedure is basically
the same as for inerting after dry dock, but with the following differences:
1) Completion of each step in the aeration procedure has the object
of achieving an oxygen content of 20% or more. At the same time,
the carbon dioxide content should be 0.5% or less and the carbon
monoxide content should not exceed 50 ppm. Aerating progress is
monitored by taking regular samples and measuring the oxygen
content. Only after the oxygen content is confirmed at 20% or
more at all sampling points, should the CO2 and CO content
measurements be made. The portable gas analyser is provided
with CO2 and CO detector tubes of various ranges.
2) In preparation, almost all checks have already been covered by
those made in the preparation for inerting after dry dock. In
addition, the nitrogen bleed to the insulation spaces would be shut
off and the nitrogen generator shut down. It should be verified
that the inert gas plant has been changed over to air production
mode and that the unit has settled down and is producing good
quality dry-air before changing the delivery back to the cargo
system. The aeration procedure normally takes at least 24 hours.
Prior to entry into the cargo tanks, the inert gas must be replaced with air. With
the IG system in dry-air production mode, the cargo tanks are purged with dryair until a reading of 20% oxygen by volume is reached.
Operation
The IG and dry-air system produce dry-air with a dew point of between -25°C
and -45°C. The dry-air enters the cargo tanks via the vapour header, to the
individual vapour domes.
The inert gas/dry-air mixture is exhausted from the bottom of the tanks to the
atmosphere at the vent mast via the tank filling pipes, the liquid header, and
spool piece and valve V2132. During aerating, the pressure in the tanks must
be kept low to maximise the piston effect.
The operation is complete when all the tanks have a 20% oxygen value and a
methane content of less than 0.2% by volume (or whatever is required by the
relevant authorities) and a dew point between -25°C and -45°C.
Before entry, test for traces of noxious gases (carbon dioxide less than 0.5% by
volume, and carbon monoxide less than 50ppm) which may have been
constituents of the inert gas. In addition, take appropriate precautions as given
in the Tanker Safety Guide and other relevant publications.
Issue: 2
Cargo Operating Manual
The pressure in the tanks is adjusted to 0.012 bar. Aeration carried out at sea as
a continuation of gas freeing will take approximately 20 hours.
Position
Description
Valve
Open
No.1 cargo tank vapour valve
V2100
WARNING
Take precautions to avoid concentrations of inert gas or nitrogen in
confined spaces, which could be hazardous to personnel. Before entering
any such areas, test for sufficient oxygen > 20% and for traces of noxious
gases: CO2 < 0.5% and CO < 50 ppm.
Open
No.1 cargo tank vent mast valve
V2137
Open
No.2 cargo tank vapour valve
V2101
Open
No.3 cargo tank vapour valve
V2103
Open
No.4 cargo tank vapour valve
V2108
Operating Procedure for Aerating the Cargo Tanks
Open
No.5 cargo tank vapour valve
V2109
Dry-air with a dew point of between -25°C and -45°C, is produced by the dryair/inert gas plant at a flow rate of 5000 Nm3/h using two generators.
a) Prepare the dry-air/inert gas plant for use in the dry-air mode (See
section 4.7.1).
b) Install the flexible connection between the flange at the end of the
inert/dry-air feeder line and the vapour manifold.
c) Install the flexible connection between the flange on the liquid
header line and the flange at each tank vent mast.
f) Set the control valve V2137, to No.1 vent riser, to 0.16 bar above
atmospheric pressure.
g) Start the dry-air production. When the dew point is between 25°C and -45°C, open the IG plant discharge valve V2353 and
open the deck valves V2352 and V2352A to allow the dry-air to
pass into the liquid header.
h) Observe the tank pressures and void space pressures, to ensure
that the tank pressures are higher than the void space pressures by
0.01 bar gauge at all times.
d) Open the following valves to supply dry-air to the liquid header:
i) Every hour, take samples from the filling pipe test connections to
test the discharge from the bottom of the tank for oxygen content.
Position
Description
Open
Aft liquid ESD valve
V2016A
Valve
Open
Aft liquid manifold valve
V2016
Open
No.1 cargo tank liquid header block valve
V2004
Open
No.1 cargo tank filling valve
V2003
Open
No.2 cargo tank liquid header block valve
V2008
Open
No.2 cargo tank filling valve
V2007
Open
No.3 cargo tank liquid header block valve
V2012
Open
No.3 cargo tank filling valve
V2011
Open
No.4 cargo tank liquid header block valve
V2020
Open
No.4 cargo tank filling valve
V2019
Open
No.5 cargo tank liquid header block valve
V2024
Open
No.5 cargo tank filling valve
V2023
j) When the oxygen content reaches above 20%, isolate and shut in
the tank.
k) When all the tanks are completed and all piping has been aired out,
raise the pressure to 0.1 bar gauge on each tank and shut the
filling and vapour valves. Restore the tank pressure controls and
valves to vent from the vapour header.
l) During the time that dry-air from the inert gas plant is supplied to
the tanks, use the dry-air to flush out inert gas from the vaporisers,
compressors, gas heaters, crossovers, pump risers and the
emergency pump wells. Pipes containing significant amounts of
inert gas should be flushed out. Smaller piping can be left filled
with inert gas or nitrogen.
m) During the time a tank is opened for inspection, dry-air will be
permanently blown through the vapour header line in order to
prevent the entry of humidity from the ambient air.
e) Open the following tank vapour valves to vent through the vent
mast on each tank:
Section 6.7.4 - Page 2 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 6.7.4a Aerating
V21
31
V21
201
V2
3
20
V2
4
23
3A
20
V2
V2
3
13
V21
LD
p.
m
Co
V21
25
e
pac
id S er
Vo Dry
Air
25
V21
Void re
or
r F osphe
ate
He e Atm
39
V21
ac
Sp
V2026
200
Vent
Mast
A
V2055
Dome
003
V2
S)
2(
V2004
00
V2
V2101
V2138
V2002 (P)
No.1
Cargo Tank
V2054
V2054
15
V23
15
V23
11
V21
A
015
V2
120
V2
061
V2
V2
39
35
V22
V2051
061
V2
V
20
V2
V21
17
V21
200
016
35
V21
.A
mp
Co
HD
28
V2100
V2138
V2051
V2051
6A
201
36
V21
V21
V2
V2
V2052
V2051
14
V21
35
13
V2 1
G
LN iser
or
Vap
14A
V21
m
Co
HD
uid
14
V21
30
p.B
r
ou
Vap ater
He
Bo
V21
30
Liq
V21
uid
32
15
V21
015
V2
uid
To
ilers
34
31
Liq
V2 1
V2 1
V21
Liq
r
ou
Vap ater
He
PI
32
ur
po
Va
n
ge
tro
Ni
G
LN
V21
Vent
Mast
sor
res
mp Room
Co
V21
V2
126
V23
V2054
14
V2054
14
V23
V21
e
pac
id S er
Vo Dry
Air
39
V2027
V2006 (P)
26
nt
N
To 2
Pla
Vent
Mast
m
ans
Fro ng F ating
e
ti
ula ce H
a
circ
Re id Sp
Vo
r
Fo
V2008
V2103
V2138
Dome
No.2
Cargo Tank
V2068
V2058
V2057
V2057
007
V2
(S)
06
0
V2
V2057
V21
V2057
V2028
22
2
01
V2
19
V21
Vent
Mast
s
To
ace
Sp
Void
10
V21
Dome
011
V2
0
V2
10
(S)
V2108
18
V21
V2068
V2064
V2063
V2063
V2010 (P)
V2138
No.3
Cargo Tank
V2063
V2063
Spray
Pump
V2029
Vent
Mast
V2
V2020
019
Dome
D
FW
S)
8(
01
V2
V2109
V2066
V2018 (P)
V2138
No.4
Cargo Tank
V2065
V2065
V2065
A
015
V2065
To
Emergency
Discharge
Astern
V2
Spray
Pump
V2030
0
212
V
V2
V2024
V
023
Dome
A
016
V2
V2
061
V2
A
352
352
V2
201
V2
V2
352
V2
Inert Gas Plant in
Dry-Air Mode
V
6
201
200
V2
uid
No.5
Cargo Tank
015
V2
Liq
V2002 (P)
061
A
200
V2
(S)
02
20
Key
Inert Gas/Air Mixture
Dry Air
Issue: 1
Section 6.7.4 - Page 3 of 4
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Precautions to be Taken During the Periods the Tanks are Open
To avoid corrosion during the periods that the cargo tanks are open, it is very
important that the tanks are vented with dry-air at all times. This is of vital
importance with 9% nickel steel tanks.
In relative humidity of less than 50%, corrosion will rarely take place.
However, the speed of corrosion increases rapidly when the relative humidity
exceeds 60%.
At all times during dry docking, the dew point temperature is to be kept more
than 3ºC lower than the cargo tank steel surface temperature and the relative
humidity is to be kept at 40% or lower.
During the dry docking period when the tanks may be open, air should be bled
into the cargo tanks and hold spaces through the ‘bottom’ line(s) and vented
out via the top.
To avoid any humid air being introduced into the cargo tank during this period,
the following additional precautions are to be taken:
A tent is to be rigged above all tank domes to avoid rain
from entering the tank
A prefabricated wooden hatch to cover the manhole is to
be fitted on all tanks which have to be entered
Avoid any more than two tanks being open at the same time
All entries into the cargo tanks are to be controlled by the vessel
Dry-air is to be bled into the tanks when entered
All tanks are to be closed when no work is taking place
A slight air overpressure is to be maintained
Issue: 1
Section 6.7.4 - Page 4 of 4
Part 7
Emergency Procedures
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 7.1a Vapour Leakage to Insulation Space
Insulation
Tank Top Showing Nitrogen Bleed to Insulation Space Pipe
Nitrogen
Bleed
Blank Flange
Rupture Disc
Removed
Rupture Disc
Skirt
Polystyrene
Insulation with
Stainless Steel
Cover
Leakage Pipes
View Showing Tank Upper Hemisphere Insulation and Walkway
Rupture
Disc
Issue: 2
Catch Basin
Section 7.1 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
Part 7 Emergency Procedures
7.1 LNG Vapour Leakage to Insulation Space
1. Leak before failure concept.
The Moss spherical cargo tank system is based on the ‘leak before failure’
concept, which means:
a) The stress level even at the welding seams is kept low enough so
as not to cause initial fatigue cracks during the lifetime of the
vessel.
b) Even if there is a dent or crack-like due to some accidental reason,
the crack will not penetrate the tank shell throughout the life of
the vessel. (The crack propagation speed of 9% Nickel-steel is
slow enough not to penetrate the tank shell.)
Cargo Operating Manual
In this case, the cargo tank insulation acts as a splash barrier for the inner hull
structure.
The insulation material itself has enough chemical/mechanical strength to
resist the leaked cargo. The aluminium sheet applied on the warm side surface
of the insulation also acts as a splash barrier and as protection for moisture
penetration.
3. Draining of leaked cargo.
The annular space between the cargo tank and the cargo tank insulation leads
the leaked cargo to the drip pan. The leaked cargo opens a rupture disc on the
drain pipe (normally for the prevention of moisture migration during normal
service) and the cargo liquid flows out to the drip pan.
c) In the next assumption, a penetrating crack is considered and
crack propagation analysis is executed.
d) In summary, no penetrating crack will be expected in the lifetime
of the vessel. Even if the crack penetrates, the speed of crack
growth and leak increase is moderate and there will be ample time
to take action before failure.
e) The ‘small leak protection system’ consists of the following:
Cargo tank insulation
Partial secondary barrier (drip pan)
Gas detection system
2. Cargo tank insulation.
The cargo tank insulation is designed to meet the requirements of the ‘small
leak protection system’ i.e;
1. Gas detection in the insulation space.
A leak starts as a ‘gas leak’. The tank insulation is not glued to the tank plate,
therefore it allows movement of a gas leak and thus the early detection of
leakage.
The insulation space (upper and lower hemisphere) is purged by N2 and the
outlet is monitored by the gas analyser regularly.
2. Insulation as a splash barrier.
With the growth of the crack size, the leaked cargo will change its form to a
liquid-gas mixture, then to liquid.
Issue: 2
Section 7.1 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 7.2.1a Use of Eductors for LNG Removal
Driving Water
V2004 V2015
V2014
Spool Piece
Turnable Spool
Piece
V30
V30A
V20A
Ejector Feed
Pump
Cargo
Tank
Eductor Inlet
Eductor Outlet
V31
V41
Overboard
V1429
V1429
Eductor Inlet Spool Piece Arrangement on Deck
V42
Side
Water Ballast
Tank
Void
Space
Bottom
Water Ballast
Tank
Cargo Discharge
Pump
Ejector
V40
Tank Cross
Section
Catch Basin
Key
LNG Liquid
Tank Void Eductor Well
Issue: 2
Section 7.2.1 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
7.2
LNG Liquid Leakage to Insulation and Void Space
7.2.1 Use of Eductors for LNG Removal
A serious failure of the tank structure, allowing liquid into the insulation space
or void space, will be indicated as follows:
1) A rapid increase in the methane content of the affected space.
Connect the tank dome ejector pipe to the cargo hold ejector pipe using the
turntable spool piece located on the port side of the main deck.
The cargo from the catch basin must be returned to the damaged cargo tank as
shown in illustration 7.2.1a. It is also possible to deliver the cargo overboard
by the cargo piping discharge system, if necessary.
Procedure to Educt Back to the Cargo Tank
2) Low temperature alarms at the temperature sensors in the
surrounding areas.
a) Install the spool piece on the void space eductor return line to the
liquid header.
3) A general lowering of inner hull steel temperatures.
b) Swing the spool piece on the LNG eductor drive line from the
cargo pump discharge.
4) Possible liquid alarms in the surrounding areas.
c) Open valve V2014, the LNG drive.
Cargo Operating Manual
Inerting the Void Space
If the leakage of cargo into the void space is observed, the oxygen content of
this space must be reduced to below the explosive limit by the use of inert gas
or nitrogen.
Inert gas is introduced via the void space aeration header to the void space
bottom and is exhausted to the atmosphere from the top of the void space.
Procedure to Inert the Void Space
a) Prepare the inert gas plant in inert gas mode (see section 4.7.1 for
further detailed information) and start the inert gas production.
When the oxygen content is between 2% and 3% and the dew
point between -25°C and -45°C, open valve V2354, upstream of
the two non-return valves on the dry air/inert gas discharge line.
5) Possible gas alarms in the surrounding areas.
Any liquid flow from the upper hemisphere will be collected in the drain
channel formed by the upper ring stiffener of the skirt. There are four drain
pipes, port, starboard, forward and aft of the tanks, which lead any cargo
leakage to the catch basin. Any liquid flow in the lower hemisphere will be led
to the catch basin by a drain pipe at the south pole.
Any liquid collecting in the catch basin will raise a liquid alarm via the DCS
system. Whether the liquid is LNG cargo due to a tank leakage, or water due
to leakage from the water ballast tanks, can be determined by observing the gas
detector and the temperature indicators. A low temperature (-100º to -163ºC for
LNG) indicates cargo leakage, while temperatures above 0ºC indicate water
leakage.
A bilge ejector is installed in the catch basin to empty the area when required.
If the basin has to be emptied of water, water supplied from the driving line
from the ejector feed pump is used as the driving force. The exhausted water
is delivered overboard. After use, the flexible hoses must be disconnected and
the pipe ends blind-flanged. A needle valve, V1429, is located at each flange.
Pressurised air from the working air system on deck is introduced to the ejector
pipe through these valves by means of quick connecting couplings and the air
will empty the ejector pipe of water through the drainpipe.
Depending on the size of the leak, liquid may find its way to the catch basin
located centrally below the affected tank.
d) Open valves V2005 and V2015, the return from the void space
eductor.
b) Ensure the spoon blank between the IG outlet at the starboard
manifold and the void space aeration header is in the correct
position.
e) Open valve V2005 - the filling valve to the tank.
c) Open the void space air inlet valve V2303.
f) Open valves V311 and V41 - the eductor inlet and outlet.
g) Start the cargo pump. LNG is drained from the catch basin
through valve V40 and discharged back to the cargo tank.
On completion, the lines are allowed to warm up and vent back to the cargo
tank before being purged with nitrogen to ensure no LNG vapour remains.
d) Take samples from the outlet pipe at the top of the void space to
test for hydrocarbon content. Also verify that the oxygen content
of the inert gas remains between 2% and 3%.
e) When the hydrocarbon content sampled from the void space
outlet falls below 1.5%, shut in the space, stop the inert gas supply
and shut down the inert gas plant. Reset the valve system for
aerating.
Aeration is carried out in the same manner as inerting, using the inert gas plant
operating in the dry air mode to supply dry-air.
The aeration operation is continued until the oxygen content, measured with a
portable oxygen indicator, is about 21%.
In order to save time, the aeration of the void spaces can be carried out
simultaneously with gas freeing of the cargo tanks.
It is very important that the aeration of the void spaces must not start before
the warming up of the cargo tanks has been completed.
When LNG cargo has to be removed from the catch basin, the cargo is also
used as the eductor driving force.
The eductor driving force LNG is fed from the starboard side cargo pump of
the tank concerned, through the ejector pipe in the tank dome.
Issue: 2
Section 7.2.1 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 7.3.1a Use of Eductors for Water Removal
V2004 V2015
Driving Water
V2014
Turnable Spool
Piece
V30
V30A
Cargo
Tank
V31
V41
Spool Piece
V20A
Ejector Feed
Pump
Eductor Inlet
Eductor Outlet
Overboard
V1429
V1429
V42
Eductor Inlet Spool Piece Arrangement on Deck
Side
Water Ballast
Tank
Void
Space
Bottom
Water Ballast
Tank
Cargo Discharge
Pump
Ejector
V40
Tank Cross
Section
Catch Basin
Key
Sea Water
Tank Void Eductor Well
Issue: 2
Section 7.3.1 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
7.3
Water Leakage to Void Spaces
7.3.1 Use of Eductors for Water Removal
Ballast water leakage from the wing tanks to the void spaces can occur through
fractures in the inner hull plating. If the leakage remains undetected and water
accumulates in these spaces, ice may be formed. Ice accumulation can cause
deformation, and possible rupture, of the tank insulation. The resultant cold
conduction paths forming in the insulation may cause cold spots to form.
To reduce the risk of damage from leakage, each cargo tank void space is
provided with water/leakage detection units.
The leakage protection system also includes a method of collecting and
accumulating small leaks of liquid cargo as well as water. This liquid is
collected in the catch basin under the cargo tank. The water leakage collects in
this basin, where the monitoring equipment is installed. The equipment
consists of a sample point for the gas detector, a liquid indicator and a
temperature indicator to raise alarms in the CCR via the DCS system.
Any liquid collecting in the catch basin will raise a liquid alarm via the DCS
system. Whether the liquid is LNG cargo due to a tank leakage, or water due
to leakage from the water ballast tanks, can be determined by observing the gas
detector and the temperature indicators. A low temperature (-100º to -163ºC for
LNG) indicates cargo leakage, while temperatures above OºC indicate water
leakage.
Issue: 1
Cargo Operating Manual
Procedure to Use the Eductors for Water Removal
A bilge ejector is installed in the catch basin to empty the area when required.
If the basin has to be emptied of water, the procedure is as follows:
a) Turn the spool pieces on the drive and outlet pipes and connect to
the drive water inlet line and overboard discharge.
b) Open valve V20A, the ejector feed pump suction valve.
c) Open valves V30 and 30A, the pump discharge valves.
d) Open valve V41, the outlet to the overboard discharge line.
e) Open valve V311, the eductor inlet.
f) Start the ejector feed pump.Water is drained from the catch basin
through valve V40 and discharged overboard.
g) On completion, shut valves V311 and V41. Swing the spool
pieces. An air outlet valve is located at each flange enabling air
from the working air system on deck to be introduced by means
of the quick connecting couplings. The air will empty the ejector
pipe of water through the drain line and valve V42.
Section 7.3.1 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 7.4a Emergency Discharge
Vent
Mast
.B
mp
Co
14A
V21
13
V21
3
20
V2
3A
20
V2
4
23
V2
V
061
V2
V
1
220
13
V21
G
LN iser
or
Vap
LD
5
2
V21
11
V21
d
Voi re
or
r F osphe
ate
39
He e Atm
V21
ac
Sp
V2026
0
V2
Vent
Mast
0
V2
A
0A
20
V2
V2055
00
V2
V2004
Dome
3
S)
2(
00
V2101
V2138
V2
V2002 (P)
No.1
Cargo Tank
V2054
V2054
e
pac
id S er
Vo r Dry
Ai
.
mp
Co
15A
12
V2
061
V2
35
.A
V21
mp
Co
D
H
39
V21
5
223
V2138
V2051
6
016
28
V21
17
V21
200
01
V2
6
3
V21
V2052
V2100
V2051
V2051
V2
14
V21
35
V21
3
20
V2
m
Fronifold
Ma
5
01
V2
V2051
HD
31
V21
r
ou
Vap ater
He
uid
B
34
V21
To
rs
oile
15
V21
uid
V
14
V21
0
3
V21
30
V21
31
Liq
r
ou
Vap ater
He
2
213
V21
ur
po
Va
n
ge
tro
Ni
uid
Liq
32
V21
Liq
r
sso
pre
m
om Roo
C
G
LN
15
V23
15
V23
25
V21
39
V21
V21
26
1
V23
V2054
V2054
4
V2027
14
V23
26
V21
G
LN r
To orise
Vap
e
pac
id S er
Vo r Dry
Ai
Vent
Mast
m
ans
Fro ing F ating
e
t
cula ace H
ir
c
Re id Sp
o
V
For
Dome
0
V2
V2103
V2138
V2006 (P)
V2068
V2058
V2057
V2057
007
V2
(S)
06
V2008
No.2
Cargo Tank
V2057
V2057
V2028
22
V21
Void
To
Sp
s
ace
V2
V2
V2108
18
V21
V2064
V2063
V2063
S)
0(
01
10
V21
Dome
011
2
Vent
Mast
01
V2
19
V21
V2010 (P)
V2138
No.3
Cargo Tank
V2068
V2063
V2063
Spray
Pump
V2029
Vent
Mast
V2066
Dome
D
FW
V2
V2109
V2138
V2018 (P)
V2065
V2065
y
e nc
erg rge
m
E c ha
Dis stern
A
To
019
V2
S)
8(
01
V2020
No.4
Cargo Tank
V2065
015
V2065
V2
Spray
Pump
V2030
3
202
V2024
120
V2
Dome
V
V2
S)
06
V2
A
016
V2
1
061
V2
200
V2
6
201
V
015
uid
201
V2
uid
Liq
ur
po
n
Va
ge
tro
Ni
No.5
Cargo Tank
V2
Liq
V2002 (P)
2(
A
200
V
0
20
A
Key
LNG Liquid
LNG Vapour
Displaced LNG
Issue: 1
Section 7.4 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
7.4
Failure of Cargo Pumps - Emergency Discharge
If the two cargo pumps in any one cargo tank fail, the remaining cargo can be
transferred to any other tank by vapour pressurisation above the liquid in the
affected tank. The rate of transfer is controlled by regulating the pressure
within the tank.
The transfer operation would normally take place at sea after the completion of
unloading and gauging of the tanks. The ship would then return to complete the
unloading operation prior to the inerting, aerating and replacement of the
defective cargo pumps.
Control of this operation would be by remote manual control from the DCS
system in the CCR, with personnel available on deck for local monitoring. Full
safety precautions are to be implemented as for any normal cargo transfer
operation. These include:
Fire hoses: laid out, pressurised
Dry powder system available
Safety personnel patrolling the cargo areas during the full
operations of purging, cooldown and pressurised transfer
of LNG.
Using this method, cargo is pressed up and displaced into the filling line by
means of increased vapour pressure above the liquid. The increased pressure is
obtained by pumping LNG from cargo tanks No.3 or 4 using the spray pump
to the vaporisers. The vapour is introduced into the required tank through the
vapour line. The flow lines for LNG vapour, liquid LNG and for the displaced
LNG are shown in illustration 7.4a. The illustration also shows the vapour
supply line to the other cargo tanks if required and the spray liquid suction
from cargo tank No.3 if required.
Cargo Operating Manual
b) Complete normal unloading procedures and final gauging of the
cargo, then sail from the port to an open sea area.
c) Connect spool pieces at the inlet and outlet of the vaporiser.
f) Monitor No. 5 cargo tank pressure increase and the cargo transfer
rate. The tank pressure will rise rapidly during the first hour or so,
then, as the tank level falls, the vapour pressure will have to be
increased to maintain the flow. Regulate the cargo tank pressure
by throttling the liquid flow into the vaporiser.
d) Open the manifold valves V2061, V2201 and V2200A and cool
down the transfer lines as required.
(Note: The vaporiser must be monitored locally during this operation.)
e) Select the Cargo Primary Window on the DCS display and carry
out the normal safety checks.
g) Ensure that the tank pressure does not rise too close to the setting
of the safety valve.
(Note: Under normal operating conditions, the LD compressor will be
supplying boil-off gas to the boilers from all tanks through the gas heater. This
operation will be continued for No. 1, 2, 3 and 4 cargo tanks.)
h) When the tank liquid level falls to approximately 2 metres, stop
the transfer of cargo by stopping No. 4 spray pump.
i) Shut down the steam supply to the vaporiser.
The Transfer of Cargo
j) Set the valves as in the following table:
a) Supply steam to the LNG vaporiser, opening steam supply valve
V937A and when the LNG supply is stabilised, place the control
valve V2203 in automatic control.
Position
Description
Valve
Close
LNG vaporiser supply valve
V2203
b) Adjust the vapour temperature out set point to -60ºC. Adjusting
the set point is described in the vaporiser manufacturer’s manual.
Close
LNG vaporiser discharge valve
V2235
Close
LNG vaporiser supply to vapour header valve
V2118
c) Set the safety valves for operation on the HP pilot in order to
adjust the opening set point to 2.15 bar.
Close
Cargo tank No.5 vapour supply valve
V2109
Close
Cargo tank No.4 spray discharge valve
V2068
d) When the LNG liquid line header has cooled down, Set these
valves as in the following table:
Open
No.4 cargo tank filling valves
V2020, 2019
Open
No.5 cargo tank filling valves
V2024, 2023
Position
Description
Valve
Open
LNG vaporiser supply valve
V2203
k) Reset No. 5 tank safety valves to their normal operating positions.
In order to avoid opening the safety valves, due to the increased pressure, the
valves are set for operation on the HP pilot. This is carried out by operating the
two-way three port ball valve via the interlock device. The opening set point is
thus increased to 2.15 bar.
Open
LNG vaporiser discharge valve
V2235
Open
LNG vaporiser supply to vapour header valve
V2118
Open
No.4 cargo tank filling valves
V2020, 2019
l) The adjustment and readjustment of the safety valves is to be
carried out under the supervision of the Master and recorded in
the ship’s log book.
The high pressure alarm is set to sound at 0.22 bar, so this alarm should be
inhibited.
Open
No.5 cargo tank filling valves
V2024, 2023
Open
Cargo tank No.5 vapour supply valve
V2108
For this example, it is assumed the pumps have failed in cargo tank No.5. The
transfer of cargo from No.5 cargo tank to No.4 cargo tank is explained.
Open
Cargo tank No.4 spray pump discharge valve
V2068
Procedure for an Emergency Discharge
a) Discharge the contents of No.1, 2, 3 and 4 cargo tanks, leaving
approximately 1500m3 in No.3 or No.4 cargo tanks. This quantity
of liquid will provide the required volume of vapour.
Issue: 1
m) Restore all alarms to their normal operating settings.
n) Remove the spool pieces at the inlet and outlet of the vaporiser.
No. 4 spray pump will now supply the LNG vaporiser to pressurise No.5 cargo
tank through valve V2109.
e) Start No.4 cargo tank spray pump.
Section 7.4 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
7.5
Cargo Operating Manual
Fire and Emergency Breakaway
All terminals have their own requirements regarding when it is unsafe for a
vessel to remain alongside a terminal. These are normally outlined in the
terminal handbook.
In case of a fire or emergency developing, either on board or ashore the
following basic procedures will be followed:
a) All cargo operations will be stopped and emergency signals
sounded as per the terminal’s requirements (as detailed in the
ship/shore checklist). Ship’s personnel should move away from
the manifold areas immediately.
b) Ship and shore emergency procedures will be put into operation.
c) The ESD1 system will be activated, resulting in the cargo arms
being disconnected.
d) In the event of fire, the water spray system on ship/shore will be
activated.
e) Fire parties would attempt to deal with the situation.
f) The vessel would prepare for departure from the berth.
g) Liaison with shore personnel to arrange for pilot and tugs and
additional support.
h) A standby tug would assist with fire fighting/movement of the
vessel from the berth.
i) The vessel would either move away from the berth to a safe area,
under its own power with assistance of a standby tug or with
additional tugs/pilot summoned from shore.
j) The owners/charterers and other interested parties would be
informed of the situation.
Issue: 1
Section 7.5 - Page 1 of 1
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 7.6.1a One Tank Warm Up
Vent
Mast
ui d
ou
r
n
20
V2
3A
20
V2
3
G
LN iser
or
Vap
016
13
V21
V2
p.
om
C
LD
5
2
V21
d
Voi re
or
r F osphe
ate
He e Atm
39
V21
ac
Sp
V2
0
V2026
Vent
Mast
061
A
A
016
200
V2
V2055
Dome
003
V2
V2004
S)
2(
00
V2
V2101
V2138
V2002 (P)
No.1
Cargo Tank
V2054
V2054
V2
126
V2054
4
V2054
1
V23
V2027
14
V23
15
V23
15
V23
11
V21
061
V2051
15A
V
e
pac
id S er
Vo r Dry
Ai
39
120
1
220
35
V21
.A
mp
Co
HD
3
4
23
V
5
223
V2
V2052
V2100
V2138
V2051
V2051
200
V2
36
20
V2
V2
17
V21
p
Va
4A
1
V21
015
V2051
V2
28
V21
V2
V2
V2
14
V21
V21
3
V21
u id
.B
mp
Co
35
V21
1
V21
ge
15
V21
HD
31
V21
tro
3
V21
r
ou
Vap ater
He
Ni
34
31
u id
B
V 21
To
rs
oile
14
V21
0
3
V21
0
32
V21
Li q
V21
32
L iq
V21
r
ou
Vap ater
He
V2137
Li q
sor
res
mp Room
o
GC
LN
25
V21
39
V21
e
pac
id S er
Vo r Dry
i
A
26
V21
t
N
To 2
n
Pla
Vent
Mast
m
ans
Fro ing F ating
e
t
cula ace H
ir
c
Re id Sp
Vo
r
Fo
Dome
S)
6(
00
V2
V2103
V2138
V2006 (P)
V2068
V2058
V2057
V2057
007
V2
V2008
No.2
Cargo Tank
V2057
V21
V2057
V2028
22
s
ace
Sp
Void
To
V2
0
01
10
V21
V2
V2108
18
V21
V2068
V2064
V2063
V2063
Dome
011
2
Vent
Mast
01
V2
19
V21
(S)
V2010 (P)
V2138
No.3
Cargo Tank
V2063
V2063
Spray
Pump
V2029
Vent
Mast
019
V2
V2109
V2018 (P)
V2138
V2065
V2065
FW
S)
8(
01
V2066
Dome
V2
V2020
D
No.4
Cargo Tank
V2065
A
015
V2
V2065
Spray
Pump
V2030
V2024
V2
023
V2
S)
2(
00
061
A
200
V2
A
016
V2
V2
061
120
V2
V2
V2
V
uid
Liq
ur
po
n
Va
ge
tro
Ni
200
V2
6
201
015
id
201
No.5
Cargo Tank
V2
u
Liq
V2002 (P)
Dome
Key
LNG Vapour
LNG Vapour (Warm)
Issue: 1
Section 7.6.1 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
7.6
One Tank Operation
7.6.1 One Tank Warm Up
It may be necessary for in-tank repairs to be carried out with the vessel in
service, in which one tank can be warmed up, inerted, aerated, entered and
work undertaken on the tank internals, i.e. change cargo pump, investigate and
cure problems with tank gauging systems etc.
Normal gas burning is continued during this operation using vapour from all
five tanks. In the first instance, normal boil-off gas procedures are followed
until this operation has stabilised, then the operation for warming up one tank
using an HD compressor can be carried out.
The warm up, inerting and aeration can be carried out with the remaining cold
tanks providing boil-off gas for burning in the boilers.
Warm Up Procedure (No.3 Tank)
Aeration should be continued throughout the repair period to prevent ingress
of humid air to the cargo tank.
Tank venting is carried out by means of the gas header line.
Operation
At the discharge port, the tank to be worked on is discharged to the lowest
measurable level and after completion of custody transfer, as much as possible
is drained to another tank using the spray/stripping pump, if possible.
Sufficient heel for the voyage, together with an extra amount for cooling down
the tank after completion of repairs, is retained in one of the other tanks.
It is assumed that all valves are closed prior to use.
a) Install the spool piece and open valves V2121 and V2125 to
discharge the heated vapour to the liquid header.
Cargo Operating Manual
m) Monitor the tank pressure and adjust the compressor(s) to
maintain the tank pressure between 0.04 bar and 0.2 bar.
n) When the tank pressure tends to decrease, stop the BOG burning.
o) Monitor the tank temperatures, warm up is completed when the
cargo tank equator temperature is higher than -20°C.
p) Stop the warm up, shut off the steam to the gas heaters and allow
vapour to circulate for 10 minutes.
q) Shut down the HD compressor(s) and set up for inerting and
aerating the tank.
b) Prepare the upper or lower gas heater for use.
CAUTION
The vapour heaters should be thoroughly preheated with steam before the
admission of methane vapour. This prevents ice formation.
c) Adjust the heater temperature set point for +75ºC.
CAUTION
When returning heated vapour to the cargo tanks, the temperature at the
heater outlet should not exceed +85ºC to avoid possible damage to the
cargo piping insulation and safety valves.
d) At the vent mast, set valve V2137 for 0.3 bar.
e) Prepare the HD compressor(s) for use.
f) Open valve V2110, the compressor(s) suction from the vapour
header.
g) Open the compressor(s) inlet valves V2113 and discharge
valve(s) V2114A and V2115 to the heaters.
h) Open the heater inlet and outlet valves V2131 and V2132.
i) Open the vapour outlet valves on each tank - V2100, V2101,
V2103, V2108 and V2109.
j) Open the filling valves V2012 and V2011 on tank No.3.
k) Start one or two HD compressors manually. Gradually increase
the flow by adjusting the speed accordingly.
l) Send boil-off gas to the boilers; carry out steam dumping and vent
control in parallel to obtain stable boiler combustion.
Issue: 2
Section 7.6.1 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 7.6.2a One Tank Gas Freeing
Vent
Mast
To
s
iler
Bo
34
r
ou
Vap ater
He
V2
Co
.B
mp
3
20
V2
3
20
V2
3A
20
V2
4
23
V2
35
V22
G
LN iser
or
Vap
p.
om
C
LD
V2026
Vent
Mast
120
V2
V2055
003
26
V21
15
25
V21
39
V21
Dome
V2
V2004
2
00
V2101
V2138
(S)
V2
V2002 (P)
V2054
V2054
V23
d
Voi re
or
r F osphe
ate
39
He e Atm
V21
ac
Sp
V2
A
A
016
V2
200
V2
15
V23
11
V21
A
015
061
V2
061
V2
e
pac
id S er
Vo r Dry
i
A
25
V21
39
V21
V2051
V2051
V2051
1
220
35
.A
V21
mp
Co
HD
28
V21
13
V21
V
V2137
V2100
V2138
V2051
V
016
V2
1
V21
5
36
V21
17
V21
4A
1
V21
V2052
015
V2
0
220
4
3
V21
13
V21
15
V21
HD
131
uid
Liq
V2 1
30
V21
2
14
V21
30
V21
31
uid
Liq
3
V2 1
V21
Ni
32
V21
r
ou
Vap ater
He
ur
po
Va
n
ge
tro
uid
Liq
sor
res
mp Room
o
GC
LN
No.1
Cargo Tank
V2054
V2054
14
V23
V2027
14
V23
26
V21
e
pac
i d S er
Vo r Dry
Ai
N
To 2
nt
Pla
Vent
Mast
m
ans
Fro ing F ating
e
t
cula ace H
ir
c
Re id Sp
o
V
For
V2
V2103
V2138
007
Dome
S)
6(
00
V2006 (P)
V2068
V2058
V2057
V2057
V2
V2008
No.2
Cargo Tank
V2057
V2057
V2028
22
V21
01
V2
19
V21
S
Void
To
es
pac
V2
0
01
10
V21
V2
V2108
18
V21
(S)
V2010 (P)
V2138
V2064
V2063
V2063
Dome
011
2
Vent
Mast
No.3
Cargo Tank
V2068
V2063
V2063
Spray
Pump
V2029
Vent
Mast
V2
V2109
V2138
FW
S)
8(
01
V2066
Dome
019
V2
V2020
V2018 (P)
No.4
Cargo Tank
V2065
V2065
* 1-5 Cargo Tank Valves 2100, 2101, 2103, 2108 and 2109
Must Be Shut On Tanks Not being Inerted
V2065
V2
Spray
Pump
V2030
V2024
V
0
20
120
V2
Dome
200
V2
S)
2(
6
201
A
V2
A
201
V2
Engine Room
IG Plant
V2
016
200
V2
ur
po
n
Va
ge
tro
Ni
352
V2
015
V2
uid
352
V2
V2
061
V
352
V2
No.5
Cargo Tank
061
A
Liq
V2002 (P)
A
015
V2065
023
V2
D
Key
Inert Gas
Issue: 1
Section 7.6.2 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
7.6.2 One Tank Gas Freeing
The tank pressure in all tanks is to be reduced as much as possible prior to
inerting as it is not possible to use the boil-off gas from the four remaining
tanks during the inerting of No.3 cargo tank.
Gas Freeing Procedure (No.3 Tank)
a) Prepare the dry-air/inert gas plant for operation in the inert gas
mode.
b) Install the flexible connection between the flange at the end of the
inert gas/dry-air feeder line and the liquid manifold or access to
the liquid header.
Cargo Operating Manual
h) By sampling at the vapour dome, check the atmosphere of the
tank using a portable oxygen analyser. The oxygen content is to
be between 2% and 3% and the dew point less between -25°C and
-45°C.
i) When the hydrocarbon content sampled from the tank outlet falls
below 1.5%, shut in the tank. On completion of inerting, stop the
inert gas supply and shut down the inert gas plant. Reset the valve
system for aerating.
(Note: If No.3 tank is to remain without inerting shut the vapour header valve
V2103 and pressurise the tank to 0.1 bar before shutting down the inert gas
plant.)
j) Close the following valves:
c) Install the flexible connection between the flange on the vapour
header line to the flange at No.3 tank vent mast.
Position
Description
Valve
d) Set up the following valves:
Close
IG plant discharge valve
V2353
Close
IG plant deck discharge valves
V2352, V2352A
V2016, V2016A
Position
Description
Valve
Close
Liquid manifold valves
Close
No.1 cargo tank vapour valve
V2100
Close
No.3 cargo tank filling valves
Close
No.2 cargo tank vapour valve
V2101
Open
No.3 cargo tank vapour valve
V2103
Close
No.4 cargo tank vapour valve
V2108
Close
No.5 cargo tank vapour valve
V2109
Open
Liquid manifold valves
Open
No.3 cargo tank filling valves
V2011, V2012
k) Disconnect the flexible hose and replace the flange on the inert
gas supply line.
l) Reset the system to send the boil-off gas in the four remaining
tanks to the ship’s boilers.
V2016, V2016A
V2011, V2012
e) Start the inert gas plant. When the oxygen content is between 2%
and 3% and the dew point is between -25°C and -45°C, open the
IG plant discharge valve V2353 and open the deck valves V2352
and V2352A to allow the inert gas to pass into the liquid header.
f) Monitor the tank pressure and adjust the opening of the fill valve
to maintain a uniform pressure.
g) Approximately once an hour, take samples of the discharge from
the vapour dome at the top of tank and test for hydrocarbon
content. Also verify that the oxygen content of the inert gas
remains between 2% and 3%, by testing at a purge valve at the
filling line of the tank being inerted.
Issue: 2
Section 7.6.2 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Illustration 7.6.3a One Tank Aerating
14
V2 1
30
14A
V21
.B
mp
Co
HD
31
V21
r
ou
Vap ater
He
15
V21
C
HD
03
2
V2
35
V21
om
2
V2
03
2
V2
A
03
34
2
V2
13
V21
G
LN iser
or
Vap
.
mp
Co
LD
016
061
0
V2
V2
V2
V
1
220
V2051
15A
V2026
120
Vent
Mast
V2
061
0A
20
V2
V2055
Dome
003
V2
V2004
S)
2(
00
V2
V2101
V2138
V2002 (P)
No.1
Cargo Tank
V2054
V2054
26
V21
e
pac
id S er
Vo r Dry
Ai
15
V23
15
V23
d
Voi
or here
rF
p
ate tmos
e
H eA
39
V21
ac
Sp
A
p.A
25
V21
11
V21
V2100
V2138
V2051
200
V2
39
V21
35
V22
V2052
V2051
V2051
016
28
V21
17
V21
015
V2
36
V21
13
V21
V2
V2
14
V21
35
V21
uid
V2 1
30
V2137
Liq
V2 1
31
uid
B
34
V21
To
rs
oile
2
V21
Liq
r
ou
Vap ater
He
3
V21
G
32
V21
ur
po
Va
n
ge
tro
Ni
uid
Liq
LN
Vent
Mast
r
sso
pre oom
m
R
Co
25
V21
39
V21
V2054
14
V23
14
V23
V2054
V2027
26
V21
e
pac
id S er
Vo r Dry
Ai
N
To 2
P
t
lan
Vent
Mast
m
ans
Fro ing F ating
e
t
ula
eH
circ Spac
e
R
Void
r
Fo
Dome
V2
V2103
V2138
V2006 (P)
V2068
V2058
V2057
V2057
007
V2
S)
6(
00
V2008
No.2
Cargo Tank
V2057
V2057
V2028
22
V21
2
01
V2
19
V21
Vent
Mast
e
pac
s
S
Void
To
0
01
10
V21
V2
V2108
18
V21
V2068
V2064
V2063
V2063
Dome
011
V2
(S)
V2010 (P)
V2138
No.3
Cargo Tank
V2063
V2063
Spray
Pump
V2029
Vent
Mast
V2
V2020
V2109
V2066
D
FW
S)
V2018 (P)
V2138
Dome
8(
01
V2
019
No.4
Cargo Tank
V2065
V2065
V2065
01
V2
V2065
Spray
Pump
V2030
V2024
V
3
202
120
V2
Dome
V2
6A
201
V
352
V2
V
Inert Gas Plant in
Dry-Air Mode
201
V2
016
V2
200
V2
uid
V
2
235
061
V2
ur
po
n
Va
ge
tro
Ni
No.5
Cargo Tank
A
2
235
015
V2
Liq
V2002 (P)
061
00A
2
V2
S)
2(
00
V2
5A
Key
Inert Gas/Air Mixture
Fresh Air
Issue: 1
Section 7.6.3 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
7.6.3 One Tank Aerating
The aeration of a single tank may be carried out in the same manner as
previously described for inerting a single tank. The supply of air from the dryair plant is sent to the tank via the liquid header and vented through the vapour
tank vent.
It is not possible to use the boil-off gas in the boilers whilst this operation is
being carried out as the other tanks have to be isolated. However, it is possible
to continue using the boil-off gas in the following alternative method:
Dry-air with a dew point of between -25°C and -45°C, is produced by the inert
gas plant operating in the dry-air mode at a flow rate of 5000Nm3/h using two
generators.
Aeration Procedure (No.3 Tank)
a) Prepare the dry-air/inert gas plant for use in the dry-air mode (See
section 4.7.1).
Cargo Operating Manual
g) Approximately once an hour, take samples from the filling pipe
test connections to test the discharge from the bottom of the tank
for oxygen content.
h) When the oxygen content reaches 20%, isolate and shut in the
tank
i) During the time a tank is opened for inspection, dry-air will be
permanently blown through the spray header line in order to
prevent the entry of humidity from the ambient air.
CAUTION
Ensure that the tank pressure in the aerated tank remains higher than the
other tanks containing LNG vapour to avoid leakage of toxic gas to this
tank. All safety precautions are to be taken to avoid creating an
inflammable mixture by fitting blanks to the pipelines surrounding the
tank.
j) During the above operation, gas burning can be continued from
the other four tanks in the usual manner.
b) Install the flexible connection between the flange at the end of the
inert/dry-air feeder line and the liquid manifold.
c) Install the flexible connection between the flange on the vapour
header line and the flange on No.3 tank vent mast.
d) Open the following valves to supply dry-air to the liquid header:
Position
Description
Valve
Open
Aft liquid ESD valve
Open
Aft liquid manifold valve
V2016
Open
No.3 cargo tank liquid header block valve
V2012
Open
No.3 cargo tank vapour valve
V2103
V2016A
e) Start the dry-air production. When the dew point is between 25°C and -45°C, open the IG plant discharge valve V2353 and
open the deck valves V2352 and V2352A to allow the dry-air to
pass into the liquid header.
f) Observe the tank pressures and void space pressures, to ensure
that the tank pressures are higher than the void space pressures by
0.01 bar gauge at all times.
Issue: 2
Section 7.6.3 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
7.7
Ship to Ship Transfer
This section is intended to complement the ICS Tanker Safety Guide,
(Liquefied Gases) and the ICS Ship to Ship Transfer Guide, (Liquefied Gases)
and should be supplemented by the Company’s own instructions and orders.
7.7.1 General Safety
The Master, or other person in overall control of the operation, should be
clearly established before the operation commences and the actual transfer
should be carried out in accordance with the wishes of the receiving ship.
The means of communication should also be well established before transfer
and both ships must be in direct contact with each other during the whole
operation. Radiotelephone contact should be established on VHF Channel 16
and thereafter on a mutually agreed working channel. Approach, mooring,
transfer and unmooring should not be attempted until fully effective
communications are established.
Should there be a breakdown in communications for whatever reason, either on
approach, or during transfer, the operation should immediately be suspended.
CAUTION
The ignition of gas vapours may be possible by direct or induced radio
frequency energy and no radio transmissions, other than at very high
frequency, should take place during transfer operations. Arrangements
should be made with an appropriate coast station for blind transmissions
which would allow reception of urgent messages.
The weather conditions should be taken into consideration, as that will
determine the type and number of fenders to be used and the type of mooring
procedure to be used. Both Masters should be in agreement that conditions are
suitable for berthing and cargo transfer before the operation takes place.
All equipment to be used should be thoroughly prepared and tested, and all
safety equipment should be checked and be ready for use if required.
Cargo Equipment to be Tested
Ventilation of compressor, pump and control room to be fully operational.
Gas detection systems to be correctly set, tested and operating.
Emergency shut down system to be tested and ready for use.
Pressure and temperature control units to be operational.
Successful operations have taken place with one ship at anchor in fine weather
conditions, and this is not too difficult if there is an appreciable current and a
steady wind from the same direction. If not, then tug assistance may be
necessary.
Mooring should be rapid and efficient and can be achieved by good planning
by the Masters of both ships.
Manifolds to be securely blanked.
The wind and sea should be ahead or nearly ahead.
Cargo hose reducers to be ready in place.
The angle of approach should not be excessive.
Hose purging equipment to be acceptable.
The two ships should make parallel contact at the same speed with no astern
movement being necessary.
Safety Precautions
The manoeuvring ship should position her manifold in line with that of the
constant heading ship and match the speed as nearly as possible.
Fire main tested and kept under pressure.
Water spray system tested and ready.
Two additional fire hoses connected near the manifold and ready for use.
Dry powder system ready.
Prior to mooring, the organisers of the transfer should notify the local
authorities of their intentions and obtain any necessary permits.
No smoking.
The size and class of manifold flanges to be used.
The most successful method of berthing is with both ships underway. One ship,
preferably the larger, maintains steerage way on a constant heading as
requested by the manoeuvring ship, usually with the wind and sea dead ahead.
The manoeuvring ship then comes alongside.
In general, the following points should be noted.
7.7.2 Pre-Mooring Preparations
Information should also be exchanged on:
7.7.3 Mooring
Cargo tanks to be cooled, if necessary.
All access doors to the accommodation to be kept closed at all times during
transfer.
The two vessels should liaise with each other and exchange details of the ships,
which side is to be used for mooring, the number of fairleads and bitts and their
distance from the bow and stern of the ship to be used for mooring.
Cargo Operating Manual
Contact is then made by the manoeuvring ship, reducing the distance between
the two ships by rudder movements, until contact is made by the primary
fenders.
(Note: Masters should be prepared to abort if necessary. The international
regulations for preventing collisions at sea must be complied with.)
First aid equipment etc. to be ready for use.
On completion of mooring, the constant heading ship will proceed to an
anchoring position previously agreed. The manoeuvring ship will have its
engines stopped and rudder amidships, or angled towards the constant heading
ship. The constant heading ship should use the anchor on the opposite side to
that on which the other ship is berthed.
Fenders should be positioned according to an agreed plan, taking into
consideration the type and size of both ships, the weather conditions and the
type of mooring that is to take place.
From the time that the manoeuvring ship is all fast alongside, to the time the
constant heading ship is anchored, the constant heading ship assumes
responsibility for the navigation of the two ships.
Impressed current cathodic protection system, if fitted, to be switched off at
least three hours before transfer.
The anticipated maximum height differential of the manifolds for determining
hose length required.
The type of hoses required and their supports to ensure that their allowable
bending radius is not exceeded.
Issue: 1
Section 7.7 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
7.7.4 Transfer Operations
7.7.5 Unmooring
Transfer can begin when the two Masters have ensured that all the pre-transfer
checks and precautions have been completed and agreed them. Both ships
should be prepared to disconnect and unmoor at short notice should anything
go wrong.
This procedure will be carried out, under normal conditions, at anchor, though
if both Masters agree, unmooring can take place whilst under way.
During transfer, ballast operations should be performed in order to keep the
trim and list of both vessels constant. Listing of either vessel should be avoided
except for proper tank draining. Checks should also be kept on the weather,
traffic in the area, and that all safety equipment is still in a state of readiness.
Transfer can take place whilst the two vessels are at anchor. This is the most
common method. Transfer can also take place whilst the two vessels are under
way, though this depends on there being adequate sea room, traffic conditions
and the availability of large diameter, high absorption fenders.
Cargo Operating Manual
Before unmooring begins, obstructions from the adjacent sides of both ships
should be cleared and the sequence and timing of the event be agreed by both
ships, and commenced at the request of the manoeuvring ship. Lines should be
singled up fore and aft, then let go the remaining forward mooring allowing the
ships to drift away from each other, at which time the remaining after moorings
are let go and the ships drift clear of each other. Neither ship should, at this
point, attempt to steam ahead or astern until their mid lengths are about two
cables apart.
Underway Transfer
After completion of mooring, the constant heading ship maintains steerage
way and the manoeuvring ship adjusts its engine speed and rudder angle to
minimise the towing load on the moorings. The course and speed should be
agreed by the two Masters and this should result in the minimum movement
between the two ships. The Master of the constant heading ship is responsible
for the navigation and safety of the two vessels.
Drifting Transfer
This should only be attempted in ideal conditions.
Completion of Transfer
After transfer has been completed and before unmooring, all hoses should be
purged, manifolds securely blanked and the relevant authorities informed that
transfer is complete.
Issue: 1
Section 7.7 - Page 2 of 2
Norman Lady
7.8
Cargo Operating Manual
LNG Jettison
WARNING
The jettisoning of cargo is an emergency operation. It should only be
carried out to avoid serious damage to the cargo tank and/or inner hull
steel structure.
A containment or insulation failure in one or more cargo tanks may necessitate
the jettisoning of cargo from that particular cargo tank to the sea. This is
carried out using a single main cargo pump, discharging LNG through a
portable nozzle fitted at the ship’s manifold.
As jettisoning of LNG will create hazardous conditions:
a) All the circumstances of the failure must be carefully evaluated
before the decision to jettison cargo is taken.
b) All relevant fire fighting equipment must be manned, in a state of
readiness and maintained so during the entire operation.
c) All accommodation and other openings and all vent fans must be
secured.
d) The NO SMOKING rule must be rigidly enforced.
e) The water curtain on the side of the jettison is to be running to
protect the ship’s structure.
Weather conditions, and the heading of the vessel relative to the wind, must be
considered so that the jettisoned liquid and resultant vapour cloud will be
carried away from the vessel. In addition, if possible, avoid blanketing the
vapour with exhaust gases from the funnel.
The discharge rate must be limited to the capacity of one cargo pump only and,
if necessary, reduced to allow acceptable dispersal within the limits of the
prevailing weather conditions.
WARNING
Too rapid a flow of LNG will result in rapid phase transfer (RPT) when
the liquid hits the sea water.
Issue: 1
Section 7.8 - Page 1 of 1
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
Try to control the direction of the dispersion with the fire hose water spray,
dilute the gas with water spray, heating the relatively cold gas to increase its
buoyancy.
7. Tank Overpressure
If any of the mooring lines should break, or a winch starts to pay out on a
mooring line, the CCR is to be notified at once. Corrective action is to be taken
as soon as possible.
The off-duty crew are to be called out to prepare for fire fighting.
If the high-pressure alarm is released and the pressure is still rising after
reducing the cooldown rate/loading rate, the following action shall be taken:
If the vessel starts moving, the CCR has to be informed and ESD to be
released. The cargo operation shall not resume until the reason why the vessel
has moved is established and the corrective action taken.
If vent mast fire, the following to be considered:
7.9 General Emergency Procedures
1. Mooring Failure
If the OOW observes a change in the weather conditions, or recognises an
unannounced vessel passing nearby, the CCR shall be notified and the
moorings shall be carefully observed.
During Cooldown or Loading
4. Fire in the Tank Vent Mast
The cooldown/loading is to be stopped immediately and the reason for the high
tank pressure is to be investigated. The terminal is to be advised.
1. Stop venting immediate, or detect the gas leakage from the safety
valves.
The cooldown/loading shall not continue until the tank pressure is under
control and accepted by the terminal.
2. Inject any kind of inert gas (IG) into the vent mast.
During Discharging
3. Spray the masthead with water.
The terminal has to be ordered to stop the return gas blower and vapour
manifold valve to be closed.
2. Cargo Leakage on Deck
5. Cargo Tank Overfill
The CCR is to be informed immediately about the observation and the extent
of the leakage is to be reported.
If any sign that a cargo tank is overfilled during a cargo operation, the
operation is to be stopped immediately and the terminal is to be advised.
The terminal is to be advised that the discharging will be stopped and that the
manifold valves will be closed until the situation is clarified.
As soon as agreed with the terminal, open the vapour valve and vent the return
gas to the shore flare or burn the excess BOG on the boilers, until the pressure
in the cargo tanks is under control.
Discharging rate/loading rate is to be reduced or stopped until the situation is
under control. The terminal is to be informed.
The situation is to be assessed and corrective action is to be taken.
If unable to stop the leakage, the cargo operation shall be suspended until the
problem is solved.
The vapour line is to be inspected to find out if any liquid has entered it and
the LNG compressors are to be stopped accordingly in order to avoid liquid
slugs.
Continue the discharging when the reason for the high tank pressure is
established and agreed by the terminal.
If possible, the excess cargo is to be transferred to another cargo tank.
8. Uncontrolled Venting
The ‘overfilled’ cargo tank is to be closely monitored during the remaining
loading.
If any uncontrolled venting should take place, all cargo operations are to be
stopped immediately.
6. Leakage in Cargo Compressor Room
Check that all openings in the deckhouse and superstructure are closed to
minimise the possibility to vapour entry.
Water shall be used to protect the steel and dilute the gas.
3. Cargo Line Burst
The ESD system is to be activated, the CCR is to be informed accordingly and
the general alarm raised.
The terminal is to be informed immediately according to the terminal’s safety
checklist procedures.
All cargo operations are to be suspended, valves closed and if possible the
fractured section to be isolated as much as possible.
If any alarm comes from the gas detection system, indicating a high gas
concentration in the cargo compressor room, the room has to be inspected with
caution (enclosed space entry procedure is to be followed), and action is to be
taken to correct the gas leakage.
All ventilation is to be closed, or stopped.
Be sure that the ventilation fan is running, and no gas has accumulated.
Smoking, naked lights and the use of electric switches everywhere onboard,
are not to be used until the area is declared as gas free.
Be sure that the gas analyser and ventilation are operating at all times.
If alongside, the terminal is to be advised.
If at sea, try to change course, related to the wind and the vessel’s speed, to
minimise the risk for any gas vapour to enter the superstructure.
Identify the gas leakage and try to isolate the gas-leaking source.
Spray the vent mast with water in order to heat and increase the vapour
buoyancy.
Fire hoses and water sprays must be ready for immediate use in the fractured
area of the vessel’s hull, in order to protect the mild steel and to disperse the
liquid overboard.
Issue: 2
Section 7.9 - Page 1 of 2
Norman Lady
Cargo Operating Manual
9. Cargo Operations during an Electrical Storm
If an electrical storm is closing on the vessel, the CCR is to be informed.
The terminal safety checklist is to be followed and the cargo operations are to
be stopped while the electrical storm is passing the vessel, terminal and plant.
The cargooperation may continue as soon as the electrical storm has passed
and is agreed by the terminal.
10. Fire in the Vicinity of the Vessel
If a fire occurs in the immediate vicinity of the vessel, whether ashore or
onboard another vessel, the following action shall be taken:
1. An alarm is to be given according to the terminal’s regulation
2. Contact the terminal and inform that the cargo operation may be
stopped.
3. Stand by at the telephone/VHF to await information and/or
instructions.
4. Rig the pilot ladder on the offshore side.
The following actions are also to be considered:
1. Stopping the cargo operation (and bunker operation, if taking
place).
2. Contacting the port authorities to obtain the latest information and
discuss/decide the best course of action to be taken.
3. Disconnecting the loading/discharging arms.
4. Starting the sprinkler on deck and spraying sea water at exposed
lifeboat/liferafts.
5. Preparations for leaving the berth.
6. Muster the fire stations.
Issue: 2
Section 7.9 - Page 2 of 2
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement